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Sample records for 19f mas nmr

  1. High-resolution (19)F MAS NMR spectroscopy: structural disorder and unusual J couplings in a fluorinated hydroxy-silicate.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Yates, Jonathan R; Berry, Andrew J; Wimperis, Stephen; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2010-11-10

    High-resolution (19)F magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is used to study disorder and bonding in a crystalline solid. (19)F MAS NMR reveals four distinct F sites in a 50% fluorine-substituted deuterated hydrous magnesium silicate (clinohumite, 4Mg(2)SiO(4)·Mg(OD(1-x)F(x))(2) with x = 0.5), indicating extensive structural disorder. The four (19)F peaks can be assigned using density functional theory (DFT) calculations of NMR parameters for a number of structural models with a range of possible local F environments generated by F(-)/OH(-) substitution. These assignments are supported by two-dimensional (19)F double-quantum MAS NMR experiments that correlate F sites based on either spatial proximity (via dipolar couplings) or through-bond connectivity (via scalar, or J, couplings). The observation of (19)F-(19)F J couplings is unexpected as the fluorines coordinate Mg atoms and the Mg-F interaction is normally considered to be ionic in character (i.e., there is no formal F-Mg-F covalent bonding arrangement). However, DFT calculations predict significant (19)F-(19)F J couplings, and these are in good agreement with the splittings observed in a (19)F J-resolved MAS NMR experiment. The existence of these J couplings is discussed in relation to both the nature of bonding in the solid state and the occurrence of so-called "through-space" (19)F-(19)F J couplings in solution. Finally, we note that we have found similar structural disorder and spin-spin interactions in both synthetic and naturally occurring clinohumite samples.

  2. Characterization of solid polymer dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients by 19F MAS NMR and factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Urbanova, Martina; Brus, Jiri; Sedenkova, Ivana; Policianova, Olivia; Kobera, Libor

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution the ability of (19)F MAS NMR spectroscopy to probe structural variability of poorly water-soluble drugs formulated as solid dispersions in polymer matrices is discussed. The application potentiality of the proposed approach is demonstrated on a moderately sized active pharmaceutical ingredient (API, Atorvastatin) exhibiting extensive polymorphism. In this respect, a range of model systems with the API incorporated in the matrix of polvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was prepared. The extent of mixing of both components was determined by T(1)((1)H) and T(1ρ)((1)H) relaxation experiments, and it was found that the API forms nanosized domains. Subsequently it was found out that the polymer matrix induces two kinds of changes in (19)F MAS NMR spectra. At first, this is a high-frequency shift reaching 2-3 ppm which is independent on molecular structure of the API and which results from the long-range polarization of the electron cloud around (19)F nucleus induced by electrostatic fields of the polymer matrix. At second, this is broadening of the signals and formation of shoulders reflecting changes in molecular arrangement of the API. To avoid misleading in the interpretation of the recorded (19)F MAS NMR spectra, because both the contributions act simultaneously, we applied chemometric approach based on multivariate analysis. It is demonstrated that factor analysis of the recorded spectra can separate both these spectral contributions, and the subtle structural differences in the molecular arrangement of the API in the nanosized domains can be traced. In this way (19)F MAS NMR spectra of both pure APIs and APIs in solid dispersions can be directly compared. The proposed strategy thus provides a powerful tool for the analysis of new formulations of fluorinated pharmaceutical substances in polymer matrices.

  3. Characterization of solid polymer dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients by 19F MAS NMR and factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanova, Martina; Brus, Jiri; Sedenkova, Ivana; Policianova, Olivia; Kobera, Libor

    In this contribution the ability of 19F MAS NMR spectroscopy to probe structural variability of poorly water-soluble drugs formulated as solid dispersions in polymer matrices is discussed. The application potentiality of the proposed approach is demonstrated on a moderately sized active pharmaceutical ingredient (API, Atorvastatin) exhibiting extensive polymorphism. In this respect, a range of model systems with the API incorporated in the matrix of polvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was prepared. The extent of mixing of both components was determined by T1(1H) and T1ρ(1H) relaxation experiments, and it was found that the API forms nanosized domains. Subsequently it was found out that the polymer matrix induces two kinds of changes in 19F MAS NMR spectra. At first, this is a high-frequency shift reaching 2-3 ppm which is independent on molecular structure of the API and which results from the long-range polarization of the electron cloud around 19F nucleus induced by electrostatic fields of the polymer matrix. At second, this is broadening of the signals and formation of shoulders reflecting changes in molecular arrangement of the API. To avoid misleading in the interpretation of the recorded 19F MAS NMR spectra, because both the contributions act simultaneously, we applied chemometric approach based on multivariate analysis. It is demonstrated that factor analysis of the recorded spectra can separate both these spectral contributions, and the subtle structural differences in the molecular arrangement of the API in the nanosized domains can be traced. In this way 19F MAS NMR spectra of both pure APIs and APIs in solid dispersions can be directly compared. The proposed strategy thus provides a powerful tool for the analysis of new formulations of fluorinated pharmaceutical substances in polymer matrices.

  4. Quantitation of crystalline material within a liquid vehicle using 1H/19F CP/MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Farrer, Brian T; Peresypkin, Andrey; Wenslow, Robert M

    2007-02-01

    A method to detect and quantify a small amount crystalline material within a liquid solution of solubilized material is described. 19F CP-MAS ssNMR was investigated as a technique to detect low levels (0.2 mg/g) of crystalline sodium (2R)-7-{3-[2-chloro-4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phenoxy]propoxy}-2-methyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-chromane-2-carboxylate (I) within a solid mixture (with microcrystalline cellulose) and a slurry with a liquid vehicle (capric and caprylic acid triglycerides). The results demonstrate that the area of the 19F CP/MAS signal obtained in 25 min at 25 degrees C is linearly dependent (R2=0.997) on the mass of I within the ssNMR rotor. Slopes of CP-MAS peak area versus mass of I in the rotor were nearly identical for the solid mixture and slurry suspension. Signal-to-noise ratio for the low potency slurry suggest detection and quantitation of 0.1 mg of crystalline I in the rotor, corresponding to 2 mg/g of crystalline material within the slurry suspension.

  5. Solid-state 19F MAS NMR study on the conformation and molecular mobility of poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene).

    PubMed

    Tatsuno, Hiroto; Aimi, Keitaro; Ando, Shinji

    2007-05-01

    The temperature dependence of molecular mobility and conformational changes of poly(chlorotrifluoro- ethylene) (PCTFE) have been investigated by solid-state (19)F magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. The pulse techniques of dipolar-filter and T(1rho)-filter allow selective observation of the amorphous and crystalline domains, respectively. The temperature dependence of T(1rho) (F) revealed that the segmental motion in the amorphous domain becomes vigorous above ca 80 degrees C, which is well above the glass transition (T(g)) temperature (52 degrees C) and more close to the beta-relaxation temperature (95 degrees C). On the other hand, vigorous molecular motions in the crystalline domain occur above 120 degrees C, which is much below the melting temperature (212 degrees C). This indicates that the polymer chains in the PCTFE crystallites are more mobile than those of typical semicrystalline fluoropolymers like poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), which can be associated with structural imperfections in the crystallites. In addition, the density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (19)F magnetic shielding suggest that the high-frequency shifts observed for the crystalline signals above 80 degrees C can be ascribed to the conformational change around meso diads toward more twisted and/or helical conformations in the main chain.

  6. Nanoscopic yttrium oxide fluorides: non-aqueous fluorolytic sol-gel synthesis and structural insights by 19F and 89Y MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Scholz, G; Dreger, M; Bertram, R; Kemnitz, E

    2015-08-14

    Nanoscopic yttrium acetate fluorides Y(CH(3)COO)(3-z)F(z) and yttrium oxide fluorides YO(3-z)/(2)F(z )were prepared with tunable Y/F molar ratios via the fluorolytic sol-gel route. All samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis and thermal analysis. In addition, local structures of all samples were studied by (19)F MAS, (19)F-(89)Y CP MAS and (1)H-(89)Y CP MAS NMR spectroscopy and the respective chemical shifts are given. For both classes of compounds, only the fluorination using one equivalent of F (z = 1) leads to defined, well crystalline matrices: yttrium acetate fluoride Y(CH(3)COO)(2)F and r-YOF.

  7. (19) F DOSY diffusion-NMR spectroscopy of fluoropolymers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenglong; Wan, Yingbo; Chen, Dongxue; Gao, Chun; Yin, Hongnan; Fetherston, Daniel; Kupce, Eriks; Lopez, Gerald; Ameduri, Bruno; Twum, Eric B; Wyzgoski, Faith J; Li, Xiaohong; McCord, Elizabeth F; Rinaldi, Peter L

    2017-05-01

    A new pulse sequence for obtaining (19) F detected DOSY (diffusion ordered spectroscopy) spectra of fluorinated molecules is presented and used to study fluoropolymers based on vinylidene fluoride and chlorotrifluoroethylene. The performance of (19) F DOSY NMR experiments (and in general any type of NMR experiment) on fluoropolymers creates some unique complications that very often prevent detection of important signals. Factors that create these complications include: (1) the presence of many scalar couplings among (1) H, (19) F and (13) C; (2) the large magnitudes of many (19) F homonuclear couplings (especially (2) JFF ); (3) the large (19) F chemical shift range; and (4) the low solubility of these materials (which requires that experiments be performed at high temperatures). A systematic study of the various methods for collecting DOSY NMR data, and the adaptation of these methods to obtain (19) F detected DOSY data, has been performed using a mixture of low molecular weight, fluorinated model compounds. The best pulse sequences and optimal experimental conditions have been determined for obtaining (19) F DOSY spectra. The optimum pulse sequences for acquiring (19) F DOSY NMR data have been determined for various circumstances taking into account the spectral dispersion, number and magnitude of couplings present, and experimental temperature. Pulse sequences and experimental parameters for optimizing these experiments for the study of fluoropolymers have been studied. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Solid state 19F NMR parameters of fluorine-labeled amino acids. Part I: Aromatic substituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürr, Ulrich H. N.; Grage, Stephan L.; Witter, Raiker; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2008-03-01

    Structural parameters of peptides and proteins in biomembranes can be directly measured by solid state NMR of selectively labeled amino acids. The 19F nucleus is a promising label to overcome the low sensitivity of 2H, 13C or 15N, and to serve as a background-free reporter group in biological compounds. To make the advantages of solid state 19F NMR fully available for structural studies of polypeptides, we have systematically measured the chemical shift anisotropies and relaxation properties of the most relevant aromatic and aliphatic 19F-labeled amino acids. In this first part of two consecutive contributions, six different 19F-substituents on representative aromatic side chains were characterized as polycrystalline powders by static and MAS experiments. The data are also compared with results on the same amino acids incorporated in synthetic peptides. The spectra show a wide variety of lineshapes, from which the principal values of the CSA tensors were extracted. In addition, temperature-dependent T1 and T2 relaxation times were determined by 19F NMR in the solid state, and isotropic chemical shifts and scalar couplings were obtained in solution.

  9. Solid-state 19F-NMR analysis of 19F-labeled tryptophan in gramicidin A in oriented membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Stephan L; Wang, Junfeng; Cross, Timothy A; Ulrich, Anne S

    2002-01-01

    The response of membrane-associated peptides toward the lipid environment or other binding partners can be monitored by solid-state NMR of suitably labeled side chains. Tryptophan is a prominent amino acid in transmembrane helices, and its (19)F-labeled analogues are generally biocompatible and cause little structural perturbation. Hence, we use 5F-Trp as a highly sensitive NMR probe to monitor the conformation and dynamics of the indole ring. To establish this (19)F-NMR strategy, gramicidin A was labeled with 5F-Trp in position 13 or 15, whose chi(1)/chi(2) torsion angles are known from previous (2)H-NMR studies. First, the alignment of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor within the membrane was deduced by lineshape analysis of oriented samples. Next, the three principal axes of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor were assigned within the molecular frame of the indole ring. Finally, determination of chi(1)/chi(2) for 5F-Trp in the lipid gel phase showed that the side chain alignment differs by up to 20 degrees from its known conformation in the liquid crystalline state. The sensitivity gain of (19)F-NMR and the reduction in the amount of material was at least 10-fold compared with previous (2)H-NMR studies on the same system and 100-fold compared with (15)N-NMR. PMID:12496101

  10. (19)F labelled glycosaminoglycan probes for solution NMR and non-linear (CARS) microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lima, Marcelo A; Cavalheiro, Renan P; M Viana, Gustavo; Meneghetti, Maria C Z; Rudd, Timothy R; Skidmore, Mark A; Powell, Andrew K; Yates, Edwin A

    2016-08-15

    Studying polysaccharide-protein interactions under physiological conditions by conventional techniques is challenging. Ideally, macromolecules could be followed by both in vitro spectroscopy experiments as well as in tissues using microscopy, to enable a proper comparison of results over these different scales but, often, this is not feasible. The cell surface and extracellular matrix polysaccharides, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) lack groups that can be detected selectively in the biological milieu. The introduction of (19)F labels into GAG polysaccharides is explored and the interaction of a labelled GAG with the heparin-binding protein, antithrombin, employing (19)F NMR spectroscopy is followed. Furthermore, the ability of (19)F labelled GAGs to be imaged using CARS microscopy is demonstrated. (19)F labelled GAGs enable both (19)F NMR protein-GAG binding studies in solution at the molecular level and non-linear microscopy at a microscopic scale to be conducted on the same material, essentially free of background signals.

  11. 19F single-quantum and 19F-33S heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence NMR of SF6 in thermotropic nematogens and in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Tervonen, Henri; Saunavaara, Jani; Ingman, L Petri; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2006-08-24

    (19)F single-quantum (SQC) and (19)F-(33)S heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) NMR spectroscopy of sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) dissolved in thermotropic liquid crystals (TLCs) were used to investigate the properties of TLCs. On one hand, environmental effects on the NMR parameters of SF(6), (19)F nuclear shielding, (19)F-(33)S spin-spin coupling, secondary isotope effects of sulfur on (19)F shielding, and the self-diffusion coefficient in the direction of the external magnetic field were studied as well. The temperature dependence of the (19)F shielding of SF(6) in TLCs was modeled with a function that takes into account the properties of both TLC and SF(6). It appears that the TLC environment deforms the electronic system of SF(6) so that the (19)F shielding tensor becomes slightly anisotropic, with the anisotropy being from -0.5 to -1.4 ppm, depending upon the TLC solvent. On the contrary, no sign of residual dipolar coupling between (19)F and (33)S was found, meaning that the so-called deformational effects, which arise from the interaction between vibrational and reorientational motions of the molecule, on the geometry of the molecule are insignificant. Diffusion activation energies, E(a), were determined from the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficients. In each TLC, E(a) increases when moving from an isotropic phase to a nematic phase. The spin-spin coupling constant, J((19)F,(33)S), increases by ca. 10 Hz when moving from the gas phase to TLC solutions. The secondary isotope shifts of (19)F shielding are practically independent of TLC solvent and temperature. For the first time, (19)F-(33)S heteronuclear multiple-quantum NMR spectra were recorded for SF(6) in the gas phase and in a liquid-crystalline solution.

  12. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  13. (19)F NMR spectroscopic characterization of the interaction of niflumic acid with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Keisuke; Omran, Ahmed A; Takegami, Shigehiko; Tanaka, Rumi; Kitade, Tatsuya

    2007-04-01

    The interaction of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, niflumic acid (NFA), with human serum albumin (HSA) has been investigated by (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A (19)F NMR spectrum of NFA in a buffered (pH 7.4) solution of NaCl (0.1 mol L(-1)) contained a single sharp signal of its CF(3) group 14.33 ppm from the internal reference 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. Addition of 0.6 mmol L(-1) HSA to the NFA buffer solution caused splitting of the CF(3) signal into two broadened signals, shifted to the lower fields of 14.56 and 15.06 ppm, with an approximate intensity ratio of 1:3. Denaturation of HSA by addition of 3.0 mol L(-1) guanidine hydrochloride (GU) restored a single sharp signal of CF(3) at 14.38 ppm, indicating complete liberation of NFA from HSA as a result of its denaturation. These results suggest that the binding is reversible and occurs in at least two HSA regions. Competitive (19)F NMR experiments using warfarin, dansyl-L: -asparagine, and benzocaine (site I ligands), and L: -tryptophan and ibuprofen (site II ligands) revealed that NFA binds to site I at two different regions, Ia and Ib, in the ratio 1:3. By use of (19)F NMR with NFA as an (19)F NMR probe the nonfluorinated site I-binding drugs sulfobromophthalein and iophenoxic acid were also found to bind sites Ia and Ib, respectively. These results illustrate the usefulness and convenience of (19)F NMR for investigation of the HSA binding of both fluorinated and nonfluorinated drugs.

  14. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  15. 19F NMR study on the biodegradation of fluorophenols by various Rhodococcus species.

    PubMed

    Bondar, V S; Boersma, M G; Golovlev, E L; Vervoort, J; Van Berkel, W J; Finkelstein, Z I; Solyanikova, I P; Golovleva, L A; Rietjens, I M

    1998-01-01

    Of all NMR observable isotopes 19F is the one perhaps most convenient for studies on biodegradation of environmental pollutants. The reasons underlying this potential of 19F NMR are discussed and illustrated on the basis of a study on the biodegradation of fluorophenols by four Rhodococcus strains. The results indicate marked differences between the biodegradation pathways of fluorophenols among the various Rhodococcus species. This holds not only for the level and nature of the fluorinated biodegradation pathway intermediates that accumulate, but also for the regioselectivity of the initial hydroxylation step. Several of the Rhodococcus species contain a phenol hydroxylase that catalyses the oxidative defluorination of ortho-fluorinated di- and trifluorophenols. Furthermore, it is illustrated how the 19F NMR technique can be used as a tool in the process of identification of an accumulated unknown metabolite, in this case most likely 5-fluoromaleylacetate. Altogether, the 19F NMR technique proved valid to obtain detailed information on the microbial biodegradation pathways of fluorinated organics, but also to provide information on the specificity of enzymes generally considered unstable and, for this reason, not much studied so far.

  16. NbF5 and TaF5: Assignment of 19F NMR resonances and chemical bond analysis from GIPAW calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Mamata; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Sadoc, Aymeric; Boucher, Florent

    2013-11-01

    The 19F isotropic chemical shifts (δiso) of two isomorphic compounds, NbF5 and TaF5, which involve six nonequivalent fluorine sites, have been experimentally determined from the reconstruction of 1D 19F MAS NMR spectra. In parallel, the corresponding 19F chemical shielding tensors have been calculated using the GIPAW method for both experimental and DFT-optimized structures. Furthermore, the [M4F20] units of NbF5 and TaF5 being held together by van der Waals interactions, the relevance of Grimme corrections to the DFT optimization processes has been evaluated. However, the semi-empirical dispersion correction term introduced by such a method does not show any significant improvement. Nonetheless, a complete and convincing assignment of the 19F NMR lines of NbF5 and TaF5 is obtained, ensured by the linearity between experimental 19F δiso values and calculated 19F isotropic chemical shielding σiso values. The effects of the geometry optimizations have been carefully analyzed, confirming among other matters, the inaccuracy of the experimental structure of NbF5. The relationships between the fluorine chemical shifts, the nature of the fluorine atoms (bridging or terminal), the position of the terminal ones (opposite or perpendicular to the bridging ones), the fluorine charges, the ionicity and the length of the M-F bonds have been established. Additionally, for three of the 19F NMR lines of NbF5, distorted multiplets, arising from 1J-coupling and residual dipolar coupling between the 19F and 93Nb nuclei, were simulated yielding to values of 93Nb-19F 1J-coupling for the corresponding fluorine sites.

  17. The metabolism of 2-trifluormethylaniline and its acetanilide in the rat by 19F NMR monitored enzyme hydrolysis and 1H/19F HPLC-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tugnait, M; Lenz, E M; Hofmann, M; Spraul, M; Wilson, I D; Lindon, J C; Nicholson, J K

    2003-01-01

    The urinary excretion profile and identity of the metabolites of 2-trifluoromethyl aniline (2-TFMA) and 2-trifluoromethyl acetanilide (2-TFMAc), following i.p. administration to the rat at 50 mg kg(-1), were determined using a combination of 19F NMR monitored enzyme hydrolysis, SPEC-MS and 19F/1H HPLC-NMR. A total recovery of approximately 96.4% of the dose was excreted into the urine as seven metabolites. The major routes of metabolism were N-conjugation (glucuronidation), and ring-hydroxylation followed by sulphation (and to a lesser extent glucuronidation). The major metabolites excreted into the urine for both compounds were a labile N-conjugated metabolite (a postulated N-glucuronide) and a sulphated ring-hydroxylated metabolite (a postulated 4-amino-5-trifluoromethylphenyl sulphate) following dosing of 2-TFMA. These accounted for approximately 53.0 and 31.5% of the dose, respectively. This study identifies problems on sample component instability in the preparation and analysis procedures.

  18. 19F solid-state NMR spectroscopic investigation of crystalline and amorphous forms of a selective muscarinic M3 receptor antagonist, in both bulk and pharmaceutical dosage form samples.

    PubMed

    Wenslow, Robert M

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of the following investigation was to display the utility of 19F solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in both distinguishing between solid forms of a selective muscarinic M3 receptor antagonist and characterizing the active pharmaceutical ingredient in low-dose tablets. Ambient- and elevated-temperature solid-state 19F fast (15 kHz) magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments were employed to obtain desired spectral resolution in this system. Ambient sample temperature combined with rotor frequencies of 15 kHz provided adequate 19F peak resolution to successfully distinguish crystalline and amorphous forms in this system. Additionally, elevated-temperature 19F MAS NMR further characterized solid forms through 19F resonance narrowing brought about by the phenomenon of solvent escape. Similar solvent dynamics at elevated temperatures were utilized in combination with ambient-temperature 19F MAS NMR analysis to provide excipient-free spectra to unambiguously identify the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) conversion from crystalline Form I to the amorphous form in low-dose tablets. It is shown that 19F solid-state NMR is exceptionally powerful in distinguishing amorphous and crystalline forms in both bulk and formulation samples.

  19. Simultaneous 19F-1H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02 mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5 mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a 1H Larmor frequency of 43.32 MHz and 40.68 MHz for 19F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating 19F and 1H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500 MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02 mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ (1H) = 0.335 mol L-1 and LOQ (19F) = 0.130 mol L-1 for trifluoroethanol in

  20. Combining insights from solid-state NMR and first principles calculation: applications to the 19F NMR of octafluoronaphthalene.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Andrew J; Ng, William T K; Jochym, Dominik; Keal, Thomas W; Clark, Stewart J; Tozer, David J; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2007-05-21

    Advances in solid-state NMR methodology and computational chemistry are applied to the (19)F NMR of solid octafluoronaphthalene. It is demonstrated experimentally, and confirmed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, that the spectral resolution in the magic-angle spinning spectrum is limited by the anisotropy of the bulk magnetic susceptibility (ABMS). This leads to the unusual observation that the resolution improves as the sample is diluted. DFT calculations provide assignments of each of the peaks in the (19)F spectrum, but the predictions are close to the limits of accuracy and correlation information from 2-D NMR is invaluable in confirming the assignments. The effects of non-Gaussian lineshapes on the use of 2-D NMR for mapping correlations of spectral frequencies (e.g. due to the ABMS) are also discussed.

  1. Solid-state (19)F-NMR of peptides in native membranes.

    PubMed

    Koch, Katja; Afonin, Sergii; Ieronimo, Marco; Berditsch, Marina; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-01-01

    To understand how membrane-active peptides (MAPs) function in vivo, it is essential to obtain structural information about them in their membrane-bound state. Most biophysical approaches rely on the use of bilayers prepared from synthetic phospholipids, i.e. artificial model membranes. A particularly successful structural method is solid-state NMR, which makes use of macroscopically oriented lipid bilayers to study selectively isotope-labelled peptides. Native biomembranes, however, have a far more complex lipid composition and a significant non-lipidic content (protein and carbohydrate). Model membranes, therefore, are not really adequate to address questions concerning for example the selectivity of these membranolytic peptides against prokaryotic vs eukaryotic cells, their varying activities against different bacterial strains, or other related biological issues.Here, we discuss a solid-state (19)F-NMR approach that has been developed for structural studies of MAPs in lipid bilayers, and how this can be translated to measurements in native biomembranes. We review the essentials of the methodology and discuss key objectives in the practice of (19)F-labelling of peptides. Furthermore, the preparation of macroscopically oriented biomembranes on solid supports is discussed in the context of other membrane models. Two native biomembrane systems are presented as examples: human erythrocyte ghosts as representatives of eukaryotic cell membranes, and protoplasts from Micrococcus luteus as membranes from Gram-positive bacteria. Based on our latest experimental experience with the antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S, the benefits and some implicit drawbacks of using such supported native membranes in solid-state (19)F-NMR analysis are discussed.

  2. 6-Trifluoromethylpyridoxine: novel (19)F NMR pH indicator for in vivo detection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Xin; Cui, Weina; Bourke, Vincent A; Mason, Ralph P

    2012-08-09

    pH plays an important role in tumor proliferation, angiogenesis, metabolic control, and the efficacy of cytotoxic therapy, and accurate noninvasive assessment of tumor pH promises to provide insight into developmental processes and prognostic information. In this paper, we report the design, synthesis, and characterization of two novel pH indicators 6-trifluoromethylpyridoxine 8 and α(4),α(5)-di-O-[3'-O-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)propyl]-6-trifluoromethylpyridoxine 17 and demonstrate 8 as an extracellular (19)F NMR pH probe to assess pH(e) of various tumors in vivo.

  3. NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}: Assignment of {sup 19}F NMR resonances and chemical bond analysis from GIPAW calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Mamata; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Sadoc, Aymeric; Boucher, Florent

    2013-11-15

    The {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shifts (δ{sub iso}) of two isomorphic compounds, NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}, which involve six nonequivalent fluorine sites, have been experimentally determined from the reconstruction of 1D {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectra. In parallel, the corresponding {sup 19}F chemical shielding tensors have been calculated using the GIPAW method for both experimental and DFT-optimized structures. Furthermore, the [M{sub 4}F{sub 20}] units of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} being held together by van der Waals interactions, the relevance of Grimme corrections to the DFT optimization processes has been evaluated. However, the semi-empirical dispersion correction term introduced by such a method does not show any significant improvement. Nonetheless, a complete and convincing assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} is obtained, ensured by the linearity between experimental {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values and calculated {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shielding σ{sub iso} values. The effects of the geometry optimizations have been carefully analyzed, confirming among other matters, the inaccuracy of the experimental structure of NbF{sub 5}. The relationships between the fluorine chemical shifts, the nature of the fluorine atoms (bridging or terminal), the position of the terminal ones (opposite or perpendicular to the bridging ones), the fluorine charges, the ionicity and the length of the M–F bonds have been established. Additionally, for three of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5}, distorted multiplets, arising from {sup 1}J-coupling and residual dipolar coupling between the {sup 19}F and {sup 93}Nb nuclei, were simulated yielding to values of {sup 93}Nb–{sup 19}F {sup 1}J-coupling for the corresponding fluorine sites. - Graphical abstract: The complete assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} allow establishing relationships between the {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values, the nature of the fluorine atoms

  4. Dissection of the ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme using 19F NMR

    PubMed Central

    Hammann, Christian; Norman, David G.; Lilley, David M. J.

    2001-01-01

    We have used 19F NMR to analyze the metal ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme by selective incorporation of 5fluorouridine. We have studied the chemical shift and linewidths of 19F resonances of 5-fluorouridine at the 4 and 7 positions in the ribozyme core as a function of added Mg2+. The data fit well to a simple two-state model whereby the formation of domain 1 is induced by the noncooperative binding of Mg2+ with an association constant in the range of 100 to 500 M−1, depending on the concentration of monovalent ions present. The results are in excellent agreement with data reporting on changes in the global shape of the ribozyme. However, the NMR experiments exploit reporters located in the center of the RNA sections undergoing the folding transitions, thereby allowing the assignment of specific nucleotides to the separate stages. The results define the folding pathway at high resolution and provide a time scale for the first transition in the millisecond range. PMID:11331743

  5. Using magnetic coupling to implement 1H, 19F, 13C experiments in routine high resolution NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Paul; Finnigan, Jim; Marsden, Brian; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2015-12-01

    We report in this paper the design of 1H, 19F, 13C circuitry using magnetic coupling which can do on demand experiments where one of the three nuclei is observed and the other two are decoupled. The implementation of this circuitry in routine NMR probes is compared with capacitive coupling methods where it was found that by using magnetic coupling the performance of the routine NMR probe was not impacted by the addition of this circuitry. It is surmised that using this type of circuitry would be highly desirable for those chemists doing routine 19F NMR.

  6. 19F NMR measurements of the rotational mobility of proteins in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S P; Haggie, P M; Brindle, K M

    1997-01-01

    Three glycolytic enzymes, hexokinase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and pyruvate kinase, were fluorine labeled in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by biosynthetic incorporation of 5-fluorotryptophan. 19F NMR longitudinal relaxation time measurements on the labeled enzymes were used to assess their rotational mobility in the intact cell. Comparison with the results obtained from relaxation time measurements of the purified enzymes in vitro and from theoretical calculations showed that two of the labeled enzymes, phosphoglycerate kinase and hexokinase, were tumbling in a cytoplasm that had a viscosity approximately twice that of water. There were no detectable signals from pyruvate kinase in vivo, although it could be detected in diluted cell extracts, indicating that there was some degree of motional restriction of the enzyme in the intact cell. PMID:8994636

  7. Solid-state {sup 19}F and {sup 13}C NMR of room temperature fluorinated graphite and samples thermally treated under fluorine: Low-field and high-resolution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Giraudet, J.; Dubois, M.; Guerin, K.; Pinheiro, J.P.; Hamwi, A.; Stone, W.E.E.; Pirotte, P.; Masin, F. . E-mail: fmasin@ulb.ac.be

    2005-04-15

    Room temperature graphite fluorides consisting of raw material and samples post-treated in pure fluorine atmosphere in the temperature range 100-500 deg. C have been studied by solid-state NMR. Several NMR approaches have been used, both high and low-field {sup 19}F, {sup 19}F MAS and {sup 13}C MAS with {sup 19}F to {sup 13}C cross polarization. The modifications, in the graphitic lattice, of the catalytic iodine fluorides products have been examined. A transformation of the C-F bond character from semi-ionic to covalent has been found to occur at a post-treatment temperature close to 400 deg. C. It is shown that covalency increases with temperature.

  8. Drug-specific [sup 19]F NMR and dynamic [sup 18]F PET imaging of the cytostatic agent 5-fluorouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Bellemann, M.E.; Brix, G.; Haberkorn, U.; Ostertag, H.J.; Lorenz, W.J. )

    1994-12-01

    The spatial distribution of the antineoplastic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been mapped both with [sup 19]F NMR and [sup 18]F PET imaging techniques. For [sup 19]F NMR imaging of 5-FU and its major catabolite [alpha]-fluoro-[beta]-alanine (FBAL), a fast gradient-echo pulse sequence was employed. A chemical-shift selective saturation pulse was used to suppress either the 5-FU or the FBAL resonance before the other component of the [sup 19]F NMR spectrum was images. This approach yielded selective 5-FU and FBAL NMR images free of chemical-shift artifacts in readout and slice-selection direction. In phantom experiments, [sup 19]F 5-FU and FBAL images with a spatial resolution of 12.5 x 12.5 x 20 mm[sup 3] were obtained in 32 min from model solutions with drug and catabolite concentrations similar to those estimated in animals and patients undergoing i.v. chemotherapy with 5-FU. The biodistribution of 5-[[sup 18]F]FU in rats shortly after administration of the drug demonstrated the good vascularization of the transplanted tumors. The metabolic turnover of the cytostatic agent started about 10--20 min p.i. and was predominant in the tumor and liver tissue. The rapid adjustment of the [sup 18]F metabolite concentrations in the transplanted tumors to a steady state provides evidence of anabolic tumor activity, which supports the hypothesis of 5-FU trapping in malignant cells based on [sup 19]F NMR spectroscopy data. The high uptake of 5-[[sup 18]F]FU in the liver, on the other hand, mainly reflects the catabolization of 5-FU to the noncytotoxic FBAL, which leads to a reduced bioavailability of the drug.

  9. Highly efficient (19)F heteronuclear decoupling in solid-state NMR spectroscopy using supercycled refocused-CW irradiation.

    PubMed

    Equbal, Asif; Basse, Kristoffer; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2016-12-07

    We present heteronuclear (19)F refocused CW (rCW) decoupling pulse sequences for solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR applications. The decoupling sequences have been designed specifically to ensure suppression of the pertinent (13)C-(19)F dipolar coupling interactions while simultaneously suppressing strong anisotropic chemical shift as well as homonuclear (19)F-(19)F dipolar coupling effects as typically present in perfluorated compounds. In an extensive numerical and experimental analysis using a rigid, organic solid as a model compound, it becomes evident that the supercycled rCW schemes markedly improve the decoupling efficiency, leading to substantial enhancements in resolution and sensitivity when compared to previous state-of-the-art methods. Furthermore, considerable gains in robustness toward rf mismatch as well as offset in the radio-frequency carrier frequency are observed, all of which clearly render the new rCW schemes the methods of choice for (19)F decoupling in rigid, fluorinated compounds - which is further supported by a Floquet-based theoretical analysis.

  10. Fluorinated amino-derivatives of the sesquiterpene lactone, parthenolide, as (19)f NMR probes in deuterium-free environments.

    PubMed

    Woods, James R; Mo, Huaping; Bieberich, Andrew A; Alavanja, Tanja; Colby, David A

    2011-11-24

    The design, synthesis, and biological activity of fluorinated amino-derivatives of the sesquiterpene lactone, parthenolide, are described. A fluorinated aminoparthenolide analogue with biological activity similar to the parent natural product was discovered, and its X-ray structure was obtained. This lead compound was then studied using (19)F NMR in the presence and absence of glutathione to obtain additional mechanism of action data, and it was found that the aminoparthenolide eliminates amine faster in the presence of glutathione than in the absence of glutathione. The exact changes in concentrations of fluorinated compound and amine were quantified by a concentration-reference method using (19)F NMR; a major benefit of applying this strategy is that no deuterated solvents or internal standards are required to obtain accurate concentrations. These mechanistic data with glutathione may contribute to the conversion of the amino-derivative to parthenolide, the active pharmacological agent, in glutathione-rich cancer cells.

  11. Fluorinated Amino-Derivatives of the Sesquiterpene Lactone, Parthenolide, as 19F NMR Probes in Deuterium-Free Environments

    PubMed Central

    Woods, James R.; Mo, Huaping; Bieberich, Andrew A.; Alavanja, Tanja; Colby, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and biological activity of fluorinated amino-derivatives of the sesquiterpene lactone, parthenolide, are described. A fluorinated aminoparthenolide analogue with biological activity similar to the parent natural product was discovered, and its X-ray structure was obtained. This lead compound was then studied using 19F NMR in the presence and absence of glutathione to obtain additional mechanism of action data, and it was found that the aminoparthenolide eliminates amine faster in the presence of glutathione than in the absence of glutathione. The exact changes in concentrations of fluorinated compound and amine were quantified by a concentration-reference method using 19F NMR; a major benefit of applying this strategy is that no deuterated solvents or internal standards are required to obtain accurate concentrations. These mechanistic data with glutathione may contribute to the conversion of the amino-derivative to parthenolide, the active pharmacological agent, in glutathione-rich cancer cells. PMID:22029741

  12. Method of Continuous Variation: Characterization of Alkali Metal Enolates Using 1H and 19F NMR Spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The method of continuous variation in conjunction with 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopies was used to characterize lithium and sodium enolates solvated by N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylethyldiamine (TMEDA) and tetrahydrofuran (THF). A strategy developed using lithium enolates was then applied to the more challenging sodium enolates. A number of sodium enolates solvated by TMEDA or THF afford exclusively tetramers. Evidence suggests that TMEDA chelates sodium on cubic tetramers. PMID:24915602

  13. Solubilization of flurbiprofen within non-ionic Tween 20 surfactant micelles: a 19F and 1H NMR study.

    PubMed

    Saveyn, Pieter; Cocquyt, Ellen; Zhu, Wuxin; Sinnaeve, Davy; Haustraete, Katrien; Martins, José C; Van der Meeren, Paul

    2009-07-14

    The solubilization of the poorly water soluble anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen in non-ionic Tween 20 surfactant micellar solutions was studied by both (19)F and (1)H NMR spectroscopy in an acidic environment. These non-destructive techniques allowed us to investigate the effect of temperature cycling in situ. Using (19)F NMR, an increased solubilisation capacity was observed as the temperature increased. This effect became more pronounced above the cloud point, which was reduced by more than 30 degrees C in the presence of an excess of flurbiprofen. Upon clouding, peak splitting was observed in the (19)F spectrum, which indicates that two pools of solubilised flurbiprofen exist that are in slow exchange on the NMR frequency timescale. The clouding and solubilization processes were found to be reversible, albeit with slow kinetics. Based on chemical shift differences of both Tween 20 and flurbiprofen, as well as NOESY experiments, the flurbiprofen was found to be accumulated within the palisade layer of the Tween 20 micelles.

  14. Magnetism, optical absorbance, and 19F NMR spectra of nafion films with self-assembling paramagnetic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, E. M.; Chen, Q.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2012-01-15

    Magnetization, optical absorbance, and {sup 19}F NMR spectra of Nafion transparent films as received and doped with Mn{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, and Fe{sup 3+} ions with and without treatment in 1H-1,2,4-triazole (trz) have been studied. Doping of Nafion with Fe{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+} and their bridging to nitrogen of triazole yields a hybrid self-assembling paramagnetic system that exhibits interesting magnetic and optical properties. These include spin crossover phenomena between high-spin (HS) and low-spin (LS) states in Nafion-Fe{sup 2+}-trz and Nafion-Co{sup 2+}-trz accompanied by thermochromic effects in the visible range induced by temperature. A large shift of the magnetization curve induced by a magnetic field in the vicinity of the HS {leftrightarrow} LS, {approx}220 K, observed for Nafion-Fe{sup 2+}-trz has a rate of {approx}6 K/kOe, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that in bulk spin crossover Fe{sup 2+} materials. Selective response of {sup 19}F NMR signals on doping with paramagnetic ions demonstrates that NMR can be used as spatially resolved method to study Nafion film with paramagnetic network. Both chemical shift and width of {sup 19}F NMR signals show that SO groups of Nafion, Fe or Co ions, and nitrogen of triazole are bonded whereas they form a spin crossover system. Based on a model of nanosize cylinders proposed for Nafion [K. Schmidt-Rohr and Q. Chen, Nat Mater (2008), 75], we suggest that paramagnetic ions are located inside these cylinders, forming self-assembling magnetically and optically active nanoscale networks.

  15. Orientation of fluorinated cholesterol in lipid bilayers analyzed by 19F tensor calculation and solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Matsumori, Nobuaki; Kasai, Yusuke; Oishi, Tohru; Murata, Michio; Nomura, Kaoru

    2008-04-09

    6-F-cholesterol was reported to exhibit biological and interfacial properties similar to unmodified cholesterol. We have also found that 6-F-cholesterol mimicked the cholesterol activity observed in the systems of amphotericin B and lipid rafts. However, to use 6-F-cholesterol as a molecular probe to explore molecular recognition in membranes, it is indispensable to have detailed knowledge of the dynamic and orientation properties of the molecule in membrane environments. In this paper, we present the molecular orientation of 6-F-cholesterol (30 mol %) in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers revealed by combined use of 19F chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), 2H NMR, and C-F rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) experiments. The axis of rotation of 6-F-cholesterol was shown to be in a similar direction to that of cholesterol in DMPC bilayers, which is almost parallel to the long axis of the molecular frame. The molecular order parameter of 6-F-cholesterol was determined to be ca. 0.85, which is within the range of reported values of cholesterol. These findings suggest that the dynamic properties of 6-F-cholesterol in DMPC are quite similar to those of unmodified cholesterol; therefore, the introduction of a fluorine atom at C6 has virtually no effect on cholesterol dynamics in membranes. In addition, this study demonstrates the practical utility of theoretical calculations for determining the 19F CSA principal axes, which would be extremely difficult to obtain experimentally. The combined use of quantum calculations and solid-state 19F NMR will make it possible to apply the orientation information of 19F CSA tensors to membrane systems.

  16. Detection and differentiation of neutral organic compounds by 19F NMR with a tungsten calix[4]arene imido complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanchuan; Swager, Timothy M

    2013-12-18

    Fluorinated tungsten calix[4]arene imido complexes were synthesized and used as receptors to detect and differentiate neutral organic compounds. It was found that the binding of specific neutral organic molecules to the tungsten centers induces an upfield shift of the fluorine atom appended on the arylimido group, the extent of which is highly dependent on electronic and steric properties. We demonstrate that the specific bonding and size-selectivity of calix[4]arene tungsten-imido complex combined with (19)F NMR spectroscopy is a powerful new method for the analysis of complex mixtures.

  17. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  18. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  19. Effects of fluoride on in vitro enamel demineralization analyzed by ¹⁹F MAS-NMR.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, N R; Kent, N W; Lynch, R J M; Karpukhina, N; Hill, R; Anderson, P

    2013-01-01

    The mechanistic action of fluoride on inhibition of enamel demineralization was investigated using (19)F magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR). The aim of this study was to monitor the fluoride-mineral phase formed on the enamel as a function of the concentration of fluoride ions [F(-)] in the demineralizing medium. The secondary aim was to investigate fluorapatite formation on enamel in the mechanism of fluoride anti-caries efficacy. Enamel blocks were immersed into demineralization solutions of 0.1 M acetic acid (pH 4) with increasing concentrations of fluoride up to 2,262 ppm. At and below 45 ppm [F(-)] in the solution, (19)F MAS-NMR showed fluoride-substituted apatite formation, and above 45 ppm, calcium fluoride (CaF2) formed in increasing proportions. Further increases in [F(-)] caused no further reduction in demineralization, but increased the proportion of CaF2 formed. Additionally, the combined effect of strontium and fluoride on enamel demineralization was also investigated using (19)F MAS-NMR. The presence of 43 ppm [Sr(2+)] in addition to 45 ppm [F(-)] increases the fraction of fluoride-substituted apatite, but delays formation of CaF2 when compared to the demineralization of enamel in fluoride-only solution.

  20. Kinetics of membrane binding and dissociation of 5-fluorouracil by pulsed-field-gradient 19F NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, Noriyuki; Okamura, Emiko

    2009-06-01

    The kinetics of membrane binding and dissociation of an anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (5FU) is quantified by high resolution NMR with the pulsed-field-gradient technique. The 19F NMR signal of 5FU is analyzed at 293-313 K by the solution of Bloch equation with exchange terms. The rate constants of 5FU binding and dissociation are 0.2 and 4.1 s -1 at 303 K. The 5FU motion in the vertical direction to the membrane surface is restricted as compared with the lateral diffusion, judging from the activation energy (57 kJ/mol) larger than the lateral diffusion in membrane (26 kJ/mol [E. Okamura, N. Yoshii, J. Chem. Phys. 129 (2008) 215102]).

  1. Phospho-selective mechanisms of arrestin conformations and functions revealed by unnatural amino acid incorporation and 19F-NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Yu, Xiao; Liu, Chuan; Qu, Chang-Xiu; Gong, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Da; Li, Fa-Hui; Wang, Hong-Mei; He, Dong-Fang; Yi, Fan; Song, Chen; Tian, Chang-Lin; Xiao, Kun-Hong; Wang, Jiang-Yun; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Specific arrestin conformations are coupled to distinct downstream effectors, which underlie the functions of many G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, using unnatural amino acid incorporation and fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance (19F-NMR) spectroscopy, we demonstrate that distinct receptor phospho-barcodes are translated to specific β-arrestin-1 conformations and direct selective signalling. With its phosphate-binding concave surface, β-arrestin-1 ‘reads' the message in the receptor phospho-C-tails and distinct phospho-interaction patterns are revealed by 19F-NMR. Whereas all functional phosphopeptides interact with a common phosphate binding site and induce the movements of finger and middle loops, different phospho-interaction patterns induce distinct structural states of β-arrestin-1 that are coupled to distinct arrestin functions. Only clathrin recognizes and stabilizes GRK2-specific β-arrestin-1 conformations. The identified receptor-phospho-selective mechanism for arrestin conformation and the spacing of the multiple phosphate-binding sites in the arrestin enable arrestin to recognize plethora phosphorylation states of numerous GPCRs, contributing to the functional diversity of receptors. PMID:26347956

  2. A 19F NMR Approach using Reporter Molecule Pairs to Assess β-Galactosidase in Human Xenograft Tumors in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Xin; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Liu, Li; Mason, Ralph P.

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy has emerged as a promising strategy for treatment of various diseases. However, widespread implementation is hampered by difficulties in assessing the success of transfection in the target tissue and the longevity of gene expression. Thus, there is increasing interest in the development of non-invasive in vivo reporter techniques to assay gene expression. We recently demonstrated the ability to detect β-galactosidase activity in stably transfected human prostate tumor xenografts in mice in vivo using 19F NMR. We now extend the studies to human MCF7 breast cancer cells growing as xenografts in nude mice. Moreover, by using two spectrally resolved reporters (o-fluoro-p-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside and an isomer) two tumors could be interrogated simultaneously revealing lacZ transgene activity in a stably transfected tumor versus no activity in a wild type tumor. Most significantly hydrolytic activity observed by 19F NMR corresponded with differential activity in lacZ expressing tumors. PMID:18288788

  3. Feasibility of 19F-NMR for assessing the molecular mobility of flufenamic acid in solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Aso, Yukio; Yoshioka, Sumie; Miyazaki, Tamaki; Kawanishi, Toru

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to clarify the feasibility of 19F-NMR for assessing the molecular mobility of flufenamic acid (FLF) in solid dispersions. Amorphous solid dispersions of FLF containing poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) or hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) were prepared by melting and rapid cooling. Spin-lattice relaxation times (T1 and T(1rho)) of FLF fluorine atoms in the solid dispersions were determined at various temperatures (-20 to 150 degrees C). Correlation time (tauc), which is a measure of rotational molecular mobility, was calculated from the observed T1 or T1rho value and that of the T1 or T1rho minimum, assuming that the relaxation mechanism of spin-lattice relaxation of FLF fluorine atoms does not change with temperature. The tauc value for solid dispersions containing 20% PVP was 2-3 times longer than that for solid dispersions containing 20% HPMC at 50 degrees C, indicating that the molecular mobility of FLF in solid dispersions containing 20% PVP was lower than that in solid dispersions containing 20% HPMC. The amount of amorphous FLF remaining in the solid dispersions stored at 60 degrees C was successfully estimated by analyzing the solid echo signals of FLF fluorine atoms, and it was possible to follow the overall crystallization of amorphous FLF in the solid dispersions. The solid dispersion containing 20% PVP was more stable than that containing 20% HPMC. The difference in stability between solid dispersions containing PVP and HPMC is considered due to the difference in molecular mobility as determined by tauc. The molecular mobility determined by 19F-NMR seems to be a useful measure for assessing the stability of drugs containing fluorine atoms in amorphous solid dispersions.

  4. 1H and 19 F NMR Study of Cation and Anion Motions in Guanidinium Hexafluorozirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottel, M.; Kozak, A.; Pająk, Z.

    1996-09-01

    Proton and fluorine NMR second moments and spin-lattice relaxation times of polycrystalline guanidinium hexafluorozirconate and its deuterated analogue were studied in laboratory (60 MHz) and rotating (H1 = 20 G) frames over a wide range of temperature. An analysis of the experimental results enabled us to reveal a dynamical inequivalence of two crystallographically independent cations and an unexpected high mobility of nonspherical anion dimers. A comparison of the ions dynamics in 2:1 complex studied with the guanidinium 1:1 and 3:1 complexes has shown a significant contribution of the hydrogen bonds to the potential barriers hindering the anion reorientations. At low temperatures a proton motion in the hydrogen bond and at 400 K a solid-solid phase transition have been discerned.

  5. (13)C and (19)F solid-state NMR and X-ray crystallographic study of halogen-bonded frameworks featuring nitrogen-containing heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Szell, Patrick M J; Gabriel, Shaina A; Gill, Russell D D; Wan, Shirley Y H; Gabidullin, Bulat; Bryce, David L

    2017-03-01

    Halogen bonding is a noncovalent interaction between the electrophilic region of a halogen (σ-hole) and an electron donor. We report a crystallographic and structural analysis of halogen-bonded compounds by applying a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD) and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) approach. Single-crystal XRD was first used to characterize the halogen-bonded cocrystals formed between two fluorinated halogen-bond donors (1,4-diiodotetrafluorobenzene and 1,3,5-trifluoro-2,4,6-triiodobenzene) and several nitrogen-containing heterocycles (acridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine, and hexamethylenetetramine). New structures are reported for the following three cocrystals, all in the P21/c space group: acridine-1,3,5-trifluoro-2,4,6-triiodobenzene (1/1), C6F3I3·C13H9N, 1,10-phenanthroline-1,3,5-trifluoro-2,4,6-triiodobenzene (1/1), C6F3I3·C12H8N2, and 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine-1,3,5-trifluoro-2,4,6-triiodobenzene (1/1), C6F3I3·C8H12N2. (13)C and (19)F solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR is shown to be a convenient method to characterize the structural features of the halogen-bond donor and acceptor, with chemical shifts attributable to cocrystal formation observed in the spectra of both nuclides. Cross polarization (CP) from (19)F to (13)C results in improved spectral sensitivity in characterizing the perfluorinated halogen-bond donor when compared to conventional (1)H CP. Gauge-including projector-augmented wave density functional theory (GIPAW DFT) calculations of magnetic shielding constants, along with optimization of the XRD structures, provide a final set of structures in best agreement with the experimental (13)C and (19)F chemical shifts. Data for carbons bonded to iodine remain outliers due to well-known relativistic effects.

  6. Spatially resolved solid-state MAS-NMR-spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Scheler, U; Schauss, G; Blümich, B; Spiess, H W

    1996-07-01

    A comprehensive account of spatially resolved solid-state MAS NMR of 13C is given. A device generating field gradients rotating synchronously with the magic angle spinner is described. Spatial resolution and sensitivity are compared for phase and frequency encoding of spatial information. The suppression of spinning sidebands is demonstrated for both cases. Prior knowledge about the involved materials can be used for the reduction of data from spatially resolved spectra to map chemical structure. Indirect detection via 13C NMR gives access to the information about mobility from proton-wideline spectra. Two-dimensional solid-state spectroscopy with spatial resolution is demonstrated for a rotor synchronized MAS experiment which resolves molecular order as a function of space. By comparison of different experiments the factors affecting the spatial resolution are investigated.

  7. /sup 19/F NMR studies of 5-fluorouracil-substituted Escherichia coli transfer RNAs: solution structure and codon-anticodon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gollnick, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    /sup 19/F NMR was used to study E. coli tRNA/sub 1//sup Val/, tRNA/sub f//sup Met/, and tRNA/sub m//Met/, in which 5-fluorouracil (FUra) has replaced uracil and uracil-derived minor bases. /sup 19/F NMR spectra of these tRNAs resolve resonances from nearly all the incorporated FUra residues. Each of the three tRNAs can be resolved into two isoaccepting species, termed forms A and B, whose /sup 19/F spectra differ in the shift of one /sup 19/F peak from ca. 4.5 ppm in form B, upfield to -15 ppm in form A. Because the two isoacceptors of each tRNA differ only at one position, the peaks at 4.5 ppm in the spectra of (FUra)tRNA/sub 1//sup Val/ and (FUra)tRNA/sub m//sup Met/; are assigned to FUra 17 and Fura 20 respectively. Bisulfate modification and pH dependence indicate that /sup 19/F signals in the central region of the spectrum of (FUra)tRNA/sub 1//sup Val/ correspond to fluorouracils in non-base-paired regions. Photoreaction with psoralen indicates upfield /sup 19/F signals arise from residues in helical environments. Removal of magnesium or addition of NaCl produces major, reversible changes in the /sup 19/F spectrum of fluorinated tRNAs. Studies of manganese and spermine binding to (FUra)tRNA/sub 1//sup Val/ allow localization of several resonances in the /sup 18/F spectrum to regions near putative binding sites for these ions. Binding of the codon G/sub p/U/sub p/A causes an upfield shift of a /sup 19/F resonance at 3.9 ppm in the spectrum of (FUra)tRNA/sub 1//sup Val/. G/sub p/U/sub p/A/sub p/A, which is complementary to the anticodon and 5'-adjacent FUra 33, shifts an additional /sup 19/F peak at 4.5 ppm. /sup 1/H NMR and RNase H digestion studies show that the oligonucleotides bind to the anticodon.

  8. Characterisation of erythrocyte transmembrane exchange of trifluoroacetate using 19F-NMR: evidence for transport via the monocarboxylate transporter.

    PubMed

    Xu, A S; Kuchel, P W

    1993-07-25

    The transport of trifluoroacetate (TFA) and difluorophosphate (DFP) into and out of human and sheep erythrocytes was measured using 19F-NMR. The pathways for the transport in human erythrocytes were characterised by differentiating between the transport inhibition caused by different reagents. (1) Pre-treatment of human erythrocytes with N-ethylmaleimide (10 mM) caused a decrease of the membrane-permeability coefficients for TFA influx and efflux to 0.74 +/- 0.05 and 0.83 +/- 0.09-times, respectively, of those determined in the absence of inhibition. Concomitantly there was no apparent effect on the band-3-mediated transport of DFP. Thus, the decrease of the permeability of TFA is consistent with the inhibition being that of the monocarboxylate transporter. (2) Inhibition of TFA and DFP exchange was also seen in human erythrocytes treated with p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonate (pCMBS). The extent of inhibition reached a maximum value for the pCMBS concentrations beyond which further inhibition was not achieved and there was substantial residual exchange of the two solutes. (3) Residual flux of TFA was found in the presence of high concentrations of the inhibitors, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (> or = 4 mM) or 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (> or = 1 mM) when each compound was used alone. (4) Complete inhibition of TFA uptake was obtained when human erythrocytes were treated with both alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (4 mM) and a stilbene disulfonate. It was, therefore, concluded that simple diffusion of TFA via the lipid bilayer was negligible in human erythrocytes and that incomplete inhibition of the monocarboxylate transporter occurred when the compounds were used alone.

  9. Development of cross-linked polystyrene-supported chiral amines featuring a fluorinated linker for gel-phase 19F NMR spectrometry monitoring of reactions.

    PubMed

    Hourdin, Marie; Gouhier, Géraldine; Gautier, Arnaud; Condamine, Eric; Piettre, Serge R

    2005-01-01

    Ten cross-linked polystyrene-supported, protected chiral amines featuring both a spacer, comprising from 5 to 15 atoms, and a fluorinated linker have been successfully prepared. The development of the monitoring technique by gel-phase 19F NMR spectrometry on cross-linked polystyrene derivatives proved to be of high value in four steps of the process, as shown by the comparison of data gathered from both a classic NMR spectrometer and elemental analysis. Gel-phase 19F NMR spectrometry, thus, constitutes a useful technique that complements IR and 13C NMR spectrometries for the qualitative monitoring of reactions. In addition, quantitative determination of the conversion in a given transformation is possible, provided that 19F chemical shifts of the substrate and the product be different enough (Deltadelta>base width), as illustrated by the Mitsunobu coupling process (16-->17). The technique is nondestructive, and the samples used to monitor the reactions may be returned to the reaction medium. Deprotection of the above amines was achieved and furnished eight of the final resins in good to acceptable purity for future applications.

  10. Interactions of diastereomeric tripeptides of lysyl-5-fluorotryptophyllysine with DNA. 1. Optical and 19F NMR studies of native DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Shine, N R; James, T L

    1985-07-30

    Lysyl-5-fluoro-L-tryptophyllysine and lysyl-5-fluoro-D-tryptophyllysine were synthesized, and their interactions with double-stranded DNA were investigated as a model for protein-nucleic acid interactions. The binding to DNA was studied by monitoring various 19F NMR parameters, the fluorescence, and the optical absorbance in thermal denaturation. The 19F resonance of the L-Trp peptide shifts upfield in the presence of DNA, and that of the D-Trp peptide shifts downfield with DNA present. The influence of ionic strength on the binding of each peptide to DNA and the fluorescence quenching titration of each with DNA indicate that electrostatic bonding (approximately 2 per peptide-DNA complex) dominates the binding in each case and accounts for the similar binding constants determined from the fluorescence quenching, i.e., 7.7 X 10(4) M-1 for the L-Trp complex and 6.2 X 10(-1) for the D-Trp complex. The 19F NMR chemical shift, line width, 19F[1H] nuclear Overhauser effect, and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) changes all indicate that the aromatic moiety of the L-Trp complex, but not that of the D-Trp complex, is stacked between the bases of DNA. The relative increases in DNA melting temperature caused by binding of the tripeptide diastereomers are also consistent with stacking in the case of the L-Trp peptide. The magnitude of the changes and the susceptibility of the 19F NMR chemical shift to altering the solvent isotope (H2O vs. D2O) suggest that the L-Trp ring is not intercalated in the classical sense but is partially inserted between the bases of one strand of the double helix.

  11. 19F NMR Reveals Multiple Conformations at the Dimer Interface of the Non-Structural Protein 1 Effector Domain from Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-Chung; Swapna, G. V. T.; Leonard, Paul G.; Ladbury, John E.; Krug, Robert M.; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-structural protein 1 of influenza A virus, NS1A, is a conserved virulence factor comprised of an N-terminal double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (RBD) and a multifunctional C-terminal effector domain (ED), each of which can independently form symmetric homodimers. Here we apply 19F NMR to NS1A from influenza A/Udorn/307/1972 virus (H3N2) labeled with 5-fluorotryptophan (5-F-Trp), and demonstrate that the 19F signal of Trp187 is a sensitive, direct monitor of the ED helix-helix dimer interface. 19F relaxation dispersion data reveal the presence of conformational dynamics within this functionally important protein-protein interface, whose rate is over three orders of magnitude faster than the kinetics of ED dimerization. 19F NMR also affords direct spectroscopic evidence that Trp187, which mediates intermolecular ED:ED interactions required for cooperative dsRNA binding, is solvent exposed in full-length NS1Aat concentrations below aggregation. These results have important implications for the diverse roles of this NS1A epitope during influenza virus infection. PMID:24582435

  12. γ-(S)-Trifluoromethyl proline: evaluation as a structural substitute of proline for solid state (19)F-NMR peptide studies.

    PubMed

    Kubyshkin, Vladimir; Afonin, Sergii; Kara, Sezgin; Budisa, Nediljko; Mykhailiuk, Pavel K; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-03-21

    γ-(4S)-Trifluoromethyl proline was synthesised according to a modified literature protocol with improved yield on a multigram scale. Conformational properties of the amide bond formed by the amino acid were characterised using N-acetyl methyl ester model. The amide populations (s-trans vs. s-cis) and thermodynamic parameters of the isomerization were found to be similar to the corresponding values for intact proline. Therefore, the γ-trifluoromethyl proline was suggested as a structurally low-disturbing proline substitution in peptides for their structural studies by (19)F-NMR. Indeed, the exchange of native proline for γ-trifluoromethyl proline in the peptide antibiotic gramicidin S was shown to preserve the overall amphipathic peptide structure. The utility of the amino acid as a selective (19)F-NMR label was demonstrated by observing the re-alignment of the labelled gramicidin S in oriented lipid bilayers.

  13. Simultaneous pressure and /sup 19/F NMR pH measurements of smooth muscle cells of intact hog carotid arteries at rest and during contractions with norepinephrine

    SciTech Connect

    Grieder, T.A.; Evans, C.A.; Greenberg, S.S.; Diecke, F.P.J.

    1988-01-01

    Using /sup 19/F NMR we have measured the intracellular pH of the vascular smooth muscle cells of hog carotid arteries at rest and during contractions induced with norepinephrine. Experiments were performed on single, intact arteries closed at both ends, superfused from the lumen and loaded with the /sup 19/F NMR pH indicator ..cap alpha..-difluoromethylalanine. At rest, luminal pressure was maintained at 100 +/-2 mm Hg and intracellular pH was 7.12 +/- 0.04. Contractions elicited with 10/sup -5/ M norepinephrine were associated with a pressure increase of 18 +/-6 mm Hg and a decrease in pH of 0.04 +/- 0.02 units.

  14. The effect of ethanol on hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine: (31)P-NMR and (19)F-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Celikbag, Yusuf; Via, Brian K; Adhikari, Sushil; Buschle-Diller, Gisela; Auad, Maria L

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the role of ethanol and temperature on the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced from hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine (Pinus spp.) carried out at 250, 300, 350 and 390°C for 30min. Water and water/ethanol mixture (1/1, wt/wt) were used as liquefying solvent in the HTL experiments. HTL in water and water/ethanol is donated as W-HTL and W/E-HTL, respectively. It was found that 300°C and water/ethanol solvent was the optimum liquefaction temperature and solvent, yielding up to 68.1wt.% bio-oil and 2.4wt.% solid residue. (31)P-NMR analysis showed that biopolyol produced by W-HTL was rich in phenolic OH while W/E-HTL produced more aliphatic OH rich biopolyols. Moreover, biopolyols with higher hydroxyl concentration were produced by W/E-HTL. Carbonyl groups were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, which showed that ethanol reduced the concentration of carbonyl groups.

  15. (19)F NMR screening of unrelated antimicrobial peptides shows that membrane interactions are largely governed by lipids.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Sergii; Glaser, Ralf W; Sachse, Carsten; Salgado, Jesús; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2014-09-01

    Many amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides permeabilize bacterial membranes via successive steps of binding, re-alignment and/or oligomerization. Here, we have systematically compared the lipid interactions of two structurally unrelated peptides: the cyclic β-pleated gramicidin S (GS), and the α-helical PGLa. (19)F NMR was used to screen their molecular alignment in various model membranes over a wide range of temperatures. Both peptides were found to respond to the phase state and composition of these different samples in a similar way. In phosphatidylcholines, both peptides first bind to the bilayer surface. Above a certain threshold concentration they can re-align and immerse more deeply into the hydrophobic core, which presumably involves oligomerization. Re-alignment is most favorable around the lipid chain melting temperature, and also promoted by decreasing bilayer thickness. The presence of anionic lipids has no influence in fluid membranes, but in the gel phase the alignment states are more complex. Unsaturated acyl chains and other lipids with intrinsic negative curvature prevent re-alignment, hence GS and PGLa do not insert into mixtures resembling bacterial membranes, nor into bacterial lipid extracts. Cholesterol, which is present in high concentrations in animal membranes, even leads to an expulsion of the peptides from the bilayer and prevents their binding altogether. However, a very low cholesterol content of 10% was found to promote binding and re-alignment of both peptides. Overall, these findings show that the ability of amphiphilic peptides to re-align and immerse into a membrane is determined by the physico-chemical properties of the lipids, such as spontaneous curvature. This idea is reinforced by the remarkably similar behavior observed here for two structurally unrelated molecules (with different conformation, size, shape, charge), which further suggests that their activity at the membrane level is largely governed by the properties of the

  16. 1H-19F spin-lattice relaxation spectroscopy: proton tunnelling in the hydrogen bond studied by field-cycling NMR.

    PubMed

    Noble, D L; Aibout, A; Horsewill, A J

    2009-12-01

    Proton tunnelling in the hydrogen bonds of two fluorine substituted benzoic acid dimers has been investigated using field-cycling NMR relaxometry. The close proximity of the (19)F nuclei to the hydrogen bond protons introduces heteronuclear (19)F-(1)H dipolar interactions into the spin-lattice relaxation processes. This renders the (1)H magnetisation-recovery biexponential and introduces multiple spectral density components into the relaxation matrix characterised by frequencies that are sums and differences of the (19)F and (1)H Larmor frequencies. Using field-cycling NMR pulse sequences that measure the spin-lattice relaxation and cross-relaxation rates we demonstrate how some of these multiple spectral density components can be separately resolved. This leads to an accurate determination of the correlation times that characterise the proton tunnelling motion. A broad spectrum of relaxation behaviour is illustrated and explored in the chosen samples and the investigation is used to explore the theory and practise of field-cycling NMR relaxometry in cases where heteronuclear interactions are significant.

  17. NMR shielding and spin–rotation constants of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B.

    2015-12-31

    This presentation demonstrates the relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants and shielding spans of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules. The results are obtained from calculations performed using density functional theory (non-relativistic and four-component relativistic) and coupled-cluster calculations. The spin-rotation constants are compared with available experimental values. In most of the molecules studied, relativistic effects make an order of magnitude difference on the NMR absolute shielding constants.

  18. A General Protocol for Temperature Calibration of MAS NMR Probes at Arbitrary Spinning Speeds

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xudong; Stark, Ruth E.

    2010-01-01

    A protocol using 207Pb NMR of solid lead nitrate was developed to determine the temperature of magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR probes over a range of nominal set temperatures and spinning speeds. Using BioMAS and fastMAS probes with typical sample spinning rates of 8 and 35 kHz, respectively, empirical equations were devised to predict the respective sample temperatures. These procedures provide a straightforward recipe for temperature calibration of any MAS probe. PMID:21036557

  19. Self-assembly of flexible β-strands into immobile amyloid-like β-sheets in membranes as revealed by solid-state 19F NMR.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Parvesh; Strandberg, Erik; Heidenreich, Nico; Bürck, Jochen; Fanghänel, Susanne; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-04-18

    The cationic peptide [KIGAKI](3) was designed as an amphiphilic β-strand and serves as a model for β-sheet aggregation in membranes. Here, we have characterized its molecular conformation, membrane alignment, and dynamic behavior using solid-state (19)F NMR. A detailed structure analysis of selectively (19)F-labeled peptides was carried out in oriented DMPC bilayers. It showed a concentration-dependent transition from monomeric β-strands to oligomeric β-sheets. In both states, the rigid (19)F-labeled side chains project straight into the lipid bilayer but they experience very different mobilities. At low peptide-to-lipid ratios ≤1:400, monomeric [KIGAKI](3) swims around freely on the membrane surface and undergoes considerable motional averaging, with essentially uncoupled φ/ψ torsion angles. The flexibility of the peptide backbone in this 2D plane is reminiscent of intrinsically unstructured proteins in 3D. At high concentrations, [KIGAKI](3) self-assembles into immobilized β-sheets, which are untwisted and lie flat on the membrane surface as amyloid-like fibrils. This is the first time the transition of monomeric β-strands into oligomeric β-sheets has been characterized by solid-state NMR in lipid bilayers. It promises to be a valuable approach for studying membrane-induced amyloid formation of many other, clinically relevant peptide systems.

  20. Demystifying fluorine chemical shifts: electronic structure calculations address origins of seemingly anomalous (19)F-NMR spectra of fluorohistidine isomers and analogues.

    PubMed

    Kasireddy, Chandana; Bann, James G; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R

    2015-11-11

    Fluorine NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying biomolecular structure, dynamics, and ligand binding, yet the origins of (19)F chemical shifts are not well understood. Herein, we use electronic structure calculations to describe the changes in (19)F chemical shifts of 2F- and 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon acid titration. While the protonation of the 2F species results in a deshielded chemical shift, protonation of the 4F isomer results in an opposite, shielded chemical shift. The deshielding of 2F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon protonation can be rationalized by concomitant decreases in charge density on fluorine and a reduced dipole moment. These correlations do not hold for 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole, however. Molecular orbital calculations reveal that for the 4F species, there are no lone pair electrons on the fluorine until protonation. Analysis of a series of 4F-imidazole analogues, all with delocalized fluorine electron density, indicates that the deshielding of (19)F chemical shifts through substituent effects correlates with increased C-F bond polarity. In summary, the delocalization of fluorine electrons in the neutral 4F species, with gain of a lone pair upon protonation may help explain the difficulty in developing a predictive framework for fluorine chemical shifts. Ideas debated by chemists over 40 years ago, regarding fluorine's complex electronic effects, are shown to have relevance for understanding and predicting fluorine NMR spectra.

  1. (19) F-NMR Reveals the Role of Mobile Loops in Product and Inhibitor Binding by the São Paulo Metallo-β-Lactamase.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Martine I; Hinchliffe, Philip; Brem, Jürgen; Macsics, Robert; Pfeffer, Inga; Makena, Anne; Umland, Klaus-Daniel; Rydzik, Anna M; Li, Guo-Bo; Spencer, James; Claridge, Timothy D W; Schofield, Christopher J

    2017-03-27

    Resistance to β-lactam antibiotics mediated by metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) is a growing problem. We describe the use of protein-observe (19) F-NMR (PrOF NMR) to study the dynamics of the São Paulo MBL (SPM-1) from β-lactam-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cysteinyl variants on the α3 and L3 regions, which flank the di-Zn(II) active site, were selectively (19) F-labeled using 3-bromo-1,1,1-trifluoroacetone. The PrOF NMR results reveal roles for the mobile α3 and L3 regions in the binding of both inhibitors and hydrolyzed β-lactam products to SPM-1. These results have implications for the mechanisms and inhibition of MBLs by β-lactams and non-β-lactams and illustrate the utility of PrOF NMR for efficiently analyzing metal chelation, identifying new binding modes, and studying protein binding from a mixture of equilibrating isomers.

  2. 31P and 19F NMR studies of glycophorin-reconstituted membranes: preferential interaction of glycophorin with phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Glycophorin A, a major glycoprotein of the erythrocyte membrane, has been incorporated into small unilamellar vesicles composed of a variety of pure and mixed phospholipids. Nuclear spin labels including 31P and 19F have been used at natural abundance or have been synthetically incorporated in lipids to act as probes of lipid-protein interaction. Interactions produce broadening of resonances in several cases and it can be used to demonstrate preferential interaction of certain lipids with glycophorin. 31P and 19F probes show a strong preferential interaction of glycophorin with phosphatidylserine over phosphatidylcholine. There is some evidence that interactions are more pronounced at the inner surface of the bilayer and these results are rationalized in terms of the asymmetric distribution of protein and lipid.

  3. Synthesis, fine structure of 19F NMR and fluorescence of novel amorphous TPA derivatives having perfluorinated cyclopentenyl and benzo[b]thiophene unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bian-Peng; Pang, Mei-Li; Tan, Ting-Feng; Meng, Ji-ben

    2013-04-01

    Three novel triphenylamine (TPA) derivatives having perfluorinated cyclopentenyl and benzo[b]thiophene unit are obtained from 4-bromo-N,N-diphenyl-2-methylbenzo[b]thiophen-5-amine. The new compounds are expected to find their use in thin film devices as charge transport materials and host organic light-emitting materials. It is found that the new compounds show relatively strong fluorescence either in solution or in solid state, and are amorphous due to a special conformation which is elucidated by the fine structure of 19F NMR. Molecular structure and properties of these compounds is characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR (broadband decoupled), ESI-HRMS, elemental analysis and thermal analysis (DSC). Fluorescent quantum yield in solution is measured using 9,10-diphenylanthrancene (DPA) as standard fluorescent substance.

  4. Evidence of a structural phase transition in superconducting SmFeAsO1-xFx from 19F NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, M.; Ghoshray, K.; Mazumdar, C.; Poddar, A.; Ghoshray, A.; Berardan, D.; Dragoe, N.

    2013-01-01

    We report resistivity, magnetization and 19F NMR results in a polycrystalline sample of SmFeAsO0.86F0.14. The resistivity and magnetization data show a sharp drop at 48 K indicating a superconducting transition. The nuclear spin-lattice rate (1/T1) and spin-spin relaxation rate (1/T2) clearly show the existence of a structural phase transition near 163 K in the sample, which also undergoes a superconducting transition. This finding creates interest in exploring whether this is unique for Sm based systems or is also present in other rare-earth based 1111 superconductors.

  5. Fluorescence and 19F NMR evidence that phenylalanine, 3-L-fluorophenylalanine and 4-L-fluorophenylalanine bind to the L-leucine specific receptor of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Luck, L. A.; Johnson, C.

    2000-01-01

    The binding capacity of the L-leucine receptor from Escherichia coli was measured with L-phenylalanine and 4-fluoro-L-phenylalanine as substrates by fluorescence. The apparent dissociation constants (KD) for L-leucine, L-phenylalanine, and 4-fluoro-L-phenylalanine are 0.40, 0.18, and 0.26 respectively. 19F NMR data show protein-induced shifts for the 4-fluoro-L-phenylalanine peak and 3-fluoro-L-phenylalanine when receptor is present. Evidence points to the binding of only the L-isomers of these fluorine analogs. PMID:11206079

  6. Determination of perfluorinated surfactants in surface water samples by two independent analytical techniques: liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and 19F NMR.

    PubMed

    Moody, C A; Kwan, W C; Martin, J W; Muir, D C; Mabury, S A

    2001-05-15

    Perfluorinated surfactants are an important class of specialty chemicals that have received recent attention as a result of their persistence in the environment. Two analytical methods for the determination of perfluorinated surfactants in aqueous samples were developed in order to investigate a spill of 22000 L of fire retardant foam containing perfluorinated surfactants into Etobicoke Creek (Toronto, Ontario). With the first method, aliquots of surface water (0.2-200 mL) were preconcentrated using solid-phase extraction. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was employed for identification and quantification of each perfluorinated surfactant. Total perfluorinated surfactant concentrations in surface water samples ranged from 0.011 to 2270 microg/L, and perfluorooctanesulfonate was the predominant surfactant observed. Interestingly, perfluorooctanoate was detected in surface water sampled upstream of the spill. A second method employing 19F NMR was developed for the determination of total perfluorinated surfactant concentrations in aqueous samples (2-100 mL). By 19F NMR, the surface water concentrations ranged from nondetect (method detection limit, 10 microg/L for a 100-mL sample) to 17000 microg/L. These methods permit comprehensive evaluation of aqueous samples for the presence of perfluorinated surfactants and have applicability to other sample matrixes.

  7. Alignment of druglike compounds in lipid bilayers analyzed by solid-state (19)F-NMR and molecular dynamics, based on dipolar couplings of adjacent CF3 groups.

    PubMed

    Dürr, Ulrich H N; Afonin, Sergii; Hoff, Barbara; de Luca, Giuseppina; Emsley, James W; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-04-26

    Solid-state (19)F-NMR spectroscopy is frequently used to analyze the structure and dynamics of lipophilic drugs and peptides embedded in biomembranes. The homonuclear dipolar couplings of trifluoromethyl (CF3) labels can provide valuable parameters such as orientational constraints and/or distances. To characterize the complex dipolar patterns of multiple (19)F spin interactions, three different model compounds carrying two CF3 groups in meta-position on a phenyl ring were incorporated in macroscopically aligned DMPC bilayers. The dipolar patterns obtained with the CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) multipulse sequence were analyzed to yield simultaneously the intra-CF3 and intergroup dipolar coupling values. The fluorine-fluorine distances were predicted by a density functional calculation, and the alignment of the labeled molecular segment could be determined from these distances and the dipolar coupling values. The different compounds were found to align in the lipid bilayer according to their amphiphilic properties, though with a weak anisotropic preference that is typical of solutes in liquid crystals. The residual dipolar couplings were used to calculate Saupe order parameters. For the least complex molecule, (CF3)2-BA, an orientational probability function for the solute in the lipid matrix could be derived. The overall description of how (CF3)2-BA is embedded in the bilayer was independently assessed by molecular dynamics simulations, and compared in structural and dynamical terms with the results of the NMR experiments.

  8. Using "On/Off" (19)F NMR/Magnetic Resonance Imaging Signals to Sense Tyrosine Kinase/Phosphatase Activity in Vitro and in Cell Lysates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Sun, Hongbin; Hu, Chen; Li, Gongyu; Liu, Xiaomei; Chen, Peiyao; Cui, Yusi; Liu, Jing; Wang, Junfeng; Liang, Gaolin

    2016-03-15

    Tyrosine kinase and phosphatase are two important, antagonistic enzymes in organisms. Development of noninvasive approach for sensing their activity with high spatial and temporal resolution remains challenging. Herein, we rationally designed a hydrogelator Nap-Phe-Phe(CF3)-Glu-Tyr-Ile-OH (1a) whose supramolecular hydrogel (i.e., Gel 1a) can be subjected to tyrosine kinase-directed disassembly, and its phosphate precursor Nap-Phe-Phe(CF3)-Glu-Tyr(H2PO3)-Ile-OH (1b), which can be subjected to alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-instructed self-assembly to form supramolecular hydrogel Gel 1b, respectively. Mechanic properties and internal fibrous networks of the hydrogels were characterized with rheology and cryo transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Disassembly/self-assembly of their corresponding supramolecular hydrogels conferring respective "On/Off" (19)F NMR/MRI signals were employed to sense the activity of these two important enzymes in vitro and in cell lysates for the first time. We anticipate that our new (19)F NMR/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method would facilitate pharmaceutical researchers to screen new inhibitors for these two enzymes without steric hindrance.

  9. Sealed rotors for in situ high temperature high pressure MAS NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Zhao, Zhenchao; ...

    2015-07-06

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations on heterogeneous samples containing solids, semi-solids, liquid and gases or a mixture of them under non-conventional conditions of a combined high pressure and high temperature, or cold temperature suffer from the unavailability of a perfectly sealed rotor. Here, we report the design of reusable and perfectly-sealed all-zircornia MAS rotors. The rotors are easy to use and are suitable for operation temperatures from below 0 to 250 °C and pressures up to 100 bar. As an example of potential applications we performed in situ MAS NMR investigations of AlPO₄-5 molecular sieve crystallization,more » a kinetic study of the cyclohexanol dehydration reaction using 13C MAS NMR, and an investigation of the metabolomics of intact biological tissue at low temperature using 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy. The in situ MAS NMR experiments performed using the reported rotors allowed reproduction of the results from traditional batch reactions, while offering more detailed quantitative information at the molecular level, as demonstrated for the molecular sieve synthesis and activation energy measurements for cyclohexanol dehydration. The perfectly sealed rotor also shows promising application for metabolomics studies using 1H HR-MAS NMR.« less

  10. Sealed rotors for in situ high temperature high pressure MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Souchang; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Camaioni, Donald M.; Peden, Charles H. F.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-07-06

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations on heterogeneous samples containing solids, semi-solids, liquid and gases or a mixture of them under non-conventional conditions of a combined high pressure and high temperature, or cold temperature suffer from the unavailability of a perfectly sealed rotor. Here, we report the design of reusable and perfectly-sealed all-zircornia MAS rotors. The rotors are easy to use and are suitable for operation temperatures from below 0 to 250 °C and pressures up to 100 bar. As an example of potential applications we performed in situ MAS NMR investigations of AlPO₄-5 molecular sieve crystallization, a kinetic study of the cyclohexanol dehydration reaction using 13C MAS NMR, and an investigation of the metabolomics of intact biological tissue at low temperature using 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy. The in situ MAS NMR experiments performed using the reported rotors allowed reproduction of the results from traditional batch reactions, while offering more detailed quantitative information at the molecular level, as demonstrated for the molecular sieve synthesis and activation energy measurements for cyclohexanol dehydration. The perfectly sealed rotor also shows promising application for metabolomics studies using 1H HR-MAS NMR.

  11. Two dimensional fluoride ion conductor RbSn {2}F {5} studied by impedance spectroscopy and {19}F, {119}Sn, and {87}Rb NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, K.; Ahmad, M. M.; Ogiso, Y.; Okuda, T.; Chikami, J.; Miehe, G.; Ehrenberg, H.; Fuess, H.

    2004-07-01

    RbSn2F5 is a two-dimensional fluoride ion conductor. It undergoes a first-order phase transition to a superionic state at 368 K. The structure of the low temperature phase has been determined from the Rietveld analysis of the X-ray powder diffraction. The dynamic properties of the fluoride ions in RbSn2F5 have been studied by impedance spectroscopy and solid state NMR. The dc ionic conductivity of this sample shows an abrupt increase at the phase transition temperature. We have obtained the hopping frequency and the concentration of the charge carriers (F- ions) at different temperatures from the analysis of the conductivity spectra using Almond-West formalism. The estimated values of the charge carriers’ concentration agree well with that determined from the structure and were found to be independent of temperature. The relatively small value of the power-law exponent, n ≈ 0.55, supports the two-dimensional property of the investigated material. Furthermore, 19F NMR with simulation has suggested the diffusive motions of the fluoride ions between different sites. In contrast, 119Sn and 87Rb NMR spectra below 250 K supported the intrinsic disordered nature due to the random distribution of the fluoride ion vacancies.

  12. Ammonia Vapor Removal by Cu3(BTC)2 and Its Characterization by MAS NMR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    further confirmation of these assignments, Soxhlet - extracted (MeOH) Cu3(BTC)2 is totally devoid of both DMF peaks, leaving only the pristine methine...samples, 1H and 13C MAS NMR spectra for solvent extracted Cu3(BTC)2 and (NH4)3BTC, Figure 15. 1H MAS NMR spectra obtained for Cu3(BTC)2 exposed to NH3

  13. Orientation of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa in lipid membranes determined from 19F-NMR dipolar couplings of 4-CF3-phenylglycine labels.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Ralf W; Sachse, Carsten; Dürr, Ulrich H N; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2004-05-01

    A highly sensitive solid state (19)F-NMR strategy is described to determine the orientation and dynamics of membrane-associated peptides from specific fluorine labels. Several analogues of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa were synthesized with the non-natural amino acid 4-trifluoromethyl-phenylglycine (CF(3)-Phg) at different positions throughout the alpha-helical peptide chain. A simple 1-pulse (19)F experiment allows the simultaneous measurement of both the anisotropic chemical shift and the homonuclear dipolar coupling within the rotating CF(3)-group in a macroscopically oriented membrane sample. The value and sign of the dipolar splitting determines the tilt of the CF(3)-rotational axis, which is rigidly attached to the peptide backbone, with respect to the external magnetic field direction. Using four CF(3)-labeled peptide analogues (with L-CF(3)-Phg at Ile9, Ala10, Ile13, and Ala14) we confirmed that PGLa is aligned at the surface of lipid membranes with its helix axis perpendicular to the bilayer normal at a peptide:lipid ratio of 1:200. We also determined the azimuthal rotation angle of the helix, which agrees well with the orientation expected from its amphiphilic character. Peptide analogues with a D-CF(3)-Phg label resulting from racemization of the amino acid during synthesis were separately collected by HPLC. Their spectra provide additional information about the PGLa structure and orientation but allow only to discriminate qualitatively between multiple solutions. The structural and functional characterization of the individual CF(3)-labeled peptides by circular dichroism and antimicrobial assays showed only small effects for our four substitutions on the hydrophobic face of the helix, but a significant disturbance was observed in a fifth analogue where Ala8 on the hydrophilic face had been replaced. Even though the hydrophobic CF(3)-Phg side chain cannot be utilized in all positions, it allows highly sensitive NMR measurements over a wide range of

  14. Investigation of domain size in polymer membranes using double quantum filtered spin diffusion MAS NMR.

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Alam, Todd Michael; Cherry, Brian Ray; Cornelius, Christopher James

    2005-02-01

    Solid-state {sup 1}H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR was used to investigate sulfonated Diels-Alder poly(phenlylene) polymer membranes. Under high spinning speed {sup 1}H MAS conditions, the proton environments of the sulfonic acid and phenylene polymer backbone are resolved. A double-quantum (DQ) filter using the rotor-synchronized back-to-back (BABA) NMR multiple-pulse sequence allowed the selective suppression of the sulfonic proton environment in the {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra. This DQ filter in conjunction with a spin diffusion NMR experiment was then used to measure the domain size of the sulfonic acid component within the membrane. In addition, the temperature dependence of the sulfonic acid spin-spin relaxation time (T{sub 2}) was determined, providing an estimate of the activation energy for the proton dynamics of the dehydrated membrane.

  15. Rapid exchange of fluoroethylamine via the Rhesus complex in human erythrocytes: 19F NMR magnetization transfer analysis showing competition by ammonia and ammonia analogues.

    PubMed

    Szekely, David; Chapman, Bogdan E; Bubb, William A; Kuchel, Philip W

    2006-08-01

    A remarkable recent discovery in red blood cell function is that the Rhesus antigen complex that for so long was considered to be simply a means of cell recognition is also the ammonia transporter. It catalyzes transmembrane exchange of ammonia on the subsecond time scale, and yet because of a lack of rapid-exchange methodology its kinetics had not been characterized. The flux of ammonia varies appreciably in diverse clinical states, and a convenient method for its characterization would be of basic and of clinical diagnostic value. Fluoroethylamine is water-soluble and when added to a suspension of human red blood cells (RBCs) displays the experimentally useful property of giving separate 19F NMR spectral peaks for the populations inside and outside the cells. By using two-site, one-dimensional magnetization exchange spectroscopy (1D-EXSY), the transmembrane exchange of fluoroethylamine was measured; it was found to occur on the subsecond time scale with an apparent first-order rate constant for efflux, under the equilibrium exchange conditions, of 3.4 s(-1). The method was used to characterize the concentration, temperature, and pH dependence of the exchange rate constant. We determined the extent of competitive inhibition exhibited by ammonia and two molecules that contain an amine group (ethylamine and methylamine). Inhibition of the exchange by incubating the suspension with anti-RhAG antibody, and no inhibition by anti-RhD antibody, suggested specificity of exchange via the RhAG protein of the Rh complex.

  16. Factor analysis of 27Al MAS NMR spectra for identifying nanocrystalline phases in amorphous geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Urbanova, Martina; Kobera, Libor; Brus, Jiri

    2013-11-01

    Nanostructured materials offer enhanced physicochemical properties because of the large interfacial area. Typically, geopolymers with specifically synthesized nanosized zeolites are a promising material for the sorption of pollutants. The structural characterization of these aluminosilicates, however, continues to be a challenge. To circumvent complications resulting from the amorphous character of the aluminosilicate matrix and from the low concentrations of nanosized crystallites, we have proposed a procedure based on factor analysis of (27)Al MAS NMR spectra. The capability of the proposed method was tested on geopolymers that exhibited various tendencies to crystallize (i) completely amorphous systems, (ii) X-ray amorphous systems with nanocrystalline phases, and (iii) highly crystalline systems. Although the recorded (27)Al MAS NMR spectra did not show visible differences between the amorphous systems (i) and the geopolymers with the nanocrystalline phase (ii), the applied factor analysis unambiguously distinguished these materials. The samples were separated into the well-defined clusters, and the systems with the evolving crystalline phase were identified even before any crystalline fraction was detected by X-ray powder diffraction. Reliability of the proposed procedure was verified by comparing it with (29)Si MAS NMR spectra. Factor analysis of (27)Al MAS NMR spectra thus has the ability to reveal spectroscopic features corresponding to the nanocrystalline phases. Because the measurement time of (27)Al MAS NMR spectra is significantly shorter than that of (29)Si MAS NMR data, the proposed procedure is particularly suitable for the analysis of large sets of specifically synthesized geopolymers in which the formation of the limited fractions of nanocrystalline phases is desired.

  17. Pulsed field gradient multiple-quantum MAS NMR spectroscopy of half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyfe, C. A.; Skibsted, J.; Grondey, H.; Meyer zu Altenschildesche, H.

    1997-12-01

    Pulsed field gradients (PFGs) have been applied to select coherence transfer pathways in multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS NMR spectra of half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei in rigid solids. 27Al triple-quantum (3Q) MAS NMR spectra of the aluminophosphate molecular sieves VPI-5 and AlPO 4-18 have been used to demonstrate the selection of the (0)→(3)→(-1) coherence transfer pathway using PFGs and no phase cycling. Compared to MQMAS experiments that employ phase cycling schemes, the main advantage of the PFG-MQMAS technique is its simplicity, which should facilitate the combination of MQMAS with other pulse sequences.

  18. Advanced instrumentation for DNP-enhanced MAS NMR for higher magnetic fields and lower temperatures.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yoh; Idehara, Toshitaka; Fukazawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2016-03-01

    Sensitivity enhancement of MAS NMR using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is gaining importance at moderate fields (B0<9T) and temperatures (T>90K) with potential applications in chemistry and material sciences. However, considering the ever-increasing size and complexity of the systems to be studied, it is crucial to establish DNP under higher field conditions, where the spectral resolution and the basic NMR sensitivity tend to improve. In this perspective, we overview our recent efforts on hardware developments, specifically targeted on improving DNP MAS NMR at high fields. It includes the development of gyrotrons that enable continuous frequency tuning and rapid frequency modulation for our 395 GHz-600 MHz and 460 GHz-700 MHz DNP NMR spectrometers. The latter 700 MHz system involves two gyrotrons and a quasi-optical transmission system that combines two independent sub-millimeter waves into a single dichromic wave. We also describe two cryogenic MAS NMR probe systems operating, respectively, at T ∼ 100K and ∼ 30K. The latter system utilizes a novel closed-loop helium recirculation mechanism, achieving cryogenic MAS without consuming any cryogen. These instruments altogether should promote high-field DNP toward more efficient, reliable and affordable technology. Some experimental DNP results obtained with these instruments are presented.

  19. Probing the sequence effects on NarI-induced -2 frameshift mutagenesis by dynamic 19F NMR, UV and CD spectroscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nidhi; Li, Yuyuan; Zhang, Li; Meneni, Srinivasa; Cho, Bongsup

    2012-01-01

    The NarI recognition sequence (5′-G1G2CG3CN-3′) is the most vulnerable hot spot for frameshift mutagenesis induced by the carcinogen 2-aminofluorene and its analogs in Escherichia coli. Lesioning of the guanine in the G3 position induces an especially high frequency of -2 deletion mutations; vulnerability to these mutations is modulated by the nature of nucleotide in the N position (C ~ A > G ≫ T). The objective of the present study was to probe the structural basis of this N-mediated influence on the propensity of the G3-lesion to form a slipped mutagenic intermediate (SMI) during translesion synthesis. We studied NarI-based fully paired [(5′-CTCG1G2CG3*CNATC-3′)(5′-GATNCGGCCGAG-3′), N = dC or dT] and -2 deletion [(5′-CTCG1G2CG3*CNATC-3′)(5′-GATNGCCGAG-3′), N = dC or dT] duplexes, in which G* was either AF [N-(2′-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-aminofluorene] or the 19F probe FAF [N-(2′-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-7-fluoro-2-aminofluorene]. The latter sequences mimic the bulged SMI for -2 deletion mutations. Dynamic 19F NMR, circular dichroism, and UV-melting results indicated that the NarI-dC/-2 deletion duplex adopts exclusively an intercalated conformer, whereas the NarI-dT/-2 deletion duplex exists as multiple conformers. The data support the presence of a putative equilibrium between a carcinogen-intercalated and a carcinogen-exposed SMI for the dT/-2 duplex. A similar dT-induced conformational heterogeneity was observed for the fully-paired duplexes in which all three guanines were individually modified by AF or FAF. The frequency of the carcinogen stacked S-conformation was found to be highest (69~75 %) at the G3 hot spot in NarI-dC duplexes. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the conformational stability of the SMI is a critical determinant for the efficacy of -2 frameshift mutagenesis in the NarI sequence. We also provide evidence for AF/FAF conformational compatibility in the NarI sequences. PMID:17960913

  20. Optimized multiple quantum MAS lineshape simulations in solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, William J.; Davis, Michael C.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2009-10-01

    /Linux Operating system: UNIX/Linux Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: Example: (1597 powder angles) × (200 Samples) × (81 F2 frequency pts) × (31 F1 frequency points) = 3.5M, SMP AMD opteron Classification: 2.3 External routines: OCTAVE ( http://www.gnu.org/software/octave/), GNU Scientific Library ( http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/), OPENMP ( http://openmp.org/wp/) Nature of problem: The optimal simulation and modeling of multiple quantum magic angle spinning NMR spectra, for general systems, especially those with mild to significant disorder. The approach outlined and implemented in C and OCTAVE also produces model parameter error estimates. Solution method: A model for each distinct chemical site is first proposed, for the individual contribution of crystallite orientations to the spectrum. This model is averaged over all powder angles [1], as well as the (stochastic) parameters; isotropic chemical shift and quadrupole coupling constant. The latter is accomplished via sampling from a bi-variate Gaussian distribution, using the Box-Muller algorithm to transform Sobol (quasi) random numbers [2]. A simulated annealing optimization is performed, and finally the non-linear jackknife [3] is applied in developing model parameter error estimates. Additional comments: The distribution contains a script, mqmasOpt.m, which runs in the OCTAVE language workspace. Running time: Example: (1597 powder angles) × (200 Samples) × (81 F2 frequency pts) × (31 F1 frequency points) = 58.35 seconds, SMP AMD opteron. References:S.K. Zaremba, Annali di Matematica Pura ed Applicata 73 (1966) 293. H. Niederreiter, Random Number Generation and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods, SIAM, 1992. T. Fox, D. Hinkley, K. Larntz, Technometrics 22 (1980) 29.

  1. Using heat to control the sample spinning speed in MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Mihaliuk, Eugene; Gullion, Terry

    2011-10-01

    A new approach using temperature to control the spinning speed of a sample rotor in magic-angle spinning NMR is presented. Instead of an electro-mechanical valve that regulates the flow of drive gas to control the spinning speed in traditional MAS NMR systems, we use a small heater wire located directly in the stator. The sample spinning speed is controlled very accurately with a surprisingly low heating power of 1 W. Results on a benchtop unit demonstrate the capability of the system.

  2. Multiple-quantum cross-polarization in MAS NMR of quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashbrook, Sharon E.; Brown, Steven P.; Wimperis, Stephen

    1998-05-01

    Using 27Al ( I=5/2) NMR of aluminium acetylacetonate, we show that it is possible to cross-polarize from a spin I=1/2 nucleus ( 1H) directly to the central triple-quantum transition of a half-integer quadrupolar nucleus ( 27Al) in a powdered sample under MAS conditions. The optimum conditions for this multiple-quantum cross-polarization (MQCP) are investigated experimentally and compared with existing theoretical results. The new technique is applied to the recently introduced two-dimensional MQMAS experiment for recording high-resolution NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei.

  3. Decomposition of adsorbed VX on activated carbons studied by 31P MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Ishay; Waysbort, Daniel; Shmueli, Liora; Nir, Ido; Kaplan, Doron

    2006-06-15

    The fate of the persistent OP nerve agent O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX) on granular activated carbons that are used for gas filtration was studied by means of 31P magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. VX as vapor or liquid was adsorbed on carbon granules, and MAS NMR spectra were recorded periodically. The results show that at least 90% of the adsorbed VX decomposes within 20 days or less to the nontoxic ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and bis(S-2-diisopropylaminoethane) {(DES)2}. Decomposition occurred irrespective of the phase from which VX was loaded, the presence of metal impregnation on the carbon surface, and the water content of the carbon. Theoretical and practical aspects of the degradation are discussed.

  4. Single-molecule magnets: structural characterization, magnetic properties, and (19)F NMR spectroscopy of a Mn(12) family spanning three oxidation levels.

    PubMed

    Chakov, Nicole E; Soler, Monica; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Abboud, Khalil A; Christou, George

    2005-07-25

    The syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetic properties of [Mn(12)O(12)(O(2)CC(6)F(5))(16)(H(2)O)(4)] (2), (NMe(4))[Mn(12)O(12)(O(2)CC(6)F(5))(16)(H(2)O)(4)] (3), and (NMe(4))(2)[Mn(12)O(12)(O(2)CC(6)F(5))(16)(H(2)O)(4)] (4) are reported. Complex 2 displays quasi-reversible redox couples when examined by cyclic voltammetry in CH(2)Cl(2): one-electron reductions are observed at 0.64 and 0.30 V vs ferrocene. The reaction of complex 2 with 1 and 2 equiv of NMe(4)I yields the one- and two-electron reduced analogues, 3 and 4, respectively. Complexes 2.3CH(2)Cl(2), 3.4.5CH(2)Cl(2).(1)/(2)H(2)O, and 4.6C(7)H(8) crystallize in the triclinic P, monoclinic P2/c, and monoclinic C2/c space groups, respectively. The molecular structures are all very similar, consisting of a central [Mn(IV)O(4)] cubane surrounded by a nonplanar alternating ring of eight Mn and eight mu(3)-O(2)(-) ions. Peripheral ligation is provided by 16 bridging C(6)F(5)CO(2)(-) and 4 H(2)O ligands. Bond valence sum calculations establish that the added electrons in 3 and 4 are localized on former Mn(III) ions giving trapped-valence Mn(IV)(4)Mn(III)(7)Mn(II) and Mn(IV)(4)Mn(III)(6)Mn(II)(2) anions, respectively. (19)F NMR spectroscopy in CD(2)Cl(2) shows retention of the solid-state structure upon dissolution and detrapping of the added electrons in 3 and 4 among the outer ring of Mn ions on the (19)F NMR time scale. DC studies on dried microcrystalline samples of 2, 3, and 4.2.5C(7)H(8) restrained in eicosane in the 1.80-10.0 K and 1-70 kG ranges were fit to give S = 10, D = -0.40 cm(-)(1), g = 1.87, D/g = 0.21 cm(-)(1) for 2, S = 19/2, D = -0.34 cm(-)(1), g = 2.04, D/g = 0.17 cm(-)(1) for 3, and S = 10, D = -0.29 cm(-)(1), g = 2.05, D/g = 0.14 cm(-)(1) for 4, where D is the axial zero-field splitting parameter. The clusters exhibit out-of-phase AC susceptibility signals (chi(M)' ') indicative of slow magnetization relaxation in the 6-8 K range for 2, 4-6 K range for 3, and 2-4 K range for 4; the shift to

  5. A 29Si MAS-NMR study of transition metal site occupancy in forsterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mccarty, R. J.; Palke, A.; Stebbins, J. F.; Hartman, S.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we address the problem of transition metal site occupancy in Mg-rich olivine using solid-state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy. Transition metal substitution in olivine can occur in either of the two crystallographically unique octahedral sites: the smaller, more symmetric M1 site or the larger, more distorted M2 site. Site occupancy of the transition metal is expected to correlate with ionic radius and d-orbital structure. In NMR spectroscopy the presence of paramagnetic ions, such as transition metal ions, can produce accessory peaks referred to as "contact shifts," due to the interaction between unpaired electrons on the paramagnetic ion locally associated with the resonating nucleus. The position and intensity of the contact shifts are dependent on the geometrical association such as bond distances and bond angles between the paramagnetic ion and the resonating nucleus. 29Si MAS-NMR spectra collected on synthetic forsterite (Mg2SiO4) doped with minor amounts (0.2-5%) of individual, divalent, paramagnetic, transition metal cations (Mn, Co, Ni, or Cu) substituting for Mg in the octahedral sites, reveals multiple contact shifts. An interpretation of the number of such contact shifts and their relative intensities correlated with structural information of possible 29Si-M1 and 29Si-M2 configurations, potentially allows for the assignment of specific transition metals to individual M1 or M2 sites. An analysis of the MAS-NMR data will potentially bring a new level of confidence to transition metal site occupancy in forsterite.

  6. (11)B MAS NMR and First-Principles Study of the [OBO3] Pyramids in Borates.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Biao-Chun; Mi, Jin-Xiao; Laskowski, Robert; Terskikh, Victor; Zhang, Xi; Yang, Lingyun; Botis, Sanda M; Sherriff, Barbara L; Pan, Yuanming

    2016-03-07

    Borates are built from the [Bϕ3] planar triangles and the [Bϕ4] tetrahedral groups, where ϕ denotes O or OH. However, the [Bϕ4] groups in some borates are highly distorted to include three normal B-O bonds and one anomalously long B-O bond and, therefore, are best described as the [OBO3] pyramids. Four synthetic borates of the boracite-type structures (Mg3B7O13Br, Cu3B7O13Br, Zn3B7O13Cl, and Mg3B7O13Cl) containing a range of [OBO3] pyramids were investigated by multifield (7.05, 14.1, and 21.1 T) (11)B magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR), triple quantum (3Q) MAS NMR experiments, as well as density functional theory calculations. The high-resolution (11)B MAS NMR spectra supported by theoretical predictions show that the [OBO3] pyramids are characterized by isotropic chemical shifts δiso((11)B) from 1.4(1) to 4.9(1) ppm and nuclear quadrupole parameters CQ((11)B) up to 1.3(1) MHz, both significantly different from those of the [BO4] and [BO3] groups in borates. These δiso((11)B) and CQ((11)B) values indicate that the [OBO3] pyramids represent an intermediate state between the [BO4] tetrahedra and [BO3] triangles and demonstrate that the (11)B NMR parameters of four-coordinate boron oxyanions are sensitive to local structural environments. The orientation of the calculated unique electronic field gradient tensor element Vzz of the [OBO3] pyramids is aligned approximately along the direction of the anomalously long B-O bond, corresponding to B-2pz with the lowest electron density.

  7. Estimation of the specific surface area of apatites in human mineralized tissues using 31P MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Kolmas, Joanna; Slósarczyk, Anna; Wojtowicz, Andrzej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2007-10-01

    Specific surface areas of apatites in whole human mineralized tissues were estimated from (31)P MAS NMR linewidths: 77 m(2)g(-1) for enamel and 94 m(2)g(-1) for dentin, dental cementum and cortical bone.

  8. Effects of nucleotide binding to LmrA: A combined MAS-NMR and solution NMR study.

    PubMed

    Hellmich, Ute A; Mönkemeyer, Leonie; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2015-12-01

    ABC transporters are fascinating examples of fine-tuned molecular machines that use the energy from ATP hydrolysis to translocate a multitude of substrates across biological membranes. While structural details have emerged on many members of this large protein superfamily, a number of functional details are still under debate. High resolution structures yield valuable insights into protein function, but it is the combination of structural, functional and dynamic insights that facilitates a complete understanding of the workings of their complex molecular mechanisms. NMR is a technique well-suited to investigate proteins in atomic resolution while taking their dynamic properties into account. It thus nicely complements other structural techniques, such as X-ray crystallography, that have contributed high-resolution data to the architectural understanding of ABC transporters. Here, we describe the heterologous expression of LmrA, an ABC exporter from Lactococcus lactis, in Escherichia coli. This allows for more flexible isotope labeling for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and the easy study of LmrA's multidrug resistance phenotype. We use a combination of solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) on the reconstituted transporter and solution NMR on its isolated nucleotide binding domain to investigate consequences of nucleotide binding to LmrA. We find that nucleotide binding affects the protein globally, but that NMR is also able to pinpoint local dynamic effects to specific residues, such as the Walker A motif's conserved lysine residue.

  9. Polymorphism of collagen triple helix revealed by 19F NMR of model peptide [Pro-4(R)-hydroxyprolyl-Gly]3-[Pro-4(R)-fluoroprolyl-Gly]-[Pro-4(R)-hydroxyprolyl-Gly]3.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Kazuki; Nemoto, Nobuaki; Motooka, Daisuke; Nishi, Yoshinori; Doi, Masamitsu; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nakazawa, Takashi; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Yoshida, Takuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2012-06-14

    We have characterized various structures of (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)(3)-Pro-fPro(R)-Gly-(Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)(3) in the process of cis-trans isomerization and helix-coil transition by exploiting the sole (19)F NMR probe in 4(R)-fluoroproline (fPro(R)). Around the transition temperature (T(m)), we detected a species with a triple helical structure distinct from the ordinary one concerning the alignment of three strands. The (19)F-(19)F exchange spectroscopy showed that this misaligned and that the ordinary triple helices were interchangeable only indirectly via an extended monomer strand with all-trans peptide bonds at Pro-fPro(R), Pro-Hyp(R), and Gly-Pro in the central segment. This finding demonstrates that the helix-coil transition of collagen peptides is not described with a simple two-state model. We thus elaborated a scheme for the transition mechanism of (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)(n) that the most extended monomer strand can be the sole source both to the misaligned and correctly folded triple-helices. The staggered ends could help misaligned triple helices to self-assemble to higher-order structures. We have also discussed the possible relationship between the misaligned triple helix accumulating maximally at T(m) and the kinetic hysteresis associated with the helix-coil transition of collagen.

  10. Assessing Heterogeneity of Osteolytic Lesions in Multiple Myeloma by 1H HR-MAS NMR Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Tavel, Laurette; Fontana, Francesca; Garcia Manteiga, Josè Manuel; Mari, Silvia; Mariani, Elisabetta; Caneva, Enrico; Sitia, Roberto; Camnasio, Francesco; Marcatti, Magda; Cenci, Simone; Musco, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of plasma cells characterized by multifocal osteolytic bone lesions. Macroscopic and genetic heterogeneity has been documented within MM lesions. Understanding the bases of such heterogeneity may unveil relevant features of MM pathobiology. To this aim, we deployed unbiased 1H high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics to analyze multiple biopsy specimens of osteolytic lesions from one case of pathological fracture caused by MM. Multivariate analyses on normalized metabolite peak integrals allowed clusterization of samples in accordance with a posteriori histological findings. We investigated the relationship between morphological and NMR features by merging morphological data and metabolite profiling into a single correlation matrix. Data-merging addressed tissue heterogeneity, and greatly facilitated the mapping of lesions and nearby healthy tissues. Our proof-of-principle study reveals integrated metabolomics and histomorphology as a promising approach for the targeted study of osteolytic lesions. PMID:27809247

  11. Immobilization of soluble protein complexes in MAS solid-state NMR: Sedimentation versus viscosity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Mainz, Andi; Busi, Baptiste; Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Kranz, Maximilian; Hofmann, Thomas; Reif, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, MAS solid-state NMR has emerged as a technique for the investigation of soluble protein complexes. It was found that high molecular weight complexes do not need to be crystallized in order to obtain an immobilized sample for solid-state NMR investigations. Sedimentation induced by sample rotation impairs rotational diffusion of proteins and enables efficient dipolar coupling based cross polarization transfers. In addition, viscosity contributes to the immobilization of the molecules in the sample. Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents (NADES) have very high viscosities, and can replace water in living organisms. We observe a considerable amount of cross polarization transfers for NADES solvents, even though their molecular weight is too low to yield significant sedimentation. We discuss how viscosity and sedimentation both affect the quality of the obtained experimental spectra. The FROSTY/sedNMR approach holds the potential to study large protein complexes, which are otherwise not amenable for a structural characterization using NMR. We show that using this method, backbone assignments of the symmetric proteasome activator complex (1.1MDa), and high quality correlation spectra of non-symmetric protein complexes such as the prokaryotic ribosome 50S large subunit binding to trigger factor (1.4MDa) are obtained.

  12. Structural analysis of molybdo-zinc-phosphate glasses: Neutron scattering, FTIR, Raman scattering, MAS NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuka, C.; Shinde, A. B.; Krishna, P. S. R.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2016-08-01

    Vitreous samples were prepared in the xMoO3-17ZnO-(83-x) NaPO3 with 35 ≥ x ≥ 55 glass forming system by energy efficient microwave heating method. Structural evolution of the vitreous network was monitored as a function of composition by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman scattering, Magic Angle Spin Nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and Neutron scattering. Addition of MoO3 to the ZnO-NaPO3 glass leads to a pronounced increase in glass transition temperature (Tg) suggesting a significant increase in network connectivity and strength. In order to analyze FTIR and Raman scattering, a simple structural model is presented to rationalize the experimental observations. A number of structural units are formed due to network modification, and the resulting glass may be characterized by a network polyhedral with different numbers of unshared corners. 31P MAS NMR confirms a clear distinction between structural species having 3, 2, 1, 0 bridging oxygens (BOs). Further, Neutron scattering studies were used to probe the structure of these glasses. The result suggests that all the investigated glasses have structures based on chains of four coordinated phosphate and six coordinated molybdate units, besides, two different lengths of P-O bonds in tetrahedral phosphate units that are assigned to bonds of the P-atom with terminal and bridging oxygen atoms.

  13. Indirect detection of infinite-speed MAS solid-state NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Venkatesh, Amrit; Hanrahan, Michael P.; Goh, Tian Wei; Huang, Wenyu; Rossini, Aaron J.; Pruski, Marek

    2017-03-01

    Heavy spin-1/2 nuclides are known to possess very large chemical shift anisotropies that can challenge even the most advanced magic-angle-spinning (MAS) techniques. Wide manifolds of overlapping spinning sidebands and insufficient excitation bandwidths often obfuscate meaningful spectral information and force the use of static, low-resolution solid-state (SS)NMR methods for the characterization of materials. To address these issues, we have merged fast-magic-angle-turning (MAT) and dipolar heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (D-HMQC) experiments to obtain D-HMQC-MAT pulse sequences which enable the rapid acquisition of 2D SSNMR spectra that correlate isotropic 1H chemical shifts to the indirectly detected isotropic ;infinite-MAS; spectra of heavy spin-1/2 nuclides. For these nuclides, the combination of fast MAS and 1H detection provides a high sensitivity, which rivals the DNP-enhanced ultra-wideline SSNMR. The new pulse sequences were used to determine the Pt coordination environments in a complex mixture of decomposition products of transplatin and in a metal-organic framework with Pt ions coordinated to the linker ligands.

  14. SLOW-MAS NMR METHODS TO STUDY METABOLIC PROCESSES IN VIVO AND IN VITRO

    SciTech Connect

    Wind, Robert A.; Bertram, Hanne Christine; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2005-09-25

    In vitro and in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy is widely used to measure metabolic profiles in cells, tissues, animals, and humans and to use them, e.g., for diagnosis and therapy response evaluations. However, the spectra often suffer from poor resolution due to variations in the isotropic bulk magnetic susceptibility present in biological objects, resulting in a broadening of the NMR lines. In principle this broadening can be averaged to zero by the technique of magic angle spinning (MAS), where the sample is rotated about an axis making an angle of 54o44’ relative to the external magnetic field. However, a problem is that in a standard MAS experiment spinning speeds of a kHz or more are required in order to avoid the occurrence of spinning sidebands (SSBs) in the spectra, which renders analysis of the spectra difficult again. At these spinning speeds the large centrifugal forces cause severe structural damage in larger biological objects, so that this method cannot be used to study metabolic processes in intact samples. In solid state NMR several methods have been developed where slow MAS is combined with special radio frequency pulse sequences to eliminate spinning side bands or separate them from the isotropic spectrum so that a SSB-free high-resolution isotropic spectrum is obtained. It has been shown recently that two methods, phase-adjusted spinning sidebands (PASS) and phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT), can successfully be modified for applications in biological materials (1, 2). With PASS MAS speeds as low as 40 Hz can be employed, allowing non or minimally invasive in vitro studies of excised tissues and organs. This method was used, amongst other things, to study post mortem changes in the proton metabolite spectra in excised rabbit muscle tissue (3). With PHORMAT the NMR sensitivity is reduced and longer measuring times are required, but with this methodology the MAS speed can be reduced to ~1 Hz. This makes PHORMAT amenable for in vivo

  15. Lipid Bilayer-Bound Conformation of an Integral Membrane Beta Barrel Protein by Multidimensional MAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Matthew T.; Su, Yongchao; Silvers, Robert; Andreas, Loren; Clark, Lindsay; Wagner, Gerhard; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon; Griffin, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms 2-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5–0.3 ppm for 13C line width and less than 0.5 ppm 15N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the reported

  16. Lipid bilayer-bound conformation of an integral membrane beta barrel protein by multidimensional MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Matthew T; Su, Yongchao; Silvers, Robert; Andreas, Loren; Clark, Lindsay; Wagner, Gerhard; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon; Griffin, Robert G

    2015-04-01

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms two-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5-0.3 ppm for (13)C line widths and <0.5 ppm (15)N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the reported

  17. MAS (1)H NMR Probes Freezing Point Depression of Water and Liquid-Gel Phase Transitions in Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhishek; van der Wel, Patrick C A

    2016-11-01

    The lipid bilayer typical of hydrated biological membranes is characterized by a liquid-crystalline, highly dynamic state. Upon cooling or dehydration, these membranes undergo a cooperative transition to a rigidified, more-ordered, gel phase. This characteristic phase transition is of significant biological and biophysical interest, for instance in studies of freezing-tolerant organisms. Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy allows for the detection and characterization of the phase transitions over a wide temperature range. In this study we employ MAS (1)H NMR to probe the phase transitions of both solvent molecules and different hydrated phospholipids, including tetraoleoyl cardiolipin (TOCL) and several phosphatidylcholine lipid species. The employed MAS NMR sample conditions cause a previously noted substantial reduction in the freezing point of the solvent phase. The effect on the solvent is caused by confinement of the aqueous solvent in the small and densely packed MAS NMR samples. In this study we report and examine how the freezing point depression also impacts the lipid phase transition, causing a ssNMR-observed reduction in the lipids' melting temperature (Tm). The molecular underpinnings of this phenomenon are discussed and compared with previous studies of membrane-associated water phases and the impact of membrane-protective cryoprotectants.

  18. Structural study of synthetic mica montmorillonite by means of 2D MAS NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba, M. D.; Castro, M. A.; Chain, P.; Naranjo, M.; Perdigón, A. C.

    2005-07-01

    Syn-1, is a synthetic mica montmorillonite interstratified mineral that forms one of the standard clay samples in the Clay Minerals Society Source Clays Project. However, there are still controversies regarding some structural aspects such as the interlayer composition or the location of the extra-aluminium determined by chemical analysis. The main objective of this paper is to shed light on those structural aspects that affect the reactivity of the interstratified minerals. For this purpose, we have used 1 H 29 Si and 1 H 27Al HETCOR MAS NMR to show that it is likely that the interlayer space of the beidellite part is composed of ammonium ions whereas ammonium and aluminium ions are responsible for the charge balance in the mica type layer.

  19. Molecular degradation of ancient documents revealed by 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Łojewska, Joanna; Mallamace, Francesco; Pietronero, Luciano; Missori, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    For centuries mankind has stored its knowledge on paper, a remarkable biomaterial made of natural cellulose fibers. However, spontaneous cellulose degradation phenomena weaken and discolorate paper over time. The detailed knowledge of products arising from cellulose degradation is essential in understanding deterioration pathways and in improving durability of cultural heritage. In this study, for the first time, products of cellulose degradation were individually detected in solid paper samples by means of an extremely powerful proton HR-MAS NMR set-up, in combination to a wise use of both ancient and, as reference, artificially aged paper samples. Carboxylic acids, in addition to more complex dicarboxylic and hydroxy-carboxylic acids, were found in all samples studied. Since these products can catalyze further degradation, their knowledge is fundamental to improve conservation strategies of historical documents. Furthermore, the identification of compounds used in ancient production techniques, also suggests for artifacts dating, authentication and provenance. PMID:24104201

  20. Higher Order Amyloid Fibril Structure by MAS NMR and DNP Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bayro, Marvin J.; Fitzpatrick, Anthony W.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Colvin, Michael T.; Caporini, Marc A.; Jaroniec, Christopher P.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Rosay, Melanie; MacPhee, Cait E.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Maas, Werner E.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has generated structural models of several amyloid fibril systems, thus providing valuable information regarding the forces and interactions that confer the extraordinary stability of the amyloid architecture. Despite these advances, however, obtaining atomic resolution information describing the higher levels of structural organization within the fibrils remains a significant challenge. Here, we detail MAS NMR experiments and sample labeling schemes designed specifically to probe such higher order amyloid structure and we have applied them to the fibrils formed by an eleven-residue segment of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin (TTR(105-115)). These experiments have allowed us to define unambiguously not only the arrangement of the peptide β-strands into β-sheets but also the β-sheet interfaces within each protofilament, and in addition to identify the nature of the protofilament-to-protofilament contacts that lead to the formation of the complete fibril. Our efforts have resulted in 111 quantitative distance and torsion angle restraints (10 per residue) that describe the various levels of structure organization. The experiments benefited extensively from the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which in some cases allowed us to shorten the data acquisition time from days to hours and to improve significantly the signal-to-noise ratios of the spectra. The β-sheet interface and protofilament interactions identified here revealed local variations in the structure that result in multiple peaks for the exposed N- and C-termini of the peptide and in inhomogeneous line-broadening for the side-chains buried within the interior of the fibrils. PMID:24304221

  1. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced MAS NMR for Structural Analysis of HIV-1 Protein Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rupal; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Caporini, Marc A.; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner; Struppe, Jochem; Suiter, Christopher; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Franks, W. Trent; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Bertarello, Andrea; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    Mature infectious HIV-1 virions contain conical capsids comprised of CA protein, generated by the proteolytic cleavage cascade of the Gag polyprotein, termed maturation. The mechanism of capsid core formation through the maturation process remains poorly understood. We present DNP-enhanced MAS NMR studies of tubular assemblies of CA and Gag CA-SP1 maturation intermediate and report 20 – 64 fold sensitivity enhancements due to DNP at 14.1 T. These sensitivity enhancements enabled direct observation of spacer peptide 1 (SP1) resonances in CA-SP1 by dipolar based correlation experiments, unequivocally indicating that the SP1 peptide is unstructured in assembled CA-SP1 at cryogenic temperatures, corroborating our earlier results. Furthermore, the dependence of DNP enhancements and spectral resolution on magnetic field strength (9.4 – 18.8 T) and temperature (109 – 180 K) was investigated. Our results suggest that DNP-based measurements could potentially provide residue-specific dynamics information by allowing for the extraction of temperature dependence of the anisotropic tensorial or relaxation parameters. With DNP, we were able to detect multiple well-resolved isoleucine sidechain conformers, unique intermolecular correlations across two CA molecules, and functionally relevant conformationally disordered states such as the 14-residue SP1 peptide, none of which are visible at ambient temperatures. The detection of isolated conformers and intermolecular correlations can provide crucial constraints for structure determination of these assemblies. Overall, our results establish DNP-based MAS NMR as an excellent tool for characterization of HIV-1 assemblies. PMID:26709853

  2. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced MAS NMR Spectroscopy for Structural Analysis of HIV-1 Protein Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupal; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Caporini, Marc A; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner; Struppe, Jochem; Suiter, Christopher; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L; Franks, W Trent; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Bertarello, Andrea; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido; Gronenborn, Angela M; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-21

    Mature infectious HIV-1 virions contain conical capsids composed of CA protein, generated by the proteolytic cleavage cascade of the Gag polyprotein, termed maturation. The mechanism of capsid core formation through the maturation process remains poorly understood. We present DNP-enhanced MAS NMR studies of tubular assemblies of CA and Gag CA-SP1 maturation intermediate and report 20-64-fold sensitivity enhancements due to DNP at 14.1 T. These sensitivity enhancements enabled direct observation of spacer peptide 1 (SP1) resonances in CA-SP1 by dipolar-based correlation experiments, unequivocally indicating that the SP1 peptide is unstructured in assembled CA-SP1 at cryogenic temperatures, corroborating our earlier results. Furthermore, the dependence of DNP enhancements and spectral resolution on magnetic field strength (9.4-18.8 T) and temperature (109-180 K) was investigated. Our results suggest that DNP-based measurements could potentially provide residue-specific dynamics information by allowing for the extraction of the temperature dependence of the anisotropic tensorial or relaxation parameters. With DNP, we were able to detect multiple well-resolved isoleucine side-chain conformers; unique intermolecular correlations across two CA molecules; and functionally relevant conformationally disordered states such as the 14-residue SP1 peptide, none of which are visible at ambient temperatures. The detection of isolated conformers and intermolecular correlations can provide crucial constraints for structure determination of these assemblies. Overall, our results establish DNP-based MAS NMR spectroscopy as an excellent tool for the characterization of HIV-1 assemblies.

  3. Assessing the fate and transformation of plant residues in the terrestrial environment using HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, Brian P.; Simpson, Myrna J.; Simpson, Andre J.

    2006-08-01

    Plant litter decomposition plays a fundamental role in carbon and nitrogen cycles, provides key nutrients to the soil environment and represents a potentially large positive feedback to atmospheric CO 2. However, the full details of decomposition pathways and products are unknown. Here we present the first application of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy on 13C and 15N labeled plant materials, and apply this approach in a preliminary study to monitor the environmental degradation of the pine and wheatgrass residues over time. In HR-MAS, is it possible to acquire very high resolution NMR data of plant biomass, and apply the vast array of multidimensional experiments available in conventional solution-state NMR. High levels of isotopic enrichment combined with HR-MAS significantly enhance the detection limits, and provide a wealth of information that is unattainable by any other method. Diffusion edited HR-MAS NMR data reveal the rapid loss of carbohydrate structures, while two-dimensional (2-D) HR-MAS NMR spectra demonstrate the relatively fast loss of both hydrolysable and condensed tannin structures from all plant tissues studied. Aromatic (partially lignin) and aliphatic components (waxes, cuticles) tend to persist, along with a small fraction of carbohydrate, and become highly functionalized over time. While one-dimensional (1-D) 13C HR-MAS NMR spectra of fresh plant tissue reflect compositional differences between pine and grass, these differences become negligible after decomposition suggesting that recalcitrant carbon may be similar despite the plant source. Two-dimensional 1H- 15N HR-MAS NMR analysis of the pine residue suggests that nitrogen from specific peptides is either selectively preserved or used for the synthesis of what appears to be novel structures. The amount of relevant data generated from plant components in situ using HR-MAS NMR is highly encouraging, and demonstrates that complete assignment will yield unprecedented structural knowledge of plant cell

  4. Technetium-99 MAS NMR spectroscopy of a cationic framework material that traps TcO4- ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, P.; Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Phillips, Brian L.; Casey, William H.

    2010-07-15

    99Tc magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra show that TcO4- ions, which are generated by nuclear fission and can contaminate the environment, can be trapped within the channels and cavities of a cationic framework material (see picture). These spectra are among the first 99Tc MAS NMR spectra reported to date, and show that the TcO4- ions can be efficiently removed from simulated nuclear waste solutions.

  5. Thermal maturity of type II kerogen from the New Albany Shale assessed by 13C CP/MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Werner-Zwanziger, Ulrike; Lis, Grzegorz; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2005-01-01

    Thermal maturity of oil and gas source rocks is typically quantified in terms of vitrinite reflectance, which is based on optical properties of terrestrial woody remains. This study evaluates 13C CP/MAS NMR parameters in kerogen (i.e., the insoluble fraction of organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks) as proxies for thermal maturity in marine-derived source rocks where terrestrially derived vitrinite is often absent or sparse. In a suite of samples from the New Albany Shale (Middle Devonian to the Early Mississippian, Illinois Basin) the abundance of aromatic carbon in kerogen determined by 13C CP/MAS NMR correlates linearly well with vitrinite reflectance.

  6. 1H HR-MAS NMR of carotenoids in aqueous samples and raw vegetables.

    PubMed

    Miglietta, M L; Lamanna, R

    2006-07-01

    Carotenoids are linear C40 tetraterpenoid hydrocarbons and represent a wide category of natural pigments. They are components of the pigment system of chloroplasts and are involved in the primary light absorption and the photon canalization of photosynthesis. Moreover, they also behave as quenchers of singlet oxygen, protecting cells and organisms against lipid peroxidation. Carotenoids have a strong lipophilic character and are usually analyzed in organic solvents. However, because of their biological activity, the characterization of these compounds in an aqueous environment or in the natural matrix is very important. One of the most important dietary carotenoids is beta-carotene, which has been extensively studied both in vivo and in model systems, but because of the low concentration and strong interaction with the biological matrix, beta-carotene has never been observed by NMR in solid aqueous samples.In the present work, a model system has been developed for the detection and identification of beta-carotene in solid aqueous samples by 1H HR-MAS NMR. The efficiency of the model has led to the identification of beta-carotene in a raw vegetable matrix.

  7. Evidence for cross-linking in tomato cutin using HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Ashish P; Simpson, André J; Hatcher, Patrick G

    2003-11-01

    Cutin is a polyester biopolymer component of plant leaf and fruit cuticles, most often associated with waxes and cuticular polysaccharides, and sometimes with another aliphatic biopolymer called cutan. Insolubility of these cuticular biopolymers has made it difficult to apply traditional analytical techniques for structure determination, because most techniques providing molecular level details require solubility. By using the relatively new technique of one and two-dimensional high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy, with added information from solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy, detailed through-bond connectivities and assignments are made for cutin from Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) fruit. Based on the data obtained, tomato cutin is found to be predominantly an aliphatic polyester with some olefinic and aromatic moieties, consistent with previous studies that employed various degradative approaches. Aside from esters, there are free primary and secondary alcohol groups, as well as free fatty acids. A significant finding is the presence of alpha-branched fatty acids/esters. Mid-chain hydroxyls appear to be generally unesterified, but esters of mid-chain hydroxyls have been identified. The alpha-branched fatty acids/esters and esters of mid-chain hydroxyls could point towards cross-linking.

  8. Magnetization-recovery experiments for static and MAS-NMR of I = 3/2 nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesinowski, James P.

    2006-05-01

    Multifrequency pulsed NMR experiments on quadrupole-perturbed I = 3/2 spins in single crystals are shown to be useful for measuring spin-lattice relaxation parameters even for a mixture of quadrupolar plus magnetic relaxation mechanisms. Such measurements can then be related to other MAS-NMR experiments on powders. This strategy is demonstrated by studies of 71Ga and 69Ga (both I = 3/2) spin-lattice relaxation behavior in a single-crystal (film) sample of gallium nitride, GaN, at various orientations of the axially symmetric nuclear quadrupole coupling tensor. Observation of apparent single-exponential relaxation behavior in I = 3/2 saturation-recovery experiments can be misleading when individual contributing rate processes are neglected in the interpretation. The quadrupolar mechanism (dominant in this study) has both a single-quantum process ( T1Q1) and a double-quantum process ( T1Q2), whose time constants are not necessarily equal. Magnetic relaxation (in this study most likely arising from hyperfine couplings to unpaired delocalized electron spins in the conduction band) also contributes to a single-quantum process ( T1M). A strategy of multifrequency irradiation with observation of satellite and/or central transitions, incorporating different initial conditions for the level populations, provides a means of obtaining these three relaxation time constants from single-crystal 71Ga data alone. The 69Ga results provide a further check of internal consistency, since magnetic and quadrupolar contributions to its relaxation scale in opposite directions compared to 71Ga. For both perpendicular and parallel quadrupole coupling tensor symmetry axis orientations small but significant differences between T1Q1 and T1Q2 were measured, whereas for a tensor symmetry axis oriented at the magic-angle (54.74°) the values were essentially equal. Magic-angle spinning introduces a number of complications into the measurement and interpretation of the spin-lattice relaxation

  9. Characterization of cation environments in polycrystalline forsterite by Mg-25 MAS, MQMAS, and QCPMG NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Michael C.; Brouwer, William J.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Gan, Zhehong; Mueller, Karl T.

    2010-11-01

    Forsterite (Mg2SiO4) is a silicate mineral frequently studied in the Earth sciences as it has a simple crystal structure and fast dissolution kinetics (elemental release rates under typical conditions on the order of 10-7 mol/m2/s1). During the dissolution process, spectroscopic techniques are often utilized to augment solution chemical analysis and to provide data for determining reaction mechanisms. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is able to interrogate the local bonding arrangement and coordination of a particular nuclide to obtain in structural information. Although previous NMR studies have focused on the silicon and oxygen environments in forsterite, studies focusing on the two nonequivalent magnesium environments in forsterite are limited to a few single-crystal studies. In this study, we present the results of 25Mg MAS, MQMAS, and static QCMG experiments performed on a powdered sample of pure synthetic forsterite. We also present spectral fits obtained from simulation software packages, which directly provide quadrupolar parameters for 25Mg nuclei occupying each of the two nonequivalent magnesium sites in the forsterite structure. These results are compared to calculations of the electric field gradient tenor conducted in previous ab initio studies to make definitive assignments correlating each peak to their respective magnesium site in the forsterite structure. Although previous NMR investigations of forsterite have focused on single-crystal samples, we have focused on powdered forsterite as the increased surface area of powdered samples makes them more amenable to laboratory-scale dissolution studies and, ultimately, the products from chemical weathering may be monitored an quantified.

  10. Heating and temperature gradients of lipid bilayer samples induced by RF irradiation in MAS solid-state NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Zhengfeng; Zhao, Weijing; Wang, Liying; Yang, Jun

    2016-05-09

    The MAS solid-state NMR has been a powerful technique for studying membrane proteins within the native-like lipid bilayer environment. In general, RF irradiation in MAS NMR experiments can heat and potentially destroy expensive membrane protein samples. However, under practical MAS NMR experimental conditions, detailed characterization of RF heating effect of lipid bilayer samples is still lacking. Herein, using (1) H chemical shift of water for temperature calibration, we systematically study the dependence of RF heating on hydration levels and salt concentrations of three lipids in MAS NMR experiments. Under practical (1) H decoupling conditions used in biological MAS NMR experiments, three lipids show different dependence of RF heating on hydration levels as well as salt concentrations, which are closely associated with the properties of lipids. The maximum temperature elevation of about 10 °C is similar for the three lipids containing 200% hydration, which is much lower than that in static solid-state NMR experiments. The RF heating due to salt is observed to be less than that due to hydration, with a maximum temperature elevation of less than 4 °C in the hydrated samples containing 120 mmol l(-1) of salt. Upon RF irradiation, the temperature gradient across the sample is observed to be greatly increased up to 20 °C, as demonstrated by the remarkable broadening of (1) H signal of water. Based on detailed characterization of RF heating effect, we demonstrate that RF heating and temperature gradient can be significantly reduced by decreasing the hydration levels of lipid bilayer samples from 200% to 30%. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Fermi resonance of C 1 chlorine compounds in the adsorbed phase of zeolites. An FTIR and MAS NMR spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannus, I.; Kónya, Z.; Nagy, J. B.; Kiricsi, I.

    1997-06-01

    Fermi resonance was investigated for CH 3Cl, COCl 2, CO + Cl 2, CCl 4 and CCl 2F 2 adsorbed in NaYFAU zeolite. The extent of the resonance was measured by IR spectroscopy, while the mechanism of surface reaction was evidenced by MAS NMR spectroscopy.

  12. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  13. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110-120 kHz), (1)H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong (1)H-(1)H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow (1)H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) (1)H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about (1)H-(1)H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic-level structural and dynamical

  14. 13C CP/MAS NMR studies of vitamin E model compounds.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Stanislaw; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wawer, Iwona

    2004-10-01

    13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR data for 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethylchroman-6-ol (2), 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox c) (3) and its acetate (4), 2-methoxy-2,2,5,7,8-pentamethylchroman-6-ol (5), 2-hydroxy-2,2,5,7,8-pentamethylchroman-6-ol (6) and 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethylchroman (7) are reported. A deshielding of 7.7 ppm for the carboxylic carbon was observed in solid Trolox due to formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds within cyclic dimers. Such crystal packing permits effective cross-polarization and fast relaxation (short T1rho(H)). The impact of the proton concentration on the CP dynamics is reflected by the longer T(CP) and T1rhoH for Trolox-d2 (deuterated at mobile proton sites). The calculated GIAO RHF shielding constants are sensitive to intramolecular effects: rotation around the C-6-O bond (changes of sigma up to 8 ppm) and conformation at C-2.

  15. Structural investigations of borosilicate glasses containing MoO 3 by MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurant, D.; Majérus, O.; Fadel, E.; Quintas, A.; Gervais, C.; Charpentier, T.; Neuville, D.

    2010-01-01

    High molybdenum concentration in glass compositions may lead to alkali and alkaline-earth molybdates crystallization during melt cooling that must be controlled particularly during the preparation of highly radioactive nuclear glassy waste forms. To understand the effect of molybdenum addition on the structure of a simplified nuclear glass and to know how composition changes can affect molybdates crystallization tendency, the structure of two glass series belonging to the SiO 2-B 2O 3-Na 2O-CaO-MoO 3 system was studied by 29Si, 11B, 23Na MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopies by increasing MoO 3 or B 2O 3 concentrations. Increasing MoO 3 amount induced an increase of the silicate network reticulation but no significant effect was observed on the proportion of BO4- units and on the distribution of Na + cations in glass structure. By increasing B 2O 3 concentration, a strong evolution of the distribution of Na + cations was observed that could explain the evolution of the nature of molybdate crystals (CaMoO 4 or Na 2MoO 4) formed during melt cooling.

  16. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin–rotation constants in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br and {sup 127}I)

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B. Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth; Jaszuński, Michał

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin–rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin–rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin–rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin–rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin–rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  17. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in (175)LuX and (197)AuX (X = (19)F, (35)Cl, (79)Br and (127)I).

    PubMed

    Demissie, Taye B; Jaszuński, Michał; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in (175)LuX and (197)AuX (X = (19)F, (35)Cl, (79)Br, (127)I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  18. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br and 127I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Taye B.; Jaszuński, Michał; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-01

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br, 127I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  19. Hydration properties of regioselectively etherified celluloses monitored by 2H and 13C solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Schöbitz, Michael; Schaller, Jens

    2012-06-20

    The hydration properties of 2,3-O-hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) and 2,3-O-hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) were analyzed by multi-nuclear solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy. By 13C single-pulse (SP) MAS and cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, differences between the immobile regions and all parts of the polysaccharides were detected as a function of hydration. Complementary information about the water environments was observed by 2H MAS NMR. By this approach it was demonstrated that side chains in 2,3-O-HPC and 2,3-O-HEC were easier to hydrate than the cellulose backbone. Furthermore the motion of water was more restricted (slower) in 2,3-O-HPC than in 2,3-O-HEC. For both polysaccharides the hydration could be explained by a two-step process: in step one increased ordering of the immobile regions occurs after which the entire polymer is hydrated in step two.

  20. Partitioning of aluminum atoms in crystallographically non-equivalent tetrahedral sites of the zeolite offretite by 29Si MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. H.; Wang, K. X.; Luo, W. L.; Yuan, Z. Y.; Wang, J. Z.; Ding, D. T.; Li, H. X.; Hu, C.

    1996-04-01

    For the zeolite offretite, a formula is proposed which includes the framework Si/Al ratio ( R), the partitioning ratio of Al over two crystallographically non-equivalent tetrahedral sites ( r) and intensities of the observed peaks in the 29Si MAS NMR spectrum. By this formula, the framework Si/Al ratio of offretite can be estimated from the 29Si MAS NMR spectrum. Combined with chemical analysis of the Si/Al ratio, Al partitioning in two kinds of T sites can also be deduced. It is concluded that the T B sites are favored by Al atoms in parent offretites and Al atoms at T B sites can more easily be substituted isomorphously by Si when treated with (NH 4) 2SiF 6. The formula proposed here is based only on experiments and may be used to testify some statistical models of Al distributions in offretites.

  1. Proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy in rigid solids with ultra-fast MAS

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Gregory P.; Cherry, Brian R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we show the potential for utilizing proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) NMR in rigid solids under ultra-fast magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The indirect detection of carbon-13 from coupled neighboring hydrogen nuclei provides a sensitivity enhancement of 3 - 4 fold in crystalline amino acids over direct-detected versions. Furthermore, the sensitivity enhancement is shown to be significantly larger for disordered solids that display inhomogeneously broadened carbon-13 spectra. Latrodectus hesperus (Black Widow) dragline silk is given as an example where the sample is mass-limited and the sensitivity enhancement for the proton-detected experiment is 8 - 13 fold. The ultra-fast MAS proton-detected HSQC solid-state NMR technique has the added advantage that no proton homonuclear decoupling is applied during the experiment. Further, well-resolved, indirectly observed carbon-13 spectra can be obtained in some cases without heteronuclear proton decoupling. PMID:19857977

  2. Thermal maturity of type II kerogen from the New Albany Shale assessed by13C CP/MAS NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner-Zwanziger, U.; Lis, G.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal maturity of oil and gas source rocks is typically quantified in terms of vitrinite reflectance, which is based on optical properties of terrestrial woody remains. This study evaluates 13C CP/MAS NMR parameters in kerogen (i.e., the insoluble fraction of organic matter in sediments and sedimentary rocks) as proxies for thermal maturity in marine-derived source rocks where terrestrially derived vitrinite is often absent or sparse. In a suite of samples from the New Albany Shale (Middle Devonian to the Early Mississippian, Illinois Basin) the abundance of aromatic carbon in kerogen determined by 13C CP/MAS NMR correlates linearly well with vitrinite reflectance. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. DRIFT and HR MAS NMR characterization of humic substances from a soil treated with different organic and mineral fertilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Erika; Francioso, Ornella; Nardi, Serenella; Saladini, Monica; Ferro, Nicola Dal; Morari, Francesco

    2011-07-01

    In this study, using DRIFT and HR MAS NMR, we analyzed the humic substances isolated from a soil treated, over 40 years, with different organic, mineral and organic plus mineral treatments and cultivated with maize as the main crop. As expected, the structure of humic substances was very complex but by combining both techniques (DRIFT and HR MAS NMR) additional information was obtained on aromatic and aliphatic components, the most recalcitrant parts of these macromolecules. In so doing we wanted to investigate the relationship between HS structure and long-term management practices. An elevated content of lignin, aminoacids, peptides and proteins was observed mainly for farmyard manure treatments with respect to mineral or liquid manure amendments; this supports how the different management practices have greatly influenced the humification process of cultivated soils.

  4. Proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy in rigid solids with ultra-fast MAS.

    PubMed

    Holland, Gregory P; Cherry, Brian R; Jenkins, Janelle E; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we show the potential for utilizing proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) NMR in rigid solids under ultra-fast magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The indirect detection of carbon-13 from coupled neighboring hydrogen nuclei provides a sensitivity enhancement of 3- to 4-fold in crystalline amino acids over direct-detected versions. Furthermore, the sensitivity enhancement is shown to be significantly larger for disordered solids that display inhomogeneously broadened carbon-13 spectra. Latrodectus hesperus (Black Widow) dragline silk is given as an example where the sample is mass-limited and the sensitivity enhancement for the proton-detected experiment is 8- to 13-fold. The ultra-fast MAS proton-detected HSQC solid-state NMR technique has the added advantage that no proton homonuclear decoupling is applied during the experiment. Further, well-resolved, indirectly observed carbon-13 spectra can be obtained in some cases without heteronuclear proton decoupling.

  5. MAS-NMR study of lithium zinc silicate glasses and glass-ceramics with various ZnO content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Madhumita; Kothiyal, Govind P.; Montagne, Lionel; Delevoye, Laurent

    2008-02-01

    Lithium zinc silicate glasses of composition (mol%): 17.5Li 2O-(72- x)SiO 2- xZnO-5.1Na 2O-1.3P 2O 5-4.1B 2O 3, 5.5⩽ x⩽17.7, were prepared by conventional melt-quenched technique and converted to glass-ceramic by controlled crystallization process. 29Si and 31P MAS-NMR was used to characterize the structure of both glass and glass-ceramic samples. Despite the complex glass composition, Q2, Q3 and Q4 sites are identified from 29Si MAS-NMR, which relative intensities are found to vary with the ZnO content, indicating a network depolymerization by ZnO. Moreover, well separated Q3 and Q4 resonances for low ZnO content indicates the occurrence of phase separation. From 31P MAS-NMR, it is seen that phosphorus is mainly present in the form of ortho-( Q0) and pyro-phosphate ( Q1) structural units and variation of ZnO content did not have much effect on these resonances, which provides an additional evidence for phase separation in the glass. On conversion to glass-ceramics, lithium disilicate (Li 2Si 2O 5), lithium zinc ortho-silicate (Li 3Zn 0.5SiO 4), tridymite (SiO 2) and cristobalite (SiO 2) were identified as major silicate crystalline phases. Using 29Si MAS-NMR, quantification of these silicate crystalline phases is carried out and correlated with the ZnO content in the glass-ceramics samples. In addition, 31P spectra unambiguously revealed the presence of crystalline Li 3PO 4 and (Na,Li) 3PO 4 in the glass-ceramics.

  6. Study of phase transition mechanisms in [N(CH3)4]2ZnCl4 by static NMR and MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Lim, Kye-Young

    2014-05-01

    The temperature dependences of chemical shifts, intensities, the spin-lattice relaxation time in laboratory frame T1, and in rotating frame T1ρ were measured for 1H and 13C in [N(CH3)4]2ZnCl4 by single-crystal NMR and MAS NMR. The unit cell in phase I contains two chemically inequivalent types of N(CH3)4 ions. However, the two chemically different ions N(CH3)4 cannot be practically identified from the 13C NMR spectrum. The structural changes for 1H and 13C were measured near Ti and TC4. The existence of chemically equivalent N(CH3)4 ions in phase I and the existence of the ferroelastic characteristic of the N(CH3)4 ions in phases IV and V are discussed.

  7. Determination of the structural changes by Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy on native corn starch with plasticizers

    SciTech Connect

    Cozar, O.; Filip, C.; Tripon, C.; Cioica, N.; Coţa, C.; Nagy, E. M.

    2013-11-13

    The plasticizing - antiplasticizing effect of water and glycerol contents on native corn starch samples is investigated by FT-Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The presence of both amorphous and crystalline structural phases was evidenced in pure native corn starch and also in the samples containing plasticizers. Among the crystalline starch structures, the A- and V- types were suggested by CP/MAS NMR spectra.

  8. 1H HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy and the Metabolite Determination of Typical Foods in Mediterranean Diet

    PubMed Central

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Dugo, Giacomo; Cicero, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has become an experimental technique widely used in food science. The experimental procedures that allow precise and quantitative analysis on different foods are relatively simple. For a better sensitivity and resolution, NMR spectroscopy is usually applied to liquid sample by means of extraction procedures that can be addressed to the observation of particular compounds. For the study of semisolid systems such as intact tissues, High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) has received great attention within the biomedical area and beyond. Metabolic profiling and metabolism changes can be investigated both in animal organs and in foods. In this work we present a proton HR-MAS NMR study on the typical vegetable foods of Mediterranean diet such as the Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) cherry tomato of Pachino, the PGI Interdonato lemon of Messina, several Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) extra virgin olive oils from Sicily, and the Traditional Italian Food Product (PAT) red garlic of Nubia. We were able to identify and quantify the main metabolites within the studied systems that can be used for their characterization and authentication. PMID:26495154

  9. The relationship between reorientational molecular motions and phase transitions in [Mg(H2O)6](BF4)2, studied with the use of 1H and 19F NMR and FT-MIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuli, Edward; Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Grad, Bartłomiej; Kozak, Asja; Wasicki, Jan W.; Bilski, Paweł; Hołderna-Natkaniec, Krystyna; Medycki, Wojciech

    2015-02-01

    A 1H and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance study of [Mg(H2O)6](BF4)2 has confirmed the existence of two phase transitions at Tc1 ≈ 257 K and Tc2 ≈ 142 K, detected earlier by the DSC method. These transitions were reflected by changes in the temperature dependences of both proton and fluorine of second moments M2H and M2F and of spin-lattice relaxation times T1H and T1F. The study revealed anisotropic reorientations of whole [Mg(H2O)6]2+ cations, reorientations by 180° jumps of H2O ligands, and aniso- and isotropic reorientations of BF4- anions. The activation parameters for these motions were obtained. It was found that the phase transition at Tc1 is associated with the reorientation of the cation as a whole unit around the C3 axis and that at Tc2 with isotropic reorientation of the BF4- anions. The temperature dependence of the full width at half maximum value of the infrared band of ρt(H2O) mode (at ˜596 cm-1) indicated that in phases I and II, all H2O ligands in [Mg(H2O)6]2+ perform fast reorientational motions (180° jumps) with a mean value of activation energy equal to ca 10 kJ mole-1, what is fully consistent with NMR results. The phase transition at Tc1 is associated with a sudden change of speed of fast (τR ≈ 10-12 s) reorientational motions of H2O ligands. Below Tc2 (in phase III), the reorientations of certain part of the H2O ligands significantly slow down, while others continue their fast reorientation with an activation energy of ca 2 kJ mole-1. This fast reorientation cannot be evidenced in NMR relaxation experiments. Splitting of certain IR bands connected with H2O ligands at the observed phase transitions suggests a reduction of the symmetry of the octahedral [Mg(H2O)6]2+ complex cation.

  10. Microscopic structural analysis of fractured silk fibers from Bombyx mori and Samia cynthia ricini using 13C CP/MAS NMR with a 1mm microcoil MAS NMR probehead.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Shizuo; Takahashi, Rui; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2010-07-01

    Conformational changes have been studied in silk fibers from the domestic silkworm Bombyx mori and a wild silkworm Samia cynthia ricini as a result of fractured by stretching. About 300 samples consisting of only the fractured regions of [1-13C]Ala or [1-13C]Gly labeled silk fibers were collected and observed by 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra. The total amount of these fractured fibers is only about 1mg and therefore we used a home-built 1mm microcoil MAS NMR probehead. A very small increase in the fraction of random coil was noted for the alanine regions of both silk fibroins and for the glycine region of B. mori silk fibroin. However, there is no difference in the spectra before and after fractured for the glycine region of S. c. ricini silk fibroin. Thus, the influence of fracture occurs exclusively at the Ala region for S. c. ricini. The relationship between sequence, fracture and structure is discussed.

  11. Quantification of ammonia binding sites in Davison (Type 3A) zeolite desiccant : a solid-state Nitrogen-15 MAS NMR spectroscopy investigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; Holland, Gregory P.; Cherry, Brian Ray

    2004-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of ammonia binding sites in the Davison (Type 3A) zeolite desiccant using solid-state {sup 15}N MAS NMR spectroscopy is reported. By utilizing 15N enriched ammonia ({sup 15}NH{sub 3}) gas, the different adsorption/binding sites within the zeolite were investigated as a function of NH{sub 3} loading. Using {sup 15}N MAS NMR multiple sites were resolved that have distinct cross-polarization dynamics and chemical shift behavior. These differences in the {sup 15}N NMR were used to characterize the adsorption environments in both the pure 3A zeolite and the silicone-molded forms of the desiccant.

  12. Site-resolved 2H relaxation experiments in solid materials by global line-shape analysis of MAS NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindh, E. L.; Stilbs, P.; Furó, I.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a way one can achieve good spectral resolution in 2H MAS NMR experiments. The goal is to be able to distinguish between and study sites in various deuterated materials with small chemical shift dispersion. We show that the 2H MAS NMR spectra recorded during a spin-relaxation experiment are amenable to spectral decomposition because of the different evolution of spectral components during the relaxation delay. We verify that the results are robust by global least-square fitting of the spectral series both under the assumption of specific line shapes and without such assumptions (COmponent-REsolved spectroscopy, CORE). In addition, we investigate the reliability of the developed protocol by analyzing spectra simulated with different combinations of spectral parameters. The performance is demonstrated in a model material of deuterated poly(methacrylic acid) that contains two 2H spin populations with similar chemical shifts but different quadrupole splittings. In 2H-exchanged cellulose containing two 2H spin populations with very similar chemical shifts and quadrupole splittings, the method provides new site-selective information about the molecular dynamics.

  13. CaCl 2 -Accelerated Hydration of Tricalcium Silicate: A STXM Study Combined with 29 Si MAS NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Qinfei; Ge, Yong; Geng, Guoqing; ...

    2015-01-01

    Tmore » he effect of calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ) on tricalcium silicate (C 3 S) hydration was investigated by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra and 29 Si MAS NMR. STXM is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for studying the chemical composition of a cement-based hydration system.he Ca L 3,2 -edge NEXAFS spectra obtained by examining C 3 S hydration in the presence of CaCl 2 showed that this accelerator does not change the coordination of calcium in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), which is the primary hydration product. O K-edge NEXAFS is also very useful in distinguishing the chemical components in hydrated C 3 S. Based on the Ca L 3,2 -edge spectra and chemical component mapping, we concluded that CaCl 2 prefers to coexist with unhydrated C 3 S instead of C-S-H. In Si K-edge NEXAFS analysis, CaCl 2 increases the degree of silicate polymerization of C-S-H in agreement with the 29 Si CP/MAS NMR results, which show that the presence of CaCl 2 in hydrated C 3 S considerably accelerates the formation of middle groups ( Q 2 ) and branch sites ( Q 3 ) in the silicate chains of C-S-H gel at 1-day hydration.« less

  14. MAS NMR of the Drug Resistant S31N M2 Proton Transporter from Influenza A

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Loren B.; Eddy, Matthew T.; Chou, James J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    We report chemical shift assignments of the drug-resistant S31N mutant of M218-60 determined with magic angle spinning (MAS) 3D spectra acquired with a 15N-13C ZF-TEDOR transfer followed by 13C-13C mixing by RFDR. The MAS spectra reveal two sets of resonances, indicating that the tetramer assembles as a dimer of dimers, similar to the wild type channel. The two sets of chemical shifts are shown to be in close proximity at residue H37, and assignments reveal a difference in the helix torsion angles, as predicted by TALOS+, for the key resistance residue N31. In contrast to wild type M218-60, chemical shift changes are minimal with addition of the inhibitor rimantadine, suggesting that the drug does not bind to S31N. PMID:22480220

  15. Deuterium MAS NMR studies of dynamics on multiple timescales: histidine and oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Chan-Huot, Monique; Wimperis, Stephen; Gervais, Christel; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Duma, Luminita

    2015-01-12

    Deuterium ((2) H) magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance is applied to monitor the dynamics of the exchanging labile deuterons of polycrystalline L-histidine hydrochloride monohydrate-d7 and α-oxalic acid dihydrate-d6 . Direct experimental evidence of fast dynamics is obtained from T1Z and T1Q measurements. Further motional information is extracted from two-dimensional single-quantum (SQ) and double-quantum (DQ) MAS spectra. Differences between the SQ and DQ linewidths clearly indicate the presence of motions on intermediate timescales for the carboxylic moiety and the D2 O in α-oxalic acid dihydrate, and for the amine group and the D2 O in L-histidine hydrochloride monohydrate. Comparison of the relaxation rate constants of Zeeman and quadrupolar order with the relaxation rate constants of the DQ coherences suggests the co-existence of fast and slow motional processes.

  16. High-resolution proton-detected NMR of proteins at very fast MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, Loren B.; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Pintacuda, Guido

    2015-04-01

    When combined with high-frequency (currently ∼60 kHz) magic-angle spinning (MAS), proton detection boosts sensitivity and increases coherence lifetimes, resulting in narrow 1H lines. Herein, we review methods for efficient proton detected techniques and applications in highly deuterated proteins, with an emphasis on 100% selected 1H site concentration for the purpose of sensitivity. We discuss the factors affecting resolution and sensitivity that have resulted in higher and higher frequency MAS. Next we describe the various methods that have been used for backbone and side-chain assignment with proton detection, highlighting the efficient use of scalar-based 13C-13C transfers. Additionally, we show new spectra making use of these schemes for side-chain assignment of methyl 13C-1H resonances. The rapid acquisition of resolved 2D spectra with proton detection allows efficient measurement of relaxation parameters used as a measure of dynamic processes. Under rapid MAS, relaxation times can be measured in a site-specific manner in medium-sized proteins, enabling the investigation of molecular motions at high resolution. Additionally, we discuss methods for measurement of structural parameters, including measurement of internuclear 1H-1H contacts and the use of paramagnetic effects in the determination of global structure.

  17. High-resolution proton-detected NMR of proteins at very fast MAS.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Pintacuda, Guido

    2015-04-01

    When combined with high-frequency (currently ∼60 kHz) magic-angle spinning (MAS), proton detection boosts sensitivity and increases coherence lifetimes, resulting in narrow ((1))H lines. Herein, we review methods for efficient proton detected techniques and applications in highly deuterated proteins, with an emphasis on 100% selected ((1))H site concentration for the purpose of sensitivity. We discuss the factors affecting resolution and sensitivity that have resulted in higher and higher frequency MAS. Next we describe the various methods that have been used for backbone and side-chain assignment with proton detection, highlighting the efficient use of scalar-based ((13))C-((13))C transfers. Additionally, we show new spectra making use of these schemes for side-chain assignment of methyl ((13))C-((1))H resonances. The rapid acquisition of resolved 2D spectra with proton detection allows efficient measurement of relaxation parameters used as a measure of dynamic processes. Under rapid MAS, relaxation times can be measured in a site-specific manner in medium-sized proteins, enabling the investigation of molecular motions at high resolution. Additionally, we discuss methods for measurement of structural parameters, including measurement of internuclear ((1))H-((1))H contacts and the use of paramagnetic effects in the determination of global structure.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility effects on 13C MAS NMR spectra of carbon materials and graphite.

    PubMed

    Freita, J C; Emmerich, F G; Cernicchiaro, G R; Sampaio, L C; Bonagamba, T J

    2001-01-01

    13C high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to study carbon materials prepared through the thermal decomposition of four different organic precursors (rice hulls, endocarp of babassu coconut, peat, and PVC). For heat treatment temperatures (HTTs) above about 600 C, all materials presented 13C NMR spectra composed of a unique resonance line associated with carbon atoms in aromatic planes. With increasing HTT a continuous broadening of this resonance and a diamagnetic shift in its central frequency were verified for all samples. The evolution of the magnitude and anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of the heat-treated carbon samples with HTT explains well these findings. It is shown that these results are better understood when a comparison is made with the features of the 13C NMR spectrum of polycrystalline graphite, for which the magnetic susceptibility effect is also present and is much more pronounced.

  19. Phase Cycling Schemes for finite-pulse-RFDR MAS Solid State NMR Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Sun, Pingchuan; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    The finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used in 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS). A recent study demonstrated the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle, XY414, for the fp-RFDR pulse sequence employed in 2D 1H/1H single-quantum/single-quantum correlation experiments under ultrafast MAS conditions. In this study, we report a comprehensive analysis on the dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY412, XY413, XY414, and XY814 phase cycles under different spinning speeds ranging from 10 to 100 kHz. The theoretical calculations reveal the presence of second-order terms (T10T2,±2, T1,±1T2,±1, etc.) in the recoupled homonuclear dipolar coupling Hamiltonian only when the basic XY4 phase cycle is utilized, making it advantageous for proton-proton magnetization transfer under ultrafast MAS conditions. It is also found that the recoupling efficiency of fp-RFDR is quite dependent on the duty factor (τ180/τR) as well as on the strength of homonuclear dipolar couplings. The rate of longitudinal magnetization transfer increases linearly with the duty factor of fp-RFDR for all the XY-based phase cycles investigated in this study. Examination of the performances of different phase cycles against chemical shift offset and RF field in homogeneity effects revealed that XY414 is the most tolerant phase cycle, while the shortest phase cycle XY4 suppressed the RF field inhomogeneity effects most efficiently under slow spinning speeds. Our results suggest that the difference in the fp-RFDR recoupling efficiencies decreases with the increasing MAS speed, while ultrafast (>60 kHz) spinning speed is advantageous as it recouples a large amount of homonuclear dipolar couplings and therefore enable fast magnetization exchange. The effects of higher-order terms and cross terms between various interactions in the effective Hamiltonian of fp-RFDR are also analyzed

  20. Phase cycling schemes for finite-pulse-RFDR MAS solid state NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Sun, Pingchuan; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-03-01

    The finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used in 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS). A recent study demonstrated the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle, XY414, for the fp-RFDR pulse sequence employed in 2D 1H/1H single-quantum/single-quantum correlation experiments under ultrafast MAS conditions. In this study, we report a comprehensive analysis on the dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY412, XY413, XY414, and XY814 phase cycles under different spinning speeds ranging from 10 to 100 kHz. The theoretical calculations reveal the presence of second-order terms (T10T2,±2, T1,±1T2,±1, etc.) in the recoupled homonuclear dipolar coupling Hamiltonian only when the basic XY4 phase cycle is utilized, making it advantageous for proton-proton magnetization transfer under ultrafast MAS conditions. It is also found that the recoupling efficiency of fp-RFDR is quite dependent on the duty factor (τ180/τR) as well as on the strength of homonuclear dipolar couplings. The rate of longitudinal magnetization transfer increases linearly with the duty factor of fp-RFDR for all the XY-based phase cycles investigated in this study. Examination of the performances of different phase cycles against chemical shift offset and RF field inhomogeneity effects revealed that XY414 is the most tolerant phase cycle, while the shortest phase cycle XY4 suppressed the RF field inhomogeneity effects most efficiently under slow spinning speeds. Our results suggest that the difference in the fp-RFDR recoupling efficiencies decreases with the increasing MAS speed, while ultrafast (>60 kHz) spinning speed is advantageous as it recouples a large amount of homonuclear dipolar couplings and therefore enable fast magnetization exchange. The effects of higher-order terms and cross terms between various interactions in the effective Hamiltonian of fp-RFDR are also analyzed

  1. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin–epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time 13C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization

    PubMed Central

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio

    2015-01-01

    Summary The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices. PMID:26877800

  2. Polydisperse methyl β-cyclodextrin-epichlorohydrin polymers: variable contact time (13)C CP-MAS solid-state NMR characterization.

    PubMed

    Mallard, Isabelle; Baudelet, Davy; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Panzeri, Walter; Ragg, Enzio; Mele, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The polymerization of partially methylated β-cyclodextrin (CRYSMEB) with epichlorohydrin was carried out in the presence of a known amount of toluene as imprinting agent. Three different preparations (D1, D2 and D3) of imprinted polymers were obtained and characterized by solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy under cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) conditions. The polymers were prepared by using the same synthetic conditions but with different molar ratios of imprinting agent/monomer, leading to morphologically equivalent materials but with different absorption properties. The main purpose of the work was to find a suitable spectroscopic descriptor accounting for the different imprinting process in three homogeneous polymeric networks. The polymers were characterized by studying the kinetics of the cross-polarization process. This approach is based on variable contact time CP-MAS spectra, referred to as VCP-MAS. The analysis of the VCP-MAS spectra provided two relaxation parameters: T CH (the CP time constant) and T 1ρ (the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame). The results and the analysis presented in the paper pointed out that T CH is sensitive to the imprinting process, showing variations related to the toluene/cyclodextrin molar ratio used for the preparation of the materials. Conversely, the observed values of T 1ρ did not show dramatic variations with the imprinting protocol, but rather confirmed that the three polymers are morphologically similar. Thus the combined use of T CH and T 1ρ can be helpful for the characterization and fine tuning of imprinted polymeric matrices.

  3. High-field 19.6 T 27Al solid-state MAS NMR of in vitro aluminated brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Pamela L.; Lukiw, Walter J.; Gan, Zhehong; Hall, Randall W.; Butler, Leslie G.

    2004-10-01

    The combination of 27Al high-field solid-state NMR (19.6 T) with rapid spinning speeds (17.8 kHz) is used to acquire 27Al NMR spectra of total RNA human brain temporal lobe tissues exposed to 0.10 mM Al 3+ (as AlCl 3) and of human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19), grown in 0.10 mM AlCl 3. The spectra of these model systems show multiple Al 3+ binding sites, good signal/noise ratios and apparent chemical shift dispersions. A single broad peak (-3 to 11 ppm) is seen for the aluminated ARPE-19 cells, consistent with reported solution-state NMR chemical shifts of Al-transferrin. The aluminated brain tissue has a considerably different 27Al MAS NMR spectrum. In addition to the transferrin-type resonance, additional peaks are seen. Tentative assignments include: -9 to -3 ppm, octahedral AlO 6 (phosphate and water); 9 ppm, condensed AlO 6 units (Al-O-Al bridges); 24 ppm, tetrahedral AlO 3N and/or octahedral Al-carbonate; and 35 ppm, more N-substituted aluminum and /or tetrahedral AlO 4. Thus, brain tissue is susceptible to a broad range of coordination by aluminum. Furthermore, the moderate 27Al C Q values (all less than 10 MHz) suggest future NMR studies may be performed at 9.4 T and a spin rate of 20 kHz.

  4. Analysis of Radiation Induced Degradation in FPC-461 Fluoropolymers by Variable Temperature Multinuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Wilson, T S; Maxwell, R S

    2004-10-27

    Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been used to investigate aging mechanisms in a vinyl chloride:chlorotrifluoroethylene copolymer, FPC-461, due to exposure to {gamma}-radiation. Solid state {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra revealed structural changes of the polymer upon irradiation under both air and nitrogen atmospheres. Considerable degradation is seen with {sup 1}H NMR in the vinyl chloride region of the polymer, particularly in the samples irradiated in air. {sup 19}F MAS NMR was used to investigate speciation in the chlorotrifluoroethylene blocks, though negligible changes were seen. {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR at elevated temperature revealed increased segmental mobility and decreased structural heterogeneity within the polymer, yielding significant resolution enhancement over room temperature solid state detection. The effects of multi-site exchange are manifest in both the {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR spectra as a line broadening and change in peak position as a function of temperature.

  5. Incorporation of phosphorus guest ions in the calcium silicate phases of Portland cement from 31P MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Søren L; Jakobsen, Hans J; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2010-06-21

    Portland cements may contain small quantities of phosphorus (typically below 0.5 wt % P(2)O(5)), originating from either the raw materials or alternative sources of fuel used to heat the cement kilns. This work reports the first (31)P MAS NMR study of anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements that focuses on the phase and site preferences of the (PO(4))(3-) guest ions in the main clinker phases and hydration products. The observed (31)P chemical shifts (10 to -2 ppm), the (31)P chemical shift anisotropy, and the resemblance of the lineshapes in the (31)P and (29)Si MAS NMR spectra strongly suggest that (PO(4))(3-) units are incorporated in the calcium silicate phases, alite (Ca(3)SiO(5)) and belite (Ca(2)SiO(4)), by substitution for (SiO(4))(4-) tetrahedra. This assignment is further supported by a determination of the spin-lattice relaxation times for (31)P in alite and belite, which exhibit the same ratio as observed for the corresponding (29)Si relaxation times. From simulations of the intensities, observed in inversion-recovery spectra for a white Portland cement, it is deduced that 1.3% and 2.1% of the Si sites in alite and belite, respectively, are replaced by phosphorus. Charge balance may potentially be achieved to some extent by a coupled substitution mechanism where Ca(2+) is replaced by Fe(3+) ions, which may account for the interaction of the (31)P spins with paramagnetic Fe(3+) ions as observed for the ordinary Portland cements. A minor fraction of phosphorus may also be present in the separate phase Ca(3)(PO(4))(2), as indicated by the observation of a narrow resonance at delta((31)P) = 3.0 ppm for two of the studied cements. (31)P{(1)H} CP/MAS NMR spectra following the hydration of a white Portland cement show that the resonances from the hydrous phosphate species fall in the same spectral range as observed for (PO(4))(3-) incorporated in alite. This similarity and the absence of a large (31)P chemical shift ansitropy indicate that the hydrous (PO(4

  6. Probing intermolecular interactions in a diethylcarbamazine citrate salt by fast MAS (1)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy and GIPAW calculations.

    PubMed

    Venâncio, Tiago; Oliveira, Lyege Magalhaes; Ellena, Javier; Boechat, Nubia; Brown, Steven P

    2017-03-02

    Fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR is used to probe intermolecular interactions in a diethylcarbamazine salt, that is widely used as a treatment against adult worms of Wuchereria bancrofti which cause a common disease in tropical countries named filariasis. Specifically, a dihydrogen citrate salt that has improved thermal stability and solubility as compared to the free form is studied. One-dimensional (1)H, (13)C and (15)N and two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C and (14)N-(1)H heteronuclear correlation NMR experiments under moderate and fast MAS together with GIPAW (CASTEP) calculations enable the assignment of the (1)H, (13)C and (14)N/(15)N resonances. A two-dimensional (1)H-(1)H double-quantum (DQ) -single-quantum (SQ) MAS spectrum recorded with BaBa recoupling at 60kHz MAS identifies specific proton-proton proximities associated with citrate-citrate and citrate-diethylcarbamazine intermolecular interactions.

  7. Glycerin-Induced Conformational Changes in Bombyx mori Silk Fibroin Film Monitored by 13C CP/MAS NMR and 1H DQMAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Endo, Masanori; Hirayama, Misaki; Arai, Hiroki; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the stiff and brittle characteristics of pure Bombyx mori (B. mori) silk fibroin (SF) film in the dry state, glycerin (Glyc) has been used as a plasticizer. However, there have been very limited studies on the structural characterization of the Glyc-blended SF film. In this study, 13C Cross Polarization/Magic Angle Spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS NMR) was used to monitor the conformational changes in the films by changing the Glyc concentration. The presence of only 5 wt % Glyc in the film induced a significant conformational change in SF where Silk I* (repeated type II β-turn and no α-helix) newly appeared. Upon further increase in Glyc concentration, the percentage of Silk I* increased linearly up to 9 wt % Glyc and then tended to be almost constant (30%). This value (30%) was the same as the fraction of Ala residue within the Silk I* form out of all Ala residues of SF present in B. mori mature silkworm. The 1H DQMAS NMR spectra of Glyc-blended SF films confirmed the appearance of Silk I* in the Glyc-blended SF film. A structural model of Glyc-SF complex including the Silk I* form was proposed with the guidance of the Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation using 1H–1H distance constraints obtained from the 1H Double-Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (DQMAS) NMR spectra. PMID:27618034

  8. 13C MAS NMR studies of the effects of hydration on the cell walls of potatoes and Chinese water chestnuts.

    PubMed

    Tang, H; Belton, P S; Ng, A; Ryden, P

    1999-02-01

    13C NMR with magic angle spinning (MAS) has been employed to investigate the cell walls of potatoes and Chinese water chestnuts over a range of hydration levels. Both single-pulse excitation (SPEMAS) and cross-polarization (CPMAS) experiments were carried out. Hydration led to a substantial increase in signal intensities of galactan and galacturonan in the SPEMAS spectra and a decrease in line width, implying mobilization in the backbone and side chains of pectin. In CPMAS spectra of both samples, noncellulose components showed signal loss as hydration increased. However, the signals of some galacturonan in the 3(1) helix configuration remained in the spectra even when the water content was as high as 110%. Cellulose was unaffected. It is concluded that the pectic polysaccharides experience a distribution of molecular conformations and mobility, whereas cellulose remained as typical rigid solid.

  9. Sensitivity Gains, Linearity, and Spectral Reproducibility in Nonuniformly Sampled Multidimensional MAS NMR Spectra of High Dynamic Range.

    SciTech Connect

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Hou, Guangjin; Sun, Shangjin; Rice, David M.; Hoch, Jeffrey C.; Rovnyak, David S.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2014-04-22

    Recently, we have demonstrated that considerable inherent sensitivity gains are attained in MAS NMR spectra acquired by nonuniform sampling (NUS) and introduced maximum entropy interpolation (MINT) processing that assures the linearity of transformation between the time and frequency domains. In this report, we examine the utility of the NUS/MINT approach in multidimensional datasets possessing high dynamic range, such as homonuclear 13C–13C correlation spectra. We demonstrate on model compounds and on 1–73-(U-13C,15N)/74–108-(U-15N) E. coli thioredoxin reassembly, that with appropriately constructed 50 % NUS schedules inherent sensitivity gains of 1.7–2.1-fold are readily reached in such datasets. We show that both linearity and line width are retained under these experimental conditions throughout the entire dynamic range of the signals. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the reproducibility of the peak intensities is excellent in the NUS/MINT approach when experiments are repeated multiple times and identical experimental and processing conditions are employed. Finally, we discuss the principles for design and implementation of random exponentially biased NUS sampling schedules for homonuclear 13C–13C MAS correlation experiments that yield high quality artifact-free datasets.

  10. MAS-NMR investigations of the crystallization behaviour of lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glasses containing P 2O 5 and TiO 2 nucleants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthanarayanan, A.; Kothiyal, G. P.; Montagne, L.; Revel, B.

    2010-06-01

    Lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glass of composition (mol%) 20.4Li 2O-4.0Al 2O 3-68.6SiO 2-3.0K 2O-2.6B 2O 3-0.5P 2O 5-0.9TiO 2 was prepared by melt quenching. The glass was then nucleated and crystallized based on differential thermal analysis (DTA) data and was characterized by 29Si, 31P, 11B and 27Al MAS-NMR. XRD and 29Si NMR showed that lithium metasilicate (Li 2SiO 3) is the first phase to c form followed by cristobalite (SiO 2) and lithium disilicate (Li 2Si 2O 5). 29Si MAS-NMR revealed a change in the network structure already for the glasses nucleated at 550 °C. Since crystalline Li 3PO 4, as observed by 31P MAS-NMR, forms concurrently with the silicate phases, we conclude that crystalline Li 3PO 4 does not act as a nucleating agent for lithium silicate phases. Moreover, 31P NMR indicates the formation of M-PO 4 ( M=B, Al or Ti) complexes. The presence of BO 3 and BO 4 structural units in all the glass/glass-ceramic samples is revealed through 11B MAS-NMR. B remains in the residual glass and the crystallization of silicate phases causes a reduction in the number of alkali ions available for charge compensation. As a result, the number of trigonally coordinated B (BO 3) increases at the expense of tetrahedrally coordinated B (BO 4). The 27Al MAS-NMR spectra indicate the presence of tetrahedrally coordinated Al species, which are only slightly perturbed by the crystallization.

  11. Structural investigations of Pu{sup III} phosphate by X-ray diffraction, MAS-NMR and XANES spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Popa, Karin; Raison, Philippe E.; Martel, Laura; Martin, Philippe M.; Solari, Pier L.; Bouëxière, Daniel; Konings, Rudy J.M.; Somers, Joseph

    2015-10-15

    PuPO{sub 4} was prepared by a solid state reaction method and its crystal structure at room temperature was solved by powder X-ray diffraction combined with Rietveld refinement. High resolution XANES measurements confirm the +III valence state of plutonium, in agreement with valence bond derivation. The presence of the americium (as β{sup −} decay product of plutonium) in the +III oxidation state was determined based on XANES spectroscopy. High resolution solid state {sup 31}P NMR agrees with the XANES results and the presence of a solid-solution. - Graphical abstract: A full structural analysis of PuPO{sub 4} based on Rietveld analysis of room temperature X-ray diffraction data, XANES and MAS NMR measurements was performed. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of PuPO{sub 4} monazite is solved. • In PuPO{sub 4} plutonium is strictly trivalent. • The presence of a minute amount of Am{sup III} is highlighted. • We propose PuPO{sub 4} as a potential reference material for spectroscopic and microscopic studies.

  12. The Effect of Antitumor Glycosides on Glioma Cells and Tissues as Studied by Proton HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, Isabel; Garrido, Leoncio; Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso; Campos-Olivas, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the treatment with glycolipid derivatives on the metabolic profile of intact glioma cells and tumor tissues, investigated using proton high resolution magic angle spinning (1H HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, is reported here. Two compounds were used, a glycoside and its thioglycoside analogue, both showing anti-proliferative activity on glioma C6 cell cultures; however, only the thioglycoside exhibited antitumor activity in vivo. At the drug concentrations showing anti-proliferative activity in cell culture (20 and 40 µM), significant increases in choline containing metabolites were observed in the 1H NMR spectra of the same intact cells. In vivo experiments in nude mice bearing tumors derived from implanted C6 glioma cells, showed that reduction of tumor volume was associated with significant changes in the metabolic profile of the same intact tumor tissues; and were similar to those observed in cell culture. Specifically, the activity of the compounds is mainly associated with an increase in choline and phosphocholine, in both the cell cultures and tumoral tissues. Taurine, a metabolite that has been considered a biomarker of apoptosis, correlated with the reduction of tumor volume. Thus, the results indicate that the mode of action of the glycoside involves, at least in part, alteration of phospholipid metabolism, resulting in cell death. PMID:24194925

  13. Acetylation of raw cotton for oil spill cleanup application: an FTIR and 13C MAS NMR spectroscopic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebajo, Moses O.; Frost, Ray L.

    2004-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy have been used to investigate the acetylation of raw cotton samples with acetic anhydride without solvents in the presence of different amounts of 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) catalyst. This is a continuation of our previous investigation of acetylation of commercial cotton in an effort to develop hydrophobic, biodegradable, cellulosic sorbent materials for cleaning up oil spills. The FTIR data have again provided a clear evidence for successful acetylation. The NMR results further confirm the successful acetylation. The extent of acetylation was quantitatively determined using the weight percent gain (WPG) due to acetylation and by calculating the ratio R between the intensity of the acetyl CO stretching band at 1740-1745 cm -1 and the intensity of CO stretching vibration of the cellulose backbone at about 1020-1040 cm -1. The FTIR technique was found to be highly sensitive and reliable for the determination of the extent of acetylation. The level of acetylation of the raw cotton samples was found to be much higher than that of cotton fabrics and the previously studied commercial cotton. The variation of the R and WPG with reaction time, amount of DMAP catalyst and different samples of raw cotton is discussed.

  14. Use of SPAM and FAM pulses in high-resolution MAS NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Ball, Thomas J; Wimperis, Stephen

    2007-08-01

    The merits of SPAM and FAM pulses for enhancing the conversion of triple- to single-quantum coherences in the two-dimensional MQMAS experiment are compared using (87)Rb (spin I=3/2) and (27)Al (I=5/2) NMR of crystalline and amorphous materials. Although SPAM pulses are more easily optimized, our experiments and simulations suggest that FAM pulses yield greater signal intensity in all cases. In conclusion, we argue that, as originally suggested, SPAM and FAM pulses are best implemented in phase-modulated whole-echo MQMAS experiments and that the use of SPAM pulses to record separate echo and antiecho data sets, which are then combined, generally yields lower signal-to-noise ratios.

  15. Use of SPAM and FAM pulses in high-resolution MAS NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Thomas J.; Wimperis, Stephen

    2007-08-01

    The merits of SPAM and FAM pulses for enhancing the conversion of triple- to single-quantum coherences in the two-dimensional MQMAS experiment are compared using 87Rb (spin I = 3/2) and 27Al ( I = 5/2) NMR of crystalline and amorphous materials. Although SPAM pulses are more easily optimized, our experiments and simulations suggest that FAM pulses yield greater signal intensity in all cases. In conclusion, we argue that, as originally suggested, SPAM and FAM pulses are best implemented in phase-modulated whole-echo MQMAS experiments and that the use of SPAM pulses to record separate echo and antiecho data sets, which are then combined, generally yields lower signal-to-noise ratios.

  16. Red coralline algae assessed as marine pH proxies using 11B MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusack, M.; Kamenos, N. A.; Rollion-Bard, C.; Tricot, G.

    2015-02-01

    Reconstructing pH from biogenic carbonates using boron isotopic compositions relies on the assumption that only borate, and no boric acid, is present. Red coralline algae are frequently used in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction due to their widespread distribution and regular banding frequency. Prior to undertaking pH reconstructions using red coralline algae we tested the boron composition of the red coralline alga Lithothamnion glaciale using high field NMR. In bulk analysed samples, thirty percent of boron was present as boric acid. We suggest that prior to reconstructing pH using coralline algae 1) species-specific boron compositions and 2) within-skeleton special distributions of boron are determined for multiple species. This will enable site selective boron analyses to be conducted validating coralline algae as palaeo-pH proxies based on boron isotopic compositions.

  17. Heteronuclear decoupling in MAS NMR in the intermediate to fast sample spinning regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Equbal, Asif; Bjerring, Morten; Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P. K.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2016-01-01

    Heteronuclear spin decoupling in solid-state magic-angle spinning NMR is investigated to present methods overcoming interferences between rf irradiation and sample spinning in the intermediate to fast spinning regime. We demonstrate that a recent phase-alternated variant of refocused CW irradiation (rCWApA) provides efficient and robust decoupling in this regime. An extensive experimental and numerical comparison is presented for rCWApA and PISSARRO (phase-inverted supercycled sequence for attenuation of rotary resonance), previously introduced to quench rotary-resonance recoupling effects, under conditions with spinning frequencies between 30 and 60 kHz. Simulations are used to identify the effect of decoupling for various nuclear spin interactions.

  18. Following Solid-Acid-Catalyzed Reactions by MAS NMR Spectroscopy in Liquid Phase -Zeolite-Catalyzed Conversion of Cyclohexanol in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Hu, Mary Y.; Feng, Ju; Camaioni, Donald M.; Mei, Donghai; Hu, Jian Z.; Zhao, Chen; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-01-07

    The catalytic conversion of cyclohexanol on zeolite HBEA in hot liquid water leads to dehydration as well as alkylation products. A novel micro autoclave suitable for application in MAS NMR at high temperatures and pressures is developed and successfully applied to obtain new insight into the mechanistic pathway leading to an understanding of the reactions under selected experimental conditions.

  19. Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings for the assignment of stereochemistry in flubenzimine.

    PubMed

    Ghiviriga, Ion; Rubinski, Miles A; Dolbier, William R

    2016-07-01

    Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings revealed the configuration of flubenzimine, with the CF3 group on N4 pointing towards the lone pair of N5. The (19) F-(15) N coupling constants were measured at natural abundance using a spin-state selective indirect-detection pulse sequence. As (15) N-labelled proteins are routinely synthesized for NMR studies, through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings have the potential to probe the stereochemistry of these proteins by (19) F labelling of some amino acids or can reveal the site of docking of fluorine-containing drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Signal intensities in ¹H-¹³C CP and INEPT MAS NMR of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Nowacka, A; Bongartz, N A; Ollila, O H S; Nylander, T; Topgaard, D

    2013-05-01

    Spectral editing with CP and INEPT in (13)C MAS NMR enables identification of rigid and mobile molecular segments in concentrated assemblies of surfactants, lipids, and/or proteins. In order to get stricter definitions of the terms "rigid" and "mobile", as well as resolving some ambiguities in the interpretation of CP and INEPT data, we have developed a theoretical model for calculating the CP and INEPT intensities as a function of rotational correlation time τc and C-H bond order parameter SCH, taking the effects of MAS into account. According to the model, the range of τc can at typical experimental settings (5kHz MAS, 1ms ramped CP at 80-100kHz B1 fields) be divided into four regimes: fast (τc<1ns), fast-intermediate (τc≈0.1μs), intermediate (τc≈1μs), and slow (τc>0.1ms). In the fast regime, the CP and INEPT intensities are independent of τc, but strongly dependent on |SCH|, with a cross-over from dominating INEPT to dominating CP at |SCH|>0.1. In the intermediate regime, neither CP nor INEPT yield signal on account of fast T1ρ and T2 relaxation. In both the fast-intermediate and slow regimes, there is exclusively CP signal. The theoretical predictions are tested by experiments on the glass-forming surfactant n-octyl-β-d-maltoside, for which τc can be varied continuously in the nano- to millisecond range by changing the temperature and the hydration level. The atomistic details of the surfactant dynamics are investigated with MD simulations. Based on the theoretical model, we propose a procedure for calculating CP and INEPT intensities directly from MD simulation trajectories. While MD shows that there is a continuous gradient of τc from the surfactant polar headgroup towards the methyl group at the end of the hydrocarbon chain, analysis of the experimental CP and INEPT data indicates that this gradient gets steeper with decreasing temperature and hydration level, eventually spanning four orders of magnitude at completely dry conditions.

  1. Enhanced sensitivity in high-resolution 1H solid-state NMR spectroscopy with DUMBO dipolar decoupling under ultra-fast MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salager, Elodie; Stein, Robin S.; Steuernagel, Stefan; Lesage, Anne; Elena, Bénédicte; Emsley, Lyndon

    2009-02-01

    The solid-state NMR 1H homonuclear decoupling sequences in the DUMBO family are shown to be effective at ultra-fast MAS rates of up to 65 kHz. The sequences are applied to model compounds glycine and [2- 13C]- L-alanine as well as the dipeptide β- L-Asp- L-Ala in windowed and continuous phase-modulated versions. They are shown to achieve especially impressive resolution when implemented in a 2D constant-time experiment. At 65 kHz MAS, 1H resolution using homonuclear decoupling is similar to that obtained at lower MAS rates, but peak intensity, and therefore spectral sensitivity, is improved by a factor of 5 over homonuclear-decoupled spectra at 10 kHz MAS.

  2. Hydration properties and phosphorous speciation in native, gelatinized and enzymatically modified potato starch analyzed by solid-state MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Kasprzak, Mirosław M; Lærke, Helle N; Knudsen, Knud Erik B; Pedersen, Sven; Jørgensen, Anne S; Blennow, Andreas

    2013-09-12

    Hydration of granular, gelatinized and molecularly modified states of potato starch in terms of molecular mobility were analyzed by (13)C and (31)P solid-state MAS NMR. Gelatinization (GEL) tremendously reduced the immobile fraction compared to native (NA) starch granules. This effect was enhanced by enzyme-assisted catalytic branching with branching enzyme (BE) or combined BE and β-amylase (BB) catalyzed exo-hydrolysis. Carbons of the glycosidic α-1,6 linkages required high hydration rates before adopting uniform chemical shifts indicating solid-state disorder and poor water accessibility. Comparative analysis of wheat and waxy maize starches demonstrated that starches were similar upon gelatinization independent of botanical origin and that the torsion angles of the glycosidic linkages were averages of the crystalline A and B type structures. In starch suspension phosphorous in immobile regions was only observed in NA starch. Moreover phosphorous was observed in a minor pH-insensitive form and as major phosphate in hydrated GEL and BE starches.

  3. Anisotropic indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling in InP: 31P CP NMR study under slow MAS condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Takahiro; Hashi, Kenjiro; Goto, Atsushi; Shimizu, Tadashi; Ohki, Shinobu

    2006-02-01

    The indirect nuclear spin-spin interaction tensor between neighboring 113,115In- 31P spins in Fe-doped InP semiconductor has been studied by 31P NMR spectra measured using CP of 113In → 31P and 115In → 31P under slow MAS condition. The isotropic ( Jiso) and anisotropic ( Janiso = 2/3[ J∥ - J⊥]) parts of the indirect interaction tensor are obtained from the spectral simulation. The acceptable combinations of these values are found to be as follows: ( Jiso, Janiso) = (224 ± 5, 500 ± 100 Hz) or (-224 ± 5, 2100 ± 100 Hz). Although, the coupling constants estimated in this study are slightly different from previously reported values of ∣ Jiso∣ = 350 Hz, Janiso = 1298 Hz [M. Engelsberg, R.E. Norberg, Phys. Rev. B 5 (1972) 3395] and of ∣ Jiso∣ = 225 ± 10, Janiso = (813 ± 50) or (1733 ± 50) Hz [M. Tomaselli et al., Phys. Rev. B 58 (1998) 8627], all of these has the trend that Janiso is rather larger than Jiso.

  4. LC/ESI-MS n and 1H HR-MAS NMR analytical methods as useful taxonomical tools within the genus Cystoseira C. Agardh (Fucales; Phaeophyceae).

    PubMed

    Jégou, Camille; Culioli, Gérald; Kervarec, Nelly; Simon, Gaëlle; Stiger-Pouvreau, Valérie

    2010-12-15

    Species of the genus Cystoseira are particularly hard to discriminate, due to the complexity of their morphology, which can be influenced by their phenological state and ecological parameters. Our study emphasized on the relevance of two kinds of analytical tools, (1) LC/ESI-MS(n) and (2) (1)H HR-MAS NMR, also called in vivo NMR, to identify Cystoseira specimens at the specific level and discuss their taxonomy. For these analyses, samples were collected at several locations in Brittany (France), where Cystoseira baccata, C. foeniculacea, C. humilis, C. nodicaulis and C. tamariscifolia were previously reported. To validate our chemical procedure, the sequence of the ITS2 has been obtained for each species to investigate their phylogenetic relationships at a molecular level. Our study highlighted the consistency of the two physico-chemical methods, compared to "classical" molecular approach, in studying taxonomy within the genus Cystoseira. Especially, LC/ESI-MS(n) and phylogenetic analyses converged into the discrimination of two taxonomical groups among the 5 species. The occurrence of some specific signals in the (1)H HR-MAS NMR spectra and/or some characteristic chemical compounds during LC/ESI-MS(n) analysis could be regarded as discriminating factors. LC/ESI-MS(n) and (1)H HR-MAS NMR turned out to be two relevant and innovative techniques to discriminate taxonomically this complex genus.

  5. Line shapes and widths of MAS sidebands for 27Al satellite transitions. multinuclear MAS NMR of tugtupite Na8Al2Be2Si8O24Cl2.

    PubMed

    Skibsted, J; Norby, P; Bildsøe, H; Jakobsen, H J

    1995-12-01

    A multinuclear 9Be, 23Na, 27Al, and 29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR study has been performed for the mineral tugtupite (Na8Al2Be2Si8O24Cl2). The extremely well-resolved spectra allow observation of separate spinning sidebands (ssb's) from the inner (+/- 1/2, +/- 3/2) and outer (+/- 3/2, +/- 5/2) 27Al satellite transitions, and are utilized in a detailed analysis of the line shapes and widths of the individual ssb's from simulations. The line widths of the ssb's from the inner and outer 27Al satellite transitions are found to decrease systematically with increasing order of the ssb's across the spectrum. Accurate values for the 9Be, 23Na, and 27Al quadrupole coupling parameters and isotropic chemical shifts are obtained from simulations of the manifolds of ssb's from the satellite transitions. MAS NMR of the 9Be satellite transitions for tugtupite, BeO, and beryl(Al2Be3Si6O18) shows that these transitions are particularly useful for determination of 9Be quadrupole couplings because of the small 9Be quadrupole moment. The 29Si shielding anisotropy of delta sigma = 48 ppm in tugtupite is the largest determined so far for a framework SiO4 tetrahedron. Finally, the crystal structure of the tugtupite sample has been refined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and correlations between the multinuclear NMR parameters and structural data are reported.

  6. Identification of Li-Ion Battery SEI Compounds through (7)Li and (13)C Solid-State MAS NMR Spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huff, Laura A; Tavassol, Hadi; Esbenshade, Jennifer L; Xing, Wenting; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-13

    Solid-state (7)Li and (13)C MAS NMR spectra of cycled graphitic Li-ion anodes demonstrate SEI compound formation upon lithiation that is followed by changes in the SEI upon delithiation. Solid-state (13)C DPMAS NMR shows changes in peaks associated with organic solvent compounds (ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate, EC/DMC) upon electrochemical cycling due to the formation of and subsequent changes in the SEI compounds. Solid-state (13)C NMR spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time measurements of lithiated Li-ion anodes and reference poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) powders, along with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry results, indicate that large-molecular-weight polymers are formed in the SEI layers of the discharged anodes. MALDI-TOF MS and NMR spectroscopy results additionally indicate that delithiated anodes exhibit a larger number of SEI products than is found in lithiated anodes.

  7. Optimum levels of exchangeable protons in perdeuterated proteins for proton detection in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Umit; Lange, Sascha; Trent Franks, W; Linser, Rasmus; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Reif, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the level of exchangeable protons on the observed amide proton linewidth obtained in perdeuterated proteins. Decreasing the amount of D(2)O employed in the crystallization buffer from 90 to 0%, we observe a fourfold increase in linewidth for both (1)H and (15)N resonances. At the same time, we find a gradual increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for (1)H-(15)N correlations in dipolar coupling based experiments for H(2)O concentrations of up to 40%. Beyond 40%, a significant reduction in SNR is observed. Scalar-coupling based (1)H-(15)N correlation experiments yield a nearly constant SNR for samples prepared with < or =30% H(2)O. Samples in which more H(2)O is employed for crystallization show a significantly reduced NMR intensity. Calculation of the SNR by taking into account the reduction in (1)H T (1) in samples containing more protons (SNR per unit time), yields a maximum SNR for samples crystallized using 30 and 40% H(2)O for scalar and dipolar coupling based experiments, respectively. A sensitivity gain of 3.8 is obtained by increasing the H(2)O concentration from 10 to 40% in the CP based experiment, whereas the linewidth only becomes 1.5 times broader. In general, we find that CP is more favorable compared to INEPT based transfer when the number of possible (1)H,(1)H interactions increases. At low levels of deuteration (> or =60% H(2)O in the crystallization buffer), resonances from rigid residues are broadened beyond detection. All experiments are carried out at MAS frequency of 24 kHz employing perdeuterated samples of the chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain.

  8. The metabolic profile of lemon juice by proton HR-MAS NMR: the case of the PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Nicola; Corsaro, Carmelo; Salvo, Andrea; Vasi, Sebastiano; Giofré, Salvatore V; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Di Stefano, Vita; Mallamace, Domenico; Dugo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    We have studied by means of High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HR-MAS NMR) the metabolic profile of the famous Sicilian lemon known as 'Interdonato Lemon of Messina PGI'. The PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina possesses high organoleptic and healthy properties and is recognised as one of the most nutrient fruits. In particular, some of its constituents are actively studied for their chemo-preventive and therapeutic properties. In this paper, we have determined by means of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy the molar concentration of the main metabolites constituent the juice of PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina in comparison with that of the not-PGI Interdonato Lemon of Turkey. Our aim is to develop an analytical technique, in order to determine a metabolic fingerprint able to reveal commercial frauds in national and international markets.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 19F SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.

    2009-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked by Liquid Waste Operations to characterize Tank 19F closure samples. Tank 19F slurry samples analyzed included the liquid and solid fractions derived from the slurry materials along with the floor scrape bottom Tank 19F wet solids. These samples were taken from Tank 19F in April 2009 and made available to SRNL in the same month. Because of limited amounts of solids observed in Tank 19F samples, the samples from the north quadrants of the tank were combined into one Tank 19F North Hemisphere sample and similarly the south quadrant samples were combined into one Tank 19F South Hemisphere sample. These samples were delivered to the SRNL shielded cell. The Tank 19F samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Where analytical methods yielded additional contaminants other than those requested by the customer, these results were also reported. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on detection values of 1E-04 {micro}Ci/g for most radionuclides and customer desired detection values of 1E-05 {micro}Ci/g for I-129, Pa-231, Np-237, and Ra-226. While many of the target detection limits, as specified in the technical task request and task technical and quality assurance plans were met for the species characterized for Tank 19F, some were not met. In a number of cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. SRNL, in conjunction with the plant customer, reviewed all these cases and determined that the impacts were negligible.

  10. Fine-tuned characterization at the solid/solution interface of organotin compounds grafted onto cross-linked polystyrene by using high-resolution MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Martins, José C; Mercier, Frédéric A G; Vandervelden, Alexander; Biesemans, Monique; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Humpfer, Eberhard; Willem, Rudolph; Lippens, Guy

    2002-08-02

    The structural characterization of organotin compounds that are grafted onto insoluble cross-linked polymers has necessarily been limited to elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and in a few instances, solid-state NMR spectroscopy. This important bottleneck in the development of such grafted systems has been addressed by using high-resolution magic angle spinning (hr-MAS) NMR spectroscopy. The great potential of this technique is demonstrated through the structural characterization of diphenylbutyl-(3,4) and dichlorobutylstannanes (5,6), grafted onto divinylbenzene cross-linked polystyrene by means of a suitable linker (1, 2). First, conditions suitable for the application of hr-MAS NMR spectroscopy were identified by characterizing the (1)H resonance line widths of the grafted organotin moiety following swelling of the functionalized beads in eight representative solvents. The presence of clearly identifiable tin coupling patterns in both the 1D (13)C and 2D (1)H-(13)C HSQC spectra, and the incorporation of (119)Sn chemical shift and connectivity information from hr-MAS 1D (119)Sn and 2D (1)H-(119)Sn HMQC spectra, provide an unprecedented level of characterization of grafted organotins directly at the solid/liquid interface. In addition, the use of hr-MAS (119)Sn NMR for reaction monitoring, impurity detection, and quantification and assessment of the extent of coordination reveals its promise as a novel tool for the investigation of polymer-grafted organotin compounds. The approach described here should be sufficiently general for extension to a variety of other nuclei of interest in polymer-supported organometallic chemistry.

  11. Insight into hydrogen bonding of uranyl hydroxide layers and capsules by use of 1H magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy [Insight into the hydrogen bonding for uranyl hydroxides using 1H MAS NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Alam, Todd M.; Liao, Zuolei; Nyman, May; ...

    2016-04-27

    Solid-state 1H magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR was used to investigate local proton environments in anhydrous [UO2(OH)2] (α-UOH) and hydrated uranyl hydroxide [(UO2)4O(OH)6·5H2O (metaschoepite). For the metaschoepite material, proton resonances of the μ2-OH hydroxyl and interlayer waters were resolved, with two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum (DQ) 1H–1H NMR correlation experiments revealing strong dipolar interactions between these different proton species. The experimental NMR results were combined with first-principles CASTEP GIPAW (gauge including projector-augmented wave) chemical shift calculations to develop correlations between hydrogen-bond strength and observed 1H NMR chemical shifts. Furthermore, these NMR correlations allowed characterization of local hydrogen-bond environments in uranyl U24 capsules andmore » of changes in hydrogen bonding that occurred during thermal dehydration of metaschoepite.« less

  12. Investigation of cation environment and framework changes in silicotitanate exchange materials using solid-state 23Na, 29Si, and 133Cs MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Brian R.; Nyman, May; Alam, Todd M.

    2004-06-01

    Crystalline silicotitanate (CST), HNa 3Ti 4Si 2O 14·4H 2O and the Nb-substituted CST (Nb-CST), HNa 2Ti 3NbSi 2O 14·4H 2O, are highly selective Cs + sorbents, which makes them attractive materials for the selective removal of radioactive species from nuclear waste solutions. The structural basis for the improved Cs + selectivity in the niobium analogs was investigated through a series of solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments. Changes in the local environment of the Na + and Cs + cations in both CST and Nb-CST materials as a function of weight percent cesium exchange were investigated using 23Na and 133Cs MAS NMR. Framework changes induced by Cs + loading and hydration state were investigated with 29Si MAS NMR. Multiple Cs + environments were observed in the CST and Nb-CST material. The relative population of these different Cs + environments varies with the extent of Cs + loading. Marked changes in the framework Si environment were noted with the initial incorporation of Cs +, however with increased Cs + loading the impact to the Si environment becomes less pronounced. The Cs + environment and Si framework structure were influenced by the Nb-substitution and were greatly affected by the amount of water present in the materials. The increased Cs + selectivity of the Nb-CST materials arises from both the chemistry and geometry of the tunnels and pores.

  13. 19F NMR-, ESR-, and vis-NIR-spectroelectrochemical study of the unconventional reduction behaviour of a perfluoroalkylated fullerene: dimerization of the C70(CF3)10 – radical anion† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional electrochemical and spectroscopic results, mass spectrometry study, and DFT-optimized Cartesian coordinates. See DOI: 10.1039/c5an01129a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Machata, Peter; Clikeman, Tyler T.; Rosenkranz, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The most abundant isomer of C70(CF3)10 (70-10-1) is a rare example of a perfluoroalkylated fullerene exhibiting electrochemically irreversible reduction. We show that electrochemical reversibility at the first reduction step is achieved at scan rates higher than 500 V s–1. Applying ESR-, vis-NIR-, and 19F NMR-spectroelectrochemistry, as well as mass spectrometry and DFT calculations, we show that the (70-10-1)– radical monoanion is in equilibrium with a singly-bonded diamagnetic dimeric dianion. This study is the first example of 19F NMR spectroelectrochemistry, which promises to be an important method for the elucidation of redox mechanisms of fluoroorganic compounds. Additionally, we demonstrate the importance of combining different spectroelectrochemical methods and quantitative analysis of the transferred charge and spin numbers in the determination of the redox mechanism. PMID:26359514

  14. A spectrometer designed for 6.7 and 14.1 T DNP-enhanced solid-state MAS NMR using quasi-optical microwave transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, Kevin J.; Kemp, Thomas F.; Takahashi, Hiroki; Day, Robert; Howes, Andrew P.; Kryukov, Eugeny V.; MacDonald, James F.; Collis, Alana E. C.; Bolton, David R.; Wylde, Richard J.; Orwick, Marcella; Kosuga, Kosuke; Clark, Andrew J.; Idehara, Toshitaka; Watts, Anthony; Smith, Graham M.; Newton, Mark E.; Dupree, Ray; Smith, Mark E.

    2012-02-01

    A Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation (DNP) enhanced solid-state Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectrometer operating at 6.7 T is described and demonstrated. The 187 GHz TE13 fundamental mode of the FU CW VII gyrotron is used as the microwave source for this magnetic field strength and 284 MHz 1H DNP-NMR. The spectrometer is designed for use with microwave frequencies up to 395 GHz (the TE16 second-harmonic mode of the gyrotron) for DNP at 14.1 T (600 MHz 1H NMR). The pulsed microwave output from the gyrotron is converted to a quasi-optical Gaussian beam using a Vlasov antenna and transmitted to the NMR probe via an optical bench, with beam splitters for monitoring and adjusting the microwave power, a ferrite rotator to isolate the gyrotron from the reflected power and a Martin-Puplett interferometer for adjusting the polarisation. The Gaussian beam is reflected by curved mirrors inside the DNP-MAS-NMR probe to be incident at the sample along the MAS rotation axis. The beam is focussed to a ˜1 mm waist at the top of the rotor and then gradually diverges to give much more efficient coupling throughout the sample than designs using direct waveguide irradiation. The probe can be used in triple channel HXY mode for 600 MHz 1H and double channel HX mode for 284 MHz 1H, with MAS sample temperatures ⩾85 K. Initial data at 6.7 T and ˜1 W pulsed microwave power are presented with 13C enhancements of 60 for a frozen urea solution (1H-13C CP), 16 for bacteriorhodopsin in purple membrane (1H-13C CP) and 22 for 15N in a frozen glycine solution (1H-15N CP) being obtained. In comparison with designs which irradiate perpendicular to the rotation axis the approach used here provides a highly efficient use of the incident microwave beam and an NMR-optimised coil design.

  15. A spectrometer designed for 6.7 and 14.1 T DNP-enhanced solid-state MAS NMR using quasi-optical microwave transmission.

    PubMed

    Pike, Kevin J; Kemp, Thomas F; Takahashi, Hiroki; Day, Robert; Howes, Andrew P; Kryukov, Eugeny V; MacDonald, James F; Collis, Alana E C; Bolton, David R; Wylde, Richard J; Orwick, Marcella; Kosuga, Kosuke; Clark, Andrew J; Idehara, Toshitaka; Watts, Anthony; Smith, Graham M; Newton, Mark E; Dupree, Ray; Smith, Mark E

    2012-02-01

    A Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation (DNP) enhanced solid-state Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectrometer operating at 6.7 T is described and demonstrated. The 187 GHz TE(13) fundamental mode of the FU CW VII gyrotron is used as the microwave source for this magnetic field strength and 284 MHz (1)H DNP-NMR. The spectrometer is designed for use with microwave frequencies up to 395 GHz (the TE(16) second-harmonic mode of the gyrotron) for DNP at 14.1T (600 MHz (1)H NMR). The pulsed microwave output from the gyrotron is converted to a quasi-optical Gaussian beam using a Vlasov antenna and transmitted to the NMR probe via an optical bench, with beam splitters for monitoring and adjusting the microwave power, a ferrite rotator to isolate the gyrotron from the reflected power and a Martin-Puplett interferometer for adjusting the polarisation. The Gaussian beam is reflected by curved mirrors inside the DNP-MAS-NMR probe to be incident at the sample along the MAS rotation axis. The beam is focussed to a ~1 mm waist at the top of the rotor and then gradually diverges to give much more efficient coupling throughout the sample than designs using direct waveguide irradiation. The probe can be used in triple channel HXY mode for 600 MHz (1)H and double channel HX mode for 284 MHz (1)H, with MAS sample temperatures ≥85 K. Initial data at 6.7 T and ~1 W pulsed microwave power are presented with (13)C enhancements of 60 for a frozen urea solution ((1)H-(13)C CP), 16 for bacteriorhodopsin in purple membrane ((1)H-(13)C CP) and 22 for (15)N in a frozen glycine solution ((1)H-(15)N CP) being obtained. In comparison with designs which irradiate perpendicular to the rotation axis the approach used here provides a highly efficient use of the incident microwave beam and an NMR-optimised coil design.

  16. High field 27Al MAS NMR and TPD studies of active sites in ethanol dehydration using thermally treated transitional aluminas as catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Xu, Suochang; Kwak, Ja Hun; Hu, Mary Y.; Wan, Chuan; Zhao, Zhenchao; Szanyi, Janos; Bao, Xinhe; Han, Xiuwen; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2016-04-01

    Gamma-, sigma- and theta-Al2O3 are well known metastable “transitional” alumina structural polymorphs. Upon heating, Al2O3 transitions to the so-called and Al2O3 polymorphs and finally forms the thermally stable Al2O3. The poorly developed crystallinity and co-existence of the , , and Al2O3 prior to forming all Al2O3, making it difficult to characterize the structures as well as to quantify the various phases of the transition alumina. As a result, there are significant controversies in the literatures. In this work, a detailed NMR analysis was carried out at high magnetic field on three special aluminum oxide samples where the, , , Al2O3 phases are made dominant, respectively, by controlling the synthesis conditions. The goal is to simplify, including making unambiguous, spectral assignments in 27Al MAS NMR spectra of transition alumina that have not yet been commonly agreed previously. Specifically, quantitative 1D 27Al MAS NMR was used to quantify the ratios of the different alumina structural units, 2D MQMAS 27Al MAS was used for obtaining the highest spectral resolution to guide the analysis of the 1D spectrum, and a saturation pulse sequence was integrated into the 1D NMR to select the amorphous structures, including obtain spectra where the penta-coordinate sites are observed with enhanced relative intensity. Collectively, this study uniquely assigns Al-peaks (both octahedral and tetrahedral) to the Al2O3 and the Al2O3 phases and offers a new way of understanding, including quantifying, the different structural units and sites in transition alumina samples.

  17. Exploiting Copper Redox for (19)F Magnetic Resonance-Based Detection of Cellular Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Da; King, Tyler L; Banerjee, Arnab; Kohli, Vikraant; Que, Emily L

    2016-03-09

    We report a pair of fluorinated, redox-active copper complexes for potential use as (19)F MRI contrast agents for detecting cellular hypoxia. Trifluorinated Cu(II) ATSM-F3 displays the appropriate redox potential for selective accumulation in hypoxic cells and a completely quenched (19)F NMR signal that is "turned on" following reduction to Cu(I). Incubation of cancer cells with CuATSM-F3 resulted in a selective detection of (19)F signal in cells grown under hypoxic conditions.

  18. Solid state structure by X-ray and 13C CP/MAS NMR of new 5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowska, Kinga; Maciejewska, Dorota; Dobrzycki, Łukasz; Socha, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (1) and 6-acetyl-5-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]-4,7-dimethylcoumarin (2), structurally related, were synthesized using both conventional and microwave-assisted approach. An impact of acetyl groups on the molecular structure of coumarin derivatives has been examined. Crystals of 2 were investigated using single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. Compound 2 crystallizes forming two polymorphs (denoted as 2_1 and 2_2), both belonging to P21/c space group. Both polymorphs are comparably stable and can be formed simultaneously during crystallization process. The solid state structure was also analysed using the fully resolved 13C CP/MAS NMR. The double signals with the intensity ratio of about 1:1 which were observed in the 13C CP/MAS NMR spectrum of compound 1 must arise due to the presence of two conformers of 1. In contrast, NMR spectrum recorded for powder mixture of two polymorphs of compound 2 displays no signal splitting. This is related to structural similarities of molecules in both polymorphs.

  19. FTIR and 1H MAS NMR investigations on the correlation between the frequency of stretching vibration and the chemical shift of surface OH groups of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Eike; Karge, H. G.; Pfeifer, H.

    1992-03-01

    The study of surface hydroxyl groups of solids, especially of zeolites, belongs to the 'classical' topics of IR spectroscopy since physico-chemical information may be derived from the wavenumber (nu) OH of the stretching vibration of the different hydroxyls. On the other hand, the last decade has seen the development of high resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy and through the use of the so-called magic-angle-spinning technique (MAS) the signals of different hydroxyl species can be resolved in the 1H NMR spectra of solids. The chemical shift (delta) H describing the position of these lines may be used as well as (nu) OH to characterize quantitatively the strength of acidity of surface OH groups of solids. In a first comparison of (nu) OH with (delta) H for several types of surface OH groups, a linear correlation between them could be found. The aim of this paper was to prove the validity of this correlation for a wide variety of hydroxyls. The IR measurements were carried out on a Perkin-Elmer FTIR spectrometer 1800 at the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Berlin, and the 1H MAS NMR spectra were recorded on a Bruker MSL- 300 at the University of Leipzig.

  20. A solid-state NMR study of the formation of molecular sieve SAPO-34.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhimin; Chen, Banghao; Huang, Yining

    2009-04-01

    This work examined the formation of a catalytically important microporous material, SAPO-34, in the presence of HF under hydrothermal synthesis conditions. The local environments of P, Al, F and Si atoms in several solid phases obtained at different stages of crystallization were characterized by several solid-state NMR techniques including (31)P, (27)Al, (19)F and (29)Si MAS, (27)Al triple-quantum MAS, (31)P{(27)Al} transfer of populations in double-resonance, (27)Al{(31)P} rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR), (27)Al-->(31)P heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy, (31)P{(19)F} and (27)Al{(19)F} REDOR as well as (1)H-->(31)P cross polarization. The NMR results provide the new insights into the formation of SAPO-34.

  1. The combined use of quantum chemical calculations and CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy to investigate soil bound residues of labeled xenobiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Hans; Philipp, Herbert; Meier, Robert J.; Narres, Hans-Dieter; Berns, Anne E.

    2010-05-01

    Application of solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to 13C- and 15N-labeled compounds is a powerful tool to study the interactions of xenobiotics with soil and its components. The type of interaction with soil components, like organic matter or the mineral phase, influences binding and release of a xenobiotic and its metabolites in soil. As such interactions to the soil matrix cause shifts in the initial positions of the NMR signals of the investigated labeled compound, NMR can be used to elucidate the binding type of bound residues. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are excellent suited to support such NMR studies of xenobiotics. In a first step, DFT calculations were used to support the interpretation of the spectra of labeled xenobiotics, their metabolites and reaction products synthesized through reaction with model substances (representing specific functionalities of humic substances). In a second step, they allow to evaluate the influence of possible bonds on the initial chemical shift (e.g. towards higher or lower field). This can be especially helpful in the case of bonds like van-der-Waals interactions, for which it is difficult to prepare defined model substances. CP/MAS-NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations were applied to study the interactions of several labeled xenobiotics and soil organic matter.

  2. Di-n-butyltin(IV) Complexes Derived from Heterocyclic β-diketones and N-Phthaloyl Amino Acids: Preparation, Biological Evaluation, Structural Elucidation Based upon Spectral [IR, NMR (1H, 13C, 19F and 119Sn)] Studies

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Shashi; Gaurb, R. B.; Sharma, R. R.

    2005-01-01

    Stable, six coordinated Bu2SnLA type complexes have been prepared [where LH = RCOC:C(OH)N(C6 H5)N:CCH3; R = -4-F-C6H4-(L1H), R = -4-Cl-C6H4-(L2H), R= -4-Br-C6H4-(L3H), R=-CF3(L4H) and AH = C(O)C6 H4 C(O)NCHR'COOH; R'= -H(A1H), -CH3(A2H), -CH(CH3)2(A3H)] by the interaction of 1:1:1 molar ratios of di-n-butyltin(IV) dichloride with corresponding organic moieties in refluxing benzene using two moles of Et3N as a base. In these complexes LH and AH behave as bidentate and coordination is taking place through oxygen, this is inferred from IR and 13C NMR studies. These complexes possess tin atoms in skew trapezoidal bipyramidal geometry with the C-Sn-C angles ranging from 149.88° to 156.84°. Some of these complexes with their corresponding organic moieties (LH, AH) were tested for their antimicrobial activities. PMID:18365100

  3. Di-n-butyltin(IV) complexes derived from heterocyclic beta-diketones and N-phthaloyl amino acids: preparation, biological evaluation, structural elucidation based upon spectral [IR, NMR (1H, 13C, 19F and 119Sn)] studies.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anurag; Verma, Shashi; Gaurb, R B; Sharma, R R

    2005-01-01

    Stable, six coordinated Bu(2)SnLA type complexes have been prepared [where LH = RCOC:C(OH)N(C(6) H(5))N:CCH(3); R = -4-F-C(6)H(4)-(L(1)H), R = -4-Cl-C(6)H(4)-(L(2)H), R= -4-Br-C(6)H(4)-(L(3)H), R=-CF(3)(L(4)H) and AH = C(O)C(6) H(4) C(O)NCHR'COOH; R'= -H(A(1)H), -CH(3)(A(2)H), -CH(CH(3))(2)(A(3)H)] by the interaction of 1:1:1 molar ratios of di-n-butyltin(IV) dichloride with corresponding organic moieties in refluxing benzene using two moles of Et(3)N as a base. In these complexes LH and AH behave as bidentate and coordination is taking place through oxygen, this is inferred from IR and (13)C NMR studies. These complexes possess tin atoms in skew trapezoidal bipyramidal geometry with the C-Sn-C angles ranging from 149.88( degrees ) to 156.84( degrees ). Some of these complexes with their corresponding organic moieties (LH, AH) were tested for their antimicrobial activities.

  4. Satellite transitions acquired in real time by magic angle spinning (STARTMAS): ``Ultrafast'' high-resolution MAS NMR spectroscopy of spin I =3/2 nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrippleton, Michael J.; Ball, Thomas J.; Wimperis, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The satellite transitions acquired in real time by magic angle spinning (STARTMAS) NMR experiment combines a train of pulses with sample rotation at the magic angle to refocus the first- and second-order quadrupolar broadening of spin I =3/2 nuclei in a series of echoes, while allowing the isotropic chemical and quadrupolar shifts to evolve. The result is real-time isotropic NMR spectra at high spinning rates using conventional MAS equipment. In this paper we describe in detail how STARTMAS data can be acquired and processed with ease on commercial equipment. We also discuss the advantages and limitations of the approach and illustrate the discussion with numerical simulations and experimental data from four different powdered solids.

  5. High field 27Al MAS NMR and TPD studies of active sites in ethanol dehydration using thermally treated transitional aluminas as catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Xu, Suochang; Kwak, Ja Hun; Hu, Mary Y.; Wan, Chuan; Zhao, Zhenchao; Szanyi, Janos; Bao, Xinhe; Han, Xiuwen; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2016-04-01

    High field quantitative 27Al MAS NMR and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of ethanol are used to study the surface and phase transformation of gamma-Al2O3 during calcination in the temperature range of 500 to 1300 degrees C. Following ethanol adsorption, ethylene is generated during TPD with a desorption temperature > 200 degrees C. With increasing calcination temperature prior to TPD, the amount of ethylene produced decreases monotonically. Significantly, 27Al MAS NMR reveals that the amount of penta-coordinate Al3+ ions (Lewis acid sites) also decreases with increasing calcination temperature. In fact, a strong correlation between the amount of penta-coordinate Al3+ ions and the amount of strongly adsorbed ethanol molecules (i.e., the ones that convert to ethylene during TPD) is obtained. This result indicates that the penta-coordinate aluminum sites are the catalytic active sites on alumina surfaces during ethanol dehydration reaction across the entire course of gamma- to alpha-Al2O3 phase transformations.

  6. MAS NMR, DRIFT, and FT-Raman Characterization of SiO(2)-AlPO(4)-B(2)O(3) Ternary Catalytic Systems.

    PubMed

    Aramendía; Boráu; Jiménez; Marinas; Ruiz; Urbano

    1999-09-01

    This work deals with the preparation of SiO(2)-AlPO(4)-B(2)O(3) ternary systems from impregation of a SiO(2)-AlPO(4) solid previously synthesized with B(OH)(3) (0-10% B(OH)(3), by weight). Characterization of the resulting solids has been carried out from adsorption-desorption isotherms of nitrogen, DRIFT, FT-Raman, pyridine adsorption, and (1)H, (11)B, (27)Al, and (31)P MAS NMR. The textural properties are scarcely changed by the impregnation and calcination steps. Moreover, the MAS NMR experiments indicated that the components of the solids do not interact among them. The solids were tested in the dehydration-dehydrogenation of propan-2-ol, widely used to correlate catalytic activity with the surface acid-base properties of the solids. The catalytic results indicate that the effect of boron dopping is an increase in the overall acidity of the solids. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  7. Solid state {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al and {sup 31}P/{sup 23}Na MAS NMR dipolar dephasing investigations of connectivity in sodium aluminophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    LANG,DAVID P.; ALAM,TODD M.; BENCOE,DENISE N.

    2000-05-01

    Solid state {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al and {sup 31}P/{sup 23}Na MAS NMR dipolar dephasing experiments have been used to investigate the spatial distribution of aluminum and sodium cations with respect to the phosphate backbone for a series of sodium aluminophosphate glasses, xAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}50Na{sub 2}O{center_dot}(50{minus}x)P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (0{le} x {le} 17.5). From the {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al and {sup 31}P/{sup 23}Na connectivity data gathered, information about the medium range order in these glasses is obtained. The expanded connectivity data allows for better identification and interpretation of the new resonances observed in the {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectra with the addition of alumina. The results of the dipolar dephasing experiments show that the sodium-phosphate distribution remains relatively unchanged for the glass series, and that the addition of aluminum occurs primarily through the depolymerization of the phosphate tetrahedral backbone.

  8. Separation of small metabolites and lipids in spectra from biopsies by diffusion-weighted HR-MAS NMR: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Diserens, G; Vermathen, M; Precht, C; Broskey, N T; Boesch, C; Amati, F; Dufour, J-F; Vermathen, P

    2015-01-07

    High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) NMR allows metabolic characterization of biopsies. HR-MAS spectra from tissues of most organs show strong lipid contributions that are overlapping metabolite regions, which hamper metabolite estimation. Metabolite quantification and analysis would benefit from a separation of lipids and small metabolites. Generally, a relaxation filter is used to reduce lipid contributions. However, the strong relaxation filter required to eliminate most of the lipids also reduces the signals for small metabolites. The aim of our study was therefore to investigate different diffusion editing techniques in order to employ diffusion differences for separating lipid and small metabolite contributions in the spectra from different organs for unbiased metabonomic analysis. Thus, 1D and 2D diffusion measurements were performed, and pure lipid spectra that were obtained at strong diffusion weighting (DW) were subtracted from those obtained at low DW, which include both small metabolites and lipids. This subtraction yielded almost lipid free small metabolite spectra from muscle tissue. Further improved separation was obtained by combining a 1D diffusion sequence with a T2-filter, with the subtraction method eliminating residual lipids from the spectra. Similar results obtained for biopsies of different organs suggest that this method is applicable in various tissue types. The elimination of lipids from HR-MAS spectra and the resulting less biased assessment of small metabolites have potential to remove ambiguities in the interpretation of metabonomic results. This is demonstrated in a reproducibility study on biopsies from human muscle.

  9. Low-power broadband homonuclear dipolar recoupling in MAS NMR by two-fold symmetry pulse schemes for magnetization transfers and double-quantum excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teymoori, Gholamhasan; Pahari, Bholanath; Edén, Mattias

    2015-12-01

    We provide an experimental, numerical, and high-order average Hamiltonian evaluation of an open-ended series of homonuclear dipolar recoupling sequences, SR2 2p 1 with p = 1, 2, 3, … . While operating at a very low radio-frequency (rf) power, corresponding to a nutation frequency of 1/2 of the magic-angle spinning (MAS) rate (ωnut =ωr / 2), these recursively generated double-quantum (2Q) dipolar recoupling schemes offer a progressively improved compensation to resonance offsets and rf inhomogeneity for increasing pulse-sequence order p. The excellent recoupling robustness to these experimental obstacles, as well as to CSA, is demonstrated for 2Q filtering (2QF) experiments and for driving magnetization transfers in 2D NMR correlation spectroscopy, where the sequences may provide either double or zero quantum dipolar Hamiltonians during mixing. Experimental and numerical demonstrations, which mostly target conditions of "ultra-fast" MAS (≳50 kHz) and high magnetic fields, are provided for recoupling of 13C across a wide range of isotropic and anisotropic chemical shifts, as well as dipolar coupling constants, encompassing [2,3-13C2 ]alanine, [1,3-13C2 ]alanine, diammonium [1,4-13C2 ]fumarate, and [U-13 C]tyrosine. When compared at equal power levels, a superior performance is observed for the SR2p 1 sequences with p ⩾ 3 relative to existing and well-established 2Q recoupling techniques. At ultra-fast MAS, proton decoupling is redundant during the homonuclear dipolar recoupling of dilute spins in organic solids, which renders the family of SR2p 1 schemes the first efficient 2Q recoupling option for general applications, such as 2Q-1Q correlation NMR and high-order multiple-quantum excitation, under truly low-power rf conditions.

  10. Low-power broadband homonuclear dipolar recoupling in MAS NMR by two-fold symmetry pulse schemes for magnetization transfers and double-quantum excitation.

    PubMed

    Teymoori, Gholamhasan; Pahari, Bholanath; Edén, Mattias

    2015-12-01

    We provide an experimental, numerical, and high-order average Hamiltonian evaluation of an open-ended series of homonuclear dipolar recoupling sequences, SR [Formula: see text] with p=1,2,3,…. While operating at a very low radio-frequency (rf) power, corresponding to a nutation frequency of 1/2 of the magic-angle spinning (MAS) rate (ωnut=ωr/2), these recursively generated double-quantum (2Q) dipolar recoupling schemes offer a progressively improved compensation to resonance offsets and rf inhomogeneity for increasing pulse-sequence order p. The excellent recoupling robustness to these experimental obstacles, as well as to CSA, is demonstrated for 2Q filtering (2QF) experiments and for driving magnetization transfers in 2D NMR correlation spectroscopy, where the sequences may provide either double or zero quantum dipolar Hamiltonians during mixing. Experimental and numerical demonstrations, which mostly target conditions of "ultra-fast" MAS (≳50kHz) and high magnetic fields, are provided for recoupling of (13)C across a wide range of isotropic and anisotropic chemical shifts, as well as dipolar coupling constants, encompassing [2,3-(13)C2]alanine, [1,3-(13)C2]alanine, diammonium [1,4-(13)C2]fumarate, and [U-(13)C]tyrosine. When compared at equal power levels, a superior performance is observed for the SR [Formula: see text] sequences with p⩾3 relative to existing and well-established 2Q recoupling techniques. At ultra-fast MAS, proton decoupling is redundant during the homonuclear dipolar recoupling of dilute spins in organic solids, which renders the family of SR [Formula: see text] schemes the first efficient 2Q recoupling option for general applications, such as 2Q-1Q correlation NMR and high-order multiple-quantum excitation, under truly low-power rf conditions.

  11. Slow-down of 13C spin diffusion in organic solids by fast MAS: a CODEX NMR Study.

    PubMed

    Reichert, D; Bonagamba, T J; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2001-07-01

    One- and two-dimensional 13C exchange nuclear magnetic resonance experiments under magic-angle spinning (MAS) can provide detailed information on slow segmental reorientations and chemical exchange in organic solids, including polymers and proteins. However, observations of dynamics on the time scale of seconds or longer are hampered by the competing process of dipolar 13C spin exchange (spin diffusion). In this Communication, we show that fast MAS can significantly slow down the dipolar spin exchange effect for unprotonated carbon sites. The exchange is measured quantitatively using the centerband-only detection of exchange technique, which enables the detection of exchange at any spinning speed, even in the absence of changes of isotropic chemical shifts. For chemically equivalent unprotonated 13C sites, the dipolar spin exchange rate is found to decrease slightly less than proportionally with the sample-rotation frequency, between 8 and 28 kHz. In the same range, the dipolar spin exchange rate for a glassy polymer with an inhomogeneously broadened MAS line decreases by a factor of 10. For methylene groups, no or only a minor slow-down of the exchange rate is found.

  12. Formation and decomposition of N,N,N-trimethylanilinium cations on zeolite H-Y investigated by in situ stopped-flow MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Seiler, Michael; Ivanova, Irina I; Sternberg, Ulrich; Weitkamp, Jens; Hunger, Michael

    2002-06-26

    Methylation of aniline by methanol on zeolite H-Y has been investigated by in situ (13)C MAS NMR spectroscopy under flow conditions. The in situ (13)C continuous-flow (CF) MAS NMR experiments were performed at reaction temperatures between 473 and 523 K, molar methanol-to-aniline ratios of 1:1 to 4:1, and modified residence times of (13)CH(3)OH between 20 and 100 (g x h)/mol. The methylation reaction was shown to start at 473 K. N,N,N-Trimethylanilinium cations causing a (13)C NMR signal at 58 ppm constitute the major product on the catalyst surface. Small amounts of protonated N-methylaniline ([PhNH(2)CH(3)](+)) and N,N-dimethylaniline ([PhNH(CH(3))(2)](+)) were also observed at ca. 39 and 48 ppm, respectively. After increase of the temperature to 523 K, the contents of N,N-dimethylanilinium cations and ring-alkylated reaction products strongly increased, accompanied by a decrease of the amount of N,N,N-trimethylanilinium cations. With application of the in situ stopped-flow (SF) MAS NMR technique, the decomposition of N,N,N-trimethylanilinium cations on zeolite H-Y to N,N-dimethylanilinium and N-methylanilinium cations was investigated to gain a deeper insight into the reaction mechanism. The results obtained allow the proposal of a mechanism consisting of three steps: (i) the conversion of methanol to surface methoxy groups and dimethyl ether (DME); (ii) the alkylation of aniline with methanol, methoxy groups, or DME leading to an equilibrium mixture of N,N,N-trimethylanilinium, N,N-dimethylanilinium, and N-methylanilinium cations attached to the zeolite surface; (iii) the deprotonation of N,N-dimethylanilinium and N-methylanilinium cations causing the formation of N,N-dimethylaniline (NNDMA) and N-methylaniline (NMA) in the gas phase, respectively. The chemical equilibrium between the anilinium cations carrying different numbers of methyl groups is suggested to play a key role for the products distribution in the gas phase.

  13. {sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for carbonate ions in cement minerals and the use of {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR in studies of Portland cement including limestone additions

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Herfort, Duncan

    2013-10-15

    {sup 13}C isotropic chemical shifts and chemical shift anisotropy parameters have been determined for a number of inorganic carbonates relevant in cement chemistry from slow-speed {sup 13}C MAS or {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR spectra (9.4 T or 14.1 T) for {sup 13}C in natural abundance. The variation in the {sup 13}C chemical shift parameters is relatively small, raising some doubts that different carbonate species in Portland cement-based materials may not be sufficiently resolved in {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectra. However, it is shown that by combining {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR carbonate anions in anhydrous and hydrated phases can be distinguished, thereby providing valuable information about the reactivity of limestone in cement blends. This is illustrated for three cement pastes prepared from an ordinary Portland cement, including 0, 16, and 25 wt.% limestone, and following the hydration for up to one year. For these blends {sup 29}Si MAS NMR reveals that the limestone filler accelerates the hydration for alite and also results in a smaller fraction of tetrahedrally coordinated Al incorporated in the C-S-H phase. The latter result is more clearly observed in {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra of the cement–limestone blends and suggests that dissolved aluminate species in the cement–limestone blends readily react with carbonate ions from the limestone filler, forming calcium monocarboaluminate hydrate. -- Highlights: •{sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for inorganic carbonates from {sup 13}C MAS NMR. •Narrow {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift range (163–171 ppm) for inorganic carbonates. •Anhydrous and hydrated carbonate species by {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR. •Limestone accelerates the hydration for alite in Portland – limestone cements. •Limestone reduces the amount of aluminium incorporated in the C-S-H phase.

  14. Size- and site-dependent reconstruction in CdSe QDs evidenced by 77Se{1H} CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lovingood, Derek D; Achey, Randall; Paravastu, Anant K; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2010-03-17

    Evidence of size-dependent reconstruction in quantum dots leading to changes in bonding is observed through analysis of the (77)Se{(1)H} cross-polarization magic angle spinning and (77)Se spin-echo solid-state NMR for Cd(77)Se quantum dots. The CP-MAS and spin-echo data indicate discrete surface and core (77)Se sites exist with the QD, in which the surface is comprised of numerous reconstructed lattice planes. Due to the nearly 100% enrichment level for (77)Se, efficient spin coupling is observed between the surface (77)Se and sublayer (77)Se sites due to spin diffusion in the Cd(77)Se quantum dots. The observed chemical shift for the discrete (77)Se sites can be correlated to the effective mass approximation via the Ramsey expression, indicating a 1/r(2) size dependence for the change in chemical shift with size, while a plot of chemical shift versus the inverse band gap is linear. The correlation of NMR shift for the discrete sites allows a valence bond theory interpretation of the size-dependent changes in bonding character within the reconstructed QD. The NMR results provide a structural model for the QDs in which global reconstruction occurs below 4 nm in diameter, while an apparent self-limiting reconstruction process occurs above 4 nm.

  15. Investigation of the Use of Solid State Cp/mas NMR for Characterization of Thermoplastic Polyamides and Unique Thermally Curable Polyamides Containing the Cyclobutene Moiety.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Douglas Graham

    1990-08-01

    A series of model diamides was synthesized from mono- and disubstituted amines with the diacid chloride of cyclobutene-1,2-dicarboxylic acid. Relative rates of thermolysis (by DSC) were dependent on the number and type of substituents. Thermolysis products were Diels-Alder dimers and spontaneously formed polymers. Thermal imidization of cycloadducts was possible in some cases with concomitant oxidation to N, N^'-disubstituted aromatic bisimides. Polyamides were prepared from cyclobutene-1,2 -dicarboxylic acid using low temperature condensation reaction conditions. The unusual solubility characteristics of the diacid as well as the instability of the diacid chloride severely limited formation of high molecular weight polymers. Secondary monomers were synthesized in order to take advantage of the more predictable reactivity of the aromatic carboxyl group. Secondary monomers were polymerized with diamine comonomers using low temperature condensation methods. Solid state ^{13}C CP/MAS NMR confirmed the polymer structure. The thermalized product was found to be insoluble, although swellable, in polar aprotic solvents. Solid state ^{13 }C NMR spectra of the thermal products confirmed crosslinking by intermolecular Diels-Alder cycloaddition. Several important aliphatic polyamides were characterized using high resolution techniques with an emphasis on the ^{15}N nucleus. Chemical shifts from ^{15}N CP/MAS were found to correlate with the alpha and gamma crystal forms found in aliphatic polyamides. This chemical shift difference is rationalized as a conformationally dependent interaction of the amide nitrogen with its substituents. Evidence is presented from molecular orbital calculations which support this theory. Nylon 6 and nylon 11 were synthesized with 20% and 99% ^{15}N enrichment, respectively. ^{15}N CP/MAS of the enriched nylon 6 showed the amorphous region of the polymer for the first time. ^{15 }N relaxation times (T_1, T_1_rho) confirmed the assignment of the

  16. Constant-time 2D and 3D through-bond correlation NMR spectroscopy of solids under 60 kHz MAS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-01-21

    Establishing connectivity and proximity of nuclei is an important step in elucidating the structure and dynamics of molecules in solids using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Although recent studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of proton-detected multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments under ultrafast-MAS frequencies and obtaining high-resolution spectral lines of protons, assignment of proton resonances is a major challenge. In this study, we first re-visit and demonstrate the feasibility of 2D constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak correlation (CTUC-COSY) NMR experiment on rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS conditions, where the sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by the reduced spin-spin relaxation rate and the use of low radio-frequency power for heteronuclear decoupling during the evolution intervals of the pulse sequence. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the performance of a proton-detected pulse sequence to obtain a 3D {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation spectrum by incorporating an additional cross-polarization period in the CTUC-COSY pulse sequence to enable proton chemical shift evolution and proton detection in the incrementable t{sub 1} and t{sub 3} periods, respectively. In addition to through-space and through-bond {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H and {sup 13}C/{sup 13}C chemical shift correlations, the 3D {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H experiment also provides a COSY-type {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation spectrum, where only the chemical shifts of those protons, which are bonded to two neighboring carbons, are correlated. By extracting 2D F1/F3 slices ({sup 1}H/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation spectrum) at different {sup 13}C chemical shift frequencies from the 3D {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H spectrum, resonances of proton atoms located close to a specific carbon atom can be identified. Overall, the through-bond and through-space homonuclear/heteronuclear proximities determined from the

  17. Constant-time 2D and 3D through-bond correlation NMR spectroscopy of solids under 60 kHz MAS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-01-01

    Establishing connectivity and proximity of nuclei is an important step in elucidating the structure and dynamics of molecules in solids using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Although recent studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of proton-detected multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments under ultrafast-MAS frequencies and obtaining high-resolution spectral lines of protons, assignment of proton resonances is a major challenge. In this study, we first re-visit and demonstrate the feasibility of 2D constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak correlation (CTUC-COSY) NMR experiment on rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS conditions, where the sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by the reduced spin-spin relaxation rate and the use of low radio-frequency power for heteronuclear decoupling during the evolution intervals of the pulse sequence. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the performance of a proton-detected pulse sequence to obtain a 3D 1H/13C/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum by incorporating an additional cross-polarization period in the CTUC-COSY pulse sequence to enable proton chemical shift evolution and proton detection in the incrementable t1 and t3 periods, respectively. In addition to through-space and through-bond 13C/1H and 13C/13C chemical shift correlations, the 3D 1H/13C/1H experiment also provides a COSY-type 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum, where only the chemical shifts of those protons, which are bonded to two neighboring carbons, are correlated. By extracting 2D F1/F3 slices (1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum) at different 13C chemical shift frequencies from the 3D 1H/13C/1H spectrum, resonances of proton atoms located close to a specific carbon atom can be identified. Overall, the through-bond and through-space homonuclear/heteronuclear proximities determined from the 3D 1H/13C/1H experiment would be useful to study the structure and dynamics of a variety of chemical and biological

  18. Efficient Resonance Assignment of Proteins in MAS NMR by Simultaneous Intra- and Inter-residue 3D Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Daviso, Eugenio; Eddy, Matthew T.; Andreas, Loren B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Herzfeld, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Resonance assignment is the first step in NMR structure determination. For magic angle spinning NMR, this is typically achieved with a set of heteronuclear correlation experiments (NCaCX, NCOCX, CONCa) that utilize SPECIFIC-CP 15N-13C transfers. However, the SPECIFIC-CP transfer efficiency is often compromised by molecular dynamics and probe performance. Here we show that one-bond ZF-TEDOR 15N-13C transfers provide simultaneous NCO and NCa transfers with at least as much sensitivity as SPECIFIC-CP for some non-crystalline samples. Furthermore, a 3D TEDOR-CC experiment provides heteronuclear sidechains correlations and robustness with respect to proton decoupling and radiofrequency power instabilities. We demonstrate transfer efficiencies and connectivities by application of 3D ZF-TEDOR-DARR to a model microcrystalline protein, GB1, and a less ideal system, GvpA in intact gas vesicles. PMID:23334347

  19. Crystal structure of silica-ZSM-12 by the combined use of high-resolution solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, C.A.; Kokotailo, G.T. ); Gies, H.; Marler, B. ); Cox, D.E. )

    1990-05-03

    The crystal structure of the synthetic zeolite silica-ZSM-12, 56 SiO{sub 2}, has been solved by the combined use of high-resolution solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy and high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction ZSM-12 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c with a{sub 0} = 24.863 {angstrom}, b{sub 0} = 5.012 {angstrom}, c{sub 0} = 24.328 {angstrom}, and {beta} = 107.7{degree}. The zeolite host structure is built from corner-linked SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra to give a three-dimensional 4-connected net. The pores of the structure are one-dimensional channels that do not intersect, with 12-membered ring pore openings of approximately 5.6 {times} 7.7 {angstrom}. The structure of ZSM-12 is frequently twinned with (100) as the twin plane, which indicates a new zeolite structure type.

  20. In Situ High Temperature High Pressure MAS NMR Study on the Crystallization of AlPO 4 -5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Suochang; Hu, Mary Y.; Bao, Xinhe; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2016-01-28

    A damped oscillating crystallization process of AlPO4-5 at the presence of small amount of water is demonstrated by in situ high temperature high pressure multinuclear MAS NMR. Crystalline AlPO4-5 is formed from an intermediate semicrystalline phase via continuous rearrangement of the local structure of amorphous precursor gel. Activated water catalyzes the rearrangement via repeatedly hydrolysis and condensation reaction. Strong interactions between organic template and inorganic species facilitate the ordered rearrangement. During the crystallization process, excess water, phosphate, and aluminums are expelled from the precursor. The oscillating crystallization reflects mass transportation between the solid and liquid phase during the crystallization process. This crystallization process is also applicable to AlPO4-5 crystallized in the presence of a relatively large amount of water.

  1. 13C CP MAS NMR and GIAO-CHF/DFT calculations of flavonoids: Morin, kaempferol, tricin, genistein, formononetin and 3,7-dihydroxyflavone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielińska, Agnieszka; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Jakowski, Jacek; Wawer, Iwona

    2008-02-01

    13C CP MAS NMR spectra of the flavonoids: morin, kaempferol, 3,7-dihydroxyflavone, tricin and isoflavones: genistein and formononetin were recorded to characterize solid-state conformations. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds forming five-, six- and seven-membered rings are present in the two morin molecules in the crystals - their 13C resonances have been assigned with the aid of the calculated shielding constants. Linear relationships between the calculated shielding constants σDFT (ppm) and chemical shifts ( δCPMAS, ppm) were obtained for all studied compounds. Higher correlation coefficients suggest that the conformation with "clockwise" orientation of both OH groups is more probable in the solid 3,7-dihydroxyflavone, whereas in the solid formononetin the OH and OCH 3 substituents are directed "anticlockwise". The barrier to the rotation of phenyl ring B decreases in the order: morin (2'-OH, 3-OH) > kaempferol (3-OH) > tricin.

  2. A study of structure and dynamics of poly(aspartic acid) sodium/poly(vinyl alcohol) blends by 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Ando, I.

    1999-09-01

    Solid state 13C CP/MAS NMR measurements have been carried out on poly(aspartic acid) sodium (PAANa)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) blends over a wide range of temperatures. From these experimental results, it is found that the main-chain conformations of PAANa in PAANa/PVA blends take the α-helix form over a wide range of blend ratios, and, in contrast, the conformation and dynamics of the side chains of PAANa are strongly influenced by the formation of an intermolecular hydrogen bond between the carboxyl group of the side chains and the hydroxyl group of PVA. The behavior of the proton spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame ( T1 ρ(H)) and the laboratory frame ( T1(H)) indicates that when the blend ratio of PAANa and PVA is 1:1, they are miscible.

  3. Modification of structure and digestibility of chestnut starch upon cooking: a solid state (13)C CP MAS NMR and enzymatic degradation study.

    PubMed

    Pizzoferrato, L; Rotilio, G; Paci, M

    1999-10-01

    The modification of starch, which is the major component of the polysaccharide fraction of chestnuts (Castanea sativa), has been studied from the point of view of structure and digestibility to understand the modifications induced by cooking and, specifically, by the Maillard reaction. The study was carried out by enzymatic degradation kinetics, monitoring the glucose released upon time, and by solid state (13)C CP MAS NMR, which has the potential of monitoring the solid state phase changes occurring upon chemical modification due to the cooking process. Results obtained reveal that large changes are induced in the macromolecular structure of starchy materials and that these changes are correlated with changes of digestibility in terms of enzymatic degradation resistance. In the system studied, the extension of the Maillard reaction is not such as to exert a significant influence on structure and/or digestibility of chestnut starch.

  4. (119)Sn MAS NMR and first-principles calculations for the investigation of disorder in stannate pyrochlores.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Martin R; Reader, Simon W; Johnston, Karen E; Pickard, Chris J; Whittle, Karl R; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2011-01-14

    The local structure and cation disorder in Y(2)Ti(2-x)Sn(x)O(7) pyrochlores, materials proposed for the encapsulation of lanthanide- and actinide-bearing radioactive waste, is studied using (119)Sn (I = 1/2) NMR spectroscopy. NMR provides an excellent probe of disorder, as it is sensitive to the atomic scale environment without the need for any long-range periodicity. However, the complex and overlapping spectral resonances that often result can be difficult to interpret. Here, we demonstrate how (119)Sn DFT calculations can be used to aid the spectral interpretation and assignment, confirming that Sn occupies only the six-coordinate pyrochlore B site, and that the Sn chemical shift is sensitive to the number of Sn/Ti on the neighbouring B sites. Although distinct resonances are resolved experimentally when the Ti content is low, there is significant spectral overlap for Ti-rich compositions. We establish that this is a result of two competing contributions to the Sn chemical shift; an upfield shift resulting from the incorporation of the more polarizing Ti(4+) cation onto the neighbouring B sites, and a concomitant downfield shift arising from the decrease in unit cell size. Despite the considerably easier spectral acquisition, the lower resolution in the (119)Sn spectra hinders the extraction of the detailed structural information previously obtained using (89)Y NMR. However, the spectra we obtain are consistent with a random distribution of Sn/Ti on the pyrochlore B sites. Finally, we consider whether an equilibrium structure has been achieved by investigating materials that have been annealed for different durations.

  5. Synthesis, Infra-red, CP/MAS-NMR characterization, structural study and electrical properties of the bis(4-amino-2-chloropyridinium) tetrachlorozincate (II) monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karâa, Najla; Hamdi, Besma; Ben Salah, Abdelhamid; Zouari, Ridha

    2013-10-01

    Single crystals of the new ionic salt bis(4-amino-2-chloropyridinium) tetrachlorozincate (II) monohydrate, (C5H6N2Cl)2 ZnCl4ṡH2O, were grown by slow evaporation from aqueous solution at room temperature. The compound was characterized by IR, thermal analysis (TGA-DSC), single crystal X-ray diffraction, CP/MAS-NMR and impedance spectroscopy. The structure (4-amino-2-chloropyridinium)2 ZnCl4·H2O, [(CAP)2ZnCl4·H2O], consists of isolated H2O, isolated [ZnCl4]2- tetrahedral anions and 4-amino-2-chloropyridinium [C5H6N2Cl] + cations, CAP, which are connected together via N-H⋯Cl, N-H⋯O ((N: pyridinium) and (N: amine)), O-H⋯Cl and C-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. Cation-cation, offset-face-to-face interactions (π-π stacking) between identical antiparallel CAP (aromatic-aromatic), in which they may be effective in the stabilization of the crystal structure. Solid state CP/MAS-NMR spectra showed five isotropic resonances, 13C, confirming the solid state structure determined by X-ray diffraction. Impedance spectroscopy study, reported for a single crystal, revealed that the conduction in the material was due to a hopping process. This work aims to reveal the thermal properties of a new zinc (II) based organic-inorganic hybrid and the conductivity properties that these compounds exhibit.

  6. 29Si{1H} CP-MAS NMR comparison and ATR-FTIR spectroscopic analysis of the diatoms Chaetoceros muelleri and Thalassiosira pseudonana grown at different salinities.

    PubMed

    La Vars, Sian M; Johnston, Martin R; Hayles, John; Gascooke, Jason R; Brown, Melissa H; Leterme, Sophie C; Ellis, Amanda V

    2013-04-01

    Diatoms are key indicators of marine environmental health. To further understand how diatoms respond to varying degrees of salinity, either due to climate change or brine waste discharge into marine environments, two different diatom species were studied. Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chaetoceros muelleri were cultured at three different salinities namely, 26 practical salinity units (PSU or parts per thousand), 36 PSU (standard salinity for culturing of seawater species) and 46 PSU. Changes in silica and organic content within the cultured diatoms were analysed using solid-state (29)Si{(1)H} cross-polarization-magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopies coupled with analysis of variance. (29)Si CP-MAS NMR showed that qualitatively the Q4:Q3 area ratios of C. muelleri, grown away from standard salinities, increased in response to the formation of more condensed (2 ≡SiOH → ≡Si-O-Si≡ + H2O) and/or an increase in closely associated organic matter to the Q4 component of the diatoms. This was not observed for T. pseudonana. However, both species showed the appearance of a new peak centered at 1575-1580 cm(-1) in the ATR-FTIR spectra, designated as the C═N band of nitrogenous purine-type compounds. Further, the C. muelleri species was shown to produce more extracellular polymeric substances at non-standard salinities. On this basis, results suggest that there is a strong relationship between diatom composition and salinity and that C. muelleri is more sensitive to its environment than T. pseudonana.

  7. Structural investigations of PuIII phosphate by X-ray diffraction, MAS-NMR and XANES spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Karin; Raison, Philippe E.; Martel, Laura; Martin, Philippe M.; Prieur, Damien; Solari, Pier L.; Bouëxière, Daniel; Konings, Rudy J. M.; Somers, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    PuPO4 was prepared by a solid state reaction method and its crystal structure at room temperature was solved by powder X-ray diffraction combined with Rietveld refinement. High resolution XANES measurements confirm the +III valence state of plutonium, in agreement with valence bond derivation. The presence of the americium (as β- decay product of plutonium) in the +III oxidation state was determined based on XANES spectroscopy. High resolution solid state 31P NMR agrees with the XANES results and the presence of a solid-solution.

  8. Influence of sodium ion dynamics on the 23Na quadrupolar interaction in sodalite: a high-temperature 23Na MAS NMR study.

    PubMed

    Fechtelkord, M

    2000-01-01

    High-temperature 33Na MAS NMR experiments up to 873 K for a number of different sodalites (Na8[AlSiO4]6(NO3)2, Na8[AlSiO4]6(NO2)2, Na8[AlSiO4]6I2, Na7.9[AlSiO4]6(SCN)7.9 x 0.5H2O, Na8[AlGeO4]6(NO3)2, and Na7[AlSiO4]6(H3O2) x 4H2O) were carried out. The spectra of the first five sodalites consist of a quadrupolar MAS pattern with different quadrupolar coupling constants. The quadrupolar interaction for the thiocyanate sodalite, the nitrate aluminosilicate, and germanate sodalite decreases strongly passing a coalescence state on heating, while the quadrupolar interaction of the iodide and nitrite sample shows nearly no change. The basic hydrosodalite shows an asymmetric lineshape at room temperature and, between 350 and 370 K, a second line due to the evaporation of cage-water emerges. The linewidth increases with rising temperature. The temperature dependence of the quadrupolar interaction seems to be a function of the sodalite beta-cage expansion. Two conceivable jump mechanisms are proposed for a tetrahedral two-site jump between occupied and unoccupied tetrahedral sites.

  9. Solubilization and localization of weakly polar lipids in unsonicated egg phosphatidylcholine: A sup 13 C MAS NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J.A. ); Fujito, D.T.; Hammer, C.F. )

    1991-03-19

    The weakly polar lipids cholesteryl ester, triacylglycerol, and diacylglycerol incorporate to a limited extent into the lamellar structure of small unilamellar vesicles. The localization of the carbonyl group(s) at the aqueous interface was detected by ({sup 13}C)carbonyl chemical shift changes relative to the neat unhydrated lipid. This study uses {sup 13}C NMR to investigate the interactions of thes lipids with unsonicated (multilamellar) phosphatidylcholine, a model system for cellular membranes and surfaces of emulsion particles with low curvature. Magic angle spinning reduced the broad lines of the unsonicated dispersions to narrow lines comparable to those from sonicated dispersions. ({sup 13}C)Carbonyl chemical shifts revealed incorporation of the three lipids into the lamellar structure of the unsonicated phospholipids and a partial hydration of the carbonyl groups similar to that observed in small vesicles. Other properties of interfacial weakly polar lipids in multilayers were similar to those in small unilamellar bilayers. There is thus a general tendency of weakly polar lipids to incorparate at least to a small extent into the lamellar structure of phospholipids and take on interfacial properties that are distinct from their bulk-phase properties. This pool of surface-located lipid is likely to be directly involved in enzymatyic transformations and protein-mediated transport. The {sup 13}C magic angle spinning NMR method may be generally useful for determining the orientation of molecules in model membranes.

  10. (19)F Oximetry with semifluorinated alkanes.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Stefan; Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Tsagogiorgas, Charalambos; Theisinger, Bastian; Glatting, Gerhard; Schad, Lothar R

    2016-12-01

    This work examines the variation of longitudinal relaxation rate R1(= 1/T1) of the (19)F-CF3-resonance of semifluorinated alkanes (SFAs) with oxygen tension (pO2), temperature (T) and pH in vitro. Contrary to their related perfluorocarbons (PFCs), SFA are amphiphilic and facilitate stable emulsions, a prerequisite for clinical use. A linear relationship between R1 and pO2 was confirmed for the observed SFAs at different temperatures. Using a standard saturation recovery sequence, T1 has been successfully measured using fluorine (19)F-MRI with a self-constructed birdcage resonator at 9.4 T. A calibration curve to calculate pO2 depending on T and R1 was found for each SFA used. In contrast to the commonly used PFC, SFAs are less sensitive to changes in pO2, but more sensitive to changes in temperature. The influence of pH to R1 was found to be negligible.

  11. Investigation of the Structure and Active Sites of TiO2 Nanorod Supported VOx Catalysts by High-Field and Fast-Spinning 51V MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Xu, Suochang; Li, Weizhen; Hu, Mary Y.; Deng, Xuchu; Dixon, David A.; Vasiliu, Monica; Craciun, Raluca; Wang, Yong; Bao, Xinhe; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-07-02

    Supported VOx/TiO2-Rod catalysts were studied by 51V MAS NMR at high field using a sample spinning rate of 55 kHz. The superior spectral resolution allows for the observation of at least five vanadate species. The assignment of these vanadate species was carried out by quantum mechanical calculations of 51V NMR chemical shifts of model V-surface structures. Methanol oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) was used to establish the correlation between the reaction rate and the various surface V-sites. It is found that monomeric V-species dominated the catalyst at low vanadium loadings with two peaks observed at about -502 and -529 ppm. V-dimers with two bridged oxygen appeare at about -555 ppm. Vanadate dimers and polyvanadates connected by one bridged oxygen atom between two adjacent V atoms resonate at about -630 ppm. A positive correlation is found between the V-dimers related to the -555 ppm peak and the ODH rate while a better correlation is obtained by including monomeric contributions. This result indicates that surface V-dimers related to the -555 ppm peak are the major active sites for ODH reaction despite mono-V species are more catalytic active but their relative ratios are decreased dramatically at high V-loadings. Furthermore, a portion of the V-species is found invisible. In particular, the level of such invisibility increases with decreased level of V-loading, suggesting the existence of paramagnetic V-species at the surface.

  12. Structure of SiO[sub 2] on Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] monolayer catalysts: Investigation by infrared spectroscopy and [sup 29]Si MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, T.C. ); Lang, S.; Morrow, B.A. ); Gay, I.D. )

    1994-07-01

    Infrared spectroscopy and [sup 29]Si MAS NMR are used to probe the structure of SiO[sub 2] on Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalysts prepared by chemical vapor deposition of Si(OCH[sub 3])[sub 4][center dot]SiO[sub 2] loadings from about 0.2-2.5 statistical monolayers are studied. Infrared shows a gradual disappearance of AlOH vibrations as the SiO[sub 2] loading is increased. A population of inaccessible AlOH is also observed. The Si-O-X asymmetric stretching frequency shows a continuous variation with SiO[sub 2] content, consistent with X varying from Al at low levels to Si at high levels of silica. [sup 29]Si NMR shows composite peaks at all SiO[sub 2] levels. At the lowest level most intensity is concentrated in the -80 to -85 ppm range, corresponding to Si with attached -OAl groups. At the highest silica levels, the spectrum can be deconvoluted into peaks at -108, -100, and -92 ppm. These correspond to Si(OSi)[sub 4], Si(OSi)[sub 3]OH, and mixtures of Si(OSi)[sub 2](OH)[sub 2] with -OAl-containing species. A model is proposed for build up of the silica layer on these catalysts. Random deposition of silica on any available surface is shown to give a semiquantitative account of the experimental results. 31 refs., 6 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  14. Al speciation in tropical podzols of the upper Amazon Basin: A solid-state 27Al MAS and MQMAS NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardy, Marion; Bonhomme, Christian; Fritsch, Emmanuel; Maquet, Jocelyne; Hajjar, Redouane; Allard, Thierry; Derenne, Sylvie; Calas, Georges

    2007-07-01

    In the upper Amazon Basin, aluminum previously accumulated in lateritic formations is massively remobilised in soils by podzolization and exported in waters. We have investigated the speciation of aluminum in the clay-size fractions of eight horizons of waterlogged podzols lying in a depression of a plateau. The horizons illustrate the main steps involved in the podzolization of laterites. They belong to eluviated topsoil A horizons and illuviated subsoil Bhs, Bh and 2BCs horizons of weakly and better-expressed podzols located at the margin and centre of the depression. For the first time, aluminum speciation is quantitatively assessed in soils by spectroscopic methods, namely FTIR, 27Al magic angle spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The results thus obtained are compared to chemical extraction data. Solid-state 27Al MAS NMR spectra enable to distinguish Al bound to organic compounds from that incorporated in secondary mineral phases detected by FTIR. MQMAS experiments additionally show that both chemical shifts and quadrupolar constants are distributed for Al nuclei linked with organic compounds. Similar amounts of chelated Al are obtained from NMR spectra and chemical extractions. The study enables to highlight three major steps in the fate of aluminum. (i) Aluminum is first released by mineral weathering, feeds complexing sites of organic matter and accumulates in subsurface Bhs horizons of weakly expressed podzols (acidocomplexolysis). (ii) Complexes of aluminum with organic matter (Al-OM) then migrate downwards in sandy horizons of better-expressed podzols and accumulate at depth in less permeable 2BCs horizons. (iii) The minor amounts of aluminum present in the 2BCs horizon of the downslope podzol show that aluminum is eventually exported towards the river network, either complexed with organic matter or as Al 3+ ions after desorption from organic compounds, due to decreasing pH or

  15. Atomic structure and dehydration mechanism of amorphous silica: Insights from 29Si and 1H solid-state MAS NMR study of SiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Na; Lee, Sung Keun

    2013-11-01

    Detailed knowledge of the atomic structure of hydrous species on surface of amorphous silica and the effect of temperature and particle size on their atomic configurations are essential to understand the nature of fluids-amorphous silicates interactions and the dehydration processes in the amorphous oxides. Here, we report the 29Si, 1H MAS, and 1H-29Si heteronuclear correlation (HetCor) NMR spectra of 7 nm and 14 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles—a model system for natural amorphous silica—where previously unknown details of changes in their atomic structures with varying dehydration temperature and particle size are revealed. Diverse hydroxyl groups with varying atomic configurations and molecular water apparently show distinct dehydration trends. The dehydration (i.e., removal of water) of amorphous silica nanoparticles mostly results in the increase of isolated silanol by removing water molecules from hydrogen-bonded silanols associated water molecules. With further increase in dehydration temperature, the intensity of isolated silanol peak decreases above ˜873 K, suggesting that the condensation of isolated silanol may occur mainly above ˜873 K. The entire dehydration (and dehydroxylation) process completes at ˜1473 K. Both the water (i.e., physisorbed water and hydrogen-bonded water) and hydrogen-bonded silanol species show a dramatic change in the slope of intensity variation at ˜873 K, indicating that most of silanols is hydrogen-bonded to water rather than to other silanols. The fraction of hydrogen-bonded proton species is also much smaller in 14 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles than in 7 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles mainly due to the presences of larger fractions of water and hydrogen-bonded silanol species. 29Si NMR results show that with increasing dehydration temperature, the fraction of Q4 species apparently increases at the expense of Q2 and Q3 species. The fractions of Q2 and Q3 structures in 7 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles are

  16. 87Rb spin-lattice relaxation times in ferroelectric-paraelectric-incommensurate phases of Rb2CoBr4 using static NMR and MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2017-04-01

    To better elucidate the structural properties of Rb2CoBr4 in paraelectric, incommensurate, and ferroelectric phases, we studied the 87Rb nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation times in laboratory frame T1 and in rotating frame T1ρ. The resonance frequency and the chemical shift do not change abruptly near the phase transition temperature of Ti = 333 K and TC = 192 K, whereas T1 and T1ρ display discontinuous changes near Ti and TC. The abrupt changes in the relaxation times near these temperatures seem to be a result of the structural phase transitions. The results are distinctly different from those reported for Rb2CoCl4.

  17. (Na{sub 4}BH{sub 4}){sup 3+} guests inside aluminosilicate, gallosilicate and aluminogermanate sodalite host frameworks studied by {sup 1}H, {sup 11}B, and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, J.-Ch.; Murshed, M.M.

    2009-07-01

    We report tetrahydroborate aluminosilicate, gallosilicate and aluminogermanate sodalites studied by {sup 11}B, {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy. The spectral parameters are consistent with the local environments of each investigated nucleus obtained from the crystal structures. The {sup 11}B MAS NMR spectra exhibit a sharp narrow line at about -49.0 ppm, which is assigned to BH{sub 4}{sup -} enclathrated into the sodalite framework matrix. The lineshape of the signal shows no quadrupolar interactions due to discreteness and high symmetry of the BH{sub 4}{sup -} unit as well as possible fast dynamic site exchange of hydrogen atoms. The {sup 23}Na MAS NMR signals also show a narrow Gaussian lineshape, which clearly indicates a single type of sodium coordination, and a centrosymmetrical charge distribution around the sodium atom. The {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra can clearly distinguish between hydrogen in BH{sub 4}{sup -} anions (-0.6 ppm), H{sub 3}O{sub 2}{sup -} anions (1.2 ppm) and H{sub 2}O molecules (5.0 ppm). The structural properties of BH{sub 4}{sup -} intercalation into sodalite framework matrix help connect the microporous materials to hydride-containing A, X and Y type zeolites.

  18. The relationship between reorientational molecular motions and phase transitions in [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2}, studied with the use of {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR and FT-MIR

    SciTech Connect

    Mikuli, Edward Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Grad, Bartłomiej; Kozak, Asja; Wąsicki, Jan W.; Bilski, Paweł; Hołderna-Natkaniec, Krystyna; Medycki, Wojciech

    2015-02-14

    A {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance study of [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2} has confirmed the existence of two phase transitions at T{sub c1} ≈ 257 K and T{sub c2} ≈ 142 K, detected earlier by the DSC method. These transitions were reflected by changes in the temperature dependences of both proton and fluorine of second moments M{sub 2}{sup H} and M{sub 2}{sup F} and of spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1}{sup H} and T{sub 1}{sup F}. The study revealed anisotropic reorientations of whole [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} cations, reorientations by 180° jumps of H{sub 2}O ligands, and aniso- and isotropic reorientations of BF{sub 4}{sup −} anions. The activation parameters for these motions were obtained. It was found that the phase transition at T{sub c1} is associated with the reorientation of the cation as a whole unit around the C{sub 3} axis and that at T{sub c2} with isotropic reorientation of the BF{sub 4}{sup −} anions. The temperature dependence of the full width at half maximum value of the infrared band of ρ{sub t}(H{sub 2}O) mode (at ∼596 cm{sup −1}) indicated that in phases I and II, all H{sub 2}O ligands in [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} perform fast reorientational motions (180° jumps) with a mean value of activation energy equal to ca 10 kJ mole{sup −1}, what is fully consistent with NMR results. The phase transition at T{sub c1} is associated with a sudden change of speed of fast (τ{sub R} ≈ 10{sup −12} s) reorientational motions of H{sub 2}O ligands. Below T{sub c2} (in phase III), the reorientations of certain part of the H{sub 2}O ligands significantly slow down, while others continue their fast reorientation with an activation energy of ca 2 kJ mole{sup −1}. This fast reorientation cannot be evidenced in NMR relaxation experiments. Splitting of certain IR bands connected with H{sub 2}O ligands at the observed phase transitions suggests a reduction of the symmetry of the octahedral [Mg(H{sub 2}O

  19. 19F MRI for quantitative in vivo cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Mangala; Heerschap, Arend; Ahrens, Eric T.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular therapy, including stem cell transplants and dendritic cell vaccines, is typically monitored for dosage optimization, accurate delivery and localization using non-invasive imaging, of which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a key modality. 19F MRI retains the advantages of MRI as an imaging modality, while allowing direct detection of labelled cells for unambiguous identification and quantification, unlike typical metal-based contrast agents. Recent developments in 19F MRI-based in vivo cell quantification, the existing clinical use of 19F compounds and current explosive interest in cellular therapeutics have brought 19F imaging technology closer to clinical application. We review the application of 19F MRI to cell tracking, discussing intracellular 19F labels, cell labelling and in vivo quantification, as well as the potential clinical use of 19F MRI. PMID:20427096

  20. Drug release from cast films of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) copolymer: Stability of drugs by 1H NMR and solid state 13C CP/MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Kalachandra, S; Lin, D M; Stejskal, E O; Prakki, A; Offenbacher, S

    2005-07-01

    The study utilizes an oral biocompatible material based on ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) designed to release drugs in vitro at therapeutic levels over several days. We examined the drug stability during film casting process using proton and solid state NMR techniques. The drug-loaded EVA films were prepared from the dry sheet obtained by solvent (dichloromethane) evaporation of polymer casting solutions. Drugs tested include chlorhexidine diacetate (CDA), doxycycline hydrochloride (DOH), tetracycline hydrochloride (TTH) and nystatin (NST). Drug release from the films was examined for at least 14 days in 10 ml ddH2O (NST in water/ethanol (4:1)) which was replaced daily. Changes in optical density were followed spectraphotometrically. Effect of temperature on rate measurements was studied and the energies of activation (E*) were calculated using Arrhenius plots. Effect of EVA copolymer composition on CDA release rate was also investigated. The enhanced rates with temperature increase may be attributed to the formation of channels with increased geometry in the polymer. The highest E* observed for CDA compared to DOH and TTH may be related to their average molecular weights. Spectral analyses for CDA and NST revealed that the chemical and physical structures of the drugs remained unaffected during the film casting process.

  1. 31P MAS-NMR study of flux-grown rare-earth element orthophosphate (monazite/xenotime) solid solutions: Evidence of random cation distribution from paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Palke, A. C.; Stebbins, J. F.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-01-01

    We present 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectra of flux-grown solid solutions of La1-xCexPO4 ( x between 0.027 and 0.32) having the monoclinic monazite structure, and of Y1-xMxPO4 (M = Vn+, Ce3+, Nd3+, x between 0.001 and 0.014) having the tetragonal zircon structure. Paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances are observed in all samples due to the presence of paramagnetic Vn+, Ce3+, and Nd3+ in the diamagnetic LaPO4 or YPO4. As a first-order observation, the number and relative intensity of these peaks is related to the symmetry and structure of the diamagnetic host phase. The presence of paramagnetic shifts allows for increased resolution between NMR resonances for distinct atomic species which leads to the observation of low intensity peaks related to PO4 species having more than one paramagnetic neighbor two or four atomic bonds away. Through careful analysis of peak areas and comparison with predictions for simple models, it was determined that solid solutions in the systems examined here are characterized by complete disorder (random distribution) of diamagnetic La3+ or Y3+ with the paramagnetic substitutional species Ce3+ and Nd3+. The increased resolution given by the paramagnetic interactions also leads to the observation of splitting of specific resonances in the 31P NMR spectra that may be caused by local, small-scale distortions from the substitution of ions having dissimilar ionic radii.

  2. In situ (1)H and (13)C MAS NMR kinetic study of the mechanism of H/D exchange for propane on zeolite H-ZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Arzumanov, Sergei S; Reshetnikov, Sergei I; Stepanov, Alexander G; Parmon, Valentin N; Freude, Dieter

    2005-10-27

    The kinetics of hydrogen (H/D) exchange between Brønsted acid sites of zeolite H-ZSM-5 and variously deuterated propanes (propane-d(8), propane-1,1,1,3,3,3-d(6), propane-2,2-d(2)) have been monitored in situ by (1)H MAS NMR spectroscopy within the temperature range of 503-556 K. The contribution of intramolecular hydrogen transfer to the H/D exchange in the adsorbed propane was estimated by monitoring the kinetics of (13)C-labeled carbon scrambling in propane-2-(13)C in situ with (13)C MAS NMR at 543-573 K. Possible mechanisms of the exchange have been verified on the basis of the analysis of the variation of protium concentration in both the methyl and the methylene groups of propane in dependence of the reaction time. The main route of the exchange consists of a direct exchange of the acidic OH groups of the zeolite with either the methyl groups or the methylene group presumably with a pentacoordinated carbonium ion intermediate. The assumption that the intramolecular H scrambling between the methyl groups and the methylene group of propane via carbenium-ion-type intermediates is the fastest process among the other possible routes does not account for the experimental kinetics of H/D exchange for propanes with different initial contents and locations of deuterium in a propane molecule. The rate constant (k(3)) for intramolecular H/D exchange between the methyl and the methylene groups is 4-5 times lower compared to those of the direct exchange of both the methyl (k(1)) and the methylene (k(2)) groups with Brønsted acid sites of the zeolite, the k(1) being ca. 1.5 times higher than k(2). At lower temperature (473 K), the exchange is slower, and the expected difference between k(1) and k(2) is more essential, k(1) = 3k(2). This accounts for earlier observed regioselectivity of the exchange for propane on H-ZSM-5 at 473 K. Faster direct exchange with the methyl groups compared to that with the methylene groups was attributed to a possible, more spatial

  3. Effect of organic matter application on CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectra of humic acids from a brown soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.

    2009-04-01

    The humified SOM or humic substances (HS) composed of humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA) and humin (HM) represent the most microbially recalcitrant and stable reservoir of organic carbon in soil (Piccolo et al., 2004). OM applications can influence the amount and structural characteristics of HS(Dou et al., 2008). During the past few decades, there has been much research on HS, but their chemical structure is still not fully understood (Dong, 2006).CP-MAS-13C-NMR spectroscopy was considered as an effective method to study structures of HS without dissolving problem compared with liquid 13C-NMR (Conte et al., 1997; Dou et al., 2008). It can directly measure the carbon framework and reflect the nature of HS transformation after OM application (Spaccini et al., 2000). For that reason, this method was applied in this study. The objective of this paper was to clarify the effect of long term OM application on the changes of structural characteristics in HAs, which provided new information for improving soil fertility by OM application. The experiment was carried out on a brown soil (Paleudalf in USDA Soil Taxonomy) at Shenyang Agricultural University, Liaoning province, China (N41°48'-E123°25'). The experiment included 3 treatments: zero-treatment (CKbr), and two pig manure (PM) treatments (O1 and O2) at the rates of 0.9 t ha-1 and 1.8 t ha-1 of organic carbon, respectively. The samples of the HA fraction were extracted, separated and purified according to the method described by Dou et al. (1991). Elemental composition, Differential thermal analysis (DTA), -lgK value, FT-IR and CP-MAS- 13C-NMR of HAs were performed. Effects on the contents of orgaic carbon and its composition. The contents of TOC were from 8.77 g kg-1 to 12.25 g kg-1. The relative contents in TOC for WSS, HA, and FA were 6.87%, 14.2% and 19.8%. Comparing the CKbr, the contents of WSS, HA and FA for O1 and O2 increased, but relative contents of WSS and FA decreased. The content of the HA increased after

  4. Analysis of local molecular motions of aromatic sidechains in proteins by 2D and 3D fast MAS NMR spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Piotr; Pawlak, Tomasz; Jeziorna, Agata; Trébosc, Julien; Hou, Guangjin; Vega, Alexander J; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Dracinsky, Martin; Polenova, Tatyana; Potrzebowski, Marek J

    2015-11-21

    We report a new multidimensional magic angle spinning NMR methodology, which provides an accurate and detailed probe of molecular motions occurring on timescales of nano- to microseconds, in sidechains of proteins. The approach is based on a 3D CPVC-RFDR correlation experiment recorded under fast MAS conditions (ν(R) = 62 kHz), where (13)C-(1)H CPVC dipolar lineshapes are recorded in a chemical shift resolved manner. The power of the technique is demonstrated in model tripeptide Tyr-(d)Ala-Phe and two nanocrystalline proteins, GB1 and LC8. We demonstrate that, through numerical simulations of dipolar lineshapes of aromatic sidechains, their detailed dynamic profile, i.e., the motional modes, is obtained. In GB1 and LC8 the results unequivocally indicate that a number of aromatic residues are dynamic, and using quantum mechanical calculations, we correlate the molecular motions of aromatic groups to their local environment in the crystal lattice. The approach presented here is general and can be readily extended to other biological systems.

  5. A (1)H HR-MAS NMR-Based Metabolomic Study for Metabolic Characterization of Rice Grain from Various Oryza sativa L. Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun-Hye; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Jeong, Jaesik; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Han-Yong; Bang, Eunjung; Hong, Young-Shick

    2016-04-20

    Rice grain metabolites are important for better understanding of the plant physiology of various rice cultivars and thus for developing rice cultivars aimed at providing diverse processed products. However, the variation of global metabolites in rice grains has rarely been explored. Here, we report the identification of intra- or intercellular metabolites in rice (Oryza sativa L.) grain powder using a (1)H high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR-based metabolomic approach. Compared with nonwaxy rice cultivars, marked accumulation of lipid metabolites such as fatty acids, phospholipids, and glycerophosphocholine in the grains of waxy rice cultivars demonstrated the distinct metabolic regulation and adaptation of each cultivar for effective growth during future germination, which may be reflected by high levels of glutamate, aspartate, asparagine, alanine, and sucrose. Therefore, this study provides important insights into the metabolic variations of diverse rice cultivars and their associations with environmental conditions and genetic backgrounds, with the aim of facilitating efficient development and the improvement of rice grain quality through inbreeding with genetic or chemical modification and mutation.

  6. Effects of solvent concentration and composition on protein dynamics: 13C MAS NMR studies of elastin in glycerol-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Demuth, Dominik; Haase, Nils; Malzacher, Daniel; Vogel, Michael

    2015-08-01

    We use (13)C CP MAS NMR to investigate the dependence of elastin dynamics on the concentration and composition of the solvent at various temperatures. For elastin in pure glycerol, line-shape analysis shows that larger-scale fluctuations of the protein backbone require a minimum glycerol concentration of ~0.6 g/g at ambient temperature, while smaller-scale fluctuations are activated at lower solvation levels of ~0.2 g/g. Immersing elastin in various glycerol-water mixtures, we observe at room temperature that the protein mobility is higher for lower glycerol fractions in the solvent and, thus, lower solvent viscosity. When decreasing the temperature, the elastin spectra approach the line shape for the rigid protein at 245 K for all studied samples, indicating that the protein ceases to be mobile on the experimental time scale of ~10(-5) s. Our findings yield evidence for a strong coupling between elastin fluctuations and solvent dynamics and, hence, such interaction is not restricted to the case of protein-water mixtures. Spectral resolution of different carbon species reveals that the protein-solvent couplings can, however, be different for side chain and backbone units. We discuss these results against the background of the slaving model for protein dynamics.

  7. Solid-state MAS NMR, TEM, and TGA studies of structural hydroxyl groups and water in nanocrystalline apatites prepared by dry milling.

    PubMed

    Pajchel, Lukasz; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2013-01-01

    A series of nanocrystalline calcium hydroxyapatites was prepared by dry milling and characterized using proton and (31)P MAS NMR, TEM, and TGA methods. The samples contained stubby rod-shaped crystals, which length and width varied in the 130-30 and 95-20 nm ranges, respectively. It was confirmed that concentration of structural hydroxyl groups in nanocrystalline apatites decreases with the decreasing crystal size. In the series of the studied apatites, the decrease was from 86 to ca. 50 % in reference to stoichiometric apatite. Water was found in the surface hydrated layer and in the c-axis channels, in which compartments existed as adsorbed and structural, respectively. Molecules of the adsorbed water were capable of moving from the crystal surface into the lattice c-axis channels of apatite. This process introduced considerable structural disorder within and around those channels and reduced the content of the structural hydroxyl groups, particularly in the region underneath the apatite crystal surface.

  8. A sequential assignment procedure for proteins that have intermediate line widths in MAS NMR spectra: amyloid fibrils of human CA150.WW2.

    PubMed

    Becker, Johanna; Ferguson, Neil; Flinders, Jeremy; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Fersht, Alan R; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2008-08-11

    The second WW domain (WW2) of CA150, a human transcriptional activator, forms amyloid fibrils in vitro under physiological conditions. Based on experimental constraints from MAS NMR spectroscopy experiments, alanine scanning and electron microscopy, a structural model of CA150.WW2 amyloid fibrils was calculated earlier. Here, the assignment strategy is presented and suggested as a general approach for proteins that show intermediate line width. The (13)C,(13)C correlation experiments were recorded on fully or partially (13)C-labelled fibrils. The earlier (13)C assignment (26 residues) was extended to 34 of the 40 residues by direct (13)C-excitation experiments by using a deuterated sample that showed strongly improved line width. A 3D HNC-TEDOR (transferred-echo double-resonance) experiment with deuterated CA150.WW2 fibrils yielded 14 amide nitrogen and proton resonance assignments. The obtained chemical shifts were compared with the chemical shifts determined with the natively folded WW domain. TALOS (Torsion angle likelihood obtained from shift and sequence similarity) predictions confirmed that, under physiological conditions, the fibrillar form of CA150.WW2 adopts a significantly different beta structure than the native WW-domain fold.

  9. I: Low Frequency NMR and NQR Using a dc SQUID. II: Variable-temperature 13C CP/MAS of Organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegeweid, Marcia A.

    1995-11-01

    NMR and NQR at low frequencies are difficult prospects due to small nuclear spin polarization. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the inductive pickup circuitry of standard spectrometers is reduced as the frequency is lowered. I have used a cw-SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) spectrometer, which has no such frequency dependence, to study the local atomic environment of 14N via the quadrupolar interaction. Because 14N has spin I = 1 and a 0-6 MHz frequency range, it is not possible to obtain well-resolved spectra in high magnetic fields. I have used a technique to observe 14N NQR resonances via their effect on neighboring protons mediated by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction to study peptides and narcotics. The sensitivity of the SQUID is not enough to measure low-frequency surface (or other low spin density) systems. The application of spin-polarized xenon has been previously used to enhance polarization in conventional NMR experiments. Because xenon only polarizes spins with which it is in contact, it is surface selective. While differences in chemical shifts between surface and bulk spins are not large, it is expected that the differences in quadrupole coupling constant should be very large due to the drastic change of the electric field gradient surrounding spins at the surface. With this in mind, I have taken preliminary steps to measure SQUID detected polarization transfer from Xe to another spin species at 4.2 K and in small magnetic fields (<50 G). In this regime, the spin-lattice relaxation of xenon is dependent on the applied magnetic field. The results of our efforts to characterize the relaxation of xenon are presented. The final section describes the solid-state variable-temperature (VT) one- and two-dimensional 13C cross polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of Hf(η5-C5H5)21-C5H5)2, Zr

  10. Solid state {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectroscopy and conductivity measurements on NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Risskov Sørensen, Daniel; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Skou, Eivind M.

    2014-11-15

    A systematic study of composite powders of niobium oxide phosphate (NbOPO{sub 4}) and phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) has been performed in order to characterize the material's ability to perform as an electrolyte material in medium temperature fuel cells and electrolyzers. Powders of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} contents between 13.1 and 74.2 M% were produced and characterized with powder X-ray diffraction, {sup 31}P MAS NMR and impedance spectroscopy. NMR revealed that a significant degree of dehydration and vaporization of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} takes place above 200 °C, and increases with temperature. At 500 °C the NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} has reacted to form niobium pyrophosphate (Nb{sub 2}P{sub 4}O{sub 15}). Impedance spectroscopy showed an increase in conductivity with increasing acid concentration, whereas the conductivity decreased slightly with increasing temperature. The highest conductivity measured was 2.5·10{sup −3} S/cm for a sample containing 74.2 M% of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Lastly, it was shown that NbOPO{sub 4} has no significant conductivity of its own. - Graphical abstract: Conductivity of NbOPO{sub 4}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} composites as a function of equivalent P{sub 2}O{sub 5} content. The conductivity is insignificant for pure NbOPO{sub 4}. - Highlights: • Composites have been made from NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. • The composites composition has been investigated with solid state NMR. • The composites have shown clear signs of acid dehydration upon heating. • The conductivity of the composites increases for increasing acid content. • NbOPO{sub 4} has no significant conductivity of its own.

  11. A bisphosphonate for 19F-magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Gavin D.; Shaw, Karen P.; Sivachelvam, Saranja; White, Andrew J.P.; Botnar, Rene M.; T.M. de Rosales, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    19F-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising technique that may allow us to measure the concentration of exogenous fluorinated imaging probes quantitatively in vivo. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterisation of a novel geminal bisphosphonate (19F-BP) that contains chemically-equivalent fluorine atoms that show a single and narrow 19F resonance and a bisphosphonate group that may be used for labelling inorganic materials based in calcium phosphates and metal oxides. The potential of 19F-BP to provide contrast was analysed in vitro and in vivo using 19F-MRI. In vitro studies demonstrated the potential of 19F-BP as an MRI contrast agent in the millimolar concentration range with signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) comparable to previously reported fluorinated probes. The preliminary in vivo MRI study reported here allowed us to visualise the biodistribution of 19F-BP, showing uptake in the liver and in the bladder/urinary system areas. However, bone uptake was not observed. In addition, 19F-BP showed undesirable toxicity effects in mice that prevent further studies with this compound at the required concentrations for MRI contrast. This study highlights the importance of developing 19F MRI probes with the highest signal intensity achievable. PMID:27110036

  12. Fluorinated Carbohydrates as Lectin Ligands: 19F-Based Direct STD Monitoring for Detection of Anomeric Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, João P.; Diercks, Tammo; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Cañada, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of the binding of reducing carbohydrates present as mixtures of anomers in solution to a sugar recepor (lectin) poses severe difficulties. In this situation, NMR spectroscopy enables the observation of signals for each anomer in the mixture by applying approaches based on ligand observation. Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR allows fast and efficient screening of compound mixtures for reactivity to a receptor. Owing to the exceptionally favorable properties of 19F in NMR spectroscopy and the often complex 1H spectra of carbohydrates, 19F-containing sugars have the potential to be turned into versatile sensors for recognition. Extending the recently established 1H → 1H STDre19F-NMR technique, we here demonstrate its applicability to measure anomeric selectivity of binding in a model system using the plant lectin concanavalin A (ConA) and 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-mannose. Indeed, it is also possible to account for the mutual inhibition between the anomers on binding to the lectin by means of a kinetic model. The monitoring of 19F-NMR signal perturbation disclosed the relative activities of the anomers in solution and thus enabled the calculation of their binding affinity towards ConA. The obtained data show a preference for the α anomer that increases with temperature. This experimental approach can be extended to others systems of biomedical interest by testing human lectins with suitably tailored glycan derivatives. PMID:26580665

  13. Investigation of organic condensed phoshates: Synthesis and structural characterization by 31P MAS NMR and X-ray diffraction of the 3-phenylpropylamonium cyclohexaphosphate dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlel, F.; Thouvenot, R.; Smiri, L.

    2005-05-01

    Preparation, crystal structure and infra-red absorption spectra are reported for a new organic salt of the cyclohexaphosphate, [C6H5(CH2)3NH3]6P6O18 . 2 H2O. The new compound crystallizes in the triclinic system (P space group) with Z = 2 and the following unit cell dimensions: a = 10.528(3), b = 19.183(2), c = 9.839(3) Å, = 74.92(5), = 117.48(6) and = 99.90(5)°. The structure was solved by using 6709 independent reflections down to R value of 0.039. The ring anion exhibits internal symmetry. Its main geometrical features are those commonly observed in the atomic arrangements of cyclohexaphosphates. The three dimensional cohesion of this atomic arrangement is maintained through H-bonds between organic cations, water molecules and the external oxygen atoms of the P6O18-6 ring. The H-bond interactions induce local distortions of the ring leading to the existence of three different types of phosphate tetrahedra.Solid-state 31P magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR), performed at 162 MHz shows three isotropic resonances at -19.8, -22.6 and -24.5 ppm, confirming the non-equivalence of the three PO4 groups. They are characterized by different chemical shift tensor parameters, which are in agreement with the local geometrical features of the tetrahedra.

  14. Structural investigations of silicate-phosphate glasses containing MoO3 by FTIR, Raman and 31P MAS NMR spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumera, Magdalena

    2014-09-01

    Molybdenum is a transition metal (refers to the “d” block of the periodic table) whose atom has an incomplete d sub-shell. It is known that in silicate glasses molybdenum may exist under four oxidation states: Mo6+, Mo5+, Mo4+ and Mo3+, simultaneously molybdenum cations, depending on their content in the glass network, may either be a glass forming component, or act as a modifier. The contemporary literature data show studies conducted mostly on the structure of silicate, phosphate, borate and borosilicate glasses containing molybdenum ions, but not silicate-phosphate glasses. Therefore, the author has undertaken detailed studies using FTIR, Raman and 31P MAS NMR techniques in order to examine the effect of MoO3 addition into the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses from SiO2sbnd P2O5sbnd K2Osbnd CaOsbnd MgO system. On the basis of obtained results it was concluded that molybdenum ions in the analysed glasses act as a modifier, which follows from the gradual breakage of oxygen bridges, i.e. Psbnd Osbnd P, Sisbnd Osbnd Si, and Sisbnd Osbnd P, and the following formation of connections such as Mo[MoO4]sbnd Osbnd Si and/or Mo[MoO4]sbnd Osbnd P. In summary, it is concluded that the increase of MoO3 content (up to 4.4 mol.%) in the structure of glasses of SiO2sbnd P2O5sbnd K2Osbnd MgOsbnd CaO system results in weakening of the structure and gradual increase of the degree of silico-oxygen and phosphor-oxygen frameworks depolymerisation.

  15. Structural investigations of silicate-phosphate glasses containing MoO3 by FTIR, Raman and 31P MAS NMR spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Szumera, M

    2014-09-15

    Molybdenum is a transition metal (refers to the "d" block of the periodic table) whose atom has an incomplete d sub-shell. It is known that in silicate glasses molybdenum may exist under four oxidation states: Mo6+, Mo5+, Mo4+ and Mo3+, simultaneously molybdenum cations, depending on their content in the glass network, may either be a glass forming component, or act as a modifier. The contemporary literature data show studies conducted mostly on the structure of silicate, phosphate, borate and borosilicate glasses containing molybdenum ions, but not silicate-phosphate glasses. Therefore, the author has undertaken detailed studies using FTIR, Raman and 31P MAS NMR techniques in order to examine the effect of MoO3 addition into the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses from SiO2P2O5K2OCaOMgO system. On the basis of obtained results it was concluded that molybdenum ions in the analysed glasses act as a modifier, which follows from the gradual breakage of oxygen bridges, i.e. POP, SiOSi, and SiOP, and the following formation of connections such as Mo[MoO4]OSi and/or Mo[MoO4]OP. In summary, it is concluded that the increase of MoO3 content (up to 4.4 mol.%) in the structure of glasses of SiO2P2O5K2OMgOCaO system results in weakening of the structure and gradual increase of the degree of silico-oxygen and phosphor-oxygen frameworks depolymerisation.

  16. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  17. Investigation of relative metabolic changes in the organs and plasma of rats exposed to X-ray radiation using HR-MAS (1)H NMR and solution (1)H NMR.

    PubMed

    Jang, Won Gyo; Park, Ju Yeon; Lee, Jueun; Bang, Eunjung; Kim, So Ra; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Yun, Hyun Jin; Kang, Chang-Mo; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2016-04-01

    Excess exposure to ionizing radiation generates reactive oxygen species and increases the cellular inflammatory response by modifying various metabolic pathways. However, an investigation of metabolic perturbations and organ-specific responses based on the amount of radiation during the acute phase has not been conducted. In this study, high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HR-MAS) NMR and solution NMR-based metabolic profiling were used to investigate dose-dependent metabolic changes in multiple organs and tissues--including the jejunum, spleen, liver, and plasma--of rats exposed to X-ray radiation. The organs, tissues, and blood samples were obtained 24, 48, and 72 h after exposure to low-dose (2 Gy) and high-dose (6 Gy) X-ray radiation and subjected to metabolite profiling and multivariate analyses. The results showed the time course of the metabolic responses, and many significant changes were detected in the high-dose compared with the low-dose group. Metabolites with antioxidant properties showed acute responses in the jejunum and spleen after radiation exposure. The levels of metabolites related to lipid and protein metabolism were decreased in the jejunum. In addition, amino acid levels increased consistently at all post-irradiation time points as a consequence of activated protein breakdown. Consistent with these changes, plasma levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate metabolites decreased. The liver did not appear to undergo remarkable metabolic changes after radiation exposure. These results may provide insight into the major metabolic perturbations and mechanisms of the biological systems in response to pathophysiological damage caused by X-ray radiation.

  18. Modeling Ti/Ge Distribution in LiTi2-xGex(PO4)3 NASICON Series by (31)P MAS NMR and First-Principles DFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Diez-Gómez, Virginia; Arbi, Kamel; Sanz, Jesús

    2016-08-03

    Ti/Ge distribution in rhombohedral LiTi2-xGex(PO4)3 NASICON series has been analyzed by (31)P magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Nuclear magnetic resonance is an excellent probe to follow Ti/Ge disorder, as it is sensitive to the atomic scale environment without long-range periodicity requirements. In the samples considered here, PO4 units are surrounded by four Ti/Ge octahedra, and then, five different components ascribed to P(OTi)4, P(OTi)3(OGe), P(OTi)2(OGe)2, P(OTi)(OGe)3, and P(OGe)4 environments are expected in (31)P MAS NMR spectra of R3̅c NASICON samples. However, (31)P MAS NMR spectra of analyzed series display a higher number of signals, suggesting that, although the overall symmetry remains R3̅c, partial substitution causes a local decrement in symmetry. With the aid of first-principles DFT calculations, 10 detected (31)P NMR signals have been assigned to different Ti4-nGen arrangements in the R3 subgroup symmetry. In this assignment, the influence of octahedra of the same or different R2(PO4)3 structural units has been considered. The influence of bond distances, angles and atom charges on (31)P NMR chemical shieldings has been discussed. Simulation of the LiTi2-xGex(PO4)3 series suggests that detection of 10 P environments is mainly due to the existence of two oxygen types, O1 and O2, whose charges are differently affected by Ge and Ti occupation of octahedra. From the quantitative analysis of detected components, a random Ti/Ge distribution has been deduced in next nearest neighbor (NNN) sites that surround tetrahedral PO4 units. This random distribution was supported by XRD data displaying Vegard's law.

  19. GET-SERF, a new gradient encoded SERF experiment for the trivial edition of 1H-19F couplings.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Maria Enrica; Aroulanda, Christie; Merlet, Denis

    2013-09-01

    A new spatially encoded heteronuclear (1)H-(19)F selective refocusing NMR experiment (GET-SERF) is proposed. This sequence allows editing in one single 2D experiment all couplings between a selected fluorine site and all the proton nuclei of the molecule. Its efficiency is illustrated in the case of diflunisal, a difluorinated anti-inflammatory drug, in isotropic and anisotropic media.

  20. Injectable hyaluronic acid hydrogel for 19F magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xia; Sun, Yi; Kootala, Sujit; Hilborn, Jöns; Heerschap, Arend; Ossipov, Dmitri

    2014-09-22

    We report on a 19F labeled injectable hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel that can be monitored by both 1H and 19F MR imaging. The HA based hydrogel formed via carbazone reaction can be obtained within a minute by simple mixing of HA-carbazate and HA-aldehyde derivatized polymers. 19F contrast agent was linked to with carbazate and thiol dually functionalized HA via orthogonal Michael addition reaction which afforded cross-linkable and 19F labeled HA. The 19F labeling of HA polymer did not affect the mechanical properties of the formed hydrogel. As a result, the shape of a hydrogel sample could be imaged very well by both 1H MRI and high resolution 19F MRI. This hydrogel has high potential in clinical applications since it is injectable, biocompatible, and can be tracked in a minimally invasive manner. The present approach can be applied in preparation of injectable 19F labeled hydrogel biomaterials from other natural biomacromolecules.

  1. Novel fluorinated ligands for gold nanoparticle labelling with applications in (19)F-MRI.

    PubMed

    Michelena, Olatz; Padro, Daniel; Carrillo-Carrión, Carolina; Del Pino, Pablo; Blanco, Jorge; Arnaiz, Blanca; Parak, Wolfgang J; Carril, Mónica

    2017-02-21

    Novel fluorinated ligands for gold nanoparticle labelling have been designed and synthesised. Several types of gold nanoparticles have been prepared in the presence of these fluorinated ligands alone, or in combination with non-fluorinated ligands. Their colloidal stability in water and other solvents was tested and the magnetic resonance properties of the so-obtained nanoparticles were also assessed in detail. (1)H and (19)F-NMR spectra were evaluated and MRI phantoms of the most promising nanoparticles were successfully measured in (19)F-MRI. The MRI signal to noise ratio was related to the fluorine concentration and compared with ICP-MS data to correlate the real concentration of fluorine grafted onto the nanoparticles with the actually active fluorine in MRI.

  2. Fluorinated polyurethane scaffolds for 19F magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Khosrow; Shi, Yang; Schulz, Volkmar; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Kiessling, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    Polymers are increasingly employed in implant materials. To reduce the incidence of complications, which in the case of vascular grafts include incorrect placement and restenosis, materials are needed which allow for image-guided implantation, as well as for accurate and efficient postoperative implant imaging. We here describe amorphous fluorinated polymers based on thermoplastic polyurethane (19F-TPU), and show that are useful starting materials for developing tissue-engineered vascular grafts which can be detected using 19F MRI.

  3. Investigating the Surface Structure of γ-Al 2 O 3 Supported WO X Catalysts by High Field 27 Al MAS NMR and Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Chuan; Hu, Mary Y.; Jaegers, Nicholas R.; Shi, Dachuan; Wang, Huamin; Gao, Feng; Qin, Zhaohai; Wang, Yong; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2016-10-13

    The metal-support interaction in γ-Al2O3 supported WOX catalysts is investigated by a combination of high field quantitative single pulse (SP) 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy, 2D MQMAS, 1H-27Al CP/MAS, and electronic structure calculations. NMR allows the observation of at least seven different Al sites, including a pentahedral Al site, three different tetrahedral Al sites, and three octahedral Al sites. It is found that the penta-coordinated Al (AlP) site density decreases monotonically with an increased WOX loading while the octahedral Al (AlO) site density increases concurrently. This suggests that the Alp sites are the preferred surface anchoring positions for the WOX species. Importantly, the AlP site isotropic chemical shift observed for the unsupported γ-Al2O3 at about 38 ppm migrates into the octahedral region with a new isotropic chemical shift value appearing near 7 ppm when the Alp site is anchored by WOX species. Density functional theory (DFT) computational modeling of the NMR parameters on proposed cluster models is carried out to accurately interpret the dramatic chemical shift changes from which the detailed anchoring mechanisms are obtained. It is found that tungsten dimers and monomers are the preferred supported surface species on γ-Al2O3, wherein one monomeric and several dimeric structures are identified as the most likely surface anchoring structures.

  4. Clonal distribution of pneumococcal serotype 19F isolates from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sparding, Nadja; Dayie, Nicholas T K D; Mills, Richael O; Newman, Mercy J; Dalsgaard, Anders; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Slotved, Hans-Christian

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Pneumococcal strains are classified according to their capsular polysaccharide and more than 90 different serotypes are currently known. In this project, three distinct groups of pneumococcal carriage isolates from Ghana were investigated; isolates from healthy children in Tamale and isolates from both healthy and children attending the outpatient department at a hospital in Accra. The isolates were previously identified and characterized by Gram staining, serotyping and susceptibility to penicillin. In this study, isolates of the common serotype 19F were further investigated by Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST). Overall, 14 different Sequence Types (STs) were identified by MLST, of which nine were novel based on the international MLST database. Two clones within serotype 19F seem to circulate in Ghana, a known ST (ST 4194) and a novel ST (ST 9090). ST 9090 was only found in healthy children in Accra, whereas ST 4194 was found equally in all children studied. In the MLST database, other isolates of ST 4194 were also associated with serotype 19F, and these isolates came from other West African countries. The majority of isolates were penicillin intermediate resistant. In conclusion, two clones within serotype 19F were found to be dominating in pneumococcal carriage in Accra and Tamale in Ghana. Furthermore, it seems as though the clonal distribution of serotype 19F may be different from what is currently known in Ghana in that many new clones were identified. This supports the importance of continued monitoring of pneumococcal carriage in Ghana and elsewhere when vaccines, e.g., PCV-13, have been introduced to monitor the possible future spread of antimicrobial resistant clones.

  5. Probing Oxide-Ion Mobility in the Mixed Ionic-Electronic Conductor La2NiO4+δ by Solid-State (17)O MAS NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Halat, David M; Dervişoğlu, Rıza; Kim, Gunwoo; Dunstan, Matthew T; Blanc, Frédéric; Middlemiss, Derek S; Grey, Clare P

    2016-09-14

    While solid-state NMR spectroscopic techniques have helped clarify the local structure and dynamics of ionic conductors, similar studies of mixed ionic-electronic conductors (MIECs) have been hampered by the paramagnetic behavior of these systems. Here we report high-resolution (17)O (I = 5/2) solid-state NMR spectra of the mixed-conducting solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode material La2NiO4+δ, a paramagnetic transition-metal oxide. Three distinct oxygen environments (equatorial, axial, and interstitial) can be assigned on the basis of hyperfine (Fermi contact) shifts and quadrupolar nutation behavior, aided by results from periodic DFT calculations. Distinct structural distortions among the axial sites, arising from the nonstoichiometric incorporation of interstitial oxygen, can be resolved by advanced magic angle turning and phase-adjusted sideband separation (MATPASS) NMR experiments. Finally, variable-temperature spectra reveal the onset of rapid interstitial oxide motion and exchange with axial sites at ∼130 °C, associated with the reported orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition of La2NiO4+δ. From the variable-temperature spectra, we develop a model of oxide-ion dynamics on the spectral time scale that accounts for motional differences of all distinct oxygen sites. Though we treat La2NiO4+δ as a model system for a combined paramagnetic (17)O NMR and DFT methodology, the approach presented herein should prove applicable to MIECs and other functionally important paramagnetic oxides.

  6. Probing Oxide-Ion Mobility in the Mixed Ionic–Electronic Conductor La2NiO4+δ by Solid-State 17O MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    While solid-state NMR spectroscopic techniques have helped clarify the local structure and dynamics of ionic conductors, similar studies of mixed ionic–electronic conductors (MIECs) have been hampered by the paramagnetic behavior of these systems. Here we report high-resolution 17O (I = 5/2) solid-state NMR spectra of the mixed-conducting solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode material La2NiO4+δ, a paramagnetic transition-metal oxide. Three distinct oxygen environments (equatorial, axial, and interstitial) can be assigned on the basis of hyperfine (Fermi contact) shifts and quadrupolar nutation behavior, aided by results from periodic DFT calculations. Distinct structural distortions among the axial sites, arising from the nonstoichiometric incorporation of interstitial oxygen, can be resolved by advanced magic angle turning and phase-adjusted sideband separation (MATPASS) NMR experiments. Finally, variable-temperature spectra reveal the onset of rapid interstitial oxide motion and exchange with axial sites at ∼130 °C, associated with the reported orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition of La2NiO4+δ. From the variable-temperature spectra, we develop a model of oxide-ion dynamics on the spectral time scale that accounts for motional differences of all distinct oxygen sites. Though we treat La2NiO4+δ as a model system for a combined paramagnetic 17O NMR and DFT methodology, the approach presented herein should prove applicable to MIECs and other functionally important paramagnetic oxides. PMID:27538437

  7. Design and Synthesis of Fluorinated Amphiphile as (19)F MRI/Fluorescence Dual-Imaging Agent by Tuning the Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Bo, Shaowei; Song, Cong; Li, Yu; Yu, Weijiang; Chen, Shizhen; Zhou, Xin; Yang, Zhigang; Zheng, Xing; Jiang, Zhong-Xing

    2015-06-19

    Both (19)F MRI and optical imaging are powerful noninvasive molecular imaging modalities in biomedical applications. To integrate these two complementary imaging modalities, the design and synthesis of a novel (19)F MRI/fluorescence dual-modal imaging agent is reported herein. Through Sonogashira coupling reaction between the fluorinated phenylacetylene and 1,2,4,5-tetraiodobenzene, a fluorophore with 48 symmetrical fluorines at its periphery was constructed with high efficacy. High aqueous solubility was achieved by PEGylation of the fluorophore with monodisperse PEGs. However, an unexpected self-assembly of the PEGylated amphiphilic fluorophore in water "turned off" the (19)F NMR signal. However, hydrogenation of the triple bonds or introduction of branched monodisperse PEGs was able to efficiently tune the self-assembly, resulting in the "turning on" of the (19)F NMR signal. One of these amphiphiles combines the advantages of label-free fluorescence, high (19)F MRI sensitivity, biocompatibility, and excellent aqueous solubility. The results demonstrate the great potential of such amphiphiles for real-time (19)F MRI and fluorescence dual-modality imaging.

  8. 13C and 15N—Chemical Shift Anisotropy of Ampicillin and Penicillin-V Studied by 2D-PASS and CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Lee, Young K.; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1998-11-01

    The principal values of the chemical shift tensors of all13C and15N sites in two antibiotics, ampicillin and penicillin-V, were determined by 2-dimensionalphaseadjustedspinningsideband (2D-PASS) and conventional CP/MAS experiments. The13C and15N chemical shift anisotropies (CSA), and their confidence limits, were evaluated using a Mathematica program. The CSA values suggest a revised assignment of the 2-methyl13C sites in the case of ampicillin. We speculate on a relationship between the chemical shift principal values of many of the13C and15N sites and the β-lactam ring conformation.

  9. Dual 19F/1H MR gene reporter molecules for in vivo detection of β-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Xin; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Hallac, Rami R.; Liu, Li; Mason, Ralph P.

    2012-01-01

    Increased emphasis on personalized medicine and novel therapies require the development of non-invasive strategies for assessing biochemistry in vivo. The detection of enzyme activity and gene expression in vivo is potentially important for the characterization of diseases and gene therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a particularly promising tool since it is non-invasive, and has no associated radioactivity, yet penetrates deep tissue. We now demonstrate a novel class of dual 1H/19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lacZ gene reporter molecule to specifically reveal enzyme activity in human tumor xenografts growing in mice. We report the design, synthesis, and characterization of six novel molecules and evaluation of the most effective reporter in mice in vivo. Substrates show a single 19F NMR signal and exposure to β-galactosidase induces a large 19F NMR chemical shift response. In the presence of ferric ions the liberated aglycone generates intense proton MRI T2 contrast. The dual modality approach allows both the detection of substrate and imaging of product enhancing the confidence in enzyme detection. PMID:22352428

  10. The Local Structural State of Aluminosilicate Garnet Solid Solutions: An Investigation of Grospydite Garnet from the Roberts Victor Kimberlite Using Paramagnetically Shifted 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, C. A.; Palke, A. C.; Stebbins, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Most rock-forming silicates are substitutional solid solutions. Over the years extensive research has been done to determine their structural and crystal chemical properties. Here, the distribution of cations, or order-disorder behavior, is of central importance. In the case of aluminosilicate garnet solid solutions (X3Al2Si3O12 with X = Mg, Fe2+, Mn2+ and Ca) it has been shown that both synthetic and natural crystals have random long-range X-cation disorder in space group Ia-3d, as given by X-ray single-crystal diffraction measurements. However, the structural state of natural garnets at the local scale is not known. Garnet from a grospydite xenolith from the Roberts Victor kimberlite, South Africa, was studied by 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy. The research thrust was placed on measuring and analyzing paramagnetically shifted resonances to determine the local (short range) structural state of the X-cations in a grossular-rich ternary aluminosilicate garnet solid solution. The garnet crystals are compositionally homogeneous based on microprobe analysis, showing no measurable zoning, and have the formula Grs46.7Prp30.0Alm23.3. The garnet is cubic with the standard garnet space group Ia-3d. The 27Al MAS NMR spectrum shows a very broad asymmetric resonance located between about 100 and -50 ppm. It consists of a number of individual overlapping paramagnetically shifted resonances, which are difficult to analyze quantitatively. The 29Si MAS NMR spectrum, showing better resolution, has two observable resonances termed S0 and S4. S0 is located between about -60 ppm and -160 ppm and S4 is centered at roughly 95 ppm. Both S0 and S4 are composite resonances in nature containing many overlapping individual peaks. S0 contains information on local cation configurations whereby an isolated SiO4 group in the garnet structure does not have an edge-shared Fe2+-containing dodecahedron. S4 involves local configurations where there is one edge-shared dodecahedron containing Fe2

  11. Efficient polarization transfer between spin-1/2 and ¹⁴N nuclei in solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Basse, Kristoffer; Jain, Sheetal Kumar; Bakharev, Oleg; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2014-07-01

    Polarization transfer between spin-1/2 nuclei and quadrupolar spin-1 nuclei such as (14)N in solid-state NMR is severely challenged by the typical presence of large quadrupole coupling interactions. This has effectively prevented the use of the abundant (14)N spin as a probe to structural information and its use as an element in multi-dimensional solid-state NMR correlation experiments for assignment and structural characterization. In turn, this has been a contributing factor to the extensive use of isotope labeling in biological solid-state NMR, where (14)N is replaced with (15)N. The alternative strategy of using the abundant (14)N spins calls for methods enabling efficient polarization transfer between (14)N and its binding partners. This work demonstrates that the recently introduced (RESPIRATION)CP transfer method can be optimized to achieve efficient (1)H ↔(14)N polarization transfer under magic angle spinning conditions. The method is demonstrated numerically and experimentally on powder samples of NH4NO3 and L-alanine.

  12. Fluorine (19F) MRS and MRI in biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Barnett, Brad P.; Bottomley, Paul A.; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Shortly after the introduction of 1H MRI, fluorinated molecules were tested as MR-detectable tracers or contrast agents. Many fluorinated compounds, which are nontoxic and chemically inert, are now being used in a broad range of biomedical applications, including anesthetics, chemotherapeutic agents, and molecules with high oxygen solubility for respiration and blood substitution. These compounds can be monitored by fluorine (19F) MRI and/or MRS, providing a noninvasive means to interrogate associated functions in biological systems. As a result of the lack of endogenous fluorine in living organisms, 19F MRI of ‘hotspots’ of targeted fluorinated contrast agents has recently opened up new research avenues in molecular and cellular imaging. This includes the specific targeting and imaging of cellular surface epitopes, as well as MRI cell tracking of endogenous macrophages, injected immune cells and stem cell transplants. PMID:20842758

  13. Characterization of the ground X{sub 1} state of {sup 204}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 206}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F, and {sup 208}Pb{sup 19}F

    SciTech Connect

    Mawhorter, Richard J.; Murphy, Benjamin S.; Baum, Alexander L.; Sears, Trevor J.; Yang, T.; Rupasinghe, P. M; McRaven, C. P.; Shafer-Ray, N. E.; Alphei, Lukas D.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2011-08-15

    Pure rotational spectra of the ground electronic-vibrational X{sub 1} state of {sup 204}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 206}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F, and {sup 208}Pb{sup 19}F are measured with a resonator pulsed supersonic jet Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer. Also reported is a new measurement of the Stark effect on the optical spectra of A(leftarrow)X{sub 1} transitions. These spectra are combined with published high-resolution infrared spectra of X{sub 2}{r_reversible}X{sub 1} transitions in order to create a complete picture of the ground state of lead monofluoride. For the microwave data, molecules are prepared by laser ablation of lead target rods and stabilized in a supersonic jet of neon mixed with sulfur hexafluoride. For the optical Stark spectra, a continuous source of molecules is created in a nozzle heated to 1000 deg. C. The microwave spectra confirm, improve, and extend previously reported constants that describe the rotational, spin-orbit, and hyperfine interactions of the ground electronic state of the PbF molecule. A discrepancy concerning the sign of the hyperfine constant describing the {sup 207}Pb nucleus is discussed. Magnetic-field-dependent microwave spectra are used to characterize the Zeeman interaction in terms of two g factors of the body-fixed electronic wave function. The optical Stark spectra are used to characterize the electric dipole moment of the X{sub 1} and A states.

  14. Carbonation of C–S–H and C–A–S–H samples studied by {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2015-05-15

    Synthesized calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) samples with Ca/Si ratios of 0.66, 1.0, and 1.5 have been exposed to atmospheric CO{sub 2} at room temperature and high relative humidity and studied after one to 12 weeks. {sup 29}Si NMR reveals that the decomposition of C–S–H caused by carbonation involves two steps and that the decomposition rate decreases with increasing Ca/Si ratio. The first step is a gradual decalcification of the C–S–H where calcium is removed from the interlayer and defect sites in the silicate chains until Ca/Si = 0.67 is reached, ideally corresponding to infinite silicate chains. In the seconds step, calcium from the principal layers is consumed, resulting in the final decomposition of the C–S–H and the formation of an amorphous silica phase composed of Q{sup 3} and Q{sup 4} silicate tetrahedra. The amount of solid carbonates and of carbonate ions in a hydrous environment increases with increasing Ca/Si ratio for the C–S–H, as shown by {sup 13}C NMR. For C–A–S–H samples with Ca/Si = 1.0 and 1.5, {sup 27}Al NMR demonstrates that all aluminium sites associated with the C–S–H are consumed during the carbonation reactions and incorporated mainly as tetrahedral Al(–OSi){sub 4} units in the amorphous silica phase. A small amount of penta-coordinated Al sites has also been identified in the silica phase.

  15. An infrared and 1H MAS NMR investigation of strong hydrogen bonding in ussingite, Na2AlSi3O8(OH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. A.; Rossman, G. R.

    The mineral ussingite, Na2AlSi3O8(OH), an ``interrupted'' tectosilicate, has strong hydrogen bonding between OH and the other nonbridging oxygen atom in the structure. Infrared spectra contain a strongly polarized, very broad OH-stretching band with an ill-defined maximum between 1500 and 1800 cm-1, and a possible OH librational bending mode at 1295 cm-1. The IR spectra confirm the orientation of the OH vector within the triclinic unit cell as determined from X-ray refinement (Rossi et al. 1974). There are three distinct bands in the 1H NMR spectrum of ussingite: a predominant band at 13.5 ppm (TMS) representing 90% of the structural hydrogen, a second band at 15.9 ppm corresponding to 8% of the protons, and a third band at 11.0 ppm accounting for the remaining 2% of structural hydrogen. From the correlation between hydrogen bond length and 1H NMR chemical shift (Sternberg and Brunner 1994), the predominant hydrogen bond length (H...O) was calculated to be 1.49 Å, in comparison to the hydrogen bond length determined from X-ray refinement (1.54 Å). The population of protons at 15.9 ppm is consistent with 5-8% Al-Si disorder. Although the ussingite crystal structure and composition are similar to those of low albite, the bonding environment of OH in low albite and other feldspars, as characterized through IR and 1H NMR, is fundamentally different from the strong hydrogen bonding found in ussingite.

  16. Spin-transfer pathways in paramagnetic lithium transition-metal phosphates from combined broadband isotropic solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Clément, Raphaële J; Pell, Andrew J; Middlemiss, Derek S; Strobridge, Fiona C; Miller, Joel K; Whittingham, M Stanley; Emsley, Lyndon; Grey, Clare P; Pintacuda, Guido

    2012-10-17

    Substituted lithium transition-metal (TM) phosphate LiFe(x)Mn(1-x)PO(4) materials with olivine-type structures are among the most promising next generation lithium ion battery cathodes. However, a complete atomic-level description of the structure of such phases is not yet available. Here, a combined experimental and theoretical approach to the detailed assignment of the (31)P NMR spectra of the LiFe(x)Mn(1-x)PO(4) (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1) pure and mixed TM phosphates is developed and applied. Key to the present work is the development of a new NMR experiment enabling the characterization of complex paramagnetic materials via the complete separation of the individual isotropic chemical shifts, along with solid-state hybrid DFT calculations providing the separate hyperfine contributions of all distinct Mn-O-P and Fe-O-P bond pathways. The NMR experiment, referred to as aMAT, makes use of short high-powered adiabatic pulses (SHAPs), which can achieve 100% inversion over a range of isotropic shifts on the order of 1 MHz and with anisotropies greater than 100 kHz. In addition to complete spectral assignments of the mixed phases, the present study provides a detailed insight into the differences in electronic structure driving the variations in hyperfine parameters across the range of materials. A simple model delimiting the effects of distortions due to Mn/Fe substitution is also proposed and applied. The combined approach has clear future applications to TM-bearing battery cathode phases in particular and for the understanding of complex paramagnetic phases in general.

  17. Interface Induced Growth and Transformation of Polymer-Conjugated Proto-Crystalline Phases in Aluminosilicate Hybrids: A Multiple-Quantum (23)Na-(23)Na MAS NMR Correlation Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Brus, Jiri; Kobera, Libor; Urbanova, Martina; Doušová, Barbora; Lhotka, Miloslav; Koloušek, David; Kotek, Jiří; Čuba, Pavel; Czernek, Jiri; Dědeček, Jiří

    2016-03-22

    Nanostructured materials typically offer enhanced physicochemical properties because of their large interfacial area. In this contribution, we present a comprehensive structural characterization of aluminosilicate hybrids with polymer-conjugated nanosized zeolites specifically grown at the organic-inorganic interface. The inorganic amorphous Al-O-Si framework is formed by alkali-activated low-temperature transformation of metakaoline, whereas simultaneous copolymerization of organic comonomers creates a secondary epoxide network covalently bound to the aluminosilicate matrix. This secondary epoxide phase not only enhances the mechanical integrity of the resulting hybrids but also introduces additional binding sites accessible for compensating negative charge on the aluminosilicate framework. This way, the polymer network initiates growth and subsequent transformation of protocrystalline short-range ordered zeolite domains that are located at the organic-inorganic interface. By applying an experimental approach based on 2D (23)Na-(23)Na double-quantum (DQ) MAS NMR spectroscopy, we discovered multiple sodium binding sites in these protocrystalline domains, in which immobilized Na(+) ions form pairs or small clusters. It is further demonstrated that these sites, the local geometry of which allows for the pairing of sodium ions, are preferentially occupied by Pb(2+) ions during the ion exchange. The proposed synthesis protocol thus allows for the preparation of a novel type of geopolymer hybrids with polymer-conjugated zeolite phases suitable for capturing and storage of metal cations. The demonstrated (23)Na-(23)Na DQ MAS NMR combined with DFT calculations represents a suitable approach for understanding the role of Na(+) ions in aluminositicate solids and related inorganic-organic hybrids, particularly their specific arrangement and clustering at interfacial areas.

  18. Stoichiometric compounds of magnesium dichloride with ethanol for the supported Ziegler-Natta catalysis: first recognition and multidimensional MAS NMR study.

    PubMed

    Sozzani, Piero; Bracco, Silvia; Comotti, Angiolina; Simonutti, Roberto; Camurati, Isabella

    2003-10-22

    Ethanol associates easily with MgCl(2) to form adducts of complex architecture, but until now available characterization methods have failed to identify the pure stoichiometric compounds and their structures. To remedy this, we set about applying homonuclear and heteronuclear 2D correlated solid-state NMR spectroscopy to identify the pure compounds and the ethanol-to-magnesium coordination pattern. High spinning speed and Lee-Goldburg sequences were able to reduce the hydrogen spin-diffusion and homonuclear coupling in the crystalline solid, thus achieving high resolution also in the hydrogen domain. On this basis, the pure adducts, of interest as catalyst supports for Ziegler-Natta polymerization, were isolated for the first time. Magnesium coordination sites with given numbers of ligands and their multiplicity in the crystal cells were determined in the new-found stoichiometric complexes. Variable temperature and 2D carbon-carbon exchange NMR, as well as relaxation times in the fast motion regime, revealed the disordering phenomena generated by ethanol dynamics in the crystal. Decoding the intriguing polymorphism of the precursors permits to trace the genealogy of tailored MgCl(2) titanate granules, active as highly productive catalysts for the stereospecific polymerization of olefins.

  19. Insight into hydrogen bonding of uranyl hydroxide layers and capsules by use of 1H magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy [Insight into the hydrogen bonding for uranyl hydroxides using 1H MAS NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd M.; Liao, Zuolei; Nyman, May; Yates, Jonathan

    2016-04-27

    Solid-state 1H magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR was used to investigate local proton environments in anhydrous [UO2(OH)2] (α-UOH) and hydrated uranyl hydroxide [(UO2)4O(OH)6·5H2O (metaschoepite). For the metaschoepite material, proton resonances of the μ2-OH hydroxyl and interlayer waters were resolved, with two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum (DQ) 1H–1H NMR correlation experiments revealing strong dipolar interactions between these different proton species. The experimental NMR results were combined with first-principles CASTEP GIPAW (gauge including projector-augmented wave) chemical shift calculations to develop correlations between hydrogen-bond strength and observed 1H NMR chemical shifts. Furthermore, these NMR correlations allowed characterization of local hydrogen-bond environments in uranyl U24 capsules and of changes in hydrogen bonding that occurred during thermal dehydration of metaschoepite.

  20. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  1. Nickel(II) complexes of N-CH2CF3 cyclam derivatives as contrast agents for (19)F magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Blahut, Jan; Hermann, Petr; Gálisová, Andrea; Herynek, Vít; Císařová, Ivana; Tošner, Zdeněk; Kotek, Jan

    2016-01-14

    Kinetically inert Ni(ii) complexes of N(1),N(8)-bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)cyclams with hydrogen atoms or phosphonic acid groups in the N(4),N(11)-positions show significant (19)F NMR relaxation rate enhancement useful for 19-fluorine MRI imaging.

  2. Magic angle Lee-Goldburg frequency offset irradiation improves the efficiency and selectivity of SPECIFIC-CP in triple-resonance MAS solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin H; De Angelis, Anna A; Opella, Stanley J

    2014-09-01

    The efficiency and selectivity of SPECIFIC-CP, a widely used method for selective double cross-polarization in triple-resonance magic angle spinning solid-state NMR, is improved by performing the tangential-shaped (13)C irradiation at an offset frequency that meets the Lee-Goldburg condition (LG-SPECIFIC-CP). This is demonstrated on polycrystalline samples of uniformly (13)C, (15)N labeled N-acetyl-leucine and N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-OH (MLF) at 700MHz and 900MHz (1)H resonance frequencies, respectively. For the single (13)Cα of N-acetyl-leucine, relative to conventional broad band cross-polarization, the SPECIFIC-CP signal has 47% of the intensity. Notably, the LG-SPECIFIC-CP signal has 72% of the intensity, essentially the theoretical maximum. There were no other changes in the experimental parameters. The three (13)Cα signals in MLF show some variation in intensities, reflecting the relatively narrow bandwidth of a frequency-offset procedure, and pointing to future developments for this class of experiment.

  3. MAS NMR Study of the Metastable Solid Solutions Found in the LiFePO4/FePO4 System

    SciTech Connect

    Cabana, Jordi; Shirakawa, Junichi; Chen, Guoying; Richardson, Thomas; Grey, Clare P.

    2009-10-09

    Li and 3IP NMR experiments were conducted on a series of single- or two-phase samples in the LiFePCvFePCM system with different overall lithium contents, and containing the two end-members and/or two metastable solid solution hases, Lio.6FeP04 or Lio.34FeP04. These experiments were carried out at different temperatures in order to search for vacancy/charge ordering and ion/electron mobility in the metastable phases. Evidence for Li+-Fe2+ interactions was bserved for both Lio.6FeP04 and Lio.34FePC>4. The strength of this interaction leads to the formation of LiFePCvlike clusters in the latter, as shown by the room temperature data. Different motional processes are proposed to exist as the temperature is increased and various scenarios are discussed. While concerted lithium-electron hopping and/or correlations explains the data below 125C, evidence for some uncorrelated motion is found at higher temperatures, together with the onset of phase mixing.

  4. The Amblygonite (LiAlPO{sub 4}F)-Montebrasite (LiAlPO{sub 4}OH) Solid Solution: A Combined powder and single-crystal neutron diffraction and solid-state {sup 6}Li MAS, CP MAS, and REDOR NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Groat, Lee A.; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Brouwer, Darren H.; Hoffman, Christina M.; Fyfe, Colin A.; Morell, Heiko; Schultz, Arthur J.

    2003-01-01

    The amblygonite-montebrasite series of minerals, common constituents of granitic pegmatites and topaz-bearing granites, show complete solid solution with ideal composition LiAlPO{sub 4}(F, OH). These compounds are ideal for studying F {leftrightarrow} OH solid solution in minerals because natural members of the series generally show little deviation from the ideal composition. In this study, we used powder and single-crystal neutron diffraction and solid-state {sup 6}Li MAS, CP MAS, and REDOR NMR techniques to study the effect of F {leftrightarrow} OH substitution on the series. Lattice parameters refined from single-crystal neutron diffraction data show increasing b and decreasing a, c, and V with increasing F/(F + OH). The volume is highest for the OH end-member because of the presence of an additional atom (H). The a and c parameters decrease with increasing F/(F + OH) because the O-H vector is close to the a-c plane and the Al-OH/F vectors are approximately parallel to c. Lattice parameters refined from neutron powder diffraction patterns collected at lower T show that thermal contraction increases with F/(F + OH), presumably because the F anion takes up less space than the OH molecule. The results show that the OH/F position is always fully occupied. The H displacement ellipsoid shows little change with occupancy, which obviously corresponds negatively with increasing F/(F + OH). However, the Li displacement ellipsoid becomes extremely large and anisotropic with increasing F fraction. Most of the distortion is associated with the U{sub 3} eigenvalue, which lies between the c and c* directions. U{sub eq} values corresponding to the Li atom show a greater reduction with decreasing temperature than the other atoms. The temperature dependence of Li is the same regardless of F content. Even when extrapolated to absolute zero the Li displacement ellipsoid is very large, which implies a large static disorder.

  5. Lithium Ion Mobility in Lithium Phosphidosilicates: Crystal Structure, (7) Li, (29) Si, and (31) P MAS NMR Spectroscopy, and Impedance Spectroscopy of Li8 SiP4 and Li2 SiP2.

    PubMed

    Toffoletti, Lorenzo; Kirchhain, Holger; Landesfeind, Johannes; Klein, Wilhelm; van Wüllen, Leo; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Fässler, Thomas F

    2016-12-05

    The need to improve electrodes and Li-ion conducting materials for rechargeable all-solid-state batteries has drawn enhanced attention to the investigation of lithium-rich compounds. The study of the ternary system Li-Si-P revealed a series of new compounds, two of which, Li8 SiP4 and Li2 SiP2 , are presented. Both phases represent members of a new family of Li ion conductors that display Li ion conductivity in the range from 1.15(7)×10(-6) Scm(-1) at 0 °C to 1.2(2)×10(-4) Scm(-1) at 75 °C (Li8 SiP4 ) and from 6.1(7)×10(-8) Scm(-1) at 0 °C to 6(1)×10(-6) Scm(-1) at 75 °C (Li2 SiP2 ), as determined by impedance measurements. Temperature-dependent solid-state (7) Li NMR spectroscopy revealed low activation energies of about 36 kJ mol(-1) for Li8 SiP4 and about 47 kJ mol(-1) for Li2 SiP2 . Both compounds were structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (single crystal and powder methods) and by (7) Li, (29) Si, and (31) P MAS NMR spectroscopy. Both phases consist of tetrahedral SiP4 anions and Li counterions. Li8 SiP4 contains isolated SiP4 units surrounded by Li atoms, while Li2 SiP2 comprises a three-dimensional network based on corner-sharing SiP4 tetrahedra, with the Li ions located in cavities and channels.

  6. (29)Si, (47)Ti, (49)Ti and (195)Pt solid state MAS NMR spectroscopic investigations of ternary silicides TPtSi, germanides TPtGe (T = Ti, Zr, Hf) and stannide TiPtSn.

    PubMed

    Benndorf, Christopher; Eckert, Hellmut; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2016-05-10

    Eight ternary tetrelides TPtX (T = Ti, Zr, Hf; X = Si, Ge, Sn) were synthesized from the elements by arc-melting and subsequent annealing. TiPtSi, ZrPtSi, ZrPtGe, HfPtSi and HfPtGe crystallize with the orthorhombic TiNiSi type structure, in the space group Pnma. The structures of HfPtSi (a = 654.44(9), b = 387.97(6), c = 750.0(1) pm, wR2 = 0.0592, 411 F(2) values, 20 variables) and HfPtGe (a = 660.36(7), b = 395.18(4), c = 763.05(8) pm, wR2 = 0.0495, 430 F(2) values, 20 variables) were refined from single crystal X-ray diffractometer data. TiPtSn adopts the cubic MgAgAs type. TiPtGe is dimorphic with a TiNiSi type high-temperature modification which transforms to cubic LT-TiPtGe (MgAgAs type). All phases were investigated by high resolution (29)Si, (47)Ti, (49)Ti and (195)Pt solid state MAS NMR spectroscopy. In the cubic compounds, the (47/49)Ti NMR signals are easily detected owing to the absence of quadrupolar broadening effects. The (195)Pt resonances of the orthorhombic compounds are characterized by strongly negative isotropic Knight shifts and large Knight shift anisotropies, whereas positive isotropic Knight shifts and no anisotropies are observed for the cubic compounds. These results indicate that the phase transition in TiPtGe is associated with dramatic changes in the electronic properties. Within each group of isotypic compounds the isotropic (29)Si, (47/49)Ti and (195)Pt Knight shifts show systematic dependences on the transition metal or tetrel atomic number, suggesting that the numerical values are influenced by the electronegativities of the metallic (or metalloid) neighbours.

  7. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 19F FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.

    2010-09-02

    Representative sampling has been completed for characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 19F as per the statistical sampling plan developed by Harris and Shine. Samples from eight locations have been obtained from the tank floor and two of the samples were archived as a contingency. Six samples, referred to in this report as the current scrape samples, have been submitted to and analyzed by SRNL. This report contains the statistical analysis of the floor sample analytical results to determine if further data are needed to reduce uncertainty. Included are comparisons with the prior Mantis samples results to determine if they can be pooled with the current scrape samples to estimate the upper 95% confidence limits (UCL95%) for concentration. Statistical analysis revealed that the Mantis and current scrape sample results are not compatible. Therefore, the Mantis sample results were not used to support the quantification of analytes in the residual material. Significant spatial variability among the current scrape sample results was not found. Constituent concentrations were similar between the North and South hemispheres as well as between the inner and outer regions of the tank floor. The current scrape sample results from all six samples fall within their 3-sigma limits. In view of the results from numerous statistical tests, the data were pooled from all six current scrape samples. As such, an adequate sample size was provided for quantification of the residual material on the floor of Tank 19F. The uncertainty is quantified in this report by an UCL95% on each analyte concentration. The uncertainty in analyte concentration was calculated as a function of the number of samples, the average, and the standard deviation of the analytical results. The UCL95% was based entirely on the six current scrape sample results (each averaged across three analytical determinations).

  8. Characterization of polysulfone and polysulfone/vanillin microcapsules by 1H NMR spectroscopy, solid-state 13C CP/MAS-NMR spectroscopy, and N2 adsorption-desorption analyses.

    PubMed

    Peña, Brisa; de Ménorval, Louis-Charles; Garcia-Valls, Ricard; Gumí, Tània

    2011-11-01

    Textile detergent and softener industries have incorporated perfume microencapsulation technology to improve their products. Perfume encapsulation allows perfume protection until use and provides a long-lasting fragrance release. But, certain industrial microcapsules show low encapsulation capacity and low material stability. Polysulfone capsules have been already proposed to solve these drawbacks. Among them, PSf/Vanillin capsules were considered as a desirable system. They present both good material stability and high encapsulation capacity. However, several factors such as the final location of the perfume in the polymeric matrix, the aggregation state that it has in the capsule and its interaction with the capsule components have not been studied yet. These factors can provide vast information about the capsule performance and its improvement. With the aim to characterize these parameters, the physical and chemical properties of PSf/Vanillin capsules have been investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and N(2) adsorption-desorption measurements. AFM micrograph and N(2) isotherms confirm that the presence of vanillin modify the physical structure of PSf/Vanillin microcapsules as it is trapped in the capsule porosity. NMR results show that vanillin is present in solid state in PSf/Vanillin microcapsules.

  9. Characterization of white Portland cement hydration and the C-S-H structure in the presence of sodium aluminate by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Morten Daugaard; Jakobsen, Hans J.; Skibsted, Joergen

    2004-05-01

    The effects of hydrating a white Portland cement (wPc) in 0.30 and 0.50 M solutions of sodium aluminate (NaAlO{sub 2}) at 5 and 20 deg. C are investigated by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that NaAlO{sub 2} accelerates the hydration of alite and belite and results in calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) phases with longer average chain lengths of SiO{sub 4}/AlO{sub 4} tetrahedra. The C-S-H phases are investigated in detail and it is shown that the Al/Si ratio for the chains of tetrahedra is quite constant during the time studied for the hydration (6 h to 2 years) but increases for higher concentration of the NaAlO{sub 2} solution. The average chain lengths of 'pure' silicate and SiO{sub 4}/AlO{sub 4} tetrahedra demonstrate that Al acts as a linker for the silicate chains, thereby producing aluminosilicate chains with longer average chain lengths. Finally, it is shown that NaAlO{sub 2} reduces the quantity of ettringite and results in larger quantities of monosulfate and a calcium aluminate hydrate phase.

  10. Combined MAS NMR and X-ray powder diffraction structural characterization of hydrofluorocarbon-134 adsorbed on zeolite NaY: Observation of cation migration and strong sorbate-cation interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Grey, C.P.; Poshni, F.I.; Gualtieri, A.F.; Norby, P. |; Hanson, J.C.; Corbin, D.R.

    1997-02-26

    {sup 23}Na MAS NMR and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction methods have been used to study the binding of hydrofluorocarbon-134 (HFC-134, CF{sub 2}HCF{sub 2}H) in zeolite NaY. A contraction of the volume of the unit cell is observed on gas adsorption, and the interaction of HFC-134 with the extraframework sodium cations is so strong that extraframework sodium cations in the sodalite cages (site I`) migrate into the supercages. These sodium cations are found on positions close to the site III` positions of zeolite NaX. Both ends of the HFC molecules are bound sodium cations, the HFC molecule bridging the site II and III` cations in the supercages. The strong cation-HFC interaction results in a considerable displacement of the sodium site II cation along the [111] direction into the supercage and an increase in the T-O-T bond angle for the three oxygen atoms coordinated to this cation. A decrease in the {sup 23}Na quadrupole coupling constant on HFC adsorption from 4.4 to less than 2.8 MHz, for the sodium cations originally located in the sodalite cages (site I`), is consistent with the sodium cation migrations. 26 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Solid State NMR Studies of Energy Conversion and Storage Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankuru Hennadige, Sohan Roshel De Silva

    NMR (Nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy is utilized to study energy conversion and storage materials. Different types of NMR techniques including Magic Angle Spinning, Cross-polarization and relaxation measurement experiments were employed. Four different projects are discussed in this dissertation. First, three types of CFx battery materials were investigated. Electrochemical studies have demonstrated different electrochemical performances by one type, delivering superior performance over the other two. 13C and 19F MAS NMR techniques are employed to identify the atomic/molecular structural factors that might account for differences in electrochemical performance among different types. Next as the second project, layered polymer dielectrics were investigated by NMR. Previous studies have shown that thin film capacitors are improved by using alternate layers of two polymers with complementary properties: one with a high breakdown strength and one with high dielectric constant as opposed to monolithic layers. 13C to 1H cross-polarization techniques were used to investigate any inter-layer properties that may cause the increase in the dielectric strength. The third project was to study two types of thermoelectric materials. These samples were made of heavily doped phosphorous and boron in silicon by two different methods: ball-milled and annealed. These samples were investigated by NMR to determine the degree of disorder and obtain insight into the doping efficiency. The last ongoing project is on a lithium-ion battery system. The nature of passivating layers or the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formed on the electrodes surface is important because of the direct correlation between the SEI and the battery life time/durability. Multinuclear (7Li, 19F, 31P) techniques are employed to identify the composition of the SEI formation of both positive and negative electrodes.

  12. Experimental (X-ray, (13)C CP/MAS NMR, IR, RS, INS, THz) and Solid-State DFT Study on (1:1) Co-Crystal of Bromanilic Acid and 2,6-Dimethylpyrazine.

    PubMed

    Łuczyńska, Katarzyna; Drużbicki, Kacper; Lyczko, Krzysztof; Dobrowolski, Jan Cz

    2015-06-04

    A combined structural, vibrational spectroscopy, and solid-state DFT study of the hydrogen-bonded complex of bromanilic acid with 2,6-dimethylpyrazine is reported. The crystallographic structure was determined by means of low-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction, which reveals the molecular units in their native protonation states, forming one-dimensional infinite nets of moderate-strength O···H-N hydrogen bonds. The nature of the crystallographic forces, stabilizing the studied structure, has been drawn by employing the noncovalent interactions analysis. It was found that, in addition to the hydrogen bonding, the intermolecular forces are dominated by stacking interactions and C-H···O contacts. The thermal and calorimetric analysis was employed to probe stability of the crystal phase. The structural analysis was further supported by a computationally assisted (13)C CP/MAS NMR study, providing a complete assignment of the recorded resonances. The vibrational dynamics was explored by combining the optical (IR, Raman, TDs-THz) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy techniques with the state-of-the-art solid-state density functional theory (DFT) computations. Despite the quasi-harmonic approximation assumed throughout the study, an excellent agreement between the theoretical and experimental data was achieved over the entire spectral range, allowing for a deep and possibly thorough understanding of the vibrational characteristics of the system. Particularly, the significant influence of the long-range dipole coupling on the IR spectrum has been revealed. On the basis of a wealth of information gathered, the recent implementation of a dispersion-corrected linear-response scheme has been extensively examined.

  13. Lead hydro sodalite [Pb2(OH)(H2O)3]2[Al3Si3O12]2: synthesis and structure determination by combining X-ray rietveld refinement, 1H MAS NMR FTIR and XANES spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Eiden-Assmann, S; Schneider, A M; Behrens, P; Wiebcke, M; Engelhardt, G; Felsche, J

    2000-01-01

    Ion exchange of the sodium hydro sodalites [Na3(H2O)4]2-[Al3Si3O12]2 [Na4(H3O2)]2[Al3Si3O12]2 and [Na4(OH)]2[Al3Si3O12]2 with aqueous Pb(NO3)2 solutions yielded, whichever reactant sodalite phase was used, the same lead hydro sodalite, [Pb2(OH)-(H2O)3]2[Al3Si3O12]2. Thus, in the case of the non-basic reactant [Na3(H2O)4]2-[Al3Si3O12]2 an overexchange occurs with respect to the number of nonframework cationic charges. Rietveld structure refinement of the lead hydro sodalite based on powder X-ray diffraction data (cubic, a = 9.070 A, room temperature, space group P43n) revealed that the two lead cations within each polyhedral sodalite cage form an orientationally disordered dinuclear [Pb2(micro-OH)(micro-H2O)(H2O)2]3+ complex. Due to additional lead framework oxygen bonds the coordination environment of each metal cation (CN 3+3) is approximately spherical, and clearly the lead 6s electron lone pair is stereochemically inactive. This is also suggested by the absence of a small peak at 13.025 keV, attributed in other Pb2+-O compounds to an electronic 2p-6s transition, in the PbL3 edge XANES spectrum. 1H MAS NMR and FTIR spectra show that the hydrogen atoms of the aqua hydroxo complex (which could not be determined in the Rietveld analysis) are involved in hydrogen bonds of various strengths.

  14. 19F-lanthanide complexes with increased sensitivity for 19F-MRI: optimization of the MR acquisition.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Kirsten H; Kenwright, Alan M; Parker, David; Blamire, Andrew M

    2011-10-01

    Fluorine-19 magnetic resonance methods offer advantages for molecular or cellular imaging in vivo due to the absence of radioactivity, lack of naturally occurring background signal, and the ability to easily combine measurements with anatomical MRI. Previous studies have shown that (19) F-MRI sensitivity is limited to millimolar concentrations by slow longitudinal relaxation. In this study, a new class of macrocyclic fluorinated lanthanide complexes is investigated where relaxation rates are significantly shortened by proximity of the fluorine group to a paramagnetic lanthanide ion located within the same molecule. Longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates are field dependent and in the range 50-150 s(-1) and 70-200 s(-1), respectively, at 7 T. Relaxation rates in these complexes are a function of the molecular structure and are independent of concentration at biologically relevant levels, so can be used as criteria to optimize imaging acquisition. Phantom experiments at 7 T indicate a lower limit for detection by imaging of 20 μM.

  15. Comprehensive multiphase NMR spectroscopy: Basic experimental approaches to differentiate phases in heterogeneous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtier-Murias, Denis; Farooq, Hashim; Masoom, Hussain; Botana, Adolfo; Soong, Ronald; Longstaffe, James G.; Simpson, Myrna J.; Maas, Werner E.; Fey, Michael; Andrew, Brian; Struppe, Jochem; Hutchins, Howard; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry J.; Hume, Alan; Simpson, André J.

    2012-04-01

    Heterogeneous samples, such as soils, sediments, plants, tissues, foods and organisms, often contain liquid-, gel- and solid-like phases and it is the synergism between these phases that determine their environmental and biological properties. Studying each phase separately can perturb the sample, removing important structural information such as chemical interactions at the gel-solid interface, kinetics across boundaries and conformation in the natural state. In order to overcome these limitations a Comprehensive Multiphase-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CMP-NMR) probe has been developed, and is introduced here, that permits all bonds in all phases to be studied and differentiated in whole unaltered natural samples. The CMP-NMR probe is built with high power circuitry, Magic Angle Spinning (MAS), is fitted with a lock channel, pulse field gradients, and is fully susceptibility matched. Consequently, this novel NMR probe has to cover all HR-MAS aspects without compromising power handling to permit the full range of solution-, gel- and solid-state experiments available today. Using this technology, both structures and interactions can be studied independently in each phase as well as transfer/interactions between phases within a heterogeneous sample. This paper outlines some basic experimental approaches using a model heterogeneous multiphase sample containing liquid-, gel- and solid-like components in water, yielding separate 1H and 13C spectra for the different phases. In addition, 19F performance is also addressed. To illustrate the capability of 19F NMR soil samples, containing two different contaminants, are used, demonstrating a preliminary, but real-world application of this technology. This novel NMR approach possesses a great potential for the in situ study of natural samples in their native state.

  16. 19F-MRI for monitoring human NK cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Ludwig, Kai D.; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Kutz, Matthew P.; Bednarz, Bryan P.; Fain, Sean B.; Capitini, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The availability of clinical-grade cytokines and artificial antigen-presenting cells has accelerated interest in using natural killer (NK) cells as adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) for cancer. One of the technological shortcomings of translating therapies from animal models to clinical application is the inability to effectively and non-invasively track these cells after infusion in patients. We have optimized the nonradioactive isotope fluorine-19 (19F) as a means to label and track NK cells in preclinical models using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human NK cells were expanded with interleukin (IL)-2 and labeled in vitro with increasing concentrations of 19F. Doses as low as 2 mg/mL 19F were detected by MRI. NK cell viability was only decreased at 8 mg/mL 19F. No effects on NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 leukemia cells were observed with 2, 4 or 8 mg/mL 19F. Higher doses of 19F, 4 mg/mL and 8 mg/mL, led to an improved 19F signal by MRI with 3 × 1011 19F atoms per NK cell. The 4 mg/mL 19F labeling had no effect on NK cell function via secretion of granzyme B or interferon gamma (IFNγ), compared to NK cells exposed to vehicle alone. 19F-labeled NK cells were detectable immediately by MRI after intratumoral injection in NSG mice and up to day 8. When 19F-labeled NK cells were injected subcutaneously, we observed a loss of signal through time at the site of injection suggesting NK cell migration to distant organs. The 19F perfluorocarbon is a safe and effective reagent for monitoring the persistence and trafficking of NK cell infusions in vivo, and may have potential for developing novel imaging techniques to monitor ACT for cancer. PMID:27467963

  17. USING 19F-NMR SPECTROSCOPY TO DETERMINE TRIFLURALIN BINDING TO SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trifluralin is a widely used herbicide for the control of broad leaf weeds in a variety of crops. Its binding to soil may result in significant losses in herbicidal activity and a delayed pollution problem. To investigate the nature of soil-bound trifluralin residues, 14

  18. Robust and efficient 19F heteronuclear dipolar decoupling using refocused continuous-wave rf irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinther, Joachim M.; Khaneja, Navin; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2013-01-01

    Refocused continuous wave (rCW) decoupling is presented as an efficient and robust means to obtain well-resolved magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectra of low-γ spins, such as 13C dipolar coupled to fluorine. The rCW decoupling sequences, recently introduced for 1H decoupling, are very robust towards large isotropic and anisotropic shift ranges as often encountered for 19F spins. In rCW decoupling, the so-called refocusing pulses inserted into the CW irradiation eliminate critical residual second- and third-order dipolar coupling and dipolar-coupling against chemical shielding anisotropy cross-terms in the effective Hamiltonian through time-reversal (i.e. refocusing). As important additional assets, the rCW decoupling sequences are robust towards variations in rf amplitudes, operational at low to high spinning speeds, and easy to set-up for optimal performance experimentally. These aspects are demonstrated analytically/numerically and experimentally in comparison to state-of-the-art decoupling sequences such as TPPM, SPINAL-64, and frequency-swept variants of these.

  19. Visualizing arthritic inflammation and therapeutic response by fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging (19F MRI)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-invasive imaging of inflammation to measure the progression of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to monitor responses to therapy is critically needed. V-Sense, a perfluorocarbon (PFC) contrast agent that preferentially labels inflammatory cells, which are then recruited out of systemic circulation to sites of inflammation, enables detection by 19F MRI. With no 19F background in the host, detection is highly-specific and can act as a proxy biomarker of the degree of inflammation present. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis in rats, a model with many similarities to human RA, was used to study the ability of the PFC contrast agent to reveal the accumulation of inflammation over time using 19F MRI. Disease progression in the rat hind limbs was monitored by caliper measurements and 19F MRI on days 15, 22 and 29, including the height of clinically symptomatic disease. Naïve rats served as controls. The capacity of the PFC contrast agent and 19F MRI to assess the effectiveness of therapy was studied in a cohort of rats administered oral prednisolone on days 14 to 28. Results Quantification of 19F signal measured by MRI in affected limbs was linearly correlated with disease severity. In animals with progressive disease, increases in 19F signal reflected the ongoing recruitment of inflammatory cells to the site, while no increase in 19F signal was observed in animals receiving treatment which resulted in clinical resolution of disease. Conclusion These results indicate that 19F MRI may be used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate longitudinal responses to a therapeutic regimen, while additionally revealing the recruitment of monocytic cells involved in the inflammatory process to the anatomical site. This study may support the use of 19F MRI to clinically quantify and monitor the severity of inflammation, and to assess the effectiveness of treatments in RA and other diseases with an inflammatory component. PMID:22721447

  20. 1H and 13C MAS NMR analysis for the role of chemically inequivalent a-N(CH3)4 and b-N(CH3)4 ions in [N(CH3)4]2CuCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2014-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory frame, T1, and in the rotating frame, T1ρ, for 1H and 13C in [N(CH3)4]2CuCl4 were measured by static NMR and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR as functions of temperature. The intensities of the 1H and 13C signals changed near phase transition temperatures TC1 and TC3, which indicated that N(CH3)4 plays an important role in these phase transitions. It was thus apparent that the T1 and T1ρ for 1H are governed by the same molecular motions. Two inequivalent ions, a-N(CH3)4 and b-N(CH3)4, were identified by 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR. From these results, the behaviors of these two chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 groups in the paraelastic and ferroelastic phases are discussed.

  1. Detection of targeted perfluorocarbon nanoparticle binding using 19F diffusion weighted MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Waters, Emily A; Chen, Junjie; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Huiying; Neumann, Robert; Santeford, Andrea; Arbeit, Jeffrey; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2008-11-01

    Real-time detection of targeted contrast agent binding is challenging due to background signal from unbound agent. (19)F diffusion weighted MR spectroscopy (DWS) could selectively detect binding of angiogenesis-targeted perfluorocarbon nanoparticles in vivo. Transgenic K14-HPV16 mice with epidermal squamous carcinomas exhibiting up-regulated neovasculature were used, with nontransgenic littermates as controls. Mice were treated with alpha(v)beta(3)-integrin targeted perfluorocarbon nanoparticles. (19)F DWS (b-values from 0 to 16,000 s/mm(2)) was performed on mouse ears in vivo at 11.74 Tesla. Progressive decay of (19)F signal with increased diffusion weighting at low b-values (< 1500 s/mm(2)) was observed in ears of both K14-HPV16 and control mice, demonstrating suppression of background (19)F signal from unbound nanoparticles in the blood. Much of the (19)F signal from ears of K14-HPV16 mice persisted at high b-values, indicating a stationary signal source, reflecting abundant nanoparticle binding to angiogenesis. (19)F signal in controls decayed completely at high b-values (> 1500 s/mm(2)), reflecting a moving signal source due to absence of angiogenesis (no binding sites). Estimated ADCs of nanoparticles in K14-HPV16 and control mice were 33.1 +/- 12.9 microm(2)/s and 19563 +/- 5858 microm(2)/s (p < 0.01). In vivo (19)F DWS can be used for specific detection of bound perfluorocarbon nanoparticles by selectively suppressing background (19)F signal from nanoparticles flowing in blood.

  2. 27Al, 47,49Ti, 31P, and 13C MAS NMR Study of VX, GD, and HD Reactions with Nanosize Al2O3, Conventional Al2O3 and TiO2, and Aluminum and Titanium Metal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    reactions involved and peak assignments for titanophosphonate 3, Ti(m) and anatase (see text). 17568 J. Phys. Chem. C , Vol. 111, No. 47, 2007 Wagner et al...postulated to be Ti(O)[O2P(CH3)OPin]2, in agreement with elemental analysis. High-field 47,49Ti MAS NMR of anatase shows marked narrowing of its signals...Metal 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Reactions of VX, GD, and HD with Al2O3, TiO2 ( anatase and rutile), aluminum, and titanium metal

  3. Structure in solid state of 3,3‧-diindolylmethane derivatives, potent cytotoxic agents against human tumor cells, followed X-ray diffraction and 13C CP/MAS NMR analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewska, Dorota; Wolska, Irena; Niemyjska, Maria; Żero, Paweł

    2005-10-01

    The 5,5'-disubstituted-3,3'-diindolylmethanes 1, 2 have been prepared and their structure was analyzed by X-ray and NMR techniques. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed interesting C-H⋯ π intermolecular interactions which may play role in characterization of their biological features. In 1H and 13C NMR spectra in solution and in 13C CPMAS NMR spectra in solid state only a single pattern of signals was observed. Both compounds reduce the growth of MCF7 (breast), NCI-H460 (lung), and SF-268 (NCS) cells dramatically.

  4. Contribution of 19F resonances on 18O( p, α)15N reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmeslem, Meriem; Chafa, Azzedine; Barhoumi, Slimane; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-08-01

    The 18O( p, α)15N reaction influences the isotopes production such as 19F, 18O, and 15N which can be used to test the models of stellar evolution. 19F is synthesized in both asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and metal-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Using R-matrix theory we allow new values of resonances parameters in 19F. We show that the most important contribution to the differential and total cross section at low energies, comes from the levels in 19F situated at resonances energies E R =151, 680 and 840 keV with spin and parity 1/2+. The total width of the 680 keV resonance is badly known. So, we have focused on this broad resonance corresponding to the 8.65 MeV level in 19F. We delimit the temperature range in which each resonance contribution to the total reaction rate occurs by analyzing the ratio ( N A < σν> i / N A < σν>). This allowed us to show that the 680 and 840 keV broad resonances strongly dominate the reaction rate over the stellar temperature range T 9=0.02-0.06 and T 9=0.5-5. Finally, these results were compared to NACRE and Iliadis astrophysical compilations.

  5. A symmetrical fluorous dendron-cyanine dye conjugated bimodal nanoprobe for quantitative 19F MRI and NIR fluorescence bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Yue, Xuyi; Wang, Yu; Qian, Chunqi; Huang, Peng; Lizak, Marty; Niu, Gang; Wang, Fu; Rong, Pengfei; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Ma, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    19F MRI and optical imaging are two powerful non-invasive molecular imaging modalities in biomedical applications. 19F MRI has great potential for high resolution in vivo imaging, while fluorescent probes enable ultracontrast cellular/tissue imaging with high accuracy and sensitivity. We, thus, developed a bimodal nanoprobe integrating the merits of 19F MRI and fluorescence imaging into a single synthetic molecule, which was further engineered into nanoprobe, by addressing shortcomings of conventional contrast agents to explore the quantitative 19F MRI and fluorescence imaging and cell tracking. Results showed that this bimodal imaging nanoprobe presented high correlation of 19F MR signal and NIR fluorescence intensity in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, this nanoprobe enabled quantitative 19F MR analysis, confirmed by complementary fluorescence analysis. This unique feature can hardly be obtained by traditional 19F MRI contrast agents. We envision that this nanoprobe would hold great potential for quantitative and sensitive multi-modal molecular imaging. PMID:24789108

  6. Discovery of a (19)F MRI sensitive salinomycin derivative with high cytotoxicity towards cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiuyan; Li, Yu; Bo, Shaowei; Li, Xiaofei; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Qi; Yang, Zhigang; Cong, Hengjiang; Deng, Hexiang; Chen, Mingnan; Chen, Shizhen; Zhou, Xin; Ding, Hong; Jiang, Zhong-Xing

    2016-04-14

    Salinomycin is a promising anti-cancer agent which selectively targets cancer stem cells. To improve its potency and selectivity, an analog library of salinomycin was generated by site-specific modification and CuAAc derivatization. Through a cytotoxicity analysis of the library, a fluorinated analog with high potency, selectivity, and (19)F MRI sensitivity was discovered as a novel theranostic agent.

  7. Monitoring Dendritic Cell Migration using 19F / 1H Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Waiczies, Helmar; Guenther, Martin; Skodowski, Julia; Lepore, Stefano; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf; Waiczies, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Continuous advancements in noninvasive imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have greatly improved our ability to study physiological or pathological processes in living organisms. MRI is also proving to be a valuable tool for capturing transplanted cells in vivo. Initial cell labeling strategies for MRI made use of contrast agents that influence the MR relaxation times (T1, T2, T2*) and lead to an enhancement (T1) or depletion (T2*) of signal where labeled cells are present. T2* enhancement agents such as ultrasmall iron oxide agents (USPIO) have been employed to study cell migration and some have also been approved by the FDA for clinical application. A drawback of T2* agents is the difficulty to distinguish the signal extinction created by the labeled cells from other artifacts such as blood clots, micro bleeds or air bubbles. In this article, we describe an emerging technique for tracking cells in vivo that is based on labeling the cells with fluorine (19F)-rich particles. These particles are prepared by emulsifying perfluorocarbon (PFC) compounds and then used to label cells, which subsequently can be imaged by 19F MRI. Important advantages of PFCs for cell tracking in vivo include (i) the absence of carbon-bound 19F in vivo, which then yields background-free images and complete cell selectivityand(ii) the possibility to quantify the cell signal by 19F MR spectroscopy. PMID:23542739

  8. In vitro quantitative ((1))H and ((19))F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging studies of fluvastatin™ in Lescol® XL tablets in a USP-IV dissolution cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qilei; Gladden, Lynn; Avalle, Paolo; Mantle, Michael

    2011-12-20

    Swellable polymeric matrices are key systems in the controlled drug release area. Currently, the vast majority of research is still focused on polymer swelling dynamics. This study represents the first quantitative multi-nuclear (((1))H and ((19))F) fast magnetic resonance imaging study of the complete dissolution process of a commercial (Lescol® XL) tablet, whose formulation is based on the hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) polymer under in vitro conditions in a standard USP-IV (United States Pharmacopeia apparatus IV) flow-through cell that is incorporated into high field superconducting magnetic resonance spectrometer. Quantitative RARE ((1))H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ((19))F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging methods have been used to give information on: (i) dissolution media uptake and hydrodynamics; (ii) active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) mobilisation and dissolution; (iii) matrix swelling and dissolution and (iv) media activity within the swelling matrix. In order to better reflect the in vivo conditions, the bio-relevant media Simulated Gastric Fluid (SGF) and Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FaSSIF) were used. A newly developed quantitative ultra-fast MRI technique was applied and the results clearly show the transport dynamics of media penetration and hydrodynamics along with the polymer swelling processes. The drug dissolution and mobility inside the gel matrix was characterised, in parallel to the ((1))H measurements, by ((19))F NMR spectroscopy and MRI, and the drug release profile in the bulk solution was recorded offline by UV spectrometer. We found that NMR spectroscopy and 1D-MRI can be uniquely used to monitor the drug dissolution/mobilisation process within the gel layer, and the results from ((19))F NMR spectra indicate that in the gel layer, the physical mobility of the drug changes from "dissolved immobilised drug" to "dissolved mobilised drug".

  9. Assessment of chemical exchange in tryptophan-albumin solution through (19)F multicomponent transverse relaxation dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping-Chang

    2015-06-01

    A number of NMR methods possess the capability of probing chemical exchange dynamics in solution. However, certain drawbacks limit the applications of these NMR approaches, particularly, to a complex system. Here, we propose a procedure that integrates the regularized nonnegative least squares (NNLS) analysis of multiexponential T2 relaxation into Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiments to probe chemical exchange in a multicompartmental system. The proposed procedure was validated through analysis of (19)F T2 relaxation data of 6-fluoro-DL-tryptophan in a two-compartment solution with and without bovine serum albumin. Given the regularized NNLS analysis of a T2 relaxation curve acquired, for example, at the CPMG frequency υ CPMG  = 125, the nature of two distinct peaks in the associated T2 distribution spectrum indicated 6-fluoro-DL-tryptophan either retaining the free state, with geometric mean */multiplicative standard deviation (MSD) = 1851.2 ms */1.51, or undergoing free/albumin-bound interconversion, with geometric mean */MSD = 236.8 ms */1.54, in the two-compartment system. Quantities of the individual tryptophan species were accurately reflected by the associated T2 peak areas, with an interconversion state-to-free state ratio of 0.45 ± 0.11. Furthermore, the CPMG relaxation dispersion analysis estimated the exchange rate between the free and albumin-bound states in this fluorinated tryptophan analog and the corresponding dissociation constant of the fluorinated tryptophan-albumin complex in the chemical-exchanging, two-compartment system.

  10. First evidences for 19F(α, p)22Ne at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agata, G.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; Blagus, S.; Figuera, P.; Grassi, L.; Guardo, G. L.; Gulino, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Indelicato, I.; Kshetri, R.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Lattuada, M.; Mijatović, T.; Milin, M.; Miljanic, D.; Prepolec, L.; Sergi, M. L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Tokic, V.; Tumino, A.; Uroic, M.

    2016-04-01

    19F experimental abundances is overestimated in respect to the theoretical one: it is therefore clear that further investigations are needed. We focused on the 19F(α, p) 22 Ne reaction, representing the main destruction channel in He-rich environments. The lowest energy at which this reaction has been studied with direct methods is E C.M. ≈ 0.91 MeV, while the Gamow region is between 0.39 ÷ 0.8 MeV, far below the Coulomb barrier (3.8 MeV). For this reason, an experiment at Rudjer Boskovic Institute (Zagreb) was performed, applying the Trojan Horse Method. Following this method we selected the quasi-free contribution coming from 6Li(19 F,p22 Ne)2 H at Ebeam=6 MeV at kinematically favourable angles, and the cross section at energies 0 < EC.M. < 1.4 MeV was extracted in arbitrary units, covering the astrophysical region of interest.

  11. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexander J.; Granwehr, Josef; Lesbats, Clémentine; Krupa, James L.; Six, Joseph S.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Thomas, Neil R.; Auer, Dorothee P.; Meersmann, Thomas; Faas, Henryk M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental “calibration factor” to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments. PMID:27727294

  12. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-18

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra.

  13. Novel electrolytes for use in new and improved batteries: An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Marc B.

    This thesis focuses on the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in order to study materials for use as electrolytes in batteries. The details of four projects are described in this thesis as well as a brief theoretical background of NMR. Structural and dynamics properties were determined using several NMR techniques such as static, MAS, PFG diffusion, and relaxation to understand microscopic and macroscopic properties of the materials described within. Nuclei investigate were 1H, 2H, 7Li, 13C, 19F, 23Na, and 27Al. The first project focuses on an exciting new material to be used as a solid electrolyte membrane. T. The second project focuses on the dynamics of ionic liquid-solvent mixtures and their comparison to molecular dynamics computer simulations. The third project involves a solvent-free film containing NaTFSI salt mixed in to PEO for use in sodium-ion batteries. This final project focuses on a composite electrolyte consisting of a ceramic and solid: LiI:PEO:LiAlO2.

  14. TANKS 18 AND 19-F EQUIPMENT GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-12-15

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) intends to remove Tanks 18-F and 19-F at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from service. The high-level waste (HLW) tanks have been isolated from the F-area Tank Farm (FTF) facilities and will be filled with cementitious grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the empty volumes in the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways from the surface to residual waste on the bottom of the tanks, (3) providing an intruder barrier, and (4) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to limit solubility of residual radionuclides. Bulk waste and heel waste removal equipment will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F when the tanks are closed. This equipment includes: mixer pumps, transfer pumps, transfer jets, equipment support masts, sampling masts and dip tube assemblies. The current Tank 18-F and 19-F closure strategy is to grout the internal void spaces in this equipment to eliminate fast vertical pathways and slow water infiltration to the residual material on the tank floor. This report documents the results of laboratory testing performed to identify a grout formulation for filling the abandoned equipment in Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The objective of this work was to formulate a flowable grout for filling internal voids of equipment that will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F during the final closures. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, Tank Farm Closure Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The scope for this task is provided in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Prepare and evaluate the SRR cooling coil grout identified in WSRC-STI-2008-00298 per the TTR for this work. The cooling coil grout is a mixture of BASF MasterFlow{reg_sign} 816 cable grout (67.67 wt. %), Grade 100 ground granulated blast furnace slag (7.52 wt. %) and water (24.81 wt. %); (2) Identify equipment grout placement and

  15. Pre-fission neutron emission in {sup 19}F+{sup 209}Bi reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Hardev; Sugathan, P.; Shidling, P. D.; Behera, B. R.; Singh, Gulzar; Govil, I. M.; Golda, K. S.; Jhingan, Akhil; Singh, R. P.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Datta, S. K.; Pal, Santanu; Viesti, G.

    2009-03-04

    The pre- and post-scission neutron multiplicities are measured for {sup 19}F+{sup 209}Bi reaction at E{sub lab} = 100, 104, 108, 112 and 116 MeV. The measured value of pre-scission neutron multiplicity was found to be increasing with the excitation energy. The comparison of experimental values with the statistical model calculations shows that the measured values are much larger than the model predictions. This difference in excess yield over the model predictions amounts to the survival time of 80{+-}5x10{sup -21} s for the {sup 228}U compound nucleus before it undergoes fission.

  16. Cerebral blood flow in experimental ischemia assessed by sup 19 F magnetic resonance spectroscopy in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, A.; Nagashima, G.; Bizzi, A.; DesPres, D.J. )

    1990-10-01

    We evaluated a 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopic technique that detects Freon-23 washout as a means of measuring cerebral blood flow in halothane-anesthetized adult cats during and after transient cerebral ischemia produced by vascular occlusion. The experiments were performed to test the ability of this recently developed method to detect postischemic flow deficits. Results were consistent with postischemic hypoperfusion. The method also proved valuable for measuring small residual flow during vascular occlusion. Our experiments indicate that this method provides simple, rapid, and repeatable flow measurements that can augment magnetic resonance examinations of cerebral metabolic parameters in the study of ischemia.

  17. Hexaphyrin as a Potential Theranostic Dye for Photothermal Therapy and 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Tomohiro; Nakatsuji, Hirotaka; Fukuda, Ryosuke; Okamoto, Haruki; Imai, Hirohiko; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Tochio, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tkachenko, Nikolai; Hashida, Mitsuru; Murakami, Tatsuya; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2017-02-15

    meso-Aryl substituted expanded porphyrins have two potential key features suitable for theranostic agents, excellent absorption in near infrared (NIR) region and possible introduction of multiple fluorine atoms at structurally nearly equivalent positions. Herein, hexaphyrin (hexa) was synthesized using 2,6-bis(trifluoromethyl)-4-formyl benzoate and pyrrole and evaluated as a novel theranostic expanded porphyrin possessing the above key features. Under NIR light illumination hexa showed intense photothermal and weak photodynamic effects, which were most likely due to its low-lying excited states close to a singlet oxygen. This sustained photothermal effect caused the ablation of cancer cells more effectively than the photodynamic effect of indocyanine green, a clinically used dye. In addition, hexa@cpHDL revealed potential for use in visualization of tumors by 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) due to the presence of the multiple fluorine atoms. These results shed light on a latent utility of expanded porphyrins as theranostic agents in both photothermal therapy and 19F MRI.

  18. First-Principles Study of Nuclear Quadruple Interaction of ^19F* and Binding in Solid Fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, D. R.; Aryal, M. M.; Adhikari, N. P.; Badu, S. R.; Pink, R. H.; Scheicher, R. H.; Chow, Lee; Das, T. P.

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the binding energy (BE) and nuclear quadrupule interaction (NQI) parameters for the ^19F* excited nuclear state in solid fluorine as part of our investigation [1] of the properties of solid halogens using the first principles Hartree-Fock Cluster procedure combined with many-body perturbation theory (MBPT), implemented by the Gaussian set of programs. Our results show that Van der Waals interaction obtained from intermolecular electron correlation effects has dominant influence on the BE but negligible effect on the NQI parameters. For the latter, ourcalculated e^2qQ is 119.0MHz using for Q(19F*), the value of 0.072 *10-28m2 [2], and η, the asymmetry parameter, is essentially zero. The influence of rotational vibrational effects on e^2qQ is being investigated using a first-principles procedure [3] to bridge the small remaining difference with experiment (127.2 MHz) for e^2qQ [4]. [1] M.M. Aryal et al., Hyperfine Interact, 176, 51 (2007). [2] K.C.Mishra et al.,Phys. Rev.B25, 3389(1982). [3] N. Sahoo et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 50, 913(1983) [4] H. Barfuss et al., Phys. Lett. 90A, 33(1982)

  19. TANK 18-F AND 19-F TANK FILL GROUT SCALE UP TEST SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2012-01-03

    High-level waste (HLW) tanks 18-F and 19-F have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure the tanks will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) entombing waste removal equipment, (4) discouraging future intrusion, and (5) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. This report documents the results of a four cubic yard bulk fill scale up test on the grout formulation recommended for filling Tanks 18-F and 19-F. Details of the scale up test are provided in a Test Plan. The work was authorized under a Technical Task Request (TTR), HLE-TTR-2011-008, and was performed according to Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The bulk fill scale up test described in this report was intended to demonstrate proportioning, mixing, and transportation, of material produced in a full scale ready mix concrete batch plant. In addition, the material produced for the scale up test was characterized with respect to fresh properties, thermal properties, and compressive strength as a function of curing time.

  20. Measured 19F(α,n) with VANDLE for Nuclear Safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, William; Clement, R. C. C.; Smith, M. S.; Pain, S.; Febbraro, M.; Pittman, S.; Thomspon, S.; Grinder, M.; Cizewski, J. A.; Reingold, C.; Manning, B.; Burcher, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Tan, W.-P.; Stech, E.; Smith, M. K.; Avetisyan, R.; Gyurjinyan, A.; Lowe, M.; Ilyushkin, S.; Grzywacz, R.; Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Taylor, S. Z.; Smith, K.

    2015-10-01

    One of the most promising non-destructive assay (NDA) methods to monitor UF6 canisters consists of measuring gross neutron rates induced by uranium-decay alpha particles reacting with the fluorine and emitting a neutron. This method currently lacks reliable nuclear data on the 19F(α,n) reaction cross section to determine an accurate neutron yield rate for a given sample of UF6. We have measured the cross section and coincident neutron spectrum for the alpha-decay energy range using the VANDLE system. This experiment had two parts: first at Notre Dame with a LaF3 target and and a pulsed alpha-particle beam, and second at ORNL with a windowless He-gas target and a 19F beam. The motivation for this measurement and cross section results will be presented. This work is funded in part by the DOE Office of Science, the National Nuclear Security Administration SSAA and the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation R&D, and the NSF.

  1. Measurement of the 19F(α,n)22Na Cross Section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Marcus; Smith, M. S.; Pain, S.; Febbraro, M.; Pittman, S.; Chipps, K. A.; Thompson, S. J.; Grinder, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Smith, K.; Thornsberry, C.; Thompson, P.; Peters, W. A.; Waddell, D.; Blanchard, R.; Carls, A.; Shadrick, S.; Engelhardt, A.; Hertz-Kintish, D.; Allen, N.; Sims, H.

    2015-10-01

    Enriched uranium is commonly stored in fluoride matrices such as UF6. Alpha decays of uranium in UF6 will create neutrons via the 19F(α,n)22Na reaction. An improved cross section for this reaction will enable improved nondestructive assays of uranium content in storage cylinders at material enrichment facilities. To determine this reaction cross section, we have performed experiments using both forward and inverse kinematic techniques at the University of Notre Dame (forward) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (inverse). Both experiments utilized the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) for neutron detection. The ORNL experiment also used a new ionization chamber for 22Na particle identification. Gating on the 22Na nuclei detected drastically reduced the background counts in the neutron time-of-flight spectra. The latest analysis and results will be presented for 19F beam energies ranging from 20-37 MeV. This work is funded in part by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics, the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation R&D, and the NSF.

  2. Tracking Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsion Delivery by 19F MRI for Precise High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo Hyun; Park, Eun-Joo; Min, Changki; Choi, Sun Il; Jeon, Soyeon; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Daehong

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions (PFCNEs) have recently been undergoing rigorous study to investigate their ability to improve the therapeutic efficacy of tumor ablation by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). For precise control of PFCNE delivery and thermal ablation, their accumulation and distribution in a tumor should be quantitatively analyzed. Here, we used fluorine-19 (19F) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantitatively track PFCNE accumulation in a tumor, and analyzed how intra-tumoral PFCNE quantities affect the therapeutic efficacy of HIFU treatment. Ablation outcomes were assessed by intra-voxel incoherent motion analysis and bioluminescent imaging up to 14 days after the procedure. Assessment of PFCNE delivery and treatment outcomes showed that 2-3 mg/mL of PFCNE in a tumor produces the largest ablation volume under the same HIFU insonation conditions. Histology showed varying degrees of necrosis depending on the amount of PFCNE delivered. 19F MRI promises to be a valuable platform for precisely guiding PFCNE-enhanced HIFU ablation of tumors. PMID:28255351

  3. TANK 18 AND 19-F TIER 1A EQUIPMENT FILL MOCK UP TEST SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-04

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) has determined that Tanks 18-F and 19-F have met the F-Tank Farm (FTF) General Closure Plan Requirements and are ready to be permanently closed. The high-level waste (HLW) tanks have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure they will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) discouraging future intrusion, and (4) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. Bulk waste removal and heel removal equipment remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F. This equipment includes the Advance Design Mixer Pump (ADMP), transfer pumps, transfer jets, standard slurry mixer pumps, equipment-support masts, sampling masts, dip tube assemblies and robotic crawlers. The present Tank 18 and 19-F closure strategy is to grout the equipment in place and eliminate vertical pathways by filling voids in the equipment to vertical fast pathways and water infiltration. The mock-up tests described in this report were intended to address placement issues identified for grouting the equipment that will be left in Tank 18-F and Tank 19-F. The Tank 18-F and 19-F closure strategy document states that one of the Performance Assessment (PA) requirements for a closed tank is that equipment remaining in the tank be filled to the extent practical and that vertical flow paths 1 inch and larger be grouted. The specific objectives of the Tier 1A equipment grout mock-up testing include: (1) Identifying the most limiting equipment configurations with respect to internal void space filling; (2) Specifying and constructing initial test geometries and forms that represent scaled boundary conditions; (3) Identifying a target grout rheology for evaluation in the scaled mock-up configurations; (4) Scaling-up production of a grout mix with the target rheology

  4. Multinuclear NMR studies of gaseous and liquid sevoflurane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macięga, E.; Makulski, W.; Jackowski, K.; Blicharska, B.

    2006-03-01

    For the first time, a small amount of sevoflurane ((CF 3) 2CHOCH 2F) in carbon dioxide and xenon as the gaseous solvents has been studied using 19F and 1H NMR spectra. Density-dependent 19F and 1H nuclear magnetic shielding was observed when the pressure of each solvent was increased. After extrapolation of the results to the zero-density limit it was possible to determine the appropriate shielding constants free from intermolecular interactions, σ0(F) and σ0(H). Similar procedure has also been applied for the investigation of fluorine-proton spin-spin couplings and the 2J 0(FH) and 3J 0(FH) constants of an isolated (CF 3) 2CHOCH 2F molecule were also obtained. Additionally, high-resolution 1H, 13C, 17O and 19F NMR spectra of pure liquid sevoflurane were also recorded and all the 1H- 13C, 1H- 19F and 19F- 13C spin-spin coupling constants and NMR chemical shifts were measured. It is shown that the experimental NMR parameters are suitable for comparison with the results of recent quantum-chemical calculations.

  5. NMR studies of hydrofluorocarbon-cation interactions and cation migrations on adsorption of hydrofluorocarbon-134 on zeolites NaY and CsY

    SciTech Connect

    Grey, C.P.; Poshni, F.I.; Ba, Y.; Corbin, D.R.

    1996-12-31

    Unlike the syntheses of the CFC refrigerants and blowing agents, the syntheses of the more environmentally-friendly hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are more complex, and involve many more steps. Unwanted HFC/hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are often produced during the reactions and the purification of the products remains a concern. {sup 23}Na and {sup 23}Na/{sup 19}F double resonance MAS NMR methods have been used to study the binding of hydrofluorocarbon-134 (CF{sub 2}HCF{sub 2}H) in zeolites NaY and CsY. The interaction of HFC-134 with the sodium cations is so strong that the sodium cations in the sodalite cages (site I{prime}) migrate into the supercages to bind to the hydrofluorocarbon molecules.

  6. Defect induced magnetism in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: bulk magnetization and 19F hyperfine interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Mohanta, S K; Mishra, S N; Davane, S M; Srivastava, S K

    2012-02-29

    We have made bulk and local investigations on defect induced magnetism in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) irradiated with a 40 MeV carbon beam. The local magnetic response of irradiated HOPG was studied by measuring the hyperfine field of recoil implanted (19)F using γ-ray time differential perturbed angular distribution (TDPAD) measurements. While the bulk magnetic properties of the irradiated sample show features characteristic of room temperature ferromagnetism, the hyperfine field data reflect enhanced paramagnetism with no indication of long range magnetic ordering. The experimental studies are further supported by ab initio density functional calculations. We believe that the ferromagnetic response in irradiated HOPG arises mostly from defect induced magnetic moments of carbon atoms in the near surface region, while those deep inside the host matrix remain paramagnetic.

  7. Tanks 18 And 19-F Structural Flowable Grout Fill Material Evaluation And Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.

    2013-04-23

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: 1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non-compressible material; 2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; 3) reduce contaminant mobility by a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and 4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: 1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). 2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. 3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix design. 4

  8. (19)F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometric Determination of the Partition Coefficients of Flutamide and Nilutamide (Antiprostate Cancer Drugs) in a Lipid Nano-Emulsion and Prediction of Its Encapsulation Efficiency for the Drugs.

    PubMed

    Takegami, Shigehiko; Kitamura, Keisuke; Ohsugi, Mayuko; Konishi, Atsuko; Kitade, Tatsuya

    2016-12-01

    To design a useful lipid drug carrier having a high encapsulation efficiency (EE%) for the antiprostate cancer drugs flutamide (FT) and nilutamide (NT), a lipid nano-emulsion (LNE) was prepared with soybean oil (SO), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and sodium palmitate, and the partition coefficients (K ps) of the drugs for the LNE were determined by (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. The (19)F NMR signal of the trifluoromethyl group of both drugs showed a downfield shift from an internal standard (trifluoroethanol) and broadening according to the increase in the lipid concentration due to their interaction with LNE particles. The difference in the chemical shift (Δδ) of each drug caused by the addition of LNE was measured under different amounts of LNE, and the K p values were calculated from the Δδ values. The results showed that FT has higher lipophilicity than NT. The total lipid concentration (SO + PC) required to encapsulate each drug into LNE with an EE% of more than 95% was calculated from the K p values as 93.3 and 189.9 mmol/L for FT and NT, respectively. For an LNE prepared with the total lipid concentration of 215 mmol/L, the predicted EE% values were 98 and 96% for FT and NT, respectively, while the experimental EE% values determined by a centrifugation method were approximately 99% for both drugs. Thus, the (19)F NMR spectrometric method is a useful technique to obtain the K p values of fluorinated drugs and thereby predict the theoretical lipid concentrations and prepare LNEs with high EE% values.

  9. TANKS 18 AND 19-F STRUCTURAL FLOWABLE GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-01

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: (1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non compressible material; (2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; (3) reduce contaminant mobility by (a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and (b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and (4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). (2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. (3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix

  10. Toward a reassessment of the 19F(p, α0)16O reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, I.; Dell'Aquila, D.; Di Leva, A.; Indelicato, I.; La Cognata, M.; La Commara, M.; Ordine, A.; Rigato, V.; Romoli, M.; Rosato, E.; Spadaccini, G.; Spitaleri, C.; Tumino, A.; Vigilante, M.

    2015-09-01

    The 19F(p, α0)16O reaction at low energies plays an important role in fundamental physics. In particular in nuclear astrophysics it represents, together with the 19F(p, γ)20Ne reaction, the crossing point between the CNO and the NeNa cycles in stars. Further, in hydrogen-rich stellar environments, it is the most important fluorine destruction channel. In this paper we report new measurements on the 19F(p, α0)16O reaction at deeply sub-Coulomb energies (0.2-0.6 MeV), a region where, despite the key role of this reaction, very few and old data are reported. The deduced astrophysical S-factor is ≈ 1.5- 2 times larger than currently adopted extrapolations with possibly important astrophysical consequences.

  11. T-maze performance after developmental exposure to 19F tagged 5-HTP in chicks.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Sherry; Nash, Laurie; Hogan, Jeremy; Branch, Craig

    2004-12-01

    Chicks were used as a model to investigate behavioral effects of administering a new compound intended for use with magnetic resonance. The compound has multiple 19F atom tags covalently bonded to the indole ring of 5-hydroxytryptophan (PF-5HTP), the immediate precursor to the neurotransmitter serotonin. On incubation Day 17, 5 microg of PF-5-HTP, an equivalent amount of 5-HTP, or just 200 microL of the weak phosphate buffered saline (PBS) vehicle was injected into the airsac of each egg. Three days after hatching, chicks were isolated at the top of a simple T-Maze which, when traversed correctly, enabled them to return to their brood mates. A second trial in the T-Maze was conducted about three hours later. The brief period of isolation at the start of a trial causes social distress in chicks who are reinforced by returning to the brood. The task was selected as being sensitive to functioning of the serotonin pathways whose development might be altered by administering the compound during brain development. Repeated-measures analysis of variance yielded a statistically significant main effect for trial within groups, but no significant difference between injection groups. Administering a low dose of the fluorine tagged compound during development did not impair performance on this T-maze task.

  12. Constraints on low-mass WIMP interactions on 19F from PICASSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, S.; Behnke, E.; Bhattacharjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dai, X.; Das, M.; Davour, A.; Debris, F.; Dhungana, N.; Farine, J.; Gagnebin, S.; Giroux, G.; Grace, E.; Jackson, C. M.; Kamaha, A.; Krauss, C.; Kumaratunga, S.; Lafrenière, M.; Laurin, M.; Lawson, I.; Lessard, L.; Levine, I.; Levy, C.; MacDonald, R. P.; Marlisov, D.; Martin, J.-P.; Mitra, P.; Noble, A. J.; Piro, M.-C.; Podviyanuk, R.; Pospisil, S.; Saha, S.; Scallon, O.; Seth, S.; Starinski, N.; Stekl, I.; Wichoski, U.; Xie, T.; Zacek, V.

    2012-05-01

    Recent results from the PICASSO dark matter search experiment at SNOLAB are reported. These results were obtained using a subset of 10 detectors with a total target mass of 0.72 kg of 19F and an exposure of 114 kgd. The low backgrounds in PICASSO allow recoil energy thresholds as low as 1.7 keV to be obtained which results in an increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below 10 GeV/c2. No dark matter signal was found. Best exclusion limits in the spin dependent sector were obtained for WIMP masses of 20 GeV/c2 with a cross section on protons of σpSD=0.032 pb (90% C.L.). In the spin independent sector close to the low mass region of 7 GeV/c2 favoured by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA, cross sections larger than σpSI=1.41×10-4 pb (90% C.L.) are excluded.

  13. Thick target neutron yield from 145 MeV 19F+27Al system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil, C.; Bandyopadhyay, T.; Nandy, M.; Suman, Vitisha; Paul, S.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Sarkar, P. K.

    2013-09-01

    The double differential neutron energy distribution has been measured for the 19F+27Al system at 145 MeV projectile energy. The time of flight technique was used to measure the energy while pulse shape discrimination has been used to separate the neutrons from photons. The results are compared with the statistical nuclear reaction model codes PACE and EMPIRE. The PACE code appears to predict the slope and the end point energy of the experimental spectra fairly well but over predicts the values. The slope obtained from the EMPIRE calculations appears to be harder while the values being closer to the experimental results. The yield from the Hauser-Feshbach based compound nucleus model calculations agree reasonably well with the experimental results at the backward angles but not in the forward directions. The energy integrated angular distribution from 145 MeV projectiles show an enhanced emission in the forward angles compared to the similar results from 110 MeV projectiles. This analysis suggests some contribution from the pre-equilibrium emissions from the system at the higher projectile energy.

  14. Xenobiotic monitoring in plants by sup 19 F and sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, A.; Barber, J.; Wood, B. ); Elliott, R. )

    1989-12-01

    {sup 19}F and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy have been used to monitor the uptake of trifluoroacetic acid in stems and leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum. The movement and location of a xenobiotic have been demonstrated in vivo by a noninvasive technique.

  15. Full differentiation and assignment of boron species in the electrolytes Li{sub 2}B{sub 6}O{sub 9}F{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braeuniger, Thomas; Pilz, Thomas; Chandran, C. Vinod; Jansen, Martin

    2012-10-15

    The syntheses of two new fluorooxoborates, Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 6}O{sub 9}F{sub 2}, which possess considerable ion conductivity at higher temperatures, have been reported recently. Here, we describe the characterisation of these compounds by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy. The complex central-transition MAS spectra, resulting from overlap of sub-spectra contributed by the individual boron species in the crystal structures, could be clearly separated by acquisition and analysis of 3QMAS spectra. By numerical fit of these sub-spectra, the isotropic chemical shift {delta}{sub iso}, the quadrupolar coupling constant {chi}, and the asymmetry {eta} were determined. Using known relations between boron coordination and chemical shift as well as quadrupolar coupling, the individual {sup 11}B NMR resonances have been ascribed to boron species in tetrahedral or trigonal environment. To remove remaining assignment ambiguities, the response of the {sup 11}B resonances to {sup 19}F decoupling was qualitatively analysed. Thus, by using the combined information conveyed by chemical shift, quadrupolar and dipolar interaction, a complete assignment of the complex {sup 11}B line shapes exhibited by the fluorooxoborates has been achieved. - Graphical abstract: Structure and solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectrum of Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterisation of title compounds by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sub-spectra of boron species separated by evaluation of 3QMAS spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotropic chemical shift and quadrupolar interaction parameters determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full boron assignment based on NMR parameters and response to {sup 19}F decoupling.

  16. First Measurement of the 19F(α, p)22Ne Reaction at Energies of Astrophysical Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; D’Agata, G.; La Cognata, M.; Indelicato, I.; Spitaleri, C.; Blagus, S.; Cherubini, S.; Figuera, P.; Grassi, L.; Guardo, G. L.; Gulino, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Kshetri, R.; Lamia, L.; Lattuada, M.; Mijatović, T.; Milin, M.; Miljanić D., Đ.; Prepolec, L.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Skukan, N.; Soić, N.; Tokić, V.; Tumino, A.; Uroić, M.

    2017-02-01

    The observational 19F abundance in stellar environments systematically exceeds the predicted one, thus representing one of the unsolved challenges for stellar modeling. It is therefore clear that further investigation is needed in this field. In this work, we focus our attention on the measurement of the {}19{{F}}{(α ,p)}22{Ne} reaction in the astrophysical energy range, between 0.2 and 0.8 MeV (far below the Coulomb barrier, 3.8 MeV), as it represents the main destruction channel in He-rich environments. The lowest energy at which this reaction has been studied with direct measurements is ∼0.66 MeV, covering only the upper tail of the Gamow window, causing the reaction-rate evaluation to be based on extrapolation. To investigate lower energies, the {}19{{F}}{(α ,p)}22{Ne} reaction has been studied by means of the Trojan horse method, applied to the quasi-free {}6{Li}{{(}19{{F}},{p}22{Ne})}2{{H}} reaction at E beam = 6 MeV. The indirect cross section of the {}19{{F}}{(α ,p)}22{Ne} reaction at energies ≲1 MeV was extracted, fully covering the astrophysical region of interest and overlapping existing direct data for normalization. Several resonances have been detected for the first time inside the Gamow window. The reaction rate has been calculated, showing an increase up to a factor of 4 with respect to the literature at astrophysical temperatures. This might lead to potential major astrophysical implications.

  17. A (25)Mg, (89)Y and (115)In solid state MAS NMR study of YT2X and Y(T0.5T'0.5)2X (T/T' = Pd, Ag, Au; X = Mg, In) Heusler phases.

    PubMed

    Benndorf, Christopher; Stein, Sebastian; Heletta, Lukas; Kersting, Marcel; Eckert, Hellmut; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2016-12-20

    Yttrium-transition metal-magnesium (indium) Heusler phases YPd2Mg, YPd2In, YAg2Mg, YAg2In, YAu2Mg, and YAu2In and their quaternary compounds (solid solutions) Y(Pd0.5Ag0.5)2Mg, Y(Pd0.5Ag0.5)2In, Y(Pd0.5Au0.5)2Mg, Y(Pd0.5Au0.5)2In, Y(Ag0.5Au0.5)2Mg and Y(Ag0.5Au0.5)2In were synthesized from the elements in sealed niobium ampoules in a high-frequency furnace or by arc-melting, respectively. All compounds crystallize with the cubic MnCu2Al type structure (Heusler phase), space group Fm3[combining macron]m. The structure of Y(Ag0.39Au0.61)2Mg was refined from single crystal X-ray diffractometer data: a = 689.97(5) pm, wR2 = 0.0619, 52 F(2) values, 6 parameters. Magnetic susceptibility measurements show Pauli paramagnetic behavior for all samples. The compounds were investigated by (25)Mg, (89)Y and (115)In solid state MAS NMR spectroscopy. Large positive resonance shifts are observed for all nuclei. A review of the present data in the context of literature data on isotypic Heusler phases with Cd and Sn indicates that the (89)Y shifts show a correlation with the electronegativity of the main group atoms (Mg, Cd, In, Sn). The solid solutions Y(Ag1-xTx)2Mg (x = 0.1, 0.25, 0.33, 0.5; T = Pd, Au) clearly show Vegard-like behavior concerning their lattice parameters, and their main group element resonance shifts arising from spin and orbital contributions are close to the interpolated values of the corresponding end-member compounds.

  18. Phenylboronic acid-based (19)F MRI probe for the detection and imaging of hydrogen peroxide utilizing its large chemical-shift change.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; An, Qi; Sugihara, Fuminori; Doura, Tomohiro; Tsuchiya, Akira; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Sando, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report on a new (19)F MRI probe for the detection and imaging of H2O2. Our designed 2-fluorophenylboronic acid-based (19)F probe promptly reacted with H2O2 to produce 2-fluorophenol via boronic acid oxidation. The accompanying (19)F chemical-shift change reached 31 ppm under our experimental conditions. Such a large chemical-shift change allowed for the imaging of H2O2 by (19)F chemical-shift-selective MRI.

  19. Direct Observation of Lattice Aluminum Environments in Li Ion Cathodes LiNi 1–yz Co y Al z O 2 and Al-Doped LiNi x Mn y Co z O 2 via 27 Al MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Fulya; Vaughey, John T.; Iddir, Hakim; Key, Baris

    2016-07-06

    Direct observations of local lattice aluminum environments have been a major challenge for aluminum -bearing Li ion battery materials, such as LiNi1-y-zCoyAlzO2 Al(NCA) and aluminum-doped LiNixMnyCozO2 (NMC). Al-27 magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the only structural probe currently available that can qualitatively and quantitatively characterize lattice and nonlattice (i.e., surface, coatings, segregation, secondary phase etc.) aluminum coordination and provide information that helps discern its effect in the lattice. In the present study, we use NMR to gain new insights into transition metal (TM)-O-Al coordination and evolution of lattice aluminum sites upon cycling. With the aid of first-principles DFT calculations, we show direct evidence of lattice Al sites, nonpreferential Ni/Co-O-Al ordering in NCA, and the lack of bulk lattice aluminum in aluminum -"doped" NMC. Aluminum coordination of the paramagnetic (lattice) and diamagnetic (nonlattice) nature is investigated for Al-doped NMC and NCA. For the latter, the evolution of the lattice site(s) upon cycling is also studied. A clear reordering of lattice aluminum environments due to nickel migration is observed in NCA upon extended cycling.

  20. Self-Assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles Designed as Imaging Probes for 19F and Relaxation-Enhanced 1H imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preslar, Adam Truett

    This work incorporates whole-body imaging functionality into peptide amphiphile (PA) nanostructures used for regenerative medicine to facilitate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two strategies were employed: 1. Conjugation of gadolinium chelates to peptide nanostructures to monitor biomaterial degradation in vivo with MRI and inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) 2. Synthesis of perfluorinated moiety-bearing peptide amphiphiles for 19F-MRI. The Gd(III) chelate gadoteridol was conjugated by copper-catalyzed "click" chemistry to a series of PAs known to form cylindrical nanostructures. By fitting nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion (NMRD) profiles to the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) equations, it was observed that the water exchange parameter (tauM) depended on thermal annealing or calcium ion cross-linking. The sequence C16V 3A3E3G(Gd) exhibited an acceleration of nearly 100 ns after thermal annealing and calcium addition. These gadolinium-labeled PAs were used to track in vivo degradation of gels within the tibialis anterior muscle in a murine model. The half-life of biomaterial degradation was determined to be 13.5 days by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) of Gd(III). Gel implants could be monitored by MRI for eight days before the signal dispersed due to implant degradation and dilution. Additionally, nanostructures incorporating highly fluorinated domains were investigated for use as MRI contrast agents. Short, perfluoroalkyane tails of seven or eight carbon atoms in length were grafted to PA sequences containing a V2A2 beta-sheet forming sequence. The V2A2 sequence is known to drive 1D nanostructure assembly. It was found that the sequences C7F13V2A 2E2 and C7F13V2A 2K3 formed 1D assemblies in water which transition from ribbon-like to cylindrical shape as pH increases from 4.5 to 8.0. Ribbon-like nanostructures had reduced magnetic resonance signal by T 2 relaxation quenching, whereas their cylindrical counterparts

  1. NMR and structural features of noble-metal fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Gabuda, S.P.; Zemskov, S.V.

    1987-11-01

    NMR studies are reported on the structures of binary and other noble-metal fluorides. Revised measurements have been made on /sup 19/F chemical shifts and the anisotropy in them. A relationship is considered between the screening tensor for /sup 19/F and the electronic structure of the molecule or ion containing the noble-metal cation in the electronic configuration d/sup 6/, d/sup 8/, or d/sup 10/. The observed anomalous shifts in this class of compound are explained qualitatively in terms of paired electrons in filled d shells affecting the result within the framework of the classical theory of magnetic nuclear screening.

  2. Solid-state NMR studies of form I of atorvastatin calcium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei David; Gao, Xudong; Strohmeier, Mark; Wang, Wei; Bai, Shi; Dybowski, Cecil

    2012-03-22

    Solid-state (13)C, (19)F, and (15)N magic angle spinning NMR studies of Form I of atorvastatin calcium are reported, including chemical shift tensors of all resolvable carbon sites and fluorine sites. The complete (13)C and (19)F chemical shift assignments are given based on an extensive analysis of (13)C-(1)H HETCOR and (13)C-(19)F HETCOR results. The solid-state NMR data indicate that the asymmetric unit of this material contains two atorvastatin molecules. A possible structure of Form I of atorvastatin calcium (ATC-I), derived from solid-state NMR data and density functional theory calculations of various structures, is proposed for this important active pharmaceutical ingredient (API).

  3. Implementation of a modified birdcage resonator for 19F/1H MRI at low fields (0.14 T).

    PubMed

    Samaratunga, R C; Pratt, R G; Zhu, Y; Massoth, R J; Thomas, S R

    1994-05-01

    Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance of perfluorinated blood substitute materials provides a method for determination of oxygen tension (pO2) in vivo. Use of a double resonant 19F/1H radio frequency coil allows convenient correlation between the high resolution anatomic presentation of proton images and the fluorine distribution. However, quantitative 19F measurements require an RF coil with good H1 field homogeneity over the image volume and a high quality factor (Q) to minimize errors caused by the low signal-to-noise levels available in in vivo imaging and image nonuniformities introduced by the large chemical shift of fluorocarbons. The birdcage coil design provides a high Q structure with optimum H1 field uniformity and fill factor. However, at low resonance frequencies, the inherently low inductance of the birdcage geometry requires the use of a large number of chip capacitors giving rise to unwieldy coil fabrication and increased cost. This communication describes a modification to the birdcage design that reduces the chip capacitor requirement by at least a factor of 4 for a given dimension, yet retains the essential characteristics of the birdcage design. The modified structure was tuned for double resonance at 5.7/6.0 MHz for 19F/1H magnetic resonance imaging at 0.14 T. For a coil with a length to diameter ratio of 1.67, an H1 uniformity of +/- 2% for the 19F resonance was obtained over a cylindrical region with radius approximately 0.6r (r = radius of coil) and length approximately 1.8r within the coil.

  4. Measurement of large /sup 19/F chemical shifts with the RYa-2305 spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Iorga, E.V.; Kucheryaev, A.G.; Lebedev, V.A.; Leont'eva, I.N.

    1985-06-01

    In order to extend the range of F-19 resonant frequencies in the RYa-2305 high-resolution NMR spectrometer, the authors have replaced the generator 9 by a tunable generator. This allows recording of the spectra together or to measure the chemical shifts exactly. The chemical shifts for MeF/sub 6/ in solutions of the hexafluorides of Mo, W, and U in organic solvents are shown, as measured at +20 degrees C. The upgrades in the RYa-2305 not only extend the range of measurable F-19 chemical shifts, but also enable one to measure large shifts with high accuracy. This principle for recording and measuring can be applied to other nuclides with the RYa2305 spectrometer.

  5. Site-specific solvent exposure analysis of a membrane protein using unnatural amino acids and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Li, Dong; Chen, Hongwei; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Solvent isotope shift analysis of {sup 19}F-tfmF in different H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O molar ratio. {yields} Correlation between solvent isotope shift of {sup 19}F-spins and solvent exposure analysis. {yields} Solvent exposure analysis of membrane proteins. -- Abstract: Membrane proteins play an essential role in cellular metabolism, transportation and signal transduction across cell membranes. The scarcity of membrane protein structures has thus far prevented a full understanding of their molecular mechanisms. Preliminary topology studies and residue solvent exposure analysis have the potential to provide valuable information on membrane proteins of unknown structure. Here, a {sup 19}F-containing unnatural amino acid (trimethylfluoro-phenylalanine, tfmF) was applied to accomplish site-specific {sup 19}F spin incorporation at different sites in diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK, an Escherichia coli membrane protein) for site-specific solvent exposure analysis. Due to isotope effect on {sup 19}F spins, a standard curve for {sup 19}F-tfmF chemical shifts was drawn for varying solvent H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O ratios. Further site-specific {sup 19}F solvent isotope shift analysis was conducted for DAGK to distinguish residues in water-soluble loops, interfacial areas or hydrophobic membrane regions. This site-specific solvent exposure analysis method could be applied for further topological analysis of other membrane proteins.

  6. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the past reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines the authors are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. The authors have been reinvestigating the prospects of using zero field NMR types of techniques for two dimensional NMR structural analysis of complex organic solids such as coals. Currently MAS spin rates are not sufficiently high to permit zero field in high field NMR for protons in typical organic solids, however they are compatible with {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C dipolar couplings. In collaboration with Dr. Robert Tycko of AT T Bell Laboratories, inventor of the zero field in high field NMR method, the authors have performed the first zero field in high field {sup 13}C NMR experiments. These results are described. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of 14N and 19F superhyperfine interaction in VO 2+ doped propylenediammonium hexafluorozirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi^Kasturi, T.; Krishnan, V. G.

    1998-05-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra have been recorded at X-band frequencies at room temperature on VO 2+ molecular ion in propylenediammonium hexafluorozirconate, [H 3N(CH 2) 3NH 3]ZrF 6, single crystals. The superhyperfine structure caused by 14N and 19F has been clearly observed in the spectra. The two sets of spectra observed are related to each other by the symmetry operations of the host crystals and represent vanadyl ion at two magnetically distinguishable interstitial sites in the unit cell.

  8. Protein-Observed Fluorine NMR Is a Complementary Ligand Discovery Method to (1)H CPMG Ligand-Observed NMR.

    PubMed

    Urick, Andrew K; Calle, Luis Pablo; Espinosa, Juan F; Hu, Haitao; Pomerantz, William C K

    2016-11-18

    To evaluate its potential as a ligand discovery tool, we compare a newly developed 1D protein-observed fluorine NMR (PrOF NMR) screening method with the well-characterized ligand-observed (1)H CPMG NMR screen. We selected the first bromodomain of Brd4 as a model system to benchmark PrOF NMR because of the high ligandability of Brd4 and the need for small molecule inhibitors of related epigenetic regulatory proteins. We compare the two methods' hit sensitivity, triaging ability, experiment speed, material consumption, and the potential for false positives and negatives. To this end, we screened 930 fragment molecules against Brd4 in mixtures of five and followed up these studies with mixture deconvolution and affinity characterization of the top hits. In selected examples, we also compare the environmental responsiveness of the (19)F chemical shift to (1)H in 1D-protein observed (1)H NMR experiments. To address concerns of perturbations from fluorine incorporation, ligand binding trends and affinities were verified via thermal shift assays and isothermal titration calorimetry. We conclude that for the protein understudy here, PrOF NMR and (1)H CPMG have similar sensitivity, with both being effective tools for ligand discovery. In cases where an unlabeled protein can be used, 1D protein-observed (1)H NMR may also be effective; however, the (19)F chemical shift remains significantly more responsive.

  9. Review of NMR characterization of pyrolysis oils

    DOE PAGES

    Hao, Naijia; Ben, Haoxi; Yoo, Chang Geun; ...

    2016-08-24

    Here, pyrolysis of renewable biomass has been developed as a method to produce green fuels and chemicals in response to energy security concerns as well as to alleviate environmental issues incurred with fossil fuel usage. However, pyrolysis oils still have limited commercial application, mainly because unprocessed oils cannot be readily blended with current petroleum-based transportation fuels. To better understand these challenges, researchers have applied diverse characterization techniques in the development of bio-oil studies. In particular, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a key spectroscopic characterization method through analysis of bio-oil components. This review highlights the NMR strategies for pyrolysis oil characterizationmore » and critically discusses the applications of 1H, 13C, 31P, 19F, and two-dimensional (2-D NMR) analyses such as heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) in representative pyrolysis oil studies.« less

  10. Understanding of Nuclear Quadruple Interaction of ^ 19F* and Binding Energies of Solid Fluorine at the First-Principles Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, D. R.; Aryal, M. M.; Adhikari, N. P.; Badu, S. R.; Pink, R. H.; Scheicher, R. H.; Chow, Lee; Das, T. P.

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the binding energy (BE) and nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) parameters for the ^19F* excited nuclear state in solid fluorine as part of our investigation [1] of the properties of solid halogens using the first principles Hartree-Fock Cluster procedure combined with many-body perturbation theory (MBPT), implemented by the Gaussian 03 set of programs. Our results show that Van der Waals interaction obtained from intermolecular electron correlation has dominant effect on the BE but negligible effect on the NQI parameters. For the latter, our e^2qQ is 117.7MHz forQ(^19F*), 0.072 *10-28 m^2 [2] and η is essentially zero.. The influence of vibrational effects on e^2qQ is being investigated using a first-principles procedure [3] to bridge the small remaining difference with experiment. [1] M.M. Aryal et al., Hyperfine Interact, 176, 51 (2007). [2] K.C.Mishra et al.,Phys. Rev.B25, 3389(1982). [3] N. Sahoo et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 50, 913(1983) [4] H. Barfuss et al., Phys. Lett. 90A, 33(1982).

  11. Simultaneous dual frequency 1H and 19F open coil imaging of arthritic rabbit knee at 3T.

    PubMed

    Hockett, Franklin D; Wallace, Kirk D; Schmieder, Anne H; Caruthers, Shelton D; Pham, Christine T N; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The combination of sensitive magnetic resonance techniques with a selective site-targeted nanoparticle contrast agent has a demonstrated utility for molecular imaging studies. By detecting a unique signature of the contrast agent, this approach can be employed to identify specific bio-molecular markers and observe cellular-level processes within a large and complex organism (e.g., in vivo rabbit). The objective of the present investigation was to design, fabricate and characterize a radio-frequency (RF) coil for the dual frequency ((1)H and (19)F) simultaneous collection of both nuclei images in a 3T field, in order to facilitate studies of arthritic knee degradation in rabbits. The coil supports both transmit and receive modes. The supporting activities included: 1) establishing a technical database for calculating the required coil parameters, 2) selection of a favorable coil geometry, and 3) adaption of existing RF measurement techniques to the design, development and electrical evaluation of the coil. The coil is used in conjunction with a Philips Medical Systems clinical MRI scanner, requiring all RF simultaneous dual frequency ((1)H and (19)F) coils to operate in both transmit and receive modes. A commercial version of SPICE (simulation program with integrated circuit emphasis) was used to estimate significant operational parameters prior to fabricating the imaging coil. Excellent images were obtained with the fabricated coil and no operational problems were observed that would limit the use of other coil geometries and field strengths.

  12. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concern how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. During the last quarter the authors have concentrated on improvements in cross polarization (CP) sequences with a goal of making the CP process insensitive to experimental conditions such as the magic angle spinning (MAS) rate. In order to be able to use fields the order of 7.0 T or higher, CP efficiency must be maintained at MAS rates of over 10 kHz. The standard sequences have severe limitations at these rates which lead to intensity distortions in {sup 13}C CPMAS spectra. Thus in order to be able to take advantage of the increases in sensitivity and resolution that accompany high field operation, improvements in the NMR methods are required. The new sequences the authors are developing will be especially important for quantitative analysis of coal structure by {sup 13}C solid state NMR at high field strengths. 13 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Synthesis of fluorophosphate nucleotide analogues and their characterization as tools for ¹⁹F NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Marek R; Nowicka, Anna; Rydzik, Anna M; Warminski, Marcin; Kasprzyk, Renata; Wojtczak, Blazej A; Wojcik, Jacek; Claridge, Timothy D W; Kowalska, Joanna; Jemielity, Jacek

    2015-04-17

    To broaden the scope of existing methods based on (19)F nucleotide labeling, we developed a new method for the synthesis of fluorophosphate (oligo)nucleotide analogues containing an O to F substitution at the terminal position of the (oligo)phosphate moiety and evaluated them as tools for (19)F NMR studies. Using three efficient and comprehensive synthetic approaches based on phosphorimidazolide chemistry and tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride, fluoromonophosphate, or fluorophosphate imidazolide as fluorine sources, we prepared over 30 fluorophosphate-containing nucleotides, varying in nucleobase type (A, G, C, U, m(7)G), phosphate chain length (from mono to tetra), and presence of additional phosphate modifications (thio, borano, imido, methylene). Using fluorophosphate imidazolide as fluorophosphorylating reagent for 5'-phosphorylated oligos we also synthesized oligonucleotide 5'-(2-fluorodiphosphates), which are potentially useful as (19)F NMR hybridization probes. The compounds were characterized by (19)F NMR and evaluated as (19)F NMR molecular probes. We found that fluorophosphate nucleotide analogues can be used to monitor activity of enzymes with various specificities and metal ion requirements, including human DcpS enzyme, a therapeutic target for spinal muscular atrophy. The compounds can also serve as reporter ligands for protein binding studies, as exemplified by studying interaction of fluorophosphate mRNA cap analogues with eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF4E).

  14. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor.

  15. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3 mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67 kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3 mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7 mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor.

  16. NMR shielding calculations across the periodic table: diamagnetic uranium compounds. 2. Ligand and metal NMR.

    PubMed

    Schreckenbach, Georg

    2002-12-16

    In this and a previous article (J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 8244), the range of application for relativistic density functional theory (DFT) is extended to the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shieldings and chemical shifts in diamagnetic actinide compounds. Two relativistic DFT methods are used, ZORA ("zeroth-order regular approximation") and the quasirelativistic (QR) method. In the given second paper, NMR shieldings and chemical shifts are calculated and discussed for a wide range of compounds. The molecules studied comprise uranyl complexes, [UO(2)L(n)](+/-)(q); UF(6); inorganic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)Cl(n), n = 0-6; and organometallic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n), n = 0-5. Uranyl complexes include [UO(2)F(4)](2-), [UO(2)Cl(4)](2-), [UO(2)(OH)(4)](2-), [UO(2)(CO(3))(3)](4-), and [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](2+). For the ligand NMR, moderate (e.g., (19)F NMR chemical shifts in UF(6-n)Cl(n)) to excellent agreement [e.g., (19)F chemical shift tensor in UF(6) or (1)H NMR in UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n)] has been found between theory and experiment. The methods have been used to calculate the experimentally unknown (235)U NMR chemical shifts. A large chemical shift range of at least 21,000 ppm has been predicted for the (235)U nucleus. ZORA spin-orbit appears to be the most accurate method for predicting actinide metal chemical shifts. Trends in the (235)U NMR chemical shifts of UF(6-n)L(n) molecules are analyzed and explained in terms of the calculated electronic structure. It is argued that the energy separation and interaction between occupied and virtual orbitals with f-character are the determining factors.

  17. NMR reveals the surface functionalisation of Ti3C2 MXene.

    PubMed

    Hope, Michael A; Forse, Alexander C; Griffith, Kent J; Lukatskaya, Maria R; Ghidiu, Michael; Gogotsi, Yury; Grey, Clare P

    2016-02-21

    (1)H and (19)F NMR experiments have identified and quantified the internal surface terminations of Ti3C2Tx MXene. -F and -OH terminations are shown to be intimately mixed and there are found to be significantly fewer -OH terminations than -F and -O, with the proportions highly dependent on the synthesis method.

  18. Differential cross section measurements of the 19F(d,d0) elastic scattering for Ion Beam Analysis purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foteinou, V.; Provatas, G.; Aslanoglou, X.; Axiotis, M.; Harissopulos, S.; Kokkoris, M.; Lagoyannis, A.; Misaelides, P.; Ntemou, E.; Patronis, N.; Preketes-Sigalas, K.

    2017-04-01

    The differential cross sections of the 19F(d,d0) elastic scattering were determined at five backward angles from 125° to 170°. Two independent experiments were performed, one for the determination of the cross sections and one for the validation of the obtained results. In the first experiment, a thin natLiF target was bombarded with deuterons in the energy region from 0.94 to 2.0 MeV. In the benchmarking experiment, a thick ZnF2 pellet was irradiated with deuterons at Ed,lab = 1.11, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8and 2.0MeV .

  19. (19)F MRSI of capecitabine in the liver at 7 T using broadband transmit-receive antennas and dual-band RF pulses.

    PubMed

    van Gorp, Jetse S; Seevinck, Peter R; Andreychenko, Anna; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; Luijten, Peter R; Viergever, Max A; Koopman, Miriam; Boer, Vincent O; Klomp, Dennis W J

    2015-11-01

    Capecitabine (Cap) is an often prescribed chemotherapeutic agent, successfully used to cure some patients from cancer or reduce tumor burden for palliative care. However, the efficacy of the drug is limited, it is not known in advance who will respond to the drug and it can come with severe toxicity. (19)F Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) have been used to non-invasively study Cap metabolism in vivo to find a marker for personalized treatment. In vivo detection, however, is hampered by low concentrations and the use of radiofrequency (RF) surface coils limiting spatial coverage. In this work, the use of a 7T MR system with radiative multi-channel transmit-receive antennas was investigated with the aim of maximizing the sensitivity and spatial coverage of (19)F detection protocols. The antennas were broadband optimized to facilitate both the (1)H (298 MHz) and (19)F (280 MHz) frequencies for accurate shimming, imaging and signal combination. B1(+) simulations, phantom and noise measurements showed that more than 90% of the theoretical maximum sensitivity could be obtained when using B1(+) and B1(-) information provided at the (1)H frequency for the optimization of B1(+) and B1(-) at the (19)F frequency. Furthermore, to overcome the limits in maximum available RF power, whilst ensuring simultaneous excitation of all detectable conversion products of Cap, a dual-band RF pulse was designed and evaluated. Finally, (19)F MRS(I) measurements were performed to detect (19)F metabolites in vitro and in vivo. In two patients, at 10 h (patient 1) and 1 h (patient 2) after Cap intake, (19)F metabolites were detected in the liver and the surrounding organs, illustrating the potential of the set-up for in vivo detection of metabolic rates and drug distribution in the body.

  20. Fluorine-19 or phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopy: a suitable analytical technique for quantitative in vitro metabolic studies of fluorinated or phosphorylated drugs.

    PubMed

    Martino, Robert; Gilard, Véronique; Desmoulin, Franck; Malet-Martino, Myriam

    2005-08-10

    Fluorine-19 or phosphorus-31 NMR (19F NMR or 31P NMR) spectroscopy provides a highly specific tool for identification of fluorine- or phosphorus-containing drugs and their metabolites in biological media as well as a suitable analytical technique for their absolute quantification. This article focuses on the application of in vitro 19F or 31P NMR to the quantitative metabolic studies of some fluoropyrimidine or oxazaphosphorine drugs in clinical use. The first part presents an overview of the advantages (non-destructive and non-selective direct quantitative study of the biological matrices) and limitations (expensive cost of the spectrometers, limited mass or concentration sensitivity) of NMR spectroscopy. The second part deals with the criteria to be considered for successful quantification by NMR (uniform excitation over the entire spectral width of the spectrum, resonance signals properly characterised by taking into account T1 values and avoiding NOE enhancements, optimisation of the data processing, choice of a suitable standard reference). The third and fourth parts report some examples of quantification of 5-fluorouracil, its prodrug capecitabine, 5-fluorocytosine and their metabolites in bulk solutions (biofluids, tissue extracts, perfusates and culture media) and heterogeneous media (excised tissues and packed intact cells) as well as cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide in biofluids. These two parts emphasise the high potential of in vitro 19F or 31P NMR for absolute quantification, in a single run, of all the fluorine- or phosphorus-containing species in the matrices analysed. The limit of quantification in bulk solutions is 1-3 microM for 19F NMR and approximately 10 microM for 31P NMR. In heterogeneous media analysed with 19F NMR, it is 2-5 nmol in excised tissues and cell pellets.

  1. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy: A Versatile Technique for Structural and Dynamic Analysis of Solid-Phase Systems

    PubMed Central

    Polenova, Tatyana; Gupta, Rupal; Goldbourt, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analysis of a broad range of systems, including inorganic materials, pharmaceuticals, and biomacromolecules. The recent developments in MAS NMR instrumentation and methodologies opened new vistas to atomic-level characterization of a plethora of chemical environments previously inaccessible to analysis, with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. PMID:25794311

  2. Use of [superscript 1]H, [superscript 13]C, and [superscript 19]F-NMR Spectroscopy and Computational Modeling to Explore Chemoselectivity in the Formation of a Grignard Reagent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Sara M.; Kopitzke, Robert W.; Nalli, Thomas W.; Esselman, Brian J.; Hill, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    A discovery-based Grignard experiment for a second-year undergraduate organic chemistry course is described. The exclusive Grignard reagent formed by the reaction of 1-bromo-4-fluorobenzene (1) with Mg is 4-fluorophenylmagnesium bromide (2), which is treated with either benzophenone or CO[subscript 2] to produce the corresponding fluorinated…

  3. Portable microcoil NMR detection coupled to capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Joana; Adams, Kristl L; Klunder, Gregory L; Evans, Lee; Steele, Paul; Vogt, Carla; Herberg, Julie L

    2011-02-15

    High-efficiency separation techniques, such as capillary electrophoresis (CE), coupled to a nondestructive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer offer the ability to separate, chemically identify, and provide structural information on analytes in small sample volumes. Previous CE-NMR coupled systems utilized laboratory-scale NMR magnets and spectrometers, which require very long separation capillaries. New technological developments in electronics have reduced the size of the NMR system, and small 1-2 T permanent magnets provide the possibilities of a truly portable NMR. The microcoils used in portable and laboratory-scale NMR may offer the advantage of improved mass sensitivity because the limit of detection (LOD) is proportional to the coil diameter. In this work, CE is coupled with a portable, briefcase-sized NMR system that incorporates a microcoil probe and a 1.8 T permanent magnet to measure (19)F NMR spectra. Separations of fluorinated molecules are demonstrated with stopped- and continuous-flow NMR detection. The results demonstrate that coupling CE to a portable NMR instrument is feasible and can provide a low-cost method to obtain structural information on microliter samples. An LOD of 31.8 nmol for perfluorotributylamine with a resolution of 4 ppm has been achieved with this system.

  4. NMR study of the reversible trapping of SF6 by cucurbit[6]uril in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Locci, Emanuela; Lai, Adolfo; Luhmer, Michel

    2008-11-27

    The complexation of sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), a highly potent greenhouse gas, by cucurbit[6]uril (CB) was studied at various temperatures in Na(2)SO(4) aqueous solutions by (19)F and (1)H NMR. CB shows a remarkable affinity for SF(6), suggesting that it is a suitable molecular container for the design of materials tailored for SF(6) trapping. At 298 K, the equilibrium constant characterizing the inclusion of SF(6) by CB is 3.1 x 10(4) M(-1) and the residence time of SF(6) within the CB cavity is estimated to be of the order of a few seconds. The enthalpic and entropic contributions to the free energy of encapsulation were determined and are discussed. This work also reports on the interest of SF(6) in the framework of the spin-spy methodology. The advantages and drawbacks of solution-state (19)F NMR of SF(6) with respect to (129)Xe NMR are discussed. SF(6) comes forward as a versatile and informative spin-spy molecule for probing systems in solution because its detection limit by (19)F NMR reaches the micromolar range with standard equipment and because quantitative integral measurements, relaxation time measurements, and demanding experiments, such as translational diffusion coefficient measurements, are easily carried out in addition to chemical shift measurements. Solution-state (19)F NMR of SF(6) emerges as a promising alternative to (129)Xe NMR for probing cavities and for other applications relying on the encapsulation of an NMR active gaseous probe.

  5. Verification of threshold activation detection (TAD) technique in prompt fission neutron detection using scintillators containing 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibczynski, P.; Kownacki, J.; Moszyński, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Gójska, A.; Gierlik, M.; Kaźmierczak, Ł.; Jakubowska, E.; Kędzierski, G.; Kujawiński, Ł.; Wojnarowicz, J.; Carrel, F.; Ledieu, M.; Lainé, F.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study ⌀ 5''× 3'' and ⌀ 2''× 2'' EJ-313 liquid fluorocarbon as well as ⌀ 2'' × 3'' BaF2 scintillators were exposed to neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source and a Sodern Genie 16GT deuterium-tritium (D+T) neutron generator. The scintillators responses to β- particles with maximum endpoint energy of 10.4 MeV from the n+19F reactions were studied. Response of a ⌀ 5'' × 3'' BC-408 plastic scintillator was also studied as a reference. The β- particles are the products of interaction of fast neutrons with 19F which is a component of the EJ-313 and BaF2 scintillators. The method of fast neutron detection via fluorine activation is already known as Threshold Activation Detection (TAD) and was proposed for photofission prompt neutron detection from fissionable and Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) in the field of Homeland Security and Border Monitoring. Measurements of the number of counts between 6.0 and 10.5 MeV with a 252Cf source showed that the relative neutron detection efficiency ratio, defined as epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'', is 32.0% ± 2.3% and 44.6% ± 3.4% for front-on and side-on orientation of the BaF2, respectively. Moreover, the ⌀ 5'' EJ-313 and side-on oriented BaF2 were also exposed to neutrons from the D+T neutron generator, and the relative efficiency epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'' was estimated to be 39.3%. Measurements of prompt photofission neutrons with the BaF2 detector by means of data acquisition after irradiation (out-of-beam) of nuclear material and between the beam pulses (beam-off) techniques were also conducted on the 9 MeV LINAC of the SAPHIR facility.

  6. Multinucleon transfer in O,1816,19F+208Pb reactions at energies near the fusion barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafferty, D. C.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Williams, E.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Luong, D. H.; McNeil, S. D.; Ramachandran, K.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Wakhle, A.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Nuclear reactions are complex, involving collisions between composite systems where many-body dynamics determines outcomes. Successful models have been developed to explain particular reaction outcomes in distinct energy and mass regimes, but a unifying picture remains elusive. The irreversible transfer of kinetic energy from the relative motion of the collision partners to their internal states, as is known to occur in deep inelastic collisions, has yet to be successfully incorporated explicitly into fully quantal reaction models. The influence of these processes on fusion is not yet quantitatively understood. Purpose: To investigate the population of high excitation energies in transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies, which are precursors to deep inelastic processes, and their dependence on the internuclear separation. Methods: Transfer probabilities and excitation energy spectra have been measured in collisions of O,1816,19F+208Pb , at various energies below and around the fusion barrier, by detecting the backscattered projectile-like fragments in a Δ E -E telescope. Results: The relative yields of different transfer outcomes are strongly driven by Q values, but change with the internuclear separation. In 16O+208Pb , single nucleon transfer dominates, with a strong contribution from -2 p transfer close to the Coulomb barrier, though this channel becomes less significant in relation to the -2 p 2 n transfer channel at larger separations. For 18O+208Pb , the -2 p 2 n channel is the dominant charge transfer mode at all separations. In the reactions with 19F,-3 p 2 n transfer is significant close to the barrier, but falls off rapidly with energy. Multinucleon transfer processes are shown to lead to high excitation energies (up to ˜15 MeV), which is distinct from single nucleon transfer modes which predominantly populate states at low excitation energy. Conclusions: Kinetic energy is transferred into internal excitations following transfer, with this

  7. In Vivo 19F MR Imaging Cell Tracking of Inflammatory Macrophages and Site-specific Development of Colitis-associated Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo Hyun; Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether the magnitude of in vivo fluorine 19 (19F) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging signal is associated with subsequent development of colitis-associated dysplasia after in situ fluorination of inflammatory macrophages in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Materials and Methods Experiments were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Mice in the experimental group (n = 10) were administered azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium to induce colitis-associated dysplasia. Five mice were in the noninduced control group. Animals were injected with a commercially available perfluorocarbon and were examined in vivo with an 11.7-T MR imager for up to 110 days. Colons were then harvested followed by high-spatial-resolution ex vivo MR imaging. Multiple colon segments with or without 19F signal were histologically graded and were correlated with 19F signal intensity by using a Spearman correlation test. The signal intensity in mice with colitis-associated dysplasia was compared with that in control mice with a two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test. Results Patchy distributions of 19F signal intensity in the colon wall were seen on in vivo and ex vivo images, representing chronic inflammation as shown by immunohistochemistry. Histologic scores of inflammation and site-specific development of colitis-associated dysplasia in the descending colon showed good correlation with normalized 19F signal intensity (r = 0.88, P = .033 for the ascending colon; r = 0.82, P = .006 for the descending colon). A significantly (P = .002) higher normalized 19F signal-to-noise ratio was found at sites that developed dysplasia (mean, 0.58 ± 0.09 [standard deviation]) as compared with sites that did not (mean, 0.17 ± 0.22). Conclusion 19F MR imaging cell tracking of macrophages can be used to assess local inflammation in a mouse model of IBD. The resulting local 19F signal intensity, representing the magnitude of inflammation, has a positive

  8. Instrumentation for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization with magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Rosay, Melanie; Blank, Monica; Engelke, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation and methodology have been key factors in the recent growth of solid-state DNP NMR applications. We review the current state of the art of solid-state DNP NMR instrumentation primarily based on available commercial platforms. We start with a general system overview, including options for microwave sources and DNP NMR probes, and then focus on specific developments for DNP at 100K with magic angle spinning (MAS). Gyrotron microwave sources, passive components to transmit microwaves, the DNP MAS probe, a cooling device for low-temperature MAS, and sample preparation procedures including radicals for DNP are considered.

  9. Instrumentation for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization with magic angle spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosay, Melanie; Blank, Monica; Engelke, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation and methodology have been key factors in the recent growth of solid-state DNP NMR applications. We review the current state of the art of solid-state DNP NMR instrumentation primarily based on available commercial platforms. We start with a general system overview, including options for microwave sources and DNP NMR probes, and then focus on specific developments for DNP at 100 K with magic angle spinning (MAS). Gyrotron microwave sources, passive components to transmit microwaves, the DNP MAS probe, a cooling device for low-temperature MAS, and sample preparation procedures including radicals for DNP are considered.

  10. Tumour oxygen dynamics measured simultaneously by near-infrared spectroscopy and 19F magnetic resonance imaging in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Mengna; Kodibagkar, Vikram; Liu, Hanli; Mason, Ralph P.

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to investigate the correlation between tumour vascular oxygenation and tissue oxygen tension dynamics in rat breast 13762NF tumours with respect to hyperoxic gas breathing. NIRS directly detected global variations in the oxygenated haemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbO2]) within tumours and oxygen tension (pO2) maps were achieved using 19F MRI of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene. Multiple correlations were examined between rates and magnitudes of vascular (Δ[HbO2]) and tissue (pO2) responses. Significant correlations were found between response to oxygen and carbogen breathing using either modality. Comparison of results for the two methods showed a correlation between the vascular perfusion rate ratio and the mean pO2 values (R2 > 0.7). The initial rates of increase of Δ[HbO2] and the slope of dynamic pO2 response, d(pO2)/dt, of well-oxygenated voxels in response to hyperoxic challenge were also correlated. These results demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous measurements using NIRS and MRI. As expected, the rate of pO2 response to oxygen is primarily dependent upon the well perfused rather than poorly perfused vasculature. Presented in part at the 12th annual meeting of the International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Kyoto, 2004.

  11. Reaction mechanism coexistence in the 123 MeV {sup 19}F+{sup 56}Fe reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Brondi, A.; Kildir, M.; La Rana, G.; Moro, R.; Vardaci, E.; Pirrone, S.; Porto, F.; Sambataro, S.; Politi, G.; Figuera, P.

    1996-10-01

    Mass and charge identified ejectiles, spanning from {sup 11}B to {sup 22}Ne, have been detected in the 123 MeV {sup 19}F+{sup 56}Fe reaction. The coexistence of deep inelastic collision (DIC) and incomplete fusion (IF) mechanisms has been observed. The shape of the energy spectra and their behavior with angle allowed us to identify two components: The less dissipative one was dominating near the grazing angle. For both components experimental optimum {ital Q} values were derived. Two approaches based on the sum rule (SR) model of Wilczy{acute n}ski were used to calculate DIC and IF contributions to the complex fragment cross sections. Both prescriptions fit reasonably well experimental ejectile cross sections and {ital Q} optimum values. Results of the present investigation support the idea that the DIC can be treated on the same footing as IF in the SR model once the first process is confined in an inner angular momentum window, starting from the maximum fusion angular momentum, with respect to quasielastic processes. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. A Miniaturized, 1.9F Integrated Optical Fiber and Stone Basket for Use in Thulium Fiber Laser Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher R; Hutchens, Thomas C; Hardy, Luke A; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2015-10-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored as an alternative laser lithotripter to the standard holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The more uniform beam profile of the TFL enables higher power transmission through smaller fibers. In this study, a 100-μm core, 140-μm outer-diameter (OD) silica fiber with 5-mm length hollow steel tip was integrated with 1.3F (0.433-mm OD) nitinol wire basket to form a 1.9F (0.633-mm OD) device. TFL energy of 30 mJ, 500 μs pulse duration, and 500 Hz pulse rate was delivered to human uric acid stones, ex vivo. Stone ablation rates measured 1.5 ± 0.2 mg/s, comparable to 1.7 ± 0.3 mg/s using bare fiber tips separately with stone basket. With further development, this device may minimize stone retropulsion, allowing more efficient TFL lithotripsy at higher pulse rates. It may also provide increased flexibility, higher saline irrigation rates through the ureteroscope working channel, reduce fiber degradation compared with separate fiber and basket manipulation, and reduce laser-induced nitinol wire damage.

  13. Nucleon momentum distributions and elastic electron scattering from 19F, 25Mg, 27Al, and 29Si nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rahmani, A.

    2016-04-01

    The nucleon momentum distributions and elastic electron scattering form factors of the ground state for some odd 2 s-1 d shell nuclei, such as 19F, 25Mg, 27Al, and 29Si, have been investigated using the coherent density fluctuation model and expressed in terms of the fluctuation function (weight function) | f( x)|2. The fluctuation function has been related to the nucleon density distribution of the nuclei and determined from the theory. The property of the long-tail manner at high-momentum region of the nucleon momentum distribution has been obtained by theoretical fluctuation function. The calculated form factors F( q) of all nuclei under study are in very good agreement with those of experimental data throughout all values of momentum transfer q. It is concluded that the contributions of the quadrupole form factor F C2( q) in 25Mg and 27Al nuclei, which are characterized by the undeformed 2 s-1 d shell model, are necessary for getting a remarkable agreement between the theoretical and experimental form factors.

  14. NMR Spectroscopy for Thin Films by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Won, Soonho; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Lee, SangGap; Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Yunseok

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental research tool that is widely used in many fields. Despite its powerful applications, unfortunately the low sensitivity of conventional NMR makes it difficult to study thin film or nano-sized samples. In this work, we report the first NMR spectrum obtained from general thin films by using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). To minimize the amount of imaging information inevitably mixed into the signal when a gradient field is used, we adopted a large magnet with a flat end with a diameter of 336 μm that generates a homogeneous field on the sample plane and a field gradient in a direction perpendicular to the plane. Cyclic adiabatic inversion was used in conjunction with periodic phase inversion of the frequency shift to maximize the SNR. In this way, we obtained the 19F NMR spectrum for a 34 nm-thick CaF2 thin film. PMID:24217000

  15. Mas' Making and Pedagogy: Imagined Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournillier, Janice B.

    2009-01-01

    In this article I draw on an ethnographic case study that examined mas' makers' perceptions of the learning/teaching practices at work in the production of costumes for Trinidad and Tobago's annual Carnival celebrations. During the 2005 Carnival season I spent four months in the field, my country of birth, and collected data through participant…

  16. Tricritical point in ferroelastic ammonium titanyl fluoride: NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Kavun, V.Ya.; Kozlova, S.G.; Laptash, N.M; Tkachenko, I.A.; Gabuda, S.P

    2010-09-15

    Ionic mobility and phase transitions in ammonium titanyl pentafluoride (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}TiOF{sub 5} were studied using the {sup 19}F and {sup 1}H NMR data. The high-temperature phase (I) is characterized by spherically symmetric (isotropic) reorientation of [TiOF{sub 5}]{sup 3-} anions and by uniaxial reorientation of these anions in the ferroelastic phase II. A previously unknown second-order phase transition to the low-temperature modification (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}TiOF{sub 5}(III) was found at 205 K. The transition is accompanied by hindering of uniaxial rotations of [TiOF{sub 5}]{sup 3-} anions and by noticeable change of {sup 19}F magnetic shielding tensor associated with the influence of pseudo-Jahn-Teller effect. A pressure-induced tricritical point with coordinates p{sub TCR{approx}}2 kbar and T{sub TCR{approx}}170 K is estimated on the base of {sup 19}F NMR chemical shift data, and previously studied p-T diagram of (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}TiOF{sub 5}. - Graphical abstract: p-T phase diagram of (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}TiOF{sub 5}.

  17. Direct mapping of 19F in 19FDG-6P in brain tissue at subcellular resolution using soft X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitry-Yamate, C.; Gianoncelli, A.; Kourousias, G.; Kaulich, B.; Lepore, M.; Gruetter, R.; Kiskinova, M.

    2013-10-01

    Low energy x-ray fluorescence (LEXRF) detection was optimized for imaging cerebral glucose metabolism by mapping the fluorine LEXRF signal of 19F in 19FDG, trapped as intracellular 19F-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate (19FDG-6P) at 1μm spatial resolution from 3μm thick brain slices. 19FDG metabolism was evaluated in brain structures closely resembling the general cerebral cytoarchitecture following formalin fixation of brain slices and their inclusion in an epon matrix. 2-dimensional distribution maps of 19FDG-6P were placed in a cytoarchitectural and morphological context by simultaneous LEXRF mapping of N and O, and scanning transmission x-ray (STXM) imaging. A disproportionately high uptake and metabolism of glucose was found in neuropil relative to intracellular domains of the cell body of hypothalamic neurons, showing directly that neurons, like glial cells, also metabolize glucose. As 19F-deoxyglucose-6P is structurally identical to 18F-deoxyglucose-6P, LEXRF of subcellular 19F provides a link to in vivo 18FDG PET, forming a novel basis for understanding the physiological mechanisms underlying the 18FDG PET image, and the contribution of neurons and glia to the PET signal.

  18. Fundamental Science Tools for Geologic Carbon Sequestration and Mineral Carbonation Chemistry: In Situ Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, D. W.; Turcu, R. V.; Sears, J. A.; Rosso, K. M.; Burton, S. D.; Kwak, J.; Felmy, A. R.; Hu, J.

    2010-12-01

    GCS is one of the most promising ways of mitigating atmospheric greenhouse gases. Mineral carbonation reactions are potentially important to the long-term sealing effectiveness of caprock but remain poorly predictable, particularly reactions occurring in low-water supercritical CO2(scCO2)-dominated environments where the chemistry has not been adequately explored. In situ probes that provide molecular-level information is desirable for investigating mechanisms and rates of GCS mineral carbonation reactions. MAS-NMR is a powerful tool for obtaining detailed molecular structure and dynamics information of a system regardless whether the system is in a solid, a liquid, a gaseous, or a supercritical state, or a mixture thereof. However, MAS NMR under scCO2 conditions has never been realized due to the tremendous technical difficulties of achieving and maintaining high pressure within a fast spinning MAS rotor. In this work, we report development of a unique high pressure MAS NMR capability, and its application to mineral carbonation chemistry in scCO2 under geologically relevant temperatures and pressures. Our high pressure MAS rotor has successfully maintained scCO2 conditions with minimal leakage over a period of 72 hours. Mineral carbonation reactions of a model magnesium silicate (forsterite) reacted with 96 bars scCO2 containing varying amounts of H2O (both below and above saturation of the scCO2) were investigated at 50○C. Figure 1 shows typical in situ 13C MAS NMR spectra demonstrating that the peaks corresponding to the reactants, intermediates, and the magnesium carbonation products are all observed in a single spectrum. For example, the scCO2 peak is located at 126.1 ppm. Reaction intermediates include the aqueous species HCO3-(160 ppm), partially hydrated/hydroxylated magnesium carbonates(166-168 ppm), and can easily be distinguished from final product magnesite(170 ppm). The new capability and this model mineral carbonation process will be overviewed in

  19. On the Observation of Discrete Fluorine NMR Spectra for Uridine 5′-β,γ-Fluoromethylenetriphosphate Diastereomers at Basic pH

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Jakeman et al. recently reported the inability to distinguish the diastereomers of uridine 5′-β,γ-fluoromethylenetriphosphate (β,γ-CHF-UTP, 1) by 19F NMR under conditions we previously prescribed for the resolution of the corresponding β,γ-CHF-dGTP spectra, stating further that 1 decomposed under these basic conditions. Here we show that the 19F NMR spectra of 1 (∼1:1 diastereomer mixture prepared by coupling of UMP-morpholidate with fluoromethylenebis(phosphonic acid)) in D2O at pH 10 are indeed readily distinguishable. 1 in this solution was stable for 24 h at rt. PMID:24819695

  20. Characterisation and evaluation of paramagnetic fluorine labelled glycol chitosan conjugates for (19)F and (1)H magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Elena; Harvey, Peter; Chalmers, Kirsten H; Mishra, Anurag; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Wilson, J Ian; Botta, Mauro; Fekete, Marianna; Blamire, Andrew M; Parker, David

    2014-02-01

    Medium molecular weight glycol chitosan conjugates have been prepared, linked by an amide bond to paramagnetic Gd(III), Ho(III) and Dy(III) macrocyclic complexes in which a trifluoromethyl reporter group is located 6.5 Å from the paramagnetic centre. The faster relaxation of the observed nucleus allows modified pulse sequences to be used with shorter acquisition times. The polydisperse materials have been characterised by gel permeation chromatography, revealing an average molecular weight on the order of 13,800 (Gd), 14,600 (Dy) and 16,200 (Ho), consistent with the presence of 8.5, 9.5 and 13 complexes, respectively. The gadolinium conjugate was prepared for both a q = 1 monoamide tricarboxylate conjugate (r1p 11.2 mM(-1) s(-1), 310 K, 1.4 T) and a q = 0 triphosphinate system, and conventional contrast-enhanced proton MRI studies at 7 T were undertaken in mice bearing an HT-29 or an HCT-116 colorectal tumour xenograft (17 μmol/kg). Enhanced contrast was observed following injection in the tail vein in tumour tissue, with uptake also evident in the liver and kidney with a tumour-to-liver ratio of 2:1 at 13 min, and large amounts in the kidney and bladder consistent with predominant renal clearance. Parallel experiments observing the (19)F resonance in the holmium conjugate complex using a surface coil did not succeed owing to its high R2 value (750 Hz, 7 T). However, the fluorine signal in the dysprosium triphosphinate chitosan conjugate [R1/R2 = 0.6 and R1 = 145 Hz (7 T)] was sharper and could be observed in vivo at -65.7 ppm, following intravenous tail vein injection of a dose of 34 μmol/kg.

  1. Synthesis, crystal structure, NMR study and AC conductivity of [(C3H7)4N]2Cd2ClF5 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajji, Rachid; Oueslati, Abderrazak; Body, Monique; Hlel, Faouzi

    2015-08-01

    The [(C3H7)4N]2Cd2ClF5 compound was crystallized in the triclinic system with space group P1. The crystal structure consists of organic-inorganic layers, stacked along direction. The organic part consists of two cations types. The inorganic layer is made up of Cd2ClF5 dimmers composed of two in-equivalent irregular tetrahedra sharing one edge (Cl-F). The MAS NMR spectra showed two, three and five isotropic resonances relative to 111Cd, 13C and 19F nuclei, respectively. DSC measurement disclosed a phase transition at around 380 K. The impedance spectroscopy and AC electrical conductivity measurements of our compound were taken from 209 Hz to 5 MHz over the temperature range of 350-381 K. Nyquist plots ( Z″ vs Z') show semicircle arcs at different temperatures, and an electrical equivalent circuit has been proposed to explain the impedance results. The circuits consist of the parallel combination of bulk resistance ( R), capacitance ( C) and fractal capacitance (CPE). The conductivity σ p follows the Arrhenius relation. The near value of activation energies obtained from the conductivity data and circuit equivalent confirms that the transport is through hopping mechanism. The analysis of the experimental data shows that the reorientation motion of [N(C3H7)4]+ cations and/or [Cd2ClF5]2- anions is probably responsible for the observed conductivity.

  2. Understanding API-polymer proximities in amorphous stabilized composite drug products using fluorine-carbon 2D HETCOR solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Anuji; Crull, George

    2014-10-06

    A simple and robust method for obtaining fluorine-carbon proximities was established using a (19)F-(13)C heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) two-dimensional (2D) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) experiment under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The method was applied to study a crystalline active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), avagacestat, containing two types of fluorine atoms and its API-polymer composite drug product. These results provide insight into the molecular structure, aid with assigning the carbon resonances, and probe API-polymer proximities in amorphous spray dried dispersions (SDD). This method has an advantage over the commonly used (1)H-(13)C HETCOR because of the large chemical shift dispersion in the fluorine dimension. In the present study, fluorine-carbon distances up to 8 Å were probed, giving insight into the API structure, crystal packing, and assignments. Most importantly, the study demonstrates a method for probing an intimate molecular level contact between an amorphous API and a polymer in an SDD, giving insights into molecular association and understanding of the role of the polymer in API stability (such as recrystallization, degradation, etc.) in such novel composite drug products.

  3. Calculation of vibrational branching ratios and hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F and its suitability for laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Yin, Yanning; Wei, Bin; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    More recently, laser cooling of the diatomic radical magnesium monofluoride (24Mg19F ) is being experimentally preformed [Appl. Phys. Express 8, 092701 (2015), 10.7567/APEX.8.092701 and Opt. Express 22, 28645 (2014), 10.1364/OE.22.028645] and was also studied theoretically [Phys. Rev. A 91, 042511 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.042511]. However, some important problems still remain unsolved, so, in our paper, we perform further theoretical study for the feasibility of laser cooling and trapping the 24Mg19F molecule. At first, the highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors of the main transitions are verified by the closed-form approximation, Morse approximation, and Rydberg-Klein-Rees inversion methods, respectively. Afterwards, we investigate the lower X 2Σ1/2 + hyperfine manifolds using a quantum effective Hamiltonian approach and obtain the zero-field hyperfine spectrum with an accuracy of less than 30 kHz ˜5 μ K compared with the experimental results, and then find out that one cooling beam and one or two repumping beams with their first-order sidebands are enough to implement an efficient laser slowing and cooling of 24Mg19F . Meanwhile, we also calculate the accurate hyperfine structure magnetic g factors of the rotational state (X 2Σ1/2 +,N =1 ) and briefly discuss the influence of the external fields on the hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F as well as its possibility of preparing three-dimensional magneto-optical trapping. Finally we give an explanation for the difference between the Stark and Zeeman effects from the perspective of parity and time reversal symmetry. Our study shows that, besides appropriate excitation wavelengths, the short lifetime for the first excited state A 2Π1 /2 , and lighter mass, the 24Mg19F radical could be a good candidate molecule amenable to laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping.

  4. From precursors to non-oxide ceramics: Pyrolytic mechanisms studied by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmund, W.M.; Aldinger, F.; Feike, M.; Spiess, H.W.

    1996-12-31

    The pyrolysis of a poly ethylsilazane was studied using a CO{sub 2}-laser beam heated solid state MAS-NMR probe head. Chemical structures of the intermediate stages could be identified. The analogy of the pyrolysis evolution for the following two different methods could be shown: (A) in an inert gas furnace conventionally prepared and (B) laser irradiated in the NMR probe head under magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions. Samples prepared by method A were studied by {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR and samples prepared by method B were studied with an appropriate cross polarization time by {sup 29}Si CP-MAS-NMR. Both experiments showed the same mechanisms for the pyrolysis as the polymer is transformed into a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/C ceramic.

  5. On the use of ultracentrifugal devices for routine sample preparation in biomolecular magic-angle-spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhishek; Boatz, Jennifer C; Wheeler, Travis B; van der Wel, Patrick C A

    2017-02-22

    A number of recent advances in the field of magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR have enabled its application to a range of biological systems of ever increasing complexity. To retain biological relevance, these samples are increasingly studied in a hydrated state. At the same time, experimental feasibility requires the sample preparation process to attain a high sample concentration within the final MAS rotor. We discuss these considerations, and how they have led to a number of different approaches to MAS NMR sample preparation. We describe our experience of how custom-made (or commercially available) ultracentrifugal devices can facilitate a simple, fast and reliable sample preparation process. A number of groups have since adopted such tools, in some cases to prepare samples for sedimentation-style MAS NMR experiments. Here we argue for a more widespread adoption of their use for routine MAS NMR sample preparation.

  6. Angiotensin (1-7) induces MAS receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Gironacci, Mariela M; Adamo, Hugo P; Corradi, Gerardo; Santos, Robson A; Ortiz, Pablo; Carretero, Oscar A

    2011-08-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) (1-7) is the endogenous ligand for the G protein-coupled receptor Mas, a receptor associated with cardiac, renal, and cerebral protective responses. Physiological evidence suggests that Mas receptor (MasR) undergoes agonist-dependent desensitization, but the underlying molecular mechanism regulating receptor activity is unknown. We investigated the hypothesis that MasR desensitizes and internalizes on stimulation with Ang-(1-7). For this purpose, we generated a chimera between the MasR and the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP; MasR-YFP). MasR-YFP-transfected HEK 293T cells were incubated with Ang-(1-7), and the relative cellular distribution of MasR-YFP was observed by confocal microscopy. In resting cells, MasR-YFP was mostly localized to the cell membrane. Ang-(1-7) induced a redistribution of MasR-YFP to intracellular vesicles of various sizes after 5 minutes. Following the time course of [(125)I]Ang-(1-7) endocytosis, we observed that half of MasR-YFP underwent endocytosis after 10 minutes, and this was blocked by a MasR antagonist. MasR-YFP colocalized with Rab5, the early endosome antigen 1, and the adaptor protein complex 2, indicating that the R is internalized through a clathrin-mediated pathway and targeted to early endosomes after Ang-(1-7) stimulation. A fraction of MasR-YFP also colocalized with caveolin 1, suggesting that at some point MasR-YFP traverses caveolin 1-positive compartments. In conclusion, MasR undergoes endocytosis on stimulation with Ang-(1-7), and this event may explain the desensitization of MasR responsiveness. In this way, MasR activity and density may be tightly controlled by the cell.

  7. Magic angle spinning NMR of paramagnetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Knight, Michael J; Felli, Isabella C; Pierattelli, Roberta; Emsley, Lyndon; Pintacuda, Guido

    2013-09-17

    Metal ions are ubiquitous in biochemical and cellular processes. Since many metal ions are paramagnetic due to the presence of unpaired electrons, paramagnetic molecules are an important class of targets for research in structural biology and related fields. Today, NMR spectroscopy plays a central role in the investigation of the structure and chemical properties of paramagnetic metalloproteins, linking the observed paramagnetic phenomena directly to electronic and molecular structure. A major step forward in the study of proteins by solid-state NMR came with the advent of ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) and the ability to use (1)H detection. Combined, these techniques have allowed investigators to observe nuclei that previously were invisible in highly paramagnetic metalloproteins. In addition, these techniques have enabled quantitative site-specific measurement of a variety of long-range paramagnetic effects. Instead of limiting solid-state NMR studies of biological systems, paramagnetism provides an information-rich phenomenon that can be exploited in these studies. This Account emphasizes state-of-the-art methods and applications of solid-state NMR in paramagnetic systems in biological chemistry. In particular, we discuss the use of ultrafast MAS and (1)H-detection in perdeuterated paramagnetic metalloproteins. Current methodology allows us to determine the structure and dynamics of metalloenzymes, and, as an example, we describe solid-state NMR studies of microcrystalline superoxide dismutase, a 32 kDa dimer. Data were acquired with remarkably short times, and these experiments required only a few milligrams of sample.

  8. Moderate MAS enhances local (1)H spin exchange and spin diffusion.

    PubMed

    Roos, Matthias; Micke, Peter; Saalwächter, Kay; Hempel, Günter

    2015-11-01

    Proton NMR spin-diffusion experiments are often combined with magic-angle spinning (MAS) to achieve higher spectral resolution of solid samples. Here we show that local proton spin diffusion can indeed become faster at low (<10 kHz) spinning rates as compared to static conditions. Spin diffusion under static conditions can thus be slower than the often referred value of 0.8 nm(2)/ms, which was determined using slow MAS (Clauss et al., 1993). The enhancement of spin diffusion by slow MAS relies on the modulation of the orientation-dependent dipolar couplings during sample rotation and goes along with transient level crossings in combination with dipolar truncation. The experimental finding and its explanation is supported by density matrix simulations, and also emphasizes the sensitivity of spin diffusion to the local coupling topology. The amplification of spin diffusion by slow MAS cannot be explained by any model based on independent spin pairs; at least three spins have to be considered.

  9. Performance of RINEPT is amplified by dipolar couplings under ultrafast MAS conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-06-01

    The refocused insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer (RINEPT) technique is commonly used for heteronuclear polarization transfer in solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Suppression of dipolar couplings, either by fast molecular motions in solution or by a combination of MAS and multiple pulse sequences in solids, enables the polarization transfer via scalar couplings. However, the presence of unsuppressed dipolar couplings could alter the functioning of RINEPT, particularly under fast/ultrafast MAS conditions. In this study, we demonstrate, through experiments on rigid solids complemented by numerical simulations, that the polarization transfer efficiency of RINEPT is dependent on the MAS frequency. In addition, we show that heteronuclear dipolar coupling is the dominant factor in the polarization transfer, which is strengthened by the presence of (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings. In fact, the simultaneous presence of homonuclear and heteronuclear dipolar couplings is the premise for the polarization transfer by RINEPT, whereas the scalar coupling plays an insignificant role under ultrafast MAS conditions on rigid solids. Our results additionally reveal that the polarization transfer efficiency decreases with the increasing duration of RF pulses used in the RINEPT sequence.

  10. Determination of size and sign of hetero-nuclear coupling constants from 2D 19F-13C correlation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampt, Kirsten A. M.; Aspers, Ruud L. E. G.; Dvortsak, Peter; van der Werf, Ramon M.; Wijmenga, Sybren S.; Jaeger, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Fluorinated organic compounds have become increasingly important within the polymer and the pharmaceutical industry as well as for clinical applications. For the structural elucidation of such compounds, NMR experiments with fluorine detection are of great value due to the favorable NMR properties of the fluorine nucleus. For the investigation of three fluorinated compounds, triple resonance 2D HSQC and HMBC experiments were adopted to fluorine detection with carbon and/or proton decoupling to yield F-C, F-C{H}, F-C{Cacq} and F-C{H,Cacq} variants. Analysis of E.COSY type cross-peak patterns in the F-C correlation spectra led, apart from the chemical shift assignments, to determination of size and signs of the JCH, JCF, and JHF coupling constants. In addition, the fully coupled F-C HMQC spectrum of steroid 1 was interpreted in terms of E.COSY type patterns. This example shows how coupling constants due to different nuclei can be determined together with their relative signs from a single spectrum. The analysis of cross-peak patterns, as presented here, not only provides relatively straightforward routes to the determination of size and sign of hetero-nuclear J-couplings in fluorinated compounds, it also provides new and easy ways for the determination of residual dipolar couplings and thus for structure elucidation. The examples and results presented in this study may contribute to a better interpretation and understanding of various F-C correlation experiments and thereby stimulate their utilization.

  11. Micellar kinetics of a fluorosurfactant through stopped-flow NMR.

    PubMed

    Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István; Stilbs, Peter

    2006-02-28

    19F NMR chemical shifts and transverse relaxation times T2 were measured as a function of time after quick stopped-flow dilution of aqueous solutions of sodium perfluorooctanoate (NaPFO) with water. Different initial concentrations of micellar solution and different proportions of mixing were tested. Previous stopped-flow studies by time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (TR-SAXS) detection indicated a slow (approximately 10 s) micellar relaxation kinetics in NaPFO solutions. In contrast, no evidence of any comparable slow (>100 ms) relaxation process was found in our NMR studies. Possible artifacts of stopped-flow experiments are discussed as well as differences between NMR and SAXS detection methods. Upper bounds on the relative weight of a slow relaxation process are given within existing kinetic theories of micellar dissolution.

  12. 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Perfluorocarbons for the Evaluation of Response to Antibiotic Therapy in a Staphylococcus aureus Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Peter; Ohlsen, Knut

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in recent decades has highlighted the importance of developing new drugs to treat infections. However, in addition to the design of new drugs, the development of accurate preclinical testing methods is essential. In vivo imaging technologies such as bioluminescence imaging (BLI) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are promising approaches. In a previous study, we showed the effectiveness of 19F MRI using perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions for detecting the site of Staphylococcus aureus infection. In the present follow-up study, we investigated the use of this method for in vivo visualization of the effects of antibiotic therapy. Methods/Principal findings Mice were infected with S. aureus Xen29 and treated with 0.9% NaCl solution, vancomycin or linezolid. Mock treatment led to the highest bioluminescence values during infection followed by vancomycin treatment. Counting the number of colony-forming units (cfu) at 7 days post-infection (p.i.) showed the highest bacterial burden for the mock group and the lowest for the linezolid group. Administration of PFCs at day 2 p.i. led to the accumulation of 19F at the rim of the abscess in all mice (in the shape of a hollow sphere), and antibiotic treatment decreased the 19F signal intensity and volume. Linezolid showed the strongest effect. The BLI, cfu, and MRI results were comparable. Conclusions 19F-MRI with PFCs is an effective non-invasive method for assessing the effects of antibiotic therapy in vivo. This method does not depend on pathogen specific markers and can therefore be used to estimate the efficacy of antibacterial therapy against a broad range of clinically relevant pathogens, and to localize sites of infection. PMID:23724049

  13. Determination of magnitudes and relative signs of 1H-19F coupling constants through 1D- and 2D-TOCSY experiments.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Juan F

    2013-12-20

    A novel methodology based on 1D- and 2D-TOCSY experiments is described for a quick and accurate measurement of proton-fluorine coupling constants in fluorinated organic compounds. The magnitude of the (1)H-(19)F coupling was measured from the displacement between the relayed peaks associated with the α or β spin state of the fluorine, and its relative sign was derived from the sense of the displacement.

  14. Completion of the Operational Closure of Tank 18F and Tank 19F at the Savannah River Site by Grouting - 13236

    SciTech Connect

    Tisler, Andrew J.

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive waste is stored in underground waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The low-level fraction of the waste is immobilized in a grout waste form, and the high level fraction is disposed of in a glass waste form. Once the waste is removed, the tanks are prepared for closure. Operational closure of the tanks consists of filling with grout for the purpose of chemically stabilizing residual material, filling the tank void space for long-term structural stability, and discouraging future intrusion. Two of the old-style single-shell tanks at the SRS have received regulatory approval confirming waste removal had been completed, and have been stabilized with grout as part of completing operational closure and removal from service. Consistent with the regulatory framework, two types of grout were used for the filling of Tanks 18F and 19F. Reducing grout was used to fill the entire volume of Tanks 18F and 19F (bulk fill grout) and a more flowable grout was used to fill equipment that was left in the tank (equipment fill grout). The reducing grout was added to the tanks using portable grout pumps filled from concrete trucks, and delivered the grout through slick lines to the center riser of each tank. Filling of the two tanks has been completed, and all equipment has been filled. The final capping of riser penetrations brings the operation closure of Tanks 18F and 19F to completion. (authors)

  15. Polarization quantum beat spectroscopy of HCF(A1A"). I. 19F and 1H hyperfine structure and Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haiyan; Ionescu, Ionela; Xin, Ju; Reid, Scott A

    2004-11-08

    To further investigate the (19)F and (1)H nuclear hyperfine structure and Zeeman effect in the simplest singlet carbene, HCF, we recorded polarization quantum beat spectra (QBS) of the pure bending levels 2(0) (n) with n = 0-7 and combination bands 1(0) (1)2(0) (n) with n = 1-6 and 2(0) (n)3(0) (1) with n = 0-3 in the HCF A(1)A(")<--X(1)A(') system. The spectra were measured under jet-cooled conditions using a pulsed discharge source, both at zero field and under application of a weak magnetic field (<30 G). Analysis yielded the nuclear spin-rotation constants C(aa) and weak field Lande g(aa) factors. Consistent with a two-state model, the majority of observed vibrational levels exhibit a linear correlation of C(aa) and g(aa), and our analysis yielded effective (a) hyperfine constants for the (19)F and (1)H nuclei (in MHz) of 728(23) and 55(2), respectively. The latter was determined here owing to the high resolving power of QBS. The vibrational state selectivity of the (19)F hyperfine constants is discussed, and we suggest that the underlying Renner-Teller interaction may play an important role.

  16. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines the authors are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. The authors have concentrated on a theoretical treatment of pairs of tightly coupled spin {1/2} nuclei under magic angle spinning conditions. The average Hamiltonian theory developed here is required for a quantitative understanding of two dimensional NMR experiments of such spin pairs in solids. These experiments in turn provide a means of determining connectivities between resonances in solid state NMR spectra. Development of these techniques will allow us to establish connectivities between functional components in coals. The complete description of these spin dynamics has turned out to be complex, and is necessary to provide a foundation upon which such experiments may be quantitatively interpreted in complex mixtures such as coals. 25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coal models. Along the same lines the author are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. During the last quarter the authors has concentrated on improvements in cross polarization (CP) sequences with a goal of making the CP process insensitive to experimental conditions such as the Hartmann-Hahn mismatch. It has been found that the usual theories of CP are incorrect, and that the CP process is very heterogeneous in nature. This has significant implications on methods typically used in quantifying {sup 13}C CPMAS spectra of coals. 19 refs., 11 figs.

  18. Infrared and 13C MAS nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of acetylation of cotton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebajo, Moses O.; Frost, Ray L.

    2004-01-01

    The acetylation of commercial cotton samples with acetic anhydride without solvents in the presence of about 5% 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) catalyst was followed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy. This preliminary investigation was conducted in an effort to develop hydrophobic, biodegradable, cellulosic materials for subsequent application in oil spill cleanup. The FTIR results provide clear evidence for successful acetylation though the NMR results indicate that the level of acetylation is low. Nevertheless, the overall results indicate that cotton fibres are potential candidates suitable for further development via acetylation into hydrophobic sorbent materials for subsequent oil spill cleanup application. The results also indicate that de-acetylation, the reverse of the equilibrium acetylation reaction, occurred when the acetylation reaction was prolonged beyond 3 h.

  19. Cross polarization magic-angle spinning NMR at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, V.; Kendrick, R.; Yannoni, C. S.

    A magic angle spinning (MAS) apparatus which can be used for high resolution solid state NMR at temperatures as low as 15 K is described. To demonstrate the utility of this apparatus, 13C spectra of molecules containing methyl groups have been investigated at cryogenic temperatures. The spectra, which are described in detail, provide direct evidence for the slowdown of methyl rotation.

  20. Nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging of multiple nuclear species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devience, Stephen J.; Pham, Linh M.; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Casola, Francesco; Corbett, Madeleine; Zhang, Huiliang; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide non-invasive information about multiple nuclear species in bulk matter, with wide-ranging applications from basic physics and chemistry to biomedical imaging. However, the spatial resolution of conventional NMR and MRI is limited to several micrometres even at large magnetic fields (>1 T), which is inadequate for many frontier scientific applications such as single-molecule NMR spectroscopy and in vivo MRI of individual biological cells. A promising approach for nanoscale NMR and MRI exploits optical measurements of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond, which provide a combination of magnetic field sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution unmatched by any existing technology, while operating under ambient conditions in a robust, solid-state system. Recently, single, shallow NV centres were used to demonstrate NMR of nanoscale ensembles of proton spins, consisting of a statistical polarization equivalent to ˜100-1,000 spins in uniform samples covering the surface of a bulk diamond chip. Here, we realize nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and MRI of multiple nuclear species (1H, 19F, 31P) in non-uniform (spatially structured) samples under ambient conditions and at moderate magnetic fields (˜20 mT) using two complementary sensor modalities.

  1. Dynamic nuclear polarization NMR spectroscopy allows high-throughput characterization of microporous organic polymers.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Frédéric; Chong, Samantha Y; McDonald, Tom O; Adams, Dave J; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc A; Cooper, Andrew I

    2013-10-16

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR was used to obtain natural abundance (13)C and (15)N CP MAS NMR spectra of microporous organic polymers with excellent signal-to-noise ratio, allowing for unprecedented details in the molecular structure to be determined for these complex polymer networks. Sensitivity enhancements larger than 10 were obtained with bis-nitroxide radical at 14.1 T and low temperature (∼105 K). This DNP MAS NMR approach allows efficient, high-throughput characterization of libraries of porous polymers prepared by combinatorial chemistry methods.

  2. Updated THM Astrophysical Factor of the 19F(p, α)16O Reaction and Influence of New Direct Data at Astrophysical Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, M.; Palmerini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Lombardo, I.; Trippella, O.

    2015-06-01

    Fluorine nucleosynthesis represents one of the most intriguing open questions in nuclear astrophysics. It has triggered new measurements which may modify the presently accepted paradigm of fluorine production and establish fluorine as an accurate probe of the inner layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Both direct and indirect measurements have attempted to improve the recommended extrapolation to astrophysical energies, showing no resonances. In this work, we will demonstrate that the interplay between direct and indirect techniques represents the most suitable approach to attain the required accuracy for the astrophysical factor at low energies, {{E}c.m.}≲ 300 keV, which is of interest for fluorine nucleosynthesis in AGB stars. We will use the recently measured direct 19F{{(p,α )}16}O astrophysical factor in the 600 keV≲ {{E}c.m.}≲ 800 keV energy interval to renormalize the existing Trojan Horse Method (THM) data spanning the astrophysical energies, accounting for all identified sources of uncertainty. This has a twofold impact on nuclear astrophysics. It shows the robustness of the THM approach even in the case of direct data of questionable quality, as normalization is extended over a broad range, minimizing systematic effects. Moreover, it allows us to obtain more accurate resonance data at astrophysical energies, thanks to the improved 19F{{(p,α )}16}O direct data. Finally, the present work strongly calls for more accurate direct data at low energies, so that we can obtain a better fitting of the direct reaction mechanism contributing to the 19F{{(p,α )}16}O astrophysical factor. Indeed, this work points out that the major source of uncertainty affecting the low-energy S(E) factor is the estimate of the non-resonant contribution, as the dominant role of the 113 keV resonance is now well established.

  3. Annual Report FY2013-- A Kinematically Complete, Interdisciplinary, and Co-Institutional Measurement of the 19F(α,n) Cross-section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, William A; Smith, Michael Scott; Clement, Ryan; Tan, Wanpeng; Stech, Ed; Cizewski, J A; Febbraro, Michael; Madurga Flores, Miguel

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this proposal is to enable neutron detection for precision Non-Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. Neutrons are continuously generated from a UFx matrix in a container or sample as a result of the interaction of alpha particles from uranium-decay α particles with fluorine nuclei in the matrix. Neutrons from 19F(α,n)22Na were once considered a poorly characterized background for assays of UFx samples via 238U spontaneous fission neutron detection [SMI2010B]. However, the yield of decay-α-driven neutrons is critical for 234,235U LEU and HEU assays, as it can used to determine both the total amount of uranium and the enrichment [BER2010]. This approach can be extremely valuable in a variety of safeguard applications, such as cylinder monitoring in underground uranium storage facilities, nuclear criticality safety studies, nuclear materials accounting, and other nonproliferation applications. The success of neutron-based assays critically depends on an accurate knowledge of the cross section of the (α,n) reaction that generates the neutrons. The 40% uncertainty in the 19F(α,n)22Na cross section currently limits the precision of such assays, and has been identified as a key factor in preventing accurate enrichment determinations [CRO2003]. The need for higher quality cross section data for (α,n) reactions has been a recurring conclusion in reviews of the nuclear data needs to support safeguards. The overarching goal of this project is to enable neutron detection to be used for precision Non- Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. This will significantly advance safeguards verification at existing declared facilities, nuclear materials accounting, process control, nuclear criticality safety monitoring, and a variety of other nonproliferation applications. To reach this goal, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rutgers University (RU), and the University of Notre

  4. NMR at earth's magnetic field using para-hydrogen induced polarization.

    PubMed

    Hamans, Bob C; Andreychenko, Anna; Heerschap, Arend; Wijmenga, Sybren S; Tessari, Marco

    2011-09-01

    A method to achieve NMR of dilute samples in the earth's magnetic field by applying para-hydrogen induced polarization is presented. Maximum achievable polarization enhancements were calculated by numerically simulating the experiment and compared to the experimental results and to the thermal equilibrium in the earth's magnetic field. Simultaneous 19F and 1H NMR detection on a sub-milliliter sample of a fluorinated alkyne at millimolar concentration (∼10(18) nuclear spins) was realized with just one single scan. A highly resolved spectrum with a signal/noise ratio higher than 50:1 was obtained without using an auxiliary magnet or any form of radio frequency shielding.

  5. Studies of minute quantities of natural abundance molecules using 2D heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy under 100kHz MAS

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Malon, M.; Singappuli-Arachchige, D.; Slowing, I. I.; Pruski, M.

    2015-02-16

    Two-dimensional 1H{13C} heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectra of naturally abundant solid materials are presented, acquired using the 0.75-mm magic angle spinning (MAS) probe at spinning rates up to 100 kHz. In spite of the miniscule sample volume (290 nL), high-quality HSQC-type spectra of bulk samples as well as surface-bound molecules can be obtained within hours of experimental time. The experiments are compared with those carried out at 40 kHz MAS using a 1.6-mm probe, which offered higher overall sensitivity due to a larger rotor volume. The benefits of ultrafast MAS in such experiments include superior resolution in 1H dimension without resorting to 1H–1H homonuclear RF decoupling, easy optimization, and applicability to mass-limited samples. As a result, the HMQC spectra of surface-bound species can be also acquired under 100 kHz MAS, although the dephasing of transverse magnetization has significant effect on the efficiency transfer under MAS alone.

  6. Studies of minute quantities of natural abundance molecules using 2D heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy under 100kHz MAS

    DOE PAGES

    Nishiyama, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Malon, M.; ...

    2015-02-16

    Two-dimensional 1H{13C} heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectra of naturally abundant solid materials are presented, acquired using the 0.75-mm magic angle spinning (MAS) probe at spinning rates up to 100 kHz. In spite of the miniscule sample volume (290 nL), high-quality HSQC-type spectra of bulk samples as well as surface-bound molecules can be obtained within hours of experimental time. The experiments are compared with those carried out at 40 kHz MAS using a 1.6-mm probe, which offered higher overall sensitivity due to a larger rotor volume. The benefits of ultrafast MAS in such experiments include superior resolution in 1H dimensionmore » without resorting to 1H–1H homonuclear RF decoupling, easy optimization, and applicability to mass-limited samples. As a result, the HMQC spectra of surface-bound species can be also acquired under 100 kHz MAS, although the dephasing of transverse magnetization has significant effect on the efficiency transfer under MAS alone.« less

  7. Probing systems in solution by NMR using sulfur hexafluoride as a spy molecule.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Locci, Emanuela; Lai, Adolfo; Luhmer, Michel

    2009-05-28

    The use of SF6 as a spy molecule in solution-state NMR is investigated as an alternative to 129Xe NMR. 19F chemical shift, longitudinal relaxation time, and integral measurements, as well as intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effects, are reported for SF6 dissolved in simple deuterated solvents and/or in various solutions among which are aqueous solutions of cucurbit[6]uril (CB) and alpha-cyclodextrin (alphaCD). Both CB and alphaCD form a 1:1 inclusion complex with SF6. In a 0.2 M D2SO4-D2O solution, the affinity of CB for SF6 is 2.9x10(5) L mol(-1) at 298 K; it is the largest value ever found for the inclusion of a neutral guest into the CB cavity. It is one order of magnitude larger than in a 0.2 M Na2SO4-D2O solution, and the role of the cation is evidenced. In D2O, the affinity of alphaCD for SF6 is about 25 L mol(-1). With CB, the kinetics is slow on both the 1H and 19F chemical shift time scales, while with alphaCD fast exchange is observed. The 19F chemical shift of SF6 is much less sensitive to medium effects than the chemical shift of 129Xe. This might be a limitation if minute structural changes are to be investigated but, in the present study, turned out to be an advantage for determining the affinity of alphaCD for SF6. With CB, the 19F chemical shift of included SF6 is found to be sensitive to the nature of the cation bound at the portals. The 19F relaxation time of SF6 dissolved in deuterated solvents is dominated by the spin-rotation mechanism and is orders of magnitude shorter that the 129Xe relaxation time. It is found to be rather sensitive to the environment and was used to determine the affinity of alphaCD for SF6. The detection limit of SF6 by 19F NMR is lower than the NMR detection limit of thermally polarized 129Xe by more than three orders of magnitude. It lies in the micromolar range, and SF6 concentrations of the order of 10 microM were determined by 19F NMR signal integral measurements and used to quantify the affinity of CB for SF6

  8. In situ solid-state NMR for heterogeneous catalysis: a joint experimental and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Xu, Shutao; Han, Xiuwen; Bao, Xinhe

    2012-01-07

    In situ solid-state NMR is a well-established tool for investigations of the structures of the adsorbed reactants, intermediates and products on the surface of solid catalysts. The techniques allow identifications of both the active sites such as acidic sites and reaction processes after introduction of adsorbates and reactants inside an NMR rotor under magic angle spinning (MAS). The in situ solid-state NMR studies of the reactions can be achieved in two ways, i.e. under batch-like or continuous-flow conditions. The former technique is low cost and accessible to the commercial instrument while the latter one is close to the real catalytic reactions on the solids. This critical review describes the research progress on the in situ solid-state NMR techniques and the applications in heterogeneous catalysis under batch-like and continuous-flow conditions in recent years. Some typical probe molecules are summarized here to detect the Brønsted and Lewis acidic sites by MAS NMR. The catalytic reactions discussed in this review include methane aromatization, olefin selective oxidation and olefin metathesis on the metal oxide-containing zeolites. With combining the in situ MAS NMR spectroscopy and the density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations, the intermediates on the catalyst can be identified, and the reaction mechanism is revealed. Reaction kinetic analysis in the nanospace instead of in the bulk state can also be performed by employing laser-enhanced MAS NMR techniques in the in situ flow mode (163 references).

  9. Visualization of Abscess Formation in a Murine Thigh Infection Model of Staphylococcus aureus by 19F-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Stefan; Basse-Lüsebrink, Thomas; Haddad, Daniel; Ohlsen, Knut; Jakob, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background During the last years, 19F-MRI and perfluorocarbon nanoemulsion (PFC) emerged as a powerful contrast agent based MRI methodology to track cells and to visualize inflammation. We applied this new modality to visualize deep tissue abscesses during acute and chronic phase of inflammation caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, a murine thigh infection model was used to induce abscess formation and PFC or CLIO (cross linked ironoxides) was administered during acute or chronic phase of inflammation. 24 h after inoculation, the contrast agent accumulation was imaged at the site of infection by MRI. Measurements revealed a strong accumulation of PFC at the abscess rim at acute and chronic phase of infection. The pattern was similar to CLIO accumulation at chronic phase and formed a hollow sphere around the edema area. Histology revealed strong influx of neutrophils at the site of infection and to a smaller extend macrophages during acute phase and strong influx of macrophages at chronic phase of inflammation. Conclusion and Significance We introduce 19F-MRI in combination with PFC nanoemulsions as a new platform to visualize abscess formation in a murine thigh infection model of S. aureus. The possibility to track immune cells in vivo by this modality offers new opportunities to investigate host immune response, the efficacy of antibacterial therapies and the influence of virulence factors for pathogenesis. PMID:21455319

  10. Analysis of the 19F(p, α0)16O reaction at low energies and the spectroscopy of 20Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, I.; Dell'Aquila, D.; Campajola, L.; Rosato, E.; Spadaccini, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2013-12-01

    The investigation of the 19F(p, α0) reaction at low bombarding energies allows the study of the spectroscopy of the 20Ne compound nucleus in an energy region where the existence of quartet excitations has been suggested in the literature. Moreover, this reaction plays a major role in the fourth branch of the CNO cycle since it is relevant for the correct description of the hydrogen burning of fluorine in stars. For these reasons, we decided to investigate the 19F(p, α0) reaction in the Ep ≃ 0.6-1 MeV energy range. The analysis of angular distributions and excitation functions allows one to improve the 20Ne spectroscopy in an excitation energy region where some ambiguities concerning Jπ assignments exist in the literature. In particular, the present data suggest a Jπ = 0+ assignment to the Ex = 13.642 MeV resonance. For this state, both partial and reduced widths for the α0 channel have been deduced. The trend of the astrophysical factor has been obtained from the integrated cross section. A comparison of the present results with data reported in the literature is also discussed.

  11. Free variable selection QSPR study to predict (19)F chemical shifts of some fluorinated organic compounds using Random Forest and RBF-PLS methods.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Nasser

    2016-04-05

    In this work, two new and powerful chemometrics methods are applied for the modeling and prediction of the (19)F chemical shift values of some fluorinated organic compounds. The radial basis function-partial least square (RBF-PLS) and random forest (RF) are employed to construct the models to predict the (19)F chemical shifts. In this study, we didn't used from any variable selection method and RF method can be used as variable selection and modeling technique. Effects of the important parameters affecting the ability of the RF prediction power such as the number of trees (nt) and the number of randomly selected variables to split each node (m) were investigated. The root-mean-square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for the training set and the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 44.70, 23.86, 29.77, and 23.69, respectively. Also, the correlation coefficients of the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 0.8684 and 0.9313, respectively. The results obtained reveal that the RF model can be used as a powerful chemometrics tool for the quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies.

  12. HR-MAS NMR metabolomics of 'Swingle' citrumelo rootstock genetically modified to overproduce proline.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Caroline S; Carlos, Eduardo F; Vieira, Luiz G E; Lião, Luciano M; Alcantara, Glaucia B

    2014-08-01

    The accumulation of proline is a typical physiological response to abiotic stresses in higher plants. 'Swingle' citrumelo, an important rootstock for citrus production, has been modified with a mutated Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase gene (VaP5CSF129A) linked to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter to induce the overproduction of free proline. This paper presents a comparative metabolomic study of nontransgenic versus transgenic 'Swingle' citrumelo plants with high endogenous proline. (1)H high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate analysis showed significant differences in some metabolites between the nontransgenic and transgenic leaves and roots. The overproduction of proline has reduced the sucrose content in transgenic leaves, revealing a metabolic cost for these plants. In roots, the high level of free proline acts for the adjustment of cation-anion balance, causing the reduction of acetic acid content. The same sucrose level in roots indicates that they can be considered as sucrose sink. Similar behavior may be waited for fruits produced on transgenic rootstock.

  13. Characterization of various magnesium oxides by XRD and {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Aramendia, M.A.; Benitez, J.A.; Borau, V.; Jimenez, C.; Marinas, J.M.; Ruiz, J.R.; Urbano, F.

    1999-04-01

    A magnesium oxide obtained by thermal decomposition of commercially available magnesium hydroxide was refluxed in water and acetone in order to improve its chemical and textural properties with the purpose of using it as a support for metals in heterogeneous catalysts. X-ray diffraction, CO{sub 2} chemisorption, and {sup 1}H magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance were used to identify crystal phases, the number of basic sites, and the nature of OH groups in the oxide, respectively.

  14. 13C MAS NMR studies of crystalline cholesterol and lipid mixtures modeling atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, W; Hamilton, J A

    1996-01-01

    Cholesterol and cholesteryl esters are the predominant lipids of atherosclerotic plaques. To provide fundamental data for the quantitative study of plaque lipids in situ, crystalline cholesterol (CHOL) and CHOL/cholesteryl ester (CE) mixtures with other lipids were studied by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle-sample spinning. Highly distinctive spectra for three different crystalline structures of CHOL were obtained. When CHOL crystals were mixed with isotropic CE oil, solubilized CHOL (approximately 13 mol % CHOL) was detected by characteristic resonances such as C5, C6, and C3; the excess crystalline CHOL (either anhydrous or monohydrate) remained in its original crystalline structure, without being affected by the coexisting CE. By use of 13C-enriched CHOL, the solubility of CHOL in the CE liquid-crystalline phase (approximately 8 mol %) was measured. When phosphatidylcholine was hydrated in presence of CHOL and CE, magic-angle-sampling nuclear magnetic resonance revealed liquid-crystalline CHOL/phosphatidylcholine multilayers with approximately an equal molar ratio of CHOL/phosphatidylcholine. Excess CHOL existed in the monohydrate crystalline form, and CE in separate oil or crystalline phases, depending on the temperature. The magic-angle-sampling nuclear magnetic resonance protocol for identifying different lipid phases was applied to intact (ex vivo) atherosclerotic plaques of cholesterol-fed rabbits. Liquid, liquid-crystalline, and solid phases of CE were characterized. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8913623

  15. Friedel's salt formation in sulfoaluminate cements: A combined XRD and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, G.; Boccaleri, E.; Buzzi, L.; Canonico, F.; Gastaldi, D.

    2015-01-15

    Four different binders based on calcium sulfoaluminate cements have been submitted to accelerated chlorination through ionic exchange on hydrated pastes, in order to investigate their ability to chemically bind chloride ions that might reduce chloride penetration. The composition of hydrated cements before and after the treatment was evaluated by means of an X-Ray Diffraction–{sup 27}Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy combined study, allowing to take into account even partially amorphous phases and to make quantitative assumption on the relative abundance of the different aluminium-containing phases. It was found that low SO{sub 3} Sulfoaluminate–Portland ternary systems are the most effective in binding chloride ions and the active role played by different members of the AFm family in chloride uptake was confirmed. Moreover, a peculiar behavior related to the formation of Friedel's salt in different pH conditions was also established for the different cements.

  16. Structural analysis of a signal peptide inside the ribosome tunnel by DNP MAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sascha; Franks, W. Trent; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Döring, Kristina; Geiger, Michel A.; Linden, Arne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are synthesized in cells by ribosomes and, in parallel, prepared for folding or targeting. While ribosomal protein synthesis is progressing, the nascent chain exposes amino-terminal signal sequences or transmembrane domains that mediate interactions with specific interaction partners, such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the SecA–adenosine triphosphatase, or the trigger factor. These binding events can set the course for folding in the cytoplasm and translocation across or insertion into membranes. A distinction of the respective pathways depends largely on the hydrophobicity of the recognition sequence. Hydrophobic transmembrane domains stabilize SRP binding, whereas less hydrophobic signal sequences, typical for periplasmic and outer membrane proteins, stimulate SecA binding and disfavor SRP interactions. In this context, the formation of helical structures of signal peptides within the ribosome was considered to be an important factor. We applied dynamic nuclear polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate the conformational states of the disulfide oxidoreductase A (DsbA) signal peptide stalled within the exit tunnel of the ribosome. Our results suggest that the nascent chain comprising the DsbA signal sequence adopts an extended structure in the ribosome with only minor populations of helical structure. PMID:27551685

  17. Natural-abundance solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy at high magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E; Mann, Sam E; Iuga, Dinu; Hughes, Colan E; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2011-06-09

    High-resolution solid-state (2)H NMR spectroscopy provides a method for measuring (1)H NMR chemical shifts in solids and is advantageous over the direct measurement of high-resolution solid-state (1)H NMR spectra, as it requires only the application of routine magic angle sample spinning (MAS) and routine (1)H decoupling methods, in contrast to the requirement for complex pulse sequences for homonuclear (1)H decoupling and ultrafast MAS in the case of high-resolution solid-state (1)H NMR. However, a significant obstacle to the routine application of high-resolution solid-state (2)H NMR is the very low natural abundance of (2)H, with the consequent problem of inherently low sensitivity. Here, we explore the feasibility of measuring (2)H MAS NMR spectra of various solids with natural isotopic abundances at high magnetic field (850 MHz), focusing on samples of amino acids, peptides, collagen, and various organic solids. The results show that high-resolution solid-state (2)H NMR can be used successfully to measure isotropic (1)H chemical shifts in favorable cases, particularly for mobile functional groups, such as methyl and -N(+)H(3) groups, and in some cases phenyl groups. Furthermore, we demonstrate that routine (2)H MAS NMR measurements can be exploited for assessing the relative dynamics of different functional groups in a molecule and for assessing whole-molecule motions in the solid state. The magnitude and field-dependence of second-order shifts due to the (2)H quadrupole interaction are also investigated, on the basis of analysis of simulated and experimental (1)H and (2)H MAS NMR spectra of fully deuterated and selectively deuterated samples of the α polymorph of glycine at two different magnetic field strengths.

  18. Microcoils and microsamples in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports on microcoils are reviewed. The first part of the review includes a discussion of how the geometries of the sample and coil affect the NMR signal intensity. In addition to derivation of the well-known result that the signal intensity increases as the coil size decreases, the prediction that dilution of a small sample with magnetically inert matter leads to better sensitivity if a tiny coil is not available is given. The second part of the review focuses on the issues specific to solid-state NMR. They include realization of magic-angle spinning (MAS) using a microcoil and harnessing of such strong pulses that are feasible only with a microcoil. Two strategies for microcoil MAS, the piggyback method and magic-angle coil spinning (MACS), are reviewed. In addition, MAS of flat, disk-shaped samples is discussed in the context of solid-state NMR of small-volume samples. Strong RF irradiation, which has been exploited in wide-line spectral excitation, multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS), and dipolar decoupling experiments, has been accompanied by new challenges regarding the Bloch-Siegert effect, the minimum time resolution of the spectrometer, and the time scale of pulse transient effects. For a possible solution to the latter problem, recent reports on active compensation of pulse transients are described.

  19. Rapid Proton-Detected NMR Assignment for Proteins with Fast Magic Angle Spinning

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Using a set of six 1H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5–30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide 2H/1H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary 13C/15N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR. PMID:25102442

  20. Rapid proton-detected NMR assignment for proteins with fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Pell, Andrew J; Retel, Joren S; Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Franks, W Trent; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J; Hiller, Matthias; Higman, Victoria; Guerry, Paul; Bertarello, Andrea; Knight, Michael J; Felletti, Michele; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Tars, Kaspars; Stoppini, Monica; Bellotti, Vittorio; Bolognesi, Martino; Ricagno, Stefano; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2014-09-03

    Using a set of six (1)H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5-30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide (2)H/(1)H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary (13)C/(15)N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR.

  1. Biosilica-Entrapped Enzymes Studied by Using Dynamic Nuclear-Polarization-Enhanced High-Field NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Enrico; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Ong, Ta-Chung; Keeler, Eric G; Martelli, Tommaso; Fragai, Marco; Griffin, Robert G; Luchinat, Claudio

    2015-08-12

    Enzymes are used as environmentally friendly catalysts in many industrial applications, and are frequently immobilized in a matrix to improve their chemical stability for long-term storage and reusability. Recently, it was shown that an atomic-level description of proteins immobilized in a biosilica matrix can be attained by examining their magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra. However, even though MAS NMR is an excellent tool for determining structure, it is severely hampered by sensitivity. In this work we provide the proof of principle that NMR characterization of biosilica-entrapped enzymes could be assisted by high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP).

  2. F NMR measurement of intracellular free calcium in human red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.K.; Schanne, F.A.X.

    1986-03-01

    Optical techniques for the measurement of intracellular Ca are not readily applicable to the human red cell because of the intense absorption of hemoglobin. The authors have therefore examined the use of /sup 19/F NMR of 5,5'-difluoro-1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid (5FBAPTA) introduced non-disruptively by intracellular hydrolysis of the membrane-permeant acetoxymethyl ester derivative. /sup 19/F NMR spectra of 5FBAPTA-containing erythrocytes at 188 MHz displayed two well resolved resonances corresponding to the free and Ca-bound forms of the chelator, the resonance of the free form being ten-fold larger than that of the Ca-bound form. Addition of the ionophore A23187 resulted in the disappearance of the resonance of the free anion and a quantitative increase in the intensity of the resonance of the Ca-complex. From these data, and a K/sub D/ of 708 nM for the Ca-5FBAPTA complex, the authors estimate red cell free Ca to be 70 nM, which is in the range of values obtained for other cells, despite the fact that the human red cell, which lacks intracellular organelles for storing Ca, possesses only 1 ..mu..mol total Ca/1. cells in comparison to mmols of total Ca found in other cells. The authors ability to use /sup 19/F NMR to measure free Ca in the red blood cell paves the way for future NMR studies of red cell free Ca concentrations in human essential hypertension as well as in other diseases states in which alterations in cellular Ca homeostasis may be involved.

  3. X-ray CT and NMR imaging of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.

    1986-03-01

    In little more than a decade, X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging have become the premier modalities of medical radiology. Both of these imaging techniques also promise to be useful tools in petrophysics and reservoir engineering, because CT and NMR can nondestructively image a host of physical and chemical properties of porous rocks and multiple fluid phases contained within their pores. The images are taken within seconds to minutes, at reservoir temperatures and pressures, with spatial resolution on the millimeter and submillimeter level. The physical properties imaged by the two techniques are complementary. CT images bulk density and effective atomic number. NMR images the nuclide concentration, M/sub 0/, of a variety of nuclei (/sup 1/H, /sup 19/F, /sup 23/Na, /sup 31/P, etc.), their longitudinal and transverse relaxation-time curves (t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/), and their chemical shift spectra. In rocks, CT images both rock matrix and pore fluids, while NMR images only mobile fluids and the interactions of these mobile fluids with the confining surfaces of the pores.

  4. Magnetization and NMR studies in SmFeAsO0.86F0.14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshray, Amitabha; Majumder, Mayukh; Poddar, Asok; Mazumdar, Chandan; Ghoshray, Kajal; Berardan, David

    2012-06-01

    The Physical properties along with NMR measurements in SmFeAsO0.86F0.14 have been carried out. Superconducting transition TC (onset) remains invariant even under a magnetic field of 7 T. 75As NMR signal could not be measured below 180K in both SmFeAsO and SmFeAsO0.86F0.14 although the later does not show any SDW transition. 19F hyperfine coupling constant found to be temperature independent.

  5. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  6. Protein structure determination with paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2013-09-17

    Many structures of the proteins and protein assemblies that play central roles in fundamental biological processes and disease pathogenesis are not readily accessible via the conventional techniques of single-crystal X-ray diffraction and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the other hand, many of these challenging biological systems are suitable targets for atomic-level structural and dynamic analysis by magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that has far less stringent limitations on the molecular size and crystalline state. Over the past decade, major advances in instrumentation and methodology have prompted rapid growth in the field of biological solid-state NMR. However, despite this progress, one challenge for the elucidation of three-dimensional (3D) protein structures via conventional MAS NMR methods is the relative lack of long-distance data. Specifically, extracting unambiguous interatomic distance restraints larger than ∼5 Å from through-space magnetic dipole-dipole couplings among the protein (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei has proven to be a considerable challenge for researchers. It is possible to circumvent this problem by extending the structural studies to include several analogs of the protein of interest, intentionally modified to contain covalently attached paramagnetic tags at selected sites. In these paramagnetic proteins, the hyperfine couplings between the nuclei and unpaired electrons can manifest themselves in NMR spectra in the form of relaxation enhancements of the nuclear spins that depend on the electron-nucleus distance. These effects can be significant for nuclei located up to ∼20 Å away from the paramagnetic center. In this Account, we discuss MAS NMR structural studies of nitroxide and EDTA-Cu(2+) labeled variants of a model 56 amino acid globular protein, B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1), in the microcrystalline solid phase. We used a set of six EDTA-Cu(2

  7. Experimental study of radiative pion capture on /sup 13/C, /sup 20/Ne, /sup 90/Zr, /sup 19/F and /sup 12/C

    SciTech Connect

    Martoff, C.J.

    1980-11-01

    Photon spectra for 50 < E/sub ..gamma../ < 135 MeV have been measured from the radiative capture of stopped negative pions by the nuclides /sup 13/C, /sup 19/F, /sup 20/Ne, and /sup 90/Zr. The e/sup +/e/sup -/ pair spectrometer system used has resolution 850 keV fwhm and photon detection efficiency 5 x 10/sup -6/. The total radiative capture branching ratios measured are /sup 13/C (1.66 +- 0.25)%, /sup 19/F (2.40 +- 0.48)%, /sup 20/Ne (1.60 +- 0.24)%, and /sup 90/Zr (2.1 +- 0.5)%. The partial radiative capture branching ratios to four bound states and two resonances in /sup 20/F, and two bound states and three resonances in /sup 13/B have also been measured. The branching ratio for /sup 13/C(..pi../sup -/,..gamma..)/sup 13/B g.s. is (6.1 +- 1.2) x 10/sup -4/. Comparison of this result with the beta decay rate of /sup 13/B shows that (84 +- 16)% of the pion capture amplitude is accounted for by the Gamow-Teller matrix element. Further analysis suggests that much of the remaining strength is E2. The measured branching ratios to resonant states in /sup 13/C(..pi../sup -/,..gamma..)/sup 13/B are shown to be in agreement with detailed shell model calculations. The total single-particle strength in these transitions is shown to be approximately half as large as that of the T = 3/2 part of the E1 photoresonance (the Giant Dipole Resonance) in /sup 13/C. The branching ratio for /sup 20/Ne(..pi../sup -/,..gamma..)/sup 20/F (T = 1, J/sup ..pi../ = 1/sup +/, E/sub x/ = 1.06 MeV) is 0.91 +- 0.52).10/sup -4/. Comparison with the electroexcitation of the analog giant M1 state in /sup 20/Ne (11.24 MeV) shows that the M1 transition amplitude is less than (46 +- 14)% Gamow-Teller. This result is in agreement with detailed shell model calculations of the M1 transition. The photon spectrum for radiative pion capture from flight (reaction /sup 12/C(..pi../sup +/ T = 44 MeV, ..gamma.. at 90/sup 0/)) has been measured. 13 figures, 12 tables.

  8. Prediction of recrystallization behavior of troglitazone/polyvinylpyrrolidone solid dispersion by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Ito, Atsutoshi; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Yada, Shuichi; Hamaura, Takeshi; Nakagami, Hiroaki; Higashi, Kenjirou; Moribe, Kunikazu; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2010-01-04

    The purpose of this study was to elaborate the relationship between the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra and the recrystallization behavior during the storage of troglitazone solid dispersions. The solid dispersions were prepared by either the solvent method or by co-grinding. The recrystallization behavior under storage conditions at 40 degrees C/94% RH was evaluated by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) equation. Solid dispersions prepared by the solvent method or by prolonged grinding brought about inhibition of the nucleation and the nuclei growth at the same time. No differences in the PXRD profiles were found in the samples prepared by the co-grinding and solvent methods, however, (13)C CP/MAS NMR showed significant differences in the spectra. The correlation coefficients using partial least square regression analysis between the PXRD profiles and the apparent nuclei-growth constant or induction period to nucleation were 0.1305 or 0.6350, respectively. In contrast, those between the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra and the constant or the period were 0.9916 or 0.9838, respectively. The (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra had good correlation with the recrystallization kinetic parameters evaluated by the KJMA equation. Consequently, solid-state NMR was judged to be a useful tool for the prediction of the recrystallization behavior of solid dispersions.

  9. Proton-Detected Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Bone with Ultrafast Magic Angle Spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Kumar Pandey, Manoj; Gong, Bo; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    While obtaining high-resolution structural details from bone is highly important to better understand its mechanical strength and the effects of aging and disease on bone ultrastructure, it has been a major challenge to do so with existing biophysical techniques. Though solid-state NMR spectroscopy has the potential to reveal the structural details of bone, it suffers from poor spectral resolution and sensitivity. Nonetheless, recent developments in magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR technology have made it possible to spin solid samples up to 110 kHz frequency. With such remarkable capabilities, 1H-detected NMR experiments that have traditionally been challenging on rigid solids can now be implemented. Here, we report the first application of multidimensional 1H-detected NMR measurements on bone under ultrafast MAS conditions to provide atomistic-level elucidation of the complex heterogeneous structure of bone. Our investigations demonstrate that two-dimensional 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectra for bone are obtainable using fp-RFDR (finite-pulse radio-frequency-driven dipolar recoupling) pulse sequence under ultrafast MAS. Our results infer that water exhibits distinct 1H-1H dipolar coupling networks with the backbone and side-chain regions in collagen. These results show the promising potential of proton-detected ultrafast MAS NMR for monitoring structural and dynamic changes caused by mechanical loading and disease in bone.

  10. N-H...F hydrogen bonds in fluorinated benzanilides: NMR and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Manjunatha Reddy, G N; Vasantha Kumar, M V; Guru Row, T N; Suryaprakash, N

    2010-10-28

    Using (19)F and (1)H-NMR (with (14)N decoupling) spectroscopic techniques together with density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations, we have investigated weak molecular interactions in isomeric fluorinated benzanilides. Simultaneous presence of through space nuclear spin-spin couplings ((1h)J(N-HF)) of diverse strengths and feeble structural fluctuations are detected as a function of site specific substitution of fluorine atoms within the basic identical molecular framework. The transfer of hydrogen bonding interaction energies through space is established by perturbing their strengths and monitoring the effect on NMR parameters. Multiple quantum (MQ) excitation, up to the highest possible MQ orders of coupled protons, is utilized as a tool for accurate (1)H assignments. Results of NMR studies and DFT calculations are compared with the relevant structural parameters taken from single crystal X-ray diffraction studies.

  11. Exploring electrolyte organization in supercapacitor electrodes with solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, Michaël; Gilbert, Edouard; Azais, Philippe; Raymundo-Piñero, Encarnación; Ammar, Mohammed Ramzi; Simon, Patrick; Massiot, Dominique; Béguin, François

    2013-04-01

    Supercapacitors are electrochemical energy-storage devices that exploit the electrostatic interaction between high-surface-area nanoporous electrodes and electrolyte ions. Insight into the molecular mechanisms at work inside supercapacitor carbon electrodes is obtained with 13C and 11B ex situ magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR). In activated carbons soaked with an electrolyte solution, two distinct adsorption sites are detected by NMR, both undergoing chemical exchange with the free electrolyte molecules. On charging, anions are substituted by cations in the negative carbon electrode and cations by anions in the positive electrode, and their proportions in each electrode are quantified by NMR. Moreover, acetonitrile molecules are expelled from the adsorption sites at the negative electrode alone. Two nanoporous carbon materials were tested, with different nanotexture orders (using Raman and 13C MAS-NMR spectroscopies), and the more disordered carbon shows a better capacitance and a better tolerance to high voltages.

  12. Solid State NMR Studies of the Aluminum Hydride Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Son-Jong; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Graetz, Jason; Reilly, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Several solid state NMR techniques including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various AlH3 samples. MAS-NMR spectra for the 1H and 27Al nuclei have been obtained on a variety of AlH3 samples that include the (beta)- and (gamma)- phases as well as the most stable (alpha)-phase. While the dominant components in these NMR spectra correspond to the aluminum hydride phases, other species were found that include Al metal, molecular hydrogen (H2), as well as peaks that can be assigned to Al-O species in different configurations. The occurrence and concentration of these extraneous components are dependent upon the initial AlH3 phase composition and preparation procedures. Both the (beta)-AlH3 and (gamma)-AlH3 phases were found to generate substantial amounts of Al metal when the materials were stored at room temperature while the (alpha)-phase materials do not exhibit these changes.

  13. MAS2-8 radar and digital control unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, J. M.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1974-01-01

    The design of the MAS 2-8 (2 to 8 GHz microwave-active spectrometer), a ground-based sensor system, is presented. A major modification in 1974 to the MAS 2-8, that of a control subsystem to automate the data-taking operation, is the prime focus. The digital control unit automatically changes all system parameters except FM rate and records the return signal on paper tape. The overall system operation and a detailed discussion of the design and operation of the digital control unit are presented.

  14. Fluorine-19 NMR and computational quantification of isoflurane binding to the voltage-gated sodium channel NaChBac

    PubMed Central

    Kinde, Monica N.; Bondarenko, Vasyl; Granata, Daniele; Bu, Weiming; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Loll, Patrick J.; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Tang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) play an important role in general anesthesia. Electrophysiology measurements suggest that volatile anesthetics such as isoflurane inhibit NaV by stabilizing the inactivated state or altering the inactivation kinetics. Recent computational studies suggested the existence of multiple isoflurane binding sites in NaV, but experimental binding data are lacking. Here we use site-directed placement of 19F probes in NMR experiments to quantify isoflurane binding to the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NaChBac. 19F probes were introduced individually to S129 and L150 near the S4–S5 linker, L179 and S208 at the extracellular surface, T189 in the ion selectivity filter, and all phenylalanine residues. Quantitative analyses of 19F NMR saturation transfer difference (STD) spectroscopy showed a strong interaction of isoflurane with S129, T189, and S208; relatively weakly with L150; and almost undetectable with L179 and phenylalanine residues. An orientation preference was observed for isoflurane bound to T189 and S208, but not to S129 and L150. We conclude that isoflurane inhibits NaChBac by two distinct mechanisms: (i) as a channel blocker at the base of the selectivity filter, and (ii) as a modulator to restrict the pivot motion at the S4–S5 linker and at a critical hinge that controls the gating and inactivation motion of S6. PMID:27856739

  15. Complete assignment of NMR data of 22 phenyl-1H-pyrazoles' derivatives.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Aline Lima; Alves de Oliveira, Carlos Henrique; Mairink, Laura Maia; Pazini, Francine; Menegatti, Ricardo; Lião, Luciano Morais

    2011-08-01

    Complete assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts and J((1)H/(1)H and (1)H/(19)F) coupling constants for 22 1-phenyl-1H-pyrazoles' derivates were performed using the concerted application of (1)H 1D and (1)H, (13)C 2D gs-HSQC and gs-HMBC experiments. All 1-phenyl-1H-pyrazoles' derivatives were synthesized as described by Finar and co-workers. The formylated 1-phenyl-1H-pyrazoles' derivatives were performed under Duff's conditions.

  16. Sodium ion effect on silk fibroin conformation characterized by solid-state NMR and generalized 2D NMR NMR correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qing-Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated Na + ion effect on the silk fibroin (SF) conformation. Samples are Na +-involved regenerated silk fibroin films. 13C CP-MAS NMR demonstrates that as added [Na +] increases, partial silk fibroin conformation transit from helix-form to β-form at certain Na + ion concentration which is much higher than that in Bombyx mori silkworm gland. The generalized two-dimensional NMR-NMR correlation analysis reveals that silk fibroin undergoes several intermediate states during its conformation transition process as [Na +] increase. The appearance order of the intermediates is followed as: helix and/or random coil → helix-like → β-sheet-like → β-sheet, which is the same as that produced by pH decrease from 6.8 to 4.8 in the resultant regenerated silk fibroin films. The binding sites of Na + to silk fibroin might involve the carbonyl oxygen atom of certain amino acids sequence which could promote the formation of β-sheet conformation. Since the Na +sbnd O bond is weak, the ability of Na + inducing the secondary structure transition is weaker than those of Ca 2+, Cu 2+ and even K +. It is maybe a reason why the sodium content is much lower than potassium in the silkworm gland.

  17. Structure of (KIAGKIA)3 aggregates in phospholipid bilayers by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Toke, Orsolya; O'Connor, R D; Weldeghiorghis, Thomas K; Maloy, W Lee; Glaser, Ralf W; Ulrich, Anne S; Schaefer, Jacob

    2004-07-01

    The interchain (13)C-(19)F dipolar coupling measured in a rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) experiment performed on mixtures of differently labeled KIAGKIA-KIAGKIA-KIAGKIA (K3) peptides (one specifically (13)C labeled, and the other specifically (19)F labeled) in multilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (1:1) shows that K3 forms close-packed clusters, primarily dimers, in bilayers at a lipid/peptide molar ratio (L/P) of 20. Dipolar coupling to additional peptides is weaker than that within the dimers, consistent with aggregates of monomers and dimers. Analysis of the sideband dephasing rates indicates a preferred orientation between the peptide chains of the dimers. The combination of the distance and orientation information from REDOR is consistent with a parallel (N-N) dimer structure in which two K3 helices intersect at a cross-angle of approximately 20 degrees. Static (19)F NMR experiments performed on K3 in oriented lipid bilayers show that between L/P = 200 and L/P = 20, K3 chains change their absolute orientation with respect to the membrane normal. This result suggests that the K3 dimers detected by REDOR at L/P = 20 are not on the surface of the bilayer but are in a membrane pore.

  18. Resolution and polarization distribution in cryogenic DNP/MAS experiments

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Corzilius, Björn; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Andreas, Loren B.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Matsuki, Yoh; Belenky, Marina L.; Lugtenburg, Johan; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    This contribution addresses four potential misconceptions associated with high-resolution dynamic nuclear polarization/magic angle spinning (DNP/MAS) experiments. First, spectral resolution is not generally compromised at the cryogenic temperatures at which DNP experiments are performed. As we demonstrate at a modest field of 9 T (380 MHz 1H), 1 ppm linewidths are observed in DNP/MAS spectra of a membrane protein in its native lipid bilayer, and <0.4 ppm linewidths are reported in a crystalline peptide at 85 K. Second, we address the concerns about paramagnetic broadening in DNP/MAS spectra of proteins by demonstrating that the exogenous radical polarizing agents utilized for DNP are distributed in the sample in such a manner as to avoid paramagnetic broadening and thus maintain full spectral resolution. Third, the enhanced polarization is not localized around the polarizing agent, but rather is effectively and uniformly dispersed throughout the sample, even in the case of membrane proteins. Fourth, the distribution of polarization from the electron spins mediated via spin diffusion between 1H–1H strongly dipolar coupled spins is so rapid that shorter magnetization recovery periods between signal averaging transients can be utilized in DNP/MAS experiments than in typical experiments performed at ambient temperature. PMID:20454732

  19. ADP-MAS: A Math and Science Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of La Raza, Washington, DC.

    This curriculum, Academia del Pueblo-Math and Science (ADP-MAS), is an outgrowth of the National Council of La Raza's Project EXCEL, a supplemental educational enrichment model for at-risk Latino students to be operated by Latino community-based organizations or public institutions, including schools with substantial Latino populations. ADP-MAS…

  20. Simulations of chemical exchange lineshapes in CP/MAS spectra using floquet theory and sparse matrix methods

    PubMed

    Hazendonk; Bain; Grondey; Harrison; Dumont

    2000-09-01

    This paper presents a general method for simulating the effect of chemical exchange on MAS NMR spectra of solid samples. The complication in MAS spectra is that the Hamiltonian itself is time-dependent, due to the spinning of the sample. The approach taken in this work is to use Floquet theory to convert the problem into a time-independent form, and then use established methods (used in liquid NMR simulations) to calculate the lineshape. Floquet theory has been admired for its elegance, but criticized for its computational inefficiencies. This is because it removes the time dependence of the system by expanding the problem in a Fourier-like series. This makes a relatively small, time-dependent calculation into a much larger time-independent one. Typically, we use twice as many Floquet blocks as there are spinning sidebands, so the increase in size is substantial. The problem that this creates stems from the fact that the usual Householder methods for diagonalizing a matrix scale as the cube of the size of the matrix. This would make a Floquet calculation prohibitively long. However, the Floquet matrix is inherently sparse, so sparse matrix methods can produce substantial computational savings. Also, fully diagonalizing a matrix is expensive, but converting the matrix to a tridiagonal form (using iterative Lanczos methods) is much cheaper. The use of the Lanczos methods makes the Floquet calculations feasible as a general method for systems of more than one spin. We show how to set up the full matrix describing chemical exchange in a spinning sample, but the details of how the Lanczos methods work are not included-they are described elsewhere. We then validate the theory by simulating the MAS spectra of dimethyl sulfone both with natural abundance (13)C and with methyl groups labeled with (13)C. The latter system has both dipolar and chemical shielding anisotropy terms contributing to the spectrum. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  1. [Hepatic manifestation of a macrophage activation syndrome (MAS)].

    PubMed

    Nagel, Michael; Schwarting, Andreas; Straub, Beate K; Galle, Peter R; Zimmermann, Tim

    2017-04-04

    Background Elevated liver values are the most common pathological laboratory result in Germany. Frequent findings, especially in younger patients, are nutritive- or medicamentous- toxic reasons, viral or autoimmune hepatitis. A macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) may manifest like a viral infectious disease with fever, hepatosplenomegaly and pancytopenia and is associated with a high mortality. It is based on an enhanced activation of macrophages with increased cytokine release, leading to organ damage and multi-organ failure. In addition to genetic causes, MAS is commonly associated with infections and rheumatic diseases. We report the case of a 26-year-old female patient suffering from MAS as a rare cause of elevated liver enzymes. Methods Patient characteristics, laboratory values, liver histology, bone marrow and radiological imaging were documented and analyzed. Case Report After an ordinary upper airway infection with bronchitis, a rheumatic arthritis appeared and was treated with leflunomide und methotrexate. In the further course of the disease, the patient developed an acute hepatitis with fever, pancytopenia and massive hyperferritinemia. Immunohistochemistry of the liver biopsy revealed hemophagocytosis and activation of CD68-positive macrophages. In the radiological and histological diagnostics of the liver and bone marrow, an MAS was diagnosed as underlying disease of the acute hepatitis. Under therapy with prednisolone, the fever disappeared and transaminases and ferritin rapidly normalized. Conclusion Aside from the frequent causes of elevated liver values in younger patients, such as nutritive toxic, drug induced liver injury, viral or autoimmune hepatitis, especially in case of massive hyperferritinemia, a MAS should be considered as a rare cause of acute liver disease.

  2. A very sensitive high-resolution NMR method for quadrupolar nuclei: SPAM-DQF-STMAS.

    PubMed

    Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Flambard, Alexandrine; Delevoye, Laurent; Montagne, Lionel

    2005-07-21

    We show that by combining the intrinsically larger (with respect to MQMAS) efficiency of Double-Quantum Filtered Satellite-Transition MAS (DQF-STMAS), with the large S/N gain of the Soft-Pulse Added Mixing (SPAM) concept, a new very sensitive high-resolution solid-state NMR method can be obtained for semi-integer quadrupolar nuclei.

  3. Recent Advances in Multinuclear NMR Spectroscopy for Chiral Recognition of Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Silva, Márcio S

    2017-02-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool for the elucidation of chemical structure and chiral recognition. In the last decade, the number of probes, media, and experiments to analyze chiral environments has rapidly increased. The evaluation of chiral molecules and systems has become a routine task in almost all NMR laboratories, allowing for the determination of molecular connectivities and the construction of spatial relationships. Among the features that improve the chiral recognition abilities by NMR is the application of different nuclei. The simplicity of the multinuclear NMR spectra relative to ¹H, the minimal influence of the experimental conditions, and the larger shift dispersion make these nuclei especially suitable for NMR analysis. Herein, the recent advances in multinuclear ((19)F, (31)P, (13)C, and (77)Se) NMR spectroscopy for chiral recognition of organic compounds are presented. The review describes new chiral derivatizing agents and chiral solvating agents used for stereodiscrimination and the assignment of the absolute configuration of small organic compounds.

  4. Action of the multifunctional peptide BP100 on native biomembranes examined by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Misiewicz, Julia; Afonin, Sergii; Grage, Stephan L; van den Berg, Jonas; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-04-01

    Membrane composition is a key factor that regulates the destructive activity of antimicrobial peptides and the non-leaky permeation of cell penetrating peptides in vivo. Hence, the choice of model membrane is a crucial aspect in NMR studies and should reflect the biological situation as closely as possible. Here, we explore the structure and dynamics of the short multifunctional peptide BP100 using a multinuclear solid-state NMR approach. The membrane alignment and mobility of this 11 amino acid peptide was studied in various synthetic lipid bilayers with different net charge, fluidity, and thickness, as well as in native biomembranes harvested from prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. (19)F-NMR provided the high sensitivity and lack of natural abundance background that are necessary to observe a labelled peptide even in protoplast membranes from Micrococcus luteus and in erythrocyte ghosts. Six selectively (19)F-labeled BP100 analogues gave remarkably similar spectra in all of the macroscopically oriented membrane systems, which were studied under quasi-native conditions of ambient temperature and full hydration. This similarity suggests that BP100 has the same surface-bound helical structure and high mobility in the different biomembranes and model membranes alike, independent of charge, thickness or cholesterol content of the system. (31)P-NMR spectra of the phospholipid components did not indicate any bilayer perturbation, so the formation of toroidal wormholes or micellarization can be excluded as a mechanism of its antimicrobial or cell penetrating action. However, (2)H-NMR analysis of the acyl chain order parameter profiles showed that BP100 leads to considerable membrane thinning and thereby local destabilization.

  5. Rotary echo nutation NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, R.; Tijink, G. A. H.; Veeman, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional solid state NMR experiment which combines rotary echoes and nutation NMR is investigated and used to study different sodium sites in zeolite NaA. It is shown that with this technique sodium ions with different relaxation rates in the rotating frame can be distinguished.

  6. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  7. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  8. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  9. Detection of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid in humans: a combined 19F-MRS in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bilecen, Deniz; Schulte, Anja-Carina; Kaspar, Armin; Küstermann, Eckerhardt; Seelig, Joachim; Elverfeldt, Dominik; Scheffler, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    This study describes for the first time results of a (19)F-MRS study on humans exposed to the fluorinated non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid. The accumulation and elimination of this commercially available selective prostaglandin synthase inhibitor is studied after an oral bolus in the human liver, in blood plasma and in urine samples. The in vivo spectra of the liver display two resonances with a similar increase in signal intensity during the investigation period of 240 min. One resonance refers to the parent compound niflumic acid (P), whereas the second resonance corresponds to a metabolite (M1) formed by the biotransformation by liver enzymes. The spectroscopic comparison with model compounds suggests 4'-hydroxyniflumic acid as the metabolite. During the entire experiment the concentration ratios of these resonances (P/M1) ranged between 0.7 and 0.9, indicating a high metabolite concentration most probably due to an efficient first pass metabolism. Both resonances (P, M1) were observed in the in vitro study of the blood plasma samples after plasma protein denaturation. However, in comparison to the liver spectra, the amount of the metabolite M1 is very small with a P/M1-ratio of 36.6 after 90 min and 16.1 after the end of measurement. This finding suggests an efficient biliary excretion of the metabolite M1, which bypasses the blood circulation system. Both resonances are also identified in the native urine samples. The signal intensity of the parent compound dominates the spectra of all urine samples, whereas the signal intensity of M1 increases slowly reaching a similar value to the parent compound P at the end of the measurement. This observation demonstrates an effective renal elimination of niflumic acid and suggests the existence of an enterohepatic circuit with a re-entry mechanism for the biliary excreted metabolite M1. In the urine spectra, an additional metabolite M2 is found. This resonance exhibits a low but constant signal

  10. Closed-cycle cold helium magic-angle spinning for sensitivity-enhanced multi-dimensional solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yoh; Nakamura, Shinji; Fukui, Shigeo; Suematsu, Hiroto; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2015-10-01

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR is a powerful tool for studying molecular structure and dynamics, but suffers from its low sensitivity. Here, we developed a novel helium-cooling MAS NMR probe system adopting a closed-loop gas recirculation mechanism. In addition to the sensitivity gain due to low temperature, the present system has enabled highly stable MAS (vR=4-12 kHz) at cryogenic temperatures (T=35-120 K) for over a week without consuming helium at a cost for electricity of 16 kW/h. High-resolution 1D and 2D data were recorded for a crystalline tri-peptide sample at T=40 K and B0=16.4 T, where an order of magnitude of sensitivity gain was demonstrated versus room temperature measurement. The low-cost and long-term stable MAS strongly promotes broader application of the brute-force sensitivity-enhanced multi-dimensional MAS NMR, as well as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced NMR in a temperature range lower than 100 K.

  11. Dynamics and interactions of ibuprofen in cyclodextrin nanosponges by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Monica; Castiglione, Franca; Pastori, Nadia; Punta, Carlo; Melone, Lucio; Panzeri, Walter; Rossi, Barbara; Trotta, Francesco; Mele, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Two different formulations of cyclodextrin nanosponges (CDNS), obtained by polycondensation of β-cyclodextrin with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid dianhydride (EDTAn), were treated with aqueous solutions of ibuprofen sodium salt (IbuNa) affording hydrogels that, after lyophilisation, gave two solid CDNS-drug formulations. (1)H fast MAS NMR and (13)C CP-MAS NMR spectra showed that IbuNa was converted in situ into its acidic and dimeric form (IbuH) after freeze-drying. (13)C CP-MAS NMR spectra also indicated that the structure of the nanosponge did not undergo changes upon drug loading compared to the unloaded system. However, the (13)C NMR spectra collected under variable contact time cross-polarization (VCT-CP) conditions showed that the polymeric scaffold CDNS changed significantly its dynamic regime on passing from the empty CDNS to the drug-loaded CDNS, thus showing that the drug encapsulation can be seen as the formation of a real supramolecular aggregate rather than a conglomerate of two solid components. Finally, the structural features obtained from the different solid-state NMR approaches reported matched the information from powder X-ray diffraction profiles.

  12. Dynamics and interactions of ibuprofen in cyclodextrin nanosponges by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Monica; Pastori, Nadia; Punta, Carlo; Melone, Lucio; Panzeri, Walter; Rossi, Barbara; Trotta, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Two different formulations of cyclodextrin nanosponges (CDNS), obtained by polycondensation of β-cyclodextrin with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid dianhydride (EDTAn), were treated with aqueous solutions of ibuprofen sodium salt (IbuNa) affording hydrogels that, after lyophilisation, gave two solid CDNS-drug formulations. 1H fast MAS NMR and 13C CP-MAS NMR spectra showed that IbuNa was converted in situ into its acidic and dimeric form (IbuH) after freeze-drying. 13C CP-MAS NMR spectra also indicated that the structure of the nanosponge did not undergo changes upon drug loading compared to the unloaded system. However, the 13C NMR spectra collected under variable contact time cross-polarization (VCT-CP) conditions showed that the polymeric scaffold CDNS changed significantly its dynamic regime on passing from the empty CDNS to the drug-loaded CDNS, thus showing that the drug encapsulation can be seen as the formation of a real supramolecular aggregate rather than a conglomerate of two solid components. Finally, the structural features obtained from the different solid-state NMR approaches reported matched the information from powder X-ray diffraction profiles. PMID:28228859

  13. In Vivo Detection of the Cyclic Osmoregulated Periplasmic Glucan of Ralstonia solanacearum by High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieruszeski, J.-M.; Bohin, A.; Bohin, J.-P.; Lippens, G.

    2001-07-01

    We investigate the mobility of the osmoregulated periplasmic glucans of Ralstonia solanacearum in the bacterial periplasm through the use of high-resolution (HR) NMR spectroscopy under static and magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. Because the nature of periplasm is far from an isotropic aqueous solution, the molecules could be freely diffusing or rather associated to a periplasmic protein, a membrane protein, a lipid, or the peptidoglycan. HR MAS NMR spectroscopy leads to more reproducible results and allows the in vivo detection and characterization of the complex molecule.

  14. Al coordination and water speciation in hydrous aluminosilicate glasses: direct evidence from high-resolution heteronuclear 1H-27Al correlation NMR.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xianyu; Kanzaki, Masami

    2007-02-01

    In order to shed light on the dissolution mechanisms of water in depolymerized aluminosilicate melts/glasses, a comprehensive one- (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR study has been carried out on hydrous Ca- and Mg-aluminosilicate glasses of a haplobasaltic composition. The applied techniques include 1D 1H MAS NMR and 27Al-->1H cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, and 2D 1H NOESY and double-quantum (DQ) MAS NMR, 27Al triple-quantum (3Q) MAS NMR and 27Al-->1H heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) and 3QMAS/HETCOR NMR. Ab initio calculations were also performed to place additional constraints on the 1H NMR characteristics of AlOH and Si(OH)Al groups. This study has revealed, for the first time, the presence of free OH (i.e. (Ca, Mg)OH), SiOH and AlOH species, in addition to molecular H2O, in hydrous glasses of a depolymerized aluminosilicate composition. The AlOH groups are mostly associated with four-coordinate Al, but some are associated with five- and six-coordinate Al.

  15. Commercial facility site selection simulating based on MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yi; Li, Qingquan; Zheng, Guizhou

    2008-10-01

    The location of commercial facility decides the benefit of the operator to a large degree. Existing location methods can express the static relationships between site selection result and location factors, but there still are some limites when express the dynamic and uncertain relationship between them. Hence, a dynamic, stochastic and forecastable location model should be built which can introduce the customer's behavior into the model and combine the macro pattern and micro spatial interaction. So the authors proposes Geosim-LM based on MAS. Geosim-LM has 3 kinds of agents, CustAgent, SiteAgent and GovAgent. They represent the customers, commercial fercilities and government. The land type, land price and traffic are the model environment. Then Geosim-LM is applied in the bank branches site evaluation and selection in Liwan district, Guangzhou. In existing bank branches site evaluation, there are 70% consistent in score grade between result of Geosim-LM after 200 round runing and actual rebust location. It proves the model is reliable and feasible. The conclusions can be get from the paper. MAS have advantages in location choice than existed methods. The result of Geosim-LM running can powerfully proves that building location model based on MAS is feasible.

  16. Structure vs. composition: A solid-state 1H and 29Si NMR study of quenched glasses along the Na 2O-SiO 2-H 2O join

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, George D.; Mysen, Bjorn O.; Lee, Sung Keun

    2005-05-01

    A suite of six hydrous (7 wt.% H 2O) sodium silicate glasses spanning sodium octasilicate to sodium disilicate in composition were analyzed using 29Si single pulse (SP) magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, 1H- 29Si cross polarization (CP) MAS NMR, and fast MAS 1H-NMR. From the 29Si SPMAS data it is observed that at low sodium compositions dissolved water significantly depolymerizes the silicate network. At higher sodium contents, however, dissolved H 2O does not affect a significant increase in depolymerization over that predicted based on the Na/Si ratio alone. The fast MAS 1H-NMR data reveal considerable complexity in proton environments in each of the glasses studied. The fast MAS 1H-NMR spectra of the highest sodium concentration glasses do not exhibit evidence of signficantly greater fractions of dissolved water as molecular H 2O than the lower sodium concentration glasses requiring that the decrease in polymerization at high sodium contents involves a change in sodium solution mechanism. Variable contact time 1H- 29Si cross polarization (CP) MAS NMR data reveal an increase in the rotating frame spin lattice relaxation rate constant ( T1ρ*) for various Q n species with increasing sodium content that correlates with a reduction in the average 1H- 29Si coupling strength. At the highest sodium concentration, however, T1ρ* drops significantly, consistent with a change in the Na 2O solution mechanism.

  17. A dynamic nuclear polarization strategy for multi-dimensional Earth's field NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Halse, Meghan E; Callaghan, Paul T

    2008-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is introduced as a powerful tool for polarization enhancement in multi-dimensional Earth's field NMR spectroscopy. Maximum polarization enhancements, relative to thermal equilibrium in the Earth's magnetic field, are calculated theoretically and compared to the more traditional prepolarization approach for NMR sensitivity enhancement at ultra-low fields. Signal enhancement factors on the order of 3000 are demonstrated experimentally using DNP with a nitroxide free radical, TEMPO, which contains an unpaired electron which is strongly coupled to a neighboring (14)N nucleus via the hyperfine interaction. A high-quality 2D (19)F-(1)H COSY spectrum acquired in the Earth's magnetic field with DNP enhancement is presented and compared to simulation.

  18. NMR characterization of functional groups: 9--isomer ratios of available chloromethylstyrene mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, S. L.; Khune, G. D.; Khatri, N. A.

    1985-01-01

    From the assignments of the 1H and 13C 11.7 tesla NMR spectra of available mixtures of m- and p-chloromethylstyrene, the proportion of the meta and para compounds are easily determined. For these materials from two common commercial sources, proportions of 72 and 28% and 68 and 32% were found. These concentrations are substantially different from the often assumed 60 and 40% for the meta and para compounds, respectively. The influence of this difference on the desired properties of copolymers made from such mixtures is discussed. An alternative quantitative procedure for determining the chloromethyl group isomer ratios is also described which employs silver trifluoroacetate in acetone displacement of chloride and 19F NMR examination of the resulting ester mixture with a 2.3 tesla spectrometer.

  19. Solid-state NMR identification and quantification of newly formed aluminosilicate phases in weathered kaolinite systems.

    PubMed

    Crosson, Garry S; Choi, Sunkyung; Chorover, Jon; Amistadi, Mary Kay; O'Day, Peggy A; Mueller, Karl T

    2006-01-19

    The weathering of a specimen kaolinite clay was studied over the course of 369 d via solid-state 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-field 27Al MAS NMR. The chosen baseline solution conditions (0.05 mol kg-1 of Al, 2 mol kg-1 of Na+, 1 mol kg-1 of NO3-, 1 mol kg-1 of OH-, and pH approximately 13.8) approximate those of solutions leaking from waste tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA. Nonradioactive Cs and Sr cations were added to this synthetic tank waste leachate (STWL) solution at concentrations of 10(-3), 10(-4), and 10(-5) molal (m) to represent their radionuclide counterparts. The transformations of silicon- and aluminum-containing solid phase species were monitored quantitatively by using NMR spectroscopy, with the resulting spectra directly reporting the influence of the initial Cs and Sr on formation and transformation of the neo-formed solids. At the lowest concentration of Cs and Sr employed (10(-5) m in each cation) peaks consistent with the formation of zeolite-like minerals were detected via 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR as early as 33 d. At concentrations of 10(-3) m in each cation, new silicon species are not detected until 93 d, although neophases containing four-coordinate aluminum were detectable at earlier reaction times via 27Al MAS NMR. At the highest magnetic field strengths employed in this NMR study, deconvolutions of resonances detected in the tetrahedral region of the 27Al MAS spectra yielded multiple components, indicating the existence of at least four new aluminum-containing phases. Two of these phases are identified as sodalite and cancrinite through comparison with diffuse-reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectra and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) results, while a third phase may correlate with a previously detected aluminum-rich chabazite phase. All measurable solid reaction products have been quantified via their 27Al MAS resonances acquired at high magnetic field strengths (17.6 T), and

  20. Solid-State NMR Identification and Quantification of Newly Formed Aluminosilicate Phases in Weathered Kaolinite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Crosson, Garry S.; Choi, Sunkyung; Chorover, Jon; Amistadi, Mary K.; O'Day, Peggy A.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-01-19

    The weathering of a specimen kaolinite clay was studied over the course of 369 d via solid-state 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-field 27Al MAS NMR. The chosen baseline solution conditions (0.05 mol kg-1 of Al, 2 mol kg-1 of Na+, 1 mol kg-1 of NO3 -, 1 mol kg-1 of OH-, and pH ~13.8) approximate those of solutions leaking from waste tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA. Nonradioactive Cs and Sr cations were added to this synthetic tank waste leachate (STWL) solution at concentrations of 10-3, 10-4, and 10-5 molal (m) to represent their radionuclide counterparts. The transformations of silicon- and aluminum-containing solid phase species were monitored quantitatively by using NMR spectroscopy, with the resulting spectra directly reporting the influence of the initial Cs and Sr on formation and transformation of the neo-formed solids. At the lowest concentration of Cs and Sr employed (10-5 m in each cation) peaks consistent with the formation of zeolite-like minerals were detected via 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR as early as 33 d. At concentrations of 10-3 m in each cation, new silicon species are not detected until 93 d, although neophases containing four-coordinate aluminum were detectable at earlier reaction times via 27Al MAS NMR. At the highest magnetic field strengths employed in this NMR study, deconvolutions of resonances detected in the tetrahedral region of the 27Al MAS spectra yielded multiple components, indicating the existence of at least four new aluminum-containing phases. Two of these phases are identified as sodalite and cancrinite through comparison with diffuse-reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectra and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) results, while a third phase may correlate with a previously detected aluminum-rich chabazite phase. All measurable solid reaction products have been quantified via their 27Al MAS resonances acquired at high magnetic field strengths (17.6 T), and the quantitative

  1. Milli-tesla NMR and spectrophotometry of liquids hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yue; Chen, Chia-Hsiu; Wilson, Zechariah; Savukov, Igor; Hilty, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarization methods offer a unique means of improving low signal strength obtained in low-field NMR. Here, simultaneous measurements of NMR at a field of 0.7 mT and laser optical absorption from samples hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) are reported. The NMR measurement field closely corresponds to a typical field encountered during sample injection in a D-DNP experiment. The optical spectroscopy allows determination of the concentration of the free radical required for DNP. Correlation of radical concentration to NMR measurement of spin polarization and spin-lattice relaxation time allows determination of relaxivity and can be used for optimization of the D-DNP process. Further, the observation of the nuclear Overhauser effect originating from hyperpolarized spins is demonstrated. Signals from 1H and 19F in a mixture of trifluoroethanol and water are detected in a single spectrum, while different atoms of the same type are distinguished by J-coupling patterns. The resulting signal changes of individual peaks are indicative of molecular contact, suggesting a new application area of hyperpolarized low-field NMR for the determination of intermolecular interactions.

  2. Quantitative fluorine NMR to determine carbohydrate density on glyconanomaterials synthesized from perfluorophenyl azide-functionalized silica nanoparticles by click reaction.

    PubMed

    Kong, Na; Zhou, Juan; Park, JaeHyeung; Xie, Sheng; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-09-15

    A quantitative fluorine NMR ((19)F qNMR) method was developed to determine the carbohydrate density on glyconanomaterials. Mannose (Man)- and galactose (Gal)-conjugated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) were synthesized from perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA)-functionalized SNPs and propargylated Man or Gal by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click reaction). After treating PFPA-SNPs or Man-SNPs with hydrofluoric acid followed by lyophilization, the remaining residues were directly subjected to (19)F NMR analysis. The density of PFPA on PFPA-SNP was determined to be 7.7 ± 0.2 × 10(-16) nmol/nm(2) and Man on Man-SNP to be 6.4 ± 0.2 × 10(-16) nmol/nm(2) giving a yield of ∼83% for the click coupling reaction. The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of Man-SNPs with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-concanavalin A (Con A) was determined using a fluorescence competition assay to be 0.289 ± 0.003 μM, which represents more than 3 orders of magnitude affinity increase compared to free Man with Con A.

  3. Biomolecular solid state NMR with magic-angle spinning at 25 K

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A magic-angle spinning (MAS) probe has been constructed which allows the sample to be cooled with helium, while the MAS bearing and drive gases are nitrogen. The sample can be cooled to 25 K using roughly 3 liters/hour of liquid helium, while the 4 mm diameter rotor spins at 6.7 kHz with good stability (±5 Hz) for many hours. Proton decoupling fields up to at least 130 kHz can be applied. This helium-cooled MAS probe enables a variety of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments on biomolecular solids and other materials at low temperatures, with signal-to-noise proportional to 1/T. We show examples of low-temperature 13C NMR data for two biomolecular samples, namely the peptide Aβ14–23 in the form of amyloid fibrils and the protein HP35 in frozen glycerol/water solution. Issues related to temperature calibration, spin-lattice relaxation at low temperatures, paramagnetic doping of frozen solutions, and 13C MAS NMR linewidths are discussed. PMID:18922715

  4. IN SITU MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING NMR FOR STUDYING GEOLOGICAL CO(2) SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2011-03-27

    Geological carbon sequestration (GCS) is one of the most promising ways of mitigating atmospheric greenhouse gases (1-3). Mineral carbonation reactions are potentially important to the long-term sealing effectiveness of caprock but remain poorly predictable, particularly in low-water supercritical CO2 (scCO2)-dominated environments where the chemistry has not been adequately explored. In situ probes that provide molecular-level information is desirable for investigating mechanisms and rates of GCS mineral carbonation reactions. MAS-NMR is a powerful tool for obtaining detailed molecular structure and dynamics information of a system regardless whether the system is in a solid, a liquid, a gaseous, or a supercritical state, or a mixture thereof (4,5). However, MAS NMR under scCO2 conditions has never been realized due to the tremendous technical difficulties of achieving and maintaining high pressure within a fast spinning MAS rotor (6,7), where non-metal materials must be used. In this work, we report development of a unique high pressure MAS NMR capability, and its application to mineral carbonation chemistry in scCO2 under geologically relevant temperatures and pressures.

  5. NMR Study of Organic Counterion Binding to Perfluorinated Micellar Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossev, Dobrin; Matsumoto, Mustuo; Nakahara, Masaru

    2008-03-01

    In this study we have applied our previously developed NMR method to study the adsorption of tetramethylammonium (TMA^+) and tetraethylammonium (TEA^+) counterions to micelles formed by perfluorooctylsulfonate (FOS^-) surfactant in water at 30 C. These two counterions induce formation of threadlike surfactant structures that result in well pronounced viscoelastic properties of the solution. To selectively probe the degree of counterion binding we have used ^1H and ^19F NMR chemical shifts and self-diffusion coefficients that are sensitive to the Stern and diffuse double layers, respectively. The competitive adsorption of TMA^+ and TEA^+ was examined as a function of the TMA^+/TEA^+ ratio at a constant FOS^- concentration of 100 mM. The two counterions were found to form Stern layer around the FOS^- micelles with comparable packing; about one counterion per two micellized FOS molecules. When mixed at intermediate proportions, however, the TEA^+ counterion shows preferential binding; the concentration of TEA^+ in the Stern layer is found to be twice higher than that of TMA^+ at equal total respective concentrations in the solution. These results are discussed in terms of counterion size and hydrophobicity and presented in parallel with those that involved the smaller and more hydrophilic lithium counterion.

  6. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  7. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of {sup 29}Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The {sup 29}Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  8. Solid-state NMR characterization of Mowry Formation shales

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-04-01

    Solid-state [sup 13]C and [sup 29]Si NMR measurements were carried out on a series of petroleum source rocks from the Mowry Formation of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The objectives of this study wereto use CP/MAS [sup 13]C NMR measurements to monitor changes in the carbon structure of the kerogen that result from depth of burial, and to examine the feasibility of [sup 29]Si NMR for studying the thermal alteration of clay minerals during diagenesis. Carbon and silicon NMR measurements were made on a suite of samples covering a present-day depth interval of 3,000 to 11,500 ft.In general, the NMR results endorsed other geochemical analyses that were performed on the source rocks as part of another study to examine pressure compartmentalization in the Mowry Formation. The carbon aromaticity of the kerogen increased with depth of burial, and at depths greater that approximately 10,000 ft the kerogen showed little capacity to generate additional oil because of the small fraction of residual aliphatic carbon. By combining NMR and Rock-Eval measurements, an estimate of the hydrogen budget was obtained. The calculations indicated that approximately 20% of the kerogen was converted to hydrocarbons, and that sufficient hydrogen was liberated from aromatization and condensation reactions to stabilize the generated products. The [sup 29]Si NMR spectra were characterized by a relatively sharp quartz resonance and a broad resonance from the clay minerals. With increasing depth of burial, the clay resonance became broader and shifted slightly downfield. These changes qualitatively support X-ray analysis that shows progressive alteration of illite to smectite with depth of burial.

  9. Solid state (13)C NMR analysis of human gallstones from cancer and benign gall bladder diseases.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmi, K; Sonkar, Kanchan; Behari, Anu; Kapoor, V K; Sinha, Neeraj

    2009-09-01

    Natural abundance (13)C cross polarized (CP) magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of human gall bladder stones collected from patients suffering from malignant and benign gall bladder disease was carried out which revealed different polymorphs of cholesterol in these stones. All gall bladder stones in present study had cholesterol as their main constituent. (13)C CP-MAS NMR analysis revealed three forms of cholesterol molecules in these stones, which are anhydrous form, monohydrate crystalline with amorphous form and monohydrate crystalline form. Our study revealed that stones collected from patients associated with chronic cholecystitis (CC) disease have mostly different polymorph of cholesterol than stones collected from patients associated with gall bladder cancer (GBC). Such study will be helpful in understanding the mechanism of formation of gallstones which are associated with different gall bladder diseases. This is the first study by solid state NMR revealing different crystal polymorphism of cholesterol in human gallstones, extending the applicability of (13)C CP-MAS NMR technique for the routine study of gallstones.

  10. A Theoretical Design Approach for Passive Shimming of a Magic-Angle-Spinning NMR Magnet.

    PubMed

    Li, Frank X; Voccio, John P; Sammartino, Michael; Ahn, Minchul; Hahn, Seungyong; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a passive shimming design approach for a magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR magnet. In order to achieve a 1.5-T magic-angle field in NMR samples, we created two independent orthogonal magnetic vector fields by two separate coils: the dipole and solenoid. These two coils create a combined 1.5-T magnetic field vector directed at the magic angle (54.74° from the spinning axis). Additionally, the stringent magnetic field homogeneity requirement of the MAS magnet is the same as that of a solenoidal NMR magnet. The challenge for the magic-angle passive shimming design is to correct both the dipole and solenoid magnetic field spherical harmonics with one set of iron pieces, the so-called ferromagnetic shimming. Furthermore, the magnetization of the iron pieces is produced by both the dipole and solenoid coils. In our design approach, a matrix of 2 mm by 5 mm iron pieces with different thicknesses was attached to a thin-walled tube, 90-mm diameter and 40-mm high. Two sets of spherical harmonic coefficients were calculated for both the dipole and solenoid coil windings. By using the multiple-objective linear programming optimization technique and coordinate transformations, we have designed a passive shimming set that can theoretically reduce 22 lower-order spherical harmonics and improve the homogeneity of our MAS NMR magnet.

  11. Milli-Arcsecond (MAS) Imaging of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, Joseph M.; Oktem, Figen S.; Kamalabadi, Farzad; O'Neill, John; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Daw, Adrian N.; Rabin, Douglas M.

    2016-05-01

    Dissipation in the solar corona is believed to occur in extremely thin current sheets of order 1-100 km. Emission from these hot but thin current sheets should be visible in coronal EUV emission lines. However, this spatial scale is far below the resolution of existing imaging instruments, so these dissipation sites have never been observed individually. Conventional optics cannot be manufactured with sufficient surface figure accuracy to obtain the required spatial resolution in the extreme-ultraviolet where these hot plasmas radiate. A photon sieve, a diffractive imaging element similar to a Fresnel zone plate, can be manufactured to provide a few milli-arcsec (MAS) resolution, with much more readily achievable tolerances than with conventional imaging technology. Prototype photon sieve elements have been fabricated and tested in the laboratory. A full-scale ultra-high resolution instrument will require formation flying and computational image deconvolution. Significant progress has been made in overcoming these challenges, and some recent results in these areas are discussed. A simple design for a sounding rocket concept demonstration payload is presented that obtains 80 MAS (0.080 arcsec) imaging with a 100 mm diameter photon sieve to image Fe XIV 334 and Fe XVI 335. These images will show the structure of the corona at a resolution never before obtained, and they will also allow a study of the temperature structure in the dissipation region.

  12. A combined deuterium NMR and quantum chemical investigation of inequivalent hydrogen bonds in organic solids.

    PubMed

    Webber, Renee; Penner, Glenn H

    2012-01-01

    Deuterium magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations are used to investigate organic solids in which inequivalent hydrogen bonds are present. The use of (2)H MAS allows one to measure the chemical shift, δ, quadrupolar coupling constant, C(Q), and asymmetry in the quadrupolar interaction, η(Q), for each type of hydrogen bond present in the system. Quantum chemical calculations of the magnetic shielding (σ, which can be related to δ) and the electric field gradient (EFG, which can be related to C(Q)) are compared to the experimental results and are discussed with respect to the relative strengths of the hydrogen bonds within each system.

  13. Optimizing Adiabaticity in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandermause, Jonathan; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    We demonstrate the utility of Berry's superadiabatic formalism for numerically finding control sequences that implement quasi-adiabatic unitary transformations. Using an iterative interaction picture, we design a shortcut to adiabaticity that reduces the time required to perform an adiabatic inversion pulse in liquid state NMR. We also show that it is possible to extend our scheme to two or more qubits to find adiabatic quantum transformations that are allowed by the control algebra, and demonstrate a two-qubit entangling operation in liquid state NMR. We examine the pulse lengths at which the fidelity of these adiabatic transitions break down and compare with the quantum speed limit.

  14. Structure determination of Ba5AlF13 by coupling electron, synchrotron and neutron powder diffraction, solid-state NMR and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Charlotte; Allix, Mathieu; Suchomel, Matthew R; Porcher, Florence; Vivet, François; Legein, Christophe; Body, Monique; Massiot, Dominique; Taulelle, Francis; Fayon, Franck

    2016-10-04

    The room temperature structure of Ba5AlF13 has been investigated by coupling electron, synchrotron and neutron powder diffraction, solid-state high-resolution NMR ((19)F and (27)Al) and first principles calculations. An initial structural model has been obtained from electron and synchrotron powder diffraction data, and its main features have been confirmed by one- and two-dimensional NMR measurements. However, DFT GIPAW calculations of the (19)F isotropic shieldings revealed an inaccurate location of one fluorine site (F3, site 8a), which exhibited unusual long F-Ba distances. The atomic arrangement was reinvestigated using neutron powder diffraction data. Subsequent Fourier maps showed that this fluorine atom occupies a crystallographic site of lower symmetry (32e) with partial occupancy (25%). GIPAW computations of the NMR parameters validate the refined structural model, ruling out the presence of local static disorder and indicating that the partial occupancy of this F site reflects a local motional process. Visualisation of the dynamic process was then obtained from the Rietveld refinement of neutron diffraction data using an anharmonic description of the displacement parameters to account for the thermal motion of the mobile fluorine. The whole ensemble of powder diffraction and NMR data, coupled with first principles calculations, allowed drawing an accurate structural model of Ba5AlF13, including site-specific dynamical disorder in the fluorine sub-network.

  15. 31P Solid State NMR Studies of ZrP, Mg3P2, and CdPS3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    valence , in contrast to that in ZrP, Mg3P2, and MgP4. The 3 1 p solid state NMR spectra are shown in Figure 9. The MAS spectrum reveals a single...orange crystals were recovered from hot concentrated HCa . In one experi- RESULTS AND DISCUSSION ment, brilliant black polyhedral crystals of ZnSnP, were

  16. NMR Evidences of the Coupling between Conduction Electrons and Molecular Degrees of Freedom in the Exotic Member of the Bechgaard Salt (TMTSF)2FSO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satsukawa, Hidetaka; Yajima, Akio; Hiraki, Ko-ichi; Takahashi, Toshihiro; Kang, Haeyong; Jo, Younjung; Kang, Woun; Chung, Ok-Hee

    2016-12-01

    We performed 77Se- and 19F-NMR measurements on single crystals of (TMTSF)2FSO3 to characterize the electronic structures of different phases in the temperature-pressure phase diagram, determined by precise transport measurements [Jo et al., Phys. Rev. B 67, 014516 (2003)]. We claim that such varieties of electronic states in the refined phase diagram are caused by strong couplings of the conduction electrons with FSO3 anions, especially with the permanent electric dipoles on the anions. We suggest that as temperature decreases, the FSO3 anions form orientational ordering through two steps; first, only the tetrahedrons form an orientational order leaving the orientations of the electronic dipoles in random (transition I); then the dipoles form a perfect orientational order at a lower temperature (transition II). In the intermediate temperature range between transitions I and II, we found an appreciable enhancement of homogeneous and inhomogeneous widths of the 77Se-NMR spectrum. From the analysis of the angular dependence of the linewidth, we attributed these anomalies to the intramolecular charge disproportionation or imbalance and its slow dynamics caused by the coupling with the permanent electric dipole of the anion. Results of 19F-NMR relaxation and lineshape measurements support this picture very well. Electronic structures at higher pressures up to 1.25 GPa are discussed on the basis of the results of the 77Se- and 19F-NMR measurements.

  17. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators.

    PubMed

    Nonappa; Kolehmainen, E

    2016-07-13

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples.

  18. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators

    PubMed Central

    Kolehmainen, E.

    2016-01-01

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples. PMID:27374054

  19. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  20. Autonomous driving in NMR.

    PubMed

    Perez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The automatic analysis of NMR data has been a much-desired endeavour for the last six decades, as it is the case with any other analytical technique. This need for automation has only grown as advances in hardware; pulse sequences and automation have opened new research areas to NMR and increased the throughput of data. Full automatic analysis is a worthy, albeit hard, challenge, but in a world of artificial intelligence, instant communication and big data, it seems that this particular fight is happening with only one technique at a time (let this be NMR, MS, IR, UV or any other), when the reality of most laboratories is that there are several types of analytical instrumentation present. Data aggregation, verification and elucidation by using complementary techniques (e.g. MS and NMR) is a desirable outcome to pursue, although a time-consuming one if performed manually; hence, the use of automation to perform the heavy lifting for users is required to make the approach attractive for scientists. Many of the decisions and workflows that could be implemented under automation will depend on the two-way communication with databases that understand analytical data, because it is desirable not only to query these databases but also to grow them in as much of an automatic manner as possible. How these databases are designed, set up and the data inside classified will determine what workflows can be implemented. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. MAS C-Terminal Tail Interacting Proteins Identified by Mass Spectrometry- Based Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Zhang, Dongmei; Osbourne, Appledene; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Desnoyer, Russ; Willard, Belinda; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of signals from G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions. MAS is a GPCR that was initially discovered as an oncogene and is now known to play an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Current literature suggests that MAS interacts with common heterotrimeric G-proteins, but MAS interaction with proteins which might mediate G protein-independent or atypical signaling is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that MAS C-terminal tail (Ct) is a major determinant of receptor-scaffold protein interactions mediating MAS signaling. Mass-spectrometry based proteomic analysis was used to comprehensively identify the proteins that interact with MAS Ct comprising the PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM). We identified both PDZ and non-PDZ proteins from human embryonic kidney cell line, mouse atrial cardiomyocyte cell line and human heart tissue to interact specifically with MAS Ct. For the first time our study provides a panel of PDZ and other proteins that potentially interact with MAS with high significance. A ‘cardiac-specific finger print’ of MAS interacting PDZ proteins was identified which includes DLG1, MAGI1 and SNTA. Cell based experiments with wild-type and mutant MAS lacking the PDZ-BM validated MAS interaction with PDZ proteins DLG1 and TJP2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested well-known multi-protein scaffold complexes involved in nitric oxide signaling (NOS), cell-cell signaling of neuromuscular junctions, synapses and epithelial cells. Majority of these protein hits were predicted to be part of disease categories comprising cancers and malignant tumors. We propose a ‘MAS-signalosome’ model to stimulate further research in understanding the molecular mechanism of MAS function. Identifying hierarchy of interactions of ‘signalosome’ components with MAS will be a necessary step in future to fully understand the physiological and pathological functions of this enigmatic receptor. PMID

  2. MODIS Airborne simulator (MAS) Final Report for CLASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Arnold; Steven Platnick

    2010-11-24

    The MAS was flown aboard the NASA ER-2 for the CLASIC field experiment, and for all data collected, provided calibrated and geolocated (Level-1B) radiance data for it’s 50 spectral bands (ranging in wavelength for 0.47 to 14.3 µm). From the Level-1B data, as directed in the Statement of Work, higher order (Level-2) data products were derived. The Level-2 products include: a) cloud optical thickness, b) cloud effective radius, c) cloud top height (temperature), d) cloud fraction, e) cloud phase products. Preliminary Level-1B and Level-2 products were provided during the field experiment (typically within one or two days of data collection). Final version data products were made available in December 2008 following considerable calibration analysis. Data collection, data processing (to Level-2), and discussion of the calibration work are summarized below.

  3. H-1 Relaxation Times of Metabolites in Biological Samples Obtained with Nondestructive Ex-vivo Slow-MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Wind, Robert A.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-03-01

    Methods suitable for measuring 1H relaxation times such as T1, T2 and T1p, in small sized biological objects including live cells, excised organs and tissues, oil seeds etc., were developed in this work. This was achieved by combining inversion-recovery, spin-echo, or spin lock segment with the phase-adjusted spinning sideband (PASS) technique that was applied at slow sample spinning rate. Here, 2D-PASS was used to produce a high-resolution 1H spectrum free from the magnetic susceptibility broadening so that the relaxation parameters of individual metabolite can be determined. Because of the slow spinning employed, tissue and cell damage due to sample spinning is minimized. The methodologies were demonstrated by measuring 1H T1, T2 and T1p of metabolites in excised rat livers and sesame seeds at spinning rates of as low as 40 Hz.

  4. Generation and characterization of alkali metal clusters in Y-FAU zeolites. An ESR and MAS NMR spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannus, István; Béres, Attila; Nagy, János B.; Halász, János; Kiricsi, Imre

    1997-06-01

    Charged and neutral metal clusters of various compositions and sizes can be prepared by controlling the alkali metal content by the decomposition of alkali azides and the composition of the host zeolite by ion-exchange. ESR signals show that electron transfer from alkali metal atoms to alkali metal cations does occur, but in a direction opposite to that predicted by the gas-phase thermochemistry. Alkali metal clusters proved to be very active basic catalytic centers.

  5. Dual-band selective double cross polarization for heteronuclear polarization transfer between dilute spins in solid-state MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Miao, Yimin; Liu, Xiaoli; Yang, Jun; Li, Conggang; Deng, Feng; Fu, Riqiang

    2012-04-01

    A sinusoidal modulation scheme is described for selective heteronuclear polarization transfer between two dilute spins in double cross polarization magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. During the second N → C cross polarization, the 13C RF amplitude is modulated sinusoidally while the 15N RF amplitude is tangent. This modulation induces an effective spin-lock field in two selective frequency bands in either side of the 13C RF carrier frequency, allowing for simultaneous polarization transfers from 15N to 13C in those two selective frequency bands. It is shown by experiments and simulations that this sinusoidal modulation allows one to selectively polarize from 15N to its covalently bonded 13Cα and 13C' carbons in neighboring peptide planes simultaneously, which is useful for establishing the backbone connectivity between two sequential residues in protein structural elucidation. The selectivity and efficiency were experimentally demonstrated on a uniformly 13C,15N-labeled β1 immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G (GB1).

  6. Chemical shift tensor determination using magnetically oriented microcrystal array (MOMA): 13C solid-state CP NMR without MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumi, R.; Kimura, F.; Song, G.; Kimura, T.

    2012-10-01

    Chemical shift tensors for the carboxyl and methyl carbons of L-alanine crystals were determined using a magnetically oriented microcrystal array (MOMA) prepared from a microcrystalline powder sample of L-alanine. A MOMA is a single-crystal-like composite in which microcrystals are aligned three-dimensionally in a matrix resin. The single-crystal rotation method was applied to the MOMA to determine the principal values and axes of the chemical shift tensors. The result showed good agreement with the literature data for the single crystal of L-alanine. This demonstrates that the present technique is a powerful tool for determining the chemical shift tensor of a crystal from a microcrystal powder sample.

  7. Food Waste Composting Study from Makanan Ringan Mas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, A. A.; Ismail, S. N. M.; Jamaludin, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    The poor management of municipal solid waste in Malaysia has worsened over the years especially on food waste. Food waste represents almost 60% of the total municipal solid waste disposed in the landfill. Composting is one of low cost alternative method to dispose the food waste. This study is conducted to compost the food waste generation in Makanan Ringan Mas, which is a medium scale industry in Parit Kuari Darat due to the lack knowledge and exposure of food waste recycling practice. The aim of this study is to identify the physical and chemical parameters of composting food waste from Makanan Ringan Mas. The physical parameters were tested for temperature and pH value and the chemical parameter are Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium. In this study, backyard composting was conducted with 6 reactors. Tapioca peel was used as fermentation liquid and soil and coconut grated were used as the fermentation bed. Backyard composting was conducted with six reactors. The overall results from the study showed that the temperature of the reactors were within the range which are from 30° to 50°C. The result of this study revealed that all the reactors which contain processed food waste tend to produce pH value within the range of 5 to 6 which can be categorized as slightly acidic. Meanwhile, the reactors which contained raw food waste tend to produce pH value within the range of 7 to 8 which can be categorized as neutral. The highest NPK obtained is from Reactor B that process only raw food waste. The average value of Nitrogen is 48540 mg/L, Phosphorus is 410 mg/L and Potassium is 1550 mg/L. From the comparison with common chemical fertilizer, it shows that NPK value from the composting are much lower than NPK of the common chemical fertilizer. However, comparison with NPK of organic fertilizer shown only slightly difference value in NPK.

  8. Simultaneously cycled NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Parish, David M; Szyperski, Thomas

    2008-04-09

    Simultaneously cycled (SC) NMR was introduced and exemplified by implementing a set of 2-D [1H,1H] SC exclusive COSY (E.COSY) NMR experiments, that is, rf pulse flip-angle cycled (SFC), rf pulse phase cycled (SPC), and pulsed field gradient (PFG) strength cycled (SGC) E.COSY. Spatially selective 1H rf pulses were applied as composite pulses such that all steps of the respective cycles were affected simultaneously in different slices of the sample. This increased the data acquisition speed for an n-step cycle n-fold. A high intrinsic sensitivity was achieved by defining the cycles in a manner that the receiver phase remains constant for all steps of the cycle. Then, the signal resulting from applying the cycle corresponded to the sum of the signals from all steps of the cycle. Hence, the detected free induction decay did not have to be separated into the contributions arising from different slices, and read-out PFGs, which not only greatly reduce sensitivity but also negatively impact lineshapes in the direct dimension, were avoided. The current implementation of SFC E.COSY reached approximately 65% of the intrinsic sensitivity of the conventional phase cycled congener, making this experiment highly attractive whenever conventional data acquisition is sampling limited. Highly resolved SC E.COSY yielding accurate 3J-coupling values was recorded for the 416 Da plant alkaloid tomatidine within 80 min, that is, 12 times faster than with conventional phase cycled E.COSY. SC NMR is applicable for a large variety of NMR experiments and thus promises to be a valuable addition to the arsenal of approaches for tackling the NMR sampling problem to avoid sampling limited data acquisition.

  9. Solid-state NMR study of various mono- and divalent cation forms of the natural zeolite natrolite.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Bum; Vicente, Aurélie; Fernandez, Christian; Hong, Suk Bong

    2013-05-28

    Here we present the one-dimensional (29)Si and (27)Al MAS NMR and two-dimensional (27)Al MQMAS and DQF-STMAS NMR spectra of the monovalent (Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), Cs(+) and NH4(+)) and divalent (Ca(2+), Sr(2+) and Ba(2+)) cation forms of the natural zeolite natrolite (framework type NAT) with complete Si-Al ordering over the crystallographically distinct tetrahedral sites and with the same hydration state (hydrated, partially dehydrated or fully dehydrated). In the case of monovalent cation-exchanged natrolites, the differences in their crystal symmetry evidenced by (29)Si MAS NMR were found to be in good agreement with those determined by crystallographic analyses. However, (27)Al DQF-STMAS NMR spectroscopy shows the presence of two distinct Al sites in dehydrated K-NAT, Rb-NAT and NH4-NAT, suggesting that their actual crystal symmetry is lower than the reported one (i.e., orthorhombic Fdd2). The MAS NMR results also show that the space group of hydrated Ca-NAT is lower than that (monoclinic F1d1) of hydrated scolecite, the natural calcium counterpart of natrolite, which is also the case with hydrated Sr-NAT and Ba-NAT. We believe that the unexpected diversity in the crystal symmetry of natrolite caused by exchange of various mono- and divalent ions, as well as by dehydration, may be inherently due to the high framework flexibility of this natural zeolite.

  10. Studying Dynamics by Magic-Angle Spinning Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Principles and Applications to Biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Schanda, Paul; Ernst, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy is an important technique to study molecular structure, dynamics and interactions, and is rapidly gaining importance in biomolecular sciences. Here we provide an overview of experimental approaches to study molecular dynamics by MAS solid-state NMR, with an emphasis on the underlying theoretical concepts and differences of MAS solid-state NMR compared to solution-state NMR. The theoretical foundations of nuclear spin relaxation are revisited, focusing on the particularities of spin relaxation in solid samples under magic-angle spinning. We discuss the range of validity of Redfield theory, as well as the inherent multi-exponential behavior of relaxation in solids. Experimental challenges for measuring relaxation parameters in MAS solid-state NMR and a few recently proposed relaxation approaches are discussed, which provide information about time scales and amplitudes of motions ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds. We also discuss the theoretical basis and experimental measurements of anisotropic interactions (chemical-shift anisotropies, dipolar and quadrupolar couplings), which give direct information about the amplitude of motions. The potential of combining relaxation data with such measurements of dynamically-averaged anisotropic interactions is discussed. Although the focus of this review is on the theoretical foundations of dynamics studies rather than their application, we close by discussing a small number of recent dynamics studies, where the dynamic properties of proteins in crystals are compared to those in solution. PMID:27110043

  11. NMR in rotating magnetic fields: Magic angle field spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Sakellariou, D.; Meriles, C.; Martin, R.; Pines, A.

    2004-09-10

    Magic angle sample spinning has been one of the cornerstones in high-resolution solid state NMR. Spinning frequencies nowadays have increased by at least one order of magnitude over the ones used in the first experiments and the technique has gained tremendous popularity. It is currently a routine procedure in solid-state NMR, high-resolution liquid-state NMR and solid-state MRI. The technique enhances the spectral resolution by averaging away rank 2 anisotropic spin interactions thereby producing isotropic-like spectra with resolved chemical shifts and scalar couplings. Andrew proposed that it should be possible to induce similar effects in a static sample if the direction of the magnetic field is varied, e.g., magic-angle rotation of the B0 field (B0-MAS) and this has been recently demonstrated using electromagnetic field rotation. Here we discuss on the possibilities to perform field rotation using alternative hardware, together with spectroscopic methods to recover isotropic resolution even in cases where the field is not rotating at the magic angle. Extension to higher magnetic fields would be beneficial in situations where the physical manipulation of the sample is inconvenient or impossible. Such situations occur often in materials or biomedical samples where ''ex-situ'' NMR spectroscopy and imaging analysis is needed.

  12. Investigation of fluorine in SiO2 and on Si surface by the 19F(p,αγ)16O reaction, secondary-ion mass spectrometry, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Byoung-gon; Arai, Eiichi; Nishioka, Yasushiro; Ohji, Yuzuru; Iwata, Seiichi; Ma, T. P.

    1990-04-01

    A fluorinated thermal SiO2, grown after HF surface treatment without de-ionized water rinse, was estimated to contain ˜3×1013 cm-2 of fluorine by the 19F(p,αγ)16O reaction. Secondary-ion mass spectrometry data indicate that the SiF distribution is peaked at the SiO2/Si interface in the fluorinated oxide. The time-dependent change of the absolute amount of fluorine on the HF-treated silicon surface as a function of storage time in air or in vacuum was also investigated by the 19F(p,αγ)16O reaction. The initial number of fluorine atoms on the HF-treated silicon surface was estimated to be ˜1015 cm-2 before substantial desorption took place. Fluorine atoms desorb from the silicon surface much more rapidly if the sample is stored in air than in vacuum. These results were also supported by the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement.

  13. A Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Anti-G Protein F(ab′)2 Monoclonal Antibody Suppresses Mucous Production and Breathing Effort in RSV rA2-line19F-Infected BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boyoglu-Barnum, Seyhan; Gaston, Kelsey A.; Todd, Sean O.; Boyoglu, Cemil; Chirkova, Tatiana; Barnum, Thomas R.; Jorquera, Patricia; Haynes, Lia M.; Tripp, Ralph A.; Moore, Martin L.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae and is the single most important cause of serious lower respiratory tract infections in young children, yet no highly effective treatment or vaccine is available. Increased airway resistance and increased airway mucin production are two manifestations of RSV infection in children. RSV rA2-line19F infection induces pulmonary mucous production and increased breathing effort in BALB/c mice and provides a way to assess these manifestations of RSV disease in an animal model. In the present study, we investigated the effect of prophylactic treatment with the F(ab′)2 form of the anti-G protein monoclonal antibody (MAb) 131-2G on disease in RSV rA2-line19F-challenged mice. F(ab′)2 131-2G does not affect virus replication. It and the intact form that does decrease virus replication prevented increased breathing effort and airway mucin production, as well as weight loss, pulmonary inflammatory-cell infiltration, and the pulmonary substance P and pulmonary Th2 cytokine levels that occur in mice challenged with this virus. These data suggest that the RSV G protein contributes to prominent manifestations of RSV disease and that MAb 131-2G can prevent these manifestations of RSV disease without inhibiting virus infection. PMID:23885067

  14. A respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) anti-G protein F(ab')2 monoclonal antibody suppresses mucous production and breathing effort in RSV rA2-line19F-infected BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Boyoglu-Barnum, Seyhan; Gaston, Kelsey A; Todd, Sean O; Boyoglu, Cemil; Chirkova, Tatiana; Barnum, Thomas R; Jorquera, Patricia; Haynes, Lia M; Tripp, Ralph A; Moore, Martin L; Anderson, Larry J

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae and is the single most important cause of serious lower respiratory tract infections in young children, yet no highly effective treatment or vaccine is available. Increased airway resistance and increased airway mucin production are two manifestations of RSV infection in children. RSV rA2-line19F infection induces pulmonary mucous production and increased breathing effort in BALB/c mice and provides a way to assess these manifestations of RSV disease in an animal model. In the present study, we investigated the effect of prophylactic treatment with the F(ab')2 form of the anti-G protein monoclonal antibody (MAb) 131-2G on disease in RSV rA2-line19F-challenged mice. F(ab')2 131-2G does not affect virus replication. It and the intact form that does decrease virus replication prevented increased breathing effort and airway mucin production, as well as weight loss, pulmonary inflammatory-cell infiltration, and the pulmonary substance P and pulmonary Th2 cytokine levels that occur in mice challenged with this virus. These data suggest that the RSV G protein contributes to prominent manifestations of RSV disease and that MAb 131-2G can prevent these manifestations of RSV disease without inhibiting virus infection.

  15. Angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis modulates fear memory and extinction in mice.

    PubMed

    Lazaroni, Thiago Luiz do Nascimento; Bastos, Cristiane Perácio; Moraes, Márcio Flávio Dutra; Santos, Robson Souza; Pereira, Grace Schenatto

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate defense-alerting reaction to fear is a common feature of neuropsychiatric diseases. Therefore, impairments in brain circuits, as well as in molecular pathways underlying the neurovegetative adjustments to fear may play an essential role on developing neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we tested the hypothesis that interfering with angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]/Mas receptor axis homeostasis, which appears to be essential to arterial pressure control, would affect fear memory and extinction. Mas knockout (MasKO) mice, in FVB/N background, showed normal cued fear memory and extinction, but increased freezing in response to context. Next, as FVB/N has poor performance in contextual fear memory, we tested MasKO in mixed 129xC57BL/6 background. MasKO mice behaved similarly to wild-type (WT), but memory extinction was slower in contextual fear conditioning to a weak protocol (1CS/US). In addition, delayed extinction in MasKO mice was even more pronounced after a stronger protocol (3CS/US). We showed previously that Angiotensin II receptor AT1 antagonist, losantan, rescued object recognition memory deficit in MasKO mice. Here, losartan was also effective. Memory extinction was accelerated in MasKO mice after treatment with losartan. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis may modulate fear memory extinction. Furthermore, we suggest MasKO mice as an animal model to study post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

  16. Susceptibility corrections in solid-state NMR experiments with oriented membrane samples. Part I: applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Ralf W.; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2003-09-01

    Chemical shift referencing of solid-state NMR experiments on oriented membranes has to compensate for bulk magnetic susceptibility effects that are associated with the non-spherical sample shape, as described in the accompanying paper [J. Magn. Reson. 164 (2003) 115-127]. The resulting frequency deviations can be on the order of 10 ppm, which is serious for nuclei with a narrow chemical shift anisotropy such as 1H or 13C, and in some cases even 19F. Two referencing schemes are proposed here to compensate for these effects: A flat (0.4 mm) glass container with an isotropic reference molecule dissolved in a thin film of liquid is stacked on top of the oriented membrane sample. Alternatively, the intrinsic proton signal of the hydrated lipid can be used for chemical shift referencing. Further aspects related to magnetic susceptibility are discussed, such as air gaps in susceptibility-matched probeheads, the benefits of shimming, and limitations in the accuracy of orientational constraints. A biological application is illustrated by a series of experiments on the antimicrobial peptide PGLa, aimed at understanding its concentration-dependent membranolytic effect. To address a wide range of molar peptide/lipid ratios between 1:3000 and 1:8, multilayers of hydrated DMPC containing a 19F-labeled peptide were oriented between stacked glass plates. Maintaining an approximately constant amount of peptide gives rise to thick samples (18 plates) at low, and thin samples (3 plates) at high peptide/lipid ratio. Accurate referencing was critical to reveal a small but significant change over 5 ppm in the anisotropic chemical shift of the 19F label on the peptide, indicative of a change in the orientation and/or dynamics of PGLa in the membrane.

  17. NMR characterization and sorption behavior of agricultural and forest soil humic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengliang; Berns, Anne E.; Séquaris, Jean-Marie; Klumpp, Erwin

    2010-05-01

    Humic substances are the predominant components of the organic matter in the terrestrial system, which are not only important for the physicochemical properties of soil but are also dominant factors for controlling the environmental behaviors and fates of some organic contaminants, such as hydrophobic compounds. Nonylphenol [4-(1-ethyl-1, 3 dimethylpentyl) phenol] (NP), a ubiquitous hydrophobic pol