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Sample records for 19q idh1 mutation

  1. Mutant IDH1 is required for IDH1 mutated tumor cell growth.

    PubMed

    Jin, Genglin; Pirozzi, Christopher J; Chen, Lee H; Lopez, Giselle Y; Duncan, Christopher G; Feng, Jie; Spasojevic, Ivan; Bigner, Darell D; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai

    2012-08-01

    Frequent somatic hotspot mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) have been identified in gliomas, acute myeloid leukemias, chondrosarcomas, and other cancers, providing a likely avenue for targeted cancer therapy. However, whether mutant IDH1 protein is required for maintaining IDH1 mutated tumor cell growth remains unknown. Here, using a genetically engineered inducible system, we report that selective suppression of endogenous mutant IDH1 expression in HT1080, a fibrosarcoma cell line with a native IDH1(R132C) heterozygous mutation, significantly inhibits cell proliferation and decreases clonogenic potential. Our findings offer insights into changes that may contribute to the inhibition of cell proliferation and offer a strong preclinical rationale for utilizing mutant IDH1 as a valid therapeutic target. PMID:22885298

  2. IDH1 Mutation in Gliomas in Mosul City - Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Mohammed Sami

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IDH1 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 1) mutation might be encounter in the low grade glioma and directs the progression of the tumor to a higher grade. OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of IDH1 mutations in gliomas and to correlate the IDH1 positivity with the type and grade of tumors, the age and sex of the patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retro– and prospective case series study. One hundred and nine cases of intracranial gliomas were collected between 2008 and 2014 from Mosul Private Laboratories and Al-Jamboree Teaching Hospitals in Mosul. IDH1 mutations were assessed immunohistochemically using anti-IDH1 R132H mouse monoclonal antibody. RESULTS: IDH1 mutation was perceived in 34.86% of gliomas. In adult gliomas, the secondary glioblastoma and the low-grade astrocytoma had the greatest values of IDH1 positivity (88.88% and 62.5% respectively), followed by oligoastrocytoma/oligodendroglioma (50.0%), and anaplastic astrocytoma (47.36%). The primary glioblastomsa showed 17.64% IDH1 positivity. Males and females expressed the IDH1 equally. While, there was no role of IDH1 in pediatric gliomas. CONCLUSION: IDH1 mutation is commonly present in adult gliomas particularly in low-grade gliomas, and secondary glioblastoma, with equal sex distribution, but it has no role in pediatric gliomas.

  3. IDH1 Mutation Induces Reprogramming of Pyruvate Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Garcia, Jose L; Viswanath, Pavithra; Eriksson, Pia; Cai, Larry; Radoul, Marina; Chaumeil, Myriam M; Blough, Michael; Luchman, H Artee; Weiss, Samuel; Cairncross, J Gregory; Phillips, Joanna J; Pieper, Russell O; Ronen, Sabrina M

    2015-08-01

    Mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) catalyzes the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate but also elicits additional metabolic changes. Levels of both glutamate and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity have been shown to be affected in U87 glioblastoma cells or normal human astrocyte (NHA) cells expressing mutant IDH1, as compared with cells expressing wild-type IDH1. In this study, we show how these phenomena are linked through the effects of IDH1 mutation, which also reprograms pyruvate metabolism. Reduced PDH activity in U87 glioblastoma and NHA IDH1 mutant cells was associated with relative increases in PDH inhibitory phosphorylation, expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-3, and levels of hypoxia inducible factor-1α. PDH activity was monitored in these cells by hyperpolarized (13)C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((13)C-MRS), which revealed a reduction in metabolism of hyperpolarized 2-(13)C-pyruvate to 5-(13)C-glutamate, relative to cells expressing wild-type IDH1. (13)C-MRS also revealed a reduction in glucose flux to glutamate in IDH1 mutant cells. Notably, pharmacological activation of PDH by cell exposure to dichloroacetate (DCA) increased production of hyperpolarized 5-(13)C-glutamate in IDH1 mutant cells. Furthermore, DCA treatment also abrogated the clonogenic advantage conferred by IDH1 mutation. Using patient-derived mutant IDH1 neurosphere models, we showed that PDH activity was essential for cell proliferation. Taken together, our results established that the IDH1 mutation induces an MRS-detectable reprogramming of pyruvate metabolism, which is essential for cell proliferation and clonogenicity, with immediate therapeutic implications. PMID:26045167

  4. Mutations in CIC and IDH1 cooperatively regulate 2-hydroxyglutarate levels and cell clonogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Chittaranjan, Suganthi; Chan, Susanna; Yang, Cindy; Yang, Kevin C.; Chen, Vincent; Moradian, Annie; Firme, Marlo; Song, Jungeun; Go, Nancy E.; Blough, Michael D.; Chan, Jennifer A.; Cairncross, J. Gregory; Gorski, Sharon M.; Morin, Gregg B.; Yip, Stephen; Marra, Marco A.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of oligodendrogliomas (ODGs) exhibit combined losses of chromosomes 1p and 19q and mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1-R132H or IDH2-R172K). Approximately 70% of ODGs with 1p19q co-deletions harbor somatic mutations in the Capicua Transcriptional Repressor (CIC) gene on chromosome 19q13.2. Here we show that endogenous long (CIC-L) and short (CIC-S) CIC proteins are predominantly localized to the nucleus or cytoplasm, respectively. Cytoplasmic CIC-S is found in close proximity to the mitochondria. To study wild type and mutant CIC function and motivated by the paucity of 1p19q co-deleted ODG lines, we created HEK293 and HOG stable cell lines ectopically co-expressing CIC and IDH1. Non-mutant lines displayed increased clonogenicity, but cells co-expressing the mutant IDH1-R132H with either CIC-S-R201W or -R1515H showed reduced clonogenicity in an additive manner, demonstrating cooperative effects in our assays. Expression of mutant CIC-R1515H increased cellular 2-Hydroxyglutarate (2HG) levels compared to wild type CIC in IDH1-R132H background. Levels of phosphorylated ATP-citrate Lyase (ACLY) were lower in cell lines expressing mutant CIC-S proteins compared to cells expressing wild type CIC-S, supporting a cytosolic citrate metabolism-related mechanism of reduced clonogenicity in our in vitro model systems. ACLY or phospho-ACLY were similarly reduced in CIC-mutant 1p19q co-deleted oligodendroglioma patient samples. PMID:25277207

  5. Cancer-Associated IDH1 Mutations Produce 2-hydroxyglutarate

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, L.; White, D; Gross, S; Bennett, B; Bittinger, M; Driggers, E; Fantin, V; Jang, H; Jin, S; et al.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the enzyme cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are a common feature of a major subset of primary human brain cancers. These mutations occur at a single amino acid residue of the IDH1 active site, resulting in loss of the enzyme's ability to catalyse conversion of isocitrate to {alpha}-ketoglutarate. However, only a single copy of the gene is mutated in tumours, raising the possibility that the mutations do not result in a simple loss of function. Here we show that cancer-associated IDH1 mutations result in a new ability of the enzyme to catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of {alpha}-ketoglutarate to R(-)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG). Structural studies demonstrate that when arginine 132 is mutated to histidine, residues in the active site are shifted to produce structural changes consistent with reduced oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate and acquisition of the ability to convert {alpha}-ketoglutarate to 2HG. Excess accumulation of 2HG has been shown to lead to an elevated risk of malignant brain tumours in patients with inborn errors of 2HG metabolism. Similarly, in human malignant gliomas harbouring IDH1 mutations, we find markedly elevated levels of 2HG. These data demonstrate that the IDH1 mutations result in production of the onco-metabolite 2HG, and indicate that the excess 2HG which accumulates in vivo contributes to the formation and malignant progression of gliomas.

  6. Establishment of a novel monoclonal antibody SMab-1 specific for IDH1-R132S mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Mika Kato; Tian, Wei; Takano, Shingo; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Sawa, Yoshihiko; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Goto, Kaoru; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Kitanaka, Chifumi; Kato, Yukinari

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} IDH1 mutations are early and frequent genetic alterations in gliomas. {yields} We newly established an anti-IDH1-R132S-specific mAb SMab-1. {yields} SMab-1 reacted with the IDH1-R132S peptide, but not with other IDH1 mutants. {yields} SMab-1 specifically stained the IDH1-R132S-expressing glioblastoma cells in immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry. {yields} SMab-1 should be useful in diagnosis of mutation-bearing gliomas. -- Abstract: Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations, which are early and frequent genetic alterations in gliomas, are specific to a single codon in the conserved and functionally important Arginine 132 (R132) in IDH1. We earlier established a monoclonal antibody (mAb), IMab-1, which is specific for R132H-containing IDH1 (IDH1-R132H), the most frequent IDH1 mutation in gliomas. To establish IDH1-R132S-specific mAb, we immunized mice with R132S-containing IDH1 (IDH1-R132S) peptide. After cell fusion using Sendai virus envelope, IDH1-R132S-specific mAbs were screened in ELISA. One mAb, SMab-1, reacted with the IDH1-R132S peptide, but not with other IDH1 mutants. Western-blot analysis showed that SMab-1 reacted only with the IDH1-R132S protein, not with IDH1-WT protein or IDH1 mutants, indicating that SMab-1 is IDH1-R132S-specific. Furthermore, SMab-1 specifically stained the IDH1-R132S-expressing glioblastoma cells in immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry, but did not react with IDH1-WT or IDH1-R132H-containing glioblastoma cells. We newly established an anti-IDH1-R132S-specific mAb SMab-1 for use in diagnosis of mutation-bearing gliomas.

  7. Mutational status of IDH1 in uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Patrick J; Kung, Yungtai; Warrick, Joshua I; Chang, Shu-Hong; Keene, C Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Uveal (intraocular) melanoma is an uncommon malignancy that comprises a small percentage of all melanoma cases. While many uveal melanomas harbor mutations in the BRCA-Associated Protein 1 (BAP1) gene, the genetics of non-BAP1 associated tumors are not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that a small subset of non-uveal melanomas hold mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), but the mutational status of IDH in uveal melanoma is unclear. Mutations in IDH are strongly prognostic and predictive of tumor behavior in other cancers, mainly diffuse gliomas, which commonly contain the IDH1-R132H mutation. For this study, we hypothesized that uveal melanoma may contain the IDH1-R132H mutation, similar to non-uveal melanoma and other cancers. A search of our institutional pathology files identified 50 consecutive cases of uveal melanoma with additional material utilized for retrospective IDH1-R132H immunohistochemical testing. The demographics of these patients included similar ages, gender distributions, and other clinical characteristics as described in previous studies. Similarly, histological subtype distributions and the presence of high risk pathologic features were consistent with other reports. All 50 of the uveal melanoma cases demonstrated negativity for IDH1-R132H by immunohistochemistry. This rate is unlike that of non-uveal melanoma and further supports their distinct molecular oncogenic profile. PMID:27155448

  8. IDH1 and IDH2 Mutations in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Adam; Holmen, Sheri; Colman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2, originally discovered in 2009, occur in the vast majority of low grade gliomas and secondary high grade gliomas. These mutations, which occur early in gliomagenesis, change the function of the enzymes, causing them to produce 2-hydroxyglutarate, a possible oncometabolite, and to not produce NADPH. IDH mutations are oncogenic, although whether the mechanism is through alterations in hydroxylases, redox potential, cellular metabolism, or gene expression is not clear. The mutations also drive increased methylation in gliomas. Gliomas with mutated IDH1 and IDH2 have improved prognosis compared to gliomas with wild-type IDH. Mutated IDH can now be detected by immunohistochemistry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. No drugs currently target mutated IDH, although this remains an area of active research. PMID:23532369

  9. IDH1/2 mutations target a key hallmark of cancer by deregulating cellular metabolism in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunzhi; Moore, Lynette M.; Li, Xia; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) enzymes have recently become a focal point for research aimed at understanding the biology of glioma. IDH1 and IDH2 are mutated in 50%–80% of astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, oligoastrocytomas, and secondary glioblastomas but are seldom mutated in primary glioblastomas. Gliomas with IDH1/2 mutations always harbor other molecular aberrations, such as TP53 mutation or 1p/19q loss. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations may serve as prognostic factors because patients with an IDH-mutated glioma survive significantly longer than those with an IDH–wild-type tumor. However, the molecular pathogenic role of IDH1/2 mutations in the development of gliomas is unclear. The production of 2-hydroxyglutarate and enhanced NADP+ levels in tumor cells with mutant IDH1/2 suggest mechanisms through which these mutations contribute to tumorigenesis. Elucidating the pathogenesis of IDH mutations will improve understanding of the molecular mechanisms of gliomagenesis and may lead to development of a new molecular classification system and novel therapies. PMID:23877318

  10. IDH1 R132H mutation generates a distinct phospholipid metabolite profile in glioma.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Morteza; Hamans, Bob C; Navis, Anna C; van Horssen, Remco; Bathen, Tone F; Gribbestad, Ingrid S; Leenders, William P; Heerschap, Arend

    2014-09-01

    Many patients with glioma harbor specific mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase gene IDH1 that associate with a relatively better prognosis. IDH1-mutated tumors produce the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate. Because IDH1 also regulates several pathways leading to lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that IDH1-mutant tumors have an altered phospholipid metabolite profile that would impinge on tumor pathobiology. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed (31)P-MRS imaging in mouse xenograft models of four human gliomas, one of which harbored the IDH1-R132H mutation. (31)P-MR spectra from the IDH1-mutant tumor displayed a pattern distinct from that of the three IDH1 wild-type tumors, characterized by decreased levels of phosphoethanolamine and increased levels of glycerophosphocholine. This spectral profile was confirmed by ex vivo analysis of tumor extracts, and it was also observed in human surgical biopsies of IDH1-mutated tumors by (31)P high-resolution magic angle spinning spectroscopy. The specificity of this profile for the IDH1-R132H mutation was established by in vitro (31)P-NMR of extracts of cells overexpressing IDH1 or IDH1-R132H. Overall, our results provide evidence that the IDH1-R132H mutation alters phospholipid metabolism in gliomas involving phosphoethanolamine and glycerophosphocholine. These new noninvasive biomarkers can assist in the identification of the mutation and in research toward novel treatments that target aberrant metabolism in IDH1-mutant glioma. PMID:25005896

  11. IDH1 Mutations Alter Citric Acid Cycle Metabolism and Increase Dependence on Oxidative Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Grassian, Alexandra R.; Parker, Seth J.; Davidson, Shawn M.; Divakarun, Ajit S.; Green, Courtney R.; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L.; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D.; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Murphy, Anne N.; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed 13C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation. PMID:24755473

  12. New Developments in the Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Targeting of the IDH1 Mutation in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Lilia; Hong, Christopher S.; Yang, Chunzhang; Zhuang, Zhengping; Heiss, John D.

    2015-01-01

    In the last five years, IDH1 mutations in human malignancies have significantly shaped the diagnosis and management of cancer patients. Ongoing intense research efforts continue to alter our understanding of the role of the IDH1 mutation in tumor formation. Currently, evidence suggests the IDH1 mutation to be an early event in tumorigenesis with multiple downstream oncogenic consequences including maintenance of a hypermethylator phenotype, alterations in HIF signalling, and disruption of collagen maturation contributing to a cancer-promoting extracellular matrix. The most recent reports elucidating these mechanisms is described in this review with an emphasis on the pathogenesis of the IDH1 mutation in glioma. Conflicting findings from various studies are discussed, in order to highlight areas warranting further research. Finally, the latest progress in developing novel therapies against the IDH1 mutation is presented, including recent findings from ongoing phase 1 clinical trials and the exciting prospect of vaccine immunotherapy targeting the IDH1 mutant protein. PMID:25678837

  13. IDH1 mutation detection by droplet digital PCR in glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yi-ying; Li, Jian-feng; Guo, Cheng-cheng; Chen, Fu-rong; Su, Hong-kai; Zhao, Hua-fu; Long, Ya-kang; Shao, Jian-yong; To, Shing shun Tony; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2015-11-24

    Glioma is the most frequent central nervous system tumor in adults. The overall survival of glioma patients is disappointing, mostly due to the poor prognosis of glioblastoma (Grade IV glioma). Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is a key factor in metabolism and catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate. Mutations in IDH genes are observed in over 70% of low-grade gliomas and some cases of glioblastoma. As the most frequent mutation, IDH1(R132H) has been served as a predictive marker of glioma patients. The recently developed droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technique generates a large amount of nanoliter-sized droplets, each of which carries out a PCR reaction on one template. Therefore, ddPCR provides high precision and absolute quantification of the nucleic acid target, with wide applications for both research and clinical diagnosis. In the current study, we collected 62 glioma tissue samples (Grade II to IV) and detected IDH1 mutations by Sanger direct sequencing, ddPCR, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). With the results from Sanger direct sequencing as the standard, the characteristics of ddPCR were compared with qRT-PCR. The data indicated that ddPCR was much more sensitive and much easier to interpret than qRT-PCR. Thus, we demonstrated that ddPCR is a reliable and sensitive method for screening the IDH mutation. Therefore, ddPCR is able to applied clinically in predicting patient prognosis and selecting effective therapeutic strategies. Our data also supported that the prognosis of Grade II and III glioma was better in patients with an IDH mutation than in those without mutation. PMID:26485760

  14. IDH1 mutation detection by droplet digital PCR in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yi-ying; Li, Jian-feng; Guo, Cheng-cheng; Chen, Fu-rong; Su, Hong-kai; Zhao, Hua-fu; Long, Ya-kang; Shao, Jian-yong; Tony To, Shing-shun; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most frequent central nervous system tumor in adults. The overall survival of glioma patients is disappointing, mostly due to the poor prognosis of glioblastoma (Grade IV glioma). Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is a key factor in metabolism and catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate. Mutations in IDH genes are observed in over 70% of low-grade gliomas and some cases of glioblastoma. As the most frequent mutation, IDH1(R132H) has been served as a predictive marker of glioma patients. The recently developed droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technique generates a large amount of nanoliter-sized droplets, each of which carries out a PCR reaction on one template. Therefore, ddPCR provides high precision and absolute quantification of the nucleic acid target, with wide applications for both research and clinical diagnosis. In the current study, we collected 62 glioma tissue samples (Grade II to IV) and detected IDH1 mutations by Sanger direct sequencing, ddPCR, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). With the results from Sanger direct sequencing as the standard, the characteristics of ddPCR were compared with qRT-PCR. The data indicated that ddPCR was much more sensitive and much easier to interpret than qRT-PCR. Thus, we demonstrated that ddPCR is a reliable and sensitive method for screening the IDH mutation. Therefore, ddPCR is able to applied clinically in predicting patient prognosis and selecting effective therapeutic strategies. Our data also supported that the prognosis of Grade II and III glioma was better in patients with an IDH mutation than in those without mutation. PMID:26485760

  15. IDH1 mutations at residue p.R132 (IDH1(R132)) occur frequently in high-grade gliomas but not in other solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Bleeker, Fonnet E; Lamba, Simona; Leenstra, Sieger; Troost, Dirk; Hulsebos, Theo; Vandertop, W Peter; Frattini, Milo; Molinari, Francesca; Knowles, Margaret; Cerrato, Aniello; Rodolfo, Monica; Scarpa, Aldo; Felicioni, Lara; Buttitta, Fiamma; Malatesta, Sara; Marchetti, Antonio; Bardelli, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Systematic sequence profiling of the Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) genome has recently led to the identification of somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene. Interestingly, only the evolutionarily conserved residue R132 located in the substrate binding site of IDH1 was found mutated in GBM. At present, the occurrence and the relevance of p.R132 (IDH1(R132)) variants in tumors other than GBMs is largely unknown. We searched for mutations at position R132 of the IDH1 gene in a panel of 672 tumor samples. These included high-grade glioma, gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), melanoma, bladder, breast, colorectal, lung, ovarian, pancreas, prostate, and thyroid carcinoma specimens. In addition, we assessed a panel of 84 cell lines from different tumor lineages. Somatic mutations affecting the IDH1(R132) residue were detected in 20% (23 of 113) high-grade glioma samples. In addition to the previously reported p.R132H and p.R132S alleles, we identified three novel somatic mutations (p.R132C, p.R132G, and p.R132L) affecting residue IDH1(R132) in GBM. Strikingly, no IDH1 mutations were detected in the other tumor types. These data indicate that cancer mutations affecting IDH1(R132) are tissue-specific, and suggest that it plays a unique role in the development of high-grade gliomas. PMID:19117336

  16. Clonal Analysis in Recurrent Astrocytic, Oligoastrocytic and Oligodendroglial Tumors Implicates IDH1- Mutation as Common Tumor Initiating Event

    PubMed Central

    von Eckardstein, Kajetan; Kiwit, Jürgen; Stockhammer, Florian; Horaczek, Jörn A.; Veelken, Julian; Herold-Mende, Christel; Jeuken, Judith; von Deimling, Andreas; Mueller, Wolf

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate the dynamics of inter- and intratumoral molecular alterations during tumor progression in recurrent gliomas. Methodology/Principal Findings To address intertumoral heterogeneity we investigated non- microdissected tumor tissue of 106 gliomas representing 51 recurrent tumors. To address intratumoral heterogeneity a set of 16 gliomas representing 7 tumor pairs with at least one recurrence, and 4 single mixed gliomas were investigated by microdissection of distinct oligodendroglial and astrocytic tumor components. All tumors and tumor components were analyzed for allelic loss of 1p/19q (LOH 1p/19q), for TP53- mutations and for R132 mutations in the IDH1 gene. The investigation of non- microdissected tumor tissue revealed clonality in 75% (38/51). Aberrant molecular alterations upon recurrence were detected in 25% (13/51). 64% (9/14) of these were novel and associated with tumor progression. Loss of previously detected alterations was observed in 36% (5/14). One tumor pair (1/14; 7%) was significant for both. Intratumoral clonality was detected in 57% (4/7) of the microdissected tumor pairs and in 75% (3/4) of single microdissected tumors. 43% (3/7) of tumor pairs and one single tumor (25%) revealed intratumoral heterogeneity. While intratumoral heterogeneity affected both the TP53- mutational status and the LOH1p/19q status, all tumors with intratumoral heterogeneity shared the R132 IDH1- mutation as a common feature in both their microdissected components. Conclusions/Significance The majority of recurrent gliomas are of monoclonal origin. However, the detection of divertive tumor cell clones in morphological distinct tumor components sharing IDH1- mutations as early event may provide insight into the tumorigenesis of true mixed gliomas. PMID:22844452

  17. Mutational analysis of IDH1 codon 132 in glioblastomas and other common cancers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mi Ran; Kim, Min Sung; Oh, Ji Eun; Kim, Yoo Ri; Song, Sang Yong; Seo, Seong Il; Lee, Ji Youl; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2009-07-15

    Missense somatic mutations in IDH1 gene affecting codon 132 have recently been reported in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and other gliomas. The recurrent nature of the IDH1 mutations in the same amino acid strongly suggests that the mutations may play important roles in the pathogenesis of glial tumors. The aim of this study was to see whether the IDH1 codon 132 mutations occur in other human cancers besides glial tumors. We also attempted to confirm the occurrence of the IDH1 mutations in GBM of Korean patients. We have analyzed 1,186 cancer tissues from various origins, including carcinomas from breast, colon, lung, stomach, esophagus, liver, prostate, urinary bladder, ovary, uterine cervix, skin and kidney, and malignant mesotheliomas, primary GBM, malignant meningiomas, multiple myelomas and acute leukemias by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. We found four IDH1 codon 132 mutations in the GBM (4/25; 16.0%), two in the prostate carcinomas (2/75; 2.7%) and one in the B-acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALL) (1/60; 1.7%), but none in other cancers. The IDH1 mutations consisted of five p.R132H and two p.R132C mutations. The data indicate that IDH1 codon 132 mutations occur not only in GBM, but also in prostate cancers and B-ALL. This study suggests that despite the infrequent incidence of the IDH1 mutations in prostate cancers and B-ALL, mutated IDH1 could be therapeutically targeted in these cancers and in glial tumors with the IDH1 mutations. PMID:19378339

  18. IDH1/IDH2 but Not TP53 Mutations Predict Prognosis in Bulgarian Glioblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stancheva, Gergana; Goranova, Teodora; Laleva, Maria; Kamenova, Margarita; Mitkova, Atanaska; Velinov, Nikolay; Poptodorov, George; Mitev, Vanio; Kaneva, Radka; Gabrovsky, Nikolay

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase isoforms 1 (IDH1) and 2 (IDH2) have been associated with good prognosis for patients with brain neoplasias and have been commonly found together with mutated TP53 gene. To determine the prevalence of IDH1, IDH2, and TP53 mutations and their impact on overall survival 106 glioblastoma patients were analysed. IDH1 mutations were detected in 13 and IDH2 mutation in one patient. Two homozygous samples with R132H mutation in IDH1 gene and a novel aberration K129R in IDH2 gene were found. Sixty-four percent of IDH1/IDH2 mutated tumours harboured also a mutation in TP53 gene. Genetic aberrations in TP53 were present in 37 patients. Statistical analysis of the impact of the studied factors on the overall survival showed that the mutations in IDH1/IDH2, but not the ones in TP53, were associated with longer survival. Also, the impact of age on prognosis was confirmed. This is the first comprehensive study on glioblastomas in Bulgaria. Our results suggest that IDH1/IDH2 but not TP53 mutations together with other prognostic factors such as age might be applied in clinical practice for prediction of outcome in patients with glioblastomas. PMID:24868540

  19. PCR- and restriction endonuclease-based detection of IDH1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jochen; Pusch, Stefan; Balss, Jörg; Capper, David; Mueller, Wolf; Christians, Arne; Hartmann, Christian; von Deimling, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Hotspot mutations in codon 132 of the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) have emerged as the most frequent DNA alteration in astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas. These mutations have been shown to be of significant diagnostic and prognostic value. So far, assessment of IDH1 mutation relied on DNA sequencing techniques. We generated a set of primers suitable for endonuclease-based detection of hotspot mutations in codon 132 of IDH1. This primer set will allow determining these mutations without the need of DNA sequencing. One set of primer sets is designed to detect the presence or absence of IDH1 mutations in codon 132, while the other primer sets individually recognize the R132H, R132C, R132S, R132G and R132L mutations. PMID:19744125

  20. A monoclonal antibody IMab-1 specifically recognizes IDH1{sup R132H}, the most common glioma-derived mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yukinari; Jin, Genglin; Kuan, Chien-Tsun; McLendon, Roger E.; Yan, Hai; Bigner, Darell D.

    2009-12-18

    IDH1 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 1) mutations have been identified as early and frequent genetic alterations in astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, and oligoastrocytomas as well as secondary glioblastomas. In contrast, primary glioblastomas very rarely contain IDH1 mutations, although primary and secondary glioblastomas are histologically indistinguishable. The IDH1 mutations are remarkably specific to a single codon in the conserved and functionally important Arg132 in IDH1. In gliomas, the most frequent IDH1 mutations (>90%) were G395A (R132H). In this study, we immunized mice with R132H-containing IDH1 (IDH1{sup R132H}) peptide. After cell fusion using Sendai virus envelope, the monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which specifically reacted with IDH1{sup R132H}, were screened in ELISA. One of the mAbs, IMab-1 reacted with the IDH1{sup R132H} peptide, but not with wild type IDH1 (IDH1{sup wt}) peptide in ELISA. In Western-blot analysis, IMab-1 reacted with only the IDH1{sup R132H} protein, not IDH1{sup wt} protein or the other IDH1 mutants, indicating that IMab-1 is IDH1{sup R132H}-specific. Furthermore, IMab-1 specifically stained the IDH1{sup R132H}-expressing cells in astrocytomas in immunohistochemistry, whereas it did not react with IDH1{sup R132H}-negative primary glioblastoma sections. In conclusion, we established an anti-IDH1{sup R132H}-specific monoclonal antibody IMab-1, which should be significantly useful for diagnosis and biological evaluation of mutation-bearing gliomas.

  1. Idh1 mutations contribute to the development of T-cell malignancies in genetically engineered mice

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zhenyue; Cairns, Rob A.; Inoue, Satoshi; Li, Wanda Y.; Sheng, Yi; Lemonnier, François; Wakeham, Andrew; Snow, Bryan E.; Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Ye, Jing; Larsen, Dana M.; Straley, Kimberly S.; Tobin, Erica R.; Narayanaswamy, Rohini; Gaulard, Philippe; Mak, Tak W.

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are key drivers of hematopoietic malignancies. Although these mutations are most commonly associated with myeloid diseases, they also occur in malignancies of the T-cell lineage. To investigate their role in these diseases and provide tractable disease models for further investigation, we analyzed the T-cell compartment in a conditional knock-in (KI) mouse model of mutant Idh1. We observed the development of a spontaneous T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in these animals. The disease was transplantable and maintained expression of mutant IDH1. Whole-exome sequencing revealed the presence of a spontaneous activating mutation in Notch1, one of the most common mutations in human T-ALL, suggesting Idh1 mutations may have the capacity to cooperate with Notch1 to drive T-ALL. To further investigate the Idh1 mutation as an oncogenic driver in the T-cell lineage, we crossed Idh1-KI mice with conditional Trp53 null mice, a well-characterized model of T-cell malignancy, and found that T-cell lymphomagenesis was accelerated in mice bearing both mutations. Because both IDH1 and p53 are known to affect cellular metabolism, we compared the requirements for glucose and glutamine in cells derived from these tumors and found that cells bearing the Idh1 mutation have an increased dependence on both glucose and glutamine. These data suggest that mutant IDH1 contributes to malignancy in the T-cell lineage and may alter the metabolic profile of malignant T cells. PMID:26787889

  2. The combination of IDH1 mutations and MGMT methylation status predicts survival in glioblastoma better than either IDH1 or MGMT alone

    PubMed Central

    Molenaar, Remco J.; Verbaan, Dagmar; Lamba, Simona; Zanon, Carlo; Jeuken, Judith W.M.; Boots-Sprenger, Sandra H.E.; Wesseling, Pieter; Hulsebos, Theo J.M.; Troost, Dirk; van Tilborg, Angela A.; Leenstra, Sieger; Vandertop, W. Peter; Bardelli, Alberto; van Noorden, Cornelis J.F.; Bleeker, Fonnet E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic and epigenetic profiling of glioblastomas has provided a comprehensive list of altered cancer genes of which only O6-methylguanine-methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation is used thus far as a predictive marker in a clinical setting. We investigated the prognostic significance of genetic and epigenetic alterations in glioblastoma patients. Methods We screened 98 human glioblastoma samples for genetic and epigenetic alterations in 10 genes and chromosomal loci by PCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). We tested the association between these genetic and epigenetic alterations and glioblastoma patient survival. Subsequently, we developed a 2-gene survival predictor. Results Multivariate analyses revealed that mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), promoter methylation of MGMT, irradiation dosage, and Karnofsky Performance Status (KFS) were independent prognostic factors. A 2-gene predictor for glioblastoma survival was generated. Based on the genetic and epigenetic status of IDH1 and MGMT, glioblastoma patients were stratified into 3 clinically different genotypes: glioblastoma patients with IDH1mt/MGMTmet had the longest survival, followed by patients with IDH1mt/MGMTunmet or IDH1wt/MGMTmet, and patients with IDH1wt/MGMTunmet had the shortest survival. This 2-gene predictor was an independent prognostic factor and performed significantly better in predicting survival than either IDH1 mutations or MGMT methylation alone. The predictor was validated in 3 external datasets. Discussion The combination of IDH1 mutations and MGMT methylation outperforms either IDH1 mutations or MGMT methylation alone in predicting survival of glioblastoma patients. This information will help to increase our understanding of glioblastoma biology, and it may be helpful for baseline comparisons in future clinical trials. PMID:24510240

  3. IDH1 R132H mutation in a pilocytic astrocytoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Behling, Felix; Steinhilber, Julia; Tatagiba, Marcos; Bisdas, Sotirios; Schittenhelm, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 72-year old female with a right cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma WHO grade I with an Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) R132H mutation. The patient is recurrence-free 6 years after the initial diagnosis. Only one single case with strikingly similar clinicopathological features has been reported before. Otherwise, IDH1/2 mutations are not seen in pilocytic astrocytomas. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26617931

  4. Establishment of a multi-specific monoclonal antibody MsMab-1 recognizing both IDH1 and IDH2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kato Kaneko, Mika; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Kato, Yukinari

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) have been reported in gliomas, cartilaginous tumors, and acute myeloid leukemias. IDH mutations are specific to a single codon in the conserved and functionally important arginine 132 residue (R132) of IDH1 or arginine 172 residue (R172) of IDH2 in gliomas. Although IDH1 and IDH2 catalyze the oxidative carboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate in cytosol and mitochondria, respectively, mutated IDH1/2 proteins can possess the ability to change α-ketoglutarate to an oncometabolite R(-)-2-hydroxyglutarate. We have established several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for IDH1/2 mutations. However, no multi-specific mAb against IDH1/2 mutations has been reported. For this study, we immunized mice with an IDH1-R132G peptide of 19 amino acids (GGVKPIIIGGHAYGDQYRA), and established a novel mAb MsMab-1 that recognizes IDH1-R132G, but not wild type IDH1 in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). It is particularly interesting that MsMab-1 recognizes all IDH1 mutants (R132H, R132C, R132S, R132G, R132L) in ELISA. Western blot analysis also revealed that MsMab-1 reacted with recombinant proteins of IDH1-R132H, IDH1-R132S, and IDH1-R132G, but not with wild type IDH1 and other IDH1 mutations, indicating that MsMab-1 is a multi-specific anti-mutated IDH1 mAb. Unexpectedly, MsMab-1 recognizes IDH2-R172M protein, despite that the IDH1-R132G peptide shows only 73.7% identity with the equivalent portion of IDH2-R172M (GGTKPITIGMHAHGDQYKA). Moreover, MsMab-1 stained the IDH1-R132S or IDH1-R132G-expressing glioma cells in immunohistochemistry. This report is the first to establish a multi-specific anti-mutated IDH1/2 mAb, that is expected to be useful for immunohistochemical determination of IDH1/2 mutation-bearing tumors. PMID:23782684

  5. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations as novel therapeutic targets: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mondesir, Johanna; Willekens, Christophe; Touat, Mehdi; de Botton, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) are key metabolic enzymes that convert isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate. IDH1/2 mutations define distinct subsets of cancers, including low-grade gliomas and secondary glioblastomas, chondrosarcomas, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, and hematologic malignancies. Somatic point mutations in IDH1/2 confer a gain-of-function in cancer cells, resulting in the accumulation and secretion in vast excess of an oncometabolite, the D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG). Overproduction of D-2HG interferes with cellular metabolism and epigenetic regulation, contributing to oncogenesis. Indeed, high levels of D-2HG inhibit α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, including histone and DNA demethylases, leading to histone and DNA hypermethylation and finally a block in cell differentiation. Furthermore, D-2HG is a biomarker suitable for the detection of IDH1/2 mutations at diagnosis and predictive of the clinical response. Finally, mutant-IDH1/2 enzymes inhibitors have entered clinical trials for patients with IDH1/2 mutations and represent a novel drug class for targeted therapy. PMID:27621679

  6. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations as novel therapeutic targets: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mondesir, Johanna; Willekens, Christophe; Touat, Mehdi; de Botton, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) are key metabolic enzymes that convert isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate. IDH1/2 mutations define distinct subsets of cancers, including low-grade gliomas and secondary glioblastomas, chondrosarcomas, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, and hematologic malignancies. Somatic point mutations in IDH1/2 confer a gain-of-function in cancer cells, resulting in the accumulation and secretion in vast excess of an oncometabolite, the D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG). Overproduction of D-2HG interferes with cellular metabolism and epigenetic regulation, contributing to oncogenesis. Indeed, high levels of D-2HG inhibit α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, including histone and DNA demethylases, leading to histone and DNA hypermethylation and finally a block in cell differentiation. Furthermore, D-2HG is a biomarker suitable for the detection of IDH1/2 mutations at diagnosis and predictive of the clinical response. Finally, mutant-IDH1/2 enzymes inhibitors have entered clinical trials for patients with IDH1/2 mutations and represent a novel drug class for targeted therapy. PMID:27621679

  7. Oncometabolic mutation IDH1 R132H confers a metformin-hypersensitive phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Cuyàs, Elisabet; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; De Llorens, Rafael; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic flexibility might be particularly constrained in tumors bearing mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) leading to the production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxygluratate (2HG). To test the hypothesis that IDH1 mutations could generate metabolic vulnerabilities for therapeutic intervention, we utilized an MCF10A cell line engineered with an arginine-to-histidine conversion at position 132 (R132H) in the catalytic site of IDH1, which equips the enzyme with a neomorphic α-ketoglutarate to 2HG reducing activity in an otherwise isogenic background. IDH1 R132H/+ and isogenic IDH1 +/+ parental cells were screened for their ability to generate energy-rich NADH when cultured in a standardized high-throughput Phenotype MicroArrayplatform comprising >300 nutrients. A radical remodeling of the metabotype occurred in cells carrying the R132H mutation since they presented a markedly altered ability to utilize numerous carbon catabolic fuels. A mitochondria toxicity-screening modality confirmed a severe inability of IDH1-mutated cells to use various carbon substrates that are fed into the electron transport chain at different points. The mitochondrial biguanide poisons, metformin and phenformin, further impaired the intrinsic weakness of IDH1-mutant cells to use certain carbon-energy sources. Additionally, metabolic reprogramming of IDH1-mutant cells increased their sensitivity to metformin in assays of cell proliferation, clonogenic potential, and mammosphere formation. Targeted metabolomics studies revealed that the ability of metformin to interfere with the anaplerotic entry of glutamine into the tricarboxylic acid cycle could explain the hypersensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to biguanides. Moreover, synergistic interactions occurred when metformin treatment was combined with the selective R132H-IDH1 inhibitor AGI-5198. Together, these results suggest that therapy involving the simultaneous targeting of metabolic vulnerabilities with metformin, and 2HG

  8. Do Long-Term Survivor Primary Glioblastoma Patients Harbor IDH1 Mutations?

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, J Manuel; Mukherjee, Debraj; Black, Keith L; Fan, Xuemo; Hu, Jethro L; Nuno, Miriam Aracely; Patil, Chirag G

    2016-05-01

    Background Approximately 3 to 16% of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients are considered long-term survivors (LTS: 3+ years). Objective Given the improved survival conferred by IDH1 mutations and the fact that these mutations are detected in 12% of newly diagnosed GBM cases, could long-term survivorship be explained by IDH1 mutation status? Our aim was to describe GBM LTS with IDH1 mutations and explore its association with overall survival (OS). Methods Records of 453 newly diagnosed adult GBM patients treated at a single institution from 2004 to 2010 were reviewed retrospectively for patients who survived at least 36 months postsurgery. Descriptive statistics for clinical characteristics, treatments received, and tumor biomarkers were reported. Estimates for progression-free survival (PFS) and OS were provided. Results Forty (8.8%) LTS GBM patients were identified, with a median age of 50 years and a median preoperative Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) of 80. Most patients underwent near-total/gross-total resection (72.5%), postoperative radiation (97.5%), and adjuvant temozolomide (95%). PFS rates at 12, 36, 48, and 72 months were 67.5%, 40%, 32.7%, and 26.2%, respectively. Median OS has not yet been reached; however, the survival rate at 48 months was 62.1%. Among 35 patients with available tumor samples, only 8 (22.9%) had IDH1 mutations. No significant difference in median PFS was found between IDH1 mutation and wild-type patients (46.6 versus 26.3 months; p =0.45). Conclusions Less than a quarter of our patients' long-term survivorship was associated with favorable IDH1 status. Therefore, IDH1 status does not explain most of the long-term survivorship in the temozolomide era. PMID:26935296

  9. Frequent IDH1/2 mutations in intracranial chondrosarcoma: a possible diagnostic clue for its differentiation from chordoma.

    PubMed

    Arai, Motohiro; Nobusawa, Sumihito; Ikota, Hayato; Takemura, Sunao; Nakazato, Yoichi

    2012-10-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1/2 have been detected in a significant proportion of diffuse gliomas and in a small fraction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases. Recently, in an examination of various types of mesenchymal tumor, IDH1/2 mutations were only found in cartilaginous tumors including central conventional and periosteal enchondromas/chondrosarcomas. The frequency of IDH1/2 mutations was 56%, and the IDH1 R132C mutation, which is not common in diffuse gliomas or AML, accounted for 40% of these mutations. In this study, we investigated the IDH1/2 mutation status of intracranial chondrosarcomas and chordomas, which are morphologically similar and affect similar regions of the cranial cavity. Of the 13 chondrosarcomas analyzed, six (46.1%) displayed IDH1/2 mutations (the predominant type was IDH1 R132C). Also, an IDH2 mutation (R172S) was observed in one case. Conversely, none of the ten chordomas analyzed displayed any IDH1 or IDH2 mutations. Our data suggest that the IDH1/2 mutation status could be valuable for distinguishing intracranial chondrosarcomas from chordomas. PMID:22323113

  10. IDH1(R132) mutation identified in one human melanoma metastasis, but not correlated with metastases to the brain.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Giselle Y; Reitman, Zachary J; Solomon, David; Waldman, Todd; Bigner, Darell D; McLendon, Roger E; Rosenberg, Steven A; Samuels, Yardena; Yan, Hai

    2010-07-30

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) are enzymes which convert isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate while reducing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+to NADPH). IDH1/2 were recently identified as mutated in a large percentage of progressive gliomas. These mutations occur at IDH1(R132) or the homologous IDH2(R172). Melanomas share some genetic features with IDH1/2-mutated gliomas, such as frequent TP53 mutation. We sought to test whether melanoma is associated with IDH1/2 mutations. Seventy-eight human melanoma samples were analyzed for IDH1(R132) and IDH2(R172) mutation status. A somatic, heterozygous IDH1 c.C394T (p.R132C) mutation was identified in one human melanoma metastasis to the lung. Having identified this mutation in one metastasis, we sought to test the hypothesis that certain selective pressures in the brain environment may specifically favor the cell growth or survival of tumor cells with mutations in IDH1/2, regardless of primary tumor site. To address this, we analyzed IDH1(R132) and IDH2(R172) mutation status 53 metastatic brain tumors, including nine melanoma metastases. Results revealed no mutations in any samples. This lack of mutations would suggest that mutations in IDH1(R132) or IDH2(R172) may be necessary for the formation of tumors in a cell-lineage dependent manner, with a particularly strong selective pressure for mutations in progressive gliomas; this also suggests the lack of a particular selective pressure for growth in brain tissue in general. Studies on the cell-lineages of tumors with IDH1/2 mutations may help clarify the role of these mutations in the development of brain tumors. PMID:20603105

  11. Genomic dynamics associated with malignant transformation in IDH1 mutated gliomas.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Kee; Park, Inho; Lee, Seungmook; Sun, Choong-Hyun; Koh, Youngil; Park, Sung-Hye; Kim, Ja Eun; Yun, Hongseok; Lee, Se-Hoon

    2015-12-22

    The genomic mechanism responsible for malignant transformation remains an open question for glioma researchers, where differing conclusions have been drawn based on diverse study conditions. Therefore, it is essential to secure direct evidence using longitudinal samples from the same patient. Moreover, malignant transformation of IDH1-mutated gliomas is of potential interest, as its genomic mechanism under influence of oncometabolite remains unclear, and even higher rate of malignant transformation was reported in IDH1-mutated low grade gliomas than in wild-type IDH1 tumors. We have analyzed genomic data using next-generation sequencing technology for longitudinal samples from 3 patients with IDH1-mutated gliomas whose disease had progressed from a low grade to a high grade phenotype. Comprehensive analysis included chromosomal aberrations as well as whole exome and transcriptome sequencing, and the candidate driver genes for malignant transformation were validated with public database. Integrated analysis of genomic dynamics in clonal evolution during the malignant transformation revealed alterations in the machinery regulating gene expression, including the spliceosome complex (U2AF2), transcription factors (TCF12), and chromatin remodelers (ARID1A). Moreover, consequential expression changes implied the activation of genes associated with the restoration of the stemness of cancer cells. The alterations in genetic regulatory mechanisms may be the key factor for the major phenotypic changes in IDH1 mutated gliomas. Despite being limited to a small number of cases, this analysis provides a direct example of the genomic changes responsible for malignant transformation in gliomas. PMID:26524630

  12. Genomic dynamics associated with malignant transformation in IDH1 mutated gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Choong-Hyun; Koh, Youngil; Park, Sung-Hye; Kim, Ja Eun; Yun, Hongseok; Lee, Se-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    The genomic mechanism responsible for malignant transformation remains an open question for glioma researchers, where differing conclusions have been drawn based on diverse study conditions. Therefore, it is essential to secure direct evidence using longitudinal samples from the same patient. Moreover, malignant transformation of IDH1-mutated gliomas is of potential interest, as its genomic mechanism under influence of oncometabolite remains unclear, and even higher rate of malignant transformation was reported in IDH1-mutated low grade gliomas than in wild-type IDH1 tumors. We have analyzed genomic data using next-generation sequencing technology for longitudinal samples from 3 patients with IDH1-mutated gliomas whose disease had progressed from a low grade to a high grade phenotype. Comprehensive analysis included chromosomal aberrations as well as whole exome and transcriptome sequencing, and the candidate driver genes for malignant transformation were validated with public database. Integrated analysis of genomic dynamics in clonal evolution during the malignant transformation revealed alterations in the machinery regulating gene expression, including the spliceosome complex (U2AF2), transcription factors (TCF12), and chromatin remodelers (ARID1A). Moreover, consequential expression changes implied the activation of genes associated with the restoration of the stemness of cancer cells. The alterations in genetic regulatory mechanisms may be the key factor for the major phenotypic changes in IDH1 mutated gliomas. Despite being limited to a small number of cases, this analysis provides a direct example of the genomic changes responsible for malignant transformation in gliomas. PMID:26524630

  13. Selective acquisition of IDH1 R132C mutations in astrocytomas associated with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takuya; Vital, Anne; Nobusawa, Sumihito; Kleihues, Paul; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2009-06-01

    Mutations of the IDH1 gene are frequent in gliomas, with R132H (CGT-->CAT) being the most common (>85%). In astrocytomas, IDH1 mutations are typically co-present with, or precede, TP53 mutations. We assessed IDH1 mutations in brain tumors diagnosed in patients from three families with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. We identified IDH1 mutations in five astrocytomas that developed in carriers of a TP53 germline mutation. Without exception, all were R132C (CGT-->TGT), which in sporadic astrocytomas accounts for <5% of IDH1 mutations. This remarkably selective occurrence of R132C mutations may reflect differences in the sequence of genetic events, with a preference for R132C mutations in astrocytes or precursor cells that already carry a germline TP53 mutation. PMID:19340432

  14. LOX Expression and Functional Analysis in Astrocytomas and Impact of IDH1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Roseli; Uno, Miyuki; Marie, Suely K. Nagahashi; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli M.

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is involved in vital biological processes such as cell motility, cell signaling and gene regulation. Deregulation of this protein can contribute to tumor formation and progression. Although it is known that LOX is involved in invasion, proliferation and tumor migration in other types of tumors, studies of LOX in astrocytomas of different grades are scarce. The purpose of our study was to characterize LOX, BMP1 and HIF1A expression by real-time PCR in astrocytomas with WHO grades I to IV compared to non-neoplastic brain tissue. IDH1 mutational status was determined by PCR and sequencing. LOX protein expression was also analyzed by immunohistochemistry. LOX functional analyses were performed using siRNA knockdown and the specific inhibitor BAPN in two glioblastoma cell lines. The expression levels of LOX, BMP1 and HIF1A were correlated and analyzed according to IDH1 mutation status and to the clinical end-point of overall survival of glioblastoma patients. The results demonstrate that increased expression and activity of LOX, BMP1 and HIF1A were positively correlated with the malignant grade of astrocytomas. LOX protein expression also increased according to the degree of malignancy, with localization in the cytoplasm and nucleus and staining observed in endothelial cells. Glioblastoma with a mutation in IDH1 expressed lower levels of LOX in the nucleus, and IDH1-mutated cases showed lower LOX expression levels when compared to wild-type IDH1 cases. LOX knockdown and inhibition by BAPN in U87MG and A172 cell lines affected migration, invasion and soft agar colony formation. Taken together, these results corroborate the role of LOX in the migration, invasion and angiogenesis of astrocytomas. Furthermore, LOX expression is influenced by IDH1 mutational status. This work provides new insights for researchers aiming to design targeted therapies to control astrocytomas. PMID:25790191

  15. Comparison of next-generation sequencing mutation profiling with BRAF and IDH1 mutation-specific immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, Kausar J; Luthra, Rajalakshmi; Patel, Keyur P; Singh, Rajesh R; Goswami, Rashmi; Aldape, Ken D; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Routbort, Mark J

    2015-04-01

    Mutation-specific antibodies for BRAF V600E and IDH1 R132H offer convenient immunohistochemical (IHC) assays to detect these mutations in tumors. Previous studies using these antibodies have shown high sensitivity and specificity, but use in routine diagnosis with qualitative assessment has not been well studied. In this retrospective study, we reviewed BRAF and IDH1 mutation-specific IHC results compared with separately obtained clinical next-generation sequencing results. For 67 tumors with combined IDH1 IHC and mutation data, IHC was unequivocally reported as positive or negative in all cases. Sensitivity of IHC for IDH1 R132H was 98% and specificity was 100% compared with mutation status. Four IHC-negative samples showed non-R132H IDH1 mutations including R132C, R132G, and P127T. For 128 tumors with combined BRAF IHC and mutation data, IHC was positive in 33, negative in 82, and equivocal in 13 tumors. The sensitivity of IHC was 97% and specificity was 99% when including only unequivocally positive or negative results. If equivocal IHC cases were included in the analysis as negative, sensitivity fell to 81%. If equivocal cases were classified as positive, specificity dropped to 91%. Eight IHC-negative samples showed non-V600E BRAF mutations including V600K, N581I, V600M, and K601E. We conclude that IHC for BRAF V600E and IDH1 R132H is relatively sensitive and specific, but there is a discordance rate that is not trivial. In addition, a significant proportion of patients harbor BRAF non-V600E or IDH1 non-R132H mutations not detectable by IHC, potentially limiting utility of IHC screening for BRAF and IDH1 mutations. PMID:25634750

  16. Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH)1/2 Mutations as Prognostic Markers in Patients With Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-Rui; Yao, Yu; Xu, Hong-Zhi; Qin, Zhi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis examining the association of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1/2 mutations with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with glioblastomas. Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar were searched from inception to January 28, 2015, using combinations of the following keywords: IDH mutation, brain tumor, glioma, glioblastoma, oligodendroglioma, prognosis. Randomized controlled trials, and prospective and retrospective studies of patients with glioblastomas that provided IDH mutation and survival data were included. OS and PFS were used to evaluate the association of IDH1 and IDH1/2 mutations and prognosis. Hazard ratios (HRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for OS and PFS were calculated and compared between patients with and without mutations. Of 165 studies that were identified, 136 nonrelevant studies were excluded. Twenty-nine full-text articles were assessed, and of these, 5 were excluded as they did not provide a quantitative outcome. Therefore, 24 studies were included in the qualitative synthesis. The pooled HR of 0.358 (95% CI 0.264–0.487, P < 0.001) indicated that IDH mutations were associated with better OS. Similarly, the pooled HR of 0.322 (95% CI 0.24200.455, P < 0.001) indicated that IDH mutations were associated with better PFS. When patients were stratified by surgery versus no surgery or IDH1 versus IDH1/2 mutations, the results also indicated that the presence of IDH mutations was associated with better OS and PFS. The IDH mutations are associated with improved survival in patients with glioblastomas. PMID:26945349

  17. Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH)1/2 Mutations as Prognostic Markers in Patients With Glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Rui; Yao, Yu; Xu, Hong-Zhi; Qin, Zhi-Yong

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis examining the association of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1/2 mutations with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with glioblastomas. Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar were searched from inception to January 28, 2015, using combinations of the following keywords: IDH mutation, brain tumor, glioma, glioblastoma, oligodendroglioma, prognosis. Randomized controlled trials, and prospective and retrospective studies of patients with glioblastomas that provided IDH mutation and survival data were included. OS and PFS were used to evaluate the association of IDH1 and IDH1/2 mutations and prognosis. Hazard ratios (HRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for OS and PFS were calculated and compared between patients with and without mutations. Of 165 studies that were identified, 136 nonrelevant studies were excluded. Twenty-nine full-text articles were assessed, and of these, 5 were excluded as they did not provide a quantitative outcome. Therefore, 24 studies were included in the qualitative synthesis. The pooled HR of 0.358 (95% CI 0.264-0.487, P < 0.001) indicated that IDH mutations were associated with better OS. Similarly, the pooled HR of 0.322 (95% CI 0.24200.455, P < 0.001) indicated that IDH mutations were associated with better PFS. When patients were stratified by surgery versus no surgery or IDH1 versus IDH1/2 mutations, the results also indicated that the presence of IDH mutations was associated with better OS and PFS. The IDH mutations are associated with improved survival in patients with glioblastomas. PMID:26945349

  18. Roles of IDH1/2 and TET2 mutations in myeloid disorders.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Satoshi; Lemonnier, François; Mak, Tak W

    2016-06-01

    Mutations of the epigenetic enzymes isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2, and the methylcytosine dioxygenase 'ten-eleven translocation 2' (TET2), are common in human myeloid malignancies and drivers of these disorders but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. This review examines mutant IDH1/2 and TET2 enzymes in the context of responses to DNA damage and their potential involvement in age-related genomic instability. The clinical relevance of these findings and their potential application in novel therapeutic strategies is also discussed. PMID:26980223

  19. Mutation Analysis of IDH1/2 Genes in Unselected De novo Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Patients in India - Identification of A Novel IDH2 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Sureshkumar; Sarojam, Santhi; Vijay, Sangeetha; Geetha, Aswathy Chandran; Sreedharan, Jayadevan; Narayanan, Geetha; Sreedharan, Hariharan

    2015-01-01

    IDH1/2 mutations which result in alternation in DNA methylation pattern are one of the most common methylation associated mutations in Acute myeloid leukaemia. IDH1/2 mutations frequently associated with higher platelet level, normal cytogentics and NPM1 mutations. Here we analyzed IDH1/2 mutations in 200 newly diagnosed unselected Indian adult AML patients and investigated their correlation with clinical, cytogenetic parameters along with cooperating NPM1 mutation. We detected 5.5% and 4% mutations in IDH1/2 genes, respectively. Except IDH2 c.515_516GG>AA mutation, all the other identified mutations were reported mutations. Similar to reported c.515G>A mutation, the novel c.515_516GG>AA mutation replaces 172nd arginine to lysine in the active site of the enzyme. Even though there was a preponderance of IDH1/2 mutations in NK-AML, cytogenetically abnormal patients also harboured IDH1/2 mutations. IDH1 mutations showed significant higher platelet count and NPM1 mutations. IDH2 mutated patients displayed infrequent NPM1 mutations and lower WBC count. All the NPM1 mutations in the IDH1/2 mutated cases showed type A mutation. The present data suggest that IDH1/2 mutations are associated with normal cytogenetics and type A NPM1 mutations in adult Indian AML patients. PMID:25987093

  20. Somatic IDH1 mutation in a pituitary adenoma of a patient with Maffucci syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuyu; Hong, Christopher S; Feng, Jie; Yang, Chunzhang; Chittiboina, Prashant; Zhang, Junting; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2016-06-01

    Maffucci syndrome is a rare disease characterized by multiple enchondromas and soft-tissue hemangiomas. Additionally, neuroendocrine tumors including pituitary adenomas have been described in these patients. The underlying genetic etiology lies in somatic mosaicism of mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) or isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2). This report describes a patient with Maffucci syndrome who presented with intracranial tumors of the skull base and suprasellar region. The patient underwent resection of both intracranial tumors, revealing histopathological diagnoses of chondrosarcoma and pituitary adenoma. DNA sequencing of the tumors was performed to identify common IDH1/2 mutations. Clinical, radiological, and biochemical assessments were performed. Genotypic studies used standard Sanger sequencing in conjunction with a target-specific peptide nucleic acid to detect IDH1 mutations in tumor tissues. DNA sequencing demonstrated identical IDH1 mutations (c.394C > T) in both tumors. To the authors' knowledge, this report provides the first genetic evidence for the inclusion of pituitary adenomas among tumors characterizing Maffucci syndrome. In patients who are newly diagnosed with Maffucci syndrome, it is appropriate to monitor for development of pituitary pathology and neuroendocrine dysfunction. PMID:26473790

  1. Noninvasive Quantification of 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Human Gliomas with IDH1 and IDH2 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Emir, Uzay E; Larkin, Sarah J; de Pennington, Nick; Voets, Natalie; Plaha, Puneet; Stacey, Richard; Al-Qahtani, Khalid; Mccullagh, James; Schofield, Christopher J; Clare, Stuart; Jezzard, Peter; Cadoux-Hudson, Tom; Ansorge, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDH1/2) occur often in diffuse gliomas, where they are associated with abnormal accumulation of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Monitoring 2-HG levels could provide prognostic information in this disease, but detection strategies that are noninvasive and sufficiently quantitative have yet to be developed. In this study, we address this need by presenting a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) acquisition scheme that uses an ultrahigh magnetic field (≥ 7T) capable of noninvasively detecting 2-HG with quantitative measurements sufficient to differentiate mutant cytosolic IDH1 and mitochondrial IDH2 in human brain tumors. Untargeted metabolomics analysis of in vivo (1)H-MRS spectra discriminated between IDH-mutant tumors and healthy tissue, and separated IDH1 from IDH2 mutations. High-quality spectra enabled the quantification of neurochemical profiles consisting of at least eight metabolites, including 2-HG, glutamate, lactate, and glutathione in both tumor and healthy tissue voxels. Notably, IDH2 mutation produced more 2-HG than IDH1 mutation, consistent with previous findings in cell culture. By offering enhanced sensitivity and specificity, this scheme can quantitatively detect 2-HG and associated metabolites that may accumulate during tumor progression, with implications to better monitor patient responses to therapy. PMID:26669865

  2. IDH1 p.R132 mutations may not be actively involved in the carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun; Zou, Yang; Xu, Ling; Yang, Run-Xiang; Fan, Yu; Zhang, Wen; Yu, Dandan; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies have identified prevalent isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) codon 132 mutations (p.R132) in gliomas and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The IDH1 mutations lead to a loss of its normal enzymatic activity and acquisition of neomorphic activity in production of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), which finally cause alterations of multiple gene expression of tumorigenesis-associated α-KG-dependent enzymes. The aim of this study was to determine whether IDH1 p.R132 mutations are involved in the carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma. Material/Methods A total of 87 Han Chinese patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were analyzed by direct DNA sequencing for IDH1 p.R132 mutations. The expression levels of multiple α-KG-dependent enzymes and associated genes were quantified in HepG2 cells overexpressing IDH1 p.R132 mutants by Western blotting and real-time PCR. Results None of 87 Han Chinese patients with HCC harbored any IDH1 p.R132 mutations. The protein levels of HIF-1α and histone methylation marker (H3K4me3 and H3K79me2) were determined in HepG2 cells overexpressing IDH1 p.R132 mutants, but we discerned no difference. Measurement of mRNA expression levels of VEGF, GLUT1, and HOXA genes also showed no significant difference between cells overexpressing IDH1 wild-type and p.R132 mutants. Conclusions Our negative results, together with some previous reports of the absence of IDH1 p.R132 mutations in HCC tissues, suggests that IDH1 p.R132 mutations are not actively involved in the development of HCC. PMID:24531386

  3. Analysis of IDH mutation, 1p/19q deletion, and PTEN loss delineates prognosis in clinical low-grade diffuse gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Sabha, Nesrin; Knobbe, Christiane B.; Maganti, Majula; Al Omar, Soha; Bernstein, Mark; Cairns, Rob; Çako, Besmira; von Deimling, Andreas; Capper, David; Mak, Tak W.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Carvalho, Philippe; Garrett, Evelyn; Perry, Arie; Zadeh, Gelareh; Guha, Abhijit; Croul, Sidney

    2014-01-01

    Background Grades II and III gliomas have unpredictable rates of progression, making management decisions difficult. Currently, several clinical and radiological characteristics are utilized to predict progression and survival but collectively are suboptimal. Methods In this study, we analyzed a set of 108 nonenhancing hemispheric grade II–III gliomas. Demographic variables, including patient age, tumor diameter, extent of resection, and performance status, were combined with molecular data (IDH mutation status [mIDH], 1p/19q codeletion, PTEN deletion, and EGFR amplification). A complete dataset for all variables was compiled for 70 of the 108 patients. Both univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to determine whether the molecular data singly or in combination offer advantages over tumor type and grade for prediction of overall survival (OS) and/or progression-free rate (PFR). Results Patient age, clinical variables (tumor diameter, extent of resection, performance status), and pathology (tumor type and grade) were not predictive of OS or PFR. IDH mutation status alone was predictive of longer OS and PFR for the entire group of tumors; 1p/19q deletion alone was predictive of OS but not PFR. In the multivariable analysis, none of the clinical or demographic factors were predictive of OS or PFR. IDH mutation status, 1p/19q codeletion, and PTEN deletion were predictive of OS (P = .003, P = .005, P = .02, respectively). Both mIDH (P < .001) and the interaction term of 1p/19q and PTEN (P < .001) were found to be predictive of PFR. Conclusions We conclude that the combination of mIDH, 1p/19q codeletion, and PTEN deletion may be particularly effective in discriminating good prognosis from poor prognosis hemispheric gliomas. We propose that such a scheme merits testing on larger prospective cohorts. Should our findings be confirmed, routine clinical analysis of hemispheric gliomas for mIDH, 1p/19q codeletion, and PTEN deletion would be justified. PMID

  4. Identification of a novel inactivating mutation in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1-R314C) in a high grade astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    van Lith, Sanne A M; Navis, Anna C; Lenting, Krissie; Verrijp, Kiek; Schepens, Jan T G; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Schubert, Nil A; Venselaar, Hanka; Wevers, Ron A; van Rooij, Arno; Wesseling, Pieter; Molenaar, Remco J; van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Pusch, Stefan; Tops, Bastiaan; Leenders, William P J

    2016-01-01

    The majority of low-grade and secondary high-grade gliomas carry heterozygous hotspot mutations in cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) or the mitochondrial variant IDH2. These mutations mostly involve Arg132 in IDH1, and Arg172 or Arg140 in IDH2. Whereas IDHs convert isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate (α-KG) with simultaneous reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH, these IDH mutants reduce α-KG to D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG) while oxidizing NADPH. D-2-HG is a proposed oncometabolite, acting via competitive inhibition of α-KG-dependent enzymes that are involved in metabolism and epigenetic regulation. However, much less is known about the implications of the metabolic stress, imposed by decreased α-KG and NADPH production, for tumor biology. We here present a novel heterozygous IDH1 mutation, IDH1(R314C), which was identified by targeted next generation sequencing of a high grade glioma from which a mouse xenograft model and a cell line were generated. IDH1(R314C) lacks isocitrate-to-α-KG conversion activity due to reduced affinity for NADP(+), and differs from the IDH1(R132) mutants in that it does not produce D-2-HG. Because IDH1(R314C) is defective in producing α-KG and NADPH, without concomitant production of the D-2-HG, it represents a valuable tool to study the effects of IDH1-dysfunction on cellular metabolism in the absence of this oncometabolite. PMID:27460417

  5. Identification of a novel inactivating mutation in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1-R314C) in a high grade astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    van Lith, Sanne A. M.; Navis, Anna C.; Lenting, Krissie; Verrijp, Kiek; Schepens, Jan T. G.; Hendriks, Wiljan J. A. J.; Schubert, Nil A.; Venselaar, Hanka; Wevers, Ron A.; van Rooij, Arno; Wesseling, Pieter; Molenaar, Remco J.; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Pusch, Stefan; Tops, Bastiaan; Leenders, William P. J.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of low-grade and secondary high-grade gliomas carry heterozygous hotspot mutations in cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) or the mitochondrial variant IDH2. These mutations mostly involve Arg132 in IDH1, and Arg172 or Arg140 in IDH2. Whereas IDHs convert isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate (α-KG) with simultaneous reduction of NADP+ to NADPH, these IDH mutants reduce α-KG to D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG) while oxidizing NADPH. D-2-HG is a proposed oncometabolite, acting via competitive inhibition of α-KG-dependent enzymes that are involved in metabolism and epigenetic regulation. However, much less is known about the implications of the metabolic stress, imposed by decreased α-KG and NADPH production, for tumor biology. We here present a novel heterozygous IDH1 mutation, IDH1R314C, which was identified by targeted next generation sequencing of a high grade glioma from which a mouse xenograft model and a cell line were generated. IDH1R314C lacks isocitrate-to-α-KG conversion activity due to reduced affinity for NADP+, and differs from the IDH1R132 mutants in that it does not produce D-2-HG. Because IDH1R314C is defective in producing α-KG and NADPH, without concomitant production of the D-2-HG, it represents a valuable tool to study the effects of IDH1-dysfunction on cellular metabolism in the absence of this oncometabolite. PMID:27460417

  6. R132C IDH1 mutations are found in spindle cell hemangiomas and not in other vascular tumors or malformations.

    PubMed

    Kurek, Kyle C; Pansuriya, Twinkal C; van Ruler, Maayke A J H; van den Akker, Brendy; Luks, Valerie L; Verbeke, Sofie L J; Kozakewich, Harry P; Sciot, Raf; Lev, Dina; Lazar, Alexander J; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2013-05-01

    Spindle cell hemangioma (SCH) is a rare, benign vascular tumor of the dermis and subcutis. The lesions can be multifocal and are overrepresented in Maffucci syndrome, in which patients also have multiple enchondromas. Somatic mosaic R132C IDH1 hotspot mutations were recently identified in Maffucci syndrome. We evaluated the presence of mutations in solitary and multiple SCHs in patients without multiple enchondromas and tested a range of other vascular lesions that enter into the differential diagnosis. The R132C IDH1 mutation was identified by hydrolysis probes assay and confirmed by Sanger sequencing in 18 of 28 (64%) SCHs; of the 10 negative cases, 2 harbored a mutation in IDH2 (R172T and R172M) by Sanger sequencing. None of 154 other vascular malformations and tumors harbored an IDH1 R132C mutation, and R132H IDH1 mutations were absent in all 182 cases. All 16 SCHs examined by immunohistochemistry were negative for expression of HIF-1α. In conclusion, 20 of 28 (71%) SCHs harbored mutations in exon 4 of IDH1 or IDH2. Given that mutations were absent in 154 other vascular lesions, the mutation seems to be highly specific for SCH. The mutation does not induce expression of HIF-1α in SCH, and therefore the exact mechanism by which mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 lead to vascular tumorigenesis remains to be established. PMID:23485734

  7. Comparison of immunohistochemistry, DNA sequencing and allele-specific PCR for the detection of IDH1 mutations in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Loussouarn, Delphine; Le Loupp, Anne-Gaëlle; Frenel, Jean-Sébastien; Leclair, François; Von Deimling, Andreas; Aumont, Maud; Martin, Stéphane; Campone, Mario; Denis, Marc G

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have identified mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene in more than 70% of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II and III gliomas. The most frequent mutation leads to a specific amino acid change from arginine to histidine at codon 132 (c.395G>A, p.R132H). IDH1 mutated tumors have a better prognosis than IDH1 non-mutated tumors. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare the methods of mIDH1 R132H immunohistochemistry, allele-specific PCR and DNA sequencing for determination of IDH1 status. We performed a retrospective study of 91 patients with WHO grade II (n=43) and III (n=48) oligodendrogliomas. A fragment of exon 4 spanning the sequence encoding the catalytic domain of IDH1, including codon 132, was amplified and sequenced using standard conditions. Allele-specific amplification was performed using two forward primers with variations in their 3' nucleotides such that each was specific for the wild-type or the mutated variant, and one reverse primer. Immunohistochemistry was performed with mouse monoclonal mIDH1 R132H. DNA was extracted from FFPE sections following macrodissection. IDH1 mutations were found in 55/90 patients (61.1%) by direct sequencing. R132H mutations were found in 47/55 patients (85.4%). The results of the allele-specific PCR positively correlated with those from DNA sequencing. Other mutations (p.R132C, p.R132S and pR132G) were found by DNA sequencing in 3, 3 and 2 tumors, respectively (8/55 patients, 14.6%). mIDH1 R132H immunostaining was found in the 47 patients presenting the R132H mutation (sensitivity 47/47, 100% for this mutation). None of the tumors presenting a wild-type IDH1 gene were stained (specificity 35/35, 100%). Our results demonstrate that immunohistochemistry using the mIDH1 R132H antibody and allele-specific amplification are highly sensitive techniques to detect the most frequent mutation of the IDH1 gene. PMID:22447191

  8. The role of IDH1 mutated tumour cells in secondary glioblastomas: an evolutionary game theoretical view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basanta, David; Scott, Jacob G.; Rockne, Russ; Swanson, Kristin R.; Anderson, Alexander R. A.

    2011-02-01

    Recent advances in clinical medicine have elucidated two significantly different subtypes of glioblastoma which carry very different prognoses, both defined by mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH-1). The mechanistic consequences of this mutation have not yet been fully clarified, with conflicting opinions existing in the literature; however, IDH-1 mutation may be used as a surrogate marker to distinguish between primary and secondary glioblastoma multiforme (sGBM) from malignant progression of a lower grade glioma. We develop a mathematical model of IDH-1 mutated secondary glioblastoma using evolutionary game theory to investigate the interactions between four different phenotypic populations within the tumor: autonomous growth, invasive, glycolytic, and the hybrid invasive/glycolytic cells. Our model recapitulates glioblastoma behavior well and is able to reproduce two recent experimental findings, as well as make novel predictions concerning the rate of invasive growth as a function of vascularity, and fluctuations in the proportions of phenotypic populations that a glioblastoma will experience under different microenvironmental constraints.

  9. Clonal leukemic evolution in myelodysplastic syndromes with TET2 and IDH1/2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tung-Liang; Nagata, Yasunobu; Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Sanada, Masashi; Okuno, Yusuke; Huang, Chein-Fuang; Liang, Der-Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Lai, Chang-Liang; Lee, En-Hui; Shih, Yu-Shu; Tanaka, Hiroko; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Lin, Tung-Huei; Wu, Jin-Hou; Miyano, Satoru; Ogawa, Seishi; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mutations of TET2, IDH1, and IDH2 have been described in myelodysplastic syndrome. The impact of these mutations on outcome of myelodysplastic syndrome and their progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia remains unclear. Mutation status of TET2, IDH1 and IDH2 was investigated in a cohort of 46 paired myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia samples and 122 non-paired cases with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, to clarify their roles in the evolution of myelodysplastic syndrome to acute myeloid leukemia. Among the 168 de novo myelodysplastic syndrome patients, the frequency of TET2, IDH1, and IDH2 mutations was 18.5%, 4.2% and 6.0%, respectively. TET2/IDH mutations had no impact on survivals, while TET2 mutations were significantly associated with rapid progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Seventeen of the 46 paired myelodysplastic syndrome/secondary acute myeloid leukemia samples harbored TET2/IDH mutations; none acquired these mutations in acute myeloid leukemia phase. Progression to acute myeloid leukemia was accompanied by evolution of a novel clone or expansion of a minor pre-existing subclone of one or more distinct mutations in 12 of the 17 cases with TET2/IDH mutations. A minor subclone in 3 cases with biallelic TET2 inactivation subsequently expanded, indicating biallelic TET2 mutations play a role in acute myeloid leukemia progression. Twelve patients acquired other genetic lesions, and/or showed increased relative mutant allelic burden of FLT3-ITD, N/K-RAS, CEBPA or RUNX1 during acute myeloid leukemia progression. Our findings provide a novel insight into the role of TET2/IDH mutation in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndrome and subsequent progression to acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:23996483

  10. IDH1 and IDH2 mutation analysis in chronic- and blast-phase myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Pardanani, A; Lasho, T L; Finke, C M; Mai, M; McClure, R F; Tefferi, A

    2010-06-01

    Bone marrow DNA was screened for isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations in 200 patients with chronic (n=166) or blast (n=34) phase myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Included among the former were 77 patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF), 47 essential thrombocythemia and 38 polycythemia vera (PV). Nine IDH mutations (5 IDH1 and 4 IDH2) were detected; mutational frequencies were approximately 21% (7 of 34) for blast-phase MPN and approximately 4% (3 of 77) for PMF. IDH mutations were seen in only 1 of 12 paired chronic-blast-phase samples and in none of 27 concurrently studied acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients without antecedent MPN. IDH1 mutations included R132C (n=4; two post-PMF AML, one post-PV AML and one PMF) and R132S (n=1; post-PMF AML). IDH2 mutations included R140Q (n=3; one post-PMF AML, one post-PV AML and one PMF) and a novel R140W (n=1; mutation found in both chronic- and blast-phase samples). The entire study cohort was also screened for JAK2 and MPL mutations and JAK2V617F was found in three IDH-mutated cases (two PMF and one PV). This study shows a relatively high incidence of IDH mutations in blast-phase MPN, regardless of JAK2 mutational status, and the occurrence of similar mutations in chronic-phase PMF. PMID:20410924

  11. Genetics and Epigenetics of Glioblastoma: Applications and Overall Incidence of IDH1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Aizhen; Hou, Chunfeng; Chen, Hongfang; Zong, Xuan; Zong, Peijun

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most fatal brain cancer found in humans. Patients suffering from glioblastoma have a dismal prognosis, with a median survival of 15 months. The tumor may develop rapidly de novo in older patients or through progression from anaplastic astrocytomas in younger patients if glioblastoma is primary or secondary, respectively. During the past decade, significant advances have been made in the understanding of processes leading to glioblastoma, and several important genetic defects that appear to be important for the development and progression of this tumor have been identified. Particularly, the discovery of recurrent mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene has shed new light on the molecular landscape in glioblastoma. Indeed, emerging research on the consequences of mutant IDH1 protein expression suggests that its neomorphic enzymatic activity catalyzing the production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate influences a range of cellular programs that affect the epigenome and contribute to glioblastoma development. One of the exciting observations is the presence of IDH1 mutation in the vast majority of secondary glioblastoma, while it is almost absent in primary glioblastoma. Growing data indicate that this particular mutation has clinical and prognostic importance and will become a critical early distinction in diagnosis of glioblastoma. PMID:26858939

  12. A heterozygous IDH1R132H/WT mutation induces genome-wide alterations in DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Christopher G.; Barwick, Benjamin G.; Jin, Genglin; Rago, Carlo; Kapoor-Vazirani, Priya; Powell, Doris R.; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Bigner, Darell D.; Vertino, Paula M.; Yan, Hai

    2012-01-01

    Monoallelic point mutations of the NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases IDH1 and IDH2 occur frequently in gliomas, acute myeloid leukemias, and chondromas, and display robust association with specific DNA hypermethylation signatures. Here we show that heterozygous expression of the IDH1R132H allele is sufficient to induce the genome-wide alterations in DNA methylation characteristic of these tumors. Using a gene-targeting approach, we knocked-in a single copy of the most frequently observed IDH1 mutation, R132H, into a human cancer cell line and profiled changes in DNA methylation at over 27,000 CpG dinucleotides relative to wild-type parental cells. We find that IDH1R132H/WT mutation induces widespread alterations in DNA methylation, including hypermethylation of 2010 and hypomethylation of 842 CpG loci. We demonstrate that many of these alterations are consistent with those observed in IDH1-mutant and G-CIMP+ primary gliomas and can segregate IDH wild-type and mutated tumors as well as those exhibiting the G-CIMP phenotype in unsupervised analysis of two primary glioma cohorts. Further, we show that the direction of IDH1R132H/WT-mediated DNA methylation change is largely dependent upon preexisting DNA methylation levels, resulting in depletion of moderately methylated loci. Additionally, whereas the levels of multiple histone H3 and H4 methylation modifications were globally increased, consistent with broad inhibition of histone demethylation, hypermethylation at H3K9 in particular accompanied locus-specific DNA hypermethylation at several genes down-regulated in IDH1R132H/WT knock-in cells. These data provide insight on epigenetic alterations induced by IDH1 mutations and support a causal role for IDH1R132H/WT mutants in driving epigenetic instability in human cancer cells. PMID:22899282

  13. Type and frequency of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are related to astrocytic and oligodendroglial differentiation and age: a study of 1,010 diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Christian; Meyer, Jochen; Balss, Jörg; Capper, David; Mueller, Wolf; Christians, Arne; Felsberg, Jörg; Wolter, Marietta; Mawrin, Christian; Wick, Wolfgang; Weller, Michael; Herold-Mende, Christel; Unterberg, Andreas; Jeuken, Judith W M; Wesseling, Peter; Reifenberger, Guido; von Deimling, Andreas

    2009-10-01

    Somatic mutations in the IDH1 gene encoding cytosolic NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase have been shown in the majority of astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas of WHO grades II and III. IDH2 encoding mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase is also mutated in these tumors, albeit at much lower frequencies. Preliminary data suggest an importance of IDH1 mutation for prognosis showing that patients with anaplastic astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas harboring IDH1 mutations seem to fare much better than patients without this mutation in their tumors. To determine mutation types and their frequencies, we examined 1,010 diffuse gliomas. We detected 716 IDH1 mutations and 31 IDH2 mutations. We found 165 IDH1 (72.7%) and 2 IDH2 mutations (0.9%) in 227 diffuse astrocytomas WHO grade II, 146 IDH1 (64.0%) and 2 IDH2 mutations (0.9%) in 228 anaplastic astrocytomas WHO grade III, 105 IDH1 (82.0%) and 6 IDH2 mutations (4.7%) in 128 oligodendrogliomas WHO grade II, 121 IDH1 (69.5%) and 9 IDH2 mutations (5.2%) in 174 anaplastic oligodendrogliomas WHO grade III, 62 IDH1 (81.6%) and 1 IDH2 mutations (1.3%) in 76 oligoastrocytomas WHO grade II and 117 IDH1 (66.1%) and 11 IDH2 mutations (6.2%) in 177 anaplastic oligoastrocytomas WHO grade III. We report on an inverse association of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in these gliomas and a non-random distribution of the mutation types within the tumor entities. IDH1 mutations of the R132C type are strongly associated with astrocytoma, while IDH2 mutations predominantly occur in oligodendroglial tumors. In addition, patients with anaplastic glioma harboring IDH1 mutations were on average 6 years younger than those without these alterations. PMID:19554337

  14. Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) Mutation in Breast Adenocarcinoma Is Associated With Elevated Levels of Serum and Urine 2-Hydroxyglutarate

    PubMed Central

    Sadrzadeh, Hossein; Comander, Amy H.; Higgins, Michaela J.; Bardia, Aditya; Perry, Ashley; Burke, Meghan; Silver, Regina; Matulis, Christina R.; Straley, Kimberly S.; Yen, Katharine E.; Agresta, Sam; Kim, Hyeryun; Schenkein, David P.; Borger, Darrell R.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the IDH1 and IDH2 (isocitrate dehydrogenase) genes have been discovered across a range of solid-organ and hematologic malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia, glioma, chondrosarcoma, and cholangiocarcinoma. An intriguing aspect of IDH-mutant tumors is the aberrant production and accumulation of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), which may play a pivotal oncogenic role in these malignancies. We describe the first reported case of an IDH1 p.R132L mutation in a patient with hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast adenocarcinoma. This patient was initially treated for locally advanced disease, but then suffered a relapse and metastasis, at which point an IDH1-R132 mutation was discovered in an affected lymph node. The mutation was subsequently found in the primary tumor tissue and all metastatic sites, but not in an uninvolved lymph node. In addition, the patient’s serum and urine displayed marked elevations in the concentration of 2-HG, significantly higher than that measured in six other patients with metastatic HR+ breast carcinoma whose tumors were found to harbor wild-type IDH1. In summary, IDH1 mutations may impact a rare subgroup of patients with breast adenocarcinoma. This may suggest future avenues for disease monitoring through noninvasive measurement of 2-HG, as well as for the development and study of targeted therapies against the aberrant IDH1 enzyme. PMID:24760710

  15. A novel COLD-PCR/FMCA assay enhances the detection of low-abundance IDH1 mutations in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pang, Brendan; Durso, Mary B; Hamilton, Ronald L; Nikiforova, Marina N

    2013-03-01

    Point mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) have been identified in many gliomas. The detection of IDH1 mutations becomes challenging on suboptimal glioma biopsies when a limited number of tumor cells is available for analysis. Coamplification at lower denaturing-polymerase chain reaction (COLD-PCR) is a PCR technique that deliberately lowers the denaturing cycle temperature to selectively favor amplification of mutant alleles, allowing for the sensitive detection of low-abundance mutations. We developed a novel COLD-PCR assay on the LightCycler platform (Roche, Applied Science, Indianapolis, IN), using post-PCR fluorescent melting curve analysis (FMCA) for the detection of mutant IDH1 with a detection limit of 1%. Thirty-five WHO grade I to IV gliomas and 9 non-neoplastic brain and spinal cord biopsies were analyzed with this technique and the results were compared with the conventional real-time PCR and the Sanger sequencing analysis. COLD-PCR/FMCA was able to detect the most common IDH1 R132H mutation and rare mutation types including R132H, R132C, R132L, R132S, and R132G mutations. Twenty-five glioma cases were positive for IDH1 mutations by COLD-PCR/FMCA, and 23 gliomas were positive by the conventional real-time PCR and Sanger sequencing. A pilocytic astrocytoma (PA I) and a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM IV) showed low-abundance IDH1 mutations detected by COLD-PCR/FMCA. The remaining 10 glioma and 9 non-neoplastic samples were negative by all the 3 methods. In summary, we report a novel COLD-PCR/FMCA method that provides rapid and sensitive detection of IDH1 mutations in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and can be used in the clinical setting to assess the small brain biopsies. PMID:23370430

  16. Cancer-associated Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) R132H Mutation and d-2-Hydroxyglutarate Stimulate Glutamine Metabolism under Hypoxia*

    PubMed Central

    Reitman, Zachary J.; Duncan, Christopher G.; Poteet, Ethan; Winters, Ali; Yan, Liang-Jun; Gooden, David M.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Boros, Laszlo G.; Yang, Shao-Hua; Yan, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the cytosolic NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1) occur in several types of cancer, and altered cellular metabolism associated with IDH1 mutations presents unique therapeutic opportunities. By altering IDH1, these mutations target a critical step in reductive glutamine metabolism, the metabolic pathway that converts glutamine ultimately to acetyl-CoA for biosynthetic processes. While IDH1-mutated cells are sensitive to therapies that target glutamine metabolism, the effect of IDH1 mutations on reductive glutamine metabolism remains poorly understood. To explore this issue, we investigated the effect of a knock-in, single-codon IDH1-R132H mutation on the metabolism of the HCT116 colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line. Here we report the R132H-isobolome by using targeted 13C isotopomer tracer fate analysis to trace the metabolic fate of glucose and glutamine in this system. We show that introduction of the R132H mutation into IDH1 up-regulates the contribution of glutamine to lipogenesis in hypoxia, but not in normoxia. Treatment of cells with a d-2-hydroxyglutarate (d-2HG) ester recapitulated these changes, indicating that the alterations observed in the knocked-in cells were mediated by d-2HG produced by the IDH1 mutant. These studies provide a dynamic mechanistic basis for metabolic alterations observed in IDH1-mutated tumors and uncover potential therapeutic targets in IDH1-mutated cancers. PMID:24986863

  17. Prognosis of Glioblastoma With Oligodendroglioma Component is Associated With the IDH1 Mutation and MGMT Methylation Status1

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jae Kyung; Cho, Hwa jin; Kim, Hanna; Park, Chul-Kee; Lee, Se Hoon; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Peom; Yoon, Jung Min; Park, Sung-Hye

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) with oligodendroglioma component (GBMO) is a newly described GBM subtype in the 2007 World Health Organization classification. However, its biological and genetic characteristics are largely unknown. We investigated the clinicopathological and molecular features of 34 GBMOs and compared the survival rate of these patients with those of patients with astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA), and conventional GBMs in our hospital. GBMO could be divided into two groups based on the presence of an IDH1 mutation. The IDH1 mutation was more frequently found in secondary GBMO, which had lower frequencies of EGFR amplification but higher MGMT methylation than the wild type IDH1 group, and patients with mutant IDH1 GBMO were on average younger than those with wild-type IDH1. Therefore, GBMO is a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous subtype, largely belonging to a proneural and classical subtype of GBM. The survival rate of GBMO patients itself was worse than that of AOA patients but not significantly better than that of conventional GBM patients. GBMO survival was independent of the dominant histopathological subtype i.e., astrocyte-dominant or oligodendroglioma -dominant, but it was significantly associated with the IDH1 mutation and MGMT methylation status. Therefore, GBMO should be regarded as a separate entity from AOA and must be classified as a subtype of GBM. However, further study is needed to determine whether it is a pathologic variant or a pattern of GBM because GBMO has a similar prognosis to conventional GBMs. PMID:25500080

  18. Biphasic papillary and lobular breast carcinoma with PIK3CA and IDH1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Ang, Daphne; VanSandt, Amanda M; Beadling, Carol; Warrick, Andrea; West, Robert B; Corless, Christopher L; Troxell, Megan L

    2012-12-01

    Morphologic "special types" of breast carcinomas have been recognized for many years, and their molecular and genetic properties have not been specifically studied until recently. Lobular carcinoma lacks functional E-cadherin expression but shares molecular similarities with low-grade invasive ductal carcinomas. Papillary carcinoma is relatively rare, and molecular features are just being elucidated. We report a case of concurrent invasive lobular and papillary carcinoma, the latter with extensive nodal involvement. Multiplex screening for activating point mutations identified different point mutations in the distinct morphologic components: lobular PIK3CA H1047R, papillary; PIK3CA Q546P, and IDH1 R132H. These molecular data favor coincidental "collision tumors" over clonal evolution. The IDH1 R132H point mutation is common in gliomas and acute myelogenous leukemia, but this has not been previously reported in breast carcinoma. The characterization of activating point mutations in morphologic special types of breast carcinoma may suggest avenues amenable to targeted therapy. PMID:23111200

  19. Mutations in IDH1, IDH2, and in the TERT promoter define clinically distinct subgroups of adult malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Patrick; Reitman, Zachary J.; Lipp, Eric; Rasheed, B. Ahmed; Yang, Rui; Diplas, Bill H.; Wang, Zhaohui; Greer, Paula K.; Zhu, Huishan; Wang, Catherine Y.; Carpenter, Austin B.; Friedman, Henry; Friedman, Allan H.; Keir, Stephen T.; He, Jie; He, Yiping; McLendon, Roger E.; Herndon II, James E.; Yan, Hai; Bigner, Darell D.

    2014-01-01

    Frequent mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) and the promoter of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) represent two significant discoveries in glioma genomics. Understanding the degree to which these two mutations co-occur or occur exclusively of one another in glioma subtypes presents a unique opportunity to guide glioma classification and prognosis. We analyzed the relationship between overall survival (OS) and the presence of IDH1/2 and TERT promoter mutations in a panel of 473 adult gliomas. We hypothesized and show that genetic signatures capable of distinguishing among several types of gliomas could be established providing clinically relevant information that can serve as an adjunct to histopathological diagnosis. We found that mutations in the TERT promoter occurred in 74.2% of glioblastomas (GBM), but occurred in a minority of Grade II-III astrocytomas (18.2%). In contrast, IDH1/2 mutations were observed in 78.4% of Grade II-III astrocytomas, but were uncommon in primary GBM. In oligodendrogliomas, TERT promoter and IDH1/2 mutations co-occurred in 79% of cases. Patients whose Grade III-IV gliomas exhibit TERT promoter mutations alone predominately have primary GBMs associated with poor median OS (11.5 months). Patients whose Grade III-IV gliomas exhibit IDH1/2 mutations alone predominately have astrocytic morphologies and exhibit a median OS of 57 months while patients whose tumors exhibit both TERT promoter and IDH1/2 mutations predominately exhibit oligodendroglial morphologies and exhibit median OS of 125 months. Analyzing gliomas based on their genetic signatures allows for the stratification of these patients into distinct cohorts, with unique prognosis and survival. PMID:24722048

  20. What do we know about IDH1/2 mutations so far, and how do we use it?

    PubMed Central

    Horbinski, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome analyses have facilitated the discovery of clinically relevant genetic alterations in a variety of diseases, most notably cancer. A prominent example of this was the discovery of mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) in a sizeable proportion of gliomas and some other neoplasms. Herein the normal functions of these enzymes, how the mutations alter their catalytic properties, the effects of their D-2-hydroxyglutarate metabolite, technical considerations in diagnostic neuropathology, implications about prognosis and therapeutic considerations, and practical applications and controversies regarding IDH1/2 mutation testing are discussed. PMID:23512379

  1. Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome are caused by somatic mosaic mutations of IDH1 and IDH2.

    PubMed

    Amary, M Fernanda; Damato, Stephen; Halai, Dina; Eskandarpour, Malihe; Berisha, Fitim; Bonar, Fiona; McCarthy, Stan; Fantin, Valeria R; Straley, Kimberly S; Lobo, Samira; Aston, Will; Green, Claire L; Gale, Rosemary E; Tirabosco, Roberto; Futreal, Andrew; Campbell, Peter; Presneau, Nadège; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2011-12-01

    Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome are characterized by multiple central cartilaginous tumors that are accompanied by soft tissue hemangiomas in Maffucci syndrome. We show that in 37 of 40 individuals with these syndromes, at least one tumor has a mutation in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) or in IDH2, 65% of which result in a R132C substitution in the protein. In 18 of 19 individuals with more than one tumor analyzed, all tumors from a given individual shared the same IDH1 mutation affecting Arg132. In 2 of 12 subjects, a low level of mutated DNA was identified in non-neoplastic tissue. The levels of the metabolite 2HG were measured in a series of central cartilaginous and vascular tumors, including samples from syndromic and nonsyndromic subjects, and these levels correlated strongly with the presence of IDH1 mutations. The findings are compatible with a model in which IDH1 or IDH2 mutations represent early post-zygotic occurrences in individuals with these syndromes. PMID:22057236

  2. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in different histologic subtypes and WHO grading gliomas in a sample from Northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pessôa, I A; Sagica, F E S; Anselmo, N P; Brito, J R N; de Oliveira, E H C

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is a term used to describe tumors derived from glial cells. These tumors are divided into subgroups based on the histological morphology and similarity of their differentiated glia cells. Traditionally, they are classified according to the World Health Organization and include astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, and oligoastrocytomas. Like most cancers, gliomas develop as a result of genetic changes that accumulate with tumor progression. Alterations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 were found to be relevant in the classification and prognostic of gliomas. Because of the importance of mutations in these genes, particularly in IDH1, in different proposals of the genesis and progression of gliomas, we analyzed the occurrence of mutations in these genes in samples obtained from patients from Belém (PA, Brazil) using polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism followed by sequencing. We compared the results obtained from tumors of different malignancy grades, evaluating the significance of the associations between different variables. R132H was the only mutation found in 17.6% (6/34) of cases, including in astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, oligodendroglioma, and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. No mutations were found in the IDH2 gene. We found no significant relationship between the identified mutations in IDH1 and the variables. Our data could not confirm that mutations in IDH1/IDH2 are indicative of malignancy and prognosis. However, the results support that the mutation in IDH1 gene was an early event in the development of gliomas, as it was found in tumors of different malignancy grades. PMID:26125858

  3. IDH1 mutation and MGMT methylation status predict survival in patients with anaplastic astrocytoma treated with temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Scaringi, Claudia; Arcella, Antonella; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Di Stefano, Domenica; Scarpino, Stefania; Bozzao, Alessandro; Pace, Andrea; Villani, Veronica; Salvati, Maurizio; Esposito, Vincenzo; Giangaspero, Felice; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2014-06-01

    Several molecular markers have been proposed as predictors of outcome in patients with high grade gliomas. We report a retrospective multicenter study of 97 consecutive adult patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) treated with radiation therapy (RT) plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) between October 2004 and March 2012. Correlations between the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation and O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation with survival outcomes have been analyzed. At a median follow-up time of 46 months (range 12-89 months), median and 5-year overall survival rates were 50.5 months (95 % CI, 37.8-63.2) and 38% (95 % CI, 25.7-50.7%), and median and 5-year progression-free survival rates were 36 months (95% CI, 28.5-44.0) and 22 % (95 % CI, 10-34%), respectively. IDH1 mutation and MGMT promoter methylation were present in 54 and 60% of evaluable patients, respectively. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that IDH1 mutation (P = 0.001), MGMT methylation (P = 0.01), age < 50 years (P = 0.02), and extent of resection (P = 0.04) were significantly associated with longer survival. Our study confirms the favorable prognostic value of IDH1 mutation and MGMT methylation in patients with AA treated with RT plus concomitant and adjuvant TMZ. The superiority of combined radiochemotherapy over other treatment modalities remains to be demonstrated. PMID:24748470

  4. Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 gene and IDH1 SNP 105C > T have a prognostic value in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1/IDH2) genes are metabolic enzymes, which are frequently mutated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The enzymes acquire neomorphic enzymatic activity when they mutated. Methods We have investigated the frequency and outcome of the acquired IDH1/IDH2 mutations and the IDH1 SNP 105C > T (rs11554137) in 189 unselected de novo AML patients by polymerase chain reaction amplification followed by direct sequencing. The survival are presented in Kaplan Meier curves with log rank test. Multivariable survival analysis was conducted using Cox regression method, taking age, risk group, treatment, IDH1/2 mutations and IDH1 SNP105 genotype into account. Results Overall, IDH1/2 mutations were found in 41/187 (21.7%) of the AML patients. IDH1 codon 132 mutations were present in 7.9%, whereas IDH2 mutations were more frequent and mutations were identified in codon 140 and 172 in a frequency of 11.1% and 2.6%, respectively. The SNP 105C > T was present in 10.5% of the patients, similar to the normal population. A significantly reduced overall survival (OS) for patients carrying IDH2 codon 140 mutation compared with patients carrying wild-type IDH2 gene (p < 0.001) was observed in the intermediate risk patient group. Neither in the entire patient group nor subdivided in different risk groups, IDH1 mutations had any significance on OS compared to the wild-type IDH1 patients. A significant difference in OS between the heterozygous SNP variant and the homozygous wild-type was observed in the intermediate risk FLT3 negative AML patients (p = 0.004). Conclusions Our results indicate that AML-patients with IDH2 mutations or the IDH1 SNP 105C > T variant can represent a new subgroup for risk stratification and may indicate new treatment options. PMID:25324972

  5. Differential prognostic effect of IDH1 versus IDH2 mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes: a Mayo Clinic study of 277 patients.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, M M; Hanson, C A; Hodnefield, J M; Lasho, T L; Finke, C M; Knudson, R A; Ketterling, R P; Pardanani, A; Tefferi, A

    2012-01-01

    Unlike the case with acute myeloid leukemia, there is limited information on the prognostic impact of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In the current study of 277 patients with MDS, IDH mutations were detected in 34 (12%) cases: 26 IDH2 (all R140Q) and 8 IDH1 (6 R132S and 2 R132C). Mutational frequency was 4% (2 of 56) in refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts, 12% (16 of 130) in refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, 14% (2 of 14) in MDS-unclassifiable, 14% (6 of 42) in refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB)-1 and 23% (8 of 35) in RAEB-2. Normal karyotype was noted in all but one IDH1-mutated cases and 13 IDH2-mutated cases. Multivariable analysis identified presence of mutant IDH1 (P=0.0004; hazard ration 4.0, 95% confidence interval 1.9-8.8), revised International Prognostic Scoring System risk category (P<0.0001), and red cell transfusion need (P=0.002) as independent predictors of inferior survival. In a similar multivariable analysis, mutant IDH1 was the only variable associated with shortened leukemia-free survival (P=0.001; hazard ration 7.0, 95% confidence interval 2.3-20.8). The presence of IDH2R140Q did not affect the overall (P=0.54) or leukemia-free (P=0.81) survival. The current study suggests a powerful adverse prognostic effect for mutant IDH1 in MDS. PMID:22033490

  6. Prognostic Stratification of GBMs Using Combinatorial Assessment of IDH1 Mutation, MGMT Promoter Methylation, and TERT Mutation Status: Experience from a Tertiary Care Center in India.

    PubMed

    Purkait, Suvendu; Mallick, Supriya; Sharma, Vikas; Kumar, Anupam; Pathak, Pankaj; Jha, Prerana; Biswas, Ahitagni; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Gupta, Deepak; Suri, Ashish; Datt Upadhyay, Ashish; Suri, Vaishali; Sharma, Mehar C; Sarkar, Chitra

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to establish the best and simplified panel of molecular markers for prognostic stratification of glioblastomas (GBMs). One hundred fourteen cases of GBMs were studied for IDH1, TP53, and TERT mutation by Sanger sequencing; EGFR and PDGFRA amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization; NF1expression by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR); and MGMT promoter methylation by methylation-specific PCR. IDH1 mutant cases had significantly longer progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) as compared to IDH1 wild-type cases. Combinatorial assessment of MGMT and TERT emerged as independent prognostic markers, especially in the IDH1 wild-type GBMs. Thus, within the IDH1 wild-type group, cases with only MGMT methylation (group 1) had the best outcome (median PFS: 83.3 weeks; OS: not reached), whereas GBMs with only TERT mutation (group 3) had the worst outcome (PFS: 19.7 weeks; OS: 32.8 weeks). Cases with both or none of these alterations (group 2) had intermediate prognosis (PFS: 47.6 weeks; OS: 89.2 weeks). Majority of the IDH1 mutant GBMs belonged to group 1 (75%), whereas only 18.7% and 6.2% showed group 2 and 3 signatures, respectively. Interestingly, none of the other genetic alterations were significantly associated with survival in IDH1 mutant or wild-type GBMs. Based on above findings, we recommend assessment of three markers, viz., IDH1, MGMT, and TERT, for GBM prognostication in routine practice. We show for the first time that IDH1 wild-type GBMs which constitute majority of the GBMs can be effectively stratified into three distinct prognostic subgroups based on MGMT and TERT status, irrespective of other genetic alterations. PMID:27567961

  7. Novel multiplex bead-based assay for detection of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shivarov, Velizar; Ivanova, Milena; Hadjiev, Evgueniy; Naumova, Elissaveta

    2013-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH) mutations are frequently found in various cancer types such as gliomas, chondrosarcomas and myeloid malignancies. Their molecular detection has recently gained wide recognition in the diagnosis and prognosis of these neoplasms. For that purpose various molecular approaches have been used but a universally accepted method is still lacking. In this study we aimed to develop a novel bead-based liquid assay using Locked nucleic acids (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide probes for multiplexed detection of the most frequent IDH1 (p.R132C, p.R132G, p.R132H, p.R132L, p.R132S) and IDH2 (p.R140Q, p.R172K) mutations. The method includes four steps: 1) PCR amplification of the targeted fragments with biotinylated primers; 2) Direct hybridization to barcoded microbeads with specific LNA-modified oligonucleotide probes; 3) Incubation with phycoerythrin coupled streptavidin; 4) Acquisition of fluorescent intensities of each set of beads on a flow platform (LuminexCorp., USA). We tested the performance of the assay on both artificial plasmid constructs and on clinical samples from 114 patients with known or suspected myeloid malignancies. The method appeared to be superior to direct sequencing having a much higher sensitivity of 2.5% mutant alleles. Applying this method to patients' samples we identified a total of 9 mutations (one IDH1 p.R132C, seven IDH2 p.R140Q and one IDH2 p.R172K). In conclusion, this method could be successfully implemented in the diagnostic work-up for various tumors known to harbor IDH1/2 mutations (e.g. myeloid malignancies, gliomas, etc.). International initiatives are needed to validate the different existing methods for detection of IDH1/2 mutations in clinical settings. PMID:24098815

  8. Novel Multiplex Bead-Based Assay for Detection of IDH1 and IDH2 Mutations in Myeloid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hadjiev, Evgueniy; Naumova, Elissaveta

    2013-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH) mutations are frequently found in various cancer types such as gliomas, chondrosarcomas and myeloid malignancies. Their molecular detection has recently gained wide recognition in the diagnosis and prognosis of these neoplasms. For that purpose various molecular approaches have been used but a universally accepted method is still lacking. In this study we aimed to develop a novel bead-based liquid assay using Locked nucleic acids (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide probes for multiplexed detection of the most frequent IDH1 (p.R132C, p.R132G, p.R132H, p.R132L, p.R132S) and IDH2 (p.R140Q, p.R172K) mutations. The method includes four steps: 1) PCR amplification of the targeted fragments with biotinylated primers; 2) Direct hybridization to barcoded microbeads with specific LNA-modified oligonucleotide probes; 3) Incubation with phycoerythrin coupled streptavidin; 4) Acquisition of fluorescent intensities of each set of beads on a flow platform (LuminexCorp., USA). We tested the performance of the assay on both artificial plasmid constructs and on clinical samples from 114 patients with known or suspected myeloid malignancies. The method appeared to be superior to direct sequencing having a much higher sensitivity of 2.5% mutant alleles. Applying this method to patients' samples we identified a total of 9 mutations (one IDH1 p.R132C, seven IDH2 p.R140Q and one IDH2 p.R172K). In conclusion, this method could be successfully implemented in the diagnostic work-up for various tumors known to harbor IDH1/2 mutations (e.g. myeloid malignancies, gliomas, etc.). International initiatives are needed to validate the different existing methods for detection of IDH1/2 mutations in clinical settings. PMID:24098815

  9. Combined "Infiltrating Astrocytoma/Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma" Harboring IDH1 R132H and BRAF V600E Mutations.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Seiji; Kipp, Benjamin R; Voss, Jesse S; Giannini, Caterina; Raghunathan, Aditya

    2016-02-01

    Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) has rarely been reported in combination with infiltrating glioma, historically interpreted as a "collision tumor." Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and BRAF V600E mutations are usually not concurrent. The former is typical of adult infiltrating gliomas, and the latter is identified in a variety of primary central nervous system neoplasms, including PXA, ganglioglioma, pilocytic astrocytoma, and rarely infiltrating gliomas. We report the case of a 56-year-old man presenting with seizures and headaches. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large right temporal lobe mass with low T1 and high T2/FLAIR signal and a discrete contrast-enhancing focus. Histologically, the tumor showed 2 distinct components: an infiltrating astrocytoma harboring 5 mitoses/10 high-power fields and a relatively circumscribed focus, resembling PXA with, at most, 2 mitoses/10 high-power fields. No microvascular proliferation or necrosis was present in either component. The infiltrating astrocytoma component contained numerous axons, whereas the PXA-like component had sparse axons, as demonstrated by the neurofilament immunostain. Both components were positive for the mutant IDH1 R132H and showed loss of ATRX expression, whereas BRAF V600E was restricted to the PXA-like component. On sequencing of the 2 components separately after microdissection, both showed identical IDH1 R132H and TP53 R273C point mutations, whereas the BRAF V600E mutation was limited to the PXA-like component. These findings are consistent with clonal expansion of a morphologically distinct focus, harboring a private BRAF V600E mutation within an IDH1-mutant glioma. Intratumoral heterogeneity and clonal evolution, as seems to have occurred here, suggest reevaluation of "collision tumors" as a concept. PMID:26414224

  10. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are frequent events in central chondrosarcoma and central and periosteal chondromas but not in other mesenchymal tumours.

    PubMed

    Amary, M Fernanda; Bacsi, Krisztian; Maggiani, Francesca; Damato, Stephen; Halai, Dina; Berisha, Fitim; Pollock, Robin; O'Donnell, Paul; Grigoriadis, Anita; Diss, Tim; Eskandarpour, Malihe; Presneau, Nadège; Hogendoorn, Pancras Cw; Futreal, Andrew; Tirabosco, Roberto; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2011-07-01

    Somatic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 occur in gliomas and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Since patients with multiple enchondromas have occasionally been reported to have these conditions, we hypothesized that the same mutations would occur in cartilaginous neoplasms. Approximately 1200 mesenchymal tumours, including 220 cartilaginous tumours, 222 osteosarcomas and another ∼750 bone and soft tissue tumours, were screened for IDH1 R132 mutations, using Sequenom(®) mass spectrometry. Cartilaginous tumours and chondroblastic osteosarcomas, wild-type for IDH1 R132, were analysed for IDH2 (R172, R140) mutations. Validation was performed by capillary sequencing and restriction enzyme digestion. Heterozygous somatic IDH1/IDH2 mutations, which result in the production of a potential oncometabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate, were only detected in central and periosteal cartilaginous tumours, and were found in at least 56% of these, ∼40% of which were represented by R132C. IDH1 R132H mutations were confirmed by immunoreactivity for this mutant allele. The ratio of IDH1:IDH2 mutation was 10.6 : 1. No IDH2 R140 mutations were detected. Mutations were detected in enchondromas through to conventional central and dedifferentiated chondrosarcomas, in patients with both solitary and multiple neoplasms. No germline mutations were detected. No mutations were detected in peripheral chondrosarcomas and osteochondromas. In conclusion, IDH1 and IDH2 mutations represent the first common genetic abnormalities to be identified in conventional central and periosteal cartilaginous tumours. As in gliomas and AML, the mutations appear to occur early in tumourigenesis. We speculate that a mosaic pattern of IDH-mutation-bearing cells explains the reports of diverse tumours (gliomas, AML, multiple cartilaginous neoplasms, haemangiomas) occurring in the same patient. PMID:21598255

  11. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are frequent in Chinese patients with acute myeloid leukemia but rare in other types of hematological disorders.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yang; Zeng, Yun; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Zou, Shan-Hua; Cheng, Yun-Feng; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2010-11-12

    Frequent mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 genes (IDH1 and IDH2) have been identified in gliomas and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our aim is to assess whether IDH mutations were presented in Chinese patients with various hematological disorders. In this study, we screened the IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in a cohort of 456 Chinese patients with various hematological malignancies and disorders. We found three missense (p.R132C, p.R132G, and p.I99M; occurred in five patients) and one silent mutation (c.315C>T; occurred in two patients) in the IDH1 gene and two missense mutations (p.R140Q and p.R172K; occurred in four AML patients) and one silent mutation (c.435G>A) in the IDH2 gene. Except for one non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patient harboring IDH1 mutation p.R132C, all IDH1 and IDH2 missense mutations were observed in patients with AML. Intriguingly, the IDH2 mutation p.R140Q and novel IDH1 mutation p.I99M co-occurred in a 75-year-old patient with AML developed from myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The frequency of IDH1 and IDH2 missense mutations in Chinese AML patients reached 5.9% and 8.3%, respectively. Our results supported the recent findings that IDH gene mutations were common in AML. Conversely, IDH mutations were rather rare in Chinese patients with other types of hematological disorders. PMID:20946881

  12. A model of a patient-derived IDH1 mutant anaplastic astrocytoma with alternative lengthening of telomeres.

    PubMed

    Borodovsky, Alexandra; Meeker, Alan K; Kirkness, Ewen F; Zhao, Qi; Eberhart, Charles G; Gallia, Gary L; Riggins, Gregory J

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) have been found in the vast majority of low grade and progressive infiltrating gliomas and are characterized by the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate from α-ketoglutarate. Recent investigations of malignant gliomas have identified additional genetic and chromosomal abnormalities which cluster with IDH1 mutations into two distinct subgroups. The astrocytic subgroup was found to have frequent mutations in ATRX, TP53 and displays alternative lengthening of telomeres. The second subgroup with oligodendrocytic morphology has frequent mutations in CIC or FUBP1, and is linked to co-deletion of the 1p/19q arms. These mutations reflect the development of two distinct molecular pathways representing the majority of IDH1 mutant gliomas. Unfortunately, due to the scarcity of endogenously derived IDH1 mutant models, there is a lack of accurate models to study mechanism and develop new therapy. Here we report the generation of an endogenous IDH1 anaplastic astrocytoma in vivo model with concurrent mutations in TP53, CDKN2A and ATRX. The model has a similar phenotype and histopathology as the original patient tumor, expresses the IDH1 (R132H) mutant protein and exhibits an alternative lengthening of telomeres phenotype. The JHH-273 model is characteristic of anaplastic astrocytoma and represents a valuable tool for investigating the pathogenesis of this distinct molecular subset of gliomas and for preclinical testing of compounds targeting IDH1 mutations or alternative lengthening of telomeres. PMID:25471051

  13. Somatic mosaic IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are associated with enchondroma and spindle cell hemangioma in Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pansuriya, Twinkal C; van Eijk, Ronald; d'Adamo, Pio; van Ruler, Maayke A J H; Kuijjer, Marieke L; Oosting, Jan; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; van Oosterwijk, Jolieke G; Verbeke, Sofie L J; Meijer, Daniëlle; van Wezel, Tom; Nord, Karolin H; Sangiorgi, Luca; Toker, Berkin; Liegl-Atzwanger, Bernadette; San-Julian, Mikel; Sciot, Raf; Limaye, Nisha; Kindblom, Lars-Gunnar; Daugaard, Soeren; Godfraind, Catherine; Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka; Kurek, Kyle C; Szuhai, Karoly; French, Pim J; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2011-12-01

    Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome are non-hereditary skeletal disorders characterized by multiple enchondromas (Ollier disease) combined with spindle cell hemangiomas (Maffucci syndrome). We report somatic heterozygous mutations in IDH1 (c.394C>T encoding an R132C substitution and c.395G>A encoding an R132H substitution) or IDH2 (c.516G>C encoding R172S) in 87% of enchondromas (benign cartilage tumors) and in 70% of spindle cell hemangiomas (benign vascular lesions). In total, 35 of 43 (81%) subjects with Ollier disease and 10 of 13 (77%) with Maffucci syndrome carried IDH1 (98%) or IDH2 (2%) mutations in their tumors. Fourteen of 16 subjects had identical mutations in separate lesions. Immunohistochemistry to detect mutant IDH1 R132H protein suggested intraneoplastic and somatic mosaicism. IDH1 mutations in cartilage tumors were associated with hypermethylation and downregulated expression of several genes. Mutations were also found in 40% of solitary central cartilaginous tumors and in four chondrosarcoma cell lines, which will enable functional studies to assess the role of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in tumor formation. PMID:22057234

  14. [Perampanel in the treatment of a patient with glioblastoma multiforme without IDH1 mutation and without MGMT promotor methylation].

    PubMed

    Rösche, J; Piek, J; Hildebrandt, G; Grossmann, A; Kirschstein, T; Benecke, R

    2015-05-01

    Malignant gliomas like glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) release glutamate which causes excitotoxic death to surrounding neurons, thereby vacating room for tumor expansion. We report the case of a patient with GBM treated with the AMPA receptor blocker Perampanel (PER) in combination therapy for partial seizures. Histological work-up of a biopsy showed the tissue of a GBM without mutation of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and without promotor methylation of the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). In a group of patients with IDH 1 wild type and non-methylated MGMT a median survival of 199 days after surgery (i. e. 6.5 months) was described. Our patient lived about one year longer. PER rendered our patient seizure-free for at least the last seven months of his life. It was well tolerated and did not increase the toxicity of temozolomide. When choosing an antiepileptic drug (AED) for the treatment of seizures in patients with malignant brain tumors, the efficacy, the tolerability and perhaps possible effects on tumor progression of the AED should be taken into account. PMID:26018396

  15. Comparative examination of various PCR-based methods for DNMT3A and IDH1/2 mutations identification in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations in epigenetic modifiers were reported in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) including mutations in DNA methyltransferase 3A gene (DNMT3A) in 20%-30% patients and mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 gene (IDH1/2) in 5%-15% patients. Novel studies have shown that mutations in DNMT3A and IDH1/2 influence prognosis, indicating an increasing need to detect these mutations during routine laboratory analysis. DNA sequencing for the identification of these mutations is time-consuming and cost-intensive. This study aimed to establish rapid screening tests to identify mutations in DNMT3A and IDH1/2 that could be applied in routine laboratory procedures and that could influence initial patient management. Methods In this study we developed an endonuclease restriction method to identify the most common DNMT3A mutation (R882H) and an amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) to analyse IDH2 R140Q mutations. Furthermore, we compared these methods with HRM analysis and evaluated the latter for the detection of IDH1 mutations. Results Of 230 samples from patients with AML 30 (13%) samples had DNMT3A mutations, 16 (7%) samples had IDH2 R140Q mutations and 36 (16%) samples had IDH1 mutations. Sensitivity assays performed using serial dilutions of mutated DNA showed that ARMS analysis had a sensitivity of 4.5%, endonuclease restriction had a sensitivity of 0.05% and HRM analysis had a sensitivity of 5.9%–7.8% for detecting different mutations. HRM analysis was the best screening method to determine the heterogeneity of IDH1 mutations. Furthermore, for the identification of mutations in IDH2 and DNMT3A, endonuclease restriction and ARMS methods showed a perfect concordance (100%) with Sanger sequencing while HRM analysis showed a near-perfect concordance (approximately 98%). Conclusion Our study suggested that all the developed methods were rapid, specific and easy to use and interpret. HRM analysis is the most timesaving and cost

  16. Glioma Groups Based on 1p/19q, IDH, and TERT Promoter Mutations in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Decker, Paul A.; Sicotte, Hugues; Pekmezci, Melike; Rice, Terri; Kosel, Matt L.; Smirnov, Ivan V.; Sarkar, Gobinda; Caron, Alissa A.; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; Praska, Corinne E.; Chada, Anisha R.; Halder, Chandralekha; Hansen, Helen M.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Bracci, Paige M.; Marshall, Roxanne; Zheng, Shichun; Reis, Gerald F.; Pico, Alexander R.; O’Neill, Brian P.; Buckner, Jan C.; Giannini, Caterina; Huse, Jason T.; Perry, Arie; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchell S.; Chang, Susan M.; Prados, Michael D.; Wiemels, Joseph; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Jenkins, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prediction of clinical behavior, response to therapy, and outcome of infiltrative glioma is challenging. On the basis of previous studies of tumor biology, we defined five glioma molecular groups with the use of three alterations: mutations in the TERT promoter, mutations in IDH, and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion). We tested the hypothesis that within groups based on these features, tumors would have similar clinical variables, acquired somatic alterations, and germline variants. METHODS We scored tumors as negative or positive for each of these markers in 1087 gliomas and compared acquired alterations and patient characteristics among the five primary molecular groups. Using 11,590 controls, we assessed associations between these groups and known glioma germline variants. RESULTS Among 615 grade II or III gliomas, 29% had all three alterations (i.e., were triplepositive), 5% had TERT and IDH mutations, 45% had only IDH mutations, 7% were triple-negative, and 10% had only TERT mutations; 5% had other combinations. Among 472 grade IV gliomas, less than 1% were triple-positive, 2% had TERT and IDH mutations, 7% had only IDH mutations, 17% were triple-negative, and 74% had only TERT mutations. The mean age at diagnosis was lowest (37 years) among patients who had gliomas with only IDH mutations and was highest (59 years) among patients who had gliomas with only TERT mutations. The molecular groups were independently associated with overall survival among patients with grade II or III gliomas but not among patients with grade IV gliomas. The molecular groups were associated with specific germline variants. CONCLUSIONS Gliomas were classified into five principal groups on the basis of three tumor markers. The groups had different ages at onset, overall survival, and associations with germline variants, which implies that they are characterized by distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:26061753

  17. Prognostic value of the extent of resection in supratentorial WHO grade II astrocytomas stratified for IDH1 mutation status: a single-center volumetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Jungk, Christine; Scherer, Moritz; Mock, Andreas; Capper, David; Radbruch, Alexander; von Deimling, Andreas; Bendszus, Martin; Herold-Mende, Christel; Unterberg, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Current evidence supports a maximized extent of resection (EOR) in low-grade gliomas (LGG), regardless of different histological subtypes and molecular markers. We therefore evaluated the prognostic impact of extensive, mainly intraoperative (i)MRI-guided surgery in low-grade astrocytomas stratified for IDH1 mutation status. Retrospective assessment of 46 consecutive cases of newly diagnosed supratentorial WHO grade II astrocytomas treated during the last decade was performed. IDH1 mutation status was obtained for all patients. Volumetric analysis of tumor volumes was performed pre-, intra-, early postoperatively and at first follow-up. Survival analysis was conducted with uni-and multivariate regression models implementing clinical parameters and continuous volumetric variables. Median EOR was 90.4 % (range 17.5-100 %) and was increased to 94.9 % (range 34.8-100 %) in iMRI-guided resections (n = 33). A greater EOR was prognostic for increased progression-free survival (HR 0.23, p = 0.031) and time to re-intervention (TTR) (HR 0.23, p = 0.03). In IDH1 mutant patients, smaller residual tumor volumes were associated with increased TTR (HR 1.01, p = 0.03). IDH1 mutation (38/46 cases) was an independent positive prognosticator for overall survival (OS) in multivariate analysis (HR 0.09, p = 0.002), while extensive surgery had limited impact upon OS. In a subgroup of patients with ≥40 % EOR (n = 39), however, initial and residual tumor volumes were prognostic for OS (HR 1.03, p = 0.005 and HR 1.08, p = 0.007, respectively), persistent to adjustment for IDH1. No association between EOR and neurologic morbidity was found. In this analysis of low-grade astrocytomas stratified for IDH1, extensive tumor resections were prognostic for progression and TTR and, in patients with ≥40 % EOR, for OS. PMID:27344556

  18. An analysis of 170 glioma patients and systematic review to investigate the association between IDH-1 mutations and preoperative glioma-related epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Mao, Qing; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Yanhui; Mao, Yunhe; Zhou, Qiao; Luo, Jiewen

    2016-09-01

    Seizure is a common presenting symptom of glioma, and many biomarkers have been suggested to be associated with preoperative seizure; however, the relationships between IDH (isocitrate dehydrogenase) mutations and glioma-related epilepsy only recently been studied. The authors aimed to examine the correlations between IDH mutations in glioma patients with preoperative seizures and tumor location. A series of 170 glioma samples were analyzed for IDH1 R132H mutations (amino acid change from arginine to histidine at codon 132) with immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining and for IDH mutations with direct DNA sequencing when the IHC results were negative. If either the IHC or direct DNA sequencing result was positive, the IDH status was defined as mutated. The results of the IDH mutation examinations were used to analyze the relationship between mutations and glioma-related epilepsy. The study population consisted of 64 (37.6%) World Health Organization (WHO) grade II gliomas, 58 (34.1%) grade III, and 48 (28.3%) grade IV gliomas. A total of 84 samples with IDH1 mutations were observed in our study, and 54 of these presented with seizures as the initial symptoms, whereas 28 of the patients with wild-type IDH status presented with seizures (p=0.043 for the WHO grade II gliomas, p=0.002 for the grade III gliomas and p=0.942 for the grade IV gliomas, chi-squared tests). Among the WHO grade II and III gliomas, IDH1 mutations were significantly associated with preoperative seizures, but no significant relationship between IDH mutations and preoperative seizures was found with glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:27406953

  19. Detection of oncogenic IDH1 mutations using magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 2-hydroxyglutarate

    PubMed Central

    Andronesi, Ovidiu C.; Rapalino, Otto; Gerstner, Elizabeth; Chi, Andrew; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Cahill, Dan P.; Sorensen, A. Gregory; Rosen, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation of metabolic pathways disturbed in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutant tumors revealed that the hallmark metabolic alteration is the production of D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG). The biological impact of D-2HG strongly suggests that high levels of this metabolite may play a central role in propagating downstream the effects of mutant IDH, leading to malignant transformation of cells. Hence, D-2HG may be an ideal biomarker for both diagnosing and monitoring treatment response targeting IDH mutations. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is well suited to the task of noninvasive D-2HG detection, and there has been much interest in developing such methods. Here, we review recent efforts to translate methodology using MRS to reliably measure in vivo D-2HG into clinical research. PMID:23999439

  20. Precise Detection of IDH1/2 and BRAF Hotspot Mutations in Clinical Glioma Tissues by a Differential Calculus Analysis of High-Resolution Melting Data

    PubMed Central

    Hatae, Ryusuke; Yoshimoto, Koji; Kuga, Daisuke; Akagi, Yojiro; Murata, Hideki; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Iihara, Koji

    2016-01-01

    High resolution melting (HRM) is a simple and rapid method for screening mutations. It offers various advantages for clinical diagnostic applications. Conventional HRM analysis often yields equivocal results, especially for surgically obtained tissues. We attempted to improve HRM analyses for more effective applications to clinical diagnostics. HRM analyses were performed for IDH1R132 and IDH2R172 mutations in 192 clinical glioma samples in duplicate and these results were compared with sequencing results. BRAFV600E mutations were analyzed in 52 additional brain tumor samples. The melting profiles were used for differential calculus analyses. Negative second derivative plots revealed additional peaks derived from heteroduplexes in PCR products that contained mutations; this enabled unequivocal visual discrimination of the mutations. We further developed a numerical expression, the HRM-mutation index (MI), to quantify the heteroduplex-derived peak of the mutational curves. Using this expression, all IDH1 mutation statuses matched those ascertained by sequencing, with the exception of three samples. These discordant results were all derived from the misinterpretation of sequencing data. The effectiveness of our approach was further validated by analyses of IDH2R172 and BRAFV600E mutations. The present analytical method enabled an unequivocal and objective HRM analysis and is suitable for reliable mutation scanning in surgically obtained glioma tissues. This approach could facilitate molecular diagnostics in clinical environments. PMID:27529619

  1. Precise Detection of IDH1/2 and BRAF Hotspot Mutations in Clinical Glioma Tissues by a Differential Calculus Analysis of High-Resolution Melting Data.

    PubMed

    Hatae, Ryusuke; Hata, Nobuhiro; Yoshimoto, Koji; Kuga, Daisuke; Akagi, Yojiro; Murata, Hideki; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Iihara, Koji

    2016-01-01

    High resolution melting (HRM) is a simple and rapid method for screening mutations. It offers various advantages for clinical diagnostic applications. Conventional HRM analysis often yields equivocal results, especially for surgically obtained tissues. We attempted to improve HRM analyses for more effective applications to clinical diagnostics. HRM analyses were performed for IDH1R132 and IDH2R172 mutations in 192 clinical glioma samples in duplicate and these results were compared with sequencing results. BRAFV600E mutations were analyzed in 52 additional brain tumor samples. The melting profiles were used for differential calculus analyses. Negative second derivative plots revealed additional peaks derived from heteroduplexes in PCR products that contained mutations; this enabled unequivocal visual discrimination of the mutations. We further developed a numerical expression, the HRM-mutation index (MI), to quantify the heteroduplex-derived peak of the mutational curves. Using this expression, all IDH1 mutation statuses matched those ascertained by sequencing, with the exception of three samples. These discordant results were all derived from the misinterpretation of sequencing data. The effectiveness of our approach was further validated by analyses of IDH2R172 and BRAFV600E mutations. The present analytical method enabled an unequivocal and objective HRM analysis and is suitable for reliable mutation scanning in surgically obtained glioma tissues. This approach could facilitate molecular diagnostics in clinical environments. PMID:27529619

  2. A low frequency variant at 8q24.21 is strongly associated with risk of oligodendroglial tumors and IDH1 or IDH2 mutated astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Robert B.; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Sicotte, Hugues; Decker, Paul A.; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; Hansen, Helen M.; Kosel, Matthew L.; Zheng, Shichun; Walsh, Kyle M.; Rice, Terri; Bracci, Paige; McCoy, Lucie S.; Smirnov, Ivan; Patoka, Joseph S.; Hsuang, George; Wiemels, Joe L.; Tihan, Tarik; Pico, Alexander R.; Prados, Michael D.; Chang, Susan M.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Caron, Alissa A.; Fink, Stephanie R.; Halder, Chandralekha; Rynearson, Amanda L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Buckner, Jan C.; O’Neill, Brian P.; Giannini, Caterina; Lachance, Daniel H.; Wiencke, John K.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Wrensch, Margaret R.

    2013-01-01

    SNPs mapped to 8q24.21 have been shown to be associated with glioma development. By means of tag SNP genotyping/imputation, pooled next-generation sequencing (NGS) using long-range PCR, and subsequent validation SNP genotyping we identified seven low-frequency SNPs that were consistently and highly associated with glioma risk (p=10−25 to 10−14). The most associated SNP, rs55705857, remained highly significant after individual adjustment for the other top six and two previously published SNPs. After stratifying by histologic and tumor genetic subtype, the most significant associations were with oligodendroglial tumors and IDH1 or IDH2 mutated gliomas, (ORrs55705857 = 5.1, p=1.1x10−31 and ORrs55705857 = 4.8, p=6.6 x10−22, respectively). Strong associations were observed for IDH1 or IDH2 mutated astrocytomas (grades II–IV) (OR rs55705857=5.16–6.66; p=4.7x10−12 to 2.2x10−8), but not IDH1 or IDH2 wild-type astrocytomas (smallest p=0.26). The conserved sequence block that includes rs55705857 is consistently modeled as a microRNA. PMID:22922872

  3. A low-frequency variant at 8q24.21 is strongly associated with risk of oligodendroglial tumors and astrocytomas with IDH1 or IDH2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Robert B; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Sicotte, Hugues; Decker, Paul A; Kollmeyer, Thomas M; Hansen, Helen M; Kosel, Matthew L; Zheng, Shichun; Walsh, Kyle M; Rice, Terri; Bracci, Paige; McCoy, Lucie S; Smirnov, Ivan; Patoka, Joseph S; Hsuang, George; Wiemels, Joe L; Tihan, Tarik; Pico, Alexander R; Prados, Michael D; Chang, Susan M; Berger, Mitchel S; Caron, Alissa A; Fink, Stephanie R; Halder, Chandralekha; Rynearson, Amanda L; Fridley, Brooke L; Buckner, Jan C; O'Neill, Brian P; Giannini, Caterina; Lachance, Daniel H; Wiencke, John K; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2012-10-01

    Variants at 8q24.21 have been shown to be associated with glioma development. By means of tag SNP genotyping and imputation, pooled next-generation sequencing using long-range PCR and subsequent validation SNP genotyping, we identified seven low-frequency SNPs at 8q24.21 that were strongly associated with glioma risk (P=1×10(-25) to 1×10(-14)). The most strongly associated SNP, rs55705857, remained highly significant after individual adjustment for the other top six SNPs and two previously published SNPs. After stratifying by histological and tumor genetic subtype, the most significant associations of rs55705857 were with oligodendroglial tumors and gliomas with mutant IDH1 or IDH2 (odds ratio (OR)=5.1, P=1.1×10(-31) and OR=4.8, P=6.6×10(-22), respectively). Strong associations were observed for astrocytomas with mutated IDH1 or IDH2 (grades 2-4) (OR=5.16-6.66, P=4.7×10(-12) to 2.2×10(-8)) but not for astrocytomas with wild-type IDH1 and IDH2 (smallest P=0.26). The conserved sequence block that includes rs55705857 is consistently modeled as a microRNA. PMID:22922872

  4. IDH1/2 but not DNMT3A mutations are suitable targets for minimal residual disease monitoring in acute myeloid leukemia patients: a study by the Acute Leukemia French Association

    PubMed Central

    Roumier, Christophe; Cheok, Meyling; Marceau-Renaut, Alice; Nibourel, Olivier; Geffroy, Sandrine; Helevaut, Nathalie; Rousselot, Philippe; Gruson, Bérengère; Gardin, Claude; Chretien, Marie-Lorraine; Sebda, Shéhérazade; Figeac, Martin; Berthon, Céline; Quesnel, Bruno; Boissel, Nicolas; Castaigne, Sylvie; Dombret, Hervé; Renneville, Aline; Preudhomme, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease. Even within the same NPM1-mutated genetic subgroup, some patients harbor additional mutations in FLT3, IDH1/2, DNMT3A or TET2. Recent studies have shown the prognostic significance of minimal residual disease (MRD) in AML but it remains to be determined which molecular markers are the most suitable for MRD monitoring. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) have provided the opportunity to use multiple molecular markers. In this study, we used NGS technology to assess MRD in 31 AML patients enrolled in the ALFA-0701 trial and harboring NPM1 mutations associated to IDH1/2 or DNMT3A mutations. NPM1 mutation-based MRD monitoring was performed by RTqPCR. IDH1/2 and DNMT3A mutations were quantified by NGS using an Ion Torrent Proton instrument with high coverage (2 million reads per sample). The monitoringof IDH1/2 mutations showed that these mutations were reliable MRD markers that allowed the prediction of relapse in the majority of patients. Moreover, IDH1/2 mutation status predicted relapse or disease evolution in 100% of cases if we included the patient who developed myelodysplastic syndrome. In contrast, DNMT3A mutations were not correlated to the disease status, as we found that a preleukemic clone with DNMT3A mutation persisted in 40% of the patients who were in complete remission, reflecting the persistence of clonal hematopoiesis. PMID:26486081

  5. IDH mutation, 1p19q codeletion and ATRX loss in WHO grade II gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Leeper, Heather E.; Caron, Alissa A.; Decker, Paul A.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Giannini, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Background Epigenetic, genetic, and molecular studies have identified several diagnostic and prognostic markers in diffuse gliomas. Their importance for evaluating WHO grade II gliomas has yet to be specifically delineated. Methods We analyzed markers, including IDH mutation(IDHmut), 1p19q codeletion(1p19qcodel), ATRX expression loss(ATRX loss) and p53 overexpression, and outcomes in 159 patients with WHO grade II oligodendroglioma, oligoastrocytoma, and astrocytoma (2003–2012). Results IDHmut was found in 141(91%) and ATRX loss in 64(87%) of IDHmut-noncodel tumors (p = 0.003). All codeleted tumors (n = 66) were IDHmut. Four subgroups were identified: IDHmut-codel, 66(43%); IDHmut-noncodel-ATRX loss, 60(39%); IDHmut-noncodel-ATRXwt, 9(6%); IDHwt, 14(9%). Median survival among 4 groups was significantly different (p = 0.038), particularly in IDHmut-codel (median survival 15.6 years) compared to the remaining 3 groups (p = 0.025). Survival by histology was not significant. Overall (OS), but not progression-free (PFS), survival was significantly longer with gross total resection vs. biopsy only (p = 0.042). Outcomes for patients with subtotal resection were not significantly different from those with biopsy only. Among these uniformly treated patients, OS far exceeds PFS, particularly in those with 1p/19q codeletion. Conclusions For WHO grade II diffuse glioma, molecular classification using 1p/19qcodel, IDHmut, and ATRX loss more accurately predicts outcome and should be incorporated in the neuropathologic evaluation. PMID:26210286

  6. P64QUANTITATIVE MGMT METHYLATION ANALYSIS BY PYROSEQUENCING REVEALS A STRONG CORRELATION BETWEEN 1P/19Q CO-DELETION AND HIGH LEVEL METHYLATION IN HIGH GRADE GLIOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Laxton, R.; Doey, L.; Aizpurua, M.; Bodi, I.; King, A.; Chandler, C.; Bhangoo, R.; Beaney, R.; Brazil, L.; Ashkan, K.; Al-Sarraj, S.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Pyrosequencing is a method that allows MGMT methylation to be measured in a quantitative manner. MGMT methylation, along with 1p/19q co-deletion and IDH1 mutation, is an important biomarker in high grade gliomas. MGMT methylation indicates an improved response to temozolomide chemotherapy; patients with 1p/19q co-deleted anaplastic oligodendrogliomas benefit from the addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy. Aim: To compare the average MGMT promoter methylation level of high grade gliomas and correlate it with other clinical parameters and markers including IDH1&2 mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion. METHOD: For 171 high grade gliomas MGMT methylation analysis was performed by pyrosequencing, mutations to IDH1 and IDH2 genes were also detected by pyrosequencing, or immunohistochemistry (n = 166). Screening for 1p/19q deletion was by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (n = 46). Statistical analysis was performed using R-Stats v2.15.2. RESULTS: The results show that higher methylation was correlated with lower grade and mutation to either IDH1 or IDH2 (27.0% vs. 16.6% p = 0.008; and 27.5 vs. 16.1 p = 0.002 respectively). Interestingly 1p/19q co-deletion versus non co-deletion was associated with a particularly high level of methylation (42.2% vs. 17.7% p = 0.001). No significant differences were seen for age or gender. CONCLUSION: The results offer a potential explanation for the improved prognosis seen in glioma patients with 1p/19q co-deletion and when combined with IDH mutation status may provide an extra control to confirm true 1p/19q co-deletion.

  7. Registered report: The common feature of leukemia-associated IDH1 and IDH2 mutations is a neomorphic enzyme activity converting alpha-ketoglutarate to 2-hydroxyglutarate

    PubMed Central

    Fiehn, Oliver; Showalter, Megan Reed; Schaner-Tooley, Christine E

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from “The common feature of leukemia-associated IDH1 and IDH2 mutations is a neomorphic enzyme activity converting alpha-ketoglutarate to 2-hydroxyglutarate” by Ward and colleagues, published in Cancer Cell in 2010 (Ward et al., 2010). The experiments that will be replicated are those reported in Figures 2, 3 and 5. Ward and colleagues demonstrate the mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2), commonly found in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), abrogate the enzyme’s wild-type activity and confer to the mutant neomorphic activity that produces the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) (Figures 2 and 3). They then show that elevated levels of 2-HG are correlated with mutations in IDH1 and IDH2 in AML patient samples (Figure 5). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange and the results of the replications will be published by eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12626.001 PMID:26943899

  8. IDH1, Histone Methylation, and So Forth.

    PubMed

    Penard-Lacronique, Virginie; Bernard, Olivier A

    2016-08-01

    IDH mutants cause aberrant DNA and histone methylation and contribute to hematological and neuronal malignancies. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Inoue et al. describe a potential specific effect of IDH1 mutations that reduces Atm expression via inhibition of H3K9 demethylases, which may represent a first step toward cellular transformation. PMID:27505668

  9. Combined mutations of ASXL1, CBL, FLT3, IDH1, IDH2, JAK2, KRAS, NPM1, NRAS, RUNX1, TET2 and WT1 genes in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene mutation is an important mechanism of myeloid leukemogenesis. However, the number and combination of gene mutated in myeloid malignancies is still a matter of investigation. Methods We searched for mutations in the ASXL1, CBL, FLT3, IDH1, IDH2, JAK2, KRAS, NPM1, NRAS, RUNX1, TET2 and WT1 genes in 65 myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and 64 acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) without balanced translocation or complex karyotype. Results Mutations in ASXL1 and CBL were frequent in refractory anemia with excess of blasts. Mutations in TET2 occurred with similar frequency in MDSs and AMLs and associated equally with either ASXL1 or NPM1 mutations. Mutations of RUNX1 were mutually exclusive with TET2 and combined with ASXL1 but not with NPM1. Mutations in FLT3 (mutation and internal tandem duplication), IDH1, IDH2, NPM1 and WT1 occurred primarily in AMLs. Conclusion Only 14% MDSs but half AMLs had at least two mutations in the genes studied. Based on the observed combinations and exclusions we classified the 12 genes into four classes and propose a highly speculative model that at least a mutation in one of each class is necessary for developing AML with simple or normal karyotype. PMID:20678218

  10. Close linkage fo the dominant cataract mutations (Cat-2) with Idh-1 and cryge on mouse Chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Loester, J.; Pretsch, W.; Sandulache, R.

    1994-09-01

    The murine dominant gene Cat-2 was located on chromosome 1 between the loci of fuzzy and leaden. Subsequent linkage analysis revealed one recombinant between Cat-2{sup t} and isocitrate dehydrogenase-1, and one between Cat-2{sup t} and {gamma}E-crystallin among 338 offspring in three-point backcrosses. The resulting genetic distance between the loci is 0.3 {+-} 0.3 cM. The very close linkage between the Cat-2 and the {gamma}-crystallin gene cluster together with the finding of reduced {gamma}-strongly that the {gamma}-crystallin genes may be candidate genes for the Cat-2 mutations.

  11. Molecular imaging of 1p/19q deletion in oligodendroglial tumours with 11C-methionine positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Iwadate, Yasuo; Shinozaki, Natsuki; Matsutani, Tomoo; Uchino, Yoshio; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chromosome 1p/19q deletion is an established prognostic and predictive marker in the WHO grade III oligodendroglial tumours (OT). To estimate the genetic status preoperatively, the authors investigated the correlation between the uptake of 11C-methionine in positron emission tomography (PET) and the 1p/19q status in grades II and III OT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 144 patients with gliomas who received 11C-methionine PET. 66 cases with grades II–III oligodendrogliomas or oligoastrocytomas underwent fluorescence in situ hybridisation to determine the 1p/19q status. The tissue uptake of 11C-methionine was expressed as the ratio of the maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) in tumour areas to the mean SUV (SUVmean) in the contralateral normal brain (tumour-to-normal tissue (T/N) ratio). Results The T/N ratio in 11C-methionine PET was significantly higher in grade III OT than in grade II tumours. The mean T/N ratio of the grade II tumours without 1p/19q deletion was significantly higher than that of the grade II tumours with 1p/19q deletion (mean 2.67 vs 1.94, respectively; p=0.0457). In grade III tumours, the mean T/N ratio of the tumours without 1p/19q deletion was also significantly higher than that of the tumours with 1p/19q deletion (mean 4.83 vs 3.49, respectively; p=0.0261). The rate of IDH1 mutation was lower and the rate of contrast enhancement on MRIs was higher in the 1p/19q non-deleted OT than those with 1p/19q deletion, which may contribute to the high T/N ratio. Conclusions Among suspected OT, 11C-methionine PET may help us preoperatively discriminate tumours with and without 1p/19q deletion. PMID:26848169

  12. IDH Mutations: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation and Prognostic Impact

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Wei; Ciccarino, Pietro; Rossetto, Marta; Marie, Yannick; Desestret, Virginie; Mokhtari, Karima; Sanson, Marc; Labussière, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    IDH1/2 mutation is the most frequent genomic alteration found in gliomas, affecting 40% of these tumors and is one of the earliest alterations occurring in gliomagenesis. We investigated a series of 1305 gliomas and showed that IDH mutation is almost constant in 1p19q codeleted tumors. We found that the distribution of IDH1R132H, IDH1nonR132H, and IDH2 mutations differed between astrocytic, mixed, and oligodendroglial tumors, with an overrepresentation of IDH2 mutations in oligodendroglial phenotype and an overrepresentation of IDH1nonR132H in astrocytic tumors. We stratified grade II and grade III gliomas according to the codeletion of 1p19q and IDH mutation to define three distinct prognostic subgroups: 1p19q and IDH mutated, IDH mutated—which contains mostly TP53 mutated tumors, and none of these alterations. We confirmed that IDH mutation with a hazard ratio = 0.358 is an independent prognostic factor of good outcome. These data refine current knowledge on IDH mutation prognostic impact and genotype-phenotype associations. PMID:24877111

  13. Mutant IDH1 Downregulates ATM and Alters DNA Repair and Sensitivity to DNA Damage Independent of TET2.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Satoshi; Li, Wanda Y; Tseng, Alan; Beerman, Isabel; Elia, Andrew J; Bendall, Sean C; Lemonnier, François; Kron, Ken J; Cescon, David W; Hao, Zhenyue; Lind, Evan F; Takayama, Naoya; Planello, Aline C; Shen, Shu Yi; Shih, Alan H; Larsen, Dana M; Li, Qinxi; Snow, Bryan E; Wakeham, Andrew; Haight, Jillian; Gorrini, Chiara; Bassi, Christian; Thu, Kelsie L; Murakami, Kiichi; Elford, Alisha R; Ueda, Takeshi; Straley, Kimberly; Yen, Katharine E; Melino, Gerry; Cimmino, Luisa; Aifantis, Iannis; Levine, Ross L; De Carvalho, Daniel D; Lupien, Mathieu; Rossi, Derrick J; Nolan, Garry P; Cairns, Rob A; Mak, Tak W

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 gene (IDH1) are common drivers of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but their mechanism is not fully understood. It is thought that IDH1 mutants act by inhibiting TET2 to alter DNA methylation, but there are significant unexplained clinical differences between IDH1- and TET2-mutant diseases. We have discovered that mice expressing endogenous mutant IDH1 have reduced numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), in contrast to Tet2 knockout (TET2-KO) mice. Mutant IDH1 downregulates the DNA damage (DD) sensor ATM by altering histone methylation, leading to impaired DNA repair, increased sensitivity to DD, and reduced HSC self-renewal, independent of TET2. ATM expression is also decreased in human IDH1-mutated AML. These findings may have implications for treatment of IDH-mutant leukemia. PMID:27424808

  14. Biochemical, cellular, and biophysical characterization of a potent inhibitor of mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase IDH1.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mindy I; Gross, Stefan; Shen, Min; Straley, Kimberly S; Pragani, Rajan; Lea, Wendy A; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; DeLaBarre, Byron; Artin, Erin; Thorne, Natasha; Auld, Douglas S; Li, Zhuyin; Dang, Lenny; Boxer, Matthew B; Simeonov, Anton

    2014-05-16

    Two mutant forms (R132H and R132C) of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) have been associated with a number of cancers including glioblastoma and acute myeloid leukemia. These mutations confer a neomorphic activity of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) production, and 2-HG has previously been implicated as an oncometabolite. Inhibitors of mutant IDH1 can potentially be used to treat these diseases. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of action of a newly discovered inhibitor, ML309, using biochemical, cellular, and biophysical approaches. Substrate binding and product inhibition studies helped to further elucidate the IDH1 R132H catalytic cycle. This rapidly equilibrating inhibitor is active in both biochemical and cellular assays. The (+) isomer is active (IC50 = 68 nm), whereas the (-) isomer is over 400-fold less active (IC50 = 29 μm) for IDH1 R132H inhibition. IDH1 R132C was similarly inhibited by (+)-ML309. WT IDH1 was largely unaffected by (+)-ML309 (IC50 >36 μm). Kinetic analyses combined with microscale thermophoresis and surface plasmon resonance indicate that this reversible inhibitor binds to IDH1 R132H competitively with respect to α-ketoglutarate and uncompetitively with respect to NADPH. A reaction scheme for IDH1 R132H inhibition by ML309 is proposed in which ML309 binds to IDH1 R132H after formation of the IDH1 R132H NADPH complex. ML309 was also able to inhibit 2-HG production in a glioblastoma cell line (IC50 = 250 nm) and had minimal cytotoxicity. In the presence of racemic ML309, 2-HG levels drop rapidly. This drop was sustained until 48 h, at which point the compound was washed out and 2-HG levels recovered. PMID:24668804

  15. Biochemical, Cellular, and Biophysical Characterization of a Potent Inhibitor of Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase IDH1*

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mindy I.; Gross, Stefan; Shen, Min; Straley, Kimberly S.; Pragani, Rajan; Lea, Wendy A.; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; DeLaBarre, Byron; Artin, Erin; Thorne, Natasha; Auld, Douglas S.; Li, Zhuyin; Dang, Lenny; Boxer, Matthew B.; Simeonov, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Two mutant forms (R132H and R132C) of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) have been associated with a number of cancers including glioblastoma and acute myeloid leukemia. These mutations confer a neomorphic activity of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) production, and 2-HG has previously been implicated as an oncometabolite. Inhibitors of mutant IDH1 can potentially be used to treat these diseases. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of action of a newly discovered inhibitor, ML309, using biochemical, cellular, and biophysical approaches. Substrate binding and product inhibition studies helped to further elucidate the IDH1 R132H catalytic cycle. This rapidly equilibrating inhibitor is active in both biochemical and cellular assays. The (+) isomer is active (IC50 = 68 nm), whereas the (−) isomer is over 400-fold less active (IC50 = 29 μm) for IDH1 R132H inhibition. IDH1 R132C was similarly inhibited by (+)-ML309. WT IDH1 was largely unaffected by (+)-ML309 (IC50 >36 μm). Kinetic analyses combined with microscale thermophoresis and surface plasmon resonance indicate that this reversible inhibitor binds to IDH1 R132H competitively with respect to α-ketoglutarate and uncompetitively with respect to NADPH. A reaction scheme for IDH1 R132H inhibition by ML309 is proposed in which ML309 binds to IDH1 R132H after formation of the IDH1 R132H NADPH complex. ML309 was also able to inhibit 2-HG production in a glioblastoma cell line (IC50 = 250 nm) and had minimal cytotoxicity. In the presence of racemic ML309, 2-HG levels drop rapidly. This drop was sustained until 48 h, at which point the compound was washed out and 2-HG levels recovered. PMID:24668804

  16. Mutational Hotspot of TET2, IDH1, IDH2, SRSF2, SF3B1, KRAS, and NRAS from Human Systemic Mastocytosis Are Not Conserved in Canine Mast Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zorzan, Eleonora; Hanssens, Katia; Giantin, Mery; Dacasto, Mauro; Dubreuil, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Both canine cutaneous mast cell tumor (MCT) and human systemic mastocytosis (SM) are characterized by abnormal proliferation and accumulation of mast cells in tissues and, frequently, by the presence of activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase V-Kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 Feline Sarcoma Viral Oncogene Homolog (c-KIT), albeit at different incidence (>80% in SM and 10–30% in MCT). In the last few years, it has been discovered that additional mutations in other genes belonging to the methylation system, the splicing machinery and cell signaling, contribute, with c-KIT, to SM pathogenesis and/or phenotype. In the present study, the mutational profile of the Tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 2 (TET2), the isocitrate dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2), the serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2), the splicing factor 3b subunit 1 (SF3B1), the Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and the neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS), commonly mutated in human myeloid malignancies and mastocytosis, was investigated in canine MCTs. Methods Using the Sanger sequencing method, a cohort of 75 DNA samples extracted from MCT biopsies already investigated for c-KIT mutations were screened for the “human-like” hot spot mutations of listed genes. Results No mutations were ever identified except for TET2 even if with low frequency (2.7%). In contrast to what is observed in human TET2 no frame-shift mutations were found in MCT samples. Conclusion Results obtained in this preliminary study are suggestive of a substantial difference between human SM and canine MCT if we consider some target genes known to be involved in the pathogenesis of human SM. PMID:26562302

  17. Inhibition of mutant IDH1 decreases D-2-HG levels without affecting tumorigenic properties of chondrosarcoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Suijker, Johnny; Oosting, Jan; Koornneef, Annemarie; Struys, Eduard A.; Salomons, Gajja S.; Schaap, Frank G.; Waaijer, Cathelijn J.F.; Wijers-Koster, Pauline M.; Briaire-de Bruijn, Inge H.; Haazen, Lizette; Riester, Scott M.; Dudakovic, Amel; Danen, Erik; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Bovée, Judith V.M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 are found in a subset of benign and malignant cartilage tumors, gliomas and leukaemias. The mutant enzyme causes the production of D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG), affecting CpG island and histone methylation. While mutations in IDH1/2 are early events in benign cartilage tumors, we evaluated whether these mutations play a role in malignant chondrosarcomas. Compared to IDH1/2 wildtype cell lines, chondrosarcoma cell lines harboring an endogenous IDH1 (n=3) or IDH2 mutation (n=2) showed up to a 100-fold increase in intracellular and extracellular D-2-HG levels. Specific inhibition of mutant IDH1 using AGI-5198 decreased levels of D-2-HG in a dose dependent manner. After 72 hours of treatment one out of three mutant IDH1 cell lines showed a moderate decrease in viability, while D-2-HG levels decreased >90%. Likewise, prolonged treatment (up to 20 passages) did not affect proliferation and migration. Furthermore, global gene expression, CpG island methylation as well as histone H3K4, -9, and -27 trimethylation levels remained unchanged. Thus, while IDH1/2 mutations cause enchondroma, malignant progression towards central chondrosarcoma renders chondrosarcoma growth independent of these mutations. Thus, monotherapy based on inhibition of mutant IDH1 appears insufficient for treatment of inoperable or metastasized chondrosarcoma patients. PMID:25895133

  18. Genome-wide transcriptional analyses of Chinese patients reveal cell migration is attenuated in IDH1-mutant glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huimin; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanwei; Zhang, Chuanbao; Li, Mingyang; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Kuanyu; Cai, Jinquan; Cheng, Wen; Huang, Hua; Jiang, Tao

    2015-02-28

    Patients with isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1)-mutant glioblastoma exhibit increased survival compared with those with wild-type IDH1 tumors. The magnitude of this finding has led to the use of IDH1 mutations as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. However, the mechanisms underlying the reported correlation between the IDH1 mutation and increased survival have not been fully revealed. In this work, based on genome-wide transcriptional analyses of 69 Chinese patients with glioblastoma, we have found that the focal adhesion pathway is significantly downregulated in IDH1-mutant glioblastomas. The impaired focal adhesion leads to compromised cell migration and tumor invasion, contributing to the optimistic prognosis of these patients. Moreover, the signature genes of HIF-1α, the downstream factor of mutated IDH1, are found to be suppressed in IDH1-mutant gliomas. Given the role of HIF-1α in cell migration, we conclude that the attenuation of HIF-1α-dependent glioblastoma cell infiltration contributes to the better outcomes of patients with IDH1-mutant gliomas. PMID:25511738

  19. Calcification on CT is a simple and valuable preoperative indicator of 1p/19q loss of heterozygosity in supratentorial brain tumors that are suspected grade II and III gliomas.

    PubMed

    Saito, Taiichi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Komori, Takashi; Tamura, Manabu; Nitta, Masayuki; Tsuzuki, Shunsuke; Kawamata, Takakazu

    2016-07-01

    Gliomas with 1p/19q loss of heterozygosity (LOH) are known to be associated with longer patient survival and higher sensitivity to treatment than tumors without 1p/19q LOH. This study was designed to clarify whether the preoperative finding of calcification on CT was correlated with 1p/19q LOH in patients with suspected WHO grade II and III gliomas. This study included 250 adult patients who underwent resection for primary supratentorial tumors at Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital. The tumors were suspected, based on MRI findings, to be WHO grade II or III gliomas. The presence of calcification on the patients' CT images was qualitatively evaluated before treatment. After surgery, the resected tumors were examined to determine their 1p/19q status and mutations of IDH1 and p53. The presence of calcification was significantly correlated with 1p/19q LOH (P < 0.0001), with a positive predictive value of 91 %. The tumors of all the 78 patients with calcification were diagnosed as oligodendroglial tumors. Seventy of these patients showed classic oligodendroglial features, while 8 patients showed non-classic features. Calcification on CT is a simple and valuable preoperative indicator of 1p/19q LOH in supratentorial brain tumors that are suspected to be WHO grade II and III gliomas. PMID:26849373

  20. Identifying the genes regulated by IDH1 via gene-chip in glioma cell U87

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jie; Lou, Meiqing; Shi, Jinlong; Xue, Yajun; Cui, Daming

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most common form of primary brain tumor. Increasing evidence show that IDH1 gene mutation is implicated in glioma. However, the mechanism involved in the progression of glioma remains unclear until now. In the study reported here, we used gene chip to identifying the genes regulated with IDH mutanted at R132. The results showed that IDH1-mutant leads to 1255 up-regulated genes and 1862 down-regulated genes in U87 cell lines. Meanwhile, GO and gene-network was performed and shown IDH1-mutant mainly affect small molecule metabolic process, mitotic cell cycle and apoptosis. This result will lay a foundation for further study of IDH1 gene function in the future. PMID:26770405

  1. D-2-hydroxyglutarate produced by mutant IDH1 perturbs collagen maturation and basement membrane function

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Masato; Knobbe, Christiane B.; Itsumi, Momoe; Elia, Andrew J.; Harris, Isaac S.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Cairns, Rob A.; McCracken, Susan; Wakeham, Andrew; Haight, Jillian; Ten, Annick You; Snow, Bryan; Ueda, Takeshi; Inoue, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Ko, Myunggon; Rao, Anjana; Yen, Katharine E.; Su, Shinsan M.; Mak, Tak Wah

    2012-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1) R132 mutations occur in glioma, but their physiological significance is unknown. Here we describe the generation and characterization of brain-specific Idh1 R132H conditional knock-in (KI) mice. Idh1 mutation results in hemorrhage and perinatal lethality. Surprisingly, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are attenuated in Idh1-KI brain cells despite an apparent increase in the NADP+/NADPH ratio. Idh1-KI cells also show high levels of D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D2HG) that are associated with inhibited prolyl-hydroxylation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (Hif1α) and up-regulated Hif1α target gene transcription. Intriguingly, D2HG also blocks prolyl-hydroxylation of collagen, causing a defect in collagen protein maturation. An endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response induced by the accumulation of immature collagens may account for the embryonic lethality of these mutants. Importantly, D2HG-mediated impairment of collagen maturation also led to basement membrane (BM) aberrations that could play a part in glioma progression. Our study presents strong in vivo evidence that the D2HG produced by the mutant Idh1 enzyme is responsible for the above effects. PMID:22925884

  2. IDH1R132H in Neural Stem Cells: Differentiation Impaired by Increased Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Rosiak, Kamila; Smolarz, Maciej; Stec, Wojciech J.; Peciak, Joanna; Grzela, Dawid; Winiecka-Klimek, Marta; Stoczynska-Fidelus, Ewelina; Krynska, Barbara; Piaskowski, Sylwester; Rieske, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background The high frequency of mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene in diffuse gliomas indicates its importance in the process of gliomagenesis. These mutations result in loss of the normal function and acquisition of the neomorphic activity converting α-ketoglutarate to 2-hydroxyglutarate. This potential oncometabolite may induce the epigenetic changes, resulting in the deregulated expression of numerous genes, including those related to the differentiation process or cell survivability. Methods Neural stem cells were derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells following embryoid body formation. Neural stem cells transduced with mutant IDH1R132H, empty vector, non-transduced and overexpressing IDH1WT controls were differentiated into astrocytes and neurons in culture. The neuronal and astrocytic differentiation was determined by morphology and expression of lineage specific markers (MAP2, Synapsin I and GFAP) as determined by real-time PCR and immunocytochemical staining. Apoptosis was evaluated by real-time observation of Caspase-3 activation and measurement of PARP cleavage by Western Blot. Results Compared with control groups, cells expressing IDH1R132H retained an undifferentiated state and lacked morphological changes following stimulated differentiation. The significant inhibitory effect of IDH1R132H on neuronal and astrocytic differentiation was confirmed by immunocytochemical staining for markers of neural stem cells. Additionally, real-time PCR indicated suppressed expression of lineage markers. High percentage of apoptotic cells was detected within IDH1R132H-positive neural stem cells population and their derivatives, if compared to normal neural stem cells and their derivatives. The analysis of PARP and Caspase-3 activity confirmed apoptosis sensitivity in mutant protein-expressing neural cells. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that expression of IDH1R132H increases apoptosis susceptibility of neural stem cells and their

  3. Hyperpolarized (13)C MR imaging detects no lactate production in mutant IDH1 gliomas: Implications for diagnosis and response monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chaumeil, Myriam M; Radoul, Marina; Najac, Chloé; Eriksson, Pia; Viswanath, Pavithra; Blough, Michael D; Chesnelong, Charles; Luchman, H Artee; Cairncross, J Gregory; Ronen, Sabrina M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic imaging of brain tumors using (13)C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate is a promising neuroimaging strategy which, after a decade of preclinical success in glioblastoma (GBM) models, is now entering clinical trials in multiple centers. Typically, the presence of GBM has been associated with elevated hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate produced from [1-(13)C] pyruvate, and response to therapy has been associated with a drop in hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate. However, to date, lower grade gliomas had not been investigated using this approach. The most prevalent mutation in lower grade gliomas is the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation, which, in addition to initiating tumor development, also induces metabolic reprogramming. In particular, mutant IDH1 gliomas are associated with low levels of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) and monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4), three proteins involved in pyruvate metabolism to lactate. We therefore investigated the potential of (13)C MRS of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] pyruvate for detection of mutant IDH1 gliomas and for monitoring of their therapeutic response. We studied patient-derived mutant IDH1 glioma cells that underexpress LDHA, MCT1 and MCT4, and wild-type IDH1 GBM cells that express high levels of these proteins. Mutant IDH1 cells and tumors produced significantly less hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate compared to GBM, consistent with their metabolic reprogramming. Furthermore, hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] lactate production was not affected by chemotherapeutic treatment with temozolomide (TMZ) in mutant IDH1 tumors, in contrast to previous reports in GBM. Our results demonstrate the unusual metabolic imaging profile of mutant IDH1 gliomas, which, when combined with other clinically available imaging methods, could be used to detect the presence of the IDH1 mutation in vivo. PMID:27437179

  4. Mitotic index, microvascular proliferation, and necrosis define 3 groups of 1p/19q codeleted anaplastic oligodendrogliomas associated with different genomic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Mokhtari, Karima; Dehais, Caroline; Jouvet, Anne; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Colin, Carole; Carpentier, Catherine; Forest, Fabien; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Polivka, Marc; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Eimer, Sandrine; Viennet, Gabriel; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Loussouarn, Delphine; Lacroix, Catherine; Rigau, Valérie; Laquerrière, Annie; Vandenbos, Fanny; Michalak, Sophie; Sevestre, Henri; Peoch, Michel; Labrousse, François; Christov, Christo; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Chiforeanu, Danchristian; Ducray, François; Idbaih, Ahmed; Desenclos, Christine; Menei, Philippe; Al Nader, Edmond; Godard, Joel; Servagi-Vernat, Stéphanie; Carpentier, Antoine; Loiseau, Hugues; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Guillamo, Jean Sebastien; Emery, Evelyne; Verelle, Pierre; Durando, Xavier; Faillot, Thierry; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Ghiringhelli, François; Parker, Fabrice; Adam, Clovis; Dubois, François; Ramirez, Carole; Gueye, Edouard Marcel; Honnorat, Jerome; Chinot, Olivier; Bauchet, Luc; Beauchesne, Patrick; Campone, Mario; Frenel, Jean Sébastien; Fontaine, Denys; Campello, Chantal; Roger, Pascal; Heitzmann, Anne; Fesneau, Mélanie; Delattre, Jean Yves; Elouadhani-Hamdi, Selma; Ricard, Damien; Colin, Philippe; Vauléon, Elodie; Langlois, Olivier; Fotso, Marie Janette Motsuo; Andraud, Marie; Mouton, Servane; Noel, Georges; Desse, Nicolas; Soulard, Raoulin; Cohen-Moyal, Elisabeth; Lubrano, Vincent; Dhermain, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to correlate histological features and molecular characteristics in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs). Methods The histological characteristics of 203 AO patients, enrolled in the French national network POLA, were analyzed. The genomic profiles of 191 cases were studied using genomic arrays. IDH mutational status was assessed by immunohistochemistry and direct sequencing. Results 1p/19q codeletion was present in 79% of cases and was associated with alpha-internexin expression (P < 10−4), IDH1/2 mutation (P < 10−4), chromosome 4 loss (P < 10−3), and better overall survival (P < 10−4). Based on mitotic index, microvascular proliferation (MVP), and necrosis, 3 groups of 1p/19q codeleted AOs were identified: (group 1) AO with more than 5 mitoses per 10-HPF, no MVP, and no necrosis; (group 2) AO with MVP and no necrosis; and (group 3) AO with MVP and necrosis. Compared with group 1, groups 2 and 3 AOs had a higher mean Ki-67 proliferation index and a higher rate of 9p and 9q losses. Compared with group 2, group 3 AOs had a higher number of chromosomal alterations including chromosome 4 loss. In the subgroup of 157 1p/19q codeleted AOs, chromosomal instability was associated with shorter progression-free survival (P = .024) and shorter overall survival (P = .023). Conclusions The present study shows that oligodendrogliomas with classic histological features remain a molecularly heterogeneous entity and should be stratified according to 1p/19q status because of its major prognostic relevance. Moreover, 1p/19q codeleted AOs are also heterogeneous. Interestingly, mitotic index, MVP, and necrosis help to classify them into 3 groups associated with distinct genomic alterations. PMID:24723566

  5. Assessing CpG island methylator phenotype, 1p/19q codeletion, and MGMT promoter methylation from epigenome-wide data in the biomarker cohort of the NOA-04 trial

    PubMed Central

    Wiestler, Benedikt; Capper, David; Hovestadt, Volker; Sill, Martin; Jones, David T.W.; Hartmann, Christian; Felsberg, Joerg; Platten, Michael; Feiden, Wolfgang; Keyvani, Kathy; Pfister, Stefan M.; Wiestler, Otmar D.; Meyermann, Richard; Reifenberger, Guido; Pietsch, Thorsten; von Deimling, Andreas; Weller, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular biomarkers including isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/2) mutation, 1p/19q codeletion, and O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation may improve prognostication and guide treatment decisions for patients with World Health Organization (WHO) anaplastic gliomas. At present, each marker is individually tested by distinct assays. Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip arrays (HM450) enable the determination of large-scale methylation profiles and genome-wide DNA copy number changes. Algorithms have been developed to detect the glioma CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP) associated with IDH1/2 mutation, 1p/19q codeletion, and MGMT promoter methylation using a single assay. Methods Here, we retrospectively investigated the diagnostic and prognostic performance of these algorithms in comparison to individual marker testing and patient outcome in the biomarker cohort (n = 115 patients) of the NOA-04 trial. Results Concordance for IDH and 1p/19q status was very high: In 92% of samples, the HM450 and reference data agreed. In discordant samples, survival analysis by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses suggested a more accurate assessment of biological phenotype by the HM450 analysis. The HM450-derived MGMT-STP27 model to calculate MGMT promoter methylation probability revealed this aberration in a significantly higher fraction of samples than conventional methylation-specific PCR, with 87 of 91 G-CIMP tumors predicted as MGMT promoter-methylated. Pyrosequencing of discordant samples confirmed the HM450 assessment in 14 of 17 cases. Conclusions G-CIMP and 1p/19q codeletion are reliably detectable by HM450 analysis and are associated with prognosis in the NOA-04 trial. For MGMT, HM450 suggests promoter methylation in the vast majority of G-CIMP tumors, which is supported by pyrosequencing. PMID:25028501

  6. [The expression of IDH1 (R132H) is positively correlated with cell proliferation and angiogenesis in glioma samples].

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiankuan; Zhao, Yuanlin; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Chao; Xie, Zhonglin; Gao, Xing; Xiao, Liming; Ye, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Objective To explore the correlations of the expression of mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1) (R132H) protein with angiogenesis and cell proliferation in glioma. Methods We performed polymerase chain reaction-based IDH gene mutation screening in 385 glioma samples, and the subcellular localization and expression levels of IDH1 (R132H) was examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Ki-67 labeling index was introduced to determine the proliferation of glioma cells, and the microvessel density was measured through CD34 staining. Statistical analyses were performed to show the correlations of IDH1 mutation with cell proliferation and microvessel density. Results The mutant rates of IDH1 were about 50%-60% in grade II-III gliomas and secondary glioblastomas, which were significantly higher than those in pilocytic astrocytoma (grade I) and primary glioblastoma (grade IV). Moreover, the level of IDH1 (R132H) protein was positively correlated with Ki-67 labeling index and microvessel density. Conclusion IDH mutation was common in grade II-III glioma and secondary glioblastoma, and the mutant IDH1 (R132H) might play a critical role in the cell proliferation and angiogenesis of glioma. PMID:26927556

  7. IDH1 mutant malignant astrocytomas are more amenable to surgical resection and have a survival benefit associated with maximal surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    Beiko, Jason; Suki, Dima; Hess, Kenneth R.; Fox, Benjamin D.; Cheung, Vincent; Cabral, Matthew; Shonka, Nicole; Gilbert, Mark R.; Sawaya, Raymond; Prabhu, Sujit S.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Lang, Frederick F.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Sulman, Erik P.; Rao, Ganesh; McCutcheon, Ian E.; Cahill, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Background IDH1 gene mutations identify gliomas with a distinct molecular evolutionary origin. We sought to determine the impact of surgical resection on survival after controlling for IDH1 status in malignant astrocytomas—World Health Organization grade III anaplastic astrocytomas and grade IV glioblastoma. Methods Clinical parameters including volumetric assessment of preoperative and postoperative MRI were recorded prospectively on 335 malignant astrocytoma patients: n = 128 anaplastic astrocytomas and n = 207 glioblastoma. IDH1 status was assessed by sequencing and immunohistochemistry. Results IDH1 mutation was independently associated with complete resection of enhancing disease (93% complete resections among mutants vs 67% among wild-type, P < .001), indicating IDH1 mutant gliomas were more amenable to resection. The impact of residual tumor on survival differed between IDH1 wild-type and mutant tumors. Complete resection of enhancing disease among IDH1 wild-type tumors was associated with a median survival of 19.6 months versus 10.7 months for incomplete resection; however, no survival benefit was observed in association with further resection of nonenhancing disease (minimization of total tumor volume). In contrast, IDH1 mutants displayed an additional survival benefit associated with maximal resection of total tumor volume (median survival 9.75 y for >5 cc residual vs not reached for <5 cc, P = .025). Conclusions The survival benefit associated with surgical resection differs based on IDH1 genotype in malignant astrocytic gliomas. Therapeutic benefit from maximal surgical resection, including both enhancing and nonenhancing tumor, may contribute to the better prognosis observed in the IDH1 mutant subgroup. Thus, individualized surgical strategies for malignant astrocytoma may be considered based on IDH1 status. PMID:24305719

  8. Immunohistochemical profiles of IDH1, MGMT and P53: practical significance for prognostication of patients with diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Ryosuke; Tsukamoto, Yoshihiro; Natsumeda, Manabu; Isogawa, Mizuho; Aoki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Seiichi; Okamoto, Kouichiro; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Fujii, Yukihiko; Kakita, Akiyoshi

    2015-08-01

    Genetic and epigenetic status, including mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) and TP53 and methylation of O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), are associated with the development of various types of glioma and are useful for prognostication. Here, using routinely available histology sections from 312 patients with diffuse gliomas, we performed immunohistochemistry using antibodies specific for IDH1 mutation, MGMT methylation status, and aberrant p53 expression to evaluate the possible prognostic significance of these features. With regard to overall survival (OS), univariate analysis indicated that an IDH1-positive profile in patients with glioblastoma (GBM), anaplastic astrocytoma (AA), anaplastic oligoastrocytoma and oligodendroglioma, or a MGMT-negative profile in patients with GBM and AA were significantly associated with a favorable outcome. Multivariate analysis revealed that both profiles were independent factors influencing prognosis. The OS of patients with IDH1-positive/MGMT-negative profiles was significantly longer than that of patients with negative/negative and negative/positive profiles. A p53 profile was not an independent prognostic factor. However, for GBM/AA patients with IDH1-negative/MGMT-negative profiles, p53 overexpression was significantly associated with an unfavorable outcome. Thus, the immunohistochemical profiles of IDH1 and MGMT are of considerable significance in gliomas, and a combination of IDH1, MGMT and p53 profiles may be useful for prognostication of GBM/AA. PMID:25950388

  9. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein Regulates the Expression and Metabolic Functions of Wild-Type and Oncogenic IDH1.

    PubMed

    Ricoult, Stéphane J H; Dibble, Christian C; Asara, John M; Manning, Brendan D

    2016-09-15

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) is a major transcriptional regulator of the enzymes underlying de novo lipid synthesis. However, little is known about the SREBP-mediated control of processes that indirectly support lipogenesis, for instance, by supplying reducing power in the form of NAPDH or directing carbon flux into lipid precursors. Here, we characterize isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) as a transcriptional target of SREBP across a spectrum of cancer cell lines and human cancers. IDH1 promotes the synthesis of lipids specifically from glutamine-derived carbons. Neomorphic mutations in IDH1 occur frequently in certain cancers, leading to the production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). We found that SREBP induces the expression of oncogenic IDH1 and influences 2-HG production from glucose. Treatment of cells with 25-hydroxycholesterol or statins, which respectively inhibit or activate SREBP, further supports SREBP-mediated regulation of IDH1 and, in cells with oncogenic IDH1, carbon flux into 2-HG. PMID:27354064

  10. Detection of ATRX and IDH1-R132H immunohistochemistry in the progression of 211 paired gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingbin; Wang, Zhiliang; Li, Guanzhang; Wang, Guangzhi; Yang, Pei; Li, Jianlong; Han, Bo; Jiang, Chuanlu; Sun, Ying; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Recurrence and progression to higher grade lesions are key biological events and characteristic behaviors in the evolution process of glioma. A small residual population of cells always escapes surgery and chemoradiation, resulting in a typically fatal tumor recurrence or progression. IDH mutation (isocitrate dehydrogenase) and ATRX (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) loss/mutation occur in association and may represent early genetic alterations in the development of gliomas. However, their prognostic value in the evolution of gliomas still needs further investigation. Two hundreds and eleven serial sampling of gliomas were included in our study. We used immunohistochemistry (IHC) to detect IDH1-R132H mutation and ATRX status and showed that the IDH1-R132H and (or) ATRX status could be necessary to provide the basic molecular information for the “integrated diagnosis” of gliomas. We illustrated an evaluation formula for the evolution of gliomas by IDH1-R132H combined with ATRX immunohistochemistry and identified the association of IDH1-R132H/ATRX loss accompanied by longer progression time interval of patients with gliomas. Furthermore, we observed that most recurrences had a consistent IDH1 and ATRX status with their matched primary tumors and demonstrated the progressive pattern of grade II astrocytoma/oligodendroglial tumors and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma with or without IDH1-R132H. Identification of IDH1-R132H and ATRX loss status in the primary-recurrent gliomas may aid in treatment strategy selection, therapeutic trial design, and clinical prognosis evaluation. PMID:26918938

  11. Detection of ATRX and IDH1-R132H immunohistochemistry in the progression of 211 paired gliomas.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinquan; Zhu, Ping; Zhang, Chuanbao; Li, Qingbin; Wang, Zhiliang; Li, Guanzhang; Wang, Guangzhi; Yang, Pei; Li, Jianlong; Han, Bo; Jiang, Chuanlu; Sun, Ying; Jiang, Tao

    2016-03-29

    Recurrence and progression to higher grade lesions are key biological events and characteristic behaviors in the evolution process of glioma. A small residual population of cells always escapes surgery and chemoradiation, resulting in a typically fatal tumor recurrence or progression. IDH mutation (isocitrate dehydrogenase) and ATRX (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) loss/mutation occur in association and may represent early genetic alterations in the development of gliomas. However, their prognostic value in the evolution of gliomas still needs further investigation.Two hundreds and eleven serial sampling of gliomas were included in our study. We used immunohistochemistry (IHC) to detect IDH1-R132H mutation and ATRX status and showed that the IDH1-R132H and (or) ATRX status could be necessary to provide the basic molecular information for the "integrated diagnosis" of gliomas. We illustrated an evaluation formula for the evolution of gliomas by IDH1-R132H combined with ATRX immunohistochemistry and identified the association of IDH1-R132H/ATRX loss accompanied by longer progression time interval of patients with gliomas. Furthermore, we observed that most recurrences had a consistent IDH1 and ATRX status with their matched primary tumors and demonstrated the progressive pattern of grade II astrocytoma/oligodendroglial tumors and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma with or without IDH1-R132H. Identification of IDH1-R132H and ATRX loss status in the primary-recurrent gliomas may aid in treatment strategy selection, therapeutic trial design, and clinical prognosis evaluation. PMID:26918938

  12. Mutant IDH1 Dysregulates the Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Association with Gene-Specific Histone Modifications to Cartilage- and Bone-Related Genes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yonghui; Elalaf, Hassan; Watanabe, Makoto; Tamaki, Sakura; Hineno, Sho; Matsunaga, Kazuhito; Woltjen, Knut; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Nagata, Sanae; Ikeya, Makoto; Kato, Tomohisa; Okamoto, Takeshi; Matsuda, Shuichi; Toguchida, Junya

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1/2 genes endow encoding proteins with neomorphic activity to produce the potential oncometabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), which induces the hypermethylation of histones and DNA. The incidence of IDH1/2 mutations in cartilaginous tumors was previously shown to be the highest among various types of tumors, except for those in the central nervous system. Mutations have been detected in both benign (enchondromas) and malignant (chondrosarcomas) types of cartilaginous tumors, whereas they have rarely been found in other mesenchymal tumors such as osteosarcomas. To address this unique tumor specificity, we herein examined the effects of IDH1 R132C, which is the most prevalent mutant in cartilaginous tumors, on the differentiation properties of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The induction of the IDH1 R132C gene into MSCs markedly increased the amount of 2-HG and up-regulated global histone methylation. The induction of IDH1 R132C promoted the chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs by enhancing the expression of SOX9 and COL2A1 genes in association with an increase in the active mark (H3K4me3), but disrupted cartilage matrix formation. On the other hand, IDH1 R132C inhibited expression of the ALPL gene in association with an increase in the repressive mark (H3K9me3), and subsequently inhibited the osteogenic properties of hMSCs and human osteosarcoma cells. Since osteogenic properties are an indispensable feature for the diagnosis of osteosarcoma, the inhibitory effects of IDH1 R132C on osteogenic properties may contribute to the lack of osteosarcomas with the IDH1 R132C mutation. These results suggested that IDH1 R132C contributed to the formation of cartilaginous tumors by dysregulating the chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs via gene-specific histone modulation. PMID:26161668

  13. Mutant IDH1 Dysregulates the Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Association with Gene-Specific Histone Modifications to Cartilage- and Bone-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Makoto; Tamaki, Sakura; Hineno, Sho; Matsunaga, Kazuhito; Woltjen, Knut; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Nagata, Sanae; Ikeya, Makoto; Kato, Tomohisa; Okamoto, Takeshi; Matsuda, Shuichi; Toguchida, Junya

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1/2 genes endow encoding proteins with neomorphic activity to produce the potential oncometabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), which induces the hypermethylation of histones and DNA. The incidence of IDH1/2 mutations in cartilaginous tumors was previously shown to be the highest among various types of tumors, except for those in the central nervous system. Mutations have been detected in both benign (enchondromas) and malignant (chondrosarcomas) types of cartilaginous tumors, whereas they have rarely been found in other mesenchymal tumors such as osteosarcomas. To address this unique tumor specificity, we herein examined the effects of IDH1 R132C, which is the most prevalent mutant in cartilaginous tumors, on the differentiation properties of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The induction of the IDH1 R132C gene into MSCs markedly increased the amount of 2-HG and up-regulated global histone methylation. The induction of IDH1 R132C promoted the chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs by enhancing the expression of SOX9 and COL2A1 genes in association with an increase in the active mark (H3K4me3), but disrupted cartilage matrix formation. On the other hand, IDH1 R132C inhibited expression of the ALPL gene in association with an increase in the repressive mark (H3K9me3), and subsequently inhibited the osteogenic properties of hMSCs and human osteosarcoma cells. Since osteogenic properties are an indispensable feature for the diagnosis of osteosarcoma, the inhibitory effects of IDH1 R132C on osteogenic properties may contribute to the lack of osteosarcomas with the IDH1 R132C mutation. These results suggested that IDH1 R132C contributed to the formation of cartilaginous tumors by dysregulating the chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs via gene-specific histone modulation. PMID:26161668

  14. Tumor suppressive miR-148a is silenced by CpG island hypermethylation in IDH1 mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sichen; Chowdhury, Reshmi; Liu, Fei; Chou, Arthur P.; Li, Tie; Mody, Reema R.; Lou, Jerry J.; Chen, Weidong; Reiss, Jean; Soto, Horacio; Prins, Robert; Liau, Linda M.; Mischel, Paul S.; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L.; Yong, William H.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Lai, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose IDH1/2 mutant gliomas harbor a distinct CpG island methylation profile (G-CIMP) that may promote the initiation and progression of secondary pathway gliomas by silencing tumor suppressive genes. The potential role of tumor suppressive miRNAs in this process is not understood. Experimental Design To identify potential tumor suppressive microRNAs hypermethylated in glioma, the methylation profiles of IDH1/2WT gliomas (n=11) and IDH1MUT glioma (n=20) were compared by using massively parallel reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS). The methylation status of selected miRNA was validated by using targeted bisulfite sequencing (BiSEQ) in a large cohort of glioma tissue samples including 219 IDH1WT and 72 IDH1/2MUT samples. The expression of selected miRNAs was determined by using TaqMan qPCR. Functional analyses of miRNA-148a were conducted and target genes were identified. Results We identify miR-148a as a novel, G-CIMP associated miRNA whose methylation is tightly correlated with IDH1 mutation and associated with improved survival in malignant glioma patients. We confirm that down-regulation of miR-148a can occur via DNA methylation. We demonstrate that IDH1 mutation provides a mechanism of miR-148a methylation and downregulation, and that restoration of miR-148a reduced tumorigenic properties of glioma cells, possibly by targeting DNMT1. Conclusions We identify miR-148a as a novel G-CIMP associated miRNA, and provide results suggesting that miR-148a restoration may have therapeutic implications. PMID:25224277

  15. Selective Inhibition of Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) via Disruption of a Metal Binding Network by an Allosteric Small Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gejing; Shen, Junqing; Yin, Ming; McManus, Jessica; Mathieu, Magali; Gee, Patricia; He, Timothy; Shi, Chaomei; Bedel, Olivier; McLean, Larry R.; Le-Strat, Frank; Zhang, Ying; Marquette, Jean-Pierre; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Bailin; Rak, Alexey; Hoffmann, Dietmar; Rooney, Eamonn; Vassort, Aurelie; Englaro, Walter; Li, Yi; Patel, Vinod; Adrian, Francisco; Gross, Stefan; Wiederschain, Dmitri; Cheng, Hong; Licht, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated point mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) confer a neomorphic enzymatic activity: the reduction of α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid, which is proposed to act as an oncogenic metabolite by inducing hypermethylation of histones and DNA. Although selective inhibitors of mutant IDH1 and IDH2 have been identified and are currently under investigation as potential cancer therapeutics, the mechanistic basis for their selectivity is not yet well understood. A high throughput screen for selective inhibitors of IDH1 bearing the oncogenic mutation R132H identified compound 1, a bis-imidazole phenol that inhibits d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid production in cells. We investigated the mode of inhibition of compound 1 and a previously published IDH1 mutant inhibitor with a different chemical scaffold. Steady-state kinetics and biophysical studies show that both of these compounds selectively inhibit mutant IDH1 by binding to an allosteric site and that inhibition is competitive with respect to Mg2+. A crystal structure of compound 1 complexed with R132H IDH1 indicates that the inhibitor binds at the dimer interface and makes direct contact with a residue involved in binding of the catalytically essential divalent cation. These results show that targeting a divalent cation binding residue can enable selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 and suggest that differences in magnesium binding between wild-type and mutant enzymes may contribute to the inhibitors' selectivity for the mutant enzyme. PMID:25391653

  16. Treatment with a Small Molecule Mutant IDH1 Inhibitor Suppresses Tumorigenic Activity and Decreases Production of the Oncometabolite 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Luyuan; Paz, Ana C; Wilky, Breelyn A; Johnson, Britt; Galoian, Karina; Rosenberg, Andrew; Hu, Guozhi; Tinoco, Gabriel; Bodamer, Olaf; Trent, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors that produce cartilaginous matrix. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase enzymes (IDH1/2) were recently described in several cancers including chondrosarcomas. The IDH1 inhibitor AGI-5198 abrogates the ability of mutant IDH1 to produce the oncometabolite D-2 hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG) in gliomas. We sought to determine if treatment with AGI-5198 would similarly inhibit tumorigenic activity and D-2HG production in IDH1-mutant human chondrosarcoma cells. Two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and HT1080 with endogenous IDH1 mutations and a human chondrocyte cell line C28 with wild type IDH1 were employed in our study. Mutation analysis of IDH was performed by PCR-based DNA sequencing, and D-2HG was detected using tandem mass spectrometry. We confirmed that JJ012 and HT1080 harbor IDH1 R132G and R132C mutation, respectively, while C28 has no mutation. D-2HG was detectable in cell pellets and media of JJ012 and HT1080 cells, as well as plasma and urine from an IDH-mutant chondrosarcoma patient, which decreased after tumor resection. AGI-5198 treatment decreased D-2HG levels in JJ012 and HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and dramatically inhibited colony formation and migration, interrupted cell cycling, and induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates anti-tumor activity of a mutant IDH1 inhibitor in human chondrosarcoma cell lines, and suggests that D-2HG is a potential biomarker for IDH mutations in chondrosarcoma cells. Thus, clinical trials of mutant IDH inhibitors are warranted for patients with IDH-mutant chondrosarcomas. PMID:26368816

  17. Treatment with a Small Molecule Mutant IDH1 Inhibitor Suppresses Tumorigenic Activity and Decreases Production of the Oncometabolite 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luyuan; Paz, Ana C.; Wilky, Breelyn A.; Johnson, Britt; Galoian, Karina; Rosenberg, Andrew; Hu, Guozhi; Tinoco, Gabriel; Bodamer, Olaf; Trent, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors that produce cartilaginous matrix. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase enzymes (IDH1/2) were recently described in several cancers including chondrosarcomas. The IDH1 inhibitor AGI-5198 abrogates the ability of mutant IDH1 to produce the oncometabolite D-2 hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG) in gliomas. We sought to determine if treatment with AGI-5198 would similarly inhibit tumorigenic activity and D-2HG production in IDH1-mutant human chondrosarcoma cells. Two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and HT1080 with endogenous IDH1 mutations and a human chondrocyte cell line C28 with wild type IDH1 were employed in our study. Mutation analysis of IDH was performed by PCR-based DNA sequencing, and D-2HG was detected using tandem mass spectrometry. We confirmed that JJ012 and HT1080 harbor IDH1 R132G and R132C mutation, respectively, while C28 has no mutation. D-2HG was detectable in cell pellets and media of JJ012 and HT1080 cells, as well as plasma and urine from an IDH-mutant chondrosarcoma patient, which decreased after tumor resection. AGI-5198 treatment decreased D-2HG levels in JJ012 and HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and dramatically inhibited colony formation and migration, interrupted cell cycling, and induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates anti-tumor activity of a mutant IDH1 inhibitor in human chondrosarcoma cell lines, and suggests that D-2HG is a potential biomarker for IDH mutations in chondrosarcoma cells. Thus, clinical trials of mutant IDH inhibitors are warranted for patients with IDH-mutant chondrosarcomas. PMID:26368816

  18. Integrated genomic characterization of IDH1-mutant glioma malignant progression

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hanwen; Harmanci, Akdes Serin; Erson-Omay, E Zeynep; Li, Jie; Coşkun, Süleyman; Simon, Matthias; Krischek, Boris; Özduman, Koray; Omay, S Bülent; Sorensen, Eric A; Turcan, Şevin; Bakırcığlu, Mehmet; Carrión-Grant, Geneive; Murray, Phillip B; Clark, Victoria E; Ercan-Sencicek, A Gulhan; Knight, James; Sencar, Leman; Altınok, Selin; Kaulen, Leon D; Gülez, Burcu; Timmer, Marco; Schramm, Johannes; Mishra-Gorur, Ketu; Henegariu, Octavian; Moliterno, Jennifer; Louvi, Angeliki; Chan, Timothy A; Tannheimer, Stacey L; Pamir, M Necmettin; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Bilguvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas represent approximately 30% of all central nervous system tumors and 80% of malignant brain tumors1. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the malignant progression of low-grade gliomas with mutations in IDH1 (encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase 1), we studied paired tumor samples from 41 patients, comparing higher-grade, progressed samples to their lower-grade counterparts. Integrated genomic analyses, including whole-exome sequencing and copy number, gene expression and DNA methylation profiling, demonstrated nonlinear clonal expansion of the original tumors and identified oncogenic pathways driving progression. These include activation of the MYC and RTK-RAS-PI3K pathways and upregulation of the FOXM1- and E2F2-mediated cell cycle transitions, as well as epigenetic silencing of developmental transcription factor genes bound by Polycomb repressive complex 2 in human embryonic stem cells. Our results not only provide mechanistic insight into the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms driving glioma progression but also identify inhibition of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family as a potential therapeutic approach. PMID:26618343

  19. IDH1/2 Mutants Inhibit TET-Promoted Oxidation of RNA 5mC to 5hmC

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lina; Zhu, Yuting; Zhou, Guangyu; Xie, Dan

    2016-01-01

    TETs (TET1/2/3) play critical roles in multi cellular processes through DNA demethylation driven by oxidation of DNA 5mdC to 5hmdC. Interestingly, recent studies indicated that TETs also oxidate RNA 5mC to 5hmC. However, little is known about the distribution of RNA 5hmC and the regulatory mechanism of RNA 5hmC in human. Here, we show that 5hmC is enriched in mRNA, and IDH1/2 mutants inhibit TET-promoted oxidation of RNA 5mC to 5hmC. Since IDH1/2 mutations have been described to block the DNA oxidative activity of TETs, we hypothesized that IDH1/2 mutations might also inhibit the RNA oxidative activity of TETs. To evaluate the role of IDH1/2 mutations in RNA 5hmC, TETs with/without IDH1/2 mutants were overexpressed in human HEK293 cells. Resultant DNA and RNA were digested and analyzed by triple-quadrupole LC mass spectrometer. DNA 5hmdC and RNA 5hmC modifications were quantified with external calibration curves of appropriate standards. It was found that compared with total RNA (5hmC/C: less than 2 X 10−7), mRNA showed much higher 5hmC level (5hmC/C: ∼7 X 10−6). Further study indicated that IDH1/2 mutants showed significant ability to inhibit TET-promoted RNA5hmC. Consistent with this result, overexpression of IDH1/2 mutants also inhibited TET catalytic domain-promoted oxidation of RNA. In this study, we show not only the enrichment of 5hmC in mRNA, but also a regulatory mechanism of RNA 5hmC—IDH1/2 mutations inhibit TET-promoted RNA 5hmC, which suggests an involvement of IDH1/2 mutations in tumorigenesis through the deregulation of RNA biology. PMID:27548812

  20. The oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutarate induced by mutant IDH1 or -2 blocks osteoblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Suijker, Johnny; Baelde, Hans J; Roelofs, Helene; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2015-06-20

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 are found in a somatic mosaic fashion in patients with multiple enchondromas. Enchondromas are benign cartilaginous tumors arising in the medulla of bone. The mutant IDH1/2 causes elevated levels of D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are the precursor of the osteoblastic, chondrogenic and adipocytic lineage and we hypothesized that increased levels of D-2-HG cause multiple enchondromas by affecting differentiation of MSCs. Bone marrow derived MSCs from different donors were differentiated towards osteoblastic, chondrogenic and adipocytic lineage in the presence or absence of 5 mM D-2-HG. Three of four MSCs showed near complete inhibition of calcification after 3 weeks under osteogenic differentiation conditions in the presence of D-2-HG, indicating a block in osteogenic differentiation. Two of four MSCs showed an increase in differentiation towards the chondrogenic lineage. To evaluate the effect of D-2-HG in vivo we monitored bone development in zebrafish, which revealed an impaired development of vertebrate rings in the presence of D-2-HG compared to control conditions (p-value < 0.0001). Our data indicate that increased levels of D-2-HG promote chondrogenic over osteogenic differentiation. Thus, mutations in IDH1/2 lead to a local block in osteogenic differentiation during skeletogenesis causing the development of benign cartilaginous tumors. PMID:26046462

  1. FOXOs support the metabolic requirements of normal and tumor cells by promoting IDH1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Charitou, Paraskevi; Rodriguez-Colman, Maria; Gerrits, Johan; van Triest, Miranda; Groot Koerkamp, Marian; Hornsveld, Marten; Holstege, Frank; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M; Burgering, Boudewijn MT

    2015-01-01

    FOXO transcription factors are considered bona fide tumor suppressors; however, recent studies showed FOXOs are also required for tumor survival. Here, we identify FOXOs as transcriptional activators of IDH1. FOXOs promote IDH1 expression and thereby maintain the cytosolic levels of α-ketoglutarate and NADPH. In cancer cells carrying mutant IDH1, FOXOs likewise stimulate mutant IDH1 expression and maintain the levels of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate, which stimulates cancer cell proliferation and inhibits TET enzymes and histone demethylases. Combined, our data provide a new paradigm for the paradoxical role of FOXOs in both tumor suppression and promotion. PMID:25648147

  2. EGFR, p53, IDH-1 and MDM2 immunohistochemical analysis in glioblastoma: therapeutic and prognostic correlation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Richard Murdoch; Queiroz, Luciano de Souza; Rogerio, Fabio

    2015-07-01

    We studied 36 glioblastoma cases at HC-UNICAMP from 2008 to 2012 and classified the immunohistochemical distribution of the wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutated forms of p53 protein and isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH-1) and murine double protein 2 (MDM2). Immunostaining findings were correlated with clinical data and response to treatment (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy). About 97% of the tumors were primary, most of them localized in the frontal lobe. Mean time free of clinical or symptomatic disease and free time of radiological disease were 7.56 and 7.14 months, respectively. We observed a significant positive correlation between expressions of p53 and MDM2, EGFR and MDM2. Clinical, radiological and overall survivals also showed a significant positive correlation. p53 staining and clinical survival showed a significant negative correlation. The current series provides clinical and histopathological data that contribute to knowledge on glioblastoma in Brazilians. PMID:26200049

  3. Idh1 protects murine hepatocytes from endotoxin-induced oxidative stress by regulating the intracellular NADP(+)/NADPH ratio.

    PubMed

    Itsumi, M; Inoue, S; Elia, A J; Murakami, K; Sasaki, M; Lind, E F; Brenner, D; Harris, I S; Chio, I I C; Afzal, S; Cairns, R A; Cescon, D W; Elford, A R; Ye, J; Lang, P A; Li, W Y; Wakeham, A; Duncan, G S; Haight, J; You-Ten, A; Snow, B; Yamamoto, K; Ohashi, P S; Mak, T W

    2015-11-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (Idh1) is an important metabolic enzyme that produces NADPH by converting isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate. Idh1 is known to reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced in cells by treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vitro. Here, we used Idh1-deficient knockout (Idh1 KO) mice to investigate the role of Idh1 in antioxidant defense in vivo. Idh1 KO mice showed heightened susceptibility to death induced by LPS and exhibited increased serum levels of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. The serum of LPS-injected Idh1 KO mice also contained elevated levels of AST, a marker of inflammatory liver damage. Furthermore, after LPS injection, livers of Idh1 KO mice showed histological evidence of elevated oxidative DNA damage compared with livers of wild-type (WT) mice. Idh1 KO livers showed a faster and more pronounced oxidative stress than WT livers. In line with that, Idh1 KO hepatocytes showed higher ROS levels and an increase in the NADP(+)/NADPH ratio when compared with hepatocytes isolated from WT mice. These results suggest that Idh1 has a physiological function in protecting cells from oxidative stress by regulating the intracellular NADP(+)/NADPH ratio. Our findings suggest that stimulation of Idh1 activity may be an effective therapeutic strategy for reducing oxidative stress during inflammatory responses, including the early stages of septic shock. PMID:25882048

  4. Reductive glutamine metabolism by IDH1 mediates lipogenesis under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, Christian M.; Gameiro, Paulo A.; Bell, Eric L.; Mattaini, Katherine R.; Yang, Juanjuan; Hiller, Karsten; Jewell, Christopher M.; Johnson, Zachary R.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Guarente, Leonard; Kelleher, Joanne K.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Iliopoulos, Othon; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) is the central biosynthetic precursor for fatty acid synthesis and protein acetylation. In the conventional view of mammalian cell metabolism, AcCoA is primarily generated from glucose-derived pyruvate through the citrate shuttle and adenosine triphosphate citrate lyase (ACL) in the cytosol1-3. However, proliferating cells that exhibit aerobic glycolysis and those exposed to hypoxia convert glucose to lactate at near stoichiometric levels, directing glucose carbon away from the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and fatty acid synthesis4. Although glutamine is consumed at levels exceeding that required for nitrogen biosynthesis5, the regulation and utilization of glutamine metabolism in hypoxic cells is not well understood. Here we show that human cells employ reductive metabolism of alpha-ketoglutarate (αKG) to synthesize AcCoA for lipid synthesis. This isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) dependent pathway is active in most cell lines under normal culture conditions, but cells grown under hypoxia rely almost exclusively on the reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived αKG for de novo lipogenesis. Furthermore, renal cell lines deficient in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein preferentially utilize reductive glutamine metabolism for lipid biosynthesis even at normal oxygen levels. These results identify a critical role for oxygen in regulating carbon utilization in order to produce AcCoA and support lipid synthesis in mammalian cells. PMID:22101433

  5. Oncogenic potential of IDH1R132C mutant in cholangiocarcinoma development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ning; Che, Li; Li, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Yan; Jiang, Li-Jie; Fan, Biao; Tao, Jun-Yan; Chen, Xin; Ji, Jia-Fu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether IDH1R132C mutant in combination with loss of p53 and activated Notch signaling promotes intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) development. METHODS: We applied hydrodynamic injection and sleeping beauty mediated somatic integration to induce loss of p53 (via shP53), activation of Notch [via intracellular domain of Notch1 (NICD)] and/or overexpression of IDH1R132C mutant together with the sleeping beauty transposase into the mouse liver. Specifically, we co-expressed shP53 and NICD (shP53/NICD, n = 4), shP53 and IDH1R132C (shP53/IDH1R132C, n = 3), NICD and IDH1R132C (NICD/IDH1R132C, n = 4), as well as NICD, shP53 and IDH1R132C (NICD/shP53/IDH1R132C, n = 9) in mice. Mice were monitored for liver tumor development and euthanized at various time points. Liver histology was analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Molecular features of NICD/shP53/IDH1R132C ICC tumor cells were characterized by Myc tag, Flag tag, Ki-67, p-Erk and p-AKT immunohistochemical staining. Desmoplastic reaction in tumor tissues was studied by Picro-Sirius red staining. RESULTS: We found that co-expression of shP53/NICD, shP53/IDH1R132C or NICD/IDH1R132C did not lead to liver tumor formation. In striking contrast, co-expression of NICD/shP53/IDH1R132C resulted in ICC development in mice (P < 0.01). The tumors could be identified as early as 12 wk post hydrodynamic injection. Tumors rapidly progressed, and by 18 wk post hydrodynamic injection, multiple cystic lesions could be identified on the liver surface. NICD/shP53/IDH1R132C liver tumors shared multiple histological features of human ICCs, including hyperplasia of irregular glands. Importantly, all tumor cells were positive for the biliary epithelial cell marker cytokeratin 19. Extensive collagen fibers could be visualized in tumor tissues using Sirus red staining, duplicating the desmoplastic reaction observed in human ICC. Tumors were highly proliferative and expressed ectopically injected genes. Together these

  6. Genetic dissection of leukemia-associated IDH1 and IDH2 mutants and D-2-hydroxyglutarate in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Reitman, Zachary J.; Sinenko, Sergey A.; Spana, Eric P.

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate–dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1 and IDH2 frequently arise in human leukemias and other cancers and produce high levels of D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG). We expressed the R195H mutant of Drosophila Idh (CG7176), which is equivalent to the human cancer-associated IDH1-R132H mutant, in fly tissues using the UAS-Gal4 binary expression system. Idh-R195H caused a >25-fold elevation of D-2HG when expressed ubiquitously in flies. Expression of mutant Idh in larval blood cells (hemocytes) resulted in higher numbers of circulating blood cells. Mutant Idh expression in fly neurons resulted in neurologic and wing-expansion defects, and these phenotypes were rescued by genetic modulation of superoxide dismutase 2, p53, and apoptotic caspase cascade mediators. Idh-R163Q, which is homologous to the common leukemia-associated IDH2-R140Q mutant, resulted in moderately elevated D-2HG and milder phenotypes. We identified the fly homolog of D-2-hydroxyglutaric acid dehydrogenase (CG3835), which metabolizes D-2HG, and showed that coexpression of this enzyme with mutant Idh abolishes mutant Idh-associated phenotypes. These results provide a flexible model system to interrogate a cancer-related genetic and metabolic pathway and offer insights into the impact of IDH mutation and D-2HG on metazoan tissues. PMID:25398939

  7. 5-azacytidine reduces methylation, promotes differentiation and induces tumor regression in a patient-derived IDH1 mutant glioma xenograft.

    PubMed

    Borodovsky, Alexandra; Salmasi, Vafi; Turcan, Sevin; Fabius, Armida W M; Baia, Gilson S; Eberhart, Charles G; Weingart, Jon D; Gallia, Gary L; Baylin, Stephen B; Chan, Timothy A; Riggins, Gregory J

    2013-10-01

    Somatic mutations in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are frequent in low grade and progressive gliomas and are characterized by the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) from α-ketoglutarate by the mutant enzyme. 2-HG is an "oncometabolite" that competitively inhibits α-KG dependent dioxygenases resulting in various widespread cellular changes including abnormal hypermethylation of genomic DNA and suppression of cellular differentiation. Despite the growing understanding of IDH mutant gliomas, the development of effective therapies has proved challenging in part due to the scarcity of endogenous mutant in vivo models. Here we report the generation of an endogenous IDH1 anaplastic astrocytoma model which rapidly grows in vivo, produces 2-HG and exhibits DNA hypermethylation. Using this model, we have demonstrated the preclinical efficacy and mechanism of action of the FDA approved demethylating drug 5-azacytidine in vivo. Long term administration of 5-azacytidine resulted in reduction of DNA methylation of promoter loci, induction of glial differentiation, reduction of cell proliferation and a significant reduction in tumor growth. Tumor regression was observed at 14 weeks and subsequently showed no signs of re-growth at 7 weeks despite discontinuation of therapy. These results have implications for clinical trials of demethylating agents for patients with IDH mutated gliomas. PMID:24077805

  8. 5-azacytidine reduces methylation, promotes differentiation and induces tumor regression in a patient-derived IDH1 mutant glioma xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Borodovsky, Alexandra; Salmasi, Vafi; Turcan, Sevin; Fabius, Armida W. M.; Baia, Gilson S.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Weingart, Jon D.; Gallia, Gary L.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Chan, Timothy A.; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Somatic mutations in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are frequent in low grade and progressive gliomas and are characterized by the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) from α-ketoglutarate by the mutant enzyme. 2-HG is an “oncometabolite” that competitively inhibits α-KG dependent dioxygenases resulting in various widespread cellular changes including abnormal hypermethylation of genomic DNA and suppression of cellular differentiation. Despite the growing understanding of IDH mutant gliomas, the development of effective therapies has proved challenging in part due to the scarcity of endogenous mutant in vivo models. Here we report the generation of an endogenous IDH1 anaplastic astrocytoma model which rapidly grows in vivo, produces 2-HG and exhibits DNA hypermethylation. Using this model, we have demonstrated the preclinical efficacy and mechanism of action of the FDA approved demethylating drug 5-azacytidine in vivo. Long term administration of 5-azacytidine resulted in reduction of DNA methylation of promoter loci, induction of glial differentiation, reduction of cell proliferation and a significant reduction in tumor growth. Tumor regression was observed at 14 weeks and subsequently showed no signs of re-growth at 7 weeks despite discontinuation of therapy. These results have implications for clinical trials of demethylating agents for patients with IDH mutated gliomas. PMID:24077805

  9. Integrated Genomic Analysis Identifies Clinically Relevant Subtypes of Glioblastoma Characterized by Abnormalities in PDGFRA, IDH1, EGFR, and NF1

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaak, Roel GW; Hoadley, Katherine A; Purdom, Elizabeth; Wang, Victoria; Qi, Yuan; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Miller, C Ryan; Ding, Li; Golub, Todd; Mesirov, Jill P; Alexe, Gabriele; Lawrence, Michael; O'Kelly, Michael; Tamayo, Pablo; Weir, Barbara A; Gabriel, Stacey; Winckler, Wendy; Gupta, Supriya; Jakkula, Lakshmi; Feiler, Heidi S; Hodgson, J Graeme; James, C David; Sarkaria, Jann N; Brennan, Cameron; Kahn, Ari; Spellman, Paul T; Wilson, Richard K; Speed, Terence P; Gray, Joe W; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad; Perou, Charles M; Hayes, D Neil; Network, The Cancer Genome Atlas Research

    2009-09-03

    The Cancer Genome Atlas Network recently cataloged recurrent genomic abnormalities in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We describe a robust gene expression-based molecular classification of GBM into Proneural, Neural, Classical, and Mesenchymal subtypes and integrate multidimensional genomic data to establish patterns of somatic mutations and DNA copy number. Aberrations and gene expression of EGFR, NF1, and PDGFRA/IDH1 each define the Classical, Mesenchymal, and Proneural subtypes, respectively. Gene signatures of normal brain cell types show a strong relationship between subtypes and different neural lineages. Additionally, response to aggressive therapy differs by subtype, with the greatest benefit in the Classical subtype and no benefit in the Proneural subtype. We provide a framework that unifies transcriptomic and genomic dimensions for GBM molecular stratification with important implications for future studies.

  10. Absence of IDH mutation identifies a novel radiologic and molecular subtype of WHO grade II gliomas with dismal prognosis.

    PubMed

    Metellus, Philippe; Coulibaly, Bema; Colin, Carole; de Paula, Andre Maues; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Taieb, David; Barlier, Anne; Boisselier, Blandine; Mokhtari, Karima; Wang, Xiao Wei; Loundou, Anderson; Chapon, Frederique; Pineau, Sandrine; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Chinot, Olivier; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2010-12-01

    The phenotypic heterogeneity of low-grade gliomas (LGGs) is still inconsistently explained by known molecular abnormalities in patients treated according to the present standards of care. IDH1 codon 132 and IDH2 codon 172 sequencing was performed in a series of 47 LGGs and correlated with clinical presentation, MR imaging characteristics, genomic profile and outcome. A total of 38 IDH1 mutations at codon 132 and 2 IDH2 mutations at codon 172 were found, including 35 R132H (87.5%), 2 R132C (5.0%), 1 R132S (2.5%) and 2 R172 M (5%). The IDH mutations were significantly associated with 1p19q deleted genotype (P = 0.031) and p53 expression (P = 0.014). The presence (vs. absence) of IDH mutations was associated with a better outcome (5-year survival rate, 93% vs. 51%, respectively, P = 0.000001). After adjustment for age, tumor location and size, radiologic infiltration pattern and extent of surgery, multivariate analysis confirmed that IDH mutations was an independent favorable prognostic factor (hazard ratio = 40.9; 95% CI, 2.89-578.49, P = 0.006). Furthermore, we showed that patients with IDH-nonmutated tumors were significantly older (P = 0.020) and that these tumors involved significantly more frequently the insula (P = 0.004), were larger in size (>6 cm, P = 0.047), displayed an infiltrative pattern on MRI (P = 0.007) and were all p53 negative with no 1p19q deletion (P < 10⁻⁶). The absence of IDH mutations in LGGs identifies a novel entity of LGGs with distinctive location, infiltrative behavior, specific molecular alterations, and dismal outcome. These findings could significantly modify the LGG classification and may represent a new tool to guide patient-tailored therapy. PMID:21080178

  11. Homozygous deletion of TNFRSF4, TP73, PPAP2B and DPYD at 1p and PDCD5 at 19q identified by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis in pediatric anaplastic glioma with questionable oligodendroglial component

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric oligodendrogliomas are rare and appear to show a different molecular profile from adult tumors. Some gliomas display allelic losses at 1p/19q in pediatric patients, although less frequently than in adult patients, but this is rare in tumors with an oligodendroglial component. The molecular basis of this genomic abnormality is unknown in pediatric gliomas, but it represents a relatively common finding in pediatric oligodendroglioma-like neoplasms with leptomeningeal dissemination. Results Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis using SALSA P088-B1 for the analysis of the 1p/19q allelic constitution in a pediatric anaplastic (oligodendro)-glioma showed homozygous co-deletion for markers: TNFRSF4 (located at 1p36.33), TP73 (1p36.32), PPAP2B (1pter-p22.1), DPYD (1p21.3), and PDCD5 (19q13.12), and hemizygous deletion of BAX (19q13.3-q13.4). No sequence changes for R132 and R172 of the IDH1/2 genes were identified. Conclusions The molecular findings in this pediatric anaplastic glioma do not allow for a clearly definitive pathological diagnosis. However, the findings provide data on a number of 1p/19q genomic regions that, because of homozygotic deletion, might be the location of genes that are important for the development and clinical evolution of some malignant gliomas in children. PMID:24387276

  12. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 occur frequently in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas and share hypermethylation targets with glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, P; Dong, Q; Zhang, C; Kuan, P-F; Liu, Y; Jeck, W R; Andersen, J B; Jiang, W; Savich, G L; Tan, T-X; Auman, J T; Hoskins, J M; Misher, A D; Moser, C D; Yourstone, S M; Kim, J W; Cibulskis, K; Getz, G; Hunt, H V; Thorgeirsson, S S; Roberts, L R; Ye, D; Guan, K-L; Xiong, Y; Qin, L-X; Chiang, D Y

    2013-06-20

    Mutations in the genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase, IDH1 and IDH2, have been reported in gliomas, myeloid leukemias, chondrosarcomas and thyroid cancer. We discovered IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in 34 of 326 (10%) intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. Tumor with mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 had lower 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and higher 5-methylcytosine levels, as well as increased dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 79 (H3K79). Mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 were associated with longer overall survival (P=0.028) and were independently associated with a longer time to tumor recurrence after intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma resection in multivariate analysis (P=0.021). IDH1 and IDH2 mutations were significantly associated with increased levels of p53 in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, but no mutations in the p53 gene were found, suggesting that mutations in IDH1 and IDH2 may cause a stress that leads to p53 activation. We identified 2309 genes that were significantly hypermethylated in 19 cholangiocarcinomas with mutations in IDH1 or IDH2, compared with cholangiocarcinomas without these mutations. Hypermethylated CpG sites were significantly enriched in CpG shores and upstream of transcription start sites, suggesting a global regulation of transcriptional potential. Half of the hypermethylated genes overlapped with DNA hypermethylation in IDH1-mutant gliobastomas, suggesting the existence of a common set of genes whose expression may be affected by mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 in different types of tumors. PMID:22824796

  13. BEAMing and Droplet Digital PCR Analysis of Mutant IDH1 mRNA in Glioma Patient Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid Extracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Walter W; Balaj, Leonora; Liau, Linda M; Samuels, Michael L; Kotsopoulos, Steve K; Maguire, Casey A; LoGuidice, Lori; Soto, Horacio; Garrett, Matthew; Zhu, Lin Dan; Sivaraman, Sarada; Chen, Clark; Wong, Eric T; Carter, Bob S; Hochberg, Fred H; Breakefield, Xandra O; Skog, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Development of biofluid-based molecular diagnostic tests for cancer is an important step towards tumor characterization and real-time monitoring in a minimally invasive fashion. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are released from tumor cells into body fluids and can provide a powerful platform for tumor biomarkers because they carry tumor proteins and nucleic acids. Detecting rare point mutations in the background of wild-type sequences in biofluids such as blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) remains a major challenge. Techniques such as BEAMing (beads, emulsion, amplification, magnetics) PCR and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) are substantially more sensitive than many other assays for mutant sequence detection. Here, we describe a novel approach that combines biofluid EV RNA and BEAMing RT-PCR (EV-BEAMing), as well droplet digital PCR to interrogate mutations from glioma tumors. EVs from CSF of patients with glioma were shown to contain mutant IDH1 transcripts, and we were able to reliably detect and quantify mutant and wild-type IDH1 RNA transcripts in CSF of patients with gliomas. EV-BEAMing and EV-ddPCR represent a valuable new strategy for cancer diagnostics, which can be applied to a variety of biofluids and neoplasms. PMID:23881452

  14. Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-1 Mutations as Prognostic Biomarker in Glioblastoma Multiforme Patients in West Bohemia

    PubMed Central

    Polivka, J.; Polivka, J.; Rohan, V.; Pesta, M.; Repik, T.; Pitule, P.; Topolcan, O.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant primary brain tumor in adults. Recent whole-genome studies revealed novel GBM prognostic biomarkers such as mutations in metabolic enzyme IDH—isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDH1 and IDH2). The distinctive mutation IDH1 R132H was uncovered to be a strong prognostic biomarker for glioma patients. We investigated the prognostic role of IDH1 R132H mutation in GBM patients in West Bohemia. Methods. The IDH1 R132H mutation was assessed by the RT-PCR in the tumor samples from 45 GBM patients treated in the Faculty Hospital in Pilsen and was correlated with the progression free and overall survival. Results. The IDH1 R132H mutation was identified in 20 from 44 GBM tumor samples (45.4%). The majority of mutated tumors were secondary GBMs (16 in 18, 89.9%). Low frequency of IDH1 mutations was observed in primary GBMs (4 in 26, 15.3%). Patients with IDH R132H mutation had longer PFS, 136 versus 51 days (P < 0.021, Wilcoxon), and OS, 270 versus 130 days (P < 0.024, Wilcoxon test). Summary. The prognostic value of IDH1 R132H mutation in GBM patients was verified. Patients with mutation had significantly longer PFS and OS than patients with wild-type IDH1 and suffered more likely from secondary GBMs. PMID:24511544

  15. 19q13.32 microdeletion syndrome: three new cases.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Angela; Kramer, Nancy; Schwartz, Charles E; Miles, Judith H; DuPont, Barbara R; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Graham, John M

    2014-01-01

    A previous report described a unique phenotype associated with an apparently de novo 732 kb 19q13.32 microdeletion, consisting of intellectual disability, facial asymmetry, ptosis, oculomotor abnormalities, orofacial clefts, cardiac defects, scoliosis and chronic constipation. We report three unrelated patients with developmental delay and dysmorphic features, who were all found to have interstitial 19q13.32 microdeletions of varying sizes. Both the previously reported patient and our Patient 1 with a larger, 1.3-Mb deletion have distinctive dysmorphic features and medical problems, allowing us to define a recognizable 19q13.32 microdeletion syndrome. Patient 1 was hypotonic and dysmorphic at birth, with aplasia of the posterior corpus callosum, bilateral ptosis, oculomotor paralysis, down-slanting palpebral fissures, facial asymmetry, submucosal cleft palate, micrognathia, wide-spaced nipples, right-sided aortic arch, hypospadias, bilateral inguinal hernias, double toenail of the left second toe, partial 2-3 toe syndactyly, kyphoscoliosis and colonic atony. Therefore, the common features of the 19q13.32 microdeletion syndrome include facial asymmetry, ptosis, oculomotor paralysis, orofacial clefting, micrognathia, kyphoscoliosis, aortic defects and colonic atony. These findings are probably related to a deletion of some combination of the 20-23 genes in common between these two patients, especially NPAS1, NAPA, ARHGAP35, SLC8A2, DHX34, MEIS3, and ZNF541. These candidate genes are expressed in the brain parenchyma, glia, heart, gastrointestinal tract and musculoskeletal system and likely play a fundamental role in the expression of this phenotype. This report delineates the phenotypic spectrum associated with the haploinsufficiency of genes found in 19q13.32. PMID:25230004

  16. Isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 is mutated in inflammatory bowel disease-associated intestinal adenocarcinoma with low-grade tubuloglandular histology but not in sporadic intestinal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Douglas J; Binion, David; Regueiro, Miguel; Schraut, Wolfgang; Bahary, Nathan; Sun, Weijing; Nikiforova, Marina; Pai, Reetesh K

    2014-08-01

    The underlying molecular alterations in chronic idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease-associated intestinal adenocarcinoma remain largely unknown. Somatic IDH mutations are often seen in gliomas and myeloid leukemia but have also been recently reported in a subset of other neoplasms. We analyzed a series of intestinal adenocarcinomas with (n=23) and without (n=39) associated chronic idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease treated at our institution for IDH1 and IDH2 mutations and correlated the clinicopathologic findings with mutation status. Compared with intestinal adenocarcinomas not associated with inflammatory bowel disease, adenocarcinomas associated with inflammatory bowel disease more frequently demonstrated IDH mutations (13% vs. 0%, P=0.047). All IDH mutations were identified in IDH1 and resulted in substitution of arginine by cysteine at position 132 (p.R132C, c.394C>T). IDH1 mutations were frequently (66%) associated with concurrent KRAS mutations (p.G12D, c.35G>A). IDH1-mutated intestinal adenocarcinomas were seen in the setting of both Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis and were located in both the ileum and colon. Compared with IDH1-negative inflammatory bowel disease-associated adenocarcinoma, IDH1-positive adenocarcinomas more frequently demonstrated tubuloglandular histology (100% vs. 25%, P=0.032) and were more frequently associated with precursor lesions exhibiting serrated morphology (66% vs. 6%, P=0.034). IDH1 mutations were also identified in the precursor dysplastic lesions associated with IDH1-positive adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, we demonstrate that IDH1 mutations are occasionally identified in inflammatory bowel disease-associated intestinal adenocarcinoma but not in intestinal adenocarcinoma not associated with inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, IDH1-mutated intestinal adenocarcinoma is associated with a characteristic low-grade tubuloglandular histology and often harbors concurrent KRAS mutations. Identification of patients

  17. Cancer-associated metabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate accumulates in acute myelogenous leukemia with isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Gross, Stefan; Cairns, Rob A; Minden, Mark D; Driggers, Edward M; Bittinger, Mark A; Jang, Hyun Gyung; Sasaki, Masato; Jin, Shengfang; Schenkein, David P; Su, Shinsan M; Dang, Lenny; Fantin, Valeria R; Mak, Tak W

    2010-02-15

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2), are present in most gliomas and secondary glioblastomas, but are rare in other neoplasms. IDH1/2 mutations are heterozygous, and affect a single arginine residue. Recently, IDH1 mutations were identified in 8% of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients. A glioma study revealed that IDH1 mutations cause a gain-of-function, resulting in the production and accumulation of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Genotyping of 145 AML biopsies identified 11 IDH1 R132 mutant samples. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolite screening revealed increased 2-HG levels in IDH1 R132 mutant cells and sera, and uncovered two IDH2 R172K mutations. IDH1/2 mutations were associated with normal karyotypes. Recombinant IDH1 R132C and IDH2 R172K proteins catalyze the novel nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate (alpha-KG) to 2-HG. The IDH1 R132C mutation commonly found in AML reduces the affinity for isocitrate, and increases the affinity for NADPH and alpha-KG. This prevents the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to alpha-KG, and facilitates the conversion of alpha-KG to 2-HG. IDH1/2 mutations confer an enzymatic gain of function that dramatically increases 2-HG in AML. This provides an explanation for the heterozygous acquisition of these mutations during tumorigenesis. 2-HG is a tractable metabolic biomarker of mutant IDH1/2 enzyme activity. PMID:20142433

  18. An integrated genomic analysis identifies clinically relevant subtypes of glioblastoma characterized by abnormalities in PDGFRA, IDH1, EGFR and NF1

    PubMed Central

    Verhaak, Roel G.W.; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Purdom, Elizabeth; Wang, Victoria; Qi, Yuan; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Miller, C. Ryan; Ding, Li; Golub, Todd; Mesirov, Jill P.; Alexe, Gabriele; Lawrence, Michael; O’Kelly, Michael; Tamayo, Pablo; Weir, Barbara A.; Gabrie, Stacey; Winckler, Wendy; Gupta, Supriya; Jakkula, Lakshmi; Feiler, Heidi S.; Hodgson, J. Graeme; James, C. David; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Brennan, Cameron; Kahn, Ari; Spellman, Paul T.; Wilson, Richard K.; Speed, Terence P.; Gray, Joe W.; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad; Perou, Charles M.; Hayes, D. Neil

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The Cancer Genome Atlas Network recently catalogued recurrent genomic abnormalities in glioblastoma (GBM). We describe a robust gene expression-based molecular classification of GBM into Proneural, Neural, Classical and Mesenchymal subtypes and integrate multi-dimensional genomic data to establish patterns of somatic mutations and DNA copy number. Aberrations and gene expression of EGFR, NF1, and PDGFRA/IDH1 each define Classical, Mesenchymal, and Proneural, respectively. Gene signatures of normal brain cell types show a strong relation between subtypes and different neural lineages. Additionally, response to aggressive therapy differs by subtype with greatest benefit in Classical and no benefit in Proneural. We provide a framework that unifies transcriptomic and genomic dimensions for GBM molecular stratification with important implications for future studies. PMID:20129251

  19. Minimally-Myelosuppressive Asparaginase-Containing Induction Regimen for Treatment of a Jehovah’s Witness with mutant IDH1/NPM1/NRAS Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Emadi, Ashkan; Bade, Najeebah A.; Stevenson, Brandi; Singh, Zeba

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who do not wish to accept blood product transfusion, including Jehovah’s Witnesses, is extremely challenging. The use of conventional chemotherapy for induction of complete remission (CR) results in profound anemia and thrombocytopenia requiring frequent transfusions of blood products, without which such treatment will be life-threatening. Finding a well tolerable, minimally myelosuppressive induction regimen for such patients with AML is a clear example of area of unmet medical need. Here, we report a successful treatment of a 52-year-old Jehovah’s Witness with newly diagnosed AML with peg-asparaginase, vincristine and methylprednisolone. The AML was characterized with normal karyotype, and mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1-Arg132Ser), nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1-Trp289Cysfs*12) and neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS-G1y12Va1). After one 28-day cycle of treatment, the patient achieved complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi) and after the second cycle, he achieved CR with full blood count recovery. The patient has never received any blood products. Notwithstanding that myeloperoxidase-induced oxidative degradation of vincristine results in its lack of activity as monotherapy in AML, its combination with corticosteroid and asparaginase has resulted in a robust remission in this patient. Diminished steroid clearance by asparaginase activity as well as reduction in serum glutamine level induced by glutaminase enzymatic activity of asparaginase may have contributed to effective killing of the myeloblasts that carry IDH1/NPM1/NRAS mutations. In conclusion, asparaginase-containing regimens, which are approved for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) but not AML, can be used to treat patients with AML who do not accept blood transfusion. PMID:27064021

  20. Minimally-Myelosuppressive Asparaginase-Containing Induction Regimen for Treatment of a Jehovah's Witness with mutant IDH1/NPM1/NRAS Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Emadi, Ashkan; Bade, Najeebah A; Stevenson, Brandi; Singh, Zeba

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who do not wish to accept blood product transfusion, including Jehovah's Witnesses, is extremely challenging. The use of conventional chemotherapy for induction of complete remission (CR) results in profound anemia and thrombocytopenia requiring frequent transfusions of blood products, without which such treatment will be life-threatening. Finding a well tolerable, minimally myelosuppressive induction regimen for such patients with AML is a clear example of area of unmet medical need. Here, we report a successful treatment of a 52-year-old Jehovah's Witness with newly diagnosed AML with peg-asparaginase, vincristine and methylprednisolone. The AML was characterized with normal karyotype, and mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1-Arg132Ser), nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1-Trp289Cysfs*12) and neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS-G1y12Va1). After one 28-day cycle of treatment, the patient achieved complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi) and after the second cycle, he achieved CR with full blood count recovery. The patient has never received any blood products. Notwithstanding that myeloperoxidase-induced oxidative degradation of vincristine results in its lack of activity as monotherapy in AML, its combination with corticosteroid and asparaginase has resulted in a robust remission in this patient. Diminished steroid clearance by asparaginase activity as well as reduction in serum glutamine level induced by glutaminase enzymatic activity of asparaginase may have contributed to effective killing of the myeloblasts that carry IDH1/NPM1/NRAS mutations. In conclusion, asparaginase-containing regimens, which are approved for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) but not AML, can be used to treat patients with AML who do not accept blood transfusion. PMID:27064021

  1. Immunohistochemical Analysis of ATRX, IDH1 and p53 in Glioblastoma and Their Correlations with Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) can be classified into molecular subgroups, on the basis of biomarker expression. Here, we classified our cohort of 163 adult GBMs into molecular subgroups according to the expression of proteins encoded by genes of alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX), isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) and TP53. We focused on the survival rate of molecular subgroups, depending on each and various combination of these biomarkers. ATRX, IDH1 and p53 protein expression were evaluated immunohistochemically and Kaplan-Meier analysis were carried out in each group. A total of 15.3% of enrolled GBMs demonstrated loss of ATRX expression (ATRX-), 10.4% expressed an aberrant IDH1 R132H protein (IDH1+), and 48.4% exhibited p53 overexpression (p53+). Survival differences were statistically significant when single protein expression or different combinations of expression of these proteins were analyzed. In conclusion, in the case of single protein expression, the patients with each IDH1+, or ATRX-, or p53- GBMs showed better survival than patients with counterparts protein expressed GBMs. In the case of double protein pairs, the patients with ATRX-/p53-, ATRX-/IDH1+, and IDH1+/p53- GBMs revealed better survival than the patients with GBMs with the remained pairs. In the case of triple protein combinations, the patients with ATRX-/p53-/IDH+ showed statistically significant survival gain than the patients with remained combination of proteins-expression status. Therefore, these three biomarkers, individually and as a combination, can stratify GBMs into prognostically relevant subgroups and have strong prognostic values in adult GBMs. PMID:27478330

  2. Immunohistochemical Analysis of ATRX, IDH1 and p53 in Glioblastoma and Their Correlations with Patient Survival.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Ajay; Park, Sung-Hye; Seo, Jeong-Wook; Park, Chul-Kee

    2016-08-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) can be classified into molecular subgroups, on the basis of biomarker expression. Here, we classified our cohort of 163 adult GBMs into molecular subgroups according to the expression of proteins encoded by genes of alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX), isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) and TP53. We focused on the survival rate of molecular subgroups, depending on each and various combination of these biomarkers. ATRX, IDH1 and p53 protein expression were evaluated immunohistochemically and Kaplan-Meier analysis were carried out in each group. A total of 15.3% of enrolled GBMs demonstrated loss of ATRX expression (ATRX-), 10.4% expressed an aberrant IDH1 R132H protein (IDH1+), and 48.4% exhibited p53 overexpression (p53+). Survival differences were statistically significant when single protein expression or different combinations of expression of these proteins were analyzed. In conclusion, in the case of single protein expression, the patients with each IDH1+, or ATRX-, or p53- GBMs showed better survival than patients with counterparts protein expressed GBMs. In the case of double protein pairs, the patients with ATRX-/p53-, ATRX-/IDH1+, and IDH1+/p53- GBMs revealed better survival than the patients with GBMs with the remained pairs. In the case of triple protein combinations, the patients with ATRX-/p53-/IDH+ showed statistically significant survival gain than the patients with remained combination of proteins-expression status. Therefore, these three biomarkers, individually and as a combination, can stratify GBMs into prognostically relevant subgroups and have strong prognostic values in adult GBMs. PMID:27478330

  3. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 R132C mutation occurs exclusively in microsatellite stable colorectal cancers with the CpG island methylator phenotype.

    PubMed

    Whitehall, V L J; Dumenil, T D; McKeone, D M; Bond, C E; Bettington, M L; Buttenshaw, R L; Bowdler, L; Montgomery, G W; Wockner, L F; Leggett, B A

    2014-11-01

    The CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) is fundamental to an important subset of colorectal cancer; however, its cause is unknown. CIMP is associated with microsatellite instability but is also found in BRAF mutant microsatellite stable cancers that are associated with poor prognosis. The isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene causes CIMP in glioma due to an activating mutation that produces the 2-hydroxyglutarate oncometabolite. We therefore examined IDH1 alteration as a potential cause of CIMP in colorectal cancer. The IDH1 mutational hotspot was screened in 86 CIMP-positive and 80 CIMP-negative cancers. The entire coding sequence was examined in 81 CIMP-positive colorectal cancers. Forty-seven cancers varying by CIMP-status and IDH1 mutation status were examined using Illumina 450K DNA methylation microarrays. The R132C IDH1 mutation was detected in 4/166 cancers. All IDH1 mutations were in CIMP cancers that were BRAF mutant and microsatellite stable (4/45, 8.9%). Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis identified an IDH1 mutation-like methylation signature in approximately half of the CIMP-positive cancers. IDH1 mutation appears to cause CIMP in a small proportion of BRAF mutant, microsatellite stable colorectal cancers. This study provides a precedent that a single gene mutation may cause CIMP in colorectal cancer, and that this will be associated with a specific epigenetic signature and clinicopathological features. PMID:25496513

  4. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 R132C mutation occurs exclusively in microsatellite stable colorectal cancers with the CpG island methylator phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Whitehall, VLJ; Dumenil, TD; McKeone, DM; Bond, CE; Bettington, ML; Buttenshaw, RL; Bowdler, L; Montgomery, GW; Wockner, LF; Leggett, BA

    2014-01-01

    The CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) is fundamental to an important subset of colorectal cancer; however, its cause is unknown. CIMP is associated with microsatellite instability but is also found in BRAF mutant microsatellite stable cancers that are associated with poor prognosis. The isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene causes CIMP in glioma due to an activating mutation that produces the 2-hydroxyglutarate oncometabolite. We therefore examined IDH1 alteration as a potential cause of CIMP in colorectal cancer. The IDH1 mutational hotspot was screened in 86 CIMP-positive and 80 CIMP-negative cancers. The entire coding sequence was examined in 81 CIMP-positive colorectal cancers. Forty-seven cancers varying by CIMP-status and IDH1 mutation status were examined using Illumina 450K DNA methylation microarrays. The R132C IDH1 mutation was detected in 4/166 cancers. All IDH1 mutations were in CIMP cancers that were BRAF mutant and microsatellite stable (4/45, 8.9%). Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis identified an IDH1 mutation-like methylation signature in approximately half of the CIMP-positive cancers. IDH1 mutation appears to cause CIMP in a small proportion of BRAF mutant, microsatellite stable colorectal cancers. This study provides a precedent that a single gene mutation may cause CIMP in colorectal cancer, and that this will be associated with a specific epigenetic signature and clinicopathological features. PMID:25496513

  5. Molecular investigation of isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (IDH) mutations in gliomas: first report of IDH2 mutations in Indian patients.

    PubMed

    Das, Bibhu Ranjan; Tangri, Rajiv; Ahmad, Firoz; Roy, Arnab; Patole, Kamlakar

    2013-01-01

    Recent genome wide sequencing has identified mutations in IDH1/IDH2 predominantly in grade II-III gliomas and secondary glioblastomas which are associated with favorable clinical outcome. These mutations have become molecular markers of significant diagnostic and prognostic relevance in the assessment of human gliomas. In the current study we evaluated IDH1 (R132) and IDH2 (R172) in 32 gliomas of various grades and tumor subtypes. Sequencing analysis revealed R132H mutations in 18.7% tumors, while none of the cases showed IDH2 (R172) mutations. The frequency of IDH1 mutations was higher in females (21.4%) than males (11.1%), and it was significantly higher in younger patients. Histological analyses demonstrated presence of necrosis and micro vascular proliferation in 69% and 75% respectively. Interestingly, IDH1 mutations were predominantly present in non-necrotic tumors as well as in cases showing microvascular proliferation. Of the six IDH1 positive cases, three were glioblastomas (IV), and one each were anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (III), anaplastic oligodendroglioma III (n=1) and diffuse astrocytoma. In conclusion, IDH1 mutations are quite frequent in Indian glioma patients while IDH2 mutations are not observed. Since IDH mutations are associated with good prognosis, their use in routine clinical practice will enable better risk stratification and management of glioma patients. PMID:24460285

  6. Contrast enhancement in 1p/19q-codeleted anaplastic oligodendrogliomas is associated with 9p loss, genomic instability, and angiogenic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Botero, German; Dehais, Caroline; Idbaih, Ahmed; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Lahutte, Marion; Carpentier, Catherine; Letouzé, Eric; Chinot, Olivier; Loiseau, Hugues; Honnorat, Jerome; Ramirez, Carole; Moyal, Elisabeth; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Ducray, François; Desenclos, Christine; Sevestre, Henri; Menei, Philippe; Michalak, Sophie; Al Nader, Edmond; Godard, Joel; Viennet, Gabriel; Carpentier, Antoine; Eimer, Sandrine; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Verrelle, Pierre; Faillot, Thierry; Gaultier, Claude; Tortel, Marie Christine; Christov, Christo; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Ghiringhelli, Francois; Berger, François; Lacroix, Catherine; Parker, Fabrice; Dubois, François; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Gueye, Edouard-Marcel; Labrousse, Francois; Jouvet, Anne; Bauchet, Luc; Rigau, Valérie; Beauchesne, Patrick; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Campone, Mario; Loussouarn, Delphine; Fontaine, Denys; Vandenbos, Fanny; Campello, Chantal; Roger, Pascal; Fesneau, Melanie; Heitzmann, Anne; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Elouadhani, Selma; Mokhtari, Karima; Polivka, Marc; Ricard, Damien; Levillain, Pierre-Marie; Wager, Michel; Colin, Philippe; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Chiforeanu, Dan; Vauleon, Elodie; Langlois, Olivier; Laquerriere, Annie; Motsuo Fotso, Marie Janette; Peoc'h, Michel; Andraud, Marie; Mouton, Servane; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Noel, Georges; Desse, Nicolas; Soulard, Raoulin; Amiel-Benouaich, Alexandra; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Dhermain, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to correlate MRI features and molecular characteristics in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs). Methods The MRI characteristics of 50 AO patients enrolled in the French national network for high-grade oligodendroglial tumors were analyzed. The genomic profiles and IDH mutational statuses were assessed using high-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays and direct sequencing, respectively. The gene expression profiles of 25 1p/19q-codeleted AOs were studied on Affymetrix expression arrays. Results Most of the cases were frontal lobe contrast-enhanced tumors (52%), but the radiological presentations of these cases were heterogeneous, ranging from low-grade glioma-like aspects (26%) to glioblastoma-like aspects (22%). The 1p/19q codeletion (n = 39) was associated with locations in the frontal lobe (P = .001), with heterogeneous intratumoral signal intensities (P = .003) and with no or nonmeasurable contrast enhancements (P = .01). The IDH wild-type AOs (n = 7) more frequently displayed ringlike contrast enhancements (P = .03) and were more frequently located outside of the frontal lobe (P = .01). However, no specific imaging pattern could be identified for the 1p/19q-codeleted AO or the IDH-mutated AO. Within the 1p/19q-codeleted AO, the contrast enhancement was associated with larger tumor volumes (P = .001), chromosome 9p loss and CDKN2A loss (P = .006), genomic instability (P = .03), and angiogenesis-related gene expression (P < .001), particularly for vascular endothelial growth factor A and angiopoietin 2. Conclusion In AOs, the 1p/19q codeletion and the IDH mutation are associated with preferential (but not with specific) imaging characteristics. Within 1p/19q-codeleted AO, imaging heterogeneity is related to additional molecular alterations, especially chromosome 9p loss, which is associated with contrast enhancement and larger tumor volume. PMID:24353325

  7. Assignment of the gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) to chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, M.; Fernald, A.A.; Bell, G.I.; Le Beau, M.M.

    1995-08-10

    The gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) was localized, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to human chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is a potent stimulator of insulin secretion and mutations in the GIPR gene may be related to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). 13 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Glioblastoma adaptation traced through decline of an IDH1 clonal driver and macro-evolution of a double-minute chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Favero, F.; McGranahan, N.; Salm, M.; Birkbak, N. J.; Sanborn, J. Z.; Benz, S. C.; Becq, J.; Peden, J. F.; Kingsbury, Z.; Grocok, R. J.; Humphray, S.; Bentley, D.; Spencer-Dene, B.; Gutteridge, A.; Brada, M.; Roger, S.; Dietrich, P.-Y.; Forshew, T.; Gerlinger, M.; Rowan, A.; Stamp, G.; Eklund, A. C.; Szallasi, Z.; Swanton, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant brain cancer occurring in adults, and is associated with dismal outcome and few therapeutic options. GBM has been shown to predominantly disrupt three core pathways through somatic aberrations, rendering it ideal for precision medicine approaches. Methods We describe a 35-year-old female patient with recurrent GBM following surgical removal of the primary tumour, adjuvant treatment with temozolomide and a 3-year disease-free period. Rapid whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of three separate tumour regions at recurrence was carried out and interpreted relative to WGS of two regions of the primary tumour. Results We found extensive mutational and copy-number heterogeneity within the primary tumour. We identified a TP53 mutation and two focal amplifications involving PDGFRA, KIT and CDK4, on chromosomes 4 and 12. A clonal IDH1 R132H mutation in the primary, a known GBM driver event, was detectable at only very low frequency in the recurrent tumour. After sub-clonal diversification, evidence was found for a whole-genome doubling event and a translocation between the amplified regions of PDGFRA, KIT and CDK4, encoded within a double-minute chromosome also incorporating miR26a-2. The WGS analysis uncovered progressive evolution of the double-minute chromosome converging on the KIT/PDGFRA/PI3K/mTOR axis, superseding the IDH1 mutation in dominance in a mutually exclusive manner at recurrence, consequently the patient was treated with imatinib. Despite rapid sequencing and cancer genome-guided therapy against amplified oncogenes, the disease progressed, and the patient died shortly after. Conclusion This case sheds light on the dynamic evolution of a GBM tumour, defining the origins of the lethal sub-clone, the macro-evolutionary genomic events dominating the disease at recurrence and the loss of a clonal driver. Even in the era of rapid WGS analysis, cases such as this illustrate the significant hurdles for precision

  9. Integrated multi-omics analysis of oligodendroglial tumours identifies three subgroups of 1p/19q co-deleted gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kamoun, Aurélie; Idbaih, Ahmed; Dehais, Caroline; Elarouci, Nabila; Carpentier, Catherine; Letouzé, Eric; Colin, Carole; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Sanson, Marc; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Ducray, François; Adam, Clovis; Andraud, Marie; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Bauchet, Luc; Beauchesne, Patrick; Bielle, Franck; Blechet, Claire; Campone, Mario; Carpentier, Antoine F.; Carpiuc, Ioana; Cazals-Hatem, Dominique; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Chiforeanu, Danchristian; Chinot, Olivier; Cohen-Moyal, Elisabeth; Colin, Philippe; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Desenclos, Christine; Desse, Nicolas; Dhermain, Frederic; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Eimer, Sandrine; Faillot, Thierry; Fesneau, Mélanie; Fontaine, Denys; Gaillard, Stéphane; Gauchotte, Guillaume; Gaultier, Claude; Ghiringhelli, François; Godard, Joel; Gueye, Edouard Marcel; Guillamo, Jean Sebastien; Hamdi-Elouadhani, Selma; Honnorat, Jerome; Kemeny, Jean Louis; Khallil, Toufik; Labrousse, François; Langlois, Olivier; Laquerriere, Annie; Larrieu-Ciron, Delphine; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Guérinel, Caroline Le; Levillain, Pierre-Marie; Loiseau, Hugues; Loussouarn, Delphine; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Menei, Philippe; Motsuo Fotso, Marie Janette; Noel, Georges; Parker, Fabrice; Peoc'h, Michel; Polivka, Marc; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Ramirez, Carole; Ricard, Damien; Richard, Pomone; Rigau, Valérie; Rousseau, Audrey; Runavot, Gwenaelle; Sevestre, Henri; Tortel, Marie Christine; Vandenbos, Fanny; Vauleon, Elodie; Viennet, Gabriel; Villa, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendroglial tumours (OT) are a heterogeneous group of gliomas. Three molecular subgroups are currently distinguished on the basis of the IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion. Here we present an integrated analysis of the transcriptome, genome and methylome of 156 OT. Not only does our multi-omics classification match the current classification but also reveals three subgroups within 1p/19q co-deleted tumours, associated with specific expression patterns of nervous system cell types: oligodendrocyte, oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) and neuronal lineage. We confirm the validity of these three subgroups using public datasets. Importantly, the OPC-like group is associated with more aggressive clinical and molecular patterns, including MYC activation. We show that the MYC activation occurs through various alterations, including MYC genomic gain, MAX genomic loss, MYC hypomethylation and microRNA-34b/c down-regulation. In the lower grade glioma TCGA dataset, the OPC-like group is associated with a poorer outcome independently of histological grade. Our study reveals previously unrecognized heterogeneity among 1p/19q co-deleted tumours. PMID:27090007

  10. Integrated multi-omics analysis of oligodendroglial tumours identifies three subgroups of 1p/19q co-deleted gliomas.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Aurélie; Idbaih, Ahmed; Dehais, Caroline; Elarouci, Nabila; Carpentier, Catherine; Letouzé, Eric; Colin, Carole; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Sanson, Marc; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Ducray, François

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendroglial tumours (OT) are a heterogeneous group of gliomas. Three molecular subgroups are currently distinguished on the basis of the IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion. Here we present an integrated analysis of the transcriptome, genome and methylome of 156 OT. Not only does our multi-omics classification match the current classification but also reveals three subgroups within 1p/19q co-deleted tumours, associated with specific expression patterns of nervous system cell types: oligodendrocyte, oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) and neuronal lineage. We confirm the validity of these three subgroups using public datasets. Importantly, the OPC-like group is associated with more aggressive clinical and molecular patterns, including MYC activation. We show that the MYC activation occurs through various alterations, including MYC genomic gain, MAX genomic loss, MYC hypomethylation and microRNA-34b/c down-regulation. In the lower grade glioma TCGA dataset, the OPC-like group is associated with a poorer outcome independently of histological grade. Our study reveals previously unrecognized heterogeneity among 1p/19q co-deleted tumours. PMID:27090007

  11. Mutations in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 and 2 Occur Frequently in Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinomas and Share Hypermethylation Targets with Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Dong, Qiongzhu; Zhang, Chong; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Liu, Yufeng; Jeck, William R.; Andersen, Jesper B.; Jiang, Wenqing; Savich, Gleb L.; Tan, Ting-Xu; Auman, J. Todd; Hoskins, Janelle M.; Misher, Anne D.; Moser, Catherine D.; Yourstone, Scott M.; Kim, Jin Woo; Cibulskis, Kristian; Getz, Gad; Hunt, Heike V.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Roberts, Lewis R.; Ye, Dan; Guan, Kun-Liang; Xiong, Yue; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Chiang, Derek Y.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase, IDH1 and IDH2, have been reported in gliomas, myeloid leukemias, chondrosarcomas, and thyroid cancer. We discovered IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in 34 of 326 (10%) intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. Tumor with mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 had lower 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and higher 5-methylcytosine (5mC) levels, as well as increased dimethylation of histone H3K79. Mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 were associated with longer overall survival (p = 0.028) and were independently associated with a longer time to tumor recurrence after intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma resection in multivariate analysis (p = 0.021). IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are significantly associated with increased levels of p53 in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, but no mutations in the p53 gene were found, suggesting that mutations in IDH1 and IDH2 may cause a stress that leads to p53 activation. We identified 2,309 genes that were significantly hypermethylated in 19 cholangiocarcinomas with mutations in IDH1 or IDH2, compared with cholangiocarcinomas without these mutations. Hypermethylated CpG sites were significantly enriched in CpG shores and upstream of transcription start sites, suggesting a global regulation of transcriptional potential. Half of the hypermethylated genes overlapped with DNA hypermethylation in IDH1-mutant gliobastomas, suggesting the existence of a common set of genes whose expression may be affected by mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 in different types of tumors. PMID:22824796

  12. Discovery of the First Potent Inhibitors of Mutant IDH1 That Lower Tumor 2-HG in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of a series of R132H IDH1 inhibitors from a high throughput screen led to the first potent molecules that show robust tumor 2-HG inhibition in a xenograft model. Compound 35 shows good potency in the U87 R132H cell based assay and ∼90% tumor 2-HG inhibition in the corresponding mouse xenograft model following BID dosing. The magnitude and duration of tumor 2-HG inhibition correlates with free plasma concentration. PMID:24900389

  13. BCAT1 promotes cell proliferation through amino acid catabolism in gliomas carrying wild-type IDH1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon Jung; Wang, Wei; Schlotter, Magdalena; Lindroth, Anders M; Pleier, Sabrina V; Bai, Alfa H C; Karra, Daniela; Piro, Rosario M; Felsberg, Jörg; Addington, Adele; Lemke, Dieter; Weibrecht, Irene; Hovestadt, Volker; Rolli, Claudio G; Campos, Benito; Turcan, Sevin; Sturm, Dominik; Witt, Hendrik; Chan, Timothy A; Herold-Mende, Christel; Kemkemer, Ralf; König, Rainer; Schmidt, Kathrin; Hull, William-Edmund; Pfister, Stefan M; Jugold, Manfred; Hutson, Susan M; Plass, Christoph; Okun, Jürgen G; Reifenberger, Guido; Lichter, Peter; Radlwimmer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Here we show that glioblastoma express high levels of branched-chain amino acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1), the enzyme that initiates the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). Expression of BCAT1 was exclusive to tumors carrying wild-type isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 genes and was highly correlated with methylation patterns in the BCAT1 promoter region. BCAT1 expression was dependent on the concentration of α-ketoglutarate substrate in glioma cell lines and could be suppressed by ectopic overexpression of mutant IDH1 in immortalized human astrocytes, providing a link between IDH1 function and BCAT1 expression. Suppression of BCAT1 in glioma cell lines blocked the excretion of glutamate and led to reduced proliferation and invasiveness in vitro, as well as significant decreases in tumor growth in a glioblastoma xenograft model. These findings suggest a central role for BCAT1 in glioma pathogenesis, making BCAT1 and BCAA metabolism attractive targets for the development of targeted therapeutic approaches to treat patients with glioblastoma. PMID:23793099

  14. Bimodal expressivity in dominant retinitis pigmentosa genetically linked to chromosome 19q.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, K; al-Maghtheh, M; Fitzke, F W; Moore, A T; Jay, M; Inglehearn, C F; Arden, G B; Bird, A C

    1995-01-01

    A clinical, psychophysical, and electrophysiologic study was undertaken of two autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa pedigrees with a genetic mutation assigned to chromosome 19q by linkage analysis. Members with the abnormal haplotype were either symptomatic with adolescent onset nyctalopia, restricted visual fields, and non-detectable electroretinographic responses by 30 years of age, or asymptomatic with normal fundus appearance and minimal or no psychophysical or electroretinographic abnormalities. There was no correlation in the severity in parents and their offspring. Pedigree analysis suggested that although the offspring of parents with the genetic mutation were at 50% risk of having the genetic defect, the risk of being symptomatic during a working lifetime was only 31%. Such bimodal phenotypic expressivity in these particular pedigrees may be explained by a second, allelic genetic influence and may be a phenomenon unique to this genetic locus. Genetic counselling in families expressing this phenotype can only be based on haplotype analysis since clinical investigations, even in the most elderly, would not preclude the presence of the mutant gene. PMID:7488604

  15. LOC283731 promoter hypermethylation prognosticates survival after radiochemotherapy in IDH1 wild-type glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Mock, Andreas; Geisenberger, Christoph; Orlik, Christian; Warta, Rolf; Schwager, Christian; Jungk, Christine; Dutruel, Céline; Geiselhart, Lea; Weichenhan, Dieter; Zucknick, Manuela; Nied, Ann-Katrin; Friauf, Sara; Exner, Janina; Capper, David; Hartmann, Christian; Lahrmann, Bernd; Grabe, Niels; Debus, Jürgen; von Deimling, Andreas; Popanda, Odilia; Plass, Christoph; Unterberg, Andreas; Abdollahi, Amir; Schmezer, Peter; Herold-Mende, Christel

    2016-07-15

    MGMT promoter methylation status is currently the only established molecular prognosticator in IDH wild-type glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Therefore, we aimed to discover novel therapy-associated epigenetic biomarkers. After enrichment for hypermethylated fractions using methyl-CpG-immunoprecipitation (MCIp), we performed global DNA methylation profiling for 14 long-term (LTS; >36 months) and 15 short-term (STS; 6-10 months) surviving GBM patients. Even after exclusion of the G-CIMP phenotype, we observed marked differences between the LTS and STS methylome. A total of 1,247 probes in 706 genes were hypermethylated in LTS and 463 probes in 305 genes were found to be hypermethylated in STS patients (p values < 0.05, log2 fold change ± 0.5). We identified 13 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) with a minimum of four differentially methylated probes per gene. Indeed, we were able to validate a subset of these DMRs through a second, independent method (MassARRAY) in our LTS/STS training set (ADCY1, GPC3, LOC283731/ISLR2). These DMRs were further assessed for their prognostic capability in an independent validation cohort (n = 62) of non-G-CIMP GBMs from the TCGA. Hypermethylation of multiple CpGs mapping to the promoter region of LOC283731 correlated with improved patient outcome (p = 0.03). The prognostic performance of LOC283731 promoter hypermethylation was confirmed in a third independent study cohort (n = 89), and was independent of gender, performance (KPS) and MGMT status (p = 0.0485, HR = 0.63). Intriguingly, the prediction was most pronounced in younger GBM patients (<60 years). In conclusion, we provide compelling evidence that promoter methylation status of this novel gene is a prognostic biomarker in IDH1 wild-type/non-G-CIMP GBMs. PMID:26934681

  16. Microfluidics for rapid detection of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation for intraoperative application.

    PubMed

    Aibaidula, Abudumijiti; Zhao, Wang; Wu, Jin-Song; Chen, Hong; Shi, Zhi-Feng; Zheng, Lu-Lu; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-Fu; Sui, Guo-Dong

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Conventional methods for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) detection, such as DNA sequencing and immunohistochemistry, are time- and labor-consuming and cannot be applied for intraoperative analysis. To develop a new approach for rapid analysis of IDH1 mutation from tiny tumor samples, this study used microfluidics as a method for IDH1 mutation detection. METHODS Forty-seven glioma tumor samples were used; IDH1 mutation status was investigated by immunohistochemistry and DNA sequencing. The microfluidic device was fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane following standard soft lithography. The immunoanalysis was conducted in the microfluidic chip. Fluorescence images of the on-chip microcolumn taken by the charge-coupled device camera were collected as the analytical results readout. Fluorescence signals were analyzed by NIS-Elements software to gather detailed information about the IDH1 concentration in the tissue samples. RESULTS DNA sequencing identified IDH1 R132H mutation in 33 of 47 tumor samples. The fluorescence signal for IDH1-mutant samples was 5.49 ± 1.87 compared with 3.90 ± 1.33 for wild type (p = 0.005). Thus, microfluidics was capable of distinguishing IDH1-mutant tumor samples from wild-type samples. When the cutoff value was 4.11, the sensitivity of microfluidics was 87.9% and the specificity was 64.3%. CONCLUSIONS This new approach was capable of analyzing IDH1 mutation status of tiny tissue samples within 30 minutes using intraoperative microsampling. This approach might also be applied for rapid pathological diagnosis of diffuse gliomas, thus guiding personalized resection. PMID:26544771

  17. 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangements in small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hongyang; Xu, Haimiao; Xie, Fajun; Qin, Jing; Han, Na; Fan, Yun; Mao, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is poor despite reports suggesting modest improvement in survival. To date, chemotherapy remains the cornerstone treatment for SCLC patients, and many studies have focused on identifying the molecular characteristics of SCLC, which serve as the basis for precision treatments that improve the prognosis of SCLC. For instance, the therapeutic effect of temozolomide, recommended for patients with relapsed SCLC, is linked to 1p/19q codeletion in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors. A subpopulation of SCLC patients may derive benefit from tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting RET. In order to identify 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangement in SCLC patients, 32 SCLC resected specimens were retrospectively collected between 2008 and 2014 from the Zhejiang Cancer Hospital in People’s Republic of China. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to detect 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangement in the specimens. A 1p single deletion was detected in eight specimens, 19q single deletion was detected in three specimens, and only three specimens had a 1p/19q codeletion. None of the specimens had a RET rearrangement. The three patients whose specimens had a 1p/19q codeletion were alive after 58, 50, and 30 months of follow-up care. There was a trend toward prolonged overall survival for the patients with codeletion compared to no codeletion, 1p single deletion, 19q single deletion, and without 1p and 19q deletion (P=0.113, 0.168, 0.116, and 0.122, respectively). Our data showed that RET rearrangement may be not an ideal molecular target for SCLC therapies in People’s Republic of China. Instead, 1p/19q codeletion is a promising marker for a good prognosis and treatment with temozolomide in SCLC. PMID:27366094

  18. Localization, by linkage analysis, of the cystinuria type III gene to chromosome 19q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Bisceglia, L.; Totaro, A.; Melchionda, S.

    1997-03-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive aminoaciduria in which three urinary phenotypes (I, II, and III) have been described. An amino acid transporter gene, SLC3A1 (formerly rBAT), was found to be responsible for this disorder. Mutational and linkage analysis demonstrated the presence of genetic heterogeneity in which the SLC3A1 gene is responsible for type I cystinuria but not for type II or type III. In this study, we report the identification of the cystinuria type III locus on the long arm of chromosome 19 (19q13.1), obtained after a genomewide search. Pairwise linkage analysis in a series of type III or type II families previously excluded from linkage to the cystinuria type I locus (SLC3A1 gene) revealed a significant maximum LOD score (Z{sub max}) of 13.11 at a maximum recombination fraction ({theta}{sub max}) of .00, with marker D19S225. Multipoint linkage analysis performed with the use of additional markers from the region placed the cystinuria type III locus between D19S414 and D19S220. Preliminary data on type II families also seem to place the disease locus for this rare type of cystinuria at 19q13.1 (significant Z{sub max} = 3.11 at {theta}{sub max} of .00, with marker D19S225). 33 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Localization, by linkage analysis, of the cystinuria type III gene to chromosome 19q13.1.

    PubMed Central

    Bisceglia, L; Calonge, M J; Totaro, A; Feliubadaló, L; Melchionda, S; García, J; Testar, X; Gallucci, M; Ponzone, A; Zelante, L; Zorzano, A; Estivill, X; Gasparini, P; Nunes, V; Palacín, M

    1997-01-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive aminoaciduria in which three urinary phenotypes (I, II, and III) have been described. An amino acid transporter gene, SLC3A1 (formerly rBAT), was found to be responsible for this disorder. Mutational and linkage analysis demonstrated the presence of genetic heterogeneity in which the SLC3A1 gene is responsible for type I cystinuria but not for type II or type III. In this study, we report the identification of the cystinuria type III locus on the long arm of chromosome 19 (19q13.1), obtained after a genomewide search. Pairwise linkage analysis in a series of type III or type II families previously excluded from linkage to the cystinuria type I locus (SLC3A1 gene) revealed a significant maximum LOD score (zeta max) of 13.11 at a maximum recombination fraction (theta max) of .00, with marker D19S225. Multipoint linkage analysis performed with the use of additional markers from the region placed the cystinuria type III locus between D19S414 and D19S220. Preliminary data on type II families also seem to place the disease locus for this rare type of cystinuria at 19q13.1 (significant zeta max = 3.11 at theta max of .00, with marker D19S225). PMID:9042921

  20. Profiling the effects of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 mutations on the cellular metabolome.

    PubMed

    Reitman, Zachary J; Jin, Genglin; Karoly, Edward D; Spasojevic, Ivan; Yang, Jian; Kinzler, Kenneth W; He, Yiping; Bigner, Darell D; Vogelstein, Bert; Yan, Hai

    2011-02-22

    Point mutations of the NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) occur early in the pathogenesis of gliomas. When mutated, IDH1 and IDH2 gain the ability to produce the metabolite (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), but the downstream effects of mutant IDH1 and IDH2 proteins or of 2HG on cellular metabolism are unknown. We profiled >200 metabolites in human oligodendroglioma (HOG) cells to determine the effects of expression of IDH1 and IDH2 mutants. Levels of amino acids, glutathione metabolites, choline derivatives, and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates were altered in mutant IDH1- and IDH2-expressing cells. These changes were similar to those identified after treatment of the cells with 2HG. Remarkably, N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG), a common dipeptide in brain, was 50-fold reduced in cells expressing IDH1 mutants and 8.3-fold reduced in cells expressing IDH2 mutants. NAAG also was significantly lower in human glioma tissues containing IDH mutations than in gliomas without such mutations. These metabolic changes provide clues to the pathogenesis of tumors associated with IDH gene mutations. PMID:21289278

  1. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 mutation is a frequent event in osteosarcoma detected by a multi-specific monoclonal antibody MsMab-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Kato, Yukinari; Kaneko, Mika Kato; Sugawara, Masato; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Tsujimoto, Yuta; Naganuma, Yasushi; Yamakawa, Mitsunori; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Takagi, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    Somatic mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and IDH2 occur in gliomas, acute myeloid leukemia, and cartilaginous tumors. Somatic mosaic IDH1/2 mutations are also reported in Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome, which are characterized by multiple central cartilaginous tumors. Although IDH1/2 mutation analysis against osteosarcoma has been performed in several studies, no IDH1/2 mutation has been reported. Herein, we newly report the IDH2-R172S mutation in three of 12 (25%) osteosarcoma patients, which was detected by direct DNA sequencing. No monoclonal antibody (mAb) has been reported against IDH2-R172S mutation. However, we demonstrate that the IDH2-R172S peptide was recognized by our established multi-specific anti-mutated IDH1/2 mAb, MsMab-1, in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot analysis revealed that MsMab-1 reacts with PA tag combined recombinant proteins of IDH2-R172S. Furthermore, MsMab-1 stained IDH2-R172S-expressing osteosarcoma tissues in immunohistochemistry. The MsMab-1 stained nine of 32 (28.1%) osteosarcomas in a tissue microarray. This report is the first describing IDH2 mutations in osteosarcoma, which can be detected by MsMab-1 mAb. Taken together, these results show that MsMab-1 can be anticipated for use in immunohistochemical determination of IDH1/2 mutation-bearing osteosarcoma. PMID:24403254

  2. Diagnostic Detection of Allelic Losses and Imbalances by Next-Generation Sequencing: 1p/19q Co-Deletion Analysis of Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Dubbink, Hendrikus J; Atmodimedjo, Peggy N; van Marion, Ronald; Krol, Niels M G; Riegman, Peter H J; Kros, Johan M; van den Bent, Martin J; Dinjens, Winand N M

    2016-09-01

    Cancer cells are genomically unstable and accumulate tumor type-specific molecular aberrations, which may represent hallmarks for predicting prognosis and targets for therapy. Co-deletion of chromosomes 1p and 19q marks gliomas with an oligodendroglioma component and predicts a better prognosis and response to chemotherapy. In the current study, we present a novel method to detect chromosome 1p/19q co-deletion or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in a diagnostic setting, based on single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis and next-generation sequencing (NGS). We selected highly polymorphic SNPs distributed evenly over both chromosome arms. To experimentally determine the sensitivity and specificity of targeted SNP analysis, we used DNAs extracted from 49 routine formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded glioma tissues and compared the outcome with diagnostic microsatellite-based LOH analysis and calculated estimates. We show that targeted SNP analysis by NGS allows reliable detection of 1p and/or 19q deletion in a background of 70% of normal cells according to calculated outcomes, is more sensitive than microsatellite-based LOH analysis, and requires much less DNA. This specific and sensitive SNP assay is broadly applicable for simultaneous allelic imbalance analysis of multiple genomic regions and can be incorporated easily into NGS mutation analyses. The combined mutation and chromosomal imbalance analysis in a single NGS assay is suited perfectly for routine glioma diagnostics and other diagnostic molecular pathology applications. PMID:27461031

  3. A 3 1/2 year old girl with distal trisomy 19q defined by FISH.

    PubMed Central

    James, C; Jauch, A; Robson, L; Watson, N; Smith, A

    1996-01-01

    A 3 1/2 year old girl was evaluated because of developmental delay. Short stature was evident with height between the 3rd and 10th centiles, while weight and head circumference were on the 50th centile. Dysmorphic features consisted of a high bossed forehead, pointed short ear lobes, small nose, bilateral convergent strabismus, left simian crease, a gap between the first and second toes bilaterally, mild clinodactyly, and a broad, barrel shaped thorax. Cytogenetic investigations showed an unbalanced karyotype, 46,XX,10q+, which was de novo in origin. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) using three library probes (from chromosomes 10, 19, and 19q) and a YAC probe (from 10q telomere) showed that the additional material on 10q was derived from chromosome 19q. The patient had an unbalanced translocation, 46,XX,-10,+der(10)t(10;19)(q26.3; q13.3), which resulted in distal trisomy 19q. Few other cases of proven distal trisomy 19q are available for comparison of clinical features. Images PMID:8880586

  4. Type and location of isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations influence clinical characteristics and disease outcome of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Koszarska, Magdalena; Bors, Andras; Feczko, Angela; Meggyesi, Nora; Batai, Arpad; Csomor, Judit; Adam, Emma; Kozma, Andras; Orban, Tamas I; Lovas, Nora; Sipos, Andrea; Karaszi, Eva; Dolgos, Janos; Fekete, Sandor; Reichardt, Judit; Lehoczky, Eniko; Masszi, Tamas; Tordai, Attila; Andrikovics, Hajnalka

    2013-05-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) are genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The aim of our study was to investigate the frequency and prognostic effect of IDH1/2 mutations together followed by an individual analysis of each substitution in a Hungarian cohort consisting of 376 patients with AML. IDH1(mut) and IDH2(mut) were mutually exclusive, detected in 8.5% and 7.5% of cases, respectively. IDH1/2(mut) was associated with: older age (p = 0.001), higher average platelet count (p = 0.001), intermediate karyotype (p < 0.0001), NPM1(mut) (p = 0.022) and lower mRNA expression level of ABCG2 gene (p = 0.006). Overall survival (OS), remission and relapse rates were not different in IDH1(mut) or IDH2(mut) vs. IDH(neg). IDH1(mut) and IDH2(mut) were associated differently with NPM1(mut); co-occurrence was observed in 14.3% of IDH1 R132C vs. 70% of R132H carriers (p = 0.02) and in 47.4% of IDH2 R140Q vs. 0% of R172K carriers (p = 0.02). IDH1 R132H negatively influenced OS compared to IDH(neg) (p = 0.02) or R132C (p = 0.019). Particular amino acid changes affecting the same IDH1 codon influence the clinical characteristics and treatment outcome in AML. PMID:23039322

  5. Radio-chemotherapy improves survival in IDH-mutant, 1p/19q non-codeleted secondary high-grade astrocytoma patients.

    PubMed

    Juratli, Tareq A; Lautenschläger, Tim; Geiger, Kathrin D; Pinzer, Thomas; Krause, Mechthild; Schackert, Gabriele; Krex, Dietmar

    2015-09-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations are beginning to drive decisions on therapy for glioma patients. Here we sought to determine the impact of adjuvant treatment in patients with IDH-mutant, 1p/19q non-codeleted secondary high-grade astrocytoma (sHGA) WHO grades III/IV. Clinical data of 109 sHGA patients grades III/IV, in addition to IDH mutation-, 1p/19q-codeletion- and MGMT-promoter methylation status-were retrospectively analyzed. Survival analysis in relation to adjuvant treatment modalities and molecular profiling were performed. Out of 109 patients, 88 patients (80.7 %) harbored IDH mutations, 30 patients had a 1p/19q-codeletion (27.5 %) and 69 patients (63.3 %) exhibited a methylated MGMT-promoter status. At a median follow-up of 9.8 years, 62 patients (57 %) died. The postsurgical treatment included: radio-chemotherapy (RT-CT; 54.5 %), RT alone (19.3 %), and CT alone (22.7 %). The median overall survival (OS) in the entire group was 3.4 years (1.9-6.7 years). Patients who received RT-CT had a significantly longer OS compared with those who underwent RT alone (6.5 vs. 1.2 years, HR 0.35, CI 0.32-0.51, p = 0.011). In the IDH-mutant 1p/19q non-codeleted sHGA subgroup the RT-CT cohort had a significantly longer OS in comparison to the RT cohort (6.4 vs. 1.2 years, HR 2.7, CI 1.1-6.5, p = 0.022). In the stepwise multivariable Cox model for OS of all 88 IDH-mutant sHGA patients, survival was strongly associated with only one factor, namely, adjuvant RT-CT at diagnosis of a sHGA. This retrospective long-term study demonstrates that RT and CT (mostly PCV) significantly improves progression-free and overall survival in IDH-mutant secondary high-grade astrocytoma patients, regardless of 1p/19q-codeletion status. PMID:26033545

  6. The Clinical Significance of IDH Mutations in Essential Thrombocythemia and Primary Myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yonal-Hindilerden, Ipek; Daglar-Aday, Aynur; Hindilerden, Fehmi; Akadam-Teker, Basak; Yilmaz, Ceylan; Nalcaci, Meliha; Yavuz, Akif Selim; Sargin, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Background Limited data exist regarding impact of IDH mutations in Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPNs). Prognostic significance of IDH mutations was asessed in 184 Ph-negative MPN patients - 107 essential thrombocythemia (ET) and 77 primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Methods High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was used to detect IDH1 and IDH2 mutations. Results PMF and ET patients showed no significant difference for prevalence of IDH mutations. Mutant IDH (IDH1 or IDH2) was documented in five of PMF (6.5%) and two of ET patients (1.9%). IDH mutations in ET patients included one IDH1 R132C and one IDH2 R140Q. Of the five IDH-mutated PMF patients, four (80%) displayed IDH1 (three IDH1 R132C and one IDH1 R132S) and one (20%) carried IDH2 (IDH2 R140Q) mutation. Sixty percent (three in five) of IDH-mutated PMF patients carried JAK2V617F with following allele burdens: 31-50%, 5-12.5% and 31-50%, respectively. Three of 77 PMF patients (3.9%) simultaneously harbored IDH and JAK2V617F mutations. IDH mutations in PMF showed a trend towards higher rate in females (100% and 52.8%, respectively). Bleeding complications were significantly higher in IDH-mutated PMF patients compared to IDH wild-type counterparts. Trend towards a lower prevalance of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) use was present in IDH mutant PMF patients compared to wild-type counterparts (20% and 63.9%, respectively). Death rate was higher in IDH-mutated PMF patients compared to IDH wild-type PMF patients (60% and 15.3%). In univariate analysis, a significantly shorter leukemia-free survival (LFS) was observed in IDH-mutated PMF patients. Conclusions We conclude that IDH mutations indicate a risk for leukemic transformation in PMF. PMID:26668680

  7. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations: new opportunities for translational research

    PubMed Central

    Keum, Young-Sam; Choi, Bu Young

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, comprehensive genome-wide sequencing studies have enabled us to find out unexpected genetic alterations of metabolism in cancer. An example is the identification of arginine missense mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenases-1 and -2 (IDH1/2) in glioma, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chondrosarcomas, and cholangiocarcinoma. These alterations are closely associated with the production of a new stereospecific metabolite, (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2HG). A large number of follow-up studies have been performed to address the molecular mechanisms of IDH1/2 mutations underlying how these events contribute to malignant transformation. In the meanwhile, the development of selective mutant IDH1/2 chemical inhibitors is being actively pursued in the scientific community and pharmaceutical industry. The present review article briefly discusses the important findings that highlight the molecular mechanisms of IDH1/2 mutations in cancer and provides a current status for development of selective mutant IDH1/2 chemical inhibitors. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(5): 266-270] PMID:25787993

  8. P17.01CHROMOSOME ARM 9P LOSS OF HETEROZYGOSITY IS A MARKER OF SHORTER SURVIVAL IN 1P/19Q CO-DELETED ANAPLASTIC OLIGODENDROGLIOMA. A POLA NETWORK STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Alentorn, A.; Dehais, C.; Carpentier, C.; Mokhtari, K.; Ducray, F.; Figarella-Branger, D.; Delattre, J.; Idbaih, A.; (POLA)”, POLA Network “Prise en charge des OLigodendrogliomes Anaplasiques

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic or WHO grade III oligodendrogliomas (AO) are a heterogeneous subgroup of diffuse glial tumors in adults. Three major histomolecular subtypes with clinical relevance have been individualized: (i) 1p/19q co-deleted AO -80% of cases-, (ii) non 1p/19q co-deleted and IDH mutated AO -10% of cases- and (iii) non 1p/19q co-deleted and IDH wild-typeAO -10% of cases-. 1p/19q co-deleted AO, and to a lesser extent IDH mutated AO, have better prognosis and better response to treatment with a median survival of more than 10 years, as shown in two phase III international trials. We have recently shown that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in chromosome arm 9p, with copy number loss -CL LOH- or without -Copy Neutral LOH- is a frequent event in AO. Interestingly, 9p CN LOH, inducing gene under-expression, has biological significance. In the present study, we address the prognostic value of 9p loss in 1p/19q co-deleted AO. In the present study, 228 AO exhibiting 1p/19q co-deletion were included. All tumors were centrally reviewed in the setting of the French national network for high-grade oligodendroglial tumors (POLA network) that recruits prospectively newly diagnosed anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors. Tumor DNA was analyzed using high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis. In the entire series, 70/228 (1/3) harbored 9p loss including CN-LOH, homozygous loss or CL-LOH. 9p loss was associated with a worse prognosis in 1p19q co-deleted AO in univariate analysis (3-years OS of 98% vs. 74%, p < 0.001) whereas PFS at three years was not significantly different (3-years PFS of 88% vs. 66% p = 0.1). After adjustment for age, KPS, and treatment, multivariate analysis demonstrated 9p loss to be an independent prognostic factor for OS, p-value = 0.03, HR = 4.9 [1.2-16], but not for PFS. 1p19q co-deleted AO harboring 9p loss have shorter overall survival compared to their non 9p-lost counterparts in this prospective cohort. Further studies are needed to validate

  9. Structural analysis of oncogenic mutation of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Vidya

    2016-06-21

    Arginine to histidine mutation at position 132 (R132H) in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) led to reduced affinity of the respective enzymes for isocitrate and increased affinity for α-ketoglutarate (AKG) and NADPH. This phenomenon retarded oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to AKG and conferred a novel enzymatic activity that facilitated the reduction of AKG to d-2-hydroxyglutarate (d-2HG). The loss of isocitrate utilization and gain of 2HG production from IDH1 R132H had been taken up as a fundamental problem and to solve this, structural biology approaches were adopted. Interaction analysis was carried out to investigate the IDH1 substrate binding environment. The altered behaviour of mutant and native IDH1 in interaction analysis was explored by performing long-term molecular dynamics simulations (∼300 ns). This study reports a comprehensive atomic behaviour of the gain-of-function mutation (R132H) in the IDH1 enzyme which in turn provides a direction towards new therapeutics. PMID:27194485

  10. Deletion of 19q13 reveals clinical overlap with Dubowitz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Urquhart, Jill E; Williams, Simon G; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Bowers, Naomi; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Newman, William G

    2015-12-01

    Dubowitz syndrome is a presumed autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities: microcephaly, learning and developmental delay, growth failure, and a predisposition to allergies and eczema. There have been more than 150 individuals reported to have this diagnosis, but no unifying genetic alteration has been identified indicating genetic heterogeneity. We report on a pair of monozygotic twins diagnosed clinically with Dubowitz syndrome by Professor Dubowitz over 30 years ago and identified to have a de novo heterozygous 3.2-Mb deletion at 19q13.11q13.12. Exome sequencing did not identify either a putative pathogenic variant on the trans allele supporting recessive inheritance or any other causative sequence variants. Comparison of the phenotype in our cases shows considerable overlap with the 19q13.11 microdeletion syndrome, suggesting that a subset of individuals diagnosed with Dubowitz syndrome may be due to deletions at 19q13. Our finding further reinforces the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of Dubowitz syndrome. PMID:26377242

  11. Refinement of the cone-rod retinal dystrophy locus on chromosome 19q

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, C.Y.; Evans, K.; Bhattacharya, S.S.; Whittaker, J.L.; Fryer, A.; Weissenbach, J.

    1994-11-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) is a severe example of an inherited retinal dystrophy: ophthalmic diseases that as a group constitute the commonest causes of blindness in children in the developed world and account for a significant proportion of visual handicap in adults. Two case reports suggested loci for CRD-causing genes on chromosomes 18q and chromosome 17q. Recently, we reported the results of a total genome search that localized an autosomal dominant form of CRD to chromosome 19q in the region 19q13.1-q13.2. Since then, using data from a short tandem repeat-polymorphism linkage map of chromosome 19 and recently developed microsatellite markers in this region, we have been able to further refine the localization of the chromosome 19q CRD-causing gene. Seven new microsatellite markers were used to genotype 34 affected subjects, 22 unaffected subjects, and 15 spouses. Two-point, multipoint, and FASTMAP analyses were performed. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  12. 1p/19q-driven prognostic molecular classification for high-grade oligodendroglial tumors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haihui; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Xiaohui; Zeng, Wei; Jia, Wenqing; Wang, Junmei; Lin, Song

    2014-12-01

    The subjectivity in pathological diagnosis of anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) and uncertainty in designation of glioblastoma with oligodendroglioma component (GBMO) were two major dilemmas which puzzled neuro-pathologists and neurosurgeons. The present study was designed to project a molecular classification scheme based on the status of chromosome 1p and 19q. Patients (n = 117) with histological diagnosis of primary high-grade oligodendroglial tumors (HGOs) enrolled in the study. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosomes 1p and 19q was performed. Univariate analysis showed that higher tumor grade, 1p/19q maintenance and 1q/19p co polysomy were confirmed as risk factors in HGOs (P < 0.01). Accordingly, patients with HGOs were divided into four subtypes which conferred remarkably distinct prognosis based on the number of risk factors (0 risk factor: HGOs-1, 1 risk factor: HGOs-2, 2 risk factors: HGOs-3, 3 risk factors: HGOs-4). Cox regression model revealed that the tumor grade was no longer independently associated with survival, while the molecular classification scheme showed a marked prognostic significance (HR = 0.359, 95 % CI 0.261-0.494, P < 0.001 for progression-free survival (PFS); HR = 0.393, 95 % CI 0.283-0.546, P < 0.001 for overall survival (OS)). The classification scheme incorporating traditional pathology with molecular information can be served as a supplement of the current WHO classification system and contribute to the personalized treatment decision-making. PMID:25151507

  13. Single Arginine Mutation in Two Yeast Isocitrate Dehydrogenases: Biochemical Characterization and Functional Implication

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ping; Wei, Huanhuan; Cao, Zhengyu; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), a housekeeping gene, has drawn the attention of cancer experts. Mutation of the catalytic Arg132 residue of human IDH1 (HcIDH) eliminates the enzyme's wild-type isocitrate oxidation activity, but confer the mutant an ability of reducing α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). To examine whether an analogous mutation in IDHs of other eukaryotes could cause similar effects, two yeast mitochondrial IDHs, Saccharomyces cerevisiae NADP+-IDH1 (ScIDH1) and Yarrowia lipolytica NADP+-IDH (YlIDH), were studied. The analogous Arg residues (Arg148 of ScIDH1 and Arg141 of YlIDH) were mutated to His. The Km values of ScIDH1 R148H and YlIDH R141H for isocitrate were determined to be 2.4-fold and 2.2-fold higher, respectively, than those of the corresponding wild-type enzymes. The catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) of ScIDH1 R148H and YlIDH R141H for isocitrate oxidation were drastically reduced by 227-fold and 460-fold, respectively, of those of the wild-type enzymes. As expected, both ScIDH1 R148H and YlIDH R141H acquired the neomorphic activity of catalyzing α-KG to 2-HG, and the generation of 2-HG was confirmed using gas chromatography/time of flight-mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS). Kinetic analysis showed that ScIDH1 R148H and YlIDH R141H displayed 5.2-fold and 3.3-fold higher affinities, respectively, for α-KG than the HcIDH R132H mutant. The catalytic efficiencies of ScIDH1 R148H and YlIDH R141H for α-KG were 5.5-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, of that of the HcIDH R132H mutant. Since the HcIDH Arg132 mutation is associated with the tumorigenesis, this study provides fundamental information for further research on the physiological role of this IDH mutation in vivo using yeast. PMID:25502799

  14. A combination of TERT promoter mutation and MGMT methylation status predicts clinically relevant subgroups of newly diagnosed glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Arita, Hideyuki; Yamasaki, Kai; Matsushita, Yuko; Nakamura, Taishi; Shimokawa, Asanao; Takami, Hirokazu; Tanaka, Shota; Mukasa, Akitake; Shirahata, Mitsuaki; Shimizu, Saki; Suzuki, Kaori; Saito, Kuniaki; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Higuchi, Fumi; Uzuka, Takeo; Otani, Ryohei; Tamura, Kaoru; Sumita, Kazutaka; Ohno, Makoto; Miyakita, Yasuji; Kagawa, Naoki; Hashimoto, Naoya; Hatae, Ryusuke; Yoshimoto, Koji; Shinojima, Naoki; Nakamura, Hideo; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Okita, Yoshiko; Kinoshita, Manabu; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Shofuda, Tomoko; Kodama, Yoshinori; Mori, Kanji; Tomogane, Yusuke; Fukai, Junya; Fujita, Koji; Terakawa, Yuzo; Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro; Moriuchi, Shusuke; Nonaka, Masahiro; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Shibuya, Makoto; Maehara, Taketoshi; Saito, Nobuhito; Nagane, Motoo; Kawahara, Nobutaka; Ueki, Keisuke; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Miyaoka, Etsuo; Nishikawa, Ryo; Komori, Takashi; Narita, Yoshitaka; Ichimura, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic impact of TERT mutations has been controversial in IDH-wild tumors, particularly in glioblastomas (GBM). The controversy may be attributable to presence of potential confounding factors such as MGMT methylation status or patients' treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of TERT status on patient outcome in association with various factors in a large series of adult diffuse gliomas. We analyzed a total of 951 adult diffuse gliomas from two cohorts (Cohort 1, n = 758; Cohort 2, n = 193) for IDH1/2, 1p/19q, and TERT promoter status. The combined IDH/TERT classification divided Cohort 1 into four molecular groups with distinct outcomes. The overall survival (OS) was the shortest in IDH wild-type/TERT mutated groups, which mostly consisted of GBMs (P < 0.0001). To investigate the association between TERT mutations and MGMT methylation on survival of patients with GBM, samples from a combined cohort of 453 IDH-wild-type GBM cases treated with radiation and temozolomide were analyzed. A multivariate Cox regression model revealed that the interaction between TERT and MGMT was significant for OS (P = 0.0064). Compared with TERT mutant-MGMT unmethylated GBMs, the hazard ratio (HR) for OS incorporating the interaction was the lowest in the TERT mutant-MGMT methylated GBM (HR, 0.266), followed by the TERT wild-type-MGMT methylated (HR, 0.317) and the TERT wild-type-MGMT unmethylated GBMs (HR, 0.542). Thus, patients with TERT mutant-MGMT unmethylated GBM have the poorest prognosis. Our findings suggest that a combination of IDH, TERT, and MGMT refines the classification of grade II-IV diffuse gliomas. PMID:27503138

  15. IDH mutation is associated with higher risk of malignant transformation in low-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Leu, Severina; von Felten, Stefanie; Frank, Stephan; Boulay, Jean-Louis; Mariani, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Acquisition of IDH1 or IDH2 mutation (IDHmut) is among the earliest genetic events that take place in the development of most low-grade glioma (LGG). IDHmut has been associated with longer overall patient survival. However, its impact on malignant transformation (MT) remains to be defined. A collection of 210 archived adult LGG previously stratified by IDHmut, MGMT methylation (MGMTmet), 1p/19q combined loss of heterozygosity (1p19qloh) and TP53 immunopositivity (TP53pos) status was analyzed. We used multistate models to assess MT-free survival, considering one initial, one transient (MT), and one absorbing state (death). Missing explanatory variables were multiply imputed. Overall, although associated with a lower risk of death (HR(DEATH) = 0.35, P = 0.0023), IDHmut had a non-significantly higher risk of MT (HR(MT) = 1.84; P = 0.1683) compared to IDH wild type (IDHwt). The double combination of IDHmut and MGMTmet and the triple combination of IDHmut, MGMTmet and 1p/19qloh, despite significantly lower hazards for death (HR(DEATH) versus IDHwt: 0.35, P = 0.0194 and 0.15, P = 0.0008, respectively), had non-significantly different hazards for MT. Conversely, the triple combination of IDHmut/MGMTmet/TP53pos, with a non-significantly different hazard for death, had a significantly higher hazard for MT than IDHwt (HR(MT) versus IDHwt: 2.83; P = 0.0452). Although IDHmut status is associated with longer overall patient survival, all IDHmut/MGMTmet subsets consistently showed higher risks of MT than of death, compared to IDHwt LGG. This supports the findings that molecular events relevant to IDH mutations impact early glioma development prior to malignant transformation. PMID:26780338

  16. Establishment of novel monoclonal antibodies KMab-1 and MMab-1 specific for IDH2 mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Mika Kato; Morita, Shunpei; Tsujimoto, Yuta; Yanagiya, Ryo; Nasu, Kana; Sasaki, Hiroko; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Goto, Kaoru; Natsume, Atsushi; Watanabe, Mika; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Takano, Shingo; Kato, Yukinari

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► IDH1/2 mutations are early and frequent genetic alterations in gliomas. ► We established anti-mutated IDH2-specific mAbs KMab-1 and MMab-1. ► KMab-1 or MMab-1 specifically reacted with mutated IDH2 in ELISA. ► MMab-1 specifically stained IDH2-R172M-expressing CHO cells in ICC. ► MMab-1 specifically stained IDH2-R172M-expressing gliomas in IHC. - Abstract: Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH1/2) mutations have been detected in gliomas, cartilaginous tumors, and leukemias. IDH1/2 mutations are early and frequent genetic alterations, are specific to a single codon in the conserved and functionally important Arginine 132 (R132) in IDH1 and Arginine 172 (R172) in IDH2. We previously established several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which are specific for IDH1 mutations: clones IMab-1 or HMab-1 against IDH1-R132H or clone SMab-1 against IDH1-R132S. However, specific mAbs against IDH2 mutations have not been reported. To establish IDH2-mutation-specific mAbs, we immunized mice or rats with each mutation-containing IDH2 peptides including IDH2-R172K and IDH2-R172M. After cell fusion, IDH2 mutation-specific mAbs were screened in Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Established mAbs KMab-1 and MMab-1 reacted with the IDH2-R172K and IDH2-R172M peptides, respectively, but not with IDH2-wild type (WT) in ELISA. Western-blot analysis also showed that KMab-1 and MMab-1 reacted with the IDH2-R172K and IDH2-R172M recombinant proteins, respectively, not with IDH2-WT or other IDH2 mutants, indicating that KMab-1 and MMab-1 are IDH2-mutation-specific. Furthermore, MMab-1 specifically stained the IDH2-R172M-expressing cells in immunocytochemistry, but did not stain IDH2-WT and other IDH2-mutation-containing cells. In immunohistochemical analysis, MMab-1 specifically stained IDH2-R172M-expressing glioma. This is the first report to establish anti-IDH2-mutation-specific mAbs, which could be useful in diagnosis of mutation-bearing tumors.

  17. D-2-Hydroxyglutarate producing neo-enzymatic activity inversely correlates with frequency of the type of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutations found in glioma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background IDH mutations frequently occur in diffuse gliomas and result in a neo-enzymatic activity that results in reduction of α-ketoglutarate to D-2-hydroxyglutarate. In gliomas, the frequency of IDH1 mutations in codon 132 increases in the order R132L-R132S-R132G-R132C-R132H with R132H constituting more than 90% of all IDH1 mutations. Results We determined the levels of D-2-hydroxyglutarate in glioma tissues with IDH1 mutations. D-2-hydroxyglutarate levels increased in the order of R132H-R132C-R132S/R132G/R132L. We expressed and purified IDH1 wild type and mutant protein for biochemical characterization. Enzyme kinetics of mutant IDH protein correlated well with D-2-hydroxyglutarate production in cells with R132H exhibiting the highest and R132L the lowest KM for α-ketoglutarate. Addition of D-2-hydroxyglutarate to the medium of cell lines revealed an inhibitory effect at higher concentrations. Migration of LN229 increased at lower D-2-hydroxyglutarate concentrations while higher concentrations showed no effect. Conclusion These findings may suggest natural selection against the rare IDH1R132 mutations in human glioma due to toxicity caused by high levels of D-2-hydroxyglutarate. PMID:24529257

  18. The 19q12 bladder cancer GWAS signal: association with cyclin E function and aggressive disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi-Ping; Kohaar, Indu; Moore, Lee E.; Lenz, Petra; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Tang, Wei; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Scott-Johnson, Alexandra; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Muchmore, Brian; Baris, Dalsu; Paquin, Ashley; Ylaya, Kris; Schwenn, Molly; Apolo, Andrea B.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Tarway, McAnthony; Johnson, Alison; Mumy, Adam; Schned, Alan; Guedez, Liliana; Jones, Michael A.; Kida, Masatoshi; Monawar Hosain, GM; Malats, Nuria; Kogevinas, Manolis; Tardon, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Wu, Xifeng; Purdue, Mark; Andriole, Gerald L.; Grubb, Robert L.; Black, Amanda; Landi, Maria T.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Vineis, Paolo; Siddiq, Afshan; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ljungberg, Börje; Severi, Gianluca; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Travis, Ruth C.; Tjønneland, Anne; Brennan, Paul; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Riboli, Elio; Prescott, Jennifer; Chen, Constance; De Vivo, Immaculata; Govannucci, Edward; Hunter, David; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Gapstur, Susan M.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Kooperberg, Charles; Hohensee, Chancellor; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Conti, David V.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Stern, Mariana C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Yuan, Jian-Min; Haiman, Christopher A.; Cussenot, Olivier; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Roupret, Morgan; Comperat, Eva; Porru, Stefano; Carta, Angela; Pavanello, Sofia; Arici, Cecilia; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Grossman, H. Barton; Wang, Zhaoming; Deng, Xiang; Chung, Charles C.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Wheeler, William; Fraumeni, Joseph; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Silverman, Debra T.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bladder cancer identified a genetic marker rs8102137 within the 19q12 region as a novel susceptibility variant. This marker is located upstream of the CCNE1 gene, which encodes cyclin E, a cell cycle protein. We performed genetic fine mapping analysis of the CCNE1 region using data from two bladder cancer GWAS (5,942 cases and 10,857 controls). We found that the original GWAS marker rs8102137 represents a group of 47 linked SNPs (with r2≥0.7) associated with increased bladder cancer risk. From this group we selected a functional promoter variant rs7257330, which showed strong allele-specific binding of nuclear proteins in several cell lines. In both GWAS, rs7257330 was associated only with aggressive bladder cancer, with a combined per-allele odds ratio (OR) =1.18 (95%CI=1.09-1.27, p=4.67×10−5 vs. OR =1.01 (95%CI=0.93-1.10, p=0.79) for non-aggressive disease, with p=0.0015 for case-only analysis. Cyclin E protein expression analyzed in 265 bladder tumors was increased in aggressive tumors (p=0.013) and, independently, with each rs7257330-A risk allele (ptrend=0.024). Over-expression of recombinant cyclin E in cell lines caused significant acceleration of cell cycle. In conclusion, we defined the 19q12 signal as the first GWAS signal specific for aggressive bladder cancer. Molecular mechanisms of this genetic association may be related to cyclin E over-expression and alteration of cell cycle in carriers of CCNE1 risk variants. In combination with established bladder cancer risk factors and other somatic and germline genetic markers, the CCNE1 variants could be useful for inclusion into bladder cancer risk prediction models. PMID:25320178

  19. An informative panel of somatic cell hybrids for physical mapping on human chromosome 19q.

    PubMed Central

    Bachinski, L L; Krahe, R; White, B F; Wieringa, B; Shaw, D; Korneluk, R; Thompson, L H; Johnson, K; Siciliano, M J

    1993-01-01

    A panel of 22 somatic cell hybrids divides the q arm of human chromosome 19 into 22 ordered subregions. The panel was characterized with respect to 41 genetic markers. In most cases, a single fragment of chromosome 19 was present in each hybrid. In two cell lines the presence of multiple fragments of the chromosome was demonstrated by segregation of these fragments in subclones. On the basis of the results of marker analysis in this panel, the most likely order of the markers tested is MANB-D19S7-PEPD-D19S9-GPI-C/EBP-TGFB1++ +-(CYP2A,BCKDHA,CGM2,NCA)-PSG1-(D19S8, XRCC1)-(ATP1A3,D19S19)-(D19S37,APOC2)-C KM-ERCC2-ERCC1-(D19S116,D19S117)- (D19S118,D19S119, D19S63,p36.1,D19S112,D19S62,D19S51,D19S54, D19S55)-pW39-D19S6-(D19S50,TNNT1)-D19S2 2-(HRC,CGB,FTL,PRKCG)-qter. This gene order is generally consistent with published physical and genetic mapping orders, although some discrepancies exist. By means of a mapping function that relates the frequency of cosegregation of markers to the distance between them, estimates were made of the sizes, in megabases, of the 19q subregions. The relative physical distances between reference markers were compared with published genetic distances for 19q. Excellent correlation was observed, suggesting that the physical distances calculated by this method are predictive of genetic distances in this region of the genome and, therefore, are just as useful in estimating relative positions of markers. Images Figure 1 PMID:8430698

  20. 19q13.33→qter trisomy in a girl with intellectual impairment and seizures

    PubMed Central

    Carvalheira, Gianna; Oliveira, Mariana Moysés; Takeno, Sylvia; Lima, Fernanda Teresa de; Meloni, Vera Ayres; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Rearrangements in chromosome 19 are rare. Among the 35 patients with partial 19q trisomy described, only six have a breakpoint defined by array. The 19q duplication results in a variable phenotype, including dysmorphisms, intellectual disability and seizure. In a female patient, although G-banding at 550 band-resolution was normal, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique and genomic array showed a 10.6 Mb terminal duplication of chromosome 19q13. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed that the duplicated region was attached to the short arm of chromosome 21 and silver staining showed four small acrocentrics with nucleolar organization region (NOR) activity, suggesting that the breakpoint in chromosome 21 was at p13. This is the first de novo translocation between 19q13.33 and 21p13 described in liveborn. The chromosome 19 is known to be rich in coding and non-coding regions, and chromosomal rearrangements involving this chromosome are very harmful. Furthermore, the 19q13.33→qter region is dense in pseudogenes and microRNAs, which are potent regulators of gene expression. The trisomic level of this region may contribute to deregulation of global gene expression, and consequently, may lead to abnormal development on the carriers of these rearrangements. PMID:25606462

  1. Overexpression of CEBPA resulting from the translocation t(14;19)(q32;q13) of human precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chapiro, Elise; Russell, Lisa; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Bastard, Christian; Lessard, Michel; Struski, Stephanie; Cave, Helene; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Barin, Carole; Maarek, Odile; Della-Valle, Veronique; Strefford, Jonathan C; Berger, Roland; Harrison, Christine J; Bernard, Olivier A; Nguyen-Khac, Florence

    2006-11-15

    Subtle variation in the expression or function of a small group of transcription factors can drive leukemogenesis. The CEBPA protein is known to regulate the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation during early hematopoietic development and myeloid differentiation. In human myeloid leukemia, CEBPA is frequently inactivated by mutation and indirect and posttranslational mechanisms, in keeping with tumor suppressor properties. We report that CEBPA is activated by juxtaposition to the immunoglobulin gene enhancer upon its rearrangement with the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus in precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia harboring t(14;19)(q32;q13). Overexpression of apparently normal CEBPA RNA or protein was observed in 6 patients. These data indicate that CEBPA may exhibit oncogenic as well as tumor suppressor properties in human leukemogenesis. PMID:16873674

  2. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of 19q12q13.1 deletions: a report of five patients.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shimul; Bandholz, Anne M; Parkash, Sandhya; Dyack, Sarah; Rideout, Andrea L; Leppig, Kathleen A; Thiese, Heidi; Wheeler, Patricia G; Tsang, Marilyn; Ballif, Blake C; Shaffer, Lisa G; Torchia, Beth S; Ellison, Jay W; Rosenfeld, Jill A

    2014-01-01

    A syndrome associated with 19q13.11 microdeletions has been proposed based on seven previous cases that displayed developmental delay, intellectual disability, speech disturbances, pre- and post-natal growth retardation, microcephaly, ectodermal dysplasia, and genital malformations in males. A 324-kb critical region was previously identified as the smallest region of overlap (SRO) for this syndrome. To further characterize this microdeletion syndrome, we present five patients with deletions within 19q12q13.12 identified using a whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray. Patients 1 and 2 possess deletions overlapping the SRO, and Patients 3-5 have deletions proximal to the SRO. Patients 1 and 2 share significant phenotypic overlap with previously reported cases, providing further definition of the 19q13.11 microdeletion syndrome phenotype, including the first presentation of ectrodactyly in the syndrome. Patients 3-5, whose features include developmental delay, growth retardation, and feeding problems, support the presence of dosage-sensitive genes outside the SRO that may contribute to the abnormal phenotypes observed in this syndrome. Multiple genotype-phenotype correlations outside the SRO are explored, including further validation of the deletion of WTIP as a candidate for male hypospadias observed in this syndrome. We postulate that unique patient-specific deletions within 19q12q13.1 may explain the phenotypic variability observed in this emerging contiguous gene deletion syndrome. PMID:24243649

  3. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome: confirmation of linkage to chromosome 19p13.3 and identification of a potential second locus, on 19q13.4.

    PubMed Central

    Mehenni, H; Blouin, J L; Radhakrishna, U; Bhardwaj, S S; Bhardwaj, K; Dixit, V B; Richards, K F; Bermejo-Fenoll, A; Leal, A S; Raval, R C; Antonarakis, S E

    1997-01-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal dominant disease with variable expression and incomplete penetrance, characterized by mucocutaneous pigmentation and hamartomatous polyposis. Patients with PJS have increased frequency of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal malignancies (ovaries, testes, and breast). In order to map the locus (or loci) associated with PJS, we performed a genomewide linkage analysis, using DNA polymorphisms in six families (two from Spain, two from India, one from the United States, and one from Portugal) comprising a total of 93 individuals, including 39 affected and 48 unaffected individuals and 6 individuals with unknown status. During this study, localization of a PJS gene to 19p13.3 (around marker D19S886) had been reported elsewhere. For our families, marker D19S886 yielded a maximum LOD score of 4.74 at a recombination fraction (theta) of .045; multipoint linkage analysis resulted in a LOD score of 7.51 for the interval between D19S886 and 19 pter. However, markers on 19q13.4 also showed significant evidence for linkage. For example, D19S880 resulted in a maximum LOD score of 3.8 at theta = .13. Most of this positive linkage was contributed by a single family, PJS07. These results confirm the mapping of a common PJS locus on 19p13.3 but also suggest the existence, in a minority of families, of a potential second PJS locus, on 19q13.4. Positional cloning and characterization of the PJS mutations will clarify the genetics of the syndrome and the implication of the gene(s) in the predisposition to neoplasias. PMID:9399902

  4. Polymorphism at 19q13.41 predicts breast cancer survival specifically after endocrine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sofia; Fagerholm, Rainer; Rafiq, Sajjad; Tapper, William; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Liu, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although most estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients benefit from endocrine therapies, a significant proportion do not. Our aim was to identify inherited genetic variations that might predict survival among patients receiving adjuvant endocrine therapies. Experimental Design We performed a meta-analysis of two genome-wide studies; Helsinki Breast Cancer Study, 805 patients, with 240 receiving endocrine therapy and Prospective study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer, 536 patients, with 155 endocrine therapy-patients, evaluating 486,478 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The top four associations from the endocrine treatment subgroup were further investigated in two independent datasets totalling 5011 patients, with 3485 receiving endocrine therapy. Results A meta-analysis identified a common SNP rs8113308, mapped to 19q13.41, associating with reduced survival among endocrine treated patients (hazard ratio (HR) 1.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37-2.07, P = 6.34 ×10−7) and improved survival among ER-negative patients, with a similar trend in ER-positive cases not receiving endocrine therapy. In a multivariate analysis adjusted for conventional prognostic factors, we found a significant interaction between the rs8113308 and endocrine treatment indicating a predictive, treatment-specific effect of the SNP rs8113308 on breast cancer survival, with the per-allele HR for interaction 2.16 (95% CI 1.30 – 3.60, Pinteraction = 0.003) and HR=7.77 (95% CI 0.93 – 64.71) for the homozygous genotype carriers. A biological rationale is suggested by in silico functional analyses. Conclusions Our findings suggest carrying the rs8113308 rare allele may identify patients who will not benefit from adjuvant endocrine treatment. PMID:25964295

  5. Evidence for a major retinitis pigmentosa locus on 19q13.4 (RP11) and association with a unique bimodal expressivity phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maghtheh, M.; Vithana, E.; Tarttelin, E.; Jay, M.; Evans, K.; Moore, T.; Bhattacharya, S.; Inglehearn, C. F.

    1996-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the name given to a heterogeneous group of retinal degenerations mapping to at least 16 loci. The autosomal dominant form (ARP), accounting for approximately 25% of cases, can be caused by mutations in two genes, rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS, and by at least six other loci identified by linkage analysis. The RP11 locus for adRP has previously been mapped to chromosome 19q13.4 in a large English family. This linkage has been independently confirmed in a Japanese family, and we now report three additional unrelated linked U.K. families, suggesting that this is a major locus for RP. Linkage analysis in the U.K. families refines the RP11 interval to 5 cM between markers D19S180 and AFMc001yb1. All linked families exhibit incomplete penetrance; some obligate gene carriers remain asymptomatic throughout their lives, whereas symptomatic individuals experience night blindness and visual field loss in their teens and are generally registered as blind by their 30s. This "bimodal expressivity" contrasts with the variable-expressivity RP mapping to chromosome 7p (RP9) in another family, which has implications for diagnosis and counseling of RP11 families. These results may also imply that a proportion of sporadic RP, previously assumed to be recessive, might result from mutations at this locus. PMID:8808602

  6. Evidence for a major retinitis pigmentosa locus on 19q13.4 (RP11), and association with a unique bimodal expressivity phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Maghtheh, M.; Vithana, E.; Tarttelin, E.; Evans, K.

    1996-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the name given to a heterogeneous group of retinal degenerations mapping to at least 16 loci. The autosomal dominant form (adRP), accounting for {approximately}25% of cases, can be caused by mutations in two genes, rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS, and by at least six other loci identified by linkage analysis. The RP11 locus for adRP has previously been mapped to chromosome 19q13.4 in a large English family. This linkage has been independently confirmed in a Japanese family, and we now report three additional unrelated linked U.K. families, suggesting that this is a major locus for RP. Linkage analysis in the U.K. families refines the RP11 interval to 5 cM between markers D19S180 and AFMc001yb1. All linked families exhibit incomplete penetrance; some obligate gene carriers remain asymptomatic throughout their lives, whereas symptomatic individuals experience night blindness and visual field loss in their teens and are generally registered as blind by their 30s. This {open_quotes}bimodal expressivity{close_quotes} contrasts with the variable-expressivity RP mapping to chromosome 7p (RP9) in another family, which has implications for diagnosis and counseling of RP11 families. These results may also imply that a proportion of sporadic RP, previously assumed to be recessive, might result from mutations at this locus. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Combination genetic signature stratifies lower-grade gliomas better than histological grade

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Shi, Zhifeng; Chen, Liang; Chung, Nellie Yuk-Fei; Liu, Joseph Shu-Ming; Li, Kay Ka-Wai; Chan, Danny Tat-Ming; Poon, Wai Sang; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Liangfu; Ng, Ho-Keung

    2015-01-01

    We studied if combination genetic signature potentially stratifies lower-grade gliomas better than histology by investigating 214 lower-grade gliomas for IDH1/2 and TERTp mutations, 1p/19q codeletion and EGFR amplification as to their impact on prognostication. Prognostic association of grading was independent of other prognostic variables including age, histological type, IDH1/2, 1p/19q and TERTp status. No single marker, including IDH1/2, superseded grading in prognostication, indicating grading was still a very important tool. Prognosis was most favorable in 31.7% of patients with IDH1/2 mutation and either 1p/19q codeletion or TERTp mutation (IDHmut-OT), intermediate in 45.8% of patients with IDH1/2 mutation only (IDHmut) and 16.9% of patients without any of the alterations (IDHwt), and poorest in 5.6% of patients with wild-type IDH1/2 and either TERTp mutation or EGFR amplification (IDHwt-ET). Our results suggested not all IDH1/2 wild-type lower-grade gliomas are aggressive and additional biomarkers are required to identify glioblastoma-equivalent tumors. Multivariate analysis revealed independent prognostic values of grading and genetic signature. Grade II IDHwt-ET gliomas exhibited shorter survival than IDH1/2 mutated grade III gliomas, suggesting combination genetic signature potentially superseded grading in prognostication. In summary, biomarker-based stratification is useful in the diagnosis and prognostication of lower-grade gliomas, and should be used together with grading. PMID:26369702

  8. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation is associated with tumor location and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics in astrocytic neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    QI, SONGTAO; YU, LEI; LI, HEZHEN; OU, YANGHUI; QIU, XIAOYU; DING, YANQING; HAN, HUIXIA; ZHANG, XUELIN

    2014-01-01

    The molecular subsets of glioma behave in biologically distinct ways. The present study detected isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and IDH2 mutations in glioma to analyze whether IDH-mutated gliomas are situated in certain preferential areas and to investigate their correlation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics. A series of 193 patients with astrocytic neoplasms (111 diffuse and 82 anaplastic astrocytomas), grouped according to prelabeled anatomical structures and the risk of surgery, were retrospectively reviewed for IDH1 and IDH2 mutations to compare the tumor location and MRI features. A total of 111 IDH1 mutations at codon 132 (57.5%) and six IDH2 mutations at codon 172 (3.1%) were detected. The IDH1/2 mutations were found to predict longer survival, independent of the histological type in this series of patients. The IDH-mutated gliomas were predominantly located in a single lobe, such as the frontal lobe, temporal lobe or cerebellum and rarely in the diencephalon or brain stem. Furthermore, according to the risk of surgery, the IDH-mutated tumors were rarely located in the high-risk regions of the brain, where surgery exhibits a high mortality rate intraoperatively and postoperatively. In addition, gliomas with IDH mutations were significantly more likely to exhibit a unilateral pattern of growth, sharp tumor margins, homogeneous signal intensity and less contrast enhancement on MRI. The results of the current study suggested that the prolonged survival of patients with IDH-mutated gliomas is primarily due to a less aggressive biological behavior according to tumor site and MRI features. PMID:24932255

  9. IDH mutation status and role of WHO grade and mitotic index in overall survival in grade II–III diffuse gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Olar, Adriana; Wani, Khalida M; Diefes, Kristin; Heathcock, Lindsey E.; van Thuijl, Hinke F.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Armstrong, Terri S.; Sulman, Erik P.; Cahill, Daniel P.; Vera-Bolanos, Elizabeth; Yuan, Ying; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Ylstra, Bauke; Wesseling, Pieter; Aldape, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse gliomas are up till now graded based upon morphology. Recent findings indicate that isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation status defines biologically distinct groups of tumors. The role of tumor grade and mitotic index in patient outcome has not been evaluated following stratification by IDH mutation status. To address this, we interrogated 558 WHO grade II–III diffuse gliomas for IDH1/2 mutations and investigated the prognostic impact of WHO grade within IDH-mutant and wild-type tumor subsets independently. The prognostic impact of grade was modest in IDH-mutant [hazard ratio (HR)=1.21, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.91–1.61] compared to IDH-wild type tumors (HR=1.74, 95% CI=0.95–3.16). Using a dichotomized mitotic index cut-off of 4/1000 tumor cells, we found that while mitotic index was significantly associated with outcome in IDH-wild type tumors (log-rank p<0.0001, HR=4.41, 95% CI=2.55–7.63), it was not associated with outcome in IDH-mutant tumors (log-rank p=0.5157, HR=1.10, 95% CI=0.80–1.51), and could demonstrate a statistical interaction (p<0.0001) between IDH mutation and mitotic index (i.e. suggesting that the effect of mitotic index on patient outcome is dependent on IDH mutation status). Patient age, an established prognostic factor in diffuse glioma, was significantly associated with outcome only in the IDH-wild type subset, and consistent with prior data, 1p/19q co-deletion conferred improved outcome in the IDH-mutant cohort. These findings suggest that stratification of grade II–III gliomas into subsets defined by the presence or absence of IDH mutation leads to subgroups with distinct prognostic characteristics. Further evaluation of grading criteria and prognostic markers is warranted within IDH-mutant versus IDH-wild type diffuse grade II–III gliomas as independent entities. PMID:25701198

  10. Prognostic Relevance of Histomolecular Classification of Diffuse Adult High-Grade Gliomas with Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Mokhtari, Karima; Colin, Carole; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Jouvet, Anne; Dehais, Caroline; Carpentier, Catherine; Villa, Chiara; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Eimer, Sandrine; Polivka, Marc; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Laquerriere, Annie; Sevestre, Henri; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Viennet, Gabriel; Adam, Clovis; Loussouarn, Delphine; Michalak, Sophie; Rigau, Valérie; Heitzmann, Anne; Vandenbos, Fanny; Forest, Fabien; Chiforeanu, Danchristian; Tortel, Marie-Claire; Labrousse, François; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Varlet, Pascale; Kemeny, Jean Louis; Levillain, Pierre-Marie; Cazals-Hatem, Dominique; Richard, Pomone; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2015-07-01

    Diffuse adult high-grade gliomas (HGGs) with necrosis encompass anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs) with necrosis (grade III), glioblastomas (GBM, grade IV) and glioblastomas with an oligodendroglial component (GBMO, grade IV). Here, we aimed to search for prognostic relevance of histological classification and molecular alterations of these tumors. About 210 patients were included (63 AO, 56 GBM and 91 GBMO). GBMO group was split into "anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) with necrosis grade IV/GBMO," restricted to tumors showing intermingled astrocytic and oligodendroglial component, and "GBM/GBMO" based on tumors presenting oligodendroglial foci and features of GBM. Genomic arrays, IDH1 R132H expression analyses and IDH direct sequencing were performed. 1p/19q co-deletion characterized AO, whereas no IDH1 R132H expression and intact 1p/19q characterized both GBM and GBM/GBMO. AOA with necrosis/GBMO mainly demonstrated IDH1 R132H expression and intact 1p/19q. Other IDH1 or IDH2 mutations were extremely rare. Both histological and molecular classifications were predictive of progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (P < 10(-4) ). Diffuse adult HGGs with necrosis can be split into three histomolecular groups of prognostic relevance: 1p/19q co-deleted AO, IDH1 R132H-GBM and 1p/19q intact IDH1 R132H+ gliomas that might be classified as IDH1 R132H+ GBM. Because of histomolecular heterogeneity, we suggest to remove the name GBMO. PMID:25407774

  11. Glioma-derived mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 beneficial to traditional chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yuejun; Huang, Rui; Zheng, Yali; Zhang, Zhiyun; Liang, Aihua

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are not detected in the rat C6 glioma cell line model. {yields} IDH2 mutations are not required for the tumorigenesis of glioma. {yields} IDH2{sup R172G} can sensitize glioma sensitivity to chemotherapy through NADPH levels. {yields} IDH2{sup R172G} can give a benefit to traditional chemotherapy of glioma. {yields} This finding serves as an important complement to existing research on this topic. -- Abstract: Heterozygous mutations in either the R132 residue of isocitrate dehydrogenase I (IDH1) or the R172 residue of IDH2 in human gliomas were recently highlighted. In the present study, we report that mutations of IDH1 and IDH2 are not detected in the rat C6 glioma cell line model, which suggests that these mutations are not required for the development of glioblastoma induced by N,N'-nitroso-methylurea. The effects of IDH2 and IDH2{sup R172G} on C6 cells proliferation and sensitivity to chemotherapy and the possible mechanism are analyzed at the cellular level. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations lead to simultaneous loss and gain of activities in the production of {alpha}-ketoglutarate ({alpha}-KG) and 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), respectively, and result in lowering NADPH levels even further. The low NADPH levels can sensitize tumors to chemotherapy, and account for the prolonged survival of patients harboring the mutations. Our data extrapolate potential importance of the in vitro rat C6 glioma cell model, show that the IDH2{sup R172G} mutation in gliomas may give a benefit to traditional chemotherapy of this cancer and serve as an important complement to existing research on this topic.

  12. Targetable signaling pathway mutations are associated with malignant phenotype in IDH-mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Shota; Curry, William T.; Loebel, Franziska; Zhao, Dan; Tateishi, Kensuke; Chen, Juxiang; Klofas, Lindsay K.; Lelic, Nina; Kim, James C.; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Ellisen, Leif W.; Borger, Darrell R.; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Iafrate, A. John; Cahill, Daniel P.; Chi, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutations occur in low-grade and high-grade gliomas. We sought to identify the genetic basis of malignant phenotype heterogeneity in IDH-mutant gliomas. METHODS We prospectively implanted tumor specimens from 20 consecutive IDH1-mutant glioma resections into mouse brains and genotyped all resection specimens using a CLIA-certified molecular panel. Gliomas with cancer driver mutations were tested for sensitivity to targeted inhibitors in vitro. Associations between genomic alterations and outcomes were analyzed in patients. RESULTS By 10 months, 8 of 20 IDH1-mutant gliomas developed intracerebral xenografts. All xenografts maintained mutant IDH1 and high levels of 2-hydroxyglutarate on serial transplantation. All xenograft-producing gliomas harbored “lineage-defining” mutations in CIC (oligodendroglioma) or TP53 (astrocytoma), and 6 of 8 additionally had activating mutations in PIK3CA or amplification of PDGFRA, MET or N-MYC. Only IDH1 and CIC/TP53 mutations were detected in non-xenograft-forming gliomas (P=.0007). Targeted inhibition of the additional alterations decreased proliferation in vitro. Moreover, we detected alterations in known cancer driver genes in 13.4% of IDH-mutant glioma patients, including PIK3CA, KRAS, AKT or PTEN mutation or PDGFRA, MET or N-MYC amplification. IDH/CIC mutant tumors were associated with PIK3CA/KRAS mutations while IDH/TP53 tumors correlated with PDGFRA/MET amplification. Presence of driver alterations at progression was associated with shorter subsequent progression-free survival (median 9.0 vs. 36.1 months, P=.0011). CONCLUSION A subset of IDH-mutant gliomas with mutations in driver oncogenes has a more malignant phenotype in patients. Identification of these alterations may provide an opportunity for use of targeted therapies in these patients. PMID:24714777

  13. Shared allelic losses on chromosomes 1p and 19q suggest a common origin of oligodendroglioma and oligoastrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, J.A.; Koopmann, J.; Kaskel, P.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in specific chromosomal regions, which are likely to harbor tumor suppressor genes, has been associated with human gliomas. In this study we have analyzed astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors for LOH on chromosomes 1 and 19. By microsatellite analysis LOH was found on chromosome arm 1p in 6/15 oligodendrogliomas WHO grade II and III, 12/25 oligoastrocytomas WHO grade II and III, 6/79 glioblastomas WHO grade IV, 5/44 astrocytomas WHO grade II and III and 0/23 pilocystic astrocytomas WHO grade I. The high incidence of LOH on chromosome arm 1p in oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas indicates that a putative tumor suppressor gene in this region is involved in the formation of gliomas with oligodendroglial features. Furthermore, the frequent involvement of chromosome arm 1p in oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas, but not in astrocytomas, suggests that genetically oligoastrocytoma is more similar to oligodendroglioma than to astrocytoma. In order to support this hypothesis, oligodendroglial and astrocytic areas in three mixed oligoastrocytomas were examined differentially for LOH 1p and for LOH 19q, the second genetic region believed to be affected in these tumors. All three tumors had LOH of 1p and LOH of 19q in both areas of oligodendroglial and of astrocytic differentiation. These findings show that the astrocytic and oligodendroglial portions of oligoastrocytoma share molecular genetic features and probably are of monoclonal origin. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Prognostic role of IDH mutations in gliomas: a meta-analysis of 55 observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhiquan; Feng, Fang; Qiao, Enqi; Li, Qinglin; Sun, Caixing; Ge, Minghua

    2015-01-01

    Background IDH (Isocitrate dehydrogenase) mutations occur frequently in gliomas, but their prognostic impact has not been fully assessed. We performed a meta-analysis of the association between IDH mutations and survival in gliomas. Methods Pubmed and EMBASE databases were searched for studies reporting IDH mutations (IHD1/2 and IDH1) and survival in gliomas. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS); the secondary outcome was progression-free survival (PFS). Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were determined using the Mantel-Haenszel random-effect modeling. Funnel plot and Egger's test were conducted to examine the risk of publication bias. Results Fifty-five studies (9487 patients) were included in the analysis. Fifty-four and twenty-seven studies investigated the association between IDH1/2 mutations and OS/PFS respectively in patients with glioma. The results showed that patients possessing an IDH1/2 mutation had significant advantages in OS (HR = 0.39, 95%CI: 0.34–0.45; P < 0.001) and PFS (HR = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.35–0.51; P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed a consistent result with pooled analysis, and patients with glioma of WHO grade III or II-III had better outcomes. Conclusions These findings provide further indication that patients with glioma harboring IDH mutations have improved OS and PFS, especially for patients with WHO grade III and grade II-III. PMID:26220714

  15. EG-08IDH MUTATIONS IN GLIOMAS ASSOCIATED WITH ENCHONDROMATOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, M. Kelly; Joseph, Loren; Venneti, Sriram; Daher, Ahmad; Pytel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The enchondromatoses, Ollier's disease and Maffucci syndrome, are non-heritable developmental disorders characterized by multiple enchondromas (Olllier's) in association with hemangiomas (Maffucci). Glial neoplasms are reported in both disorders but a pathogenic mechanism underlying this association has not been identified. We report a case of anaplastic astrocytoma in a 23 year old man with Maffucci syndrome whose tumor carried a substitution mutation of arginine for cysteine at position 132 (R132C) of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) protein. This mutation, commonly found in Maffucci-associated enchondromas and hemangiomas, was not detected on routine immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of the astrocytoma using the R132H mutation-specific antibody, commonly applied in clinical laboratories. The R132C mutation was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequently confirmed using a SNaPshot assay. Because somatic mosaic IDH mutations are associated with enchondromas and hemangiomas in Maffucci syndrome, we looked for the R132C mutation in a hemangioma, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) and histologically normal brain surrounding the tumor from this patient. The mutation was present in the hemangioma, absent in PBMNC, and present in 2% of alleles in ‘normal’ brain. The low level in surrounding brain tissue is consistent with tumor cell infiltration, not mosaicism, as a S173T p53 mutation in the tumor showed similar results. Using IHC, we further demonstrated that the mutant IDH1 protein in this glioma functions as an oncometabolite. Two repressive histone trimethylation marks were strongly positive in the tumor, supporting a role for 2-hydroxyglutarate in the inhibition of histone demethylation. Together, these data demonstrate that an IDH1 mutation common in enchodromatoses underlies the association of glial tumors reported in both Ollier's disease and Maffucci syndrome.

  16. Perspectives for therapeutic targeting of gene mutations in acute myeloid leukaemia with normal cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Falini, Brunangelo; Sportoletti, Paolo; Brunetti, Lorenzo; Martelli, Maria Paola

    2015-08-01

    The acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) genome contains more than 20 driver recurrent mutations. Here, we review the potential for therapeutic targeting of the most common mutations associated with normal cytogenetics AML, focusing on those affecting the FLT3, NPM1 and epigenetic modifier genes (DNMT3A, IDH1/2, TET2). As compared to early compounds, second generation FLT3 inhibitors are more specific and have better pharmacokinetics. They also show higher anti-leukaemic activity, leading to about 50% of composite complete remissions in refractory/relapsed FLT3-internal tandem duplication-mutated AML. However, rapid relapses invariably occur due to various mechanisms of resistance to FLT3 inhibitors. This issue and the best way for using FLT3 inhibitors in combination with other therapeutic modalities are discussed. Potential approaches for therapeutic targeting of NPM1-mutated AML include: (i) reverting the aberrant nuclear export of NPM1 mutant using exportin-1 inhibitors; (ii) disruption of the nucleolus with drugs blocking the oligomerization of wild-type nucleophosmin or inducing nucleolar stress; and (iii) immunotherapeutic targeting of highly expressed CD33 and IL3RA (CD123) antigens. Finally, we discuss the role of demethylating agents (decitabine and azacitidine) and IDH1/2 inhibitors in the treatment of AML patients carrying mutations of genes (DNMT3A, IDH1/2 and TET2) involved in the epigenetic regulation of transcription. PMID:25891481

  17. Isolation of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPR4) localized to chromosome 19q13.3.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, M S; Baird, S; Bailly, J E; Shutler, G G; Sabourin, L A; Tsilfidis, C; Neville, C E; Narang, M; Korneluk, R G

    1995-11-01

    We present the cloning and sequencing of the human gene for a novel G-protein coupled receptor (GPR4), from the critical myotonic dystrophy (DM) region on chromosome 19q13.3. The homologous porcine gene was isolated and sequenced as well. The genes of both species are intronless and contain an open reading frame encoding a protein of 362 amino acids. In human, two isoforms of GPR4 are expressed, differing in their 3' untranslated region due to the use of alternate polyadenylation signals and measuring approximately 2.8 and 1.8 kb, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that GPR4 is widely expressed, with higher levels in kidney, heart, and especially lung, where it is at least fivefold greater than in other tissues. Sequence analysis suggests that GPR4 is a peptide receptor and shares strongest homologies with purinergic receptors and receptors for angiotensin II, platelet activating factor, thrombin, and bradykinin. PMID:8595909

  18. Molecular classification of diffuse cerebral WHO grade II/III gliomas using genome- and transcriptome-wide profiling improves stratification of prognostically distinct patient groups.

    PubMed

    Weller, Michael; Weber, Ruthild G; Willscher, Edith; Riehmer, Vera; Hentschel, Bettina; Kreuz, Markus; Felsberg, Jörg; Beyer, Ulrike; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Kaulich, Kerstin; Steinbach, Joachim P; Hartmann, Christian; Gramatzki, Dorothee; Schramm, Johannes; Westphal, Manfred; Schackert, Gabriele; Simon, Matthias; Martens, Tobias; Boström, Jan; Hagel, Christian; Sabel, Michael; Krex, Dietmar; Tonn, Jörg C; Wick, Wolfgang; Noell, Susan; Schlegel, Uwe; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Pietsch, Torsten; Loeffler, Markus; von Deimling, Andreas; Binder, Hans; Reifenberger, Guido

    2015-05-01

    Cerebral gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II and III represent a major challenge in terms of histological classification and clinical management. Here, we asked whether large-scale genomic and transcriptomic profiling improves the definition of prognostically distinct entities. We performed microarray-based genome- and transcriptome-wide analyses of primary tumor samples from a prospective German Glioma Network cohort of 137 patients with cerebral gliomas, including 61 WHO grade II and 76 WHO grade III tumors. Integrative bioinformatic analyses were employed to define molecular subgroups, which were then related to histology, molecular biomarkers, including isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/2) mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations, and patient outcome. Genomic profiling identified five distinct glioma groups, including three IDH1/2 mutant and two IDH1/2 wild-type groups. Expression profiling revealed evidence for eight transcriptionally different groups (five IDH1/2 mutant, three IDH1/2 wild type), which were only partially linked to the genomic groups. Correlation of DNA-based molecular stratification with clinical outcome allowed to define three major prognostic groups with characteristic genomic aberrations. The best prognosis was found in patients with IDH1/2 mutant and 1p/19q co-deleted tumors. Patients with IDH1/2 wild-type gliomas and glioblastoma-like genomic alterations, including gain on chromosome arm 7q (+7q), loss on chromosome arm 10q (-10q), TERT promoter mutation and oncogene amplification, displayed the worst outcome. Intermediate survival was seen in patients with IDH1/2 mutant, but 1p/19q intact, mostly astrocytic gliomas, and in patients with IDH1/2 wild-type gliomas lacking the +7q/-10q genotype and TERT promoter mutation. This molecular subgrouping stratified patients into prognostically distinct groups better than histological classification. Addition of gene expression

  19. NADP(+)-IDH Mutations Promote Hypersuccinylation that Impairs Mitochondria Respiration and Induces Apoptosis Resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; He, Xiadi; Ye, Dingwei; Lin, Yan; Yu, Hongxiu; Yao, Cuifang; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Jianong; Wang, Fang; Xu, Sha; Wu, Xiaohui; Liu, Lixia; Yang, Chen; Shi, Jiaqi; He, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jie; Qu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Fushen; Zhao, Jianyuan; Xu, Wei; Zhao, Shimin

    2015-11-19

    Elucidating the tumorigenic mechanism of R-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2HG) is critical for determining how NADP(+)-IDH mutations cause cancer. Here we report that R-2HG induces cancerous metabolism and apoptosis resistance through promoting hypersuccinylation. By competitive inhibition of the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), R-2HG preferentially induced succinyl-CoA accumulation and hypersuccinylation in the mitochondria. IDH1 mutation-bearing glioma samples and cells were hypersuccinylated in the mitochondria. IDH1 mutation or SDH inactivation resulted in hypersuccinylation, causing respiration inhibition and inducing cancerous metabolism and mitochondrial depolarization. These mitochondrial dysfunctions induced BCL-2 accumulation at the mitochondrial membrane, leading to apoptosis resistance of hypersuccinylated cells. Relief of hypersuccinylation by overexpressing the desuccinylase SIRT5 or supplementing glycine rescued mitochondrial dysfunctions, reversed BCL-2 accumulation, and slowed the oncogenic growth of hypersuccinylated IDH1(R132C)-harboring HT1080 cells. Thus, R-2HG-induced hypersuccinylation contributes to the tumorigenicity of NADP(+)-IDH mutations, suggesting the potential of hypersuccinylation inhibition as an intervention for hypersuccinylation-related tumors. PMID:26585387

  20. Smoking dysregulates the human airway basal cell transcriptome at COPD risk locus 19q13.2.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Dorothy M; Vincent, Thomas L; Salit, Jacqueline; Walters, Matthew S; Agosto-Perez, Francisco; Shaykhiev, Renat; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Downey, Robert J; Buro-Auriemma, Lauren J; Staudt, Michelle R; Hackett, Neil R; Mezey, Jason G; Crystal, Ronald G

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene studies have identified a number of risk loci associated with the smoking-related disease COPD, a disorder that originates in the airway epithelium. Since airway basal cell (BC) stem/progenitor cells exhibit the earliest abnormalities associated with smoking (hyperplasia, squamous metaplasia), we hypothesized that smoker BC have a dysregulated transcriptome, enriched, in part, at known GWAS/candidate gene loci. Massive parallel RNA sequencing was used to compare the transcriptome of BC purified from the airway epithelium of healthy nonsmokers (n = 10) and healthy smokers (n = 7). The chromosomal location of the differentially expressed genes was compared to loci identified by GWAS to confer risk for COPD. Smoker BC have 676 genes differentially expressed compared to nonsmoker BC, dominated by smoking up-regulation. Strikingly, 166 (25%) of these genes are located on chromosome 19, with 13 localized to 19q13.2 (p<10⁻⁴ compared to chance), including 4 genes (NFKBIB, LTBP4, EGLN2 and TGFB1) associated with risk for COPD. These observations provide the first direct connection between known genetic risks for smoking-related lung disease and airway BC, the population of lung cells that undergo the earliest changes associated with smoking. PMID:24498427

  1. Isolation of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPR4) localized to chromosome 19q13.3

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, M.S.; Baird, S.; Bailly, J.E.

    1995-11-01

    We present the cloning and sequencing of the human gene for a novel G-protein coupled receptor (GPR4), from the critical myotonic dystrophy (DM) region on chromosome 19q13.3. The homologous porcine gene was isolated and sequenced as well. The genes of both species are intronless and contain an open reading frame encoding a protein of 362 amino acids. In human, two isoforms of GPR4 are expressed, differing in their 3{prime} untranslated region due to the use of alternate polyadenylation signals and measuring approximately 2.8 and 1.8 kb, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that GPR4 is widely expressed, with higher levels in kidney, heart, and especially lung, where it is at least fivefold greater than in other tissues. Sequence analysis suggests that GPR4 is a peptide receptor and shares strongest homologies with purinergic receptors and receptors for angiotensin II, platelet activating factor, thrombin, and bradykinin. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Chromosomal localization of the human natural killer cell class I receptor family genes to 19q13.4 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Suto, Yumiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; yabe, Toshio

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the localization of the human natural killer cell I receptor family genes to human chromosome 19q13.4 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. These genes mediate the inhibition of the cytotoxicity of subsets of natural killer cells. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Identification of a novel population in high-grade oligodendroglial tumors not deleted on 1p/19q using array CGH.

    PubMed

    Talagas, Matthieu; Marcorelles, Pascale; Uguen, Arnaud; Redon, Sylvia; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Costa, Sebastian; Férec, Claude; Morel, Frédéric; Hieu, Phong Dam; De Braekeleer, Marc

    2012-09-01

    Oligodendroglial tumors (ODTs) are primary tumors of the central nervous system that show recurrent codeletion of whole chromosome arms 1p and 19q. Non-1p/19q-deleted high-grade ODTs can present other genetic aberrations, CDKN2A deletion (9p21.3), EGFR amplification (7p11.2) and/or chromosome 10 loss, which are associated with a poor prognosis. The identification of these abnormalities allowed drafting a histo-molecular classification. The aim of this study was to precisely identify, using array CGH, the genomic hallmarks of these tumors, particularly those that are not deleted on 1p/19q. We studied 14 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded high-grade ODTs using pangenomic oligonucleotide array CGH with an average resolution of 22.3 kb. The 1p/19q codeletion was found in five anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. The three genomic aberrations carrying a poor prognosis were found, most often associated, in five out of nine tumors not deleted on 1p/19q. In addition, four recurrent copy number alterations, involving genes that participate to cell growth and cycle, were found to be strongly associated in five tumors not deleted on 1p/19q: gain or amplification at 1q32.1 (MDM4, PIK3C2B genes), 12q14.1 (CDK4 gene), 12q14.3-q15 (MDM2 gene) and homozygous deletion at 22q13.1 (APOBEC3B gene). MDM2, MDM4, CDK4 and PIK3C2B are known for potentially being amplified or overexpressed in high-grade gliomas. However, the involvement of APOBEC3B, coding for mRNA edition enzyme, is described here for the first time. Our results show a strong association between these four alterations. Therefore, this can open a perspective for a novel subgroup in high-grade ODTs not deleted on 1p/19q. PMID:22825724

  4. Glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like islands (GTNI): a report of 8 cases with chromosome 1p/19q deletion analysis.

    PubMed

    Barbashina, Violetta; Salazar, Paulo; Ladanyi, Marc; Rosenblum, Marc K; Edgar, Mark A

    2007-08-01

    Glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like islands (GTNI) is a rare neoplasm harboring circumscribed loci of neuronal differentiation and diffusely infiltrating astroglial and oligodendrocytelike components. We report 8 previously unpublished examples of GTNI, specifically studied for chromosome 1p and 19q allelic losses. All tumors showed characteristic histologic features and immunoprofile. One primary tumor displayed frankly malignant histology with frequent mitoses, microvascular proliferation, and necrosis. This tumor progressed within months of the initial resection. Three other tumors (2 low-grade and 1 showing only focal microvascular proliferation) recurred at 2 years, 3 years, and 1 year, respectively. All cases were evaluated for 1p/19q allelic losses by standard polymerase chain reaction-based loss of heterozygosity assays. No evidence of 1p/19q losses was found in 7 of 8 tumors. One tumor demonstrated small interstitial deletions at 1p36 (at D1S1612 and D1S513, but not at D1S548 or D1S1592) and a small interstitial deletion at 19q13 (at D19S219 and D19S412, but not at PLA2G4C). The lack of large, whole-arm 1p/19q losses (such as those found in oligodendroglial tumors), aberrant p53 expression, and the predominance of astroglial components may indicate a biologic relationship of the GTNI to diffuse astrocytoma. Although GTNI shares some morphologic features with recently reported cases of oligodendroglioma with neurocytic differentiation, the 2 tumors appear different at the molecular genetic level. PMID:17667543

  5. A genome-wide association study of COPD identifies a susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13.

    PubMed

    Cho, Michael H; Castaldi, Peter J; Wan, Emily S; Siedlinski, Mateusz; Hersh, Craig P; Demeo, Dawn L; Himes, Blanca E; Sylvia, Jody S; Klanderman, Barbara J; Ziniti, John P; Lange, Christoph; Litonjua, Augusto A; Sparrow, David; Regan, Elizabeth A; Make, Barry J; Hokanson, John E; Murray, Tanda; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B; Pillai, Sreekumar G; Kong, Xiangyang; Anderson, Wayne H; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Lomas, David A; Coxson, Harvey O; Edwards, Lisa D; MacNee, William; Vestbo, Jørgen; Yates, Julie C; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M A; Celli, Bartolome; Crim, Courtney; Rennard, Stephen; Wouters, Emiel; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Crapo, James D; Beaty, Terri H; Silverman, Edwin K

    2012-02-15

    The genetic risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are still largely unknown. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of limited size have identified several novel risk loci for COPD at CHRNA3/CHRNA5/IREB2, HHIP and FAM13A; additional loci may be identified through larger studies. We performed a GWAS using a total of 3499 cases and 1922 control subjects from four cohorts: the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE); the Normative Aging Study (NAS) and National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT); Bergen, Norway (GenKOLS); and the COPDGene study. Genotyping was performed on Illumina platforms with additional markers imputed using 1000 Genomes data; results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis. We identified a new genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 19q13 (rs7937, OR = 0.74, P = 2.9 × 10(-9)). Genotyping this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and another nearby SNP in linkage disequilibrium (rs2604894) in 2859 subjects from the family-based International COPD Genetics Network study (ICGN) demonstrated supportive evidence for association for COPD (P = 0.28 and 0.11 for rs7937 and rs2604894), pre-bronchodilator FEV(1) (P = 0.08 and 0.04) and severe (GOLD 3&4) COPD (P = 0.09 and 0.017). This region includes RAB4B, EGLN2, MIA and CYP2A6, and has previously been identified in association with cigarette smoking behavior. PMID:22080838

  6. Impact of 1p/19q Codeletion and Histology on Outcomes of Anaplastic Gliomas Treated With Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide

    SciTech Connect

    Speirs, Christina K.; Simpson, Joseph R.; Robinson, Clifford G.; DeWees, Todd A.; Tran, David D.; Linette, Gerry; Chicoine, Michael R.; Dacey, Ralph G.; Rich, Keith M.; Dowling, Joshua L.; Leuthardt, Eric C.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Kim, Albert H.; Huang, Jiayi

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Anaplastic gliomas represent a heterogeneous group of primary high-grade brain tumors, and the optimal postoperative treatment remains controversial. In this report, we present our institutional data on the clinical outcomes of radiation therapy (RT) plus temozolomide (RT + TMZ) for anaplastic gliomas, stratified by histology and 1p/19q codeletion. Methods and Materials: A single-institution retrospective review was conducted of patients with supratentorial anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO), mixed anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA), and anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). After surgery, RT was delivered at a median total dose of 60 Gy (range, 31.6-63 Gy) in daily fractions. All patients received standard concurrent TMZ, with or without adjuvant TMZ. Histological/molecular subtypes were defined as codeleted AO/AOA, non-codeleted AO/AOA, and AA. Results: From 2000 to 2012, 111 cases met study criteria and were evaluable. Codeleted AO/AOA had superior overall survival (OS) to non-codeleted AO/AOA (91% vs 68% at 5 years, respectively, P=.02), whereas progression-free survival (PFS) was not significantly different (70% vs 46% at 5 years, respectively, P=.10). AA had inferior OS to non-codeleted AO/AOA (37% vs 68% at 5 years, respectively, P=.007) and inferior PFS (27% vs 46%, respectively, P=.03). On multivariate analysis, age, performance status, and histological or molecular subtype were independent predictors for both PFS and OS. Compared to historical controls, RT + TMZ provided comparable OS to RT with procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (RT + PCV) for codeleted AO/AOA, superior OS to RT alone for non-codeleted AO/AOA, and similar OS to RT alone for AA. Conclusions: RT + TMZ may be a promising treatment for both codeleted and non-codeleted AO/AOA, but its role for AA remains unclear.

  7. Recurrent 12q13-15 chromosomal aberrations, high frequency of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutations, and absence of high mobility group AT-hook 2 expression in periosteal chondromas

    PubMed Central

    PANAGOPOULOS, IOANNIS; GORUNOVA, LUDMILA; TAKSDAL, INGEBORG; BJERKEHAGEN, BODIL; HEIM, SVERRE

    2015-01-01

    Periosteal chondroma is a benign cartilage tumor that accounts for <2% of chondromas. In the present study, four cases of periosteal chondromas were cytogenetically investigated and studied for the expression of high-mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2), mutations in codons 132 of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1 and 172 of IDH2; mutations -C228T and -C250T in the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT); and for methylation in the promoter regions of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and cellular retinol binding protein 1 (CRBP1). Chromosome aberrations of 12q13-15 were found in two out of the four tumors, while two had a normal karyotype. Two periosteal chondromas carried the mutation IDH1R132C (CGT>TGT), and two carried the mutation IDH1R132L (CGT>CTT). However, none of the four tumors had methylated MGMT and CRBP1 promoters or mutations at codon 172 of IDH2. In addition, -C228T and -C250T mutations were not present in the promoter region of TERT, nor was HMGA2 demonstrated to be expressed. The present study indicated that in periosteal chondromas, the involvement of 12q13-15 in structural rearrangements may be recurrent but that HMGA2 is not expressed. Additionally, the periosteal chondromas investigated in the study carried a heterozygous IDH1R132 mutation, the MGMT and CRBP1 promoters were not methylated, and -C228T and -C250T mutations in the promoter region of TERT were absent. PMID:26170993

  8. [Diagnostic and prognostic values of 1p and 19q deletions in adult gliomas: critical review of the literature and implications in daily clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Fontaine, D; Vandenbos, F; Lebrun, C; Paquis, V; Frenay, M

    2008-01-01

    Losses of chromosomes 1p and 19q are deemed correlated with diagnosis of oligodendroglioma, higher chemosensitivity and better prognosis. We reviewed the literature to evaluate the usefulness of these correlations in daily clinical practice. The rates of deletions relative to histology (WHO classifications) were extracted from 33 studies, including 2666 patients. The 1p deletions and 1p19q codeletion mean rates were respectively 65.4 and 63.3% in oligodendrogliomas, 28.7 and 21.6% in oligoastrocytomas, 13.2 and 7.5% in astrocytomas, 11.6 and 2.9% in glioblastomas. The presence of 1p deletion and 1p19q codeletion were strongly correlated with the histological diagnosis corresponding to oligodendroglioma. Calculation of specificity, sensitivity, predictive positive values and false negative rates suggests that presence of deletion 1p or codeletion represents a strong argument in favor of the diagnosis of oligodendroglioma. However, considering the high false negative rate, absence of such deletions does not rule out the diagnosis. In grade 3 oligodendroglial tumors, the probability of responding to chemotherapy, and the duration of response, were higher when codeletions were present. This suggests that, in these tumors, the presence of codeletion is a strong argument in favor of adjuvant chemotherapy. However, chemotherapy should not be systematically excluded when codeletions are absent, as the chances of response are about 33% in this situation. Data concerning low-grade gliomas were more controversial. Oligodendroglial tumors with 1p deletion or 1p19q codeletion seemed to have a better prognosis, as five-year survival rates were 50% higher than in tumors without deletion. This might be explained by the correlation between 1p deletion and other identified prognosis factors: (1) higher chemosensitivity, (2) tumor location more frequently in the frontal lobe, leading to better resection and lower risk of neurological deficit, (3) slower growth rate, (4) higher risk

  9. HHV-8-unrelated primary effusion-like lymphoma associated with clonal loss of inherited chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus-6A from the telomere of chromosome 19q.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Enjie; Cotton, Victoria E; Hidalgo-Bravo, Alberto; Huang, Yan; Bell, Adam J; Jarrett, Ruth F; Wilkie, Gavin S; Davison, Andrew J; Nacheva, Ellie P; Siebert, Reiner; Majid, Aneela; Kelpanides, Inga; Jayne, Sandrine; Dyer, Martin J; Royle, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) are associated with human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and usually occur in immunocompromised individuals. However, there are numerous reports of HHV-8-unrelated PEL-like lymphomas with unknown aetiology. Here we characterize an HHV-8-unrelated PEL-like lymphoma in an elderly woman who was negative for human immunodeficiency viruses 1 and 2, and hepatitis B and C. The woman was, however, a carrier of an inherited-chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus-6A (iciHHV-6A) genome in one 19q telomere. The iciHHV-6A genome was complete in blood DNA, encoding a full set of protein-coding genes. Interestingly, the entire iciHHV-6A genome was absent from the HHV-8-unrelated-PEL-like lymphoma cells despite retention of both copies of chromosome 19. The somatic loss of the 19q-iciHHV-6A genome occurred very early during lymphoma development and we propose it occurred via telomere-loop formation and excision to release a circular viral genome that was subsequently lost. Whether release of the HHV-6A genome from the telomere contributed to lymphomagenesis, or was coincidental, remains unclear but this event may have deregulated the expression of HHV-6A or 19q genes or else disrupted telomere function. To establish the frequency and importance of iciHHV-6 loss from telomeres, the HHV-6 copy number should be assessed in tumours that arise in iciHHV-6 carriers. PMID:26947392

  10. HHV-8-unrelated primary effusion-like lymphoma associated with clonal loss of inherited chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus-6A from the telomere of chromosome 19q

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Enjie; Cotton, Victoria E.; Hidalgo-Bravo, Alberto; Huang, Yan; J. Bell, Adam; F. Jarrett, Ruth; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Davison, Andrew J.; P. Nacheva, Ellie; Siebert, Reiner; Majid, Aneela; Kelpanides, Inga; Jayne, Sandrine; Dyer, Martin J.; Royle, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) are associated with human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and usually occur in immunocompromised individuals. However, there are numerous reports of HHV-8-unrelated PEL-like lymphomas with unknown aetiology. Here we characterize an HHV-8-unrelated PEL-like lymphoma in an elderly woman who was negative for human immunodeficiency viruses 1 and 2, and hepatitis B and C. The woman was, however, a carrier of an inherited-chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus-6A (iciHHV-6A) genome in one 19q telomere. The iciHHV-6A genome was complete in blood DNA, encoding a full set of protein-coding genes. Interestingly, the entire iciHHV-6A genome was absent from the HHV-8-unrelated-PEL-like lymphoma cells despite retention of both copies of chromosome 19. The somatic loss of the 19q-iciHHV-6A genome occurred very early during lymphoma development and we propose it occurred via telomere-loop formation and excision to release a circular viral genome that was subsequently lost. Whether release of the HHV-6A genome from the telomere contributed to lymphomagenesis, or was coincidental, remains unclear but this event may have deregulated the expression of HHV-6A or 19q genes or else disrupted telomere function. To establish the frequency and importance of iciHHV-6 loss from telomeres, the HHV-6 copy number should be assessed in tumours that arise in iciHHV-6 carriers. PMID:26947392

  11. The Importance of Mutational Drivers in GBM.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Rasime

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor, providing few effective therapeutic options, given the tumor heterogeneity and the accumulation of different genetic abnormalities that cause treatment failure. The many different genetic and epigenetic alterations present in GBM lead to modification of several major signaling pathways resulting in brain tumor growth, progression, and therapeutic resistance. Many functionally important mutations have been discovered, known as neutral passengers. IDH1/2, EZH2, and DNMT3A are the best known epigenetic modifiers in cancer. These mutations are important in determining disease prognosis such that the status of the MGMT gene is a direct target of chemotherapy. For these reasons, newly developed technologies are necessary to determine new candidate targets for targeted-therapy development in GBM. The determination of mutations will aid in this and in the discovery of combinations of targeted and conventional therapies to improve GBM treatment. PMID:27278882

  12. Chemoradiation for anaplastic oligodendrogliomas: clinical outcomes and prognostic value of molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Arcella, Antonella; Scaringi, Claudia; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Di Stefano, Domenica; Scarpino, Stefania; Pace, Andrea; Giangaspero, Felice; Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2014-01-01

    Combination of procarbazine, lomustine and vincristine (PCV) with radiation therapy (RT) has been associated with longer survival in patients with anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA), especially in those with chromosome 1p/19q codeletion. We report a multicenter retrospective study of 84 consecutive adult patients with AO and AOA treated with RT plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) between February 2004 and January 2011. Correlations between chromosome 1p/19q codeletion, isocitrate dehydrogenase1 (IDH1) mutation, and O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation with survival outcomes have been analyzed. For all 84 patients the median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival rates were 55.6 and 45.2 months, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 hematological toxicity occurred in 17 % of patients. Chromosome 1p/19q codeletion was detected in 57 %, IDH1 mutation in 63 %, and MGMT promoter methylation in 74 % of evaluable patients. In multivariate analysis the presence of chromosome 1p/19q codeletion was associated with significant survival benefit (median OS 34 months in noncodeleted tumors and not reached in codeleted tumors; HR 0.16, 95 % CI 0.03-0.45; P = 0.005). IDH1 mutation was also of prognostic significance for longer survival (P = 0.001; HR 0.20, 95 % 0.06-0.41), whereas MGMT promoter methylation was only of borderline significance. The study indicates that RT with concomitant and adjuvant TMZ is a relatively safe treatment associated with longer survival in patients with 1p/19q codeleted and IDH1 mutated tumors. Results from ongoing randomized studies will be essential to clarify if RT plus TMZ may provide survival as good as or better than RT combined with PCV for patients with AO and AOA. PMID:24162810

  13. Exome sequencing identifies frequent inactivating mutations in BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1 in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yuchen; Pawlik, Timothy M; Anders, Robert A; Selaru, Florin M; Streppel, Mirte M; Lucas, Donald J; Niknafs, Noushin; Guthrie, Violeta Beleva; Maitra, Anirban; Argani, Pedram; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Roa, Juan Carlos; Roberts, Lewis R; Gores, Gregory J; Popescu, Irinel; Alexandrescu, Sorin T; Dima, Simona; Fassan, Matteo; Simbolo, Michele; Mafficini, Andrea; Capelli, Paola; Lawlor, Rita T; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; de Braud, Filippo; Scarpa, Aldo; Jarnagin, William; Klimstra, David; Karchin, Rachel; Velculescu, Victor E; Hruban, Ralph H; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Wood, Laura D

    2013-12-01

    Through exomic sequencing of 32 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, we discovered frequent inactivating mutations in multiple chromatin-remodeling genes (including BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1), and mutation in one of these genes occurred in almost half of the carcinomas sequenced. We also identified frequent mutations at previously reported hotspots in the IDH1 and IDH2 genes encoding metabolic enzymes in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. In contrast, TP53 was the most frequently altered gene in a series of nine gallbladder carcinomas. These discoveries highlight the key role of dysregulated chromatin remodeling in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. PMID:24185509

  14. Exome sequencing identifies frequent inactivating mutations in BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1 in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Selaru, Florin M; Streppel, Mirte M; Lucas, Donald J; Niknafs, Noushin; Guthrie, Violeta Beleva; Maitra, Anirban; Argani, Pedram; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Roa, Juan Carlos; Roberts, Lewis R; Gores, Gregory J; Popescu, Irinel; Alexandrescu, Sorin T; Dima, Simona; Fassan, Matteo; Simbolo, Michele; Mafficini, Andrea; Capelli, Paola; Lawlor, Rita T; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; de Braud, Filippo; Scarpa, Aldo; Jarnagin, William; Klimstra, David; Karchin, Rachel; Velculescu, Victor E; Hruban, Ralph H; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Wood, Laura D

    2014-01-01

    Through exomic sequencing of 32 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, we discovered frequent inactivating mutations in multiple chromatin-remodeling genes (including BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1), and mutation in one of these genes occurred in almost half of the carcinomas sequenced. We also identified frequent mutations at previously reported hotspots in the IDH1 and IDH2 genes encoding metabolic enzymes in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. In contrast, TP53 was the most frequently altered gene in a series of nine gallbladder carcinomas. These discoveries highlight the key role of dysregulated chromatin remodeling in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. PMID:24185509

  15. Molecular Pathways: Isocitrate Dehydrogenase Mutations in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Clark, Owen; Yen, Katharine; Mellinghoff, Ingo K

    2016-04-15

    IDH1 and IDH2 are homodimeric enzymes that catalyze the conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and concomitantly produce reduced NADPH from NADP(+) Mutations in the genes encoding IDH1 and IDH2 have recently been found in a variety of human cancers, most commonly glioma, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chondrosarcoma, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. The mutant protein loses its normal enzymatic activity and gains a new ability to produce the "oncometabolite" R(-)-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2-HG). R-2-HG competitively inhibits α-KG-dependent enzymes which play crucial roles in gene regulation and tissue homeostasis. Expression of mutant IDH impairs cellular differentiation in various cell lineages and promotes tumor development in cooperation with other cancer genes. First-generation inhibitors of mutant IDH have entered clinical trials, and have shown encouraging results in patients with IDH-mutant AML. This article summarizes recent progress in our understanding of the role of mutant IDH in tumorigenesis.Clin Cancer Res; 22(8); 1837-42. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26819452

  16. Driver mutations of cancer epigenomes.

    PubMed

    Roy, David M; Walsh, Logan A; Chan, Timothy A

    2014-04-01

    Epigenetic alterations are associated with all aspects of cancer, from tumor initiation to cancer progression and metastasis. It is now well understood that both losses and gains of DNA methylation as well as altered chromatin organization contribute significantly to cancer-associated phenotypes. More recently, new sequencing technologies have allowed the identification of driver mutations in epigenetic regulators, providing a mechanistic link between the cancer epigenome and genetic alterations. Oncogenic activating mutations are now known to occur in a number of epigenetic modifiers (i.e. IDH1/2, EZH2, DNMT3A), pinpointing epigenetic pathways that are involved in tumorigenesis. Similarly, investigations into the role of inactivating mutations in chromatin modifiers (i.e. KDM6A, CREBBP/EP300, SMARCB1) implicate many of these genes as tumor suppressors. Intriguingly, a number of neoplasms are defined by a plethora of mutations in epigenetic regulators, including renal, bladder, and adenoid cystic carcinomas. Particularly striking is the discovery of frequent histone H3.3 mutations in pediatric glioma, a particularly aggressive neoplasm that has long remained poorly understood. Cancer epigenetics is a relatively new, promising frontier with much potential for improving cancer outcomes. Already, therapies such as 5-azacytidine and decitabine have proven that targeting epigenetic alterations in cancer can lead to tangible benefits. Understanding how genetic alterations give rise to the cancer epigenome will offer new possibilities for developing better prognostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24622842

  17. Multigene mutational profiling of cholangiocarcinomas identifies actionable molecular subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Mafficini, Andrea; Wood, Laura D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Melisi, Davide; Malleo, Giuseppe; Vicentini, Caterina; Malpeli, Giorgio; Antonello, Davide; Sperandio, Nicola; Capelli, Paola; Tomezzoli, Anna; Iacono, Calogero; Lawlor, Rita T.; Bassi, Claudio; Hruban, Ralph H.; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; de Braud, Filippo; Scarpa, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    One-hundred-fifty-three biliary cancers, including 70 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ICC), 57 extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ECC) and 26 gallbladder carcinomas (GBC) were assessed for mutations in 56 genes using multigene next-generation sequencing. Expression of EGFR and mTOR pathway genes was investigated by immunohistochemistry. At least one mutated gene was observed in 118/153 (77%) cancers. The genes most frequently involved were KRAS (28%), TP53 (18%), ARID1A (12%), IDH1/2 (9%), PBRM1 (9%), BAP1 (7%), and PIK3CA (7%). IDH1/2 (p=0.0005) and BAP1 (p=0.0097) mutations were characteristic of ICC, while KRAS (p=0.0019) and TP53 (p=0.0019) were more frequent in ECC and GBC. Multivariate analysis identified tumour stage and TP53 mutations as independent predictors of survival. Alterations in chromatin remodeling genes (ARID1A, BAP1, PBRM1, SMARCB1) were seen in 31% of cases. Potentially actionable mutations were seen in 104/153 (68%) cancers: i) KRAS/NRAS/BRAF mutations were found in 34% of cancers; ii) mTOR pathway activation was documented by immunohistochemistry in 51% of cases and by mutations in mTOR pathway genes in 19% of cancers; iii) TGF-ß/Smad signaling was altered in 10.5% cancers; iv) mutations in tyrosine kinase receptors were found in 9% cases. Our study identified molecular subgroups of cholangiocarcinomas that can be explored for specific drug targeting in clinical trials. PMID:24867389

  18. Multigene mutational profiling of cholangiocarcinomas identifies actionable molecular subgroups.

    PubMed

    Simbolo, Michele; Fassan, Matteo; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Mafficini, Andrea; Wood, Laura D; Corbo, Vincenzo; Melisi, Davide; Malleo, Giuseppe; Vicentini, Caterina; Malpeli, Giorgio; Antonello, Davide; Sperandio, Nicola; Capelli, Paola; Tomezzoli, Anna; Iacono, Calogero; Lawlor, Rita T; Bassi, Claudio; Hruban, Ralph H; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; de Braud, Filippo; Scarpa, Aldo

    2014-05-15

    One-hundred-fifty-three biliary cancers, including 70 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ICC), 57 extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ECC) and 26 gallbladder carcinomas (GBC) were assessed for mutations in 56 genes using multigene next-generation sequencing. Expression of EGFR and mTOR pathway genes was investigated by immunohistochemistry. At least one mutated gene was observed in 118/153 (77%) cancers. The genes most frequently involved were KRAS (28%), TP53 (18%), ARID1A (12%), IDH1/2 (9%), PBRM1 (9%), BAP1 (7%), and PIK3CA (7%). IDH1/2 (p=0.0005) and BAP1 (p=0.0097) mutations were characteristic of ICC, while KRAS (p=0.0019) and TP53 (p=0.0019) were more frequent in ECC and GBC. Multivariate analysis identified tumour stage and TP53 mutations as independent predictors of survival. Alterations in chromatin remodeling genes (ARID1A, BAP1, PBRM1, SMARCB1) were seen in 31% of cases. Potentially actionable mutations were seen in 104/153 (68%) cancers: i) KRAS/NRAS/BRAF mutations were found in 34% of cancers; ii) mTOR pathway activation was documented by immunohistochemistry in 51% of cases and by mutations in mTOR pathway genes in 19% of cancers; iii) TGF-ß/Smad signaling was altered in 10.5% cancers; iv) mutations in tyrosine kinase receptors were found in 9% cases. Our study identified molecular subgroups of cholangiocarcinomas that can be explored for specific drug targeting in clinical trials. PMID:24867389

  19. Spliceosomal gene mutations are frequent events in the diverse mutational spectrum of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia but largely absent in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Sarah Abu; Jankowska, Anna; Makishima, Hideki; Visconte, Valeria; Jerez, Andres; Sugimoto, Yuka; Muramatsu, Hideki; Traina, Fabiola; Afable, Manuel; Guinta, Kathryn; Tiu, Ramon V.; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Sakaguchi, Hirotoshi; Kojima, Seiji; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; List, Alan F.; McDevitt, Michael A.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a heterogeneous disease with multifactorial molecular pathogenesis. Various recurrent somatic mutations have been detected alone or in combination in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Recently, recurrent mutations in spliceosomal genes have been discovered. We investigated the contribution of U2AF1, SRSF2 and SF3B1 mutations in the pathogenesis of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and closely related diseases. We genotyped a cohort of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, secondary acute myeloid leukemia derived from chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia for somatic mutations in U2AF1, SRSF2, SF3B1 and in the other 12 most frequently affected genes in these conditions. Chromosomal abnormalities were assessed by nucleotide polymorphism array-based karyotyping. The presence of molecular lesions was correlated with clinical endpoints. Mutations in SRSF2, U2AF1 and SF3B1 were found in 32%, 13% and 6% of cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, secondary acute myeloid leukemia derived from chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, respectively. Spliceosomal genes were affected in various combinations with other mutations, including TET2, ASXL1, CBL, EZH2, RAS, IDH1/2, DNMT3A, TP53, UTX and RUNX1. Worse overall survival was associated with mutations in U2AF1 (P=0.047) and DNMT3A (P=0.015). RAS mutations had an impact on overall survival in secondary acute myeloid leukemia (P=0.0456). By comparison, our screening of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia cases showed mutations in ASXL1 (4%), CBL (10%), and RAS (6%) but not in IDH1/2, TET2, EZH2, DNMT3A or the three spliceosomal genes. SRSF2 and U2AF1 along with TET2 (48%) and ASXL1 (38%) are frequently affected by somatic mutations in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, quite distinctly from the profile seen in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. Our data also suggest that spliceosomal mutations are of ancestral origin. PMID:22773603

  20. IDH2 mutations in patients with D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria.

    PubMed

    Kranendijk, Martijn; Struys, Eduard A; van Schaftingen, Emile; Gibson, K Michael; Kanhai, Warsha A; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Amiel, Jeanne; Buist, Neil R; Das, Anibh M; de Klerk, Johannis B; Feigenbaum, Annette S; Grange, Dorothy K; Hofstede, Floris C; Holme, Elisabeth; Kirk, Edwin P; Korman, Stanley H; Morava, Eva; Morris, Andrew; Smeitink, Jan; Sukhai, Rám N; Vallance, Hilary; Jakobs, Cornelis; Salomons, Gajja S

    2010-10-15

    Heterozygous somatic mutations in the genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 and -2 (IDH1 and IDH2) were recently discovered in human neoplastic disorders. These mutations disable the enzymes' normal ability to convert isocitrate to 2-ketoglutarate (2-KG) and confer on the enzymes a new function: the ability to convert 2-KG to d-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG). We have detected heterozygous germline mutations in IDH2 that alter enzyme residue Arg(140) in 15 unrelated patients with d-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (D-2-HGA), a rare neurometabolic disorder characterized by supraphysiological levels of D-2-HG. These findings provide additional impetus for investigating the role of D-2-HG in the pathophysiology of metabolic disease and cancer. PMID:20847235

  1. Assembly of a 1-Mb restriction-mapped cosmid contig spanning the candidate region for Finnish congenital nephrosis (NPHS1) in 19q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, A.S.; Georgescu, A.; Johnson, S.; Carrano, A.V.

    1996-06-01

    We describe the assembly of a 1-Mb cosmid contig and restriction map spanning the candidate region for Finnish congenital nephrosis (NPHS1) in 19q13.1. The map was constructed from 16 smaller contigs assembled by fingerprinting, a BAC and a PAC clone, and 42 previously unmapped cosmids. In most cases, single-step cosmid walks were sufficient to join two previously assembled contigs, and all but one gap was filled from this cosmid contig library. The remaining gap of about 19 kb was spanned with a single BAC and a single PAC clone. EcoRI mapping of a dense set of overlapping clones validated the assembly of the map and indicated a length of 1040 kb for the contig. This high-resolution clone map provides an ideal resource for gene identification through cDNA selection, exon trapping, and DNA sequencing. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Clonal status of actionable driver events and the timing of mutational processes in cancer evolution.

    PubMed

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Favero, Francesco; de Bruin, Elza C; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2015-04-15

    Deciphering whether actionable driver mutations are found in all or a subset of tumor cells will likely be required to improve drug development and precision medicine strategies. We analyzed nine cancer types to determine the subclonal frequencies of driver events, to time mutational processes during cancer evolution, and to identify drivers of subclonal expansions. Although mutations in known driver genes typically occurred early in cancer evolution, we also identified later subclonal "actionable" mutations, including BRAF (V600E), IDH1 (R132H), PIK3CA (E545K), EGFR (L858R), and KRAS (G12D), which may compromise the efficacy of targeted therapy approaches. More than 20% of IDH1 mutations in glioblastomas, and 15% of mutations in genes in the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)-AKT-mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling axis across all tumor types were subclonal. Mutations in the RAS-MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase) signaling axis were less likely to be subclonal than mutations in genes associated with PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling. Analysis of late mutations revealed a link between APOBEC-mediated mutagenesis and the acquisition of subclonal driver mutations and uncovered putative cancer genes involved in subclonal expansions, including CTNNA2 and ATXN1. Our results provide a pan-cancer census of driver events within the context of intratumor heterogeneity and reveal patterns of tumor evolution across cancers. The frequent presence of subclonal driver mutations suggests the need to stratify targeted therapy response according to the proportion of tumor cells in which the driver is identified. PMID:25877892

  3. Clonal status of actionable driver events and the timing of mutational processes in cancer evolution

    PubMed Central

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Favero, Francesco; de Bruin, Elza C.; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Deciphering whether actionable driver mutations are found in all or a subset of tumor cells will likely be required to improve drug development and precision medicine strategies. We analyzed nine cancer types to determine the subclonal frequencies of driver events, to time mutational processes during cancer evolution, and to identify drivers of subclonal expansions. Although mutations in known driver genes typically occurred early in cancer evolution, we also identified later subclonal “actionable” mutations, including BRAF(V600E), IDH1(R132H), PIK3CA(E545K), EGFR(L858R), and KRAS(G12D), which may compromise the efficacy of targeted therapy approaches. More than 20% of IDH1 mutations in glioblastomas, and 15% of mutations in genes in the PI3K(phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)–AKT–mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling axis across all tumor types were subclonal. Mutations in the RAS–MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase) signaling axis were less likely to be subclonal than mutations in genes associated with PI3K-AKT-mTORsignaling. Analysis of late mutations revealed a link between APOBEC-mediated mutagenesis and the acquisition of subclonal driver mutations and uncovered putative cancer genes involved in subclonal expansions, including CTNNA2 and ATXN1. Our results provide a pan-cancer census of driver events within the context of intratumor heterogeneity and reveal patterns of tumor evolution across cancers. The frequent presence of subclonal driver mutations suggests the need to stratify targeted therapy response according to the proportion of tumor cells in which the driver is identified. PMID:25877892

  4. TCF12 is mutated in anaplastic oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Labreche, Karim; Simeonova, Iva; Kamoun, Aurélie; Gleize, Vincent; Chubb, Daniel; Letouzé, Eric; Riazalhosseini, Yasser; Dobbins, Sara E; Elarouci, Nabila; Ducray, Francois; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Zelenika, Diana; Wardell, Christopher P; Frampton, Mathew; Saulnier, Olivier; Pastinen, Tomi; Hallout, Sabrina; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Dehais, Caroline; Idbaih, Ahmed; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Huillard, Emmanuelle; Mark Lathrop, G; Sanson, Marc; Houlston, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) are rare primary brain tumours that are generally incurable, with heterogeneous prognosis and few treatment targets identified. Most oligodendrogliomas have chromosomes 1p/19q co-deletion and an IDH mutation. Here we analysed 51 AO by whole-exome sequencing, identifying previously reported frequent somatic mutations in CIC and FUBP1. We also identified recurrent mutations in TCF12 and in an additional series of 83 AO. Overall, 7.5% of AO are mutated for TCF12, which encodes an oligodendrocyte-related transcription factor. Eighty percent of TCF12 mutations identified were in either the bHLH domain, which is important for TCF12 function as a transcription factor, or were frameshift mutations leading to TCF12 truncated for this domain. We show that these mutations compromise TCF12 transcriptional activity and are associated with a more aggressive tumour type. Our analysis provides further insights into the unique and shared pathways driving AO. PMID:26068201

  5. TCF12 is mutated in anaplastic oligodendroglioma

    PubMed Central

    Labreche, Karim; Simeonova, Iva; Kamoun, Aurélie; Gleize, Vincent; Chubb, Daniel; Letouzé, Eric; Riazalhosseini, Yasser; Dobbins, Sara E.; Elarouci, Nabila; Ducray, Francois; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Zelenika, Diana; Wardell, Christopher P.; Frampton, Mathew; Saulnier, Olivier; Pastinen, Tomi; Hallout, Sabrina; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Dehais, Caroline; Idbaih, Ahmed; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Huillard, Emmanuelle; Mark Lathrop, G.; Sanson, Marc; Houlston, Richard S.; Adam, Clovis; Andraud, Marie; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Bauchet, Luc; Beauchesne, Patrick; Blechet, Claire; Campone, Mario; Carpentier, Antoine; Carpentier, Catherine; Carpiuc, Ioana; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Chiforeanu, Danchristian; Chinot, Olivier; Cohen-Moyal, Elisabeth; Colin, Philippe; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Desenclos, Christine; Desse, Nicolas; Dhermain, Frederic; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Eimer, Sandrine; Faillot, Thierry; Fesneau, Mélanie; Fontaine, Denys; Gaillard, Stéphane; Gauchotte, Guillaume; Gaultier, Claude; Ghiringhelli, Francois; Godard, Joel; Marcel Gueye, Edouard; Sebastien Guillamo, Jean; Hamdi-Elouadhani, Selma; Honnorat, Jerome; Louis Kemeny, Jean; Khallil, Toufik; Jouvet, Anne; Labrousse, Francois; Langlois, Olivier; Laquerriere, Annie; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Le Guérinel, Caroline; Levillain, Pierre-Marie; Loiseau, Hugues; Loussouarn, Delphine; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Menei, Philippe; Janette Motsuo Fotso, Marie; Noel, Georges; Parker, Fabrice; Peoc'h, Michel; Polivka, Marc; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Ramirez, Carole; Ricard, Damien; Richard, Pomone; Rigau, Valérie; Rousseau, Audrey; Runavot, Gwenaelle; Sevestre, Henri; Christine Tortel, Marie; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Vauleon, Elodie; Viennet, Gabriel; Villa, Chiara; Wager, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) are rare primary brain tumours that are generally incurable, with heterogeneous prognosis and few treatment targets identified. Most oligodendrogliomas have chromosomes 1p/19q co-deletion and an IDH mutation. Here we analysed 51 AO by whole-exome sequencing, identifying previously reported frequent somatic mutations in CIC and FUBP1. We also identified recurrent mutations in TCF12 and in an additional series of 83 AO. Overall, 7.5% of AO are mutated for TCF12, which encodes an oligodendrocyte-related transcription factor. Eighty percent of TCF12 mutations identified were in either the bHLH domain, which is important for TCF12 function as a transcription factor, or were frameshift mutations leading to TCF12 truncated for this domain. We show that these mutations compromise TCF12 transcriptional activity and are associated with a more aggressive tumour type. Our analysis provides further insights into the unique and shared pathways driving AO. PMID:26068201

  6. How to use molecular markers when caring for a patient with brain cancer: 1P/19Q as a predictive and prognostic marker in the neuro-oncology clinic.

    PubMed

    van den Bent, M J

    2013-01-01

    Although the central role of 1p/19q codeletion in oligodendroglioma was established almost two decades ago, apart from clear prognostic significance the implications for clinical care have been less clear. This has changed with the long-term follow-up analysis of the EORTC and RTOG trials on procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) chemotherapy in anaplastic oligodendroglioma. These have shown that 1p/19q loss in these tumors is predictive of overall survival benefit of the addition of PCV chemotherapy to radiotherapy. PMID:23714473

  7. DNMT3A and IDH mutations in acute myeloid leukemia and other myeloid malignancies: associations with prognosis and potential treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Im, AP; Sehgal, AR; Carroll, MP; Smith, BD; Tefferi, A; Johnson, DE; Boyiadzis, M

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective treatment strategies for most forms of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has languished for the past several decades. There are a number of reasons for this, but key among them is the considerable heterogeneity of this disease and the paucity of molecular markers that can be used to predict clinical outcomes and responsiveness to different therapies. The recent large-scale sequencing of AML genomes is now providing opportunities for patient stratification and personalized approaches to treatment that are based on individual mutational profiles. It is particularly notable that studies by The Cancer Genome Atlas and others have determined that 44% of patients with AML exhibit mutations in genes that regulate methylation of genomic DNA. In particular, frequent mutation has been observed in the genes encoding DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2), as well as Tet oncogene family member 2. This review will summarize the incidence of these mutations, their impact on biochemical functions including epigenetic modification of genomic DNA and their potential usefulness as prognostic indicators. Importantly, the presence of DNMT3A, IDH1 or IDH2 mutations may confer sensitivity to novel therapeutic approaches, including the use of demethylating agents. Therefore, the clinical experience with decitabine and azacitidine in the treatment of patients harboring these mutations will be reviewed. Overall, we propose that understanding the role of these mutations in AML biology will lead to more rational therapeutic approaches targeting molecularly defined subtypes of the disease. PMID:24699305

  8. TET2 Mutations Are Associated with Specific 5-Methylcytosine and 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine Profiles in Patients with Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Cristina; Martínez-Calle, Nicolas; Martín-Subero, José Ignacio; Segura, Victor; Delabesse, Eric; Fernandez-Mercado, Marta; Garate, Leire; Alvarez, Sara; Rifon, José; Varea, Sara; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Wainscoat, James S.; Cigudosa, Juan Cruz; Calasanz, María José; Cross, Nicholas C. P.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) has recently been associated with a high incidence of diverse mutations in genes such as TET2 or EZH2 that are implicated in epigenetic mechanisms. We have performed genome-wide DNA methylation arrays and mutational analysis of TET2, IDH1, IDH2, EZH2 and JAK2 in a group of 24 patients with CMML. 249 genes were differentially methylated between CMML patients and controls. Using Ingenuity pathway analysis, we identified enrichment in a gene network centered around PLC, JNK and ERK suggesting that these pathways, whose deregulation has beenrecently described in CMML, are affected by epigenetic mechanisms. Mutations of TET2, JAK2 and EZH2 were found in 15 patients (65%), 4 patients (17%) and 1 patient (4%) respectively while no mutations in the IDH1 and IDH2 genes were identified. Interestingly, patients with wild type TET2 clustered separately from patients with TET2 mutations, showed a higher degree of hypermethylation and were associated with higher risk karyotypes. Our results demonstrate the presence of aberrant DNA methylation in CMML and identifies TET2 mutant CMML as a biologically distinct disease subtype with a different epigenetic profile. PMID:22328940

  9. Safety Study of AG-120 or AG-221 in Combination With Induction and Consolidation Therapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia With an IDH1 and/or IDH2 Mutation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-27

    Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Untreated AML; AML Arising From Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); AML Arising From Antecedent Hematologic Disorder (AHD); AML Arising After Exposure to Genotoxic Injury

  10. Clinicopathologic Features of Pediatric Oligodendrogliomas

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Tihan, Tarik; Lin, Doris; McDonald, William; Nigro, Janice; Feuerstein, Burt; Jackson, Sadhana; Cohen, Kenneth; Burger, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrogliomas are an important adult form of diffuse gliomas with a distinctive clinical and genetic profile. Histologically similar tumors occurring rarely in children are incompletely characterized. We studied 50 patients with oligodendrogliomas (median age at diagnosis 8 y, range 7mo to 20 y). Tumors resembling dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors or pilocytic astrocytomas or those having a “mixed” histology were excluded. Tumors at first diagnosis were low grade (n=38) or anaplastic (n=12). Histologic features included uniform round cells with perinuclear halos (100%), secondary structures (predominantly perineuronal satellitosis) (90%), calcifications (46%), and microcysts (44%). Sequential surgical specimens were obtained in 8 low-grade oligodendroglioma patients, with only 1 progressing to anaplasia. Studies for 1p19q performed in 40 cases demonstrated intact 1p19q loci in 29 (73%), 1p19q codeletion in 10 (25%), and 1p deletion with intact 19q in 1 (2%). Except for 2 young patients (3 and 11 y of age), patients with 1p19q codeletion were older than 16 years at diagnosis. Mutant IDH1 (R132H) protein immunohistochemistry was positive in 4 (of 22) (18%) cases, 3 of which also had 1p19q codeletion, whereas 1p19q status was not available on the fourth case. There was a nonsignificant trend for worse overall survival in grade III tumors, but no significant association with age, extent of resection, or 1p19q status. In summary, oligodendrogliomas with classic histology occur in the pediatric population but lack 1p19q codeletion and IDH1 (R132H) mutations in most instances. They are predominantly low grade, recur/clinically progress in a subset, but demonstrate a relatively low frequency of histologic progression. PMID:24805856

  11. Clinicopathologic features of pediatric oligodendrogliomas: a series of 50 patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Fausto J; Tihan, Tarik; Lin, Doris; McDonald, William; Nigro, Janice; Feuerstein, Burt; Jackson, Sadhana; Cohen, Kenneth; Burger, Peter C

    2014-08-01

    Oligodendrogliomas are an important adult form of diffuse gliomas with a distinctive clinical and genetic profile. Histologically similar tumors occurring rarely in children are incompletely characterized. We studied 50 patients with oligodendrogliomas (median age at diagnosis 8 y, range 7 mo to 20 y). Tumors resembling dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors or pilocytic astrocytomas or those having a "mixed" histology were excluded. Tumors at first diagnosis were low grade (n=38) or anaplastic (n=12). Histologic features included uniform round cells with perinuclear halos (100%), secondary structures (predominantly perineuronal satellitosis) (90%), calcifications (46%), and microcysts (44%). Sequential surgical specimens were obtained in 8 low-grade oligodendroglioma patients, with only 1 progressing to anaplasia. Studies for 1p19q performed in 40 cases demonstrated intact 1p19q loci in 29 (73%), 1p19q codeletion in 10 (25%), and 1p deletion with intact 19q in 1 (2%). Except for 2 young patients (3 and 11 y of age), patients with 1p19q codeletion were older than 16 years at diagnosis. Mutant IDH1 (R132H) protein immunohistochemistry was positive in 4 (of 22) (18%) cases, 3 of which also had 1p19q codeletion, whereas 1p19q status was not available on the fourth case. There was a nonsignificant trend for worse overall survival in grade III tumors, but no significant association with age, extent of resection, or 1p19q status. In summary, oligodendrogliomas with classic histology occur in the pediatric population but lack 1p19q codeletion and IDH1 (R132H) mutations in most instances. They are predominantly low grade, recur/clinically progress in a subset, but demonstrate a relatively low frequency of histologic progression. PMID:24805856

  12. Prognostic Value of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase Mutations in Myelodysplastic Syndromes: A Retrospective Cohort Study and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jie; Hu, Chao; Yu, Mengxia; Chen, Feifei; Ye, Li; Yin, Xiufeng; Zhuang, Zhengping; Tong, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent genomic sequencing efforts have identified a number of recurrent mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) that may contribute to disease progression and overall survival, including mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2). Methods Pretreatment bone marrow (BM) samples were acquired from mononuclear cells in 146 adult patients with de novo MDS from January 2006 to June 2013. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing were performed on exon 4 of IDH1/2 genes and mutation status was correlated with overall survival (OS) and leukemia-free survival (LFS). We then performed a meta-analysis combining previously published and current studies to explore the effect of IDH mutations on OS and LFS in MDS. Results In our study, somatic mutations of either IDH gene were discovered in 11 MDS patients (7.53%) and were significantly correlated with poorer OS (P = 0.007). IDH mutations were specifically associated with a poorer OS in the intermediate-1 risk group by the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) (P = 0.039). In addition, we discovered decitabine achieved a better therapeutic effect compared to other treatments in IDH mutation-positive patients (P = 0.023). We identified six previous studies of IDH mutations in MDS. A meta-analysis of these studies included 111 MDS patients IDH mutations and 1671 MDS patients with wild-type IDH1/2. The hazard ratios (HRs) of OS and LFS for patients with IDH mutations were 1.62 (95% CI, 1.27–2.09) and 2.21 (95% CI, 1.48–3.30), respectively. Conclusion The results from our study and the meta-analysis provide firm evidence that IDH mutations are significantly associated with poorer clinical outcomes in MDS. Identification of IDH mutations may be pivotal for better risk stratification in MDS patients and improving IPSS score. Additionally, hypomethylating agents may be an effective treatment option for MDS patients with IDH mutations. PMID:24936872

  13. Organization of the human gene for nucleobindin (NUC) and its chromosomal assignment to 19q13.2-q13.4

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Keiji; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Hirai, Momoki

    1996-06-01

    Nucleobindin (Nuc) was first identified as a secreted protein of 55 kDa that promotes production of DNA-specific antibodies in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice. Analysis of cDNA that encoded Nuc revealed that the protein is composed of a signal peptide, a DNA-binding site, two calcium-binding motifs (EF-hand motifs), and a leucine zipper. In the present study, we analysed the organization of the human gene for Nuc (NUC). It consists of 13 exons that are distributed in a region of 32 kb. The functional motifs listed above are encoded in corresponding exons. NUC was expressed in all organs examined. Comparison of nucleotide sequences in the promotre regions between human and mouse NCU genes revealed several conserved sequences. Among them, two Sp1-binding sites and a CCAAT box are of particular interest. The promoter is of the TATA-less type, and transcription starts at multiple sites in both the human and the mouse genes. These features suggest that NUC might normally play a role as a housekeeping gene. NUC was located at human chromosome 19q13.2-q13.4. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Breakpoint characterization of the der(19)t(11;19)(q13;p13) in the ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3.

    PubMed

    Onkes, Wiebke; Fredrik, Regina; Micci, Francesca; Schönbeck, Benjamin J; Martin-Subero, Jose I; Ullmann, Reinhard; Hilpert, Felix; Bräutigam, Karen; Janssen, Ottmar; Maass, Nicolai; Siebert, Reiner; Heim, Sverre; Arnold, Norbert; Weimer, Jörg

    2013-05-01

    About 20% of ovarian carcinomas show alterations of 19p13 and/or 19q13 in the form of added extra material whose origin often is from chromosome 11. Based on earlier spectral karyotype analysis of the ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3, which shows an unbalanced translocation der(19)t(11;19), the aim of this study was to determine the precise breakpoints of that derivative chromosome. After rough delimitation of the breakpoints of microdissected derivative chromosomes by array analysis, we designed a matrix of primers spanning 11q13.2 and 19p13.2 detecting multiple amplicons on genomic and cDNA. Sequencing the amplicons, accurate localization of both breakpoints on both chromosomes was possible and we found that exon 14 of HOOK2 from chromosome 19 and exon 2 of ACTN3 from chromosome 11 were fused in the derivative chromosome. The breakpoint in the HOOK2 gene was in an intrinsic triplet of nucleic acids leading to a shift in the ACTN3 reading frame in the derivative chromosome. This frameshift alteration should give rise to an early stop codon causing a loss of function of ACTN3. Signals in two-dimensional Western blotting exactly match to calculated molecular mass and the isoelectric point of the fusion protein. PMID:23362175

  15. Mechanisms leading to Prader-Willi syndrome in a patient with a de novo 46, XY, t(15; 19)(q12; q13.41)

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Hainline, B.E.; Palmer, C.G.

    1994-09-01

    A three year and six month-old boy with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) was found to have a de novo 46, XY, t(15; 19) (q12; q13.41) karyotype. PCR studies of microsatellite loci showed heterozygosity, including biparental inheritance. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies were performed with cosmid probes D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10, and GABRB3 and no deletion was found. The chromosomal breakage occurred inside the SNRPN contig, which contains two overlapping cosmids. Each cosmid shows signals with FISH on both the der(15) and the der(19), and on the normal chromosome 15. Additional FISH studies using cosmid subfragments demonstrated that the breakage occurred upstream to coding exons of the SNRPN gene. SNRPN contains 10 exons, including two recently identified upstream exons, exon-1 and exon-0. A probe from an RT-PCR product (1020bp) of total human brain mRNA spanning exons 1-8 and an exon1-specific probe were used on genome DNA Southern hybridizaiton. An extra DNA band 20kb in size was detected specifically from our patients genomic DNA using BamHl when compared to his normal parents and normal individuals. Further studies revealed that the breakage occurred between exon 0 and exon 1 of the SNRPN gene.

  16. p190RhoGAP can act to inhibit PDGF-induced gliomas in mice: a putative tumor suppressor encoded on human Chromosome 19q13.3

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Rebecca M.; Draghi, Nicole; Liang, Xiquan; Dai, Chengkai; Uhrbom, Lene; Eklöf, Charlotta; Westermark, Bengt; Holland, Eric C.; Resh, Marilyn D.

    2003-01-01

    p190RhoGAP and Rho are key regulators of oligodendrocyte differentiation. The gene encoding p190RhoGAP is located at 19q13.3 of the human chromosome, a locus that is deleted in 50%–80% of oligodendrogliomas. Here we provide evidence that p190RhoGAP may suppress gliomagenesis by inducing a differentiated glial phenotype. Using a cell culture model of autocrine loop PDGF stimulation, we show that reduced Rho activity via p190RhoGAP overexpression or Rho kinase inhibition induced cellular process extension, a block in proliferation, and reduced expression of the neural precursor marker nestin. In vivo infection of mice with retrovirus expressing PDGF and the p190 GAP domain caused a decreased incidence of oligodendrogliomas compared with that observed with PDGF alone. Independent experiments revealed that the retroviral vector insertion site in 3 of 50 PDGF-induced gliomas was within the p190RhoGAP gene. This evidence strongly suggests that p190 regulates critical components of PDGF oncogenesis and can act as a tumor suppressor in PDGF-induced gliomas by down-regulating Rho activity. PMID:12600941

  17. Mutations in epigenetic modifiers in acute myeloid leukemia and their clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hsin-An; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have identified recurrent mutations in genes that encode proteins crucial in the epigenetic regulation of gene transcription in hematologic malignancies. Somatic mutations in epigenetic modifiers, including IDH1, IDH2, TET2, DNAMT3A, ASXL1, MLL and EZH2 are enriched in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), especially those with intermediate-risk cytogenetics. Here we describe the clinic-biologic features of AML patients with these mutations, their prognostic relevance and potential as therapeutic targets. The epigenetic alterations are present as the early pre-leukemic events and usually remain stable during disease evolution, implying the potential to be biomarkers for minimal residual disease monitoring. The high frequency of mutations in epigenetic modifiers and their prognostic implications shed light on the development of epigenetic therapy. PMID:26789100

  18. IDH mutation and MGMT promoter methylation in glioblastoma: results of a prospective registry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinyan; Peng, Xiaoxia; Chen, Baoshi; Qiu, Xiaoguang; Li, Guilin; Li, Shouwei; Wu, Chenxing; Yao, Kun; Li, Wenbin; Yan, Wei; Li, Jie; You, Yongping; Chen, Clark C.; Jiang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Background The relative contribution of isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations (mIDH) and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation (methMGMT) as biomarkers in glioblastoma remain poorly understood. Methods We investigated the association between methMGMT and mIDH with progression free survival and overall survival in a prospectively collected molecular registry of 274 glioblastoma patients. Results For glioblastoma patients who underwent Temozolomide and Radiation Therapy, OS and PFS was most favorable for those with tumors harboring both mIDH and methMGMT (median OS: 35.8 mo, median PFS: 27.5 mo); patients afflicted glioblastomas with either mIDH or methMGMT exhibited intermediate OS and PFS (mOS: 36 and 17.1 mo; mPFS: 12.2 mo and 9.9 mo, respectively); poorest OS and PFS was observed in wild type IDH1 (wtIDH1) glioblastomas that were MGMT promoter unmethylated (mOS: 15 mo, mPFS: 9.7 mo). For patients with wtIDH glioblastomas, TMZ+RT was associated with improved OS and PFS relative to patients treated with RT (OS: 15.4 mo v 9.6 mo, p < 0.001; PFS: 9.9 mo v 6.5 mo, p < 0.001). While TMZ+RT and RT treated mIDH patients exhibited improved overall survival relative to those with wtIDH, there were no differences between the TMZ+RT or RT group. These results suggest that mIDH1 conferred resistance to TMZ. Supporting this hypothesis, exogenous expression of mIDH1 in independent astrocytoma/glioblastoma lines resulted in a 3–10 fold increase in TMZ resistance after long-term passage. Conclusion Our study demonstrates IDH mutation and MGMT promoter methylation status independently associate with favorable outcome in TMZ+RT treated glioblastoma patients. However, these biomarkers differentially impact clinical TMZ response. PMID:26503470

  19. IDH Mutation Analysis in Ewing Sarcoma Family Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Na, Ki Yong; Noh, Byeong-Joo; Sung, Ji-Youn; Kim, Youn Wha; Santini Araujo, Eduardo; Park, Yong-Koo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) with production of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). Dysfunctional IDH leads to reduced production of α-KG and NADH and increased production of 2-hydroxyglutarate, an oncometabolite. This results in increased oxidative damage and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor α, causing cells to be prone to tumorigenesis. Methods: This study investigated IDH mutations in 61 Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs), using a pentose nucleic acid clamping method and direct sequencing. Results: We identified four cases of ESFTs harboring IDH mutations. The number of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations was equal and the subtype of IDH mutations was variable. Clinicopathologic analysis according to IDH mutation status did not reveal significant results. Conclusions: This study is the first to report IDH mutations in ESFTs. The results indicate that ESFTs can harbor IDH mutations in previously known hot-spot regions, although their incidence is rare. Further validation with a larger case-based study would establish more reliable and significant data on prevalence rate and the biological significance of IDH mutations in ESFTs. PMID:26018518

  20. Cloning of ELL, a gene that fuses to MLL in a t(11; 19)(q23; p13. 1) in acute myeloid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Thirman, M.J.; Levitan, D.A.; Kobayashi, H.; Simon, M.C.; Rowley, J.D. )

    1994-12-06

    To characterize the functions of MLL fusion transcripts, we cloned the gene that fuses to MLL in the translocation t(11;19)(q23;p13.1). This translocation is distinct from another type of 11;19 translocation with a 19p13.3 breakpoint that results in the fusion of MLL to the ENL gene. By PCR screening of a cDNA library prepared from a patient's leukemia cells with this translocation, we obtained a fusion transcript containing exon 7 of MLL and sequence of an unknown gene. The sequence of this gene was amplified and used as a probe to screen a fetal brain cDNA library. On Northern blot analysis, this cDNA detected a 4.4-kb transcript that was abundant in peripheral blood leukocytes, skeletal muscle, placenta, and testis and expressed at lower levels in spleen, thymus, heart, brain, lung, kidney, liver, and ovary. In addition, a 2.8-kb transcript was present in peripheral blood, testis, and placenta. On [open quotes]zoo blots,[close quotes] this gene was shown to be evolutionarily conserved in 10 mammalian species as well as in chicken, frog, and fish. We have named this gene ELL (for eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukemia gene). A highly basic, lysine-rich motif of the predicted ELL protein is homologous to similar regions of several proteins, including the DNA-binding domain of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The characterization of the normal functions of ELL as well as its altered function when fused to MLL will be critical to further our understanding of the mechanisms of leukemogenesis. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Cloning of ELL, a gene that fuses to MLL in a t(11;19)(q23;p13.1) in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Thirman, M J; Levitan, D A; Kobayashi, H; Simon, M C; Rowley, J D

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the functions of MLL fusion transcripts, we cloned the gene that fuses to MLL in the translocation t(11;19)(q23;p13.1). This translocation is distinct from another type of 11;19 translocation with a 19p13.3 breakpoint that results in the fusion of MLL to the ENL gene. By PCR screening of a cDNA library prepared from a patient's leukemia cells with this translocation, we obtained a fusion transcript containing exon 7 of MLL and sequence of an unknown gene. The sequence of this gene was amplified and used as a probe to screen a fetal brain cDNA library. On Northern blot analysis, this cDNA detected a 4.4-kb transcript that was abundant in peripheral blood leukocytes, skeletal muscle, placenta, and testis and expressed at lower levels in spleen, thymus, heart, brain, lung, kidney, liver, and ovary. In addition, a 2.8-kb transcript was present in peripheral blood, testis, and placenta. On "zoo blots," this gene was shown to be evolutionarily conserved in 10 mammalian species as well as in chicken, frog, and fish. We have named this gene ELL (for eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukemia gene). A highly basic, lysine-rich motif of the predicted ELL protein is homologous to similar regions of several proteins, including the DNA-binding domain of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The characterization of the normal functions of ELL as well as its altered function when fused to MLL will be critical to further our understanding of the mechanisms of leukemogenesis. Images PMID:7991593

  2. Unique mutation portraits and frequent COL2A1 gene alteration in chondrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Totoki, Yasushi; Yoshida, Akihiko; Hosoda, Fumie; Nakamura, Hiromi; Hama, Natsuko; Ogura, Koichi; Yoshida, Aki; Fujiwara, Tomohiro; Arai, Yasuhito; Toguchida, Junya; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Miyano, Satoru; Kawai, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most frequent malignant bone tumor. However, the etiological background of chondrosarcomagenesis remains largely unknown, along with details on molecular alterations and potential therapeutic targets. Massively parallel paired-end sequencing of whole genomes of 10 primary chondrosarcomas revealed that the process of accumulation of somatic mutations is homogeneous irrespective of the pathological subtype or the presence of IDH1 mutations, is unique among a range of cancer types, and shares significant commonalities with that of prostate cancer. Clusters of structural alterations localized within a single chromosome were observed in four cases. Combined with targeted resequencing of additional cartilaginous tumor cohorts, we identified somatic alterations of the COL2A1 gene, which encodes an essential extracellular matrix protein in chondroskeletal development, in 19.3% of chondrosarcoma and 31.7% of enchondroma cases. Epigenetic regulators (IDH1 and YEATS2) and an activin/BMP signal component (ACVR2A) were recurrently altered. Furthermore, a novel FN1-ACVR2A fusion transcript was observed in both chondrosarcoma and osteochondromatosis cases. With the characteristic accumulative process of somatic changes as a background, molecular defects in chondrogenesis and aberrant epigenetic control are primarily causative of both benign and malignant cartilaginous tumors. PMID:25024164

  3. TET2 gene mutation is unfavorable prognostic factor in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia patients with NPM1+ and FLT3-ITD - mutations.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaopeng; Xu, Yang; Yin, Jia; Tian, Hong; Chen, Suning; Wu, Depei; Sun, Aining

    2014-07-01

    Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (cn-AML) is a group of heterogeneous diseases. Gene mutations are increasingly used to assess the prognosis of cn-AML patients and guide risk-adapted treatment. In the present study, we analyzed the molecular genetics characteristics of 373 adult cn-AML patients and explored the relationship between TET2 gene mutations or different genetic mutation patterns and prognosis. We found that 16.1 % of patients had TET2 mutations, 31.6 % had FLT3 internal tandem duplications (ITDs), 6.2 % had FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain mutations, 2.4 % had c-KIT mutations, 37.8 % had NPM1 mutations, 11.3 % had WT1 mutations, 5.9 % had RUNX1 mutations, 11.5 % had ASXL1 mutations, 3.8 % had MLL-PTDs, 7.8 % had IDH1 mutations, 7.8 % had NRAS mutations, 12.3 % had IDH2 mutations, 1.6 % had EZH2 mutations, and 14.7 % had DNMT3A mutations, while none had CBL mutations. Gene mutations were detected in 76.94 % (287/373) of all patients. In the NPM1m(+) patients, those with TET2 mutations were associated with a shorter median overall survival (OS) as compared to TET2 wild-type (wt) patients (9.9 vs. 27.0 months, respectively; P = 0.023); Interestingly, the TET2 mutation was identified as an unfavorable prognostic factor and was closely associated with a shorter median OS as compared to TET2-wt (9.5 vs. 32.2 months, respectively; P = 0.013) in the NPM1m(+)/FLT3-ITDm(-) patient group. Thus, identification of TET2 combined with classic NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations allowed us to stratify cn-AML into distinct subtypes. PMID:24859829

  4. Mutation Profiling in Cholangiocarcinoma: Prognostic and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Churi, Chaitanya R.; Shroff, Rachna; Wang, Ying; Rashid, Asif; Kang, HyunSeon C.; Weatherly, Jacqueline; Zuo, Mingxin; Zinner, Ralph; Hong, David; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Janku, Filip; Crane, Christopher H.; Mishra, Lopa; Vauthey, Jean-Nicholas; Wolff, Robert A.; Mills, Gordon; Javle, Milind

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is clinically heterogeneous; intra and extrahepatic CCA have diverse clinical presentations. Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology may identify the genetic differences between these entities and identify molecular subgroups for targeted therapeutics. Methods We describe successful NGS-based testing of 75 CCA patients along with the prognostic and therapeutic implications of findings. Mutation profiling was performed using either a) NGS panel of hotspot regions in 46 cancer-related genes using a 318-chip on Ion PGM Sequencer or b) Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform for 3,769 exons of 236 cancer-related genes plus 47 introns from 19 genes to an average depth of 1000X. Clinical data was abstracted and correlated with clinical outcome. Patients with targetable mutations were referred to appropriate clinical trials. Results There were significant differences between intrahepatic (n = 55) and extrahepatic CCA (n = 20) in regard to the nature and frequency of the genetic aberrations (GAs). IDH1 and DNA repair gene alterations occurred more frequently in intrahepatic CCA, while ERBB2 GAs occurred in the extrahepatic group. Commonly occurring GAs in intrahepatic CCA were TP53 (35%), KRAS (24%), ARID1A (20%), IDH1 (18%), MCL1 (16%) and PBRM1 (11%). Most frequent GAs in extrahepatic CCA (n = 20) were TP53 (45%), KRAS (40%), ERBB2 (25%), SMAD4 (25%), FBXW7 (15%) and CDKN2A (15%). In intrahepatic CCA, KRAS, TP53 or MAPK/mTOR GAs were significantly associated with a worse prognosis while FGFR GAs correlated with a relatively indolent disease course. IDH1 GAs did not have any prognostic significance. GAs in the chromatin modulating genes, BAP1 and PBRM1 were associated with bone metastases and worse survival in extrahepatic CCA. Radiologic responses and clinical benefit was noted with EGFR, FGFR, C-met, B-RAF and MEK inhibitors. Conclusion There are significant genetic differences between intra and extrahepatic CCA. NGS

  5. Four Novel Loci (19q13, 6q24, 12q24, and 5q14) Influence the Microcirculation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ikram, M. Arfan; Wang, Jie Jin; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Breteler, Monique M. B.; Cheung, Ning; Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Kao, Linda; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Smith, Albert Vernon; Glazer, Nicole L.; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Psaty, Bruce M.; Jonasson, Fridbert; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Aspelund, Thor; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Taylor, Kent D.; Li, Xiaohui; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Xi, Quansheng; Sivakumaran, Theru A.; Mackey, David A.; MacGregor, Stuart; Martin, Nicholas G.; Young, Terri L.; Bis, Josh C.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hammond, Christopher J.; Andrew, Toby; Fahy, Samantha; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Scott, Rodney J.; Islam, F. M. Amirul; Rotter, Jerome I.; McAuley, Annie K.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tai, E. Shyong; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Siscovick, David S.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Wong, Tien Y.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the microcirculation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Changes in retinal vascular caliber reflect early microvascular disease and predict incident cardiovascular events. We performed a genome-wide association study to identify genetic variants associated with retinal vascular caliber. We analyzed data from four population-based discovery cohorts with 15,358 unrelated Caucasian individuals, who are members of the Cohort for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium, and replicated findings in four independent Caucasian cohorts (n = 6,652). All participants had retinal photography and retinal arteriolar and venular caliber measured from computer software. In the discovery cohorts, 179 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) spread across five loci were significantly associated (p<5.0×10−8) with retinal venular caliber, but none showed association with arteriolar caliber. Collectively, these five loci explain 1.0%–3.2% of the variation in retinal venular caliber. Four out of these five loci were confirmed in independent replication samples. In the combined analyses, the top SNPs at each locus were: rs2287921 (19q13; p = 1.61×10−25, within the RASIP1 locus), rs225717 (6q24; p = 1.25×10−16, adjacent to the VTA1 and NMBR loci), rs10774625 (12q24; p = 2.15×10−13, in the region of ATXN2,SH2B3 and PTPN11 loci), and rs17421627 (5q14; p = 7.32×10−16, adjacent to the MEF2C locus). In two independent samples, locus 12q24 was also associated with coronary heart disease and hypertension. Our population-based genome-wide association study demonstrates four novel loci associated with retinal venular caliber, an endophenotype of the microcirculation associated with clinical cardiovascular disease. These data provide further insights into the contribution and biological mechanisms of microcirculatory changes that underlie cardiovascular disease. PMID

  6. The impact of concurrent temozolomide with adjuvant radiation and IDH mutation status among patients with anaplastic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Caterina; Voss, Jesse S.; Decker, Paul A.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Hardie, John; Laack, Nadia N.; Parney, Ian F.; Uhm, Joon H.; Buckner, Jan C.

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses the controversial role of temozolomide (TMZ) concurrent with adjuvant radiation (RT) in patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). The impact of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) status on therapy and outcomes is also examined. All adult patients diagnosed with AA from 2001 to 2011 and treated with standard doses of adjuvant RT were identified retrospectively for clinical data extraction. IDH status was determined by IDH1-R132H immunostain and sequencing for other mutations in IDH1/IDH2. Cumulative survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards regression models were fit for univariable/multivariable analyses. 136 patients had received concurrent TMZ while 29 had not. Of these, IDH status was determined on 114 and 27 patients, respectively. On univariable analysis, improved five-year survival was independently associated with concurrent TMZ (46.2 vs. 29.3 %, p = 0.02) and IDH mutation (78.9 vs. 22.0 %, p < 0.001). IDH mutation was additionally associated with a greater likelihood of extensive resection possibly secondary to a more favorable tumor location. Gross total/subtotal resections also led to improved survival when compared to biopsy alone on univariable analysis. On multivariable analysis, the association with five-year survival persisted for both concurrent TMZ and IDH mutation, but not with extent of surgery. Both IDH mutation and concurrent TMZ are associated with improved five-year survival in patients with AA who are receiving adjuvant RT. Secondarily, the association between five-year survival and extent of resection is lost on multivariable analysis. This suggests a possible association between IDH mutation, tumor location and consequent resectability. PMID:24993250

  7. A t(17;19)(q22;p13.3) Involving TCF3, a t(1;9)(p13;p13), and a 5' IGH Deletion in a Case of Adult B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chow, R; Shabsovich, D; Schiller, G; Kallen, M; Tirado, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    TCF3 (19p13.3) abnormalities are relatively common in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). The t(1;19)(q23;p13) involving PBX1 is the most common of these rearrangements. The t(17;19)(q22;p13.3), resulting in the TCF3-HLF fusion gene, is also seen in B-ALL and is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Herein, we present the case of a 25-year-old male diagnosed with B-ALL whose initial karyotype showed a t(17;19)(q22p13.3). FISH confirmed TCF3 involvement and also revealed a 5' IGH deletion. After treatment, the patient relapsed, at which point conventional cytogenetic studies showed a t(17;19), loss of the 5' IGH region, and a t(3;10) not seen in initial studies. After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the patient relapsed again, at which point conventional cytogenetic studies showed a complex karyotype with t(17;19), t(1;9)(p13;p13), and structural anomalies involving chromosomes 5, 7, and 14, but no IGH abnormalities by FISH. The t(1;9) has been shown to involve PAX5, which plays numerous regulatory roles in B-cell differentiation. Other PAX5 rearrangements have been detected in B-ALL cases of young adults and adolescents, but with unclear clinical significance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of t(17;19)-ALL with concomitant 5' IGH deletion and t(1;9)(p13;p13) potentially involving PAX5, albeit at different time points in disease progression. This case provides insight into the clonal evolution of t(17;19)-ALL and the potential involvement of PAX5 and IGH aberrations in the evolution of this malignancy. PMID:27183380

  8. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, Der-Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML. PMID:26375248

  9. Mutations of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS): An update.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Bani Bandana; Kadam, N N

    2016-01-01

    The plethora of knowledge gained on myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a heterogeneous pre-malignant disorder of hematopoietic stem cells, through sequencing of several pathway genes has unveiled molecular pathogenesis and its progression to AML. Evolution of phenotypic classification and risk-stratification based on peripheral cytopenias and blast count has moved to five-tier risk-groups solely concerning chromosomal aberrations. Increased frequency of complex abnormalities, which is associated with genetic instability, defines the subgroup of worst prognosis in MDS. However, the independent effect of monosomal karyotype remains controversial. Recent discoveries on mutations in RNA-splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1, U2AF2); DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2); chromatin modification (ASXL1, EZH2); transcription factor (TP53, RUNX1); signal transduction/kinases (FLT3, JAK2); RAS pathway (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11); cohesin complex (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21); DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL); and other pathway genes have given insights into the independent effects and interaction of co-occurrence of mutations on disease-phenotype. RNA-splicing and DNA methylation mutations appeared to occur early and are reported as 'founder' mutations in over 50% MDS patients. TET2 mutation, through altered DNA methylation, has been found to have independent prognostic response to hypomethylating agents. Moreover, presence of DNMT3A, TET2 and ASXL1 mutations in normal elderly individuals forms the basis of understanding that accumulation of somatic mutations may not cause direct disease-development; however, cooperation with other mutations in the genes that are frequently mutated in myeloid and other hematopoietic cancers might result in clonal expansion through self-renewal and/or proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells. Identification of small molecules as inhibitors of epigenetic mutations has opened avenues for tailoring targeted drug development. The

  10. MGMT Promoter Methylation and BRAF V600E Mutations Are Helpful Markers to Discriminate Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma from Giant Cell Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lohkamp, Laura-Nanna; Schinz, Maren; Gehlhaar, Claire; Guse, Katrin; Thomale, Ulrich-Wilhelm; Vajkoczy, Peter; Heppner, Frank L; Koch, Arend

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell Glioblastoma (gcGBM) and Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) are rare astroglial tumors of the central nervous system. Although they share certain histomorphological and immunohistochemical features, they are characterized by different clinical behavior and prognosis. Nevertheless, few cases remain uncertain, as their histomorphological hallmarks and immunophenotypes do correspond to the typical pattern neither of gcGBM nor PXA. Therefore, in addition to the routinely used diagnostic histochemical and immunohistochemical markers like Gömöri, p53 and CD34, we analyzed if genetic variations like MGMT promoter methylation, mutations in the IDH1/2 genes, or BRAF mutations, which are actually used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive molecular markers in anaplastic glial tumors, could be helpful in the differential diagnostic of both tumor entities. We analyzed 34 gcGBM and 20 PXA for genetic variations in the above-named genes and found distinct distributions between both groups. MGMT promoter hypermethylation was observed in 3 out of 20 PXA compared to 14 out of 34 gcGBM (15% vs. 41.2%, p-value 0.09). BRAF V600E mutations were detected in 50% of the PXA but not in any of the gcGBM (50% vs. 0%, p-value < 0.001). IDH1 R132 and IDH R172 mutations were not present in any of the PXA and gcGBM cases. Our data indicate, that in addition to the histological and immunohistochemical evaluation, investigation of MGMT promoter methylation and in particular BRAF V600E mutations represent reliable additional tools to sustain differentiation of gcGBM from PXA on a molecular basis. Based on these data specific BRAF kinase inhibitors could represent a promising agent in the therapy of PXA and their use should be emphasized. PMID:27253461

  11. MGMT Promoter Methylation and BRAF V600E Mutations Are Helpful Markers to Discriminate Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma from Giant Cell Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lohkamp, Laura-Nanna; Schinz, Maren; Gehlhaar, Claire; Guse, Katrin; Thomale, Ulrich-Wilhelm; Vajkoczy, Peter; Heppner, Frank L.; Koch, Arend

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell Glioblastoma (gcGBM) and Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) are rare astroglial tumors of the central nervous system. Although they share certain histomorphological and immunohistochemical features, they are characterized by different clinical behavior and prognosis. Nevertheless, few cases remain uncertain, as their histomorphological hallmarks and immunophenotypes do correspond to the typical pattern neither of gcGBM nor PXA. Therefore, in addition to the routinely used diagnostic histochemical and immunohistochemical markers like Gömöri, p53 and CD34, we analyzed if genetic variations like MGMT promoter methylation, mutations in the IDH1/2 genes, or BRAF mutations, which are actually used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive molecular markers in anaplastic glial tumors, could be helpful in the differential diagnostic of both tumor entities. We analyzed 34 gcGBM and 20 PXA for genetic variations in the above-named genes and found distinct distributions between both groups. MGMT promoter hypermethylation was observed in 3 out of 20 PXA compared to 14 out of 34 gcGBM (15% vs. 41.2%, p-value 0.09). BRAF V600E mutations were detected in 50% of the PXA but not in any of the gcGBM (50% vs. 0%, p-value < 0.001). IDH1 R132 and IDH R172 mutations were not present in any of the PXA and gcGBM cases. Our data indicate, that in addition to the histological and immunohistochemical evaluation, investigation of MGMT promoter methylation and in particular BRAF V600E mutations represent reliable additional tools to sustain differentiation of gcGBM from PXA on a molecular basis. Based on these data specific BRAF kinase inhibitors could represent a promising agent in the therapy of PXA and their use should be emphasized. PMID:27253461

  12. Comprehensive, Integrative Genomic Analysis of Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Diffuse low-grade and intermediate-grade gliomas (which together make up the lower-grade gliomas, World Health Organization grades II and III) have highly variable clinical behavior that is not adequately predicted on the basis of histologic class. Some are indolent; others quickly progress to glioblastoma. The uncertainty is compounded by interobserver variability in histologic diagnosis. Mutations in IDH, TP53, and ATRX and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion) have been implicated as clinically relevant markers of lower-grade gliomas. METHODS We performed genomewide analyses of 293 lower-grade gliomas from adults, incorporating exome sequence, DNA copy number, DNA methylation, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and targeted protein expression. These data were integrated and tested for correlation with clinical outcomes. RESULTS Unsupervised clustering of mutations and data from RNA, DNA-copy-number, and DNA-methylation platforms uncovered concordant classification of three robust, nonoverlapping, prognostically significant subtypes of lower-grade glioma that were captured more accurately by IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than by histologic class. Patients who had lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation and 1p/19q codeletion had the most favorable clinical outcomes. Their gliomas harbored mutations in CIC, FUBP1, NOTCH1, and the TERT promoter. Nearly all lower-grade gliomas with IDH mutations and no 1p/19q codeletion had mutations in TP53 (94%) and ATRX inactivation (86%). The large majority of lower-grade gliomas without an IDH mutation had genomic aberrations and clinical behavior strikingly similar to those found in primary glioblastoma. CONCLUSIONS The integration of genomewide data from multiple platforms delineated three molecular classes of lower-grade gliomas that were more concordant with IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than with histologic class. Lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation either had 1p/19q

  13. Molecular analysis of cystinuria in Libyan Jews: Exclusion of the SLC3A1 gene and mapping of a new locus on 19q

    SciTech Connect

    Wartenfeld, R.; Pras, E.; Pras, M.

    1997-03-01

    Cystinuria is a hereditary disorder of amino acid transport and is manifested by the development of kidney stones. In some patients the disease is caused by mutations in the SLC3A1 gene, which is located on the short arm of chromosome 2 and encodes a renal/intestinal transporter for cystine and the dibasic amino acids. In Israel cystinuria is especially common among Jews of Libyan origin. After excluding SLC3A1 as the disease-causing gene in Libyan Jewish patients, we performed a genomewide search that shows that the Libyan Jewish cystinuria gene maps to the long arm of chromosome 19. Significant linkage was obtained for seven chromosome 19 markers. A maximal LOD score of 9.22 was obtained with the marker D19S882. Multipoint data and recombination analysis placed the gene in an 8-cM interval between the markers D19S409 and D19S208. Significant linkage disequilibrium was observed for alleles of four markers, and a specific haplotype comprising the markers D19S225, D19S208, D19S220, and D19S422 was found in 11 of 17 carrier chromosomes, versus 1 of 58 Libyan Jewish noncarrier chromosomes. 40 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. A novel somatic MAPK1 mutation in primary ovarian mixed germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yang; Deng, Wei; Wang, Feng; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Fa-Ying; Yang, Bi-Cheng; Huang, Mei-Zhen; Guo, Jiu-Bai; Xie, Qiu-Hua; He, Ming; Huang, Ou-Ping

    2016-02-01

    A recent exome-sequencing study revealed prevalent mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) p.E322K mutation in cervical carcinoma. It remains largely unknown whether ovarian carcinomas also harbor MAPK1 mutations. As paralogous gene mutations co‑occur frequently in human malignancies, we analyzed here a total of 263 ovarian carcinomas for the presence of MAPK1 and paralogous MAPK3 mutations by DNA sequencing. A previously unreported MAPK1 p.D321N somatic mutation was identified in 2 out of 18 (11.1%) ovarian mixed germ cell tumors, while no other MAPK1 or MAPK3 mutation was detected in our samples. Of note, OCC‑115, the MAPK1‑mutated sample with bilateral cancerous ovaries affected, harbored MAPK1 mutation in the right ovary while retained the left ovary intact, implicating that the genetic alterations underlying ovarian mixed germ cell tumor may be different, even in patients with similar genetic backgrounds and tumor microenvironments. The results of evolutionary conservation and protein structure modeling analysis implicated that MAPK1 p.D321N mutation may be pathogenic. Additionally, mutations in protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit α (PPP2R1A), ring finger protein 43 (RNF43), DNA directed polymerase ε (POLE1), ribonuclease type III (DICER1), CCCTC‑binding factor (CTCF), ribosomal protein L22 (RPL22), DNA methyltransferase 3α (DNMT3A), transformation/transcription domain‑associated protein (TRRAP), isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1 and IDH2 were not detected in ovarian mixed germ cell tumors, implicating these genetic alterations may be not associated with MAPK1 mutation in the development of this malignancy. The present study identified a previously unreported MAPK1 mutation in ovarian mixed germ cell tumors for the first time, and this mutation may be actively involved in the tumorigenesis of this disease. PMID:26548627

  15. Genetic variants at 1q32.1, 10q11.2 and 19q13.41 are associated with prostate-specific antigen for prostate cancer screening in two Korean population-based cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soriul; Shin, Chol; Jee, Sun Ha

    2015-02-10

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels are affected by non-cancerous conditions such as benign prostatic hyperplasia, inflammations, and inherited factors. To search for genetic variants associated with PSA levels, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a two-stage design. A total of 554 men from the Korean Cancer Prevention Study-II were used as a discovery stage and 1575 men collected by the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study were used as a replication stage. Analysis by Genome-wide Human single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array 5.0 was performed by using DNAs derived from venous blood. We analyzed the association between genetic variants and PSA levels using multivariate linear regression models, including age as a covariate. We detected 12 genome-wide significant signals on chromosome 1q32.1, 10q11.2, and 19q13.41 between PSA levels and SNPs. The top SNP associated with log PSA levels was rs2153904 in SLC45A3 (p values, 5.24×10(-9) to 2.00×10(-6)). We also investigated GWAS using 754 subjects from KCPS-II cohort whether our genome-wide significant loci were associated with a risk of prostate cancer (PCa) (200 PCa cases and 554 controls). Three of the SNPs on 10q11.2, rs7077830, rs2611489, and rs4631830, were associated with a risk of PCa. However, two loci, 1q32.1 and 19q13, were not significantly associated with a PCa risk. We suggest that our results for some but not all PCa risk SNPs to be associated with PSA levels could be used as an evidence for the advance of individual PCa screening strategies, such as applying a personalized cutoff value for PSA. PMID:25434496

  16. Comprehensive Analysis of the Transcriptional and Mutational Landscape of Follicular and Papillary Thyroid Cancers.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seong-Keun; Lee, Seungbok; Kim, Su-Jin; Jee, Hyeon-Gun; Kim, Byoung-Ae; Cho, Hyesun; Song, Young Shin; Cho, Sun Wook; Won, Jae-Kyung; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Park, Do Joon; Kim, Jong-Il; Lee, Kyu Eun; Park, Young Joo; Seo, Jeong-Sun

    2016-08-01

    Follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) and benign follicular adenoma (FA) are indistinguishable by preoperative diagnosis due to their similar histological features. Here we report the first RNA sequencing study of these tumors, with data for 30 minimally invasive FTCs (miFTCs) and 25 FAs. We also compared 77 classical papillary thyroid carcinomas (cPTCs) and 48 follicular variant of PTCs (FVPTCs) to observe the differences in their molecular properties. Mutations in H/K/NRAS, DICER1, EIF1AX, IDH1, PTEN, SOS1, and SPOP were identified in miFTC or FA. We identified a low frequency of fusion genes in miFTC (only one, PAX8-PPARG), but a high frequency of that in PTC (17.60%). The frequencies of BRAFV600E and H/K/NRAS mutations were substantially different in miFTC and cPTC, and those of FVPTC were intermediate between miFTC and cPTC. Gene expression analysis demonstrated three molecular subtypes regardless of their histological features, including Non-BRAF-Non-RAS (NBNR), as well as BRAF-like and RAS-like. The novel molecular subtype, NBNR, was associated with DICER1, EIF1AX, IDH1, PTEN, SOS1, SPOP, and PAX8-PPARG. The transcriptome of miFTC or encapsulated FVPTC was indistinguishable from that of FA, providing a molecular explanation for the similarly indolent behavior of these tumors. We identified upregulation of genes that are related to mitochondrial biogenesis including ESRRA and PPARGC1A in oncocytic follicular thyroid neoplasm. Arm-level copy number variations were correlated to histological and molecular characteristics. These results expanded the current molecular understanding of thyroid cancer and may lead to new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to the disease. PMID:27494611

  17. Comprehensive Analysis of the Transcriptional and Mutational Landscape of Follicular and Papillary Thyroid Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Hyeon-Gun; Kim, Byoung-Ae; Cho, Hyesun; Song, Young Shin; Cho, Sun Wook; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Il; Lee, Kyu Eun; Seo, Jeong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) and benign follicular adenoma (FA) are indistinguishable by preoperative diagnosis due to their similar histological features. Here we report the first RNA sequencing study of these tumors, with data for 30 minimally invasive FTCs (miFTCs) and 25 FAs. We also compared 77 classical papillary thyroid carcinomas (cPTCs) and 48 follicular variant of PTCs (FVPTCs) to observe the differences in their molecular properties. Mutations in H/K/NRAS, DICER1, EIF1AX, IDH1, PTEN, SOS1, and SPOP were identified in miFTC or FA. We identified a low frequency of fusion genes in miFTC (only one, PAX8–PPARG), but a high frequency of that in PTC (17.60%). The frequencies of BRAFV600E and H/K/NRAS mutations were substantially different in miFTC and cPTC, and those of FVPTC were intermediate between miFTC and cPTC. Gene expression analysis demonstrated three molecular subtypes regardless of their histological features, including Non–BRAF–Non–RAS (NBNR), as well as BRAF–like and RAS–like. The novel molecular subtype, NBNR, was associated with DICER1, EIF1AX, IDH1, PTEN, SOS1, SPOP, and PAX8–PPARG. The transcriptome of miFTC or encapsulated FVPTC was indistinguishable from that of FA, providing a molecular explanation for the similarly indolent behavior of these tumors. We identified upregulation of genes that are related to mitochondrial biogenesis including ESRRA and PPARGC1A in oncocytic follicular thyroid neoplasm. Arm-level copy number variations were correlated to histological and molecular characteristics. These results expanded the current molecular understanding of thyroid cancer and may lead to new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to the disease. PMID:27494611

  18. Serum 2-hydroxyglutarate levels predict isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations and clinical outcome in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    DiNardo, Courtney D.; Propert, Kathleen J.; Loren, Alison W.; Paietta, Elisabeth; Sun, Zhuoxin; Levine, Ross L.; Straley, Kimberly S.; Yen, Katharine; Patel, Jay P.; Agresta, Samuel; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Perl, Alexander E.; Litzow, Mark R.; Rowe, Jacob M.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Fernandez, Hugo F.; Margolis, David J.; Tallman, Martin S.; Luger, Selina M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-associated isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations produce the metabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), but the clinical utility of 2HG has not been established. We studied whether 2HG measurements in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients correlate with IDH mutations, and whether diagnostic or remission 2HG measurements predict survival. Sera from 223 de novo AML patients were analyzed for 2HG concentration by reverse-phase liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Pretreatment 2HG levels ranged from 10 to 30 000 ng/mL and were elevated in IDH-mutants (median, 3004 ng/mL), compared to wild-type IDH (median, 61 ng/mL) (P < .0005). 2HG levels did not differ among IDH1 or IDH2 allelic variants. In receiver operating characteristic analysis, a discriminatory level of 700 ng/mL optimally segregated patients with and without IDH mutations, and on subsequent mutational analysis of the 13 IDH wild-type samples with 2HG levels >700 ng/mL, 9 were identified to have IDH mutations. IDH-mutant patients with 2HG levels >200 at complete remission had shorter overall survival compared to 2HG ≤200 ng/mL (hazard ratio, 3.9; P = .02). We establish a firm association between IDH mutations and serum 2HG concentration in AML, and confirm that serum oncometabolite measurements provide useful diagnostic and prognostic information that can improve patient selection for IDH-targeted therapies. PMID:23641016

  19. Myeloproliferative neoplasms: From JAK2 mutations discovery to JAK2 inhibitor therapies

    PubMed Central

    Passamonti, Francesco; Maffioli, Margherita; Caramazza, Domenica; Cazzola, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Most BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) carry an activating JAK2 mutation. Approximately 96% of patients with polycythemia vera (PV) harbors the V617F mutation in JAK2 exon 14, whereas the minority of JAK2 (V617F)-negative subjects shows several mutations in exon 12. Other mutation events as MPL, TET2, LNK, EZH2 have been described in chronic phase, while NF1, IDH1, IDH2, ASX1, CBL and Ikaros in blast phase of MPN. The specific pathogenic implication of these mutations is under investigation, but they may have a role in refinement of diagnostic criteria and in development of new prognostic models. Several trials with targeted therapy (JAK inhibitors) are ongoing mostly involving patients with PMF, post-PV MF and post-essential thrombocythemia (ET) MF. Treatment with ruxolitinib and TG101348 has shown clinically significant benefits, particularly in improvement of splenomegaly and constitutional symptoms in MF patients. On the other hand, JAK inhibitors have not thus far shown disease-modifying activity therefore any other deduction on these new drugs seems premature. PMID:21646683

  20. IDH mutations in liver cell plasticity and biliary cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Supriya K; Parachoniak, Christine A; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is an aggressive cancer associated with the bile ducts within the liver. These tumors are characterized by frequent gain-of-function mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) genes—that are also common in subsets of neural, haematopoietic and bone tumors, but rare or absent in the other types of gastrointestinal malignancy. Mutant IDH acts through a novel mechanism of oncogenesis, producing high levels of the metabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate, which interferes with the function of α-ketoglutarate-dependent enzymes that regulate diverse cellular processes including histone demethylation and DNA modification. Recently, we used in vitro stem cell systems and genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) to demonstrate that mutant IDH promotes ICC formation by blocking hepatocyte differentiation and increasing pools of hepatic progenitors that are susceptible to additional oncogenic hits leading to ICC. We found that silencing of HNF4A—encoding a master transcriptional regulator of hepatocyte identity and quiescence—was critical to mutant IDH-mediated inhibition of liver differentiation. In line with these findings, human ICC with IDH mutations are characterized by a hepatic progenitor cell transcriptional signature suggesting that they are a distinct ICC subtype as compared to IDH wild type tumors. The role of mutant IDH in controlling hepatic differentiation state suggests the potential of newly developed inhibitors of the mutant enzyme as a form of differentiation therapy in a solid tumor. PMID:25485496

  1. TERT promoter mutations and long telomere length predict poor survival and radiotherapy resistance in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yiping; Wang, Maode; Cui, Bo; Ji, Meiju; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences have implicated somatic gain-of-function mutations at the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter as one of the major mechanisms that promote transcriptional activation of TERT and subsequently maintain telomere length in human cancers including glioma. To investigate the prognostic value of these mutations and telomere length, individually and their coexistence, in gliomas, we analyzed two somatic mutations C228T and C250T in the TERT promoter, relative telomere length (RTL), IDH1 mutation and MGMT methylation in 389 glioma patients, and explored their associations with patient characteristics and clinical outcomes. Our data showed that C228T and C250T mutations were found in 17.0% (66 of 389) and 11.8% (46 of 389) of gliomas, respectively, and these two mutations were mutually exclusive in this cancer. Moreover, they were significantly associated with WHO grade. We also found that the RTL was significant longer in gliomas than in meningiomas and normal brain tissues (Median, 0.89 vs. 0.44 and 0.50; P < 0.001), and demonstrated that the RTL was strongly correlated with tumor recurrence. Importantly, TERT promoter mutations or long RTL caused a significantly poorer survival than TERT wild-type or short RTL. Coexisting TERT promoter mutations and long RTL were more commonly associated with poor patient survival than they were individually. Notably, the patients with TERT promoter mutations particularly C228T or long RTL were resistant to radiotherapy. Collectively, TERT promoter mutations and long RTL are not only prognostic factors for poor clinical outcomes, but also the predictors of radiotherapy resistance in gliomas. PMID:26556853

  2. Fish provide ID(H)eas on targeting leukemia.

    PubMed

    Trompouki, Eirini

    2015-05-01

    In this issue of Blood, Shi et al describe the role of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (idh1) and idh2 in developmental hematopoiesis and demonstrate the conserved leukemogenic potential of human IDH1 mutations in zebrafish PMID:25953976

  3. Paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with t(1;19)(q23;p13): clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of 47 cases from the Nordic countries treated according to NOPHO protocols.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mette K; Autio, Kirsi; Barbany, Gisela; Borgström, Georg; Cavelier, Lucia; Golovleva, Irina; Heim, Sverre; Heinonen, Kristina; Hovland, Randi; Johannsson, Johann H; Johansson, Bertil; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Nordgren, Ann; Palmqvist, Lars; Forestier, Erik

    2011-10-01

    The translocation t(1;19)(q23;p13)/der(19)t(1;19) is a risk stratifying aberration in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP ALL) in the Nordic countries. We have identified 47 children/adolescents with t(1;19)/der(19)t(1;19)-positive BCP ALL treated on two successive Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) protocols between 1992 and 2007 and have reviewed the clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of these cases, comprising 1·8% of all cases. The translocation was balanced in 15 cases (32%) and unbalanced in 29 cases (62%). The most common additional chromosome abnormalities were del(9p), i(9q), del(6q), and del(13q). The median age was 7 years, the median white blood cell (WBC) count was 16 × 10(9)/l, and the female/male ratio was 1·2. The predicted event-free survival (EFS) at 5 and 10 years was 0·79, whereas the predicted overall survival (OS) at 5 and 10 years was 0·85 and 0·82, respectively. Nine patients had a bone marrow relapse after a median of 23 months; no patient had a central nervous system relapse. Additional cytogenetic abnormalities, age, gender, WBC count or whether the t(1;19) was balanced or unbalanced did not influence EFS or OS. Compared to cases with t(12,21) and high hyperdiploidy, EFS was similar, but overall survival was worse in patients with t(1;19)/der(19)t(1;19) (P = 0·004). PMID:21902680

  4. EZH2 Mutations Are Related to Low Blast Percentage in Bone Marrow and -7/del(7q) in De Novo Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuli; Dai, Haiping; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qinrong; Xu, Yang; Wang, Ying; Sun, Aining; Ruan, Jia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to determine the incidence and clinical implications of somatic EZH2 mutations in 714 patients with de novo acute myelogenous leukemia by sequencing the entire coding region. EZH2 mutations were identified in 13/714 (1.8%) of AML patients were found to be more common in males (P = 0.033). The presence of EZH2 mutations was significantly associated with lower blast percentage (21–30%) in bone marrow (P<0.0001) and -7/del(7q) (P = 0.025). There were no differences in the incidence of mutation in 13 genes, ASXL1, CBL, c-KIT, DNMT3A, FLT3, IDH1, IDH2, MLL, NPM1, NRAS, RUNX1, TET2, and WT1, between patients with and without EZH2 mutations. No difference in complete remission, event-free survival, or overall survival was observed between patients with and without EZH2 mutation (P>0.05). Overall, these results showed EZH2 mutation in de novo acute myeloid leukemia as a recurrent genetic abnormality to be associated with lower blast percentage in BM and -7/del(7q). PMID:23613835

  5. Altered global histone-trimethylation code and H3F3A-ATRX mutation in pediatric GBM.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Pankaj; Jha, Prerana; Purkait, Suvendu; Sharma, Vikas; Suri, Vaishali; Sharma, Mehar C; Faruq, Mohammed; Suri, Ashish; Sarkar, Chitra

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in H3.3-ATRX-DAXX chromatin remodeling pathway have been reported in pediatric GBMs. H3.3 (H3F3A) mutations may affect transcriptional regulation by altered global histone-methylation. Therefore, we analyzed yet partly understood global histone code (H3K-4/9/27/36) trimethylation pattern in H3F3A-ATRX mutants and wild-type. H3F3A, HIST1H3B, IDH1, ATRX, DAXX and Tp53 mutations were identified by sequencing/immunohistochemistry in 27 pediatric GBMs. Global histone-methylation H3K-4/9/27/36me3 and Polycomb-protein EZH2 expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. H3F3A-ATRX mutation was observed in 66.7 % (18/27) of pediatric GBMs. K27M and G34R-H3F3A mutations were found in 37 % (10/27) and 14.8 % (4/27) patients respectively. G34V-H3F3A, HIST1H3B and IDH1 mutations were absent. Notably, commonest global histone-methylation mark lost was H3K27me3 (17/25, 68 %) followed by H3K4me3 (45.5 %, 10/22) and H3K9me3 (18.2 %, 4/22). Global H3K36me3 showed no loss. Most significant observation was loss of one or more histone-trimethylation mark in 80 % (20/25) pediatric GBMs. Notably, simultaneous loss of H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 were present in 7/22 (31.8 %) of pediatric GBMs. Low expression of EZH2 was found in 12/24 (50 %) of cases. However no significant correlation of loss of histone-marks or EZH2 expression with H3F3A-ATRX mutants (loss of at least one histone-marks in 87.5 % (14/16) cases) versus wild-types (loss of at least one histone-marks in 75 % (6/8) cases) was seen. The present study highlights for the first time combinatorial loss of one or more histone-trimethylation marks associated with majority of pediatric GBMs and the finding suggests significant role of histone-code in the molecular biology that underlies pediatric GBMs. Hence therapies for patients with particular combinations of histone modifications present opportunity to design innovative patient-tailored treatment protocols. PMID:25479829

  6. Genetic risk variants in the CDKN2A/B, RTEL1 and EGFR genes are associated with somatic biomarkers in glioma.

    PubMed

    Ghasimi, Soma; Wibom, Carl; Dahlin, Anna M; Brännström, Thomas; Golovleva, Irina; Andersson, Ulrika; Melin, Beatrice

    2016-05-01

    During the last years, genome wide association studies have discovered common germline genetic variants associated with specific glioma subtypes. We aimed to study the association between these germline risk variants and tumor phenotypes, including copy number aberrations and protein expression. A total of 91 glioma patients were included. Thirteen well known genetic risk variants in TERT, EGFR, CCDC26, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, PHLDB1, TP53, and RTEL1 were selected for investigation of possible correlations with the glioma somatic markers: EGFR amplification, 1p/19q codeletion and protein expression of p53, Ki-67, and mutated IDH1. The CDKN2A/B risk variant, rs4977756, and the CDKN2B risk variant, rs1412829 were inversely associated (p = 0.049 and p = 0.002, respectively) with absence of a mutated IDH1, i.e., the majority of patients homozygous for the risk allele showed no or low expression of mutated IDH1. The RTEL1 risk variant, rs6010620 was associated (p = 0.013) with not having 1p/19q codeletion, i.e., the majority of patients homozygous for the risk allele did not show 1p/19q codeletion. In addition, the EGFR risk variant rs17172430 and the CDKN2B risk variant rs1412829, both showed a trend for association (p = 0.055 and p = 0.051, respectively) with increased EGFR copy number, i.e., the majority of patients homozygote for the risk alleles showed chromosomal gain or amplification of EGFR. Our findings indicate that CDKN2A/B risk genotypes are associated with primary glioblastoma without IDH mutation, and that there is an inverse association between RTEL1 risk genotypes and 1p/19q codeletion, suggesting that these genetic variants have a molecular impact on the genesis of high graded brain tumors. Further experimental studies are needed to delineate the functional mechanism of the association between genotype and somatic genetic aberrations. PMID:26839018

  7. Identification of a New Selective Chemical Inhibitor of Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Joon; Choi, Bu Young; Keum, Young-Sam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent genome-wide sequencing studies have identified unexpected genetic alterations in cancer. In particular, missense mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1) at arginine 132, mostly substituted into histidine (IDH1-R132H) were observed to frequently occur in glioma patients. Methods: We have purified recombinant IDH1 and IDH1-R132H proteins and monitored their catalytic activities. In parallel experiments, we have attempted to find new selective IDH1-R132H chemical inhibitor(s) from a fragment-based chemical library. Results: We have found that IDH1, but not IDH1-R132H, can catalyze the conversion of isocitrate into α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). In addition, we have observed that IDH1-R132H was more efficient than IDH1 in converting α-KG into (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2HG). Moreover, we have identified a new hit molecule, e.g., 2-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)isothioazol-3(2H)-one as a new selective IDH1-R132H inhibitor. Conclusions: We have observed an underlying biochemical mechanism explaining how a heterozygous IDH1 mutation contributes to the generation of R-2HG and increases cellular histone H3 trimethylation levels. We have also identified a novel selective IDH1-R132H chemical hit molecule, e.g., 2-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)isothioazol-3(2H)-one, which could be used for a future lead development against IDH1-R132H. PMID:25853107

  8. Identification of Mutations in the PYRIN-Containing NLR Genes (NLRP) in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yu; Lui, Vivian W. Y.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Egloff, Ann Marie

    2014-01-01

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) encompasses malignancies that arise in the mucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract. Recent high throughput DNA sequencing revealed HNSCC genes mutations that contribute to several cancer cell characteristics, including dysregulation of cell proliferation and death, intracellular proinflammatory signaling, and autophagy. The PYRIN-domain containing NLR (Nucleotide-binding domain, Leucine rich Repeats – containing) proteins have recently emerged as pivotal modulators of cell death, autophagy, inflammation, and metabolism. Their close physiologic association with cancer development prompted us to determine whether mutations within the NLRP (PYRIN-containing NLR) gene family were associated with HNSCC genome instability and their clinicopathologic correlations. Catastrophic mutational events underlie cancer cell genome instability and mark a point-of-no-return in cancer cell development and generation of heterogeneity. The mutation profiles of 62 patients with primary conventional type HNSCC excluding other histologic variants were analyzed. Associations were tested using Fisher's Exact test or Mann-Whitney U test. Mutations in NLRP were associated with elevated genome instability as characterized by higher mutation rates. Clinically, NLRP mutations were more frequently found in HNSCC arising in the floor of mouth (50.0%) in comparison with HNSCC at other head and neck locations (14.8%). These mutations were clustered at the leucine rich repeats region of NLRP proteins, and affected NLRP genes were mostly localized at chromosomes 11p15.4 and 19q13.42-19q13.43. Twenty novel NLRP mutations were identified in HNSCC, and mutations in this group of genes were correlated with increased cancer cell genome mutation rates, and such features could be a potential molecular biomarker of HNSCC genome instability. PMID:24465623

  9. PCR-Based Simple Subgrouping Is Validated for Classification of Gliomas and Defines Negative Prognostic Copy Number Aberrations in IDH Mutant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Nakae, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Hikaru; Hayashi, Saeko; Hattori, Natsuki; Kumon, Masanobu; Nishiyama, Yuya; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hayashi, Takuro; Inamasu, Joji; Abe, Masato; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic subgrouping of gliomas has been emphasized recently, particularly after the finding of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations. In a previous study, we investigated whole-chromosome copy number aberrations (CNAs) of gliomas and have described genetic subgrouping based on CNAs and IDH1 mutations. Subsequently, we classified gliomas using simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods to improve the availability of genetic subgrouping. We selected IDH1/2 and TP53 as markers and analyzed 237 adult supratentorial gliomas using Sanger sequencing. Using these markers, we classified gliomas into three subgroups that were strongly associated with patient prognoses. These included IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations, and IDH wild-type gliomas. IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, which mostly corresponded to gliomas carrying 1p19q co-deletions, showed lower recurrence rates than the other 2 groups. In the other high-recurrence groups, the median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations were significantly longer than those of patients with IDH wild-type gliomas. Notably, most IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations had at least one of the CNAs +7q, +8q, −9p, and −11p. Moreover, IDH mutant gliomas with at least one of these CNAs had a significantly worse prognosis than did other IDH mutant gliomas. PCR-based mutation analyses of IDH and TP53 were sufficient for simple genetic diagnosis of glioma that were strongly associated with prognosis of patients and enabled us to detect negative CNAs in IDH mutant gliomas. PMID:26558387

  10. TERT promoter mutations and telomere length in adult malignant gliomas and recurrences

    PubMed Central

    Heidenreich, Barbara; Rachakonda, P. Sivaramakrishna; Hosen, Ismail; Volz, Florian; Hemminki, Kari; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    In this report on 303 gliomas we show the highest frequency of TERT promoter mutations in gliobastomas (80%) followed by oligodendrogliomas (70%) and astrocytomas (39%). We observed positive association between TERT promoter and IDH mutations in oligodendroglial tumors (OR = 26.3; 95% CI 2.5–250.2) and inverse association in primary glioblastomas (OR = 0.13; 95% CI 0.03–0.58). Tumors with TERT promoter mutations compared to those without showed increased TERT transcription; we also showed difference in the transcription levels due to the two main mutations. Tumors with TERT promoter mutations had shorter telomeres than those without. The patients with only TERT promoter mutations showed worst survival (median survival 14.6 months) and patients with both IDH and TERT promoter mutations showed best survival (246.5 months). In patients with astrocytoma, the TERT promoter mutations only associated with poor survival (P < 0.0001); IDH mutations and 1p/19q deletions associated with increased survival (P = 0.0004). TERT promoter mutations in low grade gliomas associated with reduced progression free survival (HR 10.2; 95% CI 1.9 – 55.9). While our data affirm the role of TERT promoter mutations in glial tumors, effects on transcription and telomere length emphasise the importance of telomere biology in disease genesis and outcome. PMID:25797251

  11. Diagnostic value of H3F3A mutations in giant cell tumour of bone compared to osteoclast‐rich mimics

    PubMed Central

    Presneau, Nadège; Baumhoer, Daniel; Behjati, Sam; Pillay, Nischalan; Tarpey, Patrick; Campbell, Peter J; Jundt, Gernot; Hamoudi, Rifat; Wedge, David C; Loo, Peter Van; Hassan, A Bassim; Khatri, Bhavisha; Ye, Hongtao; Tirabosco, Roberto; Amary, M Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Driver mutations in the two histone 3.3 (H3.3) genes, H3F3A and H3F3B, were recently identified by whole genome sequencing in 95% of chondroblastoma (CB) and by targeted gene sequencing in 92% of giant cell tumour of bone (GCT). Given the high prevalence of these driver mutations, it may be possible to utilise these alterations as diagnostic adjuncts in clinical practice. Here, we explored the spectrum of H3.3 mutations in a wide range and large number of bone tumours (n = 412) to determine if these alterations could be used to distinguish GCT from other osteoclast‐rich tumours such as aneurysmal bone cyst, nonossifying fibroma, giant cell granuloma, and osteoclast‐rich malignant bone tumours and others. In addition, we explored the driver landscape of GCT through whole genome, exome and targeted sequencing (14 gene panel). We found that H3.3 mutations, namely mutations of glycine 34 in H3F3A, occur in 96% of GCT. We did not find additional driver mutations in GCT, including mutations in IDH1, IDH2, USP6, TP53. The genomes of GCT exhibited few somatic mutations, akin to the picture seen in CB. Overall our observations suggest that the presence of H3F3A p.Gly34 mutations does not entirely exclude malignancy in osteoclast‐rich tumours. However, H3F3A p.Gly34 mutations appear to be an almost essential feature of GCT that will aid pathological evaluation of bone tumours, especially when confronted with small needle core biopsies. In the absence of H3F3A p.Gly34 mutations, a diagnosis of GCT should be made with caution.

  12. HMGA2 expression pattern and TERT mutations in tumors of the vulva

    PubMed Central

    AGOSTINI, ANTONIO; PANAGOPOULOS, IOANNIS; ANDERSEN, HEGE KILEN; JOHANNESEN, LENE ELISABETH; DAVIDSON, BEN; TROPÉ, CLAES GÖRAN; HEIM, SVERRE; MICCI, FRANCESCA

    2015-01-01

    Malignant tumors of the vulva account for only 5% of cancers of the female genital tract in the USA. The most frequent cancers of the vulva are squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and malignant melanoma (MM). Little is known about the genetic aberrations carried by these tumors. We report a detailed study of 25 vulva tumors [22 SCC, 2 MM, 1 atypical squamous cell hyperplasia (AH)] analyzed for expression of the high-mobility group AT-hook family member genes HMGA2 and HMGA1, for mutations in the IDH1, IDH2 and TERT genes, and for methylation of the MGMT promoter. The RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses showed that HMGA2 was expressed in the great majority of analyzed samples (20 out of 24; SCC as well as MM) but not in the normal controls. HMGA1, on the other hand, was expressed in both tumors and normal tissues. Five of the 24 tumors (all SCC) showed the C228T mutation in the TERT promoter. Our results showed that HMGA2 and TERT may be of importance in the genesis and/or the progression of tumors of the vulva. PMID:25823555

  13. Molecular features assisting in diagnosis, surgery, and treatment decision making in low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ricky; Ravindra, Vijay M; Cohen, Adam L; Jensen, Randy L; Salzman, Karen L; Prescot, Andrew P; Colman, Howard

    2015-03-01

    The preferred management of suspected low-grade gliomas (LGGs) has been disputed, and the implications of molecular changes for medical and surgical management of LGGs are important to consider. Current strategies that make use of molecular markers and imaging techniques and therapeutic considerations offer additional options for management of LGGs. Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) genes suggest a role for this abnormal metabolic pathway in the pathogenesis and progression of these primary brain tumors. Use of magnetic resonance spectroscopy can provide preoperative detection of IDH-mutated gliomas and affect surgical planning. In addition, IDH1 and IDH2 mutation status may have an effect on surgical resectability of gliomas. The IDH-mutated tumors exhibit better prognosis throughout every grade of glioma, and mutation may be an early genetic event, preceding lineage-specific secondary and tertiary alterations that transform LGGs into secondary glioblastomas. The O6-methylguanine-DNAmethyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation and 1p19q codeletion status can predict sensitivity to chemotherapy and radiation in low- and intermediate-grade gliomas. Thus, these recent advances, which have led to a better understanding of how molecular, genetic, and epigenetic alterations influence the pathogenicity of the different histological grades of gliomas, can lead to better prognostication and may lead to specific targeted surgical interventions and medical therapies. PMID:25727224

  14. Epidemiology and clinical relevance of mutations in postpolycythemia vera and postessential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis: A study on 359 patients of the AGIMM group.

    PubMed

    Rotunno, Giada; Pacilli, Annalisa; Artusi, Valentina; Rumi, Elisa; Maffioli, Margherita; Delaini, Federica; Brogi, Giada; Fanelli, Tiziana; Pancrazzi, Alessandro; Pietra, Daniela; Bernardis, Isabella; Belotti, Clara; Pieri, Lisa; Sant'Antonio, Emanuela; Salmoiraghi, Silvia; Cilloni, Daniela; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Passamonti, Francesco; Barbui, Tiziano; Manfredini, Rossella; Cazzola, Mario; Tagliafico, Enrico; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Guglielmelli, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Transformation to secondary myelofibrosis (MF) occurs as part of the natural history of polycythemia vera (PPV-MF) and essential thrombocythemia (PET-MF). Although primary (PMF) and secondary MF are considered similar diseases and managed similarly, there are few studies specifically focused on the latter. The aim of this study was to characterize the mutation landscape, and describe the main clinical correlates and prognostic implications of mutations, in a series of 359 patients with PPV-MF and PET-MF. Compared with PV and ET, the JAK2V617F and CALR mutated allele burden was significantly higher in PPV-MF and/or PET-MF, indicating a role for accumulation of mutated alleles in the process of transformation to MF. However, neither the allele burden nor the type of driver mutation influenced overall survival (OS), while absence of any driver mutation (triple negativity) was associated with significant reduction of OS in PET-MF, similar to PMF. Of the five interrogated subclonal mutations (ASXL1, EZH2, SRSF2, IDH1, and IDH2), that comprise a prognostically detrimental high molecular risk (HMR) category in PMF, only SRSF2 mutations were associated with reduced survival in PET-MF, and no additional mutation profile with prognostic relevance was highlighted. Overall, these data indicate that the molecular landscape of secondary forms of MF is different from PMF, suggesting that unknown mutational events might contribute to the progression from chronic phase disease to myelofibrosis. These findings also support more extended genotyping approaches aimed at identifying novel molecular abnormalities with prognostic relevance for patients with PPV-MF and PET-MF. Am. J. Hematol. 91:681-686, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27037840

  15. K27M mutation in histone H3.3 defines clinically and biologically distinct subgroups of pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas.

    PubMed

    Khuong-Quang, Dong-Anh; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Liu, Xiao-Yang; Fontebasso, Adam M; Bouffet, Eric; Bartels, Ute; Albrecht, Steffen; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Letourneau, Louis; Bourgey, Mathieu; Bourque, Guillaume; Montpetit, Alexandre; Bourret, Genevieve; Lepage, Pierre; Fleming, Adam; Lichter, Peter; Kool, Marcel; von Deimling, Andreas; Sturm, Dominik; Korshunov, Andrey; Faury, Damien; Jones, David T; Majewski, Jacek; Pfister, Stefan M; Jabado, Nada; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2012-09-01

    Pediatric glioblastomas (GBM) including diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG) are devastating brain tumors with no effective therapy. Here, we investigated clinical and biological impacts of histone H3.3 mutations. Forty-two DIPGs were tested for H3.3 mutations. Wild-type versus mutated (K27M-H3.3) subgroups were compared for HIST1H3B, IDH, ATRX and TP53 mutations, copy number alterations and clinical outcome. K27M-H3.3 occurred in 71 %, TP53 mutations in 77 % and ATRX mutations in 9 % of DIPGs. ATRX mutations were more frequent in older children (p < 0.0001). No G34V/R-H3.3, IDH1/2 or H3.1 mutations were identified. K27M-H3.3 DIPGs showed specific copy number changes, including all gains/amplifications of PDGFRA and MYC/PVT1 loci. Notably, all long-term survivors were H3.3 wild type and this group of patients had better overall survival. K27M-H3.3 mutation defines clinically and biologically distinct subgroups and is prevalent in DIPG, which will impact future therapeutic trial design. K27M- and G34V-H3.3 have location-based incidence (brainstem/cortex) and potentially play distinct roles in pediatric GBM pathogenesis. K27M-H3.3 is universally associated with short survival in DIPG, while patients wild-type for H3.3 show improved survival. Based on prognostic and therapeutic implications, our findings argue for H3.3-mutation testing at diagnosis, which should be rapidly integrated into the clinical decision-making algorithm, particularly in atypical DIPG. PMID:22661320

  16. The H3.3 K27M mutation results in a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas than thalamic gliomas in adults.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Hao, Shuyu; Pan, Changcun; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting; Yan, Hai; Zhang, Liwei; Wan, Hong

    2015-11-01

    Brainstem and thalamic gliomas are rare, and they are poorly understood in adults. Genetic aberrations that occur in these tumors are still unknown. In this study, we investigated whether thalamic gliomas have different genetic aberrations and clinical outcomes compared with brainstem gliomas in adults. Forty-three glioma samples were selected, including 28 brainstem and 15 thalamic gliomas. The frequency of the K27M mutation in adult midline gliomas was 58.1%. High-grade gliomas in the thalamus were statistically significantly more numerous than brainstem gliomas. Patients with K27M mutant brainstem gliomas had a significantly shorter overall survival than patients with wild-type tumors (P = .020) by Cox regression after adjustment for other independent risk factors. However, there was no statistical tendency toward a poorer overall survival in thalamic gliomas containing the K27M mutation compared with wild-type tumors. The presence of the K27M mutation significantly corresponded with mutations in TP53 in thalamic gliomas. Interestingly, the K27M mutation was mutually exclusive with mutations in IDH1, which was detected only in brainstem gliomas. The microarray data identified 86 differentially expressed genes between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with the K27M mutation. The cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) gene, which plays an important role in cancer pathways, was found to be differentially expressed between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with K27M mutations. Although the K27M mutation was frequently observed in adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, this mutation tended to be associated with a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas but not in thalamic gliomas. Brainstem gliomas may present different genetic aberrations from thalamic gliomas. These differences may provide guidance for therapeutic decisions for the treatment of adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, which may have different molecular targets. PMID:26297251

  17. Anaplastic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sean A; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2016-07-01

    Anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) is a diffusely infiltrating, malignant, astrocytic, primary brain tumor. AA is currently defined by histology although future classification schemes will include molecular alterations. AA can be separated into subgroups, which share similar molecular profiles, age at diagnosis and median survival, based on 1p/19q co-deletion status and IDH mutation status. AA with co-deletion of chromosomes 1p and 19q and IDH mutation have the best prognosis. AA with IDH mutation and no 1p/19q co-deletion have intermediate prognosis and AA with wild-type IDH have the worst prognosis and share many molecular alterations with glioblastoma. Treatment of noncodeleted AA based on preliminary results from the CATNON clinical trial consists of maximal safe resection followed by radiotherapy with post-radiotherapy temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. The role of concurrent TMZ and whether IDH1 subgroups benefit from TMZ is currently being evaluated in the recently completed randomized, prospective Phase III clinical trial, CATNON. PMID:27230974

  18. Mutations in the BCR-ABL1 Kinase Domain and Elsewhere in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Soverini, Simona; de Benedittis, Caterina; Mancini, Manuela; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has been the first human malignancy to be associated, more than 50 years ago, with a consistent chromosomal abnormality--the t(9;22)(q34;q11) chromosomal translocation. The resulting BCR-ABL1 fusion gene, encoding a tyrosine kinase with deregulated activity, has a central role in the pathogenesis of CML. Ancestral or additional genetic events necessary for CML to develop have long been hypothesized but never really demonstrated. CML can successfully be treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Mutations in the BCR-ABL1 kinase domain might arise, however, that confer resistance to 1 or more of the currently available TKIs. Hence, the critical role of BCR-ABL1 mutation screening for optimal therapeutic management, with the current gold standard technique, conventional sequencing, likely to be replaced soon by ultra-deep sequencing. Mutations in genes other than BCR-ABL1 include ASXL1, TET2, RUNX1, DNMT3A, EZH2, and TP53 in chronic phase patients and RUNX1, ASXL1, IKZF1, WT1, TET2, NPM1, IDH1, IDH2, NRAS, KRAS, CBL, TP53, CDKN2A, RB1, and GATA-2 mutations in advanced phase patients. The latter also display additional cytogenetic abnormalities, including submicroscopic regions of gain or loss that only single nucleotide polymorphism arrays or array comparative genomic hybridization can detect. Whether whole genome/exome sequencing studies will uncover novel mutations relevant for pathogenesis, progression, and risk-adapted therapy is still unclear. PMID:26297264

  19. Benefit From Procarbazine, Lomustine, and Vincristine in Oligodendroglial Tumors Is Associated With Mutation of IDH

    PubMed Central

    Cairncross, J. Gregory; Wang, Meihua; Jenkins, Robert B.; Shaw, Edward G.; Giannini, Caterina; Brachman, David G.; Buckner, Jan C.; Fink, Karen L.; Souhami, Luis; Laperriere, Normand J.; Huse, Jason T.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Curran, Walter J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Patients with 1p/19q codeleted anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors who participated in RTOG (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) 9402 lived much longer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) than radiation therapy (RT) alone. However, some patients with noncodeleted tumors also benefited from CRT; survival curves separated after the median had been reached, and significantly more patients lived ≥ 10 years after CRT than RT. Thus, 1p/19q status may not identify all responders to CRT. Patients and Methods Using trial data, we inquired whether an IDH mutation or germ-line polymorphism associated with IDH-mutant gliomas identified the patients in RTOG 9402 who benefited from CRT. Results IDH status was evaluable in 210 of 291 patients; 156 (74%) had mutations. rs55705857 was evaluable in 245 patients; 76 (31%) carried the G risk allele. Both were associated with longer progression-free survival after CRT, and mutant IDH was associated with longer overall survival (9.4 v 5.7 years; hazard ratio [HR], 0.59; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.86; P = .006). For those with wild-type tumors, CRT did not prolong median survival (1.3 v 1.8 years; HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.63 to 2.04; P = .67) or 10-year survival rate (CRT, 6% v RT, 4%). Patients with codeleted mutated tumors (14.7 v 6.8 years; HR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.28 to 0.85; P = .01) and noncodeleted mutated tumors (5.5 v 3.3 years; HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.32 to 0.99; P < .05) lived longer after CRT than RT. Conclusion IDH mutational status identified patients with oligodendroglial tumors who did (and did not) benefit from alkylating-agent chemotherapy with RT. Although patients with codeleted tumors lived longest, patients with noncodeleted IDH-mutated tumors also lived longer after CRT. PMID:24516018

  20. The evolving molecular genetics of low-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Venneti, Sriram; Huse, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    Low-grade gliomas (LGG) constitute grade I and grade II tumors of astrocytic and grade II tumors of oligodendroglial lineage. Although these tumors are typically slow growing, they may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality due to recurrence and malignant progression, even in the setting of optimal resection. LGG in pediatric and adult age groups are currently classified by morphologic criteria. Recent years have heralded a molecular revolution in understanding brain tumors, including LGG. Next generation sequencing has definitively demonstrated that pediatric and adult LGG fundamentally differ in their underlying molecular characteristics, despite being histologically similar. Pediatric LGG show alterations in FGFR1 and BRAF in pilocytic astrocytomas and FGFR1 alterations in diffuse astrocytomas, each converging on the MAP kinase-signaling pathway. Adult LGG are characterized by IDH1/2 mutations and ATRX mutations in astrocytic tumors and IDH1/2 mutations and 1p/19q codeletions in oligodendroglial tumors. TERT promoter mutations are also noted in LGG and are mainly associated with oligodendrogliomas. These findings have considerably refined approaches to classifying these tumors. Moreover, many of the molecular alterations identified in LGG directly impact on prognosis, tumor biology, and the development of novel therapies. PMID:25664944

  1. Copy Number Profiling of Brazilian Astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Bidinotto, Lucas Tadeu; Torrieri, Raul; Mackay, Alan; Almeida, Gisele Caravina; Viana-Pereira, Marta; Cruvinel-Carloni, Adriana; Spina, Maria Luisa; Campanella, Nathalia Cristina; Pereira de Menezes, Weder; Clara, Carlos Afonso; Becker, Aline Paixão; Jones, Chris; Reis, Rui Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Copy number alterations (CNA) are one of the driving mechanisms of glioma tumorigenesis, and are currently used as important biomarkers in the routine setting. Therefore, we performed CNA profiling of 65 astrocytomas of distinct malignant grades (WHO grade I-IV) of Brazilian origin, using array-CGH and microsatellite instability analysis (MSI), and investigated their correlation with TERT and IDH1 mutational status and clinico-pathological features. Furthermore, in silico analysis using the Oncomine database was performed to validate our findings and extend the findings to gene expression level. We found that the number of genomic alterations increases in accordance with glioma grade. In glioblastomas (GBM), the most common alterations were gene amplifications (PDGFRA, KIT, KDR, EGFR, and MET) and deletions (CDKN2A and PTEN) Log-rank analysis correlated EGFR amplification and/or chr7 gain with better survival of the patients. MSI was observed in 11% of GBMs. A total of 69% of GBMs presented TERT mutation, whereas IDH1 mutation was most frequent in diffuse (85.7%) and anaplastic (100%) astrocytomas. The combination of 1p19q deletion and TERT and IDH1 mutational status separated tumor groups that showed distinct age of diagnosis and outcome. In silico validation pointed to less explored genes that may be worthy of future investigation, such as CDK2, DMRTA1, and MTAP Herein, using an extensive integrated analysis, we indicated potentially important genes, not extensively studied in gliomas, that could be further explored to assess their biological and clinical impact in astrocytomas. PMID:27172220

  2. Copy Number Profiling of Brazilian Astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Bidinotto, Lucas Tadeu; Torrieri, Raul; Mackay, Alan; Almeida, Gisele Caravina; Viana-Pereira, Marta; Cruvinel-Carloni, Adriana; Spina, Maria Luisa; Campanella, Nathalia Cristina; Pereira de Menezes, Weder; Clara, Carlos Afonso; Becker, Aline Paixão; Jones, Chris; Reis, Rui Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Copy number alterations (CNA) are one of the driving mechanisms of glioma tumorigenesis, and are currently used as important biomarkers in the routine setting. Therefore, we performed CNA profiling of 65 astrocytomas of distinct malignant grades (WHO grade I–IV) of Brazilian origin, using array-CGH and microsatellite instability analysis (MSI), and investigated their correlation with TERT and IDH1 mutational status and clinico-pathological features. Furthermore, in silico analysis using the Oncomine database was performed to validate our findings and extend the findings to gene expression level. We found that the number of genomic alterations increases in accordance with glioma grade. In glioblastomas (GBM), the most common alterations were gene amplifications (PDGFRA, KIT, KDR, EGFR, and MET) and deletions (CDKN2A and PTEN). Log-rank analysis correlated EGFR amplification and/or chr7 gain with better survival of the patients. MSI was observed in 11% of GBMs. A total of 69% of GBMs presented TERT mutation, whereas IDH1 mutation was most frequent in diffuse (85.7%) and anaplastic (100%) astrocytomas. The combination of 1p19q deletion and TERT and IDH1 mutational status separated tumor groups that showed distinct age of diagnosis and outcome. In silico validation pointed to less explored genes that may be worthy of future investigation, such as CDK2, DMRTA1, and MTAP. Herein, using an extensive integrated analysis, we indicated potentially important genes, not extensively studied in gliomas, that could be further explored to assess their biological and clinical impact in astrocytomas. PMID:27172220

  3. Malignant Glioma with Neuronal Marker Expression : A Clinicopathological Study of 18 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Rye; Lee, Jae Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; Nam, Do Hyun; Suh, Yeon-Lim

    2016-01-01

    Objective Malignant gliomas with neuronal marker expression (MGwNM) are rare and poorly characterized. Increasingly diverse types of MGwNM have been described and these reported cases underscore the dilemmas in the classification and diagnosis of those tumors. The aim of this study is to provide additional insights into MGwNM and present the clinicopathological features of 18 patients. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 18 patients diagnosed as MGwNM at our institute between January 2006 and December 2012. Macroscopic total resection was performed in 11 patients (61%). We evaluated the methylation status of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and expression of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH-1) in all cases, and deletions of 1p and 19q in available cases. Results The estimated median overall survival was 21.2 months. The median progression-free survival was 6.3 months. Six patients (33%) had MGMT methylation but IDH1 mutation was found in only one patient (6%). Gene analysis for 1p19q performed in nine patients revealed no deletion in six, 19q deletion only in two, and 1p deletion only in one. The extent of resection was significantly correlated with progression free survival on both univariate analysis and multivariate analysis (p=0.002 and p=0.013, respectively). Conclusion In this study, the overall survival of MGwNM was not superior to glioblastoma. The extent of resection has a significant prognostic impact on progression-free survival. Further studies of the prognostic factors related to chemo-radio therapy, similar to studies with glioblastoma, are mandatory to improve survival. PMID:26885285

  4. KRAS Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Wilbur A.; Haney, Jerry; Sugita, Michio; Bemis, Lynne; Jimeno, Antonio; Messersmith, Wells A.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of colon carcinoma with the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody Cetuximab is reported to be ineffective in KRAS-mutant tumors. Mutation testing techniques have therefore become an urgent concern. We have compared three methods for detecting KRAS mutations in 59 cases of colon carcinoma: 1) high resolution melting, 2) the amplification refractory mutation system using a bifunctional self-probing primer (ARMS/Scorpion, ARMS/S), and 3) direct sequencing. We also evaluated the effects of the methods of sectioning and coring of paraffin blocks to obtain tumor DNA on assay sensitivity and specificity. The most sensitive and specific combination of block sampling and mutational analysis was ARMS/S performed on DNA derived from 1-mm paraffin cores. This combination of tissue sampling and testing method detected KRAS mutations in 46% of colon tumors. Four samples were positive by ARMS/S, but initially negative by direct sequencing. Cloned DNA samples were retested by direct sequencing, and in all four cases KRAS mutations were identified in the DNA. In six cases, high resolution melting abnormalities could not be confirmed as specific mutations either by ARMS/S or direct sequencing. We conclude that coring of the paraffin blocks and testing by ARMS/S is a sensitive, specific, and efficient method for KRAS testing. PMID:20007845

  5. IDH mutations in primary myelofibrosis predict leukemic transformation and shortened survival: clinical evidence for leukemogenic collaboration with JAK2V617F.

    PubMed

    Tefferi, A; Jimma, T; Sulai, N H; Lasho, T L; Finke, C M; Knudson, R A; McClure, R F; Pardanani, A

    2012-03-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations are frequent in blast-phase myeloproliferative neoplasms and might therefore contribute to leukemic transformation. We examined this possibility in 301 consecutive patients with chronic-phase primary myelofibrosis (PMF). The mutant IDH was detected in 12 patients (4%): 7 IDH2 (5 R140Q, 1 R140W and 1 R172G) and 5 IDH1 (3 R132S and 2 R132C). In all, 6 (50%) of the 12 IDH-mutated patients also expressed JAK2V617F. Overall, 18 (6%) patients displayed only MPL and 164 (54.3%) only JAK2 mutations. Multivariable analysis that accounted for conventional risk factors disclosed inferior overall survival (OS; P=0.03) and leukemia-free survival (LFS; P=0.003) in IDH-mutated patients: OS hazard ratio (HR) was 0.39 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.2-0.75), 0.50 (95% CI 0.27-0.95) and 0.53 (95% CI 0.23-1.2) for patients with no, JAK2 or MPL mutations, respectively. Further analysis disclosed a more pronounced effect for the mutant IDH on OS and LFS in the presence (P=0.0002 and P<0.0001, respectively) as opposed to the absence (P=0.34 and P=0.64) of concomitant JAK2V617F. Analysis of paired samples obtained during chronic- and blast-phase disease revealed the presence of both IDH and JAK2 mutations at both time points. Our observations suggest that IDH mutations in PMF are independent predictors of leukemic transformation and raise the possibility of leukemogenic collaboration with JAK2V617F. PMID:21912393

  6. ATRX immunostaining predicts IDH and H3F3A status in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Azadeh; Skardelly, Marco; Bonzheim, Irina; Ott, Ines; Mühleisen, Helmut; Eckert, Franziska; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Schittenhelm, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent intraaxial CNS neoplasms with a heterogeneous molecular background. Recent studies on diffuse gliomas have shown frequent alterations in the genes involved in chromatin remodelling pathways such as α-thalassemia/mental-retardation-syndrome-X-linked gene (ATRX). Yet, the reliability of ATRX in predicting isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) and H3 histone, family 3A (H3F3A) mutations in gliomas, is unclear.We analysed the ATRX expression status by immunohistochemistry, in a large series of 1064 gliomas and analysed the results in correlation to IDH, H3F3A and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) 1p/19q status in these tumors. We also investigated the prognostic potential of ATRX concerning the clinical outcome of patients with diffuse gliomas.According to our results, loss of nuclear ATRX expression was accompanied with an astrocytic tumor lineage and a younger age of onset. ATRX loss in astrocytomas was also strongly associated with IDH1/2 and H3F3A mutation (p < 0.0001). Among 196 glial tumors with nuclear ATRX loss, 173 (89 %) had an IDH1 or IDH2 mutation. Among the remaining 23 cases (11 %) with ATRX loss and IDH wild type status, 7 cases had a H3F3A G34R mutation (3 %) and 2 cases had a H3F3A K27M mutation (1 %). ATRX retention in IDH1/2 mutant tumors was strongly associated with LOH 1p/19q and oligodendroglioma histology (p < 0.0001). We also confirmed the significant prognostic role of ATRX. Diffuse gliomas with ATRX loss (n = 137, median 1413 days, 95 % CI: 1065-1860 days) revealed a significantly better clinical outcome compared with tumors with ATRX retention (n = 335, median: 609, 95 % CI: 539-760 days, HR = 1.81, p < 0.0001).In conclusion, ATRX is a potential marker for prediction of IDH/H3F3A mutations and substratification of diffuse gliomas into survival relevant tumor groups. Such classification is of great importance for further clinical decision making especially concerning the therapeutic options

  7. Something old and something new about molecular diagnostics in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Horbinski, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Progress in our understanding of the molecular biology of neoplasms has been driven by remarkable improvements in molecular biology techniques. This has created a rapidly moving field in which even subspecialists struggle to keep abreast of the current literature. Nowhere is this more clearly demonstrated than in neuro-oncology, wherein molecular diagnostics can now wring more clinically useful information out of very small biopsies than ever before. Herein the biologic and practical aspects of four key molecular biomarkers in gliomas are discussed, including two that have been known for some time (1p/19q codeletion and EGFR amplification) as well as two whose relevance was discovered via advanced whole-genome assays (IDH1/2 mutations and BRAF alterations). PMID:23459421

  8. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutant R132H sensitizes glioma cells to BCNU-induced oxidative stress and cell death.

    PubMed

    Mohrenz, Isabelle Vanessa; Antonietti, Patrick; Pusch, Stefan; Capper, David; Balss, Jörg; Voigt, Sophia; Weissert, Susanne; Mukrowsky, Alicia; Frank, Jan; Senft, Christian; Seifert, Volker; von Deimling, Andreas; Kögel, Donat

    2013-11-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) decarboxylates isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) leading to generation of NADPH, which is required to regenerate reduced glutathione (GSH), the major cellular ROS scavenger. Mutation of R132 of IDH1 abrogates generation of α-KG and leads to conversion of α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate. We hypothesized that glioma cells expressing mutant IDH1 have a diminished antioxidative capacity and therefore may encounter an ensuing loss of cytoprotection under conditions of oxidative stress. Our study was performed with LN229 cells stably overexpressing IDH1 R132H and wild type IDH1 or with a lentiviral IDH1 knockdown. Quantification of GSH under basal conditions and following treatment with the glutathione reductase inhibitor BCNU revealed significantly lower GSH levels in IDH1 R132H expressing cells and IDH1 KD cells compared to their respective controls. FACS analysis of cell death and ROS production also demonstrated an increased sensitivity of IDH1-R132H-expressing cells and IDH1 KD cells to BCNU, but not to temozolomide. The sensitivity of IDH1-R132H-expressing cells and IDH1 KD cells to ROS induction and cell death was further enhanced with the transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid and under glutamine free conditions, indicating that these cells were more addicted to glutaminolysis. Increased sensitivity to BCNU-induced ROS production and cell death was confirmed in HEK293 cells inducibly expressing the IDH1 mutants R132H, R132C and R132L. Based on these findings we propose that in addition to its established pro-tumorigenic effects, mutant IDH1 may also limit the resistance of gliomas to specific death stimuli, therefore opening new perspectives for therapy. PMID:23801081

  9. Asymptomatic carriers for homozygous novel mutations in the FKRP gene: the other end of the spectrum.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Flavia; Vieira, Natássia; Starling, Alessandra; Yamamoto, Lydia Uraco; Lima, Bruno; de Cássia Pavanello, Rita; Vainzof, Mariz; Nigro, Vincenzo; Zatz, Mayana

    2003-12-01

    Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy linked to 19q13.3 (LGMD2I) was recently related to mutations in the fukutin-related protein gene (FKRP) gene. Pathogenic changes in the same gene were detected in congenital muscular dystrophy patients (MDC1C), a severe disorder. We have screened 86 LGMD genealogies to assess the frequency and distribution of mutations in the FKRP gene in Brazilian LGMD patients. We found 13 Brazilian genealogies, including 20 individuals with mutations in the FKRP gene, and identified nine novel pathogenic changes. The commonest C826A European mutation was found in 30% (9/26) of the mutated LGMD2I alleles. One affected patient homozygous for the FKRP (C826A) mutation also carries a missense R125H change in one allele of the caveolin-3 gene (responsible for LGMD1C muscular dystrophy). Two of her normal sibs were found to be double heterozygotes. In two unrelated LGMD2I families, homozygous for novel missense mutations, we identified four asymptomatic carriers, all older than 20 years. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies in the present study as well as in patients from different populations suggests that the spectrum of variability associated with mutations in the FKRP gene seems to be wider than in other forms of LGMD. It also reinforces the observations that pathogenic mutations are not always determinant of an abnormal phenotype, suggesting the possibility of other mechanisms modulating the severity of the phenotype that opens new avenues for therapeutic approaches. PMID:14647208

  10. Glioblastoma with Oligodendroglioma Component (GBM-O): Molecular Genetic and Clinical Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Appin, Christina L.; Gao, Jingjing; Chisolm, Candace; Torian, Mike; Alexis, Dianne; Vincentelli, Cristina; Schniederjan, Matthew J.; Hadjipanayis, Costas; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Hunter, Stephen; Hao, Chunhai; Brat, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive primary brain tumor with an average survival of approximately 1 year. A recently recognized subtype, glioblastoma with oligodendroglioma component (GBM-O), was designated by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2007. We investigated GBM-Os for their clinical and molecular characteristics as compared to other forms of GBM. Tissue samples were used to determine EGFR, PTEN, and 1p and 19q status by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH); p53 and mutant IDH1 protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC); and MGMT promoter status by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). GBM-Os accounted for 11.9% of all GBMs. GBM-Os arose in younger patients compared to other forms of GBMs (50.7 years vs. 58.7 years, respectively), were more frequently secondary neoplasms, had a higher frequency of IDH1 mutations and had a lower frequency of PTEN deletions. Survival was longer in patients with GBM-Os compared to those with other GBMs, with median survivals of 16.2 and 8.1 months, respectively. Most of the survival advantage for GBM-O appeared to be associated with a younger age at presentation. Among patients with GBM-O, younger age at presentation and 1p deletion were most significant in conferring prolonged survival. Thus, GBM-O represents a subset of GBMs with distinctive morphologic, clinical and molecular characteristics. PMID:23289977

  11. ETHE1 mutations are specific to ethylmalonic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tiranti, V; Briem, E; Lamantea, E; Mineri, R; Papaleo, E; De Gioia, L; Forlani, F; Rinaldo, P; Dickson, P; Abu‐Libdeh, B; Cindro‐Heberle, L; Owaidha, M; Jack, R M; Christensen, E; Burlina, A; Zeviani, M

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in ETHE1, a gene located at chromosome 19q13, have recently been identified in patients affected by ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE). EE is a devastating infantile metabolic disorder, characterised by widespread lesions in the brain, hyperlactic acidaemia, petechiae, orthostatic acrocyanosis, and high levels of ethylmalonic acid in body fluids. To investigate to what extent ETHE1 is responsible for EE, we analysed this gene in 29 patients with typical EE and in 11 patients presenting with early onset progressive encephalopathy with ethylmalonic aciduria (non‐EE EMA). Frameshift, stop, splice site, and missense mutations of ETHE1 were detected in all the typical EE patients analysed. Western blot analysis of the ETHE1 protein indicated that some of the missense mutations are associated with the presence of the protein, suggesting that the corresponding wild type amino acid residues have a catalytic function. No ETHE1 mutations were identified in non‐EE EMA patients. Experiments based on two dimensional blue native electrophoresis indicated that ETHE1 protein works as a supramolecular, presumably homodimeric, complex, and a three dimensional model of the protein suggests that it is likely to be a mitochondrial matrix thioesterase acting on a still unknown substrate. Finally, the 625G→A single nucleotide polymorphism in the gene encoding the short chain acyl‐coenzyme A dehydrogenase (SCAD) was previously proposed as a co‐factor in the aetiology of EE and other EMA syndromes. SNP analysis in our patients ruled out a pathogenic role of SCAD variants in EE, but did show a highly significant prevalence of the 625A alleles in non‐EE EMA patients. PMID:16183799

  12. Clinical Relevance of Prognostic and Predictive Molecular Markers in Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Siegal, Tali

    2016-01-01

    Sorting and grading of glial tumors by the WHO classification provide clinicians with guidance as to the predicted course of the disease and choice of treatment. Nonetheless, histologically identical tumors may have very different outcome and response to treatment. Molecular markers that carry both diagnostic and prognostic information add useful tools to traditional classification by redefining tumor subtypes within each WHO category. Therefore, molecular markers have become an integral part of tumor assessment in modern neuro-oncology and biomarker status now guides clinical decisions in some subtypes of gliomas. The routine assessment of IDH status improves histological diagnostic accuracy by differentiating diffuse glioma from reactive gliosis. It carries a favorable prognostic implication for all glial tumors and it is predictive for chemotherapeutic response in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas with codeletion of 1p/19q chromosomes. Glial tumors that contain chromosomal codeletion of 1p/19q are defined as tumors of oligodendroglial lineage and have favorable prognosis. MGMT promoter methylation is a favorable prognostic marker in astrocytic high-grade gliomas and it is predictive for chemotherapeutic response in anaplastic gliomas with wild-type IDH1/2 and in glioblastoma of the elderly. The clinical implication of other molecular markers of gliomas like mutations of EGFR and ATRX genes and BRAF fusion or point mutation is highlighted. The potential of molecular biomarker-based classification to guide future therapeutic approach is discussed and accentuated. PMID:26508407

  13. Estimating mutation rate: how to count mutations?

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yun-Xin; Huai, Haying

    2003-01-01

    Mutation rate is an essential parameter in genetic research. Counting the number of mutant individuals provides information for a direct estimate of mutation rate. However, mutant individuals in the same family can share the same mutations due to premeiotic mutation events, so that the number of mutant individuals can be significantly larger than the number of mutation events observed. Since mutation rate is more closely related to the number of mutation events, whether one should count only independent mutation events or the number of mutants remains controversial. We show in this article that counting mutant individuals is a correct approach for estimating mutation rate, while counting only mutation events will result in underestimation. We also derived the variance of the mutation-rate estimate, which allows us to examine a number of important issues about the design of such experiments. The general strategy of such an experiment should be to sample as many families as possible and not to sample much more offspring per family than the reciprocal of the pairwise correlation coefficient within each family. To obtain a reasonably accurate estimate of mutation rate, the number of sampled families needs to be in the same or higher order of magnitude as the reciprocal of the mutation rate. PMID:12807798

  14. Circulating oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate is a potential surrogate biomarker in patients with isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutant intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Borger, Darrell R.; Goyal, Lipika; Yau, Thomas; Poon, Ronnie T.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Deshpande, Vikram; Christiani, David C.; Liebman, Hannah M.; Yang, Hua; Kim, Hyeryun; Yen, Katharine; Faris, Jason E.; Iafrate, A. John; Kwak, Eunice L.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Allen, Jill N.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Murphy, Janet E.; Saha, Supriya K.; Hong, Theodore S.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Straley, Kimberly S.; Agresta, Sam; Schenkein, David P.; Ellisen, Leif W.; Ryan, David P.; Zhu, Andrew X.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in the IDH1 and IDH2 (IDH1/2) genes occur in ~20% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and lead to accumulation of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) in the tumor tissue. However, it remains unknown whether IDH1/2 mutations can lead to high levels of 2HG circulating in the blood and whether serum 2HG can be used as a biomarker for IDH1/2 mutational status and tumor burden in ICC. Experimental Design We initially measured serum 2HG concentration in blood samples collected from 31 ICC patients in a Screening cohort. Findings were validated across 38 resected ICC patients from a second cohort with tumor volume measures. Circulating levels of 2HG were evaluated relative to IDH1/2 mutational status, tumor burden and a number of clinical variables. Results Circulating levels of 2HG in the Screening cohort were significantly elevated in patients with IDH1/2-mutant (median 478 ng/ml) versus IDH1/2-wild-type (median 118 ng/ml) tumors (p<0.001). This significance was maintained in the Validation cohort (343 ng/ml vs 55 ng/ml, p<0.0001) and levels of 2HG directly correlated with tumor burden in IDH1/2-mutant cases (p<0.05). Serum 2HG levels ≥170 ng/ml could predict the presence of an IDH1/2 mutation with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 90%. No differences were noted between the allelic variants IDH1 or IDH2 in regards to the levels of circulating 2HG. Conclusions This study indicates that circulating 2HG may be a surrogate biomarker of IDH1 or IDH2 mutation status in ICC and that circulating 2HG levels may correlate directly with tumor burden. PMID:24478380

  15. BRAF V600E-mutated diffuse glioma in an adult patient: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuta; Takahashi-Fujigasaki, Junko; Akasaki, Yasuharu; Matsushima, Satoshi; Mori, Ryosuke; Karagiozov, Kostadin; Joki, Tatsuhiro; Ikeuchi, Satoshi; Ikegami, Masahiro; Manome, Yoshinobu; Murayama, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic technology and genome-wide analysis have identified key molecular alterations that are relevant to the diagnosis and prognosis of brain tumors. Molecular information such as mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes or 1p/19q co-deletion status will be more actively incorporated into the histological classification of diffuse gliomas. BRAF V600E mutations are found frequently in circumscribed low-grade gliomas such as pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) and extra-cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma, or epithelioid glioblastomas (E-GBM), a rare variant of GBM. This mutation is relatively rare in other types of diffuse gliomas, especially in adult onset cases. Here, we present an adult onset case of IDH wild-type/BRAF V600E-mutated diffuse glioma, evolving from grade III to grade IV. The tumor displayed atypical exophytic growth and had unusual histological features not fully compatible with, but indicative of PXA and E-GBM. We discuss differential diagnosis of the tumor, and review previously described diffuse gliomas with the BRAF V600E mutation. PMID:26445861

  16. An 8.9 Mb 19p13 duplication associated with precocious puberty and a sporadic 3.9 Mb 2q23.3q24.1 deletion containing NR4A2 in mentally retarded members of a family with an intrachromosomal 19p-into-19q between-arm insertion

    PubMed Central

    Lybæk, Helle; ørstavik, Karen Helene; Prescott, Trine; Hovland, Randi; Breilid, Harald; Stansberg, Christine; Steen, Vidar Martin; Houge, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    In a 2 and a half-year-old girl with onset of puberty before the age of 5 months, short stature, hand anomalies and severe mental retardation, an 8.9 Mb interstitial 19p13 duplication containing 215 predicted genes was detected. It was initially assumed that the duplication involved the kisspeptin receptor gene, GPR54, known to stimulate induction of puberty, but more refined duplication mapping excluded this possibility. In an attempt to further understand the genotype–phenotype correlation, global gene expression was measured in skin fibroblasts. The overall expression pattern was quite similar to controls, and only about 25% of the duplicated genes had an expression level that was increased by more than 1.3-fold, with no obvious changes that could explain the precocious puberty. The proband's mother carried a balanced between-arm insertion of the duplicated segment that resembled a pericentric inversion. The same insertion was found in several other family members, including one who had lost a daughter with severe mental retardation and menarche at the age of 10 years. Another close relative was severely mentally retarded, but neither dysmorphic nor microcephalic. His phenotype was initially ascribed to a presumed cryptic chromosome 19 imbalance caused by the 19p-into19q insertion, but subsequent array-CGH detected a 3.9-Mb deletion of 2q23.3q24.1. This novel microdeletion involves seven genes, of which FMNL2, a suggested regulator of Rho-GTPases, and NR4A2, an essential gene for differentiation of dopaminergic neurons, may be critical genes for the proposed 2q23q24 microdeletion syndrome. PMID:19156171

  17. Multi-platform molecular profiling of a large cohort of glioblastomas reveals potential therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Xiu, Joanne; Piccioni, David; Juarez, Tiffany; Pingle, Sandeep C.; Hu, Jethro; Rudnick, Jeremy; Fink, Karen; Spetzler, David B.; Maney, Todd; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Bender, Ryan; Gatalica, Zoran; Reddy, Sandeep; Sanai, Nader; Idbaih, Ahmed; Glantz, Michael; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most aggressive and prevalent form of gliomas with abysmal prognosis and limited treatment options. We analyzed clinically relevant molecular aberrations suggestive of response to therapies in 1035 GBM tumors. Our analysis revealed mutations in 39 genes of 48 tested. IHC revealed expression of PD-L1 in 19% and PD-1 in 46%. MGMT-methylation was seen in 43%, EGFRvIII in 19% and 1p19q co-deletion in 2%. TP53 mutation was associated with concurrent mutations, while IDH1 mutation was associated with MGMT-methylation and TP53 mutation and was mutually exclusive of EGFRvIII mutation. Distinct biomarker profiles were seen in GBM compared with WHO grade III astrocytoma, suggesting different biology and potentially different treatment approaches. Analysis of 17 metachronous paired tumors showed frequent biomarker changes, including MGMT-methylation and EGFR aberrations, indicating the need for a re-biopsy for tumor profiling to direct subsequent therapy. MGMT-methylation, PR and TOPO1 appeared as significant prognostic markers in sub-cohorts of GBM defined by age. The current study represents the largest biomarker study on clinical GBM tumors using multiple technologies to detect gene mutation, amplification, protein expression and promoter methylation. These data will inform planning for future personalized biomarker-based clinical trials and identifying effective treatments based on tumor biomarkers. PMID:26933808

  18. Multi-platform molecular profiling of a large cohort of glioblastomas reveals potential therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Joanne; Piccioni, David; Juarez, Tiffany; Pingle, Sandeep C; Hu, Jethro; Rudnick, Jeremy; Fink, Karen; Spetzler, David B; Maney, Todd; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Bender, Ryan; Gatalica, Zoran; Reddy, Sandeep; Sanai, Nader; Idbaih, Ahmed; Glantz, Michael; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-04-19

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most aggressive and prevalent form of gliomas with abysmal prognosis and limited treatment options. We analyzed clinically relevant molecular aberrations suggestive of response to therapies in 1035 GBM tumors. Our analysis revealed mutations in 39 genes of 48 tested. IHC revealed expression of PD-L1 in 19% and PD-1 in 46%. MGMT-methylation was seen in 43%, EGFRvIII in 19% and 1p19q co-deletion in 2%. TP53 mutation was associated with concurrent mutations, while IDH1 mutation was associated with MGMT-methylation and TP53 mutation and was mutually exclusive of EGFRvIII mutation. Distinct biomarker profiles were seen in GBM compared with WHO grade III astrocytoma, suggesting different biology and potentially different treatment approaches. Analysis of 17 metachronous paired tumors showed frequent biomarker changes, including MGMT-methylation and EGFR aberrations, indicating the need for a re-biopsy for tumor profiling to direct subsequent therapy. MGMT-methylation, PR and TOPO1 appeared as significant prognostic markers in sub-cohorts of GBM defined by age. The current study represents the largest biomarker study on clinical GBM tumors using multiple technologies to detect gene mutation, amplification, protein expression and promoter methylation. These data will inform planning for future personalized biomarker-based clinical trials and identifying effective treatments based on tumor biomarkers. PMID:26933808

  19. Mutation and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L. ); Albertini, R.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This book is organized under the following headings: Plenary lectures; Brook mutational mechanisms; Adduction and DNA damage; Recombination and gene conversion; Repair: Prokoyote mechanisms and induction; Repair: Lower eukaryote and plant mechanisms; Repair: Higher eukaryote mechanisms and selectivity; Repair: Human genes and mechanisms; Mutation: Spectra and mechanisms; Mutation: Shuttle vectors; Mutation: Transgenic animals; New methods: Polymerase chain reaction.

  20. Mutations in SIPA1L3 cause eye defects through disruption of cell polarity and cytoskeleton organization.

    PubMed

    Greenlees, Rebecca; Mihelec, Marija; Yousoof, Saira; Speidel, Daniel; Wu, Selwin K; Rinkwitz, Silke; Prokudin, Ivan; Perveen, Rahat; Cheng, Anson; Ma, Alan; Nash, Benjamin; Gillespie, Rachel; Loebel, David A F; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Lloyd, I Christopher; Grigg, John R; Tam, Patrick P L; Yap, Alpha S; Becker, Thomas S; Black, Graeme C M; Semina, Elena; Jamieson, Robyn V

    2015-10-15

    Correct morphogenesis and differentiation are critical in development and maintenance of the lens, which is a classic model system for epithelial development and disease. Through germline genomic analyses in patients with lens and eye abnormalities, we discovered functional mutations in the Signal Induced Proliferation Associated 1 Like 3 (SIPA1L3) gene, which encodes a previously uncharacterized member of the Signal Induced Proliferation Associated 1 (SIPA1 or SPA1) family, with a role in Rap1 signalling. Patient 1, with a de novo balanced translocation, 46,XY,t(2;19)(q37.3;q13.1), had lens and ocular anterior segment abnormalities. Breakpoint mapping revealed transection of SIPA1L3 at 19q13.1 and reduced SIPA1L3 expression in patient lymphoblasts. SIPA1L3 downregulation in 3D cell culture revealed morphogenetic and cell polarity abnormalities. Decreased expression of Sipa1l3 in zebrafish and mouse caused severe lens and eye abnormalities. Sipa1l3(-/-) mice showed disrupted epithelial cell organization and polarity and, notably, abnormal epithelial to mesenchymal transition in the lens. Patient 2 with cataracts was heterozygous for a missense variant in SIPA1L3, c.442G>T, p.Asp148Tyr. Examination of the p.Asp148Tyr mutation in an epithelial cell line showed abnormal clustering of actin stress fibres and decreased formation of adherens junctions. Our findings show that abnormalities of SIPA1L3 in human, zebrafish and mouse contribute to lens and eye defects, and we identify a critical role for SIPA1L3 in epithelial cell morphogenesis, polarity, adhesion and cytoskeletal organization. PMID:26231217

  1. CF Mutation Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Cystic Fibrosis Genotyping; CF DNA Analysis; CF Gene Mutation Panel; CF Molecular Genetic Testing Formal name: Cystic Fibrosis Gene Mutation Panel Related tests: Sweat Test ; Trypsinogen ; ...

  2. Colorectal cancer prognosis: is it all mutation, mutation, mutation?

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, A B; Paraskeva, C

    2005-01-01

    For the 500 000 new cases of colorectal cancer in the world each year, identification of patients with a worse prognosis and those who are more likely to respond to treatment is a challenge. There is an increasing body of evidence correlating genetic mutations with outcome in tumours derived from human colorectal cancer cohorts. K-ras, but not p53 or APC, mutations appear to be associated with poorer overall survival in colorectal cancer patients. PMID:16099785

  3. UV Signature Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  4. Whole-arm translocation of der(5;17)(p10;q10) with concurrent TP53 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS): A unique molecular-cytogenetic subgroup.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ming; Hao, Suyang; Patel, Keyur P; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Yin, C Cameron; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Lin, Pei; Lu, Xinyan

    2016-05-01

    Der(5;17)(p10;q10) is a recurrent but rare aberration reported in myeloid neoplasms (MNs). We report 48 such patients including 19 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 29 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), to characterize their clinicopathological features. There were 29 men and 19 women, with a median age of 61 years (range, 18-80). 62.5% patients had therapy-related diseases (t-MNs), 70.8% had multilineage dysplasia and 83.3% showed complex karyotypes. In 39 patients tested, FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, KIT were all wild type and NRAS, KRAS, IDH1, APC, TET2 mutations were detected in single case(s) respectively. TP53 mutations were identified in 8 of 10 cases (80%) tested. Median disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 3 and 10 months, respectively and did not differ between AML or MDS cases, or between de novo versus therapy-related cases, or between the groups with or without complex karyotypes. In 19 patients who achieved complete remission after chemotherapy, and in 9 patients who underwent stem cell transplantation, the OS was better (14 and 17.5 months, P = 0.0128 and P = 0.0086, respectively). The der(5;17)(p10;q10) represents a unique molecular-cytogenetic subgroup in t-MNs and, associated with complex karyotypes. TP53 inactivation, resulting from 17p deletion coupled with TP53 mutation, likely contributes to the poor clinical outcome of these patients. PMID:27134073

  5. Inhibition of Cancer-Associated Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenases: Synthesis, Structure–Activity Relationship, and Selective Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are frequently found in certain cancers such as glioma. Different from the wild-type (WT) IDH1, the mutant enzymes catalyze the reduction of α-ketoglutaric acid to d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid (D2HG), leading to cancer initiation. Several 1-hydroxypyridin-2-one compounds were identified to be inhibitors of IDH1(R132H). A total of 61 derivatives were synthesized, and their structure–activity relationships were investigated. Potent IDH1(R132H) inhibitors were identified with Ki values as low as 140 nM, while they possess weak or no activity against WT IDH1. Activities of selected compounds against IDH1(R132C) were found to be correlated with their inhibitory activities against IDH1(R132H), as well as cellular production of D2HG, with R2 of 0.83 and 0.73, respectively. Several inhibitors were found to be permeable through the blood–brain barrier in a cell-based model assay and exhibit potent and selective activity (EC50 = 0.26–1.8 μM) against glioma cells with the IDH1 R132H mutation. PMID:25271760

  6. Inhibition of cancer-associated mutant isocitrate dehydrogenases: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and selective antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Yao, Yuan; Kogiso, Mari; Zheng, Baisong; Deng, Lisheng; Qiu, Jihui J; Dong, Shuo; Lv, Hua; Gallo, James M; Li, Xiao-Nan; Song, Yongcheng

    2014-10-23

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are frequently found in certain cancers such as glioma. Different from the wild-type (WT) IDH1, the mutant enzymes catalyze the reduction of α-ketoglutaric acid to d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid (D2HG), leading to cancer initiation. Several 1-hydroxypyridin-2-one compounds were identified to be inhibitors of IDH1(R132H). A total of 61 derivatives were synthesized, and their structure-activity relationships were investigated. Potent IDH1(R132H) inhibitors were identified with Ki values as low as 140 nM, while they possess weak or no activity against WT IDH1. Activities of selected compounds against IDH1(R132C) were found to be correlated with their inhibitory activities against IDH1(R132H), as well as cellular production of D2HG, with R(2) of 0.83 and 0.73, respectively. Several inhibitors were found to be permeable through the blood-brain barrier in a cell-based model assay and exhibit potent and selective activity (EC50 = 0.26-1.8 μM) against glioma cells with the IDH1 R132H mutation. PMID:25271760

  7. World Health Organization grade II-III astrocytomas consist of genetically distinct tumor lineages.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Natsuki; Hirose, Yuichi; Sasaki, Hikaru; Nakae, Shunsuke; Hayashi, Saeko; Ohba, Shigeo; Adachi, Kazuhide; Hayashi, Takuro; Nishiyama, Yuya; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Abe, Masato

    2016-08-01

    Recent investigations revealed genetic analysis provides important information in management of gliomas, and we previously reported grade II-III gliomas could be classified into clinically relevant subgroups based on the DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs). To develop more precise genetic subgrouping, we investigated the correlation between CNAs and mutational status of the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) of those tumors. We analyzed the IDH status and CNAs of 174 adult supratentorial gliomas of astrocytic or oligodendroglial origin by PCR-based direct sequencing and comparative genomic hybridization, respectively. We analyzed the relationship between genetic subclassification and clinical features. We found the most frequent aberrations in IDH mutant tumors were the combined whole arm-loss of 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion) followed by gain on chromosome arm 7q (+7q). The gain of whole chromosome 7 (+7) and loss of 10q (-10q) were detected in IDH wild-type tumors. Kaplan-Meier estimates for progression-free survival showed that the tumors with mutant IDH, -1p/19q, or +7q (in the absence of +7p) survived longer than tumors with wild-type IDH, +7, or -10q. As tumors with +7 (IDH wild-type) showed a more aggressive clinical nature, they are probably not a subtype that developed from the slowly progressive tumors with +7q (IDH mutant). Thus, tumors with a gain on chromosome 7 (mostly astrocytic) comprise multiple lineages, and such differences in their biological nature should be taken into consideration during their clinical management. PMID:27196377

  8. UV signature mutations.

    PubMed

    Brash, Douglas E

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations—deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen—and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the nontranscribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; UV's nonsignature mutations may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  9. Recent Advances on the Molecular Pathology of Glial Neoplasms in Children and Adults.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Fausto J; Vizcaino, M Adelita; Lin, Ming-Tseh

    2016-09-01

    Gliomas represent the most common primary intraparenchymal tumors of the central nervous system in adults and children and are a genetic and phenotypic heterogeneous group. Large multi-institutional studies and The Cancer Genome Atlas have provided firm insights into the basic genetic drivers in gliomas. The main molecular biomarkers routinely applied to evaluate diffuse gliomas include MGMT promoter methylation, EGFR alterations (eg, EGFRvIII), IDH1 or IDH2 mutations, and 1p19q co-deletion. Many of these markers have become standard of care for molecular testing and prerequisites for clinical trial enrollment. Other recent biomarkers include TERT promoter and ATRX mutations, alterations that identify specific molecular subgroups of diffuse gliomas with biological and clinical relevance. It has also become apparent that distinctive patterns of molecular genetic evolution develop in the context of current therapeutic regimens. Important insights have also been uncovered in the field of pediatric glioma, including the identification of recurrent mutation, fusion, and/or duplication events of the BRAF, FGFR1, MYB, and MYBL1 genes in pediatric low-grade gliomas, mutations affecting histone components (H3F3A p.K27M or p.G34) in pediatric high-grade gliomas, and aggressive subsets developing in midline central nervous system structures. Here, we summarize current concepts in molecular testing for glial tumors, including recent findings by large-scale discovery efforts and technologic advances that are affecting routine diagnostic work. PMID:27444975

  10. Stationary mutation models.

    PubMed

    Simonsson, Ivar; Mostad, Petter

    2016-07-01

    Probability calculations for relationship inference based on DNA tests are often performed with computer packages such as Familias. When mutations are assumed to be a possibility, one may notice a curious and problematic effect of including untested parents: results tend to change slightly. In this paper, we trace this effect back to fundamental model-formulating issues which can only be resolved by using stationary mutation models. We present several methods for obtaining such stationary mutation matrices from original mutation matrices, and evaluate essential properties of these methods. Our conclusion is that typically, stationary mutation models can be obtained, but for many types of markers, it may be impossible to combine specific biologically reasonable requirements for a mutation matrix with the requirement of stationarity. PMID:27231805

  11. Effective Temperature of Mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derényi, Imre; Szöllősi, Gergely J.

    2015-02-01

    Biological macromolecules experience two seemingly very different types of noise acting on different time scales: (i) point mutations corresponding to changes in molecular sequence and (ii) thermal fluctuations. Examining the secondary structures of a large number of microRNA precursor sequences and model lattice proteins, we show that the effects of single point mutations are statistically indistinguishable from those of an increase in temperature by a few tens of kelvins. The existence of such an effective mutational temperature establishes a quantitative connection between robustness to genetic (mutational) and environmental (thermal) perturbations.

  12. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  13. Biological Significance of Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 and 2 in Gliomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    OHBA, Shigeo; HIROSE, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes are considered an important event that occurs at an early stage during gliomagenesis. The mutations often occur in grade 2 or 3 gliomas and secondary glioblastomas. Most IDH mutations are associated with codon 132 and 172 in IDH1 and IDH2 in gliomas, respectively. While IDH1 and IDH2 catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to form α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), IDH1 and IDH2 mutations convert α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). The accumulation of oncometabolite 2-HG is believed to lead progenitor cells into gliomas, inhibiting several α-KG-dependent enzymes, including ten-eleven translocation enzymes, histone demethylases, and prolyl hydroxylases, although the mechanisms have not been fully revealed. Herein, we review the contribution of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations to gliomagenesis. PMID:26960449

  14. Biological Significance of Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 and 2 in Gliomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Shigeo; Hirose, Yuichi

    2016-04-15

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes are considered an important event that occurs at an early stage during gliomagenesis. The mutations often occur in grade 2 or 3 gliomas and secondary glioblastomas. Most IDH mutations are associated with codon 132 and 172 in IDH1 and IDH2 in gliomas, respectively. While IDH1 and IDH2 catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to form α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), IDH1 and IDH2 mutations convert α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). The accumulation of oncometabolite 2-HG is believed to lead progenitor cells into gliomas, inhibiting several α-KG-dependent enzymes, including ten-eleven translocation enzymes, histone demethylases, and prolyl hydroxylases, although the mechanisms have not been fully revealed. Herein, we review the contribution of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations to gliomagenesis. PMID:26960449

  15. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutations can make profound impact on the evolution and improvement of a self-pollinated crop such as lettuce. Since it is nontransgenic, mutation breeding is more acceptable to consumers. Combined with genomic advances in new technologies like TILLING, mutagenesis is becoming an even more powerfu...

  16. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  17. Mutation rates as adaptations.

    PubMed

    Maley, C

    1997-06-01

    In order to better understand life, it is helpful to look beyond the envelop of life as we know it. A simple model of coevolution was implemented with the addition of a gene for the mutation rate of the individual. This allowed the mutation rate itself to evolve in a lineage. The model shows that when the individuals interact in a sort of zero-sum game, the lineages maintain relatively high mutation rates. However, when individuals engage in interactions that have greater consequences for one individual in the interaction than the other, lineages tend to evolve relatively low mutation rates. This model suggests that one possible cause for differential mutation rates across genes may be the coevolutionary pressure of the various forms of interactions with other genes. PMID:9219670

  18. Enantiomer-specific and paracrine leukemogenicity of mutant IDH metabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, A; Araujo Cruz, M M; Jyotsana, N; Sharma, A; Goparaju, R; Schwarzer, A; Görlich, K; Schottmann, R; Struys, E A; Jansen, E E; Rohde, C; Müller-Tidow, C; Geffers, R; Göhring, G; Ganser, A; Thol, F; Heuser, M

    2016-08-01

    Canonical mutations in IDH1 and IDH2 produce high levels of the R-enantiomer of 2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2HG), which is a competitive inhibitor of α-ketoglutarate (αKG)-dependent enzymes and a putative oncometabolite. Mutant IDH1 collaborates with HoxA9 to induce monocytic leukemia in vivo. We used two mouse models and a patient-derived acute myeloid leukemia xenotransplantation (PDX) model to evaluate the in vivo transforming potential of R-2HG, S-2HG and αKG independent of the mutant IDH1 protein. We show that R-2HG, but not S-2HG or αKG, is an oncometabolite in vivo that does not require the mutant IDH1 protein to induce hyperleukocytosis and to accelerate the onset of murine and human leukemia. Thus, circulating R-2HG acts in a paracrine manner and can drive the expansion of many different leukemic and preleukemic clones that may express wild-type IDH1, and therefore can be a driver of clonal evolution and diversity. In addition, we show that the mutant IDH1 protein is a stronger oncogene than R-2HG alone when comparable intracellular R-2HG levels are achieved. We therefore propose R-2HG-independent oncogenic functions of mutant IDH1 that may need to be targeted in addition to R-2HG production to exploit the full therapeutic potential of IDH1 inhibition. PMID:27063596

  19. Molecular classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Mischel, Paul S; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The identification of distinct genetic and epigenetic profiles in different types of gliomas has revealed novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive molecular biomarkers for refinement of glioma classification and improved prediction of therapy response and outcome. Therefore, the new (2016) World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system breaks with the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria only and incorporates molecular markers. This will involve a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis". We review the current state of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) gene mutation, α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A) aberrations in pediatric gliomas. We also outline prognostic and predictive molecular markers, including O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and discuss the potential clinical relevance of biologic glioblastoma subtypes defined by integration of multiomics data. Commonly used methods for individual marker detection as well as novel large-scale DNA methylation profiling and next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Finally, we illustrate how advances in molecular diagnostics affect novel strategies of targeted therapy, thereby raising new challenges and identifying new leads for personalized treatment of glioma patients. PMID:26948350

  20. Genetic Alterations in Gliosarcoma and Giant Cell Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Eun; Ohta, Takashi; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Satomi, Kaishi; Capper, David; Pierscianek, Daniela; Sure, Ulrich; Vital, Anne; Paulus, Werner; Mittelbronn, Michel; Antonelli, Manila; Kleihues, Paul; Giangaspero, Felice; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The majority of glioblastomas develop rapidly with a short clinical history (primary glioblastoma IDH wild-type), whereas secondary glioblastomas progress from diffuse astrocytoma or anaplastic astrocytoma. IDH mutations are the genetic hallmark of secondary glioblastomas. Gliosarcomas and giant cell glioblastomas are rare histological glioblastoma variants, which usually develop rapidly. We determined the genetic patterns of 36 gliosarcomas and 19 giant cell glioblastomas. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations were absent in all 36 gliosarcomas and in 18 of 19 giant cell glioblastomas analyzed, indicating that they are histological variants of primary glioblastoma. Furthermore, LOH 10q (88%) and TERT promoter mutations (83%) were frequent in gliosarcomas. Copy number profiling using the 450k methylome array in 5 gliosarcomas revealed CDKN2A homozygous deletion (3 cases), trisomy chromosome 7 (2 cases), and monosomy chromosome 10 (2 cases). Giant cell glioblastomas had LOH 10q in 50% and LOH 19q in 42% of cases. ATRX loss was detected immunohistochemically in 19% of giant cell glioblastomas, but absent in 17 gliosarcomas. These and previous results suggest that gliosarcomas are a variant of, and genetically similar to, primary glioblastomas, except for a lack of EGFR amplification, while giant cell glioblastoma occupies a hybrid position between primary and secondary glioblastomas. PMID:26443480

  1. The most common mutation in FKRP causing limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I) may have occurred only once and is present in Hutterites and other populations.

    PubMed

    Frosk, Patrick; Greenberg, Cheryl R; Tennese, Alysa A P; Lamont, Ryan; Nylen, Edward; Hirst, Cheryl; Frappier, Danielle; Roslin, Nicole M; Zaik, Michaela; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker; Zatz, Mayana; de Paula, Flavia; Morgan, Kenneth; Fujiwara, T Mary; Wrogemann, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) is common in the Hutterite population of North America. We previously identified a mutation in the TRIM32 gene in chromosome region 9q32, causing LGMD2H in approximately two-thirds of the 60 Hutterite LGMD patients studied to date. A genomewide scan was undertaken in five families who did not show linkage to the LGMD2H locus on chromosome 9. A second LGMD locus, LGMD2I, was identified in chromosome region 19q13.3, and the causative mutation was identified as c.826C>A (L276I), a missense mutation in the FKRP gene. A comparison of the clinical characteristics of the two LGMD patient groups in this population reveals some differences. LGMD2I patients generally have an earlier age at diagnosis, a more severe course, and higher serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. In addition, some of these patients show calf hypertrophy, cardiac symptoms, and severe reactions to general anesthesia. None of these features are present among LGMD2H patients. A single common haplotype surrounding the FKRP gene was identified in the Hutterite LGMD2I patients. An identical core haplotype was also identified in 19 other non-Hutterite LGMD2I patients from Europe, Canada, and Brazil. The occurrence of this mutation on a common core haplotype suggests that L276I is a founder mutation that is dispersed among populations of European origin. PMID:15580560

  2. The Value of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid in Low-grade Gliomas and High-grade Gliomas Lacking Glioblastoma Imaging Features: An Analysis Based on Fluorescence, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 18F-Fluoroethyl Tyrosine Positron Emission Tomography, and Tumor Molecular Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Mohammed; Wölfer, Johannes; Ewelt, Christian; Holling, Markus; Hasselblatt, Martin; Niederstadt, Thomas; Zoubi, Tarek; Weckesser, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 20% of grade II and most grade III gliomas fluoresce after 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) application. Conversely, approximately 30% of nonenhancing gliomas are actually high grade. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify preoperative factors (ie, age, enhancement, 18F-fluoroethyl tyrosine positron emission tomography [18F-FET PET] uptake ratios) for predicting fluorescence in gliomas without typical glioblastomas imaging features and to determine whether fluorescence will allow prediction of tumor grade or molecular characteristics. METHODS: Patients harboring gliomas without typical glioblastoma imaging features were given 5-ALA. Fluorescence was recorded intraoperatively, and biopsy specimens collected from fluorescing tissue. World Health Organization (WHO) grade, Ki-67/MIB-1 index, IDH1 (R132H) mutation status, O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status, and 1p/19q co-deletion status were assessed. Predictive factors for fluorescence were derived from preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-FET PET. Classification and regression tree analysis and receiver-operating-characteristic curves were generated for defining predictors. RESULTS: Of 166 tumors, 82 were diagnosed as WHO grade II, 76 as grade III, and 8 as glioblastomas grade IV. Contrast enhancement, tumor volume, and 18F-FET PET uptake ratio >1.85 predicted fluorescence. Fluorescence correlated with WHO grade (P < .001) and Ki-67/MIB-1 index (P < .001), but not with MGMT promoter methylation status, IDH1 mutation status, or 1p19q co-deletion status. The Ki-67/MIB-1 index in fluorescing grade III gliomas was higher than in nonfluorescing tumors, whereas in fluorescing and nonfluorescing grade II tumors, no differences were noted. CONCLUSION: Age, tumor volume, and 18F-FET PET uptake are factors predicting 5-ALA-induced fluorescence in gliomas without typical glioblastoma imaging features. Fluorescence was associated with an increased

  3. Mutations in man

    SciTech Connect

    Obe, G.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections that cover some of the following topics: DNA repair, gene or point mutations, aspects of nondisjunction, origin and significance of chromosomal alterations, structure and organization of the human genome, and mutagenic activity of cigarette smoke.

  4. Comparing Mutational Variabilities

    PubMed Central

    Houle, D.; Morikawa, B.; Lynch, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have reviewed the available data on V(M), the amount of genetic variation in phenotypic traits produced each generation by mutation. We use these data to make several qualitative tests of the mutation-selection balance hypothesis for the maintenance of genetic variance (MSB). To compare V(M) values, we use three dimensionless quantities: mutational heritability, V(M)/V(E); the mutational coefficient of variation, CV(M); and the ratio of the standing genetic variance to V(M), V(G)/V(M). Since genetic coefficients of variation for life history traits are larger than those for morphological traits, we predict that under MSB, life history traits should also have larger CV(M). This is confirmed; life history traits have a median CV(M) value more than six times higher than that for morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) approximates the persistence time of mutations under MSB in an infinite population. In order for MSB to hold, V(G)/V(M) must be small, substantially less than 1000, and life history traits should have smaller values than morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) averages about 50 generations for life history traits and 100 generations for morphological traits. These observations are all consistent with the predictions of a mutation-selection balance model. PMID:8807316

  5. Overexpression of isocitrate dehydrogenase mutant proteins renders glioma cells more sensitive to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sichen; Chou, Arthur P.; Chen, Weidong; Chen, Ruihuan; Deng, Yuzhong; Phillips, Heidi S.; Selfridge, Julia; Zurayk, Mira; Lou, Jerry J.; Everson, Richard G.; Wu, Kuan-Chung; Faull, Kym F.; Cloughesy, Timothy; Liau, Linda M.; Lai, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) or 2 (IDH2) are found in a subset of gliomas. Among the many phenotypic differences between mutant and wild-type IDH1/2 gliomas, the most salient is that IDH1/2 mutant glioma patients demonstrate markedly improved survival compared with IDH1/2 wild-type glioma patients. To address the mechanism underlying the superior clinical outcome of IDH1/2 mutant glioma patients, we investigated whether overexpression of the IDH1R132H protein could affect response to therapy in the context of an isogenic glioma cell background. Stable clonal U87MG and U373MG cell lines overexpressing IDH1WT and IDH1R132H were generated, as well as U87MG cell lines overexpressing IDH2WT and IDH2R172K. In vitro experiments were conducted to characterize baseline growth and migration and response to radiation and temozolomide. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were measured under various conditions. U87MG-IDH1R132H cells, U373MG-IDH1R132H cells, and U87MG-IDH2R172K cells demonstrated increased sensitivity to radiation but not to temozolomide. Radiosensitization of U87MG-IDH1R132H cells was accompanied by increased apoptosis and accentuated ROS generation, and this effect was abrogated by the presence of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine. Interestingly, U87MG-IDH1R132H cells also displayed decreased growth at higher cell density and in soft agar, as well as decreased migration. Overexpression of IDH1R132H and IDH2R172K mutant protein in glioblastoma cells resulted in increased radiation sensitivity and altered ROS metabolism and suppression of growth and migration in vitro. These findings provide insight into possible mechanisms contributing to the improved outcomes observed in patients with IDH1/2 mutant gliomas. PMID:23115158

  6. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel CEACAM16 Mutation Associated with Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss DFNA4B in a Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    He, Chufeng; Li, Haibo; Qing, Jie; Grati, Mhamed; Hu, Zhengmao; Li, Jiada; Hu, Yiqiao; Xia, Kun; Mei, Lingyun; Wang, Xingwei; Yu, Jianjun; Chen, Hongsheng; Jiang, Lu; Liu, Yalan; Men, Meichao; Zhang, Hailin; Guan, Liping; Xiao, Jingjing; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Xuezhong; Feng, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL/DFNA) is a highly genetically heterogeneous disorder. Hitherto only about 30 ADNSHL-causing genes have been identified and many unknown genes remain to be discovered. In this research, genome-wide linkage analysis mapped the disease locus to a 4.3 Mb region on chromosome 19q13 in SY-026, a five-generation nonconsanguineous Chinese family affected by late-onset and progressive ADNSHL. This linkage region showed partial overlap with the previously reported DFNA4. Simultaneously, probands were analyzed using exome capture followed by next generation sequencing. Encouragingly, a heterozygous missense mutation, c.505G>A (p.G169R) in exon 3 of the CEACAM16 gene (carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 16), was identified via this combined strategy. Sanger sequencing verified that the mutation co-segregated with hearing loss in the family and that it was not present in 200 unrelated control subjects with matched ancestry. This is the second report in the literature of a family with ADNSHL caused by CEACAM16 mutation. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blots also prove CEACAM16 to be a secreted protein. Furthermore, our studies in transfected HEK293T cells show that the secretion efficacy of the mutant CEACAM16 is much lower than that of the wild-type, suggesting a deleterious effect of the sequence variant. PMID:25589040

  7. Exome sequencing identifies a novel CEACAM16 mutation associated with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss DFNA4B in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Wang, Honghan; Wang, Xinwei; He, Chufeng; Li, Haibo; Qing, Jie; Grati, M'hamed; Hu, Zhengmao; Li, Jiada; Hu, Yiqiao; Xia, Kun; Mei, Lingyun; Wang, Xingwei; Yu, Jianjun; Chen, Hongsheng; Jiang, Lu; Liu, Yalan; Men, Meichao; Zhang, Hailin; Guan, Liping; Xiao, Jingjing; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Xuezhong; Feng, Yong

    2015-03-01

    Autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL/DFNA) is a highly genetically heterogeneous disorder. Hitherto only about 30 ADNSHL-causing genes have been identified and many unknown genes remain to be discovered. In this research, genome-wide linkage analysis mapped the disease locus to a 4.3 Mb region on chromosome 19q13 in SY-026, a five-generation nonconsanguineous Chinese family affected by late-onset and progressive ADNSHL. This linkage region showed partial overlap with the previously reported DFNA4. Simultaneously, probands were analyzed using exome capture followed by next-generation sequencing. Encouragingly, a heterozygous missense mutation, c.505G>A (p.G169R) in exon 3 of the CEACAM16 gene (carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 16), was identified via this combined strategy. Sanger sequencing verified that the mutation co-segregated with hearing loss in the family and that it was not present in 200 unrelated control subjects with matched ancestry. This is the second report in the literature of a family with ADNSHL caused by CEACAM16 mutation. Immunofluorescence staining and western blots also prove CEACAM16 to be a secreted protein. Furthermore, our studies in transfected HEK293T cells show that the secretion efficacy of the mutant CEACAM16 is much lower than that of the wild type, suggesting a deleterious effect of the sequence variant. PMID:25589040

  8. Type III 3-Methylglutaconic Aciduria (Optic Atrophy Plus Syndrome, or Costeff Optic Atrophy Syndrome): Identification of the OPA3 Gene and Its Founder Mutation in Iraqi Jews

    PubMed Central

    Anikster, Yair; Kleta, Robert; Shaag, Avraham; Gahl, William A.; Elpeleg, Orly

    2001-01-01

    Type III 3-methylglutaconic aciduria (MGA) (MIM 258501) is a neuro-ophthalmologic syndrome that consists of early-onset bilateral optic atrophy and later-onset spasticity, extrapyramidal dysfunction, and cognitive deficit. Urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid and of 3-methylglutaric acid is increased. The disorder has been reported in ∼40 patients of Iraqi Jewish origin, allowing the mapping of the disease to chromosome 19q13.2-q13.3, by linkage analysis. To isolate the causative gene, OPA3, we sequenced four genes within the critical interval and identified, in the intronic sequence of a gene corresponding to cDNA clone FLJ22187, a point mutation that segregated with the type III MGA phenotype. The FLJ22187-cDNA clone, which we identified as the OPA3 gene, consists of two exons and encodes a peptide of 179 amino acid residues. Northern blot analysis revealed a primary transcript of ∼5.0 kb that was ubiquitously expressed, most prominently in skeletal muscle and kidney. Within the brain, the cerebral cortex, the medulla, the cerebellum, and the frontal lobe, compared to other parts of the brain, had slightly increased expression. The intronic G→C mutation abolished mRNA expression in fibroblasts from affected patients and was detected in 8 of 85 anonymous Israeli individuals of Iraqi Jewish origin. Milder mutations in OPA3 should be sought in patients with optic atrophy with later onset, even in the absence of additional neurological abnormalities. PMID:11668429

  9. Mutant IDH is sufficient to initiate enchondromatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Makoto; Sasaki, Masato; Cairns, Rob A; Inoue, Satoshi; Puviindran, Vijitha; Li, Wanda Y; Snow, Bryan E; Jones, Lisa D; Wei, Qingxia; Sato, Shingo; Tang, Yuning J; Nadesan, Puviindran; Rockel, Jason; Whetstone, Heather; Poon, Raymond; Weng, Angela; Gross, Stefan; Straley, Kimberly; Gliser, Camelia; Xu, Yingxia; Wunder, Jay; Mak, Tak W; Alman, Benjamin A

    2015-03-01

    Enchondromas are benign cartilage tumors and precursors to malignant chondrosarcomas. Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDH1 and IDH2) are present in the majority of these tumor types. How these mutations cause enchondromas is unclear. Here, we identified the spectrum of IDH mutations in human enchondromas and chondrosarcomas and studied their effects in mice. A broad range of mutations was identified, including the previously unreported IDH1-R132Q mutation. These mutations harbored enzymatic activity to catalyze α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutarate (d-2HG). Mice expressing Idh1-R132Q in one allele in cells expressing type 2 collagen showed a disordered growth plate, with persistence of type X-expressing chondrocytes. Chondrocyte cell cultures from these animals or controls showed that there was an increase in proliferation and expression of genes characteristic of hypertrophic chondrocytes with expression of Idh1-R132Q or 2HG treatment. Col2a1-Cre;Idh1-R132Q mutant knock-in mice (mutant allele expressed in chondrocytes) did not survive after the neonatal stage. Col2a1-Cre/ERT2;Idh1-R132 mutant conditional knock-in mice, in which Cre was induced by tamoxifen after weaning, developed multiple enchondroma-like lesions. Taken together, these data show that mutant IDH or d-2HG causes persistence of chondrocytes, giving rise to rests of growth-plate cells that persist in the bone as enchondromas. PMID:25730874

  10. Mutant IDH is sufficient to initiate enchondromatosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Makoto; Sasaki, Masato; Cairns, Rob A.; Inoue, Satoshi; Puviindran, Vijitha; Li, Wanda Y.; Snow, Bryan E.; Jones, Lisa D.; Wei, Qingxia; Sato, Shingo; Tang, Yuning J.; Nadesan, Puviindran; Rockel, Jason; Whetstone, Heather; Poon, Raymond; Weng, Angela; Gross, Stefan; Straley, Kimberly; Gliser, Camelia; Xu, Yingxia; Wunder, Jay; Mak, Tak W.; Alman, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    Enchondromas are benign cartilage tumors and precursors to malignant chondrosarcomas. Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDH1 and IDH2) are present in the majority of these tumor types. How these mutations cause enchondromas is unclear. Here, we identified the spectrum of IDH mutations in human enchondromas and chondrosarcomas and studied their effects in mice. A broad range of mutations was identified, including the previously unreported IDH1-R132Q mutation. These mutations harbored enzymatic activity to catalyze α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutarate (d-2HG). Mice expressing Idh1-R132Q in one allele in cells expressing type 2 collagen showed a disordered growth plate, with persistence of type X-expressing chondrocytes. Chondrocyte cell cultures from these animals or controls showed that there was an increase in proliferation and expression of genes characteristic of hypertrophic chondrocytes with expression of Idh1-R132Q or 2HG treatment. Col2a1-Cre;Idh1-R132Q mutant knock-in mice (mutant allele expressed in chondrocytes) did not survive after the neonatal stage. Col2a1-Cre/ERT2;Idh1-R132 mutant conditional knock-in mice, in which Cre was induced by tamoxifen after weaning, developed multiple enchondroma-like lesions. Taken together, these data show that mutant IDH or d-2HG causes persistence of chondrocytes, giving rise to rests of growth-plate cells that persist in the bone as enchondromas. PMID:25730874

  11. Crystallographic Investigation and Selective Inhibition of Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), a key enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, have recently been found in ∼75% glioma and ∼20% acute myeloid leukemia. Different from the wild-type enzyme, mutant IDH1 catalyzes the reduction of α-ketoglutaric acid to d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid. Strong evidence has shown mutant IDH1 represents a novel target for this type of cancer. We found two 1-hydroxypyridin-2-one compounds that are potent inhibitors of R132H and R132C IDH1 mutants with Ki values as low as 120 nM. These compounds exhibit >60-fold selectivity against wild-type IDH1 and can inhibit the production of d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid in IDH1 mutated cells, representing novel chemical probes for cancer biology studies. We also report the first inhibitor-bound crystal structures of IDH1(R132H), showing these inhibitors have H-bond, electrostatic, and hydrophobic interactions with the mutant enzyme. Comparison with the substrate-bound IDH1 structures revealed the structural basis for the high enzyme selectivity of these compounds. PMID:23795241

  12. Crystallographic Investigation and Selective Inhibition of Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Baisong; Yao, Yuan; Liu, Zhen; Deng, Lisheng; Anglin, Justin L; Jiang, Hong; Prasad, B V Venkataram; Song, Yongcheng

    2013-06-13

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), a key enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, have recently been found in ~75% glioma and ~20% acute myeloid leukemia. Different from the wild-type enzyme, mutant IDH1 catalyzes the reduction of α-ketoglutaric acid to D-2-hydroxyglutaric acid. Strong evidence has shown mutant IDH1 represents a novel target for this type of cancer. We found two 1-hydroxypyridin-2-one compounds that are potent inhibitors of R132H and R132C IDH1 mutants with Ki values as low as 120 nM. These compounds exhibit >60-fold selectivity against wild-type IDH1 and can inhibit the production of D-2-hydroxyglutaric acid in IDH1 mutated cells, representing novel chemical probes for cancer biology studies. We also report the first inhibitor-bound crystal structures of IDH1(R132H), showing these inhibitors have H-bond, electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with the mutant enzyme. Comparison with the substrate-bound IDH1 structures revealed the structural basis for the high enzyme selectivity of these compounds. PMID:23795241

  13. Mutations in lettuce improvement.

    PubMed

    Mou, Beiquan

    2011-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic studies including identification and cloning of disease-resistance genes. Mutagenesis combined with genomic technology may provide powerful tools for the discovery of novel gene alleles. In addition to radiation and chemical mutagens, unconventional approaches such as tissue or protoplast culture, transposable elements, and space flights have been utilized to generate mutants in lettuce. Since mutation breeding is considered nontransgenic, it is more acceptable to consumers and will be explored more in the future for lettuce improvement. PMID:22287955

  14. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Beiquan

    2011-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic studies including identification and cloning of disease-resistance genes. Mutagenesis combined with genomic technology may provide powerful tools for the discovery of novel gene alleles. In addition to radiation and chemical mutagens, unconventional approaches such as tissue or protoplast culture, transposable elements, and space flights have been utilized to generate mutants in lettuce. Since mutation breeding is considered nontransgenic, it is more acceptable to consumers and will be explored more in the future for lettuce improvement. PMID:22287955

  15. Genetic alterations in uncommon low-grade neuroepithelial tumors: BRAF, FGFR1, and MYB mutations occur at high frequency and align with morphology.

    PubMed

    Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Orisme, Wilda; Wen, Ji; Santiago, Teresa; Gupta, Kirti; Dalton, James D; Tang, Bo; Haupfear, Kelly; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Easton, John; Mulder, Heather; Boggs, Kristy; Shao, Ying; Rusch, Michael; Becksfort, Jared; Gupta, Pankaj; Wang, Shuoguo; Lee, Ryan P; Brat, Daniel; Peter Collins, V; Dahiya, Sonika; George, David; Konomos, William; Kurian, Kathreena M; McFadden, Kathryn; Serafini, Luciano Neder; Nickols, Hilary; Perry, Arie; Shurtleff, Sheila; Gajjar, Amar; Boop, Fredrick A; Klimo, Paul D; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Baker, Suzanne J; Zhang, Jinghui; Wu, Gang; Downing, James R; Tatevossian, Ruth G; Ellison, David W

    2016-06-01

    Low-grade neuroepithelial tumors (LGNTs) are diverse CNS tumors presenting in children and young adults, often with a history of epilepsy. While the genetic profiles of common LGNTs, such as the pilocytic astrocytoma and 'adult-type' diffuse gliomas, are largely established, those of uncommon LGNTs remain to be defined. In this study, we have used massively parallel sequencing and various targeted molecular genetic approaches to study alterations in 91 LGNTs, mostly from children but including young adult patients. These tumors comprise dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNETs; n = 22), diffuse oligodendroglial tumors (d-OTs; n = 20), diffuse astrocytomas (DAs; n = 17), angiocentric gliomas (n = 15), and gangliogliomas (n = 17). Most LGNTs (84 %) analyzed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) were characterized by a single driver genetic alteration. Alterations of FGFR1 occurred frequently in LGNTs composed of oligodendrocyte-like cells, being present in 82 % of DNETs and 40 % of d-OTs. In contrast, a MYB-QKI fusion characterized almost all angiocentric gliomas (87 %), and MYB fusion genes were the most common genetic alteration in DAs (41 %). A BRAF:p.V600E mutation was present in 35 % of gangliogliomas and 18 % of DAs. Pathogenic alterations in FGFR1/2/3, BRAF, or MYB/MYBL1 occurred in 78 % of the series. Adult-type d-OTs with an IDH1/2 mutation occurred in four adolescents, the youngest aged 15 years at biopsy. Despite a detailed analysis, novel genetic alterations were limited to two fusion genes, EWSR1-PATZ1 and SLMAP-NTRK2, both in gangliogliomas. Alterations in BRAF, FGFR1, or MYB account for most pathogenic alterations in LGNTs, including pilocytic astrocytomas, and alignment of these genetic alterations and cytologic features across LGNTs has diagnostic implications. Additionally, therapeutic options based upon targeting the effects of these alterations are already in clinical trials. PMID:26810070

  16. OXPHOS mutations and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Werner J H; Distelmaier, Felix; Smeitink, Jan AM; Willems, Peter HGM

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) sustains organelle function and plays a central role in cellular energy metabolism. The OXPHOS system consists of 5 multisubunit complexes (CI–CV) that are built up of 92 different structural proteins encoded by the nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Biogenesis of a functional OXPHOS system further requires the assistance of nDNA-encoded OXPHOS assembly factors, of which 35 are currently identified. In humans, mutations in both structural and assembly genes and in genes involved in mtDNA maintenance, replication, transcription, and translation induce ‘primary' OXPHOS disorders that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Leigh syndrome (LS), which is probably the most classical OXPHOS disease during early childhood. Here, we present the current insights regarding function, biogenesis, regulation, and supramolecular architecture of the OXPHOS system, as well as its genetic origin. Next, we provide an inventory of OXPHOS structural and assembly genes which, when mutated, induce human neurodegenerative disorders. Finally, we discuss the consequences of mutations in OXPHOS structural and assembly genes at the single cell level and how this information has advanced our understanding of the role of OXPHOS dysfunction in neurodegeneration. PMID:23149385

  17. SNP Array Analysis Reveals Novel Genomic Abnormalities Including Copy Neutral Loss of Heterozygosity in Anaplastic Oligodendrogliomas

    PubMed Central

    Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Dehais, Caroline; Courdy, Célia; Carpentier, Catherine; de Bernard, Simon; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Honnorat, Jérôme; Chinot, Olivier; Ramirez, Carole; Beauchesne, Patrick; Benouaich-Amiel, Alexandra; Godard, Joël; Eimer, Sandrine; Parker, Fabrice; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Colin, Philippe; Loussouarn, Delphine; Faillot, Thierry; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Elouadhani-Hamdi, Selma; Bauchet, Luc; Langlois, Olivier; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Fontaine, Denys; Vauleon, Elodie; Menei, Philippe; Fotso, Marie Janette Motsuo; Desenclos, Christine; Verelle, Pierre; Ghiringhelli, François; Noel, Georges; Labrousse, François; Carpentier, Antoine; Dhermain, Frédéric; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOD) are rare glial tumors in adults with relative homogeneous clinical, radiological and histological features at the time of diagnosis but dramatically various clinical courses. Studies have identified several molecular abnormalities with clinical or biological relevance to AOD (e.g. t(1;19)(q10;p10), IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1 mutations). To better characterize the clinical and biological behavior of this tumor type, the creation of a national multicentric network, named “Prise en charge des OLigodendrogliomes Anaplasiques (POLA),” has been supported by the Institut National du Cancer (InCA). Newly diagnosed and centrally validated AOD patients and their related biological material (tumor and blood samples) were prospectively included in the POLA clinical database and tissue bank, respectively. At the molecular level, we have conducted a high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, which included 83 patients. Despite a careful central pathological review, AOD have been found to exhibit heterogeneous genomic features. A total of 82% of the tumors exhibited a 1p/19q-co-deletion, while 18% harbor a distinct chromosome pattern. Novel focal abnormalities, including homozygously deleted, amplified and disrupted regions, have been identified. Recurring copy neutral losses of heterozygosity (CNLOH) inducing the modulation of gene expression have also been discovered. CNLOH in the CDKN2A locus was associated with protein silencing in 1/3 of the cases. In addition, FUBP1 homozygous deletion was detected in one case suggesting a putative tumor suppressor role of FUBP1 in AOD. Our study showed that the genomic and pathological analyses of AOD are synergistic in detecting relevant clinical and biological subgroups of AOD. PMID:23071531

  18. Mutation detection by chemical cleavage.

    PubMed

    Cotton, R G

    1999-02-01

    Detection and amplification of mutations in genes in a cheap, 100% effective manner is a major objective in modern molecular genetics. This ideal is some way away and many methods are used each of which have their own particular advantages and disadvantages. Sequencing is often thought of as the 'gold standard' for mutation detection. This perception is distorted due to the fact that this is the ONLY method of mutation identification but this does not mean it is the best for mutation detection. The fact that many scanning methods detect 5-10% of mutant molecules in a wild type environment immediately indicates these methods are advantageous over sequencing. One such method, the Chemical Cleavage method, is able to cut the costs of detecting a mutation on order of magnitude and guarantees mutation detection as evidenced by track record and the fact that each mutation has two chances of being detected. PMID:10084109

  19. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph−) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  20. Calreticulin mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-10-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph(-)) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph(-) MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  1. Geographic Distributions of Idh-1 Alleles in a Cricket are Linked to Differential Enzyme Kinetic Performance Across Thermal Environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geographic clines within species are often interpreted as evidence of adaptation to varying environmental conditions. However, clines can also result from genetic drift, and these competing hypotheses must therefore be tested empirically. The striped ground cricket, Allonemobius socius, is widely-di...

  2. Two new Gaucher disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Beutler, E; Gelbart, T

    1994-02-01

    Recently, a mutation at nucleotide 1193 of the glucocerebrosidase gene was described in a patient with type 1 Gaucher disease. This mutation destroys a TaqI site in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified fragment. We used digestion with this enzyme to screen DNA samples from Gaucher disease patients representing 23 previously unidentified alleles and discovered that this site had been destroyed in three samples. However, the mutation that caused this change proved to be a CT substitution at cDNA nucleotide 1192 (Genomic 5408; 359Arg-->End). Fortuitously, another TaqI site was destroyed by a different mutation, a GA mutation at nt 1312 (Genomic 5927; 399AspAsn). Both of these mutations were functionally severe in that they were associated with type 2 (acute neuronopathic) Gaucher disease. PMID:8112750

  3. BRAF Mutations in Canine Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Kennedy, Katherine; Shapiro, Susan G.; Breen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations of the BRAF gene lead to constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway. Although many human cancers carry the mutated BRAF gene, this mutation has not yet been characterized in canine cancers. As human and canine cancers share molecular abnormalities, we hypothesized that BRAF gene mutations also exist in canine cancers. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced the exon 15 of BRAF, mutation hot spot of the gene, in 667 canine primary tumors and 38 control tissues. Sequencing analysis revealed that a single nucleotide T to A transversion at nucleotide 1349 occurred in 64 primary tumors (9.6%), with particularly high frequency in prostatic carcinoma (20/25, 80%) and urothelial carcinoma (30/45, 67%). This mutation results in the amino acid substitution of glutamic acid for valine at codon 450 (V450E) of canine BRAF, corresponding to the most common BRAF mutation in human cancer, V600E. The evolutional conservation of the BRAF V600E mutation highlights the importance of MAPK pathway activation in neoplasia and may offer opportunity for molecular diagnostics and targeted therapeutics for dogs bearing BRAF-mutated cancers. PMID:26053201

  4. Driver Mutations in Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Decatur, Christina L.; Ong, Erin; Garg, Nisha; Anbunathan, Hima; Bowcock, Anne M.; Field, Matthew G.; Harbour, J. William

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Frequent mutations have been described in the following 5 genes in uveal melanoma (UM): BAP1, EIF1AX, GNA11, GNAQ, and SF3B1. Understanding the prognostic significance of these mutations could facilitate their use in precision medicine. OBJECTIVE To determine the associations between driver mutations, gene expression profile (GEP) classification, clinicopathologic features, and patient outcomes in UM. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective study of patients with UM treated by enucleation by a single ocular oncologist between November 1, 1998, and July 31, 2014. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Clinicopathologic features, patient outcomes, GEP classification (class 1 or class 2), and mutation status were recorded. RESULTS The study cohort comprised 81 participants. Their mean age was 61.5 years, and 37% (30 of 81) were female. The GEP classification was class 1 in 35 of 81 (43%), class 2 in 42 of 81 (52%), and unknown in 4 of 81 (5%). BAP1 mutations were identified in 29 of 64 (45%), GNAQ mutations in 36 of 81 (44%), GNA11 mutations in 36 of 81 (44%), SF3B1 mutations in 19 of 81 (24%), and EIF1AX mutations in 14 of 81 (17%). Sixteen of the mutations in BAP1 and 6 of the mutations in EIF1AX were previously unreported in UM. GNAQ and GNA11 mutations were mutually exclusive. BAP1, SF3B1, and EIF1AX mutations were almost mutually exclusive with each other. Using multiple regression analysis, BAP1 mutations were associated with class 2 GEP and older patient. EIF1AX mutations were associated with class 1 GEP and the absence of ciliary body involvement. SF3B1 mutations were associated with younger patient age. GNAQ mutations were associated with the absence of ciliary body involvement and greater largest basal diameter. GNA11 mutations were not associated with any of the analyzed features. Using Cox proportional hazards modeling, class 2 GEP was the prognostic factor most strongly associated with metastasis (relative risk, 9.4; 95% CI, 3.1–28.5) and

  5. Ramifications of four concurrent thrombophilic mutations and one hypofibrinolytic mutation.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Goldenberg, Naila; Wang, Ping; Aregawi, Dawit

    2004-10-01

    A kindred was examined in which the 48-year-old white female proband with three deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary emboli events had four thrombophilic and one hypofibrinolytic mutations, and in which her 14-year-old asymptomatic daughter had four thrombophilic mutations. The proband was heterozygous for the G1691A factor V Leiden, G20210A prothrombin, and platelet glycoprotein IIIa PL A1/A2 mutations, had high factor VIII (221%), and was homozygous for the 4G4G plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene mutation, with high plasminogen activator inhibitor activity (23.7 U/mL). Her 14-year-old daughter was homozygous for the G1691A factor V Leiden and platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa PL A2/A2 mutations, compound heterozygous for the C677T and A1298C methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutations, and heterozygous for the G20210A prothrombin mutation, a combination with an estimated likelihood of 1.6 x 10(-7). In 247 white healthy controls, there was no V Leiden homozygosity and no V Leiden-prothrombin gene compound heterozygosity. Heterozygosity for the V Leiden and prothrombin gene mutations was 3.2% and 4.1%, respectively. Homozygosity for the platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa PL A2A2, PAI-1 gene 4G4G, and C677T MTHFR mutations was 3.2%, 22.7%, and 12%, respectively. The proband will receive anticoagulation therapy for life. Beyond aspirin, avoidance of exogenous estrogens, and enoxaparin prophylaxis during pregnancy, it is not known whether the proband's daughter should have lifelong anticoagulation therapy, or only after her first thrombotic event. PMID:15497023

  6. Parkinsonism Associated with Glucocerebrosidase Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sunwoo, Mun-Kyung; Kim, Seung-Min; Lee, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Background Gaucher's disease is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations of the β-glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA). There is increasing evidence that GBA mutations are a genetic risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). We report herein a family of Koreans exhibiting parkinsonism-associated GBA mutations. Case Report A 44-year-old woman suffering from slowness and paresthesia of the left arm for the previous 1.5years, visited our hospital to manage known invasive ductal carcinoma. During a preoperative evaluation, she was diagnosed with Gaucher's disease and double mutations of S271G and R359X in GBA. Parkinsonian features including low amplitude postural tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia and shuffling gait were observed. Genetic analysis also revealed that her older sister, who had also been diagnosed with PD and had been taking dopaminergic drugs for 8-years, also possessed a heterozygote R359X mutation in GBA. 18F-fluoropropylcarbomethoxyiodophenylnortropane positron-emission tomography in these patients revealed decreased uptake of dopamine transporter in the posterior portion of the bilateral putamen. Conclusions This case study demonstrates Korean familial cases of PD with heterozygote mutation of GBA, further supporting the association between PD and GBA mutation. PMID:21779299

  7. Bladder Cancer and Genetic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-09-01

    The most common type of urinary bladder cancer is called as transitional cell carcinoma. The major risk factors for bladder cancer are environmental, tobacco smoking, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals and gases, bladder inflammation due to microbial and parasitic infections, as well as some adverse side-effects of medications. The genetic mutations in some chromosomal genes, such as FGFR3, RB1, HRAS, TP53, TSC1, and others, occur which form tumors in the urinary bladder. These genes play an important role in the regulation of cell division which prevents cells from dividing too quickly. The changes in the genes of human chromosome 9 are usually responsible for tumor in bladder cancer, but the genetic mutation of chromosome 22 can also result in bladder cancer. The identification of p53 gene mutation has been studied at NIH, Washington, DC, USA, in urine samples of bladder cancer patients. The invasive bladder cancers were determined for the presence of gene mutations on p53 suppressor gene. The 18 different bladder tumors were evaluated, and 11 (61 %) had genetic mutations of p53 gene. The bladder cancer studies have suggested that 70 % of bladder cancers involve a specific mutation in a particular gene, namely telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. The TERT gene is involved in DNA protection, cellular aging processes, and cancer. The Urothelial carcinomas of the bladder have been described in Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and hematology. HRAS is a proto-oncogene and has potential to cause cancer in several organs including the bladder. The TSC1 c. 1907 1908 del (E636fs) mutation in bladder cancer suggests that the location of the mutation is Exon 15 with frequency of TSC1 mutation of 11.7 %. The recent findings of BAP1 mutations have shown that it contributes to BRCA pathway alterations in bladder cancer. The discoveries of more gene mutations and new biomarkers and polymerase chain reaction bioassays for gene mutations in bladder

  8. Mutation breeding by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zengliang; Deng, Jianguo; He, Jianjun; Huo, Yuping; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Xuedong; Lui, Guifu

    1991-07-01

    Ion implantation as a new mutagenic method has been used in the rice breeding program since 1986, and for mutation breeding of other crops later. It has been shown, in principle and in practice, that this method has many outstanding advantages: lower damage rate; higher mutation rate and wider mutational spectrum. Many new lines of rice with higher yield rate; broader disease resistance; shorter growing period but higher quality have been bred from ion beam induced mutants. Some of these lines have been utilized for the intersubspecies hybridization. Several new lines of cotton, wheat and other crops are now in breeding. Some biophysical effects of ion implantation for crop seeds have been studied.

  9. Glucocerebrosidase mutations in Gaucher disease.

    PubMed Central

    Beutler, E.; Demina, A.; Gelbart, T.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thirty-six mutations that cause Gaucher disease, the most common glycolipid storage disorder, are known. Although both alleles of most patients with the disease contain one of these mutations, in a few patients one or both disease-producing alleles have remained unidentified. Identification of mutations in these patients is useful for genetic counseling. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The DNA from 23 Gaucher disease patients in whom at least one glucocerebrosidase allele did not contain any of the 36 previously described mutations has been examined by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, followed by sequencing of regions in which abnormalities were detected. RESULTS: Eight previously undescribed mutations were detected. In exon 3, a deletion of a cytosine at cDNA nt 203 was found. In exon 6, three missense mutations were identified: a C-->A transversion at cDNA nt 644 (Ala176-->Asp), a C-->A transversion at cDNA nt 661 that resulted in a (Pro182-->Thr), and a G-->A transition at cDNA nt 721 (Gly202-->Arg). Two missense mutations were found in exon 7: a G-->A transition at cDNA nt 887 (Arg257-->Gln) and a C-->T at cDNA nt 970 (Arg285-->Cys). Two missense mutations were found in exon 9: a T-->G at cDNA nt 1249 (Trp378-->Gly) and a G-->A at cDNA nt 1255 (Asp380-->Asn). In addition to these disease-producing mutations, a silent C-->G transversion at cDNA nt 1431, occurring in a gene that already contained the 1226G mutation, was found in one family. CONCLUSIONS: The mutations described here and previously known can be classified as mild, severe, or lethal, on the basis of their effect on enzyme production and on clinical phenotype, and as polymorphic or sporadic, on the basis of the haplotype in which they are found. Rare mutations such as the new ones described here are sporadic in nature. PMID:8790604

  10. Genomic Profiling of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Refining Prognosis and Identifying Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Andrew X.; Borger, Darrell R.; Kim, Yuhree; Cosgrove, David; Ejaz, Aslam; Alexandrescu, Sorin; Groeschl, Ryan Thomas; Deshpande, Vikram; Lindberg, James M.; Ferrone, Cristina; Sempoux, Christine; Yau, Thomas; Poon, Ronnie; Popescu, Irinel; Bauer, Todd W.; Gamblin, T. Clark; Gigot, Jean Francois; Anders, Robert A.; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular alterations that drive tumorigenesis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) remain poorly defined. We sought to determine the incidence and prognostic significance of mutations associated with ICC among patients undergoing surgical resection. Methods Multiplexed mutational profiling was performed using nucleic acids that were extracted from 200 resected ICC tumor specimens from 7 centers. The frequency of mutations was ascertained and the effect on outcome was determined. Results The majority of patients (61.5 %) had no genetic mutation identified. Among the 77 patients (38.5 %) with a genetic mutation, only a small number of gene mutations were identified with a frequency of >5 %: IDH1 (15.5 %) and KRAS (8.6 %). Other genetic mutations were identified in very low frequency: BRAF (4.9 %), IDH2 (4.5 %), PIK3CA (4.3 %), NRAS (3.1 %), TP53 (2.5 %), MAP2K1 (1.9 %), CTNNB1 (0.6 %), and PTEN (0.6 %). Among patients with an IDH1-mutant tumor, approximately 7 % were associated with a concurrent PIK3CA gene mutation or a mutation in MAP2K1 (4 %). No concurrent mutations in IDH1 and KRAS were noted. Compared with ICC tumors that had no identified mutation, IDH1-mutant tumors were more often bilateral (odds ratio 2.75), while KRAS-mutant tumors were more likely to be associated with R1 margin (odds ratio 6.51) (both P < 0.05). Although clinicopathological features such as tumor number and nodal status were associated with survival, no specific mutation was associated with prognosis. Conclusions Most somatic mutations in resected ICC tissue are found at low frequency, supporting a need for broad-based mutational profiling in these patients. IDH1 and KRAS were the most common mutations noted. Although certain mutations were associated with ICC clinicopathological features, mutational status did not seemingly affect long-term prognosis. PMID:24889489

  11. Genome Destabilizing Mutator Alleles Drive Specific Mutational Trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, Peter C.; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J. M.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POLα and the Cdc13–Stn1–Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes. PMID:24336748

  12. SQSTM1 Mutations and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Scheetz, Todd E.; Roos, Ben R.; Solivan-Timpe, Frances; Miller, Kathy; DeLuca, Adam P.; Stone, Edwin M.; Kwon, Young H.; Alward, Wallace L. M.; Wang, Kai; Fingert, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is the most common cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. One subset of glaucoma, normal tension glaucoma (NTG) occurs in the absence of high intraocular pressure. Mutations in two genes, optineurin (OPTN) and TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1), cause familial NTG and have known roles in the catabolic cellular process autophagy. TKB1 encodes a kinase that phosphorylates OPTN, an autophagy receptor, which ultimately activates autophagy. The sequestosome (SQSTM1) gene also encodes an autophagy receptor and also is a target of TBK1 phosphorylation. Consequently, we hypothesized that mutations in SQSTM1 may also cause NTG. We tested this hypothesis by searching for glaucoma-causing mutations in a cohort of NTG patients (n = 308) and matched controls (n = 157) using Sanger sequencing. An additional 1098 population control samples were also analyzed using whole exome sequencing. A total of 17 non-synonymous mutations were detected which were not significantly skewed between cases and controls when analyzed separately, or as a group (p > 0.05). These data suggest that SQSTM1 mutations are not a common cause of NTG. PMID:27275741

  13. [Founder mutation in Lynch syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cajal, Andrea R; Piñero, Tamara A; Verzura, Alicia; Santino, Juan Pablo; Solano, Angela R; Kalfayan, Pablo G; Ferro, Alejandra; Vaccaro, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most frequent syndrome in hereditary colorectal cancer, a family-specific deleterious mutations in genes encoding DNA reparation proteins: MLH1 (mutL homolog 1), MSH2, MSH6 (mutS homolog 2 y 6, respectively), PMS2 (PMS1 homolog 2, mismatch repair system component) y MUTYH (mutY DNA glycosylase). The c.2252_2253delAA, p.Lys751Serfs*3 mutation in MLH1 gene segregates with a haplotype reported in the northern region of Italy and whose origin was attributed to a founder effect. This mutation co-segregates with typical characteristics of Lynch syndrome, including early age at onset and multiple primary tumors in the same individual, a high frequency of pancreatic cancer, high microsatellite instability and lack of PMS2 expression. This report describes a mutation in an Argentinian patient with endometrioid adenocarcinoma of uterus. Her first-degree relatives had a history of colon cancer diagnosed before 50 years, fulfilling the Amsterdam Criteria I and Lynch syndrome II. The high pathogenicity associated to this mutation makes necessary the study of all members from families with hereditary cancer, allowing pre-symptomatic genetic diagnosis, early assessment and the instauration of preventive treatments. PMID:27295708

  14. Two novel compound heterozygous mutations in OPA3 in two siblings with OPA3-related 3-methylglutaconic aciduria

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Christina; Gallo, Linda K.; Dineen, Richard; Ciccone, Carla; Dorward, Heidi; Hoganson, George E.; Wolfe, Lynne; Gahl, William A.; Huizing, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    OPA3-related 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, or Costeff Optic Atrophy syndrome, is a neuro-ophthalmologic syndrome of early-onset bilateral optic atrophy and later-onset spasticity, and extrapyramidal dysfunction. Urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid and of 3-methylglutaric acid is markedly increased. OPA3-related 3-methylglutaconic aciduria is due to mutations in the OPA3 gene located at 19q13.2-13.3. Here we describe two siblings with novel compound heterozygous variants in OPA3: c.1A>G (p.1M>V) in the translation initiation codon in exon 1 and a second variant, c.142+5G>C in intron 1. On cDNA sequencing the c.1A>G appeared homozygous, indicating that the allele without the c.1A>G variant is degraded. This is likely due to an intronic variant; possibly the IVS1+5 splice site variant. The older female sibling initially presented with motor developmental delay and vertical nystagmus during her first year of life and was diagnosed subsequently with optic atrophy. Her brother presented with mildly increased hip muscle tone followed by vertical nystagmus within the first 6 months of life, and was found to have elevated urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid and 3-methylglutaric acid, and optic atrophy by 1.5 years of age. Currently, ages 16 and 7, both children exhibit ataxic gaits and dysarthric speech. Immunofluorescence studies on patient’s cells showed fragmented mitochondrial morphology. Thus, though the exact function of OPA3 remains unknown, our experimental results and clinical summary provide evidence for the pathogenicity of the identified OPA3 variants and provide further evidence for a mitochondrial pathology in this disease. PMID:24749080

  15. Gene mutations in Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qi; Ge, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) is a severe (and potentially fatal) disease caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting adenomas of the pituitary gland (often termed pituitary adenomas). The majority of ACTH-secreting corticotroph tumors are sporadic and CD rarely appears as a familial disorder, thus, the genetic mechanisms underlying CD are poorly understood. Studies have reported that various mutated genes are associated with CD, such as those in menin 1, aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein and the nuclear receptor subfamily 3 group C member 1. Recently it was identified that ubiquitin-specific protease 8 mutations contribute to CD, which was significant towards elucidating the genetic mechanisms of CD. The present study reviews the associated gene mutations in CD patients. PMID:27588171

  16. Two novel PRPF31 premessenger ribonucleic acid processing factor 31 homolog mutations including a complex insertion-deletion identified in Chinese families with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Bing; Chen, Jieqiong; Zhang, Xiaohui; Pan, Zhe; Bai, Fengge

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the causative mutations in two Chinese families with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and to describe the associated phenotype. Methods Individuals from two unrelated families underwent full ophthalmic examinations. After informed consent was obtained, genomic DNA was extracted from the venous blood of all participants. Linkage analysis was performed on the known genetic loci for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with a panel of polymorphic markers in the two families, and then all coding exons of the PRP31 premessenger ribonucleic acid processing factor 31 homolog (PRPF31) gene were screened for mutations with direct sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA fragments. Allele-specific PCR was used to validate a substitution in all available family members and 100 normal controls. A large deletion was detected with real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) using a panel of primers from regions around the PRPF31 gene. Long-range PCR, followed by DNA sequencing, was used to define the breakpoints. Results Clinical examination and pedigree analysis revealed two four-generation families (RP24 and RP106) with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A significant two-point linkage odd disequilibrium score was generated at marker D19S926 (Zmax=3.55, θ=0) for family RP24 and D19S571 (Zmax=3.21, θ=0) for family RP106, and further linkage and haplotype studies confined the disease locus to chromosome 19q13.42 where the PRPF31 gene is located. Mutation screening of the PRPF31 gene revealed a novel deletion c.1215delG (p.G405fs+7X) in family RP106. The deletion cosegregated with the family’s disease phenotype, but was not found in 100 normal controls. No disease-causing mutation was detected in family RP24 with PCR-based sequencing analysis. RQ-PCR and long-range PCR analysis revealed a complex insertion-deletion (indel) in the patients of family RP24. The deletion is more than 19 kb and encompasses part of the PRPF31 gene (exons 1–3), together with three adjacent

  17. The oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate activates the mTOR signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Carbonneau, Mélissa; M Gagné, Laurence; Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Germain, Marie-Anne; Motorina, Alena; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Secco, Blandine; Vincent, Emma E; Tumber, Anthony; Hulea, Laura; Bergeman, Jonathan; Oppermann, Udo; Jones, Russell G; Laplante, Mathieu; Topisirovic, Ivan; Petrecca, Kevin; Huot, Marc-Étienne; Mallette, Frédérick A

    2016-01-01

    The identification of cancer-associated mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes isocitrate dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) highlights the prevailing notion that aberrant metabolic function can contribute to carcinogenesis. IDH1/2 normally catalyse the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate into α-ketoglutarate (αKG). In gliomas and acute myeloid leukaemias, IDH1/2 mutations confer gain-of-function leading to production of the oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) from αKG. Here we show that generation of 2HG by mutated IDH1/2 leads to the activation of mTOR by inhibiting KDM4A, an αKG-dependent enzyme of the Jumonji family of lysine demethylases. Furthermore, KDM4A associates with the DEP domain-containing mTOR-interacting protein (DEPTOR), a negative regulator of mTORC1/2. Depletion of KDM4A decreases DEPTOR protein stability. Our results provide an additional molecular mechanism for the oncogenic activity of mutant IDH1/2 by revealing an unprecedented link between TCA cycle defects and positive modulation of mTOR function downstream of the canonical PI3K/AKT/TSC1-2 pathway. PMID:27624942

  18. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  19. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wedge, David C.; Aparicio, Samuel A.J.R.; Behjati, Sam; Biankin, Andrew V.; Bignell, Graham R.; Bolli, Niccolo; Borg, Ake; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boyault, Sandrine; Burkhardt, Birgit; Butler, Adam P.; Caldas, Carlos; Davies, Helen R.; Desmedt, Christine; Eils, Roland; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Foekens, John A.; Greaves, Mel; Hosoda, Fumie; Hutter, Barbara; Ilicic, Tomislav; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Imielinsk, Marcin; Jäger, Natalie; Jones, David T.W.; Jones, David; Knappskog, Stian; Kool, Marcel; Lakhani, Sunil R.; López-Otín, Carlos; Martin, Sancha; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Nakamura, Hiromi; Northcott, Paul A.; Pajic, Marina; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Paradiso, Angelo; Pearson, John V.; Puente, Xose S.; Raine, Keiran; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Richardson, Andrea L.; Richter, Julia; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schlesner, Matthias; Schumacher, Ton N.; Span, Paul N.; Teague, Jon W.; Totoki, Yasushi; Tutt, Andrew N.J.; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; van Buuren, Marit M.; van ’t Veer, Laura; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Waddell, Nicola; Yates, Lucy R.; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Futreal, P. Andrew; McDermott, Ultan; Lichter, Peter; Meyerson, Matthew; Grimmond, Sean M.; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elías; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Pfister, Stefan M.; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    All cancers are caused by somatic mutations. However, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here, we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, kataegis, is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer with potential implications for understanding of cancer etiology, prevention and therapy. PMID:23945592

  20. Mutational Heterogeneity in Melanoma: An Inconvenient Truth.

    PubMed

    Chang, Gregory A; Polsky, David

    2015-12-01

    Identification of oncogenic BRAF mutations in primary and metastatic melanomas supports a linear model of clonal evolution in cancer. Some mutational studies, however, have failed to identify BRAF mutations in metastatic tumors from patients with BRAFmutant primary melanomas. Using a combination of methods, Riveiro-Falkenbach et al. (2015) assert that technical issues, and not clonal heterogeneity, may explain prior discordant mutational results. PMID:26569584

  1. MECHANISMS OF STATIONARY PHASE MUTATION: A Decade of Adaptive Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, P. L.

    2010-01-01

    A decade of research on adaptive mutation has revealed a plethora of mutagenic mechanisms that may be important in evolution. The DNA synthesis associated with recombination could be an important source of spontaneous mutation in cells that are not proliferating. The movement of insertion elements can be responsive to environmental conditions. Insertion elements not only activate and inactivate genes, they also provide sequence homology that allows large-scale genomic rearrangements. Some conjugative plasmids can recombine with their host’s chromosome, and may acquire chromosomal genes that could then spread through the population and even to other species. Finally, a subpopulation of transient hypermutators could be a source of multiple variant alleles, providing a mechanism for rapid evolution under adverse conditions. PMID:10690404

  2. Tracking Down Mutations Cell by Cell.

    PubMed

    Kosik, Kenneth S

    2016-03-16

    Using somatic cell nuclear transfer, Hazen et al. (2016) examined clonally expanded single neurons for mutations and found ∼100 mutations from a variety of classes. Post-mitotic mutations in individual neurons represent an exploratory direction for finding fundamental origins of neurodegeneration. PMID:26985720

  3. Mutation analysis in patients with Wilson disease: identification of 4 novel mutations. Mutation in brief no. 250. Online.

    PubMed

    Haas, R; Gutierrez-Rivero, B; Knoche, J; Böker, K; Manns, M P; Schmidt, H H

    1999-01-01

    In order to obtain novel mutations in the recently discovered Wilson disease gene, we screened 5 unrelated German individuals for mutations in the 21 exons and their flanking intronic sequences. We detected 9 mutations affecting the Wilson disease gene. Four of those, designated 802-808delTGTAAGT, 2008-2013delTATATG, Cys985Thr, and Ile1148Thr have not yet been reported. One patient had a homozygous mutation whereas the remaining four subjects were compound heterozygous. Therefore these data confirm, that mutations causing Wilson disease are frequently found in affected subjects and they are very heterogenous. PMID:10447265

  4. Plastome Mutations and Recombination Events in Barley Chloroplast Mutator Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Landau, Alejandra; Lencina, Franco; Pacheco, María G; Prina, Alberto R

    2016-05-01

    The barley chloroplast mutator (cpm) is an allele of a nuclear gene that when homozygous induces several types of cytoplasmically inherited chlorophyll deficiencies. In this work, a plastome Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING) strategy based on mismatch digestion was used on families that carried the cpm genotype through many generations. Extensive scanning of 33 plastome genes and a few intergenic regions was conducted. Numerous polymorphisms were detected on both genic and intergenic regions. The detected polymorphisms can be accounted for by at least 61 independent mutational events. The vast majority of the polymorphisms originated in substitutions and small indels (insertions/deletions) in microsatellites. The rpl23 and the rps16 genes were the most polymorphic. Interestingly, the variation observed in the rpl23 gene consisted of several combinations of 5 different one nucleotide polymorphisms. Besides, 4 large indels that have direct repeats at both ends were also observed, which appear to be originated from recombinational events. The cpm mutation spectrum suggests that the CPM gene product is probably involved in plastome mismatch repair. The numerous subtle molecular changes that were localized in a wide range of plastome sites show the cpm as a valuable source of plastome variability for plant research and/or plant breeding. Moreover, the cpm mutant appears to be an interesting experimental material for investigating the mechanisms responsible for maintaining the stability of plant organelle DNA. PMID:26774059

  5. Genetic Analysis of 63 Mutations Affecting Maize Kernel Development Isolated from Mutator Stocks

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, M. J.; Stinard, P. S.; James, M. G.; Myers, A. M.; Robertson, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-three mutations affecting development of the maize kernel were isolated from active Robertson's Mutator (Mu) stocks. At least 14 previously undescribed maize gene loci were defined by mutations in this collection. Genetic mapping located 53 of these defective kernel (dek) mutations to particular chromosome arms, and more precise map determinations were made for 21 of the mutations. Genetic analyses identified 20 instances of allelism between one of the novel mutations and a previously described dek mutation, or between new dek mutations identified in this study; phenotypic variability was observed in three of the allelic series. Viability testing of homozygous mutant kernels identified numerous dek mutations with various pleiotropic effects on seedling and plant development. The mutations described here presumably arose by insertion of a Mu transposon within a dek gene; thus, many of the affected loci are expected to be accessible to molecular cloning via transposon-tagging. PMID:8138165

  6. Interplay of mutation and disassortativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Sanjiv K.; Jalan, Sarika

    2015-08-01

    Despite disassortativity being commonly observed in many biological networks, our current understanding of its evolutionary origin is inadequate. Motivated by the occurrence of mutations during an evolutionary time span that results in changes in the behavior of interactions, we demonstrate that if we maximize the stability of the underlying system, the genetic algorithm leads to the evolution of a disassortative structure. The mutation probability governs the degree of saturation of the disassortativity coefficient, and this reveals the origin of the wide range of disassortativity values found in real systems. We analytically verify these results for star networks, and by considering various values for the antisymmetric couplings, we find a regime in which scale-free networks are more stable than the corresponding random networks.

  7. [Pathologic manifestations of hormonal receptor mutations].

    PubMed

    Milgrom, E

    2000-01-01

    Mutations of receptor genes are involved in various aspects of thyroid and gonadal pathology. Activating mutations of TSH and LH receptors are associated with hyperthyroidism and premature puberty. These mutations are dominant and lead to the synthesis of a constitutive receptor, i.e. a receptor active even in the absence of hormone. Inactivating mutations of TSH, gonadotropin and GnRH receptors are recessive. They determine either a hypothyroidism or a hypogonadism. In the case of alterations of gonadotropin receptors the hypogonadism is hypergonadotrophic. It is hypogonadotrophic in the case of mutations of the GnRH receptor. PMID:10989556

  8. Inhibition of Cancer-Associated Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenases by 2-Thiohydantoin Compounds.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fangrui; Jiang, Hong; Zheng, Baisong; Kogiso, Mari; Yao, Yuan; Zhou, Chao; Li, Xiao-Nan; Song, Yongcheng

    2015-09-10

    Somatic mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) at R132 are frequently found in certain cancers such as glioma. With losing the activity of wild-type IDH1, the R132H and R132C mutant proteins can reduce α-ketoglutaric acid (α-KG) to d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid (D2HG). The resulting high concentration of D2HG inhibits many α-KG-dependent dioxygenases, including histone demethylases, to cause broad histone hypermethylation. These aberrant epigenetic changes are responsible for the initiation of these cancers. We report the synthesis, structure-activity relationships, enzyme kinetics, and binding thermodynamics of a novel series of 2-thiohydantoin and related compounds, among which several compounds are potent inhibitors of mutant IDH1 with Ki as low as 420 nM. X-ray crystal structures of IDH1(R132H) in complex with two inhibitors are reported, showing their inhibitor-protein interactions. These compounds can decrease the cellular concentration of D2HG, reduce the levels of histone methylation, and suppress the proliferation of stem-like cancer cells in BT142 glioma with IDH1 R132H mutation. PMID:26280302

  9. Mechanisms of Mutation in Nondividing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Patricia L.; Rosche, William A.

    2010-01-01

    When populations of cells are subjected to nonlethal selection, mutations arise in the absence of cell division, a phenomenon that has been called “adaptive mutation.” In a strain of Escherichia coli that cannot metabolize lactose (Lac−) but that reverts to lactose utilization (Lac+) when lactose is its sole energy and carbon source, the mutational process consists of two components. (1) A highly efficient, recombination-dependent mechanism giving rise to mutations on the F′ episome that carries the Lac− allele; and (2) a less efficient, unknown mechanism giving rise to mutations elsewhere in the genome. Both selected and nonselected mutations arise in the Lac− population, but nonselected mutations are enriched in Lac+ mutants, suggesting that some Lac+ cells have passed though a transient period of increased mutation. These results have several evolutionary implications. (1) DNA synthesis initiated by recombination could be an important source of spontaneous mutation, particularly in cells that are not undergoing genomic replication. (2) The highly active mutational mechanism on the episome could be important in the horizontal transfer of variant alleles among species that carry and exchange conjugal plasmids. (3) A subpopulation of cells in a state of transient mutation could be a source of multiple variant alleles and could provide a mechanism for rapid adaptive evolution under adverse conditions. PMID:10415479

  10. Digenic mutations in severe congenital neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Germeshausen, Manuela; Zeidler, Cornelia; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Lanciotti, Marina; Ballmaier, Matthias; Welte, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Severe congenital neutropenia a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Mutations in different genes have been described as causative for severe neutropenia, e.g. ELANE, HAX1 and G6PC3. Although congenital neutropenia is considered to be a group of monogenic disorders, the phenotypic heterogeneity even within the yet defined genetic subtypes points to additional genetic and/or epigenetic influences on the disease phenotype. We describe congenital neutropenia patients with mutations in two candidate genes each, including 6 novel mutations. Two of them had a heterozygous ELANE mutation combined with a homozygous mutation in G6PC3 or HAX1, respectively. The other 2 patients combined homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in G6PC3 or HAX1 with a heterozygous mutation in the respective other gene. Our results suggest that digenicity may underlie this disorder of myelopoiesis at least in some congenital neutropenia patients. PMID:20220065

  11. Mutational patterns in oncogenes and tumour suppressors.

    PubMed

    Baeissa, Hanadi M; Benstead-Hume, Graeme; Richardson, Christopher J; Pearl, Frances M G

    2016-06-15

    All cancers depend upon mutations in critical genes, which confer a selective advantage to the tumour cell. Knowledge of these mutations is crucial to understanding the biology of cancer initiation and progression, and to the development of targeted therapeutic strategies. The key to understanding the contribution of a disease-associated mutation to the development and progression of cancer, comes from an understanding of the consequences of that mutation on the function of the affected protein, and the impact on the pathways in which that protein is involved. In this paper we examine the mutation patterns observed in oncogenes and tumour suppressors, and discuss different approaches that have been developed to identify driver mutations within cancers that contribute to the disease progress. We also discuss the MOKCa database where we have developed an automatic pipeline that structurally and functionally annotates all proteins from the human proteome that are mutated in cancer. PMID:27284061

  12. Molecular analysis of diffuse intrinsic brainstem gliomas in adults.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Botero, German; Giry, Marine; Mokhtari, Karima; Labussière, Marianne; Idbaih, Ahmed; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Laigle-Donadey, Florence; Sanson, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic brainstem gliomas (DIBG) account for 1-2 % of adult gliomas. Their biological characteristics are scarcely understood and whether DIBG are biologically different from supratentorial gliomas remains to be established. We analyzed 17 DIBG samples for IDH1 R132H, alpha internexin, p53, and Ki67 expression, and, in a subset with sufficient DNA amount, for IDH1 and histone H3 mutational status, genomic profiling and MGMT promoter methylation status. A series of 738 adult supratentorial gliomas was used for comparison. Median age at diagnosis was 41 years (range 18.9-65.3 years). Median overall survival was 48.7 months (57 months for low-grade vs. 16 months for high-grade gliomas, p < 0.01). IDH1 sequencing revealed two mutations (IDH1 (R132G) , IDH1 (R132C) ) out of 7 DIBG whereas the R132H IDH1 enzyme was detected in 1/17 DIBG, suggesting that IDH1 mutations are mostly non R132H in DIBG (2/2), in contrast to supratentorial gliomas (31/313; p = 0.01). Mutations in histone genes H3F3A (encoding H3.3) and HIST1H3B (encoding H3.1) were found in 3/8 (37.5 %) of the DIBG (two H3F3A (K27M) and one HIST1H3B (K27M) ) versus 6/205 (2.9 %) of the supratentorial high-grade gliomas (four H3F3A (G34R) and two H3F3A (K27M) ) (p = 0.002). The CGH array showed a higher frequency of chromosome arm 1q gain, 9q gain and 11q loss in DIBG compared to the supratentorial high-grade gliomas, which had a less frequent chromosome 7 gain, and a less frequent chromosome 10 loss. No EGFR amplification was found. These data suggest that adult DIBG differ from adult supratentorial gliomas. In particular, histone genes (H3F3A (K27M) , HIST1H3B (K27M) ) mutations are frequent in adult DIBG whereas IDH1 (R132H) mutations are rare. PMID:24242757

  13. Use of mutation spectra analysis software.

    PubMed

    Rogozin, I; Kondrashov, F; Glazko, G

    2001-02-01

    The study and comparison of mutation(al) spectra is an important problem in molecular biology, because these spectra often reflect on important features of mutations and their fixation. Such features include the interaction of DNA with various mutagens, the function of repair/replication enzymes, and properties of target proteins. It is known that mutability varies significantly along nucleotide sequences, such that mutations often concentrate at certain positions, called "hotspots," in a sequence. In this paper, we discuss in detail two approaches for mutation spectra analysis: the comparison of mutation spectra with a HG-PUBL program, (FTP: sunsite.unc.edu/pub/academic/biology/dna-mutations/hyperg) and hotspot prediction with the CLUSTERM program (www.itba.mi.cnr.it/webmutation; ftp.bionet.nsc.ru/pub/biology/dbms/clusterm.zip). Several other approaches for mutational spectra analysis, such as the analysis of a target protein structure, hotspot context revealing, multiple spectra comparisons, as well as a number of mutation databases are briefly described. Mutation spectra in the lacI gene of E. coli and the human p53 gene are used for illustration of various difficulties of such analysis. PMID:11180592

  14. Too Many Mutants with Multiple Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Drake, John W.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the classical notion of the random nature of mutation does not hold for the distribution of mutations among genes: most collections of mutants contain more isolates with two or more mutations than predicted by the mutant frequency on the assumption of a random distribution of mutations. Excesses of multiples are seen in a wide range of organisms, including riboviruses, DNA viruses, prokaryotes, yeasts, and higher eukaryotic cell lines and tissues. In addition, such excesses are produced by DNA polymerases in vitro. These “multiples” appear to be generated by transient, localized hypermutation rather than by heritable mutator mutations. The components of multiples are sometimes scattered at random and sometimes display an excess of smaller distances between mutations. As yet, almost nothing is known about the mechanisms that generate multiples, but such mutations have the capacity to accelerate those evolutionary pathways that require multiple mutations where the individual mutations are neutral or deleterious. Examples that impinge on human health may include carcinogenesis and the adaptation of microbial pathogens as they move between individual hosts. PMID:17687667

  15. Mutation, Witten index, and quiver invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heeyeon; Lee, Seung-Joo; Yi, Piljin

    2015-07-01

    We explore Seiberg-like dualities, or mutations, for quiver quantum mechanics in the context of wall-crossing. In contrast to higher dimensions, the 1d Seiberg-duality must be performed with much care. With fixed Fayet-Iliopoulos constants, at most two nodes can be mutated, one left and the other right, mapping a chamber of a quiver into a chamber of a mutated quiver. We delineate this complex pattern for triangle quivers and show how the Witten indices are preserved under such finely chosen mutations. On the other hand, the quiver invariants, or wall-crossing-safe part of supersymmetric spectra, mutate more straightforwardly, whereby a quiver is mapped to a quiver. The mutation rule that preserves the quiver invariant is different from the usual one, however, which we explore and confirm numerically.

  16. The Mutational Robustness of Influenza A Virus.

    PubMed

    Visher, Elisa; Whitefield, Shawn E; McCrone, John T; Fitzsimmons, William; Lauring, Adam S

    2016-08-01

    A virus' mutational robustness is described in terms of the strength and distribution of the mutational fitness effects, or MFE. The distribution of MFE is central to many questions in evolutionary theory and is a key parameter in models of molecular evolution. Here we define the mutational fitness effects in influenza A virus by generating 128 viruses, each with a single nucleotide mutation. In contrast to mutational scanning approaches, this strategy allowed us to unambiguously assign fitness values to individual mutations. The presence of each desired mutation and the absence of additional mutations were verified by next generation sequencing of each stock. A mutation was considered lethal only after we failed to rescue virus in three independent transfections. We measured the fitness of each viable mutant relative to the wild type by quantitative RT-PCR following direct competition on A549 cells. We found that 31.6% of the mutations in the genome-wide dataset were lethal and that the lethal fraction did not differ appreciably between the HA- and NA-encoding segments and the rest of the genome. Of the viable mutants, the fitness mean and standard deviation were 0.80 and 0.22 in the genome-wide dataset and best modeled as a beta distribution. The fitness impact of mutation was marginally lower in the segments coding for HA and NA (0.88 ± 0.16) than in the other 6 segments (0.78 ± 0.24), and their respective beta distributions had slightly different shape parameters. The results for influenza A virus are remarkably similar to our own analysis of CirSeq-derived fitness values from poliovirus and previously published data from other small, single stranded DNA and RNA viruses. These data suggest that genome size, and not nucleic acid type or mode of replication, is the main determinant of viral mutational fitness effects. PMID:27571422

  17. The Mutational Robustness of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    McCrone, John T.; Lauring, Adam S.

    2016-01-01

    A virus’ mutational robustness is described in terms of the strength and distribution of the mutational fitness effects, or MFE. The distribution of MFE is central to many questions in evolutionary theory and is a key parameter in models of molecular evolution. Here we define the mutational fitness effects in influenza A virus by generating 128 viruses, each with a single nucleotide mutation. In contrast to mutational scanning approaches, this strategy allowed us to unambiguously assign fitness values to individual mutations. The presence of each desired mutation and the absence of additional mutations were verified by next generation sequencing of each stock. A mutation was considered lethal only after we failed to rescue virus in three independent transfections. We measured the fitness of each viable mutant relative to the wild type by quantitative RT-PCR following direct competition on A549 cells. We found that 31.6% of the mutations in the genome-wide dataset were lethal and that the lethal fraction did not differ appreciably between the HA- and NA-encoding segments and the rest of the genome. Of the viable mutants, the fitness mean and standard deviation were 0.80 and 0.22 in the genome-wide dataset and best modeled as a beta distribution. The fitness impact of mutation was marginally lower in the segments coding for HA and NA (0.88 ± 0.16) than in the other 6 segments (0.78 ± 0.24), and their respective beta distributions had slightly different shape parameters. The results for influenza A virus are remarkably similar to our own analysis of CirSeq-derived fitness values from poliovirus and previously published data from other small, single stranded DNA and RNA viruses. These data suggest that genome size, and not nucleic acid type or mode of replication, is the main determinant of viral mutational fitness effects. PMID:27571422

  18. Clinical management of grade III oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, G; Gaviani, P; Botturi, A; Innocenti, A; Lamperti, E; Silvani, A

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrogliomas represent the third most common type of glioma, comprising 4%-15% of all gliomas and can be classified by degree of malignancy into grade II and grade III, according to WHO classification. Only 30% of oligodendroglial tumors have anaplastic characteristics. Anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) is often localized as a single lesion in the white matter and in the cortex, rarely in brainstem or spinal cord. The management of AO is deeply changed in the recent years. Maximal safe surgical resection followed by radiotherapy (RT) was considered as the standard of care since paramount findings regarding molecular aspects, in particular co-deletion of the short arm of chromosome 1 and the long arm of chromosome 19, revealed that these subsets of AO, benefit in terms of overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), from the addition of chemotherapy to RT. Allelic losses of chromosomes 1p and 19q occur in 50%-70% of both low-grade and anaplastic tumors, representing a strong prognostic factor and a powerful predictor of prolonged survival. Several other molecular markers have potential clinical significance as IDH1 mutations, confirming the strong prognostic role for OS. Malignant brain tumors negatively impacts on patients' quality of life. Seizures, visual impairment, headache, and cognitive disorders can be present. Moreover, chemotherapy and RT have important side effects. For these reasons, "health-related quality of life" is becoming a topic of growing interest, investigating on physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Understanding the impact of medical treatment on health-related quality of life will probably have a growing effect both on health care strategies and on patients. PMID:26251628

  19. Clinical management of grade III oligodendroglioma

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, G; Gaviani, P; Botturi, A; Innocenti, A; Lamperti, E; Silvani, A

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrogliomas represent the third most common type of glioma, comprising 4%–15% of all gliomas and can be classified by degree of malignancy into grade II and grade III, according to WHO classification. Only 30% of oligodendroglial tumors have anaplastic characteristics. Anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) is often localized as a single lesion in the white matter and in the cortex, rarely in brainstem or spinal cord. The management of AO is deeply changed in the recent years. Maximal safe surgical resection followed by radiotherapy (RT) was considered as the standard of care since paramount findings regarding molecular aspects, in particular co-deletion of the short arm of chromosome 1 and the long arm of chromosome 19, revealed that these subsets of AO, benefit in terms of overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), from the addition of chemotherapy to RT. Allelic losses of chromosomes 1p and 19q occur in 50%–70% of both low-grade and anaplastic tumors, representing a strong prognostic factor and a powerful predictor of prolonged survival. Several other molecular markers have potential clinical significance as IDH1 mutations, confirming the strong prognostic role for OS. Malignant brain tumors negatively impacts on patients’ quality of life. Seizures, visual impairment, headache, and cognitive disorders can be present. Moreover, chemotherapy and RT have important side effects. For these reasons, “health-related quality of life” is becoming a topic of growing interest, investigating on physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Understanding the impact of medical treatment on health-related quality of life will probably have a growing effect both on health care strategies and on patients. PMID:26251628

  20. Copy number variation and mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Brian; Weidner, Jacob; Wabick, Kevin

    2009-11-01

    Until very recently, the standard model of DNA included two genes for each trait. This dated model has given way to a model that includes copies of some genes well in excess of the canonical two. Copy number variations in the human genome play critical roles in causing or aggravating a number of syndromes and diseases while providing increased resistance to others. We explore the role of mutation, crossover, inversion, and reproduction in determining copy number variations in a numerical simulation of a population. The numerical model consists of a population of individuals, where each individual is represented by a single strand of DNA with the same number of genes. Each gene is initially assigned to one of two traits. Fitness of the individual is determined by the two most fit genes for trait one, and trait two genetic material is treated as a reservoir of junk DNA. After a sufficient number of generations, during which the genetic distribution is allowed to reach a steady-state, the mean numberof genes per trait and the copy number variation are recorded. Here, we focus on the role of mutation and compare simulation results to theory.

  1. Determination of a mutational spectrum

    DOEpatents

    Thilly, William G.; Keohavong, Phouthone

    1991-01-01

    A method of resolving (physically separating) mutant DNA from nonmutant DNA and a method of defining or establishing a mutational spectrum or profile of alterations present in nucleic acid sequences from a sample to be analyzed, such as a tissue or body fluid. The present method is based on the fact that it is possible, through the use of DGGE, to separate nucleic acid sequences which differ by only a single base change and on the ability to detect the separate mutant molecules. The present invention, in another aspect, relates to a method for determining a mutational spectrum in a DNA sequence of interest present in a population of cells. The method of the present invention is useful as a diagnostic or analytical tool in forensic science in assessing environmental and/or occupational exposures to potentially genetically toxic materials (also referred to as potential mutagens); in biotechnology, particularly in the study of the relationship between the amino acid sequence of enzymes and other biologically-active proteins or protein-containing substances and their respective functions; and in determining the effects of drugs, cosmetics and other chemicals for which toxicity data must be obtained.

  2. Determination of a mutational spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Thilly, W.G.; Keohavong, P.

    1991-09-03

    A method is disclosed of resolving (physically separating) mutant DNA from nonmutant DNA. A method is also described of defining or establishing a mutational spectrum or profile of alterations present in nucleic acid sequences from a sample to be analyzed, such as a tissue or body fluid. The present method is based on the fact that it is possible, through the use of DGGE, to separate nucleic acid sequences which differ by only a single base change and on the ability to detect the separate mutant molecules. The present invention, in another aspect, relates to a method for determining a mutational spectrum in a DNA sequence of interest present in a population of cells. The method of the present invention is useful as a diagnostic or analytical tool in forensic science in assessing environmental and/or occupational exposures to potentially genetically toxic materials (also referred to as potential mutagens); in biotechnology, particularly in the study of the relationship between the amino acid sequence of enzymes and other biologically-active proteins or protein-containing substances and their respective functions; and in determining the effects of drugs, cosmetics and other chemicals for which toxicity data must be obtained. 3 figures.

  3. Calreticulin Exon 9 Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Background Calreticulin (CALR) mutations were recently discovered in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We studied the frequency and type of CALR mutations and their hematological characteristics. Methods A total of 168 MPN patients (36 polycythemia vera [PV], 114 essential thrombocythemia [ET], and 18 primary myelofibrosis [PMF] cases) were included in the study. CALR mutation was analyzed by the direct sequencing method. Results CALR mutations were detected in 21.9% of ET and 16.7% of PMF patients, which accounted for 58.5% and 33.3% of ET and PMF patients without Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) or myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogenes (MPL) mutations, respectively. A total of five types of mutation were detected, among which, L367fs*46 (53.6%) and K385fs*47 (35.7%) were found to be the most common. ET patients with CALR mutation had lower leukocyte counts and ages compared with JAK2-mutated ET patients. Conclusion Genotyping for CALR could be a useful diagnostic tool for JAK2-or MPL-negative ET or PMF patients. CALR mutation may be a distinct disease group, with different hematological characteristics than that of JAK2-positive patients. PMID:25553276

  4. Methods for detection of ataxia telangiectasia mutations

    DOEpatents

    Gatti, Richard A.

    2005-10-04

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening large, complex, polyexonic eukaryotic genes such as the ATM gene for mutations and polymorphisms by an improved version of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) electrophoresis that allows electrophoresis of two or three amplified segments in a single lane. The present invention also is directed to new mutations and polymorphisms in the ATM gene that are useful in performing more accurate screening of human DNA samples for mutations and in distinguishing mutations from polymorphisms, thereby improving the efficiency of automated screening methods.

  5. Evolution of Mutation Rate in Asexual Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Scott; Levine, Herbert; Kessler, David

    2007-03-01

    Several evolution experiments with E. coli document the spontaneous emergence and eventual fixation of so called ``mutator'' alleles that increase the genomic mutation rate by the order of 100-fold. Variations in mutation rates are due to polymorphisms in the molecular machinery that copies and checks the genome for errors. These polymorphisms are coded in the genome and thus heritable. Like any heritable trait, elevated mutation rates are subject to natural selection and evolution. However, unlike other traits, mutation rate does not directly affect the rate at which an organism reproduces, i.e. its fitness. Rather, it affects the statistical distribution of the offspring's fitness. This fitness distribution, in turn, leads via ``hitchhiking'' to a change in the frequency of the mutator allele, i.e. evolution of the mutation rate itself. In our work we simulate a birth-death process that approximates simple asexual populations and we measure the fixation probability of rare mutators. We then develop an approximate analytic model of the population dynamics, the results of which agree reasonably well with simulation. In particular, we are able to analytically predict the ``effective fitness'' of mutators and the conditions under which they are expected to emerge.

  6. Three Turkish families with different transthyretin mutations.

    PubMed

    Bekircan-Kurt, Can Ebru; Güneş, Nalan; Yılmaz, Arda; Erdem-Özdamar, Sevim; Tan, Ersin

    2015-09-01

    Transthyretin (TTR)-related hereditary amyloidosis, also called familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP), is a rare autosomal dominant systemic disorder that presents with progressive axonal sensory, autonomic and/or motor neuropathies. The present report describes three families with three different TTR mutations who were followed from 1995 to 2014. Only one of these families expressed the Val30Met mutation, which is the most common mutation in endemic regions; all members of this family had late disease onset but varied severities and clinical presentations of the disease. The second family expressed the Thr49Ser mutation, which has not been well documented previously. Our limited experience obtained from these patients indicates that this mutation presents with autonomic neuropathy but a greater degree of cardiac involvement, especially fatal heart failure. The third mutation, Glu54Lys, has been identified as a cause of severe familial amyloid polyneuropathy; the family members with this mutation exhibited severe motor and autonomic neuropathy, early vitreous opacity, and fatal heart failure. Three of the patients with the Val30Met mutation were treated with tafamidis for longer than one year and cessation of the polyneuropathy resulted. However, a short trial of tafamidis in two patients with the Glu54Lys mutation, who showed severe systemic and neurological involvement, did not gain any clinical benefits. PMID:26115788

  7. Compensating the Fitness Costs of Synonymous Mutations.

    PubMed

    Knöppel, Anna; Näsvall, Joakim; Andersson, Dan I

    2016-06-01

    Synonymous mutations do not change the sequence of the polypeptide but they may still influence fitness. We investigated in Salmonella enterica how four synonymous mutations in the rpsT gene (encoding ribosomal protein S20) reduce fitness (i.e., growth rate) and the mechanisms by which this cost can be genetically compensated. The reduced growth rates of the synonymous mutants were correlated with reduced levels of the rpsT transcript and S20 protein. In an adaptive evolution experiment, these fitness impairments could be compensated by mutations that either caused up-regulation of S20 through increased gene dosage (due to duplications), increased transcription of the rpsT gene (due to an rpoD mutation or mutations in rpsT), or increased translation from the rpsT transcript (due to rpsT mutations). We suggest that the reduced levels of S20 in the synonymous mutants result in production of a defective subpopulation of 30S subunits lacking S20 that reduce protein synthesis and bacterial growth and that the compensatory mutations restore S20 levels and the number of functional ribosomes. Our results demonstrate how specific synonymous mutations can cause substantial fitness reductions and that many different types of intra- and extragenic compensatory mutations can efficiently restore fitness. Furthermore, this study highlights that also synonymous sites can be under strong selection, which may have implications for the use of dN/dS ratios as signature for selection. PMID:26882986

  8. A Landscape of Driver Mutations in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hodis, Eran; Watson, Ian R.; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Arold, Stefan T.; Imielinski, Marcin; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Auclair, Daniel; Li, Liren; Place, Chelsea; DiCara, Daniel; Ramos, Alex H.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Voet, Douglas; Saksena, Gordon; Stransky, Nicolas; Onofrio, Robert C.; Winckler, Wendy; Ardlie, Kristin; Wagle, Nikhil; Wargo, Jennifer; Chong, Kelly; Morton, Donald L.; Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Chen, Guo; Noble, Michael; Meyerson, Matthew; Ladbury, John E.; Davies, Michael A.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Wagner, Stephan N.; Hoon, Dave S.B.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Lander, Eric S.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Getz, Gad; Garraway, Levi A.; Chin, Lynda

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite recent insights into melanoma genetics, systematic surveys for driver mutations are challenged by an abundance of passenger mutations caused by carcinogenic ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. We developed a permutation-based framework to address this challenge, employing mutation data from intronic sequences to control for passenger mutational load on a per gene basis. Analysis of large-scale melanoma exome data by this approach discovered six novel melanoma genes (PPP6C, RAC1, SNX31, TACC1, STK19 and ARID2), three of which - RAC1, PPP6C and STK19 - harbored recurrent and potentially targetable mutations. Integration with chromosomal copy number data contextualized the landscape of driver mutations, providing oncogenic insights in BRAF- and NRAS-driven melanoma as well as those without known NRAS/BRAF mutations. The landscape also clarified a mutational basis for RB and p53 pathway deregulation in this malignancy. Finally, the spectrum of driver mutations provided unequivocal genomic evidence for a direct mutagenic role of UV light in melanoma pathogenesis. PMID:22817889

  9. Compensating the Fitness Costs of Synonymous Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Knöppel, Anna; Näsvall, Joakim; Andersson, Dan I.

    2016-01-01

    Synonymous mutations do not change the sequence of the polypeptide but they may still influence fitness. We investigated in Salmonella enterica how four synonymous mutations in the rpsT gene (encoding ribosomal protein S20) reduce fitness (i.e., growth rate) and the mechanisms by which this cost can be genetically compensated. The reduced growth rates of the synonymous mutants were correlated with reduced levels of the rpsT transcript and S20 protein. In an adaptive evolution experiment, these fitness impairments could be compensated by mutations that either caused up-regulation of S20 through increased gene dosage (due to duplications), increased transcription of the rpsT gene (due to an rpoD mutation or mutations in rpsT), or increased translation from the rpsT transcript (due to rpsT mutations). We suggest that the reduced levels of S20 in the synonymous mutants result in production of a defective subpopulation of 30S subunits lacking S20 that reduce protein synthesis and bacterial growth and that the compensatory mutations restore S20 levels and the number of functional ribosomes. Our results demonstrate how specific synonymous mutations can cause substantial fitness reductions and that many different types of intra- and extragenic compensatory mutations can efficiently restore fitness. Furthermore, this study highlights that also synonymous sites can be under strong selection, which may have implications for the use of dN/dS ratios as signature for selection. PMID:26882986

  10. Haplotypes and mutations in Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.R.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    Wilson disease is a disorder of copper transport, resulting in neurological and hepatic damage due to copper toxicity. We have recently identified >20 mutations in the copper-transporting ATPase defective in this disease. Given the difficulties of searching for mutations in a gene spanning >80 kb of genomic DNA, haplotype data are important as a guide to mutation detection. Here we examine the haplotypes associated with specific mutations. We have extended previous studies of DNA haplotypes of dinucleotide-repeat polymorphisms (CA repeats) in the Wilson disease region to include an additional marker, in 58 families. These haplotypes, combining three markers (D13S314, D12S316, and D13S301), are usually specific for each different mutation, even though highly polymorphic CA repeat markers have been used. Haplotypes, as well as their accompanying mutations, differ between populations. In the patients whom we have studied, the haplotype data indicate that as many as 20 mutations may still be unidentified. The use of the haplotypes that we have identified provides an important guide for the identification of known mutations and can facilitate future mutation searches. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Mutations, mutation rates, and evolution at the hypervariable VNTR loci of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Amy J; Keys, Christine E; Allender, Christopher; Bailey, Ira; Girard, Jessica; Pearson, Talima; Smith, Kimothy L; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul

    2007-03-01

    VNTRs are able to discriminate among closely related isolates of recently emerged clonal pathogens, including Yersinia pestis the etiologic agent of plague, because of their great diversity. Diversity is driven largely by mutation but little is known about VNTR mutation rates, factors affecting mutation rates, or the mutational mechanisms. The molecular epidemiological utility of VNTRs will be greatly enhanced when this foundational knowledge is available. Here, we measure mutation rates for 43 VNTR loci in Y. pestis using an in vitro generated population encompassing approximately 96,000 generations. We estimate the combined 43-locus rate and individual rates for 14 loci. A comparison of Y. pestis and Escherichia coli O157:H7 VNTR mutation rates and products revealed a similar relationship between diversity and mutation rate in these two species. Likewise, the relationship between repeat copy number and mutation rate is nearly identical between these species, suggesting a generalized relationship that may be applicable to other species. The single- versus multiple-repeat mutation ratios and the insertion versus deletion mutation ratios were also similar, providing support for a general model for the mutations associated with VNTRs. Finally, we use two small sets of Y. pestis isolates to show how this general model and our estimated mutation rates can be used to compare alternate phylogenies, and to evaluate the significance of genotype matches, near-matches, and mismatches found in empirical comparisons with a reference database. PMID:17161849

  12. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; Sale, Julian E.; Campbell, Peter J.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-11-09

    During the course of a lifetime, somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell's genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals, and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutation rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated, indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This paper provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operating in human somatic cells.

  13. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; Sale, Julian E.; Campbell, Peter J.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Stratton, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    During the course of a lifetime somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell’s genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutation rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This study provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operative in human somatic cells. PMID:26551669

  14. TERT Promoter Mutations in Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Ali S; Alsaadi, Rawan; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Sadiq, Bakr Bin

    2016-06-01

    Two mutations (C228T and C250T) in the promoter region of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have recently been described in different types of cancer including follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer (TC). In this paper, we reviewed the rates of these mutations in different types and subtypes of TC, their association with a number of clinical and histopathological features and outcome of TC, and their potential diagnostic and prognostic roles in TC. The overall rate of these mutations in TC is about 14 % with least prevalence in the well-differentiated subtypes of papillary thyroid cancer (10-13 %). Their rates increase significantly with increasing aggressiveness of TC reaching about 40 % in the undifferentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers. There is also clear association with increasing age of patients at the time of diagnosis of TC. The evidence is compelling but with some conflicting results for associations between TERT promoter mutations and tumor size, extrathyroidal invasion, distant metastases, high tumor TNM stage, BRAF (V600E) mutation, recurrence, and mortality. A couple of studies reported a potential diagnostic role for TERT promoter mutations in thyroid nodules with indeterminate cytology of fine needle aspiration biopsy. These studies showed 100 % specificity but very low sensitivity of 7-10 %. The sensitivity increases significantly when TERT promoter mutation testing is combined with other gene mutations, particularly BRAF (V600E) and RAS mutations. Although TERT promoter mutations seem to play significant roles in the pathogenesis of TC, the mechanisms by which they contribute to carcinogenesis remain elusive and future work is needed to fully assess the roles, interactions, and impact of these mutations on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics of TC. PMID:26902827

  15. Efficiency of carcinogenesis: is the mutator phenotype inevitable?

    PubMed

    Beckman, Robert A

    2010-10-01

    Cancer development requires multiple oncogenic mutations. Pathogenic mechanisms which accelerate this process may be favored carcinogenic pathways. Mutator mutations are mutations in genetic stability genes, and increase the mutation rate, speeding up the accumulation of oncogenic mutations. The mutator hypothesis states that mutator mutations play a critical role in carcinogenesis. Alternatively, tumors might arise by mutations occurring at the normal rate followed by selection and expansion of various premalignant lineages on the path to cancer. This alternative pathway is a significant argument against the mutator hypothesis. Mutator mutations may also lead to accumulation of deleterious mutations, which could lead to extinction of premalignant lineages before they become cancerous, another argument against the mutator hypothesis. Finally, the need for acquisition of a mutator mutation imposes an additional step on the carcinogenic process. Accordingly, the mutator hypothesis has been a seminal but controversial idea for several decades despite considerable experimental and theoretical work. To resolve this debate, the concept of efficiency has been introduced as a metric for comparing carcinogenic mechanisms, and a new theoretical approach of focused quantitative modeling has been applied. The results demonstrate that, given what is already known, the predominance of mutator mechanisms is likely inevitable, as they overwhelm less efficient non-mutator pathways to cancer. PMID:20934514

  16. Studies of human mutation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    November 1989, marked the beginning of a new three-year cycle of DOE grant support, in connection with which the program underwent a major reorganization. This document presents the progress on the three objectives of the present program which are: to isolate by the technique of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE), proteins of special interest because of the relative mutability of the corresponding gene, establish the identity of the protein, and, for selected proteins, move to a characterization of the corresponding gene; to develop a more efficient approach, based on 2-D PAGE, for the detection of variants in DNA, with special reference to the identification of mutations in the parents of the individual whose DNA is being examined; and, to continue an effective interface with the genetic studies on the children of atomic bomb survivors in Japan, with reference to both the planning and implementation of new studies at the molecular level.

  17. Significance of duon mutations in cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Smith, Kyle S; Flinders, Colin; Mumenthaler, Shannon M; De, Subhajyoti

    2016-01-01

    Functional mutations in coding regions not only affect the structure and function of the protein products, but may also modulate their expression in some cases. This class of mutations, recently dubbed "duon mutations" due to their dual roles, can potentially have major impacts on downstream pathways. However their significance in diseases such as cancer remain unclear. In a survey covering 4606 samples from 19 cancer types, and integrating allelic expression, overall mRNA expression, regulatory motif perturbation, and chromatin signatures in one composite index called REDACT score, we identified potential duon mutations. Several such mutations are detected in known cancer genes in multiple cancer types. For instance a potential duon mutation in TP53 is associated with increased expression of the mutant allelic gene copy, thereby possibly amplifying the functional effects on the downstream pathways. Another potential duon mutation in SF3B1 is associated with abnormal splicing and changes in angiogenesis and matrix degradation related pathways. Our findings emphasize the need to interrogate the mutations in coding regions beyond their obvious effects on protein structures. PMID:27272679

  18. Analyzing effects of naturally occurring missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Miteva, Maria A; Wang, Lin; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Single-point mutation in genome, for example, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or rare genetic mutation, is the change of a single nucleotide for another in the genome sequence. Some of them will produce an amino acid substitution in the corresponding protein sequence (missense mutations); others will not. This paper focuses on genetic mutations resulting in a change in the amino acid sequence of the corresponding protein and how to assess their effects on protein wild-type characteristics. The existing methods and approaches for predicting the effects of mutation on protein stability, structure, and dynamics are outlined and discussed with respect to their underlying principles. Available resources, either as stand-alone applications or webservers, are pointed out as well. It is emphasized that understanding the molecular mechanisms behind these effects due to these missense mutations is of critical importance for detecting disease-causing mutations. The paper provides several examples of the application of 3D structure-based methods to model the effects of protein stability and protein-protein interactions caused by missense mutations as well. PMID:22577471

  19. Model for Mutation in Bacterial Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donangelo, R.; Fort, H.

    2002-07-01

    We describe the evolution of E. coli populations through a Bak-Sneppen-type model which incorporates random mutations. We show that, for a value of the mutation level which coincides with the one estimated from experiments, this model reproduces the measures of mean fitness relative to that of a common ancestor, performed for over 10 000 bacterial generations.

  20. Spectrum of mutations in alpha-mannosidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, T; Riise, H M; Hansen, G M; Malm, D; Tranebjaerg, L; Tollersrud, O K; Nilssen, O

    1999-01-01

    alpha-Mannosidosis is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of lysosomal alpha-mannosidase (LAMAN). The resulting intracellular accumulation of mannose-containing oligosaccharides leads to mental retardation, hearing impairment, skeletal changes, and immunodeficiency. Recently, we reported the first alpha-mannosidosis-causing mutation affecting two Palestinian siblings. In the present study 21 novel mutations and four polymorphic amino acid positions were identified by the screening of 43 patients, from 39 families, mainly of European origin. Disease-causing mutations were identified in 72% of the alleles and included eight splicing, six missense, and three nonsense mutations, as well as two small insertions and two small deletions. In addition, Southern blot analysis indicated rearrangements in some alleles. Most mutations were private or occurred in two or three families, except for a missense mutation resulting in an R750W substitution. This mutation was found in 13 patients, from different European countries, and accounted for 21% of the disease alleles. Although there were clinical variations among the patients, no significant LAMAN activity could be detected in any of the fibroblast cultures. In addition, no correlation between the types of mutations and the clinical manifestations was evident. PMID:9915946

  1. De novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Allen, Andrew S; Berkovic, Samuel F; Cossette, Patrick; Delanty, Norman; Dlugos, Dennis; Eichler, Evan E; Epstein, Michael P; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B; Han, Yujun; Heinzen, Erin L; Hitomi, Yuki; Howell, Katherine B; Johnson, Michael R; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H; Lu, Yi-Fan; Madou, Maura R Z; Marson, Anthony G; Mefford, Heather C; Esmaeeli Nieh, Sahar; O'Brien, Terence J; Ottman, Ruth; Petrovski, Slavé; Poduri, Annapurna; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Sherr, Elliott H; Yuskaitis, Christopher J; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K; Bautista, Jocelyn F; Berkovic, Samuel F; Boro, Alex; Cascino, Gregory D; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P; Fiol, Miguel; Fountain, Nathan B; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Geller, Eric B; Glauser, Tracy; Glynn, Simon; Haut, Sheryl R; Hayward, Jean; Helmers, Sandra L; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E; Knowlton, Robert C; Kossoff, Eric H; Kuperman, Rachel; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H; McGuire, Shannon M; Motika, Paul V; Novotny, Edward J; Ottman, Ruth; Paolicchi, Juliann M; Parent, Jack M; Park, Kristen; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Shellhaas, Renée A; Sherr, Elliott H; Shih, Jerry J; Singh, Rani; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C; Sullivan, Joseph; Lin Thio, Liu; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P G; Von Allmen, Gretchen K; Weisenberg, Judith L; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R

    2013-09-12

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of severe childhood epilepsy disorders for which the cause is often unknown. Here we report a screen for de novo mutations in patients with two classical epileptic encephalopathies: infantile spasms (n = 149) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (n = 115). We sequenced the exomes of 264 probands, and their parents, and confirmed 329 de novo mutations. A likelihood analysis showed a significant excess of de novo mutations in the ∼4,000 genes that are the most intolerant to functional genetic variation in the human population (P = 2.9 × 10(-3)). Among these are GABRB3, with de novo mutations in four patients, and ALG13, with the same de novo mutation in two patients; both genes show clear statistical evidence of association with epileptic encephalopathy. Given the relevant site-specific mutation rates, the probabilities of these outcomes occurring by chance are P = 4.1 × 10(-10) and P = 7.8 × 10(-12), respectively. Other genes with de novo mutations in this cohort include CACNA1A, CHD2, FLNA, GABRA1, GRIN1, GRIN2B, HNRNPU, IQSEC2, MTOR and NEDD4L. Finally, we show that the de novo mutations observed are enriched in specific gene sets including genes regulated by the fragile X protein (P < 10(-8)), as has been reported previously for autism spectrum disorders. PMID:23934111

  2. Validation of Deleterious Mutations in Vorderwald Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Reinartz, Sina; Distl, Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    In Montbéliarde cattle two candidate mutations on bovine chromosomes 19 and 29 responsible for embryonic lethality have been detected. Montbéliarde bulls have been introduced into Vorderwald cattle to improve milk and fattening performance. Due to the small population size of Vorderwald cattle and the wide use of a few Montbéliarde bulls through artificial insemination, inbreeding on Montbéliarde bulls in later generations was increasing. Therefore, we genotyped an aborted fetus which was inbred on Montbéliarde as well as Vorderwald x Montbéliarde crossbred bulls for both deleterious mutations. The abortion was observed in an experimental herd of Vorderwald cattle. The objectives of the present study were to prove if one or both lethal mutations may be assumed to have caused this abortion and to show whether these deleterious mutations have been introduced into the Vorderwald cattle population through Montbéliarde bulls. The aborted fetus was homozygous for the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation (ss2019324563) on BTA29 and both parents as well as the paternal and maternal grandsire were heterozygous for this mutation. In addition, the parents and the paternal grandsire were carriers of the MH2-haplotype linked with the T-allele of the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation. For the SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation (rs38377500) on BTA19 (MH1), the aborted fetus and its sire were heterozygous. Among all further 341 Vorderwald cattle genotyped we found 27 SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T heterozygous animals resulting in an allele frequency of 0.0396. Among the 120 male Vorderwald cattle, there were 12 heterozygous with an allele frequency of 0.05. The SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation could not be found in further nine cattle breeds nor in Vorderwald cattle with contributions from Ayrshire bulls. In 69 Vorderwald cattle without genes from Montbéliarde bulls the mutated allele of SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T could not be detected. The SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation appeared unlikely to be responsible

  3. Validation of Deleterious Mutations in Vorderwald Cattle.

    PubMed

    Reinartz, Sina; Distl, Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    In Montbéliarde cattle two candidate mutations on bovine chromosomes 19 and 29 responsible for embryonic lethality have been detected. Montbéliarde bulls have been introduced into Vorderwald cattle to improve milk and fattening performance. Due to the small population size of Vorderwald cattle and the wide use of a few Montbéliarde bulls through artificial insemination, inbreeding on Montbéliarde bulls in later generations was increasing. Therefore, we genotyped an aborted fetus which was inbred on Montbéliarde as well as Vorderwald x Montbéliarde crossbred bulls for both deleterious mutations. The abortion was observed in an experimental herd of Vorderwald cattle. The objectives of the present study were to prove if one or both lethal mutations may be assumed to have caused this abortion and to show whether these deleterious mutations have been introduced into the Vorderwald cattle population through Montbéliarde bulls. The aborted fetus was homozygous for the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation (ss2019324563) on BTA29 and both parents as well as the paternal and maternal grandsire were heterozygous for this mutation. In addition, the parents and the paternal grandsire were carriers of the MH2-haplotype linked with the T-allele of the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation. For the SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation (rs38377500) on BTA19 (MH1), the aborted fetus and its sire were heterozygous. Among all further 341 Vorderwald cattle genotyped we found 27 SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T heterozygous animals resulting in an allele frequency of 0.0396. Among the 120 male Vorderwald cattle, there were 12 heterozygous with an allele frequency of 0.05. The SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation could not be found in further nine cattle breeds nor in Vorderwald cattle with contributions from Ayrshire bulls. In 69 Vorderwald cattle without genes from Montbéliarde bulls the mutated allele of SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T could not be detected. The SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation appeared unlikely to be responsible

  4. D-2-hydroxyglutarate is essential for maintaining oncogenic property of mutant IDH-containing cancer cells but dispensable for cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shenghong; Jiang, Bowen; Deng, Wanglong; Gu, Zhong-Kai; Wu, Fei-Zhen; Li, Tingting; Xia, Yukun; Yang, Hui; Ye, Dan; Xiong, Yue; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2 mutations gain a new activity of reducing α-KG to produce D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG), which is proposed to function as an oncometabolite by inhibiting α-KG dependent dioxygenases. We investigated the function of D-2-HG in tumorigenesis using IDH1 and IDH2 mutant cancer cell lines. Inhibition of D-2-HG production either by specific deletion of the mutant IDH1-R132C allele or overexpression of D-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (D2HGDH) increases α-KG and related metabolites, restores the activity of some α-KG-dependent dioxygenases, and selectively alters gene expression. Ablation of D-2-HG production has no significant effect on cell proliferation and migration, but strongly inhibits anchorage independent growth in vitro and tumor growth in xenografted mouse models. Our study identifies a new activity of oncometabolite D-2-HG in promoting tumorigenesis. PMID:25825982

  5. D-2-hydroxyglutarate is essential for maintaining oncogenic property of mutant IDH-containing cancer cells but dispensable for cell growth.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shenghong; Jiang, Bowen; Deng, Wanglong; Gu, Zhong-Kai; Wu, Fei-Zhen; Li, Tingting; Xia, Yukun; Yang, Hui; Ye, Dan; Xiong, Yue; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-04-20

    Cancer-associated isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2 mutations gain a new activity of reducing α-KG to produce D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG), which is proposed to function as an oncometabolite by inhibiting α-KG dependent dioxygenases. We investigated the function of D-2-HG in tumorigenesis using IDH1 and IDH2 mutant cancer cell lines. Inhibition of D-2-HG production either by specific deletion of the mutant IDH1-R132C allele or overexpression of D-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (D2HGDH) increases α-KG and related metabolites, restores the activity of some α-KG-dependent dioxygenases, and selectively alters gene expression. Ablation of D-2-HG production has no significant effect on cell proliferation and migration, but strongly inhibits anchorage independent growth in vitro and tumor growth in xenografted mouse models. Our study identifies a new activity of oncometabolite D-2-HG in promoting tumorigenesis. PMID:25825982

  6. The mutation spectrum in RECQL4 diseases

    PubMed Central

    Siitonen, H Annika; Sotkasiira, Jenni; Biervliet, Martine; Benmansour, Abdelmadjid; Capri, Yline; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Crandall, Barbara; Hannula-Jouppi, Katariina; Hennekam, Raoul; Herzog, Denise; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Miny, Peter; Plon, Sharon E; Riedl, Stefan; Sarkar, Ajoy; Vargas, Fernando R; Verloes, Alain; Wang, Lisa L; Kääriäinen, Helena; Kestilä, Marjo

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the RECQL4 gene can lead to three clinical phenotypes with overlapping features. All these syndromes, Rothmund–Thomson (RTS), RAPADILINO and Baller–Gerold (BGS), are characterized by growth retardation and radial defects, but RAPADILINO syndrome lacks the main dermal manifestation, poikiloderma that is a hallmark feature in both RTS and BGS. It has been previously shown that RTS patients with RECQL4 mutations are at increased risk of osteosarcoma, but the precise incidence of cancer in RAPADILINO and BGS has not been determined. Here, we report that RAPADILINO patients identified as carriers of the c.1390+2delT mutation (p.Ala420_Ala463del) are at increased risk to develop lymphoma or osteosarcoma (6 out of 15 patients). We also summarize all the published RECQL4 mutations and their associated cancer cases and provide an update of 14 novel RECQL4 mutations with accompanying clinical data. PMID:18716613

  7. The mutation spectrum in RECQL4 diseases.

    PubMed

    Siitonen, H Annika; Sotkasiira, Jenni; Biervliet, Martine; Benmansour, Abdelmadjid; Capri, Yline; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Crandall, Barbara; Hannula-Jouppi, Katariina; Hennekam, Raoul; Herzog, Denise; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Miny, Peter; Plon, Sharon E; Riedl, Stefan; Sarkar, Ajoy; Vargas, Fernando R; Verloes, Alain; Wang, Lisa L; Kääriäinen, Helena; Kestilä, Marjo

    2009-02-01

    Mutations in the RECQL4 gene can lead to three clinical phenotypes with overlapping features. All these syndromes, Rothmund-Thomson (RTS), RAPADILINO and Baller-Gerold (BGS), are characterized by growth retardation and radial defects, but RAPADILINO syndrome lacks the main dermal manifestation, poikiloderma that is a hallmark feature in both RTS and BGS. It has been previously shown that RTS patients with RECQL4 mutations are at increased risk of osteosarcoma, but the precise incidence of cancer in RAPADILINO and BGS has not been determined. Here, we report that RAPADILINO patients identified as carriers of the c.1390+2delT mutation (p.Ala420_Ala463del) are at increased risk to develop lymphoma or osteosarcoma (6 out of 15 patients). We also summarize all the published RECQL4 mutations and their associated cancer cases and provide an update of 14 novel RECQL4 mutations with accompanying clinical data. PMID:18716613

  8. On the Specificity of Adaptive Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hall, B. G.

    1997-01-01

    Adaptive mutations are mutations that occur in nondividing or slowly dividing cells during prolonged nonlethal selection, and that appear to be specific to the challenge of the selection in the sense that the only mutations that arise are those that provide a growth advantage to the cell. The issue of the specificity has been controversial because it violates our most basic assumptions about the randomness of mutations with respect to their effect on the cell. Although a variety of experiments in several systems in both bacteria and yeast have claimed to demonstrate that specificity, those experiments have been subjected to a variety of technical criticisms suggesting that the specificity may not be real. Here I use the ebg system to provide evidence that when selection is applied to one specific nucleotide site within a gene, mutation occurs at that site but not at an alternative and equally mutable site within the same gene. PMID:9017388

  9. Elevated germline mutation rate in teenage fathers.

    PubMed

    Forster, Peter; Hohoff, Carsten; Dunkelmann, Bettina; Schürenkamp, Marianne; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Neuhuber, Franz; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2015-03-22

    Men age and die, while cells in their germline are programmed to be immortal. To elucidate how germ cells maintain viable DNA despite increasing parental age, we analysed DNA from 24 097 parents and their children, from Europe, the Middle East and Africa. We chose repetitive microsatellite DNA that mutates (unlike point mutations) only as a result of cellular replication, providing us with a natural 'cell-cycle counter'. We observe, as expected, that the overall mutation rate for fathers is seven times higher than for mothers. Also as expected, mothers have a low and lifelong constant DNA mutation rate. Surprisingly, however, we discover that (i) teenage fathers already set out from a much higher mutation rate than teenage mothers (potentially equivalent to 77-196 male germline cell divisions by puberty); and (ii) ageing men maintain sperm DNA quality similar to that of teenagers, presumably by using fresh batches of stem cells known as 'A-dark spermatogonia'. PMID:25694621

  10. Evolution on a Lattice under Strong Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otwinowski, Jakub; Boettcher, Stefan

    2011-03-01

    The most common approach to study biological evolution in a population considers mutations to arise one at a time, and spread to the whole population. However, recent experimental work has shown that under conditions of strong mutation and strong selection, multiple mutations may arise simultaneously. Such overlapping mutations compete with each other and make the results difficult to analyse. Theorists are working on understanding the relationships between different parameters such as population size,