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Sample records for 19f spin-lattice relaxation

  1. 1H-19F spin-lattice relaxation spectroscopy: proton tunnelling in the hydrogen bond studied by field-cycling NMR.

    PubMed

    Noble, D L; Aibout, A; Horsewill, A J

    2009-12-01

    Proton tunnelling in the hydrogen bonds of two fluorine substituted benzoic acid dimers has been investigated using field-cycling NMR relaxometry. The close proximity of the (19)F nuclei to the hydrogen bond protons introduces heteronuclear (19)F-(1)H dipolar interactions into the spin-lattice relaxation processes. This renders the (1)H magnetisation-recovery biexponential and introduces multiple spectral density components into the relaxation matrix characterised by frequencies that are sums and differences of the (19)F and (1)H Larmor frequencies. Using field-cycling NMR pulse sequences that measure the spin-lattice relaxation and cross-relaxation rates we demonstrate how some of these multiple spectral density components can be separately resolved. This leads to an accurate determination of the correlation times that characterise the proton tunnelling motion. A broad spectrum of relaxation behaviour is illustrated and explored in the chosen samples and the investigation is used to explore the theory and practise of field-cycling NMR relaxometry in cases where heteronuclear interactions are significant.

  2. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in nanofluids with paramagnetic impurities.

    PubMed

    Furman, Gregory B; Goren, Shaul D; Meerovich, Victor M; Sokolovsky, Vladimir L

    2015-12-01

    We study the spin-lattice relaxation of the nuclear spins in a liquid or a gas entrapped in nanosized ellipsoidal cavities with paramagnetic impurities. Two cases are considered where the major axes of cavities are in orientational order and isotropically disordered. The evolution equation and analytical expression for spin lattice relaxation time are obtained which give the dependence of the relaxation time on the structural parameters of a nanocavity and the characteristics of a gas or a liquid confined in nanocavities. For the case of orientationally ordered cavities, the relaxation process is exponential. When the nanocavities are isotropically disordered, the time dependence of the magnetization is significantly non-exponential. As shown for this case, the relaxation process is characterized by two time constants. The measurements of the relaxation time, along with the information about the cavity size, allow determining the shape and orientation of the nanocavity and concentration of the paramagnetic impurities.

  3. Probing the Nuclear Spin-Lattice Relaxation Time at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, J. J. T.; den Haan, A. M. J.; de Voogd, J. M.; Bossoni, L.; de Jong, T. A.; de Wit, M.; Bastiaans, K. M.; Thoen, D. J.; Endo, A.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Zaanen, J.; Oosterkamp, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are measured on copper using magnetic-resonance force microscopy performed at temperatures down to 42 mK. The low temperature is verified by comparison with the Korringa relation. Measuring spin-lattice relaxation times locally at very low temperatures opens up the possibility to measure the magnetic properties of inhomogeneous electron systems realized in oxide interfaces, topological insulators, and other strongly correlated electron systems such as high-Tc superconductors.

  4. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in nitroxide spin-label EPR.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear relaxation is a sensitive monitor of rotational dynamics in spin-label EPR. It also contributes competing saturation transfer pathways in T1-exchange spectroscopy, and the determination of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in site-directed spin labelling. A survey shows that the definition of nitrogen nuclear relaxation rate Wn commonly used in the CW-EPR literature for (14)N-nitroxyl spin labels is inconsistent with that currently adopted in time-resolved EPR measurements of saturation recovery. Redefinition of the normalised (14)N spin-lattice relaxation rate, b=Wn/(2We), preserves the expressions used for CW-EPR, whilst rendering them consistent with expressions for saturation recovery rates in pulsed EPR. Furthermore, values routinely quoted for nuclear relaxation times that are deduced from EPR spectral diffusion rates in (14)N-nitroxyl spin labels do not accord with conventional analysis of spin-lattice relaxation in this three-level system. Expressions for CW-saturation EPR with the revised definitions are summarised. Data on nitrogen nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are compiled according to the three-level scheme for (14)N-relaxation: T1n=1/Wn. Results are compared and contrasted with those for the two-level (15)N-nitroxide system.

  5. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in nitroxide spin-label EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear relaxation is a sensitive monitor of rotational dynamics in spin-label EPR. It also contributes competing saturation transfer pathways in T1-exchange spectroscopy, and the determination of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in site-directed spin labelling. A survey shows that the definition of nitrogen nuclear relaxation rate Wn commonly used in the CW-EPR literature for 14N-nitroxyl spin labels is inconsistent with that currently adopted in time-resolved EPR measurements of saturation recovery. Redefinition of the normalised 14N spin-lattice relaxation rate, b = Wn/(2We), preserves the expressions used for CW-EPR, whilst rendering them consistent with expressions for saturation recovery rates in pulsed EPR. Furthermore, values routinely quoted for nuclear relaxation times that are deduced from EPR spectral diffusion rates in 14N-nitroxyl spin labels do not accord with conventional analysis of spin-lattice relaxation in this three-level system. Expressions for CW-saturation EPR with the revised definitions are summarised. Data on nitrogen nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are compiled according to the three-level scheme for 14N-relaxation: T1n = 1/Wn. Results are compared and contrasted with those for the two-level 15N-nitroxide system.

  6. Size dependence of 13C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in micro- and nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panich, A. M.; Sergeev, N. A.; Shames, A. I.; Osipov, V. Yu; Boudou, J.-P.; Goren, S. D.

    2015-02-01

    Size dependence of physical properties of nanodiamond particles is of crucial importance for various applications in which defect density and location as well as relaxation processes play a significant role. In this work, the impact of defects induced by milling of micron-sized synthetic diamonds was studied by magnetic resonance techniques as a function of the particle size. EPR and 13C NMR studies of highly purified commercial synthetic micro- and nanodiamonds were done for various fractions separated by sizes. Noticeable acceleration of 13C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation with decreasing particle size was found. We showed that this effect is caused by the contribution to relaxation coming from the surface paramagnetic centers induced by sample milling. The developed theory of the spin-lattice relaxation for such a case shows good compliance with the experiment.

  7. Size dependence of 13C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in micro- and nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Panich, A M; Sergeev, N A; Shames, A I; Osipov, V Yu; Boudou, J-P; Goren, S D

    2015-02-25

    Size dependence of physical properties of nanodiamond particles is of crucial importance for various applications in which defect density and location as well as relaxation processes play a significant role. In this work, the impact of defects induced by milling of micron-sized synthetic diamonds was studied by magnetic resonance techniques as a function of the particle size. EPR and (13)C NMR studies of highly purified commercial synthetic micro- and nanodiamonds were done for various fractions separated by sizes. Noticeable acceleration of (13)C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation with decreasing particle size was found. We showed that this effect is caused by the contribution to relaxation coming from the surface paramagnetic centers induced by sample milling. The developed theory of the spin-lattice relaxation for such a case shows good compliance with the experiment.

  8. Measuring nanopore size from the spin-lattice relaxation of CF4 gas

    PubMed Central

    Kuethe, Dean O.; Montaño, Rebecca; Pietraß, Tanja

    2007-01-01

    The NMR 19F spin-lattice relaxation time constant T1 for CF4 gas is dominated by spin–rotation interaction, which is mediated by the molecular collision frequency. When confined to pores of approximately the same size or smaller than the bulk gas mean free path, additional collisions of molecules with the pore walls should substantially change T1. To develop a method for measuring the surface/volume ratio S/V by measuring how T1 changes with confinement, we prepared samples of known S/V from fumed silica of known mass-specific surface area and compressed to varying degrees into cylinders of known volume. We then measured T1 for CF4 in these samples at varying pressures, and developed mathematical models for the change in T1 to fit the data. Even though CF4 has a critical temperature below room temperature, we found that its density in pores was greater than that of the bulk gas and that it was necessary to take this absorption into account. We modeled adsorption in two ways, by assuming that the gas condenses on the pore walls, and by assuming that gas in a region near the wall is denser than the bulk gas because of a simplified attractive potential. Both models suggested the same two-parameter formula, to which we added a third parameter to successfully fit the data and thus achieved a rapid, precise way to measure S/V from the increase in T1 due to confinement in pores. PMID:17400493

  9. Exchange-mediated spin-lattice relaxation of Fe3+ ions in borate glasses.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sushil K; Pilbrow, John R

    2007-03-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of two borate glasses doped with different concentrations of Fe2O3 were measured using the Electron Spin-Echo (ESE) technique at X-band (9.630 GHz) in the temperature range 2-6K. In comparison with a previous investigation of Fe3+-doped silicate glasses, the relaxation rates were comparable and differed by no more than a factor of two. The data presented here extend those previously reported for borate glasses in the 10-250K range but measured using the amplitude-modulation technique. The T1 values were found to depend on temperature (T) as T(n) with n approximately 1 for the 1% and 0.1% Fe2O3-doped glass samples. These results are consistent with spin-lattice relaxation as effected by exchange interaction of a Fe3+ spin exchange-coupled to another Fe3+ spin in an amorphous material.

  10. [Spin-lattice relaxation of water protons in plant and animal cells].

    PubMed

    Samuilov, F D; Nikiforov, E A; Nikiforova, V I

    2012-01-01

    NMR-spin echo method has been used to study spin-lattice relaxation time of protons T1 in plant and animal cells - muscle tissue of fish, the cells of which unlike plant cells have no developed system of vacuoles, plastids and a solid cell wall. According to the values of T1 time a new NMR parameter K, a coefficient of relaxation effectiveness of a cell structure, has been calculated. This parameter can be used for quantitative characterization of the influence of different cell structures, the tissue water interact with, for a time of spin-lattice relaxation of water protons. It has been ascertained that the values of K coefficient in animal tissue and in storing tissues of some plants differ little; it may be stipulated by permanent transmembrane water exchange which occurs at high rate in the living cell. It has been concluded that there exists a certain similarity between water state in protoplast of plant and animal cells.

  11. The Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Hyperpolarized 89Y Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Ashish; Lumata, Lloyd; Xing, Yixun; Merritt, Matthew; Zhao, Piyu; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, Dean; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2011-03-01

    The low sensitivity of NMR can be overcome by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). However, a limitation to the use of hyperpolarized materials is the signal decay due to T1 relaxation. Among NMR-active nuclei, 89 Y is potentially valuable in medical imaging because in chelated form, pH-sensitive agents can be developed. 89 Y also offers many attractive features -- 100 % abundance, a 1/2 spin, and a long T1 , up to 10 min. Yet, developing new 89 Y complexes with even longer T1 values is desirable. Designing such complexes relies upon understanding the mechanism(s) responsible for T1 relaxation. We report an approach to hyperpolarized T1 measurements that enabled an analysis of relaxation mechanisms by selective deuteration of the ligand backbone, the solvent or both. Hyperpolarized 89 Y -- DTPA, DOTA, EDTA, and deuterated EDTA complexes were studied. Results suggest that substitution of low-gamma nuclei on the ligand backbone as opposed to that of the solvent most effectively increase the 89 Y T1 . These results are encouraging for in vivo applications as the presence of bound water may not dramatically affect the T1 .

  12. An iterative linear method for calculation of spin-lattice relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, Ronald; Hurlbert, Stuart; Ragouzeos, Aris

    A simple algorithm for the calculation of spin-lattice relaxation times which can be run in a programmable calculator is presented. As was suggested by H. Hanssum et al., an experimentally determined inhomogeneity parameter ( I) can be used with this procedure to compensate for imperfections in the RF field. The effects of variation of pulse width and repetition rate on both I and T1 are investigated with simulated and experimental data sets. The superiority of this approach over three-parameter nonlinear fitting methods is demonstrated by comparisons between data sets generated with different pulse flip angles and sample volumes.

  13. /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation in gaseous benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Folkendt, M.M.; Weiss-Lopez, B.E.; True, N.S.

    1988-08-25

    The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time, T/sub 1/, measured for benzene protons at densities between 0.81 and 54.4 mol/m/sup 3/ (15 and 980 Torr) at 381 K exhibits a characteristic nonlinear density dependence. Analysis of the density-dependent T/sub 1/ data yields a spin-rotation coupling constant, C/sub eff/, of /vert bar/182.6 (0.4)/vert bar/ Hz and an angular momentum reorientation cross section, sigma, of 131 (1) /Angstrom//sup 2/. The /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation time of singly labeled /sup 13/C benzene is a linear function of density over the density range 1.07-75.12 mol/m/sup 3/ (20-1330 Torr). /sup 13/C T/sub 1/ values are shorter than /sup 1/H T/sub 1/ values by a factor of ca. 100 at comparable densities. The nuclear Overhauser enhancement factor, /eta/, is 0.0 /plus minus/ 0.02 at densities between 11 and 85.3 mol/m/sup 3/ (200 and 1500 Torr), demonstrating that dipole-dipole relaxation is relatively inefficient in this region. The spin-rotation coupling constant, C/sub eff/, for /sup 13/C nuclei in benzene is estimated to be /vert bar/1602 (68)/vert bar/ Hz.

  14. Ion distribution in copper exchanged zeolites by using Si-29 spin lattice relaxation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamara, Joseph; Seidel, Karsten; Moini, Ahmad; Prasad, Subramanian

    2016-06-01

    Transition metal-containing zeolites, particularly those with smaller pore size, have found extensive application in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of environmental pollutants containing nitrogen oxides. We report these zeolites have dramatically faster silicon-29 (Si-29) spin lattice relaxation times (T1) compared to their sodium-containing counterparts. Paramagnetic doping allows one to acquire Si-29 MAS spectra in the order of tens of seconds without significantly affecting the spectral resolution. Moreover, relaxation times depend on the method of preparation and the next-nearest neighbor silicon Qn(mAl) sites, where n = 4 and m = 0-4, respectively. A clear trend is noted between the effectiveness of Cu exchange and the Si-29 NMR relaxation times. It is anticipated that the availability of this tool, and the enhanced understanding of the nature of the active sites, will provide the means for designing improved SCR catalysts.

  15. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation of 205TI in TIMo 6Se 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, H.; Ohtani, T.; Sano, Y.; Nakamura, Y.

    1991-12-01

    Temperature dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate of 205TI has been studied in a superconducting Chevrel compound TIMo 6Se 8. The rate follows the Korringa relation in the normal state with (T 1T) -1=3.4×10 2 (sK) -1. It follows a power law with T 1-1=2.64×10 -3T 6.9 in the superconducting state. An enhancement of the relaxation rate just below T c was not observed. These suggest that TIMo 6Se 8 is a new example of gapless superconductors. The relaxation behaviors in this Chevrel compound, which has low T c but has high H C2 is discussed in comparison with those in high-Tc oxides.

  16. The spin-temperature theory of dynamic nuclear polarization and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Wollan, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed derivation of the equations governing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and nuclear spin lattice relaxation by use of the spin temperature theory has been carried to second order in a perturbation expansion of the density matrix. Nuclear spin diffusion in the rapid diffusion limit and the effects of the coupling of the electron dipole-dipole reservoir (EDDR) with the nuclear spins are incorporated. The complete expression for the dynamic nuclear polarization has been derived and then examined in detail for the limit of well resolved solid effect transitions. Exactly at the solid effect transition peaks, the conventional solid-effect DNP results are obtained, but with EDDR effects on the nuclear relaxation and DNP leakage factor included. Explicit EDDR contributions to DNP are discussed, and a new DNP effect is predicted.

  17. Unexpected proton spin-lattice relaxation in the solutions of polyolefin and tetrachloroethane.

    PubMed

    He, Yiyong; Qiu, Xiaohua; Zhou, Zhe

    2010-07-01

    'Unexpected' proton spin-lattice relaxation (T(1)) times are reported for the solutions of poly(ethylene-co-1-octene) and tetrachloroethane-d(2). For the residual protons of the deuterated solvent and the methyl and vinyl protons at the polymer chain ends, their T(1) relaxation times vary significantly with both the polymer concentration and molecular weight over a wide range. The T(1)s also decrease with increasing temperature at relative high temperatures. Such behaviors are in contrast to most reported polymer solutions in which the T(1) has nearly no concentration or molecular weight dependence in the dilute and semi-dilute regime, and normal dependence on temperature. Further investigation revealed that the paramagnetic oxygen effect did shorten the measured proton T(1)s, but cannot account for the unexpected T(1) dependences. Spin rotation is proposed to provide a reasonable explanation.

  18. Proton spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms and the metal-insulator transition in cerium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamir, D.; Barnes, R. G.; Salibi, N.; Cotts, R. M.; Phua, T.-T.; Torgeson, D. R.; Peterson, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) experiments have been done on cerium hydride (CeHx) samples to search for correlations between NMR properties and known electrical conductivity changes as a function of hydrogen concentration and temperature. Data are presented for the 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate R1 (=1T1) and some line shapes for 2.10<=x<=2.92 for temperatures from about 100 to 375 K. Although two 1H resonances are observed at some temperatures, proton spin-lattice relaxation is characterized by a single relaxation time at each x and T. To a good approximation R1=AT+R, where AT is attributed to direct dipolar coupling between protons and the electronic magnetic dipole moment of Ce3+, and R is an essentially temperature-independent term attributed to indirect [Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY)] coupling to the Ce3+ moment. The AT term is so large that for most experiments the proton-proton dipolar and proton-conduction-electron couplings are negligible. The x dependence of the constant A is consistent with the dipolar coupling. The constant R decreases in a steep manner as x is increased above x~2.65 just below the regime 2.75

  19. Frequency dependence of electron spin-lattice relaxation for semiquinones in alcohol solutions.

    PubMed

    Elajaili, Hanan B; Biller, Joshua R; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2014-10-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation rates at 293 K for three anionic semiquinones (2,5-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, 2,6-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, and 2,3,5,6-tetramethoxy-1,4-benzosemiquinone) were studied at up to 8 frequencies between 250 MHz and 34 GHz in ethanol or methanol solution containing high concentrations of OH(-). The relaxation rates are about a factor of 2 faster at lower frequencies than at 9 or 34 GHz. However, in perdeuterated alcohols the relaxation rates exhibit little frequency dependence, which demonstrates that the dominant frequency-dependent contribution to relaxation is modulation of dipolar interactions with solvent nuclei. The relaxation rates were modeled as the sum of two frequency-independent contributions (spin rotation and a local mode) and two frequency-dependent contributions (modulation of dipolar interaction with solvent nuclei and a much smaller contribution from modulation of g anisotropy). The correlation time for modulation of the interaction with solvent nuclei is longer than the tumbling correlation time of the semiquinone and is consistent with hydrogen bonding of the alcohol to the oxygen atoms of the semiquinones.

  20. The effect of a broad activation energy distribution on deuteron spin-lattice relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ylinen, E E; Punkkinen, M; Birczyński, A; Lalowicz, Z T

    2015-10-01

    Deuteron NMR spectra and spin-lattice relaxation were studied experimentally in zeolite NaY(2.4) samples containing 100% or 200% of CD3OH or CD3OD molecules of the total coverage of Na atoms in the temperature range 20-150K. The activation energies describing the methyl and hydroxyl motions show broad distributions. The relaxation data were interpreted by improving a recent model (Stoch et al., 2013 [16]) in which the nonexponential relaxation curves are at first described by a sum of three exponentials with adjustable relaxation rates and weights. Then a broad distribution of activation energies (the mean activation energy A0 and the width σ) was assumed for each essentially different methyl and hydroxyl position. The correlation times were calculated from the Arrhenius equation (containing the pre-exponential factor τ0), individual relaxation rates computed and classified into three classes, and finally initial relaxation rates and weights for each class formed. These were compared with experimental data, motional parameters changed slightly and new improved rates and weights for each class calculated, etc. This method was improved by deriving for the deuterons of the A and E species methyl groups relaxation rates, which depend explicitly on the tunnel frequency ωt. The temperature dependence of ωt and of the low-temperature correlation time were obtained by using the solutions of the Mathieu equation for a threefold potential. These dependencies were included in the simulations and as the result sets of A0, σ and τ0 obtained, which describe the methyl and hydroxyl motions in different positions in zeolite.

  1. Quadratic Zeeman effect and spin-lattice relaxation of Tm3 +:YAG at high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veissier, Lucile; Thiel, Charles W.; Lutz, Thomas; Barclay, Paul E.; Tittel, Wolfgang; Cone, Rufus L.

    2016-11-01

    Anisotropy of the quadratic Zeeman effect for the H36→H34 transition at 793 nm wavelength in 3+169Tm-doped Y3Al5O12 is studied, revealing shifts ranging from near zero up to +4.69 GHz/T 2 for ions in magnetically inequivalent sites. This large range of shifts is used to spectrally resolve different subsets of ions and study nuclear spin relaxation as a function of temperature, magnetic field strength, and orientation in a site-selective manner. A rapid decrease in spin lifetime is found at large magnetic fields, revealing the weak contribution of direct phonon absorption and emission to the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate. We furthermore confirm theoretical predictions for the phonon coupling strength, finding much smaller values than those estimated in the limited number of past studies of thulium in similar crystals. Finally, we observe a significant—and unexpected—magnetic field dependence of the two-phonon Orbach spin relaxation process at higher field strengths, which we explain through changes in the electronic energy-level splitting arising from the quadratic Zeeman effect.

  2. Spin-lattice relaxation and the calculation of gain, pump power, and noise temperature in ruby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    The use of a quantitative analysis of the dominant source of relaxation in ruby spin systems to make predictions of key maser amplifier parameters is described. The spin-lattice Hamiltonian which describes the interaction of the electron spins with the thermal vibrations of the surrounding lattice is obtained from the literature. Taking into account the vibrational anisotropy of ruby, Fermi's rule is used to calculate the spin transition rates between the maser energy levels. The spin population rate equations are solved for the spin transition relaxation times, and a comparison with previous calculations is made. Predictions of ruby gain, inversion ratio, and noise temperature as a function of physical temperature are made for 8.4-GHz and 32-GHz maser pumping schemes. The theory predicts that ruby oriented at 90 deg will have approximately 50 percent higher gain in dB and slightly lower noise temperature than a 54.7-deg ruby at 32 GHz (assuming pump saturation). A specific calculation relating pump power to inversion ratio is given for a single channel of the 32-GHz reflected wave maser.

  3. Spin-lattice relaxation within a dimerized Ising chain in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem, Rıza E-mail: rerdem29@hotmail.com; Gülpınar, Gül; Yalçın, Orhan; Pawlak, Andrzej

    2014-07-21

    A qualitative study of the spin-lattice relaxation within a dimerized Ising chain in a magnetic field is presented. We have first determined the time dependence of the deviation of the lattice distortion parameter δΔ from the equilibrium state within framework of a technique combining the statistical equilibrium theory based on the transfer matrix method and the linear theory of irreversible thermodynamics. We have shown that the time dependence of the lattice distortion parameter is characterized by a single time constant (τ) which diverges around the critical point in both dimerized (Δ≠0) and uniform (Δ=0) phase regions. When the temperature and magnetic field are fixed to certain values, the time τ depends only on exchange coupling between the spins. It is a characteristic time associated with the long wavelength fluctuations of distortion. We have also taken into account the effects of spatial fluctuations on the relaxation time using the full Landau-Ginzburg free energy functional. We have found an explicit expression for the relaxation time as a function of temperature, coupling constant and wave vector (q) and shown that the critical mode corresponds to the case q=0. Finally, our results are found to be in good qualitative agreement with the results obtained in recent experimental study on synchrotron x-ray scattering and muon spin relaxation in diluted material Cu{sub 1−y}Mg{sub y}GeO{sub 3} where the composition y is very close to 0.0209. These results can be considered as natural extensions of some previous works on static aspects of the problem.

  4. Anomalous nuclear spin-lattice relaxation of 3He in contact with ordered Al2O3 aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alakshin, E. M.; Zakharov, M. Yu.; Klochkov, A. V.; Kuzmin, V. V.; Safiullin, K. R.; Stanislavovas, A. A.; Tagirov, M. S.

    2016-09-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation of 3He in contact with the ordered Al2O3 fiber aerogel has been studied at the temperature of 1.6 K in fields of 0.1-0.5 T by the pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method. An additional mechanism of the relaxation of 3He in aerogels is found and it is shown that this relaxation mechanism is not associated with the adsorbed layer. A hypothesis about the influence of intrinsic paramagnetic centers on the relaxation of gaseous 3He is proposed.

  5. Molecular motions in glassy crystal cyanoadamantane : a proton spin-lattice relaxation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoureux, J. P.; Decressain, R.; Sahour, M.; Cochon, E.

    1992-02-01

    Cyanoadamantane C{10}H{15}CN exhibits four different solid phases : two cubic plastic (I and I'), one cubic glassy (Ig) and one monoclinic ordered (II). In cubic plastic phases (I, I') three types of motion coexist : a uniaxial rotation of the molecule around its C—CequivN axis, a tumbling reorientation of this dipolar axis between the <~ngle 001rangle directions and a vacancy self-diffusion. In the cubic glassy state (Ig) the tumbling motion is frozen and therefore only the uniaxial rotation survives. In the ordered phase (II), the molecules only perform a 3-fold uniaxial rotation among identical positions. These different molecular motions in the four solid phases have been studied by the analysis of the T_{1 z} and T_{1 ρ} spin-lattice relaxation times in ^1H-NMR. The derived residence time are compared, when possible, to values previously deduced from quasi-elastic neutron scattering, dielectric relaxation and second moment of the ^1H-NMR lineshape. Le cyanoadamantane C{10}H{15}CN possède quatre phases solides différentes : deux plastiques cubiques (I et I'), une vitreuse cubique (Ig) et une ordonnée monoclinique (II). Dans les phases plastiques cubiques (I, I') trois types de mouvements coexistent : une rotation uniaxiale de la molécule autour de son axe C—CequivN, un basculement de cet axe dipolaire entre les directions <~ngle 001rangle et une diffusion moléculaire. Dans l'état vitreux cubique (Ig), le mouvement de basculement est gelé et seule la rotation uniaxiale subsiste. Enfin dans la phase ordonnée (II), les molécules effectuent une rotation uniaxiale d'ordre 3 entre positions indiscernables. Ces différents mouvements dans les quatre phases solides ont été évalués par l'analyse des temps de relaxation spin-réseau T_{1 z} et T_{1 ρ} en ^1H-RMN. Les temps de résidence qui en sont déduits sont comparés (lorsque cela est possible) aux valeurs correspondantes déduites précédemment par diffusion quasi-élastique des neutrons, par

  6. Capturing fast relaxing spins with SWIFT adiabatic rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation (T1ρ) mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Nissi, M J; Idiyatullin, D; Michaeli, S; Garwood, M; Ellermann, J

    2016-04-01

    Rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation, with the characteristic time constant T1ρ, provides a means to access motion-restricted (slow) spin dynamics in MRI. As a result of their restricted motion, these spins are sometimes characterized by a short transverse relaxation time constant T2 and thus can be difficult to detect directly with conventional image acquisition techniques. Here, we introduce an approach for three-dimensional adiabatic T1ρ mapping based on a magnetization-prepared sweep imaging with Fourier transformation (MP-SWIFT) sequence, which captures signal from almost all water spin populations, including the extremely fast relaxing pool. A semi-analytical procedure for T1ρ mapping is described. Experiments on phantoms and musculoskeletal tissue specimens (tendon, articular and epiphyseal cartilages) were performed at 9.4 T for both the MP-SWIFT and fast spin echo (FSE) read outs. In the phantom with liquids having fast molecular tumbling and a single-valued T1ρ time constant, the measured T1ρ values obtained with MP-SWIFT and FSE were similar. Conversely, in normal musculoskeletal tissues, T1ρ values measured with MP-SWIFT were much shorter than the values obtained with FSE. Studies of biological tissue specimens demonstrated that T1ρ-weighted SWIFT provides higher contrast between normal and diseased tissues relative to conventional acquisitions. Adiabatic T1ρ mapping with SWIFT readout captures contributions from the otherwise undetected fast relaxing spins, allowing more informative T1ρ measurements of normal and diseased states.

  7. Miscibility of nifedipine and hydrophilic polymers as measured by (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation.

    PubMed

    Aso, Yukio; Yoshioka, Sumie; Miyazaki, Tamaki; Kawanishi, Tohru; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Satoshi; Takakura, Asako; Hayashi, Takashi; Muranushi, Noriyuki

    2007-08-01

    The miscibility of a drug with excipients in solid dispersions is considered to be one of the most important factors for preparation of stable amorphous solid dispersions. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the feasibility of (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements to assess the miscibility of a drug with excipients. Solid dispersions of nifedipine with the hydrophilic polymers poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and alpha,beta-poly(N-5-hydroxypentyl)-L-aspartamide (PHPA) with various weight ratios were prepared by spray drying, and the spin-lattice relaxation decay of the solid dispersions in a laboratory frame (T(1) decay) and in a rotating frame (T(1rho) decay) were measured. T(1rho) decay of nifedipine-PVP solid dispersions (3 : 7, 5 : 5 and 7 : 3) was describable with a mono-exponential equation, whereas T(1rho) decay of nifedipine-PHPA solid dispersions (3 : 7, 4 : 6 and 5 : 5) was describable with a bi-exponential equation. Because a mono-exponential T(1rho) decay indicates that the domain sizes of nifedipine and polymer in solid dispersion are less than several nm, it is speculated that nifedipine is miscible with PVP but not miscible with PHPA. All the nifedipine-PVP solid dispersions studied showed a single glass transition temperature (T(g)), whereas two glass transitions were observed for the nifedipine-PHPA solid dispersion (3 : 7), thus supporting the above speculation. For nifedipine-HPMC solid dispersions (3 : 7 and 5 : 5), the miscibility of nifedipine and HPMC could not be determined by DSC measurements due to the lack of obviously evident T(g). In contrast, (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements showed that nifedipine and HPMC are miscible, since T(1rho) decay of the solid dispersions (3 : 7, 5 : 5 and 7 : 3) was describable with a mono-exponential equation. These results indicate that (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements are useful for assessing the miscibility of a drug and an

  8. Electron spin-lattice relaxation in radicals containing two methyl groups, generated by /γ-irradiation of polycrystalline solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbridge, James R.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2002-12-01

    The effects of methyl rotation on electron spin-lattice relaxation times were examined by pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance for the major radicals in γ-irradiated polycrystalline α-amino isobutyric acid, dimethyl-malonic acid, and L-valine. The dominant radical is the same in irradiated dimethyl-malonic acid and α-amino isobutyric acid. Continuous wave saturation recovery was measured between 10 and 295 K at S-band and X-band. Inversion recovery, echo-detected saturation recovery, and pulsed electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) data were obtained between 77 and 295 K. For the radicals in the three solids, recovery time constants measured by the various techniques were not the same, because spectral diffusion processes contribute differently for each measurement. Hyperfine splitting due to the protons of two methyl groups is resolved in the EPR spectra for each of the samples. Pulsed ELDOR data were obtained to characterize the spectral diffusion processes that transfer magnetization between hyperfine lines. Time constants were obtained for electron spin-lattice relaxation ( T1e), nuclear spin relaxation ( T1n), cross-relaxation ( Tx1), and spin diffusion ( Ts). Between 77 and 295 K rapid cross-relaxation (Δ Ms=±1, Δ MI=∓1) was observed for each sample, which is attributed to methyl rotation at a rate that is approximately equal to the electron Larmor frequency. The large temperature range over which cross-relaxation was observed suggests that methyl groups in the radical and in the lattice, with different activation energies for rotation, contribute to the rapid cross-relaxation. Activation energies for methyl and amino group rotation between 160 and 1900 K (1.3-16 kJ/mol) were obtained by analysis of the temperature dependence of 1/ T1e at S-band and X-band in the temperature intervals where the dynamic process dominates T1e.

  9. Translation and reorientation of CD4 molecules in nanoscale cages of zeolites as studied by deuteron spin-lattice relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birczyński, A.; Punkkinen, M.; Szymocha, A. M.; Lalowicz, Z. T.

    2007-11-01

    Deuteron spin-lattice relaxation was applied to study translational and rotational mobility of CD4 molecules trapped in the cages of zeolites. Tetrahedral methane molecules are treated as quantum rotators. Relaxation rates related to the intraquadrupole interaction are derived for the T and A +E symmetry species in the presence of large tunneling splittings, consistently with the assumption that A and E species molecules relax at the same rate. An exchange model is presented, which describes the effect on relaxation of CD4 jumping between two positions characterized by different potentials. While staying at either position bonded to an atom or ion at the cage wall, the molecule has some freedom to move in the vicinity. This causes a time-dependent external electric field gradient, which contributes to the deuteron relaxation rate via the electric quadrupole interaction. Spin conversion transitions couple the relaxation of magnetizations MT and MAE, which is taken into account by reapplying the presented model under somewhat different conditions. Such a two-step procedure leads to successful fits with the experimental results obtained in the range of temperatures roughly 20-200K for zeolites HY, NaA, and NaMordenite. At higher temperatures CD4 molecules fly freely across zeolite cages and relaxation changes accordingly, while incoherent tunneling dominates for immobile molecules below 20K.

  10. Spin-lattice relaxation study of the methyl proton dynamics in solid 9,10-dimethyltriptycene (DMT).

    PubMed

    Piślewski, N; Tritt-Goc, J; Bielejewski, M; Rachocki, A; Ratajczyk, T; Szymański, S

    2009-06-01

    Proton spin-lattice relaxation studies are performed for powder samples of 9,10-dimethyltriptycene (DMT) and its isotopomer DMT-d(12) in which all the non-methyl protons in the molecule are replaced by deuterons. The relaxation data are interpreted in terms of the conventional relaxation theory based on the random jump model in which the Pauli correlations between the relevant spin and torsional states are discarded. The Arrhenius activation energies, obtained from the relaxation data, 25.3 and 24.8 kJ mol(-1) for DMT and DMT-d(12), respectively, are very high as for the methyl groups. The validity of the jump model in the present case is considered from the perspective of Haupt theory in which the Pauli principle is explicitly invoked. To this purpose, the dynamic quantities entering the Haupt model are reinterpreted in the spirit of the damped quantum rotation (DQR) approach introduced recently for the purpose of NMR lineshape studies of hindered molecular rotators. Theoretical modelling of the relevant methyl group dynamics, based on the DQR theory, was performed. From these calculations it is inferred that direct assessments of the torsional barrier heights, based on the Arrhenius activation energies extracted from relaxation data, should be treated with caution.

  11. Raman electron spin-lattice relaxation with the Debye-type and with real phonon spectra in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Stanislaw K.; Lijewski, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    Electron spin-lattice relaxation temperature dependence was measured for Ti2+ (S = 1) and for Cu2+ (S = 1/2) ions in SrF2 single crystal by electron spin echo method in temperature range 4-109 K. The spin relaxation was governed by the two-phonon Raman processes. The relaxation theory is outlined and presented in a form suitable for applying with real phonon spectra. The experimental relaxation results were described using Debye-type phonon spectrum and the real phonon spectrum of SrF2 crystal. The Debye approximation does not fit well the results for SrF2 both at low and at high temperature. The relaxation rate is faster than that predicted by Debye-type phonon spectrum at low temperatures where excess of lattice vibrations over the Debye model exists but is slower at higher temperatures (above 50 K) where density of phonon states continuously decreases when approaching to the maximal acoustic phonon frequency. The expected deviation from Debye approximation was analyzed also for Cu2+ in NaCl and MgSiO3 crystals for which phonon spectra are available. The fitting with the real phonon spectrum allowed us to calculate spin-phonon coupling parameter as 267 cm-1 for Ti2+ and 1285 cm-1 for Cu2+ in SrF2.

  12. Measurement of solute proton spin-lattice relaxation times in water using the 1,3,3,1 sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Sankar, S.S.; Mole, P.A.; Coulson, R.L.

    1986-12-01

    /sup 1/H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the N-CH3 proton resonances of phosphocreatine (PCr) and creatine (Cr) in water solutions were obtained using the 1,3,3,1 pulse sequence. These T1 values were equivalent to those obtained in D/sub 2/O and water using either the conventional inversion-recovery experiment or the 1,3,3,1 pulse sequence. Thus, the 1,3,3,1 sequence of proton NMR can provide an independent means along with phosphorous NMR for assess PCr and for the study of the creatine kinase reaction (PCr + ADP in equilibrium ATP + Cr) in aqueous solutions and perhaps in biological preparations.

  13. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation at field-induced level crossings in a Cr8F8 pivalate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    We construct a microscopic theory for the proton spin-lattice relaxation-rate 1 / T1 measurements around field-induced level crossings in a single crystal of the trivalent chromium ion wheel complex [Cr8F8(OOCtBu)16] at sufficiently low temperatures [E. Micotti et al., Phys. Rev. B 72 (2005) 020405(R)]. Exactly diagonalizing a well-equipped spin Hamiltonian for the individual clusters and giving further consideration to their possible interactions, we reveal the mechanism of 1 / T1 being single-peaked normally at the first level crossing but double-peaked intriguingly around the second level crossing. We wipe out the doubt about poor crystallization and find out a solution-intramolecular alternating Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction combined with intermolecular coupling of antiferromagnetic character, each of which is so weak as several tens of mK in magnitude.

  14. ESR lineshape and 1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion in propylene glycol solutions of nitroxide radicals - Joint analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Hoffmann, S. K.; Goslar, J.; Lijewski, S.; Kubica-Misztal, A.; Korpała, A.; Oglodek, I.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-12-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) experiments are reported for propylene glycol solutions of the nitroxide radical: 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16 containing 15N and 14N isotopes. The NMRD experiments refer to 1H spin-lattice relaxation measurements in a broad frequency range (10 kHz-20 MHz). A joint analysis of the ESR and NMRD data is performed. The ESR lineshapes give access to the nitrogen hyperfine tensor components and the rotational correlation time of the paramagnetic molecule. The NMRD data are interpreted in terms of the theory of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in solutions of nitroxide radicals, recently presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124506 (2013)]. The theory includes the effect of the electron spin relaxation on the 1H relaxation of the solvent. The 1H relaxation is caused by dipole-dipole interactions between the electron spin of the radical and the proton spins of the solvent molecules. These interactions are modulated by three dynamic processes: relative translational dynamics of the involved molecules, molecular rotation, and electron spin relaxation. The sensitivity to rotation originates from the non-central positions of the interacting spin in the molecules. The electronic relaxation is assumed to stem from the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine coupling, modulated by rotation of the radical molecule. For the interpretation of the NMRD data, we use the nitrogen hyperfine coupling tensor obtained from ESR and fit the other relevant parameters. The consistency of the unified analysis of ESR and NMRD, evaluated by the agreement between the rotational correlation times obtained from ESR and NMRD, respectively, and the agreement of the translation diffusion coefficients with literature values obtained for pure propylene glycol, is demonstrated to be satisfactory.

  15. Electron spin-lattice relaxation of nitroxyl radicals in temperature ranges that span glassy solutions to low-viscosity liquids.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hideo; Bottle, Steven E; Blinco, James P; Micallef, Aaron S; Eaton, Gareth R; Eaton, Sandra S

    2008-03-01

    Electron spin-lattice relaxation rates, 1/T1, at X-band of nitroxyl radicals (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-1-oxyl and 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolin-1-oxyl) in glass-forming solvents (decalin, glycerol, 3-methylpentane, o-terphenyl, 1-propanol, sorbitol, sucrose octaacetate, and 1:1 water:glycerol) at temperatures between 100 and 300K were measured by long-pulse saturation recovery to investigate the relaxation processes in slow-to-fast tumbling regimes. A subset of samples was also studied at lower temperatures or at Q-band. Tumbling correlation times were calculated from continuous wave lineshapes. Temperature dependence and isotope substitution (2H and 15N) were used to distinguish the contributions of various processes. Below about 100K relaxation is dominated by the Raman process. At higher temperatures, but below the glass transition temperature, a local mode process makes significant contributions. Above the glass transition temperature, increased rates of molecular tumbling modulate nuclear hyperfine and g anisotropy. The contribution from spin rotation is very small. Relaxation rates at X-band and Q-band are similar. The dependence of 1/T1 on tumbling correlation times fits better with the Cole-Davidson spectral density function than with the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound model.

  16. Electron spin lattice relaxation of nitroxyl radicals in temperature ranges that span glassy solutions to low-viscosity liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hideo; Bottle, Steven E.; Blinco, James P.; Micallef, Aaron S.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2008-03-01

    Electron spin-lattice relaxation rates, 1/ T1, at X-band of nitroxyl radicals (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-1-oxyl and 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolin-1-oxyl) in glass-forming solvents (decalin, glycerol, 3-methylpentane, o-terphenyl, 1-propanol, sorbitol, sucrose octaacetate, and 1:1 water:glycerol) at temperatures between 100 and 300 K were measured by long-pulse saturation recovery to investigate the relaxation processes in slow-to-fast tumbling regimes. A subset of samples was also studied at lower temperatures or at Q-band. Tumbling correlation times were calculated from continuous wave lineshapes. Temperature dependence and isotope substitution ( 2H and 15N) were used to distinguish the contributions of various processes. Below about 100 K relaxation is dominated by the Raman process. At higher temperatures, but below the glass transition temperature, a local mode process makes significant contributions. Above the glass transition temperature, increased rates of molecular tumbling modulate nuclear hyperfine and g anisotropy. The contribution from spin rotation is very small. Relaxation rates at X-band and Q-band are similar. The dependence of 1/ T1 on tumbling correlation times fits better with the Cole-Davidson spectral density function than with the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound model.

  17. Korringa-Like Nuclear Spin-Lattice Relaxation in a 2DES at ν= 1/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, L. A.; Pfeiffer, L. N.

    2005-03-01

    Via a resistively-detected NMR technique, the nuclear spin lattice relaxation time T1 of ^71Ga at low temperatures has been measured in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure containing two weakly-coupled 2D electron systems (2DES), each at Landau level filling ν= 1/2. Incomplete electronic spin polarization, which has been reported previously [1,2] for low density 2DESs at ν= 1/2, should facilitate hyperfine- coupled nuclear spin relaxation owing to the presence of both electron spin states at the Fermi level. Within composite fermion theory, a Korringa law temperature dependence: T1T = constant, is expected for temperatures T<1 K. Our measurements made at temperatures in the range 35 mK relaxation mechanisms in this system.[1] I. V. Kukushkin, K. v. Klitzing, and K. Eberl. Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3665 (1999); A. E. Dementyev, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 5074 (1999); S. Melinte, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 354 (2000).[2] I.B. Spielman, L.A. Tracy, J.P. Eisenstein, L.N. Pfeiffer, K.W. West, condmat/0410092.This work was supported by the DOE, NSF, and NDSEG.

  18. Probing protein hydration and aging of food materials by the magnetic field dependence of proton spin-lattice relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Godefroy, Sophie; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Creamer, Lawrence K; Watkinson, Philip J; Callaghan, Paul T

    2003-11-15

    Most cheeses can be considered as solid emulsions of milk fat in a matrix of water and proteins. Regions of each of the phases can be liquid during processing and maturation. Identifying these regions and monitoring changes in them is important as a prelude to controlling the structure of the final cheese. We concentrate on the behavior of water in the vicinity of proteins as a function of cheese aging. Our method utilizes nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) associated with the frequency dependence of water spin-lattice relaxation rates using the field cycling NMR technique. This method provides insight into the dynamical behavior of water molecules on a very large time scale. Moreover, we can distinguish between molecular motion in bulk and motion in the vicinity of a source of relaxation, such as proteins. A fit of our dispersion data using a theory developed by J.-P. Korb and R.G. Bryant (J. Chem. Phys. 115 (2001) 23) allowed us to determine the degree of hydration of proteins as a function of aging. In particular, we find that protein hydration increases with ripening.

  19. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  20. Rotating Frame Spin Lattice Relaxation in a Swine Model of Chronic, Left Ventricular Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Witschey, Walter RT; Pilla, James J; Ferrari, Giovanni; Koomalsingh, Kevin; Haris, Mohammed; Hinmon, Robin; Zsido, Gerald; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Reddy, Ravinder

    2010-01-01

    T1ρ relaxation times were quantified in a swine model of chronic, left ventricular myocardial infarction. It was found that there were low frequency relaxation mechanisms that suppress endogenous contrast at low spin lock amplitudes and in T2-weighted images. A moderate amplitude spin locking pulse could overcome these relaxation mechanisms. Relaxation dispersion data was measured over a range of RF field amplitudes and a model was formulated to include dipole-dipole relaxation modulated by molecular rotation and an apparent exchange mechanism. These techniques may find some use in the clinic for the observation of chronic, left ventricular cardiac remodeling. PMID:20677236

  1. Nuclear Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times from Continuous Wave NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, Jan B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The experiment described, suitable for undergraduate physical chemistry laboratories, illustrates the general principles of relaxation and introduces the nmr concepts of saturation and spin-inversion. (BB)

  2. Different molecular motions in lyophilized protein formulations as determined by laboratory and rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Sumie; Aso, Yukio; Kojima, Shigeo

    2002-10-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory and rotating frame (T(1) and T(1rho)) of protons and carbons in lyophilized bovine serum gamma-globulin formulation containing dextran were determined by (1)H solid-state pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and high-resolution (13)C solid-state NMR. The temperature dependence of T(1) and T(1rho) of dextran protons in the lyophilized formulation suggests that the correlation time, tau(c), of the methylene protons in dextran is approximately 10(-6) s at -100 degrees C and 60% relative humidity, and decreases to 10(-7) s at 0 degrees C. When temperature is increased from 0 degrees C, the increased motion of the methylene groups is reflected in T(1), but is too fast to be observed by changes in T(1rho). Thus, the motion of the methine groups rather than the methylene groups begins to be reflected in T(1rho). The correlation time of the methine protons as determined by T(1rho) was of the same order as that of the methine carbons as determined by T(1rho). As the temperature is increased past the glass/rubber transition temperature, both the methylene and methine motions are greatly enhanced, resulting in much shorter T(1) and T(1rho) relaxation times.

  3. Measurement of electron spin-lattice relaxation times in radical doped butanol samples at 1 K using the NEDOR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, C.; Herick, J.; Berlin, A.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G.

    2012-12-01

    The electron spin-lattice relaxation time (T1e) of TEMPO- and trityl-doped butanol samples at 2.5 T and temperatures between 0.95 K and 2.17 K was studied by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using the nuclear-electron double resonance (NEDOR) method. This method is based on the idea to measure the NMR lineshift produced by the local field of paramagnetic impurities, whose polarization can be manipulated. This is of technical advantage as measurements can be performed under conditions typically used for the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process - in our case 2.5 T and temperatures around 1 K - where a direct measurement on the electronic spins would be far more complicated to perform. As T1e is a crucial parameter determining the overall efficiency of DNP, the effect of the radical type, its spin concentration, the temperature and the oxygen content on T1e has been investigated. For radical concentrations as used in DNP (several 1019 spins/cm3) the relaxation rate (T1e-1) has shown a linear dependence on the paramagnetic electron concentration for both radicals investigated. Experiments with perdeuterated and ordinary butanol have given no indication for any influence of the host materials isotopes. The measured temperature dependence has shown an exponential characteristic. It is further observed that the oxygen content in the butanol samples has a considerable effect on the electron relaxation time and thus influences the nuclear relaxation time and polarization rate during the DNP. The experiments also show a variation in the NMR linewidth, leading to comparable time constants as determined by the lineshift. NEDOR measurements were also performed on irradiated, crystal grains of 6LiD. These samples exhibited a linewidth behavior similar to that of the cylindrically shaped butanol samples.

  4. Li chemisorption on Ru(001): LDA theory of the coverage dependence of the spin lattice relaxation time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannstadt, W.; Freeman, A. J.

    1997-03-01

    The chemisorption of alkali atoms on metals still remains a challenging topic after almost sixty years of study. Recently, a novel type of experiment, β-decay NMR, was developed and applied to investigate Li atoms chemisorbed on a Ru(001) surface( H. J. Jänsch et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 25, 120 (1995)). Such measurements of the spin lattice relaxation time provide information about the local density of states (LDOS) at EF and at the Li nucleus. Through the LDOS, the very local electronic properties of the chemisorbed alkali atom is determined, which provides new physical insight into the chemisorption process. One striking result is a constancy of the LDOS at low coverage, Θ=0 - 0.15, while the work function changes by about 2 eV. We present the first ab initio LDA calculations of the LDOS, using our full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method for thin films(E.Wimmer,H.Krakauer,M.Weinert, A.J.Freeman, Phys.Rev.B 24, 864 (1981)), to determine the Li chemisorption on Ru(001) for three coverages, Θ=1.0, 0.25 and 0.11, including a structure optimization for each. The calculations show a constant value of the LDOS at Θ= 0.25 and 0.11 which increases at high coverage by about a factor of two. * Supported by A.v.Humboldt Foundation

  5. 1H and 2H NMR spin-lattice relaxation probing water: PEG molecular dynamics in solution.

    PubMed

    Clop, Eduardo M; Perillo, María A; Chattah, Ana K

    2012-10-04

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) measurements were performed in aqueous solutions of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) of 6000 Da molecular mass to study the dynamical relation between PEG and water molecules at different solute concentrations. (1)H-T(1) experiments were carried on at a low magnetic field in the time domain (20 MHz) and at a high field (400 MHz) to obtain spectral resolution. Two contributing components were identified in each proton system, PEG and water, presenting values of T(1) with very different orders of magnitude. The approximate matching between the shorter (1)H-T(1) values associated with water and PEG has lead us to conclude that there exists a network of interactions (hydrogen bonds) between the solute and the solvent, which results in the presence of an ordered and dehydrated structure of PEG folded or self-assembled in equilibrium with a more flexible monomer structure. Dynamic light scattering results were consistent with the formation of PEG aggregates, showing a mean size between 40 and 100 nm.

  6. An NMR thermometer for cryogenic magic-angle spinning NMR: the spin-lattice relaxation of (127)I in cesium iodide.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Concistrè, Maria; Johannessen, Ole G; Beckett, Peter; Denning, Mark; Carravetta, Marina; Al-Mosawi, Maitham; Beduz, Carlo; Yang, Yifeng; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2011-10-01

    The accurate temperature measurement of solid samples under magic-angle spinning (MAS) is difficult in the cryogenic regime. It has been demonstrated by Thurber et al. (J. Magn. Reson., 196 (2009) 84-87) [10] that the temperature dependent spin-lattice relaxation time constant of (79)Br in KBr powder can be useful for measuring sample temperature under MAS over a wide temperature range (20-296 K). However the value of T(1) exceeds 3 min at temperatures below 20K, which is inconveniently long. In this communication, we show that the spin-lattice relaxation time constant of (127)I in CsI powder can be used to accurately measure sample temperature under MAS within a reasonable experimental time down to 10 K.

  7. Electron spin-lattice relaxation of the (4Fe-4S) ferredoxin from B. stearothermophilus. Comparison with other iron proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Patrick; Gayda, Jean-Pierre; Rao, K. Krishna

    1982-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of the (4Fe-4S) ferredoxin from Bacillus stearothermophilus is studied in the range 1.2 to 40 K. This dependence is similar to that observed for the (2Fe-2S) ferredoxin from Spirulina maxima and can be interpreted with the same relaxation processes [J.P. Gayda, P. Bertrand, A. Deville, C. More, G. Roger, J.F. Gibson, and R. Cammack, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 581, 15 (1979)]. In particular, between 4 and 15 K, the data are well fitted by a second-order Raman process involving three-dimensional phonons, with a Debye temperature of about 60 K (45 cm-1). This would give an estimation of the highest frequency of the vibrations which can propagate through the three-dimensional proteinic medium. In the highest temperature range (T≳30 K) the results are interpreted with an Orbach process involving an excited level of energy 120 cm-1. This process could be induced by the localized vibrations of the active site. Finally, these results are compared to those recently reported for some hemoproteins [H.J. Stapleton, J.P. Allen, C.P. Flynn, D.G. Stinson, and S.R. Kurtz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 1456 (1980)]. Below 15 K, the temperature dependence of T1 for these samples is similar to that observed for the iron-sulfur proteins and may be interpreted in the same way. Our interpretation is compared to the fractal model proposed by Stapleton et al.

  8. Zero-field studies of spin-lattice relaxation processes in non-Kramers doublet of LiF:Ni2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azamat, D. V.; Badalyan, A. G.; Dejneka, A.; Jastrabik, L.; Lančok, J.

    2016-12-01

    We use the inversion recovery technique with electron-spin-echo detection in order to study the non-resonant cross-relaxation of Ni2+-VLi with a faster relaxers—the exchange-coupled clusters of Ni2+ ions. An analysis of the results revealed a very high relaxation rate in non-Kramers doublet of LiF:Ni2+. The effect of a magnetic field on the spin-lattice relaxation of Ni2+ has estimated by comparing the results obtained for non-Kramers doublet around zero-magnetic field and for resonance at 394 mT (X-band microwave frequency).

  9. Observation of the vortex lattice melting by NMR spin-lattice relaxation in the mixed state

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskii, L.N.; Hammel, P.C.; Vinokur, V.M.

    1994-01-01

    For anisotropic layered superconductors the effect of moving vortices on the nuclear spin magnetization is calculated. Current is supposed to flow along layers, and applied magnetic field is tilted with respect to c-axis. In the solid phase the motion of the vortex lattice produces an alternating magnetic field perpendicular to the applied field which causes the decay of the spin-echo amplitude. This decay rate will display an array of peaks as a function of frequency. In the liquid phase this alternating field contribute to the longitudinal relaxation rate W{sub 1} which has a single peak.

  10. Temperature dependence of the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate for spin-1/2 chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coira, E.; Barmettler, P.; Giamarchi, T.; Kollath, C.

    2016-10-01

    We use recent developments in the framework of a time-dependent matrix product state method to compute the nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation rate 1 /T1 for spin-1/2 chains under magnetic field and for different Hamiltonians (XXX, XXZ, isotropically dimerized). We compute numerically the temperature dependence of the 1 /T1 . We consider both gapped and gapless phases, and also the proximity of quantum critical points. At temperatures much lower than the typical exchange energy scale, our results are in excellent agreement with analytical results, such as the ones derived from the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) theory and bosonization, which are valid in this regime. We also cover the regime for which the temperature T is comparable to the exchange coupling. In this case analytical theories are not appropriate, but this regime is relevant for various new compounds with exchange couplings in the range of tens of Kelvin. For the gapped phases, either the fully polarized phase for spin chains or the low-magnetic-field phase for the dimerized systems, we find an exponential decrease in Δ /(kBT ) of the relaxation time and can compute the gap Δ . Close to the quantum critical point our results are in good agreement with the scaling behavior based on the existence of free excitations.

  11. Effects of diffusion in magnetically inhomogeneous media on rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, John T.; Gore, John C.

    2014-12-01

    In an aqueous medium containing magnetic inhomogeneities, diffusion amongst the intrinsic susceptibility gradients contributes to the relaxation rate R1ρ of water protons to a degree that depends on the magnitude of the local field variations ΔBz, the geometry of the perturbers inducing these fields, and the rate of diffusion of water, D. This contribution can be reduced by using stronger locking fields, leading to a dispersion in R1ρ that can be analyzed to derive quantitative characteristics of the material. A theoretical expression was recently derived to describe these effects for the case of sinusoidal local field variations of a well-defined spatial frequency q. To evaluate the degree to which this dispersion may be extended to more realistic field patterns, finite difference Bloch-McConnell simulations were performed with a variety of three-dimensional structures to reveal how simple geometries affect the dispersion of spin-locking measurements. Dispersions were fit to the recently derived expression to obtain an estimate of the correlation time of the field variations experienced by the spins, and from this the mean squared gradient and an effective spatial frequency were obtained to describe the fields. This effective spatial frequency was shown to vary directly with the second moment of the spatial frequency power spectrum of the ΔBz field, which is a measure of the average spatial dimension of the field variations. These results suggest the theory may be more generally applied to more complex media to derive useful descriptors of the nature of field inhomogeneities. The simulation results also confirm that such diffusion effects disperse over a range of locking fields of lower amplitude than typical chemical exchange effects, and should be detectable in a variety of magnetically inhomogeneous media including regions of dense microvasculature within biological tissues.

  12. Membrane fluidity profiles as deduced by saturation-recovery EPR measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times of spin labels.

    PubMed

    Mainali, Laxman; Feix, Jimmy B; Hyde, James S; Subczynski, Witold K

    2011-10-01

    There are no easily obtainable EPR spectral parameters for lipid spin labels that describe profiles of membrane fluidity. The order parameter, which is most often used as a measure of membrane fluidity, describes the amplitude of wobbling motion of alkyl chains relative to the membrane normal and does not contain explicitly time or velocity. Thus, this parameter can be considered as nondynamic. The spin-lattice relaxation rate (T(1)(-1)) obtained from saturation-recovery EPR measurements of lipid spin labels in deoxygenated samples depends primarily on the rotational correlation time of the nitroxide moiety within the lipid bilayer. Thus, T(1)(-1) can be used as a convenient quantitative measure of membrane fluidity that reflects local membrane dynamics. T(1)(-1) profiles obtained for 1-palmitoyl-2-(n-doxylstearoyl)phosphatidylcholine (n-PC) spin labels in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes with and without 50 mol% cholesterol are presented in parallel with profiles of the rotational diffusion coefficient, R(⊥), obtained from simulation of EPR spectra using Freed's model. These profiles are compared with profiles of the order parameter obtained directly from EPR spectra and with profiles of the order parameter obtained from simulation of EPR spectra. It is shown that T(1)(-1) and R(⊥) profiles reveal changes in membrane fluidity that depend on the motional properties of the lipid alkyl chain. We find that cholesterol has a rigidifying effect only to the depth occupied by the rigid steroid ring structure and a fluidizing effect at deeper locations. These effects cannot be differentiated by profiles of the order parameter. All profiles in this study were obtained at X-band (9.5 GHz).

  13. Sub-millisecond (125)Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation times and large Knight shifts in complex tellurides: Validation of a quadratic relation across the spectrum.

    PubMed

    Levin, E M; Cui, J-F; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2016-09-01

    (125)Te NMR spectra and spin-lattice relaxation times, T1, have been measured for several GeTe-based materials with Te excess. The spectra show inhomogeneous broadening by several thousand ppm and a systematic variation in T1 relaxation time with resonance frequency. The quadratic dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, on the Knight shift in the Korringa relation is found to be valid over a wide range of Knight shifts. This result confirms that T1 relaxation in GeTe-based materials is mostly dominated by hyperfine interaction between nuclei and free charge carriers. In GeTe with 2.5% excess of Te, about 15% of the material exhibits a Knight shift of ≥4500ppm and a T1 of only 0.3ms, indicating a high hole concentration that could correspond to close to 50% vacancies on the Ge sublattice in this component. Our findings provide a basis for determining the charge carrier concentration and its distribution in complex thermoelectric and phase-change tellurides, which should lead to a better understanding of electronic and thermal transport properties as well as chemical bonding in these materials.

  14. Interaction between reduced glutathione and PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers in aqueous solutions: studied by 1H NMR and spin-lattice relaxation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lianwei; Guo, Chen; Yang, Liangrong; Xiang, Junfeng; Tang, Yalin; Liu, Huizhou

    2011-03-17

    In order to investigate the effect of PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers on the glutathione (GSH)/glutathione-S-transferase (GST) detoxification system, interaction between the copolymers and GSH is studied by NMR measurements. Selective rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect (ROE) experiment confirms that glutamyl (Glu) α-H of GSH has spatial contact with EO methylene protons. Spin-lattice relaxation times of GSH Glu α-H show a decrease when PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers are added, and the decrease is greater with copolymers possessing more EO units. Other protons of GSH show little change in the presence of the copolymers. The addition of GSH promotes the dehydration of PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers. This results from the breaking of hydrogen bonds between water and the polymers and the forming of hydrogen bonds between Glu α-carboxylate protons and oxygen atoms of EO units. The dissociation constant between GSH and P85 copolymer is determined by spin-lattice relaxation measurements, which shows the binding is of low affinity and the two molecules are in fast dissociation kinetics. This study suggests that GSH transporting or utilizing systems may be affected by treatment of PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers.

  15. Measurement of sample temperatures under magic-angle spinning from the chemical shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate of 79Br in KBr powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determination of sample temperatures in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with magic-angle spinning (MAS) can be problematic, particularly because frictional heating and heating by radio-frequency irradiation can make the internal sample temperature significantly different from the temperature outside the MAS rotor. This paper demonstrates the use of 79Br chemical shifts and spin-lattice relaxation rates in KBr powder as temperature-dependent parameters for the determination of internal sample temperatures. Advantages of this method include high signal-to-noise, proximity of the 79Br NMR frequency to that of 13C, applicability from 20 K to 320 K or higher, and simultaneity with adjustment of the MAS axis direction. We show that spin-lattice relaxation in KBr is driven by a quadrupolar mechanism. We demonstrate a simple approach to including KBr powder in hydrated samples, such as biological membrane samples, hydrated amyloid fibrils, and hydrated microcrystalline proteins, that allows direct assessment of the effects of frictional and radio-frequency heating under experimentally relevant conditions.

  16. Electron spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms of nitroxyl radicals in ionic liquids and conventional organic liquids: temperature dependence of a thermally activated process.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Krishnendu; Kattnig, Daniel R; Mladenova, Boryana Y; Grampp, Günter; Das, Ranjan

    2015-03-26

    During the past two decades, several studies have established a significant role played by a thermally activated process in the electron spin relaxation of nitroxyl free radicals in liquid solutions. Its role has been used to explain the spin relaxation behavior of these radicals in a wide range of viscosities and microwave frequencies. However, no temperature dependence of this process has been reported. In this work, our main aim was to investigate the temperature dependence of this process in neat solvents. Electron spin-lattice relaxation times of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) and 4-hydroxy-TEMPO (TEMPOL), in X-band microwave frequency, were measured by the pulse saturation recovery technique in three room-temperature ionic liquids ([bmim][BF4], [emim][BF4], and [bmim][PF6]), di-isononyl phthalate, and sec-butyl benzene. The ionic liquids provided a wide range of viscosity in a modest range of temperature. An auxiliary aim was to examine whether the dynamics of a probe molecule dissolved in ionic liquids was different from that in conventional molecular liquids, as claimed in several reports on fluorescence dynamics in ionic liquids. This was the reason for the inclusion of di-isononyl phthalate, whose viscosities are similar to that of the ionic liquids in similar temperatures, and sec-butyl benzene. Rotational correlation times of the nitroxyl radicals were determined from the hyperfine dependence of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line widths. Observation of highly well-resolved proton hyperfine lines, riding over the nitrogen hyperfine lines, in the low viscosity regime in all the solvents, gave more accurate values of the rotational correlation times than the values generally measured in the absence of these hyperfine lines and reported in the literature. The measured rotational correlation times obeyed a modified Stokes-Einstein-Debye relation of temperature dependence in all solvents. By separating the contributions of g

  17. 87Rb spin-lattice relaxation times in ferroelectric-paraelectric-incommensurate phases of Rb2CoBr4 using static NMR and MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2017-04-01

    To better elucidate the structural properties of Rb2CoBr4 in paraelectric, incommensurate, and ferroelectric phases, we studied the 87Rb nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation times in laboratory frame T1 and in rotating frame T1ρ. The resonance frequency and the chemical shift do not change abruptly near the phase transition temperature of Ti = 333 K and TC = 192 K, whereas T1 and T1ρ display discontinuous changes near Ti and TC. The abrupt changes in the relaxation times near these temperatures seem to be a result of the structural phase transitions. The results are distinctly different from those reported for Rb2CoCl4.

  18. A carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation study of the molecular conformation of the nootropic drug 2-oxopyrrolidin-1-ylacetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Grassi, A.; Guidoni, L.; Nicolini, M.; Pappalardo, G. C.; Viti, V.

    The spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1) of carbon-13 resonances of the drug 2-oxopyrrolidin- 1-ylacetamide ( 2OPYAC) were determined in CDCl 3 + DMSO and H 2O solutions to investigate the internal conformational flexibility. The measured T1s for the hydrogen-bearing carbon atoms of the 2-pyrrolidone ring fragment were diagnostic of a rigid conformation with respect to the acetamide linked moiety. The model of anisotropic reorientation of a rigid body was used to analyse the measured relaxation data in terms of a single conformation. Owing to the small number of T1 data available the fitting procedure for each of the possible conformations failed. The structure corresponding to the rigid conformation was therefore considered to be the one that is strongly stabilized by internal hydrogen bonding as predicted on the basis of theoretical MO ab initio quantum chemical calculations.

  19. Magnetic field induced anisotropy of 139La spin-lattice relaxation rates in stripe ordered La1.875Ba0.125CuO4

    DOE PAGES

    S. -H. Baek; Gu, G. D.; Utz, Y.; ...

    2015-10-26

    We report 139La nuclear magnetic resonance studies performed on a La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 single crystal. The data show that the structural phase transitions (high-temperature tetragonal → low-temperature orthorhombic → low-temperature tetragonal phase) are of the displacive type in this material. The 139La spin-lattice relaxation rate T–11 sharply upturns at the charge-ordering temperature TCO = 54 K, indicating that charge order triggers the slowing down of spin fluctuations. Detailed temperature and field dependencies of the T–11 below the spin-ordering temperature TSO=40 K reveal the development of enhanced spin fluctuations in the spin-ordered state for H ∥ [001], which are completely suppressed for largemore » fields along the CuO2 planes. Lastly, our results shed light on the unusual spin fluctuations in the charge and spin stripe ordered lanthanum cuprates.« less

  20. 11B and 27Al NMR spin-lattice relaxation and Knight shift of Mg1-xAlxB2: Evidence for an anisotropic Fermi surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papavassiliou, G.; Pissas, M.; Karayanni, M.; Fardis, M.; Koutandos, S.; Prassides, K.

    2002-10-01

    We report a detailed study of the 11B and 27Al NMR spin-lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the 27Al Knight shift (K) in Mg1-xAlxB2, 0<=x<=1. The evolution of (1/T1T) and K with x is in excellent agreement with the prediction of ab initio calculations of a highly anisotropic Fermi surface, consisting mainly of hole-type two-dimensional (2D) cylindrical sheets from bonding 2px,y boron orbitals. The density of states at the Fermi level also decreases sharply on Al doping and the 2D sheets collapse at x~0.55, where the superconducting phase disappears.

  1. NMR spin-lattice relaxation study of 7Li and 93Nb nuclei in Ti- or Fe-doped LiNbO3:Mg single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Tae Ho; Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-04-01

    In this study, to understand the effects of paramagnetic impurities, we investigated the temperature dependent of the spin-lattice relaxation times of pure LiNbO3, LiNbO3:Mg, LiNbO3:Mg/Ti, LiNbO3:Mg/Fe, and LiNbO3:Mg/Fe (thermally treated at 500°C) single crystals. The results for the LiNbO3:Mg single crystals doped with Fe3+ or Ti3+ are discussed with respect to the site distribution and atomic mobility of Li and Nb. In addition, the effects of a thermal treatment on LiNbO3:Mg/Fe single crystals were examined based on the T1 analysis of 7Li and 93Nb. It was found that the presence of impurities in the crystals induced systematic changes of activation energies concerning atomic mobility.

  2. ESR lineshape and {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion in propylene glycol solutions of nitroxide radicals – Joint analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kruk, D.; Hoffmann, S. K.; Goslar, J.; Lijewski, S.; Kubica-Misztal, A.; Korpała, A.; Oglodek, I.; Moscicki, J.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.

    2013-12-28

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) experiments are reported for propylene glycol solutions of the nitroxide radical: 4-oxo-TEMPO-d{sub 16} containing {sup 15}N and {sup 14}N isotopes. The NMRD experiments refer to {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation measurements in a broad frequency range (10 kHz–20 MHz). A joint analysis of the ESR and NMRD data is performed. The ESR lineshapes give access to the nitrogen hyperfine tensor components and the rotational correlation time of the paramagnetic molecule. The NMRD data are interpreted in terms of the theory of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in solutions of nitroxide radicals, recently presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124506 (2013)]. The theory includes the effect of the electron spin relaxation on the {sup 1}H relaxation of the solvent. The {sup 1}H relaxation is caused by dipole-dipole interactions between the electron spin of the radical and the proton spins of the solvent molecules. These interactions are modulated by three dynamic processes: relative translational dynamics of the involved molecules, molecular rotation, and electron spin relaxation. The sensitivity to rotation originates from the non-central positions of the interacting spin in the molecules. The electronic relaxation is assumed to stem from the electron spin–nitrogen spin hyperfine coupling, modulated by rotation of the radical molecule. For the interpretation of the NMRD data, we use the nitrogen hyperfine coupling tensor obtained from ESR and fit the other relevant parameters. The consistency of the unified analysis of ESR and NMRD, evaluated by the agreement between the rotational correlation times obtained from ESR and NMRD, respectively, and the agreement of the translation diffusion coefficients with literature values obtained for pure propylene glycol, is demonstrated to be satisfactory.

  3. Gd3+ spin-lattice relaxation via multi-band conduction electrons in Y(1-x)Gd(x)In3: an electron spin resonance study.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Baez, M; Iwamoto, W; Magnavita, E T; Osorio-Guillén, J M; Ribeiro, R A; Avila, M A; Rettori, C

    2014-04-30

    Interest in the electronic structure of the intermetallic compound YIn3 has been renewed with the recent discovery of superconductivity at T ∼ 1 K, which may be filamentary in nature. In this work we perform electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments on Gd(3+) doped YIn3 (Y1-xGdxIn3; 0.001 ⪅ x ⩽̸ 0.08), showing that the spin-lattice relaxation of the Gd(3+) ions, due to the exchange interaction between the Gd(3+) localized magnetic moment and the conduction electrons (ce), is processed via the presence of s-, p- and d-type ce at the YIn3 Fermi level. These findings are revealed by the Gd(3+) concentration dependence of the Korringa-like relaxation rate d(ΔH)/dT and g-shift (Δg = g - 1.993), that display bottleneck relaxation behavior for the s-electrons and unbottleneck behavior for the p- and d-electrons. The Korringa-like relaxation rates vary from 22(2) Oe/K for x ⪅ 0.001 to 8(2) Oe/K for x = 0.08 and the g-shift values change, respectively, from a positive Δg = +0.047(10) to a negative Δg = -0.008(4). Analysis in terms of a three-band ce model allows the extraction of the corresponding exchange interaction parameters Jfs, Jfp and Jfd.

  4. Molecular motions of [Beta]-carotene and a carotenoporphyrin dyad in solution. A carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation time study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.; Swindle, S.L.; Smith, S.K.; Nieman, R.A.; Moore, A.L.; Moore, T.A.; Gust, D. )

    1995-03-09

    Analysis of [sup 13]C NMR spin-lattice relaxation times (T[sub 1]) yields information concerning both overall tumbling of molecules in solution and internal rotations about single bonds. Relaxation time and nuclear Overhauser effect data have been obtained for [Beta]-carotene and two related molecules, squalane and squalene, for zinc meso-tetraphenylporphyrin, and for a dyad consisting of a porphyrin covalently linked to a carotenoid polyene through a trimethylene bridge. Squalane and squalene, which lack conjugated double bonds, behave essentially as limp string, with internal rotations at least as rapid as overall isotropic tumbling motions. In contrast, [Beta]-carotene reorients as a rigid rod, with internal motions which are too slow to affect relaxation times. Modeling it as an anisotropic rotor yields a rotational diffusion coefficient for motion about the major axis which is 14 times larger than that for rotation about axes perpendicular to that axis. The porphyrin reorients more nearly isotropically and features internal librational motions about the single bonds to the phenyl groups. The relaxation time data for the carotenoporphyrin are consistent with internal motions similar to those of a medieval military flail. 31 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Anisotropy of spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times in liquids entrapped in nanocavities: Application to MRI study of biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Gregory B.; Goren, Shaul D.; Meerovich, Victor M.; Sokolovsky, Vladimir L.

    2016-02-01

    Spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxations in liquid or gas entrapped in nanosized ellipsoidal cavities with different orientation ordering are theoretically investigated. The model is flexible in order to be applied to explain experimental results in cavities with various forms, from very prolate up to oblate ones, and different degree of ordering of nanocavities. In the framework of the considered model, the dipole-dipole interaction is determined by a single coupling constant, which depends on the form, size, and orientation of the cavity and number of nuclear spins in the cavity. It was shown that the transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates differently depend on the angle between the external magnetic field and cavity main axis. The calculation results for the local dipolar field, transverse and longitudinal relaxation times explain the angular dependencies observed in MRI experiments with biological objects: cartilage and tendon. Microstructure of these tissues can be characterized by the standard deviation of the Gaussian distribution of fibril orientations. The comparison of the theoretical and experimental results shows that the value of the standard deviation obtained at the matching of the calculation to experimental results can be used as a parameter characterizing the disorder in the biological sample.

  6. Anisotropy of spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times in liquids entrapped in nanocavities: Application to MRI study of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Furman, Gregory B; Goren, Shaul D; Meerovich, Victor M; Sokolovsky, Vladimir L

    2016-02-01

    Spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxations in liquid or gas entrapped in nanosized ellipsoidal cavities with different orientation ordering are theoretically investigated. The model is flexible in order to be applied to explain experimental results in cavities with various forms, from very prolate up to oblate ones, and different degree of ordering of nanocavities. In the framework of the considered model, the dipole-dipole interaction is determined by a single coupling constant, which depends on the form, size, and orientation of the cavity and number of nuclear spins in the cavity. It was shown that the transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates differently depend on the angle between the external magnetic field and cavity main axis. The calculation results for the local dipolar field, transverse and longitudinal relaxation times explain the angular dependencies observed in MRI experiments with biological objects: cartilage and tendon. Microstructure of these tissues can be characterized by the standard deviation of the Gaussian distribution of fibril orientations. The comparison of the theoretical and experimental results shows that the value of the standard deviation obtained at the matching of the calculation to experimental results can be used as a parameter characterizing the disorder in the biological sample.

  7. Inhomogeneous 1H NMR spin-lattice relaxation in the organic superconductor kappa-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu[N(CN)2]Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezo, Joseph Christopher

    The two-dimensional superconductors based on the organic molecule "ET" have been an active area of research since their discovery over two decades ago. The member of this family with the highest critical temperature, kappa-(ET)2Cu[N(CN)2]Br ( Tc=11.7 K), has seen renewed interest since the observation of an anomalous Nernst signal by Nam et al in 2007 [51]. A similar effect was seen earlier by Ong's group in some of the high-temperature cuprate superconductors by [78,84]. This is interpreted to be evidence of a picture of superconductivity in which the resistive transition is driven by thermal fluctuations in the phase of the superconducting order parameter. Below Tc, these fluctuations take the form of bound vortex-antivortex pairs that have no long-range effect on the phase. At Tc, they undergo a Kosterlitz-Thouless unbinding transition; the unbound vortices destroy long-range phase coherence. Previously reported proton NMR measurements on this material have shown a high sensitivity to vortex motion, but reported no interesting behavior above the phase transition [15,25,42]. In this thesis, we revisit the 1H NMR properties of kappa-(ET)2Cu[N(CN)2]Br, paying specific attention to the spin-lattice relaxation, to look for some fingerprint of the phenomenon observed by Nam et al.

  8. Molecular mobility of lyophilized poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and methylcellulose as determined by the laboratory and rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation times of 1H and 13C.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Sumie; Aso, Yukio; Kojima, Shigeo

    2003-11-01

    Laboratory- and rotating- frame spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1) and T(1rho)) of (1)H and (13)C in lyophilized poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and methylcellulose (MC) are determined to examine feasibility of using T(1) and T(1rho) as a measure of molecular motions on large time scales related to the storage stability of lyophilized formulations. The T(1rho) of proton and carbon was found to reflect the mobility of PVP and MC backbones, indicating that it is useful as a measure of large-time-scale molecular motions. In contrast to the T(1rho), the T(1) of proton measured in the same temperature range reflected the mobility of PVP and MC side chains. The T(1) of proton may be useful as a measure of local molecular motions on a smaller-time-scale, although the measurement is interfered by moisture under some conditions. The temperature dependence of T(1) and T(1rho) indicated that methylene in the MC molecule had much higher mobility than that in the dextran molecule, also indicated that methylene in the PVP side chain had a higher mobility than that in the MC side chain.

  9. Long-range Li+ dynamics in the lithium argyrodite Li7PSe6 as probed by rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation NMR.

    PubMed

    Epp, V; Gün, O; Deiseroth, H-J; Wilkening, M

    2013-05-21

    Lithium-rich argyrodites belong to a relatively new group of fast ion conducting solids. They might serve as powerful electrolytes in all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries being, from a medium-term point of view, the key technology when safe energy storage systems have to be developed. Spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements carried out in the rotating frame of reference turned out to be the method of choice to study Li dynamics in argyrodites. When plotted as a function of the inverse temperature, the SLR rates log10(R1ρ) reveal an asymmetric diffusion-induced rate peak. The rate peak contains information on the Li jump rate, the activation energy of the hopping process as well as correlation effects. In particular, considering the high-temperature flank of the SLR NMR rate peak recorded in the rotating frame of reference, an activation energy of approximately 0.49 eV is found. This value represents long-range lithium jump diffusion in crystalline Li7PSe6. As an example, at 325 K the Li jump rate determined from SLR NMR is in the order of 1.4 × 10(5) s(-1). The pronounced asymmetry of the rate peak R1ρ(1/T) points to correlated Li motion. It is comparable to that which is typically found for structurally disordered materials showing a broad range of correlation times.

  10. Nuclear Spin Lattice Relaxation and Conductivity Studies of the Non-Arrhenius Conductivity Behavior in Lithium Fast Ion Conducting Sulfide Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Benjamin Michael

    2003-01-01

    As time progresses, the world is using up more of the planet's natural resources. Without technological advances, the day will eventually arrive when these natural resources will no longer be sufficient to supply all of the energy needs. As a result, society is seeing a push for the development of alternative fuel sources such as wind power, solar power, fuel cells, and etc. These pursuits are even occurring in the state of Iowa with increasing social pressure to incorporate larger percentages of ethanol in gasoline. Consumers are increasingly demanding that energy sources be more powerful, more durable, and, ultimately, more cost efficient. Fast Ionic Conducting (FIC) glasses are a material that offers great potential for the development of new batteries and/or fuel cells to help inspire the energy density of battery power supplies. This dissertation probes the mechanisms by which ions conduct in these glasses. A variety of different experimental techniques give a better understanding of the interesting materials science taking place within these systems. This dissertation discusses Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques performed on FIC glasses over the past few years. These NMR results have been complimented with other measurement techniques, primarily impedance spectroscopy, to develop models that describe the mechanisms by which ionic conduction takes place and the dependence of the ion dynamics on the local structure of the glass. The aim of these measurements was to probe the cause of a non-Arrhenius behavior of the conductivity which has been seen at high temperatures in the silver thio-borosilicate glasses. One aspect that will be addressed is if this behavior is unique to silver containing fast ion conducting glasses. more specifically, this study will determine if a non-Arrhenius correlation time, τ, can be observed in the Nuclear Spin Lattice Relaxation (NSLR) measurements. If so, then can this behavior be modeled with a new single distribution of

  11. Electron Spin-Lattice Relaxation in Two Heme Iron and Two Blue-Copper Proteins at Liquid Helium Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, Bradley Denton

    1990-01-01

    The relaxation rates in frozen aqueous solutions of whale ferri-myoglobin azide, bovine ferri-hemoglobin azide, cupric azurin (P. aeruginosa) and cupric spinach plastocyanin were measured at 9.5 GHz using the pulse-saturation recovery method. Measurements covered a temperature range of 1.4 K to as high as 22 K, with corresponding relaxation rates up to 10^5/sec. Improvements in the equipment and the methods of analysis have enabled more stringent tests of the temperature dependence of the rates. In particular, several models proposed in the literature to explain the anomalous temperature dependence of the Raman rates in proteins are shown to be insufficient, including two fractal models. In addition, it is shown that any model based exclusively on the protein structure fails due to the diversity of the data under various solvent conditions. A general functional form consistent with a crossover in the vibrational properties is proposed instead, similar to the localization crossover in amorphous materials. The effect on the relaxation rate of several cosolvents and solutes is also examined. The effect on the direct process is much more pronounced than on the Raman region. The differences are shown to be consistent with changes in the velocity of sound at room temperature caused by the addition of cosolvents and solutes. Finally, the EPR recovery form is analyzed. We propose that the deviations in the recovery from an exponential form are due to a distribution of relaxation rates. The source of the distribution is most likely sample heating in the lower temperatures and a distribution of conformations frozen in near the paramagnetic site in the higher temperatures. It is not likely that it is caused by spin-spin interactions. The exact form of the distribution is unclear, but the most successful functional form for the recoveries is a stretched exponential with an exponent ranging from 0.5 to 1.0. However, a simple exponential fit to a limited portion of the recovery

  12. Assessment of chemical exchange in tryptophan-albumin solution through (19)F multicomponent transverse relaxation dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping-Chang

    2015-06-01

    A number of NMR methods possess the capability of probing chemical exchange dynamics in solution. However, certain drawbacks limit the applications of these NMR approaches, particularly, to a complex system. Here, we propose a procedure that integrates the regularized nonnegative least squares (NNLS) analysis of multiexponential T2 relaxation into Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiments to probe chemical exchange in a multicompartmental system. The proposed procedure was validated through analysis of (19)F T2 relaxation data of 6-fluoro-DL-tryptophan in a two-compartment solution with and without bovine serum albumin. Given the regularized NNLS analysis of a T2 relaxation curve acquired, for example, at the CPMG frequency υ CPMG  = 125, the nature of two distinct peaks in the associated T2 distribution spectrum indicated 6-fluoro-DL-tryptophan either retaining the free state, with geometric mean */multiplicative standard deviation (MSD) = 1851.2 ms */1.51, or undergoing free/albumin-bound interconversion, with geometric mean */MSD = 236.8 ms */1.54, in the two-compartment system. Quantities of the individual tryptophan species were accurately reflected by the associated T2 peak areas, with an interconversion state-to-free state ratio of 0.45 ± 0.11. Furthermore, the CPMG relaxation dispersion analysis estimated the exchange rate between the free and albumin-bound states in this fluorinated tryptophan analog and the corresponding dissociation constant of the fluorinated tryptophan-albumin complex in the chemical-exchanging, two-compartment system.

  13. Spin-lattice relaxation of coupled metal-radical spin-dimers in proteins: application to Fe(2+)-cofactor (Q(A)(-.), Q(B)(-.), phi(-.)) dimers in reaction centers from photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Rafael; Isaacson, Roger A; Abresch, Edward C; Okamura, Melvin Y; Feher, George

    2002-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) for the reduced quinone acceptors Q(A)(-.) and Q(B)(-.), and the intermediate pheophytin acceptor phi(-.), were measured in native photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) containing a high spin Fe(2+) (S = 2) and in RCs in which Fe(2+) was replaced by diamagnetic Zn(2+). From these data, the contribution of the Fe(2+) to the spin-lattice relaxation of the cofactors was determined. To relate the spin-lattice relaxation rate to the spin-spin interaction between the Fe(2+) and the cofactors, we developed a spin-dimer model that takes into account the zero field splitting and the rhombicity of the Fe(2+) ion. The relaxation mechanism of the spin-dimer involves a two-phonon process that couples the fast relaxing Fe(2+) spin to the cofactor spin. The process is analogous to the one proposed by R. Orbach (Proc. R. Soc. A. (Lond.). 264:458-484) for rare earth ions. The spin-spin interactions are, in general, composed of exchange and dipolar contributions. For the spin dimers studied in this work the exchange interaction, J(o), is predominant. The values of J(o) for Q(A)(-.)Fe(2+), Q(B)(-.)Fe(2+), and phi(-.)Fe(2+) were determined to be (in kelvin) -0.58, -0.92, and -1.3 x 10(-3), respectively. The |J(o)| of the various cofactors (obtained in this work and those of others) could be fitted with the relation exp(-beta(J)d), where d is the distance between cofactor spins and beta(J) had a value of (0.66-0.86) A(-1). The relation between J(o) and the matrix element |V(ij)|(2) involved in electron transfer rates is discussed. PMID:12414679

  14. Nuclear spin lattice relaxation and conductivity studies of the non-Arrhenius conductivity behavior in lithium fast ion conducting sulfide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Benjamin Michael

    Homogeneous xB2O3 + (1-x)B 2S3 glasses were prepared between 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.80. Raman, IR, and 11B NMR spectroscopies show that the boron oxide structures of B2O3, especially the six-membered rings, quickly diminish with increasing sulfide content, whereas the corresponding sulfide structures in B2S3 remain relatively intense as oxide content is increased. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and density measurements show that physical properties of these boron oxysulfide glasses heavily favor the B2S3 properties regardless of the amount of B2O3 added to the system. It is hypothesized that the stability of the thioboroxol ring group relative to that of the BS 3/2 trigonal group is a possible source of this behavior. The formation of mixed boron oxysulfide structures of composition BSzO3-z where 0 < z < 3 is proposed. Structural studies of the ternary xLi2S + (1-x)[0.5 B2S3 + 0.5 GeS2] glasses using IR, Raman, and 11B NMR show that these glasses do not have equal sharing of the lithium atoms between GeS2 and B2S3. The IR spectra indicates that the B2S3 glass network are under-doped in comparison to corresponding compositions in the xLi 2S + (1-x)B2S3 binary system. Additionally, the Raman spectra show that the GeS2 glass network is over-modified. 11Boron static NMR gives evidence that ˜80% of the boron atoms are in tetrahedral coordinated. A super macro tetrahedron is proposed as one of the structures in these glasses in which some of them may contain boron sites substituted by germanium atoms at lower Li2S content. Nuclear Spin Lattice Relaxation and ionic conductivity measurements of Li doped Li2S + GeS2 + B2S3 glasses were performed to investigate the ion hopping dynamics and the non-Arrhenius conductivity behavior that has been observed in some fast ion conducting glasses. A distribution of activation energies model was used to fit the NSLR results and conductivity results. Comparisons are made to previously studied binary lithium thio-germanate and binary

  15. Fast Li ion dynamics in the solid electrolyte Li7 P3 S11 as probed by (6,7) Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wohlmuth, Dominik; Epp, Viktor; Wilkening, Martin

    2015-08-24

    The development of safe and long-lasting all-solid-state batteries with high energy density requires a thorough characterization of ion dynamics in solid electrolytes. Commonly, conductivity spectroscopy is used to study ion transport; much less frequently, however, atomic-scale methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are employed. Here, we studied long-range as well as short-range Li ion dynamics in the glass-ceramic Li7 P3 S11 . Li(+) diffusivity was probed by using a combination of different NMR techniques; the results are compared with those obtained from electrical conductivity measurements. Our NMR relaxometry data clearly reveal a very high Li(+) diffusivity, which is reflected in a so-called diffusion-induced (6) Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation peak showing up at temperatures as low as 313 K. At this temperature, the mean residence time between two successful Li jumps is in the order of 3×10(8) s(-1) , which corresponds to a Li(+) ion conductivity in the order of 10(-4) to 10(-3) S cm(-1) . Such a value is in perfect agreement with expectations for the crystalline but metastable glass ceramic Li7 P3 S11 . In contrast to conductivity measurements, NMR analysis reveals a range of activation energies with values ranging from 0.17 to 0.26 eV, characterizing Li diffusivity in the bulk. In our case, through-going Li ion transport, when probed by using macroscopic conductivity spectroscopy, however, seems to be influenced by blocking grain boundaries including, for example, amorphous regions surrounding the Li7 P3 S11 crystallites. As a result of this, long-range ion transport as seen by impedance spectroscopy is governed by an activation energy of approximately 0.38 eV. The findings emphasize how surface and grain boundary effects can drastically affect long-range ionic conduction. If we are to succeed in solid-state battery technology, such effects have to be brought under control by, for example, sophisticated densification or through the preparation

  16. Effects of Off-Resonance Irradiation, Cross-Relaxation, and Chemical Exchange on Steady-State Magnetization and Effective Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsley, Peter B.; Monahan, W. Gordon

    2000-04-01

    In the presence of an off-resonance radiofrequency field, recovery of longitudinal magnetization to a steady state is not purely monoexponential. Under reasonable conditions with zero initial magnetization, recovery is nearly exponential and an effective relaxation rate constant R1eff = 1/T1eff can be obtained. Exact and approximate formulas for R1eff and steady-state magnetization are derived from the Bloch equations for spins undergoing cross-relaxation and chemical exchange between two sites in the presence of an off-resonance radiofrequency field. The relaxation formulas require that the magnetization of one spin is constant, but not necessarily zero, while the other spin relaxes. Extension to three sites with one radiofrequency field is explained. The special cases of off-resonance effects alone and with cross-relaxation or chemical exchange, cross-relaxation alone, and chemical exchange alone are compared. The inaccuracy in saturation transfer measurements of exchange rate constants by published formulas is discussed for the creatine kinase reaction.

  17. Solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation and isolated-molecule and cluster electronic structure calculations in organic molecular solids: The relationship between structure and methyl group and t-butyl group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianlong E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu; Mallory, Frank B.; Mallory, Clelia W.; Odhner, Hosanna R.; Beckmann, Peter A. E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu

    2014-05-21

    We report ab initio density functional theory electronic structure calculations of rotational barriers for t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups both in the isolated molecules and in central molecules in clusters built from the X-ray structure in four t-butyl aromatic compounds. The X-ray structures have been reported previously. We also report and interpret the temperature dependence of the solid state {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50, 22.5, and 53.0 MHz in one of the four compounds. Such experiments for the other three have been reported previously. We compare the computed barriers for methyl group and t-butyl group rotation in a central target molecule in the cluster with the activation energies determined from fitting the {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation data. We formulate a dynamical model for the superposition of t-butyl group rotation and the rotation of the t-butyl group's constituent methyl groups. The four compounds are 2,7-di-t-butylpyrene, 1,4-di-t-butylbenzene, 2,6-di-t-butylnaphthalene, and 3-t-butylchrysene. We comment on the unusual ground state orientation of the t-butyl groups in the crystal of the pyrene and we comment on the unusually high rotational barrier of these t-butyl groups.

  18. Self-Assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles Designed as Imaging Probes for 19F and Relaxation-Enhanced 1H imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preslar, Adam Truett

    This work incorporates whole-body imaging functionality into peptide amphiphile (PA) nanostructures used for regenerative medicine to facilitate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two strategies were employed: 1. Conjugation of gadolinium chelates to peptide nanostructures to monitor biomaterial degradation in vivo with MRI and inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) 2. Synthesis of perfluorinated moiety-bearing peptide amphiphiles for 19F-MRI. The Gd(III) chelate gadoteridol was conjugated by copper-catalyzed "click" chemistry to a series of PAs known to form cylindrical nanostructures. By fitting nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion (NMRD) profiles to the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) equations, it was observed that the water exchange parameter (tauM) depended on thermal annealing or calcium ion cross-linking. The sequence C16V 3A3E3G(Gd) exhibited an acceleration of nearly 100 ns after thermal annealing and calcium addition. These gadolinium-labeled PAs were used to track in vivo degradation of gels within the tibialis anterior muscle in a murine model. The half-life of biomaterial degradation was determined to be 13.5 days by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) of Gd(III). Gel implants could be monitored by MRI for eight days before the signal dispersed due to implant degradation and dilution. Additionally, nanostructures incorporating highly fluorinated domains were investigated for use as MRI contrast agents. Short, perfluoroalkyane tails of seven or eight carbon atoms in length were grafted to PA sequences containing a V2A2 beta-sheet forming sequence. The V2A2 sequence is known to drive 1D nanostructure assembly. It was found that the sequences C7F13V2A 2E2 and C7F13V2A 2K3 formed 1D assemblies in water which transition from ribbon-like to cylindrical shape as pH increases from 4.5 to 8.0. Ribbon-like nanostructures had reduced magnetic resonance signal by T 2 relaxation quenching, whereas their cylindrical counterparts

  19. Molecular determinants for drug-receptor interactions. 8. Anisotropic and internal motions in morphine, nalorphine, oxymorphone, naloxone and naltrexone in aqueous solution by carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Antonio; Perly, Bruno; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.

    1989-02-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1) were measured for morphine, oxymorphone, nalorphine, naloxone and naltrexone as hydrochloride salts in 2H 2O solution. The data refer to the molecules in the N-equatorial configuration. The experimental T1 values were interpreted using a model of anisotropic reorientation of a rigid body with superimposed internal motions of the flexible N-methyl, N-methyl-allyl and N-methyl-cyclopropyl fragments. The calculated internal motional rates were found to markedly decrease on passing from agonists to mixed (nalorphine) and pure (naloxone, naltrexone) antagonists. For these latter the observed trend of the internal flexibility about NC and CC bonds of the N-substituents is discussed in terms of a correlation with their relative antagonistic potencies. In fact, such an evidence of decreasing internal conformational dynamics in the order nalorphine, naloxone, naltrexone, appeared interestingly in line with the "two-state" model of opiate receptor operation mode proposed by Snyder.

  20. Magnetic field induced anisotropy of 139La spin-lattice relaxation rates in stripe ordered La1.875Ba0.125CuO4

    SciTech Connect

    S. -H. Baek; Gu, G. D.; Utz, Y.; Hucker, M.; Buchner, B.; Grafe, H. -J.

    2015-10-26

    We report 139La nuclear magnetic resonance studies performed on a La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 single crystal. The data show that the structural phase transitions (high-temperature tetragonal → low-temperature orthorhombic → low-temperature tetragonal phase) are of the displacive type in this material. The 139La spin-lattice relaxation rate T–11 sharply upturns at the charge-ordering temperature TCO = 54 K, indicating that charge order triggers the slowing down of spin fluctuations. Detailed temperature and field dependencies of the T–11 below the spin-ordering temperature TSO=40 K reveal the development of enhanced spin fluctuations in the spin-ordered state for H ∥ [001], which are completely suppressed for large fields along the CuO2 planes. Lastly, our results shed light on the unusual spin fluctuations in the charge and spin stripe ordered lanthanum cuprates.

  1. A general model to calculate the spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time of blood, accounting for haematocrit, oxygen saturation and magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Hales, Patrick W; Kirkham, Fenella J; Clark, Christopher A

    2016-02-01

    Many MRI techniques require prior knowledge of the T1-relaxation time of blood (T1bl). An assumed/fixed value is often used; however, T1bl is sensitive to magnetic field (B0), haematocrit (Hct), and oxygen saturation (Y). We aimed to combine data from previous in vitro measurements into a mathematical model, to estimate T1bl as a function of B0, Hct, and Y. The model was shown to predict T1bl from in vivo studies with a good accuracy (± 87 ms). This model allows for improved estimation of T1bl between 1.5-7.0 T while accounting for variations in Hct and Y, leading to improved accuracy of MRI-derived perfusion measurements.

  2. Effect of H bond removal and changes in the position of the iron-sulphur head domain on the spin-lattice relaxation properties of the [2Fe-2S](2+) Rieske cluster in cytochrome bc(1).

    PubMed

    Sarewicz, Marcin; Dutka, Małgorzata; Pietras, Rafał; Borek, Arkadiusz; Osyczka, Artur

    2015-10-14

    Here, comparative electron spin-lattice relaxation studies of the 2Fe-2S iron-sulphur (Fe-S) cluster embedded in a large membrane protein complex - cytochrome bc1 - are reported. Structural modifications of the local environment alone (mutations S158A and Y160W removing specific H bonds between Fe-S and amino acid side chains) or in combination with changes in global protein conformation (mutations/inhibitors changing the position of the Fe-S binding domain within the protein complex) resulted in different redox potentials as well as g-, g-strain and the relaxation rates (T1(-1)) for the Fe-S cluster. The relaxation rates for T < 25 K were measured directly by inversion recovery, while for T > 60 K they were deduced from simulation of continuous wave EPR spectra of the cluster using a model that included anisotropy of Lorentzian broadening. In all cases, the relaxation rate involved contributions from direct, second-order Raman and Orbach processes, each dominating over different temperature ranges. The analysis of T1(-1) (T) over the range 5-120 K yielded the values of the Orbach energy (EOrb), Debye temperature θD and Raman process efficiency CRam for each variant of the protein. As the Orbach energy was generally higher for mutants S158A and Y160W, compared to wild-type protein (WT), it is suggested that H bond removal influences the geometry leading to increased strength of antiferromagnetic coupling between two Fe ions of the cluster. While θD was similar for all variants (∼107 K), the efficiency of the Raman process generally depends on the spin-orbit coupling that is lower for S158A and Y160W mutants, when compared to the WT. However, in several cases CRam did not only correlate with spin-orbit coupling but was also influenced by other factors - possibly the modification of protein rigidity and therefore the vibrational modes around the Fe-S cluster that change upon the movement of the iron-sulphur head domain.

  3. Molecular organization of cytochrome c2 near the binding domain of cytochrome bc1 studied by electron spin-lattice relaxation enhancement.

    PubMed

    Pietras, Rafał; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2014-06-19

    Measurements of specific interactions between proteins are challenging. In redox systems, interactions involve surfaces near the attachment sites of cofactors engaged in interprotein electron transfer (ET). Here we analyzed binding of cytochrome c2 to cytochrome bc1 by measuring paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) of spin label (SL) attached to cytochrome c2. PRE was exclusively induced by the iron atom of heme c1 of cytochrome bc1, which guaranteed that only the configurations with SL to heme c1 distances up to ∼30 Å were detected. Changes in PRE were used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the binding. Our data suggest that at low ionic strength and under an excess of cytochrome c2 over cytochrome bc1, several cytochrome c2 molecules gather near the binding domain forming a "cloud" of molecules. When the cytochrome bc1 concentration increases, the cloud disperses to populate additional available binding domains. An increase in ionic strength weakens the attractive forces and the average distance between cytochrome c2 and cytochrome bc1 increases. The spatial arrangement of the protein complex at various ionic strengths is different. Above 150 mM NaCl the lifetime of the complexes becomes so short that they are undetectable. All together the results indicate that cytochrome c2 molecules, over the range of salt concentration encompassing physiological ionic strength, do not form stable, long-lived complexes but rather constantly collide with the surface of cytochrome bc1 and ET takes place coincidentally with one of these collisions.

  4. Evidence of a structural phase transition in superconducting SmFeAsO1-xFx from 19F NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, M.; Ghoshray, K.; Mazumdar, C.; Poddar, A.; Ghoshray, A.; Berardan, D.; Dragoe, N.

    2013-01-01

    We report resistivity, magnetization and 19F NMR results in a polycrystalline sample of SmFeAsO0.86F0.14. The resistivity and magnetization data show a sharp drop at 48 K indicating a superconducting transition. The nuclear spin-lattice rate (1/T1) and spin-spin relaxation rate (1/T2) clearly show the existence of a structural phase transition near 163 K in the sample, which also undergoes a superconducting transition. This finding creates interest in exploring whether this is unique for Sm based systems or is also present in other rare-earth based 1111 superconductors.

  5. Pressure and temperature effects on 2H spin-lattice relaxation times and 1H chemical shifts in tert-butyl alcohol- and urea-D2O solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Koji; Ibuki, Kazuyasu; Ueno, Masakatsu

    1998-01-01

    The pressure and temperature effects of hydrophobic hydration were studied by NMR spectroscopy. The 1H chemical shifts (δ) were measured at 7.7, 29.9, and 48.4 °C under high pressure up to 294 MPa for HDO contained as impurity in neat D2O, 1 mol kg-1 tert-butyl alcohol (TBA)-D2O, and 1 mol kg-1 urea-D2O solutions, for the methyl group of TBA in the TBA-D2O solution, and for the amino group of urea in the urea-D2O solution. The 2H spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) were measured under the same conditions as the chemical shift measurements for D2O in neat D2O, TBA-D2O and urea-D2O solutions with organic contents up to 8 mol%. The following features are observed for the pressure effect on δ (HDO) and 2H-T1 in TBA-D2O solutions: (1) The δ (HDO) exhibits a downfield shift relative to that in neat D2O, and the difference of δ (HDO) between TBA solution and neat D2O becomes larger with increasing pressure at lower temperature. (2) The decrement of the rotational correlation time of water in the hydration shell of TBA (τcs) relative to the value at atmospheric pressure is smaller than that in the bulk (τc0). (3) The pressure coefficients of T1 are positive in dilute solutions but are negative in more than 4 to 5 mol% solutions. These results suggest that the hydrophobic hydration shell of TBA is different than the open structure of water present in bulk, and resists pressure more strongly than the open structure of water in the bulk. In solutions of 4 to 5 mol%, the hydration shell collapses. On the other hand, the τcs in the hydration shell of urea is slightly larger than that in bulk water at lower pressure, but is obviously larger at higher pressure. In view of the rotational motion of water molecules, urea seems to strengthen the water structure slightly rather than weaken it, although δ (HDO) approaches that in the bulk with pressure. It is difficult to classify urea into a structure maker or a breaker.

  6. Feasibility of 19F-NMR for assessing the molecular mobility of flufenamic acid in solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Aso, Yukio; Yoshioka, Sumie; Miyazaki, Tamaki; Kawanishi, Toru

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to clarify the feasibility of 19F-NMR for assessing the molecular mobility of flufenamic acid (FLF) in solid dispersions. Amorphous solid dispersions of FLF containing poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) or hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) were prepared by melting and rapid cooling. Spin-lattice relaxation times (T1 and T(1rho)) of FLF fluorine atoms in the solid dispersions were determined at various temperatures (-20 to 150 degrees C). Correlation time (tauc), which is a measure of rotational molecular mobility, was calculated from the observed T1 or T1rho value and that of the T1 or T1rho minimum, assuming that the relaxation mechanism of spin-lattice relaxation of FLF fluorine atoms does not change with temperature. The tauc value for solid dispersions containing 20% PVP was 2-3 times longer than that for solid dispersions containing 20% HPMC at 50 degrees C, indicating that the molecular mobility of FLF in solid dispersions containing 20% PVP was lower than that in solid dispersions containing 20% HPMC. The amount of amorphous FLF remaining in the solid dispersions stored at 60 degrees C was successfully estimated by analyzing the solid echo signals of FLF fluorine atoms, and it was possible to follow the overall crystallization of amorphous FLF in the solid dispersions. The solid dispersion containing 20% PVP was more stable than that containing 20% HPMC. The difference in stability between solid dispersions containing PVP and HPMC is considered due to the difference in molecular mobility as determined by tauc. The molecular mobility determined by 19F-NMR seems to be a useful measure for assessing the stability of drugs containing fluorine atoms in amorphous solid dispersions.

  7. SPILADY: A parallel CPU and GPU code for spin-lattice magnetic molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Pui-Wai; Dudarev, S. L.; Woo, C. H.

    2016-10-01

    Spin-lattice dynamics generalizes molecular dynamics to magnetic materials, where dynamic variables describing an evolving atomic system include not only coordinates and velocities of atoms but also directions and magnitudes of atomic magnetic moments (spins). Spin-lattice dynamics simulates the collective time evolution of spins and atoms, taking into account the effect of non-collinear magnetism on interatomic forces. Applications of the method include atomistic models for defects, dislocations and surfaces in magnetic materials, thermally activated diffusion of defects, magnetic phase transitions, and various magnetic and lattice relaxation phenomena. Spin-lattice dynamics retains all the capabilities of molecular dynamics, adding to them the treatment of non-collinear magnetic degrees of freedom. The spin-lattice dynamics time integration algorithm uses symplectic Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of atomic coordinate, velocity and spin evolution operators, and delivers highly accurate numerical solutions of dynamic evolution equations over extended intervals of time. The code is parallelized in coordinate and spin spaces, and is written in OpenMP C/C++ for CPU and in CUDA C/C++ for Nvidia GPU implementations. Temperatures of atoms and spins are controlled by Langevin thermostats. Conduction electrons are treated by coupling the discrete spin-lattice dynamics equations for atoms and spins to the heat transfer equation for the electrons. Worked examples include simulations of thermalization of ferromagnetic bcc iron, the dynamics of laser pulse demagnetization, and collision cascades.

  8. Interactions of diastereomeric tripeptides of lysyl-5-fluorotryptophyllysine with DNA. 1. Optical and 19F NMR studies of native DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Shine, N R; James, T L

    1985-07-30

    Lysyl-5-fluoro-L-tryptophyllysine and lysyl-5-fluoro-D-tryptophyllysine were synthesized, and their interactions with double-stranded DNA were investigated as a model for protein-nucleic acid interactions. The binding to DNA was studied by monitoring various 19F NMR parameters, the fluorescence, and the optical absorbance in thermal denaturation. The 19F resonance of the L-Trp peptide shifts upfield in the presence of DNA, and that of the D-Trp peptide shifts downfield with DNA present. The influence of ionic strength on the binding of each peptide to DNA and the fluorescence quenching titration of each with DNA indicate that electrostatic bonding (approximately 2 per peptide-DNA complex) dominates the binding in each case and accounts for the similar binding constants determined from the fluorescence quenching, i.e., 7.7 X 10(4) M-1 for the L-Trp complex and 6.2 X 10(-1) for the D-Trp complex. The 19F NMR chemical shift, line width, 19F[1H] nuclear Overhauser effect, and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) changes all indicate that the aromatic moiety of the L-Trp complex, but not that of the D-Trp complex, is stacked between the bases of DNA. The relative increases in DNA melting temperature caused by binding of the tripeptide diastereomers are also consistent with stacking in the case of the L-Trp peptide. The magnitude of the changes and the susceptibility of the 19F NMR chemical shift to altering the solvent isotope (H2O vs. D2O) suggest that the L-Trp ring is not intercalated in the classical sense but is partially inserted between the bases of one strand of the double helix.

  9. (19)F Oximetry with semifluorinated alkanes.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Stefan; Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Tsagogiorgas, Charalambos; Theisinger, Bastian; Glatting, Gerhard; Schad, Lothar R

    2016-12-01

    This work examines the variation of longitudinal relaxation rate R1(= 1/T1) of the (19)F-CF3-resonance of semifluorinated alkanes (SFAs) with oxygen tension (pO2), temperature (T) and pH in vitro. Contrary to their related perfluorocarbons (PFCs), SFA are amphiphilic and facilitate stable emulsions, a prerequisite for clinical use. A linear relationship between R1 and pO2 was confirmed for the observed SFAs at different temperatures. Using a standard saturation recovery sequence, T1 has been successfully measured using fluorine (19)F-MRI with a self-constructed birdcage resonator at 9.4 T. A calibration curve to calculate pO2 depending on T and R1 was found for each SFA used. In contrast to the commonly used PFC, SFAs are less sensitive to changes in pO2, but more sensitive to changes in temperature. The influence of pH to R1 was found to be negligible.

  10. Study of cross - relaxation and molecular dynamics in the solid 3-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid by solid state NMR off - resonance.

    PubMed

    Woźniak-Braszak, Aneta

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics of the solid 3-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid containing proton (1)H and fluorine (19)F nuclei was explored by the solid-state NMR off - resonance technique. Contrary to the previous experiments the proton nuclei system I relaxed in the off - resonance effective field B→e while fluorine nuclei system S was saturated for short time in comparison to the relaxation time T1I. New cross - relaxation solid - state NMR off - resonance experiments were conducted on a homebuilt pulse spectrometer operating at the on-resonance frequency of 30.2MHz, at the off - resonance frequency varied between 30.2 and 30.6MHz for protons and at the frequency of 28.411MHz for fluorines, respectively. Based on the experimental data the dispersions of the proton off - resonance spin - lattice relaxation rate ρρ(I), the fluorine off - resonance spin - lattice relaxation rate ρρ(S) and the cross - relaxation rate σρ in the rotating frame were determined.

  11. Spin-lattice coupling in molecular dynamics simulation of ferromagnetic iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Pui Wai

    A model for magnetic iron where atoms are treated as classical particles with intrinsic spins is developed. The atoms interact via scalar many-body forces as well as via spin-dependent forces of the Heisenberg form. The coupling between the lattice and spin degrees of freedom is described by a coordinate-dependent exchange function, where the spin-orientation-dependent forces are proportional to the gradient of this function. A spin-lattice dynamics simulation approach extends the existing magnetic-potential treatment to the case where the strength of interaction between the atoms depends on the relative non-collinear orientations of their spins. An algorithm for integrating the linked spin-coordinate equations of motion is based on the 2nd order Suzuki-Trotter decomposition for the non-commuting evolution operators for both coordinates and spins. The notions of the spin thermostat and the spin temperature are introduced through the combined application of the Langevin spin dynamics and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. We investigate several applications of the method, performing microcanonical ensemble simulations of adiabatic spin-lattice relaxation of periodic arrays of 180° domain-walls, and isothermal-isobaric ensemble dynamical simulations of thermally equilibrated homogeneous systems at various temperatures. The isothermal magnetization curve evaluated using the spin-lattice dynamics algorithm is well described by the mean-field approximation and agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data for a broad range of temperatures. The equilibrium time-correlation functions of spin orientations exhibit the presence of short-range magnetic order above the Curie temperature. Short-range order spin fluctuations are shown to contribute to the thermal expansion of the material. Simulations on thermal expansion and elastic response of bulk bcc iron, and magnetization in bcc iron thin films are also performed and the results discussed. Our analysis illustrates

  12. Spin-Lattice Coupling and Superconductivity in Fe Pnictides

    DOE PAGES

    Egami, T.; Fine, B. V.; Parshall, D.; ...

    2010-01-01

    We consider strong spin-lattice and spin-phonon coupling in iron pnictides and discuss its implications on superconductivity. Strong magneto-volume effect in iron compounds has long been known as the Invar effect. Fe pnictides also exhibit this effect, reflected in particular on the dependence of the magnetic moment on the atomic volume of Fe defined by the positions of the nearest neighbor atoms. Through the phenomenological Landau theory, developed on the basis of the calculations by the density functional theory (DFT) and the experimental results, we quantify the strength of the spin-lattice interaction as it relates to the Stoner criterion for themore » onset of magnetism. We suggest that the coupling between electrons and phonons through the spin channel may be sufficiently strong to be an important part of the superconductivity mechanism in Fe pnictides.« less

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 19F SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.

    2009-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked by Liquid Waste Operations to characterize Tank 19F closure samples. Tank 19F slurry samples analyzed included the liquid and solid fractions derived from the slurry materials along with the floor scrape bottom Tank 19F wet solids. These samples were taken from Tank 19F in April 2009 and made available to SRNL in the same month. Because of limited amounts of solids observed in Tank 19F samples, the samples from the north quadrants of the tank were combined into one Tank 19F North Hemisphere sample and similarly the south quadrant samples were combined into one Tank 19F South Hemisphere sample. These samples were delivered to the SRNL shielded cell. The Tank 19F samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Where analytical methods yielded additional contaminants other than those requested by the customer, these results were also reported. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on detection values of 1E-04 {micro}Ci/g for most radionuclides and customer desired detection values of 1E-05 {micro}Ci/g for I-129, Pa-231, Np-237, and Ra-226. While many of the target detection limits, as specified in the technical task request and task technical and quality assurance plans were met for the species characterized for Tank 19F, some were not met. In a number of cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. SRNL, in conjunction with the plant customer, reviewed all these cases and determined that the impacts were negligible.

  14. Experimental NMR spin-lattice relaxometry study in the liquid crystalline nematic phase of propylcyano-phenylcyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Acosta, R H; Pusiol, D J

    2001-01-01

    The NMR spin-lattice proton relaxation dispersion T1(nu(L)) of the liquid crystal propylcyano-phenylcyclohexane is studied over several decades of Larmor frequencies and at different temperatures in the nematic mesophase. The results show that the order fluctuation of the local nematic director contribution to T1(nu(L)) undergoes a transition between two power regimes: from T1(nu(L)) protional to nu(1/2)L to nu(alpha)L (alpha approximately 1/3) on going from low to high Larmor frequencies.

  15. Cross relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-11-01

    Cross relaxation, and mI -dependence of the intrinsic electron spin-lattice relaxation rate We , are incorporated explicitly into the rate equations for the electron-spin population differences that govern the saturation behaviour of 14N- and 15N-nitroxide spin labels. Both prove important in spin-label EPR and ELDOR, particularly for saturation recovery studies. Neither for saturation recovery, nor for CW-saturation EPR and CW-ELDOR, can cross relaxation be described simply by increasing the value of We , the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate. Independence of the saturation recovery rates from the hyperfine line pumped or observed follows directly from solution of the rate equations including cross relaxation, even when the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate We is mI -dependent.

  16. 19F-lanthanide complexes with increased sensitivity for 19F-MRI: optimization of the MR acquisition.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Kirsten H; Kenwright, Alan M; Parker, David; Blamire, Andrew M

    2011-10-01

    Fluorine-19 magnetic resonance methods offer advantages for molecular or cellular imaging in vivo due to the absence of radioactivity, lack of naturally occurring background signal, and the ability to easily combine measurements with anatomical MRI. Previous studies have shown that (19) F-MRI sensitivity is limited to millimolar concentrations by slow longitudinal relaxation. In this study, a new class of macrocyclic fluorinated lanthanide complexes is investigated where relaxation rates are significantly shortened by proximity of the fluorine group to a paramagnetic lanthanide ion located within the same molecule. Longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates are field dependent and in the range 50-150 s(-1) and 70-200 s(-1), respectively, at 7 T. Relaxation rates in these complexes are a function of the molecular structure and are independent of concentration at biologically relevant levels, so can be used as criteria to optimize imaging acquisition. Phantom experiments at 7 T indicate a lower limit for detection by imaging of 20 μM.

  17. Solid state 19F NMR parameters of fluorine-labeled amino acids. Part I: Aromatic substituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürr, Ulrich H. N.; Grage, Stephan L.; Witter, Raiker; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2008-03-01

    Structural parameters of peptides and proteins in biomembranes can be directly measured by solid state NMR of selectively labeled amino acids. The 19F nucleus is a promising label to overcome the low sensitivity of 2H, 13C or 15N, and to serve as a background-free reporter group in biological compounds. To make the advantages of solid state 19F NMR fully available for structural studies of polypeptides, we have systematically measured the chemical shift anisotropies and relaxation properties of the most relevant aromatic and aliphatic 19F-labeled amino acids. In this first part of two consecutive contributions, six different 19F-substituents on representative aromatic side chains were characterized as polycrystalline powders by static and MAS experiments. The data are also compared with results on the same amino acids incorporated in synthetic peptides. The spectra show a wide variety of lineshapes, from which the principal values of the CSA tensors were extracted. In addition, temperature-dependent T1 and T2 relaxation times were determined by 19F NMR in the solid state, and isotropic chemical shifts and scalar couplings were obtained in solution.

  18. 19F MRI for quantitative in vivo cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Mangala; Heerschap, Arend; Ahrens, Eric T.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular therapy, including stem cell transplants and dendritic cell vaccines, is typically monitored for dosage optimization, accurate delivery and localization using non-invasive imaging, of which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a key modality. 19F MRI retains the advantages of MRI as an imaging modality, while allowing direct detection of labelled cells for unambiguous identification and quantification, unlike typical metal-based contrast agents. Recent developments in 19F MRI-based in vivo cell quantification, the existing clinical use of 19F compounds and current explosive interest in cellular therapeutics have brought 19F imaging technology closer to clinical application. We review the application of 19F MRI to cell tracking, discussing intracellular 19F labels, cell labelling and in vivo quantification, as well as the potential clinical use of 19F MRI. PMID:20427096

  19. 1H and 19 F NMR Study of Cation and Anion Motions in Guanidinium Hexafluorozirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottel, M.; Kozak, A.; Pająk, Z.

    1996-09-01

    Proton and fluorine NMR second moments and spin-lattice relaxation times of polycrystalline guanidinium hexafluorozirconate and its deuterated analogue were studied in laboratory (60 MHz) and rotating (H1 = 20 G) frames over a wide range of temperature. An analysis of the experimental results enabled us to reveal a dynamical inequivalence of two crystallographically independent cations and an unexpected high mobility of nonspherical anion dimers. A comparison of the ions dynamics in 2:1 complex studied with the guanidinium 1:1 and 3:1 complexes has shown a significant contribution of the hydrogen bonds to the potential barriers hindering the anion reorientations. At low temperatures a proton motion in the hydrogen bond and at 400 K a solid-solid phase transition have been discerned.

  20. Spin-lattice distribution MRI maps nigral pathology in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) during life: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Michael; Raff, Ulrich; Chaná, Pedro; Huete, Isidro

    2014-01-01

    An MRI biomarker for Parkinsonism has long been sought, but almost all attempts at conventional field strengths have proved unsatisfactory, since patients and controls are not separated. The exception is Spin-Lattice Distribution MRI (SLD-MRI), a technique which detects changes in the substantia nigra (SN) due to changes in the spin-lattice relaxation time, T1. This easily separates patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) from control subjects at 1.5 Tesla, suggesting that it may be sensitive to presymptomatic disease. SLD-MRI demonstrates a topography of signal change within the SN which is the same as the known topography of pathological change, where the lateral portions of the nucleus are more affected than the medial. In a further step towards its validation, we apply SLD-MRI to a disease control, Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP), the most common of the atypical forms of Parkinsonism. In PSP the topography of pathological change in the SN is reversed. We therefore hypothesized that PSP would show a topography of SLD-MRI signal change in the SN that is the reverse of PD (i.e. the medial portion is more affected than the lateral). All 7 patients showed such a topography of MR signal, and all patients were separated from control subjects. Although this is a step toward validation of SLD-MRI with respect to sensitivity and disease specificity, nevertheless we stress that this is a pilot project only. Validation will only be possible when comparing larger cohorts of PSP, PD and control subjects.

  1. THz-Driven Ultrafast Spin-Lattice Scattering in Amorphous Metallic Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, S.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Sher, M.-J.; Chen, Z.; Yang, S.-H.; Samant, M. G.; Parkin, S. S. P.; Dürr, H. A.

    2016-08-01

    We use single-cycle THz fields and the femtosecond magneto-optical Kerr effect to, respectively, excite and probe the magnetization dynamics in two thin-film ferromagnets with different lattice structures: crystalline Fe and amorphous CoFeB. We observe Landau-Lifshitz-torque magnetization dynamics of comparable magnitude in both systems, but only the amorphous sample shows ultrafast demagnetization caused by the spin-lattice depolarization of the THz-induced ultrafast spin current. Quantitative modeling shows that such spin-lattice scattering events occur on similar time scales than the conventional spin conserving electronic scattering (˜30 fs ). This is significantly faster than optical laser-induced demagnetization. THz conductivity measurements point towards the influence of lattice disorder in amorphous CoFeB as the driving force for enhanced spin-lattice scattering.

  2. Electron spin relaxation of exchange coupled pairs of transition metal ions in solids. Ti2+-Ti2+ pairs and single Ti2+ ions in SrF2 crystals.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Stanislaw K; Lijewski, Stefan; Goslar, Janina; Ulanov, Volodia A

    2010-01-01

    EPR (X- and Q-band) and electron spin relaxation measured by electron spin echo method (X-band) were studied for Ti(2+)(S=1) and Ti(2+)-Ti(2+) pairs in SrF(2) crystal at room temperature and in the temperature range 4.2-115 K. EPR spectrum consists of a strong line from Ti(2+) and quartets 2:3:3:2 from titanium pairs (S=2). Spin-Hamiltonian parameters of the pairs are g( parallel)=1.883, g( perpendicular)=1.975 and D=0.036 cm(-1). Temperature behavior of the dimer spectrum indicates ferromagnetic coupling between Ti(2+). Spin-lattice relaxation of individuals Ti(2+) is dominated by the ordinary two-phonon Raman process involving the whole phonon spectrum up to the Debye temperature Theta(D)=380 K with spin-phonon coupling parameter equal to 215 cm(-1). Important contribution to the relaxation arises from local mode vibrations of energy 133 cm(-1). The pair relaxation is faster due to the exchange coupling modulation mechanism with the relaxation rate characteristic for ferromagnetic ground state of the pairs 1/T(1) is proportional to [exp(2J/kT)-1](-1) which allowed to estimate the exchange coupling J=36 cm(-1). The theories of electron-lattice relaxation governed by exchange interaction are outlined for extended spin systems, for clusters and for individual dimers. Electron spin echo decay is strongly modulated by coupling with surrounding (19)F nuclei. FT-spectrum of the modulations shows a dipolar splitting of the fluorine lines, which allows the evaluation of the off-center shift of Ti(2+) in pair as 0.132 nm. The electron spin echo dephasing is dominated by an instantaneous diffusion at low temperatures and by the spin-lattice relaxation processes above 18K.

  3. Efficiency of free-energy calculations of spin lattices by spectral quantum algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Master, Cyrus P.; Yamaguchi, Fumiko; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2003-03-01

    Ensemble quantum algorithms are well suited to calculate estimates of the energy spectra for spin-lattice systems. Based on the phase estimation algorithm, these algorithms efficiently estimate discrete Fourier coefficients of the density of states. Their efficiency in calculating the free energy per spin of general spin lattices to bounded error is examined. We find that the number of Fourier components required to bound the error in the free energy due to the broadening of the density of states scales polynomially with the number of spins in the lattice. However, the precision with which the Fourier components must be calculated is found to be an exponential function of the system size.

  4. A bisphosphonate for 19F-magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Gavin D.; Shaw, Karen P.; Sivachelvam, Saranja; White, Andrew J.P.; Botnar, Rene M.; T.M. de Rosales, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    19F-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising technique that may allow us to measure the concentration of exogenous fluorinated imaging probes quantitatively in vivo. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterisation of a novel geminal bisphosphonate (19F-BP) that contains chemically-equivalent fluorine atoms that show a single and narrow 19F resonance and a bisphosphonate group that may be used for labelling inorganic materials based in calcium phosphates and metal oxides. The potential of 19F-BP to provide contrast was analysed in vitro and in vivo using 19F-MRI. In vitro studies demonstrated the potential of 19F-BP as an MRI contrast agent in the millimolar concentration range with signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) comparable to previously reported fluorinated probes. The preliminary in vivo MRI study reported here allowed us to visualise the biodistribution of 19F-BP, showing uptake in the liver and in the bladder/urinary system areas. However, bone uptake was not observed. In addition, 19F-BP showed undesirable toxicity effects in mice that prevent further studies with this compound at the required concentrations for MRI contrast. This study highlights the importance of developing 19F MRI probes with the highest signal intensity achievable. PMID:27110036

  5. (19) F DOSY diffusion-NMR spectroscopy of fluoropolymers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenglong; Wan, Yingbo; Chen, Dongxue; Gao, Chun; Yin, Hongnan; Fetherston, Daniel; Kupce, Eriks; Lopez, Gerald; Ameduri, Bruno; Twum, Eric B; Wyzgoski, Faith J; Li, Xiaohong; McCord, Elizabeth F; Rinaldi, Peter L

    2017-05-01

    A new pulse sequence for obtaining (19) F detected DOSY (diffusion ordered spectroscopy) spectra of fluorinated molecules is presented and used to study fluoropolymers based on vinylidene fluoride and chlorotrifluoroethylene. The performance of (19) F DOSY NMR experiments (and in general any type of NMR experiment) on fluoropolymers creates some unique complications that very often prevent detection of important signals. Factors that create these complications include: (1) the presence of many scalar couplings among (1) H, (19) F and (13) C; (2) the large magnitudes of many (19) F homonuclear couplings (especially (2) JFF ); (3) the large (19) F chemical shift range; and (4) the low solubility of these materials (which requires that experiments be performed at high temperatures). A systematic study of the various methods for collecting DOSY NMR data, and the adaptation of these methods to obtain (19) F detected DOSY data, has been performed using a mixture of low molecular weight, fluorinated model compounds. The best pulse sequences and optimal experimental conditions have been determined for obtaining (19) F DOSY spectra. The optimum pulse sequences for acquiring (19) F DOSY NMR data have been determined for various circumstances taking into account the spectral dispersion, number and magnitude of couplings present, and experimental temperature. Pulse sequences and experimental parameters for optimizing these experiments for the study of fluoropolymers have been studied. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Monitoring Dendritic Cell Migration using 19F / 1H Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Waiczies, Helmar; Guenther, Martin; Skodowski, Julia; Lepore, Stefano; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf; Waiczies, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Continuous advancements in noninvasive imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have greatly improved our ability to study physiological or pathological processes in living organisms. MRI is also proving to be a valuable tool for capturing transplanted cells in vivo. Initial cell labeling strategies for MRI made use of contrast agents that influence the MR relaxation times (T1, T2, T2*) and lead to an enhancement (T1) or depletion (T2*) of signal where labeled cells are present. T2* enhancement agents such as ultrasmall iron oxide agents (USPIO) have been employed to study cell migration and some have also been approved by the FDA for clinical application. A drawback of T2* agents is the difficulty to distinguish the signal extinction created by the labeled cells from other artifacts such as blood clots, micro bleeds or air bubbles. In this article, we describe an emerging technique for tracking cells in vivo that is based on labeling the cells with fluorine (19F)-rich particles. These particles are prepared by emulsifying perfluorocarbon (PFC) compounds and then used to label cells, which subsequently can be imaged by 19F MRI. Important advantages of PFCs for cell tracking in vivo include (i) the absence of carbon-bound 19F in vivo, which then yields background-free images and complete cell selectivityand(ii) the possibility to quantify the cell signal by 19F MR spectroscopy. PMID:23542739

  7. Injectable hyaluronic acid hydrogel for 19F magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xia; Sun, Yi; Kootala, Sujit; Hilborn, Jöns; Heerschap, Arend; Ossipov, Dmitri

    2014-09-22

    We report on a 19F labeled injectable hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel that can be monitored by both 1H and 19F MR imaging. The HA based hydrogel formed via carbazone reaction can be obtained within a minute by simple mixing of HA-carbazate and HA-aldehyde derivatized polymers. 19F contrast agent was linked to with carbazate and thiol dually functionalized HA via orthogonal Michael addition reaction which afforded cross-linkable and 19F labeled HA. The 19F labeling of HA polymer did not affect the mechanical properties of the formed hydrogel. As a result, the shape of a hydrogel sample could be imaged very well by both 1H MRI and high resolution 19F MRI. This hydrogel has high potential in clinical applications since it is injectable, biocompatible, and can be tracked in a minimally invasive manner. The present approach can be applied in preparation of injectable 19F labeled hydrogel biomaterials from other natural biomacromolecules.

  8. Slow molecular dynamics of water in a lyotropic complex fluid studied by deuterium conventional and spin-lattice relaxometry NMR.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, C R; Pusiol, D J; Figueiredo Neto, A M; Seitter, R-O

    2002-03-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance study of protons and deuterons in the mesomorphic phases of the micellar lyotropic mixture potassium laurate/1-decanol/heavy water is reported. The slow dynamical behavior of water molecules has been investigated with deuterons spin-lattice relaxation dispersion in the Larmor frequency range 10(3)

  9. Fluorinated polyurethane scaffolds for 19F magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Khosrow; Shi, Yang; Schulz, Volkmar; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Kiessling, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    Polymers are increasingly employed in implant materials. To reduce the incidence of complications, which in the case of vascular grafts include incorrect placement and restenosis, materials are needed which allow for image-guided implantation, as well as for accurate and efficient postoperative implant imaging. We here describe amorphous fluorinated polymers based on thermoplastic polyurethane (19F-TPU), and show that are useful starting materials for developing tissue-engineered vascular grafts which can be detected using 19F MRI.

  10. Solid-state 19F-NMR analysis of 19F-labeled tryptophan in gramicidin A in oriented membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Stephan L; Wang, Junfeng; Cross, Timothy A; Ulrich, Anne S

    2002-01-01

    The response of membrane-associated peptides toward the lipid environment or other binding partners can be monitored by solid-state NMR of suitably labeled side chains. Tryptophan is a prominent amino acid in transmembrane helices, and its (19)F-labeled analogues are generally biocompatible and cause little structural perturbation. Hence, we use 5F-Trp as a highly sensitive NMR probe to monitor the conformation and dynamics of the indole ring. To establish this (19)F-NMR strategy, gramicidin A was labeled with 5F-Trp in position 13 or 15, whose chi(1)/chi(2) torsion angles are known from previous (2)H-NMR studies. First, the alignment of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor within the membrane was deduced by lineshape analysis of oriented samples. Next, the three principal axes of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor were assigned within the molecular frame of the indole ring. Finally, determination of chi(1)/chi(2) for 5F-Trp in the lipid gel phase showed that the side chain alignment differs by up to 20 degrees from its known conformation in the liquid crystalline state. The sensitivity gain of (19)F-NMR and the reduction in the amount of material was at least 10-fold compared with previous (2)H-NMR studies on the same system and 100-fold compared with (15)N-NMR. PMID:12496101

  11. The relationship between reorientational molecular motions and phase transitions in [Mg(H2O)6](BF4)2, studied with the use of 1H and 19F NMR and FT-MIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuli, Edward; Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Grad, Bartłomiej; Kozak, Asja; Wasicki, Jan W.; Bilski, Paweł; Hołderna-Natkaniec, Krystyna; Medycki, Wojciech

    2015-02-01

    A 1H and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance study of [Mg(H2O)6](BF4)2 has confirmed the existence of two phase transitions at Tc1 ≈ 257 K and Tc2 ≈ 142 K, detected earlier by the DSC method. These transitions were reflected by changes in the temperature dependences of both proton and fluorine of second moments M2H and M2F and of spin-lattice relaxation times T1H and T1F. The study revealed anisotropic reorientations of whole [Mg(H2O)6]2+ cations, reorientations by 180° jumps of H2O ligands, and aniso- and isotropic reorientations of BF4- anions. The activation parameters for these motions were obtained. It was found that the phase transition at Tc1 is associated with the reorientation of the cation as a whole unit around the C3 axis and that at Tc2 with isotropic reorientation of the BF4- anions. The temperature dependence of the full width at half maximum value of the infrared band of ρt(H2O) mode (at ˜596 cm-1) indicated that in phases I and II, all H2O ligands in [Mg(H2O)6]2+ perform fast reorientational motions (180° jumps) with a mean value of activation energy equal to ca 10 kJ mole-1, what is fully consistent with NMR results. The phase transition at Tc1 is associated with a sudden change of speed of fast (τR ≈ 10-12 s) reorientational motions of H2O ligands. Below Tc2 (in phase III), the reorientations of certain part of the H2O ligands significantly slow down, while others continue their fast reorientation with an activation energy of ca 2 kJ mole-1. This fast reorientation cannot be evidenced in NMR relaxation experiments. Splitting of certain IR bands connected with H2O ligands at the observed phase transitions suggests a reduction of the symmetry of the octahedral [Mg(H2O)6]2+ complex cation.

  12. Spin-Lattice-Coupled Order in Heisenberg Antiferromagnets on the Pyrochlore Lattice.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Kazushi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2016-06-24

    Effects of local lattice distortions on the spin ordering are investigated for the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on the pyrochlore lattice. It is found by Monte Carlo simulations that the spin-lattice coupling (SLC) originating from site phonons induces a first-order transition into two different types of collinear magnetic ordered states. The state realized at the stronger SLC is cubic symmetric characterized by the magnetic (1/2,1/2,1/2) Bragg peaks, while that at the weaker SLC is tetragonal symmetric characterized by the (1,1,0) ones, each accompanied by the commensurate local lattice distortions. Experimental implications to chromium spinels are discussed.

  13. Spin-Lattice-Coupled Order in Heisenberg Antiferromagnets on the Pyrochlore Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Kazushi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2016-06-01

    Effects of local lattice distortions on the spin ordering are investigated for the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on the pyrochlore lattice. It is found by Monte Carlo simulations that the spin-lattice coupling (SLC) originating from site phonons induces a first-order transition into two different types of collinear magnetic ordered states. The state realized at the stronger SLC is cubic symmetric characterized by the magnetic (1/2 ,1/2 ,1/2 ) Bragg peaks, while that at the weaker SLC is tetragonal symmetric characterized by the (1,1,0) ones, each accompanied by the commensurate local lattice distortions. Experimental implications to chromium spinels are discussed.

  14. Clonal distribution of pneumococcal serotype 19F isolates from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sparding, Nadja; Dayie, Nicholas T K D; Mills, Richael O; Newman, Mercy J; Dalsgaard, Anders; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Slotved, Hans-Christian

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Pneumococcal strains are classified according to their capsular polysaccharide and more than 90 different serotypes are currently known. In this project, three distinct groups of pneumococcal carriage isolates from Ghana were investigated; isolates from healthy children in Tamale and isolates from both healthy and children attending the outpatient department at a hospital in Accra. The isolates were previously identified and characterized by Gram staining, serotyping and susceptibility to penicillin. In this study, isolates of the common serotype 19F were further investigated by Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST). Overall, 14 different Sequence Types (STs) were identified by MLST, of which nine were novel based on the international MLST database. Two clones within serotype 19F seem to circulate in Ghana, a known ST (ST 4194) and a novel ST (ST 9090). ST 9090 was only found in healthy children in Accra, whereas ST 4194 was found equally in all children studied. In the MLST database, other isolates of ST 4194 were also associated with serotype 19F, and these isolates came from other West African countries. The majority of isolates were penicillin intermediate resistant. In conclusion, two clones within serotype 19F were found to be dominating in pneumococcal carriage in Accra and Tamale in Ghana. Furthermore, it seems as though the clonal distribution of serotype 19F may be different from what is currently known in Ghana in that many new clones were identified. This supports the importance of continued monitoring of pneumococcal carriage in Ghana and elsewhere when vaccines, e.g., PCV-13, have been introduced to monitor the possible future spread of antimicrobial resistant clones.

  15. 19F NMR measurements of the rotational mobility of proteins in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S P; Haggie, P M; Brindle, K M

    1997-01-01

    Three glycolytic enzymes, hexokinase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and pyruvate kinase, were fluorine labeled in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by biosynthetic incorporation of 5-fluorotryptophan. 19F NMR longitudinal relaxation time measurements on the labeled enzymes were used to assess their rotational mobility in the intact cell. Comparison with the results obtained from relaxation time measurements of the purified enzymes in vitro and from theoretical calculations showed that two of the labeled enzymes, phosphoglycerate kinase and hexokinase, were tumbling in a cytoplasm that had a viscosity approximately twice that of water. There were no detectable signals from pyruvate kinase in vivo, although it could be detected in diluted cell extracts, indicating that there was some degree of motional restriction of the enzyme in the intact cell. PMID:8994636

  16. Strong spin-lattice coupling in CrSiTe3

    DOE PAGES

    Casto, L. D.; Clune, A. J.; Yokosuk, M. O.; ...

    2015-03-19

    CrSiTe3 has attracted recent interest as a candidate single-layer ferromagnetic semiconductor, but relatively little is known about the bulk properties of this material. Here, we report single-crystal X-ray diffraction, magnetic properties, thermal conductivity, vibrational, and optical spectroscopies and compare our findings with complementary electronic structure and lattice dynamics principles calculations. The high temperature paramagnetic phase is characterized by strong spin-lattice interactions that give rise to glassy behavior, negative thermal expansion, and an optical response that reveals that CrSiTe3 is an indirect gap semiconductor with indirect and direct band gaps at 0.4 and 1.2 eV, respectively. Measurements of the phonons acrossmore » the 33 K ferromagnetic transition provide additional evidence for strong coupling between the magnetic and lattice degrees of freedom. In conclusion, the Si-Te stretching and Te displacement modes are sensitive to the magnetic ordering transition, a finding that we discuss in terms of the superexchange mechanism. Lastly, spin-lattice coupling constants are also extracted.« less

  17. Strong spin-lattice coupling in CrSiTe3

    SciTech Connect

    Casto, L. D.; Clune, A. J.; Yokosuk, M. O.; Musfeldt, J. L.; Williams, T. J.; Zhuang, H. L.; Lin, M. -W.; Xiao, K.; Hennig, R. G.; Sales, B. C.; Yan, J. -Q.; Mandrus, D.

    2015-03-19

    CrSiTe3 has attracted recent interest as a candidate single-layer ferromagnetic semiconductor, but relatively little is known about the bulk properties of this material. Here, we report single-crystal X-ray diffraction, magnetic properties, thermal conductivity, vibrational, and optical spectroscopies and compare our findings with complementary electronic structure and lattice dynamics principles calculations. The high temperature paramagnetic phase is characterized by strong spin-lattice interactions that give rise to glassy behavior, negative thermal expansion, and an optical response that reveals that CrSiTe3 is an indirect gap semiconductor with indirect and direct band gaps at 0.4 and 1.2 eV, respectively. Measurements of the phonons across the 33 K ferromagnetic transition provide additional evidence for strong coupling between the magnetic and lattice degrees of freedom. In conclusion, the Si-Te stretching and Te displacement modes are sensitive to the magnetic ordering transition, a finding that we discuss in terms of the superexchange mechanism. Lastly, spin-lattice coupling constants are also extracted.

  18. Modulation of spin dynamics via voltage control of spin-lattice coupling in multiferroics

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Mingmin; Zhou, Ziyao; Peng, Bin; ...

    2017-02-03

    Our work aims at magnonics manipulation by the magnetoelectric coupling effect and is motivated by the most recent progresses in both magnonics (spin dynamics) and multiferroics fields. Here, voltage control of magnonics, particularly the surface spin waves, is achieved in La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/0.7Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.3PbTiO3 multiferroic heterostructures. With the electron spin resonance method, a large 135 Oe shift of surface spin wave resonance (≈7 times greater than conventional voltage-induced ferromagnetic resonance shift of 20 Oe) is determined. A model of the spin-lattice coupling effect, i.e., varying exchange stiffness due to voltage-induced anisotropic lattice changes, has been established to explain experiment results with good agreement.more » In addition, an “on” and “off” spin wave state switch near the critical angle upon applying a voltage is created. The modulation of spin dynamics by spin-lattice coupling effect provides a platform for realizing energy-efficient, tunable magnonics devices.« less

  19. Fluorine (19F) MRS and MRI in biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Barnett, Brad P.; Bottomley, Paul A.; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Shortly after the introduction of 1H MRI, fluorinated molecules were tested as MR-detectable tracers or contrast agents. Many fluorinated compounds, which are nontoxic and chemically inert, are now being used in a broad range of biomedical applications, including anesthetics, chemotherapeutic agents, and molecules with high oxygen solubility for respiration and blood substitution. These compounds can be monitored by fluorine (19F) MRI and/or MRS, providing a noninvasive means to interrogate associated functions in biological systems. As a result of the lack of endogenous fluorine in living organisms, 19F MRI of ‘hotspots’ of targeted fluorinated contrast agents has recently opened up new research avenues in molecular and cellular imaging. This includes the specific targeting and imaging of cellular surface epitopes, as well as MRI cell tracking of endogenous macrophages, injected immune cells and stem cell transplants. PMID:20842758

  20. Characterization of the ground X{sub 1} state of {sup 204}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 206}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F, and {sup 208}Pb{sup 19}F

    SciTech Connect

    Mawhorter, Richard J.; Murphy, Benjamin S.; Baum, Alexander L.; Sears, Trevor J.; Yang, T.; Rupasinghe, P. M; McRaven, C. P.; Shafer-Ray, N. E.; Alphei, Lukas D.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2011-08-15

    Pure rotational spectra of the ground electronic-vibrational X{sub 1} state of {sup 204}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 206}Pb{sup 19}F, {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F, and {sup 208}Pb{sup 19}F are measured with a resonator pulsed supersonic jet Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer. Also reported is a new measurement of the Stark effect on the optical spectra of A(leftarrow)X{sub 1} transitions. These spectra are combined with published high-resolution infrared spectra of X{sub 2}{r_reversible}X{sub 1} transitions in order to create a complete picture of the ground state of lead monofluoride. For the microwave data, molecules are prepared by laser ablation of lead target rods and stabilized in a supersonic jet of neon mixed with sulfur hexafluoride. For the optical Stark spectra, a continuous source of molecules is created in a nozzle heated to 1000 deg. C. The microwave spectra confirm, improve, and extend previously reported constants that describe the rotational, spin-orbit, and hyperfine interactions of the ground electronic state of the PbF molecule. A discrepancy concerning the sign of the hyperfine constant describing the {sup 207}Pb nucleus is discussed. Magnetic-field-dependent microwave spectra are used to characterize the Zeeman interaction in terms of two g factors of the body-fixed electronic wave function. The optical Stark spectra are used to characterize the electric dipole moment of the X{sub 1} and A states.

  1. Nonuniversal scaling of the magnetocaloric effect as an insight into spin-lattice interactions in manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Anders; Nielsen, Kaspar K.; Bez, Henrique N.; Bahl, Christian R. H.

    2016-08-01

    We measure the magnetocaloric effect of the manganite series La0.67Ca0.33 -xSrxMnO3 by determining the isothermal entropy change upon magnetization, using variable-field calorimetry. The results demonstrate that the field dependence of the magnetocaloric effect close to the critical temperature is not given uniquely by the critical exponents of the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition, i.e., the scaling is nonuniversal. A theoretical description based on the Bean-Rodbell model and taking into account compositional inhomogeneities is shown to be able to account for the observed field dependence. In this way the determination of the nonuniversal field dependence of the magnetocaloric effect close to a phase transition can be used as a method to gain insight into the strength of the spin-lattice interactions of magnetic materials. The approach is shown also to be applicable to first-order transitions.

  2. Measuring free energy in spin-lattice models using parallel tempering Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenlong

    2015-05-01

    An efficient and simple approach of measuring the absolute free energy as a function of temperature for spin lattice models using a two-stage parallel tempering Monte Carlo and the free energy perturbation method is discussed and the results are compared with those of population annealing Monte Carlo using the three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass model as benchmark tests. This approach requires little modification of regular parallel tempering Monte Carlo codes with also little overhead. Numerical results show that parallel tempering, even though using a much less number of temperatures than population annealing, can nevertheless equally efficiently measure the absolute free energy by simulating each temperature for longer times.

  3. Nematic spin order and spin-lattice coupling in Fe-based Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiangping; Fang, Chen; Tsai, Wei-Feng; Yao, Hong; Kivelson, Steve

    2009-03-01

    We show that the structure transitions observed in Fe-based superconductors are magnetically driven. A quantum Heisenberg model (J1-J2-Jz) exhibits a sequence of two phase transitions: from a high temperature symmetric phase to a narrow region of intermediate ``nematic'' phase, and then to a low temperature spin ordered phase when Jz is small. Identifying phases by their broken symmetries, these phases correspond precisely to the sequence of structural (tetragonal to monoclinic) and magnetic transitions that have been recently revealed in neutron scattering studies of 1111 series of Fe- based superconductors. The structural transition can thus be identified with the existence of incipient (``fluctuating'') magnetic order. We also discuss the effect of spin-lattice coupling on the phase diagram of the model. [3pt] Reference: Chen Fang, Hong Yao, Wei-Feng Tsai, JiangPing Hu and Steven A. Kivelson, Phys. Rev. B 77 224509 (2008).

  4. Many-body interferometry of a Rydberg-dressed spin lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiher, Johannes; van Bijnen, Rick; Schauß, Peter; Hild, Sebastian; Choi, Jae-Yoon; Pohl, Thomas; Bloch, Immanuel; Gross, Christian

    2016-12-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices are ideal to study fundamentally new quantum many-body systems including frustrated or topological magnetic phases and supersolids. However, the necessary control of strong long-range interactions between distant ground state atoms has remained a long-standing goal. Optical dressing of ground state atoms via off-resonant laser coupling to Rydberg states is one way to tailor such interactions. Here we report the realization of coherent Rydberg dressing to implement a two-dimensional synthetic spin lattice. Our single-atom-resolved interferometric measurements of the many-body dynamics enable the microscopic probing of the interactions and reveal their highly tunable range and anisotropy. Our work marks the first step towards the use of laser-controlled Rydberg interactions for the study of exotic quantum magnets in optical lattices.

  5. Nickel(II) complexes of N-CH2CF3 cyclam derivatives as contrast agents for (19)F magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Blahut, Jan; Hermann, Petr; Gálisová, Andrea; Herynek, Vít; Císařová, Ivana; Tošner, Zdeněk; Kotek, Jan

    2016-01-14

    Kinetically inert Ni(ii) complexes of N(1),N(8)-bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)cyclams with hydrogen atoms or phosphonic acid groups in the N(4),N(11)-positions show significant (19)F NMR relaxation rate enhancement useful for 19-fluorine MRI imaging.

  6. Characterization of solid polymer dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients by 19F MAS NMR and factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Urbanova, Martina; Brus, Jiri; Sedenkova, Ivana; Policianova, Olivia; Kobera, Libor

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution the ability of (19)F MAS NMR spectroscopy to probe structural variability of poorly water-soluble drugs formulated as solid dispersions in polymer matrices is discussed. The application potentiality of the proposed approach is demonstrated on a moderately sized active pharmaceutical ingredient (API, Atorvastatin) exhibiting extensive polymorphism. In this respect, a range of model systems with the API incorporated in the matrix of polvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was prepared. The extent of mixing of both components was determined by T(1)((1)H) and T(1ρ)((1)H) relaxation experiments, and it was found that the API forms nanosized domains. Subsequently it was found out that the polymer matrix induces two kinds of changes in (19)F MAS NMR spectra. At first, this is a high-frequency shift reaching 2-3 ppm which is independent on molecular structure of the API and which results from the long-range polarization of the electron cloud around (19)F nucleus induced by electrostatic fields of the polymer matrix. At second, this is broadening of the signals and formation of shoulders reflecting changes in molecular arrangement of the API. To avoid misleading in the interpretation of the recorded (19)F MAS NMR spectra, because both the contributions act simultaneously, we applied chemometric approach based on multivariate analysis. It is demonstrated that factor analysis of the recorded spectra can separate both these spectral contributions, and the subtle structural differences in the molecular arrangement of the API in the nanosized domains can be traced. In this way (19)F MAS NMR spectra of both pure APIs and APIs in solid dispersions can be directly compared. The proposed strategy thus provides a powerful tool for the analysis of new formulations of fluorinated pharmaceutical substances in polymer matrices.

  7. Characterization of solid polymer dispersions of active pharmaceutical ingredients by 19F MAS NMR and factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanova, Martina; Brus, Jiri; Sedenkova, Ivana; Policianova, Olivia; Kobera, Libor

    In this contribution the ability of 19F MAS NMR spectroscopy to probe structural variability of poorly water-soluble drugs formulated as solid dispersions in polymer matrices is discussed. The application potentiality of the proposed approach is demonstrated on a moderately sized active pharmaceutical ingredient (API, Atorvastatin) exhibiting extensive polymorphism. In this respect, a range of model systems with the API incorporated in the matrix of polvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was prepared. The extent of mixing of both components was determined by T1(1H) and T1ρ(1H) relaxation experiments, and it was found that the API forms nanosized domains. Subsequently it was found out that the polymer matrix induces two kinds of changes in 19F MAS NMR spectra. At first, this is a high-frequency shift reaching 2-3 ppm which is independent on molecular structure of the API and which results from the long-range polarization of the electron cloud around 19F nucleus induced by electrostatic fields of the polymer matrix. At second, this is broadening of the signals and formation of shoulders reflecting changes in molecular arrangement of the API. To avoid misleading in the interpretation of the recorded 19F MAS NMR spectra, because both the contributions act simultaneously, we applied chemometric approach based on multivariate analysis. It is demonstrated that factor analysis of the recorded spectra can separate both these spectral contributions, and the subtle structural differences in the molecular arrangement of the API in the nanosized domains can be traced. In this way 19F MAS NMR spectra of both pure APIs and APIs in solid dispersions can be directly compared. The proposed strategy thus provides a powerful tool for the analysis of new formulations of fluorinated pharmaceutical substances in polymer matrices.

  8. 19F single-quantum and 19F-33S heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence NMR of SF6 in thermotropic nematogens and in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Tervonen, Henri; Saunavaara, Jani; Ingman, L Petri; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2006-08-24

    (19)F single-quantum (SQC) and (19)F-(33)S heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) NMR spectroscopy of sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) dissolved in thermotropic liquid crystals (TLCs) were used to investigate the properties of TLCs. On one hand, environmental effects on the NMR parameters of SF(6), (19)F nuclear shielding, (19)F-(33)S spin-spin coupling, secondary isotope effects of sulfur on (19)F shielding, and the self-diffusion coefficient in the direction of the external magnetic field were studied as well. The temperature dependence of the (19)F shielding of SF(6) in TLCs was modeled with a function that takes into account the properties of both TLC and SF(6). It appears that the TLC environment deforms the electronic system of SF(6) so that the (19)F shielding tensor becomes slightly anisotropic, with the anisotropy being from -0.5 to -1.4 ppm, depending upon the TLC solvent. On the contrary, no sign of residual dipolar coupling between (19)F and (33)S was found, meaning that the so-called deformational effects, which arise from the interaction between vibrational and reorientational motions of the molecule, on the geometry of the molecule are insignificant. Diffusion activation energies, E(a), were determined from the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficients. In each TLC, E(a) increases when moving from an isotropic phase to a nematic phase. The spin-spin coupling constant, J((19)F,(33)S), increases by ca. 10 Hz when moving from the gas phase to TLC solutions. The secondary isotope shifts of (19)F shielding are practically independent of TLC solvent and temperature. For the first time, (19)F-(33)S heteronuclear multiple-quantum NMR spectra were recorded for SF(6) in the gas phase and in a liquid-crystalline solution.

  9. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 19F FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.

    2010-09-02

    Representative sampling has been completed for characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 19F as per the statistical sampling plan developed by Harris and Shine. Samples from eight locations have been obtained from the tank floor and two of the samples were archived as a contingency. Six samples, referred to in this report as the current scrape samples, have been submitted to and analyzed by SRNL. This report contains the statistical analysis of the floor sample analytical results to determine if further data are needed to reduce uncertainty. Included are comparisons with the prior Mantis samples results to determine if they can be pooled with the current scrape samples to estimate the upper 95% confidence limits (UCL95%) for concentration. Statistical analysis revealed that the Mantis and current scrape sample results are not compatible. Therefore, the Mantis sample results were not used to support the quantification of analytes in the residual material. Significant spatial variability among the current scrape sample results was not found. Constituent concentrations were similar between the North and South hemispheres as well as between the inner and outer regions of the tank floor. The current scrape sample results from all six samples fall within their 3-sigma limits. In view of the results from numerous statistical tests, the data were pooled from all six current scrape samples. As such, an adequate sample size was provided for quantification of the residual material on the floor of Tank 19F. The uncertainty is quantified in this report by an UCL95% on each analyte concentration. The uncertainty in analyte concentration was calculated as a function of the number of samples, the average, and the standard deviation of the analytical results. The UCL95% was based entirely on the six current scrape sample results (each averaged across three analytical determinations).

  10. 1H relaxation dispersion in solutions of nitroxide radicals: influence of electron spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Korpała, A; Kubica, A; Kowalewski, J; Rössler, E A; Moscicki, J

    2013-03-28

    The work presents a theory of nuclear ((1)H) spin-lattice relaxation dispersion for solutions of (15)N and (14)N radicals, including electron spin relaxation effects. The theory is a generalization of the approach presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)]. The electron spin relaxation is attributed to the anisotropic part of the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine interaction modulated by rotational dynamics of the paramagnetic molecule, and described by means of Redfield relaxation theory. The (1)H relaxation is caused by electron spin-proton spin dipole-dipole interactions which are modulated by relative translational motion of the solvent and solute molecules. The spectral density characterizing the translational dynamics is described by the force-free-hard-sphere model. The electronic relaxation influences the (1)H relaxation by contributing to the fluctuations of the inter-molecular dipolar interactions. The developed theory is tested against (1)H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion data for glycerol solutions of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(15)N and 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(14)N covering the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz. The studies are carried out as a function of temperature starting at 328 K and going down to 290 K. The theory gives a consistent overall interpretation of the experimental data for both (14)N and (15)N systems and explains the features of (1)H relaxation dispersion resulting from the electron spin relaxation.

  11. 1H relaxation dispersion in solutions of nitroxide radicals: Influence of electron spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Kubica, A.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-03-01

    The work presents a theory of nuclear (1H) spin-lattice relaxation dispersion for solutions of 15N and 14N radicals, including electron spin relaxation effects. The theory is a generalization of the approach presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736854. The electron spin relaxation is attributed to the anisotropic part of the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine interaction modulated by rotational dynamics of the paramagnetic molecule, and described by means of Redfield relaxation theory. The 1H relaxation is caused by electron spin-proton spin dipole-dipole interactions which are modulated by relative translational motion of the solvent and solute molecules. The spectral density characterizing the translational dynamics is described by the force-free-hard-sphere model. The electronic relaxation influences the 1H relaxation by contributing to the fluctuations of the inter-molecular dipolar interactions. The developed theory is tested against 1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion data for glycerol solutions of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-15N and 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-14N covering the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz. The studies are carried out as a function of temperature starting at 328 K and going down to 290 K. The theory gives a consistent overall interpretation of the experimental data for both 14N and 15N systems and explains the features of 1H relaxation dispersion resulting from the electron spin relaxation.

  12. Investigating the magnetovolume effect in isotropic body-centered-cubic iron using spin-lattice dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chui, C. P.; Zhou, Yan

    2014-08-15

    The understanding of the magnetovolume effect lacks explicit consideration of spin-lattice coupling at the atomic level, despite abundant theoretical and experimental studies throughout the years. This research gap is filled by the recently developed spin-lattice dynamics technique implemented in this study, which investigates the magnetovolume effect of isotropic body-centered-cubic (BCC) iron, a topic that has previously been subject to macroscopic analysis only. This approach demonstrates the magnetic anomaly followed by the volumetric changes associated with the effect, each characterized by the corresponding field-induced inflection temperature. The temperature of the heat capacity peaks is useful in determining the temperature for retarding the atomic volume increase. Moreover, this work shows the correlation between the effects of temperature and field strength in determining the equilibrium atomic volume of a ferromagnetic material under a magnetic field.

  13. Spin-lattice coupling mediated multiferroicity in (ND4)2FeCl5.D2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.; Cao, Huibo; Wang, Jincheng; Ye, Feng; Matsuda, M.; Yan, J.-Q.; Liu, Yaohua; Garlea, V. O.; Agrawal, Harish K.; Chakoumakos, B. C.; Sales, B. C.; Fishman, Randy S.; Fernandez-Baca, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    We report a neutron diffraction study of the multiferroic mechanism in (ND4)2FeCl5.D2O , a molecular compound that exhibits magnetically induced ferroelectricity. This material exhibits two successive magnetic transitions on cooling: a long-range order transition to an incommensurate (IC) collinear sinusoidal spin state at TN=7.3 K, followed by a second transition to an IC cycloidal spin state at TF E=6.8 K, the latter of which is accompanied by spontaneous ferroelectric polarization. The cycloid structure is strongly distorted by spin-lattice coupling, as evidenced by the observations of both odd and even higher-order harmonics associated with the cycloid wave vector, and a weak commensurate phase that coexists with the IC phase. The second-order harmonic appears at TF E, thereby providing unambiguous evidence that the onset of the electric polarization is accompanied by a lattice modulation due to spin-lattice interaction. The neutron results, in conjunction with the negative thermal expansion and large magnetostriction observed in Ref. [19], indicate that spin-lattice coupling plays a critical role in the ferroelectric mechanism of (ND4)2FeCl5.D2O .

  14. Spin-lattice coupling mediated multiferroicity in (ND4)2FeCl5·D2O

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Wei; Cao, Huibo; Wang, Jincheng; ...

    2016-12-07

    In this paper, we report a neutron diffraction study of the multiferroic mechanism in (ND4)2FeCl5 • D2O, a molecular compound that exhibits magnetically induced ferroelectricity. This material exhibits two successive magnetic transitions on cooling: a long-range order transition to an incommensurate (IC) collinear sinusoidal spin state at TN = 7.3 K, followed by a second transition to an IC cycloidal spin state at TFE = 6.8 K, the latter of which is accompanied by spontaneous ferroelectric polarization. The cycloid structure is strongly distorted by spin-lattice coupling, as evidenced by the observations of both odd and even higher-order harmonics associated withmore » the cycloid wave vector, and a weak commensurate phase that coexists with the IC phase. The second-order harmonic appears at TFE, thereby providing unambiguous evidence that the onset of the electric polarization is accompanied by a lattice modulation due to spin-lattice interaction. The neutron results, in conjunction with the negative thermal expansion and large magnetostriction observed, indicate that spin-lattice coupling plays a critical role in the ferroelectric mechanism of (ND4)2FeCl5 • D2O.« less

  15. Spin-lattice coupling mediated multiferroicity in (ND4)2FeCl5 • D2O

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Wei; Cao, Huibo; Wang, Jincheng; ...

    2016-12-07

    In this paper, we report a neutron diffraction study of the multiferroic mechanism in (ND4)2FeCl5 • D2O, a molecular compound that exhibits magnetically induced ferroelectricity. This material exhibits two successive magnetic transitions on cooling: a long-range order transition to an incommensurate (IC) collinear sinusoidal spin state at TN = 7.3 K, followed by a second transition to an IC cycloidal spin state at TFE = 6.8 K, the latter of which is accompanied by spontaneous ferroelectric polarization. The cycloid structure is strongly distorted by spin-lattice coupling, as evidenced by the observations of both odd and even higher-order harmonics associated withmore » the cycloid wave vector, and a weak commensurate phase that coexists with the IC phase. The second-order harmonic appears at TFE, thereby providing unambiguous evidence that the onset of the electric polarization is accompanied by a lattice modulation due to spin-lattice interaction. The neutron results, in conjunction with the negative thermal expansion and large magnetostriction observed, indicate that spin-lattice coupling plays a critical role in the ferroelectric mechanism of (ND4)2FeCl5 • D2O.« less

  16. A strong ferroelectric ferromagnet created by means of spin-lattice coupling.

    PubMed

    Lee, June Hyuk; Fang, Lei; Vlahos, Eftihia; Ke, Xianglin; Jung, Young Woo; Kourkoutis, Lena Fitting; Kim, Jong-Woo; Ryan, Philip J; Heeg, Tassilo; Roeckerath, Martin; Goian, Veronica; Bernhagen, Margitta; Uecker, Reinhard; Hammel, P Chris; Rabe, Karin M; Kamba, Stanislav; Schubert, Jürgen; Freeland, John W; Muller, David A; Fennie, Craig J; Schiffer, Peter; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel; Schlom, Darrell G

    2010-08-19

    -temperature manifestations of this spin-lattice coupling mechanism. Our work demonstrates that a single experimental parameter, strain, simultaneously controls multiple order parameters and is a viable alternative tuning parameter to composition for creating multiferroics.

  17. A strong ferroelectric ferromagnet created by means of spin-lattice coupling.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Fang, L.; Vlahos, E.; Ke, X.; Jung, Y.W.; Fitting Kourkaoutis, L.; Kim, J. W.; Ryan, P.; Heeg, T.; Roeckerath, M.; Goian, V.; Bernhagen, M.; Uecker, R.; Hammel, P.C.; Rabe, K. M.; Kamba, S.; Schubert, J.; Freeland, J.W.; Muller, D.A.; Fennie, C.J.; Schiffer, P.; Gopalan, V.; Johnston-Halperin, E.; Schlom, D. G.

    2010-08-19

    -temperature manifestations of this spin-lattice coupling mechanism. Our work demonstrates that a single experimental parameter, strain, simultaneously controls multiple order parameters and is a viable alternative tuning parameter to composition for creating multiferroics.

  18. The relationship between reorientational molecular motions and phase transitions in [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2}, studied with the use of {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR and FT-MIR

    SciTech Connect

    Mikuli, Edward Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Grad, Bartłomiej; Kozak, Asja; Wąsicki, Jan W.; Bilski, Paweł; Hołderna-Natkaniec, Krystyna; Medycki, Wojciech

    2015-02-14

    A {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance study of [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2} has confirmed the existence of two phase transitions at T{sub c1} ≈ 257 K and T{sub c2} ≈ 142 K, detected earlier by the DSC method. These transitions were reflected by changes in the temperature dependences of both proton and fluorine of second moments M{sub 2}{sup H} and M{sub 2}{sup F} and of spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1}{sup H} and T{sub 1}{sup F}. The study revealed anisotropic reorientations of whole [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} cations, reorientations by 180° jumps of H{sub 2}O ligands, and aniso- and isotropic reorientations of BF{sub 4}{sup −} anions. The activation parameters for these motions were obtained. It was found that the phase transition at T{sub c1} is associated with the reorientation of the cation as a whole unit around the C{sub 3} axis and that at T{sub c2} with isotropic reorientation of the BF{sub 4}{sup −} anions. The temperature dependence of the full width at half maximum value of the infrared band of ρ{sub t}(H{sub 2}O) mode (at ∼596 cm{sup −1}) indicated that in phases I and II, all H{sub 2}O ligands in [Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} perform fast reorientational motions (180° jumps) with a mean value of activation energy equal to ca 10 kJ mole{sup −1}, what is fully consistent with NMR results. The phase transition at T{sub c1} is associated with a sudden change of speed of fast (τ{sub R} ≈ 10{sup −12} s) reorientational motions of H{sub 2}O ligands. Below T{sub c2} (in phase III), the reorientations of certain part of the H{sub 2}O ligands significantly slow down, while others continue their fast reorientation with an activation energy of ca 2 kJ mole{sup −1}. This fast reorientation cannot be evidenced in NMR relaxation experiments. Splitting of certain IR bands connected with H{sub 2}O ligands at the observed phase transitions suggests a reduction of the symmetry of the octahedral [Mg(H{sub 2}O

  19. Effect of manganese on human placental spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Angtuaco, T.L.; Mattison, D.R.; Thomford, P.J.; Jordan, J.

    1986-01-01

    Human placentas were obtained immediately following delivery and incubated with manganese chloride (MnCl/sub 2/) in concentrations ranging from 0.002 to 2.0 mM. Proton density, T1 and T2 were measured at times ranging from 5-200 minutes. There was rapid uptake of manganese by the placenta producing a dose-dependent decrease in placental T1 and T2. The major effect of manganese uptake was shortening of T1 suggesting that the contrast between placenta and myometrium will be enhanced predominantly for T1-dependent imaging pulse sequences.

  20. 19F-MRI for monitoring human NK cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Ludwig, Kai D.; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Kutz, Matthew P.; Bednarz, Bryan P.; Fain, Sean B.; Capitini, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The availability of clinical-grade cytokines and artificial antigen-presenting cells has accelerated interest in using natural killer (NK) cells as adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) for cancer. One of the technological shortcomings of translating therapies from animal models to clinical application is the inability to effectively and non-invasively track these cells after infusion in patients. We have optimized the nonradioactive isotope fluorine-19 (19F) as a means to label and track NK cells in preclinical models using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human NK cells were expanded with interleukin (IL)-2 and labeled in vitro with increasing concentrations of 19F. Doses as low as 2 mg/mL 19F were detected by MRI. NK cell viability was only decreased at 8 mg/mL 19F. No effects on NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 leukemia cells were observed with 2, 4 or 8 mg/mL 19F. Higher doses of 19F, 4 mg/mL and 8 mg/mL, led to an improved 19F signal by MRI with 3 × 1011 19F atoms per NK cell. The 4 mg/mL 19F labeling had no effect on NK cell function via secretion of granzyme B or interferon gamma (IFNγ), compared to NK cells exposed to vehicle alone. 19F-labeled NK cells were detectable immediately by MRI after intratumoral injection in NSG mice and up to day 8. When 19F-labeled NK cells were injected subcutaneously, we observed a loss of signal through time at the site of injection suggesting NK cell migration to distant organs. The 19F perfluorocarbon is a safe and effective reagent for monitoring the persistence and trafficking of NK cell infusions in vivo, and may have potential for developing novel imaging techniques to monitor ACT for cancer. PMID:27467963

  1. Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings for the assignment of stereochemistry in flubenzimine.

    PubMed

    Ghiviriga, Ion; Rubinski, Miles A; Dolbier, William R

    2016-07-01

    Through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings revealed the configuration of flubenzimine, with the CF3 group on N4 pointing towards the lone pair of N5. The (19) F-(15) N coupling constants were measured at natural abundance using a spin-state selective indirect-detection pulse sequence. As (15) N-labelled proteins are routinely synthesized for NMR studies, through-space (19) F-(15) N couplings have the potential to probe the stereochemistry of these proteins by (19) F labelling of some amino acids or can reveal the site of docking of fluorine-containing drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. (19)F labelled glycosaminoglycan probes for solution NMR and non-linear (CARS) microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lima, Marcelo A; Cavalheiro, Renan P; M Viana, Gustavo; Meneghetti, Maria C Z; Rudd, Timothy R; Skidmore, Mark A; Powell, Andrew K; Yates, Edwin A

    2016-08-15

    Studying polysaccharide-protein interactions under physiological conditions by conventional techniques is challenging. Ideally, macromolecules could be followed by both in vitro spectroscopy experiments as well as in tissues using microscopy, to enable a proper comparison of results over these different scales but, often, this is not feasible. The cell surface and extracellular matrix polysaccharides, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) lack groups that can be detected selectively in the biological milieu. The introduction of (19)F labels into GAG polysaccharides is explored and the interaction of a labelled GAG with the heparin-binding protein, antithrombin, employing (19)F NMR spectroscopy is followed. Furthermore, the ability of (19)F labelled GAGs to be imaged using CARS microscopy is demonstrated. (19)F labelled GAGs enable both (19)F NMR protein-GAG binding studies in solution at the molecular level and non-linear microscopy at a microscopic scale to be conducted on the same material, essentially free of background signals.

  3. Visualizing arthritic inflammation and therapeutic response by fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging (19F MRI)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-invasive imaging of inflammation to measure the progression of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to monitor responses to therapy is critically needed. V-Sense, a perfluorocarbon (PFC) contrast agent that preferentially labels inflammatory cells, which are then recruited out of systemic circulation to sites of inflammation, enables detection by 19F MRI. With no 19F background in the host, detection is highly-specific and can act as a proxy biomarker of the degree of inflammation present. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis in rats, a model with many similarities to human RA, was used to study the ability of the PFC contrast agent to reveal the accumulation of inflammation over time using 19F MRI. Disease progression in the rat hind limbs was monitored by caliper measurements and 19F MRI on days 15, 22 and 29, including the height of clinically symptomatic disease. Naïve rats served as controls. The capacity of the PFC contrast agent and 19F MRI to assess the effectiveness of therapy was studied in a cohort of rats administered oral prednisolone on days 14 to 28. Results Quantification of 19F signal measured by MRI in affected limbs was linearly correlated with disease severity. In animals with progressive disease, increases in 19F signal reflected the ongoing recruitment of inflammatory cells to the site, while no increase in 19F signal was observed in animals receiving treatment which resulted in clinical resolution of disease. Conclusion These results indicate that 19F MRI may be used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate longitudinal responses to a therapeutic regimen, while additionally revealing the recruitment of monocytic cells involved in the inflammatory process to the anatomical site. This study may support the use of 19F MRI to clinically quantify and monitor the severity of inflammation, and to assess the effectiveness of treatments in RA and other diseases with an inflammatory component. PMID:22721447

  4. 19F NMR Reveals Multiple Conformations at the Dimer Interface of the Non-Structural Protein 1 Effector Domain from Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-Chung; Swapna, G. V. T.; Leonard, Paul G.; Ladbury, John E.; Krug, Robert M.; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-structural protein 1 of influenza A virus, NS1A, is a conserved virulence factor comprised of an N-terminal double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (RBD) and a multifunctional C-terminal effector domain (ED), each of which can independently form symmetric homodimers. Here we apply 19F NMR to NS1A from influenza A/Udorn/307/1972 virus (H3N2) labeled with 5-fluorotryptophan (5-F-Trp), and demonstrate that the 19F signal of Trp187 is a sensitive, direct monitor of the ED helix-helix dimer interface. 19F relaxation dispersion data reveal the presence of conformational dynamics within this functionally important protein-protein interface, whose rate is over three orders of magnitude faster than the kinetics of ED dimerization. 19F NMR also affords direct spectroscopic evidence that Trp187, which mediates intermolecular ED:ED interactions required for cooperative dsRNA binding, is solvent exposed in full-length NS1Aat concentrations below aggregation. These results have important implications for the diverse roles of this NS1A epitope during influenza virus infection. PMID:24582435

  5. Solid-state 19F MAS NMR study on the conformation and molecular mobility of poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene).

    PubMed

    Tatsuno, Hiroto; Aimi, Keitaro; Ando, Shinji

    2007-05-01

    The temperature dependence of molecular mobility and conformational changes of poly(chlorotrifluoro- ethylene) (PCTFE) have been investigated by solid-state (19)F magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. The pulse techniques of dipolar-filter and T(1rho)-filter allow selective observation of the amorphous and crystalline domains, respectively. The temperature dependence of T(1rho) (F) revealed that the segmental motion in the amorphous domain becomes vigorous above ca 80 degrees C, which is well above the glass transition (T(g)) temperature (52 degrees C) and more close to the beta-relaxation temperature (95 degrees C). On the other hand, vigorous molecular motions in the crystalline domain occur above 120 degrees C, which is much below the melting temperature (212 degrees C). This indicates that the polymer chains in the PCTFE crystallites are more mobile than those of typical semicrystalline fluoropolymers like poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), which can be associated with structural imperfections in the crystallites. In addition, the density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (19)F magnetic shielding suggest that the high-frequency shifts observed for the crystalline signals above 80 degrees C can be ascribed to the conformational change around meso diads toward more twisted and/or helical conformations in the main chain.

  6. Coupled nuclear spin relaxation and internal rotations in magnesium fluosilicate hexahydrate.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utton, D. B.; Tsang, T.

    1972-01-01

    Both proton and fluorine nuclear spin-lattice relaxations have been studied by the 180- to 90-deg pulse method in magnesium fluosilicate hexahydrate at 25 and 13 MHz over the temperature range from 170 to 350 K. Observed nonexponential behavior of the nuclear magnetic relaxation is explained by internal rotations of the doubly charged negative fluosilicate ions and doubly charged positive magnesium hexahydrate ions.

  7. Exploiting Copper Redox for (19)F Magnetic Resonance-Based Detection of Cellular Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Da; King, Tyler L; Banerjee, Arnab; Kohli, Vikraant; Que, Emily L

    2016-03-09

    We report a pair of fluorinated, redox-active copper complexes for potential use as (19)F MRI contrast agents for detecting cellular hypoxia. Trifluorinated Cu(II) ATSM-F3 displays the appropriate redox potential for selective accumulation in hypoxic cells and a completely quenched (19)F NMR signal that is "turned on" following reduction to Cu(I). Incubation of cancer cells with CuATSM-F3 resulted in a selective detection of (19)F signal in cells grown under hypoxic conditions.

  8. Magnetic phase transition in coupled spin-lattice systems: A replica-exchange Wang-Landau study.

    PubMed

    Perera, Dilina; Vogel, Thomas; Landau, David P

    2016-10-01

    Coupled, dynamical spin-lattice models provide a unique test ground for simulations investigating the finite-temperature magnetic properties of materials under the direct influence of the lattice vibrations. These models are constructed by combining a coordinate-dependent interatomic potential with a Heisenberg-like spin Hamiltonian, facilitating the treatment of both the atomic coordinates and the spins as explicit phase variables. Using a model parameterized for bcc iron, we study the magnetic phase transition in these complex systems via the recently introduced, massively parallel replica-exchange Wang-Landau Monte Carlo method. Comparison with the results obtained from rigid lattice (spin-only) simulations shows that the transition temperature as well as the amplitude of the peak in the specific heat curve is marginally affected by the lattice vibrations. Moreover, the results were found to be sensitive to the particular choice of interatomic potential.

  9. Magnetic phase transition in coupled spin-lattice systems: A replica-exchange Wang-Landau study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Dilina; Vogel, Thomas; Landau, David P.

    2016-10-01

    Coupled, dynamical spin-lattice models provide a unique test ground for simulations investigating the finite-temperature magnetic properties of materials under the direct influence of the lattice vibrations. These models are constructed by combining a coordinate-dependent interatomic potential with a Heisenberg-like spin Hamiltonian, facilitating the treatment of both the atomic coordinates and the spins as explicit phase variables. Using a model parameterized for bcc iron, we study the magnetic phase transition in these complex systems via the recently introduced, massively parallel replica-exchange Wang-Landau Monte Carlo method. Comparison with the results obtained from rigid lattice (spin-only) simulations shows that the transition temperature as well as the amplitude of the peak in the specific heat curve is marginally affected by the lattice vibrations. Moreover, the results were found to be sensitive to the particular choice of interatomic potential.

  10. Detection of targeted perfluorocarbon nanoparticle binding using 19F diffusion weighted MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Waters, Emily A; Chen, Junjie; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Huiying; Neumann, Robert; Santeford, Andrea; Arbeit, Jeffrey; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2008-11-01

    Real-time detection of targeted contrast agent binding is challenging due to background signal from unbound agent. (19)F diffusion weighted MR spectroscopy (DWS) could selectively detect binding of angiogenesis-targeted perfluorocarbon nanoparticles in vivo. Transgenic K14-HPV16 mice with epidermal squamous carcinomas exhibiting up-regulated neovasculature were used, with nontransgenic littermates as controls. Mice were treated with alpha(v)beta(3)-integrin targeted perfluorocarbon nanoparticles. (19)F DWS (b-values from 0 to 16,000 s/mm(2)) was performed on mouse ears in vivo at 11.74 Tesla. Progressive decay of (19)F signal with increased diffusion weighting at low b-values (< 1500 s/mm(2)) was observed in ears of both K14-HPV16 and control mice, demonstrating suppression of background (19)F signal from unbound nanoparticles in the blood. Much of the (19)F signal from ears of K14-HPV16 mice persisted at high b-values, indicating a stationary signal source, reflecting abundant nanoparticle binding to angiogenesis. (19)F signal in controls decayed completely at high b-values (> 1500 s/mm(2)), reflecting a moving signal source due to absence of angiogenesis (no binding sites). Estimated ADCs of nanoparticles in K14-HPV16 and control mice were 33.1 +/- 12.9 microm(2)/s and 19563 +/- 5858 microm(2)/s (p < 0.01). In vivo (19)F DWS can be used for specific detection of bound perfluorocarbon nanoparticles by selectively suppressing background (19)F signal from nanoparticles flowing in blood.

  11. Understanding Structure-Property Correlation in Monocationic and Dicationic Ionic Liquids through Combined Fluorescence and Pulsed-Field Gradient (PFG) and Relaxation NMR Experiments.

    PubMed

    Kumar Sahu, Prabhat; Ghosh, Arindam; Sarkar, Moloy

    2015-11-05

    Steady state, time-resolved fluorescence and NMR experiments are carried out to gain deeper insights into the structure-property correlation in structurally similar monocationic and dicationic room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). The excitation wavelength dependent fluorescence response of fluorophore in 1-methy-3-propyllimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide [C3MIm][NTf2] is found to be different from that of 1,6-bis(3-methylimidazolium-1-yl)hexane bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide [C6(MIm)2][NTf2]2 and 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide [C6MIm][NTf2]. The outcomes of the present solvent dynamics study in [C3MIm][NTf2] when compared with those in [C6(MIm)2][NTf2]2 and in [C6MIm][NTf2] from our previous studies (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2014, 16, 12918-12928) indicate the involvement of dipolar rotation of imidazolium cation during solvation. To correlate the findings of solvation dynamics study with the dipolar rotation of the imidazolium ring, pulsed-field gradient (PFG)-NMR technique for translational diffusion coefficient measurement and (1)H as well as (19)F spin-lattice relaxation measurements are employed. NMR investigation reveals that an ultrafast component of solvation can be related to the dipolar rotation of imidazolium cation; hence, the role of dipolar rotation of cations in governing the dynamics of solvation in ILs cannot be ignored. Analysis of the rotational relaxation dynamics data by the Stokes-Einstein-Debye hydrodynamic theory unveils distinctive features of solute-solvent interaction in [C3MIm][NTf2] and [C6(MIm)2][NTf2]2.

  12. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy study of fluence dependence of paramagnetic relaxation in Mn/Fe implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masenda, H.; Geburt, S.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Naidoo, D.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Johnston, K.; Mantovan, R.; Mølholt, T. E.; Ncube, M.; Shayestehaminzadeh, S.; Gislason, H. P.; Langouche, G.; Ólafsson, S.; Ronning, C.

    2016-12-01

    Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy following the implantation of radioactive precursor isotope 57Mn+ ( T 1/2= 1.5 min) into ZnO single crystals at ISOLDE/CERN shows that a large fraction of 57Fe atoms produced in the 57Mn beta decay is created as paramagnetic Fe3+ with relatively long spin-lattice relaxation times. Here we report on ZnO pre-implanted with 56Fe to fluences of 2×1013, 5×10 13 and 8 × 1013 ions/cm2 in order to investigate the dependence of the paramagnetic relaxation rate of Fe3+ on fluence. The spectra are dominated by magnetic features displaying paramagnetic relaxation effects. The extracted spin-lattice relaxation rates show a slight increase with increasing ion fluence at corresponding temperatures and the area fraction of Fe3+ at room temperature reaches a maximum contribution of 80(3)% in the studied fluence range.

  13. NMR relaxation rate and the libron energy of solid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugawara, K.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    By taking the rotational relaxation of orthohydrogen (o-H2) in solid hydrogen into account, the authors have theoretically investigated the longitudinal NMR spin lattice relaxation rate of o-H2. The rate is characterized by an anomalous maximum, as a function of temperature, at temperatures close to the mean libron energy of o-H2. Application of the theory for o-H2 concentrations between 42% and 75% reveals a nearly concentration-independent mean libron energy equivalent to about 1 K. This qualitatively and quantitatively contradicts the conclusions of other theories, but agrees with recent experiments.

  14. Contribution of 19F resonances on 18O( p, α)15N reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmeslem, Meriem; Chafa, Azzedine; Barhoumi, Slimane; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-08-01

    The 18O( p, α)15N reaction influences the isotopes production such as 19F, 18O, and 15N which can be used to test the models of stellar evolution. 19F is synthesized in both asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and metal-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Using R-matrix theory we allow new values of resonances parameters in 19F. We show that the most important contribution to the differential and total cross section at low energies, comes from the levels in 19F situated at resonances energies E R =151, 680 and 840 keV with spin and parity 1/2+. The total width of the 680 keV resonance is badly known. So, we have focused on this broad resonance corresponding to the 8.65 MeV level in 19F. We delimit the temperature range in which each resonance contribution to the total reaction rate occurs by analyzing the ratio ( N A < σν> i / N A < σν>). This allowed us to show that the 680 and 840 keV broad resonances strongly dominate the reaction rate over the stellar temperature range T 9=0.02-0.06 and T 9=0.5-5. Finally, these results were compared to NACRE and Iliadis astrophysical compilations.

  15. A symmetrical fluorous dendron-cyanine dye conjugated bimodal nanoprobe for quantitative 19F MRI and NIR fluorescence bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Yue, Xuyi; Wang, Yu; Qian, Chunqi; Huang, Peng; Lizak, Marty; Niu, Gang; Wang, Fu; Rong, Pengfei; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Ma, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    19F MRI and optical imaging are two powerful non-invasive molecular imaging modalities in biomedical applications. 19F MRI has great potential for high resolution in vivo imaging, while fluorescent probes enable ultracontrast cellular/tissue imaging with high accuracy and sensitivity. We, thus, developed a bimodal nanoprobe integrating the merits of 19F MRI and fluorescence imaging into a single synthetic molecule, which was further engineered into nanoprobe, by addressing shortcomings of conventional contrast agents to explore the quantitative 19F MRI and fluorescence imaging and cell tracking. Results showed that this bimodal imaging nanoprobe presented high correlation of 19F MR signal and NIR fluorescence intensity in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, this nanoprobe enabled quantitative 19F MR analysis, confirmed by complementary fluorescence analysis. This unique feature can hardly be obtained by traditional 19F MRI contrast agents. We envision that this nanoprobe would hold great potential for quantitative and sensitive multi-modal molecular imaging. PMID:24789108

  16. (19)F NMR spectroscopic characterization of the interaction of niflumic acid with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Keisuke; Omran, Ahmed A; Takegami, Shigehiko; Tanaka, Rumi; Kitade, Tatsuya

    2007-04-01

    The interaction of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, niflumic acid (NFA), with human serum albumin (HSA) has been investigated by (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A (19)F NMR spectrum of NFA in a buffered (pH 7.4) solution of NaCl (0.1 mol L(-1)) contained a single sharp signal of its CF(3) group 14.33 ppm from the internal reference 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. Addition of 0.6 mmol L(-1) HSA to the NFA buffer solution caused splitting of the CF(3) signal into two broadened signals, shifted to the lower fields of 14.56 and 15.06 ppm, with an approximate intensity ratio of 1:3. Denaturation of HSA by addition of 3.0 mol L(-1) guanidine hydrochloride (GU) restored a single sharp signal of CF(3) at 14.38 ppm, indicating complete liberation of NFA from HSA as a result of its denaturation. These results suggest that the binding is reversible and occurs in at least two HSA regions. Competitive (19)F NMR experiments using warfarin, dansyl-L: -asparagine, and benzocaine (site I ligands), and L: -tryptophan and ibuprofen (site II ligands) revealed that NFA binds to site I at two different regions, Ia and Ib, in the ratio 1:3. By use of (19)F NMR with NFA as an (19)F NMR probe the nonfluorinated site I-binding drugs sulfobromophthalein and iophenoxic acid were also found to bind sites Ia and Ib, respectively. These results illustrate the usefulness and convenience of (19)F NMR for investigation of the HSA binding of both fluorinated and nonfluorinated drugs.

  17. Geometrically frustrated GdInO3: An exotic system to study negative thermal expansion and spin-lattice coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Barnita; Chatterjee, Swastika; Roy, Anushree; Midya, A.; Mandal, P.; Grover, Vinita; Tyagi, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    In this article, we report negative thermal expansion and spin frustration in hexagonal GdInO3. Rietveld refinements of the x-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the negative thermal expansion in the temperature range of 50-100 K stems from the triangular lattice of Gd3 + ions. The downward deviation of the low-temperature inverse susceptibility (χ-1) versus T plot from the Curie-Weiss law and the large value of the ratio, | θCW|/ TN>28 , where θCW and TN are respectively Curie-Weiss and Neel temperature, indicate a strong spin frustration, which inhibits long-range magnetic ordering down to 1.8 K. Magnetostriction measurements clearly demonstrate a spin-lattice coupling in the system. Low-temperature anomalous phonon softening, as obtained from temperature-dependent Raman measurements, also reveals the same. Our experimental observations are supported by first-principles density functional theory calculations of the electronic and phonon dispersion in GdInO3. The calculations suggest that the GdInO3 lattice is highly frustrated at low temperature. Further, the calculated normal mode frequencies of the Gd-related Γ point phonon modes reveal significant magnetoelastic coupling in this system. The competitive role of magnetic interaction energy and thermal stabilization energy in determining the change in interatomic distances is the possible origin for the negative thermal expansion in GdInO3 over a limited range of temperature.

  18. Half-metallicity of a kagome spin lattice: the case of a manganese bis-dithiolene monolayer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingwen; Wang, Aizhu; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2013-11-07

    The spin ordering in kagome lattices has long been studied in the search for real materials with a spin-liquid ground state. The synthesis of a nickel bis-dichiolene complex (Ni3C12S12) nanosheet (T. Kambe et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013, 135, 2462) paved a way for realizing real two-dimensional kagome lattices. Using first-principles calculations, we predicted that a ferromagnetic kagome spin lattice with S = 3/2 on lattice vertices can be achieved in an Mn3C12S12 monolayer formed by substituting Ni with Mn atoms in nonmagnetic Ni3C12S12. Monte Carlo simulations on the basis of the Ising model suggest that it has a Curie temperature of about 212 K. A ferromagnetic Mn3C12S12 monolayer is half metallic with high carrier mobility in one spin channel and a band gap of 1.54 eV in another spin channel, which is quite promising for spintronic device applications. Additionally, a small band gap opens up at the Dirac point of the kagome bands due to the spin-orbital coupling effects, which may be implementable for achieving a quantum anomalous Hall effect.

  19. Discovery of a (19)F MRI sensitive salinomycin derivative with high cytotoxicity towards cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiuyan; Li, Yu; Bo, Shaowei; Li, Xiaofei; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Qi; Yang, Zhigang; Cong, Hengjiang; Deng, Hexiang; Chen, Mingnan; Chen, Shizhen; Zhou, Xin; Ding, Hong; Jiang, Zhong-Xing

    2016-04-14

    Salinomycin is a promising anti-cancer agent which selectively targets cancer stem cells. To improve its potency and selectivity, an analog library of salinomycin was generated by site-specific modification and CuAAc derivatization. Through a cytotoxicity analysis of the library, a fluorinated analog with high potency, selectivity, and (19)F MRI sensitivity was discovered as a novel theranostic agent.

  20. 19F NMR study on the biodegradation of fluorophenols by various Rhodococcus species.

    PubMed

    Bondar, V S; Boersma, M G; Golovlev, E L; Vervoort, J; Van Berkel, W J; Finkelstein, Z I; Solyanikova, I P; Golovleva, L A; Rietjens, I M

    1998-01-01

    Of all NMR observable isotopes 19F is the one perhaps most convenient for studies on biodegradation of environmental pollutants. The reasons underlying this potential of 19F NMR are discussed and illustrated on the basis of a study on the biodegradation of fluorophenols by four Rhodococcus strains. The results indicate marked differences between the biodegradation pathways of fluorophenols among the various Rhodococcus species. This holds not only for the level and nature of the fluorinated biodegradation pathway intermediates that accumulate, but also for the regioselectivity of the initial hydroxylation step. Several of the Rhodococcus species contain a phenol hydroxylase that catalyses the oxidative defluorination of ortho-fluorinated di- and trifluorophenols. Furthermore, it is illustrated how the 19F NMR technique can be used as a tool in the process of identification of an accumulated unknown metabolite, in this case most likely 5-fluoromaleylacetate. Altogether, the 19F NMR technique proved valid to obtain detailed information on the microbial biodegradation pathways of fluorinated organics, but also to provide information on the specificity of enzymes generally considered unstable and, for this reason, not much studied so far.

  1. The metabolism of 2-trifluormethylaniline and its acetanilide in the rat by 19F NMR monitored enzyme hydrolysis and 1H/19F HPLC-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tugnait, M; Lenz, E M; Hofmann, M; Spraul, M; Wilson, I D; Lindon, J C; Nicholson, J K

    2003-01-01

    The urinary excretion profile and identity of the metabolites of 2-trifluoromethyl aniline (2-TFMA) and 2-trifluoromethyl acetanilide (2-TFMAc), following i.p. administration to the rat at 50 mg kg(-1), were determined using a combination of 19F NMR monitored enzyme hydrolysis, SPEC-MS and 19F/1H HPLC-NMR. A total recovery of approximately 96.4% of the dose was excreted into the urine as seven metabolites. The major routes of metabolism were N-conjugation (glucuronidation), and ring-hydroxylation followed by sulphation (and to a lesser extent glucuronidation). The major metabolites excreted into the urine for both compounds were a labile N-conjugated metabolite (a postulated N-glucuronide) and a sulphated ring-hydroxylated metabolite (a postulated 4-amino-5-trifluoromethylphenyl sulphate) following dosing of 2-TFMA. These accounted for approximately 53.0 and 31.5% of the dose, respectively. This study identifies problems on sample component instability in the preparation and analysis procedures.

  2. A study of molecular dynamics and freezing phase transition in tissues by proton spin relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Rustgi, S N; Peemoeller, H; Thompson, R T; Kydon, D W; Pintar, M M

    1978-01-01

    Muscle, spleen, and kidney tissues from 4-wk-old C57 black mice were studied by proton magnetic resonance. Spin-lattice relaxation times at high fields and in the rotating frame, as well as the spin-spin relaxation times, are reported as a function of temperature in the liquid and frozen phase. Motions of large molecules and of water molecules and their changes at the freezing phase transition are studied. The shortcomings of the two-state fast-exchange relaxation model are discussed. PMID:667294

  3. NMR relaxation dispersion of vulcanized natural rubber.

    PubMed

    Kariyo, Sobiroh; Stapf, Siegfried

    2004-01-01

    The dependence of the 1H spin-lattice relaxation time on the magnetic field strength has been determined for linear and cross-linked polyisoprene for Larmor frequencies between 5 kHz and 20 MHz. Universal power-law relations are found for all temperatures and cross-link densities under investigation and are compared to published results of rotating-frame experiments on similar natural rubber samples. The shape of the individual dispersion functions can be superposed into a master curve using appropriate shift factors. While addition of filler particles even at large weight fractions has only a minor effect on the relaxation times, uniaxial deformation and swelling are demonstrated to alter the molecular dynamics significantly.

  4. High-resolution (19)F MAS NMR spectroscopy: structural disorder and unusual J couplings in a fluorinated hydroxy-silicate.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Yates, Jonathan R; Berry, Andrew J; Wimperis, Stephen; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2010-11-10

    High-resolution (19)F magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is used to study disorder and bonding in a crystalline solid. (19)F MAS NMR reveals four distinct F sites in a 50% fluorine-substituted deuterated hydrous magnesium silicate (clinohumite, 4Mg(2)SiO(4)·Mg(OD(1-x)F(x))(2) with x = 0.5), indicating extensive structural disorder. The four (19)F peaks can be assigned using density functional theory (DFT) calculations of NMR parameters for a number of structural models with a range of possible local F environments generated by F(-)/OH(-) substitution. These assignments are supported by two-dimensional (19)F double-quantum MAS NMR experiments that correlate F sites based on either spatial proximity (via dipolar couplings) or through-bond connectivity (via scalar, or J, couplings). The observation of (19)F-(19)F J couplings is unexpected as the fluorines coordinate Mg atoms and the Mg-F interaction is normally considered to be ionic in character (i.e., there is no formal F-Mg-F covalent bonding arrangement). However, DFT calculations predict significant (19)F-(19)F J couplings, and these are in good agreement with the splittings observed in a (19)F J-resolved MAS NMR experiment. The existence of these J couplings is discussed in relation to both the nature of bonding in the solid state and the occurrence of so-called "through-space" (19)F-(19)F J couplings in solution. Finally, we note that we have found similar structural disorder and spin-spin interactions in both synthetic and naturally occurring clinohumite samples.

  5. Novel fluorinated ligands for gold nanoparticle labelling with applications in (19)F-MRI.

    PubMed

    Michelena, Olatz; Padro, Daniel; Carrillo-Carrión, Carolina; Del Pino, Pablo; Blanco, Jorge; Arnaiz, Blanca; Parak, Wolfgang J; Carril, Mónica

    2017-02-21

    Novel fluorinated ligands for gold nanoparticle labelling have been designed and synthesised. Several types of gold nanoparticles have been prepared in the presence of these fluorinated ligands alone, or in combination with non-fluorinated ligands. Their colloidal stability in water and other solvents was tested and the magnetic resonance properties of the so-obtained nanoparticles were also assessed in detail. (1)H and (19)F-NMR spectra were evaluated and MRI phantoms of the most promising nanoparticles were successfully measured in (19)F-MRI. The MRI signal to noise ratio was related to the fluorine concentration and compared with ICP-MS data to correlate the real concentration of fluorine grafted onto the nanoparticles with the actually active fluorine in MRI.

  6. First evidences for 19F(α, p)22Ne at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agata, G.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; Blagus, S.; Figuera, P.; Grassi, L.; Guardo, G. L.; Gulino, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Indelicato, I.; Kshetri, R.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Lattuada, M.; Mijatović, T.; Milin, M.; Miljanic, D.; Prepolec, L.; Sergi, M. L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Tokic, V.; Tumino, A.; Uroic, M.

    2016-04-01

    19F experimental abundances is overestimated in respect to the theoretical one: it is therefore clear that further investigations are needed. We focused on the 19F(α, p) 22 Ne reaction, representing the main destruction channel in He-rich environments. The lowest energy at which this reaction has been studied with direct methods is E C.M. ≈ 0.91 MeV, while the Gamow region is between 0.39 ÷ 0.8 MeV, far below the Coulomb barrier (3.8 MeV). For this reason, an experiment at Rudjer Boskovic Institute (Zagreb) was performed, applying the Trojan Horse Method. Following this method we selected the quasi-free contribution coming from 6Li(19 F,p22 Ne)2 H at Ebeam=6 MeV at kinematically favourable angles, and the cross section at energies 0 < EC.M. < 1.4 MeV was extracted in arbitrary units, covering the astrophysical region of interest.

  7. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexander J.; Granwehr, Josef; Lesbats, Clémentine; Krupa, James L.; Six, Joseph S.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Thomas, Neil R.; Auer, Dorothee P.; Meersmann, Thomas; Faas, Henryk M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental “calibration factor” to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments. PMID:27727294

  8. Spin relaxation measurements using first-harmonic out-of-phase absorption EPR signals.

    PubMed

    Livshits, V A; Páli, T; Marsh, D

    1998-09-01

    The dependence on spin-lattice (T1) relaxation of the first-harmonic absorption EPR signal (V'1) detected in phase quadrature with the Zeeman modulation has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally for nitroxide spin labels. Spectral simulations were performed by iterative solution of the Bloch equations that contained explicitly both the modulation and microwave magnetic fields (T. Páli, V. A. Livshits, and D. Marsh, 1996, J. Magn. Reson. B 113, 151-159). It was found that, of the various non-linear EPR displays, the first-harmonic out-of-phase V'1-signal, recorded under conditions of partial saturation of the microwave absorption, is particularly favorable for determining spin-lattice relaxation enhancements because of its superior signal intensity and relative insensitivity to spin-spin (T2) relaxation. By varying the Zeeman modulation frequency it is also possible to tune the optimum sensitivity of the V'1-signal to different ranges of the T1-relaxation time. A Zeeman modulation frequency of 25 kHz appears to be particularly suited to spin label applications. Calibrations are given for the dependence on T1-relaxation time of both the amplitude and the second integral of the V'1-signal recorded under standard conditions. Experiments on different spin labels in solution and in membranes demonstrate the practical usable sensitivity of the V'1-signal, even at modulation frequencies of 25 kHz, and these are used to investigate the dependence on microwave field intensity, in comparison with theoretical predictions. The practicable sensitivity to spin-lattice relaxation enhancements is demonstrated experimentally for a spin-labeled membrane system in the presence of paramagnetic ions. The first-harmonic out-of-phase V'1-signal appears to be the non-linear CW EPR method of choice for determining T1-relaxation enhancements in spin-labeled systems.

  9. Enhancement of Paramagnetic Relaxation by Photoexcited Gold Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Tao; Wamer, Wayne G.; Subczynski, Witold K.; Hou, Shuai; Wu, Xiaochun; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the switchable, light-dependent effects of gold nanorods (GNRs) on paramagnetic properties of nitroxide spin probes. The photoexcited GNRs enhanced the spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxations of nitroxide spin probes. It was shown that molecular oxygen plays the key role in this process. Our results demonstrate that ESR is a powerful tool for investigating the events following photoexcitation of GNRs. The novel light-controlled effects observed for GNRs on paramagnetic properties and activities of surrounding molecules have a number of significant applications where oxygen sensing and oxygen activity is important. PMID:27071507

  10. Pulsed NMRON relaxation measurements and thermometric NMR in the quasi-2 dimensional femomagnet: Mn(COOCH 3) 2·4H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gros, M.; Kotlicld, A.; Turrell, B. G.

    1990-08-01

    The measurement of the field dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time of 54Mn in the two manganese sites in the quasi-2 dimensional ferromagnet Mn(COOCH 3) 2·4H 20 obtained by the pulsed NMRON technique is reported. This technique allows the observation in low fields of the higher frequency resonance which previously could not be measured by CW methods. The anomaly in the 54Mn relaxation time observed in the 55Mn level crossing regime is discussed, and the thermometric observation of the field dependence and lice width of the resonance lines from the abundant 55Mn spin systems is reported and related to the 54Mn spin-lattice relaxation behavior.

  11. TANKS 18 AND 19-F EQUIPMENT GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-12-15

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) intends to remove Tanks 18-F and 19-F at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from service. The high-level waste (HLW) tanks have been isolated from the F-area Tank Farm (FTF) facilities and will be filled with cementitious grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the empty volumes in the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways from the surface to residual waste on the bottom of the tanks, (3) providing an intruder barrier, and (4) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to limit solubility of residual radionuclides. Bulk waste and heel waste removal equipment will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F when the tanks are closed. This equipment includes: mixer pumps, transfer pumps, transfer jets, equipment support masts, sampling masts and dip tube assemblies. The current Tank 18-F and 19-F closure strategy is to grout the internal void spaces in this equipment to eliminate fast vertical pathways and slow water infiltration to the residual material on the tank floor. This report documents the results of laboratory testing performed to identify a grout formulation for filling the abandoned equipment in Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The objective of this work was to formulate a flowable grout for filling internal voids of equipment that will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F during the final closures. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, Tank Farm Closure Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The scope for this task is provided in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Prepare and evaluate the SRR cooling coil grout identified in WSRC-STI-2008-00298 per the TTR for this work. The cooling coil grout is a mixture of BASF MasterFlow{reg_sign} 816 cable grout (67.67 wt. %), Grade 100 ground granulated blast furnace slag (7.52 wt. %) and water (24.81 wt. %); (2) Identify equipment grout placement and

  12. Solid-state (19)F-NMR of peptides in native membranes.

    PubMed

    Koch, Katja; Afonin, Sergii; Ieronimo, Marco; Berditsch, Marina; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-01-01

    To understand how membrane-active peptides (MAPs) function in vivo, it is essential to obtain structural information about them in their membrane-bound state. Most biophysical approaches rely on the use of bilayers prepared from synthetic phospholipids, i.e. artificial model membranes. A particularly successful structural method is solid-state NMR, which makes use of macroscopically oriented lipid bilayers to study selectively isotope-labelled peptides. Native biomembranes, however, have a far more complex lipid composition and a significant non-lipidic content (protein and carbohydrate). Model membranes, therefore, are not really adequate to address questions concerning for example the selectivity of these membranolytic peptides against prokaryotic vs eukaryotic cells, their varying activities against different bacterial strains, or other related biological issues.Here, we discuss a solid-state (19)F-NMR approach that has been developed for structural studies of MAPs in lipid bilayers, and how this can be translated to measurements in native biomembranes. We review the essentials of the methodology and discuss key objectives in the practice of (19)F-labelling of peptides. Furthermore, the preparation of macroscopically oriented biomembranes on solid supports is discussed in the context of other membrane models. Two native biomembrane systems are presented as examples: human erythrocyte ghosts as representatives of eukaryotic cell membranes, and protoplasts from Micrococcus luteus as membranes from Gram-positive bacteria. Based on our latest experimental experience with the antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S, the benefits and some implicit drawbacks of using such supported native membranes in solid-state (19)F-NMR analysis are discussed.

  13. Pre-fission neutron emission in {sup 19}F+{sup 209}Bi reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Hardev; Sugathan, P.; Shidling, P. D.; Behera, B. R.; Singh, Gulzar; Govil, I. M.; Golda, K. S.; Jhingan, Akhil; Singh, R. P.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Datta, S. K.; Pal, Santanu; Viesti, G.

    2009-03-04

    The pre- and post-scission neutron multiplicities are measured for {sup 19}F+{sup 209}Bi reaction at E{sub lab} = 100, 104, 108, 112 and 116 MeV. The measured value of pre-scission neutron multiplicity was found to be increasing with the excitation energy. The comparison of experimental values with the statistical model calculations shows that the measured values are much larger than the model predictions. This difference in excess yield over the model predictions amounts to the survival time of 80{+-}5x10{sup -21} s for the {sup 228}U compound nucleus before it undergoes fission.

  14. 6-Trifluoromethylpyridoxine: novel (19)F NMR pH indicator for in vivo detection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Xin; Cui, Weina; Bourke, Vincent A; Mason, Ralph P

    2012-08-09

    pH plays an important role in tumor proliferation, angiogenesis, metabolic control, and the efficacy of cytotoxic therapy, and accurate noninvasive assessment of tumor pH promises to provide insight into developmental processes and prognostic information. In this paper, we report the design, synthesis, and characterization of two novel pH indicators 6-trifluoromethylpyridoxine 8 and α(4),α(5)-di-O-[3'-O-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)propyl]-6-trifluoromethylpyridoxine 17 and demonstrate 8 as an extracellular (19)F NMR pH probe to assess pH(e) of various tumors in vivo.

  15. Cerebral blood flow in experimental ischemia assessed by sup 19 F magnetic resonance spectroscopy in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, A.; Nagashima, G.; Bizzi, A.; DesPres, D.J. )

    1990-10-01

    We evaluated a 19F magnetic resonance spectroscopic technique that detects Freon-23 washout as a means of measuring cerebral blood flow in halothane-anesthetized adult cats during and after transient cerebral ischemia produced by vascular occlusion. The experiments were performed to test the ability of this recently developed method to detect postischemic flow deficits. Results were consistent with postischemic hypoperfusion. The method also proved valuable for measuring small residual flow during vascular occlusion. Our experiments indicate that this method provides simple, rapid, and repeatable flow measurements that can augment magnetic resonance examinations of cerebral metabolic parameters in the study of ischemia.

  16. Simultaneous 19F-1H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02 mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5 mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a 1H Larmor frequency of 43.32 MHz and 40.68 MHz for 19F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating 19F and 1H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500 MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02 mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ (1H) = 0.335 mol L-1 and LOQ (19F) = 0.130 mol L-1 for trifluoroethanol in

  17. Quadrupolar relaxation of hyperpolarized krypton-83 as a probe for surfaces.

    PubMed

    Stupic, Karl F; Cleveland, Zackary I; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    This work reports the first systematic study of relaxation experienced by the hyperpolarized (hp) noble gas isotope (83)Kr (I=9/2) in contact with surfaces. The spin-lattice relaxation of (83)Kr is found to depend strongly on the chemical composition of the surfaces in the vicinity of the gas. This effect is caused by quadrupolar interactions during brief periods of surface adsorption that are the dominating source of longitudinal spin relaxation in the (83)Kr atoms. Simple model systems of closest packed glass beads with uniform but variable bead sizes are used for the relaxation measurements. The observed relaxation rates depend strongly on the chemical treatment of the glass surfaces and on the surface to volume ratio. Hp (83)Kr NMR relaxation measurements of porous polymers with pore sizes of 70-250 microm demonstrate the potential use of this new technique for material sciences applications.

  18. Introductory Chemistry: A Molar Relaxivity Experiment in the High School Classroom.

    PubMed

    Dawsey, Anna C; Hathaway, Kathryn L; Kim, Susie; Williams, Travis J

    2013-07-09

    Dotarem and Magnevist, two clinically available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, were assessed in a high school science classroom with respect to which is the better contrast agent. Magnevist, the more efficacious contrast agent, has negative side effects because its gadolinium center can escape from its ligand. However, Dotarem, though a less efficacious contrast agent, is a safer drug choice. After the experiment, students are confronted with the FDA warning on Magnevist, which enabled a discussion of drug efficacy versus safety. We describe a laboratory experiment in which NMR spin lattice relaxation rate measurements are used to quantify the relaxivities of the active ingredients of Dotarem and Magnevist. The spin lattice relaxation rate gives the average amount of time it takes the excited nucleus to relax back to the original state. Students learn by constructing molar relaxivity curves based on inversion recovery data sets that Magnevist is more relaxive than Dotarem. This experiment is suitable for any analytical chemistry laboratory with access to NMR.

  19. Introductory Chemistry: A Molar Relaxivity Experiment in the High School Classroom

    PubMed Central

    Dawsey, Anna C.; Hathaway, Kathryn L.; Kim, Susie; Williams, Travis J.

    2013-01-01

    Dotarem and Magnevist, two clinically available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, were assessed in a high school science classroom with respect to which is the better contrast agent. Magnevist, the more efficacious contrast agent, has negative side effects because its gadolinium center can escape from its ligand. However, Dotarem, though a less efficacious contrast agent, is a safer drug choice. After the experiment, students are confronted with the FDA warning on Magnevist, which enabled a discussion of drug efficacy versus safety. We describe a laboratory experiment in which NMR spin lattice relaxation rate measurements are used to quantify the relaxivities of the active ingredients of Dotarem and Magnevist. The spin lattice relaxation rate gives the average amount of time it takes the excited nucleus to relax back to the original state. Students learn by constructing molar relaxivity curves based on inversion recovery data sets that Magnevist is more relaxive than Dotarem. This experiment is suitable for any analytical chemistry laboratory with access to NMR. PMID:23929983

  20. Characterisation and evaluation of paramagnetic fluorine labelled glycol chitosan conjugates for (19)F and (1)H magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Elena; Harvey, Peter; Chalmers, Kirsten H; Mishra, Anurag; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Wilson, J Ian; Botta, Mauro; Fekete, Marianna; Blamire, Andrew M; Parker, David

    2014-02-01

    Medium molecular weight glycol chitosan conjugates have been prepared, linked by an amide bond to paramagnetic Gd(III), Ho(III) and Dy(III) macrocyclic complexes in which a trifluoromethyl reporter group is located 6.5 Å from the paramagnetic centre. The faster relaxation of the observed nucleus allows modified pulse sequences to be used with shorter acquisition times. The polydisperse materials have been characterised by gel permeation chromatography, revealing an average molecular weight on the order of 13,800 (Gd), 14,600 (Dy) and 16,200 (Ho), consistent with the presence of 8.5, 9.5 and 13 complexes, respectively. The gadolinium conjugate was prepared for both a q = 1 monoamide tricarboxylate conjugate (r1p 11.2 mM(-1) s(-1), 310 K, 1.4 T) and a q = 0 triphosphinate system, and conventional contrast-enhanced proton MRI studies at 7 T were undertaken in mice bearing an HT-29 or an HCT-116 colorectal tumour xenograft (17 μmol/kg). Enhanced contrast was observed following injection in the tail vein in tumour tissue, with uptake also evident in the liver and kidney with a tumour-to-liver ratio of 2:1 at 13 min, and large amounts in the kidney and bladder consistent with predominant renal clearance. Parallel experiments observing the (19)F resonance in the holmium conjugate complex using a surface coil did not succeed owing to its high R2 value (750 Hz, 7 T). However, the fluorine signal in the dysprosium triphosphinate chitosan conjugate [R1/R2 = 0.6 and R1 = 145 Hz (7 T)] was sharper and could be observed in vivo at -65.7 ppm, following intravenous tail vein injection of a dose of 34 μmol/kg.

  1. Relaxation in the glass former acetylsalicylic acid studied by deuteron magnetic resonance and dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, R.; El Goresy, T.; Geil, B.; Zimmermann, H.; Böhmer, R.

    2006-08-01

    Supercooled liquid and glassy acetylsalicylic acid was studied using dielectric spectroscopy and deuteron relaxometry in a wide temperature range. The supercooled liquid is characterized by major deviations from thermally activated behavior. In the glass the secondary relaxation exhibits the typical features of a Johari-Goldstein process. Via measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times the selectively deuterated methyl group was used as a sensitive probe of its local environments. There is a large difference in the mean activation energy in the glass with respect to that in crystalline acetylsalicylic acid. This can be understood by taking into account the broad energy barrier distribution in the glass.

  2. Proton magnetic relaxation dispersion in aqueous biopolymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, S.

    Investigation of the magnetic field dependence of proton spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of bovine fibrinogen has been performed for Larmor frequencies between 50 Hz and 60 MHz, and complemented with measurements of spin-spin relaxation rates at 2 kHz and 25 MHz. A thorough analysis of experimental data, including the effects of protein concentration, temperature, pH and isotopic dilution, leads to an overall relaxation scheme consistent with T1 and T2 values at both low and high magnetic fields. The scheme involves water molecules slightly anisotropically bound on proteins as well as slow exchanging protein protons magnetically coupled to solute nuclei. A coherent picture, reminiscent of the traditional hydration layer, can be obtained for bound water. A major conclusion is that transfer of single protons may contribute substantially to the chemical exchange between free and bound water.

  3. Distribution of NMR relaxations in a random Heisenberg chain.

    PubMed

    Shiroka, T; Casola, F; Glazkov, V; Zheludev, A; Prša, K; Ott, H-R; Mesot, J

    2011-04-01

    NMR measurements of the (29)Si spin-lattice relaxation time T(1) were used to probe the spin-1/2 random Heisenberg chain compound BaCu(2)(Si(1-x)Ge(x))(2)O(7). Remarkable differences between the pure (x=0) and the fully random (x=0.5) cases are observed, indicating that randomness generates a distribution of local magnetic relaxations. This distribution, which is reflected in a stretched exponential NMR relaxation, exhibits a progressive broadening with decreasing temperature, caused by a growing inequivalence of magnetic sites. Compelling independent evidence for the influence of randomness is also obtained from magnetization data and Monte Carlo calculations. These results suggest the formation of random-singlet states in this class of materials, as previously predicted by theory.

  4. Dissection of the ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme using 19F NMR

    PubMed Central

    Hammann, Christian; Norman, David G.; Lilley, David M. J.

    2001-01-01

    We have used 19F NMR to analyze the metal ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme by selective incorporation of 5fluorouridine. We have studied the chemical shift and linewidths of 19F resonances of 5-fluorouridine at the 4 and 7 positions in the ribozyme core as a function of added Mg2+. The data fit well to a simple two-state model whereby the formation of domain 1 is induced by the noncooperative binding of Mg2+ with an association constant in the range of 100 to 500 M−1, depending on the concentration of monovalent ions present. The results are in excellent agreement with data reporting on changes in the global shape of the ribozyme. However, the NMR experiments exploit reporters located in the center of the RNA sections undergoing the folding transitions, thereby allowing the assignment of specific nucleotides to the separate stages. The results define the folding pathway at high resolution and provide a time scale for the first transition in the millisecond range. PMID:11331743

  5. Hexaphyrin as a Potential Theranostic Dye for Photothermal Therapy and 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Tomohiro; Nakatsuji, Hirotaka; Fukuda, Ryosuke; Okamoto, Haruki; Imai, Hirohiko; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Tochio, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tkachenko, Nikolai; Hashida, Mitsuru; Murakami, Tatsuya; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2017-02-15

    meso-Aryl substituted expanded porphyrins have two potential key features suitable for theranostic agents, excellent absorption in near infrared (NIR) region and possible introduction of multiple fluorine atoms at structurally nearly equivalent positions. Herein, hexaphyrin (hexa) was synthesized using 2,6-bis(trifluoromethyl)-4-formyl benzoate and pyrrole and evaluated as a novel theranostic expanded porphyrin possessing the above key features. Under NIR light illumination hexa showed intense photothermal and weak photodynamic effects, which were most likely due to its low-lying excited states close to a singlet oxygen. This sustained photothermal effect caused the ablation of cancer cells more effectively than the photodynamic effect of indocyanine green, a clinically used dye. In addition, hexa@cpHDL revealed potential for use in visualization of tumors by 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) due to the presence of the multiple fluorine atoms. These results shed light on a latent utility of expanded porphyrins as theranostic agents in both photothermal therapy and 19F MRI.

  6. First-Principles Study of Nuclear Quadruple Interaction of ^19F* and Binding in Solid Fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, D. R.; Aryal, M. M.; Adhikari, N. P.; Badu, S. R.; Pink, R. H.; Scheicher, R. H.; Chow, Lee; Das, T. P.

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the binding energy (BE) and nuclear quadrupule interaction (NQI) parameters for the ^19F* excited nuclear state in solid fluorine as part of our investigation [1] of the properties of solid halogens using the first principles Hartree-Fock Cluster procedure combined with many-body perturbation theory (MBPT), implemented by the Gaussian set of programs. Our results show that Van der Waals interaction obtained from intermolecular electron correlation effects has dominant influence on the BE but negligible effect on the NQI parameters. For the latter, ourcalculated e^2qQ is 119.0MHz using for Q(19F*), the value of 0.072 *10-28m2 [2], and η, the asymmetry parameter, is essentially zero. The influence of rotational vibrational effects on e^2qQ is being investigated using a first-principles procedure [3] to bridge the small remaining difference with experiment (127.2 MHz) for e^2qQ [4]. [1] M.M. Aryal et al., Hyperfine Interact, 176, 51 (2007). [2] K.C.Mishra et al.,Phys. Rev.B25, 3389(1982). [3] N. Sahoo et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 50, 913(1983) [4] H. Barfuss et al., Phys. Lett. 90A, 33(1982)

  7. TANK 18-F AND 19-F TANK FILL GROUT SCALE UP TEST SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2012-01-03

    High-level waste (HLW) tanks 18-F and 19-F have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure the tanks will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) entombing waste removal equipment, (4) discouraging future intrusion, and (5) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. This report documents the results of a four cubic yard bulk fill scale up test on the grout formulation recommended for filling Tanks 18-F and 19-F. Details of the scale up test are provided in a Test Plan. The work was authorized under a Technical Task Request (TTR), HLE-TTR-2011-008, and was performed according to Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The bulk fill scale up test described in this report was intended to demonstrate proportioning, mixing, and transportation, of material produced in a full scale ready mix concrete batch plant. In addition, the material produced for the scale up test was characterized with respect to fresh properties, thermal properties, and compressive strength as a function of curing time.

  8. Measured 19F(α,n) with VANDLE for Nuclear Safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, William; Clement, R. C. C.; Smith, M. S.; Pain, S.; Febbraro, M.; Pittman, S.; Thomspon, S.; Grinder, M.; Cizewski, J. A.; Reingold, C.; Manning, B.; Burcher, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Tan, W.-P.; Stech, E.; Smith, M. K.; Avetisyan, R.; Gyurjinyan, A.; Lowe, M.; Ilyushkin, S.; Grzywacz, R.; Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Taylor, S. Z.; Smith, K.

    2015-10-01

    One of the most promising non-destructive assay (NDA) methods to monitor UF6 canisters consists of measuring gross neutron rates induced by uranium-decay alpha particles reacting with the fluorine and emitting a neutron. This method currently lacks reliable nuclear data on the 19F(α,n) reaction cross section to determine an accurate neutron yield rate for a given sample of UF6. We have measured the cross section and coincident neutron spectrum for the alpha-decay energy range using the VANDLE system. This experiment had two parts: first at Notre Dame with a LaF3 target and and a pulsed alpha-particle beam, and second at ORNL with a windowless He-gas target and a 19F beam. The motivation for this measurement and cross section results will be presented. This work is funded in part by the DOE Office of Science, the National Nuclear Security Administration SSAA and the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation R&D, and the NSF.

  9. Measurement of the 19F(α,n)22Na Cross Section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Marcus; Smith, M. S.; Pain, S.; Febbraro, M.; Pittman, S.; Chipps, K. A.; Thompson, S. J.; Grinder, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Smith, K.; Thornsberry, C.; Thompson, P.; Peters, W. A.; Waddell, D.; Blanchard, R.; Carls, A.; Shadrick, S.; Engelhardt, A.; Hertz-Kintish, D.; Allen, N.; Sims, H.

    2015-10-01

    Enriched uranium is commonly stored in fluoride matrices such as UF6. Alpha decays of uranium in UF6 will create neutrons via the 19F(α,n)22Na reaction. An improved cross section for this reaction will enable improved nondestructive assays of uranium content in storage cylinders at material enrichment facilities. To determine this reaction cross section, we have performed experiments using both forward and inverse kinematic techniques at the University of Notre Dame (forward) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (inverse). Both experiments utilized the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) for neutron detection. The ORNL experiment also used a new ionization chamber for 22Na particle identification. Gating on the 22Na nuclei detected drastically reduced the background counts in the neutron time-of-flight spectra. The latest analysis and results will be presented for 19F beam energies ranging from 20-37 MeV. This work is funded in part by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics, the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation R&D, and the NSF.

  10. Tracking Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsion Delivery by 19F MRI for Precise High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo Hyun; Park, Eun-Joo; Min, Changki; Choi, Sun Il; Jeon, Soyeon; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Daehong

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions (PFCNEs) have recently been undergoing rigorous study to investigate their ability to improve the therapeutic efficacy of tumor ablation by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). For precise control of PFCNE delivery and thermal ablation, their accumulation and distribution in a tumor should be quantitatively analyzed. Here, we used fluorine-19 (19F) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantitatively track PFCNE accumulation in a tumor, and analyzed how intra-tumoral PFCNE quantities affect the therapeutic efficacy of HIFU treatment. Ablation outcomes were assessed by intra-voxel incoherent motion analysis and bioluminescent imaging up to 14 days after the procedure. Assessment of PFCNE delivery and treatment outcomes showed that 2-3 mg/mL of PFCNE in a tumor produces the largest ablation volume under the same HIFU insonation conditions. Histology showed varying degrees of necrosis depending on the amount of PFCNE delivered. 19F MRI promises to be a valuable platform for precisely guiding PFCNE-enhanced HIFU ablation of tumors. PMID:28255351

  11. TANK 18 AND 19-F TIER 1A EQUIPMENT FILL MOCK UP TEST SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-04

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) has determined that Tanks 18-F and 19-F have met the F-Tank Farm (FTF) General Closure Plan Requirements and are ready to be permanently closed. The high-level waste (HLW) tanks have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure they will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) discouraging future intrusion, and (4) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. Bulk waste removal and heel removal equipment remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F. This equipment includes the Advance Design Mixer Pump (ADMP), transfer pumps, transfer jets, standard slurry mixer pumps, equipment-support masts, sampling masts, dip tube assemblies and robotic crawlers. The present Tank 18 and 19-F closure strategy is to grout the equipment in place and eliminate vertical pathways by filling voids in the equipment to vertical fast pathways and water infiltration. The mock-up tests described in this report were intended to address placement issues identified for grouting the equipment that will be left in Tank 18-F and Tank 19-F. The Tank 18-F and 19-F closure strategy document states that one of the Performance Assessment (PA) requirements for a closed tank is that equipment remaining in the tank be filled to the extent practical and that vertical flow paths 1 inch and larger be grouted. The specific objectives of the Tier 1A equipment grout mock-up testing include: (1) Identifying the most limiting equipment configurations with respect to internal void space filling; (2) Specifying and constructing initial test geometries and forms that represent scaled boundary conditions; (3) Identifying a target grout rheology for evaluation in the scaled mock-up configurations; (4) Scaling-up production of a grout mix with the target rheology

  12. Defect induced magnetism in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: bulk magnetization and 19F hyperfine interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Mohanta, S K; Mishra, S N; Davane, S M; Srivastava, S K

    2012-02-29

    We have made bulk and local investigations on defect induced magnetism in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) irradiated with a 40 MeV carbon beam. The local magnetic response of irradiated HOPG was studied by measuring the hyperfine field of recoil implanted (19)F using γ-ray time differential perturbed angular distribution (TDPAD) measurements. While the bulk magnetic properties of the irradiated sample show features characteristic of room temperature ferromagnetism, the hyperfine field data reflect enhanced paramagnetism with no indication of long range magnetic ordering. The experimental studies are further supported by ab initio density functional calculations. We believe that the ferromagnetic response in irradiated HOPG arises mostly from defect induced magnetic moments of carbon atoms in the near surface region, while those deep inside the host matrix remain paramagnetic.

  13. Tanks 18 And 19-F Structural Flowable Grout Fill Material Evaluation And Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.

    2013-04-23

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: 1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non-compressible material; 2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; 3) reduce contaminant mobility by a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and 4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: 1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). 2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. 3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix design. 4

  14. Pressure-induced superconductivity in the antiferromagnet κ - (ET) 2C F3S O3 with quasi-one-dimensional triangular spin lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Asai, Takayuki; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Hayama, Hiromi; Yoshida, Yukihiro; Saito, Gunzi

    2016-07-01

    We report an antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering at ambient pressure and a superconducting transition under pressure for κ - (ET) 2C F3S O3 [ ET =bis (ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene], which has a two-dimensional electronic system with quasi-one-dimensional triangular spin lattice. At ambient pressure, AF ordering was detected at TN=2.5 K by 1H NMR, subsequent to two structural phase transitions at 230 and 190 K. Under hydrostatic pressures, metallic behavior appeared above ˜1.1 GPa, and a superconducting transition (maximum onset Tc=4.8 K at ˜1.3 GPa) was observed up to 2.2 GPa. Superconductivity was also found under c -axis strain, which reduced t'/t , but was absent under b -axis strain which increased t'/t .

  15. Bicollinear antiferromagnetic order, monoclinic distortion, and reversed resistivity anisotropy in FeTe as a result of spin-lattice coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Bishop, Christopher B.; Moreo, Adriana; Dagotto, Elbio

    2016-09-08

    The bicollinear antiferromagnetic order experimentally observed in FeTe is shown to be stabilized by the coupling g~12 between monoclinic lattice distortions and the spin-nematic order parameter with B2g symmetry, within a three-orbital spin-fermion model studied with Monte Carlo techniques. A finite but small value of g~12 is required, with a concomitant lattice distortion compatible with experiments, and a tetragonal-monoclinic transition strongly first order. Remarkably, the bicollinear state found here displays a planar resistivity with the reversed puzzling anisotropy discovered in transport experiments. Orthorhombic distortions are also incorporated, and phase diagrams interpolating between pnictides and chalcogenides are presented. Here, we concludemore » that the spin-lattice coupling we introduce is sufficient to explain the challenging properties of FeTe.« less

  16. Bicollinear antiferromagnetic order, monoclinic distortion, and reversed resistivity anisotropy in FeTe as a result of spin-lattice coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Christopher B.; Moreo, Adriana; Dagotto, Elbio

    2016-09-08

    The bicollinear antiferromagnetic order experimentally observed in FeTe is shown to be stabilized by the coupling g~12 between monoclinic lattice distortions and the spin-nematic order parameter with B2g symmetry, within a three-orbital spin-fermion model studied with Monte Carlo techniques. A finite but small value of g~12 is required, with a concomitant lattice distortion compatible with experiments, and a tetragonal-monoclinic transition strongly first order. Remarkably, the bicollinear state found here displays a planar resistivity with the reversed puzzling anisotropy discovered in transport experiments. Orthorhombic distortions are also incorporated, and phase diagrams interpolating between pnictides and chalcogenides are presented. Here, we conclude that the spin-lattice coupling we introduce is sufficient to explain the challenging properties of FeTe.

  17. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  18. Highly efficient (19)F heteronuclear decoupling in solid-state NMR spectroscopy using supercycled refocused-CW irradiation.

    PubMed

    Equbal, Asif; Basse, Kristoffer; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2016-12-07

    We present heteronuclear (19)F refocused CW (rCW) decoupling pulse sequences for solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR applications. The decoupling sequences have been designed specifically to ensure suppression of the pertinent (13)C-(19)F dipolar coupling interactions while simultaneously suppressing strong anisotropic chemical shift as well as homonuclear (19)F-(19)F dipolar coupling effects as typically present in perfluorated compounds. In an extensive numerical and experimental analysis using a rigid, organic solid as a model compound, it becomes evident that the supercycled rCW schemes markedly improve the decoupling efficiency, leading to substantial enhancements in resolution and sensitivity when compared to previous state-of-the-art methods. Furthermore, considerable gains in robustness toward rf mismatch as well as offset in the radio-frequency carrier frequency are observed, all of which clearly render the new rCW schemes the methods of choice for (19)F decoupling in rigid, fluorinated compounds - which is further supported by a Floquet-based theoretical analysis.

  19. TANKS 18 AND 19-F STRUCTURAL FLOWABLE GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-01

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: (1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non compressible material; (2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; (3) reduce contaminant mobility by (a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and (b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and (4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). (2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. (3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix

  20. Toward a reassessment of the 19F(p, α0)16O reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, I.; Dell'Aquila, D.; Di Leva, A.; Indelicato, I.; La Cognata, M.; La Commara, M.; Ordine, A.; Rigato, V.; Romoli, M.; Rosato, E.; Spadaccini, G.; Spitaleri, C.; Tumino, A.; Vigilante, M.

    2015-09-01

    The 19F(p, α0)16O reaction at low energies plays an important role in fundamental physics. In particular in nuclear astrophysics it represents, together with the 19F(p, γ)20Ne reaction, the crossing point between the CNO and the NeNa cycles in stars. Further, in hydrogen-rich stellar environments, it is the most important fluorine destruction channel. In this paper we report new measurements on the 19F(p, α0)16O reaction at deeply sub-Coulomb energies (0.2-0.6 MeV), a region where, despite the key role of this reaction, very few and old data are reported. The deduced astrophysical S-factor is ≈ 1.5- 2 times larger than currently adopted extrapolations with possibly important astrophysical consequences.

  1. Proton magnetic relaxation and internal rotations in tetramethylammonium cadmium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Utton, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and relaxation studies of the proton spin-lattice relaxation time (PSLRT) and proton second moment (PSM) are reported. Tetramethylammonium cadmium chloride (TMCC) was selected as a diamagnetic member of the isomorphic series, and hence proton data relate directly to the motion of the tetramethylammonium ion in the absence of paramagnetic ions. In the model adopted, the correlation time for hindered motion of one of the methyl groups differs from that of the other three groups in the low-temperature phase below 104 K. PSLRT and PSM values agree closely with experimental data with this model. Crystallographic phase transitions in TMCC occur at 104 K and 119 K according to the PSLRT measurements. Dipolar interactions between adjacent protons account for the PSLR rates below 104 K.

  2. Local Spin Relaxation within the Random Heisenberg Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbrych, J.; Kokalj, J.; Prelovšek, P.

    2013-10-01

    Finite-temperature local dynamical spin correlations Snn(ω) are studied numerically within the random spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chain. The aim is to explain measured NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in BaCu2(Si0.5Ge0.5)2O7, which is the realization of a random spin chain. In agreement with experiments we find that the distribution of relaxation times within the model shows a very large span similar to the stretched-exponential form. The distribution is strongly reduced with increasing T, but stays finite also in the high-T limit. Anomalous dynamical correlations can be associated with the random singlet concept but not directly with static quantities. Our results also reveal the crucial role of the spin anisotropy (interaction), since the behavior is in contrast with the ones for the XX model, where we do not find any significant T dependence of the distribution.

  3. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the current reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. This quarter we have focused on variable temperature spin lattice relaxation measurements for several of the Argonne coals. 5 figs.

  4. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the current reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. This quarter we have focussed on spin lattice relaxation measurements for several of the Argonne coals. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Liquid-state paramagnetic relaxation from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantaharju, Jyrki; Vaara, Juha

    2016-10-01

    We simulate nuclear and electron spin relaxation rates in a paramagnetic system from first principles. Sampling a molecular dynamics trajectory with quantum-chemical calculations produces a time series of the instantaneous parameters of the relevant spin Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonians are, in turn, used to numerically solve the Liouville-von Neumann equation for the time evolution of the spin density matrix. We demonstrate the approach by studying the aqueous solution of the Ni2 + ion. Taking advantage of Kubo's theory, the spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation rates are extracted from the simulations of the time dependence of the longitudinal and transverse magnetization, respectively. Good agreement with the available experimental data is obtained by the method.

  6. Using magnetic coupling to implement 1H, 19F, 13C experiments in routine high resolution NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Paul; Finnigan, Jim; Marsden, Brian; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2015-12-01

    We report in this paper the design of 1H, 19F, 13C circuitry using magnetic coupling which can do on demand experiments where one of the three nuclei is observed and the other two are decoupled. The implementation of this circuitry in routine NMR probes is compared with capacitive coupling methods where it was found that by using magnetic coupling the performance of the routine NMR probe was not impacted by the addition of this circuitry. It is surmised that using this type of circuitry would be highly desirable for those chemists doing routine 19F NMR.

  7. T-maze performance after developmental exposure to 19F tagged 5-HTP in chicks.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Sherry; Nash, Laurie; Hogan, Jeremy; Branch, Craig

    2004-12-01

    Chicks were used as a model to investigate behavioral effects of administering a new compound intended for use with magnetic resonance. The compound has multiple 19F atom tags covalently bonded to the indole ring of 5-hydroxytryptophan (PF-5HTP), the immediate precursor to the neurotransmitter serotonin. On incubation Day 17, 5 microg of PF-5-HTP, an equivalent amount of 5-HTP, or just 200 microL of the weak phosphate buffered saline (PBS) vehicle was injected into the airsac of each egg. Three days after hatching, chicks were isolated at the top of a simple T-Maze which, when traversed correctly, enabled them to return to their brood mates. A second trial in the T-Maze was conducted about three hours later. The brief period of isolation at the start of a trial causes social distress in chicks who are reinforced by returning to the brood. The task was selected as being sensitive to functioning of the serotonin pathways whose development might be altered by administering the compound during brain development. Repeated-measures analysis of variance yielded a statistically significant main effect for trial within groups, but no significant difference between injection groups. Administering a low dose of the fluorine tagged compound during development did not impair performance on this T-maze task.

  8. Constraints on low-mass WIMP interactions on 19F from PICASSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, S.; Behnke, E.; Bhattacharjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dai, X.; Das, M.; Davour, A.; Debris, F.; Dhungana, N.; Farine, J.; Gagnebin, S.; Giroux, G.; Grace, E.; Jackson, C. M.; Kamaha, A.; Krauss, C.; Kumaratunga, S.; Lafrenière, M.; Laurin, M.; Lawson, I.; Lessard, L.; Levine, I.; Levy, C.; MacDonald, R. P.; Marlisov, D.; Martin, J.-P.; Mitra, P.; Noble, A. J.; Piro, M.-C.; Podviyanuk, R.; Pospisil, S.; Saha, S.; Scallon, O.; Seth, S.; Starinski, N.; Stekl, I.; Wichoski, U.; Xie, T.; Zacek, V.

    2012-05-01

    Recent results from the PICASSO dark matter search experiment at SNOLAB are reported. These results were obtained using a subset of 10 detectors with a total target mass of 0.72 kg of 19F and an exposure of 114 kgd. The low backgrounds in PICASSO allow recoil energy thresholds as low as 1.7 keV to be obtained which results in an increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below 10 GeV/c2. No dark matter signal was found. Best exclusion limits in the spin dependent sector were obtained for WIMP masses of 20 GeV/c2 with a cross section on protons of σpSD=0.032 pb (90% C.L.). In the spin independent sector close to the low mass region of 7 GeV/c2 favoured by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA, cross sections larger than σpSI=1.41×10-4 pb (90% C.L.) are excluded.

  9. Thick target neutron yield from 145 MeV 19F+27Al system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil, C.; Bandyopadhyay, T.; Nandy, M.; Suman, Vitisha; Paul, S.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Sarkar, P. K.

    2013-09-01

    The double differential neutron energy distribution has been measured for the 19F+27Al system at 145 MeV projectile energy. The time of flight technique was used to measure the energy while pulse shape discrimination has been used to separate the neutrons from photons. The results are compared with the statistical nuclear reaction model codes PACE and EMPIRE. The PACE code appears to predict the slope and the end point energy of the experimental spectra fairly well but over predicts the values. The slope obtained from the EMPIRE calculations appears to be harder while the values being closer to the experimental results. The yield from the Hauser-Feshbach based compound nucleus model calculations agree reasonably well with the experimental results at the backward angles but not in the forward directions. The energy integrated angular distribution from 145 MeV projectiles show an enhanced emission in the forward angles compared to the similar results from 110 MeV projectiles. This analysis suggests some contribution from the pre-equilibrium emissions from the system at the higher projectile energy.

  10. Robust and efficient 19F heteronuclear dipolar decoupling using refocused continuous-wave rf irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinther, Joachim M.; Khaneja, Navin; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2013-01-01

    Refocused continuous wave (rCW) decoupling is presented as an efficient and robust means to obtain well-resolved magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectra of low-γ spins, such as 13C dipolar coupled to fluorine. The rCW decoupling sequences, recently introduced for 1H decoupling, are very robust towards large isotropic and anisotropic shift ranges as often encountered for 19F spins. In rCW decoupling, the so-called refocusing pulses inserted into the CW irradiation eliminate critical residual second- and third-order dipolar coupling and dipolar-coupling against chemical shielding anisotropy cross-terms in the effective Hamiltonian through time-reversal (i.e. refocusing). As important additional assets, the rCW decoupling sequences are robust towards variations in rf amplitudes, operational at low to high spinning speeds, and easy to set-up for optimal performance experimentally. These aspects are demonstrated analytically/numerically and experimentally in comparison to state-of-the-art decoupling sequences such as TPPM, SPINAL-64, and frequency-swept variants of these.

  11. GET-SERF, a new gradient encoded SERF experiment for the trivial edition of 1H-19F couplings.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Maria Enrica; Aroulanda, Christie; Merlet, Denis

    2013-09-01

    A new spatially encoded heteronuclear (1)H-(19)F selective refocusing NMR experiment (GET-SERF) is proposed. This sequence allows editing in one single 2D experiment all couplings between a selected fluorine site and all the proton nuclei of the molecule. Its efficiency is illustrated in the case of diflunisal, a difluorinated anti-inflammatory drug, in isotropic and anisotropic media.

  12. Fluorinated Carbohydrates as Lectin Ligands: 19F-Based Direct STD Monitoring for Detection of Anomeric Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, João P.; Diercks, Tammo; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Cañada, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of the binding of reducing carbohydrates present as mixtures of anomers in solution to a sugar recepor (lectin) poses severe difficulties. In this situation, NMR spectroscopy enables the observation of signals for each anomer in the mixture by applying approaches based on ligand observation. Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR allows fast and efficient screening of compound mixtures for reactivity to a receptor. Owing to the exceptionally favorable properties of 19F in NMR spectroscopy and the often complex 1H spectra of carbohydrates, 19F-containing sugars have the potential to be turned into versatile sensors for recognition. Extending the recently established 1H → 1H STDre19F-NMR technique, we here demonstrate its applicability to measure anomeric selectivity of binding in a model system using the plant lectin concanavalin A (ConA) and 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-mannose. Indeed, it is also possible to account for the mutual inhibition between the anomers on binding to the lectin by means of a kinetic model. The monitoring of 19F-NMR signal perturbation disclosed the relative activities of the anomers in solution and thus enabled the calculation of their binding affinity towards ConA. The obtained data show a preference for the α anomer that increases with temperature. This experimental approach can be extended to others systems of biomedical interest by testing human lectins with suitably tailored glycan derivatives. PMID:26580665

  13. Xenobiotic monitoring in plants by sup 19 F and sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, A.; Barber, J.; Wood, B. ); Elliott, R. )

    1989-12-01

    {sup 19}F and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy have been used to monitor the uptake of trifluoroacetic acid in stems and leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum. The movement and location of a xenobiotic have been demonstrated in vivo by a noninvasive technique.

  14. Relaxation behavior study of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles at ultralow and ultrahigh magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Dong, Hui; Pacheco, Victor; Willbold, Dieter; Zhang, Yi; Offenhaeusser, Andreas; Hartmann, Rudolf; Weirich, Thomas E; Ma, Peixiang; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Gu, Zhongwei

    2011-12-15

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) have attracted attention because of their current and potential usefulness as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). USPIOs are usually used for their significant capacity to produce predominant proton relaxation effects, which result in signal reduction. However, most previous studies that utilized USPIOs have been focused on the relaxation behavior at commonly used magnetic fields of clinical MRI systems (typically 1-3 T). In this paper, magnetic relaxation processes of protons in water surrounding the USPIOs are studied at ultralow (≤10 mT) and ultrahigh magnetic fields (14.1 T). USPIOs used in our experiments were synthesized with a core size of 6 nm, and transferred from organic to water by ligand exchange. The proton spin-lattice relaxation time (T(1)) and spin-spin relaxation time (T(2)) were investigated at ultralow (212 μT for T(2) and 10 mT for T(1)) and at 14.1 T with different iron concentrations. At all of the fields, there is a linear relationship between the inverse of relaxation times and the iron concentration. The spin-spin relaxivity (r(2)) at 14.1 T is much larger than that value of the ultralow field. At ultralow field, however, the spin-lattice relaxivity (r(1)) is larger than the r(1) at ultrahigh field. The results provide a perspective on potential in vivo and in vitro applications of USPIOs in ultralow and ultrahigh field NMR and MRI.

  15. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-06-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used.

  16. First Measurement of the 19F(α, p)22Ne Reaction at Energies of Astrophysical Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; D’Agata, G.; La Cognata, M.; Indelicato, I.; Spitaleri, C.; Blagus, S.; Cherubini, S.; Figuera, P.; Grassi, L.; Guardo, G. L.; Gulino, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Kshetri, R.; Lamia, L.; Lattuada, M.; Mijatović, T.; Milin, M.; Miljanić D., Đ.; Prepolec, L.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Skukan, N.; Soić, N.; Tokić, V.; Tumino, A.; Uroić, M.

    2017-02-01

    The observational 19F abundance in stellar environments systematically exceeds the predicted one, thus representing one of the unsolved challenges for stellar modeling. It is therefore clear that further investigation is needed in this field. In this work, we focus our attention on the measurement of the {}19{{F}}{(α ,p)}22{Ne} reaction in the astrophysical energy range, between 0.2 and 0.8 MeV (far below the Coulomb barrier, 3.8 MeV), as it represents the main destruction channel in He-rich environments. The lowest energy at which this reaction has been studied with direct measurements is ∼0.66 MeV, covering only the upper tail of the Gamow window, causing the reaction-rate evaluation to be based on extrapolation. To investigate lower energies, the {}19{{F}}{(α ,p)}22{Ne} reaction has been studied by means of the Trojan horse method, applied to the quasi-free {}6{Li}{{(}19{{F}},{p}22{Ne})}2{{H}} reaction at E beam = 6 MeV. The indirect cross section of the {}19{{F}}{(α ,p)}22{Ne} reaction at energies ≲1 MeV was extracted, fully covering the astrophysical region of interest and overlapping existing direct data for normalization. Several resonances have been detected for the first time inside the Gamow window. The reaction rate has been calculated, showing an increase up to a factor of 4 with respect to the literature at astrophysical temperatures. This might lead to potential major astrophysical implications.

  17. Drug-specific [sup 19]F NMR and dynamic [sup 18]F PET imaging of the cytostatic agent 5-fluorouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Bellemann, M.E.; Brix, G.; Haberkorn, U.; Ostertag, H.J.; Lorenz, W.J. )

    1994-12-01

    The spatial distribution of the antineoplastic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been mapped both with [sup 19]F NMR and [sup 18]F PET imaging techniques. For [sup 19]F NMR imaging of 5-FU and its major catabolite [alpha]-fluoro-[beta]-alanine (FBAL), a fast gradient-echo pulse sequence was employed. A chemical-shift selective saturation pulse was used to suppress either the 5-FU or the FBAL resonance before the other component of the [sup 19]F NMR spectrum was images. This approach yielded selective 5-FU and FBAL NMR images free of chemical-shift artifacts in readout and slice-selection direction. In phantom experiments, [sup 19]F 5-FU and FBAL images with a spatial resolution of 12.5 x 12.5 x 20 mm[sup 3] were obtained in 32 min from model solutions with drug and catabolite concentrations similar to those estimated in animals and patients undergoing i.v. chemotherapy with 5-FU. The biodistribution of 5-[[sup 18]F]FU in rats shortly after administration of the drug demonstrated the good vascularization of the transplanted tumors. The metabolic turnover of the cytostatic agent started about 10--20 min p.i. and was predominant in the tumor and liver tissue. The rapid adjustment of the [sup 18]F metabolite concentrations in the transplanted tumors to a steady state provides evidence of anabolic tumor activity, which supports the hypothesis of 5-FU trapping in malignant cells based on [sup 19]F NMR spectroscopy data. The high uptake of 5-[[sup 18]F]FU in the liver, on the other hand, mainly reflects the catabolization of 5-FU to the noncytotoxic FBAL, which leads to a reduced bioavailability of the drug.

  18. Phenylboronic acid-based (19)F MRI probe for the detection and imaging of hydrogen peroxide utilizing its large chemical-shift change.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; An, Qi; Sugihara, Fuminori; Doura, Tomohiro; Tsuchiya, Akira; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Sando, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report on a new (19)F MRI probe for the detection and imaging of H2O2. Our designed 2-fluorophenylboronic acid-based (19)F probe promptly reacted with H2O2 to produce 2-fluorophenol via boronic acid oxidation. The accompanying (19)F chemical-shift change reached 31 ppm under our experimental conditions. Such a large chemical-shift change allowed for the imaging of H2O2 by (19)F chemical-shift-selective MRI.

  19. sup 31 P and sup 1 H NMR studies of the structure of enzyme-bound substrate complexes of lobster muscle arginine kinase: Relaxation measurements with Mn(II) and Co(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Jarori, G.K.; Ray, B.D.; Rao, B.D.N. )

    1989-11-28

    The paramagnetic effects of Mn(II) and Co(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rates of {sup 31}P nuclei of ATP and ADP and of Mn(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine bound to arginine kinase from lobster tail muscle have been measured. Temperature variation of {sup 31}P relaxation rates in E-MnADP and E-MnATP yields activation energies ({Delta}E) in the range 6-10 kcal/mol. Thus, the {sup 31}P relaxation rates in these complexes are exchange limited and cannot provide structural information. However, the relaxation rates in E-CoADP and E-CoATP exhibit frequency dependence and {Delta}E values in the range 1-2 kcal/mol; i.e., these rates depend upon {sup 31}P-Co(II) distances. These distances were calculated to be in the range 3.2-4.5 {angstrom}, appropriate for direct coordination between Co(II) and the phosphoryl groups. The paramagnetic effect of Mn(II) on the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine in the E-MnADP-Arg complex was also measured at three frequencies. From the frequency dependence of the relaxation rate an effective {tau}{sub C} of 0.6 ns has also been calculated, which is most likely to be the electron spin relaxation rate ({tau}{sub S1}) for Mn(II) in this complex. The distance estimated on the basis of the reciprocal sixth root of the average relaxation rate of the {delta} protons was 10.9 {plus minus} 0.3 {angstrom}.

  20. Multi-scales nuclear spin relaxation of liquids in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korb, Jean-Pierre

    2010-03-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T(ω) is a rich source of dynamical information for characterizing the molecular dynamics of liquids in confined environments. Varying the magnetic field changes the Larmor frequency ω, and thus the fluctuations to which the nuclear spin relaxation is sensitive. Moreover, this method permits a more complete characterization of the dynamics than the usual measurements as a function of temperature at fixed magnetic field strength, because many common solvent liquids have phase transitions that may alter significantly the character of the dynamics over the temperature range usually studied. Further, the magnetic field dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T(ω), provides a good test of the theories that relate the measurement to the microdynamical behavior of the liquid. This is especially true in spatially confined systems where the effects of reduced dimensionality may force more frequent reencounters of the studied proton spin-bearing molecules with paramagnetic impurities at the pore surfaces that may alter the correlation functions that enter the relaxation equations in a fundamental way. We show by low field NMR relaxation that changing the amount of surface paramagnetic impurities leads to striking different pore-size dependences of the relaxation times T and T of liquids in pores. Here, we focus mainly on high surface area porous materials including calibrated porous silica glasses, granular packings, heterogeneous catalytic materials, cement-based materials and natural porous materials such as clay minerals and rocks. Recent highlights NMR relaxation works are reviewed for these porous materials, like continuous characterization of the evolving microstructure of various cementitious materials and measurement of wettability in reservoir carbonate rocks. Although, the recent applications of 2-dimensional T-T and T-z-store-T correlation experiments for characterization of

  1. Spin-lattice coupling mediated multiferroicity in (ND4)2FeCl5 • D2O

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Wei; Cao, Huibo; Wang, Jincheng; Ye, Feng; Matsuda, Masaaki; Yan, Jiaqiang; Liu, Yaohua; Garlea, Vasile O.; Agrawal, Harish K.; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Sales, Brian C.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A.

    2016-12-07

    In this paper, we report a neutron diffraction study of the multiferroic mechanism in (ND4)2FeCl5 • D2O, a molecular compound that exhibits magnetically induced ferroelectricity. This material exhibits two successive magnetic transitions on cooling: a long-range order transition to an incommensurate (IC) collinear sinusoidal spin state at TN = 7.3 K, followed by a second transition to an IC cycloidal spin state at TFE = 6.8 K, the latter of which is accompanied by spontaneous ferroelectric polarization. The cycloid structure is strongly distorted by spin-lattice coupling, as evidenced by the observations of both odd and even higher-order harmonics associated with the cycloid wave vector, and a weak commensurate phase that coexists with the IC phase. The second-order harmonic appears at TFE, thereby providing unambiguous evidence that the onset of the electric polarization is accompanied by a lattice modulation due to spin-lattice interaction. The neutron results, in conjunction with the negative thermal expansion and large magnetostriction observed, indicate that spin-lattice coupling plays a critical role in the ferroelectric mechanism of (ND4)2FeCl5 • D2O.

  2. Combining insights from solid-state NMR and first principles calculation: applications to the 19F NMR of octafluoronaphthalene.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Andrew J; Ng, William T K; Jochym, Dominik; Keal, Thomas W; Clark, Stewart J; Tozer, David J; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2007-05-21

    Advances in solid-state NMR methodology and computational chemistry are applied to the (19)F NMR of solid octafluoronaphthalene. It is demonstrated experimentally, and confirmed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, that the spectral resolution in the magic-angle spinning spectrum is limited by the anisotropy of the bulk magnetic susceptibility (ABMS). This leads to the unusual observation that the resolution improves as the sample is diluted. DFT calculations provide assignments of each of the peaks in the (19)F spectrum, but the predictions are close to the limits of accuracy and correlation information from 2-D NMR is invaluable in confirming the assignments. The effects of non-Gaussian lineshapes on the use of 2-D NMR for mapping correlations of spectral frequencies (e.g. due to the ABMS) are also discussed.

  3. Fluorinated amino-derivatives of the sesquiterpene lactone, parthenolide, as (19)f NMR probes in deuterium-free environments.

    PubMed

    Woods, James R; Mo, Huaping; Bieberich, Andrew A; Alavanja, Tanja; Colby, David A

    2011-11-24

    The design, synthesis, and biological activity of fluorinated amino-derivatives of the sesquiterpene lactone, parthenolide, are described. A fluorinated aminoparthenolide analogue with biological activity similar to the parent natural product was discovered, and its X-ray structure was obtained. This lead compound was then studied using (19)F NMR in the presence and absence of glutathione to obtain additional mechanism of action data, and it was found that the aminoparthenolide eliminates amine faster in the presence of glutathione than in the absence of glutathione. The exact changes in concentrations of fluorinated compound and amine were quantified by a concentration-reference method using (19)F NMR; a major benefit of applying this strategy is that no deuterated solvents or internal standards are required to obtain accurate concentrations. These mechanistic data with glutathione may contribute to the conversion of the amino-derivative to parthenolide, the active pharmacological agent, in glutathione-rich cancer cells.

  4. Fluorinated Amino-Derivatives of the Sesquiterpene Lactone, Parthenolide, as 19F NMR Probes in Deuterium-Free Environments

    PubMed Central

    Woods, James R.; Mo, Huaping; Bieberich, Andrew A.; Alavanja, Tanja; Colby, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and biological activity of fluorinated amino-derivatives of the sesquiterpene lactone, parthenolide, are described. A fluorinated aminoparthenolide analogue with biological activity similar to the parent natural product was discovered, and its X-ray structure was obtained. This lead compound was then studied using 19F NMR in the presence and absence of glutathione to obtain additional mechanism of action data, and it was found that the aminoparthenolide eliminates amine faster in the presence of glutathione than in the absence of glutathione. The exact changes in concentrations of fluorinated compound and amine were quantified by a concentration-reference method using 19F NMR; a major benefit of applying this strategy is that no deuterated solvents or internal standards are required to obtain accurate concentrations. These mechanistic data with glutathione may contribute to the conversion of the amino-derivative to parthenolide, the active pharmacological agent, in glutathione-rich cancer cells. PMID:22029741

  5. 31P and 19F NMR studies of glycophorin-reconstituted membranes: preferential interaction of glycophorin with phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Glycophorin A, a major glycoprotein of the erythrocyte membrane, has been incorporated into small unilamellar vesicles composed of a variety of pure and mixed phospholipids. Nuclear spin labels including 31P and 19F have been used at natural abundance or have been synthetically incorporated in lipids to act as probes of lipid-protein interaction. Interactions produce broadening of resonances in several cases and it can be used to demonstrate preferential interaction of certain lipids with glycophorin. 31P and 19F probes show a strong preferential interaction of glycophorin with phosphatidylserine over phosphatidylcholine. There is some evidence that interactions are more pronounced at the inner surface of the bilayer and these results are rationalized in terms of the asymmetric distribution of protein and lipid.

  6. Relaxation Times and Line Widths of Isotopically-Substituted Nitroxides in Aqueous Solution at X-band

    PubMed Central

    Biller, Joshua R.; Meyer, Virginia; Elajaili, Hanan; Rosen, Gerald M.; Kao, Joseph P.Y.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eatona, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    Optimization of nitroxides as probes for EPR imaging requires detailed understanding of spectral properties. Spin lattice relaxation times, spin packet line widths, nuclear hyperfine splitting, and overall lineshapes were characterized for six low molecular weight nitroxides in dilute deoxygenated aqueous solution at X-band. The nitroxides included 6-member, unsaturated 5-member, or saturated 5-member rings, most of which were isotopically labeled. The spectra are near the fast tumbling limit with T1 ~ T2 in the range of 0.50 to 1.1 μs at ambient temperature. Both spin-lattice relaxation T1 and spin-spin relaxation T2 are longer for 15N- than for 14N-nitroxides. The dominant contributions to T1 are modulation of nitrogen hyperfine anisotropy and spin rotation. Dependence of T1 on nitrogen nuclear spin state mI was observed for both 14N and 15N. Unresolved hydrogen/deuterium hyperfine couplings dominate overall line widths. Lineshapes were simulated by including all nuclear hyperfine couplings and spin packet line widths that agreed with values obtained by electron spin echo. Line widths and relaxation times are predicted to be about the same at 250 MHz as at X-band. PMID:21843961

  7. Primary and secondary relaxation process in plastically crystalline cyanocyclohexane studied by 2H nuclear magnetic resonance. II. Quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micko, B.; Kruk, D.; Rössler, E. A.

    2013-02-01

    We analyze the results of our previously reported 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in the plastically crystalline (PC) phase of cyanocyclohexane (Part I of this work) to study the fast secondary relaxation (or β-process) in detail. Both, the occurrence of an additional minimum in the spin-lattice relaxation T1 and the pronounced effects arising in the solid-echo spectrum above the glass transition temperature Tg = 134 K, allow for a direct determination of the restricting geometry of the β-process in terms of the "wobbling-in-a-cone" model. Whereas at temperatures below Tg the reorientation is confined to rather small solid angles (below 10°), the spatial restriction decreases strongly with temperature above Tg, i.e., the distribution of cone angles shifts continuously towards higher values. The β-process in the PC phase of cyanocyclohexane proceeds via the same mechanism as found in structural glass formers. This is substantiated by demonstrating the very similar behavior (for T < Tg) of spin-lattice relaxation, stimulated echo decays, and spectral parameters when plotted as a function of ⟨log τβ⟩ (taken from dielectric spectroscopy). We do, however, not observe a clear-cut relation between the relaxation strength of the β-process observed by NMR (calculated within the wobbling-in-a-cone model) and dielectric spectroscopy.

  8. Orientation of fluorinated cholesterol in lipid bilayers analyzed by 19F tensor calculation and solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Matsumori, Nobuaki; Kasai, Yusuke; Oishi, Tohru; Murata, Michio; Nomura, Kaoru

    2008-04-09

    6-F-cholesterol was reported to exhibit biological and interfacial properties similar to unmodified cholesterol. We have also found that 6-F-cholesterol mimicked the cholesterol activity observed in the systems of amphotericin B and lipid rafts. However, to use 6-F-cholesterol as a molecular probe to explore molecular recognition in membranes, it is indispensable to have detailed knowledge of the dynamic and orientation properties of the molecule in membrane environments. In this paper, we present the molecular orientation of 6-F-cholesterol (30 mol %) in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers revealed by combined use of 19F chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), 2H NMR, and C-F rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) experiments. The axis of rotation of 6-F-cholesterol was shown to be in a similar direction to that of cholesterol in DMPC bilayers, which is almost parallel to the long axis of the molecular frame. The molecular order parameter of 6-F-cholesterol was determined to be ca. 0.85, which is within the range of reported values of cholesterol. These findings suggest that the dynamic properties of 6-F-cholesterol in DMPC are quite similar to those of unmodified cholesterol; therefore, the introduction of a fluorine atom at C6 has virtually no effect on cholesterol dynamics in membranes. In addition, this study demonstrates the practical utility of theoretical calculations for determining the 19F CSA principal axes, which would be extremely difficult to obtain experimentally. The combined use of quantum calculations and solid-state 19F NMR will make it possible to apply the orientation information of 19F CSA tensors to membrane systems.

  9. Method of Continuous Variation: Characterization of Alkali Metal Enolates Using 1H and 19F NMR Spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The method of continuous variation in conjunction with 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopies was used to characterize lithium and sodium enolates solvated by N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylethyldiamine (TMEDA) and tetrahydrofuran (THF). A strategy developed using lithium enolates was then applied to the more challenging sodium enolates. A number of sodium enolates solvated by TMEDA or THF afford exclusively tetramers. Evidence suggests that TMEDA chelates sodium on cubic tetramers. PMID:24915602

  10. Implementation of a modified birdcage resonator for 19F/1H MRI at low fields (0.14 T).

    PubMed

    Samaratunga, R C; Pratt, R G; Zhu, Y; Massoth, R J; Thomas, S R

    1994-05-01

    Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance of perfluorinated blood substitute materials provides a method for determination of oxygen tension (pO2) in vivo. Use of a double resonant 19F/1H radio frequency coil allows convenient correlation between the high resolution anatomic presentation of proton images and the fluorine distribution. However, quantitative 19F measurements require an RF coil with good H1 field homogeneity over the image volume and a high quality factor (Q) to minimize errors caused by the low signal-to-noise levels available in in vivo imaging and image nonuniformities introduced by the large chemical shift of fluorocarbons. The birdcage coil design provides a high Q structure with optimum H1 field uniformity and fill factor. However, at low resonance frequencies, the inherently low inductance of the birdcage geometry requires the use of a large number of chip capacitors giving rise to unwieldy coil fabrication and increased cost. This communication describes a modification to the birdcage design that reduces the chip capacitor requirement by at least a factor of 4 for a given dimension, yet retains the essential characteristics of the birdcage design. The modified structure was tuned for double resonance at 5.7/6.0 MHz for 19F/1H magnetic resonance imaging at 0.14 T. For a coil with a length to diameter ratio of 1.67, an H1 uniformity of +/- 2% for the 19F resonance was obtained over a cylindrical region with radius approximately 0.6r (r = radius of coil) and length approximately 1.8r within the coil.

  11. Solubilization of flurbiprofen within non-ionic Tween 20 surfactant micelles: a 19F and 1H NMR study.

    PubMed

    Saveyn, Pieter; Cocquyt, Ellen; Zhu, Wuxin; Sinnaeve, Davy; Haustraete, Katrien; Martins, José C; Van der Meeren, Paul

    2009-07-14

    The solubilization of the poorly water soluble anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen in non-ionic Tween 20 surfactant micellar solutions was studied by both (19)F and (1)H NMR spectroscopy in an acidic environment. These non-destructive techniques allowed us to investigate the effect of temperature cycling in situ. Using (19)F NMR, an increased solubilisation capacity was observed as the temperature increased. This effect became more pronounced above the cloud point, which was reduced by more than 30 degrees C in the presence of an excess of flurbiprofen. Upon clouding, peak splitting was observed in the (19)F spectrum, which indicates that two pools of solubilised flurbiprofen exist that are in slow exchange on the NMR frequency timescale. The clouding and solubilization processes were found to be reversible, albeit with slow kinetics. Based on chemical shift differences of both Tween 20 and flurbiprofen, as well as NOESY experiments, the flurbiprofen was found to be accumulated within the palisade layer of the Tween 20 micelles.

  12. Dual 19F/1H MR gene reporter molecules for in vivo detection of β-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Xin; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Hallac, Rami R.; Liu, Li; Mason, Ralph P.

    2012-01-01

    Increased emphasis on personalized medicine and novel therapies require the development of non-invasive strategies for assessing biochemistry in vivo. The detection of enzyme activity and gene expression in vivo is potentially important for the characterization of diseases and gene therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a particularly promising tool since it is non-invasive, and has no associated radioactivity, yet penetrates deep tissue. We now demonstrate a novel class of dual 1H/19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lacZ gene reporter molecule to specifically reveal enzyme activity in human tumor xenografts growing in mice. We report the design, synthesis, and characterization of six novel molecules and evaluation of the most effective reporter in mice in vivo. Substrates show a single 19F NMR signal and exposure to β-galactosidase induces a large 19F NMR chemical shift response. In the presence of ferric ions the liberated aglycone generates intense proton MRI T2 contrast. The dual modality approach allows both the detection of substrate and imaging of product enhancing the confidence in enzyme detection. PMID:22352428

  13. Relaxed heaps

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, J.R. ); Gabow, H.N.; Shrairman, R. ); Tarjan, R.E. )

    1988-11-01

    The relaxed heap is a priority queue data structure that achieves the same amortized time bounds as the Fibonacci heap - a sequence of m decrease key and n delete min operations takes time O(m + n log n). A variant of relaxed heaps achieves similar bounds in the worst case - O(1) time for decrease key and O(log n) for delete min. Relaxed heaps give a processor-efficient parallel implementation of Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, and hence other algorithms in network optimization. A relaxed heap is a type of binomial queue that allows heap order to be violated.

  14. Site-specific solvent exposure analysis of a membrane protein using unnatural amino acids and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Li, Dong; Chen, Hongwei; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Solvent isotope shift analysis of {sup 19}F-tfmF in different H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O molar ratio. {yields} Correlation between solvent isotope shift of {sup 19}F-spins and solvent exposure analysis. {yields} Solvent exposure analysis of membrane proteins. -- Abstract: Membrane proteins play an essential role in cellular metabolism, transportation and signal transduction across cell membranes. The scarcity of membrane protein structures has thus far prevented a full understanding of their molecular mechanisms. Preliminary topology studies and residue solvent exposure analysis have the potential to provide valuable information on membrane proteins of unknown structure. Here, a {sup 19}F-containing unnatural amino acid (trimethylfluoro-phenylalanine, tfmF) was applied to accomplish site-specific {sup 19}F spin incorporation at different sites in diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK, an Escherichia coli membrane protein) for site-specific solvent exposure analysis. Due to isotope effect on {sup 19}F spins, a standard curve for {sup 19}F-tfmF chemical shifts was drawn for varying solvent H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O ratios. Further site-specific {sup 19}F solvent isotope shift analysis was conducted for DAGK to distinguish residues in water-soluble loops, interfacial areas or hydrophobic membrane regions. This site-specific solvent exposure analysis method could be applied for further topological analysis of other membrane proteins.

  15. NbF5 and TaF5: Assignment of 19F NMR resonances and chemical bond analysis from GIPAW calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Mamata; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Sadoc, Aymeric; Boucher, Florent

    2013-11-01

    The 19F isotropic chemical shifts (δiso) of two isomorphic compounds, NbF5 and TaF5, which involve six nonequivalent fluorine sites, have been experimentally determined from the reconstruction of 1D 19F MAS NMR spectra. In parallel, the corresponding 19F chemical shielding tensors have been calculated using the GIPAW method for both experimental and DFT-optimized structures. Furthermore, the [M4F20] units of NbF5 and TaF5 being held together by van der Waals interactions, the relevance of Grimme corrections to the DFT optimization processes has been evaluated. However, the semi-empirical dispersion correction term introduced by such a method does not show any significant improvement. Nonetheless, a complete and convincing assignment of the 19F NMR lines of NbF5 and TaF5 is obtained, ensured by the linearity between experimental 19F δiso values and calculated 19F isotropic chemical shielding σiso values. The effects of the geometry optimizations have been carefully analyzed, confirming among other matters, the inaccuracy of the experimental structure of NbF5. The relationships between the fluorine chemical shifts, the nature of the fluorine atoms (bridging or terminal), the position of the terminal ones (opposite or perpendicular to the bridging ones), the fluorine charges, the ionicity and the length of the M-F bonds have been established. Additionally, for three of the 19F NMR lines of NbF5, distorted multiplets, arising from 1J-coupling and residual dipolar coupling between the 19F and 93Nb nuclei, were simulated yielding to values of 93Nb-19F 1J-coupling for the corresponding fluorine sites.

  16. Muon spin relaxation studies of interstitial and molecular motion.

    PubMed

    Cox, S F

    1998-03-01

    The unusual methods of preparation and analysis of spin polarization in muSR spectroscopy, which exploit the unique properties of the positive muon, are introduced in this article. Following a summary overview of applications, particular attention is paid to the problem of spin-lattice relaxation for a muon experiencing a hyperfine interaction with a single unpaired electron. The specific cases considered are the interstitial diffusion of muonium--the 1-electron atom which may be considered as a light isotope of hydrogen-and the molecular dynamics of organic radicals labelled by muonium. Rate equations for the evolution of population in the hyperfine-coupled spin states are solved numerically for various relaxation mechanisms. The formalism is equally valid for conventional ESR studies of paramagnetic states but is pursued specifically to simulate T1-relaxation in muSR. The simulations are compared with literature data. Also treated is the case of intermittent hyperfine coupling, appropriate to electron capture and loss in semiconductors or soliton motion in polymers; for this, a Monte Carlo approach is used to simulate the muon response. (For low-dimensional motion, the relaxation function is not exponential, so that a unique value of T1 cannot be defined.) Finally, a proposal is made to implement muon-T1 measurements in the rotating frame; this is designed for the selective study of electronically diamagnetic muonium states (i.e., those without hyperfine coupling) in the presence of a paramagnetic muonium or radical fraction.

  17. Suppression of Raman electron spin relaxation of radicals in crystals. Comparison of Cu2+ and free radical relaxation in triglycine sulfate and Tutton salt single crystals.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, S K; Goslar, J; Lijewski, S

    2011-08-31

    Electron spin-lattice relaxation was measured by the electron spin echo method in a broad temperature range above 4.2 K for Cu(2+) ions and free radicals produced by ionizing radiation in triglycine sulfate (TGS) and Tutton salt (NH4)(2)Zn(SO4)2 ⋅ 6H2O crystals. Localization of the paramagnetic centres in the crystal unit cells was determined from continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance spectra. Various spin relaxation processes and mechanisms are outlined. Cu(2+) ions relax fast via two-phonon Raman processes in both crystals involving the whole phonon spectrum of the host lattice. This relaxation is slightly slower for TGS where Cu(2+) ions are in the interstitial position. The ordinary Raman processes do not contribute to the radical relaxation which relaxes via the local phonon mode. The local mode lies within the acoustic phonon band for radicals in TGS but within the optical phonon range in (NH4)(2)Zn(SO4)2 ⋅ 6H2O. In the latter the cross-relaxation was considered. A lack of phonons around the radical molecules suggested a local crystal amorphisation produced by x- or γ-rays.

  18. Magnetism, optical absorbance, and 19F NMR spectra of nafion films with self-assembling paramagnetic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, E. M.; Chen, Q.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2012-01-15

    Magnetization, optical absorbance, and {sup 19}F NMR spectra of Nafion transparent films as received and doped with Mn{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, and Fe{sup 3+} ions with and without treatment in 1H-1,2,4-triazole (trz) have been studied. Doping of Nafion with Fe{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+} and their bridging to nitrogen of triazole yields a hybrid self-assembling paramagnetic system that exhibits interesting magnetic and optical properties. These include spin crossover phenomena between high-spin (HS) and low-spin (LS) states in Nafion-Fe{sup 2+}-trz and Nafion-Co{sup 2+}-trz accompanied by thermochromic effects in the visible range induced by temperature. A large shift of the magnetization curve induced by a magnetic field in the vicinity of the HS {leftrightarrow} LS, {approx}220 K, observed for Nafion-Fe{sup 2+}-trz has a rate of {approx}6 K/kOe, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that in bulk spin crossover Fe{sup 2+} materials. Selective response of {sup 19}F NMR signals on doping with paramagnetic ions demonstrates that NMR can be used as spatially resolved method to study Nafion film with paramagnetic network. Both chemical shift and width of {sup 19}F NMR signals show that SO groups of Nafion, Fe or Co ions, and nitrogen of triazole are bonded whereas they form a spin crossover system. Based on a model of nanosize cylinders proposed for Nafion [K. Schmidt-Rohr and Q. Chen, Nat Mater (2008), 75], we suggest that paramagnetic ions are located inside these cylinders, forming self-assembling magnetically and optically active nanoscale networks.

  19. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of 14N and 19F superhyperfine interaction in VO 2+ doped propylenediammonium hexafluorozirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi^Kasturi, T.; Krishnan, V. G.

    1998-05-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra have been recorded at X-band frequencies at room temperature on VO 2+ molecular ion in propylenediammonium hexafluorozirconate, [H 3N(CH 2) 3NH 3]ZrF 6, single crystals. The superhyperfine structure caused by 14N and 19F has been clearly observed in the spectra. The two sets of spectra observed are related to each other by the symmetry operations of the host crystals and represent vanadyl ion at two magnetically distinguishable interstitial sites in the unit cell.

  20. Detection and differentiation of neutral organic compounds by 19F NMR with a tungsten calix[4]arene imido complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanchuan; Swager, Timothy M

    2013-12-18

    Fluorinated tungsten calix[4]arene imido complexes were synthesized and used as receptors to detect and differentiate neutral organic compounds. It was found that the binding of specific neutral organic molecules to the tungsten centers induces an upfield shift of the fluorine atom appended on the arylimido group, the extent of which is highly dependent on electronic and steric properties. We demonstrate that the specific bonding and size-selectivity of calix[4]arene tungsten-imido complex combined with (19)F NMR spectroscopy is a powerful new method for the analysis of complex mixtures.

  1. Phospho-selective mechanisms of arrestin conformations and functions revealed by unnatural amino acid incorporation and 19F-NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Yu, Xiao; Liu, Chuan; Qu, Chang-Xiu; Gong, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Da; Li, Fa-Hui; Wang, Hong-Mei; He, Dong-Fang; Yi, Fan; Song, Chen; Tian, Chang-Lin; Xiao, Kun-Hong; Wang, Jiang-Yun; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Specific arrestin conformations are coupled to distinct downstream effectors, which underlie the functions of many G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, using unnatural amino acid incorporation and fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance (19F-NMR) spectroscopy, we demonstrate that distinct receptor phospho-barcodes are translated to specific β-arrestin-1 conformations and direct selective signalling. With its phosphate-binding concave surface, β-arrestin-1 ‘reads' the message in the receptor phospho-C-tails and distinct phospho-interaction patterns are revealed by 19F-NMR. Whereas all functional phosphopeptides interact with a common phosphate binding site and induce the movements of finger and middle loops, different phospho-interaction patterns induce distinct structural states of β-arrestin-1 that are coupled to distinct arrestin functions. Only clathrin recognizes and stabilizes GRK2-specific β-arrestin-1 conformations. The identified receptor-phospho-selective mechanism for arrestin conformation and the spacing of the multiple phosphate-binding sites in the arrestin enable arrestin to recognize plethora phosphorylation states of numerous GPCRs, contributing to the functional diversity of receptors. PMID:26347956

  2. Quantitation of crystalline material within a liquid vehicle using 1H/19F CP/MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Farrer, Brian T; Peresypkin, Andrey; Wenslow, Robert M

    2007-02-01

    A method to detect and quantify a small amount crystalline material within a liquid solution of solubilized material is described. 19F CP-MAS ssNMR was investigated as a technique to detect low levels (0.2 mg/g) of crystalline sodium (2R)-7-{3-[2-chloro-4-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)phenoxy]propoxy}-2-methyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-chromane-2-carboxylate (I) within a solid mixture (with microcrystalline cellulose) and a slurry with a liquid vehicle (capric and caprylic acid triglycerides). The results demonstrate that the area of the 19F CP/MAS signal obtained in 25 min at 25 degrees C is linearly dependent (R2=0.997) on the mass of I within the ssNMR rotor. Slopes of CP-MAS peak area versus mass of I in the rotor were nearly identical for the solid mixture and slurry suspension. Signal-to-noise ratio for the low potency slurry suggest detection and quantitation of 0.1 mg of crystalline I in the rotor, corresponding to 2 mg/g of crystalline material within the slurry suspension.

  3. Understanding of Nuclear Quadruple Interaction of ^ 19F* and Binding Energies of Solid Fluorine at the First-Principles Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, D. R.; Aryal, M. M.; Adhikari, N. P.; Badu, S. R.; Pink, R. H.; Scheicher, R. H.; Chow, Lee; Das, T. P.

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the binding energy (BE) and nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) parameters for the ^19F* excited nuclear state in solid fluorine as part of our investigation [1] of the properties of solid halogens using the first principles Hartree-Fock Cluster procedure combined with many-body perturbation theory (MBPT), implemented by the Gaussian 03 set of programs. Our results show that Van der Waals interaction obtained from intermolecular electron correlation has dominant effect on the BE but negligible effect on the NQI parameters. For the latter, our e^2qQ is 117.7MHz forQ(^19F*), 0.072 *10-28 m^2 [2] and η is essentially zero.. The influence of vibrational effects on e^2qQ is being investigated using a first-principles procedure [3] to bridge the small remaining difference with experiment. [1] M.M. Aryal et al., Hyperfine Interact, 176, 51 (2007). [2] K.C.Mishra et al.,Phys. Rev.B25, 3389(1982). [3] N. Sahoo et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 50, 913(1983) [4] H. Barfuss et al., Phys. Lett. 90A, 33(1982).

  4. A 19F NMR Approach using Reporter Molecule Pairs to Assess β-Galactosidase in Human Xenograft Tumors in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Xin; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Liu, Li; Mason, Ralph P.

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy has emerged as a promising strategy for treatment of various diseases. However, widespread implementation is hampered by difficulties in assessing the success of transfection in the target tissue and the longevity of gene expression. Thus, there is increasing interest in the development of non-invasive in vivo reporter techniques to assay gene expression. We recently demonstrated the ability to detect β-galactosidase activity in stably transfected human prostate tumor xenografts in mice in vivo using 19F NMR. We now extend the studies to human MCF7 breast cancer cells growing as xenografts in nude mice. Moreover, by using two spectrally resolved reporters (o-fluoro-p-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside and an isomer) two tumors could be interrogated simultaneously revealing lacZ transgene activity in a stably transfected tumor versus no activity in a wild type tumor. Most significantly hydrolytic activity observed by 19F NMR corresponded with differential activity in lacZ expressing tumors. PMID:18288788

  5. Simultaneous dual frequency 1H and 19F open coil imaging of arthritic rabbit knee at 3T.

    PubMed

    Hockett, Franklin D; Wallace, Kirk D; Schmieder, Anne H; Caruthers, Shelton D; Pham, Christine T N; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The combination of sensitive magnetic resonance techniques with a selective site-targeted nanoparticle contrast agent has a demonstrated utility for molecular imaging studies. By detecting a unique signature of the contrast agent, this approach can be employed to identify specific bio-molecular markers and observe cellular-level processes within a large and complex organism (e.g., in vivo rabbit). The objective of the present investigation was to design, fabricate and characterize a radio-frequency (RF) coil for the dual frequency ((1)H and (19)F) simultaneous collection of both nuclei images in a 3T field, in order to facilitate studies of arthritic knee degradation in rabbits. The coil supports both transmit and receive modes. The supporting activities included: 1) establishing a technical database for calculating the required coil parameters, 2) selection of a favorable coil geometry, and 3) adaption of existing RF measurement techniques to the design, development and electrical evaluation of the coil. The coil is used in conjunction with a Philips Medical Systems clinical MRI scanner, requiring all RF simultaneous dual frequency ((1)H and (19)F) coils to operate in both transmit and receive modes. A commercial version of SPICE (simulation program with integrated circuit emphasis) was used to estimate significant operational parameters prior to fabricating the imaging coil. Excellent images were obtained with the fabricated coil and no operational problems were observed that would limit the use of other coil geometries and field strengths.

  6. Study of anisotropy in nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of water protons in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kasturi, S R; Chang, D C; Hazlewood, C F

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropy of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and the spin-spin relaxation times (T2) of water protons in skeletal muscle tissue have been studied by the spin-echo technique. Both T1 and T2 have been measured for the water protons of the tibialis anterior muscle of mature male rats for theta = 0, 55, and 90 degrees, where theta is the orientation of the muscle fiber with respect to the static field. The anisotropy in T1 and T2 has been measured at temperatures of 28, -5 and -10 degrees C. No significant anisotropy was observed in the T1 of the tissue water, while an average anisotropy of approximately 5% was observed in T2 at room temperature. The average anisotropy of T2 at -5 and -10 degrees C was found to be approximately 2 and 1.3%, respectively. PMID:6266530

  7. Generation of spin-polarized currents via cross-relaxation with dynamically pumped paramagnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Meriles, Carlos A.; Doherty, Marcus W.

    2014-07-14

    Key to future spintronics and spin-based information processing technologies is the generation, manipulation, and detection of spin polarization in a solid state platform. Here, we theoretically explore an alternative route to spin injection via the use of dynamically polarized nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. We focus on the geometry where carriers and NV centers are confined to proximate, parallel layers and use a “trap-and-release” model to calculate the spin cross-relaxation probabilities between the charge carriers and neighboring NV centers. We identify near-unity regimes of carrier polarization depending on the NV spin state, applied magnetic field, and carrier g-factor. In particular, we find that unlike holes, electron spins are distinctively robust against spin-lattice relaxation by other, unpolarized paramagnetic centers. Further, the polarization process is only weakly dependent on the carrier hopping dynamics, which makes this approach potentially applicable over a broad range of temperatures.

  8. Design and Synthesis of Fluorinated Amphiphile as (19)F MRI/Fluorescence Dual-Imaging Agent by Tuning the Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Bo, Shaowei; Song, Cong; Li, Yu; Yu, Weijiang; Chen, Shizhen; Zhou, Xin; Yang, Zhigang; Zheng, Xing; Jiang, Zhong-Xing

    2015-06-19

    Both (19)F MRI and optical imaging are powerful noninvasive molecular imaging modalities in biomedical applications. To integrate these two complementary imaging modalities, the design and synthesis of a novel (19)F MRI/fluorescence dual-modal imaging agent is reported herein. Through Sonogashira coupling reaction between the fluorinated phenylacetylene and 1,2,4,5-tetraiodobenzene, a fluorophore with 48 symmetrical fluorines at its periphery was constructed with high efficacy. High aqueous solubility was achieved by PEGylation of the fluorophore with monodisperse PEGs. However, an unexpected self-assembly of the PEGylated amphiphilic fluorophore in water "turned off" the (19)F NMR signal. However, hydrogenation of the triple bonds or introduction of branched monodisperse PEGs was able to efficiently tune the self-assembly, resulting in the "turning on" of the (19)F NMR signal. One of these amphiphiles combines the advantages of label-free fluorescence, high (19)F MRI sensitivity, biocompatibility, and excellent aqueous solubility. The results demonstrate the great potential of such amphiphiles for real-time (19)F MRI and fluorescence dual-modality imaging.

  9. Single-molecule magnets: structural characterization, magnetic properties, and (19)F NMR spectroscopy of a Mn(12) family spanning three oxidation levels.

    PubMed

    Chakov, Nicole E; Soler, Monica; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Abboud, Khalil A; Christou, George

    2005-07-25

    The syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetic properties of [Mn(12)O(12)(O(2)CC(6)F(5))(16)(H(2)O)(4)] (2), (NMe(4))[Mn(12)O(12)(O(2)CC(6)F(5))(16)(H(2)O)(4)] (3), and (NMe(4))(2)[Mn(12)O(12)(O(2)CC(6)F(5))(16)(H(2)O)(4)] (4) are reported. Complex 2 displays quasi-reversible redox couples when examined by cyclic voltammetry in CH(2)Cl(2): one-electron reductions are observed at 0.64 and 0.30 V vs ferrocene. The reaction of complex 2 with 1 and 2 equiv of NMe(4)I yields the one- and two-electron reduced analogues, 3 and 4, respectively. Complexes 2.3CH(2)Cl(2), 3.4.5CH(2)Cl(2).(1)/(2)H(2)O, and 4.6C(7)H(8) crystallize in the triclinic P, monoclinic P2/c, and monoclinic C2/c space groups, respectively. The molecular structures are all very similar, consisting of a central [Mn(IV)O(4)] cubane surrounded by a nonplanar alternating ring of eight Mn and eight mu(3)-O(2)(-) ions. Peripheral ligation is provided by 16 bridging C(6)F(5)CO(2)(-) and 4 H(2)O ligands. Bond valence sum calculations establish that the added electrons in 3 and 4 are localized on former Mn(III) ions giving trapped-valence Mn(IV)(4)Mn(III)(7)Mn(II) and Mn(IV)(4)Mn(III)(6)Mn(II)(2) anions, respectively. (19)F NMR spectroscopy in CD(2)Cl(2) shows retention of the solid-state structure upon dissolution and detrapping of the added electrons in 3 and 4 among the outer ring of Mn ions on the (19)F NMR time scale. DC studies on dried microcrystalline samples of 2, 3, and 4.2.5C(7)H(8) restrained in eicosane in the 1.80-10.0 K and 1-70 kG ranges were fit to give S = 10, D = -0.40 cm(-)(1), g = 1.87, D/g = 0.21 cm(-)(1) for 2, S = 19/2, D = -0.34 cm(-)(1), g = 2.04, D/g = 0.17 cm(-)(1) for 3, and S = 10, D = -0.29 cm(-)(1), g = 2.05, D/g = 0.14 cm(-)(1) for 4, where D is the axial zero-field splitting parameter. The clusters exhibit out-of-phase AC susceptibility signals (chi(M)' ') indicative of slow magnetization relaxation in the 6-8 K range for 2, 4-6 K range for 3, and 2-4 K range for 4; the shift to

  10. Paramagnetic relaxation in anisotropic materials in zero and weak constant fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fokina, N. P.; Khalvashi, E. Kh.; Khutsishvili, K. O.

    2014-12-21

    Paramagnetic relaxation in strongly anisotropic materials is analytically investigated in zero and weak constant magnetic fields. The objectives of the microscopic analytical investigation are (i) the weak-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) linewidth and (ii) the electron spin relaxation rates given by a calorimetric Gorter type experiment in the zero constant field at the arbitrary low-frequency field directions, respectively, to the sample crystallographic axes. The EPR linewidth is calculated under the suggestion of its spin-phonon nature at the one-phonon mechanism of the spin-lattice relaxation in the case of the strong isotropic exchange interaction for the arbitrary direction Z of the constant magnetic field. The EPR linewidth is presented as the half sum of the zero-field relaxation rates, measured by the Gorter experiment with the low-frequency field oriented along the X, Y axes. With the help of the macroscopic consideration, it is shown that the zero-field relaxation rates describe the relaxation of the X and Y magnetization components in a zero or weak constant magnetic field. The relaxation rates of the magnetizations created along a,b,c crystallographic axes by a low-frequency field in a Gorter type experiment follow the obtained expressions in the particular cases and are in the experimentally confirmed relations with the EPR linewidth.

  11. NMR spin relaxation rates in the Heisenberg bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Tiago; Curro, Nicholas; Scalettar, Richard; Paiva, Thereza; Dos Santos, Raimundo R.

    One of the striking features of heavy fermions is the fact that in the vicinity of a quantum phase transition these systems exhibit the breakdown of Fermi-liquid behavior and superconductivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) expirements play an important role in the study of these phenomena. Measurements of NMR spin relaxation rates and Knight shift, for instance, can be used to probe the electronic spin susceptibility of these systems. Here we studied the NMR response of the Heisenberg bilayer model. In this model, it is well known that the increase of the interplane coupling between the planes, Jperp, supresses the antiferromagnetic order at a quantum critical point (QCP). We use stochastic series expansion (SSE) and the maximum-entropy analytic continuation method to calculate the NMR spin lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 and the spin echo decay 1 /T2 G as function of Jperp. The spin echo decay, T2 G increases for small Jperp, due to the increase of the order parameter, and then vanishes abruptly in the QCP. The effects of Jperp dilution disorder in the QCP and the relaxation rates are also discussed. This research was supported by the NNSA Grant Number DE-NA 0002908, and Ciência sem fronteiras program/CNPQ.

  12. Differential cross section measurements of the 19F(d,d0) elastic scattering for Ion Beam Analysis purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foteinou, V.; Provatas, G.; Aslanoglou, X.; Axiotis, M.; Harissopulos, S.; Kokkoris, M.; Lagoyannis, A.; Misaelides, P.; Ntemou, E.; Patronis, N.; Preketes-Sigalas, K.

    2017-04-01

    The differential cross sections of the 19F(d,d0) elastic scattering were determined at five backward angles from 125° to 170°. Two independent experiments were performed, one for the determination of the cross sections and one for the validation of the obtained results. In the first experiment, a thin natLiF target was bombarded with deuterons in the energy region from 0.94 to 2.0 MeV. In the benchmarking experiment, a thick ZnF2 pellet was irradiated with deuterons at Ed,lab = 1.11, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8and 2.0MeV .

  13. Kinetics of membrane binding and dissociation of 5-fluorouracil by pulsed-field-gradient 19F NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, Noriyuki; Okamura, Emiko

    2009-06-01

    The kinetics of membrane binding and dissociation of an anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (5FU) is quantified by high resolution NMR with the pulsed-field-gradient technique. The 19F NMR signal of 5FU is analyzed at 293-313 K by the solution of Bloch equation with exchange terms. The rate constants of 5FU binding and dissociation are 0.2 and 4.1 s -1 at 303 K. The 5FU motion in the vertical direction to the membrane surface is restricted as compared with the lateral diffusion, judging from the activation energy (57 kJ/mol) larger than the lateral diffusion in membrane (26 kJ/mol [E. Okamura, N. Yoshii, J. Chem. Phys. 129 (2008) 215102]).

  14. NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}: Assignment of {sup 19}F NMR resonances and chemical bond analysis from GIPAW calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Mamata; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Sadoc, Aymeric; Boucher, Florent

    2013-11-15

    The {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shifts (δ{sub iso}) of two isomorphic compounds, NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}, which involve six nonequivalent fluorine sites, have been experimentally determined from the reconstruction of 1D {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectra. In parallel, the corresponding {sup 19}F chemical shielding tensors have been calculated using the GIPAW method for both experimental and DFT-optimized structures. Furthermore, the [M{sub 4}F{sub 20}] units of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} being held together by van der Waals interactions, the relevance of Grimme corrections to the DFT optimization processes has been evaluated. However, the semi-empirical dispersion correction term introduced by such a method does not show any significant improvement. Nonetheless, a complete and convincing assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} is obtained, ensured by the linearity between experimental {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values and calculated {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shielding σ{sub iso} values. The effects of the geometry optimizations have been carefully analyzed, confirming among other matters, the inaccuracy of the experimental structure of NbF{sub 5}. The relationships between the fluorine chemical shifts, the nature of the fluorine atoms (bridging or terminal), the position of the terminal ones (opposite or perpendicular to the bridging ones), the fluorine charges, the ionicity and the length of the M–F bonds have been established. Additionally, for three of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5}, distorted multiplets, arising from {sup 1}J-coupling and residual dipolar coupling between the {sup 19}F and {sup 93}Nb nuclei, were simulated yielding to values of {sup 93}Nb–{sup 19}F {sup 1}J-coupling for the corresponding fluorine sites. - Graphical abstract: The complete assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} allow establishing relationships between the {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values, the nature of the fluorine atoms

  15. Electron spin relaxation in x-lithium phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hideo; Dalton, Lauraine A; Ha, Duc; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2007-07-19

    Continuous-wave linewidths and spin susceptibilities, spin-spin relaxation rates (1/T2), and spin-lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) for two sources of x-LiPc were measured at 9.5 GHz between 15 and 298 K. Relaxation rates at 34 GHz were measured between 80 and 298 K. Room-temperature relaxation rates also were measured at 250 MHz, 1.9 GHz, and 2.76 GHz. The temperature dependences of linewidths and spin susceptibilities are characteristic of 1-D organic conductors. The ratio of populations of localized and delocalized electrons varies with sample preparation. For a single needle between 15 and about 200 K, 1/T2 is higher for the parallel orientation, but 1/T1 is higher for the perpendicular orientation, consistent with predictions based on dipolar interactions. Between about 60 and 150 K, which is the temperature regime in which spin susceptibility is changing rapidly with temperature, 1/T1 exhibits a non-monotonic dependence on temperature and is lower at 34 GHz than at 9.5 GHz. In other organic conductors, this dependence has been attributed to a bottleneck mechanism of relaxation. At higher temperatures, 1/T1 becomes less orientation-dependent. At room temperature, T1 increases rapidly between 250 MHz (3.0 micros) and 2.76 GHz (6.3 micros) and then shows less frequency dependence up to 34 GHz (9.8 micros). The relaxation rate near room temperature might have a substantial contribution from spin hopping perpendicular to the stacking axis of the molecules.

  16. (19)F MRSI of capecitabine in the liver at 7 T using broadband transmit-receive antennas and dual-band RF pulses.

    PubMed

    van Gorp, Jetse S; Seevinck, Peter R; Andreychenko, Anna; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; Luijten, Peter R; Viergever, Max A; Koopman, Miriam; Boer, Vincent O; Klomp, Dennis W J

    2015-11-01

    Capecitabine (Cap) is an often prescribed chemotherapeutic agent, successfully used to cure some patients from cancer or reduce tumor burden for palliative care. However, the efficacy of the drug is limited, it is not known in advance who will respond to the drug and it can come with severe toxicity. (19)F Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) have been used to non-invasively study Cap metabolism in vivo to find a marker for personalized treatment. In vivo detection, however, is hampered by low concentrations and the use of radiofrequency (RF) surface coils limiting spatial coverage. In this work, the use of a 7T MR system with radiative multi-channel transmit-receive antennas was investigated with the aim of maximizing the sensitivity and spatial coverage of (19)F detection protocols. The antennas were broadband optimized to facilitate both the (1)H (298 MHz) and (19)F (280 MHz) frequencies for accurate shimming, imaging and signal combination. B1(+) simulations, phantom and noise measurements showed that more than 90% of the theoretical maximum sensitivity could be obtained when using B1(+) and B1(-) information provided at the (1)H frequency for the optimization of B1(+) and B1(-) at the (19)F frequency. Furthermore, to overcome the limits in maximum available RF power, whilst ensuring simultaneous excitation of all detectable conversion products of Cap, a dual-band RF pulse was designed and evaluated. Finally, (19)F MRS(I) measurements were performed to detect (19)F metabolites in vitro and in vivo. In two patients, at 10 h (patient 1) and 1 h (patient 2) after Cap intake, (19)F metabolites were detected in the liver and the surrounding organs, illustrating the potential of the set-up for in vivo detection of metabolic rates and drug distribution in the body.

  17. Electron spin relaxation in pseudo-Jahn-Teller low-symmetry Cu(II) complexes in diaqua(L-aspartate)Zn(II).H(2)O crystals.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, S K; Hilczer, W; Goslar, J; Massa, M M; Calvo, R

    2001-11-01

    Low-temperature (4-55 K) pulsed EPR measurements were performed with the magnetic field directed along the z-axis of the g-factor of the low-symmetry octahedral complex [(63)Cu(L-aspartate)(2)(H2O)2] undergoing dynamic Jahn-Teller effect in diaqua(L-aspartate)Zn(II) hydrate single crystals. Spin-lattice relaxation time T(1) and phase memory time T(M) were determined by the electron spin echo (ESE) method. The relaxation rate 1/T(1) increases strongly over 5 decades in the temperature range 4-55 K. Various processes and mechanisms of T(1)-relaxation are discussed, and it is shown that the relaxation is governed mainly by Raman relaxation processes with the Debye temperature Theta(D)=204 K, with a detectable contribution from disorder in the doped Cu(2+) ions system below 12 K. An analytical approximation of the transport integral I(8) is given in temperature range T=0.025-10Theta(D) and applied for computer fitting procedures. Since the Jahn-Teller distorted configurations differ strongly in energy (delta(12)=240 cm(-1)), there is no influence of the classical vibronic dynamics mechanism on T(1). Dephasing of the ESE (phase relaxation) is governed by instantaneous diffusion and spectral diffusion below 20 K with resulting rigid lattice value 1/T(0)(M)=1.88 MHz. Above this temperature the relaxation rate 1/T(M) increases upon heating due to two mechanisms. The first is the phonon-controlled excitation to the first excited vibronic level of energy Delta=243 cm(-1), with subsequent tunneling to the neighbor potential well. This vibronic-type dynamics also produces a temperature-dependent broadening of lines in the ESEEM spectra. The second mechanism is produced by the spin-lattice relaxation. The increase in T(M) is described in terms of the spin packets forming inhomogeneously broadened EPR lines.

  18. Dynamical crossover in an Ising spin glass above T(g): a muon-spin-relaxation investigation of Fe0.05TiS2.

    PubMed

    Keren, Amit; Gulener, F; Campbell, Ian; Bazalitsky, Galina; Amato, Alex

    2002-09-02

    We investigate the temperature dependence of the spin-spin dynamical autocorrelation function of the Ising spin glass Fe0.05TiS2 through field dependent muon-spin lattice relaxation measurements. We successfully analyze the results using the Ogielski function, namely, t(-x)exp((-[t/tau](y)) as employed in numerical simulations. The experimental estimates of x, y, and tau are compared with those from simulations. Our major finding is that in this system the correlation function changes its nature from Ogielski to a form indistinguishable from pure stretched exponential upon cooling close to T(g), indicating a dynamical crossover.

  19. Relaxation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  20. Dynamics of [C{sub 3}H{sub 5}N{sub 2}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}] by means of {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry and quadrupole relaxation enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Masierak, W.; Florek-Wojciechowska, M.; Oglodek, I.; Jakubas, R.; Privalov, A. F.; Kresse, B.; Fujara, F.; Kruk, D.

    2015-05-28

    {sup 1}H spin-lattice field cycling relaxation dispersion experiments in the intermediate phase II of the solid [C{sub 3}H{sub 5}N{sub 2}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}] are presented. Two motional processes have been identified from the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion profiles and quantitatively described. It has been concluded that these processes are associated with anisotropic reorientations of the imidazolium ring, characterized by correlation times of the order of 10{sup −8} s-10{sup −9} s and of about 10{sup −5} s. Moreover, quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) effects originating from slowly fluctuating {sup 1}H-{sup 14}N dipolar interactions have been observed. From the positions of the relaxation maxima, the quadrupole coupling parameters for the {sup 14}N nuclei in [C{sub 3}H{sub 5}N{sub 2}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}] have been determined. The {sup 1}H-{sup 14}N relaxation contribution associated with the slow dynamics has been described in terms of a theory of QRE [Kruk et al., Solid State Nucl. Magn. Reson. 40, 114 (2011)] based on the stochastic Liouville equation. The shape of the QRE maxima (often referred to as “quadrupole peaks”) has been consistently reproduced for the correlation time describing the slow dynamics and the determined quadrupole coupling parameters.

  1. /sup 19/F NMR studies of 5-fluorouracil-substituted Escherichia coli transfer RNAs: solution structure and codon-anticodon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gollnick, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    /sup 19/F NMR was used to study E. coli tRNA/sub 1//sup Val/, tRNA/sub f//sup Met/, and tRNA/sub m//Met/, in which 5-fluorouracil (FUra) has replaced uracil and uracil-derived minor bases. /sup 19/F NMR spectra of these tRNAs resolve resonances from nearly all the incorporated FUra residues. Each of the three tRNAs can be resolved into two isoaccepting species, termed forms A and B, whose /sup 19/F spectra differ in the shift of one /sup 19/F peak from ca. 4.5 ppm in form B, upfield to -15 ppm in form A. Because the two isoacceptors of each tRNA differ only at one position, the peaks at 4.5 ppm in the spectra of (FUra)tRNA/sub 1//sup Val/ and (FUra)tRNA/sub m//sup Met/; are assigned to FUra 17 and Fura 20 respectively. Bisulfate modification and pH dependence indicate that /sup 19/F signals in the central region of the spectrum of (FUra)tRNA/sub 1//sup Val/ correspond to fluorouracils in non-base-paired regions. Photoreaction with psoralen indicates upfield /sup 19/F signals arise from residues in helical environments. Removal of magnesium or addition of NaCl produces major, reversible changes in the /sup 19/F spectrum of fluorinated tRNAs. Studies of manganese and spermine binding to (FUra)tRNA/sub 1//sup Val/ allow localization of several resonances in the /sup 18/F spectrum to regions near putative binding sites for these ions. Binding of the codon G/sub p/U/sub p/A causes an upfield shift of a /sup 19/F resonance at 3.9 ppm in the spectrum of (FUra)tRNA/sub 1//sup Val/. G/sub p/U/sub p/A/sub p/A, which is complementary to the anticodon and 5'-adjacent FUra 33, shifts an additional /sup 19/F peak at 4.5 ppm. /sup 1/H NMR and RNase H digestion studies show that the oligonucleotides bind to the anticodon.

  2. Advanced new relaxation filter-selective signal excitation methods for (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Asada, Mamiko; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2014-10-21

    We have developed new relaxation filter-selective signal excitation (RFS) methods for (13)C solid-state NMR, which enable extraction of the spectrum of a target component from a mixture of several components. These methods are based on the equalization of proton relaxation time in a single domain via rapid intraproton spin diffusion and the difference in proton relaxation time of individual components in the mixture. We recently reported two types of RFS methods using proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame ((1)H T1rho) in (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, to increase the availability of RFS methods, we focus on proton spin-lattice relaxation time ((1)H T1). Introduction of simple pulse sequences to one-dimensional experiments reduced data acquisition time and increased flexibility, and led to the development of two new types of RFS methods using (1)H T1. We then demonstrated these methods by selectively exciting the (13)C signals of target components in a commercially available drug and a number of physical mixtures, and we showed them to be applicable to the quantitative analysis of individual components in these solid mixtures with an experimental duration of 1.5 to about 10 h. The practicality and versatility of these four RFS methods were increased by combining two or more of them, or by using a flip-back pulse, which is an effective means of shortening experimental duration. These RFS methods are suitable for use in a broad range of fields.

  3. Verification of threshold activation detection (TAD) technique in prompt fission neutron detection using scintillators containing 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibczynski, P.; Kownacki, J.; Moszyński, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Gójska, A.; Gierlik, M.; Kaźmierczak, Ł.; Jakubowska, E.; Kędzierski, G.; Kujawiński, Ł.; Wojnarowicz, J.; Carrel, F.; Ledieu, M.; Lainé, F.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study ⌀ 5''× 3'' and ⌀ 2''× 2'' EJ-313 liquid fluorocarbon as well as ⌀ 2'' × 3'' BaF2 scintillators were exposed to neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source and a Sodern Genie 16GT deuterium-tritium (D+T) neutron generator. The scintillators responses to β- particles with maximum endpoint energy of 10.4 MeV from the n+19F reactions were studied. Response of a ⌀ 5'' × 3'' BC-408 plastic scintillator was also studied as a reference. The β- particles are the products of interaction of fast neutrons with 19F which is a component of the EJ-313 and BaF2 scintillators. The method of fast neutron detection via fluorine activation is already known as Threshold Activation Detection (TAD) and was proposed for photofission prompt neutron detection from fissionable and Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) in the field of Homeland Security and Border Monitoring. Measurements of the number of counts between 6.0 and 10.5 MeV with a 252Cf source showed that the relative neutron detection efficiency ratio, defined as epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'', is 32.0% ± 2.3% and 44.6% ± 3.4% for front-on and side-on orientation of the BaF2, respectively. Moreover, the ⌀ 5'' EJ-313 and side-on oriented BaF2 were also exposed to neutrons from the D+T neutron generator, and the relative efficiency epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'' was estimated to be 39.3%. Measurements of prompt photofission neutrons with the BaF2 detector by means of data acquisition after irradiation (out-of-beam) of nuclear material and between the beam pulses (beam-off) techniques were also conducted on the 9 MeV LINAC of the SAPHIR facility.

  4. Multinucleon transfer in O,1816,19F+208Pb reactions at energies near the fusion barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafferty, D. C.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Williams, E.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Luong, D. H.; McNeil, S. D.; Ramachandran, K.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Wakhle, A.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Nuclear reactions are complex, involving collisions between composite systems where many-body dynamics determines outcomes. Successful models have been developed to explain particular reaction outcomes in distinct energy and mass regimes, but a unifying picture remains elusive. The irreversible transfer of kinetic energy from the relative motion of the collision partners to their internal states, as is known to occur in deep inelastic collisions, has yet to be successfully incorporated explicitly into fully quantal reaction models. The influence of these processes on fusion is not yet quantitatively understood. Purpose: To investigate the population of high excitation energies in transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies, which are precursors to deep inelastic processes, and their dependence on the internuclear separation. Methods: Transfer probabilities and excitation energy spectra have been measured in collisions of O,1816,19F+208Pb , at various energies below and around the fusion barrier, by detecting the backscattered projectile-like fragments in a Δ E -E telescope. Results: The relative yields of different transfer outcomes are strongly driven by Q values, but change with the internuclear separation. In 16O+208Pb , single nucleon transfer dominates, with a strong contribution from -2 p transfer close to the Coulomb barrier, though this channel becomes less significant in relation to the -2 p 2 n transfer channel at larger separations. For 18O+208Pb , the -2 p 2 n channel is the dominant charge transfer mode at all separations. In the reactions with 19F,-3 p 2 n transfer is significant close to the barrier, but falls off rapidly with energy. Multinucleon transfer processes are shown to lead to high excitation energies (up to ˜15 MeV), which is distinct from single nucleon transfer modes which predominantly populate states at low excitation energy. Conclusions: Kinetic energy is transferred into internal excitations following transfer, with this

  5. In Vivo 19F MR Imaging Cell Tracking of Inflammatory Macrophages and Site-specific Development of Colitis-associated Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo Hyun; Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether the magnitude of in vivo fluorine 19 (19F) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging signal is associated with subsequent development of colitis-associated dysplasia after in situ fluorination of inflammatory macrophages in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Materials and Methods Experiments were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Mice in the experimental group (n = 10) were administered azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium to induce colitis-associated dysplasia. Five mice were in the noninduced control group. Animals were injected with a commercially available perfluorocarbon and were examined in vivo with an 11.7-T MR imager for up to 110 days. Colons were then harvested followed by high-spatial-resolution ex vivo MR imaging. Multiple colon segments with or without 19F signal were histologically graded and were correlated with 19F signal intensity by using a Spearman correlation test. The signal intensity in mice with colitis-associated dysplasia was compared with that in control mice with a two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test. Results Patchy distributions of 19F signal intensity in the colon wall were seen on in vivo and ex vivo images, representing chronic inflammation as shown by immunohistochemistry. Histologic scores of inflammation and site-specific development of colitis-associated dysplasia in the descending colon showed good correlation with normalized 19F signal intensity (r = 0.88, P = .033 for the ascending colon; r = 0.82, P = .006 for the descending colon). A significantly (P = .002) higher normalized 19F signal-to-noise ratio was found at sites that developed dysplasia (mean, 0.58 ± 0.09 [standard deviation]) as compared with sites that did not (mean, 0.17 ± 0.22). Conclusion 19F MR imaging cell tracking of macrophages can be used to assess local inflammation in a mouse model of IBD. The resulting local 19F signal intensity, representing the magnitude of inflammation, has a positive

  6. Zero field splitting fluctuations induced phase relaxation of Gd3+ in frozen solutions at cryogenic temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Raitsimring, A.; Dalaloyan, A.; Collauto, A.; Feintuch, A.; Meade, T.; Goldfarb, D.

    2015-01-01

    Distance measurements using double electron–electron resonance (DEER) and Gd3+ chelates for spin labels (GdSL) have been shown to be an attractive alternative to nitroxide spin labels at W-band (95 GHz). The maximal distance that can be accessed by DEER measurements and the sensitivity of such measurements strongly depends on the phase relaxation of Gd3+ chelates in frozen, glassy solutions. In this work, we explore the phase relaxation of Gd3+-DOTA as a representative of GdSL in temperature and concentration ranges typically used for W-band DEER measurements. We observed that in addition to the usual mechanisms of phase relaxation known for nitroxide based spin labels, GdSL are subjected to an additional phase relaxation mechanism that features an increase in the relaxation rate from the center to the periphery of the EPR spectrum. Since the EPR spectrum of GdSL is the sum of subspectra of the individual EPR transitions, we attribute this field dependence to transition dependent phase relaxation. Using simulations of the EPR spectra and its decomposition into the individual transition subspectra, we isolated the phase relaxation of each transition and found that its rate increases with |ms|. We suggest that this mechanism is due to transient zero field splitting (tZFS), where its magnitude and correlation time are scaled down and distributed as compared with similar situations in liquids. This tZFS induced phase relaxation mechanism becomes dominant (or at least significant) when all other well-known phase relaxation mechanisms, such as spectral diffusion caused by nuclear spin diffusion, instantaneous and electron spin spectral diffusion, are significantly suppressed by matrix deuteration and low concentration, and when the temperature is sufficiently low to disable spin lattice interaction as a source of phase relaxation. PMID:25442776

  7. Zero field splitting fluctuations induced phase relaxation of Gd3+ in frozen solutions at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitsimring, A.; Dalaloyan, A.; Collauto, A.; Feintuch, A.; Meade, T.; Goldfarb, D.

    2014-11-01

    Distance measurements using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) and Gd3+ chelates for spin labels (GdSL) have been shown to be an attractive alternative to nitroxide spin labels at W-band (95 GHz). The maximal distance that can be accessed by DEER measurements and the sensitivity of such measurements strongly depends on the phase relaxation of Gd3+ chelates in frozen, glassy solutions. In this work, we explore the phase relaxation of Gd3+-DOTA as a representative of GdSL in temperature and concentration ranges typically used for W-band DEER measurements. We observed that in addition to the usual mechanisms of phase relaxation known for nitroxide based spin labels, GdSL are subjected to an additional phase relaxation mechanism that features an increase in the relaxation rate from the center to the periphery of the EPR spectrum. Since the EPR spectrum of GdSL is the sum of subspectra of the individual EPR transitions, we attribute this field dependence to transition dependent phase relaxation. Using simulations of the EPR spectra and its decomposition into the individual transition subspectra, we isolated the phase relaxation of each transition and found that its rate increases with |ms|. We suggest that this mechanism is due to transient zero field splitting (tZFS), where its magnitude and correlation time are scaled down and distributed as compared with similar situations in liquids. This tZFS induced phase relaxation mechanism becomes dominant (or at least significant) when all other well-known phase relaxation mechanisms, such as spectral diffusion caused by nuclear spin diffusion, instantaneous and electron spin spectral diffusion, are significantly suppressed by matrix deuteration and low concentration, and when the temperature is sufficiently low to disable spin lattice interaction as a source of phase relaxation.

  8. Tumour oxygen dynamics measured simultaneously by near-infrared spectroscopy and 19F magnetic resonance imaging in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Mengna; Kodibagkar, Vikram; Liu, Hanli; Mason, Ralph P.

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to investigate the correlation between tumour vascular oxygenation and tissue oxygen tension dynamics in rat breast 13762NF tumours with respect to hyperoxic gas breathing. NIRS directly detected global variations in the oxygenated haemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbO2]) within tumours and oxygen tension (pO2) maps were achieved using 19F MRI of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene. Multiple correlations were examined between rates and magnitudes of vascular (Δ[HbO2]) and tissue (pO2) responses. Significant correlations were found between response to oxygen and carbogen breathing using either modality. Comparison of results for the two methods showed a correlation between the vascular perfusion rate ratio and the mean pO2 values (R2 > 0.7). The initial rates of increase of Δ[HbO2] and the slope of dynamic pO2 response, d(pO2)/dt, of well-oxygenated voxels in response to hyperoxic challenge were also correlated. These results demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous measurements using NIRS and MRI. As expected, the rate of pO2 response to oxygen is primarily dependent upon the well perfused rather than poorly perfused vasculature. Presented in part at the 12th annual meeting of the International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Kyoto, 2004.

  9. Reaction mechanism coexistence in the 123 MeV {sup 19}F+{sup 56}Fe reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Brondi, A.; Kildir, M.; La Rana, G.; Moro, R.; Vardaci, E.; Pirrone, S.; Porto, F.; Sambataro, S.; Politi, G.; Figuera, P.

    1996-10-01

    Mass and charge identified ejectiles, spanning from {sup 11}B to {sup 22}Ne, have been detected in the 123 MeV {sup 19}F+{sup 56}Fe reaction. The coexistence of deep inelastic collision (DIC) and incomplete fusion (IF) mechanisms has been observed. The shape of the energy spectra and their behavior with angle allowed us to identify two components: The less dissipative one was dominating near the grazing angle. For both components experimental optimum {ital Q} values were derived. Two approaches based on the sum rule (SR) model of Wilczy{acute n}ski were used to calculate DIC and IF contributions to the complex fragment cross sections. Both prescriptions fit reasonably well experimental ejectile cross sections and {ital Q} optimum values. Results of the present investigation support the idea that the DIC can be treated on the same footing as IF in the SR model once the first process is confined in an inner angular momentum window, starting from the maximum fusion angular momentum, with respect to quasielastic processes. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. A Miniaturized, 1.9F Integrated Optical Fiber and Stone Basket for Use in Thulium Fiber Laser Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher R; Hutchens, Thomas C; Hardy, Luke A; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2015-10-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored as an alternative laser lithotripter to the standard holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The more uniform beam profile of the TFL enables higher power transmission through smaller fibers. In this study, a 100-μm core, 140-μm outer-diameter (OD) silica fiber with 5-mm length hollow steel tip was integrated with 1.3F (0.433-mm OD) nitinol wire basket to form a 1.9F (0.633-mm OD) device. TFL energy of 30 mJ, 500 μs pulse duration, and 500 Hz pulse rate was delivered to human uric acid stones, ex vivo. Stone ablation rates measured 1.5 ± 0.2 mg/s, comparable to 1.7 ± 0.3 mg/s using bare fiber tips separately with stone basket. With further development, this device may minimize stone retropulsion, allowing more efficient TFL lithotripsy at higher pulse rates. It may also provide increased flexibility, higher saline irrigation rates through the ureteroscope working channel, reduce fiber degradation compared with separate fiber and basket manipulation, and reduce laser-induced nitinol wire damage.

  11. Nucleon momentum distributions and elastic electron scattering from 19F, 25Mg, 27Al, and 29Si nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rahmani, A.

    2016-04-01

    The nucleon momentum distributions and elastic electron scattering form factors of the ground state for some odd 2 s-1 d shell nuclei, such as 19F, 25Mg, 27Al, and 29Si, have been investigated using the coherent density fluctuation model and expressed in terms of the fluctuation function (weight function) | f( x)|2. The fluctuation function has been related to the nucleon density distribution of the nuclei and determined from the theory. The property of the long-tail manner at high-momentum region of the nucleon momentum distribution has been obtained by theoretical fluctuation function. The calculated form factors F( q) of all nuclei under study are in very good agreement with those of experimental data throughout all values of momentum transfer q. It is concluded that the contributions of the quadrupole form factor F C2( q) in 25Mg and 27Al nuclei, which are characterized by the undeformed 2 s-1 d shell model, are necessary for getting a remarkable agreement between the theoretical and experimental form factors.

  12. Nuclear Spin Relaxation Characteristic of Submonolayer He Films in Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Taku; Kawai, Ryosuke; Kuze, Atsushi; Hieda, Mitsunori; Wada, Nobuo

    2014-04-01

    In order to obtain information on dynamics of helium films in the nondegenerate fluid region, we have performed a pulsed-NMR experiment at 3.29 MHz on He films adsorbed in straight 2.4 nm channels of FSM silicates down to 0.54 K. In general, the spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times and were explained in terms of the two-dimensional Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound model for dipolar relaxation. Temperature dependences of in submonolayer He films show a minimum, indicating that the dipolar-field correlation time is about s. The temperature of the minimum monotonically lowers with increasing coverage, suggesting that He adatoms become more mobile at higher coverages. The low-dimensional property of He adatoms is observed as the separation of and above where . On the other hand, several features specific to films in the nanochannel geometry were also found. Especially, the temperature dependence of becomes very small just below and shows a shoulder at lower temperatures. This anomaly has not been observed in He adsorbed in wider pores or on flat surfaces, so that it is considered to be characteristic of He films confined in narrow channels with a diameter of a few nm.

  13. Direct mapping of 19F in 19FDG-6P in brain tissue at subcellular resolution using soft X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitry-Yamate, C.; Gianoncelli, A.; Kourousias, G.; Kaulich, B.; Lepore, M.; Gruetter, R.; Kiskinova, M.

    2013-10-01

    Low energy x-ray fluorescence (LEXRF) detection was optimized for imaging cerebral glucose metabolism by mapping the fluorine LEXRF signal of 19F in 19FDG, trapped as intracellular 19F-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate (19FDG-6P) at 1μm spatial resolution from 3μm thick brain slices. 19FDG metabolism was evaluated in brain structures closely resembling the general cerebral cytoarchitecture following formalin fixation of brain slices and their inclusion in an epon matrix. 2-dimensional distribution maps of 19FDG-6P were placed in a cytoarchitectural and morphological context by simultaneous LEXRF mapping of N and O, and scanning transmission x-ray (STXM) imaging. A disproportionately high uptake and metabolism of glucose was found in neuropil relative to intracellular domains of the cell body of hypothalamic neurons, showing directly that neurons, like glial cells, also metabolize glucose. As 19F-deoxyglucose-6P is structurally identical to 18F-deoxyglucose-6P, LEXRF of subcellular 19F provides a link to in vivo 18FDG PET, forming a novel basis for understanding the physiological mechanisms underlying the 18FDG PET image, and the contribution of neurons and glia to the PET signal.

  14. NMR relaxation of the orientation of single segments in semiflexible dendrimers

    SciTech Connect

    Markelov, Denis A. Gotlib, Yuli Ya.; Dolgushev, Maxim; Blumen, Alexander

    2014-06-28

    We study the orientational properties of labeled segments in semiflexible dendrimers making use of the viscoelastic approach of Dolgushev and Blumen [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 044905 (2009)]. We focus on the segmental orientational autocorrelation functions (ACFs), which are fundamental for the frequency-dependent spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1}(ω). We show that semiflexibility leads to an increase of the contribution of large-scale motions to the ACF. This fact influences the position of the maxima of the [1/T{sub 1}]-functions. Thus, going from outer to inner segments, the maxima shift to lower frequencies. Remarkably, this feature is not obtained in the classical bead-spring model of flexible dendrimers, although many experiments on dendrimers manifest such a behavior.

  15. Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion investigations of water retention mechanism by cellulose ethers in mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Patural, Laetitia; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Govin, Alexandre; Grosseau, Philippe; Ruot, Bertrand; Deves, Olivier

    2012-10-15

    We show how nuclear magnetic spin-lattice relaxation dispersion of proton-water (NMRD) can be used to elucidate the effect of cellulose ethers on water retention and hydration delay of freshly-mixed white cement pastes. NMRD is useful to determine the surface diffusion coefficient of water, the specific area and the hydration kinetics of the cement-based material. In spite of modifications of the solution's viscosity, we show that the cellulosic derivatives do not modify the surface diffusion coefficient of water. Thus, the mobility of water present inside the medium is not affected by the presence of polymer. However, these admixtures modify significantly the surface fraction of mobile water molecules transiently present at solid surfaces. This quantity measured, for the first time, for all admixed cement pastes is thus relevant to explain the water retention mechanism.

  16. Characterisation of erythrocyte transmembrane exchange of trifluoroacetate using 19F-NMR: evidence for transport via the monocarboxylate transporter.

    PubMed

    Xu, A S; Kuchel, P W

    1993-07-25

    The transport of trifluoroacetate (TFA) and difluorophosphate (DFP) into and out of human and sheep erythrocytes was measured using 19F-NMR. The pathways for the transport in human erythrocytes were characterised by differentiating between the transport inhibition caused by different reagents. (1) Pre-treatment of human erythrocytes with N-ethylmaleimide (10 mM) caused a decrease of the membrane-permeability coefficients for TFA influx and efflux to 0.74 +/- 0.05 and 0.83 +/- 0.09-times, respectively, of those determined in the absence of inhibition. Concomitantly there was no apparent effect on the band-3-mediated transport of DFP. Thus, the decrease of the permeability of TFA is consistent with the inhibition being that of the monocarboxylate transporter. (2) Inhibition of TFA and DFP exchange was also seen in human erythrocytes treated with p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonate (pCMBS). The extent of inhibition reached a maximum value for the pCMBS concentrations beyond which further inhibition was not achieved and there was substantial residual exchange of the two solutes. (3) Residual flux of TFA was found in the presence of high concentrations of the inhibitors, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (> or = 4 mM) or 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (> or = 1 mM) when each compound was used alone. (4) Complete inhibition of TFA uptake was obtained when human erythrocytes were treated with both alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (4 mM) and a stilbene disulfonate. It was, therefore, concluded that simple diffusion of TFA via the lipid bilayer was negligible in human erythrocytes and that incomplete inhibition of the monocarboxylate transporter occurred when the compounds were used alone.

  17. Mechanisms of relaxation and spin decoherence in nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tol, Johan

    Relaxation in spin systems is of great interest with respect to various possible applications like quantum information processing and storage, spintronics, and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The implementation of high frequencies and fields is crucial in the study of systems with large zero-field splitting or large interactions, as for example molecular magnets and low dimensional magnetic materials. Here we will focus on the implementation of pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (ERP) at multiple frequencies of 10, 95, 120, 240, and 336 GHz, and the relaxation and decoherence processes as a function of magnetic field and temperature. Firstly, at higher frequencies the direct single-phonon spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) is considerably enhanced, and will more often than not be the dominant relaxation mechanism at low temperatures, and can be much faster than at lower fields and frequencies. In principle the measurement of the SLR rates as a function of the frequency provides a means to map the phonon density of states. Secondly, the high electron spin polarization at high fields has a strong influence on the spin fluctuations in relatively concentrated spin systems, and the contribution of the electron-electron dipolar interactions to the coherence rate can be partially quenched at low temperatures. This not only allows the study of relatively concentrated spin systems by pulsed EPR (as for example magnetic nanoparticles and molecular magnets), it enables the separation of the contribution of the fluctuations of the electron spin system from other decoherence mechanisms. Besides choice of temperature and field, several strategies in sample design, pulse sequences, or clock transitions can be employed to extend the coherence time in nanomagnets. A review will be given of the decoherence mechanisms with an attempt at a quantitative comparison of experimental rates with theory.

  18. Calculation of vibrational branching ratios and hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F and its suitability for laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Yin, Yanning; Wei, Bin; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    More recently, laser cooling of the diatomic radical magnesium monofluoride (24Mg19F ) is being experimentally preformed [Appl. Phys. Express 8, 092701 (2015), 10.7567/APEX.8.092701 and Opt. Express 22, 28645 (2014), 10.1364/OE.22.028645] and was also studied theoretically [Phys. Rev. A 91, 042511 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.042511]. However, some important problems still remain unsolved, so, in our paper, we perform further theoretical study for the feasibility of laser cooling and trapping the 24Mg19F molecule. At first, the highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors of the main transitions are verified by the closed-form approximation, Morse approximation, and Rydberg-Klein-Rees inversion methods, respectively. Afterwards, we investigate the lower X 2Σ1/2 + hyperfine manifolds using a quantum effective Hamiltonian approach and obtain the zero-field hyperfine spectrum with an accuracy of less than 30 kHz ˜5 μ K compared with the experimental results, and then find out that one cooling beam and one or two repumping beams with their first-order sidebands are enough to implement an efficient laser slowing and cooling of 24Mg19F . Meanwhile, we also calculate the accurate hyperfine structure magnetic g factors of the rotational state (X 2Σ1/2 +,N =1 ) and briefly discuss the influence of the external fields on the hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F as well as its possibility of preparing three-dimensional magneto-optical trapping. Finally we give an explanation for the difference between the Stark and Zeeman effects from the perspective of parity and time reversal symmetry. Our study shows that, besides appropriate excitation wavelengths, the short lifetime for the first excited state A 2Π1 /2 , and lighter mass, the 24Mg19F radical could be a good candidate molecule amenable to laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping.

  19. Effects of spin-lock field direction on the quantitative measurement of spin-lattice relaxation time constant in the rotating frame (T1ρ) in a clinical MRI system

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Seonghwan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether the direction of spin-lock field, either parallel or antiparallel to the rotating magnetization, has any effect on the spin-lock MRI signal and further on the quantitative measurement of T1ρ, in a clinical 3 T MRI system. Methods: The effects of inverted spin-lock field direction were investigated by acquiring a series of spin-lock MRI signals for an American College of Radiology MRI phantom, while the spin-lock field direction was switched between the parallel and antiparallel directions. The acquisition was performed for different spin-locking methods (i.e., for the single- and dual-field spin-locking methods) and for different levels of clinically feasible spin-lock field strength, ranging from 100 to 500 Hz, while the spin-lock duration was varied in the range from 0 to 100 ms. Results: When the spin-lock field was inverted into the antiparallel direction, the rate of MRI signal decay was altered and the T1ρ value, when compared to the value for the parallel field, was clearly different. Different degrees of such direction-dependency were observed for different spin-lock field strengths. In addition, the dependency was much smaller when the parallel and the antiparallel fields are mixed together in the dual-field method. Conclusions: The spin-lock field direction could impact the MRI signal and further the T1ρ measurement in a clinical MRI system.

  20. Natural relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by natural inflation, we propose a relaxation mechanism consistent with inflationary cosmology that explains the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and Planck scale. This scenario is based on a selection mechanism that identifies the low-scale dynamics as the one that is screened from UV physics. The scenario also predicts the near-criticality and metastability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum state, explaining the Higgs boson mass observed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Once Majorana right-handed neutrinos are introduced to provide a viable reheating channel, our framework yields a corresponding mass scale that allows for the seesaw mechanism as well as for standard thermal leptogenesis. We argue that considering singlet scalar dark matter extensions of the proposed scenario could solve the vacuum stability problem and discuss how the cosmological constant problem is possibly addressed.

  1. (19)F NMR screening of unrelated antimicrobial peptides shows that membrane interactions are largely governed by lipids.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Sergii; Glaser, Ralf W; Sachse, Carsten; Salgado, Jesús; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2014-09-01

    Many amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides permeabilize bacterial membranes via successive steps of binding, re-alignment and/or oligomerization. Here, we have systematically compared the lipid interactions of two structurally unrelated peptides: the cyclic β-pleated gramicidin S (GS), and the α-helical PGLa. (19)F NMR was used to screen their molecular alignment in various model membranes over a wide range of temperatures. Both peptides were found to respond to the phase state and composition of these different samples in a similar way. In phosphatidylcholines, both peptides first bind to the bilayer surface. Above a certain threshold concentration they can re-align and immerse more deeply into the hydrophobic core, which presumably involves oligomerization. Re-alignment is most favorable around the lipid chain melting temperature, and also promoted by decreasing bilayer thickness. The presence of anionic lipids has no influence in fluid membranes, but in the gel phase the alignment states are more complex. Unsaturated acyl chains and other lipids with intrinsic negative curvature prevent re-alignment, hence GS and PGLa do not insert into mixtures resembling bacterial membranes, nor into bacterial lipid extracts. Cholesterol, which is present in high concentrations in animal membranes, even leads to an expulsion of the peptides from the bilayer and prevents their binding altogether. However, a very low cholesterol content of 10% was found to promote binding and re-alignment of both peptides. Overall, these findings show that the ability of amphiphilic peptides to re-align and immerse into a membrane is determined by the physico-chemical properties of the lipids, such as spontaneous curvature. This idea is reinforced by the remarkably similar behavior observed here for two structurally unrelated molecules (with different conformation, size, shape, charge), which further suggests that their activity at the membrane level is largely governed by the properties of the

  2. Hydration water dynamics in biopolymers from NMR relaxation in the rotating frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blicharska, Barbara; Peemoeller, Hartwig; Witek, Magdalena

    2010-12-01

    Assuming dipole-dipole interaction as the dominant relaxation mechanism of protons of water molecules adsorbed onto macromolecule (biopolymer) surfaces we have been able to model the dependences of relaxation rates on temperature and frequency. For adsorbed water molecules the correlation times are of the order of 10 -5 s, for which the dispersion region of spin-lattice relaxation rates in the rotating frame R1ρ = 1/ T1ρ appears over a range of easily accessible B1 values. Measurements of T1ρ at constant temperature and different B1 values then give the "dispersion profiles" for biopolymers. Fitting a theoretical relaxation model to these profiles allows for the estimation of correlation times. This way of obtaining the correlation time is easier and faster than approaches involving measurements of the temperature dependence of R1 = 1/ T1. The T1ρ dispersion approach, as a tool for molecular dynamics study, has been demonstrated for several hydrated biopolymer systems including crystalline cellulose, starch of different origins (potato, corn, oat, wheat), paper (modern, old) and lyophilized proteins (albumin, lysozyme).

  3. Spin dynamics simulation of electron spin relaxation in Ni{sup 2+}(aq)

    SciTech Connect

    Rantaharju, Jyrki Mareš, Jiří Vaara, Juha

    2014-07-07

    The ability to quantitatively predict and analyze the rate of electron spin relaxation of open-shell systems is important for electron paramagnetic resonance and paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. We present a combined molecular dynamics (MD), quantum chemistry (QC), and spin dynamics simulation method for calculating such spin relaxation rates. The method is based on the sampling of a MD trajectory by QC calculations, to produce instantaneous parameters of the spin Hamiltonian used, in turn, to numerically solve the Liouville-von Neumann equation for the time evolution of the spin density matrix. We demonstrate the approach by simulating the relaxation of electron spin in an aqueous solution of Ni{sup 2+} ion. The spin-lattice (T{sub 1}) and spin-spin (T{sub 2}) relaxation rates are extracted directly from the simulations of the time dependence of the longitudinal and transverse magnetization, respectively. Good agreement with the available, indirectly obtained experimental data is obtained by our method.

  4. Determining diffusion coefficients of ionic liquids by means of field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Meier, R; Rachocki, A; Korpała, A; Singh, R K; Rössler, E A

    2014-06-28

    Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FC NMR) relaxation studies are reported for three ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMIM-SCN, 220-258 K), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM-BF4, 243-318 K), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF6, 258-323 K). The dispersion of (1)H spin-lattice relaxation rate R1(ω) is measured in the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz, and the studies are complemented by (19)F spin-lattice relaxation measurements on BMIM-PF6 in the corresponding frequency range. From the (1)H relaxation results self-diffusion coefficients for the cation in EMIM-SCN, BMIM-BF4, and BMIM-PF6 are determined. This is done by performing an analysis considering all relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation contributions to the (1)H spin-lattice relaxation as well as by benefiting from the universal low-frequency dispersion law characteristic of Fickian diffusion which yields, at low frequencies, a linear dependence of R1 on square root of frequency. From the (19)F relaxation both anion and cation diffusion coefficients are determined for BMIM-PF6. The diffusion coefficients obtained from FC NMR relaxometry are in good agreement with results reported from pulsed- field-gradient NMR. This shows that NMR relaxometry can be considered as an alternative route of determining diffusion coefficients of both cations and anions in ionic liquids.

  5. γ-(S)-Trifluoromethyl proline: evaluation as a structural substitute of proline for solid state (19)F-NMR peptide studies.

    PubMed

    Kubyshkin, Vladimir; Afonin, Sergii; Kara, Sezgin; Budisa, Nediljko; Mykhailiuk, Pavel K; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-03-21

    γ-(4S)-Trifluoromethyl proline was synthesised according to a modified literature protocol with improved yield on a multigram scale. Conformational properties of the amide bond formed by the amino acid were characterised using N-acetyl methyl ester model. The amide populations (s-trans vs. s-cis) and thermodynamic parameters of the isomerization were found to be similar to the corresponding values for intact proline. Therefore, the γ-trifluoromethyl proline was suggested as a structurally low-disturbing proline substitution in peptides for their structural studies by (19)F-NMR. Indeed, the exchange of native proline for γ-trifluoromethyl proline in the peptide antibiotic gramicidin S was shown to preserve the overall amphipathic peptide structure. The utility of the amino acid as a selective (19)F-NMR label was demonstrated by observing the re-alignment of the labelled gramicidin S in oriented lipid bilayers.

  6. Simultaneous pressure and /sup 19/F NMR pH measurements of smooth muscle cells of intact hog carotid arteries at rest and during contractions with norepinephrine

    SciTech Connect

    Grieder, T.A.; Evans, C.A.; Greenberg, S.S.; Diecke, F.P.J.

    1988-01-01

    Using /sup 19/F NMR we have measured the intracellular pH of the vascular smooth muscle cells of hog carotid arteries at rest and during contractions induced with norepinephrine. Experiments were performed on single, intact arteries closed at both ends, superfused from the lumen and loaded with the /sup 19/F NMR pH indicator ..cap alpha..-difluoromethylalanine. At rest, luminal pressure was maintained at 100 +/-2 mm Hg and intracellular pH was 7.12 +/- 0.04. Contractions elicited with 10/sup -5/ M norepinephrine were associated with a pressure increase of 18 +/-6 mm Hg and a decrease in pH of 0.04 +/- 0.02 units.

  7. Nanoscopic yttrium oxide fluorides: non-aqueous fluorolytic sol-gel synthesis and structural insights by 19F and 89Y MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Scholz, G; Dreger, M; Bertram, R; Kemnitz, E

    2015-08-14

    Nanoscopic yttrium acetate fluorides Y(CH(3)COO)(3-z)F(z) and yttrium oxide fluorides YO(3-z)/(2)F(z )were prepared with tunable Y/F molar ratios via the fluorolytic sol-gel route. All samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis and thermal analysis. In addition, local structures of all samples were studied by (19)F MAS, (19)F-(89)Y CP MAS and (1)H-(89)Y CP MAS NMR spectroscopy and the respective chemical shifts are given. For both classes of compounds, only the fluorination using one equivalent of F (z = 1) leads to defined, well crystalline matrices: yttrium acetate fluoride Y(CH(3)COO)(2)F and r-YOF.

  8. 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Perfluorocarbons for the Evaluation of Response to Antibiotic Therapy in a Staphylococcus aureus Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Peter; Ohlsen, Knut

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in recent decades has highlighted the importance of developing new drugs to treat infections. However, in addition to the design of new drugs, the development of accurate preclinical testing methods is essential. In vivo imaging technologies such as bioluminescence imaging (BLI) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are promising approaches. In a previous study, we showed the effectiveness of 19F MRI using perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions for detecting the site of Staphylococcus aureus infection. In the present follow-up study, we investigated the use of this method for in vivo visualization of the effects of antibiotic therapy. Methods/Principal findings Mice were infected with S. aureus Xen29 and treated with 0.9% NaCl solution, vancomycin or linezolid. Mock treatment led to the highest bioluminescence values during infection followed by vancomycin treatment. Counting the number of colony-forming units (cfu) at 7 days post-infection (p.i.) showed the highest bacterial burden for the mock group and the lowest for the linezolid group. Administration of PFCs at day 2 p.i. led to the accumulation of 19F at the rim of the abscess in all mice (in the shape of a hollow sphere), and antibiotic treatment decreased the 19F signal intensity and volume. Linezolid showed the strongest effect. The BLI, cfu, and MRI results were comparable. Conclusions 19F-MRI with PFCs is an effective non-invasive method for assessing the effects of antibiotic therapy in vivo. This method does not depend on pathogen specific markers and can therefore be used to estimate the efficacy of antibacterial therapy against a broad range of clinically relevant pathogens, and to localize sites of infection. PMID:23724049

  9. Determination of magnitudes and relative signs of 1H-19F coupling constants through 1D- and 2D-TOCSY experiments.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Juan F

    2013-12-20

    A novel methodology based on 1D- and 2D-TOCSY experiments is described for a quick and accurate measurement of proton-fluorine coupling constants in fluorinated organic compounds. The magnitude of the (1)H-(19)F coupling was measured from the displacement between the relayed peaks associated with the α or β spin state of the fluorine, and its relative sign was derived from the sense of the displacement.

  10. Self-assembly of flexible β-strands into immobile amyloid-like β-sheets in membranes as revealed by solid-state 19F NMR.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Parvesh; Strandberg, Erik; Heidenreich, Nico; Bürck, Jochen; Fanghänel, Susanne; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-04-18

    The cationic peptide [KIGAKI](3) was designed as an amphiphilic β-strand and serves as a model for β-sheet aggregation in membranes. Here, we have characterized its molecular conformation, membrane alignment, and dynamic behavior using solid-state (19)F NMR. A detailed structure analysis of selectively (19)F-labeled peptides was carried out in oriented DMPC bilayers. It showed a concentration-dependent transition from monomeric β-strands to oligomeric β-sheets. In both states, the rigid (19)F-labeled side chains project straight into the lipid bilayer but they experience very different mobilities. At low peptide-to-lipid ratios ≤1:400, monomeric [KIGAKI](3) swims around freely on the membrane surface and undergoes considerable motional averaging, with essentially uncoupled φ/ψ torsion angles. The flexibility of the peptide backbone in this 2D plane is reminiscent of intrinsically unstructured proteins in 3D. At high concentrations, [KIGAKI](3) self-assembles into immobilized β-sheets, which are untwisted and lie flat on the membrane surface as amyloid-like fibrils. This is the first time the transition of monomeric β-strands into oligomeric β-sheets has been characterized by solid-state NMR in lipid bilayers. It promises to be a valuable approach for studying membrane-induced amyloid formation of many other, clinically relevant peptide systems.

  11. Completion of the Operational Closure of Tank 18F and Tank 19F at the Savannah River Site by Grouting - 13236

    SciTech Connect

    Tisler, Andrew J.

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive waste is stored in underground waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The low-level fraction of the waste is immobilized in a grout waste form, and the high level fraction is disposed of in a glass waste form. Once the waste is removed, the tanks are prepared for closure. Operational closure of the tanks consists of filling with grout for the purpose of chemically stabilizing residual material, filling the tank void space for long-term structural stability, and discouraging future intrusion. Two of the old-style single-shell tanks at the SRS have received regulatory approval confirming waste removal had been completed, and have been stabilized with grout as part of completing operational closure and removal from service. Consistent with the regulatory framework, two types of grout were used for the filling of Tanks 18F and 19F. Reducing grout was used to fill the entire volume of Tanks 18F and 19F (bulk fill grout) and a more flowable grout was used to fill equipment that was left in the tank (equipment fill grout). The reducing grout was added to the tanks using portable grout pumps filled from concrete trucks, and delivered the grout through slick lines to the center riser of each tank. Filling of the two tanks has been completed, and all equipment has been filled. The final capping of riser penetrations brings the operation closure of Tanks 18F and 19F to completion. (authors)

  12. Demystifying fluorine chemical shifts: electronic structure calculations address origins of seemingly anomalous (19)F-NMR spectra of fluorohistidine isomers and analogues.

    PubMed

    Kasireddy, Chandana; Bann, James G; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R

    2015-11-11

    Fluorine NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying biomolecular structure, dynamics, and ligand binding, yet the origins of (19)F chemical shifts are not well understood. Herein, we use electronic structure calculations to describe the changes in (19)F chemical shifts of 2F- and 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon acid titration. While the protonation of the 2F species results in a deshielded chemical shift, protonation of the 4F isomer results in an opposite, shielded chemical shift. The deshielding of 2F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon protonation can be rationalized by concomitant decreases in charge density on fluorine and a reduced dipole moment. These correlations do not hold for 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole, however. Molecular orbital calculations reveal that for the 4F species, there are no lone pair electrons on the fluorine until protonation. Analysis of a series of 4F-imidazole analogues, all with delocalized fluorine electron density, indicates that the deshielding of (19)F chemical shifts through substituent effects correlates with increased C-F bond polarity. In summary, the delocalization of fluorine electrons in the neutral 4F species, with gain of a lone pair upon protonation may help explain the difficulty in developing a predictive framework for fluorine chemical shifts. Ideas debated by chemists over 40 years ago, regarding fluorine's complex electronic effects, are shown to have relevance for understanding and predicting fluorine NMR spectra.

  13. Polarization quantum beat spectroscopy of HCF(A1A"). I. 19F and 1H hyperfine structure and Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haiyan; Ionescu, Ionela; Xin, Ju; Reid, Scott A

    2004-11-08

    To further investigate the (19)F and (1)H nuclear hyperfine structure and Zeeman effect in the simplest singlet carbene, HCF, we recorded polarization quantum beat spectra (QBS) of the pure bending levels 2(0) (n) with n = 0-7 and combination bands 1(0) (1)2(0) (n) with n = 1-6 and 2(0) (n)3(0) (1) with n = 0-3 in the HCF A(1)A(")<--X(1)A(') system. The spectra were measured under jet-cooled conditions using a pulsed discharge source, both at zero field and under application of a weak magnetic field (<30 G). Analysis yielded the nuclear spin-rotation constants C(aa) and weak field Lande g(aa) factors. Consistent with a two-state model, the majority of observed vibrational levels exhibit a linear correlation of C(aa) and g(aa), and our analysis yielded effective (a) hyperfine constants for the (19)F and (1)H nuclei (in MHz) of 728(23) and 55(2), respectively. The latter was determined here owing to the high resolving power of QBS. The vibrational state selectivity of the (19)F hyperfine constants is discussed, and we suggest that the underlying Renner-Teller interaction may play an important role.

  14. Development of cross-linked polystyrene-supported chiral amines featuring a fluorinated linker for gel-phase 19F NMR spectrometry monitoring of reactions.

    PubMed

    Hourdin, Marie; Gouhier, Géraldine; Gautier, Arnaud; Condamine, Eric; Piettre, Serge R

    2005-01-01

    Ten cross-linked polystyrene-supported, protected chiral amines featuring both a spacer, comprising from 5 to 15 atoms, and a fluorinated linker have been successfully prepared. The development of the monitoring technique by gel-phase 19F NMR spectrometry on cross-linked polystyrene derivatives proved to be of high value in four steps of the process, as shown by the comparison of data gathered from both a classic NMR spectrometer and elemental analysis. Gel-phase 19F NMR spectrometry, thus, constitutes a useful technique that complements IR and 13C NMR spectrometries for the qualitative monitoring of reactions. In addition, quantitative determination of the conversion in a given transformation is possible, provided that 19F chemical shifts of the substrate and the product be different enough (Deltadelta>base width), as illustrated by the Mitsunobu coupling process (16-->17). The technique is nondestructive, and the samples used to monitor the reactions may be returned to the reaction medium. Deprotection of the above amines was achieved and furnished eight of the final resins in good to acceptable purity for future applications.

  15. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... level is often dependent on his or her breathing pattern. Therefore, people with chronic lung conditions may ...

  16. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  17. Intrinsic spin and momentum relaxation in organic single-crystalline semiconductors probed by ESR and Hall measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurumi, Junto; Häusermann, Roger; Watanabe, Shun; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    Spin and charge momentum relaxation mechanism has been argued among organic semiconductors with various methods, devices, and materials. However, little is known in organic single-crystalline semiconductors because it has been hard to obtain an ideal organic crystal with an excellent crystallinity and controllability required for accurate measurements. By using more than 1-inch sized single crystals which are fabricated via contentious edge-casting method developed by our group, we have successfully demonstrated a simultaneous determination of spin and momentum relaxation time for gate-induced charges of 3,11-didecyldinaphtho[2,3- d:2',3'- d']benzo[1,2- b:4,5- b']dithiophene, by combining electron spin resonance (ESR) and Hall effect measurements. The obtained temperature dependences of spin and momentum relaxation times are in good agreement in terms of power law with a factor of approximately -2. It is concluded that Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism can be dominant at room temperature regime (200 - 300 K). Probing characteristic time scales such as spin-lattice, spin-spin, and momentum relaxation times, demonstrated in the present work, would be a powerful tool to elucidate fundamental spin and charge transport mechanisms. We acknowledge the New Energy and Industrial Technology Developing Organization (NEDO) for financial support.

  18. Estimation of free copper ion concentrations in blood serum using T1 relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blicharska, Barbara; Witek, Magdalena; Fornal, Maria; MacKay, Alex L.

    2008-09-01

    The water proton relaxation rate constant R1 = 1/ T1 (at 60 MHz) of blood serum is substantially increased by the presence of free Cu 2+ ions at concentrations above normal physiological levels. Addition of chelating agents to serum containing paramagnetic Cu 2+ nulls this effect. This was demonstrated by looking at the effect of adding a chelating agent—D-penicillamine (D-PEN) to CuSO 4 and CuCl 2 aqueous solutions as well as to rabbit blood serum. We propose that the measurement of water proton spin-lattice relaxation rate constants before and after chelation may be used as an alternative approach for monitoring the presence of free copper ions in blood serum. This method may be used in the diagnosis of some diseases (leukaemia, liver diseases and particularly Wilson's disease) because, in contrast to conventional methods like spectrophotometry which records the total number of both bound and free ions, the proton relaxation technique is sensitive solely to free paramagnetic ions dissolved in blood serum. The change in R1 upon chelation was found to be less than 0.06 s -1 for serum from healthy subjects but greater than 0.06 s -1 for serum from untreated Wilson's patients.

  19. 19F solid-state NMR spectroscopic investigation of crystalline and amorphous forms of a selective muscarinic M3 receptor antagonist, in both bulk and pharmaceutical dosage form samples.

    PubMed

    Wenslow, Robert M

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of the following investigation was to display the utility of 19F solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in both distinguishing between solid forms of a selective muscarinic M3 receptor antagonist and characterizing the active pharmaceutical ingredient in low-dose tablets. Ambient- and elevated-temperature solid-state 19F fast (15 kHz) magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments were employed to obtain desired spectral resolution in this system. Ambient sample temperature combined with rotor frequencies of 15 kHz provided adequate 19F peak resolution to successfully distinguish crystalline and amorphous forms in this system. Additionally, elevated-temperature 19F MAS NMR further characterized solid forms through 19F resonance narrowing brought about by the phenomenon of solvent escape. Similar solvent dynamics at elevated temperatures were utilized in combination with ambient-temperature 19F MAS NMR analysis to provide excipient-free spectra to unambiguously identify the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) conversion from crystalline Form I to the amorphous form in low-dose tablets. It is shown that 19F solid-state NMR is exceptionally powerful in distinguishing amorphous and crystalline forms in both bulk and formulation samples.

  20. The effects of bone on proton NMR relaxation times of surrounding liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. A.; Genant, H. K.; Dunham, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary attempts by our group at UCSF to assess fat content of vertebral marrow in the lumbar spine using relaxation time information demonstrated that the presence of trabecular bone affects relaxation times. The objective of this work was a thorough study of the effects of bone on NMR relaxation characteristics of surrounding liquids. Trabecular bone from autopsy specimens was ground up and sifted into a series of powders with graded densities ranging from 0.3 gm/cc to 0.8 gm/cc. Each powder was placed first in n-saline and then in cottonseed oil. With spectroscopy, spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) and effective spin-spin relaxation times (T2*) were measured for each liquid in each bone powder. As bone density and surface to volume ratio increased, T1 decreased faster for saline than for oil. T2* decreased significantly for both water and oil as the surface to volume ratio increased. It was concluded that effects of water on T1 could be explained by a surface interaction at the bone/liquid interface, which restricted rotational and translational motion of nearby molecules. The T1s of oil were not affected since oil molecules are nonpolar, do not participate in significant intermolecular hydrogen bonding, and therefore would not be expected to interact strongly with the bone surface. Effects on T2* could be explained by local magnetic field inhomogeneities created by discontinuous magnetic susceptibility near the bone surface. These preliminary results suggest that water in contact with trabecular bone in vivo will exhibit shortened relaxation times.

  1. Dosimetry of {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir gamma-irradiated agarose gels by proton relaxation time measurement and NMR imaging, in a 0-100 Gy dose range

    SciTech Connect

    Chalansonnet, A.; Briguet, A.; Bonnat, J.L.

    1997-05-01

    Localized irradiation of the skin and subcutaneous tissues with large single doses of gamma rays can induce immediate effects characterized by erythema, desquamation, and necrosis. Correlations between the evolution of the lesions and dosimetry studies have to be established by biophysical methods. NMR studies of the effects of an irradiated Fricke solution might be a means of controlling the delivered irradiation doses. After exposition to ionizing radiations, ferrous ions are transformed into ferric ions. Both are paramagnetic ions, and proton spin-lattice relaxation is accelerated depending on the oxidation reaction. In this study, solution of ammonium ferrous sulfate in an acid environment was incorporated into a gelling substance made with agarose, so that T{sub 1} weighted image contrast could be used to detect ferric ion formation. Experiments with {sup 192}Ir and {sup 90}Co gamma rays with doses in the 0 to 100 Gy range were conducted with Fe{sup 2+} concentrations of 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 mM in a gelling substance containing 4% agarose. A relationship was established between the amount of Fe{sup 3+} created and the spin-lattice proton relaxation rate, which led to a straightforward dose-effect relation. The use of such high doses allowed us to reproduce realistic conditions of accidental overexposure. A linear relationship was obtained between the doses absorbed and the NMR parameters measured (T{sub 1} and relative image intensity). 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Updated THM Astrophysical Factor of the 19F(p, α)16O Reaction and Influence of New Direct Data at Astrophysical Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, M.; Palmerini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Lombardo, I.; Trippella, O.

    2015-06-01

    Fluorine nucleosynthesis represents one of the most intriguing open questions in nuclear astrophysics. It has triggered new measurements which may modify the presently accepted paradigm of fluorine production and establish fluorine as an accurate probe of the inner layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Both direct and indirect measurements have attempted to improve the recommended extrapolation to astrophysical energies, showing no resonances. In this work, we will demonstrate that the interplay between direct and indirect techniques represents the most suitable approach to attain the required accuracy for the astrophysical factor at low energies, {{E}c.m.}≲ 300 keV, which is of interest for fluorine nucleosynthesis in AGB stars. We will use the recently measured direct 19F{{(p,α )}16}O astrophysical factor in the 600 keV≲ {{E}c.m.}≲ 800 keV energy interval to renormalize the existing Trojan Horse Method (THM) data spanning the astrophysical energies, accounting for all identified sources of uncertainty. This has a twofold impact on nuclear astrophysics. It shows the robustness of the THM approach even in the case of direct data of questionable quality, as normalization is extended over a broad range, minimizing systematic effects. Moreover, it allows us to obtain more accurate resonance data at astrophysical energies, thanks to the improved 19F{{(p,α )}16}O direct data. Finally, the present work strongly calls for more accurate direct data at low energies, so that we can obtain a better fitting of the direct reaction mechanism contributing to the 19F{{(p,α )}16}O astrophysical factor. Indeed, this work points out that the major source of uncertainty affecting the low-energy S(E) factor is the estimate of the non-resonant contribution, as the dominant role of the 113 keV resonance is now well established.

  3. NMR shielding and spin–rotation constants of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B.

    2015-12-31

    This presentation demonstrates the relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants and shielding spans of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules. The results are obtained from calculations performed using density functional theory (non-relativistic and four-component relativistic) and coupled-cluster calculations. The spin-rotation constants are compared with available experimental values. In most of the molecules studied, relativistic effects make an order of magnitude difference on the NMR absolute shielding constants.

  4. Fluorescence and 19F NMR evidence that phenylalanine, 3-L-fluorophenylalanine and 4-L-fluorophenylalanine bind to the L-leucine specific receptor of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Luck, L. A.; Johnson, C.

    2000-01-01

    The binding capacity of the L-leucine receptor from Escherichia coli was measured with L-phenylalanine and 4-fluoro-L-phenylalanine as substrates by fluorescence. The apparent dissociation constants (KD) for L-leucine, L-phenylalanine, and 4-fluoro-L-phenylalanine are 0.40, 0.18, and 0.26 respectively. 19F NMR data show protein-induced shifts for the 4-fluoro-L-phenylalanine peak and 3-fluoro-L-phenylalanine when receptor is present. Evidence points to the binding of only the L-isomers of these fluorine analogs. PMID:11206079

  5. Annual Report FY2013-- A Kinematically Complete, Interdisciplinary, and Co-Institutional Measurement of the 19F(α,n) Cross-section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, William A; Smith, Michael Scott; Clement, Ryan; Tan, Wanpeng; Stech, Ed; Cizewski, J A; Febbraro, Michael; Madurga Flores, Miguel

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this proposal is to enable neutron detection for precision Non-Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. Neutrons are continuously generated from a UFx matrix in a container or sample as a result of the interaction of alpha particles from uranium-decay α particles with fluorine nuclei in the matrix. Neutrons from 19F(α,n)22Na were once considered a poorly characterized background for assays of UFx samples via 238U spontaneous fission neutron detection [SMI2010B]. However, the yield of decay-α-driven neutrons is critical for 234,235U LEU and HEU assays, as it can used to determine both the total amount of uranium and the enrichment [BER2010]. This approach can be extremely valuable in a variety of safeguard applications, such as cylinder monitoring in underground uranium storage facilities, nuclear criticality safety studies, nuclear materials accounting, and other nonproliferation applications. The success of neutron-based assays critically depends on an accurate knowledge of the cross section of the (α,n) reaction that generates the neutrons. The 40% uncertainty in the 19F(α,n)22Na cross section currently limits the precision of such assays, and has been identified as a key factor in preventing accurate enrichment determinations [CRO2003]. The need for higher quality cross section data for (α,n) reactions has been a recurring conclusion in reviews of the nuclear data needs to support safeguards. The overarching goal of this project is to enable neutron detection to be used for precision Non- Destructive Assays (NDAs) of actinide-fluoride samples. This will significantly advance safeguards verification at existing declared facilities, nuclear materials accounting, process control, nuclear criticality safety monitoring, and a variety of other nonproliferation applications. To reach this goal, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rutgers University (RU), and the University of Notre

  6. A classical description of relaxation of interacting pairs of unlike spins: Extension to T1 ϱ, T2, and T1 ϱoff, including contact interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konig, Seymour H.

    A novel derivation of the equations that describe the spin-lattice magnetic relaxation of nuclear spin moments, in liquids, resulting from magnetic dipolar interactions with neighboring paramagnetic ions, the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan equations was previously presented (S. H. Koenig, J. Magn. Reson.31, 1 (1978)). The derivation involves a computation of the dissipative energy flow from the nuclear spins to the lattice rather than a computation of the lattice-produced fluctuations of the local field at the nuclear spins. Two advantages accrue: (1) the spectral densities that enter into the relaxation expressions can be directly related to well-defined absorption transitions and relaxation processes of the paramagnetic ions, clarifying the physical processes that produce relaxation, and (2) the derivation can be readily generalized to paramagnetic ions with arbitrary spin Hamiltonian, and to deviations of their susceptibility from Curie law behavior. The derivation is extended to include relaxation in liquids in the rotating frame: the on resonance T1 ϱ which reduces to T2 for small amplitude radiofrequency fields; and the off resonance T1 ϱoff, which reduces to T1. The results, which are given for contact as well as dipolar interactions, also describe relaxation of 13C and 15N nuclei by protons under conditions of proton-decoupling, a situation becoming increasingly important in the study of biological macromolecules by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy.

  7. Visualization of Abscess Formation in a Murine Thigh Infection Model of Staphylococcus aureus by 19F-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Stefan; Basse-Lüsebrink, Thomas; Haddad, Daniel; Ohlsen, Knut; Jakob, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background During the last years, 19F-MRI and perfluorocarbon nanoemulsion (PFC) emerged as a powerful contrast agent based MRI methodology to track cells and to visualize inflammation. We applied this new modality to visualize deep tissue abscesses during acute and chronic phase of inflammation caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, a murine thigh infection model was used to induce abscess formation and PFC or CLIO (cross linked ironoxides) was administered during acute or chronic phase of inflammation. 24 h after inoculation, the contrast agent accumulation was imaged at the site of infection by MRI. Measurements revealed a strong accumulation of PFC at the abscess rim at acute and chronic phase of infection. The pattern was similar to CLIO accumulation at chronic phase and formed a hollow sphere around the edema area. Histology revealed strong influx of neutrophils at the site of infection and to a smaller extend macrophages during acute phase and strong influx of macrophages at chronic phase of inflammation. Conclusion and Significance We introduce 19F-MRI in combination with PFC nanoemulsions as a new platform to visualize abscess formation in a murine thigh infection model of S. aureus. The possibility to track immune cells in vivo by this modality offers new opportunities to investigate host immune response, the efficacy of antibacterial therapies and the influence of virulence factors for pathogenesis. PMID:21455319

  8. Determination of perfluorinated surfactants in surface water samples by two independent analytical techniques: liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and 19F NMR.

    PubMed

    Moody, C A; Kwan, W C; Martin, J W; Muir, D C; Mabury, S A

    2001-05-15

    Perfluorinated surfactants are an important class of specialty chemicals that have received recent attention as a result of their persistence in the environment. Two analytical methods for the determination of perfluorinated surfactants in aqueous samples were developed in order to investigate a spill of 22000 L of fire retardant foam containing perfluorinated surfactants into Etobicoke Creek (Toronto, Ontario). With the first method, aliquots of surface water (0.2-200 mL) were preconcentrated using solid-phase extraction. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was employed for identification and quantification of each perfluorinated surfactant. Total perfluorinated surfactant concentrations in surface water samples ranged from 0.011 to 2270 microg/L, and perfluorooctanesulfonate was the predominant surfactant observed. Interestingly, perfluorooctanoate was detected in surface water sampled upstream of the spill. A second method employing 19F NMR was developed for the determination of total perfluorinated surfactant concentrations in aqueous samples (2-100 mL). By 19F NMR, the surface water concentrations ranged from nondetect (method detection limit, 10 microg/L for a 100-mL sample) to 17000 microg/L. These methods permit comprehensive evaluation of aqueous samples for the presence of perfluorinated surfactants and have applicability to other sample matrixes.

  9. Alignment of druglike compounds in lipid bilayers analyzed by solid-state (19)F-NMR and molecular dynamics, based on dipolar couplings of adjacent CF3 groups.

    PubMed

    Dürr, Ulrich H N; Afonin, Sergii; Hoff, Barbara; de Luca, Giuseppina; Emsley, James W; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-04-26

    Solid-state (19)F-NMR spectroscopy is frequently used to analyze the structure and dynamics of lipophilic drugs and peptides embedded in biomembranes. The homonuclear dipolar couplings of trifluoromethyl (CF3) labels can provide valuable parameters such as orientational constraints and/or distances. To characterize the complex dipolar patterns of multiple (19)F spin interactions, three different model compounds carrying two CF3 groups in meta-position on a phenyl ring were incorporated in macroscopically aligned DMPC bilayers. The dipolar patterns obtained with the CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) multipulse sequence were analyzed to yield simultaneously the intra-CF3 and intergroup dipolar coupling values. The fluorine-fluorine distances were predicted by a density functional calculation, and the alignment of the labeled molecular segment could be determined from these distances and the dipolar coupling values. The different compounds were found to align in the lipid bilayer according to their amphiphilic properties, though with a weak anisotropic preference that is typical of solutes in liquid crystals. The residual dipolar couplings were used to calculate Saupe order parameters. For the least complex molecule, (CF3)2-BA, an orientational probability function for the solute in the lipid matrix could be derived. The overall description of how (CF3)2-BA is embedded in the bilayer was independently assessed by molecular dynamics simulations, and compared in structural and dynamical terms with the results of the NMR experiments.

  10. Using "On/Off" (19)F NMR/Magnetic Resonance Imaging Signals to Sense Tyrosine Kinase/Phosphatase Activity in Vitro and in Cell Lysates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Sun, Hongbin; Hu, Chen; Li, Gongyu; Liu, Xiaomei; Chen, Peiyao; Cui, Yusi; Liu, Jing; Wang, Junfeng; Liang, Gaolin

    2016-03-15

    Tyrosine kinase and phosphatase are two important, antagonistic enzymes in organisms. Development of noninvasive approach for sensing their activity with high spatial and temporal resolution remains challenging. Herein, we rationally designed a hydrogelator Nap-Phe-Phe(CF3)-Glu-Tyr-Ile-OH (1a) whose supramolecular hydrogel (i.e., Gel 1a) can be subjected to tyrosine kinase-directed disassembly, and its phosphate precursor Nap-Phe-Phe(CF3)-Glu-Tyr(H2PO3)-Ile-OH (1b), which can be subjected to alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-instructed self-assembly to form supramolecular hydrogel Gel 1b, respectively. Mechanic properties and internal fibrous networks of the hydrogels were characterized with rheology and cryo transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Disassembly/self-assembly of their corresponding supramolecular hydrogels conferring respective "On/Off" (19)F NMR/MRI signals were employed to sense the activity of these two important enzymes in vitro and in cell lysates for the first time. We anticipate that our new (19)F NMR/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method would facilitate pharmaceutical researchers to screen new inhibitors for these two enzymes without steric hindrance.

  11. Analysis of the 19F(p, α0)16O reaction at low energies and the spectroscopy of 20Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, I.; Dell'Aquila, D.; Campajola, L.; Rosato, E.; Spadaccini, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2013-12-01

    The investigation of the 19F(p, α0) reaction at low bombarding energies allows the study of the spectroscopy of the 20Ne compound nucleus in an energy region where the existence of quartet excitations has been suggested in the literature. Moreover, this reaction plays a major role in the fourth branch of the CNO cycle since it is relevant for the correct description of the hydrogen burning of fluorine in stars. For these reasons, we decided to investigate the 19F(p, α0) reaction in the Ep ≃ 0.6-1 MeV energy range. The analysis of angular distributions and excitation functions allows one to improve the 20Ne spectroscopy in an excitation energy region where some ambiguities concerning Jπ assignments exist in the literature. In particular, the present data suggest a Jπ = 0+ assignment to the Ex = 13.642 MeV resonance. For this state, both partial and reduced widths for the α0 channel have been deduced. The trend of the astrophysical factor has been obtained from the integrated cross section. A comparison of the present results with data reported in the literature is also discussed.

  12. (19) F-NMR Reveals the Role of Mobile Loops in Product and Inhibitor Binding by the São Paulo Metallo-β-Lactamase.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Martine I; Hinchliffe, Philip; Brem, Jürgen; Macsics, Robert; Pfeffer, Inga; Makena, Anne; Umland, Klaus-Daniel; Rydzik, Anna M; Li, Guo-Bo; Spencer, James; Claridge, Timothy D W; Schofield, Christopher J

    2017-03-27

    Resistance to β-lactam antibiotics mediated by metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) is a growing problem. We describe the use of protein-observe (19) F-NMR (PrOF NMR) to study the dynamics of the São Paulo MBL (SPM-1) from β-lactam-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cysteinyl variants on the α3 and L3 regions, which flank the di-Zn(II) active site, were selectively (19) F-labeled using 3-bromo-1,1,1-trifluoroacetone. The PrOF NMR results reveal roles for the mobile α3 and L3 regions in the binding of both inhibitors and hydrolyzed β-lactam products to SPM-1. These results have implications for the mechanisms and inhibition of MBLs by β-lactams and non-β-lactams and illustrate the utility of PrOF NMR for efficiently analyzing metal chelation, identifying new binding modes, and studying protein binding from a mixture of equilibrating isomers.

  13. Free variable selection QSPR study to predict (19)F chemical shifts of some fluorinated organic compounds using Random Forest and RBF-PLS methods.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Nasser

    2016-04-05

    In this work, two new and powerful chemometrics methods are applied for the modeling and prediction of the (19)F chemical shift values of some fluorinated organic compounds. The radial basis function-partial least square (RBF-PLS) and random forest (RF) are employed to construct the models to predict the (19)F chemical shifts. In this study, we didn't used from any variable selection method and RF method can be used as variable selection and modeling technique. Effects of the important parameters affecting the ability of the RF prediction power such as the number of trees (nt) and the number of randomly selected variables to split each node (m) were investigated. The root-mean-square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for the training set and the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 44.70, 23.86, 29.77, and 23.69, respectively. Also, the correlation coefficients of the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 0.8684 and 0.9313, respectively. The results obtained reveal that the RF model can be used as a powerful chemometrics tool for the quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies.

  14. Distinguishing magnetic vs. quadrupolar relaxation in b-NMR using 8Li and 9Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzichristos, A.; McFadden, R. M. L.; Karner, V. L.; Cortie, D. L.; Fang, A.; Levy, C. D. P.; Macfarlane, W. A.; Morris, G. D.; Pearson, M. R.; Salman, Z.; Kiefl, R. F.

    2016-09-01

    Beta-detected NMR is a powerful technique in condensed matter physics. It uses the parity violation of beta decay to detect the NMR signal from a beam of highly polarized radionuclides implanted in a sample material. Spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) is studied by monitoring the rate with which the asymmetry between the beta counts in two opposing detectors is lost. Unlike classical NMR, b-NMR can study thin films and near-surface effects. The most common b-NMR isotope at TRIUMF is 8Li, which has a quadrupole moment, thus it is sensitive to both magnetic fields and electric field gradients. A challenge with 8Li b-NMR is identifying the predominant mechanism of SLR in a given sample. It is possible to distinguish between SLR mechanisms by varying the probe isotope. For two isotopes with different nuclear moments, the ratio of SLR rates should be different in the limits of either pure magnetic or quadrupolar relaxation. This method has been used in classical NMR and we report its first application to b-NMR. We measured the SLR rates for 8Li and 8Li in Pt foil and SrTiO3. Pt is a test case for pure magnetic relaxation. SrTiO3 is a non-magnetic insulator, but the source of its relaxation is not well understood. Here we show that its relaxation is mainly quadrupolar. We thank TRIUMF's CMMS for their technical support. This work was supported by: NSERC Discovery Grants to R.F.K. and W.A.M.; and IsoSiM fellowships to A.C. and R.M.L.M.

  15. Latent Period of Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Irisawa, H

    1961-10-27

    The latent period of relaxation of molluscan myocardium due to anodal current is much longer than that of contraction. Although the rate and the grade of relaxation are intimately related to both the stimulus condition and the muscle tension, the latent period of relaxation remains constant, except when the temperature of the bathing fluid is changed.

  16. (13)C and (19)F solid-state NMR and X-ray crystallographic study of halogen-bonded frameworks featuring nitrogen-containing heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Szell, Patrick M J; Gabriel, Shaina A; Gill, Russell D D; Wan, Shirley Y H; Gabidullin, Bulat; Bryce, David L

    2017-03-01

    Halogen bonding is a noncovalent interaction between the electrophilic region of a halogen (σ-hole) and an electron donor. We report a crystallographic and structural analysis of halogen-bonded compounds by applying a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD) and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) approach. Single-crystal XRD was first used to characterize the halogen-bonded cocrystals formed between two fluorinated halogen-bond donors (1,4-diiodotetrafluorobenzene and 1,3,5-trifluoro-2,4,6-triiodobenzene) and several nitrogen-containing heterocycles (acridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine, and hexamethylenetetramine). New structures are reported for the following three cocrystals, all in the P21/c space group: acridine-1,3,5-trifluoro-2,4,6-triiodobenzene (1/1), C6F3I3·C13H9N, 1,10-phenanthroline-1,3,5-trifluoro-2,4,6-triiodobenzene (1/1), C6F3I3·C12H8N2, and 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine-1,3,5-trifluoro-2,4,6-triiodobenzene (1/1), C6F3I3·C8H12N2. (13)C and (19)F solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR is shown to be a convenient method to characterize the structural features of the halogen-bond donor and acceptor, with chemical shifts attributable to cocrystal formation observed in the spectra of both nuclides. Cross polarization (CP) from (19)F to (13)C results in improved spectral sensitivity in characterizing the perfluorinated halogen-bond donor when compared to conventional (1)H CP. Gauge-including projector-augmented wave density functional theory (GIPAW DFT) calculations of magnetic shielding constants, along with optimization of the XRD structures, provide a final set of structures in best agreement with the experimental (13)C and (19)F chemical shifts. Data for carbons bonded to iodine remain outliers due to well-known relativistic effects.

  17. Analysis of Molecular Interaction of Drugs Within β-Cyclodextrin Cavity by Solution State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Krishnan, Yogeshwaran; Paranjothy, Manikandan; Pal, Samanwita

    2017-03-09

    The prime focus of the present study is to employ NMR relaxation measurement to address the intermolecular interactions as well as motional dynamics of drugs viz., paracetamol and aspirin encapsulated within β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) cavity. In this report we have attempted to demonstrate the applicability of nonselective (R1(ns) ), selective (R1(se)) and bi-selective (R1(bs)) spin-lattice relaxation rates to infer dynamical parameters e.g., molecular rotational correlation times (τc) and cross-relaxation rates (σij) of the encapsulated drugs. Molecular rotational correlation times of the free drugs were calculated using selective relaxation rate in the fast molecular motion time regime ( ωH(2)τc(2)<1 and R1(ns)/R1(se)≈ 1.500), whereas that of the 1:1 complexed drugs were found from the ratio of R1(ns)/R1(se) in the intermediate motion time regime ( ωH(2)τc(2)≈ 1 and R1(ns)/R1(se) ≈ 1.054) and compared with each other to confirm the formation of inclusion complexes. Furthermore the cross-relaxation rates have been used to evaluate the intermolecular proton distances. Also, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to determine the minimum energy geometry of the inclusion complexes and the results compared with experiments. The report thus presents the possibility of utilizing NMR relaxation data, a more cost effective experiments to calculate internuclear distances in case of drug-supramolecule complexes that are generally addressed by extremely time consuming 2D Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement (NOE) based methods. Plausible mode of insertion of drug molecules into the β-CD cavity has also been described based on experimental NMR relaxation data analysis.

  18. Spin relaxation mechanism in silver nanowires covered with MgO protection layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idzuchi, H.; Fukuma, Y.; Wang, L.; Otani, Y.

    2012-07-01

    Spin-flip mechanism in Ag nanowires with MgO surface protection layers has been investigated by nonlocal spin injection using permalloy/Ag lateral spin valves. The spin flip events mediated by surface scattering are effectively suppressed by the MgO capping layer. The spin relaxation process was found to be well described in the framework of Elliott-Yafet mechanism (R. J. Elliott, Phys. Rev. 96, 266 (1954); Y. Yafet, in Solid State Physics, edited by F. Seitz and D. Turnbull (Academic, New York, 1963), pp. 1-98) and then the probabilities of spin-filp scattering for phonon or impurity mediated momentum scattering is precisely determined in the nanowires. The temperature dependent spin-lattice relaxation follows the Bloch-Grüneisen theory (V. F. Bloch, Z. Phys. 59, 208 (1930); V. E. Grüneisen, Ann. Phys. 5, 530 (1933)) and falls on to a universal curve of Ag as in the conduction-electron-spin resonance data for bulk.

  19. Impurities and electron spin relaxations in nanodiamonds studied by multi-frequency electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Franklin; Takahashi, Susumu

    2014-03-01

    Nano-sized diamond or nanodiamond is a fascinating material for potential applications of fluorescence imaging and magnetic sensing of biological systems via nitrogen-vacancy defect centers in diamonds. Sensitivity of the magnetic sensing strongly depends on coupling to surrounding environmental noises, thus understanding of the environment is critical to realize the application. In the present study, we employ multi-frequency (X-band, 115 GHz and 230 GHz) continuous-wave (cw) and pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to investigate impurity contents and spin relaxation properties in various sizes of nanodiamonds. Spectra taken with our home-built 230/115 GHz cw/pulsed ESR spectrometer shows presence of two major impurity contents; single substitutional nitrogen impurities (P1) also common in bulk diamonds and paramagnetic impurities (denoted as X) unique to nanodiamonds. The ESR measurement also shows a strong dependence of the population ratio between P1 and X on particle size. Furthermore, we will discuss the nature of spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of nanodiamonds studied by pulsed ESR measurements at X-band, 115 GHz and 230 GHz.

  20. Higher triplet state of fullerene C{sub 70} revealed by electron spin relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Uvarov, Mikhail N.; Behrends, Jan; Kulik, Leonid V.

    2015-12-28

    Spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1} of photoexcited triplets {sup 3}C{sub 70} in glassy decalin were obtained from electron spin echo inversion recovery dependences. In the range 30–100 K, the temperature dependence of T{sub 1} was fitted by the Arrhenius law with an activation energy of 172 cm{sup −1}. This indicates that the dominant relaxation process of {sup 3}C{sub 70} is described by an Orbach-Aminov mechanism involving the higher triplet state t{sub 2} which lies 172 cm{sup −1} above the lowest triplet state t{sub 1}. Chemical modification of C{sub 70} fullerene not only decreases the intrinsic triplet lifetime by about ten times but also increases T{sub 1} by several orders of magnitude. The reason for this is the presence of a low-lying excited triplet state in {sup 3}C{sub 70} and its absence in triplet C{sub 70} derivatives. The presence of the higher triplet state in C{sub 70} is in good agreement with the previous results from phosphorescence spectroscopy.

  1. Transverse Relaxation and Magnetization Transfer in Skeletal Muscle: Effect of pH

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Elizabeth A.; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Does, Mark D.; Damon, Bruce M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise increases the intracellular T2 (T2,i) of contracting muscles. The mechanism(s) for the T2,i increase have not been fully described, and may include increased intracellular free water and acidification. These changes may alter chemical exchange processes between intracellular free water and proteins. In this study, the hypotheses were tested that 1) pH changes T2,i by affecting the rate of magnetization transfer (MT) between free intracellular water and intracellular proteins and 2) the magnitude of the T2,i effect depends on acquisition mode (localized or non-localized) and echo spacing. Frog gastrocnemius muscles were excised and their intracellular pH was either kept at physiological pH (7.0) or modified to model exercising muscle (pH 6.5). The intracellular transverse relaxation rate (R2,i =1/T2,i) always decreased in the acidic muscles, but the changes were greater when measured using more rapid refocusing rates. The MT rate from the macromolecular proton pool to the free water proton pool, its reverse rate, and the spin-lattice relaxation rate of water decreased in acidic muscles. It is concluded that intracellular acidification alters the R2,i of muscle water in a refocusing rate-dependent manner and that the R2,i changes are correlated with changes in the MT rate between macromolecules and free intracellular water. PMID:19097244

  2. Higher triplet state of fullerene C70 revealed by electron spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, Mikhail N.; Behrends, Jan; Kulik, Leonid V.

    2015-12-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation times T1 of photoexcited triplets 3C70 in glassy decalin were obtained from electron spin echo inversion recovery dependences. In the range 30-100 K, the temperature dependence of T1 was fitted by the Arrhenius law with an activation energy of 172 cm-1. This indicates that the dominant relaxation process of 3C70 is described by an Orbach-Aminov mechanism involving the higher triplet state t2 which lies 172 cm-1 above the lowest triplet state t1. Chemical modification of C70 fullerene not only decreases the intrinsic triplet lifetime by about ten times but also increases T1 by several orders of magnitude. The reason for this is the presence of a low-lying excited triplet state in 3C70 and its absence in triplet C70 derivatives. The presence of the higher triplet state in C70 is in good agreement with the previous results from phosphorescence spectroscopy.

  3. Temperature dependence of proton NMR relaxation times at earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Cervantes, Eduardo; Oomen, Anisha; Krishnan, Anagha; Goyal, Aayush; Lumata, Lloyd

    The theoretical description of relaxation processes for protons, well established and experimentally verified at conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fields, has remained untested at low fields despite significant advances in low field NMR technology. In this study, proton spin-lattice relaxation (T1) times in pure water and water doped with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic agent copper chloride have been measured from 6 to 92oC at earth's magnetic field (1700 Hz). Results show a linear increase of T1 with temperature for each of the samples studied. Increasing the concentration of the copper chloride greatly reduced T1 and reduced dependence on temperature. The consistency of the results with theory is an important confirmation of past results, while the ability of an ultra-low field NMR system to do contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is promising for future applicability to low-cost medical imaging and chemical identification. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  4. Temperature dependence of relaxation times in proton components of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kagayaki; Iwabuchi, Taku; Obara, Makoto; Honda, Masatoshi; Saito, Kensuke; Imai, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    We examined the temperature dependence of relaxation times in proton components of fatty acids in various samples in vitro at 11 tesla as a standard calibration data for quantitative temperature imaging of fat. The spin-lattice relaxation time, T(1), of both the methylene (CH(2)) chain and terminal methyl (CH(3)) was linearly related to temperature (r>0.98, P<0.001) in samples of animal fat. The temperature coefficients for the 2 primary proton components differed significantly; in 5 bovine fat samples, the coefficient at 30 °C was 1.79±0.07 (%/°C) for methylene and 2.98±0.38 (%/°C) for methyl. Numerical simulations based on such a difference demonstrated the possibility of considerable error from inconsistent ratios in fatty acid components when calibrating and estimating temperature. The error reached 3.3 °C per 15 °C in temperature elevation when we used a pure CH(2) signal for calibration and observed the signal with 18% of CH(3) to estimate temperature. These findings suggested that separating the fatty acid components would significantly improve accuracy in quantitative thermometry for fat. Use of the T(1) of CH(2) seems promising in terms of reliability and reproducibility in measuring temperature of fat.

  5. Synthesis, fine structure of 19F NMR and fluorescence of novel amorphous TPA derivatives having perfluorinated cyclopentenyl and benzo[b]thiophene unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bian-Peng; Pang, Mei-Li; Tan, Ting-Feng; Meng, Ji-ben

    2013-04-01

    Three novel triphenylamine (TPA) derivatives having perfluorinated cyclopentenyl and benzo[b]thiophene unit are obtained from 4-bromo-N,N-diphenyl-2-methylbenzo[b]thiophen-5-amine. The new compounds are expected to find their use in thin film devices as charge transport materials and host organic light-emitting materials. It is found that the new compounds show relatively strong fluorescence either in solution or in solid state, and are amorphous due to a special conformation which is elucidated by the fine structure of 19F NMR. Molecular structure and properties of these compounds is characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR (broadband decoupled), ESI-HRMS, elemental analysis and thermal analysis (DSC). Fluorescent quantum yield in solution is measured using 9,10-diphenylanthrancene (DPA) as standard fluorescent substance.

  6. Orientation of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa in lipid membranes determined from 19F-NMR dipolar couplings of 4-CF3-phenylglycine labels.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Ralf W; Sachse, Carsten; Dürr, Ulrich H N; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2004-05-01

    A highly sensitive solid state (19)F-NMR strategy is described to determine the orientation and dynamics of membrane-associated peptides from specific fluorine labels. Several analogues of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa were synthesized with the non-natural amino acid 4-trifluoromethyl-phenylglycine (CF(3)-Phg) at different positions throughout the alpha-helical peptide chain. A simple 1-pulse (19)F experiment allows the simultaneous measurement of both the anisotropic chemical shift and the homonuclear dipolar coupling within the rotating CF(3)-group in a macroscopically oriented membrane sample. The value and sign of the dipolar splitting determines the tilt of the CF(3)-rotational axis, which is rigidly attached to the peptide backbone, with respect to the external magnetic field direction. Using four CF(3)-labeled peptide analogues (with L-CF(3)-Phg at Ile9, Ala10, Ile13, and Ala14) we confirmed that PGLa is aligned at the surface of lipid membranes with its helix axis perpendicular to the bilayer normal at a peptide:lipid ratio of 1:200. We also determined the azimuthal rotation angle of the helix, which agrees well with the orientation expected from its amphiphilic character. Peptide analogues with a D-CF(3)-Phg label resulting from racemization of the amino acid during synthesis were separately collected by HPLC. Their spectra provide additional information about the PGLa structure and orientation but allow only to discriminate qualitatively between multiple solutions. The structural and functional characterization of the individual CF(3)-labeled peptides by circular dichroism and antimicrobial assays showed only small effects for our four substitutions on the hydrophobic face of the helix, but a significant disturbance was observed in a fifth analogue where Ala8 on the hydrophilic face had been replaced. Even though the hydrophobic CF(3)-Phg side chain cannot be utilized in all positions, it allows highly sensitive NMR measurements over a wide range of

  7. Superparamagnetic behaviour and T 1, T 2 relaxivity of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjura Hoque, S.; Srivastava, C.; Venkatesha, N.; Kumar, P. S. Anil; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2013-05-01

    In the present study, ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation followed by calcinations at 473 and 673 K for 4 h. Particle sizes obtained were 4 and 6 nm for the calcination temperatures of 473 and 673 K, respectively. To study the origin of system's low temperature spin dynamic behaviour, temperature dependence of susceptibility ? was investigated as a function of particle size and frequency. Slight increase in the grain size from 4 nm at 473 K to 6 nm at 673 K has led to a peak shift of temperature dependence of susceptibility measured at a constant frequency of 400 Hz. Temperature dependence of ? at different frequencies also resulted in peak shift. Relaxation time dependence of peak temperature obeys a power law, which provides the fitting parameters within the range of superparamagnetic nature of the particles. Further, dependence of relaxation time and peak temperature obeys Vogel-Fulcher law rather than Néel-Brown equation demonstrating that the particles follow the behaviour of superparamagnetism of slightly interacting system. Spin-lattice, T 1 and spin-spin, T 2 relaxivity of proton of the water molecule in the presence of chitosan-coated superparamagnetic ZnFe2O4 nanoparticle yields the values of 0.002 and 0.360 s-1 per ppm.

  8. PARAMAGNETIC RELAXATION IN CRYSTALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTALS, PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE, RELAXATION TIME , CRYSTAL DEFECTS, QUARTZ, GLASS, STRAIN(MECHANICS), TEMPERATURE, NUCLEAR SPINS, HYDROGEN, CALCIUM COMPOUNDS, FLUORIDES, COLOR CENTERS, PHONONS, OXYGEN.

  9. Solid-state {sup 19}F and {sup 13}C NMR of room temperature fluorinated graphite and samples thermally treated under fluorine: Low-field and high-resolution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Giraudet, J.; Dubois, M.; Guerin, K.; Pinheiro, J.P.; Hamwi, A.; Stone, W.E.E.; Pirotte, P.; Masin, F. . E-mail: fmasin@ulb.ac.be

    2005-04-15

    Room temperature graphite fluorides consisting of raw material and samples post-treated in pure fluorine atmosphere in the temperature range 100-500 deg. C have been studied by solid-state NMR. Several NMR approaches have been used, both high and low-field {sup 19}F, {sup 19}F MAS and {sup 13}C MAS with {sup 19}F to {sup 13}C cross polarization. The modifications, in the graphitic lattice, of the catalytic iodine fluorides products have been examined. A transformation of the C-F bond character from semi-ionic to covalent has been found to occur at a post-treatment temperature close to 400 deg. C. It is shown that covalency increases with temperature.

  10. Experimental study of radiative pion capture on /sup 13/C, /sup 20/Ne, /sup 90/Zr, /sup 19/F and /sup 12/C

    SciTech Connect

    Martoff, C.J.

    1980-11-01

    Photon spectra for 50 < E/sub ..gamma../ < 135 MeV have been measured from the radiative capture of stopped negative pions by the nuclides /sup 13/C, /sup 19/F, /sup 20/Ne, and /sup 90/Zr. The e/sup +/e/sup -/ pair spectrometer system used has resolution 850 keV fwhm and photon detection efficiency 5 x 10/sup -6/. The total radiative capture branching ratios measured are /sup 13/C (1.66 +- 0.25)%, /sup 19/F (2.40 +- 0.48)%, /sup 20/Ne (1.60 +- 0.24)%, and /sup 90/Zr (2.1 +- 0.5)%. The partial radiative capture branching ratios to four bound states and two resonances in /sup 20/F, and two bound states and three resonances in /sup 13/B have also been measured. The branching ratio for /sup 13/C(..pi../sup -/,..gamma..)/sup 13/B g.s. is (6.1 +- 1.2) x 10/sup -4/. Comparison of this result with the beta decay rate of /sup 13/B shows that (84 +- 16)% of the pion capture amplitude is accounted for by the Gamow-Teller matrix element. Further analysis suggests that much of the remaining strength is E2. The measured branching ratios to resonant states in /sup 13/C(..pi../sup -/,..gamma..)/sup 13/B are shown to be in agreement with detailed shell model calculations. The total single-particle strength in these transitions is shown to be approximately half as large as that of the T = 3/2 part of the E1 photoresonance (the Giant Dipole Resonance) in /sup 13/C. The branching ratio for /sup 20/Ne(..pi../sup -/,..gamma..)/sup 20/F (T = 1, J/sup ..pi../ = 1/sup +/, E/sub x/ = 1.06 MeV) is 0.91 +- 0.52).10/sup -4/. Comparison with the electroexcitation of the analog giant M1 state in /sup 20/Ne (11.24 MeV) shows that the M1 transition amplitude is less than (46 +- 14)% Gamow-Teller. This result is in agreement with detailed shell model calculations of the M1 transition. The photon spectrum for radiative pion capture from flight (reaction /sup 12/C(..pi../sup +/ T = 44 MeV, ..gamma.. at 90/sup 0/)) has been measured. 13 figures, 12 tables.

  11. Probing the sequence effects on NarI-induced -2 frameshift mutagenesis by dynamic 19F NMR, UV and CD spectroscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nidhi; Li, Yuyuan; Zhang, Li; Meneni, Srinivasa; Cho, Bongsup

    2012-01-01

    The NarI recognition sequence (5′-G1G2CG3CN-3′) is the most vulnerable hot spot for frameshift mutagenesis induced by the carcinogen 2-aminofluorene and its analogs in Escherichia coli. Lesioning of the guanine in the G3 position induces an especially high frequency of -2 deletion mutations; vulnerability to these mutations is modulated by the nature of nucleotide in the N position (C ~ A > G ≫ T). The objective of the present study was to probe the structural basis of this N-mediated influence on the propensity of the G3-lesion to form a slipped mutagenic intermediate (SMI) during translesion synthesis. We studied NarI-based fully paired [(5′-CTCG1G2CG3*CNATC-3′)(5′-GATNCGGCCGAG-3′), N = dC or dT] and -2 deletion [(5′-CTCG1G2CG3*CNATC-3′)(5′-GATNGCCGAG-3′), N = dC or dT] duplexes, in which G* was either AF [N-(2′-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-aminofluorene] or the 19F probe FAF [N-(2′-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-7-fluoro-2-aminofluorene]. The latter sequences mimic the bulged SMI for -2 deletion mutations. Dynamic 19F NMR, circular dichroism, and UV-melting results indicated that the NarI-dC/-2 deletion duplex adopts exclusively an intercalated conformer, whereas the NarI-dT/-2 deletion duplex exists as multiple conformers. The data support the presence of a putative equilibrium between a carcinogen-intercalated and a carcinogen-exposed SMI for the dT/-2 duplex. A similar dT-induced conformational heterogeneity was observed for the fully-paired duplexes in which all three guanines were individually modified by AF or FAF. The frequency of the carcinogen stacked S-conformation was found to be highest (69~75 %) at the G3 hot spot in NarI-dC duplexes. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the conformational stability of the SMI is a critical determinant for the efficacy of -2 frameshift mutagenesis in the NarI sequence. We also provide evidence for AF/FAF conformational compatibility in the NarI sequences. PMID:17960913

  12. TEACHING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NORRIS, JEANNE E.; STEINHAUS, ARTHUR H.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO FIND OUT WHETHER (1) THE METHODS FOR ATTAINING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION THAT HAVE PROVED FRUITFUL IN THE ONE-TO-ONE RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLINIC CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY ADAPTED TO THE TEACHER-CLASS RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLASSROOM AND GYMNASIUM, AND (2) NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION CAN BE TAUGHT SUCCESSFULLY BY AN APPROPRIATELY TRAINED…

  13. Relaxation of magnetotail plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.

    1987-01-01

    A quasi-thermodynamic model is presented for the relaxation of magnetotail plasmas during substorms, followed by quiet times. It is proposed that the plasma relaxes to a state of low-potential energy subject to a small number of global constraints. The constraints are exactly preserved by all ideal motions and, approximately, by a wide class of motions of the plasma undergoing magnetic reconnection. A variational principle which minimizes the free energy predicts the relaxed state. Exact, two-dimensional solutions of the relaxed state are obtained. A universal feature of the exact solutions is a chain of magnetic islands along the tail axis. Sufficient conditions for the stability of relaxed states are obtained from the second variation of the free-energy functional.

  14. Rapid exchange of fluoroethylamine via the Rhesus complex in human erythrocytes: 19F NMR magnetization transfer analysis showing competition by ammonia and ammonia analogues.

    PubMed

    Szekely, David; Chapman, Bogdan E; Bubb, William A; Kuchel, Philip W

    2006-08-01

    A remarkable recent discovery in red blood cell function is that the Rhesus antigen complex that for so long was considered to be simply a means of cell recognition is also the ammonia transporter. It catalyzes transmembrane exchange of ammonia on the subsecond time scale, and yet because of a lack of rapid-exchange methodology its kinetics had not been characterized. The flux of ammonia varies appreciably in diverse clinical states, and a convenient method for its characterization would be of basic and of clinical diagnostic value. Fluoroethylamine is water-soluble and when added to a suspension of human red blood cells (RBCs) displays the experimentally useful property of giving separate 19F NMR spectral peaks for the populations inside and outside the cells. By using two-site, one-dimensional magnetization exchange spectroscopy (1D-EXSY), the transmembrane exchange of fluoroethylamine was measured; it was found to occur on the subsecond time scale with an apparent first-order rate constant for efflux, under the equilibrium exchange conditions, of 3.4 s(-1). The method was used to characterize the concentration, temperature, and pH dependence of the exchange rate constant. We determined the extent of competitive inhibition exhibited by ammonia and two molecules that contain an amine group (ethylamine and methylamine). Inhibition of the exchange by incubating the suspension with anti-RhAG antibody, and no inhibition by anti-RhD antibody, suggested specificity of exchange via the RhAG protein of the Rh complex.

  15. The effect of ethanol on hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine: (31)P-NMR and (19)F-NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Celikbag, Yusuf; Via, Brian K; Adhikari, Sushil; Buschle-Diller, Gisela; Auad, Maria L

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the role of ethanol and temperature on the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in biopolyol produced from hydrothermal liquefaction of loblolly pine (Pinus spp.) carried out at 250, 300, 350 and 390°C for 30min. Water and water/ethanol mixture (1/1, wt/wt) were used as liquefying solvent in the HTL experiments. HTL in water and water/ethanol is donated as W-HTL and W/E-HTL, respectively. It was found that 300°C and water/ethanol solvent was the optimum liquefaction temperature and solvent, yielding up to 68.1wt.% bio-oil and 2.4wt.% solid residue. (31)P-NMR analysis showed that biopolyol produced by W-HTL was rich in phenolic OH while W/E-HTL produced more aliphatic OH rich biopolyols. Moreover, biopolyols with higher hydroxyl concentration were produced by W/E-HTL. Carbonyl groups were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, which showed that ethanol reduced the concentration of carbonyl groups.

  16. Two dimensional fluoride ion conductor RbSn {2}F {5} studied by impedance spectroscopy and {19}F, {119}Sn, and {87}Rb NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, K.; Ahmad, M. M.; Ogiso, Y.; Okuda, T.; Chikami, J.; Miehe, G.; Ehrenberg, H.; Fuess, H.

    2004-07-01

    RbSn2F5 is a two-dimensional fluoride ion conductor. It undergoes a first-order phase transition to a superionic state at 368 K. The structure of the low temperature phase has been determined from the Rietveld analysis of the X-ray powder diffraction. The dynamic properties of the fluoride ions in RbSn2F5 have been studied by impedance spectroscopy and solid state NMR. The dc ionic conductivity of this sample shows an abrupt increase at the phase transition temperature. We have obtained the hopping frequency and the concentration of the charge carriers (F- ions) at different temperatures from the analysis of the conductivity spectra using Almond-West formalism. The estimated values of the charge carriers’ concentration agree well with that determined from the structure and were found to be independent of temperature. The relatively small value of the power-law exponent, n ≈ 0.55, supports the two-dimensional property of the investigated material. Furthermore, 19F NMR with simulation has suggested the diffusive motions of the fluoride ions between different sites. In contrast, 119Sn and 87Rb NMR spectra below 250 K supported the intrinsic disordered nature due to the random distribution of the fluoride ion vacancies.

  17. Dielectric relaxation near 25 K in multiferroic BiFeO3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, B.; Dixit, A.; Naik, R.; Lawes, G.; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2011-11-01

    Our investigations using low-temperature Raman spectroscopy, dielectric, and magnetodielectric studies of as-prepared and vacuum-annealed BiFeO3 ceramics revealed two dielectric anomalies near 25 and 281 K. Systematic studies were carried out to probe the anomaly near 25 K which exhibits clear frequency dependence and falls close to a previously observed magnetic transition. The low-temperature dielectric relaxation behavior yielded characteristic energy scales of ˜30 and ˜34 meV for the as-prepared and vacuum-annealed BiFeO3 samples, respectively. Raman spectra showed hardening of the E(TO6) and E(TO9) modes near 25 K, and the Raman shift in phonon frequencies is found to be broader in the vacuum-annealed BiFeO3 than in the as-prepared BiFeO3. We observed a linear magnetodielectric coupling in both samples at 25 K. These experimental results suggest that coupling among spin, lattice, and dielectric properties persist to low temperatures in BiFeO3.

  18. 13C NMR Relaxation Study of Segmental Motion of Poly(l-histidine) in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, Shinichi; Hiraoki, Toshifumi; Tsutsumi, Akihiro

    2004-05-01

    To study the segmental motion of poly (l-histidine) (PLH) in aqueous solution, the 13C spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) was measured at six resonance frequencies (ωC/2π) ranging from 15 to 100 MHz at temperatures from 10 to 80°C. For backbone Cα, plots of log(T1/ωC) against log(ωC) gave the well-superposed master curve, showing that the time-temperature reduction rule is realized. The shift factor obeyed the Arrhenius-type temperature dependence with the activation energy of 25.0 kJmol-1. Using this activation energy for the temperature dependence of the correlation time, the master curve was well reproduced by the Dejean-Lauprêtre-Monnerie (DLM) model. One of the parameters relating to the segmental motion was τ0/τ1=15, where τ0 and τ1 are the correlation times for the isolated single and correlated pair conformational transitions, respectively. It was found that the spectral density function J(ωC) has the exponent to the correlation time τ1 as ωCJ(ωC)˜(ωCτ1)0.71 in the region of ωCτ1≪ 1.

  19. Lattice dynamics, phase transitions and spin relaxation in [Fe(C5H5)2] PF6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herber, R. H.; Felner, I.; Nowik, I.

    2016-12-01

    The organometallic compound ferrocenium hexafluorophosphate, [Fe(C5H5)2] PF6, has been studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy in the past, mainly to determine the crystal structure at high temperatures. Here we present studies at 95 K to 305 K and analyze the spectra in terms of spin relaxation theory which yields accurately the hyperfine interaction parameters and the spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation rates in this paramagnetic compound. The spectral area under the resonance curve yields the recoil free fraction and thus the mean square of the vibration amplitude . One observes a large discontinuity in the slope of versus T at ˜210 K, indicative of a phase transition. The analysis of the spectra proves that the quadrupole interaction is small but certainly negative, ½e2qQ = -0.12(2) mm/s, and causes the asymmetry observed in the spectra. The detailed analysis yields also, for the first time, the fluctuating effective magnetic hyperfine field, H eff = 180(50) kOe.

  20. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  1. Relaxation techniques for stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems such as high blood pressure, stomachaches, headaches, anxiety, and depression. Using relaxation techniques can help you feel calm. These exercises can also help you manage stress and ease ...

  2. Importance of cross-correlated relaxation in the spectra of simple organofluorine compounds: Spectral complexity of A3B3X spin systems compared to ABX spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemany, Lawrence B.; Malloy, Thomas B.; Nunes, Megan M.; Zaibaq, Nicholas G.

    2012-09-01

    In a continuation of our initial investigation of the complex 13C and 19F spectra exhibited by two simple organofluorine compounds, additional organofluorine compounds expected to exhibit a wide range of spectral complexity were studied. Spectral simulations are critical for analyzing the more complex spin systems, in particular, A3B3X and A6B3X. Cross-correlated relaxation is commonly observed; examples of 13Csbnd 19F cross-correlated relaxation are shown with the signals for each nucleus exhibiting unequal relaxation rates. Higher order effects are particularly noticeable in the spectra of perfluoro-t-butyl alcohol because of a large 4JFF value in the (13CF3)(12CF3)212COH isotopomer. The many additional transitions in an A3B3X spin system compared to an ABX spin system result in much more complex 19F (A3 and B3) and 13C (X) spectra, even though only three types of nuclei are involved in each spin system. The corresponding protio compounds typically constitute a much simpler A3M3X spin system because the long-range nJHH coupling (n ⩾ 4) is much smaller than the corresponding long-range nJFF coupling. Spectra previously published for ethane-1-13C (A3B3X) and hexafluoroethane-1-13C (A3M3X) are notable exceptions and are discussed.

  3. Very short NMR relaxation times of anions in ionic liquids: new pulse sequence to eliminate the acoustic ringing.

    PubMed

    Klimavicius, Vytautas; Gdaniec, Zofia; Balevicius, Vytautas

    2014-11-11

    NMR relaxation processes of anions were studied in two neat imidazolium-based room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) 1-decyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide- and chloride. The spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxations of 81Br and 35Cl nuclei were found to be extremely fast due to very strong quadrupolar interactions. The determined relaxation rates are comparable with those observed in the solids or in some critical organic solute/water/salt systems. In order to eliminate the acoustic ringing of the probe-head during relaxation times measurements the novel pulse sequence has been devised. It is based on the conventional inversion recovery pulse sequence, however, instead of the last 90° pulse the subsequence of three 90° pulses applied along axes to fulfill the phase cycling condition is used. Using this pulse sequence it was possible to measure T1 for both studied nuclei. The viscosity measurements have been carried out and the rotational correlation times were calculated. The effective 35Cl quadrupolar coupling constant was found to be almost one order lower than that for 81Br, i.e. 1.8 MHz and 16.0 MHz, respectively. Taking into account the facts that the ratio of (Q(35Cl)/Q(81Br))2≈0.1 and EFG tensors on the anions are quite similar, analogous structural organizations are expected for both RTILs. The observed T1/T2 (1.27-1.44) ratios were found to be not sufficiently high to confirm the presence of long-living (on the time scale of ≥10(-8) s) mesoscopic structures or heterogeneities in the studied neat ionic liquids.

  4. Detection of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid in humans: a combined 19F-MRS in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bilecen, Deniz; Schulte, Anja-Carina; Kaspar, Armin; Küstermann, Eckerhardt; Seelig, Joachim; Elverfeldt, Dominik; Scheffler, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    This study describes for the first time results of a (19)F-MRS study on humans exposed to the fluorinated non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid. The accumulation and elimination of this commercially available selective prostaglandin synthase inhibitor is studied after an oral bolus in the human liver, in blood plasma and in urine samples. The in vivo spectra of the liver display two resonances with a similar increase in signal intensity during the investigation period of 240 min. One resonance refers to the parent compound niflumic acid (P), whereas the second resonance corresponds to a metabolite (M1) formed by the biotransformation by liver enzymes. The spectroscopic comparison with model compounds suggests 4'-hydroxyniflumic acid as the metabolite. During the entire experiment the concentration ratios of these resonances (P/M1) ranged between 0.7 and 0.9, indicating a high metabolite concentration most probably due to an efficient first pass metabolism. Both resonances (P, M1) were observed in the in vitro study of the blood plasma samples after plasma protein denaturation. However, in comparison to the liver spectra, the amount of the metabolite M1 is very small with a P/M1-ratio of 36.6 after 90 min and 16.1 after the end of measurement. This finding suggests an efficient biliary excretion of the metabolite M1, which bypasses the blood circulation system. Both resonances are also identified in the native urine samples. The signal intensity of the parent compound dominates the spectra of all urine samples, whereas the signal intensity of M1 increases slowly reaching a similar value to the parent compound P at the end of the measurement. This observation demonstrates an effective renal elimination of niflumic acid and suggests the existence of an enterohepatic circuit with a re-entry mechanism for the biliary excreted metabolite M1. In the urine spectra, an additional metabolite M2 is found. This resonance exhibits a low but constant signal

  5. Dipolar nuclear spin relaxation in liquids and plane fluids undergoing chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, P. H.

    We describe the correlated translational and rotational relative brownian motions of two reacting groups of atoms, alternatively bound and free, by the normalized solutions of a set of coupled diffusion equations. Under equilibrium conditions we calculate the spectral densities j(ω) characteristic of the fluctuations of the intermolecular dipolar coupling between spins of these diffusing groups of atoms. When ωτ << 1, where τ is the translational correlation time, the form of the spectral density j2(ω) in three-dimensional liquids is j2(0) - α3ω1/2. The coefficient α3 is independent of the molecular local order, of the diffusional rotation speed of the spin-carrying groups of atoms and of their association and dissociation rates. In plane fluids, when ωτ << 1, the spectral density j(0)(ω) may be written as -a2 ln (ωτ) where the dependence of a2 on the average relative distribution of the interacting spins varies with the rate of the chemical reactions. In both three- and two-dimensional fluids spectral densities show an ω-3/2 or ω-2 behaviour for ωτ >> 1 according to the magnitude of the association rate of the reacting groups of atoms. In liquid glycerol we analyse the low- and high-frequency limits of the experimental proton relaxation rate 1/T1 and 1/T1ρ measured by Harmon, Harmon and Burnett, and Lenk. We also discuss the proton spin-lattice relaxation times measured by Kleinberg and Silbernagel in layered intercalation compounds TiS2-NH3 and TaS2-NH3.

  6. In vitro quantitative ((1))H and ((19))F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging studies of fluvastatin™ in Lescol® XL tablets in a USP-IV dissolution cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qilei; Gladden, Lynn; Avalle, Paolo; Mantle, Michael

    2011-12-20

    Swellable polymeric matrices are key systems in the controlled drug release area. Currently, the vast majority of research is still focused on polymer swelling dynamics. This study represents the first quantitative multi-nuclear (((1))H and ((19))F) fast magnetic resonance imaging study of the complete dissolution process of a commercial (Lescol® XL) tablet, whose formulation is based on the hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) polymer under in vitro conditions in a standard USP-IV (United States Pharmacopeia apparatus IV) flow-through cell that is incorporated into high field superconducting magnetic resonance spectrometer. Quantitative RARE ((1))H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ((19))F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging methods have been used to give information on: (i) dissolution media uptake and hydrodynamics; (ii) active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) mobilisation and dissolution; (iii) matrix swelling and dissolution and (iv) media activity within the swelling matrix. In order to better reflect the in vivo conditions, the bio-relevant media Simulated Gastric Fluid (SGF) and Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FaSSIF) were used. A newly developed quantitative ultra-fast MRI technique was applied and the results clearly show the transport dynamics of media penetration and hydrodynamics along with the polymer swelling processes. The drug dissolution and mobility inside the gel matrix was characterised, in parallel to the ((1))H measurements, by ((19))F NMR spectroscopy and MRI, and the drug release profile in the bulk solution was recorded offline by UV spectrometer. We found that NMR spectroscopy and 1D-MRI can be uniquely used to monitor the drug dissolution/mobilisation process within the gel layer, and the results from ((19))F NMR spectra indicate that in the gel layer, the physical mobility of the drug changes from "dissolved immobilised drug" to "dissolved mobilised drug".

  7. Non-Korringa nuclear relaxation in the ferromagnetic phase of the bilayered manganite La{sub1.2}Sr{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7}.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoch, M. J. R.; Kuhns, P. L.; Moulton, W. G.; Lu, J.; Reyes, A. P.; Mitchell, J. F.; Materials Science Division; Florida State Univ.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to ferromagnetic (FM) three-dimensional manganites, {sup 55}Mn NMR spectra obtained for the FM phase of the colossal magnetoresistance bilayer manganite La{sub 1.2}Sr{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7} show a broad distribution of hyperfine fields at Mn sites. The hyperfine distribution reflects variations in the electronic structure at the local level. {sup 55}Mn spin-lattice relaxation rates have a surprisingly weak dependence both on temperature and on applied magnetic field. Significant departures of the relaxation rate from Korringa temperature dependence below 40 K provide evidence for non Fermi liquid behavior in this quasi-two-dimensional metal. At temperatures approaching T{sub c} from below, in the range where colossal magnetoresistance appears, further anomalous and field-dependent behavior is found in the relaxation rate temperature dependence. The results provide evidence for changes in the electronic structure with temperature in this poorly metallic system. At low temperatures the changes are possibly linked to orbital ordering effects. In addition, statistical fluctuations in dopant concentration may play some role in inducing local variations in the electronic structure. Above 90 K the emergence of polarons is likely to be responsible for the observed decrease in the relaxation rate.

  8. Relaxation in quantum glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona Torres, Carlos E.

    The Ising model in transverse field provides the simplest description of a quantum glass. I study two systems that are realizations of the Ising model in transverse field, LiHoxY1-- xF4 and Rb1-- x(NH4)xH2PO 4. In the spin glass LiHoxY1-- xF4, applying a magnetic field Ht transverse to the Ising direction introduces tunneling between the bare Ising eigenstates. In addition, the coupling between the transverse dipolar interaction and the transverse field introduces entanglement or tunable random fields depending on the concentration. By comparing the classical and quantum transitions in LiHo0.198Y0.802F4 and LiHo 0.167Y0.833F4, I characterize the crossover from random field dominated behavior in the 19.8% sample to entanglement dominated behavior in the 16.7% sample. The quantum transition in the 19.8% sample is dominated by the limit on its correlation length caused by the random fields, while the dominant effect in the 16.7% sample is the enhanced tunneling rate introduced by entanglement. The proton glass Rb1--x(NH 4)xH2PO4 relaxes through tunneling of protons in the hydrogen bonds of the crystal, yielding an effective Ising model in transverse field. Since this field cannot be tuned directly, I combine bulk dielectric susceptibility measurements with neutron Compton scattering measurements of the local tunneling potential in two different concentrations, x = 35% and 72%. I find that tunneling drives the fastest relaxation processes at temperatures as high as 20 K and explicitly calculate the tunneling rate from the tunneling potential of the hydrogen bond. Moreover, the structural mechanism for the glassy relaxation allows a real-space picture of the relaxation dynamics to be correlated to the free energy description of aging. I find that the glassy relaxation is driven by the sequential diffusion of defects called Takagi configurations with a classical to quantum crossover in the relaxation at 3 K. I relate the relaxation rate to the quantum action of tunneling

  9. Polymorphism of collagen triple helix revealed by 19F NMR of model peptide [Pro-4(R)-hydroxyprolyl-Gly]3-[Pro-4(R)-fluoroprolyl-Gly]-[Pro-4(R)-hydroxyprolyl-Gly]3.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Kazuki; Nemoto, Nobuaki; Motooka, Daisuke; Nishi, Yoshinori; Doi, Masamitsu; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nakazawa, Takashi; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Yoshida, Takuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2012-06-14

    We have characterized various structures of (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)(3)-Pro-fPro(R)-Gly-(Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)(3) in the process of cis-trans isomerization and helix-coil transition by exploiting the sole (19)F NMR probe in 4(R)-fluoroproline (fPro(R)). Around the transition temperature (T(m)), we detected a species with a triple helical structure distinct from the ordinary one concerning the alignment of three strands. The (19)F-(19)F exchange spectroscopy showed that this misaligned and that the ordinary triple helices were interchangeable only indirectly via an extended monomer strand with all-trans peptide bonds at Pro-fPro(R), Pro-Hyp(R), and Gly-Pro in the central segment. This finding demonstrates that the helix-coil transition of collagen peptides is not described with a simple two-state model. We thus elaborated a scheme for the transition mechanism of (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)(n) that the most extended monomer strand can be the sole source both to the misaligned and correctly folded triple-helices. The staggered ends could help misaligned triple helices to self-assemble to higher-order structures. We have also discussed the possible relationship between the misaligned triple helix accumulating maximally at T(m) and the kinetic hysteresis associated with the helix-coil transition of collagen.

  10. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  11. Synthesis of chlorambucil-tempol adduct and its delivery using fluoroalkyl double-ended poly (ethylene glycol) micelles.

    PubMed

    Prabhutendolkar, Anuja; Liu, Xiangli; Mathias, Errol V; Ba, Yong; Kornfield, Julie A

    2006-01-01

    In our pursuit to find potent anticancer drugs, we have covalently bonded free radical tempol to chlorambucil giving a chlorambucil-tempol (CT) adduct in which both of the anticancer active sites in tempol and chlorambucil were left intact. Analysis using NMR, Maldi-TOF, and EPR verified the designed chemical structure. Because the CT adduct is more hydrophobic than chlorambucil, its delivery also was investigated using fluoroalkyl double-ended poly (ethylene glycol) (Rf-PEG) micelles. Results from EPR spectra and(19) F and(1) H NMR spin lattice relaxation times show that the Rf-PEG micelles are able to encapsulate CT into the Rf cores of the micelles.

  12. A Comparison of Relaxation Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    Some researchers argue that all relaxation techniques produce a single relaxation response while others support a specific-effects hypothesis which suggests that progressive relaxation affects the musculoskeletal system and that guided imagery affects cognitive changes. Autogenics is considered a technique which is both somatic and cognitive. This…

  13. Relaxation from particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Anson; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo

    2016-12-01

    We consider using particle production as a friction force by which to implement a "Relaxion" solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. Using this approach, we are able to avoid superplanckian field excursions and avoid any conflict with the strong CP problem. The relaxation mechanism can work before, during or after inflation allowing for inflationary dynamics to play an important role or to be completely decoupled.

  14. Chain Dynamics, Relaxation Times, and Conductivities of Bithiophene--Acene Copolymers Measured Using High Frequency Saturation Transfer EPR.

    PubMed

    Fraind, Alicia M; Ryzhkov, Lev R; Tovar, John D

    2016-02-11

    We present a study to probe the formation of localized aromatic sextets and their effects on the charge transport properties in polymers with acene cores. Bithiophene-acene copolymers containing benzene, naphthalene, or anthracene as acene cores were synthesized using Yamamoto polymerization. Drop-casted polymer films were chemically doped and analyzed using high frequency saturation transfer EPR (HF ST-EPR), a method which has proven useful in the study of conducting polymers. The spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times were determined for these polymers at low temperatures (4 to 20 K) and used to obtain inter- and intrachain spin diffusion rates and conductivities. Similar interchain spin diffusion rates were seen across all polymer systems; however, anthracene containing polymer poly(hexylTTATT) was found to have the largest intrachain spin diffusion rate. The poly(hexylTTATT) intrachain spin diffusion rate may be artificially high if the anthracene ring restricts the diffusion of spin to the hexylated quaterthiophene segment in poly(hexylTTATT) whereas the spins diffuse through the acene cores in the benzene and naphthalene derivatives. Alternatively, as both the spin diffusion rates and conductivities vary unpredictably with temperature, it is possible that the π-electron localization previously seen in the anthracene core could be relieved at lower temperatures.

  15. PREFACE: Muon spin rotation, relaxation or resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffner, Robert H.; Nagamine, Kanetada

    2004-10-01

    ), is currently being built to replace the current Japanese muSR capability at KEK. These muSR institutions provide scientists a variety of sample environments, including a range of temperatures, magnetic fields and applied pressure. In addition, very low-energy muon beams (< 1 keV) have been developed for studies of thin films and nano-materials. In 2002 this world-wide community founded the International Society of muSR Spectroscopy (http://musr.org/~isms/) in order to promote the health of this growing field of research. The 20 papers presented in this volume are intended to highlight some of the current muSR research activities of interest to condensed matter physicists. It is not an exhaustive review. In particular, the active and exciting area of muonium chemistry is left to a future volume. The group of papers in section I addresses the physics of strongly correlated electrons in solids, one of the most active fields of condensed matter research today. Strong electron correlations arise from (Coulomb) interactions which render Landau's theory of electron transport for weakly interacting systems invalid. Included in this category are unconventional heavy-fermion superconductors, high-temperature copper-oxide superconductors, non-Fermi liquid (NFL) systems and systems with strong electron-lattice-spin coupling, such as the colossal magnetoresistance manganites. Two key properties often make the muon a unique probe of these materials: (1) the muon's large magnetic moment (~3 mup) renders it extremely sensitive to the tiny magnetic fields (~1 Gauss) found, for example, in many NFL systems and in superconductors possessing time-reversal-violating order parameters, and (2) the muon's spin 1/2 creates a simple muSR lineshape (no quadrupolar coupling), ideal for measuring spin-lattice-relaxation, local susceptibilities and magnetic-field distributions in ordered magnets and superconductors. Section II contains studies which exploit the unique sensitivities of muSR just

  16. Softening temperature of lyophilized bovine serum albumin and gamma-globulin as measured by spin-spin relaxation time of protein protons.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, S; Aso, Y; Kojima, S

    1997-04-01

    We investigated the usefulness of the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of protein protons as a probe for evaluating the molecular flexibility of freeze-dried protein formulations. It is proposed that the microscopic softening temperature determined from changes in the T2 of protein protons (Ts(T2)) is an important characteristic of freeze-dried protein formulations, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of which is generally difficult to determine by differential scanning calorimetry. We determined the molecular flexibility of lyophilized bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine gamma-globulin (BGG) by measuring the T2 of protein and water protons as well as the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the latter as a function of temperature. The flexibility of freeze-dried BSA and BGG cakes markedly varied at temperatures above and below the Ts(T2), affecting the stability of the proteins. The denaturation and subsequent aggregation of lyophilized BSA and BGG cakes with a relatively high water content was enhanced in the softened state at temperatures above the Ts(T2). Lyophilized cakes with an extremely low water content were significantly denatured, even in the unsoftened state at temperatures below the Ts(T2), probably due to the thermodynamically unstable structures of protein molecules generated by a loss of structural water.

  17. Transverse spin relaxation and magnetic correlation in Pr1-xCaxMnO3: Influence of particle size variation and chemical doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Vinay Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Soumik

    2017-03-01

    The short ranged magnetic correlations and dynamics of hole doped Pr1-xCaxMnO3 (0.33 < x < 0.5) of different crystallite sizes have been investigated using electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The major contribution to the temperature dependence of paramagnetic line-width is attributed to the spin-lattice relaxation dominated by thermally activated hopping of small polarons with the typical activation energy of 20-50 meV. Irrespective of the crystallite size and dopant concentration, the transverse spin relaxation time (t2) follows a universal scaling behaviour of the type t 2 ˜ ( T / T 0 ) n in the paramagnetic regime, where T0 and n are the scaling parameters. Using the temperature dependence of t2, we construct a phase diagram which shows that near half-doping, the magnetic correlations associated with charge ordering not only survives even down to the crystallite size of 22 nm but is also actually enhanced. We conclude that the eventual suppression of charge ordering with reduction in the particle size is possibly more to do with the greater influence of chemical disorder than any intrinsic effect.

  18. Observation of zero-point quantum fluctuations of a single-molecule magnet through the relaxation of its nuclear spin bath.

    PubMed

    Morello, A; Millán, A; de Jongh, L J

    2014-03-21

    A single-molecule magnet placed in a magnetic field perpendicular to its anisotropy axis can be truncated to an effective two-level system, with easily tunable energy splitting. The quantum coherence of the molecular spin is largely determined by the dynamics of the surrounding nuclear spin bath. Here we report the measurement of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1n in a single crystal of the single-molecule magnet Mn12-ac, at T ≈ 30 mK in perpendicular fields B⊥ up to 9 T. The relaxation channel at B ≈ 0 is dominated by incoherent quantum tunneling of the Mn12-ac spin S, aided by the nuclear bath itself. However for B⊥>5 T we observe an increase of 1/T1n by several orders of magnitude up to the highest field, despite the fact that the molecular spin is in its quantum mechanical ground state. This striking observation is a consequence of the zero-point quantum fluctuations of S, which allow it to mediate the transfer of energy from the excited nuclear spin bath to the crystal lattice at much higher rates. Our experiment highlights the importance of quantum fluctuations in the interaction between an "effective two-level system" and its surrounding spin bath.

  19. (19)F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometric Determination of the Partition Coefficients of Flutamide and Nilutamide (Antiprostate Cancer Drugs) in a Lipid Nano-Emulsion and Prediction of Its Encapsulation Efficiency for the Drugs.

    PubMed

    Takegami, Shigehiko; Kitamura, Keisuke; Ohsugi, Mayuko; Konishi, Atsuko; Kitade, Tatsuya

    2016-12-01

    To design a useful lipid drug carrier having a high encapsulation efficiency (EE%) for the antiprostate cancer drugs flutamide (FT) and nilutamide (NT), a lipid nano-emulsion (LNE) was prepared with soybean oil (SO), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and sodium palmitate, and the partition coefficients (K ps) of the drugs for the LNE were determined by (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. The (19)F NMR signal of the trifluoromethyl group of both drugs showed a downfield shift from an internal standard (trifluoroethanol) and broadening according to the increase in the lipid concentration due to their interaction with LNE particles. The difference in the chemical shift (Δδ) of each drug caused by the addition of LNE was measured under different amounts of LNE, and the K p values were calculated from the Δδ values. The results showed that FT has higher lipophilicity than NT. The total lipid concentration (SO + PC) required to encapsulate each drug into LNE with an EE% of more than 95% was calculated from the K p values as 93.3 and 189.9 mmol/L for FT and NT, respectively. For an LNE prepared with the total lipid concentration of 215 mmol/L, the predicted EE% values were 98 and 96% for FT and NT, respectively, while the experimental EE% values determined by a centrifugation method were approximately 99% for both drugs. Thus, the (19)F NMR spectrometric method is a useful technique to obtain the K p values of fluorinated drugs and thereby predict the theoretical lipid concentrations and prepare LNEs with high EE% values.

  20. Progressive muscle relaxation, yoga stretching, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Ghoncheh, Shahyad; Smith, Jonathan C

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and yoga stretching (hatha) exercises. Forty participants were randomly divided into two groups and taught PMR or yoga stretching exercises. Both groups practiced once a week for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, practitioners of PMR displayed higher levels of relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement at Week 4 and higher levels of Mental Quiet and Joy as a posttraining aftereffect at Week 5. Contrary to what was hypothesized, groups did not display different levels of R-States Energized or Aware. Results suggest the value of supplementing traditional somatic conceptualizations of relaxation with the psychological approach embodied in ABC relaxation theory. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  1. Diffusion-weighted 19F-MRI of lung periphery: Influence of pressure and air-SF6 composition on apparent diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Pérez-Sánchez, José Manuel; Pérez de Alejo, Rigoberto; Rodríguez, Ignacio; González-Mangado, Nicolás; Peces-Barba, Germán; Cortijo, Manuel

    2005-08-25

    Lung functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a reality using different inert hyperpolarized gases, such as 3He and 129Xe, which have provided an extraordinary boost in lung imaging and has also attracted interest to other chemically inert gaseous contrast agents. In this context, we have recently demonstrated the first diffusion-weighted images using thermally polarized inhaled sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) in small animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether or not the diffusion coefficient of this fluorinated gas is sensitive to pulmonary structure, gas concentration and air pressure in the airways. Diffusion coefficients of SF6 (both pure and in air mixtures) measured in vitro at different pressures and 20 degrees C showed an excellent agreement with theoretical values. Measurements of diffusion coefficients were also performed in vivo and post-mortem on healthy rats, achieving satisfactory signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and SF6 gas was found to be in an almost completely restricted diffusion regime in the lung, i.e., the transport by molecular diffusion is delayed by collisions with barriers such as the alveolar septa. This observed low diffusivity means that this gas will be less sensitive to structural changes in the lungs than other magnetic resonance sensitive gas such as 3He, particularly at human scale. However, it is still possible that SF6 plays a role since it opens a new structural window. Thus, the interest of researchers in delimiting the important limiting technical factors that makes this process very challenging is obvious. Among them, T2 relaxation is very fast, so gradient systems with very fast switching rate and probably large radiofrequency (RF) power and high field systems will be needed for hexafluoride to be used in human studies.

  2. Ultrafast Relaxation in Conjugated Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * EXPERIMENTAL * Samples * Femtosecond experimental apparatus * RESULTS AND DISCUSSION * Poly(phenylacetylenes) * Blue-phase PDA-3BCMU * Red-phase PDA-4BCMU * Blue-phase PDA-DFMP * P3MT * P3DT * PTV * RELAXATION MECHANISMS * Review of the previous works * Symmetry of the lower electronic excited states * Primary relaxation processes * Theoretical studies of nonlinear excitations * Mechanism of relaxation in polymers with a weakly nondegenerate ground state (poly(phenylacetylene)s) * Dual peak component with power-law decay * Single-peak component with an exponential decay * Hot self-trapped exciton * Transition to the electron-hole threshold * Transition to a biexciton state * Mechanism of relaxation in polymers with a strongly or moderately nondegenerate ground state * Classifications of polymers * Femtosecond relaxation * Picosecond relaxation * CONCLUSION * Acknowledgments * REFERENCES

  3. Relaxing music for anxiety control.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Dave; Polman, Remco; McGregor, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the characteristics of relaxing music for anxiety control. Undergraduate students (N=84) were instructed to imagine themselves in an anxiety producing situation while listening to a selection of 30 music compositions. For each composition, level of relaxation, the factors that either enhanced or detracted from its relaxing potential and the emotional labels attached were assessed. Participants were also asked to state which music components (e.g., tempo, melody) were most conducive to relaxation. Additional information was obtained through the use of a focus group of 6 undergraduate music students. This paper presents details on the characteristics of relaxing-music for anxiety control and emotional labels attached to the relaxing compositions. Furthermore, an importance value has been attached to each of the music components under scrutiny, thus providing an indication of which music components should receive greatest attention when selecting music for anxiety control.

  4. ABC relaxation theory and the factor structure of relaxation states, recalled relaxation activities, dispositions, and motivations.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Wedell, A B; Kolotylo, C J; Lewis, J E; Byers, K Y; Segin, C M

    2000-06-01

    ABC Relaxation Theory proposes 15 psychological relaxation-related states (R-States): Sleepiness, Disengagement, Physical Relaxation, Mental Quiet, Rested/Refreshed, At Ease/At Peace, Energized, Aware, Joy, Thankfulness and Love, Prayerfulness, Childlike Innocence, Awe and Wonder, Mystery, and Timeless/Boundless/Infinite. The present study summarizes the results of 13 separate factor analyses of immediate relaxation-related states, states associated with recalled relaxation activities, relaxation dispositions, and relaxation motivations on a combined sample of 1,904 individuals (group average ages ranged from 28-40 yr.). Four exploratory factor analyses of Smith Relaxation Inventories yielded 15 items that most consistently and exclusively load (generally at least .70) on six replicated factors. These items included happy, joyful, energized, rested, at peace, warm, limp, silent, quiet, dozing, drowsy, prayerful, mystery, distant, and indifferent. Subsequent factor analyses restricted to these items and specifying six factors were performed on 13 different data sets. Each yielded the same six-factor solution: Factor 1: Centered Positive Affect, Factor 2: Sleepiness, Factor 3: Disengagement, Factor 4: Physical Relaxation, Factor 5: Mental Quiet, and Factor 6: Spiritual. Implications for ABC Relaxation Theory are discussed.

  5. Investigation of fluorine in SiO2 and on Si surface by the 19F(p,αγ)16O reaction, secondary-ion mass spectrometry, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Byoung-gon; Arai, Eiichi; Nishioka, Yasushiro; Ohji, Yuzuru; Iwata, Seiichi; Ma, T. P.

    1990-04-01

    A fluorinated thermal SiO2, grown after HF surface treatment without de-ionized water rinse, was estimated to contain ˜3×1013 cm-2 of fluorine by the 19F(p,αγ)16O reaction. Secondary-ion mass spectrometry data indicate that the SiF distribution is peaked at the SiO2/Si interface in the fluorinated oxide. The time-dependent change of the absolute amount of fluorine on the HF-treated silicon surface as a function of storage time in air or in vacuum was also investigated by the 19F(p,αγ)16O reaction. The initial number of fluorine atoms on the HF-treated silicon surface was estimated to be ˜1015 cm-2 before substantial desorption took place. Fluorine atoms desorb from the silicon surface much more rapidly if the sample is stored in air than in vacuum. These results were also supported by the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement.

  6. A Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Anti-G Protein F(ab′)2 Monoclonal Antibody Suppresses Mucous Production and Breathing Effort in RSV rA2-line19F-Infected BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boyoglu-Barnum, Seyhan; Gaston, Kelsey A.; Todd, Sean O.; Boyoglu, Cemil; Chirkova, Tatiana; Barnum, Thomas R.; Jorquera, Patricia; Haynes, Lia M.; Tripp, Ralph A.; Moore, Martin L.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae and is the single most important cause of serious lower respiratory tract infections in young children, yet no highly effective treatment or vaccine is available. Increased airway resistance and increased airway mucin production are two manifestations of RSV infection in children. RSV rA2-line19F infection induces pulmonary mucous production and increased breathing effort in BALB/c mice and provides a way to assess these manifestations of RSV disease in an animal model. In the present study, we investigated the effect of prophylactic treatment with the F(ab′)2 form of the anti-G protein monoclonal antibody (MAb) 131-2G on disease in RSV rA2-line19F-challenged mice. F(ab′)2 131-2G does not affect virus replication. It and the intact form that does decrease virus replication prevented increased breathing effort and airway mucin production, as well as weight loss, pulmonary inflammatory-cell infiltration, and the pulmonary substance P and pulmonary Th2 cytokine levels that occur in mice challenged with this virus. These data suggest that the RSV G protein contributes to prominent manifestations of RSV disease and that MAb 131-2G can prevent these manifestations of RSV disease without inhibiting virus infection. PMID:23885067

  7. A respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) anti-G protein F(ab')2 monoclonal antibody suppresses mucous production and breathing effort in RSV rA2-line19F-infected BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Boyoglu-Barnum, Seyhan; Gaston, Kelsey A; Todd, Sean O; Boyoglu, Cemil; Chirkova, Tatiana; Barnum, Thomas R; Jorquera, Patricia; Haynes, Lia M; Tripp, Ralph A; Moore, Martin L; Anderson, Larry J

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae and is the single most important cause of serious lower respiratory tract infections in young children, yet no highly effective treatment or vaccine is available. Increased airway resistance and increased airway mucin production are two manifestations of RSV infection in children. RSV rA2-line19F infection induces pulmonary mucous production and increased breathing effort in BALB/c mice and provides a way to assess these manifestations of RSV disease in an animal model. In the present study, we investigated the effect of prophylactic treatment with the F(ab')2 form of the anti-G protein monoclonal antibody (MAb) 131-2G on disease in RSV rA2-line19F-challenged mice. F(ab')2 131-2G does not affect virus replication. It and the intact form that does decrease virus replication prevented increased breathing effort and airway mucin production, as well as weight loss, pulmonary inflammatory-cell infiltration, and the pulmonary substance P and pulmonary Th2 cytokine levels that occur in mice challenged with this virus. These data suggest that the RSV G protein contributes to prominent manifestations of RSV disease and that MAb 131-2G can prevent these manifestations of RSV disease without inhibiting virus infection.

  8. Development of relaxation turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, C. M.

    1976-01-01

    Relaxation turbulence models have been intensively studied. The complete time dependent mass averaged Navier-Stokes equations have been solved for flow into a two dimensional compression corner. A new numerical scheme has been incorporated into the developed computed code with an attendant order of magnitude reduction in computation time. Computed solutions are compared with experimental measurements of Law for supersonic flow. Details of the relaxation process have been studied; several different relaxation models, including different relaxation processes and varying relaxation length, are tested and compared. Then a parametric study has been conducted in which both Reynolds number and wedge angle are varied. To assess effects of Reynolds number and wedge angle, the parametric study includes the comparison of computed separation location and upstream extent of pressure rise; numerical results are also compared with the measurements of surface pressure, skin friction and mean velocity field.

  9. Dynamics of helical worm-like chains. VIII. Higher-order subspace approximations to dielectric and magnetic relaxation and fluorescence depolarization for flexible chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Hiromi; Yoshizaki, Takenao; Fujii, Motoharu

    1986-04-01

    Following the general scheme developed in the preceding paper (paper VII), dielectric and magnetic relaxation and fluorescence depolarization for flexible chain polymers in dilute solution are reinvestigated on the basis of the discrete helical worm-like chain in the higher-order subspace approximation. A comparison of theory with experiment is made with respect to the dielectric correlation time τD, the spin-lattice relaxation time T1, the spin-spin relaxation time T2, the nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE), the fluorescence emission anisotropy r(t), the average fluorescence anisotropy r¯, and the fluorescence correlation time τF. It is found that there is agreement between the diameters of the chains determined from these dynamic properties and those from chemical structures, better than in the previous crude subspace approximation, indicating that the theory is remarkably improved in the present approximation. The magnetic correlation time τM is in general not an observable, and therefore an empirical equation to be used for its determination from the observed T1 is constructed. It is then found that there is good correlation between the dynamic chain stiffness τX/τ0X and the static chain stiffness λ-1, where τ0X is the correlation time of the isolated subbody (monomer unit) with X=D, M, and F; τX/τ0X is a monotonically increasing function of λ-1 nearly independent of X as far as perpendicular dipoles are concerned. An explanation of this result is given. However, the dependence of τX on temperature cannot be explained very satisfactorily.

  10. Oxygen Mapping within Healthy and Acutely Infarcted Brain Tissue in Humans Using the NMR Relaxation of Lipids: A Proof-Of-Concept Translational Study.

    PubMed

    Colliez, Florence; Safronova, Marta M; Magat, Julie; Joudiou, Nicolas; Peeters, André P; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Gallez, Bernard; Duprez, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The clinical applicability of brain oxygenation mapping using the MOBILE (Mapping of Oxygen By Imaging Lipids relaxation Enhancement) magnetic resonance (MR) technique was assessed in the clinical setting of normal brain and of acute cerebral ischemia as a founding proof-of-concept translational study. Changes in the oxygenation level within healthy brain tissue can be detected by analyzing the spin-lattice proton relaxation ('Global T1' combining water and lipid protons) because of the paramagnetic properties of molecular oxygen. It was hypothesized that selective measurement of the relaxation of the lipid protons ('Lipids T1') would result in enhanced sensitivity of pO2 mapping because of higher solubility of oxygen in lipids than in water, and this was demonstrated in pre-clinical models using the MOBILE technique. In the present study, 12 healthy volunteers and eight patients with acute (48-72 hours) brain infarction were examined with the same clinical 3T MR system. Both Lipids R1 (R1 = 1/T1) and Global R1 were significantly different in the infarcted area and the contralateral unaffected brain tissue, with a higher statistical significance for Lipids R1 (median difference: 0.408 s-1; p<0.0001) than for Global R1 (median difference: 0.154 s-1; p = 0.027). Both Lipids R1 and Global R1 values in the unaffected contralateral brain tissue of stroke patients were not significantly different from the R1 values calculated in the brain tissue of healthy volunteers. The main limitations of the present prototypic version of the MOBILE sequence are the long acquisition time (4 min), hampering robustness of data in uncooperative patients, and a 2 mm slice thickness precluding accurate measurements in small infarcts because of partial volume averaging effects.

  11. Cross sections for proton induced high energy γ -ray emission (PIGE) in reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O at incident proton energies between 1.5 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanelas, P.; Cruz, J.; Fonseca, M.; Henriques, A.; Lourenço, F.; Luís, H.; Machado, J.; Pires Ribeiro, J.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Teubig, P.; Velho, P.; Zarza-Moreno, M.; Galaviz, D.; Jesus, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the high energy gamma-rays produced in the reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O for incident proton energies from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV over NaF/Ag and CaF2/Ag thin targets in two different sets of data. Gamma-rays were detected with a High Purity Ge detector with an angle of 130° with respect to the beam axis. The cross-sections for the high energy gamma-rays of 6.129, 6.915 and 7.115 MeV have been measured for the whole group between 5 and 7.2 MeV with accuracy better than 10%. A new energy range was covered and more points are included in the cross-sections data base expanding the existing set of data. Results are in agreement with previous measurements in similar conditions.

  12. Progressive muscle relaxation, breathing exercises, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Smith, J C

    2001-12-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) and breathing exercises. Forty-two students were divided randomly into two groups and taught PMR or breathing exercises. Both groups practiced for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, PMR practitioners displayed greater increments in relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement, while breathing practitioners displayed higher levels of R-State Strength and Awareness. Slight differences emerged at Weeks 1 and 2; major differences emerged at Weeks 4 and 5. A delayed and potentially reinforcing aftereffect emerged for PMR only after five weeks of training--increased levels of Mental Quiet and Joy. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed.

  13. Stress relaxation in heterogeneous polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, T. A.

    1992-05-01

    When heterogeneous polymers such as diblock copolymers form a microdomain phase, an imposed strain gives rise to stress from two sources, and several mechanisms of stress relaxation. The release of stress by disentanglement is strongly influenced by the effective confinement of the junction points to the domain boundaries and by the stretching of the chains. Using accepted notions of entangled chain kinetics, it is argued that the relaxation time for sliding stress is exponential in the chainlength to the 7/9 power. A method for calculating the frequency-dependent dynamic modulus is sketched. Despite the slow relaxation implied by these mechanisms, it appears possible to create domains of high energy.

  14. Dispersion of Relaxation Rates in the Rotating Frame Under the Action of Spin-Locking Pulses and Diffusion in Inhomogeneous Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Spear, John T.; Zu, Zhongliang; Gore, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A method is described for characterizing magnetically inhomogeneous media and the spatial scales of intrinsic susceptibility variations within samples. The rate of spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame, R1ρ, is affected by diffusion effects to a degree that depends on the magnitude of an applied spin-locking field. Appropriate analysis of the dispersion of R1ρ with locking field may be used to characterize susceptibility variations in inhomogeneous tissues. Theory and Methods The contribution of diffusion to R1ρ is quantified by an analytic expression derived by analyzing of the effects of diffusion through periodic variations of magnetic susceptibility and is used to predict the effects of inhomogeneities in simple phantoms. The theory is further applied to imaging to derive parametric images that portray the dimensions of susceptibility inhomogeneities independent of their magnitude. Results Significant dispersion of R1ρ with locking field was predicted and measured experimentally for suspensions of microspheres ranging from 1 to 90 µm in diameter. For scales of practical interest, these dispersion effects occur at much lower locking fields than the range in which chemical exchange effects cause similar dispersion. Conclusion There is good agreement between theory and experiment, and the method has potential for quantitative tissue characterization and functional imaging. PMID:23804212

  15. Stress Relaxation of Interim Restoratives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-18

    unmodified zinc oxide- eugenol cement were more favorable than those of IRM and Cavit. The plastic behavior of gutta-percha temporary stopping precluded assessment of its relaxation at temperatures in excess of 22P C. (Author)

  16. Relaxation labeling using modular operators

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.S.; Frei, W.

    1983-01-01

    Probabilistic relaxation labeling has been shown to be useful in image processing, pattern recognition, and artificial intelligence. The approaches taken to date have been encumbered with computationally extensive summations which generally prevent real-time operation and/or easy hardware implementation. The authors present a new and unique approach to the relaxation labeling problem using modular, VLSI-oriented hierarchical complex operators. One of the fundamental concepts of this work is the representation of the probability distribution of the possible labels for a given object (pixel) as an ellipse, which may be summed with neighboring object's distribution ellipses, resulting in a new, relaxed label space. The mathematical development of the elliptical approach will be presented and compared to more classical approaches, and a hardware block diagram that shows the implementation of the relaxation scheme using vlsi chips will be presented. Finally, results will be shown which illustrate applications of the modular scheme, iteratively, to both edges and lines. 13 references.

  17. Vacancy Relaxation in Cubic Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girifalco, L. A.; Weizer, V. G.

    1960-01-01

    The configuration of the atoms surrounding a vacancy in four face-centered cubic and three body-centered cubic metals has been computed, using a pairwise, central-force model in which the energy of interaction between two atoms was taken to have the form of a Morse function. Only radial relaxations were considered. The first and second nearest-neighbor relaxations for the face-centered systems were found to be: Pb (1.42,-0.43), Ni (2.14,-0.39), Cu(2.24,-0.40) and Ca (2.73,-0.41, expressed in percentages of normal distances. For the body-centered systems the relaxations out to the fourth nearest neighbors to the vacancy were: Fe (6.07,-2.12, -0.25, -), Ba (7.85, -2.70, 0.70, -0.33) and Na (10.80, -3.14, 3.43, -0.20). The positive signs indicate relaxation toward the vacancy and the negative signs indicate relaxation away from the vacancy. The energies of relaxation (eV) are: Pb (0.162), Ni (0.626), Cu (0.560), Ca (0.400), Fe (1.410), Ba (0.950) and Na (0.172).

  18. Relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yimin; Fulton, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    Two relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods are presented for elliptic equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The first scheme is a pointwise-preconditioned Richardson relaxation scheme and the second is a line relaxation scheme. The line relaxation scheme provides an efficient and relatively simple approach for solving two-dimensional spectral equations. Numerical examples and comparisons with other methods are given.

  19. String order and symmetries in quantum spin lattices.

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, D; Wolf, M M; Sanz, M; Verstraete, F; Cirac, J I

    2008-04-25

    We show that the existence of string order in a given quantum state is intimately related to the presence of a local symmetry by proving that both concepts are equivalent within the framework of finitely correlated states. Once this connection is established, we provide a complete characterization of local symmetries in these states. The results allow us to understand in a straightforward way many of the properties of string order parameters, like their robustness or fragility under perturbations and their typical disappearance beyond strictly one-dimensional lattices. We propose and discuss an alternative definition, ideally suited for detecting phase transitions, and generalizations to two and more spatial dimensions.

  20. Analysis of amorphous solid dispersions using 2D solid-state NMR and (1)H T(1) relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tran N; Watson, Simon A; Edwards, Andrew J; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S; Strohmeier, Mark; Vogt, Frederick G

    2010-10-04

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) can provide detailed structural information about amorphous solid dispersions of pharmaceutical small molecules. In this study, the ability of SSNMR experiments based on dipolar correlation, spin diffusion, and relaxation measurements to characterize the structure of solid dispersions is explored. Observation of spin diffusion effects using the 2D (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization heteronuclear correlation (CP-HETCOR) experiment is shown to be a useful probe of association between the amorphous drug and polymer that is capable of directly proving glass solution formation. Dispersions of acetaminophen and indomethacin in different polymers are examined using this approach, as well as (1)H double-quantum correlation experiments to probe additional structural features. (1)H-(19)F CP-HETCOR serves a similar role for fluorinated drug molecules such as diflunisal in dispersions, providing a rapid means to prove the formation of a glass solution. Phase separation is detected using (13)C, (19)F, and (23)Na-detected (1)H T(1) experiments in crystalline and amorphous solid dispersions that contain small domains. (1)H T(1) measurements of amorphous nanosuspensions of trehalose and dextran illustrate the ability of SSNMR to detect domain size effects in dispersions that are not glass solutions via spin diffusion effects. Two previously unreported amorphous solid dispersions involving up to three components and containing voriconazole and telithromycin are analyzed using these experiments to demonstrate the general applicability of the approach.

  1. Ellipsoidal Relaxation of Deformed Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Lira, Rafael B.; Riske, Karin A.; Dimova, Rumiana; Lin, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical analysis and experimental quantification on the ellipsoidal relaxation of vesicles are presented. The current work reveals the simplicity and universal aspects of this process. The Helfrich formula is shown to apply to the dynamic relaxation of moderate-to-high tension membranes, and a closed-form solution is derived which predicts the vesicle aspect ratio as a function of time. Scattered data are unified by a time scale, which leads to a similarity behavior, governed by a distinctive solution for each vesicle type. Two separate regimes in the relaxation are identified, namely, the "entropic" and the "constant-tension" regimes. The bending rigidity and the initial membrane tension can be simultaneously extracted from the data analysis, posing the current approach as an effective means for the mechanical analysis of biomembranes.

  2. Relaxed Poisson cure rate models.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cordeiro, Gauss M; Cancho, Vicente G; Balakrishnan, N

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the standard promotion cure rate model (Yakovlev and Tsodikov, ) more flexible by assuming that the number of lesions or altered cells after a treatment follows a fractional Poisson distribution (Laskin, ). It is proved that the well-known Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, ) is a simple way to obtain a new cure rate model that is a compromise between the promotion and geometric cure rate models allowing for superdispersion. So, the relaxed cure rate model developed here can be considered as a natural and less restrictive extension of the popular Poisson cure rate model at the cost of an additional parameter, but a competitor to negative-binomial cure rate models (Rodrigues et al., ). Some mathematical properties of a proper relaxed Poisson density are explored. A simulation study and an illustration of the proposed cure rate model from the Bayesian point of view are finally presented.

  3. A mixed relaxed clock model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325829

  4. A mixed relaxed clock model.

    PubMed

    Lartillot, Nicolas; Phillips, Matthew J; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-19

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'.

  5. NMR T{sub 1} relaxation time measurements and calculations with translational and rotational components for liquid electrolytes containing LiBF{sub 4} and propylene carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, P. M. Voice, A. M. Ward, I. M.

    2013-12-07

    Longitudinal relaxation (T{sub 1}) measurements of {sup 19}F, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 1}H in propylene carbonate/LiBF{sub 4} liquid electrolytes are reported. Comparison of T{sub 1} values with those for the transverse relaxation time (T{sub 2}) confirm that the measurements are in the high temperature (low correlation time) limit of the T{sub 1} minimum. Using data from pulsed field gradient measurements of self-diffusion coefficients and measurements of solution viscosity measured elsewhere, it is concluded that although in general there are contributions to T{sub 1} from both translational and rotational motions. For the lithium ions, this is mainly translational, and for the fluorine ions mainly rotational.

  6. Analog circuits for relaxation networks.

    PubMed

    Card, H

    1993-12-01

    Selected examples are presented of recent advances, primarily from the U.S. and Canada, in analog circuits for relaxation networks. Relaxation networks having feedback connections exhibit potentially greater computational power per neuron than feedforward networks. They are also more poorly understood especially with respect to learning algorithms. Examples are described of analog circuits for (i) supervised learning in deterministic Boltzmann machines, (ii) unsupervised competitive learning and feature maps and (iii) networks with resistive grids for vision and audition tasks. We also discuss recent progress on in-circuit learning and synaptic weight storage mechanisms.

  7. A study of coal extraction with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.; Mehlenbacher, R.C.; Ito, O.

    1993-09-01

    An electron spin and proton magnetic relaxation study is presented on the effects of the solvent extraction of coal on the macromoleculer network of the coal and on the mobile molecular species that are initially within the coal. The eight Argonne Premium coals were extracted at room temperature with a 1:1 (v/v) N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP)-CS2 solvent mixture under an inert atmosphere. As much solvent as possible was removed from extract and residue by treatment in a vacuum. The mobilization of molecular free radicals by the solvent and the exposure of free radicals in the macromoleculer matrix to solvent or to species dissolved in the solvent, results in a preferential survival of residue radicals of types that depend on the particular coal and results in the apparently fairly uniform loss of all types of radicals in bituminous coal extracts. The surviving extract and residue free radicals are more predominantly of the odd- alternate hydrocarbon free radical type. The spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) of these coal free radicals has previously been inferred (Doetschman and Dwyer, Energy Fuels, 1992, 6, 783) to be from the modulation of the intramolecular electron-nuclear dipole-interactions of the CH groups in a magnetic field by rocldng motions of the radical in the coal matrix. Such a modulation would depend not only on the rocking amplitude and frequency but also upon the electron spin density at the CH groups in the radical. The observed SLR rates decrease with coal rank in agreement with the smaller spin densities and the lower rocidng amplitudes that are expected for the larger polycondensed ring systems in coals of higher rank. The SLR rates are found to be generally faster in the extracts (than residues) where the molecular species would be expected to have a smaller polycondensed ring system than in the macromoleculer matrix of the residue.

  8. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin–rotation constants in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br and {sup 127}I)

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B. Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth; Jaszuński, Michał

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin–rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin–rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin–rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin–rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin–rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  9. Important Mutations Contributing to High-Level Penicillin Resistance in Taiwan(19F)-14, Taiwan(23F)-15, and Spain(23F)-1 of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolated from Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Esther Yip-Mei; Chang, Jen-Chang; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chang, Feng-Yee; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2016-12-01

    Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae is a serious concern worldwide. In this study, we analyzed the cause of β-lactam resistance in pandemic multidrug-resistant clones. A total of 41 penicillin-nonsusceptible clinical isolates were collected from 1996 to 2012. Sero- and molecular typing confirmed that these isolates were clonal types of Taiwan(19F)-14, Taiwan(23F)-15, and Spain(23F)-1. Sero-switching was found in four isolates. All isolates were multidrug resistant. Sequencing analysis of the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) was performed on PBP1a, 2b, and 2x, and a large number of mutations were identified in comparing to clinical penicillin-susceptible isolates and the recipient strain R6 used for homologous recombination. The T451A substitution was the key amino acid in PBP2b that contributed to penicillin resistance. T338A in PBP2x played a role in resistance and reached the highest level of resistance when combined with other mutations in PBP2x. High-level penicillin resistance could not be obtained without the combination of mutations in PBP1a with PBP2b and 2x. The amino acid substitutions in PBP1a, 2b, and 2x were the crucial factors for β-lactam resistance.

  10. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in (175)LuX and (197)AuX (X = (19)F, (35)Cl, (79)Br and (127)I).

    PubMed

    Demissie, Taye B; Jaszuński, Michał; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in (175)LuX and (197)AuX (X = (19)F, (35)Cl, (79)Br, (127)I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  11. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br and 127I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Taye B.; Jaszuński, Michał; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-01

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br, 127I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  12. "Stressing" Relaxation in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager-Decker, Iris

    A rationale is offered for incorporating relaxation training in elementary school classroom activities. Cited are research studies which focus on the reaction of children to stressful life changes and resulting behavioral and physical disorders. A list is given of significant life events which may be factors in causing diseases or misbehavior in…

  13. Theory of nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, J.

    1983-01-01

    A theory of nuclear magnetic interaction is based on the study of the stochastic rotation operator. The theory is applied explicitly to relaxation by anisotropic chemical shift and to spin-rotational interactions. It is applicable also to dipole-dipole and quadrupole interactions.

  14. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  15. Distributed Relaxation for Conservative Discretizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2001-01-01

    A multigrid method is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work that is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in one target-grid residual evaluation. The way to achieve this efficiency is the distributed relaxation approach. TME solvers employing distributed relaxation have already been demonstrated for nonconservative formulations of high-Reynolds-number viscous incompressible and subsonic compressible flow regimes. The purpose of this paper is to provide foundations for applications of distributed relaxation to conservative discretizations. A direct correspondence between the primitive variable interpolations for calculating fluxes in conservative finite-volume discretizations and stencils of the discretized derivatives in the nonconservative formulation has been established. Based on this correspondence, one can arrive at a conservative discretization which is very efficiently solved with a nonconservative relaxation scheme and this is demonstrated for conservative discretization of the quasi one-dimensional Euler equations. Formulations for both staggered and collocated grid arrangements are considered and extensions of the general procedure to multiple dimensions are discussed.

  16. Enhancement of T1 and T2 relaxation by paramagnetic silica-coated nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gerion, D; Herberg, J; Gjersing, E; Ramon, E; Maxwell, R; Gray, J W; Budinger, T F; Chen, F F

    2006-08-28

    We present the first comprehensive investigation on water-soluble nanoparticles embedded into a paramagnetic shell and their properties as an MRI contrast agent. The nanoprobes are constructed with an inorganic core embedded into an ultra-thin silica shell covalently linked to chelated Gd{sup 3+} paramagnetic ions that act as an MRI contrast agent. The chelator contains the molecule DOTA and the inorganic core contains a fluorescent CdSe/ZnS qdots in Au nanoparticles. Optical properties of the cores (fluorescence emission or plasmon position) are not affected by the neither the silica shell nor the presence of the chelated paramagnetic ions. The resulting complex is a MRI/fluorescence probe with a diameter of 8 to 15 nm. This probe is highly soluble in high ionic strength buffers at pH ranging from {approx}4 to 11. In MRI experiments at clinical field strengths of 60 MHz, the QDs probes posses spin-lattice (T{sub 1}) and a spin-spin (T{sub 2}) relaxivities of 1018.6 +/- 19.4 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} and 2438.1 +/- 46.3 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} respectively for probes having {approx}8 nm. This increase in relaxivity has been correlated to the number of paramagnetic ions covalently linked to the silica shell, ranging from approximately 45 to over 320. We found that each bound chelated paramagnetic species contributes by over 23 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} to the total T{sub 1} and by over 54 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} to the total T{sub 2} relaxivity respectively. The contrast power is modulated by the number of paramagnetic moieties linked to the silica shell and is only limited by the number of chelated paramagnetic species that can be packed on the surface. So far, the sensitivity of our probes is in the 100 nM range for 8-10 nm particles and reaches 10 nM for particles with approximately 15-18 nm in diameter. The sensitivities values in solutions are equivalent of those obtained with small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles of 7 nm diameter clustered into a 100 nm polymeric

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Spin-Noise and Unusual Relaxation of Oxygen-17 in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendet-Taicher, Eli

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have evolved into widely used techniques, providing diagnostic power in medicine and material sciences due to their high precision and non-invasive nature. Due to the small population differences between spin energy states, a significant sensitivity problem for NMR arises. The low sensitivity of NMR is probably its greatest limitation for applications to biological systems. An alternative probe tuning strategy based on the spin-noise response for application in standard one-dimensional and common high-resolution multidimensional standard biomolecular NMR experiments has shown an increase of up to 50% signal-to-noise (SNR) in one-dimensional NMR experiments and an increase of up to 22% in multi-dimensional ones. The method requires the adjustment of the optimal tuning condition, which may be offset by several hundreds kHz from the conventional tuning settings using the noise response of the water protons as an indicator. This work is described in the first part of the thesis (chapters 2--3). The second part (Chapter 4) of the thesis deals with anomalous oxygen-17 NMR relaxation behavior in water. Oxygen-17 (17O), which has spin of 5/2 and a natural abundance of 0.0373% possesses an electric quadrupole moment. Spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation occur by the quadrupole interaction, while the J-coupling to 1H spins and exchange are deciding factors. T1 and T2 of 17O in water have been previously measured over a large range of temperatures. The spin-spin relaxation times of 17O as a function of temperature show an anomalous behaviour, expressed by a local maximum at the temperature of maximum density (TMD) of water. It is shown that the same anomalous behaviour shifts to the respective temperatures of maximum density for H2O/D2O solutions with different compositions and salt concentrations. This phenomenon can be correlated to the pH dependency of T2 of 17O in water, and water proton exchange rates

  18. Relaxation processes in non-Debye dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turik, A. V.; Bogatin, A. S.; Andreev, E. V.

    2011-12-01

    The specific features of the relaxation processes in non-Debye dielectrics have been investigated. The nature of the difference between the relaxation frequencies of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss (conductivity) has been explained. It has been shown that the average relaxation frequency of the conductivity is considerably (in some cases, by several orders of magnitude) higher than the relaxation frequency of the dielectric constant owing to an increase in the conductivity spectra of the statistical weight of the relaxation processes with short relaxation times.

  19. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  20. Prophylaxis with a Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Anti-G Protein Monoclonal Antibody Shifts the Adaptive Immune Response to RSV rA2-line19F Infection from Th2 to Th1 in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boyoglu-Barnum, Seyhan; Chirkova, Tatiana; Todd, Sean O.; Barnum, Thomas R.; Gaston, Kelsey A.; Jorquera, Patricia; Haynes, Lia M.; Tripp, Ralph A.; Moore, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the single most important cause of serious lower respiratory tract infections in young children, yet no highly effective treatment or vaccine is available. In the present study, we investigated the effect of prophylactic treatment with the intact and F(ab′)2 forms of an anti-G protein monoclonal antibody (MAb), 131-2G, on the humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses to RSV rA2-line19F (r19F) challenge in BALB/c mice. The F(ab′)2 form of 131-2G does not decrease virus replication, but intact 131-2G does. The serum specimens for antibodies and spleen cells for memory T cell responses to RSV antigens were analyzed at 30, 45, 75, and 95 days postinfection (p.i.) with or without prior treatment with 131-2G. The ratios of Th2 to Th1 antibody isotypes at each time p.i indicated that both forms of MAb 131-2G shifted the subclass response from a Th2 (IgG1 and IgG2b) to a Th1 (IgG2A) bias. The ratio of IgG1 to IgG2A antibody titer was 3-fold to 10-fold higher for untreated than MAb-treated mice. There was also some increase in IgG (22% ± 13% increase) and neutralization (32% increase) in antibodies with MAb 131-2G prophylaxis at 75 days p.i. Treatment with 131-2G significantly (P ≤ 0.001) decreased the percentage of interleukin-4 (IL-4)-positive CD4 and CD8 cells in RSV-stimulated spleen cells at all times p.i., while the percentage of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) T cells significantly (P ≤ 0.001) increased ≥75 days p.i. The shift from a Th2- to a Th1-biased T cell response in treated compared to untreated mice likely was directed by the much higher levels of T-box transcription factor (T-bet) (≥45% versus <10%) in CD4 and CD8 T cells and lower levels of Gata-3 (≤2% versus ≥ 6%) in CD4 T cells in peptide-stimulated, day 75 p.i. spleen cells. These data show that the RSV G protein affects both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses, and induction of 131-2G-like antibodies might improve the safety and

  1. Bioluminescence and 19F magnetic resonance imaging visualize the efficacy of lysostaphin alone and in combination with oxacillin against Staphylococcus aureus in murine thigh and catheter-associated infection models.

    PubMed

    Hertlein, Tobias; Sturm, Volker; Lorenz, Udo; Sumathy, K; Jakob, Peter; Ohlsen, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococci are the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increasingly, they resist antibiotic treatment owing to the development of multiple antibiotic resistance mechanisms in most strains. Therefore, the activity and efficacy of recombinant lysostaphin as a drug against this pathogen have been evaluated. Lysostaphin exerts high levels of activity against antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The therapeutic value of lysostaphin has been analyzed in two different clinically relevant in vivo models, a catheter-associated infection model and a thigh infection model. We infected mice with luciferase-expressing S. aureus Xen 29, and the efficacies of lysostaphin, vancomycin, oxacillin, and combined lysostaphin-oxacillin were investigated by determining numbers of CFU, detecting bioluminescent signals, and measuring the accumulation of perfluorocarbon emulsion at the site of infection by (19)F magnetic resonance imaging. Lysostaphin treatment significantly reduced the bacterial burden in infected thigh muscles and, after systemic spreading from the catheter, in inner organs. The efficiency of lysostaphin treatment was even more pronounced in combinatorial therapy with oxacillin. These results suggest that recombinant lysostaphin may have potential as an anti-S. aureus drug worthy of further clinical development. In addition, both imaging technologies demonstrated efficacy patterns similar to that of CFU determination, although they proved to be less sensitive. Nonetheless, they served as powerful tools to provide additional information about the course and gravity of infection in a noninvasive manner, possibly allowing a reduction in the number of animals needed for research evaluation of new antibiotics in future studies.

  2. Bioluminescence and 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging Visualize the Efficacy of Lysostaphin Alone and in Combination with Oxacillin against Staphylococcus aureus in Murine Thigh and Catheter-Associated Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Hertlein, Tobias; Sturm, Volker; Lorenz, Udo; Sumathy, K.; Jakob, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococci are the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increasingly, they resist antibiotic treatment owing to the development of multiple antibiotic resistance mechanisms in most strains. Therefore, the activity and efficacy of recombinant lysostaphin as a drug against this pathogen have been evaluated. Lysostaphin exerts high levels of activity against antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The therapeutic value of lysostaphin has been analyzed in two different clinically relevant in vivo models, a catheter-associated infection model and a thigh infection model. We infected mice with luciferase-expressing S. aureus Xen 29, and the efficacies of lysostaphin, vancomycin, oxacillin, and combined lysostaphin-oxacillin were investigated by determining numbers of CFU, detecting bioluminescent signals, and measuring the accumulation of perfluorocarbon emulsion at the site of infection by 19F magnetic resonance imaging. Lysostaphin treatment significantly reduced the bacterial burden in infected thigh muscles and, after systemic spreading from the catheter, in inner organs. The efficiency of lysostaphin treatment was even more pronounced in combinatorial therapy with oxacillin. These results suggest that recombinant lysostaphin may have potential as an anti-S. aureus drug worthy of further clinical development. In addition, both imaging technologies demonstrated efficacy patterns similar to that of CFU determination, although they proved to be less sensitive. Nonetheless, they served as powerful tools to provide additional information about the course and gravity of infection in a noninvasive manner, possibly allowing a reduction in the number of animals needed for research evaluation of new antibiotics in future studies. PMID:24366730

  3. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, D. K.; Somphonsane, R.; Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-12-28

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  4. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

    PubMed

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  5. Models of violently relaxed galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, David; Tremaine, Scott; Johnstone, Doug

    1989-02-01

    The properties of spherical self-gravitating models derived from two distribution functions that incorporate, in a crude way, the physics of violent relaxation are investigated. The first distribution function is identical to the one discussed by Stiavelli and Bertin (1985) except for a change in the sign of the 'temperature', i.e., e exp(-aE) to e exp(+aE). It is shown that these 'negative temperature' models provide a much better description of the end-state of violent relaxation than 'positive temperature' models. The second distribution function is similar to the first except for a different dependence on angular momentum. Both distribution functions yield single-parameter families of models with surface density profiles very similar to the R exp 1/4 law. Furthermore, the central concentration of models in both families increases monotonically with the velocity anisotropy, as expected in systems that formed through cold collapse.

  6. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  7. Resonant relaxation in electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christopher; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.

    2005-04-01

    We compute the leading, chiral charge-changing relaxation term in the quantum transport equations that govern electroweak baryogenesis using the closed time path formulation of nonequilibrium quantum field theory. We show that the relaxation transport coefficients may be resonantly enhanced under appropriate conditions on electroweak model parameters and that such enhancements can mitigate the impact of similar enhancements in the CP-violating source terms. We also develop a power counting in the time and energy scales entering electroweak baryogenesis and include effects through second order in ratios ɛ of the small and large scales. We illustrate the implications of the resonantly enhanced O(ɛ2) terms using the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, focusing on the interplay between the requirements of baryogenesis and constraints obtained from collider studies, precision electroweak data, and electric dipole moment searches.

  8. Relaxation: A Fourth "R" for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick, A. B.

    Relaxation training helps the individual handle tension through concentrating upon efficient use of muscles. A program of progressive relaxation can be easily incorporated into elementary and secondary schools. Objectives of such a program include the following: (a) to learn to relax technically for purposes of complete rest (deep muscle…

  9. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  10. Effects of Various Forms of Relaxation Training on Physiological and Self-Report Measures of Relaxation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinking, Richard H.; Kohl, Marilyn L.

    1975-01-01

    Examines relative effectiveness of four types of relaxation training including Jacobson-Wolpe and electromyograph (EMG) feedback. Dependent measures are EMG recordings and self-report measures of relaxation. All groups reported increased relaxation, but EMG groups were superior in EMG measures of speed of learning and depth of relaxation.…

  11. Relation between Direct Observation of Relaxation and Self-Reported Mindfulness and Relaxation States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hites, Lacey S.; Lundervold, Duane A.

    2013-01-01

    Forty-four individuals, 18-47 (MN 21.8, SD 5.63) years of age, took part in a study examining the magnitude and direction of the relationship between self-report and direct observation measures of relaxation and mindfulness. The Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS), a valid direct observation measure of relaxation, was used to assess relaxed behavior…

  12. Effects of Progressive Relaxation versus Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation with College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    See, John D.; Czerlinsky, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Examined use of biofeedback, relaxation training, or both in a college relaxation class with an enrollment of 33 students. Results indicated students receiving relaxation training plus biofeedback improved significantly more on psychological variables than did students receiving only relaxation training. (Author/ABL)

  13. Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (β=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

  14. Time of relaxation in dusty plasma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Dust particles in plasma may have different values of average kinetic energy for vertical and horizontal motion. The partial equilibrium of the subsystems and the relaxation processes leading to this asymmetry are under consideration. A method for the relaxation time estimation in nonideal dusty plasma is suggested. The characteristic relaxation times of vertical and horizontal motion of dust particles in gas discharge are estimated by analytical approach and by analysis of simulation results. These relaxation times for vertical and horizontal subsystems appear to be different. A single hierarchy of relaxation times is proposed.

  15. Paramagnetic fluorinated nanoemulsions for sensitive cellular fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kislukhin, Alexander A.; Xu, Hongyan; Adams, Stephen R.; Narsinh, Kazim H.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Ahrens, Eric T.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging (19F MRI) probes enable quantitative in vivo detection of cell therapies and inflammatory cells. Here, we describe the formulation of perfluorocarbon-based nanoemulsions with improved sensitivity for cellular MRI. Reduction of the 19F spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) enables rapid imaging and an improved signal-to-noise ratio, thereby improving cell detection sensitivity. We synthesized metal-binding β-diketones conjugated to linear perfluoropolyether (PFPE), formulated these fluorinated ligands as aqueous nanoemulsions, and then metalated them with various transition and lanthanide ions in the fluorous phase. Iron(III) tris-β-diketonate ('FETRIS') nanoemulsions with PFPE have low cytotoxicity (<20%) and superior MRI properties. Moreover, the 19F T1 can readily be reduced by an order of magnitude and tuned by stoichiometric modulation of the iron concentration. The resulting 19F MRI detection sensitivity is enhanced by 3-to-5 fold over previously used tracers at 11.7 T, and is predicted to increase by at least 8-fold at clinical field strength of 3 T. PMID:26974409

  16. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    PubMed Central

    Popov, M.; Popov, V.L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  17. Relaxation of liquid bridge after droplets coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jiangen; Shi, Haiyang; Chen, Guo; Huang, Yingzhou; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the relaxation of liquid bridge after the coalescence of two sessile droplets resting on an organic glass substrate both experimentally and theoretically. The liquid bridge is found to relax to its equilibrium shape via two distinct approaches: damped oscillation relaxation and underdamped relaxation. When the viscosity is low, damped oscillation shows up, in this approach, the liquid bridge undergoes a damped oscillation process until it reaches its stable shape. However, if the viscous effects become significant, underdamped relaxation occurs. In this case, the liquid bridge relaxes to its equilibrium state in a non-periodic decay mode. In depth analysis indicates that the damping rate and oscillation period of damped oscillation are related to an inertial-capillary time scale τc. These experimental results are also testified by our numerical simulations with COMSOL Multiphysics.

  18. Conservation of magnetic helicity during plasma relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.

    1994-07-01

    Decay of the total magnetic helicity during the sawtooth relaxation in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch is much larger than the MHD prediction. However, the helicity decay (3--4%) is smaller than the magnetic energy decay (7--9%), modestly supportive of the helicity conservation hypothesis in Taylor`s relaxation theory. Enhanced fluctuation-induced helicity transport during the relaxation is observed.

  19. Dielectric relaxation in a protein matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.W.; Boxer, S.G.

    1992-06-25

    The dielectric relaxation of a sperm whale ApoMb-DANCA complex is measured by the fluorescence dynamic Stokes shift method. Emission energy increases with decreasing temperature, suggesting that the relaxation activation energies of the rate-limiting motions either depend on the conformational substrate or different types of protein motions with different frequencies participate in the reaction. Experimental data suggest that there may be relaxations on a scale of <100 ps. 61 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Paley-Wiener criterion for relaxation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, K. L.; Rajagopal, A. K.; Rendell, R. W.; Teitler, S.

    1983-11-01

    It is shown how the Paley-Wiener theorem in Fourier-transform theory can provide the bound for physically acceptable relaxation functions for long times. In principle the linear exponential decay function, and hence also a superposition of linear exponential decay functions, does not provide an acceptable description of relaxation phenomenon although the Paley-Wiener bound can be made to approach arbitrarily close to linear exponential. A class of relaxation functions proposed recently obeys the Paley-Wiener bound. The general necessity for time-dependent relaxation rates is emphasized and discussed.

  1. Myocardial contraction-relaxation coupling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Since the pioneering work of Henry Pickering Bowditch in the late 1800s to early 1900s, cardiac muscle contraction has remained an intensely studied topic for several reasons. The heart is located centrally in our body, and its pumping motion demands the attention of the observer. The contraction of the heart encompasses a complex interplay of mechanical, chemical, and electrical properties, and its function can thus be studied from any of these viewpoints. In addition, diseases of the heart are currently killing more people in the Westernized world than any other disease. When combined with the increasing emphasis of research to be clinically relevant, this contributes to the heart remaining a topic of continued basic and clinical investigation. Yet, there are significant aspects of cardiac muscle contraction that are still not well understood. A big complication of the study of cardiac muscle contraction is that there exists no equilibrium among many of the important governing parameters, which include pre- and afterload, intracellular ion concentrations, membrane potential, and velocity and direction of movement. Thus the classic approach of perturbing an equilibrium or a steady state to learn about the role of the perturbing factor in the system cannot be unambiguously interpreted, since each of the parameters that govern contraction are constantly changing, as well as constantly changing their interaction with each other. In this review, presented as the 54th Bowditch Lecture at Experimental Biology meeting in Anaheim in April 2010, I will revisit several governing factors of cardiac muscle relaxation by applying newly developed tools and protocols to isolated cardiac muscle tissue in which the dynamic interactions between the governing factors of contraction and relaxation can be studied. PMID:20852049

  2. Mechanical spectroscopy of Snoek type relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, S. A.; Golovin, I. S.

    2012-09-01

    A review is presented for work in the area of elasticity for metals and alloys with a body-centered cubic lattice caused by diffusion under stress of interstitial atoms, i.e., Snoek relaxation in metals and Snoek type relaxation in alloys. Practical possibilities in analyzing materials of this class by mechanical spectroscopy are demonstrated.

  3. Analysis of sawtooth relaxation oscillations in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, K.; McGuire, K.; Okabayashi, M.

    1982-07-01

    Sawtooth relaxation oscillations are analyzed using the Kadomtsev's disruption model and a thermal relaxation model. The sawtooth period is found to be very sensitive to the thermal conduction loss. Qualitative agreement between these calculations and the sawtooth period observed in several tokamaks is demonstrated.

  4. Dielectric relaxations in partly deuterated ammonium dichromate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, John le G.

    1987-12-01

    Two dielectric relaxations in partly deuterated ammonium dichromate are attributed to reorientations of mixed-isotope ammonium ions. Loss peaks were observed between 20 and 40 K and obey the Arrhenius law with activation energy 1.5 kcal/mol for the stronger relaxation. The dipole moment is of the order of 0.015 D.

  5. On relaxations and aging of various glasses

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Ariel; Oreg, Yuval; Imry, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Slow relaxation occurs in many physical and biological systems. “Creep” is an example from everyday life. When stretching a rubber band, for example, the recovery to its equilibrium length is not, as one might think, exponential: The relaxation is slow, in many cases logarithmic, and can still be observed after many hours. The form of the relaxation also depends on the duration of the stretching, the “waiting time.” This ubiquitous phenomenon is called aging, and is abundant both in natural and technological applications. Here, we suggest a general mechanism for slow relaxations and aging, which predicts logarithmic relaxations, and a particular aging dependence on the waiting time. We demonstrate the generality of the approach by comparing our predictions to experimental data on a diverse range of physical phenomena, from conductance in granular metals to disordered insulators and dirty semiconductors, to the low temperature dielectric properties of glasses. PMID:22315418

  6. Enthalpy relaxation and annealing effect in polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Sakatsuji, Waki; Konishi, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-07-01

    The effects of thermal history on the enthalpy relaxation in polystyrene are studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The temperature dependence of the specific heat in the liquid and the glassy states, that of relaxation time, and the exponent of the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts function are determined by measurements of the thermal response against sinusoidal temperature variation. A phenomenological model equation previously proposed to interpret the memory effect in the frozen state is applied to the enthalpy relaxation and the evolution of entropy under a given thermal history is calculated. The annealing below the glass transition temperature produces two effects on enthalpy relaxation: the decay of excess entropy with annealing time in the early stage of annealing and the increase in relaxation time due to physical aging in the later stage. The crossover of these effects is reflected in the variation of temperature of the maximum specific heat observed in the heating process after annealing and cooling.

  7. Postseismic relaxation and transient creep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Svarc, J.L.; Yu, S.-B.

    2005-01-01

    Postseismic deformation has been observed in the epicentral area following the 1992 Landers (M = 7.3), 1999 Chi-Chi (M = 7.6), 1999 Hector Mine (M = 7.1), 2002 Denali (M = 7.9), 2003 San Simeon (M = 6.5), and 2004 Parkfield (M = 6.0) earthquakes. The observations consist of repeated GPS measurements of the position of one monument relative to another (separation ???100 km). The early observations (t < 0.1 year) are well fit by the function a' + c'log(t), where t is the time after the earthquake and a' and c' are constants chosen to fit the data. Because a log(t) time dependence is characteristic of transient (primary) creep, the early postseismic response may be governed by transient creep as Benioff proposed in 1951. That inference is provisional as the stress conditions prevailing in postseismic relaxation are not identical to the constant stress condition in creep experiments. The observed logarithmic time dependence includes no characteristic time that might aid in identifying the micromechanical cause.

  8. Supervised Discrete Hashing With Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Gui, Jie; Liu, Tongliang; Sun, Zhenan; Tao, Dacheng; Tan, Tieniu

    2016-12-29

    Data-dependent hashing has recently attracted attention due to being able to support efficient retrieval and storage of high-dimensional data, such as documents, images, and videos. In this paper, we propose a novel learning-based hashing method called ''supervised discrete hashing with relaxation'' (SDHR) based on ''supervised discrete hashing'' (SDH). SDH uses ordinary least squares regression and traditional zero-one matrix encoding of class label information as the regression target (code words), thus fixing the regression target. In SDHR, the regression target is instead optimized. The optimized regression target matrix satisfies a large margin constraint for correct classification of each example. Compared with SDH, which uses the traditional zero-one matrix, SDHR utilizes the learned regression target matrix and, therefore, more accurately measures the classification error of the regression model and is more flexible. As expected, SDHR generally outperforms SDH. Experimental results on two large-scale image data sets (CIFAR-10 and MNIST) and a large-scale and challenging face data set (FRGC) demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of SDHR.

  9. Nonlinear electrochemical relaxation around conductors.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kevin T; Bazant, Martin Z

    2006-07-01

    We analyze the simplest problem of electrochemical relaxation in more than one dimension-the response of an uncharged, ideally polarizable metallic sphere (or cylinder) in a symmetric, binary electrolyte to a uniform electric field. In order to go beyond the circuit approximation for thin double layers, our analysis is based on the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations of dilute solution theory. Unlike most previous studies, however, we focus on the nonlinear regime, where the applied voltage across the conductor is larger than the thermal voltage. In such strong electric fields, the classical model predicts that the double layer adsorbs enough ions to produce bulk concentration gradients and surface conduction. Our analysis begins with a general derivation of surface conservation laws in the thin double-layer limit, which provide effective boundary conditions on the quasineutral bulk. We solve the resulting nonlinear partial differential equations numerically for strong fields and also perform a time-dependent asymptotic analysis for weaker fields, where bulk diffusion and surface conduction arise as first-order corrections. We also derive various dimensionless parameters comparing surface to bulk transport processes, which generalize the Bikerman-Dukhin number. Our results have basic relevance for double-layer charging dynamics and nonlinear electrokinetics in the ubiquitous PNP approximation.

  10. Multifrequency Pulsed EPR and the Characterization of Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2017-01-01

    In fluid solution motion-dependent processes dominate electron spin lattice relaxation for nitroxides and semiquinones at frequencies between 250 MHz and 34 GHz. For triarylmethyl radicals motion-dependent processes dominate spin lattice relaxation at frequencies below about 3 GHz. The frequency dependence of relaxation provides invaluable information about dynamic processes occurring with characteristic times on the order of the electron Zeeman frequency. Relaxation mechanisms, methods of measuring spin-lattice relaxation, and motional processes for nitroxide, semiquinone, and triarylmethyl radicals are discussed. PMID:26478481

  11. Spin-spin cross relaxation and spin-Hamiltonian spectroscopy by optical pumping of Pr/sup 3+/:LaF/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect

    Lukac, M.; Otto, F.W.; Hahn, E.L.

    1989-02-01

    We report the observation of an anticrossing in solid-state laser spectroscopy produced by cross relaxation. Spin-spin cross relaxation between the /sup 141/Pr- and /sup 19/F-spin reservoirs in Pr/sup 3+/:LaF/sub 3/ and its influence on the /sup 141/Pr NMR spectrum is detected by means of optical pumping. The technique employed combines optical pumping and hole burning with either external magnetic field sweep or rf resonance saturation in order to produce slow transient changes in resonant laser transmission. At a certain value of the external Zeeman field, where the energy-level splittings of Pr and F spins match, a level repulsion and discontinuity of the Pr/sup 3+/ NMR lines is observed. This effect is interpreted as the ''anticrossing'' of the combined Pr-F spin-spin reservoir energy states. The Zeeman-quadrupole-Hamiltonian spectrum of the hyperfine optical ground states of Pr/sup 3+/:LaF/sub 3/ is mapped out over a wide range of Zeeman magnetic fields. A new scheme is proposed for dynamic polarization of nuclei by means of optical pumping, based on resonant cross relaxation between rare spins and spin reservoirs.

  12. Plasma Relaxation Dynamics Moderated by Current Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, Robert; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Yoshida, Zensho

    2014-10-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamics (IMHD) is strongly constrained by an infinite number of microscopic constraints expressing mass, entropy and magnetic flux conservation in each infinitesimal fluid element, the latter preventing magnetic reconnection. By contrast, in the Taylor-relaxed equilibrium model all these constraints are relaxed save for global magnetic flux and helicity. A Lagrangian is presented that leads to a new variational formulation of magnetized fluid dynamics, relaxed MHD (RxMHD), all static solutions of which are Taylor equilibrium states. By postulating that some long-lived macroscopic current sheets can act as barriers to relaxation, separating the plasma into multiple relaxation regions, a further generalization, multi-relaxed MHD (MRxMHD), is developed. These concepts are illustrated using a simple two-region slab model similar to that proposed by Hahm and Kulsrud--the formation of an initial shielding current sheet after perturbation by boundary rippling is calculated using MRxMHD and the final island state, after the current sheet has relaxed through a reconnection sequence, is calculated using RxMHD. Australian Research Council Grant DP110102881.

  13. Relaxation processes in disaccharide sugar glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yoon-Hwae; Kwon, Hyun-Joung; Seo, Jeong-Ah; Shin, Dong-Myeong; Ha, Ji-Hye; Kim, Hyung-Kook

    2013-02-01

    We represented relaxation processes of disaccharide sugars (anhydrous trehalose and maltose) in supercooled and glassy states by using several spectroscopy techniques which include a broadband dielectric loss spectroscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (Retvield analysis) methods which are powerful tools to measure the dynamics in glass forming materials. In a dielectric loss spectroscopy study, we found that anhydrous trehalose and maltose glasses have an extra relaxation process besides α-, JG β- and γ-relaxations which could be related to a unique property of glycoside bond in disaccharides. In photon correlation spectroscopy study, we found an interesting compressed exponential relaxation at temperatures above 140°C. The q-1 dependence of its relaxation time corresponds to an ultraslow ballistic motion due to the local structure rearrangements. In the same temperature range, we found the glycosidic bond structure changes in trehalose molecule from the Raman and the Retvield X-ray diffraction measurements indicating that the observed compressed exponential relaxation in supercooled liquid trehalose could be resulted in the glycosidic bond structure change. Therefore, the overall results from this study might support the fact that the superior bioprotection ability of disaccharide sugar glasses might originate from this unique relaxation process of glycosidic bond.

  14. Relaxation of impact basins on icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Paul J.; Squyres, Steven W.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of relaxation of very large impact craters on icy satellites is addressed and the extent to which such studies can help place constraints on the nature of such satellite interiors is investigated. Very general calculations aimed at understanding the nature of relaxation of large impact structures, including the directions, relaxation velocities, and stress levels, are presented. The dependence of relaxation on such factors as silicate core size and viscosity gradients in the ice is examined. The general results are used to address whether comparing the current morphology of impact basins to estimates of their original shape will yield an understanding of the thermal and mechanical structure of the interiors of the icy satellites. It is found that the relaxation rates derived from models of satellite interiors can provide constraints on viscous layer thicknesses. High thermal gradients can permit substantial relaxation even in thin viscous layers. Finally, the constraints on the internal structure of Tethys arising from the extremely relaxed state of the Odysseus basin and the existence of Ithaca Chasma are discussed.

  15. A Study of the Effect of Heat-Treatment on the Morphology of Nafion Ionomer Dispersion for Use in the Passive Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC)

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ting; Zhang, Haifeng; Zou, Zhiqing; Khatun, Sufia; Akins, Daniel; Adam, Yara; Suarez, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Aggregation in heat-treated Nafion ionomer dispersion and 117 membrane are investigated by 1H and 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra, spin-lattice relaxation time, and self-diffusion coefficient measurements. Results demonstrate that heat-treatment affects the average Nafion particle size in aqueous dispersions. Measurements on heat-treated Nafion 117 membrane show changes in the 1H isotropic chemical shift and no significant changes in ionic conductivity. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of prepared cathode catalyst layer containing the heat-treated dispersions reveals that the surface of the electrode with the catalyst ink that has been pretreated at ca. 80 °C exhibits a compact and uniform morphology. The decrease of Nafion ionomer’s size results in better contact between catalyst particles and electrolyte, higher electrochemically active surface area, as well as significant improvement in the DMFC’s performance, as verified by electrochemical analysis and single cell evaluation. PMID:24958431

  16. [A study on Korean concepts of relaxation].

    PubMed

    Park, J S

    1992-01-01

    Relaxation technique is an independent nursing intervention used in various stressful situations. The concept of relaxation must be explored for the meaning given by the people in their traditional thought and philosophy. Korean relaxation technique, wanting to become culturally acceptable and effective, is learning to recognize and develop Korean concepts, experiences, and musics of relaxation. This study was aimed at discovering Korean concepts, experiences and musics of relaxation and contributing the development of the relaxation technique for Korean people. The subjects were 59 nursing students, 39 hospitalized patients, 61 housewives, 21 rural residents and 16 researchers. Data were collected from September 4th to October 24th, 1991 by interviews or questionnaires. The data analysis was done by qualitative research method, and validity assured by conformation of the concept and category by 2 nursing scientists who had written a Master's thesis on the relaxation technique. The results of the study were summarized as follows; 1. The meaning of the relaxation concept; From 298 statements, 107 concepts were extracted and then 5 categories "Physical domain", "Psychological domain", "Complex domain", "Situation", and "environment" were organized. 'Don't have discomforts, 'don't have muscle tension', 'don't have energy (him in Korean)', 'don't have activities' subcategories were included in "Physical domain". 'Don't have anxiety', 'feel good', 'emotional stability', 'don't have wordly thoughts', 'feel one's brain muddled', 'loss of desire' subcategories were included in "physical domain" 'Comfort body and mind', 'don't have tension of body and mind', 'be sagged' 'liveliness of thoughts' subcategories were included in "Complex domain". 'Rest', 'sleep', 'others' subcategories were included in "Situation domain". And 'quite environment' & 'comfortable environment' subcategories were included in "Environmental domain". 2. The experiences of the relaxation; From 151

  17. Le Chatelier's principle with multiple relaxation channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, R.; Levine, R. D.

    1986-05-01

    Le Chatelier's principle is discussed within the constrained variational approach to thermodynamics. The formulation is general enough to encompass systems not in thermal (or chemical) equilibrium. Particular attention is given to systems with multiple constraints which can be relaxed. The moderation of the initial perturbation increases as additional constraints are removed. This result is studied in particular when the (coupled) relaxation channels have widely different time scales. A series of inequalities is derived which describes the successive moderation as each successive relaxation channel opens up. These inequalities are interpreted within the metric-geometry representation of thermodynamics.

  18. Relaxation time in disordered molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Rodrigo P.; Freire, José A.

    2015-05-28

    Relaxation time is the typical time it takes for a closed physical system to attain thermal equilibrium. The equilibrium is brought about by the action of a thermal reservoir inducing changes in the system micro-states. The relaxation time is intuitively expected to increase with system disorder. We derive a simple analytical expression for this dependence in the context of electronic equilibration in an amorphous molecular system model. We find that the disorder dramatically enhances the relaxation time but does not affect its independence of the nature of the initial state.

  19. Neural control of muscle relaxation in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Elphick, M R; Melarange, R

    2001-03-01

    Smooth muscle relaxation in vertebrates is regulated by a variety of neuronal signalling molecules, including neuropeptides and nitric oxide (NO). The physiology of muscle relaxation in echinoderms is of particular interest because these animals are evolutionarily more closely related to the vertebrates than to the majority of invertebrate phyla. However, whilst in vertebrates there is a clear structural and functional distinction between visceral smooth muscle and skeletal striated muscle, this does not apply to echinoderms, in which the majority of muscles, whether associated with the body wall skeleton and its appendages or with visceral organs, are made up of non-striated fibres. The mechanisms by which the nervous system controls muscle relaxation in echinoderms were, until recently, unknown. Using the cardiac stomach of the starfish Asterias rubens as a model, it has been established that the NO-cGMP signalling pathway mediates relaxation. NO also causes relaxation of sea urchin tube feet, and NO may therefore function as a 'universal' muscle relaxant in echinoderms. The first neuropeptides to be identified in echinoderms were two related peptides isolated from Asterias rubens known as SALMFamide-1 (S1) and SALMFamide-2 (S2). Both S1 and S2 cause relaxation of the starfish cardiac stomach, but with S2 being approximately ten times more potent than S1. SALMFamide neuropeptides have also been isolated from sea cucumbers, in which they cause relaxation of both gut and body wall muscle. Therefore, like NO, SALMFamides may also function as 'universal' muscle relaxants in echinoderms. The mechanisms by which SALMFamides cause relaxation of echinoderm muscle are not known, but several candidate signal transduction pathways are discussed here. The SALMFamides do not, however, appear to act by promoting release of NO, and muscle relaxation in echinoderms is therefore probably regulated by at least two neuronal signalling systems acting in parallel. Recently, other

  20. Elastic and magnetoelastic relaxation behaviour of multiferroic (ferromagnetic + ferroelectric + ferroelastic) Pb(Fe0.5Nb0.5)O3 perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, M. A.; Schiemer, J. A.; Lascu, I.; Harrison, R. J.; Kumar, A.; Katiyar, R. S.; Ortega, N.; Sanchez, D. A.; Salazar Mejia, C.; Schnelle, W.; Echizen, M.; Shinohara, H.; Heap, A. J. F.; Nagaratnam, R.; Dutton, S. E.; Scott, J. F.

    2015-07-01

    Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy has been used to characterize elastic and anelastic anomalies in a polycrystalline sample of multiferroic Pb(Fe0.5Nb0.5)O3 (PFN). Elastic softening begins at ~550 K, which is close to the Burns temperature marking the development of dynamical polar nanoregions. A small increase in acoustic loss at ~425 K coincides with the value of T* reported for polar nanoregions starting to acquire a static or quasi-static component. Softening of the shear modulus by ~30-35% through ~395-320 K, together with a peak in acoustic loss, is due to classical strain/order parameter coupling through the cubic → tetragonal → monoclinic transition sequence of ferroelectric/ferroelastic transitions. A plateau of high acoustic loss below ~320 K is due to the mobility under stress of a ferroelastic microstructure but, instead of the typical effects of freezing of twin wall motion at some low temperature, there is a steady decrease in loss and increase in elastic stiffness below ~85 K. This is attributed to freezing of a succession of strain-coupled defects with a range of relaxation times and is consistent with a report in the literature that PFN develops a tweed microstructure over a wide temperature interval. No overt anomaly was observed near the expected Néel point, ~145 K, consistent with weak/absent spin/lattice coupling but heat capacity measurements showed that the antiferromagnetic transition is actually smeared out or suppressed. Instead, the sample is weakly ferromagnetic up to ~560 K, though it has not been possible to exclude definitively the possibility that this could be due to some magnetic impurity. Overall, evidence from the RUS data is of a permeating influence of static and dynamic strain relaxation effects which are attributed to local strain heterogeneity on a mesoscopic length scale. These, in turn, must have a role in determining the magnetic properties and multiferroic character of PFN.

  1. Spin dynamics in CuO and Cu[sub 1[minus][ital x

    SciTech Connect

    Carretta, P.; Corti, M.; Rigamonti, A. )

    1993-08-01

    [sup 63]Cu nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), nuclear antiferromagnetic resonance (AFNMR), and spin-lattice relaxation, as well as [sup 7]Li NMR and relaxation measurements in CuO and in Cu[sub 1[minus][ital x

  2. Vibrational energy relaxation in liquid oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, K. F.; Egorov, S. A.; Skinner, J. L.

    1998-09-01

    We consider theoretically the relaxation from the first excited vibrational state to the ground state of oxygen molecules in neat liquid oxygen. The relaxation rate constant is related in the usual way to the Fourier transform of a certain quantum mechanical force-force time-correlation function. A result from Egelstaff allows one instead to relate the rate constant (approximately) to the Fourier transform of a classical force-force time-correlation function. This Fourier transform is then evaluated approximately by calculating three equilibrium averages from a classical molecular dynamics simulation. Our results for the relaxation times (at two different temperatures) are within a factor of 5 of the experimental relaxation times, which are in the ms range.

  3. Energy landscape of relaxed amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiquette, Francis; Mousseau, Normand

    2003-09-01

    We analyze the structure of the energy landscape of a well-relaxed 1000-atom model of amorphous silicon using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau). Generating more than 40 000 events starting from a single minimum, we find that activated mechanisms are local in nature, that they are distributed uniformly throughout the model, and that the activation energy is limited by the cost of breaking one bond, independently of the complexity of the mechanism. The overall shape of the activation-energy-barrier distribution is also insensitive to the exact details of the configuration, indicating that well-relaxed configurations see essentially the same environment. These results underscore the localized nature of relaxation in this material.

  4. Relaxation dynamics of a multihierarchical polymer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurjiu, Aurel; Biter, Teodor Lucian; Turcu, Flaviu

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we study the relaxation dynamics of a multihierarchical polymer network built by replicating the Vicsek fractal in dendrimer shape. The relaxation dynamics is investigated in the framework of the generalized Gaussian structure model by employing both Rouse and Zimm approaches. In the Rouse-type approach, we show the iterative procedure whereby the whole eigenvalue spectrum of the connectivity matrix of the multihierarchical structure can be obtained. Remarkably, the general picture that emerges from both approaches, even though we have a mixed growth algorithm, is that the obtained multihierarchical structure preserves the individual relaxation behaviors of its components. The theoretical findings with respect to the splitting of the intermediate domain of the relaxation quantities are well supported by experimental results.

  5. The Irreversible Thermodynamics of Chemical Relaxation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schelly, Z. A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the thermodynamics of relaxation methods, considering (1) mode of perturbation of chemical equilibria, (2) enforced change of the concentrations, and (3) chemical contributions to equations of state. (CS)

  6. Slow spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orendac, Martin; Sedlakova, Lucia; Orendacova, Alzbeta; Vrabel, Peter; Feher, Alexander; Pajerowski, Daniel M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Meisel, Mark W.; Shirai, Masae; Bramwell, Steven T.

    2009-03-01

    Spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7 was investigated using the magnetocaloric effect and susceptibility. The magnetocaloric behavior of Dy2Ti2O7 at temperatures where the orientation of spins is governed by ``ice rules`` (T < Tice) revealed thermally activated relaxation; however, the resulting temperature dependence of the relaxation time is more complicated than anticipated by a mere extrapolation of the corresponding high temperature data [1]. A susceptibility study of Ho2Ti2O7 was performed at T > Tice and in high magnetic fields, and the results suggest a slow relaxation of spins analogous to the behavior reported in a highly polarized cooperative paramagnet [2]. [1] J. Snyder et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 107201. [2] B. G. Ueland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) 027216.

  7. Control of dipolar relaxation in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquiou, B.; Bismut, G.; Beaufils, Q.; Crubellier, A.; Maréchal, E.; Pedri, P.; Vernac, L.; Gorceix, O.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.

    2010-04-01

    We study dipolar relaxation in both ultracold thermal and Bose-condensed Cr atom gases. We show three different ways to control dipolar relaxation, making use of either a static magnetic field, an oscillatory magnetic field, or an optical lattice to reduce the dimensionality of the gas from three-dimensional (3D) to two-dimensional (2D). Although dipolar relaxation generally increases as a function of a static magnetic-field intensity, we find a range of nonzero magnetic-field intensities where dipolar relaxation is strongly reduced. We use this resonant reduction to accurately determine the S=6 scattering length of Cr atoms: a6=103±4a0. We compare this new measurement to another new determination of a6, which we perform by analyzing the precise spectroscopy of a Feshbach resonance in d-wave collisions, yielding a6=102.5±0.4a0. These two measurements provide, by far, the most precise determination of a6 to date. We then show that, although dipolar interactions are long-range interactions, dipolar relaxation only involves the incoming partial wave l=0 for large enough magnetic-field intensities, which has interesting consequences on the stability of dipolar Fermi gases. We then study ultracold Cr gases in a one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice resulting in a collection of independent 2D gases. We show that dipolar relaxation is modified when the atoms collide in reduced dimensionality at low magnetic-field intensities, and that the corresponding dipolar relaxation rate parameter is reduced by a factor up to 7 compared to the 3D case. Finally, we study dipolar relaxation in the presence of rf oscillating magnetic fields, and we show that both the output channel energy and the transition amplitude can be controlled by means of the rf frequency and Rabi frequency.

  8. On convex relaxation of graph isomorphism

    PubMed Central

    Aflalo, Yonathan; Bronstein, Alexander; Kimmel, Ron

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of exact and inexact matching of weighted undirected graphs, in which a bijective correspondence is sought to minimize a quadratic weight disagreement. This computationally challenging problem is often relaxed as a convex quadratic program, in which the space of permutations is replaced by the space of doubly stochastic matrices. However, the applicability of such a relaxation is poorly understood. We define a broad class of friendly graphs characterized by an easily verifiable spectral property. We prove that for friendly graphs, the convex relaxation is guaranteed to find the exact isomorphism or certify its inexistence. This result is further extended to approximately isomorphic graphs, for which we develop an explicit bound on the amount of weight disagreement under which the relaxation is guaranteed to find the globally optimal approximate isomorphism. We also show that in many cases, the graph matching problem can be further harmlessly relaxed to a convex quadratic program with only n separable linear equality constraints, which is substantially more efficient than the standard relaxation involving 2n equality and n2 inequality constraints. Finally, we show that our results are still valid for unfriendly graphs if additional information in the form of seeds or attributes is allowed, with the latter satisfying an easy to verify spectral characteristic. PMID:25713342

  9. Ultrasonic relaxations in lanthanide phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, G.; D'angelo, G.; Federico, M.; Tripodo, G.; Saunders, G. A.; Senin, H. B.

    1994-08-01

    The attenuation and velocity of ultrasonic waves of frequencies in the range of 10 to 90 MHz have been measured in La2O3-P2O5 and Sm2O3-P2O5 glasses with high lanthanide concentrations as a function of temperature between 1.5 and 400 K. Two distinct features characterize the attenuation behavior: (i) a plateau at temperatures below 15 K and (ii) a broad high-temperature peak. The former feature is interpreted in terms of the phonon-assisted relaxation of two-level systems and the latter by assuming the existence of a distribution of thermally activated relaxing centers. For both these mechanisms the product of the deformation potential squared and the density of relaxing particles decreases with increasing lanthanide-ion concentration. This result, taken together with previous observations of the properties of oxide glasses, provides physical insight into the microscopic origin of the relaxation effects and suggests that the source of the low- and high-temperature attenuation mechanisms is the same. At temperatures below 100 K, the sound velocity, after the subtraction of the relaxation and anharmonic contributions, follows a linear law as predicted by the soft-potential model for the relaxation of soft harmonic oscillators. An encouraging agreement is obtained between the parameters regulating this mechanism and those determined from the acoustic attenuation plateau.

  10. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy of phlogopite mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Mohan; Singh, Anupinder; Awasthi, A. M.; Singh, Lakhwant

    2012-11-01

    An in-depth investigation of the dielectric characteristics of annealed phlogopite mica has been conducted in the frequency range 0.1 Hz-10 MHz and over the temperature range 653-873 K through the framework of dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and conductivity formalisms. These formalisms show qualitative similarities in relaxation processes. The frequency dependence of the M″ and dc conductivity is found to obey an Arrhenius law and the activation energy of the phlogopite mica calculated both from dc conductivity and the modulus spectrum is similar, indicating that same type of charge carriers are involved in the relaxation phenomena. The electric modulus and conductivity data have been fitted with the Havriliak-Negami function. Scaling of M‧, M″, ac conductivity has also been performed in order to obtain insight into the relaxation mechanisms. The scaling behaviour indicates that the relaxation describes the same mechanism at different temperatures. The relaxation mechanism was also examined using the Cole-Cole approach. The study elaborates that the investigation regarding the temperature and frequency dependence of dielectric relaxation in the phlogopite mica will be helpful for various cutting edge applications of this material in electrical engineering.

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Magnetohydrodynamics of Plasma Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.

    1998-06-01

    This monograph on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation in plasmas by Ortolani and Schnack occupies a fascinating niche in the plasma physics literature. It is rare in the complex and often technically sophisticated subject of plasma physics to be able to isolate a topic and deal with it comprehensively in a mere 180 pages. Furthermore, it brings a refreshingly original and personal approach to the treatment of plasma relaxation, synthesizing the experiences of the two authors to produce a very readable account of phenomena appearing in such diverse situations as laboratory reversed field pinches (RFPs) and the solar corona. Its novelty lies in that, while it does acknowledge the seminal Taylor theory of relaxation as a general guide, it emphasizes the role of large scale numerical MHD simulations in developing a picture for the relaxation phenomena observed in experiment and nature. Nevertheless, the volume has some minor shortcomings: a tendency to repetitiveness and some omissions that prevent it being entirely self-contained. The monograph is divided into nine chapters, with the first a readable, `chatty', introduction to the physics and phenomena of relaxation discussed in the later chapters. Chapter 2 develops the tools for describing relaxation processes, namely the resistive MHD model, leading to a discussion of resistive instabilities and the stability properties of RFPs. This chapter demonstrates the authors' confessed desire to avoid mathematical detail with a rather simplified discussion of Δ' and magnetic islands; it also sets the stage for their own belief, or thesis, that numerical simulation of the non-linear consequences of the MHD model is the best approach to explaining the physics of relaxation. Nevertheless, in Chapter 3 they provide a reasonably good account and critique of one analytic approach that is available, and which is the commonly accepted picture for relaxation in pinches - the Taylor relaxation theory based on the conservation of

  12. A Comparative Evaluation of Three Relaxation Training Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Jeffrey E.

    Comparison was made between the effectiveness of three relaxation training procedures: (1) Behavioral Relaxation Training, which consisted of training in relaxing specific parts of the body and controlling breathing; (2) Meditation (based on Benson's procedure for eliciting the relaxation response); and (3) Seashore Sounds "Attention Focusing,"…

  13. Electrical Relaxation in Rare Earth Doped Cubic Lead Fluoride.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    PAGE (W v,. Data Fleted ) READ INSTRUCTIONSREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE BEFRE CMPETINGFORSORE OMPLETIN FO M 1. REPORT NUMBER j2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3...For the smallest rare earths, however, at least nine .* relaxations are found. The concentration studies indicate multiple relaxations for certain...relaxations are found. The concentration studies indicate multiple relaxations for certain sites. Both simple sites and clusters are observed for

  14. Fractal geometry impact on nuclear relaxation in irregular pores.

    PubMed

    Sapoval, B; Russ, S; Petit, D; Korb, J P

    1996-01-01

    We apply a fractal description of pore surface irregularity to study the nuclear relaxation of a confined liquid. From the introduction of a length characteristic of diffusive and surface relaxing properties we describe three different relaxation regimes. These regimes show that the nuclear relaxation can be drastically modified by pore surface irregularity.

  15. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    SciTech Connect

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; Hijazi, Hassan; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutions to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution

  16. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  17. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-21

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  18. Hot Electron Energy Relaxation in Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chia-Hung

    We present experimental results on hot electron relaxation in doped bulk GaAs and quantum wells. Using steady state photoluminescence we measured the electron -LO phonon scattering time for thermalized hot electrons in quantum wells. The results are in good agreement with our theoretical calculation of electron-LO phonon interaction in two dimensional systems. Within random phase approximation, the emitted LO phonons may couple to two dimensional plasmons. Both the screening and phonon reabsorption properties can be drastically changed as a function of electron density, temperature and phonon lifetime. Theoretical energy relaxation rates, including dynamical screening and phonon reabsorption effects, will be presented. For hot electrons with energies well above the LO phonon energy, we developed a two-beam, lock-in technique to measure the energy-resolved cooling rate. In the case of quantum wells, hot electrons relax at a constant rate. For heavily doped bulk GaAs, the relaxation rate is inversely proportional to electron kinetic energy. The new method demonstrates itself as a valuable way to study the fast initial relaxation which would otherwise need femtosecond pulse laser techniques.

  19. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:26996253

  20. Anomalous Enthalpy Relaxation in Vitreous Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-08-01

    It is a challenge to calorimetrically determine the glass transition temperature (Tg) of vitreous silica. Here we demonstrate that this challenge mainly arises from the extreme sensitivity of the Tg to the hydroxyl content in vitreous silica, but also from the irreversibility of its glass transition when repeating the calorimetric scans. It is known that the liquid fragility (i.e., the speed of the viscous slow-down of a supercooled liquid at its Tg during cooling) has impact on enthalpy relaxation in glass. Here we find that vitreous silica (as a strong system) exhibits striking anomalies in both glass transition and enthalpy relaxation compared to fragile oxide systems. The anomalous enthalpy relaxation of vitreous silica is discovered by performing the hperquenching-annealing-calorimetry experiments. We argue that the strong systems like vitreous silica and vitreous Germania relax in a structurally cooperative manner, whereas the fragile ones do in a structurally independent fashion. We discuss the origin of the anomalous enthalpy relaxation in the HQ vitreous silica.

  1. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    DOE PAGES

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutionsmore » to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution« less

  2. Mozart versus new age music: relaxation states, stress, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan C; Joyce, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Smith's (2001) Attentional Behavioral Cognitive (ABC) relaxation theory proposes that all approaches to relaxation (including music) have the potential for evoking one or more of 15 factor-analytically derived relaxation states, or "R-States" (Sleepiness, Disengagement, Rested / Refreshed, Energized, Physical Relaxation, At Ease/Peace, Joy, Mental Quiet, Childlike Innocence, Thankfulness and Love, Mystery, Awe and Wonder, Prayerfulness, Timeless/Boundless/Infinite, and Aware). The present study investigated R-States and stress symptom-patterns associated with listening to Mozart versus New Age music. Students (N = 63) were divided into three relaxation groups based on previously determined preferences. Fourteen listened to a 28-minute tape recording of Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and 14 listened to a 28-minute tape of Steven Halpern's New Age Serenity Suite. Others (n = 35) did not want music and instead chose a set of popular recreational magazines. Participants engaged in their relaxation activity at home for three consecutive days for 28 minutes a session. Before and after each session, each person completed the Smith Relaxation States Inventory (Smith, 2001), a comprehensive questionnaire tapping 15 R-States as well as the stress states of somatic stress, worry, and negative emotion. Results revealed no differences at Session 1. At Session 2, those who listened to Mozart reported higher levels of At Ease/Peace and lower levels of Negative Emotion. Pronounced differences emerged at Session 3. Mozart listeners uniquely reported substantially higher levels of Mental Quiet, Awe and Wonder, and Mystery. Mozart listeners reported higher levels, and New Age listeners slightly elevated levels, of At Ease/Peace and Rested/Refreshed. Both Mozart and New Age listeners reported higher levels of Thankfulness and Love. In summary, those who listened to Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik reported more psychological relaxation and less stress than either those who listened to

  3. Structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.; Lee, Y.H.; Chen, C.; Pang, T.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon (a-Si) using a tight-binding molecular-dynamics method. The most significant difference between vacancies in a-Si and those in crystalline silicon (c-Si) is that the deep gap states do not show up in a-Si. This difference is explained through the unusual behavior of the structural relaxation near the vacancies in a-Si, which enhances the sp{sup 2} + p bonding near the band edges. They have also observed that the vacancies do not migrate below 450 K although some of them can still be annihilated, particularly at high defect density due to large structural relaxation.

  4. Swelling and Stress Relaxation in Portland Brownstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, I.; Scherer, G.

    2003-04-01

    Portland Brownstone (PB) is an arkose sandstone extensively used in the northeast-ern USA during the nineteenth century. This reddish-brown stone contains a fraction of swelling clays that are thought to contribute to its degradation upon cycles of wet-ting and drying. During drying events, contraction of the drying surface leads to stresses approaching the tensile strength of the stone. However, we have found that the magnitude of these stresses is limited by the ability of the stone to undergo stress relaxation. In this paper we describe novel methods to determine the magnitude of the stresses and the rate at which they develop and relax. We also discuss the influ-ence of surfactants on the magnitude of swelling and the rate of the stress relaxation of PB. The implications of our findings for the understanding of damage due to swelling of clays are discussed.

  5. A general relaxation theory of simple liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merilo, M.; Morgan, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    A relatively simple relaxation theory to account for the behavior of liquids under dynamic conditions was proposed. The general dynamical equations are similar in form to the phenomenological relaxation equations used in theories of viscoelasticity, however, they differ in that all the coefficients of the present equations are expressed in terms of thermodynamic and molecular quantities. The theory is based on the concept that flow in a liquid distorts both the radial and the velocity distribution functions, and that relaxation equations describing the return of these functions to their isotropic distributions, characterizing a stationary liquid, can be written. The theory was applied to the problems of steady and oscillatory shear flows and to the propagation of longitudinal waves. In all cases classical results are predicted for strain rates, and an expression for the viscosity of a liquid, simular to the Macedo-Litovitz equation, is obtained.

  6. Dielectric relaxation of high-k oxides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Frequency dispersion of high-k dielectrics was observed and classified into two parts: extrinsic cause and intrinsic cause. Frequency dependence of dielectric constant (dielectric relaxation), that is the intrinsic frequency dispersion, could not be characterized before considering the effects of extrinsic frequency dispersion. Several mathematical models were discussed to describe the dielectric relaxation of high-k dielectrics. For the physical mechanism, dielectric relaxation was found to be related to the degree of polarization, which depended on the structure of the high-k material. It was attributed to the enhancement of the correlations among polar nanodomain. The effect of grain size for the high-k materials' structure mainly originated from higher surface stress in smaller grain due to its higher concentration of grain boundary. PMID:24180696

  7. Dielectric relaxation in AC powder electroluminescent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Su, Haibin; Tan, Chuan Seng; Wong, Terence Kin Shun; Teo, Ronnie Jin Wah

    2017-01-01

    The dielectric properties of AC powder electroluminescent devices were measured and analyzed using complex impedance spectroscopy to determine the relaxation processes occurring within the devices. The relaxation processes identified were ascribed to the electrode polarization caused by ion accumulation at the electrode/resin interfaces, the Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars effects at the (ZnS or BaTiO3) particle/resin interfaces, and the dipolar reorientation of polymer chains in the resin matrix. Each relaxation process was represented by its corresponding equivalent circuit component. Space charge polarization at the electrodes were represented by a Warburg element, a resistor, and a constant phase element. The resin matrix, ZnS/resin and BaTiO3/resin interfaces could each be modeled by a resistor and a capacitor in parallel. The simulated equivalent circuits for three different printed structures showed good fitting with their experimental impedance results.

  8. Stratospheric Relaxation in IMPACT's Radiation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Edis, T; Grant, K; Cameron-Smith, P

    2006-11-13

    While Impact incorporates diagnostic radiation routines from our work in previous years, it has not previously included the stratospheric relaxation required for forcing calculations. We have now implemented the necessary changes for stratospheric relaxation, tested its stability, and compared the results with stratosphere temperatures obtained from CAM3 met data. The relaxation results in stable temperature profiles in the stratosphere, which is encouraging for use in forcing calculations. It does, however, produce a cooling bias when compared to CAM3, which appears to be due to differences in radiation calculations rather than the interactive treatment of ozone. The cause of this bias is unclear as yet, but seems to be systematic and hence cancels out when differences are taken relative to a control simulation.

  9. Vibrational relaxation of chloroiodomethane in cold argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Amber; Sibert, Edwin L.

    2013-10-01

    Electronically exciting the C-I stretch in the molecule chloroiodomethane CH2ClI embedded in a matrix of argon at 12 K can lead to an isomer, iso-chloroiodomethane CH2Cl-I, that features a chlorine iodine bond. By temporally probing the isomer at two different frequencies of 435 nm and 485 nm, multiple timescales for isomerization and vibrational energy relaxation were inferred [T. J. Preston, et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 114503 (2011)]. This relaxation is studied theoretically using molecular dynamics by considering 2 and 3 dimensional models. Multiple decay rate constants of the same order of magnitude as the experiment are observed. These decay rate constants are interpreted within the context of the Landau-Teller theory. Sensitivity of the decay rate constants on the bath and system parameters shed more light into the mechanism of vibrational energy relaxation.

  10. Proton relaxation times in cancer diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Santhana Mariappan, S.V.; Subramanian, S.; Chandrakumar, N.; Rajalakshmi, K.R.; Sukumaran, S.S.

    1988-10-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation parameters (T1, T2) were measured for over 100 malignant and normal tissue samples of various organs of the human body. The purpose of this study was to estimate the reliability of the NMR technique in discriminating normal from malignant tissues. Breast and cervix samples were analyzed by using the malignancy index concept and we were able to distinguish malignant and normal tissue in 17 out of 18 breast samples and 5 out of 7 cervix samples. Since the relaxation data of a normal control population of the other organs were not available, the data for these are reported without any further analysis. The distinction between carcinomas and sarcomas was also made by using the estimated relaxation parameters. Malignancy indices of breast tissue samples for linear least-squares and nonlinear two-parameter and three-parameter least-squares procedures were calculated and used to evaluate the relative efficiencies in discriminating malignant from normal tissues.

  11. Relaxation Phenomena in Optically Pumped Mercury Isotopes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-15

    AD-AIFIG 332 SINGER CO LITTLE FALLS NJ KEARFOTT DIV F /G 20/10 RELAXATION PHENOMENA IN OPTICALLY PUMPED MERCURY ISOTOPES.(U) AUG 80 P A HEIMANN, J H...2. GVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 7 MOSRqr 80 - 7 44 1 j D,&s~ *> T4iTLE (and SubtUte; S. TYPE O F REPOR ൏ APER_2-VA Relaxation...Phenomena in Optically Interim SAticJepait./ Pupd__uyIooe. 1 Jul R79- Jun. l90 ’ 9 PEFORMNG OGANZA I ’AU!ANO C RSSEI. PORAM EMNd󈧰 T. NOJ ECT RS 7

  12. Synthetic aperture radar autofocus via semidefinite relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuang-Hung; Wiesel, Ami; Munson, David C

    2013-06-01

    The autofocus problem in synthetic aperture radar imaging amounts to estimating unknown phase errors caused by unknown platform or target motion. At the heart of three state-of-the-art autofocus algorithms, namely, phase gradient autofocus, multichannel autofocus (MCA), and Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus (FMCA), is the solution of a constant modulus quadratic program (CMQP). Currently, these algorithms solve a CMQP by using an eigenvalue relaxation approach. We propose an alternative relaxation approach based on semidefinite programming, which has recently attracted considerable attention in other signal processing problems. Experimental results show that our proposed methods provide promising performance improvements for MCA and FMCA through an increase in computational complexity.

  13. A Bayesian method for analysing relaxation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocci Brazzano, L.; Pellizza, L. J.; Matteo, C. L.; Sorichetti, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of electrical and mechanical properties of material, relies on a precise analysis of the relaxation spectra. We explore the ability of a Bayesian method to achieve an accurate estimation of spectral parameters. We implemented a parallel-tempering Markov-chain Monte Carlo algorithm and used it to fit simulated and measured spectra. An exhaustive testing of the code shows that it presents an extremely good performance, accurately fitting complex spectra under strong noise and overlapping components. We conclude that this technique is quite suitable for relaxation spectra analysis, complementing classical methods.

  14. Fast temperature relaxation model in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    We present a fast model to calculate the temperature-relaxation rates in dense plasmas. The electron-ion interaction-potential is calculated by combining a Yukawa approach and a finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model. We include the internal energy as well as the excess energy of ions using the QEOS model. Comparisons with molecular dynamics simulations and calculations based on an average-atom model are presented. This approach allows the study of the temperature relaxation in a two-temperature electron-ion system in warm and hot dense matter.

  15. Soft Sphere Suspensions: Flow and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workamp, Marcel; Dijksman, Joshua A.

    We experimentally study the role of particle elasticity on the rheology of soft sphere suspensions. Experiments consist of custom designed particles with tuneable stiffness. These particles allow us to probe the role of elastic timescales, relaxation and anisotropy in a custom 3D printed shear cell. We find robust rheological features, such as a flow instability, that are not well captured by existing models for suspension flows. In addition, we find relaxation effects after shear even in the absence of shear or thermal fluctuations. We aim to integrate these findings in the emerging unified framework for structured fluids.

  16. The efficacy of relaxation training with children.

    PubMed

    Richter, N C

    1984-06-01

    This paper reviews studies that have examined the efficacy of relaxation training techniques in the treatment of childhood disorders. Methodological problems encountered in doing research in this area resemble those found in working with an adult population: imprecise definitions of subject populations and use of a variety of dependent variables from one study to another. Findings suggest that relaxation training is at least as effective as other treatment approaches for a variety of learning, behavioral, and physiological disorders when it is continued over an extended period of time and is augmented by other supportive measures. Needs for future research include better follow-up studies and further investigations with a behaviorally disruptive population.

  17. Magnetic Relaxation Detector for Microbead Labels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Paul Peng; Skucha, Karl; Duan, Yida; Megens, Mischa; Kim, Jungkyu; Izyumin, Igor I.; Gambini, Simone; Boser, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    A compact and robust magnetic label detector for biomedical assays is implemented in 0.18-μm CMOS. Detection relies on the magnetic relaxation signature of a microbead label for improved tolerance to environmental variations and relaxed dynamic range requirement, eliminating the need for baseline calibration and reference sensors. The device includes embedded electromagnets to eliminate external magnets and reduce power dissipation. Correlated double sampling combined with offset servo loops and magnetic field modulation, suppresses the detector offset to sub-μT. Single 4.5-μm magnetic beads are detected in 16 ms with a probability of error <0.1%. PMID:25308988

  18. Vibrational relaxation in hypersonic flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Willard E.; Miner, Gilda A.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical formulations of vibrational relaxation are derived from first principles for application to fluid dynamic computations of hypersonic flow fields. Relaxation within and immediately behind shock waves is shown to be substantially faster than that described in current numerical codes. The result should be a significant reduction in nonequilibrium radiation overshoot in shock layers and in radiative heating of hypersonic vehicles; these results are precisely the trends needed to bring theoretical predictions more in line with flight data. Errors in existing formulations are identified and qualitative comparisons are made.

  19. Dielectric relaxation characteristics of muscovite mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Lakhwant; Singh, Mohan; Awasthi, A. M.; Kumar, Jitender

    2014-04-01

    In the present work, the dielectric relaxation phenomenon in muscovite mica has been studied over the frequency range 0.1 Hz-10 MHz and in the temperature range of 653-853K, using the dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and conductivity formalisms. The values of the activation energy obtained from electric modulus and conductivity data are found to be nearly similar, suggesting that same types of charge carriers are involved in the relaxation mechanism. This type of study will explore the potential of this material for various applications in electrical engineering.

  20. Nonlocal and collective relaxation in stellar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1993-01-01

    The modal response of stellar systems to fluctuations at large scales is presently investigated by means of analytic theory and n-body simulation; the stochastic excitation of these modes is shown to increase the relaxation rate even for a system which is moderately far from instability. The n-body simulations, when designed to suppress relaxation at small scales, clearly show the effects of large-scale fluctuations. It is predicted that large-scale fluctuations will be largest for such marginally bound systems as forming star clusters and associations.

  1. Adiabatic fast passage application in solid state NMR study of cross relaxation and molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, M.; Woźniak-Braszak, A.; Jurga, K.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the benefits of using fast adiabatic passage for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame. A homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2 MHz and 28.411 MHz for protons and fluorines, respectively, has been enhanced with microcontroller direct digital synthesizer DDS controller [1-4]. This work briefly describes how to construct a low-cost and easy-to-assemble adiabatic extension set for homemade and commercial spectrometers based on recently very popular Arduino shields. The described set was designed for fast adiabatic generation. Timing and synchronization problems are discussed. The cross-relaxation experiments with different initial states of the two spin systems have been performed. Contrary to our previous work [5] where the steady-state NOE experiments were conducted now proton spins 1H are polarized in the magnetic field B0 while fluorine spins 19F are perturbed by selective saturation for a short time and then the system is allowed to evolve for a period in the absence of a saturating field. The adiabatic passage application leads to a reversal of magnetization of fluorine spins and increases the amplitude of the signal.

  2. High relaxivity MRI contrast agents part 2: Optimization of inner- and second-sphere relaxivity

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Vincent; Dumas, Stephane; Sun, Wei-Chuan; Troughton, Jeffrey S.; Greenfield, Matthew T.; Caravan, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Rationale and objectives The observed relaxivity of gadolinium based contrast agents has contributions from the water molecule(s) that bind directly to the gadolinium ion (inner-sphere water), long lived water molecules and exchangeable protons that make up the second-sphere of coordination, and water molecules that diffuse near the contrast agent (outer-sphere). Inner- and second-sphere relaxivity can both be increased by optimization of the lifetimes of the water molecules and protons in these coordination spheres, the rotational motion of the complex, and the electronic relaxation of the gadolinium ion. We sought to identify new high relaxivity contrast agents by systematically varying the donor atoms that bind directly to gadolinium to increase inner-sphere relaxivity and concurrently including substituents that influence the second-sphere relaxivity. Methods Twenty GdDOTA derivatives were prepared and their relaxivity determined in presence and absence of human serum albumin as a function of temperature and magnetic field. Data was analyzed to extract the underlying molecular parameters influencing relaxivity. Each compound had a common albumin-binding group and an inner-sphere donor set comprising the 4 tertiary amine N atoms from cyclen, an α-substituted acetate oxygen atom, two amide oxygen atoms, an inner-sphere water oxygen atom, and a variable donor group. Each amide nitrogen was substituted with different groups to promote hydrogen bonding with second-sphere water molecules. Results Relaxivites at 0.47T and 1.4T, 37 °C, in serum albumin ranged from 16.0 to 58.1 mM−1s−1 and from 12.3 to 34.8 mM−1s−1 respectively. The reduction of inner-sphere water exchange typical of amide donor groups could be offset by incorporating a phosphonate or phenolate oxygen atom donor in the first coordination sphere resulting in higher relaxivity. Amide nitrogen substitution with pendant phosphonate or carboxylate groups increased relaxivity by as much as 88

  3. Relaxation/Covert Rehearsal for Problematic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fling, Sheila; McKenzie, Patricia

    A study was conducted to determine whether group relaxation training combined with guided fantasy as a method of covert cognitive rehearsal would be more effective than story-listening or no special treatment in enabling "problematic" children to decrease muscle tension, activity level, and behavior problems and to increase academic performance…

  4. Relaxation dynamics of multilayer triangular Husimi cacti.

    PubMed

    Galiceanu, Mircea; Jurjiu, Aurel

    2016-09-14

    We focus on the relaxation dynamics of multilayer polymer structures having, as underlying topology, the Husimi cactus. The relaxation dynamics of the multilayer structures is investigated in the framework of generalized Gaussian structures model using both Rouse and Zimm approaches. In the Rouse type-approach, we determine analytically the complete eigenvalues spectrum and based on it we calculate the mechanical relaxation moduli (storage and loss modulus) and the average monomer displacement. First, we monitor these physical quantities for structures with a fixed generation number and we increase the number of layers, such that the linear topology will smoothly come into play. Second, we keep constant the size of the structures, varying simultaneously two parameters: the generation number of the main layer, G, and the number of layers, c. This fact allows us to study in detail the crossover from a pure Husimi cactus behavior to a predominately linear chain behavior. The most interesting situation is found when the two limiting topologies cancel each other. For this case, we encounter in the intermediate frequency/time domain regions of constant slope for different values of the parameter set (G, c) and we show that the number of layers follows an exponential-law of G. In the Zimm-type approach, which includes the hydrodynamic interactions, the quantities that describe the mechanical relaxation dynamics do not show scaling behavior as in the Rouse model, except the limiting case, namely, a very high number of layers and low generation number.

  5. Relaxation processes of densified silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Antoine; Martinez, Valérie; de Ligny, Dominique; Champagnon, Bernard; Martinet, Christine

    2017-03-01

    Densified SiO2 glasses, obtained from different pressure and temperature routes, have been annealed over a wide range of temperatures far below the glass transition temperature (500 °C-900 °C). Hot and cold compressions were useful to separate the effects of pressure and the compression temperature. In situ micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to follow the structural evolution during the thermal relaxation. A similar glass structure between the non-densified silica and the recovered densified silica after the temperature annealing demonstrates a perfect recovery of the non-densified silica glass structure. While the density decreases monotonically, the structural relaxation takes place through a more complex mechanism, which shows that density is not a sufficient parameter to fully characterize the structure of densified silica glass. The relaxation takes place through a transitory state, consisting in an increase of the network inhomogeneity, shown by an increase in the intensity of the D2 band which is associated with 3 membered rings. The activation energy of these processes is 255 ± 45 kJ/mol for the hot compressed samples. The kinetic is overall faster for the cold compressed samples. In that last case, the relaxation is partially activated by internal stresses release.

  6. Dipole Relaxation in an Electric Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Richard M.

    1980-01-01

    Derives an expression for the orientational entropy of a rigid rod (electric dipole) from Boltzmann's equation. Subsequent application of Newton's second law of motion produces Debye's classical expression for the relaxation of an electric dipole in a viscous medium. (Author/GS)

  7. Collection Development: Relaxation & Meditation, September 1, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lettus, Dodi

    2010-01-01

    One of the first books to document the relationship between stress and physical and emotional health was "The Relaxation Response" by Herbert Benson, M.D., with Miriam Z. Klipper. Originally published in 1975, the book grew out of Benson's observations as a cardiologist and his research as a fellow at Harvard Medical School. Benson's study of…

  8. An Introduction to Relaxed Hand Anthropometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Anthropometric data comparing the length of the relaxed hand with the flat, straightened hand are presented. The correlation coefficient between the hand length in the two positions is not high. A forthcoming comprehensive research program on the anthropometry of the hand is revealed.

  9. Relaxation for Children. (Revised and Expanded Edition.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickard, Jenny

    Intended as a guide to reduce negative stress in children, this book suggests relaxation and meditation techniques to help children cope with stressful events. Part 1 provides an introduction to the format of the book. Part 2 contains summaries of the 10 sessions that make up the program. Each session has six sequential stages in which students…

  10. Charge Relaxation Dynamics of an Electrolytic Nanocapacitor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Understanding ion relaxation dynamics in overlapping electric double layers (EDLs) is critical for the development of efficient nanotechnology-based electrochemical energy storage, electrochemomechanical energy conversion, and bioelectrochemical sensing devices as well as the controlled synthesis of nanostructured materials. Here, a lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is employed to simulate an electrolytic nanocapacitor subjected to a step potential at t = 0 for various degrees of EDL overlap, solvent viscosities, ratios of cation-to-anion diffusivity, and electrode separations. The use of a novel continuously varying and Galilean-invariant molecular-speed-dependent relaxation time (MSDRT) with the LB equation recovers a correct microscopic description of the molecular-collision phenomena and enhances the stability of the LB algorithm. Results for large EDL overlaps indicated oscillatory behavior for the ionic current density, in contrast to monotonic relaxation to equilibrium for low EDL overlaps. Further, at low solvent viscosities and large EDL overlaps, anomalous plasmalike spatial oscillations of the electric field were observed that appeared to be purely an effect of nanoscale confinement. Employing MSDRT in our simulations enabled modeling of the fundamental physics of the transient charge relaxation dynamics in electrochemical systems operating away from equilibrium wherein Nernst–Einstein relation is known to be violated. PMID:25678941

  11. Relaxation dynamics of multilayer triangular Husimi cacti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiceanu, Mircea; Jurjiu, Aurel

    2016-09-01

    We focus on the relaxation dynamics of multilayer polymer structures having, as underlying topology, the Husimi cactus. The relaxation dynamics of the multilayer structures is investigated in the framework of generalized Gaussian structures model using both Rouse and Zimm approaches. In the Rouse type-approach, we determine analytically the complete eigenvalues spectrum and based on it we calculate the mechanical relaxation moduli (storage and loss modulus) and the average monomer displacement. First, we monitor these physical quantities for structures with a fixed generation number and we increase the number of layers, such that the linear topology will smoothly come into play. Second, we keep constant the size of the structures, varying simultaneously two parameters: the generation number of the main layer, G, and the number of layers, c. This fact allows us to study in detail the crossover from a pure Husimi cactus behavior to a predominately linear chain behavior. The most interesting situation is found when the two limiting topologies cancel each other. For this case, we encounter in the intermediate frequency/time domain regions of constant slope for different values of the parameter set (G, c) and we show that the number of layers follows an exponential-law of G. In the Zimm-type approach, which includes the hydrodynamic interactions, the quantities that describe the mechanical relaxation dynamics do not show scaling behavior as in the Rouse model, except the limiting case, namely, a very high number of layers and low generation number.

  12. BRIEF REPORT: The colour relaxation equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaofei, Zhang; Jiarong, Li

    1996-03-01

    Colour diffusion in quark - gluon plasma (QGP) is investigated from the transport equations of QGP. The pure non-Abelian collision term describing the colour diffusion in QGP is obtained, the expression for colour relaxation time is derived and the physical picture of the colour diffusion in QGP is shown.

  13. Relaxation in bolted thermoplastic composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Walter J.; Schmitt, Ron R.

    1993-04-01

    The long term effects of the relaxation of fastener clamp-up force on the strength of mechanically fastened joints were investigated through a test program of single-shear joints. Static tests of two graphite/thermoplastic composite materials, IM6/KIII and IM8/APC (HTA), established joint bearing strength as a function of clamp-up force for both protruding head and countersunk fasteners. Test results indicated that joint bearing strength of both materials increased by as much as twenty-eight percent over the range of clamp-up force. Short-term fastener clamp-up force relaxation was monitored with special bolt force sensor washers. The results of these tests indicated that the fastener clamp-up force decreased an average of six percent from the initial value during the short-term room temperature tests and was projected to be as high as sixteen percent after 100,000 hours of service. The relaxation rate at the elevated temperature of 250F was projected to be as high as thirty-seven percent for HTA and sixty percent for KIII after 100,000 hours of service. It was concluded that the short-term relaxation of the clamp-up force did not significantly lower the bearing strength of either material, but an extended exposure to 250F could affect the bearing strength.

  14. Relaxation Treatment for Insomnia: A Component Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolfolk, Robert L.; McNulty, Terrence F.

    1983-01-01

    Compared four relaxation treatments for sleep onset insomnia with a waiting-list control. Treatments varied in presence or absence of muscular tension-release instructions and in foci of attention. Results showed all treatment conditions reduced latency of sleep onset and fatigue; visual focusing best reduced the number of nocturnal awakenings.…

  15. Towards a Calm Baby and Relaxed Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaper, Karen Kennedy

    1982-01-01

    Reviews research findings concerning benefits of particular forms of infant stimulation. Suggests stimulation has a soothing effect on infants. Proposes that, because many parents react with anxiety to infant stress, the use of these stimulation techniques may not only soothe the infant, but also relax the parents. (Author/RC)

  16. Electron Spin Relaxation in Irradiated Solids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-01

    the development and use of ELDOR techniques to study the spectral diffusion in irradiated L-alanine and other irradiated organic solids. Pulsed STELDOR...and pulsed two-frequency ELDOR methods were developed and the details of the implementation is reported. The assignment of relaxation times that gave

  17. Dielectric relaxation of CdSe nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sayantani; Dutta, Alo; Ghosh, Binita; Banerjee, Sourish; Sinha, T. P.

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles of cadmium selenide (CdSe) have been synthesized by soft chemical route using mercaptoethanol as a capping agent. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope measurements show that the prepared sample belongs to sphalerite structure with the average particle size of 25 nm. The band gap of the material is found to be 2.1 eV. The photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra of the sample are measured at various excitation wavelengths. The PL spectra appear in the visible region, and the emission feature depends on the wavelength of the excitation. Impedance spectroscopy is applied to investigate the dielectric relaxation of the sample in a temperature range from 323 to 473 K and in a frequency range from 42 Hz to 1.1 MHz. The complex impedance plane plot has been analyzed by an equivalent circuit consisting of two serially connected R-CPE units, each containing a resistance (R) and a constant phase element (CPE). The dielectric relaxation of the sample is investigated in the electric modulus formalism. The temperature dependent relaxation times obey the Arrhenius law. The Havriliak-Negami model is used to investigate the dielectric relaxation mechanism in the sample. The frequency dependent conductivity spectra are found to obey the power law.

  18. Relaxation processes in administered-rate pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.; Arnold, Michael R.

    2000-10-01

    We show how the theory of anelasticity unifies the observed dynamics and proposed models of administered-rate products. This theory yields a straightforward approach to rate model construction that we illustrate by simulating the observed relaxation dynamics of two administered rate products. We also demonstrate how the use of this formalism leads to a natural definition of market friction.

  19. Stretched Exponential relaxation in pure Se glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S.; Ravindren, S.; Boolchand, P.

    A universal feature of glasses is the stretched exponential relaxation, f (t) = exp[ - t / τ ] β . The model of diffusion of excitations to randomly distributed traps in a glass by Phillips1 yields the stretched exponent β = d[d +2] where d, the effective dimensionality. We have measured the enthalpy of relaxation ΔHnr (tw) at Tg of Se glass in modulated DSC experiments as glasses age at 300K and find β = 0.43(2) for tw in the 0 relaxation is a narrowing of the glass transition width from 7.1°C to 1.4°C, and the ΔHnr term increasing from 0.21 cal/gm to 0.92 cal/gm. In bulk GexSe100-x glasses as x increases to 20%, the length of the polymeric Sen chains between the Ge-crosslinks decreases to n = 2. and the striking relaxation effects nearly vanish. J.C. Phillips, Rep.Prog.Phys. 59 , 1133 (1996). Supported by NSF Grant DMR 08-53957.

  20. Controlling spin relaxation with a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienfait, Audrey; Pla, Jarryd; Kubo, Yuimaru; Zhou, Xin; Stern, Michael; Lo, Cheuk; Weis, Christopher; Schenkel, Thomas; Vion, Denis; Esteve, Daniel; Morton, John; Bertet, Patrice

    Spontaneous emission of radiation is one of the fundamental relaxation mechanisms for a quantum system. For spins, however, it is negligible compared to non-radiative relaxation processes due to their weak coupling to the electromagnetic field. In 1946, Purcell realized that spontaneous emission is strongly enhanced when the quantum system is placed in a resonant cavity - an effect now used to control the lifetime of systems with an electrical dipole. Here, by coupling donor spins in silicon to a high quality factor superconducting microwave cavity of small mode volume, we reach the regime where spontaneous emission constitutes the dominant spin relaxation channel. The relaxation rate is increased by three orders of magnitude when the spins are tuned to the cavity resonance, showing it can be engineered and controlled on-demand. Our results provide a novel way to initialize any spin into its ground state, with applications in magnetic resonance and quantum information processing. They also show for the first time an alteration of spin dynamics by quantum fluctuations, a step towards the coherent magnetic coupling of a spin to microwave photons.