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Sample records for 19f nmr spectrum

  1. A 19F NMR Study of Enzyme Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterman, Keith E.; Lentz, Kevin; Duncan, Jeffery

    1998-10-01

    This basic enzyme activity laboratory experiment demonstrates how 19F NMR can be used in biochemical studies and presents the advantages of 19F NMR over 1H NMR for studies of this nature. N-Trifluoroacetylglycine was selected as a commercially available model fluorine-tagged substrate that readily undergoes acylase I-catalyzed hydrolysis to produce trifluoroacetic acid and glycine. Progress of the reaction was monitored by following conversion of the trifluoroacetyl moiety peak of N-trifluoroacetylglycine to trifluoroacetic acid. The extent of hydrolysis was determined by comparing integrated ratios of the two 19F NMR peaks. A plot of percent hydrolysis versus enzyme concentration was used to calculate unit activity of the enzyme. This is a viable laboratory experiment for junior/senior-level courses in instrumental analytical chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, or spectroscopy.

  2. Prediction of (19)F NMR Chemical Shifts in Labeled Proteins: Computational Protocol and Case Study.

    PubMed

    Isley, William C; Urick, Andrew K; Pomerantz, William C K; Cramer, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    The structural analysis of ligand complexation in biomolecular systems is important in the design of new medicinal therapeutic agents; however, monitoring subtle structural changes in a protein's microenvironment is a challenging and complex problem. In this regard, the use of protein-based (19)F NMR for screening low-molecular-weight molecules (i.e., fragments) can be an especially powerful tool to aid in drug design. Resonance assignment of the protein's (19)F NMR spectrum is necessary for structural analysis. Here, a quantum chemical method has been developed as an initial approach to facilitate the assignment of a fluorinated protein's (19)F NMR spectrum. The epigenetic "reader" domain of protein Brd4 was taken as a case study to assess the strengths and limitations of the method. The overall modeling protocol predicts chemical shifts for residues in rigid proteins with good accuracy; proper accounting for explicit solvation of fluorinated residues by water is critical. PMID:27218275

  3. Solid-state 19F-NMR analysis of 19F-labeled tryptophan in gramicidin A in oriented membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Stephan L; Wang, Junfeng; Cross, Timothy A; Ulrich, Anne S

    2002-01-01

    The response of membrane-associated peptides toward the lipid environment or other binding partners can be monitored by solid-state NMR of suitably labeled side chains. Tryptophan is a prominent amino acid in transmembrane helices, and its (19)F-labeled analogues are generally biocompatible and cause little structural perturbation. Hence, we use 5F-Trp as a highly sensitive NMR probe to monitor the conformation and dynamics of the indole ring. To establish this (19)F-NMR strategy, gramicidin A was labeled with 5F-Trp in position 13 or 15, whose chi(1)/chi(2) torsion angles are known from previous (2)H-NMR studies. First, the alignment of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor within the membrane was deduced by lineshape analysis of oriented samples. Next, the three principal axes of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor were assigned within the molecular frame of the indole ring. Finally, determination of chi(1)/chi(2) for 5F-Trp in the lipid gel phase showed that the side chain alignment differs by up to 20 degrees from its known conformation in the liquid crystalline state. The sensitivity gain of (19)F-NMR and the reduction in the amount of material was at least 10-fold compared with previous (2)H-NMR studies on the same system and 100-fold compared with (15)N-NMR. PMID:12496101

  4. {sup 19}F NMR spectra and structures of halogenated porphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, E.R.; Hodge, J.A.; Grinstaff, M.W.

    1995-07-05

    Fluorine-19 NMR spectra of a series of halogenated porphyrins have been used to create a spectral library of different types of fluorine splitting patterns for tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrins (TFPP) complexed with diamagnetic and paramagnetic metal ions. The paramagnetic shift, line broadening, and fine structure of the resonances form the peripheral pentafluorophenyl rings are dependent on the symmetry and core environment of the porphyrin macrocycles. In combination with crystal structure data, {sup 19}F NMR helps define the behavior of halogenated porphyrins in solution. Six new crystal structures for TFPP and octahalo-TFPP derivatives are reported: H{sub 2}TFPP in rhombohedral space group R3, a = 20.327(4) {Angstrom}, c = 15.261(2) {Angstrom}, {beta} = 103.87(2){degrees}, V = 2227.6(13) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2; CuTFPP in rhombohedral space group R3, a = 20.358(5), c = 14.678(2) {Angstrom}, {alpha} = 88.97(1), {beta}=76.05(1){degrees}, {gamma} = 71.29(1){degrees}, V = 2181.4(6) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2; ZnTFPPCl{sub 8} in tetragonal space group P42, c, a = 19.502(20), c = 10.916(8) {Angstrom}, V = 4152(6) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2; H{sub 2}TFPPBr{sub 8} in monoclinic space group C2, a = 27.634(6) {Angstrom}, b = 6.926(2) {Angstrom}, c = 14.844(3) {Angstrom}, {beta} = 109.64(2){degrees}, V = 2675.8(11) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2.

  5. Ring current shifts in (19)F-NMR of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongsheng; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2016-05-01

    Fluorine-19 NMR markers are attractive reporter groups for use in studies of complex biomacromolecular systems, in particular also for studies of function-related conformational equilibria and rate processes in membrane proteins. Advantages of (19)F-NMR probes include high sensitivity of the (19)F chemical shifts to variations in the non-covalent environment. Nonetheless, in studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) we encountered situations where (19)F chemical shifts were not responsive to conformational changes that had been implicated by other methods. This prompted us to examine possible effects of aromatic ring current fields on the chemical shifts of (19)F-NMR probes used in GPCRs. Analysis of previously reported (19)F-NMR data on the β2-adrenergic receptor and mammalian rhodopsin showed that all (19)F-labeling sites which manifested conformational changes are located near aromatic residues. Although ring current effects are small when compared to other known non-covalent effects on (19)F chemical shifts, there is thus an indication that their contributions are significant when studying activation processes in GPCRs, since the observed activation-related (19)F-NMR chemical shifts are comparable in size to the calculated ring current shifts. Considering the impact of ring current shifts may thus be helpful in identifying promising indigenous or engineered labeling sites for future (19)F-NMR studies of GPCR activation, and novel information may be obtained on the nature of conformational rearrangements near the (19)F-labels. It will then also be interesting to see if the presently indicated role of ring current shifts in membrane protein studies with (19)F-NMR markers can be substantiated by a more extensive data base resulting from future studies. PMID:27240587

  6. A 1H/19F minicoil NMR probe for solid-state NMR: application to 5-fluoroindoles.

    PubMed

    Graether, Steffen P; DeVries, Jeffrey S; McDonald, Robert; Rakovszky, Melissa L; Sykes, Brian D

    2006-01-01

    We show that it is feasible to use a minicoil for solid-state 19F 1H NMR experiments that has short pulse widths, good RF homogeneity, and excellent signal-to-noise for small samples while using low power amplifiers typical to liquid-state NMR. The closely spaced resonant frequencies of 1H and 19F and the ubiquitous use of fluorine in modern plastics and electronic components present two major challenges in the design of a high-sensitivity, high-field 1H/19F probe. Through the selection of specific components, circuit design, and pulse sequence, we were able to build a probe that has low 19F background and excellent separation of 1H and 19F signals. We determine the principle components of the chemical shift anisotropy tensor of 5-fluoroindole-3-acetic acid (5FIAA) and 5-fluorotryptophan. We also solve the crystal structure of 5FIAA, determine the orientation dependence of the chemical shift of a single crystal of 5FIAA, and predict the 19F chemical shift based on the orientation of the fluorine in the crystal. The results show that this 1H/19F probe is suitable for solid-state NMR experiments with low amounts of biological molecules that have been labeled with 19F. PMID:16198131

  7. Parallel NMR spectroscopy with simultaneous detection of (1) H and (19) F nuclei.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Helena; Kupče, Ēriks

    2016-07-01

    Recording NMR signals of several nuclear species simultaneously by using parallel receivers provides more information from a single measurement and at the same time increases the measurement sensitivity per unit time. Here we present a comprehensive series of the most frequently used NMR experiments modified for simultaneous direct detection of two of the most sensitive NMR nuclei - (1) H and (19) F. We hope that the presented material will stimulate interest in and further development of this technique. PMID:27021630

  8. Simultaneous detection of distinct ubiquitin chain topologies by 19F NMR.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Sujan S; Pham, Grace H; Prabakaran, Jyothiprashanth; Strieter, Eric R

    2014-10-17

    The dynamic interplay between ubiquitin (Ub) chain construction and destruction is critical for the regulation of many cellular pathways. To understand these processes, it would be ideal to simultaneously detect different Ub chains as they are created and destroyed in the cell. This objective cannot be achieved with existing detection strategies. Here, we report on the use of 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to detect and characterize conformationally distinct Ub oligomers. By exploiting the environmental sensitivity of the 19F nucleus and the conformational diversity found among Ub chains of different linkage types, we can simultaneously resolve the 19F NMR signals for mono-Ub and three distinct di-Ub oligomers (K6, K48, and K63) in heterogeneous mixtures. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by the ability to interrogate the selectivity of deubiquitinases with multiple Ub substrates in real time. We also demonstrate that 19F NMR can be used to discern Ub linkages that are formed by select E3 ligases found in pathogenic bacteria. Collectively, our results assert the potential of 19F NMR for monitoring Ub signaling in cells to reveal fundamental insights about the associated cellular pathways. PMID:25119846

  9. Simultaneous Detection of Distinct Ubiquitin Chain Topologies by 19F NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic interplay between ubiquitin (Ub) chain construction and destruction is critical for the regulation of many cellular pathways. To understand these processes, it would be ideal to simultaneously detect different Ub chains as they are created and destroyed in the cell. This objective cannot be achieved with existing detection strategies. Here, we report on the use of 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to detect and characterize conformationally distinct Ub oligomers. By exploiting the environmental sensitivity of the 19F nucleus and the conformational diversity found among Ub chains of different linkage types, we can simultaneously resolve the 19F NMR signals for mono-Ub and three distinct di-Ub oligomers (K6, K48, and K63) in heterogeneous mixtures. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by the ability to interrogate the selectivity of deubiquitinases with multiple Ub substrates in real time. We also demonstrate that 19F NMR can be used to discern Ub linkages that are formed by select E3 ligases found in pathogenic bacteria. Collectively, our results assert the potential of 19F NMR for monitoring Ub signaling in cells to reveal fundamental insights about the associated cellular pathways. PMID:25119846

  10. Applications of (19)F-NMR in Fragment-Based Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Norton, Raymond S; Leung, Eleanor W W; Chandrashekaran, Indu R; MacRaild, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    (19)F-NMR has proved to be a valuable tool in fragment-based drug discovery. Its applications include screening libraries of fluorinated fragments, assessing competition among elaborated fragments and identifying the binding poses of promising hits. By observing fluorine in both the ligand and the target protein, useful information can be obtained on not only the binding pose but also the dynamics of ligand-protein interactions. These applications of (19)F-NMR will be illustrated in this review with studies from our fragment-based drug discovery campaigns against protein targets in parasitic and infectious diseases. PMID:27438818

  11. A mutagenesis-free approach to assignment of (19)F NMR resonances in biosynthetically labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Kitevski-LeBlanc, Julianne L; Al-Abdul-Wahid, M Sameer; Prosser, R Scott

    2009-02-18

    Solution NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics using fluorinated amino acid probes are a valuable addition to the repertoire of existing (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H experiments. Despite the numerous advantages of the (19)F nucleus in NMR, protein studies are complicated by the dependence of resonance assignments on site-directed mutagenesis methods which are laborious and often problematic. Here we report an NMR-based route to the assignment of fluorine resonances in (13)C,(15)N-3-fluoro-l-tyrosine labeled calmodulin. The assignment begins with the correlation of the fluorine nucleus to the delta proton in the novel (13)C,(15)N-enriched probe which is achieved using a CT-HCCF-COSY experiment. Connection to the backbone is made through two additional solution NMR experiments, namely the (H(beta))C(beta)(C(gamma)C(delta))H(delta) and HNCACB. Assignments are completed using either previously published backbone chemical shift data or obtained experimentally provided uniform (13)C,(15)N labeling procedures are employed during protein expression. Additional benefits of the (13)C,(15)N-3-fluoro-l-tyrosine probe include the reduction of spectral overlap through ((13)C(19)F) CT-HSQCs, as well as the ability to monitor side chain dynamics using (19)F T(1), T(2), and the (13)C-(19)F NOE. PMID:19173647

  12. Homonuclear dipolar recoupling under ultra-fast magic-angle spinning: probing 19F-19F proximities by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Hu, Bingwen; Lafon, Olivier; Trébosc, Julien; Deng, Feng; Amoureux, Jean-Paul

    2010-03-01

    We describe dipolar recoupling methods that accomplish, at high magic-angle spinning (MAS) frequencies, the excitation of double-quantum (DQ) coherences between spin-1/2 nuclei. We employ rotor-synchronized symmetry-based pulse sequences which are either gamma-encoded or non-gamma-encoded. The sensitivity and the robustness to both chemical-shift anisotropy and offset are examined. We also compare different techniques to avoid signal folding in the indirect dimension of two-dimensional double-quantum<-->single-quantum (DQ-SQ) spectra. This comprehensive analysis results in the identification of satisfactory conditions for dipolar (19)F-(19)F recoupling at high magnetic fields and high MAS frequencies. The utility of these recoupling methods is demonstrated with high-resolution DQ-SQ NMR spectra, which allow probing (19)F-(19)F proximities in powered fluoroaluminates. PMID:20044288

  13. 19F-NMR Study on the Equilateral Triangular Spin Tube CsCrF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kazuki; Goto, Takayuki; Manaka, Hirotaka; Miura, Yoko

    In order to investigate the hyperfine coupling of three inequivalent 19F sites in the equilateral triangular spin-tube antiferromagnet CsCrF4, we have measured the temperature dependence of 19F-NMR Knight shift in the paramagnetic state above 20K. The hyperfine coupling constants for three F-sites were determined to be -0.170, 0.280 and -0.045 T/μB, and were found to be consistent with the observed spectra at 1.65K, where the system is possibly in the ordered state.

  14. Probing the Pu4 + magnetic moment in PuF4 with 19F NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capan, Cigdem; Dempsey, Richard J.; Sinkov, Sergey; McNamara, Bruce K.; Cho, Herman

    2016-06-01

    The magnetic fields produced by Pu4 + centers have been measured by 19F NMR spectroscopy to elucidate the Pu-F electronic interactions in polycrystalline PuF4. Spectra acquired at applied fields of 2.35 and 7.05 T reveal a linear scaling of the 19F line shape. A model is presented that treats the line broadening and shifts as due to dipolar fields produced by Pu valence electrons in localized noninteracting orbitals. Alternative explanations for the observed line shape involving covalent Pu-F bonding, superexchange interactions, and electronic configurations with enhanced magnetic moments are considered.

  15. The metabolism of 2-trifluormethylaniline and its acetanilide in the rat by 19F NMR monitored enzyme hydrolysis and 1H/19F HPLC-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tugnait, M; Lenz, E M; Hofmann, M; Spraul, M; Wilson, I D; Lindon, J C; Nicholson, J K

    2003-01-01

    The urinary excretion profile and identity of the metabolites of 2-trifluoromethyl aniline (2-TFMA) and 2-trifluoromethyl acetanilide (2-TFMAc), following i.p. administration to the rat at 50 mg kg(-1), were determined using a combination of 19F NMR monitored enzyme hydrolysis, SPEC-MS and 19F/1H HPLC-NMR. A total recovery of approximately 96.4% of the dose was excreted into the urine as seven metabolites. The major routes of metabolism were N-conjugation (glucuronidation), and ring-hydroxylation followed by sulphation (and to a lesser extent glucuronidation). The major metabolites excreted into the urine for both compounds were a labile N-conjugated metabolite (a postulated N-glucuronide) and a sulphated ring-hydroxylated metabolite (a postulated 4-amino-5-trifluoromethylphenyl sulphate) following dosing of 2-TFMA. These accounted for approximately 53.0 and 31.5% of the dose, respectively. This study identifies problems on sample component instability in the preparation and analysis procedures. PMID:12467928

  16. Simultaneous 19F-1H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02 mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5 mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a 1H Larmor frequency of 43.32 MHz and 40.68 MHz for 19F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating 19F and 1H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500 MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02 mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ (1H) = 0.335 mol L-1 and LOQ (19F) = 0.130 mol L-1 for trifluoroethanol in

  17. Simultaneous (19)F-(1)H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-10-18

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a (1)H Larmor frequency of 43.32MHz and 40.68MHz for (19)F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating (19)F and (1)H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ ((1)H)=0.335molL(-1) and LOQ ((19)F)=0.130molL(-1) for trifluoroethanol

  18. Bulk magnetic susceptibility induced broadening in the 19F NMR of suspended leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Adebodun, F; Post, J F

    1993-01-01

    The relevance of bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) induced broadening to in vivo NMR studies of intact cells has been examined and the significance of the contribution of BMS difference to the resolution of intra- and extracellular resonances was demonstrated. BMS difference between intra- and extracellular compartments was found to limit the resolution of intra- and extracellular 19F resonances of fluoro compounds in leukemic cells. PMID:8499242

  19. Fluorinated Boronic Acid-Appended Bipyridinium Salts for Diol Recognition and Discrimination via (19)F NMR Barcodes.

    PubMed

    Axthelm, Jörg; Görls, Helmar; Schubert, Ulrich S; Schiller, Alexander

    2015-12-16

    Fluorinated boronic acid-appended benzyl bipyridinium salts, derived from 4,4'-, 3,4'-, and 3,3'-bipyridines, were synthesized and used to detect and differentiate diol-containing analytes at physiological conditions via (19)F NMR spectroscopy. An array of three water-soluble boronic acid receptors in combination with (19)F NMR spectroscopy discriminates nine diol-containing bioanalytes--catechol, dopamine, fructose, glucose, glucose-1-phosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, galactose, lactose, and sucrose--at low mM concentrations. Characteristic (19)F NMR fingerprints are interpreted as two-dimensional barcodes without the need of multivariate analysis techniques. PMID:26595191

  20. Conformation analysis and molecular mobility of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene copolymer using solid-state 19F MAS and 1H --> 19F CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Aimi, Keitaro; Ando, Shinji

    2004-07-01

    The changes in the conformation and molecular mobility accompanied by a phase transition in the crystalline domain were analyzed for ethylene (E) and tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) copolymer, ETFE, using variable-temperature (VT) solid-state 19F magic angle spinning (MAS) and 1H --> 19F cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The shifts of the signals for fluorines in TFE units to higher frequency and the continuing decrease and increase in the T1rho(F) values suggest that conformational exchange motions exist in the crystalline domain between 42 and 145 degrees C. Quantum chemical calculations of magnetic shielding constants showed that the high-frequency shift of TFE units should be induced by trans to gauche conformational changes at the CH2-CF2 linkage in the E-TFE unit. Although the 19F signals of the crystalline domain are substantially overlapped with those of the amorphous domain at ambient probe temperature (68 degrees C), they were successfully distinguished by using the dipolar filter and spin-lock pulse sequences at 145 degrees C. The dipolar coupling constants for the crystalline domain, which can be estimated by fitting the dipolar oscillation behaviors in the 1H --> 19F CP curve, showed a significant decrease with increasing temperature from 42 to 145 degrees C. This is due to the averaging of 1H-19F dipolar interactions originating from the molecular motion in the crystalline domain. The increase in molecular mobility in the crystalline domain was clearly shown by VT T1rho(F) and 1H --> 19F CP measurements in the phase transition temperature range. PMID:15181627

  1. Intracellular pH of perfused single frog skin: combined 19F- and 31P-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Civan, M M; Lin, L E; Peterson-Yantorno, K; Taylor, J; Deutsch, C

    1984-11-01

    Intracellular pH (pHc) has been determined in frog skin by applying two different methods of pH measurement, 19F and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, to the same tissues. Results from both NMR approaches confirm an observation by Lin, Shporer, and Civan [Am. J. Physiol. 248 (Cell Physiol. 17): 1985] that acidification of the extracellular medium reverses the sign of the pH gradient present under baseline conditions. The fluorinated probe, alpha-(difluoromethyl)-alanine methyl ester, was introduced into the epithelial cells by preincubating skins for 4.7-10.4 h at room temperature in Ringer solutions containing 1 mM ester. The free amino acid was subsequently released by intracellular esterase activity, thus providing a high enough probe concentration for NMR analysis to be practicable. From measurements of short-circuit current and transepithelial resistance under base-line and experimental conditions and the appearance of phosphocreatine (PCr) in the 31P spectrum of preloaded tissues, the fluorinated probe appears to be nontoxic to frog skin. Measurement of the chemical shift of methylphosphonate relative to PCr permitted calculation of extracellular pH. Estimation of the intracellular pH was performed both by measurement of the chemical shift of inorganic phosphate (Pi) relative to PCr and by measurement of the central peak spacing of the 19F spectrum. From four direct comparisons of the two techniques in two experiments, the difference in the estimated pH was only 0.03 +/- 0.07 pH units, supporting the concept that 31P-NMR analysis is a valid method of measuring pH in this tissue. PMID:6496729

  2. {sup 19}F NMR measurements of NO production in hypertensive ISIAH and OXYS rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bobko, Andrey A. . E-mail: bobko@kinetics.nsc.ru; Sergeeva, Svetlana V.; Bagryanskaya, Elena G.; Markel, Arkadii L.; Khramtsov, Valery V.; Reznikov, Vladimir A.; Kolosova, Nataljya G.

    2005-05-06

    Recently we demonstrated the principal possibility of application of {sup 19}F NMR spin-trapping technique for in vivo {sup {center_dot}}NO detection [Free Radic. Biol. Med. 36 (2004) 248]. In the present study, we employed this method to elucidate the significance of {sup {center_dot}}NO availability in animal models of hypertension. In vivo {sup {center_dot}}NO-induced conversion of the hydroxylamine of the fluorinated nitronyl nitroxide (HNN) to the hydroxylamine of the iminonitroxide (HIN) in hypertensive ISIAH and OXYS rat strains and normotensive Wistar rat strain was measured. Significantly lower HIN/HNN ratios were measured in the blood of the hypertensive rats. The NMR data were found to positively correlate with the levels of nitrite/nitrate evaluated by Griess method and negatively correlate with the blood pressure. In comparison with other traditionally used methods {sup 19}F NMR spectroscopy allows in vivo evaluation of {sup {center_dot}}NO production and provides the basis for in vivo {sup {center_dot}}NO imaging.

  3. Solid-state (19)F-NMR of peptides in native membranes.

    PubMed

    Koch, Katja; Afonin, Sergii; Ieronimo, Marco; Berditsch, Marina; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-01-01

    To understand how membrane-active peptides (MAPs) function in vivo, it is essential to obtain structural information about them in their membrane-bound state. Most biophysical approaches rely on the use of bilayers prepared from synthetic phospholipids, i.e. artificial model membranes. A particularly successful structural method is solid-state NMR, which makes use of macroscopically oriented lipid bilayers to study selectively isotope-labelled peptides. Native biomembranes, however, have a far more complex lipid composition and a significant non-lipidic content (protein and carbohydrate). Model membranes, therefore, are not really adequate to address questions concerning for example the selectivity of these membranolytic peptides against prokaryotic vs eukaryotic cells, their varying activities against different bacterial strains, or other related biological issues.Here, we discuss a solid-state (19)F-NMR approach that has been developed for structural studies of MAPs in lipid bilayers, and how this can be translated to measurements in native biomembranes. We review the essentials of the methodology and discuss key objectives in the practice of (19)F-labelling of peptides. Furthermore, the preparation of macroscopically oriented biomembranes on solid supports is discussed in the context of other membrane models. Two native biomembrane systems are presented as examples: human erythrocyte ghosts as representatives of eukaryotic cell membranes, and protoplasts from Micrococcus luteus as membranes from Gram-positive bacteria. Based on our latest experimental experience with the antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S, the benefits and some implicit drawbacks of using such supported native membranes in solid-state (19)F-NMR analysis are discussed. PMID:21598096

  4. NMR spectroscopy in studies of light-induced structural changes in mammalian rhodopsin: applicability of solution (19)F NMR.

    PubMed

    Klein-Seetharaman, J; Getmanova, E V; Loewen, M C; Reeves, P J; Khorana, H G

    1999-11-23

    We report high resolution solution (19)F NMR spectra of fluorine-labeled rhodopsin mutants in detergent micelles. Single cysteine substitution mutants in the cytoplasmic face of rhodopsin were labeled by attachment of the trifluoroethylthio (TET), CF(3)-CH(2)-S, group through a disulfide linkage. TET-labeled cysteine mutants at amino acid positions 67, 140, 245, 248, 311, and 316 in rhodopsin were thus prepared. Purified mutant rhodopsins (6-10 mg), in dodecylmaltoside, were analyzed at 20 degrees C by solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy. The spectra recorded in the dark showed the following chemical shifts relative to trifluoroacetate: Cys-67, 9.8 ppm; Cys-140, 10.6 ppm; Cys-245, 9.9 ppm; Cys-248, 9.5 ppm; Cys-311, 9.9 ppm; and Cys-316, 10.0 ppm. Thus, all mutants showed chemical shifts downfield that of free TET (6.5 ppm). On illumination to form metarhodopsin II, upfield changes in chemical shift were observed for (19)F labels at positions 67 (-0.2 ppm) and 140 (-0.4 ppm) and downfield changes for positions 248 (+0.1 ppm) and 316 (+0.1 ppm) whereas little or no change was observed at positions 311 and 245. On decay of metarhodopsin II, the chemical shifts reverted largely to those originally observed in the dark. The results demonstrate the applicability of solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy to studies of the tertiary structures in the cytoplasmic face of intact rhodopsin in the dark and on light activation. PMID:10570143

  5. Dissection of the ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme using 19F NMR

    PubMed Central

    Hammann, Christian; Norman, David G.; Lilley, David M. J.

    2001-01-01

    We have used 19F NMR to analyze the metal ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme by selective incorporation of 5fluorouridine. We have studied the chemical shift and linewidths of 19F resonances of 5-fluorouridine at the 4 and 7 positions in the ribozyme core as a function of added Mg2+. The data fit well to a simple two-state model whereby the formation of domain 1 is induced by the noncooperative binding of Mg2+ with an association constant in the range of 100 to 500 M−1, depending on the concentration of monovalent ions present. The results are in excellent agreement with data reporting on changes in the global shape of the ribozyme. However, the NMR experiments exploit reporters located in the center of the RNA sections undergoing the folding transitions, thereby allowing the assignment of specific nucleotides to the separate stages. The results define the folding pathway at high resolution and provide a time scale for the first transition in the millisecond range. PMID:11331743

  6. Resolution of Oligomeric Species during the Aggregation of Aβ1-40 Using 19F NMR

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yuta; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Soper, Molly T.; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Zhou, Yunlong; Ruotolo, Brandon T.; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Marsh, E. Neil G.

    2013-01-01

    In the commonly used nucleation-dependent model of protein aggregation, aggregation proceeds only after a lag phase in which the concentration of energetically unfavorable nuclei reaches a critical value. The formation of oligomeric species prior to aggregation can be difficult to detect by current spectroscopic techniques. By using real-time 19F NMR along with other techniques, we are able to show that multiple oligomeric species can be detected during the lag phase of Aβ1-40 fiber formation, consistent with a complex mechanism of aggregation. At least 6 types of oligomers can be detected by 19F NMR. These include the reversible formation of large β-sheet oligomer immediately after solubilization at high peptide concentration; a small oligomer that forms transiently during the early stages of the lag phase; and 4 spectroscopically distinct forms of oligomers with molecular weights between ~30–100 kDa that appear during the later stages of aggregation. The ability to resolve individual oligomers and track their formation in real-time should prove fruitful in understanding the aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins and in isolating potentially toxic non-amyloid oligomers. PMID:23445400

  7. Using magnetic coupling to implement 1H, 19F, 13C experiments in routine high resolution NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Paul; Finnigan, Jim; Marsden, Brian; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2015-12-01

    We report in this paper the design of 1H, 19F, 13C circuitry using magnetic coupling which can do on demand experiments where one of the three nuclei is observed and the other two are decoupled. The implementation of this circuitry in routine NMR probes is compared with capacitive coupling methods where it was found that by using magnetic coupling the performance of the routine NMR probe was not impacted by the addition of this circuitry. It is surmised that using this type of circuitry would be highly desirable for those chemists doing routine 19F NMR.

  8. 19F NMR measurements of the rotational mobility of proteins in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S P; Haggie, P M; Brindle, K M

    1997-01-01

    Three glycolytic enzymes, hexokinase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and pyruvate kinase, were fluorine labeled in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by biosynthetic incorporation of 5-fluorotryptophan. 19F NMR longitudinal relaxation time measurements on the labeled enzymes were used to assess their rotational mobility in the intact cell. Comparison with the results obtained from relaxation time measurements of the purified enzymes in vitro and from theoretical calculations showed that two of the labeled enzymes, phosphoglycerate kinase and hexokinase, were tumbling in a cytoplasm that had a viscosity approximately twice that of water. There were no detectable signals from pyruvate kinase in vivo, although it could be detected in diluted cell extracts, indicating that there was some degree of motional restriction of the enzyme in the intact cell. PMID:8994636

  9. Intracellular free calcium concentration measured with /sup 19/F NMR spectroscopy in intact ferret hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Marban, E.; Kitakaze, M.; Kusuoka, H.; Porterfield, J.K.; Yue, D.T.; Chacko, V.P.

    1987-08-01

    Changes in the intracellular free Ca/sup 2 +/ concentration, (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/, mediate excitation-contraction coupling in the heart and contribute to cellular injury during ischemia and reperfusion. To study these processes directly, the authors measured (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ in perfused ferret (Mustela putorius furo) hearts using /sup 19/F NMR spectroscopy to detect the 5,5'-difluoro derivative of the Ca/sup 2 +/ chelator, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). To load cells, hearts were perfused with the acetoxymethyl ester derivative of 5,5'-F/sub 2/-BAPTA. They measured /sup 19/F NMR spectra and left ventricular pressure simultaneously,at rest and during pacing at various external Ca concentrations ((Ca)/sub 0/). Although contractile force was attenuated by the Ca/sup 2 +/ buffering properties of 5,5'-F/sup 2/-BAPTA, the decrease in pressure could be overcome by raising (Ca)/sub 0/. The mean value of 104 nM for (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ at rest in the perfused heart agrees well with previous measurements in isolated ventricular muscle. During pacing at 0.6-4 Hz, time-averaged (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ increased; the effect of pacing was augmented by increasing (Ca)/sub 0/. (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ more than tripled during 10-20 min of global ischemia, and returned toward control levels upon reperfusion. This approach promises to be particularly useful in investigating the physiology of intact hearts and the pathophysiology of alterations in the coronary circulation

  10. Magnetic properties and hyperfine interactions in Cr8, Cr7Cd, and Cr7Ni molecular rings from 19F-NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Bordonali, L; Garlatti, E; Casadei, C M; Furukawa, Y; Lascialfari, A; Carretta, S; Troiani, F; Timco, G; Winpenny, R E; Borsa, F

    2014-04-14

    A detailed experimental investigation of the 19F nuclear magnetic resonance is made on single crystals of the homometallic Cr₈ antiferromagnetic molecular ring and heterometallic Cr₇Cd and Cr₇ Ni rings in the low temperature ground state. Since the F- ion is located midway between neighboring magnetic metal ions in the ring, the 19F-NMR spectra yield information about the local electronic spin density and ¹⁹F hyperfine interactions. In Cr8, where the ground state is a singlet with total spin S T = 0, the ¹⁹F-NMR spectra at 1.7 K and low external magnetic field display a single narrow line, while when the magnetic field is increased towards the first level crossing field, satellite lines appear in the ¹⁹F-NMR spectrum, indicating a progressive increase in the Boltzmann population of the first excited state S T = 1. In the heterometallic rings, Cr₇Cd and Cr₇ Ni, whose ground state is magnetic with S T = 3/2 and S T = 1/2, respectively, the ¹⁹F-NMR spectrum has a complicated structure which depends on the strength and orientation of the magnetic field, due to both isotropic and anisotropic transferred hyperfine interactions and classical dipolar interactions. From the 19F-NMR spectra in single crystals we estimated the transferred hyperfine constants for both the F⁻-Ni2⁺ and the F⁻-Cd2⁺ bonds. The values of the hyperfine constants compare well to the ones known for F⁻-Ni2⁺ in KNiF₃ and NiF₂ and for F⁻-Cr³⁺ in K₂NaCrF₆. The results are discussed in terms of hybridization of the 2s, 2p orbitals of the F⁻ ion and the d orbitals of the magnetic ion. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the electron-spin decoherence.

  11. Fragment-Linking Approach Using (19)F NMR Spectroscopy To Obtain Highly Potent and Selective Inhibitors of β-Secretase.

    PubMed

    Jordan, John B; Whittington, Douglas A; Bartberger, Michael D; Sickmier, E Allen; Chen, Kui; Cheng, Yuan; Judd, Ted

    2016-04-28

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a widely used tool in small-molecule drug discovery efforts. One of the most commonly used biophysical methods in detecting weak binding of fragments is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, FBDD performed with (19)F NMR-based methods has been shown to provide several advantages over (1)H NMR using traditional magnetization-transfer and/or two-dimensional methods. Here, we demonstrate the utility and power of (19)F-based fragment screening by detailing the identification of a second-site fragment through (19)F NMR screening that binds to a specific pocket of the aspartic acid protease, β-secretase (BACE-1). The identification of this second-site fragment allowed the undertaking of a fragment-linking approach, which ultimately yielded a molecule exhibiting a more than 360-fold increase in potency while maintaining reasonable ligand efficiency and gaining much improved selectivity over cathepsin-D (CatD). X-ray crystallographic studies of the molecules demonstrated that the linked fragments exhibited binding modes consistent with those predicted from the targeted screening approach, through-space NMR data, and molecular modeling. PMID:26978477

  12. Characterization of solid polymer dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients by 19F MAS NMR and factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanova, Martina; Brus, Jiri; Sedenkova, Ivana; Policianova, Olivia; Kobera, Libor

    In this contribution the ability of 19F MAS NMR spectroscopy to probe structural variability of poorly water-soluble drugs formulated as solid dispersions in polymer matrices is discussed. The application potentiality of the proposed approach is demonstrated on a moderately sized active pharmaceutical ingredient (API, Atorvastatin) exhibiting extensive polymorphism. In this respect, a range of model systems with the API incorporated in the matrix of polvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was prepared. The extent of mixing of both components was determined by T1(1H) and T1ρ(1H) relaxation experiments, and it was found that the API forms nanosized domains. Subsequently it was found out that the polymer matrix induces two kinds of changes in 19F MAS NMR spectra. At first, this is a high-frequency shift reaching 2-3 ppm which is independent on molecular structure of the API and which results from the long-range polarization of the electron cloud around 19F nucleus induced by electrostatic fields of the polymer matrix. At second, this is broadening of the signals and formation of shoulders reflecting changes in molecular arrangement of the API. To avoid misleading in the interpretation of the recorded 19F MAS NMR spectra, because both the contributions act simultaneously, we applied chemometric approach based on multivariate analysis. It is demonstrated that factor analysis of the recorded spectra can separate both these spectral contributions, and the subtle structural differences in the molecular arrangement of the API in the nanosized domains can be traced. In this way 19F MAS NMR spectra of both pure APIs and APIs in solid dispersions can be directly compared. The proposed strategy thus provides a powerful tool for the analysis of new formulations of fluorinated pharmaceutical substances in polymer matrices.

  13. (19)F-labeling of the adenine H2-site to study large RNAs by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sochor, F; Silvers, R; Müller, D; Richter, C; Fürtig, B; Schwalbe, H

    2016-01-01

    In comparison to proteins and protein complexes, the size of RNA amenable to NMR studies is limited despite the development of new isotopic labeling strategies including deuteration and ligation of differentially labeled RNAs. Due to the restricted chemical shift dispersion in only four different nucleotides spectral resolution remains limited in larger RNAs. Labeling RNAs with the NMR-active nucleus (19)F has previously been introduced for small RNAs up to 40 nucleotides (nt). In the presented work, we study the natural occurring RNA aptamer domain of the guanine-sensing riboswitch comprising 73 nucleotides from Bacillus subtilis. The work includes protocols for improved in vitro transcription of 2-fluoroadenosine-5'-triphosphat (2F-ATP) using the mutant P266L of the T7 RNA polymerase. Our NMR analysis shows that the secondary and tertiary structure of the riboswitch is fully maintained and that the specific binding of the cognate ligand hypoxanthine is not impaired by the introduction of the (19)F isotope. The thermal stability of the (19)F-labeled riboswitch is not altered compared to the unmodified sequence, but local base pair stabilities, as measured by hydrogen exchange experiments, are modulated. The characteristic change in the chemical shift of the imino resonances detected in a (1)H,(15)N-HSQC allow the identification of Watson-Crick base paired uridine signals and the (19)F resonances can be used as reporters for tertiary and secondary structure transitions, confirming the potential of (19)F-labeling even for sizeable RNAs in the range of 70 nucleotides. PMID:26704707

  14. 19F-decoupling of half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei in solid-state NMR: application of frequency-swept decoupling methods.

    PubMed

    Chandran, C Vinod; Hempel, Günter; Bräuniger, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    In solid-state NMR studies of minerals and ion conductors, quadrupolar nuclei like (7)Li, (23)Na or (133)Cs are frequently situated in close proximity to fluorine, so that application of (19)F decoupling is beneficial for spectral resolution. Here, we compare the decoupling efficiency of various multi-pulse decoupling sequences by acquiring (19)F-decoupled (23)Na-NMR spectra of cryolite (Na(3)AlF(6)). Whereas the MAS spectrum is only marginally affected by application of (19)F decoupling, the 3Q-filtered (23)Na signal is very sensitive to it, as the de-phasing caused by the dipolar interaction between sodium and fluorine is three-fold magnified. Experimentally, we find that at moderate MAS speeds, the decoupling efficiencies of the frequency-swept decoupling schemes SW(f)-TPPM and SW(f)-SPINAL are significantly better than the conventional TPPM and SPINAL sequences. The frequency-swept sequences are therefore the methods of choice for efficient decoupling of quadrupolar nuclei with half-integer spin from fluorine. PMID:21856132

  15. Fluorinated Amino-Derivatives of the Sesquiterpene Lactone, Parthenolide, as 19F NMR Probes in Deuterium-Free Environments

    PubMed Central

    Woods, James R.; Mo, Huaping; Bieberich, Andrew A.; Alavanja, Tanja; Colby, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and biological activity of fluorinated amino-derivatives of the sesquiterpene lactone, parthenolide, are described. A fluorinated aminoparthenolide analogue with biological activity similar to the parent natural product was discovered, and its X-ray structure was obtained. This lead compound was then studied using 19F NMR in the presence and absence of glutathione to obtain additional mechanism of action data, and it was found that the aminoparthenolide eliminates amine faster in the presence of glutathione than in the absence of glutathione. The exact changes in concentrations of fluorinated compound and amine were quantified by a concentration-reference method using 19F NMR; a major benefit of applying this strategy is that no deuterated solvents or internal standards are required to obtain accurate concentrations. These mechanistic data with glutathione may contribute to the conversion of the amino-derivative to parthenolide, the active pharmacological agent, in glutathione-rich cancer cells. PMID:22029741

  16. sup 19 F NMR studies of the D-galactose chemosensory receptor. (1) Sugar binding yields a global structural change

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, L.A.; Falke, J.J. )

    1991-04-30

    The Escherichia coli D-galactose and D-glucose receptor is an aqueous sugar-binding protein and the first component in the distinct chemosensory and transport pathways for these sugars. Activation of the receptor occurs when the sugar binds and induces a conformational change, which in turn enable docking to specific membrane proteins. Only the structure of the activated receptor containing bound D-glucose is known. To investigate the sugar-induced structural change, the authors have used {sup 19}F NMR to probe 12 sites widely distributed in the receptor molecule. Five sites are tryptophan positions probed by incorporation of 5-fluorotryptophan; the resulting {sup 19}F NMR resonances were assigned by site-directed mutagenesis. The other seven sites are phenylalanine positions probed by incorporation of 3-fluorophenylaline. Sugar binding to the substrate binding cleft was observed to trigger a global structural change detected via {sup 19}F NMR frequency shifts at 10 of the 12 labeled sites. The results are consistent with a model in which multiple secondary structural elements, known to extend between the substrate cleft and the protein surface, undergo shifts in their average positions upon sugar binding to the cleft. Such structural coupling provides a mechanism by which sugar binding to the substrate cleft can cause structural changes at one or more docking sites on the receptor surface.

  17. Automated data evaluation and modelling of simultaneous (19) F-(1) H medium-resolution NMR spectra for online reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Paul, Andrea; Engel, Dirk; Guthausen, Gisela; Kraume, Matthias; Maiwald, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Medium-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MR-NMR) currently develops to an important analytical tool for both quality control and process monitoring. In contrast to high-resolution online NMR (HR-NMR), MR-NMR can be operated under rough environmental conditions. A continuous re-circulating stream of reaction mixture from the reaction vessel to the NMR spectrometer enables a non-invasive, volume integrating online analysis of reactants and products. Here, we investigate the esterification of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol with acetic acid to 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl acetate both by (1) H HR-NMR (500 MHz) and (1) H and (19) F MR-NMR (43 MHz) as a model system. The parallel online measurement is realised by splitting the flow, which allows the adjustment of quantitative and independent flow rates, both in the HR-NMR probe as well as in the MR-NMR probe, in addition to a fast bypass line back to the reactor. One of the fundamental acceptance criteria for online MR-MNR spectroscopy is a robust data treatment and evaluation strategy with the potential for automation. The MR-NMR spectra are treated by an automated baseline and phase correction using the minimum entropy method. The evaluation strategies comprise (i) direct integration, (ii) automated line fitting, (iii) indirect hard modelling (IHM) and (iv) partial least squares regression (PLS-R). To assess the potential of these evaluation strategies for MR-NMR, prediction results are compared with the line fitting data derived from the quantitative HR-NMR spectroscopy. Although, superior results are obtained from both IHM and PLS-R for (1) H MR-NMR, especially the latter demands for elaborate data pretreatment, whereas IHM models needed no previous alignment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25854892

  18. Parahydrogen-induced polarization transfer to 19F in perfluorocarbons for 19F NMR spectroscopy and MRI.

    PubMed

    Plaumann, Markus; Bommerich, Ute; Trantzschel, Thomas; Lego, Denise; Dillenberger, Sonja; Sauer, Grit; Bargon, Joachim; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Bernarding, Johannes

    2013-05-10

    Fluorinated substances are important in chemistry, industry, and the life sciences. In a new approach, parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) is applied to enhance (19)F MR signals of (perfluoro-n-hexyl)ethene and (perfluoro-n-hexyl)ethane. Unexpectedly, the end-standing CF3 group exhibits the highest amount of polarization despite the negligible coupling to the added protons. To clarify this non-intuitive distribution of polarization, signal enhancements in deuterated chloroform and acetone were compared and (19)F-(19)F NOESY spectra, as well as (19)F T1 values were measured by NMR spectroscopy. By using the well separated and enhanced signal of the CF3 group, first (19)F MR images of hyperpolarized linear semifluorinated alkenes were recorded. PMID:23526596

  19. Magnetism, optical absorbance, and 19F NMR spectra of nafion films with self-assembling paramagnetic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, E. M.; Chen, Q.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2012-01-15

    Magnetization, optical absorbance, and {sup 19}F NMR spectra of Nafion transparent films as received and doped with Mn{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, and Fe{sup 3+} ions with and without treatment in 1H-1,2,4-triazole (trz) have been studied. Doping of Nafion with Fe{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+} and their bridging to nitrogen of triazole yields a hybrid self-assembling paramagnetic system that exhibits interesting magnetic and optical properties. These include spin crossover phenomena between high-spin (HS) and low-spin (LS) states in Nafion-Fe{sup 2+}-trz and Nafion-Co{sup 2+}-trz accompanied by thermochromic effects in the visible range induced by temperature. A large shift of the magnetization curve induced by a magnetic field in the vicinity of the HS {leftrightarrow} LS, {approx}220 K, observed for Nafion-Fe{sup 2+}-trz has a rate of {approx}6 K/kOe, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that in bulk spin crossover Fe{sup 2+} materials. Selective response of {sup 19}F NMR signals on doping with paramagnetic ions demonstrates that NMR can be used as spatially resolved method to study Nafion film with paramagnetic network. Both chemical shift and width of {sup 19}F NMR signals show that SO groups of Nafion, Fe or Co ions, and nitrogen of triazole are bonded whereas they form a spin crossover system. Based on a model of nanosize cylinders proposed for Nafion [K. Schmidt-Rohr and Q. Chen, Nat Mater (2008), 75], we suggest that paramagnetic ions are located inside these cylinders, forming self-assembling magnetically and optically active nanoscale networks.

  20. Fragment Screening and Druggability Assessment for the CBP/p300 KIX Domain Via Protein Observed 19F NMR

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Clifford T.; Koleski, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    19F NMR of labeled proteins is a sensitive method for characterizing structure, conformational dynamics, higher-order assembly, and ligand binding. Fluorination of aromatic side chains has been suggested as a labeling strategy for small molecule ligand discovery for protein-protein interaction interfaces. Using a model transcription factor binding domain of the CREB binding protein (CBP)/p300, KIX, we report the first full small molecule screen using protein-observed 19F NMR. Screening of 508 compounds and validation by 1H-15N HSQC NMR led to the identification of a minimal pharmacaphore for the MLL-KIX interaction site. Hit rate analysis for the CREB-KIX and MLL-KIX sites provided a metric to assess the ligandability or “druggability” of each interface informing future medicinal chemistry efforts. The structural information from the simplified spectra and data collection speed, affords a new screening tool for analysis of protein interfaces and discovery of small molecules. PMID:25651535

  1. (19)F NMR study of ligand dynamics in carboxylate-bridged diiron(II) complexes supported by a macrocyclic ligand.

    PubMed

    Minier, Mikael A; Lippard, Stephen J

    2015-11-01

    A series of asymmetrically carboxylate-bridged diiron(ii) complexes featuring fluorine atoms as NMR spectroscopic probes, [Fe2(PIM)(Ar(4F-Ph)CO2)2] (10), [Fe2(F2PIM)(Ar(Tol)CO2)2] (11), and [Fe2(F2PIM)(Ar(4F-Ph)CO2)2] (12), were prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and VT (19)F NMR spectroscopy. These complexes are part of a rare family of syn N-donor diiron(ii) compounds, [Fe2(X2PIM)(RCO2)2], that are structurally very similar to the active site of the hydroxylase enzyme component of reduced methane monooxygenase (MMOHred). Solution characterization of these complexes demonstrates that they undergo intramolecular carboxylate rearrangements, or carboxylate shifts, a dynamic feature relevant to the reactivity of the diiron centers in bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases. PMID:26418547

  2. 19F NMR Study of Ligand Dynamics in Carboxylate-Bridged Diiron(II) Complexes Supported by a Macrocyclic Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Minier, Mikael A.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    A series of asymmetrically carboxylate-bridged diiron(II) complexes featuring fluorine atoms as NMR spectroscopic probes, [Fe2(PIM)(Ar4F-PhCO2)2] (10), [Fe2(F2PIM)(ArTolCO2)2] (11), and [Fe2(F2PIM)(Ar4F-PhCO2)2] (12), were prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and VT 19F NMR spectroscopy. These complexes are part of a rare family of syn-N diiron(II) complexes, [Fe2(X2PIM)(RCO2)2], that are structurally very similar to the active site of the hydroxylase enzyme component of reduced methane monooxygenase (MMOHred). Solution characterization of these complexes demonstrates that they undergo intramolecular carboxylate rearrangements, or carboxylate shifts, a dynamic feature relevant to the reactivity of the diiron centers in bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases. PMID:26418547

  3. Phospho-selective mechanisms of arrestin conformations and functions revealed by unnatural amino acid incorporation and 19F-NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Yu, Xiao; Liu, Chuan; Qu, Chang-Xiu; Gong, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Da; Li, Fa-Hui; Wang, Hong-Mei; He, Dong-Fang; Yi, Fan; Song, Chen; Tian, Chang-Lin; Xiao, Kun-Hong; Wang, Jiang-Yun; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Specific arrestin conformations are coupled to distinct downstream effectors, which underlie the functions of many G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, using unnatural amino acid incorporation and fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance (19F-NMR) spectroscopy, we demonstrate that distinct receptor phospho-barcodes are translated to specific β-arrestin-1 conformations and direct selective signalling. With its phosphate-binding concave surface, β-arrestin-1 ‘reads' the message in the receptor phospho-C-tails and distinct phospho-interaction patterns are revealed by 19F-NMR. Whereas all functional phosphopeptides interact with a common phosphate binding site and induce the movements of finger and middle loops, different phospho-interaction patterns induce distinct structural states of β-arrestin-1 that are coupled to distinct arrestin functions. Only clathrin recognizes and stabilizes GRK2-specific β-arrestin-1 conformations. The identified receptor-phospho-selective mechanism for arrestin conformation and the spacing of the multiple phosphate-binding sites in the arrestin enable arrestin to recognize plethora phosphorylation states of numerous GPCRs, contributing to the functional diversity of receptors. PMID:26347956

  4. 19F-NMR reveals metal and operator-induced allostery in MerR.

    PubMed

    Song, Lingyun; Teng, Quincy; Phillips, Robert S; Brewer, John M; Summers, Anne O

    2007-08-01

    Metalloregulators of the MerR family activate transcription upon metal binding by underwinding the operator-promoter DNA to permit open complex formation by pre-bound RNA polymerase. Historically, MerR's allostery has been monitored only indirectly via nuclease sensitivity or by fluorescent nucleotide probes and was very specific for Hg(II), although purified MerR binds several thiophilic metals. To observe directly MerR's ligand-induced behavior we made 2-fluorotyrosine-substituted MerR and found similar, minor changes in (19)F chemical shifts of tyrosine residues in the free protein exposed to Hg(II), Cd(II) or Zn(II). However, DNA binding elicits large chemical shift changes in MerR's tyrosine residues and in DNA-bound MerR Hg(II) provokes changes very distinct from those of Cd(II) or Zn(II). These chemical shift changes and other biophysical and phenotypic properties of wild-type MerR and relevant mutants reveal elements of an allosteric network that enables the coordination state of the metal binding site to direct metal-specific movements in the distant DNA binding site and the DNA-bound state also to affect the metal binding domain. PMID:17560604

  5. Magnetic properties and hyperfine interactions in Cr{sub 8}, Cr{sub 7}Cd, and Cr{sub 7}Ni molecular rings from {sup 19}F-NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Bordonali, L.; Borsa, F.; Consorzio INSTM, Via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 ; Garlatti, E.; Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Parma, Viale G. P. Usberti 7 Casadei, C. M.; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 ; Furukawa, Y.; Lascialfari, A.; Consorzio INSTM, Via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze; Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano ; Carretta, S.; Timco, G.; Winpenny, R. E. P.

    2014-04-14

    A detailed experimental investigation of the {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance is made on single crystals of the homometallic Cr{sub 8} antiferromagnetic molecular ring and heterometallic Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 7}Ni rings in the low temperature ground state. Since the F{sup −} ion is located midway between neighboring magnetic metal ions in the ring, the {sup 19}F-NMR spectra yield information about the local electronic spin density and {sup 19}F hyperfine interactions. In Cr{sub 8}, where the ground state is a singlet with total spin S{sub T} = 0, the {sup 19}F-NMR spectra at 1.7 K and low external magnetic field display a single narrow line, while when the magnetic field is increased towards the first level crossing field, satellite lines appear in the {sup 19}F-NMR spectrum, indicating a progressive increase in the Boltzmann population of the first excited state S{sub T} = 1. In the heterometallic rings, Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 7}Ni, whose ground state is magnetic with S{sub T} = 3/2 and S{sub T} = 1/2, respectively, the {sup 19}F-NMR spectrum has a complicated structure which depends on the strength and orientation of the magnetic field, due to both isotropic and anisotropic transferred hyperfine interactions and classical dipolar interactions. From the {sup 19}F-NMR spectra in single crystals we estimated the transferred hyperfine constants for both the F{sup −}-Ni{sup 2+} and the F{sup −}-Cd{sup 2+} bonds. The values of the hyperfine constants compare well to the ones known for F{sup −}-Ni{sup 2+} in KNiF{sub 3} and NiF{sub 2} and for F{sup −}-Cr{sup 3+} in K{sub 2}NaCrF{sub 6}. The results are discussed in terms of hybridization of the 2s, 2p orbitals of the F{sup −} ion and the d orbitals of the magnetic ion. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the electron-spin decoherence.

  6. Binding mechanism of the tyrosine-kinase inhibitor nilotinib to human serum albumin determined by 1H STD NMR, 19F NMR, and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin; Wu, Di; Sun, Pingchuan; Ma, Xiaoli; Wang, Lili; Li, Shanshan; Xu, Kailin; Li, Hui

    2016-05-30

    Drug interaction with albumins significantly affects in vivo drug transport and biological metabolism. To gain insight into the binding mechanisms of tyrosine-kinase inhibitor nilotinib (NIL) to human serum albumin (HSA), an approach combining (1)H saturation-transfer difference (STD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, (19)F NMR spectroscopy, steady-state fluorescence quenching, and molecular modeling was adopted. (19)F NMR was used to determine the binding constant, and a value of 4.12 × 10(3)M(-1) was obtained. Fluorescence spectroscopy was also used to determine the binding constant, and the value obtained was within the same order of magnitude. The binding process was mainly driven by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces. Displacement experiments further showed that NIL mainly bound to the hydrophobic cavity of HSA's subdomain IIA, also called Sudlow's site I. Molecular docking simulation was also used to establish a molecular binding model, and findings were consistent with those of displacement and the (1)H STD NMR experiments. PMID:26922576

  7. Combined ligand-observe 19F and protein-observe 15N,1H-HSQC NMR suggests phenylalanine as the key Δ-somatostatin residue recognized by human protein disulfide isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Kirsty L.; Rowe, Michelle L.; Hudson, Paul B.; Williamson, Richard A.; Howard, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Human protein disulphide isomerase (hPDI) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) based isomerase and folding chaperone. Molecular detail of ligand recognition and specificity of hPDI are poorly understood despite the importance of the hPDI for folding secreted proteins and its implication in diseases including cancer and lateral sclerosis. We report a detailed study of specificity, interaction and dissociation constants (Kd) of the peptide-ligand Δ-somatostatin (AGSKNFFWKTFTSS) binding to hPDI using 19F ligand-observe and 15N,1H-HSQC protein-observe NMR methods. Phe residues in Δ-somatostatin are hypothesised as important for recognition by hPDI therefore, step-wise peptide Phe-to-Ala changes were progressively introduced and shown to raise the Kd from 103 + 47 μM until the point where binding was abolished when all Phe residues were modified to Ala. The largest step-changes in Kd involved the F11A peptide modification which implies the C-terminus of Δ-somatostatin is a prime recognition region. Furthermore, this study also validated the combined use of 19F ligand-observe and complimentary 15N,1H-HSQC titrations to monitor interactions from the protein’s perspective. 19F ligand-observe NMR was ratified as mirroring 15N protein-observe but highlighted the advantage that 19F offers improved Kd precision due to higher spectrum resolution and greater chemical environment sensitivity. PMID:26786784

  8. Alternate strategies to obtain mass balance without the use of radiolabeled compounds: application of quantitative fluorine (19F) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in metabolism studies.

    PubMed

    Mutlib, Abdul; Espina, Robert; Atherton, James; Wang, Jianyao; Talaat, Rasmy; Scatina, JoAnn; Chandrasekaran, Appavu

    2012-03-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is playing an increasingly important role in the quantitation of small and large molecules. Recently, we demonstrated that (1)H NMR could be used to quantitate drug metabolites isolated in submilligram quantities from biological sources. It was shown that these metabolites, once quantitated by NMR, were suitable to be used as reference standards in quantitative LC/MS-based assays, hence circumventing the need for radiolabeled material or synthetic standards to obtain plasma exposure estimates in humans and preclinical species. The quantitative capabilities of high-field NMR is further demonstrated in the current study by obtaining the mass balance of fluorinated compounds using (19)F-NMR. Two fluorinated compounds which were radio-labeled with carbon-14 on metabolically stable positions were dosed in rats and urine and feces collected. The mass balance of the compounds was obtained initially by counting the radioactivity present in each sample. Subsequently, the same sets of samples were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, and the concentrations determined by this method were compared with data obtained using radioactivity counting. It was shown that the two methods produced comparable values. To demonstrate the value of this analytical technique in drug discovery, a fluorinated compound was dosed intravenously in dogs and feces and urine collected. Initial profiling of samples showed that this compound was excreted mainly unchanged in feces, and hence, an estimate of mass balance was obtained using (19)F-NMR. The data obtained by this method was confirmed by additional quantitative studies using mass spectrometry. Hence cross-validations of the quantitative (19)F-NMR method by radioactivity counting and mass spectrometric analysis were demonstrated in this study. A strategy outlining the use of fluorinated compounds in conjunction with (19)F-NMR to understand their routes of excretion or mass balance in animals is proposed. These

  9. NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}: Assignment of {sup 19}F NMR resonances and chemical bond analysis from GIPAW calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Mamata; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Sadoc, Aymeric; Boucher, Florent

    2013-11-15

    The {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shifts (δ{sub iso}) of two isomorphic compounds, NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}, which involve six nonequivalent fluorine sites, have been experimentally determined from the reconstruction of 1D {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectra. In parallel, the corresponding {sup 19}F chemical shielding tensors have been calculated using the GIPAW method for both experimental and DFT-optimized structures. Furthermore, the [M{sub 4}F{sub 20}] units of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} being held together by van der Waals interactions, the relevance of Grimme corrections to the DFT optimization processes has been evaluated. However, the semi-empirical dispersion correction term introduced by such a method does not show any significant improvement. Nonetheless, a complete and convincing assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} is obtained, ensured by the linearity between experimental {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values and calculated {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shielding σ{sub iso} values. The effects of the geometry optimizations have been carefully analyzed, confirming among other matters, the inaccuracy of the experimental structure of NbF{sub 5}. The relationships between the fluorine chemical shifts, the nature of the fluorine atoms (bridging or terminal), the position of the terminal ones (opposite or perpendicular to the bridging ones), the fluorine charges, the ionicity and the length of the M–F bonds have been established. Additionally, for three of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5}, distorted multiplets, arising from {sup 1}J-coupling and residual dipolar coupling between the {sup 19}F and {sup 93}Nb nuclei, were simulated yielding to values of {sup 93}Nb–{sup 19}F {sup 1}J-coupling for the corresponding fluorine sites. - Graphical abstract: The complete assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} allow establishing relationships between the {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values, the nature of the fluorine atoms

  10. CP-MAS 207Pb with 19F decoupling NMR spectroscopy: medium range investigation in fluoride materials.

    PubMed

    Bureau, B; Silly, G; Buzaré, J Y

    1999-11-01

    The isotropic chemical shift of 207Pb is used to perform structural investigations of crystalline fluoride compounds (PbF2, Pb2ZnF6, PbGaF5, Pb3Ga2F12 and Pb9Ga2F24) and transition metal fluoride glasses (TMFG) of the PZG family (PbF2-ZnF2-GaF3). Using 207Pb Cross Polarisation Magic Angle Spinning (CP-MAS) NMR with 19F decoupling, it is shown that the isotropic chemical shift of 207Pb varies on a large scale (1000 ppm) and that the main changes of its value are not due to the nearest neighbour fluorines but may be related to the number of next nearest neighbour (nnn) Pb2+ ions. In this way, it is demonstrated that 207Pb chemical shift is an interesting probe to investigate medium range order in either crystalline or glassy fluoride systems. The 207Pb delta(iso) parameter has been linearly correlated to the number of nnn Pb2+ ions. PMID:10670899

  11. Modulation of the antioxidant activity of HO* scavengers by albumin binding: a 19F-NMR study.

    PubMed

    Aime, Silvio; Digilio, Giuseppe; Bruno, Erik; Mainero, Valentina; Baroni, Simona; Fasano, Mauro

    2003-08-01

    The interaction between different HO(z.rad;) radical scavengers in a three-component antioxidant system has been investigated by means of 19F-NMR spectroscopy. This system is composed of bovine serum albumin (BSA), trolox, and N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-trifluoroacetamide (CF(3)PAF). The antioxidant capacity of BSA and trolox has been assessed by measuring the amount of trifluoroacetamide (TFAM) arising from the radical mediated decomposition of CF(3)PAF. When assayed separately, both trolox and BSA behaved as antioxidants, as they were effective to protect CF(3)PAF from HO* radical-mediated decomposition. By contrast, trolox enhanced the production of TFAM in the presence of BSA, thus behaving as a pro-oxidant. Urate, carnosine, glucose, and propylgallate showed antioxidant properties both with or without BSA. CF(3)PAF and trolox were found to bind to BSA with association constants in the order of 5 x 10(3)M(-1) and to compete for the same binding sites. These results have been discussed in terms of BSA-catalysed cross-reactions between trolox-derived secondary radicals and CF(3)PAF. PMID:12878205

  12. 1H and 19F NMR studies on molecular motions and phase transitions in solid triethylammonium tetrafluoroborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Seki, Riki; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Ishida, Hiroyuki

    1995-02-01

    Measurements by differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry and of the spin-lattice relaxation time ( T1), the spin-spin relaxation time ( T2), and the second moment ( M2) of 1H and 19F NMR were carried out in the three solid phases of (CH 3CH 2) 3NHBF 4. X-ray powder patterns were taken in the highest-temperature phase (Phase I) existing above 367 K and the room-temperature phase (Phase II) stable between 220 and 367 K. Phase I formed a NaCl-type cubic structure with a = 11.65(3) Å, Z = 4, V = 1581(13) Å3, and Dx = 0.794 g cm -3, and was expected to be an ionic plastic phase. In this phase, the self-diffusion of anions and the isotropic reorientation of cations were observed. Phase II formed a tetragonal structure with a = 12.47(1) and c = 9.47(3) Å, Z = 4, V = 1473(6) Å3, and Dx = 0.852 g cm -3. From the present DSC and NMR results in this phase, the cations and/or anions were considered to be dynamically disordered states. The C3 reorientation of the cation about the NH bond axis was detected and, in addition, the onset of nutation of the cations and local diffusion of the anions was suggested. In the low-temperature phase (Phase III) stable below 219 K, the C3 reorientations of the three methyl groups of cations and the isotropic reorientation of anions were observed. The motional parameters for these modes were evaluated.

  13. 19F Magic angle spinning NMR reporter molecules: empirical measures of surface shielding, polarisability and H-bonding.

    PubMed

    Budarin, Vitaliy L; Clark, James H; Deswarte, Fabien E I; Mueller, Karl T; Tavener, Stewart J

    2007-06-14

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) (19)F NMR spectra have been obtained and chemical shifts measured for 37 molecules in the gas phase and adsorbed on the surfaces of six common materials: octadecyl- and octyl-functionalised chromatography silicas, Kieselgel 100 silica, Brockmann neutral alumina, Norit activated charcoal and 3-(1-piperidino)propyl functionalised silica. From these six surfaces, octadecyl-silica is selected as a non-polar reference to which the others are compared. The change in chemical shift of a fluorine nucleus within a molecule on adsorption to a surface from the gas phase, Deltadelta(gas)(surface), is described by the empirical relationship: Deltadelta(gas)(surface) = delta(s) + (alpha(s)+pi(s))/alpha(r) (Deltadelta(gas)(reference) - delta(r)) + delta(HBA) + delta(HBD), where delta(s) and delta(r) are constants that describe the chemical shift induced by the electromagnetic field of the surface under investigation and reference surface, alpha(s) and alpha(r) are the relative surface polarisability for the surface and reference, pi(s) is an additional contribution to the surface polarisabilities due to its ability to interact with aromatic molecules, and delta(HBA) and delta(HBD) are measurements of the hydrogen acceptor and donor properties of the surface. These empirical parameters are measured for the surfaces under study. Silica and alumina are found to undergo specific interactions with aromatic reporter molecules and both accept and donate H-bonds. Activated charcoal was found to have an extreme effect on shielding but no specific interactions with the adsorbed molecules. 3-(1-Piperidino)propyl functionalised silica exhibits H-bond acceptor ability, but does not donate H-bonds. PMID:17487325

  14. γ-(S)-Trifluoromethyl proline: evaluation as a structural substitute of proline for solid state (19)F-NMR peptide studies.

    PubMed

    Kubyshkin, Vladimir; Afonin, Sergii; Kara, Sezgin; Budisa, Nediljko; Mykhailiuk, Pavel K; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-03-21

    γ-(4S)-Trifluoromethyl proline was synthesised according to a modified literature protocol with improved yield on a multigram scale. Conformational properties of the amide bond formed by the amino acid were characterised using N-acetyl methyl ester model. The amide populations (s-trans vs. s-cis) and thermodynamic parameters of the isomerization were found to be similar to the corresponding values for intact proline. Therefore, the γ-trifluoromethyl proline was suggested as a structurally low-disturbing proline substitution in peptides for their structural studies by (19)F-NMR. Indeed, the exchange of native proline for γ-trifluoromethyl proline in the peptide antibiotic gramicidin S was shown to preserve the overall amphipathic peptide structure. The utility of the amino acid as a selective (19)F-NMR label was demonstrated by observing the re-alignment of the labelled gramicidin S in oriented lipid bilayers. PMID:25703116

  15. The effect of ethanol on hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine: (31)P-NMR and (19)F-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Celikbag, Yusuf; Via, Brian K; Adhikari, Sushil; Buschle-Diller, Gisela; Auad, Maria L

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the role of ethanol and temperature on the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced from hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine (Pinus spp.) carried out at 250, 300, 350 and 390°C for 30min. Water and water/ethanol mixture (1/1, wt/wt) were used as liquefying solvent in the HTL experiments. HTL in water and water/ethanol is donated as W-HTL and W/E-HTL, respectively. It was found that 300°C and water/ethanol solvent was the optimum liquefaction temperature and solvent, yielding up to 68.1wt.% bio-oil and 2.4wt.% solid residue. (31)P-NMR analysis showed that biopolyol produced by W-HTL was rich in phenolic OH while W/E-HTL produced more aliphatic OH rich biopolyols. Moreover, biopolyols with higher hydroxyl concentration were produced by W/E-HTL. Carbonyl groups were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, which showed that ethanol reduced the concentration of carbonyl groups. PMID:27126078

  16. NMR shielding and spin–rotation constants of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B.

    2015-12-31

    This presentation demonstrates the relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants and shielding spans of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules. The results are obtained from calculations performed using density functional theory (non-relativistic and four-component relativistic) and coupled-cluster calculations. The spin-rotation constants are compared with available experimental values. In most of the molecules studied, relativistic effects make an order of magnitude difference on the NMR absolute shielding constants.

  17. NMR shielding and spin-rotation constants of 175LuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br, 127I) molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Taye B.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation demonstrates the relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants and shielding spans of 175LuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br, 127I) molecules. The results are obtained from calculations performed using density functional theory (non-relativistic and four-component relativistic) and coupled-cluster calculations. The spin-rotation constants are compared with available experimental values. In most of the molecules studied, relativistic effects make an order of magnitude difference on the NMR absolute shielding constants.

  18. Demystifying fluorine chemical shifts: electronic structure calculations address origins of seemingly anomalous (19)F-NMR spectra of fluorohistidine isomers and analogues.

    PubMed

    Kasireddy, Chandana; Bann, James G; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R

    2015-11-11

    Fluorine NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying biomolecular structure, dynamics, and ligand binding, yet the origins of (19)F chemical shifts are not well understood. Herein, we use electronic structure calculations to describe the changes in (19)F chemical shifts of 2F- and 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon acid titration. While the protonation of the 2F species results in a deshielded chemical shift, protonation of the 4F isomer results in an opposite, shielded chemical shift. The deshielding of 2F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon protonation can be rationalized by concomitant decreases in charge density on fluorine and a reduced dipole moment. These correlations do not hold for 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole, however. Molecular orbital calculations reveal that for the 4F species, there are no lone pair electrons on the fluorine until protonation. Analysis of a series of 4F-imidazole analogues, all with delocalized fluorine electron density, indicates that the deshielding of (19)F chemical shifts through substituent effects correlates with increased C-F bond polarity. In summary, the delocalization of fluorine electrons in the neutral 4F species, with gain of a lone pair upon protonation may help explain the difficulty in developing a predictive framework for fluorine chemical shifts. Ideas debated by chemists over 40 years ago, regarding fluorine's complex electronic effects, are shown to have relevance for understanding and predicting fluorine NMR spectra. PMID:26524669

  19. Synthesis, fine structure of 19F NMR and fluorescence of novel amorphous TPA derivatives having perfluorinated cyclopentenyl and benzo[b]thiophene unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bian-Peng; Pang, Mei-Li; Tan, Ting-Feng; Meng, Ji-ben

    2013-04-01

    Three novel triphenylamine (TPA) derivatives having perfluorinated cyclopentenyl and benzo[b]thiophene unit are obtained from 4-bromo-N,N-diphenyl-2-methylbenzo[b]thiophen-5-amine. The new compounds are expected to find their use in thin film devices as charge transport materials and host organic light-emitting materials. It is found that the new compounds show relatively strong fluorescence either in solution or in solid state, and are amorphous due to a special conformation which is elucidated by the fine structure of 19F NMR. Molecular structure and properties of these compounds is characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR (broadband decoupled), ESI-HRMS, elemental analysis and thermal analysis (DSC). Fluorescent quantum yield in solution is measured using 9,10-diphenylanthrancene (DPA) as standard fluorescent substance.

  20. Evidence of a structural phase transition in superconducting SmFeAsO1-xFx from 19F NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, M.; Ghoshray, K.; Mazumdar, C.; Poddar, A.; Ghoshray, A.; Berardan, D.; Dragoe, N.

    2013-01-01

    We report resistivity, magnetization and 19F NMR results in a polycrystalline sample of SmFeAsO0.86F0.14. The resistivity and magnetization data show a sharp drop at 48 K indicating a superconducting transition. The nuclear spin-lattice rate (1/T1) and spin-spin relaxation rate (1/T2) clearly show the existence of a structural phase transition near 163 K in the sample, which also undergoes a superconducting transition. This finding creates interest in exploring whether this is unique for Sm based systems or is also present in other rare-earth based 1111 superconductors.

  1. Using "On/Off" (19)F NMR/Magnetic Resonance Imaging Signals to Sense Tyrosine Kinase/Phosphatase Activity in Vitro and in Cell Lysates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Sun, Hongbin; Hu, Chen; Li, Gongyu; Liu, Xiaomei; Chen, Peiyao; Cui, Yusi; Liu, Jing; Wang, Junfeng; Liang, Gaolin

    2016-03-15

    Tyrosine kinase and phosphatase are two important, antagonistic enzymes in organisms. Development of noninvasive approach for sensing their activity with high spatial and temporal resolution remains challenging. Herein, we rationally designed a hydrogelator Nap-Phe-Phe(CF3)-Glu-Tyr-Ile-OH (1a) whose supramolecular hydrogel (i.e., Gel 1a) can be subjected to tyrosine kinase-directed disassembly, and its phosphate precursor Nap-Phe-Phe(CF3)-Glu-Tyr(H2PO3)-Ile-OH (1b), which can be subjected to alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-instructed self-assembly to form supramolecular hydrogel Gel 1b, respectively. Mechanic properties and internal fibrous networks of the hydrogels were characterized with rheology and cryo transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Disassembly/self-assembly of their corresponding supramolecular hydrogels conferring respective "On/Off" (19)F NMR/MRI signals were employed to sense the activity of these two important enzymes in vitro and in cell lysates for the first time. We anticipate that our new (19)F NMR/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method would facilitate pharmaceutical researchers to screen new inhibitors for these two enzymes without steric hindrance. PMID:26901415

  2. Reaction monitoring in LPOS by 19F NMR. Study of soluble polymer supports with fluorine in spacer or linker components of supports.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipathi, Pandarinathan; Crévisy, Christophe; Grée, Rene

    2002-01-01

    Various soluble polystyrene supports with fluorinated spacer or linker were prepared and studied by (19)F NMR for their use in LPOS reaction monitoring. Among three types of systems studied, the perfluoro Wang linker was found to be most efficient for this purpose. Substrates could be easily anchored to and cleaved from this new support-bound linker. The anchoring of the linker and the substrates on the polymer led to significant changes in the fluorine resonances. Therefore, the progress of these reactions could be both monitored and quantified. On the other hand, the chemical transformations on the anchored substrates led only to moderate changes in the fluorine resonances. Nevertheless, the reaction progress could also be monitored in this case. After cleavage of products, the polymer supports were recovered without loss in loading. Membrane separation technology was used to purify some polymer-bound products as well as to obtain the polymer-free cleaved product. PMID:12425606

  3. Solid-state {sup 19}F and {sup 13}C NMR of room temperature fluorinated graphite and samples thermally treated under fluorine: Low-field and high-resolution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Giraudet, J.; Dubois, M.; Guerin, K.; Pinheiro, J.P.; Hamwi, A.; Stone, W.E.E.; Pirotte, P.; Masin, F. . E-mail: fmasin@ulb.ac.be

    2005-04-15

    Room temperature graphite fluorides consisting of raw material and samples post-treated in pure fluorine atmosphere in the temperature range 100-500 deg. C have been studied by solid-state NMR. Several NMR approaches have been used, both high and low-field {sup 19}F, {sup 19}F MAS and {sup 13}C MAS with {sup 19}F to {sup 13}C cross polarization. The modifications, in the graphitic lattice, of the catalytic iodine fluorides products have been examined. A transformation of the C-F bond character from semi-ionic to covalent has been found to occur at a post-treatment temperature close to 400 deg. C. It is shown that covalency increases with temperature.

  4. Targeting the Endocannabinoid System for Neuroprotection: A 19F-NMR Study of a Selective FAAH Inhibitor Binding with an Anandamide Carrier Protein, HSA

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jianqin; Yang, De-Ping; Tian, Xiaoyu; Nikas, Spyros P.; Sharma, Rishi; Guo, Jason Jianxin; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme involved in the inactivation of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA), is being considered as a therapeutic target for analgesia and neuroprotection. We have developed a brain permeable FAAH inhibitor, AM5206, which has served as a valuable pharmacological tool to explore neuroprotective effects of this class of compounds. In the present work, we characterized the interactions of AM5206 with a representative AEA carrier protein, human serum albumin (HSA), using 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our data showed that as a drug carrier, albumin can significantly enhance the solubility of AM5206 in aqueous environment. Through a series of titration and competitive binding experiments, we also identified that AM5206 primarily binds to two distinct sites within HSA. Our results may provide insight into the mechanism of HSA-AM5206 interactions. The findings should also help in the development of suitable formulations of the lipophilic AM5206 and its congeners for their effective delivery to specific target sites in the brain. PMID:24533425

  5. Roles of Arginine and Lysine Residues in the Translocation of a Cell-Penetrating Peptide from 13C, 31P and 19F Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yongchao; Doherty, Tim; Waring, Alan J.; Ruchala, Piotr; Hong, Mei

    2009-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are small cationic peptides that cross the cell membrane while carrying macromolecular cargoes. We use solid-state NMR to investigate the structure and lipid interaction of two cationic residues, Arg10 and Lys13, in the CPP penetratin. 13C chemical shifts indicate that Arg10 adopts a rigid β-strand conformation in the liquid-crystalline state of anionic lipid membranes. This behavior contrasts with all other residues observed so far in this peptide, which adopt a dynamic β-turn conformation with coil-like chemical shifts at physiological temperature. Low-temperature 13C-31P distances between the peptide and the lipid phosphates indicate that both the Arg10 guanidinium Cζ and the Lys13 Cε lie in close proximity to the lipid 31P (4.0 - 4.2 Å), proving the existence of charge-charge interaction for both Arg10 and Lys13 in the gel-phase membrane. However, since lysine substitution in CPPs are known to reduce their translocation ability, we propose that low temperature stabilizes both lysine and arginine interactions with the phosphates, whereas at high temperature the lysine-phosphate interaction is much weaker than the arginine-phosphate interaction. This is supported by the unusually high rigidity of the Arg10 sidechain and its β-strand conformation at high temperature. The latter is proposed to be important for ion pair formation by allowing close approach of the lipid headgroups to guanidinium sidechains. 19F and 13C spin diffusion experiments indicate that penetratin is oligomerized into β-sheets in gel-phase membranes. These solid-state NMR data indicate that guanidinium-phosphate interactions exist in penetratin, and guanidinium groups play a stronger structural role than ammonium groups in the lipid-assisted translocation of CPPs across liquid-crystalline cell membranes. PMID:19364134

  6. Quality assessment of fluoxetine and fluvoxamine pharmaceutical formulations purchased in different countries or via the Internet by 19F and 2D DOSY 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Trefi, Saleh; Gilard, Véronique; Balayssac, Stéphane; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Martino, Robert

    2008-03-13

    A simple and selective (19)F NMR method has been validated for the quantitation of fluoxetine (FLX) and fluvoxamine (FLV) in methanol solutions and in human plasma and urine. The regression equations for FLX and FLV showed a good linearity in the range of 1.4-620 microg mL(-1) (3.3 x 10(-6)-1.8 x 10(-3) mol L(-1)) with a limit of detection of approximately 0.5 microg mL(-1) (1.3 x 10(-6) mol L(-1)) and a limit of quantification of approximately 2 microg mL(-1) (4.6 x 10(-6) mol L(-1)). The precision of the assay depends on the concentrations and is comprised between 1.5 and 9.5% for a range of concentrations between 1.2 x 10(-3) and 3.2 x 10(-6) mol L(-1). The accuracy evaluated through recovery studies ranged from approximately 96 to 103% in methanol solutions and in urine, and from approximately 93 to 104% in plasma, with standard deviations <7.5%. The low sensitivity of the method precludes its use for the assay of these antidepressants in biofluids at least at therapeutic doses as the ranges of FLX and FLV plasma levels are 0.15-0.5 microg mL(-1) and 0.15-0.25 microg mL(-1), respectively. The method was applied successfully to the determination of FLX and FLV contents in pharmaceutical samples (brand-named and generic) purchased in several countries or via the Internet. All the commercial formulations contain the active ingredient in the range 94-103% of stated concentration. A "signature" of the formulations (solid and liquid) was obtained with 2D Diffusion-Ordered SpectroscopY (DOSY) (1)H NMR which allowed the characterisation of the active ingredient and excipients present in the formulations studied. Finally, the DOSY separation of FLX and FLV whose molecular weights are very close was obtained by using beta-cyclodextrin as host-guest complexing agent. PMID:18206329

  7. 19F NMR-, ESR-, and vis-NIR-spectroelectrochemical study of the unconventional reduction behaviour of a perfluoroalkylated fullerene: dimerization of the C70(CF3)10– radical anion†

    PubMed Central

    Zalibera, Michal; Machata, Peter; Clikeman, Tyler T.; Rosenkranz, Marco; Strauss, Steven H.; Boltalina, Olga V.; Popov, Alexey A.

    2016-01-01

    The most abundant isomer of C70(CF3)10 (70-10-1) is a rare example of a perfluoroalkylated fullerene exhibiting electrochemically irreversible reduction. We show that electrochemical reversibility at the first reduction step is achieved at scan rates higher than 500 V s-1 Applying ESR-, vis-NIR-, and 19F NMR- spectroelectrochemistry, as well as mass spectrometry and DFT calculations, we show that the (70-10-1)- radical monoanion is in equilibrium with a singly-bonded diamagnetic dimeric dianion. This study is the first example of 19F NMR spectroelectrochemistry, which promises to be an important method for the elucidation of redox mechanisms of fluoroorganic compounds. Additionally, we demonstrate the importance of combining different spectroelectrochemical methods and quantitative analysis of the transferred charge and spin numbers in the determination of the redox mechanism. PMID:26359514

  8. Identification of 2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]- cyclohexane-1,3-dione metabolites in urine of patients suffering from tyrosinemia type I with the use of 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szczeciński, Przemysław; Lamparska, Diana; Gryff-Keller, Adam; Gradowska, Wanda

    2008-01-01

    Organic extracts of six urine samples from children treated with nitisinone, a medicine against tyrosinemia type I, were investigated by (1)H and (19)F NMR spectroscopy. The presence of unchanged 2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]cyclohexane-1,3-dione (NTBC), 6-hydroxy-2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]cyclohexane-1,3-dione (NTBC-OH) and 2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoic acid (NTFA) as well as a few other unidentified compounds containing CF(3) group was documented. PMID:19039335

  9. The Effective Hamiltonian for the Ground State of 207Pb19F and New Measurements of the Fine Structure Spectrum Near 1.2 μ m.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawhorter, Richard; Murphey, Benjamin; Baum, Alexander; Sears, Trevor J.; Yang, T. Zh.; Rupasinghe, P. M.; McRaven, C. P.; Shafer-Ray, N. E.; Alphei, Lukas D.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe.

    2011-06-01

    We have measured rotational transitions in the ground, X_1 ^2Π1/2, electronic state of naturally occuring isotopomers of PbF in a supersonic free jet Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The data for 207Pb19F is particularly interesting because it is a candidate for a future experimental e-EDM measurement. To fit the data for this species to the measurement precision, the nuclear spin-spin dipolar interaction and a second term that can be equivalently viewed as a centrifugal distortion correction to the familiar Frosch and Foley hyperfine coupling terms, or an Ω- dependent correction to the nuclear spin-rotational coupling are required, in addition to the standard terms. To characterize the higher X_2 ^2Π3/2 component of the ground state of PbF, we are attempting a direct measurement of transitions between the two components in a slit jet-cooled sample using a frequency comb-referenced extended cavity diode laser. This spectrum was originally detected in a hot source by Fourier transform near-infrared spectroscopy, but low-J transitions were unresolved at that time. Acknowledgments: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Work by N. E. Shafer-Ray was performed with support from the National Science Foundatation award NSF-0855431. J.-U. Grabow ackonwledges funding from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the Land Niedersachsen. K. Ziebarth, K. Setzer, O. Shestakov and E. Fink J. Molec. Spectrosc. 191, 108 1998.

  10. jsNMR: an embedded platform-independent NMR spectrum viewer.

    PubMed

    Vosegaard, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    jsNMR is a lightweight NMR spectrum viewer written in JavaScript/HyperText Markup Language (HTML), which provides a cross-platform spectrum visualizer that runs on all computer architectures including mobile devices. Experimental (and simulated) datasets are easily opened in jsNMR by (i) drag and drop on a jsNMR browser window, (ii) by preparing a jsNMR file from the jsNMR web site, or (iii) by mailing the raw data to the jsNMR web portal. jsNMR embeds the original data in the HTML file, so a jsNMR file is a self-transforming dataset that may be exported to various formats, e.g. comma-separated values. The main applications of jsNMR are to provide easy access to NMR data without the need for dedicated software installed and to provide the possibility to visualize NMR spectra on web sites. PMID:25641013

  11. Phase transitions and molecular motions in [Cd(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2} studied by DSC, {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR and FT-MIR

    SciTech Connect

    Mikuli, E. . E-mail: mikuli@chemia.uj.edu.pl; Grad, B.; Medycki, W.; Holderna-Natkaniec, K.

    2004-10-01

    Two solid phase transitions of [Cd(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2} occurring on heating at T{sub C2}=183.3K and T{sub C1}=325.3K, with 2K and 5K hysteresis, respectively, were detected by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). High value of entropy changes indicated large orientational disorder of the high temperature and intermediate phase. Nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR and {sup 19}F NMR) relaxation measurements revealed that the phase transitions at T{sub C1} and T{sub C2} were associated with a drastic and small change, respectively, of the both spin-lattice relaxation times: T{sub 1}({sup 1}H) and T{sub 1}({sup 19}F). These relaxation processes were connected with the 'tumbling' motions of the [Cd(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+}, reorientational motions of the H{sub 2}O ligands, and with the iso- and anisotropic reorientation of the BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions. The cross-relaxation effect was observed in phase III. The line width and the second moment of the {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR line measurements revealed that the H{sub 2}O reorientate in all three phases of the title compound. On heating the onset of the reorientation of 3 H{sub 2}O in the [Cd(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup +2}, around the three-fold symmetry axis of these octahedron, causes the isotropic reorientation of the whole cation. The BF{sub 4}{sup -} reorientate isotropically in the phases I and II, but in the phase III they perform slow reorientation only about three- or two-fold axes. A small distortion in the structure of BF{sub 4}{sup -} as well as of [Cd(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} is postulated. The temperature dependence of the bandwidth of the O-H stretching mode measured by Fourier transform middle infrared spectroscopy (FT-MIR) indicated that the activation energy for the reorientation of the H{sub 2}O did not change much at the T{sub C2} phase transition.

  12. Correlated fluorine diffusion and ionic conduction in the nanocrystalline F(-) solid electrolyte Ba(0.6)La(0.4)F(2.4)-(19)F T1(ρ) NMR relaxation vs. conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Preishuber-Pflügl, F; Bottke, P; Pregartner, V; Bitschnau, B; Wilkening, M

    2014-05-28

    Chemical reactions induced by mechanical treatment may give access to new compounds whose properties are governed by chemical metastability, defects introduced and the size effects present. Their interplay may lead to nanocrystalline ceramics with enhanced transport properties being useful to act as solid electrolytes. Here, the introduction of large amounts of La into the cubic structure of BaF2 served as such an example. The ion transport properties in terms of dc-conductivity values of the F(-) anion conductor Ba1-xLaxF2+x (here with x = 0.4) considerably exceed those of pure, nanocrystalline BaF2. So far, there is only little knowledge about activation energies and jump rates of the elementary hopping processes. Here, we took advantage of both impedance spectroscopy and (19)F NMR relaxometry to get to the bottom of ion jump diffusion proceeding on short-range and long-range length scales in Ba0.6La0.4F2.4. While macroscopic transport is governed by an activation energy of 0.55 to 0.59 eV, the elementary steps of hopping seen by NMR are characterised by much smaller activation energies. Fortunately, we were able to deduce an F(-) self-diffusion coefficient by the application of spin-locking NMR relaxometry. PMID:24728404

  13. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin–rotation constants in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br and {sup 127}I)

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B. Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth; Jaszuński, Michał

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin–rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin–rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin–rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin–rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin–rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  14. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in (175)LuX and (197)AuX (X = (19)F, (35)Cl, (79)Br and (127)I).

    PubMed

    Demissie, Taye B; Jaszuński, Michał; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in (175)LuX and (197)AuX (X = (19)F, (35)Cl, (79)Br, (127)I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides. PMID:26520517

  15. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br and 127I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Taye B.; Jaszuński, Michał; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-01

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br, 127I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  16. Study of fluorine in silicate glass with 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, T. M.; Douglass, D. C.; Csencsits, R.; Walker, K. L.

    1986-07-01

    We report an application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to the study of fluorine-doped silicate glass prepared by the modified chemical vapor deposition process, prior to drawing the rod into fibers. The silica contains 1.03-wt. % fluorine, as determined by the calibrated intensity of the 19F NMR spectrum. The isotropic chemical shift of the 19F spectrum shows that fluorine bonds only to silicon; there is no evidence of oxyfluorides. Analysis of the distribution of nuclear dipolar couplings between fluorine nuclei reveals that the relative populations of silicon monofluoride sites [Si(O-)3F] and species having near-neighbor fluorines, such as silicon difluoride sites [Si(O-)2F2], are nearly statistically random. That is, to a good approximation, the fluorine substitutes randomly into the oxygen sites of the silica network. There is no evidence of local clusters of fluorine sites, silicon trifluoride sites [Si(O-)F3], or silicon tetrafluoride (SiF4).

  17. Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings for the assignment of stereochemistry in flubenzimine.

    PubMed

    Ghiviriga, Ion; Rubinski, Miles A; Dolbier, William R

    2016-07-01

    Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings revealed the configuration of flubenzimine, with the CF3 group on N4 pointing towards the lone pair of N5. The (19) F-(15) N coupling constants were measured at natural abundance using a spin-state selective indirect-detection pulse sequence. As (15) N-labelled proteins are routinely synthesized for NMR studies, through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings have the potential to probe the stereochemistry of these proteins by (19) F labelling of some amino acids or can reveal the site of docking of fluorine-containing drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27059012

  18. Perfluoroalkyl Grignard Reagents: NMR Study of 1-Heptafluoropropylmagnesium Chloride in Solution.

    PubMed

    Guang, Jie; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G; Fujiu, Motohiro; Negishi, Kazuyuki; Mikami, Koichi

    2016-07-15

    We report on the generation of a perfluoroalkyl Grignard reagent ((F)RMgX) by exchange reaction between a perfluoroalkyl iodide ((F)R-I) and a Grignard reagent (RMgX). (19)F NMR was applied to monitor the generation of n-C3F7MgCl. Additional NMR techniques, including (19)F COSY, NOESY, and pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) diffusion NMR, were invoked to assign peaks observed in (19)F spectrum. Schlenk equilibrium was observed and was significantly influenced by solvent, diethyl ether, or THF. PMID:27295419

  19. Achievement of 1 H-19 F heteronuclear experiments using the conventional spectrometer with a shared single high band amplifier.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Chiseko; Kurita, Jun-ichi; Furihata, Kazuo; Tashiro, Mitsuru

    2015-05-01

    The (1)H-(19) F heteronuclear NMR experiments were achieved using the conventional spectrometer equipped with a single high band amplifier and a (1)H/(19)F/(13) C double-tuned probe. Although double high band amplifiers are generally required to perform such experiments, a simple modification of pathway in the conventional spectrometer was capable of acquiring various (1)H-(19)F heteronuclear spectra. The efficiency of the present technique was demonstrated in an application for (19)F{(1)H} and (1)H{(19)F} saturation transfer difference experiments. PMID:25808615

  20. Detection of thin film NMR spectrum by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saun, Seung-Bo; Kwon, Sungmin; Lee, Soonchil; Won, Soonho

    2014-03-01

    NMR is widely used in many fields due to its powerful advantages such as nondestructive, chemically selective detection, and local probing. However, because of its low sensitivity, it is difficult to investigate thin film samples by conventional NMR. MRFM is the combined technic of NMR and Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM), and it enabled exceptional sensitivity increasement of NMR detection. We succeeded in detecting general thin film NMR spectrum for the first time by modifying the MRFM. CaF2 34nm thin film NMR was detected and we observed 20 Gauss spectrum in proximity to bulk spectrum which is about 10 Gauss.

  1. Identification of 2-Fluoro-2-deoxy- D-glucose Metabolites by 19F{ 1H} Hetero-RELAY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Thomas M.; London, Robert E.

    1995-12-01

    It has been proposed that in mammalian systems the glucose analog 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is phosphoryated and subsequently converted to the corresponding mannose derivative via the action of phosphoglucose isomerase. As is generally true in metabolic studies of fluorinated molecules, the fluorine spectrum alone is suggestive, without providing definitive structural evidence, while the use of1H NMR techniques generally suffers from a lack of adequate selectivity. A1H-19F version of the hetero-RELAY experiment has been applied to this problem. Formation of the corresponding C-6 phosphorylated 2-FDG analog with hexokinase, followed by treatment of the resulting phosphorylated products with phosphoglucose isomerase, resulted in the observation of additional19F resonances consistent with the corresponding 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-mannose-6-phosphate metabolite. A more definitive product identification was obtained using the hetero-RELAY experiment, which provides a complete19F-decoupled proton spectrum for each of the fluorinated species.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 19F SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.

    2009-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked by Liquid Waste Operations to characterize Tank 19F closure samples. Tank 19F slurry samples analyzed included the liquid and solid fractions derived from the slurry materials along with the floor scrape bottom Tank 19F wet solids. These samples were taken from Tank 19F in April 2009 and made available to SRNL in the same month. Because of limited amounts of solids observed in Tank 19F samples, the samples from the north quadrants of the tank were combined into one Tank 19F North Hemisphere sample and similarly the south quadrant samples were combined into one Tank 19F South Hemisphere sample. These samples were delivered to the SRNL shielded cell. The Tank 19F samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Where analytical methods yielded additional contaminants other than those requested by the customer, these results were also reported. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on detection values of 1E-04 {micro}Ci/g for most radionuclides and customer desired detection values of 1E-05 {micro}Ci/g for I-129, Pa-231, Np-237, and Ra-226. While many of the target detection limits, as specified in the technical task request and task technical and quality assurance plans were met for the species characterized for Tank 19F, some were not met. In a number of cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. SRNL, in conjunction with the plant customer, reviewed all these cases and determined that the impacts were negligible.

  3. Strategies to enhance signal intensity with paramagnetic fluorine-labelled lanthanide complexes as probes for 19F magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Kirsten H; Botta, Mauro; Parker, David

    2011-01-28

    The synthesis and (19)F NMR spectroscopic properties are reported for three series of CF(3)-labelled lanthanide(III) complexes, based on mono- and diamide cyclen ligands. Analyses of variable temperature, pH and field (19)F, (17)O and (1)H NMR spectroscopic experiments are reported and the merits of a triphosphinate mono-amide complex defined by virtue of its favourable isomer distribution and attractive relaxation properties. These lead to an enhanced sensitivity of detection in (19)F magnetic resonance experiments versus a diamagnetic Y(III) analogue, paving the way for future shift and imaging studies. PMID:21127807

  4. Photoneutron angular distribution of 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, P. C.-K.; Jury, J. W.; McNeill, K. G.; Sherman, N. K.; Davidson, W. F.

    1989-07-01

    Photoneutron time-of-flight spectra from the reaction 19F(γ, n 0) 18F were measured between 48° and 139° using 10 m flight paths over the excitation energy range from 15-25 MeV. The measured values of the normalized Legendre a1 and a3 coefficients are very small or close to zero over the energy region studied, indicating dominance of E1 absorption in this region. A simple modeldependent analysis of the a2 coefficient showed that the likely reaction mechanisms are mainly s → p and d → p single-particle transitions of channel spin {1}/{2}. A comparison of the present angleintegrated ground-state cross section with the (γ, n tot) work of Veyssière et al. indicates that decays to excited states in 18F are much preferred (typically by a factor of 5) over the ground-state channel. The 19F(γ, n 0) cross section shows reasonable agreement in structure and magnitude with the 19F(γ, p 0) cross section of Kerkhove et al. as well as with the 18O(γ, n 0) data of Jury et al. (although some discrepancies are seen at 16 MeV and above 23 MeV).

  5. Modified polysaccharides as potential (19)F magnetic resonance contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Tomasz; Minoshima, Masafumi; Sugihara, Fuminori; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2016-06-16

    The introduction of 3-aminobenzotrifluoride into partially oxidized alginic acid, dextran, and polygalacturonic acid (10-100 kDa) by means of the imine formation and a subsequent reduction resulted in water-soluble materials containing 1-14% of fluorine. They showed a single or split (19)F NMR signal in a narrow range of -63 to -63.5 ppm. The observed T1 and T2 were approximately 1 and 0.2 s at 400 or 500 MHz instruments, respectively. The samples showed low toxicity and uptake toward the HeLa cells similar to native polysaccharides and were preferentially localized in lysosomes. A tail intravenous injection of 5 mg of modified dextran containing 1% of fluorine revealed that the probe was not trapped in liver, spleen or kidneys, but was quickly cleared with urine. The proposed materials can be used for imaging of the gastrointestinal tract or the genitourinary system and act as a material for more complex (19)F MRI agent synthesis. PMID:27148998

  6. 19F MRI for quantitative in vivo cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Mangala; Heerschap, Arend; Ahrens, Eric T.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular therapy, including stem cell transplants and dendritic cell vaccines, is typically monitored for dosage optimization, accurate delivery and localization using non-invasive imaging, of which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a key modality. 19F MRI retains the advantages of MRI as an imaging modality, while allowing direct detection of labelled cells for unambiguous identification and quantification, unlike typical metal-based contrast agents. Recent developments in 19F MRI-based in vivo cell quantification, the existing clinical use of 19F compounds and current explosive interest in cellular therapeutics have brought 19F imaging technology closer to clinical application. We review the application of 19F MRI to cell tracking, discussing intracellular 19F labels, cell labelling and in vivo quantification, as well as the potential clinical use of 19F MRI. PMID:20427096

  7. The relationship between reorientational molecular motions and phase transitions in [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2}, studied with the use of {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR and FT-MIR

    SciTech Connect

    Mikuli, Edward Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Grad, Bartłomiej; Kozak, Asja; Wąsicki, Jan W.; Bilski, Paweł; Hołderna-Natkaniec, Krystyna; Medycki, Wojciech

    2015-02-14

    A {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance study of [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2} has confirmed the existence of two phase transitions at T{sub c1} ≈ 257 K and T{sub c2} ≈ 142 K, detected earlier by the DSC method. These transitions were reflected by changes in the temperature dependences of both proton and fluorine of second moments M{sub 2}{sup H} and M{sub 2}{sup F} and of spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1}{sup H} and T{sub 1}{sup F}. The study revealed anisotropic reorientations of whole [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} cations, reorientations by 180° jumps of H{sub 2}O ligands, and aniso- and isotropic reorientations of BF{sub 4}{sup −} anions. The activation parameters for these motions were obtained. It was found that the phase transition at T{sub c1} is associated with the reorientation of the cation as a whole unit around the C{sub 3} axis and that at T{sub c2} with isotropic reorientation of the BF{sub 4}{sup −} anions. The temperature dependence of the full width at half maximum value of the infrared band of ρ{sub t}(H{sub 2}O) mode (at ∼596 cm{sup −1}) indicated that in phases I and II, all H{sub 2}O ligands in [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} perform fast reorientational motions (180° jumps) with a mean value of activation energy equal to ca 10 kJ mole{sup −1}, what is fully consistent with NMR results. The phase transition at T{sub c1} is associated with a sudden change of speed of fast (τ{sub R} ≈ 10{sup −12} s) reorientational motions of H{sub 2}O ligands. Below T{sub c2} (in phase III), the reorientations of certain part of the H{sub 2}O ligands significantly slow down, while others continue their fast reorientation with an activation energy of ca 2 kJ mole{sup −1}. This fast reorientation cannot be evidenced in NMR relaxation experiments. Splitting of certain IR bands connected with H{sub 2}O ligands at the observed phase transitions suggests a reduction of the symmetry of the octahedral [Mg(H{sub 2}O

  8. Tracking Transitions in Spider Wrapping Silk Conformation and Dynamics by (19)F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Muzaddid; Orrell, Kathleen E; Xu, Lingling; Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Bak, Jessi J; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2016-05-31

    Aciniform silk protein (AcSp1) is the primary component of wrapping silk, the toughest of the spider silks because of a combination of high tensile strength and extensibility. Argiope trifasciata AcSp1 contains a core repetitive domain with at least 14 homogeneous 200-amino acid units ("W" units). Upon fibrillogenesis, AcSp1 converts from an α-helix-rich soluble state to a mixed α-helical/β-sheet conformation. Solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allowed demonstration of variable local stability within the W unit, but comprehensive characterization was confounded by spectral overlap, which was exacerbated by decreased chemical shift dispersion upon denaturation. Here, (19)F NMR spectroscopy, in the context of a single W unit (W1), is applied to track changes in structure and dynamics. Four strategic positions in the W unit were mutated to tryptophan and biosynthetically labeled with 5-fluorotryptophan (5F-Trp). Simulated annealing-based structure calculations implied that these substitutions should be tolerated, while circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and (1)H-(15)N chemical shift displacements indicated minimal structural perturbation in W1 mutants. Fiber formation by W2 concatemers containing 5F-Trp substitutions in both W units demonstrated retention of functionality, a somewhat surprising finding in light of sequence conservation between species. Each 5F-Trp-labeled W1 exhibited a unique (19)F chemical shift, line width, longitudinal relaxation time constant (T1), and solvent isotope shift. Perturbation to (19)F chemical shift and nuclear spin relaxation parameters reflected changes in the conformation and dynamics at each 5F-Trp site upon addition of urea and dodecylphosphocholine (DPC). (19)F NMR spectroscopy allowed unambiguous localized tracking throughout titration with each perturbant, demonstrating distinct behavior for each perturbant not previously revealed by heteronuclear NMR experiments. PMID:27153372

  9. A Pipeline Software Architecture for NMR Spectrum Data Translation

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Heidi J.C.; Weatherby, Gerard; Nowling, Ronald J.; Vyas, Jay; Fenwick, Matthew; Gryk, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of formatting data so that it conforms to the required input for scientific data processing tools pervades scientific computing. The CONNecticut Joint University Research Group (CONNJUR) has developed a data translation tool based on a pipeline architecture that partially solves this problem. The CONNJUR Spectrum Translator supports data format translation for experiments that use Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to determine the structure of large protein molecules. PMID:24634607

  10. A bisphosphonate for 19F-magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Gavin D.; Shaw, Karen P.; Sivachelvam, Saranja; White, Andrew J.P.; Botnar, Rene M.; T.M. de Rosales, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    19F-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising technique that may allow us to measure the concentration of exogenous fluorinated imaging probes quantitatively in vivo. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterisation of a novel geminal bisphosphonate (19F-BP) that contains chemically-equivalent fluorine atoms that show a single and narrow 19F resonance and a bisphosphonate group that may be used for labelling inorganic materials based in calcium phosphates and metal oxides. The potential of 19F-BP to provide contrast was analysed in vitro and in vivo using 19F-MRI. In vitro studies demonstrated the potential of 19F-BP as an MRI contrast agent in the millimolar concentration range with signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) comparable to previously reported fluorinated probes. The preliminary in vivo MRI study reported here allowed us to visualise the biodistribution of 19F-BP, showing uptake in the liver and in the bladder/urinary system areas. However, bone uptake was not observed. In addition, 19F-BP showed undesirable toxicity effects in mice that prevent further studies with this compound at the required concentrations for MRI contrast. This study highlights the importance of developing 19F MRI probes with the highest signal intensity achievable. PMID:27110036

  11. Complete fusion of 19F with Al and Si isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, M. S.; Wu, M. W.; Easwar, N.; Maher, J. V.

    1981-12-01

    Complete fusion cross sections have been determined by directly detecting evaporation residuals for the systems 19F + 27Al and 19F + 28,30Si over a 19F laboratory energy range 34-75 MeV. In all cases σfus increases smoothly with energy and eventually saturates at 1200-1250 mb. In the barrier penetration region the cross section for 19F + 28Si is always sufficiently smaller than that for 19F + 30Si to make the reduced barrier radius in a Glas-Mosel parametrization significantly smaller for the former system than for the latter. Three entrance channels are now available for the fused-system 46Ti: Critical angular momentum data from the 16O + 30Si entrance channel approach the statistical yrast line at much lower fused-system excitation energy than do the data from the entrance channels 18O + 28Si and 19F + 27Al. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Measured complete fusion cross sections for the systems 19F + 27Al, 19F + 28Si, 19F + 30Si; E=34-75 MeV. Deduced Glas-Mosel model and statistical yrast model parameters.

  12. Fluorinated Carbohydrates as Lectin Ligands: 19F-Based Direct STD Monitoring for Detection of Anomeric Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, João P.; Diercks, Tammo; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Cañada, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of the binding of reducing carbohydrates present as mixtures of anomers in solution to a sugar recepor (lectin) poses severe difficulties. In this situation, NMR spectroscopy enables the observation of signals for each anomer in the mixture by applying approaches based on ligand observation. Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR allows fast and efficient screening of compound mixtures for reactivity to a receptor. Owing to the exceptionally favorable properties of 19F in NMR spectroscopy and the often complex 1H spectra of carbohydrates, 19F-containing sugars have the potential to be turned into versatile sensors for recognition. Extending the recently established 1H → 1H STDre19F-NMR technique, we here demonstrate its applicability to measure anomeric selectivity of binding in a model system using the plant lectin concanavalin A (ConA) and 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-mannose. Indeed, it is also possible to account for the mutual inhibition between the anomers on binding to the lectin by means of a kinetic model. The monitoring of 19F-NMR signal perturbation disclosed the relative activities of the anomers in solution and thus enabled the calculation of their binding affinity towards ConA. The obtained data show a preference for the α anomer that increases with temperature. This experimental approach can be extended to others systems of biomedical interest by testing human lectins with suitably tailored glycan derivatives. PMID:26580665

  13. Binding energies and 19F nuclear magnetic deshielding in paramagnetic halogen-bonded complexes of TEMPO with haloperfluorocarbons.

    PubMed

    Cavallotti, Carlo; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Meyer, Franck; Recupero, Francesco; Resnati, Giuseppe

    2008-10-01

    19F NMR measurements and theoretical calculations were performed to study paramagnetic complexes of iodoperfluorocarbons with stable nitroxide radicals. Contrary to what is usually measured for diamagnetic halogen-bonded complexes involving iodoperfluorocarbons, it was found that the formation of complexes with the 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl(piperidin-1-yloxyl) (TEMPO) radical determines downfield shifts in the 19F NMR spectra. The experimental finding was confirmed by calculating nuclear shielding using density functional theory and correcting the isotropic diamagnetic (19)F chemical shift with contact interactions evaluated from the hyperfine coupling tensor. The computational analysis of the interaction between CF3I and TEMPO, by using DFT and MP2 theories, showed that the occurrence of the halogen bond between the interacting partners is associated with a significant charge transfer to CF3I and that the measured downfield shift is due to the occurring spin transfer. PMID:18795762

  14. Heteronuclear 19F-1H statistical total correlation spectroscopy as a tool in drug metabolism: study of flucloxacillin biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Keun, Hector C; Athersuch, Toby J; Beckonert, Olaf; Wang, Yulan; Saric, Jasmina; Shockcor, John P; Lindon, John C; Wilson, Ian D; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2008-02-15

    We present a novel application of the heteronuclear statistical total correlation spectroscopy (HET-STOCSY) approach utilizing statistical correlation between one-dimensional 19F/1H NMR spectroscopic data sets collected in parallel to study drug metabolism. Parallel one-dimensional (1D) 800 MHz 1H and 753 MHz 19F{1H} spectra (n = 21) were obtained on urine samples collected from volunteers (n = 6) at various intervals up to 24 h after oral dosing with 500 mg of flucloxacillin. A variety of statistical relationships between and within the spectroscopic datasets were explored without significant loss of the typically high 1D spectral resolution, generating 1H-1H STOCSY plots, and novel 19F-1H HET-STOCSY, 19F-19F STOCSY, and 19F-edited 1H-1H STOCSY (X-STOCSY) spectroscopic maps, with a resolution of approximately 0.8 Hz/pt for both nuclei. The efficient statistical editing provided by these methods readily allowed the collection of drug metabolic data and assisted structure elucidation. This approach is of general applicability for studying the metabolism of other fluorine-containing drugs, including important anticancer agents such as 5-fluorouracil and flutamide, and is extendable to any drug metabolism study where there is a spin-active X-nucleus (e.g., 13C, 15N, 31P) label present. PMID:18211034

  15. 19F magnetic resonance imaging of endogenous macrophages in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Bönner, Florian; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we review the use of (19) F MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) for in vivo tracking of monocytes and macrophages in the course of tissue inflammation. Emulsified perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are preferentially phagocytized by monocytes/macrophages and are readily detected by (19) F MRI. Because of the lack of any (19) F background in the body, observed signals are robust and exhibit an excellent degree of specificity. As a consequence of progressive infiltration of the labeled immunocompetent cells into inflamed areas, foci of inflammation can be localized as hot spots by simultaneous acquisition of morphologically matched proton ((1) H) and fluorine ((19) F) MRI. The identification of inflammation by (19) F MRI--at a time when the inflammatory cascade is initiated--opens the possibility for an early detection and more timely therapeutic intervention. Since signal intensity in the (19) F images reflects the severity of inflammation, this approach is also suitable to monitor the efficacy of pharmaceutical treatment. Because PFCs are biochemically inert and the fluorine nucleus exhibits high magnetic resonance (MR) sensitivity, (19) F MRI may be applicable for clinical inflammation imaging. PMID:22354793

  16. Correlation between 19F environment and isotropic chemical shift in barium and calcium fluoroaluminates.

    PubMed

    Body, M; Silly, G; Legein, C; Buzaré, J-Y

    2004-04-19

    High-speed MAS (19)F NMR spectra are recorded and reconstructed for 10 compounds from BaF(2)-AlF(3) and CaF(2)-AlF(3) binary systems which leads to the determination of 77 isotropic (19)F chemical shifts in various environments. A first attribution of NMR lines is performed for 8 compounds using a superposition model as initially proposed by B. Bureau et al. The phenomenological parameters of this model are then refined to improve the NMR line assignment. A satisfactory reliability is reached with a root-mean-square (RMS) deviation between calculated and measured values equal to 6 ppm. The refined parameters are then successfully tested on alpha-BaCaAlF(7) whose structure was recently determined. Finally, the isotropic chemical shift ranges are defined for shared, unshared, and "free" fluorine atoms encountered in the investigated binary systems. So, the fluorine surroundings can be deduced from the NMR line positions in compounds whose structure is unknown. Such an approach can also be applied to fluoride glasses. PMID:15074964

  17. Cell Labeling for 19F MRI: New and Improved Approach to Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsion Design

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sravan K.; Williams, Jonathan; Janjic, Jelena M.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes novel perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions designed to improve ex vivo cell labeling for 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 19F MRI is a powerful non-invasive technique for monitoring cells of the immune system in vivo, where cells are labeled ex vivo with PFC nanoemulsions in cell culture. The quality of 19F MRI is directly affected by the quality of ex vivo PFC cell labeling. When co-cultured with cells for longer periods of time, nanoemulsions tend to settle due to high specific weight of PFC oils (1.5–2.0 g/mL). This in turn can decrease efficacy of excess nanoemulsion removal and reliability of the cell labeling in vitro. To solve this problem, novel PFC nanoemulsions are reported which demonstrate lack of sedimentation and high stability under cell labeling conditions. They are monodisperse, have small droplet size (~130 nm) and low polydispersity (<0.15), show a single peak in the 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum at −71.4 ppm and possess high fluorine content. The droplet size and polydispersity remained unchanged after 160 days of follow up at three temperatures (4, 25 and 37 °C). Further, stressors such as elevated temperature in the presence of cells, and centrifugation, did not affect the nanoemulsion droplet size and polydispersity. Detailed synthetic methodology and in vitro testing for these new PFC nanoemulsions is presented. PMID:25586263

  18. Experimental Protein Structure Verification by Scoring with a Single, Unassigned NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Joseph M; Ye, Qing; Nesbitt, Anna E; Tang, Ming; Tuttle, Marcus D; Watt, Eric D; Nuzzio, Kristin M; Sperling, Lindsay J; Comellas, Gemma; Peterson, Joseph R; Morrissey, James H; Rienstra, Chad M

    2015-10-01

    Standard methods for de novo protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) require time-consuming data collection and interpretation efforts. Here we present a qualitatively distinct and novel approach, called Comparative, Objective Measurement of Protein Architectures by Scoring Shifts (COMPASS), which identifies the best structures from a set of structural models by numerical comparison with a single, unassigned 2D (13)C-(13)C NMR spectrum containing backbone and side-chain aliphatic signals. COMPASS does not require resonance assignments. It is particularly well suited for interpretation of magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectra, but also applicable to solution NMR spectra. We demonstrate COMPASS with experimental data from four proteins--GB1, ubiquitin, DsbA, and the extracellular domain of human tissue factor--and with reconstructed spectra from 11 additional proteins. For all these proteins, with molecular mass up to 25 kDa, COMPASS distinguished the correct fold, most often within 1.5 Å root-mean-square deviation of the reference structure. PMID:26365800

  19. One- and two-dimensional exchange J-resolved CP-MAS NMR spectrum of adamantane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegoshi, K.; McDowell, C. A.

    1986-02-01

    A combined technique of 1D and 2D exchange NMR and J-resolved CP-MAS NMR of dilute spins in solids and its application to study a spin exchange process of abundant spins in solids is described, and demonstrated for powdered adamantane. A high-resolution J-resolved NMR spectrum of a 13C nucleus obtained by applying homonuclear decoupling and magic angle sample spinning is employed to label the spin states of 1H spins bonded to the 13C nucleus. Perspective 2D exchange spectra are employed to map out connectivity between the proton spin states, and the rate constants for the 1H spin exchange involved are determined by 1D exchange NMR techniques. Discussions based on the total energy conservation enable us to conclude that the observed spin exchange processes are to be ascribed mainly to the flip-flop motion of 1H spins; the spin-lattice process is negligible. The rate constant for the flip-flop motion of the proton spins is determined to be (7±2)×103 s-1 at room temperature.

  20. /sup 19/F shielding anisotropy in RbCaF/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect

    Kaliaperumal, R.; Sears, R.E.J.; Finch, C.B.

    1987-07-01

    A /sup 19/F NMR multipulse measurement of the chemical shift in a single crystal of cubic RbCaF/sub 3/ gave -47.0 +- 3 ppm as the isotropic value with respect to C/sub 6/F/sub 6/, and 128.7 +- 6 ppm as the anisotropy. The shielding is accounted for by the usual diamagnetic and paramagnetic ionic overlap and covalent terms. As a result, the Ca/sup + +/ -F/sup -/ bond is estimated to be 98% ionic. No significant spectral changes were found when the crystal was cooled below the cubic to tetragonal phase transition temperature. Reasons for this are given.

  1. Single 19F Probe for Simultaneous Detection of Multiple Metal Ions Using miCEST MRI

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The local presence and concentration of metal ions in biological systems has been extensively studied ex vivo using fluorescent dyes. However, the detection of multiple metal ions in vivo remains a major challenge. We present a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based method for noninvasive detection of specific ions that may be coexisting, using the tetrafluorinated derivative of the BAPTA (TF-BAPTA) chelate as a 19F chelate analogue of existing optical dyes. Taking advantage of the difference in the ion-specific 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift offset (Δω) values between the ion-bound and free TF-BAPTA, we exploited the dynamic exchange between ion-bound and free TF-BAPTA to obtain MRI contrast with multi-ion chemical exchange saturation transfer (miCEST). We demonstrate that TF-BAPTA as a prototype single 19F probe can be used to separately visualize mixed Zn2+ and Fe2+ ions in a specific and simultaneous fashion, without interference from potential competitive ions. PMID:25523816

  2. Amphiphilic Hyperbranched Fluoropolymers as Nanoscopic 19F-Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wenjun; Nyström, Andreas M.; Zhang, Lei; Powell, Kenya T.; Li, Yali; Cheng, Chong; Wickline, Samuel A.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    Three hyperbranched fluoropolymers were synthesized and their micelles were constructed as potential 19F MRI agents. A hyperbranched star-like core was first synthesized via ATR-SCVCP of 4-chloromethyl styrene (CMS), lauryl acrylate (LA) and 1,1,1-tris(4′-(2″-bromoisobutyryloxy)phenyl)ethane (TBBPE). The polymerization gave a small core with Mn of 5.5 kDa with PDI of 1.6, which served as a macroinitiator. Trifluoroethyl methacrylate (TFEMA) and tert-butyl acrylate (tBA) in different ratio were then “grafted” from the core to give three polymers with Mn of ca. 120 kDa and PDI values of ca. 1.6–1.8. After acidolysis of the tert-butyl ester groups, amphiphilic, hyperbranched star-like polymers with Mn of ca. 100 kDa were obtained. These structures were subjected to micelle formation in aqueous solution to give micelles having TEM-measured diameters ranging from 3–8 nm and DLS-measured hydrodynamic diameters from 20–30 nm. These micelles gave a narrow, single resonance by 19F NMR spectroscopy, with a half width of approximately 130 Hz. The T1/T2 parameters were ca. 500 ms and 50 ms, respectively, and were not significantly affected by the composition and sizes of the micelles. 19F MRI phantom images of these fluorinated micelles were acquired, which demonstrated that these fluorinated micelles maybe useful as novel 19F MRI agents for a variety of biomedical studies. PMID:18795785

  3. The (1) H NMR spectrum of pyrazole in a nematic phase.

    PubMed

    Provasi, Patricio; Jimeno, María Luisa; Alkorta, Ibon; Reviriego, Felipe; Elguero, José; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2016-08-01

    The experimental (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of 1H-pyrazole was recorded in thermotropic nematic liquid crystal N-(p-ethoxybenzylidene)-p-butylaniline (EBBA) within the temperature range of 299-308 K. Two of three observable dipolar DHH -couplings appeared to be equal at each temperature because of fast prototropic tautomerism. Analysis of the Saupe orientational order parameters using fixed geometry determined by computations and experimental dipolar couplings results in a situation in which the molecular orientation relative to the magnetic field (and the liquid crystal director) can be described exceptionally by a single parameter. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26947581

  4. Filtering and parameter estimation of surface-NMR data using singular spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanati, Reza; Kazem Hafizi, Mohammad; Mahmoudvand, Rahim; Fallahsafari, Mahdi

    2016-07-01

    Ambient electromagnetic interferences at the site of investigation often degrade the signal quality of the Surface-NMR measurements leading to inaccurate estimation of the signal parameters. This paper proposes a new powerful de-noising method based on singular spectrum analysis (SSA), which is a nonparametric method for analyzing time series. SSA is a relatively simple method and can be understood using basic algebra notations. Singular value decomposition (SVD) plays a crucial role in SSA. As the length of recordings increases, the computational time required for computing SVD raises which restricts the usage of SSA in long-term time series. In order to overcome this drawback, we propose a randomized version of the singular value decomposition to accelerate the decomposition step of the algorithm. To evaluate the performance of the proposed strategy, the method is tested on synthetic signals corrupted by both simulated noise (including Gaussian white noise, spiky events and harmonic noise) and real noise recordings obtained from surface-NMR field surveys and a real data set. Our results show that the proposed algorithm can enhance the signal to noise ratio significantly, and gives an improvement in estimation of the surface-NMR signal parameters.

  5. NMR Spectroscopy for Thin Films by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Won, Soonho; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Lee, SangGap; Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Yunseok

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental research tool that is widely used in many fields. Despite its powerful applications, unfortunately the low sensitivity of conventional NMR makes it difficult to study thin film or nano-sized samples. In this work, we report the first NMR spectrum obtained from general thin films by using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). To minimize the amount of imaging information inevitably mixed into the signal when a gradient field is used, we adopted a large magnet with a flat end with a diameter of 336 μm that generates a homogeneous field on the sample plane and a field gradient in a direction perpendicular to the plane. Cyclic adiabatic inversion was used in conjunction with periodic phase inversion of the frequency shift to maximize the SNR. In this way, we obtained the 19F NMR spectrum for a 34 nm-thick CaF2 thin film. PMID:24217000

  6. Dual 19F/1H MR gene reporter molecules for in vivo detection of β-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Xin; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Hallac, Rami R.; Liu, Li; Mason, Ralph P.

    2012-01-01

    Increased emphasis on personalized medicine and novel therapies require the development of non-invasive strategies for assessing biochemistry in vivo. The detection of enzyme activity and gene expression in vivo is potentially important for the characterization of diseases and gene therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a particularly promising tool since it is non-invasive, and has no associated radioactivity, yet penetrates deep tissue. We now demonstrate a novel class of dual 1H/19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lacZ gene reporter molecule to specifically reveal enzyme activity in human tumor xenografts growing in mice. We report the design, synthesis, and characterization of six novel molecules and evaluation of the most effective reporter in mice in vivo. Substrates show a single 19F NMR signal and exposure to β-galactosidase induces a large 19F NMR chemical shift response. In the presence of ferric ions the liberated aglycone generates intense proton MRI T2 contrast. The dual modality approach allows both the detection of substrate and imaging of product enhancing the confidence in enzyme detection. PMID:22352428

  7. A General and Facile Strategy to Fabricate Multifunctional Nanoprobes for Simultaneous (19)F Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Optical/Thermal Imaging, and Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Gaofei; Li, Nannan; Tang, Juan; Xu, Suying; Wang, Leyu

    2016-09-01

    (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), due to its high sensitivity and negligible background, is anticipated to be a powerful noninvasive, sensitive, and accurate molecular imaging technique. However, the major challenge of (19)F MRI is to increase the number of (19)F atoms while maintaining the solubility and molecular mobility of the probe. Here, we successfully developed a facile and general strategy to synthesize the multifunctional (19)F MRI nanoprobes by encapsulating the hydrophobic inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) into a hybrid polymer micelle consisting of hydrolysates of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (PDTES) and oleylamine-functionalized poly(succinimide) (PSIOAm). Due to their good water dispersibility, excellent molecular mobility resulting from the ultrathin coating, and high (19)F atom numbers, these nanoprobes generate a separate sharp singlet of (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal (at -82.8 ppm) with half peak width of ∼28 Hz, which is highly applicable for (19)F MRI. Significantly, by varying the inorganic core from metals (Au), oxides (Fe3O4), fluorides (NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+)), and phosphates (YPO4) to semiconductors (Cu7S4 and Ag2S, ZnS:Mn(2+)) NPs, which renders the nanoprobes' multifunctional properties such as photothermal ability (Au, Cu7S4), magnetism (Fe3O4), fluorescence (ZnS:Mn(2+)), near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence (Ag2S), and upconversion (UC) luminescence. Meanwhile, the as-prepared nanoprobes possess relatively small sizes (about 50 nm), which is beneficial for long-time circulation. The proof-of-concept in vitro (19)F NMR and photothermal ablation of ZnS:Mn(2+)@PDTES/PSIOAm and Cu7S4@PDTES/PSIOAm nanoprobes further suggest that these nanoprobes hold wide potentials for multifunctional applications in biomedical fields. PMID:27534896

  8. Characterization of 19A-like 19F pneumococcal isolates from Papua New Guinea and Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, E.M.; Tikkanen, L.; Balloch, A.; Gould, K.; Yoannes, M.; Phuanukoonnon, S.; Licciardi, P.V.; Russell, F.M.; Mulholland, E.K.; Satzke, C.; Hinds, J.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19F is routinely performed by PCR targeting the wzy gene of the capsular biosynthetic locus. However, 19F isolates with genetic similarity to 19A have been reported in the United States and Brazil. We screened 78 pneumococcal carriage isolates and found six 19F wzy variants that originated from children in Papua New Guinea and Fiji. Isolates were characterized using multilocus sequence typing and opsonophagocytic assays. The 19F wzy variants displayed similar susceptibility to anti-19F IgG antibodies compared to standard 19F isolates. Our findings indicate that these 19F variants may be more common than previously believed. PMID:26339490

  9. Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways: Identifying Metabolic Pathways Directly from a Single 2D NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhinav; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Pal, Debnath; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2015-12-15

    Identifying cellular processes in terms of metabolic pathways is one of the avowed goals of metabolomics studies. Currently, this is done after relevant metabolites are identified to allow their mapping onto specific pathways. This task is daunting due to the complex nature of cellular processes and the difficulty in establishing the identity of individual metabolites. We propose here a new method: ChemSMP (Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways), which facilitates rapid analysis by identifying the active metabolic pathways directly from chemical shifts obtained from a single two-dimensional (2D) [(13)C-(1)H] correlation NMR spectrum without the need for identification and assignment of individual metabolites. ChemSMP uses a novel indexing and scoring system comprised of a "uniqueness score" and a "coverage score". Our method is demonstrated on metabolic pathways data from the Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) and chemical shifts from the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). Benchmarks show that ChemSMP has a positive prediction rate of >90% in the presence of decluttered data and can sustain the same at 60-70% even in the presence of noise, such as deletions of peaks and chemical shift deviations. The method tested on NMR data acquired for a mixture of 20 amino acids shows a success rate of 93% in correct recovery of pathways. When used on data obtained from the cell lysate of an unexplored oncogenic cell line, it revealed active metabolic pathways responsible for regulating energy homeostasis of cancer cells. Our unique tool is thus expected to significantly enhance analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data by reducing existing impediments. PMID:26556218

  10. In vivo 19F MRI and 19F MRS of 19F-labelled boronophenylalanine fructose complex on a C6 rat glioma model to optimize boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcari, Paola; Capuani, Silvia; D'Amore, Emanuela; Lecce, Mario; La Bella, Angela; Fasano, Fabrizio; Campanella, Renzo; Migneco, Luisa Maria; Saverio Pastore, Francesco; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary modality used to treat malignant brain gliomas. To optimize BNCT effectiveness a non-invasive method is needed to monitor the spatial distribution of BNCT carriers in order to estimate the optimal timing for neutron irradiation. In this study, in vivo spatial distribution mapping and pharmacokinetics evaluation of the 19F-labelled boronophenylalanine (BPA) were performed using 19F magnetic resonance imaging (19F MRI) and 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19F MRS). Characteristic uptake of 19F-BPA in C6 glioma showed a maximum at 2.5 h after compound infusion as confirmed by both 19F images and 19F spectra acquired on blood samples collected at different times after infusion. This study shows the ability of 19F MRI to selectively map the bio-distribution of 19F-BPA in a C6 rat glioma model, as well as providing a useful method to perform pharmacokinetics of BNCT carriers.

  11. Fluorine (19F) MRS and MRI in biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Barnett, Brad P.; Bottomley, Paul A.; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Shortly after the introduction of 1H MRI, fluorinated molecules were tested as MR-detectable tracers or contrast agents. Many fluorinated compounds, which are nontoxic and chemically inert, are now being used in a broad range of biomedical applications, including anesthetics, chemotherapeutic agents, and molecules with high oxygen solubility for respiration and blood substitution. These compounds can be monitored by fluorine (19F) MRI and/or MRS, providing a noninvasive means to interrogate associated functions in biological systems. As a result of the lack of endogenous fluorine in living organisms, 19F MRI of ‘hotspots’ of targeted fluorinated contrast agents has recently opened up new research avenues in molecular and cellular imaging. This includes the specific targeting and imaging of cellular surface epitopes, as well as MRI cell tracking of endogenous macrophages, injected immune cells and stem cell transplants. PMID:20842758

  12. Characterization of the ground X{sub 1} state of {sup 204}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 206}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F, and {sup 208}Pb{sup 19}F

    SciTech Connect

    Mawhorter, Richard J.; Murphy, Benjamin S.; Baum, Alexander L.; Sears, Trevor J.; Yang, T.; Rupasinghe, P. M; McRaven, C. P.; Shafer-Ray, N. E.; Alphei, Lukas D.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2011-08-15

    Pure rotational spectra of the ground electronic-vibrational X{sub 1} state of {sup 204}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 206}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F, and {sup 208}Pb{sup 19}F are measured with a resonator pulsed supersonic jet Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer. Also reported is a new measurement of the Stark effect on the optical spectra of A(leftarrow)X{sub 1} transitions. These spectra are combined with published high-resolution infrared spectra of X{sub 2}{r_reversible}X{sub 1} transitions in order to create a complete picture of the ground state of lead monofluoride. For the microwave data, molecules are prepared by laser ablation of lead target rods and stabilized in a supersonic jet of neon mixed with sulfur hexafluoride. For the optical Stark spectra, a continuous source of molecules is created in a nozzle heated to 1000 deg. C. The microwave spectra confirm, improve, and extend previously reported constants that describe the rotational, spin-orbit, and hyperfine interactions of the ground electronic state of the PbF molecule. A discrepancy concerning the sign of the hyperfine constant describing the {sup 207}Pb nucleus is discussed. Magnetic-field-dependent microwave spectra are used to characterize the Zeeman interaction in terms of two g factors of the body-fixed electronic wave function. The optical Stark spectra are used to characterize the electric dipole moment of the X{sub 1} and A states.

  13. Conformation of gramicidin A channel in phospholipid vesicles: a 13C and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, S; Wallace, B A; Blout, E R; Morrow, J S; Veatch, W

    1979-01-01

    We have determined the conformation of the channel-forming polypeptide antibiotic gramicidin A in phosphatidylcholine vesicles by using 13C and 19F NMR spectroscopy. The models previously proposed for the conformation of the dimer channel differ in the surface localization of the NH2 and COOH termini. We have incorporated specific 13C and 19F nuclei at both the NH2, and COOH termini of gramicidin and have used 13C and 19F chemical shifts and spin lattice relaxation time measurements to determine the accessibility of these labels to three paramagnetic NMR probes--two in aqueous solution and one attached to the phosphatidylcholine fatty acid chain9 all of our results indicate that the COOH terminus of gramicidin in the channel is located near the surface of the membrane and the NH2 terminus is buried deep within the lipid bilayer. These findings strongly favor an NH2-terminal to NH2-terminal helical dimer as the major conformation for the gramicidin channel in phosphatidylcholine vesicles. PMID:92025

  14. Assigning the NMR Spectrum of Glycidol: An Advanced Organic Chemistry Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Eric; Arpaia, Nicholas; Widener, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Various one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments have been found to be extremely useful for assigning the proton and carbon NMR spectra of glycidol. The technique provides extremely valuable information aiding in the complete assignment of the peaks.

  15. Measuring 19F(α,n) with VANDLE for Nuclear Safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, William; Clement, R. C. C.; Smith, M. S.; Pain, S. D.; Thompson, S.; Cizewski, J. A.; Reingold, C.; Manning, B.; Burcher, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Tan, W.-P.; Stech, E.; Smith, M. K.; Smith, K.; Avetisyan, R.; Long, A.; Battaglia, A.; Marley, S.; Gyurjinyan, A.; Ilyushkin, S.; O'Malley, P. D.; Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Taylor, S.; Febbraro, M.

    2014-09-01

    UF6 is used in many parts of the Uranium Fuel Cycle, and various techniques are used by nonproliferation agencies to monitor and account for the material. One of the most promising non-destructive assay (NDA) methods consists of measuring gross neutron rates induced by uranium-decay alpha particles reacting with the fluorine and emitting a neutron. This method, however, currently lacks reliable nuclear data on the 19F(α,n) reaction cross section to determine an accurate neutron yield rate for a given sample of UF6. We have used the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) to measure the cross section and coincident neutron spectrum over an energy range pertinent to NDA in a two part experiment: First at Notre Dame with a LaF3 target and a pulsed alpha-particle beam, and second at ORNL with a windowless He-gas target and a 19F beam. The motivation for this measurement and preliminary results will be presented. UF6 is used in many parts of the Uranium Fuel Cycle, and various techniques are used by nonproliferation agencies to monitor and account for the material. One of the most promising non-destructive assay (NDA) methods consists of measuring gross neutron rates induced by uranium-decay alpha particles reacting with the fluorine and emitting a neutron. This method, however, currently lacks reliable nuclear data on the 19F(α,n) reaction cross section to determine an accurate neutron yield rate for a given sample of UF6. We have used the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) to measure the cross section and coincident neutron spectrum over an energy range pertinent to NDA in a two part experiment: First at Notre Dame with a LaF3 target and a pulsed alpha-particle beam, and second at ORNL with a windowless He-gas target and a 19F beam. The motivation for this measurement and preliminary results will be presented. This work is funded in part by NSF Grant 1068192, DOE Office of Science, and the NNSA Office of Defense Nuclear

  16. Voltage Controlled Geometric Phase Rotation in ^{208}Pb^{19}F.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furneaux, J. E.; Shafer-Ray, Neil; Coker, J.; Rupasinghe, P. M.; McRaven, C. P.

    2013-06-01

    Many theoretical publications have investigated the impact of the geometric phase on measurements of the e-EDM. However, there has been surprisingly little quantitative comparison of these models with experiment. Here we create a quantum beat experiment that starts with an optical pump and ends with an optical probe of ^{208}Pb^{19}F. This measurement includes the ability to control a geometric phase variation of the molecular alignment by applying an appropriate bias voltage. These experiments will then used to test the accuracy of our model calculations of geometric phase rotation.

  17. 1H and 19F spin-lattice relaxation and CH3 or CF3 reorientation in molecular solids containing both H and F atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Peter A.; Rheingold, Arnold L.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of methyl (CH3) and fluoromethyl (CF3) groups in organic molecular (van der Waals) solids can be exploited to survey their local environments. We report solid state 1H and 19F spin-lattice relaxation experiments in polycrystalline 3-trifluoromethoxycinnamic acid, along with an X-ray diffraction determination of the molecular and crystal structure, to investigate the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions that determine the properties that characterize the CF3 reorientation. The molecule is of no particular interest; it simply provides a motionless backbone (on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) time scale) to investigate CF3 reorientation occurring on the NMR time scale. The effects of 19F-19F and 19F-1H spin-spin dipolar interactions on the complicated nonexponential NMR relaxation provide independent inputs into determining a model for CF3 reorientation. As such, these experiments provide much more information than when only one spin species (usually 1H) is present. In Sec. IV, which can be read immediately after the Introduction without reading the rest of the paper, we compare the barrier to CH3 and CF3 reorientation in seven organic solids and separate this barrier into intramolecular and intermolecular components.

  18. Pharmaceutical Applications of Relaxation Filter-Selective Signal Excitation Methods for (19)F Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Case Study With Atorvastatin in Dosage Formulation.

    PubMed

    Asada, Mamiko Nasu; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi

    2016-03-01

    We recently developed several new relaxation filter-selective signal excitation (RFS) methods for (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) that allow (13)C signal extraction of the target components from pharmaceuticals. These methods were successful in not only qualification but also quantitation over the wide range of 5% to 100%. Here, we aimed to improve the sensitivity of these methods and initially applied them to (19)F solid-state NMR, on the basis that the fluorine atom is one of the most sensitive NMR-active nuclei. For testing, we selected atorvastatin calcium (ATC), an antilipid BCS class II drug that inhibits 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and is marketed in crystalline and amorphous forms. Tablets were obtained from 2 generic drug suppliers, and the ATC content occurred mainly as an amorphous form. Using the RFS method with (19)F solid-state NMR, we succeeded in qualifying trace amounts (less than 0.5% w/w level) of crystalline phase (Form I) of ATC in the tablets. RFS methods with (19)F solid-state NMR are practical and time efficient and can contribute not only to the study of pharmaceutical drugs, including those with small amounts of a highly potent active ingredient within a formulated product, but also to the study of fluoropolymers in material sciences. PMID:26886305

  19. Measured 19F(α,n) with VANDLE for Nuclear Safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, William; Clement, R. C. C.; Smith, M. S.; Pain, S.; Febbraro, M.; Pittman, S.; Thomspon, S.; Grinder, M.; Cizewski, J. A.; Reingold, C.; Manning, B.; Burcher, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Tan, W.-P.; Stech, E.; Smith, M. K.; Avetisyan, R.; Gyurjinyan, A.; Lowe, M.; Ilyushkin, S.; Grzywacz, R.; Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Taylor, S. Z.; Smith, K.

    2015-10-01

    One of the most promising non-destructive assay (NDA) methods to monitor UF6 canisters consists of measuring gross neutron rates induced by uranium-decay alpha particles reacting with the fluorine and emitting a neutron. This method currently lacks reliable nuclear data on the 19F(α,n) reaction cross section to determine an accurate neutron yield rate for a given sample of UF6. We have measured the cross section and coincident neutron spectrum for the alpha-decay energy range using the VANDLE system. This experiment had two parts: first at Notre Dame with a LaF3 target and and a pulsed alpha-particle beam, and second at ORNL with a windowless He-gas target and a 19F beam. The motivation for this measurement and cross section results will be presented. This work is funded in part by the DOE Office of Science, the National Nuclear Security Administration SSAA and the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation R&D, and the NSF.

  20. Singular spectrum analysis for an automated solvent artifact removal and baseline correction of 1D NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sanctis, Silvia; Malloni, Wilhelm M.; Kremer, Werner; Tomé, Ana M.; Lang, Elmar W.; Neidig, Klaus-Peter.; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2011-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy in biology and medicine is generally performed in aqueous solutions, thus in 1H NMR spectroscopy, the dominant signal often stems from the partly suppressed solvent and can be many orders of magnitude larger than the resonances of interest. Strong solvent signals lead to a disappearance of weak resonances of interest close to the solvent artifact and to base plane variations all over the spectrum. The AUREMOL-SSA/ALS approach for automated solvent artifact removal and baseline correction has been originally developed for multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Here, we describe the necessary adaptations for an automated application to one-dimensional NMR spectra. Its core algorithm is still based on singular spectrum analysis (SSA) applied on time domain signals (FIDs) and it is still combined with an automated baseline correction (ALS) in the frequency domain. However, both steps (SSA and ALS) have been modified in order to achieve optimal results when dealing with one-dimensional spectra. The performance of the method has been tested on one-dimensional synthetic and experimental spectra including the back-calculated spectrum of HPr protein and an experimental spectrum of a human urine sample. The latter has been recorded with the typically used NOESY-type 1D pulse sequence including water pre-saturation. Furthermore, the fully automated AUREMOL-SSA/ALS procedure includes the managing of oversampled, digitally filtered and zero-filled data and the correction of the frequency domain phase shift caused by the group delay time shift from the digital finite response filtering.

  1. Method and apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise oreintationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions is zero.

  2. Method and sample spinning apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR apparatus and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus spins the sample about an axis. The angle of the axis is mechanically varied such that the time average of two or more Legendre polynomials are zero.

  3. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 19F FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.

    2010-09-02

    Representative sampling has been completed for characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 19F as per the statistical sampling plan developed by Harris and Shine. Samples from eight locations have been obtained from the tank floor and two of the samples were archived as a contingency. Six samples, referred to in this report as the current scrape samples, have been submitted to and analyzed by SRNL. This report contains the statistical analysis of the floor sample analytical results to determine if further data are needed to reduce uncertainty. Included are comparisons with the prior Mantis samples results to determine if they can be pooled with the current scrape samples to estimate the upper 95% confidence limits (UCL95%) for concentration. Statistical analysis revealed that the Mantis and current scrape sample results are not compatible. Therefore, the Mantis sample results were not used to support the quantification of analytes in the residual material. Significant spatial variability among the current scrape sample results was not found. Constituent concentrations were similar between the North and South hemispheres as well as between the inner and outer regions of the tank floor. The current scrape sample results from all six samples fall within their 3-sigma limits. In view of the results from numerous statistical tests, the data were pooled from all six current scrape samples. As such, an adequate sample size was provided for quantification of the residual material on the floor of Tank 19F. The uncertainty is quantified in this report by an UCL95% on each analyte concentration. The uncertainty in analyte concentration was calculated as a function of the number of samples, the average, and the standard deviation of the analytical results. The UCL95% was based entirely on the six current scrape sample results (each averaged across three analytical determinations).

  4. (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxation and CH3 or CF3 reorientation in molecular solids containing both H and F atoms.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Peter A; Rheingold, Arnold L

    2016-04-21

    The dynamics of methyl (CH3) and fluoromethyl (CF3) groups in organic molecular (van der Waals) solids can be exploited to survey their local environments. We report solid state (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxationexperiments in polycrystalline 3-trifluoromethoxycinnamic acid, along with an X-ray diffraction determination of the molecular and crystal structure, to investigate the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions that determine the properties that characterize the CF3 reorientation. The molecule is of no particular interest; it simply provides a motionless backbone (on the nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) time scale) to investigate CF3 reorientation occurring on the NMR time scale. The effects of (19)F-(19)F and (19)F-(1)H spin-spin dipolar interactions on the complicated nonexponential NMRrelaxation provide independent inputs into determining a model for CF3 reorientation. As such, these experiments provide much more information than when only one spin species (usually (1)H) is present. In Sec. IV, which can be read immediately after the Introduction without reading the rest of the paper, we compare the barrier to CH3 and CF3 reorientation in seven organic solids and separate this barrier into intramolecular and intermolecular components. PMID:27389221

  5. The Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectrum of Methyl 7-Cycloheptatrienylacetate: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurch, G. R., Jr.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes an advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment designed to give the senior chemistry student an opportunity to apply several synthetic and purification techniques as well as possibilities for the application of NMR spectroscopy. (CS)

  6. (19)F-MRI for monitoring human NK cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Ludwig, Kai D; Gordon, Jeremy W; Kutz, Matthew P; Bednarz, Bryan P; Fain, Sean B; Capitini, Christian M

    2016-05-01

    The availability of clinical-grade cytokines and artificial antigen-presenting cells has accelerated interest in using natural killer (NK) cells as adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) for cancer. One of the technological shortcomings of translating therapies from animal models to clinical application is the inability to effectively and non-invasively track these cells after infusion in patients. We have optimized the nonradioactive isotope fluorine-19 ((19)F) as a means to label and track NK cells in preclinical models using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human NK cells were expanded with interleukin (IL)-2 and labeled in vitro with increasing concentrations of (19)F. Doses as low as 2 mg/mL (19)F were detected by MRI. NK cell viability was only decreased at 8 mg/mL (19)F. No effects on NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 leukemia cells were observed with 2, 4 or 8 mg/mL (19)F. Higher doses of (19)F, 4 mg/mL and 8 mg/mL, led to an improved (19)F signal by MRI with 3 × 10(11) (19)F atoms per NK cell. The 4 mg/mL (19)F labeling had no effect on NK cell function via secretion of granzyme B or interferon gamma (IFNγ), compared to NK cells exposed to vehicle alone. (19)F-labeled NK cells were detectable immediately by MRI after intratumoral injection in NSG mice and up to day 8. When (19)F-labeled NK cells were injected subcutaneously, we observed a loss of signal through time at the site of injection suggesting NK cell migration to distant organs. The (19)F perfluorocarbon is a safe and effective reagent for monitoring the persistence and trafficking of NK cell infusions in vivo, and may have potential for developing novel imaging techniques to monitor ACT for cancer. PMID:27467963

  7. Improved Quantitative 19F MR Molecular Imaging With Flip Angle Calibration and B1-Mapping Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Goette, Matthew J.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To improve 19F flip angle calibration and compensate for B1 inhomogeneities in quantitative 19F MRI of sparse molecular epitopes with perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoparticle (NP) emulsion contrast agents. Materials and Methods Flip angle sweep experiments on PFC-NP point source phantoms with three custom-designed 19F/1H dual-tuned coils revealed a difference in required power settings for 19F and 1H nuclei, which was used to calculate a calibration ratio specific for each coil. An image-based correction technique was developed using B1-field mapping on 1H to correct for 19F and 1H images in two phantom experiments. Results Optimized 19F peak power differed significantly from that of 1H power for each coil (p<0.05). A ratio of 19F/1H power settings yielded a coil-specific and spatially independent calibration value (surface: 1.48±0.06; semi-cylindrical: 1.71±0.02, single-turn-solenoid: 1.92±0.03). 1H-image-based B1 correction equalized the signal intensity of 19F images for two identical 19F PFC-NP samples placed in different parts of the field, which were offset significantly by ~66% (p<0.001) before correction. Conclusion 19F flip angle calibration and B1-mapping compensations to the 19F images employing the more abundant 1H signal as a basis for correction result in a significant change in the quantification of sparse 19F MR signals from targeted PFC NP emulsions. PMID:25425244

  8. USING 19F-NMR SPECTROSCOPY TO DETERMINE TRIFLURALIN BINDING TO SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trifluralin is a widely used herbicide for the control of broad leaf weeds in a variety of crops. Its binding to soil may result in significant losses in herbicidal activity and a delayed pollution problem. To investigate the nature of soil-bound trifluralin residues, 14

  9. Noninvasive detection of graft rejection by in vivo (19) F MRI in the early stage.

    PubMed

    Flögel, U; Su, S; Kreideweiss, I; Ding, Z; Galbarz, L; Fu, J; Jacoby, C; Witzke, O; Schrader, J

    2011-02-01

    Diagnosis of transplant rejection requires tissue biopsy and entails risks. Here, we describe a new (19) F MRI approach for noninvasive visualization of organ rejection via the macrophage host response. For this, we employed biochemically inert emulsified perfluorocarbons (PFCs), known to be preferentially phagocytized by monocytes and macrophages. Isografts from C57BL/6 or allografts from C57B10.A mice were heterotopically transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients. PFCs were applied intravenously followed by (1) H/(19) F MRI at 9.4 T 24 h after injection. (1) H images showed a similar position and anatomy of the graft in the abdomen for both cases. However, corresponding (19) F signals were only observed in allogenic tissue. (1) H/(19) F MRI enabled us to detect the initial immune response not later than 3 days after surgery, when conventional parameters did not reveal any signs of rejection. In allografts, the observed (19) F signal strongly increased with time and correlated with the extent of rejection. In separate experiments, rapamycin was used to demonstrate the ability of (19) F MRI to monitor immunosuppressive therapy. Thus, PFCs can serve as positive contrast agent for the early detection of transplant rejection by (19) F MRI with high spatial resolution and an excellent degree of specificity due to lack of any (19) F background. PMID:21214858

  10. Gadolinium-modulated 19F signals from Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles as a New Strategy for Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Anne M.; Myerson, Jacob; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Hockett, Franklin D.; Winter, Patrick M.; Chen, Junjie; Gaffney, Patrick J.; Robertson, J. David; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in the design of fluorinated nanoparticles for magnetic resonance molecular imaging have enabled specific detection of 19F nuclei, providing unique and quantifiable spectral signatures. However, a pressing need for signal enhancement exists because the total 19F in imaging voxels is often limited. By directly incorporating a relaxation agent (gadolinium) into the lipid monolayer that surrounds the perfluorocarbon, a marked augmentation of the 19F signal from 200nm nanoparticles was achieved. This design increases the magnetic relaxation rate of the 19F nuclei 4-fold at 1.5 T and effects a 125% increase in signal, an effect which is maintained when they are targeted to human plasma clots. By varying the surface concentration of gadolinium, the relaxation effect can be quantitatively modulated to tailor particle properties. This novel strategy dramatically improves the sensitivity and range of 19F MRI/MRS and forms the basis for designing contrast agents capable of sensing their surface chemistry. PMID:18956457

  11. Visualizing arthritic inflammation and therapeutic response by fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging (19F MRI)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-invasive imaging of inflammation to measure the progression of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to monitor responses to therapy is critically needed. V-Sense, a perfluorocarbon (PFC) contrast agent that preferentially labels inflammatory cells, which are then recruited out of systemic circulation to sites of inflammation, enables detection by 19F MRI. With no 19F background in the host, detection is highly-specific and can act as a proxy biomarker of the degree of inflammation present. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis in rats, a model with many similarities to human RA, was used to study the ability of the PFC contrast agent to reveal the accumulation of inflammation over time using 19F MRI. Disease progression in the rat hind limbs was monitored by caliper measurements and 19F MRI on days 15, 22 and 29, including the height of clinically symptomatic disease. Naïve rats served as controls. The capacity of the PFC contrast agent and 19F MRI to assess the effectiveness of therapy was studied in a cohort of rats administered oral prednisolone on days 14 to 28. Results Quantification of 19F signal measured by MRI in affected limbs was linearly correlated with disease severity. In animals with progressive disease, increases in 19F signal reflected the ongoing recruitment of inflammatory cells to the site, while no increase in 19F signal was observed in animals receiving treatment which resulted in clinical resolution of disease. Conclusion These results indicate that 19F MRI may be used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate longitudinal responses to a therapeutic regimen, while additionally revealing the recruitment of monocytic cells involved in the inflammatory process to the anatomical site. This study may support the use of 19F MRI to clinically quantify and monitor the severity of inflammation, and to assess the effectiveness of treatments in RA and other diseases with an inflammatory component. PMID:22721447

  12. Measurement of Long Range 1H-19F Scalar Coupling Constants and their Glycosidic Torsion Dependence in 5-Fluoropyrimidine Substituted RNA

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Mirko; Munzarová, Markéta L.; Bermel, Wolfgang; Scott, Lincoln G.; Sklenár̂, Vladimír; Williamson, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Long range scalar 5J(H1’,F) couplings were observed in 5-fluoropyrimidine substituted RNA. We developed a novel S3E-19F-α,β-edited NOESY experiment for quantitation of these long range scalar 5J(H1’,F), where the J-couplings can be extracted from inspection of intraresidual (H1’,H6) NOE crosspeaks. Quantum chemical calculations were exploited to investigate the relation between scalar couplings and conformations around the glycosidic bond in oligonucleotides. The theoretical dependence of the observed 5J(H1’,F) couplings on the torsion angle χ can be described by a generalized Karplus relationship. The corresponding density functional theory (DFT) analysis is outlined. Additional NMR experiments facilitating the resonance assignments of 5-fluoropyrimidine substituted RNAs are described and chemical shift changes due to altered shielding in the presence of fluorine-19 (19F) are presented. PMID:16637654

  13. Nuclear relaxation rates study of GTP(gamma F)-tubulin interaction using 19F-nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Monasterio, O

    1989-07-01

    To study the relationship between the exchangeable GTP binding site (E-site) and the high affinity metal binding site we synthesized P3-fluoro P1-5'-guanosine tripaosphate (GTP(gamma F), an analog of GTP. Our results show that this analog binds to the exchangeable GTP binding site of calf brain tubulin. The values of the dissociation constant and the stoichiometry of the GTP(gamma F)-Mn(II) complex as determined by EPR spectroscopy were 1.64 x 10(-4) M and one mole of manganese per mole of nucleotide, respectively. The distance separating the high-affinity binding site for the divalent metal ion and the exchangeable nucleotide binding site was evaluated by using high-resolution 19F-NMR. The 31P- and 19F-NMR spectra of GTP(gamma F) were studied, both the fluorine and the gamma-phosphate were split in a doublet with a coupling constant of 936 Hz. Tubulin purified by the method of Weisenberg (Weisenberg, R.C., and Timashef, S.N. (1970) Biochemistry 9, 4110-4116) was treated with colchicine to stabilize it, GTP(gamma F) was added and the 254.1 MHz 19fluorine relaxation rates measured within the first four hours. Longitudinal and transversal relaxation rates were determined in the presence of colchicine-tubulin-Mn(II), (paramagnetic complex), or the ternary complex with magnesium (diamagnetic complex). The analysis of the temperature-dependent relaxation data indicates that the metal and the exchangeable nucleotide binding sites are separated by a maximal distance of 6 at 35 degrees C, to 8.1 A at 12 degrees C. PMID:2619317

  14. Design principles and theory of paramagnetic fluorine-labelled lanthanide complexes as probes for (19)F magnetic resonance: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Kirsten H; De Luca, Elena; Hogg, Naomi H M; Kenwright, Alan M; Kuprov, Ilya; Parker, David; Botta, Mauro; Wilson, J Ian; Blamire, Andrew M

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis and spectroscopic properties of a series of CF(3)-labelled lanthanide(III) complexes (Ln=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) with amide-substituted ligands based on 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane are described. The theoretical contributions of the (19)F magnetic relaxation processes in these systems are critically assessed and selected volumetric plots are presented. These plots allow an accurate estimation of the increase in the rates of longitudinal and transverse relaxation as a function of the distance between the Ln(III) ion and the fluorine nucleus, the applied magnetic field, and the re-rotational correlation time of the complex, for a given Ln(III) ion. Selected complexes exhibit pH-dependent chemical shift behaviour, and a pK(a) of 7.0 was determined in one example based on the holmium complex of an ortho-cyano DO3A-monoamide ligand, which allowed the pH to be assessed by measuring the difference in chemical shift (varying by over 14 ppm) between two (19)F resonances. Relaxation analyses of variable-temperature and variable-field (19)F, (17)O and (1)H NMR spectroscopy experiments are reported, aided by identification of salient low-energy conformers by using density functional theory. The study of fluorine relaxation rates, over a field range of 4.7 to 16.5 T allowed precise computation of the distance between the Ln(III) ion and the CF(3) reporter group by using global fitting methods. The sensitivity benefits of using such paramagnetic fluorinated probes in (19)F NMR spectroscopic studies are quantified in preliminary spectroscopic and imaging experiments with respect to a diamagnetic yttrium(III) analogue. PMID:19957317

  15. Interference of homonuclear decoupling and exchange in the solid-state NMR of perfluorocyclohexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Deborah E.; Hazendonk, Paul; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2003-04-01

    We observe an interference between RF irradiation used for homonuclear decoupling of 19F and conformational exchange in the 13C spectrum of perfluorocyclohexane. We show that these effects can be readily reproduced in simulation, and characterise their dependence on the various NMR and experimental parameters. Their application to observing exchange rates on the kHz timescale is evaluated with respect to T1 ρ measurements and the connections between the two approaches established. The implications for experiments that use homonuclear decoupling of 1H to resolve 1J CH couplings in the solid-state are also evaluated in detail.

  16. Trifluoroethanol and 19F magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance as a basic surface hydroxyl reactivity probe for zirconium(IV) hydroxide structures.

    PubMed

    DeCoste, Jared B; Glover, T Grant; Mogilevsky, Gregory; Peterson, Gregory W; Wagner, George W

    2011-08-01

    A novel technique for determining the relative accessibility and reactivity of basic surface hydroxyl sites by reacting various zirconium(IV) hydroxide materials with 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) and characterizing the resulting material using (19)F magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is presented here. Studied here are three zirconium hydroxide samples, two unperturbed commercial materials, and one commercial material that is crushed by a pellet press. Factors, such as the ratio of bridging/terminal hydroxyls, surface area, and pore size distribution, are examined and found to affect the ability of the zirconium(IV) hydroxide to react with TFE. X-ray diffraction, nitrogen isotherms, and (1)H MAS NMR were used to characterize the unperturbed materials, while thermogravitric analysis with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry along with the (19)F MAS NMR were used to characterize the materials that were reacted with TFE. Zirconium hydroxide materials with a high surface area and a low bridging/terminal hydroxyl ratio were found to react TFE in the greatest amounts. PMID:21699226

  17. Calculation of vibrational branching ratios and hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F and its suitability for laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Yin, Yanning; Wei, Bin; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    More recently, laser cooling of the diatomic radical magnesium monofluoride (24Mg19F ) is being experimentally preformed [Appl. Phys. Express 8, 092701 (2015), 10.7567/APEX.8.092701 and Opt. Express 22, 28645 (2014), 10.1364/OE.22.028645] and was also studied theoretically [Phys. Rev. A 91, 042511 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.042511]. However, some important problems still remain unsolved, so, in our paper, we perform further theoretical study for the feasibility of laser cooling and trapping the 24Mg19F molecule. At first, the highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors of the main transitions are verified by the closed-form approximation, Morse approximation, and Rydberg-Klein-Rees inversion methods, respectively. Afterwards, we investigate the lower X 2Σ1/2 + hyperfine manifolds using a quantum effective Hamiltonian approach and obtain the zero-field hyperfine spectrum with an accuracy of less than 30 kHz ˜5 μ K compared with the experimental results, and then find out that one cooling beam and one or two repumping beams with their first-order sidebands are enough to implement an efficient laser slowing and cooling of 24Mg19F . Meanwhile, we also calculate the accurate hyperfine structure magnetic g factors of the rotational state (X 2Σ1/2 +,N =1 ) and briefly discuss the influence of the external fields on the hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F as well as its possibility of preparing three-dimensional magneto-optical trapping. Finally we give an explanation for the difference between the Stark and Zeeman effects from the perspective of parity and time reversal symmetry. Our study shows that, besides appropriate excitation wavelengths, the short lifetime for the first excited state A 2Π1 /2 , and lighter mass, the 24Mg19F radical could be a good candidate molecule amenable to laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping.

  18. A symmetrical fluorous dendron-cyanine dye-conjugated bimodal nanoprobe for quantitative 19F MRI and NIR fluorescence bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Yue, Xuyi; Wang, Yu; Qian, Chunqi; Huang, Peng; Lizak, Marty; Niu, Gang; Wang, Fu; Rong, Pengfei; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Ma, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-08-01

    (19)F MRI and optical imaging are two powerful noninvasive molecular imaging modalities in biomedical applications. (19)F MRI has great potential for high resolution in vivo imaging, while fluorescent probes enable ultracontrast cellular/tissue imaging with high accuracy and sensitivity. A bimodal nanoprobe is developed, integrating the merits of (19)F MRI and fluorescence imaging into a single synthetic molecule, which is further engineered into nanoprobe, by addressing shortcomings of conventional contrast agents to explore the quantitative (19)F MRI and fluorescence imaging and cell tracking. Results show that this bimodal imaging nanoprobe presents high correlation of (19)F MR signal and NIR fluorescence intensity in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, this nanoprobe enables quantitative (19)F MR analysis, confirmed by a complementary fluorescence analysis. This unique feature can hardly be obtained by traditional (19)F MRI contrast agents. It is envisioned that this nanoprobe can hold great potential for quantitative and sensitive multi-modal molecular imaging. PMID:24789108

  19. Contribution of 19F resonances on 18O( p, α)15N reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmeslem, Meriem; Chafa, Azzedine; Barhoumi, Slimane; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-08-01

    The 18O( p, α)15N reaction influences the isotopes production such as 19F, 18O, and 15N which can be used to test the models of stellar evolution. 19F is synthesized in both asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and metal-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Using R-matrix theory we allow new values of resonances parameters in 19F. We show that the most important contribution to the differential and total cross section at low energies, comes from the levels in 19F situated at resonances energies E R =151, 680 and 840 keV with spin and parity 1/2+. The total width of the 680 keV resonance is badly known. So, we have focused on this broad resonance corresponding to the 8.65 MeV level in 19F. We delimit the temperature range in which each resonance contribution to the total reaction rate occurs by analyzing the ratio ( N A < σν> i / N A < σν>). This allowed us to show that the 680 and 840 keV broad resonances strongly dominate the reaction rate over the stellar temperature range T 9=0.02-0.06 and T 9=0.5-5. Finally, these results were compared to NACRE and Iliadis astrophysical compilations.

  20. Multinuclear high-resolution NMR study of compounds from the ternary system NaF-CaF2-AlF3: from determination to modeling of NMR parameters.

    PubMed

    Martineau, C; Body, M; Legein, C; Silly, G; Buzaré, J-Y; Fayon, F

    2006-12-11

    27Al and 23Na NMR satellite transition spectroscopy and 3Q magic-angle-spinning spectra are recorded for three compounds from the ternary NaF-CaF2-AlF3 system. The quadrupolar frequency nuQ, asymmetry parameter etaQ, and isotropic chemical shift deltaiso are extracted from the spectrum reconstructions for five aluminum and four sodium sites. The quadrupolar parameters are calculated using the LAPW-based ab initio code WIEN2k. It is necessary to perform a structure optimization of all compounds to ensure a fine agreement between experimental and calculated parameters. By a comparison of experimental and calculated values, an attribution of all of the 27Al and 23Na NMR lines to the crystallographic sites is achieved. High-speed 19F NMR MAS spectra are recorded and reconstructed for the same compounds, leading to the determination of 18 isotropic chemical shifts. The superposition model developed by Bureau et al. is used, allowing a bijective assignment of the 19F NMR lines to the crystallographic sites. PMID:17140229

  1. Protein-Observed Fluorine NMR: A Bioorthogonal Approach for Small Molecule Discovery.

    PubMed

    Arntson, Keith E; Pomerantz, William C K

    2016-06-01

    The (19)F isotope is 100% naturally abundant and is the second most sensitive and stable NMR-active nucleus. Unlike the ubiquitous hydrogen atom, fluorine is nearly absent in biological systems, making it a unique bioorthogonal atom for probing molecular interactions in biology. Over 73 fluorinated proteins have been studied by (19)F NMR since the seminal studies of Hull and Sykes in 1974. With advances in cryoprobe production and fluorinated amino acid incorporation strategies, protein-based (19)F NMR offers opportunities to the medicinal chemist for characterizing and ultimately discovering new small molecule protein ligands. This review will highlight new advances using (19)F NMR for characterizing small molecule interactions with both small and large proteins as well as detailing NMR resonance assignment challenges and amino acid incorporation approaches. PMID:26599421

  2. In Vivo Imaging of Stepwise Vessel Occlusion in Cerebral Photothrombosis of Mice by 19F MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Kampf, Thomas; Jakob, Peter M.; Stoll, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Background 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was recently introduced as a promising technique for in vivo cell tracking. In the present study we compared 19F MRI with iron-enhanced MRI in mice with photothrombosis (PT) at 7 Tesla. PT represents a model of focal cerebral ischemia exhibiting acute vessel occlusion and delayed neuroinflammation. Methods/Principal Findings Perfluorocarbons (PFC) or superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) were injected intravenously at different time points after photothrombotic infarction. While administration of PFC directly after PT induction led to a strong 19F signal throughout the entire lesion, two hours delayed application resulted in a rim-like 19F signal at the outer edge of the lesion. These findings closely resembled the distribution of signal loss on T2-weighted MRI seen after SPIO injection reflecting intravascular accumulation of iron particles trapped in vessel thrombi as confirmed histologically. By sequential administration of two chemically shifted PFC compounds 0 and 2 hours after illumination the different spatial distribution of the 19F markers (infarct core/rim) could be visualized in the same animal. When PFC were applied at day 6 the fluorine marker was only detected after long acquisition times ex vivo. SPIO-enhanced MRI showed slight signal loss in vivo which was much more prominent ex vivo indicative for neuroinflammation at this late lesion stage. Conclusion Our study shows that vessel occlusion can be followed in vivo by 19F and SPIO-enhanced high-field MRI while in vivo imaging of neuroinflammation remains challenging. The timing of contrast agent application was the major determinant of the underlying processes depicted by both imaging techniques. Importantly, sequential application of different PFC compounds allowed depiction of ongoing vessel occlusion from the core to the margin of the ischemic lesions in a single MRI measurement. PMID:22194810

  3. 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Crystallographic Studies of 5-Fluorotryptophan-Labeled Anthrax Protective Antigen and Effects of the Receptor on Stability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is an 83 kDa protein that is one of three protein components of the anthrax toxin, an AB toxin secreted by Bacillus anthracis. PA is capable of undergoing several structural changes, including oligomerization to either a heptameric or octameric structure called the prepore, and at acidic pH a major conformational change to form a membrane-spanning pore. To follow these structural changes at a residue-specific level, we have conducted initial studies in which we have biosynthetically incorporated 5-fluorotryptophan (5-FTrp) into PA, and we have studied the influence of 5-FTrp labeling on the structural stability of PA and on binding to the host receptor capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2) using 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). There are seven tryptophans in PA, but of the four domains in PA, only two contain tryptophans: domain 1 (Trp65, -90, -136, -206, and -226) and domain 2 (Trp346 and -477). Trp346 is of particular interest because of its proximity to the CMG2 binding interface, and because it forms part of the membrane-spanning pore. We show that the 19F resonance of Trp346 is sensitive to changes in pH, consistent with crystallographic studies, and that receptor binding significantly stabilizes Trp346 to both pH and temperature. In addition, we provide evidence that suggests that resonances from tryptophans distant from the binding interface are also stabilized by the receptor. Our studies highlight the positive impact of receptor binding on protein stability and the use of 19F NMR in gaining insight into structural changes in a high-molecular weight protein. PMID:24387629

  4. Degradation of 4-fluorobiphenyl by mycorrhizal fungi as determined by {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and {sup 14}C radiolabelling analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.A.; Meharg, A.A.; Till, C.; Troke, J.; Nicholson, J.K.

    1999-09-01

    The pathways of biotransformation of 4-fluorobiphenyl (4FBP) by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tylospora fibrilosa and several other mycorrhizal fungi were investigated by using {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with {sup 14}C radioisotope-detected high-performance liquid chromatography ({sup 14}C-HPLC). Under the conditions used in this study T. fibrillosa and some other species degraded 4FBP. {sup 14}C-HPLC profiles indicated that there were four major biotransformation products, whereas {sup 19}F NMR showed that there were six major fluorine-containing products. The authors confirmed that 4-fluorobiphen-4{prime}-ol and 4-fluorobiphen-3{prime}-ol were two of the major products formed, but no other products were conclusively identified. There was no evidence for the expected biotransformation pathway (namely, meta cleavage of the less halogenated ring), as none of the expected products of this route were found. To the best of their knowledge, this is the first report describing intermediates formed during mycorrhizal degradation of halogenated biphenyls.

  5. Study of fusion-fission dynamics in 19F+238U reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, R.; Sugathan, P.; Jhingan, A.; Kaur, Gurpreet; Mukul, Ish; Siwal, Davinder; Saneesh, N.; Banerjee, Tathagata; Yadav, Abhishek; Thakur, Meenu; Mahajan, Ruchi; Chaterjee, M. B.

    2016-05-01

    Mass angle distribution measurements for 19F+238U reaction were carried out around the sub barrier energies. Mass angle correlation has not been observed at above and below the fusion barrier in present reaction. This infer the minimal presence of non compound like events at these bombarding energies range.

  6. Comparison between optimized GRE and RARE sequences for 19F MRI studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffientini, Chiara D.; Mastropietro, Alfonso; Caffini, Matteo; Cocco, Sara; Zucca, Ileana; Scotti, Alessandro; Baselli, Giuseppe; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia

    2014-03-01

    In 19F-MRI studies limiting factors are the presence of a low signal due to the low concentration of 19F-nuclei, necessary for biological applications, and the inherent low sensitivity of MRI. Hence, acquiring images using the pulse sequence with the best signal to noise ratio (SNR) by optimizing the acquisition parameters specifically to a 19F compound is a core issue. In 19F-MRI, multiple-spin-echo (RARE) and gradient-echo (GRE) are the two most frequently used pulse sequence families; therefore we performed an optimization study of GRE pulse sequences based on numerical simulations and experimental acquisitions on fluorinated compounds. We compared GRE performance to an optimized RARE sequence. Images were acquired on a 7T MRI preclinical scanner on phantoms containing different fluorinated compounds. Actual relaxation times (T1, T2, T2*) were evaluated in order to predict SNR dependence on sequence parameters. Experimental comparisons between spoiled GRE and RARE, obtained at a fixed acquisition time and in steady state condition, showed RARE sequence outperforming the spoiled GRE (up to 406% higher). Conversely, the use of the unbalanced-SSFP showed a significant increase in SNR compared to RARE (up to 28% higher). Moreover, this sequence (as GRE in general) was confirmed to be virtually insensitive to T1 and T2 relaxation times, after proper optimization, thus improving marker independence from the biological environment. These results confirm the efficacy of the proposed optimization tool and foster further investigation addressing in-vivo applicability.

  7. 19F MRI detection of acute allograft rejection with in vivo perfluorocarbon labeling of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Hitchens, T Kevin; Ye, Qing; Eytan, Danielle F; Janjic, Jelena M; Ahrens, Eric T; Ho, Chien

    2011-04-01

    Current diagnosis of organ rejection following transplantation relies on tissue biopsy, which is not ideal due to sampling limitations and risks associated with the invasive procedure.We have previously shown that cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of iron-oxide labeled immune-cell infiltration can provide a noninvasive measure of rejection status by detecting areas of hypointensity on T 2*-weighted images. In this study, we tested the feasibility of using a fluorine-based cellular tracer agent to detect macrophage accumulation in rodent models of acute allograft rejection by fluorine-19 ((19) F) MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This study used two rat models of acute rejection, including abdominal heterotopic cardiac transplant and orthotopic kidney transplant models. Following in vivo labeling of monocytes and macrophages with a commercially available agent containing perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether, we observed (19) F-signal intensity in the organs experiencing rejection by (19) F MRI, and conventional (1) H MRI was used for anatomical context. Immunofluorescence and histology confirmed macrophage labeling. These results are consistent with our previous studies and show the complementary nature of the two cellular imaging techniques. With no background signal, (19) F MRI/magnetic resonance spectroscopy can provide unambiguous detection of fluorine labeled cells, and may be a useful technique for detecting and quantifying rejection grade in patients. PMID:21305593

  8. Symmetry-guided design and fluorous synthesis of a stable and rapidly excreted imaging tracer for (19)F MRI.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhong-Xing; Liu, Xin; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Yu, Yihua Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Getting FIT: A bispherical (19)F imaging tracer, (19)FIT, was designed and synthesized. (19)FIT is advantageous over perfluorocarbon-based (19)F imaging agents, as it is not retained in the organs and does not require complex formulation procedures. Imaging agents such as (19)FIT can lead to (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) playing an important role in drug therapy, analogous to the role played by (1)H MRI in disease diagnosis. PMID:19475598

  9. Minimizing the effects of RF inhomogeneity and phase transients allows resolution of two peaks in the (1)H CRAMPS NMR spectrum of adamantane.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Darren H; Horvath, Matthew

    2015-10-01

    One of the limiting factors to achieving highly resolved (1)H NMR spectra with (1)H homonuclear decoupling sequences is imperfections in the applied radiofrequency (RF) pulses, most notably phase transients and RF inhomogeneity. Through a series of simulations and solid-state NMR experiments, it is demonstrated that the combined effects of phase transients and RF inhomogeneity can be minimized by a combination of (i) restricting the sample to small volume of the rotor, (ii) by employing a super-cycled version of the DUMBO decoupling sequence, and (iii) by carefully adjusting the probe tuning such that the asymmetric component of phase transients is minimized. Under these optimal conditions, it was possible to clearly resolve two signals in the (1)H CRAMPS NMR spectrum of adamantane arising from the CH and CH2 protons in the molecule. It is proposed that adamantane could be a very useful setup sample for (1)H CRAMPS NMR as the two peaks are only resolved when the effects of RF inhomogeneity and phase transients are minimized. PMID:26483329

  10. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-18

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra. PMID:26789115

  11. Impurity effect of the Λ particle on the structure of 18F and Λ19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimura, Y.; Hagino, K.; Sagawa, H.

    2012-10-01

    We perform three-body model calculations for a sd-shell hypernucleus Λ19F (Λ17O+p+n) and its core nucleus 18F (16O+p+n), employing a density-dependent contact interaction between the valence proton and neutron. We find that the B(E2) value from the first excited state (with spin and parity of Iπ=3+) to the ground state (Iπ=1+) is slightly changed by the addition of a Λ particle, which exhibits the so called shrinkage effect of Λ particle. We also show that the excitation energy of the 3+ state is reduced in Λ19F compared to 18F, as is observed in a p-shell nucleus 6Li. We discuss the mechanism of this reduction of the excitation energy, pointing out that it is caused by a different mechanism from that in Λ7Li.

  12. A Study on 19F( n,α) Reaction Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uğur, F. A.; Tel, E.; Gökçe, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, cross sections of neutron induced reactions have been investigated for fluorine target nucleus. The calculations have been made on the excitation functions of 19F ( n,α), 19F( n,xα) reactions. Fluorine (F) and its molten salt compounds (LiF) can serve as a coolant which can be used at high temperatures without reaching a high vapor pressure and also the molten salt compounds are also a good neutron moderator. In these calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been investigated. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the full exciton model and the cascade exciton model. The equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing model. Also in the present work, reaction cross sections have calculated by using evaluated empirical formulas developed by Tel et al. at 14-15 MeV energy. The obtained results have been discussed and compared with the available experimental data.

  13. Fission fragment angular distributions for 11B and 19F+238U systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnik, A.; Kailas, S.; Chatterjee, A.; Navin, A.; Shrivastava, A.; Singh, P.; Samant, M. S.

    1995-12-01

    The fission fragment angular distributions were measured at energies above the fusion barrier, for the systems 11B and 19F + 238U. An analysis of the present data along with those already available for the systems 6,7Li, 12C, and 16O + 238U was made in terms of the saddle-point statistical model. While the anisotropies were ``normal'' for 6,7Li, 11B, 12C+238U systems, the ones for 16O and 19F+238U systems were found to be ``anomalous.'' The entrance channel mass asymmetry dependence of the anisotropies as observed here is consistent with the expectations of preequilibrium fission dynamics. This result emphasizes the importance of preequilibrium fission in heavy-ion induced fusion-fission reactions.

  14. Dark matter spin-dependent limits for WIMP interactions on 19F by PICASSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, S.; Aubin, F.; Auger, M.; Behnke, E.; Beltran, B.; Clark, K.; Dai, X.; Davour, A.; Farine, J.; Faust, R.; Genest, M.-H.; Giroux, G.; Gornea, R.; Krauss, C.; Kumaratunga, S.; Lawson, I.; Leroy, C.; Lessard, L.; Levy, C.; Levine, I.; MacDonald, R.; Martin, J.-P.; Nadeau, P.; Noble, A.; Piro, M.-C.; Pospisil, S.; Shepherd, T.; Starinski, N.; Stekl, I.; Storey, C.; Wichoski, U.; Zacek, V.

    2009-11-01

    The PICASSO experiment at SNOLAB reports new results for spin-dependent WIMP interactions on 19F using the superheated droplet technique. A new generation of detectors and new features which enable background discrimination via the rejection of non-particle induced events are described. First results are presented for a subset of two detectors with target masses of 19F of 65 g and 69 g respectively and a total exposure of 13.75 ± 0.48 kgd. No dark matter signal was found and for WIMP masses around 24 GeV /c2 new limits have been obtained on the spin-dependent cross section on 19F of σF = 13.9 pb (90% C.L.) which can be converted into cross section limits on protons and neutrons of σp = 0.16 pb and σn = 2.60 pb respectively (90% C.L.). The obtained limits on protons restrict recent interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulations in terms of spin-dependent interactions.

  15. First evidences for 19F(α, p)22Ne at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D’Agata, G.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; Blagus, S.; Figuera, P.; Grassi, L.; Guardo, G. L.; Gulino, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Indelicato, I.; Kshetri, R.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Lattuada, M.; Mijatović, T.; Milin, M.; Miljanic, D.; Prepolec, L.; Sergi, M. L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Tokic, V.; Tumino, A.; Uroic, M.

    2016-04-01

    19F experimental abundances is overestimated in respect to the theoretical one: it is therefore clear that further investigations are needed. We focused on the 19F(α, p) 22 Ne reaction, representing the main destruction channel in He-rich environments. The lowest energy at which this reaction has been studied with direct methods is E C.M. ≈ 0.91 MeV, while the Gamow region is between 0.39 ÷ 0.8 MeV, far below the Coulomb barrier (3.8 MeV). For this reason, an experiment at Rudjer Boskovic Institute (Zagreb) was performed, applying the Trojan Horse Method. Following this method we selected the quasi-free contribution coming from 6Li(19 F,p22 Ne)2 H at Ebeam=6 MeV at kinematically favourable angles, and the cross section at energies 0 < EC.M. < 1.4 MeV was extracted in arbitrary units, covering the astrophysical region of interest.

  16. (19)F Magnetic Resonance Imaging Signals from Peptide Amphiphile Nanostructures Are Strongly Affected by Their Shape.

    PubMed

    Preslar, Adam T; Tantakitti, Faifan; Park, Kitae; Zhang, Shanrong; Stupp, Samuel I; Meade, Thomas J

    2016-08-23

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive imaging modality that provides excellent spatial and temporal resolution. The most commonly used MR probes face significant challenges originating from the endogenous (1)H background signal of water. In contrast, fluorine MRI ((19)F MRI) allows quantitative probe imaging with zero background signal. Probes with high fluorine content are required for high sensitivity, suggesting nanoscale supramolecular assemblies containing (19)F probes offer a potentially useful strategy for optimum imaging as a result of improved payload. We report here on supramolecular nanostructures formed by fluorinated peptide amphiphiles containing either glutamic acid or lysine residues in their sequence. We identified molecules that form aggregates in water which transition from cylindrical to ribbon-like shape as pH increased from 4.5 to 8.0. Interestingly, we found that ribbon-like nanostructures had reduced magnetic resonance signal, whereas their cylindrical counterparts exhibited strong signals. We attribute this drastic difference to the greater mobility of fluorinated tails in the hydrophobic compartment of cylindrical nanostructures compared to lower mobility in ribbon-like assemblies. This discovery identifies a strategy to design supramolecular, self-assembling contrast agents for (19)F MRI that can spatially map physiologically relevant changes in pH using changes in morphology. PMID:27425636

  17. Methyl tunnelling sidebands in the low-field NMR spectrum of 3-pentanone: Driving A-E transitions using rf irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Horsewill, Anthony J

    2015-09-01

    Using magnetic field-cycling at cryogenic temperatures, low-field dipole-dipole driven NMR spectra have been recorded on 3-pentanone (CH3CH2C(O)CH2CH3). The spectra are characterised by tunnelling sidebands arising from the quantum dynamics of the methyl (CH3) rotors. From the sideband frequencies, the CH3 tunnelling frequency is determined to be νt=3.05±0.01MHz. The tunnelling sidebands are characterised by A-E transitions in nuclear spin-symmetry, involving simultaneous changes in tunnelling and nuclear spin states. To gain further insight, a theoretical analysis of the spin Hamiltonian matrix has been used to calculate the sideband transition probabilities. These are subsequently used in a thermodynamic model to simulate the low-field NMR spectrum which is compared with experiment. The level-crossings encountered as part of the magnetic field-cycling NMR sequence are found to play an essential role in determining the tunnelling sideband intensities. PMID:26183303

  18. NMR and protein folding: equilibrium and stopped-flow studies.

    PubMed Central

    Frieden, C.; Hoeltzli, S. D.; Ropson, I. J.

    1993-01-01

    NMR studies are now unraveling the structure of intermediates of protein folding using hydrogen-deuterium exchange methodologies. These studies provide information about the time dependence of formation of secondary structure. They require the ability to assign specific resonances in the NMR spectra to specific amide protons of a protein followed by experiments involving competition between folding and exchange reactions. Another approach is to use 19F-substituted amino acids to follow changes in side-chain environment upon folding. Current techniques of molecular biology allow assignments of 19F resonances to specific amino acids by site-directed mutagenesis. It is possible to follow changes and to analyze results from 19F spectra in real time using a stopped-flow device incorporated into the NMR spectrometer. PMID:8298453

  19. Milli-tesla NMR and spectrophotometry of liquids hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue; Chen, Chia-Hsiu; Wilson, Zechariah; Savukov, Igor; Hilty, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarization methods offer a unique means of improving low signal strength obtained in low-field NMR. Here, simultaneous measurements of NMR at a field of 0.7mT and laser optical absorption from samples hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) are reported. The NMR measurement field closely corresponds to a typical field encountered during sample injection in a D-DNP experiment. The optical spectroscopy allows determination of the concentration of the free radical required for DNP. Correlation of radical concentration to NMR measurement of spin polarization and spin-lattice relaxation time allows determination of relaxivity and can be used for optimization of the D-DNP process. Further, the observation of the nuclear Overhauser effect originating from hyperpolarized spins is demonstrated. Signals from (1)H and (19)F in a mixture of trifluoroethanol and water are detected in a single spectrum, while different atoms of the same type are distinguished by J-coupling patterns. The resulting signal changes of individual peaks are indicative of molecular contact, suggesting a new application area of hyperpolarized low-field NMR for the determination of intermolecular interactions. PMID:27423094

  20. Milli-tesla NMR and spectrophotometry of liquids hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yue; Chen, Chia-Hsiu; Wilson, Zechariah; Savukov, Igor; Hilty, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarization methods offer a unique means of improving low signal strength obtained in low-field NMR. Here, simultaneous measurements of NMR at a field of 0.7 mT and laser optical absorption from samples hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) are reported. The NMR measurement field closely corresponds to a typical field encountered during sample injection in a D-DNP experiment. The optical spectroscopy allows determination of the concentration of the free radical required for DNP. Correlation of radical concentration to NMR measurement of spin polarization and spin-lattice relaxation time allows determination of relaxivity and can be used for optimization of the D-DNP process. Further, the observation of the nuclear Overhauser effect originating from hyperpolarized spins is demonstrated. Signals from 1H and 19F in a mixture of trifluoroethanol and water are detected in a single spectrum, while different atoms of the same type are distinguished by J-coupling patterns. The resulting signal changes of individual peaks are indicative of molecular contact, suggesting a new application area of hyperpolarized low-field NMR for the determination of intermolecular interactions.

  1. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of the distance between the E-site GTP and the high-affinity Mg2+ in tubulin.

    PubMed

    Monasterio, O

    1987-09-22

    The distance separating the divalent metal ion high-affinity binding site and the exchangeable nucleotide binding site on tubulin was evaluated by using high-resolution 19F NMR. The 31P and 19F NMR spectra of guanosine 5'-(gamma-fluorotriphosphate) [GTP (gamma F)] were studied. Both the fluorine and the gamma-phosphate were split into a doublet with a coupling constant of 936 Hz. Tubulin purified according to the method of Weisenberg [Weisenberg, R.C., & Timasheff, S.N. (1970) Biochemistry 9, 4110-4116] was incubated with 1 mM Mn2+. After one cycle of assembly, Mn2+ replaced Mg2+ only partially, i.e., 60% at the high-affinity binding site. After colchicine treatment of tubulin to stabilize it, GTP(gamma F) was added, and the 254-MHz fluorine-19 relaxation rates were measured within the first 4 h. Longitudinal and transversal relaxation rates were determined at two concentrations of GTP(gamma F) and variable concentrations of colchicine-tubulin-Mn(II) (paramagnetic complex) or the ternary complex with magnesium (diamagnetic complex). The analysis of the relaxation data indicates that the rate of exchange of GTP(gamma F) from the exchangeable nucleotide site has a lower limit of 8.7 X 10(4) s-1 and the metal and exchangeable nucleotide binding sites are separated by an upper distance between 6 and 8 A. These data confirm that the high-affinity divalent cation site is situated in the same locus as that of the exchangeable nucleotide, forming a metal-nucleotide complex. PMID:3689763

  2. /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of the distance between the E-site GTP and the high-affinity Mg/sup 2 +/ in tubulin

    SciTech Connect

    Monasterio, O.

    1987-09-22

    The distance separating the divalent metal ion high-affinity binding site and the exchangeable nucleotide binding site on tubulin was evaluated by using high-resolution /sup 19/F NMR. The /sup 31/P and /sup 19/F NMR spectra of guanosine 5'-(..gamma..-fluorotriphosphate) (GTP(..gamma..F)) were studied. Both the fluorine and the ..gamma..-phosphate were split into a doublet with a coupling constant of 936 Hz. Tubulin purified according to the method of Weisenberg was incubated with 1 mM Mn/sup 2 +/. After one cycle of assembly, Mn/sup 2 +/ only partially, i.e., 60% at the high-affinity binding site. After colchicine treatment of tubulin to stabilize it, GTP(..gamma..F) was added, and the 254-MHz fluorine-19 relaxation rates were measured within the first 4 h. Longitudinal and transversal relaxation rates were determined at two concentrations of GTP(..gamma..F) and variable concentrations of colchicine-tubulin-Mn(II) (paramagnetic complex) or the ternary complex with magnesium diamagnetic complex). The analysis of the relaxation data indicates that the rate of exchange of GTP(..gamma..F) from the exchangeable nucleotide site has a lower limit of 8.7 x 10/sup 4/ s/sup -1/ and the metal and exchangeable nucleotide binding sites are separated by an upper distance between 6 and 8 A. These data confirm that the high-affinity divalent cation site is situated in the same locus as that of the exchangeable nucleotide, forming a metal-nucleotide complex.

  3. TANKS 18 AND 19-F EQUIPMENT GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-12-15

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) intends to remove Tanks 18-F and 19-F at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from service. The high-level waste (HLW) tanks have been isolated from the F-area Tank Farm (FTF) facilities and will be filled with cementitious grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the empty volumes in the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways from the surface to residual waste on the bottom of the tanks, (3) providing an intruder barrier, and (4) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to limit solubility of residual radionuclides. Bulk waste and heel waste removal equipment will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F when the tanks are closed. This equipment includes: mixer pumps, transfer pumps, transfer jets, equipment support masts, sampling masts and dip tube assemblies. The current Tank 18-F and 19-F closure strategy is to grout the internal void spaces in this equipment to eliminate fast vertical pathways and slow water infiltration to the residual material on the tank floor. This report documents the results of laboratory testing performed to identify a grout formulation for filling the abandoned equipment in Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The objective of this work was to formulate a flowable grout for filling internal voids of equipment that will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F during the final closures. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, Tank Farm Closure Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The scope for this task is provided in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Prepare and evaluate the SRR cooling coil grout identified in WSRC-STI-2008-00298 per the TTR for this work. The cooling coil grout is a mixture of BASF MasterFlow{reg_sign} 816 cable grout (67.67 wt. %), Grade 100 ground granulated blast furnace slag (7.52 wt. %) and water (24.81 wt. %); (2) Identify equipment grout placement and

  4. Quantitative Tissue Oxygen Measurement in Multiple Organs Using 19F MRI in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Siyuan; Shah, Sameer J.; Wilmes, Lisa J.; Feiner, John; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Wendland, Michael F.; Mason, Ralph P.; Hylton, Nola; Hopf, Harriet W.; Rollins, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of individual organ tissue oxygen levels can provide information to help evaluate and optimize medical interventions in many areas including wound healing, resuscitation strategies, and cancer therapeutics. Echo planar 19F MRI has previously focused on tumor oxygen measurement at low oxygen levels (pO2) < 30 mmHg. It uses the linear relationship between spin-lattice relaxation rate (R1) of hexafluorobenzene (HFB) and pO2. The feasibility of this technique for a wider range of pO2 values and individual organ tissue pO2 measurement was investigated in a rat model. Spin-lattice relaxation times (T1=1/R1) of HFB were measured using 19F saturation recovery echo planar imaging (EPI). Initial in vitro studies validated the linear relationship between R1 and pO2 from 0 mmHg to 760 mmHg oxygen partial pressure at 25°C, 37°C, and 41°C at 7 Tesla for HFB. In vivo experiments measured rat tissue oxygen (ptO2) levels of brain, kidney, liver, gut, muscle and skin during inhalation of both 30% and 100% oxygen. All organ ptO2 values significantly increased with hyperoxia (p<0.001). This study demonstrates that 19F MRI of HFB offers a feasible tool to measure regional ptO2 in vivo, and that hyperoxia significantly increases ptO2 of multiple organs in a rat model. PMID:21688315

  5. Mise en évidence par RMN du 19F d'une distorsion des octaèdres dans la solution solide CsCaF 3- xH x de type perovskite (0 ≤ x ≤ 1,70)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezat, M.; Senegas, J.; Villeneuve, G.; Park, H. H.; Tressaud, A.

    1988-12-01

    19F and 1H NMR investigations have been carried out on three powder samples of CsCaF 3- xH x composition (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.70), and on a single crystal of CsCaF 3. It appears that the spectra of 19F are consistent with a distortion of the Ca(F,H) 6 octahedra involving either lower symmetry or a random distribution of a c4-maxis with respect to the crystallographic directions.

  6. Cerebral blood flow in experimental ischemia assessed by sup 19 F magnetic resonance spectroscopy in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, A.; Nagashima, G.; Bizzi, A.; DesPres, D.J. )

    1990-10-01

    We evaluated a 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopic technique that detects Freon-23 washout as a means of measuring cerebral blood flow in halothane-anesthetized adult cats during and after transient cerebral ischemia produced by vascular occlusion. The experiments were performed to test the ability of this recently developed method to detect postischemic flow deficits. Results were consistent with postischemic hypoperfusion. The method also proved valuable for measuring small residual flow during vascular occlusion. Our experiments indicate that this method provides simple, rapid, and repeatable flow measurements that can augment magnetic resonance examinations of cerebral metabolic parameters in the study of ischemia.

  7. Fission fragment angular distributions for the system 19F+232Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailas, S.; Navin, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Singh, P.; Choudhury, R. K.; Saxena, A.; Nadkarni, D. M.; Kapoor, S. S.; Ramamurthy, V. S.; Nayak, B. K.; Suryanarayana, S. V.

    1991-03-01

    The fission fragment angular distributions for the system 19F+232Th have been measured at several bombarding energies between 94 and 108 MeV. Even though the anisotropy values measured in the present work are considerably smaller than the ones reported by Zhang et al. for the same system at similar energies, they are still anomalous when compared with the predictions of the standard saddle-point statistical model and fit into the systematics of entrance-channel dependence of fission anisotropies reported by us earlier.

  8. Analysis of Radiation Induced Degradation in FPC-461 Fluoropolymers by Variable Temperature Multinuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Wilson, T S; Maxwell, R S

    2004-10-27

    Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been used to investigate aging mechanisms in a vinyl chloride:chlorotrifluoroethylene copolymer, FPC-461, due to exposure to {gamma}-radiation. Solid state {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra revealed structural changes of the polymer upon irradiation under both air and nitrogen atmospheres. Considerable degradation is seen with {sup 1}H NMR in the vinyl chloride region of the polymer, particularly in the samples irradiated in air. {sup 19}F MAS NMR was used to investigate speciation in the chlorotrifluoroethylene blocks, though negligible changes were seen. {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR at elevated temperature revealed increased segmental mobility and decreased structural heterogeneity within the polymer, yielding significant resolution enhancement over room temperature solid state detection. The effects of multi-site exchange are manifest in both the {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR spectra as a line broadening and change in peak position as a function of temperature.

  9. SOLID-STATE 19F NMR INVESTIGATION OF HEXAFLUOROBENZENE SORPTION TO SOIL ORGANIC MATTER. (R825549C058)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  10. A comparative study of 1H and 19F Overhauser DNP in fluorinated benzenes.

    PubMed

    Neudert, Oliver; Mattea, Carlos; Spiess, Hans Wolfgang; Stapf, Siegfried; Münnemann, Kerstin

    2013-12-21

    Hyperpolarization techniques, such as Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), can provide a dramatic increase in the signal obtained from nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and may therefore enable new applications where sensitivity is a limiting factor. In this contribution, studies of the (1)H and (19)F Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization enhancements at 345 mT are presented for three different aromatic solvents with the TEMPO radical for a range of radical concentrations. Furthermore, nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion measurements of the same solutions are analyzed, showing contributions from dipolar and scalar coupling modulated by translational diffusion and different coupling efficiency for different solvents and nuclei. Measurements of the electron paramagnetic resonance linewidth are included to support the analysis of the DNP saturation factor for varying radical concentration. The results of our study give an insight into the characteristics of nitroxide radicals as polarizing agents for (19)F Overhauser DNP of aromatic fluorinated solvents. Furthermore, we compare our results with the findings of the extensive research on Overhauser DNP that was conducted in the past for a large variety of other radicals. PMID:24192645

  11. Measurement of the 19F(α,n)22Na Cross Section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Marcus; Smith, M. S.; Pain, S.; Febbraro, M.; Pittman, S.; Chipps, K. A.; Thompson, S. J.; Grinder, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Smith, K.; Thornsberry, C.; Thompson, P.; Peters, W. A.; Waddell, D.; Blanchard, R.; Carls, A.; Shadrick, S.; Engelhardt, A.; Hertz-Kintish, D.; Allen, N.; Sims, H.

    2015-10-01

    Enriched uranium is commonly stored in fluoride matrices such as UF6. Alpha decays of uranium in UF6 will create neutrons via the 19F(α,n)22Na reaction. An improved cross section for this reaction will enable improved nondestructive assays of uranium content in storage cylinders at material enrichment facilities. To determine this reaction cross section, we have performed experiments using both forward and inverse kinematic techniques at the University of Notre Dame (forward) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (inverse). Both experiments utilized the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) for neutron detection. The ORNL experiment also used a new ionization chamber for 22Na particle identification. Gating on the 22Na nuclei detected drastically reduced the background counts in the neutron time-of-flight spectra. The latest analysis and results will be presented for 19F beam energies ranging from 20-37 MeV. This work is funded in part by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics, the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation R&D, and the NSF.

  12. Dark matter spin-dependent limits for WIMP interactions on 19F by PICASSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltran, Berta; Picasso Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The PICASSO experiment at SNOLAB uses super-heated C4F10 droplets suspended in a gel as a target sensitive to WIMP-proton spin-dependent elastic scattering. The phase II setup has been improved substantially in sensitivity by using an array of 32 detectors with an active mass of ~65 g each and largely reduced background. First results are presented for a subset of two detectors with target masses of 19F of 65 g and 69 g respectively and a total exposure of 13.75 ± 0.48 kgd. No dark matter signal was found and for WIMP masses around 24 GeV/c2 new limits have been obtained on the spin-dependent cross section on 19F of σF = 13.9 pb (90% C.L.) which can be converted into cross section limits on protons and neutrons of σp = 0.15 pb and σn = 2.45 pb respectively (90% C.L). The obtained limits on protons restrict recent interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulations in terms of spin-dependent interactions.

  13. TANK 18-F AND 19-F TANK FILL GROUT SCALE UP TEST SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2012-01-03

    High-level waste (HLW) tanks 18-F and 19-F have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure the tanks will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) entombing waste removal equipment, (4) discouraging future intrusion, and (5) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. This report documents the results of a four cubic yard bulk fill scale up test on the grout formulation recommended for filling Tanks 18-F and 19-F. Details of the scale up test are provided in a Test Plan. The work was authorized under a Technical Task Request (TTR), HLE-TTR-2011-008, and was performed according to Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The bulk fill scale up test described in this report was intended to demonstrate proportioning, mixing, and transportation, of material produced in a full scale ready mix concrete batch plant. In addition, the material produced for the scale up test was characterized with respect to fresh properties, thermal properties, and compressive strength as a function of curing time.

  14. J-Modulation in ID NMR 1H Spectrum of Taurine and Aspartate Using Spin-Echo Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oturak, Halil; Sağlam, Adnan; Bahçeli, Semiha

    1999-05-01

    This study reports on a theoretical calculation of Hahn's spin-echo experiment in case of a model A2B2 spin system with a strongly coupling character and gives the experimental results of one-dimension 1H high-resolution NMR spectra of taurine and aspartate. The calculated amplitudes of the spin-echoes for two different proton groups of taurine are given. Using results of our calculations for taurine, the computer simulations of J-modulation are implemented. It is shown that the agreement be-tween the experimental and simulated spectra is good.

  15. TANK 18 AND 19-F TIER 1A EQUIPMENT FILL MOCK UP TEST SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-04

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) has determined that Tanks 18-F and 19-F have met the F-Tank Farm (FTF) General Closure Plan Requirements and are ready to be permanently closed. The high-level waste (HLW) tanks have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure they will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) discouraging future intrusion, and (4) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. Bulk waste removal and heel removal equipment remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F. This equipment includes the Advance Design Mixer Pump (ADMP), transfer pumps, transfer jets, standard slurry mixer pumps, equipment-support masts, sampling masts, dip tube assemblies and robotic crawlers. The present Tank 18 and 19-F closure strategy is to grout the equipment in place and eliminate vertical pathways by filling voids in the equipment to vertical fast pathways and water infiltration. The mock-up tests described in this report were intended to address placement issues identified for grouting the equipment that will be left in Tank 18-F and Tank 19-F. The Tank 18-F and 19-F closure strategy document states that one of the Performance Assessment (PA) requirements for a closed tank is that equipment remaining in the tank be filled to the extent practical and that vertical flow paths 1 inch and larger be grouted. The specific objectives of the Tier 1A equipment grout mock-up testing include: (1) Identifying the most limiting equipment configurations with respect to internal void space filling; (2) Specifying and constructing initial test geometries and forms that represent scaled boundary conditions; (3) Identifying a target grout rheology for evaluation in the scaled mock-up configurations; (4) Scaling-up production of a grout mix with the target rheology

  16. Annual Report FY2013-- A Kinematically Complete, Interdisciplinary, and Co-Institutional Measurement of the 19F(α,n) Cross-section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, William A; Smith, Michael Scott; Clement, Ryan; Tan, Wanpeng; Stech, Ed; Cizewski, J A; Febbraro, Michael; Madurga Flores, Miguel

    2013-10-01

    Dame (UND), will focus on three specific items: (1) making a precision (better than 10 %) determination of the absolute cross section of the 19F(α,n)22Na reaction as a function of energy; (2) determining the spectrum of neutrons and γ-rays emitted from 19F(α,n)22Na over an energy range pertinent to NDA; and (3) performing simulations with this new cross section to extract the neutron yield (neutrons/gram/second) and resulting neutron- and gamma ray-spectra when α particles interact with fluorine nuclei in actinide samples, to aid in the design and reduce uncertainty of future NDA measurements and simulations.

  17. [Non-invasive analysis of proteins in living cells using NMR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Tochio, Hidehito; Murayama, Shuhei; Inomata, Kohsuke; Morimoto, Daichi; Ohno, Ayako; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy enables structural analyses of proteins and has been widely used in the structural biology field in recent decades. NMR spectroscopy can be applied to proteins inside living cells, allowing characterization of their structures and dynamics in intracellular environments. The simplest "in-cell NMR" approach employs bacterial cells; in this approach, live Escherichia coli cells overexpressing a specific protein are subjected to NMR. The cells are grown in an NMR active isotope-enriched medium to ensure that the overexpressed proteins are labeled with the stable isotopes. Thus the obtained NMR spectra, which are derived from labeled proteins, contain atomic-level information about the structure and dynamics of the proteins. Recent progress enables us to work with higher eukaryotic cells such as HeLa and HEK293 cells, for which a number of techniques have been developed to achieve isotope labeling of the specific target protein. In this review, we describe successful use of electroporation for in-cell NMR. In addition, (19)F-NMR to characterize protein-ligand interactions in cells is presented. Because (19)F nuclei rarely exist in natural cells, when (19)F-labeled proteins are delivered into cells and (19)F-NMR signals are observed, one can safely ascertain that these signals originate from the delivered proteins and not other molecules. PMID:25759048

  18. Enantiotopic discrimination in the deuterium NMR spectrum of solutes with S4 symmetry in chiral liquid crystalsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aroulanda, Christie; Zimmermann, Herbert; Luz, Zeev; Lesot, Philippe

    2011-04-01

    Enantiotopic discrimination in the NMR spectra of prochiral rigid solutes in chiral liquid crystals (CLC), by the ordering mechanism, is limited to molecules possessing one of the four, so called, "allowed" symmetries, D2d, C2v, Cs, and S4. So far, such spectral discrimination was demonstrated only for solutes possessing one of the first three symmetries. In this work, we present deuterium NMR measurements on a rigid S4 compound dissolved in a chiral nematic solvent and demonstrate, for the first time, enantiotopic discrimination in such symmetry. The measurements were performed on the isotopically normal icosane derivative (1) and on its isotopomer (1-d8), specifically deuterated in its four core methylene groups. As a CLC solvent, a lyotropic mesophase, consisting of a solution of poly-γ-benzyl-L-glutamate (PBLG) in pyridine, was employed. For comparison with a corresponding achiral liquid crystal (ALC) solvent, a solution of a racemic mixture of poly-γ-benzylglutamate (PBG) of similar composition in the same co-solvent was used. The spectra were recorded at 92.1 MHz using the 2D Q-COSY Fz sequence with proton decoupling. In the CLC solvents they exhibited clear discrimination due to different enantiotopic sites, with components displaced symmetrically, at frequencies below and above those in the corresponding ALC, as expected for discrimination by ordering. Two procedures were employed for correlating the enantiotopic sites in the CLC spectra. For 1-d8 the dipolar cross-peaks in a 2D 2H-2H COSY-90 experiment provided identification of signals belonging to the same methylene (and hence the same enantiotopic) groups. For 1 the correlation was achieved using a least-square-deviation fitting of the experimental quadrupole splittings with respect to those expected from the molecular geometry. These results, with appropriate symmetry considerations were used to determine the symmetric (Szz) and antisymmetric (Sxy and Sxx-Syy) components of the Saupe ordering matrix

  19. Characterization and quantification of microstructures of a fluorinated terpolymer by both homonuclear and heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ok, Salim

    2015-02-01

    Fluoropolymers are usually insoluble in organic solvents. Insolubility of fluoropolymers limits basic characterization such as microstructural investigations. In the family of fluoropolymers, terpolymer of tetrafluorethylene (TFE), hexafluoropropylene (HFP), and vinylidene fluoride (VDF), named THV is one of the newest members. There are nine grades of THV available. Among the nine grades, THV-221 G is an ideal model polymer for basic characterization purposes. THV-221 G is soluble in solvents such as acetone and ethyl acetate. In the current report, both homonuclear and heteronuclear 2D NMR experiments were employed in solution on THV-221 G. The homonuclear gradient correlation spectroscopy NMR measurement revealed that THV has two adjacent TFE units in addition to TFE-HFP sequence orders. The fraction of the microstructures is quantified by the analysis of 1D solution (19)F NMR spectrum. Further, the gradient heteronuclear single quantum coherence experiment helped with the clarification of chemical environments of the units TFE, HFP, and VDF. The 1D solution (13)C NMR spectrum was helpful in clarifying sequence assignments of VDF. It is concluded that THV is a random polymer with a limited fraction of TFE-TFE and TFE-HFP sequence orders in addition to head-to-tail polymerization of VDF unit. PMID:25327292

  20. Imaging of Intratumoral Inflammation during Oncolytic Virotherapy of Tumors by 19F-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Michael; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Seubert, Carolin; Langbein-Laugwitz, Johanna; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Sturm, Volker Jörg Friedrich; Ye, Yuxiang; Kampf, Thomas; Jakob, Peter Michael; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oncolytic virotherapy of tumors is an up-coming, promising therapeutic modality of cancer therapy. Unfortunately, non-invasive techniques to evaluate the inflammatory host response to treatment are rare. Here, we evaluate 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which enables the non-invasive visualization of inflammatory processes in pathological conditions by the use of perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions (PFC) for monitoring of oncolytic virotherapy. Methodology/Principal Findings The Vaccinia virus strain GLV-1h68 was used as an oncolytic agent for the treatment of different tumor models. Systemic application of PFC emulsions followed by 1H/19F MRI of mock-infected and GLV-1h68-infected tumor-bearing mice revealed a significant accumulation of the 19F signal in the tumor rim of virus-treated mice. Histological examination of tumors confirmed a similar spatial distribution of the 19F signal hot spots and CD68+-macrophages. Thereby, the CD68+-macrophages encapsulate the GFP-positive viral infection foci. In multiple tumor models, we specifically visualized early inflammatory cell recruitment in Vaccinia virus colonized tumors. Furthermore, we documented that the 19F signal correlated with the extent of viral spreading within tumors. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest 19F MRI as a non-invasive methodology to document the tumor-associated host immune response as well as the extent of intratumoral viral replication. Thus, 19F MRI represents a new platform to non-invasively investigate the role of the host immune response for therapeutic outcome of oncolytic virotherapy and individual patient response. PMID:23441176

  1. Measurement of the 19F(α,n) Cross Section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingold, C. S.; Cizewski, J. A.; Peters, W. A.; Clement, R. R. C.; Bardayan, D. W.; Smith, M. S.; Stech, E.; Strauss, S.; Tan, W. P.; Wiescher, M.; Madurga, M.; Vandle Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A precise measurement of the 19F(α,n) cross section will improve Non Destructive Assays (NDA) of UF6 and other actinide-fluoride samples via neutron detection techniques. We will determine the cross section with two complementary approaches. First, we will bombard a LaF3 target with a pulsed 4He beam from the Notre Dame FN tandem accelerator; second, we will send a fluorine beam from the ORNL tandem through a pure helium gas target. The neutron spectra from both of these reactions will be measured using the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE), and coincident γ rays with a HPGe detector. We report here on data taken with VANDLE and a HPGe detector on a LaF3 target. My poster outlines the motivation for this experiment, explains the stages of this experiment, the current experimental setup, and preliminary data. This work is supported by the NNSA.

  2. Tanks 18 And 19-F Structural Flowable Grout Fill Material Evaluation And Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.

    2013-04-23

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: 1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non-compressible material; 2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; 3) reduce contaminant mobility by a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and 4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: 1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). 2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. 3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix design. 4

  3. Efficient acid-catalyzed (18) F/(19) F fluoride exchange of BODIPY dyes.

    PubMed

    Keliher, Edmund J; Klubnick, Jenna A; Reiner, Thomas; Mazitschek, Ralph; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-07-01

    Fluorine-containing fluorochromes are important validation agents for positron emission tomography imaging compounds, as they can be readily validated in cells by fluorescence imaging. In particular, the (18) F-labeled BODIPY-FL fluorophore has emerged as an important platform, but little is known about alternative (18) F-labeling strategies or labeling on red-shifted fluorophores. In this study we explore acid-catalyzed (18) F/(19) F exchange on a range of commercially available N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester and maleimide BODIPY fluorophores. We show this method to be a simple and efficient (18) F-labeling strategy for a diverse span of fluorescent compounds, including a BODIPY-modified PARP-1 inhibitor, and amine- and thiol-reactive BODIPY fluorophores. PMID:24596307

  4. Magnetic Resonance Detection of CD34+ Cells from Umbilical Cord Blood Using a 19F Label

    PubMed Central

    Duinhouwer, Lucia E.; van Rossum, Bernard J. M.; van Tiel, Sandra T.; van der Werf, Ramon M.; Doeswijk, Gabriela N.; Haeck, Joost C.; Rombouts, Elwin W. J. C.; ter Borg, Mariëtte N. D.; Kotek, Gyula; Braakman, Eric; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Bernsen, Monique R.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired homing and delayed recovery upon hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) derived from umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a major problem. Tracking transplanted cells in vivo will be helpful to detect impaired homing at an early stage and allows early interventions to improve engraftment and outcome after transplantation. In this study, we show sufficient intracellular labeling of UCB-derived CD34+ cells, with 19F-containing PLGA nanoparticles which were detectable with both flow cytometry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In addition, labeled CD34+ cells maintain their capacity to proliferate and differentiate, which is pivotal for successful engraftment after transplantation in vivo. These results set the stage for in vivo tracking experiments, through which the homing efficiency of transplanted cells can be studied. PMID:26394043

  5. Evaluation of tumor ischemia in response to an indole-based vascular disrupting agent using BLI and (19)F MRI.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heling; Hallac, Rami R; Lopez, Ramona; Denney, Rebecca; MacDonough, Matthew T; Li, Li; Liu, Li; Graves, Edward E; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Pinney, Kevin G; Mason, Ralph P

    2015-01-01

    Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) have been proposed as an effective broad spectrum approach to cancer therapy, by inducing ischemia leading to hypoxia and cell death. A novel VDA (OXi8007) was recently reported to show rapid acute selective shutdown of tumor vasculature based on color-Doppler ultrasound. We have now expanded investigations to noninvasively assess perfusion and hypoxiation of orthotopic human MDA-MB-231/luc breast tumor xenografts following the administration of OXi8007 based on dynamic bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). BLI showed significantly lower signal four hours after the administration of OXi8007, which was very similar to the response to combretastatin A-4P (CA4P), but the effect lasted considerably longer, with the BLI signal remaining depressed at 72 hrs. Meanwhile, control tumors exhibited minimal change. Oximetry used (19)F MRI of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene and FREDOM (Fluorocarbon Relaxometry using Echo Planar Imaging for Dynamic Oxygen Mapping) to assess pO2 distributions during air and oxygen breathing. pO2 decreased significantly upon the administration of OXi8007 during oxygen breathing (from 122 ± 64 to 34 ± 20 Torr), with further decrease upon switching the gas to air (pO2 = 17 ± 9 Torr). pO2 maps indicated intra-tumor heterogeneity in response to OXi8007, though ultimately all tumor regions became hypoxic. Both BLI and FREDOM showed the efficacy of OXi8007. The pO2 changes measured by FREDOM may be crucial for future study of combined therapy. PMID:25973335

  6. Measurement of the 19F(α,n) Cross Section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingold, C. S.; Cizewski, J. A.; Burcher, S.; Manning, B.; Peters, W. A.; Clement, R. R. C.; Smith, M. S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Stech, E.; Tan, W. P.; Madurga, M.; Ilyushkin, S.; Thompson, S.; Vandle Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    A precise measurement of the 19F(α,n) cross section will improve Non Destructive Assays (NDA) of UF6 and other actinide-fluoride samples via neutron detection techniques. The cross section will be determined with two complementary approaches. We have already bombarded a LaF3 target with a pulsed 4He beam from the Notre Dame FN tandem accelerator; next, we will send a fluorine beam from the ORNL tandem through a pure helium gas target. The neutron spectra from both of these reactions will be measured using the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE), and coincident γ rays with a HPGe detector. We report here on data taken with VANDLE and a HPGe detector on a LaF3 target. This poster outlines the motivation for this experiment, explains the stages of this experiment, and presents both of our experimental setups and preliminary data. A precise measurement of the 19F(α,n) cross section will improve Non Destructive Assays (NDA) of UF6 and other actinide-fluoride samples via neutron detection techniques. The cross section will be determined with two complementary approaches. We have already bombarded a LaF3 target with a pulsed 4He beam from the Notre Dame FN tandem accelerator; next, we will send a fluorine beam from the ORNL tandem through a pure helium gas target. The neutron spectra from both of these reactions will be measured using the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE), and coincident γ rays with a HPGe detector. We report here on data taken with VANDLE and a HPGe detector on a LaF3 target. This poster outlines the motivation for this experiment, explains the stages of this experiment, and presents both of our experimental setups and preliminary data. This work is supported by the NNSA, NSF, and DOE.

  7. Balanced UTE-SSFP for 19F MR Imaging of Complex Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Goette, Matthew J.; Keupp, Jochen; Rahmer, Jürgen; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Caruthers, Shelton D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A novel technique for highly sensitive detection of multi-resonant fluorine imaging agents was designed and tested with the use of dual-frequency 19F/1H ultra-short echo times (UTE) sampled with a balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) pulse sequence and 3D radial readout. Methods Feasibility of 3D radial balanced UTE-SSFP imaging was demonstrated for a phantom comprising liquid perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB). Sensitivity of the pulse sequence was measured and compared to other sequences imaging the PFOB (CF2)6 line group including UTE radial gradient-echo (GRE) at α=30°, as well as Cartesian GRE, balanced SSFP, and fast spin-echo (FSE). The PFOB CF3 peak was also sampled with FSE. Results The proposed balanced UTE-SSFP technique exhibited a relative detection sensitivity of 51 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2 (α=30°), at least twice that of other sequence types with either 3D radial (UTE GRE: 20 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2) or Cartesian k-space filling (GRE: 12 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2; FSE: 16 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2 balanced SSFP: 23 μmolPFOB−1min−1/2 In vivo imaging of angiogenesis-targeted PFOB nanoparticles was demonstrated in a rabbit model of cancer on a clinical 3T scanner. Conclusion A new dual 19F/1H balanced UTE-SSFP sequence manifests high SNR, with detection sensitivity more than twofold better than traditional techniques, and alleviates imaging problems caused by dephasing in complex spectra. PMID:25163853

  8. Determination of size and sign of hetero-nuclear coupling constants from 2D 19F-13C correlation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampt, Kirsten A. M.; Aspers, Ruud L. E. G.; Dvortsak, Peter; van der Werf, Ramon M.; Wijmenga, Sybren S.; Jaeger, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Fluorinated organic compounds have become increasingly important within the polymer and the pharmaceutical industry as well as for clinical applications. For the structural elucidation of such compounds, NMR experiments with fluorine detection are of great value due to the favorable NMR properties of the fluorine nucleus. For the investigation of three fluorinated compounds, triple resonance 2D HSQC and HMBC experiments were adopted to fluorine detection with carbon and/or proton decoupling to yield F-C, F-C{H}, F-C{Cacq} and F-C{H,Cacq} variants. Analysis of E.COSY type cross-peak patterns in the F-C correlation spectra led, apart from the chemical shift assignments, to determination of size and signs of the JCH, JCF, and JHF coupling constants. In addition, the fully coupled F-C HMQC spectrum of steroid 1 was interpreted in terms of E.COSY type patterns. This example shows how coupling constants due to different nuclei can be determined together with their relative signs from a single spectrum. The analysis of cross-peak patterns, as presented here, not only provides relatively straightforward routes to the determination of size and sign of hetero-nuclear J-couplings in fluorinated compounds, it also provides new and easy ways for the determination of residual dipolar couplings and thus for structure elucidation. The examples and results presented in this study may contribute to a better interpretation and understanding of various F-C correlation experiments and thereby stimulate their utilization.

  9. New applications and perspectives of fast field cycling NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Steele, Rebecca M; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Ferrante, Gianni; Bubici, Salvatore

    2016-06-01

    The field cycling NMR relaxometry method (also known as fast field cycling (FFC) when instruments employing fast electrical switching of the magnetic field are used) allows determination of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1 ) continuously over five decades of Larmor frequency. The method can be exploited to observe the T1 frequency dependence of protons, as well as any other NMR-sensitive nuclei, such as (2) H, (13) C, (31) P, and (19) F in a wide range of substances and materials. The information obtained is directly correlated with the physical/chemical properties of the compound and can be represented as a 'nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion' curve. We present some recent academic and industrial applications showing the relevance of exploiting FFC NMR relaxometry in complex materials to study the molecular dynamics or, simply, for fingerprinting or quality control purposes. The basic nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion features are outlined in representative examples of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, porous media, proteins, and food stuffs. We will focus on the new directions and perspectives for the FFC technique. For instance, the introduction of the latest Wide Bore FFC NMR relaxometers allows probing, for the first time, of the dynamics of confined surface water contained in the macro-pores of carbonate rock cores. We also evidence the use of the latest field cycling technology with a new cryogen-free variable-field electromagnet, which enhances the range of available frequencies in the 2D T1 -T2 correlation spectrum for separating oil and water in crude oil. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25855084

  10. Visualizing brain inflammation with a shingled-leg radio-frequency head probe for 19F/1H MRI.

    PubMed

    Waiczies, Helmar; Lepore, Stefano; Drechsler, Susanne; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Purfürst, Bettina; Sydow, Karl; Dathe, Margitta; Kühne, André; Lindel, Tomasz; Hoffmann, Werner; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf; Waiczies, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides the opportunity of tracking cells in vivo. Major challenges in dissecting cells from the recipient tissue and signal sensitivity constraints albeit exist. In this study, we aimed to tackle these limitations in order to study inflammation in autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We constructed a very small dual-tunable radio frequency (RF) birdcage probe tailored for (19)F (fluorine) and (1)H (proton) MR mouse neuroimaging. The novel design eliminated the need for extra electrical components on the probe structure and afforded a uniform -field as well as good SNR. We employed fluorescently-tagged (19)F nanoparticles and could study the dynamics of inflammatory cells between CNS and lymphatic system during development of encephalomyelitis, even within regions of the brain that are otherwise not easily visualized by conventional probes. (19)F/(1)H MR Neuroimaging will allow us to study the nature of immune cell infiltration during brain inflammation over an extensive period of time. PMID:23412352

  11. TANKS 18 AND 19-F STRUCTURAL FLOWABLE GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-01

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: (1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non compressible material; (2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; (3) reduce contaminant mobility by (a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and (b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and (4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). (2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. (3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix

  12. EASY-GOING deconvolution: Automated MQMAS NMR spectrum analysis based on a model with analytical crystallite excitation efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimminck, Dennis L. A. G.; van Meerten, Bas; Verkuijlen, Margriet H. W.; van Eck, Ernst R. H.; Leo Meerts, W.; Kentgens, Arno P. M.

    2013-03-01

    The EASY-GOING deconvolution (EGdeconv) program is extended to enable fast and automated fitting of multiple quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) spectra guided by evolutionary algorithms. We implemented an analytical crystallite excitation model for spectrum simulation. Currently these efficiencies are limited to two-pulse and z-filtered 3QMAS spectra of spin 3/2 and 5/2 nuclei, whereas for higher spin-quantum numbers ideal excitation is assumed. The analytical expressions are explained in full to avoid ambiguity and facilitate others to use them. The EGdeconv program can fit interaction parameter distributions. It currently includes a Gaussian distribution for the chemical shift and an (extended) Czjzek distribution for the quadrupolar interaction. We provide three case studies to illustrate EGdeconv's capabilities for fitting MQMAS spectra. The EGdeconv program is available as is on our website http://egdeconv.science.ru.nl for 64-bit Linux operating systems.

  13. Binary channels of the {sup 19}F-on-{sup 12}C reaction at 92 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aissaoui, N.; Haas, F.; Freeman, R.M.; Beck, C.; Morsad, A.; Djerroud, B.; Caplar, R.; Hachem, A.

    1997-01-01

    Binary-reaction channels of {sup 19}F+{sup 12}C have been studied at E{sub lab}({sup 19}F)=92 MeV using kinematic coincidence techniques. The results are discussed in the light of previous inclusive measurements performed at the same incident energy and for which the occurrence of an important incomplete fusion mechanism after projectile breakup was proposed. Evidence for strong damped binary, especially quasisymmetric, decay processes is found. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. An overview of the 19F(p,α0)16 O reaction with direct methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell’Aquila, D.; Lombardo, I.

    2016-04-01

    The study of the 19F(p,α)16O reaction at low energy is important both for Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics. Despite of its importance, the S-factor of this reaction is poorly known, especially at astrophysical energies. We present an overview of the 19F(p,α0)16O reaction cross section, as obtained from recent direct measurements and from published works in the literature. We include in the systematic also data from an unpublished work, where several excitation functions and angular distributions for α0 and απ channels are reported.

  15. Constraints on low-mass WIMP interactions on 19F from PICASSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, S.; Behnke, E.; Bhattacharjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dai, X.; Das, M.; Davour, A.; Debris, F.; Dhungana, N.; Farine, J.; Gagnebin, S.; Giroux, G.; Grace, E.; Jackson, C. M.; Kamaha, A.; Krauss, C.; Kumaratunga, S.; Lafrenière, M.; Laurin, M.; Lawson, I.; Lessard, L.; Levine, I.; Levy, C.; MacDonald, R. P.; Marlisov, D.; Martin, J.-P.; Mitra, P.; Noble, A. J.; Piro, M.-C.; Podviyanuk, R.; Pospisil, S.; Saha, S.; Scallon, O.; Seth, S.; Starinski, N.; Stekl, I.; Wichoski, U.; Xie, T.; Zacek, V.

    2012-05-01

    Recent results from the PICASSO dark matter search experiment at SNOLAB are reported. These results were obtained using a subset of 10 detectors with a total target mass of 0.72 kg of 19F and an exposure of 114 kgd. The low backgrounds in PICASSO allow recoil energy thresholds as low as 1.7 keV to be obtained which results in an increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below 10 GeV/c2. No dark matter signal was found. Best exclusion limits in the spin dependent sector were obtained for WIMP masses of 20 GeV/c2 with a cross section on protons of σpSD=0.032 pb (90% C.L.). In the spin independent sector close to the low mass region of 7 GeV/c2 favoured by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA, cross sections larger than σpSI=1.41×10-4 pb (90% C.L.) are excluded.

  16. (19)F(α,n) thick target yield from 3.5 to 10.0 MeV.

    PubMed

    Norman, E B; Chupp, T E; Lesko, K T; Grant, P J; Woodruff, G L

    2015-09-01

    Using a target of PbF2, the thick-target yield from the (19)F(α,n) reaction was measured from E(α)=3.5-10 MeV. From these results, we infer the thick-target neutron yields from targets of F2 and UF6 over this same alpha-particle energy range. PMID:26115205

  17. Mapping phosphorylation rate of fluoro-deoxy-glucose in rat brain by 19F chemical shift imaging

    PubMed Central

    Coman, Daniel; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Cheng, David; McCarthy, Timothy; Rothman, Douglas L.; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2014-01-01

    19F magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies of 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate (FDG-6P) can be used for directly assessing total glucose metabolism in vivo. To date, 19F MRS measurements of FDG phosphorylation in the brain have either been achieved ex vivo from extracted tissue or in vivo by unusually long acquisition times. Electrophysiological and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements indicate that FDG doses up to 500mg/kg can be tolerated with minimal side effects on cerebral physiology and evoked fMRI-BOLD responses to forepaw stimulation. In halothane-anesthetized rats, we report localized in vivo detection and separation of FDG and FDG-6P MRS signals with 19F 2D chemical shift imaging (CSI) at 11.7T. A metabolic model based on reversible transport between plasma and brain tissue, which included a non-saturable plasma to tissue component, was used to calculate spatial distribution of FDG and FDG-6P concentrations in rat brain. In addition, spatial distribution of rate constants and metabolic fluxes of FDG to FDG-6P conversion were estimated. Mapping the rate of FDG to FDG-6P conversion by 19F CSI provides an MR methodology that could impact other in vivo applications such as characterization of tumor pathophysiology. PMID:24581725

  18. Energy dependence of fission fragment angular distributions for 19F, 24Mg and 28Si induced reactions on 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, M. B.; Utsunomiya, H.; Gelbke, C. K.; Lynch, W. G.; Back, B. B.; Saini, S.; Baisden, P. A.; McMahan, M. A.

    1983-09-01

    The energy dependence of fission fragment angular distributions was measured for reaction induced by 19F, 24Mg, and 28Si on 208Pb over the range of incident energies of {E}/{A} = 5.6-10 MeV. For all three systems the angular distributions are inconsistent with the saddle point deformations of the rotating liquid drop model.

  19. Angular Distribution and Angular Dispersion in Collision of 19F+27Al at 114 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Dong, Yu-Chuan; Li, Song-Lin; Duan, Li-Min; Xu, Hu-Shan; Xu, Hua-Gen; Chen, Ruo-Fu; Wu, He-Yu; Han, Jian-Long; Li, Zhi-Chang; Lu, Xiu-Qin; Zhao, Kui; Liu, Jian-Cheng; Sergey, Yu-Kun

    2004-10-01

    Angular distributions of fragments B, C, N, O, F, Ne, Na, Mg and Al induced by the collision of 19F+27Al at 114 MeV have been measured. Angular dispersion parameters are extracted from the experimental data and compared with the theoretical ones. The dynamic dispersions for dissipative products depend strongly on the charge number Z of the fragments.

  20. Technical advance: monitoring the trafficking of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes during the course of tissue inflammation by noninvasive 19F MRI.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Jacoby, Christoph; Ding, Zhaoping; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation results in the recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes, which is crucial for the healing process. In the present study, we used (19)F MRI to monitor in vivo the infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes from the onset of inflammation to the resolution and healing phase. Matrigel, with or without LPS, was s.c.-implanted into C57BL/6 mice. This resulted in a focal inflammation lasting over a period of 20 days, with constantly decreasing LPS levels in doped matrigel plugs. After i.v. administration of (19)F containing contrast agent, (19)F MRI revealed a zonular (19)F signal in the periphery of LPS containing matrigel plugs, which was not observed in control plugs. Analysis of the (19)F signal over the observation period demonstrated the strongest (19)F signal after 24 h, which decreased to nearly zero after 20 days. The (19)F signal was mirrored by the amount of leukocytes in the matrigel, with neutrophils dominating at early time-points and macrophages at later time-points. Both populations were shown to take up the (19)F contrast agent. In conclusion, (19)F MRI, in combination with the matrigel/LPS model, permits the noninvasive analysis of neutrophil and monocyte infiltration over the complete course of inflammation in vivo. PMID:24319285

  1. Impact of Zeolite Transferred from Tank 19F to Tank 18F on DWPF Vitrification of Sludge Batch 3

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2004-01-07

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is planning to initiate vitrification of Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) in combination with Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) in the spring of 2004. The contents of Sludge Batch 3 will be a mixture of the heel remaining from Sludge Batch 1B, sludge from Tank 7F (containing coal, sand, and sodium oxalate), and sludge materials from Tank 18F. The sludge materials in Tank 18F contain part of a mound of zeolitic material transferred there from Tank 19F. This mound was physically broken up and transfers were made from Tank 19F to Tank 18F for vitrification into SB3. In addition, excess Pu and Am/Cm materials were transferred to Tank 51H to be processed through the DWPF as part of SB3. Additional Pu material and a Np stream from the Canyons are also planned to be added to SB3 before processing of this batch commences at DWPF. The primary objective of this task was to assess the impacts of the excess zeolite mound material in Tank 19F on the predicted glass and processing properties of interest when the zeolite becomes part of SB3. The two potential impacts of the Tank 19F zeolite mound on DWPF processing relates to (1) the samples taken for determination of the acceptability of a macrobatch of DWPF feed and (2) the achievable waste loading. The potential effects of the large size of the zeolite particles found in the Tank 19F solids, as reported in this study, are considered minimal for processing of SB3 in DWPF. Other findings about the zeolite conversion mechanism via a process of Ostwald ripening are discussed in the text and in the conclusions.

  2. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance as a probe of the spatial relationship between the heme iron of cytochrome P-450 and its substrate.

    PubMed

    Crull, G B; Kennington, J W; Garber, A R; Ellis, P D; Dawson, J H

    1989-02-15

    The distance between the heme iron of ferrous cytochrome P-450-CAM and a fluorine label attached to the 9-methyl carbon of its substrate, (1R)-(+)-camphor, has been determined using 19F NMR. This investigation uses the Solomon-Bloembergen equation to measure the distance from a paramagnetic heme iron to a fluorine probe incorporated into a substrate that is not in fast exchange. The structural identity of the substrate analogue, 9-fluorocamphor, has been established using one- and two-dimensional NMR methods and mass spectrometry. The relaxation rate of 9-fluorocamphor bound to high-spin paramagnetic ferrous P-450-CAM has been studied at 188, 282, and 376 MHz, and the correlation time has been directly determined from the frequency dependence of the relaxation rate. When the substrate analogue was bound to the low-spin diamagnetic ferrous-CO derivative of the enzyme, the relaxation rate was found to be 100 times slower and was therefore neglected in the distance calculation. The relaxation data for the paramagnetic system and the correlation time have been used to calculate a distance of 3.8 A between the heme iron and the C-9 fluoride. A fit of the distance and the chemical shift data to the pseudocontact shift equation predicts an angle of approximately 52 degrees between the heme normal and the Fe-F vector. The solution state Fe-F distance is somewhat shorter and the angle between the heme normal and the Fe-F vector slightly larger for the substrate-bound ferrous enzyme reported herein than the analogous values for the substrate-bound ferric enzyme determined in the solid state by x-ray crystallography. These differences may reflect a structural change at the substrate-binding site upon reduction of the iron. PMID:2914926

  3. Self-Assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles Designed as Imaging Probes for 19F and Relaxation-Enhanced 1H imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preslar, Adam Truett

    This work incorporates whole-body imaging functionality into peptide amphiphile (PA) nanostructures used for regenerative medicine to facilitate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two strategies were employed: 1. Conjugation of gadolinium chelates to peptide nanostructures to monitor biomaterial degradation in vivo with MRI and inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) 2. Synthesis of perfluorinated moiety-bearing peptide amphiphiles for 19F-MRI. The Gd(III) chelate gadoteridol was conjugated by copper-catalyzed "click" chemistry to a series of PAs known to form cylindrical nanostructures. By fitting nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion (NMRD) profiles to the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) equations, it was observed that the water exchange parameter (tauM) depended on thermal annealing or calcium ion cross-linking. The sequence C16V 3A3E3G(Gd) exhibited an acceleration of nearly 100 ns after thermal annealing and calcium addition. These gadolinium-labeled PAs were used to track in vivo degradation of gels within the tibialis anterior muscle in a murine model. The half-life of biomaterial degradation was determined to be 13.5 days by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) of Gd(III). Gel implants could be monitored by MRI for eight days before the signal dispersed due to implant degradation and dilution. Additionally, nanostructures incorporating highly fluorinated domains were investigated for use as MRI contrast agents. Short, perfluoroalkyane tails of seven or eight carbon atoms in length were grafted to PA sequences containing a V2A2 beta-sheet forming sequence. The V2A2 sequence is known to drive 1D nanostructure assembly. It was found that the sequences C7F13V2A 2E2 and C7F13V2A 2K3 formed 1D assemblies in water which transition from ribbon-like to cylindrical shape as pH increases from 4.5 to 8.0. Ribbon-like nanostructures had reduced magnetic resonance signal by T 2 relaxation quenching, whereas their cylindrical counterparts

  4. Characterization of the Tank 19F Closure Grab and Core Samples and the Tank 18F Dip Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Swingle, R.F.

    2002-05-02

    The results of analyses of the Tank 19F closure characterization samples are included herein. The samples analyzed include the two Tank 19F grab samples (FTF-075 and FTF-077) and a Tank 18F dip sample (FTF-076) taken in September 2001 and a Tank 19F core sample (FTF-118) taken in December 2001. The FTF-075 and FTF-077 grab samples were pulled from Tank 19F and the FTF-076 dip sample was pulled from Tank 18F in September 2001 as part of the characterization process for closure of Tank 19F. The samples were delivered to the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) Shielded Cells on September 28, 2001 and placed in the Shielded Cells on October 2, 2001. The samples were opened and both grab samples were found to contain plenty of material to allow completion of the analyses. The samples were dark and resembled marsh muck (see Figures 1 and 2). The dip sample was also found to contain plenty of material. The sample looked like muddy water (Figure 4). The FTF-118F core sample was pulled from Tank 19F in December 2001 as part of the characterization process for closure of the tank. The sample was delivered to the SRTC Shielded Cells on December 6, 2001 and placed in the Shielded Cells on December 7, 2001. The sample was opened and found to contain plenty of material to allow completion of the analyses. As evident in Figure 3, the sample resembled a somewhat drier version of the previous grab samples FTF-075 and FTF-077. A group consisting of SRTC Waste Processing Technology (WPT) section personnel and High Level Waste Engineering (HLWE) personnel viewed the sample when it was opened and came to the consensus that the sample appeared to be homogeneous. The decision was made to treat the sample as a single phase and analyze accordingly. Initially, small portions were archived from the top, middle and bottom of the sample in case it is later decided to analyze the levels of the sample separately. The analytical results from the two grab samples and the core sample were all

  5. Recognition of Escherichia coli valine transfer RNA by its cognate synthetase: A fluorine-19 NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Wenchy; Horowitz, J. )

    1991-02-12

    Interactions of 5-fluorouracil-substituted Escherichia coli tRNA{sup Val} with its cognate synthetase have been investigated by fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance. Valyl-tRNA synthetase (VRS) (EC 6.1.1.9), purified to homogeneity from an overproducing strain of E. coli, differs somewhat from VRS previously isolated from E. coli K12. Its amino acid composition and N-terminal sequence agree well with results derived from the sequence of the VRS gene. Apparent K{sub M} and V{sub max} values of the purified VRS are the same for both normal and 5-fluorouracil (FUra)-substituted tRNA{sup Val}. Binding of VRS to (FUra)tRNA{sup Val} induces structural perturbations that are reflected in selective changes in the {sup 19}F NMR spectrum of the tRNA. Addition of increasing amounts of VRS results in a gradual loss of intensity at resonances corresponding to FU34, FU7, and FU67, with FU34, at the wobble position of the anticodon, being affected most. At higher VRS/tRNA ratios, a broadening and shifting of FU12 and of FU4 and/or FU8 occur. These results indicate that VRS interacts with tRNA{sup Val} along the entire inside of the L-shape molecule, from the acceptor stem to the anticodon. Valyl-tRNA synthetase also causes a splitting of resonances FU55 and FU64 in the T-loop and stem of tRNA{sup Val}, suggesting conformational changes in this part of the molecule. No {sup 19}F NMR evidence was found for formation of the Michael adduct between VRS and FU8 of 5-fluorouracil-substituted tRNA{sup Val} that has been proposed as a common intermediate in the aminoacylation reaction.

  6. The quantitative spectrum of inositol phosphate metabolites in avian erythrocytes, analysed by proton n.m.r. and h.p.l.c. with direct isomer detection.

    PubMed Central

    Radenberg, T; Scholz, P; Bergmann, G; Mayr, G W

    1989-01-01

    The spectrum of inositol phosphate isomers present in avian erythrocytes was investigated in qualitative and quantitative terms. Inositol phosphates were isolated in micromolar quantities from turkey blood by anion-exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and subjected to proton n.m.r. and h.p.l.c. analysis. We employed a h.p.l.c. technique with a novel, recently described complexometric post-column detection system, called 'metal-dye detection' [Mayr (1988) Biochem. J. 254, 585-591], which enabled us to identify non-radioactively labelled inositol phosphate isomers and to determine their masses. The results indicate that avian erythrocytes contain the same inositol phosphate isomers as mammalian cells. Denoted by the 'lowest-locant rule' [NC-IUB Recommendations (1988) Biochem. J. 258, 1-2] irrespective of true enantiomerism, these are Ins(1,4)P2, Ins(1,6)P2, Ins(1,3,4)P3, Ins(1,4,5)P3, Ins(1,3,4,5)P4, Ins(1,3,4,6)P4, Ins(1,4,5,6)P4, Ins(1,3,4,5,6)P5, and InsP6. Furthermore, we identified two inositol trisphosphate isomers hitherto not described for mammalian cells, namely Ins(1,5,6)P3 and Ins(2,4,5)P3. The possible position of these two isomers in inositol phosphate metabolism and implications resulting from absolute abundances of inositol phosphates are discussed. PMID:2604720

  7. Angular distributions and cross-sections of projectile-like fragments in the 19F + 159Tb reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Tripathi, R.; Sodaye, S.; Sudarshan, K.; Pujari, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    The angular distribution of projectile-like fragments (PLFs) in the 19F + 159Tb reaction have been measured at beam energy equal to 98MeV. Angular distributions of PLFs showed a systematic change with increasing mass transfer, starting from the peaking at grazing angle for heavier PLFs to very forward peaked angular distributions for lighter PLFs. Cross-sections of the different PLFs were obtained by integrating their centre-of-mass angular distributions. The PLF cross-sections have been compared with the incomplete fusion cross-sections obtained from the earlier measurement of the evaporation residue cross-section. Reduced cross-sections for lighter PLFs were observed to be higher compared to those observed in 19F + 66Zn reaction at similar values of E cm/ V b. Also, elastic scattering measurements were carried out to get information about the grazing angle and total reaction cross-section.

  8. Probing different perfluorocarbons for in vivo inflammation imaging by 19F MRI: image reconstruction, biological half-lives and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Temme, Sebastian; Mayenfels, Friederike; Benoit, Nicole; Krafft, Marie Pierre; Schubert, Rolf; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory processes can reliably be assessed by (19)F MRI using perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which is primarily based on the efficient uptake of emulsified PFCs by circulating cells of the monocyte-macrophage system and subsequent infiltration of the (19)F-labeled cells into affected tissue. An ideal candidate for the sensitive detection of fluorine-loaded cells is the biochemically inert perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PFCE), as it contains 20 magnetically equivalent (19)F atoms. However, the biological half-life of PFCE in the liver and spleen is extremely long, and so this substance is not suitable for future clinical applications. In the present study, we investigated alternative, nontoxic PFCs with predicted short biological half-lives and high fluorine content: perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB), perfluorodecalin (PFD) and trans-bis-perfluorobutyl ethylene (F-44E). Despite the complex spectra of these compounds, we obtained artifact-free images using sine-squared acquisition-weighted three-dimensional chemical shift imaging and dedicated reconstruction accomplished with in-house-developed software. The signal-to-noise ratio of the images was maximized using a Nutall window with only moderate localization error. Using this approach, the retention times of the different PFCs in murine liver and spleen were determined at 9.4 T. The biological half-lives were estimated to be 9 days (PFD), 12 days (PFOB) and 28 days (F-44E), compared with more than 250 days for PFCE. In vivo sensitivity for inflammation imaging was assessed using an ear clip injury model. The alternative PFCs PFOB and F-44E provided 37% and 43%, respectively, of the PFCE intensities, whereas PFD did not show any signal in the ear model. Thus, for in vivo monitoring of inflammatory processes, PFOB emerges as the most promising candidate for possible future translation of (19)F MR inflammation imaging to human applications. PMID:24353148

  9. Novel 19F Activatable Probe for the Detection of Matrix Metalloprotease-2 Activity by MRI/MRS

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) have been found to be highly expressed in a variety of malignant tumor tissues. Noninvasive visualization of MMP activity may play an important role in the diagnosis of MMP associated diseases. Here we report the design and synthesis of a set of fluorine-19 dendron-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes for real-time imaging of MMP-2 activity. The probes have the following features: (a) symmetrical fluorine atoms; (b) the number of fluorine atoms can be increased through facile chemical modification; (c) readily accessible peptide sequence as the MMP-2 substrate; (d) activatable 19F signal (off/on mode) via paramagnetic metal ion incorporation. Following optimization for water solubility, one of the probes was selected to evaluate MMP-2 activity by 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Our results showed that the fluorine signal increased by 8.5-fold in the presence of MMP-2. The specific cleavage site was verified by mass spectrometry. The selected probe was further applied to detect secreted MMP-2 activity of living SCC7 squamous cell carcinoma cells. The fluorine signal was increased by 4.8-fold by MRS analysis after 24 h incubation with SCC7 cells. This type of fluorine probe can be applied to evaluate other enzyme activities by simply tuning the substrate structures. This symmetrical fluorine dendron-based probe design extends the scope of the existing 19F MRI agents and provides a simple but robust method for real-time 19F MRI application. PMID:25271556

  10. Multimodal Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsions for 19F MRI, Ultrasonography, and Catalysis of MRgFUS-Mediated Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapoport, N.; Nam, K.-H.; Christensen, D. A.; Kennedy, A. M.; Parker, D. L.; Payne, A. H.; Todd, N.; Shea, J. E.; Scaife, C. L.

    2011-09-01

    Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions can target lipophilic therapeutic agents to solid tumors and simultaneously provide for monitoring nanocarrier biodistribution via ultrasonography and/or 19F MRI. In the first generation of block copolymer stabilized perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions, perfluoropentane (PFP) was used as the droplet forming compound. Although manifesting excellent therapeutic and ultrasound imaging properties, PFP nanoemulsions were unstable at storage, difficult to handle, and underwent droplet-to-bubble transition upon injection that was hard to control. To solve the above problems, perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether (PFCE) was used as a core forming compound in the second generation of block copolymer stabilized perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions. In the present paper, acoustic, imaging, and therapeutic properties of unloaded and paclitaxel (PTX) loaded PFCE nanoemulsions are reported. The size of paclitaxel-loaded PFCE nanodroplets (300 nm to 500 nm depending on emulsification conditions) favors their passive accumulation in tumor tissue. PFCE nanodroplets manifest both ultrasound and 19F MR contrast properties, which allows the use of multimodal imaging to monitor nanodroplet biodistribution. Ultrasonography and 19F MRI produced consistent results on nanodroplet biodistribution. Sonication with 1-MHz therapeutic ultrasound triggered reversible droplet-to-bubble transition in PFCE nanoemulsions. Microbubbles formed by acoustic vaporization underwent stable cavitation. In a pilot study on ultrasound-mediated therapy of a large breast cancer tumor, paclitaxel-loaded PFCE nanoemulsions combined with 1-MHz ultrasound (MI≥1.75) showed excellent therapeutic properties. Anticipated mechanisms of the observed effects are discussed.

  11. Computational prediction and analysis of the (27)Al solid-state NMR spectrum of methylaluminoxane (MAO) at variable temperatures and field strengths.

    PubMed

    Falls, Zackary; Zurek, Eva; Autschbach, Jochen

    2016-09-14

    Calculations of NMR shielding tensors and nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) tensors at the Kohn-Sham density functional level are used to simulate (27)Al magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra of the important olefin polymerization co-catalyst methylaluminoxane (MAO) at 77, 298, 398, and 498 K and spectrometer magnetic field inductions B ranging from 14.1 to 23.5 T. The calculations utilize the temperature (T) dependent distribution of species present in MAO determined recently by Zurek and coworkers from first-principles theory [Macromolecules, 2014, 47, 8556]. The NMR calculations suggest that variable-T and variable-B NMR measurements are able to quantify the ratio of free versus bound trimethyl-aluminum (TMA) in MAO via characteristic spectral features assigned to 3-coordinate and 4-coordinate Al sites in MAO as well as spectral features arising from free TMA or its dimer. The T-dependent distribution of species causes other characteristic features in the NMR spectra to appear/disappear that can be associated with different aluminum environments such as square vs. hexagonal faces in cage and tubular structures. The simulated spectra at 298 K and 19.6 T are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectra obtained previously for MAO gel. The promise and limitations of solid-state NMR to unravel the enigma surrounding the structure(s) of MAO are discussed. PMID:27526292

  12. Moving NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Danieli, Ernesto; Gong, Qingxia; Greferath, Marcus; Haber, Agnes; Kolz, Jürgen; Perlo, Juan

    2008-12-01

    Initiated by the use of NMR for well logging, portable NMR instruments are being developed for a variety of novel applications in materials testing and process analysis and control. Open sensors enable non-destructive testing of large objects, and small, cup-size magnets become available for high throughput analysis by NMR relaxation and spectroscopy. Some recent developments of mobile NMR are reviewed which delineate the direction into which portable NMR is moving.

  13. Activatable 19F MRI nanoparticle probes for the detection of reducing environments.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Matsushita, Hisashi; Sugihara, Fuminori; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Mizukami, Shin; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2015-01-12

    (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes that can detect biological phenomena such as cell dynamics, ion concentrations, and enzymatic activity have attracted significant attention. Although perfluorocarbon (PFC) encapsulated nanoparticles are of interest in molecular imaging owing to their high sensitivity, activatable PFC nanoparticles have not been developed. In this study, we showed for the first time that the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effect can efficiently decrease the (19)F NMR/MRI signals of PFCs in silica nanoparticles. On the basis of the PRE effect, we developed a reduction-responsive PFC-encapsulated nanoparticle probe, FLAME-SS-Gd(3+) (FSG). This is the first example of an activatable PFC-encapsulated nanoparticle that can be used for in vivo imaging. Calculations revealed that the ratio of fluorine atoms to Gd(3+) complexes per nanoparticle was more than approximately 5.0×10(2), resulting in the high signal augmentation. PMID:25413833

  14. Summary of Miniature NMR Development

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Gennady; Feinerman, Alan

    2000-12-31

    The effort in this project has been in 3 distinct directions: (1) First, they focused on development of miniature microfabricated micro-coil NMR detectors with maximum Signal-to-Noise (SNR) ratio. (2) Secondly, they focused on design of miniature micro-coil NMR detectors that have minimal effect on the NMR spectrum distortions. (3) Lastly they focused on the development of a permanent magnet capable of generating fields on the order of 1 Tesla with better than 10 ppm uniformity.

  15. Multinuclear NMR Imaging of Fluid Phases in Berea Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S. N.; Dechter, J. J.; Komoroski, R. A.

    Multinuclear NMR of 7Li, 19F, and 1H has been investigated as a method for discriminating multiple fluid phases in porous rock. Good 7Li NMR images from LiCl brine in saturated Berea sandstone were obtained within a few hours at 1 × 1 × 5 mm 3 resolution using a low-TE, 3D volume imaging sequence. At 4.7 T, the 7Li T1 was 750 ms, and T2 was 10 ms. High-quality 19F and 1H images of a model fluorinated injectant (trifluorotoluene) in Berea were obtained at 0.4 × 0.4 × 3 mm 3 resolution in a few hours. Fluorine-19 imaging was found to be easier than 1H imaging due to the narrower 19F resonance and comparable T1 and T2 in Berea sandstone. Lithium-7 and 19F imaging offer alternatives for discriminating aqueous and organic phases unambiguously in flooded oil cores, especially where 1H signals for the two phases are unresolved.

  16. Site-specific solvent exposure analysis of a membrane protein using unnatural amino acids and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Li, Dong; Chen, Hongwei; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Solvent isotope shift analysis of {sup 19}F-tfmF in different H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O molar ratio. {yields} Correlation between solvent isotope shift of {sup 19}F-spins and solvent exposure analysis. {yields} Solvent exposure analysis of membrane proteins. -- Abstract: Membrane proteins play an essential role in cellular metabolism, transportation and signal transduction across cell membranes. The scarcity of membrane protein structures has thus far prevented a full understanding of their molecular mechanisms. Preliminary topology studies and residue solvent exposure analysis have the potential to provide valuable information on membrane proteins of unknown structure. Here, a {sup 19}F-containing unnatural amino acid (trimethylfluoro-phenylalanine, tfmF) was applied to accomplish site-specific {sup 19}F spin incorporation at different sites in diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK, an Escherichia coli membrane protein) for site-specific solvent exposure analysis. Due to isotope effect on {sup 19}F spins, a standard curve for {sup 19}F-tfmF chemical shifts was drawn for varying solvent H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O ratios. Further site-specific {sup 19}F solvent isotope shift analysis was conducted for DAGK to distinguish residues in water-soluble loops, interfacial areas or hydrophobic membrane regions. This site-specific solvent exposure analysis method could be applied for further topological analysis of other membrane proteins.

  17. Review of NMR characterization of pyrolysis oils

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hao, Naijia; Ben, Haoxi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Adhikari, Sushil; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-08-24

    Here, pyrolysis of renewable biomass has been developed as a method to produce green fuels and chemicals in response to energy security concerns as well as to alleviate environmental issues incurred with fossil fuel usage. However, pyrolysis oils still have limited commercial application, mainly because unprocessed oils cannot be readily blended with current petroleum-based transportation fuels. To better understand these challenges, researchers have applied diverse characterization techniques in the development of bio-oil studies. In particular, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a key spectroscopic characterization method through analysis of bio-oil components. This review highlights the NMR strategies for pyrolysis oil characterizationmore » and critically discusses the applications of 1H, 13C, 31P, 19F, and two-dimensional (2-D NMR) analyses such as heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) in representative pyrolysis oil studies.« less

  18. Fission fragment angular distribution for the 19F+197Au fusion-fission reaction at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Sodaye, S.; Reddy, A. V.; Mahata, K.; Goswami, A.

    2005-04-01

    Angular distribution of fission fragments have been measured for 19F+197Au reaction at bombarding energies from 91 to 110 MeV. Fission fragment angular distributions have been calculated by transition state model with the transmission coefficients obtained using the coupled-channels theory. The calculated angular anisotropies are in good agreement with the experimental anisotropies. The experimental fission cross sections have also been reproduced on the basis of the coupled-channels theory. The results of angular distribution measurement do not show any significant contribution from quasifission as was reported in the literature based on the measurement of evaporation residues and mass distribution.

  19. Superfluorinated PEI Derivative Coupled with (99m) Tc for ASGPR Targeted (19) F MRI/SPECT/PA Tri-Modality Imaging.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhide; Gao, Mengna; Song, Manli; Li, Yesen; Zhang, Deliang; Xu, Duo; You, Linyi; Wang, Liangliang; Zhuang, Rongqiang; Su, Xinhui; Liu, Ting; Du, Jin; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-07-01

    Fluorinated polyethylenimine derivative labeled with radionuclide (99m) Tc is developed as a (19) F MRI/SPECT/PA multifunctional imaging agent with good asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR)-targeting ability. This multifunctional agent is safe and suitable for (19) F MRI/SPECT/PA imaging and has the potential to detect hepatic diseases and to assess liver function, which provide powerful support for the development of personalized and precision medicine. PMID:27159903

  20. Full differentiation and assignment of boron species in the electrolytes Li{sub 2}B{sub 6}O{sub 9}F{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braeuniger, Thomas; Pilz, Thomas; Chandran, C. Vinod; Jansen, Martin

    2012-10-15

    The syntheses of two new fluorooxoborates, Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}B{sub 6}O{sub 9}F{sub 2}, which possess considerable ion conductivity at higher temperatures, have been reported recently. Here, we describe the characterisation of these compounds by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy. The complex central-transition MAS spectra, resulting from overlap of sub-spectra contributed by the individual boron species in the crystal structures, could be clearly separated by acquisition and analysis of 3QMAS spectra. By numerical fit of these sub-spectra, the isotropic chemical shift {delta}{sub iso}, the quadrupolar coupling constant {chi}, and the asymmetry {eta} were determined. Using known relations between boron coordination and chemical shift as well as quadrupolar coupling, the individual {sup 11}B NMR resonances have been ascribed to boron species in tetrahedral or trigonal environment. To remove remaining assignment ambiguities, the response of the {sup 11}B resonances to {sup 19}F decoupling was qualitatively analysed. Thus, by using the combined information conveyed by chemical shift, quadrupolar and dipolar interaction, a complete assignment of the complex {sup 11}B line shapes exhibited by the fluorooxoborates has been achieved. - Graphical abstract: Structure and solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectrum of Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterisation of title compounds by solid-state {sup 11}B NMR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sub-spectra of boron species separated by evaluation of 3QMAS spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotropic chemical shift and quadrupolar interaction parameters determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full boron assignment based on NMR parameters and response to {sup 19}F decoupling.

  1. NMR shielding calculations across the periodic table: diamagnetic uranium compounds. 2. Ligand and metal NMR.

    PubMed

    Schreckenbach, Georg

    2002-12-16

    In this and a previous article (J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 8244), the range of application for relativistic density functional theory (DFT) is extended to the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shieldings and chemical shifts in diamagnetic actinide compounds. Two relativistic DFT methods are used, ZORA ("zeroth-order regular approximation") and the quasirelativistic (QR) method. In the given second paper, NMR shieldings and chemical shifts are calculated and discussed for a wide range of compounds. The molecules studied comprise uranyl complexes, [UO(2)L(n)](+/-)(q); UF(6); inorganic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)Cl(n), n = 0-6; and organometallic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n), n = 0-5. Uranyl complexes include [UO(2)F(4)](2-), [UO(2)Cl(4)](2-), [UO(2)(OH)(4)](2-), [UO(2)(CO(3))(3)](4-), and [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](2+). For the ligand NMR, moderate (e.g., (19)F NMR chemical shifts in UF(6-n)Cl(n)) to excellent agreement [e.g., (19)F chemical shift tensor in UF(6) or (1)H NMR in UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n)] has been found between theory and experiment. The methods have been used to calculate the experimentally unknown (235)U NMR chemical shifts. A large chemical shift range of at least 21,000 ppm has been predicted for the (235)U nucleus. ZORA spin-orbit appears to be the most accurate method for predicting actinide metal chemical shifts. Trends in the (235)U NMR chemical shifts of UF(6-n)L(n) molecules are analyzed and explained in terms of the calculated electronic structure. It is argued that the energy separation and interaction between occupied and virtual orbitals with f-character are the determining factors. PMID:12470051

  2. Bayesian reconstruction of projection reconstruction NMR (PR-NMR).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Won

    2014-11-01

    Projection reconstruction nuclear magnetic resonance (PR-NMR) is a technique for generating multidimensional NMR spectra. A small number of projections from lower-dimensional NMR spectra are used to reconstruct the multidimensional NMR spectra. In our previous work, it was shown that multidimensional NMR spectra are efficiently reconstructed using peak-by-peak based reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm. We propose an extended and generalized RJMCMC algorithm replacing a simple linear model with a linear mixed model to reconstruct close NMR spectra into true spectra. This statistical method generates samples in a Bayesian scheme. Our proposed algorithm is tested on a set of six projections derived from the three-dimensional 700 MHz HNCO spectrum of a protein HasA. PMID:25218584

  3. (19)F MRSI of capecitabine in the liver at 7 T using broadband transmit-receive antennas and dual-band RF pulses.

    PubMed

    van Gorp, Jetse S; Seevinck, Peter R; Andreychenko, Anna; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; Luijten, Peter R; Viergever, Max A; Koopman, Miriam; Boer, Vincent O; Klomp, Dennis W J

    2015-11-01

    Capecitabine (Cap) is an often prescribed chemotherapeutic agent, successfully used to cure some patients from cancer or reduce tumor burden for palliative care. However, the efficacy of the drug is limited, it is not known in advance who will respond to the drug and it can come with severe toxicity. (19)F Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) have been used to non-invasively study Cap metabolism in vivo to find a marker for personalized treatment. In vivo detection, however, is hampered by low concentrations and the use of radiofrequency (RF) surface coils limiting spatial coverage. In this work, the use of a 7T MR system with radiative multi-channel transmit-receive antennas was investigated with the aim of maximizing the sensitivity and spatial coverage of (19)F detection protocols. The antennas were broadband optimized to facilitate both the (1)H (298 MHz) and (19)F (280 MHz) frequencies for accurate shimming, imaging and signal combination. B1(+) simulations, phantom and noise measurements showed that more than 90% of the theoretical maximum sensitivity could be obtained when using B1(+) and B1(-) information provided at the (1)H frequency for the optimization of B1(+) and B1(-) at the (19)F frequency. Furthermore, to overcome the limits in maximum available RF power, whilst ensuring simultaneous excitation of all detectable conversion products of Cap, a dual-band RF pulse was designed and evaluated. Finally, (19)F MRS(I) measurements were performed to detect (19)F metabolites in vitro and in vivo. In two patients, at 10 h (patient 1) and 1 h (patient 2) after Cap intake, (19)F metabolites were detected in the liver and the surrounding organs, illustrating the potential of the set-up for in vivo detection of metabolic rates and drug distribution in the body. PMID:26373355

  4. NMR study of the reversible trapping of SF6 by cucurbit[6]uril in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Locci, Emanuela; Lai, Adolfo; Luhmer, Michel

    2008-11-27

    The complexation of sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), a highly potent greenhouse gas, by cucurbit[6]uril (CB) was studied at various temperatures in Na(2)SO(4) aqueous solutions by (19)F and (1)H NMR. CB shows a remarkable affinity for SF(6), suggesting that it is a suitable molecular container for the design of materials tailored for SF(6) trapping. At 298 K, the equilibrium constant characterizing the inclusion of SF(6) by CB is 3.1 x 10(4) M(-1) and the residence time of SF(6) within the CB cavity is estimated to be of the order of a few seconds. The enthalpic and entropic contributions to the free energy of encapsulation were determined and are discussed. This work also reports on the interest of SF(6) in the framework of the spin-spy methodology. The advantages and drawbacks of solution-state (19)F NMR of SF(6) with respect to (129)Xe NMR are discussed. SF(6) comes forward as a versatile and informative spin-spy molecule for probing systems in solution because its detection limit by (19)F NMR reaches the micromolar range with standard equipment and because quantitative integral measurements, relaxation time measurements, and demanding experiments, such as translational diffusion coefficient measurements, are easily carried out in addition to chemical shift measurements. Solution-state (19)F NMR of SF(6) emerges as a promising alternative to (129)Xe NMR for probing cavities and for other applications relying on the encapsulation of an NMR active gaseous probe. PMID:18956898

  5. Study of viscosity on the fission dynamics of the excited nuclei 228U produced in 19F + 209Bi reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslamizadeh, H.

    2015-06-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) dynamical model based on Langevin equations was applied to study the fission dynamics of the compound nuclei 228U produced in 19F + 209Bi reactions at intermediate excitation energies. The distance between the centers of masses of the future fission fragments was used as the first dimension and the projection of the total spin of the compound nucleus onto the symmetry axis, K, was considered as the second dimension in Langevin dynamical calculations. The magnitude of post-saddle friction strength was inferred by fitting measured data on the average pre-scission neutron multiplicity for 228U. It was shown that the results of calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data by using values of the post-saddle friction equal to 6-8 × 1021s-1.

  6. Incomplete fusion studies in the 19F+159Tb system at low energies and its correlation with various systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaib, Mohd.; Sharma, Vijay R.; Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Devendra P.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2016-07-01

    The excitation functions of reaction residues populated via the complete fusion and incomplete fusion process in the interaction of the 19F+159Tb system have been measured at energies ≈4 -6 MeV/nucleon, using off-line γ -ray spectroscopy. The analysis of data was done within the framework of statistical model code pace4 (a compound nucleus model). A significant fraction of incomplete fusion was observed in the production of reaction residues involving α particle(s) in the exit channels, even at energies as low as near the Coulomb barrier. The incomplete fusion strength function was deduced from the experimental excitation functions and the dependence of this strength function on various entrance channel parameters was studied. The present results show a strong dependence on the projectile α -Q value that agrees well with the existing data. To probe the dependence of incomplete fusion on entrance channel mass asymmetry, the present work was compared with the results obtained in the interaction of 12C, 16O, and 19F with nearby targets available in the literature. It was observed that the mass asymmetry linearly increases for each projectile separately and turns out to be a projectile-dependent mass-asymmetry systematics. The deduced incomplete fusion strength functions in the present work are also plotted as a function of ZPZT (Coulomb effect) and compared with the existing literature. A strong dependence of the Coulomb effect on the incomplete fusion fraction was observed. It was found that the fraction of incomplete fusion linearly increases with ZPZT and was found to be more for larger ZPZT values indicating significantly important linear systematics.

  7. Indocyanine green-loaded perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions for bimodal 19F-magnetic resonance/nearinfrared fluorescence imaging and subsequent phototherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan-Guo; Kim, Hyunjin; Mun, Saehun

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an indocyanine green-loaded perfluorocarbon (ICG/PFCE) nanoemulsion as a multifunctional theranostic nanomedicine which enables not only 19F magnetic resonance (MR)/near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) bimodal imaging but also subsequent photodynamic/photothermal dual therapy of cancer. The hydrodynamic size of ICG/PFCE nanoemulsions was 164.2 nm. The stability of indocyanine green (ICG) in aqueous solution was significantly improved when loaded on perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions. In addition, ICG/PFCE nanoemulsions showed good dispersion stability in aqueous media containing 10% fetal bovine serum, for at least 14 days. 19F-MRI of ICG/PFCE nanoemulsions showed that the signal intensity increased with increasing nanoemulsion concentration with no signal observed from the surrounding background. Using NIRF imaging with perfluorocarbon nanoemulsion alone, without ICG, did not produce NIRF, while clear and bright fluorescent images were obtained with ICG/PFCE nanoemulsions at 10-µM ICG equivalent. The capacity of ICG-loaded nanoemulsions to generate heat following light irradiation by using an 810-nm laser was comparable to that of free ICG, while singlet oxygen generation of ICG-loaded nanoemulsions was significantly better than that of free ICG. In vitro cytotoxicity tests and fluorescence microscopy confirmed biocompatibility of the nanoemulsion. Upon light irradiation, U87MG glioblastoma cells incubated with ICG/PFCE nanoemulsions underwent necrotic cell death. The therapeutic mechanism during light illumination appears to be mainly due to the photodynamic effect at lower ICG concentrations, whilst the photothermal effect became more obvious at increased ICG concentrations, enabling combined photodynamic/photothermal therapy of cancer cells. PMID:23833726

  8. Imaging Neuroinflammation In Vivo in a Neuropathic Pain Rat Model with Near-Infrared Fluorescence and 19F Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Vasudeva, Kiran; Andersen, Karl; Zeyzus-Johns, Bree; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Patel, Sravan Kumar; Balducci, Anthony; Janjic, Jelena M.; Pollock, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain following surgery represents a serious worldwide health problem leading to life-long treatment and the possibility of significant disability. In this study, neuropathic pain was modeled using the chronic constriction injury (CCI). The CCI rats exhibit mechanical hypersensitivity (typical neuropathic pain symptom) to mechanical stimulation of the affected paw 11 days post surgery, at a time when sham surgery animals do not exhibit hypersensitivity. Following a similar time course, TRPV1 gene expression appears to rise with the hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation. Recent studies have shown that immune cells play a role in the development of neuropathic pain. To further explore the relationship between neuropathic pain and immune cells, we hypothesize that the infiltration of immune cells into the affected sciatic nerve can be monitored in vivo by molecular imaging. To test this hypothesis, an intravenous injection of a novel perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsion, which is phagocytosed by inflammatory cells (e.g. monocytes and macrophages), was used in a rat CCI model. The nanoemulsion carries two distinct imaging agents, a near-infrared (NIR) lipophilic fluorescence reporter (DiR) and a 19F MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) tracer, PFC. We demonstrate that in live rats, NIR fluorescence is concentrated in the area of the affected sciatic nerve. Furthermore, the 19F MRI signal was observed on the sciatic nerve. Histological examination of the CCI sciatic nerve reveals significant infiltration of CD68 positive macrophages. These results demonstrate that the infiltration of immune cells into the sciatic nerve can be visualized in live animals using these methods. PMID:24587398

  9. Chromatographic NMR in NMR solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, Caroline; Viel, Stéphane; Delaurent, Corinne; Ziarelli, Fabio; Excoffier, Grégory; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that pseudo-chromatographic NMR experiments could be performed using typical chromatographic solids and solvents. This first setup yielded improved separation of the spectral components of the NMR spectra of mixtures using PFG self-diffusion measurements. The method (dubbed Chromatographic NMR) was successively shown to possess, in favorable cases, superior resolving power on non-functionalized silica, compared to its LC counterpart. To further investigate the applicability of the method, we studied here the feasibility of Chromatographic NMR in common deuterated solvents. Two examples are provided, using deuterated chloroform and water, for homologous compounds soluble in these solvents, namely aromatic molecules and alcohols, respectively.

  10. Chiral Recognition Studies of α-(Nonafluoro-tert-butoxy)carboxylic Acids by NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Anikó; Csóka, Tamás; Béni, Szabolcs; Farkas, Viktor; Rábai, József; Szabó, Dénes

    2015-06-19

    Three chiral α-(nonafluoro-tert-butoxy)carboxylic acids (R)-1, (RS)-2, (R)-3 were synthesized to examine their application as chiral solvating agents with amines. As a model compound, first (S)- and/or (RS)-α-phenylethylamine was used, and their diastereomeric salts were investigated by (1)H and (19)F NMR and ECD spectroscopy. The NMR spectroscopic studies were carried out at room temperature using the slightly polar CDCl3 and apolar C6D6 as solvents in 5 mM and 54 mM concentrations. The difference of the chemical shifts (Δδ) in the diastereomeric complexes is comparable with other, well-known chiral derivatizing and solvating agents (e.g., Mosher's acid, Pirkle's alcohol). Diastereomeric salts of racemic acids (RS)-1 and (RS)-2 with biologically active amines (1R,2S)-ephedrine and (S)-dapoxetine were also investigated by (19)F NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26024423

  11. (19)F(alpha,n)(22)Na, (22)Ne(p,n)(22)Na, and the Role of their Inverses in the Destruction of (22)Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrean, Patricia Rose

    The inverses of the 19F(α,n)22Na and 22Ne(p,n)22Na reactions may be important destruction mechanisms for 22Na in neutron-rich, high-temperature or explosive nucleosynthesis. I have measured the cross sections for the 19F(α,n)22Na and 22Ne(p,n)22Na reactions from threshold to 3.1 and 5.4 MeV, respectively. The absolute efficiency of the 4π neutron detector was determined by Monte Carlo calculations and calibrated using two standard sources and two nuclear reactions. Cross sections for the inverse reactions have been calculated using the principle of detailed balance, and reaction rates for both the reactions and their inverses determined for temperatures between 0.01 and 10 GK for 19F(α,n)22Na and between 0.1 and 10 GK for 22Ne(p,n)22Na.

  12. Application of /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance to examine covalent modification reactions of tyrosyl derivatives: a study of calcineurin catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.L.; Graves, D.J.

    1988-04-01

    The hydrolysis of fluorotyrosine phosphate by the calmodulin-activated phosphatase calcineurin has been monitored by /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Previous work had established that the /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance shift of the fluorine nucleus was altered after the phosphorylation of the phenolic hydroxyl group. The disappearance of substrate and the appearance of product can be measured simultaneously with this approach. Application of the integrated form of the Michaelis-Menten equation yields estimates of the kinetic parameter, K/sub M/, close to the values obtained by initial rate kinetics. The velocity term, V/sub M/ was also evaluated to be approximately the same value. Calcineurin was determined not to be inactivated over the time period of the reaction. The results demonstrate that /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be applied to the examination of enzyme-catalyzed reactions.

  13. Solid-state NMR strategies for the structural characterization of paramagnetic NO adducts of Frustrated Lewis Pairs (FLPs).

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Thomas; Sajid, Muhammad; Kehr, Gerald; Erker, Gerhard; Eckert, Hellmut

    2014-01-01

    By N,N addition of NO to the norbonane annulated borane-phosphane Frustrated Lewis pair (FLP) 1 a five-membered heterocyclic persistent aminoxyl radical 2 and its diamagnetic hydroxylamine reduction product 3 are prepared, and the comprehensive multinuclear solid state NMR characterization ((1)H, (11)B, (19)F, (31)P) of these FLP adducts is reported. Signal quantification experiments using a standard addition method reveal that the (11)B and (31)P NMR signals observed in 2 actually arise from molecular impurities of 3 embedded in the paramagnetic crystal. In contrast analogous quantification experiments reveal that the (1)H and (19)F MAS-NMR spectra originate from spin-carrying molecules. Peak assignments are based on DFT-calculated Mulliken spin densities, which lead to the surprising result that the largest paramagnetic shift affecting a proton NMR resonance in 2 originates from intermolecular interactions. For the (19)F nuclei, experiments and calculations indicate that paramagnetic shift effects are very small. In this case, assignments are based on DFT chemical shift calculations carried out on diamagnetic 3 and (19)F((11)B) Rotational Echo Adiabatic Passage DOuble Resonance (REAPDOR) experiments. The set of experiments described here defines an efficient strategy for the structural analysis of paramagnetic FLP adducts. PMID:24815176

  14. Use of [superscript 1]H, [superscript 13]C, and [superscript 19]F-NMR Spectroscopy and Computational Modeling to Explore Chemoselectivity in the Formation of a Grignard Reagent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Sara M.; Kopitzke, Robert W.; Nalli, Thomas W.; Esselman, Brian J.; Hill, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    A discovery-based Grignard experiment for a second-year undergraduate organic chemistry course is described. The exclusive Grignard reagent formed by the reaction of 1-bromo-4-fluorobenzene (1) with Mg is 4-fluorophenylmagnesium bromide (2), which is treated with either benzophenone or CO[subscript 2] to produce the corresponding fluorinated…

  15. Verification of threshold activation detection (TAD) technique in prompt fission neutron detection using scintillators containing 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibczynski, P.; Kownacki, J.; Moszyński, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Gójska, A.; Gierlik, M.; Kaźmierczak, Ł.; Jakubowska, E.; Kędzierski, G.; Kujawiński, Ł.; Wojnarowicz, J.; Carrel, F.; Ledieu, M.; Lainé, F.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study ⌀ 5''× 3'' and ⌀ 2''× 2'' EJ-313 liquid fluorocarbon as well as ⌀ 2'' × 3'' BaF2 scintillators were exposed to neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source and a Sodern Genie 16GT deuterium-tritium (D+T) neutron generator. The scintillators responses to β- particles with maximum endpoint energy of 10.4 MeV from the n+19F reactions were studied. Response of a ⌀ 5'' × 3'' BC-408 plastic scintillator was also studied as a reference. The β- particles are the products of interaction of fast neutrons with 19F which is a component of the EJ-313 and BaF2 scintillators. The method of fast neutron detection via fluorine activation is already known as Threshold Activation Detection (TAD) and was proposed for photofission prompt neutron detection from fissionable and Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) in the field of Homeland Security and Border Monitoring. Measurements of the number of counts between 6.0 and 10.5 MeV with a 252Cf source showed that the relative neutron detection efficiency ratio, defined as epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'', is 32.0% ± 2.3% and 44.6% ± 3.4% for front-on and side-on orientation of the BaF2, respectively. Moreover, the ⌀ 5'' EJ-313 and side-on oriented BaF2 were also exposed to neutrons from the D+T neutron generator, and the relative efficiency epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'' was estimated to be 39.3%. Measurements of prompt photofission neutrons with the BaF2 detector by means of data acquisition after irradiation (out-of-beam) of nuclear material and between the beam pulses (beam-off) techniques were also conducted on the 9 MeV LINAC of the SAPHIR facility.

  16. Multinucleon transfer in O,1816,19F+208Pb reactions at energies near the fusion barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafferty, D. C.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Williams, E.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Luong, D. H.; McNeil, S. D.; Ramachandran, K.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Wakhle, A.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Nuclear reactions are complex, involving collisions between composite systems where many-body dynamics determines outcomes. Successful models have been developed to explain particular reaction outcomes in distinct energy and mass regimes, but a unifying picture remains elusive. The irreversible transfer of kinetic energy from the relative motion of the collision partners to their internal states, as is known to occur in deep inelastic collisions, has yet to be successfully incorporated explicitly into fully quantal reaction models. The influence of these processes on fusion is not yet quantitatively understood. Purpose: To investigate the population of high excitation energies in transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies, which are precursors to deep inelastic processes, and their dependence on the internuclear separation. Methods: Transfer probabilities and excitation energy spectra have been measured in collisions of O,1816,19F+208Pb , at various energies below and around the fusion barrier, by detecting the backscattered projectile-like fragments in a Δ E -E telescope. Results: The relative yields of different transfer outcomes are strongly driven by Q values, but change with the internuclear separation. In 16O+208Pb , single nucleon transfer dominates, with a strong contribution from -2 p transfer close to the Coulomb barrier, though this channel becomes less significant in relation to the -2 p 2 n transfer channel at larger separations. For 18O+208Pb , the -2 p 2 n channel is the dominant charge transfer mode at all separations. In the reactions with 19F,-3 p 2 n transfer is significant close to the barrier, but falls off rapidly with energy. Multinucleon transfer processes are shown to lead to high excitation energies (up to ˜15 MeV), which is distinct from single nucleon transfer modes which predominantly populate states at low excitation energy. Conclusions: Kinetic energy is transferred into internal excitations following transfer, with this

  17. Study of the metabolism of flucytosine in Aspergillus species by sup 19 F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chouini-Lalanne, N.; Malet-Martino, M.C.; Martino, R.; Michel, G. )

    1989-11-01

    The metabolism of flucytosine (5FC) in two Aspergillus species (Aspergillus fumigatus and A. niger) was investigated by 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In intact mycelia, 5FC was found to be deaminated to 5-fluorouracil and then transformed into fluoronucleotides; the catabolite alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine was also detected in A. fumigatus. Neither 5-fluoroorotic acid nor 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate was detected in perchloric acid extracts after any incubation with 5FC. 5FC, 5-fluorouracil, and the classical fluoronucleotides 5-fluorouridine-5'-mono-, di-, and triphosphates were identified in the acid-soluble pool. Two hydrolysis products of 5-fluorouracil incorporated into RNA, 5-fluorouridine-2'-monophosphate and 5-fluorouridine-3'-monophosphate, were found in the acid-insoluble pool. No significant differences in the metabolic transformation of 5FC were noted in the two species of Aspergillus. The main pathway of 5FC metabolism in the two species of Aspergillus studied is thus the biotransformation into ribofluoronucleotides and the subsequent incorporation of 5-fluorouridine-5'-triphosphate into RNA.

  18. A Miniaturized, 1.9F Integrated Optical Fiber and Stone Basket for Use in Thulium Fiber Laser Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher R; Hutchens, Thomas C; Hardy, Luke A; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2015-10-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored as an alternative laser lithotripter to the standard holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The more uniform beam profile of the TFL enables higher power transmission through smaller fibers. In this study, a 100-μm core, 140-μm outer-diameter (OD) silica fiber with 5-mm length hollow steel tip was integrated with 1.3F (0.433-mm OD) nitinol wire basket to form a 1.9F (0.633-mm OD) device. TFL energy of 30 mJ, 500 μs pulse duration, and 500 Hz pulse rate was delivered to human uric acid stones, ex vivo. Stone ablation rates measured 1.5 ± 0.2 mg/s, comparable to 1.7 ± 0.3 mg/s using bare fiber tips separately with stone basket. With further development, this device may minimize stone retropulsion, allowing more efficient TFL lithotripsy at higher pulse rates. It may also provide increased flexibility, higher saline irrigation rates through the ureteroscope working channel, reduce fiber degradation compared with separate fiber and basket manipulation, and reduce laser-induced nitinol wire damage. PMID:26167738

  19. Tumour oxygen dynamics measured simultaneously by near-infrared spectroscopy and 19F magnetic resonance imaging in rats.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mengna; Kodibagkar, Vikram; Liu, Hanli; Mason, Ralph P

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to investigate the correlation between tumour vascular oxygenation and tissue oxygen tension dynamics in rat breast 13762NF tumours with respect to hyperoxic gas breathing. NIRS directly detected global variations in the oxygenated haemoglobin concentration (Delta[HbO(2)]) within tumours and oxygen tension (pO(2)) maps were achieved using (19)F MRI of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene. Multiple correlations were examined between rates and magnitudes of vascular (Delta[HbO(2)]) and tissue (pO(2)) responses. Significant correlations were found between response to oxygen and carbogen breathing using either modality. Comparison of results for the two methods showed a correlation between the vascular perfusion rate ratio and the mean pO(2) values (R(2) > 0.7). The initial rates of increase of Delta[HbO(2)] and the slope of dynamic pO(2) response, d(pO(2))/dt, of well-oxygenated voxels in response to hyperoxic challenge were also correlated. These results demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous measurements using NIRS and MRI. As expected, the rate of pO(2) response to oxygen is primarily dependent upon the well perfused rather than poorly perfused vasculature. PMID:16357430

  20. Fission-fragment angular distributions for the 19F + 208Pb near- and sub-barrier fusion-fission reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huanqiao, Zhang; Zuhua, Liu; Jincheng, Xu; Kan, Xu; Jun, Lu; Ming, Ruan

    1990-06-01

    Fission cross sections and angular distributions have been measured for the 19F + 208Pb reaction at bombarding energies from 83 to 105 MeV. The fission excitation function is well reproduced on the basis of the coupled-channels theory. The fission-fragment angular distributions are calculated in terms of the transition-state theory, with the transmission coefficients extracted from the excitation function calculation. It is found that a discrepancy between the observations and the predictions in angular anisotropy of fission fragments exists at near- and sub-barrier energies, except for lower and higher energy regions where the discrepancy tends to disappear. Moreover, the anisotropies as a function of the center-of-mass energy show a shoulder around 82 MeV. Our results clearly indicate the considerable effects of the coupling on the sub-barrier fusion cross section and on the near-barrier compound-nucleus spin distribution, and confirm the prediction of an approximately constant value for the mean square spin of a compound nucleus produced in a far sub-barrier fusion reaction.

  1. (19)F spin-lattice relaxation of perfluoropolyethers: Dependence on temperature and magnetic field strength (7.0-14.1T).

    PubMed

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K; Damodaran, Krishnan; Hitchens, T Kevin; Bulte, Jeff W M; Ahrens, Eric T

    2014-05-01

    Fluorine ((19)F) MRI of perfluorocarbon-labeled cells has become a powerful technique to track the migration and accumulation of cells in living organisms. It is common to label cells for (19)F MRI with nanoemulsions of perfluoropolyethers that contain a large number of chemically equivalent fluorine atoms. Understanding the mechanisms of (19)F nuclear relaxation, and in particular the spin-lattice relaxation of these molecules, is critical to improving experimental sensitivity. To date, the temperature and magnetic field strength dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate constant (R1) for perfluoropolyethers has not been described in detail. In this study, we evaluated the R1 of linear perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and cyclic perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PCE) at three magnetic field strengths (7.0, 9.4, and 14.1T) and at temperatures ranging from 256-323K. Our results show that R1 of perfluoropolyethers is dominated by dipole-dipole interactions and chemical shift anisotropy. R1 increased with magnetic field strength for both PCE and PFPE. In the temperature range studied, PCE was in the fast motion regime (ωτc<1) at all field strengths, but for PFPE, R1 passed through a maximum, from which the rotational correlation time was estimated. The importance of these measurements for the rational design of new (19)F MRI agents and methods is discussed. PMID:24594752

  2. 19F Spin-lattice Relaxation of Perfluoropolyethers: Dependence on Temperature and Magnetic Field Strength (7.0-14.1T)

    PubMed Central

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Damodaran, Krishnan; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Bulte, Jeff W.M.; Ahrens, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine (19F) MRI of perfluorocarbon labeled cells has become a powerful technique to track the migration and accumulation of cells in living organisms. It is common to label cells for 19F MRI with nanoemulsions of perfluoropolyethers that contain a large number of chemically equivalent fluorine atoms. Understanding the mechanisms of 19F nuclear relaxation, and in particular the spin-lattice relaxation of these molecules, is critical to improving experimental sensitivity. To date, the temperature and magnetic field strength dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate constant (R1) for perfluoropolyethers has not been described in detail. In this study, we evaluated R1 of linear perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and cyclic perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PCE) at three magnetic field strengths (7.0, 9.4, and 14.1 T) and at temperatures ranging from 256-323K. Our results show that R1 of perfluoropolyethers is dominated by dipole-dipole interactions and chemical shift anisotropy. R1 increased with magnetic field strength for both PCE and PFPE. In the temperature range studied, PCE was in the fast motion regime (ωτc < 1) at all field strengths, but for PFPE, R1 passed through a maximum, from which the rotational correlation time was estimated. The importance of these measurements for the rational design of new 19F MRI agents and methods is discussed. PMID:24594752

  3. Precision spectroscopy of the {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F molecule: Implications for measurement of P-odd and T-odd effects

    SciTech Connect

    Alphei, Lukas D.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Petrov, A. N.; Mawhorter, Richard; Murphy, Benjamin; Baum, Alexander; Sears, Trevor J.; Yang, T. Zh.; Rupasinghe, P. M.; McRaven, C. P.; Shafer-Ray, N. E.

    2011-04-15

    Here we report precision microwave spectroscopy of pure rotational transitions of the {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F isotopologue. We use these data to make predictions of the sensitivity of the molecule to P-odd, T-even and P-odd, T-odd effects.

  4. 19F spin-lattice relaxation of perfluoropolyethers: Dependence on temperature and magnetic field strength (7.0-14.1 T)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Damodaran, Krishnan; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Bulte, Jeff W. M.; Ahrens, Eric T.

    2014-05-01

    Fluorine (19F) MRI of perfluorocarbon-labeled cells has become a powerful technique to track the migration and accumulation of cells in living organisms. It is common to label cells for 19F MRI with nanoemulsions of perfluoropolyethers that contain a large number of chemically equivalent fluorine atoms. Understanding the mechanisms of 19F nuclear relaxation, and in particular the spin-lattice relaxation of these molecules, is critical to improving experimental sensitivity. To date, the temperature and magnetic field strength dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate constant (R1) for perfluoropolyethers has not been described in detail. In this study, we evaluated the R1 of linear perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and cyclic perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PCE) at three magnetic field strengths (7.0, 9.4, and 14.1 T) and at temperatures ranging from 256-323 K. Our results show that R1 of perfluoropolyethers is dominated by dipole-dipole interactions and chemical shift anisotropy. R1 increased with magnetic field strength for both PCE and PFPE. In the temperature range studied, PCE was in the fast motion regime (ωτc < 1) at all field strengths, but for PFPE, R1 passed through a maximum, from which the rotational correlation time was estimated. The importance of these measurements for the rational design of new 19F MRI agents and methods is discussed.

  5. Direct mapping of 19F in 19FDG-6P in brain tissue at subcellular resolution using soft X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitry-Yamate, C.; Gianoncelli, A.; Kourousias, G.; Kaulich, B.; Lepore, M.; Gruetter, R.; Kiskinova, M.

    2013-10-01

    Low energy x-ray fluorescence (LEXRF) detection was optimized for imaging cerebral glucose metabolism by mapping the fluorine LEXRF signal of 19F in 19FDG, trapped as intracellular 19F-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate (19FDG-6P) at 1μm spatial resolution from 3μm thick brain slices. 19FDG metabolism was evaluated in brain structures closely resembling the general cerebral cytoarchitecture following formalin fixation of brain slices and their inclusion in an epon matrix. 2-dimensional distribution maps of 19FDG-6P were placed in a cytoarchitectural and morphological context by simultaneous LEXRF mapping of N and O, and scanning transmission x-ray (STXM) imaging. A disproportionately high uptake and metabolism of glucose was found in neuropil relative to intracellular domains of the cell body of hypothalamic neurons, showing directly that neurons, like glial cells, also metabolize glucose. As 19F-deoxyglucose-6P is structurally identical to 18F-deoxyglucose-6P, LEXRF of subcellular 19F provides a link to in vivo 18FDG PET, forming a novel basis for understanding the physiological mechanisms underlying the 18FDG PET image, and the contribution of neurons and glia to the PET signal.

  6. Lifetime-parameters for quasi elastic and deep inelastic collisions extracted from complete angular distributions of89Y(19F, x) y reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suomijärvi, T.; Lucas, R.; Mermaz, M. C.; Coffin, J.-P.; Guillaume, G.; Heusch, B.; Jundt, F.; Rami, F.

    1985-09-01

    Energy spectra and angular distributions of heavy fragments produced in 19F + 89Y reaction at 140 MeV incident energy have been measured. Two different domains of reaction mechanism are observed at forward and backward angles respectively; the corresponding lifetime parameters are extracted from their angular distributions.

  7. Fragment based drug discovery: practical implementation based on ¹⁹F NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, John B; Poppe, Leszek; Xia, Xiaoyang; Cheng, Alan C; Sun, Yax; Michelsen, Klaus; Eastwood, Heather; Schnier, Paul D; Nixey, Thomas; Zhong, Wenge

    2012-01-26

    Fragment based drug discovery (FBDD) is a widely used tool for discovering novel therapeutics. NMR is a powerful means for implementing FBDD, and several approaches have been proposed utilizing (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) as well as one-dimensional (1)H and (19)F NMR to screen compound mixtures against a target of interest. While proton-based NMR methods of fragment screening (FBS) have been well documented and are widely used, the use of (19)F detection in FBS has been only recently introduced (Vulpetti et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2009, 131 (36), 12949-12959) with the aim of targeting "fluorophilic" sites in proteins. Here, we demonstrate a more general use of (19)F NMR-based fragment screening in several areas: as a key tool for rapid and sensitive detection of fragment hits, as a method for the rapid development of structure-activity relationship (SAR) on the hit-to-lead path using in-house libraries and/or commercially available compounds, and as a quick and efficient means of assessing target druggability. PMID:22165820

  8. Line Narrowing in Solid-State Proton NMR with Acquisition Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, B. M.; Tong, Tat-Hung; Dollase, Thilo; Magnuson, Matthew L.

    Organic solids have extensive proton-proton dipolar interactions, and their 1H NMR linewidths are very large even with magic-angle spinning at moderate speeds. Recently it has been shown that substantial narrowing of the proton linewidths of organic solids can be achieved by using single-pulse excitation with acquisition delay or spin echo [S. Ding and C. A. McDowell, J. Magn. Reson. A111, 212 (1994); 115, 141 (1995); 117, 171 (1995)]. This interesting line-narrowing phenomenon has been further examined through the study of several amino acids, their deuterated analogs, and some aromatic compounds. The results confirm that narrow proton peaks are observed with long acquisition delay, and the peaks appear in the appropriate chemical-shift ranges for organic protons (0-10 ppm with respect to tetramethylsilane). However, except for some special cases, the observed peaks cannot be assigned to individual types of protons based on chemical-shift considerations only. To explore the reason for the line narrowing, the effect of acquisition delay on the 19F linewidth of CaF 2was also studied and compared with that on the 1H linewidths of organic solids. It is suggested that the broad proton peak in an organic solid is a superposition of numerous transitions. These transitions have different linewidths, and the narrow peaks in the spectrum remain observable with long acquisition delays.

  9. Characterisation and evaluation of paramagnetic fluorine labelled glycol chitosan conjugates for (19)F and (1)H magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Elena; Harvey, Peter; Chalmers, Kirsten H; Mishra, Anurag; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Wilson, J Ian; Botta, Mauro; Fekete, Marianna; Blamire, Andrew M; Parker, David

    2014-02-01

    Medium molecular weight glycol chitosan conjugates have been prepared, linked by an amide bond to paramagnetic Gd(III), Ho(III) and Dy(III) macrocyclic complexes in which a trifluoromethyl reporter group is located 6.5 Å from the paramagnetic centre. The faster relaxation of the observed nucleus allows modified pulse sequences to be used with shorter acquisition times. The polydisperse materials have been characterised by gel permeation chromatography, revealing an average molecular weight on the order of 13,800 (Gd), 14,600 (Dy) and 16,200 (Ho), consistent with the presence of 8.5, 9.5 and 13 complexes, respectively. The gadolinium conjugate was prepared for both a q = 1 monoamide tricarboxylate conjugate (r1p 11.2 mM(-1) s(-1), 310 K, 1.4 T) and a q = 0 triphosphinate system, and conventional contrast-enhanced proton MRI studies at 7 T were undertaken in mice bearing an HT-29 or an HCT-116 colorectal tumour xenograft (17 μmol/kg). Enhanced contrast was observed following injection in the tail vein in tumour tissue, with uptake also evident in the liver and kidney with a tumour-to-liver ratio of 2:1 at 13 min, and large amounts in the kidney and bladder consistent with predominant renal clearance. Parallel experiments observing the (19)F resonance in the holmium conjugate complex using a surface coil did not succeed owing to its high R2 value (750 Hz, 7 T). However, the fluorine signal in the dysprosium triphosphinate chitosan conjugate [R1/R2 = 0.6 and R1 = 145 Hz (7 T)] was sharper and could be observed in vivo at -65.7 ppm, following intravenous tail vein injection of a dose of 34 μmol/kg. PMID:23955558

  10. Evidence for the importance of 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine catabolism in humans from 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malet-Martino, M C; Armand, J P; Lopez, A; Bernadou, J; Béteille, J P; Bon, M; Martino, R

    1986-04-01

    The use of a new methodology, 19F nuclear magnetic resonance, has allowed detection of all the fluorinated metabolites in the biofluids of patients treated with 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-dFUrd) injected i.v. at a dose of 10 g/m2 over 6 h. This technique, which requires no labeled drug, allows a direct study of the biological sample with no need for extraction or derivatization and a simultaneous identification and quantitation of all the different fluorinated metabolites. As well as the already known metabolites, unmetabolized 5'-dFUrd, 5-fluorouracil, and 5,6-dihydro-5-fluorouracil, the presence of alpha-fluoro-beta-ureidopropionic acid, alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL), N-carboxy-alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine, and the fluoride anion F- is reported. The catabolic pathway proposed for 5'-dFUrd is analogous to that of 5-fluorouracil, completed with FBAL----F- step, and the plasmatic equilibrium of FBAL with N-carboxy-alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine, its N-carboxy derivative. The quantitative analysis of the different metabolites found in plasma and urine emphasizes the significance of the catabolic pathway. High concentrations of alpha-fluoro-beta ureidopropionic acid and FBAL are recovered in plasma from 3 h after the beginning of the perfusion to 1 h after its end. The global urinary excretion results show that there is a high excretion of 5'-dFUrd and metabolites. Unchanged 5'-dFUrd and FBAL are by far the major excretory products and are at nearly equal rates. The protocol followed in this study produces relatively low but persistent plasmatic concentrations of 5-fluorouracil throughout the perfusion. PMID:2936452

  11. pEffect of MRI tags: SPIO nanoparticles and 19F nanoemulsion on various populations of mouse mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Ghulam; Jablonska, Anna; Rose, Laura; Walczak, Piotr; Janowski, Miroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of myriad human disorders, including several neurological diseases. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and fluorine nanoemulsion (19F) are characterized by low toxicity and good sensitivity, and, as such, are among the most frequently used cell-labeling agents. However, to date, their impact across the various populations of MSCs has not been comprehensively investigated. Thus, the impact of MRI tags (independent variable) has been set as a primary endpoint. The various populations of mouse MSCs in which the effect of tag was investigated consisted of 1) tissue of cell origin: bone marrow vs. adipose tissue; 2) age of donor: young vs. old; 3) cell culture conditions: hypoxic vs. normal vs. normal +ascorbic acid (AA); 4) exposure to acidosis: yes vs. no. The impact of those populations has been also analyzed and considered as secondary endpoints. The experimental readouts (dependent variables) included: 1) cell viability; 2) cell size; 3) cell doubling time; 4) colony formation; 5) efficiency of labeling; and 6) cell migration. We did not identify any impact of cell labeling for these investigated populations in any of the readouts. In addition, we found that the harsh microenvironment of injured tissue modeled by a culture of cells in a highly acidic environment has a profound effect on all readouts, and both age of donor and cell origin tissue also have a substantial influence on most of the readouts, while oxygen tension in the cell culture conditions has a smaller impact on MSCs. A detailed characterization of the factors that influence the quality of MSCs is vital to the proper pursuit of preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26232992

  12. Revisiting NMR through-space J(FF) spin-spin coupling constants for getting insight into proximate F---F interactions.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Rubén H; Llorente, Tomás; Ducati, Lucas Colucci; Tormena, Cláudio Francisco

    2014-07-10

    At present times it is usual practice to mark biological compounds replacing an H for an F atom to study, by means of (19)F NMR spectroscopy, aspects such as binding sites and molecular folding features. This interesting methodology could nicely be improved if it is known how proximity interactions on the F atom affect its electronic structure as gauged through high-resolution (19)F NMR spectroscopy. This is the main aim of the present work and, to this end, differently substituted peri-difluoronaphthalenes are chosen as model systems. In such compounds are rationalized some interesting aspects of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic parts of the (19)F nuclear magnetic shielding tensor as well as the transmission mechanisms for the PSO and FC contributions to (4)JF1F8 indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants. PMID:24935717

  13. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  14. Angular momentum distribution for the formation of evaporation residues in fusion of 19F with 184W near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, S.; Gehlot, J.; Prasad, E.; Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Shidling, P. D.; Madhavan, N.; Muralithar, S.; Golda, K. S.; Jhingan, A.; Varughese, T.; Rao, P. V. Madhusudhana; Sinha, A. K.; Pal, Santanu

    2011-01-01

    We present γ-ray multiplicity distributions for the formation of evaporation residues in the fusion reaction 19F + 184W → 20383Bi 120 at beam energies in the range of 90-110 MeV. The measurements were carried out using a 14 element BGO detector array and the Heavy Ion Reaction Analyzer at the Inter University Accelerator Centre. The data have been unfolded to obtain angular momentum distributions with inputs from the statistical model calculation. Comparison with another neighboring system, viz. 19F + 175Lu → 19480Hg 114 with nearly similar entrance-channel mass asymmetry, hints at the depletion of higher angular momenta after crossing of the Z=82 shell in the compound nucleus.

  15. High-resolution three-dimensional 19F-magnetic resonance imaging of rat lung in situ: evaluation of airway strain in the perfluorocarbon-filled lung.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Julia K; Steinmann, Daniel; Emerich, Philipp; Stahl, Claudius A; v Elverfeldt, Dominik; Guttmann, Josef

    2011-02-01

    Perfluorocarbons (PFC) are biologically and chemically inert fluids with high oxygen and CO(2) carrying capacities. Their use as liquid intrapulmonary gas carriers during liquid ventilation has been investigated. We established a method of high resolution 3D-(19)F-MRI of the totally PFC-filled lung. The goal of this study was to investigate longitudinal and circumferential airway strain in the setting of increasing airway pressures on 3D-(19)F-MR images of the PFC-filled lung. Sixteen female Wistar rats were euthanized and the liquid perfluorocarbon FC-84 instilled into their lungs. 3D-(19)F-MRI was performed at various intrapulmonary pressures. Measurements of bronchial length and cross-sectional area were obtained from transversal 2D images for each pressure range. Changes in bronchial area were used to determine circumferential strain, while longitudinal strain was calculated from changes in bronchial length. Our method of 3D-(19)F-MRI allowed clear visualization of the great bronchi. Longitudinal strain increased significantly up to 31.1 cmH(2)O. The greatest strain could be found in the range of low airway pressures. Circumferential strain increased strongly with the initial pressure rise, but showed no significant changes above 10.4 cmH(2)O. Longitudinal strain was generally higher in distal airways, while circumferential strain showed no difference. Analysis of mechanical characteristics showed that longitudinal and circumferential airway expansion occurred in an anisotropic fashion. Whereas longitudinal strain still increased with higher pressures, circumferential strain quickly reached a 'strain limit'. Longitudinal strain was higher in distal bronchi, as dense PFCs gravitate to dependent, in this case to dorso-basal parts of the lung, acting as liquid positive end expiratory pressure. PMID:21193813

  16. 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Perfluorocarbons for the Evaluation of Response to Antibiotic Therapy in a Staphylococcus aureus Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Peter; Ohlsen, Knut

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in recent decades has highlighted the importance of developing new drugs to treat infections. However, in addition to the design of new drugs, the development of accurate preclinical testing methods is essential. In vivo imaging technologies such as bioluminescence imaging (BLI) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are promising approaches. In a previous study, we showed the effectiveness of 19F MRI using perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions for detecting the site of Staphylococcus aureus infection. In the present follow-up study, we investigated the use of this method for in vivo visualization of the effects of antibiotic therapy. Methods/Principal findings Mice were infected with S. aureus Xen29 and treated with 0.9% NaCl solution, vancomycin or linezolid. Mock treatment led to the highest bioluminescence values during infection followed by vancomycin treatment. Counting the number of colony-forming units (cfu) at 7 days post-infection (p.i.) showed the highest bacterial burden for the mock group and the lowest for the linezolid group. Administration of PFCs at day 2 p.i. led to the accumulation of 19F at the rim of the abscess in all mice (in the shape of a hollow sphere), and antibiotic treatment decreased the 19F signal intensity and volume. Linezolid showed the strongest effect. The BLI, cfu, and MRI results were comparable. Conclusions 19F-MRI with PFCs is an effective non-invasive method for assessing the effects of antibiotic therapy in vivo. This method does not depend on pathogen specific markers and can therefore be used to estimate the efficacy of antibacterial therapy against a broad range of clinically relevant pathogens, and to localize sites of infection. PMID:23724049

  17. Interactions between Nafion resin and protonated dodecylamine modified montmorillonite: a solid state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limin; Xu, Jun; Hou, Guangjin; Tang, Huiru; Deng, Feng

    2007-07-01

    A series of nanocomposites have been prepared from perfluorosulfonylfluoride copolymer resin (Nafion) and layered montmorillonite (MMT) modified with protonated dodecylamine by conventional sol-gel intercalation. The structure of these nanocomposite materials have been characterized using FT-IR, elemental analysis, XRD and solid state NMR techniques, including 19F magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR, 19F NMR relaxation time measurements, 29Si MAS, 1H MAS, 1H-13C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CPMAS), and 1H-13C heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) 2D NMR. The results showed that thermal stability of Nafion was improved moderately by the addition of dodecylamine modified MMT without intercalation. FT-IR and 29Si MAS NMR results indicated that dodecylamine modification did not result in obvious changes in the MMT lattice structure. The XRD results showed that the protonated dodecylamine has been embedded and intercalated into the MMT interlayers, whereas Nafion was not. Elemental analysis results also suggested that some dodecylamine was adsorbed on the surface of MMT. 1H-13C HETCOR 2D NMR experiment clearly indicated that strong electrostatic interactions were present between the NH+3 group of dodecylamine and the fluorine-containing groups (CF3, OCF2, and SCF2) of Nafion resin. Such electrostatic interactions are probably the major contributors for the improved thermal stability of the resultant composite materials. PMID:17382953

  18. THE FLUORINE DESTRUCTION IN STARS: FIRST EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE {sup 19}F(p, {alpha}{sub 0}){sup 16}O REACTION AT ASTROPHYSICAL ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Kiss, G. G.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Aliotta, M.; Burjan, V.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Mrazek, J.; Piskor, S.; Coc, A.

    2011-10-01

    The {sup 19}F(p, {alpha}){sup 16}O reaction is an important fluorine destruction channel in the proton-rich outer layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and it might also play a role in hydrogen-deficient post-AGB star nucleosynthesis. So far, available direct measurements do not reach the energy region of astrophysical interest (E {sub cm} {approx}< 300 keV), because of the hindrance effect of the Coulomb barrier. The Trojan Horse (TH) method was thus used to access this energy region, by extracting the quasi-free contribution to the {sup 2}H({sup 19}F, {alpha}{sup 16}O)n and the {sup 19}F({sup 3}He, {alpha}{sup 16}O)d reactions. The TH measurement of the {alpha}{sub 0} channel shows the presence of resonant structures not observed before, which cause an increase of the reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures up to a factor of 1.7, with potential consequences for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  19. Completion of the Operational Closure of Tank 18F and Tank 19F at the Savannah River Site by Grouting - 13236

    SciTech Connect

    Tisler, Andrew J.

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive waste is stored in underground waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The low-level fraction of the waste is immobilized in a grout waste form, and the high level fraction is disposed of in a glass waste form. Once the waste is removed, the tanks are prepared for closure. Operational closure of the tanks consists of filling with grout for the purpose of chemically stabilizing residual material, filling the tank void space for long-term structural stability, and discouraging future intrusion. Two of the old-style single-shell tanks at the SRS have received regulatory approval confirming waste removal had been completed, and have been stabilized with grout as part of completing operational closure and removal from service. Consistent with the regulatory framework, two types of grout were used for the filling of Tanks 18F and 19F. Reducing grout was used to fill the entire volume of Tanks 18F and 19F (bulk fill grout) and a more flowable grout was used to fill equipment that was left in the tank (equipment fill grout). The reducing grout was added to the tanks using portable grout pumps filled from concrete trucks, and delivered the grout through slick lines to the center riser of each tank. Filling of the two tanks has been completed, and all equipment has been filled. The final capping of riser penetrations brings the operation closure of Tanks 18F and 19F to completion. (authors)

  20. Theoretical investigation of the 19F(p, p0) differential cross section up to Ep = 2.3 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paneta, V.; Gurbich, A.; Kokkoris, M.

    2016-03-01

    The use of experimental cross-section data on fluorine in analytical EBS studies is quite problematic, because they are indeed inadequate and discrepant (up to ∼30%). The evaluated values on the other hand, being produced by incorporating the available experimental cross sections within a unified theoretical approach, provide the most reliable data to be used and are therefore very important. The present work contributes in this field by reproducing and attempting to extend the corresponding evaluation for 19F(p, p0), which ranges up to 1730 keV, to proton energies up to 2250 keV, using the AZURE code. The performed R-matrix calculations involved the simultaneous analysis of several experimental input datasets, as well as spectroscopic information concerning the formed compound nucleus 20Ne, while valuable feedback information was provided by proton benchmarking spectra on ZnF2 taken at Ep = 1730 and 2250 keV and at several backscattering angles for the fine tuning of the parameters used. The problem of the 19F(p, p‧) and 19F(p, αx) contributions in the obtained thick target yield spectra is also discussed.

  1. Sequential assignment of proton resonances in the NMR spectrum of Zn-substituted alpha chains from human hemoglobin. Ligand-induced tertiary changes in the heme pocket.

    PubMed

    Martineau, L; Craescu, C T

    1993-06-01

    We constructed an artificial holoprotein as a complex between alpha globin from human adult hemoglobin and the protoporphyrin IX-Zn(II). The prosthetic group is bound in a single conformation to the apoglobin via a coordinative bond between Zn(II) ion and the proximal histidine (His87). The complex is diamagnetic and does not bind either CO nor O2 thus representing a diamagnetic model of deoxygenated alpha chains. In the present paper we report extensive resonance assignment in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the Zn-substituted alpha chains in phosphate buffer pH 5.6. A large number of aromatic and aliphatic side chain spin systems were identified in the two-dimensional homonuclear COSY spectra. Based on the assigned resonances of heme substituent protons and their NOE cross-peaks, we assigned the majority of resonances representing the heme pocket side chains. Using the main-chain-directed assignment strategy, we could establish several continuous patterns of sequential assignment and identify partial or total spin systems for a large number of side chains. The final assignment corresponds to 73% of the amino acids. Analysis of chemical shift of assigned resonances and of nuclear Overhauser enhancement connectivities provides structural information on the global and local tertiary conformation in solution and on the ligand-induced conformational changes. Comparison of observed and calculated ring current shifts enabled us to compare the solution structure with the X-ray crystal structure of alpha subunits in deoxy and carbonmonoxy hemoglobin. The global tertiary structure of unliganded chains is highly similar to both ligand and unliganded counterparts in the crystalline state. On the distal side of the heme pocket. Val62 is significantly closer to the heme center, in agreement with its conformation in the crystallographic structure. In contrast, the position of the proximal histidine (His87) relative to the heme is clearly more closely related

  2. Nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging of multiple nuclear species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devience, Stephen J.; Pham, Linh M.; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Casola, Francesco; Corbett, Madeleine; Zhang, Huiliang; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide non-invasive information about multiple nuclear species in bulk matter, with wide-ranging applications from basic physics and chemistry to biomedical imaging. However, the spatial resolution of conventional NMR and MRI is limited to several micrometres even at large magnetic fields (>1 T), which is inadequate for many frontier scientific applications such as single-molecule NMR spectroscopy and in vivo MRI of individual biological cells. A promising approach for nanoscale NMR and MRI exploits optical measurements of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond, which provide a combination of magnetic field sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution unmatched by any existing technology, while operating under ambient conditions in a robust, solid-state system. Recently, single, shallow NV centres were used to demonstrate NMR of nanoscale ensembles of proton spins, consisting of a statistical polarization equivalent to ˜100-1,000 spins in uniform samples covering the surface of a bulk diamond chip. Here, we realize nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and MRI of multiple nuclear species (1H, 19F, 31P) in non-uniform (spatially structured) samples under ambient conditions and at moderate magnetic fields (˜20 mT) using two complementary sensor modalities.

  3. Rotational-vibration analysis of the n=0, nν6+ν1-nν6 subband in the hydrogen-bonded system 16O 12C ṡṡṡ 1H 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrö, E. K.; Shoja-Chaghervand, P.; McMillan, K.; Eliades, M.; Danzeiser, D.; Bevan, J. W.

    1983-07-01

    Thirty-three P(J) branch and 15 R(J) branch transitions associated with the n=0, nν6+ν1-nν6 vibration in 16O 12C ṡṡṡ 1H 19F have been assigned. Rotational constants B, centrifugal distortion constants DJ, rotational-vibrational interaction constant α1, and the frequency of the band origin ν0, have been determined as: B″=0.102 148(14)cm-1; B'=0.104 196(14) cm-1; D″J=3.6(1.8)×10-7 cm-1; D″J=3.8 (1.8)×10-7 cm-1; α1=-61.4(5) MHz; ν0=3844.0294 (50) cm-1. The spectrum is consistent with a linear complex having a hydrogen bond ν6 bending frequency of 75±12 cm-1 and excited state r(CṡṡṡF) distance of 3.012 Å. A lower limit to the excited state lifetime is set at ≥2.8×10-10 s.

  4. A Guided Inquiry Approach to NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Laura E.; Lisensky, George C.; Spencer, Brock

    1998-04-01

    We present a novel way to introduce NMR spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum as part of a week-long aspirin project in our one-semester introductory course. Aspirin is synthesized by reacting salicylic acid and acetic anhydride. Purity is determined by titration and IR and NMR spectroscopy. Students compare IR and NMR spectra of their aspirin product to a series of reference spectra obtained by the class. Students are able to interpret the IR spectra of their aspirin using IR data from previous experiments. NMR is introduced by having students collect 1H NMR spectra of a series of reference compounds chosen to include some of the structural features of aspirin and compare spectra and structures of the reference compounds to develop a correlation chart for chemical shifts. This process is done in small groups using shared class data and is guided by a series of questions designed to relate the different kinds of hydrogen atoms to number and position of peaks in the NMR spectrum. Students then identify the peaks in the NMR spectrum of their aspirin product and relate percent purity by titration with spectral results and percent yield. This is an enjoyable project that combines the synthesis of a familiar material with a guided inquiry-based introduction to NMR spectroscopy.

  5. Structure of (NH4)3GaF6 investigated by multinuclear magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy in comparison with rietveld refinement.

    PubMed

    Krahl, Thoralf; Ahrens, Mike; Scholz, Gudrun; Heidemann, Detlef; Kemnitz, Erhard

    2008-01-21

    The structure of ammonium gallium cryolite (NH(4))(3)GaF(6) was investigated by (19)F and (69,71)Ga magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR in comparison with X-ray powder diffraction followed by Rietveld refinement. In agreement with previous thermodynamic measurements, NMR experiments on (NH(4))(3)GaF(6) support the model of rigid GaF(6) octahedra. At high spinning speeds (30 kHz), the scalar coupling between the six equivalent (19)F nuclei and (69,71)Ga can be directly observed in the powder spectra. The coupling constants are J(19)F(69)Ga = 197 Hz and J(19)F(71)Ga = 264 Hz. To explain the (71)Ga spectra recorded at 3 kHz a small distribution of quadrupolar frequencies has to be included. The spread of the spinning sidebands hints to a largest nu(Q) value of 28 kHz for (71)Ga. This can be explained by the occurrence of highly symmetric GaF(6) octahedra, which are tilted against the surrounding atoms. In addition, the incomplete motional excitation does not average out the quadrupolar effects. NMR findings are in discrepancy to those of Rietveld refinement. As result it appears that X-ray diffraction is not sensitive enough to deliver proper results. PMID:18069821

  6. Updated THM Astrophysical Factor of the 19F(p, α)16O Reaction and Influence of New Direct Data at Astrophysical Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, M.; Palmerini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Lombardo, I.; Trippella, O.

    2015-06-01

    Fluorine nucleosynthesis represents one of the most intriguing open questions in nuclear astrophysics. It has triggered new measurements which may modify the presently accepted paradigm of fluorine production and establish fluorine as an accurate probe of the inner layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Both direct and indirect measurements have attempted to improve the recommended extrapolation to astrophysical energies, showing no resonances. In this work, we will demonstrate that the interplay between direct and indirect techniques represents the most suitable approach to attain the required accuracy for the astrophysical factor at low energies, {{E}c.m.}≲ 300 keV, which is of interest for fluorine nucleosynthesis in AGB stars. We will use the recently measured direct 19F{{(p,α )}16}O astrophysical factor in the 600 keV≲ {{E}c.m.}≲ 800 keV energy interval to renormalize the existing Trojan Horse Method (THM) data spanning the astrophysical energies, accounting for all identified sources of uncertainty. This has a twofold impact on nuclear astrophysics. It shows the robustness of the THM approach even in the case of direct data of questionable quality, as normalization is extended over a broad range, minimizing systematic effects. Moreover, it allows us to obtain more accurate resonance data at astrophysical energies, thanks to the improved 19F{{(p,α )}16}O direct data. Finally, the present work strongly calls for more accurate direct data at low energies, so that we can obtain a better fitting of the direct reaction mechanism contributing to the 19F{{(p,α )}16}O astrophysical factor. Indeed, this work points out that the major source of uncertainty affecting the low-energy S(E) factor is the estimate of the non-resonant contribution, as the dominant role of the 113 keV resonance is now well established.

  7. Status of the direct measurements of 18O(p,γ)19F and 23Na(p,γ)24Mg cross sections at astrophysical energies at LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeltzig, A.; Pantaleo, F. R.; Best, A.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.

    2016-04-01

    18O(p, γ)19F and 23Na(p,γ)24Mg are reactions of astrophysical interest for example in AGB star scenarios. The rates of both reactions are potentially influenced by low-energy resonances for whose strengths either exist only values with large uncertainties, upper limits or even contradictory claims. Measurements at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) aim at a direct observation of these low-energy resonances, and additional cross section measurements to aid a more precise determination of the reaction rates in astrophysical scenarios. We report the experimental setup and the status of the ongoing measurements of the two reactions at LUNA.

  8. In situ assessment of tumor vascularity using fluorine NMR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ceckler, T L; Gibson, S L; Hilf, R; Bryant, R G

    1990-03-01

    In situ fluorine NMR imaging has been used to measure vascularity in subcutaneously implanted mammary tumors. Oxyferol, a perfluorinated blood substitute comprised of an emulsion of 25% w/v perfluorotributylamine, was used as a tracer. Following iv administration, this perfluorocarbon emulsion remains primarily in the vasculature during the image acquisition period. The distribution of the PFTA in the 19F NMR image gives a map of tissue regions with intact vascularity. This technique has been used to demonstrate decreased blood flow in necrotic regions of R3230AC mammary tumors in which vasculature had been damaged either as a result of spontaneous necrosis or by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Damage to tumor vascularity following PDT was observed prior to the development of necrosis. PMID:2325542

  9. NMR planar microcoil for microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorli, B.; Chateaux, J. F.; Quiquerez, L.; Bouchet-Fakri, L.; Briguet, A.; Morin, P.

    2006-11-01

    This article deals with the analysis of small sample volume by using a planar microcoil and a micromachined cavity. This microcoil is used as a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency detection coil in order to perform in vitro NMR analysis of the sample introduced into the microcavity. It is a real challenging task to develop microsystem for NMR spectrum extraction for smaller and smaller sample volume. Moreover, it is advantageous that these microsystems could be integrated in a Micro Total Analysing System (μ -TAS) as an analysing tool. In this paper, NMR theory, description, fabrication process and electrical characterization of planar microcoils receiver are described. Results obtained on NMR microspectroscopy experiments have been performed on water and ethanol, using a 1 mm diameter planar coil. This microcoil is tuned and matched at 85.13 MHz which is the Larmor frequency of proton in a 2 T magnetic field. This paper has been presented at “3e colloque interdisciplinaire en instrumentation (C2I 2004)”, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 29 30 janvier 2004.

  10. Diamond deposition and defect chemistry studied via solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Karen K.

    1994-06-01

    Diamond defects were quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). While maintaining the macroscopic integrity of the films, concentrations between 0.001 and 1.0 at.% H were measured, among the lowest ever reported by solid-state 1H NMR. These concentrations were correlated to infrared absorption in the 8 to 10 micron region and to thermal conductivity. Despite the low concentrations, Multiple Quantum NMR reveals a high degree of hydrogen clustering consistent with grain boundary passivation. Most hydrogen is rigidly held, but some, probably in -OCH3 and -NCH3 defects, undergoes rotation at room temperature. Similar results were obtained for hot-filament, microwave-plasma and DC arc-jet films, suggesting a common surface chemistry, but no hydrogen was detected in an as-deposited combustion film. 13C NMR provided the first quantitative determination of non-diamond bonded carbon defects, providing a benchmark for Raman spectroscopy, the primary characterization method for diamond. Selective 13C labeling demonstrated heterogeneous reactions involving carbon occur at the hot-filament. With high-speed magic-angle-spinning 19F NMR, CFx (x=1-3) functionalities were resolved on the surface of plasma-treated diamond powder. Understanding these defects impacts the understanding of film growth mechanisms and structure-property relationships for CVD diamond.

  11. Free variable selection QSPR study to predict 19F chemical shifts of some fluorinated organic compounds using Random Forest and RBF-PLS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Nasser

    2016-04-01

    In this work, two new and powerful chemometrics methods are applied for the modeling and prediction of the 19F chemical shift values of some fluorinated organic compounds. The radial basis function-partial least square (RBF-PLS) and random forest (RF) are employed to construct the models to predict the 19F chemical shifts. In this study, we didn't used from any variable selection method and RF method can be used as variable selection and modeling technique. Effects of the important parameters affecting the ability of the RF prediction power such as the number of trees (nt) and the number of randomly selected variables to split each node (m) were investigated. The root-mean-square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for the training set and the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 44.70, 23.86, 29.77, and 23.69, respectively. Also, the correlation coefficients of the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 0.8684 and 0.9313, respectively. The results obtained reveal that the RF model can be used as a powerful chemometrics tool for the quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies.

  12. Analysis of the 19F(p, α0)16O reaction at low energies and the spectroscopy of 20Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, I.; Dell'Aquila, D.; Campajola, L.; Rosato, E.; Spadaccini, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2013-12-01

    The investigation of the 19F(p, α0) reaction at low bombarding energies allows the study of the spectroscopy of the 20Ne compound nucleus in an energy region where the existence of quartet excitations has been suggested in the literature. Moreover, this reaction plays a major role in the fourth branch of the CNO cycle since it is relevant for the correct description of the hydrogen burning of fluorine in stars. For these reasons, we decided to investigate the 19F(p, α0) reaction in the Ep ≃ 0.6-1 MeV energy range. The analysis of angular distributions and excitation functions allows one to improve the 20Ne spectroscopy in an excitation energy region where some ambiguities concerning Jπ assignments exist in the literature. In particular, the present data suggest a Jπ = 0+ assignment to the Ex = 13.642 MeV resonance. For this state, both partial and reduced widths for the α0 channel have been deduced. The trend of the astrophysical factor has been obtained from the integrated cross section. A comparison of the present results with data reported in the literature is also discussed.

  13. The fluorine destruction in stars: First experimental study of the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Aliotta, M.; Burjan, V.; Cherubini, S.; Coc, A.; Gulino, M.; Hons, Z.; Kiss, G. G.; Kroha, V.; Lamia, L.; Mrazek, J.; Palmerini, S.; Piskor, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; and others

    2012-11-12

    The {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction is an important fluorine destruction channel in the proton-rich outer layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and it might also play a role in hydrogendeficient post-AGB star nucleosynthesis. So far, available direct measurements do not reach the energy region of astrophysical interest (E{sub cm}{approx} 300 keV), because of the hindrance effect of the Coulomb barrier. The Trojan Horse (TH) method was thus used to access this energy region, by extracting the quasi-free contribution to the {sup 2}H({sup 19}F,{alpha}{sup 16}O)n reaction. The TH measurement of the {alpha}{sub 0} channel, which is the dominant one at such energies, shows the presence of resonant structures not observed before that cause an increase of the reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures up to a factor of 1.7, with potential important consequences for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  14. Deconvolution of Complex 1D NMR Spectra Using Objective Model Selection.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Travis S; Wilson, Henry D; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Kojetin, Douglas J

    2015-01-01

    Fluorine (19F) NMR has emerged as a useful tool for characterization of slow dynamics in 19F-labeled proteins. One-dimensional (1D) 19F NMR spectra of proteins can be broad, irregular and complex, due to exchange of probe nuclei between distinct electrostatic environments; and therefore cannot be deconvoluted and analyzed in an objective way using currently available software. We have developed a Python-based deconvolution program, decon1d, which uses Bayesian information criteria (BIC) to objectively determine which model (number of peaks) would most likely produce the experimentally obtained data. The method also allows for fitting of intermediate exchange spectra, which is not supported by current software in the absence of a specific kinetic model. In current methods, determination of the deconvolution model best supported by the data is done manually through comparison of residual error values, which can be time consuming and requires model selection by the user. In contrast, the BIC method used by decond1d provides a quantitative method for model comparison that penalizes for model complexity helping to prevent over-fitting of the data and allows identification of the most parsimonious model. The decon1d program is freely available as a downloadable Python script at the project website (https://github.com/hughests/decon1d/). PMID:26241959

  15. Effects of fluoride on in vitro enamel demineralization analyzed by ¹⁹F MAS-NMR.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, N R; Kent, N W; Lynch, R J M; Karpukhina, N; Hill, R; Anderson, P

    2013-01-01

    The mechanistic action of fluoride on inhibition of enamel demineralization was investigated using (19)F magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR). The aim of this study was to monitor the fluoride-mineral phase formed on the enamel as a function of the concentration of fluoride ions [F(-)] in the demineralizing medium. The secondary aim was to investigate fluorapatite formation on enamel in the mechanism of fluoride anti-caries efficacy. Enamel blocks were immersed into demineralization solutions of 0.1 M acetic acid (pH 4) with increasing concentrations of fluoride up to 2,262 ppm. At and below 45 ppm [F(-)] in the solution, (19)F MAS-NMR showed fluoride-substituted apatite formation, and above 45 ppm, calcium fluoride (CaF2) formed in increasing proportions. Further increases in [F(-)] caused no further reduction in demineralization, but increased the proportion of CaF2 formed. Additionally, the combined effect of strontium and fluoride on enamel demineralization was also investigated using (19)F MAS-NMR. The presence of 43 ppm [Sr(2+)] in addition to 45 ppm [F(-)] increases the fraction of fluoride-substituted apatite, but delays formation of CaF2 when compared to the demineralization of enamel in fluoride-only solution. PMID:23712030

  16. Dual Screening of BPTF and Brd4 Using Protein-Observed Fluorine NMR Uncovers New Bromodomain Probe Molecules.

    PubMed

    Urick, Andrew K; Hawk, Laura M L; Cassel, Melissa K; Mishra, Neeraj K; Liu, Shuai; Adhikari, Neeta; Zhang, Wei; dos Santos, Camila O; Hall, Jennifer L; Pomerantz, William C K

    2015-10-16

    Bromodomain-containing protein dysregulation is linked to cancer, diabetes, and inflammation. Selective inhibition of bromodomain function is a newly proposed therapeutic strategy. We describe a (19)F NMR dual screening method for small molecule discovery using fluorinated tryptophan resonances on two bromodomain-containing proteins. The chemical shift dispersion of (19)F resonances within fluorine-labeled proteins enables the simultaneous analysis of two fluorinated bromodomains by NMR. A library of 229 small molecules was screened against the first bromodomain of Brd4 and the BPTF bromodomain. We report the first small molecule selective for BPTF over Brd4, termed AU1. The Kd = 2.8 μM for AU1, which is active in a cell-based reporter assay. No binding is detected with Brd4. Three new Brd4 inhibitors with submicromolar affinity were also discovered. Brd4 hits were validated in a thermal stability assay and potency determined via fluorescence anisotropy. The speed, ease of interpretation, and low protein concentration needed for protein-observed (19)F NMR experiments in a multiprotein format offers a new method to discover and characterize selective ligands for bromodomain-containing proteins. PMID:26158404

  17. A combined first principles computational and solid-state NMR study of a molecular crystal: flurbiprofen.

    PubMed

    Yates, Jonathan R; Dobbins, Sara E; Pickard, Chris J; Mauri, Francesco; Ghi, Phuong Y; Harris, Robin K

    2005-04-01

    The 1H, 13C and 19F magic-angle spinning NMR spectra have been recorded for Form 1 of flurbiprofen. In the case of 19F, spinning sideband analysis has produced data for the components of the shielding tensor. The chemical shift of the hydrogen-bonded proton was found to be 14.0 ppm. Shielding parameters for all three nuclei have been calculated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) together with the Gauge Including Projector Augmented Wave (GIPAW) method which takes full allowance for the repetition inherent in crystalline structures. Such computations were made for the reported geometry, for a structure with all the atomic positions relaxed using DFT, and with only the hydrogen positions relaxed. The relationships of the computed shifts to those observed are discussed. In general, the correlations are good. PMID:19787961

  18. Ferrocene-like iron bis(dicarbollide), [3-Fe(III)-(1,2-C(2)B(9)H(11))(2)](-). The first experimental and theoretical refinement of a paramagnetic (11)B NMR spectrum.

    PubMed

    Pennanen, Teemu O; Machácek, Jan; Taubert, Stefan; Vaara, Juha; Hnyk, Drahomír

    2010-07-14

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of paramagnetic molecules (pNMR) provides detailed information on the structure and bonding of metallo-organic systems. The physical mechanisms underlying chemical shifts are considerably more complicated in the presence of unpaired electrons than in the case of diamagnetic compounds. We report for the first time a combined first-principles theoretical as well as experimental liquid-state (11)B NMR study of a paramagnetic compound, applied on the [3-Fe(III)-(1,2-C(2)B(9)H(11))(2)](-) metallaborane, which is an electronically open-shell structure where the iron centre binds two hemispherical boron-carbon cages. We show that this combined theoretical and experimental analysis constitutes a firm basis for the assignment of experimental (11)B NMR chemical shifts in paramagnetic metallaboranes. In the calculations, the roles of the different physical contributions to the pNMR chemical shift are elaborated, and the performance of different popular exchange-correlation functionals of density-functional theory as well as basis sets, are evaluated. A dynamic correction to the calculated shifts via first-principles molecular dynamics simulations is found to be important. Solvent effects on the chemical shifts were computed and found to be of minor significance. PMID:20464023

  19. Estimation of angular distribution of neutron dose using time-of-flight for 19F+Al system at 110 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Maitreyee; Sunil, C.; Maiti, Moumita; Palit, R.; Sarkar, P. K.

    2007-06-01

    We have reported measured angular and energy distributions of neutron dose from 110 MeV 19F projectiles bombarding a thick aluminum target. The measurements are carried out with BC501 liquid scintillator detector using the time-of-flight technique. We have measured neutron energy distributions at 0∘, 30∘, 60∘, 90∘, and 120∘ and converted them to dose distributions using the ICRP recommended fluence to ambient dose equivalent and absorbed dose conversion coefficients. Similar conversions to ambient dose equivalent are done for theoretically estimated distributions from the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE-2.18. The experimental results are compared with calculated ambient dose equivalent from different empirical formulations proposed by earlier workers. Based on the comparison, we have attempted modifications of the parameters in these empirical expressions.

  20. Absolute (γ,p0) and (γ,p1) cross sections and angular distributions for the light, deformed nucleus 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkhove, E.; Ferdinande, H.; van de Vyver, R.; Berkvens, P.; van Otten, P.; van Camp, E.; Ryckbosch, D.

    1984-06-01

    Absolute (γ,p0) and (γ,p1) differential cross sections for 19F have been measured at seven angles in the energy interval between 13.4 and 25.8 MeV. A sum of Legendre polynomials was fitted to the angular distributions to deduce the angular distribution coefficients. The (γ,p0) and (γ,p1) cross sections have a similar magnitude and represent a minor fraction of the total photoproton channel. The global difference between the two cross sections is attributed to configurational splitting effects. From the (γ,p0) angular distribution coefficients, an E2 cross section was estimated, contributing about 37% to the total E2 energy-weighted sum rule.

  1. Impact of reduction on the properties of metal bisdithiolenes: multinuclear solid-state NMR and structural studies on Pt(tfd)2 and its reduced forms.

    PubMed

    Tang, Joel A; Kogut, Elzbieta; Norton, Danielle; Lough, Alan J; McGarvey, Bruce R; Fekl, Ulrich; Schurko, Robert W

    2009-03-19

    Transition-metal dithiolene complexes have interesting structures and fascinating redox properties, making them promising candidates for a number of applications, including superconductors, photonic devices, chemical sensors, and catalysts. However, not enough is known about the molecular electronic origins of these properties. Multinuclear solid-state NMR spectroscopy and first-principles calculations are used to examine the molecular and electronic structures of the redox series [Pt(tfd)(2)](z-) (tfd = S(2)C(2)(CF(3))(2); z = 0, 1, 2; the anionic species have [NEt(4)](+) countercations). Single-crystal X-ray structures for the neutral (z = 0) and the fully reduced forms (z = 2) were obtained. The two species have very similar structures but differ slightly in their intraligand bond lengths. (19)F-(195)Pt CP/CPMG and (195)Pt magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments are used to probe the diamagnetic (z = 0, 2) species, revealing large platinum chemical shielding anisotropies (CSA) with distinct CS tensor properties, despite the very similar structural features of these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to rationalize the large platinum CSAs and CS tensor orientations of the diamagnetic species using molecular orbital (MO) analysis, and are used to explain their distinct molecular electronic structures in the context of the NMR data. The paramagnetic species (z = 1) is examined using both EPR spectroscopy and (13)C and (19)F MAS NMR spectroscopy. Platinum g-tensor components were determined by using solid-state EPR experiments. The unpaired electron spin densities at (13)C and (19)F nuclei were measured by employing variable-temperature (13)C and (19)F NMR experiments. DFT and ab initio calculations are able to qualitatively reproduce the experimentally measured g-tensor components and spin densities. The combination of experimental and theoretical data confirm localization of unpaired electron density in the pi-system of the

  2. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented. PMID:21051249

  3. Isomerization of the prenucleation building unit during crystallization of AlPO{sub 4}-CJ2: An MQMAS, CP-MQMAS, and HETCOR NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Taulelle, F.; Pruski, M.; Amoureux, J.P.

    1999-12-29

    The structure of AlPO{sub 4}-CJ2 aluminophosphate has been reinvestigated by MAS, MQMAS (multiple quantum magic angle spinning), CP-MQMAS (cross polarization-MQMAS), and HETCOR (heteronuclear correlation) NMR spectroscopy. The CP-MQMAS method showed that the sample, when not allowed adequate time for crystallization, included a substantial concentration of amorphous species. The crystalline component was cleanly singled out by this technique. The authors discuss the relative populations and the distributions of F and OH groups within the structural building units (SBUs) and the distribution of various SBUs within the crystalline structure of AlPO{sub 4}-CJ2. For the latter case, a mixture of SBUs is demonstrated from the {sup 19}F {r{underscore}arrow} {sup 31}P HETCOR spectrum. Prenucleation building units (PNBUs) are the principal objects used for efficient crystal formation. They may undergo an isomerization to reach the proper configuration to integrate into the solid network. The isomerization implies formation of a bridge within the PNBU, probably at random with respect to OH or F. As integration in the network is taking place parallel to isomerization, the network forms as domains containing a mixture of the different types of SBUs.

  4. X-ray CT and NMR imaging of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.

    1986-03-01

    In little more than a decade, X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging have become the premier modalities of medical radiology. Both of these imaging techniques also promise to be useful tools in petrophysics and reservoir engineering, because CT and NMR can nondestructively image a host of physical and chemical properties of porous rocks and multiple fluid phases contained within their pores. The images are taken within seconds to minutes, at reservoir temperatures and pressures, with spatial resolution on the millimeter and submillimeter level. The physical properties imaged by the two techniques are complementary. CT images bulk density and effective atomic number. NMR images the nuclide concentration, M/sub 0/, of a variety of nuclei (/sup 1/H, /sup 19/F, /sup 23/Na, /sup 31/P, etc.), their longitudinal and transverse relaxation-time curves (t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/), and their chemical shift spectra. In rocks, CT images both rock matrix and pore fluids, while NMR images only mobile fluids and the interactions of these mobile fluids with the confining surfaces of the pores.

  5. Multiplet-separated heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Malcolm H.; Sørensen, O. W.; Ernst, R. R.

    1983-02-01

    Techniques are described for the identification and separation of peaks of different multiplicity in heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The methods are applied to the two-dimensional 13C- 1H shift correlation spectrum of menthol.

  6. UPLC-MS, HPLC-radiometric, and NMR-spectroscopic studies on the metabolic fate of 3-fluoro-[U-14C]-aniline in the bile-cannulated rat.

    PubMed

    Athersuch, T J; Castro-Perez, J; Rodgers, C; Nicholson, J K; Wilson, Ian D

    2010-07-01

    1. A study of the rates and routes of excretion of 3-fluoro-[U-(14)C]aniline following intraperitoneal administration to male bile-cannulated rats by liquid scintillation counting (LSC) gave a total recovery of approximately 90% in the 48 h following dosing, with the majority of the dose being excreted in the urine during the first 24 h (approximately 49%). 2. The total recovery as determined by (19)F-nuclear magnetic resonance ((19)F-NMR) was approximately 49%, with the majority of the dose excreted in the first 24 h (approximately 41%). The comparatively low recovery in comparison to that obtained from LSC was due to matrix effects in bile and a contribution from metabolic defluorination. 3. High-performance liquid chromatography with radiometric profiling of urine and bile revealed a complex pattern of metabolites with the bulk of the dose excreted as a single peak. 4. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-orthogonal acceleration time of flight mass spectrometry profiling also showed a complex pattern of metabolites, detecting approximately 21 metabolites of 3-fluoroaniline (3-FA) with six of these detected only in urine and four solely in bile. 5. (19)F-NMR revealed the presence of the parent compound and 15 metabolites in urine collected during the first 24 h after -dosing. The matrix effects of bile on (19)F-NMR spectroscopy made metabolite profiling impractical for this biofluid. The major metabolite of 3-FA was identified as 2-fluoro-4-acetamidophenol-sulfate. PMID:20443683

  7. Introducing the gNMR Program in an Introductory NMR Spectrometry Course to Parallel Its Use by Spectroscopists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummey, Jackie M.; Boyce, Mary C.

    2004-01-01

    An approach that is useful to any introductory nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy course is developed. This approach to teaching NMR spectrometry includes spectral simulation along with the traditional elements of hands-on instrument use and structure elucidation to demonstrate the connection between simulating a spectrum and structure…

  8. Properties of small molecular drug loading and diffusion in a fluorinated PEG hydrogel studied by H molecular diffusion NMR and F spin diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Errol V; Aponte, Julia; Kornfield, Julia A; Ba, Yong

    2010-12-01

    R(f)-PEG (fluoroalkyl double-ended poly(ethylene glycol)) hydrogel is potentially useful as a drug delivery depot due to its advanced properties of sol-gel two-phase coexistence and low surface erosion. In this study, (1)H molecular diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and (19)F spin diffusion NMR were used to probe the drug loading and diffusion properties of the R(f)-PEG hydrogel for small anticancer drugs, 5-fluorouracil (FU) and its hydrophobic analog, 1,3-dimethyl-5-fluorouracil (DMFU). It was found that FU has a larger apparent diffusion coefficient than that of DMFU, and the diffusion of the latter was more hindered. The result of (19)F spin diffusion NMR for the corresponding freeze-dried samples indicates that a larger portion of DMFU resided in the R(f) core/IPDU intermediate-layer region (where IPDU refers to isophorone diurethane, as a linker to interconnect the R(f) group and the PEG chain) than that of FU while the opposite is true in the PEG-water phase. To understand the experimental data, a diffusion model was proposed to include: (1) hindered diffusion of the drug molecules in the R(f) core/IPDU-intermediate-layer region; (2) relatively free diffusion of the drug molecules in the PEG-water phase (or region); and (3) diffusive exchange of the probe molecules between the above two regions. This study also shows that molecular diffusion NMR combined with spin diffusion NMR is useful in studying the drug loading and diffusion properties in hydrogels for the purpose of drug delivery applications. PMID:21170115

  9. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  10. Measurement and analysis of energy and angular distributions of thick target neutron yields from 110 MeV {sup 19}F on {sup 27}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, C.; Nandy, Maitreyee; Sarkar, P. K.

    2008-12-15

    Energy distributions of emitted neutrons were measured for 110 MeV {sup 19}F ions incident on a thick {sup 27}Al target. Measurements were done at 0 deg., 30 deg., 60 deg., 90 deg., and 120 deg. with respect to the projectile direction employing the time-of-flight technique using a proton recoil scintillation detector. Comparison with calculated results from equilibrium nuclear reaction model codes like PACE-2 and EMPIRE 2.18 using various level-density options was carried out. It is observed that the dynamic level-density approach in EMPIRE 2.18 gives the closest approximation to the measured data. In the Fermi-gas level-density approach the best approximation of the level-density parameter is a=A/12.0, where A is the mass number of the composite system. The trend in the angular distribution of emitted neutrons is well reproduced by the projection of the angular momentum on the recoil axis as done in the PACE-2 code.

  11. Polymer swelling, drug mobilization and drug recrystallization in hydrating solid dispersion tablets studied by multinuclear NMR microimaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Carina; Dvinskikh, Sergey V; Schuleit, Michael; Furó, István

    2011-08-01

    Despite the advantages offered by solid dispersions, the marketed products based on this technology are few. The most frequent concern is the stability of the amorphous drug. The state of the drug in solid dispersions is, in general, poorly characterized as the number of characterization techniques available to monitor nanometer-sized drug particles embedded in a matrix are limited. Here we present a combination of localized NMR spectroscopic and NMR imaging techniques which allow in situ monitoring of the state of the drug during tablet disintegration and dissolution. (19)F NMR relaxation is shown to be sensitive to both the crystalline/amorphous state and the size of the model nanoparticles made of the drug substance flutamide. The time course of drug mobilization and recrystallization is detected with spatial resolution within swelling solid dispersion tablets. Comparing results from spatially resolved (19)F, (2)H and (1)H NMR experiments, recrystallization is related to its enabling factors such as local hydration level and local mobility of the polymer matrix. The initially amorphous drug may recrystallize either by nanoparticle coalescence or by ripening of crystalline grains. PMID:21696185

  12. The metabolism of 4-trifluoromethoxyaniline and [13C]-4-trifluoromethoxyacetanilide in the rat: detection and identification of metabolites excreted in the urine by NMR and HPLC-NMR.

    PubMed

    Tugnait, M; Lenz, E M; Phillips, P; Hofmann, M; Spraul, M; Lindon, J C; Nicholson, J K; Wilson, I D

    2002-06-01

    A combination of 19F, 1H NMR and HPLC-NMR spectroscopic approaches have been used to quantify and identify the urinary-excreted metabolites of 4-trifluoromethoxyaniline (4-TFMeA) and its [13C]-labelled acetanilide following i.p. administration at 50 mg/kg to rats. The major metabolite excreted in the urine for both compounds was a sulphated ring-hydroxylated metabolite (either 2- or 3-trifluoromethyl-5-aminosulphate) which accounted for approximately 32.3% of the dose following the administration of 4-TFMeA and approximately 29.9% following dosing of the acetanilide. The trifluoromethoxy-substituent appeared to be metabolically stable, with no evidence of O-detrifluoromethylation. There was no evidence of the excretion of N-oxanilic acids in urine, of the type seen with 4-trifluoromethylaniline. PMID:12039629

  13. Comprehensive multiphase NMR spectroscopy: basic experimental approaches to differentiate phases in heterogeneous samples.

    PubMed

    Courtier-Murias, Denis; Farooq, Hashim; Masoom, Hussain; Botana, Adolfo; Soong, Ronald; Longstaffe, James G; Simpson, Myrna J; Maas, Werner E; Fey, Michael; Andrew, Brian; Struppe, Jochem; Hutchins, Howard; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry J; Hume, Alan; Simpson, André J

    2012-04-01

    Heterogeneous samples, such as soils, sediments, plants, tissues, foods and organisms, often contain liquid-, gel- and solid-like phases and it is the synergism between these phases that determine their environmental and biological properties. Studying each phase separately can perturb the sample, removing important structural information such as chemical interactions at the gel-solid interface, kinetics across boundaries and conformation in the natural state. In order to overcome these limitations a Comprehensive Multiphase-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CMP-NMR) probe has been developed, and is introduced here, that permits all bonds in all phases to be studied and differentiated in whole unaltered natural samples. The CMP-NMR probe is built with high power circuitry, Magic Angle Spinning (MAS), is fitted with a lock channel, pulse field gradients, and is fully susceptibility matched. Consequently, this novel NMR probe has to cover all HR-MAS aspects without compromising power handling to permit the full range of solution-, gel- and solid-state experiments available today. Using this technology, both structures and interactions can be studied independently in each phase as well as transfer/interactions between phases within a heterogeneous sample. This paper outlines some basic experimental approaches using a model heterogeneous multiphase sample containing liquid-, gel- and solid-like components in water, yielding separate (1)H and (13)C spectra for the different phases. In addition, (19)F performance is also addressed. To illustrate the capability of (19)F NMR soil samples, containing two different contaminants, are used, demonstrating a preliminary, but real-world application of this technology. This novel NMR approach possesses a great potential for the in situ study of natural samples in their native state. PMID:22425441

  14. Comprehensive multiphase NMR spectroscopy: Basic experimental approaches to differentiate phases in heterogeneous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtier-Murias, Denis; Farooq, Hashim; Masoom, Hussain; Botana, Adolfo; Soong, Ronald; Longstaffe, James G.; Simpson, Myrna J.; Maas, Werner E.; Fey, Michael; Andrew, Brian; Struppe, Jochem; Hutchins, Howard; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry J.; Hume, Alan; Simpson, André J.

    2012-04-01

    Heterogeneous samples, such as soils, sediments, plants, tissues, foods and organisms, often contain liquid-, gel- and solid-like phases and it is the synergism between these phases that determine their environmental and biological properties. Studying each phase separately can perturb the sample, removing important structural information such as chemical interactions at the gel-solid interface, kinetics across boundaries and conformation in the natural state. In order to overcome these limitations a Comprehensive Multiphase-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CMP-NMR) probe has been developed, and is introduced here, that permits all bonds in all phases to be studied and differentiated in whole unaltered natural samples. The CMP-NMR probe is built with high power circuitry, Magic Angle Spinning (MAS), is fitted with a lock channel, pulse field gradients, and is fully susceptibility matched. Consequently, this novel NMR probe has to cover all HR-MAS aspects without compromising power handling to permit the full range of solution-, gel- and solid-state experiments available today. Using this technology, both structures and interactions can be studied independently in each phase as well as transfer/interactions between phases within a heterogeneous sample. This paper outlines some basic experimental approaches using a model heterogeneous multiphase sample containing liquid-, gel- and solid-like components in water, yielding separate 1H and 13C spectra for the different phases. In addition, 19F performance is also addressed. To illustrate the capability of 19F NMR soil samples, containing two different contaminants, are used, demonstrating a preliminary, but real-world application of this technology. This novel NMR approach possesses a great potential for the in situ study of natural samples in their native state.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from patients with community-acquired pneumonia and molecular analysis of multidrug-resistant serotype 19F and 23F strains in Japan.

    PubMed

    Qin, L; Watanabe, H; Yoshimine, H; Guio, H; Watanabe, K; Kawakami, K; Iwagaki, A; Nagai, H; Goto, H; Kuriyama, T; Fukuchi, Y; Matsushima, T; Kudoh, S; Shimada, K; Matsumoto, K; Nagatake, T; Mizota, T; Oishi, K

    2006-12-01

    A nationwide study was undertaken to determine the susceptibility to penicillin and serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Japan. S. pneumoniae was isolated from 114 adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia over 22 months at 20 hospitals and medical centres in different regions in Japan. All but five isolates were from sputum. Forty-eight isolates (42.1%) were susceptible, 40 (35.1%) showed intermediate resistance (MIC, 0.12-1.0 microg/ml) and 26 (22.8%) were resistant (MIC, >or=2.0 microg/ml) to penicillin G. All isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone (breakpoint 1 microg/ml), imipenem (4 microg/ml) and vancomycin (4 microg/ml). Most were resistant to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin; only two were resistant to levofloxacin. Differences were found in the distribution of serotypes among isolates showing susceptibility to penicillin (predominant types 3, 6B, and 19F), intermediate resistance (6B, 14, 19F, and 23F) and full resistance (19F and 23F). PFGE typing showed that 14 of the 25 strains of serotype 19F had a single DNA profile, pattern A, a pattern closely similar to that of the Taiwan multidrug-resistant 19F clone. Twelve pattern A strains were not susceptible to penicillin but carried the macrolide resistance gene mef(A). The DNA profiles of the 15 strains of 23F were also heterogeneous but six were highly similar (pattern b) yet distinct from the Spanish multidrug-resistant 23F clone although possibly related to the Taiwan multidrug-resistant 23F clone. The pattern b strains were not susceptible to penicillin and also harboured either mef(A) or erm(B). Our results indicate that multidrug-resistant pneumococci are spreading rapidly in Japan. Efforts to prevent the spread of the pandemic multidrug-resistant serotypes should be intensified. PMID:16650327

  16. Two dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schram, J.; Bellama, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Two dimensional NMR represents a significant achievement in the continuing effort to increase solution in NMR spectroscopy. This book explains the fundamentals of this new technique and its analytical applications. It presents the necessary information, in pictorial form, for reading the ''2D NMR,'' and enables the practicing chemist to solve problems and run experiments on a commercial spectrometer by using the software provided by the manufacturer.

  17. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Applications for chemists and biochemists

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2-D NMR) has become a very powerful class of experiments (in the hands of an adept scientist) with broad adaptability to new situations. It is the product of a happy marriage between modern pulse FT-NMR technology, with its large memory and high-speed computers, and the physicists and chemists who love to manipulate spin systems. Basic 2-D experiments are now a standard capability of modern NMR spectrometers, and this timely book intends to make 2-D NMR users of those who are familiar with normal 1-D NMR. The 2-D NMR goal is correlation of the lines of the observed NMR spectrum with other properties of the system. This book deals with applications to high-resolution spectrum analysis, utilizing either coupling between the NMR-active nuclei or chemical exchange to perform the correlation. The coupling can be scalar (through bonds) or direct through space (within 5 A). The coupling may be homonuclear (between like nuclei) or heteronuclear.

  18. Investigations of adsorption sites on oxide surfaces using solid-state NMR and TPD-IGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombeck, Rebecca A.

    diameters and thermal histories. The bulk structural features in both compositions of glass fibers were identified using high-resolution 29Si, 27Al, and 11B magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopic measurements. In multi-component glasses, the determination of silicon, aluminum, and boron distributions becomes difficult due to the competitive nature of the network-modifying oxides among the network-forming oxides. In pure silicates, 29Si MAS NMR can often resolve resonances arising from silicate tetrahedron having varying numbers of bridging oxygens. In aluminoborosilicate glasses, aluminum is present in four-, five-, and six- coordination with oxygen as neighbors. The speciation of the aluminum can be determined using 27Al MAS NMR. The fraction of tetrahedral boron species in the glass fibers were measured using 11B MAS NMR, which is typically used to study the short-range structure of borate containing glasses such as alkali borate, borosilicate, and aluminoborosilicate glasses. While solid-state NMR is a powerful tool for elucidating bonding environments and coordination changes in the glass structure, it cannot quantitatively probe low to moderate surface area samples due to insufficient spins. Chemical probes either physisorbed or chemisorbed to the fiber's surface can increase the surface selectivity of NMR for analysis of samples with low surface areas and provide information about the local molecular structure of the reactive surface site. Common chemical probe molecules contain NMR active nuclei such as 19F or may be enriched with 13C. A silyating agent, (3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)dimethylchlorosilane (TFS), reacts with reactive surface hydroxyls, which can be quantified by utilizing the NMR active nucleus (19F) contained in the probe molecule. The observed 19F MAS NMR peak area is integrated and compared against a standard of known fluorine spins (concentration), allowing the number of reactive hydroxyl sites to be quantified. IGC is a method used to study the

  19. A 4-mm Probe for C-13 CP/MAS NMR of Solids at 21.15 T

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsen, Hans J.; Daugaard, P; Hald, E; Rice, D; Kupce, Eriks; Ellis, Paul D. )

    2002-05-31

    With the recent announcement of a persistent 21.15 Tesla (i.e., 900 MHz for 1H NMR) narrow-bore (54 mm bore) superconducting magnet by Oxford Instruments and the associated Unity INOVA-900 console by Varian Inc. we were challenged with the task of designing a double-resonance broadband solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR probe in particular for evaluating the 13C-{1H} cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR experiment on this magnet and spectrometer system. In this communication we report the successful construction of an efficient X-1H/19F double resonance multinuclear MAS probe for this purpose along with our preliminary results on its performance at the 900 MHz spectrometer.

  20. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  1. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  2. NMR characterization of functional groups: 9--isomer ratios of available chloromethylstyrene mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, S. L.; Khune, G. D.; Khatri, N. A.

    1985-01-01

    From the assignments of the 1H and 13C 11.7 tesla NMR spectra of available mixtures of m- and p-chloromethylstyrene, the proportion of the meta and para compounds are easily determined. For these materials from two common commercial sources, proportions of 72 and 28% and 68 and 32% were found. These concentrations are substantially different from the often assumed 60 and 40% for the meta and para compounds, respectively. The influence of this difference on the desired properties of copolymers made from such mixtures is discussed. An alternative quantitative procedure for determining the chloromethyl group isomer ratios is also described which employs silver trifluoroacetate in acetone displacement of chloride and 19F NMR examination of the resulting ester mixture with a 2.3 tesla spectrometer.

  3. Substrate-driven conformational changes in ClC-ec1 observed by fluorine NMR

    PubMed Central

    Elvington, Shelley M; Liu, Corey W; Maduke, Merritt C

    2009-01-01

    The CLC ‘Cl− channel' family consists of both Cl−/H+ antiporters and Cl− channels. Although CLC channels can undergo large, conformational changes involving cooperativity between the two protein subunits, it has been hypothesized that conformational changes in the antiporters may be limited to small movements localized near the Cl− permeation pathway. However, to date few studies have directly addressed this issue, and therefore little is known about the molecular movements that underlie CLC-mediated antiport. The crystal structure of the Escherichia coli antiporter ClC-ec1 provides an invaluable molecular framework, but this static picture alone cannot depict the protein movements that must occur during ion transport. In this study we use fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to monitor substrate-induced conformational changes in ClC-ec1. Using mutational analysis, we show that substrate-dependent 19F spectral changes reflect functionally relevant protein movement occurring at the ClC-ec1 dimer interface. Our results show that conformational change in CLC antiporters is not restricted to the Cl− permeation pathway and show the usefulness of 19F NMR for studying conformational changes in membrane proteins of known structure. PMID:19745816

  4. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  5. Silver and Gold NMR

    PubMed Central

    Zangger, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    Silver and gold, together with copper, form the transition metal group IB elements in the periodic table and possess very different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic properties. While there is only one gold isotope (197Au), which has a spin of 3/2 and therefore a quadrupole moment, silver occurs in two isotopic forms (109Ag and 109Au), both of which have a spin 1/2 and similar NMR spectroscopic properties. The unfavorable properties of gold have prevented its NMR spectroscopic investigation thus far. On the other hand, there are several reports of silver NMR. However, the low sensitivity of silver, combined with its long relaxation times have rendered the direct detection of silver possible only with concentrations greater than a few tenth molar. Reviewed here are the general limitations of silver NMR and some techniques to partially overcome these limitations, as well as a summary of currently available chemical shift and scalar coupling data on 109Ag. PMID:18475898

  6. Rapid characterization of molecular diffusion by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pudakalakatti, Shivanand M; Chandra, Kousik; Thirupathi, Ravula; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2014-11-24

    An NMR-based approach for rapid characterization of translational diffusion of molecules has been developed. Unlike the conventional method of acquiring a series of 2D (13)C and (1)H spectra, the proposed approach involves a single 2D NMR spectrum, which can be acquired in minutes. Using this method, it was possible to detect the presence of intermediate oligomeric species of diphenylalanine in solution during the process of its self-assembly to form nanotubular structures. PMID:25331210

  7. Quantitative fluorine NMR to determine carbohydrate density on glyconanomaterials synthesized from perfluorophenyl azide-functionalized silica nanoparticles by click reaction.

    PubMed

    Kong, Na; Zhou, Juan; Park, JaeHyeung; Xie, Sheng; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-09-15

    A quantitative fluorine NMR ((19)F qNMR) method was developed to determine the carbohydrate density on glyconanomaterials. Mannose (Man)- and galactose (Gal)-conjugated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) were synthesized from perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA)-functionalized SNPs and propargylated Man or Gal by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click reaction). After treating PFPA-SNPs or Man-SNPs with hydrofluoric acid followed by lyophilization, the remaining residues were directly subjected to (19)F NMR analysis. The density of PFPA on PFPA-SNP was determined to be 7.7 ± 0.2 × 10(-16) nmol/nm(2) and Man on Man-SNP to be 6.4 ± 0.2 × 10(-16) nmol/nm(2) giving a yield of ∼83% for the click coupling reaction. The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of Man-SNPs with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-concanavalin A (Con A) was determined using a fluorescence competition assay to be 0.289 ± 0.003 μM, which represents more than 3 orders of magnitude affinity increase compared to free Man with Con A. PMID:26280598

  8. Clonal dissemination of macrolide-resistant and penicillin-susceptible serotype 3 and penicillin-resistant Taiwan 19F-14 and 23F-15 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Japan: a pilot surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kei; Maeda, Koichi; Mikasa, Keiichi; Uno, Kenji; Takahashi, Ken; Konishi, Mitsuru; Yoshimoto, Eiichiro; Murakawa, Koichi; Kita, Eiji; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2005-04-01

    Large-scale surveillance studies using molecular techniques such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) have revealed that the spread of antibiotic-resistant pneumococci is due to clonal spread. However, in Japan, surveillance studies using such molecular techniques have never been done. Therefore, we conducted a pilot surveillance study to elucidate the present situation in Japan. Among the 145 isolates examined, the most prevalent serotype was type 19F (20%), for which most isolates were not susceptible to penicillin (86.2%) but were positive for the mef(A)/mef(E) gene (89.7%). The secondmost prevalent was serotype 3 (16.6%), for which most isolates were susceptible to penicillin (87.5%) and positive for the erm(B) gene (91.7%). PFGE analysis showed that both serotypes consisted mainly of clonally identical or related isolates and, in particular, 38% of the type 19F isolates were indistinguishable from or closely related to the Taiwan 19F-14 clone. In addition, some of the Japanese type 23F isolates with the erm(B) gene were indistinguishable from or related to the Taiwan 23F-15 clone as analyzed by PFGE. Based on the results of our pilot study performed in a single institution, it is likely that international antibiotic-resistant clones have already spread in Japan; therefore, a nationwide surveillance study should be urgently conducted. PMID:15814978

  9. Spin-lattice relaxation of {sup 113}Cd and {sup 19}F nuclear spins in the crystal lattice of CdF{sub 2} semiconductor crystals with DX centers

    SciTech Connect

    Kazanskii, S. A.; Warren, W. W.; Ryskin, A. I.

    2009-08-15

    Temperature dependences of spin-lattice relaxation rates of the {sup 113}Cd and {sup 19}F lattice nuclei in the CdF{sub 2} semiconductor crystals containing bistable In and Ga impurity centers show that the relaxation mechanisms in the CdF{sub 2}:In and CdF{sub 2}:Ga crystals are different. The basic mechanism of spin-lattice relaxation of the {sup 113}Cd nuclei in the CdF{sub 2}:In crystal is the scalar contact's interaction of nuclear spins with spins of mobile charge carriers of the conduction band. In the CdF{sub 2}:Ga crystal, relaxation of the {sup 113}Cd nuclei is controlled by the contact interaction with electrons moving within a narrow band of impurity states. The same mechanism is apparently responsible for relaxation of the {sup 19}F nuclei in this crystal. In the CdF{sub 2}:In crystal, the {sup 19}F nuclei relax by the dipole-dipole interaction with electron spins localized at the hydrogen-like orbits of shallow donors.

  10. High resolution NMR measurements using a 400 MHz NMR with an (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting inner coil: Towards a compact super-high-field NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, R.; Iguchi, S.; Hamada, M.; Matsumoto, S.; Suematsu, H.; Saito, A. T.; Li, J.; Nakagome, H.; Takao, T.; Takahashi, M.; Maeda, H.; Yanagisawa, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Use of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) inner coils in combination with conventional low-temperature superconducting (LTS) outer coils for an NMR magnet, i.e. a LTS/HTS NMR magnet, is a suitable option to realize a high-resolution NMR spectrometer with operating frequency >1 GHz. From the standpoint of creating a compact magnet, (RE: Rare earth) Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO) HTS inner coils which can tolerate a strong hoop stress caused by a Lorentz force are preferred. However, in our previous work on a first-generation 400 MHz LTS/REBCO NMR magnet, the NMR resolution and sensitivity were about ten times worse than that of a conventional LTS NMR magnet. The result was caused by a large field inhomogeneity in the REBCO coil itself and the shielding effect of a screening current induced in that coil. In the present paper, we describe the operation of a modified 400 MHz LTS/REBCO NMR magnet with an advanced field compensation technology using a combination of novel ferromagnetic shimming and an appropriate procedure for NMR spectrum line shape optimization. We succeeded in obtaining a good NMR line shape and 2D NOESY spectrum for a lysozyme aqueous sample. We believe that this technology is indispensable for the realization of a compact super-high-field high-resolution NMR.

  11. NMR study in sodium-hydrogen-C{sub 60} superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, H.; Miyajima, S.; Imaeda, K.; Inokuchi, H.

    1998-12-31

    {sup 23}Na and {sup 1}H NMR studies have been carried out for a Na{sub x}H{sub y}C{sub 60} superconductor. The peak position of the {sup 23}Na NMR spectrum exhibits discontinuous upfield shift of 30 ppm at about 250 K, indicates a first order phase transition. From the line shape of the {sup 23}Na spectrum obtained at 7 K, the quadrupole coupling constant tensor is evaluated to be {vert_bar}e{sup 2}Qq/h{vert_bar} = 3.7 MHz with the asymmetry parameter {eta} = 0.95. The {sup 1}H NMR spectrum suggests an anionic hydrogen state with weakly delocalized nature.

  12. RUBIDIUM, a program for computer-aided assignment of two-dimensional NMR spectra of polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Yu, C; Hwang, J F; Chen, T B; Soo, V W

    1992-01-01

    Taking advantage of the rule-based expert system technology, a program named RUBIDIUM (Rule-Based Identification In 2D NMR Spectrum) was developed to accomplish the automatic 1H NMR resonance assignments of polypeptides. Besides noise elimination and peak selection capabilities, RUBIDIUM detects the cross-peak patterns of amino acid residues in the COSY spectrum, assigning these patterns to amino acid types, performing sequential assignments using combined COSY/NOESY spectra, and finally, achieving the total assignment of the 1H NMR spectrum. PMID:1607394

  13. Zellweger Spectrum

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Zellweger spectrum result from defects in the assembly of a cellular structure called the peroxisome, and ... Zellweger spectrum are caused by defects in the assembly of the peroxisome. There are at least 12 ...

  14. Effects of Phe-to-Trp mutation and fluorotryptophan incorporation on the solution structure of cardiac troponin C, and analysis of its suitability as a potential probe for in situ NMR studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Mercier, Pascal; Letourneau, Paul-Jean; Sykes, Brian D.

    2005-01-01

    19F NMR spectroscopy is potentially a powerful tool for probing protein properties in situ. However, results obtained using this technique are relevant only if the 19F probe offers minimal perturbation to the surrounding environment. In this paper, we examine the effect of 5-fluorotryptophan (5fW) incorporation on the three-dimensional structure of cardiac troponin-C (cTnC), with the intention of developing a 19F-labeled TnC for use in in situ 19FNMR. We find that, in general, 5fW does not perturb the structure of the protein significantly. Replacement of residue Phe 153 with 5fW produces no noticeable change in protein conformation. However, replacement of residue Phe 104 with 5fW produces a folding behavior that is dependent on the Escherichia coli strain used to express the mutant. The orientations of the indole rings in these mutants are such that the Trp residue adopts a χ2 of ~90° in the F104W mutant and ~−100° in the F153W mutant. Using results from 19F-1H heteronuclear NOE experiment, we show the replacement of L-Trp with 5fW at these positions does not change the orientation of the indole ring and the spread of the 5fW side-chain dihedral angles increases moderately for the F104(5fW) mutant and not at all for the F153(5fW) mutant. Based on these structures, we conclude that the substitution of Phe by 5fW at these two positions has minimal effects on the structure of cTnC and that the 5fW indole rings in both mutants have well defined orientation, making the two mutants viable candidates for use in in situ 19F NMR spectroscopy. PMID:16131667

  15. Studying the active-site loop movement of the São Paolo metallo-β-lactamase-1† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Procedures for protein expression and purification, 19F-labelling, crystallisation, data collection, and structure determination, table of crystallographic data, table of crystallographic parameters and refinement statistics, figures showing binding mode and distances, procedures for mass spectrometry measurements, differential scanning fluorimetry measurements, stopped-flow measurements and other kinetics measurements. See DOI: 10.1039/c4sc01752h Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Brem, Jürgen; Struwe, Weston B.; Rydzik, Anna M.; Tarhonskaya, Hanna; Pfeffer, Inga; Flashman, Emily; van Berkel, Sander S.; Spencer, James; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; McDonough, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) catalyse the hydrolysis of almost all β-lactam antibiotics. We report biophysical and kinetic studies on the São Paulo MBL (SPM-1), which reveal its Zn(ii) ion usage and mechanism as characteristic of the clinically important di-Zn(ii) dependent B1 MBL subfamily. Biophysical analyses employing crystallography, dynamic 19F NMR and ion mobility mass spectrometry, however, reveal that SPM-1 possesses loop and mobile element regions characteristic of the B2 MBLs. These include a mobile α3 region which is important in catalysis and determining inhibitor selectivity. SPM-1 thus appears to be a hybrid B1/B2 MBL. The results have implications for MBL evolution and inhibitor design. PMID:25717359

  16. Solid-state NMR in the analysis of drugs and naturally occurring materials.

    PubMed

    Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wawer, Iwona

    2014-05-01

    This article presents some of the solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques used in the pharmaceutical and biomedical research. Solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR provides structural information on powder amorphous solids for which single-crystal diffraction structures cannot be obtained. NMR is non-destructive; the powder sample may be used for further studies. Quantitative results can be obtained, although solid-state NMR spectra are not normally quantitative. As compared with other techniques, MAS NMR is insensitive and requires a significant amount of the powder sample (2-100mg) to fill the 1.3-7 mm ZrO2 rotor. This is its main drawback, since natural compounds isolated from plants, microorganisms or cell cultures are difficult to obtain in quantities higher than a few milligrams. Multinuclear MAS NMR routinely uses (1)H and (13)C nuclei, less frequently (15)N, (19)F, (31)P, (77)Se, (29)Si, (43)Ca or (23)Na. The article focuses on the pharmaceutical applications of SSNMR, the studies were aimed to control over manufacturing processes (e.g. crystallization and milling) investigation of chemical and physical stability of solid forms both as pure drug and in a formulated product. SSNMR is used in combination with some other analytical methods (DSC, XRD, FT-IR) and theoretical calculations of NMR parameters. Biologically active compounds, such as amino acids and small peptides, steroids and flavonoids were studied by SSNMR methods (part 4) providing valuable structural information. The SSNMR experiments performed on biopolymers and large natural products like proteins, cellulose and lipid layers are commented upon briefly in part 5. PMID:24173236

  17. High resolution 1H NMR of a lipid cubic phase using a solution NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle-Roden, E.; Hoefer, N.; Dey, K. K.; Grandinetti, P. J.; Caffrey, M.

    2007-11-01

    The cubic mesophase formed by monoacylglycerols and water is an important medium for the in meso crystallogenesis of membrane proteins. To investigate molecular level lipid and additive interactions within the cubic phase, a method was developed for improving the resolution of 1H NMR spectra when using a conventional solution state NMR probe. Using this approach we obtained well-resolved J-coupling multiplets in the one-dimensional NMR spectrum of the cubic-Ia3d phase prepared with hydrated monoolein. A high resolution t-ROESY two-dimensional 1H NMR spectrum of the cubic-Ia3d phase is also reported. Using this new methodology, we have investigated the interaction of two additive molecules, L-tryptophan and ruthenium-tris(2,2-bipyridyl) dichloride (rubipy), with the cubic mesophase. Based on the measured chemical shift differences when changing from an aqueous solution to the cubic phase, we conclude that L-tryptophan experiences specific interactions with the bilayer interface, whereas rubipy remains in the aqueous channels and does not associate with the lipid bilayer.

  18. DFT and NMR parameterized conformation of valeranone.

    PubMed

    Torres-Valencia, J Martín; Meléndez-Rodríguez, Myriam; Alvarez-García, Rocío; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2004-10-01

    A Monte Carlo random search using molecular mechanics, followed by geometry optimization of each minimum energy structure employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G* level and a Boltzmann analysis of the total energies, generated accurate molecular models which describe the conformational behavior of the antispasmodic bicyclic sesquiterpene valeranone (1). The theoretical H-C-C-H dihedral angles gave the corresponding 1H, 1H vicinal coupling constants using a generalized Karplus-type equation. In turn, the 3J(H,H) values were used as initial input data for the spectral simulation of 1, which after iteration provided an excellent correlation with the experimental 1H NMR spectrum. The calculated 3J(H,H) values closely predicted the experimental values, excepting the coupling constant between the axial hydrogen alpha to the carbonyl group and the equatorial hydrogen beta to the carbonyl group (J(2beta, 3beta)). The difference is explained in terms of the electron density distribution found in the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 1. The simulated spectrum, together with 2D NMR experiments, allowed the total assignment of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of 1. PMID:15366065

  19. NMR/MS Translator for the Enhanced Simultaneous Analysis of Metabolomics Mixtures by NMR Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry: Application to Human Urine.

    PubMed

    Bingol, Kerem; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    A novel metabolite identification strategy is presented for the combined NMR/MS analysis of complex metabolite mixtures. The approach first identifies metabolite candidates from 1D or 2D NMR spectra by NMR database query, which is followed by the determination of the masses (m/z) of their possible ions, adducts, fragments, and characteristic isotope distributions. The expected m/z ratios are then compared with the MS(1) spectrum for the direct assignment of those signals of the mass spectrum that contain information about the same metabolites as the NMR spectra. In this way, the mass spectrum can be assigned with very high confidence, and it provides at the same time validation of the NMR-derived metabolites. The method was first demonstrated on a model mixture, and it was then applied to human urine collected from a pool of healthy individuals. A number of metabolites could be detected that had not been reported previously, further extending the list of known urine metabolites. The new analysis approach, which is termed NMR/MS Translator, is fully automated and takes only a few seconds on a computer workstation. NMR/MS Translator synergistically uses the power of NMR and MS, enhancing the accuracy and efficiency of the identification of those metabolites compiled in databases. PMID:25881480

  20. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  1. Dipeptide Structural Analysis Using Two-Dimensional NMR for the Undergraduate Advanced Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Elizabeth; Dolino, Drew; Schwartzenburg, Danielle; Steiger, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was developed to introduce students in either an organic chemistry or biochemistry lab course to two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy using simple biomolecules. The goal of this experiment is for students to understand and interpret the information provided by a 2D NMR spectrum. Students are…

  2. A Solid-State NMR Experiment: Analysis of Local Structural Environments in Phosphate Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stanley E.; Saiki, David; Eckert, Hellmut; Meise-Gresch, Karin

    2004-01-01

    An experiment that can be used to directly study the local chemical environments of phosphorus in solid amorphous materials is demonstrated. The experiment aims at familiarizing the students of chemistry with the principles of solid-state NMR, by having them synthesize a simple phosphate glass, and making them observe the (super 31)P NMR spectrum,…

  3. A proposed direct measurement of cross section at Gamow window for key reaction 19F(p,α) 16O in Asymptotic Giant Branch stars with a planned accelerator in CJPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, JianJun; Xu, ShiWei; Ma, ShaoBo; Hu, Jun; Zhang, LiYong; Fu, ChangBo; Zhang, NingTao; Lian, Gang; Su, Jun; Li, YunJu; Yan, ShengQuan; Shen, YangPing; Hou, SuQing; Jia, BaoLu; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, XiaoPeng; Guo, Bing; Kubono, Shigeru; Liu, WeiPing

    2016-05-01

    In 2014, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) approved the Jinping Underground Nuclear Astrophysics laboratory (JUNA) project, which aims at direct cross-section measurements of four key stellar nuclear reactions right down to the Gamow windows. In order to solve the observed fluorine overabundances in Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, measuring the key 19F(p,α)16O reaction at effective burning energies (i.e., at Gamow window) is established as one of the scientific research sub-projects. The present paper describes this sub-project in details, including motivation, status, experimental setup, yield and background estimation, aboveground test, as well as other relevant reactions.

  4. Multifunctional pulse sequence generator for pulse NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongsheng

    1988-06-01

    A new multifunctional pulse sequence generator has been designed and constructed. It can conveniently generate various pulse sequences used in nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) to measure the spin-lattice relaxation time T1, the spin-spin relaxation time T2, and the spin-locking relaxation time T1 ρ. It can also be used in pulse Fourier transform NMR and double resonance. The intervals of pulses can increase automatically with sequence repetitions and the generator can be used in two-dimensional spectrum measurement and spin-density imaging research. The sequences can be generated through four different triggering methods and there are two synchronous pulse outputs and fifteen auxiliary pulse outputs, so the generator can be conveniently interfaced with a computer or other instruments. The circuitry, functions, and features of the generator are described in this article.

  5. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  6. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Joshua; Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards a dual species nuclear magnetic oscillator using synchronous spin exchange optical pumping. By applying the bias field as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses, we generate alkali polarization transverse to the bias field. The alkali polarization is then modulated at the noble gas resonance so that through spin exchange collisions the noble gas becomes polarized. This novel method of NMR suppresses the alkali field frequency shift by at least a factor of 2500 as compared to longitudinal NMR. We will present details of the apparatus and measurements of dual species co-magnetometry using this method. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  7. Software-assisted serum metabolite quantification using NMR.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young-Sang; Hyeon, Jin-Seong; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2016-08-31

    The goal of metabolomics is to analyze a whole metabolome under a given set of conditions, and accurate and reliable quantitation of metabolites is crucial. Absolute concentration is more valuable than relative concentration; however, the most commonly used method in NMR-based serum metabolic profiling, bin-based and full data point peak quantification, provides relative concentration levels of metabolites and are not reliable when metabolite peaks overlap in a spectrum. In this study, we present the software-assisted serum metabolite quantification (SASMeQ) method, which allows us to identify and quantify metabolites in NMR spectra using Chenomx software. This software uses the ERETIC2 utility from TopSpin to add a digitally synthesized peak to a spectrum. The SASMeQ method will advance NMR-based serum metabolic profiling by providing an accurate and reliable method for absolute quantification that is superior to bin-based quantification. PMID:27506360

  8. Inter- and intramolecular spin transfer in molecular magnetic materials. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of paramagnetic metallocenium ions.

    PubMed

    Heise, Henrike; Köhler, Frank H; Herker, Martin; Hiller, Wolfgang

    2002-09-11

    To shed light on the interaction in molecule-based magnetic materials, the decamethylmetallocenium hexafluorophosphates, [(C(5)Me(5))(2)M](+) [PF(6)](-) with M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, as well as the tetracyanoethenides, [(C(5)Me(5))(2)M](+) [TCNE](-) with M = Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co, have been investigated in the solid state by using (1)H, (13)C, (19)F, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy under magic angle spinning (MAS). The isotropic (13)C and (1)H NMR signals cover ranges of about 1300 and 500 ppm, respectively. From the shift anisotropies of the ring carbon signal of the [(C(5)Me(5))(2)M](+) cations, the total unpaired electron spin density in the ligand pi orbitals has been calculated; it amounts up to 36% (M = Ni) and is negative for M = Cr, Mn, and Fe. The radical anion of [(C(5)Me(5))(2)M](+) [TCNE](-) shifts the (13)C NMR signals of all [(C(5)Me(5))(2)M](+) cations to high frequency, which establishes transfer of positive spin density from the anions to the cations. The (19)F and (31)P NMR signals of the paramagnetic salts [(C(5)Me(5))(2)M](+) [PF(6)](-) are shifted up to 13.5 ppm relative to diamagnetic [(C(5)Me(5))(2)Co](+) [PF(6)](-). The signs of these shifts are the same as those of the pi spin density in [(C(5)Me(5))(2)M](+). After consideration of interionic ligand- and metal-centered dipolar shifts, this establishes cation-anion spin delocalization. The mixed crystals [(C(5)Me(5))(2)M(x)Co(1-x)](+)[PF(6)](-) have been prepared for M = Cr and Ni. They are isostructural with [(C(5)Me(5))(2)Co](+) [PF(6)](-) whose single-crystal structure has been determined by X-ray diffraction. The (13)C, (19)F, and (31)P MAS NMR spectra of the mixed crystals show that the respective two closest paramagnetic ions in the lattice delocalize spin density to [(C(5)Me(5))(2)Co](+), [(C(5)Me(5))(2)Ni](+), and [PF(6)](-). In [(C(5)Me(5))(2)M](+), about 10(-4) au per carbon atom are transferred. PMID:12207538

  9. Accurate, fully-automated NMR spectral profiling for metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Ravanbakhsh, Siamak; Liu, Philip; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Bjordahl, Trent C; Mandal, Rupasri; Grant, Jason R; Wilson, Michael; Eisner, Roman; Sinelnikov, Igor; Hu, Xiaoyu; Luchinat, Claudio; Greiner, Russell; Wishart, David S

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause significant changes to the concentrations of small molecules (a.k.a. metabolites) that appear in a person's biofluids, which means such diseases can often be readily detected from a person's "metabolic profile"-i.e., the list of concentrations of those metabolites. This information can be extracted from a biofluids Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrum. However, due to its complexity, NMR spectral profiling has remained manual, resulting in slow, expensive and error-prone procedures that have hindered clinical and industrial adoption of metabolomics via NMR. This paper presents a system, BAYESIL, which can quickly, accurately, and autonomously produce a person's metabolic profile. Given a 1D 1H NMR spectrum of a complex biofluid (specifically serum or cerebrospinal fluid), BAYESIL can automatically determine the metabolic profile. This requires first performing several spectral processing steps, then matching the resulting spectrum against a reference compound library, which contains the "signatures" of each relevant metabolite. BAYESIL views spectral matching as an inference problem within a probabilistic graphical model that rapidly approximates the most probable metabolic profile. Our extensive studies on a diverse set of complex mixtures including real biological samples (serum and CSF), defined mixtures and realistic computer generated spectra; involving > 50 compounds, show that BAYESIL can autonomously find the concentration of NMR-detectable metabolites accurately (~ 90% correct identification and ~ 10% quantification error), in less than 5 minutes on a single CPU. These results demonstrate that BAYESIL is the first fully-automatic publicly-accessible system that provides quantitative NMR spectral profiling effectively-with an accuracy on these biofluids that meets or exceeds the performance of trained experts. We anticipate this tool will usher in high-throughput metabolomics and enable a wealth of new applications of NMR in

  10. Synthesis of LaF{sub 3} nanosheets with high fluorine mobility investigated by NMR relaxometry and diffusometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gulina, L. B.; Tolstoy, V. P.; Murin, I. V.; Schäfer, M.; Privalov, A. F.

    2015-12-21

    Ionically conducting lanthanum fluoride (LaF{sub 3}), displaying a nanoscopic lamellar structure, has been synthesized at the surface of an aqueous solution of LaCl{sub 3} and HF. The structure and the chemical composition of the conductor have been analyzed by SEM, electron probe microanalysis, X-ray powder diffraction, FTIR, and {sup 19}F magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The fluorine dynamics have been studied by NMR diffusometry and relaxometry in a temperature range from room temperature up to 875 K. The fluorine self-diffusion coefficient of the nanostructured LaF{sub 3} is about two orders of magnitude larger than that of bulk LaF{sub 3}. This novel material is highly promising for many typical applications of fluorine ionic systems.

  11. (19) F NMR Spectroscopy as a Highly Sensitive Method for the Direct Monitoring of Confined Crystallization within Nanoporous Materials.

    PubMed

    Nartowski, Karol P; Malhotra, Diksha; Hawarden, Lucy E; Sibik, Juraj; Iuga, Dinu; Zeitler, J Axel; Fábián, László; Khimyak, Yaroslav Z

    2016-07-25

    The introduction of fluorine into the structure of pharmaceuticals has been an effective strategy for tuning their pharmacodynamic properties, with more than 40 new drugs entering the market in the last 15 years. In this context, (19) F NMR spectroscopy can be viewed as a useful method for investigating the host-guest chemistry of pharmaceuticals in nanosized drug-delivery systems. Although the interest in confined crystallization, nanosized devices, and porous catalysts is gradually increasing, understanding of the complex phase behavior of organic molecules confined within nanochambers or nanoreactors is still lacking. Using (19) F magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy, we obtained detailed mechanistic insight into the crystallization of flufenamic acid (FFA) in a confined environment of mesoporous silica materials with different pore diameters (3.2-29 nm), providing direct experimental evidence for the formation of a molecular-liquid-like layer besides crystalline confined FFA form I. PMID:27272008

  12. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  13. Screening proteins for NMR suitability

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Adelinda A.; Semesi, Anthony; Garcia, Maite; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary NMR spectroscopy is an invaluable tool in structural genomics. Identification of protein samples that are amenable to structure determination by NMR spectroscopy requires efficient screening. Here, we describe how we prepare multiple samples in parallel and screen by NMR. The method described here is applicable to large structural genomics projects but can easily be scaled down for application to small structural biology projects since all the equipments used are those commonly found in any NMR structural biology laboratory. PMID:24590717

  14. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  15. Enantiodiscrimination by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Balzano, Federica; Salvadori, Piero

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of enantiorecognition processes involves the detection of enantiomeric species as well as the study of chiral discrimination mechanisms. In both fields Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays a fundamental role, providing several tools, based on the use of suitable chiral auxiliaries, for observing distinct signals of enantiomers and for investigating the complexation phenomena involved in enantiodiscrimination processes. PMID:17100610

  16. Dynamic effects in MAS and MQMAS NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei: calculations and an application to the double perovskite cryolite.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Mrignayani; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Grey, Clare P; Frydman, Lucio

    2005-11-30

    Dynamic processes such as chemical exchange or rotations between inequivalent orientations can affect the magic-angle spinning (MAS) and the multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei. The present paper discusses such dynamic multisite MAS and MQMAS effects and applies them to study the dynamic processes that occur in the double perovskite cryolite, Na3AlF6. Dynamic line shape simulations invoking a second-order broadening of the central transition and relying on the semiclassical Bloch-McConnell formalism for chemical exchange were performed for a variety of exchange models possessing different symmetries. Fitting experimental variable-temperature cryolite 23Na NMR data with this formalism revealed that the two inequivalent sodium sites in this mineral undergo an exchange characterized by a broad distribution of rates. To further assess this dynamic process a variety of 27Al and 19F MAS NMR studies were also undertaken; quantitative 27Al-19F dipolar coupling measurements then revealed a dynamic motion of the AlF6 octahedra that were qualitatively consistent with predictions stemming from molecular dynamic simulations on this double perovskite. PMID:16305261

  17. Detection of Taurine in Biological Tissues by 33S NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2001-12-01

    The potential of 33S NMR spectroscopy for biochemical investigations on taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is explored. It is demonstrated that 33S NMR spectroscopy allows the selective and unequivocal identification of taurine in biological samples. 33S NMR spectra of homogenated and intact tissues are reported for the first time, together with the spectrum of a living mollusc. Emphasis is placed on the importance of choosing appropriate signal processing methods to improve the quality of the 33S NMR spectra of biological tissues.

  18. Determination of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in amikacin in water solution by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola; Maccotta, Antonella; Valensin, Gianni; Marini, Domenico; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Delfini, Maurizio

    1995-10-01

    An NMR investigation has been carried out on amikacin in water solution in the physiological pH range. Two-dimenstional heterocorrelated maps provide 1H NMR chemical shifts from the unambiguous assignment of the 13C NMR spectrum. Reorientational dynamics at the molecular level are interpreted in terms of a pseudoisotropic motion with a correlation time of 0.17 ns at 300 K. The pH and temperature dependences of 13C NMR chemical shifts are interpreted to delineate protonation equilibria (all p Ks are determined) and to assess the occurrence of two intermolecular hydrogen bonds, which are confirmed by molecular modelling.

  19. The registration of signals from the nuclei other than protons at 0.5 T MRI scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, N.; Volkov, D.; Gulyaev, M.; Pavlova, O.; Pirogov, Yu

    2016-02-01

    The practical aspects of the adaptation of the medical MRI scanner for multinuclear applications are considered. Examples of high resolution NMR spectra for nuclei 19F, 31P, 23Na, 11B, 13C, 2H, and also NQR spectrum for 35Cl are given. Possibilities of MRI for nuclei 19F, 31P, 23Na, 11B are shown. Experiments on registration of signals 19F from the fluorocarbons injected in laboratory animals are described.

  20. High-sensitivity chemical derivatization NMR analysis for condition monitoring of aged elastomers.

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, Roger Alan; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Skutnik, Julie Michelle

    2004-06-01

    An aged polybutadiene-based elastomer was reacted with trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA) and subsequently analyzed via 19F NMR spectroscopy. Derivatization between the TFAA and hydroxyl functionalities produced during thermo-oxidative aging was achieved, resulting in the formation of trifluoroester groups on the polymer. Primary and secondary alcohols were confirmed to be the main oxidation products of this material, and the total percent oxidation correlated with data obtained from oxidation rate measurements. The chemical derivatization appears to be highly sensitive and can be used to establish the presence and identity of oxidation products in aged polymeric materials. This methodology represents a novel condition monitoring approach for the detection of chemical changes that are otherwise difficult to analyze.

  1. 224} studied by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Y; Fang, X; Kögerler, P

    2014-05-14

    7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have been performed to investigate magnetic properties and spin dynamics of Mn3+ (S = 2) spins in the giant polyoxometalate molecule {Mn40W224}. The 7Li-NMR line width is proportional to the external magnetic field H as expected in a paramagnetic state above 3 K. Below this temperature the line width shows a sudden increase and is almost independent of H, which indicates freezing of the local Mn3+ spins. The temperature dependence of T1 for both 1H and 7Li reveals slow spin dynamics at low temperatures, consistent with spin freezing. The slow spin dynamics is also evidenced by the observation of a peak of 1/T2 around 3 K, where the fluctuation frequency of spins is of the order of ~200 kHz. An explicit form of the temperature dependence of the fluctuation frequency of Mn3+ spins is derived from the nuclear relaxation data.

  2. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  3. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Rothwell, W.P.

    1988-03-01

    A method for obtaining at least one petrophysical property of a porous material containing therein at least one preselected fluid, is described, comprising: NMR imaging the material to generate signals dependent upon both M(0) and T/sub 1/ and M(0) and T/sub 2/, generating separate M(0), T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images from the signals, and determining at least one petrophysical property from at least one of the images.

  4. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  5. NMR at the Picomole Level of a DNA Adduct

    PubMed Central

    Kautz, Roger; Wang, Poguang; Giese, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the limit of detection for obtaining NMR data of a DNA adduct using modern microscale NMR instrumentation, once the adduct has been isolated at the pmol level. Eighty nanograms (130 pmol) of a DNA adduct standard, N-(2′-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene 5′-monophosphate (AAF-dGMP), in 1.5 μL of D2O with 10% methanol-d4, in a vial, was completely picked up as a droplet suspended in a fluorocarbon liquid, and loaded efficiently into a microcoil probe. This work demonstrates a practical manual method of droplet microfluidic sample loading, previously demonstrated using automated equipment, which provides a several-fold advantage over conventional flow injection. Eliminating dilution during injection and confining the sample into the observed volume realizes the full theoretical mass sensitivity of a microcoil, comparable to a micro-cryo probe. With 80 ng, an NMR spectrum acquired over 40 hr showed all of the resonances seen in a standard spectrum of AAF-dGMP, with a S/N of at least 10, despite broadening due to previously-noted effects of conformational exchange. Also a 2D TOCSY spectrum (total correlation spectroscopy) was acquired on 1.6 μg in 18 hr. This work helps to define the utility of NMR in combination with other analytical methods for the structural characterization of a small amount of a DNA adduct. PMID:24028148

  6. Novel electrolytes for use in new and improved batteries: An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Marc B.

    This thesis focuses on the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in order to study materials for use as electrolytes in batteries. The details of four projects are described in this thesis as well as a brief theoretical background of NMR. Structural and dynamics properties were determined using several NMR techniques such as static, MAS, PFG diffusion, and relaxation to understand microscopic and macroscopic properties of the materials described within. Nuclei investigate were 1H, 2H, 7Li, 13C, 19F, 23Na, and 27Al. The first project focuses on an exciting new material to be used as a solid electrolyte membrane. T. The second project focuses on the dynamics of ionic liquid-solvent mixtures and their comparison to molecular dynamics computer simulations. The third project involves a solvent-free film containing NaTFSI salt mixed in to PEO for use in sodium-ion batteries. This final project focuses on a composite electrolyte consisting of a ceramic and solid: LiI:PEO:LiAlO2.

  7. NMR studies of multiple conformations in complexes of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase with analogues of pyrimethamine

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, B.; Tendler, S.J.B.; Feeney, J.; Carr, M.D. ); Arnold, J.R.P.; Thomas, J.A.; Roberts, G.C.K. ); Griffin, R.J.; Stevens, M.F.G. )

    1990-10-01

    {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR signals from bound ligands have been assigned in one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra of complexes of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase with various pyrimethamine analogues. The signals were identified mainly by correlating signals from bound and free ligands by using 2D exchange experiments. Analogues with symmetrically substituted phenyl rings give rise to {sup 1}H signals from four nonequivalent aromatic protons, clearly indicating the presence of hindered rotation about the pyrimidine-phenyl bond. Analogues with symmetrically substituted phenyl rings give rise to {sup 1}H signals from four nonequivalent aromatic protons, clearly indicating the presence of hindered rotation about the pyrimidine-phenyl bond. Analogues containing asymmetrically substituted aromatic rings exist as mixtures of two rotational isomers (an enantiomeric pair) because of this hindered rotation and the NMR spectra revealed that both isomers (forms A and B) bind to the enzyme with comparable, though unequal, binding energies. In this case two complete sets of bound proton signals were observed. The relative orientations of the two forms have been determined from NOE through-space connections between protons on the ligand and protein. Ternary complexes with NADP{sup {plus}} were also examined.

  8. Localized double-quantum-filtered 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. A.; Hetherington, H. P.; Meyerhoff, D. J.; Twieg, D. B.

    The image-guided in vivo spectroscopic (ISIS) pulse sequence has been combined with a double-quantum-filter scheme in order to obtain localized and water-suppressed 1H NMR spectra of J-coupled metabolites. The coherence-transfer efficiency associated with the DQ filter for AX and A 3X spin systems is described. Phantom results of carnosine, alanine, and ethanol in aqueous solution are presented. For comparison, the 1H NMR spectrum of alanine in aqueous solution with the binomial (1331, 2662) spin-echo sequence is also shown.

  9. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  10. Cross sections for proton induced high energy γ -ray emission (PIGE) in reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O at incident proton energies between 1.5 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanelas, P.; Cruz, J.; Fonseca, M.; Henriques, A.; Lourenço, F.; Luís, H.; Machado, J.; Pires Ribeiro, J.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Teubig, P.; Velho, P.; Zarza-Moreno, M.; Galaviz, D.; Jesus, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the high energy gamma-rays produced in the reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O for incident proton energies from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV over NaF/Ag and CaF2/Ag thin targets in two different sets of data. Gamma-rays were detected with a High Purity Ge detector with an angle of 130° with respect to the beam axis. The cross-sections for the high energy gamma-rays of 6.129, 6.915 and 7.115 MeV have been measured for the whole group between 5 and 7.2 MeV with accuracy better than 10%. A new energy range was covered and more points are included in the cross-sections data base expanding the existing set of data. Results are in agreement with previous measurements in similar conditions.

  11. Fission-fragment angular distributions and excitation functions in fission following complete fusion and targetlike-fragment fission reactions of 19F+232Th at near- and sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, N.; Bhattacharya, P.; Biswas, D. C.; Choudhury, R. K.; Nadkarni, D. M.; Saxena, A.

    1995-06-01

    The fragment angular distributions and excitation functions of the fission following complete fusion (FFCF) have been measured after separating them from targetlike-fragment fission (TLFF) for the 19F+232Th system in the bombarding energy range of 84.5 to 106.5 MeV. The fraction of the targetlike-fragment fission was observed to increase with decreasing bombarding energy below the Coulomb barrier. The excitation function for fission following complete fusion reaction agrees well with coupled channel calculations. However, the values derived from the fragment anisotropy data of the FFCF events are found to be much larger than those calculated using the coupled channel transmission coefficient values. The discrepancy between the experimental and calculated values increases as the bombarding energy is decreased below the barrier.

  12. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.

  13. Site-assignment of 17O-NMR signals in itinerant metamagnetic compound Sr 3Ru 2O 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Kentaro; Ishida, Kenji; Perry, Robin S.; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2006-05-01

    We have performed an 17O-NMR measurement in the bilayered perovskite ruthenate Sr 3Ru 2O 7 which shows itinerant metamagnetism at low temperatures. Three oxygen sites are identified in the 17O-NMR spectrum. NMR lines arising from the outer-apical O site are observable in the vicinity of a metamagnetic quantum critical point in spite of strong spin fluctuations. The field dependence of the Knight shift scales with the bulk magnetization.

  14. Accurate Characterization of Ion Transport Properties in Binary Symmetric Electrolytes Using In Situ NMR Imaging and Inverse Modeling.

    PubMed

    Sethurajan, Athinthra Krishnaswamy; Krachkovskiy, Sergey A; Halalay, Ion C; Goward, Gillian R; Protas, Bartosz

    2015-09-17

    We used NMR imaging (MRI) combined with data analysis based on inverse modeling of the mass transport problem to determine ionic diffusion coefficients and transference numbers in electrolyte solutions of interest for Li-ion batteries. Sensitivity analyses have shown that accurate estimates of these parameters (as a function of concentration) are critical to the reliability of the predictions provided by models of porous electrodes. The inverse modeling (IM) solution was generated with an extension of the Planck-Nernst model for the transport of ionic species in electrolyte solutions. Concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients and transference numbers were derived using concentration profiles obtained from in situ (19)F MRI measurements. Material properties were reconstructed under minimal assumptions using methods of variational optimization to minimize the least-squares deviation between experimental and simulated concentration values with uncertainty of the reconstructions quantified using a Monte Carlo analysis. The diffusion coefficients obtained by pulsed field gradient NMR (PFG-NMR) fall within the 95% confidence bounds for the diffusion coefficient values obtained by the MRI+IM method. The MRI+IM method also yields the concentration dependence of the Li(+) transference number in agreement with trends obtained by electrochemical methods for similar systems and with predictions of theoretical models for concentrated electrolyte solutions, in marked contrast to the salt concentration dependence of transport numbers determined from PFG-NMR data. PMID:26247105

  15. Stereoregularity of poly (lactic acid) and their model compounds as studied by NMR and quantum chemical calculations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to understand the origin of the tacticity splitting in the NMR spectrum of poly(lactic acid), monomer model compound and dimer model compounds (both isotactic and syndiotactic) were synthesized and their 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts observed. Two energetically stable conformations were o...

  16. Exploring the use of Generalized Indirect Covariance to reconstruct pure shift NMR spectra: Current Pros and Cons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredi, André; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Martin, Gary E.; Parella, Teodor

    2016-05-01

    The current Pros and Cons of a processing protocol to generate pure chemical shift NMR spectra using Generalized Indirect Covariance are presented and discussed. The transformation of any standard 2D homonuclear and heteronuclear spectrum to its pure shift counterpart by using a reference DIAG spectrum is described. Reconstructed pure shift NMR spectra of NOESY, HSQC, HSQC-TOCSY and HSQMBC experiments are reported for the target molecule strychnine.

  17. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140–600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  18. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-08-29

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140-600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  19. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Written for chemists and biochemists who are not NMR spectroscopists, but who wish to use the new techniques of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, this book brings together for the first time much of the practical and experimental data needed. It also serves as information source for industrial, academic, and graduate student researchers who already use NMR spectroscopy, but not yet in two dimensions. The authors describe the use of 2-D NMR in a wide variety of chemical and biochemical fields, among them peptides, steroids, oligo- and poly-saccharides, nucleic acids, natural products (including terpenoids, alkaloids, and coal-derived heterocyclics), and organic synthetic intermediates. They consider throughout the book both the advantages and limitations of using 2-D NMR.

  20. NMR relaxation studies in doped poly-3-methylthiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. Jugeshwar; Clark, W. G.; Gaidos, G.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P.; Thompson, J. D.; Menon, R.; Ramesh, K. P.

    2015-05-01

    NMR relaxation rates (1 /T1 ), magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity studies in doped poly-3-methylthiophene are reported in this paper. The magnetic susceptibility data show the contributions from both Pauli and Curie spins, with the size of the Pauli term depending strongly on the doping level. Proton and fluorine NMR relaxation rates have been studied as a function of temperature (3-300 K) and field (for protons at 0.9, 9.0, 16.4, and 23.4 T, and for fluorine at 9.0 T). The temperature dependence of T1 is classified into three regimes: (a) For T <(g μBB /2 kB ) , the relaxation mechanism follows a modified Korringa relation due to electron-electron interactions and disorder. 1H - T1 is due to the electron-nuclear dipolar interaction in addition to the contact term. (b) For the intermediate temperature range (g μBB /2 kB ) 19F nuclei has been observed in the entire temperature range suggesting the role of magnetic dipolar interaction modulated by the reorientation of the symmetric molecular subgroups. The data analysis shows that the enhancement in the Korringa ratio is greater in a less conducting sample. Intra- and interchain hopping of charge carriers is found to be a dominant relaxation mechanism at low temperature. Frequency dependence of T1-1 on temperature shows that at low temperature [T <(g μBB /2 kB ) ] the system shows three dimensions and changes to quasi one dimension at

  1. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  2. NMR Study of Strontium Binding by a Micaceous Mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, S.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-04-13

    The nature of strontium binding by soil minerals directly affects the transport and sequestration/remediation of radioactive strontium species released from leaking high-level nuclear waste storage tanks. However, the molecular-level structure of strontium binding sites has seldom been explored in phyllosilicate minerals by direct spectroscopic means and is not well-understood. In this work, we use solid-state NMR to analyze strontium directly and indirectly in a fully strontium-exchanged synthetic mica of nominal composition Na4Mg6Al4Si4O20F4. Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and NMR evidence supports that heat treatment at 500 °C for 4 h fully dehydrates the mica, creating a hydrogen-free interlayer. Analysis of the strontium NMR spectrum of the heat-treated mica shows a single strontium environment with a quadrupolar coupling constant of 9.02 MHz and a quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of 1.0. These quadrupolar parameters are consistent with a highly distorted and asymmetric coordination environment that would be produced by strontium cations without water in the coordination sphere bound deep within the ditrigonal holes. Evidence for at least one additional strontium environment, where proton-strontium couplings may occur, was found via a 1H-87Sr transfer of populations by double resonance NMR experiment. We conclude that the strontium cations in the proton-free interlayer are observable by 87Sr NMR and bound through electrostatic interactions as nine coordinate inner-sphere complexes sitting in the ditrigonal holes. Partially hydrated strontium cations invisible to direct 87Sr NMR are also present and located on the external mica surfaces, which are known to hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture. These results demonstrate that modern pulsed NMR techniques and high fields can be used effectively to provide structural details of strontium binding by phyllosilicate minerals.

  3. Studies of electrolyte penetration in carbon anodes by NMR techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Sandi, G.

    1998-12-09

    A toroid cavity nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detector capable of recording radial concentration profiles, diffusion constants, and displacements of charge carriers was employed to investigate the lithium ion distribution in an electrochemical cell containing a carbonaceous material synthesized from pyrene and pillared clays as inorganic templates. A carbon rod was used in a control experiment to assign the Li{sup +} spectrum and to calibrate the one dimensional radial images.

  4. Computational and ESR studies of electron attachment to decafluorocyclopentane, octafluorocyclobutane, and hexafluorocyclopropane: electron affinities of the molecules and the structures of their stable negative ions as determined from 13C and 19F hyperfine coupling constants.

    PubMed

    ElSohly, Adel M; Tschumper, Gregory S; Crocombe, Richard A; Wang, Jih Tzong; Williams, Ffrancon

    2005-08-01

    High-resolution ESR spectra of the ground-state negative ions of hexafluorocyclopropane (c-C3F6*-), octafluorocyclobutane (c-C4F8*-), and decafluorocyclopentane (c-C5F10*-) are reported and their isotropic 19F hyperfine coupling constants (hfcc) of 198.6 +/- 0.4 G, 147.6 +/- 0.4 G, and 117.9 +/- 0.4 G, respectively, are in inverse ratio to the total number of fluorine atoms per anion. Together with the small value of 5.2 +/- 0.4 G determined for the isotropic 13C hfcc of c-C4F8*-, these results indicate that in each case the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) is delocalized over the equivalent fluorines and possesses a nodal plane through the carbon atoms of a time-averaged D(nh) structure. A series of quantum chemical computations were carried out to further characterize these anions and their neutral counterparts. Both the B3LYP density functional and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) indicate that c-C3F6*- adopts a D(3h) geometry and a (2)A2'' ground electronic state, that c-C4F8*- adopts a D(4h) geometry and a (2)A2u ground electronic state, and that c-C5F10*- adopts a C(s) structure and a (2)A' electronic state. Moreover, the 19F hyperfine coupling constants computed with the MP2 method and a high quality triple-zeta basis set are within 1% of the experimental values. Also, the values computed for the 13C hfcc of c-C4F8*- are consistent with the experimental value of 5.2 G. Therefore, in keeping with the ESR results, these negative ions derived from first-row elements can be characterized as pi* species. In addition, the hypervalency of these perfluorocycloalkane radical anions has been clarified. PMID:16045345

  5. Analysis of amorphous solid dispersions using 2D solid-state NMR and (1)H T(1) relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tran N; Watson, Simon A; Edwards, Andrew J; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S; Strohmeier, Mark; Vogt, Frederick G

    2010-10-01

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) can provide detailed structural information about amorphous solid dispersions of pharmaceutical small molecules. In this study, the ability of SSNMR experiments based on dipolar correlation, spin diffusion, and relaxation measurements to characterize the structure of solid dispersions is explored. Observation of spin diffusion effects using the 2D (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization heteronuclear correlation (CP-HETCOR) experiment is shown to be a useful probe of association between the amorphous drug and polymer that is capable of directly proving glass solution formation. Dispersions of acetaminophen and indomethacin in different polymers are examined using this approach, as well as (1)H double-quantum correlation experiments to probe additional structural features. (1)H-(19)F CP-HETCOR serves a similar role for fluorinated drug molecules such as diflunisal in dispersions, providing a rapid means to prove the formation of a glass solution. Phase separation is detected using (13)C, (19)F, and (23)Na-detected (1)H T(1) experiments in crystalline and amorphous solid dispersions that contain small domains. (1)H T(1) measurements of amorphous nanosuspensions of trehalose and dextran illustrate the ability of SSNMR to detect domain size effects in dispersions that are not glass solutions via spin diffusion effects. Two previously unreported amorphous solid dispersions involving up to three components and containing voriconazole and telithromycin are analyzed using these experiments to demonstrate the general applicability of the approach. PMID:20681586

  6. Mapping hypoxia-induced bioenergetic rearrangements and metabolic signaling by 18O-assisted 31P NMR and 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pucar, Darko; Dzeja, Petras P; Bast, Peter; Gumina, Richard J; Drahl, Carmen; Lim, Lynette; Juranic, Nenad; Macura, Slobodan; Terzic, Andre

    2004-01-01

    Brief hypoxia or ischemia perturbs energy metabolism inducing paradoxically a stress-tolerant state, yet metabolic signals that trigger cytoprotection remain poorly understood. To evaluate bioenergetic rearrangements, control and hypoxic hearts were analyzed with 18O-assisted 31P NMR and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The 18O-induced isotope shift in the 31P NMR spectrum of CrP, betaADP and betaATP was used to quantify phosphotransfer fluxes through creatine kinase and adenylate kinase. This analysis was supplemented with determination of energetically relevant metabolites in the phosphomonoester (PME) region of 31P NMR spectra, and in both aromatic and aliphatic regions of 1H NMR spectra. In control conditions, creatine kinase was the major phosphotransfer pathway processing high-energy phosphoryls between sites of ATP consumption and ATP production. In hypoxia, creatine kinase flux was dramatically reduced with a compensatory increase in adenylate kinase flux, which supported heart energetics by regenerating and transferring beta- and gamma-phosphoryls of ATP. Activation of adenylate kinase led to a build-up of AMP, IMP and adenosine, molecules involved in cardioprotective signaling. 31P and 1H NMR spectral analysis further revealed NADH and H+ scavenging by alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (alphaGPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase contributing to maintained glycolysis under hypoxia. Hypoxia-induced accumulation of alpha-glycerophosphate and nucleoside 5'-monophosphates, through alphaGPDH and adenylate kinase reactions, respectively, was mapped within the increased PME signal in the 31P NMR spectrum. Thus, 18O-assisted 31P NMR combined with 1H NMR provide a powerful approach in capturing rearrangements in cardiac bioenergetics, and associated metabolic signaling that underlie the cardiac adaptive response to stress. PMID:14977188

  7. Practical model fitting approaches to the direct extraction of NMR parameters simultaneously from all dimensions of multidimensional NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Chylla, R A; Volkman, B F; Markley, J L

    1998-08-01

    A maximum likelihood (ML)-based approach has been established for the direct extraction of NMR parameters (e.g., frequency, amplitude, phase, and decay rate) simultaneously from all dimensions of a D-dimensional NMR spectrum. The approach, referred to here as HTFD-ML (hybrid time frequency domain maximum likelihood), constructs a time-domain model composed of a sum of exponentially-decaying sinusoidal signals. The apodized Fourier transform of this time-domain signal is a model spectrum that represents the 'best-fit' to the equivalent frequency-domain data spectrum. The desired amplitude and frequency parameters can be extracted directly from the signal model constructed by the HTFD-ML algorithm. The HTFD-ML approach presented here, as embodied in the software package CHIFIT, is designed to meet the challenges posed by model fitting of D-dimensional NMR data sets, where each consists of many data points (10(8) is not uncommon) encoding information about numerous signals (up to 10(5) for a protein of moderate size) that exhibit spectral overlap. The suitability of the approach is demonstrated by its application to the concerted analysis of a series of ten 2D 1H-15N HSQC experiments measuring 15N T1 relaxation. In addition to demonstrating the practicality of performing maximum likelihood analysis on large, multidimensional NMR spectra, the results demonstrate that this parametric model-fitting approach provides more accurate amplitude and frequency estimates than those obtained from conventional peak-based analysis of the FT spectrum. The improved performance of the model fitting approach derives from its ability to take into account the simultaneous contributions of all signals in a crowded spectral region (deconvolution) as well as to incorporate prior knowledge in constructing models to fit the data. PMID:9751999

  8. Fission Spectrum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  9. Access to experimentally infeasible spectra by pure-shift NMR covariance.

    PubMed

    Fredi, André; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Parella, Teodor

    2016-09-01

    Covariance processing is a versatile processing tool to generate synthetic NMR spectral representations without the need to acquire time-consuming experimental datasets. Here we show that even experimentally prohibited NMR spectra can be reconstructed by introducing key features of a reference 1D CHn-edited spectrum into standard 2D spectra. This general procedure is illustrated with the calculation of experimentally infeasible multiplicity-edited pure-shift NMR spectra of some very popular homonuclear (ME-psCOSY and ME-psTOCSY) and heteronuclear (ME-psHSQC-TOCSY and ME-psHMBC) experiments. PMID:27494746

  10. Access to experimentally infeasible spectra by pure-shift NMR covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredi, André; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Parella, Teodor

    2016-09-01

    Covariance processing is a versatile processing tool to generate synthetic NMR spectral representations without the need to acquire time-consuming experimental datasets. Here we show that even experimentally prohibited NMR spectra can be reconstructed by introducing key features of a reference 1D CHn-edited spectrum into standard 2D spectra. This general procedure is illustrated with the calculation of experimentally infeasible multiplicity-edited pure-shift NMR spectra of some very popular homonuclear (ME-psCOSY and ME-psTOCSY) and heteronuclear (ME-psHSQC-TOCSY and ME-psHMBC) experiments.

  11. NMR assessment on bone simulated under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Q.; Qin, Y.

    Introduction Microgravity-induced bone loss has been suggested to be similar to disuse-osteoporosis on Earth which constitutes a challenging public health problem No current non-destructive method can provide the microstructural changes in bone particularly on cortical bone Recently the authors have applied low field nuclear magnetic resonance NMR spin-spin relaxation technique and computational analysis method to determine the porosity pore size distribution and microdamage of cortical bone 1-3 The studies by the authors have shown that this technology can be used to characterize microstructural changes as well as bone water distribution bound and mobile water changes of weightless treated simulating a microgravity condition turkey and mouse cortical bone We further determinate that the NMR spin-spin relaxation time T 2 spectrum derived parameters can be used as descriptions of bone quality e g matrix water distribution and porosity size distributions and alone or in combination with current techniques bone mineral density measurements more accurately predict bone mechanical properties Methods underline Bone sample preparation Two kinds of animal samples were collected and prepared for designed experiments from SUNY Cortical bones of the mid-diaphyses of the ulnae of 1-year-old male turkeys were dissected from freshly slaughtered animals Eight samples were categorized from normal or control and four samples were 4-week disuse treated by functionally isolated osteotomies disuse A total of 12

  12. NMR measurements in solutions of dialkylimidazolium haloaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Saboungi, M.L.; Klingler, R.J.; Chen, M.J.; Rathke, J.W.

    1992-06-01

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 35}Cl NMR spectra of AlCl{sub 3}-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) melts were measured for initial compositions ranging from 50 to 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} at various temperatures. It was shown by changing the preaquisition delay time (DE value) that the dominant aluminum species are AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in the melt formed by mixing 50 mol % with EMIC and Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 7}{sup {minus}} in the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} melt. In the equimolar mixture, the chemical shift of {sup 27}Al NMR spectrum is 103.28 ppm and the line width is 22.83Hz. In the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixture, the chemical shift is 103.41 ppm and the line width is 2624Hz. A third species observed at 97 ppm in the {sup 27}Al spectra for the 55 and 60 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixtures is identified to be a product of the reaction with residual water. The relaxation rates for each species in the melts were determined.

  13. The minimal metabolism of inhaled 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane to trifluoroacetic acid in man as determined by high sensitivity 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of urine samples.

    PubMed

    Monté, S Y; Ismail, I; Mallett, D N; Matthews, C; Tanner, R J

    1994-12-01

    In this work, oxidative metabolism of the new propellant, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane to trifluoroacetic acid in man is shown to be minimal. Alternative propellants and refrigerants are under development to replace the currently used chlorofluorocarbons which lead to stratospheric ozone depletion. One potentially useful replacement is the hydrofluorocarbon, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFA-134a). Before it can be used, however, particularly as a propellant in an aerosol pharmaceutical formulation whereby the compound is in effect dosed to people, it is important that the safety of this compound is established. As a part of this safety evaluation it is necessary to understand the metabolism of HFA-134a. In this work the production of the potential oxidative metabolite of HFA-134a, trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) has been studied in human urine following inhalation dosing with HFA-134a. The concentrations of TFA in urine have been measured using a highly sensitive 19F nuclear magnetic resonance procedure with a limit of detection of 10 ng ml-1 based on an acquisition time of only 2.25 h per sample. TFA is the only fluorinated species observed in the urine samples and only at very low levels, indicating that the oxidative route of metabolism can occur in vivo in man, but this metabolism is minimal in terms of percentage of administered dose. PMID:7696372

  14. Recent results of measurements of evaporation residue excitation functions for 19F+194,196,198Pt and 16,18O+198Pt systems with HYRA spectrometer at IUAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    In this talk results of the evaporation residue (ER) cross sections for the 19F+194,196,198Pt (forming compound nuclei 213,215,217Fr) and 16,18O+198Pt (forming compound nuclei 214,216Rn) systems measured at Hybrid Recoil mass Analyzer (HYRA) spectrometer installed at the Pelletron+LINAC accelerator facility of the Inter University Accelerator Center (IUAC), New Delhi are reported. The survival probabilities of 215Fr and 217Fr with neutron numbers N = 126 are found to be lower than the survival probabilities of 215Fr and 217Fr with neutron numbers N = 128 and 130 respectively. Statistical model analysis of the ER cross sections show that an excitation energy dependent scaling factor of the finite-range rotating liquid drop model fission barrier is necessary to fit the experimental data. For the case of 214,216Rn, the experimental ER cross sections are compared with the predictions from the statistical model calculations of compound nuclear decay where Kramer's fission width is used. The strength of nuclear dissipation is treated as a free parameter in the calculations to fit the experimental data.

  15. Labeling strategy and signal broadening mechanism of Protein NMR spectroscopy in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yansheng; Liu, Xiaoli; Chen, Yanhua; Xu, Guohua; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Zeting; Yao, Chendie; Liu, Maili; Li, Conggang

    2015-06-01

    We used Xenopus laevis oocytes, a paradigm for a variety of biological studies, as a eukaryotic model system for in-cell protein NMR spectroscopy. The small globular protein GB1 was one of the first studied in Xenopus oocytes, but there have been few reports since then of high-resolution spectra in oocytes. The scarcity of data is at least partly due to the lack of good labeling strategies and the paucity of information on resonance broadening mechanisms. Here, we systematically evaluate isotope enrichment and labeling methods in oocytes injected with five different proteins with molecular masses of 6 to 54 kDa. (19) F labeling is more promising than (15) N, (13) C, and (2) H enrichment. We also used (19) F NMR spectroscopy to quantify the contribution of viscosity, weak interactions, and sample inhomogeneity to resonance broadening in cells. We found that the viscosity in oocytes is only about 1.2 times that of water, and that inhomogeneous broadening is a major factor in determining line width in these cells. PMID:25965532

  16. Theoretical and NMR experimental insights on urea, thiourea and diindolyurea as fluoride carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, João Guilherme P.; Silla, Josué M.; Andrade, Laize A. F.; Fernandes, Sergio A.; Cormanich, Rodrigo A.; Freitas, Matheus P.

    2016-06-01

    Urea and thiourea derivatives are widely known as anion transporters. The pristine urea and thiourea compounds were theoretically and spectroscopically evaluated as fluoride ligands, since transportation of F- is involved in many biochemical processes and this anion is suitable to be analyzed through NMR. Conformational changes induced by anions can be useful to probe ligand-anion complexation, but urea and thiourea do not undergo conformational isomerization. Thus, diindolylurea (DIU) was computationally investigated to search for its conformational preferences upon complexation with fluoride. Overall, the NMR proton signal for urea and thiourea moved downfield and broadened upon addition of one equivalent of fluoride anion in DMSO solution, indicating complexation. The 19F signal for the thiourea-F- mixture also shifted relative to the anion source. However, a J(N)H,F coupling constant was not observed, probably because of entropy and bulk solvation effects. In addition, the conformational preference of DIU changed drastically after simulated complexation with fluoride, in agreement with previous studies with other anions. This confirms the potential of urea derivatives as fluoride carriers.

  17. Discriminating halogen-bonding from other noncovalent interactions by a combined NOE NMR/DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Ciancaleoni, Gianluca; Bertani, Roberta; Rocchigiani, Luca; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Zuccaccia, Cristiano; Macchioni, Alceo

    2015-01-01

    Herein a combined NOE NMR/DFT methodology to discriminate between adducts held together by halogen bonding (XB) and other noncovalent interactions (non-XB, such as lone pair/π), based on the determination of the XB donors' and acceptors' relative orientation, is proposed. In particular, (19) F,(1) H HOESY NMR spectroscopy experiments and DFT calculations on different XB donors, such as perfluorohexyl iodide (I1), iodopentafluorobenzene (I2) and bromopentafluorobenzene (Br), combined with different Lewis bases, such as 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) and 2,4,6-trimethylpyridine (Me3 Py), were performed. The results clearly show that in the case DABCO/I1 the XB adduct is practically the only one present in solution, whereas for the other pairs a certain amount of non-XB adduct is present. Combining DFT and HOESY results, the amount of non-XB adducts can be roughly quantified under our experimental conditions as 4 % for DABCO/I2, between 10 and 20 % for Me3 Py/I1 and Me3 Py/I2, and 44 % for DABCO/Br. PMID:25353654

  18. Integrative NMR for biomolecular research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Dashti, Hesam; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M; Butcher, Samuel E; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A; Markley, John L

    2016-04-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determining structural and functional features of biomolecules in physiological solution as well as for observing their intermolecular interactions in real-time. However, complex steps associated with its practice have made the approach daunting for non-specialists. We introduce an NMR platform that makes biomolecular NMR spectroscopy much more accessible by integrating tools, databases, web services, and video tutorials that can be launched by simple installation of NMRFAM software packages or using a cross-platform virtual machine that can be run on any standard laptop or desktop computer. The software package can be downloaded freely from the NMRFAM software download page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download_packages.html ), and detailed instructions are available from the Integrative NMR Video Tutorial page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/integrative.html ). PMID:27023095

  19. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; van Hulsteyn, David B.

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  20. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  1. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  2. Multispectral Analysis of NMR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterfield, R. L.; Vannier, M. W. And Associates; Jordan, D.

    1985-01-01

    Conference paper discusses initial efforts to adapt multispectral satellite-image analysis to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scans of human body. Flexibility of these techniques makes it possible to present NMR data in variety of formats, including pseudocolor composite images of pathological internal features. Techniques do not have to be greatly modified from form in which used to produce satellite maps of such Earth features as water, rock, or foliage.

  3. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  4. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  5. Selectively Labeling the Heterologous Protein in Escherichia coli for NMR Studies: A Strategy to Speed Up NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, F. C. L.; Amorim, G. C.; Moreau, V. H.; Sousa, V. O.; Creazola, A. T.; Américo, T. A.; Pais, A. P. N.; Leite, A.; Netto, L. E. S.; Giordano, R. J.; Valente, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective 15N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good 1H/15N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The 15N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the 1H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  6. MULTIPLE-QUANTUM NMR IN SOLIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Y-S.

    1982-11-01

    Time domain multiple-quantum (MQ) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for spectral simplification and for providing new information on molecular dynamics. In this thesis, applications of MQ NMR are presented and show distinctly the advantages of this method over the conventional single-quantum NMR. Chapter 1 introduces the spin Hamiltonians, the density matrix formalism and some basic concepts of MQ NMR spectroscopy. In chapter 2, {sup 14}N double-quantum coherence is observed with high sensitivity in isotropic solution, using only the magnetization of bound protons. Spin echoes are used to obtain the homogeneous double-quantum spectrum and to suppress a large H{sub 2}O solvent signal. Chapter 3 resolves the main difficulty in observing high MQ transitions in solids. Due to the profusion of spin transitions in a solid, individual lines are unresolved. Excitation and detection of high quantum transitions by normal schemes are thus difficult. To ensure that overlapping lines add constructively and thereby to enhance sensitivity, time-reversal pulse sequences are used to generate all lines in phase. Up to 22-quantum {sup 1}H absorption in solid adamantane is observed. A time dependence study shows an increase in spin correlations as the excitation time increased. In chapter 4, a statistical theory of MQ second moments is developed for coupled spins of spin I = 1/2. The model reveals that the ratio of the average dipolar coupling to the rms value largely determines the dependence of second moments on the number of quanta. The results of this model are checked against computer-calculated and experimental second moments, and show good agreement. A simple scheme is proposed in chapter 5 for sensitivity improvement in a MQ experiment. The scheme involves acquiring all of the signal energy available in the detection period by applying pulsed spinlocking and sampling between pulses. Using this technique on polycrystalline adamantane, a large

  7. Automated protein NMR resonance assignments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Dong; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Lin, Guohui

    2003-01-01

    NMR resonance peak assignment is one of the key steps in solving an NMR protein structure. The assignment process links resonance peaks to individual residues of the target protein sequence, providing the prerequisite for establishing intra- and inter-residue spatial relationships between atoms. The assignment process is tedious and time-consuming, which could take many weeks. Though there exist a number of computer programs to assist the assignment process, many NMR labs are still doing the assignments manually to ensure quality. This paper presents (1) a new scoring system for mapping spin systems to residues, (2) an automated adjacency information extraction procedure from NMR spectra, and (3) a very fast assignment algorithm based on our previous proposed greedy filtering method and a maximum matching algorithm to automate the assignment process. The computational tests on 70 instances of (pseudo) experimental NMR data of 14 proteins demonstrate that the new score scheme has much better discerning power with the aid of adjacency information between spin systems simulated across various NMR spectra. Typically, with automated extraction of adjacency information, our method achieves nearly complete assignments for most of the proteins. The experiment shows very promising perspective that the fast automated assignment algorithm together with the new score scheme and automated adjacency extraction may be ready for practical use. PMID:16452794

  8. NMR Relaxation and Petrophysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Marc

    2011-03-01

    NMR relaxation is routinely used in the field of geosciences to give basic petrophysical properties such as porosity, pore size distribution, saturation etc. In this tutorial, we focus on the pore size distribution deduced from NMR. We recall the basic principle used in the interpretation of the NMR signal and compare the results with other standard petrophysical techniques such as mercury pore size distribution, BET specific surface measurements, thin section visualizations. The NMR pore size distribution is a unique information available on water saturated porous media and can give similar results as MICP in certain situations. The scaling of NMR relaxation time distribution (s) into pore sizes (μm) requires the knowledge of the surface relaxivity (μm/s) and we recommend using specific surface measurements as an independent determination of solid surface areas. With usual surface relaxivities, the NMR technique can explore length-scales starting from nano-meters and ending around 100 μm. Finally, we will introduce briefly recent techniques sensitive to the pore to pore diffusional exchange, providing new information on the connectivity of the pore network, but showing another possibility of discrepancy in the determination of pore size distribution with standard techniques.

  9. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Smith, Pieter E S; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2015-12-28

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials' structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences' phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, "ultrafast" NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets. PMID:26723664

  10. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan E-mail: lylfj2005@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong E-mail: lylfj2005@xmu.edu.cn; Smith, Pieter E. S.

    2015-12-28

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials’ structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences’ phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, “ultrafast” NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets.

  11. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Smith, Pieter E. S.; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials' structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences' phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, "ultrafast" NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets.

  12. Counter-ion binding and mobility in the presence of hydrophobic polyions – combining molecular dynamics simulations and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druchok, Maksym; Malikova, Natalie; Rollet, Anne-Laure; Vlachy, Vojko

    2016-06-01

    Counter-ion binding and mobility in aqueous solutions of partially hydrophobic ionene oligoions is studied here by a combination of all-atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and NMR (19F and 81Br nuclei) measurements. We present results for 12, 12-ionenes in the presence of different halide ions (F-, Cl-, Br- and I-), as well as their mixtures; the latter allowing us to probe counter-ion selectivity of these oligoions. We consolidate both structural and dynamic information, in particular simulated radial distribution functions and average residence times of counter-ions in the vicinity of ionenes and NMR data in the form of counter-ion chemical shift and self-diffusion coefficients. On one hand, previously reported enthalpy of dilution and mixing measurements show a reverse counter-ion sequence for 12, 12-ionenes with respect to their less hydrophobic 3, 3- and 6, 6- analogues. On the other hand, the current MD and NMR data, reflecting the counter-ion binding tendencies to the ionene chain, give evidence for the same ordering as that observed by MD for 3, 3-ionenes. This is not seen as a contradiction and can be rationalized on the basis of increasing chain hydrophobicity, which has different consequences for enthalpy and ion-binding. The latter is reflecting free energy changes and as such includes both enthalpic and entropic contributions.

  13. DFT study of molecular structures and 13C NMR parameters of two fluorinated biphenyls and their η6-tricarbonylchromium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryff-Keller, Adam; Szczeciński, Przemysław

    2015-07-01

    The molecular structures of 2,2‧-difluoro-6,6‧-dimethylbiphenyl, 4,5-difluoro-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene and of their η6-tricarbonylchromium complexes have been discussed in the light of the results of molecular energy calculations. Also the isotropic magnetic shielding constants and carbon-fluorine spin-spin coupling constants for these objects have been calculated and compared with the experimental values of 13C NMR chemical shifts and J constants. The calculational methods used were: DFT/BHandH/6-311++G(2d,p) and/or DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p). It has been confirmed that experimental 13C NMR chemical shifts for η6-arene tricarbonylchromium complexes can be satisfactorily predicted using both methods, although the method exploiting BHandH functional is not able to reproduce the 13C NMR chemical shifts of Cr(CO)3 carbon atoms. On the other hand, this method provides the J(13C, 19F) values which are close to the experimental ones.

  14. Bioluminescence and 19F magnetic resonance imaging visualize the efficacy of lysostaphin alone and in combination with oxacillin against Staphylococcus aureus in murine thigh and catheter-associated infection models.

    PubMed

    Hertlein, Tobias; Sturm, Volker; Lorenz, Udo; Sumathy, K; Jakob, Peter; Ohlsen, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococci are the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increasingly, they resist antibiotic treatment owing to the development of multiple antibiotic resistance mechanisms in most strains. Therefore, the activity and efficacy of recombinant lysostaphin as a drug against this pathogen have been evaluated. Lysostaphin exerts high levels of activity against antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The therapeutic value of lysostaphin has been analyzed in two different clinically relevant in vivo models, a catheter-associated infection model and a thigh infection model. We infected mice with luciferase-expressing S. aureus Xen 29, and the efficacies of lysostaphin, vancomycin, oxacillin, and combined lysostaphin-oxacillin were investigated by determining numbers of CFU, detecting bioluminescent signals, and measuring the accumulation of perfluorocarbon emulsion at the site of infection by (19)F magnetic resonance imaging. Lysostaphin treatment significantly reduced the bacterial burden in infected thigh muscles and, after systemic spreading from the catheter, in inner organs. The efficiency of lysostaphin treatment was even more pronounced in combinatorial therapy with oxacillin. These results suggest that recombinant lysostaphin may have potential as an anti-S. aureus drug worthy of further clinical development. In addition, both imaging technologies demonstrated efficacy patterns similar to that of CFU determination, although they proved to be less sensitive. Nonetheless, they served as powerful tools to provide additional information about the course and gravity of infection in a noninvasive manner, possibly allowing a reduction in the number of animals needed for research evaluation of new antibiotics in future studies. PMID:24366730

  15. Cryoreduction EPR and 13C, 19F ENDOR study of substrate-bound substates and solvent kinetic isotope effects in the catalytic cycle of cytochrome P450cam and its T252A mutant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Hee; Yang, Tran-Chin; Perera, Roshan; Jin, Shengxi; Bryson, Thomas A; Sono, Masanori; Davydov, Roman; Dawson, John H; Hoffman, Brian M

    2005-11-01

    We recently used cryoreduction EPR/ENDOR techniques to show that a substrate can modulate the properties of both the monooxygenase active-oxygen intermediates and of the proton-delivery network which encompasses them. In the present report we use Q-band pulsed 19F ENDOR (Mims 3-pulse sequence) to examine the substrate binding geometries of camphor, through use of the 5,5'--difluorocamphor, and 13C ENDOR to examine the binding of 5-methylenyl camphor labeled with 13C at C11. These probes are examined in multiple states of the catalytic cycle of P450cam and its T252A mutant. As part of this investigation we further report a new cryoreduction reaction, the reduction of a ferroheme to the EPR-visible Fe(I) state, and use it to probe the substrate binding to the EPR-silent ferroheme state. Finally we report the solvent kinetic isotope effect on the decay of the camphor complex of the hydroperoxo-ferric intermediate, the first such measurement on an individual step within the P450cam reaction cycle. Following reduction of oxyferrous-P450cam, this step is the rate-limiting step in camphor hydroxylation, and its solv-KIE of 1.8 at 190 K establishes that it involves activation of the hydroperoxo moiety by transfer of the 'second' proton of catalysis. We suggest that the finding that the heme pocket can exist in multiple substates, including multiple substrate binding locations, even in P450cam, along with the established possibility that the hydroperoxo-ferriheme intermediate can react with substrate, may explain the formation of multiple products by P450s. PMID:16234926

  16. Cross sections of projectile-like fragments in the reaction {sup 19}F+{sup 66}Zn in the beam energy range of 3-6 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Sodaye, S.; Reddy, A. V. R.; Goswami, A.; Sharma, S. K.; Nayak, B. K.

    2009-06-15

    Angular distributions of projectile-like fragments (PLFs) have been measured in the reaction {sup 19}F+{sup 66}Zn at E{sub lab}=61,82,92, and 109 MeV to understand their formation in the low energy domain (< or approx. 7 MeV nucleon). In this energy range, maximum angular momentum 'l{sub max}' in the reaction is lower than or close to the critical or limiting angular momentum for complete fusion 'l{sub lim}(CF).' The sum-rule model was modified to explain the cross sections of PLFs in the present study. For the first time, the modified sum-rule model, with a competition of incomplete fusion (ICF) reaction with complete fusion below l{sub lim}(CF) reasonably reproduced the cross sections of PLFs in the beam energy range of the present study. It was observed that the cross sections of lighter PLFs fall more rapidly with decreasing beam energy compared to those of heavier PLFs, suggesting a change in the reaction mechanism from heavier to lighter PLFs. Transfer probabilities for peripheral collisions were calculated within the framework of a semiclassical formalism. The parameters of the nuclear potential required for the calculation of transfer probability were obtained by fitting the elastic scattering data measured in the present work. Calculated transfer probabilities were significantly lower compared to the corresponding experimental values, suggesting a significant overlap of the projectile and the target nuclei in incomplete fusion reactions. The present analysis showed that the overlap of the projectile and the target nuclei increases with increasing mass transfer at a given beam energy and for a given PLF, overlap increases with increasing beam energy.

  17. Bioluminescence and 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging Visualize the Efficacy of Lysostaphin Alone and in Combination with Oxacillin against Staphylococcus aureus in Murine Thigh and Catheter-Associated Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Hertlein, Tobias; Sturm, Volker; Lorenz, Udo; Sumathy, K.; Jakob, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococci are the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increasingly, they resist antibiotic treatment owing to the development of multiple antibiotic resistance mechanisms in most strains. Therefore, the activity and efficacy of recombinant lysostaphin as a drug against this pathogen have been evaluated. Lysostaphin exerts high levels of activity against antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The therapeutic value of lysostaphin has been analyzed in two different clinically relevant in vivo models, a catheter-associated infection model and a thigh infection model. We infected mice with luciferase-expressing S. aureus Xen 29, and the efficacies of lysostaphin, vancomycin, oxacillin, and combined lysostaphin-oxacillin were investigated by determining numbers of CFU, detecting bioluminescent signals, and measuring the accumulation of perfluorocarbon emulsion at the site of infection by 19F magnetic resonance imaging. Lysostaphin treatment significantly reduced the bacterial burden in infected thigh muscles and, after systemic spreading from the catheter, in inner organs. The efficiency of lysostaphin treatment was even more pronounced in combinatorial therapy with oxacillin. These results suggest that recombinant lysostaphin may have potential as an anti-S. aureus drug worthy of further clinical development. In addition, both imaging technologies demonstrated efficacy patterns similar to that of CFU determination, although they proved to be less sensitive. Nonetheless, they served as powerful tools to provide additional information about the course and gravity of infection in a noninvasive manner, possibly allowing a reduction in the number of animals needed for research evaluation of new antibiotics in future studies. PMID:24366730

  18. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  19. NMR Imaging: Instrumentation and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingle, Jeremy Mark

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis presents three original contributions to the field of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR): the experimental framework and analysis for the measurement of a new imaging parameter to describe perfusion; the measurement and analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity and a practical correction system for their reduction; a novel system for the synchronous control of NMR experiments based on the microprogrammed concept. The thesis begins with an introduction to the theory of NMR. The application of NMR to imaging is also introduced with emphasis on the techniques which developed into those in common use today. Inaccurate determination of the traditional NMR parameters (T_1 and T_2 and the molecular diffusion coefficient) can be caused by non-diffusive fluid movement within the sample. The experimental basis for determining a new imaging parameter --the Perfusion coefficient--is presented. This provides a measure of forced isotropic fluid motion through an organ or tissue. The instrumentation required for conducting NMR experiments is described in order to introduce the contribution made in this area during this research: A sequence controller. The controller is based on the concept of microprogramming and enables completely synchronous output of 128 bits of data. The software for the generation and storage of control data and the regulation of the data to provide experimental control is microcomputer based. It affords precise and accurate regulation of the magnetic field gradients, the rf synthesizer and the spectrometer for spectroscopic and imaging applications. Fundamental to the science of NMR is the presence of a magnetic field. A detailed study of the analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity in terms of spherical harmonics is presented. The field of a whole body imaging system with poor inhomogeneity was measured and analyzed to determine and describe the components of the inhomogeneity. Finally a

  20. Amplification of Xenon NMR and MRI by remote detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moule, Adam J.; Spence, Megan M.; Han, Song-I.; Seeley, JulietteA.; Pierce, Kimberly L.; Saxena, Sunil; Pines, Alexander

    2003-03-31

    A novel technique is proposed in which a nuclear magneticresonance (NMR) spectrum or magnetic resonance image (MRI) is encoded andstored as spin polarization and is then moved to a different physicallocation to be detected. Remote detection allows the separateoptimization of the encoding and detection steps, permitting theindependent choice of experimental conditions, and excitation anddetection methodologies. In the first experimental demonstration of thistechnique, we show that NMR signal can be amplified by taking diluted129Xe from a porous sample placed inside a large encoding coil, andconcentrating it into a smaller detection coil. In general, the study ofNMR active molecules at low concentration that have low physical fillingfactor is facilitated by remote detection. In the second experiment, MRIinformation encoded in a very low field magnet (4-7mT) is transferred toa high field magnet (4.2 T) in order to be detected under optimizedconditions. Furthermore, remote detection allows the utilization ofultra-sensitive optical or superconducting detection techniques, whichbroadens the horizon of NMR experimentation.

  1. Two Phase Flow Measurements by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, Stephen A; Fukushima, Eiichi

    2006-08-14

    different nuclei, protons and 19F. It also uses two different types of NMR image formation, a conventional spin-echo and a single-point method. The single-point method is notable for being useful for imaging materials which are much more rigid than can usually be studied by NMR imaging. We use it to image “low density” polyethylene (LDPE) plastic in this application. We have reduced the imaging time for this three-phase imaging method to less than 10 s per pair of profiles by using new hardware. Directly measuring the solid LDPE signal was a novel feature for multi-phase flow studies. We also used thermally polarized gas NMR (as opposed to hyper-polarized gas) which produces low signal to noise ratios because gas densities are on the order of 1000 times smaller than liquid densities. However since we used multi-atom molecules that have short T1's and operated at elevated pressures we could overcome some of the losses. Thermally polarized gases have advantages over hyperpolarized gases in the ease of preparation, and in maintaining a well-defined polarization. In these studies (Codd and Altobelli, 2003), we used stimulated echo sequences to successfully obtain propagators of gas in bead packs out to observation times of 300 ms. Zarraga, et al. (2000) used laser-sheet profilometry to investigate normal stress differences in concentrated suspensions. Recently we developed an NMR imaging analog for comparison with numerical work that is being performed by Rekha Rao at Sandia National Laboratories (Rao, Mondy, Sun, et al, 2002). A neutrally buoyant suspension of 100 mm PMMA spheres in a Newtonian liquid was sheared in a vertical Couette apparatus inside the magnet. The outer cylinder rotates and the inner cylinder is fixed. At these low rotation rates, the free-surface of the Newtonian liquid shows no measurable deformation, but the suspension clearly shows its non-Newtonian character.

  2. Geochemical kinetics via the Swift-Connick equations and solution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, Steven J.; Ohlin, C. André; Casey, William H.

    2011-07-01

    Signal analysis in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy is among the most powerful methods to quantify reaction rates in aqueous solutions. To this end, the Swift-Connick approximations to the Bloch-McConnell equations have been used extensively to estimate rate parameters for elementary reactions. The method is primarily used for 17O NMR in aqueous solutions, but the list of geochemically relevant nuclei that can be used is long, and includes 29Si, 27Al, 19F, 13C and many others of particular interest to geochemists. Here we review the derivation of both the Swift-Connick and Bloch-McConnell equations and emphasize assumptions and quirks. For example, the equations were derived for CW-NMR, but are used with modern pulse FT-NMR and can be applied to systems that have exchange rates that are shorter than the lifetime of a typical pulse. The method requires a dilute solution where the minor reacting species contributes a negligible amount of total magnetization. We evaluate the sensitivity of results to this dilute-solution requirement and also highlight the need for chemically well-defined systems if reliable data are to be obtained. The limitations in using longitudinal relaxation to estimate reaction rate parameters are discussed. Finally, we provide examples of the application of the method, including ligand exchanges from aqua ions and hydrolysis complexes, that emphasize its flexibility. Once the basic requirements of the Swift-Connick method are met, it allows geochemists to establish rates of elementary reactions. Reactions at this scale lend themselves well to methods of computational simulation and could provide key tests of accuracy.

  3. Fast and Efficient Fragment-Based Lead Generation by Fully Automated Processing and Analysis of Ligand-Observed NMR Binding Data.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chen; Frommlet, Alexandra; Perez, Manuel; Cobas, Carlos; Blechschmidt, Anke; Dominguez, Santiago; Lingel, Andreas

    2016-04-14

    NMR binding assays are routinely applied in hit finding and validation during early stages of drug discovery, particularly for fragment-based lead generation. To this end, compound libraries are screened by ligand-observed NMR experiments such as STD, T1ρ, and CPMG to identify molecules interacting with a target. The analysis of a high number of complex spectra is performed largely manually and therefore represents a limiting step in hit generation campaigns. Here we report a novel integrated computational procedure that processes and analyzes ligand-observed proton and fluorine NMR binding data in a fully automated fashion. A performance evaluation comparing automated and manual analysis results on (19)F- and (1)H-detected data sets shows that the program delivers robust, high-confidence hit lists in a fraction of the time needed for manual analysis and greatly facilitates visual inspection of the associated NMR spectra. These features enable considerably higher throughput, the assessment of larger libraries, and shorter turn-around times. PMID:26964888

  4. PR-CALC: A program for the reconstruction of NMR spectra from projections

    PubMed Central

    Coggins, Brian E.; Zhou, Pei

    2013-01-01

    Projection-reconstruction NMR (PR-NMR) has attracted growing attention as a method for collecting multidimensional NMR data rapidly. The PR-NMR procedure involves measuring lower-dimensional projections of a higher-dimensional spectrum, which are then used for the mathematical reconstruction of the full spectrum. We describe here the program PR-CALC, for the reconstruction of NMR spectra from projection data. This program implements a number of reconstruction algorithms, highly optimized to achieve maximal performance, and manages the reconstruction process automatically, producing either full spectra or subsets, such as regions or slices, as requested. The ability to obtain subsets allows large spectra to be analyzed by reconstructing and examining only those subsets containing peaks, offering considerable savings in processing time and storage space. PR-CALC is straightforward to use, and integrates directly into the conventional pipeline for data processing and analysis. It was written in standard C++ and should run on any platform. The organization is flexible, and permits easy extension of capabilities, as well as reuse in new software. PR-CALC should facilitate the widespread utilization of PR-NMR in biomedical research. PMID:16604426

  5. Improving NMR Structures of RNA.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Clore, G Marius; Schwieters, Charles D

    2016-05-01

    Here, we show that modern solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures of RNA exhibit more steric clashes and conformational ambiguities than their crystallographic X-ray counterparts. To tackle these issues, we developed RNA-ff1, a new force field for structure calculation with Xplor-NIH. Using seven published NMR datasets, RNA-ff1 improves covalent geometry and MolProbity validation criteria for clashes and backbone conformation in most cases, relative to both the previous Xplor-NIH force field and the original structures associated with the experimental data. In addition, with smaller base-pair step rises in helical stems, RNA-ff1 structures enjoy more favorable base stacking. Finally, structural accuracy improves in the majority of cases, as supported by complete residual dipolar coupling cross-validation. Thus, the reported advances show great promise in bridging the quality gap that separates NMR and X-ray structures of RNA. PMID:27066747

  6. Analysis of organic matter at the soil-water interface by NMR spectroscopy: Implications for contaminant sorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, M.; Simpson, A.

    2009-05-01

    Contaminant sorption to soil organic matter (OM) is the main fate of nonionic, hydrophobic organic contaminants in terrestrial environments and a number of studies have suggested that both soil OM structure and physical conformation (as regulated by the clay mineral phase) govern contaminant sorption processes. To investigate this further, a number of soil samples were characterized by both solid-state 13 C Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CPMAS) NMR and 1H High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR- MAS) NMR. HR-MAS NMR is an innovative NMR method that allows one to examine samples that are semi- solid using liquid state NMR methods (ie: observe 1H which is more sensitive than 13C). With HR-MAS NMR, only those structures that are in contact with the solvent are NMR visible thus one can probe different components within a mixture using different solvents. The 1H HR-MAS NMR spectrum of a grassland soil swollen in water (D2O) is dominated by signals from alkyl and O-alkyl structures but signals from aromatic protons are negligible (the peak at ~8.2ppm is attributed to formic acid). When the soil is swollen in DMSO-d6, a solvent which is more penetrating and capable of breaking hydrogen bonds, aromatic signals are visible suggesting that the aromatic structures are buried within the soil matrix and do not exist at the soil-water interface. The 13C solid-state NMR data confirms that aromatic carbon is present in substantial amounts (estimated at ~40% of the total 13C signal) therefore, the lack of 1H aromatic signals in the HR-MAS NMR spectrum indicates that aromatic structures are buried and that the soil-water interface is dominated by aliphatic chains, carbohydrates, and peptides. The NMR data indicates that the mineral component of soils governs the physical conformation of OM at the soil-water interface.

  7. Molecular structure by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, R.

    Two examples are presented of the use of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy to solve molecular structure problems. The first is called correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and it allows us to disentangle a complex network of spin-spin couplings. By dispersing the NMR information in two frequency dimensions, it facilitates the analysis of very complex spectra of organic and biochemical molecules, normally too crowded to be tractable. The second application exploits the special properties of multiple-quantum coherence to explore the molecular framework one CC linkage at a time. The natural product panamine is used as a test example; with some supplementary evidence, the structure of this six-ringed heterocyclic molecule is elucidated from the double-quantum filtered two-dimensional spectrum.

  8. A SENSITIVE NMR THERMOMETER FOR MULTINUCLEI FT NMR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pernicious problem in multinuclei FT NMR is accurate measurement of sample temperature. This arises from several factors including widespread use of high-power decoupling, large sample tubes (with potentially large temperature gradients across the sample volume), and lack of su...

  9. Effects of instrumental artifacts on triple quantum filtered NMR spectra for spin I = 3/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cheng; Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Zhixiao

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the effects of various instrumental artifacts on the triple quantum filtered NMR spectra for spin I = 3/2 nuclei are investigated. The studied artifacts include finite pulse widths, phase errors, radio frequency field inhomogeneity and pulse transients, which are commonly encountered in practice. The triple quantum filtered spectra are numerically simulated, based on the evolution of the spin density operator under the Hamiltonian for the artifacts. The results show that the presence of the artifacts introduces a shape distortion in the spectrum as well as a variation in the peak intensity, compared with the spectrum without any artifacts. This work indicates that the existence of the instrumental artifacts may cause a misunderstanding of the triple quantum filtered NMR spectra in experiments. The results suggest that one be aware of the instrumental artifacts when performing the triple quantum filtered NMR experiments.

  10. 63,65Cu NMR Method in a Local Field for Investigation of Copper Ore Concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilenko, A. N.; Starykh, R. V.; Khabibullin, I. Kh.; Matukhin, V. L.

    2015-01-01

    To choose the most efficient method and ore beneficiation flow diagram, it is important to know physical and chemical properties of ore concentrates. The feasibility of application of the 63,65Cu nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method in a local field aimed at studying the properties of copper ore concentrates in the copper-iron-sulfur system is demonstrated. 63,65Cu NMR spectrum is measured in a local field for a copper concentrate sample and relaxation parameters (times T1 and T2) are obtained. The spectrum obtained was used to identify a mineral (chalcopyrite) contained in the concentrate. Based on the experimental data, comparative characteristics of natural chalcopyrite and beneficiated copper concentrate are given. The feasibility of application of the NMR method in a local field to explore mineral deposits is analyzed.

  11. Effects of instrumental artifacts on triple quantum filtered NMR spectra for spin I=3/2.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng; Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Zhixiao

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the effects of various instrumental artifacts on the triple quantum filtered NMR spectra for spin I=3/2 nuclei are investigated. The studied artifacts include finite pulse widths, phase errors, radio frequency field inhomogeneity and pulse transients, which are commonly encountered in practice. The triple quantum filtered spectra are numerically simulated, based on the evolution of the spin density operator under the Hamiltonian for the artifacts. The results show that the presence of the artifacts introduces a shape distortion in the spectrum as well as a variation in the peak intensity, compared with the spectrum without any artifacts. This work indicates that the existence of the instrumental artifacts may cause a misunderstanding of the triple quantum filtered NMR spectra in experiments. The results suggest that one be aware of the instrumental artifacts when performing the triple quantum filtered NMR experiments. PMID:27149654

  12. Lattice simulation method to model diffusion and NMR spectra in porous materials.

    PubMed

    Merlet, Céline; Forse, Alexander C; Griffin, John M; Frenkel, Daan; Grey, Clare P

    2015-03-01

    A coarse-grained simulation method to predict nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of ions diffusing in porous carbons is proposed. The coarse-grained model uses input from molecular dynamics simulations such as the free-energy profile for ionic adsorption, and density-functional theory calculations are used to predict the NMR chemical shift of the diffusing ions. The approach is used to compute NMR spectra of ions in slit pores with pore widths ranging from 2 to 10 nm. As diffusion inside pores is fast, the NMR spectrum of an ion trapped in a single mesopore will be a sharp peak with a pore size dependent chemical shift. To account for the experimentally observed NMR line shapes, our simulations must model the relatively slow exchange between different pores. We show that the computed NMR line shapes depend on both the pore size distribution and the spatial arrangement of the pores. The technique presented in this work provides a tool to extract information about the spatial distribution of pore sizes from NMR spectra. Such information is difficult to obtain from other characterisation techniques. PMID:25747093

  13. Synthesis of stereospecifically deuterated desoxypodophyllotoxins and 1H-nmr assignment of desoxypodophyllotoxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pullockaran, A. J.; Kingston, D. G.; Lewis, N. G.

    1989-01-01

    [4 beta- 2H1]Desoxypodophyllotoxin [3], [4 alpha- 2H1]desoxypodophyllotoxin [4], and [4, 4- 2 H2]desoxypodophyllotoxin [9] were prepared from podophyllotoxin [1] via its chloride [5]. A complete assignment of the 1H-nmr spectrum of desoxypodophyllotoxin [2] was made on the basis of the spectra of the deuterated compounds [3] and [4].

  14. Scalable synthesis of quaterrylene: solution-phase 1H NMR spectroscopy of its oxidative dication.

    PubMed

    Thamatam, Rajesh; Skraba, Sarah L; Johnson, Richard P

    2013-10-14

    Quaterrylene is prepared in a single reaction and high yield by Scholl-type coupling of perylene, utilizing trifluoromethanesulfonic acid as catalyst and DDQ or molecular oxygen as oxidant. Dissolution in 1 M triflic acid/dichloroethane with sonication yields the aromatic quaterrylene oxidative dication, which is characterized by its (1)H NMR spectrum. PMID:23999880

  15. Autism Spectrum Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Autism Spectrum Disorder Information Page Condensed from Autism Spectrum ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Autism Spectrum Disorder? Autistic disorder (sometimes called autism or ...

  16. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  17. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  18. Push-through Direction Injectin NMR Automation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two major spectroscopic techniques successfully used in metabolomics studies. The non-invasive, quantitative and reproducible characteristics make NMR spectroscopy an excellent technique for detection of endogeno...

  19. Maximum entropy signal processing in practical NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibisi, Sibusiso; Skilling, John; Brereton, Richard G.; Laue, Ernest D.; Staunton, James

    1984-10-01

    NMR spectroscopy is intrinsically insensitive, a frequently serious limitation especially in biochemical applications where sample size is limited and compounds may be too insoluble or unstable for data to be accumulated over long periods. Fourier transform (FT) NMR was developed by Ernst1 to speed up the accumulation of useful data, dramatically improving the quality of spectra obtained in a given observing time by recording the free induction decay (FID) data directly in time, at the cost of requiring numerical processing. Ernst also proposed that more information could be obtained from the spectrum if the FID was multiplied by a suitable apodizing function before being Fourier transformed. For example (see ref. 2), an increase in sensitivity can result from the use of a matched filter1, whereas an increase in resolution can be achieved by the use of gaussian multiplication1,3, application of sine bells4-8 or convolution difference9. These methods are now used routinely in NMR data processing. The maximum entropy method (MEM)10 is theoretically capable of achieving simultaneous enhancement in both respects11, and this has been borne out in practice in other fields where it has been applied. However, this technique requires relatively heavy computation. We describe here the first practical application of MEM to NMR, and we analyse 13C and 1H NMR spectra of 2-vinyl pyridine. Compared with conventional spectra, MEM gives considerable suppression of noise, accompanied by significant resolution enhancement. Multiplets in the 1H spectra are resolved better leading to improved visual clarity.

  20. Study of correlations in molecular motion by multiple quantum NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.H.

    1981-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a very useful tool for characterizing molecular configurations through the measurement of transition frequencies and dipolar couplings. The measurement of spectral lineshapes, spin-lattice relaxation times, and transverse relaxation times also provide us with valuable information about correlations in molecular motion. The new technique of multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance has numerous advantages over the conventional single quantum NMR techniques in obtaining information about static and dynamic interactions of coupled spin systems. In the first two chapters, the theoretical background of spin Hamiltonians and the density matrix formalism of multiple quantum NMR is discussed. The creation and detection of multiple quantum coherence by multiple pulse sequence are discussed. Prototype multiple quantum spectra of oriented benzene are presented. Redfield relaxation theory and the application of multiple quantum NMR to the study of correlations in fluctuations are presented. A specific example of an oriented methyl group relaxed by paramagnetic impurities is studied in detail. The study of possible correlated motion between two coupled methyl groups by multiple quantum NMR is presented. For a six spin system it is shown that the four-quantum spectrum is sensitive to two-body correlations, and serves a ready test of correlated motion. The study of the spin-lattice dynamics of orienting or tunneling methyl groups (CH/sub 3/ and CD/sub 3/) at low temperatures is presented. The anisotropic spin-lattice relaxation of deuterated hexamethylbenzene, caused by the sixfold reorientation of the molecules, is investigated, and the NMR spectrometers and other experimental details are discussed.

  1. SQUID detected NMR and NQR. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    PubMed

    Augustine, M P; TonThat, D M; Clarke, J

    1998-03-01

    The dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order 1 muphi0 Hz(-1/2) at liquid helium temperatures. Here phi0 = h/2e is the flux quantum. In our NMR or NQR spectrometer, a niobium wire coil wrapped around the sample is coupled to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned input circuit the SQUID measures the flux, rather than the rate of change of flux, and thus retains its high sensitivity down to arbitrarily low frequencies. This feature is exploited in a cw spectrometer that monitors the change in the static magnetization of a sample induced by radio frequency irradiation. Examples of this technique are the detection of NQR in 27Al in sapphire and 11B in boron nitride, and a level crossing technique to enhance the signal of 14N in peptides. Research is now focused on a SQUID-based spectrometer for pulsed NQR and NMR, which has a bandwidth of 0-5 MHz. This spectrometer is used with spin-echo techniques to measure the NQR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of 14N in NH4ClO4, 63+/-6 ms and 22+/-2 ms, respectively. With the aid of two-frequency pulses to excite the 359 kHz and 714 kHz resonances in ruby simultaneously, it is possible to obtain a two-dimensional NQR spectrum. As a third example, the pulsed spectrometer is used to study NMR spectrum of 129Xe after polariza-tion with optically pumped Rb. The NMR line can be detected at frequencies as low as 200 Hz. At fields below about 2 mT the longitudinal relaxation time saturates at about 2000 s. Two recent experiments in other laboratories have extended these pulsed NMR techniques to higher temperatures and smaller samples. In the first, images were obtained of mineral oil floating on water at room temperature. In the second, a SQUID configured as a thin film gradiometer was used to detect NMR in a 50 microm particle of 195Pt at 6 mT and 4.2 K. PMID:9650797

  2. Deuterium Exchange Kinetics by NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment which allows such concepts as kinetics, catalysis, isotope shifts, coupling constants, and the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for quantitative work to be covered in the same exercise. Background information, experimental procedures used, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  3. Petrophysical applications of NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, W.P.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    A system for obtaining high-resolution NMR images of oil field cores is described. Separate proton density and T/sub 2/ relaxation images are obtained to distinguish spatial variations of fluid-filled porosity and the physical nature of the pores. Results are presented for typical sandstones.

  4. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  5. Confirming the 3D Solution Structure of a Short Double-Stranded DNA Sequence Using NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruhayel, Rasha A.; Berners-Price, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    2D [superscript 1]H NOESY NMR spectroscopy is routinely used to give information on the closeness of hydrogen atoms through space. This work is based on a 2D [superscript 1]H NOESY NMR spectrum of a 12 base-pair DNA duplex. This 6-h laboratory workshop aims to provide advanced-level chemistry students with a basic, yet solid, understanding of how…

  6. New insights into the bonding arrangements of L- and D-glutamates from solid state 17O NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, V.; Pike, K. J.; Watts, A.; Anupold, T.; Samoson, A.; Smith, M. E.; Dupree, R.

    2003-03-01

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) from L- and D-glutamic acid-HCl at 14.1 T produces highly structured and very similar NMR spectra. Lines from all 4 oxygen sites are readily distinguished and assigned. These 17O NMR spectra are very different from the previously reported 17O spectrum of the D, L-form presumably because that was a racemic crystal. 17O NMR from L-monosodium glutamate-HCl is very different again requiring the application of double angle rotation and 3 quantum MAS NMR to provide resolution of 5 different sites. Hence high resolution 17O solid state NMR techniques offer possible new insight into biochemical bonding processes.

  7. Graphical interpretation of Boolean operators for protein NMR assignments.

    PubMed

    Verdegem, Dries; Dijkstra, Klaas; Hanoulle, Xavier; Lippens, Guy

    2008-09-01

    We have developed a graphics based algorithm for semi-automated protein NMR assignments. Using the basic sequential triple resonance assignment strategy, the method is inspired by the Boolean operators as it applies "AND"-, "OR"- and "NOT"-like operations on planes pulled out of the classical three-dimensional spectra to obtain its functionality. The method's strength lies in the continuous graphical presentation of the spectra, allowing both a semi-automatic peaklist construction and sequential assignment. We demonstrate here its general use for the case of a folded protein with a well-dispersed spectrum, but equally for a natively unfolded protein where spectral resolution is minimal. PMID:18762868

  8. Proton zero-quantum 2D NMR of 2-propenenitrile aligned by an electric field. Determination of the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruessink, B. H.; De Kanter, F. J. J.; MaClean, C.

    Zero-quantum NMR, selectively detected by 2D NMR, is applied to observe small 1H- 1H dipolar couplings in a polar liquid partially oriented by a strong electric field. The normal (single-quantum) 1H spectrum is severely broadened, which prevents the observation of small couplings. The results from the zero-quantum proton spectrum are used to calculate the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants of 2-deutero-2-propenenitrile from the 2H and 14N NMR spectra.

  9. Distortions of ethyne when complexed with a cuprous or argentous halide: the rotational spectrum of C2H2CuF.

    PubMed

    Zaleski, Daniel P; Stephens, Susanna L; Tew, David P; Bittner, Dror M; Walker, Nicholas R; Legon, Anthony C

    2015-07-15

    A new molecule C2H2CuF has been synthesized in the gas phase by means of the reaction of laser-ablated metallic copper with a pulse of gas consisting of a dilute mixture of ethyne and sulfur hexafluoride in argon. The ground-state rotational spectrum was detected by two types of Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy, namely that conducted in a microwave Fabry-Perot cavity and the chirped-pulse broadband technique. The spectroscopic constants of the six isotopologues (12)C2H2(63)Cu(19)F, (12)C2H2(65)Cu(19)F, (13)C2H2(63)Cu(19)F, (13)C2H2(65)Cu(19)F, (12)C2D2(63)Cu(19)F and (12)C2D2(65)Cu(19)F were determined and interpreted to show that the molecule has a planar, T-shaped geometry belonging to the molecular point group C2v, with CuF forming the stem of the T. Quantitative interpretation reveals that the ethyne molecule is distorted when subsumed into the complex in such manner that the C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C bond lengthens (by δr) and the two H atoms cease to be collinear with the C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C internuclear line. The H atoms move symmetrically away from the approaching Cu atom of CuF, to increase each *[triple bond, length as m-dash]C-H angle by δA = 14.65(2)°, from 180° to 194.65(2)°. Ab initio calculations at the explicitly-correlated level of theory CCSD(T)(F12*)/aug-cc-pVTZ lead to good agreement with the experimental geometry. It is shown that similar distortions δr and δA, similarly determined, for four complexes C2H2MX (M = Cu or Ag; X = F, Cl or CCH) are approximately linearly related to the energies De for the dissociation process C2H2MX = C2H2 + MX. PMID:26134582

  10. Study of chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 ions in [N(CH3)4]2ZnBr4 near the phase transition temperature using 1H MAS NMR, 13C CP/MAS NMR, and 14N NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-02-01

    The temperature dependences of the chemical shifts and intensities of 1H, 13C, and 14N nuclei in tetramethylammonium tetrabromozincate, [N(CH3)4]2ZnBr4, were investigated using single-crystal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to elucidate the structural geometry near the phase transition temperature. Based on the analysis of the 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR and 14N NMR spectra, the two chemically inequivalent N(1) (CH3)4 and N(2) (CH3)4 ions were distinguished. Furthermore, the 14N NMR spectrum at the phase transition temperature indicated the existence of the ferroelastic characteristics of the N(CH3)4 ions.

  11. High-resolution iterative frequency identification for NMR as a general strategy for multidimensional data collection.

    PubMed

    Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Hallenga, Klaas; Markley, John L

    2005-09-14

    We describe a novel approach to the rapid collection and processing of multidimensional NMR data: "high-resolution iterative frequency identification for NMR" (HIFI-NMR). As with other reduced dimensionality approaches, HIFI-NMR collects n-dimensional data as a set of two-dimensional (2D) planes. The HIFI-NMR algorithm incorporates several innovative features. (1) Following the initial collection of two orthogonal 2D planes, tilted planes are selected adaptively, one-by-one. (2) Spectral space is analyzed in a rigorous statistical manner. (3) An online algorithm maintains a model that provides a probabilistic representation of the three-dimensional (3D) peak positions, derives the optimal angle for the next plane to be collected, and stops data collection when the addition of another plane would not improve the data model. (4) A robust statistical algorithm extracts information from the plane projections and is used to drive data collection. (5) Peak lists with associated probabilities are generated directly, without total reconstruction of the 3D spectrum; these are ready for use in subsequent assignment or structure determination steps. As a proof of principle, we have tested the approach with 3D triple-resonance experiments of the kind used to assign protein backbone and side-chain resonances. Peaks extracted automatically by HIFI-NMR, for both small and larger proteins, included approximately 98% of real peaks obtained from control experiments in which data were collected by conventional 3D methods. HIFI-NMR required about one-tenth the time for data collection and avoided subsequent data processing and peak-picking. The approach can be implemented on commercial NMR spectrometers and is extensible to higher-dimensional NMR. PMID:16144400

  12. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  13. Metabolic engineering applications of in vivo sup 31 P and sup 13 C NMR studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Shanks, J.V.

    1989-01-01

    With intent to quantify NMR measurements as much as possible, analysis techniques of the in vivo {sup 31}P NMR spectrum are developed. A systematic procedure is formulated for estimating the relative intracellular concentrations of the sugar phosphates in S. cerevisiae from the {sup 31}P NMR spectrum. In addition, in vivo correlation of inorganic phosphate chemical shift with the chemical shifts of 3-phosphoglycerate, {beta}-fructose 1,6-diphosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, and glucose 6-phosphate are determined. Also, a method was developed for elucidation of the cytoplasmic and vacuolar components of inorganic phosphate in the {sup 31}P NMR spectrum of S. cerevisiae. An in vivo correlation relating the inorganic phosphate chemical shift of the vacuole with the chemical shift of the resonance for pyrophosphate and the terminal phosphate of polyphosphate (PP{sub 1}) is established. Transient measurements provided by {sup 31}P NMR are applied to reg1 mutant and standard strains. {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C NMR measurements are used to analyze the performance of recombinant strains in which the glucose phosphorylation step had been altered.

  14. Cathodoluminescence Spectrum Imaging Software

    2011-04-07

    The software developed for spectrum imaging is applied to the analysis of the spectrum series generated by our cathodoluminescence instrumentation. This software provides advanced processing capabilities s such: reconstruction of photon intensity (resolved in energy) and photon energy maps, extraction of the spectrum from selected areas, quantitative imaging mode, pixel-to-pixel correlation spectrum line scans, ASCII, output, filling routines, drift correction, etc.

  15. Solution NMR of large molecules and assemblies†

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Mark P.; McElroy, Craig A.; Amero, Carlos D.

    2008-01-01

    Solution NMR spectroscopy represents a powerful tool for examining the structure and function of biological macromolecules. The advent of multidimensional (2D–4D) NMR, together with the widespread use of uniform isotopic labeling of proteins and RNA with the NMR-active isotopes, 15N and 13C, opened the door to detailed analyses of macromolecular structure, dynamics and interactions of smaller macromolecules (< ~25 kDa). Over the past 10 years, advances in NMR and isotope labeling methods have expanded the range of NMR-tractable targets by at least an order of magnitude. Here we briefly describe the methodological advances that allow NMR spectroscopy of large macromolecules and their complexes, and provide a perspective on the wide range of applications of NMR to biochemical problems. PMID:17209543

  16. Structure and Mechanism of Beta-Hairpin Antimicrobial Peptides in Lipid Bilayers from Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ming; Hong, Mei

    2010-01-01

    The membrane-bound structure, lipid interaction, and dynamics of the arginine-rich β-hairpin antimicrobial peptide PG-1 as studied by solid-state NMR is highlighted here. A variety of solid-state NMR techniques, including paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, 1H and 19F spin diffusion, dipolar recoupling distance experiments, and 2D anisotropic-isotropic correlation experiments, are used to elucidate the structural basis for the membrane disruptive activity of this representative β-hairpin antimicrobial peptide. We found that PG-1 structure is membrane dependent: in bacteria-mimetic anionic lipid membranes the peptide forms oligomeric transmembrane β-barrels, whereas in cholesterol-rich membranes mimicking eukaryotic cells the peptide forms β-sheet aggregates on the surface of the bilayer. PG-1 causes toroidal pore defects in the anionic membrane, suggesting that the cationic arginine residues drag the lipid phosphate groups along as the peptide inserts. Mutation of PG-1 to reduce the number of cationic residues or to change the arginine guanidinium structure significantly changes the degree of insertion and orientation of the peptide in the lipid membrane, resulting in much weaker antimicrobial activities. PMID:19396367

  17. Two-dimensional NMR spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, T.C.

    1987-06-01

    This article is the second in a two-part series. In part one (ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, May 15) the authors discussed one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and some relatively advanced nuclear spin gymnastics experiments that provide a capability for selective sensitivity enhancements. In this article and overview and some applications of two-dimensional NMR experiments are presented. These powerful experiments are important complements to the one-dimensional experiments. As in the more sophisticated one-dimensional experiments, the two-dimensional experiments involve three distinct time periods: a preparation period, t/sub 0/; an evolution period, t/sub 1/; and a detection period, t/sub 2/.

  18. NMR investigation of Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwanghyo; Jang, Zeehoon

    2013-01-01

    109Ag nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and relaxation measurements have been performed on two powder samples of Ag nanoparticles with average sizes of 20 nm and 80 nm. The measurements have been done in an external field of 9.4 T and in the temperature range 10 K < T < 280 K. The 109Ag NMR spectra for both samples have close to Lorentzian shapes and turn out to be mixtures of homogeneous and inhomogeneous lines. The linewidth Δ ν at room temperature is 1.3 kHz for both samples and gradually increases with decreasing temperature. Both the Knight shift ( K) and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/ T 1) are observed to be almost identical to the values reported for the bulk Ag metal, whereby the Korringa ratio R(= K 2 T 1 T/S) is found to be 2.0 for both samples in the investigated temperature range.

  19. REDOR NMR for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-01-01

    Rotational-Echo DOuble-Resonance (REDOR) NMR is a powerful and versatile solid-state NMR measurement that has been recruited to elucidate drug modes of action and to drive the design of new therapeutics. REDOR has been implemented to examine composition, structure, and dynamics in diverse macromolecular and whole-cell systems, including taxol-bound microtubules, enzyme-cofactor-inhibitor ternary complexes, and antibiotic-whole-cell complexes. The REDOR approach involves the integrated design of specific isotopic labeling strategies and the selection of appropriate REDOR experiments. By way of example, this digest illustrates the versatility of the REDOR approach, with an emphasis on the practical considerations of experimental design and data interpretation. PMID:24035486

  20. NMR Hyperpolarization Techniques for Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in NMR hyperpolarization have enabled a wide array of new in vivo molecular imaging modalities—ranging from functional imaging of the lungs to metabolic imaging of cancer. This Concept article explores selected advances in methods for the preparation and use of hyperpolarized contrast agents, many of which are already at or near the phase of their clinical validation in patients. PMID:25470566

  1. Measurement of deformations by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytchenkoff, Dimitri; Rodts, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Two NMR data acquisition protocols together with corresponding data processing algorithms for locating macroscopic objects, measuring distances between them or monitoring their displacements or deformations with microscopic precision are presented and discussed. The performance of the methods is demonstrated by applying them to the measurement of deformations of a freely supported beam under loading. We believe that our methods will find their applications in mechanics, civil engineering and medicine.

  2. Solution NMR of polypeptides hyperpolarized by dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Ragavan, Mukundan; Chen, Hsueh-Ying; Sekar, Giridhar; Hilty, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Hyperpolarization of nuclear spins through techniques such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can greatly increase the signal-to-noise ratio in NMR measurements, thus eliminating the need for signal averaging. This enables the study of many dynamic processes which would otherwise not be amenable to study by NMR spectroscopy. A report of solid- to liquid-state DNP of a short peptide, bacitracin A, as well as of a full-length protein, L23, is presented here. The polypeptides are hyperpolarized at low temperature and dissolved for NMR signal acquisition in the liquid state in mixtures of organic solvent and water. Signal enhancements of 300-2000 are obtained in partially deuterated polypeptide when hyperpolarized on (13)C and of 30-180 when hyperpolarized on (1)H. A simulated spectrum is used to identify different resonances in the hyperpolarized (13)C spectra, and the relation between observed signal enhancement for various groups in the protein and relaxation parameters measured from the hyperpolarized samples is discussed. Thus far, solid- to liquid-state DNP has been used in conjunction with small molecules. The results presented here, however, demonstrate the feasibility of hyperpolarizing larger proteins, with potential applications toward the study of protein folding or macromolecular interactions. PMID:21651293

  3. Improved spin-echo-edited NMR diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Otto, W H; Larive, C K

    2001-12-01

    The need for simple and robust schemes for the analysis of ligand-protein binding has resulted in the development of diffusion-based NMR techniques that can be used to assay binding in protein solutions containing a mixture of several ligands. As a means of gaining spectral selectivity in NMR diffusion measurements, a simple experiment, the gradient modified spin-echo (GOSE), has been developed to reject the resonances of coupled spins and detect only the singlets in the (1)H NMR spectrum. This is accomplished by first using a spin echo to null the resonances of the coupled spins. Following the spin echo, the singlet magnetization is flipped out of the transverse plane and a dephasing gradient is applied to reduce the spectral artifacts resulting from incomplete cancellation of the J-coupled resonances. The resulting modular sequence is combined here with the BPPSTE pulse sequence; however, it could be easily incorporated into any pulse sequence where additional spectral selectivity is desired. Results obtained with the GOSE-BPPSTE pulse sequence are compared with those obtained with the BPPSTE and CPMG-BPPSTE experiments for a mixture containing the ligands resorcinol and tryptophan in a solution of human serum albumin. PMID:11740906

  4. Classification of commercial Catuaba samples by NMR, HPLC and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Daolio, Cristina; Beltrame, Flávio L; Ferreira, Antonio G; Cass, Quezia B; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia; Ferreira, Márcia M C

    2008-01-01

    For over a century, Catuaba has been used in Brazilian folk medicine as an aphrodisiac even though the identity of the plant material employed is often uncertain. The species recommended by the Brazilian Pharmacopeia is Anemopaegma arvense (Bignoniaceae), but many other plants, regionally known as Catuaba, are commercialised. Frequently, the quality control of such a complex system is based on chemical markers that do not supply a general idea of the system. With the advent of the metabolomics approach, a global analysis of samples becomes possible. It appears that (1)H-NMR is the most useful method for such application, since it can be used as a wide-spectrum chemical analysis technique. Unfortunately, the generated spectra is complex so a possible approach is to look at the metabolite profile as a whole using multivariate methods, for example, by application of principal component analysis (PCA). In the present paper, we describe for the first time a proton high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-HR-MAS NMR) method coupled with PCA for the metabolomic analysis of some commercial Catuaba samples, which provided a reduction in the time required for such analysis. A comparative study of HPLC, HR-MAS and liquid-NMR techniques is also reported. PMID:17890569

  5. NMR studies of magnetic properties in Heusler-type Mn 3 Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, H.; Yogi, M.; Nakamura, S.; Uechi, A.; Tomiyoshi, S.

    2013-05-01

    In order to microscopically investigate the magnetic properties of both paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases in Mn3Si ( T N = 23 K), the 55Mn NMR has been carried out at temperatures between 2.2 K and 300 K. The temperature dependences of the spectrum, Knight shift (or resonance frequency shift) and spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 of 55Mn NMR have been measured. In the paramagnetic phase, only one resonance spectrum can be obtained. The observed spectrum is identified to be a signal corresponding to the Mn(II) site. In the antiferromagnetic phase, two different spectra corresponding to the Mn(I) and Mn(II) sites are found at the resonance frequencies of 145 and 6 MHz, respectively, by the zero field NMR at 4.2 K. From these results, the internal magnetic fields on the 55Mn(I) and 55Mn(II) nuclei are found to be 13.6 and 0.6 T, respectively. According to the NMR results, the helical structure in incommensurate Mn spin states is better explained compared with the transverse sinusoidal structure.

  6. Solid-State NMR Investigations of the Immobilization of a BF4 Salt of a Palladium(II) Complex on Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Wiench, Jerzy W.; Michon, Christophe; Ellern, Arkady; Hazendonk, Paul; Iuga, Adriana; Angelici, Robert J.; Pruski, Marek

    2009-08-03

    The structure of the silica supported palladium(II) complex [Pd(dppp)(S{sub 2}C-NEt{sub 2})]BF{sub 4} (abbreviated as [Pd(dppp)(dtc)]BF{sub 4}, where dppp is Ph{sub 2}P(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}PPh{sub 2}) and interactions between the [Pd(dppp)(dtc)]{sup +} cation, the BF{sub 4}{sup -} anion, and the silica surface are studied using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The unsupported, crystalline form of [Pd(dppp)(dtc)]BF{sub 4} is also investigated, both by X-ray diffraction and NMR. The structures of the cation and anion are found to be essentially the same in both unsupported and supported complex. The [Pd(dppp)(dtc)]BF{sub 4} loading has been determined by quantitative measurements of {sup 11}B, {sup 19}F, and {sup 31}P intensities, whereas the arrangement of anions and cations on the surface of silica has been established by two-dimensional heteronuclear correlation experiments involving {sup 1}H, {sup 11}B, {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F, {sup 29}Si, and {sup 31}P nuclei. At low coverages, the [Pd(dppp)(dtc)]{sup +} cations are located near the BF{sub 4}{sup -} anions, which in turn are immobilized directly on the surface near the Q{sup 4} sites. At higher loadings, which in this study corresponded to 0.06-0.15 mmol/g, the complexes stack on top of each other, despite the fact that the directly adsorbed molecules take up less than 10% of the silica surface. The relevance of these findings to heterogeneous catalysis is discussed.

  7. High-resolution heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Huang, Yuqing; Smith, Pieter E. S.; Wang, Kaiyu; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy is an extremely powerful tool for determining the structures of organic molecules and is of particular significance in the structural analysis of proteins. In order to leverage the method’s potential for structural investigations, obtaining high-resolution NMR spectra is essential and this is generally accomplished by using very homogeneous magnetic fields. However, there are several situations where magnetic field distortions and thus line broadening is unavoidable, for example, the samples under investigation may be inherently heterogeneous, and the magnet’s homogeneity may be poor. This line broadening can hinder resonance assignment or even render it impossible. We put forth a new class of pulse sequences for obtaining high-resolution heteronuclear spectra in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations based on distant dipolar field modulations. This strategy’s capabilities are demonstrated with the acquisition of high-resolution 2D gHSQC and gHMBC spectra. These sequences’ performances are evaluated on the basis of their sensitivities and acquisition efficiencies. Moreover, we show that by encoding and decoding NMR observables spatially, as is done in ultrafast NMR, an extra dimension containing J-coupling information can be obtained without increasing the time necessary to acquire a heteronuclear correlation spectrum. Since the new sequences relax magnetic field homogeneity constraints imposed upon high-resolution NMR, they may be applied in portable NMR sensors and studies of heterogeneous chemical and biological materials.

  8. The Kinetics of Dissociations of Aluminum - Oxygen Bonds in Aqueous Complexes - An NMR Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. William Casey

    2003-09-03

    OAK B262 The Kinetics of Dissociations of Aluminum--Oxygen Bonds in Aqueous Complexes--An NMR Study. In this project we determined rates and mechanisms of Al(III)-O bond rupture at mineral surfaces and in dissolved aluminum complexes. We then compared the experimental results to simulations in an attempt to predict rate coefficients. Most of the low-temperature reactions that are geochemically important involve a bonded atom or molecule that is replaced with another. We probe these reactions at the most fundamental level in order to establish a model to predict rates for the wide range of reactions that cannot be experimentally studied. The chemistry of small aluminum cluster (Figure) provides a window into the hydrolytic processes that control rates of mineral formation and the transformation of adsorbates into extended structures. The molecule shown below as an example exposes several types of oxygens to the bulk solution including seven structurally distinct sets of bridging hydroxyls. This molecule is a rich model for the aqueous interface of aluminum (hydr)oxide minerals, since it approaches colloidal dimensions in size, yet is a dissolved complex with +18 charge. We have conducted both {sup 17}O- {sup 27}Al- and {sup 19}F-NMR experiments to identify the reactive sites and to determine the rates of isotopic exchange between these sites and the bulk solution. The research was enormously successful and led to a series of papers that are being used as touchstones for assessing the accuracy of computer models of bond ruptures in water.

  9. Fruit juice authentication by 1H NMR spectroscopy in combination with different chemometrics tools.

    PubMed

    Cuny, M; Vigneau, E; Le Gall, G; Colquhoun, I; Lees, M; Rutledge, D N

    2008-01-01

    To discriminate orange juice from grapefruit juice in a context of fraud prevention, (1)H NMR data were submitted to different treatments to extract informative variables which were then analysed using multivariate techniques. Averaging contiguous data points of the spectrum followed by logarithmic transformation improved the results of the data analysis. Moreover, supervised variable selection methods gave better rates of classification of the juices into the correct groups. Last, independent-component analysis gave better classification results than principal-component analysis. Hence, ICA may be an efficient chemometric tool to detect differences in the (1)H NMR spectra of similar samples, and so may be useful for authentication of foods. PMID:18026939

  10. Thin film NMR T1 measurement by MRFM using cyclic adiabatic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sungmin; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Won, Soonho

    2014-03-01

    We obtained the NMR spectrum and the spin lattice relaxation time (T1) for thin film samples using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM). The samples were Alq3, which is widely used as an organic light emitting diode (OLED), thin films of 150 nm thick and a bulk crystal. T1 was measured by using the cyclic adiabatic inversion method at a fixed frequency of 297 MHz and at 12 K. To confirm the reliability of our measurement technique we compared the result with that obtained by conventional NMR method. T1 of thin film samples was measured and compared with that of the bulk sample. thin film, MRFM.

  11. Fast multi-dimensional NMR acquisition and processing using the sparse FFT.

    PubMed

    Hassanieh, Haitham; Mayzel, Maxim; Shi, Lixin; Katabi, Dina; Orekhov, Vladislav Yu

    2015-09-01

    Increasing the dimensionality of NMR experiments strongly enhances the spectral resolution and provides invaluable direct information about atomic interactions. However, the price tag is high: long measurement times and heavy requirements on the computation power and data storage. We introduce sparse fast Fourier transform as a new method of NMR signal collection and processing, which is capable of reconstructing high quality spectra of large size and dimensionality with short measurement times, faster computations than the fast Fourier transform, and minimal storage for processing and handling of sparse spectra. The new algorithm is described and demonstrated for a 4D BEST-HNCOCA spectrum. PMID:26123316

  12. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm2 silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  13. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-08-19

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm(2) silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  14. Advanced NMR technology for bioscience and biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Hernandez, G.; Trewhella, J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Boumenthal, D.K.; Kennedy, M.A.; Moore, G.J.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NMR plays critical roles in bioscience and biotechnology in both imaging and structure determination. NMR is limited, however, by the inherent low sensitivity of the NMR experiment and the demands for spectral resolution required to study biomolecules. The authors addressed both of these issues by working on the development of NMR force microscopy for molecular imaging, and high field NMR with isotope labeling to overcome limitations in the size of biomolecules that can be studied using NMR. A novel rf coil design for NMR force microscopy was developed that increases the limits of sensitivity in magnetic resonance detection for imaging, and the authors demonstrated sub-surface spatial imaging capabilities. The authors also made advances in the miniaturization of two critical NMR force microscope components. They completed high field NMR and isotope labeling studies of a muscle protein complex which is responsible for regulating muscle contraction and is too large for study using conventional NMR approaches.

  15. The Use of Dodecylphosphocholine Micelles in Solution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallick, D. A.; Tessmer, M. R.; Watts, C. R.; Li, C. Y.

    Dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles are useful as a model membrane system for solution NMR. Several new observations on dodecylphosphocholine micelles and their interactions with opioid peptides are described. The optimal lipid concentration has been investigated for small peptide NMR studies in DPC micelles for two opioid peptides, a 5-mer and a 17-mer. In contrast to reports in the literature, identical 2D spectra have been observed at low and high lipid concentrations. The chemical shift of resolved peptide proton resonances has been followed as a function of added lipid and indicates that there are changes in the chemical shifts above the critical micelle concentration and up to a ratio of 7:1 (lipid:peptide) for the 17-mer, and 9.6:1 for the 5-mer. These results suggest that conformational changes occur in the peptide significantly above the critical micelle concentration, up to a lipid:peptide ratio which is dependent upon the peptide, here ranging from 7:1 to 9.6:1. To address the stoichiometry more directly, the diffusion coefficients of the lipid alone and the lipid with peptide have been measured using pulsed-field gradient spin-echo NMR experiments. These data have been used to calculate the hydrodynamic radius and the aggregation number of the micelle with and without peptide and show that the aggregation number of the peptide-lipid complex increases at high lipid concentrations without a concomitant change in the peptide conformation. Last, several protonated impurities have been observed in the commercial preparation of DPC which resonate in the amide proton region of the NMR spectrum. These results are significant for researchers using DPC micelles and illustrate that both care in sample preparation and the stoichiometry are important issues with the use of DPC as a model membrane.

  16. Dynamic processes and chemical composition of Lepidium sativum seeds determined by means of field-cycling NMR relaxometry and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rachocki, A; Latanowicz, L; Tritt-Goc, J

    2012-12-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as field-cycling relaxometry, wide-line NMR spectroscopy, and magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, were applied to study the seeds of cress, Lepidium sativum. Field-cycling NMR relaxometry was used for the first time to investigate the properties of the whole molecular system of dry cress seeds. This method not only allowed the dynamics to be studied, but was also successful in the differentiation among the solid (i.e., carbohydrates, proteins, or fats forming a solid form of lipids) and liquid-like (oil compounds) components of the seeds. The (1)H NMR relaxation dispersion of oils was interpreted as a superposition of intramolecular and intermolecular contributions. The intramolecular part was described in terms of a Lorentzian spectral density function, whereas a log-Gaussian distribution of correlation times was applied for the intermolecular dipole-dipole contribution. The models applied led to very good agreement with the experimental data and demonstrate that the contribution of the intermolecular relaxation to the overall relaxation should not be disregarded, especially at low frequencies. A power-law frequency dependence of the proton relaxation dispersion was used for the interpretation of the solid components. From the analysis of the (1)H wide-line NMR spectra of the liquid-like component of hydrated cress seeds, we can conclude that the contribution of oil protons should always be taken into account when evaluating the spin-lattice relaxation times values or measuring the moisture and oil content. The application of (1)H magic angle spinning NMR significantly improves resolution in the liquid-like spectrum of seeds and allows the determination of the chemical composition of cress seeds. PMID:23001307

  17. High-Resolution Iterative Frequency Identification for NMR as a General Strategy for Multidimensional Data Collection

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Hallenga, Klaas; Markley, John L.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel approach to the rapid collection and processing of multidimensional NMR data: “high-resolution iterative frequency identification for NMR” (HIFI–NMR). As with other reduced dimensionality approaches, HIFI–NMR collects n-dimensional data as a set of two-dimensional (2D) planes. The HIFI–NMR algorithm incorporates several innovative features. (1) Following the initial collection of two orthogonal 2D planes, tilted planes are selected adaptively, one-by-one. (2) Spectral space is analyzed in a rigorous statistical manner. (3) An online algorithm maintains a model that provides a probabilistic representation of the three-dimensional (3D) peak positions, derives the optimal angle for the next plane to be collected, and stops data collection when the addition of another plane would not improve the data model. (4) A robust statistical algorithm extracts information from the plane projections and is used to drive data collection. (5) Peak lists with associated probabilities are generated directly, without total reconstruction of the 3D spectrum; these are ready for use in subsequent assignment or structure determination steps. As a proof of principle, we have tested the approach with 3D triple-resonance experiments of the kind used to assign protein backbone and side-chain resonances. Peaks extracted automatically by HIFI–NMR, for both small and larger proteins, included ~98% of real peaks obtained from control experiments in which data were collected by conventional 3D methods. HIFI–NMR required about one-tenth the time for data collection and avoided subsequent data processing and peak-picking. The approach can be implemented on commercial NMR spectrometers and is extensible to higher-dimensional NMR. PMID:16144400

  18. Development of LC-13C NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, H. C.; Wang, J. S.; Glass, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    This study involves the development of C-13 nuclear resonance as an on-line detector for liquid chromatography (LC-C-13 NMR) for the chemical characterization of aviation fuels. The initial focus of this study was the development of a high sensitivity flow C-13 NMR probe. Since C-13 NMR sensitivity is of paramount concern, considerable effort during the first year was directed at new NMR probe designs. In particular, various toroid coil designs were examined. In addition, corresponding shim coils for correcting the main magnetic field (B sub 0) homogeneity were examined. Based on these initial probe design studies, an LC-C-13 NMR probe was built and flow C-13 NMR data was obtained for a limited number of samples.

  19. Pseudogap in Fe2VGa: NMR evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, C. S.; Ross, Joseph H.

    2001-02-01

    We report the results of a 51V and 69Ga nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of Fe2VGa at temperatures between 4 and 450 K. The presence of magnetic antisite defects is deduced from the NMR linewidth, which displays a Curie-law temperature dependence. The absence of associated NMR shifts indicates the material to be intrinsically nonmagnetic. At low temperatures the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate exhibits Korringa behavior, indicating a small carrier density at the Fermi level. At elevated temperatures, the Knight shifts and NMR relaxation rates go over to a thermally activated response, a semiconductor-like behavior. These results are consistent with pseudogap features identified by recent band structure calculations. The Fermi level density of states deduced from NMR is considerably smaller than given by the specific heat coefficient, γ. The electronic properties are compared to the isostructural semimetal Fe2VAl.

  20. Autism Spectrum Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurological and developmental disorder that begins early in childhood and lasts throughout a ... and pervasive developmental disorders. It is called a "spectrum" disorder because people with ASD can have a ...

  1. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of developmental disabilities that can cause significant social, communication and behavioral ... for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental disabilities. More E-mail Your Friends "Children with autism ...

  2. Applications of NMR in Dairy Research

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Anthony D.; Rochfort, Simone J.

    2014-01-01

    NMR is a robust analytical technique that has been employed to investigate the properties of many substances of agricultural relevance. NMR was first used to investigate the properties of milk in the 1950s and has since been employed in a wide range of studies; including properties analysis of specific milk proteins to metabolomics techniques used to monitor the health of dairy cows. In this brief review, we highlight the different uses of NMR in the dairy industry. PMID:24958391

  3. Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: combining NMR with NIR, GPC/SEC and rheometry.

    PubMed

    Räntzsch, Volker; Wilhelm, Manfred; Guthausen, Gisela

    2016-06-01

    Hyphenated low-field NMR techniques are promising characterization methods for online process analytics and comprehensive offline studies of soft materials. By combining different analytical methods with low-field NMR, information on chemical and physical properties can be correlated with molecular dynamics and complementary chemical information. In this review, we present three hyphenated low-field NMR techniques: a combination of near-infrared spectroscopy and time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) relaxometry, online (1) H-NMR spectroscopy measured directly after size exclusion chromatographic (SEC, also known as GPC) separation and a combination of rheometry and TD-NMR relaxometry for highly viscous materials. Case studies are reviewed that underline the possibilities and challenges of the different hyphenated low-field NMR methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25854997

  4. Probing surface interactions by combining NMR cryoporometry and NMR relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Stark, S. C.; Strange, J. H.

    2005-06-01

    To further expand on the understanding of surface interactions at the liquid/solid interface on pore walls, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of cryoporometry and relaxometry have been combined. The combination of these techniques allows variations in NMR relaxation parameters from pore surface to volume ratio changes and from surface interaction changes to be distinguished. By studying a range of sol-gel silicas from two different sources, it was noted that the relaxation time measurements were not consistent with the pore diameters determined by cryoporometry and N2 gas adsorption. Instead distinctly different relaxivity constants were determined for each absorbate in each of the two brands of silica. It was clear that the relaxation times were modified by more than just the pore geometry. Independent experiments on the two brands of silica suggested that the relaxometry results were heavily influenced by the concentration of paramagnetic relaxation centres in the silica gels. The strength of surface interaction, and hence surface affinity, was seen to depend on the liquid in the pores. Using this difference in surface affinities, binary mixtures of alkanes placed in sol-gel silicas were separated via preferential absorption and their components identified using cryoporometry, whereas the components could not be distinguished in the bulk liquid.

  5. Spin-Exchange-Pumped NMR Gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. G.; Larsen, M. S.

    We present the basic theory governing spin-exchange pumped NMR gyros. We review the basic physics of spin-exchange collisions and relaxation as they pertain to precision NMR. We present a simple model of operation as an NMR oscillator and use it to analyze the dynamic response and noise properties of the oscillator. We discuss the primary systematic errors (differential alkali fields, quadrupole shifts, and offset drifts) that limit the bias stability, and discuss methods to minimize them. We give with a brief overview of a practical implementation and performance of an NMR gyro built by Northrop-Grumman Corporation, and conclude with some comments about future prospects.

  6. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  7. Solid-state NMR and Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2015-01-01

    The native environment for a membrane protein is a phospholipid bilayer. Because the protein is immobilized on NMR timescales by the interactions within a bilayer membrane, solid-state NMR methods are essential to obtain high-resolution spectra. Approaches have been developed for both unoriented and oriented samples, however, they all rest on the foundation of the most fundamental aspects solid-state NMR, and the chemical shift and homo- and hetero-nuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Solid-state NMR has advanced sufficiently to enable the structures of membrane proteins to be determined under near-native conditions in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:25681966

  8. NMR exposure sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ghibelli, L; Cerella, C; Cordisco, S; Clavarino, G; Marazzi, S; De Nicola, M; Nuccitelli, S; D'Alessio, M; Magrini, A; Bergamaschi, A; Guerrisi, V; Porfiri, L M

    2006-03-01

    NMR technology has dramatically contributed to the revolution of image diagnostic. NMR apparatuses use combinations of microwaves over a homogeneous strong (1 Tesla) static magnetic field. We had previously shown that low intensity (0.3-66 mT) static magnetic fields deeply affect apoptosis in a Ca2+ dependent fashion (Fanelli et al., 1999 FASEBJ., 13;95-102). The rationale of the present study is to examine whether exposure to the static magnetic fields of NMR can affect apoptosis induced on reporter tumor cells of haematopoietic origin. The impressive result was the strong increase (1.8-2.5 fold) of damage-induced apoptosis by NMR. This potentiation is due to cytosolic Ca2+ overload consequent to NMR-promoted Ca2+ influx, since it is prevented by intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca2+ chelation or by inhibition of plasma membrane L-type Ca2+ channels. Three-days follow up of treated cultures shows that NMR decrease long term cell survival, thus increasing the efficiency of cytocidal treatments. Importantly, mononuclear white blood cells are not sensitised to apoptosis by NMR, showing that NMR may increase the differential cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs on tumor vs normal cells. This strong, differential potentiating effect of NMR on tumor cell apoptosis may have important implications, being in fact a possible adjuvant for antitumor therapies. PMID:16528477

  9. Analytical Applications of NMR: Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1982-01-01

    Highlights a symposium on analytical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), discussing pulse Fourier transformation technique, two-dimensional NMR, solid state NMR, and multinuclear NMR. Includes description of ORACLE, an NMR data processing system at Syracuse University using real-time color graphics, and algorithms for…

  10. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which spectral…

  11. Improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme for (1)H and (13)C NMR Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kapaev, Roman R; Toukach, Philip V

    2015-07-21

    The improved Carbohydrate Structure Generalization Scheme has been developed for the simulation of (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra of oligo- and polysaccharides and their derivatives, including those containing noncarbohydrate constituents found in natural glycans. Besides adding the (1)H NMR calculations, we improved the accuracy and performance of prediction and optimized the mathematical model of the precision estimation. This new approach outperformed other methods of chemical shift simulation, including database-driven, neural net-based, and purely empirical methods and quantum-mechanical calculations at high theory levels. It can process structures with rarely occurring and noncarbohydrate constituents unsupported by the other methods. The algorithm is transparent to users and allows tracking used reference NMR data to original publications. It was implemented in the Glycan-Optimized Dual Empirical Spectrum Simulation (GODESS) web service, which is freely available at the platform of the Carbohydrate Structure Database (CSDB) project ( http://csdb.glycoscience.ru). PMID:26087011

  12. NMR difference spectroscopy with a dual saddle-coil difference probe.

    PubMed

    Macnaughtan, Megan A; Smith, Aaron P; Goldsbrough, Peter B; Santini, Robert E; Raftery, Daniel

    2004-03-01

    A new difference probe for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented. The difference probe uses two saddle-shaped coils to excite and detect two samples simultaneously. The samples are held in a specially modified 3-mm NMR tube with an Ultem plastic disk to separate the samples. The probe's resonant circuit contains two crossed diodes that passively switch the relative phase of each coil during the NMR experiment. The result is a difference spectrum from the two samples. The degree of cancellation of common signals was determined to be approximately 90%, and the application of the probe to relaxation-edited difference spectroscopy for identifying protein-ligand interactions was demonstrated using glutathione and glutathione S-transferase binding protein. PMID:15214412

  13. Spin fluctuations in La2-xSrxCuO4: NMR versus inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzykin, V.; Pines, D.; Thelen, D.

    1994-12-01

    We use a one-component description to analyze the current experimental situation for the low-frequency magnetic properties of La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 as determined by NMR and neutron-scattering experiments. We show that the measured 17O spin-lattice relaxation rate is in sharp conflict with the incommensurate-magnetic-structure interpretation of neutron-scattering experiments, but is quantitatively explained if the local-spin-fluctuation spectrum (measured by NMR) possesses a commensurate peak. We conclude that the formation of domains, as suggested by Slichter and Phillips, represents the best (and, quite possibly, only) way of reconciling NMR and neutron-scattering experiments on La1.85Sr0.15CuO4.

  14. Protein–RNA specificity by high-throughput principal component analysis of NMR spectra

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Katherine M.; Oregioni, Alain; Robertson, Laura E.; Kelly, Geoff; Ramos, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Defining the RNA target selectivity of the proteins regulating mRNA metabolism is a key issue in RNA biology. Here we present a novel use of principal component analysis (PCA) to extract the RNA sequence preference of RNA binding proteins. We show that PCA can be used to compare the changes in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of a protein upon binding a set of quasi-degenerate RNAs and define the nucleobase specificity. We couple this application of PCA to an automated NMR spectra recording and processing protocol and obtain an unbiased and high-throughput NMR method for the analysis of nucleobase preference in protein–RNA interactions. We test the method on the RNA binding domains of three important regulators of RNA metabolism. PMID:25586222

  15. Diamagnetic lanthanide tris beta-diketonates as organic-soluble chiral NMR shift reagents.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Thomas J; Wenzel, Bradford T

    2009-01-01

    Diamagnetic lanthanium(III) and lutetium(III) tris beta-diketonate complexes of 3-(trifluoroacetyl)-d-camphor, 3-(heptafluorobutyryl)-d-camphor, and d,d-dicampholylmethane are shown to be effective chiral NMR shift reagents for determining the enantiomeric purity of compounds with hard Lewis base functional groups. These include substrates with amine, alcohol, epoxide, sulfoxide, and oxaxolidine moieties. Enantiomeric discrimination is observed in the (1)H NMR spectrum. Diamagnetic lanthanide complexes represent an alternative to paramagnetic varieties that often cause too much line broadening in the NMR spectra. The choice of which metal to use varies with substrate. Similarly, there is no consistent trend with ligand as not one of the complexes is consistently better than the others for all substrates. The enantiomeric discrimination also varies with solvent. Comparisons show that the chiral recognition was usually larger in benzene-d(6) than in chloroform-d or cyclohexane-d(12). PMID:18506837

  16. Magnetic susceptibility effects on 13C MAS NMR spectra of carbon materials and graphite.

    PubMed

    Freita, J C; Emmerich, F G; Cernicchiaro, G R; Sampaio, L C; Bonagamba, T J

    2001-01-01

    13C high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to study carbon materials prepared through the thermal decomposition of four different organic precursors (rice hulls, endocarp of babassu coconut, peat, and PVC). For heat treatment temperatures (HTTs) above about 600 C, all materials presented 13C NMR spectra composed of a unique resonance line associated with carbon atoms in aromatic planes. With increasing HTT a continuous broadening of this resonance and a diamagnetic shift in its central frequency were verified for all samples. The evolution of the magnitude and anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of the heat-treated carbon samples with HTT explains well these findings. It is shown that these results are better understood when a comparison is made with the features of the 13C NMR spectrum of polycrystalline graphite, for which the magnetic susceptibility effect is also present and is much more pronounced. PMID:11529420

  17. Verwey transition of nano-sized magnetite crystals investigated by 57Fe NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sumin; Choi, Baek Soon; Lee, Soon Chil; Hong, Jaeyoung; Lee, Jisoo; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Taehun; Jeong, Jaehong; Park, Je-Geun

    It is well known that magnetite crystals undergo a metal-insulator transition at the Verwey transition temperature, TV = 123 K. In this work, we studied the Verwey transition of nano-sized crystals with 57Fe NMR. In the metallic state above Tv, the NMR spectrum shows a single sharp peak, which broadens below TV indicating the Verwey transition. We measured the spectra of the nano-crystals with radii of 16 nm, 25 nm, and 40 nm and compared with that of a bulk. The transition temperature obtained from the NMR spectra depends on both the crystal size and crystallinity. When the crystal size decreases from bulk to 16 nm, the transition temperature drops from 123 K to 100 K. The transition temperature of the samples kept dry air decrease due to aging.

  18. 103Rh-NMR studies in the superconductor Rh17S15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Kanda, K.; Ueda, K.; Mito, T.; Kohara, T.; Nakamura, H.

    2010-01-01

    103Rh nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements have been performed in the superconductor Rh17S15 with the transition temperature TC=5.4 K. The observed 103Rh-NMR spectrum shows an asymmetric shape with several peaks, reflecting the local symmetry around each Rh site. We have identified the observed NMR lines corresponding to four different Rh sites and obtained the temperature (T) dependence of the Knight shift of 24m site. The isotropic part of the Knight shift Kiso decreases with decreasing T, indicating the existence of the electron correlation in Rh17S15. In the superconducting state, the resonance lines shift to higher frequencies owing to a decrease of the spin part of the Knight shift with negative hyperfine coupling.

  19. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  20. Picoliter H-1 NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R. ); Wind, Robert A. )

    2002-02-01

    A RF probe that fits inside the bore of a small gradient coil package is described for routine 1H-NMR microscopy measurements on small samples. The probe operates at 500 MHz and houses a 267-um-diameter solenoid transceiver. When used in three dimensional chemical shift imaging (3D-CSI) experiments, the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is shown to be within 20-30 percent of theoretical limits formulated by only considering the solenoid's resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-um-diameter globule of triacylglycerols ({approx}900mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus Laevis frogs, and water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live cells ({approx}33mM). In chemical shift images generated using a few thousand scans, the choline methyl line is found to have an acceptable SNR in resolved from just 5 picoliters in the Xenopus globule. It is concluded that the probe's sensitivity is sufficient for performing 1H-NMR on picoliter-scale volumes in biological cells and tissues.

  1. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  2. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  3. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  4. Using Cloud Storage for NMR Data Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soulsby, David

    2012-01-01

    An approach using Google Groups as method for distributing student-acquired NMR data has been implemented. We describe how to configure NMR spectrometer software so that data is uploaded to a laboratory section specific Google Group, thereby removing bottlenecks associated with printing and processing at the spectrometer workstation. Outside of…

  5. Large NMR signals and polarization asymmetries.

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, S. I.

    1998-11-25

    A large modulation in the series Q-meter can lead to nonlinear NMR signals and asymmetric polarization values. With a careful circuit analysis the nonlinearity can be estimated and corrections to polarization can be determined as a function of the strength of the modulation. We describe the recent LAMPF polarized proton target experiment, its NMR measurement and corrections to the measured polarizations.

  6. Spectroscopic separation of (13) C NMR spectra of complex isomeric mixtures by the CSSF-TOCSY-INEPT experiment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Moreno, Aitor; Fieber, Wolfgang; Brauchli, Robert; Sommer, Horst

    2015-04-01

    Isomeric mixtures from synthetic or natural origins can pose fundamental challenges for their chromatographic separation and spectroscopic identification. A novel 1D selective NMR experiment, chemical shift selective filter (CSSF)-TOCSY-INEPT, is presented that allows the extraction of (13) C NMR subspectra of discrete isomers in complex mixtures without physical separation. This is achieved via CSS excitation of proton signals in the (1) H NMR mixture spectrum, propagation of the selectivity by polarization transfer within coupled (1) H spins, and subsequent relaying of the magnetization from (1) H to (13) C by direct INEPT transfer to generate (13) C NMR subspectra. Simple consolidation of the subspectra yields (13) C NMR spectra for individual isomers. Alternatively, CSSF-INEPT with heteronuclear long-range transfer can correlate the isolated networks of coupled spins and therefore facilitate the reconstruction of the (13) C NMR spectra for isomers containing multiple spin systems. A proof-of-principle validation of the CSSF-TOCSY-INEPT experiment is demonstrated on three mixtures with different spectral and structural complexities. The results show that CSSF-TOCSY-INEPT is a versatile, powerful tool for deconvoluting isomeric mixtures within the NMR tube with unprecedented resolution and offers unique, unambiguous spectral information for structure elucidation. PMID:25616134

  7. Total (1)H NMR assignment of 3β-acetoxypregna-5,16-dien-20-one.

    PubMed

    Becerra-Martinez, Elvia; Ramírez-Gualito, Karla E; Pérez-Hernández, Nury; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    This work describes the total and unambiguous assignment of the 750 MHz (1)H NMR spectrum of 3β-acetoxypregna-5,16-dien-20-one or 16-DPA (1), the well-known intermediate utilized in the synthesis of biological important commercial steroids. The task was accomplished by extracting the coupling constant values in the overlapped spectrum region by HSQC, and using these values in the (1)H iterative full spin analysis integrated in the PERCH NMR software. Comparison of the experimental vicinal coupling constants of 1 with the values calculated using Altona provides an excellent correlation. The same procedure, when applied to the published data of progesterone (2) and testosterone (3), afforded an acceptable correlation for 2 and a poor correlation for 3. In the last case, this suggested the reassignment of all four vicinal coupling constants for the methylene signals at the C-15 and C-16 positions, demonstrating the utility of this methodology. PMID:26476187

  8. Robust, integrated computational control of NMR experiments to achieve optimal assignment by ADAPT-NMR.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Sahu, Sarata C; Singarapu, Kiran K; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Markley, John L

    2012-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) represents a groundbreaking prototype for automated protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With a [(13)C,(15)N]-labeled protein sample loaded into the NMR spectrometer, ADAPT-NMR delivers complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure in an optimal fashion without human intervention. ADAPT-NMR achieves this by implementing a strategy in which the goal of optimal assignment in each step determines the subsequent step by analyzing the current sum of available data. ADAPT-NMR is the first iterative and fully automated approach designed specifically for the optimal assignment of proteins with fast data collection as a byproduct of this goal. ADAPT-NMR evaluates the current spectral information, and uses a goal-directed objective function to select the optimal next data collection step(s) and then directs the NMR spectrometer to collect the selected data set. ADAPT-NMR extracts peak positions from the newly collected data and uses this information in updating the analysis resonance assignments and secondary structure. The goal-directed objective function then defines the next data collection step. The procedure continues until the collected data support comprehensive peak identification, resonance assignments at the desired level of completeness, and protein secondary structure. We present test cases in which ADAPT-NMR achieved results in two days or less that would have taken two months or more by manual approaches. PMID:22427982

  9. NMR and MRI apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Myers, Whittier; McDermott, Robert; ten Haken, Bernard; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas

    2007-03-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. Additional signal to noise benefits are obtained by use of a low noise polarization coil, comprising litz wire or superconducting materials. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  10. Probing Cancer Cell Metabolism Using NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hollinshead, Kate E R; Williams, Debbie S; Tennant, Daniel A; Ludwig, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is now accepted to be at the core of many diseases including cancer. Over the past 20 years, NMR has become a core technology to study these metabolic perturbations in detail. This chapter reviews current NMR-based methods for steady-state metabolism and, in particular, the use of non-radioactive stable isotope-enriched tracers. Opportunities and challenges for each method, such as 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy and (13)C carbon-based NMR spectroscopic methods, are discussed. Ultimately, the combination of NMR and mass spectra as orthogonal technologies are required to compensate for the drawbacks of each technique when used singly are discussed. PMID:27325263

  11. Assessment of structural changes of human teeth by low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qingwen; Chen, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    A technique of low-field pulsed proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation is described for assessment of age-related structural changes (dentin and pulp) of human teeth in vitro. The technique involves spin-spin relaxation measurement and inversion spin-spin spectral analysis methods. The spin-spin relaxation decay curve is converted into a T2 distribution spectrum by a sum of single exponential decays. The NMR spectra from the extracted dentin-portion-only and dental pulp-cells-only were compared with the whole extracted teeth spectra, for the dentin and pulp peak assignments. While dentin and pulp are highly significant parameters in determining tooth quality, variations in these parameters with age can be used as an effective tool for estimating tooth quality. Here we propose an NMR calibration method—the ratio of the amount of dentin to the amount of pulp obtained from NMR T2 distribution spectra can be used for measuring the age-related structural changes in teeth while eliminating any variations in size of teeth. Eight teeth (third molars) extracted from humans, aged among 17-67 years old, were tested in this study. It is found that the intensity ratio of dentin to pulp sensitively changes from 0.48 to 3.2 approaching a linear growth with age. This indicates that age-related structural changes in human teeth can be detected using the low-field NMR technique.

  12. Negative impact of noise on the principal component analysis of NMR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halouska, Steven; Powers, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is routinely applied to the study of NMR based metabolomic data. PCA is used to simplify the examination of complex metabolite mixtures obtained from biological samples that may be composed of hundreds or thousands of chemical components. PCA is primarily used to identify relative changes in the concentration of metabolites to identify trends or characteristics within the NMR data that permits discrimination between various samples that differ in their source or treatment. A common concern with PCA of NMR data is the potential over emphasis of small changes in high concentration metabolites that would over-shadow significant and large changes in low-concentration components that may lead to a skewed or irrelevant clustering of the NMR data. We have identified an additional concern, very small and random fluctuations within the noise of the NMR spectrum can also result in large and irrelevant variations in the PCA clustering. Alleviation of this problem is obtained by simply excluding the noise region from the PCA by a judicious choice of a threshold above the spectral noise.

  13. Accelerating Spectrum Sharing Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Juan D. Deaton; Lynda L. Brighton; Rangam Subramanian; Hussein Moradi; Jose Loera

    2013-09-01

    Spectrum sharing potentially holds the promise of solving the emerging spectrum crisis. However, technology innovators face the conundrum of developing spectrum sharing technologies without the ability to experiment and test with real incumbent systems. Interference with operational incumbents can prevent critical services, and the cost of deploying and operating an incumbent system can be prohibitive. Thus, the lack of incumbent systems and frequency authorization for technology incubation and demonstration has stymied spectrum sharing research. To this end, industry, academia, and regulators all require a test facility for validating hypotheses and demonstrating functionality without affecting operational incumbent systems. This article proposes a four-phase program supported by our spectrum accountability architecture. We propose that our comprehensive experimentation and testing approach for technology incubation and demonstration will accelerate the development of spectrum sharing technologies.

  14. Background suppression in MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffery L.; Beck, Larry W.; Ferguson, David B.; Haw, James F.

    Pulse sequences for suppressing background signals from spinning modules used in magic-angle spinning NMR are described. These pulse sequences are based on spatially selective composite 90° pulses originally reported by Bax, which provide for no net excitation of spins outside the homogeneous region of the coil. We have achieved essentially complete suppression of background signals originating from our Vespel spinning module (which uses a free-standing coil) in both 1H and 13C spectra without notable loss in signal intensity. Successful modification of both Bloch decay and cross-polarization pulse sequences to include spatially selective pulses was essential to acquire background-free spectra for weak samples. Background suppression was also found to be particularly valuable for both T1 and T1 ϱ, relaxation measurements.

  15. Tetrahedral site ordering in synthetic gallium albite: A 29Si MAS NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff, Barbara L.; Fleet, Michael E.; Burns, Peter C.

    1991-09-01

    The ordering of Si in the tetrahedral sites of gallium albite (NaGaSi 3O 8) has been studied by MAS NMR and Rietveld structure refinement of X-ray powder diffraction data. Low structural state (ordered) material was annealed at about 800°C under a load pressure of 1 kbar, and by Rietveld refinement has tetrahedral-site occupancies for Si of T1O = 0.24(3), T1m = 0.89(2), T2O = 0.98(2), and T2m = 0.89(2), respectively. Corresponding Si occupancies for high structural state (disordered) material are 0.71(2), 0.78(1), 0.76(2), and 0.74(2), respectively. The 29Si MAS NMR spectra of low gallium albite is equivalent to the three-peak spectrum of natural (Amelia) albite, with resonances at -89.6, -96.4, and -104.2 ppm but with relative peak areas of 0.79:1.0:0.77. The tetrahedral-site occupancies derived from the MAS NMR spectrum are in good agreement with those obtained by Rietveld refinement and, in particular, indicate that the -96.4 ppm peak must correspond to Si in T2O. This is the first independent assignment of the 29Si peak at -96 ppm in the spectrum of ordered albite to the T2O site. A peak at -96 ppm is also resolved in the spectrum of high gallium albite. The systematic differences in peak position between the 29Si MAS NMR spectra of low gallium albite and those of Amelia albite cannot be explained simply by the direct replacement of Al by Ga, without a change in angle at the bridging oxygen atoms.

  16. High-resolution J-resolved NMR spectra of dilute spins in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terao, T.; Miura, H.; Saika, A.

    1981-08-01

    A technique for obtaining J-resolved NMR spectra of dilute spins in solids has been developed. It is based on the observation that a combination of magic-angle irradiation and magic-angle spinning removes dipolar broadening, but leaves indirect spin-spin coupling. A preliminary application of this technique to adamantane clearly reveals the AX (J = 121 Hz) and AX (J = 135 Hz) multiplets in the methylene and methyne 13C spectrum, respectively.

  17. NMR solution structure of butantoxin.

    PubMed

    Holaday, S K; Martin, B M; Fletcher, P L; Krishna, N R

    2000-07-01

    The NMR structure of a new toxin, butantoxin (BuTX), which is present in the venoms of the three Brazilian scorpions Tityus serrulatus, Tityus bahiensis, and Tityus stigmurus, has been investigated. This toxin was shown to reversibly block the Shaker B potassium channels (K(d) approximately 660 nM) and inhibit the proliferation of T-cells and the interleukin-2 production of antigen-stimulated T-helper cells. BuTX is a 40 amino acid basic protein stabilized by the four disulfide bridges: Cys2-Cys5, Cys10-Cys31, Cys16-Cys36, and Cys20-Cys38. The latter three are conserved among all members of the short-chain scorpion toxin family, while the first is unique to BuTX. The three-dimensional structure of BuTX was determined using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. NOESY, phase sensitive COSY (PH-COSY), and amide hydrogen exchange data were used to generate constraints for molecular modeling calculations. Distance geometry and simulated annealing calculations were performed to generate a family of 49 structures free of constraint violations. The secondary structure of BuTX consists of a short 2(1/2) turn alpha-helix (Glu15-Phe23) and a beta-sheet. The beta-sheet is composed of two well-defined antiparallel strands (Gly29-Met32 and Lys35-Cys38) connected by a type-I' beta-turn (Asn33-Asn34). Residues Cys5-Ala9 form a quasi-third strand of the beta-sheet. The N-terminal C2-C5 disulfide bridge unique to this toxin does not appear to confer stability to the protein. PMID:10864437

  18. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of the E. coli peptide deformylase in complex with a natural inhibitor called actinonin.

    PubMed

    Larue, Valéry; Seijo, Bili; Tisne, Carine; Dardel, Frédéric

    2009-06-01

    In eubacteria, the formyl group of nascent polypeptides is removed by peptide deformylase protein (PDF). This is the reason why PDF has received special attention in the course of the search for new antibacterial agents. We observed by NMR that actinonin, a natural inhibitor, induced drastic changes in the HSQC spectrum of E. coli PDF. We report here the complete NMR chemical shift assignments of PDF resonances bound to actinonin. PMID:19636969

  19. Automated structure verification based on a combination of 1D (1)H NMR and 2D (1)H - (13)C HSQC spectra.

    PubMed

    Golotvin, Sergey S; Vodopianov, Eugene; Pol, Rostislav; Lefebvre, Brent A; Williams, Antony J; Rutkowske, Randy D; Spitzer, Timothy D

    2007-10-01

    A method for structure validation based on the simultaneous analysis of a 1D (1)H NMR and 2D (1)H - (13)C single-bond correlation spectrum such as HSQC or HMQC is presented here. When compared with the validation of a structure by a 1D (1)H NMR spectrum alone, the advantage of including a 2D HSQC spectrum in structure validation is that it adds not only the information of (13)C shifts, but also which proton shifts they are directly coupled to, and an indication of which methylene protons are diastereotopic. The lack of corresponding peaks in the 2D spectrum that appear in the 1D (1)H spectrum, also gives a clear picture of which protons are attached to heteroatoms. For all these benefits, combined NMR verification was expected and found by all metrics to be superior to validation by 1D (1)H NMR alone. Using multiple real-life data sets of chemical structures and the corresponding 1D and 2D data, it was possible to unambiguously identify at least 90% of the correct structures. As part of this test, challenging incorrect structures, mostly regioisomers, were also matched with each spectrum set. For these incorrect structures, the false positive rate was observed as low as 6%. PMID:17694570

  20. An Introduction to Biological NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612