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Sample records for 19f mri oximetry

  1. 19F MRI for quantitative in vivo cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Mangala; Heerschap, Arend; Ahrens, Eric T.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular therapy, including stem cell transplants and dendritic cell vaccines, is typically monitored for dosage optimization, accurate delivery and localization using non-invasive imaging, of which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a key modality. 19F MRI retains the advantages of MRI as an imaging modality, while allowing direct detection of labelled cells for unambiguous identification and quantification, unlike typical metal-based contrast agents. Recent developments in 19F MRI-based in vivo cell quantification, the existing clinical use of 19F compounds and current explosive interest in cellular therapeutics have brought 19F imaging technology closer to clinical application. We review the application of 19F MRI to cell tracking, discussing intracellular 19F labels, cell labelling and in vivo quantification, as well as the potential clinical use of 19F MRI. PMID:20427096

  2. Fluorine (19F) MRS and MRI in biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Barnett, Brad P.; Bottomley, Paul A.; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Shortly after the introduction of 1H MRI, fluorinated molecules were tested as MR-detectable tracers or contrast agents. Many fluorinated compounds, which are nontoxic and chemically inert, are now being used in a broad range of biomedical applications, including anesthetics, chemotherapeutic agents, and molecules with high oxygen solubility for respiration and blood substitution. These compounds can be monitored by fluorine (19F) MRI and/or MRS, providing a noninvasive means to interrogate associated functions in biological systems. As a result of the lack of endogenous fluorine in living organisms, 19F MRI of ‘hotspots’ of targeted fluorinated contrast agents has recently opened up new research avenues in molecular and cellular imaging. This includes the specific targeting and imaging of cellular surface epitopes, as well as MRI cell tracking of endogenous macrophages, injected immune cells and stem cell transplants. PMID:20842758

  3. Coronary venous oximetry using MRI.

    PubMed

    Foltz, W D; Merchant, N; Downar, E; Stainsby, J A; Wright, G A

    1999-11-01

    Based on the Fick law, coronary venous blood oxygen measurements have value for assessing functional parameters such as the coronary flow reserve. At present, the application of this measure is restricted by its invasive nature. This report describes the design and testing of a noninvasive coronary venous blood oxygen measurement using MRI, with a preliminary focus on the coronary sinus. After design optimization including a four-coil phased array and an optimal set of data acquisition parameters, quality tests indicate measurement precision on the order of the gold standard optical measurement (3%O(2)). Comparative studies using catheter sampling suggest reasonable accuracy (3 subjects), with variability dominated by sampling location uncertainty ( approximately 7%O(2)). Intravenous dipyridamole (5 subjects) induces significant changes in sinus blood oxygenation (22 +/- 9% O(2)), corresponding to flow reserves of 1.8 +/- 0.4, suggesting the potential for clinical utility. Underestimation of flow reserve is dominated by right atrial mixing and the systemic effects of dipyridamole. Magn Reson Med 42:837-848, 1999. PMID:10542342

  4. Noninvasive detection of graft rejection by in vivo (19) F MRI in the early stage.

    PubMed

    Flögel, U; Su, S; Kreideweiss, I; Ding, Z; Galbarz, L; Fu, J; Jacoby, C; Witzke, O; Schrader, J

    2011-02-01

    Diagnosis of transplant rejection requires tissue biopsy and entails risks. Here, we describe a new (19) F MRI approach for noninvasive visualization of organ rejection via the macrophage host response. For this, we employed biochemically inert emulsified perfluorocarbons (PFCs), known to be preferentially phagocytized by monocytes and macrophages. Isografts from C57BL/6 or allografts from C57B10.A mice were heterotopically transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients. PFCs were applied intravenously followed by (1) H/(19) F MRI at 9.4 T 24 h after injection. (1) H images showed a similar position and anatomy of the graft in the abdomen for both cases. However, corresponding (19) F signals were only observed in allogenic tissue. (1) H/(19) F MRI enabled us to detect the initial immune response not later than 3 days after surgery, when conventional parameters did not reveal any signs of rejection. In allografts, the observed (19) F signal strongly increased with time and correlated with the extent of rejection. In separate experiments, rapamycin was used to demonstrate the ability of (19) F MRI to monitor immunosuppressive therapy. Thus, PFCs can serve as positive contrast agent for the early detection of transplant rejection by (19) F MRI with high spatial resolution and an excellent degree of specificity due to lack of any (19) F background. PMID:21214858

  5. (19)F-MRI for monitoring human NK cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Ludwig, Kai D; Gordon, Jeremy W; Kutz, Matthew P; Bednarz, Bryan P; Fain, Sean B; Capitini, Christian M

    2016-05-01

    The availability of clinical-grade cytokines and artificial antigen-presenting cells has accelerated interest in using natural killer (NK) cells as adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) for cancer. One of the technological shortcomings of translating therapies from animal models to clinical application is the inability to effectively and non-invasively track these cells after infusion in patients. We have optimized the nonradioactive isotope fluorine-19 ((19)F) as a means to label and track NK cells in preclinical models using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human NK cells were expanded with interleukin (IL)-2 and labeled in vitro with increasing concentrations of (19)F. Doses as low as 2 mg/mL (19)F were detected by MRI. NK cell viability was only decreased at 8 mg/mL (19)F. No effects on NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 leukemia cells were observed with 2, 4 or 8 mg/mL (19)F. Higher doses of (19)F, 4 mg/mL and 8 mg/mL, led to an improved (19)F signal by MRI with 3 × 10(11) (19)F atoms per NK cell. The 4 mg/mL (19)F labeling had no effect on NK cell function via secretion of granzyme B or interferon gamma (IFNγ), compared to NK cells exposed to vehicle alone. (19)F-labeled NK cells were detectable immediately by MRI after intratumoral injection in NSG mice and up to day 8. When (19)F-labeled NK cells were injected subcutaneously, we observed a loss of signal through time at the site of injection suggesting NK cell migration to distant organs. The (19)F perfluorocarbon is a safe and effective reagent for monitoring the persistence and trafficking of NK cell infusions in vivo, and may have potential for developing novel imaging techniques to monitor ACT for cancer. PMID:27467963

  6. Visualizing arthritic inflammation and therapeutic response by fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging (19F MRI)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-invasive imaging of inflammation to measure the progression of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to monitor responses to therapy is critically needed. V-Sense, a perfluorocarbon (PFC) contrast agent that preferentially labels inflammatory cells, which are then recruited out of systemic circulation to sites of inflammation, enables detection by 19F MRI. With no 19F background in the host, detection is highly-specific and can act as a proxy biomarker of the degree of inflammation present. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis in rats, a model with many similarities to human RA, was used to study the ability of the PFC contrast agent to reveal the accumulation of inflammation over time using 19F MRI. Disease progression in the rat hind limbs was monitored by caliper measurements and 19F MRI on days 15, 22 and 29, including the height of clinically symptomatic disease. Naïve rats served as controls. The capacity of the PFC contrast agent and 19F MRI to assess the effectiveness of therapy was studied in a cohort of rats administered oral prednisolone on days 14 to 28. Results Quantification of 19F signal measured by MRI in affected limbs was linearly correlated with disease severity. In animals with progressive disease, increases in 19F signal reflected the ongoing recruitment of inflammatory cells to the site, while no increase in 19F signal was observed in animals receiving treatment which resulted in clinical resolution of disease. Conclusion These results indicate that 19F MRI may be used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate longitudinal responses to a therapeutic regimen, while additionally revealing the recruitment of monocytic cells involved in the inflammatory process to the anatomical site. This study may support the use of 19F MRI to clinically quantify and monitor the severity of inflammation, and to assess the effectiveness of treatments in RA and other diseases with an inflammatory component. PMID:22721447

  7. In vivo 19F MRI and 19F MRS of 19F-labelled boronophenylalanine fructose complex on a C6 rat glioma model to optimize boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcari, Paola; Capuani, Silvia; D'Amore, Emanuela; Lecce, Mario; La Bella, Angela; Fasano, Fabrizio; Campanella, Renzo; Migneco, Luisa Maria; Saverio Pastore, Francesco; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary modality used to treat malignant brain gliomas. To optimize BNCT effectiveness a non-invasive method is needed to monitor the spatial distribution of BNCT carriers in order to estimate the optimal timing for neutron irradiation. In this study, in vivo spatial distribution mapping and pharmacokinetics evaluation of the 19F-labelled boronophenylalanine (BPA) were performed using 19F magnetic resonance imaging (19F MRI) and 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19F MRS). Characteristic uptake of 19F-BPA in C6 glioma showed a maximum at 2.5 h after compound infusion as confirmed by both 19F images and 19F spectra acquired on blood samples collected at different times after infusion. This study shows the ability of 19F MRI to selectively map the bio-distribution of 19F-BPA in a C6 rat glioma model, as well as providing a useful method to perform pharmacokinetics of BNCT carriers.

  8. A symmetrical fluorous dendron-cyanine dye-conjugated bimodal nanoprobe for quantitative 19F MRI and NIR fluorescence bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Yue, Xuyi; Wang, Yu; Qian, Chunqi; Huang, Peng; Lizak, Marty; Niu, Gang; Wang, Fu; Rong, Pengfei; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Ma, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-08-01

    (19)F MRI and optical imaging are two powerful noninvasive molecular imaging modalities in biomedical applications. (19)F MRI has great potential for high resolution in vivo imaging, while fluorescent probes enable ultracontrast cellular/tissue imaging with high accuracy and sensitivity. A bimodal nanoprobe is developed, integrating the merits of (19)F MRI and fluorescence imaging into a single synthetic molecule, which is further engineered into nanoprobe, by addressing shortcomings of conventional contrast agents to explore the quantitative (19)F MRI and fluorescence imaging and cell tracking. Results show that this bimodal imaging nanoprobe presents high correlation of (19)F MR signal and NIR fluorescence intensity in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, this nanoprobe enables quantitative (19)F MR analysis, confirmed by a complementary fluorescence analysis. This unique feature can hardly be obtained by traditional (19)F MRI contrast agents. It is envisioned that this nanoprobe can hold great potential for quantitative and sensitive multi-modal molecular imaging. PMID:24789108

  9. In Vivo Imaging of Stepwise Vessel Occlusion in Cerebral Photothrombosis of Mice by 19F MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Kampf, Thomas; Jakob, Peter M.; Stoll, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Background 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was recently introduced as a promising technique for in vivo cell tracking. In the present study we compared 19F MRI with iron-enhanced MRI in mice with photothrombosis (PT) at 7 Tesla. PT represents a model of focal cerebral ischemia exhibiting acute vessel occlusion and delayed neuroinflammation. Methods/Principal Findings Perfluorocarbons (PFC) or superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) were injected intravenously at different time points after photothrombotic infarction. While administration of PFC directly after PT induction led to a strong 19F signal throughout the entire lesion, two hours delayed application resulted in a rim-like 19F signal at the outer edge of the lesion. These findings closely resembled the distribution of signal loss on T2-weighted MRI seen after SPIO injection reflecting intravascular accumulation of iron particles trapped in vessel thrombi as confirmed histologically. By sequential administration of two chemically shifted PFC compounds 0 and 2 hours after illumination the different spatial distribution of the 19F markers (infarct core/rim) could be visualized in the same animal. When PFC were applied at day 6 the fluorine marker was only detected after long acquisition times ex vivo. SPIO-enhanced MRI showed slight signal loss in vivo which was much more prominent ex vivo indicative for neuroinflammation at this late lesion stage. Conclusion Our study shows that vessel occlusion can be followed in vivo by 19F and SPIO-enhanced high-field MRI while in vivo imaging of neuroinflammation remains challenging. The timing of contrast agent application was the major determinant of the underlying processes depicted by both imaging techniques. Importantly, sequential application of different PFC compounds allowed depiction of ongoing vessel occlusion from the core to the margin of the ischemic lesions in a single MRI measurement. PMID:22194810

  10. 19F MRI detection of acute allograft rejection with in vivo perfluorocarbon labeling of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Hitchens, T Kevin; Ye, Qing; Eytan, Danielle F; Janjic, Jelena M; Ahrens, Eric T; Ho, Chien

    2011-04-01

    Current diagnosis of organ rejection following transplantation relies on tissue biopsy, which is not ideal due to sampling limitations and risks associated with the invasive procedure.We have previously shown that cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of iron-oxide labeled immune-cell infiltration can provide a noninvasive measure of rejection status by detecting areas of hypointensity on T 2*-weighted images. In this study, we tested the feasibility of using a fluorine-based cellular tracer agent to detect macrophage accumulation in rodent models of acute allograft rejection by fluorine-19 ((19) F) MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This study used two rat models of acute rejection, including abdominal heterotopic cardiac transplant and orthotopic kidney transplant models. Following in vivo labeling of monocytes and macrophages with a commercially available agent containing perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether, we observed (19) F-signal intensity in the organs experiencing rejection by (19) F MRI, and conventional (1) H MRI was used for anatomical context. Immunofluorescence and histology confirmed macrophage labeling. These results are consistent with our previous studies and show the complementary nature of the two cellular imaging techniques. With no background signal, (19) F MRI/magnetic resonance spectroscopy can provide unambiguous detection of fluorine labeled cells, and may be a useful technique for detecting and quantifying rejection grade in patients. PMID:21305593

  11. Comparison between optimized GRE and RARE sequences for 19F MRI studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffientini, Chiara D.; Mastropietro, Alfonso; Caffini, Matteo; Cocco, Sara; Zucca, Ileana; Scotti, Alessandro; Baselli, Giuseppe; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia

    2014-03-01

    In 19F-MRI studies limiting factors are the presence of a low signal due to the low concentration of 19F-nuclei, necessary for biological applications, and the inherent low sensitivity of MRI. Hence, acquiring images using the pulse sequence with the best signal to noise ratio (SNR) by optimizing the acquisition parameters specifically to a 19F compound is a core issue. In 19F-MRI, multiple-spin-echo (RARE) and gradient-echo (GRE) are the two most frequently used pulse sequence families; therefore we performed an optimization study of GRE pulse sequences based on numerical simulations and experimental acquisitions on fluorinated compounds. We compared GRE performance to an optimized RARE sequence. Images were acquired on a 7T MRI preclinical scanner on phantoms containing different fluorinated compounds. Actual relaxation times (T1, T2, T2*) were evaluated in order to predict SNR dependence on sequence parameters. Experimental comparisons between spoiled GRE and RARE, obtained at a fixed acquisition time and in steady state condition, showed RARE sequence outperforming the spoiled GRE (up to 406% higher). Conversely, the use of the unbalanced-SSFP showed a significant increase in SNR compared to RARE (up to 28% higher). Moreover, this sequence (as GRE in general) was confirmed to be virtually insensitive to T1 and T2 relaxation times, after proper optimization, thus improving marker independence from the biological environment. These results confirm the efficacy of the proposed optimization tool and foster further investigation addressing in-vivo applicability.

  12. Symmetry-guided design and fluorous synthesis of a stable and rapidly excreted imaging tracer for (19)F MRI.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhong-Xing; Liu, Xin; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Yu, Yihua Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Getting FIT: A bispherical (19)F imaging tracer, (19)FIT, was designed and synthesized. (19)FIT is advantageous over perfluorocarbon-based (19)F imaging agents, as it is not retained in the organs and does not require complex formulation procedures. Imaging agents such as (19)FIT can lead to (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) playing an important role in drug therapy, analogous to the role played by (1)H MRI in disease diagnosis. PMID:19475598

  13. Cell Labeling for 19F MRI: New and Improved Approach to Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsion Design

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sravan K.; Williams, Jonathan; Janjic, Jelena M.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes novel perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions designed to improve ex vivo cell labeling for 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 19F MRI is a powerful non-invasive technique for monitoring cells of the immune system in vivo, where cells are labeled ex vivo with PFC nanoemulsions in cell culture. The quality of 19F MRI is directly affected by the quality of ex vivo PFC cell labeling. When co-cultured with cells for longer periods of time, nanoemulsions tend to settle due to high specific weight of PFC oils (1.5–2.0 g/mL). This in turn can decrease efficacy of excess nanoemulsion removal and reliability of the cell labeling in vitro. To solve this problem, novel PFC nanoemulsions are reported which demonstrate lack of sedimentation and high stability under cell labeling conditions. They are monodisperse, have small droplet size (~130 nm) and low polydispersity (<0.15), show a single peak in the 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum at −71.4 ppm and possess high fluorine content. The droplet size and polydispersity remained unchanged after 160 days of follow up at three temperatures (4, 25 and 37 °C). Further, stressors such as elevated temperature in the presence of cells, and centrifugation, did not affect the nanoemulsion droplet size and polydispersity. Detailed synthetic methodology and in vitro testing for these new PFC nanoemulsions is presented. PMID:25586263

  14. Single 19F Probe for Simultaneous Detection of Multiple Metal Ions Using miCEST MRI

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The local presence and concentration of metal ions in biological systems has been extensively studied ex vivo using fluorescent dyes. However, the detection of multiple metal ions in vivo remains a major challenge. We present a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based method for noninvasive detection of specific ions that may be coexisting, using the tetrafluorinated derivative of the BAPTA (TF-BAPTA) chelate as a 19F chelate analogue of existing optical dyes. Taking advantage of the difference in the ion-specific 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift offset (Δω) values between the ion-bound and free TF-BAPTA, we exploited the dynamic exchange between ion-bound and free TF-BAPTA to obtain MRI contrast with multi-ion chemical exchange saturation transfer (miCEST). We demonstrate that TF-BAPTA as a prototype single 19F probe can be used to separately visualize mixed Zn2+ and Fe2+ ions in a specific and simultaneous fashion, without interference from potential competitive ions. PMID:25523816

  15. Evaluation of tumor ischemia in response to an indole-based vascular disrupting agent using BLI and (19)F MRI.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heling; Hallac, Rami R; Lopez, Ramona; Denney, Rebecca; MacDonough, Matthew T; Li, Li; Liu, Li; Graves, Edward E; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Pinney, Kevin G; Mason, Ralph P

    2015-01-01

    Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) have been proposed as an effective broad spectrum approach to cancer therapy, by inducing ischemia leading to hypoxia and cell death. A novel VDA (OXi8007) was recently reported to show rapid acute selective shutdown of tumor vasculature based on color-Doppler ultrasound. We have now expanded investigations to noninvasively assess perfusion and hypoxiation of orthotopic human MDA-MB-231/luc breast tumor xenografts following the administration of OXi8007 based on dynamic bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). BLI showed significantly lower signal four hours after the administration of OXi8007, which was very similar to the response to combretastatin A-4P (CA4P), but the effect lasted considerably longer, with the BLI signal remaining depressed at 72 hrs. Meanwhile, control tumors exhibited minimal change. Oximetry used (19)F MRI of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene and FREDOM (Fluorocarbon Relaxometry using Echo Planar Imaging for Dynamic Oxygen Mapping) to assess pO2 distributions during air and oxygen breathing. pO2 decreased significantly upon the administration of OXi8007 during oxygen breathing (from 122 ± 64 to 34 ± 20 Torr), with further decrease upon switching the gas to air (pO2 = 17 ± 9 Torr). pO2 maps indicated intra-tumor heterogeneity in response to OXi8007, though ultimately all tumor regions became hypoxic. Both BLI and FREDOM showed the efficacy of OXi8007. The pO2 changes measured by FREDOM may be crucial for future study of combined therapy. PMID:25973335

  16. Quantitative Tissue Oxygen Measurement in Multiple Organs Using 19F MRI in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Siyuan; Shah, Sameer J.; Wilmes, Lisa J.; Feiner, John; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Wendland, Michael F.; Mason, Ralph P.; Hylton, Nola; Hopf, Harriet W.; Rollins, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of individual organ tissue oxygen levels can provide information to help evaluate and optimize medical interventions in many areas including wound healing, resuscitation strategies, and cancer therapeutics. Echo planar 19F MRI has previously focused on tumor oxygen measurement at low oxygen levels (pO2) < 30 mmHg. It uses the linear relationship between spin-lattice relaxation rate (R1) of hexafluorobenzene (HFB) and pO2. The feasibility of this technique for a wider range of pO2 values and individual organ tissue pO2 measurement was investigated in a rat model. Spin-lattice relaxation times (T1=1/R1) of HFB were measured using 19F saturation recovery echo planar imaging (EPI). Initial in vitro studies validated the linear relationship between R1 and pO2 from 0 mmHg to 760 mmHg oxygen partial pressure at 25°C, 37°C, and 41°C at 7 Tesla for HFB. In vivo experiments measured rat tissue oxygen (ptO2) levels of brain, kidney, liver, gut, muscle and skin during inhalation of both 30% and 100% oxygen. All organ ptO2 values significantly increased with hyperoxia (p<0.001). This study demonstrates that 19F MRI of HFB offers a feasible tool to measure regional ptO2 in vivo, and that hyperoxia significantly increases ptO2 of multiple organs in a rat model. PMID:21688315

  17. Imaging of Intratumoral Inflammation during Oncolytic Virotherapy of Tumors by 19F-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Michael; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Seubert, Carolin; Langbein-Laugwitz, Johanna; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Sturm, Volker Jörg Friedrich; Ye, Yuxiang; Kampf, Thomas; Jakob, Peter Michael; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oncolytic virotherapy of tumors is an up-coming, promising therapeutic modality of cancer therapy. Unfortunately, non-invasive techniques to evaluate the inflammatory host response to treatment are rare. Here, we evaluate 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which enables the non-invasive visualization of inflammatory processes in pathological conditions by the use of perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions (PFC) for monitoring of oncolytic virotherapy. Methodology/Principal Findings The Vaccinia virus strain GLV-1h68 was used as an oncolytic agent for the treatment of different tumor models. Systemic application of PFC emulsions followed by 1H/19F MRI of mock-infected and GLV-1h68-infected tumor-bearing mice revealed a significant accumulation of the 19F signal in the tumor rim of virus-treated mice. Histological examination of tumors confirmed a similar spatial distribution of the 19F signal hot spots and CD68+-macrophages. Thereby, the CD68+-macrophages encapsulate the GFP-positive viral infection foci. In multiple tumor models, we specifically visualized early inflammatory cell recruitment in Vaccinia virus colonized tumors. Furthermore, we documented that the 19F signal correlated with the extent of viral spreading within tumors. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest 19F MRI as a non-invasive methodology to document the tumor-associated host immune response as well as the extent of intratumoral viral replication. Thus, 19F MRI represents a new platform to non-invasively investigate the role of the host immune response for therapeutic outcome of oncolytic virotherapy and individual patient response. PMID:23441176

  18. Visualizing brain inflammation with a shingled-leg radio-frequency head probe for 19F/1H MRI.

    PubMed

    Waiczies, Helmar; Lepore, Stefano; Drechsler, Susanne; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Purfürst, Bettina; Sydow, Karl; Dathe, Margitta; Kühne, André; Lindel, Tomasz; Hoffmann, Werner; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf; Waiczies, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides the opportunity of tracking cells in vivo. Major challenges in dissecting cells from the recipient tissue and signal sensitivity constraints albeit exist. In this study, we aimed to tackle these limitations in order to study inflammation in autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We constructed a very small dual-tunable radio frequency (RF) birdcage probe tailored for (19)F (fluorine) and (1)H (proton) MR mouse neuroimaging. The novel design eliminated the need for extra electrical components on the probe structure and afforded a uniform -field as well as good SNR. We employed fluorescently-tagged (19)F nanoparticles and could study the dynamics of inflammatory cells between CNS and lymphatic system during development of encephalomyelitis, even within regions of the brain that are otherwise not easily visualized by conventional probes. (19)F/(1)H MR Neuroimaging will allow us to study the nature of immune cell infiltration during brain inflammation over an extensive period of time. PMID:23412352

  19. Novel 19F Activatable Probe for the Detection of Matrix Metalloprotease-2 Activity by MRI/MRS

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) have been found to be highly expressed in a variety of malignant tumor tissues. Noninvasive visualization of MMP activity may play an important role in the diagnosis of MMP associated diseases. Here we report the design and synthesis of a set of fluorine-19 dendron-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes for real-time imaging of MMP-2 activity. The probes have the following features: (a) symmetrical fluorine atoms; (b) the number of fluorine atoms can be increased through facile chemical modification; (c) readily accessible peptide sequence as the MMP-2 substrate; (d) activatable 19F signal (off/on mode) via paramagnetic metal ion incorporation. Following optimization for water solubility, one of the probes was selected to evaluate MMP-2 activity by 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Our results showed that the fluorine signal increased by 8.5-fold in the presence of MMP-2. The specific cleavage site was verified by mass spectrometry. The selected probe was further applied to detect secreted MMP-2 activity of living SCC7 squamous cell carcinoma cells. The fluorine signal was increased by 4.8-fold by MRS analysis after 24 h incubation with SCC7 cells. This type of fluorine probe can be applied to evaluate other enzyme activities by simply tuning the substrate structures. This symmetrical fluorine dendron-based probe design extends the scope of the existing 19F MRI agents and provides a simple but robust method for real-time 19F MRI application. PMID:25271556

  20. Technical advance: monitoring the trafficking of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes during the course of tissue inflammation by noninvasive 19F MRI.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Jacoby, Christoph; Ding, Zhaoping; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation results in the recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes, which is crucial for the healing process. In the present study, we used (19)F MRI to monitor in vivo the infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes from the onset of inflammation to the resolution and healing phase. Matrigel, with or without LPS, was s.c.-implanted into C57BL/6 mice. This resulted in a focal inflammation lasting over a period of 20 days, with constantly decreasing LPS levels in doped matrigel plugs. After i.v. administration of (19)F containing contrast agent, (19)F MRI revealed a zonular (19)F signal in the periphery of LPS containing matrigel plugs, which was not observed in control plugs. Analysis of the (19)F signal over the observation period demonstrated the strongest (19)F signal after 24 h, which decreased to nearly zero after 20 days. The (19)F signal was mirrored by the amount of leukocytes in the matrigel, with neutrophils dominating at early time-points and macrophages at later time-points. Both populations were shown to take up the (19)F contrast agent. In conclusion, (19)F MRI, in combination with the matrigel/LPS model, permits the noninvasive analysis of neutrophil and monocyte infiltration over the complete course of inflammation in vivo. PMID:24319285

  1. Multimodal Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsions for 19F MRI, Ultrasonography, and Catalysis of MRgFUS-Mediated Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapoport, N.; Nam, K.-H.; Christensen, D. A.; Kennedy, A. M.; Parker, D. L.; Payne, A. H.; Todd, N.; Shea, J. E.; Scaife, C. L.

    2011-09-01

    Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions can target lipophilic therapeutic agents to solid tumors and simultaneously provide for monitoring nanocarrier biodistribution via ultrasonography and/or 19F MRI. In the first generation of block copolymer stabilized perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions, perfluoropentane (PFP) was used as the droplet forming compound. Although manifesting excellent therapeutic and ultrasound imaging properties, PFP nanoemulsions were unstable at storage, difficult to handle, and underwent droplet-to-bubble transition upon injection that was hard to control. To solve the above problems, perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether (PFCE) was used as a core forming compound in the second generation of block copolymer stabilized perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions. In the present paper, acoustic, imaging, and therapeutic properties of unloaded and paclitaxel (PTX) loaded PFCE nanoemulsions are reported. The size of paclitaxel-loaded PFCE nanodroplets (300 nm to 500 nm depending on emulsification conditions) favors their passive accumulation in tumor tissue. PFCE nanodroplets manifest both ultrasound and 19F MR contrast properties, which allows the use of multimodal imaging to monitor nanodroplet biodistribution. Ultrasonography and 19F MRI produced consistent results on nanodroplet biodistribution. Sonication with 1-MHz therapeutic ultrasound triggered reversible droplet-to-bubble transition in PFCE nanoemulsions. Microbubbles formed by acoustic vaporization underwent stable cavitation. In a pilot study on ultrasound-mediated therapy of a large breast cancer tumor, paclitaxel-loaded PFCE nanoemulsions combined with 1-MHz ultrasound (MI≥1.75) showed excellent therapeutic properties. Anticipated mechanisms of the observed effects are discussed.

  2. Superfluorinated PEI Derivative Coupled with (99m) Tc for ASGPR Targeted (19) F MRI/SPECT/PA Tri-Modality Imaging.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhide; Gao, Mengna; Song, Manli; Li, Yesen; Zhang, Deliang; Xu, Duo; You, Linyi; Wang, Liangliang; Zhuang, Rongqiang; Su, Xinhui; Liu, Ting; Du, Jin; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-07-01

    Fluorinated polyethylenimine derivative labeled with radionuclide (99m) Tc is developed as a (19) F MRI/SPECT/PA multifunctional imaging agent with good asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR)-targeting ability. This multifunctional agent is safe and suitable for (19) F MRI/SPECT/PA imaging and has the potential to detect hepatic diseases and to assess liver function, which provide powerful support for the development of personalized and precision medicine. PMID:27159903

  3. Probing different perfluorocarbons for in vivo inflammation imaging by 19F MRI: image reconstruction, biological half-lives and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Temme, Sebastian; Mayenfels, Friederike; Benoit, Nicole; Krafft, Marie Pierre; Schubert, Rolf; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory processes can reliably be assessed by (19)F MRI using perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which is primarily based on the efficient uptake of emulsified PFCs by circulating cells of the monocyte-macrophage system and subsequent infiltration of the (19)F-labeled cells into affected tissue. An ideal candidate for the sensitive detection of fluorine-loaded cells is the biochemically inert perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PFCE), as it contains 20 magnetically equivalent (19)F atoms. However, the biological half-life of PFCE in the liver and spleen is extremely long, and so this substance is not suitable for future clinical applications. In the present study, we investigated alternative, nontoxic PFCs with predicted short biological half-lives and high fluorine content: perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB), perfluorodecalin (PFD) and trans-bis-perfluorobutyl ethylene (F-44E). Despite the complex spectra of these compounds, we obtained artifact-free images using sine-squared acquisition-weighted three-dimensional chemical shift imaging and dedicated reconstruction accomplished with in-house-developed software. The signal-to-noise ratio of the images was maximized using a Nutall window with only moderate localization error. Using this approach, the retention times of the different PFCs in murine liver and spleen were determined at 9.4 T. The biological half-lives were estimated to be 9 days (PFD), 12 days (PFOB) and 28 days (F-44E), compared with more than 250 days for PFCE. In vivo sensitivity for inflammation imaging was assessed using an ear clip injury model. The alternative PFCs PFOB and F-44E provided 37% and 43%, respectively, of the PFCE intensities, whereas PFD did not show any signal in the ear model. Thus, for in vivo monitoring of inflammatory processes, PFOB emerges as the most promising candidate for possible future translation of (19)F MR inflammation imaging to human applications. PMID:24353148

  4. Activatable 19F MRI nanoparticle probes for the detection of reducing environments.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Matsushita, Hisashi; Sugihara, Fuminori; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Mizukami, Shin; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2015-01-12

    (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes that can detect biological phenomena such as cell dynamics, ion concentrations, and enzymatic activity have attracted significant attention. Although perfluorocarbon (PFC) encapsulated nanoparticles are of interest in molecular imaging owing to their high sensitivity, activatable PFC nanoparticles have not been developed. In this study, we showed for the first time that the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effect can efficiently decrease the (19)F NMR/MRI signals of PFCs in silica nanoparticles. On the basis of the PRE effect, we developed a reduction-responsive PFC-encapsulated nanoparticle probe, FLAME-SS-Gd(3+) (FSG). This is the first example of an activatable PFC-encapsulated nanoparticle that can be used for in vivo imaging. Calculations revealed that the ratio of fluorine atoms to Gd(3+) complexes per nanoparticle was more than approximately 5.0×10(2), resulting in the high signal augmentation. PMID:25413833

  5. pEffect of MRI tags: SPIO nanoparticles and 19F nanoemulsion on various populations of mouse mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Ghulam; Jablonska, Anna; Rose, Laura; Walczak, Piotr; Janowski, Miroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of myriad human disorders, including several neurological diseases. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and fluorine nanoemulsion (19F) are characterized by low toxicity and good sensitivity, and, as such, are among the most frequently used cell-labeling agents. However, to date, their impact across the various populations of MSCs has not been comprehensively investigated. Thus, the impact of MRI tags (independent variable) has been set as a primary endpoint. The various populations of mouse MSCs in which the effect of tag was investigated consisted of 1) tissue of cell origin: bone marrow vs. adipose tissue; 2) age of donor: young vs. old; 3) cell culture conditions: hypoxic vs. normal vs. normal +ascorbic acid (AA); 4) exposure to acidosis: yes vs. no. The impact of those populations has been also analyzed and considered as secondary endpoints. The experimental readouts (dependent variables) included: 1) cell viability; 2) cell size; 3) cell doubling time; 4) colony formation; 5) efficiency of labeling; and 6) cell migration. We did not identify any impact of cell labeling for these investigated populations in any of the readouts. In addition, we found that the harsh microenvironment of injured tissue modeled by a culture of cells in a highly acidic environment has a profound effect on all readouts, and both age of donor and cell origin tissue also have a substantial influence on most of the readouts, while oxygen tension in the cell culture conditions has a smaller impact on MSCs. A detailed characterization of the factors that influence the quality of MSCs is vital to the proper pursuit of preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26232992

  6. Parahydrogen-induced polarization transfer to 19F in perfluorocarbons for 19F NMR spectroscopy and MRI.

    PubMed

    Plaumann, Markus; Bommerich, Ute; Trantzschel, Thomas; Lego, Denise; Dillenberger, Sonja; Sauer, Grit; Bargon, Joachim; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Bernarding, Johannes

    2013-05-10

    Fluorinated substances are important in chemistry, industry, and the life sciences. In a new approach, parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) is applied to enhance (19)F MR signals of (perfluoro-n-hexyl)ethene and (perfluoro-n-hexyl)ethane. Unexpectedly, the end-standing CF3 group exhibits the highest amount of polarization despite the negligible coupling to the added protons. To clarify this non-intuitive distribution of polarization, signal enhancements in deuterated chloroform and acetone were compared and (19)F-(19)F NOESY spectra, as well as (19)F T1 values were measured by NMR spectroscopy. By using the well separated and enhanced signal of the CF3 group, first (19)F MR images of hyperpolarized linear semifluorinated alkenes were recorded. PMID:23526596

  7. A bisphosphonate for 19F-magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Gavin D.; Shaw, Karen P.; Sivachelvam, Saranja; White, Andrew J.P.; Botnar, Rene M.; T.M. de Rosales, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    19F-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising technique that may allow us to measure the concentration of exogenous fluorinated imaging probes quantitatively in vivo. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterisation of a novel geminal bisphosphonate (19F-BP) that contains chemically-equivalent fluorine atoms that show a single and narrow 19F resonance and a bisphosphonate group that may be used for labelling inorganic materials based in calcium phosphates and metal oxides. The potential of 19F-BP to provide contrast was analysed in vitro and in vivo using 19F-MRI. In vitro studies demonstrated the potential of 19F-BP as an MRI contrast agent in the millimolar concentration range with signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) comparable to previously reported fluorinated probes. The preliminary in vivo MRI study reported here allowed us to visualise the biodistribution of 19F-BP, showing uptake in the liver and in the bladder/urinary system areas. However, bone uptake was not observed. In addition, 19F-BP showed undesirable toxicity effects in mice that prevent further studies with this compound at the required concentrations for MRI contrast. This study highlights the importance of developing 19F MRI probes with the highest signal intensity achievable. PMID:27110036

  8. 19F magnetic resonance imaging of endogenous macrophages in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Bönner, Florian; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we review the use of (19) F MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) for in vivo tracking of monocytes and macrophages in the course of tissue inflammation. Emulsified perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are preferentially phagocytized by monocytes/macrophages and are readily detected by (19) F MRI. Because of the lack of any (19) F background in the body, observed signals are robust and exhibit an excellent degree of specificity. As a consequence of progressive infiltration of the labeled immunocompetent cells into inflamed areas, foci of inflammation can be localized as hot spots by simultaneous acquisition of morphologically matched proton ((1) H) and fluorine ((19) F) MRI. The identification of inflammation by (19) F MRI--at a time when the inflammatory cascade is initiated--opens the possibility for an early detection and more timely therapeutic intervention. Since signal intensity in the (19) F images reflects the severity of inflammation, this approach is also suitable to monitor the efficacy of pharmaceutical treatment. Because PFCs are biochemically inert and the fluorine nucleus exhibits high magnetic resonance (MR) sensitivity, (19) F MRI may be applicable for clinical inflammation imaging. PMID:22354793

  9. Improved Quantitative 19F MR Molecular Imaging With Flip Angle Calibration and B1-Mapping Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Goette, Matthew J.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To improve 19F flip angle calibration and compensate for B1 inhomogeneities in quantitative 19F MRI of sparse molecular epitopes with perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoparticle (NP) emulsion contrast agents. Materials and Methods Flip angle sweep experiments on PFC-NP point source phantoms with three custom-designed 19F/1H dual-tuned coils revealed a difference in required power settings for 19F and 1H nuclei, which was used to calculate a calibration ratio specific for each coil. An image-based correction technique was developed using B1-field mapping on 1H to correct for 19F and 1H images in two phantom experiments. Results Optimized 19F peak power differed significantly from that of 1H power for each coil (p<0.05). A ratio of 19F/1H power settings yielded a coil-specific and spatially independent calibration value (surface: 1.48±0.06; semi-cylindrical: 1.71±0.02, single-turn-solenoid: 1.92±0.03). 1H-image-based B1 correction equalized the signal intensity of 19F images for two identical 19F PFC-NP samples placed in different parts of the field, which were offset significantly by ~66% (p<0.001) before correction. Conclusion 19F flip angle calibration and B1-mapping compensations to the 19F images employing the more abundant 1H signal as a basis for correction result in a significant change in the quantification of sparse 19F MR signals from targeted PFC NP emulsions. PMID:25425244

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 19F SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.

    2009-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked by Liquid Waste Operations to characterize Tank 19F closure samples. Tank 19F slurry samples analyzed included the liquid and solid fractions derived from the slurry materials along with the floor scrape bottom Tank 19F wet solids. These samples were taken from Tank 19F in April 2009 and made available to SRNL in the same month. Because of limited amounts of solids observed in Tank 19F samples, the samples from the north quadrants of the tank were combined into one Tank 19F North Hemisphere sample and similarly the south quadrant samples were combined into one Tank 19F South Hemisphere sample. These samples were delivered to the SRNL shielded cell. The Tank 19F samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Where analytical methods yielded additional contaminants other than those requested by the customer, these results were also reported. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on detection values of 1E-04 {micro}Ci/g for most radionuclides and customer desired detection values of 1E-05 {micro}Ci/g for I-129, Pa-231, Np-237, and Ra-226. While many of the target detection limits, as specified in the technical task request and task technical and quality assurance plans were met for the species characterized for Tank 19F, some were not met. In a number of cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. SRNL, in conjunction with the plant customer, reviewed all these cases and determined that the impacts were negligible.

  11. Gadolinium-modulated 19F signals from Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles as a New Strategy for Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Anne M.; Myerson, Jacob; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Hockett, Franklin D.; Winter, Patrick M.; Chen, Junjie; Gaffney, Patrick J.; Robertson, J. David; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in the design of fluorinated nanoparticles for magnetic resonance molecular imaging have enabled specific detection of 19F nuclei, providing unique and quantifiable spectral signatures. However, a pressing need for signal enhancement exists because the total 19F in imaging voxels is often limited. By directly incorporating a relaxation agent (gadolinium) into the lipid monolayer that surrounds the perfluorocarbon, a marked augmentation of the 19F signal from 200nm nanoparticles was achieved. This design increases the magnetic relaxation rate of the 19F nuclei 4-fold at 1.5 T and effects a 125% increase in signal, an effect which is maintained when they are targeted to human plasma clots. By varying the surface concentration of gadolinium, the relaxation effect can be quantitatively modulated to tailor particle properties. This novel strategy dramatically improves the sensitivity and range of 19F MRI/MRS and forms the basis for designing contrast agents capable of sensing their surface chemistry. PMID:18956457

  12. Pathway to Retinal Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Beach, James

    2014-01-01

    Events and discoveries in oxygen monitoring over the past two centuries are presented as the background from which oximetry of the human retina evolved. Achievements and the people behind them are discussed, showing parallels between the work in tissue measurements and later in the eye. Developments in the two-wavelength technique for oxygen saturation measurements in retinal vessels are shown to exploit the forms of imaging technology available over time. The last section provides a short summary of the recent research in retinal diseases using vessel oximetry. PMID:25237591

  13. Photoneutron angular distribution of 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, P. C.-K.; Jury, J. W.; McNeill, K. G.; Sherman, N. K.; Davidson, W. F.

    1989-07-01

    Photoneutron time-of-flight spectra from the reaction 19F(γ, n 0) 18F were measured between 48° and 139° using 10 m flight paths over the excitation energy range from 15-25 MeV. The measured values of the normalized Legendre a1 and a3 coefficients are very small or close to zero over the energy region studied, indicating dominance of E1 absorption in this region. A simple modeldependent analysis of the a2 coefficient showed that the likely reaction mechanisms are mainly s → p and d → p single-particle transitions of channel spin {1}/{2}. A comparison of the present angleintegrated ground-state cross section with the (γ, n tot) work of Veyssière et al. indicates that decays to excited states in 18F are much preferred (typically by a factor of 5) over the ground-state channel. The 19F(γ, n 0) cross section shows reasonable agreement in structure and magnitude with the 19F(γ, p 0) cross section of Kerkhove et al. as well as with the 18O(γ, n 0) data of Jury et al. (although some discrepancies are seen at 16 MeV and above 23 MeV).

  14. Modified polysaccharides as potential (19)F magnetic resonance contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Tomasz; Minoshima, Masafumi; Sugihara, Fuminori; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2016-06-16

    The introduction of 3-aminobenzotrifluoride into partially oxidized alginic acid, dextran, and polygalacturonic acid (10-100 kDa) by means of the imine formation and a subsequent reduction resulted in water-soluble materials containing 1-14% of fluorine. They showed a single or split (19)F NMR signal in a narrow range of -63 to -63.5 ppm. The observed T1 and T2 were approximately 1 and 0.2 s at 400 or 500 MHz instruments, respectively. The samples showed low toxicity and uptake toward the HeLa cells similar to native polysaccharides and were preferentially localized in lysosomes. A tail intravenous injection of 5 mg of modified dextran containing 1% of fluorine revealed that the probe was not trapped in liver, spleen or kidneys, but was quickly cleared with urine. The proposed materials can be used for imaging of the gastrointestinal tract or the genitourinary system and act as a material for more complex (19)F MRI agent synthesis. PMID:27148998

  15. (19)F Magnetic Resonance Imaging Signals from Peptide Amphiphile Nanostructures Are Strongly Affected by Their Shape.

    PubMed

    Preslar, Adam T; Tantakitti, Faifan; Park, Kitae; Zhang, Shanrong; Stupp, Samuel I; Meade, Thomas J

    2016-08-23

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive imaging modality that provides excellent spatial and temporal resolution. The most commonly used MR probes face significant challenges originating from the endogenous (1)H background signal of water. In contrast, fluorine MRI ((19)F MRI) allows quantitative probe imaging with zero background signal. Probes with high fluorine content are required for high sensitivity, suggesting nanoscale supramolecular assemblies containing (19)F probes offer a potentially useful strategy for optimum imaging as a result of improved payload. We report here on supramolecular nanostructures formed by fluorinated peptide amphiphiles containing either glutamic acid or lysine residues in their sequence. We identified molecules that form aggregates in water which transition from cylindrical to ribbon-like shape as pH increased from 4.5 to 8.0. Interestingly, we found that ribbon-like nanostructures had reduced magnetic resonance signal, whereas their cylindrical counterparts exhibited strong signals. We attribute this drastic difference to the greater mobility of fluorinated tails in the hydrophobic compartment of cylindrical nanostructures compared to lower mobility in ribbon-like assemblies. This discovery identifies a strategy to design supramolecular, self-assembling contrast agents for (19)F MRI that can spatially map physiologically relevant changes in pH using changes in morphology. PMID:27425636

  16. Complete fusion of 19F with Al and Si isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, M. S.; Wu, M. W.; Easwar, N.; Maher, J. V.

    1981-12-01

    Complete fusion cross sections have been determined by directly detecting evaporation residuals for the systems 19F + 27Al and 19F + 28,30Si over a 19F laboratory energy range 34-75 MeV. In all cases σfus increases smoothly with energy and eventually saturates at 1200-1250 mb. In the barrier penetration region the cross section for 19F + 28Si is always sufficiently smaller than that for 19F + 30Si to make the reduced barrier radius in a Glas-Mosel parametrization significantly smaller for the former system than for the latter. Three entrance channels are now available for the fused-system 46Ti: Critical angular momentum data from the 16O + 30Si entrance channel approach the statistical yrast line at much lower fused-system excitation energy than do the data from the entrance channels 18O + 28Si and 19F + 27Al. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Measured complete fusion cross sections for the systems 19F + 27Al, 19F + 28Si, 19F + 30Si; E=34-75 MeV. Deduced Glas-Mosel model and statistical yrast model parameters.

  17. Amphiphilic Hyperbranched Fluoropolymers as Nanoscopic 19F-Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wenjun; Nyström, Andreas M.; Zhang, Lei; Powell, Kenya T.; Li, Yali; Cheng, Chong; Wickline, Samuel A.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    Three hyperbranched fluoropolymers were synthesized and their micelles were constructed as potential 19F MRI agents. A hyperbranched star-like core was first synthesized via ATR-SCVCP of 4-chloromethyl styrene (CMS), lauryl acrylate (LA) and 1,1,1-tris(4′-(2″-bromoisobutyryloxy)phenyl)ethane (TBBPE). The polymerization gave a small core with Mn of 5.5 kDa with PDI of 1.6, which served as a macroinitiator. Trifluoroethyl methacrylate (TFEMA) and tert-butyl acrylate (tBA) in different ratio were then “grafted” from the core to give three polymers with Mn of ca. 120 kDa and PDI values of ca. 1.6–1.8. After acidolysis of the tert-butyl ester groups, amphiphilic, hyperbranched star-like polymers with Mn of ca. 100 kDa were obtained. These structures were subjected to micelle formation in aqueous solution to give micelles having TEM-measured diameters ranging from 3–8 nm and DLS-measured hydrodynamic diameters from 20–30 nm. These micelles gave a narrow, single resonance by 19F NMR spectroscopy, with a half width of approximately 130 Hz. The T1/T2 parameters were ca. 500 ms and 50 ms, respectively, and were not significantly affected by the composition and sizes of the micelles. 19F MRI phantom images of these fluorinated micelles were acquired, which demonstrated that these fluorinated micelles maybe useful as novel 19F MRI agents for a variety of biomedical studies. PMID:18795785

  18. Pulse oximetry in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Fouzas, Sotirios; Priftis, Kostas N; Anthracopoulos, Michael B

    2011-10-01

    The introduction of pulse oximetry in clinical practice has allowed for simple, noninvasive, and reasonably accurate estimation of arterial oxygen saturation. Pulse oximetry is routinely used in the emergency department, the pediatric ward, and in pediatric intensive and perioperative care. However, clinically relevant principles and inherent limitations of the method are not always well understood by health care professionals caring for children. The calculation of the percentage of arterial oxyhemoglobin is based on the distinct characteristics of light absorption in the red and infrared spectra by oxygenated versus deoxygenated hemoglobin and takes advantage of the variation in light absorption caused by the pulsatility of arterial blood. Computation of oxygen saturation is achieved with the use of calibration algorithms. Safe use of pulse oximetry requires knowledge of its limitations, which include motion artifacts, poor perfusion at the site of measurement, irregular rhythms, ambient light or electromagnetic interference, skin pigmentation, nail polish, calibration assumptions, probe positioning, time lag in detecting hypoxic events, venous pulsation, intravenous dyes, and presence of abnormal hemoglobin molecules. In this review we describe the physiologic principles and limitations of pulse oximetry, discuss normal values, and highlight its importance in common pediatric diseases, in which the principle mechanism of hypoxemia is ventilation/perfusion mismatch (eg, asthma exacerbation, acute bronchiolitis, pneumonia) versus hypoventilation (eg, laryngotracheitis, vocal cord dysfunction, foreign-body aspiration in the larynx or trachea). Additional technologic advancements in pulse oximetry and its incorporation into evidence-based clinical algorithms will improve the efficiency of the method in daily pediatric practice. PMID:21930554

  19. A General and Facile Strategy to Fabricate Multifunctional Nanoprobes for Simultaneous (19)F Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Optical/Thermal Imaging, and Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Gaofei; Li, Nannan; Tang, Juan; Xu, Suying; Wang, Leyu

    2016-09-01

    (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), due to its high sensitivity and negligible background, is anticipated to be a powerful noninvasive, sensitive, and accurate molecular imaging technique. However, the major challenge of (19)F MRI is to increase the number of (19)F atoms while maintaining the solubility and molecular mobility of the probe. Here, we successfully developed a facile and general strategy to synthesize the multifunctional (19)F MRI nanoprobes by encapsulating the hydrophobic inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) into a hybrid polymer micelle consisting of hydrolysates of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (PDTES) and oleylamine-functionalized poly(succinimide) (PSIOAm). Due to their good water dispersibility, excellent molecular mobility resulting from the ultrathin coating, and high (19)F atom numbers, these nanoprobes generate a separate sharp singlet of (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal (at -82.8 ppm) with half peak width of ∼28 Hz, which is highly applicable for (19)F MRI. Significantly, by varying the inorganic core from metals (Au), oxides (Fe3O4), fluorides (NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+)), and phosphates (YPO4) to semiconductors (Cu7S4 and Ag2S, ZnS:Mn(2+)) NPs, which renders the nanoprobes' multifunctional properties such as photothermal ability (Au, Cu7S4), magnetism (Fe3O4), fluorescence (ZnS:Mn(2+)), near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence (Ag2S), and upconversion (UC) luminescence. Meanwhile, the as-prepared nanoprobes possess relatively small sizes (about 50 nm), which is beneficial for long-time circulation. The proof-of-concept in vitro (19)F NMR and photothermal ablation of ZnS:Mn(2+)@PDTES/PSIOAm and Cu7S4@PDTES/PSIOAm nanoprobes further suggest that these nanoprobes hold wide potentials for multifunctional applications in biomedical fields. PMID:27534896

  20. A 19F NMR Study of Enzyme Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterman, Keith E.; Lentz, Kevin; Duncan, Jeffery

    1998-10-01

    This basic enzyme activity laboratory experiment demonstrates how 19F NMR can be used in biochemical studies and presents the advantages of 19F NMR over 1H NMR for studies of this nature. N-Trifluoroacetylglycine was selected as a commercially available model fluorine-tagged substrate that readily undergoes acylase I-catalyzed hydrolysis to produce trifluoroacetic acid and glycine. Progress of the reaction was monitored by following conversion of the trifluoroacetyl moiety peak of N-trifluoroacetylglycine to trifluoroacetic acid. The extent of hydrolysis was determined by comparing integrated ratios of the two 19F NMR peaks. A plot of percent hydrolysis versus enzyme concentration was used to calculate unit activity of the enzyme. This is a viable laboratory experiment for junior/senior-level courses in instrumental analytical chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, or spectroscopy.

  1. Mapping phosphorylation rate of fluoro-deoxy-glucose in rat brain by 19F chemical shift imaging

    PubMed Central

    Coman, Daniel; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Cheng, David; McCarthy, Timothy; Rothman, Douglas L.; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2014-01-01

    19F magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies of 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate (FDG-6P) can be used for directly assessing total glucose metabolism in vivo. To date, 19F MRS measurements of FDG phosphorylation in the brain have either been achieved ex vivo from extracted tissue or in vivo by unusually long acquisition times. Electrophysiological and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements indicate that FDG doses up to 500mg/kg can be tolerated with minimal side effects on cerebral physiology and evoked fMRI-BOLD responses to forepaw stimulation. In halothane-anesthetized rats, we report localized in vivo detection and separation of FDG and FDG-6P MRS signals with 19F 2D chemical shift imaging (CSI) at 11.7T. A metabolic model based on reversible transport between plasma and brain tissue, which included a non-saturable plasma to tissue component, was used to calculate spatial distribution of FDG and FDG-6P concentrations in rat brain. In addition, spatial distribution of rate constants and metabolic fluxes of FDG to FDG-6P conversion were estimated. Mapping the rate of FDG to FDG-6P conversion by 19F CSI provides an MR methodology that could impact other in vivo applications such as characterization of tumor pathophysiology. PMID:24581725

  2. Solid-state 19F-NMR analysis of 19F-labeled tryptophan in gramicidin A in oriented membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Stephan L; Wang, Junfeng; Cross, Timothy A; Ulrich, Anne S

    2002-01-01

    The response of membrane-associated peptides toward the lipid environment or other binding partners can be monitored by solid-state NMR of suitably labeled side chains. Tryptophan is a prominent amino acid in transmembrane helices, and its (19)F-labeled analogues are generally biocompatible and cause little structural perturbation. Hence, we use 5F-Trp as a highly sensitive NMR probe to monitor the conformation and dynamics of the indole ring. To establish this (19)F-NMR strategy, gramicidin A was labeled with 5F-Trp in position 13 or 15, whose chi(1)/chi(2) torsion angles are known from previous (2)H-NMR studies. First, the alignment of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor within the membrane was deduced by lineshape analysis of oriented samples. Next, the three principal axes of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor were assigned within the molecular frame of the indole ring. Finally, determination of chi(1)/chi(2) for 5F-Trp in the lipid gel phase showed that the side chain alignment differs by up to 20 degrees from its known conformation in the liquid crystalline state. The sensitivity gain of (19)F-NMR and the reduction in the amount of material was at least 10-fold compared with previous (2)H-NMR studies on the same system and 100-fold compared with (15)N-NMR. PMID:12496101

  3. Characterization of 19A-like 19F pneumococcal isolates from Papua New Guinea and Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, E.M.; Tikkanen, L.; Balloch, A.; Gould, K.; Yoannes, M.; Phuanukoonnon, S.; Licciardi, P.V.; Russell, F.M.; Mulholland, E.K.; Satzke, C.; Hinds, J.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19F is routinely performed by PCR targeting the wzy gene of the capsular biosynthetic locus. However, 19F isolates with genetic similarity to 19A have been reported in the United States and Brazil. We screened 78 pneumococcal carriage isolates and found six 19F wzy variants that originated from children in Papua New Guinea and Fiji. Isolates were characterized using multilocus sequence typing and opsonophagocytic assays. The 19F wzy variants displayed similar susceptibility to anti-19F IgG antibodies compared to standard 19F isolates. Our findings indicate that these 19F variants may be more common than previously believed. PMID:26339490

  4. Characterization of the ground X{sub 1} state of {sup 204}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 206}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F, and {sup 208}Pb{sup 19}F

    SciTech Connect

    Mawhorter, Richard J.; Murphy, Benjamin S.; Baum, Alexander L.; Sears, Trevor J.; Yang, T.; Rupasinghe, P. M; McRaven, C. P.; Shafer-Ray, N. E.; Alphei, Lukas D.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2011-08-15

    Pure rotational spectra of the ground electronic-vibrational X{sub 1} state of {sup 204}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 206}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F, and {sup 208}Pb{sup 19}F are measured with a resonator pulsed supersonic jet Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer. Also reported is a new measurement of the Stark effect on the optical spectra of A(leftarrow)X{sub 1} transitions. These spectra are combined with published high-resolution infrared spectra of X{sub 2}{r_reversible}X{sub 1} transitions in order to create a complete picture of the ground state of lead monofluoride. For the microwave data, molecules are prepared by laser ablation of lead target rods and stabilized in a supersonic jet of neon mixed with sulfur hexafluoride. For the optical Stark spectra, a continuous source of molecules is created in a nozzle heated to 1000 deg. C. The microwave spectra confirm, improve, and extend previously reported constants that describe the rotational, spin-orbit, and hyperfine interactions of the ground electronic state of the PbF molecule. A discrepancy concerning the sign of the hyperfine constant describing the {sup 207}Pb nucleus is discussed. Magnetic-field-dependent microwave spectra are used to characterize the Zeeman interaction in terms of two g factors of the body-fixed electronic wave function. The optical Stark spectra are used to characterize the electric dipole moment of the X{sub 1} and A states.

  5. Cerebral oximetry and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Skhirtladze-Dworschak, Keso; Dworschak, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Cerebral oximetry is a Food and Drug Administration-approved technology that allows monitoring of brain oxygen saturation in accessible superficial brain cortex regions, which are amongst the most vulnerable in regard to ischemic or hypoxic injury. Since most oxygen in the area of interest is located in the venous compartment, the determined regional brain oxygen saturation approximately reflects the local balance between oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption. Major systemic alterations in blood oxygen content and oxygen delivery will be accompanied by corresponding changes in regional brain saturation. This systematic review, which is based on a Medline search, focuses on the characteristic changes in regional cerebral oxygen saturation that occur, when global oxygen supply to the brain ceases. It further highlights the potential application of cerebral oximetry in the management of cardiac arrest victims, the predictability of clinical outcome after global cerebral ischemia, and it also indicates possible potentials for the management of cerebral reperfusion after having instituted return of spontaneous circulation. PMID:23782549

  6. Dual 19F/1H MR gene reporter molecules for in vivo detection of β-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Xin; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Hallac, Rami R.; Liu, Li; Mason, Ralph P.

    2012-01-01

    Increased emphasis on personalized medicine and novel therapies require the development of non-invasive strategies for assessing biochemistry in vivo. The detection of enzyme activity and gene expression in vivo is potentially important for the characterization of diseases and gene therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a particularly promising tool since it is non-invasive, and has no associated radioactivity, yet penetrates deep tissue. We now demonstrate a novel class of dual 1H/19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lacZ gene reporter molecule to specifically reveal enzyme activity in human tumor xenografts growing in mice. We report the design, synthesis, and characterization of six novel molecules and evaluation of the most effective reporter in mice in vivo. Substrates show a single 19F NMR signal and exposure to β-galactosidase induces a large 19F NMR chemical shift response. In the presence of ferric ions the liberated aglycone generates intense proton MRI T2 contrast. The dual modality approach allows both the detection of substrate and imaging of product enhancing the confidence in enzyme detection. PMID:22352428

  7. Pulse oximetry in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Weston Smith, S G; Glass, U H; Acharya, J; Pearson, T C

    1989-01-01

    The place of pulse oximetry in monitoring arterial oxygen saturation in sickle cell disease has been evaluated. In four admissions of patients with sickle cell anaemia with varying degrees of arterial haemoglobin oxygen desaturation, pulse oximetry was compared with a simultaneous assessment of oxygen saturation by arterial blood gas measurement and oxygen dissociation curve (ODC) analysis. Close agreement was found between the oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry and that calculated from the measured arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) with reference to the patient's own ODC. Calculation of oxygen saturation by the blood gas analyser assuming a normal ODC was erroneous. Pulse oximetry is an accurate and effective non-invasive method for monitoring the arterial oxygen saturation in sickle cell disease. PMID:2591150

  8. Pulse oximetry in bronchiolitis: is it needed?

    PubMed Central

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jomha, Fatima A; Alhammadi, Ahmed H

    2015-01-01

    Infants admitted to health-care centers with acute bronchiolitis are frequently monitored with a pulse oximeter, a noninvasive method commonly used for measuring oxygen saturation. The decision to hospitalize children with bronchiolitis has been largely influenced by pulse oximetry, despite its questionable diagnostic value in delineating the severity of the illness. Many health-care providers lack the appropriate clinical fundamentals and limitations of pulse oximetry. This deficiency in knowledge might have been linked to changes in the management of bronchiolitis. The aim of this paper is to provide the current evidence on the role of pulse oximetry in bronchiolitis. We discuss the history, fundamentals of operation, and limitations of the apparatus. A search of the Google Scholar, Embase, Medline, and PubMed databases was carried out for published articles covering the use of pulse oximetry in bronchiolitis. PMID:26491341

  9. Voltage Controlled Geometric Phase Rotation in ^{208}Pb^{19}F.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furneaux, J. E.; Shafer-Ray, Neil; Coker, J.; Rupasinghe, P. M.; McRaven, C. P.

    2013-06-01

    Many theoretical publications have investigated the impact of the geometric phase on measurements of the e-EDM. However, there has been surprisingly little quantitative comparison of these models with experiment. Here we create a quantum beat experiment that starts with an optical pump and ends with an optical probe of ^{208}Pb^{19}F. This measurement includes the ability to control a geometric phase variation of the molecular alignment by applying an appropriate bias voltage. These experiments will then used to test the accuracy of our model calculations of geometric phase rotation.

  10. (19)F spin-lattice relaxation of perfluoropolyethers: Dependence on temperature and magnetic field strength (7.0-14.1T).

    PubMed

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K; Damodaran, Krishnan; Hitchens, T Kevin; Bulte, Jeff W M; Ahrens, Eric T

    2014-05-01

    Fluorine ((19)F) MRI of perfluorocarbon-labeled cells has become a powerful technique to track the migration and accumulation of cells in living organisms. It is common to label cells for (19)F MRI with nanoemulsions of perfluoropolyethers that contain a large number of chemically equivalent fluorine atoms. Understanding the mechanisms of (19)F nuclear relaxation, and in particular the spin-lattice relaxation of these molecules, is critical to improving experimental sensitivity. To date, the temperature and magnetic field strength dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate constant (R1) for perfluoropolyethers has not been described in detail. In this study, we evaluated the R1 of linear perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and cyclic perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PCE) at three magnetic field strengths (7.0, 9.4, and 14.1T) and at temperatures ranging from 256-323K. Our results show that R1 of perfluoropolyethers is dominated by dipole-dipole interactions and chemical shift anisotropy. R1 increased with magnetic field strength for both PCE and PFPE. In the temperature range studied, PCE was in the fast motion regime (ωτc<1) at all field strengths, but for PFPE, R1 passed through a maximum, from which the rotational correlation time was estimated. The importance of these measurements for the rational design of new (19)F MRI agents and methods is discussed. PMID:24594752

  11. 19F Spin-lattice Relaxation of Perfluoropolyethers: Dependence on Temperature and Magnetic Field Strength (7.0-14.1T)

    PubMed Central

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Damodaran, Krishnan; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Bulte, Jeff W.M.; Ahrens, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine (19F) MRI of perfluorocarbon labeled cells has become a powerful technique to track the migration and accumulation of cells in living organisms. It is common to label cells for 19F MRI with nanoemulsions of perfluoropolyethers that contain a large number of chemically equivalent fluorine atoms. Understanding the mechanisms of 19F nuclear relaxation, and in particular the spin-lattice relaxation of these molecules, is critical to improving experimental sensitivity. To date, the temperature and magnetic field strength dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate constant (R1) for perfluoropolyethers has not been described in detail. In this study, we evaluated R1 of linear perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and cyclic perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PCE) at three magnetic field strengths (7.0, 9.4, and 14.1 T) and at temperatures ranging from 256-323K. Our results show that R1 of perfluoropolyethers is dominated by dipole-dipole interactions and chemical shift anisotropy. R1 increased with magnetic field strength for both PCE and PFPE. In the temperature range studied, PCE was in the fast motion regime (ωτc < 1) at all field strengths, but for PFPE, R1 passed through a maximum, from which the rotational correlation time was estimated. The importance of these measurements for the rational design of new 19F MRI agents and methods is discussed. PMID:24594752

  12. 19F spin-lattice relaxation of perfluoropolyethers: Dependence on temperature and magnetic field strength (7.0-14.1 T)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Damodaran, Krishnan; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Bulte, Jeff W. M.; Ahrens, Eric T.

    2014-05-01

    Fluorine (19F) MRI of perfluorocarbon-labeled cells has become a powerful technique to track the migration and accumulation of cells in living organisms. It is common to label cells for 19F MRI with nanoemulsions of perfluoropolyethers that contain a large number of chemically equivalent fluorine atoms. Understanding the mechanisms of 19F nuclear relaxation, and in particular the spin-lattice relaxation of these molecules, is critical to improving experimental sensitivity. To date, the temperature and magnetic field strength dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate constant (R1) for perfluoropolyethers has not been described in detail. In this study, we evaluated the R1 of linear perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and cyclic perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PCE) at three magnetic field strengths (7.0, 9.4, and 14.1 T) and at temperatures ranging from 256-323 K. Our results show that R1 of perfluoropolyethers is dominated by dipole-dipole interactions and chemical shift anisotropy. R1 increased with magnetic field strength for both PCE and PFPE. In the temperature range studied, PCE was in the fast motion regime (ωτc < 1) at all field strengths, but for PFPE, R1 passed through a maximum, from which the rotational correlation time was estimated. The importance of these measurements for the rational design of new 19F MRI agents and methods is discussed.

  13. Photonic textiles for pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Rothmaier, Markus; Selm, Bärbel; Spichtig, Sonja; Haensse, Daniel; Wolf, Martin

    2008-08-18

    Biomedical sensors, integrated into textiles would enable monitoring of many vitally important physiological parameters during our daily life. In this paper we demonstrate the design and performance of a textile based pulse oximeter, operating on the forefinger tip in transmission mode. The sensors consisted of plastic optical fibers integrated into common fabrics. To emit light to the human tissue and to collect transmitted light the fibers were either integrated into a textile substrate by embroidery (producing microbends with a nominal diameter of 0.5 to 2 mm) or the fibers inside woven patterns have been altered mechanically after fabric production. In our experiments we used a two-wavelength approach (690 and 830 nm) for pulse wave acquisition and arterial oxygen saturation calculation. We have fabricated different specimens to study signal yield and quality, and a cotton glove, equipped with textile based light emitter and detector, has been used to examine movement artifacts. Our results show that textile-based oximetry is feasible with sufficient data quality and its potential as a wearable health monitoring device is promising. PMID:18711536

  14. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 19F FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.

    2010-09-02

    Representative sampling has been completed for characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 19F as per the statistical sampling plan developed by Harris and Shine. Samples from eight locations have been obtained from the tank floor and two of the samples were archived as a contingency. Six samples, referred to in this report as the current scrape samples, have been submitted to and analyzed by SRNL. This report contains the statistical analysis of the floor sample analytical results to determine if further data are needed to reduce uncertainty. Included are comparisons with the prior Mantis samples results to determine if they can be pooled with the current scrape samples to estimate the upper 95% confidence limits (UCL95%) for concentration. Statistical analysis revealed that the Mantis and current scrape sample results are not compatible. Therefore, the Mantis sample results were not used to support the quantification of analytes in the residual material. Significant spatial variability among the current scrape sample results was not found. Constituent concentrations were similar between the North and South hemispheres as well as between the inner and outer regions of the tank floor. The current scrape sample results from all six samples fall within their 3-sigma limits. In view of the results from numerous statistical tests, the data were pooled from all six current scrape samples. As such, an adequate sample size was provided for quantification of the residual material on the floor of Tank 19F. The uncertainty is quantified in this report by an UCL95% on each analyte concentration. The uncertainty in analyte concentration was calculated as a function of the number of samples, the average, and the standard deviation of the analytical results. The UCL95% was based entirely on the six current scrape sample results (each averaged across three analytical determinations).

  15. Pulse oximetry performance in mechanically ventilated newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Solevåg, Anne L; Solberg, Marianne T; Šaltytė-Benth, Jūratė

    2015-08-01

    Pulse oximetry is widely used to target oxygenation in newborn infants. In a retrospective chart review of 138 mechanically ventilated infants, pulse oximetry overestimated blood oxygen saturation compared to arterial blood gas analyses. Despite improvements in pulse oximeter technology, pulse oximetry performance in sick newborns should still be under scrutiny. PMID:26067867

  16. Using pulse oximetry to assess oxygen levels.

    PubMed

    Olive, Sandra

    Abstract Olive S (2016) Using pulse oximetry to assess oxygen levels. Detecting low oxygen levels in patients is important but not always easy; central cyanosis--when a patient's lips, tongue and mucus membranes acquire a blue tinge--can be missed, even by skilled observers, until significant hypoxaemia is present. Pulse oximetry can be undertaken to measure a patient's oxygen levels and help identify earlier when action must be taken. This article outlines the procedure and its limitations, as well as the circumstances in which it should be used. PMID:27295798

  17. Homonuclear dipolar recoupling under ultra-fast magic-angle spinning: probing 19F-19F proximities by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Hu, Bingwen; Lafon, Olivier; Trébosc, Julien; Deng, Feng; Amoureux, Jean-Paul

    2010-03-01

    We describe dipolar recoupling methods that accomplish, at high magic-angle spinning (MAS) frequencies, the excitation of double-quantum (DQ) coherences between spin-1/2 nuclei. We employ rotor-synchronized symmetry-based pulse sequences which are either gamma-encoded or non-gamma-encoded. The sensitivity and the robustness to both chemical-shift anisotropy and offset are examined. We also compare different techniques to avoid signal folding in the indirect dimension of two-dimensional double-quantum<-->single-quantum (DQ-SQ) spectra. This comprehensive analysis results in the identification of satisfactory conditions for dipolar (19)F-(19)F recoupling at high magnetic fields and high MAS frequencies. The utility of these recoupling methods is demonstrated with high-resolution DQ-SQ NMR spectra, which allow probing (19)F-(19)F proximities in powered fluoroaluminates. PMID:20044288

  18. Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings for the assignment of stereochemistry in flubenzimine.

    PubMed

    Ghiviriga, Ion; Rubinski, Miles A; Dolbier, William R

    2016-07-01

    Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings revealed the configuration of flubenzimine, with the CF3 group on N4 pointing towards the lone pair of N5. The (19) F-(15) N coupling constants were measured at natural abundance using a spin-state selective indirect-detection pulse sequence. As (15) N-labelled proteins are routinely synthesized for NMR studies, through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings have the potential to probe the stereochemistry of these proteins by (19) F labelling of some amino acids or can reveal the site of docking of fluorine-containing drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27059012

  19. 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Perfluorocarbons for the Evaluation of Response to Antibiotic Therapy in a Staphylococcus aureus Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Peter; Ohlsen, Knut

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in recent decades has highlighted the importance of developing new drugs to treat infections. However, in addition to the design of new drugs, the development of accurate preclinical testing methods is essential. In vivo imaging technologies such as bioluminescence imaging (BLI) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are promising approaches. In a previous study, we showed the effectiveness of 19F MRI using perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions for detecting the site of Staphylococcus aureus infection. In the present follow-up study, we investigated the use of this method for in vivo visualization of the effects of antibiotic therapy. Methods/Principal findings Mice were infected with S. aureus Xen29 and treated with 0.9% NaCl solution, vancomycin or linezolid. Mock treatment led to the highest bioluminescence values during infection followed by vancomycin treatment. Counting the number of colony-forming units (cfu) at 7 days post-infection (p.i.) showed the highest bacterial burden for the mock group and the lowest for the linezolid group. Administration of PFCs at day 2 p.i. led to the accumulation of 19F at the rim of the abscess in all mice (in the shape of a hollow sphere), and antibiotic treatment decreased the 19F signal intensity and volume. Linezolid showed the strongest effect. The BLI, cfu, and MRI results were comparable. Conclusions 19F-MRI with PFCs is an effective non-invasive method for assessing the effects of antibiotic therapy in vivo. This method does not depend on pathogen specific markers and can therefore be used to estimate the efficacy of antibacterial therapy against a broad range of clinically relevant pathogens, and to localize sites of infection. PMID:23724049

  20. {sup 19}F NMR spectra and structures of halogenated porphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, E.R.; Hodge, J.A.; Grinstaff, M.W.

    1995-07-05

    Fluorine-19 NMR spectra of a series of halogenated porphyrins have been used to create a spectral library of different types of fluorine splitting patterns for tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrins (TFPP) complexed with diamagnetic and paramagnetic metal ions. The paramagnetic shift, line broadening, and fine structure of the resonances form the peripheral pentafluorophenyl rings are dependent on the symmetry and core environment of the porphyrin macrocycles. In combination with crystal structure data, {sup 19}F NMR helps define the behavior of halogenated porphyrins in solution. Six new crystal structures for TFPP and octahalo-TFPP derivatives are reported: H{sub 2}TFPP in rhombohedral space group R3, a = 20.327(4) {Angstrom}, c = 15.261(2) {Angstrom}, {beta} = 103.87(2){degrees}, V = 2227.6(13) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2; CuTFPP in rhombohedral space group R3, a = 20.358(5), c = 14.678(2) {Angstrom}, {alpha} = 88.97(1), {beta}=76.05(1){degrees}, {gamma} = 71.29(1){degrees}, V = 2181.4(6) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2; ZnTFPPCl{sub 8} in tetragonal space group P42, c, a = 19.502(20), c = 10.916(8) {Angstrom}, V = 4152(6) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2; H{sub 2}TFPPBr{sub 8} in monoclinic space group C2, a = 27.634(6) {Angstrom}, b = 6.926(2) {Angstrom}, c = 14.844(3) {Angstrom}, {beta} = 109.64(2){degrees}, V = 2675.8(11) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2.

  1. Ring current shifts in (19)F-NMR of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongsheng; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2016-05-01

    Fluorine-19 NMR markers are attractive reporter groups for use in studies of complex biomacromolecular systems, in particular also for studies of function-related conformational equilibria and rate processes in membrane proteins. Advantages of (19)F-NMR probes include high sensitivity of the (19)F chemical shifts to variations in the non-covalent environment. Nonetheless, in studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) we encountered situations where (19)F chemical shifts were not responsive to conformational changes that had been implicated by other methods. This prompted us to examine possible effects of aromatic ring current fields on the chemical shifts of (19)F-NMR probes used in GPCRs. Analysis of previously reported (19)F-NMR data on the β2-adrenergic receptor and mammalian rhodopsin showed that all (19)F-labeling sites which manifested conformational changes are located near aromatic residues. Although ring current effects are small when compared to other known non-covalent effects on (19)F chemical shifts, there is thus an indication that their contributions are significant when studying activation processes in GPCRs, since the observed activation-related (19)F-NMR chemical shifts are comparable in size to the calculated ring current shifts. Considering the impact of ring current shifts may thus be helpful in identifying promising indigenous or engineered labeling sites for future (19)F-NMR studies of GPCR activation, and novel information may be obtained on the nature of conformational rearrangements near the (19)F-labels. It will then also be interesting to see if the presently indicated role of ring current shifts in membrane protein studies with (19)F-NMR markers can be substantiated by a more extensive data base resulting from future studies. PMID:27240587

  2. MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan is an imaging test that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  3. High-resolution three-dimensional 19F-magnetic resonance imaging of rat lung in situ: evaluation of airway strain in the perfluorocarbon-filled lung.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Julia K; Steinmann, Daniel; Emerich, Philipp; Stahl, Claudius A; v Elverfeldt, Dominik; Guttmann, Josef

    2011-02-01

    Perfluorocarbons (PFC) are biologically and chemically inert fluids with high oxygen and CO(2) carrying capacities. Their use as liquid intrapulmonary gas carriers during liquid ventilation has been investigated. We established a method of high resolution 3D-(19)F-MRI of the totally PFC-filled lung. The goal of this study was to investigate longitudinal and circumferential airway strain in the setting of increasing airway pressures on 3D-(19)F-MR images of the PFC-filled lung. Sixteen female Wistar rats were euthanized and the liquid perfluorocarbon FC-84 instilled into their lungs. 3D-(19)F-MRI was performed at various intrapulmonary pressures. Measurements of bronchial length and cross-sectional area were obtained from transversal 2D images for each pressure range. Changes in bronchial area were used to determine circumferential strain, while longitudinal strain was calculated from changes in bronchial length. Our method of 3D-(19)F-MRI allowed clear visualization of the great bronchi. Longitudinal strain increased significantly up to 31.1 cmH(2)O. The greatest strain could be found in the range of low airway pressures. Circumferential strain increased strongly with the initial pressure rise, but showed no significant changes above 10.4 cmH(2)O. Longitudinal strain was generally higher in distal airways, while circumferential strain showed no difference. Analysis of mechanical characteristics showed that longitudinal and circumferential airway expansion occurred in an anisotropic fashion. Whereas longitudinal strain still increased with higher pressures, circumferential strain quickly reached a 'strain limit'. Longitudinal strain was higher in distal bronchi, as dense PFCs gravitate to dependent, in this case to dorso-basal parts of the lung, acting as liquid positive end expiratory pressure. PMID:21193813

  4. Esophageal pulse oximetry utilizing reflectance photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Kyriacou, Panayiotis A; Powell, Sarah; Langford, Richard M; Jones, Deric P

    2002-11-01

    Peripheral perfusion is often poor and barely pulsatile in patients undergoing prolonged major surgery. Hence, the arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) readings from commercial finger pulse oximeters can become unreliable or cease when they are most needed. To overcome this limitation, the esophagus has been investigated as an alternative measurement site, as perfusion may be preferentially preserved centrally. A reflectance esophageal pulse oximeter probe, and a processing system implemented in LabVIEW were developed. The system was evaluated in clinical measurements on 49 cardiothoracic surgery patients. The SpO2 values from the esophagus were in good agreement with arterial blood oxygen saturation (SaO2) values obtained from blood gas analysis and CO-oximetry. The means (+/-SD) of the differences between the esophageal SpO2 and SaO2 results from blood gas analysis and CO-oximetry were 0.02 +/- 0.88% and -0.73 +/- 0.72%, respectively. In five (10.2%) of the patients, the finger pulse oximeter failed for at least 10 min while the esophageal SpO2 readings remained reliable. The results confirm that the esophagus may be used as an alternative monitoring site for pulse oximetry even in patients with compromised peripheral perfusion. PMID:12450366

  5. Tissue oximetry in anaesthesia and intensive care.

    PubMed

    Biedrzycka, Aleksandra; Lango, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    Conventional monitoring during surgery and intensive care is not sufficiently sensitive to detect acute changes in vital organs perfusion, while its good quality is critical for maintaining their function. Disturbed vital organ perfusion may lead to the development of postoperative complications, including neurological sequel and renal failure. Near-infra-red spectroscopy (NIRS) represents one of up-to-date techniques of patient monitoring which is commonly used for the assessment of brain oximetry in thoracic aorta surgery, and - increasingly more often -in open-heart surgery. Algorithms for maintaining adequate brain saturation may result in a decrease of neurological complications and cognitive dysfunction following cardiac surgery. The assessment of kidney and visceral perfusion with tissue oximetry is gaining increasing interest during pediatric cardiac surgery. Attempts at decreasing complications by the use of brain oximetry during carotid endarterectomy, as well as thoracic and abdominal surgery demonstrated conflicting results. In recent years NIRS technique was proposed as a tool for muscle perfusion assessment under short term ischemia and reperfusion, referred to as vascular occlusion test (VOT). This monitoring extension allows for the identification of early disturbances in tissue perfusion. Results of recent studies utilizing VOT suggest that the muscle saturation decrease rate is reduced in septic shock patients, while decreased speed of saturation recovery on reperfusion is related to disturbed microcirculation. Being non-invasive and feasible technique, NIRS offers an improvement of preoperative risk assessment in cardiac surgery and promises more comprehensive intraoperative and ICU patient monitoring allowing for better outcome. PMID:26966109

  6. Conformation analysis and molecular mobility of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene copolymer using solid-state 19F MAS and 1H --> 19F CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Aimi, Keitaro; Ando, Shinji

    2004-07-01

    The changes in the conformation and molecular mobility accompanied by a phase transition in the crystalline domain were analyzed for ethylene (E) and tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) copolymer, ETFE, using variable-temperature (VT) solid-state 19F magic angle spinning (MAS) and 1H --> 19F cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The shifts of the signals for fluorines in TFE units to higher frequency and the continuing decrease and increase in the T1rho(F) values suggest that conformational exchange motions exist in the crystalline domain between 42 and 145 degrees C. Quantum chemical calculations of magnetic shielding constants showed that the high-frequency shift of TFE units should be induced by trans to gauche conformational changes at the CH2-CF2 linkage in the E-TFE unit. Although the 19F signals of the crystalline domain are substantially overlapped with those of the amorphous domain at ambient probe temperature (68 degrees C), they were successfully distinguished by using the dipolar filter and spin-lock pulse sequences at 145 degrees C. The dipolar coupling constants for the crystalline domain, which can be estimated by fitting the dipolar oscillation behaviors in the 1H --> 19F CP curve, showed a significant decrease with increasing temperature from 42 to 145 degrees C. This is due to the averaging of 1H-19F dipolar interactions originating from the molecular motion in the crystalline domain. The increase in molecular mobility in the crystalline domain was clearly shown by VT T1rho(F) and 1H --> 19F CP measurements in the phase transition temperature range. PMID:15181627

  7. Pulse oximetry in the evaluation of peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jawahar, D; Rachamalla, H R; Rafalowski, A; Ilkhani, R; Bharathan, T; Anandarao, N

    1997-08-01

    The role of pulse oximetry in the evaluation of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) was investigated. In addition, the value of elevating the limb to improve the sensitivity of detection of PVD by the pulse oximeter was also determined. Pulse oximetry reading in the toes were obtained in 40 young, healthy volunteers and in 40 randomly selected patients referred to the vascular investigation laboratory over a period of two months. All 40 healthy volunteers had normal pulse oximetry readings. Normal pulse oximetry reading in the toes was defined as > 95% O2 Sat and +/-2 of finger pulse oximetry reading. In all 40 patients, pulse oximetry readings were either normal or not detected at all. Since there was no gradation in decrease in the pulse oximetry reading with severity of disease or with elevation of the patient's lower extremity, an absent or no reading was considered as an abnormal result from the test. The frequency of abnormal pulse oximetry readings increased significantly in groups with abnormal ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) and also varied significantly with elevation of the patients' lower limbs. In patients with no PVD detected by Doppler (ABPI > 0.9), pulse oximetry readings were normal in all. However, in patients with moderate PVD (ABPI, 0.5-0.9), 84% of the patients' lower limbs had normal pulse oximetry readings and 16% had an abnormal reading at baseline level (flat). An additional 12% of the lower limbs in this group had an abnormal reading on elevation of the limb to 12 inches. In patients with severe PVD (ABPI < 0.5), 54% of the patients' lower limbs had an abnormal reading at baseline and an additional 23% had an abnormal reading at elevation of the limb to 12 inches. In conclusion, pulse oximetry was not a sensitive test for detecting early PVD. PMID:9269142

  8. Imaging Neuroinflammation In Vivo in a Neuropathic Pain Rat Model with Near-Infrared Fluorescence and 19F Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Vasudeva, Kiran; Andersen, Karl; Zeyzus-Johns, Bree; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Patel, Sravan Kumar; Balducci, Anthony; Janjic, Jelena M.; Pollock, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain following surgery represents a serious worldwide health problem leading to life-long treatment and the possibility of significant disability. In this study, neuropathic pain was modeled using the chronic constriction injury (CCI). The CCI rats exhibit mechanical hypersensitivity (typical neuropathic pain symptom) to mechanical stimulation of the affected paw 11 days post surgery, at a time when sham surgery animals do not exhibit hypersensitivity. Following a similar time course, TRPV1 gene expression appears to rise with the hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation. Recent studies have shown that immune cells play a role in the development of neuropathic pain. To further explore the relationship between neuropathic pain and immune cells, we hypothesize that the infiltration of immune cells into the affected sciatic nerve can be monitored in vivo by molecular imaging. To test this hypothesis, an intravenous injection of a novel perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsion, which is phagocytosed by inflammatory cells (e.g. monocytes and macrophages), was used in a rat CCI model. The nanoemulsion carries two distinct imaging agents, a near-infrared (NIR) lipophilic fluorescence reporter (DiR) and a 19F MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) tracer, PFC. We demonstrate that in live rats, NIR fluorescence is concentrated in the area of the affected sciatic nerve. Furthermore, the 19F MRI signal was observed on the sciatic nerve. Histological examination of the CCI sciatic nerve reveals significant infiltration of CD68 positive macrophages. These results demonstrate that the infiltration of immune cells into the sciatic nerve can be visualized in live animals using these methods. PMID:24587398

  9. Tumour oxygen dynamics measured simultaneously by near-infrared spectroscopy and 19F magnetic resonance imaging in rats.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mengna; Kodibagkar, Vikram; Liu, Hanli; Mason, Ralph P

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to investigate the correlation between tumour vascular oxygenation and tissue oxygen tension dynamics in rat breast 13762NF tumours with respect to hyperoxic gas breathing. NIRS directly detected global variations in the oxygenated haemoglobin concentration (Delta[HbO(2)]) within tumours and oxygen tension (pO(2)) maps were achieved using (19)F MRI of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene. Multiple correlations were examined between rates and magnitudes of vascular (Delta[HbO(2)]) and tissue (pO(2)) responses. Significant correlations were found between response to oxygen and carbogen breathing using either modality. Comparison of results for the two methods showed a correlation between the vascular perfusion rate ratio and the mean pO(2) values (R(2) > 0.7). The initial rates of increase of Delta[HbO(2)] and the slope of dynamic pO(2) response, d(pO(2))/dt, of well-oxygenated voxels in response to hyperoxic challenge were also correlated. These results demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous measurements using NIRS and MRI. As expected, the rate of pO(2) response to oxygen is primarily dependent upon the well perfused rather than poorly perfused vasculature. PMID:16357430

  10. Pulse Oximetry as a Medical Physics Practical on School Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Adam P.; Chandra, Elizabeth; Chandra, Manik

    2009-01-01

    We have measured blood oxygenation levels in a group of 14 people (8 young people and 6 adults) on a physically demanding expedition to Mt Kenya. Blood oxygenation was measured at 11 different altitudes between 1910 and 4985 m using pulse oximetry. We found that pulse oximetry was suitable for use on a youth expedition and we were able to show…

  11. Retinal Oximetry in a Healthy Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yuki; Shimazaki, Takeru; Kobayashi, Nobuko; Miyoshi, Yukiko; Ono, Aoi; Kobayashi, Mamoru; Shiragami, Chieko; Hirooka, Kazuyuki; Tsujikawa, Akitaka

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To establish the normative database of retinal oximetry using Oxymap T1 in a healthy Japanese population, and study the reproducibility of the measurements in Japanese. Methods We measured oxygen saturation in the major retinal vessels with Oxymap T1 in 252 eyes of 252 healthy Japanese subjects. Fundus images acquired using Oxymap T1 were processed using built-in Oxymap Analyzer software. Reproducibility of retinal oximetry was investigated using 20 eyes of 20 healthy subjects. Results The mean retinal oxygen saturation of 4 quadrants in healthy Japanese was 97.0 ± 6.9% in arteries and 52.8 ± 8.3% in veins. The mean arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation was 44.2 ± 9.2%. Both arterial and venous oxygen saturation were significantly lower in the temporal side of the retina, especially in the temporal-inferior vessels. However, the arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation was limited in the 4 quadrants. Interphotograph, intervisit, and interevaluator intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.936–0.979, 0.809–0.837, and 0.732–0.947, respectively. In the major retinal arteries, oxygen saturation increased with age (r = 0.18, p<0.01), at a rate of 0.67% per 10 years. However, venous oxygen saturation showed no correlation with age. Conclusions This study provides the normative database for the Japanese population. The arterial saturation value appears to be higher than other previous studies. Mean retinal oximetry in 4 quadrants with Oxymap T1 has high reproducibility. PMID:27434373

  12. Modeling photon transport in transabdominal fetal oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Steven L.; Ramanujam, Nirmala; Vishnoi, Gargi; Choe, Regine; Chance, Britton

    2000-07-01

    The possibility of optical oximetry of the blood in the fetal brain measured across the maternal abdomen just prior to birth is under investigated. Such measurements could detect fetal distress prior to birth and aid in the clinical decision regarding Cesarean section. This paper uses a perturbation method to model photon transport through a 8- cm-diam fetal brain located at a constant 2.5 cm below a curved maternal abdominal surface with an air/tissue boundary. In the simulation, a near-infrared light source delivers light to the abdomen and a detector is positioned up to 10 cm from the source along the arc of the abdominal surface. The light transport [W/cm2 fluence rate per W incident power] collected at the 10 cm position is Tm equals 2.2 X 10-6 cm-2 if the fetal brain has the same optical properties as the mother and Tf equals 1.0 X 10MIN6 cm-2 for an optically perturbing fetal brain with typical brain optical properties. The perturbation P equals (Tf - Tm)/Tm is -53% due to the fetal brain. The model illustrates the challenge and feasibility of transabdominal oximetry of the fetal brain.

  13. Review of splanchnic oximetry in clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Sean M; Mally, Pradeep V

    2016-09-01

    Global tissue perfusion and oxygenation are important indicators of physiologic function in humans. The monitoring of splanchnic oximetry through the use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an emerging method used to assess tissue oxygenation status. Splanchnic tissue oxygenation (SrSO2) is thought to be potentially of high value in critically ill patients because gastrointestinal organs can often be the first to suffer ischemic injury. During conditions of hypovolemia, cardiac dysfunction, or decreased oxygen-carrying capacity, blood flow is diverted toward vital organs, such as the brain and the heart at the expense of the splanchnic circulation. While monitoring SrSO2 has great potential benefit, there are limitations to the technology and techniques. SrSO2 has been found to have a relatively high degree of variability that can potentially make it difficult to interpret. In addition, because splanchnic organs only lie near the skin surface in children and infants, and energy from currently available sensors only penetrates a few centimeters deep, it can be difficult to use clinically in a noninvasive manner in adults. Research thus far is showing that splanchnic oximetry holds great promise in the ability to monitor patient oxygenation status and detect disease states in humans, especially in pediatric populations. PMID:27165703

  14. Achievement of 1 H-19 F heteronuclear experiments using the conventional spectrometer with a shared single high band amplifier.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Chiseko; Kurita, Jun-ichi; Furihata, Kazuo; Tashiro, Mitsuru

    2015-05-01

    The (1)H-(19) F heteronuclear NMR experiments were achieved using the conventional spectrometer equipped with a single high band amplifier and a (1)H/(19)F/(13) C double-tuned probe. Although double high band amplifiers are generally required to perform such experiments, a simple modification of pathway in the conventional spectrometer was capable of acquiring various (1)H-(19)F heteronuclear spectra. The efficiency of the present technique was demonstrated in an application for (19)F{(1)H} and (1)H{(19)F} saturation transfer difference experiments. PMID:25808615

  15. Simultaneous detection of distinct ubiquitin chain topologies by 19F NMR.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Sujan S; Pham, Grace H; Prabakaran, Jyothiprashanth; Strieter, Eric R

    2014-10-17

    The dynamic interplay between ubiquitin (Ub) chain construction and destruction is critical for the regulation of many cellular pathways. To understand these processes, it would be ideal to simultaneously detect different Ub chains as they are created and destroyed in the cell. This objective cannot be achieved with existing detection strategies. Here, we report on the use of 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to detect and characterize conformationally distinct Ub oligomers. By exploiting the environmental sensitivity of the 19F nucleus and the conformational diversity found among Ub chains of different linkage types, we can simultaneously resolve the 19F NMR signals for mono-Ub and three distinct di-Ub oligomers (K6, K48, and K63) in heterogeneous mixtures. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by the ability to interrogate the selectivity of deubiquitinases with multiple Ub substrates in real time. We also demonstrate that 19F NMR can be used to discern Ub linkages that are formed by select E3 ligases found in pathogenic bacteria. Collectively, our results assert the potential of 19F NMR for monitoring Ub signaling in cells to reveal fundamental insights about the associated cellular pathways. PMID:25119846

  16. Simultaneous Detection of Distinct Ubiquitin Chain Topologies by 19F NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic interplay between ubiquitin (Ub) chain construction and destruction is critical for the regulation of many cellular pathways. To understand these processes, it would be ideal to simultaneously detect different Ub chains as they are created and destroyed in the cell. This objective cannot be achieved with existing detection strategies. Here, we report on the use of 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to detect and characterize conformationally distinct Ub oligomers. By exploiting the environmental sensitivity of the 19F nucleus and the conformational diversity found among Ub chains of different linkage types, we can simultaneously resolve the 19F NMR signals for mono-Ub and three distinct di-Ub oligomers (K6, K48, and K63) in heterogeneous mixtures. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by the ability to interrogate the selectivity of deubiquitinases with multiple Ub substrates in real time. We also demonstrate that 19F NMR can be used to discern Ub linkages that are formed by select E3 ligases found in pathogenic bacteria. Collectively, our results assert the potential of 19F NMR for monitoring Ub signaling in cells to reveal fundamental insights about the associated cellular pathways. PMID:25119846

  17. Contribution of 19F resonances on 18O( p, α)15N reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmeslem, Meriem; Chafa, Azzedine; Barhoumi, Slimane; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-08-01

    The 18O( p, α)15N reaction influences the isotopes production such as 19F, 18O, and 15N which can be used to test the models of stellar evolution. 19F is synthesized in both asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and metal-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Using R-matrix theory we allow new values of resonances parameters in 19F. We show that the most important contribution to the differential and total cross section at low energies, comes from the levels in 19F situated at resonances energies E R =151, 680 and 840 keV with spin and parity 1/2+. The total width of the 680 keV resonance is badly known. So, we have focused on this broad resonance corresponding to the 8.65 MeV level in 19F. We delimit the temperature range in which each resonance contribution to the total reaction rate occurs by analyzing the ratio ( N A < σν> i / N A < σν>). This allowed us to show that the 680 and 840 keV broad resonances strongly dominate the reaction rate over the stellar temperature range T 9=0.02-0.06 and T 9=0.5-5. Finally, these results were compared to NACRE and Iliadis astrophysical compilations.

  18. Indocyanine green-loaded perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions for bimodal 19F-magnetic resonance/nearinfrared fluorescence imaging and subsequent phototherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan-Guo; Kim, Hyunjin; Mun, Saehun

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an indocyanine green-loaded perfluorocarbon (ICG/PFCE) nanoemulsion as a multifunctional theranostic nanomedicine which enables not only 19F magnetic resonance (MR)/near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) bimodal imaging but also subsequent photodynamic/photothermal dual therapy of cancer. The hydrodynamic size of ICG/PFCE nanoemulsions was 164.2 nm. The stability of indocyanine green (ICG) in aqueous solution was significantly improved when loaded on perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions. In addition, ICG/PFCE nanoemulsions showed good dispersion stability in aqueous media containing 10% fetal bovine serum, for at least 14 days. 19F-MRI of ICG/PFCE nanoemulsions showed that the signal intensity increased with increasing nanoemulsion concentration with no signal observed from the surrounding background. Using NIRF imaging with perfluorocarbon nanoemulsion alone, without ICG, did not produce NIRF, while clear and bright fluorescent images were obtained with ICG/PFCE nanoemulsions at 10-µM ICG equivalent. The capacity of ICG-loaded nanoemulsions to generate heat following light irradiation by using an 810-nm laser was comparable to that of free ICG, while singlet oxygen generation of ICG-loaded nanoemulsions was significantly better than that of free ICG. In vitro cytotoxicity tests and fluorescence microscopy confirmed biocompatibility of the nanoemulsion. Upon light irradiation, U87MG glioblastoma cells incubated with ICG/PFCE nanoemulsions underwent necrotic cell death. The therapeutic mechanism during light illumination appears to be mainly due to the photodynamic effect at lower ICG concentrations, whilst the photothermal effect became more obvious at increased ICG concentrations, enabling combined photodynamic/photothermal therapy of cancer cells. PMID:23833726

  19. Tracking the Fate of Stem Cell Implants with Fluorine-19 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, Jeffrey M.; Ribot, Emeline J.; Chen, Yuhua; Gilbert, Kyle M.; Foster, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In this study we used cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) labeled with a Fluorine-19 (19F) agent. 19F-MRI offers unambiguous detection and in vivo quantification of labeled cells. Methods We investigated two common stem cell transplant mouse models: an immune competent, syngeneic transplant model and an immune compromised, xenograft transplant model. 19F labelled stem cells were implanted intramuscularly into the hindlimb of healthy mice. The transplant was then monitored for up to 17 days using 19F-MRI, after which the tissue was excised for fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemisty. Results Immediately following transplantation, 19F-MRI quantification correlated very well with the expected cell number in both models. The 19F signal decreased over time in both models, with a more rapid decrease in the syngeneic model. By endpoint, only 2/7 syngeneic mice had any detectable 19F signal. In the xenograft model, all mice had detectable signal at endpoint. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry were used to show that the 19F signal was related to the presence of bystander labeled macrophages, and not original MSC. Conclusions Our results show that 19F-MRI is an excellent tool for verifying the delivery of therapeutic cells early after transplantation. However, in certain circumstances the transfer of cellular label to other bystander cells may confuse interpretation of the long-term fate of the transplanted cells. PMID:25767871

  20. Four-wavelength retinal vessel oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, Jonathan Jensen

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation documents the design and construction of a four-wavelength retinal vessel oximeter, the Eye Oximeter (EOX). The EOX scans low-powered laser beams (at 629, 678, 821 and 899 nm) into the eye and across a targeted retinal vessel to measure the transmittance of the blood within the vessel. From the transmittance measurements, the oxygen saturation of the blood within the vessel is computed. Retinal vessel oxygen saturation has been suggested as a useful parameter for monitoring a wide range of conditions including occult blood loss and a variety of ophthalmic diseases. An artificial eye that simulates the geometry of a human retinal vessel was constructed and used to calibrate the EOX saturation measurement. A number of different oximetry equations were developed and tested. From measurements made on whole human blood in the artificial eye, an oximetry equation that places a linear wavelength dependance on the scattering losses (3% decrease from 629 to 899 nm) is found to best calibrate the EOX oxygen saturation measurement. This calibration also requires that an adjustment be made to the absorption coefficient of hemoglobin at 629 nm that has been reported in the literature. More than 4,000 measurements were made in the eyes of three human subjects during the development of the EOX. Applying the oximetry equation developed through the in vitro experiments to human data, the average human retinal venous oxygen saturation is estimated to be 0.63 +/- 0.07 and the average human retinal arterial oxygen saturation is 0.99 +/- 0.03. Furthermore, measurements made away from the optic disk resulted in a larger variance in the calculated saturation when compared to measurements made on the optic disk. A series of EOX experiments using anesthetized swine helped to verify the sensitivity of the EOX measurement of oxygen saturation. It is found that the calibration in swine differed from the calibration in the artificial eye. An empirical calibration from the

  1. Transillumination waveform simulator for pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Jaccaud, Camille; Paez, Gonzalo; Strojnik, Marija

    2009-08-01

    Pulse oximetry technique is a non invasive method useful to monitor the quantity of oxygen in hemoglobin, used in medical diagnosis and clinical decision-making. It is based on the ratio between the red and infrared light absorbance corresponding to the oxygenated (HbO2) and non-oxygenated (Hb) state of the hemoglobin. We develop the mathematical model to obtain the oxygen saturation value observing that it depends on four known parameters: two transillumination values assessed at the common pulse oximetry wavelengths (λ1 = 660 nm y λ2 = 940 nm), and the extinction coefficients for the oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin at these given wavelengths. Analyzing the extinction curves for oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin we note that at λ equal to 660 nm the HbO2 component almost does not contribute to the attenuation of incidance when we transilluminate tissue (7.479x10-5 cm-1M-1). In this case is the Hb component that gives the significant attenuation value (7.863x10-4 cm-1M-1). In 940 nm the extinction coefficient of the Hb is 2.589x10-5 cm-1M-1 and we can ignore it when we count attenuation. At this λ we assume that the pulsate component is only affected by the HbO2 (2.099x10-4 cm-1M-1). This analysis of hemoglobin extinction coefficients in the absorption curves highlights the signal to noise ratio between these two oxygen dependent elements. We are interested in accentuate the better contrast interval (λ pair), where this signal-to-noise ratio is higher, looking for more transillumination information and more precise SO2 value. We propose to use a transillumination waveform simulator to study the different effects (respiration, artifact body movement, absorption, low perfusion, etc) presented in complex physiological signals and to know the optical path-integrated behavior when we transilluminate tissue. This is practical for acquisition and processing transillumination signals. The present work is the first part of a λ selection method to guaratee the optimum S/N for

  2. Prediction of (19)F NMR Chemical Shifts in Labeled Proteins: Computational Protocol and Case Study.

    PubMed

    Isley, William C; Urick, Andrew K; Pomerantz, William C K; Cramer, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    The structural analysis of ligand complexation in biomolecular systems is important in the design of new medicinal therapeutic agents; however, monitoring subtle structural changes in a protein's microenvironment is a challenging and complex problem. In this regard, the use of protein-based (19)F NMR for screening low-molecular-weight molecules (i.e., fragments) can be an especially powerful tool to aid in drug design. Resonance assignment of the protein's (19)F NMR spectrum is necessary for structural analysis. Here, a quantum chemical method has been developed as an initial approach to facilitate the assignment of a fluorinated protein's (19)F NMR spectrum. The epigenetic "reader" domain of protein Brd4 was taken as a case study to assess the strengths and limitations of the method. The overall modeling protocol predicts chemical shifts for residues in rigid proteins with good accuracy; proper accounting for explicit solvation of fluorinated residues by water is critical. PMID:27218275

  3. The registration of signals from the nuclei other than protons at 0.5 T MRI scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, N.; Volkov, D.; Gulyaev, M.; Pavlova, O.; Pirogov, Yu

    2016-02-01

    The practical aspects of the adaptation of the medical MRI scanner for multinuclear applications are considered. Examples of high resolution NMR spectra for nuclei 19F, 31P, 23Na, 11B, 13C, 2H, and also NQR spectrum for 35Cl are given. Possibilities of MRI for nuclei 19F, 31P, 23Na, 11B are shown. Experiments on registration of signals 19F from the fluorocarbons injected in laboratory animals are described.

  4. 19F-NMR Study on the Equilateral Triangular Spin Tube CsCrF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kazuki; Goto, Takayuki; Manaka, Hirotaka; Miura, Yoko

    In order to investigate the hyperfine coupling of three inequivalent 19F sites in the equilateral triangular spin-tube antiferromagnet CsCrF4, we have measured the temperature dependence of 19F-NMR Knight shift in the paramagnetic state above 20K. The hyperfine coupling constants for three F-sites were determined to be -0.170, 0.280 and -0.045 T/μB, and were found to be consistent with the observed spectra at 1.65K, where the system is possibly in the ordered state.

  5. Probing the Pu4 + magnetic moment in PuF4 with 19F NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capan, Cigdem; Dempsey, Richard J.; Sinkov, Sergey; McNamara, Bruce K.; Cho, Herman

    2016-06-01

    The magnetic fields produced by Pu4 + centers have been measured by 19F NMR spectroscopy to elucidate the Pu-F electronic interactions in polycrystalline PuF4. Spectra acquired at applied fields of 2.35 and 7.05 T reveal a linear scaling of the 19F line shape. A model is presented that treats the line broadening and shifts as due to dipolar fields produced by Pu valence electrons in localized noninteracting orbitals. Alternative explanations for the observed line shape involving covalent Pu-F bonding, superexchange interactions, and electronic configurations with enhanced magnetic moments are considered.

  6. Applications of (19)F-NMR in Fragment-Based Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Norton, Raymond S; Leung, Eleanor W W; Chandrashekaran, Indu R; MacRaild, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    (19)F-NMR has proved to be a valuable tool in fragment-based drug discovery. Its applications include screening libraries of fluorinated fragments, assessing competition among elaborated fragments and identifying the binding poses of promising hits. By observing fluorine in both the ligand and the target protein, useful information can be obtained on not only the binding pose but also the dynamics of ligand-protein interactions. These applications of (19)F-NMR will be illustrated in this review with studies from our fragment-based drug discovery campaigns against protein targets in parasitic and infectious diseases. PMID:27438818

  7. Optimal filter bandwidth for pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuban, Norbert; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2012-10-01

    Pulse oximeters contain one or more signal filtering stages between the photodiode and microcontroller. These filters are responsible for removing the noise while retaining the useful frequency components of the signal, thus improving the signal-to-noise ratio. The corner frequencies of these filters affect not only the noise level, but also the shape of the pulse signal. Narrow filter bandwidth effectively suppresses the noise; however, at the same time, it distorts the useful signal components by decreasing the harmonic content. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the filter bandwidth on the accuracy of pulse oximeters. We used a pulse oximeter tester device to produce stable, repetitive pulse waves with digitally adjustable R ratio and heart rate. We built a pulse oximeter and attached it to the tester device. The pulse oximeter digitized the current of its photodiode directly, without any analog signal conditioning. We varied the corner frequency of the low-pass filter in the pulse oximeter in the range of 0.66-15 Hz by software. For the tester device, the R ratio was set to R = 1.00, and the R ratio deviation measured by the pulse oximeter was monitored as a function of the corner frequency of the low-pass filter. The results revealed that lowering the corner frequency of the low-pass filter did not decrease the accuracy of the oxygen level measurements. The lowest possible value of the corner frequency of the low-pass filter is the fundamental frequency of the pulse signal. We concluded that the harmonics of the pulse signal do not contribute to the accuracy of pulse oximetry. The results achieved by the pulse oximeter tester were verified by human experiments, performed on five healthy subjects. The results of the human measurements confirmed that filtering out the harmonics of the pulse signal does not degrade the accuracy of pulse oximetry.

  8. Paramagnetic lanthanide chelates for multicontrast MRI.

    PubMed

    Cakić, Nevenka; Savić, Tanja; Stricker-Shaver, Janice; Truffault, Vincent; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Mirkes, Christian; Pohmann, Rolf; Scheffler, Klaus; Angelovski, Goran

    2016-07-28

    The preparation of a paramagnetic chelator that serves as a platform for multicontrast MRI, and can be utilized either as a T1-weighted, paraCEST or (19)F MRI contrast agent is reported. Its europium(iii) complex exhibits an extremely slow water exchange rate which is optimal for the use in CEST MRI. The potential of this platform was demonstrated through a series of MRI studies on tube phantoms and animals. PMID:27291157

  9. Using "On/Off" (19)F NMR/Magnetic Resonance Imaging Signals to Sense Tyrosine Kinase/Phosphatase Activity in Vitro and in Cell Lysates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Sun, Hongbin; Hu, Chen; Li, Gongyu; Liu, Xiaomei; Chen, Peiyao; Cui, Yusi; Liu, Jing; Wang, Junfeng; Liang, Gaolin

    2016-03-15

    Tyrosine kinase and phosphatase are two important, antagonistic enzymes in organisms. Development of noninvasive approach for sensing their activity with high spatial and temporal resolution remains challenging. Herein, we rationally designed a hydrogelator Nap-Phe-Phe(CF3)-Glu-Tyr-Ile-OH (1a) whose supramolecular hydrogel (i.e., Gel 1a) can be subjected to tyrosine kinase-directed disassembly, and its phosphate precursor Nap-Phe-Phe(CF3)-Glu-Tyr(H2PO3)-Ile-OH (1b), which can be subjected to alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-instructed self-assembly to form supramolecular hydrogel Gel 1b, respectively. Mechanic properties and internal fibrous networks of the hydrogels were characterized with rheology and cryo transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Disassembly/self-assembly of their corresponding supramolecular hydrogels conferring respective "On/Off" (19)F NMR/MRI signals were employed to sense the activity of these two important enzymes in vitro and in cell lysates for the first time. We anticipate that our new (19)F NMR/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method would facilitate pharmaceutical researchers to screen new inhibitors for these two enzymes without steric hindrance. PMID:26901415

  10. Study of fusion-fission dynamics in 19F+238U reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, R.; Sugathan, P.; Jhingan, A.; Kaur, Gurpreet; Mukul, Ish; Siwal, Davinder; Saneesh, N.; Banerjee, Tathagata; Yadav, Abhishek; Thakur, Meenu; Mahajan, Ruchi; Chaterjee, M. B.

    2016-05-01

    Mass angle distribution measurements for 19F+238U reaction were carried out around the sub barrier energies. Mass angle correlation has not been observed at above and below the fusion barrier in present reaction. This infer the minimal presence of non compound like events at these bombarding energies range.

  11. A mutagenesis-free approach to assignment of (19)F NMR resonances in biosynthetically labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Kitevski-LeBlanc, Julianne L; Al-Abdul-Wahid, M Sameer; Prosser, R Scott

    2009-02-18

    Solution NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics using fluorinated amino acid probes are a valuable addition to the repertoire of existing (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H experiments. Despite the numerous advantages of the (19)F nucleus in NMR, protein studies are complicated by the dependence of resonance assignments on site-directed mutagenesis methods which are laborious and often problematic. Here we report an NMR-based route to the assignment of fluorine resonances in (13)C,(15)N-3-fluoro-l-tyrosine labeled calmodulin. The assignment begins with the correlation of the fluorine nucleus to the delta proton in the novel (13)C,(15)N-enriched probe which is achieved using a CT-HCCF-COSY experiment. Connection to the backbone is made through two additional solution NMR experiments, namely the (H(beta))C(beta)(C(gamma)C(delta))H(delta) and HNCACB. Assignments are completed using either previously published backbone chemical shift data or obtained experimentally provided uniform (13)C,(15)N labeling procedures are employed during protein expression. Additional benefits of the (13)C,(15)N-3-fluoro-l-tyrosine probe include the reduction of spectral overlap through ((13)C(19)F) CT-HSQCs, as well as the ability to monitor side chain dynamics using (19)F T(1), T(2), and the (13)C-(19)F NOE. PMID:19173647

  12. The metabolism of 2-trifluormethylaniline and its acetanilide in the rat by 19F NMR monitored enzyme hydrolysis and 1H/19F HPLC-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tugnait, M; Lenz, E M; Hofmann, M; Spraul, M; Wilson, I D; Lindon, J C; Nicholson, J K

    2003-01-01

    The urinary excretion profile and identity of the metabolites of 2-trifluoromethyl aniline (2-TFMA) and 2-trifluoromethyl acetanilide (2-TFMAc), following i.p. administration to the rat at 50 mg kg(-1), were determined using a combination of 19F NMR monitored enzyme hydrolysis, SPEC-MS and 19F/1H HPLC-NMR. A total recovery of approximately 96.4% of the dose was excreted into the urine as seven metabolites. The major routes of metabolism were N-conjugation (glucuronidation), and ring-hydroxylation followed by sulphation (and to a lesser extent glucuronidation). The major metabolites excreted into the urine for both compounds were a labile N-conjugated metabolite (a postulated N-glucuronide) and a sulphated ring-hydroxylated metabolite (a postulated 4-amino-5-trifluoromethylphenyl sulphate) following dosing of 2-TFMA. These accounted for approximately 53.0 and 31.5% of the dose, respectively. This study identifies problems on sample component instability in the preparation and analysis procedures. PMID:12467928

  13. Examiner's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayama, Naohiro; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2014-06-01

    The best way to assess fetal condition is to observe the oxygen status of the fetus (as well as to assess the condition of infants, children, and adults). Previously, several fetal oximeters have been developed; however, no instrument has been utilized in clinical practice because of the low-capturing rate of the fetal oxygen saturation. To overcome the problem, we developed a doctor's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximeter, whose sensor volume is one hundredth of the conventional one. Additionally, we prepared transparent gloves. The calculation algorithm of the hemoglobin concentration was derived from the light propagation analysis based on the transport theory. We measured neonatal and fetal oxygen saturation (StO2) with the new tissue oximeter. Neonatal StO was measured at any position of the head regardless of amount of hair. Neonatal StO was found to be around 77%. Fetal StO was detected in every position of the fetal head during labor regardless of the presence of labor pain. Fetal StO without labor pain was around 70% in the first stage of labor and around 60% in the second stage of labor. We concluded that our new concept of fetal tissue oximetry would be useful for detecting fetal StO in any condition of the fetus.

  14. A 1H/19F minicoil NMR probe for solid-state NMR: application to 5-fluoroindoles.

    PubMed

    Graether, Steffen P; DeVries, Jeffrey S; McDonald, Robert; Rakovszky, Melissa L; Sykes, Brian D

    2006-01-01

    We show that it is feasible to use a minicoil for solid-state 19F 1H NMR experiments that has short pulse widths, good RF homogeneity, and excellent signal-to-noise for small samples while using low power amplifiers typical to liquid-state NMR. The closely spaced resonant frequencies of 1H and 19F and the ubiquitous use of fluorine in modern plastics and electronic components present two major challenges in the design of a high-sensitivity, high-field 1H/19F probe. Through the selection of specific components, circuit design, and pulse sequence, we were able to build a probe that has low 19F background and excellent separation of 1H and 19F signals. We determine the principle components of the chemical shift anisotropy tensor of 5-fluoroindole-3-acetic acid (5FIAA) and 5-fluorotryptophan. We also solve the crystal structure of 5FIAA, determine the orientation dependence of the chemical shift of a single crystal of 5FIAA, and predict the 19F chemical shift based on the orientation of the fluorine in the crystal. The results show that this 1H/19F probe is suitable for solid-state NMR experiments with low amounts of biological molecules that have been labeled with 19F. PMID:16198131

  15. Impurity effect of the Λ particle on the structure of 18F and Λ19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimura, Y.; Hagino, K.; Sagawa, H.

    2012-10-01

    We perform three-body model calculations for a sd-shell hypernucleus Λ19F (Λ17O+p+n) and its core nucleus 18F (16O+p+n), employing a density-dependent contact interaction between the valence proton and neutron. We find that the B(E2) value from the first excited state (with spin and parity of Iπ=3+) to the ground state (Iπ=1+) is slightly changed by the addition of a Λ particle, which exhibits the so called shrinkage effect of Λ particle. We also show that the excitation energy of the 3+ state is reduced in Λ19F compared to 18F, as is observed in a p-shell nucleus 6Li. We discuss the mechanism of this reduction of the excitation energy, pointing out that it is caused by a different mechanism from that in Λ7Li.

  16. A Study on 19F( n,α) Reaction Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uğur, F. A.; Tel, E.; Gökçe, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, cross sections of neutron induced reactions have been investigated for fluorine target nucleus. The calculations have been made on the excitation functions of 19F ( n,α), 19F( n,xα) reactions. Fluorine (F) and its molten salt compounds (LiF) can serve as a coolant which can be used at high temperatures without reaching a high vapor pressure and also the molten salt compounds are also a good neutron moderator. In these calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been investigated. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the full exciton model and the cascade exciton model. The equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing model. Also in the present work, reaction cross sections have calculated by using evaluated empirical formulas developed by Tel et al. at 14-15 MeV energy. The obtained results have been discussed and compared with the available experimental data.

  17. Fission fragment angular distributions for 11B and 19F+238U systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnik, A.; Kailas, S.; Chatterjee, A.; Navin, A.; Shrivastava, A.; Singh, P.; Samant, M. S.

    1995-12-01

    The fission fragment angular distributions were measured at energies above the fusion barrier, for the systems 11B and 19F + 238U. An analysis of the present data along with those already available for the systems 6,7Li, 12C, and 16O + 238U was made in terms of the saddle-point statistical model. While the anisotropies were ``normal'' for 6,7Li, 11B, 12C+238U systems, the ones for 16O and 19F+238U systems were found to be ``anomalous.'' The entrance channel mass asymmetry dependence of the anisotropies as observed here is consistent with the expectations of preequilibrium fission dynamics. This result emphasizes the importance of preequilibrium fission in heavy-ion induced fusion-fission reactions.

  18. Tracking Transitions in Spider Wrapping Silk Conformation and Dynamics by (19)F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Muzaddid; Orrell, Kathleen E; Xu, Lingling; Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Bak, Jessi J; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2016-05-31

    Aciniform silk protein (AcSp1) is the primary component of wrapping silk, the toughest of the spider silks because of a combination of high tensile strength and extensibility. Argiope trifasciata AcSp1 contains a core repetitive domain with at least 14 homogeneous 200-amino acid units ("W" units). Upon fibrillogenesis, AcSp1 converts from an α-helix-rich soluble state to a mixed α-helical/β-sheet conformation. Solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allowed demonstration of variable local stability within the W unit, but comprehensive characterization was confounded by spectral overlap, which was exacerbated by decreased chemical shift dispersion upon denaturation. Here, (19)F NMR spectroscopy, in the context of a single W unit (W1), is applied to track changes in structure and dynamics. Four strategic positions in the W unit were mutated to tryptophan and biosynthetically labeled with 5-fluorotryptophan (5F-Trp). Simulated annealing-based structure calculations implied that these substitutions should be tolerated, while circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and (1)H-(15)N chemical shift displacements indicated minimal structural perturbation in W1 mutants. Fiber formation by W2 concatemers containing 5F-Trp substitutions in both W units demonstrated retention of functionality, a somewhat surprising finding in light of sequence conservation between species. Each 5F-Trp-labeled W1 exhibited a unique (19)F chemical shift, line width, longitudinal relaxation time constant (T1), and solvent isotope shift. Perturbation to (19)F chemical shift and nuclear spin relaxation parameters reflected changes in the conformation and dynamics at each 5F-Trp site upon addition of urea and dodecylphosphocholine (DPC). (19)F NMR spectroscopy allowed unambiguous localized tracking throughout titration with each perturbant, demonstrating distinct behavior for each perturbant not previously revealed by heteronuclear NMR experiments. PMID:27153372

  19. Bulk magnetic susceptibility induced broadening in the 19F NMR of suspended leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Adebodun, F; Post, J F

    1993-01-01

    The relevance of bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) induced broadening to in vivo NMR studies of intact cells has been examined and the significance of the contribution of BMS difference to the resolution of intra- and extracellular resonances was demonstrated. BMS difference between intra- and extracellular compartments was found to limit the resolution of intra- and extracellular 19F resonances of fluoro compounds in leukemic cells. PMID:8499242

  20. Parallel NMR spectroscopy with simultaneous detection of (1) H and (19) F nuclei.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Helena; Kupče, Ēriks

    2016-07-01

    Recording NMR signals of several nuclear species simultaneously by using parallel receivers provides more information from a single measurement and at the same time increases the measurement sensitivity per unit time. Here we present a comprehensive series of the most frequently used NMR experiments modified for simultaneous direct detection of two of the most sensitive NMR nuclei - (1) H and (19) F. We hope that the presented material will stimulate interest in and further development of this technique. PMID:27021630

  1. Dark matter spin-dependent limits for WIMP interactions on 19F by PICASSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, S.; Aubin, F.; Auger, M.; Behnke, E.; Beltran, B.; Clark, K.; Dai, X.; Davour, A.; Farine, J.; Faust, R.; Genest, M.-H.; Giroux, G.; Gornea, R.; Krauss, C.; Kumaratunga, S.; Lawson, I.; Leroy, C.; Lessard, L.; Levy, C.; Levine, I.; MacDonald, R.; Martin, J.-P.; Nadeau, P.; Noble, A.; Piro, M.-C.; Pospisil, S.; Shepherd, T.; Starinski, N.; Stekl, I.; Storey, C.; Wichoski, U.; Zacek, V.

    2009-11-01

    The PICASSO experiment at SNOLAB reports new results for spin-dependent WIMP interactions on 19F using the superheated droplet technique. A new generation of detectors and new features which enable background discrimination via the rejection of non-particle induced events are described. First results are presented for a subset of two detectors with target masses of 19F of 65 g and 69 g respectively and a total exposure of 13.75 ± 0.48 kgd. No dark matter signal was found and for WIMP masses around 24 GeV /c2 new limits have been obtained on the spin-dependent cross section on 19F of σF = 13.9 pb (90% C.L.) which can be converted into cross section limits on protons and neutrons of σp = 0.16 pb and σn = 2.60 pb respectively (90% C.L.). The obtained limits on protons restrict recent interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulations in terms of spin-dependent interactions.

  2. First evidences for 19F(α, p)22Ne at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D’Agata, G.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; Blagus, S.; Figuera, P.; Grassi, L.; Guardo, G. L.; Gulino, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Indelicato, I.; Kshetri, R.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Lattuada, M.; Mijatović, T.; Milin, M.; Miljanic, D.; Prepolec, L.; Sergi, M. L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Tokic, V.; Tumino, A.; Uroic, M.

    2016-04-01

    19F experimental abundances is overestimated in respect to the theoretical one: it is therefore clear that further investigations are needed. We focused on the 19F(α, p) 22 Ne reaction, representing the main destruction channel in He-rich environments. The lowest energy at which this reaction has been studied with direct methods is E C.M. ≈ 0.91 MeV, while the Gamow region is between 0.39 ÷ 0.8 MeV, far below the Coulomb barrier (3.8 MeV). For this reason, an experiment at Rudjer Boskovic Institute (Zagreb) was performed, applying the Trojan Horse Method. Following this method we selected the quasi-free contribution coming from 6Li(19 F,p22 Ne)2 H at Ebeam=6 MeV at kinematically favourable angles, and the cross section at energies 0 < EC.M. < 1.4 MeV was extracted in arbitrary units, covering the astrophysical region of interest.

  3. Experience of pulse oximetry in children with croup.

    PubMed

    Stoney, P J; Chakrabarti, M K

    1991-04-01

    We report our experience with 199 patients requiring admission with a diagnosis of croup over an 18 month period. The value of using pulse oximetry to monitor these children was critically examined. Twenty-nine patients with clinically significant stridor were monitored for an average of 12 hours. There was poor correlation of clinical status and respiratory rate with hypoxia as shown by the technique, with frequent dips in oxygen saturation being caused by technical problems such as movement artefact. Pulse oximetry is a useful adjunct to the clinical assessment of croup, but cannot be relied upon solely for monitoring these labile patients. PMID:2026945

  4. Strategies to enhance signal intensity with paramagnetic fluorine-labelled lanthanide complexes as probes for 19F magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Kirsten H; Botta, Mauro; Parker, David

    2011-01-28

    The synthesis and (19)F NMR spectroscopic properties are reported for three series of CF(3)-labelled lanthanide(III) complexes, based on mono- and diamide cyclen ligands. Analyses of variable temperature, pH and field (19)F, (17)O and (1)H NMR spectroscopic experiments are reported and the merits of a triphosphinate mono-amide complex defined by virtue of its favourable isomer distribution and attractive relaxation properties. These lead to an enhanced sensitivity of detection in (19)F magnetic resonance experiments versus a diamagnetic Y(III) analogue, paving the way for future shift and imaging studies. PMID:21127807

  5. Fluorinated Boronic Acid-Appended Bipyridinium Salts for Diol Recognition and Discrimination via (19)F NMR Barcodes.

    PubMed

    Axthelm, Jörg; Görls, Helmar; Schubert, Ulrich S; Schiller, Alexander

    2015-12-16

    Fluorinated boronic acid-appended benzyl bipyridinium salts, derived from 4,4'-, 3,4'-, and 3,3'-bipyridines, were synthesized and used to detect and differentiate diol-containing analytes at physiological conditions via (19)F NMR spectroscopy. An array of three water-soluble boronic acid receptors in combination with (19)F NMR spectroscopy discriminates nine diol-containing bioanalytes--catechol, dopamine, fructose, glucose, glucose-1-phosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, galactose, lactose, and sucrose--at low mM concentrations. Characteristic (19)F NMR fingerprints are interpreted as two-dimensional barcodes without the need of multivariate analysis techniques. PMID:26595191

  6. TANKS 18 AND 19-F EQUIPMENT GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-12-15

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) intends to remove Tanks 18-F and 19-F at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from service. The high-level waste (HLW) tanks have been isolated from the F-area Tank Farm (FTF) facilities and will be filled with cementitious grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the empty volumes in the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways from the surface to residual waste on the bottom of the tanks, (3) providing an intruder barrier, and (4) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to limit solubility of residual radionuclides. Bulk waste and heel waste removal equipment will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F when the tanks are closed. This equipment includes: mixer pumps, transfer pumps, transfer jets, equipment support masts, sampling masts and dip tube assemblies. The current Tank 18-F and 19-F closure strategy is to grout the internal void spaces in this equipment to eliminate fast vertical pathways and slow water infiltration to the residual material on the tank floor. This report documents the results of laboratory testing performed to identify a grout formulation for filling the abandoned equipment in Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The objective of this work was to formulate a flowable grout for filling internal voids of equipment that will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F during the final closures. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, Tank Farm Closure Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The scope for this task is provided in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Prepare and evaluate the SRR cooling coil grout identified in WSRC-STI-2008-00298 per the TTR for this work. The cooling coil grout is a mixture of BASF MasterFlow{reg_sign} 816 cable grout (67.67 wt. %), Grade 100 ground granulated blast furnace slag (7.52 wt. %) and water (24.81 wt. %); (2) Identify equipment grout placement and

  7. Solid-state (19)F-NMR of peptides in native membranes.

    PubMed

    Koch, Katja; Afonin, Sergii; Ieronimo, Marco; Berditsch, Marina; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-01-01

    To understand how membrane-active peptides (MAPs) function in vivo, it is essential to obtain structural information about them in their membrane-bound state. Most biophysical approaches rely on the use of bilayers prepared from synthetic phospholipids, i.e. artificial model membranes. A particularly successful structural method is solid-state NMR, which makes use of macroscopically oriented lipid bilayers to study selectively isotope-labelled peptides. Native biomembranes, however, have a far more complex lipid composition and a significant non-lipidic content (protein and carbohydrate). Model membranes, therefore, are not really adequate to address questions concerning for example the selectivity of these membranolytic peptides against prokaryotic vs eukaryotic cells, their varying activities against different bacterial strains, or other related biological issues.Here, we discuss a solid-state (19)F-NMR approach that has been developed for structural studies of MAPs in lipid bilayers, and how this can be translated to measurements in native biomembranes. We review the essentials of the methodology and discuss key objectives in the practice of (19)F-labelling of peptides. Furthermore, the preparation of macroscopically oriented biomembranes on solid supports is discussed in the context of other membrane models. Two native biomembrane systems are presented as examples: human erythrocyte ghosts as representatives of eukaryotic cell membranes, and protoplasts from Micrococcus luteus as membranes from Gram-positive bacteria. Based on our latest experimental experience with the antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S, the benefits and some implicit drawbacks of using such supported native membranes in solid-state (19)F-NMR analysis are discussed. PMID:21598096

  8. Cerebral blood flow in experimental ischemia assessed by sup 19 F magnetic resonance spectroscopy in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, A.; Nagashima, G.; Bizzi, A.; DesPres, D.J. )

    1990-10-01

    We evaluated a 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopic technique that detects Freon-23 washout as a means of measuring cerebral blood flow in halothane-anesthetized adult cats during and after transient cerebral ischemia produced by vascular occlusion. The experiments were performed to test the ability of this recently developed method to detect postischemic flow deficits. Results were consistent with postischemic hypoperfusion. The method also proved valuable for measuring small residual flow during vascular occlusion. Our experiments indicate that this method provides simple, rapid, and repeatable flow measurements that can augment magnetic resonance examinations of cerebral metabolic parameters in the study of ischemia.

  9. Measuring 19F(α,n) with VANDLE for Nuclear Safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, William; Clement, R. C. C.; Smith, M. S.; Pain, S. D.; Thompson, S.; Cizewski, J. A.; Reingold, C.; Manning, B.; Burcher, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Tan, W.-P.; Stech, E.; Smith, M. K.; Smith, K.; Avetisyan, R.; Long, A.; Battaglia, A.; Marley, S.; Gyurjinyan, A.; Ilyushkin, S.; O'Malley, P. D.; Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Taylor, S.; Febbraro, M.

    2014-09-01

    UF6 is used in many parts of the Uranium Fuel Cycle, and various techniques are used by nonproliferation agencies to monitor and account for the material. One of the most promising non-destructive assay (NDA) methods consists of measuring gross neutron rates induced by uranium-decay alpha particles reacting with the fluorine and emitting a neutron. This method, however, currently lacks reliable nuclear data on the 19F(α,n) reaction cross section to determine an accurate neutron yield rate for a given sample of UF6. We have used the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) to measure the cross section and coincident neutron spectrum over an energy range pertinent to NDA in a two part experiment: First at Notre Dame with a LaF3 target and a pulsed alpha-particle beam, and second at ORNL with a windowless He-gas target and a 19F beam. The motivation for this measurement and preliminary results will be presented. UF6 is used in many parts of the Uranium Fuel Cycle, and various techniques are used by nonproliferation agencies to monitor and account for the material. One of the most promising non-destructive assay (NDA) methods consists of measuring gross neutron rates induced by uranium-decay alpha particles reacting with the fluorine and emitting a neutron. This method, however, currently lacks reliable nuclear data on the 19F(α,n) reaction cross section to determine an accurate neutron yield rate for a given sample of UF6. We have used the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) to measure the cross section and coincident neutron spectrum over an energy range pertinent to NDA in a two part experiment: First at Notre Dame with a LaF3 target and a pulsed alpha-particle beam, and second at ORNL with a windowless He-gas target and a 19F beam. The motivation for this measurement and preliminary results will be presented. This work is funded in part by NSF Grant 1068192, DOE Office of Science, and the NNSA Office of Defense Nuclear

  10. /sup 19/F shielding anisotropy in RbCaF/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect

    Kaliaperumal, R.; Sears, R.E.J.; Finch, C.B.

    1987-07-01

    A /sup 19/F NMR multipulse measurement of the chemical shift in a single crystal of cubic RbCaF/sub 3/ gave -47.0 +- 3 ppm as the isotropic value with respect to C/sub 6/F/sub 6/, and 128.7 +- 6 ppm as the anisotropy. The shielding is accounted for by the usual diamagnetic and paramagnetic ionic overlap and covalent terms. As a result, the Ca/sup + +/ -F/sup -/ bond is estimated to be 98% ionic. No significant spectral changes were found when the crystal was cooled below the cubic to tetragonal phase transition temperature. Reasons for this are given.

  11. Simultaneous 19F-1H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02 mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5 mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a 1H Larmor frequency of 43.32 MHz and 40.68 MHz for 19F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating 19F and 1H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500 MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02 mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ (1H) = 0.335 mol L-1 and LOQ (19F) = 0.130 mol L-1 for trifluoroethanol in

  12. Simultaneous (19)F-(1)H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-10-18

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a (1)H Larmor frequency of 43.32MHz and 40.68MHz for (19)F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating (19)F and (1)H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ ((1)H)=0.335molL(-1) and LOQ ((19)F)=0.130molL(-1) for trifluoroethanol

  13. Fission fragment angular distributions for the system 19F+232Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailas, S.; Navin, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Singh, P.; Choudhury, R. K.; Saxena, A.; Nadkarni, D. M.; Kapoor, S. S.; Ramamurthy, V. S.; Nayak, B. K.; Suryanarayana, S. V.

    1991-03-01

    The fission fragment angular distributions for the system 19F+232Th have been measured at several bombarding energies between 94 and 108 MeV. Even though the anisotropy values measured in the present work are considerably smaller than the ones reported by Zhang et al. for the same system at similar energies, they are still anomalous when compared with the predictions of the standard saddle-point statistical model and fit into the systematics of entrance-channel dependence of fission anisotropies reported by us earlier.

  14. Characterisation and evaluation of paramagnetic fluorine labelled glycol chitosan conjugates for (19)F and (1)H magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Elena; Harvey, Peter; Chalmers, Kirsten H; Mishra, Anurag; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Wilson, J Ian; Botta, Mauro; Fekete, Marianna; Blamire, Andrew M; Parker, David

    2014-02-01

    Medium molecular weight glycol chitosan conjugates have been prepared, linked by an amide bond to paramagnetic Gd(III), Ho(III) and Dy(III) macrocyclic complexes in which a trifluoromethyl reporter group is located 6.5 Å from the paramagnetic centre. The faster relaxation of the observed nucleus allows modified pulse sequences to be used with shorter acquisition times. The polydisperse materials have been characterised by gel permeation chromatography, revealing an average molecular weight on the order of 13,800 (Gd), 14,600 (Dy) and 16,200 (Ho), consistent with the presence of 8.5, 9.5 and 13 complexes, respectively. The gadolinium conjugate was prepared for both a q = 1 monoamide tricarboxylate conjugate (r1p 11.2 mM(-1) s(-1), 310 K, 1.4 T) and a q = 0 triphosphinate system, and conventional contrast-enhanced proton MRI studies at 7 T were undertaken in mice bearing an HT-29 or an HCT-116 colorectal tumour xenograft (17 μmol/kg). Enhanced contrast was observed following injection in the tail vein in tumour tissue, with uptake also evident in the liver and kidney with a tumour-to-liver ratio of 2:1 at 13 min, and large amounts in the kidney and bladder consistent with predominant renal clearance. Parallel experiments observing the (19)F resonance in the holmium conjugate complex using a surface coil did not succeed owing to its high R2 value (750 Hz, 7 T). However, the fluorine signal in the dysprosium triphosphinate chitosan conjugate [R1/R2 = 0.6 and R1 = 145 Hz (7 T)] was sharper and could be observed in vivo at -65.7 ppm, following intravenous tail vein injection of a dose of 34 μmol/kg. PMID:23955558

  15. Self-Assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles Designed as Imaging Probes for 19F and Relaxation-Enhanced 1H imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preslar, Adam Truett

    This work incorporates whole-body imaging functionality into peptide amphiphile (PA) nanostructures used for regenerative medicine to facilitate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two strategies were employed: 1. Conjugation of gadolinium chelates to peptide nanostructures to monitor biomaterial degradation in vivo with MRI and inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) 2. Synthesis of perfluorinated moiety-bearing peptide amphiphiles for 19F-MRI. The Gd(III) chelate gadoteridol was conjugated by copper-catalyzed "click" chemistry to a series of PAs known to form cylindrical nanostructures. By fitting nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion (NMRD) profiles to the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) equations, it was observed that the water exchange parameter (tauM) depended on thermal annealing or calcium ion cross-linking. The sequence C16V 3A3E3G(Gd) exhibited an acceleration of nearly 100 ns after thermal annealing and calcium addition. These gadolinium-labeled PAs were used to track in vivo degradation of gels within the tibialis anterior muscle in a murine model. The half-life of biomaterial degradation was determined to be 13.5 days by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) of Gd(III). Gel implants could be monitored by MRI for eight days before the signal dispersed due to implant degradation and dilution. Additionally, nanostructures incorporating highly fluorinated domains were investigated for use as MRI contrast agents. Short, perfluoroalkyane tails of seven or eight carbon atoms in length were grafted to PA sequences containing a V2A2 beta-sheet forming sequence. The V2A2 sequence is known to drive 1D nanostructure assembly. It was found that the sequences C7F13V2A 2E2 and C7F13V2A 2K3 formed 1D assemblies in water which transition from ribbon-like to cylindrical shape as pH increases from 4.5 to 8.0. Ribbon-like nanostructures had reduced magnetic resonance signal by T 2 relaxation quenching, whereas their cylindrical counterparts

  16. Correlation between 19F environment and isotropic chemical shift in barium and calcium fluoroaluminates.

    PubMed

    Body, M; Silly, G; Legein, C; Buzaré, J-Y

    2004-04-19

    High-speed MAS (19)F NMR spectra are recorded and reconstructed for 10 compounds from BaF(2)-AlF(3) and CaF(2)-AlF(3) binary systems which leads to the determination of 77 isotropic (19)F chemical shifts in various environments. A first attribution of NMR lines is performed for 8 compounds using a superposition model as initially proposed by B. Bureau et al. The phenomenological parameters of this model are then refined to improve the NMR line assignment. A satisfactory reliability is reached with a root-mean-square (RMS) deviation between calculated and measured values equal to 6 ppm. The refined parameters are then successfully tested on alpha-BaCaAlF(7) whose structure was recently determined. Finally, the isotropic chemical shift ranges are defined for shared, unshared, and "free" fluorine atoms encountered in the investigated binary systems. So, the fluorine surroundings can be deduced from the NMR line positions in compounds whose structure is unknown. Such an approach can also be applied to fluoride glasses. PMID:15074964

  17. A comparative study of 1H and 19F Overhauser DNP in fluorinated benzenes.

    PubMed

    Neudert, Oliver; Mattea, Carlos; Spiess, Hans Wolfgang; Stapf, Siegfried; Münnemann, Kerstin

    2013-12-21

    Hyperpolarization techniques, such as Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), can provide a dramatic increase in the signal obtained from nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and may therefore enable new applications where sensitivity is a limiting factor. In this contribution, studies of the (1)H and (19)F Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization enhancements at 345 mT are presented for three different aromatic solvents with the TEMPO radical for a range of radical concentrations. Furthermore, nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion measurements of the same solutions are analyzed, showing contributions from dipolar and scalar coupling modulated by translational diffusion and different coupling efficiency for different solvents and nuclei. Measurements of the electron paramagnetic resonance linewidth are included to support the analysis of the DNP saturation factor for varying radical concentration. The results of our study give an insight into the characteristics of nitroxide radicals as polarizing agents for (19)F Overhauser DNP of aromatic fluorinated solvents. Furthermore, we compare our results with the findings of the extensive research on Overhauser DNP that was conducted in the past for a large variety of other radicals. PMID:24192645

  18. Study of fluorine in silicate glass with 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, T. M.; Douglass, D. C.; Csencsits, R.; Walker, K. L.

    1986-07-01

    We report an application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to the study of fluorine-doped silicate glass prepared by the modified chemical vapor deposition process, prior to drawing the rod into fibers. The silica contains 1.03-wt. % fluorine, as determined by the calibrated intensity of the 19F NMR spectrum. The isotropic chemical shift of the 19F spectrum shows that fluorine bonds only to silicon; there is no evidence of oxyfluorides. Analysis of the distribution of nuclear dipolar couplings between fluorine nuclei reveals that the relative populations of silicon monofluoride sites [Si(O-)3F] and species having near-neighbor fluorines, such as silicon difluoride sites [Si(O-)2F2], are nearly statistically random. That is, to a good approximation, the fluorine substitutes randomly into the oxygen sites of the silica network. There is no evidence of local clusters of fluorine sites, silicon trifluoride sites [Si(O-)F3], or silicon tetrafluoride (SiF4).

  19. Measurement of the 19F(α,n)22Na Cross Section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Marcus; Smith, M. S.; Pain, S.; Febbraro, M.; Pittman, S.; Chipps, K. A.; Thompson, S. J.; Grinder, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Smith, K.; Thornsberry, C.; Thompson, P.; Peters, W. A.; Waddell, D.; Blanchard, R.; Carls, A.; Shadrick, S.; Engelhardt, A.; Hertz-Kintish, D.; Allen, N.; Sims, H.

    2015-10-01

    Enriched uranium is commonly stored in fluoride matrices such as UF6. Alpha decays of uranium in UF6 will create neutrons via the 19F(α,n)22Na reaction. An improved cross section for this reaction will enable improved nondestructive assays of uranium content in storage cylinders at material enrichment facilities. To determine this reaction cross section, we have performed experiments using both forward and inverse kinematic techniques at the University of Notre Dame (forward) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (inverse). Both experiments utilized the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) for neutron detection. The ORNL experiment also used a new ionization chamber for 22Na particle identification. Gating on the 22Na nuclei detected drastically reduced the background counts in the neutron time-of-flight spectra. The latest analysis and results will be presented for 19F beam energies ranging from 20-37 MeV. This work is funded in part by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics, the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation R&D, and the NSF.

  20. Dark matter spin-dependent limits for WIMP interactions on 19F by PICASSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltran, Berta; Picasso Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The PICASSO experiment at SNOLAB uses super-heated C4F10 droplets suspended in a gel as a target sensitive to WIMP-proton spin-dependent elastic scattering. The phase II setup has been improved substantially in sensitivity by using an array of 32 detectors with an active mass of ~65 g each and largely reduced background. First results are presented for a subset of two detectors with target masses of 19F of 65 g and 69 g respectively and a total exposure of 13.75 ± 0.48 kgd. No dark matter signal was found and for WIMP masses around 24 GeV/c2 new limits have been obtained on the spin-dependent cross section on 19F of σF = 13.9 pb (90% C.L.) which can be converted into cross section limits on protons and neutrons of σp = 0.15 pb and σn = 2.45 pb respectively (90% C.L). The obtained limits on protons restrict recent interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulations in terms of spin-dependent interactions.

  1. {sup 19}F NMR measurements of NO production in hypertensive ISIAH and OXYS rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bobko, Andrey A. . E-mail: bobko@kinetics.nsc.ru; Sergeeva, Svetlana V.; Bagryanskaya, Elena G.; Markel, Arkadii L.; Khramtsov, Valery V.; Reznikov, Vladimir A.; Kolosova, Nataljya G.

    2005-05-06

    Recently we demonstrated the principal possibility of application of {sup 19}F NMR spin-trapping technique for in vivo {sup {center_dot}}NO detection [Free Radic. Biol. Med. 36 (2004) 248]. In the present study, we employed this method to elucidate the significance of {sup {center_dot}}NO availability in animal models of hypertension. In vivo {sup {center_dot}}NO-induced conversion of the hydroxylamine of the fluorinated nitronyl nitroxide (HNN) to the hydroxylamine of the iminonitroxide (HIN) in hypertensive ISIAH and OXYS rat strains and normotensive Wistar rat strain was measured. Significantly lower HIN/HNN ratios were measured in the blood of the hypertensive rats. The NMR data were found to positively correlate with the levels of nitrite/nitrate evaluated by Griess method and negatively correlate with the blood pressure. In comparison with other traditionally used methods {sup 19}F NMR spectroscopy allows in vivo evaluation of {sup {center_dot}}NO production and provides the basis for in vivo {sup {center_dot}}NO imaging.

  2. TANK 18-F AND 19-F TANK FILL GROUT SCALE UP TEST SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2012-01-03

    High-level waste (HLW) tanks 18-F and 19-F have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure the tanks will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) entombing waste removal equipment, (4) discouraging future intrusion, and (5) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. This report documents the results of a four cubic yard bulk fill scale up test on the grout formulation recommended for filling Tanks 18-F and 19-F. Details of the scale up test are provided in a Test Plan. The work was authorized under a Technical Task Request (TTR), HLE-TTR-2011-008, and was performed according to Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The bulk fill scale up test described in this report was intended to demonstrate proportioning, mixing, and transportation, of material produced in a full scale ready mix concrete batch plant. In addition, the material produced for the scale up test was characterized with respect to fresh properties, thermal properties, and compressive strength as a function of curing time.

  3. Dissection of the ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme using 19F NMR

    PubMed Central

    Hammann, Christian; Norman, David G.; Lilley, David M. J.

    2001-01-01

    We have used 19F NMR to analyze the metal ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme by selective incorporation of 5fluorouridine. We have studied the chemical shift and linewidths of 19F resonances of 5-fluorouridine at the 4 and 7 positions in the ribozyme core as a function of added Mg2+. The data fit well to a simple two-state model whereby the formation of domain 1 is induced by the noncooperative binding of Mg2+ with an association constant in the range of 100 to 500 M−1, depending on the concentration of monovalent ions present. The results are in excellent agreement with data reporting on changes in the global shape of the ribozyme. However, the NMR experiments exploit reporters located in the center of the RNA sections undergoing the folding transitions, thereby allowing the assignment of specific nucleotides to the separate stages. The results define the folding pathway at high resolution and provide a time scale for the first transition in the millisecond range. PMID:11331743

  4. Resolution of Oligomeric Species during the Aggregation of Aβ1-40 Using 19F NMR

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yuta; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Soper, Molly T.; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Zhou, Yunlong; Ruotolo, Brandon T.; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Marsh, E. Neil G.

    2013-01-01

    In the commonly used nucleation-dependent model of protein aggregation, aggregation proceeds only after a lag phase in which the concentration of energetically unfavorable nuclei reaches a critical value. The formation of oligomeric species prior to aggregation can be difficult to detect by current spectroscopic techniques. By using real-time 19F NMR along with other techniques, we are able to show that multiple oligomeric species can be detected during the lag phase of Aβ1-40 fiber formation, consistent with a complex mechanism of aggregation. At least 6 types of oligomers can be detected by 19F NMR. These include the reversible formation of large β-sheet oligomer immediately after solubilization at high peptide concentration; a small oligomer that forms transiently during the early stages of the lag phase; and 4 spectroscopically distinct forms of oligomers with molecular weights between ~30–100 kDa that appear during the later stages of aggregation. The ability to resolve individual oligomers and track their formation in real-time should prove fruitful in understanding the aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins and in isolating potentially toxic non-amyloid oligomers. PMID:23445400

  5. Measured 19F(α,n) with VANDLE for Nuclear Safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, William; Clement, R. C. C.; Smith, M. S.; Pain, S.; Febbraro, M.; Pittman, S.; Thomspon, S.; Grinder, M.; Cizewski, J. A.; Reingold, C.; Manning, B.; Burcher, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Tan, W.-P.; Stech, E.; Smith, M. K.; Avetisyan, R.; Gyurjinyan, A.; Lowe, M.; Ilyushkin, S.; Grzywacz, R.; Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Taylor, S. Z.; Smith, K.

    2015-10-01

    One of the most promising non-destructive assay (NDA) methods to monitor UF6 canisters consists of measuring gross neutron rates induced by uranium-decay alpha particles reacting with the fluorine and emitting a neutron. This method currently lacks reliable nuclear data on the 19F(α,n) reaction cross section to determine an accurate neutron yield rate for a given sample of UF6. We have measured the cross section and coincident neutron spectrum for the alpha-decay energy range using the VANDLE system. This experiment had two parts: first at Notre Dame with a LaF3 target and and a pulsed alpha-particle beam, and second at ORNL with a windowless He-gas target and a 19F beam. The motivation for this measurement and cross section results will be presented. This work is funded in part by the DOE Office of Science, the National Nuclear Security Administration SSAA and the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation R&D, and the NSF.

  6. Heteronuclear 19F-1H statistical total correlation spectroscopy as a tool in drug metabolism: study of flucloxacillin biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Keun, Hector C; Athersuch, Toby J; Beckonert, Olaf; Wang, Yulan; Saric, Jasmina; Shockcor, John P; Lindon, John C; Wilson, Ian D; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2008-02-15

    We present a novel application of the heteronuclear statistical total correlation spectroscopy (HET-STOCSY) approach utilizing statistical correlation between one-dimensional 19F/1H NMR spectroscopic data sets collected in parallel to study drug metabolism. Parallel one-dimensional (1D) 800 MHz 1H and 753 MHz 19F{1H} spectra (n = 21) were obtained on urine samples collected from volunteers (n = 6) at various intervals up to 24 h after oral dosing with 500 mg of flucloxacillin. A variety of statistical relationships between and within the spectroscopic datasets were explored without significant loss of the typically high 1D spectral resolution, generating 1H-1H STOCSY plots, and novel 19F-1H HET-STOCSY, 19F-19F STOCSY, and 19F-edited 1H-1H STOCSY (X-STOCSY) spectroscopic maps, with a resolution of approximately 0.8 Hz/pt for both nuclei. The efficient statistical editing provided by these methods readily allowed the collection of drug metabolic data and assisted structure elucidation. This approach is of general applicability for studying the metabolism of other fluorine-containing drugs, including important anticancer agents such as 5-fluorouracil and flutamide, and is extendable to any drug metabolism study where there is a spin-active X-nucleus (e.g., 13C, 15N, 31P) label present. PMID:18211034

  7. TANK 18 AND 19-F TIER 1A EQUIPMENT FILL MOCK UP TEST SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-04

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) has determined that Tanks 18-F and 19-F have met the F-Tank Farm (FTF) General Closure Plan Requirements and are ready to be permanently closed. The high-level waste (HLW) tanks have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure they will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) discouraging future intrusion, and (4) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. Bulk waste removal and heel removal equipment remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F. This equipment includes the Advance Design Mixer Pump (ADMP), transfer pumps, transfer jets, standard slurry mixer pumps, equipment-support masts, sampling masts, dip tube assemblies and robotic crawlers. The present Tank 18 and 19-F closure strategy is to grout the equipment in place and eliminate vertical pathways by filling voids in the equipment to vertical fast pathways and water infiltration. The mock-up tests described in this report were intended to address placement issues identified for grouting the equipment that will be left in Tank 18-F and Tank 19-F. The Tank 18-F and 19-F closure strategy document states that one of the Performance Assessment (PA) requirements for a closed tank is that equipment remaining in the tank be filled to the extent practical and that vertical flow paths 1 inch and larger be grouted. The specific objectives of the Tier 1A equipment grout mock-up testing include: (1) Identifying the most limiting equipment configurations with respect to internal void space filling; (2) Specifying and constructing initial test geometries and forms that represent scaled boundary conditions; (3) Identifying a target grout rheology for evaluation in the scaled mock-up configurations; (4) Scaling-up production of a grout mix with the target rheology

  8. 19F NMR measurements of the rotational mobility of proteins in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S P; Haggie, P M; Brindle, K M

    1997-01-01

    Three glycolytic enzymes, hexokinase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and pyruvate kinase, were fluorine labeled in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by biosynthetic incorporation of 5-fluorotryptophan. 19F NMR longitudinal relaxation time measurements on the labeled enzymes were used to assess their rotational mobility in the intact cell. Comparison with the results obtained from relaxation time measurements of the purified enzymes in vitro and from theoretical calculations showed that two of the labeled enzymes, phosphoglycerate kinase and hexokinase, were tumbling in a cytoplasm that had a viscosity approximately twice that of water. There were no detectable signals from pyruvate kinase in vivo, although it could be detected in diluted cell extracts, indicating that there was some degree of motional restriction of the enzyme in the intact cell. PMID:8994636

  9. Measurement of the 19F(α,n) Cross Section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingold, C. S.; Cizewski, J. A.; Peters, W. A.; Clement, R. R. C.; Bardayan, D. W.; Smith, M. S.; Stech, E.; Strauss, S.; Tan, W. P.; Wiescher, M.; Madurga, M.; Vandle Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A precise measurement of the 19F(α,n) cross section will improve Non Destructive Assays (NDA) of UF6 and other actinide-fluoride samples via neutron detection techniques. We will determine the cross section with two complementary approaches. First, we will bombard a LaF3 target with a pulsed 4He beam from the Notre Dame FN tandem accelerator; second, we will send a fluorine beam from the ORNL tandem through a pure helium gas target. The neutron spectra from both of these reactions will be measured using the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE), and coincident γ rays with a HPGe detector. We report here on data taken with VANDLE and a HPGe detector on a LaF3 target. My poster outlines the motivation for this experiment, explains the stages of this experiment, the current experimental setup, and preliminary data. This work is supported by the NNSA.

  10. Tanks 18 And 19-F Structural Flowable Grout Fill Material Evaluation And Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.

    2013-04-23

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: 1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non-compressible material; 2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; 3) reduce contaminant mobility by a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and 4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: 1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). 2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. 3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix design. 4

  11. Efficient acid-catalyzed (18) F/(19) F fluoride exchange of BODIPY dyes.

    PubMed

    Keliher, Edmund J; Klubnick, Jenna A; Reiner, Thomas; Mazitschek, Ralph; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-07-01

    Fluorine-containing fluorochromes are important validation agents for positron emission tomography imaging compounds, as they can be readily validated in cells by fluorescence imaging. In particular, the (18) F-labeled BODIPY-FL fluorophore has emerged as an important platform, but little is known about alternative (18) F-labeling strategies or labeling on red-shifted fluorophores. In this study we explore acid-catalyzed (18) F/(19) F exchange on a range of commercially available N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester and maleimide BODIPY fluorophores. We show this method to be a simple and efficient (18) F-labeling strategy for a diverse span of fluorescent compounds, including a BODIPY-modified PARP-1 inhibitor, and amine- and thiol-reactive BODIPY fluorophores. PMID:24596307

  12. Magnetic Resonance Detection of CD34+ Cells from Umbilical Cord Blood Using a 19F Label

    PubMed Central

    Duinhouwer, Lucia E.; van Rossum, Bernard J. M.; van Tiel, Sandra T.; van der Werf, Ramon M.; Doeswijk, Gabriela N.; Haeck, Joost C.; Rombouts, Elwin W. J. C.; ter Borg, Mariëtte N. D.; Kotek, Gyula; Braakman, Eric; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Bernsen, Monique R.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired homing and delayed recovery upon hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) derived from umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a major problem. Tracking transplanted cells in vivo will be helpful to detect impaired homing at an early stage and allows early interventions to improve engraftment and outcome after transplantation. In this study, we show sufficient intracellular labeling of UCB-derived CD34+ cells, with 19F-containing PLGA nanoparticles which were detectable with both flow cytometry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In addition, labeled CD34+ cells maintain their capacity to proliferate and differentiate, which is pivotal for successful engraftment after transplantation in vivo. These results set the stage for in vivo tracking experiments, through which the homing efficiency of transplanted cells can be studied. PMID:26394043

  13. Transcutaneous oximetry: normal values for the lower limb.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Consistent with the Committee on Publication Ethics guidelines, we the above authors are initiating the retraction of our paper: Blake DF, Young DA, Brown LH: Transcutaneous oximetry: normal values for the lower limb. Diving Hyperb Med. 2014 September;44(3):146-153. We wish to make the following statement: "The authors voluntarily retract this article after discovering a critical error associated with the instrumentation used in the study, namely the fitting of incorrect sensor membranes on the electrodes of the transcutaneous oximetry device used in the study. This resulted in transcutaneous oxygen tension (PtcO₂) measurements that were consistently lower than those that would be recorded with the correct electrode membranes in place, which we recently confirmed by comparing the two membrane types once we discovered the error. We are in the process of replicating our work using the correct PtcO₂ specific membranes." PMID:27044466

  14. Transcutaneous oximetry measurement: normal values for the upper limb.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Consistent with the Committee on Publication Ethics guidelines, we the above authors are initiating the retraction of our paper: Young DA, Blake DF, Brown LH: Transcutaneous oximetry measurement: normal values for the upper limb. Diving Hyperb Med. 2012;42(4):208-213. We wish to make the following statement: "The authors voluntarily retract this article after discovering a critical error associated with the instrumentation used in the study, namely the fitting of incorrect sensor membranes on the electrodes of the transcutaneous oximetry device used in the study. This resulted in transcutaneous oxygen tension (PtcO₂) measurements that were consistently lower than those that would have been recorded with the correct electrode membranes in place. We recently confirmed this by comparing the two membrane types once we discovered the error. We are in the process of replicating our work using the correct PtcO₂ specific membranes." PMID:27044465

  15. Improving pulse oximetry pitch perception with multisensory perceptual training.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Joseph J; Stevenson, Ryan A; Shotwell, Matthew S; Wallace, Mark T

    2014-06-01

    The pulse oximeter is a critical monitor in anesthesia practice designed to improve patient safety. Here, we present an approach to improve the ability of anesthesiologists to monitor arterial oxygen saturation via pulse oximetry through an audiovisual training process. Fifteen residents' abilities to detect auditory changes in pulse oximetry were measured before and after perceptual training. Training resulted in a 9% (95% confidence interval, 4%-14%, P = 0.0004, t(166) = 3.60) increase in detection accuracy, and a 72-millisecond (95% confidence interval, 40-103 milliseconds, P < 0.0001, t(166) = -4.52) speeding of response times in attentionally demanding and noisy conditions that were designed to simulate an operating room. This study illustrates the benefits of multisensory training and sets the stage for further work to better define the role of perceptual training in clinical anesthesiology. PMID:24846194

  16. Intracellular free calcium concentration measured with /sup 19/F NMR spectroscopy in intact ferret hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Marban, E.; Kitakaze, M.; Kusuoka, H.; Porterfield, J.K.; Yue, D.T.; Chacko, V.P.

    1987-08-01

    Changes in the intracellular free Ca/sup 2 +/ concentration, (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/, mediate excitation-contraction coupling in the heart and contribute to cellular injury during ischemia and reperfusion. To study these processes directly, the authors measured (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ in perfused ferret (Mustela putorius furo) hearts using /sup 19/F NMR spectroscopy to detect the 5,5'-difluoro derivative of the Ca/sup 2 +/ chelator, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). To load cells, hearts were perfused with the acetoxymethyl ester derivative of 5,5'-F/sub 2/-BAPTA. They measured /sup 19/F NMR spectra and left ventricular pressure simultaneously,at rest and during pacing at various external Ca concentrations ((Ca)/sub 0/). Although contractile force was attenuated by the Ca/sup 2 +/ buffering properties of 5,5'-F/sup 2/-BAPTA, the decrease in pressure could be overcome by raising (Ca)/sub 0/. The mean value of 104 nM for (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ at rest in the perfused heart agrees well with previous measurements in isolated ventricular muscle. During pacing at 0.6-4 Hz, time-averaged (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ increased; the effect of pacing was augmented by increasing (Ca)/sub 0/. (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ more than tripled during 10-20 min of global ischemia, and returned toward control levels upon reperfusion. This approach promises to be particularly useful in investigating the physiology of intact hearts and the pathophysiology of alterations in the coronary circulation

  17. Measurement of the 19F(α,n) Cross Section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingold, C. S.; Cizewski, J. A.; Burcher, S.; Manning, B.; Peters, W. A.; Clement, R. R. C.; Smith, M. S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Stech, E.; Tan, W. P.; Madurga, M.; Ilyushkin, S.; Thompson, S.; Vandle Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    A precise measurement of the 19F(α,n) cross section will improve Non Destructive Assays (NDA) of UF6 and other actinide-fluoride samples via neutron detection techniques. The cross section will be determined with two complementary approaches. We have already bombarded a LaF3 target with a pulsed 4He beam from the Notre Dame FN tandem accelerator; next, we will send a fluorine beam from the ORNL tandem through a pure helium gas target. The neutron spectra from both of these reactions will be measured using the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE), and coincident γ rays with a HPGe detector. We report here on data taken with VANDLE and a HPGe detector on a LaF3 target. This poster outlines the motivation for this experiment, explains the stages of this experiment, and presents both of our experimental setups and preliminary data. A precise measurement of the 19F(α,n) cross section will improve Non Destructive Assays (NDA) of UF6 and other actinide-fluoride samples via neutron detection techniques. The cross section will be determined with two complementary approaches. We have already bombarded a LaF3 target with a pulsed 4He beam from the Notre Dame FN tandem accelerator; next, we will send a fluorine beam from the ORNL tandem through a pure helium gas target. The neutron spectra from both of these reactions will be measured using the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE), and coincident γ rays with a HPGe detector. We report here on data taken with VANDLE and a HPGe detector on a LaF3 target. This poster outlines the motivation for this experiment, explains the stages of this experiment, and presents both of our experimental setups and preliminary data. This work is supported by the NNSA, NSF, and DOE.

  18. Balanced UTE-SSFP for 19F MR Imaging of Complex Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Goette, Matthew J.; Keupp, Jochen; Rahmer, Jürgen; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Caruthers, Shelton D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A novel technique for highly sensitive detection of multi-resonant fluorine imaging agents was designed and tested with the use of dual-frequency 19F/1H ultra-short echo times (UTE) sampled with a balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) pulse sequence and 3D radial readout. Methods Feasibility of 3D radial balanced UTE-SSFP imaging was demonstrated for a phantom comprising liquid perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB). Sensitivity of the pulse sequence was measured and compared to other sequences imaging the PFOB (CF2)6 line group including UTE radial gradient-echo (GRE) at α=30°, as well as Cartesian GRE, balanced SSFP, and fast spin-echo (FSE). The PFOB CF3 peak was also sampled with FSE. Results The proposed balanced UTE-SSFP technique exhibited a relative detection sensitivity of 51 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2 (α=30°), at least twice that of other sequence types with either 3D radial (UTE GRE: 20 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2) or Cartesian k-space filling (GRE: 12 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2; FSE: 16 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2 balanced SSFP: 23 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2 In vivo imaging of angiogenesis-targeted PFOB nanoparticles was demonstrated in a rabbit model of cancer on a clinical 3T scanner. Conclusion A new dual 19F/1H balanced UTE-SSFP sequence manifests high SNR, with detection sensitivity more than twofold better than traditional techniques, and alleviates imaging problems caused by dephasing in complex spectra. PMID:25163853

  19. Finger blood content, light transmission, and pulse oximetry errors.

    PubMed

    Craft, T M; Lawson, R A; Young, J D

    1992-01-01

    The changes in light emitting diode current necessary to maintain a constant level of light incident upon a photodetector were measured in 20 volunteers at the two wavelengths employed by pulse oximeters. Three states of finger blood content were assessed; exsanguinated, hyperaemic, and normal. The changes in light emitting diode current with changes in finger blood content were small and are not thought to represent a significant source of error in saturation as measured by pulse oximetry. PMID:1536406

  20. Optoelectronic blood oximetry as a tool of health safety monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cysewska-Sobusiak, Anna

    2001-08-01

    A metrological approach of some selected problems connected with the significant field of biomedical optics i.e., monitoring of arterial blood oxygenation by use of the tissues as optical media exposed to the controlled light action, has been presented. The subject of the measurements based on utilization of the selection absorption properties of blood is the hemoglobin oxygen saturation. Using optoelectronic sensing allows to convert sophisticated effects of noninvasive light-living tissue interaction to electrical signals which may be convenient to measure. Pulse oximetry which is based upon such a way of sensing and processing, is the recent advance in noninvasive oximetry. The unique advantages of that marvelous diagnostic technique have caused to recommend pulse oximeters as standard equipment in intensive care and other critical situations impending hypoxemia appearance. However, end-users of the pulse oximeters not always are aware of that these devices fall under specific limitations, of both physiological and technical nature. The author of this paper is a metrologist and deals mainly with various interdisciplinary problems of a measurement reliability including the aspects such as uncertainty of an outcome accessible to the user, causes affecting sensitivity, resolution and repeatability of processing function, and response time and stability of results. Referring to the subject discussed herein, and taking into account some open questions, the author's contribution is her own experience in modeling as well as in in vivo measuring of transilluminated living objects. A proposed novel use of the known pulse oximetry concept may be considered as complementary results against a general review background of the achievements obtained in oximetry as the state-of-the-art, and furthermore, the developing studies which are still in progress.

  1. Retinal oximeter for the blue-green oximetry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denninghoff, Kurt R.; Sieluzycka, Katarzyna B.; Hendryx, Jennifer K.; Ririe, Tyson J.; Deluca, Lawrence; Chipman, Russell A.

    2011-10-01

    Retinal oximetry offers potential for noninvasive assessment of central venous oxyhemoglobin saturation (SO2) via the retinal vessels but requires a calibrated accuracy of +/-3% saturation in order to be clinically useful. Prior oximeter designs have been hampered by poor saturation calibration accuracy. We demonstrate that the blue-green oximetry (BGO) technique can provide accuracy within +/-3% in swine when multiply scattered light from blood within a retinal vessel is isolated. A noninvasive on-axis scanning retinal oximeter (ROx-3) is constructed that generates a multiwavelength image in the range required for BGO. A field stop in the detection pathway is used in conjunction with an anticonfocal bisecting wire to remove specular vessel reflections and isolate multiply backscattered light from the blood column within a retinal vessel. This design is tested on an enucleated swine eye vessel and a retinal vein in a human volunteer with retinal SO2 measurements of ~1 and ~65%, respectively. These saturations, calculated using the calibration line from earlier work, are internally consistent with a standard error of the mean of +/-2% SO2. The absolute measures are well within the expected saturation range for the site (-1 and 63%). This is the first demonstration of noninvasive on-axis BGO retinal oximetry.

  2. A hand-held EPR scanner for transcutaneous oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson, Helen; Ahmad, Rizwan; Twig, Ygal; Blank, Aharon; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2015-03-01

    Cutaneous (skin) oxygenation is an important prognostic factor for the treatment of chronic wounds, skin cancer, diabetes side effects, and limb amputation. Currently, there are no reliable methods for measuring this parameter. Oximetry, using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, is emerging as a potential tool for clinical oximetry, including cutaneous applications. The problem with EPR oximetry, however, is that the conventional EPR design requires the use of a large magnet that can generate homogeneous field across the sample, making it unattractive for clinical practice. We present a novel approach that makes use of a miniature permanent magnet, combined with a small microwave resonator, to enable the acquisition of EPR signals from paramagnetic species placed on the skin. The instrumentation consists of a hand-held, modular, cylindrical probehead with overall dimensions of 36-mm diameter and 24-mm height, with 150-g weight. The probehead includes a Halbach array of 16 pieces (4×4×8 mm3) of Sm-Co permanent magnet and a loop-gap resonator (2.24 GHz). Preliminary measurements using a Hahn-echo pulse sequence (800 echos in 20 ms) showed a signalto- noise ratio of ~70 compared to ~435 in a homogenous magnet under identical settings. Further work is in progress to improve the performance of the probehead and to optimize the hand-held system for clinical use

  3. Accuracy of retinal oximetry: a Monte Carlo investigation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenzhong; Jiao, Shuliang

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Retinal hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) level is believed to be associated with the pathophysiology of several leading blinding diseases. Methods to properly measure retinal sO2 have been investigated for decades; however, the accuracy of retinal oximetry is still considered to be limited. The Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport in retina to examine how the accuracy of retinal oximetry is affected by local parameters is discussed. Fundus photography was simulated in a multilayer retinal model, in which a single vessel segment with 0.7  sO2 was embedded, at six optical wavelengths. Then, 200 million photons were traced in each simulation to ensure statistically stable results. The optical reflectance and energy deposit were recorded to measure sO2 using both the reflection method (existing retinal oximetry) and a new absorption method, photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM). By varying the vessel diameter and melanin concentration in the retinal pigment epithelium, the relative error of sO2 measurement in the reflection method increased with increasing vessel diameter and melanin concentration; in comparison, the sO2 measurement was insensitive to these two parameters in PAOM. The results suggest that PAOM potentially can be a more accurate tool in quantifying retinal sO2. PMID:23733019

  4. Advances in Probes and Methods for Clinical EPR Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Chen, Eunice Y.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2015-01-01

    EPR oximetry, which enables reliable, accurate, and repeated measurements of the partial pressure of oxygen in tissues, provides a unique opportunity to investigate the role of oxygen in the pathogenesis and treatment of several diseases including cancer, stroke, and heart failure. Building on significant advances in the in vivo application of EPR oximetry for small animal models of disease, we are developing suitable probes and instrumentation required for use in human subjects. Our laboratory has established the feasibility of clinical EPR oximetry in cancer patients using India ink, the only material presently approved for clinical use. We now are developing the next generation of probes, which are both superior in terms of oxygen sensitivity and biocompatibility including an excellent safety profile for use in humans. Further advances include the development of implantable oxygen sensors linked to an external coupling loop for measurements of deep-tissue oxygenations at any depth, overcoming the current limitation of 10 mm. This paper presents an overview of recent developments in our ability to make meaningful measurements of oxygen partial pressures in human subjects under clinical settings. PMID:24729217

  5. Global oximetry: an international anaesthesia quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Walker, I A; Merry, A F; Wilson, I H; McHugh, G A; O'Sullivan, E; Thoms, G M; Nuevo, F; Whitaker, D K

    2009-10-01

    Pulse oximetry is mandatory during anaesthesia in many countries, a standard endorsed by the World Health Organization 'Safe Surgery Saves Lives' initiative. The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland, the World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists and GE Healthcare collaborated in a quality improvement project over a 15-month period to investigate pulse oximetry in four pilot sites in Uganda, Vietnam, India and the Philippines, using 84 donated pulse oximeters. A substantial gap in oximeter provision was demonstrated at the start of the project. Formal training was essential for oximeter-naïve practitioners. After introduction of oximeters, logbook data were collected from over 8000 anaesthetics, and responses to desaturation were judged appropriate. Anaesthesia providers believed pulse oximeters were essential for patient safety and defined characteristics of the ideal oximeter for their setting. Robust systems for supply and maintenance of low-cost oximeters are required for sustained uptake of pulse oximetry in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:19735394

  6. Accuracy of retinal oximetry: a Monte Carlo investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenzhong; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2013-06-01

    Retinal hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) level is believed to be associated with the pathophysiology of several leading blinding diseases. Methods to properly measure retinal sO have been investigated for decades; however, the accuracy of retinal oximetry is still considered to be limited. The Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport in retina to examine how the accuracy of retinal oximetry is affected by local parameters is discussed. Fundus photography was simulated in a multilayer retinal model, in which a single vessel segment with 0.7 sO2 was embedded, at six optical wavelengths. Then, 200 million photons were traced in each simulation to ensure statistically stable results. The optical reflectance and energy deposit were recorded to measure sO using both the reflection method (existing retinal oximetry) and a new absorption method, photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM). By varying the vessel diameter and melanin concentration in the retinal pigment epithelium, the relative error of sO measurement in the reflection method increased with increasing vessel diameter and melanin concentration; in comparison, the sO measurement was insensitive to these two parameters in PAOM. The results suggest that PAOM potentially can be a more accurate tool in quantifying retinal sO.

  7. ROx3: Retinal oximetry utilizing the blue-green oximetry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Jennifer Kathleen Hendryx

    The ROx is a retinal oximeter under development with the purpose of non-invasively and accurately measuring oxygen saturation (SO2) in vivo. It is novel in that it utilizes the blue-green oximetry technique with on-axis illumination. ROx calibration tests were performed by inducing hypoxia in live anesthetized swine and comparing ROx measurements to SO 2 values measured by a CO-Oximeter. Calibration was not achieved to the precision required for clinical use, but limiting factors were identified and improved. The ROx was used in a set of sepsis experiments on live pigs with the intention of tracking retinal SO2 during the development of sepsis. Though conclusions are qualitative due to insufficient calibration of the device, retinal venous SO2 is shown to trend generally with central venous SO2 as sepsis develops. The novel sepsis model developed in these experiments is also described. The method of cecal ligation and perforation with additional soiling of the abdomen consistently produced controllable severe sepsis/septic shock in a matter of hours. In addition, the ROx was used to collect retinal images from a healthy human volunteer. These experiments served as a bench test for several of the additions/modifications made to the ROx. This set of experiments specifically served to illuminate problems with various light paths and image acquisition. The analysis procedure for the ROx is under development, particularly automating the process for consistency, accuracy, and time efficiency. The current stage of automation is explained, including data acquisition processes and the automated vessel fit routine. Suggestions for the next generation of device minimization are also described.

  8. Binding energies and 19F nuclear magnetic deshielding in paramagnetic halogen-bonded complexes of TEMPO with haloperfluorocarbons.

    PubMed

    Cavallotti, Carlo; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Meyer, Franck; Recupero, Francesco; Resnati, Giuseppe

    2008-10-01

    19F NMR measurements and theoretical calculations were performed to study paramagnetic complexes of iodoperfluorocarbons with stable nitroxide radicals. Contrary to what is usually measured for diamagnetic halogen-bonded complexes involving iodoperfluorocarbons, it was found that the formation of complexes with the 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl(piperidin-1-yloxyl) (TEMPO) radical determines downfield shifts in the 19F NMR spectra. The experimental finding was confirmed by calculating nuclear shielding using density functional theory and correcting the isotropic diamagnetic (19)F chemical shift with contact interactions evaluated from the hyperfine coupling tensor. The computational analysis of the interaction between CF3I and TEMPO, by using DFT and MP2 theories, showed that the occurrence of the halogen bond between the interacting partners is associated with a significant charge transfer to CF3I and that the measured downfield shift is due to the occurring spin transfer. PMID:18795762

  9. Retinal Oximetry with Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Vehmeijer, Wouter B.; Magnusdottir, Vigdis; Eliasdottir, Thorunn S.; Hardarson, Sveinn Hakon; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; Stefánsson, Einar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dual wavelength retinal oximetry has been developed for adults, but is not available for infants. Retinal oximetry may provide insight into the pathophysiology of oxygen-mediated diseases like retinopathy of prematurity. More insight in the oxygen metabolism of the retina in infants may provide valuable clues for better understanding and subsequent prevention or treatment of the disease. The measurements of oxygen saturation are obtained with two fundus images simultaneously captured in two different wavelengths of light. The comparison in light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin can be used to estimate the oxygen saturation within the retinal vessels by means of a software algorithm. This study aims to make retinal oximetry available for neonates. The first step towards estimating retinal oxygen saturation is determining the optical density ratio. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to image healthy newborn infants with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope and determine the optical density ratio for retinal oximetry analysis. Methods Images of the retina of full-term healthy infants were obtained with an SLO, Optomap 200Tx (Optos), with two laser wavelengths (532nm and 633nm). The infant lay face down on the lower arm of the parent, while the parent supported the chest and chin with one hand, and stabilized the back with the other hand. No mydriatics or eyelid specula were used during this study. The images were analyzed with modified Oxymap Analyzer software for calculation of the Optical Density Ratio (ODR) and vessel width. The ODR is inversely and approximately linearly related to the oxygen saturation. Measurements were included from the superotemporal vessel pair. A paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results Fifty-nine infants, (58% female), were included with mean gestational age of 40 ± 1.3 weeks (mean ± SD) and mean post-natal age of 16 ± 4.8 days. A total of 28 images were selected for retinal oximetry analysis

  10. TANKS 18 AND 19-F STRUCTURAL FLOWABLE GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-01

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: (1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non compressible material; (2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; (3) reduce contaminant mobility by (a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and (b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and (4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). (2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. (3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix

  11. Using magnetic coupling to implement 1H, 19F, 13C experiments in routine high resolution NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Paul; Finnigan, Jim; Marsden, Brian; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2015-12-01

    We report in this paper the design of 1H, 19F, 13C circuitry using magnetic coupling which can do on demand experiments where one of the three nuclei is observed and the other two are decoupled. The implementation of this circuitry in routine NMR probes is compared with capacitive coupling methods where it was found that by using magnetic coupling the performance of the routine NMR probe was not impacted by the addition of this circuitry. It is surmised that using this type of circuitry would be highly desirable for those chemists doing routine 19F NMR.

  12. Binary channels of the {sup 19}F-on-{sup 12}C reaction at 92 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aissaoui, N.; Haas, F.; Freeman, R.M.; Beck, C.; Morsad, A.; Djerroud, B.; Caplar, R.; Hachem, A.

    1997-01-01

    Binary-reaction channels of {sup 19}F+{sup 12}C have been studied at E{sub lab}({sup 19}F)=92 MeV using kinematic coincidence techniques. The results are discussed in the light of previous inclusive measurements performed at the same incident energy and for which the occurrence of an important incomplete fusion mechanism after projectile breakup was proposed. Evidence for strong damped binary, especially quasisymmetric, decay processes is found. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. An overview of the 19F(p,α0)16 O reaction with direct methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell’Aquila, D.; Lombardo, I.

    2016-04-01

    The study of the 19F(p,α)16O reaction at low energy is important both for Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics. Despite of its importance, the S-factor of this reaction is poorly known, especially at astrophysical energies. We present an overview of the 19F(p,α0)16O reaction cross section, as obtained from recent direct measurements and from published works in the literature. We include in the systematic also data from an unpublished work, where several excitation functions and angular distributions for α0 and απ channels are reported.

  14. 19F-NMR reveals metal and operator-induced allostery in MerR.

    PubMed

    Song, Lingyun; Teng, Quincy; Phillips, Robert S; Brewer, John M; Summers, Anne O

    2007-08-01

    Metalloregulators of the MerR family activate transcription upon metal binding by underwinding the operator-promoter DNA to permit open complex formation by pre-bound RNA polymerase. Historically, MerR's allostery has been monitored only indirectly via nuclease sensitivity or by fluorescent nucleotide probes and was very specific for Hg(II), although purified MerR binds several thiophilic metals. To observe directly MerR's ligand-induced behavior we made 2-fluorotyrosine-substituted MerR and found similar, minor changes in (19)F chemical shifts of tyrosine residues in the free protein exposed to Hg(II), Cd(II) or Zn(II). However, DNA binding elicits large chemical shift changes in MerR's tyrosine residues and in DNA-bound MerR Hg(II) provokes changes very distinct from those of Cd(II) or Zn(II). These chemical shift changes and other biophysical and phenotypic properties of wild-type MerR and relevant mutants reveal elements of an allosteric network that enables the coordination state of the metal binding site to direct metal-specific movements in the distant DNA binding site and the DNA-bound state also to affect the metal binding domain. PMID:17560604

  15. Constraints on low-mass WIMP interactions on 19F from PICASSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, S.; Behnke, E.; Bhattacharjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dai, X.; Das, M.; Davour, A.; Debris, F.; Dhungana, N.; Farine, J.; Gagnebin, S.; Giroux, G.; Grace, E.; Jackson, C. M.; Kamaha, A.; Krauss, C.; Kumaratunga, S.; Lafrenière, M.; Laurin, M.; Lawson, I.; Lessard, L.; Levine, I.; Levy, C.; MacDonald, R. P.; Marlisov, D.; Martin, J.-P.; Mitra, P.; Noble, A. J.; Piro, M.-C.; Podviyanuk, R.; Pospisil, S.; Saha, S.; Scallon, O.; Seth, S.; Starinski, N.; Stekl, I.; Wichoski, U.; Xie, T.; Zacek, V.

    2012-05-01

    Recent results from the PICASSO dark matter search experiment at SNOLAB are reported. These results were obtained using a subset of 10 detectors with a total target mass of 0.72 kg of 19F and an exposure of 114 kgd. The low backgrounds in PICASSO allow recoil energy thresholds as low as 1.7 keV to be obtained which results in an increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below 10 GeV/c2. No dark matter signal was found. Best exclusion limits in the spin dependent sector were obtained for WIMP masses of 20 GeV/c2 with a cross section on protons of σpSD=0.032 pb (90% C.L.). In the spin independent sector close to the low mass region of 7 GeV/c2 favoured by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA, cross sections larger than σpSI=1.41×10-4 pb (90% C.L.) are excluded.

  16. Simultaneous Dual-Nuclei Imaging for Motion Corrected Detection and Quantification of 19F Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Keupp, Jochen; Rahmer, Jürgen; Grässlin, Ingmar; Mazurkewitz, Peter C.; Schaeffter, Tobias; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Caruthers, Shelton D.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorine MRI offers broad potential for specific detection and quantification of molecularly targeted agents in diagnosis and therapy planning or monitoring. Because non-proton MRI applications lack morphological information, accompanying proton images are needed to elucidate the spatial tissue context. Furthermore, low concentrations typical of targeted molecular imaging agents require long examinations for signal averaging during which physiological motion may lead to blurring, underestimation in signal quantification, and erroneous localization of the agent distribution. Novel methods for truly-simultaneous acquisition of dual-nuclei MR data are presented that offer efficient and precise anatomical localization of fluorine signals using accurate motion correction based on contemporaneous proton signals. The feasibility of simultaneous dual-nuclei MRI motion correction and corresponding dual-resolution reconstruction, providing nuclei-specific spatial resolution to retrospectively optimize the balance between signal-to-noise ratio and resolution, is shown on a clinical 3T MR system. PMID:21394779

  17. (19)F(α,n) thick target yield from 3.5 to 10.0 MeV.

    PubMed

    Norman, E B; Chupp, T E; Lesko, K T; Grant, P J; Woodruff, G L

    2015-09-01

    Using a target of PbF2, the thick-target yield from the (19)F(α,n) reaction was measured from E(α)=3.5-10 MeV. From these results, we infer the thick-target neutron yields from targets of F2 and UF6 over this same alpha-particle energy range. PMID:26115205

  18. Fluorinated Carbohydrates as Lectin Ligands: 19F-Based Direct STD Monitoring for Detection of Anomeric Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, João P.; Diercks, Tammo; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Cañada, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of the binding of reducing carbohydrates present as mixtures of anomers in solution to a sugar recepor (lectin) poses severe difficulties. In this situation, NMR spectroscopy enables the observation of signals for each anomer in the mixture by applying approaches based on ligand observation. Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR allows fast and efficient screening of compound mixtures for reactivity to a receptor. Owing to the exceptionally favorable properties of 19F in NMR spectroscopy and the often complex 1H spectra of carbohydrates, 19F-containing sugars have the potential to be turned into versatile sensors for recognition. Extending the recently established 1H → 1H STDre19F-NMR technique, we here demonstrate its applicability to measure anomeric selectivity of binding in a model system using the plant lectin concanavalin A (ConA) and 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-mannose. Indeed, it is also possible to account for the mutual inhibition between the anomers on binding to the lectin by means of a kinetic model. The monitoring of 19F-NMR signal perturbation disclosed the relative activities of the anomers in solution and thus enabled the calculation of their binding affinity towards ConA. The obtained data show a preference for the α anomer that increases with temperature. This experimental approach can be extended to others systems of biomedical interest by testing human lectins with suitably tailored glycan derivatives. PMID:26580665

  19. Energy dependence of fission fragment angular distributions for 19F, 24Mg and 28Si induced reactions on 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, M. B.; Utsunomiya, H.; Gelbke, C. K.; Lynch, W. G.; Back, B. B.; Saini, S.; Baisden, P. A.; McMahan, M. A.

    1983-09-01

    The energy dependence of fission fragment angular distributions was measured for reaction induced by 19F, 24Mg, and 28Si on 208Pb over the range of incident energies of {E}/{A} = 5.6-10 MeV. For all three systems the angular distributions are inconsistent with the saddle point deformations of the rotating liquid drop model.

  20. Angular Distribution and Angular Dispersion in Collision of 19F+27Al at 114 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Dong, Yu-Chuan; Li, Song-Lin; Duan, Li-Min; Xu, Hu-Shan; Xu, Hua-Gen; Chen, Ruo-Fu; Wu, He-Yu; Han, Jian-Long; Li, Zhi-Chang; Lu, Xiu-Qin; Zhao, Kui; Liu, Jian-Cheng; Sergey, Yu-Kun

    2004-10-01

    Angular distributions of fragments B, C, N, O, F, Ne, Na, Mg and Al induced by the collision of 19F+27Al at 114 MeV have been measured. Angular dispersion parameters are extracted from the experimental data and compared with the theoretical ones. The dynamic dispersions for dissipative products depend strongly on the charge number Z of the fragments.

  1. Visible-light optical coherence tomography for retinal oximetry.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ji; Wei, Qing; Liu, Wenzhong; Backman, Vadim; Zhang, Hao F

    2013-06-01

    We applied a visible-light spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) for in vivo retinal oximetry. To extract hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO(2)) in individual retinal vessels, we established a comprehensive analytical model to describe optical absorption, optical scattering, and blood cell packing factor in the whole blood and fit the acquired vis-OCT signals from the bottom of each imaged vessel. We found that averaged sO(2) values in arterial and venous bloods were 95% and 72%, respectively. PMID:23722747

  2. Impact of Zeolite Transferred from Tank 19F to Tank 18F on DWPF Vitrification of Sludge Batch 3

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2004-01-07

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is planning to initiate vitrification of Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) in combination with Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) in the spring of 2004. The contents of Sludge Batch 3 will be a mixture of the heel remaining from Sludge Batch 1B, sludge from Tank 7F (containing coal, sand, and sodium oxalate), and sludge materials from Tank 18F. The sludge materials in Tank 18F contain part of a mound of zeolitic material transferred there from Tank 19F. This mound was physically broken up and transfers were made from Tank 19F to Tank 18F for vitrification into SB3. In addition, excess Pu and Am/Cm materials were transferred to Tank 51H to be processed through the DWPF as part of SB3. Additional Pu material and a Np stream from the Canyons are also planned to be added to SB3 before processing of this batch commences at DWPF. The primary objective of this task was to assess the impacts of the excess zeolite mound material in Tank 19F on the predicted glass and processing properties of interest when the zeolite becomes part of SB3. The two potential impacts of the Tank 19F zeolite mound on DWPF processing relates to (1) the samples taken for determination of the acceptability of a macrobatch of DWPF feed and (2) the achievable waste loading. The potential effects of the large size of the zeolite particles found in the Tank 19F solids, as reported in this study, are considered minimal for processing of SB3 in DWPF. Other findings about the zeolite conversion mechanism via a process of Ostwald ripening are discussed in the text and in the conclusions.

  3. (19)F-labeling of the adenine H2-site to study large RNAs by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sochor, F; Silvers, R; Müller, D; Richter, C; Fürtig, B; Schwalbe, H

    2016-01-01

    In comparison to proteins and protein complexes, the size of RNA amenable to NMR studies is limited despite the development of new isotopic labeling strategies including deuteration and ligation of differentially labeled RNAs. Due to the restricted chemical shift dispersion in only four different nucleotides spectral resolution remains limited in larger RNAs. Labeling RNAs with the NMR-active nucleus (19)F has previously been introduced for small RNAs up to 40 nucleotides (nt). In the presented work, we study the natural occurring RNA aptamer domain of the guanine-sensing riboswitch comprising 73 nucleotides from Bacillus subtilis. The work includes protocols for improved in vitro transcription of 2-fluoroadenosine-5'-triphosphat (2F-ATP) using the mutant P266L of the T7 RNA polymerase. Our NMR analysis shows that the secondary and tertiary structure of the riboswitch is fully maintained and that the specific binding of the cognate ligand hypoxanthine is not impaired by the introduction of the (19)F isotope. The thermal stability of the (19)F-labeled riboswitch is not altered compared to the unmodified sequence, but local base pair stabilities, as measured by hydrogen exchange experiments, are modulated. The characteristic change in the chemical shift of the imino resonances detected in a (1)H,(15)N-HSQC allow the identification of Watson-Crick base paired uridine signals and the (19)F resonances can be used as reporters for tertiary and secondary structure transitions, confirming the potential of (19)F-labeling even for sizeable RNAs in the range of 70 nucleotides. PMID:26704707

  4. Characterization of solid polymer dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients by 19F MAS NMR and factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanova, Martina; Brus, Jiri; Sedenkova, Ivana; Policianova, Olivia; Kobera, Libor

    In this contribution the ability of 19F MAS NMR spectroscopy to probe structural variability of poorly water-soluble drugs formulated as solid dispersions in polymer matrices is discussed. The application potentiality of the proposed approach is demonstrated on a moderately sized active pharmaceutical ingredient (API, Atorvastatin) exhibiting extensive polymorphism. In this respect, a range of model systems with the API incorporated in the matrix of polvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was prepared. The extent of mixing of both components was determined by T1(1H) and T1ρ(1H) relaxation experiments, and it was found that the API forms nanosized domains. Subsequently it was found out that the polymer matrix induces two kinds of changes in 19F MAS NMR spectra. At first, this is a high-frequency shift reaching 2-3 ppm which is independent on molecular structure of the API and which results from the long-range polarization of the electron cloud around 19F nucleus induced by electrostatic fields of the polymer matrix. At second, this is broadening of the signals and formation of shoulders reflecting changes in molecular arrangement of the API. To avoid misleading in the interpretation of the recorded 19F MAS NMR spectra, because both the contributions act simultaneously, we applied chemometric approach based on multivariate analysis. It is demonstrated that factor analysis of the recorded spectra can separate both these spectral contributions, and the subtle structural differences in the molecular arrangement of the API in the nanosized domains can be traced. In this way 19F MAS NMR spectra of both pure APIs and APIs in solid dispersions can be directly compared. The proposed strategy thus provides a powerful tool for the analysis of new formulations of fluorinated pharmaceutical substances in polymer matrices.

  5. Detection of the optimal region of interest for camera oximetry.

    PubMed

    Karlen, Walter; Ansermino, J Mark; Dumont, Guy A; Scheffer, Cornie

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of heart rate and blood oxygen saturation with an imaging array on a mobile phone (camera oximetry) has great potential for mobile health applications as no additional hardware other than a camera and LED flash enabled phone are required. However, this approach is challenging as the configuration of the camera can negatively influence the estimation quality. Further, the number of photons recorded with the photo detector is largely dependent on the optical path length, resulting in a non-homogeneous image. In this paper we describe a novel method to automatically detect the optimal region of interest (ROI) for the captured image to extract a pulse waveform. We also present a study to select the optimal camera settings, notably the white balance. The experiments show that the incandescent white balance mode is the preferable setting for camera oximetry applications on the tested mobile phone (Samsung Galaxy Ace). Also, the ROI algorithm successfully identifies the frame regions which provide waveforms with the largest amplitudes. PMID:24110175

  6. Assessment of the calibration curve for transmittance pulse-oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronin, A.; Fine, I.; Meglinski, I.

    2011-11-01

    Optical/laser modalities provide a broad variety of practical solutions for clinical diagnostics and therapy in a range from imaging of single cells and molecules to non-invasive biopsy of specific biological tissues and organs tomography. Near-infrared transmittance pulse oximetry with laser diodes is the accepted standard in current clinical practice and widely used for noninvasive monitoring of oxygen saturation in arterial blood hemoglobin. Conceptual design of practical pulse oximetry systems requires careful selection of various technical parameters, including intensity, wavelength, beam size and profile of incident laser radiation, size, numerical aperture of the detector, as well as a clear understanding of how the spatial and temporal structural alterations in biological tissues can be linked with and can be distinguished by variations of these parameters. In current letter utilizing state-of-the-art NVIDEA CUDA technology, a new object oriented programming paradigm and on-line solutions we introduce a computational tool applied for human finger transmittance spectra simulation and assessment of calibration curve for near-infrared transmitted pulseoximetry.

  7. Assessing diabetic foot ulcer development risk with hyperspectral tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Foot ulceration remains a serious health concern for diabetic patients and has a major impact on the cost of diabetes treatment. Early detection and preventive care, such as offloading or improved hygiene, can greatly reduce the risk of further complications. We aim to assess the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry in predicting the risk of diabetic foot ulcer formation. Tissue oximetry measurements are performed during several visits with hyperspectral imaging of the feet in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus subjects that are at risk for foot ulceration. The data are retrospectively analyzed at 21 sites that ulcerated during the course of our study and an ulceration prediction index is developed. Then, an image processing algorithm based on this index is implemented. This algorithm is able to predict tissue at risk of ulceration with a sensitivity and specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively, for images taken, on average, 58 days before tissue damage is apparent to the naked eye. Receiver operating characteristic analysis is also performed to give a range of sensitivity/specificity values resulting in a Q-value of 89%.

  8. Clinical hyperbaric oxygen therapy, wound perfusion, and transcutaneous oximetry.

    PubMed

    Niinikoski, Juha H A

    2004-03-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is an important adjunct in the management of problem wounds which exist in chronic oxygen deficiency and in which the local oxygen tension is below optimal for healing. In the treatment of hypoxic and ischemic wounds, the most important effects of hyperbaric oxygenation are the stimulation of fibroblast proliferation and differentiation, increased collagen formation and cross-linking, augmented neovascularization, and the stimulation of leukocyte microbial killing. Ischemic soft tissues also benefit from hyperoxygenation through improved preservation of energy metabolism and reduction of edema. Hyperbaric oxygen is administered in either a multiplace or a monoplace hyperbaric chamber. Normally, pressures of 2 to 2.5 ATA are used for a period of 90 minutes once or twice daily. For an objective assessment of wound perfusion and oxygenation, transcutaneous oximetry provides a simple, reliable, noninvasive, diagnostic technique. It can be used for assessment of tissue perfusion in the vicinity of the problem wound. Transcutaneous oximetry may be used in the assessment of wound healing potential, selection of amputation level, and patient selection for HBOT. In diabetic patients with chronic foot ulcers peri-wound transcutaneous oxygen tensions (TcP(O2)) over 400 mmHg in 2.5 ATA hyperbaric oxygen or over 50 mmHg in normobaric pure oxygen predict healing success with adjuncted HBOT with high accuracy. PMID:14961187

  9. HIGH LIFE: High altitude fatalities led to pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, John W

    2016-01-15

    In 1875, Paul Bert linked high altitude danger to the low partial pressure of oxygen when 2 of 3 French balloonists died euphorically at about 8,600 m altitude. World War I fatal crashes of high altitude fighter pilots led to a century of efforts to use oximetry to warn pilots. The carotid body, discovered in 1932 to be the hypoxia detector, led to most current physiologic understanding of the body's respiratory responses to hypoxia and CO2. The author describes some of his UCSF group's work: In 1963, we reported both the brain's ventral medullary near-surface CO2 (and pH) chemosensors and the role of cerebrospinal fluid in acclimatization to altitude. In 1966, we reported the effect of altitude on cerebral blood flow and later the changes of carotid body sensitivity at altitude and the differences in natives of high altitude. In 1973, pulse oximetry was invented when Japanese biophysicist Takuo Aoyagi read and applied to pulses a largely forgotten 35-year-old discovery by English medical student J. R. Squire of a method of computing oxygen saturation from red and infrared light passing through both perfused and blanched tissue. PMID:26251514

  10. The light-tissue interaction of pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Mannheimer, Paul D

    2007-12-01

    The underlying science of pulse oximetry is based on a simple manipulation of the Lambert-Beer law, which describes the attenuation of light traveling through a mixture of absorbers. Signals from detected red and infrared light that has traveled through blood-perfused tissues are used to estimate the underlying arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation. However, light scatters in tissue and influences some of the simplifications made in determining this relationship. Under most clinical circumstances, the empirical process that manufacturers use to calibrate the system during its design readily accommodates this and results in accurate readings. The same tissue light scattering properties allow sensors to be configured for use on opposing or adjacent surfaces, provided that the placement sites offer sufficient signal strength and are absent factors known to influence accuracy. In this paper I review the light-tissue interaction in pulse oximetry and describe some of the assumptions made and their implications. Certain deviations from the nominal conditions, whether clinical in nature or misuse of the product, can affect system performance. Consequently, users should be cautious in modifying sensors and/or using them on tissue sites not intended by the manufacturer (off-label use). While perhaps helpful for obtaining pulsatile signals or extending the lifetime of a sensor, some practices can disrupt the optical integrity of the measurement and negatively impact the oxygen saturation reading accuracy. PMID:18048891

  11. New spectral imaging techniques for blood oximetry in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabboud, Ied; Muyo, Gonzalo; Gorman, Alistair; Mordant, David; McNaught, Andrew; Petres, Clement; Petillot, Yvan R.; Harvey, Andrew R.

    2007-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging of the retina presents a unique opportunity for direct and quantitative mapping of retinal biochemistry - particularly of the vasculature where blood oximetry is enabled by the strong variation of absorption spectra with oxygenation. This is particularly pertinent both to research and to clinical investigation and diagnosis of retinal diseases such as diabetes, glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. The optimal exploitation of hyperspectral imaging however, presents a set of challenging problems, including; the poorly characterised and controlled optical environment of structures within the retina to be imaged; the erratic motion of the eye ball; and the compounding effects of the optical sensitivity of the retina and the low numerical aperture of the eye. We have developed two spectral imaging techniques to address these issues. We describe first a system in which a liquid crystal tuneable filter is integrated into the illumination system of a conventional fundus camera to enable time-sequential, random access recording of narrow-band spectral images. Image processing techniques are described to eradicate the artefacts that may be introduced by time-sequential imaging. In addition we describe a unique snapshot spectral imaging technique dubbed IRIS that employs polarising interferometry and Wollaston prism beam splitters to simultaneously replicate and spectrally filter images of the retina into multiple spectral bands onto a single detector array. Results of early clinical trials acquired with these two techniques together with a physical model which enables oximetry map are reported.

  12. Characterization of the Tank 19F Closure Grab and Core Samples and the Tank 18F Dip Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Swingle, R.F.

    2002-05-02

    The results of analyses of the Tank 19F closure characterization samples are included herein. The samples analyzed include the two Tank 19F grab samples (FTF-075 and FTF-077) and a Tank 18F dip sample (FTF-076) taken in September 2001 and a Tank 19F core sample (FTF-118) taken in December 2001. The FTF-075 and FTF-077 grab samples were pulled from Tank 19F and the FTF-076 dip sample was pulled from Tank 18F in September 2001 as part of the characterization process for closure of Tank 19F. The samples were delivered to the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) Shielded Cells on September 28, 2001 and placed in the Shielded Cells on October 2, 2001. The samples were opened and both grab samples were found to contain plenty of material to allow completion of the analyses. The samples were dark and resembled marsh muck (see Figures 1 and 2). The dip sample was also found to contain plenty of material. The sample looked like muddy water (Figure 4). The FTF-118F core sample was pulled from Tank 19F in December 2001 as part of the characterization process for closure of the tank. The sample was delivered to the SRTC Shielded Cells on December 6, 2001 and placed in the Shielded Cells on December 7, 2001. The sample was opened and found to contain plenty of material to allow completion of the analyses. As evident in Figure 3, the sample resembled a somewhat drier version of the previous grab samples FTF-075 and FTF-077. A group consisting of SRTC Waste Processing Technology (WPT) section personnel and High Level Waste Engineering (HLWE) personnel viewed the sample when it was opened and came to the consensus that the sample appeared to be homogeneous. The decision was made to treat the sample as a single phase and analyze accordingly. Initially, small portions were archived from the top, middle and bottom of the sample in case it is later decided to analyze the levels of the sample separately. The analytical results from the two grab samples and the core sample were all

  13. In vivo MRI cell tracking using perfluorocarbon probes and fluorine-19 detection

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Eric T.; Zhong, Jia

    2013-01-01

    This article is a brief survey of preclinical in vivo cell tracking methods and applications using perfluorocarbon (PFC) probes and fluorine-19 (19F) MRI detection. Detection of the 19F signal offers high cell specificity and quantification abilities in spin-density weighted MR images. We discuss the compositions of matter, methods, and applications of PFC-based cell tracking using ex vivo and in situ PFC labeling in preclinical studies of inflammation and cellular therapeutics. We will also address potential applicability of 19F cell tracking to clinical trials. PMID:23606473

  14. Fluorinated Amino-Derivatives of the Sesquiterpene Lactone, Parthenolide, as 19F NMR Probes in Deuterium-Free Environments

    PubMed Central

    Woods, James R.; Mo, Huaping; Bieberich, Andrew A.; Alavanja, Tanja; Colby, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and biological activity of fluorinated amino-derivatives of the sesquiterpene lactone, parthenolide, are described. A fluorinated aminoparthenolide analogue with biological activity similar to the parent natural product was discovered, and its X-ray structure was obtained. This lead compound was then studied using 19F NMR in the presence and absence of glutathione to obtain additional mechanism of action data, and it was found that the aminoparthenolide eliminates amine faster in the presence of glutathione than in the absence of glutathione. The exact changes in concentrations of fluorinated compound and amine were quantified by a concentration-reference method using 19F NMR; a major benefit of applying this strategy is that no deuterated solvents or internal standards are required to obtain accurate concentrations. These mechanistic data with glutathione may contribute to the conversion of the amino-derivative to parthenolide, the active pharmacological agent, in glutathione-rich cancer cells. PMID:22029741

  15. Angular distributions and cross-sections of projectile-like fragments in the 19F + 159Tb reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Tripathi, R.; Sodaye, S.; Sudarshan, K.; Pujari, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    The angular distribution of projectile-like fragments (PLFs) in the 19F + 159Tb reaction have been measured at beam energy equal to 98MeV. Angular distributions of PLFs showed a systematic change with increasing mass transfer, starting from the peaking at grazing angle for heavier PLFs to very forward peaked angular distributions for lighter PLFs. Cross-sections of the different PLFs were obtained by integrating their centre-of-mass angular distributions. The PLF cross-sections have been compared with the incomplete fusion cross-sections obtained from the earlier measurement of the evaporation residue cross-section. Reduced cross-sections for lighter PLFs were observed to be higher compared to those observed in 19F + 66Zn reaction at similar values of E cm/ V b. Also, elastic scattering measurements were carried out to get information about the grazing angle and total reaction cross-section.

  16. NMR spectroscopy in studies of light-induced structural changes in mammalian rhodopsin: applicability of solution (19)F NMR.

    PubMed

    Klein-Seetharaman, J; Getmanova, E V; Loewen, M C; Reeves, P J; Khorana, H G

    1999-11-23

    We report high resolution solution (19)F NMR spectra of fluorine-labeled rhodopsin mutants in detergent micelles. Single cysteine substitution mutants in the cytoplasmic face of rhodopsin were labeled by attachment of the trifluoroethylthio (TET), CF(3)-CH(2)-S, group through a disulfide linkage. TET-labeled cysteine mutants at amino acid positions 67, 140, 245, 248, 311, and 316 in rhodopsin were thus prepared. Purified mutant rhodopsins (6-10 mg), in dodecylmaltoside, were analyzed at 20 degrees C by solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy. The spectra recorded in the dark showed the following chemical shifts relative to trifluoroacetate: Cys-67, 9.8 ppm; Cys-140, 10.6 ppm; Cys-245, 9.9 ppm; Cys-248, 9.5 ppm; Cys-311, 9.9 ppm; and Cys-316, 10.0 ppm. Thus, all mutants showed chemical shifts downfield that of free TET (6.5 ppm). On illumination to form metarhodopsin II, upfield changes in chemical shift were observed for (19)F labels at positions 67 (-0.2 ppm) and 140 (-0.4 ppm) and downfield changes for positions 248 (+0.1 ppm) and 316 (+0.1 ppm) whereas little or no change was observed at positions 311 and 245. On decay of metarhodopsin II, the chemical shifts reverted largely to those originally observed in the dark. The results demonstrate the applicability of solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy to studies of the tertiary structures in the cytoplasmic face of intact rhodopsin in the dark and on light activation. PMID:10570143

  17. Conformation of gramicidin A channel in phospholipid vesicles: a 13C and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, S; Wallace, B A; Blout, E R; Morrow, J S; Veatch, W

    1979-01-01

    We have determined the conformation of the channel-forming polypeptide antibiotic gramicidin A in phosphatidylcholine vesicles by using 13C and 19F NMR spectroscopy. The models previously proposed for the conformation of the dimer channel differ in the surface localization of the NH2 and COOH termini. We have incorporated specific 13C and 19F nuclei at both the NH2, and COOH termini of gramicidin and have used 13C and 19F chemical shifts and spin lattice relaxation time measurements to determine the accessibility of these labels to three paramagnetic NMR probes--two in aqueous solution and one attached to the phosphatidylcholine fatty acid chain9 all of our results indicate that the COOH terminus of gramicidin in the channel is located near the surface of the membrane and the NH2 terminus is buried deep within the lipid bilayer. These findings strongly favor an NH2-terminal to NH2-terminal helical dimer as the major conformation for the gramicidin channel in phosphatidylcholine vesicles. PMID:92025

  18. Identification of 2-Fluoro-2-deoxy- D-glucose Metabolites by 19F{ 1H} Hetero-RELAY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Thomas M.; London, Robert E.

    1995-12-01

    It has been proposed that in mammalian systems the glucose analog 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is phosphoryated and subsequently converted to the corresponding mannose derivative via the action of phosphoglucose isomerase. As is generally true in metabolic studies of fluorinated molecules, the fluorine spectrum alone is suggestive, without providing definitive structural evidence, while the use of1H NMR techniques generally suffers from a lack of adequate selectivity. A1H-19F version of the hetero-RELAY experiment has been applied to this problem. Formation of the corresponding C-6 phosphorylated 2-FDG analog with hexokinase, followed by treatment of the resulting phosphorylated products with phosphoglucose isomerase, resulted in the observation of additional19F resonances consistent with the corresponding 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-mannose-6-phosphate metabolite. A more definitive product identification was obtained using the hetero-RELAY experiment, which provides a complete19F-decoupled proton spectrum for each of the fluorinated species.

  19. sup 19 F NMR studies of the D-galactose chemosensory receptor. (1) Sugar binding yields a global structural change

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, L.A.; Falke, J.J. )

    1991-04-30

    The Escherichia coli D-galactose and D-glucose receptor is an aqueous sugar-binding protein and the first component in the distinct chemosensory and transport pathways for these sugars. Activation of the receptor occurs when the sugar binds and induces a conformational change, which in turn enable docking to specific membrane proteins. Only the structure of the activated receptor containing bound D-glucose is known. To investigate the sugar-induced structural change, the authors have used {sup 19}F NMR to probe 12 sites widely distributed in the receptor molecule. Five sites are tryptophan positions probed by incorporation of 5-fluorotryptophan; the resulting {sup 19}F NMR resonances were assigned by site-directed mutagenesis. The other seven sites are phenylalanine positions probed by incorporation of 3-fluorophenylaline. Sugar binding to the substrate binding cleft was observed to trigger a global structural change detected via {sup 19}F NMR frequency shifts at 10 of the 12 labeled sites. The results are consistent with a model in which multiple secondary structural elements, known to extend between the substrate cleft and the protein surface, undergo shifts in their average positions upon sugar binding to the cleft. Such structural coupling provides a mechanism by which sugar binding to the substrate cleft can cause structural changes at one or more docking sites on the receptor surface.

  20. Fragment-Linking Approach Using (19)F NMR Spectroscopy To Obtain Highly Potent and Selective Inhibitors of β-Secretase.

    PubMed

    Jordan, John B; Whittington, Douglas A; Bartberger, Michael D; Sickmier, E Allen; Chen, Kui; Cheng, Yuan; Judd, Ted

    2016-04-28

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a widely used tool in small-molecule drug discovery efforts. One of the most commonly used biophysical methods in detecting weak binding of fragments is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, FBDD performed with (19)F NMR-based methods has been shown to provide several advantages over (1)H NMR using traditional magnetization-transfer and/or two-dimensional methods. Here, we demonstrate the utility and power of (19)F-based fragment screening by detailing the identification of a second-site fragment through (19)F NMR screening that binds to a specific pocket of the aspartic acid protease, β-secretase (BACE-1). The identification of this second-site fragment allowed the undertaking of a fragment-linking approach, which ultimately yielded a molecule exhibiting a more than 360-fold increase in potency while maintaining reasonable ligand efficiency and gaining much improved selectivity over cathepsin-D (CatD). X-ray crystallographic studies of the molecules demonstrated that the linked fragments exhibited binding modes consistent with those predicted from the targeted screening approach, through-space NMR data, and molecular modeling. PMID:26978477

  1. EPR Oximetry in Three Spatial Dimensions using Sparse Spin Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Som, Subhojit; Potter, Lee C.; Ahmad, Rizwan; Vikram, Deepti S.; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2008-01-01

    A method is presented to use continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance imaging for rapid measurement of oxygen partial pressure in three spatial dimensions. A particulate paramagnetic probe is employed to create a sparse distribution of spins in a volume of interest. Information encoding location and spectral linewidth is collected by varying the spatial orientation and strength of an applied magnetic gradient field. Data processing exploits the spatial sparseness of spins to detect voxels with nonzero spin and to estimate the spectral linewidth for those voxels. The parsimonious representation of spin locations and linewidths permits an order of magnitude reduction in data acquisition time, compared to four-dimensional tomographic reconstruction using traditional spectral-spatial imaging. The proposed oximetry method is experimentally demonstrated for a lithium octa-n-butoxy naphthalocyanine (LiNc-BuO) probe using an L-band EPR spectrometer. PMID:18538600

  2. Pulse oximetry in a cohort study of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Homi, J; Levee, L; Higgs, D; Thomas, P; Serjeant, G

    1997-03-01

    Oxygen saturation was determined by pulse oximetry in a representative sample of Jamaican patients with steady-state sickle cell disease in a cohort study from birth. There were 220 with homozygous sickle cell (SS) disease and 142 with sickle cell-haemoglobin C (SC) disease aged 9-18 years, and 122 with a normal haemoglobin (AA) genotype aged 15-18 years. Pulse oximetry (SpO2) values were lower in SS disease (mean [95% confidence interval], 92.5 [92.0-93.0]) than in SC disease (96.7[96.5-96.9]) or AA controls (97.1 [96.8-97.3]). Inhalation of 100% oxygen in SS patients with O2 saturations below 90% consistently increased saturation to 99-100%. In SS disease, SpO2 correlated positively with haemoglobin and fetal haemoglobin and negatively with reticulocyte counts but not with MCHC, MCV or bilirubin level. Mean SpO2 in SS subjects with a normal alpha globin gene complement (mean [SD], 91.7 [3.9]%) was lower than in heterozygotes (93.4 [4.0]%) or homozygotes (96.1 [3.0]%) for alpha+ thalassaemia, the effects of alpha-thalassaemia not being explained by differences in haemoglobin or MCHC. In SS disease, SpO2 levels were not associated with age (within this age range), sex, number of sick clinic visits or number of hospital admissions. Higher SpO2 levels were associated with greater height and weight, more frequent painful crises and less frequent acute chest syndrome, but these associations were not significant after adjustment for haemoglobin level. Desaturation is common in steady-state SS disease and knowledge of the individual's steady-state value may be important in the interpreting low values during acute complications. PMID:9146942

  3. Spin label oximetry to assess extracellular oxygen during myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Baker, J E; Froncisz, W; Joseph, J; Kalyanaraman, B

    1997-01-01

    We describe real-time measurement of myocardial oxygen consumption during ischemia in the intact heart. Measurement of extracellular oxygen concentration during myocardial ischemia by spin label oximetry has been limited by ischemia-induced reduction of the neutral, water-soluble nitroxide TEMPONE. We have overcome this problem by encapsulating the nitroxides. Isolated immature (7-10 d old) rabbit hearts (n = 8) were perfused aerobically within the cavity of a loop gap resonator with bicarbonate buffer containing an oxygen-sensitive, lipid-soluble nitroxide (14N-TEMPO laurate in FC-43 perfluorocarbon micelles) and a much less oxygen-sensitive and positively charged nitroxide (15N-TEMPO choline in multilamellar vesicles) as an internal standard. The ratio of the ESR signal amplitudes of these nitroxides was used as a sensitive index of oxygen concentration. Sequestration of the nitroxides decreased their reduction rate by ascorbate in comparison with nonsequestered nitroxides. Hearts were subjected to 60 min of global no-flow ischemia at 20 degrees C. Extracellular oxygen content (mean +/- SD) during aerobic perfusion was 1195 +/- 55 mumol/liter. The electron spin resonance signal from TEMPO laurate increased with the onset and progression of ischemia, consistent with a decrease in extracellular oxygen, while the signal for TEMPO choline was relatively unchanged. Extracellular oxygen content after 40 and 60 min of ischemia was reduced to 393 +/- 27 mumol/liter (p < .05) and 61 +/- 5 mumol/liter (p < .05), respectively. We conclude that spin-label oximetry can directly and precisely measure myocardial oxygen consumption at constant temperature during ischemia in the intact heart. PMID:8958135

  4. Site-specific solvent exposure analysis of a membrane protein using unnatural amino acids and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Li, Dong; Chen, Hongwei; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Solvent isotope shift analysis of {sup 19}F-tfmF in different H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O molar ratio. {yields} Correlation between solvent isotope shift of {sup 19}F-spins and solvent exposure analysis. {yields} Solvent exposure analysis of membrane proteins. -- Abstract: Membrane proteins play an essential role in cellular metabolism, transportation and signal transduction across cell membranes. The scarcity of membrane protein structures has thus far prevented a full understanding of their molecular mechanisms. Preliminary topology studies and residue solvent exposure analysis have the potential to provide valuable information on membrane proteins of unknown structure. Here, a {sup 19}F-containing unnatural amino acid (trimethylfluoro-phenylalanine, tfmF) was applied to accomplish site-specific {sup 19}F spin incorporation at different sites in diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK, an Escherichia coli membrane protein) for site-specific solvent exposure analysis. Due to isotope effect on {sup 19}F spins, a standard curve for {sup 19}F-tfmF chemical shifts was drawn for varying solvent H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O ratios. Further site-specific {sup 19}F solvent isotope shift analysis was conducted for DAGK to distinguish residues in water-soluble loops, interfacial areas or hydrophobic membrane regions. This site-specific solvent exposure analysis method could be applied for further topological analysis of other membrane proteins.

  5. Pulse oximetry screening: a review of diagnosing critical congenital heart disease in newborns

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Melissa S; Kochilas, Lazaros K

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most common birth defects, with an incidence of nine out of every 1,000 live births. The mortality of infants with CHD has decreased over the past 3 decades, but significant morbidity and mortality continue to occur if not diagnosed shortly after birth. Pulse oximetry was recommended as a screening tool to detect critical CHD in 2011 by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association. Pulse oximetry is a tool to measure oxygen saturation, and based on the presence of hypoxemia, many cardiac lesions are detected. Due to its ease of application to the patient, providing results in a timely manner and without the need for calibrating the sensor probe, pulse oximetry offers many advantages as a screening tool. However, pulse oximetry has also important limitations of which physicians should be aware to be able to assess the significance of the pulse oximetry measurement for a given patient. This review aims to highlight the benefits and shortcomings of pulse oximetry within the context of screening for critical CHD and suggests future avenues to cover existing gaps in current practices. PMID:27468253

  6. Pediatric OSAS: Oximetry can provide answers when polysomnography is not available.

    PubMed

    Kaditis, Athanasios; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Gozal, David

    2016-06-01

    Overnight polysomnography is the gold standard tool for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in habitually snoring children, but it is expensive and not always available. Nocturnal oximetry has been proposed as an abbreviated and low-cost testing modality for the diagnosis of OSAS. In this systematic review, 25 original articles were evaluated to: (i) summarize reference values of nocturnal oximetry parameters in healthy children; (ii) identify abnormal oximetry patterns that predict OSAS in habitually snoring children; (iii) delineate abnormalities in oximetry that can predict responses to treatment interventions for OSAS and potential complications. Nocturnal SpO2 drops <90%, more than two clusters of desaturation events (≥4%) and oxyhemoglobin desaturation (≥4%) index (ODI4) >2.2 episodes/h are unusual in children without OSAS. At least three clusters of desaturation events, and at least three SpO2 drops below 90% in a nocturnal oximetry recording are indicative of moderate-to-severe OSAS. An ODI4 >2 episodes/h combined with OSAS symptoms also exhibits high positive predictive value for apnea-hypopnea index >1 episode/h. Children without clusters of desaturation events have low risk of major respiratory complications following adenotonsillectomy. Thus, nocturnal oximetry emerges as a valuable tool that can facilitate treatment decisions when polysomnography is not available. PMID:26146027

  7. Magnetism, optical absorbance, and 19F NMR spectra of nafion films with self-assembling paramagnetic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, E. M.; Chen, Q.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2012-01-15

    Magnetization, optical absorbance, and {sup 19}F NMR spectra of Nafion transparent films as received and doped with Mn{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, and Fe{sup 3+} ions with and without treatment in 1H-1,2,4-triazole (trz) have been studied. Doping of Nafion with Fe{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+} and their bridging to nitrogen of triazole yields a hybrid self-assembling paramagnetic system that exhibits interesting magnetic and optical properties. These include spin crossover phenomena between high-spin (HS) and low-spin (LS) states in Nafion-Fe{sup 2+}-trz and Nafion-Co{sup 2+}-trz accompanied by thermochromic effects in the visible range induced by temperature. A large shift of the magnetization curve induced by a magnetic field in the vicinity of the HS {leftrightarrow} LS, {approx}220 K, observed for Nafion-Fe{sup 2+}-trz has a rate of {approx}6 K/kOe, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that in bulk spin crossover Fe{sup 2+} materials. Selective response of {sup 19}F NMR signals on doping with paramagnetic ions demonstrates that NMR can be used as spatially resolved method to study Nafion film with paramagnetic network. Both chemical shift and width of {sup 19}F NMR signals show that SO groups of Nafion, Fe or Co ions, and nitrogen of triazole are bonded whereas they form a spin crossover system. Based on a model of nanosize cylinders proposed for Nafion [K. Schmidt-Rohr and Q. Chen, Nat Mater (2008), 75], we suggest that paramagnetic ions are located inside these cylinders, forming self-assembling magnetically and optically active nanoscale networks.

  8. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... tell your health care provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips Certain types of artificial heart valves ...

  9. Fission fragment angular distribution for the 19F+197Au fusion-fission reaction at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Sodaye, S.; Reddy, A. V.; Mahata, K.; Goswami, A.

    2005-04-01

    Angular distribution of fission fragments have been measured for 19F+197Au reaction at bombarding energies from 91 to 110 MeV. Fission fragment angular distributions have been calculated by transition state model with the transmission coefficients obtained using the coupled-channels theory. The calculated angular anisotropies are in good agreement with the experimental anisotropies. The experimental fission cross sections have also been reproduced on the basis of the coupled-channels theory. The results of angular distribution measurement do not show any significant contribution from quasifission as was reported in the literature based on the measurement of evaporation residues and mass distribution.

  10. Phospho-selective mechanisms of arrestin conformations and functions revealed by unnatural amino acid incorporation and 19F-NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Yu, Xiao; Liu, Chuan; Qu, Chang-Xiu; Gong, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Da; Li, Fa-Hui; Wang, Hong-Mei; He, Dong-Fang; Yi, Fan; Song, Chen; Tian, Chang-Lin; Xiao, Kun-Hong; Wang, Jiang-Yun; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Specific arrestin conformations are coupled to distinct downstream effectors, which underlie the functions of many G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, using unnatural amino acid incorporation and fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance (19F-NMR) spectroscopy, we demonstrate that distinct receptor phospho-barcodes are translated to specific β-arrestin-1 conformations and direct selective signalling. With its phosphate-binding concave surface, β-arrestin-1 ‘reads' the message in the receptor phospho-C-tails and distinct phospho-interaction patterns are revealed by 19F-NMR. Whereas all functional phosphopeptides interact with a common phosphate binding site and induce the movements of finger and middle loops, different phospho-interaction patterns induce distinct structural states of β-arrestin-1 that are coupled to distinct arrestin functions. Only clathrin recognizes and stabilizes GRK2-specific β-arrestin-1 conformations. The identified receptor-phospho-selective mechanism for arrestin conformation and the spacing of the multiple phosphate-binding sites in the arrestin enable arrestin to recognize plethora phosphorylation states of numerous GPCRs, contributing to the functional diversity of receptors. PMID:26347956

  11. Fragment Screening and Druggability Assessment for the CBP/p300 KIX Domain Via Protein Observed 19F NMR

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Clifford T.; Koleski, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    19F NMR of labeled proteins is a sensitive method for characterizing structure, conformational dynamics, higher-order assembly, and ligand binding. Fluorination of aromatic side chains has been suggested as a labeling strategy for small molecule ligand discovery for protein-protein interaction interfaces. Using a model transcription factor binding domain of the CREB binding protein (CBP)/p300, KIX, we report the first full small molecule screen using protein-observed 19F NMR. Screening of 508 compounds and validation by 1H-15N HSQC NMR led to the identification of a minimal pharmacaphore for the MLL-KIX interaction site. Hit rate analysis for the CREB-KIX and MLL-KIX sites provided a metric to assess the ligandability or “druggability” of each interface informing future medicinal chemistry efforts. The structural information from the simplified spectra and data collection speed, affords a new screening tool for analysis of protein interfaces and discovery of small molecules. PMID:25651535

  12. All-organic optoelectronic sensor for pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochner, Claire M.; Khan, Yasser; Pierre, Adrien; Arias, Ana C.

    2014-12-01

    Pulse oximetry is a ubiquitous non-invasive medical sensing method for measuring pulse rate and arterial blood oxygenation. Conventional pulse oximeters use expensive optoelectronic components that restrict sensing locations to finger tips or ear lobes due to their rigid form and area-scaling complexity. In this work, we report a pulse oximeter sensor based on organic materials, which are compatible with flexible substrates. Green (532 nm) and red (626 nm) organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are used with an organic photodiode (OPD) sensitive at the aforementioned wavelengths. The sensor’s active layers are deposited from solution-processed materials via spin-coating and printing techniques. The all-organic optoelectronic oximeter sensor is interfaced with conventional electronics at 1 kHz and the acquired pulse rate and oxygenation are calibrated and compared with a commercially available oximeter. The organic sensor accurately measures pulse rate and oxygenation with errors of 1% and 2%, respectively.

  13. All-organic optoelectronic sensor for pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Claire M; Khan, Yasser; Pierre, Adrien; Arias, Ana C

    2014-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is a ubiquitous non-invasive medical sensing method for measuring pulse rate and arterial blood oxygenation. Conventional pulse oximeters use expensive optoelectronic components that restrict sensing locations to finger tips or ear lobes due to their rigid form and area-scaling complexity. In this work, we report a pulse oximeter sensor based on organic materials, which are compatible with flexible substrates. Green (532 nm) and red (626 nm) organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are used with an organic photodiode (OPD) sensitive at the aforementioned wavelengths. The sensor's active layers are deposited from solution-processed materials via spin-coating and printing techniques. The all-organic optoelectronic oximeter sensor is interfaced with conventional electronics at 1 kHz and the acquired pulse rate and oxygenation are calibrated and compared with a commercially available oximeter. The organic sensor accurately measures pulse rate and oxygenation with errors of 1% and 2%, respectively. PMID:25494220

  14. Low renal oximetry correlates with acute kidney injury after infant cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gabe E; King, Karen; Gurney, James G; Charpie, John R

    2011-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery during infancy. Standard methods for evaluating renal function are not particularly sensitive nor are proximate indicators of renal dysfunction that allow intervention in real time. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a newer noninvasive technology that continuously evaluates regional oximetry and may correlate with renal injury and adverse outcomes after cardiac surgery in infants. This prospective observational study enrolled 40 infants (age, <12 months) undergoing biventricular repair. Continuous renal oximetry data were collected for the first 48 postoperative hours and correlated with postoperative course, standard laboratory data, and the occurrence of acute renal injury. Subjects with low renal oximetry (below 50% for >2 h) had significantly higher postoperative peak creatinine levels by 48 h (0.8 ± 0.4 vs. 0.52 ± 0.2; p = 0.003) and a higher incidence of AKI (50 vs. 3.1%; p = 0.003) than those with normal renal oximetry. These subjects also required more ventilator days and greater vasoactive support, and they had elevated lactate levels. Prolonged low renal near-infrared oximetry appears to correlate with renal dysfunction, decreased systemic oxygen delivery, and the overall postoperative course in infants with congenital heart disease undergoing biventricular repair. PMID:21085945

  15. Clinical use of pulse oximetry: official guidelines from the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Pretto, Jeffrey J; Roebuck, Teanau; Beckert, Lutz; Hamilton, Garun

    2014-01-01

    Pulse oximetry provides a simple, non-invasive approximation of arterial oxygenation in a wide variety of clinical settings including emergency and critical-care medicine, hospital-based and ambulatory care, perioperative monitoring, inpatient and outpatient settings, and for specific diagnostic applications. Pulse oximetry is of utility in perinatal, paediatric, adult and geriatric populations but may require use of age-specific sensors in these groups. It plays a role in the monitoring and treatment of respiratory dysfunction by detecting hypoxaemia and is effective in guiding oxygen therapy in both adult and paediatric populations. Pulse oximetry does not provide information about the adequacy of ventilation or about precise arterial oxygenation, particularly when arterial oxygen levels are very high or very low. Arterial blood gas analysis is the gold standard in these settings. Pulse oximetry may be inaccurate as a marker of oxygenation in the presence of dyshaemoglobinaemias such as carbon monoxide poisoning or methaemoglobinaemia where arterial oxygen saturation values will be overestimated. Technical considerations such as sensor position, signal averaging time and data sampling rates may influence clinical interpretation of pulse oximetry readings. PMID:24251722

  16. NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}: Assignment of {sup 19}F NMR resonances and chemical bond analysis from GIPAW calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Mamata; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Sadoc, Aymeric; Boucher, Florent

    2013-11-15

    The {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shifts (δ{sub iso}) of two isomorphic compounds, NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}, which involve six nonequivalent fluorine sites, have been experimentally determined from the reconstruction of 1D {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectra. In parallel, the corresponding {sup 19}F chemical shielding tensors have been calculated using the GIPAW method for both experimental and DFT-optimized structures. Furthermore, the [M{sub 4}F{sub 20}] units of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} being held together by van der Waals interactions, the relevance of Grimme corrections to the DFT optimization processes has been evaluated. However, the semi-empirical dispersion correction term introduced by such a method does not show any significant improvement. Nonetheless, a complete and convincing assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} is obtained, ensured by the linearity between experimental {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values and calculated {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shielding σ{sub iso} values. The effects of the geometry optimizations have been carefully analyzed, confirming among other matters, the inaccuracy of the experimental structure of NbF{sub 5}. The relationships between the fluorine chemical shifts, the nature of the fluorine atoms (bridging or terminal), the position of the terminal ones (opposite or perpendicular to the bridging ones), the fluorine charges, the ionicity and the length of the M–F bonds have been established. Additionally, for three of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5}, distorted multiplets, arising from {sup 1}J-coupling and residual dipolar coupling between the {sup 19}F and {sup 93}Nb nuclei, were simulated yielding to values of {sup 93}Nb–{sup 19}F {sup 1}J-coupling for the corresponding fluorine sites. - Graphical abstract: The complete assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} allow establishing relationships between the {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values, the nature of the fluorine atoms

  17. (19)F MRSI of capecitabine in the liver at 7 T using broadband transmit-receive antennas and dual-band RF pulses.

    PubMed

    van Gorp, Jetse S; Seevinck, Peter R; Andreychenko, Anna; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; Luijten, Peter R; Viergever, Max A; Koopman, Miriam; Boer, Vincent O; Klomp, Dennis W J

    2015-11-01

    Capecitabine (Cap) is an often prescribed chemotherapeutic agent, successfully used to cure some patients from cancer or reduce tumor burden for palliative care. However, the efficacy of the drug is limited, it is not known in advance who will respond to the drug and it can come with severe toxicity. (19)F Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) have been used to non-invasively study Cap metabolism in vivo to find a marker for personalized treatment. In vivo detection, however, is hampered by low concentrations and the use of radiofrequency (RF) surface coils limiting spatial coverage. In this work, the use of a 7T MR system with radiative multi-channel transmit-receive antennas was investigated with the aim of maximizing the sensitivity and spatial coverage of (19)F detection protocols. The antennas were broadband optimized to facilitate both the (1)H (298 MHz) and (19)F (280 MHz) frequencies for accurate shimming, imaging and signal combination. B1(+) simulations, phantom and noise measurements showed that more than 90% of the theoretical maximum sensitivity could be obtained when using B1(+) and B1(-) information provided at the (1)H frequency for the optimization of B1(+) and B1(-) at the (19)F frequency. Furthermore, to overcome the limits in maximum available RF power, whilst ensuring simultaneous excitation of all detectable conversion products of Cap, a dual-band RF pulse was designed and evaluated. Finally, (19)F MRS(I) measurements were performed to detect (19)F metabolites in vitro and in vivo. In two patients, at 10 h (patient 1) and 1 h (patient 2) after Cap intake, (19)F metabolites were detected in the liver and the surrounding organs, illustrating the potential of the set-up for in vivo detection of metabolic rates and drug distribution in the body. PMID:26373355

  18. Clinical cell therapy imaging using a perfluorocarbon tracer and fluorine-19 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Eric T; Helfer, Brooke M; O'Hanlon, Charles F; Schirda, Claudiu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cellular therapeutics are emerging as a treatment option for a host of serious human diseases. To accelerate clinical translation, noninvasive imaging of cell grafts in clinical trials can potentially be used to assess the initial delivery and behavior of cells. Methods The use of a perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracer agent for clinical fluorine-19 (19F) MRI cell detection is described. This technology was used to detect immunotherapeutic dendritic cells (DCs) delivered to colorectal adenocarcinoma patients. Autologous DC vaccines were labeled with a PFC MRI agent ex vivo. Patients received DCs intradermally, and 19F spin-density-weighted MRI at 3 Tesla (T) was used to observe cells. Results Spin-density-weighted 19F images at the injection site displayed DCs as background-free “hot-spot” images. 19F images were acquired in clinically relevant scan times (<10 min). Apparent DC numbers could be quantified in two patients from the 19F hot-spots and were observed to decrease by ∼50% at injection site by 24 h. From 3T phantom studies, the sensitivity limit for DC detection is estimated to be on the order of ∼105 cells/voxel in this study. Conclusion These results help to establish a clinically applicable means to track a broad range of cell types used in cell therapy. Magn Reson Med 72:1696–1701, 2014. © 2014 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance. PMID:25241945

  19. Study of viscosity on the fission dynamics of the excited nuclei 228U produced in 19F + 209Bi reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslamizadeh, H.

    2015-06-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) dynamical model based on Langevin equations was applied to study the fission dynamics of the compound nuclei 228U produced in 19F + 209Bi reactions at intermediate excitation energies. The distance between the centers of masses of the future fission fragments was used as the first dimension and the projection of the total spin of the compound nucleus onto the symmetry axis, K, was considered as the second dimension in Langevin dynamical calculations. The magnitude of post-saddle friction strength was inferred by fitting measured data on the average pre-scission neutron multiplicity for 228U. It was shown that the results of calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data by using values of the post-saddle friction equal to 6-8 × 1021s-1.

  20. (19)F NMR study of ligand dynamics in carboxylate-bridged diiron(II) complexes supported by a macrocyclic ligand.

    PubMed

    Minier, Mikael A; Lippard, Stephen J

    2015-11-01

    A series of asymmetrically carboxylate-bridged diiron(ii) complexes featuring fluorine atoms as NMR spectroscopic probes, [Fe2(PIM)(Ar(4F-Ph)CO2)2] (10), [Fe2(F2PIM)(Ar(Tol)CO2)2] (11), and [Fe2(F2PIM)(Ar(4F-Ph)CO2)2] (12), were prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and VT (19)F NMR spectroscopy. These complexes are part of a rare family of syn N-donor diiron(ii) compounds, [Fe2(X2PIM)(RCO2)2], that are structurally very similar to the active site of the hydroxylase enzyme component of reduced methane monooxygenase (MMOHred). Solution characterization of these complexes demonstrates that they undergo intramolecular carboxylate rearrangements, or carboxylate shifts, a dynamic feature relevant to the reactivity of the diiron centers in bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases. PMID:26418547

  1. 19F NMR Study of Ligand Dynamics in Carboxylate-Bridged Diiron(II) Complexes Supported by a Macrocyclic Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Minier, Mikael A.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    A series of asymmetrically carboxylate-bridged diiron(II) complexes featuring fluorine atoms as NMR spectroscopic probes, [Fe2(PIM)(Ar4F-PhCO2)2] (10), [Fe2(F2PIM)(ArTolCO2)2] (11), and [Fe2(F2PIM)(Ar4F-PhCO2)2] (12), were prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and VT 19F NMR spectroscopy. These complexes are part of a rare family of syn-N diiron(II) complexes, [Fe2(X2PIM)(RCO2)2], that are structurally very similar to the active site of the hydroxylase enzyme component of reduced methane monooxygenase (MMOHred). Solution characterization of these complexes demonstrates that they undergo intramolecular carboxylate rearrangements, or carboxylate shifts, a dynamic feature relevant to the reactivity of the diiron centers in bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases. PMID:26418547

  2. Nuclear relaxation rates study of GTP(gamma F)-tubulin interaction using 19F-nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Monasterio, O

    1989-07-01

    To study the relationship between the exchangeable GTP binding site (E-site) and the high affinity metal binding site we synthesized P3-fluoro P1-5'-guanosine tripaosphate (GTP(gamma F), an analog of GTP. Our results show that this analog binds to the exchangeable GTP binding site of calf brain tubulin. The values of the dissociation constant and the stoichiometry of the GTP(gamma F)-Mn(II) complex as determined by EPR spectroscopy were 1.64 x 10(-4) M and one mole of manganese per mole of nucleotide, respectively. The distance separating the high-affinity binding site for the divalent metal ion and the exchangeable nucleotide binding site was evaluated by using high-resolution 19F-NMR. The 31P- and 19F-NMR spectra of GTP(gamma F) were studied, both the fluorine and the gamma-phosphate were split in a doublet with a coupling constant of 936 Hz. Tubulin purified by the method of Weisenberg (Weisenberg, R.C., and Timashef, S.N. (1970) Biochemistry 9, 4110-4116) was treated with colchicine to stabilize it, GTP(gamma F) was added and the 254.1 MHz 19fluorine relaxation rates measured within the first four hours. Longitudinal and transversal relaxation rates were determined in the presence of colchicine-tubulin-Mn(II), (paramagnetic complex), or the ternary complex with magnesium (diamagnetic complex). The analysis of the temperature-dependent relaxation data indicates that the metal and the exchangeable nucleotide binding sites are separated by a maximal distance of 6 at 35 degrees C, to 8.1 A at 12 degrees C. PMID:2619317

  3. Intracellular pH of perfused single frog skin: combined 19F- and 31P-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Civan, M M; Lin, L E; Peterson-Yantorno, K; Taylor, J; Deutsch, C

    1984-11-01

    Intracellular pH (pHc) has been determined in frog skin by applying two different methods of pH measurement, 19F and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, to the same tissues. Results from both NMR approaches confirm an observation by Lin, Shporer, and Civan [Am. J. Physiol. 248 (Cell Physiol. 17): 1985] that acidification of the extracellular medium reverses the sign of the pH gradient present under baseline conditions. The fluorinated probe, alpha-(difluoromethyl)-alanine methyl ester, was introduced into the epithelial cells by preincubating skins for 4.7-10.4 h at room temperature in Ringer solutions containing 1 mM ester. The free amino acid was subsequently released by intracellular esterase activity, thus providing a high enough probe concentration for NMR analysis to be practicable. From measurements of short-circuit current and transepithelial resistance under base-line and experimental conditions and the appearance of phosphocreatine (PCr) in the 31P spectrum of preloaded tissues, the fluorinated probe appears to be nontoxic to frog skin. Measurement of the chemical shift of methylphosphonate relative to PCr permitted calculation of extracellular pH. Estimation of the intracellular pH was performed both by measurement of the chemical shift of inorganic phosphate (Pi) relative to PCr and by measurement of the central peak spacing of the 19F spectrum. From four direct comparisons of the two techniques in two experiments, the difference in the estimated pH was only 0.03 +/- 0.07 pH units, supporting the concept that 31P-NMR analysis is a valid method of measuring pH in this tissue. PMID:6496729

  4. Incomplete fusion studies in the 19F+159Tb system at low energies and its correlation with various systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaib, Mohd.; Sharma, Vijay R.; Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Devendra P.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2016-07-01

    The excitation functions of reaction residues populated via the complete fusion and incomplete fusion process in the interaction of the 19F+159Tb system have been measured at energies ≈4 -6 MeV/nucleon, using off-line γ -ray spectroscopy. The analysis of data was done within the framework of statistical model code pace4 (a compound nucleus model). A significant fraction of incomplete fusion was observed in the production of reaction residues involving α particle(s) in the exit channels, even at energies as low as near the Coulomb barrier. The incomplete fusion strength function was deduced from the experimental excitation functions and the dependence of this strength function on various entrance channel parameters was studied. The present results show a strong dependence on the projectile α -Q value that agrees well with the existing data. To probe the dependence of incomplete fusion on entrance channel mass asymmetry, the present work was compared with the results obtained in the interaction of 12C, 16O, and 19F with nearby targets available in the literature. It was observed that the mass asymmetry linearly increases for each projectile separately and turns out to be a projectile-dependent mass-asymmetry systematics. The deduced incomplete fusion strength functions in the present work are also plotted as a function of ZPZT (Coulomb effect) and compared with the existing literature. A strong dependence of the Coulomb effect on the incomplete fusion fraction was observed. It was found that the fraction of incomplete fusion linearly increases with ZPZT and was found to be more for larger ZPZT values indicating significantly important linear systematics.

  5. A Novel Free Flap Monitoring System Using Tissue Oximetry with Text Message Alerts.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Joseph A; Vargas, Christina R; Lin, Samuel J; Tobias, Adam M; Taghinia, Amir H; Lee, Bernard T

    2016-06-01

    Background The time to detection of vascular compromise is a significant predictor of free flap salvage outcomes as early reexploration improves salvage rates. Continuous transcutaneous near-infrared tissue oximetry is an objective, quantitative method of detecting flap vascular compromise and has been shown to allow earlier reexploration and higher salvage rates than clinical assessment alone. We designed a novel text messaging system to improve communication using tissue oximetry monitoring. Methods A retrospective review was performed of a prospectively collected database of all microsurgical breast reconstructions from 2008 to 2015. A novel text messaging system was introduced in 2013 and programmed to send text messages alert when the tissue oximetry readings suggested potential flap compromise based on established thresholds. Patient demographics and complications, including rate of reexploration and flap loss were assessed. Results There were 900 autologous microsurgical breast free flaps during the study period: 614 were monitored with standard clinical monitoring and tissue oximetry compared with 286 flaps with the additional text messaging system. There were 27 unplanned returns to the operating room in the tissue oximetry group and 5 in the text messaging group with 1 complete flap loss in each group. Reexploration occurred sooner as a result of these text message alerts (17.5 vs. 26.6 hours postoperatively), however, it did not achieve statistical significance. Conclusions We were able to demonstrate the use of a novel text messaging system for tissue oximetry. This alert system shows promise in identifying impending flap loss with rapid notification of the surgical team. PMID:27135144

  6. Assaying macrophage activity in a murine model of inflammatory bowel disease using fluorine-19 MRI.

    PubMed

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Young, Won-Bin; Ahrens, Eric T

    2012-04-01

    Macrophages have an important role in the pathogenesis of most chronic inflammatory diseases. A means of non-invasively quantifying macrophage migration would contribute significantly towards our understanding of chronic inflammatory processes and aid the evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies. We describe the use of a perfluorocarbon tracer reagent and in vivo (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify macrophage burden longitudinally. We apply these methods to evaluate the severity and three-dimensional distribution of macrophages in a murine model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). MRI results were validated by histological analysis, immunofluorescence and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Selective depletion of macrophages in vivo was also performed, further validating that macrophage accumulation of perfluorocarbon tracers was the basis of (19)F MRI signals observed in the bowel. We tested the effects of two common clinical drugs, dexamethasone and cyclosporine A, on IBD progression. Whereas cyclosporine A provided mild therapeutic effect, unexpectedly dexamethasone enhanced colon inflammation, especially in the descending colon. Overall, (19)F MRI can be used to evaluate early-stage inflammation in IBD and is suitable for evaluating putative therapeutics. Due to its high macrophage specificity and quantitative ability, we envisage (19)F MRI having an important role in evaluating a wide range of chronic inflammatory conditions mediated by macrophages. PMID:22330343

  7. Combining transcutaneous blood gas measurement and pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, Patrick; Gisiger, P A; Gardaz, J P; Spahn, D R

    2002-01-01

    We are describing the preliminary results of tests performed in adult volunteers and in adult patients during and after general anesthesia with a miniaturized single sensor combining the continuous and non-invasive measurement of oxygen saturaiton by pulse oximetry (SpO2) and transcutaneous PCO2 (OxiCarbo sensor). The sensor is heated to 42 degrees C to arterialize the cutaneous tissue and is applied at the ear lobe with a special low-pressure clip. The results indicate a good agreement between ear lobe PCO2 and arterial PCO2 in the range 35 to 70 mmHg (10 patients, number of measurements 104, regression line TcPCO2 = 1.01 PaCO2 + 0.59 mmHg, bias 1.22 mmHg, SD 3.69 mmHg) and between ear lobe SpO2 and SaO2 (bias 0.44% with SD 0.77% in the range 80% to 100%, bias 1.39% with SD 1.43% in the range 60% to 80%). The ear lobe OxiCarbog sensor detects the SpO2 change 5 to 37 sec faster than a finger sensor and the PCO2 change 9 to 48 sec faster than a transcutaneous sensor fixed at the upper arm. Further improvements versus single sensors are a higher stability of the SpO2 signal and the possibility of performing long term SpO2 and PCO2 measurement at the ear lobe. PMID:11900043

  8. Time-Resolved MRI Oximetry for Quantifying CMRO2 and Vascular Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Wehrli, Felix W; Rodgers, Zachary B; Jain, Varsha; Langham, Michael C; Li, Cheng; Licht, Daniel J; Magland, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    This brief review of magnetic resonance susceptometry summarizes the methods conceived in the authors’ laboratory during the past several years. It is shown how venous oxygen saturation is quantified in large draining veins by field mapping and how this information, in concert with simultaneous measurement of cerebral blood flow, yields CMRO2, the brain’s rate of oxygen consumption. The accuracy of this model-based approach in which the blood vessel is approximated as a long, straight cylinder, for which an analytical solution for the induced field exists, is discussed. It is shown that the approach is remarkably robust, allowing for time-resolved quantification of whole-brain metabolism at rest and in response to stimuli, thereby providing detailed information on cerebral physiology in health and disease not previously amenable by noninvasive methods. PMID:24439334

  9. Pulse Oximetry in the Physics Lab: A Colorful Alternative to Traditional Optics Curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, Ellynne; Dunlap, Justin C.; Byrd, Misti; Norlin, Casey; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    We designed a physics laboratory exercise around pulse oximetry, a noninvasive medical technique used to assess a patient's blood oxygen saturation. An alternative to a traditional optics and light lab, this exercise teaches the principles of light absorption, spectroscopy, and the properties of light, while simultaneously studying a common medical device. Pulse oximeters are ubiquitous in clinical environments; many people who have undergone surgery or visited a hospital environment have experienced the use of this device, making it a good candidate for an investigative lab. The experiment elicits the creative process of device development from students as they conduct measurements using a blood analog that reconstructs the principles of pulse oximetry.

  10. Overnight Pulse Oximetry for Evaluation of Sleep Apnea among Children with Trisomy 21

    PubMed Central

    Coverstone, Andrea M.; Bird, Merielle; Sicard, Melissa; Tao, Yu; Grange, Dorothy K.; Cleveland, Claudia; Molter, David; Kemp, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: For children with trisomy 21, polysomnography at age 4 to assess obstructive sleep disordered breathing (OSDB) is the standard of care. Oximetry alone has been used to screen for disease among children without trisomy 21. This study evaluates the potential usefulness of oximetry scoring in diagnosing OSDB among children with trisomy 21. Methods: A McGill oximetry score from 1 to 4 was derived from a full overnight PSG done on 119 consecutive pediatric subjects with trisomy 21. Most were referred to the sleep laboratory because of suspicion for OSDB. Oximetry scorers were blinded to the child's full PSG and clinical course. Results of the complete PSG were then compared to oximetry scores. Results: Obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (OAHI) was ≥ 2.5 for 50% of all subjects. Fifty-nine subjects (49.6%) had McGill Score 1 (“inconclusive”); median OAHI was 1.0 (IQR 0.4–3.3). McGill Score was 2 for 43 subjects (36.1%); median OAHI was 4.5 (IQR 1.3-8.8). Seventeen subjects (14.3%) had McGill Scores of 3 or 4; median OAHI was 16.1 (IQR 9.3–45.5, range 2.1 to 101.1). Ten percent of subjects had a considerable number of central events (≥ 2.5 respiratory events/h but OAHI < 2.5), including 7 with McGill Score 2. Conclusions: In a retrospective cohort of children with trisomy 21, McGill oximetry scores of 3 or 4 reliably identified patients with marked OSDB. The possibility of central apneas causing hypoxemia must be considered in those with McGill Score 2. With these caveats, oximetry screening should be considered when developing streamlined protocols for early intervention to treat OSDB in this population. Citation: Coverstone AM, Bird M, Sicard M, Tao Y, Grange DK, Cleveland C, Molter D, Kemp JS. Overnight pulse oximetry for evaluation of sleep apnea among children with trisomy 21. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(12):1309-1315. PMID:25325597

  11. Pulse Oximetry Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease: Bringing Evidence Into Practice.

    PubMed

    Amsbaugh, Sarah; Scott, Shannon D; Foss, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common and serious type of infant birth defect. Pulse oximetry screening has been supported in the literature as a valuable tool to aid in the prompt detection of critical defects. Pulse oximetry is easily accessible, inexpensive, and noninvasive, and can be readily performed by clinical nurses at the infant's bedside; however, it remains a technology that is underutilized in newborns. Nurses can be leaders in addressing the need to translate knowledge into practice to improve the morbidity and mortality rates in the newborn population. PMID:25458107

  12. (19)F(alpha,n)(22)Na, (22)Ne(p,n)(22)Na, and the Role of their Inverses in the Destruction of (22)Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrean, Patricia Rose

    The inverses of the 19F(α,n)22Na and 22Ne(p,n)22Na reactions may be important destruction mechanisms for 22Na in neutron-rich, high-temperature or explosive nucleosynthesis. I have measured the cross sections for the 19F(α,n)22Na and 22Ne(p,n)22Na reactions from threshold to 3.1 and 5.4 MeV, respectively. The absolute efficiency of the 4π neutron detector was determined by Monte Carlo calculations and calibrated using two standard sources and two nuclear reactions. Cross sections for the inverse reactions have been calculated using the principle of detailed balance, and reaction rates for both the reactions and their inverses determined for temperatures between 0.01 and 10 GK for 19F(α,n)22Na and between 0.1 and 10 GK for 22Ne(p,n)22Na.

  13. Application of /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance to examine covalent modification reactions of tyrosyl derivatives: a study of calcineurin catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.L.; Graves, D.J.

    1988-04-01

    The hydrolysis of fluorotyrosine phosphate by the calmodulin-activated phosphatase calcineurin has been monitored by /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Previous work had established that the /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance shift of the fluorine nucleus was altered after the phosphorylation of the phenolic hydroxyl group. The disappearance of substrate and the appearance of product can be measured simultaneously with this approach. Application of the integrated form of the Michaelis-Menten equation yields estimates of the kinetic parameter, K/sub M/, close to the values obtained by initial rate kinetics. The velocity term, V/sub M/ was also evaluated to be approximately the same value. Calcineurin was determined not to be inactivated over the time period of the reaction. The results demonstrate that /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be applied to the examination of enzyme-catalyzed reactions.

  14. Spin-label oximetry at Q- and W-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subczynski, W. K.; Mainali, L.; Camenisch, T. G.; Froncisz, W.; Hyde, J. S.

    2011-04-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1s) of small water-soluble spin-labels in the aqueous phase as well as lipid-type spin-labels in membranes increase when the microwave frequency increases from 2 to 35 GHz (Hyde, et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 108 (2004) 9524-9529). The T1s measured at W-band (94 GHz) for the water-soluble spin-labels CTPO and TEMPONE (Froncisz, et al., J. Magn. Reson. 193 (2008) 297-304) are, however, shorter than when measured at Q-band (35 GHz). In this paper, the decreasing trends at W-band have been confirmed for commonly used lipid-type spin-labels in model membranes. It is concluded that the longest values of T1 will generally be found at Q-band, noting that long values are advantageous for measurement of bimolecular collisions with oxygen. The contribution of dissolved molecular oxygen to the relaxation rate was found to be independent of microwave frequency up to 94 GHz for lipid-type spin-labels in membranes. This contribution is expressed in terms of the oxygen transport parameter W=T1-1 (Air)-T1-1 (N), which is a function of both concentration and translational diffusion of oxygen in the local environment of a spin-label. The new capabilities in measurement of the oxygen transport parameter using saturation-recovery (SR) EPR at Q- and W-band have been demonstrated in saturated (DMPC) and unsaturated (POPC) lipid bilayer membranes with the use of stearic acid ( n-SASL) and phosphatidylcholine ( n-PC) spin-labels, and compared with results obtained earlier at X-band. SR EPR spin-label oximetry at Q- and W-band has the potential to be a powerful tool for studying samples of small volume, ˜30 nL. These benefits, together with other factors such as a higher resonator efficiency parameter and a new technique for canceling free induction decay signals, are discussed.

  15. Desaturation Patterns Detected by Oximetry in a Large Population of Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrido-Chamorro, Raul P.; Gonzalez-Lorenzo, Marta; Sirvent-Belando, Jose; Blasco-Lafarga, Cristina; Roche, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Optimal exercise performance in well trained athletes can be affected by arterial oxygen saturation failure. Noninvasive detection of this phenomenon when performing a routine ergometric test can be a valuable tool for subsequent planning of the athlete's training, recovery, and nutrition. Oximetry has been used to this end. The authors studied…

  16. Pulse Oximetry in the Physics Lab: A Colorful Alternative to Traditional Optics Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutschera, Ellynne; Dunlap, Justin C.; Byrd, Misti; Norlin, Casey; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    We designed a physics laboratory exercise around pulse oximetry, a noninvasive medical technique used to assess a patient's blood oxygen saturation. An alternative to a traditional optics and light lab, this exercise teaches the principles of light absorption, spectroscopy, and the properties of light, while simultaneously studying a common…

  17. Verification of threshold activation detection (TAD) technique in prompt fission neutron detection using scintillators containing 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibczynski, P.; Kownacki, J.; Moszyński, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Gójska, A.; Gierlik, M.; Kaźmierczak, Ł.; Jakubowska, E.; Kędzierski, G.; Kujawiński, Ł.; Wojnarowicz, J.; Carrel, F.; Ledieu, M.; Lainé, F.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study ⌀ 5''× 3'' and ⌀ 2''× 2'' EJ-313 liquid fluorocarbon as well as ⌀ 2'' × 3'' BaF2 scintillators were exposed to neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source and a Sodern Genie 16GT deuterium-tritium (D+T) neutron generator. The scintillators responses to β- particles with maximum endpoint energy of 10.4 MeV from the n+19F reactions were studied. Response of a ⌀ 5'' × 3'' BC-408 plastic scintillator was also studied as a reference. The β- particles are the products of interaction of fast neutrons with 19F which is a component of the EJ-313 and BaF2 scintillators. The method of fast neutron detection via fluorine activation is already known as Threshold Activation Detection (TAD) and was proposed for photofission prompt neutron detection from fissionable and Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) in the field of Homeland Security and Border Monitoring. Measurements of the number of counts between 6.0 and 10.5 MeV with a 252Cf source showed that the relative neutron detection efficiency ratio, defined as epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'', is 32.0% ± 2.3% and 44.6% ± 3.4% for front-on and side-on orientation of the BaF2, respectively. Moreover, the ⌀ 5'' EJ-313 and side-on oriented BaF2 were also exposed to neutrons from the D+T neutron generator, and the relative efficiency epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'' was estimated to be 39.3%. Measurements of prompt photofission neutrons with the BaF2 detector by means of data acquisition after irradiation (out-of-beam) of nuclear material and between the beam pulses (beam-off) techniques were also conducted on the 9 MeV LINAC of the SAPHIR facility.

  18. Multinucleon transfer in O,1816,19F+208Pb reactions at energies near the fusion barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafferty, D. C.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Williams, E.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Luong, D. H.; McNeil, S. D.; Ramachandran, K.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Wakhle, A.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Nuclear reactions are complex, involving collisions between composite systems where many-body dynamics determines outcomes. Successful models have been developed to explain particular reaction outcomes in distinct energy and mass regimes, but a unifying picture remains elusive. The irreversible transfer of kinetic energy from the relative motion of the collision partners to their internal states, as is known to occur in deep inelastic collisions, has yet to be successfully incorporated explicitly into fully quantal reaction models. The influence of these processes on fusion is not yet quantitatively understood. Purpose: To investigate the population of high excitation energies in transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies, which are precursors to deep inelastic processes, and their dependence on the internuclear separation. Methods: Transfer probabilities and excitation energy spectra have been measured in collisions of O,1816,19F+208Pb , at various energies below and around the fusion barrier, by detecting the backscattered projectile-like fragments in a Δ E -E telescope. Results: The relative yields of different transfer outcomes are strongly driven by Q values, but change with the internuclear separation. In 16O+208Pb , single nucleon transfer dominates, with a strong contribution from -2 p transfer close to the Coulomb barrier, though this channel becomes less significant in relation to the -2 p 2 n transfer channel at larger separations. For 18O+208Pb , the -2 p 2 n channel is the dominant charge transfer mode at all separations. In the reactions with 19F,-3 p 2 n transfer is significant close to the barrier, but falls off rapidly with energy. Multinucleon transfer processes are shown to lead to high excitation energies (up to ˜15 MeV), which is distinct from single nucleon transfer modes which predominantly populate states at low excitation energy. Conclusions: Kinetic energy is transferred into internal excitations following transfer, with this

  19. Should pulse oximetry be included in GPs’ assessment of patients with obstructive lung disease?

    PubMed Central

    Dalbak, Lene G.; Straand, Jørund; Melbye, Hasse

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the associations between decreased pulse oximetry values (SpO2) and clinical, laboratory, and demographic variables in general practice patients diagnosed with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including those with both COPD and asthma in combination. Design/setting: A cross-sectional study in seven Norwegian general practices of patients aged 40 years or over who were diagnosed by their general practitioner (GP) with asthma and/or COPD. The patients were examined during a stable phase of their disease. Patients diagnosed with COPD (including those with combined COPD/asthma) and those diagnosed with asthma only were analysed separately. Main outcome measures: Decreased SpO2 values (≤ 95% and ≤ 92%). Results: Of 372 patients included (mean age 61.5 years, 62% women), 82 (22.0%) had SpO2 ≤ 95%, of which 11 had SpO2 ≤ 92%. In both asthma and COPD patients, SpO2 ≤ 95% was significantly associated with reduced lung function (spirometry), a diagnosis of coronary heart disease and older age (≥ 65 years). In the COPD group, haemoglobin above normal was associated with SpO2 ≤ 95%. These associations were confirmed by multivariable logistic regression, where FEV1% predicted < 50 was the strongest predictor of SpO2 ≤ 95% (odds ratio 6.8, 95% confidence interval 2.8–16.4). Conclusion. Pulse oximetry represents a useful diagnostic adjunct for assessing the severity of obstructive pulmonary disease. Decreased pulse oximetry values in stable-phase patients with asthma and/or COPD should prompt the GP to consider revising the diagnosis and treatment and to look for co-morbidities.Key PointsDespite its common use in general practice, the diagnostic benefits of pulse oximetry remain to be established.Decreased pulse oximetry values are associated with both reduced lung function (spirometry) and with a diagnosis of coronary heart disease.Decreased pulse oximetry values may reflect suboptimal

  20. Evaluating the impact of pulse oximetry on childhood pneumonia mortality in resource-poor settings.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Jessica; Wu, Lindsey; Hay Burgess, Deborah; Izadnegahdar, Rasa; Mukanga, David; Ghani, Azra C

    2015-12-01

    It is estimated that pneumonia is responsible for 15% of childhood deaths worldwide. Recent research has shown that hypoxia and malnutrition are strong predictors of mortality in children hospitalized for pneumonia. It is estimated that 15% of children under 5 who are hospitalized for pneumonia have hypoxaemia and that around 1.5 million children with severe pneumonia require oxygen treatment each year. We developed a deterministic compartmental model that links the care pathway to disease progression to assess the impact of introducing pulse oximetry as a prognostic tool to distinguish severe from non-severe pneumonia in under-5 year olds across 15 countries with the highest burden worldwide. We estimate that, assuming access to supplemental oxygen, pulse oximetry has the potential to avert up to 148,000 deaths if implemented across the 15 countries. By contrast, integrated management of childhood illness alone has a relatively small impact on mortality owing to its low sensitivity. Pulse oximetry can significantly increase the incidence of correctly treated severe cases as well as reduce the incidence of incorrect treatment with antibiotics. We also found that the combination of pulse oximetry with integrated management of childhood illness is highly cost-effective, with median estimates ranging from US$2.97 to $52.92 per disability-adjusted life year averted in the 15 countries analysed. This combination of substantial burden reduction and favourable cost-effectiveness makes pulse oximetry a promising candidate for improving the prognosis for children with pneumonia in resource-poor settings. PMID:26633766

  1. CP-MAS 207Pb with 19F decoupling NMR spectroscopy: medium range investigation in fluoride materials.

    PubMed

    Bureau, B; Silly, G; Buzaré, J Y

    1999-11-01

    The isotropic chemical shift of 207Pb is used to perform structural investigations of crystalline fluoride compounds (PbF2, Pb2ZnF6, PbGaF5, Pb3Ga2F12 and Pb9Ga2F24) and transition metal fluoride glasses (TMFG) of the PZG family (PbF2-ZnF2-GaF3). Using 207Pb Cross Polarisation Magic Angle Spinning (CP-MAS) NMR with 19F decoupling, it is shown that the isotropic chemical shift of 207Pb varies on a large scale (1000 ppm) and that the main changes of its value are not due to the nearest neighbour fluorines but may be related to the number of next nearest neighbour (nnn) Pb2+ ions. In this way, it is demonstrated that 207Pb chemical shift is an interesting probe to investigate medium range order in either crystalline or glassy fluoride systems. The 207Pb delta(iso) parameter has been linearly correlated to the number of nnn Pb2+ ions. PMID:10670899

  2. Study of the metabolism of flucytosine in Aspergillus species by sup 19 F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chouini-Lalanne, N.; Malet-Martino, M.C.; Martino, R.; Michel, G. )

    1989-11-01

    The metabolism of flucytosine (5FC) in two Aspergillus species (Aspergillus fumigatus and A. niger) was investigated by 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In intact mycelia, 5FC was found to be deaminated to 5-fluorouracil and then transformed into fluoronucleotides; the catabolite alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine was also detected in A. fumigatus. Neither 5-fluoroorotic acid nor 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate was detected in perchloric acid extracts after any incubation with 5FC. 5FC, 5-fluorouracil, and the classical fluoronucleotides 5-fluorouridine-5'-mono-, di-, and triphosphates were identified in the acid-soluble pool. Two hydrolysis products of 5-fluorouracil incorporated into RNA, 5-fluorouridine-2'-monophosphate and 5-fluorouridine-3'-monophosphate, were found in the acid-insoluble pool. No significant differences in the metabolic transformation of 5FC were noted in the two species of Aspergillus. The main pathway of 5FC metabolism in the two species of Aspergillus studied is thus the biotransformation into ribofluoronucleotides and the subsequent incorporation of 5-fluorouridine-5'-triphosphate into RNA.

  3. A Miniaturized, 1.9F Integrated Optical Fiber and Stone Basket for Use in Thulium Fiber Laser Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher R; Hutchens, Thomas C; Hardy, Luke A; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2015-10-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored as an alternative laser lithotripter to the standard holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The more uniform beam profile of the TFL enables higher power transmission through smaller fibers. In this study, a 100-μm core, 140-μm outer-diameter (OD) silica fiber with 5-mm length hollow steel tip was integrated with 1.3F (0.433-mm OD) nitinol wire basket to form a 1.9F (0.633-mm OD) device. TFL energy of 30 mJ, 500 μs pulse duration, and 500 Hz pulse rate was delivered to human uric acid stones, ex vivo. Stone ablation rates measured 1.5 ± 0.2 mg/s, comparable to 1.7 ± 0.3 mg/s using bare fiber tips separately with stone basket. With further development, this device may minimize stone retropulsion, allowing more efficient TFL lithotripsy at higher pulse rates. It may also provide increased flexibility, higher saline irrigation rates through the ureteroscope working channel, reduce fiber degradation compared with separate fiber and basket manipulation, and reduce laser-induced nitinol wire damage. PMID:26167738

  4. Modulation of the antioxidant activity of HO* scavengers by albumin binding: a 19F-NMR study.

    PubMed

    Aime, Silvio; Digilio, Giuseppe; Bruno, Erik; Mainero, Valentina; Baroni, Simona; Fasano, Mauro

    2003-08-01

    The interaction between different HO(z.rad;) radical scavengers in a three-component antioxidant system has been investigated by means of 19F-NMR spectroscopy. This system is composed of bovine serum albumin (BSA), trolox, and N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-trifluoroacetamide (CF(3)PAF). The antioxidant capacity of BSA and trolox has been assessed by measuring the amount of trifluoroacetamide (TFAM) arising from the radical mediated decomposition of CF(3)PAF. When assayed separately, both trolox and BSA behaved as antioxidants, as they were effective to protect CF(3)PAF from HO* radical-mediated decomposition. By contrast, trolox enhanced the production of TFAM in the presence of BSA, thus behaving as a pro-oxidant. Urate, carnosine, glucose, and propylgallate showed antioxidant properties both with or without BSA. CF(3)PAF and trolox were found to bind to BSA with association constants in the order of 5 x 10(3)M(-1) and to compete for the same binding sites. These results have been discussed in terms of BSA-catalysed cross-reactions between trolox-derived secondary radicals and CF(3)PAF. PMID:12878205

  5. Fission-fragment angular distributions for the 19F + 208Pb near- and sub-barrier fusion-fission reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huanqiao, Zhang; Zuhua, Liu; Jincheng, Xu; Kan, Xu; Jun, Lu; Ming, Ruan

    1990-06-01

    Fission cross sections and angular distributions have been measured for the 19F + 208Pb reaction at bombarding energies from 83 to 105 MeV. The fission excitation function is well reproduced on the basis of the coupled-channels theory. The fission-fragment angular distributions are calculated in terms of the transition-state theory, with the transmission coefficients extracted from the excitation function calculation. It is found that a discrepancy between the observations and the predictions in angular anisotropy of fission fragments exists at near- and sub-barrier energies, except for lower and higher energy regions where the discrepancy tends to disappear. Moreover, the anisotropies as a function of the center-of-mass energy show a shoulder around 82 MeV. Our results clearly indicate the considerable effects of the coupling on the sub-barrier fusion cross section and on the near-barrier compound-nucleus spin distribution, and confirm the prediction of an approximately constant value for the mean square spin of a compound nucleus produced in a far sub-barrier fusion reaction.

  6. Precision spectroscopy of the {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F molecule: Implications for measurement of P-odd and T-odd effects

    SciTech Connect

    Alphei, Lukas D.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Petrov, A. N.; Mawhorter, Richard; Murphy, Benjamin; Baum, Alexander; Sears, Trevor J.; Yang, T. Zh.; Rupasinghe, P. M.; McRaven, C. P.; Shafer-Ray, N. E.

    2011-04-15

    Here we report precision microwave spectroscopy of pure rotational transitions of the {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F isotopologue. We use these data to make predictions of the sensitivity of the molecule to P-odd, T-even and P-odd, T-odd effects.

  7. (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxation and CH3 or CF3 reorientation in molecular solids containing both H and F atoms.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Peter A; Rheingold, Arnold L

    2016-04-21

    The dynamics of methyl (CH3) and fluoromethyl (CF3) groups in organic molecular (van der Waals) solids can be exploited to survey their local environments. We report solid state (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxationexperiments in polycrystalline 3-trifluoromethoxycinnamic acid, along with an X-ray diffraction determination of the molecular and crystal structure, to investigate the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions that determine the properties that characterize the CF3 reorientation. The molecule is of no particular interest; it simply provides a motionless backbone (on the nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) time scale) to investigate CF3 reorientation occurring on the NMR time scale. The effects of (19)F-(19)F and (19)F-(1)H spin-spin dipolar interactions on the complicated nonexponential NMRrelaxation provide independent inputs into determining a model for CF3 reorientation. As such, these experiments provide much more information than when only one spin species (usually (1)H) is present. In Sec. IV, which can be read immediately after the Introduction without reading the rest of the paper, we compare the barrier to CH3 and CF3 reorientation in seven organic solids and separate this barrier into intramolecular and intermolecular components. PMID:27389221

  8. 1H and 19F spin-lattice relaxation and CH3 or CF3 reorientation in molecular solids containing both H and F atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Peter A.; Rheingold, Arnold L.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of methyl (CH3) and fluoromethyl (CF3) groups in organic molecular (van der Waals) solids can be exploited to survey their local environments. We report solid state 1H and 19F spin-lattice relaxation experiments in polycrystalline 3-trifluoromethoxycinnamic acid, along with an X-ray diffraction determination of the molecular and crystal structure, to investigate the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions that determine the properties that characterize the CF3 reorientation. The molecule is of no particular interest; it simply provides a motionless backbone (on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) time scale) to investigate CF3 reorientation occurring on the NMR time scale. The effects of 19F-19F and 19F-1H spin-spin dipolar interactions on the complicated nonexponential NMR relaxation provide independent inputs into determining a model for CF3 reorientation. As such, these experiments provide much more information than when only one spin species (usually 1H) is present. In Sec. IV, which can be read immediately after the Introduction without reading the rest of the paper, we compare the barrier to CH3 and CF3 reorientation in seven organic solids and separate this barrier into intramolecular and intermolecular components.

  9. Direct mapping of 19F in 19FDG-6P in brain tissue at subcellular resolution using soft X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitry-Yamate, C.; Gianoncelli, A.; Kourousias, G.; Kaulich, B.; Lepore, M.; Gruetter, R.; Kiskinova, M.

    2013-10-01

    Low energy x-ray fluorescence (LEXRF) detection was optimized for imaging cerebral glucose metabolism by mapping the fluorine LEXRF signal of 19F in 19FDG, trapped as intracellular 19F-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate (19FDG-6P) at 1μm spatial resolution from 3μm thick brain slices. 19FDG metabolism was evaluated in brain structures closely resembling the general cerebral cytoarchitecture following formalin fixation of brain slices and their inclusion in an epon matrix. 2-dimensional distribution maps of 19FDG-6P were placed in a cytoarchitectural and morphological context by simultaneous LEXRF mapping of N and O, and scanning transmission x-ray (STXM) imaging. A disproportionately high uptake and metabolism of glucose was found in neuropil relative to intracellular domains of the cell body of hypothalamic neurons, showing directly that neurons, like glial cells, also metabolize glucose. As 19F-deoxyglucose-6P is structurally identical to 18F-deoxyglucose-6P, LEXRF of subcellular 19F provides a link to in vivo 18FDG PET, forming a novel basis for understanding the physiological mechanisms underlying the 18FDG PET image, and the contribution of neurons and glia to the PET signal.

  10. Lifetime-parameters for quasi elastic and deep inelastic collisions extracted from complete angular distributions of89Y(19F, x) y reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suomijärvi, T.; Lucas, R.; Mermaz, M. C.; Coffin, J.-P.; Guillaume, G.; Heusch, B.; Jundt, F.; Rami, F.

    1985-09-01

    Energy spectra and angular distributions of heavy fragments produced in 19F + 89Y reaction at 140 MeV incident energy have been measured. Two different domains of reaction mechanism are observed at forward and backward angles respectively; the corresponding lifetime parameters are extracted from their angular distributions.

  11. Calculation of vibrational branching ratios and hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F and its suitability for laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Yin, Yanning; Wei, Bin; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    More recently, laser cooling of the diatomic radical magnesium monofluoride (24Mg19F ) is being experimentally preformed [Appl. Phys. Express 8, 092701 (2015), 10.7567/APEX.8.092701 and Opt. Express 22, 28645 (2014), 10.1364/OE.22.028645] and was also studied theoretically [Phys. Rev. A 91, 042511 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.042511]. However, some important problems still remain unsolved, so, in our paper, we perform further theoretical study for the feasibility of laser cooling and trapping the 24Mg19F molecule. At first, the highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors of the main transitions are verified by the closed-form approximation, Morse approximation, and Rydberg-Klein-Rees inversion methods, respectively. Afterwards, we investigate the lower X 2Σ1/2 + hyperfine manifolds using a quantum effective Hamiltonian approach and obtain the zero-field hyperfine spectrum with an accuracy of less than 30 kHz ˜5 μ K compared with the experimental results, and then find out that one cooling beam and one or two repumping beams with their first-order sidebands are enough to implement an efficient laser slowing and cooling of 24Mg19F . Meanwhile, we also calculate the accurate hyperfine structure magnetic g factors of the rotational state (X 2Σ1/2 +,N =1 ) and briefly discuss the influence of the external fields on the hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F as well as its possibility of preparing three-dimensional magneto-optical trapping. Finally we give an explanation for the difference between the Stark and Zeeman effects from the perspective of parity and time reversal symmetry. Our study shows that, besides appropriate excitation wavelengths, the short lifetime for the first excited state A 2Π1 /2 , and lighter mass, the 24Mg19F radical could be a good candidate molecule amenable to laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping.

  12. 1H and 19F NMR studies on molecular motions and phase transitions in solid triethylammonium tetrafluoroborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Seki, Riki; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Ishida, Hiroyuki

    1995-02-01

    Measurements by differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry and of the spin-lattice relaxation time ( T1), the spin-spin relaxation time ( T2), and the second moment ( M2) of 1H and 19F NMR were carried out in the three solid phases of (CH 3CH 2) 3NHBF 4. X-ray powder patterns were taken in the highest-temperature phase (Phase I) existing above 367 K and the room-temperature phase (Phase II) stable between 220 and 367 K. Phase I formed a NaCl-type cubic structure with a = 11.65(3) Å, Z = 4, V = 1581(13) Å3, and Dx = 0.794 g cm -3, and was expected to be an ionic plastic phase. In this phase, the self-diffusion of anions and the isotropic reorientation of cations were observed. Phase II formed a tetragonal structure with a = 12.47(1) and c = 9.47(3) Å, Z = 4, V = 1473(6) Å3, and Dx = 0.852 g cm -3. From the present DSC and NMR results in this phase, the cations and/or anions were considered to be dynamically disordered states. The C3 reorientation of the cation about the NH bond axis was detected and, in addition, the onset of nutation of the cations and local diffusion of the anions was suggested. In the low-temperature phase (Phase III) stable below 219 K, the C3 reorientations of the three methyl groups of cations and the isotropic reorientation of anions were observed. The motional parameters for these modes were evaluated.

  13. 19F Magic angle spinning NMR reporter molecules: empirical measures of surface shielding, polarisability and H-bonding.

    PubMed

    Budarin, Vitaliy L; Clark, James H; Deswarte, Fabien E I; Mueller, Karl T; Tavener, Stewart J

    2007-06-14

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) (19)F NMR spectra have been obtained and chemical shifts measured for 37 molecules in the gas phase and adsorbed on the surfaces of six common materials: octadecyl- and octyl-functionalised chromatography silicas, Kieselgel 100 silica, Brockmann neutral alumina, Norit activated charcoal and 3-(1-piperidino)propyl functionalised silica. From these six surfaces, octadecyl-silica is selected as a non-polar reference to which the others are compared. The change in chemical shift of a fluorine nucleus within a molecule on adsorption to a surface from the gas phase, Deltadelta(gas)(surface), is described by the empirical relationship: Deltadelta(gas)(surface) = delta(s) + (alpha(s)+pi(s))/alpha(r) (Deltadelta(gas)(reference) - delta(r)) + delta(HBA) + delta(HBD), where delta(s) and delta(r) are constants that describe the chemical shift induced by the electromagnetic field of the surface under investigation and reference surface, alpha(s) and alpha(r) are the relative surface polarisability for the surface and reference, pi(s) is an additional contribution to the surface polarisabilities due to its ability to interact with aromatic molecules, and delta(HBA) and delta(HBD) are measurements of the hydrogen acceptor and donor properties of the surface. These empirical parameters are measured for the surfaces under study. Silica and alumina are found to undergo specific interactions with aromatic reporter molecules and both accept and donate H-bonds. Activated charcoal was found to have an extreme effect on shielding but no specific interactions with the adsorbed molecules. 3-(1-Piperidino)propyl functionalised silica exhibits H-bond acceptor ability, but does not donate H-bonds. PMID:17487325

  14. Evidence for the importance of 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine catabolism in humans from 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malet-Martino, M C; Armand, J P; Lopez, A; Bernadou, J; Béteille, J P; Bon, M; Martino, R

    1986-04-01

    The use of a new methodology, 19F nuclear magnetic resonance, has allowed detection of all the fluorinated metabolites in the biofluids of patients treated with 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-dFUrd) injected i.v. at a dose of 10 g/m2 over 6 h. This technique, which requires no labeled drug, allows a direct study of the biological sample with no need for extraction or derivatization and a simultaneous identification and quantitation of all the different fluorinated metabolites. As well as the already known metabolites, unmetabolized 5'-dFUrd, 5-fluorouracil, and 5,6-dihydro-5-fluorouracil, the presence of alpha-fluoro-beta-ureidopropionic acid, alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL), N-carboxy-alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine, and the fluoride anion F- is reported. The catabolic pathway proposed for 5'-dFUrd is analogous to that of 5-fluorouracil, completed with FBAL----F- step, and the plasmatic equilibrium of FBAL with N-carboxy-alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine, its N-carboxy derivative. The quantitative analysis of the different metabolites found in plasma and urine emphasizes the significance of the catabolic pathway. High concentrations of alpha-fluoro-beta ureidopropionic acid and FBAL are recovered in plasma from 3 h after the beginning of the perfusion to 1 h after its end. The global urinary excretion results show that there is a high excretion of 5'-dFUrd and metabolites. Unchanged 5'-dFUrd and FBAL are by far the major excretory products and are at nearly equal rates. The protocol followed in this study produces relatively low but persistent plasmatic concentrations of 5-fluorouracil throughout the perfusion. PMID:2936452

  15. Automated data evaluation and modelling of simultaneous (19) F-(1) H medium-resolution NMR spectra for online reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Paul, Andrea; Engel, Dirk; Guthausen, Gisela; Kraume, Matthias; Maiwald, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Medium-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MR-NMR) currently develops to an important analytical tool for both quality control and process monitoring. In contrast to high-resolution online NMR (HR-NMR), MR-NMR can be operated under rough environmental conditions. A continuous re-circulating stream of reaction mixture from the reaction vessel to the NMR spectrometer enables a non-invasive, volume integrating online analysis of reactants and products. Here, we investigate the esterification of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol with acetic acid to 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl acetate both by (1) H HR-NMR (500 MHz) and (1) H and (19) F MR-NMR (43 MHz) as a model system. The parallel online measurement is realised by splitting the flow, which allows the adjustment of quantitative and independent flow rates, both in the HR-NMR probe as well as in the MR-NMR probe, in addition to a fast bypass line back to the reactor. One of the fundamental acceptance criteria for online MR-MNR spectroscopy is a robust data treatment and evaluation strategy with the potential for automation. The MR-NMR spectra are treated by an automated baseline and phase correction using the minimum entropy method. The evaluation strategies comprise (i) direct integration, (ii) automated line fitting, (iii) indirect hard modelling (IHM) and (iv) partial least squares regression (PLS-R). To assess the potential of these evaluation strategies for MR-NMR, prediction results are compared with the line fitting data derived from the quantitative HR-NMR spectroscopy. Although, superior results are obtained from both IHM and PLS-R for (1) H MR-NMR, especially the latter demands for elaborate data pretreatment, whereas IHM models needed no previous alignment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25854892

  16. Accuracy and precision of MR blood oximetry based on the long paramagnetic cylinder approximation of large vessels.

    PubMed

    Langham, Michael C; Magland, Jeremy F; Epstein, Charles L; Floyd, Thomas F; Wehrli, Felix W

    2009-08-01

    An accurate noninvasive method to measure the hemoglobin oxygen saturation (%HbO(2)) of deep-lying vessels without catheterization would have many clinical applications. Quantitative MRI may be the only imaging modality that can address this difficult and important problem. MR susceptometry-based oximetry for measuring blood oxygen saturation in large vessels models the vessel as a long paramagnetic cylinder immersed in an external field. The intravascular magnetic susceptibility relative to surrounding muscle tissue is a function of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO(2)) and can be quantified with a field-mapping pulse sequence. In this work, the method's accuracy and precision was investigated theoretically on the basis of an analytical expression for the arbitrarily oriented cylinder, as well as experimentally in phantoms and in vivo in the femoral artery and vein at 3T field strength. Errors resulting from vessel tilt, noncircularity of vessel cross-section, and induced magnetic field gradients were evaluated and methods for correction were designed and implemented. Hemoglobin saturation was measured at successive vessel segments, differing in geometry, such as eccentricity and vessel tilt, but constant blood oxygen saturation levels, as a means to evaluate measurement consistency. The average standard error and coefficient of variation of measurements in phantoms were <2% with tilt correction alone, in agreement with theory, suggesting that high accuracy and reproducibility can be achieved while ignoring noncircularity for tilt angles up to about 30 degrees . In vivo, repeated measurements of %HbO(2) in the femoral vessels yielded a coefficient of variation of less than 5%. In conclusion, the data suggest that %HbO(2) can be measured reproducibly in vivo in large vessels of the peripheral circulation on the basis of the paramagnetic cylinder approximation of the incremental field. PMID:19526517

  17. Alternate strategies to obtain mass balance without the use of radiolabeled compounds: application of quantitative fluorine (19F) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in metabolism studies.

    PubMed

    Mutlib, Abdul; Espina, Robert; Atherton, James; Wang, Jianyao; Talaat, Rasmy; Scatina, JoAnn; Chandrasekaran, Appavu

    2012-03-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is playing an increasingly important role in the quantitation of small and large molecules. Recently, we demonstrated that (1)H NMR could be used to quantitate drug metabolites isolated in submilligram quantities from biological sources. It was shown that these metabolites, once quantitated by NMR, were suitable to be used as reference standards in quantitative LC/MS-based assays, hence circumventing the need for radiolabeled material or synthetic standards to obtain plasma exposure estimates in humans and preclinical species. The quantitative capabilities of high-field NMR is further demonstrated in the current study by obtaining the mass balance of fluorinated compounds using (19)F-NMR. Two fluorinated compounds which were radio-labeled with carbon-14 on metabolically stable positions were dosed in rats and urine and feces collected. The mass balance of the compounds was obtained initially by counting the radioactivity present in each sample. Subsequently, the same sets of samples were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, and the concentrations determined by this method were compared with data obtained using radioactivity counting. It was shown that the two methods produced comparable values. To demonstrate the value of this analytical technique in drug discovery, a fluorinated compound was dosed intravenously in dogs and feces and urine collected. Initial profiling of samples showed that this compound was excreted mainly unchanged in feces, and hence, an estimate of mass balance was obtained using (19)F-NMR. The data obtained by this method was confirmed by additional quantitative studies using mass spectrometry. Hence cross-validations of the quantitative (19)F-NMR method by radioactivity counting and mass spectrometric analysis were demonstrated in this study. A strategy outlining the use of fluorinated compounds in conjunction with (19)F-NMR to understand their routes of excretion or mass balance in animals is proposed. These

  18. Comparison of dysphagics and nondysphagics on pulse oximetry during oral feeding.

    PubMed

    Colodny, N

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether significant differences in SpO(2) levels existed among elderly individuals with dysphagia, and, more specifically, whether pulse oximetry can discriminate dysphagic from nondysphagic individuals. In addition, differences in SpO(2) between liquid aspirators, solid aspirators, laryngeal penetrators, and normals was investigated in a sample of 181 subjects, 104 of whom were dysphagic. Results indicated that aspirators had lower SpO(2) levels before, during, and after feeding compared with nonaspirators. Solid aspirators were the most compromised. No relation was found between SpO(2) levels and aspiration. Pulse levels rose for all subjects from before to during feeding, declining slightly thereafter. These data were consistent with previous findings that dysphagics have compromised pulmonary systems but at variance with studies that indicated changes in pulse oximetry during aspiration. PMID:10758188

  19. Theoretical considerations to optimize transabdominal monitoring of fetal arterial blood oxygenation using pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zourabian, Anna; Boas, David A.

    2001-06-01

    Pulse oximetry (oxygen saturation monitoring) has markedly improved medical care in many fields, including anesthesiology, intensive care, and newborn intensive care. In obstetrics, fetal heart rate monitoring remains the standard for intrapartum assessment of fetal well being. Fetal oxygen saturation monitoring is a new technique currently under development. It is potentially superior to electronic fetal heart rate monitoring (cardiotocography) because it allows direct assessment of both fetal oxygen status and fetal tissue perfusion. Here we present the analysis for determining the most optimal wavelength selection for pulse oximetry. The wavelengths we chose as the most optimal are: the first in the range of 670-720nm and the second in the range of 825-925nm. Further we discuss the possible systematic errors during our measurements, and their contribution to the obtained saturation results.

  20. Pulse oximetry error in a patient with a Santa Ana haemoglobinopathy.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Alistair; Rahemtulla, Amin

    2016-01-01

    A young man with a rare unstable haemoglobinopathy presented with a high fever, worsening shortness of breath and abdominal pain. At triage his pulse oximetry (SpO2) suggested that his blood oxygen saturation was 84% at room air. However, an arterial blood gas (ABG) oxygen saturation reading (SaO2) was 100%. The significant disparity between the two measurements demonstrates that using pulse oximetry in some unstable haemoglobinopathies may significantly underestimate the actual reading. This error is most probably due to the structural differences in the variant haemoglobin causing light to be absorbed at a different wavelength beyond the normal range of the oximeter. Haemoglobinopathies affect about 7% of the world's population and is often asymptomatic; so, there may be many more undiagnosed cases. Therefore, clinicians may confirm low SpO2 readings with an ABG and, where there is significant disparity with no obvious extrinsic cause, they should consider haemoglobinopathies. PMID:27599809

  1. Pulse oximetry: A reliable and cost effective screening tool in children with pneumonia for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Muhammad Akhter; Chandna, Ayesha; Siddiqui, Sohaib; Fayyaz, Jabeen

    2016-08-01

    The infant mortality rates are high in developing countries and, according to World Health Organisation (WHO), statistics show that the main contributors are acute respiratory infections and pneumonia. In children hypoxaemia is an ominous sign associated with respiratory tract infections. Hypoxia can be detected easily with pulse oximetry. It is a non-invasive, readily available and cost-effective way to identify hypoxaemia. If we identify hypoxaemia at the primary care level, especially in a low-income setting, we can make early referral to tertiary care settings. This will subsequently have a positive impact in saving lives. A detailed search of Medline database was conducted through PubMed from 1990 to date, to review the literature on the usefulness of pulse oximetry at primary care centres in developing countries. Such information will become vital in formulating guidelines for income-poor countries in order to stratify high-risk children with hypoxaemia. PMID:27524539

  2. Fluorine-19 MRI for visualization and quantification of cell migration in a diabetes model.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Mangala; Morel, Penelope A; Ernst, Lauren A; Laidlaw, David H; Ahrens, Eric T

    2007-10-01

    This article describes an in vivo imaging method for visualizing and quantifying a specific cell population. Cells are labeled ex vivo with a perfluoropolyether nanoparticle tracer agent and then detected in vivo using (19)F MRI following cell transfer. (19)F MRI selectively visualizes only the labeled cells with no background, and a conventional (1)H image taken in the same imaging session provides anatomical context. Using the nonobese diabetic mouse, an established model of type 1 diabetes, (19)F MRI data were acquired showing the early homing behavior of diabetogenic T cells to the pancreas. A computational algorithm provided T cell counts in the pancreas. Approximately 2% of the transferred cells homed to the pancreas after 48 hr. The technique allows for both unambiguous detection of labeled cells and quantification directly from the in vivo images. The in vivo quantification and cell trafficking patterns were verified using (19)F spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy in excised pancreata. The labeling procedure did not affect T-cell migration in vivo. This imaging platform is applicable to many cell types and disease models and can potentially be used for monitoring the trafficking of cellular therapeutics. PMID:17899609

  3. Functional muscle studies by dual-wavelength eight-channel time-resolved oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Biscotti, Giovanni; Pifferi, Antonio; Taroni, Paola; Torricelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Marco; Quaresima, Valentina

    2003-10-01

    A portable instrument for tissue oximetry based on time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy was developed. The performances of the system were tested on phantoms in terms of stability, reproducibility among channels, and accuracy in the determination of the optical properties. Preliminary in vivo measurements were performed on healthy volunteers to monitor spatial changes in calf (medial and lateral gastrocnemius) oxygen hemoglobin saturation and blood volume during dynamic plantar flexion exercise.

  4. Peri-operative pulse oximetry in low-income countries: a cost–effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chilton, Peter J; Gawande, Atul A; Lilford, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the cost–effectiveness of pulse oximetry – compared with no peri-operative monitoring – during surgery in low-income countries. Methods We considered the use of tabletop and portable, hand-held pulse oximeters among patients of any age undergoing major surgery in low-income countries. From earlier studies we obtained baseline mortality and the effectiveness of pulse oximeters to reduce mortality. We considered the direct costs of purchasing and maintaining pulse oximeters as well as the cost of supplementary oxygen used to treat hypoxic episodes identified by oximetry. Health benefits were measured in disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted and benefits and costs were both discounted at 3% per year. We used recommended cost–effectiveness thresholds – both absolute and relative to gross domestic product (GDP) per capita – to assess if pulse oximetry is a cost–effective health intervention. To test the robustness of our results we performed sensitivity analyses. Findings In 2013 prices, tabletop and hand-held oximeters were found to have annual costs of 310 and 95 United States dollars (US$), respectively. Assuming the two types of oximeter have identical effectiveness, a single oximeter used for 22 procedures per week averted 0.83 DALYs per annum. The tabletop and hand-held oximeters cost US$ 374 and US$ 115 per DALY averted, respectively. For any country with a GDP per capita above US$ 677 the hand-held oximeter was found to be cost–effective if it prevented just 1.7% of anaesthetic-related deaths or 0.3% of peri-operative mortality. Conclusion Pulse oximetry is a cost–effective intervention for low-income settings. PMID:25552770

  5. A rapid Look-Locker imaging sequence for quantitative tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidya Shankar, Rohini; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.

    2015-03-01

    Tissue oximetry studies using magnetic resonance imaging are increasingly contributing to advances in the imaging and treatment of cancer. The non-invasive measurement of tissue oxygenation (pO2) may facilitate a better understanding of the pathophysiology and prognosis of diseases, particularly in the assessment of the extensive hypoxic regions associated with cancerous lesions. The availability of tumor hypoxia maps could help quantify and predict tumor response to intervention and therapy. The PISTOL (Proton Imaging of Siloxanes to map Tissue Oxygenation Levels) oximetry technique maps the T1 of administered hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), an 1H NMR pO2 reporter molecule in about 3 ½ min. This allows us to subsequently monitor static and dynamic changes in the tissue pO2 (in response to intervention) at various locations due to the linear relationship between 1/T1 and pO2. In this work, an HMDSO-selective Look-Locker imaging sequence with EPI readout has been developed to enable faster PISTOL acquisitions. The new sequence incorporates the fast Look-Locker measurement method to enable T1, and hence, pO2 mapping of HMDSO in under one minute. To demonstrate the application of this pulse sequence in vivo, 50 μL of neat HMDSO was administered to the thigh muscle of a healthy rat (Fischer F344, n=4). Dynamic changes in the mean pO2 of the thigh muscle were measured using both PISTOL and the developed LL oximetry sequence in response to oxygen challenge and compared. Results demonstrate the efficacy of the new sequence in rapidly mapping the pO2 changes, leading to advances in fast quantitative 1H MR oximetry.

  6. Cerebral oximetry in preterm infants: an agenda for research with a clear clinical goal.

    PubMed

    Greisen, Gorm; Andresen, Bjørn; Plomgaard, Anne Mette; Hyttel-Sørensen, Simon

    2016-07-01

    Preterm birth constitutes a major cause of death before 5 years of age and it is a major cause of neurodevelopmental impairment across the world. Preterm infants are most unstable during the transition between fetal and newborn life during the first days of life and most brain damage occurs in this period. The brain of the preterm infant is accessible for tissue oximetry by near-infrared spectroscopy. Cerebral oximetry has the potential to improve the long-term outcome by helping to tailor the support of respiration and circulation to the individual infant's needs, but the evidence is still lacking. The goals for research include testing the benefit and harms of cerebral oximetry in large-scale randomized trials, improved definition of the hypoxic threshold, better understanding the effects of intensive care on cerebral oxygenation, as well as improved precision of oximeters and calibration among devices or standardization of values in the hypoxic range. These goals can be pursued in parallel. PMID:27158632

  7. Trans-abdominal monitoring of fetal arterial blood oxygenation using pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zourabian, Anna; Siegel, Andrew M.; Chance, Britton; Ramanujam, Nirmala; Rode, Martha; Boas, David A.

    2000-10-01

    Pulse oximetry (oxygen saturation monitoring) has markedly improved medical care in many fields, including anesthesiology, intensive care, and newborn intensive care. In obstetrics, fetal heart rate monitoring remains the standard for intrapartum assessment of fetal well being. Fetal oxygen saturation monitoring is a new technique currently under development. It is potentially superior to electronic fetal heart rate monitoring (cardiotocography) because it allows direct assessment of both the fetal oxygen status and fetal tissue perfusion. Here we present the analysis for determining the most optimal wavelength selection for pulse oximetry. The wavelengths we chose as the most optimal are the first in the range of 670 - 720 nm and the second in the range of 825 - 925 nm. Further, we discuss the possible systematic errors during our measurements and their contribution to the obtained saturation results. We present feasibility studies for fetal pulse oximetry, monitored noninvasively through the maternal abdomen. Our preliminary experiments show that the fetal pulse can be discriminated from the maternal pulse and thus, in principle, the fetal arterial oxygen saturation can be obtained. We present the methodology for obtaining these data, and discuss the dependence of our measurements on the fetal position with respect to the optode assembly.

  8. Evaluation of cerebral oximetry during endovascular treatment of carotid-cavernous fistula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujovny, Manuel; Misra, Mukesh; Alp, M. Serdar; Debrun, Gerard; Charbel, F. T.; Aletich, Victor; Ausman, James I.

    1997-08-01

    Endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous fistula is done routinely in our institution. We have been monitoring these patients with transcranial cerebral oximetry. The transcranial cerebral oximeter is a reliable, low-cost, non-invasive device that provides real-time evaluation of regional brain oxygen saturation during and after endovascular treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. We used the INVOS 3100A (Somanetics, Troy, MI) in our study. We discuss seven patients with carotid-cavernous fistulas treated by endovascular balloon occlusion, each monitored continuously before, during, and after the procedure with transcranial cerebral oximetry. The cerebral oxygen saturation depicted was directly related to the side of the venous drainage of the fistula, with the brain oxygen saturation 15 - 20% higher on the side of the venous drainage. Following endovascular occlusion of the fistula, oxygen saturation gradually became equal on both sides. In our patients treated for carotid-cavernous fistula, we evaluated the sensitivity and usefulness of cerebral oximetry as an important non-invasive monitoring tool for the endovascular treatment of carotid-cavernous fistula.

  9. γ-(S)-Trifluoromethyl proline: evaluation as a structural substitute of proline for solid state (19)F-NMR peptide studies.

    PubMed

    Kubyshkin, Vladimir; Afonin, Sergii; Kara, Sezgin; Budisa, Nediljko; Mykhailiuk, Pavel K; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-03-21

    γ-(4S)-Trifluoromethyl proline was synthesised according to a modified literature protocol with improved yield on a multigram scale. Conformational properties of the amide bond formed by the amino acid were characterised using N-acetyl methyl ester model. The amide populations (s-trans vs. s-cis) and thermodynamic parameters of the isomerization were found to be similar to the corresponding values for intact proline. Therefore, the γ-trifluoromethyl proline was suggested as a structurally low-disturbing proline substitution in peptides for their structural studies by (19)F-NMR. Indeed, the exchange of native proline for γ-trifluoromethyl proline in the peptide antibiotic gramicidin S was shown to preserve the overall amphipathic peptide structure. The utility of the amino acid as a selective (19)F-NMR label was demonstrated by observing the re-alignment of the labelled gramicidin S in oriented lipid bilayers. PMID:25703116

  10. Measurement of Long Range 1H-19F Scalar Coupling Constants and their Glycosidic Torsion Dependence in 5-Fluoropyrimidine Substituted RNA

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Mirko; Munzarová, Markéta L.; Bermel, Wolfgang; Scott, Lincoln G.; Sklenár̂, Vladimír; Williamson, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Long range scalar 5J(H1’,F) couplings were observed in 5-fluoropyrimidine substituted RNA. We developed a novel S3E-19F-α,β-edited NOESY experiment for quantitation of these long range scalar 5J(H1’,F), where the J-couplings can be extracted from inspection of intraresidual (H1’,H6) NOE crosspeaks. Quantum chemical calculations were exploited to investigate the relation between scalar couplings and conformations around the glycosidic bond in oligonucleotides. The theoretical dependence of the observed 5J(H1’,F) couplings on the torsion angle χ can be described by a generalized Karplus relationship. The corresponding density functional theory (DFT) analysis is outlined. Additional NMR experiments facilitating the resonance assignments of 5-fluoropyrimidine substituted RNAs are described and chemical shift changes due to altered shielding in the presence of fluorine-19 (19F) are presented. PMID:16637654

  11. Angular momentum distribution for the formation of evaporation residues in fusion of 19F with 184W near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, S.; Gehlot, J.; Prasad, E.; Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Shidling, P. D.; Madhavan, N.; Muralithar, S.; Golda, K. S.; Jhingan, A.; Varughese, T.; Rao, P. V. Madhusudhana; Sinha, A. K.; Pal, Santanu

    2011-01-01

    We present γ-ray multiplicity distributions for the formation of evaporation residues in the fusion reaction 19F + 184W → 20383Bi 120 at beam energies in the range of 90-110 MeV. The measurements were carried out using a 14 element BGO detector array and the Heavy Ion Reaction Analyzer at the Inter University Accelerator Centre. The data have been unfolded to obtain angular momentum distributions with inputs from the statistical model calculation. Comparison with another neighboring system, viz. 19F + 175Lu → 19480Hg 114 with nearly similar entrance-channel mass asymmetry, hints at the depletion of higher angular momenta after crossing of the Z=82 shell in the compound nucleus.

  12. Design principles and theory of paramagnetic fluorine-labelled lanthanide complexes as probes for (19)F magnetic resonance: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Kirsten H; De Luca, Elena; Hogg, Naomi H M; Kenwright, Alan M; Kuprov, Ilya; Parker, David; Botta, Mauro; Wilson, J Ian; Blamire, Andrew M

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis and spectroscopic properties of a series of CF(3)-labelled lanthanide(III) complexes (Ln=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) with amide-substituted ligands based on 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane are described. The theoretical contributions of the (19)F magnetic relaxation processes in these systems are critically assessed and selected volumetric plots are presented. These plots allow an accurate estimation of the increase in the rates of longitudinal and transverse relaxation as a function of the distance between the Ln(III) ion and the fluorine nucleus, the applied magnetic field, and the re-rotational correlation time of the complex, for a given Ln(III) ion. Selected complexes exhibit pH-dependent chemical shift behaviour, and a pK(a) of 7.0 was determined in one example based on the holmium complex of an ortho-cyano DO3A-monoamide ligand, which allowed the pH to be assessed by measuring the difference in chemical shift (varying by over 14 ppm) between two (19)F resonances. Relaxation analyses of variable-temperature and variable-field (19)F, (17)O and (1)H NMR spectroscopy experiments are reported, aided by identification of salient low-energy conformers by using density functional theory. The study of fluorine relaxation rates, over a field range of 4.7 to 16.5 T allowed precise computation of the distance between the Ln(III) ion and the CF(3) reporter group by using global fitting methods. The sensitivity benefits of using such paramagnetic fluorinated probes in (19)F NMR spectroscopic studies are quantified in preliminary spectroscopic and imaging experiments with respect to a diamagnetic yttrium(III) analogue. PMID:19957317

  13. THE FLUORINE DESTRUCTION IN STARS: FIRST EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE {sup 19}F(p, {alpha}{sub 0}){sup 16}O REACTION AT ASTROPHYSICAL ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Kiss, G. G.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Aliotta, M.; Burjan, V.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Mrazek, J.; Piskor, S.; Coc, A.

    2011-10-01

    The {sup 19}F(p, {alpha}){sup 16}O reaction is an important fluorine destruction channel in the proton-rich outer layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and it might also play a role in hydrogen-deficient post-AGB star nucleosynthesis. So far, available direct measurements do not reach the energy region of astrophysical interest (E {sub cm} {approx}< 300 keV), because of the hindrance effect of the Coulomb barrier. The Trojan Horse (TH) method was thus used to access this energy region, by extracting the quasi-free contribution to the {sup 2}H({sup 19}F, {alpha}{sup 16}O)n and the {sup 19}F({sup 3}He, {alpha}{sup 16}O)d reactions. The TH measurement of the {alpha}{sub 0} channel shows the presence of resonant structures not observed before, which cause an increase of the reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures up to a factor of 1.7, with potential consequences for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  14. Completion of the Operational Closure of Tank 18F and Tank 19F at the Savannah River Site by Grouting - 13236

    SciTech Connect

    Tisler, Andrew J.

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive waste is stored in underground waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The low-level fraction of the waste is immobilized in a grout waste form, and the high level fraction is disposed of in a glass waste form. Once the waste is removed, the tanks are prepared for closure. Operational closure of the tanks consists of filling with grout for the purpose of chemically stabilizing residual material, filling the tank void space for long-term structural stability, and discouraging future intrusion. Two of the old-style single-shell tanks at the SRS have received regulatory approval confirming waste removal had been completed, and have been stabilized with grout as part of completing operational closure and removal from service. Consistent with the regulatory framework, two types of grout were used for the filling of Tanks 18F and 19F. Reducing grout was used to fill the entire volume of Tanks 18F and 19F (bulk fill grout) and a more flowable grout was used to fill equipment that was left in the tank (equipment fill grout). The reducing grout was added to the tanks using portable grout pumps filled from concrete trucks, and delivered the grout through slick lines to the center riser of each tank. Filling of the two tanks has been completed, and all equipment has been filled. The final capping of riser penetrations brings the operation closure of Tanks 18F and 19F to completion. (authors)

  15. Pharmaceutical Applications of Relaxation Filter-Selective Signal Excitation Methods for (19)F Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Case Study With Atorvastatin in Dosage Formulation.

    PubMed

    Asada, Mamiko Nasu; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi

    2016-03-01

    We recently developed several new relaxation filter-selective signal excitation (RFS) methods for (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) that allow (13)C signal extraction of the target components from pharmaceuticals. These methods were successful in not only qualification but also quantitation over the wide range of 5% to 100%. Here, we aimed to improve the sensitivity of these methods and initially applied them to (19)F solid-state NMR, on the basis that the fluorine atom is one of the most sensitive NMR-active nuclei. For testing, we selected atorvastatin calcium (ATC), an antilipid BCS class II drug that inhibits 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and is marketed in crystalline and amorphous forms. Tablets were obtained from 2 generic drug suppliers, and the ATC content occurred mainly as an amorphous form. Using the RFS method with (19)F solid-state NMR, we succeeded in qualifying trace amounts (less than 0.5% w/w level) of crystalline phase (Form I) of ATC in the tablets. RFS methods with (19)F solid-state NMR are practical and time efficient and can contribute not only to the study of pharmaceutical drugs, including those with small amounts of a highly potent active ingredient within a formulated product, but also to the study of fluoropolymers in material sciences. PMID:26886305

  16. Theoretical investigation of the 19F(p, p0) differential cross section up to Ep = 2.3 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paneta, V.; Gurbich, A.; Kokkoris, M.

    2016-03-01

    The use of experimental cross-section data on fluorine in analytical EBS studies is quite problematic, because they are indeed inadequate and discrepant (up to ∼30%). The evaluated values on the other hand, being produced by incorporating the available experimental cross sections within a unified theoretical approach, provide the most reliable data to be used and are therefore very important. The present work contributes in this field by reproducing and attempting to extend the corresponding evaluation for 19F(p, p0), which ranges up to 1730 keV, to proton energies up to 2250 keV, using the AZURE code. The performed R-matrix calculations involved the simultaneous analysis of several experimental input datasets, as well as spectroscopic information concerning the formed compound nucleus 20Ne, while valuable feedback information was provided by proton benchmarking spectra on ZnF2 taken at Ep = 1730 and 2250 keV and at several backscattering angles for the fine tuning of the parameters used. The problem of the 19F(p, p‧) and 19F(p, αx) contributions in the obtained thick target yield spectra is also discussed.

  17. Demystifying fluorine chemical shifts: electronic structure calculations address origins of seemingly anomalous (19)F-NMR spectra of fluorohistidine isomers and analogues.

    PubMed

    Kasireddy, Chandana; Bann, James G; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R

    2015-11-11

    Fluorine NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying biomolecular structure, dynamics, and ligand binding, yet the origins of (19)F chemical shifts are not well understood. Herein, we use electronic structure calculations to describe the changes in (19)F chemical shifts of 2F- and 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon acid titration. While the protonation of the 2F species results in a deshielded chemical shift, protonation of the 4F isomer results in an opposite, shielded chemical shift. The deshielding of 2F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon protonation can be rationalized by concomitant decreases in charge density on fluorine and a reduced dipole moment. These correlations do not hold for 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole, however. Molecular orbital calculations reveal that for the 4F species, there are no lone pair electrons on the fluorine until protonation. Analysis of a series of 4F-imidazole analogues, all with delocalized fluorine electron density, indicates that the deshielding of (19)F chemical shifts through substituent effects correlates with increased C-F bond polarity. In summary, the delocalization of fluorine electrons in the neutral 4F species, with gain of a lone pair upon protonation may help explain the difficulty in developing a predictive framework for fluorine chemical shifts. Ideas debated by chemists over 40 years ago, regarding fluorine's complex electronic effects, are shown to have relevance for understanding and predicting fluorine NMR spectra. PMID:26524669

  18. 19F-decoupling of half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei in solid-state NMR: application of frequency-swept decoupling methods.

    PubMed

    Chandran, C Vinod; Hempel, Günter; Bräuniger, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    In solid-state NMR studies of minerals and ion conductors, quadrupolar nuclei like (7)Li, (23)Na or (133)Cs are frequently situated in close proximity to fluorine, so that application of (19)F decoupling is beneficial for spectral resolution. Here, we compare the decoupling efficiency of various multi-pulse decoupling sequences by acquiring (19)F-decoupled (23)Na-NMR spectra of cryolite (Na(3)AlF(6)). Whereas the MAS spectrum is only marginally affected by application of (19)F decoupling, the 3Q-filtered (23)Na signal is very sensitive to it, as the de-phasing caused by the dipolar interaction between sodium and fluorine is three-fold magnified. Experimentally, we find that at moderate MAS speeds, the decoupling efficiencies of the frequency-swept decoupling schemes SW(f)-TPPM and SW(f)-SPINAL are significantly better than the conventional TPPM and SPINAL sequences. The frequency-swept sequences are therefore the methods of choice for efficient decoupling of quadrupolar nuclei with half-integer spin from fluorine. PMID:21856132

  19. In vivo oximetry of human bulbar conjunctival and episcleral microvasculature using snapshot multispectral imaging.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, L E; Choudhary, T R; McNaught, A I; Harvey, A R

    2016-08-01

    Multispectral imaging (MSI) is a well-established technique for non-invasive oximetry of retinal blood vessels, which has contributed to the understanding of a variety of retinal conditions, including glaucoma, diabetes, vessel occlusion, and retinal auto-regulation. We report the first study to use snapshot multi-spectral imaging (SMSI) for oximetry of the bulbar conjunctival and episcleral microvasculature in the anterior segment of the eye. We report the oxygen dynamics of the bulbar conjunctival and episcleral microvasculature at normoxia and at acute mild hypoxia conditions. A retinal-fundus camera fitted with a custom Image-Replicating Imaging Spectrometer was used to image the bulbar conjunctival and episcleral microvasculature in ten healthy human subjects at normoxia (21% Fraction of Inspired Oxygen [FiO2]) and acute mild hypoxia (15% FiO2) conditions. Eyelid closure was used to control oxygen diffusion between ambient air and the sclera surface. Four subjects were imaged for 30 seconds immediately following eyelid opening. Vessel diameter and Optical Density Ratio (ODR: a direct proxy for oxygen saturation) of vessels was computed automatically. Oximetry capability was validated using a simple phantom that mimicked the scleral vasculature. Acute mild hypoxia resulted in a decrease in blood oxygen saturation (SO2) (i.e. an increase in ODR) when compared with normoxia in both bulbar conjunctival (p < 0.001) and episcleral vessels (p = 0.03). Average episcleral diameter increased from 78.9 ± 8.7 μm (mean ± standard deviation) at normoxia to 97.6 ± 14.3 μm at hypoxia (p = 0.02). Diameters of bulbar conjunctival vessels showed no significant change from 80.1 ± 7.6 μm at normoxia to 80.6 ± 7.0 μm at hypoxia (p = 0.89). When exposed to ambient air, hypoxic bulbar conjunctival vessels rapidly reoxygenated due to oxygen diffusion from ambient air. Reoxygenation occured in an exponential manner, and SO2 reached normoxia baseline levels. The average

  20. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  1. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe kidney problems. People have been harmed in MRI machines when they did not remove metal objects from their clothes or when metal objects were left in the room by others. MRI is most often not recommended for traumatic injuries. ...

  2. Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea assessment using pulse oximetry and dual RIP bands.

    PubMed

    Mason, David G; Iyer, Kartik; Terrill, Philip I; Wilson, Stephen J; Suresh, Sadasivam

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) in children presents a challenging diagnostic problem given the high prevalence (2-3%), the resource intensity of the overnight polysomnography investigation, and the realisation that OSA poses a serious threat to the healthy growth and development of children. Previous attempts to develop OSA diagnostic systems using home pulse oximetry studies have failed to meet the accuracy requirements - particularly the low false normal rate (FNR) - required for a pre-PSG screening test. Thus the aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of an OSA severity diagnostic system based on both oximetry and dual respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) bands. A total of 90 PSG studies (30 each of normal, mild/moderate and severe OSA) were retrospectively analyzed. Quantifications of oxygen desaturations (S), respiratory events (E) and heart rate arousals (A) were calculated and extracted and an empirical rule-based SEA classifier model for normal, mild/moderate and severe OSA defined and developed. In addition, an automated classifier using a decision tree algorithm was trained and tested using a 10-fold cross-validation. The empirical classification system showed a correct classification rate (CCR) of 0.83 (Cohen's Kappa κ=0.81, FNR=0.08), and the decision tree classifier achieved a CCR of 0.79 (κ=0.73, FNR=0.08) when compared to gold standard PSG assessment. The relatively high CCR, and low FNR indicate that a OSA severity system based on dual RIP and oximetry is feasible for application as a pre-PSG screening tool. PMID:21097147

  3. Nanofiber-based paramagnetic probes for rapid, real-time biomedical oximetry.

    PubMed

    Bhallamudi, Vidya P; Xue, Ruipeng; Purser, Carola M; Presley, Kayla F; Banasavadi-Siddegowda, Yeshavanth K; Hwang, Jinwoo; Kaur, Balveen; Hammel, P Chris; Poirier, Michael G; Lannutti, John J; Pandian, Ramasamy P

    2016-04-01

    EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) based biological oximetry is a powerful tool that accurately and repeatedly measures tissue oxygen levels. In vivo determination of oxygen in tissues is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of a number of diseases. Here, we report the first successful fabrication and remarkable properties of nanofiber sensors for EPR-oximetry applications. Lithium octa-n-butoxynaphthalocyanine (LiNc- BuO), an excellent paramagnetic oxygen sensor, was successfully encapsulated in 300-500 nm diameter fibers consisting of a core of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a shell of polycaprolactone (PCL) by electrospinning. This core-shell nanosensor (LiNc-BuO-PDMS-PCL) shows a linear dependence of linewidth versus oxygen partial pressure (pO2). The nanofiber sensors have response and recovery times of 0.35 s and 0.55 s, respectively, these response and recovery times are ~12 times and ~218 times faster than those previously reported for PDMS-LiNc-BuO chip sensors. This greater responsiveness is likely due to the high porosity and excellent oxygen permeability of the nanofibers. Electrospinning of the structurally flexible PDMS enabled the fabrication of fibers having tailored spin densities. Core-shell encapsulation ensures the non-exposure of embedded LiNc-BuO and mitigates potential biocompatibility concerns. In vitro evaluation of the fiber performed under exposure to cultured cells showed that it is both stable and biocompatible. The unique combination of biocompatibility due to the PCL 'shell,' the excellent oxygen transparency of the PDMS core, and the excellent oxygen-sensing properties of LiNc-BuO makes LiNc-BuO-PDMS-PCL platform promising for long-term oximetry and repetitive oxygen measurements in both biological systems and clinical applications. PMID:27106026

  4. Magnetic properties and hyperfine interactions in Cr8, Cr7Cd, and Cr7Ni molecular rings from 19F-NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Bordonali, L; Garlatti, E; Casadei, C M; Furukawa, Y; Lascialfari, A; Carretta, S; Troiani, F; Timco, G; Winpenny, R E; Borsa, F

    2014-04-14

    A detailed experimental investigation of the 19F nuclear magnetic resonance is made on single crystals of the homometallic Cr₈ antiferromagnetic molecular ring and heterometallic Cr₇Cd and Cr₇ Ni rings in the low temperature ground state. Since the F- ion is located midway between neighboring magnetic metal ions in the ring, the 19F-NMR spectra yield information about the local electronic spin density and ¹⁹F hyperfine interactions. In Cr8, where the ground state is a singlet with total spin S T = 0, the ¹⁹F-NMR spectra at 1.7 K and low external magnetic field display a single narrow line, while when the magnetic field is increased towards the first level crossing field, satellite lines appear in the ¹⁹F-NMR spectrum, indicating a progressive increase in the Boltzmann population of the first excited state S T = 1. In the heterometallic rings, Cr₇Cd and Cr₇ Ni, whose ground state is magnetic with S T = 3/2 and S T = 1/2, respectively, the ¹⁹F-NMR spectrum has a complicated structure which depends on the strength and orientation of the magnetic field, due to both isotropic and anisotropic transferred hyperfine interactions and classical dipolar interactions. From the 19F-NMR spectra in single crystals we estimated the transferred hyperfine constants for both the F⁻-Ni2⁺ and the F⁻-Cd2⁺ bonds. The values of the hyperfine constants compare well to the ones known for F⁻-Ni2⁺ in KNiF₃ and NiF₂ and for F⁻-Cr³⁺ in K₂NaCrF₆. The results are discussed in terms of hybridization of the 2s, 2p orbitals of the F⁻ ion and the d orbitals of the magnetic ion. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the electron-spin decoherence.

  5. Updated THM Astrophysical Factor of the 19F(p, α)16O Reaction and Influence of New Direct Data at Astrophysical Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, M.; Palmerini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Lombardo, I.; Trippella, O.

    2015-06-01

    Fluorine nucleosynthesis represents one of the most intriguing open questions in nuclear astrophysics. It has triggered new measurements which may modify the presently accepted paradigm of fluorine production and establish fluorine as an accurate probe of the inner layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Both direct and indirect measurements have attempted to improve the recommended extrapolation to astrophysical energies, showing no resonances. In this work, we will demonstrate that the interplay between direct and indirect techniques represents the most suitable approach to attain the required accuracy for the astrophysical factor at low energies, {{E}c.m.}≲ 300 keV, which is of interest for fluorine nucleosynthesis in AGB stars. We will use the recently measured direct 19F{{(p,α )}16}O astrophysical factor in the 600 keV≲ {{E}c.m.}≲ 800 keV energy interval to renormalize the existing Trojan Horse Method (THM) data spanning the astrophysical energies, accounting for all identified sources of uncertainty. This has a twofold impact on nuclear astrophysics. It shows the robustness of the THM approach even in the case of direct data of questionable quality, as normalization is extended over a broad range, minimizing systematic effects. Moreover, it allows us to obtain more accurate resonance data at astrophysical energies, thanks to the improved 19F{{(p,α )}16}O direct data. Finally, the present work strongly calls for more accurate direct data at low energies, so that we can obtain a better fitting of the direct reaction mechanism contributing to the 19F{{(p,α )}16}O astrophysical factor. Indeed, this work points out that the major source of uncertainty affecting the low-energy S(E) factor is the estimate of the non-resonant contribution, as the dominant role of the 113 keV resonance is now well established.

  6. 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Crystallographic Studies of 5-Fluorotryptophan-Labeled Anthrax Protective Antigen and Effects of the Receptor on Stability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is an 83 kDa protein that is one of three protein components of the anthrax toxin, an AB toxin secreted by Bacillus anthracis. PA is capable of undergoing several structural changes, including oligomerization to either a heptameric or octameric structure called the prepore, and at acidic pH a major conformational change to form a membrane-spanning pore. To follow these structural changes at a residue-specific level, we have conducted initial studies in which we have biosynthetically incorporated 5-fluorotryptophan (5-FTrp) into PA, and we have studied the influence of 5-FTrp labeling on the structural stability of PA and on binding to the host receptor capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2) using 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). There are seven tryptophans in PA, but of the four domains in PA, only two contain tryptophans: domain 1 (Trp65, -90, -136, -206, and -226) and domain 2 (Trp346 and -477). Trp346 is of particular interest because of its proximity to the CMG2 binding interface, and because it forms part of the membrane-spanning pore. We show that the 19F resonance of Trp346 is sensitive to changes in pH, consistent with crystallographic studies, and that receptor binding significantly stabilizes Trp346 to both pH and temperature. In addition, we provide evidence that suggests that resonances from tryptophans distant from the binding interface are also stabilized by the receptor. Our studies highlight the positive impact of receptor binding on protein stability and the use of 19F NMR in gaining insight into structural changes in a high-molecular weight protein. PMID:24387629

  7. NMR shielding and spin–rotation constants of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B.

    2015-12-31

    This presentation demonstrates the relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants and shielding spans of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules. The results are obtained from calculations performed using density functional theory (non-relativistic and four-component relativistic) and coupled-cluster calculations. The spin-rotation constants are compared with available experimental values. In most of the molecules studied, relativistic effects make an order of magnitude difference on the NMR absolute shielding constants.

  8. NMR shielding and spin-rotation constants of 175LuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br, 127I) molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Taye B.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation demonstrates the relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants and shielding spans of 175LuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br, 127I) molecules. The results are obtained from calculations performed using density functional theory (non-relativistic and four-component relativistic) and coupled-cluster calculations. The spin-rotation constants are compared with available experimental values. In most of the molecules studied, relativistic effects make an order of magnitude difference on the NMR absolute shielding constants.

  9. Evidence of a structural phase transition in superconducting SmFeAsO1-xFx from 19F NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, M.; Ghoshray, K.; Mazumdar, C.; Poddar, A.; Ghoshray, A.; Berardan, D.; Dragoe, N.

    2013-01-01

    We report resistivity, magnetization and 19F NMR results in a polycrystalline sample of SmFeAsO0.86F0.14. The resistivity and magnetization data show a sharp drop at 48 K indicating a superconducting transition. The nuclear spin-lattice rate (1/T1) and spin-spin relaxation rate (1/T2) clearly show the existence of a structural phase transition near 163 K in the sample, which also undergoes a superconducting transition. This finding creates interest in exploring whether this is unique for Sm based systems or is also present in other rare-earth based 1111 superconductors.

  10. Annual Report FY2013-- A Kinematically Complete, Interdisciplinary, and Co-Institutional Measurement of the 19F(α,n) Cross-section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, William A; Smith, Michael Scott; Clement, Ryan; Tan, Wanpeng; Stech, Ed; Cizewski, J A; Febbraro, Michael; Madurga Flores, Miguel

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this proposal is to enable neutron detection for precision Non-Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. Neutrons are continuously generated from a UFx matrix in a container or sample as a result of the interaction of alpha particles from uranium-decay α particles with fluorine nuclei in the matrix. Neutrons from 19F(α,n)22Na were once considered a poorly characterized background for assays of UFx samples via 238U spontaneous fission neutron detection [SMI2010B]. However, the yield of decay-α-driven neutrons is critical for 234,235U LEU and HEU assays, as it can used to determine both the total amount of uranium and the enrichment [BER2010]. This approach can be extremely valuable in a variety of safeguard applications, such as cylinder monitoring in underground uranium storage facilities, nuclear criticality safety studies, nuclear materials accounting, and other nonproliferation applications. The success of neutron-based assays critically depends on an accurate knowledge of the cross section of the (α,n) reaction that generates the neutrons. The 40% uncertainty in the 19F(α,n)22Na cross section currently limits the precision of such assays, and has been identified as a key factor in preventing accurate enrichment determinations [CRO2003]. The need for higher quality cross section data for (α,n) reactions has been a recurring conclusion in reviews of the nuclear data needs to support safeguards. The overarching goal of this project is to enable neutron detection to be used for precision Non- Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. This will significantly advance safeguards verification at existing declared facilities, nuclear materials accounting, process control, nuclear criticality safety monitoring, and a variety of other nonproliferation applications. To reach this goal, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rutgers University (RU), and the University of Notre

  11. Status of the direct measurements of 18O(p,γ)19F and 23Na(p,γ)24Mg cross sections at astrophysical energies at LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeltzig, A.; Pantaleo, F. R.; Best, A.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.

    2016-04-01

    18O(p, γ)19F and 23Na(p,γ)24Mg are reactions of astrophysical interest for example in AGB star scenarios. The rates of both reactions are potentially influenced by low-energy resonances for whose strengths either exist only values with large uncertainties, upper limits or even contradictory claims. Measurements at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) aim at a direct observation of these low-energy resonances, and additional cross section measurements to aid a more precise determination of the reaction rates in astrophysical scenarios. We report the experimental setup and the status of the ongoing measurements of the two reactions at LUNA.

  12. Degradation of 4-fluorobiphenyl by mycorrhizal fungi as determined by {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and {sup 14}C radiolabelling analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.A.; Meharg, A.A.; Till, C.; Troke, J.; Nicholson, J.K.

    1999-09-01

    The pathways of biotransformation of 4-fluorobiphenyl (4FBP) by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tylospora fibrilosa and several other mycorrhizal fungi were investigated by using {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with {sup 14}C radioisotope-detected high-performance liquid chromatography ({sup 14}C-HPLC). Under the conditions used in this study T. fibrillosa and some other species degraded 4FBP. {sup 14}C-HPLC profiles indicated that there were four major biotransformation products, whereas {sup 19}F NMR showed that there were six major fluorine-containing products. The authors confirmed that 4-fluorobiphen-4{prime}-ol and 4-fluorobiphen-3{prime}-ol were two of the major products formed, but no other products were conclusively identified. There was no evidence for the expected biotransformation pathway (namely, meta cleavage of the less halogenated ring), as none of the expected products of this route were found. To the best of their knowledge, this is the first report describing intermediates formed during mycorrhizal degradation of halogenated biphenyls.

  13. Binding mechanism of the tyrosine-kinase inhibitor nilotinib to human serum albumin determined by 1H STD NMR, 19F NMR, and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin; Wu, Di; Sun, Pingchuan; Ma, Xiaoli; Wang, Lili; Li, Shanshan; Xu, Kailin; Li, Hui

    2016-05-30

    Drug interaction with albumins significantly affects in vivo drug transport and biological metabolism. To gain insight into the binding mechanisms of tyrosine-kinase inhibitor nilotinib (NIL) to human serum albumin (HSA), an approach combining (1)H saturation-transfer difference (STD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, (19)F NMR spectroscopy, steady-state fluorescence quenching, and molecular modeling was adopted. (19)F NMR was used to determine the binding constant, and a value of 4.12 × 10(3)M(-1) was obtained. Fluorescence spectroscopy was also used to determine the binding constant, and the value obtained was within the same order of magnitude. The binding process was mainly driven by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces. Displacement experiments further showed that NIL mainly bound to the hydrophobic cavity of HSA's subdomain IIA, also called Sudlow's site I. Molecular docking simulation was also used to establish a molecular binding model, and findings were consistent with those of displacement and the (1)H STD NMR experiments. PMID:26922576

  14. Free variable selection QSPR study to predict 19F chemical shifts of some fluorinated organic compounds using Random Forest and RBF-PLS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Nasser

    2016-04-01

    In this work, two new and powerful chemometrics methods are applied for the modeling and prediction of the 19F chemical shift values of some fluorinated organic compounds. The radial basis function-partial least square (RBF-PLS) and random forest (RF) are employed to construct the models to predict the 19F chemical shifts. In this study, we didn't used from any variable selection method and RF method can be used as variable selection and modeling technique. Effects of the important parameters affecting the ability of the RF prediction power such as the number of trees (nt) and the number of randomly selected variables to split each node (m) were investigated. The root-mean-square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for the training set and the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 44.70, 23.86, 29.77, and 23.69, respectively. Also, the correlation coefficients of the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 0.8684 and 0.9313, respectively. The results obtained reveal that the RF model can be used as a powerful chemometrics tool for the quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies.

  15. Analysis of the 19F(p, α0)16O reaction at low energies and the spectroscopy of 20Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, I.; Dell'Aquila, D.; Campajola, L.; Rosato, E.; Spadaccini, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2013-12-01

    The investigation of the 19F(p, α0) reaction at low bombarding energies allows the study of the spectroscopy of the 20Ne compound nucleus in an energy region where the existence of quartet excitations has been suggested in the literature. Moreover, this reaction plays a major role in the fourth branch of the CNO cycle since it is relevant for the correct description of the hydrogen burning of fluorine in stars. For these reasons, we decided to investigate the 19F(p, α0) reaction in the Ep ≃ 0.6-1 MeV energy range. The analysis of angular distributions and excitation functions allows one to improve the 20Ne spectroscopy in an excitation energy region where some ambiguities concerning Jπ assignments exist in the literature. In particular, the present data suggest a Jπ = 0+ assignment to the Ex = 13.642 MeV resonance. For this state, both partial and reduced widths for the α0 channel have been deduced. The trend of the astrophysical factor has been obtained from the integrated cross section. A comparison of the present results with data reported in the literature is also discussed.

  16. Trifluoroethanol and 19F magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance as a basic surface hydroxyl reactivity probe for zirconium(IV) hydroxide structures.

    PubMed

    DeCoste, Jared B; Glover, T Grant; Mogilevsky, Gregory; Peterson, Gregory W; Wagner, George W

    2011-08-01

    A novel technique for determining the relative accessibility and reactivity of basic surface hydroxyl sites by reacting various zirconium(IV) hydroxide materials with 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) and characterizing the resulting material using (19)F magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is presented here. Studied here are three zirconium hydroxide samples, two unperturbed commercial materials, and one commercial material that is crushed by a pellet press. Factors, such as the ratio of bridging/terminal hydroxyls, surface area, and pore size distribution, are examined and found to affect the ability of the zirconium(IV) hydroxide to react with TFE. X-ray diffraction, nitrogen isotherms, and (1)H MAS NMR were used to characterize the unperturbed materials, while thermogravitric analysis with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry along with the (19)F MAS NMR were used to characterize the materials that were reacted with TFE. Zirconium hydroxide materials with a high surface area and a low bridging/terminal hydroxyl ratio were found to react TFE in the greatest amounts. PMID:21699226

  17. The fluorine destruction in stars: First experimental study of the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Aliotta, M.; Burjan, V.; Cherubini, S.; Coc, A.; Gulino, M.; Hons, Z.; Kiss, G. G.; Kroha, V.; Lamia, L.; Mrazek, J.; Palmerini, S.; Piskor, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; and others

    2012-11-12

    The {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction is an important fluorine destruction channel in the proton-rich outer layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and it might also play a role in hydrogendeficient post-AGB star nucleosynthesis. So far, available direct measurements do not reach the energy region of astrophysical interest (E{sub cm}{approx} 300 keV), because of the hindrance effect of the Coulomb barrier. The Trojan Horse (TH) method was thus used to access this energy region, by extracting the quasi-free contribution to the {sup 2}H({sup 19}F,{alpha}{sup 16}O)n reaction. The TH measurement of the {alpha}{sub 0} channel, which is the dominant one at such energies, shows the presence of resonant structures not observed before that cause an increase of the reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures up to a factor of 1.7, with potential important consequences for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  18. Development and initial testing of a pulse oximetry prototype for measuring dental pulp vitality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueira, M.; Ferreira, M.; Caramelo, F.

    2015-05-01

    The guiding principle of endodontic treatment is to preserve teeth while maintaining its aesthetic and functional roles. To accomplish this goal the assessment of teeth pulp vitality is very important since it will determine the procedures that should be adopted and define the therapy strategy. Currently, the most commonly tests for determining dental pulp state are the thermal and the electrical tests, which are based on nerve response and, because of that, have a relatively high rate of false positives and false negatives cases. In this work we present a simple test to be used in the clinical setting for evaluating noninvasively the existence of blood perfusion in dental pulp. This test is based on pulse oximetry principle that was devised to indirectly measure the amount of oxygen in blood. Although pulse oximetry has already demonstrated its usefulness in clinical environment its usage for the determination of dental pulp vitality has been frustrated by several factors, notably the absence of a suitable sensor to the complex shape of the various coronary teeth. We developed a suitable sensor and present the first trials with promising results, regarding the ability for distinguish teeth with and without blood perfusion.

  19. Skeletal Muscle Oxygenation Measured by EPR Oximetry Using a Highly Sensitive Polymer-Encapsulated Paramagnetic Sensor.

    PubMed

    Hou, H; Khan, N; Nagane, M; Gohain, S; Chen, E Y; Jarvis, L A; Schaner, P E; Williams, B B; Flood, A B; Swartz, H M; Kuppusamy, P

    2016-01-01

    We have incorporated LiNc-BuO, an oxygen-sensing paramagnetic material, in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which is an oxygen-permeable, biocompatible, and stable polymer. We fabricated implantable and retrievable oxygen-sensing chips (40 % LiNc-BuO in PDMS) using a 20-G Teflon tubing to mold the chips into variable shapes and sizes for in vivo studies in rats. In vitro EPR measurements were used to test the chip's oxygen response. Oxygen induced linear and reproducible line broadening with increasing partial pressure (pO2). The oxygen response was similar to that of bare (unencapsulated) crystals and did not change significantly on sterilization by autoclaving. The chips were implanted in rat femoris muscle and EPR oximetry was performed repeatedly (weekly) for 12 weeks post-implantation. The measurements showed good reliability and reproducibility over the period of testing. These results demonstrated that the new formulation of OxyChip with 40 % LiNc-BuO will enable the applicability of EPR oximetry for long-term measurement of oxygen concentration in tissues and has the potential for clinical applications. PMID:27526163

  20. A paramagnetic implant containing lithium naphthalocyanine microcrystals for high-resolution biological oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenakshisundaram, Guruguhan; Pandian, Ramasamy P.; Eteshola, Edward; Lee, Stephen C.; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2010-03-01

    Lithium naphthalocyanine (LiNc) is a microcrystalline EPR oximetry probe with high sensitivity to oxygen [R.P. Pandian, M. Dolgos, C. Marginean, P.M. Woodward, P.C. Hammel, P.T. Manoharan, P. Kuppusamy, Molecular packing and magnetic properties of lithium naphthalocyanine crystal: hollow channels enabling permeability and paramagnetic sensitivity to molecular oxygen J. Mater. Chem. 19 (2009) 4138-4147]. However, direct implantation of the crystals in the tissue for in vivo oxygen measurements may be hindered by concerns associated with their direct contact with the tissue/cells and loss of EPR signal due to particle migration in the tissue. In order to address these concerns, we have developed encapsulations (chips) of LiNc microcrystals in polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS), an oxygen-permeable, bioinert polymer. Oximetry evaluation of the fabricated chips revealed that the oxygen sensitivity of the crystals was unaffected by encapsulation in PDMS. Chips were stable against sterilization procedures or treatment with common biological oxidoreductants. In vivo oxygen measurements established the ability of the chips to provide reliable and repeated measurements of tissue oxygenation. This study establishes PDMS-encapsulated LiNc as a potential probe for long-term and repeated measurements of tissue oxygenation.

  1. Noncontact simultaneous dual wavelength photoplethysmography: A further step toward noncontact pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Kenneth; Ward, Tomas; Markham, Charles

    2007-04-01

    We present a camera-based device capable of capturing two photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals at two different wavelengths simultaneously, in a remote noncontact manner. The system comprises a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera and dual wavelength array of light emitting diodes (760 and 880nm). By alternately illuminating a region of tissue with each wavelength of light, and detecting the backscattered photons with the camera at a rate of 16frames/wavelengths, two multiplexed PPG wave forms are simultaneously captured. This process is the basis of pulse oximetry, and we describe how, with the inclusion of a calibration procedure, this system could be used as a noncontact pulse oximeter to measure arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) remotely. Results from an experiment on ten subjects, exhibiting normal SpO2 readings, that demonstrate the instrument's ability to capture signals from a range of subjects under realistic lighting and environmental conditions are presented. We compare the signals captured by the noncontact system to a conventional PPG signal captured concurrently from a finger, and show by means of a J. Bland and D. Altman [Lancet 327, 307 (1986); Statistician 32, 307 (1983)] test, the noncontact device to be comparable to a contact device as a monitor of heart rate. We highlight some considerations that should be made when using camera-based "integrative" sampling methods and demonstrate through simulation, the suitability of the captured PPG signals for application of existing pulse oximetry calibration procedures.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of a mathematical model to predict apnea–hypopnea index using nighttime pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebben, Matthew R.; Krieger, Ana C.

    2016-03-01

    The intent of this study is to develop a predictive model to convert an oxygen desaturation index (ODI) to an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). This model will then be compared to actual AHI to determine its precision. One thousand four hundred and sixty-seven subjects given polysomnograms with concurrent pulse oximetry between April 14, 2010, and February 7, 2012, were divided into model development (n=733) and verification groups (n=734) in order to develop a predictive model of AHI using ODI. Quadratic regression was used for model development. The coefficient of determination (r2) between the actual AHI and the predicted AHI (PredAHI) was 0.80 (r=0.90), which was significant at a p<0.001. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve ranged from 0.96 for AHI thresholds of ≥10 and ≥15/h to 0.97 for thresholds of ≥5 and ≥30/h. The algorithm described in this paper provides a convenient and accurate way to convert ODI to a predicted AHI. This tool makes it easier for clinicians to understand oximetry data in the context of traditional measures of sleep apnea.

  3. A phantom with pulsating artificial vessels for non-invasive fetal pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Laqua, Daniel; Pollnow, Stefan; Fischer, Jan; Ley, Sebastian; Husar, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Arterial oxygen saturation of the fetus is an important parameter for monitoring its physical condition. During labor and delivery the transabdominal non-invasive fetal pulse oximetry could minimize the risk for mother and fetus, compared to other existing invasive examination methods. In this contribution, we developed a physical-like phantom to investigate new sensor circuits and algorithms of a non-invasive diagnostic method for fetal pulse oximetry. Hence, the developed artificial vascular system consists of two independent tube systems representing the maternal and fetal vessel system. The arterial blood pressure is reproduced with a pre-pressure and an artificial vascular system. Each pulse wave can be reproduced, by digital control of a proportional valve, adjustable viscoelastic elements, and resistances. The measurements are performed by pressure transducers, optical sensor units, and a coplanar capacitive sensor. Transmission and reflection measurements have shown that the fetal and maternal pulse waves can be reproduced qualitatively. The measured light represents the transabdominal modulated signal on an abdomen of a pregnant woman. PMID:25571272

  4. Detection of pulsus paradoxus by pulse oximetry in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Amoozgar, Hamid; Ghodsi, Hossein; Borzoee, Mohammad; Amirghofran, Ahmad Ali; Ajami, Gholamhossein; Serati, Zahra

    2009-01-01

    The presence or absence of pulsus paradoxus (PP), defined as an inspiratory decrease greater than 10 mmHg in systolic blood pressure, can have significant diagnostic and therapeutic implications for many clinical conditions including acute asthma, pericardial tamponade, heart failure, hypovolemia, shock states, and the like. However, PP may be difficult to measure in children. Indwelling arterial catheters facilitate the measurement of PP, but this invasive technique generally is reserved for critically ill patients. This study aimed to assess the use of the pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveform (POPW) for the detection of PP in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery. The study enrolled 40 pediatric patients 18 years of age and younger who had invasive blood pressure monitoring with an intraarterial cannula. Systolic pressure variability (SPV) and changes in POPW amplitude (DeltaPOPW%), calculated using five consecutive snapshots from every patient's monitor, were compared using linear regression, Pearson product-moment correlation, the Spearman rank method, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. A strong correlation existed between respiratory SPV and DeltaPOPW% for the detection of PP (r = 0.682; p < 0.0001). A respiratory variation in DeltaPOPW% exceeding 25.44% (about one-fourth the amplitude of the tallest POP waveform) allowed detection of PP with a sensitivity of 86.7% and a specificity of 88%. Pulse oximetry is a readily available and easily performed noninvasive means for detecting PP in children. PMID:18665417

  5. Regularity analysis of nocturnal oximetry recordings to assist in the diagnosis of sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marcos, J Víctor; Hornero, Roberto; Nabney, Ian T; Álvarez, Daniel; Gutiérrez-Tobal, Gonzalo C; del Campo, Félix

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (SAHS) severity and the regularity of nocturnal oxygen saturation (SaO2) recordings was analysed. Three different methods were proposed to quantify regularity: approximate entropy (AEn), sample entropy (SEn) and kernel entropy (KEn). A total of 240 subjects suspected of suffering from SAHS took part in the study. They were randomly divided into a training set (96 subjects) and a test set (144 subjects) for the adjustment and assessment of the proposed methods, respectively. According to the measurements provided by AEn, SEn and KEn, higher irregularity of oximetry signals is associated with SAHS-positive patients. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and Pearson correlation analyses showed that KEn was the most reliable predictor of SAHS. It provided an area under the ROC curve of 0.91 in two-class classification of subjects as SAHS-negative or SAHS-positive. Moreover, KEn measurements from oximetry data exhibited a linear dependence on the apnoea-hypopnoea index, as shown by a correlation coefficient of 0.87. Therefore, these measurements could be used for the development of simplified diagnostic techniques in order to reduce the demand for polysomnographies. Furthermore, KEn represents a convincing alternative to AEn and SEn for the diagnostic analysis of noisy biomedical signals. PMID:26719242

  6. Inaccurate pulse CO-oximetry of carboxyhemoglobin due to digital clubbing: case report.

    PubMed

    Harlan, Nicole; Weaver, Lindell K; Deru, Kayla

    2016-01-01

    Newer pulse CO-oximeters provide a non-invasive and quick means of measuring oxyhemoglobin, carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin. Clubbing has been reported to cause inaccuracy in pulse oximeters. We present a case of inaccurate carboxy-hemoglobin measurement by pulse CO-oximetry due to digital clubbing. An 18-year-old man with a history of cystic fibrosis presented after a suicide attempt by inhalation of exhaust. At the initial emergency department evaluation, his blood carboxyhemoglobin was 33%. He was intubated, placed on 100% oxygen and transferred to our facility. Upon arrival, we placed three different pulse CO-oximeters on different fingers and toes. Carboxyhemoglobin levels measured by these meters ranged from 9%-11%. A venous blood gas drawn on arrival showed a carboxyhemoglobin level of 2.3% after four hours on 100% oxygen by endotracheal tube. Thirty minutes later, we checked arterial blood gas, which revealed a COHb level of 0.9%. Again, non-invasive carboxyhemoglobin measurements read 10%. The patient was treated with hyperbaric oxygen for carbon monoxide poisoning. This case suggests that non-invasive measurements of carboxyhemoglobin should be correlated with the clinic history and with an arterial or venous blood gas oximetry analysis. PMID:27000014

  7. Introduction of a new patient monitoring system during dental procedures: pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Luotio, K; Mattila, M A; Kotilainen, R M

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes three cases of early detection of hypoxia with pulse oximeter during intravenous sedation. In the main study group over 40 patients were monitored by pulse oximetry during large dental operation under iv-sedation. Diatsepam with soybean oily solvent and midatsolam were used as intravenous sedative agents in this study. The first signs of hypoxia were seen by pulse oximetry. In three healthy patients some periods of remarkable hypoxia was detected and those cases are reported in this paper. Two of the patients were treated by a surgical operation and one patient underwent large conservative dental treatment under sedation because of dental care fobia. During the dental treatment period external oxygen was added for all these three patients to avoid more complications as a result of hypoxia. Two of the patients received an injection of bentsodiatsepine antagonist, too. One patient needed further follow up but non of these patients developed any additional complications. As a conclusion pulse oximetric monitoring was found to be extremely sensitive as a predictor for coming complications as well as allowing early intervention in ventilation problems. PMID:8935103

  8. Cerebral oximetry improves detection of sickle cell patients at risk for nocturnal cerebral hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Raj, Ashok B; O'brien, Louise M; Bertolone, Salvatore J; Gozal, David; Edmonds, Harvey L

    2006-11-01

    We previously used cerebral oximetry to identify low cerebral venous oxygen saturation in waking children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Because arterial oxyhemoglobin desaturation is common during sleep in SCD patients, this study compared both waking and sleeping systemic arterial and cerebral venous oxygenation dynamics in children with and without SCD. Seventeen African-American (AA) children with homozygous SCD [8 (4-15) years; 29% male; normal transcranial Doppler velocities] were compared with a control cohort (CON) comprised of six healthy AA children [9 (4-16) years, 33% male]. Standard all-night polysomnographic recordings were performed, including measurement of arterial oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO(2)). Regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO(2)) was measured non-invasively with cerebral oximetry. Intra-cohort comparisons examined the influence of sleep on SpO(2) and rSO(2) in the subjects. Inter-cohort comparisons of SpO(2), rSO(2,) and the rSO(2)/SpO(2) ratio assessed the impact of SCD on systemic and cerebral oxygenation during wakefulness and sleep. Cohort differences in SpO(2) were not statistically significant in either wakefulness or sleep. However, only in the SCD cohort was the magnitude of SpO(2) change statistically significant (P = 0.002). In contrast, both waking and sleep rSO(2) cohort median values did differ significantly [awake: CON 76 (67-86) vs. SCD 62 (58-71), P = 0.01; sleep: CON 65 (60-77) vs. SCD 55 (48-61), P = 0.01)]. The waking rSO(2)/SpO(2) ratio was also significantly lower in the SCD group [CON 0.78 (0.68-0.88) vs. SCD of 0.66 (0.61-0.72); P = 0.015]. During sleep, the ratio was also significantly lower in the SCD group [CON 0.71 (0.66-0.81) vs. SCD 0.59 (0.52-0.65); P = 0.011]. Our findings suggest that SCD patients may be at increased risk of cerebral hypoxia during both wakefulness and sleep. PMID:16998929

  9. Reaction monitoring in LPOS by 19F NMR. Study of soluble polymer supports with fluorine in spacer or linker components of supports.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipathi, Pandarinathan; Crévisy, Christophe; Grée, Rene

    2002-01-01

    Various soluble polystyrene supports with fluorinated spacer or linker were prepared and studied by (19)F NMR for their use in LPOS reaction monitoring. Among three types of systems studied, the perfluoro Wang linker was found to be most efficient for this purpose. Substrates could be easily anchored to and cleaved from this new support-bound linker. The anchoring of the linker and the substrates on the polymer led to significant changes in the fluorine resonances. Therefore, the progress of these reactions could be both monitored and quantified. On the other hand, the chemical transformations on the anchored substrates led only to moderate changes in the fluorine resonances. Nevertheless, the reaction progress could also be monitored in this case. After cleavage of products, the polymer supports were recovered without loss in loading. Membrane separation technology was used to purify some polymer-bound products as well as to obtain the polymer-free cleaved product. PMID:12425606

  10. Synthesis, fine structure of 19F NMR and fluorescence of novel amorphous TPA derivatives having perfluorinated cyclopentenyl and benzo[b]thiophene unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bian-Peng; Pang, Mei-Li; Tan, Ting-Feng; Meng, Ji-ben

    2013-04-01

    Three novel triphenylamine (TPA) derivatives having perfluorinated cyclopentenyl and benzo[b]thiophene unit are obtained from 4-bromo-N,N-diphenyl-2-methylbenzo[b]thiophen-5-amine. The new compounds are expected to find their use in thin film devices as charge transport materials and host organic light-emitting materials. It is found that the new compounds show relatively strong fluorescence either in solution or in solid state, and are amorphous due to a special conformation which is elucidated by the fine structure of 19F NMR. Molecular structure and properties of these compounds is characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR (broadband decoupled), ESI-HRMS, elemental analysis and thermal analysis (DSC). Fluorescent quantum yield in solution is measured using 9,10-diphenylanthrancene (DPA) as standard fluorescent substance.

  11. Estimation of angular distribution of neutron dose using time-of-flight for 19F+Al system at 110 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Maitreyee; Sunil, C.; Maiti, Moumita; Palit, R.; Sarkar, P. K.

    2007-06-01

    We have reported measured angular and energy distributions of neutron dose from 110 MeV 19F projectiles bombarding a thick aluminum target. The measurements are carried out with BC501 liquid scintillator detector using the time-of-flight technique. We have measured neutron energy distributions at 0∘, 30∘, 60∘, 90∘, and 120∘ and converted them to dose distributions using the ICRP recommended fluence to ambient dose equivalent and absorbed dose conversion coefficients. Similar conversions to ambient dose equivalent are done for theoretically estimated distributions from the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE-2.18. The experimental results are compared with calculated ambient dose equivalent from different empirical formulations proposed by earlier workers. Based on the comparison, we have attempted modifications of the parameters in these empirical expressions.

  12. Absolute (γ,p0) and (γ,p1) cross sections and angular distributions for the light, deformed nucleus 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkhove, E.; Ferdinande, H.; van de Vyver, R.; Berkvens, P.; van Otten, P.; van Camp, E.; Ryckbosch, D.

    1984-06-01

    Absolute (γ,p0) and (γ,p1) differential cross sections for 19F have been measured at seven angles in the energy interval between 13.4 and 25.8 MeV. A sum of Legendre polynomials was fitted to the angular distributions to deduce the angular distribution coefficients. The (γ,p0) and (γ,p1) cross sections have a similar magnitude and represent a minor fraction of the total photoproton channel. The global difference between the two cross sections is attributed to configurational splitting effects. From the (γ,p0) angular distribution coefficients, an E2 cross section was estimated, contributing about 37% to the total E2 energy-weighted sum rule.

  13. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of the distance between the E-site GTP and the high-affinity Mg2+ in tubulin.

    PubMed

    Monasterio, O

    1987-09-22

    The distance separating the divalent metal ion high-affinity binding site and the exchangeable nucleotide binding site on tubulin was evaluated by using high-resolution 19F NMR. The 31P and 19F NMR spectra of guanosine 5'-(gamma-fluorotriphosphate) [GTP (gamma F)] were studied. Both the fluorine and the gamma-phosphate were split into a doublet with a coupling constant of 936 Hz. Tubulin purified according to the method of Weisenberg [Weisenberg, R.C., & Timasheff, S.N. (1970) Biochemistry 9, 4110-4116] was incubated with 1 mM Mn2+. After one cycle of assembly, Mn2+ replaced Mg2+ only partially, i.e., 60% at the high-affinity binding site. After colchicine treatment of tubulin to stabilize it, GTP(gamma F) was added, and the 254-MHz fluorine-19 relaxation rates were measured within the first 4 h. Longitudinal and transversal relaxation rates were determined at two concentrations of GTP(gamma F) and variable concentrations of colchicine-tubulin-Mn(II) (paramagnetic complex) or the ternary complex with magnesium (diamagnetic complex). The analysis of the relaxation data indicates that the rate of exchange of GTP(gamma F) from the exchangeable nucleotide site has a lower limit of 8.7 X 10(4) s-1 and the metal and exchangeable nucleotide binding sites are separated by an upper distance between 6 and 8 A. These data confirm that the high-affinity divalent cation site is situated in the same locus as that of the exchangeable nucleotide, forming a metal-nucleotide complex. PMID:3689763

  14. /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of the distance between the E-site GTP and the high-affinity Mg/sup 2 +/ in tubulin

    SciTech Connect

    Monasterio, O.

    1987-09-22

    The distance separating the divalent metal ion high-affinity binding site and the exchangeable nucleotide binding site on tubulin was evaluated by using high-resolution /sup 19/F NMR. The /sup 31/P and /sup 19/F NMR spectra of guanosine 5'-(..gamma..-fluorotriphosphate) (GTP(..gamma..F)) were studied. Both the fluorine and the ..gamma..-phosphate were split into a doublet with a coupling constant of 936 Hz. Tubulin purified according to the method of Weisenberg was incubated with 1 mM Mn/sup 2 +/. After one cycle of assembly, Mn/sup 2 +/ only partially, i.e., 60% at the high-affinity binding site. After colchicine treatment of tubulin to stabilize it, GTP(..gamma..F) was added, and the 254-MHz fluorine-19 relaxation rates were measured within the first 4 h. Longitudinal and transversal relaxation rates were determined at two concentrations of GTP(..gamma..F) and variable concentrations of colchicine-tubulin-Mn(II) (paramagnetic complex) or the ternary complex with magnesium diamagnetic complex). The analysis of the relaxation data indicates that the rate of exchange of GTP(..gamma..F) from the exchangeable nucleotide site has a lower limit of 8.7 x 10/sup 4/ s/sup -1/ and the metal and exchangeable nucleotide binding sites are separated by an upper distance between 6 and 8 A. These data confirm that the high-affinity divalent cation site is situated in the same locus as that of the exchangeable nucleotide, forming a metal-nucleotide complex.

  15. Pulse Oximetry

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.thoracic.org amount of gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide) that are in your blood. To get an ... Also, a pulse oximeter does not measure your carbon dioxide level. How accurate is the pulse oximeter? The ...

  16. Musculoskeletal MRI.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jaime E; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    MRI has the unique ability to detect abnormal fluid content, and is therefore unparalleled in its role of detection, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment planning and follow-up evaluation of musculoskeletal disease. MRI in companion animals should be considered in the following circumstances: a definitive diagnosis cannot be made on radiographs; a patient is nonresponsive to medical or surgical therapy; prognostic information is desired; assessing surgical margins and traumatic and/or infectious joint and bone disease; ruling out subtle developmental or early aggressive bone lesions. The MRI features of common disorders affecting the shoulder, elbow, stifle, carpal, and tarsal joints are included in this chapter. PMID:26928749

  17. Nano-emulsions of fluorinated trityl radicals as sensors for EPR oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlier, N.; Driesschaert, B.; Wauthoz, N.; Beghein, N.; Préat, V.; Amighi, K.; Marchand-Brynaert, J.; Gallez, B.

    2009-04-01

    This article reports the development and evaluation of two nano-emulsions (F45T-03/HFB and F15T-03/PFOB) containing fluorinated trityl radicals dissolved in perfluorocarbons. Preparation with a high-pressure homogenizer conferred sub-micronic size to both nano-emulsions. In vitro and in vivo EPR spectroscopy showed that the nano-emulsions had much greater oxygen sensitivity than the hydrophilic trityl, CT-03. In vivo experiments in rodents confirmed the ability of the nano-emulsions to follow the changes in oxygen concentration after induced ischemia. Histological evaluation of the tissue injected with the nano-emulsions revealed some acute toxicity for the F45T-03/HFB nano-emulsion but none for the F15T-03/PFOB nano-emulsion. These new formulations should be considered for further EPR oximetry experiments in pathophysiological situations where subtle changes in tissue oxygenation are expected.

  18. Nano-emulsions of fluorinated trityl radicals as sensors for EPR oximetry.

    PubMed

    Charlier, N; Driesschaert, B; Wauthoz, N; Beghein, N; Préat, V; Amighi, K; Marchand-Brynaert, J; Gallez, B

    2009-04-01

    This article reports the development and evaluation of two nano-emulsions (F45T-03/HFB and F15T-03/PFOB) containing fluorinated trityl radicals dissolved in perfluorocarbons. Preparation with a high-pressure homogenizer conferred sub-micronic size to both nano-emulsions. In vitro and in vivo EPR spectroscopy showed that the nano-emulsions had much greater oxygen sensitivity than the hydrophilic trityl, CT-03. In vivo experiments in rodents confirmed the ability of the nano-emulsions to follow the changes in oxygen concentration after induced ischemia. Histological evaluation of the tissue injected with the nano-emulsions revealed some acute toxicity for the F45T-03/HFB nano-emulsion but none for the F15T-03/PFOB nano-emulsion. These new formulations should be considered for further EPR oximetry experiments in pathophysiological situations where subtle changes in tissue oxygenation are expected. PMID:19128993

  19. Is Pulse Oximetry Useful for Screening Neonates for Critical Congenital Heart Disease at High Altitudes?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Julien I E

    2016-06-01

    Now that pulse oximetry is used widely to screen for critical congenital heart disease, it is time to consider whether this screening method is applicable to those who live at high altitudes. Consideration of basic physical principles and reports from the literature indicate that not only is the 95 % cutoff point for arterial oxygen saturation incorrect at high altitudes, but the lower saturations are accompanied by greater variability and therefore there is the possibility of a greater percentage of false-positive screening tests at high altitudes. Because of ethnic differences in response to high altitudes, normative data will have to be collected separately in different countries and perhaps for different ethnic groups. PMID:27090652

  20. An ECG oximetry system for identifying obstructive and central apnoea events.

    PubMed

    de Chazal, Philip; Sadr, Nadi; Jayawardhana, Madhuka

    2015-08-01

    An automatic algorithm for processing simultaneously acquired electrocardiogram (ECG) and oximetry signals that identifies epochs of pure central apnoea, epochs containing obstructive apnoea and epochs of normal breathing is presented. The algorithm uses time and spectral features from the ECG derived heart-rate and respiration information, as well as features capturing desaturations from the oximeter sensor. Evaluation of performance of the system was achieved by using leave-one-record-out cross validation on the St. Vincent's University Hospital / University College Dublin Sleep Apnea Database from the Physionet collections of recorded physiologic signals. When classifying the three epoch types, our system achieved a specificity of 80%, a sensitivity to central apnoea of 44% and sensitivity to obstructive apnoea of 35%. A sensitivity of 81% was achieved when the central and obstructive epochs were combined into one class. PMID:26738069

  1. Universal Pulse Oximetry Screening for Early Detection of Critical Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a major cause of infant death and morbidity worldwide. An early diagnosis and timely intervention can significantly reduce the likelihood of an adverse outcome. However, studies from the United States and other developed countries have shown that as many as 30%–50% of infants with CCHD are discharged after birth without being identified. This diagnostic gap is likely to be even higher in low-resource countries. Several large randomized trials have shown that the use of universal pulse-oximetry screening (POS) at the time of discharge from birth hospital can help in early diagnosis of these infants. The objective of this review is to share data to show that the use of POS for early detection of CCHD meets the criteria necessary for inclusion to the universal newborn screening panel and could be adopted worldwide. PMID:27279759

  2. Application of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Oximetry to Monitor Oxygen in Wounds in Diabetic Models

    PubMed Central

    Desmet, Céline M.; Lafosse, Aurore; Vériter, Sophie; Porporato, Paolo E.; Sonveaux, Pierre; Dufrane, Denis; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A lack of oxygen is classically described as a major cause of impaired wound healing in diabetic patients. Even if the role of oxygen in the wound healing process is well recognized, measurement of oxygen levels in a wound remains challenging. The purpose of the present study was to assess the value of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry to monitor pO2 in wounds during the healing process in diabetic mouse models. Kinetics of wound closure were carried out in streptozotocin (STZ)-treated and db/db mice. The pO2 was followed repeatedly during the healing process by 1 GHz EPR spectroscopy with lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) crystals used as oxygen sensor in two different wound models: a full-thickness excisional skin wound and a pedicled skin flap. Wound closure kinetics were dramatically slower in 12-week-old db/db compared to control (db/+) mice, whereas kinetics were not statistically different in STZ-treated compared to control mice. At the center of excisional wounds, measurements were highly influenced by atmospheric oxygen early in the healing process. In pedicled flaps, hypoxia was observed early after wounding. While reoxygenation occurred over time in db/+ mice, hypoxia was prolonged in the diabetic db/db model. This observation was consistent with impaired healing and microangiopathies observed using intravital microscopy. In conclusion, EPR oximetry using LiPc crystals as the oxygen sensor is an appropriate technique to follow wound oxygenation in acute and chronic wounds, in normal and diabetic animals. Nevertheless, the technique is limited for measurements in pedicled skin flaps and cannot be applied to excisional wounds in which diffusion of atmospheric oxygen significantly affects the measurements. PMID:26659378

  3. Elevated Carboxyhaemoglobin Concentrations by Pulse CO-Oximetry is Associated with Severe Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mashayekhian, Mohammad; Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hossein; Rahimi, Mitra; Zamani, Nasim; Aghabiklooei, Abbas; Shadnia, Shahin

    2016-09-01

    In pulse CO-oximetry of aluminium phosphide (ALP)-poisoned patients, we discovered that carboxyhaemoglobin (CO-Hb) level was elevated. We aimed to determine whether a higher CO level was detected in patients with severe ALP poisoning and if this could be used as a prognostic factor in these patients. In a prospective case-control study, 96 suspected cases of ALP poisoning were evaluated. In the ALP-poisoned group, demographic characteristics, gastric and exhalation silver nitrate test results, average CO-Hb saturation, methaemoglobin saturation, and blood pressure and blood gas analysis until death/discharge were recorded. Severely poisoned patients were defined as those with systolic blood pressure ≤80 mmHg, pH ≤7.2, or HCO3 ≤15 meq/L or those who died, while patients with minor poisoning were those without any of these signs/symptoms. A control group (37 patients) was taken from other medically ill patients to detect probable effects of hypotension and metabolic acidosis on CO-Hb and methaemoglobin saturations. Of 96 patients, 27 died and 37 fulfilled the criteria for severe poisoning. All patients with carbon monoxide saturation >18% met the criteria to be included in the severe poisoning group and all with a SpCO >25% died. Concerning all significant variables in univariate analysis of severe ALP toxicity, the only significant variable which could independently predict death was carbon monoxide saturation. Due to high mortality rate and need for intensive care support, early prediction of outcome is vital for choosing an appropriate setting (ICU or ordinary ward). CO-oximetry is a good diagnostic and prognostic factor in patients with ALP poisoning even before any clinical evidence of toxicity will develop. PMID:26899262

  4. Transcutaneous oximetry in clinical practice: consensus statements from an expert panel based on evidence.

    PubMed

    Fife, C E; Smart, D R; Sheffield, P J; Hopf, H W; Hawkins, G; Clarke, D

    2009-01-01

    Transcutaneous oximetry (PtcO2) is finding increasing application as a diagnostic tool to assess the peri-wound oxygen tension of wounds, ulcers, and skin flaps. It must be remembered that PtcO2 measures the oxygen partial pressure in adjacent areas of a wound and does not represent the actual partial pressure of oxygen within the wound, which is extremely difficult to perform. To provide clinical practice guidelines, an expert panel was convened with participants drawn from the transcutaneous oximetry workshop held on June 13, 2007, in Maui, Hawaii. Important consensus statements were (a) tissue hypoxia is defined as a PtcO2 <40 mm Hg; (b) in patients without vascular disease, PtcO2 values on the extremity increase to a value >100 mm Hg when breathing 100% oxygen under normobaric pressures; (c) patients with critical limb ischemia (ankle systolic pressure of < or =50 mm Hg or toe systolic pressure of < or =30 mm Hg) breathing air will usually have a PtcO2 <30 mm Hg; (d) low PtcO2 values obtained while breathing normobaric air can be caused by a diffusion barrier; (e) a PtcO2 <40 mm Hg obtained while breathing normobaric air is associated with a reduced likelihood of amputation healing; (f) if the baseline PtcO2 increases <10 mm Hg while breathing 100% normobaric oxygen, this is at least 68% accurate in predicting failure of healing post-amputation; (g) an increase in PtcO2 to >40 mm Hg during normobaric air breathing after revascularization is usually associated with subsequent healing, although the increase in PtcO2 may be delayed; (h) PtcO2 obtained while breathing normobaric air can assist in identifying which patients will not heal spontaneously. PMID:19341127

  5. Screening by Pulse CO-Oximetry for Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure in Preanesthetic Children

    PubMed Central

    Cardwell, Kathryn; Pan, Zhaoxing; Boucher, Rebecca; Zuk, Jeannie; Friesen, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of multiple wavelength pulse CO-oximetry (SpCO) to screen for environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure in children. Background Exposure to ETS is associated with an increased risk of perioperative respiratory complications in children. It is often difficult to obtain an accurate history for ETS exposure, so a preoperative screening tool is desirable. Carbon monoxide is a measurable product of tobacco combustion. Multiple wavelength pulse CO-oximetry is a recently developed point-of-care monitor. Methods Following IRB approval and parental consent, 220 children aged 1–16 years having outpatient surgical procedures were enrolled. SpCO was measured preoperatively 3 times with the Radical-7 Rainbow SET CO-oximeter (Masimo, Irvine, CA). Immediately following induction of anesthesia, a blood sample for laboratory measurement of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and serum cotinine was obtained. Regression analysis determined the correlation of SpCO with serum cotinine values. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves analyzed the discriminating ability of SpCO or COHb to predict ETS exposure based on cotinine cutoff values known to be present in children exposed to ETS. Agreement of SpCO and COHb values was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. Results SpCO did not correlate with cotinine (R2=0.005). Both SpCO and COHb had poor discriminating ability for ETS exposure (area under the ROC curve = 0.606 and 0.562, respectively). SpCO values had poor agreement with COHb values. Conclusions The point-of-care multiple wavelength pulse CO-oximeter does not appear to be a useful preoperative screening tool for ETS exposure in children. PMID:22587734

  6. Application of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Oximetry to Monitor Oxygen in Wounds in Diabetic Models.

    PubMed

    Desmet, Céline M; Lafosse, Aurore; Vériter, Sophie; Porporato, Paolo E; Sonveaux, Pierre; Dufrane, Denis; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A lack of oxygen is classically described as a major cause of impaired wound healing in diabetic patients. Even if the role of oxygen in the wound healing process is well recognized, measurement of oxygen levels in a wound remains challenging. The purpose of the present study was to assess the value of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry to monitor pO2 in wounds during the healing process in diabetic mouse models. Kinetics of wound closure were carried out in streptozotocin (STZ)-treated and db/db mice. The pO2 was followed repeatedly during the healing process by 1 GHz EPR spectroscopy with lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) crystals used as oxygen sensor in two different wound models: a full-thickness excisional skin wound and a pedicled skin flap. Wound closure kinetics were dramatically slower in 12-week-old db/db compared to control (db/+) mice, whereas kinetics were not statistically different in STZ-treated compared to control mice. At the center of excisional wounds, measurements were highly influenced by atmospheric oxygen early in the healing process. In pedicled flaps, hypoxia was observed early after wounding. While reoxygenation occurred over time in db/+ mice, hypoxia was prolonged in the diabetic db/db model. This observation was consistent with impaired healing and microangiopathies observed using intravital microscopy. In conclusion, EPR oximetry using LiPc crystals as the oxygen sensor is an appropriate technique to follow wound oxygenation in acute and chronic wounds, in normal and diabetic animals. Nevertheless, the technique is limited for measurements in pedicled skin flaps and cannot be applied to excisional wounds in which diffusion of atmospheric oxygen significantly affects the measurements. PMID:26659378

  7. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging method that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the heart. It does ... radiation involved in MRI. The magnetic fields and radio waves used during the scan have not been shown ...

  8. Obstetric MRI.

    PubMed

    Levine, Deborah

    2006-07-01

    Ultrasound is the imaging modality of choice for pregnant patients. However, MRI is increasingly utilized in patients in whom the sonographic diagnosis is unclear. These include maternal conditions unique to pregnancy such as ectopic pregnancy, placenta accreta, and uterine dehiscence. MRI is also being increasingly utilized in the assessment of abdominopelvic pain in pregnancy, in particular in assessment for appendicitis. Fetal MRI is performed to assess central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities and patients who are considering fetal surgery for conditions such as neural tube defects, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and masses that obstruct the airway. In the future, functional MRI and fetal volumetry may provide additional information that can aid in our care of complicated pregnancies. PMID:16736491

  9. Solid-state {sup 19}F and {sup 13}C NMR of room temperature fluorinated graphite and samples thermally treated under fluorine: Low-field and high-resolution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Giraudet, J.; Dubois, M.; Guerin, K.; Pinheiro, J.P.; Hamwi, A.; Stone, W.E.E.; Pirotte, P.; Masin, F. . E-mail: fmasin@ulb.ac.be

    2005-04-15

    Room temperature graphite fluorides consisting of raw material and samples post-treated in pure fluorine atmosphere in the temperature range 100-500 deg. C have been studied by solid-state NMR. Several NMR approaches have been used, both high and low-field {sup 19}F, {sup 19}F MAS and {sup 13}C MAS with {sup 19}F to {sup 13}C cross polarization. The modifications, in the graphitic lattice, of the catalytic iodine fluorides products have been examined. A transformation of the C-F bond character from semi-ionic to covalent has been found to occur at a post-treatment temperature close to 400 deg. C. It is shown that covalency increases with temperature.

  10. Is pulse oximetry an essential tool or just another distraction? The role of the pulse oximeter in modern anesthesia care.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit; Shelley, Kirk H

    2013-06-01

    Since the discovery of anesthetic agents, patient monitoring has been considered one of the core responsibilities of the anesthesiologist. As depicted in Robert Hinckley's famous painting, The First Operation with Ether, one observes William Thomas Green Morton carefully watching over his patient. Since its founding in 1905, 'Vigilance' has been the motto of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). Over a hundred years have passed, and one would think we would be clear regarding what we are watching for and how we should be watching. On the contrary, the introduction of new technology and outcome research is requiring us to re-examine our fundamental assumptions regarding what is and what is not important in the care of the patient. A vast majority of anesthesiologists would refuse to proceed with an anesthetic without the presence of a pulse oximeter. On the other hand, outcome studies have failed to demonstrate an improvement in patient care with their use. For that matter, it can be argued that outcome studies have yet to demonstrate an unambiguous role for any monitor of any type (i.e. blood pressure cuff or ECG), as outcome studies may fail to capture rare events. Because of the increased safety that has been attributed to pulse oximetry, it is unlikely that further studies can or will be conducted. As we enter a new era of clinical monitoring, with an emphasis on noninvasive cardiovascular monitoring, it might be of benefit to examine the role of the pulse oximeter in clinical care. This article reviews the available evidence for pulse oximetry. Further, it discusses contemporary issues, events, and perceptions that may help to explain how and why pulse oximetry may have been adopted as a standard of care despite the lack of supportive. Lastly, it discusses less obvious benefits of pulse oximetry that may have further implications on the future of anesthesia care and perhaps even automated anesthesia. PMID:23314807

  11. Repetitive Tissue PO2 Measurements by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Oximetry: Current Status and Future Potential for Experimental and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    KHAN, NADEEM; WILLIAMS, BENJAMIN B.; HOU, HUAGANG; LI, HONGBIN; SWARTZ, HAROLD M.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue oxygen plays a crucial role in maintaining tissue viability and in various diseases, including responses to therapy. Useful knowledge has been gained by methods that can give limited snapshots of tissue oxygen (e.g., oxygen electrodes) or evidence of a history of tissue hypoxia (e.g., EF5) or even indirect evidence by monitoring oxygen availability in the circulatory system (e.g., NMR methods). Each of these methods has advantages and significant limitations. EPR oximetry is a technique for direct measurement of tissue pO2, which has several advantages over the other existing methods for applications in which the parameter of interest is the pO2 of tissues, and information is needed over a time course of minutes to hours, and/or for repetitive measurements over days or weeks or years. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of EPR oximetry using particulates to readers who are not familiar with this technique and its potential in vivo and clinical applications. The data presented here are from the experiments currently being carried out in our laboratory. We are confident that in vivo EPR oximetry will play a crucial role in the understanding and clinical management of various pathologies in the years to come. PMID:17536960

  12. Portable MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  13. Measurement and analysis of energy and angular distributions of thick target neutron yields from 110 MeV {sup 19}F on {sup 27}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, C.; Nandy, Maitreyee; Sarkar, P. K.

    2008-12-15

    Energy distributions of emitted neutrons were measured for 110 MeV {sup 19}F ions incident on a thick {sup 27}Al target. Measurements were done at 0 deg., 30 deg., 60 deg., 90 deg., and 120 deg. with respect to the projectile direction employing the time-of-flight technique using a proton recoil scintillation detector. Comparison with calculated results from equilibrium nuclear reaction model codes like PACE-2 and EMPIRE 2.18 using various level-density options was carried out. It is observed that the dynamic level-density approach in EMPIRE 2.18 gives the closest approximation to the measured data. In the Fermi-gas level-density approach the best approximation of the level-density parameter is a=A/12.0, where A is the mass number of the composite system. The trend in the angular distribution of emitted neutrons is well reproduced by the projection of the angular momentum on the recoil axis as done in the PACE-2 code.

  14. The effect of ethanol on hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine: (31)P-NMR and (19)F-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Celikbag, Yusuf; Via, Brian K; Adhikari, Sushil; Buschle-Diller, Gisela; Auad, Maria L

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the role of ethanol and temperature on the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced from hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine (Pinus spp.) carried out at 250, 300, 350 and 390°C for 30min. Water and water/ethanol mixture (1/1, wt/wt) were used as liquefying solvent in the HTL experiments. HTL in water and water/ethanol is donated as W-HTL and W/E-HTL, respectively. It was found that 300°C and water/ethanol solvent was the optimum liquefaction temperature and solvent, yielding up to 68.1wt.% bio-oil and 2.4wt.% solid residue. (31)P-NMR analysis showed that biopolyol produced by W-HTL was rich in phenolic OH while W/E-HTL produced more aliphatic OH rich biopolyols. Moreover, biopolyols with higher hydroxyl concentration were produced by W/E-HTL. Carbonyl groups were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, which showed that ethanol reduced the concentration of carbonyl groups. PMID:27126078

  15. Targeting the Endocannabinoid System for Neuroprotection: A 19F-NMR Study of a Selective FAAH Inhibitor Binding with an Anandamide Carrier Protein, HSA

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jianqin; Yang, De-Ping; Tian, Xiaoyu; Nikas, Spyros P.; Sharma, Rishi; Guo, Jason Jianxin; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme involved in the inactivation of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA), is being considered as a therapeutic target for analgesia and neuroprotection. We have developed a brain permeable FAAH inhibitor, AM5206, which has served as a valuable pharmacological tool to explore neuroprotective effects of this class of compounds. In the present work, we characterized the interactions of AM5206 with a representative AEA carrier protein, human serum albumin (HSA), using 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our data showed that as a drug carrier, albumin can significantly enhance the solubility of AM5206 in aqueous environment. Through a series of titration and competitive binding experiments, we also identified that AM5206 primarily binds to two distinct sites within HSA. Our results may provide insight into the mechanism of HSA-AM5206 interactions. The findings should also help in the development of suitable formulations of the lipophilic AM5206 and its congeners for their effective delivery to specific target sites in the brain. PMID:24533425

  16. Pulse oximetry versus transcutaneous pO2 in sick newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Wimberley, P D; Helledie, N R; Friis-Hansen, B; Fogh-Andersen, N; Olesen, H

    1987-01-01

    A pulse oximeter (Ohmeda Biox 3700) and two transcutaneous systems (Radiometer TCM3) were applied simultaneously to 18 newborn infants with respiratory insufficiency. All infants had either an umbilical catheter placed in the mid thoracic aorta or a radial artery catheter. The average monitoring time was 2 hours. Arterial blood pO2, pCO2 and pH (Radiometer ABL300), arterial sO2, HbCO and metHb (Radiometer OSM3), erythrocyte 2,3 DPG concentration, and fetal hemoglobin fraction (alkali denaturation kinetic method) were measured. Using arterial sO2 and pO2 as reference, the analytical bias of pulse oximetry (-0.5 +/- 1.0%, mean +/- 1 SD) corresponded in magnitude, when converted to pO2, to that of transcutaneous - pO2 (0.6 +/- 1.4 kPa for combined O2-CO2 electrode and -0.1 +/- 2.3 kPa for single O2 electrode). Transcutaneous pCO2 showed the smallest bias (0.3 +/- 0.3 kPa). Both pulse oximetry and transcutaneous pO2 electrodes were good as trend monitors detecting rapid changes in the infants' oxygenation status. The pulse oximeter offers certain advantages in not requiring calibration or heating. The variations in the levels of fetal hemoglobin fraction (44 to 97%), pH (7.27 to 7.49), pCO2 (3.3 to 6.8 kPa) and 2,3 diphosphoglycerate concentration (1.6 to 5.9 mmol/l) between the infants studied, resulted in a variable pO2-sO2 relation (p50 2.5 to 3.5 kPa). This presents difficulties in interpreting sO2 values in sick newborn infants, and we therefore recommend caution in using a pulse oximeter to apply strict limits for avoiding hypoxia and hyperoxia in this population. PMID:2453078

  17. In vivo evidence of methamphetamine induced attenuation of brain tissue oxygenation as measured by EPR oximetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, John; Yang, Yirong; Purvis, Rebecca; Weatherwax, Theodore; Rosen, Gerald M.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-03-01

    Abuse of methamphetamine (METH) is a major and significant societal problem in the US, as a number of studies have suggested that METH is associated with increased cerebrovascular events, hemorrhage or vasospasm. Although cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in METH-induced toxicity are not completely understood, changes in brain O{sub 2} may play an important role and contribute to METH-induced neurotoxicity including dopaminergic receptor degradation. Given that O{sub 2} is the terminal electron acceptor for many enzymes that are important in brain function, the impact of METH on brain tissue pO{sub 2}in vivo remains largely uncharacterized. This study investigated striatal tissue pO{sub 2} changes in male C57BL/6 mice (16–20 g) following METH administration using EPR oximetry, a highly sensitive modality to measure pO{sub 2}in vivo, in situ and in real time. We demonstrate that 20 min after a single injection of METH (8 mg/kg i.v.), the striatal pO{sub 2} was reduced to 81% of the pretreatment level and exposure to METH for 3 consecutive days further attenuated striatal pO{sub 2} to 64%. More importantly, pO{sub 2} did not recover fully to control levels even 24 h after administration of a single dose of METH and continual exposure to METH exacerbates the condition. We also show a reduction in cerebral blood flow associated with a decreased brain pO{sub 2} indicating an ischemic condition. Our findings suggests that administration of METH can attenuate brain tissue pO{sub 2}, which may lead to hypoxic insult, thus a risk factor for METH-induced brain injury and the development of stroke in young adults. - Highlights: • Explored striatal tissue pO{sub 2}in vivo after METH administration by EPR oximetry. • pO{sub 2} was reduced by 81% after a single dose and 64% after 3 consecutive daily doses. • pO{sub 2} did not recover fully to control levels even 24 h after a single dose. • Decrease in brain tissue pO{sub 2} may be associated with a decrease in

  18. EPR Oximetry for Investigation of Hyperbaric O2 Pre-treatment for Tumor Radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Williams, Benjamin B; Hou, Huagang; Coombs, Rachel; Swartz, Harold M

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have reported benefits associated with the application of hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBO) delivered immediately prior to radiation therapy. While these studies provide evidence that pre-treatment with HBO may be beneficial, no measurements of intratumoral pO2 were carried out and they do not directly link the apparent benefits to decreased hypoxic fractions at the time of radiation therapy. While there is empirical evidence and some theoretical basis for HBO to enhance radiation therapy, without direct and repeated measurements of its effects on pO2, it is unlikely that the use of HBO can be understood and optimized for clinical applications. In vivo EPR oximetry is a technique uniquely capable of providing repeated direct measurements of pO2 through a non-invasive procedure in both animal models and human patients. In order to evaluate the ability of pretreatment with HBO to elevate tumor pO2, a novel small animal hyperbaric chamber system was constructed that allows simultaneous in vivo EPR oximetry. This chamber can be placed within the EPR magnet and is equipped with a variety of ports for multiplace gas delivery, thermoregulation, delivery of anesthesia, physiologic monitoring, and EPR detection. Initial measurements were performed in a subcutaneous RIF-1 tumor model in C3H/HeJ mice. The mean baseline pO2 value was 6.0 ± 1.2 mmHg (N = 7) and responses to two atmospheres absolute pressure HBO varied considerably across subjects, within tumors, and over time. When an increase in pO2 was observed, the effect was transient in all but one case, with durations lasting from 5 min to over 20 min, and returned to baseline levels during HBO administration. These results indicate that without direct measurements of pO2 in the tissue of interest, it is likely to be difficult to know the effects of HBO on actual tissue pO2. PMID:27526165

  19. Combined ligand-observe 19F and protein-observe 15N,1H-HSQC NMR suggests phenylalanine as the key Δ-somatostatin residue recognized by human protein disulfide isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Kirsty L.; Rowe, Michelle L.; Hudson, Paul B.; Williamson, Richard A.; Howard, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Human protein disulphide isomerase (hPDI) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) based isomerase and folding chaperone. Molecular detail of ligand recognition and specificity of hPDI are poorly understood despite the importance of the hPDI for folding secreted proteins and its implication in diseases including cancer and lateral sclerosis. We report a detailed study of specificity, interaction and dissociation constants (Kd) of the peptide-ligand Δ-somatostatin (AGSKNFFWKTFTSS) binding to hPDI using 19F ligand-observe and 15N,1H-HSQC protein-observe NMR methods. Phe residues in Δ-somatostatin are hypothesised as important for recognition by hPDI therefore, step-wise peptide Phe-to-Ala changes were progressively introduced and shown to raise the Kd from 103 + 47 μM until the point where binding was abolished when all Phe residues were modified to Ala. The largest step-changes in Kd involved the F11A peptide modification which implies the C-terminus of Δ-somatostatin is a prime recognition region. Furthermore, this study also validated the combined use of 19F ligand-observe and complimentary 15N,1H-HSQC titrations to monitor interactions from the protein’s perspective. 19F ligand-observe NMR was ratified as mirroring 15N protein-observe but highlighted the advantage that 19F offers improved Kd precision due to higher spectrum resolution and greater chemical environment sensitivity. PMID:26786784

  20. Magnetic properties and hyperfine interactions in Cr{sub 8}, Cr{sub 7}Cd, and Cr{sub 7}Ni molecular rings from {sup 19}F-NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Bordonali, L.; Borsa, F.; Consorzio INSTM, Via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 ; Garlatti, E.; Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Parma, Viale G. P. Usberti 7 Casadei, C. M.; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 ; Furukawa, Y.; Lascialfari, A.; Consorzio INSTM, Via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze; Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano ; Carretta, S.; Timco, G.; Winpenny, R. E. P.

    2014-04-14

    A detailed experimental investigation of the {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance is made on single crystals of the homometallic Cr{sub 8} antiferromagnetic molecular ring and heterometallic Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 7}Ni rings in the low temperature ground state. Since the F{sup −} ion is located midway between neighboring magnetic metal ions in the ring, the {sup 19}F-NMR spectra yield information about the local electronic spin density and {sup 19}F hyperfine interactions. In Cr{sub 8}, where the ground state is a singlet with total spin S{sub T} = 0, the {sup 19}F-NMR spectra at 1.7 K and low external magnetic field display a single narrow line, while when the magnetic field is increased towards the first level crossing field, satellite lines appear in the {sup 19}F-NMR spectrum, indicating a progressive increase in the Boltzmann population of the first excited state S{sub T} = 1. In the heterometallic rings, Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 7}Ni, whose ground state is magnetic with S{sub T} = 3/2 and S{sub T} = 1/2, respectively, the {sup 19}F-NMR spectrum has a complicated structure which depends on the strength and orientation of the magnetic field, due to both isotropic and anisotropic transferred hyperfine interactions and classical dipolar interactions. From the {sup 19}F-NMR spectra in single crystals we estimated the transferred hyperfine constants for both the F{sup −}-Ni{sup 2+} and the F{sup −}-Cd{sup 2+} bonds. The values of the hyperfine constants compare well to the ones known for F{sup −}-Ni{sup 2+} in KNiF{sub 3} and NiF{sub 2} and for F{sup −}-Cr{sup 3+} in K{sub 2}NaCrF{sub 6}. The results are discussed in terms of hybridization of the 2s, 2p orbitals of the F{sup −} ion and the d orbitals of the magnetic ion. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the electron-spin decoherence.

  1. Nitrate Effects on Nodule Oxygen Permeability and Leghemoglobin (Nodule Oximetry and Computer Modeling).

    PubMed Central

    Denison, R. F.; Harter, B. L.

    1995-01-01

    Two current hypotheses to explain nitrate inhibition of nodule function both involve decreased O2 supply for respiration in support of N2 fixation. This decrease could result from either (a) decreased O2 permeability (PO) of the nodule cortex, or (b) conversion of leghemoglobin (Lb) to an inactive, nitrosyl form. These hypotheses were tested using alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv Weevlchek) and birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L. cv Fergus) plants grown in growth pouches under controlled conditions. Nodulated roots were exposed to 10 mM KNO3 or KCI. Fractional oxygenation of Lb under air (FOLair), relative concentration of functional Lb, apparent PO, and O2-saturated central zone respiration rate were all monitored by nodule oximetry. Apparent PO and FOLair in nitrate-treated nodules decreased to <50% of values for KCI controls within 24 h, but there was no decrease in functional Lb concentration during the first 72 h. In nitrate-treated alfalfa, but not in birdsfoot trefoil, FOLair, apparent PO, and O2-saturated central zone respiration rate decreased during each light period and recovered somewhat during the subsequent dark period. This species difference could be explained by greater reliance on photoreduction of nitrate in alfalfa than in birdsfoot trefoil. Computer simulations extended the experimental results, showing that previously reported decreases in apparent PO of Glycine max nodules with nitrate exposure cannot be explained by hypothetical decreases in the concentration or O2 affinity of Lb. PMID:12228439

  2. Reproducibility of transcutaneous oximetry and laser Doppler flowmetry in facial skin and gingival tissue.

    PubMed

    Svalestad, J; Hellem, S; Vaagbø, G; Irgens, A; Thorsen, E

    2010-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and transcutaneous oximetry (TcPO(2)) are non-invasive techniques, widely used in the clinical setting, for assessing microvascular blood flow and tissue oxygen tension, e.g. recording vascular changes after radiotherapy and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. With standardized procedures and improved reproducibility, these methods might also be applicable in longitudinal studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of facial skin and gingival LDF and facial skin TcPO(2). The subjects comprised ten healthy volunteers, 5 men, aged 31-68 years. Gingival perfusion was recorded with the LDF probe fixed to a custom made, tooth-supported acrylic splint. Skin perfusion was recorded on the cheek. TcPO(2) was recorded on the forehead and cheek and in the second intercostal space. The reproducibility of LDF measurements taken after vasodilation by heat provocation was greater than for basal flow in both facial skin and mandibular gingiva. Pronounced intraday variations were observed. Interweek reproducibility assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient ranged from 0.74 to 0.96 for LDF and from 0.44 to 0.75 for TcPO(2). The results confirm acceptable reproducibility of LDF and TcPO(2) in longitudinal studies in a vascular laboratory where subjects serve as their own controls. The use of thermoprobes is recommended. Repeat measurements should be taken at the same time of day. PMID:19837098

  3. Near-infrared spectral imaging of the female breast for quantitative oximetry in optical mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yang; Liu Ning; Sassaroli, Angelo; Fantini, Sergio

    2009-04-01

    We present a hybrid continuous-wave, frequency-domain instrument for near-infrared spectral imaging of the female breast based on a tandem, planar scanning of one illumination optical fiber and one collection optical fiber configured in a transmission geometry. The spatial sampling rate of 25 points/cm{sup 2} is increased to 400 points/cm{sup 2} by postprocessing the data with a 2D cubic spline interpolation. We then apply a previously developed spatial second-derivative algorithm to an edge-corrected intensity image (N-image) to enhance the visibility and resolution of optical inhomogeneities in breast tissue such as blood vessels and tumors. The spectral data at each image pixel consist of 515-point spectra over the 650-900 nm wavelength range, thus featuring a spectral density of two data points per nanometer. We process the measured spectra with a paired-wavelength spectral analysis method to quantify the oxygen saturation of detected optical inhomogeneities, under the assumption that they feature a locally higher hemoglobin concentration. Our initial measurements on two healthy human subjects have generated high-resolution optical mammograms displaying a network of blood vessels with values of hemoglobin saturation typically falling within the 60%-95% range, which is physiologically reasonable. This approach to spectral imaging and oximetry of the breast has the potential to efficiently exploit the high intrinsic contrast provided by hemoglobin in breast tissue and to contribute a useful tool in the detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of breast pathologies.

  4. Oximetry system performance assessment with POM (acetal) phantoms incorporating hemoglobin calibration standards and customized saturation levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyounguk; Singh, Karam; Wang, Hsing-Wen; Pfefer, T. J.; Chen, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Standardized approaches for performance assessment of biophotonic devices have the potential to facilitate system development and intercomparison, clinical trial standardization, recalibration, manufacturing quality control and quality assurance during clinical use. Evaluation of devices based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for detection of hemoglobin (Hb) content and oxygenation have often involved tissue-simulating phantoms incorporating artificial dyes or flow systems. Towards the development of simple, effective techniques for objective, quantitative evaluation of basic NIRS system performance, we have developed and evaluated two test methods. These methods are based on cuvette inserts in solid turbid phantoms for measuring commercially-available Hb oximetry standards and custom-formulated oxy/deoxy-Hb solutions. Both approaches incorporate solid acetal, or polyoxymethylene (POM), as a tissue-simulating matrix material. First, inverse-adding-doubling (IAD) based on measurements with a spectrophotometer and an integrating sphere was used to measure POM optical properties and their stability over time. Second, two fiberopticprobe- based NIRS systems were used to measure concentration change of oxy- and deoxy-Hb in standard Hb solutions and customized Hb solutions by adding yeast. Differences in system performance were likely due to differences in light source outputs and fiberoptic probe design. Our preliminary results indicate that simple phantom-based approaches based on commercially available polymers and inclusions containing Hb standards, or controlled oxygenation levels may be useful for benchtop assessment of NIRS device quality for a variety of biophotonic devices.

  5. Preliminary investigation of multispectral retinal tissue oximetry mapping using a hyperspectral retinal camera.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Michèle; Sylvestre, Jean-Philippe; Jafari, Reza; Kulasekara, Susith; Rose, Kalpana; Trussart, Rachel; Arbour, Jean Daniel; Hudson, Chris; Lesage, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Oximetry measurement of principal retinal vessels represents a first step towards understanding retinal metabolism, but the technique could be significantly enhanced by spectral imaging of the fundus outside of main vessels. In this study, a recently developed Hyperspectral Retinal Camera was used to measure relative oximetric (SatO2) and total hemoglobin (HbT) maps of the retina, outside of large vessels, in healthy volunteers at baseline (N = 7) and during systemic hypoxia (N = 11), as well as in patients with glaucoma (N = 2). Images of the retina, on a field of view of ∼30°, were acquired between 500 and 600 nm with 2 and 5 nm steps, in under 3 s. The reflectance spectrum from each pixel was fitted to a model having oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin as the main absorbers and scattering modeled by a power law, yielding estimates of relative SatO2 and HbT over the fundus. Average optic nerve head (ONH) saturation over 8 eyes was 68 ± 5%. During systemic hypoxia, mean ONH saturation decreased by 12.5% on average. Upon further development and validation, the relative SatO2 and HbT maps of microvasculature obtained with this imaging system could ultimately contribute to the diagnostic and management of diseases affecting the ONH and retina. PMID:27060375

  6. Evaluation of pulse-oximetry oxygen saturation taken through skin protective covering

    PubMed Central

    James, Jyotsna; Tiwari, Lokesh; Upadhyay, Pramod; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Bhambhani, Vikas; Puliyel, Jacob M

    2006-01-01

    Background The hard edges of adult finger clip probes of the pulse oximetry oxygen saturation (POOS) monitor can cause skin damage if used for prolonged periods in a neonate. Covering the skin under the probe with Micropore surgical tape or a gauze piece might prevent such injury. The study was done to see if the protective covering would affect the accuracy of the readings. Methods POOS was studied in 50 full-term neonates in the first week of life. After obtaining consent from their parents the neonates had POOS readings taken directly (standard technique) and through the protective covering. Bland-Altman plots were used to compare the new method with the standard technique. A test of repeatability for each method was also performed. Results The Bland-Altman plots suggest that there is no significant loss of accuracy when readings are taken through the protective covering. The mean difference was 0.06 (SD of 1.39) and 0.04 (SD 1.3) with Micropore and gauze respectively compared to the standard method. The mean difference was 0.22 (SD 0.23) on testing repeatability with the standard method. Conclusion Interposing Micropore or gauze does not significantly affect the accuracy of the POOS reading. The difference between the standard method and the new method was less than the difference seen on testing repeatability of the standard method. PMID:16677394

  7. Intracellular hypoxia of tumor tissue estimated by noninvasive electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry technique using paramagnetic probes.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Atsuko; Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Matsumoto, Shingo; Hyodo, Fuminori; Sowers, Anastasia L; Koscielniak, Janusz W; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B; Krishna, Murali C

    2011-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry at 700 MHz operating frequency employing a surface coil resonator is used to assess tissue partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)) using paramagnetic media whose linewidth and decay constant are related to oxygen concentration. Differences in extracellular and intracellular pO(2) in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumor tissue were tested using several types of water-soluble paramagnetic media, which localize extracellularly or permeate through the cell membrane. The nitroxide carboxy-PROXYL (CxP) can only be distributed in blood plasma and extracellular fluids whereas the nitroxides carbamoyl-PROXYL (CmP) and TEMPOL (TPL) can permeate cell membranes and localize intracellularly. EPR signal decay constant and the linewidth of the intravenously administered nitroxides in SCC tumor tissues implanted in mouse thigh and the contralateral normal muscle of healthy mice breathing gases with different pO(2) were compared. The pO(2) in the blood can depend on the oxygen content in the breathing gas while tissue pO(2) was not directly influenced by pO(2) in the breathing gas. The decay constants of CmP and TPL in tumor tissue were significantly larger than in the normal muscles, and lower linewidths of CmP and TPL in tumor tissue was observed. The SCC tumor showed intracellular hypoxia even though the extracellular pO(2) is similar to normal tissue in the peripheral region. PMID:21212532

  8. Impact of Intraoperative Events on Cerebral Tissue Oximetry in Patients Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Ševerdija, Ervin E; Vranken, Nousjka P A; Teerenstra, Steven; Ganushchak, Yuri M; Weerwind, Patrick W

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies showed that decreased cerebral saturation during cardiac surgery is related to adverse postoperative outcome. Therefore, we investigated the influence of intraoperative events on cerebral tissue saturation in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). A total of 52 adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery using pulsatile CPB were included in this prospective explorative study. Cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (SctO2) was measured in both the left and right cerebral hemisphere. Intraoperative events, involving interventions performed by anesthesiologist, surgeon, and clinical perfusionist, were documented. Simultaneously, in-line hemodynamic parameters (partial oxygen pressure, partial carbon dioxide pressure, hematocrit, arterial blood pressure, and CPB flow rates) were recorded. Cerebral tissue saturation was affected by anesthetic induction (p < .001), placement of the sternal retractor (p < .001), and initiation (p < .001) as well as termination of CPB (p < .001). Placement (p < .001) and removal of the aortic cross-clamp (p = .026 for left hemisphere, p = .048 for right hemisphere) led to changes in cerebral tissue saturation. In addition, when placing the aortic crossclamp, hematocrit (p < .001) as well as arterial (p = .007) and venous (p < .001) partial oxygen pressures changed. Cerebral tissue oximetry effectively identifies changes related to surgical events or vulnerable periods during cardiac surgery. Future studies are needed to identify methods of mitigating periods of reduced cerebral saturation. PMID:26390677

  9. Newborn Critical Congenital Heart Disease Screening Using Pulse Oximetry: Nursing Aspects.

    PubMed

    Hom, Lisa A; Martin, Gerard R

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart disease (CCHD) is the most common birth defect. Screening for the most critical forms (CCHD) using pulse oximetry was added to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel in the United States in 2011. Since then, CCHD screening has become nearly universal in the United States. Nurses are ideally situated to contribute to the development of best practices for implementation and provide education to families on CCHD screening. Much of the standardization, advocacy, and development of national recommendations occurred with key input from nurses. Nurses often have responsibility for educating parents, performing the screening, interpreting the screening algorithm, and the documentation of results. The nurse role often includes implementing follow-up quality improvement initiatives to ensure that systematic and accurate screening occurs. Smooth implementation can be achieved by identifying champions early, obtaining input from a multidisciplinary team including both physician and nursing leaders, and identifying ways to integrate screening into already existing workflow. By knowing the basics of why screening is important, how to screen, current recommendations on the follow-up for positive screens and the limitations of CCHD screening, nurses can advocate for their patients and positively impact outcomes for infants born with CCHD through early identification before discharge. PMID:27603538

  10. Comparison of NIRS, laser Doppler flowmetry, photoplethysmography, and pulse oximetry during vascular occlusion challenges.

    PubMed

    Abay, T Y; Kyriacou, P A

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring changes in blood volume, blood flow, and oxygenation in tissues is of vital importance in fields such as reconstructive surgery and trauma medicine. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), laser Doppler (LDF) flowmetry, photoplethysmography (PPG), and pulse oximetry (PO) contribute to such fields due to their safe and noninvasive nature. However, the techniques have been rarely investigated simultaneously or altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate all the techniques simultaneously on healthy subjects during vascular occlusion challenges. Sensors were attached on the forearm (NIRS and LDF) and fingers (PPG and PO) of 19 healthy volunteers. Different degrees of vascular occlusion were induced by inflating a pressure cuff on the upper arm. The responses of tissue oxygenation index (NIRS), tissue haemoglobin index (NIRS), flux (LDF), perfusion index (PPG), and arterial oxygen saturation (PO) have been recorded and analyzed. Moreover, the optical densities were calculated from slow varying dc PPG, in order to distinguish changes in venous blood volumes. The indexes showed significant changes (p  <  0.05) in almost all occlusions, either venous or over-systolic occlusions. However, differentiation between venous and arterial occlusion by LDF may be challenging and the perfusion index (PI) may not be adequate to indicate venous occlusions. Optical densities may be an additional tool to detect venous occlusions by PPG. PMID:26963349

  11. Neural networks and wavelet analysis in the computer interpretation of pulse oximetry data

    SciTech Connect

    Dowla, F.U.; Skokowski, P.G.; Leach, R.R. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    Pulse oximeters determine the oxygen saturation level of blood by measuring the light absorption of arterial blood. The sensor consists of red and infrared light sources and photodetectors. A method based on neural networks and wavelet analysis is developed for improved saturation estimation in the presence of sensor motion. Spectral and correlation functions of the dual channel oximetry data are used by a backpropagation neural network to characterize the type of motion. Amplitude ratios of red to infrared signals as a function of time scale are obtained from the multiresolution wavelet decomposition of the two-channel data. Motion class and amplitude ratios are then combined to obtain a short-time estimate of the oxygen saturation level. A final estimate of oxygen saturation is obtained by applying a 15 s smoothing filter on the short-time measurements based on 3.5 s windows sampled every 1.75 s. The design employs two backpropagation neural networks. The first neural network determines the motion characteristics and the second network determines the saturation estimate. Our approach utilizes waveform analysis in contrast to the standard algorithms that are based on the successful detection of peaks and troughs in the signal. The proposed algorithm is numerically efficient and has stable characteristics with a reduced false alarm rate with a small loss in detection. The method can be rapidly developed on a digital signal processing platform.

  12. Oximetry Signal Processing Identifies REM Sleep-Related Vulnerability Trait in Asthmatic Children

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Geovanny F.; Gutierrez, Maria J.; Huseni, Shehlanoor; Pancham, Khrisna; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E.; Nino, Cesar L.; Nino, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Rationale. The sleep-related factors that modulate the nocturnal worsening of asthma in children are poorly understood. This study addressed the hypothesis that asthmatic children have a REM sleep-related vulnerability trait that is independent of OSA. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of pulse-oximetry signals obtained during REM and NREM sleep in control and asthmatic children (n = 134). Asthma classification was based on preestablished clinical criteria. Multivariate linear regression model was built to control for potential confounders (significance level P ≤ 0.05). Results. Our data demonstrated that (1) baseline nocturnal respiratory parameters were not significantly different in asthmatic versus control children, (2) the maximal % of SaO2 desaturation during REM, but not during NREM, was significantly higher in asthmatic children, and (3) multivariate analysis revealed that the association between asthma and REM-related maximal % SaO2 desaturation was independent of demographic variables. Conclusion. These results demonstrate that children with asthma have a REM-related vulnerability trait that impacts oxygenation independently of OSA. Further research is needed to delineate the REM sleep neurobiological mechanisms that modulate the phenotypical expression of nocturnal asthma in children. PMID:24288619

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from patients with community-acquired pneumonia and molecular analysis of multidrug-resistant serotype 19F and 23F strains in Japan.

    PubMed

    Qin, L; Watanabe, H; Yoshimine, H; Guio, H; Watanabe, K; Kawakami, K; Iwagaki, A; Nagai, H; Goto, H; Kuriyama, T; Fukuchi, Y; Matsushima, T; Kudoh, S; Shimada, K; Matsumoto, K; Nagatake, T; Mizota, T; Oishi, K

    2006-12-01

    A nationwide study was undertaken to determine the susceptibility to penicillin and serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Japan. S. pneumoniae was isolated from 114 adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia over 22 months at 20 hospitals and medical centres in different regions in Japan. All but five isolates were from sputum. Forty-eight isolates (42.1%) were susceptible, 40 (35.1%) showed intermediate resistance (MIC, 0.12-1.0 microg/ml) and 26 (22.8%) were resistant (MIC, >or=2.0 microg/ml) to penicillin G. All isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone (breakpoint 1 microg/ml), imipenem (4 microg/ml) and vancomycin (4 microg/ml). Most were resistant to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin; only two were resistant to levofloxacin. Differences were found in the distribution of serotypes among isolates showing susceptibility to penicillin (predominant types 3, 6B, and 19F), intermediate resistance (6B, 14, 19F, and 23F) and full resistance (19F and 23F). PFGE typing showed that 14 of the 25 strains of serotype 19F had a single DNA profile, pattern A, a pattern closely similar to that of the Taiwan multidrug-resistant 19F clone. Twelve pattern A strains were not susceptible to penicillin but carried the macrolide resistance gene mef(A). The DNA profiles of the 15 strains of 23F were also heterogeneous but six were highly similar (pattern b) yet distinct from the Spanish multidrug-resistant 23F clone although possibly related to the Taiwan multidrug-resistant 23F clone. The pattern b strains were not susceptible to penicillin and also harboured either mef(A) or erm(B). Our results indicate that multidrug-resistant pneumococci are spreading rapidly in Japan. Efforts to prevent the spread of the pandemic multidrug-resistant serotypes should be intensified. PMID:16650327

  14. The Effective Hamiltonian for the Ground State of 207Pb19F and New Measurements of the Fine Structure Spectrum Near 1.2 μ m.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawhorter, Richard; Murphey, Benjamin; Baum, Alexander; Sears, Trevor J.; Yang, T. Zh.; Rupasinghe, P. M.; McRaven, C. P.; Shafer-Ray, N. E.; Alphei, Lukas D.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe.

    2011-06-01

    We have measured rotational transitions in the ground, X_1 ^2Π1/2, electronic state of naturally occuring isotopomers of PbF in a supersonic free jet Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The data for 207Pb19F is particularly interesting because it is a candidate for a future experimental e-EDM measurement. To fit the data for this species to the measurement precision, the nuclear spin-spin dipolar interaction and a second term that can be equivalently viewed as a centrifugal distortion correction to the familiar Frosch and Foley hyperfine coupling terms, or an Ω- dependent correction to the nuclear spin-rotational coupling are required, in addition to the standard terms. To characterize the higher X_2 ^2Π3/2 component of the ground state of PbF, we are attempting a direct measurement of transitions between the two components in a slit jet-cooled sample using a frequency comb-referenced extended cavity diode laser. This spectrum was originally detected in a hot source by Fourier transform near-infrared spectroscopy, but low-J transitions were unresolved at that time. Acknowledgments: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Work by N. E. Shafer-Ray was performed with support from the National Science Foundatation award NSF-0855431. J.-U. Grabow ackonwledges funding from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the Land Niedersachsen. K. Ziebarth, K. Setzer, O. Shestakov and E. Fink J. Molec. Spectrosc. 191, 108 1998.

  15. Roles of Arginine and Lysine Residues in the Translocation of a Cell-Penetrating Peptide from 13C, 31P and 19F Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yongchao; Doherty, Tim; Waring, Alan J.; Ruchala, Piotr; Hong, Mei

    2009-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are small cationic peptides that cross the cell membrane while carrying macromolecular cargoes. We use solid-state NMR to investigate the structure and lipid interaction of two cationic residues, Arg10 and Lys13, in the CPP penetratin. 13C chemical shifts indicate that Arg10 adopts a rigid β-strand conformation in the liquid-crystalline state of anionic lipid membranes. This behavior contrasts with all other residues observed so far in this peptide, which adopt a dynamic β-turn conformation with coil-like chemical shifts at physiological temperature. Low-temperature 13C-31P distances between the peptide and the lipid phosphates indicate that both the Arg10 guanidinium Cζ and the Lys13 Cε lie in close proximity to the lipid 31P (4.0 - 4.2 Å), proving the existence of charge-charge interaction for both Arg10 and Lys13 in the gel-phase membrane. However, since lysine substitution in CPPs are known to reduce their translocation ability, we propose that low temperature stabilizes both lysine and arginine interactions with the phosphates, whereas at high temperature the lysine-phosphate interaction is much weaker than the arginine-phosphate interaction. This is supported by the unusually high rigidity of the Arg10 sidechain and its β-strand conformation at high temperature. The latter is proposed to be important for ion pair formation by allowing close approach of the lipid headgroups to guanidinium sidechains. 19F and 13C spin diffusion experiments indicate that penetratin is oligomerized into β-sheets in gel-phase membranes. These solid-state NMR data indicate that guanidinium-phosphate interactions exist in penetratin, and guanidinium groups play a stronger structural role than ammonium groups in the lipid-assisted translocation of CPPs across liquid-crystalline cell membranes. PMID:19364134

  16. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance as a probe of the spatial relationship between the heme iron of cytochrome P-450 and its substrate.

    PubMed

    Crull, G B; Kennington, J W; Garber, A R; Ellis, P D; Dawson, J H

    1989-02-15

    The distance between the heme iron of ferrous cytochrome P-450-CAM and a fluorine label attached to the 9-methyl carbon of its substrate, (1R)-(+)-camphor, has been determined using 19F NMR. This investigation uses the Solomon-Bloembergen equation to measure the distance from a paramagnetic heme iron to a fluorine probe incorporated into a substrate that is not in fast exchange. The structural identity of the substrate analogue, 9-fluorocamphor, has been established using one- and two-dimensional NMR methods and mass spectrometry. The relaxation rate of 9-fluorocamphor bound to high-spin paramagnetic ferrous P-450-CAM has been studied at 188, 282, and 376 MHz, and the correlation time has been directly determined from the frequency dependence of the relaxation rate. When the substrate analogue was bound to the low-spin diamagnetic ferrous-CO derivative of the enzyme, the relaxation rate was found to be 100 times slower and was therefore neglected in the distance calculation. The relaxation data for the paramagnetic system and the correlation time have been used to calculate a distance of 3.8 A between the heme iron and the C-9 fluoride. A fit of the distance and the chemical shift data to the pseudocontact shift equation predicts an angle of approximately 52 degrees between the heme normal and the Fe-F vector. The solution state Fe-F distance is somewhat shorter and the angle between the heme normal and the Fe-F vector slightly larger for the substrate-bound ferrous enzyme reported herein than the analogous values for the substrate-bound ferric enzyme determined in the solid state by x-ray crystallography. These differences may reflect a structural change at the substrate-binding site upon reduction of the iron. PMID:2914926

  17. Battlefield MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  18. Can we Replace Arterial Blood Gas Analysis by Pulse Oximetry in Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome, who are Treated According to INSURE Protocol?

    PubMed Central

    Niknafs, Pedram; Norouzi, Elahe; Bahman Bijari, Bahareh; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Neonates with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), who are treated according to INSURE protocol; require arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis to decide on appropriate management. We conducted this study to investigate the validity of pulse oximetry instead of frequent ABG analysis in the evaluation of these patients. From a total of 193 blood samples obtained from 30 neonates <1500 grams with RDS, 7.2% were found to have one or more of the followings: acidosis, hypercapnia, or hypoxemia. We found that pulse oximetry in the detection of hyperoxemia had a good validity to appropriately manage patients without blood gas analysis. However, the validity of pulse oximetry was not good enough to detect acidosis, hypercapnia, and hypoxemia. PMID:25999627

  19. Direct Measurements of Oxygen Gradients in Spheroid Culture System Using Electron Parametric Resonance Oximetry.

    PubMed

    Langan, Laura M; Dodd, Nicholas J F; Owen, Stewart F; Purcell, Wendy M; Jackson, Simon K; Jha, Awadhesh N

    2016-01-01

    Advanced in vitro culture from tissues of different origin includes three-dimensional (3D) organoid micro structures that may mimic conditions in vivo. One example of simple 3D culture is spheroids; ball shaped structures typically used as liver and tumour models. Oxygen is critically important in physiological processes, but is difficult to quantify in 3D culture: and the question arises, how small does a spheroid have to be to have minimal micro-environment formation? This question is of particular importance in the growing field of 3D based models for toxicological assessment. Here, we describe a simple non-invasive approach modified for the quantitative measurement and subsequent evaluation of oxygen gradients in spheroids developed from a non-malignant fish cell line (i.e. RTG-2 cells) using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) oximetry. Sonication of the paramagnetic probe Lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) allows for incorporation of probe particulates into spheroid during its formation. Spectra signal strength after incorporation of probe into spheroid indicated that a volume of 20 μl of probe (stock solution: 0.10 mg/mL) is sufficient to provide a strong spectra across a range of spheroid sizes. The addition of non-toxic probes (that do not produce or consume oxygen) report on oxygen diffusion throughout the spheroid as a function of size. We provide evidence supporting the use of this model over a range of initial cell seeding densities and spheroid sizes with the production of oxygen distribution as a function of these parameters. In our spheroid model, lower cell seeding densities (∼2,500 cells/spheroid) and absolute size (118±32 μm) allow control of factors such as pre-existing stresses (e.g. ∼ 2% normoxic/hypoxic interface) for more accurate measurement of treatment response. The applied methodology provides an elegant, widely applicable approach to directly characterize spheroid (and other organoid) cultures in biomedical and toxicological

  20. Direct Measurements of Oxygen Gradients in Spheroid Culture System Using Electron Parametric Resonance Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Langan, Laura M.; Dodd, Nicholas J. F.; Owen, Stewart F.; Purcell, Wendy M.; Jackson, Simon K.; Jha, Awadhesh N.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced in vitro culture from tissues of different origin includes three-dimensional (3D) organoid micro structures that may mimic conditions in vivo. One example of simple 3D culture is spheroids; ball shaped structures typically used as liver and tumour models. Oxygen is critically important in physiological processes, but is difficult to quantify in 3D culture: and the question arises, how small does a spheroid have to be to have minimal micro-environment formation? This question is of particular importance in the growing field of 3D based models for toxicological assessment. Here, we describe a simple non-invasive approach modified for the quantitative measurement and subsequent evaluation of oxygen gradients in spheroids developed from a non-malignant fish cell line (i.e. RTG-2 cells) using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) oximetry. Sonication of the paramagnetic probe Lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) allows for incorporation of probe particulates into spheroid during its formation. Spectra signal strength after incorporation of probe into spheroid indicated that a volume of 20 μl of probe (stock solution: 0.10 mg/mL) is sufficient to provide a strong spectra across a range of spheroid sizes. The addition of non-toxic probes (that do not produce or consume oxygen) report on oxygen diffusion throughout the spheroid as a function of size. We provide evidence supporting the use of this model over a range of initial cell seeding densities and spheroid sizes with the production of oxygen distribution as a function of these parameters. In our spheroid model, lower cell seeding densities (∼2,500 cells/spheroid) and absolute size (118±32 μm) allow control of factors such as pre-existing stresses (e.g. ∼ 2% normoxic/hypoxic interface) for more accurate measurement of treatment response. The applied methodology provides an elegant, widely applicable approach to directly characterize spheroid (and other organoid) cultures in biomedical and toxicological

  1. Pulse Oximetry Wave Variation as a Noninvasive Tool to Assess Volume Status in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Glauco A; Silva, Eliezer; Gonçalves, Anderson Roman; Filho, Milton Caldeira; Poli-de-Figueiredo, Luíz F

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare variations of plethysmographic wave amplitude (ΔPpleth) and to determine the percent difference between inspiratory and expiratory pulse pressure (ΔPp) cutoff values for volume responsiveness in a homogenous population of postoperative cardiac surgery patients. INTRODUCTION: Intra-thoracic pressure variations interfere with stroke volume variation. Pulse pressure variations through arterial lines during mechanical ventilation have been recommended for the estimation of fluid responsiveness. Pulse oximetry may offer a non-invasive plethysmographic method to evaluate pulse pressure; this may be useful for guiding fluid replacement. METHODS: Controlled, prospective study in cardiac surgery patients under controlled ventilation. Simultaneous digital recordings of arterial pressure and plethysmographic waves were performed. ΔPp, systolic pressure (ΔPs), ΔPpleth, and systolic component (ΔSpleth) were calculated. A ΔPp ≥ 13% identified fluid-responsive patients. Volume expansion was performed in responsive subjects. Systolic and amplitude components of pressure and plethysmographic waves were compared. RESULTS: In 50 measurements from 43 patients, ΔPp was correlated with (Ppleth (r=0.90, p<0.001), (Ps (r=0.90, p<0.001), and (Spleth (r=0.73, p<0.001). An aArea under ROC curve (AUC) identified the fluid responsiveness thresholds: (Ppleth of 11% (AUC = 0.95±0.04), (Ps of 8% (AUC=0.93±0.05), and (Spleth of 32% (AUC=0.82±0.07). A (Ppleth value ≥ 11% predicted (Pp ≥ 13% with 100% specificity and 91% sensitivity. Volume expansion, performed in 20 patients, changed (Pp, (Ppleth, (Ps and (Spleth significantly (p<0.008). CONCLUSIONS: ΔPpleth is well correlated with ΔPp and constitutes a simple and non-invasive method for assessing fluid responsiveness in patients following cardiac surgery. PMID:19488592

  2. Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Defects with Pulse Oximetry: Medical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Ewer, Andrew K

    2016-09-01

    The detection of newborn babies with potentially life-threatening, critical congenital heart defects (CCHDs) before they collapse or expire remains an important clinical challenge. The absence of physical signs and the difficulty assessing mild cyanosis means that the newborn baby check misses up to a third of babies. Fetal anomaly ultrasound scanning identifies an increasing proportion, but this screen is operator-dependent and therefore highly variable; although some units report very high detection rates, overall most babies with CCHD are still missed. Pulse oximetry screening (POS) is an additional test that meets the criteria for universal screening. POS increases overall detection of CCHD to over 90% and also identifies babies with noncardiac, hypoxemic conditions (such as congenital pneumonia, early-onset sepsis, and pulmonary hypertension), which are usually included in the false positives. There is a wealth of published data on the POS, both in a research setting and more recently in routine clinical practice, and consideration of POS is becoming increasingly widespread particularly among high-income countries. But a degree of controversy still remains, and debate continues regarding the most appropriate time to screen, the most effective screening pathway, and screening outside the well-baby nursery. So, should all newborn babies be screened with POS, if so, when and where should screening take place, what saturations are acceptable, and which conditions are we trying to identify? This review will look at the available evidence and try to suggest the way forward for those considering its introduction into their clinical practice. PMID:27603536

  3. Transcutaneous Oximetry May Predict Wound Healing Complications In Preoperatively Radiated Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Nystrom, Lukas M; Miller, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    Background Preoperative radiation is frequently used in management of soft tissue sarcoma. We hypothesize that anoxic tissue from preoperative radiation contributes to surgical wound complications and that transcutaneous oximetry (TcO2) measurements made preoperatively can predict wounds at risk. Methods Ten consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled. TcO2 was recorded at five time points. Wound complications (defined as major or minor) and healing outcomes were recorded out to 120 days postoperatively. Means between groups with and without wound complications were compared by use of a Student’s t-test (p < 0.05). Results There were three major and one minor wound complication. During the time from radiation to surgery, patients with wound complications had a 13.1 mmHg decrease in mean TcO2 while those who healed uneventfully had an increase of 2.3 mm Hg (p=0.09). Patients with complications had a low preoperative TcO2 of 18.7 mmHg compared to those without complications (18.7 vs. 33.4 mmHg; p=0.09). No patient with a TcO2 greater than 25 mmHg immediately preoperatively developed a wound complication. Conclusions This data suggests an earlier recovery of tissue oxygenation in patients that healed without complication. The TcO2 measurement immediately preceding surgery seems to be the most important in predicting wound complications. Larger scale investigation may determine if TcO2 measurement is a viable clinical tool to aid in risk assessment for potential wound complications. PMID:27528847

  4. Visible light optical coherence tomography for microvascular oximetry in ocular circulation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Siyu; Yi, Ji; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-03-01

    Visible light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) is intrinsically capable of optical determination of blood oxygen saturation (sO2). Thanks to its 3D sectioning ability, confounding factors that plaque multi-wavelength fundus photography can be avoided. We further supplemented it with motion-enhanced angiography (vis-OCTA), which allowed us to resolve retinal micro vessels without losing spectral information. As a result, spectroscopic vis-OCTA can extract microvascular sO2 which are generally inaccessible. Here we extend the theoretical formulation of vis-OCTA oximetry to include optical attenuation, scattering and motion contrast. The model allows robust estimation of sO2, while also promising reduction of illuminating power to 1/3 of current value of ~1 mW. To demonstrate the capability of our approach, we performed oxygen challenge while taking vis-OCTA measurements on rat ocular circulation in vivo. We supplied the experiment animal with the following gas mixture: normal air, 5% CO2 air, pure O2 and 10% O2 air. For each inhalation gas, the OCTA measurements were compared with peripheral capillary sO2 (spO2) provided by a pulse oximeter. The retinal artery sO2 measurements corresponded well with spO2 reading as expected (R2 = 0.87). We found that both retinal and choroidal circulation sO2 moderately increased when we supplied 5% CO2 air. 100% O2 inhalation significantly increased both artery and vein oxygenation. On the contrary, 10% O2 air could deplete the oxygen reservoir in the circulation and lead to low sO2 readings.

  5. Quality assessment of fluoxetine and fluvoxamine pharmaceutical formulations purchased in different countries or via the Internet by 19F and 2D DOSY 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Trefi, Saleh; Gilard, Véronique; Balayssac, Stéphane; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Martino, Robert

    2008-03-13

    A simple and selective (19)F NMR method has been validated for the quantitation of fluoxetine (FLX) and fluvoxamine (FLV) in methanol solutions and in human plasma and urine. The regression equations for FLX and FLV showed a good linearity in the range of 1.4-620 microg mL(-1) (3.3 x 10(-6)-1.8 x 10(-3) mol L(-1)) with a limit of detection of approximately 0.5 microg mL(-1) (1.3 x 10(-6) mol L(-1)) and a limit of quantification of approximately 2 microg mL(-1) (4.6 x 10(-6) mol L(-1)). The precision of the assay depends on the concentrations and is comprised between 1.5 and 9.5% for a range of concentrations between 1.2 x 10(-3) and 3.2 x 10(-6) mol L(-1). The accuracy evaluated through recovery studies ranged from approximately 96 to 103% in methanol solutions and in urine, and from approximately 93 to 104% in plasma, with standard deviations <7.5%. The low sensitivity of the method precludes its use for the assay of these antidepressants in biofluids at least at therapeutic doses as the ranges of FLX and FLV plasma levels are 0.15-0.5 microg mL(-1) and 0.15-0.25 microg mL(-1), respectively. The method was applied successfully to the determination of FLX and FLV contents in pharmaceutical samples (brand-named and generic) purchased in several countries or via the Internet. All the commercial formulations contain the active ingredient in the range 94-103% of stated concentration. A "signature" of the formulations (solid and liquid) was obtained with 2D Diffusion-Ordered SpectroscopY (DOSY) (1)H NMR which allowed the characterisation of the active ingredient and excipients present in the formulations studied. Finally, the DOSY separation of FLX and FLV whose molecular weights are very close was obtained by using beta-cyclodextrin as host-guest complexing agent. PMID:18206329

  6. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging - leg; Magnetic resonance imaging - lower extremity; MRI - ankle; Magnetic resonance imaging - ankle; MRI - femur; MRI - leg ... or bone scan Birth defects of the leg, ankle, or foot Bone pain and fever Broken bone ...

  7. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor wants to perform a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam, there is a possibility that your ...

  8. 19F NMR-, ESR-, and vis-NIR-spectroelectrochemical study of the unconventional reduction behaviour of a perfluoroalkylated fullerene: dimerization of the C70(CF3)10– radical anion†

    PubMed Central

    Zalibera, Michal; Machata, Peter; Clikeman, Tyler T.; Rosenkranz, Marco; Strauss, Steven H.; Boltalina, Olga V.; Popov, Alexey A.

    2016-01-01

    The most abundant isomer of C70(CF3)10 (70-10-1) is a rare example of a perfluoroalkylated fullerene exhibiting electrochemically irreversible reduction. We show that electrochemical reversibility at the first reduction step is achieved at scan rates higher than 500 V s-1 Applying ESR-, vis-NIR-, and 19F NMR- spectroelectrochemistry, as well as mass spectrometry and DFT calculations, we show that the (70-10-1)- radical monoanion is in equilibrium with a singly-bonded diamagnetic dimeric dianion. This study is the first example of 19F NMR spectroelectrochemistry, which promises to be an important method for the elucidation of redox mechanisms of fluoroorganic compounds. Additionally, we demonstrate the importance of combining different spectroelectrochemical methods and quantitative analysis of the transferred charge and spin numbers in the determination of the redox mechanism. PMID:26359514

  9. A Digital Preclinical PET/MRI Insert and Initial Results.

    PubMed

    Weissler, Bjoern; Gebhardt, Pierre; Dueppenbecker, Peter M; Wehner, Jakob; Schug, David; Lerche, Christoph W; Goldschmidt, Benjamin; Salomon, Andre; Verel, Iris; Heijman, Edwin; Perkuhn, Michael; Heberling, Dirk; Botnar, Rene M; Kiessling, Fabian; Schulz, Volkmar

    2015-11-01

    Combining Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) results in a promising hybrid molecular imaging modality as it unifies the high sensitivity of PET for molecular and cellular processes with the functional and anatomical information from MRI. Digital Silicon Photomultipliers (dSiPMs) are the digital evolution in scintillation light detector technology and promise high PET SNR. DSiPMs from Philips Digital Photon Counting (PDPC) were used to develop a preclinical PET/RF gantry with 1-mm scintillation crystal pitch as an insert for clinical MRI scanners. With three exchangeable RF coils, the hybrid field of view has a maximum size of 160 mm × 96.6 mm (transaxial × axial). 0.1 ppm volume-root-mean-square B 0-homogeneity is kept within a spherical diameter of 96 mm (automatic volume shimming). Depending on the coil, MRI SNR is decreased by 13% or 5% by the PET system. PET count rates, energy resolution of 12.6% FWHM, and spatial resolution of 0.73 mm (3) (isometric volume resolution at isocenter) are not affected by applied MRI sequences. PET time resolution of 565 ps (FWHM) degraded by 6 ps during an EPI sequence. Timing-optimized settings yielded 260 ps time resolution. PET and MR images of a hot-rod phantom show no visible differences when the other modality was in operation and both resolve 0.8-mm rods. Versatility of the insert is shown by successfully combining multi-nuclei MRI ((1)H/(19)F) with simultaneously measured PET ((18)F-FDG). A longitudinal study of a tumor-bearing mouse verifies the operability, stability, and in vivo capabilities of the system. Cardiac- and respiratory-gated PET/MRI motion-capturing (CINE) images of the mouse heart demonstrate the advantage of simultaneous acquisition for temporal and spatial image registration. PMID:25935031

  10. Clonal dissemination of macrolide-resistant and penicillin-susceptible serotype 3 and penicillin-resistant Taiwan 19F-14 and 23F-15 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Japan: a pilot surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kei; Maeda, Koichi; Mikasa, Keiichi; Uno, Kenji; Takahashi, Ken; Konishi, Mitsuru; Yoshimoto, Eiichiro; Murakawa, Koichi; Kita, Eiji; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2005-04-01

    Large-scale surveillance studies using molecular techniques such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) have revealed that the spread of antibiotic-resistant pneumococci is due to clonal spread. However, in Japan, surveillance studies using such molecular techniques have never been done. Therefore, we conducted a pilot surveillance study to elucidate the present situation in Japan. Among the 145 isolates examined, the most prevalent serotype was type 19F (20%), for which most isolates were not susceptible to penicillin (86.2%) but were positive for the mef(A)/mef(E) gene (89.7%). The secondmost prevalent was serotype 3 (16.6%), for which most isolates were susceptible to penicillin (87.5%) and positive for the erm(B) gene (91.7%). PFGE analysis showed that both serotypes consisted mainly of clonally identical or related isolates and, in particular, 38% of the type 19F isolates were indistinguishable from or closely related to the Taiwan 19F-14 clone. In addition, some of the Japanese type 23F isolates with the erm(B) gene were indistinguishable from or related to the Taiwan 23F-15 clone as analyzed by PFGE. Based on the results of our pilot study performed in a single institution, it is likely that international antibiotic-resistant clones have already spread in Japan; therefore, a nationwide surveillance study should be urgently conducted. PMID:15814978

  11. Spin-lattice relaxation of {sup 113}Cd and {sup 19}F nuclear spins in the crystal lattice of CdF{sub 2} semiconductor crystals with DX centers

    SciTech Connect

    Kazanskii, S. A.; Warren, W. W.; Ryskin, A. I.

    2009-08-15

    Temperature dependences of spin-lattice relaxation rates of the {sup 113}Cd and {sup 19}F lattice nuclei in the CdF{sub 2} semiconductor crystals containing bistable In and Ga impurity centers show that the relaxation mechanisms in the CdF{sub 2}:In and CdF{sub 2}:Ga crystals are different. The basic mechanism of spin-lattice relaxation of the {sup 113}Cd nuclei in the CdF{sub 2}:In crystal is the scalar contact's interaction of nuclear spins with spins of mobile charge carriers of the conduction band. In the CdF{sub 2}:Ga crystal, relaxation of the {sup 113}Cd nuclei is controlled by the contact interaction with electrons moving within a narrow band of impurity states. The same mechanism is apparently responsible for relaxation of the {sup 19}F nuclei in this crystal. In the CdF{sub 2}:In crystal, the {sup 19}F nuclei relax by the dipole-dipole interaction with electron spins localized at the hydrogen-like orbits of shallow donors.

  12. Measurement of time-resolved oxygen concentration changes in photosynthetic systems by nitroxide-based EPR oximetry.

    PubMed

    Strzalka, K; Walczak, T; Sarna, T; Swartz, H M

    1990-09-01

    The application of recent developments of EPR oximetry to photosynthetic systems is described and used to study rapid processes in isolated thylakoid membranes from spinach and in intact photoautotrophic soybean cells. Using the peak heights of 15N perdeuterated Tempone and two microwave power levels oxygen evolution and consumption were measured. The method measured time-resolved oxygen concentration changes in the micromolar range. Oxygen evolution was linearly proportionate to the chlorophyl concentration of thylakoid membrane over the range studied (0-2 mg/ml). Oxygen evolution associated with single turnover light pulses was consistent with the four state model. The time (t1/2) to reach equilibrium of oxygen concentrations after a single turnover pulse was 0.4-0.5 ms, indicating that the evolution of oxygen coupled to the S4-S0 transition may be shorter than reported previously. The time for equilibrium of oxygen after single turnover pulses in soybean cells was relatively long (400 ms), which suggests that there are significant barriers to the free diffusion of oxygen in this system. The method also was used to study oxygen consumption by the electron transport chain of photosystem I and photosystem II. We conclude that EPR oximetry can provide quantitative and time-resolved data on oxygen concentrations with a sensitivity that is useful for studies of such systems. PMID:2168161

  13. Relation between respiratory variations in pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveform amplitude and arterial pulse pressure in ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Cannesson, Maxime; Besnard, Cyril; Durand, Pierre G; Bohé, Julien; Jacques, Didier

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory variation in arterial pulse pressure is a reliable predictor of fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients with circulatory failure. The main limitation of this method is that it requires an invasive arterial catheter. Both arterial and pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveforms depend on stroke volume. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the relationship between respiratory variation in arterial pulse pressure and respiratory variation in pulse oximetry plethysmographic (POP) waveform amplitude. Method This prospective clinical investigation was conducted in 22 mechanically ventilated patients. Respiratory variation in arterial pulse pressure and respiratory variation in POP waveform amplitude were recorded simultaneously in a beat-to-beat evaluation, and were compared using a Spearman correlation test and a Bland–Altman analysis. Results There was a strong correlation (r2 = 0.83; P < 0.001) and a good agreement (bias = 0.8 ± 3.5%) between respiratory variation in arterial pulse pressure and respiratory variation in POP waveform amplitude. A respiratory variation in POP waveform amplitude value above 15% allowed discrimination between patients with respiratory variation in arterial pulse pressure above 13% and those with variation of 13% or less (positive predictive value 100%). Conclusion Respiratory variation in arterial pulse pressure above 13% can be accurately predicted by a respiratory variation in POP waveform amplitude above 15%. This index has potential applications in patients who are not instrumented with an intra-arterial catheter. PMID:16277719

  14. Evaluation of oxygen-response times of phthalocyanine-based crystalline paramagnetic spin probes for EPR oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Vikram, Deepti S.; Ahmad, Rizwan; Pandian, Ramasamy P.; Petryakov, Sergey; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the temporal response of particulate-based EPR oximetry probes to changes in partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). In order to accurately evaluate the oxygen-response time, we developed a method for rapid modulation of pO2 in a chamber containing the probe using an oscillator-driven speaker–diaphragm setup. The apparatus was capable of producing sinusoidal changes in pO2 at frequencies up to 300 Hz or more. The pressure-modulation setup was used to evaluate the temporal response of some of the most commonly used phthalocyanine-based particulate probes. For validation, the time-response of the probes was compared to that of a high sensitivity pressure sensor. The results revealed that some particulate probes could respond to changes in pO2 with a temporal response of 3.3 ms (300 Hz). The observations were interpreted in the light of their crystalline packing in favor of oxygen diffusion. The results of the present study should enable the selection of probes for oximetry applications requiring high temporal resolution. PMID:18479953

  15. A novel analytical method to evaluate directly catalase activity of microorganisms and mammalian cells by ESR oximetry.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Mokudai, Takayuki; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Niwano, Yoshimi; Kohno, Masahiro

    2010-09-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) oximetry technique was applied for analysis of catalase activity in the present study. Catalase activity was evaluated by measuring oxygen from the reaction between hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and catalase-positive cells. It was demonstrated that the ESR spectra of spin-label probes, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPOL), 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (4-oxo-TEMPO) and 4-maleimido-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (4-maleimido-TEMPO) in the presence of H(2)O(2) were broadened with the concentrations of catalase. It was possible to make a calibration curve for catalase activity by peak widths of the spectra of each spin-label probe, which are broadened dependently on catalase concentrations. The broadened ESR spectra were also observed when the catalase-positive micro-organisms or the mammalian cells originally from circulating monocytes/macrophages were mixed with TEMPOL and H(2)O(2). Meanwhile, catalase-negative micro-organisms caused no broadening change of ESR spectra. The present study indicates that it is possible to evaluate directly the catalase activity of various micro-organisms and mammalian cells by using an ESR oximetry technique. PMID:20815766

  16. Diffuse Optical Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Human Breast for Quantitative Oximetry with Depth Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang

    Near-infrared spectral imaging for breast cancer diagnostics and monitoring has been a hot research topic for the past decade. Here we present instrumentation for diffuse optical imaging of breast tissue with tandem scan of a single source-detector pair with broadband light in transmission geometry for tissue oximetry. The efforts to develop the continuous-wave (CW) domain instrument have been described, and a frequency-domain (FD) system is also used to measure the bulk tissue optical properties and the breast thickness distribution. We also describe the efforts to improve the data processing codes in the 2D spatial domain for better noise suppression, contrast enhancement, and spectral analysis. We developed a paired-wavelength approach, which is based on finding pairs of wavelength that feature the same optical contrast, to quantify the tissue oxygenation for the absorption structures detected in the 2D structural image. A total of eighteen subjects, two of whom were bearing breast cancer on their right breasts, were measured with this hybrid CW/FD instrument and processed with the improved algorithms. We obtained an average tissue oxygenation value of 87% +/- 6% from the healthy breasts, significantly higher than that measured in the diseased breasts (69% +/- 14%) (p < 0.01). For the two diseased breasts, the tumor areas bear hypoxia signatures versus the remainder of the breast, with oxygenation values of 49 +/- 11% (diseased region) vs. 61 +/- 16% (healthy regions) for the breast with invasive ductal carcinoma, and 58 +/- 8% (diseased region) vs 77 +/- 11% (healthy regions) for ductal carcinoma in situ. Our subjects came from various ethnical/racial backgrounds, and two-thirds of our subjects were less than thirty years old, indicating a potential to apply the optical mammography to a broad population. The second part of this thesis covers the topic of depth discrimination, which is lacking with our single source-detector scan system. Based on an off

  17. Rejection of Erroneous Saturation Data in Optical Pulse Oximetry in Newborn Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, L.; Marchionni, Paolo; Carnielli, Virgilio P.

    2011-08-01

    Pulse oximetry (PO) is extensively used in intensive care unit (ICU); this is mainly due to the fact that it is a non-invasive and real-time monitoring method. PO allows to measure arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and in particular hemoglobin oxygenation. Optical PO is typically realized by the use of a clip (to be applied on the ear or on the finger top) containing a couple of monochromatic LED sources and a photodiode. The main drawback with the use of PO is the presence of movement artifacts or disturbance due to optical sources and skin, causing erroneous saturation data. The aim of this work is to present the measurement procedure based on a specially developed algorithm able to reject erroneous oxygen saturation data during long lasting monitoring of patients in ICU and to compare measurement data with reference data provided by EGA. We have collected SaO2 data from a standard PO and used an intensive care unit monitor to collect data. This device was connected to our acquisition system and heart rate (HR) and SaO2 data were acquired and processed by our specially developed algorithm and directly reproduced on the PC screen for use by the clinicians. The algorithm here used for the individuation and rejection of erroneous saturation data is based on the assessment of the difference between the Heart Rate (HR) measured by respectively by the ECG and PO. We have used an emogasanalyzer (EGA) for comparison of the measured data. The study was carried out in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), using 817 data coming from 24 patients and the observation time was of about 10000 hours. Results show a reduction in the maximum difference between the SaO2 data measured, simultaneously, on the same patient by the EGA and by the proposed method of 14.20% and of the 4.76% in average over the 817 samples. The measurement method proposed is therefore able to individuate and eliminate the erroneous saturation data due to motion artifacts and reported by the pulse oxymeter

  18. Craniofacial tissue oxygen saturation is associated with blood pH using an examiner's finger-mounted tissue oximetry in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Toshiyuki; Kanayama, Naohiro; Kawai, Kenta; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2016-04-01

    Although fetal scalp blood sampling is an examination to assess fetal acidosis during the intrapartum period, it has not been widely used by obstetricians because of its invasiveness. We have developed a small, portable oximetry with a sensor attached to the examiner's finger. Our previous report using this oximetry concluded that fetal head tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) correlated with umbilical cord artery blood pH. We investigated whether the association between StO2 and blood pH in mice could be validated using this oximetry. Eleven the Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice were measured using a near-infrared spectroscopy probe at the craniofacial site in a closed polyethylene bag while changing the oxygen concentration. A total of nine blood samples were collected and analyzed for pH. The StO2 and tissue blood pH showed a strong positive correlation (r=0.90 and P=0.0009). The StO2 and total hemoglobin index also showed a positive correlation (r=0.84 and P=0.0049). Thus, the results of the present study support those of our previous report on clinical cases and allow examiners to easily check the status of fetal acidosis. Fetal management using this oximetry might gain popularity with obstetricians in the near future.

  19. Utility of the pediatric sleep questionnaire and pulse oximetry as screening tools in pediatric patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peña-Zarza, Jose A; Osona-Rodriguez de Torres, Borja; Gil-Sanchez, Jose Antonio; Figuerola-Mulet, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To assess the screening tools in snoring patients. Material and Methods. A retrospective review of data was conducted from children between 2 and 15 years old who were referred on suspicion of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea (OSAH) between June 2008 and June 2011. We excluded patients with significant comorbidities. Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ), physical exam (PE), and pulse-oximetry data were collected and correlated with the results of the nightly polygraph at home. Results. We selected 98 patients. The 22-item version of the PSQ had sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 36.8%. The overall value of the clinic predictor of OSAH (PSQ and PE together) exhibited an increased specificity 57.6% with 94.6% of sensitivity. The nocturnal home oximetry method used alone was very specific, 92.1%, but had a lower sensitivity, 77.1%. The set of clinical assessment tools used together with pulse-oximetry screening provided excellent specificity 98.1% and a positive predictive value 94.1% globally. The performance of this screening tool is related with the severity of OSAH and accuracy is better in moderate and severe cases. Conclusion. The combination of clinical assessment and pulse-oximetry screening can provide a sufficient diagnostic approach for pediatric patients with suspected OSAH at least in moderate and severe cases. PMID:23471006

  20. Skeletal muscle and glioma oxygenation by carbogen inhalation in rats: a longitudinal study by EPR oximetry using single-probe implantable oxygen sensors.

    PubMed

    Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Lariviere, Jean; Hodge, Sassan; Chen, Eunice Y; Jarvis, Lesley A; Eastman, Alan; Williams, Benjamin B; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Swartz, Harold M

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of EPR oximetry using a single-probe implantable oxygen sensor (ImOS) was tested for repeated measurement of pO₂ in skeletal muscle and ectopic 9L tumors in rats. The ImOS (50 mm length) were constructed using nickel-chromium alloy wires, with lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc, oximetry probe) crystals loaded in the sensor loop and coated with AF 2400(®) Teflon. These ImOS were implanted into the skeletal muscle in the thigh and subcutaneous 9L tumors. Dynamic changes in tissue pO₂ were assessed by EPR oximetry at baseline, during tumor growth, and repeated hyperoxygenation with carbogen breathing. The mean skeletal muscle pO₂ of normal rats was stable and significantly increased during carbogen inhalation in experiments repeated for 12 weeks. The 9L tumors were hypoxic with a tissue pO₂ of 12.8 ± 6.4 mmHg on day 1; however, the response to carbogen inhalation varied among the animals. A significant increase in the glioma pO₂ was observed during carbogen inhalation on day 9 and day 14 only. In summary, EPR oximetry with ImOS allowed direct and longitudinal oxygen measurements in deep muscle tissue and tumors. The heterogeneity of 9L tumors in response to carbogen highlights the need to repeatedly monitor pO₂ to confirm tumor oxygenation so that such changes can be taken into account in planning therapies and interpreting results. PMID:24729220

  1. Beyond Critical Congenital Heart Disease: Newborn Screening Using Pulse Oximetry for Neonatal Sepsis and Respiratory Diseases in a Middle-Income Country

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Hak-Lee; Omar, Asma

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies on pulse oximetry screening for neonatal sepsis and respiratory disease in a middle-income country are lacking. Newborn screening for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) using pulse oximetry is an effective and life-saving strategy in developed countries. While most studies have reported false-positive results during CCHD screening, they have not elaborated on the detected disease types. We studied the effectiveness and outcomes of pulse oximetry newborn screening for non-cardiac hypoxemic diseases such as neonatal sepsis, respiratory diseases, and CCHD in a middle-income country. Methods and Findings In a pilot study performed at the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Malaysia, all apparently healthy term newborns, delivered at UMMC were screened pre-discharge using pulse oximetry. Echocardiography was performed for newborns that had positive screening results on two separate occasions, 1-h apart. Newborns with normal echocardiograms were evaluated and treated for other non-cardiac diseases. Fifteen of 5247 term newborns had positive screening results. The median age at screening was 20 h. Thirteen newborns (0.24%) had significant non-cardiac diseases: sepsis (n = 2) and respiratory diseases (n = 11) that required hospitalization and treatment. The remaining two newborns with normal antenatal ultrasonograms had positive screening test and confirmed to have CCHD. Another 18 newborns with negative screening test were later admitted for treatment of sepsis (n = 16) and penumonia (n = 2). All newborns were treated and alive at the end of the study. The sensitivity and specificity of pulse oximetry screening for non-cardiac diseases were 42% and 99.9% respectively, and 100% and 99.7% for CCHD, respectively. Conclusions Routine pulse oximetry screening test was effective in identifying newborns with CCHD and other hypoxemia illnesses, which may led to potential life-threatening condition. This study showed that the expanded use of pulse

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  3. Combining Perfluorocarbon and Superparamagnetic Iron-oxide Cell Labeling for Improved and Expanded Applications of Cellular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hitchens, T. Kevin; Liu, Li; Foley, Lesley M.; Simplaceanu, Virgil; Ahrens, Eric T.; Ho, Chien

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The ability to detect the migration of cells in living organisms is fundamental in understanding biological processes and important for the development of novel cell-based therapies to treat disease. MRI can be used to detect the migration of cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO) or perfluorocarbon (PFC) agents. In this study, we explored combining these two cell-labeling approaches to overcome current limitations and enable new applications for cellular MRI. Methods We characterized 19F-NMR relaxation properties of PFC-labeled cells in the presence of SPIO and imaged cells both ex vivo and in vivo in a rodent inflammation model to demonstrate selective visualization of cell populations. Results We show that with UTE3D, RARE and FLASH 19F images one can uniquely identify PFC-labeled cells, co-localized PFC- and SPIO-labeled cells, and PFC/SPIO co-labeled cells. Conclusion This new methodology has the ability to improve and expand applications of MRI cell tracking. Combining PFC and SPIO strategies can potentially provide a method to quench PFC signal transferred from dead cells to macrophages, thereby eliminating false positives. In addition, combining these techniques could also be used to track two cell types simultaneously and probe cell-cell proximity in vivo with MRI. PMID:24478194

  4. Photodynamic treatment of the RIF-1 tumor with verteporfin with online monitoring of tissue oxygen using electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Liu, Ke J.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Swartz, Harold

    1999-06-01

    In this study, treatment of the RIF-1 tumor was examined with photodynamic therapy using Verteprofin (formerly benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD). The effects of two different optical dose rates were examined, with no detectable difference in the tumor regrowth time. Oxygen consumption during PDT could reliably be monitored with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry using an implanted paramagnetic material within the tumor. A reduction of the tumor pO2 was detected in the animals that were followed after treatment, suggesting that there was a compromise to the tumor vasculature that persisted throughout the measurements. At high total doses some of the tumors did not regrow. Altogether these results are indicative of the tumor destruction being caused by destruction of the blood vessels from the treatment.

  5. Tracing and quantification of pharmaceuticals using MR imaging and spectroscopy at clinical MRI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Eun-Kee; Liu, Xin; Shi, Xianfeng; Yu, Y. Bruce; Lu, Zeng-Rong

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) is very powerful modality for imaging and localized investigation of biological tissue. Medical MRI measures nuclear magnetization of the water protons, which consists of 70 % of our body. MRI provides superior contrast among different soft tissues to all other existing medical imaging modalities, including ultrasound, X-ray CT, PET, and SPECT. In principle, MRI/S may be an ideal non-invasive tool for drug delivery research. However, because of its low sensitivity, a large dose is required for tracing pharmaceuticals. Therefore, its use for imaging of pharmaceuticals is very limited mostly to molecules that contain a paramagnetic metal ion, such as gadolinium (Gd3+) and manganese (Mn2+). The paramagnetic metal ion provides a large fluctuating magnetic field at the proton in the water molecule via a coordinate site. The measurement of local drug concentration is the first step for further quantification. Local concentration of the paramagnetic-ion based MRI contrast agent can be indirectly measured via the change in the water signal intensity. 19F MRI/S of fluorinated complex may be an option for drug delivery and tracing agent, because the fluorinated molecule may be directly detected due to its large magnetic moment (94 % of proton) and 100 % abundance.

  6. Identification of 2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]- cyclohexane-1,3-dione metabolites in urine of patients suffering from tyrosinemia type I with the use of 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szczeciński, Przemysław; Lamparska, Diana; Gryff-Keller, Adam; Gradowska, Wanda

    2008-01-01

    Organic extracts of six urine samples from children treated with nitisinone, a medicine against tyrosinemia type I, were investigated by (1)H and (19)F NMR spectroscopy. The presence of unchanged 2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]cyclohexane-1,3-dione (NTBC), 6-hydroxy-2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]cyclohexane-1,3-dione (NTBC-OH) and 2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoic acid (NTFA) as well as a few other unidentified compounds containing CF(3) group was documented. PMID:19039335

  7. A proposed direct measurement of cross section at Gamow window for key reaction 19F(p,α) 16O in Asymptotic Giant Branch stars with a planned accelerator in CJPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, JianJun; Xu, ShiWei; Ma, ShaoBo; Hu, Jun; Zhang, LiYong; Fu, ChangBo; Zhang, NingTao; Lian, Gang; Su, Jun; Li, YunJu; Yan, ShengQuan; Shen, YangPing; Hou, SuQing; Jia, BaoLu; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, XiaoPeng; Guo, Bing; Kubono, Shigeru; Liu, WeiPing

    2016-05-01

    In 2014, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) approved the Jinping Underground Nuclear Astrophysics laboratory (JUNA) project, which aims at direct cross-section measurements of four key stellar nuclear reactions right down to the Gamow windows. In order to solve the observed fluorine overabundances in Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, measuring the key 19F(p,α)16O reaction at effective burning energies (i.e., at Gamow window) is established as one of the scientific research sub-projects. The present paper describes this sub-project in details, including motivation, status, experimental setup, yield and background estimation, aboveground test, as well as other relevant reactions.

  8. Pulse Oximetry: A Non-Invasive, Novel Marker for the Quality of Chest Compressions in Porcine Models of Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fei; Li, Yan; Walline, Joseph; Fu, Yangyang; Yao, Dongqi; Zhang, Xiaocui; Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Huadong; Guo, Shubin; Wang, Zhong; Yu, Xuezhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pulse oximetry, which noninvasively detects the blood flow of peripheral tissue, has achieved widespread clinical use. We have noticed that the better the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the better the appearance of pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveform (POP). We investigated whether the area under the curve (AUC) and/or the amplitude (Amp) of POP could be used to monitor the quality of CPR. Design Prospective, randomized controlled study. Setting Animal experimental center in Peking Union Medical Collage Hospital, Beijing, China. Subjects Healthy 3-month-old male domestic swine. Interventions 34 local pigs were enrolled in this study. After 4 minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation, animals were randomly assigned into two resuscitation groups: a “low quality” group (with a compression depth of 3cm) and a “high quality” group (with a depth of 5cm). All treatments between the two groups were identical except for the depth of chest compressions. Hemodynamic parameters [coronary perfusion pressure (CPP), partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2)] as well as AUC and Amp of POP were all collected and analyzed. Measurements and Findings There were statistical differences between the “high quality” group and the “low quality” group in AUC, Amp, CPP and PETCO2 during CPR (P<0.05). AUC, Amp and CPP were positively correlated with PETCO2, respectively (P<0.01). There was no statistical difference between the heart rate calculated according to the POP (FCPR) and the frequency of mechanical CPR at the 3rd minute of CPR. The FCPR was lower than the frequency of mechanical CPR at the 6th and the 9th minute of CPR. Conclusions Both the AUC and Amp of POP correlated well with CPP and PETCO2 in animal models. The frequency of POP closely matched the CPR heart rate. AUC and Amp of POP might be potential noninvasive quality monitoring markers for CPR. PMID:26485651

  9. What Is Chest MRI?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive ... creates detailed pictures of the structures in your chest, such as your chest wall, heart, and blood ...

  10. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  11. Breast MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast MRI may be done in combination with mammography or ultrasound . It is not a replacement for mammography. ... breast screening with MRI as an adjunct to mammography. CA Cancer J Clin . 2007;57:75-89. ...

  12. Pelvis MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... The table slides into the middle of the MRI machine. Small devices, called coils, may be placed around ... anxious. Or your provider may suggest an open MRI in which the machine is not as close to the body. Before ...

  13. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging (MRI) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the lower part of ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  14. MRI in cranial tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Just, M; Higer, H P; Betting, O; Bockenheimer, S; Pfannenstiel, P

    1987-11-01

    A case of multiple intracranial tuberculomas is presented. CT and MRI findings are discussed and compared. MRI showed multiple tuberculomas characterised by the same signal intensity as the surrounding brain parenchyma. Differentiation could be achieved only by the perifocal oedema of high signal intensity. Changes of the lesions during chemotherapy were monitored by CT and MRI and the results are presented. PMID:3691545

  15. Phase transitions and molecular motions in [Cd(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2} studied by DSC, {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR and FT-MIR

    SciTech Connect

    Mikuli, E. . E-mail: mikuli@chemia.uj.edu.pl; Grad, B.; Medycki, W.; Holderna-Natkaniec, K.

    2004-10-01

    Two solid phase transitions of [Cd(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2} occurring on heating at T{sub C2}=183.3K and T{sub C1}=325.3K, with 2K and 5K hysteresis, respectively, were detected by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). High value of entropy changes indicated large orientational disorder of the high temperature and intermediate phase. Nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR and {sup 19}F NMR) relaxation measurements revealed that the phase transitions at T{sub C1} and T{sub C2} were associated with a drastic and small change, respectively, of the both spin-lattice relaxation times: T{sub 1}({sup 1}H) and T{sub 1}({sup 19}F). These relaxation processes were connected with the 'tumbling' motions of the [Cd(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+}, reorientational motions of the H{sub 2}O ligands, and with the iso- and anisotropic reorientation of the BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions. The cross-relaxation effect was observed in phase III. The line width and the second moment of the {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR line measurements revealed that the H{sub 2}O reorientate in all three phases of the title compound. On heating the onset of the reorientation of 3 H{sub 2}O in the [Cd(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup +2}, around the three-fold symmetry axis of these octahedron, causes the isotropic reorientation of the whole cation. The BF{sub 4}{sup -} reorientate isotropically in the phases I and II, but in the phase III they perform slow reorientation only about three- or two-fold axes. A small distortion in the structure of BF{sub 4}{sup -} as well as of [Cd(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} is postulated. The temperature dependence of the bandwidth of the O-H stretching mode measured by Fourier transform middle infrared spectroscopy (FT-MIR) indicated that the activation energy for the reorientation of the H{sub 2}O did not change much at the T{sub C2} phase transition.

  16. Cross sections for proton induced high energy γ -ray emission (PIGE) in reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O at incident proton energies between 1.5 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanelas, P.; Cruz, J.; Fonseca, M.; Henriques, A.; Lourenço, F.; Luís, H.; Machado, J.; Pires Ribeiro, J.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Teubig, P.; Velho, P.; Zarza-Moreno, M.; Galaviz, D.; Jesus, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the high energy gamma-rays produced in the reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O for incident proton energies from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV over NaF/Ag and CaF2/Ag thin targets in two different sets of data. Gamma-rays were detected with a High Purity Ge detector with an angle of 130° with respect to the beam axis. The cross-sections for the high energy gamma-rays of 6.129, 6.915 and 7.115 MeV have been measured for the whole group between 5 and 7.2 MeV with accuracy better than 10%. A new energy range was covered and more points are included in the cross-sections data base expanding the existing set of data. Results are in agreement with previous measurements in similar conditions.

  17. Fission-fragment angular distributions and excitation functions in fission following complete fusion and targetlike-fragment fission reactions of 19F+232Th at near- and sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, N.; Bhattacharya, P.; Biswas, D. C.; Choudhury, R. K.; Nadkarni, D. M.; Saxena, A.

    1995-06-01

    The fragment angular distributions and excitation functions of the fission following complete fusion (FFCF) have been measured after separating them from targetlike-fragment fission (TLFF) for the 19F+232Th system in the bombarding energy range of 84.5 to 106.5 MeV. The fraction of the targetlike-fragment fission was observed to increase with decreasing bombarding energy below the Coulomb barrier. The excitation function for fission following complete fusion reaction agrees well with coupled channel calculations. However, the values derived from the fragment anisotropy data of the FFCF events are found to be much larger than those calculated using the coupled channel transmission coefficient values. The discrepancy between the experimental and calculated values increases as the bombarding energy is decreased below the barrier.

  18. Oximetry: a reflective tool for the detection of physiological expression of emotions in a science education classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón, Olga

    2016-07-01

    The pulse oximeter is a device that measures the oxygen concentration (or oxygen saturation—SpO2); heart rate, and heartbeat of a person at any given time. This instrument is commonly used in medical and aerospace fields to monitor physiological outputs of a patient according to health conditions or physiological yields of a flying pilot according to changes in altitude and oxygen availability in the atmosphere. Nonetheless, the uses for pulse oximetry may expand to other fields where there is human interaction and where physiological outputs reflect fluctuations mediated by arising emotions. A classroom, for instance is filled with a plethora of emotions, but very often participants in this space are unaware of others' or their own sentiments as these arise as a result of interactions and responses to class discussions. In this paper I describe part of a larger study-taking place at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York. The focus is on the exploration of emotions and mindfulness in the science classroom. The oximeter is used in this study as a reflexive tool to detect emotions emerging among participants of a graduate History and Philosophy of Science Education course offered in the spring of 2012. Important physiological information of class participants provided by the oximeter is used to analyze the role of emotions in the classroom as sensitive and controversial topics in science education are discussed every week.

  19. Real-Time, In Vivo Determination of Dynamic Changes in Lung and Heart Tissue Oxygenation Using EPR Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Brian K.; Naidu, Shan K.; Subramanian, Kamal; Joseph, Matthew; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Swartz, Harold M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry for oxygen measurements in deep tissues (>1 cm) is challenging due to the limited penetration depth of the microwave energy. To overcome this limitation, implantable resonators, having a small (0 5 mm diameter) sensory loop containing the oxygen-sensing paramagnetic material connected by a pair of twisted copper wire to a coupling loop (8–10 mm diameter), have been developed, which enable repeated measurements of deep-tissue oxygen levels (pO2, partial pressure of oxygen) in the brain and tumors of rodents. In this study, we have demonstrated the feasibility of measuring dynamic changes in pO2 in the heart and lung of rats using deep-tissue implantable oxygen sensors. The sensory loop of the resonator contained lithium octa-n-butoxynaphthalocyanine (LiNc-BuO) crystals embedded in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer and was implanted in the myocardial tissue or lung pleura. The external coupling loop was secured subcutaneously above chest. The rats were exposed to different breathing gas mixtures while undergoing EPR measurements. The results demonstrated that implantable oxygen sensors provide reliable measurements of pO2 in deep tissues such as heart and lung under adverse conditions of cardiac and respiratory motions. PMID:24729218

  20. Higher temporal resolution is necessary for continuous-wave near -infrared spectrophotometric monitors in both cerebral and muscular tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, Eiichi; Shiga, Toshikazu; Tanabe, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Yoshifumi

    1997-12-01

    Conventional near infrared spectrophotometric monitors have temporal resolution of less than about 1 Hz. However, physiological Hb signals such as pulsation and muscle contraction have higher frequency than 1 Hz. Insufficient sampling rates inevitably lead aliasing of the recorded signals in tissue oximetry for both brain and muscle. Cerebral Hb signals (57 y.o. female artificially ventilated under general anesthesia) and thigh muscle (22 y.o. male with 20 W - 240 W exercise at 1 Hz cycling in semirecumbent ergometer) were measured with NIRS monitor with temporal resolution of 10 Hz (OMRON Co. Ltd., Japan). The detail of physiological fluctuations such as pulsation, ventilation, and muscle pumping was clearly recognized with a 10 Hz sampling. The comparison with recalculated waveforms at slower sampling rate (0.5 Hz, 1 Hz, 2 Hz) revealed that with slower sampling than 1 Hz cerebral respiratory waves were deformed by pulsation, and that magnitudes of muscle pumping could not be properly evaluated in dynamic exercise. In both pulsatile and muscle contractile cycle a phase delay between oxygenated component and deoxygenated one was also detected, which has been overlooked by conventional NIRS monitoring.

  1. Higher temporal resolution is necessary for continuous-wave near -infrared spectrophotometric monitors in both cerebral and muscular tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, Eiichi; Shiga, Toshikazu; Tanabe, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Yoshifumi

    1998-01-01

    Conventional near infrared spectrophotometric monitors have temporal resolution of less than about 1 Hz. However, physiological Hb signals such as pulsation and muscle contraction have higher frequency than 1 Hz. Insufficient sampling rates inevitably lead aliasing of the recorded signals in tissue oximetry for both brain and muscle. Cerebral Hb signals (57 y.o. female artificially ventilated under general anesthesia) and thigh muscle (22 y.o. male with 20 W - 240 W exercise at 1 Hz cycling in semirecumbent ergometer) were measured with NIRS monitor with temporal resolution of 10 Hz (OMRON Co. Ltd., Japan). The detail of physiological fluctuations such as pulsation, ventilation, and muscle pumping was clearly recognized with a 10 Hz sampling. The comparison with recalculated waveforms at slower sampling rate (0.5 Hz, 1 Hz, 2 Hz) revealed that with slower sampling than 1 Hz cerebral respiratory waves were deformed by pulsation, and that magnitudes of muscle pumping could not be properly evaluated in dynamic exercise. In both pulsatile and muscle contractile cycle a phase delay between oxygenated component and deoxygenated one was also detected, which has been overlooked by conventional NIRS monitoring.

  2. MRI of the shoulder

    SciTech Connect

    Zlatkin, M.B.; Iannotti, J.P.; Schnall, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    This book reports on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluating shoulder disorders. The book gives detailed information on MRI techniques and shoulder anatomy, describes and illustrates MRI findings for a wide range of shoulder disorders, and explains how abnormalities seen on MIR images relate to pathophysiology and clinical signs. Special attention is given to imaging of rotator cuff disease and shoulder instability conditions for which MRI is the imaging procedure of choice. Complementing the text are 365 high-quality scans depicting normal shoulder anatomy and showing the wide variety of pathologic findings encountered in practice.

  3. Mise en évidence par RMN du 19F d'une distorsion des octaèdres dans la solution solide CsCaF 3- xH x de type perovskite (0 ≤ x ≤ 1,70)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezat, M.; Senegas, J.; Villeneuve, G.; Park, H. H.; Tressaud, A.

    1988-12-01

    19F and 1H NMR investigations have been carried out on three powder samples of CsCaF 3- xH x composition (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.70), and on a single crystal of CsCaF 3. It appears that the spectra of 19F are consistent with a distortion of the Ca(F,H) 6 octahedra involving either lower symmetry or a random distribution of a c4-maxis with respect to the crystallographic directions.

  4. Dynamic changes in oxygenation of intracranial tumor and contralateral brain during tumor growth and carbogen breathing: A multisite EPR oximetry with implantable resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Huagang; Dong, Ruhong; Li, Hongbin; Williams, Benjamin; Lariviere, Jean P.; Hekmatyar, S. K.; Kauppinen, Risto A.; Khan, Nadeem; Swartz, Harold

    2012-01-01

    IntroductionSeveral techniques currently exist for measuring tissue oxygen; however technical difficulties have limited their usefulness and general application. We report a recently developed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry approach with multiple probe implantable resonators (IRs) that allow repeated measurements of oxygen in tissue at depths of greater than 10 mm. MethodsThe EPR signal to noise ( S/ N) ratio of two probe IRs was compared with that of LiPc deposits. The feasibility of intracranial tissue pO 2 measurements by EPR oximetry using IRs was tested in normal rats and rats bearing intracerebral F98 tumors. The dynamic changes in the tissue pO 2 were assessed during repeated hyperoxia with carbogen breathing. ResultsA 6-10 times increase in the S/ N ratio was observed with IRs as compared to LiPc deposits. The mean brain pO 2 of normal rats was stable and increased significantly during carbogen inhalation in experiments repeated for 3 months. The pO 2 of F98 glioma declined gradually, while the pO 2 of contralateral brain essentially remained the same. Although a significant increase in the glioma pO 2 was observed during carbogen inhalation, this effect declined in experiments repeated over days. ConclusionEPR oximetry with IRs provides a significant increase in S/ N ratio. The ability to repeatedly assess orthotopic glioma pO 2 is likely to play a vital role in understanding the dynamics of tissue pO 2 during tumor growth and therapies designed to modulate tumor hypoxia. This information could then be used to optimize chemoradiation by scheduling treatments at times of increased glioma oxygenation.

  5. Intraoperative prediction of ischaemic injury of the bowel: a comparison of laser Doppler flowmetry and tissue oximetry to histological analysis.

    PubMed

    Krohg-Sørensen, K; Line, P D; Haaland, T; Horn, R S; Kvernebo, K

    1992-09-01

    Intraoperative diagnosis of inadequate colonic perfusion would contribute to prevention of ischaemic colitis after abdominal aortic reconstructions. The aim of this study was to evaluate laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and tissue oximetry (TpO2) as predictors of the development of bowel necrosis. Devascularised loops of colon and ileum in anaesthetised pigs were divided into 10-20 mm segments and measurements of laser Doppler flux and TpO2 were performed in each segment. After 7 h of ischaemia the segments were resected for histological and biochemical analysis. In 65 colonic and 58 ileal segments a significantly lower flux was found in segments with necrosis of greater than or equal to 30% of the mucosal thickness compared to segments with necrosis of less than or equal to 10% (p less than 0.01). The discriminant flux value was 50 perfusion units, confirming a previous clinical study. The specificity was 0.96 and the sensitivity 0.94. Flux was inversely correlated to tissue lactate concentration. Significantly lower TpO2 was found in 19 colonic segments with necrosis of greater than or equal to 30% of mucosa compared to 19 colonic segments with necrosis of less than or equal to 10% (p less than 0.01). Using a discriminant value of 5kPa, a specificity of 0.79, and a sensitivity of 0.95 were calculated. In 27 ileum segments no significant difference in TpO2 between different histological groups was found (p greater than 0.30). The results show that LDF and TpO2 can predict ischaemic injury of the colon, and LDF also of the small bowel. PMID:1397347

  6. Computational and ESR studies of electron attachment to decafluorocyclopentane, octafluorocyclobutane, and hexafluorocyclopropane: electron affinities of the molecules and the structures of their stable negative ions as determined from 13C and 19F hyperfine coupling constants.

    PubMed

    ElSohly, Adel M; Tschumper, Gregory S; Crocombe, Richard A; Wang, Jih Tzong; Williams, Ffrancon

    2005-08-01

    High-resolution ESR spectra of the ground-state negative ions of hexafluorocyclopropane (c-C3F6*-), octafluorocyclobutane (c-C4F8*-), and decafluorocyclopentane (c-C5F10*-) are reported and their isotropic 19F hyperfine coupling constants (hfcc) of 198.6 +/- 0.4 G, 147.6 +/- 0.4 G, and 117.9 +/- 0.4 G, respectively, are in inverse ratio to the total number of fluorine atoms per anion. Together with the small value of 5.2 +/- 0.4 G determined for the isotropic 13C hfcc of c-C4F8*-, these results indicate that in each case the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) is delocalized over the equivalent fluorines and possesses a nodal plane through the carbon atoms of a time-averaged D(nh) structure. A series of quantum chemical computations were carried out to further characterize these anions and their neutral counterparts. Both the B3LYP density functional and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) indicate that c-C3F6*- adopts a D(3h) geometry and a (2)A2'' ground electronic state, that c-C4F8*- adopts a D(4h) geometry and a (2)A2u ground electronic state, and that c-C5F10*- adopts a C(s) structure and a (2)A' electronic state. Moreover, the 19F hyperfine coupling constants computed with the MP2 method and a high quality triple-zeta basis set are within 1% of the experimental values. Also, the values computed for the 13C hfcc of c-C4F8*- are consistent with the experimental value of 5.2 G. Therefore, in keeping with the ESR results, these negative ions derived from first-row elements can be characterized as pi* species. In addition, the hypervalency of these perfluorocycloalkane radical anions has been clarified. PMID:16045345

  7. Respiratory rate and pulse oximetry derived information as predictors of hospital admission in young children in Bangladesh: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Garde, Ainara; Zhou, Guohai; Raihana, Shahreen; Dunsmuir, Dustin; Karlen, Walter; Dekhordi, Parastoo; Huda, Tanvir; Arifeen, Shams El; Larson, Charles; Kissoon, Niranjan; Dumont, Guy A; Ansermino, J Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hypoxaemia is a strong predictor of mortality in children. Early detection of deteriorating condition is vital to timely intervention. We hypothesise that measures of pulse oximetry dynamics may identify children requiring hospitalisation. Our aim was to develop a predictive tool using only objective data derived from pulse oximetry and observed respiratory rate to identify children at increased risk of hospital admission. Setting Tertiary-level hospital emergency department in Bangladesh. Participants Children under 5 years (n=3374) presenting at the facility (October 2012–April 2013) without documented chronic diseases were recruited. 1-minute segments of pulse oximetry (photoplethysmogram (PPG), blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate (HR)) and respiratory rate were collected with a mobile app. Primary outcome The need for hospitalisation based on expert physician review and follow-up. Methods Pulse rate variability (PRV) using pulse peak intervals of the PPG signal and features extracted from the SpO2 signal, all derived from pulse oximetry recordings, were studied. A univariate age-adjusted logistic regression was applied to evaluate differences between admitted and non-admitted children. A multivariate logistic regression model was developed using a stepwise selection of predictors and was internally validated using bootstrapping. Results Children admitted to hospital showed significantly (p<0.01) decreased PRV and higher SpO2 variability compared to non-admitted children. The strongest predictors of hospitalisation were reduced PRV-power in the low frequency band (OR associated with a 0.01 unit increase, 0.93; 95% CI 0.89 to 0.98), greater time spent below an SpO2 of 98% and 94% (OR associated with 10 s increase, 1.4; 95% CI 1.3 to 1.4 and 1.5; 95% CI 1.4 to 1.6, respectively), high respiratory rate, high HR, low SpO2, young age and male sex. These variables provided a bootstrap-corrected AUC of the receiver operating characteristic

  8. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin–rotation constants in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br and {sup 127}I)

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B. Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth; Jaszuński, Michał

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin–rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin–rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin–rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin–rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin–rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  9. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in (175)LuX and (197)AuX (X = (19)F, (35)Cl, (79)Br and (127)I).

    PubMed

    Demissie, Taye B; Jaszuński, Michał; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in (175)LuX and (197)AuX (X = (19)F, (35)Cl, (79)Br, (127)I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides. PMID:26520517

  10. The minimal metabolism of inhaled 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane to trifluoroacetic acid in man as determined by high sensitivity 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of urine samples.

    PubMed

    Monté, S Y; Ismail, I; Mallett, D N; Matthews, C; Tanner, R J

    1994-12-01

    In this work, oxidative metabolism of the new propellant, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane to trifluoroacetic acid in man is shown to be minimal. Alternative propellants and refrigerants are under development to replace the currently used chlorofluorocarbons which lead to stratospheric ozone depletion. One potentially useful replacement is the hydrofluorocarbon, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFA-134a). Before it can be used, however, particularly as a propellant in an aerosol pharmaceutical formulation whereby the compound is in effect dosed to people, it is important that the safety of this compound is established. As a part of this safety evaluation it is necessary to understand the metabolism of HFA-134a. In this work the production of the potential oxidative metabolite of HFA-134a, trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) has been studied in human urine following inhalation dosing with HFA-134a. The concentrations of TFA in urine have been measured using a highly sensitive 19F nuclear magnetic resonance procedure with a limit of detection of 10 ng ml-1 based on an acquisition time of only 2.25 h per sample. TFA is the only fluorinated species observed in the urine samples and only at very low levels, indicating that the oxidative route of metabolism can occur in vivo in man, but this metabolism is minimal in terms of percentage of administered dose. PMID:7696372

  11. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br and 127I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Taye B.; Jaszuński, Michał; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-01

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br, 127I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  12. Correlated fluorine diffusion and ionic conduction in the nanocrystalline F(-) solid electrolyte Ba(0.6)La(0.4)F(2.4)-(19)F T1(ρ) NMR relaxation vs. conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Preishuber-Pflügl, F; Bottke, P; Pregartner, V; Bitschnau, B; Wilkening, M

    2014-05-28

    Chemical reactions induced by mechanical treatment may give access to new compounds whose properties are governed by chemical metastability, defects introduced and the size effects present. Their interplay may lead to nanocrystalline ceramics with enhanced transport properties being useful to act as solid electrolytes. Here, the introduction of large amounts of La into the cubic structure of BaF2 served as such an example. The ion transport properties in terms of dc-conductivity values of the F(-) anion conductor Ba1-xLaxF2+x (here with x = 0.4) considerably exceed those of pure, nanocrystalline BaF2. So far, there is only little knowledge about activation energies and jump rates of the elementary hopping processes. Here, we took advantage of both impedance spectroscopy and (19)F NMR relaxometry to get to the bottom of ion jump diffusion proceeding on short-range and long-range length scales in Ba0.6La0.4F2.4. While macroscopic transport is governed by an activation energy of 0.55 to 0.59 eV, the elementary steps of hopping seen by NMR are characterised by much smaller activation energies. Fortunately, we were able to deduce an F(-) self-diffusion coefficient by the application of spin-locking NMR relaxometry. PMID:24728404

  13. Rotational-vibration analysis of the n=0, nν6+ν1-nν6 subband in the hydrogen-bonded system 16O 12C ṡṡṡ 1H 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrö, E. K.; Shoja-Chaghervand, P.; McMillan, K.; Eliades, M.; Danzeiser, D.; Bevan, J. W.

    1983-07-01

    Thirty-three P(J) branch and 15 R(J) branch transitions associated with the n=0, nν6+ν1-nν6 vibration in 16O 12C ṡṡṡ 1H 19F have been assigned. Rotational constants B, centrifugal distortion constants DJ, rotational-vibrational interaction constant α1, and the frequency of the band origin ν0, have been determined as: B″=0.102 148(14)cm-1; B'=0.104 196(14) cm-1; D″J=3.6(1.8)×10-7 cm-1; D″J=3.8 (1.8)×10-7 cm-1; α1=-61.4(5) MHz; ν0=3844.0294 (50) cm-1. The spectrum is consistent with a linear complex having a hydrogen bond ν6 bending frequency of 75±12 cm-1 and excited state r(CṡṡṡF) distance of 3.012 Å. A lower limit to the excited state lifetime is set at ≥2.8×10-10 s.

  14. Recent results of measurements of evaporation residue excitation functions for 19F+194,196,198Pt and 16,18O+198Pt systems with HYRA spectrometer at IUAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    In this talk results of the evaporation residue (ER) cross sections for the 19F+194,196,198Pt (forming compound nuclei 213,215,217Fr) and 16,18O+198Pt (forming compound nuclei 214,216Rn) systems measured at Hybrid Recoil mass Analyzer (HYRA) spectrometer installed at the Pelletron+LINAC accelerator facility of the Inter University Accelerator Center (IUAC), New Delhi are reported. The survival probabilities of 215Fr and 217Fr with neutron numbers N = 126 are found to be lower than the survival probabilities of 215Fr and 217Fr with neutron numbers N = 128 and 130 respectively. Statistical model analysis of the ER cross sections show that an excitation energy dependent scaling factor of the finite-range rotating liquid drop model fission barrier is necessary to fit the experimental data. For the case of 214,216Rn, the experimental ER cross sections are compared with the predictions from the statistical model calculations of compound nuclear decay where Kramer's fission width is used. The strength of nuclear dissipation is treated as a free parameter in the calculations to fit the experimental data.

  15. Concurrent recording of RF pulses and gradient fields - comprehensive field monitoring for MRI.

    PubMed

    Brunner, David O; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Çavuşoğlu, Mustafa; Wilm, Bertram J; Schmid, Thomas; Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-09-01

    Reconstruction of MRI data is based on exact knowledge of all magnetic field dynamics, since the interplay of RF and gradient pulses generates the signal, defines the contrast and forms the basis of resolution in spatial and spectral dimensions. Deviations caused by various sources, such as system imperfections, delays, eddy currents, drifts or externally induced fields, can therefore critically limit the accuracy of MRI examinations. This is true especially at ultra-high fields, because many error terms scale with the main field strength, and higher available SNR renders even smaller errors relevant. Higher baseline field also often requires higher acquisition bandwidths and faster signal encoding, increasing hardware demands and the severity of many types of hardware imperfection. To address field imperfections comprehensively, in this work we propose to expand the concept of magnetic field monitoring to also encompass the recording of RF fields. In this way, all dynamic magnetic fields relevant for spin evolution are covered, including low- to audio-frequency magnetic fields as produced by main magnets, gradients and shim systems, as well as RF pulses generated with single- and multiple-channel transmission systems. The proposed approach permits field measurements concurrently with actual MRI procedures on a strict common time base. The combined measurement is achieved with an array of miniaturized field probes that measure low- to audio-frequency fields via (19) F NMR and simultaneously pick up RF pulses in the MRI system's (1) H transmit band. Field recordings can form the basis of system calibration, retrospective correction of imaging data or closed-loop feedback correction, all of which hold potential to render MRI more robust and relax hardware requirements. The proposed approach is demonstrated for a range of imaging methods performed on a 7 T human MRI system, including accelerated multiple-channel RF pulses. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  16. Implantable medical devices MRI safe.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Renzo; Hecker, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Pacemakers, ICDs, neurostimulators like deep brain stimulator electrodes, spiral cord stimulators, insulin pumps, cochlear implants, retinal implants, hearing aids, electro cardio gram (ECG) leads, or devices in interventional MRI such as vascular guide wires or catheters are affected by MRI magnetic and electromagnetic fields. Design of MRI Safe medical devices requires computer modeling, bench testing, phantom testing, and animal studies. Implanted medical devices can be MRI unsafe, MRI conditional or MRI safe (see glossary). In the following paragraphs we will investigate how to design implanted medical devices MRI safe. PMID:23739365

  17. Non-invasive measurement of peripheral venous oxygen saturation using a new venous oximetry method: evaluation during bypass in heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Echiadis, A S; Crabtree, V P; Bence, J; Hadjinikolaou, L; Alexiou, C; Spyt, T J; Hu, S

    2007-08-01

    Monitoring of mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO(2)) is currently performed using invasive fibre-optic catheters. This procedure is not without risk as complications may arise from catheterization. This paper describes an alternative, non-invasive method of monitoring peripheral venous oxygen saturation (SxvO(2)) which, although it cannot replace pulmonary artery catheters, can serve as an adjunct/early warning indicator of when there is an imbalance in oxygen supply and demand. The technique requires the generation of an artificial venous pulse at the finger, thereby causing modulation of the venous blood volume within the digit. The blood volume changes are monitored using an optical sensor. Just as pulse oximetry utilizes the natural arterial pulse to perform a spectrophotometric analysis of the peripheral blood in order to estimate the arterial blood oxygen saturation, the proposed venous oximetry technique uses the artificially generated venous pulse to estimate SxvO(2). A prototype device was tested in a pilot study with patients undergoing heart surgery. Data from this study support the notion that the method is capable of tracking haemodynamic changes and suggests the technique is worthy of further development and evaluation. PMID:17664681

  18. Knee MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the knee joint and ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  19. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  20. Cervical MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the part of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  1. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need a lumbar MRI if you have: Low back pain that does not get better after treatment Leg ... spine Injury or trauma to the lower spine Low back pain and a history or signs of cancer Multiple ...

  2. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... some MRI exams, intravenous (IV) drugs, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used to change the contrast of the MR image. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are rare earth metals that ...

  3. MRI of the Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a supplemental tool to breast screening with mammography or ultrasound. It may be used to screen ... following diagnosis, or further evaluate abnormalities seen on mammography. Breast MRI does not use ionizing radiation, and ...

  4. Towards MRI microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hall, Andrew; Mundell, Victoria J; Blanco-Andujar, Cristina; Bencsik, Martin; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I; Cave, Gareth W V

    2010-04-14

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanometre scale particles have been utilised as contrast agents to image staked target binding oligonucleotide arrays using MRI to correlate the signal intensity and T(2)* relaxation times in different NMR fluids. PMID:20379545

  5. Sinus MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thomsen HS, Reimer P. Intravascular contrast media for radiology, CT, and MRI. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, ... JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ...

  6. Shoulder MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test that uses energy from powerful magnets and to create pictures of the shoulder area. ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed in the room ...

  7. Optogenetic Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  8. Optogenetic Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  9. Bioluminescence and 19F magnetic resonance imaging visualize the efficacy of lysostaphin alone and in combination with oxacillin against Staphylococcus aureus in murine thigh and catheter-associated infection models.

    PubMed

    Hertlein, Tobias; Sturm, Volker; Lorenz, Udo; Sumathy, K; Jakob, Peter; Ohlsen, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococci are the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increasingly, they resist antibiotic treatment owing to the development of multiple antibiotic resistance mechanisms in most strains. Therefore, the activity and efficacy of recombinant lysostaphin as a drug against this pathogen have been evaluated. Lysostaphin exerts high levels of activity against antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The therapeutic value of lysostaphin has been analyzed in two different clinically relevant in vivo models, a catheter-associated infection model and a thigh infection model. We infected mice with luciferase-expressing S. aureus Xen 29, and the efficacies of lysostaphin, vancomycin, oxacillin, and combined lysostaphin-oxacillin were investigated by determining numbers of CFU, detecting bioluminescent signals, and measuring the accumulation of perfluorocarbon emulsion at the site of infection by (19)F magnetic resonance imaging. Lysostaphin treatment significantly reduced the bacterial burden in infected thigh muscles and, after systemic spreading from the catheter, in inner organs. The efficiency of lysostaphin treatment was even more pronounced in combinatorial therapy with oxacillin. These results suggest that recombinant lysostaphin may have potential as an anti-S. aureus drug worthy of further clinical development. In addition, both imaging technologies demonstrated efficacy patterns similar to that of CFU determination, although they proved to be less sensitive. Nonetheless, they served as powerful tools to provide additional information about the course and gravity of infection in a noninvasive manner, possibly allowing a reduction in the number of animals needed for research evaluation of new antibiotics in future studies. PMID:24366730

  10. Cryoreduction EPR and 13C, 19F ENDOR study of substrate-bound substates and solvent kinetic isotope effects in the catalytic cycle of cytochrome P450cam and its T252A mutant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Hee; Yang, Tran-Chin; Perera, Roshan; Jin, Shengxi; Bryson, Thomas A; Sono, Masanori; Davydov, Roman; Dawson, John H; Hoffman, Brian M

    2005-11-01

    We recently used cryoreduction EPR/ENDOR techniques to show that a substrate can modulate the properties of both the monooxygenase active-oxygen intermediates and of the proton-delivery network which encompasses them. In the present report we use Q-band pulsed 19F ENDOR (Mims 3-pulse sequence) to examine the substrate binding geometries of camphor, through use of the 5,5'--difluorocamphor, and 13C ENDOR to examine the binding of 5-methylenyl camphor labeled with 13C at C11. These probes are examined in multiple states of the catalytic cycle of P450cam and its T252A mutant. As part of this investigation we further report a new cryoreduction reaction, the reduction of a ferroheme to the EPR-visible Fe(I) state, and use it to probe the substrate binding to the EPR-silent ferroheme state. Finally we report the solvent kinetic isotope effect on the decay of the camphor complex of the hydroperoxo-ferric intermediate, the first such measurement on an individual step within the P450cam reaction cycle. Following reduction of oxyferrous-P450cam, this step is the rate-limiting step in camphor hydroxylation, and its solv-KIE of 1.8 at 190 K establishes that it involves activation of the hydroperoxo moiety by transfer of the 'second' proton of catalysis. We suggest that the finding that the heme pocket can exist in multiple substates, including multiple substrate binding locations, even in P450cam, along with the established possibility that the hydroperoxo-ferriheme intermediate can react with substrate, may explain the formation of multiple products by P450s. PMID:16234926

  11. Cross sections of projectile-like fragments in the reaction {sup 19}F+{sup 66}Zn in the beam energy range of 3-6 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Sodaye, S.; Reddy, A. V. R.; Goswami, A.; Sharma, S. K.; Nayak, B. K.

    2009-06-15

    Angular distributions of projectile-like fragments (PLFs) have been measured in the reaction {sup 19}F+{sup 66}Zn at E{sub lab}=61,82,92, and 109 MeV to understand their formation in the low energy domain (< or approx. 7 MeV nucleon). In this energy range, maximum angular momentum 'l{sub max}' in the reaction is lower than or close to the critical or limiting angular momentum for complete fusion 'l{sub lim}(CF).' The sum-rule model was modified to explain the cross sections of PLFs in the present study. For the first time, the modified sum-rule model, with a competition of incomplete fusion (ICF) reaction with complete fusion below l{sub lim}(CF) reasonably reproduced the cross sections of PLFs in the beam energy range of the present study. It was observed that the cross sections of lighter PLFs fall more rapidly with decreasing beam energy compared to those of heavier PLFs, suggesting a change in the reaction mechanism from heavier to lighter PLFs. Transfer probabilities for peripheral collisions were calculated within the framework of a semiclassical formalism. The parameters of the nuclear potential required for the calculation of transfer probability were obtained by fitting the elastic scattering data measured in the present work. Calculated transfer probabilities were significantly lower compared to the corresponding experimental values, suggesting a significant overlap of the projectile and the target nuclei in incomplete fusion reactions. The present analysis showed that the overlap of the projectile and the target nuclei increases with increasing mass transfer at a given beam energy and for a given PLF, overlap increases with increasing beam energy.

  12. Bioluminescence and 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging Visualize the Efficacy of Lysostaphin Alone and in Combination with Oxacillin against Staphylococcus aureus in Murine Thigh and Catheter-Associated Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Hertlein, Tobias; Sturm, Volker; Lorenz, Udo; Sumathy, K.; Jakob, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococci are the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increasingly, they resist antibiotic treatment owing to the development of multiple antibiotic resistance mechanisms in most strains. Therefore, the activity and efficacy of recombinant lysostaphin as a drug against this pathogen have been evaluated. Lysostaphin exerts high levels of activity against antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The therapeutic value of lysostaphin has been analyzed in two different clinically relevant in vivo models, a catheter-associated infection model and a thigh infection model. We infected mice with luciferase-expressing S. aureus Xen 29, and the efficacies of lysostaphin, vancomycin, oxacillin, and combined lysostaphin-oxacillin were investigated by determining numbers of CFU, detecting bioluminescent signals, and measuring the accumulation of perfluorocarbon emulsion at the site of infection by 19F magnetic resonance imaging. Lysostaphin treatment significantly reduced the bacterial burden in infected thigh muscles and, after systemic spreading from the catheter, in inner organs. The efficiency of lysostaphin treatment was even more pronounced in combinatorial therapy with oxacillin. These results suggest that recombinant lysostaphin may have potential as an anti-S. aureus drug worthy of further clinical development. In addition, both imaging technologies demonstrated efficacy patterns similar to that of CFU determination, although they proved to be less sensitive. Nonetheless, they served as powerful tools to provide additional information about the course and gravity of infection in a noninvasive manner, possibly allowing a reduction in the number of animals needed for research evaluation of new antibiotics in future studies. PMID:24366730

  13. Small BODIPY Probes for Combined Dual (19) F MRI and Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Anh Minh; Müller, Andreas; Kessler, Sonja M; Henrikus, Sarah; Hoffmann, Caroline; Kiemer, Alexandra K; Bücker, Arno; Jung, Gregor

    2016-07-19

    The combination of the two complementary imaging modalities (19) F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging (FLI) possesses high potential for biological and medical applications. Herein we report the first design, synthesis, dual detection validation, and cytotoxic testing of four promising BODIPY dyes for dual (19) F MRI-fluorescence detection. Using straightforward Steglich reactions, small fluorinated alcohols were easily covalently tethered to a BODIPY dye in high yields, leaving its fluorescence properties unaffected. The synthesized compounds were analyzed with various techniques to demonstrate their potential utility in dual imaging. As expected, the chemically and magnetically equivalent trifluoromethyl groups of the agents exhibited a single NMR signal. The determined longitudinal relaxation times T1 and the transverse relaxation times T2 , both in the lower second range, enabled the imaging of four compounds in vitro. The most auspicious dual (19) F MRI-fluorescence agent was also successfully imaged in a mouse post-mortem within a 9.4 T small-animal tomograph. Toxicological assays with human cells (primary HUVEC and HepG2 cell line) also indicated the possibility for animal testing. PMID:27347843

  14. Fractional ventilation mapping using inert fluorinated gas MRI in rat models of inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Fox, Matthew S; Viel, Chris; Gajawada, Gowtham; Li, Tao; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Albert, Mitchell S

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend established methods for fractional ventilation mapping using (19) F MRI of inert fluorinated gases to rat models of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, five rats were instilled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the lungs two days prior to imaging, six rats were instilled with bleomycin in the lungs two weeks prior to imaging and an additional four rats were used as controls. (19) F MR lung imaging was performed at 3 T with rats continuously breathing a mixture of sulfur hexafluoride and O2 . Fractional ventilation maps were obtained using a wash-out approach, by switching the breathing mixture to pure O2 , and acquiring images following each successive wash-out breath. The mean fractional ventilation (r) was 0.29 ± 0.05 for control rats, 0.23 ± 0.10 for LPS-instilled rats and 0.19 ± 0.03 for bleomycin-instilled rats. Bleomycin-instilled rats had a significantly decreased mean r value compared with controls (P = 0.010). Although LPS-instilled rats had a slightly reduced mean r value, this trend was not statistically significant (P = 0.556). Fractional ventilation gradients were calculated in the anterior/posterior (A/P) direction, and the mean A/P gradient was -0.005 ± 0.008 cm(-1) for control rats, 0.013 ± 0.005 cm(-1) for LPS-instilled rats and 0.009 ± 0.018 cm(-1) for bleomycin-instilled rats. Fractional ventilation gradients were significantly different for control rats compared with LPS-instilled rats only (P = 0.016). The ventilation gradients calculated from control rats showed the expected gravitational relationship, while ventilation gradients calculated from LPS- and bleomycin-instilled rats showed the opposite trend. Histology confirmed that LPS-instilled rats had a significantly elevated alveolar wall thickness, while bleomycin-instilled rats showed signs of substantial fibrosis. Overall, (19) F MRI may be able to detect the effects of pulmonary

  15. Radiotherapy planning using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Maria A.; Payne, Geoffrey S.

    2015-11-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimized, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT.

  16. MRI Catheterization in Cardiopulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Toby; Ratnayaka, Kanishka

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognostication in patients with complex cardiopulmonary disease can be a clinical challenge. A new procedure, MRI catheterization, involves invasive right-sided heart catheterization performed inside the MRI scanner using MRI instead of traditional radiographic fluoroscopic guidance. MRI catheterization combines simultaneous invasive hemodynamic and MRI functional assessment in a single radiation-free procedure. By combining both modalities, the many individual limitations of invasive catheterization and noninvasive imaging can be overcome, and additional clinical questions can be addressed. Today, MRI catheterization is a clinical reality in specialist centers in the United States and Europe. Advances in medical device design for the MRI environment will enable not only diagnostic but also interventional MRI procedures to be performed within the next few years. PMID:24394821

  17. Gadofullerene MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bolskar, Robert D

    2008-04-01

    A promising new class of MRI contrast-enhancing agents with high relaxivities is based on gadolinium-containing metallofullerenes, which are also termed gadofullerenes. Detailed study of the water-proton relaxivity properties and intermolecular nanoclustering behavior of gadofullerene derivatives has revealed valuable information about their relaxivity mechanisms and given a deeper understanding of this new class of paramagnetic contrast agent. Here, the latest findings on water-solubilized gadofullerene materials and how these findings relate to their future applications in MRI are reviewed and discussed. PMID:18373426

  18. Skin oxygenation after topical application of liposome-entrapped benzyl nicotinate as measured by EPR oximetry in vivo: influence of composition and size.

    PubMed

    Kristl, Julijana; Abramović, Zrinka; Sentjurc, Marjeta

    2003-01-01

    New and improved drug delivery systems are the important subject of much scientific research. The development of formulations that increase skin oxygenation and of methods for measuring oxygen levels in skin are important for dealing with healing processes affected by the level of oxygen. We have used EPR oximetry in vivo to compare the influence of liposomal formulations of different size and composition with that of hydrogel with respect to the action of the entrapped benzyl nicotinate (BN). Following the topical application of BN onto the skin of mice, pO2 increase was measured by low-frequency EPR as a function of time. The effect of BN was evaluated by 3 different parameters: lag-time, time needed for maximum pO2 increase, and overall effectiveness expressed by the area under the response-time curve. An increase in skin oxygenation was observed after BN application. The results show that the effect of BN incorporated in liposomes is achieved more rapidly than the effect from hydrophilic gel. The composition of the liposomes significantly affects the time at which BN starts to act and, to a lesser extent, the maximum increase of pO2 in skin and the effectiveness of BN action. However, the size of the liposomes influences both the effectiveness of BN action and the time at which BN starts to act. After repeated application of liposomes, the pO2 baseline increased and the response of the skin tissue was faster. Our results demonstrate that EPR oximetry is a useful method for evaluating oxygen changes after drug application and for following the time course of their action. PMID:12713274

  19. MRI driven magnetic microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Kósa, Gábor; Jakab, Péter; Székely, Gábor; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Capsule endoscopy is a promising technique for diagnosing diseases in the digestive system. Here we design and characterize a miniature swimming mechanism that uses the magnetic fields of the MRI for both propulsion and wireless powering of the capsule. Our method uses both the static and the radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields inherently available in MRI to generate a propulsive force. Our study focuses on the evaluation of the propulsive force for different swimming tails and experimental estimation of the parameters that influence its magnitude. We have found that an approximately 20 mm long, 5 mm wide swimming tail is capable of producing 0.21 mN propulsive force in water when driven by a 20 Hz signal providing 0.85 mW power and the tail located within the homogeneous field of a 3 T MRI scanner. We also analyze the parallel operation of the swimming mechanism and the scanner imaging. We characterize the size of artifacts caused by the propulsion system. We show that while the magnetic micro swimmer is propelling the capsule endoscope, the operator can locate the capsule on the image of an interventional scene without being obscured by significant artifacts. Although this swimming method does not scale down favorably, the high magnetic field of the MRI allows self propulsion speed on the order of several millimeter per second and can propel an endoscopic capsule in the stomach. PMID:22037673

  20. Teratoma - MRI scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This MRI scan shows a tumor (teratoma) at the base of the spine (seen on the left lower edge of the screen), located in the sacrum and coccyx (sacrococcygeal) area. Teratomas are present at birth and may contain hair, teeth, and other tissues.

  1. High-quality breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, R Edward

    2014-05-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demands the competing factors of high spatial resolution, good temporal resolution, high signal-to-noise ratios, and complete bilateral breast coverage. Achieving these competing factors requires modern MRI equipment with high magnetic field strength and homogeneity, high maximum gradient strength with short rise times, dedicated multichannel bilateral breast coils with prone patient positioning, and 3D (volume) gradient-echo MRI pulse sequences with short TR, short TE, high spatial resolution, and reasonably short acquisition times. This article discusses the equipment and pulse sequences needed to achieve high-quality breast MRI and summarizes requirements of the ACR Breast MRI Accreditation Program. PMID:24792656

  2. SU-D-18C-06: Initial Experience with Implementing MRI Safety Guidelines for Patients with Pacemakers - Medical Physicist Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    James, J; Place, V; Panda, A; Edmonson, H; Felmlee, J; Pooley, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Several institutions have developed MRI guidelines for patients with MR-unsafe or MR-conditional pacemakers. Here we highlight the role of a medical physicist in implementing these guidelines for non-pacemaker dependent patients. Guidelines: Implementing these guidelines requires involvement from several medical specialties and a strong collaboration with the site MRI supervisor to develop a structured workflow. A medical physicist is required to be present during the scan to supervise the MR scanning and to maintain a safety checklist that ensures: 1) uninterrupted patient communication with the technologist, 2) continuous patient physiologic monitoring (e.g. blood pressure and electrocardiography) by a trained nurse, 3) redundant patient vitals monitoring (e.g. pulse oximetry) due to the possibility of in vivo electrocardiography reading fluctuations during image acquisition. A radiologist is strongly recommended to be available to review the images before patients are discharged from the scanner. Pacemaker MRI should be restricted to 1.5T field strength. The MRI sequences should be optimized by the physicist with regards to: a) SAR: limited to <1.5 W/Kg for MR-unsafe pacemakers in normal operating mode, b) RF exposure time: <30 min, c) Coils: use T/R coils but not restricted to such, d) Artifacts: further optimization of sequences whenever image quality is compromised due to the pacemaker. In particular, cardiac, breast and left-shoulder MRIs are most susceptible to these artifacts. Possible strategies to lower the SAR include: a) BW reduction, 2) echo-train-length reduction, 3) increase TR, 4) decrease number of averages, 5) decrease flip angle, 6) reduce slices and/or a combination of all the options. Conclusion: A medical physicist in collaboration with the MR supervisor plays an important role in the supervision/implementation of safe MR scanning of pacemaker patients. Developing and establishing a workflow has enabled our institution to scan over

  3. MRI of the penis

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, A

    2012-01-01

    MRI of the penis is an expensive test that is not always superior to clinical examination or ultrasound. However, it shows many of the important structures, and in particular the combination of tumescence from intracavernosal alprostadil, and high-resolution T2 sequences show the glans, corpora and the tunica albuginea well. In this paper we summarise the radiological anatomy and discuss the indications for MRI. For penile cancer, it may be useful in cases where the local stage is not apparent clinically. In priapism, it is an emerging technique for assessing corporal viability, and in fracture it can in most cases make the diagnosis and locate the injury. In some cases of penile fibrosis and Peyronie's disease, it may aid surgical planning, and in complex pelvic fracture may replace or augment conventional urethrography. It is an excellent investigation for the malfunctioning penile prosthesis. PMID:23118102

  4. Occupational exposure in MRI.

    PubMed

    McRobbie, D W

    2012-04-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B(0), imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B(0) fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2-0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42 ± 24% of B(0), with time-averaged exposures of 5.2 ± 2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6-4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B(0) fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s(-1). Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  5. [MRI in coma survivors].

    PubMed

    Tshibanda, L; Vanhaudenhuyse, A; Bruno, M A; Boly, M; Soddu, A; Laureys, S; Moonen, G

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic and non-traumatic brain injured disorders of consciousness patients are still challenging for diagnosis, prognosis, ethical and socio-economic reasons. Currently, there remains a high rate of misdiagnosis of the vegetative state (Schnakers, et al. 2009). Recent advances in MRI techniques (diffusion tensor, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and functional imaging) provide data that could improve the diagnostic and prognostic evaluation and management of these patients. PMID:20085015

  6. MRI Anatomy of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    McCarley, Robert W.; Wible, Cynthia G.; Frumin, Melissa; Hirayasu, Yoshio; Levitt, James J.; Fischer, Iris A.; Shenton, Martha E.

    2010-01-01

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data have provided much evidence in support of our current view that schizophrenia is a brain disorder with altered brain structure, and consequently involving more than a simple disturbance in neurotransmission. This review surveys 118 peer–reviewed studies with control group from 1987 to May 1998. Most studies (81%) do not find abnormalities of whole brain/intracranial contents, while lateral ventricle enlargement is reported in 77%, and third ventricle enlargement in 67%. The temporal lobe was the brain parenchymal region with the most consistently documented abnormalities. Volume decreases were found in 62% of 37 studies of whole temporal lobe, and in 81% of 16 studies of the superior temporal gyrus (and in 100% with gray matter separately evaluated). Fully 77% of the 30 studies of the medial temporal lobe reported volume reduction in one or more of its constituent structures (hippocampus, amygdala, parahippocampal gyrus). Despite evidence for frontal lobe functional abnormalities, structural MRI investigations less consistently found abnormalities, with 55% describing volume reduction. It may be that frontal lobe volume changes are small, and near the threshold for MRI detection. The parietal and occipital lobes were much less studied; about half of the studies showed positive findings. Most studies of cortical gray matter (86%) found volume reductions were not diffuse, but more pronounced in certain areas. About two thirds of the studies of subcortical structures of thalamus, corpus callosum and basal ganglia (which tend to increase volume with typical neuroleptics), show positive findings, as do almost all (91%) studies of cavum septi pellucidi (CSP). Most data were consistent with a developmental model, but growing evidence was compatible also with progressive, neurodegenerative features, suggesting a “two– hit” model of schizophrenia, for which a cellular hypothesis is discussed. The relationship of

  7. MRI Findings in Neuroferritinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Emiko; Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Neuroferritinopathy is a neurodegenerative disease which demonstrates brain iron accumulation caused by the mutations in the ferritin light chain gene. On brain MRI in neuroferritinopathy, iron deposits are observed as low-intensity areas on T2WI and as signal loss on T2∗WI. On T2WI, hyperintense abnormalities reflecting tissue edema and gliosis are also seen. Another characteristic finding is the presence of symmetrical cystic changes in the basal ganglia, which are seen in the advanced stages of this disorder. Atrophy is sometimes noted in the cerebellar and cerebral cortices. The variety in the MRI findings is specific to neuroferritinopathy. Based on observations of an excessive iron content in patients with chronic neurologic disorders, such as Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease, the presence of excess iron is therefore recognized as a major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. The future development of multimodal and advanced MRI techniques is thus expected to play an important role in accurately measuring the brain iron content and thereby further elucidating the neurodegenerative process. PMID:21808735

  8. [Nocturnal monitoring of home non-invasive ventilation: Contribution of simple tools such as pulse-oximetry, capnography, built-in ventilator software and autonomic markers of sleep fragmentation].

    PubMed

    Janssens, J-P; Borel, J-C; Pépin, J-L

    2014-02-01

    Complex respiratory events, which may have a detrimental effect on both quality of sleep and control of nocturnal hypoventilation, occur during sleep in patients treated by non-invasive ventilation (NIV). Among these events are patient-ventilator asynchrony, increases in upper airway resistance with or without increased respiratory drive, and leaks. Detection of these events is important in order to select the most appropriate ventilator settings and interface. Simple tools can provide important information when monitoring NIV. Pulse-oximetry is important to ensure that an adequate SpO2 is provided, and to detect either prolonged or short and recurrent desaturations. However, the specificity of pulse-oximetry tracings under NIV is low. Transcutaneous capnography discriminates between hypoxemia related to V/Q mismatch and hypoventilation, documents correction of nocturnal hypoventilation, and may detect ventilator-induced hyperventilation, a possible cause for central apnea/hypopnea and glottic closure. Data provided by ventilator software helps the clinician by estimating ventilation, tidal volume, leaks, rate of inspiratory or expiratory triggering by the patient, although further validation of these signals by independent studies is indicated. Finally, autonomic markers of sympathetic tone using signals such as pulse wave amplitude of the pulse-oximetry signal can provide reliable information of sleep fragmentation. PMID:24602678

  9. Sodium MRI: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-05-01

    Sodium NMR spectroscopy and MRI have become popular in recent years through the increased availability of high-field MRI scanners, advanced scanner hardware and improved methodology. Sodium MRI is being evaluated for stroke and tumor detection, for breast cancer studies, and for the assessment of osteoarthritis and muscle and kidney functions, to name just a few. In this article, we aim to present an up-to-date review of the theoretical background, the methodology, the challenges, limitations, and current and potential new applications of sodium MRI. PMID:24815363

  10. Sodium MRI: Methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-01-01

    Sodium NMR spectroscopy and MRI have become popular in recent years through the increased availability of high-field MRI scanners, advanced scanner hardware and improved methodology. Sodium MRI is being evaluated for stroke and tumor detection, for breast cancer studies, and for the assessment of osteoarthritis and muscle and kidney functions, to name just a few. In this article, we aim to present an up-to-date review of the theoretical background, the methodology, the challenges and limitations, and current and potential new applications of sodium MRI. PMID:24815363

  11. Iron shielded MRI optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, C. A.; Fabbri, M.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the main current systems of an actively shielded and of an iron shielded MRI device for nuclear resonance imaging, is considered. The model for the analysis of the magnetic induction produced by the current system, is based on the combination of a Boundary Element technique and of the integration of two Fredholm integral equations of the first and the second kind. The equivalent current magnetization model is used for the calculation of the magnetization produced by the iron shield. High field uniformity in a spherical region inside the device, and a low stray field in the neighborhood of the device are required. In order to meet the design requirements a multi-objective global minimization problem is solved. The minimization method is based on the combination of the filled function technique and the (1+1) evolution strategy algorithm. The multi-objective problem is treated by means of a penalty method. The actively shielded MRI system results to utilize larger amount of conductor and produce higher magnetic energy than the iron shield device. On veut étudier le projet du système des courants principaux d'un MRI à écran en fer et d'un MRI à écran actif. Le modèle d'analyse du champ magnétique produit par le système de courants est basé sur la combinaison d'une technique Boundary Element et de l'intégration de deux équations intégrales de Fredholm de première et de seconde sorte. On utilise pour calculer la magnétisation produite par l'écran en fer le modèle à cou rants de magné ti sa tion équivalents. On exige une élévation uniforme du champ dans une région sphérique au cœur de l'appareil et un bas champ magnétique dispersé à proximité de l'appareil. Dans le but de répondre aux impératifs du projet, on va résoudre un problème multiobjectif de minimisation globale. On utilise une technique de minimisation obtenue par la combinaison des méthodes “Filled Function” et “(1+1) Evolution Strategy”. Le probl

  12. Type III home sleep testing versus pulse oximetry: is the respiratory disturbance index better than the oxygen desaturation index to predict the apnoea-hypopnoea index measured during laboratory polysomnography?

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Arthur; Loving, Richard T; Gordon, Robert M; Abel, Susan L; Loewy, Derek; Kripke, Daniel F; Kline, Lawrence E

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In its guidelines on the use of portable monitors to diagnose obstructive sleep apnoea, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine endorses home polygraphy with type III devices recording at a minimum airflow the respiratory effort and pulse oximetry, but advises against simple pulse oximetry. However, oximetry is widely available and simple to use in the home. This study was designed to compare the ability of the oxygen desaturation index (ODI) based on oximetry alone with a stand-alone pulse oximeter (SPO) and from the oximetry channel of the ApneaLink Plus (ALP), with the respiratory disturbance index (RDI) based on four channels from the ALP to predict the apnoea–hypopnoea index (AHI) from laboratory polysomnography. Design Cross-sectional diagnostic accuracy study. Setting Sleep medicine practice of a multispecialty clinic. Participants Patients referred for laboratory polysomnography with suspected sleep apnoea. We enrolled 135 participants with 123 attempting the home sleep testing and 73 having at least 4 hours of satisfactory data from SPO and ALP. Interventions Participants had home testing performed simultaneously with both a SPO and an ALP. The 2 oximeter probes were worn on different fingers of the same hand. The ODI for the SPO was calculated using Profox software (ODISOX). For the ALP, RDI and ODI were calculated using both technician scoring (RDIMAN and ODIMAN) and the ALP computer scoring (RDIRAW and ODIRAW). Results The receiver–operator characteristic areas under the curve for AHI ≥5 were RDIMAN 0.88 (95% confidence limits 0.81–0.96), RDIRAW 0.86 (0.76–0.94), ODIMAN 0.86 (0.77–0.95), ODIRAW 0.84 (0.75–0.93) and ODISOX 0.83 (0.73–0.93). Conclusions We conclude that the RDI and the ODI, measured at home on the same night, give similar predictions of the laboratory AHI, measured on a different night. The differences between the two methods are small compared with the reported night-to-night variation of the AHI. PMID

  13. Occupational exposure in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mcrobbie, D W

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B0, imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B0 fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2–0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42±24% of B0, with time-averaged exposures of 5.2±2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6–4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B0 fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s−1. Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  14. Cardiovascular MRI with ferumoxytol.

    PubMed

    Finn, J P; Nguyen, K-L; Han, F; Zhou, Z; Salusky, I; Ayad, I; Hu, P

    2016-08-01

    The practice of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) has changed significantly in the span of a decade. Concerns regarding gadolinium (Gd)-associated nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in those with severely impaired renal function spurred developments in low-dose CEMRA and non-contrast MRA as well as efforts to seek alternative MR contrast agents. Originally developed for MR imaging use, ferumoxytol (an ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle), is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in adults with renal disease. Since its clinical availability in 2009, there has been rising interest in the scientific and clinical use of ferumoxytol as an MR contrast agent. The unique physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of ferumoxytol, including its long intravascular half-life and high r1 relaxivity, support a spectrum of MRI applications beyond the scope of Gd-based contrast agents. Moreover, whereas Gd is not found in biological systems, iron is essential for normal metabolism, and nutritional iron deficiency poses major public health challenges worldwide. Once the carbohydrate shell of ferumoxytol is degraded, the elemental iron at its core is incorporated into the reticuloendothelial system. These considerations position ferumoxytol as a potential game changer in the field of CEMRA and MRI. In this paper, we aim to summarise our experience with the cardiovascular applications of ferumoxytol and provide a brief synopsis of ongoing investigations on ferumoxytol-enhanced MR applications. PMID:27221526

  15. Arterial input function of an optical tracer for dynamic contrast enhanced imaging can be determined from pulse oximetry oxygen saturation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Wright, Eric A.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Diop, Mamadou; Morrison, Laura B.; Pogue, Brian W.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2012-12-01

    In many cases, kinetic modeling requires that the arterial input function (AIF)—the time-dependent arterial concentration of a tracer—be characterized. A straightforward method to measure the AIF of red and near-infrared optical dyes (e.g., indocyanine green) using a pulse oximeter is presented. The method is motivated by the ubiquity of pulse oximeters used in both preclinical and clinical applications, as well as the gap in currently available technologies to measure AIFs in small animals. The method is based on quantifying the interference that is observed in the derived arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) following a bolus injection of a light-absorbing dye. In other words, the change in SaO2 can be converted into dye concentration knowing the chromophore-specific extinction coefficients, the true arterial oxygen saturation, and total hemoglobin concentration. A simple error analysis was performed to highlight potential limitations of the approach, and a validation of the method was conducted in rabbits by comparing the pulse oximetry method with the AIF acquired using a pulse dye densitometer. Considering that determining the AIF is required for performing quantitative tracer kinetics, this method provides a flexible tool for measuring the arterial dye concentration that could be used in a variety of applications.

  16. MRI of plants and foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory.

  17. fMRI adaptation revisited.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jonas; Solomon, Samuel G; Kohn, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Adaptation has been widely used in functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) studies to infer neuronal response properties in human cortex. fMRI adaptation has been criticized because of the complex relationship between fMRI adaptation effects and the multiple neuronal effects that could underlie them. Many of the longstanding concerns about fMRI adaptation have received empirical support from neurophysiological studies over the last decade. We review these studies here, and also consider neuroimaging studies that have investigated how fMRI adaptation effects are influenced by high-level perceptual processes. The results of these studies further emphasize the need to interpret fMRI adaptation results with caution, but they also provide helpful guidance for more accurate interpretation and better experimental design. In addition, we argue that rather than being used as a proxy for measurements of neuronal stimulus selectivity, fMRI adaptation may be most useful for studying population-level adaptation effects across cortical processing hierarchies. PMID:26703375

  18. MRI Meets MPI: a bimodal MPI-MRI tomograph.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Patrick; Lother, Steffen; Rückert, Martin A; Kullmann, Walter H; Jakob, Peter M; Fidler, Florian; Behr, Volker C

    2014-10-01

    While magnetic particle imaging (MPI) constitutes a novel biomedical imaging technique for tracking superparamagnetic nanoparticles in vivo, unlike magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), it cannot provide anatomical background information. Until now these two modalities have been performed in separate scanners and image co-registration has been hampered by the need to reposition the sample in both systems as similarly as possible. This paper presents a bimodal MPI-MRI-tomograph that combines both modalities in a single system.MPI and MRI images can thus be acquired without moving the sample or replacing any parts in the setup. The images acquired with the presented setup show excellent agreement between the localization of the nanoparticles in MPI and the MRI background data. A combination of two highly complementary imaging modalities has been achieved. PMID:25291350

  19. Breast MRI: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Day, Deborah

    2009-12-01

    In 2007, the American Cancer Society published guidelines for using breast MRI to screen women who were at high risk for breast cancer. Although breast MRI, which is typically used as an adjunctto mammography, is highly sensitive for detecting breast cancers, its use is somewhat controversial for a number of reasons including its cost and lack of specificity. This article describes the indications for breast MRI and discusses the pros and cons of using it to screen women for cancer and evaluate the extent of disease in women who are newly diagnosed. PMID:20092173

  20. Scientists attack European MRI rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Margaret

    2010-08-01

    A report by the European Science Foundation (ESF) has sharply criticized a European Union (EU) directive on electromagnetic fields, arguing that limits on workers' exposure will have "potentially disastrous" consequences for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  1. BOLD MRI of the Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lu-Ping; Halter, Sarah; Prasad, Pottumarthi V.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Oxygenation status plays a major role in renal physiology and pathophysiology and hence has attracted considerable attention in recent years. While much of the early work and a significant amount of present work is based on invasive methods or ex vivo analysis and hence restricted to animal models, BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) MRI has been shown to extend these findings to humans. BOLD MRI is most useful in monitoring effects of physiological or pharmacological maneuvers. Several teams around the world have demonstrated reproducible data and have illustrated several useful applications. Studies supporting the use of renal BOLD MRI in characterizing disease with prognostic value have also been reported. Here, an overview of the current state-of-the art of renal BOLD MRI is provided. PMID:18926426

  2. Metalloprotein-based MRI probes

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yuri; Jasanoff, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Metalloproteins have long been recognized as key determinants of endogenous contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of biological subjects. More recently, both natural and engineered metalloproteins have been harnessed as biotechnological tools to probe gene expression, enzyme activity, and analyte concentrations by MRI. Metalloprotein MRI probes are paramagnetic and function by analogous mechanisms to conventional gadolinium or iron oxide-based MRI contrast agents. Compared with synthetic agents, metalloproteins typically offer worse sensitivity, but the possibilities of using protein engineering and targeted gene expression approaches in conjunction with metalloprotein contrast agents are powerful and sometimes definitive strengths. This review summarizes theoretical and practical aspects of metalloprotein-based contrast agents, and discusses progress in the exploitation of these proteins for molecular imaging applications. PMID:23376346

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary ...

  4. Assessment of oxygen saturation in retinal vessels of normal subjects and diabetic patients with and without retinopathy using Flow Oximetry System

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A.; Annam, Rachel E.; Sepah, Yasir J.; Luu, Long; Bittencourt, Millena G.; Jang, Hyun S.; Lemaillet, Paul; Munoz, Beatriz; Duncan, Donald D.; West, Sheila; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess oxygen saturation (StO2) in retinal vessels of normal subjects and diabetic patients with and without retinopathy using the modified version of the Flow Oximetry System (FOS) and a novel assessment software. Methods The FOS and novel assessment software were used to determine StO2 levels in arteries and veins located between 1 and 2 mm from the margin of the optic disc and in the macular area. Results Eighteen normal subjects, 15 diabetics without diabetic retinopathy (DM no DR), and 11 with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) were included in final analysis. The mean [± standard deviation (SD)] StO2 in retinal arteries was 96.9%±3.8% in normal subjects; 97.4%±3.7% in DM no DR; and 98.4%±2.0% in NPDR. The mean venous StO2 was 57.5%±6.8% in normal subjects; 57.4%±7.5% in DM no DR; and 51.8%±6.8% in NPDR. The mean arterial and venous StO2 across the three groups were not statistically different (P=0.498 and P=0.071, respectively). The arterio-venous differences between the three study groups, however, were found to be statistically significant (P=0.015). Pairwise comparisons have demonstrated significant differences when comparing the A-V difference in the NPDR group to either normal subjects (P=0.02) or diabetic patients without DR (P=0.04). Conclusions The arterio-venous difference was greater, and statistically significant, in patients with NPDR when compared to normal subjects and to patients with diabetes and no retinopathy. The mean venous StO2 was lower, but not statistically significant, in NPDR compared with diabetics without retinopathy and with normal subjects. PMID:25694958

  5. Pulse Oximetry for the Detection of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Can the Memory Capacity of Oxygen Saturation Influence Their Diagnostic Accuracy?

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Carlos A.; Dibur, Eduardo; Rhodius, Edgardo

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To assess the diagnostic ability of WristOx 3100 using its three different recording settings in patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Methods. All participants (135) performed the oximetry (three oximeters WristOx 3100) and polysomnography (PSG) simultaneously in the sleep laboratory. Both recordings were interpreted blindly. Each oximeter was set to one of three different recording settings (memory capabilities 0.25, 0.5, and 1 Hz). The software (nVision 5.1) calculated the adjusted O2 desaturation index-mean number of O2 desaturation per hour of analyzed recording ≥2, 3, and 4% (ADI2, 3, and 4). The ADI2, 3, and 4 cutoff points that better discriminated between subjects with or without OSAS arose from the receiver-operator characteristics (ROCs) curve analysis. OSAS was defined as a respiratory disturbance index (RDI) ≥ 5. Results. 101 patients were included (77 men, mean age 52, median RDI 22.6, median BMI 27.4 kg/m2). The area under the ROCs curves (AUC-ROCs) of ADI2, 3, and 4 with different data storage rates were similar (AUC-ROCs with data storage rates of 0.25/0.5/1 Hz: ADI2: 0.958/0.948/0.965, ADI3: 0.961/0.95/0.966, and ADI4: 0.957/0.949/0.963, P NS). Conclusions. The ability of WristOx 3100 to detect patients with OSAS was not affected by the data storage rate of the oxygen saturation signal. Both memory capacity of 0.25, 0.5, or 1 Hz showed a similar performance for the diagnosis of OSAS. PMID:23471171

  6. Quantitative pharmacologic MRI in mice.

    PubMed

    Perles-Barbacaru, Teodora-Adriana; Procissi, Daniel; Demyanenko, Andrey V; Jacobs, Russell E

    2012-04-01

    Pharmacologic MRI (phMRI) uses functional MRI techniques to provide a noninvasive in vivo measurement of the hemodynamic effects of drugs. The cerebral blood volume change (ΔCBV) serves as a surrogate for neuronal activity via neurovascular coupling mechanisms. By assessing the location and time course of brain activity in mouse mutant studies, phMRI can provide valuable insights into how different behavioral phenotypes are expressed in deferring brain activity response to drug challenge. In this report, we evaluate the utility of three different intravascular ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) contrast agents for phMRI using a gradient-echo technique, with temporal resolution of one min at high magnetic field. The tissue half-life of the USPIOs was studied using a nonlinear detrending model. The three USPIOs are candidates for CBV weighted phMRI experiments, with r(2)/r(1) ratios ≥ 20 and apparent half-lives ≥ 1.5 h at the described doses. An echo-time of about 10 ms or longer results in a functional contrast to noise ratio (fCNR) > 75 after USPIO injection, with negligible decrease between 1.5-2 h. phMRI experiments were conducted at 7 T using cocaine as a psychotropic substance and acetazolamide, a global vasodilator, as a positive control. Cocaine acts as a dopamine-serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, increasing extracellular concentrations of these neurotransmitters, and thus increasing dopaminergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. phMRI results showed that CBV was reduced in the normal mouse brain after cocaine challenge, with the largest effects in the nucleus accumbens, whereas after acetazolamide, blood volume was increased in both cerebral and extracerebral tissue. PMID:21793079

  7. Coaxial waveguide MRI.

    PubMed

    Alt, Stefan; Müller, Marco; Umathum, Reiner; Bolz, Armin; Bachert, Peter; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bock, Michael

    2012-04-01

    As ultrahigh-field MR imaging systems suffer from the standing wave problems of conventional coil designs, the use of antenna systems that generate travelling waves was suggested. As a modification to the original approach, we propose the use of a coaxial waveguide configuration with interrupted inner conductor. This concept can focus the radiofrequency energy to the desired imaging region in the human body and can operate at different Larmor frequencies without hardware modifications, as it is not limited by a lower cut-off frequency. We assessed the potential of the method with a hardware prototype setup that was loaded with a tissue equivalent phantom and operated with imaging areas of different size. Signal and flip angle distributions within the phantom were analyzed, and imaging at different Larmor frequencies was performed. Results were compared to a finite difference time domain simulation of the setup that additionally provides information on the spatial distribution of the specific absorption rate load. Furthermore, simulation results with a human model (virtual family) are presented. It was found that the proposed method can be used for MRI at multiple frequencies, achieving transmission efficiencies similar to other travelling wave approaches but still suffers from several limitations due to the used mode of wave propagation. PMID:22021117

  8. Functional MRI at the Crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2009-01-01

    Since the observation of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect on measured MR signal in the brain, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has rapidly become the tool of choice for exploring brain function in cognitive neuroscience. Although fMRI is an exciting and powerful means to examining the brain in vivo, the field has sometimes permitted itself to believe that patterns of BOLD activity reveal more than it is possible to measure given the method’s spatial and temporal sampling, while concurrently not fully exploring the amount of information it provides. In this article, we examine some of the constraints on the kinds of inferences that can be supported by fMRI. We critique the concept of reverse inference that is often employed to say some cognitive function must be present given activity in a specific region. We review the consideration of functional and effective connectivity that remain infrequently applied in cognitive neuroimaging, highlighting recent thinking on the ways in which functional imaging can be used to characterize inter-regional communication. Recent advances in neuroimaging that make it possible to assess anatomical connectivity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and we discuss how these may inform interpretation of fMRI results. Descriptions of fMRI studies in the media, in some instances, serve to misrepresent fMRI’s capabilities. We comment on how researchers need to faithfully represent fMRI’s promise and limitations in dealing with the media. Finally, as we stand at the crossroads of fMRI research, where one pathway leads toward a rigorous understanding of cognitive operations using fMRI and another leads us to a predictable collection of observations absent of clear insight, we offer our impressions of a fruitful path for future functional imaging research. PMID:19041348

  9. Estimating Motion From MRI Data

    PubMed Central

    OZTURK, CENGIZHAN; DERBYSHIRE, J. ANDREW; MCVEIGH, ELLIOT R.

    2007-01-01

    Invited Paper Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal imaging modality to measure blood flow and tissue motion. It provides excellent contrast between soft tissues, and images can be acquired at positions and orientations freely defined by the user. From a temporal sequence of MR images, boundaries and edges of tissues can be tracked by image processing techniques. Additionally, MRI permits the source of the image signal to be manipulated. For example, temporary magnetic tags displaying a pattern of variable brightness may be placed in the object using MR saturation techniques, giving the user a known pattern to detect for motion tracking. The MRI signal is a modulated complex quantity, being derived from a rotating magnetic field in the form of an induced current. Well-defined patterns can also be introduced into the phase of the magnetization, and could be thought of as generalized tags. If the phase of each pixel is preserved during image reconstruction, relative phase shifts can be used to directly encode displacement, velocity and acceleration. New methods for modeling motion fields from MRI have now found application in cardiovascular and other soft tissue imaging. In this review, we shall describe the methods used for encoding, imaging, and modeling motion fields with MRI. PMID:18958181

  10. [MRI-guided musculoskeletal biopsy].

    PubMed

    Daecke, W; Libicher, M; Mädler, U; Rumpf, C; Bernd, L

    2003-02-01

    MRI-guided musculoskeletal biopsy has been mentioned to be a minimally invasive method to obtain specimens for diagnostic purposes in bone tumors. To evaluate the viability, to assess the accuracy, and to record possible complications of this method, clinical data of 19 MRI-guided biopsies were analyzed. Interventions were performed on 18 patients (1-78 years) as an outpatient procedure: 15 skeletal and 4 soft tissue biopsies were taken from the pelvis, upper limb,or lower limb. We used T1-weighted gradient echoes (GE) for locating the puncture site and T2-weighted turbo spin echoes (TSE) for visualization of needle position. In 14 of 18 MRI-guided biopsies, a definite histological diagnosis was obtained. According to the pathologist, the inadequate size of the specimen was the main reason for missing the diagnoses in four cases.Long intervention time and inappropriate biopsy tools proved to be the main disadvantages of MRI-guided biopsy, but technical improvement might solve these technical problems in future.A postbiopsy hematoma was the only complication observed. Once technically improved, MRI-guided biopsy could be a precise alternative routine method for musculoskeletal biopsies in future. PMID:12607083

  11. Environmentally responsive MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Gemma-Louise; Kramberger, Iris; Davis, Jason J.

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical imaging techniques can provide a vast amount of anatomical information, enabling diagnosis and the monitoring of disease and treatment profile. MRI uniquely offers convenient, non-invasive, high resolution tomographic imaging. A considerable amount of effort has been invested, across several decades, in the design of non toxic paramagnetic contrast agents capable of enhancing positive MRI signal contrast. Recently, focus has shifted towards the development of agents capable of specifically reporting on their local biochemical environment, where a switch in image contrast is triggered by a specific stimulus/biochemical variable. Such an ability would not only strengthen diagnosis but also provide unique disease-specific biochemical insight. This feature article focuses on recent progress in the development of MRI contrast switching with molecular, macromolecular and nanoparticle-based agents. PMID:24040650

  12. [MRI of the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Langevad, Line; Madsen, Camilla Gøbel; Siebner, Hartwig; Garde, Ellen

    2014-11-10

    The pineal gland (CP) is located centrally in the brain and produces melatonin. Cysts and concrements are frequent findings on MRI but their significance is still unclear. The visualization of CP is difficult due to its location and surrounding structures and so far, no standardized method exists. New studies suggest a correlation between CP-morphology and melatonin secretion as well as a connection between melatonin, disturbed circadian rhythm, and the development of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, underlining the need for a standardized approach to CP on MRI. PMID:25394927

  13. Fetal MRI: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Sapna; Joshi, Priscilla; Kelkar, Abhimanyu; Seth, Nagesh

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary method for antenatal fetal evaluation. However, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now become a valuable adjunct to USG in confirming/excluding suspected abnormalities and in the detection of additional abnormalities, thus changing the outcome of pregnancy and optimizing perinatal management. With the development of ultrafast sequences, fetal MRI has made remarkable progress in recent times. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate a spectrum of structural abnormalities affecting the central nervous system, thorax, genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract, as well as miscellaneous anomalies. Anomalies in twin gestations and placental abnormalities have also been included. PMID:27081224

  14. MRI EVALUATION OF KNEE CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Camanho, Gilberto Luís

    2015-01-01

    Through the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to characterize soft tissue noninvasively, it has become an excellent method for evaluating cartilage. The development of new and faster methods allowed increased resolution and contrast in evaluating chondral structure, with greater diagnostic accuracy. In addition, physiological techniques for cartilage assessment that can detect early changes before the appearance of cracks and erosion have been developed. In this updating article, the various techniques for chondral assessment using knee MRI will be discussed and demonstrated. PMID:27022562

  15. The Raven MRI teaching file

    SciTech Connect

    Lufkin, R.B.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1990-01-01

    This book presents individually bound guides for each section of the body, the 1,000 concise and clearly illustrated case files cover neoplastic, non-neoplastic, degenerative, inflammatory, congenital, and acquired disease of the brain, head and neck, spine, musculoskeletal system, cardiovascular system, chest, abdomen, and male and female pelvis. It focuses on specific body regions; one is devoted to pediatric MRI; and one reviews the principles of MRI and identifies frequently encountered artifacts. It contains 100 completed case studies, with high-resolution MR images.

  16. MRI and low back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... it is getting worse If you have low back pain but none of the warning signs just mentioned, having an MRI won't lead to better treatment, better pain relief, or a quicker return to activities. You and your doctor may want ...

  17. MRI Biosensors: A Short Primer

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Angelique

    2013-01-01

    Interest in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agents for molecular imaging of biological function experienced a surge of excitement approximately 20 years ago with the development of the first activatable contrast agents that could act as biosensors and turn “on” in response to a specific biological activity. This brief tutorial, based on a short course lecture from the 2011 ISMRM meeting, provides an overview of underlying principles governing the design of biosensing contrast agents. We describe mechanisms by which a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent can be made into a sensor for both T1 and T2 types contrast agents. Examples of biological activities that can interact with a contrast agent are discussed using specific examples from the recent literature to illustrate the primary mechanisms of action that have been utilized to achieve activation. MRI sensors for pH, ion binding, enzyme cleavage, and oxidation-reduction are presented. This article is not meant to be an exhaustive review, but an illustrative primer to explain how activation can be achieved for an MRI contrast agent. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is not covered as these agents were covered in a separate lecture. PMID:23996662

  18. Advances in Clinical PET/MRI Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Hans; Lerche, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, the first whole-body PET/MRI scanners installed for clinical use were the sequential Philips PET/MRI with PMT-based, TOF-capable technology and the integrated simultaneous Siemens PET/MRI. Avalanche photodiodes as non-magneto-sensitive readout electronics allowed PET integrated within the MRI. The experiences with these scanners showed that improvements of software aspects, such as attenuation correction, were necessary and that efficient protocols combining optimally PET and MRI must be still developed. In 2014, General Electric issued an integrated PET/MRI with SiPM-based PET detectors, allowing TOF-PET. Looking at the MRI components of current PET/MR imaging systems, primary improvements come from sequences and new coils. PMID:26952724

  19. Integration of DCE-MRI and DW-MRI Quantitative Parameters for Breast Lesion Classification

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Roberta; Sansone, Mario; Filice, Salvatore; Granata, Vincenza; Catalano, Orlando; Amato, Daniela Maria; Di Bonito, Maurizio; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Capasso, Immacolata; Rinaldo, Massimo; Petrillo, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of an imaging protocol combining dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in patients with suspicious breast lesions. Materials and Methods. A total of 31 breast lesions (15 malignant and 16 benign proved by histological examination) in 26 female patients were included in this study. For both DCE-MRI and DW-MRI model free and model based parameters were computed pixel by pixel on manually segmented ROIs. Statistical procedures included conventional linear analysis and more advanced techniques for classification of lesions in benign and malignant. Results. Our findings indicated no strong correlation between DCE-MRI and DW-MRI parameters. Results of classification analysis show that combining of DCE parameters or DW-MRI parameter, in comparison of single feature, does not yield a dramatic improvement of sensitivity and specificity of the two techniques alone. The best performance was obtained considering a full combination of all features. Moreover, the classification results combining all features are dominated by DCE-MRI features alone. Conclusion. The combination of DWI and DCE-MRI does not show a potential to dramatically increase the sensitivity and specificity of breast MRI. DCE-MRI alone gave the same performance as in combination with DW-MRI. PMID:26339597

  20. Concerted nucleophilic aromatic substitution with (19)F(-) and (18)F(-).

    PubMed

    Neumann, Constanze N; Hooker, Jacob M; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-06-16

    Nucleophilic aromatic substitution (SNAr) is widely used by organic chemists to functionalize aromatic molecules, and it is the most commonly used method to generate arenes that contain (18)F for use in positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging. A wide range of nucleophiles exhibit SNAr reactivity, and the operational simplicity of the reaction means that the transformation can be conducted reliably and on large scales. During SNAr, attack of a nucleophile at a carbon atom bearing a 'leaving group' leads to a negatively charged intermediate called a Meisenheimer complex. Only arenes with electron-withdrawing substituents can sufficiently stabilize the resulting build-up of negative charge during Meisenheimer complex formation, limiting the scope of SNAr reactions: the most common SNAr substrates contain strong π-acceptors in the ortho and/or para position(s). Here we present an unusual concerted nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction (CSNAr) that is not limited to electron-poor arenes, because it does not proceed via a Meisenheimer intermediate. We show a phenol deoxyfluorination reaction for which CSNAr is favoured over a stepwise displacement. Mechanistic insights enabled us to develop a functional-group-tolerant (18)F-deoxyfluorination reaction of phenols, which can be used to synthesize (18)F-PET probes. Selective (18)F introduction, without the need for the common, but cumbersome, azeotropic drying of (18)F, can now be accomplished from phenols as starting materials, and provides access to (18)F-labelled compounds not accessible through conventional chemistry. PMID:27281221

  1. Tank 19F Folding Crawler Final Evaluation, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Nance, T.

    2000-10-25

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to removing millions of gallons of high-level radioactive waste from 51 underground waste storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The primary radioactive waste constituents are strontium, plutonium,and cesium. It is recognized that the continued storage of this waste is a risk to the public, workers, and the environment. SRS was the first site in the DOE complex to have emptied and operationally closed a high-level radioactive waste tank. The task of emptying and closing the rest of the tanks will be completed by FY28.

  2. Polycatechol Nanoparticle MRI Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiwen; Huang, Yuran; Wang, Zhao; Carniato, Fabio; Xie, Yijun; Patterson, Joseph P; Thompson, Matthew P; Andolina, Christopher M; Ditri, Treffly B; Millstone, Jill E; Figueroa, Joshua S; Rinehart, Jeffrey D; Scadeng, Miriam; Botta, Mauro; Gianneschi, Nathan C

    2016-02-01

    Amphiphilic triblock copolymers containing Fe(III) -catecholate complexes formulated as spherical- or cylindrical-shaped micellar nanoparticles (SMN and CMN, respectively) are described as new T1-weighted agents with high relaxivity, low cytotoxicity, and long-term stability in biological fluids. Relaxivities of both SMN and CMN exceed those of established gadolinium chelates across a wide range of magnetic field strengths. Interestingly, shape-dependent behavior is observed in terms of the particles' interactions with HeLa cells, with CMN exhibiting enhanced uptake and contrast via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with SMN. These results suggest that control over soft nanoparticle shape will provide an avenue for optimization of particle-based contrast agents as biodiagnostics. The polycatechol nanoparticles are proposed as suitable for preclinical investigations into their viability as gadolinium-free, safe, and effective imaging agents for MRI contrast enhancement. PMID:26681255

  3. MRI of Focal Liver Lesions.

    PubMed

    Albiin, Nils

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, MRI has more advantages than ultrasound, computed tomography, CT, positron emission tomography, PET, or any other imaging modality in diagnosing focal hepatic masses. With a combination of basic T1 and T2 weighted sequences, diffusion weighted imaging, DWI, and hepatobiliary gadolinium contrast agents, that is gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA) and gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB), most liver lesions can be adequately diagnosed. Benign lesions, as cyst, hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia, FNH or adenoma, can be distinguished from malignant lesions. In a non-cirrhotic liver, the most common malignant lesions are metastases which may be hypovascular or hypervascular. In the cirrhotic liver hepatocellular carcinoma, HCC, is of considerable importance. Besides, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and other less common malignancies has to be assessed. In this review, the techniques and typical MRI features are presented as well as the new algorithm issued by American Association for the Study of the Liver Diseases (AASLD). PMID:23049491

  4. Future perspectives for intraoperative MRI.

    PubMed

    Jolesz, Ferenc A

    2005-01-01

    MRI-guided neurosurgery not only represents a technical challenge but a transformation from conventional hand-eye coordination to interactive navigational operations. In the future, multimodality-based images will be merged into a single model, in which anatomy and pathologic changes are at once distinguished and integrated into the same intuitive framework. The long-term goals of improving surgical procedures and attendant outcomes, reducing costs, and achieving broad use can be achieved with a three-pronged approach: 1. Improving the presentation of preoperative and real-time intraoperative image information 2. Integrating imaging and treatment-related technology into therapy delivery systems 3. Testing the clinical utility of image guidance in surgery The recent focus in technology development is on improving our ability to understand and apply medical images and imaging systems. Areas of active research include image processing, model-based image analysis, model deformation, real-time registration, real-time 3D (so-called "four-dimensional") imaging, and the integration and presentation of image and sensing information in the operating room. Key elements of the technical matrix also include visualization and display platforms and related software for information and display, model-based image understanding, the use of computing clusters to speed computation (ie, algorithms with partitioned computation to optimize performance), and advanced devices and systems for 3D device tracking (navigation). Current clinical applications are successfully incorporating real-time and/or continuously up-dated image-based information for direct intra-operative visualization. In addition to using traditional imaging systems during surgery, we foresee optimized use of molecular marker technology, direct measures of tissue characterization (ie, optical measurements and/or imaging), and integration of the next generation of surgical and therapy devices (including image

  5. How to scan polymer gels with MRI?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deene, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The absorbed radiation dose fixated in a polymer gel dosimeter can be read out by several methods such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical CT, X-ray CT and ultrasound with MRI being the first method that was explored. Although MRI was considered as an elegant scanning technique, readily available in most hospitals, it was later found that using a non-optimized imaging protocol may result in unacceptable deviations in the obtained dose distribution. Although most medical physicists have an understanding of the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the optimization of quantitative imaging sequences and protocols is often perceived as the work of MRI experts. In this paper, we aim at providing the reader with some easy guidelines in how to obtain reliable quantitative MRI maps.

  6. Integrated speech enhancement for functional MRI environment.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Nishank; Milani, Ali A; Panahi, Issa; Briggs, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated speech enhancement (SE) method for the noisy MRI environment. We show that the performance of SE system improves considerably when the speech signal dominated by MRI acoustic noise at very low SNR is enhanced in two successive stages using two-channel SE methods followed by a single-channel post processing SE algorithm. Actual MRI noisy speech data are used in our experiments showing the improved performance of the proposed SE method. PMID:19964964

  7. Competitive Advantage of PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved. PMID:23791129

  8. MRI Scans - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resonance Imaging) (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) 核磁共振成像(MRI) - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) 核磁共振成像( ...

  9. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved. PMID:23791129

  10. Functional MRI and Outcome in Traumatic Coma

    PubMed Central

    Giacino, Joseph T.; Wu, Ona

    2013-01-01

    Advances in task-based functional MRI (fMRI), resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI), and arterial-spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI have occurred at a rapid pace in recent years. These techniques for measuring brain function have great potential to improve the accuracy of prognostication for civilian and military patients with traumatic coma. In addition, fMRI, rs-fMRI, and ASL have provided novel insights into the pathophysiology of traumatic disorders of consciousness, as well as mechanisms of recovery from coma. However, functional neuroimaging techniques have yet to achieve widespread clinical use as prognostic tests for patients with traumatic coma. Rather, a broad spectrum of methodological hurdles currently limits the feasibility of clinical implementation. In this review, we discuss the basic principles of fMRI, rs-fMRI and ASL and their potential applications as prognostic tools for patients with traumatic coma. We also discuss future strategies for overcoming the current barriers to clinical implementation. PMID:23881623

  11. PET/MRI: challenges, solutions and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Hans

    2012-12-01

    Already from the start of PET/CT integrating positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) in one instrument, there have been considerations how to combine PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) so that their complementary abilities can be utilized in a single investigation. Since classical PET electronics fail in an even weak magnetic field and PET signal processing might disturb high-frequency signals of MRI, it soon became clear that new solutions had to be found to avoid mutual interferences. During the last fifteen years a number of different approaches towards PET/MRI for small animal imaging have been developed by research groups which together with their specific features are summarized in this review. Recently, PET/MRI for human imaging became available as well - this time by industrial initiatives. First some prototypes of BrainPET/MRI were developed followed by commercial products for simultaneous and non-simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI. Although only PET/MRI integrated in one scanner offers the full diversity of complementary multiparametric imaging, there are also promising applications of non-simultaneous sequential PET/MRI. While describing the present instrumentation for human PET/MRI, this review discusses the challenges and promises related to this new imaging technology. PMID:22925652

  12. Sparse representation of complex MRI images.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Hari Prasad; Ji, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Sparse representation of images acquired from Magnet Resonance Imaging (MRI) has several potential applications. MRI is unique in that the raw images are complex. Complex wavelet transforms (CWT) can be used to produce flexible signal representations when compared to Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). In this work, five different schemes using CWT or DWT are tested for sparse representation of MRI images which are in the form of complex values, separate real/imaginary, or separate magnitude/phase. The experimental results on real in-vivo MRI images show that appropriate CWT, e.g., dual-tree CWT (DTCWT), can achieve sparsity better than DWT with similar Mean Square Error. PMID:19162677

  13. The diagnostic value of MRI fistulogram and MRI distal colostogram in patients with anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Kavalcova, Lucie; Skaba, Richard; Kyncl, Martin; Rouskova, Blanka; Prochazka, Ales

    2013-08-01

    Contrast fistulogram (FG) and distal pressure colostogram (DPCG) are standard diagnostic methods for the assessment of anorectal malformations. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) earned a place among essential diagnostic methods in preoperative investigations after the Currarino syndrome and a high incidence of associated spinal dysraphism were described. The aim of our study was to evaluate the possibility of substituting FG and DPCG by a modified pelvic MRI, e.g. MRI fistulogram (MRI-FG) and MRI colostogram (MRI-DPCG). The prospective study involved 29 patients with anorectal malformations who underwent a modified pelvic MRI. The length and course of fistulas and rectum, and the presence of sacral anomalies were studied on MRI images and compared with images obtained by radiologic examinations. Modified MRI brought identical results as contrast studies in 25 patients when related to the fistula and rectum length and course. MRI was more accurate for the detection of sacral anomalies. MRI-FG was the only imaging method used in the four most recent patients. The results support the assumption that conventional contrast examinations for the assessment of anorectal malformations can be replaced by MRI, thus reducing the radiation dose. PMID:23932626

  14. The Accuracy of a Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Cerebral Oximetry Device and Its Potential Value for Estimating Jugular Venous Oxygen Saturation

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Keita; MacLeod, David B; Grocott, Hilary P.; Moretti, Eugene W.; Ames, Warwick; Vacchiano, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background An intriguing potential clinical use of cerebral oximeter measurements (SctO2) is the ability to noninvasively estimate jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2). Our purpose in this study was to determine the accuracy of the FORE-SIGHT® (CAS Medical Systems; Branford, CT), which is calibrated to a weighted average of 70% (SjvO2) and 30% arterial saturation, for Food and Drug Administration pre-market approval 510 (k) certification by adapting an industry standard protocol, ISO 9919:2005 [www.ISO.org] (used for pulse oximeters) and to evaluate the use of SctO2 and SpO2 measurements to noninvasively estimate jugular venous oxygen saturation (SnvO2). Methods Paired blood gas samples from the radial artery and the jugular venous bulb were collected from 20 healthy volunteers undergoing progressive oxygen desaturation from 100 to 70%. The blood sample pairs were analyzed via co-oximetry and used to calculate the approximate mixed vascular cerebral blood oxygen saturation, or reference SctO2 values (refSctO2), during increasing hypoxia. These reference values were compared to bilateral FORE-SIGHT SctO2 values recorded simultaneously with the blood gas draws to determine its accuracy. Bilateral SctO2 and SpO2 measurements were then used to calculate SnvO2 values which were compared to SjvO2. Results Two hundred forty-six arterial and 253 venous samples from 18 subjects were used in the analysis. The ipsilateral FORE-SIGHT SctO2 values showed a tolerance interval (TI) of [−10.72 10.90] Lin’s concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) with standard error (SE) of 0.83 ± 0.073 with the refSctO2 values calculated using arterial and venous blood gases. The combined data had a CCC of 0. 81 + 0.059 with TI of [−9.22 9.40] with overall bias was 0.09% and amplitude of the root mean square of error after it was corrected with random effects analysis was 2.92%. The bias and variability values between the ipsilateral and the contralateral FORE-SIGHT SctO2

  15. Pantopaque simulating thrombosed intracranial aneurysms on MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lidov, M.W.; Silvers, A.R.; Mosesson, R.E.; Stollman, A.L.; Som, P.M.

    1996-03-01

    A patient is presented in whom iophendylate (Pantopaque) within the basal cisterns closely resembled the appearance on MRI of thrombosed aneurysms of the middle cerebral arteries. The sometimes subtle differences between the appearances on MRI of Pantopaque and aneurysmal clot are discussed to permit accurate diagnosis without resorting to more invasive diagnostic tests, such as cerebral angiography. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Functional MRI Using Regularized Parallel Imaging Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Huang, Teng-Yi; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Fu-Nien; Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Belliveau, John W.; Wald, Lawrence L.; Kwong, Kenneth K.

    2013-01-01

    Parallel MRI techniques reconstruct full-FOV images from undersampled k-space data by using the uncorrelated information from RF array coil elements. One disadvantage of parallel MRI is that the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is degraded because of the reduced data samples and the spatially correlated nature of multiple RF receivers. Regularization has been proposed to mitigate the SNR loss originating due to the latter reason. Since it is necessary to utilize static prior to regularization, the dynamic contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in parallel MRI will be affected. In this paper we investigate the CNR of regularized sensitivity encoding (SENSE) acquisitions. We propose to implement regularized parallel MRI acquisitions in functional MRI (fMRI) experiments by incorporating the prior from combined segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisition into SENSE reconstructions. We investigated the impact of regularization on the CNR by performing parametric simulations at various BOLD contrasts, acceleration rates, and sizes of the active brain areas. As quantified by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the simulations suggest that the detection power of SENSE fMRI can be improved by regularized reconstructions, compared to unregularized reconstructions. Human motor and visual fMRI data acquired at different field strengths and array coils also demonstrate that regularized SENSE improves the detection of functionally active brain regions. PMID:16032694

  17. MRI endoscopy using intrinsically localized probes

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayana, Shashank; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is traditionally performed with fixed externally applied gradient magnetic fields and is hence intrinsically locked to the laboratory frame of reference (FoR). Here a method for high-resolution MRI that employs active, catheter-based, tiny internal probes that utilize the spatial properties of the probe itself for localization is proposed and demonstrated at 3 T. Because these properties are intrinsic to the probe, they move with it, transforming MRI from the laboratory FoR to the FoR of the device itself, analogous to an endoscope. The “MRI endoscope” can utilize loop coils and loopless antennas with modified sensitivity, in combination with adiabatic excitation by the device itself, to restrict the MRI sensitivity to a disk-shaped plane a few mm thick. Excitation with the MRI endoscope limits the eddy currents induced in the sample to an excited volume whose size is orders of magnitude below that excited by a conventional body MRI coil. Heat testing shows maximum local temperature increases of <1 °C during MRI, within regulatory guidelines. The method is demonstrated in a kiwifruit, in intact porcine and rabbit aortas, and in an atherosclerotic human iliac artery specimen, with in-plane resolution as small as 80 μm and 1.5–5 mm slice thickness. PMID:19378751

  18. Live nephron imaging by MRI.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chunqi; Yu, Xin; Pothayee, Nikorn; Dodd, Stephen; Bouraoud, Nadia; Star, Robert; Bennett, Kevin; Koretsky, Alan

    2014-11-15

    The local sensitivity of MRI can be improved with small MR detectors placed close to regions of interest. However, to maintain such sensitivity advantage, local detectors normally need to communicate with the external amplifier through cable connections, which prevent the use of local detectors as implantable devices. Recently, an integrated wireless amplifier was developed that can efficiently amplify and broadcast locally detected signals, so that the local sensitivity was enhanced without the need for cable connections. This integrated detector enabled the live imaging of individual glomeruli using negative contrast introduced by cationized ferritin, and the live imaging of renal tubules using positive contrast introduced by gadopentetate dimeglumine. Here, we utilized the high blood flow to image individual glomeruli as hyperintense regions without any contrast agent. These hyperintense regions were identified for pixels with signal intensities higher than the local average. Addition of Mn(2+) allowed the simultaneous detection of both glomeruli and renal tubules: Mn(2+) was primarily reabsorbed by renal tubules, which would be distinguished from glomeruli due to higher enhancement in T1-weighted MRI. Dynamic studies of Mn(2+) absorption confirmed the differential absorption affinity of glomeruli and renal tubules, potentially enabling the in vivo observation of nephron function. PMID:25186296

  19. MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the body. It does ... be studied. These help send and receive the radio waves, and improve the quality of the images. During ...

  20. Visual Mapping Using BOLD fMRI

    PubMed Central

    DeYoe, Edgar A.; Raut, Ryan V.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is used clinically to map visual cortex prior to brain surgery or other invasive treatments in order to achieve an optimal balance between therapeutic effect and the avoidance of post-operative vision deficits. Clinically optimized stimuli, behavioral task, analysis and displays permit identification of cortical subregions supporting high acuity central vision that is critical for reading and other essential visual functions. A novel data display permits instant appreciation of the functional relationship between the pattern of fMRI brain activation and the pattern of vision loss and preservation within the patient’s field of view. Neurovascular uncoupling and its detection in visual cortex are key issues for the interpretation of fMRI results in patients with existing brain pathology. Emerging techniques such as resting state fMRI may facilitate the use of fMRI-based vision mapping with a broader range of patients. PMID:25441501

  1. Background parenchymal enhancement in preoperative breast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kohara, Satoko; Ishigaki, Satoko; Satake, Hiroko; Kawamura, Akiko; Kawai, Hisashi; Kikumori, Toyone; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We aimed to assess the influence of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) on surgical planning performed using preoperative MRI for breast cancer evaluation. Between January 2009 and December 2010, 91 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients (mean age, 55.5 years; range, 30−88 years) who underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI followed by planned breast conservation therapy were retrospectively enrolled. MRI was performed to assess the tumor extent in addition to mammography and breast ultrasonography. BPE in the contralateral normal breast MRI at the early dynamic phase was visually classified as follows: minimal (n=49), mild (n=27), moderate (n=7), and marked (n=8). The correlations between the BPE grade and age, menopausal status, index tumor size, changes in surgical management based on MRI results, positive predictive value (PPV) of MRI, and surgical margins were assessed. Patients in the strong BPE groups were significantly younger (p=0.002) and generally premenopausal (p<0.001). Surgical treatment was not changed in 67 cases (73.6%), while extended excision and mastectomy were performed in 12 cases (13.2%), each based on additional lesions on MRI. Six of 79 (7.6%) patients who underwent breast conservation therapy had tumor-positive resection margins. In cases where surgical management was changed, the PPV for MRI-detected foci was high in the minimal (91.7%) and mild groups (66.7%), and 0% in the moderate and marked groups (p=0.002). Strong BPE causes false-positive MRI findings and may lead to overly extensive surgery, whereas MRI may be beneficial in select patients with weak BPE. PMID:26412883

  2. NMR, MRI, and spectroscopic MRI in inhomogeneous fields

    DOEpatents

    Demas, Vasiliki; Pines, Alexander; Martin, Rachel W; Franck, John; Reimer, Jeffrey A

    2013-12-24

    A method for locally creating effectively homogeneous or "clean" magnetic field gradients (of high uniformity) for imaging (with NMR, MRI, or spectroscopic MRI) both in in-situ and ex-situ systems with high degrees of inhomogeneous field strength. THe method of imaging comprises: a) providing a functional approximation of an inhomogeneous static magnetic field strength B.sub.0({right arrow over (r)}) at a spatial position {right arrow over (r)}; b) providing a temporal functional approximation of {right arrow over (G)}.sub.shim(t) with i basis functions and j variables for each basis function, resulting in v.sub.ij variables; c) providing a measured value .OMEGA., which is an temporally accumulated dephasing due to the inhomogeneities of B.sub.0({right arrow over(r)}); and d) minimizing a difference in the local dephasing angle .phi.({right arrow over (r)},t)=.gamma..intg..sub.0.sup.t{square root over (|{right arrow over (B)}.sub.1({right arrow over (r)},t')|.sup.2+({right arrow over (r)}{right arrow over (G)}.sub.shimG.sub.shim(t')+.parallel.{right arrow over (B)}.sub.0({right arrow over (r)}).parallel..DELTA..omega.({right arrow over (r)},t'/.gamma/).sup.2)}dt'-.OMEGA. by varying the v.sub.ij variables to form a set of minimized v.sub.ij variables. The method requires calibration of the static fields prior to minimization, but may thereafter be implemented without such calibration, may be used in open or closed systems, and potentially portable systems.

  3. Activity-induced manganese-dependent MRI (AIM-MRI) and functional MRI in awake rabbits during somatosensory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Matthew P; Weiss, Craig; Procissi, Daniel; Wang, Lei; Disterhoft, John F

    2016-02-01

    Activity-induced manganese-dependent MRI (AIM-MRI) is a powerful tool to track system-wide neural activity using high resolution, quantitative T1-weighted MRI in animal models and has significant advantages for investigating neural activity over other modalities including BOLD fMRI. With AIM-MRI, Mn(2+) ions enter neurons via voltage-gated calcium channels preferentially active during the time of experimental exposure. A broad range of AIM-MRI studies using different species studying different phenomena have been performed, but few of these studies provide a systematic evaluation of the factors influencing the detection of Mn(2+) such as dosage and the temporal characteristics of Mn(2+) uptake. We identified an optimal dose of Mn(2+) (25 mg/kg, s.c.) in order to characterize the time-course of Mn(2+) accumulation in active neural regions in the rabbit. T1-weighted MRI and functional MRI were collected 0-3, 6-9, and 24-27 h post-Mn(2+) injection while the vibrissae on the right side were vibrated. Significant BOLD activation in the left somatosensory (SS) cortex and left ventral posteromedial (VPM) thalamic nucleus was detected during whisker vibration. T1-weighted signal intensities were extracted from these regions, their corresponding contralateral regions and the visual cortex (to serve as controls). A significant elevation in T1-weighted signal intensity in the left SS cortex (relative to right) was evident 6-9 and 24-27 h post-Mn(2+) injection while the left VPM thalamus showed a significant enhancement (relative to the right) only during the 24-27 h session. Visual cortex showed no hemispheric difference at any timepoint. Our results suggest that studies employing AIM-MRI would benefit by conducting experimental manipulations 6-24 h after subcutaneous MnCl2 injections to optimize the concentration of contrast agent in the regions active during the exposure. PMID:26589332

  4. Portable MRI developed at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-04-22

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the World's poorest regions. "MRI technology is a powerful medical diagnostic tool," said Michelle Espy, the Battlefield MRI (bMRI) project leader, "ideally suited for imaging soft-tissue injury, particularly to the brain." But hospital-based MRI devices are big and expensive, and require considerable infrastructure, such as large quantities of cryogens like liquid nitrogen and helium, and they typically use a large amount of energy. "Standard MRI machines just can't go everywhere," said Espy. "Soldiers wounded in battle usually have to be flown to a large hospital and people in emerging nations just don't have access to MRI at all. We've been in contact with doctors who routinely work in the Third World and report that MRI would be extremely valuable in treating pediatric encephalopathy, and other serious diseases in children." So the Los Alamos team started thinking about a way to make an MRI device that could be relatively easy to transport, set up, and use in an unconventional setting. Conventional MRI machines use very large magnetic fields that align the protons in water molecules to then create magnetic resonance signals, which are detected by the machine and turned into images. The large magnetic fields create exceptionally detailed images, but they are difficult and expensive to make. Espy and her team wanted to see if images of sufficient quality could be made with ultra-low-magnetic fields, similar in strength to the Earth's magnetic field. To achieve images at such low fields they use exquisitely sensitive detectors called Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, or SQUIDs. SQUIDs are among the most sensitive magnetic field detectors available, so interference with the signal is the primary stumbling block. "SQUIDs are

  5. MRI-compatible micromanipulator; design and implementation and MRI-compatibility tests.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Yoshihiko; Tanikawa, Tamio; Chinzei, Kiyoyuki

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible micromanipulator, which can be employed to provide medical and biological scientists with the ability to concurrently manipulate and observe micron-scale objects inside an MRI gantry. The micromanipulator formed a two-finger micro hand, and it could handle a micron-scale object using a chopstick motion. For performing operations inside the MRI gantry in a manner such that the MRI is not disturbed, the system was designed to be nonmagnetic and electromagnetically compatible with the MRI. The micro-manipulator was implemented with piezoelectric transducers (PZT) as actuators for micro-motion, strain gauges as sensors for closed-loop control, and a flexure parallel mechanism made of acrylic plastic. Its compatibility with a 2-Tesla MRI was preliminarily tested by checking if the MRI obtained with the micromanipulator were similar to those obtained without the micromanipulator. The tests concluded that the micromanipulator caused no distortion but small artifacts on the MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the MRI significantly deteriorated mainly due to the wiring of the micromanipulator. The MRI caused noise of the order of ones of volts in the strain amplifier. PMID:18001990

  6. Massively parallel MRI detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Boris; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2013-04-01

    Originally proposed as a method to increase sensitivity by extending the locally high-sensitivity of small surface coil elements to larger areas via reception, the term parallel imaging now includes the use of array coils to perform image encoding. This methodology has impacted clinical imaging to the point where many examinations are performed with an array comprising multiple smaller surface coil elements as the detector of the MR signal. This article reviews the theoretical and experimental basis for the trend towards higher channel counts relying on insights gained from modeling and experimental studies as well as the theoretical analysis of the so-called “ultimate” SNR and g-factor. We also review the methods for optimally combining array data and changes in RF methodology needed to construct massively parallel MRI detector arrays and show some examples of state-of-the-art for highly accelerated imaging with the resulting highly parallel arrays.

  7. Massively Parallel MRI Detector Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Boris; Wald, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Originally proposed as a method to increase sensitivity by extending the locally high-sensitivity of small surface coil elements to larger areas, the term parallel imaging now includes the use of array coils to perform image encoding. This methodology has impacted clinical imaging to the point where many examinations are performed with an array comprising multiple smaller surface coil elements as the detector of the MR signal. This article reviews the theoretical and experimental basis for the trend towards higher channel counts relying on insights gained from modeling and experimental studies as well as the theoretical analysis of the so-called “ultimate” SNR and g-factor. We also review the methods for optimally combining array data and changes in RF methodology needed to construct massively parallel MRI detector arrays and show some examples of state-of-the-art for highly accelerated imaging with the resulting highly parallel arrays. PMID:23453758

  8. Massively parallel MRI detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Keil, Boris; Wald, Lawrence L

    2013-04-01

    Originally proposed as a method to increase sensitivity by extending the locally high-sensitivity of small surface coil elements to larger areas via reception, the term parallel imaging now includes the use of array coils to perform image encoding. This methodology has impacted clinical imaging to the point where many examinations are performed with an array comprising multiple smaller surface coil elements as the detector of the MR signal. This article reviews the theoretical and experimental basis for the trend towards higher channel counts relying on insights gained from modeling and experimental studies as well as the theoretical analysis of the so-called "ultimate" SNR and g-factor. We also review the methods for optimally combining array data and changes in RF methodology needed to construct massively parallel MRI detector arrays and show some examples of state-of-the-art for highly accelerated imaging with the resulting highly parallel arrays. PMID:23453758

  9. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David; Woody, Craig L.; Rooney, William; Vaska, Paul; Stoll, Sean; Pratte, Jean-Francois; O'Connor, Paul

    2007-10-23

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  10. Intra voxel analysis in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosanio, Michele; Baselice, Fabio; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Pascazio, Vito

    2014-03-01

    A new application of Compressive Sensing (CS) in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) field is presented. In particular, first results of the Intra Voxel Analysis (IVA) technique are reported. The idea is to exploit CS peculiarities in order to distinguish different contributions inside the same resolution cell, instead of reconstructing images from not fully sampled k-space acquisition. Applied to MRI field, this means the possibility of estimating the presence of different tissues inside the same voxel, i.e. in one pixel of the obtained image. In other words, the method is the first attempt, as far as we know, of achieving Spectroscopy-like results starting from each pixel of MR images. In particular, tissues are distinguished each others by evaluating their spin-spin relaxation times. Within this manuscript, first results on clinical dataset, in particular a phantom made by aqueous solution and oil and an occipital brain lesion corresponding to a metastatic breast cancer nodule, are reported. Considering the phantom dataset, in particular focusing on the slice where the separation between water and oil occurs, the methodology is able to distinguish the two components with different spin-spin relaxation times. With respect to clinical dataset,focusing on a voxel of the lesion area, the approach is able to detect the presence of two tissues, namely the healthy and the cancer related ones, while in other location outside the lesion only the healthy tissue is detected. Of course, these are the first results of the proposed methodology, further studies on different types of clinical datasets are required in order to widely validate the approach. Although few datasets have been considered, results seem both interesting and promising.

  11. Emergency abdominal MRI: current uses and trends.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hei S; Gupta, Avneesh; Soto, Jorge A; LeBedis, Christina

    2016-05-01

    When evaluating the abdomen in the emergency setting, CT and ultrasound are the imaging modalities of choice, mainly because of accessibility, speed and lower relative cost. CT has the added benefit of assessing the whole abdomen for a wide spectrum of gastrointestinal disease, whereas ultrasound has the benefit of avoiding ionizing radiation. MRI is another tool that has demonstrated increasing utility in the emergency setting and also avoids the use of ionizing radiation. MRI also has the additional advantage of excellent soft-tissue contrast. However, widespread use of MRI in the emergency setting is limited by availability and relative cost. Despite such limitations, advances in MRI technology, including improved pulse sequences and coil technology and increasing clinician awareness of MRI, have led to an increased demand in abdominal MRI in the emergency setting. This is particularly true in the evaluation of acute pancreatitis; choledocholithiasis with or without cholecystitis; acute appendicitis, particularly in pregnant patients; and, in some cases, Crohn's disease. In cases of pancreatitis and Crohn's disease, MRI also plays a role in subsequent follow-up examinations. PMID:26514590

  12. Functional MRI: A confluence of fortunate circumstances.

    PubMed

    Bandettini, Peter A

    2012-02-01

    Functional MRI has existed for about twenty years and by almost all measures has been incredibly successful. What are the reasons behind this success? In this review, eight extremely fortunate circumstances came together to produce BOLD based fMRI as we know it today. They are as follows: 1. The MRI signal, 2. The MRI relaxation rates, 3. The oxygen-dependent magnetic susceptibility of blood, 4. Neuronal-hemodynamic coupling, 5. The spatial scale of brain activation, 6. The prevalence of scanners able to perform echo planar imaging (EPI), 7. The parallel development of computing power, and 8. The very large group of neuroscientists who, pre-1991, were perfectly poised, willing, and able to exploit the capability of fMRI. These circumstances are discussed in detail. The desired goal of this review is primarily to convey the field of fMRI from the perspective of what was critically important before, during and after its inception and how things might have been if these circumstances would have been different. While there are many instances where circumstances could have been better, it is clear that they worked out extremely well, as the field of fMRI, a major aspect of functional neuroimaging today, is thriving. PMID:22342876

  13. MRI visualisation by digitally reconstructed radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrurier, Antoine; Bönsch, Andrea; Lau, Robert; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2015-03-01

    Visualising volumetric medical images such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) clients is often achieved by image browsing in sagittal, coronal or axial views or three-dimensional (3D) rendering. This latter technique requires fine thresholding for MRI. On the other hand, computing virtual radiograph images, also referred to as digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR), provides in a single two-dimensional (2D) image a complete overview of the 3D data. It appears therefore as a powerful alternative for MRI visualisation and preview in PACS. This study describes a method to compute DRR from T1-weighted MRI. After segmentation of the background, a histogram distribution analysis is performed and each foreground MRI voxel is labeled as one of three tissues: cortical bone, also known as principal absorber of the X-rays, muscle and fat. An intensity level is attributed to each voxel according to the Hounsfield scale, linearly related to the X-ray attenuation coefficient. Each DRR pixel is computed as the accumulation of the new intensities of the MRI dataset along the corresponding X-ray. The method has been tested on 16 T1-weighted MRI sets. Anterior-posterior and lateral DRR have been computed with reasonable qualities and avoiding any manual tissue segmentations. This proof-of-concept holds for research application for use in clinical PACS.

  14. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI.

    PubMed

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; LaPierre, Cristen D; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E J; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5-3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm(3) imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (<10 mT) will complement traditional MRI, providing clinically relevant images and setting new standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices. PMID:26469756

  15. Recommendations for real-time speech MRI.

    PubMed

    Lingala, Sajan Goud; Sutton, Brad P; Miquel, Marc E; Nayak, Krishna S

    2016-01-01

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (RT-MRI) is being increasingly used for speech and vocal production research studies. Several imaging protocols have emerged based on advances in RT-MRI acquisition, reconstruction, and audio-processing methods. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art, discusses technical considerations, and provides specific guidance for new groups entering this field. We provide recommendations for performing RT-MRI of the upper airway. This is a consensus statement stemming from the ISMRM-endorsed Speech MRI summit held in Los Angeles, February 2014. A major unmet need identified at the summit was the need for consensus on protocols that can be easily adapted by researchers equipped with conventional MRI systems. To this end, we provide a discussion of tradeoffs in RT-MRI in terms of acquisition requirements, a priori assumptions, artifacts, computational load, and performance for different speech tasks. We provide four recommended protocols and identify appropriate acquisition and reconstruction tools. We list pointers to open-source software that facilitate implementation. We conclude by discussing current open challenges in the methodological aspects of RT-MRI of speech. PMID:26174802

  16. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; LaPierre, Cristen D.; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E. J.; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5–3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm3 imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (<10 mT) will complement traditional MRI, providing clinically relevant images and setting new standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices. PMID:26469756

  17. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; Lapierre, Cristen D.; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E. J.; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5-3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm3 imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (<10 mT) will complement traditional MRI, providing clinically relevant images and setting new standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices.

  18. A Novel MRI Marker for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J. Stafford, R. Jason; Bankson, James A.; Li Chun; Swanson, David A.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Martirosyan, Karen S.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the optimal imaging modality for the prostate and surrounding critical organ structures. However, on MRI, the titanium radioactive seeds used for brachytherapy appear as black holes (negative contrast) and cannot be accurately localized. We sought to develop an encapsulated contrast agent marker (ECAM) with high-signal intensity on MRI to permit accurate localization of radioactive seeds with MRI during and after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We investigated several agents with paramagnetic and superparamagnetic properties. The agents were injected into titanium, acrylic, and glass seeds, which were linked together in various combinations and imaged with MRI. The agent with the greatest T1-weighted signal was tested further in a canine prostate and agarose phantom. Studies were performed on a 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner. Results: The cobalt-chloride complex contrast (C4) agent with stoichiometry (CoCl{sub 2}){sub 0.8}(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}NO{sub 2}){sub 0.2} had the greatest T1-weighted signal (positive contrast) with a relaxivity ratio >1 (r{sub 2}/r{sub 1} = 1.21 {+-} 0.29). Acrylic-titanium and glass-titanium seed strands were clearly visualized with the encapsulated contrast agent marker. Conclusion: We have developed a novel ECAM that permits positive identification of the radioactive seeds used for prostate brachytherapy on MRI. Preclinical in vitro phantom studies and in vivo canine studies are needed to further optimize MRI sequencing techniques to facilitate MRI-based dosimetry.

  19. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5 T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200 ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research. PMID:23610088

  20. Falx Cerebri Ossification: CT and MRI Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridis, I; Natsis, K; Goutsaridou, F; Tsitouridis, K; Tarazi, L; Chondromatidou, S; Papapostolou, P; Papastergiou, C; Emmanouilidou, M

    2006-11-30

    During the last three years, CT and MRI brain scans of 40 patients revealed falx cerebri partial ossification as an incidental finding. The patients had been admitted for brain CT and MRI for several reasons. In most cases, there was no problem in the differential diagnosis of falx cerebri ossification during interpretation of the cases. In a few cases, the lesion should be distinguished from calcified meningioma, small hematoma in the interhemispheric fissure and in one case there was also meningeal infiltration of breast cancer. In these cases both CT and MRI scans of the brain were evaluated and a definite diagnosis was made. PMID:24351265