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Sample records for 19f mas nmr

  1. Characterization of solid polymer dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients by 19F MAS NMR and factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanova, Martina; Brus, Jiri; Sedenkova, Ivana; Policianova, Olivia; Kobera, Libor

    In this contribution the ability of 19F MAS NMR spectroscopy to probe structural variability of poorly water-soluble drugs formulated as solid dispersions in polymer matrices is discussed. The application potentiality of the proposed approach is demonstrated on a moderately sized active pharmaceutical ingredient (API, Atorvastatin) exhibiting extensive polymorphism. In this respect, a range of model systems with the API incorporated in the matrix of polvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was prepared. The extent of mixing of both components was determined by T1(1H) and T1ρ(1H) relaxation experiments, and it was found that the API forms nanosized domains. Subsequently it was found out that the polymer matrix induces two kinds of changes in 19F MAS NMR spectra. At first, this is a high-frequency shift reaching 2-3 ppm which is independent on molecular structure of the API and which results from the long-range polarization of the electron cloud around 19F nucleus induced by electrostatic fields of the polymer matrix. At second, this is broadening of the signals and formation of shoulders reflecting changes in molecular arrangement of the API. To avoid misleading in the interpretation of the recorded 19F MAS NMR spectra, because both the contributions act simultaneously, we applied chemometric approach based on multivariate analysis. It is demonstrated that factor analysis of the recorded spectra can separate both these spectral contributions, and the subtle structural differences in the molecular arrangement of the API in the nanosized domains can be traced. In this way 19F MAS NMR spectra of both pure APIs and APIs in solid dispersions can be directly compared. The proposed strategy thus provides a powerful tool for the analysis of new formulations of fluorinated pharmaceutical substances in polymer matrices.

  2. Coal structure at reactive sites by sup 1 H- sup 13 C- sup 19 F double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, E.W.; Woody, M.C. )

    1989-01-01

    The solid state NMR technique, {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C-{sup 31}P double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy, uses the direct dipolar interaction between {sup 13}C-{sup 31}P spin pairs in organophosphorus substances to identify the subset of carbons within a spherical volume element of 0.4 nm radius centered on the {sup 31}P atom. In combination with chemical manipulation of coals designed to introduce phosphorus containing functionality into the organic matrix, the NMR experiment becomes a method to examine selectively the carbon bonding network at the reactive sites in the coal. This approach generates a statistical structure description of the coal at the reaction centers in contrast to bulk carbon characterization using conventional {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. 3 refs.

  3. (19)F-modified proteins and (19)F-containing ligands as tools in solution NMR studies of protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Naima G; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2015-01-01

    (19)F solution NMR is a powerful and versatile tool to study protein structure and protein-ligand interactions due to the favorable NMR characteristics of the (19)F atom, its absence in naturally occurring biomolecules, and small size. Protocols to introduce (19)F atoms into both proteins and their ligands are readily available and offer the ability to conduct protein-observe (using (19)F-labeled proteins) or ligand-observe (using (19)F-containing ligands) NMR experiments. This chapter provides two protocols for the (19)F-labeling of proteins, using an Escherichia coli expression system: (i) amino acid type-specific incorporation of (19)F-modified amino acids and (ii) site-specific incorporation of (19)F-modified amino acids using recombinantly expressed orthogonal amber tRNA/tRNA synthetase pairs. In addition, we discuss several applications, involving (19)F-modified proteins and (19)F-containing ligands.

  4. 19F high magnetic field NMR study of beta-ZrF4 and CeF4: from spectra reconstruction to correlation between fluorine sites and 19F isotropic chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Legein, C; Fayon, F; Martineau, C; Body, M; Buzaré, J-Y; Massiot, D; Durand, E; Tressaud, A; Demourgues, A; Péron, O; Boulard, B

    2006-12-25

    High magnetic field and high spinning frequency one- and two-dimensional one-pulse MAS 19F NMR spectra of beta-ZrF4 and CeF4 were recorded and reconstructed allowing the accurate determination of the 19F chemical shift tensor parameters for the seven different crystallographic fluorine sites of each compound. The attributions of the NMR resonances are performed using the superposition model for 19F isotropic chemical shift calculation initially proposed by Bureau et al. (Bureau, B.; Silly, G.; Emery, J.; Buzaré, J.-Y. Chem. Phys. 1999, 249, 85-104). A satisfactory reliability is reached with a root-mean-square (rms) deviation between calculated and measured isotropic chemical shift values equal to 1.5 and 3.5 ppm for beta-ZrF4 and CeF4, respectively. PMID:17173418

  5. Direct Comparison of (19)F qNMR and (1)H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin; He, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR ((1)H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR ((19)F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both (19)F and (1)H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that (19)F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to (1)H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from (19)F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. (19)F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  6. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  7. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes.

  8. Prediction of (19)F NMR Chemical Shifts in Labeled Proteins: Computational Protocol and Case Study.

    PubMed

    Isley, William C; Urick, Andrew K; Pomerantz, William C K; Cramer, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    The structural analysis of ligand complexation in biomolecular systems is important in the design of new medicinal therapeutic agents; however, monitoring subtle structural changes in a protein's microenvironment is a challenging and complex problem. In this regard, the use of protein-based (19)F NMR for screening low-molecular-weight molecules (i.e., fragments) can be an especially powerful tool to aid in drug design. Resonance assignment of the protein's (19)F NMR spectrum is necessary for structural analysis. Here, a quantum chemical method has been developed as an initial approach to facilitate the assignment of a fluorinated protein's (19)F NMR spectrum. The epigenetic "reader" domain of protein Brd4 was taken as a case study to assess the strengths and limitations of the method. The overall modeling protocol predicts chemical shifts for residues in rigid proteins with good accuracy; proper accounting for explicit solvation of fluorinated residues by water is critical. PMID:27218275

  9. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  10. Probing the Pu4 + magnetic moment in PuF4 with 19F NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capan, Cigdem; Dempsey, Richard J.; Sinkov, Sergey; McNamara, Bruce K.; Cho, Herman

    2016-06-01

    The magnetic fields produced by Pu4 + centers have been measured by 19F NMR spectroscopy to elucidate the Pu-F electronic interactions in polycrystalline PuF4. Spectra acquired at applied fields of 2.35 and 7.05 T reveal a linear scaling of the 19F line shape. A model is presented that treats the line broadening and shifts as due to dipolar fields produced by Pu valence electrons in localized noninteracting orbitals. Alternative explanations for the observed line shape involving covalent Pu-F bonding, superexchange interactions, and electronic configurations with enhanced magnetic moments are considered.

  11. Simultaneous 19F-1H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02 mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5 mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a 1H Larmor frequency of 43.32 MHz and 40.68 MHz for 19F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating 19F and 1H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500 MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02 mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ (1H) = 0.335 mol L-1 and LOQ (19F) = 0.130 mol L-1 for trifluoroethanol in

  12. Simultaneous (19)F-(1)H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-10-18

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a (1)H Larmor frequency of 43.32MHz and 40.68MHz for (19)F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating (19)F and (1)H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ ((1)H)=0.335molL(-1) and LOQ ((19)F)=0.130molL(-1) for trifluoroethanol

  13. Synthesis of fluorinated maltose derivatives for monitoring protein interaction by (19)F NMR.

    PubMed

    Braitsch, Michaela; Kählig, Hanspeter; Kontaxis, Georg; Fischer, Michael; Kawada, Toshinari; Konrat, Robert; Schmid, Walther

    2012-01-01

    A novel reporter system, which is applicable to the (19)F NMR investigation of protein interactions, is presented. This approach uses 2-F-labeled maltose as a spy ligand to indirectly probe protein-ligand or protein-protein interactions of proteins fused or tagged to the maltose-binding protein (MBP). The key feature is the simultaneous NMR observation of both (19)F NMR signals of gluco/manno-type-2-F-maltose-isomers; one isomer (α-gluco-type) binds to MBP and senses the protein interaction, and the nonbinding isomers (β-gluco- and/or α/β-manno-type) are utilized as internal references. Moreover, this reporter system was used for relative affinity studies of fluorinated and nonfluorinated carbohydrates to the maltose-binding protein, which were found to be in perfect agreement with published X-ray data. The results of the NMR competition experiments together with the established correlation between (19)F chemical shift data and molecular interaction patterns, suggest valuable applications for studies of protein-ligand interaction interfaces. PMID:22509216

  14. Fluorinated Boronic Acid-Appended Bipyridinium Salts for Diol Recognition and Discrimination via (19)F NMR Barcodes.

    PubMed

    Axthelm, Jörg; Görls, Helmar; Schubert, Ulrich S; Schiller, Alexander

    2015-12-16

    Fluorinated boronic acid-appended benzyl bipyridinium salts, derived from 4,4'-, 3,4'-, and 3,3'-bipyridines, were synthesized and used to detect and differentiate diol-containing analytes at physiological conditions via (19)F NMR spectroscopy. An array of three water-soluble boronic acid receptors in combination with (19)F NMR spectroscopy discriminates nine diol-containing bioanalytes--catechol, dopamine, fructose, glucose, glucose-1-phosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, galactose, lactose, and sucrose--at low mM concentrations. Characteristic (19)F NMR fingerprints are interpreted as two-dimensional barcodes without the need of multivariate analysis techniques.

  15. Solid-state (19)F-NMR of peptides in native membranes.

    PubMed

    Koch, Katja; Afonin, Sergii; Ieronimo, Marco; Berditsch, Marina; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-01-01

    To understand how membrane-active peptides (MAPs) function in vivo, it is essential to obtain structural information about them in their membrane-bound state. Most biophysical approaches rely on the use of bilayers prepared from synthetic phospholipids, i.e. artificial model membranes. A particularly successful structural method is solid-state NMR, which makes use of macroscopically oriented lipid bilayers to study selectively isotope-labelled peptides. Native biomembranes, however, have a far more complex lipid composition and a significant non-lipidic content (protein and carbohydrate). Model membranes, therefore, are not really adequate to address questions concerning for example the selectivity of these membranolytic peptides against prokaryotic vs eukaryotic cells, their varying activities against different bacterial strains, or other related biological issues.Here, we discuss a solid-state (19)F-NMR approach that has been developed for structural studies of MAPs in lipid bilayers, and how this can be translated to measurements in native biomembranes. We review the essentials of the methodology and discuss key objectives in the practice of (19)F-labelling of peptides. Furthermore, the preparation of macroscopically oriented biomembranes on solid supports is discussed in the context of other membrane models. Two native biomembrane systems are presented as examples: human erythrocyte ghosts as representatives of eukaryotic cell membranes, and protoplasts from Micrococcus luteus as membranes from Gram-positive bacteria. Based on our latest experimental experience with the antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S, the benefits and some implicit drawbacks of using such supported native membranes in solid-state (19)F-NMR analysis are discussed.

  16. NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}: Assignment of {sup 19}F NMR resonances and chemical bond analysis from GIPAW calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Mamata; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Sadoc, Aymeric; Boucher, Florent

    2013-11-15

    The {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shifts (δ{sub iso}) of two isomorphic compounds, NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}, which involve six nonequivalent fluorine sites, have been experimentally determined from the reconstruction of 1D {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectra. In parallel, the corresponding {sup 19}F chemical shielding tensors have been calculated using the GIPAW method for both experimental and DFT-optimized structures. Furthermore, the [M{sub 4}F{sub 20}] units of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} being held together by van der Waals interactions, the relevance of Grimme corrections to the DFT optimization processes has been evaluated. However, the semi-empirical dispersion correction term introduced by such a method does not show any significant improvement. Nonetheless, a complete and convincing assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} is obtained, ensured by the linearity between experimental {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values and calculated {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shielding σ{sub iso} values. The effects of the geometry optimizations have been carefully analyzed, confirming among other matters, the inaccuracy of the experimental structure of NbF{sub 5}. The relationships between the fluorine chemical shifts, the nature of the fluorine atoms (bridging or terminal), the position of the terminal ones (opposite or perpendicular to the bridging ones), the fluorine charges, the ionicity and the length of the M–F bonds have been established. Additionally, for three of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5}, distorted multiplets, arising from {sup 1}J-coupling and residual dipolar coupling between the {sup 19}F and {sup 93}Nb nuclei, were simulated yielding to values of {sup 93}Nb–{sup 19}F {sup 1}J-coupling for the corresponding fluorine sites. - Graphical abstract: The complete assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} allow establishing relationships between the {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values, the nature of the fluorine atoms

  17. Study of comparative transmission capacity of C-N bond by /sup 19/F NMR method

    SciTech Connect

    Pombrik, S.I.; Polunkin, E.V.; Peregudov, A.S.; Kravtsov, D.N.; Fedin, E.I.

    1982-04-20

    A study was made of the /sup 19/F NMR spectra of a number of free and N-substituted benzylanilines ArCH/sub 2/NHC/sub 6/H/sub 4/F-4 and ArCH/sub 2/N(SO/sub 2/Ph)C/sub 6/H/sub 4/F, respectively. Results indicated that the binuclear bridge grouping CH/sub 2/-N has a high transmission capacity (TC). The addition of an acidic grouping the nitrogen atom has no effect on the TC of the C-N bond.

  18. Dissection of the ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme using 19F NMR

    PubMed Central

    Hammann, Christian; Norman, David G.; Lilley, David M. J.

    2001-01-01

    We have used 19F NMR to analyze the metal ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme by selective incorporation of 5fluorouridine. We have studied the chemical shift and linewidths of 19F resonances of 5-fluorouridine at the 4 and 7 positions in the ribozyme core as a function of added Mg2+. The data fit well to a simple two-state model whereby the formation of domain 1 is induced by the noncooperative binding of Mg2+ with an association constant in the range of 100 to 500 M−1, depending on the concentration of monovalent ions present. The results are in excellent agreement with data reporting on changes in the global shape of the ribozyme. However, the NMR experiments exploit reporters located in the center of the RNA sections undergoing the folding transitions, thereby allowing the assignment of specific nucleotides to the separate stages. The results define the folding pathway at high resolution and provide a time scale for the first transition in the millisecond range. PMID:11331743

  19. Solid-state {sup 19}F and {sup 13}C NMR of room temperature fluorinated graphite and samples thermally treated under fluorine: Low-field and high-resolution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Giraudet, J.; Dubois, M.; Guerin, K.; Pinheiro, J.P.; Hamwi, A.; Stone, W.E.E.; Pirotte, P.; Masin, F. . E-mail: fmasin@ulb.ac.be

    2005-04-15

    Room temperature graphite fluorides consisting of raw material and samples post-treated in pure fluorine atmosphere in the temperature range 100-500 deg. C have been studied by solid-state NMR. Several NMR approaches have been used, both high and low-field {sup 19}F, {sup 19}F MAS and {sup 13}C MAS with {sup 19}F to {sup 13}C cross polarization. The modifications, in the graphitic lattice, of the catalytic iodine fluorides products have been examined. A transformation of the C-F bond character from semi-ionic to covalent has been found to occur at a post-treatment temperature close to 400 deg. C. It is shown that covalency increases with temperature.

  20. Drug-specific [sup 19]F NMR and dynamic [sup 18]F PET imaging of the cytostatic agent 5-fluorouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Bellemann, M.E.; Brix, G.; Haberkorn, U.; Ostertag, H.J.; Lorenz, W.J. )

    1994-12-01

    The spatial distribution of the antineoplastic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been mapped both with [sup 19]F NMR and [sup 18]F PET imaging techniques. For [sup 19]F NMR imaging of 5-FU and its major catabolite [alpha]-fluoro-[beta]-alanine (FBAL), a fast gradient-echo pulse sequence was employed. A chemical-shift selective saturation pulse was used to suppress either the 5-FU or the FBAL resonance before the other component of the [sup 19]F NMR spectrum was images. This approach yielded selective 5-FU and FBAL NMR images free of chemical-shift artifacts in readout and slice-selection direction. In phantom experiments, [sup 19]F 5-FU and FBAL images with a spatial resolution of 12.5 x 12.5 x 20 mm[sup 3] were obtained in 32 min from model solutions with drug and catabolite concentrations similar to those estimated in animals and patients undergoing i.v. chemotherapy with 5-FU. The biodistribution of 5-[[sup 18]F]FU in rats shortly after administration of the drug demonstrated the good vascularization of the transplanted tumors. The metabolic turnover of the cytostatic agent started about 10--20 min p.i. and was predominant in the tumor and liver tissue. The rapid adjustment of the [sup 18]F metabolite concentrations in the transplanted tumors to a steady state provides evidence of anabolic tumor activity, which supports the hypothesis of 5-FU trapping in malignant cells based on [sup 19]F NMR spectroscopy data. The high uptake of 5-[[sup 18]F]FU in the liver, on the other hand, mainly reflects the catabolization of 5-FU to the noncytotoxic FBAL, which leads to a reduced bioavailability of the drug.

  1. Cluster models and ab initio calculations of (19)F NMR isotropic chemical shifts for inorganic fluorides.

    PubMed

    Body, Monique; Silly, Gilles; Legein, Christophe; Buzaré, Jean-Yves

    2005-05-26

    (19)F NMR isotropic chemical shift (delta(iso)) calculations are performed in crystallized compounds using the GIAO method with the B3LYP hybrid functional at DFT level. Clusters centered on the studied fluorine atoms mimic the crystalline structures. The 6-311+G(d) basis set is chosen for the central fluorine atom, and the LanL2DZ basis set for the others. The metal atoms are described by the 3-21G(2d) basis set or, when not available, by the CRENBL basis set with the corresponding ECP, and augmented with 2d polarization functions when existing. First, for high-symmetry systems (MF, MF(2), and MF(3) compounds), a systematization of the cluster building up from coordination spheres is proposed, generalized to fluoroperovskites and fluoroaluminates KAlF(4) and RbAlF(4). When applied to rather low symmetry systems such as barium fluorometalates BaMgF(4), BaZnF(4), and Ba(2)ZnF(6), the definition of the coordination spheres is far from easy. Then, for structures built up from a MF(6) octahedron network, we may define different "starting clusters": [FM(2)F(8)] for the shared fluorine atoms, [FMF(4)] for the unshared ones, and [FBa(4)](7+) for the "free" ones. Analogous "starting clusters" are then tested on compounds from the NaF-AlF(3), BaF(2)-AlF(3), and CaF(2)-AlF(3) binary systems and for alpha-BaCaAlF(7) that are also built up from a MF(6) octahedron network. For each of these corresponding fluorine sites, delta(iso) values are calculated with the "starting clusters" and several larger clusters and compared to the experimental delta(iso) values. For the barium-containing clusters, the RMS deviation is equal to 51 ppm. It is suggested that this result may be related to the poor quality of the barium basis sets for which no polarization functions are available for the moment. In total, chemical shifts were calculated for 122 fluorine sites, in a various range of compounds. For the clusters without barium, the ab initio method leads to a RMS equal to 22 ppm, which is

  2. Studies of metabolism and disposition of potent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase inhibitors using 19F-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, E; Pesci, S; Taliani, M; Fiore, F; Petrocchi, A; Nizi, E; Rowley, M; Laufer, R; Summa, V

    2007-09-01

    (19)F-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been extensively used in a drug-discovery programme to support the selection of candidates for further development. Data on an early lead compound, N-(4-fluorobenzyl)-5-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-(4-methylmorpholin-3-yl)-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidine-4-carboxamide (compound A (+)), and MK-0518 (N-(4-fluorobenzyl)-5-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-(1-methyl-1-{[(5-methyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)carbonyl]amino}ethyl)-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidine-4-carboxamide), a potent inhibitor of this series currently in phase III clinical trials, are described. The metabolic fate and excretion balance of compound A (+) and MK-0518 were investigated in rats and dogs following intravenous and oral dosing using a combination of (19)F-NMR-monitored enzyme hydrolysis and solid-phase extraction chromatography and NMR spectroscopy (SPEC-NMR). Dosing with the (3)H-labelled compound A (+) enabled the comparison of standard radiochemical analysis with (19)F-NMR spectroscopy to obtain quantitative metabolism and excretion data. Both compounds were eliminated mainly by metabolism. The major metabolite identified in rat urine and bile and in dog urine was the 5-O-glucuronide.

  3. Fragment-Linking Approach Using (19)F NMR Spectroscopy To Obtain Highly Potent and Selective Inhibitors of β-Secretase.

    PubMed

    Jordan, John B; Whittington, Douglas A; Bartberger, Michael D; Sickmier, E Allen; Chen, Kui; Cheng, Yuan; Judd, Ted

    2016-04-28

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a widely used tool in small-molecule drug discovery efforts. One of the most commonly used biophysical methods in detecting weak binding of fragments is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, FBDD performed with (19)F NMR-based methods has been shown to provide several advantages over (1)H NMR using traditional magnetization-transfer and/or two-dimensional methods. Here, we demonstrate the utility and power of (19)F-based fragment screening by detailing the identification of a second-site fragment through (19)F NMR screening that binds to a specific pocket of the aspartic acid protease, β-secretase (BACE-1). The identification of this second-site fragment allowed the undertaking of a fragment-linking approach, which ultimately yielded a molecule exhibiting a more than 360-fold increase in potency while maintaining reasonable ligand efficiency and gaining much improved selectivity over cathepsin-D (CatD). X-ray crystallographic studies of the molecules demonstrated that the linked fragments exhibited binding modes consistent with those predicted from the targeted screening approach, through-space NMR data, and molecular modeling. PMID:26978477

  4. (19)F-labeling of the adenine H2-site to study large RNAs by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sochor, F; Silvers, R; Müller, D; Richter, C; Fürtig, B; Schwalbe, H

    2016-01-01

    In comparison to proteins and protein complexes, the size of RNA amenable to NMR studies is limited despite the development of new isotopic labeling strategies including deuteration and ligation of differentially labeled RNAs. Due to the restricted chemical shift dispersion in only four different nucleotides spectral resolution remains limited in larger RNAs. Labeling RNAs with the NMR-active nucleus (19)F has previously been introduced for small RNAs up to 40 nucleotides (nt). In the presented work, we study the natural occurring RNA aptamer domain of the guanine-sensing riboswitch comprising 73 nucleotides from Bacillus subtilis. The work includes protocols for improved in vitro transcription of 2-fluoroadenosine-5'-triphosphat (2F-ATP) using the mutant P266L of the T7 RNA polymerase. Our NMR analysis shows that the secondary and tertiary structure of the riboswitch is fully maintained and that the specific binding of the cognate ligand hypoxanthine is not impaired by the introduction of the (19)F isotope. The thermal stability of the (19)F-labeled riboswitch is not altered compared to the unmodified sequence, but local base pair stabilities, as measured by hydrogen exchange experiments, are modulated. The characteristic change in the chemical shift of the imino resonances detected in a (1)H,(15)N-HSQC allow the identification of Watson-Crick base paired uridine signals and the (19)F resonances can be used as reporters for tertiary and secondary structure transitions, confirming the potential of (19)F-labeling even for sizeable RNAs in the range of 70 nucleotides.

  5. Fluorinated Amino-Derivatives of the Sesquiterpene Lactone, Parthenolide, as 19F NMR Probes in Deuterium-Free Environments

    PubMed Central

    Woods, James R.; Mo, Huaping; Bieberich, Andrew A.; Alavanja, Tanja; Colby, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and biological activity of fluorinated amino-derivatives of the sesquiterpene lactone, parthenolide, are described. A fluorinated aminoparthenolide analogue with biological activity similar to the parent natural product was discovered, and its X-ray structure was obtained. This lead compound was then studied using 19F NMR in the presence and absence of glutathione to obtain additional mechanism of action data, and it was found that the aminoparthenolide eliminates amine faster in the presence of glutathione than in the absence of glutathione. The exact changes in concentrations of fluorinated compound and amine were quantified by a concentration-reference method using 19F NMR; a major benefit of applying this strategy is that no deuterated solvents or internal standards are required to obtain accurate concentrations. These mechanistic data with glutathione may contribute to the conversion of the amino-derivative to parthenolide, the active pharmacological agent, in glutathione-rich cancer cells. PMID:22029741

  6. Method of Continuous Variation: Characterization of Alkali Metal Enolates Using 1H and 19F NMR Spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The method of continuous variation in conjunction with 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopies was used to characterize lithium and sodium enolates solvated by N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylethyldiamine (TMEDA) and tetrahydrofuran (THF). A strategy developed using lithium enolates was then applied to the more challenging sodium enolates. A number of sodium enolates solvated by TMEDA or THF afford exclusively tetramers. Evidence suggests that TMEDA chelates sodium on cubic tetramers. PMID:24915602

  7. Quantitation of dexfenfluramine/d-norfenfluramine concentration in primate brain using 19F NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Christensen, J D; Babb, S M; Cohen, B M; Renshaw, P F

    1998-01-01

    Fluorine (19F) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to quantify the combined concentration of the anorectic drug dexfenfluramine (DF) and its active metabolite d-norfenfluramine (dNF) in rhesus monkey brain. The accuracy of the MRS technique was assessed by comparison with gas chromatography. Brain 19F MRS signals were converted to brain DF + dNF concentrations after correction for signal relaxation losses and drug distribution in nonbrain tissue. Gas chromatography (GC) was used to assay brain DF and dNF concentrations following MRS evaluation. DF + dNF concentrations measured by 19F MRS averaged 104 +/- 36 microM (mean +/- SD) and GC measurements averaged 71 +/- 12 microM. Correction for the distribution of DF and its metabolites in nonbrain tissue yielded a DF + metabolite brain concentration that was within one standard deviation of the GC-derived value. The concentration of DF plus dNF measured by 19F MRS was similar to or greater than the value obtained by GC, which indicates that DF and its active metabolite dNF are fully detected by 19F MRS in primate brain in vivo. The application of these techniques to human subjects should enable the measurement of low micromolar-range brain concentrations of DF and other fluorinated drugs.

  8. Automated data evaluation and modelling of simultaneous (19) F-(1) H medium-resolution NMR spectra for online reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Paul, Andrea; Engel, Dirk; Guthausen, Gisela; Kraume, Matthias; Maiwald, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Medium-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MR-NMR) currently develops to an important analytical tool for both quality control and process monitoring. In contrast to high-resolution online NMR (HR-NMR), MR-NMR can be operated under rough environmental conditions. A continuous re-circulating stream of reaction mixture from the reaction vessel to the NMR spectrometer enables a non-invasive, volume integrating online analysis of reactants and products. Here, we investigate the esterification of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol with acetic acid to 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl acetate both by (1) H HR-NMR (500 MHz) and (1) H and (19) F MR-NMR (43 MHz) as a model system. The parallel online measurement is realised by splitting the flow, which allows the adjustment of quantitative and independent flow rates, both in the HR-NMR probe as well as in the MR-NMR probe, in addition to a fast bypass line back to the reactor. One of the fundamental acceptance criteria for online MR-MNR spectroscopy is a robust data treatment and evaluation strategy with the potential for automation. The MR-NMR spectra are treated by an automated baseline and phase correction using the minimum entropy method. The evaluation strategies comprise (i) direct integration, (ii) automated line fitting, (iii) indirect hard modelling (IHM) and (iv) partial least squares regression (PLS-R). To assess the potential of these evaluation strategies for MR-NMR, prediction results are compared with the line fitting data derived from the quantitative HR-NMR spectroscopy. Although, superior results are obtained from both IHM and PLS-R for (1) H MR-NMR, especially the latter demands for elaborate data pretreatment, whereas IHM models needed no previous alignment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  10. Effects of fluoride on in vitro enamel demineralization analyzed by ¹⁹F MAS-NMR.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, N R; Kent, N W; Lynch, R J M; Karpukhina, N; Hill, R; Anderson, P

    2013-01-01

    The mechanistic action of fluoride on inhibition of enamel demineralization was investigated using (19)F magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR). The aim of this study was to monitor the fluoride-mineral phase formed on the enamel as a function of the concentration of fluoride ions [F(-)] in the demineralizing medium. The secondary aim was to investigate fluorapatite formation on enamel in the mechanism of fluoride anti-caries efficacy. Enamel blocks were immersed into demineralization solutions of 0.1 M acetic acid (pH 4) with increasing concentrations of fluoride up to 2,262 ppm. At and below 45 ppm [F(-)] in the solution, (19)F MAS-NMR showed fluoride-substituted apatite formation, and above 45 ppm, calcium fluoride (CaF2) formed in increasing proportions. Further increases in [F(-)] caused no further reduction in demineralization, but increased the proportion of CaF2 formed. Additionally, the combined effect of strontium and fluoride on enamel demineralization was also investigated using (19)F MAS-NMR. The presence of 43 ppm [Sr(2+)] in addition to 45 ppm [F(-)] increases the fraction of fluoride-substituted apatite, but delays formation of CaF2 when compared to the demineralization of enamel in fluoride-only solution. PMID:23712030

  11. A 4-mm Probe for C-13 CP/MAS NMR of Solids at 21.15 T

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsen, Hans J.; Daugaard, P; Hald, E; Rice, D; Kupce, Eriks; Ellis, Paul D. )

    2002-05-31

    With the recent announcement of a persistent 21.15 Tesla (i.e., 900 MHz for 1H NMR) narrow-bore (54 mm bore) superconducting magnet by Oxford Instruments and the associated Unity INOVA-900 console by Varian Inc. we were challenged with the task of designing a double-resonance broadband solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR probe in particular for evaluating the 13C-{1H} cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR experiment on this magnet and spectrometer system. In this communication we report the successful construction of an efficient X-1H/19F double resonance multinuclear MAS probe for this purpose along with our preliminary results on its performance at the 900 MHz spectrometer.

  12. Development of an 19F NMR method for the analysis of fluorinated acids in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Ellis, D A; Martin, J W; Muir, D C; Mabury, S A

    2000-02-15

    This investigation was carried out to evaluate 19F NMR as an analytical tool for the measurement of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and other fluorinated acids in the aquatic environment. A method based upon strong anionic exchange (SAX) chromatography was also optimized for the concentration of the fluoro acids prior to NMR analysis. Extraction of the analyte from the SAX column was carried out directly in the NMR solvent in the presence of the strong organic base, DBU. The method allowed the analysis of the acid without any prior cleanup steps being involved. Optimal NMR sensitivity based upon T1 relaxation times was investigated for seven fluorinated compounds in four different NMR solvents. The use of the relaxation agent chromium acetylacetonate, Cr(acac)3, within these solvent systems was also evaluated. Results show that the optimal NMR solvent differs for each fluorinated analyte. Cr(acac)3 was shown to have pronounced effects on the limits of detection of the analyte. Generally, the optimal sensitivity condition appears to be methanol-d4/2M DBU in the presence of 4 mg/mL of Cr-(acac)3. The method was validated through spike and recovery for five fluoro acids from environmentally relevant waters. Results are presented for the analysis of TFA in Toronto rainwater, which ranged from < 16 to 850 ng/L. The NMR results were confirmed by GC-MS selected-ion monitoring of the fluoroanalide derivative.

  13. Detection and differentiation of neutral organic compounds by 19F NMR with a tungsten calix[4]arene imido complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanchuan; Swager, Timothy M

    2013-12-18

    Fluorinated tungsten calix[4]arene imido complexes were synthesized and used as receptors to detect and differentiate neutral organic compounds. It was found that the binding of specific neutral organic molecules to the tungsten centers induces an upfield shift of the fluorine atom appended on the arylimido group, the extent of which is highly dependent on electronic and steric properties. We demonstrate that the specific bonding and size-selectivity of calix[4]arene tungsten-imido complex combined with (19)F NMR spectroscopy is a powerful new method for the analysis of complex mixtures.

  14. (19)F NMR studies of the leucine-isoleucine-valine binding protein: evidence that a closed conformation exists in solution.

    PubMed

    Salopek-Sondi, Branka; Vaughan, Mark D; Skeels, Matthew C; Honek, John F; Luck, Linda A

    2003-10-01

    The leucine-isoleucine-valine binding protein (LIV) found in the periplasmic space of E. coli has been used as a structural model for a number of neuronal receptors. This "venus fly trap" type protein has been characterized by crystallography in only the open form. Herein we have labeled LIV with 5-fluorotryptophan (5F-Trp) and difluoromethionine (DFM) in order to explore the structural dynamics of this protein and the application of DFM as a potential (19)F NMR structural probe for this family of proteins. Based on mass spectrometric analysis of the protein overproduced in the presence of DFM, approximately 30% of the five LIV methionine residues were randomly substituted with the fluorinated analog. Urea denaturation experiments imply a slight decrease in protein stability when DFM is incorporated into LIV. However, the fluorinated methionine did not alter leucine-binding activity upon its incorporation into the protein. Binding of L-leucine stabilizes both the unlabeled and DFM-labeled LIV, and induces the protein to adopt a three-state unfolding model in place of the two-state process observed for the free protein. The (19)F NMR spectrum of DFM-labeled LIV gave distinct resonances for the five Met residues found in LIV. 5F-Trp labeled LIV gave a well resolved spectrum for the three Trp residues. Trp to Phe mutants defined the resonances in the spectrum. The distinct narrowing in line width of the resonances when ligand was added identified the closed form of the protein.

  15. Phospho-selective mechanisms of arrestin conformations and functions revealed by unnatural amino acid incorporation and 19F-NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Yu, Xiao; Liu, Chuan; Qu, Chang-Xiu; Gong, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Da; Li, Fa-Hui; Wang, Hong-Mei; He, Dong-Fang; Yi, Fan; Song, Chen; Tian, Chang-Lin; Xiao, Kun-Hong; Wang, Jiang-Yun; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Specific arrestin conformations are coupled to distinct downstream effectors, which underlie the functions of many G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, using unnatural amino acid incorporation and fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance (19F-NMR) spectroscopy, we demonstrate that distinct receptor phospho-barcodes are translated to specific β-arrestin-1 conformations and direct selective signalling. With its phosphate-binding concave surface, β-arrestin-1 ‘reads' the message in the receptor phospho-C-tails and distinct phospho-interaction patterns are revealed by 19F-NMR. Whereas all functional phosphopeptides interact with a common phosphate binding site and induce the movements of finger and middle loops, different phospho-interaction patterns induce distinct structural states of β-arrestin-1 that are coupled to distinct arrestin functions. Only clathrin recognizes and stabilizes GRK2-specific β-arrestin-1 conformations. The identified receptor-phospho-selective mechanism for arrestin conformation and the spacing of the multiple phosphate-binding sites in the arrestin enable arrestin to recognize plethora phosphorylation states of numerous GPCRs, contributing to the functional diversity of receptors. PMID:26347956

  16. Discovery of selective ligands for telomeric RNA G-quadruplexes (TERRA) through 19F-NMR based fragment screening.

    PubMed

    Garavís, Miguel; López-Méndez, Blanca; Somoza, Alvaro; Oyarzabal, Julen; Dalvit, Claudio; Villasante, Alfredo; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2014-07-18

    Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) is a novel and very attractive antitumoral target. Here, we report the first successful application of (19)F-NMR fragment-based screening to identify chemically diverse compounds that bind to an RNA molecule such as TERRA. We have built a library of 355 fluorinated fragments, and checked their interaction with a long telomeric RNA as a target molecule. The screening resulted in the identification of 20 hits (hit rate of 5.6%). For a number of binders, their interaction with TERRA was confirmed by (19)F- and (1)H NMR as well as by CD melting experiments. We have also explored the selectivity of the ligands for RNA G-quadruplexes and found that some of the hits do not interact with other nucleic acids such as tRNA and duplex DNA and, most importantly, favor the propeller-like parallel conformation in telomeric DNA G-quadruplexes. This suggests a selective recognition of this particular quadruplex topology and that different ligands may recognize specific sites in propeller-like parallel G-quadruplexes. Such features make some of the resulting binders promising lead compounds for fragment based drug discovery.

  17. High-temperature MAS-NMR at high spinning speeds.

    PubMed

    Kirchhain, Holger; Holzinger, Julian; Mainka, Adrian; Spörhase, Andreas; Venkatachalam, Sabarinathan; Wixforth, Achim; van Wüllen, Leo

    2016-09-01

    A low cost version to enable high temperature MAS NMR experiments at temperatures of up to 700°C and spinning speeds of up to 10kHz is presented. The method relies on inductive heating using a metal coated rotor insert. The metal coating is accomplished via a two step process involving physical vapor deposition and galvanization.

  18. /sup 19/F NMR study of the transmission capacity of binuclear -N(X)SO/sub 2/- bridging groups

    SciTech Connect

    Pombrik, S.I.; Golovchenko, L.S.; Peregudov, A.S.; Fedin, E.I.; Kravtsov, D.N.

    1986-12-10

    A comparative /sup 19/F NMR study of a series of model ArN(X)SO/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 4/F-4 compounds (X = H, HgPh, and Na) showed that the mechanism for the transmission of the substituent electronic effects in these compounds depends on the polarity of the N/sup delta/sup -//-X/sup delta/sup +// bond. An increase in this polarity leads to an increase in the relative contribution of direct polar conjugation. The specific solvation of the mercury atom in the binuclear bridging N(HgPh)SO/sub 2/ group has only a slight effect on its transmission capacity.

  19. Detection of organic sulfur by {sup 15}N and {sup 19}F NMR via formation of iminosulfuranes

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Lamb, C.N.

    1992-08-01

    We have synthesized new iminosulfuranes from a variety of diaryl-and dialkyl sulfides and dibenzothiophene. The pattern of {sup 15}N chemical shifts indicates that functional groups attached to sulfur are not simply resolved into aryl and alkyl groups. Thus, resolution of sulfur functional groups using {sup 15}N NMR via iminosulfurane does not appear practicable. However, iminosulfurane formation, together with the N-haloamide reaction and the Pummerer rearrangement, provides pathways for chemical discrimination of different sulfur substituents using unique {sup 15}N- or, {sup 19}F-labelled fragments for different categories of sulfur functional groups. In efforts currently underway, we are applying these reactions to methylated extracts and conversion products of the high-organic-sulfur containing Yugoslavian Rasa and Spanish Mequinenza lignites. 1 tab, 14 refs.

  20. Detection of organic sulfur by [sup 15]N and [sup 19]F NMR via formation of iminosulfuranes

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Lamb, C.N.

    1992-08-01

    We have synthesized new iminosulfuranes from a variety of diaryl-and dialkyl sulfides and dibenzothiophene. The pattern of [sup 15]N chemical shifts indicates that functional groups attached to sulfur are not simply resolved into aryl and alkyl groups. Thus, resolution of sulfur functional groups using [sup 15]N NMR via iminosulfurane does not appear practicable. However, iminosulfurane formation, together with the N-haloamide reaction and the Pummerer rearrangement, provides pathways for chemical discrimination of different sulfur substituents using unique [sup 15]N- or, [sup 19]F-labelled fragments for different categories of sulfur functional groups. In efforts currently underway, we are applying these reactions to methylated extracts and conversion products of the high-organic-sulfur containing Yugoslavian Rasa and Spanish Mequinenza lignites. 1 tab, 14 refs.

  1. (19)F NMR studies of the leucine-isoleucine-valine binding protein: evidence that a closed conformation exists in solution.

    PubMed

    Salopek-Sondi, Branka; Vaughan, Mark D; Skeels, Matthew C; Honek, John F; Luck, Linda A

    2003-10-01

    The leucine-isoleucine-valine binding protein (LIV) found in the periplasmic space of E. coli has been used as a structural model for a number of neuronal receptors. This "venus fly trap" type protein has been characterized by crystallography in only the open form. Herein we have labeled LIV with 5-fluorotryptophan (5F-Trp) and difluoromethionine (DFM) in order to explore the structural dynamics of this protein and the application of DFM as a potential (19)F NMR structural probe for this family of proteins. Based on mass spectrometric analysis of the protein overproduced in the presence of DFM, approximately 30% of the five LIV methionine residues were randomly substituted with the fluorinated analog. Urea denaturation experiments imply a slight decrease in protein stability when DFM is incorporated into LIV. However, the fluorinated methionine did not alter leucine-binding activity upon its incorporation into the protein. Binding of L-leucine stabilizes both the unlabeled and DFM-labeled LIV, and induces the protein to adopt a three-state unfolding model in place of the two-state process observed for the free protein. The (19)F NMR spectrum of DFM-labeled LIV gave distinct resonances for the five Met residues found in LIV. 5F-Trp labeled LIV gave a well resolved spectrum for the three Trp residues. Trp to Phe mutants defined the resonances in the spectrum. The distinct narrowing in line width of the resonances when ligand was added identified the closed form of the protein. PMID:12956607

  2. A novel 19F-NMR method for the investigation of the antioxidant capacity of biomolecules and biofluids.

    PubMed

    Aime, S; Calzoni, S; Digilio, G; Giraudo, S; Fasano, M; Maffeo, D

    1999-08-01

    A new assay for the measurement of the antioxidant capacity of biomolecules by high resolution 19F-NMR spectroscopy is presented here. This method is based on the use of trifluoroacetanilidic detectors, namely trifluoroacetanilide, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-trifluoroacetamide and 2-hydroxy-4-trifluoroacetamidobenzoic acid. Upon hydroxyl radical attack, such fluorinated detectors yield trifluoroacetamide and trifluoroacetic acid that can be quantitatively determined by 19F-NMR spectroscopy. Trifluoroacetamide was found to be a reliable reporter of hydroxyl radical attack on the fluorinated detectors, whereas N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-trifluoroacetamide was found to be the most sensitive detector amongst the ones considered. Therefore, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-trifluoroacetamide has been used in competition experiments to assess the antioxidant capacity of a number of low and high molecular weight antioxidants. The antioxidant capacity of a given compound has been scaled in terms of an adimensional parameter, kF, that represents the ratio between the scavenger abilities of the fluorinated detector and the competitor. kF values obtained for low-molecular-mass compounds fall in the range 0.17 < kF < 1.5 and are in good agreement with second order rate constants (k2OH) for the reaction of the antioxidant with hydroxyl radicals. The kF value for serum albumin is much larger (46.9) than that predicted from the reported k2OH value. This finding supports the view that the protein can very effectively scavenge hydroxyl radicals as well as secondary radicals. Human blood serum showed that its antioxidant capacity is even higher than that shown by aqueous solutions of albumin at physiologic concentration suggesting a further contribution from other macromolecular serum components. PMID:10468209

  3. 19F NMR study on the complex of fluorinated vitamin D derivatives with vitamin D receptor: elucidation of the conformation of vitamin D ligands accommodated in the receptor.

    PubMed

    Morizono, Daisuke

    2011-12-28

    Nuclear receptors mediate allosteric communications where ligand binding initiates a cascade of signal transduction. The interaction of vitamin D with vitamin D receptor (VDR) was investigated by (19)F NMR spectroscopy of the complexes of three fluorinated vitamin D derivatives with the full-length rat VDR-LBD. In the (19)F NMR spectra of the VDR-ligand complexes, the A-ring of 4,4-difluoro-1,25(OH)2D3 was revealed to adopt β-conformation in the VDR in solution, and the spectra were shown to be dependent on the dissociation constant. While the complex of 4,4-difluoro-1,25(OH)2D3 with VDR exhibited a clear distinguishable (19)F NMR spectrum, those of (19)F-1,25(OH)2D3 stereoisomers, which have 10-fold higher VDR affinity than 4,4-difluoro-1,25(OH)2D3, did not. The solid-phase NMR technique was useful for (19)F-1,25(OH)2D3 stereoisomers. The fluorinated vitamin D derivatives showed marked changes in the chemical shift (Δ4-19.7 ppm) upon VDR-complex formation, and the ab initio MO method suggested that van der Waals interactions play a major role in the complex formation.

  4. Multinuclear MAS NMR investigation of zeolites reacted with chlorofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannus, I.; Kónya, Z.; Lentz, P.; Nagy, J. B.; Kiricsi, I.

    1999-05-01

    Multinuclear ( 23Na, 27Al, 29Si, 13C) MAS NMR techniques were used for investigation of surface reaction of Y-type zeolites with CFCs (CCl 4, CCl 3F, CCl 2F 2, CClF 3, CF 4) and HCFC (CHClF 2). The hydrogen containing derivative reacts slowly. Those possessing more than 2 F atoms can be regarded as stable unreactive materials. CCl 4, CCl 3F, CCl 2F 2 react strongly with the zeolites. The reaction of HCFC with zeolites has a different mechanism to the other CFCs tested. On the basis of multinuclear NMR results a mechanism is given for the decomposition of HCFC.

  5. Spatially resolved solid-state MAS-NMR-spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Scheler, U; Schauss, G; Blümich, B; Spiess, H W

    1996-07-01

    A comprehensive account of spatially resolved solid-state MAS NMR of 13C is given. A device generating field gradients rotating synchronously with the magic angle spinner is described. Spatial resolution and sensitivity are compared for phase and frequency encoding of spatial information. The suppression of spinning sidebands is demonstrated for both cases. Prior knowledge about the involved materials can be used for the reduction of data from spatially resolved spectra to map chemical structure. Indirect detection via 13C NMR gives access to the information about mobility from proton-wideline spectra. Two-dimensional solid-state spectroscopy with spatial resolution is demonstrated for a rotor synchronized MAS experiment which resolves molecular order as a function of space. By comparison of different experiments the factors affecting the spatial resolution are investigated.

  6. 1H and 19F NMR studies on molecular motions and phase transitions in solid triethylammonium tetrafluoroborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Seki, Riki; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Ishida, Hiroyuki

    1995-02-01

    Measurements by differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry and of the spin-lattice relaxation time ( T1), the spin-spin relaxation time ( T2), and the second moment ( M2) of 1H and 19F NMR were carried out in the three solid phases of (CH 3CH 2) 3NHBF 4. X-ray powder patterns were taken in the highest-temperature phase (Phase I) existing above 367 K and the room-temperature phase (Phase II) stable between 220 and 367 K. Phase I formed a NaCl-type cubic structure with a = 11.65(3) Å, Z = 4, V = 1581(13) Å3, and Dx = 0.794 g cm -3, and was expected to be an ionic plastic phase. In this phase, the self-diffusion of anions and the isotropic reorientation of cations were observed. Phase II formed a tetragonal structure with a = 12.47(1) and c = 9.47(3) Å, Z = 4, V = 1473(6) Å3, and Dx = 0.852 g cm -3. From the present DSC and NMR results in this phase, the cations and/or anions were considered to be dynamically disordered states. The C3 reorientation of the cation about the NH bond axis was detected and, in addition, the onset of nutation of the cations and local diffusion of the anions was suggested. In the low-temperature phase (Phase III) stable below 219 K, the C3 reorientations of the three methyl groups of cations and the isotropic reorientation of anions were observed. The motional parameters for these modes were evaluated.

  7. Study of the interactions of cadmium and zinc ions with cellular calcium homoeostasis using 19F-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Benters, J; Flögel, U; Schäfer, T; Leibfritz, D; Hechtenberg, S; Beyersmann, D

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the heavy-metal ions Cd2+ and Zn2+ on the homoeostasis of intracellular free Ca2+ in E367 neuroblastoma cells were examined using 19F-NMR spectroscopy with the fluorinated chelator probe 1,2-bis-(2-amino-5-fluorophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N', N'-tetra-acetic acid (5F-BAPTA). First, the technique was used to quantify the uptake and intracellular free concentrations of the heavy metals after treatment of the cells with 20 microM CdCl2 or 100 microM ZnCl2. Secondly, metal-induced transients in intracellular free Ca2+ were recorded. Addition of 20 microM CdCl2, but not 100 microM ZnCl2, evoked a transient increase in Ca2+ from a resting level of 84 nM to approx. 190 nM within 15 min after addition of the metal. Zn2+ at 20 microM completely prevented the induction of a Ca2+ transient by Cd2+. Ca2+ was mobilized by Cd2+ from intracellular organelles, since depletion of these stores by thapsigargin abolished the effect of the toxic metal. Furthermore, 20 microM Cd2+ evoked a transient rise in cellular Ins(1,4,5)P3, reaching a maximum level within 5 min after addition of the metal. These results demonstrate that perturbation of the Ins(1,4,5)P3/Ca2+ messenger system is an early and discrete cellular effect of Cd2+. PMID:9148751

  8. (19)F NMR reveals multiple conformations at the dimer interface of the nonstructural protein 1 effector domain from influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Aramini, James M; Hamilton, Keith; Ma, Li-Chung; Swapna, G V T; Leonard, Paul G; Ladbury, John E; Krug, Robert M; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2014-04-01

    Nonstructural protein 1 of influenza A virus (NS1A) is a conserved virulence factor comprised of an N-terminal double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain and a multifunctional C-terminal effector domain (ED), each of which can independently form symmetric homodimers. Here we apply (19)F NMR to NS1A from influenza A/Udorn/307/1972 virus (H3N2) labeled with 5-fluorotryptophan, and we demonstrate that the (19)F signal of Trp187 is a sensitive, direct monitor of the ED helix:helix dimer interface. (19)F relaxation dispersion data reveal the presence of conformational dynamics within this functionally important protein:protein interface, whose rate is more than three orders of magnitude faster than the kinetics of ED dimerization. (19)F NMR also affords direct spectroscopic evidence that Trp187, which mediates intermolecular ED:ED interactions required for cooperative dsRNA binding, is solvent exposed in full-length NS1A at concentrations below aggregation. These results have important implications for the diverse roles of this NS1A epitope during influenza virus infection.

  9. A general protocol for temperature calibration of MAS NMR probes at arbitrary spinning speeds.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xudong; Stark, Ruth E

    2010-01-01

    A protocol using (207)Pb NMR of solid lead nitrate was developed to determine the temperature of magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR probes over a range of nominal set temperatures and spinning speeds. Using BioMAS and FastMAS probes with typical sample spinning rates of 8 and 35 kHz, respectively, empirical equations were devised to predict the respective sample temperatures. These procedures provide a straightforward recipe for temperature calibration of any MAS probe. PMID:21036557

  10. A General Protocol for Temperature Calibration of MAS NMR Probes at Arbitrary Spinning Speeds

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xudong; Stark, Ruth E.

    2010-01-01

    A protocol using 207Pb NMR of solid lead nitrate was developed to determine the temperature of magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR probes over a range of nominal set temperatures and spinning speeds. Using BioMAS and fastMAS probes with typical sample spinning rates of 8 and 35 kHz, respectively, empirical equations were devised to predict the respective sample temperatures. These procedures provide a straightforward recipe for temperature calibration of any MAS probe. PMID:21036557

  11. Multinuclear MAS NMR studies of sodalitic framework materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.M.; Mead, P.J.; Dann, S.E.; Weller, M.T.

    2000-02-24

    A wide range of sodalite framework materials, M{sub 8}[TT{prime}O{sub 4}]{sub 6}X{sub 2} where T = Al, Ga, Si, T{prime} = Be, Al, Si, Ge, have been characterized using {sup 27}Al, {sup 29}Si, and {sup 71}Ga magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy. Structural parameters, such as functions of the framework T{single{underscore}bond}O{single{underscore}bond}T{prime} angle, correlate linearly with the determined chemical shift values and provide relationships, as a function of T{prime}, which will facilitate characterization of more complex zeolitic compounds containing such species. The effects of changing a particular neighboring framework cation on the resonance position is controlled by variations in both framework bond angles/distances and electrostatic effects; these contributions are resolved.

  12. The effect of ethanol on hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine: (31)P-NMR and (19)F-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Celikbag, Yusuf; Via, Brian K; Adhikari, Sushil; Buschle-Diller, Gisela; Auad, Maria L

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the role of ethanol and temperature on the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced from hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine (Pinus spp.) carried out at 250, 300, 350 and 390°C for 30min. Water and water/ethanol mixture (1/1, wt/wt) were used as liquefying solvent in the HTL experiments. HTL in water and water/ethanol is donated as W-HTL and W/E-HTL, respectively. It was found that 300°C and water/ethanol solvent was the optimum liquefaction temperature and solvent, yielding up to 68.1wt.% bio-oil and 2.4wt.% solid residue. (31)P-NMR analysis showed that biopolyol produced by W-HTL was rich in phenolic OH while W/E-HTL produced more aliphatic OH rich biopolyols. Moreover, biopolyols with higher hydroxyl concentration were produced by W/E-HTL. Carbonyl groups were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, which showed that ethanol reduced the concentration of carbonyl groups. PMID:27126078

  13. The effect of ethanol on hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine: (31)P-NMR and (19)F-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Celikbag, Yusuf; Via, Brian K; Adhikari, Sushil; Buschle-Diller, Gisela; Auad, Maria L

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the role of ethanol and temperature on the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced from hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine (Pinus spp.) carried out at 250, 300, 350 and 390°C for 30min. Water and water/ethanol mixture (1/1, wt/wt) were used as liquefying solvent in the HTL experiments. HTL in water and water/ethanol is donated as W-HTL and W/E-HTL, respectively. It was found that 300°C and water/ethanol solvent was the optimum liquefaction temperature and solvent, yielding up to 68.1wt.% bio-oil and 2.4wt.% solid residue. (31)P-NMR analysis showed that biopolyol produced by W-HTL was rich in phenolic OH while W/E-HTL produced more aliphatic OH rich biopolyols. Moreover, biopolyols with higher hydroxyl concentration were produced by W/E-HTL. Carbonyl groups were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, which showed that ethanol reduced the concentration of carbonyl groups.

  14. NMR shielding and spin–rotation constants of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B.

    2015-12-31

    This presentation demonstrates the relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants and shielding spans of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules. The results are obtained from calculations performed using density functional theory (non-relativistic and four-component relativistic) and coupled-cluster calculations. The spin-rotation constants are compared with available experimental values. In most of the molecules studied, relativistic effects make an order of magnitude difference on the NMR absolute shielding constants.

  15. Magnetic properties and hyperfine interactions in Cr8, Cr7Cd, and Cr7Ni molecular rings from 19F-NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Bordonali, L; Garlatti, E; Casadei, C M; Furukawa, Y; Lascialfari, A; Carretta, S; Troiani, F; Timco, G; Winpenny, R E; Borsa, F

    2014-04-14

    A detailed experimental investigation of the 19F nuclear magnetic resonance is made on single crystals of the homometallic Cr₈ antiferromagnetic molecular ring and heterometallic Cr₇Cd and Cr₇ Ni rings in the low temperature ground state. Since the F- ion is located midway between neighboring magnetic metal ions in the ring, the 19F-NMR spectra yield information about the local electronic spin density and ¹⁹F hyperfine interactions. In Cr8, where the ground state is a singlet with total spin S T = 0, the ¹⁹F-NMR spectra at 1.7 K and low external magnetic field display a single narrow line, while when the magnetic field is increased towards the first level crossing field, satellite lines appear in the ¹⁹F-NMR spectrum, indicating a progressive increase in the Boltzmann population of the first excited state S T = 1. In the heterometallic rings, Cr₇Cd and Cr₇ Ni, whose ground state is magnetic with S T = 3/2 and S T = 1/2, respectively, the ¹⁹F-NMR spectrum has a complicated structure which depends on the strength and orientation of the magnetic field, due to both isotropic and anisotropic transferred hyperfine interactions and classical dipolar interactions. From the 19F-NMR spectra in single crystals we estimated the transferred hyperfine constants for both the F⁻-Ni2⁺ and the F⁻-Cd2⁺ bonds. The values of the hyperfine constants compare well to the ones known for F⁻-Ni2⁺ in KNiF₃ and NiF₂ and for F⁻-Cr³⁺ in K₂NaCrF₆. The results are discussed in terms of hybridization of the 2s, 2p orbitals of the F⁻ ion and the d orbitals of the magnetic ion. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the electron-spin decoherence.

  16. Analysis of dynamics and mechanism of ligand binding to Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin. A 13C and 19F NMR study.

    PubMed

    Krishna Sastry, M V; Swamy, M J; Surolia, A

    1988-10-15

    Binding of 13C-labeled N-acetylgalactosamine (13C-GalNAc) and N-trifluoroacetylgalactosamine (19F-GalNAc) to Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin has been studied using 13C and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Binding of these saccharides resulted in broadening of the resonances, and no change in chemical shift was observed, suggesting that the alpha- and beta-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc experience a magnetically equivalent environment in the lectin combining site. The alpha- and beta-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc were found to be in slow exchange between free and protein bound states. Binding of 13C-GalNAc was studied as a function of temperature. From the temperature dependence of the line broadening, the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were evaluated. The association rate constants obtained for the alpha-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc (k+1 = 1.01 x 10(5) M-1.s-1 and 0.698 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, respectively) are in close agreement with those obtained for the corresponding beta-anomers (k+1 = 0.95 x 10(5) M-1.s-1 and 0.65 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, respectively), suggesting that the two anomers bind to the lectin by a similar mechanism. In addition these values are several orders of magnitude slower than those obtained for diffusion controlled processes. The dissociation rate constants obtained are 49.9, 56.9, 42, and 43 s-1, respectively, for the alpha- and beta-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc. A two-step mechanism has been proposed for the interaction of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc with A. integrifolia lectin in view of the slow association rates and high activation entropies. The thermodynamic parameters obtained for the association and dissociation reactions suggest that the binding process is entropically favored and that there is a small enthalpic contribution.

  17. Demystifying fluorine chemical shifts: electronic structure calculations address origins of seemingly anomalous (19)F-NMR spectra of fluorohistidine isomers and analogues.

    PubMed

    Kasireddy, Chandana; Bann, James G; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R

    2015-11-11

    Fluorine NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying biomolecular structure, dynamics, and ligand binding, yet the origins of (19)F chemical shifts are not well understood. Herein, we use electronic structure calculations to describe the changes in (19)F chemical shifts of 2F- and 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon acid titration. While the protonation of the 2F species results in a deshielded chemical shift, protonation of the 4F isomer results in an opposite, shielded chemical shift. The deshielding of 2F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon protonation can be rationalized by concomitant decreases in charge density on fluorine and a reduced dipole moment. These correlations do not hold for 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole, however. Molecular orbital calculations reveal that for the 4F species, there are no lone pair electrons on the fluorine until protonation. Analysis of a series of 4F-imidazole analogues, all with delocalized fluorine electron density, indicates that the deshielding of (19)F chemical shifts through substituent effects correlates with increased C-F bond polarity. In summary, the delocalization of fluorine electrons in the neutral 4F species, with gain of a lone pair upon protonation may help explain the difficulty in developing a predictive framework for fluorine chemical shifts. Ideas debated by chemists over 40 years ago, regarding fluorine's complex electronic effects, are shown to have relevance for understanding and predicting fluorine NMR spectra.

  18. Sealed rotors for in situ high temperature high pressure MAS NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Souchang; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Camaioni, Donald M.; Peden, Charles H. F.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-07-06

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations on heterogeneous samples containing solids, semi-solids, liquid and gases or a mixture of them under non-conventional conditions of a combined high pressure and high temperature, or cold temperature suffer from the unavailability of a perfectly sealed rotor. Here, we report the design of reusable and perfectly-sealed all-zircornia MAS rotors. The rotors are easy to use and are suitable for operation temperatures from below 0 to 250 °C and pressures up to 100 bar. As an example of potential applications we performed in situ MAS NMR investigations of AlPO₄-5 molecular sieve crystallization,more » a kinetic study of the cyclohexanol dehydration reaction using 13C MAS NMR, and an investigation of the metabolomics of intact biological tissue at low temperature using 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy. The in situ MAS NMR experiments performed using the reported rotors allowed reproduction of the results from traditional batch reactions, while offering more detailed quantitative information at the molecular level, as demonstrated for the molecular sieve synthesis and activation energy measurements for cyclohexanol dehydration. The perfectly sealed rotor also shows promising application for metabolomics studies using 1H HR-MAS NMR.« less

  19. Sealed rotors for in situ high temperature high pressure MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Souchang; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Camaioni, Donald M.; Peden, Charles H. F.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-07-06

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations on heterogeneous samples containing solids, semi-solids, liquid and gases or a mixture of them under non-conventional conditions of a combined high pressure and high temperature, or cold temperature suffer from the unavailability of a perfectly sealed rotor. Here, we report the design of reusable and perfectly-sealed all-zircornia MAS rotors. The rotors are easy to use and are suitable for operation temperatures from below 0 to 250 °C and pressures up to 100 bar. As an example of potential applications we performed in situ MAS NMR investigations of AlPO₄-5 molecular sieve crystallization, a kinetic study of the cyclohexanol dehydration reaction using 13C MAS NMR, and an investigation of the metabolomics of intact biological tissue at low temperature using 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy. The in situ MAS NMR experiments performed using the reported rotors allowed reproduction of the results from traditional batch reactions, while offering more detailed quantitative information at the molecular level, as demonstrated for the molecular sieve synthesis and activation energy measurements for cyclohexanol dehydration. The perfectly sealed rotor also shows promising application for metabolomics studies using 1H HR-MAS NMR.

  20. Citron and lemon under the lens of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mucci, Adele; Parenti, Francesca; Righi, Valeria; Schenetti, Luisa

    2013-12-01

    High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) is an NMR technique that can be applied to semi-solid samples. Flavedo, albedo, pulp, seeds, and oil gland content of lemon and citron were studied through HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy, which was used directly on intact tissue specimens without any physicochemical manipulation. HR-MAS NMR proved to be a very suitable technique for detecting terpenes, sugars, organic acids, aminoacids and osmolites. It is valuable in observing changes in sugars, principal organic acids (mainly citric and malic) and ethanol contents of pulp specimens and this strongly point to its use to follow fruit ripening, or commercial assessment of fruit maturity. HR-MAS NMR was also used to derive the molar percentage of fatty acid components of lipids in seeds, which can change depending on the Citrus species and varieties. Finally, this technique was employed to elucidate the metabolic profile of mold flavedo. PMID:23871074

  1. A Comparison of Three Commercial Perfluorocarbon Emulsions as High-Field 19F NMR Probes of Oxygen Tension and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, H. P.; Mason, R. P.; Woessner, D. E.; Antich, P. P.

    The increasing use of perfluorocarbons (PFCs) as probes of tissue oxygenation on the basis of the 19F spin-lattice relaxation rate ( R1) prompts comparison between several commercially available PFC blood-substitute emulsions, The relative sensitivities to both oxygen and temperature of the emulsions Oxypherol, Oxygent, and Fluosol at 7 T have been investigated, The linear response of R1 with pO 2 was confirmed for each resonance in the range 4-50°C, In general, R1 is not a linear function of temperature, and we demonstrate this for perfluorotributylamine (FTBA) over an extended range of temperatures, 239-343 K. Theoretical R1 values of FTBA were compared with experimental data by computer modeling of relaxation mechanisms, To further understand the structure-function relationships of PFCs, 2D COSY experiments were used for the assignment of resonances and as an aid in interpretation of relaxation mechanisms, Finally, the utility of Oxygent and Oxypherol for measuring tissue pO 2 in perfused rat hearts was compared before, during, and after eight minutes of global ischemia.

  2. Site-specific protein backbone and side-chain NMR chemical shift and relaxation analysis of human vinexin SH3 domain using a genetically encoded {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-labeled unnatural amino acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Xi, Zhaoyong; Wang, Hu; Shi, Chaowei; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} Chemical synthesis of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine. {yields} Site-specific incorporation of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine to SH3. {yields} Site-specific backbone and side chain chemical shift and relaxation analysis. {yields} Different internal motions at different sites of SH3 domain upon ligand binding. -- Abstract: SH3 is a ubiquitous domain mediating protein-protein interactions. Recent solution NMR structural studies have shown that a proline-rich peptide is capable of binding to the human vinexin SH3 domain. Here, an orthogonal amber tRNA/tRNA synthetase pair for {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine ({sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-tfmF) has been applied to achieve site-specific labeling of SH3 at three different sites. One-dimensional solution NMR spectra of backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F were obtained for SH3 with three different site-specific labels. Site-specific backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F chemical shift and relaxation analysis of SH3 in the absence or presence of a peptide ligand demonstrated different internal motions upon ligand binding at the three different sites. This site-specific NMR analysis might be very useful for studying large-sized proteins or protein complexes.

  3. Investigation of domain size in polymer membranes using double quantum filtered spin diffusion MAS NMR.

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Alam, Todd Michael; Cherry, Brian Ray; Cornelius, Christopher James

    2005-02-01

    Solid-state {sup 1}H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR was used to investigate sulfonated Diels-Alder poly(phenlylene) polymer membranes. Under high spinning speed {sup 1}H MAS conditions, the proton environments of the sulfonic acid and phenylene polymer backbone are resolved. A double-quantum (DQ) filter using the rotor-synchronized back-to-back (BABA) NMR multiple-pulse sequence allowed the selective suppression of the sulfonic proton environment in the {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra. This DQ filter in conjunction with a spin diffusion NMR experiment was then used to measure the domain size of the sulfonic acid component within the membrane. In addition, the temperature dependence of the sulfonic acid spin-spin relaxation time (T{sub 2}) was determined, providing an estimate of the activation energy for the proton dynamics of the dehydrated membrane.

  4. 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR spectra of mullites from different kaolinites.

    PubMed

    He, Hongping; Guo, Jiugao; Zhu, Jianxi; Yuan, Peng; Hu, Cheng

    2004-04-01

    Mullites synthesized from four kaolinites with different random defect densities have been studied by 27Al and 29Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). All these mullites show the same XRD pattern. However, 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR spectra reveal that the mullites derived from kaolinites with high defect densities, have a sillimanite-type Al/Si ordering scheme and are low in silica, whereas those mullites derived from kaolinites with low defect densities, consist of both sillimanite- and mullite-type Al/Si ordering schemes and are rich in silica. PMID:15084323

  5. Advanced instrumentation for DNP-enhanced MAS NMR for higher magnetic fields and lower temperatures.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yoh; Idehara, Toshitaka; Fukazawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2016-03-01

    Sensitivity enhancement of MAS NMR using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is gaining importance at moderate fields (B0<9T) and temperatures (T>90K) with potential applications in chemistry and material sciences. However, considering the ever-increasing size and complexity of the systems to be studied, it is crucial to establish DNP under higher field conditions, where the spectral resolution and the basic NMR sensitivity tend to improve. In this perspective, we overview our recent efforts on hardware developments, specifically targeted on improving DNP MAS NMR at high fields. It includes the development of gyrotrons that enable continuous frequency tuning and rapid frequency modulation for our 395 GHz-600 MHz and 460 GHz-700 MHz DNP NMR spectrometers. The latter 700 MHz system involves two gyrotrons and a quasi-optical transmission system that combines two independent sub-millimeter waves into a single dichromic wave. We also describe two cryogenic MAS NMR probe systems operating, respectively, at T ∼ 100K and ∼ 30K. The latter system utilizes a novel closed-loop helium recirculation mechanism, achieving cryogenic MAS without consuming any cryogen. These instruments altogether should promote high-field DNP toward more efficient, reliable and affordable technology. Some experimental DNP results obtained with these instruments are presented.

  6. Advanced instrumentation for DNP-enhanced MAS NMR for higher magnetic fields and lower temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuki, Yoh; Idehara, Toshitaka; Fukazawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2016-03-01

    Sensitivity enhancement of MAS NMR using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is gaining importance at moderate fields (B0 < 9 T) and temperatures (T > 90 K) with potential applications in chemistry and material sciences. However, considering the ever-increasing size and complexity of the systems to be studied, it is crucial to establish DNP under higher field conditions, where the spectral resolution and the basic NMR sensitivity tend to improve. In this perspective, we overview our recent efforts on hardware developments, specifically targeted on improving DNP MAS NMR at high fields. It includes the development of gyrotrons that enable continuous frequency tuning and rapid frequency modulation for our 395 GHz-600 MHz and 460 GHz-700 MHz DNP NMR spectrometers. The latter 700 MHz system involves two gyrotrons and a quasi-optical transmission system that combines two independent sub-millimeter waves into a single dichromic wave. We also describe two cryogenic MAS NMR probe systems operating, respectively, at T ∼100 K and ∼30 K. The latter system utilizes a novel closed-loop helium recirculation mechanism, achieving cryogenic MAS without consuming any cryogen. These instruments altogether should promote high-field DNP toward more efficient, reliable and affordable technology. Some experimental DNP results obtained with these instruments are presented.

  7. Advanced instrumentation for DNP-enhanced MAS NMR for higher magnetic fields and lower temperatures.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yoh; Idehara, Toshitaka; Fukazawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2016-03-01

    Sensitivity enhancement of MAS NMR using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is gaining importance at moderate fields (B0<9T) and temperatures (T>90K) with potential applications in chemistry and material sciences. However, considering the ever-increasing size and complexity of the systems to be studied, it is crucial to establish DNP under higher field conditions, where the spectral resolution and the basic NMR sensitivity tend to improve. In this perspective, we overview our recent efforts on hardware developments, specifically targeted on improving DNP MAS NMR at high fields. It includes the development of gyrotrons that enable continuous frequency tuning and rapid frequency modulation for our 395 GHz-600 MHz and 460 GHz-700 MHz DNP NMR spectrometers. The latter 700 MHz system involves two gyrotrons and a quasi-optical transmission system that combines two independent sub-millimeter waves into a single dichromic wave. We also describe two cryogenic MAS NMR probe systems operating, respectively, at T ∼ 100K and ∼ 30K. The latter system utilizes a novel closed-loop helium recirculation mechanism, achieving cryogenic MAS without consuming any cryogen. These instruments altogether should promote high-field DNP toward more efficient, reliable and affordable technology. Some experimental DNP results obtained with these instruments are presented. PMID:26920836

  8. Elucidating proline dynamics in spider dragline silk fibre using 2H-13C HETCOR MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangyan; Yarger, Jeffery L; Holland, Gregory P

    2014-05-14

    (2)H-(13)C HETCOR MAS NMR is performed on (2)H/(13)C/(15)N-Pro enriched A. aurantia dragline silk. Proline dynamics are extracted from (2)H NMR line shapes and T1 in a site-specific manner to elucidate the backbone and side chain molecular dynamics for the MaSp2 GPGXX β-turn regions for spider dragline silk in the dry and wet, supercontracted states.

  9. Targeting the Endocannabinoid System for Neuroprotection: A 19F-NMR Study of a Selective FAAH Inhibitor Binding with an Anandamide Carrier Protein, HSA

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jianqin; Yang, De-Ping; Tian, Xiaoyu; Nikas, Spyros P.; Sharma, Rishi; Guo, Jason Jianxin; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme involved in the inactivation of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA), is being considered as a therapeutic target for analgesia and neuroprotection. We have developed a brain permeable FAAH inhibitor, AM5206, which has served as a valuable pharmacological tool to explore neuroprotective effects of this class of compounds. In the present work, we characterized the interactions of AM5206 with a representative AEA carrier protein, human serum albumin (HSA), using 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our data showed that as a drug carrier, albumin can significantly enhance the solubility of AM5206 in aqueous environment. Through a series of titration and competitive binding experiments, we also identified that AM5206 primarily binds to two distinct sites within HSA. Our results may provide insight into the mechanism of HSA-AM5206 interactions. The findings should also help in the development of suitable formulations of the lipophilic AM5206 and its congeners for their effective delivery to specific target sites in the brain. PMID:24533425

  10. A risk-based statistical investigation of the quantification of polymorphic purity of a pharmaceutical candidate by solid-state 19F NMR.

    PubMed

    Barry, Samantha J; Pham, Tran N; Borman, Phil J; Edwards, Andrew J; Watson, Simon A

    2012-01-27

    The DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve and Control) framework and associated statistical tools have been applied to both identify and reduce variability observed in a quantitative (19)F solid-state NMR (SSNMR) analytical method. The method had been developed to quantify levels of an additional polymorph (Form 3) in batches of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), where Form 1 is the predominant polymorph. In order to validate analyses of the polymorphic form, a single batch of API was used as a standard each time the method was used. The level of Form 3 in this standard was observed to gradually increase over time, the effect not being immediately apparent due to method variability. In order to determine the cause of this unexpected increase and to reduce method variability, a risk-based statistical investigation was performed to identify potential factors which could be responsible for these effects. Factors identified by the risk assessment were investigated using a series of designed experiments to gain a greater understanding of the method. The increase of the level of Form 3 in the standard was primarily found to correlate with the number of repeat analyses, an effect not previously reported in SSNMR literature. Differences in data processing (phasing and linewidth) were found to be responsible for the variability in the method. After implementing corrective actions the variability was reduced such that the level of Form 3 was within an acceptable range of ±1% ww(-1) in fresh samples of API. PMID:22177062

  11. Optimized multiple quantum MAS lineshape simulations in solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, William J.; Davis, Michael C.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2009-10-01

    /Linux Operating system: UNIX/Linux Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: Example: (1597 powder angles) × (200 Samples) × (81 F2 frequency pts) × (31 F1 frequency points) = 3.5M, SMP AMD opteron Classification: 2.3 External routines: OCTAVE ( http://www.gnu.org/software/octave/), GNU Scientific Library ( http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/), OPENMP ( http://openmp.org/wp/) Nature of problem: The optimal simulation and modeling of multiple quantum magic angle spinning NMR spectra, for general systems, especially those with mild to significant disorder. The approach outlined and implemented in C and OCTAVE also produces model parameter error estimates. Solution method: A model for each distinct chemical site is first proposed, for the individual contribution of crystallite orientations to the spectrum. This model is averaged over all powder angles [1], as well as the (stochastic) parameters; isotropic chemical shift and quadrupole coupling constant. The latter is accomplished via sampling from a bi-variate Gaussian distribution, using the Box-Muller algorithm to transform Sobol (quasi) random numbers [2]. A simulated annealing optimization is performed, and finally the non-linear jackknife [3] is applied in developing model parameter error estimates. Additional comments: The distribution contains a script, mqmasOpt.m, which runs in the OCTAVE language workspace. Running time: Example: (1597 powder angles) × (200 Samples) × (81 F2 frequency pts) × (31 F1 frequency points) = 58.35 seconds, SMP AMD opteron. References:S.K. Zaremba, Annali di Matematica Pura ed Applicata 73 (1966) 293. H. Niederreiter, Random Number Generation and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods, SIAM, 1992. T. Fox, D. Hinkley, K. Larntz, Technometrics 22 (1980) 29.

  12. Magnetic properties and hyperfine interactions in Cr{sub 8}, Cr{sub 7}Cd, and Cr{sub 7}Ni molecular rings from {sup 19}F-NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Bordonali, L.; Borsa, F.; Garlatti, E.; Furukawa, Y.; Lascialfari, A.; Carretta, S.; Timco, G.; Winpenny, R. E. P.

    2014-04-14

    A detailed experimental investigation of the {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance is made on single crystals of the homometallic Cr{sub 8} antiferromagnetic molecular ring and heterometallic Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 7}Ni rings in the low temperature ground state. Since the F{sup −} ion is located midway between neighboring magnetic metal ions in the ring, the {sup 19}F-NMR spectra yield information about the local electronic spin density and {sup 19}F hyperfine interactions. In Cr{sub 8}, where the ground state is a singlet with total spin S{sub T} = 0, the {sup 19}F-NMR spectra at 1.7 K and low external magnetic field display a single narrow line, while when the magnetic field is increased towards the first level crossing field, satellite lines appear in the {sup 19}F-NMR spectrum, indicating a progressive increase in the Boltzmann population of the first excited state S{sub T} = 1. In the heterometallic rings, Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 7}Ni, whose ground state is magnetic with S{sub T} = 3/2 and S{sub T} = 1/2, respectively, the {sup 19}F-NMR spectrum has a complicated structure which depends on the strength and orientation of the magnetic field, due to both isotropic and anisotropic transferred hyperfine interactions and classical dipolar interactions. From the {sup 19}F-NMR spectra in single crystals we estimated the transferred hyperfine constants for both the F{sup −}-Ni{sup 2+} and the F{sup −}-Cd{sup 2+} bonds. The values of the hyperfine constants compare well to the ones known for F{sup −}-Ni{sup 2+} in KNiF{sub 3} and NiF{sub 2} and for F{sup −}-Cr{sup 3+} in K{sub 2}NaCrF{sub 6}. The results are discussed in terms of hybridization of the 2s, 2p orbitals of the F{sup −} ion and the d orbitals of the magnetic ion. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the electron-spin decoherence.

  13. Combined ligand-observe 19F and protein-observe 15N,1H-HSQC NMR suggests phenylalanine as the key Δ-somatostatin residue recognized by human protein disulfide isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Kirsty L.; Rowe, Michelle L.; Hudson, Paul B.; Williamson, Richard A.; Howard, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Human protein disulphide isomerase (hPDI) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) based isomerase and folding chaperone. Molecular detail of ligand recognition and specificity of hPDI are poorly understood despite the importance of the hPDI for folding secreted proteins and its implication in diseases including cancer and lateral sclerosis. We report a detailed study of specificity, interaction and dissociation constants (Kd) of the peptide-ligand Δ-somatostatin (AGSKNFFWKTFTSS) binding to hPDI using 19F ligand-observe and 15N,1H-HSQC protein-observe NMR methods. Phe residues in Δ-somatostatin are hypothesised as important for recognition by hPDI therefore, step-wise peptide Phe-to-Ala changes were progressively introduced and shown to raise the Kd from 103 + 47 μM until the point where binding was abolished when all Phe residues were modified to Ala. The largest step-changes in Kd involved the F11A peptide modification which implies the C-terminus of Δ-somatostatin is a prime recognition region. Furthermore, this study also validated the combined use of 19F ligand-observe and complimentary 15N,1H-HSQC titrations to monitor interactions from the protein’s perspective. 19F ligand-observe NMR was ratified as mirroring 15N protein-observe but highlighted the advantage that 19F offers improved Kd precision due to higher spectrum resolution and greater chemical environment sensitivity. PMID:26786784

  14. Solid-state 29Si MAS NMR studies of diatoms: structural characterization of biosilica deposits.

    PubMed

    Bertermann, R; Kröger, N; Tacke, R

    2003-03-01

    Four different diatom species (Chaetoceros debilis, Chaetoceros didymum, Cylindrotheca fusiformis, Nitzschia angularis) were studied by solid-state (29)Si MAS NMR spectroscopy. To determine the Q(2):Q(3):Q(4) ratios in the biosilica deposits of the diatoms, quantitative (29)Si MAS NMR experiments were performed. This analysis did not reveal any differences regarding the molecular architecture of the silica (i.e. the degree of condensation of the SiOH units (2 identical with SiOH --> identical with Si-O-Si identical with + H(2)O)) from the different diatom species. However, complete cells showed significantly smaller Q(4):Q(3) ratios (1.8-1.9) than extracted cell walls (2.5-2.8), indicating the existence of intracellular pools of less condensed silica.

  15. 19F NMR-, ESR-, and vis-NIR-spectroelectrochemical study of the unconventional reduction behaviour of a perfluoroalkylated fullerene: dimerization of the C70(CF3)10– radical anion†

    PubMed Central

    Zalibera, Michal; Machata, Peter; Clikeman, Tyler T.; Rosenkranz, Marco; Strauss, Steven H.; Boltalina, Olga V.; Popov, Alexey A.

    2016-01-01

    The most abundant isomer of C70(CF3)10 (70-10-1) is a rare example of a perfluoroalkylated fullerene exhibiting electrochemically irreversible reduction. We show that electrochemical reversibility at the first reduction step is achieved at scan rates higher than 500 V s-1 Applying ESR-, vis-NIR-, and 19F NMR- spectroelectrochemistry, as well as mass spectrometry and DFT calculations, we show that the (70-10-1)- radical monoanion is in equilibrium with a singly-bonded diamagnetic dimeric dianion. This study is the first example of 19F NMR spectroelectrochemistry, which promises to be an important method for the elucidation of redox mechanisms of fluoroorganic compounds. Additionally, we demonstrate the importance of combining different spectroelectrochemical methods and quantitative analysis of the transferred charge and spin numbers in the determination of the redox mechanism. PMID:26359514

  16. Fluoride-ion acceptor properties of WSF4: synthesis, characterization, and computational study of the WSF5(-) and W2S2F9(-) anions and 19F NMR spectroscopic characterization of the W2OSF9(-) anion.

    PubMed

    Nieboer, Jared; Haiges, Ralf; Hillary, William; Yu, Xin; Richardet, Tyler; Mercier, Hélène P A; Gerken, Michael

    2012-06-01

    The new [N(CH(3))(4)][WSF(5)] salt was synthesized by two preparative methods: (a) by reaction of WSF(4) with [N(CH(3))(4)][F] in CH(3)CN and (b) directly from WF(6) using the new sulfide-transfer reagent [N(CH(3))(4)][SSi(CH(3))(3)]. The [N(CH(3))(4)][WSF(5)] salt was characterized by Raman, IR, and (19)F NMR spectroscopy and [N(CH(3))(4)][WSF(5)]·CH(3)CN by X-ray crystallography. The reaction of WSF(4) with half an aliquot of [N(CH(3))(4)][F] yielded [N(CH(3))(4)][W(2)S(2)F(9)], which was characterized by Raman and (19)F NMR spectroscopy and by X-ray crystallography. The WSF(5)(-) and W(2)S(2)F(9)(-) anions were studied by density functional theory calculations. The novel [W(2)OSF(9)](-) anion was observed by (19)F NMR spectroscopy in a CH(3)CN solution of WOF(4) and WSF(5)(-), as well as CH(3)CN solutions of WSF(4) and WOF(5)(-).

  17. Conformational Insights into the Lesion and Sequence Effects for Arylamine-Induced Translesion DNA Synthesis: 19F NMR, Surface Plasmon Resonance, and Primer Kinetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Adduct-induced DNA damage can affect transcription efficiency and DNA replication and repair. We previously investigated the effects of the 3′-next flanking base (G*CT vs G*CA; G*, FABP, N-(2′-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4′-fluoro-4-aminobiphenyl; FAF, N-(2′-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-7-fluoro-2-aminofluorene) on the conformation of arylamine-DNA lesions in relation to E. coli nucleotide excision repair (JainV., HiltonB., LinB., PatnaikS., LiangF., DarianE., ZouY., MackerellA. D.Jr., and ChoB. P. (2013) Nucleic Acids Res., 41, 869−88023180767). Here, we report the differential effects of the same pair of sequences on DNA replication in vitro by the polymerases exofree Klenow fragment (Kf-exo–) and Dpo4. We obtained dynamic 19F NMR spectra for two 19-mer modified templates during primer elongation: G*CA [d(5′-CTTACCATCG*CAACCATTC-3′)] and G*CT [d(5′-CTTACCATCG*CTACCATTC-3′)]. We found that lesion stacking is favored in the G*CT sequence compared to the G*CA counterpart. Surface plasmon resonance binding results showed consistently weaker affinities for the modified DNA with the binding strength in the order of FABP > FAF and G*CA > G*CT. Primer extension was stalled at (n) and near (n – 1 and n + 1) the lesion site, and the extent of blockage and the extension rates across the lesion were influenced by not only the DNA sequences but also the nature of the adduct’s chemical structure (FAF vs FABP) and the polymerase employed (Kf-exo– vs Dpo4). Steady-state kinetics analysis with Kf-exo– revealed the most dramatic sequence and lesion effects at the lesion (n) and postinsertion (n + 1) sites, respectively. Taken together, these results provide insights into the important role of lesion-induced conformational heterogeneity in modulating translesion DNA synthesis. PMID:24915610

  18. Investigation of multiaxial molecular dynamics by 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, J H; Hoatson, G L; Vold, R L

    1998-11-01

    The technique of 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy is presented for the investigation of multiaxial molecular dynamics. To evaluate the effects of discrete random reorientation a Lie algebraic formalism based on the stochastic Liouville-von Neumann equation is developed. The solution to the stochastic Liouville-von Neumann equation is obtained both in the presence and absence of rf irradiation. This allows effects of molecular dynamics to be evaluated during rf pulses and extends the applicability of the formalism to arbitrary multiple pulse experiments. Theoretical methods are presented for the description of multiaxial dynamics with particular emphasis on the application of vector parameters to represent molecular rotations. Numerical time and powder integration algorithms are presented that are both efficient and easy to implement computationally. The applicability of 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy for investigating molecular dynamics is evaluated from theoretical spectra. To demonstrate the potential of the technique the dynamics of thiourea-2H4 is investigated experimentally. From a series of variable temperature MAS and quadrupole echo spectra it has been found that the dynamics can be described by composite rotation about the CS and CN bonds. Both experiments are sensitive to the fast CS rotation which is shown to be described by the Arrhenius parameters E(CS) = 46.4 +/- 2.3 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A(CS))= 32.6 +/- 0.9. The MAS experiment represents a significant improvement by simultaneously allowing the dynamics of the slow CN rotation to be fully characterized in terms of E(CN) = 56.3 +/- 3.4 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A(CN)) = 25.3 +/- 1.1. PMID:9875600

  19. High-resolution multiple quantum MAS NMR spectroscopy of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gang; Rovnyank, David; Sun, Boqin; Griffin, Robert G.

    1996-02-01

    We demonstrate the utility of a two-pulse sequence in obtaining high-resolution solid state NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei with magic-angle-spinning (MAS). The experiment, which utilizes multiple/single-quantum correlation, was first described in a different form by Frydman and Harwood [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 117 (1995) 5367] and yields high-resolution isotropic NMR spectra where shifts are determined by the sum of resonance offset (chemical shift) and second-order quadrupolar effects. The two-pulse sequence described here is shown to provide a higher and more uniform excitation of multiple-quantum coherence than the three-pulse sequence used previously.

  20. Immobilization of soluble protein complexes in MAS solid-state NMR: Sedimentation versus viscosity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Mainz, Andi; Busi, Baptiste; Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Kranz, Maximilian; Hofmann, Thomas; Reif, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, MAS solid-state NMR has emerged as a technique for the investigation of soluble protein complexes. It was found that high molecular weight complexes do not need to be crystallized in order to obtain an immobilized sample for solid-state NMR investigations. Sedimentation induced by sample rotation impairs rotational diffusion of proteins and enables efficient dipolar coupling based cross polarization transfers. In addition, viscosity contributes to the immobilization of the molecules in the sample. Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents (NADES) have very high viscosities, and can replace water in living organisms. We observe a considerable amount of cross polarization transfers for NADES solvents, even though their molecular weight is too low to yield significant sedimentation. We discuss how viscosity and sedimentation both affect the quality of the obtained experimental spectra. The FROSTY/sedNMR approach holds the potential to study large protein complexes, which are otherwise not amenable for a structural characterization using NMR. We show that using this method, backbone assignments of the symmetric proteasome activator complex (1.1MDa), and high quality correlation spectra of non-symmetric protein complexes such as the prokaryotic ribosome 50S large subunit binding to trigger factor (1.4MDa) are obtained. PMID:27017576

  1. Immobilization of soluble protein complexes in MAS solid-state NMR: Sedimentation versus viscosity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Mainz, Andi; Busi, Baptiste; Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Kranz, Maximilian; Hofmann, Thomas; Reif, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, MAS solid-state NMR has emerged as a technique for the investigation of soluble protein complexes. It was found that high molecular weight complexes do not need to be crystallized in order to obtain an immobilized sample for solid-state NMR investigations. Sedimentation induced by sample rotation impairs rotational diffusion of proteins and enables efficient dipolar coupling based cross polarization transfers. In addition, viscosity contributes to the immobilization of the molecules in the sample. Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents (NADES) have very high viscosities, and can replace water in living organisms. We observe a considerable amount of cross polarization transfers for NADES solvents, even though their molecular weight is too low to yield significant sedimentation. We discuss how viscosity and sedimentation both affect the quality of the obtained experimental spectra. The FROSTY/sedNMR approach holds the potential to study large protein complexes, which are otherwise not amenable for a structural characterization using NMR. We show that using this method, backbone assignments of the symmetric proteasome activator complex (1.1MDa), and high quality correlation spectra of non-symmetric protein complexes such as the prokaryotic ribosome 50S large subunit binding to trigger factor (1.4MDa) are obtained.

  2. Structural analysis of molybdo-zinc-phosphate glasses: Neutron scattering, FTIR, Raman scattering, MAS NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuka, C.; Shinde, A. B.; Krishna, P. S. R.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2016-08-01

    Vitreous samples were prepared in the xMoO3-17ZnO-(83-x) NaPO3 with 35 ≥ x ≥ 55 glass forming system by energy efficient microwave heating method. Structural evolution of the vitreous network was monitored as a function of composition by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman scattering, Magic Angle Spin Nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and Neutron scattering. Addition of MoO3 to the ZnO-NaPO3 glass leads to a pronounced increase in glass transition temperature (Tg) suggesting a significant increase in network connectivity and strength. In order to analyze FTIR and Raman scattering, a simple structural model is presented to rationalize the experimental observations. A number of structural units are formed due to network modification, and the resulting glass may be characterized by a network polyhedral with different numbers of unshared corners. 31P MAS NMR confirms a clear distinction between structural species having 3, 2, 1, 0 bridging oxygens (BOs). Further, Neutron scattering studies were used to probe the structure of these glasses. The result suggests that all the investigated glasses have structures based on chains of four coordinated phosphate and six coordinated molybdate units, besides, two different lengths of P-O bonds in tetrahedral phosphate units that are assigned to bonds of the P-atom with terminal and bridging oxygen atoms.

  3. Mechanisms for fluoride-promoted dissolution of bayerite [{beta}-Al(OH){sub 3}(s)] and boehmite [{gamma}-AlOOH]: {sup 19}F-NMR spectroscopy and aqueous surface chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Nordin, J.P.; Sullivan, D.J.; Phillips, B.L.; Casey, W.H.

    1999-11-01

    Some reactions that control the dissolution of bayerite [{beta}-Al(OH){sub 3}(s)] and boehmite [{gamma}-AlOOH] were identified by comparing the adsorption chemistry, the dissolution rates, and solid-state {sup 19}F-NMR spectra of the reacting surfaces. The {sup 19}F-NMR spectra of bayerite distinguish two sites for fluoride reaction that vary in relative concentration with the total adsorbate density. One resonance at {minus}131 ppm is assigned to fluoride bridges and the other resonance at {minus}142 ppm is assigned to fluoride at terminal sites. These same resonances are observed on boehmite, in addition to a third resonance at {minus}151 ppm that is tentatively assigned to aqueous AlF{sub n}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6{minus}n}{sup (3{minus}n)+} (aq) complexes in pores. Peak broadening due to dipolar coupling between surface fluorides at high loading indicates that these sites are in close proximity. A consistent picture of dissolution is derived by considering the {sup 19}F-NMR results, the aqueous experiments, and information derived from the studies of aqueous complexes, particularly studies of the dissociation mechanisms of aqueous multimers. Both fluoride and adsorbed proton enhance the dissolution rates via a series of pathways that may be coupled to one another, and there is a profound dependence of the rate on the concentration of adsorbed protons and adsorbed fluorides. Particularly important are fluoride-substituted bridges and sites where aluminum atoms are bonded to several terminal fluorides or hydroxyls. These results illustrate that it is possible to test hypotheses about molecular-scale processes if adsorption studies are coupled to spectroscopy and ligand-promoted dissolution experiments where reaction via different pathways can be distinguished.

  4. Identification of 2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]- cyclohexane-1,3-dione metabolites in urine of patients suffering from tyrosinemia type I with the use of 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szczeciński, Przemysław; Lamparska, Diana; Gryff-Keller, Adam; Gradowska, Wanda

    2008-01-01

    Organic extracts of six urine samples from children treated with nitisinone, a medicine against tyrosinemia type I, were investigated by (1)H and (19)F NMR spectroscopy. The presence of unchanged 2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]cyclohexane-1,3-dione (NTBC), 6-hydroxy-2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]cyclohexane-1,3-dione (NTBC-OH) and 2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoic acid (NTFA) as well as a few other unidentified compounds containing CF(3) group was documented.

  5. Metallic Li colloids studied by Li-7 MAS NMR in electron-irradiated LiF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zogal, O. J.; Beuneu, F.; Vajda, P.; Florian, P.; Massiot, D.

    Li-7 MAS NMR spectra of 2.5 MeV electron-irradiated LiF crystals have been measured in a field of 9.4 T. Besides the resonance line of the ionic compound, a second well-separated spectrum is observed in the region of the Knight shift value for metallic lithium. At room temperature, the latter can be decomposed into two components with different Knight shift and linewidth values. When the temperature is increased, line narrowing takes place at first, indicating shortening of correlation times for self-diffusion, independently in both components. Above 370 K, both lines broaden and approach each other before collapsing into a single line. The high ppm component disappears after crossing the melting temperature of metallic lithium (454 K). The two lines are attributed to different types of metallic Li: one to bulk-like metal, the other to Li present initially under pressure and relaxing to the former under thermal treatment.

  6. Molecular degradation of ancient documents revealed by 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Łojewska, Joanna; Mallamace, Francesco; Pietronero, Luciano; Missori, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    For centuries mankind has stored its knowledge on paper, a remarkable biomaterial made of natural cellulose fibers. However, spontaneous cellulose degradation phenomena weaken and discolorate paper over time. The detailed knowledge of products arising from cellulose degradation is essential in understanding deterioration pathways and in improving durability of cultural heritage. In this study, for the first time, products of cellulose degradation were individually detected in solid paper samples by means of an extremely powerful proton HR-MAS NMR set-up, in combination to a wise use of both ancient and, as reference, artificially aged paper samples. Carboxylic acids, in addition to more complex dicarboxylic and hydroxy-carboxylic acids, were found in all samples studied. Since these products can catalyze further degradation, their knowledge is fundamental to improve conservation strategies of historical documents. Furthermore, the identification of compounds used in ancient production techniques, also suggests for artifacts dating, authentication and provenance. PMID:24104201

  7. Molecular degradation of ancient documents revealed by 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Łojewska, Joanna; Mallamace, Francesco; Pietronero, Luciano; Missori, Mauro

    2013-10-09

    For centuries mankind has stored its knowledge on paper, a remarkable biomaterial made of natural cellulose fibers. However, spontaneous cellulose degradation phenomena weaken and discolorate paper over time. The detailed knowledge of products arising from cellulose degradation is essential in understanding deterioration pathways and in improving durability of cultural heritage. In this study, for the first time, products of cellulose degradation were individually detected in solid paper samples by means of an extremely powerful proton HR-MAS NMR set-up, in combination to a wise use of both ancient and, as reference, artificially aged paper samples. Carboxylic acids, in addition to more complex dicarboxylic and hydroxy-carboxylic acids, were found in all samples studied. Since these products can catalyze further degradation, their knowledge is fundamental to improve conservation strategies of historical documents. Furthermore, the identification of compounds used in ancient production techniques, also suggests for artifacts dating, authentication and provenance.

  8. Higher Order Amyloid Fibril Structure by MAS NMR and DNP Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bayro, Marvin J.; Fitzpatrick, Anthony W.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Colvin, Michael T.; Caporini, Marc A.; Jaroniec, Christopher P.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Rosay, Melanie; MacPhee, Cait E.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Maas, Werner E.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has generated structural models of several amyloid fibril systems, thus providing valuable information regarding the forces and interactions that confer the extraordinary stability of the amyloid architecture. Despite these advances, however, obtaining atomic resolution information describing the higher levels of structural organization within the fibrils remains a significant challenge. Here, we detail MAS NMR experiments and sample labeling schemes designed specifically to probe such higher order amyloid structure and we have applied them to the fibrils formed by an eleven-residue segment of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin (TTR(105-115)). These experiments have allowed us to define unambiguously not only the arrangement of the peptide β-strands into β-sheets but also the β-sheet interfaces within each protofilament, and in addition to identify the nature of the protofilament-to-protofilament contacts that lead to the formation of the complete fibril. Our efforts have resulted in 111 quantitative distance and torsion angle restraints (10 per residue) that describe the various levels of structure organization. The experiments benefited extensively from the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which in some cases allowed us to shorten the data acquisition time from days to hours and to improve significantly the signal-to-noise ratios of the spectra. The β-sheet interface and protofilament interactions identified here revealed local variations in the structure that result in multiple peaks for the exposed N- and C-termini of the peptide and in inhomogeneous line-broadening for the side-chains buried within the interior of the fibrils. PMID:24304221

  9. Assessing the fate and transformation of plant residues in the terrestrial environment using HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, Brian P.; Simpson, Myrna J.; Simpson, Andre J.

    2006-08-01

    Plant litter decomposition plays a fundamental role in carbon and nitrogen cycles, provides key nutrients to the soil environment and represents a potentially large positive feedback to atmospheric CO 2. However, the full details of decomposition pathways and products are unknown. Here we present the first application of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy on 13C and 15N labeled plant materials, and apply this approach in a preliminary study to monitor the environmental degradation of the pine and wheatgrass residues over time. In HR-MAS, is it possible to acquire very high resolution NMR data of plant biomass, and apply the vast array of multidimensional experiments available in conventional solution-state NMR. High levels of isotopic enrichment combined with HR-MAS significantly enhance the detection limits, and provide a wealth of information that is unattainable by any other method. Diffusion edited HR-MAS NMR data reveal the rapid loss of carbohydrate structures, while two-dimensional (2-D) HR-MAS NMR spectra demonstrate the relatively fast loss of both hydrolysable and condensed tannin structures from all plant tissues studied. Aromatic (partially lignin) and aliphatic components (waxes, cuticles) tend to persist, along with a small fraction of carbohydrate, and become highly functionalized over time. While one-dimensional (1-D) 13C HR-MAS NMR spectra of fresh plant tissue reflect compositional differences between pine and grass, these differences become negligible after decomposition suggesting that recalcitrant carbon may be similar despite the plant source. Two-dimensional 1H- 15N HR-MAS NMR analysis of the pine residue suggests that nitrogen from specific peptides is either selectively preserved or used for the synthesis of what appears to be novel structures. The amount of relevant data generated from plant components in situ using HR-MAS NMR is highly encouraging, and demonstrates that complete assignment will yield unprecedented structural knowledge of plant cell

  10. Thermal maturity of type II kerogen from the New Albany Shale assessed by 13C CP/MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Werner-Zwanziger, Ulrike; Lis, Grzegorz; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2005-01-01

    Thermal maturity of oil and gas source rocks is typically quantified in terms of vitrinite reflectance, which is based on optical properties of terrestrial woody remains. This study evaluates 13C CP/MAS NMR parameters in kerogen (i.e., the insoluble fraction of organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks) as proxies for thermal maturity in marine-derived source rocks where terrestrially derived vitrinite is often absent or sparse. In a suite of samples from the New Albany Shale (Middle Devonian to the Early Mississippian, Illinois Basin) the abundance of aromatic carbon in kerogen determined by 13C CP/MAS NMR correlates linearly well with vitrinite reflectance.

  11. Residue specific hydration of primary cell wall potato pectin identified by solid-state 13C single-pulse MAS and CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Byg, Inge; Damager, Iben; Diaz, Jerome; Engelsen, Søren B; Ulvskov, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Hydration of rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) derived from potato cell wall was analyzed by (13)C single-pulse (SP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and (13)C cross-polarization (CP) MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and supported by (2)H SP/MAS NMR experiments. The study shows that the arabinan side chains hydrate more readily than the galactan side chains and suggests that the overall hydration properties can be controlled by modifying the ratio of these side chains. Enzymatic modification of native (NA) RG-I provided samples with reduced content of arabinan (sample DA), galactan (sample DG), or both side chains (sample DB). Results of these samples suggested that hydration properties were determined by the length and character of the side chains. NA and DA exhibited similar hydration characteristics, whereas DG and DB were difficult to hydrate because of the less hydrophilic properties of the rhamnose-galacturonic acid (Rha-GalA) backbone in RG-I. Potential food ingredient uses of RG-I by tailoring of its structure are discussed.

  12. Pulsed field gradient MAS-NMR studies of the mobility of carboplatin in cubic liquid-crystalline phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pampel, André; Michel, Dieter; Reszka, Regina

    2002-05-01

    A drug delivery system with cubic liquid-crystalline phase structure (cubic phase) containing the anti-cancer drug Carboplatin is studied. It is demonstrated that the combination of pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR and MAS-NMR is a useful tool to study the biophysical properties of a cubic phase. The linewidth in 1H-NMR spectra is narrowed by MAS, which can be exploited to perform PFG diffusion NMR experiments under high-resolution conditions. Measurement of self-diffusion coefficients of all components of the cubic phase becomes possible. The influence of polyethylene glycol chains on the drug mobility is discussed. It is shown that polyethylene glycol chains interact with Carboplatin.

  13. Magnesium Silicate Dissolution Investigated by 29Si MAS, 1H-29Si CP MAS, 25Mg QCPMG, and 1H-25Mg CP QCPMG NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Michael C.; Brouwer, William J.; Wesolowski, David J.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2009-08-01

    Olivine has been the subject of frequent investigation in the earth sciences because of its simple structure and rapid dissolution kinetics. Several studies have observed a preferential release of magnesium with respect to silica during weathering under acidic conditions, which has been correlated to the formation of a silicon rich leached layer. While leached layer formation has been inferred through the changing solution chemistry, a thorough spectroscopic investigation of olivine reacted under acidic conditions has not been conducted. In particular, the fate of magnesium in the system is not understood and spectroscopic interrogations through nuclear magnetic resonance can elucidate the changing magnesium coordination and bonding environment. In this study, we combine analysis of the changing solution chemistry with advanced spectroscopic techniques (29Si MAS, 1H-29Si CP MAS, 25Mg QCPMG, and 1H-25Mg 2 CP QCPMG NMR) to probe leached layer formation and possible secondary phase precipitation during the dissolution of forsterite at 150 oC.

  14. Characterization of cation environments in polycrystalline forsterite by Mg-25 MAS, MQMAS, and QCPMG NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Michael C.; Brouwer, William J.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Gan, Zhehong; Mueller, Karl T.

    2010-11-01

    Forsterite (Mg2SiO4) is a silicate mineral frequently studied in the Earth sciences as it has a simple crystal structure and fast dissolution kinetics (elemental release rates under typical conditions on the order of 10-7 mol/m2/s1). During the dissolution process, spectroscopic techniques are often utilized to augment solution chemical analysis and to provide data for determining reaction mechanisms. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is able to interrogate the local bonding arrangement and coordination of a particular nuclide to obtain in structural information. Although previous NMR studies have focused on the silicon and oxygen environments in forsterite, studies focusing on the two nonequivalent magnesium environments in forsterite are limited to a few single-crystal studies. In this study, we present the results of 25Mg MAS, MQMAS, and static QCMG experiments performed on a powdered sample of pure synthetic forsterite. We also present spectral fits obtained from simulation software packages, which directly provide quadrupolar parameters for 25Mg nuclei occupying each of the two nonequivalent magnesium sites in the forsterite structure. These results are compared to calculations of the electric field gradient tenor conducted in previous ab initio studies to make definitive assignments correlating each peak to their respective magnesium site in the forsterite structure. Although previous NMR investigations of forsterite have focused on single-crystal samples, we have focused on powdered forsterite as the increased surface area of powdered samples makes them more amenable to laboratory-scale dissolution studies and, ultimately, the products from chemical weathering may be monitored an quantified.

  15. HR-MAS NMR Tissue Metabolomic Signatures Cross-Validated by Mass Spectrometry Distinguish Bladder Cancer from Benign Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Pratima; Somashekar, Bagganahalli S; Ponnusamy, M.; Gursky, Amy; Dailey, Stephen; Kunju, Priya; Lee, Cheryl T.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Rajendiran, Thekkelnaycke M.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    Effective diagnosis and surveillance of Bladder Cancer (BCa) is currently challenged by detection methods that are of poor sensitivity, particularly for low-grade tumors, resulting in unnecessary invasive procedures and economic burden. We performed HR-MAS NMR-based global metabolomic profiling and applied unsupervised principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering performed on NMR dataset of bladder derived tissues and identified metabolic signatures that differentiate BCa from benign disease. A partial least-square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model (leave-one-out cross-validation) was used as diagnostic model to distinguish benign and BCa tissues. Receiver operating characteristic curve generated either from PC1 loadings of PCA or from predicted Y-values resulted in an area under curve of 0.97. Relative quantification of more than fifteen tissue metabolites derived from HR-MAS NMR showed significant differences (P < 0.001) between benign and BCa samples. Noticeably, striking metabolic signatures were observed even for early stage BCa tissues (Ta-T1) demonstrating the sensitivity in detecting BCa. With the goal of cross-validating metabolic signatures derived from HR-MAS NMR, we utilized the same tissue samples to analyze eight metabolites through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-targeted analysis, which undoubtedly complements HR-MAS NMR derived metabolomic information. Cross-validation through GC-MS clearly demonstrates the utility of straightforward, non-destructive and rapid HR-MAS NMR technique for clinical diagnosis of BCa with even greater sensitivity. In addition to its utility as a diagnostic tool, these studies will lead to a better understanding of aberrant metabolic pathways in cancer as well as the design and implementation of personalized cancer therapy through metabolic modulation. PMID:23731241

  16. Rapid measurement of multidimensional 1H solid-state NMR spectra at ultra-fast MAS frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yue Qi; Malon, Michal; Martineau, Charlotte; Taulelle, Francis; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2014-02-01

    A novel method to realize rapid repetition of 1H NMR experiments at ultra-fast MAS frequencies is demonstrated. The ultra-fast MAS at 110 kHz slows the 1H-1H spin diffusion, leading to variations of 1H T1 relaxation times from atom to atom within a molecule. The different relaxation behavior is averaged by applying 1H-1H recoupling during relaxation delay even at ultra-fast MAS, reducing the optimal relaxation delay to maximize the signal to noise ratio. The way to determine optimal relaxation delay for arbitrary relaxation curve is shown. The reduction of optimal relaxation delay by radio-frequency driven recoupling (RFDR) was demonstrated on powder samples of glycine and ethenzamide with one and multi-dimensional NMR measurements.

  17. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110-120 kHz), (1)H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong (1)H-(1)H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow (1)H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) (1)H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about (1)H-(1)H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic-level structural and dynamical

  18. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  19. Correlated fluorine diffusion and ionic conduction in the nanocrystalline F(-) solid electrolyte Ba(0.6)La(0.4)F(2.4)-(19)F T1(ρ) NMR relaxation vs. conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Preishuber-Pflügl, F; Bottke, P; Pregartner, V; Bitschnau, B; Wilkening, M

    2014-05-28

    Chemical reactions induced by mechanical treatment may give access to new compounds whose properties are governed by chemical metastability, defects introduced and the size effects present. Their interplay may lead to nanocrystalline ceramics with enhanced transport properties being useful to act as solid electrolytes. Here, the introduction of large amounts of La into the cubic structure of BaF2 served as such an example. The ion transport properties in terms of dc-conductivity values of the F(-) anion conductor Ba1-xLaxF2+x (here with x = 0.4) considerably exceed those of pure, nanocrystalline BaF2. So far, there is only little knowledge about activation energies and jump rates of the elementary hopping processes. Here, we took advantage of both impedance spectroscopy and (19)F NMR relaxometry to get to the bottom of ion jump diffusion proceeding on short-range and long-range length scales in Ba0.6La0.4F2.4. While macroscopic transport is governed by an activation energy of 0.55 to 0.59 eV, the elementary steps of hopping seen by NMR are characterised by much smaller activation energies. Fortunately, we were able to deduce an F(-) self-diffusion coefficient by the application of spin-locking NMR relaxometry.

  20. Molybdenum modified phosphate glasses studied by 31P MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szumera, Magdalena

    2015-02-25

    Glasses have been synthesized in the system P2O5-SiO2-K2O-MgO-CaO modified by addition of MoO3. Glasses were prepared by conventional fusion method from 40 g batches. The influence of Mo-cations on the analysed glass structure was investigated by means of Raman and (31)P MAS-NMR techniques. It has been found that molybdate units can form Mo[MoO4/MoO6]-O-P and/or Mo[MoO4/MoO6]-O-Si bonds with non-bridging oxygens atoms of Q2 methaphosphate units, resulting in the transformation of chain methaphosphate structure into pyrophosphate and finally into orthophosphate structure. It has been also found that increasing amount of MoO3 in the structure of investigated glasses causes their gradual depolymerization and molybdenum ions in the analysed glass matrix act as modifying cations.

  1. Hydration properties of regioselectively etherified celluloses monitored by 2H and 13C solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Schöbitz, Michael; Schaller, Jens

    2012-06-20

    The hydration properties of 2,3-O-hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) and 2,3-O-hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) were analyzed by multi-nuclear solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy. By 13C single-pulse (SP) MAS and cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, differences between the immobile regions and all parts of the polysaccharides were detected as a function of hydration. Complementary information about the water environments was observed by 2H MAS NMR. By this approach it was demonstrated that side chains in 2,3-O-HPC and 2,3-O-HEC were easier to hydrate than the cellulose backbone. Furthermore the motion of water was more restricted (slower) in 2,3-O-HPC than in 2,3-O-HEC. For both polysaccharides the hydration could be explained by a two-step process: in step one increased ordering of the immobile regions occurs after which the entire polymer is hydrated in step two.

  2. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin–rotation constants in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br and {sup 127}I)

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B. Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth; Jaszuński, Michał

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin–rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin–rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin–rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin–rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin–rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  3. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br and 127I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Taye B.; Jaszuński, Michał; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-01

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br, 127I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  4. Rapid identification of osmolytes in tropical microalgae and cyanobacteria by (1)H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zea Obando, Claudia; Linossier, Isabelle; Kervarec, Nelly; Zubia, Mayalen; Turquet, Jean; Faÿ, Fabienne; Rehel, Karine

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we report the chemical characterization of 47 tropical microalgae and cyanobacteria by HR-MAS. The generated data confirm the interest of HR-MAS as a rapid screening technique with the major advantage of its easiness. The sample is used as powder of freeze-dried microalgae without any extraction process before acquisition. The spectral fingerprints of strains are then tested as variables for a chemotaxonomy study to discriminate cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates. The individual factor map generated by PCA analysis succeeds in separating the two groups, essentially thanks to the presence of specific carbohydrates. Furthermore, more resolved signals enable to identify many osmolytes. More precisely the characteristics δ of 2-O-alpha-D-glucosylglycerol (GG) are observed in all 21 h-MAS spectra of tropical cyanobacteria. After specific extraction, complementary analysis by 1D and 2D-NMR spectroscopies validates the identification of this osmolyte. PMID:27130130

  5. Magnesium silicate dissolution investigated by Si-29 MAS, H-1-Si-29 CPMAS, Mg-25 QCPMG NMR.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M C; Wesolowski, David J

    2009-09-01

    Olivine-(Mg,Fe){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}-has been the subject of frequent investigation in the earth sciences because of its simple structure and rapid dissolution kinetics. Several studies have observed a preferential release of the divalent cation with respect to silicon during weathering under acidic conditions, which has been correlated to the formation of a silicon-rich leached layer. While leached layer formation has been inferred through the changing solution chemistry, a thorough spectroscopic investigation of olivine reacted under acidic conditions has not been conducted. The pure magnesium end member of the olivine series (forsterite-Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) was chosen for detailed investigations in this study because paramagnetic iron hinders NMR investigations by providing an extra mode of relaxation for neighboring nuclei, causing lineshapes to become significantly broadened and unobservable in the NMR spectrum. For reacting forsterite, spectroscopic interrogations using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can elucidate the changing magnesium coordination and bonding environment. In this study, we combine analysis of the changing solution chemistry with advanced NMR techniques ({sup 29}Si MAS, {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si CP MAS, {sup 25}Mg QCPMG, and {sup 1}H-{sup 25}Mg CP QCPMG NMR) to probe leached layer formation and secondary phase precipitation during the dissolution of forsterite at 150 C.

  6. Proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy in rigid solids with ultra-fast MAS

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Gregory P.; Cherry, Brian R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we show the potential for utilizing proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) NMR in rigid solids under ultra-fast magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The indirect detection of carbon-13 from coupled neighboring hydrogen nuclei provides a sensitivity enhancement of 3 - 4 fold in crystalline amino acids over direct-detected versions. Furthermore, the sensitivity enhancement is shown to be significantly larger for disordered solids that display inhomogeneously broadened carbon-13 spectra. Latrodectus hesperus (Black Widow) dragline silk is given as an example where the sample is mass-limited and the sensitivity enhancement for the proton-detected experiment is 8 - 13 fold. The ultra-fast MAS proton-detected HSQC solid-state NMR technique has the added advantage that no proton homonuclear decoupling is applied during the experiment. Further, well-resolved, indirectly observed carbon-13 spectra can be obtained in some cases without heteronuclear proton decoupling. PMID:19857977

  7. DRIFT and HR MAS NMR characterization of humic substances from a soil treated with different organic and mineral fertilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Erika; Francioso, Ornella; Nardi, Serenella; Saladini, Monica; Ferro, Nicola Dal; Morari, Francesco

    2011-07-01

    In this study, using DRIFT and HR MAS NMR, we analyzed the humic substances isolated from a soil treated, over 40 years, with different organic, mineral and organic plus mineral treatments and cultivated with maize as the main crop. As expected, the structure of humic substances was very complex but by combining both techniques (DRIFT and HR MAS NMR) additional information was obtained on aromatic and aliphatic components, the most recalcitrant parts of these macromolecules. In so doing we wanted to investigate the relationship between HS structure and long-term management practices. An elevated content of lignin, aminoacids, peptides and proteins was observed mainly for farmyard manure treatments with respect to mineral or liquid manure amendments; this supports how the different management practices have greatly influenced the humification process of cultivated soils.

  8. X-ray and MAS NMR characterization of the thermal transformation of Li(Na)-Y zeolite to lithium aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, M.A.; Corbin, D.R.; Farlee, R.D.

    1986-12-01

    The high temperature thermal transformation of Li-exchanged Na-Y zeolite has been investigated by X-ray diffraction and /sup 29/Si MAS NMR studies. At 700/sup 0/C, the zeolite was transformed into an amorphous phase and upon further heating to 800/sup 0/C, formation of lithium aluminosilicate with high-quartz structure, in addition to an amorphous phase, was noted. When heated above 900/sup 0/C, the high-quartz structure was transformed into a ..beta..-spodumene related solid solution. X-ray and MAS NMR studies indicate the ..beta..-spodumene solid solution formed has the composition close to (Li/sub 0.23/Na/sub 0.06/)A iota /sub 0.29/Si/sub 0.71/O/sub 2/, which is in agreement with chemical analysis.

  9. Thermal maturity of type II kerogen from the New Albany Shale assessed by13C CP/MAS NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner-Zwanziger, U.; Lis, G.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal maturity of oil and gas source rocks is typically quantified in terms of vitrinite reflectance, which is based on optical properties of terrestrial woody remains. This study evaluates 13C CP/MAS NMR parameters in kerogen (i.e., the insoluble fraction of organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks) as proxies for thermal maturity in marine-derived source rocks where terrestrially derived vitrinite is often absent or sparse. In a suite of samples from the New Albany Shale (Middle Devonian to the Early Mississippian, Illinois Basin) the abundance of aromatic carbon in kerogen determined by 13C CP/MAS NMR correlates linearly well with vitrinite reflectance. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Spectral editing through laser-flash excitation in two-dimensional photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Sankar Gupta, Karthick Babu; Daviso, Eugenio; Jeschke, Gunnar; Alia, A.; Ernst, Matthias; Matysik, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    In solid-state photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) MAS NMR experiments, strong signal enhancement is observed from molecules forming a spin-correlated radical pair in a rigid matrix. Two-dimensional 13C-13C dipolar-assisted rotational resonance (DARR) photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments have been applied to obtain exact chemical shift assignments from those cofactors. Under continuous illumination, the signals are enhanced via three-spin mixing (TSM) and differential decay (DD) and their intensity corresponds to the electron spin density in pz orbitals. In multiple-13C labelled samples, spin diffusion leads to propagation of signal enhancement to all 13C spins. Under steady-state conditions, direct signal assignment is possible due to the uniform signal intensity. The original intensities, however, are inaccessible and the information of the local electron spin density is lost. Upon laser-flash illumination, the signal is enhanced via the classical radical pair mechanism (RPM). The obtained intensities are related to isotropic hyperfine interactions aiso and both enhanced absorptive and emissive lines can be observed due to differences in the sign of the local isotropic hyperfine interaction. Exploiting the mechanism of the polarization, selectivity can be increased by the novel time-resolved two-dimensional dipolar-assisted rotational resonance (DARR) MAS NMR experiment which simplifies the signal assignment compared to complex spectra of the same RCs obtained by continuous illumination. Here we present two-dimensional time-resolved photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments providing both directly: signal assignment and spectral editing by sign and strength of aiso. Hence, this experiment provides a direct key to the electronic structure of the correlated radical pair.

  11. Spectral editing through laser-flash excitation in two-dimensional photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Sai Sankar Gupta, Karthick Babu; Daviso, Eugenio; Jeschke, Gunnar; Alia, A; Ernst, Matthias; Matysik, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    In solid-state photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) MAS NMR experiments, strong signal enhancement is observed from molecules forming a spin-correlated radical pair in a rigid matrix. Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C dipolar-assisted rotational resonance (DARR) photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments have been applied to obtain exact chemical shift assignments from those cofactors. Under continuous illumination, the signals are enhanced via three-spin mixing (TSM) and differential decay (DD) and their intensity corresponds to the electron spin density in pz orbitals. In multiple-(13)C labelled samples, spin diffusion leads to propagation of signal enhancement to all (13)C spins. Under steady-state conditions, direct signal assignment is possible due to the uniform signal intensity. The original intensities, however, are inaccessible and the information of the local electron spin density is lost. Upon laser-flash illumination, the signal is enhanced via the classical radical pair mechanism (RPM). The obtained intensities are related to isotropic hyperfine interactions aiso and both enhanced absorptive and emissive lines can be observed due to differences in the sign of the local isotropic hyperfine interaction. Exploiting the mechanism of the polarization, selectivity can be increased by the novel time-resolved two-dimensional dipolar-assisted rotational resonance (DARR) MAS NMR experiment which simplifies the signal assignment compared to complex spectra of the same RCs obtained by continuous illumination. Here we present two-dimensional time-resolved photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments providing both directly: signal assignment and spectral editing by sign and strength of aiso. Hence, this experiment provides a direct key to the electronic structure of the correlated radical pair.

  12. Characterizing crystal disorder of trospium chloride: a comprehensive,(13) C CP/MAS NMR, DSC, FTIR, and XRPD study.

    PubMed

    Urbanova, Martina; Sturcova, Adriana; Brus, Jiri; Benes, Hynek; Skorepova, Eliska; Kratochvil, Bohumil; Cejka, Jan; Sedenkova, Ivana; Kobera, Libor; Policianova, Olivia; Sturc, Antonin

    2013-04-01

    Analysis of C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray powder diffraction data of trospium chloride (TCl) products crystallized from different mixtures of water-ethanol [φ(EtOH) = 0.5-1.0] at various temperatures (0°C, 20°C) and initial concentrations (saturated solution, 30%-50% excess of solvent) revealed extensive structural variability of TCl. Although (13) C CP/MAS NMR spectra indicated broad variety of structural phases arising from molecular disorder, temperature-modulated DSC identified presence of two distinct components in the products. FTIR spectra revealed alterations in the hydrogen bonding network (ionic hydrogen bond formation), whereas the X-ray diffraction reflected unchanged unit cell parameters. These results were explained by a two-component character of TCl products in which a dominant polymorphic form is accompanied by partly separated nanocrystalline domains of a secondary phase that does not provide clear Bragg reflections. These phases slightly differ in the degree of molecular disorder, in the quality of crystal lattice and hydrogen bonding network. It is also demonstrated that, for the quality control of such complex products, (13) C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy combined with factor analysis (FA) can satisfactorily be used for categorizing the individual samples: FA of (13) C CP/MAS NMR spectra found clear relationships between the extent of molecular disorder and crystallization conditions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 102:1235-1248, 2013.

  13. Conversion of propan-2-ol on zeolites LaNaY and HY investigated by gas chromatography and in situ MAS NMR spectroscopy under continuous-flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, M.; Horvath, T.

    1997-04-01

    The conversion of propan-2-ol on zeolites HY and LaNaY has been investigated by gas chromatography (GC) and in situ {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy under continuous-flow conditions using a new MAS NMR microreactor with cylindrical catalyst bed. At reaction temperatures of T = 373 K and T = 393 K a propan-2-ol conversion of 50 and 100%, respectively, and the formation of propene, diisopropyl. ether, and small amounts of acetone was determined by GC. Applying in situ {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy, the initial step of the reaction was found to be the physisorption of propan-2-ol on Bronsted acid sites. A formation of isopropoxy species could be excluded by {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy. {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectroscopy indicated that the Bronsted acid sites of the zeolites LaNaY and HY were hydrated by water molecules in the first part of the induction period. These water molecules were formed in result of the propan-2-ol dehydration. The strong low-field shift of the {sup 1}H MAS NMR signals of the hydrated Bronsted acid sites is due to a partial protonation of adsorbed water molecules. At T = 393 K, a significant {sup 13}C MAS NMR signal of strongly bonded acetone molecules appeared at 220 ppm in the spectra of zeolites LaNaY and HY. As demonstrated by propan-2-ol conversion on a partially dealuminated zeolite HY, this by-reaction is promoted by extra-framework aluminium species. The formation of coke precursors which caused {sup 13}C MAS NMR signals at 10-50 ppm is explained by an oligomerization of propene. In situ {sup 13}C MAS NMR experiments carried out under a continuous flow of propene showed that the above-mentioned coke precursors are also formed on partially rehydrated zeolite HY. 25 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  14. MAS-NMR study of lithium zinc silicate glasses and glass-ceramics with various ZnO content

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Madhumita; Kothiyal, Govind P.; Montagne, Lionel Delevoye, Laurent

    2008-02-15

    Lithium zinc silicate glasses of composition (mol%): 17.5Li{sub 2}O-(72-x)SiO{sub 2}-xZnO-5.1Na{sub 2}O-1.3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-4.1B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 5.5{<=}x{<=}17.7, were prepared by conventional melt-quenched technique and converted to glass-ceramic by controlled crystallization process. {sup 29}Si and {sup 31}P MAS-NMR was used to characterize the structure of both glass and glass-ceramic samples. Despite the complex glass composition, Q{sup 2}, Q{sup 3} and Q{sup 4} sites are identified from {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR, which relative intensities are found to vary with the ZnO content, indicating a network depolymerization by ZnO. Moreover, well separated Q{sup 3} and Q{sup 4} resonances for low ZnO content indicates the occurrence of phase separation. From {sup 31}P MAS-NMR, it is seen that phosphorus is mainly present in the form of ortho-(Q{sup 0}) and pyro-phosphate (Q{sup 1}) structural units and variation of ZnO content did not have much effect on these resonances, which provides an additional evidence for phase separation in the glass. On conversion to glass-ceramics, lithium disilicate (Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}), lithium zinc ortho-silicate (Li{sub 3}Zn{sub 0.5}SiO{sub 4}), tridymite (SiO{sub 2}) and cristobalite (SiO{sub 2}) were identified as major silicate crystalline phases. Using {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR, quantification of these silicate crystalline phases is carried out and correlated with the ZnO content in the glass-ceramics samples. In addition, {sup 31}P spectra unambiguously revealed the presence of crystalline Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and (Na,Li){sub 3}PO{sub 4} in the glass-ceramics. - Graphical abstract: {sup 29}Si and {sup 31}P MAS-NMR analyses were carried out on multi-component Li{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2}-ZnO-Na{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses and glass-ceramics developed for sealing application. Structural data are reported, including phase separation process and quantification of amorphous and crystalline phases.

  15. Transport Properties of Ibuprofen Encapsulated in Cyclodextrin Nanosponge Hydrogels: A Proton HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Monica; Castiglione, Franca; Punta, Carlo; Melone, Lucio; Panzeri, Walter; Rossi, Barbara; Trotta, Francesco; Mele, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The chemical cross-linking of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) with ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride (EDTA) led to branched polymers referred to as cyclodextrin nanosponges (CDNSEDTA). Two different preparations are described with 1:4 and 1:8 CD-EDTA molar ratios. The corresponding cross-linked polymers were contacted with 0.27 M aqueous solution of ibuprofen sodium salt (IP) leading to homogeneous, colorless, drug loaded hydrogels. The systems were characterized by high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Pulsed field gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the mean square displacement (MSD) of IP inside the polymeric gel at different observation times td. The data were further processed in order to study the time dependence of MSD: MSD = f(td). The proposed methodology is useful to characterize the different diffusion regimes that, in principle, the solute may experience inside the hydrogel, namely normal or anomalous diffusion. The full protocols including the polymer preparation and purification, the obtainment of drug-loaded hydrogels, the NMR sample preparation, the measurement of MSD by HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy and the final data processing to achieve the time dependence of MSD are here reported and discussed. The presented experiments represent a paradigmatic case and the data are discussed in terms of innovative approach to the characterization of the transport properties of an encapsulated guest within a polymeric host of potential application for drug delivery. PMID:27585291

  16. Development of a rapid method for the quantification of cellulose in tobacco by (13)C CP/MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinhui; Hu, Yonghua; Tian, Zhenfeng; Chen, Kaibo; Ge, Shaolin; Xu, Yingbo; Tian, Dong; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A method was developed for rapid quantitative determination of cellulose in tobacco by utilizing (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy ((13)C CP/MAS NMR). Sample powder was loaded into NMR rotor, which was customized rotor containing a matched silicon tube as an intensity reference. (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of tobacco samples were processed with spectral deconvolution to obtain the area of the C-1 resonance at 105.5ppm and the internal standard at 0ppm. The ratio between the area of 105.5ppm and 0ppm of a set of standard cellulose samples was used to construct a calibration curve. The cellulose content of a tobacco sample was determined by comparison of the ratio between the area of 105.5ppm and 0ppm to the calibration curve. Results of this developed method showed good agreement with those obtained from chemical analysis. The proposed method has such advantages of accuracy, quickness and efficiency, and could be an alternative to chemical analyses of cellulose.

  17. Spectroscopic characterization of coumarin-stained beads: quantification of the number of fluorophores per particle with solid-state 19F-NMR and measurement of absolute fluorescence quantum yields.

    PubMed

    Huber, Alexandra; Behnke, Thomas; Würth, Christian; Jaeger, Christian; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2012-04-17

    The rational design of nano- and micrometer-sized particles with tailor-made optical properties for biological, diagnostic, and photonic applications requires tools to characterize the signal-relevant properties of these typically scattering bead suspensions. This includes methods for the preferably nondestructive quantification of the number of fluorophores per particle and the measurement of absolute fluorescence quantum yields and absorption coefficients of suspensions of fluorescent beads for material performance optimization and comparison. Here, as a first proof-of-concept, we present the first time determination of the number of dye molecules per bead using nondestructive quantitative ((19)F) NMR spectroscopy and 1000 nm-sized carboxylated polystyrene particles loaded with varying concentrations of the laser dye coumarin 153 containing a CF(3) group. Additionally, the signal-relevant optical properties of these dye-loaded particles were determined in aqueous suspension in comparison to the free dye in solvents of different polarity with a custom-built integrating sphere setup that enables spectrally resolved measurements of emission, transmission, and reflectance as well absolute fluorescence quantum yields. These measurements present an important step toward absolute brightness values and quantitative fluorescence analysis with particle systems that can be exploited, for example, for optical imaging techniques and different fluorescence assays as well as for the metrological traceability of fluorescence methods. PMID:22404690

  18. Synthesis and photophysical properties of biaryl-substituted nucleos(t)ides. Polymerase synthesis of DNA probes bearing solvatochromic and pH-sensitive dual fluorescent and 19F NMR labels.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Jan; Pohl, Radek; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Hocek, Michal

    2012-01-20

    The design of four new fluorinated biaryl fluorescent labels and their attachment to nucleosides and nucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) by the aqueous cross-coupling reactions of biarylboronates is reported. The modified dNTPs were good substrates for KOD XL polymerase and were enzymatically incorporated into DNA probes. The photophysical properties of the biaryl-modified nucleosides, dNTPs, and DNA were studied systematically. The different substitution pattern of the biaryls was used for tuning of emission maxima in the broad range of 366-565 nm. Using methods of computational chemistry the emission maxima were reproduced with a satisfactory degree of accuracy, and it was shown that the large solvatochromic shifts observed for the studied probes are proportional to the differences in dipole moments of the ground (S(0)) and excited (S(1)) states that add on top of smaller shifts predicted already for these systems in vacuo. Thus, we present a set of compounds that may serve as multipurpose base-discriminating fluorophores for sensing of hairpins, deletions, and mismatches by the change of emission maxima and intensities of fluorescence and that can be also conviently studied by (19)F NMR spectroscopy. In addition, aminobenzoxazolyl-fluorophenyl-labeled nucleotides and DNA also exert dual pH-sensitive and solvatochromic fluorescence, which may imply diverse applications.

  19. Determination of the structural changes by Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy on native corn starch with plasticizers

    SciTech Connect

    Cozar, O.; Filip, C.; Tripon, C.; Cioica, N.; Coţa, C.; Nagy, E. M.

    2013-11-13

    The plasticizing - antiplasticizing effect of water and glycerol contents on native corn starch samples is investigated by FT-Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The presence of both amorphous and crystalline structural phases was evidenced in pure native corn starch and also in the samples containing plasticizers. Among the crystalline starch structures, the A- and V- types were suggested by CP/MAS NMR spectra.

  20. (1)H HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy and the Metabolite Determination of Typical Foods in Mediterranean Diet.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Dugo, Giacomo; Cicero, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has become an experimental technique widely used in food science. The experimental procedures that allow precise and quantitative analysis on different foods are relatively simple. For a better sensitivity and resolution, NMR spectroscopy is usually applied to liquid sample by means of extraction procedures that can be addressed to the observation of particular compounds. For the study of semisolid systems such as intact tissues, High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) has received great attention within the biomedical area and beyond. Metabolic profiling and metabolism changes can be investigated both in animal organs and in foods. In this work we present a proton HR-MAS NMR study on the typical vegetable foods of Mediterranean diet such as the Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) cherry tomato of Pachino, the PGI Interdonato lemon of Messina, several Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) extra virgin olive oils from Sicily, and the Traditional Italian Food Product (PAT) red garlic of Nubia. We were able to identify and quantify the main metabolites within the studied systems that can be used for their characterization and authentication.

  1. 1H HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy and the Metabolite Determination of Typical Foods in Mediterranean Diet

    PubMed Central

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Dugo, Giacomo; Cicero, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has become an experimental technique widely used in food science. The experimental procedures that allow precise and quantitative analysis on different foods are relatively simple. For a better sensitivity and resolution, NMR spectroscopy is usually applied to liquid sample by means of extraction procedures that can be addressed to the observation of particular compounds. For the study of semisolid systems such as intact tissues, High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) has received great attention within the biomedical area and beyond. Metabolic profiling and metabolism changes can be investigated both in animal organs and in foods. In this work we present a proton HR-MAS NMR study on the typical vegetable foods of Mediterranean diet such as the Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) cherry tomato of Pachino, the PGI Interdonato lemon of Messina, several Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) extra virgin olive oils from Sicily, and the Traditional Italian Food Product (PAT) red garlic of Nubia. We were able to identify and quantify the main metabolites within the studied systems that can be used for their characterization and authentication. PMID:26495154

  2. Directly and indirectly detected through-bond heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectroscopy under fast MAS

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Kanmi; Pruski, Marek

    2009-09-10

    Two-dimensional through-bond {sup 1}H({sup 13}C) solid-state NMR experiments utilizing fast magic angle spinning (MAS) and homonuclear multipulse {sup 1}H decoupling are presented. Remarkable efficiency of polarization transfer can be achieved at MAS rates exceeding 40 kHz, which is instrumental in these measurements. Schemes utilizing direct and indirect detection of heteronuclei are compared in terms of resolution and sensitivity. A simple procedure for optimization of {sup 1}H homonuclear decoupling sequences under these conditions is proposed. The capabilities of these techniques were confirmed on two naturally abundant solids, tripeptide N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (f-MLF-OH) and brown coal.

  3. Slow motions in microcrystalline proteins as observed by MAS-dependent 15N rotating-frame NMR relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushelnitsky, Alexey; Zinkevich, Tatiana; Reif, Bernd; Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-11-01

    15N NMR relaxation rate R1ρ measurements reveal that a substantial fraction of residues in the microcrystalline chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain protein undergoes dynamics in the μs-ms timescale range. On the basis of a comparison of 2D site-resolved with 1D integrated 15N spectral intensities, we demonstrate that the significant fraction of broad signals in the 2D spectrum exhibits the most pronounced slow mobility. We show that 15N R1ρ's in proton-diluted protein samples are practically free from the coherent spin-spin contribution even at low MAS rates, and thus can be analysed quantitatively. Moderate MAS rates (10-30 kHz) can be more advantageous in comparison with the rates >50-60 kHz when slow dynamics are to be identified and quantified by means of R1ρ experiments.

  4. 13C CP MAS NMR and GIAO-CHF calculations of coumarins.

    PubMed

    Zolek, Teresa; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wawer, Iwona

    2003-01-01

    13C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning NMR spectra were recorded for a series of solid coumarins. Ab initio calculations of shielding constants were performed with the use of GIAO-CHF method. The combined CPMAS NMR and theoretical approach was successful in characterizing solid-state conformations of coumarins; a relationship sigma (ppm) = -1.032 xdelta + 205.28 (R(2) = 0.9845) can be used to obtain structural information for coumarins, for which solid-state NMR or crystal structure data are not available.

  5. Neither moderate hypoxia nor mild hypoglycaemia alone causes any significant increase in cerebral [Ca2+]i: only a combination of the two insults has this effect. A 31P and 19F NMR study.

    PubMed

    Badar-Goffer, R S; Thatcher, N M; Morris, P G; Bachelard, H S

    1993-12-01

    (1) The energy state and free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) of superfused cortical slices were measured in moderate hypoxia (approximately 65 microM O2), in mild hypoglycaemia (0.5 mM glucose), and in combinations of the two insults using 19F and 31P NMR spectroscopy. (2) Neither hypoxia nor hypoglycaemia alone caused any significant change in [Ca2+]i. Hypoxia caused a 40% fall in phosphocreatine (PCr) content but not in ATP level, and hypoglycaemia produced a slight fall in both (as expected from previous studies). These changes in the energy state recovered on return to control conditions. (3) A combined sequential insult (hypoxia, followed by hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia) produced a 100% increase in [Ca2+]i and a decrease in PCr level to approximately 25% of control. The reverse combined sequential insult (hypoglycaemia, followed by hypoglycaemia plus hypoxia) had the same effect. On return to control conditions there was some decrease in [Ca2+]i and a small increase in PCr content, but neither recovered to control levels. (4) Exposure of the tissue to the combined simultaneous insult (hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia) immediately after the control spectra had been recorded resulted in a fivefold increase in [Ca2+]i and a similar decrease in PCr level to 20-25% of control. There was little if any change of [Ca2+]i or PCr level on return to control conditions. (5) These results are discussed in terms of metabolic adaptation of some but not all of the cortical cells to the single type of insult, which renders the tissues less vulnerable to the combined insult.

  6. Quantification of ammonia binding sites in Davison (Type 3A) zeolite desiccant : a solid-state Nitrogen-15 MAS NMR spectroscopy investigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; Holland, Gregory P.; Cherry, Brian Ray

    2004-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of ammonia binding sites in the Davison (Type 3A) zeolite desiccant using solid-state {sup 15}N MAS NMR spectroscopy is reported. By utilizing 15N enriched ammonia ({sup 15}NH{sub 3}) gas, the different adsorption/binding sites within the zeolite were investigated as a function of NH{sub 3} loading. Using {sup 15}N MAS NMR multiple sites were resolved that have distinct cross-polarization dynamics and chemical shift behavior. These differences in the {sup 15}N NMR were used to characterize the adsorption environments in both the pure 3A zeolite and the silicone-molded forms of the desiccant.

  7. Recognition of Membrane Sterols by Polyene Antifungals Amphotericin B and Natamycin, A 13C MAS NMR Study

    PubMed Central

    Ciesielski, Filip; Griffin, David C.; Loraine, Jessica; Rittig, Michael; Delves-Broughton, Joss; Bonev, Boyan B.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular action of polyene macrolides with antifungal activity, amphotericin B and natamycin, involves recognition of sterols in membranes. Physicochemical and functional studies have contributed details to understanding the interactions between amphotericin B and ergosterol and, to a lesser extent, with cholesterol. Fewer molecular details are available on interactions between natamycin with sterols. We use solid state 13C MAS NMR to characterize the impact of amphotericin B and natamycin on mixed lipid membranes of DOPC/cholesterol or DOPC/ergosterol. In cholesterol-containing membranes, amphotericin B addition resulted in marked increase in both DOPC and cholesterol 13C MAS NMR linewidth, reflecting membrane insertion and cooperative perturbation of the bilayer. By contrast, natamycin affects little either DOPC or cholesterol linewidth but attenuates cholesterol resonance intensity preferentially for sterol core with lesser impact on the chain. Ergosterol resonances, attenuated by amphotericin B, reveal specific interactions in the sterol core and chain base. Natamycin addition selectively augmented ergosterol resonances from sterol core ring one and, at the same time, from the end of the chain. This puts forward an interaction model similar to the head-to-tail model for amphotericin B/ergosterol pairing but with docking on opposite sterol faces. Low toxicity of natamycin is attributed to selective, non-cooperative sterol engagement compared to cooperative membrane perturbation by amphotericin B. PMID:27379235

  8. CaCl 2 -Accelerated Hydration of Tricalcium Silicate: A STXM Study Combined with 29 Si MAS NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Qinfei; Ge, Yong; Geng, Guoqing; Bae, Sungchul; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Tmore » he effect of calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ) on tricalcium silicate (C 3 S) hydration was investigated by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra and 29 Si MAS NMR. STXM is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for studying the chemical composition of a cement-based hydration system.he Ca L 3,2 -edge NEXAFS spectra obtained by examining C 3 S hydration in the presence of CaCl 2 showed that this accelerator does not change the coordination of calcium in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), which is the primary hydration product. O K-edge NEXAFS is also very useful in distinguishing the chemical components in hydrated C 3 S. Based on the Ca L 3,2 -edge spectra and chemical component mapping, we concluded that CaCl 2 prefers to coexist with unhydrated C 3 S instead of C-S-H. In Si K-edge NEXAFS analysis, CaCl 2 increases the degree of silicate polymerization of C-S-H in agreement with the 29 Si CP/MAS NMR results, which show that the presence of CaCl 2 in hydrated C 3 S considerably accelerates the formation of middle groups ( Q 2 ) and branch sites ( Q 3 ) in the silicate chains of C-S-H gel at 1-day hydration.« less

  9. Site-resolved 2H relaxation experiments in solid materials by global line-shape analysis of MAS NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindh, E. L.; Stilbs, P.; Furó, I.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a way one can achieve good spectral resolution in 2H MAS NMR experiments. The goal is to be able to distinguish between and study sites in various deuterated materials with small chemical shift dispersion. We show that the 2H MAS NMR spectra recorded during a spin-relaxation experiment are amenable to spectral decomposition because of the different evolution of spectral components during the relaxation delay. We verify that the results are robust by global least-square fitting of the spectral series both under the assumption of specific line shapes and without such assumptions (COmponent-REsolved spectroscopy, CORE). In addition, we investigate the reliability of the developed protocol by analyzing spectra simulated with different combinations of spectral parameters. The performance is demonstrated in a model material of deuterated poly(methacrylic acid) that contains two 2H spin populations with similar chemical shifts but different quadrupole splittings. In 2H-exchanged cellulose containing two 2H spin populations with very similar chemical shifts and quadrupole splittings, the method provides new site-selective information about the molecular dynamics.

  10. Characterization of active phosphorus surface sites at synthetic carbonate-free fluorapatite using single-pulse 1H, 31P, and 31P CP MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Jarlbring, Mathias; Sandström, Dan E; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Forsling, Willis

    2006-05-01

    The chemically active phosphorus surface sites defined as PO(x), PO(x)H, and PO(x)H2, where x = 1, 2, or 3, and the bulk phosphorus groups of PO4(3-) at synthetic carbonate-free fluorapatite (Ca5(PO4)3F) have been studied by means of single-pulse 1H,31P, and 31P CP MAS NMR. The changes in composition and relative amounts of each surface species are evaluated as a function of pH. By combining spectra from single-pulse 1H and 31P MAS NMR and data from 31P CP MAS NMR experiments at varying contact times in the range 0.2-3.0 ms, it has been possible to distinguish between resonance lines in the NMR spectra originating from active surface sites and bulk phosphorus groups and also to assign the peaks in the NMR spectra to the specific phosphorus species. In the 31P CP MAS NMR experiments, the spinning frequency was set to 4.2 kHz; in the single-pulse 1H MAS NMR experiments, the spinning frequency was 10 kHz. The 31P CP MAS NMR spectrum of fluorapatite at pH 5.9 showed one dominating resonance line at 2.9 ppm assigned to originate from PO4(3-) groups and two weaker shoulder peaks at 5.4 and 0.8 ppm which were assigned to the unprotonated PO(x) (PO, PO2-, and PO3(2-)) and protonated PO(x)H (PO2H and PO3H-) surface sites. At pH 12.7, the intensity of the peak representing unprotonated PO(x) surface sites has increased 1.7% relative to the bulk peak, while the intensity of the peaks of the protonated species PO(x)H have decreased 1.4% relative to the bulk peak. At pH 3.5, a resonance peak at -4.5 ppm has appeared in the 31P CP MAS NMR spectrum assigned to the surface species PO(x)H2 (PO3H2). The results from the 1H MAS and 31P CP MAS NMR measurements indicated that H+, OH-, and physisorbed H2O at the surface were released during the drying process at 200 degrees C.

  11. Processing of CP MAS kinetics: Towards NMR crystallography for complex solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagys, Laurynas; Klimavicius, Vytautas; Balevicius, Vytautas

    2016-09-01

    Variable temperature and high data point density measurements of 1H-31P cross-polarization kinetics in the powdered ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) have been carried out in the range of -40 °C to +90 °C upon 7 and 10 kHz MAS. The advanced route of processing CP MAS kinetic data has been developed. It is based on reducing the incoherent far range order spin couplings and extracting the CP oscillatory term with the sequent mathematical treatment. The proper replica has been found, which allowed to reduce the Fourier-Bessel (Hankel) transform calculating the angularly averaged and purely distance-depending spin distribution profile to the routine Fourier transform. The shortest 31P-1H distances determined by CP MAS kinetics get between the values obtained by neutron and X-ray diffraction, whereas those for more remote protons are slightly larger. The changes in P⋯H distances are hardly noticeable, though a certain trend to increase upon the heating can be deduced. The clearly pronounced effect was the increase of the spin-diffusion rate constant upon heating. It allows to state that the communication between interacting spins is the process extremely easy to activate.

  12. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin–epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time 13C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization

    PubMed Central

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio

    2015-01-01

    Summary The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices. PMID:26877800

  13. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin-epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time (13)C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization.

    PubMed

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio; Mele, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices. PMID:26877800

  14. Phase Cycling Schemes for finite-pulse-RFDR MAS Solid State NMR Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Sun, Pingchuan; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    The finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used in 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS). A recent study demonstrated the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle, XY414, for the fp-RFDR pulse sequence employed in 2D 1H/1H single-quantum/single-quantum correlation experiments under ultrafast MAS conditions. In this study, we report a comprehensive analysis on the dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY412, XY413, XY414, and XY814 phase cycles under different spinning speeds ranging from 10 to 100 kHz. The theoretical calculations reveal the presence of second-order terms (T10T2,±2, T1,±1T2,±1, etc.) in the recoupled homonuclear dipolar coupling Hamiltonian only when the basic XY4 phase cycle is utilized, making it advantageous for proton-proton magnetization transfer under ultrafast MAS conditions. It is also found that the recoupling efficiency of fp-RFDR is quite dependent on the duty factor (τ180/τR) as well as on the strength of homonuclear dipolar couplings. The rate of longitudinal magnetization transfer increases linearly with the duty factor of fp-RFDR for all the XY-based phase cycles investigated in this study. Examination of the performances of different phase cycles against chemical shift offset and RF field in homogeneity effects revealed that XY414 is the most tolerant phase cycle, while the shortest phase cycle XY4 suppressed the RF field inhomogeneity effects most efficiently under slow spinning speeds. Our results suggest that the difference in the fp-RFDR recoupling efficiencies decreases with the increasing MAS speed, while ultrafast (>60 kHz) spinning speed is advantageous as it recouples a large amount of homonuclear dipolar couplings and therefore enable fast magnetization exchange. The effects of higher-order terms and cross terms between various interactions in the effective Hamiltonian of fp-RFDR are also analyzed

  15. Phase cycling schemes for finite-pulse-RFDR MAS solid state NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Sun, Pingchuan; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-03-01

    The finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used in 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS). A recent study demonstrated the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle, XY4(1)4, for the fp-RFDR pulse sequence employed in 2D (1)H/(1)H single-quantum/single-quantum correlation experiments under ultrafast MAS conditions. In this study, we report a comprehensive analysis on the dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY4(1)2, XY4(1)3, XY4(1)4, and XY8(1)4 phase cycles under different spinning speeds ranging from 10 to 100 kHz. The theoretical calculations reveal the presence of second-order terms (T(10)T(2,±2), T(1,±1)T(2,±1), etc.) in the recoupled homonuclear dipolar coupling Hamiltonian only when the basic XY4 phase cycle is utilized, making it advantageous for proton-proton magnetization transfer under ultrafast MAS conditions. It is also found that the recoupling efficiency of fp-RFDR is quite dependent on the duty factor (τ180/τR) as well as on the strength of homonuclear dipolar couplings. The rate of longitudinal magnetization transfer increases linearly with the duty factor of fp-RFDR for all the XY-based phase cycles investigated in this study. Examination of the performances of different phase cycles against chemical shift offset and RF field inhomogeneity effects revealed that XY4(1)4 is the most tolerant phase cycle, while the shortest phase cycle XY4 suppressed the RF field inhomogeneity effects most efficiently under slow spinning speeds. Our results suggest that the difference in the fp-RFDR recoupling efficiencies decreases with the increasing MAS speed, while ultrafast (>60 kHz) spinning speed is advantageous as it recouples a large amount of homonuclear dipolar couplings and therefore enable fast magnetization exchange. The effects of higher-order terms and cross terms between various interactions in the effective Hamiltonian of fp

  16. Analysis of Radiation Induced Degradation in FPC-461 Fluoropolymers by Variable Temperature Multinuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Wilson, T S; Maxwell, R S

    2004-10-27

    Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been used to investigate aging mechanisms in a vinyl chloride:chlorotrifluoroethylene copolymer, FPC-461, due to exposure to {gamma}-radiation. Solid state {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra revealed structural changes of the polymer upon irradiation under both air and nitrogen atmospheres. Considerable degradation is seen with {sup 1}H NMR in the vinyl chloride region of the polymer, particularly in the samples irradiated in air. {sup 19}F MAS NMR was used to investigate speciation in the chlorotrifluoroethylene blocks, though negligible changes were seen. {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR at elevated temperature revealed increased segmental mobility and decreased structural heterogeneity within the polymer, yielding significant resolution enhancement over room temperature solid state detection. The effects of multi-site exchange are manifest in both the {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR spectra as a line broadening and change in peak position as a function of temperature.

  17. Acceleration of Natural-Abundance Solid-State MAS NMR Measurements on Bone by Paramagnetic Relaxation from Gadolinium-DTPA

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans. PMID:24881032

  18. SCAM-STMAS: satellite-transition MAS NMR of quadrupolar nuclei with self-compensation for magic-angle misset.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; Wimperis, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    Several methods are available for the acquisition of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei with half-integer spin quantum number. Satellite-transition MAS (STMAS) offers an approach that employs only conventional MAS hardware and can yield substantial signal enhancements over the widely used multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS) experiment. However, the presence of the first-order quadrupolar interaction in the satellite transitions imposes the requirement of a high degree of accuracy in the setting of the magic angle on the NMR probehead. The first-order quadrupolar interaction is only fully removed if the sample spinning angle, chi, equals cos(-1)(1/3) exactly and rotor synchronization is performed. The required level of accuracy is difficult to achieve experimentally, particularly when the quadrupolar interaction is large. If the magic angle is not set correctly, the first-order splitting is reintroduced and the spectral resolution is severely compromised. Recently, we have demonstrated a novel STMAS method (SCAM-STMAS) that is self-compensated for angle missets of up to +/-1 degrees via coherence transfer between the two different satellite transitions ST(+)(m(I)=+3/2<-->+1/2) and ST(-)(m(I)=-1/2<-->-3/2) midway through the t(1) period. In this work we describe in more detail the implementation of SCAM-STMAS and demonstrate its wider utility through 23Na (I=3/2), 87 Rb (I=3/2), 27 Al (I=5/2), and 59 Co (I=7/2) NMR. We discuss linewidths in SCAM-STMAS and the limits over which angle-misset compensation is achieved and we demonstrate that SCAM-STMAS is more tolerant of temporary spinning rate fluctuations than STMAS, resulting in less "t(1) noise" in the two-dimensional spectrum. In addition, alternative correlation experiments, for example involving the use of double-quantum coherences, that similarly display self-compensation for angle misset are investigated. The use of SCAM-STMAS is also considered in systems where other high-order interactions

  19. Charge transfer in Li/CFx-silver vanadium oxide hybrid cathode batteries revealed by solid state 7Li and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sideris, Paul J.; Yew, Rowena; Nieves, Ian; Chen, Kaimin; Jain, Gaurav; Schmidt, Craig L.; Greenbaum, Steve G.

    2014-05-01

    Solid state 7Li and 19F magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) experiments are conducted on several cathodes containing CFx-Silver vanadium oxide (CFx-Ag2V4O11) hybrid cathodes discharged to 50% depth of discharge (DoD) and stored at their open-circuit voltage for a period of one and three months. Three carbonaceous sources for the CFx phase are investigated: petroleum coke-based, fibrous, and mixed fibrous. For each hybrid cathode, a measurable increase in the relative amount of lithium fluoride is observed after a three month resting period in both the 7Li and 19F NMR spectra. These changes are attributed to lithium ion migration from the silver vanadium oxide to the CFx phase during the resting period, and help clarify the mechanism behind high power handling capability of this cathode.

  20. Glycerin-Induced Conformational Changes in Bombyx mori Silk Fibroin Film Monitored by 13C CP/MAS NMR and 1H DQMAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Endo, Masanori; Hirayama, Misaki; Arai, Hiroki; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the stiff and brittle characteristics of pure Bombyx mori (B. mori) silk fibroin (SF) film in the dry state, glycerin (Glyc) has been used as a plasticizer. However, there have been very limited studies on the structural characterization of the Glyc-blended SF film. In this study, 13C Cross Polarization/Magic Angle Spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS NMR) was used to monitor the conformational changes in the films by changing the Glyc concentration. The presence of only 5 wt % Glyc in the film induced a significant conformational change in SF where Silk I* (repeated type II β-turn and no α-helix) newly appeared. Upon further increase in Glyc concentration, the percentage of Silk I* increased linearly up to 9 wt % Glyc and then tended to be almost constant (30%). This value (30%) was the same as the fraction of Ala residue within the Silk I* form out of all Ala residues of SF present in B. mori mature silkworm. The 1H DQMAS NMR spectra of Glyc-blended SF films confirmed the appearance of Silk I* in the Glyc-blended SF film. A structural model of Glyc-SF complex including the Silk I* form was proposed with the guidance of the Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation using 1H–1H distance constraints obtained from the 1H Double-Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (DQMAS) NMR spectra. PMID:27618034

  1. Glycerin-Induced Conformational Changes in Bombyx mori Silk Fibroin Film Monitored by (13)C CP/MAS NMR and ¹H DQMAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Endo, Masanori; Hirayama, Misaki; Arai, Hiroki; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the stiff and brittle characteristics of pure Bombyx mori (B. mori) silk fibroin (SF) film in the dry state, glycerin (Glyc) has been used as a plasticizer. However, there have been very limited studies on the structural characterization of the Glyc-blended SF film. In this study, (13)C Cross Polarization/Magic Angle Spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS NMR) was used to monitor the conformational changes in the films by changing the Glyc concentration. The presence of only 5 wt % Glyc in the film induced a significant conformational change in SF where Silk I* (repeated type II β-turn and no α-helix) newly appeared. Upon further increase in Glyc concentration, the percentage of Silk I* increased linearly up to 9 wt % Glyc and then tended to be almost constant (30%). This value (30%) was the same as the fraction of Ala residue within the Silk I* form out of all Ala residues of SF present in B. mori mature silkworm. The ¹H DQMAS NMR spectra of Glyc-blended SF films confirmed the appearance of Silk I* in the Glyc-blended SF film. A structural model of Glyc-SF complex including the Silk I* form was proposed with the guidance of the Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation using ¹H-¹H distance constraints obtained from the ¹H Double-Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (DQMAS) NMR spectra. PMID:27618034

  2. A cross-polarization based rotating-frame separated-local-field NMR experiment under ultrafast MAS conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Damron, Joshua; Vosegaard, Thomas; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Rotating-frame separated-local-field solid-state NMR experiments measure highly resolved heteronuclear dipolar couplings which, in turn, provide valuable interatomic distances for structural and dynamic studies of molecules in the solid-state. Though many different rotating-frame SLF sequences have been put forth, recent advances in ultrafast MAS technology have considerably simplified pulse sequence requirements due to the suppression of proton-proton dipolar interactions. In this study we revisit a simple two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C dipolar coupling/chemical shift correlation experiment using (13)C detected cross-polarization with a variable contact time (CPVC) and systematically study the conditions for its optimal performance at 60 kHz MAS. In addition, we demonstrate the feasibility of a proton-detected version of the CPVC experiment. The theoretical analysis of the CPVC pulse sequence under different Hartmann-Hahn matching conditions confirms that it performs optimally under the ZQ (w1H-w1C=±wr) condition for polarization transfer. The limits of the cross polarization process are explored and precisely defined as a function of offset and Hartmann-Hahn mismatch via spin dynamics simulation and experiments on a powder sample of uniformly (13)C-labeled L-isoleucine. Our results show that the performance of the CPVC sequence and subsequent determination of (1)H-(13)C dipolar couplings are insensitive to (1)H/(13)C frequency offset frequency when high RF fields are used on both RF channels. Conversely, the CPVC sequence is quite sensitive to the Hartmann-Hahn mismatch, particularly for systems with weak heteronuclear dipolar couplings. We demonstrate the use of the CPVC based SLF experiment as a tool to identify different carbon groups, and hope to motivate the exploration of more sophisticated (1)H detected avenues for ultrafast MAS.

  3. Sensitivity Gains, Linearity, and Spectral Reproducibility in Nonuniformly Sampled Multidimensional MAS NMR Spectra of High Dynamic Range.

    SciTech Connect

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Hou, Guangjin; Sun, Shangjin; Rice, David M.; Hoch, Jeffrey C.; Rovnyak, David S.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2014-04-22

    Recently, we have demonstrated that considerable inherent sensitivity gains are attained in MAS NMR spectra acquired by nonuniform sampling (NUS) and introduced maximum entropy interpolation (MINT) processing that assures the linearity of transformation between the time and frequency domains. In this report, we examine the utility of the NUS/MINT approach in multidimensional datasets possessing high dynamic range, such as homonuclear 13C–13C correlation spectra. We demonstrate on model compounds and on 1–73-(U-13C,15N)/74–108-(U-15N) E. coli thioredoxin reassembly, that with appropriately constructed 50 % NUS schedules inherent sensitivity gains of 1.7–2.1-fold are readily reached in such datasets. We show that both linearity and line width are retained under these experimental conditions throughout the entire dynamic range of the signals. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the reproducibility of the peak intensities is excellent in the NUS/MINT approach when experiments are repeated multiple times and identical experimental and processing conditions are employed. Finally, we discuss the principles for design and implementation of random exponentially biased NUS sampling schedules for homonuclear 13C–13C MAS correlation experiments that yield high quality artifact-free datasets.

  4. Sensitivity gains, linearity, and spectral reproducibility in nonuniformly sampled multidimensional MAS NMR spectra of high dynamic range

    PubMed Central

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Hou, Guangjin; Sun, Shangjin; Rice, David; Hoch, Jeffrey C.; Rovnyak, David

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that considerable inherent sensitivity gains are attained in MAS NMR spectra acquired by nonuniform sampling (NUS) and introduced maximum entropy interpolation (MINT) processing that assures the linearity of transformation between the time and frequency domains. In this report, we examine the utility of the NUS/MINT approach in multidimensional datasets possessing high dynamic range, such as homonuclear 13C–13C correlation spectra. We demonstrate on model compounds and on 1–73-(U-13C, 15N)/74–108-(U-15N) E. coli thioredoxin reassembly, that with appropriately constructed 50 % NUS schedules inherent sensitivity gains of 1.7–2.1-fold are readily reached in such datasets. We show that both linearity and line width are retained under these experimental conditions throughout the entire dynamic range of the signals. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the reproducibility of the peak intensities is excellent in the NUS/MINT approach when experiments are repeated multiple times and identical experimental and processing conditions are employed. Finally, we discuss the principles for design and implementation of random exponentially biased NUS sampling schedules for homonuclear 13C–13C MAS correlation experiments that yield high-quality artifact-free datasets. PMID:24752819

  5. Effects of T2-relaxation in MAS NMR spectra of the satellite transitions for quadrupolar nuclei: a 27Al MAS and single-crystal NMR study of alum KAl(SO 4) 2 · 12H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Morten Daugaard; Jakobsen, Hans J.; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2005-04-01

    Asymmetries in the manifold of spinning sidebands (ssbs) from the satellite transitions have been observed in variable-temperature 27Al MAS NMR spectra of alum (KAl(SO 4) 2 · 12H 2O), recorded in the temperature range from -76 to 92 °C. The asymmetries decrease with increasing temperature and reflect the fact that the ssbs exhibit systematically different linewidths for different spectral regions of the manifold. From spin-echo 27Al NMR experiments on a single-crystal of alum, it is demonstrated that these variations in linewidth originate from differences in transverse ( T2) relaxation times for the two inner ( m = 1/2 ↔ m = 3/2 and m = -1/2 ↔ m = -3/2) and correspondingly for the two outer ( m = 3/2 ↔ m = 5/2 and m = -3/2 ↔ m = -5/2) satellite transitions. T2 relaxation times in the range 0.5-3.5 ms are observed for the individual satellite transitions at -50 °C and 7.05 T, whereas the corresponding T1 relaxation times, determined from similar saturation-recovery 27Al NMR experiments, are almost constant ( T1 = 0.07-0.10 s) for the individual satellite transitions. The variation in T2 values for the individual 27Al satellite transitions for alum is justified by a simple theoretical approach which considers the cross-correlation of the local fluctuating fields from the quadrupolar coupling and the heteronuclear ( 27Al- 1H) dipolar interaction on the T2 relaxation times for the individual transitions. This approach and the observed differences in T2 values indicate that a single random motional process modulates both the quadrupolar and heteronuclear dipolar interactions for 27Al in alum at low temperatures.

  6. Structural investigations of Pu{sup III} phosphate by X-ray diffraction, MAS-NMR and XANES spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Popa, Karin; Raison, Philippe E.; Martel, Laura; Martin, Philippe M.; Solari, Pier L.; Bouëxière, Daniel; Konings, Rudy J.M.; Somers, Joseph

    2015-10-15

    PuPO{sub 4} was prepared by a solid state reaction method and its crystal structure at room temperature was solved by powder X-ray diffraction combined with Rietveld refinement. High resolution XANES measurements confirm the +III valence state of plutonium, in agreement with valence bond derivation. The presence of the americium (as β{sup −} decay product of plutonium) in the +III oxidation state was determined based on XANES spectroscopy. High resolution solid state {sup 31}P NMR agrees with the XANES results and the presence of a solid-solution. - Graphical abstract: A full structural analysis of PuPO{sub 4} based on Rietveld analysis of room temperature X-ray diffraction data, XANES and MAS NMR measurements was performed. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of PuPO{sub 4} monazite is solved. • In PuPO{sub 4} plutonium is strictly trivalent. • The presence of a minute amount of Am{sup III} is highlighted. • We propose PuPO{sub 4} as a potential reference material for spectroscopic and microscopic studies.

  7. Proton-detected scalar coupling based assignment strategies in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy applied to perdeuterated proteins.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2008-07-01

    Assignment of proteins in MAS (magic angle spinning) solid-state NMR relies so far on correlations among heteronuclei. This strategy is based on well dispersed resonances in the (15)N dimension. In many complex cases like membrane proteins or amyloid fibrils, an additional frequency dimension is desirable in order to spread the amide resonances. We show here that proton detected HNCO, HNCA, and HNCACB type experiments can successfully be implemented in the solid-state. Coherences are sufficiently long lived to allow pulse schemes of a duration greater than 70 ms before incrementation of the first indirect dimension. The achieved resolution is comparable to the resolution obtained in solution-state NMR experiments. We demonstrate the experiments using a triply labeled sample of the SH3 domain of chicken alpha-spectrin, which was re-crystallized in H(2)O/D(2)O using a ratio of 1/9. We employ paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) using EDTA chelated Cu(II) to enable rapid data acquisition. PMID:18462963

  8. The Effect of Antitumor Glycosides on Glioma Cells and Tissues as Studied by Proton HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, Isabel; Garrido, Leoncio; Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso; Campos-Olivas, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the treatment with glycolipid derivatives on the metabolic profile of intact glioma cells and tumor tissues, investigated using proton high resolution magic angle spinning (1H HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, is reported here. Two compounds were used, a glycoside and its thioglycoside analogue, both showing anti-proliferative activity on glioma C6 cell cultures; however, only the thioglycoside exhibited antitumor activity in vivo. At the drug concentrations showing anti-proliferative activity in cell culture (20 and 40 µM), significant increases in choline containing metabolites were observed in the 1H NMR spectra of the same intact cells. In vivo experiments in nude mice bearing tumors derived from implanted C6 glioma cells, showed that reduction of tumor volume was associated with significant changes in the metabolic profile of the same intact tumor tissues; and were similar to those observed in cell culture. Specifically, the activity of the compounds is mainly associated with an increase in choline and phosphocholine, in both the cell cultures and tumoral tissues. Taurine, a metabolite that has been considered a biomarker of apoptosis, correlated with the reduction of tumor volume. Thus, the results indicate that the mode of action of the glycoside involves, at least in part, alteration of phospholipid metabolism, resulting in cell death. PMID:24194925

  9. Use of SPAM and FAM pulses in high-resolution MAS NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Thomas J.; Wimperis, Stephen

    2007-08-01

    The merits of SPAM and FAM pulses for enhancing the conversion of triple- to single-quantum coherences in the two-dimensional MQMAS experiment are compared using 87Rb (spin I = 3/2) and 27Al ( I = 5/2) NMR of crystalline and amorphous materials. Although SPAM pulses are more easily optimized, our experiments and simulations suggest that FAM pulses yield greater signal intensity in all cases. In conclusion, we argue that, as originally suggested, SPAM and FAM pulses are best implemented in phase-modulated whole-echo MQMAS experiments and that the use of SPAM pulses to record separate echo and antiecho data sets, which are then combined, generally yields lower signal-to-noise ratios.

  10. Analysis of Hydroperoxides in Solid Polyethylene by MAS (13)C NMR and EPR

    SciTech Connect

    ASSINK,ROGER A.; CELINA,MATHIAS C.; DUNBAR,TIMOTHY D.; ALAM,TODD M.; CLOUGH,ROGER LEE; GILLEN,KENNETH T.

    1999-11-19

    {sup 13}C-enriched polyethylene was subjected to {gamma}-irradiation in the presence of air at 25 and 80 C for total doses ranging from 71 to 355 kGy. Significant quantities of hydroperoxides were detected in the 25 C irradiated sample by {sup 13}C magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. This method of detection was performed on the solid polymer and required no chemical derivatization or addition of solvent. The chemical stability and subsequent products of the hydroperoxide species were studied by annealing the irradiated samples in air at temperatures ranging from 22 to 110 C. A time-temperature superposition analysis provided an activation energy of 108 kJ/mol for the hydroperoxide decomposition process. The primary products of hydroperoxide decomposition were ketones and secondary alcohols with lesser amounts of acids and esters. EPR measurements suggest that the reactive hydroperoxide species reside in the amorphous phase of polyethylene, consistent with degradation occurring in the amorphous phase.

  11. Heteronuclear decoupling in MAS NMR in the intermediate to fast sample spinning regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Equbal, Asif; Bjerring, Morten; Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P. K.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2016-01-01

    Heteronuclear spin decoupling in solid-state magic-angle spinning NMR is investigated to present methods overcoming interferences between rf irradiation and sample spinning in the intermediate to fast spinning regime. We demonstrate that a recent phase-alternated variant of refocused CW irradiation (rCWApA) provides efficient and robust decoupling in this regime. An extensive experimental and numerical comparison is presented for rCWApA and PISSARRO (phase-inverted supercycled sequence for attenuation of rotary resonance), previously introduced to quench rotary-resonance recoupling effects, under conditions with spinning frequencies between 30 and 60 kHz. Simulations are used to identify the effect of decoupling for various nuclear spin interactions.

  12. Red coralline algae assessed as marine pH proxies using 11B MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusack, M.; Kamenos, N. A.; Rollion-Bard, C.; Tricot, G.

    2015-02-01

    Reconstructing pH from biogenic carbonates using boron isotopic compositions relies on the assumption that only borate, and no boric acid, is present. Red coralline algae are frequently used in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction due to their widespread distribution and regular banding frequency. Prior to undertaking pH reconstructions using red coralline algae we tested the boron composition of the red coralline alga Lithothamnion glaciale using high field NMR. In bulk analysed samples, thirty percent of boron was present as boric acid. We suggest that prior to reconstructing pH using coralline algae 1) species-specific boron compositions and 2) within-skeleton special distributions of boron are determined for multiple species. This will enable site selective boron analyses to be conducted validating coralline algae as palaeo-pH proxies based on boron isotopic compositions.

  13. Red coralline algae assessed as marine pH proxies using 11B MAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Cusack, M.; Kamenos, N. A.; Rollion-Bard, C.; Tricot, G.

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing pH from biogenic carbonates using boron isotopic compositions relies on the assumption that only borate, and no boric acid, is present. Red coralline algae are frequently used in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction due to their widespread distribution and regular banding frequency. Prior to undertaking pH reconstructions using red coralline algae we tested the boron composition of the red coralline alga Lithothamnion glaciale using high field NMR. In bulk analysed samples, thirty percent of boron was present as boric acid. We suggest that prior to reconstructing pH using coralline algae 1) species-specific boron compositions and 2) within-skeleton special distributions of boron are determined for multiple species. This will enable site selective boron analyses to be conducted validating coralline algae as palaeo-pH proxies based on boron isotopic compositions. PMID:25640229

  14. Following Solid-Acid-Catalyzed Reactions by MAS NMR Spectroscopy in Liquid Phase -Zeolite-Catalyzed Conversion of Cyclohexanol in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Hu, Mary Y.; Feng, Ju; Camaioni, Donald M.; Mei, Donghai; Hu, Jian Z.; Zhao, Chen; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-01-07

    The catalytic conversion of cyclohexanol on zeolite HBEA in hot liquid water leads to dehydration as well as alkylation products. A novel micro autoclave suitable for application in MAS NMR at high temperatures and pressures is developed and successfully applied to obtain new insight into the mechanistic pathway leading to an understanding of the reactions under selected experimental conditions.

  15. Signal intensities in ¹H-¹³C CP and INEPT MAS NMR of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Nowacka, A; Bongartz, N A; Ollila, O H S; Nylander, T; Topgaard, D

    2013-05-01

    Spectral editing with CP and INEPT in (13)C MAS NMR enables identification of rigid and mobile molecular segments in concentrated assemblies of surfactants, lipids, and/or proteins. In order to get stricter definitions of the terms "rigid" and "mobile", as well as resolving some ambiguities in the interpretation of CP and INEPT data, we have developed a theoretical model for calculating the CP and INEPT intensities as a function of rotational correlation time τc and C-H bond order parameter SCH, taking the effects of MAS into account. According to the model, the range of τc can at typical experimental settings (5kHz MAS, 1ms ramped CP at 80-100kHz B1 fields) be divided into four regimes: fast (τc<1ns), fast-intermediate (τc≈0.1μs), intermediate (τc≈1μs), and slow (τc>0.1ms). In the fast regime, the CP and INEPT intensities are independent of τc, but strongly dependent on |SCH|, with a cross-over from dominating INEPT to dominating CP at |SCH|>0.1. In the intermediate regime, neither CP nor INEPT yield signal on account of fast T1ρ and T2 relaxation. In both the fast-intermediate and slow regimes, there is exclusively CP signal. The theoretical predictions are tested by experiments on the glass-forming surfactant n-octyl-β-d-maltoside, for which τc can be varied continuously in the nano- to millisecond range by changing the temperature and the hydration level. The atomistic details of the surfactant dynamics are investigated with MD simulations. Based on the theoretical model, we propose a procedure for calculating CP and INEPT intensities directly from MD simulation trajectories. While MD shows that there is a continuous gradient of τc from the surfactant polar headgroup towards the methyl group at the end of the hydrocarbon chain, analysis of the experimental CP and INEPT data indicates that this gradient gets steeper with decreasing temperature and hydration level, eventually spanning four orders of magnitude at completely dry conditions.

  16. Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings for the assignment of stereochemistry in flubenzimine.

    PubMed

    Ghiviriga, Ion; Rubinski, Miles A; Dolbier, William R

    2016-07-01

    Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings revealed the configuration of flubenzimine, with the CF3 group on N4 pointing towards the lone pair of N5. The (19) F-(15) N coupling constants were measured at natural abundance using a spin-state selective indirect-detection pulse sequence. As (15) N-labelled proteins are routinely synthesized for NMR studies, through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings have the potential to probe the stereochemistry of these proteins by (19) F labelling of some amino acids or can reveal the site of docking of fluorine-containing drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. 3D NMR spectroscopy for resonance assignment and structure elucidation of proteins under MAS: novel pulse schemes and sensitivity considerations.

    PubMed

    Heise, Henrike; Seidel, Karsten; Etzkorn, Manuel; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2005-03-01

    Two types of 3D MAS NMR experiments are introduced, which combine standard (NC,CC) transfer schemes with (1H,1H) mixing to simultaneously detect connectivities and structural constraints of uniformly 15N,13C-labeled proteins with high spectral resolution. The homonuclear CCHHC and CCC experiments are recorded with one double-quantum evolution dimension in order to avoid a cubic diagonal in the spectrum. Depending on the second transfer step, spin systems or proton-proton contacts can be determined with reduced spectral overlap. The heteronuclear NHHCC experiment encodes NH-HC proton-proton interactions, which are indicative for the backbone conformation of the protein. The third dimension facilitates the identification of the amino acid spin system. Experimental results on U-[15N,13C]valine and U-[15N,13C]ubiquitin demonstrate their usefulness for resonance assignments and for the determination of structural constraints. Furthermore, we give a detailed analysis of alternative multidimensional sampling schemes and their effect on sensitivity and resolution. PMID:15705514

  18. 13C MAS NMR evidence for a homogeneously ordered environment of tyrosine M210 in reaction centres of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shochat, S.; Gast, P.; Hoff, A. J.; Boender, G. J.; van Leeuwen, S.; van Liemt, W. B. S.; Vijgenboom, E.; Raap, J.; Lugtenburg, J.; de Groot, H. J. M.

    1995-01-01

    The initial electron transfer time in the photosynthetic reaction centre of Rhodobacter sphaeroides is highly sensitive to the replacement of tyrosine M210 by a tryptophan residue. Low-temperature magic angle spinning 13C NMR is used to study Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 (M)Y210W mutant reaction centres that are labelled with [4'- 13C]tyrosine. The response of (M)Y210 in R26 is assigned unambiguously to the most upfield narrow signal (linewidth 34 Hz) at σi = 152.2 ppm, in the region where non-hydrogen bonded tyrosine signals are expected. From the comparison with the signal of labelled R26 it follows that the chemical environment of the (M)Y210 label is unique. The Y(M)210 is in a structurally and electrostatically homogeneous region on the sensitivity scale of the MAS NMR technique. The environment of M210 is structurally stable and the observation of a narrow line shows that the (M)Y210 side chain can be considered static with respect to rotational diffusion on time scales as long as 10 -2s. The narrow signals from the remaining labels in the protein interior for the 2.4.1 (M)Y210W mutant are remarkably similar to those observed for R26. Using a commonly accepted ratio of 150 ppm shift per positive charge equivalent for aromatic carbons, the chemical shift differences between mutant and R26 translate into small variations of the order of 10 -3 electronic equivalents of charge polarization. Also the linewidths are similar, except for a narrow response at σi = 156.4 ppm that sharpens slightly in the (M)Y210W mutant. Thus, the influence of the (M)Y210W mutation on the global electrostatic properties and structure of the protein, as probed by the tyrosine labels, is minimal. This strongly argues against an explanation of slow and non-exponential electron transfer kinetics in the (M)Y210W RC in terms of loss of structural integrity upon mutation. In contrast, the NMR results strongly support current opinions that (M)Y210 contributes to the fine-tuning of the

  19. Identification of Li-Ion Battery SEI Compounds through (7)Li and (13)C Solid-State MAS NMR Spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huff, Laura A; Tavassol, Hadi; Esbenshade, Jennifer L; Xing, Wenting; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-13

    Solid-state (7)Li and (13)C MAS NMR spectra of cycled graphitic Li-ion anodes demonstrate SEI compound formation upon lithiation that is followed by changes in the SEI upon delithiation. Solid-state (13)C DPMAS NMR shows changes in peaks associated with organic solvent compounds (ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate, EC/DMC) upon electrochemical cycling due to the formation of and subsequent changes in the SEI compounds. Solid-state (13)C NMR spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time measurements of lithiated Li-ion anodes and reference poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) powders, along with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry results, indicate that large-molecular-weight polymers are formed in the SEI layers of the discharged anodes. MALDI-TOF MS and NMR spectroscopy results additionally indicate that delithiated anodes exhibit a larger number of SEI products than is found in lithiated anodes. PMID:26653886

  20. Magnesium silicate dissolution investigated by S1-29 MAS, H-1 Si-29 CPMAS, Mg-25 QCPMG, and H-1 Mg-25 CP QCPMG NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M C; Brouwer, Piet W; Wesolowski, David J; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M

    2009-07-01

    Olivine-(Mg,Fe){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}-has been the subject of frequent investigation in the earth sciences because of its simple structure and rapid dissolution kinetics. Several studies have observed a preferential release of the divalent cation with respect to silicon during weathering under acidic conditions, which has been correlated to the formation of a silicon-rich leached layer. While leached layer formation has been inferred through the changing solution chemistry, a thorough spectroscopic investigation of olivine reacted under acidic conditions has not been conducted. The pure magnesium end member of the olivine series (forsterite-Mg2SiO4) was chosen for detailed investigations in this study because paramagnetic iron hinders NMR investigations by providing an extra mode of relaxation for neighboring nuclei, causing lineshapes to become significantly broadened and unobservable in the NMR spectrum. For reacting forsterite, spectroscopic interrogations using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can elucidate the changing magnesium coordination and bonding environment. In this study, we combine analysis of the changing solution chemistry with advanced NMR techniques ({sup 29}Si MAS, {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si CP MAS, {sup 25}Mg QCPMG, and {sup 1}H-{sup 25}Mg CP QCPMG NMR) to probe leached layer formation and secondary phase precipitation during the dissolution of forsterite at 150 C.

  1. The metabolic profile of lemon juice by proton HR-MAS NMR: the case of the PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Nicola; Corsaro, Carmelo; Salvo, Andrea; Vasi, Sebastiano; Giofré, Salvatore V; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Di Stefano, Vita; Mallamace, Domenico; Dugo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    We have studied by means of High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HR-MAS NMR) the metabolic profile of the famous Sicilian lemon known as 'Interdonato Lemon of Messina PGI'. The PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina possesses high organoleptic and healthy properties and is recognised as one of the most nutrient fruits. In particular, some of its constituents are actively studied for their chemo-preventive and therapeutic properties. In this paper, we have determined by means of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy the molar concentration of the main metabolites constituent the juice of PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina in comparison with that of the not-PGI Interdonato Lemon of Turkey. Our aim is to develop an analytical technique, in order to determine a metabolic fingerprint able to reveal commercial frauds in national and international markets.

  2. Optimum levels of exchangeable protons in perdeuterated proteins for proton detection in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Umit; Lange, Sascha; Trent Franks, W; Linser, Rasmus; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Reif, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the level of exchangeable protons on the observed amide proton linewidth obtained in perdeuterated proteins. Decreasing the amount of D(2)O employed in the crystallization buffer from 90 to 0%, we observe a fourfold increase in linewidth for both (1)H and (15)N resonances. At the same time, we find a gradual increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for (1)H-(15)N correlations in dipolar coupling based experiments for H(2)O concentrations of up to 40%. Beyond 40%, a significant reduction in SNR is observed. Scalar-coupling based (1)H-(15)N correlation experiments yield a nearly constant SNR for samples prepared with < or =30% H(2)O. Samples in which more H(2)O is employed for crystallization show a significantly reduced NMR intensity. Calculation of the SNR by taking into account the reduction in (1)H T (1) in samples containing more protons (SNR per unit time), yields a maximum SNR for samples crystallized using 30 and 40% H(2)O for scalar and dipolar coupling based experiments, respectively. A sensitivity gain of 3.8 is obtained by increasing the H(2)O concentration from 10 to 40% in the CP based experiment, whereas the linewidth only becomes 1.5 times broader. In general, we find that CP is more favorable compared to INEPT based transfer when the number of possible (1)H,(1)H interactions increases. At low levels of deuteration (> or =60% H(2)O in the crystallization buffer), resonances from rigid residues are broadened beyond detection. All experiments are carried out at MAS frequency of 24 kHz employing perdeuterated samples of the chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain.

  3. Achievement of 1 H-19 F heteronuclear experiments using the conventional spectrometer with a shared single high band amplifier.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Chiseko; Kurita, Jun-ichi; Furihata, Kazuo; Tashiro, Mitsuru

    2015-05-01

    The (1)H-(19) F heteronuclear NMR experiments were achieved using the conventional spectrometer equipped with a single high band amplifier and a (1)H/(19)F/(13) C double-tuned probe. Although double high band amplifiers are generally required to perform such experiments, a simple modification of pathway in the conventional spectrometer was capable of acquiring various (1)H-(19)F heteronuclear spectra. The efficiency of the present technique was demonstrated in an application for (19)F{(1)H} and (1)H{(19)F} saturation transfer difference experiments. PMID:25808615

  4. Achievement of 1 H-19 F heteronuclear experiments using the conventional spectrometer with a shared single high band amplifier.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Chiseko; Kurita, Jun-ichi; Furihata, Kazuo; Tashiro, Mitsuru

    2015-05-01

    The (1)H-(19) F heteronuclear NMR experiments were achieved using the conventional spectrometer equipped with a single high band amplifier and a (1)H/(19)F/(13) C double-tuned probe. Although double high band amplifiers are generally required to perform such experiments, a simple modification of pathway in the conventional spectrometer was capable of acquiring various (1)H-(19)F heteronuclear spectra. The efficiency of the present technique was demonstrated in an application for (19)F{(1)H} and (1)H{(19)F} saturation transfer difference experiments.

  5. Sensitivity enhancement in natural-abundance solid-state 33S MAS NMR spectroscopy employing adiabatic inversion pulses to the satellite transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Michael Ryan; Brorson, Michael; Bildsøe, Henrik; Skibsted, Jørgen; Jakobsen, Hans J.

    2008-02-01

    The WURST (wideband uniform rate smooth truncation) and hyperbolic secant (HS) pulse elements have each been employed as pairs of inversion pulses to induce population transfer (PT) between the four energy levels in natural abundance solid-state 33S (spin I = 3/2) MAS NMR, thereby leading to a significant gain in intensity for the central transition (CT). The pair of inversion pulses are applied to the satellite transitions for a series of inorganic sulfates, the sulfate ions in the two cementitious materials ettringite and thaumasite, and the two tetrathiometallates (NH 4) 2WS 4 and (NH 4) 2MoS 4. These materials all exhibit 33S quadrupole coupling constants ( CQ) in the range 0.1-1.0 MHz, with precise CQ values being determined from analysis of the PT enhanced 33S MAS NMR spectra. The enhancement factors for the WURST and HS elements are quite similar and are all in the range 1.74-2.25 for the studied samples, in excellent agreement with earlier reports on HS enhancement factors (1.6-2.4) observed for other spin I = 3/2 nuclei with similar CQ values (0.3-1.2 MHz). Thus, a time saving in instrument time by a factor up to five has been achieved in natural abundance 33S MAS NMR, a time saving which is extremely welcome for this important low-γ nucleus.

  6. Sensitivity enhancement in natural-abundance solid-state 33S MAS NMR spectroscopy employing adiabatic inversion pulses to the satellite transitions.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Michael Ryan; Brorson, Michael; Bildsøe, Henrik; Skibsted, Jørgen; Jakobsen, Hans J

    2008-02-01

    The WURST (wideband uniform rate smooth truncation) and hyperbolic secant (HS) pulse elements have each been employed as pairs of inversion pulses to induce population transfer (PT) between the four energy levels in natural abundance solid-state (33)S (spin I=3/2) MAS NMR, thereby leading to a significant gain in intensity for the central transition (CT). The pair of inversion pulses are applied to the satellite transitions for a series of inorganic sulfates, the sulfate ions in the two cementitious materials ettringite and thaumasite, and the two tetrathiometallates (NH(4))(2)WS(4) and (NH(4))(2)MoS(4). These materials all exhibit (33)S quadrupole coupling constants (C(Q)) in the range 0.1-1.0 MHz, with precise C(Q) values being determined from analysis of the PT enhanced (33)S MAS NMR spectra. The enhancement factors for the WURST and HS elements are quite similar and are all in the range 1.74-2.25 for the studied samples, in excellent agreement with earlier reports on HS enhancement factors (1.6-2.4) observed for other spin I=3/2 nuclei with similar C(Q) values (0.3-1.2 MHz). Thus, a time saving in instrument time by a factor up to five has been achieved in natural abundance (33)S MAS NMR, a time saving which is extremely welcome for this important low-gamma nucleus. PMID:18082436

  7. Identification of lithium-sulfur battery discharge products through 6Li and 33S solid-state MAS and 7Li solution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Laura A.; Rapp, Jennifer L.; Baughman, Jessi A.; Rinaldi, Peter L.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    6Li and 33S solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to identify the discharge products in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery cathodes. Cathodes were stopped at different potentials throughout battery discharge and measured ex-situ to obtain chemical shifts and T2 relaxation rates of the products formed. The chemical shifts in the spectra of both 6Li and 33S NMR demonstrate that long-chain, soluble lithium polysulfide species formed at the beginning of discharge are indistinguishable from each other (similar chemical shifts), while short-chain, insoluble polysulfide species that form at the end of discharge (presumably Li2S2 and Li2S) have a different chemical shift, thus distinguishing them from the soluble long-chain products. T2 relaxation measurements of discharged cathodes were also performed which resulted in two groupings of T2 rates that follow a trend and support the previous conclusions that long-chain polysulfide species are converted to shorter chain species during discharge. Through the complementary techniques of 1-D 6Li and 33S solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy, solution 7Li and 1H NMR spectroscopy, and T2 relaxation rate measurements, structural information about the discharge products of Li-S batteries is obtained.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 19F SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.

    2009-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked by Liquid Waste Operations to characterize Tank 19F closure samples. Tank 19F slurry samples analyzed included the liquid and solid fractions derived from the slurry materials along with the floor scrape bottom Tank 19F wet solids. These samples were taken from Tank 19F in April 2009 and made available to SRNL in the same month. Because of limited amounts of solids observed in Tank 19F samples, the samples from the north quadrants of the tank were combined into one Tank 19F North Hemisphere sample and similarly the south quadrant samples were combined into one Tank 19F South Hemisphere sample. These samples were delivered to the SRNL shielded cell. The Tank 19F samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Where analytical methods yielded additional contaminants other than those requested by the customer, these results were also reported. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on detection values of 1E-04 {micro}Ci/g for most radionuclides and customer desired detection values of 1E-05 {micro}Ci/g for I-129, Pa-231, Np-237, and Ra-226. While many of the target detection limits, as specified in the technical task request and task technical and quality assurance plans were met for the species characterized for Tank 19F, some were not met. In a number of cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. SRNL, in conjunction with the plant customer, reviewed all these cases and determined that the impacts were negligible.

  9. (sup 6)Li and (sup 7)MAS NMR and In Situ X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Lithium Manganate Cathode Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Joo; Wang, Francis; Grey, Clare P.; Mukerjee, Sanjeev; McBreen, James

    1998-11-30

    {sup 6}Li MAS NMR spectra of lithium manganese oxides with differing manganese oxidation states (LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Li{sub 4}Mn{sub 5}O{sub 12}, Li{sub 2}Mn{sub 4}O{sub 9}, and Li{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4}) are presented. Improved understanding of the lithium NMR spectra of these model compounds is used to interpret the local structure of the Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode materials following electrochemical Li{sup +} deintercalation to various charging levels. In situ x-ray diffraction patterns of the same material during charging are also reported for comparison. Evidence for two-phase behavior for x <0.4 (Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4}) is seen by both NMR and diffraction.

  10. Multi-nuclear MRS and 19F MRI of 19F-labelled and 10B-enriched p-boronophenylalanine-fructose complex to optimize boron neutron capture therapy: phantom studies at high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Porcari, Paola; Capuani, Silvia; Campanella, Renzo; La Bella, Angela; Migneco, Luisa Maria; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2006-06-21

    Reaction yield optimization for the synthesis and the complexation of a boron neutron capture therapy agent (19)F-labelled, (10)B-enriched p-boronophenylalanine-fructose ((19)F-BPA-fr) complex was obtained. (1)H, (19)F, (13)C and (10)B magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the (19)F-BPA-fr complex in aqueous and rat blood solution phantoms and its spatial distribution mapping using (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results are reported. 7 T and 9.4 T magnetic fields were used to perform MRI and MRS respectively. Our in vitro results suggest that in vivo studies on (19)F-BPA through (19)F NMR will be feasible. PMID:16757868

  11. Solid state structure by X-ray and 13C CP/MAS NMR of new 5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowska, Kinga; Maciejewska, Dorota; Dobrzycki, Łukasz; Socha, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (1) and 6-acetyl-5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (2), structurally related, were synthesized using both conventional and microwave-assisted approach. An impact of acetyl groups on the molecular structure of coumarin derivatives has been examined. Crystals of 2 were investigated using single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. Compound 2 crystallizes forming two polymorphs (denoted as 2_1 and 2_2), both belonging to P21/c space group. Both polymorphs are comparably stable and can be formed simultaneously during crystallization process. The solid state structure was also analysed using the fully resolved 13C CP/MAS NMR. The double signals with the intensity ratio of about 1:1 which were observed in the 13C CP/MAS NMR spectrum of compound 1 must arise due to the presence of two conformers of 1. In contrast, NMR spectrum recorded for powder mixture of two polymorphs of compound 2 displays no signal splitting. This is related to structural similarities of molecules in both polymorphs.

  12. FTIR and 1H MAS NMR investigations on the correlation between the frequency of stretching vibration and the chemical shift of surface OH groups of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Eike; Karge, H. G.; Pfeifer, H.

    1992-03-01

    The study of surface hydroxyl groups of solids, especially of zeolites, belongs to the 'classical' topics of IR spectroscopy since physico-chemical information may be derived from the wavenumber (nu) OH of the stretching vibration of the different hydroxyls. On the other hand, the last decade has seen the development of high resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy and through the use of the so-called magic-angle-spinning technique (MAS) the signals of different hydroxyl species can be resolved in the 1H NMR spectra of solids. The chemical shift (delta) H describing the position of these lines may be used as well as (nu) OH to characterize quantitatively the strength of acidity of surface OH groups of solids. In a first comparison of (nu) OH with (delta) H for several types of surface OH groups, a linear correlation between them could be found. The aim of this paper was to prove the validity of this correlation for a wide variety of hydroxyls. The IR measurements were carried out on a Perkin-Elmer FTIR spectrometer 1800 at the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Berlin, and the 1H MAS NMR spectra were recorded on a Bruker MSL- 300 at the University of Leipzig.

  13. Obtaining aluminas from the thermal decomposition of their different precursors: An {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and X-ray powder diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chagas, L.H.; De Carvalho, G.S.G.; San Gil, R.A.S.; Chiaro, S.S.X.; Leitão, A.A.; Diniz, R.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We synthesized three precursors of alumina from different methods. • The calcination of the precursors generated several alumina polymorphs. • XRD and NMR were used for structural investigation of the polymorphs. • The synthesis route determines the structural and textural properties of the solids. - Abstract: A commercial sample of Boehmite was used as precursor of alumina polymorphs. For comparison, three other precursors were synthesized from different methods. Particularly, the use of excess of urea promoted a very crystalline form of basic aluminum carbonate. The characteristics of the four precursors were investigated by thermal, vibrational and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis. Additionally, the nuclear magnetic resonance, with magic angle spinning ({sup 27}Al MAS NMR), was used to verify the coordination of aluminum cations. Each precursor was calcined at various temperatures generating alumina polymorphs, which were structurally analyzed by XRD and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR. Due to interest in catalysis supports, special attention was given to the γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase, which in addition to structural investigation was subjected to textural analysis. The results showed that, from different synthesis procedures and common route of calcination, one can obtain materials with the same composition but with different structural and textural properties, which in turn can significantly influence the performance of a supported catalyst.

  14. HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy of reconstructed human epidermis: potential for the in situ investigation of the chemical interactions between skin allergens and nucleophilic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Elbayed, Karim; Berl, Valérie; Debeuckelaere, Camille; Moussallieh, François-Marie; Piotto, Martial; Namer, Izzie-Jacques; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-18

    High-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) is a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique that enables the characterization of metabolic phenotypes/metabolite profiles of cells, tissues, and organs, under both normal and pathological conditions, without resorting to time-consuming extraction techniques. In this article, we explore a new domain of application of HR-MAS, namely, reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) and the in situ observation of chemical interactions between skin sensitizers and nucleophilic amino acids. First, the preparation, storage, and analysis of RHE were optimized, and this work demonstrated that HR-MAS NMR was well adapted for investigating RHE with spectra of good quality allowing qualitative as well as quantitative studies of metabolites. Second, in order to study the response of RHE to chemical sensitizers, the ((13)C)methyldodecanesulfonate was chosen as an NMR probe, and we compared adducts formed on human serum albumin (HSA) in solution and adducts formed in RHE. Thus, while the modification of proteins or peptides in solution takes several days to lead to a significant amount of modification, in RHE the modifications of nucleophilic amino acids were observable already at 24 h. The chemioselectivity also appeared to be different with major modifications taking place on histidine, methionine, and cysteine residues in RHE, while on HSA, significant modifications were observed on lysine residues with the formation of methylated and dimethylated amino groups. We thus demonstrated that RHE could be used to investigate in situ chemical interactions taking place between skin sensitizers and nucleophilic amino acids. This opens perspectives for the molecular understanding of the skin immune system activation by sensitizing chemicals.

  15. Separation of small metabolites and lipids in spectra from biopsies by diffusion-weighted HR-MAS NMR: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Diserens, G; Vermathen, M; Precht, C; Broskey, N T; Boesch, C; Amati, F; Dufour, J-F; Vermathen, P

    2015-01-01

    High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) NMR allows metabolic characterization of biopsies. HR-MAS spectra from tissues of most organs show strong lipid contributions that are overlapping metabolite regions, which hamper metabolite estimation. Metabolite quantification and analysis would benefit from a separation of lipids and small metabolites. Generally, a relaxation filter is used to reduce lipid contributions. However, the strong relaxation filter required to eliminate most of the lipids also reduces the signals for small metabolites. The aim of our study was therefore to investigate different diffusion editing techniques in order to employ diffusion differences for separating lipid and small metabolite contributions in the spectra from different organs for unbiased metabonomic analysis. Thus, 1D and 2D diffusion measurements were performed, and pure lipid spectra that were obtained at strong diffusion weighting (DW) were subtracted from those obtained at low DW, which include both small metabolites and lipids. This subtraction yielded almost lipid free small metabolite spectra from muscle tissue. Further improved separation was obtained by combining a 1D diffusion sequence with a T2-filter, with the subtraction method eliminating residual lipids from the spectra. Similar results obtained for biopsies of different organs suggest that this method is applicable in various tissue types. The elimination of lipids from HR-MAS spectra and the resulting less biased assessment of small metabolites have potential to remove ambiguities in the interpretation of metabonomic results. This is demonstrated in a reproducibility study on biopsies from human muscle.

  16. Solid state {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al and {sup 31}P/{sup 23}Na MAS NMR dipolar dephasing investigations of connectivity in sodium aluminophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    LANG,DAVID P.; ALAM,TODD M.; BENCOE,DENISE N.

    2000-05-01

    Solid state {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al and {sup 31}P/{sup 23}Na MAS NMR dipolar dephasing experiments have been used to investigate the spatial distribution of aluminum and sodium cations with respect to the phosphate backbone for a series of sodium aluminophosphate glasses, xAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}50Na{sub 2}O{center_dot}(50{minus}x)P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (0{le} x {le} 17.5). From the {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al and {sup 31}P/{sup 23}Na connectivity data gathered, information about the medium range order in these glasses is obtained. The expanded connectivity data allows for better identification and interpretation of the new resonances observed in the {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectra with the addition of alumina. The results of the dipolar dephasing experiments show that the sodium-phosphate distribution remains relatively unchanged for the glass series, and that the addition of aluminum occurs primarily through the depolymerization of the phosphate tetrahedral backbone.

  17. Low-power broadband homonuclear dipolar recoupling in MAS NMR by two-fold symmetry pulse schemes for magnetization transfers and double-quantum excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teymoori, Gholamhasan; Pahari, Bholanath; Edén, Mattias

    2015-12-01

    We provide an experimental, numerical, and high-order average Hamiltonian evaluation of an open-ended series of homonuclear dipolar recoupling sequences, SR2 2p 1 with p = 1, 2, 3, … . While operating at a very low radio-frequency (rf) power, corresponding to a nutation frequency of 1/2 of the magic-angle spinning (MAS) rate (ωnut =ωr / 2), these recursively generated double-quantum (2Q) dipolar recoupling schemes offer a progressively improved compensation to resonance offsets and rf inhomogeneity for increasing pulse-sequence order p. The excellent recoupling robustness to these experimental obstacles, as well as to CSA, is demonstrated for 2Q filtering (2QF) experiments and for driving magnetization transfers in 2D NMR correlation spectroscopy, where the sequences may provide either double or zero quantum dipolar Hamiltonians during mixing. Experimental and numerical demonstrations, which mostly target conditions of "ultra-fast" MAS (≳50 kHz) and high magnetic fields, are provided for recoupling of 13C across a wide range of isotropic and anisotropic chemical shifts, as well as dipolar coupling constants, encompassing [2,3-13C2 ]alanine, [1,3-13C2 ]alanine, diammonium [1,4-13C2 ]fumarate, and [U-13 C]tyrosine. When compared at equal power levels, a superior performance is observed for the SR2p 1 sequences with p ⩾ 3 relative to existing and well-established 2Q recoupling techniques. At ultra-fast MAS, proton decoupling is redundant during the homonuclear dipolar recoupling of dilute spins in organic solids, which renders the family of SR2p 1 schemes the first efficient 2Q recoupling option for general applications, such as 2Q-1Q correlation NMR and high-order multiple-quantum excitation, under truly low-power rf conditions.

  18. {sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for carbonate ions in cement minerals and the use of {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR in studies of Portland cement including limestone additions

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Herfort, Duncan

    2013-10-15

    {sup 13}C isotropic chemical shifts and chemical shift anisotropy parameters have been determined for a number of inorganic carbonates relevant in cement chemistry from slow-speed {sup 13}C MAS or {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR spectra (9.4 T or 14.1 T) for {sup 13}C in natural abundance. The variation in the {sup 13}C chemical shift parameters is relatively small, raising some doubts that different carbonate species in Portland cement-based materials may not be sufficiently resolved in {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectra. However, it is shown that by combining {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR carbonate anions in anhydrous and hydrated phases can be distinguished, thereby providing valuable information about the reactivity of limestone in cement blends. This is illustrated for three cement pastes prepared from an ordinary Portland cement, including 0, 16, and 25 wt.% limestone, and following the hydration for up to one year. For these blends {sup 29}Si MAS NMR reveals that the limestone filler accelerates the hydration for alite and also results in a smaller fraction of tetrahedrally coordinated Al incorporated in the C-S-H phase. The latter result is more clearly observed in {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra of the cement–limestone blends and suggests that dissolved aluminate species in the cement–limestone blends readily react with carbonate ions from the limestone filler, forming calcium monocarboaluminate hydrate. -- Highlights: •{sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for inorganic carbonates from {sup 13}C MAS NMR. •Narrow {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift range (163–171 ppm) for inorganic carbonates. •Anhydrous and hydrated carbonate species by {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR. •Limestone accelerates the hydration for alite in Portland – limestone cements. •Limestone reduces the amount of aluminium incorporated in the C-S-H phase.

  19. Spin Diffusion Driven by R-Symmetry Sequences: Applications to Homonuclear Correlation Spectroscopy in MAS NMR of Biological and Organic Solids

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guangjin; Yan, Si; Sun, Shangjin; Han, Yun; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Concel, Jason; Samoson, Ago; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2011-01-01

    We present a family of homonuclear 13C-13C magic angle spinning spin diffusion experiments, based on R2nv (n = 1 and 2, v = 1 and 2) symmetry sequences. These experiments are well suited for 13C-13C correlation spectroscopy in biological and organic systems, and are especially advantageous at very fast MAS conditions, where conventional PDSD and DARR experiments fail. At very fast MAS frequencies the R211, R221, and R222 sequences result in excellent quality correlation spectra both in model compounds and in proteins. Under these conditions, individual R2nv display different polarization transfer efficiency-dependencies on isotropic chemical shift differences: R221 recouples efficiently both small and large chemical shift differences (in proteins these correspond to aliphatic-to-aliphatic and carbonyl-to-aliphatic correlations, respectively), while R211 and R222 exhibit the maximum recoupling efficiency for the aliphatic-to-aliphatic or carbonyl-to-aliphatic correlations, respectively. At moderate MAS frequencies (10–20 kHz), all R2nv sequences introduced in this work display similar transfer efficiencies, and their performance is very similar to that of PDSD and DARR. Polarization transfer dynamics and chemical shift dependencies of these R2-driven spin diffusion (RDSD) schemes are experimentally evaluated and investigated by numerical simulations for [U-13C,15N]-alanine and the [U-13C,15N] N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (MLF) tripeptide. Further applications of this approach are illustrated for several proteins: spherical assemblies of HIV-1 U-13C,15N CA protein, U-13C,15N enriched dynein light chain DLC8, and sparsely 13C/uniformly 15N enriched CAP-Gly domain of dynactin. Due to the excellent performance and ease of implementation, the presented R2nv symmetry sequences are expected to be of wide applicability in studies of proteins and protein assemblies as well as other organic solids by MAS NMR spectroscopy. PMID:21361320

  20. High-temperature superconductivity and antiferromagnetism in multilayer cuprates: 63Cu and 19F NMR on five-layer Ba2Ca4Cu5O10(F,O)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Sunao; Tabata, Shin-Ichiro; Iwai, Shiho; Mukuda, Hidekazu; Kitaoka, Yoshio; Shirage, Parasharam M.; Kito, Hijiri; Iyo, Akira

    2012-01-01

    We report systematic Cu and F NMR measurements of five-layered high-Tc cuprates Ba2Ca4Cu5O10(F,O)2. It is revealed that antiferromagnetism (AFM) uniformly coexists with superconductivity (SC) in underdoped regions, and that the critical hole density pc for AFM is ˜0.11 in the five-layered compound. We present the layer-number dependence of AFM and SC phase diagrams in hole-doped cuprates, where pc for n-layered compounds pc(n) increases from pc(1) ˜ 0.02 in La2-xSrxCuO4 or pc(2) ˜ 0.05 in YBa2Cu3O6+y to pc(5) ˜ 0.11. The variation of pc(n) is attributed to interlayer magnetic coupling, which becomes stronger with increasing n. In addition, we focus on the ground-state phase diagram of CuO2 planes, where AFM metallic states in slightly doped Mott insulators change into the uniformly mixed phase of AFM and SC and into simple d-wave SC states. The maximum Tc exists just outside the quantum critical hole density, at which AFM moments on a CuO2 plane collapse at the ground state, indicating an intimate relationship between AFM and SC. These characteristics of the ground state are accounted for by the Mott physics based on the t-J model; the attractive interaction of high-Tc SC, which raises Tc as high as 160 K, is an in-plane superexchange interaction Jin (˜0.12 eV), and the large Jin binds electrons of opposite spins between neighboring sites. It is the Coulomb repulsive interaction U (>6 eV) between Cu-3d electrons that plays a central role in the physics behind high-Tc phenomena.

  1. Probing the interface of core shell particles of GaPO 4 and AlPO 4 by 31P MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulshreshtha, S. K.; Jayakumar, O. D.; Vishwanadh, B.; Sudarsan, V.

    2011-02-01

    Hexagonal GaPO 4, pseudo-hexagonal AlPO 4 and the core shell particles of these phosphates have been prepared in ethylene glycol medium at 180 °C, followed by annealing at 900 °C for 24 h and investigated by powder X-ray diffraction and 31P Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) techniques. The 31P NMR studies of these core shell particles showed a multi-component NMR pattern consisting of five peaks originating due to the distinct structural configurations formed by the varying number of Al 3+ and Ga 3+ as the next nearest neighbors around the probe 31P nuclei of the PO 4 tetrahedron. Existence of different PO 4 structural units with varying number of Al 3+ and Ga 3+ as its next nearest neighbors around P nucleus at the interface of the core shell particles has been confirmed. These results clearly indicate the bond formation at the interface between the core and shell material for these particles.

  2. Constant-time 2D and 3D through-bond correlation NMR spectroscopy of solids under 60 kHz MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-01-01

    Establishing connectivity and proximity of nuclei is an important step in elucidating the structure and dynamics of molecules in solids using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Although recent studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of proton-detected multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments under ultrafast-MAS frequencies and obtaining high-resolution spectral lines of protons, assignment of proton resonances is a major challenge. In this study, we first re-visit and demonstrate the feasibility of 2D constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak correlation (CTUC-COSY) NMR experiment on rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS conditions, where the sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by the reduced spin-spin relaxation rate and the use of low radio-frequency power for heteronuclear decoupling during the evolution intervals of the pulse sequence. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the performance of a proton-detected pulse sequence to obtain a 3D 1H/13C/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum by incorporating an additional cross-polarization period in the CTUC-COSY pulse sequence to enable proton chemical shift evolution and proton detection in the incrementable t1 and t3 periods, respectively. In addition to through-space and through-bond 13C/1H and 13C/13C chemical shift correlations, the 3D 1H/13C/1H experiment also provides a COSY-type 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum, where only the chemical shifts of those protons, which are bonded to two neighboring carbons, are correlated. By extracting 2D F1/F3 slices (1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum) at different 13C chemical shift frequencies from the 3D 1H/13C/1H spectrum, resonances of proton atoms located close to a specific carbon atom can be identified. Overall, the through-bond and through-space homonuclear/heteronuclear proximities determined from the 3D 1H/13C/1H experiment would be useful to study the structure and dynamics of a variety of chemical and biological

  3. Constant-time 2D and 3D through-bond correlation NMR spectroscopy of solids under 60 kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-01-21

    Establishing connectivity and proximity of nuclei is an important step in elucidating the structure and dynamics of molecules in solids using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Although recent studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of proton-detected multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments under ultrafast-MAS frequencies and obtaining high-resolution spectral lines of protons, assignment of proton resonances is a major challenge. In this study, we first re-visit and demonstrate the feasibility of 2D constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak correlation (CTUC-COSY) NMR experiment on rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS conditions, where the sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by the reduced spin-spin relaxation rate and the use of low radio-frequency power for heteronuclear decoupling during the evolution intervals of the pulse sequence. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the performance of a proton-detected pulse sequence to obtain a 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectrum by incorporating an additional cross-polarization period in the CTUC-COSY pulse sequence to enable proton chemical shift evolution and proton detection in the incrementable t1 and t3 periods, respectively. In addition to through-space and through-bond (13)C/(1)H and (13)C/(13)C chemical shift correlations, the 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H experiment also provides a COSY-type (1)H/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectrum, where only the chemical shifts of those protons, which are bonded to two neighboring carbons, are correlated. By extracting 2D F1/F3 slices ((1)H/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectrum) at different (13)C chemical shift frequencies from the 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H spectrum, resonances of proton atoms located close to a specific carbon atom can be identified. Overall, the through-bond and through-space homonuclear/heteronuclear proximities determined from the 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H experiment would be useful to study the structure and dynamics of

  4. Two-dimensional MAS NMR correlation protocols involving double-quantum filtering of quadrupolar spin-pairs.

    PubMed

    Edén, Mattias

    2010-05-01

    Three two-dimensional (2D) NMR homonuclear correlation techniques invoking double-quantum (2Q) filtration of the central transitions of half-integer spins are evaluated numerically and experimentally. They correlate directly detected single-quantum (1Q) coherences in the t(2) domain with either of 1Q, two-spin 2Q or single-spin multiple-quantum coherence-evolutions in the indirect (t(1)) dimension. We employ experimental (23)Na and (27)Al NMR on sodium sulfite and the natural mineral sillimanite (SiAl(2)O(5)), in conjunction with simulated 2D spectra from pairs of dipolar-recoupled spins-3/2 and 5/2 at different external magnetic fields, to compare the correlation strategies from the viewpoints of 2D spectral resolution, signal sensitivity, implementational aspects and their relative merits for establishing internuclear proximities and quadrupolar tensor orientations. PMID:20202872

  5. Two-dimensional MAS NMR correlation protocols involving double-quantum filtering of quadrupolar spin-pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edén, Mattias

    2010-05-01

    Three two-dimensional (2D) NMR homonuclear correlation techniques invoking double-quantum (2Q) filtration of the central transitions of half-integer spins are evaluated numerically and experimentally. They correlate directly detected single-quantum (1Q) coherences in the t2 domain with either of 1Q, two-spin 2Q or single-spin multiple-quantum coherence-evolutions in the indirect (t1) dimension. We employ experimental 23Na and 27Al NMR on sodium sulfite and the natural mineral sillimanite (SiAl2O5), in conjunction with simulated 2D spectra from pairs of dipolar-recoupled spins-3/2 and 5/2 at different external magnetic fields, to compare the correlation strategies from the viewpoints of 2D spectral resolution, signal sensitivity, implementational aspects and their relative merits for establishing internuclear proximities and quadrupolar tensor orientations.

  6. Selective detection and complete identification of triglycerides in cortical bone by high-resolution (1)H MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mroue, Kamal H; Xu, Jiadi; Zhu, Peizhi; Morris, Michael D; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-07-28

    Using (1)H-based magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we report an atomistic-level characterization of triglycerides in compact cortical bone. By suppressing contributions from immobile molecules present in bone, we show that a (1)H-based constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak (CTUC) two-dimensional COSY-type experiment that correlates the chemical shifts of protons can selectively detect a mobile triglyceride layer as the main component of small lipid droplets embedded on the surface of collagen fibrils. High sensitivity and resolution afforded by this NMR approach could be potentially utilized to investigate the origin of triglycerides and their pathological roles associated with bone fractures, diseases, and aging. PMID:27374353

  7. A {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li MAS-NMR study of sol-gel lithium triborate glass subjected to thermal densification

    SciTech Connect

    Mustarelli, P.; Quartarone, E.; Benevelli, F.

    1997-06-01

    The effects of thermal densification on a sol-gel lithium triborate glass have been studied by {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li NMR both static and at the magic angle (MAS). {sup 11}B spectra show that the boron average coordination is similar in sol-gel and melt-quenched samples and it does not change upon annealing. {sup 7}Li T{sub 1} is shorter ({approximately}8.5 s) in sol-gel glass as prepared than in its melt-quenched counterpart ({approximately}13 s) due to dipolar-dipolar Li-H interaction. {sup 7}Li longitudinal relaxation behavior captures a part of a complex devitrification process which is driven by the loss of both residual solvent and moisture.

  8. Asymmetric simultaneous phase-inversion cross-polarization in solid-state MAS NMR: Relaxing selective polarization transfer condition between two dilute spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jianping; Yang, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Double cross polarization (DCP) has been widely used for heteronuclear polarization transfer between 13C and 15N in solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR. However, DCP is such sensitive to experimental settings that small variations or deviations in RF fields would deteriorate its efficiency. Here, we report on asymmetric simultaneous phase-inversion cross polarization (referred as aSPICP) for selective polarization transfer between low-γ 13C and 15N spins. We have demonstrated through simulations and experiments using biological solids that the asymmetric duration in the simultaneous phase-inversion cross polarization scheme leads to efficient polarization transfer between 13C and 15N even with large chemical shift anisotropies in the presence of B1 field variations or mismatch of the Hartmann-Hahn conditions. This could be very useful in the aspect of long-duration experiments for membrane protein studies at high fields.

  9. Conformations of solid 2-methyl-4-( p-X-phenylazo)imidazoles by 13C CP MAS NMR spectroscopy and PM3 semi-empirical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewska, Dorota

    1999-03-01

    Solid 2-methyl-4-( p-X-phenylazo)imidazoles form hydrogen bonded chains with N-H⋯N bonds and C-H⋯O or C-H⋯N interaction. Depending on the nature and orientation of the substituents X it was possible to identify one tautomer if XH ( 2), Br ( 3), NO 2 ( 4) and the two, a- and b-tautomers in the crystal unit if XOCH 3 ( 1). The 13C CP MAS NMR spectra of ( 4) indicate the presence of phenyl ring dynamics. A preferred structure present in the solid state is that with different lengths of C1'-N and C4-N bonds and with higher dipole moment.

  10. Resolution and measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings of a noncrystalline protein immobilized in a biological supramolecular assembly by proton-detected MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Ho; Yang, Chen; Opella, Stanley J.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-dimensional 15N chemical shift/1H chemical shift and three-dimensional 1H-15N dipolar coupling/15N chemical shift/1H chemical shift MAS solid-state NMR correlation spectra of the filamentous bacteriophage Pf1 major coat protein show single-site resolution in noncrystalline, intact-phage preparations. The high sensitivity and resolution result from 1H detection at 600 MHz under 50 kHz magic angle spinning using ∼0.5 mg of perdeuterated and uniformly 15N-labeled protein in which the exchangeable amide sites are partially or completely back-exchanged (reprotonated). Notably, the heteronuclear 1H-15N dipolar coupling frequency dimension is shown to select among 15N resonances, which will be useful in structural studies of larger proteins where the resonances exhibit a high degree of overlap in multidimensional chemical shift correlation spectra.

  11. Composite-180° pulse-based symmetry sequences to recouple proton chemical shift anisotropy tensors under ultrafast MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Malon, Michal; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the measurement of proton ((1)H) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors to obtain deeper insights into H-bonding interactions which find numerous applications in chemical and biological systems. However, the presence of strong (1)H/(1)H dipolar interaction makes it difficult to determine small size (1)H CSAs from the homogeneously broadened NMR spectra. Previously reported pulse sequences for (1)H CSA recoupling are prone to the effects of radio frequency field (B1) inhomogeneity. In the present work we have carried out a systematic study using both numerical and experimental approaches to evaluate γ-encoded radio frequency (RF) pulse sequences based on R-symmetries that recouple (1)H CSA in the indirect dimension of a 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation experiment under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies. The spectral resolution and sensitivity can be significantly improved in both frequency dimensions of the 2D (1)H/(1)H correlation spectrum without decoupling (1)H/(1)H dipolar couplings but by using ultrafast MAS rates up to 70 kHz. We successfully demonstrate that with a reasonable RF field requirement (<200 kHz) a set of symmetry-based recoupling sequences, with a series of phase-alternating 270°0-90°180 composite-180° pulses, are more robust in combating B1 inhomogeneity effects. In addition, our results show that the new pulse sequences render remarkable (1)H CSA recoupling efficiency and undistorted CSA lineshapes. Experimental results on citric acid and malonic acid comparing the efficiencies of these newly developed pulse sequences with that of previously reported CSA recoupling pulse sequences are also reported under ultrafast MAS conditions. PMID:25497846

  12. Structural elucidation of b-(Y,Sc){sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} : combined use of {sub 89}Y MAS NMR and powder diffraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Allix, M.; Alba, M. D.; Florian, P.; Fernandez-Carrion, A. J.; Suchomel, M. R.; Escudero, A.; Suard, E.; Becerro, A. I.

    2011-08-01

    Although the structures of pure Sc{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} and {beta}-Y{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} have been described in the literature using the C2/m space group, {sup 29}Si magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR measurements of the intermediate members of the Sc{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}-{beta}-Y{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} system indicate a lowering of the symmetry to the C2 space group. Indeed, these compositions exhibit a unique Si crystallographic site and an Si-O-Si angle lower than 180{sup o}, incompatible with the C2/m space group. C2 is the only possible alternative. Space group Cm can be discarded with regard to its two different Si sites per unit cell. Moreover, {sup 89}Y MAS NMR data have revealed the existence of two different Y sites in the structure of the intermediate members of the Sc{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}-{beta}-Y{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} system, confirming the lowering of the symmetry to the C2 space group. The viability of the C2 model has therefore been tested and confirmed by refinement of synchrotron and neutron powder diffraction data for the different members of the system. The structural evolutions across the Sc{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}-{beta}-Y{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} system are discussed.

  13. Analysis of 31P MAS NMR spectra and transversal relaxation of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1994-01-01

    Phosphorus magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and transversal relaxation of M13 and TMV are analyzed by use of a model, which includes both local backbone motions of the encapsulated nucleic acid molecules and overall rotational diffusion of the rod-shaped virions about their length axis. Backbone motions influence the sideband intensities by causing a fast restricted reorientation of the phosphodiesters. To evaluate their influence on the observed sideband patterns, we extend the model that we used previously to analyze nonspinning 31P NMR lineshapes (Magusin, P.C.M.M., and M. A. Hemminga. 1993a. Biophys. J. 64:1861-1868) to magic angle spinning NMR experiments. Backbone motions also influence the conformation of the phosphodiesters, causing conformational averaging of the isotropic chemical shift, which offers a possible explanation for the various linewidths of the centerband and the sidebands observed for M13 gels under various conditions. The change of the experimental lineshape of M13 as a function of temperature and hydration is interpreted in terms of fast restricted fluctuation of the dihedral angles between the POC and the OCH planes on both sides of the 31P nucleus in the nucleic acid backbone. Backbone motions also seem to be the main cause of transversal relaxation measured at spinning rates of 4 kHz or higher. At spinning rates less than 2 kHz, transversal relaxation is significantly faster. This effect is assigned to slow, overall rotation of the rod-shaped M13 phage about its length axis. Equations are derived to simulate the observed dependence of T2e on the spinning rate. PMID:8038391

  14. Comparative analysis of the interaction of capecitabine and gefitinib with human serum albumin using (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance-based approach.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Yan, Jin; Sun, Pingchuan; Xu, Kailin; Li, Shanshan; Yang, Hongqi; Li, Hui

    2016-09-10

    Monitoring the interaction between drugs and proteins is critical to understanding drug transport and metabolism underlying pharmacodynamics. The binding capacities to human serum albumin of two anticancer drugs, capecitabine and gefitinib, were compared via an approach combining (19)F NMR, (1)H saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR, circular dichroism and docking simulations. Results showed that the two drugs interaction with human serum albumin caused (19)F NMR signal shifted to different directions. Capecitabine had accurate binding site and higher binding affinity than gefitinib. This study provided fresh insights into ligand-protein interaction and the strength of (19)F NMR approach in biomedical research was well illustrated in this case.

  15. Comparative analysis of the interaction of capecitabine and gefitinib with human serum albumin using (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance-based approach.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Yan, Jin; Sun, Pingchuan; Xu, Kailin; Li, Shanshan; Yang, Hongqi; Li, Hui

    2016-09-10

    Monitoring the interaction between drugs and proteins is critical to understanding drug transport and metabolism underlying pharmacodynamics. The binding capacities to human serum albumin of two anticancer drugs, capecitabine and gefitinib, were compared via an approach combining (19)F NMR, (1)H saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR, circular dichroism and docking simulations. Results showed that the two drugs interaction with human serum albumin caused (19)F NMR signal shifted to different directions. Capecitabine had accurate binding site and higher binding affinity than gefitinib. This study provided fresh insights into ligand-protein interaction and the strength of (19)F NMR approach in biomedical research was well illustrated in this case. PMID:27392172

  16. Structural investigations of PuIII phosphate by X-ray diffraction, MAS-NMR and XANES spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Karin; Raison, Philippe E.; Martel, Laura; Martin, Philippe M.; Prieur, Damien; Solari, Pier L.; Bouëxière, Daniel; Konings, Rudy J. M.; Somers, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    PuPO4 was prepared by a solid state reaction method and its crystal structure at room temperature was solved by powder X-ray diffraction combined with Rietveld refinement. High resolution XANES measurements confirm the +III valence state of plutonium, in agreement with valence bond derivation. The presence of the americium (as β- decay product of plutonium) in the +III oxidation state was determined based on XANES spectroscopy. High resolution solid state 31P NMR agrees with the XANES results and the presence of a solid-solution.

  17. Al environment in tectosilicate and peraluminous glasses: A 27Al MQ-MAS NMR, Raman, and XANES investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, Daniel R.; Cormier, Laurent; Massiot, Dominique

    2004-12-01

    Tecto-aluminosilicate and peraluminous glasses have been prepared by conventional and laser heating techniques, respectively, in the CaO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2 system. The structure of these glasses were studied using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray absorption at the Al K-edge and 27Al NMR spectroscopy with two different high fields (400 and 750 MHz). Raman spectroscopy and X-ray absorption are techniques sensitive to the network polymerization and, in particular, show different signal as a function of silica content. However, these two techniques are less sensitive than NMR to describe the local aluminium environment. For tectosilicate glasses, aluminium in five-fold coordination, [5]Al, was found and a careful quantification allows the determination of a significant amount of [5]Al (7% in the anorthite glass). The proportion of [5]Al increases for the peraluminous glasses with small amounts (<2%) of six-fold coordination, [6]Al. The presence of [5]Al agrees with previous observations of the existence of nonbridging oxygens (NBOs) in tectosilicate compositions. However, the proportion of [5]Al in the present study indicates that no major proportion of triclusters (oxygen coordinated to three (Si,Al)O 4 tetrahedra) is required to explain these NBOS.

  18. Solubilization and localization of weakly polar lipids in unsonicated egg phosphatidylcholine: A sup 13 C MAS NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J.A. ); Fujito, D.T.; Hammer, C.F. )

    1991-03-19

    The weakly polar lipids cholesteryl ester, triacylglycerol, and diacylglycerol incorporate to a limited extent into the lamellar structure of small unilamellar vesicles. The localization of the carbonyl group(s) at the aqueous interface was detected by ({sup 13}C)carbonyl chemical shift changes relative to the neat unhydrated lipid. This study uses {sup 13}C NMR to investigate the interactions of thes lipids with unsonicated (multilamellar) phosphatidylcholine, a model system for cellular membranes and surfaces of emulsion particles with low curvature. Magic angle spinning reduced the broad lines of the unsonicated dispersions to narrow lines comparable to those from sonicated dispersions. ({sup 13}C)Carbonyl chemical shifts revealed incorporation of the three lipids into the lamellar structure of the unsonicated phospholipids and a partial hydration of the carbonyl groups similar to that observed in small vesicles. Other properties of interfacial weakly polar lipids in multilayers were similar to those in small unilamellar bilayers. There is thus a general tendency of weakly polar lipids to incorparate at least to a small extent into the lamellar structure of phospholipids and take on interfacial properties that are distinct from their bulk-phase properties. This pool of surface-located lipid is likely to be directly involved in enzymatyic transformations and protein-mediated transport. The {sup 13}C magic angle spinning NMR method may be generally useful for determining the orientation of molecules in model membranes.

  19. Investigation of the Structure and Active Sites of TiO2 Nanorod Supported VOx Catalysts by High-Field and Fast-Spinning 51V MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Xu, Suochang; Li, Weizhen; Hu, Mary Y.; Deng, Xuchu; Dixon, David A.; Vasiliu, Monica; Craciun, Raluca; Wang, Yong; Bao, Xinhe; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-07-02

    Supported VOx/TiO2-Rod catalysts were studied by 51V MAS NMR at high field using a sample spinning rate of 55 kHz. The superior spectral resolution allows for the observation of at least five vanadate species. The assignment of these vanadate species was carried out by quantum mechanical calculations of 51V NMR chemical shifts of model V-surface structures. Methanol oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) was used to establish the correlation between the reaction rate and the various surface V-sites. It is found that monomeric V-species dominated the catalyst at low vanadium loadings with two peaks observed at about -502 and -529 ppm. V-dimers with two bridged oxygen appeare at about -555 ppm. Vanadate dimers and polyvanadates connected by one bridged oxygen atom between two adjacent V atoms resonate at about -630 ppm. A positive correlation is found between the V-dimers related to the -555 ppm peak and the ODH rate while a better correlation is obtained by including monomeric contributions. This result indicates that surface V-dimers related to the -555 ppm peak are the major active sites for ODH reaction despite mono-V species are more catalytic active but their relative ratios are decreased dramatically at high V-loadings. Furthermore, a portion of the V-species is found invisible. In particular, the level of such invisibility increases with decreased level of V-loading, suggesting the existence of paramagnetic V-species at the surface.

  20. Analysis of mercerization process based on the intensity change of deconvoluted resonances of (13)C CP/MAS NMR: Cellulose mercerized under cooling and non-cooling conditions.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kento; Nakano, Takato

    2015-08-01

    The area intensity change of C1, C4, and C6 in spectrum obtained by (13)C CP/MAS NMR and the mutual relationship between their changes were examined for cellulose samples treated with various concentrations of aqueous NaOH solutions under non-cooling and cooling conditions. The area intensity of C1-up and C6-down changed cooperatively with that of C4-down which corresponds to the crystallinity of samples: "-up" and "-down" are the up- and down- field component in a splitting peak of NMR spectrum, respectively. The intensity change of C1-up starts to decrease with decreasing in that of C4-down after that of C6-down is almost complete. These changes were more clearly observed for samples treated under cooling condition. It can be suggested that their characteristic change relates closely to the change in conformation of cellulose chains by induced decrystallization and the subsequent crystallization of cellulose II, and presumed that their changes at microscopic level relate to the macroscopic morphological changes such as contraction along the length of cellulose chains and recovery along the length. PMID:26042706

  1. (19)F Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancement: A Valuable Tool for Distance Measurements in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Matei, Elena; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Fluorine NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement was evaluated as a versatile approach for extracting distance information in selectively F-labeled proteins. Proof of concept and initial applications are presented for the HIV-inactivating lectin cyanovirin-N. Single F atoms were introduced at the 4-, 5-, 6- or 7 positions of Trp49 and the 4-position of Phe4, Phe54, and Phe80. The paramagnetic nitroxide spin label was attached to Cys residues that were placed into the protein at positions 50 or 52. (19)F-T2  NMR spectra with different relaxation delays were recorded and the transverse (19)F-PRE rate, (19)F-Γ2 , was used to determine the average distance between the F nucleus and the paramagnetic center. Our data show that experimental (19)F PRE-based distances correspond to 0.93 of the (1)HN-PRE distances, in perfect agreement with the gyromagnetic γ(19)F/γ(1)H ratio, thereby demonstrating that (19)F PREs are excellent alternative parameters for quantitative distance measurements in selectively F-labeled proteins.

  2. Al speciation in tropical podzols of the upper Amazon Basin: A solid-state 27Al MAS and MQMAS NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardy, Marion; Bonhomme, Christian; Fritsch, Emmanuel; Maquet, Jocelyne; Hajjar, Redouane; Allard, Thierry; Derenne, Sylvie; Calas, Georges

    2007-07-01

    In the upper Amazon Basin, aluminum previously accumulated in lateritic formations is massively remobilised in soils by podzolization and exported in waters. We have investigated the speciation of aluminum in the clay-size fractions of eight horizons of waterlogged podzols lying in a depression of a plateau. The horizons illustrate the main steps involved in the podzolization of laterites. They belong to eluviated topsoil A horizons and illuviated subsoil Bhs, Bh and 2BCs horizons of weakly and better-expressed podzols located at the margin and centre of the depression. For the first time, aluminum speciation is quantitatively assessed in soils by spectroscopic methods, namely FTIR, 27Al magic angle spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The results thus obtained are compared to chemical extraction data. Solid-state 27Al MAS NMR spectra enable to distinguish Al bound to organic compounds from that incorporated in secondary mineral phases detected by FTIR. MQMAS experiments additionally show that both chemical shifts and quadrupolar constants are distributed for Al nuclei linked with organic compounds. Similar amounts of chelated Al are obtained from NMR spectra and chemical extractions. The study enables to highlight three major steps in the fate of aluminum. (i) Aluminum is first released by mineral weathering, feeds complexing sites of organic matter and accumulates in subsurface Bhs horizons of weakly expressed podzols (acidocomplexolysis). (ii) Complexes of aluminum with organic matter (Al-OM) then migrate downwards in sandy horizons of better-expressed podzols and accumulate at depth in less permeable 2BCs horizons. (iii) The minor amounts of aluminum present in the 2BCs horizon of the downslope podzol show that aluminum is eventually exported towards the river network, either complexed with organic matter or as Al 3+ ions after desorption from organic compounds, due to decreasing pH or

  3. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  4. Hybridizing cross-polarization with NOE or refocused-INEPT enhances the sensitivity of MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-05-01

    Heteronuclear cross polarization (CP) has been commonly used to enhance the sensitivity of dilute low-γ nuclei in almost all solid-state NMR experiments. However, CP relies on heteronuclear dipolar couplings, and therefore the magnetization transfer efficiency becomes inefficient when the dipolar couplings are weak, as is often the case for mobile components in solids. Here, we demonstrate methods that combine CP with heteronuclear Overhauser effect (referred to as CP-NOE) or with refocused-INEPT (referred to as CP-RINEPT) to overcome the efficiency limitation of CP and enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for mobile components. Our experimental results reveal that, compared to the conventional CP, significant S/N ratio enhancement can be achieved for resonances originating from mobile components, whereas the resonance signals associated with rigid groups are not significantly affected due to their long spin-lattice relaxation times. In fact, the S/N enhancement factor is also dependent on the temperature, CP contact time as well as on the system under investigation. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that CP-RINEPT experiment can be successfully employed to independently detect mobile and rigid signals in a single experiment without affecting the data collection time. However, the resolution of CP spectrum obtained from the CP-RINEPT experiment could be slightly compromised by the mandatory use of continuous wave (CW) decoupling during the acquisition of signals from rigid components. In addition, CP-RINEPT experiment can be used for spectral editing utilizing the difference in dynamics of different regions of a molecule and/or different components present in the sample, and could also be useful for the assignment of resonances from mobile components in poorly resolved spectra. Therefore, we believe that the proposed approaches are beneficial for the structural characterization of multiphase and heterogeneous systems, and could be used as a building block in

  5. Atomic structure and dehydration mechanism of amorphous silica: Insights from 29Si and 1H solid-state MAS NMR study of SiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Na; Lee, Sung Keun

    2013-11-01

    Detailed knowledge of the atomic structure of hydrous species on surface of amorphous silica and the effect of temperature and particle size on their atomic configurations are essential to understand the nature of fluids-amorphous silicates interactions and the dehydration processes in the amorphous oxides. Here, we report the 29Si, 1H MAS, and 1H-29Si heteronuclear correlation (HetCor) NMR spectra of 7 nm and 14 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles—a model system for natural amorphous silica—where previously unknown details of changes in their atomic structures with varying dehydration temperature and particle size are revealed. Diverse hydroxyl groups with varying atomic configurations and molecular water apparently show distinct dehydration trends. The dehydration (i.e., removal of water) of amorphous silica nanoparticles mostly results in the increase of isolated silanol by removing water molecules from hydrogen-bonded silanols associated water molecules. With further increase in dehydration temperature, the intensity of isolated silanol peak decreases above ˜873 K, suggesting that the condensation of isolated silanol may occur mainly above ˜873 K. The entire dehydration (and dehydroxylation) process completes at ˜1473 K. Both the water (i.e., physisorbed water and hydrogen-bonded water) and hydrogen-bonded silanol species show a dramatic change in the slope of intensity variation at ˜873 K, indicating that most of silanols is hydrogen-bonded to water rather than to other silanols. The fraction of hydrogen-bonded proton species is also much smaller in 14 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles than in 7 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles mainly due to the presences of larger fractions of water and hydrogen-bonded silanol species. 29Si NMR results show that with increasing dehydration temperature, the fraction of Q4 species apparently increases at the expense of Q2 and Q3 species. The fractions of Q2 and Q3 structures in 7 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles are

  6. MAS-NMR investigations of the crystallization behaviour of lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glasses containing P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and TiO{sub 2} nucleants

    SciTech Connect

    Ananthanarayanan, A.; Kothiyal, G.P.; Montagne, L.; Revel, B.

    2010-06-15

    Lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glass of composition (mol%) 20.4Li{sub 2}O-4.0Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-68.6SiO{sub 2}-3.0K{sub 2}O-2.6B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0.5P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-0.9TiO{sub 2} was prepared by melt quenching. The glass was then nucleated and crystallized based on differential thermal analysis (DTA) data and was characterized by {sup 29}Si, {sup 31}P, {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al MAS-NMR. XRD and {sup 29}Si NMR showed that lithium metasilicate (Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) is the first phase to c form followed by cristobalite (SiO{sub 2}) and lithium disilicate (Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}). {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR revealed a change in the network structure already for the glasses nucleated at 550 {sup o}C. Since crystalline Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, as observed by {sup 31}P MAS-NMR, forms concurrently with the silicate phases, we conclude that crystalline Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} does not act as a nucleating agent for lithium silicate phases. Moreover, {sup 31}P NMR indicates the formation of M-PO{sub 4} (M=B, Al or Ti) complexes. The presence of BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} structural units in all the glass/glass-ceramic samples is revealed through {sup 11}B MAS-NMR. B remains in the residual glass and the crystallization of silicate phases causes a reduction in the number of alkali ions available for charge compensation. As a result, the number of trigonally coordinated B (BO{sub 3}) increases at the expense of tetrahedrally coordinated B (BO{sub 4}). The {sup 27}Al MAS-NMR spectra indicate the presence of tetrahedrally coordinated Al species, which are only slightly perturbed by the crystallization. - Graphical abstract: {sup 11}B MAS-NMR spectra of LAS glass heat treated at different temperatures, showing the evolution of the residual glass matrix during the crystallization treatment. High-field (18.8 T) NMR enables us to record high resolution spectra, from which the glass network modifications could be related to the formation of intermediate lithium silicate crystalline phases.

  7. The 15N(α,γ)19F reaction and nucleosynthesis of 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmes, S.; Wilmes, V.; Staudt, G.; Mohr, P.; Hammer, J. W.

    2002-12-01

    Several resonances in the 15N(α,γ)19F reaction have been investigated in the energy range between 0.6 MeV and 2.7 MeV. Resonance strengths and branching ratios have been determined. High sensitivity could be obtained by the combination of the Dynamitron high current accelerator, the windowless gas target system Rhinoceros, and actively shielded germanium detectors. Two levels of 19F could be observed for the first time in the (α,γ) channel, and several weak branchings below the detection limits of previous experiments were measured. Two observed resonances correspond to α-cluster states in 19F, which have been assigned unambiguously. The astrophysical reaction rate is derived from this set of resonance strengths.

  8. Accurate determination of order parameters from 1H,15N dipolar couplings in MAS solid-state NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2009-10-01

    A reliable site-specific estimate of the individual N-H bond lengths in the protein backbone is the fundamental basis of any relaxation experiment in solution and in the solid-state NMR. The N-H bond length can in principle be influenced by hydrogen bonding, which would result in an increased N-H distance. At the same time, dynamics in the backbone induces a reduction of the experimental dipolar coupling due to motional averaging. We present a 3D dipolar recoupling experiment in which the (1)H,(15)N dipolar coupling is reintroduced in the indirect dimension using phase-inverted CP to eliminate effects from rf inhomogeneity. We find no variation of the N-H dipolar coupling as a function of hydrogen bonding. Instead, variations in the (1)H,(15)N dipolar coupling seem to be due to dynamics of the protein backbone. This is supported by the observed correlation between the H(N)-N dipolar coupling and the amide proton chemical shift. The experiment is demonstrated for a perdeuterated sample of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain. Perdeuteration is a prerequisite to achieve high accuracy. The average error in the analysis of the H-N dipolar couplings is on the order of +/-370 Hz (+/-0.012 A) and can be as small as 150 Hz, corresponding to a variation of the bond length of +/-0.005 A.

  9. Effect of organic matter application on CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectra of humic acids from a brown soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.

    2009-04-01

    The humified SOM or humic substances (HS) composed of humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA) and humin (HM) represent the most microbially recalcitrant and stable reservoir of organic carbon in soil (Piccolo et al., 2004). OM applications can influence the amount and structural characteristics of HS(Dou et al., 2008). During the past few decades, there has been much research on HS, but their chemical structure is still not fully understood (Dong, 2006).CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectroscopy was considered as an effective method to study structures of HS without dissolving problem compared with liquid 13C-NMR (Conte et al., 1997; Dou et al., 2008). It can directly measure the carbon framework and reflect the nature of HS transformation after OM application (Spaccini et al., 2000). For that reason, this method was applied in this study. The objective of this paper was to clarify the effect of long term OM application on the changes of structural characteristics in HAs, which provided new information for improving soil fertility by OM application. The experiment was carried out on a brown soil (Paleudalf in USDA Soil Taxonomy) at Shenyang Agricultural University, Liaoning province, China (N41°48'-E123°25'). The experiment included 3 treatments: zero-treatment (CKbr), and two pig manure (PM) treatments (O1 and O2) at the rates of 0.9 t ha-1 and 1.8 t ha-1 of organic carbon, respectively. The samples of the HA fraction were extracted, separated and purified according to the method described by Dou et al. (1991). Elemental composition, Differential thermal analysis (DTA), -lgK value, FT-IR and CP-MAS- 13C-NMR of HAs were performed. Effects on the contents of orgaic carbon and its composition. The contents of TOC were from 8.77 g kg-1 to 12.25 g kg-1. The relative contents in TOC for WSS, HA, and FA were 6.87%, 14.2% and 19.8%. Comparing the CKbr, the contents of WSS, HA and FA for O1 and O2 increased, but relative contents of WSS and FA decreased. The content of the HA increased after

  10. Effect of organic matter application on CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectra of humic acids from a brown soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.

    2009-04-01

    The humified SOM or humic substances (HS) composed of humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA) and humin (HM) represent the most microbially recalcitrant and stable reservoir of organic carbon in soil (Piccolo et al., 2004). OM applications can influence the amount and structural characteristics of HS(Dou et al., 2008). During the past few decades, there has been much research on HS, but their chemical structure is still not fully understood (Dong, 2006).CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectroscopy was considered as an effective method to study structures of HS without dissolving problem compared with liquid 13C-NMR (Conte et al., 1997; Dou et al., 2008). It can directly measure the carbon framework and reflect the nature of HS transformation after OM application (Spaccini et al., 2000). For that reason, this method was applied in this study. The objective of this paper was to clarify the effect of long term OM application on the changes of structural characteristics in HAs, which provided new information for improving soil fertility by OM application. The experiment was carried out on a brown soil (Paleudalf in USDA Soil Taxonomy) at Shenyang Agricultural University, Liaoning province, China (N41°48'-E123°25'). The experiment included 3 treatments: zero-treatment (CKbr), and two pig manure (PM) treatments (O1 and O2) at the rates of 0.9 t ha-1 and 1.8 t ha-1 of organic carbon, respectively. The samples of the HA fraction were extracted, separated and purified according to the method described by Dou et al. (1991). Elemental composition, Differential thermal analysis (DTA), -lgK value, FT-IR and CP-MAS- 13C-NMR of HAs were performed. Effects on the contents of orgaic carbon and its composition. The contents of TOC were from 8.77 g kg-1 to 12.25 g kg-1. The relative contents in TOC for WSS, HA, and FA were 6.87%, 14.2% and 19.8%. Comparing the CKbr, the contents of WSS, HA and FA for O1 and O2 increased, but relative contents of WSS and FA decreased. The content of the HA increased after

  11. 19F NMR ligand perturbation studies on 6,7-bis(trifluoromethyl)-8-ribityllumazine-7-hydrates and the lumazine synthase complex of Bacillus subtilis. Site-directed mutagenesis changes the mechanism and the stereoselectivity of the catalyzed haloform-type reaction.

    PubMed

    Scheuring, J; Kugelbrey, K; Weinkauf, S; Cushman, M; Bacher, A; Fischer, M

    2001-06-01

    The riboflavin synthase/lumazine synthase complex of Bacillus subtilis catalyzes the last two steps in riboflavin biosynthesis. The protein comprises a capsid of 60 beta subunits with lumazine synthase activity and a core of three alpha subunits with riboflavin synthase activity. The beta subunits catalyze the formation of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine (3) from 5-amino-6-ribitylamino-2,4(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione (1) and 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate (2). Complexes of recombinant lumazine synthase (beta(60) capsids) with 6-trifluoromethyl-7-oxo-8-ribityllumazine (10) as well as 7S- or 7R-6,7-bistrifluoromethyl-8-ribityllumazine hydrate (11) were studied by (19)F NMR spectroscopy. Despite the large molecular weight of approximately 960 kDa of the protein, spectra with separated signals of free and bound ligand could be obtained. An unusually large shift difference of 8 ppm was observed between the 7-trifluoromethyl signals of free and bound ligand for epimer B of 11 and the enzyme. The signal is sensitive to the replacement of amino acid residues F22 and H88. Lumazine synthase catalyzes the elimination of the 7-trifluoromethyl group of R-diastereomer epimer A in a haloform-like reaction. The elimination reaction is also catalyzed by F22 mutants. The H88R mutant displays an opposite stereoselectivity for epimer B and a greatly enhanced reaction rate. From a model of the epimers in the active site of the protein, the main function of the side chain of F22 seems to be to keep the substrate ring in the correct position. H88 is in a position suited to act as proton acceptor in both the physiological as well as the haloform reaction. A different mechanism of the haloform-reaction is proposed in the case of the H88R mutant, initiated by hydrogen bonding of the 7-trifluorormethyl group and the guanidinium group of the arginine residue.

  12. 19F MRI for quantitative in vivo cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Mangala; Heerschap, Arend; Ahrens, Eric T.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular therapy, including stem cell transplants and dendritic cell vaccines, is typically monitored for dosage optimization, accurate delivery and localization using non-invasive imaging, of which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a key modality. 19F MRI retains the advantages of MRI as an imaging modality, while allowing direct detection of labelled cells for unambiguous identification and quantification, unlike typical metal-based contrast agents. Recent developments in 19F MRI-based in vivo cell quantification, the existing clinical use of 19F compounds and current explosive interest in cellular therapeutics have brought 19F imaging technology closer to clinical application. We review the application of 19F MRI to cell tracking, discussing intracellular 19F labels, cell labelling and in vivo quantification, as well as the potential clinical use of 19F MRI. PMID:20427096

  13. Simultaneous cross polarization to 13C and 15N with 1H detection at 60 kHz MAS solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bibhuti B.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe high resolution MAS solid-state NMR experiments that utilize 1H detection with 60 kHz magic angle spinning; simultaneous cross-polarization from 1H to 15N and 13C nuclei; bidirectional cross-polarization between 13C and 15N nuclei; detection of both amide nitrogen and aliphatic carbon 1H; and measurement of both 13C and 15N chemical shifts through multi-dimensional correlation experiments. Three-dimensional experiments correlate amide 1H and alpha 1H selectively with 13C or 15N nuclei in a polypeptide chain. Two separate three-dimensional spectra correlating 1Hα/13Cα/1HN and 1HN/15N/1Hα are recorded simultaneously in a single experiment, demonstrating that a twofold savings in experimental time is potentially achievable. Spectral editing using bidirectional coherence transfer pathways enables simultaneous magnetization transfers between 15N, 13Cα(i) and 13C‧(i-1), facilitating intra- and inter-residue correlations for sequential resonance assignment. Non-uniform sampling is integrated into the experiments, further reducing the length of experimental time.

  14. 1H HR-MAS NMR Based Metabolic Profiling of Cells in Response to Treatment with a Hexacationic Ruthenium Metallaprism as Potential Anticancer Drug

    PubMed Central

    Vermathen, Martina; Paul, Lydia E. H.; Diserens, Gaëlle

    2015-01-01

    1H high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy was applied in combination with multivariate statistical analyses to study the metabolic response of whole cells to the treatment with a hexacationic ruthenium metallaprism [1]6+ as potential anticancer drug. Human ovarian cancer cells (A2780), the corresponding cisplatin resistant cells (A2780cisR), and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293) were each incubated for 24 h and 72 h with [1]6+ and compared to untreated cells. Different responses were obtained depending on the cell type and incubation time. Most pronounced changes were found for lipids, choline containing compounds, glutamate and glutathione, nucleotide sugars, lactate, and some amino acids. Possible contributions of these metabolites to physiologic processes are discussed. The time-dependent metabolic response patterns suggest that A2780 cells on one hand and HEK-293 cells and A2780cisR cells on the other hand may follow different cell death pathways and exist in different temporal stages thereof. PMID:26024484

  15. The relationship between reorientational molecular motions and phase transitions in [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2}, studied with the use of {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR and FT-MIR

    SciTech Connect

    Mikuli, Edward Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Grad, Bartłomiej; Kozak, Asja; Wąsicki, Jan W.; Bilski, Paweł; Hołderna-Natkaniec, Krystyna; Medycki, Wojciech

    2015-02-14

    A {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance study of [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2} has confirmed the existence of two phase transitions at T{sub c1} ≈ 257 K and T{sub c2} ≈ 142 K, detected earlier by the DSC method. These transitions were reflected by changes in the temperature dependences of both proton and fluorine of second moments M{sub 2}{sup H} and M{sub 2}{sup F} and of spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1}{sup H} and T{sub 1}{sup F}. The study revealed anisotropic reorientations of whole [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} cations, reorientations by 180° jumps of H{sub 2}O ligands, and aniso- and isotropic reorientations of BF{sub 4}{sup −} anions. The activation parameters for these motions were obtained. It was found that the phase transition at T{sub c1} is associated with the reorientation of the cation as a whole unit around the C{sub 3} axis and that at T{sub c2} with isotropic reorientation of the BF{sub 4}{sup −} anions. The temperature dependence of the full width at half maximum value of the infrared band of ρ{sub t}(H{sub 2}O) mode (at ∼596 cm{sup −1}) indicated that in phases I and II, all H{sub 2}O ligands in [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} perform fast reorientational motions (180° jumps) with a mean value of activation energy equal to ca 10 kJ mole{sup −1}, what is fully consistent with NMR results. The phase transition at T{sub c1} is associated with a sudden change of speed of fast (τ{sub R} ≈ 10{sup −12} s) reorientational motions of H{sub 2}O ligands. Below T{sub c2} (in phase III), the reorientations of certain part of the H{sub 2}O ligands significantly slow down, while others continue their fast reorientation with an activation energy of ca 2 kJ mole{sup −1}. This fast reorientation cannot be evidenced in NMR relaxation experiments. Splitting of certain IR bands connected with H{sub 2}O ligands at the observed phase transitions suggests a reduction of the symmetry of the octahedral [Mg(H{sub 2}O

  16. Solid state {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectroscopy and conductivity measurements on NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Risskov Sørensen, Daniel; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Skou, Eivind M.

    2014-11-15

    A systematic study of composite powders of niobium oxide phosphate (NbOPO{sub 4}) and phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) has been performed in order to characterize the material's ability to perform as an electrolyte material in medium temperature fuel cells and electrolyzers. Powders of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} contents between 13.1 and 74.2 M% were produced and characterized with powder X-ray diffraction, {sup 31}P MAS NMR and impedance spectroscopy. NMR revealed that a significant degree of dehydration and vaporization of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} takes place above 200 °C, and increases with temperature. At 500 °C the NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} has reacted to form niobium pyrophosphate (Nb{sub 2}P{sub 4}O{sub 15}). Impedance spectroscopy showed an increase in conductivity with increasing acid concentration, whereas the conductivity decreased slightly with increasing temperature. The highest conductivity measured was 2.5·10{sup −3} S/cm for a sample containing 74.2 M% of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Lastly, it was shown that NbOPO{sub 4} has no significant conductivity of its own. - Graphical abstract: Conductivity of NbOPO{sub 4}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} composites as a function of equivalent P{sub 2}O{sub 5} content. The conductivity is insignificant for pure NbOPO{sub 4}. - Highlights: • Composites have been made from NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. • The composites composition has been investigated with solid state NMR. • The composites have shown clear signs of acid dehydration upon heating. • The conductivity of the composites increases for increasing acid content. • NbOPO{sub 4} has no significant conductivity of its own.

  17. I: Low Frequency NMR and NQR Using a dc SQUID. II: Variable-temperature 13C CP/MAS of Organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegeweid, M.A.

    1995-11-29

    NMR and NQR at low frequencies are difficult prospects due to small nuclear spin polarization. Furthermore, the sensitivity'of the inductive pickup circuitry of standard spectrometers is reduced as the frequency is lowered. I have used a cw-SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) spectrometer, which has no such frequency dependence, to study the local atomic environment of {sup 14}N via the quadrupolar interaction. Because {sup 14}N has spin I = 1 and a 0-6 MHz frequency range, it is not possible to obtain well-resolved spectra in high magnetic fields. I have used a technique to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances via their effect on neighboring protons mediated by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction to study peptides and narcotics. The sensitivity of the SQUID is not enough to measure low-frequency surface (or other low spin density) systems. The application of spin-polarized xenon has been previously used to enhance polarization in conventional NMR experiments. Because xenon only polarizes spins with which it is in contact, it is surface selective. While differences in chemical shifts between surface and bulk spins are not large, it is expected that the differences in quadrupole coupling constant should be very large due to the drastic change of the electric field gradient surrounding spins at the surface. With this in mind, I have taken preliminary steps to measure SQUID detected polarization transfer from Xe to another spin species at 4.2 K and in small magnetic fields (<50 G). In this regime, the spin-lattice relaxation of xenon is dependent on the applied magnetic field. The results of our efforts to characterize the relaxation of xenon are presented. The final section describes the solid-state variable-temperature (VT) one- and two-dimensional {sup 13}C cross polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of Hf({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, Zr({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3}({eta}{sup 1}-C

  18. Current issues in the utility of 19F nuclear magnetic resonance methodologies for the assessment of tumour hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Simon P; Griffiths, John R

    2004-01-01

    It is now well established that uncontrolled proliferation of tumour cells together with the chaotic and poorly regulated blood supply of solid tumours result in tissue hypoxia, and that hypoxic regions of tumours are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The development and application of non-invasive methods to rapidly determine the degree and extent of tumour hypoxia in an individual tumour would clearly enhance cancer treatment strategies. This review describes the current status of two (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methodologies that have been exploited to investigate tumour hypoxia, namely: (i) (19)F NMR oximetry following administration of perfluorocarbons, from which tumour p(O)(2) measurements can be made; and (ii) (19)F NMR measurements of the tumour retention of fluorinated 2-nitroimidazoles. PMID:15306411

  19. (19)F-encoded combinatorial libraries: discovery of selective metal binding and catalytic peptoids.

    PubMed

    Pirrung, Michael C; Park, Kaapjoo; Tumey, L Nathan

    2002-01-01

    A (19)F NMR method for encoding of combinatorial libraries has been developed. Aryl fluorides whose chemical shifts are modified by aromatic substituents were prepared and attached to resin support beads that were used in the split-pool synthesis of peptoids. The detection of the (19)F NMR signal of tags derived from a single "big bead" was demonstrated. The library diversity arises from peptoid amines and the cyclic anhydrides used in their acylation. The resulting 90-compound library was examined for metal ion binding, and novel ligands for iron and copper were discovered. Their binding constants were determined to be in the low micromolar range using conventional methods. The library was also examined for autocatalysis of acylation, and a molecule possessing the catalytic triad of serine proteases was deduced.

  20. Structural investigations of silicate-phosphate glasses containing MoO3 by FTIR, Raman and 31P MAS NMR spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Szumera, M

    2014-09-15

    Molybdenum is a transition metal (refers to the "d" block of the periodic table) whose atom has an incomplete d sub-shell. It is known that in silicate glasses molybdenum may exist under four oxidation states: Mo6+, Mo5+, Mo4+ and Mo3+, simultaneously molybdenum cations, depending on their content in the glass network, may either be a glass forming component, or act as a modifier. The contemporary literature data show studies conducted mostly on the structure of silicate, phosphate, borate and borosilicate glasses containing molybdenum ions, but not silicate-phosphate glasses. Therefore, the author has undertaken detailed studies using FTIR, Raman and 31P MAS NMR techniques in order to examine the effect of MoO3 addition into the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses from SiO2P2O5K2OCaOMgO system. On the basis of obtained results it was concluded that molybdenum ions in the analysed glasses act as a modifier, which follows from the gradual breakage of oxygen bridges, i.e. POP, SiOSi, and SiOP, and the following formation of connections such as Mo[MoO4]OSi and/or Mo[MoO4]OP. In summary, it is concluded that the increase of MoO3 content (up to 4.4 mol.%) in the structure of glasses of SiO2P2O5K2OMgOCaO system results in weakening of the structure and gradual increase of the degree of silico-oxygen and phosphor-oxygen frameworks depolymerisation.

  1. Structural investigations of silicate-phosphate glasses containing MoO3 by FTIR, Raman and 31P MAS NMR spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Szumera, M

    2014-09-15

    Molybdenum is a transition metal (refers to the "d" block of the periodic table) whose atom has an incomplete d sub-shell. It is known that in silicate glasses molybdenum may exist under four oxidation states: Mo6+, Mo5+, Mo4+ and Mo3+, simultaneously molybdenum cations, depending on their content in the glass network, may either be a glass forming component, or act as a modifier. The contemporary literature data show studies conducted mostly on the structure of silicate, phosphate, borate and borosilicate glasses containing molybdenum ions, but not silicate-phosphate glasses. Therefore, the author has undertaken detailed studies using FTIR, Raman and 31P MAS NMR techniques in order to examine the effect of MoO3 addition into the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses from SiO2P2O5K2OCaOMgO system. On the basis of obtained results it was concluded that molybdenum ions in the analysed glasses act as a modifier, which follows from the gradual breakage of oxygen bridges, i.e. POP, SiOSi, and SiOP, and the following formation of connections such as Mo[MoO4]OSi and/or Mo[MoO4]OP. In summary, it is concluded that the increase of MoO3 content (up to 4.4 mol.%) in the structure of glasses of SiO2P2O5K2OMgOCaO system results in weakening of the structure and gradual increase of the degree of silico-oxygen and phosphor-oxygen frameworks depolymerisation. PMID:24759778

  2. A bisphosphonate for 19F-magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Gavin D.; Shaw, Karen P.; Sivachelvam, Saranja; White, Andrew J.P.; Botnar, Rene M.; T.M. de Rosales, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    19F-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising technique that may allow us to measure the concentration of exogenous fluorinated imaging probes quantitatively in vivo. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterisation of a novel geminal bisphosphonate (19F-BP) that contains chemically-equivalent fluorine atoms that show a single and narrow 19F resonance and a bisphosphonate group that may be used for labelling inorganic materials based in calcium phosphates and metal oxides. The potential of 19F-BP to provide contrast was analysed in vitro and in vivo using 19F-MRI. In vitro studies demonstrated the potential of 19F-BP as an MRI contrast agent in the millimolar concentration range with signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) comparable to previously reported fluorinated probes. The preliminary in vivo MRI study reported here allowed us to visualise the biodistribution of 19F-BP, showing uptake in the liver and in the bladder/urinary system areas. However, bone uptake was not observed. In addition, 19F-BP showed undesirable toxicity effects in mice that prevent further studies with this compound at the required concentrations for MRI contrast. This study highlights the importance of developing 19F MRI probes with the highest signal intensity achievable. PMID:27110036

  3. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  4. Modeling Ti/Ge Distribution in LiTi2-xGex(PO4)3 NASICON Series by (31)P MAS NMR and First-Principles DFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Diez-Gómez, Virginia; Arbi, Kamel; Sanz, Jesús

    2016-08-01

    Ti/Ge distribution in rhombohedral LiTi2-xGex(PO4)3 NASICON series has been analyzed by (31)P magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Nuclear magnetic resonance is an excellent probe to follow Ti/Ge disorder, as it is sensitive to the atomic scale environment without long-range periodicity requirements. In the samples considered here, PO4 units are surrounded by four Ti/Ge octahedra, and then, five different components ascribed to P(OTi)4, P(OTi)3(OGe), P(OTi)2(OGe)2, P(OTi)(OGe)3, and P(OGe)4 environments are expected in (31)P MAS NMR spectra of R3̅c NASICON samples. However, (31)P MAS NMR spectra of analyzed series display a higher number of signals, suggesting that, although the overall symmetry remains R3̅c, partial substitution causes a local decrement in symmetry. With the aid of first-principles DFT calculations, 10 detected (31)P NMR signals have been assigned to different Ti4-nGen arrangements in the R3 subgroup symmetry. In this assignment, the influence of octahedra of the same or different R2(PO4)3 structural units has been considered. The influence of bond distances, angles and atom charges on (31)P NMR chemical shieldings has been discussed. Simulation of the LiTi2-xGex(PO4)3 series suggests that detection of 10 P environments is mainly due to the existence of two oxygen types, O1 and O2, whose charges are differently affected by Ge and Ti occupation of octahedra. From the quantitative analysis of detected components, a random Ti/Ge distribution has been deduced in next nearest neighbor (NNN) sites that surround tetrahedral PO4 units. This random distribution was supported by XRD data displaying Vegard's law.

  5. GET-SERF, a new gradient encoded SERF experiment for the trivial edition of 1H-19F couplings.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Maria Enrica; Aroulanda, Christie; Merlet, Denis

    2013-09-01

    A new spatially encoded heteronuclear (1)H-(19)F selective refocusing NMR experiment (GET-SERF) is proposed. This sequence allows editing in one single 2D experiment all couplings between a selected fluorine site and all the proton nuclei of the molecule. Its efficiency is illustrated in the case of diflunisal, a difluorinated anti-inflammatory drug, in isotropic and anisotropic media.

  6. In-Vivo Detection and Tracking of T Cells in Various Organs in a Melanoma Tumor Model by 19F-Fluorine MRS/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Christine; Yoshihara, Hikari A. I.; Dilek, Nahzli; Leignadier, Julie; Irving, Melita; Mieville, Pascal; Helm, Lothar; Michielin, Olivier; Schwitter, Juerg

    2016-01-01

    Background 19F-MRI and 19F-MRS can identify specific cell types after in-vitro or in-vivo 19F-labeling. Knowledge on the potential to track in-vitro 19F-labeled immune cells in tumor models by 19F-MRI/MRS is scarce. Aim To study 19F-based MR techniques for in-vivo tracking of adoptively transferred immune cells after in-vitro 19F-labeling, i.e. to detect and monitor their migration non-invasively in melanoma-bearing mice. Methods Splenocytes (SP) were labeled in-vitro with a perfluorocarbon (PFC) and IV-injected into non-tumor bearing mice. In-vitro PFC-labeled ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cells from the T cell receptor-transgenic line OT-1, activated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies (Tact) or OVA-peptide pulsed antigen presenting cells (TOVA-act), were injected into B16 OVA melanoma-bearing mice. The distribution of the 19F-labelled donor cells was determined in-vivo by 19F-MRI/MRS. In-vivo 19F-MRI/MRS results were confirmed by ex-vivo 19F-NMR and flow cytometry. Results SP, Tact, and TOVA-act were successfully PFC-labeled in-vitro yielding 3x1011-1.4x1012 19F-atoms/cell in the 3 groups. Adoptively transferred 19F-labeled SP, TOVA-act, and Tact were detected by coil-localized 19F-MRS in the chest, abdomen, and left flank in most animals (corresponding to lungs, livers, and spleens, respectively, with highest signal-to-noise for SP vs TOVA-act and Tact, p<0.009 for both). SP and Tact were successfully imaged by 19F-MRI (n = 3; liver). These in-vivo data were confirmed by ex-vivo high-resolution 19F-NMR-spectroscopy. By flow cytometric analysis, however, TOVA-act tended to be more abundant versus SP and Tact (liver: p = 0.1313; lungs: p = 0.1073; spleen: p = 0.109). Unlike 19F-MRI/MRS, flow cytometry also identified transferred immune cells (SP, Tact, and TOVA-act) in the tumors. Conclusion SP, Tact, and TOVA-act were successfully PFC-labeled in-vitro and detected in-vivo by non-invasive 19F-MRS/MRI in liver, lung, and spleen. The portion of 19F-labeled T cells

  7. 19F magnetic resonance imaging of endogenous macrophages in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Bönner, Florian; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we review the use of (19) F MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) for in vivo tracking of monocytes and macrophages in the course of tissue inflammation. Emulsified perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are preferentially phagocytized by monocytes/macrophages and are readily detected by (19) F MRI. Because of the lack of any (19) F background in the body, observed signals are robust and exhibit an excellent degree of specificity. As a consequence of progressive infiltration of the labeled immunocompetent cells into inflamed areas, foci of inflammation can be localized as hot spots by simultaneous acquisition of morphologically matched proton ((1) H) and fluorine ((19) F) MRI. The identification of inflammation by (19) F MRI--at a time when the inflammatory cascade is initiated--opens the possibility for an early detection and more timely therapeutic intervention. Since signal intensity in the (19) F images reflects the severity of inflammation, this approach is also suitable to monitor the efficacy of pharmaceutical treatment. Because PFCs are biochemically inert and the fluorine nucleus exhibits high magnetic resonance (MR) sensitivity, (19) F MRI may be applicable for clinical inflammation imaging. PMID:22354793

  8. 19F magnetic resonance imaging of endogenous macrophages in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Bönner, Florian; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we review the use of (19) F MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) for in vivo tracking of monocytes and macrophages in the course of tissue inflammation. Emulsified perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are preferentially phagocytized by monocytes/macrophages and are readily detected by (19) F MRI. Because of the lack of any (19) F background in the body, observed signals are robust and exhibit an excellent degree of specificity. As a consequence of progressive infiltration of the labeled immunocompetent cells into inflamed areas, foci of inflammation can be localized as hot spots by simultaneous acquisition of morphologically matched proton ((1) H) and fluorine ((19) F) MRI. The identification of inflammation by (19) F MRI--at a time when the inflammatory cascade is initiated--opens the possibility for an early detection and more timely therapeutic intervention. Since signal intensity in the (19) F images reflects the severity of inflammation, this approach is also suitable to monitor the efficacy of pharmaceutical treatment. Because PFCs are biochemically inert and the fluorine nucleus exhibits high magnetic resonance (MR) sensitivity, (19) F MRI may be applicable for clinical inflammation imaging.

  9. Ultrahigh (19)F Loaded Cu1.75S Nanoprobes for Simultaneous (19)F Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongli; Song, Manli; Tang, Juan; Hu, Gaofei; Xu, Suying; Guo, Zhide; Li, Nannan; Cui, Jiabin; Zhang, Xianzhong; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Leyu

    2016-01-26

    (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful noninvasive, sensitive, and accurate molecular imaging technique for early diagnosis of diseases. The major challenge of (19)F MRI is signal attenuation caused by the reduced solubility of probes with increased number of fluorine atoms and the restriction of molecular mobility. Herein, we present a versatile one-pot strategy for the fabrication of a multifunctional nanoprobe with high (19)F loading (∼2.0 × 10(8 19)F atoms per Cu1.75S nanoparticle). Due to the high (19)F loading and good molecular mobility that results from the small particle size (20.8 ± 2.0 nm) and ultrathin polymer coating, this nanoprobe demonstrates ultrahigh (19)F MRI signal. In vivo tests show that this multifunctional nanoprobe is suitable for (19)F MRI and photothermal therapy. This versatile fabrication strategy has also been readily extended to other single-particle nanoprobes for ablation and sensitive multimodal imaging.

  10. In vivo 19F MR imaging and spectroscopy for the BNCT optimization.

    PubMed

    Porcari, P; Capuani, S; D'Amore, E; Lecce, M; La Bella, A; Fasano, F; Migneco, L M; Campanella, R; Maraviglia, B; Pastore, F S

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the boron biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of 4-borono-2-fluorophenylalanine ((19)F-BPA) using (19)F MR Imaging ((19)F MRI) and Spectroscopy ((19)F MRS). The correlation between the results obtained by both techniques, (19)F MRI on rat brain and (19)F MRS on blood samples, showed the maximum (19)F-BPA uptake in C6 glioma model at 2.5h after infusion determining the optimal irradiation time. Moreover, the effect of L-DOPA as potential enhancer of (19)F-BPA tumour intake was assessed using (19)F MRI.

  11. In vivo 19F MR imaging and spectroscopy for the BNCT optimization.

    PubMed

    Porcari, P; Capuani, S; D'Amore, E; Lecce, M; La Bella, A; Fasano, F; Migneco, L M; Campanella, R; Maraviglia, B; Pastore, F S

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the boron biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of 4-borono-2-fluorophenylalanine ((19)F-BPA) using (19)F MR Imaging ((19)F MRI) and Spectroscopy ((19)F MRS). The correlation between the results obtained by both techniques, (19)F MRI on rat brain and (19)F MRS on blood samples, showed the maximum (19)F-BPA uptake in C6 glioma model at 2.5h after infusion determining the optimal irradiation time. Moreover, the effect of L-DOPA as potential enhancer of (19)F-BPA tumour intake was assessed using (19)F MRI. PMID:19375924

  12. Modeling Ti/Ge Distribution in LiTi2-xGex(PO4)3 NASICON Series by (31)P MAS NMR and First-Principles DFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Diez-Gómez, Virginia; Arbi, Kamel; Sanz, Jesús

    2016-08-01

    Ti/Ge distribution in rhombohedral LiTi2-xGex(PO4)3 NASICON series has been analyzed by (31)P magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Nuclear magnetic resonance is an excellent probe to follow Ti/Ge disorder, as it is sensitive to the atomic scale environment without long-range periodicity requirements. In the samples considered here, PO4 units are surrounded by four Ti/Ge octahedra, and then, five different components ascribed to P(OTi)4, P(OTi)3(OGe), P(OTi)2(OGe)2, P(OTi)(OGe)3, and P(OGe)4 environments are expected in (31)P MAS NMR spectra of R3̅c NASICON samples. However, (31)P MAS NMR spectra of analyzed series display a higher number of signals, suggesting that, although the overall symmetry remains R3̅c, partial substitution causes a local decrement in symmetry. With the aid of first-principles DFT calculations, 10 detected (31)P NMR signals have been assigned to different Ti4-nGen arrangements in the R3 subgroup symmetry. In this assignment, the influence of octahedra of the same or different R2(PO4)3 structural units has been considered. The influence of bond distances, angles and atom charges on (31)P NMR chemical shieldings has been discussed. Simulation of the LiTi2-xGex(PO4)3 series suggests that detection of 10 P environments is mainly due to the existence of two oxygen types, O1 and O2, whose charges are differently affected by Ge and Ti occupation of octahedra. From the quantitative analysis of detected components, a random Ti/Ge distribution has been deduced in next nearest neighbor (NNN) sites that surround tetrahedral PO4 units. This random distribution was supported by XRD data displaying Vegard's law. PMID:27373306

  13. Through-space (19)F-(19)F spin-spin coupling in ortho-fluoro Z-azobenzene.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Shiva K; Rogers, Robert A; Shi, Justin; Brown, Christopher T; Salinas, Cindy; Martin, Katherine M; Armitage, Jacob; Dorsey, Christopher; Chun, Gao; Rinaldi, Peter; Brittain, William J

    2016-02-01

    We report through-space (TS) (19)F-(19)F coupling for ortho-fluoro-substituted Z-azobenzenes. The magnitude of the TS-coupling constant ((TS) JFF ) ranged from 2.2-5.9 Hz. Using empirical formulas reported in the literature, these coupling constants correspond to non-bonded F-F distances (dFF) of 3.0-3.5 Å. These non-bonded distances are significantly smaller than those determined by X-ray crystallography or density functional theory, which argues that simple models of (19)F-(19)F TS spin-spin coupling solely based dFF are not applicable. (1)H, (13)C and (19)F data are reported for both the E and Z isomers of ten fluorinated azobenzenes. Density functional theory [B3YLP/6-311++G(d,p)] was used to calculate (19) F chemical shifts, and the calculated values deviated 0.3-10.0 ppm compared with experimental values.

  14. MAS-NMR studies of lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glasses and glass-ceramics having different Li{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Ananthanarayanan, A.; Kothiyal, G.P.; Montagne, L.; Revel, B.

    2010-01-15

    Emergence of phases in lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glasses of composition (wt%) xLi{sub 2}O-71.7SiO{sub 2}-(17.7-x)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-4.9K{sub 2}O-3.2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-2.5P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (5.1<=x<=12.6) upon heat treatment were studied. {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al, {sup 31}P and {sup 11}B MAS-NMR were employed for structural characterization of both LAS glasses and glass-ceramics. In glass samples, Al is found in tetrahedral coordination, while P exists mainly in the form of orthophosphate units. B exists as BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} units. {sup 27}Al NMR spectra show no change with crystallization, ruling out the presence of any Al containing phase. Contrary to X-ray diffraction studies carried out, {sup 11}B (high field 18.8 T) and {sup 29}Si NMR spectra clearly indicate the unexpected crystallization of a borosilicate phase (Li,K)BSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, whose structure is similar to the aluminosilicate virgilite. Also, lithium disilicate (Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}), lithium metasilicate (Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) and quartz (SiO{sub 2}) were identified in the {sup 29}Si NMR spectra of the glass-ceramics. {sup 31}P NMR spectra of the glass-ceramics revealed the presence of Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and a mixed phase (Li,K){sub 3}PO{sub 4} at low alkali concentrations. - Graphical Abstract: The {sup 11}B MAS-NMR spectra of lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glass-ceramics indicating the formation of Li/KBSiO{sub 6} phase. This phase is isostructural with virgilite and cannot be distinguished in X-ray diffractograms.

  15. Amphiphilic Hyperbranched Fluoropolymers as Nanoscopic 19F-Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wenjun; Nyström, Andreas M.; Zhang, Lei; Powell, Kenya T.; Li, Yali; Cheng, Chong; Wickline, Samuel A.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    Three hyperbranched fluoropolymers were synthesized and their micelles were constructed as potential 19F MRI agents. A hyperbranched star-like core was first synthesized via ATR-SCVCP of 4-chloromethyl styrene (CMS), lauryl acrylate (LA) and 1,1,1-tris(4′-(2″-bromoisobutyryloxy)phenyl)ethane (TBBPE). The polymerization gave a small core with Mn of 5.5 kDa with PDI of 1.6, which served as a macroinitiator. Trifluoroethyl methacrylate (TFEMA) and tert-butyl acrylate (tBA) in different ratio were then “grafted” from the core to give three polymers with Mn of ca. 120 kDa and PDI values of ca. 1.6–1.8. After acidolysis of the tert-butyl ester groups, amphiphilic, hyperbranched star-like polymers with Mn of ca. 100 kDa were obtained. These structures were subjected to micelle formation in aqueous solution to give micelles having TEM-measured diameters ranging from 3–8 nm and DLS-measured hydrodynamic diameters from 20–30 nm. These micelles gave a narrow, single resonance by 19F NMR spectroscopy, with a half width of approximately 130 Hz. The T1/T2 parameters were ca. 500 ms and 50 ms, respectively, and were not significantly affected by the composition and sizes of the micelles. 19F MRI phantom images of these fluorinated micelles were acquired, which demonstrated that these fluorinated micelles maybe useful as novel 19F MRI agents for a variety of biomedical studies. PMID:18795785

  16. In situ {sup 13}C MAS NMR study of n-hexane conversion on Pt and Pd supported on basic materials. II. On the mechanism of isomerization and hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, I.I.; Seirvert, M.; Pasau-Claerbout, A.; Derouane, E.G.; Blom, N.

    1996-12-01

    {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy was performed in situ to investigate the mechanisms of n-hexane isomerization and hydrocracking on Pt and Pd supported on Al-stabilized magnesia (Pt/Mg(Al)O and Pd/Mg(Al)O), and Pt on KL zeolite (Pt/KL). All the catalysts had high metal dispersion, the metal particle sizes being 13, 11, and 18 {Angstrom}, respectively. n-Hexane 1-{sup 13}C was used for in situ label tracer experiments. {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectra were obtained during the time course of the reaction at 573 and 653 K. The NMR results were then quantified, and the reaction kinetics were studied. Identification of the primary and secondary labeled reaction products led to the conclusion that both cyclic and bond-shift isomerization mechanisms operate on the three catalysts. In the case of Pt/Mg(Al)O, the cyclic mechanism accounts for 80% of the isomerization products. In the case of Pt/KL and Pd/Mg(Al)O, the contribution of bond-shift reactions increases due to restricted formation of the methylcyclopentane intermediate on the former and to suppressed hydrogenolysis of methylcyclopentane on the latter. A nonselective cyclic isomerization mechanism operates on magnesia catalysts, while on Pt/KL selective bisecondary bond rupturing occurs. Mechanistic pathways of bond-shift and hydrocracking reactions involve both 1,3- and 2,4-metallocyclobutane intermediates in the case of magnesia-supported catalysts, while in the case of the Pt/KL catalyst a 1,3-metallocyclobutane intermediate is preferentially formed. Only terminal scission occurs on Pt/KL. The Pd catalyst demonstrates enhanced activity in demethylation. The observed differences in the mechanistic pathways are explained on the basis of the specific properties of the metal and support. 64 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. NMR evidence of LiF coating rather than fluorine substitution in Li(Ni{sub 0.425}Mn{sub 0.425}Co{sub 0.15})O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Menetrier, M.; Bains, J.; Croguennec, L. Flambard, A.; Bekaert, E.; Jordy, C.; Biensan, Ph.; Delmas, C.

    2008-12-15

    A series of 'Li{sub 1+z/2}(Ni{sub 0.425}Mn{sub 0.425}Co{sub 0.15}){sub 1-z/2}O{sub 2-z}F{sub z}' materials was prepared by a coprecipitation route and their structure was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), as well as {sup 7}Li and {sup 19}F Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Two hypotheses were considered: (i) formation of layered oxyfluoride materials and (ii) formation of a mixture between the layered material and LiF. Structural parameters were refined by the Rietveld method, using XRD diffraction data. The refinement results did not allow us to choose between these two hypotheses: no significant change in crystallinity and structural parameters was observed irrespective of the fluorine ratio. {sup 7}Li and {sup 19}F MAS NMR analyses showed signals with isotropic positions characteristic of LiF, but envelopes characteristic of very strong dipolar interactions with the electron spins of the material, demonstrating that LiF was not incorporated into the layered oxide structure but was instead present as a coating. - Graphical abstract: {sup 7}Li and {sup 19}F MAS NMR show signals with isotropic positions characteristic of LiF, but with spinning sidebands envelopes characteristic of very strong dipolar interactions with the electron spins of the layered oxide, demonstrating that F is not a part of the material but is present as an LiF coating.

  18. Probing Oxide-Ion Mobility in the Mixed Ionic–Electronic Conductor La2NiO4+δ by Solid-State 17O MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    While solid-state NMR spectroscopic techniques have helped clarify the local structure and dynamics of ionic conductors, similar studies of mixed ionic–electronic conductors (MIECs) have been hampered by the paramagnetic behavior of these systems. Here we report high-resolution 17O (I = 5/2) solid-state NMR spectra of the mixed-conducting solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode material La2NiO4+δ, a paramagnetic transition-metal oxide. Three distinct oxygen environments (equatorial, axial, and interstitial) can be assigned on the basis of hyperfine (Fermi contact) shifts and quadrupolar nutation behavior, aided by results from periodic DFT calculations. Distinct structural distortions among the axial sites, arising from the nonstoichiometric incorporation of interstitial oxygen, can be resolved by advanced magic angle turning and phase-adjusted sideband separation (MATPASS) NMR experiments. Finally, variable-temperature spectra reveal the onset of rapid interstitial oxide motion and exchange with axial sites at ∼130 °C, associated with the reported orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition of La2NiO4+δ. From the variable-temperature spectra, we develop a model of oxide-ion dynamics on the spectral time scale that accounts for motional differences of all distinct oxygen sites. Though we treat La2NiO4+δ as a model system for a combined paramagnetic 17O NMR and DFT methodology, the approach presented herein should prove applicable to MIECs and other functionally important paramagnetic oxides. PMID:27538437

  19. Unique Backbone-Water Interaction Detected in Sphingomyelin Bilayers with 1H/31P and 1H/13C HETCOR MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Gregory P.; Alam, Todd M.

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional 1H/31P dipolar heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to investigate the correlation of the lipid headgroup with various intra- and intermolecular proton environments. Cross-polarization NMR techniques involving 31P have not been previously pursued to a great extent in lipid bilayers due to the long 1H-31P distances and high degree of headgroup mobility that averages the dipolar coupling in the liquid crystalline phase. The results presented herein show that this approach is very promising and yields information not readily available with other experimental methods. Of particular interest is the detection of a unique lipid backbone-water intermolecular interaction in egg sphingomyelin (SM) that is not observed in lipids with glycerol backbones like phosphatidylcholines. This backbone-water interaction in SM is probed when a mixing period allowing magnetization exchange between different 1H environments via the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) is included in the NMR pulse sequence. The molecular information provided by these 1H/31P dipolar HETCOR experiments with NOE mixing differ from those previously obtained by conventional NOE spectroscopy and heteronuclear NOE spectroscopy NMR experiments. In addition, two-dimensional 1H/13C INEPT HETCOR experiments with NOE mixing support the 1H/31P dipolar HETCOR results and confirm the presence of a H2O environment that has nonvanishing dipolar interactions with the SM backbone. PMID:18390621

  20. Probing Oxide-Ion Mobility in the Mixed Ionic-Electronic Conductor La2NiO4+δ by Solid-State (17)O MAS NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Halat, David M; Dervişoğlu, Rıza; Kim, Gunwoo; Dunstan, Matthew T; Blanc, Frédéric; Middlemiss, Derek S; Grey, Clare P

    2016-09-14

    While solid-state NMR spectroscopic techniques have helped clarify the local structure and dynamics of ionic conductors, similar studies of mixed ionic-electronic conductors (MIECs) have been hampered by the paramagnetic behavior of these systems. Here we report high-resolution (17)O (I = 5/2) solid-state NMR spectra of the mixed-conducting solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode material La2NiO4+δ, a paramagnetic transition-metal oxide. Three distinct oxygen environments (equatorial, axial, and interstitial) can be assigned on the basis of hyperfine (Fermi contact) shifts and quadrupolar nutation behavior, aided by results from periodic DFT calculations. Distinct structural distortions among the axial sites, arising from the nonstoichiometric incorporation of interstitial oxygen, can be resolved by advanced magic angle turning and phase-adjusted sideband separation (MATPASS) NMR experiments. Finally, variable-temperature spectra reveal the onset of rapid interstitial oxide motion and exchange with axial sites at ∼130 °C, associated with the reported orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition of La2NiO4+δ. From the variable-temperature spectra, we develop a model of oxide-ion dynamics on the spectral time scale that accounts for motional differences of all distinct oxygen sites. Though we treat La2NiO4+δ as a model system for a combined paramagnetic (17)O NMR and DFT methodology, the approach presented herein should prove applicable to MIECs and other functionally important paramagnetic oxides. PMID:27538437

  1. 13C and 15N—Chemical Shift Anisotropy of Ampicillin and Penicillin-V Studied by 2D-PASS and CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Lee, Young K.; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1998-11-01

    The principal values of the chemical shift tensors of all13C and15N sites in two antibiotics, ampicillin and penicillin-V, were determined by 2-dimensionalphaseadjustedspinningsideband (2D-PASS) and conventional CP/MAS experiments. The13C and15N chemical shift anisotropies (CSA), and their confidence limits, were evaluated using a Mathematica program. The CSA values suggest a revised assignment of the 2-methyl13C sites in the case of ampicillin. We speculate on a relationship between the chemical shift principal values of many of the13C and15N sites and the β-lactam ring conformation.

  2. Synthesis of 19F in Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, G.; Arnould, M.

    2000-03-01

    Meynet & Arnould (1993) have suggested that Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars could significantly contaminate the Galaxy with \\chem{19}{F}. In their scenario, \\chem{19}{F} is synthesized at the beginning of the He-burning phase from the \\chem{14}{N} left over by the previous CNO-burning core, and is ejected in the interstellar medium when the star enters its WC phase. Recourse to CNO seeds makes the \\chem{19}{F} yields metallicity-dependent. These yields are calculated on grounds of detailed stellar evolutionary sequences for an extended range of initial masses (from 25 to 120 Msun) and metallicities (Z=0.008, 0.02 and 0.04). The adopted mass loss rate prescription enables to account for the observed variations of WR populations in different environments. The \\chem{19}{F} abundance in the WR winds of 60 M_sun model stars is found to be about 10 to 70 times higher than its initial value, depending on the metallicity. This prediction is used in conjunction with a very simple model for the chemical evolution of the Galaxy to predict that WR stars could be significant (dominant?) contributors to the solar system fluorine content. We also briefly discuss the implications of our model on the possible detection of fluorine at high redshift.

  3. Labeling cells for in vivo tracking using (19)F MRI.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Mangala; Boehm-Sturm, Philipp; Figdor, Carl G; de Vries, I Jolanda; Hoehn, Mathias

    2012-12-01

    Noninvasive in vivo cell tracking is crucial to fully understand the function of mobile and/or transplanted cells, particularly immune cells and cellular therapeutics. (19)F MRI for cell tracking has several advantages; chief among them are its noninvasive nature which allows longitudinal data acquisition, use of a stable, non-radioactive isotope permitting long-term tracking, the absence of confounding endogenous signal, and the ability to quantify cell numbers from image data. However, generation of sufficient signal i.e. (19)F cell loading is a key challenge, particularly with non-phagocytic cells such as lymphocytes and stem cells. A range of (19)F cell labels have been developed, including emulsions, particles, polymers, and agents for clinical use. Various animal and primary human cells, such as dendritic cells, lymphocytes and phagocytes have been successfully labeled and studied in models of autoimmune disease, inflammation and transplant rejection. Primary human cells, particularly dendritic cells as used in vaccine therapy have been tested for imminent clinical application. Here, we summarize current cell loading strategies and sensitivity of in vivo cell imaging with (19)F MRI, and discuss the processing of image data for accurate quantification of cell numbers. This novel technology is uniquely applicable to the longitudinal and quantitative tracking of cells in vivo.

  4. Clonal distribution of pneumococcal serotype 19F isolates from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sparding, Nadja; Dayie, Nicholas T K D; Mills, Richael O; Newman, Mercy J; Dalsgaard, Anders; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Slotved, Hans-Christian

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Pneumococcal strains are classified according to their capsular polysaccharide and more than 90 different serotypes are currently known. In this project, three distinct groups of pneumococcal carriage isolates from Ghana were investigated; isolates from healthy children in Tamale and isolates from both healthy and children attending the outpatient department at a hospital in Accra. The isolates were previously identified and characterized by Gram staining, serotyping and susceptibility to penicillin. In this study, isolates of the common serotype 19F were further investigated by Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST). Overall, 14 different Sequence Types (STs) were identified by MLST, of which nine were novel based on the international MLST database. Two clones within serotype 19F seem to circulate in Ghana, a known ST (ST 4194) and a novel ST (ST 9090). ST 9090 was only found in healthy children in Accra, whereas ST 4194 was found equally in all children studied. In the MLST database, other isolates of ST 4194 were also associated with serotype 19F, and these isolates came from other West African countries. The majority of isolates were penicillin intermediate resistant. In conclusion, two clones within serotype 19F were found to be dominating in pneumococcal carriage in Accra and Tamale in Ghana. Furthermore, it seems as though the clonal distribution of serotype 19F may be different from what is currently known in Ghana in that many new clones were identified. This supports the importance of continued monitoring of pneumococcal carriage in Ghana and elsewhere when vaccines, e.g., PCV-13, have been introduced to monitor the possible future spread of antimicrobial resistant clones.

  5. Dual 19F/1H MR gene reporter molecules for in vivo detection of β-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Xin; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Hallac, Rami R.; Liu, Li; Mason, Ralph P.

    2012-01-01

    Increased emphasis on personalized medicine and novel therapies require the development of non-invasive strategies for assessing biochemistry in vivo. The detection of enzyme activity and gene expression in vivo is potentially important for the characterization of diseases and gene therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a particularly promising tool since it is non-invasive, and has no associated radioactivity, yet penetrates deep tissue. We now demonstrate a novel class of dual 1H/19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lacZ gene reporter molecule to specifically reveal enzyme activity in human tumor xenografts growing in mice. We report the design, synthesis, and characterization of six novel molecules and evaluation of the most effective reporter in mice in vivo. Substrates show a single 19F NMR signal and exposure to β-galactosidase induces a large 19F NMR chemical shift response. In the presence of ferric ions the liberated aglycone generates intense proton MRI T2 contrast. The dual modality approach allows both the detection of substrate and imaging of product enhancing the confidence in enzyme detection. PMID:22352428

  6. Interface Induced Growth and Transformation of Polymer-Conjugated Proto-Crystalline Phases in Aluminosilicate Hybrids: A Multiple-Quantum (23)Na-(23)Na MAS NMR Correlation Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Brus, Jiri; Kobera, Libor; Urbanova, Martina; Doušová, Barbora; Lhotka, Miloslav; Koloušek, David; Kotek, Jiří; Čuba, Pavel; Czernek, Jiri; Dědeček, Jiří

    2016-03-22

    Nanostructured materials typically offer enhanced physicochemical properties because of their large interfacial area. In this contribution, we present a comprehensive structural characterization of aluminosilicate hybrids with polymer-conjugated nanosized zeolites specifically grown at the organic-inorganic interface. The inorganic amorphous Al-O-Si framework is formed by alkali-activated low-temperature transformation of metakaoline, whereas simultaneous copolymerization of organic comonomers creates a secondary epoxide network covalently bound to the aluminosilicate matrix. This secondary epoxide phase not only enhances the mechanical integrity of the resulting hybrids but also introduces additional binding sites accessible for compensating negative charge on the aluminosilicate framework. This way, the polymer network initiates growth and subsequent transformation of protocrystalline short-range ordered zeolite domains that are located at the organic-inorganic interface. By applying an experimental approach based on 2D (23)Na-(23)Na double-quantum (DQ) MAS NMR spectroscopy, we discovered multiple sodium binding sites in these protocrystalline domains, in which immobilized Na(+) ions form pairs or small clusters. It is further demonstrated that these sites, the local geometry of which allows for the pairing of sodium ions, are preferentially occupied by Pb(2+) ions during the ion exchange. The proposed synthesis protocol thus allows for the preparation of a novel type of geopolymer hybrids with polymer-conjugated zeolite phases suitable for capturing and storage of metal cations. The demonstrated (23)Na-(23)Na DQ MAS NMR combined with DFT calculations represents a suitable approach for understanding the role of Na(+) ions in aluminositicate solids and related inorganic-organic hybrids, particularly their specific arrangement and clustering at interfacial areas.

  7. A General and Facile Strategy to Fabricate Multifunctional Nanoprobes for Simultaneous (19)F Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Optical/Thermal Imaging, and Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Gaofei; Li, Nannan; Tang, Juan; Xu, Suying; Wang, Leyu

    2016-09-01

    (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), due to its high sensitivity and negligible background, is anticipated to be a powerful noninvasive, sensitive, and accurate molecular imaging technique. However, the major challenge of (19)F MRI is to increase the number of (19)F atoms while maintaining the solubility and molecular mobility of the probe. Here, we successfully developed a facile and general strategy to synthesize the multifunctional (19)F MRI nanoprobes by encapsulating the hydrophobic inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) into a hybrid polymer micelle consisting of hydrolysates of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (PDTES) and oleylamine-functionalized poly(succinimide) (PSIOAm). Due to their good water dispersibility, excellent molecular mobility resulting from the ultrathin coating, and high (19)F atom numbers, these nanoprobes generate a separate sharp singlet of (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal (at -82.8 ppm) with half peak width of ∼28 Hz, which is highly applicable for (19)F MRI. Significantly, by varying the inorganic core from metals (Au), oxides (Fe3O4), fluorides (NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+)), and phosphates (YPO4) to semiconductors (Cu7S4 and Ag2S, ZnS:Mn(2+)) NPs, which renders the nanoprobes' multifunctional properties such as photothermal ability (Au, Cu7S4), magnetism (Fe3O4), fluorescence (ZnS:Mn(2+)), near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence (Ag2S), and upconversion (UC) luminescence. Meanwhile, the as-prepared nanoprobes possess relatively small sizes (about 50 nm), which is beneficial for long-time circulation. The proof-of-concept in vitro (19)F NMR and photothermal ablation of ZnS:Mn(2+)@PDTES/PSIOAm and Cu7S4@PDTES/PSIOAm nanoprobes further suggest that these nanoprobes hold wide potentials for multifunctional applications in biomedical fields. PMID:27534896

  8. A General and Facile Strategy to Fabricate Multifunctional Nanoprobes for Simultaneous (19)F Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Optical/Thermal Imaging, and Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Gaofei; Li, Nannan; Tang, Juan; Xu, Suying; Wang, Leyu

    2016-09-01

    (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), due to its high sensitivity and negligible background, is anticipated to be a powerful noninvasive, sensitive, and accurate molecular imaging technique. However, the major challenge of (19)F MRI is to increase the number of (19)F atoms while maintaining the solubility and molecular mobility of the probe. Here, we successfully developed a facile and general strategy to synthesize the multifunctional (19)F MRI nanoprobes by encapsulating the hydrophobic inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) into a hybrid polymer micelle consisting of hydrolysates of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (PDTES) and oleylamine-functionalized poly(succinimide) (PSIOAm). Due to their good water dispersibility, excellent molecular mobility resulting from the ultrathin coating, and high (19)F atom numbers, these nanoprobes generate a separate sharp singlet of (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal (at -82.8 ppm) with half peak width of ∼28 Hz, which is highly applicable for (19)F MRI. Significantly, by varying the inorganic core from metals (Au), oxides (Fe3O4), fluorides (NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+)), and phosphates (YPO4) to semiconductors (Cu7S4 and Ag2S, ZnS:Mn(2+)) NPs, which renders the nanoprobes' multifunctional properties such as photothermal ability (Au, Cu7S4), magnetism (Fe3O4), fluorescence (ZnS:Mn(2+)), near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence (Ag2S), and upconversion (UC) luminescence. Meanwhile, the as-prepared nanoprobes possess relatively small sizes (about 50 nm), which is beneficial for long-time circulation. The proof-of-concept in vitro (19)F NMR and photothermal ablation of ZnS:Mn(2+)@PDTES/PSIOAm and Cu7S4@PDTES/PSIOAm nanoprobes further suggest that these nanoprobes hold wide potentials for multifunctional applications in biomedical fields.

  9. Characterization of 19A-like 19F pneumococcal isolates from Papua New Guinea and Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, E.M.; Tikkanen, L.; Balloch, A.; Gould, K.; Yoannes, M.; Phuanukoonnon, S.; Licciardi, P.V.; Russell, F.M.; Mulholland, E.K.; Satzke, C.; Hinds, J.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19F is routinely performed by PCR targeting the wzy gene of the capsular biosynthetic locus. However, 19F isolates with genetic similarity to 19A have been reported in the United States and Brazil. We screened 78 pneumococcal carriage isolates and found six 19F wzy variants that originated from children in Papua New Guinea and Fiji. Isolates were characterized using multilocus sequence typing and opsonophagocytic assays. The 19F wzy variants displayed similar susceptibility to anti-19F IgG antibodies compared to standard 19F isolates. Our findings indicate that these 19F variants may be more common than previously believed. PMID:26339490

  10. Carbonation of C–S–H and C–A–S–H samples studied by {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2015-05-15

    Synthesized calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) samples with Ca/Si ratios of 0.66, 1.0, and 1.5 have been exposed to atmospheric CO{sub 2} at room temperature and high relative humidity and studied after one to 12 weeks. {sup 29}Si NMR reveals that the decomposition of C–S–H caused by carbonation involves two steps and that the decomposition rate decreases with increasing Ca/Si ratio. The first step is a gradual decalcification of the C–S–H where calcium is removed from the interlayer and defect sites in the silicate chains until Ca/Si = 0.67 is reached, ideally corresponding to infinite silicate chains. In the seconds step, calcium from the principal layers is consumed, resulting in the final decomposition of the C–S–H and the formation of an amorphous silica phase composed of Q{sup 3} and Q{sup 4} silicate tetrahedra. The amount of solid carbonates and of carbonate ions in a hydrous environment increases with increasing Ca/Si ratio for the C–S–H, as shown by {sup 13}C NMR. For C–A–S–H samples with Ca/Si = 1.0 and 1.5, {sup 27}Al NMR demonstrates that all aluminium sites associated with the C–S–H are consumed during the carbonation reactions and incorporated mainly as tetrahedral Al(–OSi){sub 4} units in the amorphous silica phase. A small amount of penta-coordinated Al sites has also been identified in the silica phase.

  11. Spin-transfer pathways in paramagnetic lithium transition-metal phosphates from combined broadband isotropic solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Clément, Raphaële J; Pell, Andrew J; Middlemiss, Derek S; Strobridge, Fiona C; Miller, Joel K; Whittingham, M Stanley; Emsley, Lyndon; Grey, Clare P; Pintacuda, Guido

    2012-10-17

    Substituted lithium transition-metal (TM) phosphate LiFe(x)Mn(1-x)PO(4) materials with olivine-type structures are among the most promising next generation lithium ion battery cathodes. However, a complete atomic-level description of the structure of such phases is not yet available. Here, a combined experimental and theoretical approach to the detailed assignment of the (31)P NMR spectra of the LiFe(x)Mn(1-x)PO(4) (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1) pure and mixed TM phosphates is developed and applied. Key to the present work is the development of a new NMR experiment enabling the characterization of complex paramagnetic materials via the complete separation of the individual isotropic chemical shifts, along with solid-state hybrid DFT calculations providing the separate hyperfine contributions of all distinct Mn-O-P and Fe-O-P bond pathways. The NMR experiment, referred to as aMAT, makes use of short high-powered adiabatic pulses (SHAPs), which can achieve 100% inversion over a range of isotropic shifts on the order of 1 MHz and with anisotropies greater than 100 kHz. In addition to complete spectral assignments of the mixed phases, the present study provides a detailed insight into the differences in electronic structure driving the variations in hyperfine parameters across the range of materials. A simple model delimiting the effects of distortions due to Mn/Fe substitution is also proposed and applied. The combined approach has clear future applications to TM-bearing battery cathode phases in particular and for the understanding of complex paramagnetic phases in general.

  12. Hyperfine fields at the Li site in LiFePO(4)-type olivine materials for lithium rechargeable batteries: a (7)Li MAS NMR and SQUID study.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Michael C; Doeff, Marca M; Richardson, Thomas J; Fiñones, Rita; Cairns, Elton J; Reimer, Jeffrey A

    2002-04-17

    The (7)Li NMR isotropic shift for olivine LiMPO(4) (M = Fe, Mn, Co, Ni) is assigned to hyperfine coupling between the (7)Li nucleus and the transition metal unpaired electrons on the basis of the Curie-Weiss temperature dependence of the shift. The hyperfine shift arises from a linear combination of Li-O-M through-bond interactions wherein the unpaired A' electrons contribute a negative shift and the unpaired A' ' electrons contribute a positive shift. The hyperfine coupling constant is determined for each composition.

  13. Elemental and structural analysis of silicon forms in herbal drugs using silicon-29 MAS NMR and WD-XRF spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Pajchel, L; Nykiel, P; Kolodziejski, W

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this work was to study concentration of silicon and its structural forms present in herbal drugs. Equisetum arvense and Urtica dioica L. from teapot bags, dietary supplements (tablets and capsules) containing those herbs, dry extract obtained from a teapot bag of E. arvense, and samples of the latter herb harvested in wild habitat over four months were studied using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WD-XRF) and high-resolution solid-state (29)Si NMR. The highest concentration of Si, ca. 27mg/g, was found in the herbal material from the teapot bags containing E. arvense. The Si content in natural E. arvense (whole plants) increased from May to August by ca. 7mg/g, reaching value 26mg/g. Three different silicon forms were detected in the studied herbal samples: Si(OSi)4 (Q(4)), Si(OH)(OSi)3 (Q(3)) and Si(OH)2(OSi)2 (Q(2)). Those sites were populated in E. arvense in the following order: Q(4)≫Q(3)>Q(2). A dramatic, ca. 50-fold decrease of the Si concentration during the infusion process was observed. The infusion process and the subsequent drying procedure augmented population of the Q(4) sites at the cost of the Q(2) sites. The WD-XRF and (29)Si NMR methods occurred useful and complementary in the study of herbal materials.

  14. Fluorine (19F) MRS and MRI in biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Barnett, Brad P.; Bottomley, Paul A.; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Shortly after the introduction of 1H MRI, fluorinated molecules were tested as MR-detectable tracers or contrast agents. Many fluorinated compounds, which are nontoxic and chemically inert, are now being used in a broad range of biomedical applications, including anesthetics, chemotherapeutic agents, and molecules with high oxygen solubility for respiration and blood substitution. These compounds can be monitored by fluorine (19F) MRI and/or MRS, providing a noninvasive means to interrogate associated functions in biological systems. As a result of the lack of endogenous fluorine in living organisms, 19F MRI of ‘hotspots’ of targeted fluorinated contrast agents has recently opened up new research avenues in molecular and cellular imaging. This includes the specific targeting and imaging of cellular surface epitopes, as well as MRI cell tracking of endogenous macrophages, injected immune cells and stem cell transplants. PMID:20842758

  15. Direct Observation of Lattice Aluminum Environments in Li Ion Cathodes LiNi1-y-zCoyAlzO2 and Al-Doped LiNixMnyCozO2 via (27)Al MAS NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Fulya; Vaughey, John T; Iddir, Hakim; Key, Baris

    2016-07-01

    Direct observations of local lattice aluminum environments have been a major challenge for aluminum-bearing Li ion battery materials, such as LiNi1-y-zCoyAlzO2 (NCA) and aluminum-doped LiNixMnyCozO2 (NMC). (27)Al magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the only structural probe currently available that can qualitatively and quantitatively characterize lattice and nonlattice (i.e., surface, coatings, segregation, secondary phase etc.) aluminum coordination and provide information that helps discern its effect in the lattice. In the present study, we use NMR to gain new insights into transition metal (TM)-O-Al coordination and evolution of lattice aluminum sites upon cycling. With the aid of first-principles DFT calculations, we show direct evidence of lattice Al sites, nonpreferential Ni/Co-O-Al ordering in NCA, and the lack of bulk lattice aluminum in aluminum-"doped" NMC. Aluminum coordination of the paramagnetic (lattice) and diamagnetic (nonlattice) nature is investigated for Al-doped NMC and NCA. For the latter, the evolution of the lattice site(s) upon cycling is also studied. A clear reordering of lattice aluminum environments due to nickel migration is observed in NCA upon extended cycling.

  16. In vivo (19)F MRI and (19)F MRS of (19)F-labelled boronophenylalanine-fructose complex on a C6 rat glioma model to optimize boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

    PubMed

    Porcari, Paola; Capuani, Silvia; D'Amore, Emanuela; Lecce, Mario; La Bella, Angela; Fasano, Fabrizio; Campanella, Renzo; Migneco, Luisa Maria; Pastore, Francesco Saverio; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary modality used to treat malignant brain gliomas. To optimize BNCT effectiveness a non-invasive method is needed to monitor the spatial distribution of BNCT carriers in order to estimate the optimal timing for neutron irradiation. In this study, in vivo spatial distribution mapping and pharmacokinetics evaluation of the (19)F-labelled boronophenylalanine (BPA) were performed using (19)F magnetic resonance imaging ((19)F MRI) and (19)F magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((19)F MRS). Characteristic uptake of (19)F-BPA in C6 glioma showed a maximum at 2.5 h after compound infusion as confirmed by both (19)F images and (19)F spectra acquired on blood samples collected at different times after infusion. This study shows the ability of (19)F MRI to selectively map the bio-distribution of (19)F-BPA in a C6 rat glioma model, as well as providing a useful method to perform pharmacokinetics of BNCT carriers. PMID:19001698

  17. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  18. Correlations between lithium local structure and electrochemistry of layered LiCo(1-2x)Ni(x)Mn(x)O2 oxides: 7Li MAS NMR and EPR studies.

    PubMed

    Stoyanova, Radostina; Ivanova, Svetlana; Zhecheva, Ekaterina; Samoson, Ago; Simova, Svetlana; Tzvetkova, Pavleta; Barra, Anne-Laure

    2014-02-14

    Advanced (7)Li MAS NMR technologies and high frequency EPR are combined to identify structural motifs and their relation to electrochemical properties of layered lithium-cobalt-nickel-manganese oxides LiCo1-2xNixMnxO2 (0 < x ≤ 0.5) used as cathode materials in lithium ion batteries. Structural-chemical shift regularities were established by systematic variation of the ratio of diamagnetic Co(3+) to paramagnetic Ni/Mn ions with variable valences. While EPR allows identifying the oxidation state of transition metal ions inside the layers, (7)Li NMR probes the local structure of Li with respect to transition metal ions located in two adjacent layers. For assignment of the lithium chemical shifts, we examine first magnetically diluted LiCo1-2xNixMnxO2 with x = 0.02, where paramagnetic ions are stabilized only in Mn(4+) and Ni(3+) form. Then the studies are extended towards the intermediate compositions with x = 0.10 and 0.33, containing simultaneously paramagnetic Mn(4+), Ni(3+) and Ni(2+) ions and diamagnetic Co(3+) ions. The benefit of using NMR with ultrafast spinning rates is demonstrated for the end composition LiNi0.5Mn0.5O2 having only paramagnetic Ni(2+) and Mn(2+) ions. The local structure of Li is quantified in respect of the number of Ni(2+) and Mn(4+) neighbors. It has been demonstrated that Ni(2+) and Mn(4+) are non-randomly distributed around Li and their distribution depends on the method of synthesis. The extent of local cationic order and its effect on the electrochemical properties of LiNi0.5Mn0.5O2 are discussed.

  19. The Amblygonite (LiAlPO{sub 4}F)-Montebrasite (LiAlPO{sub 4}OH) Solid Solution: A Combined powder and single-crystal neutron diffraction and solid-state {sup 6}Li MAS, CP MAS, and REDOR NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Groat, Lee A.; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Brouwer, Darren H.; Hoffman, Christina M.; Fyfe, Colin A.; Morell, Heiko; Schultz, Arthur J.

    2003-01-01

    The amblygonite-montebrasite series of minerals, common constituents of granitic pegmatites and topaz-bearing granites, show complete solid solution with ideal composition LiAlPO{sub 4}(F, OH). These compounds are ideal for studying F {leftrightarrow} OH solid solution in minerals because natural members of the series generally show little deviation from the ideal composition. In this study, we used powder and single-crystal neutron diffraction and solid-state {sup 6}Li MAS, CP MAS, and REDOR NMR techniques to study the effect of F {leftrightarrow} OH substitution on the series. Lattice parameters refined from single-crystal neutron diffraction data show increasing b and decreasing a, c, and V with increasing F/(F + OH). The volume is highest for the OH end-member because of the presence of an additional atom (H). The a and c parameters decrease with increasing F/(F + OH) because the O-H vector is close to the a-c plane and the Al-OH/F vectors are approximately parallel to c. Lattice parameters refined from neutron powder diffraction patterns collected at lower T show that thermal contraction increases with F/(F + OH), presumably because the F anion takes up less space than the OH molecule. The results show that the OH/F position is always fully occupied. The H displacement ellipsoid shows little change with occupancy, which obviously corresponds negatively with increasing F/(F + OH). However, the Li displacement ellipsoid becomes extremely large and anisotropic with increasing F fraction. Most of the distortion is associated with the U{sub 3} eigenvalue, which lies between the c and c* directions. U{sub eq} values corresponding to the Li atom show a greater reduction with decreasing temperature than the other atoms. The temperature dependence of Li is the same regardless of F content. Even when extrapolated to absolute zero the Li displacement ellipsoid is very large, which implies a large static disorder.

  20. A generalized theoretical framework for the description of spin decoupling in solid-state MAS NMR: Offset effect on decoupling performance.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kong Ooi; Agarwal, Vipin; Meier, Beat H; Ernst, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    We present a generalized theoretical framework that allows the approximate but rapid analysis of residual couplings of arbitrary decoupling sequences in solid-state NMR under magic-angle spinning conditions. It is a generalization of the tri-modal Floquet analysis of TPPM decoupling [Scholz et al., J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] where three characteristic frequencies are used to describe the pulse sequence. Such an approach can be used to describe arbitrary periodic decoupling sequences that differ only in the magnitude of the Fourier coefficients of the interaction-frame transformation. It allows a ∼100 times faster calculation of second-order residual couplings as a function of pulse sequence parameters than full spin-dynamics simulations. By comparing the theoretical calculations with full numerical simulations, we show the potential of the new approach to examine the performance of decoupling sequences. We exemplify the usefulness of this framework by analyzing the performance of commonly used high-power decoupling sequences and low-power decoupling sequences such as amplitude-modulated XiX (AM-XiX) and its super-cycled variant SC-AM-XiX. In addition, the effect of chemical-shift offset is examined for both high- and low-power decoupling sequences. The results show that the cross-terms between the dipolar couplings are the main contributions to the line broadening when offset is present. We also show that the SC-AM-XIX shows a better offset compensation.

  1. A generalized theoretical framework for the description of spin decoupling in solid-state MAS NMR: Offset effect on decoupling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kong Ooi; Agarwal, Vipin; Meier, Beat H.; Ernst, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    We present a generalized theoretical framework that allows the approximate but rapid analysis of residual couplings of arbitrary decoupling sequences in solid-state NMR under magic-angle spinning conditions. It is a generalization of the tri-modal Floquet analysis of TPPM decoupling [Scholz et al., J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] where three characteristic frequencies are used to describe the pulse sequence. Such an approach can be used to describe arbitrary periodic decoupling sequences that differ only in the magnitude of the Fourier coefficients of the interaction-frame transformation. It allows a ˜100 times faster calculation of second-order residual couplings as a function of pulse sequence parameters than full spin-dynamics simulations. By comparing the theoretical calculations with full numerical simulations, we show the potential of the new approach to examine the performance of decoupling sequences. We exemplify the usefulness of this framework by analyzing the performance of commonly used high-power decoupling sequences and low-power decoupling sequences such as amplitude-modulated XiX (AM-XiX) and its super-cycled variant SC-AM-XiX. In addition, the effect of chemical-shift offset is examined for both high- and low-power decoupling sequences. The results show that the cross-terms between the dipolar couplings are the main contributions to the line broadening when offset is present. We also show that the SC-AM-XIX shows a better offset compensation.

  2. A generalized theoretical framework for the description of spin decoupling in solid-state MAS NMR: Offset effect on decoupling performance.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kong Ooi; Agarwal, Vipin; Meier, Beat H; Ernst, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    We present a generalized theoretical framework that allows the approximate but rapid analysis of residual couplings of arbitrary decoupling sequences in solid-state NMR under magic-angle spinning conditions. It is a generalization of the tri-modal Floquet analysis of TPPM decoupling [Scholz et al., J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] where three characteristic frequencies are used to describe the pulse sequence. Such an approach can be used to describe arbitrary periodic decoupling sequences that differ only in the magnitude of the Fourier coefficients of the interaction-frame transformation. It allows a ∼100 times faster calculation of second-order residual couplings as a function of pulse sequence parameters than full spin-dynamics simulations. By comparing the theoretical calculations with full numerical simulations, we show the potential of the new approach to examine the performance of decoupling sequences. We exemplify the usefulness of this framework by analyzing the performance of commonly used high-power decoupling sequences and low-power decoupling sequences such as amplitude-modulated XiX (AM-XiX) and its super-cycled variant SC-AM-XiX. In addition, the effect of chemical-shift offset is examined for both high- and low-power decoupling sequences. The results show that the cross-terms between the dipolar couplings are the main contributions to the line broadening when offset is present. We also show that the SC-AM-XIX shows a better offset compensation. PMID:27608994

  3. MAS NMR Study of the Metastable Solid Solutions Found in the LiFePO4/FePO4 System

    SciTech Connect

    Cabana, Jordi; Shirakawa, Junichi; Chen, Guoying; Richardson, Thomas; Grey, Clare P.

    2009-10-09

    Li and 3IP NMR experiments were conducted on a series of single- or two-phase samples in the LiFePCvFePCM system with different overall lithium contents, and containing the two end-members and/or two metastable solid solution hases, Lio.6FeP04 or Lio.34FeP04. These experiments were carried out at different temperatures in order to search for vacancy/charge ordering and ion/electron mobility in the metastable phases. Evidence for Li+-Fe2+ interactions was bserved for both Lio.6FeP04 and Lio.34FePC>4. The strength of this interaction leads to the formation of LiFePCvlike clusters in the latter, as shown by the room temperature data. Different motional processes are proposed to exist as the temperature is increased and various scenarios are discussed. While concerted lithium-electron hopping and/or correlations explains the data below 125C, evidence for some uncorrelated motion is found at higher temperatures, together with the onset of phase mixing.

  4. Magic angle Lee-Goldburg frequency offset irradiation improves the efficiency and selectivity of SPECIFIC-CP in triple-resonance MAS solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin H; De Angelis, Anna A; Opella, Stanley J

    2014-09-01

    The efficiency and selectivity of SPECIFIC-CP, a widely used method for selective double cross-polarization in triple-resonance magic angle spinning solid-state NMR, is improved by performing the tangential-shaped (13)C irradiation at an offset frequency that meets the Lee-Goldburg condition (LG-SPECIFIC-CP). This is demonstrated on polycrystalline samples of uniformly (13)C, (15)N labeled N-acetyl-leucine and N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-OH (MLF) at 700MHz and 900MHz (1)H resonance frequencies, respectively. For the single (13)Cα of N-acetyl-leucine, relative to conventional broad band cross-polarization, the SPECIFIC-CP signal has 47% of the intensity. Notably, the LG-SPECIFIC-CP signal has 72% of the intensity, essentially the theoretical maximum. There were no other changes in the experimental parameters. The three (13)Cα signals in MLF show some variation in intensities, reflecting the relatively narrow bandwidth of a frequency-offset procedure, and pointing to future developments for this class of experiment.

  5. 1H and 19F spin-lattice relaxation and CH3 or CF3 reorientation in molecular solids containing both H and F atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Peter A.; Rheingold, Arnold L.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of methyl (CH3) and fluoromethyl (CF3) groups in organic molecular (van der Waals) solids can be exploited to survey their local environments. We report solid state 1H and 19F spin-lattice relaxation experiments in polycrystalline 3-trifluoromethoxycinnamic acid, along with an X-ray diffraction determination of the molecular and crystal structure, to investigate the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions that determine the properties that characterize the CF3 reorientation. The molecule is of no particular interest; it simply provides a motionless backbone (on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) time scale) to investigate CF3 reorientation occurring on the NMR time scale. The effects of 19F-19F and 19F-1H spin-spin dipolar interactions on the complicated nonexponential NMR relaxation provide independent inputs into determining a model for CF3 reorientation. As such, these experiments provide much more information than when only one spin species (usually 1H) is present. In Sec. IV, which can be read immediately after the Introduction without reading the rest of the paper, we compare the barrier to CH3 and CF3 reorientation in seven organic solids and separate this barrier into intramolecular and intermolecular components.

  6. 13C CP/MAS NMR Studies of Hemoprotein Models with and without an Axial Hindered Base: (13)C Shielding Tensors and Comparison with Hemoproteins and X-ray Structural Data.

    PubMed

    Gerothanassis, I. P.; Momenteau, M.; Barrie, P. J.; Kalodimos, C. G.; Hawkes, G. E.

    1996-04-24

    13C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectra of several carbonmonoxide (93-99% (13)C enriched) hemoprotein models with 1,2-dimethylimidazole (1,2-diMeIm) and 1-methylimidazole (1-MeIm) as axial ligands are reported. This enables the (13)CO spinning sideband manifold to be measured and hence the principal components of the (13)CO chemical shift tensor to be obtained. Negative polar interactions in the binding pocket of the cap porphyrin model and inhibition of Fe-->CO back-donation result in a reduction in shielding anisotropy; on the contrary, positive distal polar interactions result in an increase in the shielding anisotropy and asymmetry parameter in some models. It appears that the axial hindered base 1,2-dimethylimidazole has little direct effect on the local geometry at the CO site, despite higher rates of CO desorption being observed for such complexes. This suggests that the mechanism by which steric interactions are released for the 1,2-diMeIm complexes compared to 1-MeIm complexes does not involve a significant increase in bending of the Fe-C-O unit. The asymmetry of the shielding tensor of all the heme model compounds studied is smaller than that found for horse myoglobin and rabbit hemoglobin.

  7. Examination of the structure in solid state of amino analogs of 4,4‧-[1,5-pentanediylbis(oxy)]bisbenzonitrile by means of X-ray diffraction, 13C CP/MAS NMR, and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewska, Dorota; Wolska, Irena; Żabiński, Jerzy

    2008-05-01

    A single crystal of X-ray diffraction structures is presented for 4,4'-[1,5-(3-oxapentanediylbis(amino))]bisbenzonitrile 2 and 4,4'-[1,5-( N-methyl-3-azapentane-diylbis(oxy))]bisbenzonitrile 3. The molecular structures of these derivatives differ especially in conformations of the central linker: in 2 this linker adopts a trans/ gauche conformation, whereas in 3 - a fully extended conformation. The N atoms in various positions of the aliphatic linker change dramatically the molecular packing mode of both bisnitriles. But in both cases the nitrile groups take part in intermolecular hydrogen bonds: a type of N sbnd H···N in 2 and of C sbnd H···N in 3. Various conformations of both molecules were reflected in 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra in solid state as single and double resonance patterns for 2 and 3, respectively. A preliminary anticancer assay against 60 cell lines of 3 reveals strong growth inhibition of leukemia, melanoma, and renal cancer cells.

  8. Characterization of polysulfone and polysulfone/vanillin microcapsules by 1H NMR spectroscopy, solid-state 13C CP/MAS-NMR spectroscopy, and N2 adsorption-desorption analyses.

    PubMed

    Peña, Brisa; de Ménorval, Louis-Charles; Garcia-Valls, Ricard; Gumí, Tània

    2011-11-01

    Textile detergent and softener industries have incorporated perfume microencapsulation technology to improve their products. Perfume encapsulation allows perfume protection until use and provides a long-lasting fragrance release. But, certain industrial microcapsules show low encapsulation capacity and low material stability. Polysulfone capsules have been already proposed to solve these drawbacks. Among them, PSf/Vanillin capsules were considered as a desirable system. They present both good material stability and high encapsulation capacity. However, several factors such as the final location of the perfume in the polymeric matrix, the aggregation state that it has in the capsule and its interaction with the capsule components have not been studied yet. These factors can provide vast information about the capsule performance and its improvement. With the aim to characterize these parameters, the physical and chemical properties of PSf/Vanillin capsules have been investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and N(2) adsorption-desorption measurements. AFM micrograph and N(2) isotherms confirm that the presence of vanillin modify the physical structure of PSf/Vanillin microcapsules as it is trapped in the capsule porosity. NMR results show that vanillin is present in solid state in PSf/Vanillin microcapsules.

  9. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 19F FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.

    2010-09-02

    Representative sampling has been completed for characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 19F as per the statistical sampling plan developed by Harris and Shine. Samples from eight locations have been obtained from the tank floor and two of the samples were archived as a contingency. Six samples, referred to in this report as the current scrape samples, have been submitted to and analyzed by SRNL. This report contains the statistical analysis of the floor sample analytical results to determine if further data are needed to reduce uncertainty. Included are comparisons with the prior Mantis samples results to determine if they can be pooled with the current scrape samples to estimate the upper 95% confidence limits (UCL95%) for concentration. Statistical analysis revealed that the Mantis and current scrape sample results are not compatible. Therefore, the Mantis sample results were not used to support the quantification of analytes in the residual material. Significant spatial variability among the current scrape sample results was not found. Constituent concentrations were similar between the North and South hemispheres as well as between the inner and outer regions of the tank floor. The current scrape sample results from all six samples fall within their 3-sigma limits. In view of the results from numerous statistical tests, the data were pooled from all six current scrape samples. As such, an adequate sample size was provided for quantification of the residual material on the floor of Tank 19F. The uncertainty is quantified in this report by an UCL95% on each analyte concentration. The uncertainty in analyte concentration was calculated as a function of the number of samples, the average, and the standard deviation of the analytical results. The UCL95% was based entirely on the six current scrape sample results (each averaged across three analytical determinations).

  10. Ascomycotin A, a new citromycetin analogue produced by Ascomycota sp. Ind19F07 isolated from deep sea sediment.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yong-qi; Lin, Xiu-ping; Liu, Juan; Kaliyaperumal, Kumaravel; Ai, Wen; Ju, Zhi-ran; Yang, Bin; Wang, Junfeng; Yang, Xian-wen; Liu, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    A new citromycetin analogue, ascomycotin A (1), together with eight known compounds, wortmannilactone E (2), orcinol (3), orsellinic acid (4), isosclerone (5), (3R,4S)-( - )-4-hydroxymellein (6), diorcinol (7), chaetocyclinone B (8) and 2,5-dimethoxy-3,6-di(p-methoxypheny1)-1,4-benzoquinone (9), was isolated from the fungal strain Ascomycota sp. Ind19F07, which was isolated from the deep sea sediment of the Indian Ocean. The structures of the compounds were established by spectroscopic data including 1D and 2D NMR and HR-ESI-MS. Compounds (1-9) were evaluated for antibacterial activity.

  11. Progress Towards Measurement of the Anapole Moment of 137 Ba19 F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahn, Sidney; Altuntas, Emine; Demille, David; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Weak interactions inside the nucleus produce a toroidal current distribution around the axis of nuclear spin. This current distribution, known as the nuclear anapole moment is the dominant source of nuclear spin-dependent parity violation (NSD-PV) effects for nuclei with nucleon number A >= 20.We propose to measure the anapole moment of 137 Ba19 F. To diagnose systematics and establish a measurement sequence we use 138 Ba19 F, which has negligible NSD-PV effects. 138 Ba19 F has a larger isotopic abundance and fewer hyperfine levels compared to those of 137 Ba19 F. Therefore fluorescence signals from 138 Ba19 F are approximately 26 times larger than those from 137 Ba19 F. Here we present planned improvements to our apparatus, including a magnetic hexapole lens to improve the molecular beam flux and preliminary spectroscopy measurements with 137 Ba19 F.

  12. (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxation and CH3 or CF3 reorientation in molecular solids containing both H and F atoms.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Peter A; Rheingold, Arnold L

    2016-04-21

    The dynamics of methyl (CH3) and fluoromethyl (CF3) groups in organic molecular (van der Waals) solids can be exploited to survey their local environments. We report solid state (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxationexperiments in polycrystalline 3-trifluoromethoxycinnamic acid, along with an X-ray diffraction determination of the molecular and crystal structure, to investigate the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions that determine the properties that characterize the CF3 reorientation. The molecule is of no particular interest; it simply provides a motionless backbone (on the nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) time scale) to investigate CF3 reorientation occurring on the NMR time scale. The effects of (19)F-(19)F and (19)F-(1)H spin-spin dipolar interactions on the complicated nonexponential NMRrelaxation provide independent inputs into determining a model for CF3 reorientation. As such, these experiments provide much more information than when only one spin species (usually (1)H) is present. In Sec. IV, which can be read immediately after the Introduction without reading the rest of the paper, we compare the barrier to CH3 and CF3 reorientation in seven organic solids and separate this barrier into intramolecular and intermolecular components. PMID:27389221

  13. (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxation and CH3 or CF3 reorientation in molecular solids containing both H and F atoms.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Peter A; Rheingold, Arnold L

    2016-04-21

    The dynamics of methyl (CH3) and fluoromethyl (CF3) groups in organic molecular (van der Waals) solids can be exploited to survey their local environments. We report solid state (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxationexperiments in polycrystalline 3-trifluoromethoxycinnamic acid, along with an X-ray diffraction determination of the molecular and crystal structure, to investigate the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions that determine the properties that characterize the CF3 reorientation. The molecule is of no particular interest; it simply provides a motionless backbone (on the nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) time scale) to investigate CF3 reorientation occurring on the NMR time scale. The effects of (19)F-(19)F and (19)F-(1)H spin-spin dipolar interactions on the complicated nonexponential NMRrelaxation provide independent inputs into determining a model for CF3 reorientation. As such, these experiments provide much more information than when only one spin species (usually (1)H) is present. In Sec. IV, which can be read immediately after the Introduction without reading the rest of the paper, we compare the barrier to CH3 and CF3 reorientation in seven organic solids and separate this barrier into intramolecular and intermolecular components.

  14. Experimental (X-ray, (13)C CP/MAS NMR, IR, RS, INS, THz) and Solid-State DFT Study on (1:1) Co-Crystal of Bromanilic Acid and 2,6-Dimethylpyrazine.

    PubMed

    Łuczyńska, Katarzyna; Drużbicki, Kacper; Lyczko, Krzysztof; Dobrowolski, Jan Cz

    2015-06-01

    A combined structural, vibrational spectroscopy, and solid-state DFT study of the hydrogen-bonded complex of bromanilic acid with 2,6-dimethylpyrazine is reported. The crystallographic structure was determined by means of low-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction, which reveals the molecular units in their native protonation states, forming one-dimensional infinite nets of moderate-strength O···H-N hydrogen bonds. The nature of the crystallographic forces, stabilizing the studied structure, has been drawn by employing the noncovalent interactions analysis. It was found that, in addition to the hydrogen bonding, the intermolecular forces are dominated by stacking interactions and C-H···O contacts. The thermal and calorimetric analysis was employed to probe stability of the crystal phase. The structural analysis was further supported by a computationally assisted (13)C CP/MAS NMR study, providing a complete assignment of the recorded resonances. The vibrational dynamics was explored by combining the optical (IR, Raman, TDs-THz) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy techniques with the state-of-the-art solid-state density functional theory (DFT) computations. Despite the quasi-harmonic approximation assumed throughout the study, an excellent agreement between the theoretical and experimental data was achieved over the entire spectral range, allowing for a deep and possibly thorough understanding of the vibrational characteristics of the system. Particularly, the significant influence of the long-range dipole coupling on the IR spectrum has been revealed. On the basis of a wealth of information gathered, the recent implementation of a dispersion-corrected linear-response scheme has been extensively examined.

  15. In vivo19F MRI for Cell Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Mangala; Boehm-Sturm, Philipp; Aswendt, Markus; Pracht, Eberhard D.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda; Hoehn, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    In vivo19F MRI allows quantitative cell tracking without the use of ionizing radiation. It is a noninvasive technique that can be applied to humans. Here, we describe a general protocol for cell labeling, imaging, and image processing. The technique is applicable to various cell types and animal models, although here we focus on a typical mouse model for tracking murine immune cells. The most important issues for cell labeling are described, as these are relevant to all models. Similarly, key imaging parameters are listed, although the details will vary depending on the MRI system and the individual setup. Finally, we include an image processing protocol for quantification. Variations for this, and other parts of the protocol, are assessed in the Discussion section. Based on the detailed procedure described here, the user will need to adapt the protocol for each specific cell type, cell label, animal model, and imaging setup. Note that the protocol can also be adapted for human use, as long as clinical restrictions are met. PMID:24299964

  16. MAS and MI+ Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grice, Ila M.

    1991-01-01

    Compares the compact disc read-only-memory (CD-ROM) Magazine Article Summaries (MAS) and Magazine Index Plus Backfile (MI+) in terms of system hardware, index coverage, searching capabilities, citation display, printing citations, local holdings, and miscellaneous features and costs. Finds in favor of MAS. (DMM)

  17. (19)F-MRI for monitoring human NK cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Ludwig, Kai D; Gordon, Jeremy W; Kutz, Matthew P; Bednarz, Bryan P; Fain, Sean B; Capitini, Christian M

    2016-05-01

    The availability of clinical-grade cytokines and artificial antigen-presenting cells has accelerated interest in using natural killer (NK) cells as adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) for cancer. One of the technological shortcomings of translating therapies from animal models to clinical application is the inability to effectively and non-invasively track these cells after infusion in patients. We have optimized the nonradioactive isotope fluorine-19 ((19)F) as a means to label and track NK cells in preclinical models using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human NK cells were expanded with interleukin (IL)-2 and labeled in vitro with increasing concentrations of (19)F. Doses as low as 2 mg/mL (19)F were detected by MRI. NK cell viability was only decreased at 8 mg/mL (19)F. No effects on NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 leukemia cells were observed with 2, 4 or 8 mg/mL (19)F. Higher doses of (19)F, 4 mg/mL and 8 mg/mL, led to an improved (19)F signal by MRI with 3 × 10(11) (19)F atoms per NK cell. The 4 mg/mL (19)F labeling had no effect on NK cell function via secretion of granzyme B or interferon gamma (IFNγ), compared to NK cells exposed to vehicle alone. (19)F-labeled NK cells were detectable immediately by MRI after intratumoral injection in NSG mice and up to day 8. When (19)F-labeled NK cells were injected subcutaneously, we observed a loss of signal through time at the site of injection suggesting NK cell migration to distant organs. The (19)F perfluorocarbon is a safe and effective reagent for monitoring the persistence and trafficking of NK cell infusions in vivo, and may have potential for developing novel imaging techniques to monitor ACT for cancer. PMID:27467963

  18. Improved Quantitative 19F MR Molecular Imaging With Flip Angle Calibration and B1-Mapping Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Goette, Matthew J.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To improve 19F flip angle calibration and compensate for B1 inhomogeneities in quantitative 19F MRI of sparse molecular epitopes with perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoparticle (NP) emulsion contrast agents. Materials and Methods Flip angle sweep experiments on PFC-NP point source phantoms with three custom-designed 19F/1H dual-tuned coils revealed a difference in required power settings for 19F and 1H nuclei, which was used to calculate a calibration ratio specific for each coil. An image-based correction technique was developed using B1-field mapping on 1H to correct for 19F and 1H images in two phantom experiments. Results Optimized 19F peak power differed significantly from that of 1H power for each coil (p<0.05). A ratio of 19F/1H power settings yielded a coil-specific and spatially independent calibration value (surface: 1.48±0.06; semi-cylindrical: 1.71±0.02, single-turn-solenoid: 1.92±0.03). 1H-image-based B1 correction equalized the signal intensity of 19F images for two identical 19F PFC-NP samples placed in different parts of the field, which were offset significantly by ~66% (p<0.001) before correction. Conclusion 19F flip angle calibration and B1-mapping compensations to the 19F images employing the more abundant 1H signal as a basis for correction result in a significant change in the quantification of sparse 19F MR signals from targeted PFC NP emulsions. PMID:25425244

  19. Multinuclear high-resolution NMR study of compounds from the ternary system NaF-CaF2-AlF3: from determination to modeling of NMR parameters.

    PubMed

    Martineau, C; Body, M; Legein, C; Silly, G; Buzaré, J-Y; Fayon, F

    2006-12-11

    27Al and 23Na NMR satellite transition spectroscopy and 3Q magic-angle-spinning spectra are recorded for three compounds from the ternary NaF-CaF2-AlF3 system. The quadrupolar frequency nuQ, asymmetry parameter etaQ, and isotropic chemical shift deltaiso are extracted from the spectrum reconstructions for five aluminum and four sodium sites. The quadrupolar parameters are calculated using the LAPW-based ab initio code WIEN2k. It is necessary to perform a structure optimization of all compounds to ensure a fine agreement between experimental and calculated parameters. By a comparison of experimental and calculated values, an attribution of all of the 27Al and 23Na NMR lines to the crystallographic sites is achieved. High-speed 19F NMR MAS spectra are recorded and reconstructed for the same compounds, leading to the determination of 18 isotropic chemical shifts. The superposition model developed by Bureau et al. is used, allowing a bijective assignment of the 19F NMR lines to the crystallographic sites. PMID:17140229

  20. USING 19F-NMR SPECTROSCOPY TO DETERMINE TRIFLURALIN BINDING TO SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trifluralin is a widely used herbicide for the control of broad leaf weeds in a variety of crops. Its binding to soil may result in significant losses in herbicidal activity and a delayed pollution problem. To investigate the nature of soil-bound trifluralin residues, 14

  1. Noninvasive detection of graft rejection by in vivo (19) F MRI in the early stage.

    PubMed

    Flögel, U; Su, S; Kreideweiss, I; Ding, Z; Galbarz, L; Fu, J; Jacoby, C; Witzke, O; Schrader, J

    2011-02-01

    Diagnosis of transplant rejection requires tissue biopsy and entails risks. Here, we describe a new (19) F MRI approach for noninvasive visualization of organ rejection via the macrophage host response. For this, we employed biochemically inert emulsified perfluorocarbons (PFCs), known to be preferentially phagocytized by monocytes and macrophages. Isografts from C57BL/6 or allografts from C57B10.A mice were heterotopically transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients. PFCs were applied intravenously followed by (1) H/(19) F MRI at 9.4 T 24 h after injection. (1) H images showed a similar position and anatomy of the graft in the abdomen for both cases. However, corresponding (19) F signals were only observed in allogenic tissue. (1) H/(19) F MRI enabled us to detect the initial immune response not later than 3 days after surgery, when conventional parameters did not reveal any signs of rejection. In allografts, the observed (19) F signal strongly increased with time and correlated with the extent of rejection. In separate experiments, rapamycin was used to demonstrate the ability of (19) F MRI to monitor immunosuppressive therapy. Thus, PFCs can serve as positive contrast agent for the early detection of transplant rejection by (19) F MRI with high spatial resolution and an excellent degree of specificity due to lack of any (19) F background. PMID:21214858

  2. Noninvasive detection of graft rejection by in vivo (19) F MRI in the early stage.

    PubMed

    Flögel, U; Su, S; Kreideweiss, I; Ding, Z; Galbarz, L; Fu, J; Jacoby, C; Witzke, O; Schrader, J

    2011-02-01

    Diagnosis of transplant rejection requires tissue biopsy and entails risks. Here, we describe a new (19) F MRI approach for noninvasive visualization of organ rejection via the macrophage host response. For this, we employed biochemically inert emulsified perfluorocarbons (PFCs), known to be preferentially phagocytized by monocytes and macrophages. Isografts from C57BL/6 or allografts from C57B10.A mice were heterotopically transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients. PFCs were applied intravenously followed by (1) H/(19) F MRI at 9.4 T 24 h after injection. (1) H images showed a similar position and anatomy of the graft in the abdomen for both cases. However, corresponding (19) F signals were only observed in allogenic tissue. (1) H/(19) F MRI enabled us to detect the initial immune response not later than 3 days after surgery, when conventional parameters did not reveal any signs of rejection. In allografts, the observed (19) F signal strongly increased with time and correlated with the extent of rejection. In separate experiments, rapamycin was used to demonstrate the ability of (19) F MRI to monitor immunosuppressive therapy. Thus, PFCs can serve as positive contrast agent for the early detection of transplant rejection by (19) F MRI with high spatial resolution and an excellent degree of specificity due to lack of any (19) F background.

  3. Gadolinium-modulated 19F signals from Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles as a New Strategy for Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Anne M.; Myerson, Jacob; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Hockett, Franklin D.; Winter, Patrick M.; Chen, Junjie; Gaffney, Patrick J.; Robertson, J. David; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in the design of fluorinated nanoparticles for magnetic resonance molecular imaging have enabled specific detection of 19F nuclei, providing unique and quantifiable spectral signatures. However, a pressing need for signal enhancement exists because the total 19F in imaging voxels is often limited. By directly incorporating a relaxation agent (gadolinium) into the lipid monolayer that surrounds the perfluorocarbon, a marked augmentation of the 19F signal from 200nm nanoparticles was achieved. This design increases the magnetic relaxation rate of the 19F nuclei 4-fold at 1.5 T and effects a 125% increase in signal, an effect which is maintained when they are targeted to human plasma clots. By varying the surface concentration of gadolinium, the relaxation effect can be quantitatively modulated to tailor particle properties. This novel strategy dramatically improves the sensitivity and range of 19F MRI/MRS and forms the basis for designing contrast agents capable of sensing their surface chemistry. PMID:18956457

  4. The thermonuclear production of 19F by Wolf-Rayet stars revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, A.; Arnould, M.; Meynet, G.

    2005-11-01

    New models of rotating and non-rotating stars are computed for initial masses between 25 and 120 M_⊙ and for metallicities Z = 0.004, 0.008, 0.020, and 0.040 with the aim of reexamining the wind contribution of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars to the 19F enrichment of the interstellar medium. Models with an initial rotation velocity υi = 300 km s-1 are found to globally eject less 19F than the non-rotating models. We compare our new predictions with those of Meynet & Arnould (2000, A&A, 355, 176), and demonstrate that the 19F yields are very sensitive to the still uncertain 19F (α ,p) 22Ne rate and to the adopted mass loss rates. Using the recommended mass loss rate values that take into account the clumping of the WR wind and the NACRE reaction rates, when available, we obtain WR 19F yields that are significantly lower than predicted by Meynet & Arnould (2000, A&A, 355, 176) and that would make WR stars non-important contributors to the galactic 19F budget. In view, however, of the large nuclear and mass loss rate uncertainties, we consider that the question of the WR contribution to the galactic 19F remains quite open.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of low-OH-fluor-chlorapatite: A single-crystal XRD and NMR spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    McCubbin, Francis M; Mason, Harris E; Park, Hyunsoo; Phillips, Brian L; Parise, John B; Nekvasil, Hanna; Lindsley, Donald H

    2008-12-12

    Los-OH apatite of the compositional range Ca{sub 4.99-5.06}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2.98-3.00}F{sub 0.51-0.48}Cl{sub 0.38-0.36}OH{sub 0.14-0.12} was synthesized and characterized structurally by synchrotron-based single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), and multiple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques. the average structure is hexagonal with space group P6{sub 3}/m. The presence of scattering in the single-crystal diffraction data set, which is incommensurate within the average hexagonal structure, suggests the presence of localized short-range monoclinic domains. Complex lineshapes in the {sup 31}P and {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectra are also consistent with the presence of an incommensurate phase. No evidence was detected for splitting of the Ca2 site into two distinct sites (as had been previously reported for hexagonal ternary apatities). Structure refinement and {sup 19}F{l_brace}{sup 35}Cl{r_brace} TRAPDOR NMR experiments verified intercolumnal neighboring of F and Cl atoms (inter-column distance of 2.62 {angstrom}) within this low-OH{sup -} apatite suggesting that long-range neighboring of F and Cl within the apatite anion channels is feasible.

  6. Ultra-low temperature MAS-DNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daniel; Bouleau, Eric; Saint-Bonnet, Pierre; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2016-03-01

    Since the infancy of NMR spectroscopy, sensitivity and resolution have been the limiting factors of the technique. Regular essential developments on this front have led to the widely applicable, versatile, and powerful spectroscopy that we know today. However, the Holy Grail of ultimate sensitivity and resolution is not yet reached, and technical improvements are still ongoing. Hence, high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) making use of high-frequency, high-power microwave irradiation of electron spins has become very promising in combination with magic angle sample spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments. This is because it leads to a transfer of the much larger polarization of these electron spins under suitable irradiation to surrounding nuclei, greatly increasing NMR sensitivity. Currently, this boom in MAS-DNP is mainly performed at minimum sample temperatures of about 100 K, using cold nitrogen gas to pneumatically spin and cool the sample. This Perspective deals with the desire to improve further the sensitivity and resolution by providing "ultra"-low temperatures for MAS-DNP, using cryogenic helium gas. Different designs on how this technological challenge has been overcome are described. It is shown that stable and fast spinning can be attained for sample temperatures down to 30 K using a large cryostat developed in our laboratory. Using this cryostat to cool a closed-loop of helium gas brings the additional advantage of sample spinning frequencies that can greatly surpass those achievable with nitrogen gas, due to the differing fluidic properties of these two gases. It is shown that using ultra-low temperatures for MAS-DNP results in substantial experimental sensitivity enhancements and according time-savings. Access to this temperature range is demonstrated to be both viable and highly pertinent.

  7. The ^19F(p,γ)^20Ne Reaction and Breakout from the Cold CNO Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, Aaron; Daly, Jason; Giesen, Ulrich; Görres, Joachim; Lee, Hye-Young; Stech, Edward; Ugalde, Claudio; Wiescher, Michael

    2001-10-01

    The ^19F(p,γ)^20Ne reaction is considered the only candidate for breakout from the cold CNO cycle(Wiescher M., J. Görres, and H. Schatz. J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 25) 1999 R133-R161.. While the reaction rate is expected to be sufficiently small as to make the break-out negligible when considering CNO nucleosynthesis, this has not been experimentally demonstrated. The competing ^19F(p,αγ)^20Ne reaction creates a beam induced background that dominates the observed spectra. While ^19F(p,γ_0,1)^20Ne has been measured down to about 300 keV(Subotić), K. M., R. Ostojić, and B. Z. Stephančić. Nucl. Phys. A331 (1979) 491-501., to date only limited measurements have been made of the total cross-section of ^19F(p,γ)^20Ne at energies below 1 MeV. A new method for suppressing the ^19F(p,αγ)^20Ne background has been developed at the University of Notre Dame. This allowed new low-energy measurements the ^19F(p,γ)^20Ne reaction rates near the region of astrophysical interest. The first results of these measurements will be presented.

  8. Contribution of 19F resonances on 18O( p, α)15N reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmeslem, Meriem; Chafa, Azzedine; Barhoumi, Slimane; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-08-01

    The 18O( p, α)15N reaction influences the isotopes production such as 19F, 18O, and 15N which can be used to test the models of stellar evolution. 19F is synthesized in both asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and metal-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Using R-matrix theory we allow new values of resonances parameters in 19F. We show that the most important contribution to the differential and total cross section at low energies, comes from the levels in 19F situated at resonances energies E R =151, 680 and 840 keV with spin and parity 1/2+. The total width of the 680 keV resonance is badly known. So, we have focused on this broad resonance corresponding to the 8.65 MeV level in 19F. We delimit the temperature range in which each resonance contribution to the total reaction rate occurs by analyzing the ratio ( N A < σν> i / N A < σν>). This allowed us to show that the 680 and 840 keV broad resonances strongly dominate the reaction rate over the stellar temperature range T 9=0.02-0.06 and T 9=0.5-5. Finally, these results were compared to NACRE and Iliadis astrophysical compilations.

  9. Structural investigations of {beta}-CaAlF{sub 5} by coupling powder XRD, NMR, EPR and spectroscopic parameter calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Body, M. . E-mail: monique.body@univ-lemans.fr; Silly, G.; Legein, C.; Buzare, J.-Y.; Calvayrac, F.; Blaha, P.

    2005-12-15

    {beta}-CaAlF{sub 5} was synthesized by solid-state reaction. The precise structure was refined from X-ray powder diffraction data in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c with lattice constants a=5.3361A, b=9.8298A, c=7.3271A, and {beta}=109.91{sup o} (Z=4). The structure exhibits isolated chains of AlF{sub 6}{sup 3-} octahedra sharing opposite corners.{sup 19}F and {sup 27}Al solid state NMR spectra were recorded using MAS and SATRAS techniques. An EPR spectrum was recorded for {beta}-CaAlF{sub 5}:Cr{sup 3+}. The experimental spectra were simulated in order to extract the NMR and EPR parameter values. Five fluorine sites and one low symmetry aluminium site were found in agreement with the refined structure. These parameters were calculated using empirical and ab-initio methods. The agreement obtained between the calculated {sup 19}F chemical shift values, {sup 27}Al quadrupolar parameters, Cr{sup 3+} EPR fine structure parameters and the experimental results demonstrates the complementarity of XRD, magnetic resonance experiments and theoretical methodologies.

  10. In Vivo Imaging of Stepwise Vessel Occlusion in Cerebral Photothrombosis of Mice by 19F MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Kampf, Thomas; Jakob, Peter M.; Stoll, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Background 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was recently introduced as a promising technique for in vivo cell tracking. In the present study we compared 19F MRI with iron-enhanced MRI in mice with photothrombosis (PT) at 7 Tesla. PT represents a model of focal cerebral ischemia exhibiting acute vessel occlusion and delayed neuroinflammation. Methods/Principal Findings Perfluorocarbons (PFC) or superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) were injected intravenously at different time points after photothrombotic infarction. While administration of PFC directly after PT induction led to a strong 19F signal throughout the entire lesion, two hours delayed application resulted in a rim-like 19F signal at the outer edge of the lesion. These findings closely resembled the distribution of signal loss on T2-weighted MRI seen after SPIO injection reflecting intravascular accumulation of iron particles trapped in vessel thrombi as confirmed histologically. By sequential administration of two chemically shifted PFC compounds 0 and 2 hours after illumination the different spatial distribution of the 19F markers (infarct core/rim) could be visualized in the same animal. When PFC were applied at day 6 the fluorine marker was only detected after long acquisition times ex vivo. SPIO-enhanced MRI showed slight signal loss in vivo which was much more prominent ex vivo indicative for neuroinflammation at this late lesion stage. Conclusion Our study shows that vessel occlusion can be followed in vivo by 19F and SPIO-enhanced high-field MRI while in vivo imaging of neuroinflammation remains challenging. The timing of contrast agent application was the major determinant of the underlying processes depicted by both imaging techniques. Importantly, sequential application of different PFC compounds allowed depiction of ongoing vessel occlusion from the core to the margin of the ischemic lesions in a single MRI measurement. PMID:22194810

  11. 14N overtone NMR under MAS: signal enhancement using symmetry-based sequences and novel simulation strategies† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4cp03994g Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Haies, Ibraheem M.; Jarvis, James A.; Bentley, Harry; Heinmaa, Ivo; Kuprov, Ilya; Williamson, Philip T. F.

    2015-01-01

    Overtone 14N NMR spectroscopy is a promising route for the direct detection of 14N signals with good spectral resolution. Its application is currently limited, however, by the absence of efficient polarization techniques for overtone signal enhancement and the lack of efficient numerical simulation techniques to aid in both the development of new methods and the analysis and interpretation of experimental data. In this paper we report a novel method for the transfer of polarization from 1H to the 14N overtone using symmetry-based R-sequences that overcome many of the limitations of adiabatic approaches that have worked successfully on static samples. Refinement of these sequences and the analysis of the resulting spectra have been facilitated through the development of an efficient simulation strategy for 14N overtone NMR spectroscopy of spinning samples, using effective Hamiltonians on top of Floquet and Fokker–Planck equations. PMID:25662410

  12. 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Crystallographic Studies of 5-Fluorotryptophan-Labeled Anthrax Protective Antigen and Effects of the Receptor on Stability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is an 83 kDa protein that is one of three protein components of the anthrax toxin, an AB toxin secreted by Bacillus anthracis. PA is capable of undergoing several structural changes, including oligomerization to either a heptameric or octameric structure called the prepore, and at acidic pH a major conformational change to form a membrane-spanning pore. To follow these structural changes at a residue-specific level, we have conducted initial studies in which we have biosynthetically incorporated 5-fluorotryptophan (5-FTrp) into PA, and we have studied the influence of 5-FTrp labeling on the structural stability of PA and on binding to the host receptor capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2) using 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). There are seven tryptophans in PA, but of the four domains in PA, only two contain tryptophans: domain 1 (Trp65, -90, -136, -206, and -226) and domain 2 (Trp346 and -477). Trp346 is of particular interest because of its proximity to the CMG2 binding interface, and because it forms part of the membrane-spanning pore. We show that the 19F resonance of Trp346 is sensitive to changes in pH, consistent with crystallographic studies, and that receptor binding significantly stabilizes Trp346 to both pH and temperature. In addition, we provide evidence that suggests that resonances from tryptophans distant from the binding interface are also stabilized by the receptor. Our studies highlight the positive impact of receptor binding on protein stability and the use of 19F NMR in gaining insight into structural changes in a high-molecular weight protein. PMID:24387629

  13. Degradation of 4-fluorobiphenyl by mycorrhizal fungi as determined by {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and {sup 14}C radiolabelling analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.A.; Meharg, A.A.; Till, C.; Troke, J.; Nicholson, J.K.

    1999-09-01

    The pathways of biotransformation of 4-fluorobiphenyl (4FBP) by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tylospora fibrilosa and several other mycorrhizal fungi were investigated by using {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with {sup 14}C radioisotope-detected high-performance liquid chromatography ({sup 14}C-HPLC). Under the conditions used in this study T. fibrillosa and some other species degraded 4FBP. {sup 14}C-HPLC profiles indicated that there were four major biotransformation products, whereas {sup 19}F NMR showed that there were six major fluorine-containing products. The authors confirmed that 4-fluorobiphen-4{prime}-ol and 4-fluorobiphen-3{prime}-ol were two of the major products formed, but no other products were conclusively identified. There was no evidence for the expected biotransformation pathway (namely, meta cleavage of the less halogenated ring), as none of the expected products of this route were found. To the best of their knowledge, this is the first report describing intermediates formed during mycorrhizal degradation of halogenated biphenyls.

  14. Comparison between optimized GRE and RARE sequences for 19F MRI studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffientini, Chiara D.; Mastropietro, Alfonso; Caffini, Matteo; Cocco, Sara; Zucca, Ileana; Scotti, Alessandro; Baselli, Giuseppe; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia

    2014-03-01

    In 19F-MRI studies limiting factors are the presence of a low signal due to the low concentration of 19F-nuclei, necessary for biological applications, and the inherent low sensitivity of MRI. Hence, acquiring images using the pulse sequence with the best signal to noise ratio (SNR) by optimizing the acquisition parameters specifically to a 19F compound is a core issue. In 19F-MRI, multiple-spin-echo (RARE) and gradient-echo (GRE) are the two most frequently used pulse sequence families; therefore we performed an optimization study of GRE pulse sequences based on numerical simulations and experimental acquisitions on fluorinated compounds. We compared GRE performance to an optimized RARE sequence. Images were acquired on a 7T MRI preclinical scanner on phantoms containing different fluorinated compounds. Actual relaxation times (T1, T2, T2*) were evaluated in order to predict SNR dependence on sequence parameters. Experimental comparisons between spoiled GRE and RARE, obtained at a fixed acquisition time and in steady state condition, showed RARE sequence outperforming the spoiled GRE (up to 406% higher). Conversely, the use of the unbalanced-SSFP showed a significant increase in SNR compared to RARE (up to 28% higher). Moreover, this sequence (as GRE in general) was confirmed to be virtually insensitive to T1 and T2 relaxation times, after proper optimization, thus improving marker independence from the biological environment. These results confirm the efficacy of the proposed optimization tool and foster further investigation addressing in-vivo applicability.

  15. Cell Labeling for 19F MRI: New and Improved Approach to Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsion Design

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sravan K.; Williams, Jonathan; Janjic, Jelena M.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes novel perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions designed to improve ex vivo cell labeling for 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 19F MRI is a powerful non-invasive technique for monitoring cells of the immune system in vivo, where cells are labeled ex vivo with PFC nanoemulsions in cell culture. The quality of 19F MRI is directly affected by the quality of ex vivo PFC cell labeling. When co-cultured with cells for longer periods of time, nanoemulsions tend to settle due to high specific weight of PFC oils (1.5–2.0 g/mL). This in turn can decrease efficacy of excess nanoemulsion removal and reliability of the cell labeling in vitro. To solve this problem, novel PFC nanoemulsions are reported which demonstrate lack of sedimentation and high stability under cell labeling conditions. They are monodisperse, have small droplet size (~130 nm) and low polydispersity (<0.15), show a single peak in the 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum at −71.4 ppm and possess high fluorine content. The droplet size and polydispersity remained unchanged after 160 days of follow up at three temperatures (4, 25 and 37 °C). Further, stressors such as elevated temperature in the presence of cells, and centrifugation, did not affect the nanoemulsion droplet size and polydispersity. Detailed synthetic methodology and in vitro testing for these new PFC nanoemulsions is presented. PMID:25586263

  16. In vitro quantitative ((1))H and ((19))F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging studies of fluvastatin™ in Lescol® XL tablets in a USP-IV dissolution cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qilei; Gladden, Lynn; Avalle, Paolo; Mantle, Michael

    2011-12-20

    Swellable polymeric matrices are key systems in the controlled drug release area. Currently, the vast majority of research is still focused on polymer swelling dynamics. This study represents the first quantitative multi-nuclear (((1))H and ((19))F) fast magnetic resonance imaging study of the complete dissolution process of a commercial (Lescol® XL) tablet, whose formulation is based on the hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) polymer under in vitro conditions in a standard USP-IV (United States Pharmacopeia apparatus IV) flow-through cell that is incorporated into high field superconducting magnetic resonance spectrometer. Quantitative RARE ((1))H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ((19))F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging methods have been used to give information on: (i) dissolution media uptake and hydrodynamics; (ii) active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) mobilisation and dissolution; (iii) matrix swelling and dissolution and (iv) media activity within the swelling matrix. In order to better reflect the in vivo conditions, the bio-relevant media Simulated Gastric Fluid (SGF) and Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FaSSIF) were used. A newly developed quantitative ultra-fast MRI technique was applied and the results clearly show the transport dynamics of media penetration and hydrodynamics along with the polymer swelling processes. The drug dissolution and mobility inside the gel matrix was characterised, in parallel to the ((1))H measurements, by ((19))F NMR spectroscopy and MRI, and the drug release profile in the bulk solution was recorded offline by UV spectrometer. We found that NMR spectroscopy and 1D-MRI can be uniquely used to monitor the drug dissolution/mobilisation process within the gel layer, and the results from ((19))F NMR spectra indicate that in the gel layer, the physical mobility of the drug changes from "dissolved immobilised drug" to "dissolved mobilised drug".

  17. Carbon-13 CP-MAS nuclear magnetic resonance studies of teas.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Richa, Antonio; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2003-05-01

    13C CP-MAS NMR spectra of green and black tea were obtained and assigned based on the solid-state NMR spectra of tropolone, (+)-catechin hydrate, gallic acid, caffeine and flavone derivatives. The peak shape and chemical shifts observed for carbonyl carbons in CP-MAS spectra of teas indicate the existence of different chemical species, mainly free phenollic acids and ester derivatives of flavonoids. The peak patterns allow to establish differences between both teas.

  18. Investigations of adsorption sites on oxide surfaces using solid-state NMR and TPD-IGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombeck, Rebecca A.

    diameters and thermal histories. The bulk structural features in both compositions of glass fibers were identified using high-resolution 29Si, 27Al, and 11B magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopic measurements. In multi-component glasses, the determination of silicon, aluminum, and boron distributions becomes difficult due to the competitive nature of the network-modifying oxides among the network-forming oxides. In pure silicates, 29Si MAS NMR can often resolve resonances arising from silicate tetrahedron having varying numbers of bridging oxygens. In aluminoborosilicate glasses, aluminum is present in four-, five-, and six- coordination with oxygen as neighbors. The speciation of the aluminum can be determined using 27Al MAS NMR. The fraction of tetrahedral boron species in the glass fibers were measured using 11B MAS NMR, which is typically used to study the short-range structure of borate containing glasses such as alkali borate, borosilicate, and aluminoborosilicate glasses. While solid-state NMR is a powerful tool for elucidating bonding environments and coordination changes in the glass structure, it cannot quantitatively probe low to moderate surface area samples due to insufficient spins. Chemical probes either physisorbed or chemisorbed to the fiber's surface can increase the surface selectivity of NMR for analysis of samples with low surface areas and provide information about the local molecular structure of the reactive surface site. Common chemical probe molecules contain NMR active nuclei such as 19F or may be enriched with 13C. A silyating agent, (3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)dimethylchlorosilane (TFS), reacts with reactive surface hydroxyls, which can be quantified by utilizing the NMR active nucleus (19F) contained in the probe molecule. The observed 19F MAS NMR peak area is integrated and compared against a standard of known fluorine spins (concentration), allowing the number of reactive hydroxyl sites to be quantified. IGC is a method used to study the

  19. Determination of relative orientation between (1)H CSA tensors from a 3D solid-state NMR experiment mediated through (1)H/(1)H RFDR mixing under ultrafast MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    To obtain piercing insights into inter and intramolecular H-bonding, and π-electron interactions measurement of (1)H chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors is gradually becoming an obvious choice. While the magnitude of CSA tensors provides unique information about the local electronic environment surrounding the nucleus, the relative orientation between these tensors can offer further insights into the spatial arrangement of interacting nuclei in their respective three-dimensional (3D) space. In this regard, we present a 3D anisotropic/anisotropic/isotropic proton chemical shift (CSA/CSA/CS) correlation experiment mediated through (1)H/(1)H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) which enhances spin diffusion through recoupled (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequency (70kHz). Relative orientation between two interacting 1H CSA tensors is obtained by fitting two-interacting (1)H CSA tensors by fitting two-dimensional (2D) (1)H/(1)H CSA/CSA spectral slices through extensive numerical simulations. To recouple (1)H CSAs in the indirect frequency dimensions of a 3D experiment we have employed γ-encoded radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence based on R-symmetry (R188(7)) with a series of phase-alternated 2700(°)-90180(°) composite-180° pulses on citric acid sample. Due to robustness of applied (1)H CSA recoupling sequence towards the presence of RF field inhomogeneity, we have successfully achieved an excellent (1)H/(1)H CSA/CSA cross-correlation efficiency between H-bonded sites of citric acid. PMID:26065628

  20. A Study on 19F( n,α) Reaction Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uğur, F. A.; Tel, E.; Gökçe, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, cross sections of neutron induced reactions have been investigated for fluorine target nucleus. The calculations have been made on the excitation functions of 19F ( n,α), 19F( n,xα) reactions. Fluorine (F) and its molten salt compounds (LiF) can serve as a coolant which can be used at high temperatures without reaching a high vapor pressure and also the molten salt compounds are also a good neutron moderator. In these calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been investigated. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the full exciton model and the cascade exciton model. The equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing model. Also in the present work, reaction cross sections have calculated by using evaluated empirical formulas developed by Tel et al. at 14-15 MeV energy. The obtained results have been discussed and compared with the available experimental data.

  1. Signal turn-on probe for nucleic acid detection based on (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Takashi; Shimizu, Yu-ki; Sasaki, Jun; Hayakawa, Hikaru; Fujimoto, Kenzo

    2011-01-01

    To image gene expression in vivo, we designed and synthesized a novel signal turn-on probe for (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (MR) imaging based on paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. The stem-loop structured oligodeoxyribonucleotide (ODN) having a molecular beacon sequence for point mutated K-ras mRNA was doubly labeled with bis(trifluoromethyl)benzene moiety and Gd-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid chelate moiety at the each termini of the ODN probe, respectively. We found that the (19)F MR signal of the bis(trifluoromethyl)benzene moiety tethered at the 5' termini of the probe turned on by the addition of complementary ODN. The probe has the potential to image gene expressions in vivo.

  2. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-18

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra. PMID:26789115

  3. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-18

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra.

  4. Novel electrolytes for use in new and improved batteries: An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Marc B.

    This thesis focuses on the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in order to study materials for use as electrolytes in batteries. The details of four projects are described in this thesis as well as a brief theoretical background of NMR. Structural and dynamics properties were determined using several NMR techniques such as static, MAS, PFG diffusion, and relaxation to understand microscopic and macroscopic properties of the materials described within. Nuclei investigate were 1H, 2H, 7Li, 13C, 19F, 23Na, and 27Al. The first project focuses on an exciting new material to be used as a solid electrolyte membrane. T. The second project focuses on the dynamics of ionic liquid-solvent mixtures and their comparison to molecular dynamics computer simulations. The third project involves a solvent-free film containing NaTFSI salt mixed in to PEO for use in sodium-ion batteries. This final project focuses on a composite electrolyte consisting of a ceramic and solid: LiI:PEO:LiAlO2.

  5. Amyloid imaging using fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging ((19)F-MRI).

    PubMed

    Tooyama, Ikuo; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Taguchi, Hiroyasu; Kato, Tomoko; Hirao, Koichi; Shirai, Nobuaki; Sogabe, Takayuki; Ibrahim, Nor Faeizah; Inubushi, Toshiro; Morikawa, Shigehiro

    2016-09-01

    The formation of senile plaques followed by the deposition of amyloid-β is the earliest pathological change in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the detection of senile plaques remains the most important early diagnostic indicator of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid imaging is a noninvasive technique for visualizing senile plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's patients using positron emission tomography (PET) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Because fluorine-19 ((19)F) displays an intense nuclear magnetic resonance signal and is almost non-existent in the body, targets are detected with a higher signal-to-noise ratio using appropriate fluorinated contrast agents. The recent introduction of high-field MRI allows us to detect amyloid depositions in the brain of living mouse using (19)F-MRI. So far, at least three probes have been reported to detect amyloid deposition in the brain of transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease; (E,E)-1-fluoro-2,5-bis-(3-hydroxycarbonyl-4-hydroxy)styrylbenzene (FSB), 1,7-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-trifluoromethoxyphenyl)-4-methoxycarbonylethyl-1,6-heptadiene3,5-dione (FMeC1, Shiga-Y5) and 6-(3',6',9',15',18',21'-heptaoxa-23',23',23'-trifluorotricosanyloxy)-2-(4'-dimethylaminostyryl)benzoxazole (XP7, Shiga-X22). This review presents the recent advances in amyloid imaging using (19)F-MRI, including our own studies.

  6. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexander J.; Granwehr, Josef; Lesbats, Clémentine; Krupa, James L.; Six, Joseph S.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Thomas, Neil R.; Auer, Dorothee P.; Meersmann, Thomas; Faas, Henryk M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental “calibration factor” to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments. PMID:27727294

  7. First evidences for 19F(α, p)22Ne at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agata, G.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; Blagus, S.; Figuera, P.; Grassi, L.; Guardo, G. L.; Gulino, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Indelicato, I.; Kshetri, R.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Lattuada, M.; Mijatović, T.; Milin, M.; Miljanic, D.; Prepolec, L.; Sergi, M. L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Tokic, V.; Tumino, A.; Uroic, M.

    2016-04-01

    19F experimental abundances is overestimated in respect to the theoretical one: it is therefore clear that further investigations are needed. We focused on the 19F(α, p) 22 Ne reaction, representing the main destruction channel in He-rich environments. The lowest energy at which this reaction has been studied with direct methods is E C.M. ≈ 0.91 MeV, while the Gamow region is between 0.39 ÷ 0.8 MeV, far below the Coulomb barrier (3.8 MeV). For this reason, an experiment at Rudjer Boskovic Institute (Zagreb) was performed, applying the Trojan Horse Method. Following this method we selected the quasi-free contribution coming from 6Li(19 F,p22 Ne)2 H at Ebeam=6 MeV at kinematically favourable angles, and the cross section at energies 0 < EC.M. < 1.4 MeV was extracted in arbitrary units, covering the astrophysical region of interest.

  8. Understanding structure-property relationships in lithium metal phosphates and oxide electrode materials: X-ray/neutron diffraction and lithium-7 MAS-NMR coupled with lithium-ion electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shih-Chieh

    Li-ion rechargeable battery has emerged as one of the most important portable energy carriers in the last decade. While LiCoO2 has been used as the cathode for a decade because of the good capacity and cycle retentions, tremendous efforts have been devoted to search other low cost and environmentally viable materials. Some of the promising materials such as LiFePO4, Li3V2(PO4)3, and LiNi1/3 Mn1/3Co1/3O2 were studied in this thesis. New lithium metal fluorophosphates were also discovered as potential cathode materials. The use of an aqueous solution synthesis route employing nanosized oxidized carbon black particles to inhibit LiFePO4 crystal growth was demonstrated. The resultant particle size of about 100 nm is reduced by 20 times compared to the solution synthesis method alone. Electron diffraction patterns and high resolution images from TEM experiments confirmed the single olivine phase nature of the material and the very small crystallite sizes. The 100 nm crystallites of LiFePO4-OCB showed vastly improved capacity (0.7 Li, 125mAh/g) compared to the 2mum particle. This improvement is due to contributions of decreased Li diffusion paths and improved contact with conductive carbon particles. Electrochemical PITT experiments coupled with ex-situ X-ray diffraction studies revealed the structural similarities of the delithiated monoclinic single phase compositions of LixV2(PO 4)3. (x = 2, 1, 0) From Le Bail refinements of XRD patterns, monoclinic Li3V2(PO4)3 shows only 7% volume variation upon delithiation which demonstrates its excellent intercalation characteristics. Structures of delithiated single phase compositions were further studied by both powder neutron diffraction and 7Li solid state NMR. From the structure solutions, each plateau in the V vs x curve corresponds to a two-phase transition involving the reorganization of electrons and Li ions within the lattice. The existence of charge ordering in Li2V2(PO4)3 demonstrates the electrons are pinned on both

  9. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the coat protein of bacteriophage M13 in synthetic phospholipid vesicles and deoxycholate micelles.

    PubMed Central

    Dettman, H D; Weiner, J H; Sykes, B D

    1982-01-01

    The nonlytic, filamentous coliphage M13 offers an excellent model system for the study of membrane-protein interactions. We prepare derivatives of the protein containing fluorine-labeled amino acids and use 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study the protein in both deoxycholate micelles and phospholipid vesicles. We have previously described the in vivo preparation of an m-fluorotyrosyl derivative of M13 coat protein and also a method for incorporation of high levels of this protein into small, uniformly sized phospholipid vesicles of defined composition. Herein we describe the in vivo preparation and the characterization of an m-fluorophenylalanine derivative. We simultaneously compare the environment and mobility of the tyrosine and phenylalanine residues (the former in the hydrophobic region of the protein and the latter in the hydrophilic regions) as influenced by bile salt detergent or lipid interactions. PMID:7055622

  10. TANKS 18 AND 19-F EQUIPMENT GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-12-15

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) intends to remove Tanks 18-F and 19-F at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from service. The high-level waste (HLW) tanks have been isolated from the F-area Tank Farm (FTF) facilities and will be filled with cementitious grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the empty volumes in the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways from the surface to residual waste on the bottom of the tanks, (3) providing an intruder barrier, and (4) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to limit solubility of residual radionuclides. Bulk waste and heel waste removal equipment will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F when the tanks are closed. This equipment includes: mixer pumps, transfer pumps, transfer jets, equipment support masts, sampling masts and dip tube assemblies. The current Tank 18-F and 19-F closure strategy is to grout the internal void spaces in this equipment to eliminate fast vertical pathways and slow water infiltration to the residual material on the tank floor. This report documents the results of laboratory testing performed to identify a grout formulation for filling the abandoned equipment in Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The objective of this work was to formulate a flowable grout for filling internal voids of equipment that will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F during the final closures. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, Tank Farm Closure Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The scope for this task is provided in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Prepare and evaluate the SRR cooling coil grout identified in WSRC-STI-2008-00298 per the TTR for this work. The cooling coil grout is a mixture of BASF MasterFlow{reg_sign} 816 cable grout (67.67 wt. %), Grade 100 ground granulated blast furnace slag (7.52 wt. %) and water (24.81 wt. %); (2) Identify equipment grout placement and

  11. /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of the distance between the E-site GTP and the high-affinity Mg/sup 2 +/ in tubulin

    SciTech Connect

    Monasterio, O.

    1987-09-22

    The distance separating the divalent metal ion high-affinity binding site and the exchangeable nucleotide binding site on tubulin was evaluated by using high-resolution /sup 19/F NMR. The /sup 31/P and /sup 19/F NMR spectra of guanosine 5'-(..gamma..-fluorotriphosphate) (GTP(..gamma..F)) were studied. Both the fluorine and the ..gamma..-phosphate were split into a doublet with a coupling constant of 936 Hz. Tubulin purified according to the method of Weisenberg was incubated with 1 mM Mn/sup 2 +/. After one cycle of assembly, Mn/sup 2 +/ only partially, i.e., 60% at the high-affinity binding site. After colchicine treatment of tubulin to stabilize it, GTP(..gamma..F) was added, and the 254-MHz fluorine-19 relaxation rates were measured within the first 4 h. Longitudinal and transversal relaxation rates were determined at two concentrations of GTP(..gamma..F) and variable concentrations of colchicine-tubulin-Mn(II) (paramagnetic complex) or the ternary complex with magnesium diamagnetic complex). The analysis of the relaxation data indicates that the rate of exchange of GTP(..gamma..F) from the exchangeable nucleotide site has a lower limit of 8.7 x 10/sup 4/ s/sup -1/ and the metal and exchangeable nucleotide binding sites are separated by an upper distance between 6 and 8 A. These data confirm that the high-affinity divalent cation site is situated in the same locus as that of the exchangeable nucleotide, forming a metal-nucleotide complex.

  12. Cerebral blood flow in experimental ischemia assessed by sup 19 F magnetic resonance spectroscopy in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, A.; Nagashima, G.; Bizzi, A.; DesPres, D.J. )

    1990-10-01

    We evaluated a 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopic technique that detects Freon-23 washout as a means of measuring cerebral blood flow in halothane-anesthetized adult cats during and after transient cerebral ischemia produced by vascular occlusion. The experiments were performed to test the ability of this recently developed method to detect postischemic flow deficits. Results were consistent with postischemic hypoperfusion. The method also proved valuable for measuring small residual flow during vascular occlusion. Our experiments indicate that this method provides simple, rapid, and repeatable flow measurements that can augment magnetic resonance examinations of cerebral metabolic parameters in the study of ischemia.

  13. SOLID-STATE 19F NMR INVESTIGATION OF HEXAFLUOROBENZENE SORPTION TO SOIL ORGANIC MATTER. (R825549C058)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. In-situ NMR study of molecular and ionic processes inside carbon nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhixiang

    Interactions of simple ions with water and interfaces play critical roles in many electrochemical and biological processes. They are especially significant in nanoconfined regions and have a profound impact in many applications, for instance nanofluidics and supercapacitors. This dissertation employs a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique to study their influence on the ionic processes inside carbon nanopores. To characterize the carbon micropore structure, a convenient NMR method is established by taking a 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) spectrum of the adsorbed water. A density functional theory (DFT) computation of the nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) yields a quantitative relationship between the NICS values and the micropore sizes. The carbon micropore size and distribution are derived from the chemical shift and the spectrum lineshape. For aqueous electrolytes inside uncharged carbon nanopores, the measurement of ion concentrations reveals a substantial electroneutrality breakdown. The specific ion effects and ion-ion correlations are shown to play crucial roles in determining the degree of electroneutrality breakdown. The importance of those interactions is further revealed by the asymmetric and nonlinear responses of ion concentrations to the charging of the confining carbon walls. Such information is obtained with a carbon supercapacitor built into the NMR probe. The NMR observations are validated by a numerical calculation of the ion distribution in the nanopores using the generalized Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation, demonstrating that the nonelectrostatic interfacial interactions can indeed dominate the electrostatic interactions and lead to the breakdown of electroneutrality inside nanoconfined regions. Interfacial ion hydration is an essential part of the specific ion effects. Using in-situ 23Na and 19F NMR on carbon supercapacitors with different carbon pore sizes, I provide a molecular-scale understanding of the permeation and

  15. Measurement of the 19F(α,n)22Na Cross Section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Marcus; Smith, M. S.; Pain, S.; Febbraro, M.; Pittman, S.; Chipps, K. A.; Thompson, S. J.; Grinder, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Smith, K.; Thornsberry, C.; Thompson, P.; Peters, W. A.; Waddell, D.; Blanchard, R.; Carls, A.; Shadrick, S.; Engelhardt, A.; Hertz-Kintish, D.; Allen, N.; Sims, H.

    2015-10-01

    Enriched uranium is commonly stored in fluoride matrices such as UF6. Alpha decays of uranium in UF6 will create neutrons via the 19F(α,n)22Na reaction. An improved cross section for this reaction will enable improved nondestructive assays of uranium content in storage cylinders at material enrichment facilities. To determine this reaction cross section, we have performed experiments using both forward and inverse kinematic techniques at the University of Notre Dame (forward) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (inverse). Both experiments utilized the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) for neutron detection. The ORNL experiment also used a new ionization chamber for 22Na particle identification. Gating on the 22Na nuclei detected drastically reduced the background counts in the neutron time-of-flight spectra. The latest analysis and results will be presented for 19F beam energies ranging from 20-37 MeV. This work is funded in part by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics, the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation R&D, and the NSF.

  16. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of stereoselective binding of isoflurane to bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Tang, P; Firestone, L; Zhang, T T

    1996-01-01

    Whether proteins or lipids are the primary target sites for general anesthetic action has engendered considerable debate. Recent in vivo studies have shown that the S(+) and R(-) enantiomers of isoflurane are not equipotent, implying involvement of proteins. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), a soluble protein devoid of lipid, contains specific binding sites for isoflurane and other anesthetics. We therefore conducted 19F nuclear magnetic resonance measurements to determine whether binding of isoflurane to BSA was stereoselective. Isoflurane chemical shifts were measured as a function of BSA concentration to determine the chemical shift differences between the free and bound isoflurane. KD was determined by measuring the 19F transverse relaxation times (T2) as a function of isoflurane concentration. The binding duration was determined by assessing increases in 1/T2 as a result of isoflurane exchanging between the free and bound states. The S(+) and R(-) enantiomers exhibited no stereoselectivity in chemical shifts and KD values (KD = 1.3 +/- 0.2 mM, mean +/- SE, for S(+), R(-), and the racemic mixture). Nonetheless, stereoselectivity was observed in dynamic binding parameters; the S(+) enantiomer bound with slower association and dissociation rates than the R(-). Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8770230

  17. TANK 18-F AND 19-F TANK FILL GROUT SCALE UP TEST SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2012-01-03

    High-level waste (HLW) tanks 18-F and 19-F have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure the tanks will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) entombing waste removal equipment, (4) discouraging future intrusion, and (5) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. This report documents the results of a four cubic yard bulk fill scale up test on the grout formulation recommended for filling Tanks 18-F and 19-F. Details of the scale up test are provided in a Test Plan. The work was authorized under a Technical Task Request (TTR), HLE-TTR-2011-008, and was performed according to Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The bulk fill scale up test described in this report was intended to demonstrate proportioning, mixing, and transportation, of material produced in a full scale ready mix concrete batch plant. In addition, the material produced for the scale up test was characterized with respect to fresh properties, thermal properties, and compressive strength as a function of curing time.

  18. TANK 18 AND 19-F TIER 1A EQUIPMENT FILL MOCK UP TEST SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-04

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) has determined that Tanks 18-F and 19-F have met the F-Tank Farm (FTF) General Closure Plan Requirements and are ready to be permanently closed. The high-level waste (HLW) tanks have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure they will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) discouraging future intrusion, and (4) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. Bulk waste removal and heel removal equipment remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F. This equipment includes the Advance Design Mixer Pump (ADMP), transfer pumps, transfer jets, standard slurry mixer pumps, equipment-support masts, sampling masts, dip tube assemblies and robotic crawlers. The present Tank 18 and 19-F closure strategy is to grout the equipment in place and eliminate vertical pathways by filling voids in the equipment to vertical fast pathways and water infiltration. The mock-up tests described in this report were intended to address placement issues identified for grouting the equipment that will be left in Tank 18-F and Tank 19-F. The Tank 18-F and 19-F closure strategy document states that one of the Performance Assessment (PA) requirements for a closed tank is that equipment remaining in the tank be filled to the extent practical and that vertical flow paths 1 inch and larger be grouted. The specific objectives of the Tier 1A equipment grout mock-up testing include: (1) Identifying the most limiting equipment configurations with respect to internal void space filling; (2) Specifying and constructing initial test geometries and forms that represent scaled boundary conditions; (3) Identifying a target grout rheology for evaluation in the scaled mock-up configurations; (4) Scaling-up production of a grout mix with the target rheology

  19. Tanks 18 And 19-F Structural Flowable Grout Fill Material Evaluation And Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.

    2013-04-23

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: 1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non-compressible material; 2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; 3) reduce contaminant mobility by a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and 4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: 1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). 2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. 3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix design. 4

  20. Calculated cross sections for neutron induced reactions on sup 19 F and uncertainties of parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.X. . Inst. of Atomic Energy); Fu, C.Y.; Larson, D.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Nuclear model codes were used to calculate cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on {sup 19}F for incident energies from 2 to 20 MeV. The model parameters in the codes were adjusted to best reproduce experimental data and are given in this report. The calculated results are compared to measured data and the evaluated values of ENDF/B-V. The covariance matrix for several of the most sensitive model parameters is given based on the scatter of measured data around the theoretical curves and the long-range correlation error of measured data. The results of these calculations form the basis for the new ENDF/B-VI fluorine evaluation. 44 refs., 64 figs., 14 tabs.

  1. Efficient Acid-catalyzed 18F/19F Fluoride Exchange of BODIPY Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Keliher, Edmund J.; Klubnick, Jenna A.; Reiner, Thomas; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine containing fluorochromes represent important validation agents for PET imaging agents as they can be easily rapidly validated in cells by fluorescence imaging. In particular, the 18F-labeled BODIPY-FL fluorophore has emerged as an important platform but little is known about alternative 18F-labeling strategies or labeling on red shifted fluorophores. Here we explore the acid-catalyzed 18F/19F exchange on a range of commercially available N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester and maleimide BODIPY fluorophores. We show this method to be a simple and efficient 18F-labeling strategy for a diverse span of fluorescent compounds, including a BODIPY modified PARP-1 inhibitor, and amine- and thiol-reactive BODIPY fluorophores. PMID:24596307

  2. Imaging of Intratumoral Inflammation during Oncolytic Virotherapy of Tumors by 19F-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Michael; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Seubert, Carolin; Langbein-Laugwitz, Johanna; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Sturm, Volker Jörg Friedrich; Ye, Yuxiang; Kampf, Thomas; Jakob, Peter Michael; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oncolytic virotherapy of tumors is an up-coming, promising therapeutic modality of cancer therapy. Unfortunately, non-invasive techniques to evaluate the inflammatory host response to treatment are rare. Here, we evaluate 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which enables the non-invasive visualization of inflammatory processes in pathological conditions by the use of perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions (PFC) for monitoring of oncolytic virotherapy. Methodology/Principal Findings The Vaccinia virus strain GLV-1h68 was used as an oncolytic agent for the treatment of different tumor models. Systemic application of PFC emulsions followed by 1H/19F MRI of mock-infected and GLV-1h68-infected tumor-bearing mice revealed a significant accumulation of the 19F signal in the tumor rim of virus-treated mice. Histological examination of tumors confirmed a similar spatial distribution of the 19F signal hot spots and CD68+-macrophages. Thereby, the CD68+-macrophages encapsulate the GFP-positive viral infection foci. In multiple tumor models, we specifically visualized early inflammatory cell recruitment in Vaccinia virus colonized tumors. Furthermore, we documented that the 19F signal correlated with the extent of viral spreading within tumors. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest 19F MRI as a non-invasive methodology to document the tumor-associated host immune response as well as the extent of intratumoral viral replication. Thus, 19F MRI represents a new platform to non-invasively investigate the role of the host immune response for therapeutic outcome of oncolytic virotherapy and individual patient response. PMID:23441176

  3. Balanced UTE-SSFP for 19F MR Imaging of Complex Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Goette, Matthew J.; Keupp, Jochen; Rahmer, Jürgen; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Caruthers, Shelton D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A novel technique for highly sensitive detection of multi-resonant fluorine imaging agents was designed and tested with the use of dual-frequency 19F/1H ultra-short echo times (UTE) sampled with a balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) pulse sequence and 3D radial readout. Methods Feasibility of 3D radial balanced UTE-SSFP imaging was demonstrated for a phantom comprising liquid perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB). Sensitivity of the pulse sequence was measured and compared to other sequences imaging the PFOB (CF2)6 line group including UTE radial gradient-echo (GRE) at α=30°, as well as Cartesian GRE, balanced SSFP, and fast spin-echo (FSE). The PFOB CF3 peak was also sampled with FSE. Results The proposed balanced UTE-SSFP technique exhibited a relative detection sensitivity of 51 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2 (α=30°), at least twice that of other sequence types with either 3D radial (UTE GRE: 20 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2) or Cartesian k-space filling (GRE: 12 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2; FSE: 16 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2 balanced SSFP: 23 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2 In vivo imaging of angiogenesis-targeted PFOB nanoparticles was demonstrated in a rabbit model of cancer on a clinical 3T scanner. Conclusion A new dual 19F/1H balanced UTE-SSFP sequence manifests high SNR, with detection sensitivity more than twofold better than traditional techniques, and alleviates imaging problems caused by dephasing in complex spectra. PMID:25163853

  4. Visualizing brain inflammation with a shingled-leg radio-frequency head probe for 19F/1H MRI.

    PubMed

    Waiczies, Helmar; Lepore, Stefano; Drechsler, Susanne; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Purfürst, Bettina; Sydow, Karl; Dathe, Margitta; Kühne, André; Lindel, Tomasz; Hoffmann, Werner; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf; Waiczies, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides the opportunity of tracking cells in vivo. Major challenges in dissecting cells from the recipient tissue and signal sensitivity constraints albeit exist. In this study, we aimed to tackle these limitations in order to study inflammation in autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We constructed a very small dual-tunable radio frequency (RF) birdcage probe tailored for (19)F (fluorine) and (1)H (proton) MR mouse neuroimaging. The novel design eliminated the need for extra electrical components on the probe structure and afforded a uniform -field as well as good SNR. We employed fluorescently-tagged (19)F nanoparticles and could study the dynamics of inflammatory cells between CNS and lymphatic system during development of encephalomyelitis, even within regions of the brain that are otherwise not easily visualized by conventional probes. (19)F/(1)H MR Neuroimaging will allow us to study the nature of immune cell infiltration during brain inflammation over an extensive period of time. PMID:23412352

  5. Visualizing Brain Inflammation with a Shingled-Leg Radio-Frequency Head Probe for 19F/1H MRI

    PubMed Central

    Waiczies, Helmar; Lepore, Stefano; Drechsler, Susanne; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Purfürst, Bettina; Sydow, Karl; Dathe, Margitta; Kühne, André; Lindel, Tomasz; Hoffmann, Werner; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf; Waiczies, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides the opportunity of tracking cells in vivo. Major challenges in dissecting cells from the recipient tissue and signal sensitivity constraints albeit exist. In this study, we aimed to tackle these limitations in order to study inflammation in autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We constructed a very small dual-tunable radio frequency (RF) birdcage probe tailored for 19F (fluorine) and 1H (proton) MR mouse neuroimaging. The novel design eliminated the need for extra electrical components on the probe structure and afforded a uniform -field as well as good SNR. We employed fluorescently-tagged 19F nanoparticles and could study the dynamics of inflammatory cells between CNS and lymphatic system during development of encephalomyelitis, even within regions of the brain that are otherwise not easily visualized by conventional probes. 19F/1H MR Neuroimaging will allow us to study the nature of immune cell infiltration during brain inflammation over an extensive period of time. PMID:23412352

  6. TANKS 18 AND 19-F STRUCTURAL FLOWABLE GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-01

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: (1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non compressible material; (2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; (3) reduce contaminant mobility by (a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and (b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and (4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). (2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. (3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix

  7. Full differentiation and assignment of boron species in the electrolytes Li{sub 2}B{sub 6}O{sub 9}F{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braeuniger, Thomas; Pilz, Thomas; Chandran, C. Vinod; Jansen, Martin

    2012-10-15

    The syntheses of two new fluorooxoborates, Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 6}O{sub 9}F{sub 2}, which possess considerable ion conductivity at higher temperatures, have been reported recently. Here, we describe the characterisation of these compounds by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy. The complex central-transition MAS spectra, resulting from overlap of sub-spectra contributed by the individual boron species in the crystal structures, could be clearly separated by acquisition and analysis of 3QMAS spectra. By numerical fit of these sub-spectra, the isotropic chemical shift {delta}{sub iso}, the quadrupolar coupling constant {chi}, and the asymmetry {eta} were determined. Using known relations between boron coordination and chemical shift as well as quadrupolar coupling, the individual {sup 11}B NMR resonances have been ascribed to boron species in tetrahedral or trigonal environment. To remove remaining assignment ambiguities, the response of the {sup 11}B resonances to {sup 19}F decoupling was qualitatively analysed. Thus, by using the combined information conveyed by chemical shift, quadrupolar and dipolar interaction, a complete assignment of the complex {sup 11}B line shapes exhibited by the fluorooxoborates has been achieved. - Graphical abstract: Structure and solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectrum of Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterisation of title compounds by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sub-spectra of boron species separated by evaluation of 3QMAS spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotropic chemical shift and quadrupolar interaction parameters determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full boron assignment based on NMR parameters and response to {sup 19}F decoupling.

  8. Rapid monitoring of oxygenation by 19F magnetic resonance imaging: Simultaneous comparison with fluorescence quenching.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bénédicte F; Cron, Greg O; Gallez, Bernard

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an MRI fluorocarbon oximetry technique using snapshot inversion recovery and compare it with fluorescence quenching fiber-optic probe oximetry (OxyLite) performed simultaneously in experimental mouse tumors. The oxygen reporter probe hexafluorobenzene (HFB) was injected directly into the tumors, along with the insertion of the OxyLite probe. Tumor oxygenation (pO(2)) was modified using carbogen or lethal doses of the anesthetic gas. MRI pO(2) maps were generated in 1.5 min with an in-plane spatial resolution of 1.88 mm. MRI and OxyLite showed consistent baseline and postmortem pO(2) values. Increases in tumor pO(2) during carbogen breathing showed similar kinetics for the two methods. The pO(2) values observed using the OxyLite corresponded with relatively hypoxic values observed by MRI. The apparent discrepancy between mean values might be due to the difference in sampling volumes of the techniques and the observation of multiple locations using (19)F MRI versus a single location using the large optical fiber. Overall, the present method provides a rapid way to map the tumor oxygenation and is particularly suitable to monitor acute changes of pO(2) in tumors.

  9. /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the carbamate reaction of alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL), the major catabolite of fluoropyrimidines. Application to FBAL carbamate determination in body fluids of patients treated with 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, R.; Malet-Martino, M.C.; Vialaneix, C.; Lopez, A.; Bon, M.

    1987-11-01

    alpha-Fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL), the major catabolite of the antineoplastic fluoropyrimidines, is an amino acid which is in equilibrium with its carbamate derivative in weakly alkaline aqueous solutions containing carbonate. In both water and control biological fluids (urine, plasma) spiked with FBAL (and sodium bicarbonate, in some cases), /sup 19/F NMR was used: (i) to determine the pH range over which FBAL carbamate is present (pH greater than or equal to 7), the maximum concentration formed occurring around pH 9, (ii) to show that the amino group of FBAL interacts very slowly with a non-protein plasma component to form a compound X, unstable in acid medium. The presumed structure of X is RCONHCH2CHFCOOH, with R different from an alkyl group but still unidentified. The behavior of FBAL in urine and plasma of rats treated with FBAL or 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-dFUrd), a prodrug of 5-fluorouracil, and from patients treated with 5'-dFUrd was investigated. FBAL carbamate was not present in acid medium and was therefore absent in acidic human urine. However, it was found in alkaline rat urine. FBAL carbamate was found in plasma along with the compound X. The /sup 19/F NMR spectra of FBAL and derivatives are complex since alpha-fluoro-beta-ureido-propionic acid, the precursor of FBAL in the catabolic pathway of antineoplastic fluoropyrimidines, produces a signal overlapping that of FBAL carbamate, and very close to that of compound X.

  10. (19)F(α,n) thick target yield from 3.5 to 10.0 MeV.

    PubMed

    Norman, E B; Chupp, T E; Lesko, K T; Grant, P J; Woodruff, G L

    2015-09-01

    Using a target of PbF2, the thick-target yield from the (19)F(α,n) reaction was measured from E(α)=3.5-10 MeV. From these results, we infer the thick-target neutron yields from targets of F2 and UF6 over this same alpha-particle energy range.

  11. Technical advance: monitoring the trafficking of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes during the course of tissue inflammation by noninvasive 19F MRI.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Jacoby, Christoph; Ding, Zhaoping; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation results in the recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes, which is crucial for the healing process. In the present study, we used (19)F MRI to monitor in vivo the infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes from the onset of inflammation to the resolution and healing phase. Matrigel, with or without LPS, was s.c.-implanted into C57BL/6 mice. This resulted in a focal inflammation lasting over a period of 20 days, with constantly decreasing LPS levels in doped matrigel plugs. After i.v. administration of (19)F containing contrast agent, (19)F MRI revealed a zonular (19)F signal in the periphery of LPS containing matrigel plugs, which was not observed in control plugs. Analysis of the (19)F signal over the observation period demonstrated the strongest (19)F signal after 24 h, which decreased to nearly zero after 20 days. The (19)F signal was mirrored by the amount of leukocytes in the matrigel, with neutrophils dominating at early time-points and macrophages at later time-points. Both populations were shown to take up the (19)F contrast agent. In conclusion, (19)F MRI, in combination with the matrigel/LPS model, permits the noninvasive analysis of neutrophil and monocyte infiltration over the complete course of inflammation in vivo. PMID:24319285

  12. Technical advance: monitoring the trafficking of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes during the course of tissue inflammation by noninvasive 19F MRI.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Jacoby, Christoph; Ding, Zhaoping; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation results in the recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes, which is crucial for the healing process. In the present study, we used (19)F MRI to monitor in vivo the infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes from the onset of inflammation to the resolution and healing phase. Matrigel, with or without LPS, was s.c.-implanted into C57BL/6 mice. This resulted in a focal inflammation lasting over a period of 20 days, with constantly decreasing LPS levels in doped matrigel plugs. After i.v. administration of (19)F containing contrast agent, (19)F MRI revealed a zonular (19)F signal in the periphery of LPS containing matrigel plugs, which was not observed in control plugs. Analysis of the (19)F signal over the observation period demonstrated the strongest (19)F signal after 24 h, which decreased to nearly zero after 20 days. The (19)F signal was mirrored by the amount of leukocytes in the matrigel, with neutrophils dominating at early time-points and macrophages at later time-points. Both populations were shown to take up the (19)F contrast agent. In conclusion, (19)F MRI, in combination with the matrigel/LPS model, permits the noninvasive analysis of neutrophil and monocyte infiltration over the complete course of inflammation in vivo.

  13. A computational investigation of electronic structure as well as 19F and 29Si chemical shielding tensors in the fluorinated silicon fullerenes SinFn (n≤60)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anafcheh, Maryam; Ghafouri, Reza

    2013-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to investigate the electronic features of the structures of fluorinated polysilanes SinFn (n=4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 20, 24, 28, 30, 32, 36, 50, and 60). Among all of these fluorinated polysilanes, Si20F20 has the highest binding energy and, thus, stability. The binding energy then shows a very slow (monotonically) decrease as the size of the fluorinated silicon fullerene n≥20 increases which can be related to an increase in fluorine-fluorine repulsion. Following an irregular pattern, the HOMO-LUMO energy gap strongly depends on the size of the cage. On the other hand, 29Si CS parameters detect equivalent electronic environment for silicon atoms within SinHn polysilanes with n≤20 while 29Si NMR pattern indicates a few separated peaks for SinHn polysilanes with n≥20. Seeking correlation between these peaks and local structures around silicon sites, Siα, Siβ, Siγ observed in these models shows that δiso(Siγ)<δiso(Siβ) <δiso(Siα). Obtaining similar values (458.8-478.7 ppm) of 19F calculated chemical shieldings for all the fluorinated polysilanes means the same tendency of the silicon atoms on the surfaces of all cages for contribution to chemical bonding with fluorine atoms.

  14. Self-Assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles Designed as Imaging Probes for 19F and Relaxation-Enhanced 1H imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preslar, Adam Truett

    This work incorporates whole-body imaging functionality into peptide amphiphile (PA) nanostructures used for regenerative medicine to facilitate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two strategies were employed: 1. Conjugation of gadolinium chelates to peptide nanostructures to monitor biomaterial degradation in vivo with MRI and inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) 2. Synthesis of perfluorinated moiety-bearing peptide amphiphiles for 19F-MRI. The Gd(III) chelate gadoteridol was conjugated by copper-catalyzed "click" chemistry to a series of PAs known to form cylindrical nanostructures. By fitting nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion (NMRD) profiles to the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) equations, it was observed that the water exchange parameter (tauM) depended on thermal annealing or calcium ion cross-linking. The sequence C16V 3A3E3G(Gd) exhibited an acceleration of nearly 100 ns after thermal annealing and calcium addition. These gadolinium-labeled PAs were used to track in vivo degradation of gels within the tibialis anterior muscle in a murine model. The half-life of biomaterial degradation was determined to be 13.5 days by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) of Gd(III). Gel implants could be monitored by MRI for eight days before the signal dispersed due to implant degradation and dilution. Additionally, nanostructures incorporating highly fluorinated domains were investigated for use as MRI contrast agents. Short, perfluoroalkyane tails of seven or eight carbon atoms in length were grafted to PA sequences containing a V2A2 beta-sheet forming sequence. The V2A2 sequence is known to drive 1D nanostructure assembly. It was found that the sequences C7F13V2A 2E2 and C7F13V2A 2K3 formed 1D assemblies in water which transition from ribbon-like to cylindrical shape as pH increases from 4.5 to 8.0. Ribbon-like nanostructures had reduced magnetic resonance signal by T 2 relaxation quenching, whereas their cylindrical counterparts

  15. 5-Fluorotryptophan as a Dual NMR and Fluorescent Probe of α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferkorn, Candace M.; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2012-01-01

    i. Summary Analysis of conventional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments on intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is challenging because of the highly flexible and multiple rapidly exchanging conformations typifying this class of proteins. One method to circumvent some of these difficulties is to incorporate non-native fluorine (19F) nuclei at specific sites within the polypeptide. 19F NMR is particularly suitable for characterization of unfolded structures because 19F chemical shifts are highly sensitive to local environments and conformations. Furthermore, the incorporation of fluorine analogs of fluorescent amino acids such as 5-fluoro-tryptophan (5FW) allows for complementary studies of protein microenvironment via fluorescence spectroscopy. Herein we describe methods to produce, purify, characterize, and perform steady-state fluorescence and 1-D NMR experiments on 5FW analogues of the IDP α-synuclein. PMID:22760321

  16. Probing different perfluorocarbons for in vivo inflammation imaging by 19F MRI: image reconstruction, biological half-lives and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Temme, Sebastian; Mayenfels, Friederike; Benoit, Nicole; Krafft, Marie Pierre; Schubert, Rolf; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory processes can reliably be assessed by (19)F MRI using perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which is primarily based on the efficient uptake of emulsified PFCs by circulating cells of the monocyte-macrophage system and subsequent infiltration of the (19)F-labeled cells into affected tissue. An ideal candidate for the sensitive detection of fluorine-loaded cells is the biochemically inert perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PFCE), as it contains 20 magnetically equivalent (19)F atoms. However, the biological half-life of PFCE in the liver and spleen is extremely long, and so this substance is not suitable for future clinical applications. In the present study, we investigated alternative, nontoxic PFCs with predicted short biological half-lives and high fluorine content: perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB), perfluorodecalin (PFD) and trans-bis-perfluorobutyl ethylene (F-44E). Despite the complex spectra of these compounds, we obtained artifact-free images using sine-squared acquisition-weighted three-dimensional chemical shift imaging and dedicated reconstruction accomplished with in-house-developed software. The signal-to-noise ratio of the images was maximized using a Nutall window with only moderate localization error. Using this approach, the retention times of the different PFCs in murine liver and spleen were determined at 9.4 T. The biological half-lives were estimated to be 9 days (PFD), 12 days (PFOB) and 28 days (F-44E), compared with more than 250 days for PFCE. In vivo sensitivity for inflammation imaging was assessed using an ear clip injury model. The alternative PFCs PFOB and F-44E provided 37% and 43%, respectively, of the PFCE intensities, whereas PFD did not show any signal in the ear model. Thus, for in vivo monitoring of inflammatory processes, PFOB emerges as the most promising candidate for possible future translation of (19)F MR inflammation imaging to human applications. PMID:24353148

  17. Probing different perfluorocarbons for in vivo inflammation imaging by 19F MRI: image reconstruction, biological half-lives and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Temme, Sebastian; Mayenfels, Friederike; Benoit, Nicole; Krafft, Marie Pierre; Schubert, Rolf; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory processes can reliably be assessed by (19)F MRI using perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which is primarily based on the efficient uptake of emulsified PFCs by circulating cells of the monocyte-macrophage system and subsequent infiltration of the (19)F-labeled cells into affected tissue. An ideal candidate for the sensitive detection of fluorine-loaded cells is the biochemically inert perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PFCE), as it contains 20 magnetically equivalent (19)F atoms. However, the biological half-life of PFCE in the liver and spleen is extremely long, and so this substance is not suitable for future clinical applications. In the present study, we investigated alternative, nontoxic PFCs with predicted short biological half-lives and high fluorine content: perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB), perfluorodecalin (PFD) and trans-bis-perfluorobutyl ethylene (F-44E). Despite the complex spectra of these compounds, we obtained artifact-free images using sine-squared acquisition-weighted three-dimensional chemical shift imaging and dedicated reconstruction accomplished with in-house-developed software. The signal-to-noise ratio of the images was maximized using a Nutall window with only moderate localization error. Using this approach, the retention times of the different PFCs in murine liver and spleen were determined at 9.4 T. The biological half-lives were estimated to be 9 days (PFD), 12 days (PFOB) and 28 days (F-44E), compared with more than 250 days for PFCE. In vivo sensitivity for inflammation imaging was assessed using an ear clip injury model. The alternative PFCs PFOB and F-44E provided 37% and 43%, respectively, of the PFCE intensities, whereas PFD did not show any signal in the ear model. Thus, for in vivo monitoring of inflammatory processes, PFOB emerges as the most promising candidate for possible future translation of (19)F MR inflammation imaging to human applications.

  18. Multimodal Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsions for 19F MRI, Ultrasonography, and Catalysis of MRgFUS-Mediated Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapoport, N.; Nam, K.-H.; Christensen, D. A.; Kennedy, A. M.; Parker, D. L.; Payne, A. H.; Todd, N.; Shea, J. E.; Scaife, C. L.

    2011-09-01

    Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions can target lipophilic therapeutic agents to solid tumors and simultaneously provide for monitoring nanocarrier biodistribution via ultrasonography and/or 19F MRI. In the first generation of block copolymer stabilized perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions, perfluoropentane (PFP) was used as the droplet forming compound. Although manifesting excellent therapeutic and ultrasound imaging properties, PFP nanoemulsions were unstable at storage, difficult to handle, and underwent droplet-to-bubble transition upon injection that was hard to control. To solve the above problems, perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether (PFCE) was used as a core forming compound in the second generation of block copolymer stabilized perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions. In the present paper, acoustic, imaging, and therapeutic properties of unloaded and paclitaxel (PTX) loaded PFCE nanoemulsions are reported. The size of paclitaxel-loaded PFCE nanodroplets (300 nm to 500 nm depending on emulsification conditions) favors their passive accumulation in tumor tissue. PFCE nanodroplets manifest both ultrasound and 19F MR contrast properties, which allows the use of multimodal imaging to monitor nanodroplet biodistribution. Ultrasonography and 19F MRI produced consistent results on nanodroplet biodistribution. Sonication with 1-MHz therapeutic ultrasound triggered reversible droplet-to-bubble transition in PFCE nanoemulsions. Microbubbles formed by acoustic vaporization underwent stable cavitation. In a pilot study on ultrasound-mediated therapy of a large breast cancer tumor, paclitaxel-loaded PFCE nanoemulsions combined with 1-MHz ultrasound (MI≥1.75) showed excellent therapeutic properties. Anticipated mechanisms of the observed effects are discussed.

  19. Activatable 19F MRI nanoparticle probes for the detection of reducing environments.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Matsushita, Hisashi; Sugihara, Fuminori; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Mizukami, Shin; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2015-01-12

    (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes that can detect biological phenomena such as cell dynamics, ion concentrations, and enzymatic activity have attracted significant attention. Although perfluorocarbon (PFC) encapsulated nanoparticles are of interest in molecular imaging owing to their high sensitivity, activatable PFC nanoparticles have not been developed. In this study, we showed for the first time that the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effect can efficiently decrease the (19)F NMR/MRI signals of PFCs in silica nanoparticles. On the basis of the PRE effect, we developed a reduction-responsive PFC-encapsulated nanoparticle probe, FLAME-SS-Gd(3+) (FSG). This is the first example of an activatable PFC-encapsulated nanoparticle that can be used for in vivo imaging. Calculations revealed that the ratio of fluorine atoms to Gd(3+) complexes per nanoparticle was more than approximately 5.0×10(2), resulting in the high signal augmentation. PMID:25413833

  20. Understanding the symmetric line shape in the 17O MAS spectra for hexagonal ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Oki, Shinobu; Deguchi, Kenzo; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2016-06-01

    Solid-state 17O Magic-Angle Spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 17O-enriched hexagonal ice, [17O]-Ih, between 173 and 253 K were presented. Marked changes in the line shape were clearly observed, indicating water molecular reorientation in the crystal structure. At 173 K, molecular motions were considered to be frozen and analysis of the 1D MAS spectrum yielded the following parameters: quadrupole coupling constant (CQ) = 6.6 ± 0.2 MHz and asymmetry parameter (ηQ) = 0.95 ± 0.05. At 232 K and above, contrary to the conventional explanation, pseudo-symmetric line shapes appeared in the 17O MAS NMR spectra arising from the contribution of second-order quadrupole interactions. As a chemical exchange model to describe these isotropic 17O MAS NMR spectra, a modified Ratcliffe model, which consider the effects of proton disorder, was proposed, and the resulting theoretical spectra could well reproduce the experimental spectra.

  1. Site-specific solvent exposure analysis of a membrane protein using unnatural amino acids and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Li, Dong; Chen, Hongwei; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Solvent isotope shift analysis of {sup 19}F-tfmF in different H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O molar ratio. {yields} Correlation between solvent isotope shift of {sup 19}F-spins and solvent exposure analysis. {yields} Solvent exposure analysis of membrane proteins. -- Abstract: Membrane proteins play an essential role in cellular metabolism, transportation and signal transduction across cell membranes. The scarcity of membrane protein structures has thus far prevented a full understanding of their molecular mechanisms. Preliminary topology studies and residue solvent exposure analysis have the potential to provide valuable information on membrane proteins of unknown structure. Here, a {sup 19}F-containing unnatural amino acid (trimethylfluoro-phenylalanine, tfmF) was applied to accomplish site-specific {sup 19}F spin incorporation at different sites in diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK, an Escherichia coli membrane protein) for site-specific solvent exposure analysis. Due to isotope effect on {sup 19}F spins, a standard curve for {sup 19}F-tfmF chemical shifts was drawn for varying solvent H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O ratios. Further site-specific {sup 19}F solvent isotope shift analysis was conducted for DAGK to distinguish residues in water-soluble loops, interfacial areas or hydrophobic membrane regions. This site-specific solvent exposure analysis method could be applied for further topological analysis of other membrane proteins.

  2. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor. PMID:26073599

  3. 10B-editing 1H-detection and 19F MRI strategies to optimize boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Capuani, Silvia; Porcari, Paola; Fasano, Fabrizio; Campanella, Renzo; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2008-09-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary radiation therapy used to treat malignant brain tumours. It is based on the nuclear reaction (10B + n th --> [11B*] --> alpha + 7Li + 2.79 MeV) that occurs when 10B captures a thermal neutron to yield alpha particles and recoiling 7Li nuclei, both responsible of tumour cells destruction by short range and high ionization energy release. The clinical success of the therapy depends on the selective accumulation of the 10B carriers in the tumour and on the high thermal neutron capture cross-section of 10B. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods provide the possibility of monitoring, through 10B nuclei, the metabolic and physiological processes suitable to optimize the BNCT procedure. In this study, spatial distribution mapping of borocaptate (BSH) and 4-borono-phenylalanine (BPA), the two boron carriers used in clinical trials, has been obtained. The BSH map in excised rat brain and the 19F-BPA image in vivo rat brain, representative of BPA spatial distribution, were reported. The BSH image was obtained by means of double-resonance 10B-editing 1H-detection sequence, named M-Bend, exploiting the J-coupling interaction between 10B and 1H nuclei. Conversely, the BPA map was obtained by 19F-BPA using 19F-MRI. Both images were obtained at 7 T, in C6 glioma-bearing rat brain. Our results demonstrate the powerful of non conventional MRI techniques to optimize the BNCT procedure.

  4. 10B-editing 1H-detection and 19F MRI strategies to optimize boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Capuani, Silvia; Porcari, Paola; Fasano, Fabrizio; Campanella, Renzo; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2008-09-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary radiation therapy used to treat malignant brain tumours. It is based on the nuclear reaction (10B + n th --> [11B*] --> alpha + 7Li + 2.79 MeV) that occurs when 10B captures a thermal neutron to yield alpha particles and recoiling 7Li nuclei, both responsible of tumour cells destruction by short range and high ionization energy release. The clinical success of the therapy depends on the selective accumulation of the 10B carriers in the tumour and on the high thermal neutron capture cross-section of 10B. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods provide the possibility of monitoring, through 10B nuclei, the metabolic and physiological processes suitable to optimize the BNCT procedure. In this study, spatial distribution mapping of borocaptate (BSH) and 4-borono-phenylalanine (BPA), the two boron carriers used in clinical trials, has been obtained. The BSH map in excised rat brain and the 19F-BPA image in vivo rat brain, representative of BPA spatial distribution, were reported. The BSH image was obtained by means of double-resonance 10B-editing 1H-detection sequence, named M-Bend, exploiting the J-coupling interaction between 10B and 1H nuclei. Conversely, the BPA map was obtained by 19F-BPA using 19F-MRI. Both images were obtained at 7 T, in C6 glioma-bearing rat brain. Our results demonstrate the powerful of non conventional MRI techniques to optimize the BNCT procedure. PMID:18486394

  5. 5-fluoro-D,L-tryptophan as a dual NMR and fluorescent probe of α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Pfefferkorn, Candace M; Lee, Jennifer C

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of conventional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments on intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is challenging because of the highly flexible and multiple rapidly exchanging conformations typifying this class of proteins. One method to circumvent some of these difficulties is to incorporate nonnative fluorine ((19)F) nuclei at specific sites within the polypeptide. (19)F NMR is particularly suitable for characterization of unfolded structures because (19)F chemical shifts are highly sensitive to local environments and conformations. Furthermore, the incorporation of fluorine analogs of fluorescent amino acids such as 5-fluoro-D: ,L: -tryptophan (5FW) allows for complementary studies of protein microenvironment via fluorescence spectroscopy. Herein, we describe methods to produce, purify, characterize, and perform steady-state fluorescence and 1D NMR experiments on 5FW analogs of the IDP α-synuclein.

  6. Review of NMR characterization of pyrolysis oils

    DOE PAGES

    Hao, Naijia; Ben, Haoxi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Adhikari, Sushil; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-08-24

    Here, pyrolysis of renewable biomass has been developed as a method to produce green fuels and chemicals in response to energy security concerns as well as to alleviate environmental issues incurred with fossil fuel usage. However, pyrolysis oils still have limited commercial application, mainly because unprocessed oils cannot be readily blended with current petroleum-based transportation fuels. To better understand these challenges, researchers have applied diverse characterization techniques in the development of bio-oil studies. In particular, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a key spectroscopic characterization method through analysis of bio-oil components. This review highlights the NMR strategies for pyrolysis oil characterizationmore » and critically discusses the applications of 1H, 13C, 31P, 19F, and two-dimensional (2-D NMR) analyses such as heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) in representative pyrolysis oil studies.« less

  7. Superfluorinated PEI Derivative Coupled with (99m) Tc for ASGPR Targeted (19) F MRI/SPECT/PA Tri-Modality Imaging.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhide; Gao, Mengna; Song, Manli; Li, Yesen; Zhang, Deliang; Xu, Duo; You, Linyi; Wang, Liangliang; Zhuang, Rongqiang; Su, Xinhui; Liu, Ting; Du, Jin; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-07-01

    Fluorinated polyethylenimine derivative labeled with radionuclide (99m) Tc is developed as a (19) F MRI/SPECT/PA multifunctional imaging agent with good asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR)-targeting ability. This multifunctional agent is safe and suitable for (19) F MRI/SPECT/PA imaging and has the potential to detect hepatic diseases and to assess liver function, which provide powerful support for the development of personalized and precision medicine.

  8. Synthesis, NMR and vibrational spectroscopic characterization, and computational study of the cis-IO2F3 2- anion.

    PubMed

    Mack, Johnathan P; Boatz, Jerry A; Gerken, Michael

    2008-04-21

    The N(CH3)4(+) salt of the cis-IO2F3(2-) anion was synthesized from [N(CH 3)4][IO2F2] and excess [N(CH3)4][F] in CH3CN solvent. The [N(CH3)4] 2[IO2F3] salt was characterized by Raman, infrared, and (19)F solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy. Geometry optimization and calculation of the vibrational frequencies at the DFT level of theory corroborated the experimental finding that the IO2F3(2-) anion exists as a single isomer with a cis-dioxo and mer-trifluoro arrangement. The fluorine atom in IO2F3(2-) that is trans to one of the oxygen atoms is weakly bound with a calculated bond length of 228.1 pm. The IO2F3(2-) anion is only the second example of an AEO 2F 3 species after XeO2F3(-).

  9. Is solid-state NMR enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization?

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    The recent trend of high-field (~5-20 T), low-temperature (~100 K) ssNMR combined with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions is analyzed. A brief overview of the current theory of hyperpolarization for so-called MAS-DNP experiments is given, along with various reasons why the DNP-enhancement, the ratio of the NMR signal intensities obtained in the presence and absence of microwave irradiation suitable for hyperpolarization, should not be used alone to gauge the value of performing MAS-DNP experiments relative to conventional ssNMR. This is demonstrated through a dissection of the current conditions required for MAS-DNP with particular attention to resulting absolute sensitivities and spectral resolution. Consequently, sample preparation methods specifically avoiding the surplus of glass-forming solvents so as to improve the absolute sensitivity and resolution are discussed, as are samples that are intrinsically pertinent for MAS-DNP studies (high surface area, amorphous, and porous). Owing to their pertinence, examples of recent applications on these types of samples where chemically-relevant information has been obtained that would have been impossible without the sensitivity increases bestowed by MAS-DNP are also detailed. Additionally, a promising further implementation for MAS-DNP is exampled, whereby the sensitivity improvements shown for (correlation) spectroscopy of nuclei at low natural isotopic abundance, facilitate internuclear distance measurements, especially for long distances (absence of dipolar truncation). Finally, we give some speculative perspectives for MAS-DNP.

  10. NMR shielding calculations across the periodic table: diamagnetic uranium compounds. 2. Ligand and metal NMR.

    PubMed

    Schreckenbach, Georg

    2002-12-16

    In this and a previous article (J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 8244), the range of application for relativistic density functional theory (DFT) is extended to the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shieldings and chemical shifts in diamagnetic actinide compounds. Two relativistic DFT methods are used, ZORA ("zeroth-order regular approximation") and the quasirelativistic (QR) method. In the given second paper, NMR shieldings and chemical shifts are calculated and discussed for a wide range of compounds. The molecules studied comprise uranyl complexes, [UO(2)L(n)](+/-)(q); UF(6); inorganic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)Cl(n), n = 0-6; and organometallic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n), n = 0-5. Uranyl complexes include [UO(2)F(4)](2-), [UO(2)Cl(4)](2-), [UO(2)(OH)(4)](2-), [UO(2)(CO(3))(3)](4-), and [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](2+). For the ligand NMR, moderate (e.g., (19)F NMR chemical shifts in UF(6-n)Cl(n)) to excellent agreement [e.g., (19)F chemical shift tensor in UF(6) or (1)H NMR in UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n)] has been found between theory and experiment. The methods have been used to calculate the experimentally unknown (235)U NMR chemical shifts. A large chemical shift range of at least 21,000 ppm has been predicted for the (235)U nucleus. ZORA spin-orbit appears to be the most accurate method for predicting actinide metal chemical shifts. Trends in the (235)U NMR chemical shifts of UF(6-n)L(n) molecules are analyzed and explained in terms of the calculated electronic structure. It is argued that the energy separation and interaction between occupied and virtual orbitals with f-character are the determining factors.

  11. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy: A Versatile Technique for Structural and Dynamic Analysis of Solid-Phase Systems

    PubMed Central

    Polenova, Tatyana; Gupta, Rupal; Goldbourt, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analysis of a broad range of systems, including inorganic materials, pharmaceuticals, and biomacromolecules. The recent developments in MAS NMR instrumentation and methodologies opened new vistas to atomic-level characterization of a plethora of chemical environments previously inaccessible to analysis, with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. PMID:25794311

  12. Millimeter-Wave Atmospheric Sounder (MAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, G. K.

    1988-01-01

    MAS is a remote sensing instrument for passive sounding (limb sounding) of the earth's atmosphere from the Space Shuttle. The main objective of the MAS is to study the composition and dynamic structure of the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere in the height range 20 to 100 km, the region known as the middle atmosphere. The MAS will be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission scheduled for late 1990. The Millimeter-Wave Atmospheric Sounder will provide, for the first time, information obtained simultaneously on the temperature and on ozone concentrations in the 20 to 90 km altitude region. The information will cover a large area of the globe, will have high accuracy and high vertical resolution, and will cover both day and night times. Additionally, data on the two important molecules, H2O and ClO, will also be provided.

  13. (19)F MRSI of capecitabine in the liver at 7 T using broadband transmit-receive antennas and dual-band RF pulses.

    PubMed

    van Gorp, Jetse S; Seevinck, Peter R; Andreychenko, Anna; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; Luijten, Peter R; Viergever, Max A; Koopman, Miriam; Boer, Vincent O; Klomp, Dennis W J

    2015-11-01

    Capecitabine (Cap) is an often prescribed chemotherapeutic agent, successfully used to cure some patients from cancer or reduce tumor burden for palliative care. However, the efficacy of the drug is limited, it is not known in advance who will respond to the drug and it can come with severe toxicity. (19)F Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) have been used to non-invasively study Cap metabolism in vivo to find a marker for personalized treatment. In vivo detection, however, is hampered by low concentrations and the use of radiofrequency (RF) surface coils limiting spatial coverage. In this work, the use of a 7T MR system with radiative multi-channel transmit-receive antennas was investigated with the aim of maximizing the sensitivity and spatial coverage of (19)F detection protocols. The antennas were broadband optimized to facilitate both the (1)H (298 MHz) and (19)F (280 MHz) frequencies for accurate shimming, imaging and signal combination. B1(+) simulations, phantom and noise measurements showed that more than 90% of the theoretical maximum sensitivity could be obtained when using B1(+) and B1(-) information provided at the (1)H frequency for the optimization of B1(+) and B1(-) at the (19)F frequency. Furthermore, to overcome the limits in maximum available RF power, whilst ensuring simultaneous excitation of all detectable conversion products of Cap, a dual-band RF pulse was designed and evaluated. Finally, (19)F MRS(I) measurements were performed to detect (19)F metabolites in vitro and in vivo. In two patients, at 10 h (patient 1) and 1 h (patient 2) after Cap intake, (19)F metabolites were detected in the liver and the surrounding organs, illustrating the potential of the set-up for in vivo detection of metabolic rates and drug distribution in the body.

  14. Incomplete fusion studies in the 19F+159Tb system at low energies and its correlation with various systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaib, Mohd.; Sharma, Vijay R.; Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Devendra P.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2016-07-01

    The excitation functions of reaction residues populated via the complete fusion and incomplete fusion process in the interaction of the 19F+159Tb system have been measured at energies ≈4 -6 MeV/nucleon, using off-line γ -ray spectroscopy. The analysis of data was done within the framework of statistical model code pace4 (a compound nucleus model). A significant fraction of incomplete fusion was observed in the production of reaction residues involving α particle(s) in the exit channels, even at energies as low as near the Coulomb barrier. The incomplete fusion strength function was deduced from the experimental excitation functions and the dependence of this strength function on various entrance channel parameters was studied. The present results show a strong dependence on the projectile α -Q value that agrees well with the existing data. To probe the dependence of incomplete fusion on entrance channel mass asymmetry, the present work was compared with the results obtained in the interaction of 12C, 16O, and 19F with nearby targets available in the literature. It was observed that the mass asymmetry linearly increases for each projectile separately and turns out to be a projectile-dependent mass-asymmetry systematics. The deduced incomplete fusion strength functions in the present work are also plotted as a function of ZPZT (Coulomb effect) and compared with the existing literature. A strong dependence of the Coulomb effect on the incomplete fusion fraction was observed. It was found that the fraction of incomplete fusion linearly increases with ZPZT and was found to be more for larger ZPZT values indicating significantly important linear systematics.

  15. Instrumentation for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization with magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Rosay, Melanie; Blank, Monica; Engelke, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation and methodology have been key factors in the recent growth of solid-state DNP NMR applications. We review the current state of the art of solid-state DNP NMR instrumentation primarily based on available commercial platforms. We start with a general system overview, including options for microwave sources and DNP NMR probes, and then focus on specific developments for DNP at 100K with magic angle spinning (MAS). Gyrotron microwave sources, passive components to transmit microwaves, the DNP MAS probe, a cooling device for low-temperature MAS, and sample preparation procedures including radicals for DNP are considered. PMID:26920834

  16. Use of [superscript 1]H, [superscript 13]C, and [superscript 19]F-NMR Spectroscopy and Computational Modeling to Explore Chemoselectivity in the Formation of a Grignard Reagent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Sara M.; Kopitzke, Robert W.; Nalli, Thomas W.; Esselman, Brian J.; Hill, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    A discovery-based Grignard experiment for a second-year undergraduate organic chemistry course is described. The exclusive Grignard reagent formed by the reaction of 1-bromo-4-fluorobenzene (1) with Mg is 4-fluorophenylmagnesium bromide (2), which is treated with either benzophenone or CO[subscript 2] to produce the corresponding fluorinated…

  17. Application of /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance to examine covalent modification reactions of tyrosyl derivatives: a study of calcineurin catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.L.; Graves, D.J.

    1988-04-01

    The hydrolysis of fluorotyrosine phosphate by the calmodulin-activated phosphatase calcineurin has been monitored by /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Previous work had established that the /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance shift of the fluorine nucleus was altered after the phosphorylation of the phenolic hydroxyl group. The disappearance of substrate and the appearance of product can be measured simultaneously with this approach. Application of the integrated form of the Michaelis-Menten equation yields estimates of the kinetic parameter, K/sub M/, close to the values obtained by initial rate kinetics. The velocity term, V/sub M/ was also evaluated to be approximately the same value. Calcineurin was determined not to be inactivated over the time period of the reaction. The results demonstrate that /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be applied to the examination of enzyme-catalyzed reactions.

  18. Verification of threshold activation detection (TAD) technique in prompt fission neutron detection using scintillators containing 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibczynski, P.; Kownacki, J.; Moszyński, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Gójska, A.; Gierlik, M.; Kaźmierczak, Ł.; Jakubowska, E.; Kędzierski, G.; Kujawiński, Ł.; Wojnarowicz, J.; Carrel, F.; Ledieu, M.; Lainé, F.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study ⌀ 5''× 3'' and ⌀ 2''× 2'' EJ-313 liquid fluorocarbon as well as ⌀ 2'' × 3'' BaF2 scintillators were exposed to neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source and a Sodern Genie 16GT deuterium-tritium (D+T) neutron generator. The scintillators responses to β- particles with maximum endpoint energy of 10.4 MeV from the n+19F reactions were studied. Response of a ⌀ 5'' × 3'' BC-408 plastic scintillator was also studied as a reference. The β- particles are the products of interaction of fast neutrons with 19F which is a component of the EJ-313 and BaF2 scintillators. The method of fast neutron detection via fluorine activation is already known as Threshold Activation Detection (TAD) and was proposed for photofission prompt neutron detection from fissionable and Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) in the field of Homeland Security and Border Monitoring. Measurements of the number of counts between 6.0 and 10.5 MeV with a 252Cf source showed that the relative neutron detection efficiency ratio, defined as epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'', is 32.0% ± 2.3% and 44.6% ± 3.4% for front-on and side-on orientation of the BaF2, respectively. Moreover, the ⌀ 5'' EJ-313 and side-on oriented BaF2 were also exposed to neutrons from the D+T neutron generator, and the relative efficiency epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'' was estimated to be 39.3%. Measurements of prompt photofission neutrons with the BaF2 detector by means of data acquisition after irradiation (out-of-beam) of nuclear material and between the beam pulses (beam-off) techniques were also conducted on the 9 MeV LINAC of the SAPHIR facility.

  19. Multinucleon transfer in O,1816,19F+208Pb reactions at energies near the fusion barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafferty, D. C.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Williams, E.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Luong, D. H.; McNeil, S. D.; Ramachandran, K.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Wakhle, A.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Nuclear reactions are complex, involving collisions between composite systems where many-body dynamics determines outcomes. Successful models have been developed to explain particular reaction outcomes in distinct energy and mass regimes, but a unifying picture remains elusive. The irreversible transfer of kinetic energy from the relative motion of the collision partners to their internal states, as is known to occur in deep inelastic collisions, has yet to be successfully incorporated explicitly into fully quantal reaction models. The influence of these processes on fusion is not yet quantitatively understood. Purpose: To investigate the population of high excitation energies in transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies, which are precursors to deep inelastic processes, and their dependence on the internuclear separation. Methods: Transfer probabilities and excitation energy spectra have been measured in collisions of O,1816,19F+208Pb , at various energies below and around the fusion barrier, by detecting the backscattered projectile-like fragments in a Δ E -E telescope. Results: The relative yields of different transfer outcomes are strongly driven by Q values, but change with the internuclear separation. In 16O+208Pb , single nucleon transfer dominates, with a strong contribution from -2 p transfer close to the Coulomb barrier, though this channel becomes less significant in relation to the -2 p 2 n transfer channel at larger separations. For 18O+208Pb , the -2 p 2 n channel is the dominant charge transfer mode at all separations. In the reactions with 19F,-3 p 2 n transfer is significant close to the barrier, but falls off rapidly with energy. Multinucleon transfer processes are shown to lead to high excitation energies (up to ˜15 MeV), which is distinct from single nucleon transfer modes which predominantly populate states at low excitation energy. Conclusions: Kinetic energy is transferred into internal excitations following transfer, with this

  20. Measurement of the properties of the astrophysically interesting 3/2+ state at 7.101 MeV in 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Y. M.; Hammer, J. W.; Jaeger, M.; Kunz, R.; Mayer, A.; Parker, P. D.; Schreiter, R.; Staudt, G.

    1998-07-01

    The isospin mirror of the Jπ=3/2+ 18F+p resonance at Ex=7.070 MeV in 19Ne has been measured in 19F via the 15N(α,γ)19F reaction using the RHINOCEROS windowless gas target at the Stuttgart 4-MV Dynamitron facility. This resonance is measured to have the following properties: Ex=7.101+/-0.001 MeV, Γtot=28+/-1 keV, and a strength of ωγ=0.77+/-0.11 eV (corresponding to Γγ=0.39+/-0.06 eV).

  1. Understanding API-polymer proximities in amorphous stabilized composite drug products using fluorine-carbon 2D HETCOR solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Anuji; Crull, George

    2014-10-01

    A simple and robust method for obtaining fluorine-carbon proximities was established using a (19)F-(13)C heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) two-dimensional (2D) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) experiment under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The method was applied to study a crystalline active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), avagacestat, containing two types of fluorine atoms and its API-polymer composite drug product. These results provide insight into the molecular structure, aid with assigning the carbon resonances, and probe API-polymer proximities in amorphous spray dried dispersions (SDD). This method has an advantage over the commonly used (1)H-(13)C HETCOR because of the large chemical shift dispersion in the fluorine dimension. In the present study, fluorine-carbon distances up to 8 Å were probed, giving insight into the API structure, crystal packing, and assignments. Most importantly, the study demonstrates a method for probing an intimate molecular level contact between an amorphous API and a polymer in an SDD, giving insights into molecular association and understanding of the role of the polymer in API stability (such as recrystallization, degradation, etc.) in such novel composite drug products.

  2. Isomerization of the prenucleation building unit during crystallization of AlPO{sub 4}-CJ2: An MQMAS, CP-MQMAS, and HETCOR NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Taulelle, F.; Pruski, M.; Amoureux, J.P.

    1999-12-29

    The structure of AlPO{sub 4}-CJ2 aluminophosphate has been reinvestigated by MAS, MQMAS (multiple quantum magic angle spinning), CP-MQMAS (cross polarization-MQMAS), and HETCOR (heteronuclear correlation) NMR spectroscopy. The CP-MQMAS method showed that the sample, when not allowed adequate time for crystallization, included a substantial concentration of amorphous species. The crystalline component was cleanly singled out by this technique. The authors discuss the relative populations and the distributions of F and OH groups within the structural building units (SBUs) and the distribution of various SBUs within the crystalline structure of AlPO{sub 4}-CJ2. For the latter case, a mixture of SBUs is demonstrated from the {sup 19}F {r{underscore}arrow} {sup 31}P HETCOR spectrum. Prenucleation building units (PNBUs) are the principal objects used for efficient crystal formation. They may undergo an isomerization to reach the proper configuration to integrate into the solid network. The isomerization implies formation of a bridge within the PNBU, probably at random with respect to OH or F. As integration in the network is taking place parallel to isomerization, the network forms as domains containing a mixture of the different types of SBUs.

  3. Synthesis, crystal structure, NMR study and AC conductivity of [(C3H7)4N]2Cd2ClF5 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajji, Rachid; Oueslati, Abderrazak; Body, Monique; Hlel, Faouzi

    2015-08-01

    The [(C3H7)4N]2Cd2ClF5 compound was crystallized in the triclinic system with space group P1. The crystal structure consists of organic-inorganic layers, stacked along direction. The organic part consists of two cations types. The inorganic layer is made up of Cd2ClF5 dimmers composed of two in-equivalent irregular tetrahedra sharing one edge (Cl-F). The MAS NMR spectra showed two, three and five isotropic resonances relative to 111Cd, 13C and 19F nuclei, respectively. DSC measurement disclosed a phase transition at around 380 K. The impedance spectroscopy and AC electrical conductivity measurements of our compound were taken from 209 Hz to 5 MHz over the temperature range of 350-381 K. Nyquist plots ( Z″ vs Z') show semicircle arcs at different temperatures, and an electrical equivalent circuit has been proposed to explain the impedance results. The circuits consist of the parallel combination of bulk resistance ( R), capacitance ( C) and fractal capacitance (CPE). The conductivity σ p follows the Arrhenius relation. The near value of activation energies obtained from the conductivity data and circuit equivalent confirms that the transport is through hopping mechanism. The analysis of the experimental data shows that the reorientation motion of [N(C3H7)4]+ cations and/or [Cd2ClF5]2- anions is probably responsible for the observed conductivity.

  4. Study of the metabolism of flucytosine in Aspergillus species by sup 19 F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chouini-Lalanne, N.; Malet-Martino, M.C.; Martino, R.; Michel, G. )

    1989-11-01

    The metabolism of flucytosine (5FC) in two Aspergillus species (Aspergillus fumigatus and A. niger) was investigated by 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In intact mycelia, 5FC was found to be deaminated to 5-fluorouracil and then transformed into fluoronucleotides; the catabolite alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine was also detected in A. fumigatus. Neither 5-fluoroorotic acid nor 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate was detected in perchloric acid extracts after any incubation with 5FC. 5FC, 5-fluorouracil, and the classical fluoronucleotides 5-fluorouridine-5'-mono-, di-, and triphosphates were identified in the acid-soluble pool. Two hydrolysis products of 5-fluorouracil incorporated into RNA, 5-fluorouridine-2'-monophosphate and 5-fluorouridine-3'-monophosphate, were found in the acid-insoluble pool. No significant differences in the metabolic transformation of 5FC were noted in the two species of Aspergillus. The main pathway of 5FC metabolism in the two species of Aspergillus studied is thus the biotransformation into ribofluoronucleotides and the subsequent incorporation of 5-fluorouridine-5'-triphosphate into RNA.

  5. 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis of 5-Fluorouracil Metabolism in Four Differently Pigmented Strains of Nectria haematococca

    PubMed Central

    Parisot, Denise; Malet-Martino, Marie C.; Martino, Robert; Crasnier, Philippe

    1991-01-01

    19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to study the metabolism of 5-fluorouracil in four strains of Nectria haematococca which displayed similar sensitivities to growth inhibition by this compound but differed in their pigmentation. The major metabolites, 5-fluorouridine and α-fluoro-β-alanine, were excreted into the medium by all four strains. The classical ribofluoronucleotides (5-fluorouridine-5′-monophosphate, -diphosphate, and -triphosphate) and α-fluoro-β-alanine were identified in the acid-soluble fraction of perchloric acid extracts of mycelia. Two hydrolysis products of 5-fluorouracil incorporated into RNA were found in the acid-insoluble pool. They were unambiguously assigned to 5-fluorouridine-2′-monophosphate and 3′-monophosphate with specific hydrolysis reactions on isolated RNA. The lack of fluorodeoxyribonucleotides and the fact that the four strains incorporated similar amounts of fluororibonucleotides into their RNAs strongly suggest an RNA-directed mechanism of cytotoxicity for 5-fluorouracil. The heavily pigmented wild type differed from the three low-pigmented strains in its low uptake of 5-fluorouracil and, consequently, in its reduced biosynthesis of 5-fluorouridine and α-fluoro-β-alanine. At present, it is not clear whether this change in 5-fluorouracil metabolism is a side effect of pigment production or results from another event. PMID:16348609

  6. Reaction mechanism coexistence in the 123 MeV {sup 19}F+{sup 56}Fe reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Brondi, A.; Kildir, M.; La Rana, G.; Moro, R.; Vardaci, E.; Pirrone, S.; Porto, F.; Sambataro, S.; Politi, G.; Figuera, P.

    1996-10-01

    Mass and charge identified ejectiles, spanning from {sup 11}B to {sup 22}Ne, have been detected in the 123 MeV {sup 19}F+{sup 56}Fe reaction. The coexistence of deep inelastic collision (DIC) and incomplete fusion (IF) mechanisms has been observed. The shape of the energy spectra and their behavior with angle allowed us to identify two components: The less dissipative one was dominating near the grazing angle. For both components experimental optimum {ital Q} values were derived. Two approaches based on the sum rule (SR) model of Wilczy{acute n}ski were used to calculate DIC and IF contributions to the complex fragment cross sections. Both prescriptions fit reasonably well experimental ejectile cross sections and {ital Q} optimum values. Results of the present investigation support the idea that the DIC can be treated on the same footing as IF in the SR model once the first process is confined in an inner angular momentum window, starting from the maximum fusion angular momentum, with respect to quasielastic processes. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. A Miniaturized, 1.9F Integrated Optical Fiber and Stone Basket for Use in Thulium Fiber Laser Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher R; Hutchens, Thomas C; Hardy, Luke A; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2015-10-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored as an alternative laser lithotripter to the standard holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The more uniform beam profile of the TFL enables higher power transmission through smaller fibers. In this study, a 100-μm core, 140-μm outer-diameter (OD) silica fiber with 5-mm length hollow steel tip was integrated with 1.3F (0.433-mm OD) nitinol wire basket to form a 1.9F (0.633-mm OD) device. TFL energy of 30 mJ, 500 μs pulse duration, and 500 Hz pulse rate was delivered to human uric acid stones, ex vivo. Stone ablation rates measured 1.5 ± 0.2 mg/s, comparable to 1.7 ± 0.3 mg/s using bare fiber tips separately with stone basket. With further development, this device may minimize stone retropulsion, allowing more efficient TFL lithotripsy at higher pulse rates. It may also provide increased flexibility, higher saline irrigation rates through the ureteroscope working channel, reduce fiber degradation compared with separate fiber and basket manipulation, and reduce laser-induced nitinol wire damage.

  8. Ultra fast magic angle spinning solid - state NMR spectroscopy of intact bone.

    PubMed

    Singh, Chandan; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Kayastha, Arvind M; Sinha, Neeraj

    2016-02-01

    Ultra fast magic angle spinning (MAS) has been a potent method to significantly average out homogeneous/inhomogeneous line broadening in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) spectroscopy. It has given a new direction to ssNMR spectroscopy with its different applications. We present here the first and foremost application of ultra fast MAS (~60 kHz) for ssNMR spectroscopy of intact bone. This methodology helps to comprehend and elucidate the organic content in the intact bone matrix with resolution and sensitivity enhancement. At this MAS speed, amino protons from organic part of intact bone start to appear in (1) H NMR spectra. The experimental protocol of ultra-high speed MAS for intact bone has been entailed with an additional insight achieved at 60 kHz.

  9. Direct mapping of 19F in 19FDG-6P in brain tissue at subcellular resolution using soft X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitry-Yamate, C.; Gianoncelli, A.; Kourousias, G.; Kaulich, B.; Lepore, M.; Gruetter, R.; Kiskinova, M.

    2013-10-01

    Low energy x-ray fluorescence (LEXRF) detection was optimized for imaging cerebral glucose metabolism by mapping the fluorine LEXRF signal of 19F in 19FDG, trapped as intracellular 19F-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate (19FDG-6P) at 1μm spatial resolution from 3μm thick brain slices. 19FDG metabolism was evaluated in brain structures closely resembling the general cerebral cytoarchitecture following formalin fixation of brain slices and their inclusion in an epon matrix. 2-dimensional distribution maps of 19FDG-6P were placed in a cytoarchitectural and morphological context by simultaneous LEXRF mapping of N and O, and scanning transmission x-ray (STXM) imaging. A disproportionately high uptake and metabolism of glucose was found in neuropil relative to intracellular domains of the cell body of hypothalamic neurons, showing directly that neurons, like glial cells, also metabolize glucose. As 19F-deoxyglucose-6P is structurally identical to 18F-deoxyglucose-6P, LEXRF of subcellular 19F provides a link to in vivo 18FDG PET, forming a novel basis for understanding the physiological mechanisms underlying the 18FDG PET image, and the contribution of neurons and glia to the PET signal.

  10. Calculation of vibrational branching ratios and hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F and its suitability for laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Yin, Yanning; Wei, Bin; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    More recently, laser cooling of the diatomic radical magnesium monofluoride (24Mg19F ) is being experimentally preformed [Appl. Phys. Express 8, 092701 (2015), 10.7567/APEX.8.092701 and Opt. Express 22, 28645 (2014), 10.1364/OE.22.028645] and was also studied theoretically [Phys. Rev. A 91, 042511 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.042511]. However, some important problems still remain unsolved, so, in our paper, we perform further theoretical study for the feasibility of laser cooling and trapping the 24Mg19F molecule. At first, the highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors of the main transitions are verified by the closed-form approximation, Morse approximation, and Rydberg-Klein-Rees inversion methods, respectively. Afterwards, we investigate the lower X 2Σ1/2 + hyperfine manifolds using a quantum effective Hamiltonian approach and obtain the zero-field hyperfine spectrum with an accuracy of less than 30 kHz ˜5 μ K compared with the experimental results, and then find out that one cooling beam and one or two repumping beams with their first-order sidebands are enough to implement an efficient laser slowing and cooling of 24Mg19F . Meanwhile, we also calculate the accurate hyperfine structure magnetic g factors of the rotational state (X 2Σ1/2 +,N =1 ) and briefly discuss the influence of the external fields on the hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F as well as its possibility of preparing three-dimensional magneto-optical trapping. Finally we give an explanation for the difference between the Stark and Zeeman effects from the perspective of parity and time reversal symmetry. Our study shows that, besides appropriate excitation wavelengths, the short lifetime for the first excited state A 2Π1 /2 , and lighter mass, the 24Mg19F radical could be a good candidate molecule amenable to laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping.

  11. Effect of MRI tags: SPIO nanoparticles and 19F nanoemulsion on various populations of mouse mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Ghulam; Jablonska, Anna; Rose, Laura; Walczak, Piotr; Janowski, Miroslaw

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of myriad human disorders, including several neurological diseases. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and fluorine nanoemulsion (19F) are characterized by low toxicity and good sensitivity, and, as such, are among the most frequently used cell-labeling agents. However, to date, their impact across the various populations of MSCs has not been comprehensively investigated. Thus, the impact of MRI tags (independent variable) has been set as a primary endpoint. The various populations of mouse MSCs in which the effect of tag was investigated consisted of (1) tissue of cell origin: bone marrow vs. Adipose tissue; (2) age of donor: young vs. old; (3) cell culture conditions: hypoxic vs. normal vs. normal + ascorbic acid (AA); (4) exposure to acidosis: yes vs. no. The impact of those populations has been also analyzed and considered as secondary endpoints. The experimental readouts (dependent variables) included: (1) cell viability; (2) cell size; (3) cell doubling time; (4) colony formation; (5) efficiency of labeling; and (6) cell migration. We did not identify any impact of cell labeling for these investigated populations in any of the readouts. In addition, we found that the harsh microenvironment of injured tissue modeled by a culture of cells in a highly acidic environment has a profound effect on all readouts, and both age of donor and cell origin tissue also have a substantial influence on most of the readouts, while oxygen tension in the cell culture conditions has a smaller impact on MSCs. A detailed characterization of the factors that influence the quality of MSCs is vital to the proper pursuit of preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26232992

  12. Evidence for the importance of 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine catabolism in humans from 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malet-Martino, M C; Armand, J P; Lopez, A; Bernadou, J; Béteille, J P; Bon, M; Martino, R

    1986-04-01

    The use of a new methodology, 19F nuclear magnetic resonance, has allowed detection of all the fluorinated metabolites in the biofluids of patients treated with 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-dFUrd) injected i.v. at a dose of 10 g/m2 over 6 h. This technique, which requires no labeled drug, allows a direct study of the biological sample with no need for extraction or derivatization and a simultaneous identification and quantitation of all the different fluorinated metabolites. As well as the already known metabolites, unmetabolized 5'-dFUrd, 5-fluorouracil, and 5,6-dihydro-5-fluorouracil, the presence of alpha-fluoro-beta-ureidopropionic acid, alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL), N-carboxy-alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine, and the fluoride anion F- is reported. The catabolic pathway proposed for 5'-dFUrd is analogous to that of 5-fluorouracil, completed with FBAL----F- step, and the plasmatic equilibrium of FBAL with N-carboxy-alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine, its N-carboxy derivative. The quantitative analysis of the different metabolites found in plasma and urine emphasizes the significance of the catabolic pathway. High concentrations of alpha-fluoro-beta ureidopropionic acid and FBAL are recovered in plasma from 3 h after the beginning of the perfusion to 1 h after its end. The global urinary excretion results show that there is a high excretion of 5'-dFUrd and metabolites. Unchanged 5'-dFUrd and FBAL are by far the major excretory products and are at nearly equal rates. The protocol followed in this study produces relatively low but persistent plasmatic concentrations of 5-fluorouracil throughout the perfusion. PMID:2936452

  13. Effect of MRI tags: SPIO nanoparticles and 19F nanoemulsion on various populations of mouse mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Ghulam; Jablonska, Anna; Rose, Laura; Walczak, Piotr; Janowski, Miroslaw

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of myriad human disorders, including several neurological diseases. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and fluorine nanoemulsion (19F) are characterized by low toxicity and good sensitivity, and, as such, are among the most frequently used cell-labeling agents. However, to date, their impact across the various populations of MSCs has not been comprehensively investigated. Thus, the impact of MRI tags (independent variable) has been set as a primary endpoint. The various populations of mouse MSCs in which the effect of tag was investigated consisted of (1) tissue of cell origin: bone marrow vs. Adipose tissue; (2) age of donor: young vs. old; (3) cell culture conditions: hypoxic vs. normal vs. normal + ascorbic acid (AA); (4) exposure to acidosis: yes vs. no. The impact of those populations has been also analyzed and considered as secondary endpoints. The experimental readouts (dependent variables) included: (1) cell viability; (2) cell size; (3) cell doubling time; (4) colony formation; (5) efficiency of labeling; and (6) cell migration. We did not identify any impact of cell labeling for these investigated populations in any of the readouts. In addition, we found that the harsh microenvironment of injured tissue modeled by a culture of cells in a highly acidic environment has a profound effect on all readouts, and both age of donor and cell origin tissue also have a substantial influence on most of the readouts, while oxygen tension in the cell culture conditions has a smaller impact on MSCs. A detailed characterization of the factors that influence the quality of MSCs is vital to the proper pursuit of preclinical and clinical studies.

  14. Evaluation of tumor ischemia in response to an indole-based vascular disrupting agent using BLI and 19F MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Heling; Hallac, Rami R; Lopez, Ramona; Denney, Rebecca; MacDonough, Matthew T; Li, Li; Liu, Li; Graves, Edward E; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Pinney, Kevin G; Mason, Ralph P

    2015-01-01

    Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) have been proposed as an effective broad spectrum approach to cancer therapy, by inducing ischemia leading to hypoxia and cell death. A novel VDA (OXi8007) was recently reported to show rapid acute selective shutdown of tumor vasculature based on color-Doppler ultrasound. We have now expanded investigations to noninvasively assess perfusion and hypoxiation of orthotopic human MDA-MB-231/luc breast tumor xenografts following the administration of OXi8007 based on dynamic bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). BLI showed significantly lower signal four hours after the administration of OXi8007, which was very similar to the response to combretastatin A-4P (CA4P), but the effect lasted considerably longer, with the BLI signal remaining depressed at 72 hrs. Meanwhile, control tumors exhibited minimal change. Oximetry used 19F MRI of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene and FREDOM (Fluorocarbon Relaxometry using Echo Planar Imaging for Dynamic Oxygen Mapping) to assess pO2 distributions during air and oxygen breathing. pO2 decreased significantly upon the administration of OXi8007 during oxygen breathing (from 122 ± 64 to 34 ± 20 Torr), with further decrease upon switching the gas to air (pO2 = 17 ± 9 Torr). pO2 maps indicated intra-tumor heterogeneity in response to OXi8007, though ultimately all tumor regions became hypoxic. Both BLI and FREDOM showed the efficacy of OXi8007. The pO2 changes measured by FREDOM may be crucial for future study of combined therapy. PMID:25973335

  15. In situ NMR analysis of fluids contained in sedimentary rock

    PubMed

    de Swiet TM; Tomaselli; Hurlimann; Pines

    1998-08-01

    Limitations of resolution and absorption in standard chemical spectroscopic techniques have made it difficult to study fluids in sedimentary rocks. In this paper, we show that a chemical characterization of pore fluids may be obtained in situ by magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which is normally used for solid samples. 1H MAS-NMR spectra of water and crude oil in Berea sandstone show sufficient chemical shift resolution for a straightforward determination of the oil/water ratio. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  16. Advanced NMR approaches in the characterization of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Maciel, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    A considerable effort in this project during the past few months has been focussed on the development of [sup 1]H and [sup 13]C NMR imaging techniques to yield spatially-resolved chemical shift (structure) information on coal. In order to yield the chemical shift information, a solid-state NMR imaging technique must include magic-angle spinning, so rotating gradient capabilities are indicated. A [sup 13]C MAS imaging probe and a [sup 1]H MAS imaging probe and the circuitry necessary for rotating gradients have been designed and constructed. The [sup 1]H system has already produced promising preliminary results, which are briefly described in this report.

  17. Fragment based drug discovery: practical implementation based on ¹⁹F NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, John B; Poppe, Leszek; Xia, Xiaoyang; Cheng, Alan C; Sun, Yax; Michelsen, Klaus; Eastwood, Heather; Schnier, Paul D; Nixey, Thomas; Zhong, Wenge

    2012-01-26

    Fragment based drug discovery (FBDD) is a widely used tool for discovering novel therapeutics. NMR is a powerful means for implementing FBDD, and several approaches have been proposed utilizing (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) as well as one-dimensional (1)H and (19)F NMR to screen compound mixtures against a target of interest. While proton-based NMR methods of fragment screening (FBS) have been well documented and are widely used, the use of (19)F detection in FBS has been only recently introduced (Vulpetti et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2009, 131 (36), 12949-12959) with the aim of targeting "fluorophilic" sites in proteins. Here, we demonstrate a more general use of (19)F NMR-based fragment screening in several areas: as a key tool for rapid and sensitive detection of fragment hits, as a method for the rapid development of structure-activity relationship (SAR) on the hit-to-lead path using in-house libraries and/or commercially available compounds, and as a quick and efficient means of assessing target druggability. PMID:22165820

  18. Revisiting NMR through-space J(FF) spin-spin coupling constants for getting insight into proximate F---F interactions.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Rubén H; Llorente, Tomás; Ducati, Lucas Colucci; Tormena, Cláudio Francisco

    2014-07-10

    At present times it is usual practice to mark biological compounds replacing an H for an F atom to study, by means of (19)F NMR spectroscopy, aspects such as binding sites and molecular folding features. This interesting methodology could nicely be improved if it is known how proximity interactions on the F atom affect its electronic structure as gauged through high-resolution (19)F NMR spectroscopy. This is the main aim of the present work and, to this end, differently substituted peri-difluoronaphthalenes are chosen as model systems. In such compounds are rationalized some interesting aspects of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic parts of the (19)F nuclear magnetic shielding tensor as well as the transmission mechanisms for the PSO and FC contributions to (4)JF1F8 indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants.

  19. In situ 19F MRS measurement of RIF-1 tumor blood volume: corroboration by radioisotope-labeled [125I]-albumin and correlation to tumor size.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, N J; Wang, Y; Ng, T C

    1996-01-01

    Tumor blood volume (TBV) is an important factor in the metabolism of a tumor and in its response to therapy. Until recently, the only methods to determine TBV were highly invasive and many involved radioisotopes. In this study, a perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion, Oxypherol, was monitored by 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). TBVs as determined by 19F MRS of in situ and excised radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumors (n = 9), were strongly correlated with the TBV measured by a radioisotope labeled albumin method (slopes of 1.1 and 0.8 with R = 0.86 and 0.91, respectively, by linear regression). In general, the TBV as calculated from the in situ MRS measurements (n = 24) decreased from 28 to 5 ml/100 g tumor mass for tumors ranging in mass from 0.15 to 2 g. However, there was an indication of an initial increase of TBV in tumors smaller than 0.5 g.

  20. Study on the compounds containing 19F and 10B atoms in a single molecule for the application to MRI and BNCT.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yoshihide; Asano, Tomoyuki; Niki, Yoko; Kondoh, Hirofumi; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Wakamiya, Tateaki

    2006-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are quite attractive techniques for diagnosis and treatment of cancer, respectively. In order to progress the study on both MRI and BNCT, the novel compounds containing 19F and 10B atoms in a single molecule were designed and synthesized. In the present paper, the syntheses and the internalization rates into tumor cells of these compounds are elucidated.

  1. Experimental investigation of the 19F( n, α)16N reaction excitation function in the neutron energy range of 4 to 7.35 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, I. P.; Khryachkov, V. A.; Ivanova, T. A.; Kuz'minov, B. D.; Semenova, N. N.; Sergachev, A. I.

    2013-07-01

    The interaction of neutrons with light nuclei study is of interest for understanding nuclear-reaction mechanisms. Fluorine nuclei are worth particular attention because they are abundant in the core of the promising molten-salt reactors and can noticeably affect the chain reaction kinetics. In this work we have experimentally investigated the 19F( n, α)16N reaction cross-section at neutron energies ranging from 4 to 7.35 MeV.

  2. High-resolution three-dimensional 19F-magnetic resonance imaging of rat lung in situ: evaluation of airway strain in the perfluorocarbon-filled lung.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Julia K; Steinmann, Daniel; Emerich, Philipp; Stahl, Claudius A; v Elverfeldt, Dominik; Guttmann, Josef

    2011-02-01

    Perfluorocarbons (PFC) are biologically and chemically inert fluids with high oxygen and CO(2) carrying capacities. Their use as liquid intrapulmonary gas carriers during liquid ventilation has been investigated. We established a method of high resolution 3D-(19)F-MRI of the totally PFC-filled lung. The goal of this study was to investigate longitudinal and circumferential airway strain in the setting of increasing airway pressures on 3D-(19)F-MR images of the PFC-filled lung. Sixteen female Wistar rats were euthanized and the liquid perfluorocarbon FC-84 instilled into their lungs. 3D-(19)F-MRI was performed at various intrapulmonary pressures. Measurements of bronchial length and cross-sectional area were obtained from transversal 2D images for each pressure range. Changes in bronchial area were used to determine circumferential strain, while longitudinal strain was calculated from changes in bronchial length. Our method of 3D-(19)F-MRI allowed clear visualization of the great bronchi. Longitudinal strain increased significantly up to 31.1 cmH(2)O. The greatest strain could be found in the range of low airway pressures. Circumferential strain increased strongly with the initial pressure rise, but showed no significant changes above 10.4 cmH(2)O. Longitudinal strain was generally higher in distal airways, while circumferential strain showed no difference. Analysis of mechanical characteristics showed that longitudinal and circumferential airway expansion occurred in an anisotropic fashion. Whereas longitudinal strain still increased with higher pressures, circumferential strain quickly reached a 'strain limit'. Longitudinal strain was higher in distal bronchi, as dense PFCs gravitate to dependent, in this case to dorso-basal parts of the lung, acting as liquid positive end expiratory pressure. PMID:21193813

  3. Determination of size and sign of hetero-nuclear coupling constants from 2D 19F-13C correlation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampt, Kirsten A. M.; Aspers, Ruud L. E. G.; Dvortsak, Peter; van der Werf, Ramon M.; Wijmenga, Sybren S.; Jaeger, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Fluorinated organic compounds have become increasingly important within the polymer and the pharmaceutical industry as well as for clinical applications. For the structural elucidation of such compounds, NMR experiments with fluorine detection are of great value due to the favorable NMR properties of the fluorine nucleus. For the investigation of three fluorinated compounds, triple resonance 2D HSQC and HMBC experiments were adopted to fluorine detection with carbon and/or proton decoupling to yield F-C, F-C{H}, F-C{Cacq} and F-C{H,Cacq} variants. Analysis of E.COSY type cross-peak patterns in the F-C correlation spectra led, apart from the chemical shift assignments, to determination of size and signs of the JCH, JCF, and JHF coupling constants. In addition, the fully coupled F-C HMQC spectrum of steroid 1 was interpreted in terms of E.COSY type patterns. This example shows how coupling constants due to different nuclei can be determined together with their relative signs from a single spectrum. The analysis of cross-peak patterns, as presented here, not only provides relatively straightforward routes to the determination of size and sign of hetero-nuclear J-couplings in fluorinated compounds, it also provides new and easy ways for the determination of residual dipolar couplings and thus for structure elucidation. The examples and results presented in this study may contribute to a better interpretation and understanding of various F-C correlation experiments and thereby stimulate their utilization.

  4. Polarization quantum beat spectroscopy of HCF(A1A"). I. 19F and 1H hyperfine structure and Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haiyan; Ionescu, Ionela; Xin, Ju; Reid, Scott A

    2004-11-01

    To further investigate the (19)F and (1)H nuclear hyperfine structure and Zeeman effect in the simplest singlet carbene, HCF, we recorded polarization quantum beat spectra (QBS) of the pure bending levels 2(0) (n) with n = 0-7 and combination bands 1(0) (1)2(0) (n) with n = 1-6 and 2(0) (n)3(0) (1) with n = 0-3 in the HCF A(1)A(")<--X(1)A(') system. The spectra were measured under jet-cooled conditions using a pulsed discharge source, both at zero field and under application of a weak magnetic field (<30 G). Analysis yielded the nuclear spin-rotation constants C(aa) and weak field Lande g(aa) factors. Consistent with a two-state model, the majority of observed vibrational levels exhibit a linear correlation of C(aa) and g(aa), and our analysis yielded effective (a) hyperfine constants for the (19)F and (1)H nuclei (in MHz) of 728(23) and 55(2), respectively. The latter was determined here owing to the high resolving power of QBS. The vibrational state selectivity of the (19)F hyperfine constants is discussed, and we suggest that the underlying Renner-Teller interaction may play an important role.

  5. 1020MHz single-channel proton fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Zhang, Rongchun; Hashi, Kenjiro; Ohki, Shinobu; Nishijima, Gen; Matsumoto, Shinji; Noguchi, Takashi; Deguchi, Kenzo; Goto, Atsushi; Shimizu, Tadashi; Maeda, Hideaki; Takahashi, Masato; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Yamazaki, Toshio; Iguchi, Seiya; Tanaka, Ryoji; Nemoto, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Tetsuo; Suematsu, Hiroto; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Miki, Takashi; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-12-01

    This study reports a first successful demonstration of a single channel proton 3D and 2D high-throughput ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR techniques in an ultra-high magnetic field (1020MHz) NMR spectrometer comprised of HTS/LTS magnet. High spectral resolution is well demonstrated.

  6. Solid-State NMR Studies of Chemically Lithiated CFx

    PubMed Central

    Leifer, N. D.; Johnson, V. S.; Ben-Ari, R.; Gan, H.; Lehnes, J. M.; Guo, R.; Lu, W.; Muffoletto, B. C.; Reddy, T.; Stallworth, P. E.; Greenbaum, S. G.

    2010-01-01

    Three types of fluorinated carbon, all in their original form and upon sequential chemical lithiations via n-butyllithium, were investigated by 13C and 19F solid-state NMR methods. The three starting CFx materials [where x = 1 (nominally)] were fiber based, graphite based, and petroleum coke based. The aim of the current study was to identify, at the atomic/molecular structural level, factors that might account for differences in electrochemical performance among the different kinds of CFx. Differences were noted in the covalent F character among the starting compounds and in the details of LiF production among the lithiated samples. PMID:20676233

  7. Solid-State NMR Studies of Chemically Lithiated CF.

    PubMed

    Leifer, N D; Johnson, V S; Ben-Ari, R; Gan, H; Lehnes, J M; Guo, R; Lu, W; Muffoletto, B C; Reddy, T; Stallworth, P E; Greenbaum, S G

    2010-01-01

    Three types of fluorinated carbon, all in their original form and upon sequential chemical lithiations via n-butyllithium, were investigated by (13)C and (19)F solid-state NMR methods. The three starting CF(x) materials [where x = 1 (nominally)] were fiber based, graphite based, and petroleum coke based. The aim of the current study was to identify, at the atomic/molecular structural level, factors that might account for differences in electrochemical performance among the different kinds of CF(x). Differences were noted in the covalent F character among the starting compounds and in the details of LiF production among the lithiated samples.

  8. Studies of minute quantities of natural abundance molecules using 2D heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy under 100kHz MAS

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Malon, M.; Singappuli-Arachchige, D.; Slowing, I. I.; Pruski, M.

    2015-02-16

    Two-dimensional 1H{13C} heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectra of naturally abundant solid materials are presented, acquired using the 0.75-mm magic angle spinning (MAS) probe at spinning rates up to 100 kHz. In spite of the miniscule sample volume (290 nL), high-quality HSQC-type spectra of bulk samples as well as surface-bound molecules can be obtained within hours of experimental time. The experiments are compared with those carried out at 40 kHz MAS using a 1.6-mm probe, which offered higher overall sensitivity due to a larger rotor volume. The benefits of ultrafast MAS in such experiments include superior resolution in 1H dimension without resorting to 1H–1H homonuclear RF decoupling, easy optimization, and applicability to mass-limited samples. As a result, the HMQC spectra of surface-bound species can be also acquired under 100 kHz MAS, although the dephasing of transverse magnetization has significant effect on the efficiency transfer under MAS alone.

  9. Studies of minute quantities of natural abundance molecules using 2D heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy under 100kHz MAS

    DOE PAGES

    Nishiyama, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Malon, M.; Singappuli-Arachchige, D.; Slowing, I. I.; Pruski, M.

    2015-02-16

    Two-dimensional 1H{13C} heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectra of naturally abundant solid materials are presented, acquired using the 0.75-mm magic angle spinning (MAS) probe at spinning rates up to 100 kHz. In spite of the miniscule sample volume (290 nL), high-quality HSQC-type spectra of bulk samples as well as surface-bound molecules can be obtained within hours of experimental time. The experiments are compared with those carried out at 40 kHz MAS using a 1.6-mm probe, which offered higher overall sensitivity due to a larger rotor volume. The benefits of ultrafast MAS in such experiments include superior resolution in 1H dimensionmore » without resorting to 1H–1H homonuclear RF decoupling, easy optimization, and applicability to mass-limited samples. As a result, the HMQC spectra of surface-bound species can be also acquired under 100 kHz MAS, although the dephasing of transverse magnetization has significant effect on the efficiency transfer under MAS alone.« less

  10. Forensic examination of electrical tapes using high resolution magic angle spinning ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schoenberger, Torsten; Simmross, Ulrich; Poppe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The application of high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) (1)H NMR spectroscopy is ideally suited for the differentiation of plastics. In addition to the actual material composition, the different types of polymer architectures and tacticity provide characteristic signals in the fingerprint of the (1)H NMR spectra. The method facilitates forensic comparison, as even small amounts of insoluble but swellable plastic particles are utilized. The performance of HR-MAS NMR can be verified against other methods that were recently addressed in various articles about forensic tape comparison. In this study samples of the 90 electrical tapes already referenced by the FBI laboratory were used. The discrimination power of HR-MAS is demonstrated by the fact that more tape groups can be distinguished by NMR spectroscopy than by using the combined evaluation of several commonly used analytical techniques. An additional advantage of this robust and quick method is the very simple sample preparation. PMID:26558760

  11. Nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging of multiple nuclear species.

    PubMed

    DeVience, Stephen J; Pham, Linh M; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sushkov, Alexander O; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Casola, Francesco; Corbett, Madeleine; Zhang, Huiliang; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide non-invasive information about multiple nuclear species in bulk matter, with wide-ranging applications from basic physics and chemistry to biomedical imaging. However, the spatial resolution of conventional NMR and MRI is limited to several micrometres even at large magnetic fields (>1 T), which is inadequate for many frontier scientific applications such as single-molecule NMR spectroscopy and in vivo MRI of individual biological cells. A promising approach for nanoscale NMR and MRI exploits optical measurements of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond, which provide a combination of magnetic field sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution unmatched by any existing technology, while operating under ambient conditions in a robust, solid-state system. Recently, single, shallow NV centres were used to demonstrate NMR of nanoscale ensembles of proton spins, consisting of a statistical polarization equivalent to ∼100-1,000 spins in uniform samples covering the surface of a bulk diamond chip. Here, we realize nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and MRI of multiple nuclear species ((1)H, (19)F, (31)P) in non-uniform (spatially structured) samples under ambient conditions and at moderate magnetic fields (∼20 mT) using two complementary sensor modalities. PMID:25559712

  12. High-resolution solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy of polymorphs of glycine.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E; Mann, Sam E; Rahman, Aisha S; McMillan, Paul F; Corà, Furio; Iuga, Dinu; Hughes, Colan E; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2011-11-10

    High-resolution solid-state (2)H MAS NMR studies of the α and γ polymorphs of fully deuterated glycine (glycine-d(5)) are reported. Analysis of spinning sideband patterns is used to determine the (2)H quadrupole interaction parameters, and is shown to yield good agreement with the corresponding parameters determined from single-crystal (2)H NMR measurements (the maximum deviation in quadrupole coupling constants determined from these two approaches is only 1%). From analysis of simulated (2)H MAS NMR sideband patterns as a function of reorientational jump frequency (κ) for the -N(+)D(3) group in glycine-d(5), the experimentally observed differences in the (2)H MAS NMR spectrum for the -N(+)D(3) deutrons in the α and γ polymorphs is attributed to differences in the rate of reorientation of the -N(+)D(3) group. These simulations show severe broadening of the (2)H MAS NMR signal in the intermediate motion regime, suggesting that deuterons undergoing reorientational motions at rates in the range κ ≈ 10(4)-10(6) s(-1) are likely to be undetectable in (2)H MAS NMR measurements for materials with natural isotopic abundances. The (1)H NMR chemical shifts for the α and γ polymorphs of glycine have been determined from the (2)H MAS NMR results, taking into account the known second-order shift. Further quantum mechanical calculations of (2)H quadrupole interaction parameters and (1)H chemical shifts reveal the structural dependence of these parameters in the two polymorphs and suggest that the existence of two short intermolecular C-H···O contacts for one of the H atoms of the >CH(2) group in the α polymorph have a significant influence on the (2)H quadrupole coupling and (1)H chemical shift for this site. PMID:21939265

  13. Measurement of pH by NMR Spectroscopy in Concentrated Aqueous Fluoride Buffers

    PubMed Central

    Gerken, James B.

    2010-01-01

    An NMR spectroscopic technique has been developed to give rapid, accurate pH measurements on tenth-milliliter samples of concentrated acidic aqueous solutions buffered by fluoride ion in the pH 1.5 – 4.5 range. The fluoride 19F chemical shift has been calibrated as a function of pH at 0.1 and 1.0 M concentration by reference to an internal 3-fluoropyridine standard. Subsequent measurements of fluoride buffer pH required no additives and only two NMR spectra in the presence of an external reference standard. PMID:21278857

  14. 48 CFR 538.272 - MAS price reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false MAS price reductions. 538... Schedules 538.272 MAS price reductions. (a) Section 552.238-75, Price Reductions, requires the contractor to maintain during the contract period the negotiated price/discount relationship (and/or term and...

  15. Annual Report FY2013-- A Kinematically Complete, Interdisciplinary, and Co-Institutional Measurement of the 19F(α,n) Cross-section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, William A; Smith, Michael Scott; Clement, Ryan; Tan, Wanpeng; Stech, Ed; Cizewski, J A; Febbraro, Michael; Madurga Flores, Miguel

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this proposal is to enable neutron detection for precision Non-Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. Neutrons are continuously generated from a UFx matrix in a container or sample as a result of the interaction of alpha particles from uranium-decay α particles with fluorine nuclei in the matrix. Neutrons from 19F(α,n)22Na were once considered a poorly characterized background for assays of UFx samples via 238U spontaneous fission neutron detection [SMI2010B]. However, the yield of decay-α-driven neutrons is critical for 234,235U LEU and HEU assays, as it can used to determine both the total amount of uranium and the enrichment [BER2010]. This approach can be extremely valuable in a variety of safeguard applications, such as cylinder monitoring in underground uranium storage facilities, nuclear criticality safety studies, nuclear materials accounting, and other nonproliferation applications. The success of neutron-based assays critically depends on an accurate knowledge of the cross section of the (α,n) reaction that generates the neutrons. The 40% uncertainty in the 19F(α,n)22Na cross section currently limits the precision of such assays, and has been identified as a key factor in preventing accurate enrichment determinations [CRO2003]. The need for higher quality cross section data for (α,n) reactions has been a recurring conclusion in reviews of the nuclear data needs to support safeguards. The overarching goal of this project is to enable neutron detection to be used for precision Non- Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. This will significantly advance safeguards verification at existing declared facilities, nuclear materials accounting, process control, nuclear criticality safety monitoring, and a variety of other nonproliferation applications. To reach this goal, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rutgers University (RU), and the University of Notre

  16. Natural-abundance solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy at high magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E; Mann, Sam E; Iuga, Dinu; Hughes, Colan E; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2011-06-01

    High-resolution solid-state (2)H NMR spectroscopy provides a method for measuring (1)H NMR chemical shifts in solids and is advantageous over the direct measurement of high-resolution solid-state (1)H NMR spectra, as it requires only the application of routine magic angle sample spinning (MAS) and routine (1)H decoupling methods, in contrast to the requirement for complex pulse sequences for homonuclear (1)H decoupling and ultrafast MAS in the case of high-resolution solid-state (1)H NMR. However, a significant obstacle to the routine application of high-resolution solid-state (2)H NMR is the very low natural abundance of (2)H, with the consequent problem of inherently low sensitivity. Here, we explore the feasibility of measuring (2)H MAS NMR spectra of various solids with natural isotopic abundances at high magnetic field (850 MHz), focusing on samples of amino acids, peptides, collagen, and various organic solids. The results show that high-resolution solid-state (2)H NMR can be used successfully to measure isotropic (1)H chemical shifts in favorable cases, particularly for mobile functional groups, such as methyl and -N(+)H(3) groups, and in some cases phenyl groups. Furthermore, we demonstrate that routine (2)H MAS NMR measurements can be exploited for assessing the relative dynamics of different functional groups in a molecule and for assessing whole-molecule motions in the solid state. The magnitude and field-dependence of second-order shifts due to the (2)H quadrupole interaction are also investigated, on the basis of analysis of simulated and experimental (1)H and (2)H MAS NMR spectra of fully deuterated and selectively deuterated samples of the α polymorph of glycine at two different magnetic field strengths.

  17. Structural analysis of a signal peptide inside the ribosome tunnel by DNP MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Lange, Sascha; Franks, W Trent; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Döring, Kristina; Geiger, Michel A; Linden, Arne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Proteins are synthesized in cells by ribosomes and, in parallel, prepared for folding or targeting. While ribosomal protein synthesis is progressing, the nascent chain exposes amino-terminal signal sequences or transmembrane domains that mediate interactions with specific interaction partners, such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the SecA-adenosine triphosphatase, or the trigger factor. These binding events can set the course for folding in the cytoplasm and translocation across or insertion into membranes. A distinction of the respective pathways depends largely on the hydrophobicity of the recognition sequence. Hydrophobic transmembrane domains stabilize SRP binding, whereas less hydrophobic signal sequences, typical for periplasmic and outer membrane proteins, stimulate SecA binding and disfavor SRP interactions. In this context, the formation of helical structures of signal peptides within the ribosome was considered to be an important factor. We applied dynamic nuclear polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate the conformational states of the disulfide oxidoreductase A (DsbA) signal peptide stalled within the exit tunnel of the ribosome. Our results suggest that the nascent chain comprising the DsbA signal sequence adopts an extended structure in the ribosome with only minor populations of helical structure. PMID:27551685

  18. 13C MAS NMR studies of crystalline cholesterol and lipid mixtures modeling atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, W; Hamilton, J A

    1996-01-01

    Cholesterol and cholesteryl esters are the predominant lipids of atherosclerotic plaques. To provide fundamental data for the quantitative study of plaque lipids in situ, crystalline cholesterol (CHOL) and CHOL/cholesteryl ester (CE) mixtures with other lipids were studied by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle-sample spinning. Highly distinctive spectra for three different crystalline structures of CHOL were obtained. When CHOL crystals were mixed with isotropic CE oil, solubilized CHOL (approximately 13 mol % CHOL) was detected by characteristic resonances such as C5, C6, and C3; the excess crystalline CHOL (either anhydrous or monohydrate) remained in its original crystalline structure, without being affected by the coexisting CE. By use of 13C-enriched CHOL, the solubility of CHOL in the CE liquid-crystalline phase (approximately 8 mol %) was measured. When phosphatidylcholine was hydrated in presence of CHOL and CE, magic-angle-sampling nuclear magnetic resonance revealed liquid-crystalline CHOL/phosphatidylcholine multilayers with approximately an equal molar ratio of CHOL/phosphatidylcholine. Excess CHOL existed in the monohydrate crystalline form, and CE in separate oil or crystalline phases, depending on the temperature. The magic-angle-sampling nuclear magnetic resonance protocol for identifying different lipid phases was applied to intact (ex vivo) atherosclerotic plaques of cholesterol-fed rabbits. Liquid, liquid-crystalline, and solid phases of CE were characterized. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8913623

  19. HR-MAS NMR metabolomics of 'Swingle' citrumelo rootstock genetically modified to overproduce proline.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Caroline S; Carlos, Eduardo F; Vieira, Luiz G E; Lião, Luciano M; Alcantara, Glaucia B

    2014-08-01

    The accumulation of proline is a typical physiological response to abiotic stresses in higher plants. 'Swingle' citrumelo, an important rootstock for citrus production, has been modified with a mutated Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase gene (VaP5CSF129A) linked to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter to induce the overproduction of free proline. This paper presents a comparative metabolomic study of nontransgenic versus transgenic 'Swingle' citrumelo plants with high endogenous proline. (1)H high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate analysis showed significant differences in some metabolites between the nontransgenic and transgenic leaves and roots. The overproduction of proline has reduced the sucrose content in transgenic leaves, revealing a metabolic cost for these plants. In roots, the high level of free proline acts for the adjustment of cation-anion balance, causing the reduction of acetic acid content. The same sucrose level in roots indicates that they can be considered as sucrose sink. Similar behavior may be waited for fruits produced on transgenic rootstock.

  20. Friedel's salt formation in sulfoaluminate cements: A combined XRD and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, G.; Boccaleri, E.; Buzzi, L.; Canonico, F.; Gastaldi, D.

    2015-01-15

    Four different binders based on calcium sulfoaluminate cements have been submitted to accelerated chlorination through ionic exchange on hydrated pastes, in order to investigate their ability to chemically bind chloride ions that might reduce chloride penetration. The composition of hydrated cements before and after the treatment was evaluated by means of an X-Ray Diffraction–{sup 27}Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy combined study, allowing to take into account even partially amorphous phases and to make quantitative assumption on the relative abundance of the different aluminium-containing phases. It was found that low SO{sub 3} Sulfoaluminate–Portland ternary systems are the most effective in binding chloride ions and the active role played by different members of the AFm family in chloride uptake was confirmed. Moreover, a peculiar behavior related to the formation of Friedel's salt in different pH conditions was also established for the different cements.

  1. Structural analysis of a signal peptide inside the ribosome tunnel by DNP MAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sascha; Franks, W. Trent; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Döring, Kristina; Geiger, Michel A.; Linden, Arne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are synthesized in cells by ribosomes and, in parallel, prepared for folding or targeting. While ribosomal protein synthesis is progressing, the nascent chain exposes amino-terminal signal sequences or transmembrane domains that mediate interactions with specific interaction partners, such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the SecA–adenosine triphosphatase, or the trigger factor. These binding events can set the course for folding in the cytoplasm and translocation across or insertion into membranes. A distinction of the respective pathways depends largely on the hydrophobicity of the recognition sequence. Hydrophobic transmembrane domains stabilize SRP binding, whereas less hydrophobic signal sequences, typical for periplasmic and outer membrane proteins, stimulate SecA binding and disfavor SRP interactions. In this context, the formation of helical structures of signal peptides within the ribosome was considered to be an important factor. We applied dynamic nuclear polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate the conformational states of the disulfide oxidoreductase A (DsbA) signal peptide stalled within the exit tunnel of the ribosome. Our results suggest that the nascent chain comprising the DsbA signal sequence adopts an extended structure in the ribosome with only minor populations of helical structure. PMID:27551685

  2. The fluorine destruction in stars: First experimental study of the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Aliotta, M.; Burjan, V.; Cherubini, S.; Coc, A.; Gulino, M.; Hons, Z.; Kiss, G. G.; Kroha, V.; Lamia, L.; Mrazek, J.; Palmerini, S.; Piskor, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; and others

    2012-11-12

    The {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction is an important fluorine destruction channel in the proton-rich outer layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and it might also play a role in hydrogendeficient post-AGB star nucleosynthesis. So far, available direct measurements do not reach the energy region of astrophysical interest (E{sub cm}{approx} 300 keV), because of the hindrance effect of the Coulomb barrier. The Trojan Horse (TH) method was thus used to access this energy region, by extracting the quasi-free contribution to the {sup 2}H({sup 19}F,{alpha}{sup 16}O)n reaction. The TH measurement of the {alpha}{sub 0} channel, which is the dominant one at such energies, shows the presence of resonant structures not observed before that cause an increase of the reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures up to a factor of 1.7, with potential important consequences for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  3. Free variable selection QSPR study to predict 19F chemical shifts of some fluorinated organic compounds using Random Forest and RBF-PLS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Nasser

    2016-04-01

    In this work, two new and powerful chemometrics methods are applied for the modeling and prediction of the 19F chemical shift values of some fluorinated organic compounds. The radial basis function-partial least square (RBF-PLS) and random forest (RF) are employed to construct the models to predict the 19F chemical shifts. In this study, we didn't used from any variable selection method and RF method can be used as variable selection and modeling technique. Effects of the important parameters affecting the ability of the RF prediction power such as the number of trees (nt) and the number of randomly selected variables to split each node (m) were investigated. The root-mean-square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for the training set and the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 44.70, 23.86, 29.77, and 23.69, respectively. Also, the correlation coefficients of the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 0.8684 and 0.9313, respectively. The results obtained reveal that the RF model can be used as a powerful chemometrics tool for the quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies.

  4. NMR Studies of Cartilage Dynamics, Diffusion, Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huster, Daniel; Schiller, Jurgen; Naji, Lama; Kaufmann Jorn; Arnold, Klaus

    An increasing number of people is suffering from rheumatic diseases, and, therefore, methods of early diagnosis of joint degeneration are urgently required. For their establishment, however, an improved knowledge about the molecular organisation of cartilage would be helpful. Cartilage consists of three main components: Water, collagen and chondroitin sulfate (CS) that is (together with further polysaccharides and proteins) a major constituent of the proteoglycans of cartilage. 1H and 13C MAS (magic-angle spinning) NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) opened new perspectives for the study of the macromolecular components in cartilage. We have primarily studied the mobilities of CS and collagen in bovine nasal and pig articular cartilage (that differ significantly in their collagen/polysaccharide content) by measuring 13C NMR relaxation times as well as the corresponding 13C CP (cross polarisation) MAS NMR spectra. These data clearly indicate that the mobility of cartilage macromolecules is broadly distributed from almost completely rigid (collagen) to highly mobile (polysaccharides), which lends cartilage its mechanical strength and shock-absorbing properties.

  5. Rapid proton-detected NMR assignment for proteins with fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Pell, Andrew J; Retel, Joren S; Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Franks, W Trent; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J; Hiller, Matthias; Higman, Victoria; Guerry, Paul; Bertarello, Andrea; Knight, Michael J; Felletti, Michele; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Tars, Kaspars; Stoppini, Monica; Bellotti, Vittorio; Bolognesi, Martino; Ricagno, Stefano; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2014-09-01

    Using a set of six (1)H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5-30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide (2)H/(1)H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary (13)C/(15)N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR.

  6. An electromagnetic PIC code on the MasPar

    SciTech Connect

    MacNeice, P.

    1993-12-31

    A 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell code has been rewritten to run on the MasPar. The original code; known as TRISTAN which was written by Oscar Buneman was rewritten in MPL and its data structure altered to suit the MasPar architecture and exploit the fully local property of the algorithm. We discuss the significant issues associated with porting the code and present a comparative analysis of the code run times on the MasPar and on the CRAY YMP and C90. Results of a simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with the earth`s magnetosphere are shown.

  7. Multinuclear Solid-State NMR Investigation of Hexaniobate and Hexatantalate Compounds.

    PubMed

    Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Coelho-Diogo, Cristina; Chagnes, Alexandre; Cote, Gérard; Smith, Mark E; Hanna, John V; Iuga, Dinu; Bonhomme, Christian

    2016-06-20

    This work determines the potential of solid-state NMR techniques to probe proton, alkali, and niobium environments in Lindqvist salts. Na7HNb6O19·15H2O (1), K8Nb6O19·16H2O (2), and Na8Ta6O19·24.5H2O (3) have been studied by solid-state static and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR at high and ultrahigh magnetic field (16.4 and 19.9 T). (1)H MAS NMR was found to be a convenient and straightforward tool to discriminate between protonated and nonprotonated clusters AxH8-xM6O19·nH2O (A = alkali ion; M = Nb, Ta). (93)Nb MAS NMR studies at different fields and MAS rotation frequencies have been performed on 1. For the first time, the contributions of NbO5Oμ2H sites were clearly distinguished from those assigned to NbO6 sites in the hexaniobate cluster. The strong broadening of the resonances obtained under MAS was interpreted by combining chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) with quadrupolar effects and by using extensive fitting of the line shapes. In order to obtain the highest accuracy for all NMR parameters (CSA and quadrupolar), (93)Nb WURST QCPMG spectra in the static mode were recorded at 16.4 T for sample 1. The (93)Nb NMR spectra were interpreted in connection with the XRD data available in the literature (i.e., fractional occupancies of the NbO5Oμ2H sites). 1D (23)Na MAS and 2D (23)Na 3QMAS NMR studies of 1 revealed several distinct sodium sites. The multiplicity of the sites was again compared to structural details previously obtained by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The (23)Na MAS NMR study of 3 confirmed the presence of a much larger distribution of sodium sites in accordance with the 10 sodium sites predicted by XRD. Finally, the effect of Nb/Ta substitutions in 1 was also probed by multinuclear MAS NMR ((1)H, (23)Na, and (93)Nb).

  8. Multinuclear Solid-State NMR Investigation of Hexaniobate and Hexatantalate Compounds.

    PubMed

    Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Coelho-Diogo, Cristina; Chagnes, Alexandre; Cote, Gérard; Smith, Mark E; Hanna, John V; Iuga, Dinu; Bonhomme, Christian

    2016-06-20

    This work determines the potential of solid-state NMR techniques to probe proton, alkali, and niobium environments in Lindqvist salts. Na7HNb6O19·15H2O (1), K8Nb6O19·16H2O (2), and Na8Ta6O19·24.5H2O (3) have been studied by solid-state static and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR at high and ultrahigh magnetic field (16.4 and 19.9 T). (1)H MAS NMR was found to be a convenient and straightforward tool to discriminate between protonated and nonprotonated clusters AxH8-xM6O19·nH2O (A = alkali ion; M = Nb, Ta). (93)Nb MAS NMR studies at different fields and MAS rotation frequencies have been performed on 1. For the first time, the contributions of NbO5Oμ2H sites were clearly distinguished from those assigned to NbO6 sites in the hexaniobate cluster. The strong broadening of the resonances obtained under MAS was interpreted by combining chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) with quadrupolar effects and by using extensive fitting of the line shapes. In order to obtain the highest accuracy for all NMR parameters (CSA and quadrupolar), (93)Nb WURST QCPMG spectra in the static mode were recorded at 16.4 T for sample 1. The (93)Nb NMR spectra were interpreted in connection with the XRD data available in the literature (i.e., fractional occupancies of the NbO5Oμ2H sites). 1D (23)Na MAS and 2D (23)Na 3QMAS NMR studies of 1 revealed several distinct sodium sites. The multiplicity of the sites was again compared to structural details previously obtained by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The (23)Na MAS NMR study of 3 confirmed the presence of a much larger distribution of sodium sites in accordance with the 10 sodium sites predicted by XRD. Finally, the effect of Nb/Ta substitutions in 1 was also probed by multinuclear MAS NMR ((1)H, (23)Na, and (93)Nb). PMID:27245403

  9. Complete protocol for slow-spinning high-resolution magic-angle spinning NMR analysis of fragile tissues.

    PubMed

    André, Marion; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Rezig, Lamya; Shintu, Laetitia; Piotto, Martial; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    High-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an essential tool to characterize a variety of semisolid systems, including biological tissues, with virtually no sample preparation. The "non-destructive" nature of NMR is typically compromised, however, by the extreme centrifugal forces experienced under conventional HR-MAS frequencies of several kilohertz. These features limit the usefulness of current HR-MAS approaches for fragile samples. Here, we introduce a full protocol for acquiring high-quality HR-MAS NMR spectra of biological tissues at low spinning rates (down to a few hundred hertz). The protocol first consists of a carefully designed sample preparation, which yields spectra without significant spinning sidebands at low spinning frequency for several types of sample holders, including the standard disposable inserts classically used in HR-MAS NMR-based metabolomics. Suppression of broad spectral features is then achieved using a modified version of the recently introduced PROJECT experiment with added water suppression and rotor synchronization, which deposits limited power in the sample and which can be suitably rotor-synchronized at low spinning rates. The performance of the slow HR-MAS NMR procedure is demonstrated on conventional (liver tissue) and very delicate (fish eggs) samples, for which the slow-spinning conditions are shown to preserve the structural integrity and to minimize intercompartmental leaks of metabolites. Taken together, these results expand the applicability and reliability of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy. These results have been obtained at 400 and 600 MHz and suggest that high-quality slow HR-MAS spectra can be expected at higher magnetic fields using the described protocol.

  10. Dual Screening of BPTF and Brd4 Using Protein-Observed Fluorine NMR Uncovers New Bromodomain Probe Molecules.

    PubMed

    Urick, Andrew K; Hawk, Laura M L; Cassel, Melissa K; Mishra, Neeraj K; Liu, Shuai; Adhikari, Neeta; Zhang, Wei; dos Santos, Camila O; Hall, Jennifer L; Pomerantz, William C K

    2015-10-16

    Bromodomain-containing protein dysregulation is linked to cancer, diabetes, and inflammation. Selective inhibition of bromodomain function is a newly proposed therapeutic strategy. We describe a (19)F NMR dual screening method for small molecule discovery using fluorinated tryptophan resonances on two bromodomain-containing proteins. The chemical shift dispersion of (19)F resonances within fluorine-labeled proteins enables the simultaneous analysis of two fluorinated bromodomains by NMR. A library of 229 small molecules was screened against the first bromodomain of Brd4 and the BPTF bromodomain. We report the first small molecule selective for BPTF over Brd4, termed AU1. The Kd = 2.8 μM for AU1, which is active in a cell-based reporter assay. No binding is detected with Brd4. Three new Brd4 inhibitors with submicromolar affinity were also discovered. Brd4 hits were validated in a thermal stability assay and potency determined via fluorescence anisotropy. The speed, ease of interpretation, and low protein concentration needed for protein-observed (19)F NMR experiments in a multiprotein format offers a new method to discover and characterize selective ligands for bromodomain-containing proteins.

  11. Chemistry and structure of a host-guest relationship: the power of NMR and X-ray diffraction in tandem.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi-Qiang; Day, Victor W; Bowman-James, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    An amine/amide mixed covalent organic tetrahedral cage 1 (H(12)) was synthesized and characterized. The H(12) cage contains 12 amide NH groups plus four tertiary amine N groups, the latter of which are positioned in a pseudo-tetrahedral array. Crystallographic findings indicate that the tetrahedral host can adopt either a pseudo-C(3) symmetric "compressed tetrahedron" structure, or one in which there are two sets of three stacked pyridine units related by a pseudo-S(4) axis. The latter conformation is ideal for encapsulating small pentameric clusters, either a water molecule or a fluoride ion surrounded by a tetrahedral array of water molecules, i.e., H(2)O·4H(2)O or F(-)·4H(2)O, as observed crystallographically. In solution, however, (19)F NMR spectroscopy indicates that H(12) encapsulates fluoride ion through direct amide hydrogen bonding. By collectively combining one-dimensional (1)H, (13)C, and (19)F with two-dimensional (1)H-(1)H COSY, (1)H-(13)C HSQC, and (1)H-(19)F HETCOR NMR techniques, the solution binding mode of fluoride can be ascertained as consisting of four sets of independent structural subunits with C(3) symmetry. A complex deuterium exchange process for the fluoride complex can also be unraveled by multiple NMR techniques.

  12. Chemical-shift-resolved ¹⁹F NMR spectroscopy between 13.5 and 135 MHz: Overhauser-DNP-enhanced diagonal suppressed correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    George, Christy; Chandrakumar, Narayanan

    2014-08-01

    Overhauser-DNP-enhanced homonuclear 2D (19)F correlation spectroscopy with diagonal suppression is presented for small molecules in the solution state at moderate fields. Multi-frequency, multi-radical studies demonstrate that these relatively low-field experiments may be operated with sensitivity rivalling that of standard 200-1000 MHz NMR spectroscopy. Structural information is accessible without a sensitivity penalty, and diagonal suppressed 2D NMR correlations emerge despite the general lack of multiplet resolution in the 1D ODNP spectra. This powerful general approach avoids the rather stiff excitation, detection, and other special requirements of high-field (19)F NMR spectroscopy.

  13. 19F nuclear spin relaxation and spin diffusion effects in the single-ion magnet LiYF4:Ho3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, B. Z.; Vanyunin, M. V.; Graf, M. J.; Lago, J.; Borsa, F.; Lascialfari, A.; Tkachuk, A. M.; Barbara, B.

    2008-11-01

    Temperature and magnetic field dependences of the 19F nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in a single crystal of LiYF4 doped with holmium are described by an approach based on a detailed consideration of the magnetic dipole-dipole interactions between nuclei and impurity paramagnetic ions and nuclear spin diffusion processes. The observed non-exponential long time recovery of the nuclear magnetization after saturation at intermediate temperatures is in agreement with predictions of the spin-diffusion theory in a case of the diffusion limited relaxation. At avoided level crossings in the spectrum of electron-nuclear states of Ho3 + ions, rates of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation increase due to quasi-resonant energy exchange between nuclei and paramagnetic ions in contrast to the predominant role played by electronic cross-relaxation processes in the low-frequency ac-susceptibility.

  14. Lewis acid-assisted isotopic 18F-19F exchange in BODIPY dyes: facile generation of positron emission tomography/fluorescence dual modality agents for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanglong; Lin, Tzu-Pin; Li, Dan; Leamer, Lauren; Shan, Hong; Li, Zibo; Gabbaï, François P; Conti, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful technique for imaging biological pathways in vivo, particularly those that are key targets in disease processes. In contrast, fluorescence imaging has demonstrated to be a superior method for image-guided surgery, such as tumor removal. Although the integration of PET and optical imaging could provide an attractive strategy for patient management, there is a significant shortage of established platforms/methods for PET/optical probe construction. In this study, various reaction conditions were explored to develop a simple and fast method allowing for the introduction of [(18)F]-fluoride into BODIPY dyes. Through a systematic optimization of the reaction conditions, we found that BODIPY dyes, including commercial amine-reactive BODIPY succinimidyl esters, may be converted into their radioactive analogues in the matter of minutes via a (18)F-(19)F isotopic exchange reaction promoted by a Lewis acid such as SnCl4. An integrin-targeting RGD peptide was also conjugated with [(18)F]BODIPY® R6G , derived from the commercially available BODIPY® R6G fluorescent tag, to provide a [(18)F]-RGD conjugate in 82% yield. In vivo evaluation of this imaging probe showed a discernible tumor uptake in the U87MG xenograft model. The dual modality imaging properties of the probe was confirmed by ex vivo fluorescence and microPET imaging experiments. In summary, in the matter of minutes, BODIPY dyes were converted into their "hot" radioactive analogues via a (18)F-(19)F isotopic exchange reaction promoted by a Lewis acid. This approach, which can be applied to commercial BODIPY dyes, provides easy access to positron emission tomography/fluorescence dual modality imaging agents. PMID:23471211

  15. Advanced NMR approaches in the characterization of coal. [Quarterly] report No. 9

    SciTech Connect

    Maciel, G.E.

    1992-12-31

    A considerable effort in this project during the past few months has been focussed on the development of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR imaging techniques to yield spatially-resolved chemical shift (structure) information on coal. In order to yield the chemical shift information, a solid-state NMR imaging technique must include magic-angle spinning, so rotating gradient capabilities are indicated. A {sup 13}C MAS imaging probe and a {sup 1}H MAS imaging probe and the circuitry necessary for rotating gradients have been designed and constructed. The {sup 1}H system has already produced promising preliminary results, which are briefly described in this report.

  16. The evaluation of different MAS techniques at low spinning rates in aqueous samples and in the presence of magnetic susceptibility gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi Hu, Jian; Wind, Robert A.

    2002-11-01

    It was recently demonstrated that the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) linewidths for stationary biological samples are dictated mainly by magnetic susceptibility gradients, and that phase-altered spinning sideband (PASS) and phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) solid-state NMR techniques employing slow and ultra-slow magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies can be used to overcome the static susceptibility broadening to yield high-resolution, spinning sideband (SSB)-free 1H NMR spectra [Magn. Reson. Med. 46 (2001) 213; 47 (2002) 829]. An additional concern is that molecular diffusion in the presence of the susceptibility gradients may limit the minimum useful MAS frequency by broadening the lines and reducing SSB suppression at low spinning frequencies. In this article the performance of PASS, PHORMAT, total sideband suppression (TOSS), and standard MAS techniques were evaluated as a function of spinning frequency. To this end, 300 MHz (7.05 T) 1H NMR spectra were acquired via PASS, TOSS, PHORMAT, and standard MAS NMR techniques for a 230-μm-diameter spherical glass bead pack saturated with water. The resulting strong magnetic susceptibility gradients result in a static linewidth of about 3.7 kHz that is larger than observed for a natural biological sample, constituting a worst-case scenario for examination of susceptibility broadening effects. Results: (I) TOSS produces a distorted centerband and fails in suppressing the SSBs at a spinning rate below ˜1 kHz. (II) Standard MAS requires spinning speeds above a few hundred Hz to separate the centerband from the SSBs. (III) PASS produces nearly SSB-free spectra at spinning speeds as low as 30 Hz, and is only limited by T2-induced signal losses. (IV) With PHORMAT, a SSB-free isotropic projection is obtained at any spinning rate, even at an ultra-slow spinning rate as slow as 1 Hz. (V) It is found empirically that the width of the isotropic peak is proportional to F- x, where F is the spinning frequency, and x

  17. X-ray CT and NMR imaging of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.

    1986-03-01

    In little more than a decade, X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging have become the premier modalities of medical radiology. Both of these imaging techniques also promise to be useful tools in petrophysics and reservoir engineering, because CT and NMR can nondestructively image a host of physical and chemical properties of porous rocks and multiple fluid phases contained within their pores. The images are taken within seconds to minutes, at reservoir temperatures and pressures, with spatial resolution on the millimeter and submillimeter level. The physical properties imaged by the two techniques are complementary. CT images bulk density and effective atomic number. NMR images the nuclide concentration, M/sub 0/, of a variety of nuclei (/sup 1/H, /sup 19/F, /sup 23/Na, /sup 31/P, etc.), their longitudinal and transverse relaxation-time curves (t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/), and their chemical shift spectra. In rocks, CT images both rock matrix and pore fluids, while NMR images only mobile fluids and the interactions of these mobile fluids with the confining surfaces of the pores.

  18. Protein structure determination with paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2013-09-17

    Many structures of the proteins and protein assemblies that play central roles in fundamental biological processes and disease pathogenesis are not readily accessible via the conventional techniques of single-crystal X-ray diffraction and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the other hand, many of these challenging biological systems are suitable targets for atomic-level structural and dynamic analysis by magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that has far less stringent limitations on the molecular size and crystalline state. Over the past decade, major advances in instrumentation and methodology have prompted rapid growth in the field of biological solid-state NMR. However, despite this progress, one challenge for the elucidation of three-dimensional (3D) protein structures via conventional MAS NMR methods is the relative lack of long-distance data. Specifically, extracting unambiguous interatomic distance restraints larger than ∼5 Å from through-space magnetic dipole-dipole couplings among the protein (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei has proven to be a considerable challenge for researchers. It is possible to circumvent this problem by extending the structural studies to include several analogs of the protein of interest, intentionally modified to contain covalently attached paramagnetic tags at selected sites. In these paramagnetic proteins, the hyperfine couplings between the nuclei and unpaired electrons can manifest themselves in NMR spectra in the form of relaxation enhancements of the nuclear spins that depend on the electron-nucleus distance. These effects can be significant for nuclei located up to ∼20 Å away from the paramagnetic center. In this Account, we discuss MAS NMR structural studies of nitroxide and EDTA-Cu(2+) labeled variants of a model 56 amino acid globular protein, B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1), in the microcrystalline solid phase. We used a set of six EDTA-Cu(2

  19. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  20. Discrimination of Basal Cell Carcinoma from Normal Skin Tissue Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Je-Ho; Lee, Heonho; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Shukmann

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating the metabolism of various cancers. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer. However, to our knowledge, data on metabolic profiling of BCC have not been reported in the literature. The objective of the present study was to investigate the metabolic profiling of cutaneous BCC using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity of histopathologically confirmed BCC tissues and normal skin tissue (NST) samples. The metabolic intensity normalized to the total spectral intensities in BCC and NST was compared, and multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Univariate analysis revealed 9 metabolites that showed statistically significant difference between BCC and NST. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with the HR-MAS NMR metabolic profiles revealed a clear separation of BCC from NST. The receiver operating characteristic curve generated from the results revealed an excellent discrimination of BCC from NST with an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.961. The present study demonstrated that the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity differ between BCC and NST, and that HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of BCC. PMID:26934749

  1. Discrimination of Basal Cell Carcinoma from Normal Skin Tissue Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mun, Je-Ho; Lee, Heonho; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Shukmann

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating the metabolism of various cancers. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer. However, to our knowledge, data on metabolic profiling of BCC have not been reported in the literature. The objective of the present study was to investigate the metabolic profiling of cutaneous BCC using HR-MAS (1)H NMR spectroscopy. HR-MAS (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity of histopathologically confirmed BCC tissues and normal skin tissue (NST) samples. The metabolic intensity normalized to the total spectral intensities in BCC and NST was compared, and multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Univariate analysis revealed 9 metabolites that showed statistically significant difference between BCC and NST. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with the HR-MAS NMR metabolic profiles revealed a clear separation of BCC from NST. The receiver operating characteristic curve generated from the results revealed an excellent discrimination of BCC from NST with an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.961. The present study demonstrated that the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity differ between BCC and NST, and that HR-MAS (1)H NMR spectroscopy can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of BCC. PMID:26934749

  2. Solid State NMR Studies of the Aluminum Hydride Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Son-Jong; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Graetz, Jason; Reilly, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Several solid state NMR techniques including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various AlH3 samples. MAS-NMR spectra for the 1H and 27Al nuclei have been obtained on a variety of AlH3 samples that include the (beta)- and (gamma)- phases as well as the most stable (alpha)-phase. While the dominant components in these NMR spectra correspond to the aluminum hydride phases, other species were found that include Al metal, molecular hydrogen (H2), as well as peaks that can be assigned to Al-O species in different configurations. The occurrence and concentration of these extraneous components are dependent upon the initial AlH3 phase composition and preparation procedures. Both the (beta)-AlH3 and (gamma)-AlH3 phases were found to generate substantial amounts of Al metal when the materials were stored at room temperature while the (alpha)-phase materials do not exhibit these changes.

  3. In-situ analysis and quantification of swelling kinetics in glassy and rubbery networks using [sup 1]H and [sup 19]F magnetic resonance microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, G.D.; Botto, R.E. . Chemistry Div.)

    1994-04-25

    [sup 1]H and [sup 19]F magnetic resonance microscopies are used to determine the characteristics of diffusion in four different network-solvent systems. Transport of methanol in poly(ethyl methacrylate) (PEMA) and pyridine in coal is explored and compared with Fickian transport of toluene in polybutadiene rubber (PBD) and hexafluorobenzene in poly(methyl silicone) (PMS). These former two systems are characterized by sharp solvent fronts which propagate into the cores of the samples at a constant velocity. The swelling kinetics are quantified by applying a simple model which couples the kinetics of solvent diffusion to a second-order phase transition which induces network relaxation. Parameterization is accomplished with two kinetic terms and one thermodynamic parameter. These are a mass-fixed glassy diffusion coefficient, a network relaxation constant, and a critical concentration corresponding to the concentration of solvent necessary to induce a glass to rubber transition. Solvent from velocities, obtained through magnetic resonance microscopy, are used with independently derived critical concentrations to calculate the glassy diffusion coefficient and network relaxation rate constant. Kinetic swelling data are then fit with theoretical uptake curves computed using these parameters. A high-quality fit demonstrates that the proposed model successfully quantifies non-Fickian transport using a small number of physical based dynamic parameters.

  4. Solid-state NMR structures of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR is unique for its ability to obtain three-dimensional structures and to measure atomic-resolution structural and dynamic information for membrane proteins in native lipid bilayers. An increasing number and complexity of integral membrane protein structures have been determined by solid-state NMR using two main methods. Oriented sample solid-state NMR uses macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers to obtain orientational restraints that define secondary structure and global fold of embedded peptides and proteins and their orientation and topology in lipid bilayers. Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR uses unoriented rapidly spinning samples to obtain distance and torsion angle restraints that define tertiary structure and helix packing arrangements. Details of all current protein structures are described, highlighting developments in experimental strategy and other technological advancements. Some structures originate from combining solid- and solution-state NMR information and some have used solid-state NMR to refine X-ray crystal structures. Solid-state NMR has also validated the structures of proteins determined in different membrane mimetics by solution-state NMR and X-ray crystallography and is therefore complementary to other structural biology techniques. By continuing efforts in identifying membrane protein targets and developing expression, isotope labelling and sample preparation strategies, probe technology, NMR experiments, calculation and modelling methods and combination with other techniques, it should be feasible to determine the structures of many more membrane proteins of biological and biomedical importance using solid-state NMR. This will provide three-dimensional structures and atomic-resolution structural information for characterising ligand and drug interactions, dynamics and molecular mechanisms of membrane proteins under physiological lipid bilayer conditions.

  5. Solid-state NMR structures of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR is unique for its ability to obtain three-dimensional structures and to measure atomic-resolution structural and dynamic information for membrane proteins in native lipid bilayers. An increasing number and complexity of integral membrane protein structures have been determined by solid-state NMR using two main methods. Oriented sample solid-state NMR uses macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers to obtain orientational restraints that define secondary structure and global fold of embedded peptides and proteins and their orientation and topology in lipid bilayers. Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR uses unoriented rapidly spinning samples to obtain distance and torsion angle restraints that define tertiary structure and helix packing arrangements. Details of all current protein structures are described, highlighting developments in experimental strategy and other technological advancements. Some structures originate from combining solid- and solution-state NMR information and some have used solid-state NMR to refine X-ray crystal structures. Solid-state NMR has also validated the structures of proteins determined in different membrane mimetics by solution-state NMR and X-ray crystallography and is therefore complementary to other structural biology techniques. By continuing efforts in identifying membrane protein targets and developing expression, isotope labelling and sample preparation strategies, probe technology, NMR experiments, calculation and modelling methods and combination with other techniques, it should be feasible to determine the structures of many more membrane proteins of biological and biomedical importance using solid-state NMR. This will provide three-dimensional structures and atomic-resolution structural information for characterising ligand and drug interactions, dynamics and molecular mechanisms of membrane proteins under physiological lipid bilayer conditions. PMID:26857803

  6. Measurement of the {sup 19}F(p,{gamma}){sup 20}Ne reaction and interference terms from E{sub c.m.}=200-760 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, A.; Beard, M.; Couder, M.; Goerres, J.; Lamm, L.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Lee, H. Y.; O'Brien, S.; Palumbo, A.; Stech, E.; Strandberg, E.; Tan, W.; Uberseder, E.; Ugalde, C.; Wiescher, M.; Azuma, R.

    2008-01-15

    The {sup 19}F(p,{gamma}){sup 20}Ne reaction represents the only breakout path for the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle operating at temperatures below T=0.1 GK, an energy regime important for main-sequence hydrogen burning as well as hydrogen burning in asymptotic giant branch stars. Large experimental uncertainties exist due to unknown low energy direct and resonant reaction contributions that have been difficult to study because of the high {gamma}-ray background from the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{sub 2}{gamma}) reaction. A new detection technique has been developed at the University of Notre Dame to measure the {sup 19}F(p,{gamma}) and {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{sub i}{gamma}) reactions over an energy range of E{sub c.m.}=200-760 keV. The analysis was carried out in a Breit-Wigner framework. This allowed a new determination of the resonance parameters as well as a first measurement of the signs of the interference terms. Partial widths and resonance strengths are reported for the resonances in this region.

  7. Studies on metabolic regulation using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, H; Badar-Goffer, R; Ben-Yoseph, O; Morris, P; Thatcher, N

    1993-01-01

    The effects of hypoxia and hypoglycaemia on cerebral metabolism and calcium have been studied using multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. 13C MRS showed that severe hypoxia did not cause any further increase in metabolic flux into lactate seen in mild hypoxia, but there was a further increase in 13C labelling of alanine and glycerol 3-phosphate. These results are discussed in terms of the ability of lactate dehydrogenase to maintain normal levels of NADH in mild hypoxia, but not in severe hypoxia. We conclude that glycerol 3-phosphate and alanine may provide novel means of monitoring severe hypoxia whereas lactate is a reliable indicator only of mild hypoxia. 19F- and 31P NMR spectroscopy showed that neither hypoxia nor hypoglycaemia alone caused any significant change in [Ca2+]i. Combined sequential insults (hypoxia, followed by hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia), or vice versa, produced a 100% increase in [Ca2+]i, whereas immediate exposure to the combined insult (hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia) resulted in a large 5-fold increase in [Ca2+]i, with severe irreversible effects on the energy state. These results are discussed in terms of metabolic adaptation to the single type of insult, which renders the tissue less vulnerable to the combined insult. The effects of this combined insult are far more severe than those caused by glutamate or NMDA, which throws doubt on the current excitoxic hypothesis of cell damage.

  8. Solid State FT-IR and (31)P NMR Spectral Features of Phosphate Compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solid-state spectroscopic techniques, including Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and solid-state 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopies, are powerful tools for evaluating metal speciation and transformation mechanisms of P compounds in the environment. Studie...

  9. NMR study of crystallization in MgO-CaO-SiO 2-P 2O 5 glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hai-Lan; Yue, Yong; Ye, Chao-Hui; Guo, Li-Ping; Lei, Jia-Heng

    1998-08-01

    29Si and 31P magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements were employed to investigate crystallization in MgO-CaO-SiO 2-P 2O 5 bioglass-ceramics. The results suggest that wollastonite (β-CaSiO 3) is separated as a new crystalline phase, corresponding to the appearance of a sharp signal in the 29Si MAS NMR spectra, while oxyapatite (Ca 10(PO 4) 6O) forms in the process of the order of the phosphorus-rich phases increasing as a whole, corresponding to the gradual narrowing of 31P MAS NMR spectra. ZnO can make the glass stable and difficult to crystallize at a low temperature, while at a high temperature, ZnO can participate in the crystallization of β-CaSiO 3 and promote it.

  10. Sodium ion effect on silk fibroin conformation characterized by solid-state NMR and generalized 2D NMR NMR correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qing-Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated Na + ion effect on the silk fibroin (SF) conformation. Samples are Na +-involved regenerated silk fibroin films. 13C CP-MAS NMR demonstrates that as added [Na +] increases, partial silk fibroin conformation transit from helix-form to β-form at certain Na + ion concentration which is much higher than that in Bombyx mori silkworm gland. The generalized two-dimensional NMR-NMR correlation analysis reveals that silk fibroin undergoes several intermediate states during its conformation transition process as [Na +] increase. The appearance order of the intermediates is followed as: helix and/or random coil → helix-like → β-sheet-like → β-sheet, which is the same as that produced by pH decrease from 6.8 to 4.8 in the resultant regenerated silk fibroin films. The binding sites of Na + to silk fibroin might involve the carbonyl oxygen atom of certain amino acids sequence which could promote the formation of β-sheet conformation. Since the Na +sbnd O bond is weak, the ability of Na + inducing the secondary structure transition is weaker than those of Ca 2+, Cu 2+ and even K +. It is maybe a reason why the sodium content is much lower than potassium in the silkworm gland.

  11. Ion counting in supercapacitor electrodes using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Wang, Hao; Trease, Nicole M; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2014-01-01

    (19)F NMR spectroscopy has been used to study the local environments of anions in supercapacitor electrodes and to quantify changes in the populations of adsorbed species during charging. In the absence of an applied potential, anionic species adsorbed within carbon micropores (in-pore) are distinguished from those in large mesopores and spaces between particles (ex-pore) by a characteristic nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS). Adsorption experiments and two-dimensional exchange experiments confirm that anions are in dynamic equilibrium between the in- and ex-pore environments with an exchange rate in the order of tens of Hz. (19)F in situ NMR spectra recorded at different charge states reveal changes in the intensity and NICS of the in-pore resonances, which are interpreted in term of changes in the population and local environments of the adsorbed anions that arise due to the charge-storage process. A comparison of the results obtained for a range of electrolytes reveals that several factors influence the charging mechanism. For a tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate electrolyte, positive polarisation of the electrode is found to proceed by anion adsorption at a low concentration, whereas increased ion exchange plays a more important role for a high concentration electrolyte. In contrast, negative polarization of the electrode proceeds by cation adsorption for both concentrations. For a tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate electrolyte, anion expulsion is observed in the negative charging regime; this is attributed to the reduced mobility and/or access of the larger cations inside the pores, which forces the expulsion of anions in order to build up ionic charge. Significant anion expulsion is also observed in the negative charging regime for alkali metal bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide electrolytes, suggesting that more subtle factors also affect the charging mechanism.

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from patients with community-acquired pneumonia and molecular analysis of multidrug-resistant serotype 19F and 23F strains in Japan.

    PubMed

    Qin, L; Watanabe, H; Yoshimine, H; Guio, H; Watanabe, K; Kawakami, K; Iwagaki, A; Nagai, H; Goto, H; Kuriyama, T; Fukuchi, Y; Matsushima, T; Kudoh, S; Shimada, K; Matsumoto, K; Nagatake, T; Mizota, T; Oishi, K

    2006-12-01

    A nationwide study was undertaken to determine the susceptibility to penicillin and serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Japan. S. pneumoniae was isolated from 114 adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia over 22 months at 20 hospitals and medical centres in different regions in Japan. All but five isolates were from sputum. Forty-eight isolates (42.1%) were susceptible, 40 (35.1%) showed intermediate resistance (MIC, 0.12-1.0 microg/ml) and 26 (22.8%) were resistant (MIC, >or=2.0 microg/ml) to penicillin G. All isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone (breakpoint 1 microg/ml), imipenem (4 microg/ml) and vancomycin (4 microg/ml). Most were resistant to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin; only two were resistant to levofloxacin. Differences were found in the distribution of serotypes among isolates showing susceptibility to penicillin (predominant types 3, 6B, and 19F), intermediate resistance (6B, 14, 19F, and 23F) and full resistance (19F and 23F). PFGE typing showed that 14 of the 25 strains of serotype 19F had a single DNA profile, pattern A, a pattern closely similar to that of the Taiwan multidrug-resistant 19F clone. Twelve pattern A strains were not susceptible to penicillin but carried the macrolide resistance gene mef(A). The DNA profiles of the 15 strains of 23F were also heterogeneous but six were highly similar (pattern b) yet distinct from the Spanish multidrug-resistant 23F clone although possibly related to the Taiwan multidrug-resistant 23F clone. The pattern b strains were not susceptible to penicillin and also harboured either mef(A) or erm(B). Our results indicate that multidrug-resistant pneumococci are spreading rapidly in Japan. Efforts to prevent the spread of the pandemic multidrug-resistant serotypes should be intensified. PMID:16650327

  13. Conformation and topology of diacylglycerol kinase in E.coli membranes revealed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanke; Zhang, Zhengfeng; Tang, Xinqi; Li, Jianping; Glaubitz, Clemens; Yang, Jun

    2014-05-26

    Solid-state NMR is a powerful tool for studying membrane proteins in a native-like lipid environment. 3D magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR was employed to characterize the structure of E.coli diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) reconstituted into its native E.coli lipid membranes. The secondary structure and topology of DAGK revealed by solid-state NMR are different from those determined by solution-state NMR and X-ray crystallography. This study provides a good example for demonstrating the influence of membrane environments on the structure of membrane proteins.

  14. Uptake and washout of borocaptate sodium and borono-phenylalanine in cultured melanoma cells: a multi-nuclear NMR study.

    PubMed

    Panov, V; Salomon, Y; Kabalka, G W; Bendel, P

    2000-07-01

    The cellular uptake and washout of the two principal boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agents, borocaptate sodium (BSH) and borono-phenylalanine (BPA), were monitored on-line, noninvasively, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The uptake and washout of inorganic borate (B(i)) was also followed for comparison. M2R mouse melanoma cells grown on polystyrene microspheres were perfused inside the NMR sample tube. (11)B NMR was used to detect the presence of B(i), BSH and BPA, and (19)F NMR was applied to detect fluorinated BPA ((19)F-BPA). The results revealed chemical modifications of BSH due to spontaneous formation of the borocaptate dimer, BSSB, in the culture medium. BPA readily formed a complex with glucose contained in the culture medium but was also converted in the cells to a yet unidentified compound in a reaction that probably involves the hydrolysis of BPA and the release of B(i). The cellular accumulation ratio for BPA was significantly higher than 1 and was also significantly higher than that for BSH. On the other hand, the cellular retention time observed for BSH was much longer than for BPA, indicating a strong trapping of BSH in cells.

  15. Accurate heteronuclear J-coupling measurements in dilute spin systems using the multiple-quantum filtered J-resolved experiment.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Charlotte; Fayon, Franck; Legein, Christophe; Buzaré, Jean-Yves; Silly, Gilles; Massiot, Dominique

    2007-07-14

    A new solid-state MAS NMR experiment is proposed to accurately measure heteronuclear (19)F-(207)Pb J-coupling constants, even though these couplings are not visible on high speed (19)F 1D MAS spectra; in particular, we demonstrate that the J-resolved experiment combined with scalar multiple-quantum filtering considerably improves the resolution of J-multiplet patterns for dilute spin systems. PMID:17594032

  16. Solid-state NMR studies of theophylline co-crystals with dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Pindelska, Edyta; Sokal, Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-11-01

    In this work, three polycrystalline materials containing co-crystals of theophylline with malonic, maleic, and glutaric acids were studied using (13)C, (15)N and (1)H solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. The NMR assignments were supported by gauge including projector augmented waves (GIPAW) calculations of chemical shielding, performed using X-ray determined geometry. The experimental (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR results and the calculated isotropic chemical shifts were in excellent agreement. A rapid and convenient method for theophylline co-crystals crystal structure analysis has been proposed for co-crystals, which are potentially new APIs.

  17. Cross ambiguity functions on the MasPar MP-2

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.A.; Pryor, D.V.; Frock, C.K.

    1995-12-01

    In a signal processing environment, cross ambiguity functions are often used to detect when one signal is a time and/or frequency shift of another. They consist of multiple cross-correlations, which can be computed efficiently using complex valued FFTs. This paper discusses the implementation of cross ambiguity functions on the MasPar MP-2, a SIMD processor array. Two different implementations are developed. The first computes each cross ambiguity function serially, using FFT code that parallelizes across the complete set of processors. The second uses the MasPar IORAM to realign the data so that the cross ambiguity functions can be computed in parallel. In this case, multiple FFTs are executed in parallel on subsets of the processors, which lowers the overall amount of communication required.

  18. Closed-cycle cold helium magic-angle spinning for sensitivity-enhanced multi-dimensional solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yoh; Nakamura, Shinji; Fukui, Shigeo; Suematsu, Hiroto; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2015-10-01

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR is a powerful tool for studying molecular structure and dynamics, but suffers from its low sensitivity. Here, we developed a novel helium-cooling MAS NMR probe system adopting a closed-loop gas recirculation mechanism. In addition to the sensitivity gain due to low temperature, the present system has enabled highly stable MAS (vR=4-12 kHz) at cryogenic temperatures (T=35-120 K) for over a week without consuming helium at a cost for electricity of 16 kW/h. High-resolution 1D and 2D data were recorded for a crystalline tri-peptide sample at T=40 K and B0=16.4 T, where an order of magnitude of sensitivity gain was demonstrated versus room temperature measurement. The low-cost and long-term stable MAS strongly promotes broader application of the brute-force sensitivity-enhanced multi-dimensional MAS NMR, as well as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced NMR in a temperature range lower than 100 K.

  19. Action of the multifunctional peptide BP100 on native biomembranes examined by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Misiewicz, Julia; Afonin, Sergii; Grage, Stephan L; van den Berg, Jonas; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-04-01

    Membrane composition is a key factor that regulates the destructive activity of antimicrobial peptides and the non-leaky permeation of cell penetrating peptides in vivo. Hence, the choice of model membrane is a crucial aspect in NMR studies and should reflect the biological situation as closely as possible. Here, we explore the structure and dynamics of the short multifunctional peptide BP100 using a multinuclear solid-state NMR approach. The membrane alignment and mobility of this 11 amino acid peptide was studied in various synthetic lipid bilayers with different net charge, fluidity, and thickness, as well as in native biomembranes harvested from prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. (19)F-NMR provided the high sensitivity and lack of natural abundance background that are necessary to observe a labelled peptide even in protoplast membranes from Micrococcus luteus and in erythrocyte ghosts. Six selectively (19)F-labeled BP100 analogues gave remarkably similar spectra in all of the macroscopically oriented membrane systems, which were studied under quasi-native conditions of ambient temperature and full hydration. This similarity suggests that BP100 has the same surface-bound helical structure and high mobility in the different biomembranes and model membranes alike, independent of charge, thickness or cholesterol content of the system. (31)P-NMR spectra of the phospholipid components did not indicate any bilayer perturbation, so the formation of toroidal wormholes or micellarization can be excluded as a mechanism of its antimicrobial or cell penetrating action. However, (2)H-NMR analysis of the acyl chain order parameter profiles showed that BP100 leads to considerable membrane thinning and thereby local destabilization.

  20. Commercial facility site selection simulating based on MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yi; Li, Qingquan; Zheng, Guizhou

    2008-10-01

    The location of commercial facility decides the benefit of the operator to a large degree. Existing location methods can express the static relationships between site selection result and location factors, but there still are some limites when express the dynamic and uncertain relationship between them. Hence, a dynamic, stochastic and forecastable location model should be built which can introduce the customer's behavior into the model and combine the macro pattern and micro spatial interaction. So the authors proposes Geosim-LM based on MAS. Geosim-LM has 3 kinds of agents, CustAgent, SiteAgent and GovAgent. They represent the customers, commercial fercilities and government. The land type, land price and traffic are the model environment. Then Geosim-LM is applied in the bank branches site evaluation and selection in Liwan district, Guangzhou. In existing bank branches site evaluation, there are 70% consistent in score grade between result of Geosim-LM after 200 round runing and actual rebust location. It proves the model is reliable and feasible. The conclusions can be get from the paper. MAS have advantages in location choice than existed methods. The result of Geosim-LM running can powerfully proves that building location model based on MAS is feasible.

  1. High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H-NMR Metabolic Profiling of Nanoliter Biological Tissues at High Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Ju; Hu, Jian Z.; Burton, Sarah D.; Hoyt, David W.

    2013-03-05

    It is demonstrated that a high resolution magic angle spinning 1H-NMR spectrum of biological tissue samples with volumes as small as 150 nanoliters, or 0.15 mg in weight, can be acquired in a few minutes at 21.1 T magnetic field using a commercial 1.6 mm fast-MAS probe with minor modification of the MAS rotor. The strategies of sealing the samples inside the MAS rotor to avoid fluid leakage as well as the ways of optimizing the signal to noise are discussed.

  2. Probing Structure and Dynamics of Protein Assemblies by Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Si; Suiter, Christopher L.; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2013-01-01

    CONSPECTUS In living organisms, biological molecules often organize into multi-component complexes. Such assemblies consist of various proteins and carry out essential functions, ranging from cell division, transport, and energy transduction to catalysis, signaling, and viral infectivity. To understand the biological functions of these assemblies, in both healthy and disease states, researchers need to study their three-dimensional architecture and molecular dynamics. To date, the large size, the lack of inherent long-range order, and insolubility have made atomic-resolution studies of many protein assemblies challenging or impractical using traditional structural biology methods such as X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy. In the past ten years, we have focused our work on the development and application of magic angle spinning solid-state NMR (MAS NMR) methods to characterize large protein assemblies at atomic-level resolution. In this Account, we discuss the rapid progress in the field of MAS NMR spectroscopy, citing work from our laboratory and others on methodological developments that have facilitated the in-depth analysis of biologically important protein assemblies. We emphasize techniques that yield enhanced sensitivity and resolution, such as fast MAS (spinning frequencies of 40 kHz and above) and non-uniform sampling protocols for data acquisition and processing. We also discuss the experiments for gaining distance restraints and for recoupling anisotropic tensorial interactions under fast MAS conditions. We give an overview of sample preparation approaches when working with protein assemblies. Following the overview of contemporary MAS NMR methods, we present case studies into the structure and dynamics of two classes of biological systems under investigation in our laboratory. We will first turn our attention to cytoskeletal microtubule motor proteins including mammalian dynactin and dynein light chain 8. We will then discuss protein

  3. In Vivo Detection of the Cyclic Osmoregulated Periplasmic Glucan of Ralstonia solanacearum by High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieruszeski, J.-M.; Bohin, A.; Bohin, J.-P.; Lippens, G.

    2001-07-01

    We investigate the mobility of the osmoregulated periplasmic glucans of Ralstonia solanacearum in the bacterial periplasm through the use of high-resolution (HR) NMR spectroscopy under static and magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. Because the nature of periplasm is far from an isotropic aqueous solution, the molecules could be freely diffusing or rather associated to a periplasmic protein, a membrane protein, a lipid, or the peptidoglycan. HR MAS NMR spectroscopy leads to more reproducible results and allows the in vivo detection and characterization of the complex molecule.

  4. Bulk magnetization and 1H NMR spectra of magnetically heterogeneous model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, E M; Bud' ko, S L

    2011-04-28

    Bulk magnetization and ¹H static and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of two magnetically heterogeneous model systems based on laponite (LAP) layered silicate or polystyrene (PS) with low and high proton concentration, respectively, and ferrimagnetic Fe₂O₃ nano- or micro-particles have been studied. In LAP+Fe₂O₃, a major contribution to the NMR signal broadening is due to the dipolar coupling between the magnetic moments of protons and magnetic particles. In PS+Fe₂O₃, due to the higher proton concentration in polystyrene and stronger proton–proton dipolar coupling, an additional broadening is observed, i.e. ¹H MAS NMR spectra of magnetically heterogeneous systems are sensitive to both proton–magnetic particles and proton–proton dipolar couplings. An increase of the volume magnetization by ~1 emu/cm³ affects the ¹H NMR signal width in a way that is similar to an increase of the proton concentration by ~2×10²²/cm³. ¹H MAS NMR spectra, along with bulk magnetization measurements, allow the accurate determination of the hydrogen concentration in magnetically heterogeneous systems.

  5. An advanced NMR protocol for the structural characterization of aluminophosphate glasses.

    PubMed

    van Wüllen, Leo; Tricot, Grégory; Wegner, Sebastian

    2007-10-01

    In this work a combination of complementary advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategies is employed to analyse the network organization in aluminophosphate glasses to an unprecedented level of detailed insight. The combined results from MAS, MQMAS and (31)P-{(27)Al}-CP-heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy (HETCOR) NMR experiments allow for a detailed speciation of the different phosphate and aluminate species present in the glass. The interconnection of these local building units to an extended three-dimensional network is explored employing heteronuclear dipolar and scalar NMR approaches to quantify P-O-Al connectivity by (31)P{(27)Al}-heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC), -rotational echo adiabatic passage double resonance (REAPDOR) and -HETCOR NMR as well as (27)Al{(31)P}-rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) NMR experiments, complemented by (31)P-2D-J-RESolved MAS NMR experiments to probe P-O-P connectivity utilizing the through bond scalar J-coupling. The combination of the results from the various NMR approaches enables us to not only quantify the phosphate units present in the glass but also to identify their respective structural environments within the three-dimensional network on a medium length scale employing a modified Q notation, Q(n)(m),(AlO)(x), where n denotes the number of connected tetrahedral phosphate, m gives the number of aluminate species connected to a central phosphate unit and x specifies the nature of the bonded aluminate species (i.e. 4, 5 or 6 coordinate aluminium).

  6. Study of the ferroelastic phase transition in the tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H5)4]2ZnBr4 by magic-angle spinning and static NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-03-01

    The ferroelastic phase transition of tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H5)4]2ZnBr4 at the phase transition temperature (TC) = 283 K was characterized by magic-angle spinning (MAS) and static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and confirmed by optical polarizing spectroscopy. The structural geometry near TC was studied in terms of the chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation times T1ρ in the rotating frame for 1H MAS NMR and 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR. The two inequivalent ethyl groups were distinguishable in the 13C NMR spectrum, and the T1ρ results indicate that they undergo tumbling motion above TC in a coupled manner. From the 14N NMR results, the two nitrogen nuclei in the N(C2H5)4+ ions were distinguishable above TC, and the splitting in the spectra below TC was related to the ferroelastic domains with different orientations.

  7. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  8. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  9. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  10. NMR studies of metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Sun, Hongzhe

    2012-01-01

    Metalloproteins represent a large share of the proteomes, with the intrinsic metal ions providing catalytic, regulatory, and structural roles critical to protein functions. Structural characterization of metalloproteins and identification of metal coordination features including numbers and types of ligands and metal-ligand geometry, and mapping the structural and dynamic changes upon metal binding are significant for understanding biological functions of metalloproteins. NMR spectroscopy has long been used as an invaluable tool for structure and dynamic studies of macromolecules. Here we focus on the application of NMR spectroscopy in characterization of metalloproteins, including structural studies and identification of metal coordination spheres by hetero-/homo-nuclear metal NMR spectroscopy. Paramagnetic NMR as well as (13)C directly detected protonless NMR spectroscopy will also be addressed for application to paramagnetic metalloproteins. Moreover, these techniques offer great potential for studies of other non-metal binding macromolecules.

  11. Hexameric Capsules Studied by Magic Angle Spinning Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Identifying Solvent Molecules in Pyrogallol[4]arene Capsules.

    PubMed

    Avram, Liat; Goldbourt, Amir; Cohen, Yoram

    2016-01-18

    Powders of pyrogallol[4]arene hexamers were produced by evaporation from organic solvents and were studied, for the first time, by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR (MAS ssNMR). Evaporation selectively removed non-encapsulated solvent molecules leaving stable hexameric capsules encapsulating solvent molecules. After exposure of the powder to solvent vapors, (1)H/(13)C heteronuclear correlation MAS ssNMR experiments were used to assign the signals of the external and encapsulated solvent molecules. The formed capsules were stable for months and the process of solvent encapsulation was reversible. According to the ssNMR experiments, the encapsulated solvent molecules occupy different sites and those sites differ in their mobility. The presented approach paves the way for studying guest exchange, guest affinity, and gas storage in hexamers of this type in the solid state.

  12. NMR methods in combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, M J; Wareing, J R

    1998-06-01

    The use of NMR spectroscopy in combinatorial chemistry has provided a versatile tool for monitoring combinatorial chemistry reactions and for assessing ligand-receptor interactions. The application of magic angle spinning NMR is widespread and has allowed structure determination to be performed on compounds attached to solid supports. A variety of two-dimensional NMR techniques have been applied to enhance the usability of the magic angle spinning NMR data. New developments for solution NMR analysis include high performance liquid chromatography, NMR, mass spectroscopy and flow NMR. NMR based methods currently being investigated may prove valuable as compound screening tools.

  13. Solid-State NMR Identification and Quantification of Newly Formed Aluminosilicate Phases in Weathered Kaolinite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Crosson, Garry S.; Choi, Sunkyung; Chorover, Jon; Amistadi, Mary K.; O'Day, Peggy A.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-01-19

    The weathering of a specimen kaolinite clay was studied over the course of 369 d via solid-state 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-field 27Al MAS NMR. The chosen baseline solution conditions (0.05 mol kg-1 of Al, 2 mol kg-1 of Na+, 1 mol kg-1 of NO3 -, 1 mol kg-1 of OH-, and pH ~13.8) approximate those of solutions leaking from waste tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA. Nonradioactive Cs and Sr cations were added to this synthetic tank waste leachate (STWL) solution at concentrations of 10-3, 10-4, and 10-5 molal (m) to represent their radionuclide counterparts. The transformations of silicon- and aluminum-containing solid phase species were monitored quantitatively by using NMR spectroscopy, with the resulting spectra directly reporting the influence of the initial Cs and Sr on formation and transformation of the neo-formed solids. At the lowest concentration of Cs and Sr employed (10-5 m in each cation) peaks consistent with the formation of zeolite-like minerals were detected via 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR as early as 33 d. At concentrations of 10-3 m in each cation, new silicon species are not detected until 93 d, although neophases containing four-coordinate aluminum were detectable at earlier reaction times via 27Al MAS NMR. At the highest magnetic field strengths employed in this NMR study, deconvolutions of resonances detected in the tetrahedral region of the 27Al MAS spectra yielded multiple components, indicating the existence of at least four new aluminum-containing phases. Two of these phases are identified as sodalite and cancrinite through comparison with diffuse-reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectra and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) results, while a third phase may correlate with a previously detected aluminum-rich chabazite phase. All measurable solid reaction products have been quantified via their 27Al MAS resonances acquired at high magnetic field strengths (17.6 T), and the quantitative

  14. NMR characterization of functional groups: 9--isomer ratios of available chloromethylstyrene mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, S. L.; Khune, G. D.; Khatri, N. A.

    1985-01-01

    From the assignments of the 1H and 13C 11.7 tesla NMR spectra of available mixtures of m- and p-chloromethylstyrene, the proportion of the meta and para compounds are easily determined. For these materials from two common commercial sources, proportions of 72 and 28% and 68 and 32% were found. These concentrations are substantially different from the often assumed 60 and 40% for the meta and para compounds, respectively. The influence of this difference on the desired properties of copolymers made from such mixtures is discussed. An alternative quantitative procedure for determining the chloromethyl group isomer ratios is also described which employs silver trifluoroacetate in acetone displacement of chloride and 19F NMR examination of the resulting ester mixture with a 2.3 tesla spectrometer.

  15. Biomolecular solid state NMR with magic-angle spinning at 25 K

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A magic-angle spinning (MAS) probe has been constructed which allows the sample to be cooled with helium, while the MAS bearing and drive gases are nitrogen. The sample can be cooled to 25 K using roughly 3 liters/hour of liquid helium, while the 4 mm diameter rotor spins at 6.7 kHz with good stability (±5 Hz) for many hours. Proton decoupling fields up to at least 130 kHz can be applied. This helium-cooled MAS probe enables a variety of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments on biomolecular solids and other materials at low temperatures, with signal-to-noise proportional to 1/T. We show examples of low-temperature 13C NMR data for two biomolecular samples, namely the peptide Aβ14–23 in the form of amyloid fibrils and the protein HP35 in frozen glycerol/water solution. Issues related to temperature calibration, spin-lattice relaxation at low temperatures, paramagnetic doping of frozen solutions, and 13C MAS NMR linewidths are discussed. PMID:18922715

  16. IN SITU MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING NMR FOR STUDYING GEOLOGICAL CO(2) SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2011-03-27

    Geological carbon sequestration (GCS) is one of the most promising ways of mitigating atmospheric greenhouse gases (1-3). Mineral carbonation reactions are potentially important to the long-term sealing effectiveness of caprock but remain poorly predictable, particularly in low-water supercritical CO2 (scCO2)-dominated environments where the chemistry has not been adequately explored. In situ probes that provide molecular-level information is desirable for investigating mechanisms and rates of GCS mineral carbonation reactions. MAS-NMR is a powerful tool for obtaining detailed molecular structure and dynamics information of a system regardless whether the system is in a solid, a liquid, a gaseous, or a supercritical state, or a mixture thereof (4,5). However, MAS NMR under scCO2 conditions has never been realized due to the tremendous technical difficulties of achieving and maintaining high pressure within a fast spinning MAS rotor (6,7), where non-metal materials must be used. In this work, we report development of a unique high pressure MAS NMR capability, and its application to mineral carbonation chemistry in scCO2 under geologically relevant temperatures and pressures.

  17. NMR study of ferroelastic phase transition of tetramethylammonium tetrabromocobaltate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Kim, Sun Ha

    2016-09-01

    Static and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments were carried out on 1H, 13C, and 14N nuclei in order to understand the structural changes of the N(CH3)4 groups in [N(CH3)4]2CoBr4 near the ferroelastic phase transition temperature TC. The two chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 groups were distinguished using 13C cross-polarization/(CP)MAS and 14N static NMR. The changes in chemical shifts, line intensities, and the spin-lattice relaxation time near TC can be correlated with the changing structural geometry, which underlies the phase transition. The 14N NMR spectra indicated a crystal symmetry change at TC, which is related to the ferroelastic domain with different orientations of the N(CH3)4 groups. The ferroelastic domain walls were confirmed by optical polarizing microscopy, and the wall orientations were described by the Sapriel theory. The transition to the ferroelastic phase was found to be related to the orientational ordering of the N(CH3)4 groups.

  18. Multinuclear NMR studies of relaxor ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Donghua

    Multinuclear NMR of 93Nb, 45Sc, and 207Pb has been carried out to study the structure, disorder, and dynamics of a series of important solid solutions: perovskite relaxor ferroelectric materials (1-x) Pb(Mg1/3Nb 2/3)O3-x Pb(Sc1/2Nb1/2)O 3 (PMN-PSN). 93Nb NMR investigations of the local structure and cation order/disorder are presented as a function of PSN concentration, x. The superb fidelity and accuracy of 3QMAS allows us to make clear and consistent assignments of spectral intensities to the 28 possible nearest B-site neighbor (nBn) configurations, (NMg, NSc, NNb), where each number ranges from 0 to 6 and their sum is 6. For most of the 28 possible nBn configurations, isotropic chemical shifts and quadrupole product constants have been extracted from the data. The seven configurations with only larger cations, Mg 2+ and Sc3+ (and no Nb5+) are assigned to the seven observed narrow peaks, whose deconvoluted intensities facilitate quantitative evaluation of, and differentiation between, different models of B-site (chemical) disorder. The "completely random" model is ruled out and the "random site" model is shown to be in qualitative agreement with the NMR experiments. To obtain quantitative agreement with observed NMR intensities, the random site model is slightly modified by including unlike-pair interaction energies. To date, 45Sc studies have not been as fruitful as 93Nb NMR because the resolution is lower in the 45Sc spectra. The lower resolution of 45Sc spectra is due to a smaller span of isotropic chemical shift (40 ppm for 45Sc vs. 82 ppm for 93Nb) and to the lack of a fortuitous mechanism that simplifies the 93Nb spectra; for 93Nb the overlap of the isotropic chemical shifts of 6-Sc and 6-Nb configurations results in the alignment of all the 28 configurations along only seven quadrupole distribution axes. Finally we present variable temperature 207Pb static, MAS, and 2D-PASS NMR studies. Strong linear correlations between isotropic and anisotropic chemical

  19. Observation of the Astrophysically Interesting 3/2^+ =0D State of ^19F at E_x=3D7101 keV(This work supported by USDOE Contract No. DE-FG02-91ER40609)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Yousaf; Parker, P.; Hammer, J. W.; Jaeger, M.; Kunz, R.; Mayer, A.; Schreiter, R.; Staudt, G.

    1998-04-01

    We report on the observation of the astrophysically interesting 3/2^+ state in ^19F at E_x=3D7101 ± 1 keV via the ^15N(α,γ)^19F reaction using the RHINOCEROS windowless gas target system at the University of Stuttgart 4 MV Dynamitron facility. These direct measurements of this resonance, determine a total width of 28 ± 1 keV, a gamma width of 0.39 ± 0.06 eV, and a resonance strength, ωγ=3D0.77 ± 0.11 eV, supporting the recent discovery of the isospin mirror 3/2^+ state, E_x≈7070 keV, in ^19Ne (K. E. Rehm et al., Phys. Rev. C \\underline52) (1995) R460^, (R. Coszach et al., Phys. Lett. B \\underline353) (1995) 184 which dominates the recycling/breakout rates from the HotCNO cycle to the rp-process via the ^18F(p,α)^15O and ^18F(p,γ)^19Ne reactions. The 3/2^+ state in ^19F was identified by its unique γ-decay scheme.

  20. Clonal dissemination of macrolide-resistant and penicillin-susceptible serotype 3 and penicillin-resistant Taiwan 19F-14 and 23F-15 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Japan: a pilot surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kei; Maeda, Koichi; Mikasa, Keiichi; Uno, Kenji; Takahashi, Ken; Konishi, Mitsuru; Yoshimoto, Eiichiro; Murakawa, Koichi; Kita, Eiji; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2005-04-01

    Large-scale surveillance studies using molecular techniques such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) have revealed that the spread of antibiotic-resistant pneumococci is due to clonal spread. However, in Japan, surveillance studies using such molecular techniques have never been done. Therefore, we conducted a pilot surveillance study to elucidate the present situation in Japan. Among the 145 isolates examined, the most prevalent serotype was type 19F (20%), for which most isolates were not susceptible to penicillin (86.2%) but were positive for the mef(A)/mef(E) gene (89.7%). The secondmost prevalent was serotype 3 (16.6%), for which most isolates were susceptible to penicillin (87.5%) and positive for the erm(B) gene (91.7%). PFGE analysis showed that both serotypes consisted mainly of clonally identical or related isolates and, in particular, 38% of the type 19F isolates were indistinguishable from or closely related to the Taiwan 19F-14 clone. In addition, some of the Japanese type 23F isolates with the erm(B) gene were indistinguishable from or related to the Taiwan 23F-15 clone as analyzed by PFGE. Based on the results of our pilot study performed in a single institution, it is likely that international antibiotic-resistant clones have already spread in Japan; therefore, a nationwide surveillance study should be urgently conducted. PMID:15814978

  1. Milli-tesla NMR and spectrophotometry of liquids hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yue; Chen, Chia-Hsiu; Wilson, Zechariah; Savukov, Igor; Hilty, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarization methods offer a unique means of improving low signal strength obtained in low-field NMR. Here, simultaneous measurements of NMR at a field of 0.7 mT and laser optical absorption from samples hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) are reported. The NMR measurement field closely corresponds to a typical field encountered during sample injection in a D-DNP experiment. The optical spectroscopy allows determination of the concentration of the free radical required for DNP. Correlation of radical concentration to NMR measurement of spin polarization and spin-lattice relaxation time allows determination of relaxivity and can be used for optimization of the D-DNP process. Further, the observation of the nuclear Overhauser effect originating from hyperpolarized spins is demonstrated. Signals from 1H and 19F in a mixture of trifluoroethanol and water are detected in a single spectrum, while different atoms of the same type are distinguished by J-coupling patterns. The resulting signal changes of individual peaks are indicative of molecular contact, suggesting a new application area of hyperpolarized low-field NMR for the determination of intermolecular interactions.

  2. Milli-Arcsecond (MAS) Imaging of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, Joseph M.; Oktem, Figen S.; Kamalabadi, Farzad; O'Neill, John; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Daw, Adrian N.; Rabin, Douglas M.

    2016-05-01

    Dissipation in the solar corona is believed to occur in extremely thin current sheets of order 1-100 km. Emission from these hot but thin current sheets should be visible in coronal EUV emission lines. However, this spatial scale is far below the resolution of existing imaging instruments, so these dissipation sites have never been observed individually. Conventional optics cannot be manufactured with sufficient surface figure accuracy to obtain the required spatial resolution in the extreme-ultraviolet where these hot plasmas radiate. A photon sieve, a diffractive imaging element similar to a Fresnel zone plate, can be manufactured to provide a few milli-arcsec (MAS) resolution, with much more readily achievable tolerances than with conventional imaging technology. Prototype photon sieve elements have been fabricated and tested in the laboratory. A full-scale ultra-high resolution instrument will require formation flying and computational image deconvolution. Significant progress has been made in overcoming these challenges, and some recent results in these areas are discussed. A simple design for a sounding rocket concept demonstration payload is presented that obtains 80 MAS (0.080 arcsec) imaging with a 100 mm diameter photon sieve to image Fe XIV 334 and Fe XVI 335. These images will show the structure of the corona at a resolution never before obtained, and they will also allow a study of the temperature structure in the dissipation region.

  3. Visibility of lipid resonances in HR-MAS spectra of brain biopsies subject to spinning rate variation.

    PubMed

    Precht, C; Diserens, G; Oevermann, A; Vermathen, M; Lang, J; Boesch, C; Vermathen, P

    2015-12-01

    Lipid resonances from mobile lipids can be observed by ¹H NMR spectroscopy in multiple tissues and have also been associated with malignancy. In order to use lipid resonances as a marker for disease, a reference standard from a healthy tissue has to be established taking the influence of variable factors like the spinning rate into account. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of spinning rate variation on the HR-MAS pattern of lipid resonances in non-neoplastic brain biopsies from different regions and visualize polar and non-polar lipids by fluorescence microscopy using Nile Red staining. ¹H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy demonstrated higher lipid peak intensities in normal sheep brain pure white matter biopsies compared to mixed white and gray matter biopsies and pure gray matter biopsies. High spinning rates increased the visibility particularly of the methyl resonances at 1.3 and the methylene resonance at 0.89 ppm in white matter biopsies stronger compared to thalamus and brainstem biopsies, and gray matter biopsies. The absence of lipid droplets and presence of a large number of myelin sheaths observed in white matter by Nile Red fluorescence microscopy suggest that the observed lipid resonances originate from the macromolecular pool of lipid protons of the myelin sheath's plasma membranes. When using lipid contents as a marker for disease, the variable behavior of lipid resonances in different neuroanatomical regions of the brain and at variable spinning rates should be considered. The findings may open up interesting possibilities for investigating lipids in myelin sheaths.

  4. Proton HR-MAS spectroscopy and quantitative pathologic analysis of MRI/3D-MRSI-targeted postsurgical prostate tissues.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Mark G; Vigneron, Daniel B; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Males, Ryan G; Schmitt, Lars; Carroll, Peter R; James, Joyce K; Hurd, Ralph E; Kurhanewicz, John

    2003-11-01

    Proton high-resolution magic angle spinning ((1)H HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy and quantitative histopathology were performed on the same 54 MRI/3D-MRSI-targeted postsurgical prostate tissue samples. Presurgical MRI/3D-MRSI targeted healthy and malignant prostate tissues with an accuracy of 81%. Even in the presence of substantial tissue heterogeneity, distinct (1)H HR-MAS spectral patterns were observed for different benign tissue types and prostate cancer. Specifically, healthy glandular tissue was discriminated from prostate cancer based on significantly higher levels of citrate (P = 0.04) and polyamines (P = 0.01), and lower (P = 0.02) levels of the choline-containing compounds choline, phosphocholine (PC), and glycerophosphocholine (GPC). Predominantly stromal tissue lacked both citrate and polyamines, but demonstrated significantly (P = 0.01) lower levels of choline compounds than cancer. In addition, taurine, myo-inositol, and scyllo-inositol were all higher in prostate cancer vs. healthy glandular and stromal tissues. Among cancer samples, larger increases in choline, and decreases in citrate and polyamines (P = 0.05) were observed with more aggressive cancers, and a MIB-1 labeling index correlated (r = 0.62, P = 0.01) with elevated choline. The elucidation of spectral patterns associated with mixtures of different prostate tissue types and cancer grades, and the inclusion of new metabolic markers for prostate cancer may significantly improve the clinical interpretation of in vivo prostate MRSI data.

  5. Quantitative fluorine NMR to determine carbohydrate density on glyconanomaterials synthesized from perfluorophenyl azide-functionalized silica nanoparticles by click reaction.

    PubMed

    Kong, Na; Zhou, Juan; Park, JaeHyeung; Xie, Sheng; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-09-15

    A quantitative fluorine NMR ((19)F qNMR) method was developed to determine the carbohydrate density on glyconanomaterials. Mannose (Man)- and galactose (Gal)-conjugated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) were synthesized from perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA)-functionalized SNPs and propargylated Man or Gal by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click reaction). After treating PFPA-SNPs or Man-SNPs with hydrofluoric acid followed by lyophilization, the remaining residues were directly subjected to (19)F NMR analysis. The density of PFPA on PFPA-SNP was determined to be 7.7 ± 0.2 × 10(-16) nmol/nm(2) and Man on Man-SNP to be 6.4 ± 0.2 × 10(-16) nmol/nm(2) giving a yield of ∼83% for the click coupling reaction. The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of Man-SNPs with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-concanavalin A (Con A) was determined using a fluorescence competition assay to be 0.289 ± 0.003 μM, which represents more than 3 orders of magnitude affinity increase compared to free Man with Con A.

  6. Pure shift NMR.

    PubMed

    Zangger, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Although scalar-coupling provides important structural information, the resulting signal splittings significantly reduce the resolution of NMR spectra. Limited resolution is a particular problem in proton NMR experiments, resulting in part from the limited proton chemical shift range (∼10 ppm) but even more from the splittings due to scalar coupling to nearby protons. "Pure shift" NMR spectroscopy (also known as broadband homonuclear decoupling) has been developed for disentangling overlapped proton NMR spectra. The resulting spectra are considerably simplified as they consist of single lines, reminiscent of proton-decoupled C-13 spectra at natural abundance, with no multiplet structure. The different approaches to obtaining pure shift spectra are reviewed here and several applications presented. Pure shift spectra are especially useful for highly overlapped proton spectra, as found for example in reaction mixtures, natural products and biomacromolecules.

  7. A combined deuterium NMR and quantum chemical investigation of inequivalent hydrogen bonds in organic solids.

    PubMed

    Webber, Renee; Penner, Glenn H

    2012-01-01

    Deuterium magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations are used to investigate organic solids in which inequivalent hydrogen bonds are present. The use of (2)H MAS allows one to measure the chemical shift, δ, quadrupolar coupling constant, C(Q), and asymmetry in the quadrupolar interaction, η(Q), for each type of hydrogen bond present in the system. Quantum chemical calculations of the magnetic shielding (σ, which can be related to δ) and the electric field gradient (EFG, which can be related to C(Q)) are compared to the experimental results and are discussed with respect to the relative strengths of the hydrogen bonds within each system.

  8. Quantitative identification of metastable magnesium carbonate minerals by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy K; Surface, J Andrew; Brenner, Allison; Wang, Louis S; Skemer, Philip; Conradi, Mark S; Hayes, Sophia E

    2015-01-01

    In the conversion of CO2 to mineral carbonates for the permanent geosequestration of CO2, there are multiple magnesium carbonate phases that are potential reaction products. Solid-state (13)C NMR is demonstrated as an effective tool for distinguishing magnesium carbonate phases and quantitatively characterizing magnesium carbonate mixtures. Several of these mineral phases include magnesite, hydromagnesite, dypingite, and nesquehonite, which differ in composition by the number of waters of hydration or the number of crystallographic hydroxyl groups. These carbonates often form in mixtures with nearly overlapping (13)C NMR resonances which makes their identification and analysis difficult. In this study, these phases have been investigated with solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy, including both static and magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments. Static spectra yield chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) lineshapes that are indicative of the site-symmetry variations of the carbon environments. MAS spectra yield isotropic chemical shifts for each crystallographically inequivalent carbon and spin-lattice relaxation times, T1, yield characteristic information that assist in species discrimination. These detailed parameters, and the combination of static and MAS analyses, can aid investigations of mixed carbonates by (13)C NMR.

  9. MAS C-Terminal Tail Interacting Proteins Identified by Mass Spectrometry- Based Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Zhang, Dongmei; Osbourne, Appledene; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Desnoyer, Russ; Willard, Belinda; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of signals from G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions. MAS is a GPCR that was initially discovered as an oncogene and is now known to play an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Current literature suggests that MAS interacts with common heterotrimeric G-proteins, but MAS interaction with proteins which might mediate G protein-independent or atypical signaling is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that MAS C-terminal tail (Ct) is a major determinant of receptor-scaffold protein interactions mediating MAS signaling. Mass-spectrometry based proteomic analysis was used to comprehensively identify the proteins that interact with MAS Ct comprising the PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM). We identified both PDZ and non-PDZ proteins from human embryonic kidney cell line, mouse atrial cardiomyocyte cell line and human heart tissue to interact specifically with MAS Ct. For the first time our study provides a panel of PDZ and other proteins that potentially interact with MAS with high significance. A ‘cardiac-specific finger print’ of MAS interacting PDZ proteins was identified which includes DLG1, MAGI1 and SNTA. Cell based experiments with wild-type and mutant MAS lacking the PDZ-BM validated MAS interaction with PDZ proteins DLG1 and TJP2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested well-known multi-protein scaffold complexes involved in nitric oxide signaling (NOS), cell-cell signaling of neuromuscular junctions, synapses and epithelial cells. Majority of these protein hits were predicted to be part of disease categories comprising cancers and malignant tumors. We propose a ‘MAS-signalosome’ model to stimulate further research in understanding the molecular mechanism of MAS function. Identifying hierarchy of interactions of ‘signalosome’ components with MAS will be a necessary step in future to fully understand the physiological and pathological functions of this enigmatic receptor. PMID

  10. NMR Studies of Heat-Induced Transitions in Structure and Cation Binding Environments of a Strontium-Saturated Swelling Mica

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Davis, Michael C.; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, S.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2007-12-03

    In this work we combined Al, Si, F, and Na magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to characterize the structure and interlayer cation environments in a strontium-saturated member of the swelling mica family before and after a heat induced collapse of the interlayer space.

  11. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of {sup 29}Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The {sup 29}Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  12. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state [sup 13]C and [sup 29]Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS [sup 13]C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of [sup 29]Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The [sup 29]Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  13. MODIS Airborne simulator (MAS) Final Report for CLASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Arnold; Steven Platnick

    2010-11-24

    The MAS was flown aboard the NASA ER-2 for the CLASIC field experiment, and for all data collected, provided calibrated and geolocated (Level-1B) radiance data for it’s 50 spectral bands (ranging in wavelength for 0.47 to 14.3 µm). From the Level-1B data, as directed in the Statement of Work, higher order (Level-2) data products were derived. The Level-2 products include: a) cloud optical thickness, b) cloud effective radius, c) cloud top height (temperature), d) cloud fraction, e) cloud phase products. Preliminary Level-1B and Level-2 products were provided during the field experiment (typically within one or two days of data collection). Final version data products were made available in December 2008 following considerable calibration analysis. Data collection, data processing (to Level-2), and discussion of the calibration work are summarized below.

  14. Anode consumption on a subsea X-mas tree

    SciTech Connect

    Lye, R.E.

    1998-12-31

    Anode consumption and coating breakdown on a X-mas tree installed at the Troll Field in the Norwegian North Sea was investigated after 5 years. A comparison with a spare tree and one tree being exposed for only 3--4 months was done. The epoxy coating has several blisters, in particular on stainless steel surfaces. Water inside the blisters has a pH of 13-14 indicating that the cathodic reaction occurs inside them. The anode dimensions indicate an overall anode consumption of approximately 20%, while the design allows 27% after 5 years. This indicates that the original design is quite conservative. If the design had been done according to present day design rules, the conservatism would be reduced; an overall anode consumption of 23% is then likely (still less than allowed 27%).

  15. Tumbling motions of NH2(CH3)2 ions in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 studied using 1H MAS NMR and 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam Hee; Choi, Jae Hun; Lim, Ae Ran

    2014-12-01

    The structure and the phase transition temperatures of [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 were determined using X-ray diffraction and DSC, respectively. The temperature dependence of chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation time T1ρ in the rotating frame were measured for the 1H and 13C nuclei in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4. From these results, it was observed that the structural change by chemical shifts does not occur with temperature. However, T1ρ for 1H and 13C in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 showed a minimum, and it is apparent that both T1ρ values are governed by the same tumbling motions. The activation energies of tumbling motions for 1H and 13C are nearly the same owing to the connection between CH3 and NH2 ions in the [NH2(CH3)2]+ group.

  16. Food Waste Composting Study from Makanan Ringan Mas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, A. A.; Ismail, S. N. M.; Jamaludin, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    The poor management of municipal solid waste in Malaysia has worsened over the years especially on food waste. Food waste represents almost 60% of the total municipal solid waste disposed in the landfill. Composting is one of low cost alternative method to dispose the food waste. This study is conducted to compost the food waste generation in Makanan Ringan Mas, which is a medium scale industry in Parit Kuari Darat due to the lack knowledge and exposure of food waste recycling practice. The aim of this study is to identify the physical and chemical parameters of composting food waste from Makanan Ringan Mas. The physical parameters were tested for temperature and pH value and the chemical parameter are Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium. In this study, backyard composting was conducted with 6 reactors. Tapioca peel was used as fermentation liquid and soil and coconut grated were used as the fermentation bed. Backyard composting was conducted with six reactors. The overall results from the study showed that the temperature of the reactors were within the range which are from 30° to 50°C. The result of this study revealed that all the reactors which contain processed food waste tend to produce pH value within the range of 5 to 6 which can be categorized as slightly acidic. Meanwhile, the reactors which contained raw food waste tend to produce pH value within the range of 7 to 8 which can be categorized as neutral. The highest NPK obtained is from Reactor B that process only raw food waste. The average value of Nitrogen is 48540 mg/L, Phosphorus is 410 mg/L and Potassium is 1550 mg/L. From the comparison with common chemical fertilizer, it shows that NPK value from the composting are much lower than NPK of the common chemical fertilizer. However, comparison with NPK of organic fertilizer shown only slightly difference value in NPK.

  17. Angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis modulates fear memory and extinction in mice.

    PubMed

    Lazaroni, Thiago Luiz do Nascimento; Bastos, Cristiane Perácio; Moraes, Márcio Flávio Dutra; Santos, Robson Souza; Pereira, Grace Schenatto

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate defense-alerting reaction to fear is a common feature of neuropsychiatric diseases. Therefore, impairments in brain circuits, as well as in molecular pathways underlying the neurovegetative adjustments to fear may play an essential role on developing neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we tested the hypothesis that interfering with angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]/Mas receptor axis homeostasis, which appears to be essential to arterial pressure control, would affect fear memory and extinction. Mas knockout (MasKO) mice, in FVB/N background, showed normal cued fear memory and extinction, but increased freezing in response to context. Next, as FVB/N has poor performance in contextual fear memory, we tested MasKO in mixed 129xC57BL/6 background. MasKO mice behaved similarly to wild-type (WT), but memory extinction was slower in contextual fear conditioning to a weak protocol (1CS/US). In addition, delayed extinction in MasKO mice was even more pronounced after a stronger protocol (3CS/US). We showed previously that Angiotensin II receptor AT1 antagonist, losantan, rescued object recognition memory deficit in MasKO mice. Here, losartan was also effective. Memory extinction was accelerated in MasKO mice after treatment with losartan. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis may modulate fear memory extinction. Furthermore, we suggest MasKO mice as an animal model to study post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

  18. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  19. Carbon-fluorine bond cleavage in the preparation of Osmium(III) and Osmium(IV) fluorothiolate complexes. Fluorine by fluorine NMR-assignment and fluxional processes.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Maribel; Bernès, Sylvain; Cerón, Margarita; Cortina, Verónica; Mendoza, Consuelo; Torrens, Hugo

    2007-06-11

    Reactions of OsO4 with HSR (R=C6F5, C6F4H-4,) in refluxing ethanol afford [Os(SC6F5)3(SC6F4(SC6F5)-2)] (1) and [Os(SC6F4H-4)3(SC6F3H-4-(SC6F4H-4)-2)] (2), which involve the rupture of C-F bonds. At room temperature, the compound [Os(SC6F5)3(PMe2Ph)2] or [Os(SC6F5)4(PMe2Ph)] reacts with KOH(aq) in acetone, giving rise to [ Os(SC6F5)(SC6F4(SC6F4O-2)-2)(PMe2Ph)2] (3), through a process involving the rupture of two C-F bonds, while the compound [Os(SC6F4H)4(PPh3)] reacts with KOH(aq) in acetone to afford [Os(SC6F4H-4)2(SC6F3H-4-O-2)(PPh3)] (4), which also implies a C-F bond cleavage. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies of 1, 2, and 4 indicate that these compounds include five-coordinated metal ions in essentially trigonal-bipyramidal geometries, whereas these studies on the paramagnetic compound 3 show a six-coordinated osmium center in a distorted octahedral geometry. 19F, 1H, 31P{1H}, and COSY 19F-19F NMR studies for the diamagnetic 1, 2, and 4 compounds, including variable-temperature 19F NMR experiments, showed that these molecules are fluxional. Some of the activation parameters for these dynamic processes have been determined.

  20. Predictions of the fluorine NMR chemical shifts of perfluorinated carboxylic acids, CnF(2n+1)COOH (n = 6-8).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zizhong; Goddard, John D

    2009-12-17

    Perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) are a class of persistent environmental pollutants. Commercially available PFCAs are mixtures of linear and branched isomers, possibly with impurities. Different isomers have different physical and chemical properties and toxicities. However, little is known about the properties and the finer details of the structures of the individual branched isomers. Full geometry optimizations for the linear n-alkane (C(6)-C(27)) PFCAs indicated that all have helical structures. The helical angle increases slightly with increasing chain length, from 16.3 degrees in C(6)F(13)COOH to 17.0 degrees in C(27)F(55)COOH. This study predicts (19)F NMR parameters for 69 linear and branched isomers of the perfluoro carboxylic acids C(6)F(13)COOH, C(7)F(15)COOH, and C(8)F(17)COOH. B3LYP-GIAO/6-31++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) was used for the NMR calculations with analysis of the chemical shifts by the natural bond orbital method. The predictions of the (19)F chemical shifts revealed the differences among the CF(3), CF(2), and CF groups. In general, the absolute values for the chemical shifts for the CF(3) group are smaller than 90 ppm, for the CF larger than 160 ppm, and for the CF(2) between 110 and 130 ppm. The chemical shifts of the branched isomers are smaller in magnitude than the linear ones. The decrease is correlated with the steric hindrance of the CF(3) groups, the more hindered the CF(3), the greater the decrease in the (19)F chemical shifts. The predicted (19)F chemical shifts are similar to those for analogous perfluoro compounds with other terminal functional groups such as -SO(3)H or -SO(3)NH(2)CH(2)CH(3).

  1. Efficient heteronuclear decoupling in MAS solid-state NMR using non-rotor-synchronized rCW irradiation.

    PubMed

    Equbal, Asif; Paul, Subhradip; Mithu, Venus Singh; Madhu, P K; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2014-09-01

    We present new non-rotor-synchronized variants of the recently introduced refocused continuous wave (rCW) heteronuclear decoupling method significantly improving the performance relative to the original rotor-synchronized variants. Under non-rotor-synchronized conditions the rCW decoupling sequences provide more efficient decoupling, are easier to setup, and prove more robust towards experimental parameters such as radio frequency (rf) field amplitude and spinning frequency. This is demonstrated through numerical simulations substantiated with experimental results under different sample spinning and rf field amplitude conditions for powder samples of U-(13)C-glycine and U-(13)C-L-histidine·HCl·H2O. PMID:25123538

  2. H-1 Relaxation Times of Metabolites in Biological Samples Obtained with Nondestructive Ex-vivo Slow-MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Wind, Robert A.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-03-01

    Methods suitable for measuring 1H relaxation times such as T1, T2 and T1p, in small sized biological objects including live cells, excised organs and tissues, oil seeds etc., were developed in this work. This was achieved by combining inversion-recovery, spin-echo, or spin lock segment with the phase-adjusted spinning sideband (PASS) technique that was applied at slow sample spinning rate. Here, 2D-PASS was used to produce a high-resolution 1H spectrum free from the magnetic susceptibility broadening so that the relaxation parameters of individual metabolite can be determined. Because of the slow spinning employed, tissue and cell damage due to sample spinning is minimized. The methodologies were demonstrated by measuring 1H T1, T2 and T1p of metabolites in excised rat livers and sesame seeds at spinning rates of as low as 40 Hz.

  3. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators.

    PubMed

    Nonappa; Kolehmainen, E

    2016-07-13

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples. PMID:27374054

  4. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators.

    PubMed

    Nonappa; Kolehmainen, E

    2016-07-13

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples.

  5. Solid-State NMR Characterization of Mixed Phosphonic Acid Ligand Binding and Organization on Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Davidowski, Stephen K; Holland, Gregory P

    2016-04-01

    As ligand functionalization of nanomaterials becomes more complex, methods to characterize the organization of multiple ligands on surfaces is required. In an effort to further the understanding of ligand-surface interactions, a combination of multinuclear ((1)H, (29)Si, (31)P) and multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques was utilized to characterize the phosphonic acid functionalization of fumed silica nanoparticles using methylphosphonic acid (MPA) and phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). (1)H → (29)Si cross-polarization (CP)-magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR was used to selectively detect silicon atoms near hydrogen atoms (primarily surface species); these results indicate that geminal silanols are preferentially depleted during the functionalization with phosphonic acids. (1)H → (31)P CP-MAS solid-state NMR measurements on the functionalized silica nanoparticles show three distinct resonances shifted upfield (lower ppm) and broadened compared to the resonances of the crystalline ligands. Quantitative (31)P MAS solid-state NMR measurements indicate that ligands favor a monodentate binding mode. When fumed silica nanoparticles were functionalized with an equal molar ratio of MPA and PPA, the MPA bound the nanoparticle surface preferentially. Cross-peaks apparent in the 2D (1)H exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) NMR measurements of the multiligand sample at short mixing times indicate that the MPA and PPA are spatially close (≤5 Å) on the surface of the nanostructure. Furthermore, (1)H-(1)H double quantum-single quantum (DQ-SQ) back-to-back (BABA) 2D NMR spectra further confirmed that MPA and PPA are strongly dipolar coupled with observation of DQ intermolecular contacts between the ligands. DQ experimental buildup curves and simulations indicate that the average distance between MPA and PPA is no further than 4.2 ± 0.2 Å. PMID:26914738

  6. 17O and 29Si NMR parameters of MgSiO3 phases from high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy and first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; Berry, Andrew J; Frost, Daniel J; Gregorovic, Alan; Pickard, Chris J; Readman, Jennifer E; Wimperis, Stephen

    2007-10-31

    The 29Si and 17O NMR parameters of six polymorphs of MgSiO3 were determined through a combination of high-resolution solid-state NMR and first-principles gauge including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) formalism calculations using periodic boundary conditions. MgSiO3 is an important component of the Earth's mantle that undergoes structural changes as a function of pressure and temperature. For the lower pressure polymorphs (ortho-, clino-, and protoenstatite), all oxygen species in the 17O high-resolution triple-quantum magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra were resolved and assigned. These assignments differ from those tentatively suggested in previous work on the basis of empirical experimental correlations. The higher pressure polymorphs of MgSiO3 (majorite, akimotoite, and perovskite) are stabilized at pressures corresponding to the Earth's transition zone and lower mantle, with perovskite being the major constituent at depths >660 km. We present the first 17O NMR data for these materials and confirm previous 29Si work in the literature. The use of high-resolution multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS) and satellite-transition MAS (STMAS) experiments allows us to resolve distinct oxygen species, and full assignments are suggested. The six polymorphs exhibit a wide variety of structure types, providing an ideal opportunity to consider the variation of NMR parameters (both shielding and quadrupolar) with local structure, including changes in coordination number, local geometry (bond distances and angles), and bonding. For example, we find that, although there is a general correlation of increasing 17O chemical shift with increasing Si-O bond length, the shift observed also depends upon the exact coordination environment.

  7. 13C and 15N CP/MAS, 1H-15N SCT CP/MAS and FTIR spectroscopy as tools for qualitative detection of the presence of zwitterionic and non-ionic forms of ansa-macrolide 3-formylrifamycin SV and its derivatives in solid state.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Piotr; Pyta, Krystian; Klich, Katarzyna; Schilf, Wojciech; Kamieński, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    (13)C, (15)N CP/MAS, including (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N short contact time CP/MAS experiments, and FTIR methods were applied for detailed structural characterization of ansa-macrolides as 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its derivatives (2-6) in crystal and in powder forms. Although HPLC chromatograms for 2/CH3 OH and 2/CH3 CCl3 were the same for rifampicin crystals dissolved in respective solvents, the UV-vis data recorded for them were different in 300-375 nm region. Detailed solid state (13)C and (15)N CP/MAS NMR and FTIR studies revealed that rifampicin (2), in contrast to 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its amino derivatives (3-6), can occur in pure non-ionic or zwitterionic forms in crystal and in pure these forms or a mixture of them in a powder. Multinuclear CP/MAS and FTIR studies demonstrated also that 3-6 derivatives were present exclusively in pure zwitterionic forms, both in powder and in crystal. On the basis of the solid state NMR and FTIR studies, two conformers of 3-formylrifamycin SV were detected in powder form due to the different orientations of carbonyl group of amide moiety. The PM6 molecular modeling at the semi-empirical level of theory, allowed visualization the most energetically favorable non-ionic and zwitterionic forms of 1-6 antibiotics, strongly stabilized via intramolecular H-bonds. FTIR studies indicated that the originally adopted forms of these type antibiotics in crystal or in powder are stable in standard laboratory conditions in time. The results presented point to the fact that because of a possible presence of two forms of rifampicin (compound 2), quantification of the content of this antibiotic in relevant pharmaceuticals needs caution. PMID:24347399

  8. 13C and 15N CP/MAS, 1H-15N SCT CP/MAS and FTIR spectroscopy as tools for qualitative detection of the presence of zwitterionic and non-ionic forms of ansa-macrolide 3-formylrifamycin SV and its derivatives in solid state.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Piotr; Pyta, Krystian; Klich, Katarzyna; Schilf, Wojciech; Kamieński, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    (13)C, (15)N CP/MAS, including (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N short contact time CP/MAS experiments, and FTIR methods were applied for detailed structural characterization of ansa-macrolides as 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its derivatives (2-6) in crystal and in powder forms. Although HPLC chromatograms for 2/CH3 OH and 2/CH3 CCl3 were the same for rifampicin crystals dissolved in respective solvents, the UV-vis data recorded for them were different in 300-375 nm region. Detailed solid state (13)C and (15)N CP/MAS NMR and FTIR studies revealed that rifampicin (2), in contrast to 3-formylrifamycin SV (1) and its amino derivatives (3-6), can occur in pure non-ionic or zwitterionic forms in crystal and in pure these forms or a mixture of them in a powder. Multinuclear CP/MAS and FTIR studies demonstrated also that 3-6 derivatives were present exclusively in pure zwitterionic forms, both in powder and in crystal. On the basis of the solid state NMR and FTIR studies, two conformers of 3-formylrifamycin SV were detected in powder form due to the different orientations of carbonyl group of amide moiety. The PM6 molecular modeling at the semi-empirical level of theory, allowed visualization the most energetically favorable non-ionic and zwitterionic forms of 1-6 antibiotics, strongly stabilized via intramolecular H-bonds. FTIR studies indicated that the originally adopted forms of these type antibiotics in crystal or in powder are stable in standard laboratory conditions in time. The results presented point to the fact that because of a possible presence of two forms of rifampicin (compound 2), quantification of the content of this antibiotic in relevant pharmaceuticals needs caution.

  9. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)