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Sample records for 1a disease cmt1a

  1. Identification of Drug Modulators Targeting Gene-Dosage Disease CMT1A

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung-Wook; Lopez-Anido, Camila; MacArthur, Ryan; Svaren, John; Inglese, James

    2012-01-01

    The structural integrity of myelin formed by Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) is required for proper nerve conduction and is dependent on adequate expression of myelin genes including peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22). Consequently, excess PMP22 resulting from its genetic duplication and overexpression has been directly associated with the peripheral neuropathy called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), the most prevalent type of CMT. Here, in an attempt to identify transcriptional inhibitors with therapeutic value towards CMT1A, we developed a cross-validating pair of orthogonal reporter - firefly luciferase (FLuc) and β-lactamase (βLac) - assays capable of recapitulating PMP22 expression, utilizing the intronic regulatory element of the human PMP22 gene. Each compound from a collection of approximately 3,000 approved drugs was tested at multiple titration points to achieve a pharmacological endpoint in a 1536-well plate quantitative high-throughput screen (qHTS) format. In conjunction with an independent counter-screen for cytotoxicity, the design of our orthogonal screen platform effectively contributed to selection and prioritization of active compounds, among which three drugs (fenretinide, olvanil, and bortezomib) exhibited marked reduction of endogenous Pmp22 mRNA and protein. Overall, the findings of this study provide a strategic approach to assay development for gene-dosage diseases such as CMT1A. PMID:22530759

  2. Selected items from the Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Neuropathy Score and secondary clinical outcome measures serve as sensitive clinical markers of disease severity in CMT1A patients.

    PubMed

    Mannil, Manoj; Solari, Alessandra; Leha, Andreas; Pelayo-Negro, Ana L; Berciano, José; Schlotter-Weigel, Beate; Walter, Maggie C; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Schnizer, Tuuli J; Schenone, Angelo; Seeman, Pavel; Kadian, Chandini; Schreiber, Olivia; Angarita, Natalia G; Fabrizi, Gian Maria; Gemignani, Franco; Padua, Luca; Santoro, Lucio; Quattrone, Aldo; Vita, Giuseppe; Calabrese, Daniela; Young, Peter; Laurà, Matilde; Haberlová, Jana; Mazanec, Radim; Paulus, Walter; Beissbarth, Tim; Shy, Michael E; Reilly, Mary M; Pareyson, Davide; Sereda, Michael W

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates primary and secondary clinical outcome measures in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) with regard to their contribution towards discrimination of disease severity. The nine components of the composite Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Neuropathy Score and six additional secondary clinical outcome measures were assessed in 479 adult patients with genetically proven CMT1A and 126 healthy controls. Using hierarchical clustering, we identified four significant clusters of patients according to clinical severity. We then tested the impact of each of the CMTNS components and of the secondary clinical parameters with regard to their power to differentiate these four clusters. The CMTNS components ulnar sensory nerve action potential (SNAP), pin sensibility, vibration and strength of arms did not increase the discriminant value of the remaining five CMTNS components (Ulnar compound motor action potential [CMAP], leg motor symptoms, arm motor symptoms, leg strength and sensory symptoms). However, three of the six additional clinical outcome measures - the 10m-timed walking test (T10MW), 9 hole-peg test (9HPT), and foot dorsal flexion dynamometry - further improved discrimination between severely and mildly affected patients. From these findings, we identified three different composite measures as score hypotheses and compared their discriminant power with that of the CMTNS. A composite of eight components CMAP, Motor symptoms legs, Motor symptoms arms, Strength of Legs, Sensory symptoms), displayed the strongest power to discriminate between the clusters. As a conclusion, five items from the CMTNS and three secondary clinical outcome measures improve the clinical assessment of patients with CMT1A significantly and are beneficial for upcoming clinical and therapeutic trials. PMID:25085517

  3. Selected items from the Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Neuropathy Score and secondary clinical outcome measures serve as sensitive clinical markers of disease severity in CMT1A patients.

    PubMed

    Mannil, Manoj; Solari, Alessandra; Leha, Andreas; Pelayo-Negro, Ana L; Berciano, José; Schlotter-Weigel, Beate; Walter, Maggie C; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Schnizer, Tuuli J; Schenone, Angelo; Seeman, Pavel; Kadian, Chandini; Schreiber, Olivia; Angarita, Natalia G; Fabrizi, Gian Maria; Gemignani, Franco; Padua, Luca; Santoro, Lucio; Quattrone, Aldo; Vita, Giuseppe; Calabrese, Daniela; Young, Peter; Laurà, Matilde; Haberlová, Jana; Mazanec, Radim; Paulus, Walter; Beissbarth, Tim; Shy, Michael E; Reilly, Mary M; Pareyson, Davide; Sereda, Michael W

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates primary and secondary clinical outcome measures in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) with regard to their contribution towards discrimination of disease severity. The nine components of the composite Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Neuropathy Score and six additional secondary clinical outcome measures were assessed in 479 adult patients with genetically proven CMT1A and 126 healthy controls. Using hierarchical clustering, we identified four significant clusters of patients according to clinical severity. We then tested the impact of each of the CMTNS components and of the secondary clinical parameters with regard to their power to differentiate these four clusters. The CMTNS components ulnar sensory nerve action potential (SNAP), pin sensibility, vibration and strength of arms did not increase the discriminant value of the remaining five CMTNS components (Ulnar compound motor action potential [CMAP], leg motor symptoms, arm motor symptoms, leg strength and sensory symptoms). However, three of the six additional clinical outcome measures - the 10m-timed walking test (T10MW), 9 hole-peg test (9HPT), and foot dorsal flexion dynamometry - further improved discrimination between severely and mildly affected patients. From these findings, we identified three different composite measures as score hypotheses and compared their discriminant power with that of the CMTNS. A composite of eight components CMAP, Motor symptoms legs, Motor symptoms arms, Strength of Legs, Sensory symptoms), displayed the strongest power to discriminate between the clusters. As a conclusion, five items from the CMTNS and three secondary clinical outcome measures improve the clinical assessment of patients with CMT1A significantly and are beneficial for upcoming clinical and therapeutic trials.

  4. Computational Analysis Reveals the Association of Threonine 118 Methionine Mutation in PMP22 Resulting in CMT-1A

    PubMed Central

    Swetha, Rayapadi G.

    2014-01-01

    The T118M mutation in PMP22 gene is associated with Charcot Marie Tooth, type 1A (CMT1A). CMT1A is a form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, the most common inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Mutations in CMT related disorder are seen to increase the stability of the protein resulting in the diseased state. We performed SNP analysis for all the nsSNPs of PMP22 protein and carried out molecular dynamics simulation for T118M mutation to compare the stability difference between the wild type protein structure and the mutant protein structure. The mutation T118M resulted in the overall increase in the stability of the mutant protein. The superimposed structure shows marked structural variation between the wild type and the mutant protein structures. PMID:25400662

  5. Tolerability and efficacy study of P2X7 inhibition in experimental Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sociali, Giovanna; Visigalli, Davide; Prukop, Thomas; Cervellini, Ilaria; Mannino, Elena; Venturi, Consuelo; Bruzzone, Santina; Sereda, Michael W; Schenone, Angelo

    2016-11-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A) is a demyelinating hereditary neuropathy for which pharmacological treatments are not yet available. An abnormally high intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was observed in Schwann cells (SC) from CMT1A rats, caused by the PMP22-mediated overexpression of the P2X7 purinoceptor. The purpose of this study was to investigate the tolerability and therapeutic potential of a pharmacological antagonist of the P2X7 receptor (A438079) in CMT1A. A438079 ameliorated in vitro myelination of organotypic DRG cultures from CMT1A rats. Furthermore, we performed an experimental therapeutic trial in PMP22 transgenic and in wild-type rats. A preliminary dose-escalation trial showed that 3mg/kg A438079 administered via intraperitoneal injection every 24h for four weeks was well tolerated by wild type and CMT1A rats. Affected rats treated with 3mg/kg A438079 revealed a significant improvement of the muscle strength, when compared to placebo controls. Importantly, histologic analysis revealed a significant increase of the total number of myelinated axons in tibial nerves. Moreover, a significant decrease of the hypermyelination of small caliber axons and a significant increase of the frequency and diameter of large caliber myelinated axons was highlighted. An improved distal motor latencies was recorded, whereas compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) remained unaltered. A438079 reduced the SC differentiation defect in CMT1A rats. These results show that pharmacological inhibition of the P2X7 receptor is well tolerated in CMT1A rats and represents a proof-of-principle that antagonizing this pathway may correct the molecular derangements and improve the clinical phenotype in the CMT1A neuropathy. PMID:27431093

  6. Tolerability and efficacy study of P2X7 inhibition in experimental Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sociali, Giovanna; Visigalli, Davide; Prukop, Thomas; Cervellini, Ilaria; Mannino, Elena; Venturi, Consuelo; Bruzzone, Santina; Sereda, Michael W; Schenone, Angelo

    2016-11-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A) is a demyelinating hereditary neuropathy for which pharmacological treatments are not yet available. An abnormally high intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was observed in Schwann cells (SC) from CMT1A rats, caused by the PMP22-mediated overexpression of the P2X7 purinoceptor. The purpose of this study was to investigate the tolerability and therapeutic potential of a pharmacological antagonist of the P2X7 receptor (A438079) in CMT1A. A438079 ameliorated in vitro myelination of organotypic DRG cultures from CMT1A rats. Furthermore, we performed an experimental therapeutic trial in PMP22 transgenic and in wild-type rats. A preliminary dose-escalation trial showed that 3mg/kg A438079 administered via intraperitoneal injection every 24h for four weeks was well tolerated by wild type and CMT1A rats. Affected rats treated with 3mg/kg A438079 revealed a significant improvement of the muscle strength, when compared to placebo controls. Importantly, histologic analysis revealed a significant increase of the total number of myelinated axons in tibial nerves. Moreover, a significant decrease of the hypermyelination of small caliber axons and a significant increase of the frequency and diameter of large caliber myelinated axons was highlighted. An improved distal motor latencies was recorded, whereas compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) remained unaltered. A438079 reduced the SC differentiation defect in CMT1A rats. These results show that pharmacological inhibition of the P2X7 receptor is well tolerated in CMT1A rats and represents a proof-of-principle that antagonizing this pathway may correct the molecular derangements and improve the clinical phenotype in the CMT1A neuropathy.

  7. A meta-analysis of randomized double-blind clinical trials in CMT1A to assess the change from baseline in CMTNS and ONLS scales after one year of treatment.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Jonas; Bertrand, Viviane; Lehert, Philippe; Attarian, Shahram; Magy, Laurent; Micallef, Joëlle; Chumakov, Ilya; Scart-Grès, Catherine; Guedj, Mickael; Cohen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    CMT1A is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. There is currently no approved treatment. We performed a meta-analysis including four randomized, double-blind, Placebo-controlled clinical trials to assess the disease progression after one year under Placebo, Ascorbic Acid (AA) or PXT3003, a combination of three repurposed drugs. We observed a weak deterioration in patients under Placebo, well below the reported natural disease progression. Patients treated with AA were stable after one year but not significantly different from Placebo. Patients undergoing PXT3003 treatment showed an improvement in CMTNS and ONLS, statistically significant versus Placebo and potentially precursory of a meaningful change in the disease course. PMID:26070802

  8. An essential role of MAG in mediating axon-myelin attachment in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A disease

    PubMed Central

    Kinter, Jochen; Lazzati, Thomas; Schmid, Daniela; Zeis, Thomas; Erne, Beat; Lützelschwab, Roland; Steck, Andreas J.; Pareyson, Davide; Peles, Elior; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is a hereditary demyelinating peripheral neuropathy caused by the duplication of the PMP22 gene. Demyelination precedes the occurrence of clinical symptoms that correlate with axonal degeneration. It was postulated that a disturbed axon-glia interface contribute to altered myelination consequently leading to axonal degeneration. In this study, we examined the expression of MAG and Necl4, two critical adhesion molecules that are present at the axon-glia interface, in sural nerve biopsies of CMT1A patients and in peripheral nerves of mice overexpressing human PMP22, an animal model for CMT1A. We show an increase in the expression of MAG and a strong decrease of Necl4 in biopsies of CMT1A patients as well as in CMT1A mice. Expression analysis revealed that MAG is strongly upregulated during peripheral nerve maturation, whereas Necl4 expression remains very low. Ablating MAG in CMT1A mice results in separation of axons from their myelin sheath. Our data show that MAG is important for axon-glia contact in a model for CMT1A, and suggest that its increased expression in CMT1A disease has a compensatory role in the pathology of the disease. Thus, we demonstrate that MAG together with other adhesion molecules such as Necl4 is important in sustaining axonal integrity. PMID:22940629

  9. Atypical presentation of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1A: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Shilpa D; Sayed, Rafat; Garg, Meenal; Patil, Varsha A

    2015-11-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) 1A is the most common form of CMT disease and is characterized by duplication of Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. We report a boy with genetically confirmed CMT1A disease having clinical involvement of hypoglossal and glossopharyngeal nerves, as well as asymmetrical and primarily upper limb involvement. These atypical features widen the clinical spectrum of CMT1A, leading to interesting observations about PMP22 gene related disorders and varied clinical expression of similar genetic mutations.

  10. Animal models of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A.

    PubMed

    Sereda, M W; Nave, K-A

    2006-01-01

    The most frequent genetic subtype of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is CMT1A, linked to chromosome 17p11.2. In the majority of cases, CMT1A is a gene dosage disease associated with a 1.5 Mb large genomic duplication. Transgenic models with extra copies of the Pmp22 gene have provided formal proof that overexpression of only this candidate gene is sufficent to cause peripheral demyelination, onion bulb formation, secondary axonal loss, and progressive muscle atrophy, the pathological hallmarks of CMT1A. The transgenic CMT rat with about 1.6-fold PMP22 overexpression exhibits clinical abnormalities, such as reduced nerve conduction velocity and lower grip strength that mimick findings in CMT1A patients. Also transgenic mice, carrying yeast artifical chromosomes as Pmp22 transgenes, demonstrate the variability of disease expression as a function of increased gene dosage. Recently, the first rational experimental therapies of CMT1A were tested, using transgenic animal models. In one proof-of-principle study with the CMT rat, a synthetic antagonist of the nuclear progesterone receptor was shown to reduce PMP22 overexpression and to ameliorate the clinical severity. In another study, administration of ascorbic acid, an essential factor of in vitro myelination, prolonged the survival and restored myelination of a dysmyelinated mouse model. Application of gene expression analysis to nerve biopsies that are readily available from such CMT1A animal models might identify additional pharmacological targets.

  11. Neurological dysfunction and axonal degeneration in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, K M; Lewis, R A; Fuerst, D R; Turansky, C; Hinderer, S R; Garbern, J; Kamholz, J; Shy, M E

    2000-07-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), the most frequent form of CMT, is caused by a 1.5 Mb duplication on the short arm of chromosome 17. Patients with CMT1A typically have slowed nerve conduction velocities (NCVs), reduced compound motor and sensory nerve action potentials (CMAPs and SNAPs), distal weakness, sensory loss and decreased reflexes. In order to understand further the molecular pathogenesis of CMT1A, as well as to determine which features correlate with neurological dysfunction and might thus be amenable to treatment, we evaluated the clinical and electrophysiological phenotype in 42 patients with CMT1A. In these patients, muscle weakness, CMAP amplitudes and motor unit number estimates correlated with clinical disability, while motor NCV did not. In addition, loss of joint position sense and reduction in SNAP amplitudes also correlated with clinical disability, while sensory NCV did not. Taken together, these data strongly support the hypothesis that neurological dysfunction and clinical disability in CMT1A are caused by loss or damage to large calibre motor and sensory axons. Therapeutic approaches to ameliorate disability in CMT1A, as in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurodegenerative diseases, should thus be directed towards preventing axonal degeneration and/or promoting axonal regeneration. PMID:10869062

  12. Postural instability in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A disease.

    PubMed

    Tozza, Stefano; Aceto, Maria Gabriella; Pisciotta, Chiara; Bruzzese, Dario; Iodice, Rosa; Santoro, Lucio; Manganelli, Fiore

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of somatosensory impairment, distal muscle weakness and foot deformities on the balance in 21 CMT1A patients using a baropodometric platform. Stabilometric analysis by measuring sway area and velocity of a centre of pressure (CoP) both at open and closed eyes were used to assess postural imbalance. Static analysis, by measuring the load and the plantar surface of forefoot, midfoot and hindfoot was used to define the footprint shape and to assess as a whole foot deformities. Stabilometric and static results were compared with those of a control group. In CMT1A patients, stabilometric findings were correlated with static parameters, Achilles' tendon retraction, distal muscle strength and CMT examination score (CMTES). CMT1A patients compared to controls had lower plantar surface and load on midfoot, and higher load on a forefoot. CMT1A patients had a greater postural instability, since they had a higher CoP velocity, both at open and closed eyes. Moreover, the CoP velocity correlated inversely with the strength of ankle dorsi-flexion muscles and directly with CMTES as whole and with the item "motor symptoms legs". Postural imbalance was not correlated with sensory impairment and foot deformities as expressed by static analysis and Achilles' tendon retraction. In this study we demonstrated an altered balance in CMT1A patients during upright standing. The imbalance in our CMT patients seems to be related to the weakness of ankle dorsi-flexor muscles rather than sensory impairment or foot deformities. These results could be due to a mildly affected CMT1A population, evaluated in an early stage of the disease. PMID:27491052

  13. Nerve Excitability Properties in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 1A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nodera, Hiroyuki; Bostock, Hugh; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Takashi; Asanuma, Kotaro; Jia-Ying, Sung; Ogawara, Kazue; Hattori, Naoki; Hirayama, Masaaki; Kaji, Ryuji

    2004-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is commonly considered a prototype of a hereditary demyelinating polyneuropathy. Apart from the myelin involvement, there has been little information on axonal membrane properties in this condition. Taking advantage of the uniform nature of the disease process, we undertook the "in vivo" assessment of…

  14. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A.

    PubMed

    De Vos, A; Sermon, K; De Rijcke, M; Goossens, V; Henderix, P; Van Ranst, N; Platteau, P; Lissens, W; Devroey, P; Van Steirteghem, A; Liebaers, I

    2003-07-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the 'common' name for a range of hereditary peripheral neuropathies. CMT1 is the most common form and is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. CMT1A maps to chromosome 17p11.2 and is caused, in the majority of cases, by a 1.5 Mb DNA duplication, that includes the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP) gene. This paper reports on preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for CMT1A in five couples. The CMT1A duplication was detected by fluorescent PCR analysis using polymorphic (CA)n markers localized within the duplication. Single-cell PCR on blastomeres allowed genetic analysis of embryos obtained after ICSI. Only healthy unaffected embryos were transferred to the uterus. PCR experiments with single EBV-transformed lymphoblasts or with research blastomeres allowed the evaluation of amplification efficiencies, as well as contamination and allele drop-out (ADO) rates for each PCR protocol. Three simplex PCR protocols (using one primer pair) and two duplex PCR protocols (using two primer pairs) were developed for CMT1A. Additionally, a protocol using all three primer pairs in triplex was also established. Thirteen clinical ICSI-PGD cycles were performed for five couples (12 simplex PCR cycles and one duplex PCR cycle), resulting in seven embryo transfers. Three singleton pregnancies ensued in two couples and three healthy babies were delivered. This report describes different fluorescent PCR-based tests which allow efficient and accurate single-cell level detection of the CMT1A duplication. On the basis of the presence of the healthy allele of the affected parent-to-be (and/or absence of the affected one), healthy embryos can be selected for transfer. The assays are suitable for PGD for other couples who present with the same CMT1A duplication [depending on their informativity for the (CA)n markers available] as described here.

  15. Prevalence and origin of De Novo duplications in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: First report of a De Novo duplication with a maternal origin

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, I.P.; Nash, J.; Gordon, M.J.; Nicholson, G.A.

    1996-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. Sporadic cases of CMT have been described since the earliest reports of the disease. The most frequent form of the disorder, CMT1A, is associated with a 1.5-Mb DNA duplication on chromosome 17p11.2, which segregates with the disease. In order to investigate the prevalence of de novo CMT1A duplications, this study examined 118 duplication-positive CMT1A families. In 10 of these families it was demonstrated that the disease had arisen as the result of a de novo mutation. By taking into account the ascertainment of families, it can be estimated that {>=}10% of autosomal dominant CMT1 families are due to de novo duplications. The CMT1A duplication is thought to be the product of unequal crossing over between parental chromosome 17 homologues during meiosis. Polymorphic markers from within the duplicated region were used to determine the parental origin of these de novo duplications in eight informative families. Seven were of paternal and one of maternal origin. This study represents the first report of a de novo duplication with a maternal origin and indicates that it is not a phenomenon associated solely with male meioses. Recombination fractions for the region duplicated in CMT1A are larger in females than in males. That suggests that oogenesis may be afforded greater protection from misalignment during synapsis, and/or that there may be lower activity of those factors or mechanisms that lead to unequal crossing over at the CMT1A locus. 41 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A disease from patient to laboratory.

    PubMed

    Perveen, Shazia; Mannan, Shazia; Hussain, Abrar; Kanwal, Sumaira

    2015-02-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a well-known neural or spinal type of muscular atrophy. It is the most familiar disease within a group of conditions called Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathies (HMSN). The disease was discovered by three scientists several years ago. Several genes are involved as the causative agents for the disease. Hundreds of causative mutations have been found and research work for the identification of a novel locus and for the treatment of CMT1A is going on. This review article was planned to gather information on CMT disease and updates on its treatment.National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and PubMed were searched for data retrieval. Molgen database, which is the exclusive site for CMT mutation, was the other source of articles. Different aspects of the CMT disease were compared.Advancements in the finding of the causative gene, discovery of the novel Loci are the current issues in this regard.CMT disease is incurable, but researchers are trying to get some benefits from different natural compounds and several therapeutic agents.Various groups are working on the treatment projects of CMT1A. Major step forward in CMT research was taken in 2004 when ascorbic acid was used for transgenic mice treatment. Gene therapy for constant neurotrophin-3 (NT- 3) delivery by secretion by muscle cells for the CMT1A is also one of the possible treatments under trial.

  17. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a different neuropathy distinct from CMT1A called hereditary neuropathy with predisposition to pressure palsy (HNPP) is caused ... PMP-22 gene result in episodic, recurrent demyelinating neuropathy. CMT1B is an autosomal dominant disease caused by ...

  18. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease 1A with superimposed inflammatory polyneuropathy in children.

    PubMed

    Desurkar, A; Lin, J-P; Mills, K; Al-Sarraj, S; Jan, W; Jungbluth, H; Wraige, E

    2009-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is genetically heterogeneous and subdivided into demyelinating (CMT 1) and axonal (CMT 2) types based on neurophysiology findings. CMT1A, the commonest form associated with duplication of the PMP22 segment on chromosome 17p, often arises in childhood but is generally a slowly progressive disease. We report 2 children presenting with clinical features of an acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) who were subsequently diagnosed with underlying CMT1A. Both children had neurophysiology and histopathology features consistent with CMT1. Immunoglobulin treatment was initiated considering the evidence of superimposed inflammation and appeared to modify disease progression. Our findings indicate that CMT1A predisposes to a superimposed inflammatory neuropathy. Recognition of this association is difficult, particularly in children without clear family history, but of great importance as immunomodulatory treatment may improve outcome. In addition, we postulate that an underlying genetic polyneuropathy should be suspected if the recovery from AIDP is slower than expected, or incomplete. PMID:19809938

  19. Comparison between Clinical Disabilities and Electrophysiological Values in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A Patients with PMP22 Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Hwa; Chung, Hwa Kyung; Park, Kee Duk; Choi, Kyoung-Gyu; Kim, Seung-Min; Sunwoo, Il-Nam; Choi, Young-Chul; Lim, Jeong-Geun; Lee, Kwang Woo; Kim, Kwang-Kuk; Lee, Dong Kuk; Joo, In Soo; Kwon, Ki-Han; Gwon, Seok Beom; Park, Jae Hyeon; Kim, Dae-Seong; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Woo-Kyung; Suh, Bum Chun; Kim, Sang-Beom; Kim, Nam-Hee; Sohn, Eun Hee; Kim, Ok-Joon; Kim, Hyun Sook; Cho, Jung Hee; Kang, Sa-Yoon; Park, Chan-Ik; Oh, Jiyoung; Shin, Jong Hyu; Chung, Ki Wha

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 1A (CMT1A) is the demyelinating form of CMT that is significantly associated with PMP22 duplication. Some studies have found that the disease-related disabilities of these patients are correlated with their compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), while others have suggested that they are related to the nerve conduction velocities. In the present study, we investigated the correlations between the disease-related disabilities and the electrophysiological values in a large cohort of Korean CMT1A patients. Methods We analyzed 167 CMT1A patients of Korean origin with PMP22 duplication using clinical and electrophysiological assessments, including the CMT neuropathy score and the functional disability scale. Results Clinical motor disabilities were significantly correlated with the CMAPs but not the motor nerve conduction velocities (MNCVs). Moreover, the observed sensory impairments matched the corresponding reductions in the sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) but not with slowing of the sensory nerve conduction velocities (SNCVs). In addition, CMAPs were strongly correlated with the disease duration but not with the age at onset. The terminal latency index did not differ between CMT1A patients and healthy controls. Conclusions In CMT1A patients, disease-related disabilities such as muscle wasting and sensory impairment were strongly correlated with CMAPs and SNAPs but not with the MNCVs or SNCVs. Therefore, we suggest that the clinical disabilities of CMT patients are determined by the extent of axonal dysfunction. PMID:22787498

  20. [Autopsy case of a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and suspected chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, which was later diagnosed as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Sakiyama, Yusuke; Nishihira, Yasushi; Endo, Kazuhiro; Suwazono, Shugo; Suehara, Masahito

    2012-01-01

    We report an autopsy case of a 74-year-old man with late onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) diagnosed by genetic screening, later associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). At the age of 70 years, the patient was admitted to our hospital because of progressive weakness and dysesthesia in the right upper limb. In the early stages of the illness, he was diagnosed with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), and transient improvement was achieved with intravenous immunoglobulin. However, the symptoms progressively worsened and became refractory. Gene analysis revealed PMP22 gene duplication, which confirmed CMT1A. On sural nerve biopsy, severe demyelinating neuropathy and abundant onion-bulb formations with endoneurial infiltration of inflammatory cells were observed. Thereafter, pseudo-bulbar palsy and respiratory muscle weakness developed insidiously and progressed rapidly along with muscle weakness in the limbs and trunk. The patient died about four years after the onset of this disease. Postmortem examination showed moderate neuronal cell loss, Bunina bodies, and TDP-43-positive inclusions in the anterior horn cells. The spinal cord revealed axonal loss and extensive macrophage permeation in the corticospinal tracts. On the basis of these findings, the final neuropathological diagnosis was ALS. This is the first report of an autopsy case of CMT1A complicated with ALS. We here discuss the significant clinical and neuropathological findings of this case.

  1. PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is usually reported as 1:2,500, epidemiological studies show that 20-64% of CMT patients carry the PMP22 duplication. The prevalence of HNPP is not well known. CMT1A usually presents in the first two decades with difficulty walking or running. Distal symmetrical muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is present, legs more frequently and more severely affected than arms. HNPP typically leads to episodic, painless, recurrent, focal motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy, preceded by minor compression on the affected nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation is needed to determine whether the polyneuropathy is demyelinating. Sonography of the nerves can be useful. Diagnosis is confirmed by finding respectively a PMP22 duplication, deletion or point mutation. Differential diagnosis includes other inherited neuropathies, and acquired polyneuropathies. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant and de novo mutations occur. Offspring of patients have a chance of 50% to inherit the mutation from their affected parent. Prenatal testing is possible; requests for prenatal testing are not common. Treatment is currently symptomatic and may include management by a rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and orthopaedic surgeon. Adult CMT1A patients show slow clinical progression of disease, which seems to reflect a process of normal ageing. Life expectancy is normal. PMID:24646194

  2. Efficacy of focal mechanic vibration treatment on balance in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pazzaglia, Costanza; Camerota, F; Germanotta, M; Di Sipio, E; Celletti, C; Padua, L

    2016-07-01

    Patients affected by Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease experience an impaired balance. Although the causes of the postural instability are not fully understood, somatosensory system seems to play a key role. Mechanical vibration seems to act on the somatosensory system and to improve its function. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of focal mechanical vibration (fMV) on the balance of CMT 1A patients. We enrolled 14 genetically confirmed CMT 1A patients (8 female and 6 male, mean age 492 years, range 32-74, mean duration of disease: 13 years, range 1-30). Patients underwent a 3-day fMV treatment on quadriceps and triceps surae and were evaluated before the treatment as well as 1 week and 1 month after the end of the treatment. The primary outcome measure was the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the secondary were the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), the 6 Min Walking Test (6MWT), the muscular strength of lower limbs, the Quality of Life (QoL) questionnaire and the stabilometric variables. The statistical analysis showed a significant modification of the BBS due to the effect of treatment (p < 0.05). A significant modification was also found in the DGI (p < 0.05). Concerning the stabilometric variables we found significant changes only for the eyes closed condition; in particular, a significant decrease was found in VelocityML (p < 0.05) and Sway path length (p < 0.05). The fMV treatment applied on lower limbs of CMT 1A patients determined an improvement of balance as detected by the BBS. The concurrent improvement of stabilometric variables in the eyes closed condition only suggests that fMV acts mostly on somatosensory afferences. Further studies are needed to confirm these data on a larger sample of CMT patients.

  3. Efficacy of focal mechanic vibration treatment on balance in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pazzaglia, Costanza; Camerota, F; Germanotta, M; Di Sipio, E; Celletti, C; Padua, L

    2016-07-01

    Patients affected by Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease experience an impaired balance. Although the causes of the postural instability are not fully understood, somatosensory system seems to play a key role. Mechanical vibration seems to act on the somatosensory system and to improve its function. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of focal mechanical vibration (fMV) on the balance of CMT 1A patients. We enrolled 14 genetically confirmed CMT 1A patients (8 female and 6 male, mean age 492 years, range 32-74, mean duration of disease: 13 years, range 1-30). Patients underwent a 3-day fMV treatment on quadriceps and triceps surae and were evaluated before the treatment as well as 1 week and 1 month after the end of the treatment. The primary outcome measure was the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the secondary were the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), the 6 Min Walking Test (6MWT), the muscular strength of lower limbs, the Quality of Life (QoL) questionnaire and the stabilometric variables. The statistical analysis showed a significant modification of the BBS due to the effect of treatment (p < 0.05). A significant modification was also found in the DGI (p < 0.05). Concerning the stabilometric variables we found significant changes only for the eyes closed condition; in particular, a significant decrease was found in VelocityML (p < 0.05) and Sway path length (p < 0.05). The fMV treatment applied on lower limbs of CMT 1A patients determined an improvement of balance as detected by the BBS. The concurrent improvement of stabilometric variables in the eyes closed condition only suggests that fMV acts mostly on somatosensory afferences. Further studies are needed to confirm these data on a larger sample of CMT patients. PMID:27177999

  4. Respiratory dysfunction in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Alcântara, Mônica; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H; Fernandes, Regina Maria França; da Silva, Geruza Alves; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Sander, Heide H; Marques Junior, Wilson

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship between neurological compromise, respiratory parameters in wakefulness and in sleep, physiology, and morphology of phrenic nerves in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A). Sixteen patients with CMT1A were evaluated by spirometry, maximal expiratory and maximal inspiratory pressures (MEP, MIP), polysomnography, phrenic nerve compound muscle action potential (CMAP), and ultrasonography (roots C3,C4,C5 and phrenic nerves). Clinical disability was measured with Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy score (CMT-NS; range 0-36). Two control groups, comprising 30 individuals matched for age, sex, and body mass index, were used for comparison. Ten patients were female (62%), mean age was 37.88 years (range 24-76); and CMT-NS range was 7-34. MIP was reduced in five (31%) and MEP in 12 patients (75%), although only one had restrictive respiratory dysfunction in spirometry. Apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI) was significantly higher in patients (12.01 ± 11.57/h × 5.89 ± 8.36/h; p value = 0.05) and increased in REM sleep compared with NREM (9.94 ± 10.96/h × 19.13 ± 19.93/h; p value = 0.01). There were significant correlations between CMT-NS and AHI (Pearson = 0.69; p value = 0.03); CMT-NS and MIP (Pearson = -0.691, p value = 0.003); and CMT-NS and MEP (Pearson = -0.603, p value = 0.013). Also, AHI showed negative correlation with MIP (Pearson = -0.52, p value = 0.036) and MEP (Pearson = -0.55, p value = 0.026). Phrenic nerves were enlarged in ultrasonography in all patients and presented significant correlations with CMAPs (right: Pearson = -0.554, p value = 0.026; left: Pearson = -0.558, p value = 0.025). We suggest that axonal degeneration of nerves directed to muscles of respiration might explain the high prevalence of respiratory weakness in patients with CMT1A. Clinical manifestations are frequent during sleep, where the diaphragm alone can only partially surpass the overload in breathing apparatus. PMID:25761374

  5. Ascorbic acid in Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A (CMT-TRIAAL and CMT-TRAUK): a double-blind randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Pareyson, Davide; Reilly, Mary M; Schenone, Angelo; Fabrizi, Gian Maria; Cavallaro, Tiziana; Santoro, Lucio; Vita, Giuseppe; Quattrone, Aldo; Padua, Luca; Gemignani, Franco; Visioli, Francesco; Laurà, Matilde; Radice, Davide; Calabrese, Daniela; Hughes, Richard AC; Solari, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Ascorbic acid reduced the severity of neuropathy in transgenic mice overexpressing peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22), a model of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) associated with the PMP22 duplication. However, in three 1-year trials, ascorbic acid had no benefit in human beings. We did a multicentre 2-year trial to test the efficacy and tolerability of ascorbic acid in patients with CMT1A. Methods Adult patients (aged 18–70 years) with symptomatic CMT1A were enrolled from nine centres in Italy and the UK, and were randomly assigned (1:1 ratio) to receive 1·5 g/day oral ascorbic acid or matching placebo for 24 months. The randomisation sequence was computer generated by block randomisation, stratified by centre and disease severity, and patients were allocated to treatment by telephone. The primary outcome was change in the CMT neuropathy score (CMTNS) at 24 months. Secondary outcomes were timed 10 m walk test, nine-hole peg test, overall neuropathy limitations scale, distal maximal voluntary isometric contraction, visual analogue scales for pain and fatigue, 36-item short-form questionnaire, and electrophysiological measurements. Patients, treating physicians, and physicians assessing outcome measures were masked to treatment allocation. Analysis of the primary outcome was done on all randomised patients who received at least one dose of study drug. This study is registered, numbers ISRCTN61074476 (CMT-TRAUK) and EudraCT 2006-000032-27 (CMT-TRIAAL). Findings We enrolled and randomly assigned 277 patients, of whom six (four assigned to receive ascorbic acid) withdrew consent before receiving treatment; 138 receiving ascorbic acid and 133 receiving placebo were eligible for analysis. Treatment was well tolerated: 241 of 271 patients (89% in each group) completed the study; 20 patients (nine receiving ascorbic acid) dropped out because of adverse events. Mean CMTNS at baseline with missing data imputed was 14·7 (SD 4·8) in the

  6. Exposure at the cell surface is required for gas3/PMP22 To regulate both cell death and cell spreading: implication for the Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and Dejerine-Sottas diseases.

    PubMed

    Brancolini, C; Edomi, P; Marzinotto, S; Schneider, C

    2000-09-01

    Gas3/PMP22 is a tetraspan membrane protein highly expressed in myelinating Schwann cells. Point mutations in the gas3/PMP22 gene account for the dominant inherited peripheral neuropathies Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A disease (CMT1A) and Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS). Gas3/PMP22 can regulate apoptosis and cell spreading in cultured cells. Gas3/PMP22 point mutations, which are responsible for these diseases, are defective in this respect. In this report, we demonstrate that Gas3/PMP22-WT is exposed at the cell surface, while its point-mutated derivatives are intracellularly retained, colocalizing mainly with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The putative retrieval motif present in the carboxyl terminus of Gas3/PMP22 is not sufficient for the intracellular sequestration of its point-mutated forms. On the contrary, the introduction of a retrieval signal at the carboxyl terminus of Gas3/PMP22-WT leads to its intracellular accumulation, which is accompanied by a failure to trigger cell death as well as by changes in cell spreading. In addition, by substituting the Asn at position 41 required for N-glycosylation, we provide evidence that N-glycosylation is required for the full effect on cell spreading, but it is not necessary for triggering cell death. In conclusion, we suggest that the DSS and the CMT1A neuropathies derived from point mutations of Gas3/PMP22 might arise, at the molecular level, from a reduced exposure of Gas3/PMP22 at the cell surface, which is required to exert its biological functions. PMID:10982389

  7. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoung-Song; Kim, Min Jee; Ko, Duck Sung; Jeon, Eun Jin; Kim, Jin Young

    2013-01-01

    Objective Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an assisted reproductive technique for couples carrying genetic risks. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common hereditary neuropathy, with a prevalence rate of 1/2,500. In this study, we report on our experience with PGD cycles performed for CMT types 1A and 2F. Methods Before clinical PGD, we assessed the amplification rate and allele drop-out (ADO) rate of multiplex fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by fragment analysis or sequencing using single lymphocytes. We performed six cycles of PGD for CMT1A and one cycle for CMT2F. Results Two duplex and two triplex protocols were developed according to the available markers for each CMT1A couple. Depending on the PCR protocols, the amplification rates and ADO rates ranged from 90.0% to 98.3% and 0.0% to 11.1%, respectively. For CMT2F, the amplification rates and ADO rates were 93.3% and 4.8%, respectively. In case of CMT1A, 60 out of 63 embryos (95.2%) were diagnosed and 13 out of 21 unaffected embryos were transferred in five cycles. Two pregnancies were achieved and three babies were delivered without any complications. In the case of CMT2F, a total of eight embryos were analyzed and diagnosed. Seven embryos were diagnosed as unaffected and four embryos were transferred, resulting in a twin pregnancy. Two healthy babies were delivered. Conclusion This is the first report of successful pregnancy and delivery after specific PGD for CMT disease in Korea. Our PGD procedure could provide healthy babies to couples with a high risk of transmitting genetic diseases. PMID:24505562

  8. De Novo duplication in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Mandich, P.; Bellone, E.; Ajmar, F.

    1996-09-01

    We read with interest the paper on {open_quotes}Prevalence and Origin of De Novo Duplications in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 1A: First Report of a De Novo Duplication with a Maternal Origin,{close_quotes}. They reported their experience with 10 sporadic cases of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) in which it was demonstrated that the disease had arisen as the result of a de novo duplication. They analyzed the de novo-duplication families by using microsatellite markers and identified the parental origin of the duplication in eight cases. In one family the duplication was of maternal origin, whereas in the remaining seven cases it was of paternal origin. The authors concluded that their report was the first evidence of a de novo duplication of maternal origin, suggesting that this is not a phenomenon associated solely with male meiosis. 7 refs.

  9. [Pathology of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease].

    PubMed

    Oka, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Although genetic testing is available, nerve biopsy is useful in selected patients for the diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). These are sporadic cases of hereditary neuropathy, or familial cases in which genetic testing is negative. CMT is caused by mutations of various genes. The pathological features of CMT have mostly been investigated using nerve biopsy, which may shed light on the presumed functions of mutated gene products. PMP22 duplication in CMT1A induces numerous large onion bulb lesions (OB). Compared to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, the differential features of CMT1A are patchy distribution of OB and non-inflammatory lesions. CMT1B also manifests as OB, but presents abnormal compaction of myelin sheaths caused by uncompacted myelin or excessive myelin folding. CMT2 includes axonal neuropathies and many causative genes have been found. CMT2A (MFN2 mutation) shows abnormal mitochondria with a spherical morphology instead of tubular in the longitudinal direction. CMT4 consists of autosomal recessive forms with demyelinating pathology. Most subtypes have mutations of genes relating to myelin maintenance, and pathologically, they show abnormal folding of the myelin structure.

  10. Sirtuin 1: A Target for Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lili; Wu, Hao; Zhou, Wenhua; Luo, Manyu; Tan, Yi; Miao, Lining; Cai, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is an evolutionarily conserved NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase that is necessary for caloric restriction–related lifespan extension. SIRT1, as an intracellular energy sensor, detects the concentration of intracellular NAD+ and uses this information to adapt cellular energy output to cellular energy requirements. Previous studies on SIRT1 have confirmed its beneficial effects on cellular immunity to oxidative stress, reduction of fibrosis, suppression of inflammation, inhibition of apoptosis, regulation of metabolism, induction of autophagy and regulation of blood pressure. All of the above biological processes are involved in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. Therefore, the activation of SIRT1 may become a therapeutic target to improve the clinical outcome of kidney diseases. In this review, we give an overview of SIRT1 and its molecular targets as well as SIRT1-modulated biological processes, with a particular focus on the role of SIRT1 in kidney diseases. PMID:25587857

  11. [Autoimmune diseases in type 1A diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Molina-Ayala, Mario Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Type 1A diabetes (DM1A) is an autoimmune disease that comprises 10% of patients with diabetes mellitus. Its frequency is gradually increasing in countries like Mexico. Patients with DM1A commonly have hypothyroidism, Addison disease, celiac disease and less common diseases such as polyglandular syndrome. These diseases are related to susceptibility genes such as HLA, CTLA-4 and PTPN22, which induce central and peripheral immunologic tolerance. This review article emphasizes the importance of searching other autoimmune diseases in patients with DM1A, to improve their prognosis and quality of life.

  12. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Manganelli, Fiore; Nolano, Maria; Pisciotta, Chiara; Provitera, Vincenzo; Fabrizi, Gian M.; Cavallaro, Tiziana; Stancanelli, Annamaria; Caporaso, Giuseppe; Shy, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate, by skin biopsy, dermal nerve fibers in 31 patients with 3 common Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) genotypes (CMT1A, late-onset CMT1B, and CMTX1), and rarer forms of CMT caused by mutations in RAB7 (CMT2B), TRPV4 (CMT2C), and GDAP1 (AR-CMT2K) genes. Methods: We investigated axonal loss by quantifying Meissner corpuscles and intrapapillary myelinated endings and evaluated morphometric changes in myelinated dermal nerve fibers by measuring fiber caliber, internodal, and nodal gap length. Results: The density of both Meissner corpuscles and intrapapillary myelinated endings was reduced in skin samples from patients with CMT1A and all the other CMT genotypes. Nodal gaps were larger in all the CMT genotypes though widening was greater in CMT1A. Perhaps an altered communication between axons and glia may be a common feature for multiple forms of CMT. Internodal lengths were shorter in all the CMT genotypes, and patients with CMT1A had the shortest internodes of all our patients. The uniformly shortened internodes in all the CMT genotypes suggest that mutations in both myelin and axon genes may developmentally impede internode formation. The extent of internodal shortening and nodal gap widening are likely both important in determining nerve conduction velocities in CMT. Conclusions: This study extends the information gained from skin biopsies on morphologic abnormalities in various forms of CMT and provides insights into potential pathomechanisms of axonal and demyelinating CMT. PMID:26362287

  13. Screening of the early growth response 2 gene in Japanese patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1.

    PubMed

    Numakura, Chikahiko; Shirahata, Emi; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Kanai, Masayo; Kijima, Kazuki; Matsuki, Takasumi; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2003-06-15

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1) is a heterogeneous disorder. Most CMT1 patients are associated with a duplication of 17p11.2-p12 (CMT1A duplication), but a small number of patients have mutations of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22), myelin protein zero (MPZ), connexin 32 (Cx32) and early growth response 2 (EGR2) genes. In our previous study, we identified the responsible mutations in 72 of 128 Japanese CMT1 patients as CMT1A duplication in 40, PMP22 mutation in 6, MPZ mutation in 12 and Cx32 mutation in 14 patients. A total of 56 Japanese CMT1 patients with no identified mutations were screened for EGR2 mutation by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). We detected a heterozygous Asp383Tyr mutation of EGR2 in one patient with severe CMT1, Dejerine-Sottas syndrome. EGR2 mutation is rare cause of CMT1 in Japan as in other nations. We were unable to identify the responsible mutation in 55 of 128 CMT1 patients and need further analysis to identify their candidate genes. PMID:12736090

  14. Myelinating and demyelinating phenotype of Trembler-J mouse (a model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth human disease) analyzed by atomic force microscopy and confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Gonzalo; Negreira, Carlos; Sotelo, José R; Kun, Alejandra

    2012-05-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins is associated with various neurodegenerative conditions. Mutations in PMP-22 are associated with the human peripheral neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1A (CMT1A). PMP-22 is a short-lived 22 kDa glycoprotein, which plays a key role in the maintenance of myelin structure and compaction, highly expressed by Schwann cells. It forms aggregates when the proteasome is inhibited or the protein is mutated. This study reports the application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a detector of profound topographical and mechanical changes in Trembler-J mouse (CMT1A animal model). AFM images showed topographical differences in the extracellular matrix and basal lamina organization of Tr-J/+ nerve fibers. The immunocytochemical analysis indicated that PMP-22 protein is associated with type IV collagen (a basal lamina ubiquitous component) in the Tr-J/+ Schwann cell perinuclear region. Changes in mechanical properties of single myelinating Tr-J/+ nerve fibers were investigated, and alterations in cellular stiffness were found. These results might be associated with F-actin cytoskeleton organization in Tr-J/+ nerve fibers. AFM nanoscale imaging focused on topography and mechanical properties of peripheral nerve fibers might provide new insights into the study of peripheral nervous system diseases.

  15. Calcium kinetics in glycogen storage disease type 1a.

    PubMed

    Goans, R E; Weiss, G H; Vieira, N E; Sidbury, J B; Abrams, S A; Yergey, A L

    1996-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1a (Von Gierke's disease) is one of the more common glycogen storage diseases (GSD). GSD 1a patients can have severe idiopathic osteopenia, often beginning at a young age. Since calcium tracer studies offer a sensitive probe of the bone microenvironment and of calcium deposition, kinetics might be disturbed in patients with GSD 1a. Plasma dilution kinetics obtained using the stable isotope 42Ca are shown in this paper to be quite different between GSD 1a patients and age-matched controls. Comparison of kinetic parameters in these two populations is made using a new binding site model for describing calcium dynamics at the plasma-bone interface. This model describes reversible binding of calcium ions to postulated short-term and long-term sites by a retention probability density function psi (t). Using this analysis, adult GSD subjects exhibited a significant decrease (P = 0.023) in the apparent half-life of a calcium ion on the longer-term site compared with controls. The general theory of calcium tracer dilution kinetics is then discussed in terms of a new model of short-term calcium homeostasis recently proposed by Bronner and Stein [5]. PMID:8939770

  16. Biomarkers research in neuromuscular disease Charcot-Marie-Tooth.

    PubMed

    Seco-Cervera, Marta; Ibañez-Cabellos, Jose Santiago; Garcia-Gimenez, Jose Luis; Espinos, Carmen; Palau, Francesc; Pallardo, Federico V

    2014-10-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) (ORPHA166) is the most frequent hereditary neuropathy. CMT is a heterogeneous group of disorders which, despite some variability in their clinical features, share the same general phenotype, usually characterized by wasting and weakness of distal limb muscles, decreased to absent deep tendon reflexes, distal sensory loss, and frequent skeletal deformities. Despite the clinical and molecular description of this disease in the last 20 years, there is no effective drug or advanced therapy available. Here we have pretend the identification of metabolic and oxidative stress biomarkers in plasmas from patients with duplication at PMP22 gene, the most frequent mutation causing CMT, and clinically characterized as CMT1A. The samples were collected in the neuropathy units from "La Fe" Hospital of Valencia, "Bellvitge" Hospital of Barcelona, "La Paz" Hospital of Madrid, and "Virgen del Rocío" Hospital of Sevilla. The metabolic biomarkers research was performed using 2D-DIGE analysis (Typhoon TRIO, GE) and DeCyder software (GE). Protein identification was made by mass spectrometry by MALDI-TOF-TOF (ABSciex) and liquid Chromatography analysis (ABSciex). The oxidative stress biomarkers research consisted in carbonylated proteins analysis by reaction with DNPH and Dot-blot. Total antioxidant capacity and GSSG/GSH ratio were analyzed with Antioxidant Assay kit (Cayman) and Glutathione Fluorescent detection Kit (Arbor Assays), respectively. Finally now we are performing the MDA levels by HPLC-UV. We found 8, 13 and 36 proteins with differential expression in mild, moderate and severely affected patients, respectively compared with their own matched controls. Also we found differences on oxidative stress parameters between de different groups analyzed. Our results suggest differences in the oxidative stress profile between the studied phenotypes in CMT1A patients.

  17. Biomarkers research in neuromuscular disease Charcot-Marie-Tooth.

    PubMed

    Seco-Cervera, Marta; Ibañez-Cabellos, Jose Santiago; Garcia-Gimenez, Jose Luis; Espinos, Carmen; Palau, Francesc; Pallardo, Federico V

    2014-10-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) (ORPHA166) is the most frequent hereditary neuropathy. CMT is a heterogeneous group of disorders which, despite some variability in their clinical features, share the same general phenotype, usually characterized by wasting and weakness of distal limb muscles, decreased to absent deep tendon reflexes, distal sensory loss, and frequent skeletal deformities. Despite the clinical and molecular description of this disease in the last 20 years, there is no effective drug or advanced therapy available. Here we have pretend the identification of metabolic and oxidative stress biomarkers in plasmas from patients with duplication at PMP22 gene, the most frequent mutation causing CMT, and clinically characterized as CMT1A. The samples were collected in the neuropathy units from "La Fe" Hospital of Valencia, "Bellvitge" Hospital of Barcelona, "La Paz" Hospital of Madrid, and "Virgen del Rocío" Hospital of Sevilla. The metabolic biomarkers research was performed using 2D-DIGE analysis (Typhoon TRIO, GE) and DeCyder software (GE). Protein identification was made by mass spectrometry by MALDI-TOF-TOF (ABSciex) and liquid Chromatography analysis (ABSciex). The oxidative stress biomarkers research consisted in carbonylated proteins analysis by reaction with DNPH and Dot-blot. Total antioxidant capacity and GSSG/GSH ratio were analyzed with Antioxidant Assay kit (Cayman) and Glutathione Fluorescent detection Kit (Arbor Assays), respectively. Finally now we are performing the MDA levels by HPLC-UV. We found 8, 13 and 36 proteins with differential expression in mild, moderate and severely affected patients, respectively compared with their own matched controls. Also we found differences on oxidative stress parameters between de different groups analyzed. Our results suggest differences in the oxidative stress profile between the studied phenotypes in CMT1A patients. PMID:26461392

  18. Parkinson's disease and CYP1A2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, J T; Grünewald, R A; Rostami-Hodjegan, A; Lennard, M S; Sagar, H J; Tucker, G T

    2000-01-01

    Aims MPTP, a neurotoxin which induces parkinsonism is partially metabolized by the enzyme CYP1A2. Smoking appears to protect against Parkinson's disease (PD) and cigarette smoke induces CYP1A2 activity. Thus, we investigated the hypothesis that idiopathic PD is associated with lower CYP1A2 activity using caffeine as a probe compound. Methods CYP1A2 activity was assessed using saliva paraxanthine (PX) to caffeine (CA) ratios. Caffeine half-life was also estimated from salivary concentrations of caffeine at 2 and 5 h post dose. 117 treated and 40 untreated patients with PD and 105 healthy control subjects were studied. Results PX/CA ratios were 0.57, 0.93 and 0.77 in treated patients, untreated patients and healthy control subjects, respectively, with no significant differences between study groups (95% CI: treated patients vs controls −0.24, 0.57; untreated patients vs controls −0.75, 0.35). However, patients with PD (treated or untreated) had caffeine half-lives shorter than that in controls (treated patients: 262 min, untreated patients: 244 min, controls: 345 min; 95% CI: controls vs treated patients 23, 143 (P = 0.003); controls vs untreated patients 19, 184 (P = 0.011)). Amongst the patients with PD, caffeine half-life was also inversely related to the age of onset of disease (P = 0.012); gender and concomitant drugs did not influence this significantly. Conclusions Based on PX/CA ratio, there was no evidence of decreased CYP1A2 activity in patients compared with control subjects. The observed decrease in the elimination half-life of caffeine in PD may be caused by increased CYP2E1 activity, an enzyme that also contributes to the metabolism of caffeine. The latter warrants further investigation. PMID:11012552

  19. DYRK1A inhibition as potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Stotani, Silvia; Giordanetto, Fabrizio; Medda, Federico

    2016-04-01

    In total, 47,500,000 people worldwide are affected by dementia and this number is estimated to double by 2030 and triple within 2050 resulting in a huge burden on public health. Alzheimer's disease (AD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is the most common cause of dementia, accounting for 60-70% of all the cases. The cause of AD is still poorly understood but several brain abnormalities (e.g., loss of neuronal connections and neuronal death) have been identified in affected patients. In addition to the accumulation of β-amyloid plaques in the brain tissue, aberrant phosphorylation of tau proteins has proved to increase neuronal death. DYRK1A phosphorylates tau on 11 different Ser/Thr residues, resulting in the formation of aggregates called 'neurofibrillary tangles' which, together with amyloid plaques, could be responsible for dementia, neuronal degeneration and cell death. Small molecule inhibition of DYRK1A could thus represent an interesting approach toward the treatment of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. Herein we review the current progress in the identification and development of DYRK1A inhibitors. PMID:27073990

  20. [Therapy for Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease: From the Standpoint of Neurologists].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    To date, there is no approved pharmacologic treatment for any form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). However, some clinical or preclinical trials for CMT1A have been undertaken, for example Neurotrophin-3, PXT3003, and neuregulin-1. Gene therapy for CMT1X, CMT2F and Giant axonal neuropathy using animal model or culture cells have been reported with some interesting results. Stem cell research for example iPS cells derived from patients with CMT2A or CMT2E, is being conducted to clarify the mechanism of CMT and find therapeutic clues. The development of new surrogate markers for clinical trials is also needed. Additionally, steps should be taken to improve the quality of life of patients with CMT, including pain control and life style enhancement.

  1. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Sivera, Rafael; Vílchez, Juan Jesús; Martínez-Rubio, Dolores; Chumillas, María José; Vázquez, Juan Francisco; Muelas, Nuria; Bataller, Luis; Millán, José María; Palau, Fancesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the genetic distribution and the phenotypic correlation of an extensive series of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in a geographically well-defined Mediterranean area. Methods: A thorough genetic screening, including most of the known genes involved in this disease, was performed and analyzed in this longitudinal descriptive study. Clinical data were analyzed and compared among the genetic subgroups. Results: Molecular diagnosis was accomplished in 365 of 438 patients (83.3%), with a higher success rate in demyelinating forms of the disease. The CMT1A duplication (PMP22 gene) was the most frequent genetic diagnosis (50.4%), followed by mutations in the GJB1 gene (15.3%), and in the GDAP1 gene (11.5%). Mutations in 13 other genes were identified, but were much less frequent. Sixteen novel mutations were detected and characterized phenotypically. Conclusions: The relatively high frequency of GDAP1 mutations, coupled with the scarceness of MFN2 mutations (1.1%) and the high proportion of recessive inheritance (11.6%) in this series exemplify the particularity of the genetic distribution of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in this region. PMID:24078732

  2. Myelin protein zero gene sequencing diagnoses Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1B disease

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.; Zhang, H.; Madrid, R.

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most common genetic neuropathy, affects about 1 in 2600 people in Norway and is found worldwide. CMT Type 1 (CMT1) has slow nerve conduction with demyelinated Schwann cells. Autosomal dominant CMT Type 1B (CMT1B) results from mutations in the myelin protein zero gene which directs the synthesis of more than half of all Schwann cell protein. This gene was mapped to the chromosome 1q22-1q23.1 borderline by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The first 7 of 7 reported CMT1B mutations are unique. Thus the most effective means to identify CMT1B mutations in at-risk family members and fetuses is to sequence the entire coding sequence in dominant or sporadic CMT patients without the CMT1A duplication. Of the 19 primers used in 16 pars to uniquely amplify the entire MPZ coding sequence, 6 primer pairs were used to amplify and sequence the 6 exons. The DyeDeoxy Terminator cycle sequencing method used with four different color fluorescent lables was superior to manual sequencing because it sequences more bases unambiguously from extracted genomic DNA samples within 24 hours. This protocol was used to test 28 CMT and Dejerine-Sottas patients without CMT1A gene duplication. Sequencing MPZ gene-specific amplified fragments identified 9 polymorphic sites within the 6 exons that encode the 248 amino acid MPZ protein. The large number of major CMT1B mutations identified by single strand sequencing are being verified by reverse strand sequencing and when possible, by restriction enzyme analysis. This protocol can be used to distringuish CMT1B patients from othre CMT phenotypes and to determine the CMT1B status of relatives both presymptomatically and prenatally.

  3. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy 1A - evidence for “double trouble” overlapping syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We report on a patient with genetically confirmed overlapping diagnoses of CMT1A and FSHD. This case adds to the increasing number of unique patients presenting with atypical phenotypes, particularly in FSHD. Even if a mutation in one disease gene has been found, further genetic testing might be warranted in cases with unusual clinical presentation. Case presentation The reported 53 years old male patient suffered from walking difficulties and foot deformities first noticed at age 20. Later on, he developed scapuloperoneal and truncal muscle weakness, along with atrophy of the intrinsic hand and foot muscles, pes cavus, claw toes and a distal symmetric hypoesthesia. Motor nerve conduction velocities were reduced to 20 m/s in the upper extremities, and not educible in the lower extremities, sensory nerve conduction velocities were not attainable. Electromyography showed both, myopathic and neurogenic changes. A muscle biopsy taken from the tibialis anterior muscle showed a mild myopathy with some neurogenic findings and hypertrophic type 1 fibers. Whole-body muscle MRI revealed severe changes in the lower leg muscles, tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles were highly replaced by fatty tissue. Additionally, fatty degeneration of shoulder girdle and straight back muscles, and atrophy of dorsal upper leg muscles were seen. Taken together, the presenting features suggested both, a neuropathy and a myopathy. Patient’s family history suggested an autosomal dominant inheritance. Molecular testing revealed both, a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type 1A (HMSN1A, also called Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy 1A, CMT1A) due to a PMP22 gene duplication and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) due to a partial deletion of the D4Z4 locus (19 kb). Conclusion Molecular testing in hereditary neuromuscular disorders has led to the identification of an increasing number of atypical phenotypes. Nevertheless, finding the right diagnosis is crucial

  4. [The level of circulating PGC1a in cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Zhloba, A A; Subbotina, T F; Alekseevskaya, E S; Moiseeva, O M; Gavrilyuk, N D; Irtyuga, O B

    2016-01-01

    The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC1α) in human blood plasma was investigated. Samples of healthy individuals (n=34) and patients with cardiovascular diseases (n=110), including aortic aneurysm (n=69), aortic stenosis (n=25) and patients without aortic pathologies were analyzed. In patients the PGC1α concentration was higher than that in healthy persons, and tended to decrease with age. Elevated concentrations of lactic acid, total homocysteine and asymmetric dimethylarginine in the blood of patients suggested a parallel development of endothelial and secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. However, concentrations of lactic and pyruvic acids exceeding reference limit were associated with the decrease in the PGC1α level. PMID:27143380

  5. TRPV1: A Potential Drug Target for Treating Various Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Rafael; Sheth, Sandeep; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel present on sensory neurons which is activated by heat, protons, capsaicin and a variety of endogenous lipids termed endovanilloids. As such, TRPV1 serves as a multimodal sensor of noxious stimuli which could trigger counteractive measures to avoid pain and injury. Activation of TRPV1 has been linked to chronic inflammatory pain conditions and peripheral neuropathy, as observed in diabetes. Expression of TRPV1 is also observed in non-neuronal sites such as the epithelium of bladder and lungs and in hair cells of the cochlea. At these sites, activation of TRPV1 has been implicated in the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystitis, asthma and hearing loss. Therefore, drugs which could modulate TRPV1 channel activity could be useful for the treatment of conditions ranging from chronic pain to hearing loss. This review describes the roles of TRPV1 in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of selected organs of the body and highlights how drugs targeting this channel could be important clinically. PMID:24861977

  6. The TNF-family cytokine TL1A: from lymphocyte costimulator to disease co-conspirator

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Arianne C.; Ferdinand, John R.; Meylan, Françoise; Hayes, Erika T.; Gabay, Odile; Siegel, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Originally described in 2002 as a T cell-costimulatory cytokine, the tumor necrosis factor family member TNF-like factor 1A (TL1A), encoded by the TNFSF15 gene, has since been found to affect multiple cell lineages through its receptor, death receptor 3 (DR3, encoded by TNFRSF25) with distinct cell-type effects. Genetic deficiency or blockade of TL1A-DR3 has defined a number of disease states that depend on this cytokine-receptor pair, whereas excess TL1A leads to allergic gastrointestinal inflammation through stimulation of group 2 innate lymphoid cells. Noncoding variants in the TL1A locus are associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease and leprosy, predicting that the level of TL1A expression may influence host defense and the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26188076

  7. The Role of TL1A and DR3 in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Aiba, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    TNF-like ligand 1A (TL1A), which binds its cognate receptor DR3 and the decoy receptor DcR3, is an identified member of the TNF superfamily. TL1A exerts pleiotropic effects on cell proliferation, activation, and differentiation of immune cells, including helper T cells and regulatory T cells. TL1A and its two receptors expression is increased in both serum and inflamed tissues in autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Polymorphisms of the TNFSF15 gene that encodes TL1A are associated with the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome, leprosy, and autoimmune diseases, including IBD, AS, and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). In mice, blocking of TL1A-DR3 interaction by either antagonistic antibodies or deletion of the DR3 gene attenuates the severity of multiple autoimmune diseases, whereas sustained TL1A expression on T cells or dendritic cells induces IL-13-dependent small intestinal inflammation. This suggests that modulation of TL1A-DR3 interaction may be a potential therapeutic target in several autoimmune diseases, including IBD, RA, AS, and PBC. PMID:24453414

  8. [Nerve ultrasound is useful for the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases].

    PubMed

    Noto, Yu-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasound allowed for more detailed morphological assessment peripheral nerves and muscles. It is important to elucidate ultrasound features of peripheral nerves or muscles in various neuromuscular diseases because ultrasound is a widely used, non-invasive and easily accessible diagnostic tool. We attempted to demonstrate characteristic findings of nerve ultrasound in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Cervical radiculopathy. In patients with CMT1A, cross sectional areas (CSAs) of all the nerves we examined were significantly larger than those in normal controls. Additionally, median nerve CSA had positive correlation with CMT neuropathy score, and negative correlation with nerve conduction velocity. In patients with ALS, increased CSA forearm/upper arm ratio of the median nerve was a characteristic finding to support the diagnosis. In patients with cervical radiculopathy, we could observe that decreased CSA and diameter of the nerve root corresponding to the findings of MRI and electromyography. These results demonstrate that the combination of electrophysiological study, diagnostic imaging, and nerve ultrasound could lead to accurate diagnosis of various neuromuscular diseases.

  9. Neuromuscular Hip Dysplasia in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 1A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamford, Nigel S.; White, Klane K.; Robinett, Stephanie A.; Otto, Randolph K.; Gospe, Sidney M., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is one of the most common inherited neurological disorders, affecting 36 in 100,000 people. CMT type 1A (hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy) is the most frequent form of this disease, affecting 60 to 80% of the CMT population, but its diagnosis may be delayed because of inconsistent clinical signs and…

  10. [Ultrasound diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease].

    PubMed

    Noto, Yu-ichi

    2014-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases with over 45 different causative gene mutations identified. Nerve conduction studies are important for the classification and diagnosis of CMT, whereas ultrasound (US) is increasingly used to assess the peripheral nerves of patients with CMT, as a complement to neurophysiological studies. Recent ultrasound assessment reports of peripheral nerves in CMT are summarized here. An ultrasound finding of CMT1A, which is the most common demyelinating subtype of CMT, is characterized by uniform enlargement of peripheral nerves and nerve roots. Patients with CMT1B (MPZ mutation) also have larger nerves than normal subjects do. Peripheral nerves of patients with CMT2, which is an axonal type of CMT, are slightly larger than those of normal subjects. Focal enlargement of nerves at entrapment sites is a characteristic US finding of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy. US findings of CMT are thus subtype-specific. Therefore, the assessment of nerve US may become a useful supporting tool for the diagnosis of CMT subtypes.

  11. Amount and intensity of daily living activities in Charcot–Marie–Tooth 1A patients

    PubMed Central

    Menotti, Federica; Laudani, Luca; Damiani, Antonello; Macaluso, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background Charcot–Marie–Tooth 1A (CMT1A) patients show a reduction of spontaneous activities of daily living measured by means of questionnaires or pedometers, which are quite inaccurate compared to recent measurement techniques. Aim The study aimed at quantifying daily living activities in CMT1A patients by means of inertial sensors, which give information not only on the amount but also on the intensity of these activities. Materials and methods Time and count (amount), and velocity and power (intensity) of 24 h daily living activities were measured in eight patients (20–48 years; Barthel >90; Tinetti >20) and eight healthy individuals, matched for age and gender, by means of a wearable inertial sensor device. Results There were no differences between patients and controls in the 24-h distance covered and count of steps. However, count of step climbing and sit to stand were lower in patients than in controls (139.93 ± 141.66 vs. 341.06 ± 164.07 n and 58.23 ± 7.82 vs. 65.81 ± 4.75 n, respectively; P < 0.05) as well as mean daily step-climbing and walking velocities (1.07 ± 0.17 vs. 1.21 ± 0.10 m/sec and 1.16 ± 0.31 vs. 1.87 ± 0.50 m/sec, respectively; P < 0.05). In CMT1A patients there was a positive correlation between strength of the knee extensor muscles and both count of steps climbed (R = 0.80) and sit to stand (R = 0.79). Discussion and conclusion The reduced ability of CMT1A patients to carry out activities at high intensity, which was correlated with strength, suggests that strength training might be a rehabilitation tool for improving the 1 ability to carry out these activities. PMID:24653950

  12. UGT1A1 variation and gallstone formation in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Haverfield, Eden V; McKenzie, Colin A; Forrester, Terrence; Bouzekri, Nourdine; Harding, Rosalind; Serjeant, Graham; Walker, Thomas; Peto, Tim E A; Ward, Ryk; Weatherall, David J

    2005-02-01

    Pigment gallstones are a common clinical complication of sickle cell (SS) disease. Genetic variation in the promoter of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) underlies Gilbert syndrome, a chronic form of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia, and appears to be a risk factor for gallstone formation. We investigated the association between UGT1A1 (TA)(n) genotype, hyperbilirubinemia, and gallstones in a sample of Jamaicans with SS disease. Subjects were from the Jamaican Sickle Cell Cohort Study (cohort sample, n = 209) and the Sickle Cell Clinic at the University of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica (clinic sample, n = 357). The UGT1A1 (TA)(n) promoter region was sequenced in 541 SS disease subjects and 111 healthy controls (control sample). Indirect bilirubin levels for (TA)(7)/(TA)(7) and (TA)(7)/(TA)(8) genotypes were elevated compared with (TA)(6)/(TA)(6) (clinic sample, P < 10(-5); cohort sample, P < 10(-3)). The (TA)(7)/(TA)(7) genotype was also associated with symptomatic presentation and gallstones in the clinic sample (odds ratio [OR] = 11.3; P = 7.0 x 10(-4)) but not in the younger cohort sample. These unexpected findings indicate that the temporal evolution of symptomatic gallstones may involve factors other than the bilirubin level. Although further studies of the pathogenesis of gallstones in SS disease are required, the (TA)(7)/(TA)(7) genotype may be a risk factor for symptomatic gallstones in older people with SS disease.

  13. Plasma DYRK1A as a novel risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Janel, N; Sarazin, M; Corlier, F; Corne, H; de Souza, L C; Hamelin, L; Aka, A; Lagarde, J; Blehaut, H; Hindié, V; Rain, J-C; Arbones, M L; Dubois, B; Potier, M C; Bottlaender, M; Delabar, J M

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether apparent involvement of DYRK1A in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology makes it a candidate plasma biomarker for diagnosis, we developed a method to quantify plasma DYRK1A by immunoblot in transgenic mouse models having different gene dosages of Dyrk1a, and, consequently, different relative protein expression. Then, we measured plasma DYRK1A levels in 26 patients with biologically confirmed AD and 25 controls (negative amyloid imaging available on 13). DYRK1A was detected in transgenic mouse brain and plasma samples, and relative levels of DYRK1A correlated with the gene copy number. In plasma from AD patients, DYRK1A levels were significantly lower compared with controls (P<0.0001). Results were similar when we compared AD patients with the subgroup of controls confirmed by negative amyloid imaging. In a subgroup of patients with early AD (CDR=0.5), lower DYRK1A expression was confirmed. In contrast, no difference was found in levels of DYRK1B, the closest relative of DYRK1A, between AD patients and controls. Further, AD patients exhibited a positive correlation between plasma DYRK1A levels and cerebrospinal fluid tau and phosphorylated-tau proteins, but no correlation with amyloid-β42 levels and Pittsburgh compound B cortical binding. DYRK1A levels detected in lymphoblastoid cell lines from AD patients were also lower when compared with cells from age-matched controls. These findings suggest that reduced DYRK1A expression might be a novel plasma risk factor for AD. PMID:25116835

  14. PKA regulatory subunit 1A inactivating mutation induces serotonin signaling in primary pigmented nodular adrenal disease

    PubMed Central

    Bram, Zakariae; Louiset, Estelle; Renouf, Sylvie; Duparc, Céline; Boutelet, Isabelle; Rizk-Rabin, Marthe; Libé, Rossella; Young, Jacques; Carson, Dennis; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Szarek, Eva; Martinez, Antoine; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Bertherat, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) is a rare cause of ACTH-independent hypercortisolism. The disease is primarily caused by germline mutations of the protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunit 1A (PRKAR1A) gene, which induces constitutive activation of PKA in adrenocortical cells. Hypercortisolism is thought to result from PKA hyperactivity, but PPNAD tissues exhibit features of neuroendocrine differentiation, which may lead to stimulation of steroidogenesis by abnormally expressed neurotransmitters. We hypothesized that serotonin (5-HT) may participate in the pathophysiology of PPNAD-associated hypercortisolism. We show that PPNAD tissues overexpress the 5-HT synthesizing enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase type 2 (Tph2) and the serotonin receptors types 4, 6, and 7, leading to formation of an illicit stimulatory serotonergic loop whose pharmacological inhibition in vitro decreases cortisol production. In the human PPNAD cell line CAR47, the PKA inhibitor H-89 decreases 5-HT4 and 5-HT7 receptor expression. Moreover, in the human adrenocortical cell line H295R, inhibition of PRKAR1A expression increases the expression of Tph2 and 5-HT4/6/7 receptors, an effect that is blocked by H-89. These findings show that the serotonergic process observed in PPNAD tissues results from PKA activation by PRKAR1A mutations. They also suggest that Tph inhibitors may represent efficient treatments of hypercortisolism in patients with PPNAD.

  15. PKA regulatory subunit 1A inactivating mutation induces serotonin signaling in primary pigmented nodular adrenal disease

    PubMed Central

    Bram, Zakariae; Louiset, Estelle; Renouf, Sylvie; Duparc, Céline; Boutelet, Isabelle; Rizk-Rabin, Marthe; Libé, Rossella; Young, Jacques; Carson, Dennis; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Szarek, Eva; Martinez, Antoine; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Bertherat, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) is a rare cause of ACTH-independent hypercortisolism. The disease is primarily caused by germline mutations of the protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunit 1A (PRKAR1A) gene, which induces constitutive activation of PKA in adrenocortical cells. Hypercortisolism is thought to result from PKA hyperactivity, but PPNAD tissues exhibit features of neuroendocrine differentiation, which may lead to stimulation of steroidogenesis by abnormally expressed neurotransmitters. We hypothesized that serotonin (5-HT) may participate in the pathophysiology of PPNAD-associated hypercortisolism. We show that PPNAD tissues overexpress the 5-HT synthesizing enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase type 2 (Tph2) and the serotonin receptors types 4, 6, and 7, leading to formation of an illicit stimulatory serotonergic loop whose pharmacological inhibition in vitro decreases cortisol production. In the human PPNAD cell line CAR47, the PKA inhibitor H-89 decreases 5-HT4 and 5-HT7 receptor expression. Moreover, in the human adrenocortical cell line H295R, inhibition of PRKAR1A expression increases the expression of Tph2 and 5-HT4/6/7 receptors, an effect that is blocked by H-89. These findings show that the serotonergic process observed in PPNAD tissues results from PKA activation by PRKAR1A mutations. They also suggest that Tph inhibitors may represent efficient treatments of hypercortisolism in patients with PPNAD. PMID:27699247

  16. [Association of polymorph variants of CYP1A2 and CYP1A1 genes with reproductive and thyroid diseases in female workers of petrochemical industry].

    PubMed

    Irmiakova, A R; Kochetova, O V; Gaĭnullina, M K; Sivochalova, O V; Viktorova, T V

    2012-01-01

    The article presents results obtained in study of relationship between polymorph variants of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 genes with reproductive and thyroid diseases risk in female workers of petrochemical industry, when compared with reference group females. Variants TD and DD of CYP1A2 gene appeared to be associated with nodes formation in uterus and breast in female workers and reference group females. Following liability markers are obtained: homozygous in rare allele genotype CC of CYP1A1 gene for reproductive and thyroid diseaes (fibrous cystic mastopathy and nodular goitre), heterozygous genotype AG of CYP1A1 gene in uterine myoma and fibrous cystic mastopathy, homozygous in deleted T genotype of CYP1A2 gene in autoimmune thyroiditis. Occupational hazards and long length of service at hazardous industries increase effects of rare alleles of the genes studied.

  17. Occurrence of Optic Neuritis and Cervical Cord Schwannoma with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 4B1 Disease.

    PubMed

    Scott, Patrick; Bruwer, Zandre; Al-Kharusi, Khalsa; Meftah, Douja; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya

    2016-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 4B1 (CMT4B1) disease is a rare subtype of CMT4 with reported association of facial weakness, vocal cord paresis, chest deformities, and claw hands. We report the unusual occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in a male individual with confirmed CMT4B1 disease. Sequencing of the MTMR2 gene revealed a novel nonsense homozygous mutation c.1768C>T (p.Gln590*). The mutation was identified in affected relatives of the proband and a second, apparently unrelated, family. The rare association of optic neuritis or schwannoma with genetically confirmed CMT1A has been individually observed, but never with recessive CMT. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in the same patient has never been reported with any form of CMT including CMT4B1. In similar cases, we recommend immediate medical attention to rule out the possibility of schwannomas in patients with all demyelinating CMT subtypes in case of the development of focal neurological signs or acute worsening of clinical status.

  18. Occurrence of Optic Neuritis and Cervical Cord Schwannoma with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 4B1 Disease

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Patrick; Bruwer, Zandre; Al-Kharusi, Khalsa; Meftah, Douja; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 4B1 (CMT4B1) disease is a rare subtype of CMT4 with reported association of facial weakness, vocal cord paresis, chest deformities, and claw hands. We report the unusual occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in a male individual with confirmed CMT4B1 disease. Sequencing of the MTMR2 gene revealed a novel nonsense homozygous mutation c.1768C>T (p.Gln590*). The mutation was identified in affected relatives of the proband and a second, apparently unrelated, family. The rare association of optic neuritis or schwannoma with genetically confirmed CMT1A has been individually observed, but never with recessive CMT. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of optic neuritis and cervical cord schwannoma in the same patient has never been reported with any form of CMT including CMT4B1. In similar cases, we recommend immediate medical attention to rule out the possibility of schwannomas in patients with all demyelinating CMT subtypes in case of the development of focal neurological signs or acute worsening of clinical status. PMID:27162595

  19. Mutation screening of mitofusin 2 in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2

    PubMed Central

    McCorquodale, Donald S.; Montenegro, Gladys; Peguero, Ainsley; Carlson, Nicole; Speziani, Fiorella; Price, Justin; Taylor, Sean W.; Melanson, Michel; Vance, Jeffery M.

    2011-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is among the most common inherited neurological disorders. Mutations in the gene mitofusin 2 (MFN2) cause the axonal subtype CMT2A, which has also been shown to be associated with optic atrophy, clinical signs of first motor neuron involvement, and early onset stroke. Mutations in MFN2 account for up to 20–30% of all axonal CMT type 2 cases. To further investigate the prevalence of MFN2 mutations and to add to the genotypic spectrum, we sequenced all exons of MFN2 in a cohort of 39 CMT2 patients. We identified seven variants, four of which are novel. One previously described change was co-inherited with a PMP22 duplication, which itself causes the demyelinating form CMT1A. Another mutation was a novel in frame deletion, which is a rare occurrence in the genotypic spectrum of MFN2 characterized mainly by missense mutations. Our results confirm a MFN2 mutation rate of ~ 15–20% in CMT2. PMID:21258814

  20. Cyclin D1, a novel molecular marker of minimal residual disease, in metastatic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Irene Y; Feng, Yi; Vickers, Andrew; Gerald, William; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2007-04-01

    Accurate monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) is critical for the management of metastatic neuroblastoma (NB). We evaluated cyclin D1 (CCND1), a cell-cycle control gene, as a novel MRD marker of NB. Using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, we studied CCND1 expression in 133 solid tumors of different histological types, including 39 NB tumors, and examined its potential clinical utility as an early response marker in the bone marrows before and after treatment of 118 stage 4 patients enrolled after induction chemotherapy in an immunotherapy protocol. Based on 40 normal marrow and peripheral blood samples, a CCND1 transcript value greater than the mean + 2 SD was defined as positive. Sensitivity of this assay was one NB cell in 10(6) normal mononuclear cells. CCND1 transcript levels were high in NB, breast cancer, and Ewing family tumors. Among the NB patients evaluated, early (2.5 months from protocol entry) marrow response was strongly associated with both progression-free (P=0.0001) and overall survival (P=0.0006). CCND1 response remained predictive of survival among a subset of 66 patients who had no histological evidence of marrow disease before immunotherapy. We conclude that CCND1 has potential clinical utility as a novel molecular marker of MRD in the bone marrow of patients with metastatic NB.

  1. ALDH1A2 (RALDH2) genetic variation in human congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Signaling by the vitamin A-derived morphogen retinoic acid (RA) is required at multiple steps of cardiac development. Since conversion of retinaldehyde to RA by retinaldehyde dehydrogenase type II (ALDH1A2, a.k.a RALDH2) is critical for cardiac development, we screened patients with congenital heart disease (CHDs) for genetic variation at the ALDH1A2 locus. Methods One-hundred and thirty-three CHD patients were screened for genetic variation at the ALDH1A2 locus through bi-directional sequencing. In addition, six SNPs (rs2704188, rs1441815, rs3784259, rs1530293, rs1899430) at the same locus were studied using a TDT-based association approach in 101 CHD trios. Observed mutations were modeled through molecular mechanics (MM) simulations using the AMBER 9 package, Sander and Pmemd programs. Sequence conservation of observed mutations was evaluated through phylogenetic tree construction from ungapped alignments containing ALDH8 s, ALDH1Ls, ALDH1 s and ALDH2 s. Trees were generated by the Neighbor Joining method. Variations potentially affecting splicing mechanisms were cloned and functional assays were designed to test splicing alterations using the pSPL3 splicing assay. Results We describe in Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) the mutations Ala151Ser and Ile157Thr that change non-polar to polar residues at exon 4. Exon 4 encodes part of the highly-conserved tetramerization domain, a structural motif required for ALDH oligomerization. Molecular mechanics simulation studies of the two mutations indicate that they hinder tetramerization. We determined that the SNP rs16939660, previously associated with spina bifida and observed in patients with TOF, does not affect splicing. Moreover, association studies performed with classical models and with the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) design using single marker genotype, or haplotype information do not show differences between cases and controls. Conclusion In summary, our screen indicates that ALDH1A2 genetic

  2. Human CDC2-like kinase 1 (CLK1): a novel target for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jain, Princi; Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Moorthy, N S Hari Narayana; Waiker, Digambar Kumar; Jain, Arvind Kumar; Trivedi, Piyush

    2014-05-01

    The cdc2-like kinases (CLKs) are an evolutionarily conserved group of dual specificity kinases belonging to the CMGC (cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAP kinases), glycogen synthase kinases (GSK) and CDK-like kinases). The CLK family consists of four isoforms namely CLK1, CLK2, CLK3 and CLK4. The human CLK1 encoded protein comprises 454 amino acids and the catalytic domain of CLK1 exhibits the typical protein kinase fold. CLK1 has been shown to autophosphorylate on serine, threonine and tyrosine residues and phosphorylate exogenous substrates on serine and threonine residues. CLK1 plays an important role in the regulation of RNA splicing through phosphorylation of members of the serine and arginine-rich (SR) family of splicing factors. CLK1 is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease by phosphorylating the serine residue in SR proteins. Nuclear speckles of the nucleoplasm contain the stored form of SR proteins and are moderately responsible for the choice of splicing sites during pre-mRNA splicing. Hence, the inhibition of CLK1 can be used as a therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease. Many natural and synthetic molecules are reported to possess CLK1 inhibitory activity. Some specific examples are Marine alkaloid Leucettamine B and KH-CB19. Leucettamine B is a potent inhibitor of CLK1 (15 nM), Dyrk1A (40 nM), and Dyrk2 (35 nM) and a moderate inhibitor of CLK3 (4.5 µM) whereas KH-CB19 is a highly specific and potent inhibitor of the CLK1/CLK4. X-ray crystallographic studies have revealed the binding mode of marine sponge metabolite hymenialdisine and a dichloroindolyl enamino nitrile (KH-CB19) to CLK1. This review focuses on the role of CLKs in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease and therapeutic potential of targeting CLK1 in Alzheimer's disease drug discovery and development. In addition, the recent developments in drug discovery efforts targeting human CLK1 are also highlighted. PMID:24568585

  3. Evaluation of Presumably Disease Causing SCN1A Variants in a Cohort of Common Epilepsy Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    May, Patrick; Thiele, Holger; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Schwarz, Günter; Riesch, Erik; Ikram, M. Arfan; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Steinböck, Hannelore; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Neophytou, Birgit; Zara, Federico; Hahn, Andreas; Gormley, Padhraig; Becker, Felicitas; Weber, Yvonne G.; Cilio, Maria Roberta; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Krause, Roland; Zimprich, Fritz; Lemke, Johannes R.; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas; Lerche, Holger; Neubauer, Bernd A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The SCN1A gene, coding for the voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha subunit NaV1.1, is the clinically most relevant epilepsy gene. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are generating an ever-increasing catalogue of SCN1A variants. Variants are more likely to be classified as pathogenic if they have already been identified previously in a patient with epilepsy. Here, we critically re-evaluate the pathogenicity of this class of variants in a cohort of patients with common epilepsy syndromes and subsequently ask whether a significant fraction of benign variants have been misclassified as pathogenic. Methods We screened a discovery cohort of 448 patients with a broad range of common genetic epilepsies and 734 controls for previously reported SCN1A mutations that were assumed to be disease causing. We re-evaluated the evidence for pathogenicity of the identified variants using in silico predictions, segregation, original reports, available functional data and assessment of allele frequencies in healthy individuals as well as in a follow up cohort of 777 patients. Results and Interpretation We identified 8 known missense mutations, previously reported as pathogenic, in a total of 17 unrelated epilepsy patients (17/448; 3.80%). Our re-evaluation indicates that 7 out of these 8 variants (p.R27T; p.R28C; p.R542Q; p.R604H; p.T1250M; p.E1308D; p.R1928G; NP_001159435.1) are not pathogenic. Only the p.T1174S mutation may be considered as a genetic risk factor for epilepsy of small effect size based on the enrichment in patients (P = 6.60 x 10−4; OR = 0.32, fishers exact test), previous functional studies but incomplete penetrance. Thus, incorporation of previous studies in genetic counseling of SCN1A sequencing results is challenging and may produce incorrect conclusions. PMID:26990884

  4. Shortened internodal length of dermal myelinated nerve fibres in Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease type 1A

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Katona, Istvan; Lewis, Richard A.; Masse, Stacey; Shy, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is the most common inherited neuropathy and is caused by duplication of chromosome 17p11.2 containing the peripheral myelin protein-22 gene. This disease is characterized by uniform slowing of conduction velocities and secondary axonal loss, which are in contrast with non-uniform slowing of conduction velocities in acquired demyelinating disorders, such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Mechanisms responsible for the slowed conduction velocities and axonal loss in Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease type 1A are poorly understood, in part because of the difficulty in obtaining nerve samples from patients, due to the invasive nature of nerve biopsies. We have utilized glabrous skin biopsies, a minimally invasive procedure, to evaluate these issues systematically in patients with Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (n = 32), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (n = 4) and healthy controls (n = 12). Morphology and molecular architecture of dermal myelinated nerve fibres were examined using immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Internodal length was uniformly shortened in patients with Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease type 1A, compared with those in normal controls (P < 0.0001). Segmental demyelination was absent in the Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease type 1A group, but identifiable in all patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Axonal loss was measurable using the density of Meissner corpuscles and associated with an accumulation of intra-axonal mitochondria. Our study demonstrates that skin biopsy can reveal pathological and molecular architectural changes that distinguish inherited from acquired demyelinating neuropathies. Uniformly shortened internodal length in Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease type 1A suggests a potential developmental defect of internodal lengthening. Intra-axonal accumulation of mitochondria provides new insights into the

  5. Microbial induction of inflammatory bowel disease associated gene TL1A (TNFSF15) in antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Shih, David Q; Kwan, Lola Y; Chavez, Valerie; Cohavy, Offer; Gonsky, Rivkah; Chang, Elmer Y; Chang, Christopher; Elson, Charles O; Targan, Stephan R

    2009-11-01

    TL1A is a member of the TNF superfamily and its expression is increased in the mucosa of inflammatory bowel disease patients. Neutralizing anti-mouse TL1A Ab attenuates chronic colitis in two T-cell driven murine models, suggesting that TL1A is a central modulator of gut mucosal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. We showed previously that TL1A is induced by immune complexes via the Fc gamma R signaling pathway. In this study, we report that multiple bacteria, including gram negative organisms (E. coli, E. coli Nissle 1917, Salmonella typhimurium), gram positive organisms (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus epidermidis), partial anaerobes (Campylobacter jejuni), and obligate anaerobes (Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bifidobacterium breve, Clostridium A4) activate TL1A expression in human APC, including monocytes and monocyte-derived DC. Bacterially induced TL1A mRNA expression correlates with the detection of TL1A protein levels. TL1A induced by bacteria is mediated in part by the TLR signaling pathway and inhibited by downstream blockade of p38 MAPK and NF-kappaB activation. Microbial induction of TL1A production by human APC potentiated CD4(+) T-cell effector function by augmenting IFN-gamma production. Our findings suggest a role for TL1A in pro-inflammatory APC-T cell interactions and implicate TL1A in host responses to enteric microorganisms.

  6. The influence of somatosensory and muscular deficits on postural stabilization: Insights from an instrumented analysis of subjects affected by different types of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Tiziana; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Rabuffetti, Marco; Bovi, Gabriele; Calabrese, Daniela; Aiello, Alessia; Di Sipio, Enrica; Padua, Luca; Diverio, Manuela; Pareyson, Davide; Ferrarin, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common hereditary neuromuscular disorder. CMT1 is primarily demyelinating, CMT2 is primarily axonal, and CMTX1 is characterized by both axonal and demyelinating abnormalities. We investigated the role of somatosensory and muscular deficits on quiet standing and postural stabilization in patients affected by different forms of CMT, comparing their performances with those of healthy subjects. Seventy-six CMT subjects (CMT1A, CMT2 and CMTX1) and 41 healthy controls were evaluated during a sit-to-stand transition and the subsequent quiet upright posture by means of a dynamometric platform. All CMT patients showed altered balance and postural stabilization compared to controls. Multivariate analysis showed that in CMT patients worsening of postural stabilization was related to vibration sense deficit and to dorsi-flexor's weakness, while quiet standing instability was related to the reduction of pinprick sensibility and to plantar-flexor's weakness. Our results show that specific sensory and muscular deficits play different roles in balance impairment of CMT patients, both during postural stabilization and in static posture. An accurate evaluation of residual sensory and muscular functions is therefore necessary to plan for the appropriate balance rehabilitation treatment for each patient, besides the CMT type.

  7. The adenine nucleotide translocase type 1 (ANT1): a new factor in mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Sharer, J Daniel

    2005-09-01

    Mitochondrial disorders of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) comprise a growing list of potentially lethal diseases caused by mutations in either mitochondrial (mtDNA) or nuclear DNA (nDNA). Two such conditions, autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) and Senger's Syndrome, are associated with dysfunction of the heart and muscle-specific isoform of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT1), a nDNA gene product that facilitates transport of ATP and ADP across the inner mitochondrial membrane. AdPEO is a mtDNA deletion disorder broadly characterized by pathology involving the eyes, skeletal muscle, and central nervous system. In addition to ANT1, mutations in at least two other nuclear genes, twinkle and POLG, have been shown to cause mtDNA destabilization associated with adPEO. Senger's syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by congenital heart defects, abnormalities of skeletal muscle mitochondria, cataracts, and elevated circulatory levels of lactic acid. This syndrome is associated with severe depletion of ANT1, which may be the result of an as yet unidentified ANT1-specific transcriptional or translational processing error. ANT1 has also been associated with a third condition, autosomal dominant facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), an adult onset disorder characterized by variable muscle weakness in the face, feet, shoulders, and hips. FSHD patients possess specific DNA deletions on chromosome 4, which appear to cause derepression of several nearby genes, including ANT1. Early development of FSHD may involve mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress, possibly associated with overexpression of ANT1. PMID:16203679

  8. Disease-specificity of autoantibodies to cytosolic 5’-nucleotidase 1A in sporadic inclusion body myositis versus known autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Megan K; Stammen-Vogelzangs, Judith; Verbeek, Marcel M; Rietveld, Anke; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Chinoy, Hector; Lamb, Janine A; Cooper, Robert G; Roberts, Mark; Badrising, Umesh A; De Bleecker, Jan L; Machado, Pedro M; Hanna, Michael G; Plestilova, Lenka; Vencovsky, Jiri; van Engelen, Baziel G; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The diagnosis of inclusion body myositis (IBM) can be challenging as it can be difficult to clinically distinguish from other forms of myositis, particularly polymyositis (PM). Recent studies have shown frequent presence of autoantibodies directed against cytosolic 5’-nucleotidase 1A (cN-1A) in patients with IBM. We therefore, examined the autoantigenicity and disease-specificity of major epitopes of cN-1A in patients with sporadic IBM compared with healthy and disease controls. Methods Serum samples obtained from patients with IBM (n=238), polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM) (n=185), other autoimmune diseases (n=246), other neuromuscular diseases (n=93) and healthy controls (n=35) were analysed for the presence of autoantibodies using immunodominant cN-1A peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Results Autoantibodies directed against major epitopes of cN-1A were frequent in IBM patients (37%) but not in PM, DM or non-autoimmune neuromuscular diseases (<5%). Anti-cN-1A reactivity was also observed in some other autoimmune diseases, particularly Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS; 36%) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; 20%). Conclusions In summary, we found frequent anti-cN-1A autoantibodies in sera from IBM patients. Heterogeneity in reactivity with the three immunodominant epitopes indicates that serological assays should not be limited to a distinct epitope region. The similar reactivities observed for SjS and SLE demonstrate the need to further investigate whether distinct IBM-specific epitopes exist. PMID:25714931

  9. Microbial Induction of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Associated Gene TL1A (TNFSF15) in Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shih, David Q.; Kwan, Lola Y.; Chavez, Valerie; Cohavy, Offer; Gonsky, Rivkah; Chang, Elmer Y.; Chang, Christopher; Elson, Charles O.; Targan, Stephan R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary TL1A is a member of the TNF superfamily and its expression is increased in the mucosa of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Neutralizing anti-mouse TL1A Ab attenuates chronic colitis in two T cell driven murine models, suggesting that TL1A is a central modulator of gut mucosal inflammation in IBD. We showed previously that TL1A is induced by immune complexes (IC) via the FcγR signaling pathway. In this study, we report that multiple bacteria, including gram negative organisms (E. coli, E. coli Nissle 1917, S. typhimurium), gram positive organisms (L. monocytogenes, S. epidermidis), partial anaerobes (C. jejuni), and obligate anaerobes (B. thetaiotaomicron, B. breve, Clostridium A4) activate TL1A expression in human APC, including monocytes and monocyte-derived DC. Bacterially induced TL1A mRNA expression correlates with the detection of TL1A protein levels. TL1A induced by bacteria is mediated in part by the TLR signaling pathway and inhibited by downstream blockade of p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation. Microbial induction of TL1A production by human APC potentiated CD4+ T cell effector function by augmenting IFN-γ production. Our findings suggest a role for TL1A in pro-inflammatory APC-T cell interactions and implicate TL1A in host responses to enteric microorganisms. PMID:19839006

  10. ATG16L1: A multifunctional susceptibility factor in Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Salem, Mohammad; Ammitzboell, Mette; Nys, Kris; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2015-04-01

    Genetic variations in the autophagic pathway influence genetic predispositions to Crohn disease. Autophagy, the major lysosomal pathway for degrading and recycling cytoplasmic material, constitutes an important homeostatic cellular process. Of interest, single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ATG16L1 (autophagy-related 16-like 1 [S. cerevisiae]), a key component in the autophagic response to invading pathogens, have been associated with an increased risk of developing Crohn disease. The most common and well-studied genetic variant of ATG16L1 (rs2241880; leading to a T300A conversion) exhibits a strong association with risk for developing Crohn disease. The rs2241880 variant plays a crucial role in pathogen clearance, resulting in imbalanced cytokine production, and is linked to other biological processes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum stress/unfolded protein response. In this review, we focus on the importance of ATG16L1 and its genetic variant (T300A) within the elementary biological processes linked to Crohn disease. PMID:25906181

  11. Amyloid fibrils activate B-1a lymphocytes to ameliorate inflammatory brain disease.

    PubMed

    Kurnellas, Michael Phillip; Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Schartner, Jill M; Baker, Jeanette; Rothbard, Jesse J; Negrin, Robert S; Herzenberg, Leonore A; Fathman, C Garrison; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B

    2015-12-01

    Amyloid fibrils composed of peptides as short as six amino acids are therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), reducing paralysis and inflammation, while inducing several pathways of immune suppression. Intraperitoneal injection of fibrils selectively activates B-1a lymphocytes and two populations of resident macrophages (MΦs), increasing IL-10 production, and triggering their exodus from the peritoneum. The importance of IL-10-producing B-1a cells in this effective therapy was established in loss-of-function experiments where neither B-cell-deficient (μMT) nor IL10(-/-) mice with EAE responded to the fibrils. In gain-of-function experiments, B-1a cells, adoptively transferred to μMT mice with EAE, restored their therapeutic efficacy when Amylin 28-33 was administered. Stimulation of adoptively transferred bioluminescent MΦs and B-1a cells by amyloid fibrils resulted in rapid (within 60 min of injection) trafficking of both cell types to draining lymph nodes. Analysis of gene expression indicated that the fibrils activated the CD40/B-cell receptor pathway in B-1a cells and induced a set of immune-suppressive cell-surface proteins, including BTLA, IRF4, and Siglec G. Collectively, these data indicate that the fibrils activate B-1a cells and F4/80(+) MΦs, resulting in their migration to the lymph nodes, where IL-10 and cell-surface receptors associated with immune-suppression limit antigen presentation and T-cell activation. These mechanisms culminate in reduction of paralytic signs of EAE. PMID:26621719

  12. Pathologic studies of the osteoporosis of Von Gierke's disease (glycogenosis 1a).

    PubMed

    Soejima, K; Landing, B H; Roe, T F; Swanson, V L

    1985-01-01

    Pathologic and point count-morphometric studies of ribs, vertebrae, and iliac crests of 7 patients with Von Gierke's glycogenesis type Ia aged 5 months to 30 years were performed. The bone lesion is a pure osteoporosis (reduction in mass of bone matrix) with no evidences of significant physeal cartilage abnormality or of osteitis fibrosa or osteomalacia (reduced mineralization of bone matrix). The osteoporosis was already marked in the youngest patient studied (5 months). The discrepancy between normal and glycogen storage disease (GSD) bones increased progressively with age for ribs and was less severe for vertebrae. Available biochemical data give no indication of primary disturbance of calcium or phosphate metabolism, of parathyroid activity, or of vitamin D metabolism. Clinical data suggest that the osteoporosis of Von Gierke's disease is due to hypoglycemia or a metabolic sequela thereof, such as insulinopenia, but pathologic study of patients treated by newer techniques of maintaining euglycemia in GSD is needed. PMID:3867867

  13. NAC1, A POZ/BTB protein interacts with Parkin and may contribute to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Korutla, L; Furlong, H A; Mackler, S A

    2014-01-17

    Loss-of-function in the Parkin protein is thought to play a part in causing neuronal cell death in patients with Parkinson's disease. This study explores the effect of Parkin degradation, via the overexpression of nucleus accumbens 1 (NAC1), on cell viability. It was found that NAC1 and Parkin are co-localized within the cell and interact with one another, leading to a decrease in Parkin levels. Moreover, NAC1 down-regulates Parkin by presenting it for ubiquitin-dependent proteasome degradation, which causes a decrease in proteasomal activity in neuronal cells. Consequently, this decrease in proteasomal activity leads to an increase in the cells' susceptibility to proteasome inhibition-induced toxicity. It was also found that Parkin and NAC1 are key proteins found to be present mainly in the cytoplasm and are co-localized in neurons of Parkinson's disease patients. Interestingly, mutation in the POZ/BTB domain (Q23L) of NAC1 disrupts the co-localization and interaction of NAC1 with Parkin and it further abrogates the proteasome inhibition-induced toxicity. We further observed that co-transfection of the mutant form of NAC1 with Parkin reversed the proteasome activity and 20S proteasome protein levels. These results indicate a novel interaction between NAC1 and Parkin that leads to neuronal cell death, a main characteristic in Parkinson's disease.

  14. Glycogen Storage Disease type 1a – a secondary cause for hyperlipidemia: report of five cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia) is a rare metabolic disorder, caused by deficient activity of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. It produces fasting induced hypoglycemia and hepatomegaly, usually manifested in the first semester of life. Besides, it is also associated with growth delay, anemia, platelet dysfunction, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis. Hyperlipidemia and hyperuricemia are almost always present and hepatocellular adenomas and renal dysfunction frequent late complications. Methods The authors present a report of five adult patients with GSD Ia followed in internal medicine appointments and subspecialties. Results Four out of five patients were diagnosed in the first 6 months of life, while the other one was diagnosed in adult life after the discovery of hepatocellular adenomas. In two cases genetic tests were performed, being identified the missense mutation R83C in one, and the mutation IVS4-3C > G in the intron 4 of glucose-6-phosphatase gene, not previously described, in the other. Growth retardation was present in 3 patients, and all of them had anemia, increased bleeding tendency and hepatocellular adenomas; osteopenia/osteoporosis was present in three cases. All but one patient had marked hyperlipidemia and hyperuricemia, with evidence of endothelial dysfunction in one case and of brain damage with refractory epilepsy in another case. Proteinuria was present in two cases and end-stage renal disease in another case. There was a great variability in the dietary measures; in one case, liver transplantation was performed, with correction of the metabolic derangements. Conclusions Hyperlipidemia is almost always present and only partially responds to dietary and drug therapy; liver transplantation is the only definitive solution. Although its association with premature atherosclerosis is rare, there have been reports of endothelial dysfunction, raising the possibility for increased cardiovascular risk in this group of

  15. Genetic basis of glycogen storage disease type 1a: prevalent mutations at the glucose-6-phosphatase locus.

    PubMed

    Lei, K J; Chen, Y T; Chen, H; Wong, L J; Liu, J L; McConkie-Rosell, A; Van Hove, J L; Ou, H C; Yeh, N J; Pan, L Y

    1995-10-01

    Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a currently is established by demonstrating the lack of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity in the patient's biopsied liver specimen. Recent cloning of the G6Pase gene and identification of mutations within the gene that causes GSD type 1a allow for the development of a DNA-based diagnostic method. Using SSCP analysis and DNA sequencing, we characterized the G6Pase gene of 70 unrelated patients with enzymatically confirmed diagnosis of GSD type 1a and detected mutations in all except 17 alleles (88%). Sixteen mutations were uncovered that were shown by expression to abolish or greatly reduce G6Pase activity and that therefore are responsible for the GSD type 1a disorder. R83C and Q347X are the most prevalent mutations found in Caucasians, 130X and R83C are most prevalent in Hispanics, and R83H is most prevalent in Chinese. The Q347X mutation has thus far been identified only in Caucasian patients, and the 130X mutation has been identified only in Hispanic patients. Our results demonstrate that the DNA-based analysis can accurately, rapidly, and noninvasively detect the majority of mutations in GSD type 1a. This DNA-based diagnosis now permits prenatal diagnosis among at-risk patients and serves as a database in screening and counseling patients clinically suspected of having this disease.

  16. Necroptosis in Niemann–Pick disease, type C1: a potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Cougnoux, A; Cluzeau, C; Mitra, S; Li, R; Williams, I; Burkert, K; Xu, X; Wassif, C A; Zheng, W; Porter, F D

    2016-01-01

    Niemann–Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) is a neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorder due to mutation of the NPC1 gene. The NPC1 phenotype is characterized by progressive neuronal dysfunction, including cerebellar ataxia and dementia. There is histological evidence of neuroinflammation and progressive neuronal loss, with cerebellar Purkinje cells particularly vulnerable to loss of NPC1 function. Necroptosis was evaluated as a mechanism of neuronal loss. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1) and RIP3 are key components of the necrosomal complex that regulates necroptotic cell death. We report increased expression of RIP1 and RIP3 in NPC1 fibroblasts, NPC1 iPS cell-derived neuronal precursors, and in cerebellar tissue from both NPC1 mice and patients. Our data suggest a positive correlation between NPC1 neurological disease severity and assembly of the necrosome complex. Furthermore, we demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of RIP1 decreases cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of Npc1-mutant mice with necrostatin-1, an allosteric inhibitor of RIP1, significantly delayed cerebellar Purkinje cell loss, progression of neurological symptoms, and death. Collectively, our data identified necroptosis as a key component of the molecular network that contributes to neuronal loss in NPC1 and establish that inhibition of necroptosis is a potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:26986514

  17. Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphatase gene that cause glycogen storage disease type 1a

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Lei, K.J.; Shelly, L.L.

    1994-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type la (von Gierke disease) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), the key enzyme in glucose homeostasis. The disease presents with clinical manifestations of severe hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, growth retardation, lactic acidemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperuricemia. We have succeeded in isolating a murine G6Pase cDNA from a normal mouse liver cDNA library by differentially screening method. We then isolated the human G6Pase cDNA and gene. To date, we have characterized the G6Pase genes of twelve GSD type la patients and uncovered a total of six different mutations. The mutations are comprised of R83C (an Arg at codon 83 to a Cys), Q347X (a Gly at codon 347 to a stop codon), 459insTA (a two basepair insertion at nucleotide 459 yielding a truncated G6Pase of 129 residues), R295C (an Arg at codon 295 to a Cys), G222R (a Gly at codon 222 to an Arg) and {delta}F327 (a codon deletion for Phe-327 at nucleotides 1058 to 1060). The relative incidences of these mutations are 37.5% (R83C), 33.3% (Q347X), 16.6% (459insTA), 4.2% (G222R), 4.2% (R295C) and 4.2% ({delta}F327). Site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression assays demonstrated that the R83C, Q347X, R295C, and {delta}F327 mutations abolished whereas the G222R mutation greatly reduced G6Pase activity. We further characterized the structure-function requirements of amino acids 83, 222, and 295 in G6Pase catalysis. The identification of mutations in GSD type la patients has unequivocally established the molecular basis of the type la disorder. Knowledge of the mutations may be applied to prenatal diagnosis and opens the way for developing and evaluating new therapeutic approaches.

  18. Serotonin 1A Receptors on Astrocytes as a Potential Target for the Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant neuron-supporting glial cells in the central nervous system. The neuroprotective role of astrocytes has been demonstrated in various neurological disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, stroke and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Astrocyte dysfunction or loss-of-astrocytes increases the susceptibility of neurons to cell death, while astrocyte transplantation in animal studies has therapeutic advantage. We reported recently that stimulation of serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptors on astrocytes promoted astrocyte proliferation and upregulated antioxidative molecules to act as a neuroprotectant in parkinsonian mice. PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with motor symptoms such as tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and postural instability, that are based on selective loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, and with non-motor symptoms such as orthostatic hypotension and constipation based on peripheral neurodegeneration. Although dopaminergic therapy for managing the motor disability associated with PD is being assessed at present, the main challenge remains the development of neuroprotective or disease-modifying treatments. Therefore, it is desirable to find treatments that can reduce the progression of dopaminergic cell death. In this article, we summarize first the neuroprotective properties of astrocytes targeting certain molecules related to PD. Next, we review neuroprotective effects induced by stimulation of 5-HT1A receptors on astrocytes. The review discusses new promising therapeutic strategies based on neuroprotection against oxidative stress and prevention of dopaminergic neurodegeneration. PMID:26795196

  19. Genetic basis of glycogen storage disease type 1a: Prevalent mutations at the glucose-6-phosphatase locus

    SciTech Connect

    Ke-Jian Lei; Hungwen Chen; Ji-Lan Liu

    1995-10-01

    Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a currently is established by demonstrating the lack of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity in the patient`s biopsied liver specimen. Recent cloning of the G6Pase gene and identification of mutations within the gene that causes GSD type 1a allow for the development of a DNA-based diagnostic method. Using SSCP analysis and DNA sequencing, we characterized the G6Pase gene of 70 unrelated patients with enzymatically confirmed diagnosis of GSD type 1a and detected mutations in all except 17 alleles (88%). Sixteen mutations were uncovered that were shown by expression to abolish or greatly reduce G6Pase activity and that therefore are responsible for the GSD type la disorder. R83C and Q347X are the most prevalent mutations found in Caucasians, 130X and R83C are most prevalent in Hispanics, and R83H is most prevalent in Chinese. The Q347X mutation has thus far been identified only in Caucasian patients, and the 130X mutation has been identified only in Hispanic patients. Our results demonstrate that the DNA-based analysis can accurately, rapidly, and noninvasively detect the majority of mutations in GSD type 1a. This DNA-based diagnosis now permits prenatal diagnosis among at-risk patients and serves as a database in screening and counseling patients clinically suspected of having this disease. 22 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1): A Potential Target for Intervention in Ocular Neovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Constant oxygen supply is essential for proper tissue development, homeostasis and function of all eukaryotic organisms. Cellular response to reduced oxygen levels is mediated by the transcriptional regulator hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). It is a heterodimeric complex protein consisting of an oxygen dependent subunit (HIF-1α) and a constitutively expressed nuclear subunit (HIF-1β). In normoxic conditions, de novo synthesized cytoplasmic HIF-1α is degraded by 26S proteasome. Under hypoxic conditions, HIF-1α is stabilized, binds with HIF-1β and activates transcription of various target genes. These genes play a key role in regulating angiogenesis, cell survival, proliferation, chemotherapy, radiation resistance, invasion, metastasis, genetic instability, immortalization, immune evasion, metabolism and stem cell maintenance. This review highlights the importance of hypoxia signaling in development and progression of various vision threatening pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. Further, various inhibitors of HIF-1 pathway that may have a viable potential in the treatment of oxygen-dependent ocular diseases are also discussed. PMID:23701276

  1. Ofd1, a human disease gene, regulates the length and distal structure of centrioles

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Veena; Romaguera-Ros, Miriam; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Reiter, Jeremy F.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Centrosomes and their component centrioles represent the principal microtubule organizing centers of animal cells. Here we show that the gene underlying Orofaciodigital Syndrome 1, Ofd1, is a component of the distal centriole that controls centriole length. In the absence of Ofd1, distal regions of centrioles, but not procentrioles, elongate abnormally. These long centrioles are structurally similar to normal centrioles, but contain destabilized microtubules with abnormal post-translational modifications. Ofd1 is also important for centriole distal appendage formation and centriolar recruitment of the intraflagellar transport protein Ift88. To model OFD1 Syndrome in embryonic stem cells, we replaced the Ofd1 gene with missense alleles from human OFD1 patients. Distinct disease-associated mutations cause different degrees of excessive or decreased centriole elongation, all of which are associated with diminished ciliogenesis. Our results indicate that Ofd1 acts at the distal centriole to build distal appendages, recruit Ift88, and stabilize centriolar microtubules at a defined length. PMID:20230748

  2. Heme oxygenase-1, a critical arbitrator of cell death pathways in lung injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Morse, Danielle; Lin, Ling; Choi, Augustine M K; Ryter, Stefan W

    2009-07-01

    Increases in cell death by programmed (i.e., apoptosis, autophagy) or nonprogrammed mechanisms (i.e., necrosis) occur during tissue injury and may contribute to the etiology of several pulmonary or vascular disease states. The low-molecular-weight stress protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) confers cytoprotection against cell death in various models of lung and vascular injury by inhibiting apoptosis, inflammation, and cell proliferation. HO-1 serves a vital metabolic function as the rate-limiting step in the heme degradation pathway and in the maintenance of iron homeostasis. The transcriptional induction of HO-1 occurs in response to multiple forms of chemical and physical cellular stress. The cytoprotective functions of HO-1 may be attributed to heme turnover, as well as to beneficial properties of its enzymatic reaction products: biliverdin-IXalpha, iron, and carbon monoxide (CO). Recent studies have demonstrated that HO-1 or CO inhibits stress-induced extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in vitro. A variety of signaling molecules have been implicated in the cytoprotection conferred by HO-1/CO, including autophagic proteins, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins, nuclear factor-kappaB, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt, and others. Enhanced HO-1 expression or the pharmacological application of HO end-products affords protection in preclinical models of tissue injury, including experimental and transplant-associated ischemia/reperfusion injury, promising potential future therapeutic applications.

  3. Intermittent fasting alleviates the neuropathic phenotype in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Madorsky, Irina; Opalach, Katherine; Waber, Amanda; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Solmo, Chelsea; Foster, Thomas; Dunn, William A; Notterpek, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) neuropathies linked to the misexpression of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) are progressive demyelinating disorders of the peripheral nervous system. In this study we asked whether dietary restriction by intermittent fasting (IF) could alleviate the neuropathic phenotype in the Trembler J (TrJ) mouse model of CMT1A. Our results show that neuropathic mice kept on a five month long IF regimen had improved locomotor performance compared to ad libitum (AL) fed littermates. The functional benefits of this dietary intervention are associated with an increased expression of myelin proteins combined with a thicker myelin sheath, less redundant basal lamina, and a reduction in aberrant Schwann cell proliferation. These morphological improvements are accompanied by a decrease in PMP22 protein aggregates, and enhanced expression of cytosolic chaperones and constituents of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. These results indicate that dietary restriction is beneficial for peripheral nerve function in TrJ neuropathic mice, as it promotes the maintenance of locomotor performance. PMID:19320048

  4. CYP1A Induction and Blue SAC Disease in Early Developmental Stages of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss) Exposed to Retene.

    PubMed

    Brinkworth, Lyndon; Hodson, Peter; Tabash, Samir; Lee, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Early life stages of rainbow trout were exposed to different regimes of water-borne retene (7-isopropyl-1-methylphenanthrene) to determine if there is an ontogenic stage particularly sensitive to retene toxicity, and if cytochrome P-4501A (CYP1A) induction is a forerunner to blue sac disease (BSD), the syndrome of toxicity. CYP1A protein concentrations, measured by immunohistochemistry, were first detected during organogenesis, when organ and enzyme systems are first being developed, and steadily increased until swim-up. The prevalence of signs of BSD rose 1 wk following a marked increase in CYP1A activity after hatch, suggesting that CYP1A induction is related to BSD. The larval stage was the most sensitive to retene toxicity, based on CYP1A induction and a high prevalence of BSD. The most common signs of BSD were hemorrhaging, yolk-sac edema, and mortality, but hemorrhaging was the first and most frequently observed response. Tissue concentrations of retene were elevated just after fertilization, but decreased steadily as fish developed to the swim-up stage, most likely due to the establishment of more efficient metabolic and excretory systems in later stages of development. PMID:12746134

  5. CYP1A induction and blue sac disease in early developmental stages of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss) exposed to retene.

    PubMed

    Brinkworth, Lyndon C; Hodson, Peter V; Tabash, Samir; Lee, Patricia

    2003-04-11

    Early life stages of rainbow trout were exposed to different regimes of water-borne retene (7-isopropyl-1-methylphenanthrene) to determine if there is an ontogenic stage particularly sensitive to retene toxicity, and if cytochrome P-4501A (CYP1A) induction is a forerunner to blue sac disease (BSD), the syndrome of toxicity. CYP1A protein concentrations, measured by immunohistochemistry, were first detected during organogenesis, when organ and enzyme systems are first being developed, and steadily increased until swim-up. The prevalence of signs of BSD rose 1 wk following a marked increase in CYP1A activity after hatch, suggesting that CYP1A induction is related to BSD. The larval stage was the most sensitive to retene toxicity, based on CYP1A induction and a high prevalence of BSD. The most common signs of BSD were hemorrhaging, yolk-sac edema, and mortality, but hemorrhaging was the first and most frequently observed response. Tissue concentrations of retene were elevated just after fertilization, but decreased steadily as fish developed to the swim-up stage, most likely due to the establishment of more efficient metabolic and excretory systems in later stages of development. PMID:12751390

  6. QSAR and pharmacophore study of Dyrk1A inhibitory meridianin analogs as potential agents for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Bharate, Sandip B; Yadav, Rammohan R; Vishwakarma, Ram A

    2013-02-01

    Dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) is a protein kinase with diverse functions in neuronal development and adult brain physiology. Elevated levels of Dyrk1A are associated with the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases and have been implicated in some neurobiological alterations of Down syndrome, such as mental retardation. Meridianins are marine derived indole alkaloids exhibiting anti-proliferative activity as well as are known to inhibit panel of kinases. In the present article, a descriptor based QSAR study was carried out for a series of meridianin analogs inhibiting Dyrk1A to find out structural features which are crucial for biological activity. Developed QSAR model showed good correlation coefficient (r > 0.9), higher F value (F > 20) and excellent predictive power (r2 cv and r2 pred > 0.6). Activity of naturally occurring meridianins was also predicted using developed model. The study indicated that kier Chi4 path/cluster, total lipole, VAMP polarization ZZ component, dipole moment Z component and log P plays important role in Dyrk1A inhibition. Further analysis of pharmacophore model using PHASE module of Schrodinger revealed that two hydrogen bond acceptors (A), two hydrogen bond donors (D) and two hydrophobic aromatic rings (R) are crucial molecular features that predict binding affinity for meridianins to the Dyrk1A enzyme. These observations provide important insights to the key structural requirements of meridianins for potent Dyrk1A inhibition. Excellent statistical results of developed models strongly suggest that these models are reasonable for prediction of the activity of new inhibitors and in future drug design. PMID:22920091

  7. Genome Anatomy of Streptococcus parasanguinis Strain C1A, Isolated from a Patient with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Reveals Unusual Genomic Features

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kim Tien; Pang, Yong Kek; Chong, Teik Min; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Yin, Wai-Fong; Tee, Kok Keng

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus parasanguinis causes invasive diseases. However, the mechanism by which it causes disease remains unclear. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence of S. parasanguinis C1A, isolated from a patient diagnosed with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Several genes that might be associated with pathogenesis are also described. PMID:26021924

  8. ATP1A2 Mutations in Migraine: Seeing through the Facets of an Ion Pump onto the Neurobiology of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Thomas; Tavraz, Neslihan N.; Junghans, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in four genes have been identified in familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), from which CACNA1A (FHM type 1) and SCN1A (FHM type 3) code for neuronal voltage-gated calcium or sodium channels, respectively, while ATP1A2 (FHM type 2) encodes the α2 isoform of the Na+,K+-ATPase's catalytic subunit, thus classifying FHM primarily as an ion channel/ion transporter pathology. FHM type 4 is attributed to mutations in the PRRT2 gene, which encodes a proline-rich transmembrane protein of as yet unknown function. The Na+,K+-ATPase maintains the physiological gradients for Na+ and K+ ions and is, therefore, critical for the activity of ion channels and transporters involved neuronal excitability, neurotransmitter uptake or Ca2+ signaling. Strikingly diverse functional abnormalities have been identified for disease-linked ATP1A2 mutations which frequently lead to changes in the enzyme's voltage-dependent properties, kinetics, or apparent cation affinities, but some mutations are truly deleterious for enzyme function and thus cause full haploinsufficiency. Here, we summarize structural and functional data about the Na+,K+-ATPase available to date and an overview is provided about the particular properties of the α2 isoform that explain its physiological relevance in electrically excitable tissues. In addition, current concepts about the neurobiology of migraine, the correlations between primary brain dysfunction and mechanisms of headache pain generation are described, together with insights gained recently from modeling approaches in computational neuroscience. Then, a survey is given about ATP1A2 mutations implicated in migraine cases as documented in the literature with focus on mutations that were described to completely destroy enzyme function, or lead to misfolded or mistargeted protein in particular model cell lines. We also discuss whether or not there are correlations between these most severe mutational effects and clinical phenotypes. Finally, perspectives

  9. ATP1A2 Mutations in Migraine: Seeing through the Facets of an Ion Pump onto the Neurobiology of Disease.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Thomas; Tavraz, Neslihan N; Junghans, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in four genes have been identified in familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), from which CACNA1A (FHM type 1) and SCN1A (FHM type 3) code for neuronal voltage-gated calcium or sodium channels, respectively, while ATP1A2 (FHM type 2) encodes the α2 isoform of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase's catalytic subunit, thus classifying FHM primarily as an ion channel/ion transporter pathology. FHM type 4 is attributed to mutations in the PRRT2 gene, which encodes a proline-rich transmembrane protein of as yet unknown function. The Na(+),K(+)-ATPase maintains the physiological gradients for Na(+) and K(+) ions and is, therefore, critical for the activity of ion channels and transporters involved neuronal excitability, neurotransmitter uptake or Ca(2+) signaling. Strikingly diverse functional abnormalities have been identified for disease-linked ATP1A2 mutations which frequently lead to changes in the enzyme's voltage-dependent properties, kinetics, or apparent cation affinities, but some mutations are truly deleterious for enzyme function and thus cause full haploinsufficiency. Here, we summarize structural and functional data about the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase available to date and an overview is provided about the particular properties of the α2 isoform that explain its physiological relevance in electrically excitable tissues. In addition, current concepts about the neurobiology of migraine, the correlations between primary brain dysfunction and mechanisms of headache pain generation are described, together with insights gained recently from modeling approaches in computational neuroscience. Then, a survey is given about ATP1A2 mutations implicated in migraine cases as documented in the literature with focus on mutations that were described to completely destroy enzyme function, or lead to misfolded or mistargeted protein in particular model cell lines. We also discuss whether or not there are correlations between these most severe mutational effects and clinical phenotypes

  10. CMT subtypes and disease burden in patients enrolled in the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium natural history study: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, V; Bundy, B; Reilly, M M; Pareyson, D; Bacon, C; Burns, J; Day, J; Feely, S; Finkel, R S; Grider, T; Kirk, C A; Herrmann, D N; Laurá, M; Li, J; Lloyd, T; Sumner, C J; Muntoni, F; Piscosquito, G; Ramchandren, S; Shy, R; Siskind, C E; Yum, S W; Moroni, I; Pagliano, E; Zuchner, S; Scherer, S S; Shy, M E

    2015-01-01

    Background The international Inherited Neuropathy Consortium (INC) was created with the goal of obtaining much needed natural history data for patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. We analysed clinical and genetic data from patients in the INC to determine the distribution of CMT subtypes and the clinical impairment associated with them. Methods We analysed data from 1652 patients evaluated at 13 INC centres. The distribution of CMT subtypes and pathogenic genetic mutations were determined. The disease burden of all the mutations was assessed by the CMT Neuropathy Score (CMTNS) and CMT Examination Score (CMTES). Results 997 of the 1652 patients (60.4%) received a genetic diagnosis. The most common CMT subtypes were CMT1A/PMP22 duplication, CMT1X/GJB1 mutation, CMT2A/MFN2 mutation, CMT1B/MPZ mutation, and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy/PMP22 deletion. These five subtypes of CMT accounted for 89.2% of all genetically confirmed mutations. Mean CMTNS for some but not all subtypes were similar to those previously reported. Conclusions Our findings confirm that large numbers of patients with a representative variety of CMT subtypes have been enrolled and that the frequency of achieving a molecular diagnosis and distribution of the CMT subtypes reflects those previously reported. Measures of severity are similar, though not identical, to results from smaller series. This study confirms that it is possible to assess patients in a uniform way between international centres, which is critical for the planned natural history study and future clinical trials. These data will provide a representative baseline for longitudinal studies of CMT. Clinical trial registration ID number NCT01193075. PMID:25430934

  11. A novel DYRK1A (dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A) inhibitor for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: effect on Tau and amyloid pathologies in vitro.

    PubMed

    Coutadeur, Séverine; Benyamine, Hélène; Delalonde, Laurence; de Oliveira, Catherine; Leblond, Bertrand; Foucourt, Alicia; Besson, Thierry; Casagrande, Anne-Sophie; Taverne, Thierry; Girard, Angélique; Pando, Matthew P; Désiré, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    The dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) gene is located within the Down Syndrome (DS) critical region on chromosome 21 and is implicated in the generation of Tau and amyloid pathologies that are associated with the early onset Alzheimer's Disease (AD) observed in DS. DYRK1A is also found associated with neurofibrillary tangles in sporadic AD and phosphorylates key AD players (Tau, amyloid precursor, protein, etc). Thus, DYRK1A may be an important therapeutic target to modify the course of Tau and amyloid beta (Aβ) pathologies. Here, we describe EHT 5372 (methyl 9-(2,4-dichlorophenylamino) thiazolo[5,4-f]quinazoline-2-carbimidate), a novel, highly potent (IC50 = 0.22 nM) DYRK1A inhibitor with a high degree of selectivity over 339 kinases. Models in which inhibition of DYRK1A by siRNA reduced and DYRK1A over-expression induced Tau phosphorylation or Aβ production were used. EHT 5372 inhibits DYRK1A-induced Tau phosphorylation at multiple AD-relevant sites in biochemical and cellular assays. EHT 5372 also normalizes both Aβ-induced Tau phosphorylation and DYRK1A-stimulated Aβ production. DYRK1A is thus as a key element of Aβ-mediated Tau hyperphosphorylation, which links Tau and amyloid pathologies. EHT 5372 and other compounds in its class warrant in vivo investigation as a novel, high-potential therapy for AD and other Tau opathies. Inhibition of the dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) is a new high-potential therapeutic approach for Alzheimer disease. Here we describe EHT 5372, a novel potent and selective DYRK1A inhibitor. EHT 5372 inhibits DYRK1A-induced Tau phosphorylation, Aβ production and Aβ effects on phospho-Tau, including Tau aggregation. PMID:25556849

  12. Recent advances in the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of selective DYRK1A inhibitors: a new avenue for a disease modifying treatment of Alzheimer's?

    PubMed

    Smith, Breland; Medda, Federico; Gokhale, Vijay; Dunckley, Travis; Hulme, Christopher

    2012-11-21

    With 24.3 million people affected in 2005 and an estimated rise to 42.3 million in 2020, dementia is currently a leading unmet medical need and costly burden on public health. Seventy percent of these cases have been attributed to Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative pathology whose most evident symptom is a progressive decline in cognitive functions. Dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase-1A (DYRK1A) is important in neuronal development and plays a variety of functional roles within the adult central nervous system. The DYRK1A gene is located within the Down syndrome critical region (DSCR) on human chromosome 21 and current research suggests that overexpression of DYRK1A may be a significant factor leading to cognitive deficits in people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down syndrome (DS). Currently, treatment options for cognitive deficiencies associated with Down syndrome, as well as Alzheimer's disease, are extremely limited and represent a major unmet therapeutic need. Small molecule inhibition of DYRK1A activity in the brain may provide an avenue for pharmaceutical intervention of mental impairment associated with AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. We herein review the current state of the art in the development of DYRK1A inhibitors. PMID:23173067

  13. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A: Co-existence of two rare neuromuscular genetic diseases in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, Anna; Scaioli, Vidmer; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Salsano, Ettore; Dalla Bella, Eleonora; Gellera, Cinzia; Pareyson, Davide

    2015-10-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked neuromuscular disease caused by a trinucleotide CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene; it is clinically characterized by adult-onset, slowly progressive weakness and atrophy mainly affecting proximal limb and bulbar muscles. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is an autosomal dominant polyneuropathy due to peripheral myelin protein 22 gene duplication and characterized by slowly progressive distal limb muscle weakness, atrophy and sensory loss with foot deformities. Here we report the co-occurrence of both neuromuscular genetic diseases in the same male patient. Difficulties in climbing stairs and jaw weakness were presenting symptoms consistent with SBMA. However, predominant distal weakness and bilateral pes cavus were rather suggestive of a hereditary polyneuropathy. The combination of two diseases, even if extremely rare, should be considered in the presence of atypical symptoms; in the case of genetic diseases this event may have important implications on family members' counseling.

  14. DYRK1A promotes dopaminergic neuron survival in the developing brain and in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Barallobre, M J; Perier, C; Bové, J; Laguna, A; Delabar, J M; Vila, M; Arbonés, M L

    2014-01-01

    In the brain, programmed cell death (PCD) serves to adjust the numbers of the different types of neurons during development, and its pathological reactivation in the adult leads to neurodegeneration. Dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) is a pleiotropic kinase involved in neural proliferation and cell death, and its role during brain growth is evolutionarily conserved. Human DYRK1A lies in the Down syndrome critical region on chromosome 21, and heterozygous mutations in the gene cause microcephaly and neurological dysfunction. The mouse model for DYRK1A haploinsufficiency (the Dyrk1a(+/-) mouse) presents neuronal deficits in specific regions of the adult brain, including the substantia nigra (SN), although the mechanisms underlying these pathogenic effects remain unclear. Here we study the effect of DYRK1A copy number variation on dopaminergic cell homeostasis. We show that mesencephalic DA (mDA) neurons are generated in the embryo at normal rates in the Dyrk1a haploinsufficient model and in a model (the mBACtgDyrk1a mouse) that carries three copies of Dyrk1a. We also show that the number of mDA cells diminishes in postnatal Dyrk1a(+/-) mice and increases in mBACtgDyrk1a mice due to an abnormal activity of the mitochondrial caspase9 (Casp9)-dependent apoptotic pathway during the main wave of PCD that affects these neurons. In addition, we show that the cell death induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6 tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), a toxin that activates Casp9-dependent apoptosis in mDA neurons, is attenuated in adult mBACtgDyrk1a mice, leading to an increased survival of SN DA neurons 21 days after MPTP intoxication. Finally, we present data indicating that Dyrk1a phosphorylation of Casp9 at the Thr125 residue is the mechanism by which this kinase hinders both physiological and pathological PCD in mDA neurons. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms that control cell death in brain DA neurons and they show that

  15. Upregulation of a small vault RNA (svtRNA2-1a) is an early event in Parkinson disease and induces neuronal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Miñones-Moyano, Elena; Friedländer, Marc R.; Pallares, Joan; Kagerbauer, Birgit; Porta, Sílvia; Escaramís, Georgia; Ferrer, Isidre; Estivill, Xavier; Martí, Eulàlia

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and other small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, playing key roles in neuronal development, plasticity, and disease. Transcriptome deregulation caused by miRNA dysfunction has been associated to neurodegenerative diseases. Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease showing deregulation of the coding and small non-coding transcriptome. On profiling sncRNA in PD brain areas differently affected, we found that upregulation of a small vault RNA (svtRNA2-1a) is widespread in PD brains, occurring early in the course of the disease (at pre-motor stages). SvtRNA2-1a biogenesis was dependent on Dicer activity on its precursor (vtRNA2-1) but independent of Drosha endonuclease, unlike the canonical miRNAs. Although endogenous svtRNA2-1a was enriched in Ago-2 immunoprecipitates in differentiated SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, overexpression of svtRNA2-1a induced subtle transcriptomic changes, suggesting that gene expression regulation may involve other mechanisms than mRNA decay only. Function enrichment analysis of the genes deregulated by svtRNA2-1a overexpression or svtRNA2-1a predicted targets identified pathways related to nervous system development and cell type specification. The expression pattern of svtRNA2-1a during development and aging of the human brain and the detrimental consequences of a svtRNA2-1a mimic overexpression in neuronal cells further indicate that low svtRNA2-1a levels may be important for the maintenance of neurons. Our results suggest that early svtRNA2-1a upregulation in PD may contribute to perturbations of gene expression networks, underlying metabolic impairment and cell dysfunction. A better understanding of the pathways regulated by svtRNA2-a, and also the mechanisms regulating its expression should facilitate the identification of new targets for therapeutic approaches in PD. PMID:23673382

  16. Are elevated levels of soluble ICAM-1 a marker of chronic graft disease in heart transplant recipients?

    PubMed

    Campana, E; Parlapiano, C; Borgia, M C; Papalia, U; Laurenti, A; Pantone, P; Giovanniello, T; Marangi, M; Sanguigni, S

    2000-02-01

    Positivity for circulating intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in heart transplant recipients has been claimed to predict the development of coronary artery disease and risk of graft failure. Soluble ICAM-1 were evaluated in 32 heart transplant recipients. Five of these patients, who had undergone transplantation several years before, were positive for soluble ICAM-1 but did not present any clinical sign of graft rejection. Furthermore, although heart graft coronary disease was diagnosed in 15 of the 32 patients, they did not show significantly higher titres of soluble ICAM-1 compared to the remaining patients. These findings suggest that major caution is necessary when considering ICAM-1 positivity as a marker of graft disease. PMID:10657564

  17. Herbal therapeutics that block the oncogenic kinase PAK1: a practical approach towards PAK1-dependent diseases and longevity.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    Over 35 years research on PAKs, RAC/CDC42(p21)-activated kinases, comes of age, and in particular PAK1 has been well known to be responsible for a variety of diseases such as cancer (mainly solid tumors), Alzheimer's disease, acquired immune deficiency syndrome and other viral/bacterial infections, inflammatory diseases (asthma and arthritis), diabetes (type 2), neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, learning disability, autism, etc. Although several distinct synthetic PAK1-blockers have been recently developed, no FDA-approved PAK1 blockers are available on the market as yet. Thus, patients suffering from these PAK1-dependent diseases have to rely on solely a variety of herbal therapeutics such as propolis and curcumin that block PAK1 without affecting normal cell growth. Furthermore, several recent studies revealed that some of these herbal therapeutics significantly extend the lifespan of nematodes (C. elegans) and fruit flies (Drosophila), and PAK1-deficient worm lives longer than the wild type. Here, I outline mainly pathological phenotypes of hyper-activated PAK1 and a list of herbal therapeutics that block PAK1, but cause no side (harmful) effect on healthy people or animals.

  18. Herbal therapeutics that block the oncogenic kinase PAK1: a practical approach towards PAK1-dependent diseases and longevity.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    Over 35 years research on PAKs, RAC/CDC42(p21)-activated kinases, comes of age, and in particular PAK1 has been well known to be responsible for a variety of diseases such as cancer (mainly solid tumors), Alzheimer's disease, acquired immune deficiency syndrome and other viral/bacterial infections, inflammatory diseases (asthma and arthritis), diabetes (type 2), neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, learning disability, autism, etc. Although several distinct synthetic PAK1-blockers have been recently developed, no FDA-approved PAK1 blockers are available on the market as yet. Thus, patients suffering from these PAK1-dependent diseases have to rely on solely a variety of herbal therapeutics such as propolis and curcumin that block PAK1 without affecting normal cell growth. Furthermore, several recent studies revealed that some of these herbal therapeutics significantly extend the lifespan of nematodes (C. elegans) and fruit flies (Drosophila), and PAK1-deficient worm lives longer than the wild type. Here, I outline mainly pathological phenotypes of hyper-activated PAK1 and a list of herbal therapeutics that block PAK1, but cause no side (harmful) effect on healthy people or animals. PMID:23943274

  19. Regulation of Sclerostin Expression in Multiple Myeloma by Dkk-1: A Potential Therapeutic Strategy for Myeloma Bone Disease.

    PubMed

    Eda, Homare; Santo, Loredana; Wein, Marc N; Hu, Dorothy Z; Cirstea, Diana D; Nemani, Neeharika; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Raines, Sarah E; Kuhstoss, Stuart Allen; Munshi, Nikhil C; Kronenberg, Henry M; Raje, Noopur S

    2016-06-01

    Sclerostin is a potent inhibitor of osteoblastogenesis. Interestingly, newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) patients have high levels of circulating sclerostin that correlate with disease stage and fractures. However, the source and impact of sclerostin in MM remains to be defined. Our goal was to determine the role of sclerostin in the biology of MM and its bone microenvironment as well as investigate the effect of targeting sclerostin with a neutralizing antibody (scl-Ab) in MM bone disease. Here we confirm increased sclerostin levels in MM compared with precursor disease states like monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering MM. Furthermore, we found that a humanized MM xenograft mouse model bearing human MM cells (NOD-SCID.CB17 male mice injected intravenously with 2.5 million of MM1.S-Luc-GFP cells) demonstrated significantly higher concentrations of mouse-derived sclerostin, suggesting a microenvironmental source of sclerostin. Associated with the increased sclerostin levels, activated β-catenin expression levels were lower than normal in MM mouse bone marrow. Importantly, a high-affinity grade scl-Ab reversed osteolytic bone disease in this animal model. Because scl-Ab did not demonstrate significant in vitro anti-MM activity, we combined it with the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib. Our data demonstrated that this combination therapy significantly inhibited tumor burden and improved bone disease in our in vivo MM mouse model. In agreement with our in vivo data, sclerostin expression was noted in marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts of MM patient bone marrow samples. Moreover, MM cells stimulated sclerostin expression in immature osteoblasts while inhibiting osteoblast differentiation in vitro. This was in part regulated by Dkk-1 secreted by MM cells and is a potential mechanism contributing to the osteoblast dysfunction noted in MM. Our data confirm the role of sclerostin as a potential therapeutic target in MM bone disease

  20. Structure of the Trypanosoma cruzi protein tyrosine phosphatase TcPTP1, a potential therapeutic target for Chagas' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S.

    2013-06-05

    Chagas’ disease, a neglected tropical affliction transmitted by the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is prevalent in Latin America and affects nearly 18 million people worldwide, yet few approved drugs are available to treat the disease. Moreover, the currently available drugs exhibit severe toxicity or are poorly effective in the chronic phase of the disease. This limitation, along with the large population at risk, underscores the urgent need to discover new molecular targets and novel therapeutic agents. Recently, the T. cruzi protein tyrosine phosphatase TcPTP1 has been implicated in the cellular differentiation and infectivity of the parasite and is therefore a promising target for the design of novel anti-parasitic drugs. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of TcPTP1 refined to a resolution of 2.18 Å, which provides structural insights into the active site environment that can be used to initiate structure-based drug design efforts to develop specific TcPTP1 inhibitors. Potential strategies to develop such inhibitors are also discussed.

  1. MRI shows increased sciatic nerve cross sectional area in inherited and inflammatory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, C D J; Miranda, M A; Cowley, P; Morrow, J M; Davagnanam, I; Mehta, H; Hanna, M G; Koltzenburg, M; Reilly, M M; Yousry, T A; Thornton, J S

    2011-11-01

    Measurements of the cross sectional area of the sciatic nerve are described in a group of 10 patients with genetically confirmed Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), nine patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and 10 healthy controls using MRI. One mid-thigh of each individual was imaged using a short tau inversion recovery sequence and the nerve appearance evaluated radiologically with respect to the signal intensity and visibility of the internal neural structure. The cross sectional area of the sciatic nerve of each individual was measured by defining irregular enclosing regions of interest on the MRI images. The sciatic nerve area was enlarged in both CMT1A (p<0.001) and CIDP (p=0.008) compared with controls and in CMT1A compared with CIDP (p<0.001). Median (interquartile range) areas were 67.6 (16.2) mm(2) for the CIDP group, 135.9 (46.5) mm(2) for the CMT1A group and 43.3 (19.9) mm(2) for the control group. The critical upper value for discriminating pathologically enlarged nerves from normal controls with p<0.05 was 64.4 mm(2). Quantification of sciatic nerve hypertrophy on MRI may be of assistance in cases where the diagnosis is still in doubt, providing an objective pathological marker complimenting other clinical investigations.

  2. Cigarette smoking, dietary habits and genetic polymorphisms in GSTT1, GSTM1 and CYP1A1 metabolic genes: A case-control study in oncohematological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cerliani, María Belén; Pavicic, Walter; Gili, Juan Antonio; Klein, Graciela; Saba, Silvia; Richard, Silvina

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the association between oncohematological diseases and GSTT1/GSTM1/CYP1A1 polymorphisms, dietary habits and smoking, in an argentine hospital-based case-control study. METHODS This hospital-based case-control study involved 125 patients with oncohematological diseases and 310 control subjects. A questionnaire was used to obtain sociodemographic data and information about habits. Blood samples were collected, and DNA was extracted using salting out methods. Deletions in GSTT1 and GSTM1 (null genotypes) were addressed by PCR. CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism was detected by PCR-RFLP. Odds ratio (OR) and 95%CI were calculated to estimate the association between each variable studied and oncohematological disease. RESULTS Women showed lower risk of disease compared to men (OR 0.52, 95%CI: 0.34-0.82, P = 0.003). Higher levels of education (> 12 years) were significantly associated with an increased risk, compared to complete primary school or less (OR 3.68, 95%CI: 1.82-7.40, P < 0.001 adjusted for age and sex). With respect to tobacco, none of the smoking categories showed association with oncohematological diseases. Regarding dietary habits, consumption of grilled/barbecued meat 3 or more times per month showed significant association with an increased risk of disease (OR 1.72, 95%CI: 1.08-2.75, P = 0.02). Daily consumption of coffee also was associated with an increased risk (OR 1.77, 95%CI: 1.03-3.03, P = 0.03). Results for GSTT1, GSTM1 and CYP1A1 polymorphisms showed no significant association with oncohematological diseases. When analyzing the interaction between polymorphisms and tobacco smoking or dietary habits, no statistically significant associations that modify disease risk were found. CONCLUSION We reported an increased risk of oncohematological diseases associated with meat and coffee intake. We did not find significant associations between genetic polymorphisms and blood cancer. PMID:27777882

  3. Novel variants of SERPIN1A gene: Interplay between alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Arif; Shah, Naveed Nazir; Hazari, Younis Mohammad; Habib, Mudasir; Bashir, Samirul; Hilal, Nazia; Banday, Mariam; Asrafuzzaman, Syed; Fazili, Khalid Majid

    2016-08-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) is one of the major circulating anti-protease whose levels in circulation are raised during excessive amount of proteases, especially neutrophil elastase (NE) released during the course of inflammation. Proteolytic attack of NE on peripheral organs, more exclusively on lung parenchyma has severe consequence that may precipitate pulmonary emphysema. Normally, human body has its own molecular and physiological mechanisms to synthesize and regulate the production of anti-protease like AAT to mitigate the extent of inflammatory damage. AAT coded by serine-protease inhibitor (SERPINA1) is predominantly expressed in hepatocytes and to some extent by macrophages, monocytes, lung tissue etc. The observation that persons with AAT deficiency developed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and early-onset of emphysema proposed a role for pathways connecting AAT in pathogenesis. Extensive studies have been done till now to bridge a connection between numerous genetic polymorphisms of SERPINA1 gene and the early onset of COPD. Here in this review, we have comprehensively discussed some of the variants of SERPINA1 gene discovered till date and their association with the exacerbation of obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:27492524

  4. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-05-31

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  5. Structural and Functional Abnormalities of the Neuromuscular Junction in the Trembler-J Homozygote Mouse Model of Congenital Hypomyelinating Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Scurry, Alexandra N; Heredia, Dante J; Feng, Cheng-Yuan; Gephart, Gregory B; Hennig, Grant W; Gould, Thomas W

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) result in the most common form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, CMT1A. This hereditary peripheral neuropathy is characterized by dysmyelination of peripheral nerves, reduced nerve conduction velocity, and muscle weakness. APMP22 point mutation in L16P (leucine 16 to proline) underlies a form of human CMT1A as well as the Trembler-J mouse model of CMT1A. Homozygote Trembler-J mice (Tr(J)) die early postnatally, fail to make peripheral myelin, and, therefore, are more similar to patients with congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy than those with CMT1A. Because recent studies of inherited neuropathies in humans and mice have demonstrated that dysfunction and degeneration of neuromuscular synapses or junctions (NMJs) often precede impairments in axonal conduction, we examined the structure and function of NMJs in Tr(J)mice. Although synapses appeared to be normally innervated even in end-stage Tr(J)mice, the growth and maturation of the NMJs were altered. In addition, the amplitudes of nerve-evoked muscle endplate potentials were reduced and there was transmission failure during sustained nerve stimulation. These results suggest that the severe congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy that characterizes Tr(J)mice results in structural and functional deficits of the developing NMJ.

  6. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  7. SLIT2/ROBO1-miR-218-1-RET/PLAG1: a new disease pathway involved in Hirschsprung's disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weibing; Tang, Junwei; He, Jun; Zhou, Zhigang; Qin, Yufeng; Qin, Jingjing; Li, Bo; Xu, Xiaoqun; Geng, Qiming; Jiang, Weiwei; Wu, Wei; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2015-06-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) is a rare congenital disease caused by impaired proliferation and migration of neural crest cells. We investigated changes in expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) and the genes they regulate in tissues of patients with HSCR. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses were used to measure levels of miRNA, mRNAs, and proteins in colon tissues from 69 patients with HSCR and 49 individuals without HSCR (controls). Direct interactions between miRNAs and specific mRNAs were indentified in vitro, while the function role of miR-218-1 was investigated by using miR-218 transgenic mice. An increased level of miR-218-1 correlated with increased levels of SLIT2 and decreased levels of RET and PLAG1 mRNA and protein. The reductions in RET and PLAG1 by miR-218-1 reduced proliferation and migration of SH-SY5Y cells. Overexpression of the secreted form of SLIT2 inhibited cell migration via binding to its receptor ROBO1. Bowel tissues from miR-218-1 transgenic mice had nerve fibre hyperplasia and reduced numbers of gangliocytes, compared with wild-type mice. Altered miR-218-1 regulation of SLIT2, RET and PLAG1 might be involved in the pathogenesis of HSCR.

  8. SLIT2/ROBO1-miR-218-1-RET/PLAG1: a new disease pathway involved in Hirschsprung's disease

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weibing; Tang, Junwei; He, Jun; Zhou, Zhigang; Qin, Yufeng; Qin, Jingjing; Li, Bo; Xu, Xiaoqun; Geng, Qiming; Jiang, Weiwei; Wu, Wei; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) is a rare congenital disease caused by impaired proliferation and migration of neural crest cells. We investigated changes in expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) and the genes they regulate in tissues of patients with HSCR. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses were used to measure levels of miRNA, mRNAs, and proteins in colon tissues from 69 patients with HSCR and 49 individuals without HSCR (controls). Direct interactions between miRNAs and specific mRNAs were indentified in vitro, while the function role of miR-218-1 was investigated by using miR-218 transgenic mice. An increased level of miR-218-1 correlated with increased levels of SLIT2 and decreased levels of RET and PLAG1mRNA and protein. The reductions in RET and PLAG1 by miR-218-1 reduced proliferation and migration of SH-SY5Y cells. Overexpression of the secreted form of SLIT2 inhibited cell migration via binding to its receptor ROBO1. Bowel tissues from miR-218-1 transgenic mice had nerve fibre hyperplasia and reduced numbers of gangliocytes, compared with wild-type mice. Altered miR-218-1 regulation of SLIT2, RET and PLAG1 might be involved in the pathogenesis of HSCR. PMID:25786906

  9. Truncation and Activation of Dual Specificity Tyrosine Phosphorylation-regulated Kinase 1A by Calpain I: A MOLECULAR MECHANISM LINKED TO TAU PATHOLOGY IN ALZHEIMER DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Jin, Nana; Yin, Xiaomin; Gu, Jianlan; Zhang, Xinhua; Shi, Jianhua; Qian, Wei; Ji, Yuhua; Cao, Maohong; Gu, Xiaosong; Ding, Fei; Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2015-06-12

    Hyperphosphorylation and dysregulation of exon 10 splicing of Tau are pivotally involved in pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) and/or other tauopathies. Alternative splicing of Tau exon 10, which encodes the second microtubule-binding repeat, generates Tau isoforms containing three and four microtubule-binding repeats, termed 3R-Taus and 4R-Taus, respectively. Dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) lies at the Down syndrome critical region of chromosome 21. Overexpression of this kinase may contribute to the early Tau pathology in Down syndrome via phosphorylation of Tau and dysregulation of Tau exon 10. Here, we report that Dyrk1A was truncated at the C terminus and was associated with overactivation of calpain I in AD brain. Calpain I proteolyzed Dyrk1A in vitro first at the C terminus and further at the N terminus and enhanced its kinase activity toward Tau via increased Vmax but not Km. C-terminal truncation of Dyrk1A resulted in stronger activity than its full-length protein in promotion of exon 10 exclusion and phosphorylation of Tau. Dyrk1A was truncated in kainic acid-induced excitotoxic mouse brains and coincided with an increase in 3R-Tau expression and phosphorylation of Tau via calpain activation. Moreover, truncation of Dyrk1A was correlated with an increase in the ratio of 3R-Tau/4R-Tau and Tau hyperphosphorylation in AD brain. Collectively, these findings suggest that truncation/activation of Dyrk1A by Ca(2+)/calpain I might contribute to Tau pathology via promotion of exon 10 exclusion and hyperphosphorylation of Tau in AD brain. PMID:25918155

  10. Expression pattern in retinal photoreceptors of POMGnT1, a protein involved in muscle-eye-brain disease

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Mary Luz; Haro, Carmen; Campello, Laura; Cruces, Jesús; Martín-Nieto, José

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The POMGNT1 gene, encoding protein O-linked-mannose β-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1, is associated with muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB) and other dystroglycanopathies. This gene’s lack of function or expression causes hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG) in the muscle and the central nervous system, including the brain and the retina. The ocular symptoms of patients with MEB include retinal degeneration and detachment, glaucoma, and abnormal electroretinogram. Nevertheless, the POMGnT1 expression pattern in the healthy mammalian retina has not yet been investigated. In this work, we address the expression of the POMGNT1 gene in the healthy retina of a variety of mammals and characterize the distribution pattern of this gene in the adult mouse retina and the 661W photoreceptor cell line. Methods Using reverse transcription (RT)–PCR and immunoblotting, we studied POMGNT1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in various mammalian species, from rodents to humans. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy analyses were performed to characterize the distribution profile of its protein product in mouse retinal sections and in 661W cultured cells. The intranuclear distribution of POMT1 and POMT2, the two enzymes preceding POMGnT1 in the α-DG O-mannosyl glycosylation pathway, was also analyzed. Results POMGNT1 mRNA and its encoded protein were expressed in the neural retina of all mammals studied. POMGnT1 was located in the cytoplasmic fraction in the mouse retina and concentrated in the myoid portion of the photoreceptor inner segments, where the protein colocalized with GM130, a Golgi complex marker. The presence of POMGnT1 in the Golgi complex was also evident in 661W cells. However, and in contrast to retinal tissue, POMGnT1 additionally accumulated in the nucleus of the 661W photoreceptors. Colocalization was found within this organelle between POMGnT1 and POMT1/2, the latter associated with euchromatic regions of the nucleus. Conclusions

  11. Identification and characterization of Crr1a, a gene for resistance to clubroot disease (Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin) in Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Katsunori; Suwabe, Keita; Tomita, Rubens Norio; Kato, Takeyuki; Nunome, Tsukasa; Fukuoka, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    Clubroot disease, caused by the obligate biotrophic protist Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin, is one of the most economically important diseases of Brassica crops in the world. Although many clubroot resistance (CR) loci have been identified through genetic analysis and QTL mapping, the molecular mechanisms of defense responses against P. brassicae remain unknown. Fine mapping of the Crr1 locus, which was originally identified as a single locus, revealed that it comprises two gene loci, Crr1a and Crr1b. Here we report the map-based cloning and characterization of Crr1a, which confers resistance to clubroot in Brassica rapa. Crr1a(G004), cloned from the resistant line G004, encodes a Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor/nucleotide-binding site/leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NB-LRR) protein expressed in the stele and cortex of hypocotyl and roots, where secondary infection of the pathogen occurs, but not in root hairs, where primary infection occurs. Gain-of-function analysis proved that Crr1a(G004) alone conferred resistance to isolate Ano-01 in susceptible Arabidopsis and B. rapa. In comparison, the susceptible allele Crr1a(A9709) encodes a truncated NB-LRR protein, which lacked more than half of the TIR domain on account of the insertion of a solo-long terminal repeat (LTR) in exon 1 and included several substitutions and insertion-deletions in the LRR domain. This study provides a basis for further molecular analysis of defense mechanisms against P. brassicae and will contribute to the breeding of resistant cultivars of Brassica vegetables by marker-assisted selection.Data deposition The sequence reported in this paper has been deposited in the GenBank database (accession no. AB605024).

  12. Exon redefinition by a point mutation within exon 5 of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene is the major cause of glycogen storage disease type 1a in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Susumu; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Kido, Keiko

    1995-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a (von Gierke disease) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). We have identified a novel mutation in the G6Pase gene of a individual with GSD type 1a. The cDNA from the patient`s liver revealed a 91-nt deletion in exon 5. The genomic DNA from the patient`s white blood cells revealed no deletion or mutation at the splicing junction of intron 4 and exon 5. The 3{prime} splicing occurred 91 bp from the 5{prime} site of exon 5 (at position 732 in the coding region), causing a substitution of a single nucleotide (G to T) at position 727 in the coding region. Further confirmation of the missplicing was obtained by transient expression of allelic minigene constructs into animal cells. Another eight unrelated families of nine Japanese patients were all found to have this mutation. This mutation is a new type of splicing mutation in the G6Pase gene, and 91% of patients and carriers suffering from GSD1a in Japan are detectable with this splicing mutation. 28 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral midbrain of adult mice heterozygote for Engrailed1: a new genetic model for Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Le Pen, Gwenaëlle; Sonnier, Laure; Hartmann, Andreas; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Trovero, Fabrice; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Prochiantz, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Engrailed1 is a developmental gene of the homeogene family that controls the survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons throughout life. Since these neurons have been crucially implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD), transgenic mice lacking one En1 allele could be of particular interest for the development of an animal model for PD. We showed in En1+/- mice, some traits reminiscent of PD such as (1) a progressive loss of mesencephalic dopaminergic (DA) neurons, and (2) motor deficits, anhedonia, decreased social interactions and depression-like behaviours. Further validation is needed, but these first results suggest that En1+/- mice could provide a promising model for the study of PD.

  14. Hologram QSAR models of a series of 6-arylquinazolin-4-amine inhibitors of a new Alzheimer's disease target: dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase-1A enzyme.

    PubMed

    Leal, Felipe Dias; da Silva Lima, Camilo Henrique; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Castro, Helena Carla; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão

    2015-01-01

    Dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase-1A (DYRK1A) is an enzyme directly involved in Alzheimer's disease, since its increased expression leads to β-amyloidosis, Tau protein aggregation, and subsequent formation of neurofibrillary tangles. Hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship (HQSAR, 2D fragment-based) models were developed for a series of 6-arylquinazolin-4-amine inhibitors (36 training, 10 test) of DYRK1A. The best HQSAR model (q2 = 0.757; SEcv = 0.493; R2 = 0.937; SE = 0.251; R2pred = 0.659) presents high goodness-of-fit (R2 > 0.9), as well as high internal (q2 > 0.7) and external (R2pred > 0.5) predictive power. The fragments that increase and decrease the biological activity values were addressed using the colored atomic contribution maps provided by the method. The HQSAR contribution map of the best model is an important tool to understand the activity profiles of new derivatives and may provide information for further design of novel DYRK1A inhibitors.

  15. Hologram QSAR models of a series of 6-arylquinazolin-4-amine inhibitors of a new Alzheimer's disease target: dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase-1A enzyme.

    PubMed

    Leal, Felipe Dias; da Silva Lima, Camilo Henrique; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Castro, Helena Carla; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão

    2015-01-01

    Dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase-1A (DYRK1A) is an enzyme directly involved in Alzheimer's disease, since its increased expression leads to β-amyloidosis, Tau protein aggregation, and subsequent formation of neurofibrillary tangles. Hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship (HQSAR, 2D fragment-based) models were developed for a series of 6-arylquinazolin-4-amine inhibitors (36 training, 10 test) of DYRK1A. The best HQSAR model (q2 = 0.757; SEcv = 0.493; R2 = 0.937; SE = 0.251; R2pred = 0.659) presents high goodness-of-fit (R2 > 0.9), as well as high internal (q2 > 0.7) and external (R2pred > 0.5) predictive power. The fragments that increase and decrease the biological activity values were addressed using the colored atomic contribution maps provided by the method. The HQSAR contribution map of the best model is an important tool to understand the activity profiles of new derivatives and may provide information for further design of novel DYRK1A inhibitors. PMID:25756379

  16. Integrins alpha4 and alpha M, collagen1A1, and matrix metalloproteinase 7 are upregulated in acute Kawasaki disease vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reindel, Rebecca; Baker, Susan C.; Kim, Kwang-Youn; Rowley, Carol A.; Shulman, Stanford T.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Lingen, Mark W.; Rowley, Anne H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Kawasaki Disease (KD) can result in fatal coronary artery aneurysms especially in untreated patients. Our recent studies of KD vascular pathology revealed subacute/chronic vasculitis that began early in the illness with proliferation of smooth muscle cell derived-myofibroblasts in a complex extracellular matrix (ECM). We hypothesized that there is dysregulation of specific ECM and adhesion molecules in KD coronary arteries. Methods Gene expression profiling for ECM and adhesion molecules was performed on 6 acute KD and 8 control coronary arteries using a targeted real-time PCR array approach. Results Integrins alpha4 and alphaM (ITGA4, ITGAM), collagen 1A1 (COL1A1), and matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7) were significantly upregulated in KD coronary arteries compared with controls. Immunohistochemistry with anti- ITGAM antibodies revealed expression on inflammatory cells within the coronary artery wall in KD patients but not controls. Conclusion Integrins ITGA4 and ITGAM are upregulated in KD vasculopathy, likely promoting inflammatory recruitment that stimulates smooth muscle cell transition to myofibroblasts and their proliferation. MMP-7 likely enhances myofibroblast proliferation and luminal lesion expansion, and overexpression of COL1A1 may lead to coronary artery stenosis. Identification of the molecular pathogenesis of KD vasculopathy may lead to the development of circulating biomarkers and to directed therapeutic interventions. PMID:23344661

  17. Targeted Proteolysis of Plectin Isoform 1a Accounts for Hemidesmosome Dysfunction in Mice Mimicking the Dominant Skin Blistering Disease EBS-Ogna

    PubMed Central

    Walko, Gernot; Vukasinovic, Nevena; Gross, Karin; Fischer, Irmgard; Sibitz, Sabrina; Fuchs, Peter; Reipert, Siegfried; Jungwirth, Ute; Berger, Walter; Salzer, Ulrich; Carugo, Oliviero; Castañón, Maria J.; Wiche, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in the cytolinker protein plectin account for the multisystem disorders epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) associated with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD), pyloric atresia (EBS-PA), and congenital myasthenia (EBS-CMS). In contrast, a dominant missense mutation leads to the disease EBS-Ogna, manifesting exclusively as skin fragility. We have exploited this trait to study the molecular basis of hemidesmosome failure in EBS-Ogna and to reveal the contribution of plectin to hemidesmosome homeostasis. We generated EBS-Ogna knock-in mice mimicking the human phenotype and show that blistering reflects insufficient protein levels of the hemidesmosome-associated plectin isoform 1a. We found that plectin 1a, in contrast to plectin 1c, the major isoform expressed in epidermal keratinocytes, is proteolytically degraded, supporting the notion that degradation of hemidesmosome-anchored plectin is spatially controlled. Using recombinant proteins, we show that the mutation renders plectin's 190-nm-long coiled-coil rod domain more vulnerable to cleavage by calpains and other proteases activated in the epidermis but not in skeletal muscle. Accordingly, treatment of cultured EBS-Ogna keratinocytes as well as of EBS-Ogna mouse skin with calpain inhibitors resulted in increased plectin 1a protein expression levels. Moreover, we report that plectin's rod domain forms dimeric structures that can further associate laterally into remarkably stable (paracrystalline) polymers. We propose focal self-association of plectin molecules as a novel mechanism contributing to hemidesmosome homeostasis and stabilization. PMID:22144912

  18. Agonist and antagonist bind differently to 5-HT1A receptors during Alzheimer's disease: A post-mortem study with PET radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Benjamin; Sebti, Johan; Verdurand, Mathieu; Fieux, Sylvain; Billard, Thierry; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Troakes, Claire; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Zimmer, Luc

    2016-10-01

    PET imaging studies using 5-HT1A receptor radiotracers show a decreased density of this receptor in hippocampi of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) at advanced stages. However, current 5-HT1A receptor radiopharmaceuticals used in neuroimaging are antagonists, thought to bind to 5-HT1A receptors in different functional states (i.e., both the one which displays high affinity for agonists and is thought to mediate receptor activation, as well as the state which has low affinity for agonists). Comparing the PET imaging obtained using an agonist radiotracer, which binds selectively to functional receptors, with the PET imaging obtained using an antagonist radiotracer would therefore provide original information on 5-HT1A receptor impairment during AD. Quantitative autoradiography using [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF, a 5-HT1A agonist and antagonist, respectively, was measured in hippocampi of patients with AD (n = 25, at different Braak stages) and control subjects (n = 9). The neuronal density was measured in the same tissues by NeuN immunohistochemistry. The specific binding of both radiotracers was determined by addition of WAY-100635, a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. The autoradiography distribution of both 5-HT1A PET radiotracers varied across hippocampus regions. The highest binding density was in the pyramidal layer of CA1. Incubation with Gpp(NH)p, a non-hydrolysable analogue of GTP, reduced significantly [(18)F]F13640 binding in hippocampal regions, confirming its preferential interaction with G-coupled receptors, and slightly increased [(18)F]MPPF binding. In the CA1 subfield, [(18)F]F13640 binding was significantly decreased at Braak stages I/II (-19%), Braak stages III/IV (-23%), and Braak stages V/VI (-36%) versus control. In contrast, [(18)F]MPPF binding was statistically reduced only at the most advanced Braak stages V/VI compared to control (-33%). Since [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF can be used in vivo in humans, this

  19. A Novel Mutation in the type Iα Regulatory Subunit of Protein Kinase A (PRKAR1A) in a Cushing's Syndrome Patient with Primary Pigmented Nodular Adrenocortical Disease.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Ryohei; Tamba, Sachiko; Yamada, Yuya; Okita, Tomonori; Kawachi, Yusuke; Mori, Reiko; Kyo, Mitsuaki; Saisho, Kenji; Kuroda, Yohei; Yamamoto, Koji; Furuya, Akiko; Mukai, Tokuo; Maekawa, Takashi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Sasano, Hironobu; Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with Cushing's syndrome due to bilateral adrenal hyperplasia with multiple nodules. Computed tomography scan results were atypical demonstrating an enlargement of the bilateral adrenal glands harboring multiple small nodules, but the lesion was clinically diagnosed to be primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) based on both endocrinological test results and his family history. We performed bilateral adrenalectomy and confirmed the diagnosis histologically. An analysis of the patient and his mother's genomic DNA identified a novel mutation in the type Iα regulatory subunit of protein kinase A (PRKAR1A) gene; p.E17X (c.49G>T). This confirmed the diagnosis of PPNAD which is associated with Carney Complex. PMID:27580546

  20. Malignant Transformation of Hepatic Adenoma in Glycogen Storage Disease Type-1a: Report of an Exceptional Case Diagnosed on Surveillance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Baheti, Akshay D.; Yeh, Matthew M.; O'Malley, Ryan; Lalwani, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular adenoma is a heterogeneous group of benign neoplasms arising from hepatocellular cells and can be subclassified into four major groups based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. These four subtypes are hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 1α-inactivated, β-catenin–activated, inflammatory, and unclassified adenomas. Immunohistochemistry studies have demonstrated that since β-catenin–activated adenomas have a higher risk of malignant transformation, the identification of the subtype of adenoma remains crucial in patient management. However, malignant transformation of hepatic adenoma without β-catenin overexpression can be seen in 30–65% cases. We report a case of malignant transformation of hepatic adenoma without overexpression of β-catenin in a 31-year-old man with a known glycogen storage disease (GSD) Type-1a, which was diagnosed on surveillance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI showed a mild interval increase in one lesion with relative stability of the other adenomas. The lesion was presumed to be suspicious for a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and was confirmed on pathology. PMID:26430540

  1. Peginterferon Beta-1a Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... peginterferon beta-1a injection at around the same time of day each time you inject it. Follow ...

  2. The PMP22 Gene and Its Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Parker, Brett; Martyn, Colin; Natarajan, Chandramohan; Guo, Jiasong

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) is primarily expressed in the compact myelin of the peripheral nervous system. Levels of PMP22 have to be tightly regulated since alterations of PMP22 levels by mutations of the PMP22 gene are responsible for >50% of all patients with inherited peripheral neuropathies, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth type-1A (CMT1A) with trisomy of PMP22, hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) with heterozygous deletion of PMP22, and CMT1E with point mutations of PMP22. While over-expression and point-mutations of the PMP22 gene may produce gain-of-function phenotypes, deletion of PMP22 results in a loss-of-function phenotype that reveals the normal physiological functions of the PMP22 protein. In this article, we will review the basic genetics, biochemistry and molecular structure of PMP22, followed by discussion of the current understanding of pathogenic mechanisms involving in the inherited neuropathies with mutations in PMP22 gene. PMID:23224996

  3. Expression and regulation of pear 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase gene (PpACS1a) during fruit ripening, under salicylic acid and indole-3-acetic acid treatment, and in diseased fruit.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Yu-Xing

    2014-06-01

    In plants, the level of ethylene is determined by the activity of the key enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase (ACS). A gene encoding an ACC synthase protein was isolated from pear (Pyrus pyrifolia). This gene designated PpACS1a (GenBank accession no. KC632526) was 1488 bp in length with an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 495 amino acids that shared high similarity with other pear ACC synthase proteins. The PpACS1a was grouped into type-1 subfamily of plant ACS based on its conserved domain and phylogenetic status. Real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PpACS1a was differentially expressed in pear tissues and predominantly expressed in anthers. The expression signal of PpACS1a was also detected in fruit and leaves, but no signal was detected in shoots and petals. Furthermore, the PpACS1a expression was regulated during fruit ripening. In addition, the PpACS1a gene expression was regulated by salicylic acid (SA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in fruit. Moreover, the expression of the PpACS1a was up-regulated in diseased pear fruit. These results indicated that PpACS1a might be involved in fruit ripening and response to SA, IAA and disease.

  4. The disease-linked Glu-26-Lys mutant version of Coronin 1A exhibits pleiotropic and pathway-specific signaling defects

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Virginia; Robles-Valero, Javier; Barreira, María; Bustelo, Xosé R.

    2015-01-01

    Coronin 1A (Coro1A) is involved in cytoskeletal and signaling events, including the regulation of Rac1 GTPase– and myosin II–dependent pathways. Mutations that generate truncated or unstable Coro1A proteins cause immunodeficiencies in both humans and rodents. However, in the case of the peripheral T-cell–deficient (Ptcd) mouse strain, the immunodeficiency is caused by a Glu-26-Lys mutation that targets a surface-exposed residue unlikely to affect the intramolecular architecture and stability of the protein. Here we report that this mutation induces pleiotropic effects in Coro1A protein, including the exacerbation of Coro1A-dependent actin-binding and -bundling activities; the formation of large meshworks of Coro1AE26K-decorated filaments endowed with unusual organizational, functional, and staining properties; and the elimination of Coro1A functions associated with both Rac1 and myosin II signaling. By contrast, it does not affect the ability of Coro1A to stimulate the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NF-AT). Coro1AE26K is not a dominant-negative mutant, indicating that its pathological effects are derived from the inability to rescue the complete loss of the wild-type counterpart in cells. These results indicate that Coro1AE26K behaves as either a recessive gain-of-function or loss-of-function mutant protein, depending on signaling context and presence of the wild-type counterpart in cells. PMID:26108624

  5. UGT1A1*28 polymorphism in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: the first investigation of the polymorphism in disease susceptibility and its specific cytogenetic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Karakosta, Maria; Kalotychou, Vassiliki; Kostakis, Alkiviadis; Pantelias, Gabriel; Rombos, Ioannis; Kouraklis, Gregory; Manola, Kalliopi N

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has been recently attributed to a combination of genetic predisposition and exposure to environmental factors. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A1*28 is an inborn polymorphism that results in significant downregulation of uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase 1-1 (UGT1A1) activity, one of the most critical metabolizing enzymes involved in the detoxification of toxic substances, some of which contribute to CLL pathogenesis. Here, for the first time, we investigated the putative impact of UGT1A1*28 on CLL incidence and on the formation of the most common chromosomal abnormalities of CLL. UGT1A1*28 was investigated in 109 CLL patients and 108 healthy controls, and was associated with karyotypic and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) results. A significant high frequency of the mutant genotype was observed in patients carrying abnormal FISH patterns, especially del(11q) and +12, which are CLL-specific abnormalities. We also observed a significant association between UGT1A1*28 and the intermediate to unfavorable cytogenetic CLL risk groups. No difference, though, was observed in genotypes between patients and controls. Therefore, we could suggest that UGT-deficient individuals may be at a greater risk for developing CLL-specific abnormalities. Our study might serve as a starting point to consider UGT1A1*28 polymorphism as one of the possible predisposing factors of CLL pathogenesis. PMID:24458221

  6. Nonrecurrent 17p11.2p12 Rearrangement Events that Result in Two Concomitant Genomic Disorders: The PMP22-RAI1 Contiguous Gene Duplication Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bo; Harel, Tamar; Gu, Shen; Liu, Pengfei; Burglen, Lydie; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Gelowani, Violet; Beck, Christine R.; Carvalho, Claudia M.B.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Coe, Andrew; Malan, Valérie; Munnich, Arnold; Magoulas, Pilar L.; Potocki, Lorraine; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The genomic duplication associated with Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS) maps in close proximity to the duplication associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A). PTLS is characterized by hypotonia, failure to thrive, reduced body weight, intellectual disability, and autistic features. CMT1A is a common autosomal dominant distal symmetric peripheral polyneuropathy. The key dosage-sensitive genes RAI1 and PMP22 are respectively associated with PTLS and CMT1A. Recurrent duplications accounting for the majority of subjects with these conditions are mediated by nonallelic homologous recombination between distinct low-copy repeat (LCR) substrates. The LCRs flanking a contiguous genomic interval encompassing both RAI1 and PMP22 do not share extensive homology; thus, duplications encompassing both loci are rare and potentially generated by a different mutational mechanism. We characterized genomic rearrangements that simultaneously duplicate PMP22 and RAI1, including nine potential complex genomic rearrangements, in 23 subjects by high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization and breakpoint junction sequencing. Insertions and microhomologies were found at the breakpoint junctions, suggesting potential replicative mechanisms for rearrangement formation. At the breakpoint junctions of these nonrecurrent rearrangements, enrichment of repetitive DNA sequences was observed, indicating that they might predispose to genomic instability and rearrangement. Clinical evaluation revealed blended PTLS and CMT1A phenotypes with a potential earlier onset of neuropathy. Moreover, additional clinical findings might be observed due to the extra duplicated material included in the rearrangements. Our genomic analysis suggests replicative mechanisms as a predominant mechanism underlying PMP22-RAI1 contiguous gene duplications and provides further evidence supporting the role of complex genomic architecture in genomic instability. PMID:26544804

  7. The global burden of myocarditis: part 1: a systematic literature review for the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors 2010 study.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Leslie T; Keren, Andre; Sliwa, Karen; Matsumori, Akira; Mensah, George A

    2014-03-01

    Myocarditis contributes to the global burden of cardiovascular disease primarily through sudden death and dilated cardiomyopathy. A systematic approach to identify the cardiovascular mortality and major morbidity attributable to myocarditis has not been performed. A writing group convened by the GBD 2010 (Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries and Risk Factors) Study systematically reviewed the world's literature by a manual review of all titles since 1966 on myocarditis identified using Ovid Medline, development of a disease model, and provision of estimates when possible of the incidence, prevalence, risk of death, and major morbidity for the world regions. Accurate population-based estimates of myocarditis incidence and prevalence are not directly available in any world region. However, a model that quantitates the risk of acute death and chronic heart failure following myocarditis was derived from the published data. Using hospital dismissal data, the burden of myocarditis as a percentage of prevalent heart failure varied by age and region from approximately 0.5% to 4.0%. The novel combination of multiple data sources may provide an estimate of the years of life lost and years of life disabled from myocarditis. Pending the integration of these data sources, the burden of dilated cardiomyopathy and myocarditis were reported together in the 2010 GBD report. The 2013 GBD project may refine these estimates with the inclusion of more comprehensive payor databases and more precise case definitions. PMID:25432122

  8. AAV1.NT-3 Gene Therapy for Charcot–Marie–Tooth Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sahenk, Zarife; Galloway, Gloria; Clark, Kelly Reed; Malik, Vinod; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R; Kaspar, Brian K.; Chen, Lei; Braganza, Cilwyn; Montgomery, Chrystal; Mendell, Jerry R

    2014-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) neuropathies represent a heterogeneous group of peripheral nerve disorders affecting 1 in 2,500 persons. One variant, CMT1A, is a primary Schwann cell (SC) disorder, and represents the single most common variant. In previous studies, we showed that neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) improved the tremblerJ (TrJ) mouse and also showed efficacy in CMT1A patients. Long-term treatment with NT-3 was not possible related to its short half-life and lack of availability. This led to considerations of NT-3 gene therapy via adenoassociated virus (AAV) delivery to muscle, acting as secretory organ for widespread distribution of this neurotrophic agent. In the TrJ model of demyelinating CMT, rAAV1.NT-3 therapy resulted in measurable NT-3 secretion levels in blood sufficient to provide improvement in motor function, histopathology, and electrophysiology of peripheral nerves. Furthermore, we showed that the compound muscle action potential amplitude can be used as surrogate for functional improvement and established the therapeutic dose and a preferential muscle-specific promoter to achieve sustained NT-3 levels. These studies of intramuscular (i.m.) delivery of rAAV1.NT-3 serve as a template for future CMT1A clinical trials with a potential to extend treatment to other nerve diseases with impaired nerve regeneration. PMID:24162799

  9. FC-TRIPLEX Chagas/Leish IgG1: A Multiplexed Flow Cytometry Method for Differential Serological Diagnosis of Chagas Disease and Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Campos, Fernanda Magalhães Freire; Geiger, Stefan Michael; Rocha, Roberta Dias Rodrigues; de Araújo, Fernanda Fortes; Vitelli-Avelar, Danielle Marquete; Andrade, Mariléia Chaves; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Lemos, Elenice Moreira; de Freitas Carneiro Proietti, Anna Bárbara; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira; Caldas, Rafaella Gaiotti; Freitas, Carolina Renata Camargos; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2015-01-01

    Differential serological diagnosis of Chagas disease and leishmaniasis is difficult owing to cross-reactivity resulting from the fact that the parasites that cause these pathologies share antigenic epitopes. Even with optimized serological assays that use parasite-specific recombinant antigens, inconclusive test results continue to be a problem. Therefore, new serological tests with high sensitivity and specificity are needed. In the present work, we developed and evaluated the performance of a new flow cytometric serological method, referred to as FC-TRIPLEX Chagas/Leish IgG1, for the all-in-one classification of inconclusive tests. The method uses antigens for the detection of visceral leishmaniasis, localized cutaneous leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease and is based on an inverted detuned algorithm for analysis of anti-Trypanosomatidae IgG1 reactivity. First, parasites were label with fluorescein isothiocyanate or Alexa Fluor 647 at various concentrations. Then serum samples were serially diluted, the dilutions were incubated with suspensions of mixed labeled parasites, and flow cytometric measurements were performed to determine percentages of positive fluorescent parasites. Using the new method, we obtained correct results for 76 of 80 analyzed serum samples (95% overall performance), underscoring the outstanding performance of the method. Moreover, we found that the fluorescently labeled parasite suspensions were stable during storage at room temperature, 4°C, and –20°C for 1 year. In addition, two different lots of parasite suspensions showed equivalent antigen recognition; that is, the two lots showed equivalent categorical segregation of anti-Trypanosomatidae IgG1 reactivity at selected serum dilutions. In conclusion, we have developed a sensitive and selective method for differential diagnosis of Chagas disease, visceral leishmaniasis, and localized cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:25875961

  10. FC-TRIPLEX Chagas/Leish IgG1: a multiplexed flow cytometry method for differential serological diagnosis of chagas disease and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Campos, Fernanda Magalhães Freire; Geiger, Stefan Michael; Rocha, Roberta Dias Rodrigues; de Araújo, Fernanda Fortes; Vitelli-Avelar, Danielle Marquete; Andrade, Mariléia Chaves; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Lemos, Elenice Moreira; de Freitas Carneiro Proietti, Anna Bárbara; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira; Caldas, Rafaella Gaiotti; Freitas, Carolina Renata Camargos; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2015-01-01

    Differential serological diagnosis of Chagas disease and leishmaniasis is difficult owing to cross-reactivity resulting from the fact that the parasites that cause these pathologies share antigenic epitopes. Even with optimized serological assays that use parasite-specific recombinant antigens, inconclusive test results continue to be a problem. Therefore, new serological tests with high sensitivity and specificity are needed. In the present work, we developed and evaluated the performance of a new flow cytometric serological method, referred to as FC-TRIPLEX Chagas/Leish IgG1, for the all-in-one classification of inconclusive tests. The method uses antigens for the detection of visceral leishmaniasis, localized cutaneous leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease and is based on an inverted detuned algorithm for analysis of anti-Trypanosomatidae IgG1 reactivity. First, parasites were label with fluorescein isothiocyanate or Alexa Fluor 647 at various concentrations. Then serum samples were serially diluted, the dilutions were incubated with suspensions of mixed labeled parasites, and flow cytometric measurements were performed to determine percentages of positive fluorescent parasites. Using the new method, we obtained correct results for 76 of 80 analyzed serum samples (95% overall performance), underscoring the outstanding performance of the method. Moreover, we found that the fluorescently labeled parasite suspensions were stable during storage at room temperature, 4 °C, and -20 °C for 1 year. In addition, two different lots of parasite suspensions showed equivalent antigen recognition; that is, the two lots showed equivalent categorical segregation of anti-Trypanosomatidae IgG1 reactivity at selected serum dilutions. In conclusion, we have developed a sensitive and selective method for differential diagnosis of Chagas disease, visceral leishmaniasis, and localized cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  11. Peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] KNOPE1, a class 1 KNOX orthologue to Arabidopsis BREVIPEDICELLUS/KNAT1, is misexpressed during hyperplasia of leaf curl disease.

    PubMed

    Testone, Giulio; Bruno, Leonardo; Condello, Emiliano; Chiappetta, Adriana; Bruno, Alessandro; Mele, Giovanni; Tartarini, Andrea; Spanò, Laura; Innocenti, Anna Maria; Mariotti, Domenico; Bitonti, Maria Beatrice; Giannino, Donato

    2008-01-01

    Class 1 KNOTTED-like (KNOX) transcription factors control cell meristematic identity. An investigation was carried out to determine whether they maintain this function in peach plants and might act in leaf curliness caused by the ascomycete Taphrina deformans. KNOPE1 function was assessed by overexpression in Arabidopsis and by yeast two-hybrid assays with Arabidopsis BELL proteins. Subsequently, KNOPE1 mRNA and zeatin localization was monitored during leaf curl disease. KNOPE1 and Arabidopsis BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP) proteins fell into the same phyletic group and recognized the same BELL factors. 35S:KNOPE1 Arabidopsis lines exhibited altered traits resembling those of BP-overexpressing lines. In peach shoot apical meristem, KNOPE1 was expressed in the peripheral and central zones but not in leaf primordia, identically to the BP expression pattern. These results strongly suggest that KNOPE1 must be down-regulated for leaf initiation and that it can control cell meristem identity equally as well as all class 1 KNOX genes. Leaves attacked by T. deformans share histological alterations with class 1 KNOX-overexpressing leaves, including cell proliferation and loss of cell differentiation. Both KNOPE1 and a cytokinin synthesis ISOPENTENYLTRANSFERASE gene were found to be up-regulated in infected curled leaves. At early disease stages, KNOPE1 was uniquely triggered in the palisade cells interacting with subepidermal mycelium, while zeatin vascular localization was unaltered compared with healthy leaves. Subsequently, when mycelium colonization and asci development occurred, both KNOPE1 and zeatin signals were scattered in sectors of cell disorders. These results suggest that KNOPE1 misexpression and de novo zeatin synthesis of host origin might participate in hyperplasia of leaf curl disease.

  12. HMGB1, a pathogenic molecule that induces neurite degeneration via TLR4-MARCKS, is a potential therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kyota; Motoki, Kazumi; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Chen, Xigui; Hama, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Kazuyuki; Homma, Hidenori; Tamura, Takuya; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Katsuno, Masahisa; Matsumi, Chiemi; Kajikawa, Masunori; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi; Sobue, Gen; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease, but it remains an intractable condition. Its pathogenesis is predominantly attributed to the aggregation and transmission of two molecules, Aβ and tau; however, other pathological mechanisms are possible. Here, we reveal that phosphorylation of MARCKS, a submembrane protein that regulates the stability of the actin network, occurs at Ser46 prior to aggregation of Aβ and is sustained throughout the course of AD in human and mouse brains. Furthermore, HMGB1 released from necrotic or hyperexcitatory neurons binds to TLR4, triggers the specific phosphorylation of MARCKS via MAP kinases, and induces neurite degeneration, the classical hallmark of AD pathology. Subcutaneous injection of a newly developed monoclonal antibody against HMGB1 strongly inhibits neurite degeneration even in the presence of Aβ plaques and completely recovers cognitive impairment in a mouse model. HMGB1 and Aβ mutually affect polymerization of the other molecule, and the therapeutic effects of the anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody are mediated by Aβ-dependent and Aβ-independent mechanisms. We propose that HMGB1 is a critical pathogenic molecule promoting AD pathology in parallel with Aβ and tau and a new key molecular target of preclinical antibody therapy to delay the onset of AD. PMID:27557632

  13. A lentiviral vector with expression controlled by E2F-1: A potential tool for the study and treatment of proliferative diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Bryan E.; Vieira de Carvalho, Anna Carolina; Bajgelman, Marcio C.

    2006-10-06

    We have constructed a lentiviral vector with expression limited to cells presenting active E2F-1 protein, a potential advantage for gene therapy of proliferative diseases. For the FE2FLW vector, the promoter region of the human E2F-1 gene was utilized to drive expression of luciferase cDNA, included as a reporter of viral expression. Primary, immortalized, and transformed cells were transduced with the FE2FLW vector and cell cycle alterations were induced with serum starvation/replacement, contact inhibition or drug treatment, revealing cell cycle-dependent changes in reporter activity. Forced E2F-1 expression, but not E2F-2 or E2F-3, increased reporter activity, indicating a major role for this factor in controlling expression from the FE2FLW virus. We show the utility of this vector as a reporter of E2F-1 and proliferation-dependent cellular alterations upon cytotoxic/cytostatic treatment, such as the introduction of tumor suppressor genes. We propose that the FE2FLW vector may be a starting point for the development of gene therapy strategies for proliferative diseases, such as cancer or restinosis.

  14. HMGB1, a pathogenic molecule that induces neurite degeneration via TLR4-MARCKS, is a potential therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kyota; Motoki, Kazumi; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Chen, Xigui; Hama, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Kazuyuki; Homma, Hidenori; Tamura, Takuya; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Katsuno, Masahisa; Matsumi, Chiemi; Kajikawa, Masunori; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi; Sobue, Gen; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease, but it remains an intractable condition. Its pathogenesis is predominantly attributed to the aggregation and transmission of two molecules, Aβ and tau; however, other pathological mechanisms are possible. Here, we reveal that phosphorylation of MARCKS, a submembrane protein that regulates the stability of the actin network, occurs at Ser46 prior to aggregation of Aβ and is sustained throughout the course of AD in human and mouse brains. Furthermore, HMGB1 released from necrotic or hyperexcitatory neurons binds to TLR4, triggers the specific phosphorylation of MARCKS via MAP kinases, and induces neurite degeneration, the classical hallmark of AD pathology. Subcutaneous injection of a newly developed monoclonal antibody against HMGB1 strongly inhibits neurite degeneration even in the presence of Aβ plaques and completely recovers cognitive impairment in a mouse model. HMGB1 and Aβ mutually affect polymerization of the other molecule, and the therapeutic effects of the anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody are mediated by Aβ-dependent and Aβ-independent mechanisms. We propose that HMGB1 is a critical pathogenic molecule promoting AD pathology in parallel with Aβ and tau and a new key molecular target of preclinical antibody therapy to delay the onset of AD. PMID:27557632

  15. Consensus recommendations from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on the management of rosacea, part 1: a status report on the disease state, general measures, and adjunctive skin care.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Thiboutot, Diane; Gallo, Richard; Webster, Guy; Tanghetti, Emil; Eichenfield, Larry; Stein-Gold, Linda; Berson, Diane; Zaenglein, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    Rosacea is a common clinical diagnosis that encompasses a variety of presentations, predominantly involving the centrofacial skin. Reported to present most commonly in adults of Northern European heritage with fair skin, rosacea can affect males and females of all ethnicities and skin types. Pathophysiologic mechanisms that appear to correlate with the manifestation of rosacea have been the focus of multiple research studies, with outcomes providing a better understanding of why some individuals are affected and how their visible signs and symptoms develop. A better appreciation of the pathophysiologic mechanisms and inflammatory pathways of rosacea has allowed therapeutic strategies to be optimally incorporated. Part 1 of this 5-part series discusses the rosacea disease state with an emphasis on clinical correlation, reviews adjunctive skin care for cutaneous rosacea, and provides management caveats.

  16. Rer1 and calnexin regulate endoplasmic reticulum retention of a peripheral myelin protein 22 mutant that causes type 1A Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Taichi; Hashimoto, Yukiko; Akuzawa, Tomoko; Hirai, Rika; Kobayashi, Hisae; Sato, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) resides in the plasma membrane and is required for myelin formation in the peripheral nervous system. Many PMP22 mutants accumulate in excess in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and lead to the inherited neuropathies of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. However, the mechanism through which PMP22 mutants accumulate in the ER is unknown. Here, we studied the quality control mechanisms for the PMP22 mutants L16P and G150D, which were originally identified in mice and patients with CMT. We found that the ER-localised ubiquitin ligase Hrd1/SYVN1 mediates ER-associated degradation (ERAD) of PMP22(L16P) and PMP22(G150D), and another ubiquitin ligase, gp78/AMFR, mediates ERAD of PMP22(G150D) as well. We also found that PMP22(L16P), but not PMP22(G150D), is partly released from the ER by loss of Rer1, which is a Golgi-localised sorting receptor for ER retrieval. Rer1 interacts with the wild-type and mutant forms of PMP22. Interestingly, release of PMP22(L16P) from the ER was more prominent with simultaneous knockdown of Rer1 and the ER-localised chaperone calnexin than with the knockdown of each gene. These results suggest that CMT disease-related PMP22(L16P) is trapped in the ER by calnexin-dependent ER retention and Rer1-mediated early Golgi retrieval systems and partly degraded by the Hrd1-mediated ERAD system. PMID:25385046

  17. The effect of PN-1, a Traditional Chinese Prescription, on the Learning and Memory in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Ling; Liang, Liang; Liu, Yu; Yang, Ya-Jun; Huang, Lan; Zhu, Hua; Ma, Chun-Mei; Qin, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is a complete medical system that has been practiced for more than 3000 years. Prescription number 1 (PN-1) consists of several Chinese medicines and is designed according to TCM theories to treat patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. The evidence of clinical practice suggests the benefit effects of PN-1 on cognitive deficits of dementia patients. We try to prove and explain this by using contemporary methodology and transgenic animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The behavioral studies were developed to evaluate the memory of transgenic animals after intragastric administration of PN-1 for 3 months. Amyloid beta-protein (A β ) neuropathology was quantified using immunohistochemistry and ELISA. The western blotting was used to detect the levels of plasticity associated proteins. The safety of PN-1 on mice was also assessed through multiple parameters. Results showed that PN-1 could effectively relieve learning and memory impairment of transgenic animals. Possible mechanisms showed that PN-1 could significantly reduce plaque burden and A β levels and boost synaptic plasticity. Our observations showed that PN-1 could improve learning and memory ability through multiple mechanisms without detectable side effects on mice. We propose that PN-1 is a promising alternative treatment for AD in the future.

  18. The levels of 7,8-dihydrodeoxyguanosine (8-oxoG) and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) - A potential diagnostic biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sliwinska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowski, Dominik; Czarny, Piotr; Toma, Monika; Wigner, Paulina; Drzewoski, Jozef; Fabianowska-Majewska, Krystyna; Szemraj, Janusz; Maes, Michael; Galecki, Piotr; Sliwinski, Tomasz

    2016-09-15

    Evidence indicates that oxidative stress contributes to neuronal cell death in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased oxidative DNA damage l, as measured with 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), and reduced capacity of proteins responsible for removing of DNA damage, including 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1), were detected in brains of AD patients. In the present study we assessed peripheral blood biomarkers of oxidative DNA damage, i.e. 8- oxoG and OGG1, in AD diagnosis, by comparing their levels between the patients and the controls. Our study was performed on DNA and serum isolated from peripheral blood taken from 100 AD patients and 110 controls. For 8-oxoG ELISA was employed. The OGG1 level was determined using ELISA and Western blot technique. Levels of 8-oxoG were significantly higher in DNA of AD patients. Both ELISA and Western blot showed decreased levels of OGG1 in serum of AD patients. Our results show that oxidative DNA damage biomarkers detected in peripheral tissue could reflect the changes occurring in the brain of patients with AD. These results also suggest that peripheral blood samples may be useful to measure oxidative stress biomarkers in AD. PMID:27538622

  19. Hologram QSAR Models of a Series of 6-Arylquinazolin-4-Amine Inhibitors of a New Alzheimer’s Disease Target: Dual Specificity Tyrosine-Phosphorylation-Regulated Kinase-1A Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Felipe Dias; da Silva Lima, Camilo Henrique; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Castro, Helena Carla; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão

    2015-01-01

    Dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase-1A (DYRK1A) is an enzyme directly involved in Alzheimer’s disease, since its increased expression leads to β-amyloidosis, Tau protein aggregation, and subsequent formation of neurofibrillary tangles. Hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship (HQSAR, 2D fragment-based) models were developed for a series of 6-arylquinazolin-4-amine inhibitors (36 training, 10 test) of DYRK1A. The best HQSAR model (q2 = 0.757; SEcv = 0.493; R2 = 0.937; SE = 0.251; R2pred = 0.659) presents high goodness-of-fit (R2 > 0.9), as well as high internal (q2 > 0.7) and external (R2pred > 0.5) predictive power. The fragments that increase and decrease the biological activity values were addressed using the colored atomic contribution maps provided by the method. The HQSAR contribution map of the best model is an important tool to understand the activity profiles of new derivatives and may provide information for further design of novel DYRK1A inhibitors. PMID:25756379

  20. Interferon Beta-1a Intramuscular Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... interferon beta-1a intramuscular at around the same time of day on your injection days. Follow the ...

  1. Role of 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A Receptors in 6-Hydroxydopmaine-induced Catalepsy-like Immobilization in Rats: a Therapeutic Approach for Treating Catalepsy of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    eyhani-rad, Siamak; Mohajjel Nayebi, Alireza; Mahmoudi, Javad; Samini, Morteza; Babapour, Vahab

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that buspirone, a partial agonist of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) receptors, improves motor dysfunctions induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and haloperidol in rats. The present work extends these findings by investigating the role of 5-HT1A receptors on catalepsy-like immobilization in rats, a model of Parkinson’s disease. Catalepsy was induced by unilateral infusion of 6-OH-dopamine (8 μg/2μL/rat) into the central region of the substantia nigra, compact part (SNc) and assayed by bar-test method 5, 60, 120 and 180 min after the drugs administration. The involvement of 5-HT1A receptors in 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy was studied through intraperitoneal (0.25, 0.5 and 1mg/Kg IP) and intrasubstantia nigra, compact part (10 μg/rat, intra-SNc) injection of 8-hydroxy-2-[di-n-propylamino] tetralin (8-OHDPAT) as well as administration of 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4-[4-(2-pthalimmido) butyl] piperazine hydrobromide (0.1, 0.5 and 1 mg/Kg, NAN-190, IP). NAN-190 (1 mg/Kg, IP) and 8-OHDPAT (1 mg/Kg, IP and 10 μg/rat, intra-SNc) increased and decreased 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy respectively. In normal (non 6-OHDA-lesioned) rats, NAN-190 (1 mg/Kg, IP) increased the elapsed time in bar-test while 8-OHDPAT did not produce any significant effect. The anticataleptic effect of 8-OHDPAT (1 mg/Kg, IP) was reversed markedly by co-injection with NAN-190 (1 mg/Kg, IP). These findings suggest that 5-HT1A receptors are involved in 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy-like immobilization. PMID:24250551

  2. CRISPR/Cas9 facilitates investigation of neural circuit disease using human iPSCs: mechanism of epilepsy caused by an SCN1A loss-of-function mutation.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Gao, C; Chen, W; Ma, W; Li, X; Shi, Y; Zhang, H; Zhang, L; Long, Y; Xu, H; Guo, X; Deng, S; Yan, X; Yu, D; Pan, G; Chen, Y; Lai, L; Liao, W; Li, Z

    2016-01-05

    Mutations in SCN1A, the gene encoding the α subunit of Nav1.1 channel, can cause epilepsies with wide ranges of clinical phenotypes, which are associated with the contrasting effects of channel loss-of-function or gain-of-function. In this project, CRISPR/Cas9- and TALEN-mediated genome-editing techniques were applied to induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-based-disease model to explore the mechanism of epilepsy caused by SCN1A loss-of-function mutation. By fluorescently labeling GABAergic subtype in iPSC-derived neurons using CRISPR/Cas9, we for the first time performed electrophysiological studies on SCN1A-expressing neural subtype and monitored the postsynaptic activity of both inhibitory and excitatory types. We found that the mutation c.A5768G, which led to no current of Nav1.1 in exogenously transfected system, influenced the properties of not only Nav current amount, but also Nav activation in Nav1.1-expressing GABAergic neurons. The two alterations in Nav further reduced the amplitudes and enhanced the thresholds of action potential in patient-derived GABAergic neurons, and led to weakened spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in the patient-derived neuronal network. Although the spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) did not change significantly, when the frequencies of both sIPSCs and sEPSCs were further analyzed, we found the whole postsynaptic activity transferred from the inhibition-dominated state to excitation in patient-derived neuronal networks, suggesting that changes in sIPSCs alone were sufficient to significantly reverse the excitatory level of spontaneous postsynaptic activity. In summary, our findings fill the gap of our knowledge regarding the relationship between SCN1A mutation effect recorded on exogenously transfected cells and on Nav1.1-expressing neurons, and reveal the physiological basis underlying epileptogenesis caused by SCN1A loss-of-function mutation.

  3. CRISPR/Cas9 facilitates investigation of neural circuit disease using human iPSCs: mechanism of epilepsy caused by an SCN1A loss-of-function mutation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Gao, C; Chen, W; Ma, W; Li, X; Shi, Y; Zhang, H; Zhang, L; Long, Y; Xu, H; Guo, X; Deng, S; Yan, X; Yu, D; Pan, G; Chen, Y; Lai, L; Liao, W; Li, Z

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in SCN1A, the gene encoding the α subunit of Nav1.1 channel, can cause epilepsies with wide ranges of clinical phenotypes, which are associated with the contrasting effects of channel loss-of-function or gain-of-function. In this project, CRISPR/Cas9- and TALEN-mediated genome-editing techniques were applied to induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-based-disease model to explore the mechanism of epilepsy caused by SCN1A loss-of-function mutation. By fluorescently labeling GABAergic subtype in iPSC-derived neurons using CRISPR/Cas9, we for the first time performed electrophysiological studies on SCN1A-expressing neural subtype and monitored the postsynaptic activity of both inhibitory and excitatory types. We found that the mutation c.A5768G, which led to no current of Nav1.1 in exogenously transfected system, influenced the properties of not only Nav current amount, but also Nav activation in Nav1.1-expressing GABAergic neurons. The two alterations in Nav further reduced the amplitudes and enhanced the thresholds of action potential in patient-derived GABAergic neurons, and led to weakened spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in the patient-derived neuronal network. Although the spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) did not change significantly, when the frequencies of both sIPSCs and sEPSCs were further analyzed, we found the whole postsynaptic activity transferred from the inhibition-dominated state to excitation in patient-derived neuronal networks, suggesting that changes in sIPSCs alone were sufficient to significantly reverse the excitatory level of spontaneous postsynaptic activity. In summary, our findings fill the gap of our knowledge regarding the relationship between SCN1A mutation effect recorded on exogenously transfected cells and on Nav1.1-expressing neurons, and reveal the physiological basis underlying epileptogenesis caused by SCN1A loss-of-function mutation. PMID:26731440

  4. Skeletal muscle MRI magnetisation transfer ratio reflects clinical severity in peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, C D J; Morrow, J M; Miranda, M A; Davagnanam, I; Cowley, P C; Mehta, H; Hanna, M G; Koltzenburg, M; Yousry, T A; Reilly, M M; Thornton, J S

    2012-01-01

    MRI may provide treatment outcome measures in neuromuscular conditions. The authors assessed MRI magnetisation transfer ratios (MTRs) in lower-limb musculature as markers of pathology in peripheral neuropathies and compared the findings with associated clinical data. Ten patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) and nine patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) were compared with 10 healthy subjects. The MTR in the calf muscles was significantly lower than controls in the two patient groups (both p<0.001). The median MTRs (IQR) were 50.5(1.6) percentage units (p.u.) (control), 41.5(10.6) p.u. (CMT1A) and 39.3(8.7) p.u. (CIDP). Moreover, anterior lower leg MTR correlated strongly with strength of ankle dorsiflexion, measured with the Medical Research Council scale, in CIDP (ρ=0.88, p<0.001) and also in CMT1A (ρ=0.50, p<0.05), where MTR also showed an association with disease duration (ρ=-0.86, p<0.001). Short tau inversion recovery MRI of the same muscles showed abnormalities associated with regions of reduced MTR (p<0.001), and MTR was also reduced in other muscles otherwise deemed normal appearing (p<0.001), indicating that MTR may be more sensitive to muscle damaged by denervation than conventional MRI. The significant reductions in muscle MTR in peripheral neuropathies and the associated correlations with clinical measures indicate that MTR has potential as an imaging outcome measure in future therapeutic trials.

  5. MIL1A

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-03

    ... MISR Level 1A camera charge-coupled device (CCD) Science Data: Reformatted Annotated Level 1A product of the CCD science data. ... Files:  Processing Status Production Report Read Software Files :  Data Product ...

  6. The modified ultrasound pattern sum score mUPSS as additional diagnostic tool for genetically distinct hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Alexander; Rasenack, Maria; Athanasopoulou, Ioanna M; Dammeier, Nele Maria; Lipski, Christina; Wolking, Stefan; Vittore, Debora; Décard, Bernhard F; Axer, Hubertus

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the nerve ultrasound characteristics in genetically distinct inherited neuropathies, the value of the modified ultrasound pattern sum score (mUPSS) to differentiate between the subtypes and the correlation of ultrasound with nerve conduction studies (NCS), disease duration and severity. All patients underwent a standardized neurological examination, ultrasound, and NCS. In addition, genetic testing was performed. Consequently, mUPSS was applied, which is a sum-score of cross-sectional areas (CSA) at predefined anatomical points in different nerves. 31 patients were included (10xCharcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT)1a, 3xCMT1b, 3xCMTX, 9xCMT2, 6xHNPP [Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies]). Generalized, homogeneous nerve enlargement and significantly increased UPS scores emphasized the diagnosis of demyelinating neuropathy, particularly CMT1a and CMT1b. The amount of enlargement did not depend on disease duration, symptom severity, height and weight. In CMTX the nerves were enlarged, as well, however, only in the roots and lower limbs, most prominent in men. In CMT2 no significant enlargement was detectable. In HNPP the CSA values were increased at entrapped sites, and not elsewhere. However, a distinction from CMT1, which also showed enlarged CSA values at entrapment sites, was only possible by calculating the entrapment ratios and entrapment score. The mUPSS allowed distinction between CMT1a (increased UPS scores, entrapment ratios <1.0) and HNPP (low UPS scores, entrapment ratios >1.4), while CMT1b and CMTX showed intermediate UPS types and entrapment ratios <1.0. Although based on few cases, ultrasound revealed consistent and homogeneous nerve alteration in certain inherited neuropathies. The modified UPSS is a quantitative tool, which may provide useful information for diagnosis, differentiation and follow-up evaluation in addition to NCS and molecular testing.

  7. U1A Complex

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  8. U1A Complex

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-28

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  9. Clinical implications of peripheral myelin protein 22 for nerve compression and neural regeneration: a review.

    PubMed

    Hui-Chou, Helen G; Hashemi, Sharyhar S; Hoke, Ahmet; Dellon, A Lee

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is a major component of the peripheral myelin sheath. The PMP22 gene is located on chromosome 17p11.2, and defects in PMP22 gene have been implicated in several common inherited peripheral neuropathies. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), Charcot-Marie Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), Dejerine-Sottas syndrome, and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy are all associated with defects in PMP22 gene. The disease phenotypes mirror the range of expression of PMP22 due to the corresponding genetic defect. HNPP, characterized by a milder recurrent episodic focal demyelinating neuropathy, is attributed to a deletion leading to PMP22 underexpression. On the other end of the spectrum, CMT1A leads to a more uniform demyelination and axonal loss, resulting in severe progressive distal weakness and paresthesias; it is due to a duplication at 17p11.2 leading to PMP22 overexpression. Additional point mutations result in varying phenotypes due to dysfunction of the resultant PMP22 protein. All inherited neuropathies are diagnosed with a combination of physical findings on examination, electromyography, sural nerve biopsies, and genetic testing. Treatment and management of these disorders differ depending on the underlying genetic defect, nerves involved, and resulting functional impairments. A review of current literature elucidates clinical, microsurgical implications, and management of patients with PMP22-related neuropathy. PMID:20976668

  10. Depleting endogenous neurotrophin-3 enhances myelin formation in the Trembler-J mouse, a model of a peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Varma, Sushama; Tsao, David; Shooter, Eric M; Tolwani, Ravi J

    2007-10-01

    The heterozygous Trembler-J (TrJ/+) mouse, containing a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein 22 (Pmp22) gene, is characterized by severe hypomyelination and is a representative model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A) disease/Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS). Given that the neurotrophin-3 (NT3)-TrkC signaling pathway is inhibitory to myelination during development, we investigated the role of the NT3-TrkC pathway in myelination and manipulated this pathway to improve myelin formation in the CMT1A/DSS mouse model. Injection of NT3 to the TrJ/+ mice decreased the myelin protein P(0) level in the sciatic nerves. Suppressing the NT3-TrkC pathway with TrkC-Fc, an NT3 scavenger, enhanced myelination in vitro and in vivo in the TrJ/+ mouse. Furthermore, we found that full-length TrkC was expressed in adult TrJ/+ mouse sciatic nerves but was not detected in the wild-type adults, suggesting that the full-length TrkC is a potential target of treatment to enhance myelination in the TrJ/+ mouse. PMID:17628499

  11. Screening for mutations in the peripheral myelin genes PMP22, MPZ and Cx32 (GJB1) in Russian Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy patients.

    PubMed

    Mersiyanova, I V; Ismailov, S M; Polyakov, A V; Dadali, E L; Fedotov, V P; Nelis, E; Löfgren, A; Timmerman, V; van Broeckhoven, C; Evgrafov, O V

    2000-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and related inherited peripheral neuropathies, including Dejerine-Sottas syndrome, congenital hypomyelination, and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), are caused by mutations in three myelin genes: PMP22, MPZ and Cx32 (GJB1). The most common mutations are the 1.5 Mb CMT1A tandem duplication on chromosome 17p11.2-p12 in CMT1 patients and the reciprocal 1.5 Mb deletion in HNPP patients. We performed a mutation screening in 174 unrelated CMT patients and three HNPP families of Russian origin. The unrelated CMT patients included 108 clinically and electrophysiologically diagnosed CMT1 cases, 32 CMT2 cases, and 34 cases with unspecified CMT. Fifty-nine CMT1A duplications were found, of which 58 belonged to the CMT1 patient group. We found twelve distinct mutations in Cx32, six mutations in MPZ, and two mutations in PMP22. Of these respectively, eight, five, and two lead to a CMT1 phenotype. Eight mutations (Cx32: Ile20Asn/Gly21Ser, Met34Lys, Leu90Val, and Phe193Leu; MPZ: Asp134Gly, Lys138Asn, and Thr139Asn; PMP22: ValSer25-26del) were not reported previously. Phenotype-genotype correlations were based on nerve conduction velocity studies and mutation type. PMID:10737979

  12. Conversion of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Wharton’s Jelly to Dopamine Neurons Mediated by the Lmx1a and Neurturin In Vitro: Potential Therapeutic Application for Parkinson’s Disease in a Rhesus Monkey Model

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Min; Sun, Maosheng; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Wanpu; He, Zhanlong; Tang, Donghong; Lu, Shuaiyao; Wang, Xiaonan; Li, Song; Wang, Wenju; Li, Hongjun

    2013-01-01

    hUC-MSCs hold great promise in vitro neuronal differentiation and therapy for neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease. Recent studies provided that Lmx1α play an important role in the midbrain dopamine cells differentiation. Neurturin is desired candidate gene for providing a neuroprotective to DA neurons. In this study, we investigated a novel neuronal differentiation strategy in vitro with Lmx1α and NTN. We transferred these two genes to hUC-MSCs by recombinant adenovirus combined with Lmx1α regulatory factor and other inductor to improve the efficiency of inducing. Then those induced cells were implanted into the striatum and substantia nigra of MPTP lesioned hemi-parkinsonian rhesus monkeys. Monkeys were monitored by using behavioral test for six months after implantation. The result showed that cells isolated from the umbilical cord were negative for CD45, CD34 and HLA-DR, but were positive for CD44, CD49d, CD29. After those cells were infected with recombinant adenovirus, RT-PCR result shows that both Lmx1α and NTN genes were transcribed in hUC-MSCs. We also observed that the exogenous were highly expressed in hUC-MSCs from immunofluorescence and western blot. Experiments in vitro have proved that secretion NTN could maintain the survival of rat fetal midbrain dopaminergic neurons. After hUC-MSCs were induced with endogenous and exogenous factors, the mature neurons specific gene TH, Pitx3 was transcripted and the neurons specific protein TH, β-tubulinIII, NSE, Nestin, MAP-2 was expressed in those differentiated cells. In addition, the PD monkeys, transplanted with the induced cells demonstrated the animals’ symptoms amelioration by the behavioral measures. Further more, pathological and immunohistochemistry data showed that there were neuronal-like cells survived in the right brain of those PD monkeys, which may play a role as dopaminergic neurons. The findings from this study may help us to better understand the inside mechanisms

  13. RN-1, a potent and selective lysine-specific demethylase 1 inhibitor, increases γ-globin expression, F reticulocytes, and F cells in a sickle cell disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Angela; Vaitkus, Kestis; Ruiz, Maria Armila; Ibanez, Vinzon; Jagadeeswaran, Ramasamy; Kouznetsova, Tatiana; DeSimone, Joseph; Lavelle, Donald

    2015-07-01

    Increased levels of fetal hemoglobin are associated with decreased symptoms and increased lifespan in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Hydroxyurea, the only drug currently approved for SCD, is not effective in a large fraction of patients, and therefore, new agents are urgently needed. Recently it was found that lysine demethylase 1, an enzyme that removes monomethyl and dimethyl residues from the lysine 4 residue of histone H3, is a repressor of γ-globin gene expression. In this article, we have compared the ability of tranylcypromine (TCP) and a more potent TCP derivative, RN-1, to increase γ-globin expression in cultured baboon erythroid progenitor cells and in the SCD mouse model. The results indicate that the ability of RN-1 to induce F cells and γ-globin mRNA in SCD mice is similar to that of decitabine, the most powerful fetal hemoglobin-inducing drug known, and greater than that of either TCP or hydroxyurea. We conclude that RN-1 and other lysine demethylase 1 inhibitors may be promising new γ-globin-inducing agents for the treatment of SCD that warrant further studies in other preclinical models, such as nonhuman primates.

  14. Role of PPM1A and anti-PPM1A Autoantibodies in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Sokolove, Jeremy; Lindstrom, Tamsin M.; Yoo, Bin; Lee, Chang-Keun; Reveille, John D.; Taurog, Joel D.; Robinson, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is driven by immunemediated processes, little is known about the presence and role of autoantibodies in this disease. Methods We performed human protein microarray analysis of sera derived from patients with AS and other autoimmune disorders to identify autoantibodies associated specifically with AS, and identified autoantibody targeting of protein phosphatase magnesium-dependent 1A (PPM1A) in AS. We performed ELISA analysis of sera from two independent AS cohorts to confirm autoantibody targeting of PPM1A, and to assess associations between levels of anti-PPM1A antibodies and AS disease severity or response (as measured by BASDAI score) to anti-TNF therapy. Levels of anti-PPM1A antibodies were also evaluated in sera from transgenic rats overexpressing HLA-B27 and human β2-microglobulin. The expression of PPM1A was assessed by immunohistochemistry in synovial tissues from patients with AS, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. The role of PPM1A on osteoblast differentiation was investigated by gene knock-down and overexpression. Results AS was associated with autoantibody targeting of PPM1A, and levels of anti-PPM1A autoantibodies were significantly higher in patients with more advanced sacroiliitis and correlated with BASDAI score after treatment with anti-TNF agents. The levels of anti-PPM1A autoantibodies were also higher in sera of transgenic rats that are prone to develop AS than in those that are not. PPM1A was expressed in AS synovial tissue, and PPM1A overexpression promoted osteoblast differentiation, whereas PPM1A knockdown suppressed it. Conclusions Anti-PPM1A autoantibodies are present in AS, and our findings suggest that PPM1A may contribute to the pathogenic bone ankylosis characteristic of AS. PMID:24980965

  15. Dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) enhances tau expression.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei; Jin, Nana; Shi, Jianhua; Yin, Xiaomin; Jin, Xiaoxia; Wang, Shibao; Cao, Maohong; Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is found to be accumulated and aggregated in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. Dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) is overexpressed in Down syndrome and may play a critical role in the early onset of tau pathology in this disease. To investigate the effect of Dyrk1A on tau expression, we co-expressed different isoforms of tau with Dyrk1A in HEK-293FT cells and measured the mRNA and protein levels of tau using RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. We further investigated the mechanism of regulation of tau expression by Dyrk1A. We found that Dyrk1A enhanced tau expression in a dose-dependent manner. The enhancement did not require the kinase activity of Dyrk1A. Dyrk1A increased the expression of tau isoforms containing exon 10 to a larger extent than isoforms lacking exon 10. The expression of endogenous tau in neuronal cells was also regulated by Dyrk1A, and increased tau levels were found in the brains of Ts65Dn mice that overexpress Dyrk1A due to partial trisomy of chromosome 16. Dyrk1A did not enhance tau gene transcription, but increased tau mRNA stability. These results suggest that Dyrk1A enhances tau expression by stabilizing its mRNA and provides a novel insight into the regulation of tau expression and a molecular mechanism of tauopathies. PMID:23948904

  16. MISR Level 1A Products

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

    ... MISR Level 1A Products Level 1A Engineering Data File Type 1 and Level 1A Navigation Data Processing ... Product Specification Rev K  (PDF). Transparent software rebuild with Irix 6.5.2 OS. F01_0007 (FM_ENG), ...

  17. Distinct neurological disorders with ATP1A3 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Heinzen, Erin L.; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Brashear, Allison; Clapcote, Steven J.; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Goldstein, David B.; Jóhannesson, Sigurður H.; Mikati, Mohamad A.; Neville, Brian; Nicole, Sophie; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Poulsen, Hanne; Schyns, Tsveta; Sweadner, Kathleen J.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn; Vilsen, Bente

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research has shown that mutations that modify the protein-coding sequence of ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase, cause both rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood. These discoveries link two clinically distinct neurological diseases to the same gene, however, ATP1A3 mutations are, with one exception, disease-specific. Although the exact mechanism of how these mutations lead to disease is still unknown, much knowledge has been gained about functional consequences of ATP1A3 mutations using a range of in vitro and animal model systems, and the role of Na+/K+-ATPases in the brain. Researchers and clinicians are attempting to further characterise neurological manifestations associated with mutations in ATP1A3, and to build on the existing molecular knowledge to understand how specific mutations can lead to different diseases. PMID:24739246

  18. Distinct neurological disorders with ATP1A3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Heinzen, Erin L; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Brashear, Allison; Clapcote, Steven J; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Goldstein, David B; Jóhannesson, Sigurður H; Mikati, Mohamad A; Neville, Brian; Nicole, Sophie; Ozelius, Laurie J; Poulsen, Hanne; Schyns, Tsveta; Sweadner, Kathleen J; van den Maagdenberg, Arn; Vilsen, Bente

    2014-05-01

    Genetic research has shown that mutations that modify the protein-coding sequence of ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, cause both rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood. These discoveries link two clinically distinct neurological diseases to the same gene, however, ATP1A3 mutations are, with one exception, disease-specific. Although the exact mechanism of how these mutations lead to disease is still unknown, much knowledge has been gained about functional consequences of ATP1A3 mutations using a range of in-vitro and animal model systems, and the role of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPases in the brain. Researchers and clinicians are attempting to further characterise neurological manifestations associated with mutations in ATP1A3, and to build on the existing molecular knowledge to understand how specific mutations can lead to different diseases. PMID:24739246

  19. X-1A on lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1955-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1A (48-1384) is photographed in July 1955 sitting on Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards Air Force Base, California. This view of the left side of the aircraft shows the change to the X-1A canopy from the X-1s (see photo E49-0039 under XS-1) The nose boom carries an angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip vane, along with a pitot tube for measuring static and impact pressures. The fuselage length is 35 feet 8 inches, with a wing span of 28 feet. The X-1A was created to explore stability and control characteristics at speeds in excess of Mach 2 and altitudes greater than 90,000 feet. Bell test pilot Jean 'Skip' Ziegler made six test flights in the X-1A between 14 February and 25 April 1953. Air Force test pilots Maj. Charles 'Chuck' Yeager and Maj. Arthur 'Kit' Murray made 18 flights between 21 November 1953 and 26 August 1954. NACA test pilot Joseph Walker made one successful flight on 20 July 1955. During a second flight attempt, on 8 August 1955, an explosion damaged the X-1A shortly before launch. Walker, unhurt, climbed up into the JTB-29A mothership, and the X-1A was jettisoned over the Edwards AFB bombing range.

  20. Molecular basis of hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Chance, P F

    2001-05-01

    Inherited disorders of peripheral nerves represent a common group of neurologic diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1 (CMT1) is a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies with loci mapping to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B) and to another unknown autosome (CMT1C). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-megabase (Mb) duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-12, or in rare patients may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in the myelin protein zero (P0 or MPZ) gene. The molecular defect in CMT1C is unknown. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMTX), which has clinical features similar to CMT1, is associated with mutations in the connexin32 gene. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2 (CMT2) is an axonal neuropathy, also of undetermined cause. Forms of CMT2 map to chromosome 1p36 (CMT2A), chromosome 3p (CMT2B), chromosome 7p (CMT2D), and to chromosome 8p21 (CMT2E). Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), also called hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSNIII), is a severe, infantile-onset, demyelinating polyneuropathy syndrome that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene or the P0 gene and shares considerable clinical and pathologic features with CMT1. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results in a recurrent, episodic demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12 and results from reduced expression of the PMP22 gene. CMT1A and HNPP are reciprocal duplication/deletion syndromes originating from unequal crossover during germ cell meiosis. Other rare forms of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies map to chromosomes 8q, 10q, and 11q. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (familial brachial plexus neuropathy) is an autosomal dominant disorder causing painful, recurrent brachial plexopathies

  1. Inherited peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Keller, M P; Chance, P F

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary disorders of the peripheral nerves constitute a group of frequently encountered neurological diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1 (CMT1) is genetically heterogeneous and characterized by demyelination with moderately to severely reduced nerve conduction velocities, absent muscle stretch reflexes and onion bulb formation. Genetic loci for CMT1 map to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B), and another unknown autosome (CMT1C). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-megabase (Mb) duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-12, or in rare patients may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1 B result from point mutations in the myelin protein zero (Po or MPZ) gene. The molecular defect in CMT1 C is unknown. Mutations in the early growth response 2 gene (EGR2) are also associated with demyelinating neuropathy. Other rare forms of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies map to chromosome 8q, 10q, and 11q. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMTX), which has clinical features similar to CMT1, is associated with mutations in the connexin32 gene. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2 (CMT2) is characterized by normal or mildly reduced nerve conduction velocity with decreased amplitude and axonal loss without hypertrophic features. One form of CMT2 maps to chromosome 1 p36 (CMT2A), another to chromosome 3p (CMT2B) and another to 7p (CMT2D). Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), also called hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSNIII), is a severe, infantile-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene or the Po gene and shares considerable clinical and pathological features with CMT1. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results in a recurrent, episodic demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12 and results from reduced

  2. Flowability of JSC-1a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, Enrique; Wilkinson, Allen; Elliot, Alan; Young, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    We have done a complete flowability characterization of the lunar soil simulant, JSC-1a, following closely the ASTM-6773 standard for the Schulze ring shear test. The measurements, which involve pre-shearing the material before each yield point, show JSC-1a to be cohesionless, with an angle of internal friction near 40 deg. We also measured yield loci after consolidating the material in a vibration table which show it to have significant cohesion (approximately equal to 1 kPa) and an angle of internal friction of about 60 deg. Hopper designs based on each type of flowability test differ significantly. These differences highlight the need to discern the condition of the lunar soil in the specific process where flowability is an issue. We close with a list not necessarily comprehensive of engineering rules of thumb that apply to powder flow in hoppers.

  3. Screening of CACNA1A and ATP1A2 genes in hemiplegic migraine: clinical, genetic, and functional studies

    PubMed Central

    Carreño, Oriel; Corominas, Roser; Serra, Selma Angèlica; Sintas, Cèlia; Fernández-Castillo, Noèlia; Vila-Pueyo, Marta; Toma, Claudio; Gené, Gemma G; Pons, Roser; Llaneza, Miguel; Sobrido, María-Jesús; Grinberg, Daniel; Valverde, Miguel Ángel; Fernández-Fernández, José Manuel; Macaya, Alfons; Cormand, Bru

    2013-01-01

    Hemiplegic migraine (HM) is a rare and severe subtype of autosomal dominant migraine, characterized by a complex aura including some degree of motor weakness. Mutations in four genes (CACNA1A, ATP1A2, SCN1A and PRRT2) have been detected in familial and in sporadic cases. This genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder is often accompanied by permanent ataxia, epileptic seizures, mental retardation, and chronic progressive cerebellar atrophy. Here we report a mutation screening in the CACNA1A and ATP1A2 genes in 18 patients with HM. Furthermore, intragenic copy number variant (CNV) analysis was performed in CACNA1A using quantitative approaches. We identified four previously described missense CACNA1A mutations (p.Ser218Leu, p.Thr501Met, p.Arg583Gln, and p.Thr666Met) and two missense changes in the ATP1A2 gene, the previously described p.Ala606Thr and the novel variant p.Glu825Lys. No structural variants were found. This genetic screening allowed the identification of more than 30% of the disease alleles, all present in a heterozygous state. Functional consequences of the CACNA1A-p.Thr501Met mutation, previously described only in association with episodic ataxia, and ATP1A2-p.Glu825Lys, were investigated by means of electrophysiological studies, cell viability assays or Western blot analysis. Our data suggest that both these variants are disease-causing. PMID:24498617

  4. Severe demyelinating hypertrophic polyneuropathy caused by a de novo frameshift mutation within the intracellular domain of myelin protein zero (MPZ/P0).

    PubMed

    Zschüntzsch, Jana; Dibaj, Payam; Pilgram, Sara; Kötting, Judith; Gerding, Wanda M; Neusch, C

    2009-06-15

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), also known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous neuropathies classically divided into demyelinating (CMT1) and axonal forms (CMT2). The most common demyelinating form is CMT1A with an underlying duplication in the gene coding for the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22). Less frequently, mutations in the myelin protein zero gene (MPZ/P(0)) account for demyelinating CMT1B, Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS), or congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy (CHN). Here, we report a patient with a severe, early-onset hypertrophic and dysmyelinating neuropathy. The patient exhibits a novel frameshift mutation with an insertion of a single T-nucleotide on position c.618_619 of the MPZ gene resulting in a premature stop M207fsX38. PMID:19344920

  5. Neurologic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscular dystrophy Problems with the way the nervous system develops, such as spina bifida Degenerative diseases, where nerve cells are damaged or die, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease Diseases of the blood vessels that supply ...

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesvirus 1A.

    PubMed

    Ling, Paul D; Reid, Jeffrey G; Qin, Xiang; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard; Petrosino, Joseph; Peng, Rongsheng; Zong, Jian-Chao; Heaggans, Sarah Y; Hayward, Gary S

    2013-01-01

    Elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus 1A is a member of the Proboscivirus genus and is a major cause of fatal hemorrhagic disease in endangered juvenile Asian elephants worldwide. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence from this genus, obtained directly from necropsy DNA, in which 60 of the 115 predicted genes are not found in any known herpesvirus.

  7. DYRK1A kinase inhibitors with emphasis on cancer.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, A; Dufrasne, F; Gelbcke, M; Jabin, I; Kiss, R; Lamoral-Theys, D

    2012-11-01

    Various types of cancers (including gliomas, melanomas, and esophageal, pancreas and non-small-cell lung cancers) display intrinsic resistance to pro-apoptotic stimuli, such as conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and/or the activation of a multidrug resistance phenotype, which are major barriers to effective treatment and lead to poor patient prognosis. The DYRK1A kinase is directly implicated in the resistance of cancer cells to pro-apoptotic stimuli and drives several pathways that enhance proliferation, migration, and the reduction of cell death, leading to very aggressive biological behavior in cancer cell populations. The DYRK1A kinase is also implicated in neurological diseases and in neoangiogenic processes. Thus, the DYRK1A kinase is of great interest for both cancer and neuroscience research. During the last decade, numerous compounds that inhibit DYRK1A have been synthesized. The present review discusses the available molecules known to interfere with DYRK1A activity and the implications of DYRK1A in cancer and other diseases and serves as a rational analysis for researchers who aim to improve the anti-DYRK1A activity of currently available compounds. PMID:23016545

  8. Scutellarin inhibits cytochrome P450 isoenzyme 1A2 (CYP1A2) in rats.

    PubMed

    Jian, Tun-Yu; He, Jian-Chang; He, Gong-Hao; Feng, En-Fu; Li, Hong-Liang; Bai, Min; Xu, Gui-Li

    2012-08-01

    Scutellarin is the most important flavone glycoside in the herbal drug Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand.-Mazz. It is used frequently in the clinic to treat ischemic vascular diseases in China. However, the direct relationship between scutellarin and cytochrome P450 (CYP450) is unclear. The present study investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of scutellarin on cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP 1A2) metabolism. According to in vitro experiments, scutellarin (10-250 µM) decreased the formation of 4-acetamidophenol in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC₅₀ value of 108.20 ± 0.657 µM. Furthermore, scutellarin exhibited a weak mixed-type inhibition against the activity of CYP1A2 in rat liver microsomes, with a K(i) value of 95.2 µM. Whereas in whole animal studies, scutellarin treatment for 7 days (at 5, 15, 30 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the clearance (CL), and increased the T(1/2) (at 15, 30 mg/kg, i.p.), it did not affect the V(d) of phenacetin. Scutellarin treatment (at 5, 15, 30 mg/kg, i.p.) increased the AUC(0-∞) by 14.3%, 67.3% and 159.2%, respectively. Scutellarin at 30 mg/kg also weakly inhibited CYP1A2 activity, in accordance with our in vitro study. Thus, the results indicate that CYP1A2 is inhibited directly, but weakly, by scutellarin in vivo, and provide useful information on the safe and effective use of scutellarin in clinical practice.

  9. Clinical utility of a DNA probe to 17p11.2 in screening of patients with a peripheral neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Blancato, J.; Precht, K.; Meck, J.

    1994-09-01

    We assessed the usefulness of in situ hybridization with a DNA probe to the area of chromosome 17 at p11.2 as a diagnostic tool for screening for Charcot Marte Tooth 1A (CMT 1A). In situ hybridization with a probe to 17p11.2 was performed on fixed lymphocytes from the following groups of individuals: (1) normal controls; (2) patients evoking a strong clinical suspicion of CMT 1A; and (3) 3 families with an apparent autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy of unknown diagnoses. Group 2 patients had evidence of demyelination as defined by nerve conduction of less that 50% of the normal mean or terminal latency greater than 50% of the normal mean in conduction studies. Analysis of interphase cells hybridized with a cosmid DNA probe to 17p11.2 requires inclusion of a normal control with each trial and masked observer. Due to the size of the target DNA and the nature of the centromeric heterochromatin, the scoring of this probe is more subjective than centromere probes. For example, if the two 17 chromosomes are decondensed as in interphase, two tandem signals may be visualized as one. Results from duplication positive patients demonstrate a large proportion of cells with two closely aligned, but separate, signals with an additional single signal. Normal results demonstrate a majority of cells with two separate signals representing both normal homologues. None of the 3 families with questionable diagnosis revealed a duplication at the region, reinforcing our belief that a clinical diagnosis is the most discriminating tool available for diagnosis of CMT 1A. We concur with Boylan that molecular analysis for CMT 1A is useful for establishing a diagnosis of CMT 1A, but is not a primary differential diagnostic test. The yield in screening patients without physiologic evidence of demyelination is likely to be low. We further find that the use of in situ hybridization is a simple method of performing the duplication analysis.

  10. Molecular analysis of the Smith-Magenis syndrome: a possible contiguous-gene syndrome associated with del(17)(p11.2).

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, F; Guzzetta, V; Montes de Oca-Luna, R; Magenis, R E; Smith, A C; Richter, S F; Kondo, I; Dobyns, W B; Patel, P I; Lupski, J R

    1991-01-01

    We undertook clinical evaluation (32 cases) and molecular evaluation (31 cases) of unrelated patients affected with Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) associated with an interstitial deletion of band p11.2 of chromosome 17. Patients were evaluated both clinically and electrophysiologically for peripheral neuropathy, since markers showing close linkage to one form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1A) map to this chromosomal region. The common clinical findings were broad flat midface with brachycephaly, broad nasal bridge, brachydactyly, speech delay, and hoarse, deep voice. Fifty-five percent of the patients showed clinical signs (e.g., decreased or absent deep tendon reflexes, pes planus or pes cavus, decreased sensitivity to pain, and decreased leg muscle mass) suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. However, unlike patients with CMT1A, these patients demonstrated normal nerve conduction velocities. Self-destructive behaviors, primarily onychotillomania and polyembolokoilamania, were observed in 67% of the patients, and significant symptoms of sleep disturbance were observed in 62%. The absence of REM sleep was demonstrated by polysomnography in two patients. Southern analysis indicated that most patients were deleted for five 17p11.2 markers--FG1 (D17S446), 1516 (D17S258), pYNM67-R5 (D17S29), pA10-41 (D17S71), and pS6.1-HB2 (D17S445)--thus defining a region which appears to be critical to SMS. The deletion was determined to be of paternal origin in nine patients and of maternal origin in six patients. The apparent random parental origin of deletion documented in 15 patients suggests that genomic imprinting does not play a role in the expression of the SMS clinical phenotype. Our findings suggest that SMS is likely a contiguous-gene deletion syndrome which comprises characteristic clinical features, developmental delay, clinical signs of peripheral neuropathy, abnormal sleep function, and specific behavioral anomalies. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1746552

  11. Molecular analysis of the Smith-Magenis syndrome: a possible contiguous-gene syndrome associated with del(17)(p11.2).

    PubMed

    Greenberg, F; Guzzetta, V; Montes de Oca-Luna, R; Magenis, R E; Smith, A C; Richter, S F; Kondo, I; Dobyns, W B; Patel, P I; Lupski, J R

    1991-12-01

    We undertook clinical evaluation (32 cases) and molecular evaluation (31 cases) of unrelated patients affected with Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) associated with an interstitial deletion of band p11.2 of chromosome 17. Patients were evaluated both clinically and electrophysiologically for peripheral neuropathy, since markers showing close linkage to one form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1A) map to this chromosomal region. The common clinical findings were broad flat midface with brachycephaly, broad nasal bridge, brachydactyly, speech delay, and hoarse, deep voice. Fifty-five percent of the patients showed clinical signs (e.g., decreased or absent deep tendon reflexes, pes planus or pes cavus, decreased sensitivity to pain, and decreased leg muscle mass) suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. However, unlike patients with CMT1A, these patients demonstrated normal nerve conduction velocities. Self-destructive behaviors, primarily onychotillomania and polyembolokoilamania, were observed in 67% of the patients, and significant symptoms of sleep disturbance were observed in 62%. The absence of REM sleep was demonstrated by polysomnography in two patients. Southern analysis indicated that most patients were deleted for five 17p11.2 markers--FG1 (D17S446), 1516 (D17S258), pYNM67-R5 (D17S29), pA10-41 (D17S71), and pS6.1-HB2 (D17S445)--thus defining a region which appears to be critical to SMS. The deletion was determined to be of paternal origin in nine patients and of maternal origin in six patients. The apparent random parental origin of deletion documented in 15 patients suggests that genomic imprinting does not play a role in the expression of the SMS clinical phenotype. Our findings suggest that SMS is likely a contiguous-gene deletion syndrome which comprises characteristic clinical features, developmental delay, clinical signs of peripheral neuropathy, abnormal sleep function, and specific behavioral anomalies.

  12. Impact of Dyrk1A level on alcohol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Renon, Marjorie; Legrand, Béatrice; Blanc, Etienne; Daubigney, Fabrice; Bokobza, Cindy; Mortreux, Marie; Paul, Jean-Louis; Delabar, Jean-Maurice; Rouach, Hélène; Andreau, Karine; Janel, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    Alcoholic liver diseases arise from complex phenotypes involving many genetic factors. It is quite common to find hyperhomocysteinemia in chronic alcoholic liver diseases, mainly due to deregulation of hepatic homocysteine metabolism. Dyrk1A, involved in homocysteine metabolism at different crossroads, is decreased in liver of hyperhomocysteinemic mice. Here, we hypothesized that Dyrk1A contributes to alcohol-induced hepatic impairment in mice. Control, hyperhomocysteinemic and mice overexpressing Dyrk1A were fed using a Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet with or without ethanol (5% v/v ethanol) for one month, and liver histological examination and liver biochemical function tests were performed. Plasma alanine aminotransferase and homocysteine levels were significantly decreased in mice overexpressing Dyrk1A compared to control mice with or without alcohol administration. On the contrary, the mean plasma alanine aminotransferase and homocysteine levels were significantly higher in hyperhomocysteinemic mice than that of control mice after alcohol administration. Paraoxonase 1 and CYP2E1, two phase I xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, were found increased in the three groups of mice after alcohol administration. However, NQO1, a phase II enzyme, was only found increased in hyperhomocysteinemic mice after alcohol exposure, suggesting a greater effect of alcohol in liver of hyperhomocysteinemic mice. We observed positive correlations between hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase activity, Dyrk1A and ADH4 protein levels. Importantly, a deleterious effect of alcohol consumption on hepatic Dyrk1A protein level was found. Our study reveals on the one hand a role of Dyrk1A in ethanol metabolism and on the other hand a deleterious effect of alcohol administration on hepatic Dyrk1A level.

  13. Impact of Dyrk1A level on alcohol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Renon, Marjorie; Legrand, Béatrice; Blanc, Etienne; Daubigney, Fabrice; Bokobza, Cindy; Mortreux, Marie; Paul, Jean-Louis; Delabar, Jean-Maurice; Rouach, Hélène; Andreau, Karine; Janel, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    Alcoholic liver diseases arise from complex phenotypes involving many genetic factors. It is quite common to find hyperhomocysteinemia in chronic alcoholic liver diseases, mainly due to deregulation of hepatic homocysteine metabolism. Dyrk1A, involved in homocysteine metabolism at different crossroads, is decreased in liver of hyperhomocysteinemic mice. Here, we hypothesized that Dyrk1A contributes to alcohol-induced hepatic impairment in mice. Control, hyperhomocysteinemic and mice overexpressing Dyrk1A were fed using a Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet with or without ethanol (5% v/v ethanol) for one month, and liver histological examination and liver biochemical function tests were performed. Plasma alanine aminotransferase and homocysteine levels were significantly decreased in mice overexpressing Dyrk1A compared to control mice with or without alcohol administration. On the contrary, the mean plasma alanine aminotransferase and homocysteine levels were significantly higher in hyperhomocysteinemic mice than that of control mice after alcohol administration. Paraoxonase 1 and CYP2E1, two phase I xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, were found increased in the three groups of mice after alcohol administration. However, NQO1, a phase II enzyme, was only found increased in hyperhomocysteinemic mice after alcohol exposure, suggesting a greater effect of alcohol in liver of hyperhomocysteinemic mice. We observed positive correlations between hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase activity, Dyrk1A and ADH4 protein levels. Importantly, a deleterious effect of alcohol consumption on hepatic Dyrk1A protein level was found. Our study reveals on the one hand a role of Dyrk1A in ethanol metabolism and on the other hand a deleterious effect of alcohol administration on hepatic Dyrk1A level. PMID:27216978

  14. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine. People with celiac disease cannot eat gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. ... Disease Doctors treat celiac disease by prescribing a gluten-free diet. Symptoms significantly improve for most people ...

  15. Huntington's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited disease that causes certain nerve cells in the brain to waste ... express emotions. If one of your parents has Huntington's disease, you have a 50 percent chance of ...

  16. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share External Link Disclaimer Digestive Diseases Wilson Disease Alternate Versions Wilson Disease (444 KB) You can also ... things psychosis—when a person loses contact with reality Other Signs and Symptoms Other signs and symptoms ...

  17. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. Crohn's can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum. The cause of Crohn's disease ...

  18. Pick disease

    MedlinePlus

    Semantic dementia; Dementia - semantic; Frontotemporal dementia; FTD; Arnold Pick disease; 3R tauopathy ... can help doctors tell Pick disease apart from Alzheimer disease. (Memory loss is often the main, and earliest, ...

  19. Interferon Beta-1a Subcutaneous Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... under the skin). It is usually injected three times a week. You should inject this medication on ...

  20. Bladder Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  1. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  2. 9 CFR 73.1a - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false 73.1a Section 73.1a Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.1a...

  3. 9 CFR 73.1a - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false 73.1a Section 73.1a Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.1a...

  4. 9 CFR 73.1a - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 73.1a Section 73.1a Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.1a...

  5. 9 CFR 73.1a - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false 73.1a Section 73.1a Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.1a...

  6. 9 CFR 73.1a - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false 73.1a Section 73.1a Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.1a...

  7. Mutations in ALDH1A3 cause microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Aldahmesh, M A; Khan, A O; Hijazi, H; Alkuraya, F S

    2013-08-01

    Microphthalmia is an important inborn error of eye development that can be associated with multisystem involvement. Anophthalmia is more severe and rarer. Single mutations in an expanding list of genes are known to cause this spectrum of anomaly. In one branch of a multiplex family with microphthalmia and anophthalmia, autozygome analysis excluded all known microphthalmia genes at the time of doing this study. Exome sequencing and autozygome filtration identified a novel homozygous variant in ALDH1A3. Subsequently, we identified another homozygous variant in 2 of the 10 probands with microphthalmia we specifically screened for mutations in ALDH1A3. Interestingly, the other branch of the original family was found to segregate anophthalmia/syndactyly with a novel homozygous SMOC1 variant. Our data support the very recent and independent identification of ALDH1A3 as a disease gene in microphthalmia. Locus heterogeneity should be considered in consanguineous families even for extremely rare phenotypes.

  8. PRKAR1A and the evolution of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2010-09-15

    Carney complex (CNC) is an inherited tumor predisposition associated with pituitary tumors, including GH-producing pituitary adenomas and rare reports of prolactinomas. This disease is caused by mutations in PRKAR1A, which encodes the type 1A regulatory subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA. Loss of PRKAR1A causes enhanced PKA signaling, which leads to pituitary tumorigenesis. Mutations in the gene have not been detected in sporadic pituitary tumors, but there is some data to suggest that non-genomic mechanisms may cause loss of protein expression. Unlike CNC patients, mice heterozygous for Prkar1a mutations do not develop pituitary tumors, although complete knockout of the gene in the Pit1 lineage of the pituitary produces GH-secreting pituitary adenomas. These data indicate that complete loss of Prkar1a/PRKAR1A is able to cause pituitary tumors in mice and men. The pattern of tumors is likely related to the signaling pathways employed in specific pituitary cell types. PMID:20451576

  9. Mutations in PTF1A cause pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis.

    PubMed

    Sellick, Gabrielle S; Barker, Karen T; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Fleischmann, Christina; Coleman, Richard J; Garrett, Christine; Gloyn, Anna L; Edghill, Emma L; Hattersley, Andrew T; Wellauer, Peter K; Goodwin, Graham; Houlston, Richard S

    2004-12-01

    Individuals with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus usually present within the first three months of life and require insulin treatment. We recently identified a locus on chromosome 10p13-p12.1 involved in permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus associated with pancreatic and cerebellar agenesis in a genome-wide linkage search of a consanguineous Pakistani family. Here we report the further linkage analysis of this family and a second family of Northern European descent segregating an identical phenotype. Positional cloning identified the mutations 705insG and C886T in the gene PTF1A, encoding pancreas transcription factor 1alpha, as disease-causing sequence changes. Both mutations cause truncation of the expressed PTF1A protein C-terminal to the basic-helix-loop-helix domain. Reporter-gene studies using a minimal PTF1A deletion mutant indicate that the deleted region defines a new domain that is crucial for the function of this protein. PTF1A is known to have a role in mammalian pancreatic development, and the clinical phenotype of the affected individuals implicated the protein as a key regulator of cerebellar neurogenesis. The essential role of PTF1A in normal cerebellar development was confirmed by detailed neuropathological analysis of Ptf1a(-/-) mice. PMID:15543146

  10. Kimura disease

    PubMed Central

    AlGhamdi, Fares E.; Al-Khatib, Talal A.; Marzouki, Hani Z.; AlGarni, Mohammed A

    2016-01-01

    Kimura disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that mainly manifests as a lump in the cervical region. Although the underlying pathophysiology is not clear yet, the diagnosis can be established based on specific histopathological characteristics. The first case of this disease was described in China, as well as the majority of subsequent cases that were also described in the Far East countries made Kimura disease traditionally a disease of adult patients of Asian descent. This report describes the occurrence of Kimura disease in pediatric non-Asian patient with a similar clinicopathologic presentation. PMID:26905356

  11. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune disease in which people can't eat gluten because it will damage their small intestine. If you have celiac disease and eat foods with gluten, your immune system responds by damaging the small ...

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    ... therapy approaches to Menkes disease. 3 1. Kaler, SG. The neurology of STPAT copper transporter disease: emerging ... Reviews Neurology , 2001:7:15-19.. 2. Kaler SG, et al. Neonatal Diagnosis and Treatment of Menkes ...

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    MedlinePlus

    ... Sandhoff Disease? Sandhoff disease is a rare, inherited lipid storage disorder that progressively destroys nerve cells in ... results in the harmful accumulation of certain fats (lipids) in the brain and other organs of the ...

  14. Gaucher Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... one of the inherited metabolic disorders known as lipid storage diseases. Lipids are fatty materials that include oils, fatty acids, ... research to find ways to treat and prevent lipid storage disorders such as Gaucher disease. For example, ...

  15. Huntington disease

    MedlinePlus

    Huntington chorea ... Huntington disease is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 4. The defect causes a part of ... 10 to 28 times. But in persons with Huntington disease, it is repeated 36 to 120 times. ...

  16. Digestive diseases

    MedlinePlus

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  17. Tickborne Diseases

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    ... for tickborne diseases ranges from studying the basic biology of the microbes that cause these diseases to ... Nucleotide Polymorphism Phylogenetics & Ontology Proteomics & Protein Analysis Systems Biology Data Portals Software Applications BCBB Mobyle Interface Designer ( ...

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    MedlinePlus

    ... our online catalog. ​ Additional Links Hashimoto's Disease Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Pregnancy & Thyroid Disease Thyroid Tests Find a Specialist ... everyone who receives radioactive iodine treatment eventually develops hypothyroidism, which occurs when the thyroid does not make ...

  19. Fifth disease

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    Parvovirus B19; Erythema infectiosum; Slapped cheek rash ... Fifth disease is caused by human parvovirus B19. It often affects preschoolers or school-age children during the spring. The disease spreads through the fluids in the nose and ...

  20. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... having celiac disease? Yes, you can have gluten sensitivity without the immune system attack on the small ... gluten causes in celiac disease. Symptoms of gluten sensitivity are generally milder than those seen in celiac ...

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    MedlinePlus

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  4. Raynaud's Disease

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    Raynaud's disease is a rare disorder of the blood vessels, usually in the fingers and toes. It causes the ... secondary Raynaud's, which is caused by injuries, other diseases, or certain medicines. People in colder climates are ...

  5. Meniere's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Meniere's disease is a disorder of the inner ear. It can cause severe dizziness, a roaring sound in your ... together over several days. Some people with Meniere's disease have "drop attacks" during which the dizziness is ...

  6. Legionnaires' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Legionnaires' disease is a type of pneumonia caused by bacteria. You usually get it by breathing in mist from ... spread from person to person. Symptoms of Legionnaires' disease include high fever, chills, a cough, and sometimes ...

  7. Chagas Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Chagas disease is caused by a parasite. It is common in Latin America but not in the United States. ... nose, the bite wound or a cut. The disease can also spread through contaminated food, a blood ...

  8. Mitochondrial Diseases

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    ... disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Mitochondrial diseases are a group of metabolic disorders. Mitochondria are ... cells and cause damage. The symptoms of mitochondrial disease can vary. It depends on how many mitochondria ...

  9. Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... until you go to the bathroom. Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys ... medicines. You have a higher risk of kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or ...

  10. Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites ... be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies ...

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    ... low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond ... In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are ...

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    Wilson disease is a rare inherited disorder that prevents your body from getting rid of extra copper. You need ... copper into bile, a digestive fluid. With Wilson disease, the copper builds up in your liver, and ...

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    ... blood pressure and water and salt balance. Addison disease happens if the adrenal glands don't make ... problem with your immune system usually causes Addison disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, ...

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    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

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    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a type of movement disorder. It happens when nerve cells in the brain don't ... coordination As symptoms get worse, people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking, or doing simple ...

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    Fifth disease is a viral infection caused by parvovirus B19. The virus only infects humans; it's not the same parvovirus that dogs and cats can get. Fifth disease mostly affects children. Symptoms can include a low ...

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    ... and Information What is Binswanger's Disease? Binswanger's disease (BD), also called subcortical vascular dementia , is a type ... and brain tissue dies. A characteristic pattern of BD-damaged brain tissue can be seen with modern ...

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    ... the adrenal glands (autoimmune disease) Infections such as tuberculosis , HIV, or fungal infections Hemorrhage into the adrenal glands Tumors Risk factors for the autoimmune type of Addison disease include ...

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    MedlinePlus

    ... neurological disorders such as Behcet's disease. The National Human Genome Research Institute, another Institute of the National Institutes of Health, conducts research into the genomic basis of Behcet's disease. This research is aimed ...

  2. Lyme disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... The same disease occurs in many parts of Europe and Asia. In the United States, most Lyme ... Risk factors for Lyme disease include: Doing outside activities that increase tick exposure (for example, gardening, hunting, ...

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    MedlinePlus

    Lyme disease is a bacterial infection you get from the bite of an infected tick. The first symptom ... Muscle and joint aches A stiff neck Fatigue Lyme disease can be hard to diagnose because you may ...

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    ... pneumococcal disease. Quick Facts About Pneumococcal Disease and Vaccination According to WHO, pneumococcal pneumonia and meningitis are ... of antibiotic treatment. (9, 10, 11) Conjugate pneumococcal vaccination is safe and effective for preventing severe childhood ...

  6. Gilbert disease

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  8. Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri; Terzakis, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects one million people in the United States. This article reviews the etiology and pathophysiology of PD, risk factors, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and treatment of this common disease. Implications for home care clinicians are included.

  9. Crinkle Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crinkle disease of hop was first described in Europe in 1930, and subsequent reports of the disease appear in literature published in the 1960s and 1970s. The disease appears to be of little importance in most regions of hop production. A fastidious rickettsia-like organism (RLO) is thought to cau...

  10. Rare Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are often very complex Are often caused by changes in genes It can be hard to find a specialist who knows how to treat your rare disease. Disease advocacy groups, rare disease organizations, and genetics clinics may help you to find ...

  11. Behcet's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Behçet’s disease keep their joints strong and flexible. What Is the Prognosis for a Person With Behçet’s Disease? Most people with Behçet’s disease can lead productive lives and control symptoms with proper medicine, rest, and exercise. Doctors ...

  12. Lyme Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  13. Meniere's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schessel, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Meniere's disease is characterized by unpredictable spells of severe vertigo and fluctuations in hearing and tinnitus. This article discusses the incidence of Meniere's disease, the present status of our understanding of this disease, controversies in its diagnosis, and the multiple therapeutic modalities recruited in its treatment. (Contains…

  14. Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review This article presents an update on the clinical aspects of human prion disease, including the wide spectrum of their presentations. Recent Findings Prion diseases, a group of disorders caused by abnormally shaped proteins called prions, occur in sporadic (Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease), genetic (genetic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia), and acquired (kuru, variant Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, and iatrogenic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease) forms. This article presents updated information on the clinical features and diagnostic methods for human prion diseases. New antemortem potential diagnostic tests based on amplifying prions in order to detect them are showing very high specificity. Understanding of the diversity of possible presentations of human prion diseases continues to evolve, with some genetic forms progressing slowly over decades, beginning with dysautonomia and neuropathy and progressing to a frontal-executive dementia with pathology of combined prionopathy and tauopathy. Unfortunately, to date, all human prion disease clinical trials have failed to show survival benefit. A very rare polymorphism in the prion protein gene recently has been identified that appears to protect against prion disease; this finding, in addition to providing greater understanding of the prionlike mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders, might lead to potential treatments. Summary Sporadic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease is the most common form of human prion disease. Genetic prion diseases, resulting from mutations in the prion-related protein gene (PRNP), are classified based on the mutation, clinical phenotype, and neuropathologic features and can be difficult to diagnose because of their varied presentations. Perhaps most relevant to this Continuum issue on neuroinfectious diseases, acquired prion diseases are caused by accidental transmission to humans, but fortunately, they are the least common form and

  15. Glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Vaden, Shelly L

    2011-08-01

    Glomerular diseases are a leading cause of chronic kidney disease in dogs but seem to be less common in cats. Glomerular diseases are diverse, and a renal biopsy is needed to determine the specific glomerular disease that is present in any animal. Familial glomerulopathies occur in many breeds of dogs. However, most dogs with glomerular disease have acquired glomerular injury that is either immune-complex mediated or due to systemic factors, both of which are believed to be the result of a disease process elsewhere in the body (i.e., neoplastic, infectious, and noninfectious inflammatory disorders). A thorough clinical evaluation is indicated in all dogs suspected of having glomerular disease and should include an extensive evaluation for potential predisposing disorders. Nonspecific management of dogs with glomerular disease can be divided into 3 major categories: (1) treatment of potential predisposing disorders, (2) management of proteinuria, and (3) management of uremia and other complications of glomerular disease and chronic kidney disease. Specific management of specific glomerular diseases has not been fully studied in dogs. However, it may be reasonable to consider immunosuppressive therapy in dogs that have developed a form of glomerulonephritis secondary to a steroid-responsive disease (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus) or have immune-mediated lesions that have been documented in renal biopsy specimens. Appropriate patient monitoring during therapy is important for maximizing patient care. The prognosis for dogs and cats with glomerular disease is variable and probably dependent on a combination of factors. The purpose of this article is to discuss the general diagnosis and management of dogs with glomerular disease. PMID:21782143

  16. [Social diseases, civilization diseases or lifestyle diseases?].

    PubMed

    Betlejewski, Stansław

    2007-01-01

    In general, the development of civilization is viewed as a positive step for the well-being of the human species, leading to an increased duration and quality of life. The accelerated progress of civilization (mainly industrialization, urbanization and nutrition) has lead to new possibilities for adverse effects on human health. In former high civilization--like old Egypt, Greece, Roman, Chinese, Indian, Maya civilizations--the "modem civilization diseases" were unknown. Modem science through improved sanitation, vaccination and antibiotics as well as improved social and economical conditions, has eliminated the threat of death from most infectious diseases. In the years after World War II the social, economic and health conditions changed. Most deaths have resulted from heart disease, stroke, cancer and other diseases as a result of an inappropriate relationship of people with their environment and changed lifestyle. Lifestyle diseases are different from other diseases because they are potentially preventable and can be lowered with changes in diet, lifestyle and environment. PMID:18350729

  17. DYRK1A in neurodegeneration and cancer: Molecular basis and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Abbassi, Ramzi; Johns, Terrance G; Kassiou, Michael; Munoz, Lenka

    2015-07-01

    Protein kinases are one of the most studied drug targets in current pharmacological research, as evidenced by the vast number of kinase-targeting agents enrolled in active clinical trials. Dual-specificity Tyrosine phosphorylation-Regulated Kinase 1A (DYRK1A) has been much less studied compared to many other kinases. DYRK1A primary function occurs during early development, where this protein regulates cellular processes related to proliferation and differentiation of neuronal progenitor cells. Although most extensively characterised for its role in brain development, DYRK1A is over-expressed in a variety of diseases including a number of human malignancies, such as haematological and brain cancers. Here we review the accumulating molecular studies that support our understanding of how DYRK1A signalling could underlie these pathological functions. The relevance of DYRK1A in a number of diseases is also substantiated with intensive drug discovery efforts to develop potent and selective inhibitors of DYRK1A. Several classes of DYRK1A inhibitors have recently been disclosed and some molecules are promising leads to develop DYRK1A inhibitors as drugs for DYRK1A-dependent diseases. PMID:25795597

  18. Characterization of Two Distinct Structural Classes of Selective Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Cynthia A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) catalyze the irreversible oxidation of aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acid. Alterations in ALDH1A1 activity are associated with such diverse diseases as cancer, Parkinson’s disease, obesity, and cataracts. Inhibitors of ALDH1A1 could aid in illuminating the role of this enzyme in disease processes. However, there are no commercially available selective inhibitors for ALDH1A1. Here we characterize two distinct chemical classes of inhibitors that are selective for human ALDH1A1 compared to eight other ALDH isoenzymes. The prototypical members of each structural class, CM026 and CM037, exhibit sub-micromolar inhibition constants, but have different mechanisms of inhibition. The crystal structures of these compounds bound to ALDH1A1 demonstrate that they bind within the aldehyde binding pocket of ALDH1A1 and exploit the presence of a unique Glycine residue to achieve their selectivity. These two novel and selective ALDH1A1 inhibitors may serve as chemical tools to better understand the contributions of ALDH1A1 to normal biology and to disease states. PMID:25634381

  19. Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Nagral, Aabha

    2014-03-01

    Gaucher disease is the commonest lysosomal storage disease seen in India and worldwide. It should be considered in any child or adult with an unexplained splenohepatomegaly and cytopenia which are seen in the three types of Gaucher disease. Type 1 is the non-neuronopathic form and type 2 and 3 are the neuronopathic forms. Type 2 is a more severe neuronopathic form leading to mortality by 2 years of age. Definitive diagnosis is made by a blood test-the glucocerebrosidase assay. There is no role for histological examination of the bone marrow, liver or spleen for diagnosis of the disease. Molecular studies for mutations are useful for confirming diagnosis, screening family members and prognosticating the disease. A splenectomy should not be performed except for palliation or when there is no response to enzyme replacement treatment or no possibility of getting any definitive treatment. Splenectomy may worsen skeletal and lung manifestations in Gaucher disease. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has completely revolutionized the prognosis and is now the standard of care for patients with this disease. Best results are seen in type 1 disease with good resolution of splenohepatomegaly, cytopenia and bone symptoms. Neurological symptoms in type 3 disease need supportive care. ERT is of no benefit in type 2 disease. Monitoring of patients on ERT involves evaluation of growth, blood counts, liver and spleen size and biomarkers such as chitotriosidase which reflect the disease burden. Therapy with ERT is very expensive and though patients in India have so far got the drug through a charitable access programme, there is a need for the government to facilitate access to treatment for this potentially curable disease. Bone marrow transplantation is an inferior option but may be considered when access to expensive ERT is not possible. PMID:25755533

  20. Parathyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hong Yan; Schumacher, H Ralph; Zhang, Li Yun

    2010-11-01

    Patients with parathyroid disease can have important musculoskeletal problems.Hypoparathyroidism can cause subcutaneous calcifications, tetany, muscle cramps,and paresthesias, but also myopathies and an ankylosing spondylitis-like back disease. Hypoparathyroidism can occur in SLE caused by antiparathyroid antibodies.Patients with hyperparathyroidism can develop bone disease with cysts, erosions,and deformities. They can also develop pseudogout, gout, myopathies, and tendon ruptures.

  1. Infectious disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of viewgraphs on the Johnson Space Center's work on infectious disease. It addresses their major concern over outbreaks of infectious disease that could jeopardize the health, safety and/or performance of crew members engaged in long duration space missions. The Antarctic environment is seen as an analogous location on Earth and a good place to carry out such infectious disease studies and methods for proposed studies as suggested.

  2. Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Finkbeiner, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is the most common inherited neurodegenerative disease and is characterized by uncontrolled excessive motor movements and cognitive and emotional deficits. The mutation responsible for HD leads to an abnormally long polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the huntingtin (Htt) protein, which confers one or more toxic functions to mutant Htt leading to neurodegeneration. The polyQ expansion makes Htt prone to aggregate and accumulate, and manipulations that mitigate protein misfolding or facilitate the clearance of misfolded proteins tend to slow disease progression in HD models. This article will focus on HD and the evidence that it is a conformational disease. PMID:21441583

  3. [Wilson's disease].

    PubMed

    Moilanen, Veikko; Mäkisalo, Heikki

    2010-01-01

    Wilson's disease is a disorder of the liver's copper metabolism. Accumulation of copper causes liver and central nervous system damage. Wilson's disease should always be suspected, when a liver disease is detected in a child or an adolescent. The disease may also manifest itself as severe neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders. The diagnosis is often delayed despite the fact that the accumulation of copper in the body can be shown by various means. Early started medication will stop the accumulation of copper into the body. If the treatment is delayed or ineffective, liver transplantation is required.

  4. The phenotype range of achondrogenesis 1A.

    PubMed

    Grigelioniene, Giedre; Geiberger, Stefan; Papadogiannakis, Nikos; Mäkitie, Outi; Nishimura, Gen; Nordgren, Ann; Conner, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Achondrogenesis 1A (ACG1A; OMIM 200600) is an autosomal recessive perinatally lethal skeletal dysplasia comprising intrauterine growth failure, micromelia, minor facial anomalies, deficient ossification of the skull, absent or extremely defective spinal ossification, short beaded ribs, and short deformed long bones with a stellate appearance. ACG1A is caused by mutations in the TRIP11 gene, resulting in deficiency of the Golgi microtubule associated protein 210. In this study we describe dizygotic twins with a clinical and radiological phenotype of ACG1A who were homozygous for a novel nonsense mutation in the TRIP11 gene. In addition, another patient with a milder manifestation, not readily distinguishable from those of other lethal skeletal dysplasias, was found to be a compound heterozygote for a nonsense mutation and a deletion of the 3' end of the TRIP11 gene. We conclude that mutations of the TRIP11 gene may encompass a wider phenotypic range than previously recognized. PMID:23956106

  5. Ras Regulates Rb via NORE1A.

    PubMed

    Barnoud, Thibaut; Donninger, Howard; Clark, Geoffrey J

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in the Ras oncogene are one of the most frequent events in human cancer. Although Ras regulates numerous growth-promoting pathways to drive transformation, it can paradoxically promote an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as oncogene-induced senescence. Although senescence has clearly been implicated as a major defense mechanism against tumorigenesis, the mechanisms by which Ras can promote such a senescent phenotype remain poorly defined. We have shown recently that the Ras death effector NORE1A plays a critical role in promoting Ras-induced senescence and connects Ras to the regulation of the p53 tumor suppressor. We now show that NORE1A also connects Ras to the regulation of a second major prosenescent tumor suppressor, the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. We show that Ras induces the formation of a complex between NORE1A and the phosphatase PP1A, promoting the activation of the Rb tumor suppressor by dephosphorylation. Furthermore, suppression of Rb reduces NORE1A senescence activity. These results, together with our previous findings, suggest that NORE1A acts as a critical tumor suppressor node, linking Ras to both the p53 and the Rb pathways to drive senescence.

  6. [Cardiovascular disease in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Nasonov, E L; Popkova, T V; Novikova, D S

    2016-01-01

    The representatives of immunoinflammatory diseases are rheumatic ones, such as primarily rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, spondyloarthritis, psoriatic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and other systemic connective diseases, which are characterized by a high risk for untimely death. The high risk of untimely death in these diseases has been found to be associated with the severity of an immunoinflammatory process that gives rise to severe irreversible damage to vital organs and systems and with the development of a wide spectrum of comorbidities (infections, interstitial lung disease, malignant tumors, osteoporotic fractures, etc.). Among them, diseases of the cardiovascular system, which are most commonly caused by the early development and.accelerated progression of atherosclerotic coronary lesions, hold a central.position. The paper gives the data available in the recent literature on the impact.of antirheumatic therapy (disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biological agents) on' the cardiovascular system. PMID:27458622

  7. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R Croft; Cowley, Patrick M; Singh, Abhishek; Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M; Baker, Anthony J; Simpson, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  8. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart

    PubMed Central

    Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M.; Baker, Anthony J.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  9. Alpers' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by mutation in the gene for the mitochondrial DNA polymerase POLG. The disease occurs in about one in 100,000 persons. ... typically occur months before tissue samples show the mitochondrial DNA depletion, so ... with Alpers' disease develop symptoms in the first two years of ...

  10. Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, I; Cantarini, L; Filippou, G; Frediani, B

    2014-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone is the most common metabolic bone disease after osteoporosis and affects 2-4% of adults over 55 years of age. Its etiology is only partly understood and includes both genetic and environmental factors. The disease may be asymptomatic and can be uncovered incidentally on x-ray or in biochemical tests performed for another condition. It can also manifest itself with bone pain, deformity, fracture or other complications. Paget's disease is diagnosed by x-rays and in general has very typical radiological features, but occasionally the clinical picture may be unusual and a differential diagnosis of sclerotic or lytic metastases needs to be considered. Plasma total alkaline phosphatase activity is the most clinically useful indicator of disease activity. It is elevated in most untreated patients, but may be within the normal range in patients with monostotic or limited disease. Bisphosphonate therapy is indicated for patients with symptoms and should also be considered in patients with disease sites that suggest a risk of complications, such as long bones, vertebrae or base of the skull. Orthopedic surgery in Paget's disease patients includes almost exclusively the correction of fractures and arthroplasty. PMID:25069498

  11. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Kidney Disease What is Kidney Disease? What the Kidneys Do Click for more information You have two ... damaged, wastes can build up in the body. Kidney Function and Aging Kidney function may be reduced ...

  12. Addison's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Addison’s disease? Addison’s disease affects your body’s adrenal glands. The adrenal glands are part of the endocrine system. The endocrine ... your moods, growth, metabolism, and tissue function. The adrenal glands are located just above your kidneys. They produce ...

  13. Endocrine Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... high or too low, you may have an endocrine disease or disorder. Endocrine diseases and disorders also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Featured Topics Adrenal Insufficiency ... Topics Research Discoveries & News Children with Cushing ...

  14. Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Tamer M.; Ariganjoye, Rafiu O.; Alsaeed, Gihad I.

    2015-01-01

    We aim to describe an 8-year-old boy with an unusual clinical presentation of Gaucher disease (GD). Gaucher disease is a progressive lysosomal storage disorder due to deficiency of the specific enzyme glucocerebrosidase with varying clinical features, but often involving the monocytes-macrophages systems. This child ran a progressive course with a devastating outcome. Three distinct GD subtypes have been described with varying clinical features based on the presence or absence of neurologic involvement. Gaucher disease diagnosis is obtained via: enzyme activity assay, gene mutation study, bone marrow aspiration in addition to multiple other tests that have been successfully used in diagnosis of cases of GD. Treatment modalities include enzyme replacement treatment, substrate reduction therapy, bone marrow transplantation, blood transfusion, and surgery are available management modalities for GD. Gaucher disease is a chronic disease requiring a multidisciplinary team approach with regular follow up with multiple subspecialties. PMID:26166597

  15. Beryllium disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jones Williams, W.

    1988-01-01

    The increasing use of beryllium in a variety of industries continues to be a hazard. New cases are still being reported to the UK Beryllium Case Registry, now numbering 60 in the period 1945-1988. The majority of cases follow inhalation which results in acute beryllium disease (chemical pneumonitis) or more commonly chronic beryllium disease--a granulomatous pneumonitis. Granulomatous skin nodules also occur following local implantation. The clinical and radiological features are briefly described with the emphasis on pathology and immunology. Laser microprobe mass spectrometry analysis of tissue sections is a major advance in diagnosis. Detection of beryllium distinguishes the granulomas of chronic beryllium disease from other diseases, in particular sarcoidosis. The role of beryllium lymphocyte transformation tests is discussed. Chronic beryllium disease is steroid dependent and local excision of skin lesions appears to be curative. There is no evidence that beryllium is carcinogenic. Images Figure 1 PMID:3074283

  16. Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Breteler, Monique M B; de Strooper, Bart; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Salloway, Stephen; Van der Flier, Wiesje Maria

    2016-07-30

    Although the prevalence of dementia continues to increase worldwide, incidence in the western world might have decreased as a result of better vascular care and improved brain health. Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent cause of dementia, is still defined by the combined presence of amyloid and tau, but researchers are gradually moving away from the simple assumption of linear causality as proposed in the original amyloid hypothesis. Age-related, protective, and disease-promoting factors probably interact with the core mechanisms of the disease. Amyloid β42, and tau proteins are established core cerebrospinal biomarkers; novel candidate biomarkers include amyloid β oligomers and synaptic markers. MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose PET are established imaging techniques for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid PET is gaining traction in the clinical arena, but validity and cost-effectiveness remain to be established. Tau PET might offer new insights and be of great help in differential diagnosis and selection of patients for trials. In the search for understanding the disease mechanism and keys to treatment, research is moving increasingly into the earliest phase of disease. Preclinical Alzheimer's disease is defined as biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's pathological changes in cognitively healthy individuals. Patients with subjective cognitive decline have been identified as a useful population in whom to look for preclinical Alzheimer's disease. Moderately positive results for interventions targeting several lifestyle factors in non-demented elderly patients and moderately positive interim results for lowering amyloid in pre-dementia Alzheimer's disease suggest that, ultimately, there will be a future in which specific anti-Alzheimer's therapy will be combined with lifestyle interventions targeting general brain health to jointly combat the disease. In this Seminar, we discuss the main developments in Alzheimer's research. PMID:26921134

  17. Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Breteler, Monique M B; de Strooper, Bart; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Salloway, Stephen; Van der Flier, Wiesje Maria

    2016-07-30

    Although the prevalence of dementia continues to increase worldwide, incidence in the western world might have decreased as a result of better vascular care and improved brain health. Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent cause of dementia, is still defined by the combined presence of amyloid and tau, but researchers are gradually moving away from the simple assumption of linear causality as proposed in the original amyloid hypothesis. Age-related, protective, and disease-promoting factors probably interact with the core mechanisms of the disease. Amyloid β42, and tau proteins are established core cerebrospinal biomarkers; novel candidate biomarkers include amyloid β oligomers and synaptic markers. MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose PET are established imaging techniques for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid PET is gaining traction in the clinical arena, but validity and cost-effectiveness remain to be established. Tau PET might offer new insights and be of great help in differential diagnosis and selection of patients for trials. In the search for understanding the disease mechanism and keys to treatment, research is moving increasingly into the earliest phase of disease. Preclinical Alzheimer's disease is defined as biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's pathological changes in cognitively healthy individuals. Patients with subjective cognitive decline have been identified as a useful population in whom to look for preclinical Alzheimer's disease. Moderately positive results for interventions targeting several lifestyle factors in non-demented elderly patients and moderately positive interim results for lowering amyloid in pre-dementia Alzheimer's disease suggest that, ultimately, there will be a future in which specific anti-Alzheimer's therapy will be combined with lifestyle interventions targeting general brain health to jointly combat the disease. In this Seminar, we discuss the main developments in Alzheimer's research.

  18. Casein Kinase 2 Is a Novel Regulator of the Human Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1A2 (OATP1A2) Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ting; Cheung, Florence Shin Gee; Zheng, Jian; Lu, Xiaoxi; Zhu, Ling; Grewal, Thomas; Murray, Michael; Zhou, Fanfan

    2016-01-01

    Human organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) mediate the influx of many important drugs into cells. Casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a critical protein kinase that phosphorylates >300 protein substrates and is dysregulated in a number of disease states. Among the CK2 substrates are several transporters, although whether this includes human OATPs has not been evaluated. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the regulation of human OATP1A2 by CK2. HEK-239T cells in which OATP1A2 was overexpressed were treated with CK2 specific inhibitors or transfected with CK2 specific siRNA, and the activity, expression, and subcellular trafficking of OATP1A2 was evaluated. CK2 inhibition decreased the uptake of the prototypic OATP1A2 substrate estrone-3-sulfate (E3S). Kinetic studies revealed that this was due to a decrease in the maximum velocity (Vmax) of E3S uptake, while the Michaelis constant was unchanged. The cell surface expression, but not the total cellular expression of OATP1A2, was impaired by CK2 inhibition and knockdown of the catalytic α-subunits of CK2. CK2 inhibition decreased the internalization of OATP1A2 via a clathrin-dependent pathway, decreased OATP1A2 recycling, and likely impaired OATP1A2 targeting to the cell surface. Consistent with these findings, CK2 inhibition also disrupted the colocalization of OATP1A2 and Rab GTPase (Rab)4-, Rab8-, and Rab9-positive endosomal and secretory vesicles. Taken together, CK2 has emerged as a novel regulator of the subcellular trafficking and stability of OATP1A2. Because OATP1A2 transports many molecules of physiological and pharmacological importance, the present data may inform drug selection in patients with diseases in which CK2 and OATP1A2 are dysregulated.

  19. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Nat, Laura Bogdana; Simiti, Adriana Liana; Poanta, Laura Irina

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease (Borreliosis), also called the "disease of 1000 faces", is produced by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi, transmitted by the Ixodes tick. The clinical picture is non-specific and polymorph, with multisystemic involvement. Diagnosis is most often one of exclusion, and certain diagnosis is based on the presence of Borellia antibodies. The treatment is done differently depending on the stage of the disease and the severity of injuries, being used antibiotics like Doxycycline, Amoxicillin, Erythromycin or Penicillin. Under treatment the disease quickly heals without sequel, in the early stages, but advanced stages are usually resistant to treatment and chronic injuries can occur. Symptoms get worse without treatment and become chronic. We present the case of a woman of 66-year-old with a complex history of disease, which began one year prior to admission, through multiple and nonspecific symptoms; she presented herself in numerous medical services (gastroenterology, rheumatology--where an immunosuppressive treatment was initiated, hematology) without determining a final diagnosis. She was admitted in our service with altered general state and worsening symptoms, predominantly fever, muscle pain, joint pain, the patient being immobilized in bed. After multiple investigations and the problem of differential diagnosis with multiple pathologies, we finally established the diagnosis of Lyme disease. The peculiarities of the case are represented by the severity of the clinical manifestations and fulminant disease evolution under the unjustified administration of immunosuppressive treatment, and atypical joint involvement regarding localization and evolution that raised the issue of differential diagnosis with osteosarcoma or bone tuberculosis. PMID:25726630

  20. Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Playfer, J R

    1997-05-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common disabling disease of old age. The diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease is based on clinical signs and has poor sensitivity, with about 25% of patients confidently diagnosed as having the disease actually having other conditions such as multi-system atrophy and other parkinsonism-plus syndromes. Benign essential tremor and arteriosclerotic pseudo-parkinsonism can easily be confused with Parkinson's disease. The cause of Parkinson's disease remains unknown. Speculative research highlights the role of oxidative stress and free radical mediated damage to dopaminergic cells. Parkinson's disease is the one neurodegenerative disorder in which drugs have been demonstrated to be of value. There is now a wide variety of drugs and formulations available, including anticholinergics, amantidine, L-dopa, dopamine agonists including apomorphine, selegiline and soon to be available catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors. Disabling side-effects of treatment, fluctuations, dyskinesias and psychiatric problems require strategic use of the drugs available. There is an increasing potential for neurosurgical intervention. PMID:9196696

  1. [Castleman disease].

    PubMed

    Sánchez de Toledo Sancho, J; Fàbrega Sabaté, J; Marhuenda Irastorza, C; Lucaya Layret, X; Torán Fuentes, N; Gros Subias, L; Sábado Alvarez, C

    2005-07-01

    Castleman disease or angiofollicular hyperplasia is a rare disorder included in the group of lymphoproliferative disorders. This entity was originally described by Castleman in 1956. The etiology remains unknown but it is postulated to be a reactive lymphoid hyperplasia due to chronic antigenic stimulation caused by a viral infection. The disease presents in young adults and is more frequent in women; it is exceptionally rare in the pediatric age group. It is classified into two clinical groups (localized disease and disseminated disease) and there are two histologic variants (hyaline-vascular and plasma cell Castleman disease). Localized disease is usually asymptomatic, has a good prognosis, and is the most common presentation in pediatric patients, usually corresponding to highly vascularized mediastinal masses. Resection of the mass, which is curative, is associated with a high risk of blood loss. Recently, preoperative arteriography with embolization has been used satisfactorily in the preoperative management of these tumors. We present a case of localized Castleman disease in a 12-year-old girl satisfactorily treated with embolization before curative resection.

  2. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases 1A6 and 1A10 catalyze reduced menadione glucuronidation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Takahito; Ohnuma, Tomokazu; Inoue, Yuu; Kishi, Takehiko; Ogura, Kenichiro; Hiratsuka, Akira

    2008-06-27

    Menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquine), also known as vitamin K3, has been widely used as a model compound in the field of oxidative stress-related research. The metabolism of menadione has been studied, and it is known that menadione undergoes a two-electron reduction by NAD(P)H:Quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) after which the reduced form of menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthalenediol, menadiol) is glucuronidated and excreted in urine. To investigate which human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms participate in the glucuronidation of menadiol reduced by NQO1 from menadione, we first constructed heterologously expressed NQO1 in Sf9 cells and tested the menadiol glucuronidating activity of 16 human recombinant UGT isoforms. Of the 16 UGT isoforms, UGTs 1A6, 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, and 1A10 catalyzed menadiol glucuronidation, and, of these, UGTs 1A6 and 1A10 catalyzed menadiol glucuronidation at much higher rates than the other UGTs. Menadiol was regioselectively glucuronidated in the manner of 4-position > 1-position by UGTs 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, and 1A10. In contrast to these UGTs, only UGT1A6 exhibited 1-menadiol-preferential glucuronidating activity. The results suggest possible detoxification pathways for quinones via NQO1 reduction followed by UGT glucuronidation.

  3. Kummell disease

    PubMed Central

    Schucany, William G.; Opatowsky, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Kummell disease, or avascular necrosis of a vertebral body, presents as vertebral osteonecrosis typically affecting a thoracic vertebra with compression deformity, intravertebral vacuum cleft, and exaggerated kyphosis weeks to months after a minor traumatic injury. This rare disease is increasing in prevalence secondary to an aging population and the associated rise in osteoporosis. Treatment with vertebroplasty or surgical decompression and fusion is often required. We present a classic case of Kummell disease to illustrate the salient features of the condition, with associated imaging findings on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:23814399

  4. Kummell disease.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Larry T; Schucany, William G; Opatowsky, Michael J

    2013-07-01

    Kummell disease, or avascular necrosis of a vertebral body, presents as vertebral osteonecrosis typically affecting a thoracic vertebra with compression deformity, intravertebral vacuum cleft, and exaggerated kyphosis weeks to months after a minor traumatic injury. This rare disease is increasing in prevalence secondary to an aging population and the associated rise in osteoporosis. Treatment with vertebroplasty or surgical decompression and fusion is often required. We present a classic case of Kummell disease to illustrate the salient features of the condition, with associated imaging findings on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

  5. Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Bohra, Vijay; Nair, Velu

    2011-07-01

    Gaucher's disease (GD) is the most common amongst the various disorders classified under the lysosomal storage disorders. GD is a model for applications of molecular medicine to clinical delineation, diagnosis, and treatment. The multiorgan and varied presentation of the disease makes it a challenge to diagnose GD early. The advent of enzyme replacement therapy in the early 1990s changed the management, and survival, of patients with GD. In addition to this, development of substrate reduction, pharmacological chaperone, and gene therapies has broadened the horizon for this rare disease. However, in resource-poor countries like ours, optimal management is still a distant dream. PMID:21897894

  6. Polyclonal T-Cells Express CD1a in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) Lesions

    PubMed Central

    West, Jennifer A.; Olsen, Sharon L.; Mitchell, Jenée M.; Priddle, Ross E.; Luke, Jennifer M.; Åkefeldt, Selma Olsson; Henter, Jan-Inge; Turville, Christopher; Kannourakis, George

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a complex and poorly understood disorder that has characteristics of both inflammatory and neoplastic disease. By using eight-colour flow cytometry, we have identified a previously unreported population of CD1a+/CD3+ T-cells in LCH lesions. The expression of CD1a is regarded as a hallmark of this disease; however, it has always been presumed that it was only expressed by pathogenic Langerhans cells (LCs). We have now detected CD1a expression by a range of T-cell subsets within all of the LCH lesions that were examined, establishing that CD1a expression in these lesions is no longer restricted to pathogenic LCs. The presence of CD1a+ T-cells in all of the LCH lesions that we have studied to date warrants further investigation into their biological function to determine whether these cells are important in the pathogenesis of LCH. PMID:25343480

  7. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics with GRAPE-1A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umemura, Masayuki; Fukushige, Toshiyuki; Makino, Junichiro; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Sugimoto, Daiichiro; Turner, Edwin L.; Loeb, Abraham

    1993-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) scheme using GRAPE-1A, a special-purpose processor used for gravitational N-body simulations. The GRAPE-1A calculates the gravitational force exerted on a particle from all other particles in a system, while simultaneously making a list of the nearest neighbors of the particle. It is found that GRAPE-1A accelerates SPH calculations by direct summation by about two orders of magnitudes for a ten thousand-particle simulation. The effective speed is 80 Mflops, which is about 30 percent of the peak speed of GRAPE-1A. Also, in order to investigate the accuracy of GRAPE-SPH, some test simulations were executed. We found that the force and position errors are smaller than those due to representing a fluid by a finite number of particles. The total energy and momentum were conserved within 0.2-0.4 percent and 2-5 x 10 exp -5, respectively, in simulations with several thousand particles. We conclude that GRAPE-SPH is quite effective and sufficiently accurate for self-gravitating hydrodynamics.

  8. Gaucher disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... harmful substances to build up in the liver, spleen, bones, and bone marrow. These substances prevent cells ... common. It involves bone disease, anemia, an enlarged spleen and low platelets (thrombocytopenia). Type I affects both ...

  9. Fabry Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidneys may become progressively impaired, leading to renal failure. Other signs include decreased sweating, fever, and gastrointestinal ... of complications from strokes, heart disease, or kidney failure. What research is being done? The mission of ...

  10. Planning Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabel, Medard

    1984-01-01

    To solve societal problems, both local and global, a global approach is needed. Serious diseases that are crippling present-day problem solving and planning are discussed, and the characteristics of a healthy, effective planning approach are described. (RM)

  11. Stargardt Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... ways to prevent it. A decrease in color perception also occurs in Stargardt disease. This is because photoreceptor cells involved in color perception are concentrated in the macula. Back to top ...

  12. Legionnaire disease

    MedlinePlus

    Legionella pneumonia; Pontiac fever; Legionellosis ... Edelstein PH, Roy CR. Legionnaires' disease and Pontiac fever. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious ...

  13. Sever's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Sever's Disease KidsHealth > ...

  14. Prion Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and sometimes polymerize in neurodegenerative disorders. Credit: NIAID Biology & Genetics Scientists are examining how abnormal prion protein ... the abnormal form. Read more about prion diseases biology and genetics Therapeutic Approaches Although there are no ...

  15. Canavan disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... want to have children and have a family history of Canavan disease. Counseling should be considered if both parents are of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. For this group, DNA testing can almost always tell if the parents ...

  16. Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Carcinogens: Captafol A Human Health Perspective on Climate Change (Full Report) (4MB) Certain Glass Wool Fibers (Inhalable) ( ... Environmental Public Health (PEPH) (1MB) Programs and Initiatives: Climate Change and Human Health Respiratory Disease and the Environment ( ...

  17. Lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lungs to take in oxygen and release carbon dioxide. People with this type of lung disorder often ... the lungs to take up oxygen and release carbon dioxide. These diseases may also affect heart function. An ...

  18. Meningococcal Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... at increased risk of meningococcal disease. This includes college students, military personnel, international travelers to areas where meningococcal ... You May Also Like An 18-Year-Old College Student’s Battle with Meningitis Meningococcal Serogroup B Cases and ...

  19. Whipple's disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... fatal. Treatment relieves symptoms and can cure the disease. ... Brain damage Heart valve damage (from endocarditis ) Nutritional deficiencies Symptoms return (which may be because of drug resistance) Weight loss

  20. Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk of urinary tract and other serious infections. Malnutrition or dehydration: People who have Alzheimer’s disease may ... swallow. It’s important to watch for signs of malnutrition. If you think that a loved one might ...

  1. Zoonotic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov . One Health About One Health Zoonotic Diseases History of One Health One Health in Action The Story of the Rift Valley Fever Virus Vaccine Lead Poisoning Investigation in Northern Nigeria Domestic One Health Activities "Friends" Magazine Global One ...

  2. Pilonidal Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content ASCRS Patients Educational Resources Diseases and Conditions Patient Education Library Patient Success Stories Treatments and Screening Resources Find a Surgeon Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Registries Helpful Links Physicians ...

  3. Batten Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene codes has not been identified. In addition, research scientists are working with NCL animal models to improve understanding and treatment of these disorders. One research team, for example, is ... for scientists to study the genetics of these diseases. NIH ...

  4. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol Smoking Obesity Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  5. Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with heart disease? What do my cholesterol and triglyceride numbers mean? How can I lower my cholesterol? ... weight Know your numbers (blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglycerides) You can reduce your chances of getting heart ...

  6. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wilson disease. Growing knowledge of the copper transporting gene ATP7B, which in its mutated form causes WD, should lead to the design of better therapies for this disorder. NIH Patient Recruitment for Wilson ...

  7. Crohn disease

    PubMed Central

    Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Rioux, John D.; Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Huett, Alan; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Wileman, Tom; Mizushima, Noboru; Carding, Simon; Akira, Shizuo; Parkes, Miles; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic and debilitating inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract.1 Prevalence in western populations is 100–150/100,000 and somewhat higher in Ashkenazi Jews. Peak incidence is in early adult life, although any age can be affected and a majority of affected individuals progress to relapsing and chronic disease. Medical treatments rely significantly on empirical corticosteroid therapy and immunosuppression, and intestinal resectional surgery is frequently required. Thus, 80% of patients with CD come to surgery for refractory disease or complications. It is hoped that an improved understanding of pathogenic mechanisms, for example by studying the genetic basis of CD and other forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), will lead to improved therapies and possibly preventative strategies in individuals identified as being at risk. PMID:20729636

  8. Behcet's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Silk Route,” which spans the region from Japan and China in the Far East to the ... the disease’s epidemiology is not well understood. In Japan, Behcet’s disease ranks as a leading cause of ...

  9. Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePlus

    Senile dementia - Alzheimer type (SDAT); SDAT; Dementia - Alzheimer ... The exact cause of Alzheimer disease (AD) is not known. Research shows that certain changes in the brain lead to AD. You are more likely ...

  10. Chagas disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... will help control the spread of the disease. Blood banks in Central and South America screen donors for ... discarded if the donor has the parasite. Most blood banks in the United States began screening for Chagas ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells make and use a brain chemical called dopamine (say: DOH-puh-meen) to send messages to ... coordinate body movements. When someone has Parkinson's disease, dopamine levels are low. So, the body doesn't ...

  12. [Kawasaki disease].

    PubMed

    Gliwińska, E

    1995-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD), first described in Japan in 1967 by Dr. Tomisaku Kawasaki, is an acute multi system vasculitis of infancy and early childhood characterised by high fever, rash, conjunctivitis, inflammation of the mucous membranes, erythematous induration of the hands and feet and cervical lymphadenopathy. Synonyms for Kawasaki disease include "Kawasaki syndrome" and "mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome" (MCLS, MLNS, MCLNS). Kawasaki disease was initially presumed to occur only in Japan; but now this disease is known in the whole world. The first cases in the United States were reported in Hawaii in 1976. In poland 5 cases were recognized, and first time described in 1981. The etiology of Kawasaki disease remains unknown. Toxic, allergic and immunologic causes have been suspected, but most investigators favor an infectious cause or an immune response to an infectious agent. Among classes of microorganism suspected of causing Kawasaki disease were bacteria, leptospires, fungi, rickettsiae and a number of viruses. Recently, there has been considerable interest in the possibility, that Kawasaki disease is caused by RETROVIRUSES. Although the disease is generally benign and self-limited, about 20% of children develop coronary artery aneurysms. In 5% of cases, giant aneurysm/more then 8 mm/develop, predisposing the patient to acute coronary artery thrombosis, myocardial infarction and sudden death. This is the most serious complication of KD. Other manifestations of hearth involvement, include pericarditis, myocarditis, myocardial failure and mitral regurgitation. Besides this many other clinical findings are commonly noted in KD; such as: pneumonia, diarrhea, arthritis, aseptic meningitis, otitis media, obstructive jaundice, hydrops of gallbladder and others.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7545822

  13. [Kawasaki's disease].

    PubMed

    Cortes, J; Martínez, B; Montini, C; Barraza, P; Reyes, A

    1989-08-01

    We described a case of Kawasaki's disease in a chilean girl, one year and 5 months old of age, who presented the oral characteristics, cutaneous and systemic manifestation of the condition, that is not very common for the dentist but that it is necessary to know due to the heart complications and the mortality associated with the disease, and it is necessary that the dentist recognize early this condition.

  14. [Devic disease].

    PubMed

    Papeix, Caroline

    2006-11-01

    Devic disease, also known as neuromyelitis optica, is a severe rare condition characterized clinically by one or more episodes of optical neuritis and myelitis. Pathologically, it is characterized by extensive demyelination associated with axon loss and deposits of complement and immunoglobulins (IgM) within the lesions. Specific antibodies for this disease (IgG NMO) were recently identified. Immunosuppressive treatment is currently the best option for preventing relapse. PMID:17086129

  15. Incomplete penetrance of biallelic ALDH1A3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Plaisancié, Julie; Brémond-Gignac, Dominique; Demeer, Bénédicte; Gaston, Véronique; Verloes, Alain; Fares-Taie, Lucas; Gerber, Sylvie; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Calvas, Patrick; Chassaing, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    The formation of a properly shaped eye is a complex developmental event that requires the coordination of many induction processes and differentiation pathways. Microphthalmia and anophthalmia (MA) represent the most severe defects that can affect the ocular globe during embryonic development. When genetic, these ocular disorders exhibit large genetic heterogeneity and extreme variable expressivity. Around 20 monogenic diseases are known to be associated with MA as main phenotype and the penetrance of mutations is usually full in the patients. Some of these genes encode proteins involved in the vitamin A pathway, tightly regulated during eye development. One of those retinoic acid synthesis genes is ALDH1A3 and biallelic mutations in that gene have been recently found to lead to MA phenotype in patients. Interestingly, we report here the lack of ocular defect in a girl carrying the same homozygous mutation in the ALDH1A3 gene than the affected members of her family. Thus, this report brings new information for the phenotype-genotype correlation of ALDH1A3 mutations and raises important questions, especially in terms of genetic counselling given to the patients and their families. Furthermore, these data contribute to the more general understanding that we have for the complex genetic inheritance of these MA phenotypes. PMID:26873617

  16. Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipids that is caused by mutations of the GLA gene that codes for α-galactosidase A, leads to dysfunction of many cell types and includes a systemic vasculopathy. As a result, patients have a markedly increased risk of developing ischemic stroke, small-fiber peripheral neuropathy, cardiac dysfunction and chronic kidney disease. Virtually all complications of Fabry disease are non-specific in nature and clinically indistinguishable from similar abnormalities that occur in the context of more common disorders in the general population. Recent studies suggested a much higher incidence of mutations of the GLA gene, suggesting that this disorder is under-diagnosed. However, some of the gene variants may be benign. Although the etiology of Fabry disease has been known for many years, the mechanism by which the accumulating α-D-galactosyl moieties cause this multi organ disorder has only recently been studied and is yet to be completely elucidated. Specific therapy for Fabry disease has been developed in the last few years but its role in the management of the disorder is still being investigated. Fortunately, standard 'non-specific' medical and surgical therapy is effective in slowing deterioration or compensating for organ failure in patients with Fabry disease. PMID:26564084

  17. Whipple's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ratnaike, R.

    2000-01-01

    Whipple's disease is a systemic bacterial infection and the common though not invariable manifestations are diarrhoea, weight loss, abdominal pain, and arthralgia. Arthritis or arthralgia may be the only presenting symptom, predating other manifestations by years. Virtually all organs in the body may be affected, with protean clinical manifestations. Various immunological abnormalities, some of which may be epiphenomena, are described. The causative organism is Tropheryma whippelii.
The disease is uncommon though lethal if not treated. Recent data suggest the disease occurs in an older age group than previously described. The characteristic histopathological features are found most often in the small intestine. These are variable villous atrophy and distension of the normal villous architecture by an infiltrate of foamy macrophages with a coarsely granular cytoplasm, which stain a brilliant magenta colour with PAS. These pathognomonic PAS positive macrophages may also be present in the peripheral and mesenteric lymph nodes and various other organs. The histological differential diagnoses include histoplasmosis and Mycobacterium avium-intercellulare complex.
The clinical diagnosis of Whipple's disease may be elusive, especially if gastrointestinal symptoms are not present. A unique sign of CNS involvement, if present, is oculofacial-skeletal myorhythmia or oculomasticatory myorhythmia, both diagnostic of Whipple's disease. A small bowel biopsy is often diagnostic, though in about 30% of patients no abnormality is present. In patients with only CNS involvement, a stereotactic brain biopsy can be done under local anaesthetic. A recent important diagnostic test is polymerase chain reaction of the 16S ribosomal RNA of Tropheryma whippelii.
Whipple's disease is potentially fatal but responds dramatically to antibiotic treatment. In this review the current recommended treatments are presented. The response to treatment should be monitored closely, as relapses are

  18. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Valve Disease Overview The human heart has ...

  19. Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Suzuki Kurokawa, M; Suzuki, N

    2004-09-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a systemic disorder of recurrent acute inflammation, characterized by major symptoms of oral aphthous ulcers, uveitis, skin lesions and genital ulcers. Involvement of intestines, vessels, and central nervous system (CNS) sometimes leads to a poor prognosis. Patients with BD are known to distribute along the ancient Silk Road. The incidence is relatively higher from eastern Asia to the Mediterranean area as roughly 1-10 patients in 10,000 people, whereas only 1-2 patients in 1,000,000 people in UK and North America. Although etiology of the disease is still unknown, high prevalence of HLA-B51, increased expression of heat shock protein 60 and Th1 dominant immune responses in the patients are considered important in its pathogenesis. Non-infectious neutrophil activation and infection with Streptococcus sanguis and herpes simplex virus would also be associated. Because BD lacks any pathognomonic symptoms and laboratory findings, the diagnosis relies largely upon the criteria proposed by the International Study Group for Behcet's disease in 1990. In Japan, the diagnosis was also made according to the Japanese criteria revised in 1987. Recently, the Behcet's Disease Research Committee of Japan again revised the Japanese criteria in 2003 to avoid overdiagnosis. The new Japanese criteria are introduced in this review. Differential diagnosis excluding Sweet's disease, pemphigus, erythema nodosum and Crohn's disease is important, and positive laboratory data for pathergy test, prick test for dead Streptococci and HLA-B51 are emphasized to make appropriate diagnosis in these criteria. Pathological findings of the disease-affected site such as erythematous nodosum is also stressed. Treatment for the disease has been chosen according to the clinical symptoms. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, immunosuppressants, corticosteroids and colchicine are basically introduced. Recently, effects of interferon-alpha/beta, anti-tumor necrosis factor antibody

  20. Cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Portegies, M L P; Koudstaal, P J; Ikram, M A

    2016-01-01

    With 16.9 million people who suffered a first-ever stroke in 2010 worldwide, stroke is a very common vascular disease. Epidemiologic studies have played an essential role in assessing this burden and in detecting the risk factors for stroke. Primary prevention of these risk factors, primarily hypertension, smoking, diabetes, and atrial fibrillation, has reduced the incidence in high-income countries. However, stroke remains a major cause of death and disability, and therefore research should be continued. Subarachnoid hemorrhages are less prevalent than strokes but have an even higher risk of death. Similar to stroke, epidemiologic studies identified smoking and hypertension as its most important risk factors, together with excessive alcohol intake. Although rare, arterial dissections, CADASIL, arteriovenous malformations, venous sinus thrombosis, moyamoya disease, and vasculitis can lead to serious symptoms. The burden and risk factors of those rare diseases are more challenging to assess. Whenever possible, they should be recognized in a timely manner for their increased risk of stroke, but most often they are diagnosed only at the time of stroke. Some cerebrovascular abnormalities do not result in immediate symptoms. This subclinical cerebrovascular disease includes silent infarcts, white-matter lesions, and microbleeds, and is incidentally found by neuroimaging. These lesions are not innocent, as several epidemiologic studies have associated subclinical cerebrovascular disease with an increased risk of stroke, cognitive decline, dementia, and death. PMID:27637962

  1. [Eales' disease].

    PubMed

    Errera, M-H; Pratas, A; Goldschmidt, P; Sedira, N; Sahel, J-A; Benesty, J

    2016-05-01

    The syndrome of recurrent vitreous hemorrhages in young men was described for the first time by Henry Eales in 1880. The association with a clinical manifestation of ocular inflammation was reported 5years later. Eales disease affects young adults who present with ischemic retinal vasculitis, with the peripheral retina most commonly affected. Most cases have been reported in South Asia. Although the etiology of this abnormality is unknown, it may be related to an immune sensitivity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens. Its pathogenesis is related to extensive ischemia that affects the retina, secondary to an obliterative retinal vasculopathy with release of angiogenic factors of the VEGF type. Involvement of the retina is the hallmark of the disease, which manifests as follows: periphlebitis, retinal capillary ischemia most often affecting the periphery with secondary proliferative retinopathy and retinal and/or papillary neovascularization, recurrent vitreous hemorrhages and tractional retinal detachment. These complications are potentially blinding. The natural history of Eales disease varies, with temporary or permanent remission in some cases and continuous progression in others. Progression is often bilateral, which necessitates regular follow-up. The treatment of Eales disease depends on the stage of the disease and is not well defined. Observation only, pars plana vitrectomy surgery and/or intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF are recommended in cases of vitreous hemorrhage, associated with corticosteroids when retinal vasculitis is present. Laser pan-retinal photocoagulation is necessary when neovascularization is present. PMID:27185661

  2. Acid-sensing ion channels 1a (ASIC1a) inhibit neuromuscular transmission in female mice.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Francisco J; Lino, Noelia G; González-Inchauspe, Carlota M F; González, Laura E; Colettis, Natalia; Vattino, Lucas G; Wunsch, Amanda M; Wemmie, John A; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2014-02-15

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) open in response to extracellular acidosis. ASIC1a, a particular subtype of these channels, has been described to have a postsynaptic distribution in the brain, being involved not only in ischemia and epilepsy, but also in fear and psychiatric pathologies. High-frequency stimulation of skeletal motor nerve terminals (MNTs) can induce presynaptic pH changes in combination with an acidification of the synaptic cleft, known to contribute to muscle fatigue. Here, we studied the role of ASIC1a channels on neuromuscular transmission. We combined a behavioral wire hanging test with electrophysiology, pharmacological, and immunofluorescence techniques to compare wild-type and ASIC1a lacking mice (ASIC1a (-/-) knockout). Our results showed that 1) ASIC1a (-/-) female mice were weaker than wild type, presenting shorter times during the wire hanging test; 2) spontaneous neurotransmitter release was reduced by ASIC1a activation, suggesting a presynaptic location of these channels at individual MNTs; 3) ASIC1a-mediated effects were emulated by extracellular local application of acid saline solutions (pH = 6.0; HEPES/MES-based solution); and 4) immunofluorescence techniques revealed the presence of ASIC1a antigens on MNTs. These results suggest that ASIC1a channels might be involved in controlling neuromuscular transmission, muscle contraction and fatigue in female mice.

  3. Acid-sensing ion channels 1a (ASIC1a) inhibit neuromuscular transmission in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Lino, Noelia G.; González-Inchauspe, Carlota M. F.; González, Laura E.; Colettis, Natalia; Vattino, Lucas G.; Wunsch, Amanda M.; Wemmie, John A.; Uchitel, Osvaldo D.

    2013-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) open in response to extracellular acidosis. ASIC1a, a particular subtype of these channels, has been described to have a postsynaptic distribution in the brain, being involved not only in ischemia and epilepsy, but also in fear and psychiatric pathologies. High-frequency stimulation of skeletal motor nerve terminals (MNTs) can induce presynaptic pH changes in combination with an acidification of the synaptic cleft, known to contribute to muscle fatigue. Here, we studied the role of ASIC1a channels on neuromuscular transmission. We combined a behavioral wire hanging test with electrophysiology, pharmacological, and immunofluorescence techniques to compare wild-type and ASIC1a lacking mice (ASIC1a −/− knockout). Our results showed that 1) ASIC1a −/− female mice were weaker than wild type, presenting shorter times during the wire hanging test; 2) spontaneous neurotransmitter release was reduced by ASIC1a activation, suggesting a presynaptic location of these channels at individual MNTs; 3) ASIC1a-mediated effects were emulated by extracellular local application of acid saline solutions (pH = 6.0; HEPES/MES-based solution); and 4) immunofluorescence techniques revealed the presence of ASIC1a antigens on MNTs. These results suggest that ASIC1a channels might be involved in controlling neuromuscular transmission, muscle contraction and fatigue in female mice. PMID:24336653

  4. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  5. Recessive mutations in a distal PTF1A enhancer cause isolated pancreatic agenesis.

    PubMed

    Weedon, Michael N; Cebola, Inês; Patch, Ann-Marie; Flanagan, Sarah E; De Franco, Elisa; Caswell, Richard; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Cho, Candy H-H; Lango Allen, Hana; Houghton, Jayne A L; Roth, Christian L; Chen, Rongrong; Hussain, Khalid; Marsh, Phil; Vallier, Ludovic; Murray, Anna; Ellard, Sian; Ferrer, Jorge; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of cis-regulatory mutations to human disease remains poorly understood. Whole-genome sequencing can identify all noncoding variants, yet the discrimination of causal regulatory mutations represents a formidable challenge. We used epigenomic annotation in human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived pancreatic progenitor cells to guide the interpretation of whole-genome sequences from individuals with isolated pancreatic agenesis. This analysis uncovered six different recessive mutations in a previously uncharacterized ~400-bp sequence located 25 kb downstream of PTF1A (encoding pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a) in ten families with pancreatic agenesis. We show that this region acts as a developmental enhancer of PTF1A and that the mutations abolish enhancer activity. These mutations are the most common cause of isolated pancreatic agenesis. Integrating genome sequencing and epigenomic annotation in a disease-relevant cell type can thus uncover new noncoding elements underlying human development and disease. PMID:24212882

  6. Recessive mutations in a distal PTF1A enhancer cause isolated pancreatic agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Sarah E.; De Franco, Elisa; Caswell, Richard; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A.; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Cho, Candy H-H.; Allen, Hana Lango; Houghton, Jayne AL.; Roth, Christian L.; Chen, Rongrong; Hussain, Khalid; Marsh, Phil; Vallier, Ludovic; Murray, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of cis-regulatory mutations to human disease remains poorly understood. Whole genome sequencing can identify all non-coding variants, yet discrimination of causal regulatory mutations represents a formidable challenge. We used epigenomic annotation in hESC-derived embryonic pancreatic progenitor cells to guide the interpretation of whole genome sequences from patients with isolated pancreatic agenesis. This uncovered six different recessive mutations in a previously uncharacterized ~400bp sequence located 25kb downstream of PTF1A (pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a) in ten families with pancreatic agenesis. We show that this region acts as a developmental enhancer of PTF1A and that the mutations abolish enhancer activity. These mutations are the most common cause of isolated pancreatic agenesis. Integrating genome sequencing and epigenomic annotation in a disease-relevant cell type can uncover novel non-coding elements underlying human development and disease. PMID:24212882

  7. Phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) by dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A).

    PubMed

    Song, Woo-Joo; Song, Eun-Ah Christine; Jung, Min-Su; Choi, Sun-Hee; Baik, Hyung-Hwan; Jin, Byung Kwan; Kim, Jeong Hee; Chung, Sul-Hee

    2015-01-23

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) participates in many cellular processes, and its dysregulation has been implicated in a wide range of diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer, and Alzheimer disease. Inactivation of GSK3β by phosphorylation at specific residues is a primary mechanism by which this constitutively active kinase is controlled. However, the regulatory mechanism of GSK3β is not fully understood. Dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) has multiple biological functions that occur as the result of phosphorylation of diverse proteins that are involved in metabolism, synaptic function, and neurodegeneration. Here we show that GSK3β directly interacts with and is phosphorylated by Dyrk1A. Dyrk1A-mediated phosphorylation at the Thr(356) residue inhibits GSK3β activity. Dyrk1A transgenic (TG) mice are lean and resistant to diet-induced obesity because of reduced fat mass, which shows an inverse correlation with the effect of GSK3β on obesity. This result suggests a potential in vivo association between GSK3β and Dyrk1A regarding the mechanism underlying obesity. The level of Thr(P)(356)-GSK3β was higher in the white adipose tissue of Dyrk1A TG mice compared with control mice. GSK3β activity was differentially regulated by phosphorylation at different sites in adipose tissue depending on the type of diet the mice were fed. Furthermore, overexpression of Dyrk1A suppressed the expression of adipogenic proteins, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, in 3T3-L1 cells and in young Dyrk1A TG mice fed a chow diet. Taken together, these results reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for GSK3β activity and indicate that overexpression of Dyrk1A may contribute to the obesity-resistant phenotype through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK3β. PMID:25477508

  8. Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Newburger, Jane W; Takahashi, Masato; Burns, Jane C

    2016-04-12

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, self-limited vasculitis of unknown etiology that occurs predominantly in infants and children. If not treated early with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin, 1 in 5 children develop coronary artery aneurysms; this risk is reduced 5-fold if intravenous immunoglobulin is administered within 10 days of fever onset. Coronary artery aneurysms evolve dynamically over time, usually reaching a peak dimension by 6 weeks after illness onset. Almost all the morbidity and mortality occur in patients with giant aneurysms. Risk of myocardial infarction from coronary artery thrombosis is greatest in the first 2 years after illness onset. However, stenosis and occlusion progress over years. Indeed, Kawasaki disease is no longer a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome presenting in young adults. Both coronary artery bypass surgery and percutaneous intervention have been used to treat Kawasaki disease patients who develop myocardial ischemia as a consequence of coronary artery aneurysms and stenosis. PMID:27056781

  9. [Refsum disease].

    PubMed

    Hochner, I; Blickle, J F; Brogard, J M

    1996-01-01

    Refsum's disease, firstly described almost 50 years ago by the Norvegian neurologist Sigvald Refsum, is an autosomic recessive disease affecting mostly the Scandinavians and the populations originating from Northern Europe. The disease results from a specific enzyme deficiency of the first step of phytanic acid catabolism pathway. This deficiency leads to an accumulation of this C20 fatty acid in the serum and the tissues with a preference for adipose tissue, liver and kidneys. The clinical picture includes retinitis pigmentosa, peripheral neuropathy, ataxia and elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration. Other less frequent manifestations include cranial nerves deficiency, myocardiopathy, renal tubular dysfunction and ichtyosis. The diagnosis relies on serum phytanic acid measurement. The treatment consists of a phytanic-acid free diet sometimes associated with plasmapheresis. This treatment is generally effective on neuropathy but not on cranial nerves dysfunction and retinitis pigmentosa.

  10. Dent's disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Dent's disease is a renal tubular disorder characterized by manifestations of proximal tubule dysfunction, including low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and progressive renal failure. These features are generally found in males only, and may be present in early childhood, whereas female carriers may show a milder phenotype. Prevalence is unknown; the disorder has been reported in around 250 families to date. Complications such as rickets or osteomalacia may occur. The disease is caused by mutations in either the CLCN5 (Dent disease 1) or OCRL1 (Dent disease 2) genes that are located on chromosome Xp11.22 and Xq25, respectively. CLCN5 encodes the electrogenic Cl-/H+ exchanger ClC-5, which belongs to the CLC family of Cl- channels/transporters. OCRL1 encodes a phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) 5-phosphatase and mutations are also associated with Lowe Syndrome. The phenotype of Dent's disease is explained by the predominant expression of ClC-5 in the proximal tubule segments of the kidney. No genotype-phenotype correlation has been described thus far, and there is considerable intra-familial variability in disease severity. A few patients with Dent's disease do not harbour mutations in CLCN5 and OCRL1, pointing to the involvement of other genes. Diagnosis is based on the presence of all three of the following criteria: low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria and at least one of the following: nephrocalcinosis, kidney stones, hematuria, hypophosphatemia or renal insufficiency. Molecular genetic testing confirms the diagnosis. The differential diagnosis includes other causes of generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubules (renal Fanconi syndrome), hereditary, acquired, or caused by exogenous substances. Antenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic testing is not advised. The care of patients with Dent's disease is supportive, focusing on the treatment of hypercalciuria and the prevention of

  11. [Detection of the PMP22 gene duplication in peripheral neuropathy patients: a study in Mexican population].

    PubMed

    Cortés, Hernán; Hernández-Hernández, Óscar; Bautista-Tirado, Teresa; Escobar-Cedillo, Rosa Elena; Magaña, Jonathan J; Leyva-García, Norberto

    2014-08-01

    Introduccion. La enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) es una neuropatia que afecta los nervios motores y sensitivos, y la CMT1A es el subtipo mas frecuente en el mundo. La CMT1A se produce por una duplicacion de 1,5 Mb en el locus 17p11.2-p12, donde se localiza el gen PMP22. Para el diagnostico de CMT1A es importante contar con tecnicas moleculares especificas para la determinacion de esta mutacion. Objetivos. Establecer un metodo de uso rutinario para detectar la duplicacion de PMP22 en la poblacion mexicana y estimar su frecuencia en pacientes con caracteristicas clinicas para la CMT. Pacientes y metodos. Se analizaron 157 pacientes mexicanos no relacionados entre si, diagnosticados de CMT por valoracion clinica. La determinacion de la duplicacion de PMP22 se realizo a traves de reaccion en cadena de la polimerasa en tiempo real mediante el metodo comparativo 2–ΔΔCT. Resultados. El metodo 2–ΔΔCT para detectar la duplicacion del gen PMP22 mostro ser sensible y fiable. Los resultados fueron consistentes con los obtenidos mediante la tecnica de hibridacion in situ fluorescente. Se detecto la duplicacion de PMP22 en 79 pacientes (50,3%), con un comportamiento similar a lo comunicado en Estados Unidos, Australia, Finlandia, Suecia y España. Sin embargo, se observo que existen diferencias con otras poblaciones. Conclusiones. La tecnica de reaccion en cadena de la polimerasa cuantitativa se implemento como un diagnostico molecular de CMT1A eficaz y de bajo coste, por lo que puede utilizarse rutinariamente en Mexico. Esto es esencial para el asesoramiento genetico y el tratamiento oportuno de los pacientes con CMT. La frecuencia de la duplicacion del gen PMP22 varia entre regiones geograficas, por lo que es importante estimarla en diferentes poblaciones.

  12. X-1A in flight over lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1A (48-1384) returning from an Air Force test flight over Edwards Air Force Base, California in late 1953. A North American F-86A Sabre as chase plane will follow the X-1A to touchdown. The Rogers Dry Lake is the whitish area under the planes with the airfield at the edge of the dry lake. Bell test pilot Jean 'Skip' Ziegler made six flights between 14 February and 25 April 1953. Air Force test pilots Maj. Charles 'Chuck' Yeager and Maj. Arthur 'Kit' Murray made 18 test flights between 21 November 1953 and 26 August 1954. NACA test pilot Joseph Walker made one successful flight on 20 July 1955. During a second flight attempt, on 8 August 1955, an explosion damaged the aircraft shortly before launch. Walker, unhurt, climbed up into the JTB-29A mothership, and the X-1A was jettisoned over the Edwards AFB bombing range. There were five versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for EXperimental Sonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system

  13. Angiotensin type 1a receptor deficiency decreases amyloid β-protein generation and ameliorates brain amyloid pathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junjun; Liu, Shuyu; Matsumoto, Yukino; Murakami, Saki; Sugakawa, Yusuke; Kami, Ayako; Tanabe, Chiaki; Maeda, Tomoji; Michikawa, Makoto; Komano, Hiroto; Zou, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by neuronal loss and cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ) and lowering the generation of Aβ is a pivotal approach in the strategy of Alzheimer’s disease treatment. Midlife hypertension is a major risk factor for the future onset of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease and the use of some antihypertensive drugs may decrease the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease. However, it is largely unknown how the blood pressure regulation system is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Here we found that the deficiency of angiotensin type 1a receptor (AT1a), a key receptor for regulating blood pressure, significantly decreased Aβ generation and amyloid plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. The lack of AT1a inhibited the endocleavage of presenilin-1 (PS1), which is essential for γ-secretase complex formation and Aβ generation. Notably, the ligand of AT1a, angiotensin II, enhanced Aβ generation, PS1 endocleavage and γ-secretase complex formation. Our results suggest that AT1a activation is closely associated with Aβ generation and brain amyloid accumulation by regulating γ-secretase complex formation. Thus, removal of life style factors or stresses that stimulate AT1a to elevate blood pressure may decrease Aβ generation and brain amyloid accumulation, thereby preventing the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26154270

  14. Autoinflammatory Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Behçet’s Disease Progress and Promise Key Words The Immune System When your body is attacked—perhaps by a virus or other germs—your immune system defends you. It “sees” and kills the germs ...

  15. Foodborne Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Foodsafety.gov ​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned off causing certain features of the ... incorrectly. Please visit your browser settings and turn JavaScript on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Top ...

  16. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 414–961–0533 Email: info@wilsonsdisease.org Internet: www.wilsonsdisease.org National Organization for Rare Disorders ... or 203–744–0100 Fax: 203–798–2291 Internet: www.rarediseases.org Office of Rare Diseases Research ...

  17. SMUT DISEASES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF MOST ASPECTS OF COMMON BUNT AND DWARF BUNT DISEASES OF WHEAT IS PRESENTED. INCLUDED ARE SECTIONS ON HISTORY, DISTRIBUTION AND ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE, TAXONOMY, MORPHOLOGY, SPORE GERMINATION, CULTURE, AND PHYSIOLOGY. EXTENSIVE SECTIONS DEAL WITH RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND DISEA...

  18. Sunflower diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sunflower disease chapter is part of the Sunflower Oilseeds Monograph, which will be a new publication in the AOCS Oilseeds Monograph series. The monograph contains an overview and history of sunflower crop development, how the oilseed is cultivated, how the oilseed is produced, how the seed is...

  19. Blount Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse Healthy School Lunch Planner How Can I ...

  20. [Autoinflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Russo, Ricardo A G; Katsicas, María M

    2016-01-01

    The monogenic autoinflammatory diseases are rare, genetic disorders resulting in constitutive innate immune defects leading to excessive response to danger signals, spontaneous activation of inflammatory mediators or loss of inhibitory regulators. During the past 15 years, a growing number of monogenic inflammatory diseases have been described and their respective responsible genes identified. The proteins encoded by these genes are involved in the regulatory pathways of inflammation and are mostly expressed in cells of the innate immune system. Although a group of patients exhibit episodic systemic inflammation (periodic fevers), these disorders are mediated by continuous overproduction and release of pro-inflammatory mediators, notably IL-1β, and are best considered as autoinflammatory diseases rather than periodic fevers. The most common autoinflammatory diseases are familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency/hyperimmunoglobulin D syndrome (MKD/HIDS) and the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Clinical features often include fever, cutaneous rash, serosal involvement and acute phase reactants. Autoantibodies are usually absent but may accompany certain syndromes. Diagnosis remains clinical and is based on the different phenotypic features. Genetic diagnosis is of utmost importance, but must be performed judiciously and interpreted cautiously. Treatment with biologic agents that block proinflammatory cytokines, particularly IL-1, has proved to be dramatically effective in many patients. Still, in many cases of autoinflammation no genetic abnormalities are detected and treatment remains suboptimal, raising the question of novel pathogenic mutations in unexplored genes and pathways. PMID:27295706

  1. Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to ... you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in ...

  2. Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Rivera, E; Assiri, A; Guandalini, S

    2013-10-01

    Celiac disease, with a prevalence around 1% of the general population, is the most common genetically-induced food intolerance in the world. Triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals, this enteropathy may appear at any age, and is characterized by a wide variety of clinical signs and symptoms. Among them, gastrointestinal presentations include chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss or failure to thrive in children; but extra-intestinal manifestations are also common, and actually appear to be on the rise. They include a large variety of ailments, such as dermatitis Herpetiformis, anemia, short stature, osteoporosis, arthritis, neurologic problems, unexplained elevation of transaminases, and even female infertility. For the clinician interested in oral diseases, celiac disease can lead to delayed tooth eruption, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent oral aphthae. Diagnosing celiac disease requires therefore a high degree of suspicion followed by a very sensitive screening test: serum levels of the autoantibody anti-tissue transglutaminase. A positive subject will then be confirmed by an intestinal biopsy, and will then be put on a strict gluten-free diet, that in most cases will bring a marked improvement of symptoms. Newer forms of treatment which in the future will probably be available to the non-responsive patients are currently being actively pursued. PMID:23496382

  3. Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Green, Peter H R; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Greywoode, Ruby

    2015-05-01

    This review will focus on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of celiac disease (CD). Given an increasing awareness of gluten-related disorders, medical professionals of all varieties are encountering patients with a diagnosis of CD or who are thought to have food intolerance to gluten. The prevalence of CD among the general population is estimated to be 1% in Western nations, and there is growing evidence for underdiagnosis of the disease, especially in non-Western nations that were traditionally believed to be unaffected. The development of serologic markers specific to CD has revolutionized the ability both to diagnose and monitor patients with the disease. Additionally, understanding of the clinical presentations of CD has undergone a major shift over the past half century. Although it is well understood that CD develops in genetically predisposed subjects exposed to gluten, the extent of other environmental factors in the pathogenesis of the disease is an area of continued research. Currently, the main therapeutic intervention for CD is a gluten-free diet; however, novel nondietary agents are under active investigation. Future areas of research should also help us understand the relationship of CD to other gluten-related disorders.

  4. Huntington's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... rather than by the loss of individual cells, scientists are using cutting-edge methods such as optogenetics (where neurons are activated or silenced in the brains of living animals using light beams) to probe the cause ... defects in HD. Scientists are also using stem cells to study disease ...

  5. CYP1B1: a unique gene with unique characteristics.

    PubMed

    Faiq, Muneeb A; Dada, Rima; Sharma, Reetika; Saluja, Daman; Dada, Tanuj

    2014-01-01

    CYP1B1, a recently described dioxin inducible oxidoreductase, is a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily involved in the metabolism of estradiol, retinol, benzo[a]pyrene, tamoxifen, melatonin, sterols etc. It plays important roles in numerous physiological processes and is expressed at mRNA level in many tissues and anatomical compartments. CYP1B1 has been implicated in scores of disorders. Analyses of the recent studies suggest that CYP1B1 can serve as a universal/ideal cancer marker and a candidate gene for predictive diagnosis. There is plethora of literature available about certain aspects of CYP1B1 that have not been interpreted, discussed and philosophized upon. The present analysis examines CYP1B1 as a peculiar gene with certain distinctive characteristics like the uniqueness in its chromosomal location, gene structure and organization, involvement in developmentally important disorders, tissue specific, not only expression, but splicing, potential as a universal cancer marker due to its involvement in key aspects of cellular metabolism, use in diagnosis and predictive diagnosis of various diseases and the importance and function of CYP1B1 mRNA in addition to the regular translation. Also CYP1B1 is very difficult to express in heterologous expression systems, thereby, halting its functional studies. Here we review and analyze these exceptional and startling characteristics of CYP1B1 with inputs from our own experiences in order to get a better insight into its molecular biology in health and disease. This may help to further understand the etiopathomechanistic aspects of CYP1B1 mediated diseases paving way for better research strategies and improved clinical management. PMID:25658124

  6. Shiga Toxin (Stx) Type 1a Reduces the Oral Toxicity of Stx Type 2a

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Lisa M.; Melton-Celsa, Angela R.; O'Brien, Alison D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Shiga toxin (Stx) is the primary virulence factor of Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). STEC can produce Stx1a and/or Stx2a, which are antigenically distinct. However, Stx2a-producing STEC are associated with more severe disease than strains producing both Stx1a and Stx2a. Methods and Results. To address the hypothesis that the reason for the association of Stx2a with more severe disease is because Stx2a crosses the intestinal barrier with greater efficiency that Stx1a, we covalently labeled Stx1a and Stx2a with Alexa Fluor 750 and determined the ex vivo fluorescent intensity of murine systemic organs after oral intoxication. Surprisingly, both Stxs exhibited similar dissemination patterns and accumulated in the kidneys. We next cointoxicated mice to determine whether Stx1a could impede Stx2a. Cointoxication resulted in increased survival and an extended mean time to death, compared with intoxication with Stx2a only. The survival benefit was dose dependent, with the greatest effect observed when 5 times more Stx1a than Stx2a was delivered, and was amplified when Stx1a was delivered 3 hours prior to Stx2a. Cointoxication with an Stx1a active site toxoid also reduced Stx2a toxicity. Conclusions. These studies suggest that Stx1a reduces Stx2a-mediated toxicity, a finding that may explain why STEC that produce only Stx2a are associated with more severe disease than strains producing Stx1a and Stx2a. PMID:26743841

  7. Human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a peptides do not reliably suppress anti-HPA-1a responses using a humanized severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D J; Eastlake, J L; Kumpel, B M

    2014-04-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) occurs most frequently when human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a-positive fetal platelets are destroyed by maternal HPA-1a immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies. Pregnancies at risk are treated by administration of high-dose intravenous Ig (IVIG) to women, but this is expensive and often not well tolerated. Peptide immunotherapy may be effective for ameliorating some allergic and autoimmune diseases. The HPA-1a/1b polymorphism is Leu/Pro33 on β3 integrin (CD61), and the anti-HPA-1a response is restricted to HPA-1b1b and HLA-DRB3*0101-positive pregnant women with an HPA-1a-positive fetus. We investigated whether or not HPA-1a antigen-specific peptides that formed the T cell epitope could reduce IgG anti-HPA-1a responses, using a mouse model we had developed previously. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in blood donations from HPA-1a-immunized women were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with peptides and HPA-1a-positive platelets. Human anti-HPA-1a in murine plasma was quantitated at intervals up to 15 weeks. HPA-1a-specific T cells in PBMC were identified by proliferation assays. Using PBMC of three donors who had little T cell reactivity to HPA-1a peptides in vitro, stimulation of anti-HPA-1a responses by these peptides occurred in vivo. However, with a second donation from one of these women which, uniquely, had high HPA-1a-specific T cell proliferation in vitro, marked suppression of the anti-HPA-1a response by HPA-1a peptides occurred in vivo. HPA-1a peptide immunotherapy in this model depended upon reactivation of HPA-1a T cell responses in the donor. For FNAIT, we suggest that administration of antigen-specific peptides to pregnant women might cause either enhancement or reduction of pathogenic antibodies.

  8. Human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a peptides do not reliably suppress anti-HPA-1a responses using a humanized severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, D J; Eastlake, J L; Kumpel, B M

    2014-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) occurs most frequently when human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a-positive fetal platelets are destroyed by maternal HPA-1a immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies. Pregnancies at risk are treated by administration of high-dose intravenous Ig (IVIG) to women, but this is expensive and often not well tolerated. Peptide immunotherapy may be effective for ameliorating some allergic and autoimmune diseases. The HPA-1a/1b polymorphism is Leu/Pro33 on β3 integrin (CD61), and the anti-HPA-1a response is restricted to HPA-1b1b and HLA-DRB3*0101-positive pregnant women with an HPA-1a-positive fetus. We investigated whether or not HPA-1a antigen-specific peptides that formed the T cell epitope could reduce IgG anti-HPA-1a responses, using a mouse model we had developed previously. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in blood donations from HPA-1a-immunized women were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with peptides and HPA-1a-positive platelets. Human anti-HPA-1a in murine plasma was quantitated at intervals up to 15 weeks. HPA-1a-specific T cells in PBMC were identified by proliferation assays. Using PBMC of three donors who had little T cell reactivity to HPA-1a peptides in vitro, stimulation of anti-HPA-1a responses by these peptides occurred in vivo. However, with a second donation from one of these women which, uniquely, had high HPA-1a-specific T cell proliferation in vitro, marked suppression of the anti-HPA-1a response by HPA-1a peptides occurred in vivo. HPA-1a peptide immunotherapy in this model depended upon reactivation of HPA-1a T cell responses in the donor. For FNAIT, we suggest that administration of antigen-specific peptides to pregnant women might cause either enhancement or reduction of pathogenic antibodies. PMID:24261689

  9. ARID1A Is Essential for Endometrial Function during Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong; Lydon, John P.; Khatri, Shikha; Hawkins, Shannon M.; Leach, Richard E.; Fazleabas, Asgerally T.; Young, Steven L.; Lessey, Bruce A.; Ku, Bon Jeong; Jeong, Jae-Wook

    2015-01-01

    AT-rich interactive domain 1A gene (ARID1A) loss is a frequent event in endometriosis-associated ovarian carcinomas. Endometriosis is a disease in which tissue that normally grows inside the uterus grows outside the uterus, and 50% of women with endometriosis are infertile. ARID1A protein levels were significantly lower in the eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis compared to women without endometriosis. However, an understanding of the physiological effects of ARID1A loss remains quite poor, and the function of Arid1a in the female reproductive tract has remained elusive. In order to understand the role of Arid1a in the uterus, we have generated mice with conditional ablation of Arid1a in the PGR positive cells (Pgr cre/+ Arid1a f/f; Arid1a d/d). Ovarian function and uterine development of Arid1a d/d mice were normal. However, Arid1a d/d mice were sterile due to defective embryo implantation and decidualization. The epithelial proliferation was significantly increased in Arid1a d/d mice compared to control mice. Enhanced epithelial estrogen activity and reduced epithelial PGR expression, which impedes maturation of the receptive uterus, was observed in Arid1a d/d mice at the peri-implantation period. The microarray analysis revealed that ARID1A represses the genes related to cell cycle and DNA replication. We showed that ARID1A positively regulates Klf15 expression with PGR to inhibit epithelial proliferation at peri-implantation. Our results suggest that Arid1a has a critical role in modulating epithelial proliferation which is a critical requisite for fertility. This finding provides a new signaling pathway for steroid hormone regulation in female reproductive biology and furthers our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie dysregulation of hormonal signaling in human reproductive disorders such as endometriosis. PMID:26378916

  10. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Chomel, B

    2015-08-01

    Lyme disease is among the most frequently diagnosed zoonotic tick-borne diseases worldwide. The number of human cases has been on the increase since the first recognition of its aetiological agent. Lyme disease is caused by spirochete bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia, with B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) found in the Americas, and B. afzelii and B. garinii, in addition to B. burgdorferi s.s., in Europe and Asia. Environmental factors, such as human encroachment onto habitats favourable to ticks and their hosts, reduced deforestation, increased human outdoor activities, and climatic factors favouring a wider distribution of tick vectors, have enhanced the impact of the disease on both humans and animals. Clinical manifestations in humans include, in the early phases, erythema migrans, followed several weeks later by neuro-borreliosis (meningo-radiculitis, meningitis or meningo-encephalitis), Lyme arthritis and/or Borrelia lymphocytoma. In dogs, acute signs include fever, general malaise, lameness, lymph node enlargement and polyarthritis, as well as neuro-borreliosis in the chronic form. Diagnosis is mainly serological in both humans and animals, based on either a two-tier approach (an immunoenzymatic test followed by a Western blot confirmatory test) in humans or C(6) peptide, only in dogs. Early treatment with antibiotics, such as doxycycline or amoxicillin, for three weeks usually reduces the risk of chronic disease. Tick control, including the use of tick repellents for both humans and animals, particularly dogs, is highly reliable in preventing transmission. Vaccines are not available to prevent human infection, whereas several vaccines are available to reduce transmission and the clinical manifestations of infection in dogs.

  11. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Chomel, B

    2015-08-01

    Lyme disease is among the most frequently diagnosed zoonotic tick-borne diseases worldwide. The number of human cases has been on the increase since the first recognition of its aetiological agent. Lyme disease is caused by spirochete bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia, with B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) found in the Americas, and B. afzelii and B. garinii, in addition to B. burgdorferi s.s., in Europe and Asia. Environmental factors, such as human encroachment onto habitats favourable to ticks and their hosts, reduced deforestation, increased human outdoor activities, and climatic factors favouring a wider distribution of tick vectors, have enhanced the impact of the disease on both humans and animals. Clinical manifestations in humans include, in the early phases, erythema migrans, followed several weeks later by neuro-borreliosis (meningo-radiculitis, meningitis or meningo-encephalitis), Lyme arthritis and/or Borrelia lymphocytoma. In dogs, acute signs include fever, general malaise, lameness, lymph node enlargement and polyarthritis, as well as neuro-borreliosis in the chronic form. Diagnosis is mainly serological in both humans and animals, based on either a two-tier approach (an immunoenzymatic test followed by a Western blot confirmatory test) in humans or C(6) peptide, only in dogs. Early treatment with antibiotics, such as doxycycline or amoxicillin, for three weeks usually reduces the risk of chronic disease. Tick control, including the use of tick repellents for both humans and animals, particularly dogs, is highly reliable in preventing transmission. Vaccines are not available to prevent human infection, whereas several vaccines are available to reduce transmission and the clinical manifestations of infection in dogs. PMID:26601457

  12. Oculocutaneous albinism type 1A: a case report.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The term, oculocutaneous albinism (OCA), describes a group of inherited disorders of melanin biosynthesis that exhibits congenital hypopigmentation of ocular and cutaneous tissues. The clinical spectrum of OCA ranges from a complete lack of melanin pigmentation to mildly hypopigmented forms. OCA1A is the most severe type with a complete lack of melanin production throughout life; the milder forms OCA1B, OCA2, OCA3 and OCA4 show some pigment accumulation over time. Clinical manifestations include various degrees of congenital nystagmus, iris hypopigmentation and translucency, reduced pigmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium, foveal hypoplasia, reduced visual acuity and refractive errors, color vision impairment, and prominent photophobia. All four types of OCA are inherited as autosomal recessive disorders. At least four genes are responsible for the different types of the disease (TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, and MATP). Diagnosis is based on clinical findings of hypopigmentation of the skin and hair in addition to the characteristic ocular symptoms. Herein we present a case with OCA1A. PMID:19094851

  13. (1) (1)A' ← X (1)A' Electronic Transition of Protonated Coronene at 15 K.

    PubMed

    Rice, C A; Hardy, F-X; Gause, O; Maier, J P

    2014-03-20

    The electronic spectrum of protonated coronene in the gas phase was measured at vibrational and rotational temperatures of ∼15 K in a 22-pole ion trap. The (1) (1)A' ← X (1)A' electronic transition of this larger polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cation has an origin band maximum at 14 383.8 ± 0.2 cm(-1) and shows distinct vibrational structure in the (1) (1)A' state. Neither the origin nor the strongest absorptions to the blue coincide with known diffuse interstellar bands, implying that protonated coronene is not a carrier.

  14. Genetic evaluation of inherited motor/sensory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chance, Phillip F

    2004-01-01

    Inherited disorders of peripheral nerves represent a common group of neurologic diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1 (CMT1) is a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies with loci mapping to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B), chromosome 16 (CMT1C) and chromosome 10 (CMT1D). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-megabase (Mb) duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-p12. In rare patients it may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in the myelin protein zero (Po or MPZ) gene. Mutations in the SIMPLE gene cause CMT1C, and CMT1D is the result of mutations in the early response 2 (ERG2 or Krox-20) gene. An X-linked form of CMT1 (CMT1X) maps to Xq13 and is associated with mutations in the connexin32 (Cx32) gene. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2 (CMT2) is an axonal neuropathy that maps to chromosome 1p35-p36 (CMT2A), chromosome 3q13-q22 (CMT2B), chromosome 7p14 (CMT2D), chromosome 8p21 (CMT2E), chromosome 1q22-q23 (CMT2F) or chromosome 3q13 (CMT2G). Two X-linked forms of CMT2 have been reported (CMT2XA and CMT2XB), but the genes remain unidentified. An area that has recently expanded is the identification of autosomal recessive forms of CMT type 1 and 2. Of the eight recessive forms of CMT1 that have been identified to date, only two have been fully characterized at the molecular level (CMT1 AR B 1 and CMT1 AR D). Point mutations were found in the myotubularin-related protein-2 (MTM2) gene for CMT1 AR B1. CMT1 AR D is the result of point mutations in the N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1). Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), also called hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSNIII), is a severe, infantile-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy syndrome that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene, PO gene, EGR2 gene or the PRX gene (for the recessive form). It shares considerable clinical and

  15. Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, X-linked inherited disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficient or absent lysosomal α-galactosidase A activity. FD is pan-ethnic and the reported annual incidence of 1 in 100,000 may underestimate the true prevalence of the disease. Classically affected hemizygous males, with no residual α-galactosidase A activity may display all the characteristic neurological (pain), cutaneous (angiokeratoma), renal (proteinuria, kidney failure), cardiovascular (cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia), cochleo-vestibular and cerebrovascular (transient ischemic attacks, strokes) signs of the disease while heterozygous females have symptoms ranging from very mild to severe. Deficient activity of lysosomal α-galactosidase A results in progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide within lysosomes, believed to trigger a cascade of cellular events. Demonstration of marked α-galactosidase A deficiency is the definitive method for the diagnosis of hemizygous males. Enzyme analysis may occasionnally help to detect heterozygotes but is often inconclusive due to random X-chromosomal inactivation so that molecular testing (genotyping) of females is mandatory. In childhood, other possible causes of pain such as rheumatoid arthritis and 'growing pains' must be ruled out. In adulthood, multiple sclerosis is sometimes considered. Prenatal diagnosis, available by determination of enzyme activity or DNA testing in chorionic villi or cultured amniotic cells is, for ethical reasons, only considered in male fetuses. Pre-implantation diagnosis is possible. The existence of atypical variants and the availability of a specific therapy singularly complicate genetic counseling. A disease-specific therapeutic option - enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human α-galactosidase A - has been recently introduced and its long term outcome is currently still being investigated. Conventional management consists of pain relief with analgesic drugs

  16. Avian Paramyxovirus Serotype-1: A Review of Disease Distribution, Clinical Symptoms, and Laboratory Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Nichole L.; Miller, Cathy L.

    2012-01-01

    Avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 (APMV-1) is capable of infecting a wide range of avian species leading to a broad range of clinical symptoms. Ease of transmission has allowed the virus to spread worldwide with varying degrees of virulence depending on the virus strain and host species. Classification systems have been designed to group isolates based on their genetic composition. The genetic composition of the fusion gene cleavage site plays an important role in virulence. Presence of multiple basic amino acids at the cleavage site allows enzymatic cleavage of the fusion protein enabling virulent viruses to spread systemically. Diagnostic tests, including virus isolation, real-time reverse-transcription PCR, and sequencing, are used to characterize the virus and identify virulent strains. Genetic diversity within APMV-1 demonstrates the need for continual monitoring for changes that may arise requiring modifications to the molecular assays to maintain their usefulness for diagnostic testing. PMID:22577610

  17. Erdheim-Chester disease.

    PubMed

    Haroche, Julien; Arnaud, Laurent; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Hervier, Baptiste; Charlotte, Frédéric; Emile, Jean-François; Amoura, Zahir

    2013-05-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare form of non-Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Diagnosis of ECD is based on the identification in tissue biopsy of histiocytes, which are typically foamy and immunostain for CD68+ CD1a-. Central nervous system involvement is a major prognostic factor in ECD. Interferon alpha may be the best first-line therapy and significantly improves survival of ECD. The BRAFV600E mutation is found in more than 50% of cases. Vemurafenib has been used for a small number of patients harbouring this mutation; inhibition of BRAF activation by vemurafenib was highly beneficial in these cases of severe multisystemic and refractory ECD. PMID:23597965

  18. Total syntheses of disulphated glycosphingolipid SB1a and the related monosulphated SM1a

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Haruka; Tamai, Hideki; Gao, Chao; Imamura, Akihiro; Ando, Hiromune; Ishida, Hideharu; Feizi, Ten; Kiso, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Total syntheses of two natural sulphoglycolipids, disulphated glycosphingolipid SB1a and the structurally related monosulphated SM1a, are described. They have common glycan sequences and ceramide moiety and are associated with human epithelial carcinomas. The syntheses featured efficient glycan assembly and the glucosyl ceramide cassette as a versatile building block. The binding of the synthetic sulphoglycolipids by the carcinoma-specific monoclonal antibody AE3 was investigated using carbohydrate microarray technology. PMID:26399908

  19. Excitation/inhibition balance and learning are modified by Dyrk1a gene dosage.

    PubMed

    Souchet, Benoit; Guedj, Fayçal; Sahún, Ignasi; Duchon, Arnaud; Daubigney, Fabrice; Badel, Anne; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Barallobre, Maria Jose; Dierssen, Mara; Yu, Eugene; Herault, Yann; Arbones, Mariona; Janel, Nathalie; Créau, Nicole; Delabar, Jean Maurice

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive deficits in Down syndrome (DS) have been linked to increased synaptic inhibition, leading to an imbalance of excitation/inhibition (E/I). Various mouse models and studies from human brains have implicated an HSA21 gene, the serine/threonine kinase DYRK1A, as a candidate for inducing cognitive dysfunction. Here, consequences of alterations in Dyrk1a dosage were assessed in mouse models with varying copy numbers of Dyrk1a: mBACtgDyrk1a, Ts65Dn and Dp(16)1Yey (with 3 gene copies) and Dyrk1a(+/-) (one functional copy). Molecular (i.e. immunoblotting/immunohistochemistry) and behavioral analyses (e.g., rotarod, Morris water maze, Y-maze) were performed in mBACtgDyrk1a mice. Increased expression of DYRK1A in mBACtgDyrk1a induced molecular alterations in synaptic plasticity pathways, particularly expression changes in GABAergic and glutaminergic related proteins. Similar alterations were observed in models with partial trisomy of MMU16, Ts65Dn and Dp(16)1Yey, and were reversed in the Dyrk1a(+/-) model. Dyrk1a overexpression produced an increased number and signal intensity of GAD67 positive neurons, indicating enhanced inhibition pathways in three different models: mBACtgDyrk1a, hYACtgDyrk1a and Dp(16)1Yey. Functionally, Dyrk1a overexpression protected mice from PTZ-induced seizures related to GABAergic neuron plasticity. Our study shows that DYRK1A overexpression affects pathways involved in synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity and influences E/I balance toward inhibition. Inhibition of DYRK1A activity offers a therapeutic target for DS, but its inhibition/activation may also be relevant for other psychiatric diseases with E/I balance alterations.

  20. Excitation/inhibition balance and learning are modified by Dyrk1a gene dosage.

    PubMed

    Souchet, Benoit; Guedj, Fayçal; Sahún, Ignasi; Duchon, Arnaud; Daubigney, Fabrice; Badel, Anne; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Barallobre, Maria Jose; Dierssen, Mara; Yu, Eugene; Herault, Yann; Arbones, Mariona; Janel, Nathalie; Créau, Nicole; Delabar, Jean Maurice

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive deficits in Down syndrome (DS) have been linked to increased synaptic inhibition, leading to an imbalance of excitation/inhibition (E/I). Various mouse models and studies from human brains have implicated an HSA21 gene, the serine/threonine kinase DYRK1A, as a candidate for inducing cognitive dysfunction. Here, consequences of alterations in Dyrk1a dosage were assessed in mouse models with varying copy numbers of Dyrk1a: mBACtgDyrk1a, Ts65Dn and Dp(16)1Yey (with 3 gene copies) and Dyrk1a(+/-) (one functional copy). Molecular (i.e. immunoblotting/immunohistochemistry) and behavioral analyses (e.g., rotarod, Morris water maze, Y-maze) were performed in mBACtgDyrk1a mice. Increased expression of DYRK1A in mBACtgDyrk1a induced molecular alterations in synaptic plasticity pathways, particularly expression changes in GABAergic and glutaminergic related proteins. Similar alterations were observed in models with partial trisomy of MMU16, Ts65Dn and Dp(16)1Yey, and were reversed in the Dyrk1a(+/-) model. Dyrk1a overexpression produced an increased number and signal intensity of GAD67 positive neurons, indicating enhanced inhibition pathways in three different models: mBACtgDyrk1a, hYACtgDyrk1a and Dp(16)1Yey. Functionally, Dyrk1a overexpression protected mice from PTZ-induced seizures related to GABAergic neuron plasticity. Our study shows that DYRK1A overexpression affects pathways involved in synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity and influences E/I balance toward inhibition. Inhibition of DYRK1A activity offers a therapeutic target for DS, but its inhibition/activation may also be relevant for other psychiatric diseases with E/I balance alterations. PMID:24801365

  1. Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Walker, Francis O

    2007-04-01

    Huntington's disease may present at any age, but most typically manifests between the ages of 35 and 45 years as a slowly progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder with cognitive and behavioral impairment. It is an autosomal-dominant disorder that has a substantial impact on family structure and dynamics in terms of providing care for affected family members and, for the offspring of an affected parent, dealing with at-risk status. Therapy that slows the progressive neuronal dysfunction or degeneration is unavailable, so pharmacotherapy is currently aimed primarily at managing behavioral and psychiatric symptoms, and, in selected cases, controlling severe chorea. Effective intervention by clinicians is possible, however, in terms of providing patients and families with accurate information about the disease, counseling them about availability of genetic testing at specialized centers, and in giving them sound advice regarding work, driving, relationships, finances, research participation, and support groups.

  2. Thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications.

  3. Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Mignot, Cyril; Gelot, Antoinette; De Villemeur, Thierry Billette

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive condition due to glucocerebrosidase deficiency responsible for the lysosomal accumulation of glucosylceramide, a complex lipid derived from cell membranes, mainly in macrophages. It is due to mutations mostly in the GBA gene, although saposine C deficiency is due to mutations in the PSAP gene. It encompasses an extremely heterogeneous spectrum of clinical involvement from the fetus to adulthood. Splenomegaly, blood cytopenia, and bone involvement are the main manifestations of Gaucher disease, but nervous system degeneration is observed in about 5-10% of patients. The accumulation in neurons of glucosylceramide and its derivative, psychosine, are thought to underlie neuronal dysfunction and death, although Gaucher cells that mostly accumulate such substances are mainly macrophages. Enzyme replacement therapy dramatically improves the outcome of patients because of its extreme efficacy in the treatment of the systemic involvement. However, it has only limited effects on most neurological signs. PMID:23622393

  4. Morgellons disease?

    PubMed

    Accordino, Robert E; Engler, Danielle; Ginsburg, Iona H; Koo, John

    2008-01-01

    Morgellons disease, a pattern of dermatologic symptoms very similar, if not identical, to those of delusions of parasitosis, was first described many centuries ago, but has recently been given much attention on the internet and in the mass media. The present authors present a history of Morgellons disease, in addition to which they discuss the potential benefit of using this diagnostic term as a means of building trust and rapport with patients to maximize treatment benefit. The present authors also suggest "meeting the patient halfway" and creating a therapeutic alliance when providing dermatologic treatment by taking their cutaneous symptoms seriously enough to provide both topical ointments as well as antipsychotic medications, which can be therapeutic in these patients. PMID:18318880

  5. Morgellons disease?

    PubMed

    Accordino, Robert E; Engler, Danielle; Ginsburg, Iona H; Koo, John

    2008-01-01

    Morgellons disease, a pattern of dermatologic symptoms very similar, if not identical, to those of delusions of parasitosis, was first described many centuries ago, but has recently been given much attention on the internet and in the mass media. The present authors present a history of Morgellons disease, in addition to which they discuss the potential benefit of using this diagnostic term as a means of building trust and rapport with patients to maximize treatment benefit. The present authors also suggest "meeting the patient halfway" and creating a therapeutic alliance when providing dermatologic treatment by taking their cutaneous symptoms seriously enough to provide both topical ointments as well as antipsychotic medications, which can be therapeutic in these patients.

  6. Heme Oxygenase-1: A Metabolic Nike

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Bulmer, Andrew C.; Otterbein, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Heme degradation, which was described more than 30 years ago, is still very actively explored with many novel discoveries on its role in various disease models every year. Recent Advances: The heme oxygenases (HO) are metabolic enzymes that utilize NADPH and oxygen to break apart the heme moiety liberating biliverdin (BV), carbon monoxide (CO), and iron. Heme that is derived from hemoproteins can be toxic to the cells and if not removed immediately, it causes cell apoptosis and local inflammation. Elimination of heme from the milieu enables generation of three products that influences numerous metabolic changes in the cell. Critical Issues: CO has profound effects on mitochondria and cellular respiration and other hemoproteins to which it can bind and affect their function, while BV and bilirubin (BR), the substrate and product of BV, reductase, respectively, are potent antioxidants. Sequestration of iron into ferritin and its recycling in the tissues is a part of the homeodynamic processes that control oxidation-reduction in cellular metabolism. Further, heme is an important component of a number of metabolic enzymes, and, therefore, HO-1 plays an important role in the modulation of cellular bioenergetics. Future Directions: In this review, we describe the cross-talk between heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and its products with other metabolic pathways. HO-1, which we have labeled Nike, the goddess who personified victory, dictates triumph over pathophysiologic conditions, including diabetes, ischemia, and cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1709–1722. PMID:24180257

  7. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... down or stop. A risk factor for heart disease is something that increases your chance of getting ...

  8. [Wilsons disease].

    PubMed

    Mareček, Z; Brůha, R

    2013-07-01

    Wilsons disease is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder in which copper accumulates in tissues, especially in the liver and the brain. The genetic defect affects the P type ATPase gene (ATP7B). More than 500 mutations causing Wilsons disease have been described. The most common mutation in Central Europe concerns H1069Q. The symptoms of Wilsons disease include hepatic or neurological conditions. The hepatic condition is manifested as steatosis, acute or chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis. The neurological conditions are most often manifested after the age of 20 as motor disorders (tremor, speech and writing disorders), which may result in severe extrapyramidal syndrome with rigidity, dysarthria and muscle contractions. The dia-gnosis is based on clinical and laboratory assessments (neurological signs, liver lesions, low ceruloplasmin, increased free serum copper, high Cu volumes in urine, KayserFleischer ring). The dia-gnosis is confirmed by a high Cu level in liver tissue or genetic proof. Untreated Wilsons disease causes death of the patient. If treated properly the survival rate approximates to the survival rate of the common population. The treatment concerns either removal of copper from the body using chelating agents excreted into the urine (Penicillamine, Trientine) or limitation of copper absorption from the intestine and reducing the toxicity of copper (zinc, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate). In the Czech Republic, Penicillamine or zinc is used. A liver transplant is indicated in patients with fulminant hepatic failure or decompensated liver cirrhosis. In the family all siblings of the affected individual need to be screened in order to treat any asymptomatic subjects.

  9. [Wilsons disease].

    PubMed

    Mareček, Z; Brůha, R

    2013-07-01

    Wilsons disease is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder in which copper accumulates in tissues, especially in the liver and the brain. The genetic defect affects the P type ATPase gene (ATP7B). More than 500 mutations causing Wilsons disease have been described. The most common mutation in Central Europe concerns H1069Q. The symptoms of Wilsons disease include hepatic or neurological conditions. The hepatic condition is manifested as steatosis, acute or chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis. The neurological conditions are most often manifested after the age of 20 as motor disorders (tremor, speech and writing disorders), which may result in severe extrapyramidal syndrome with rigidity, dysarthria and muscle contractions. The dia-gnosis is based on clinical and laboratory assessments (neurological signs, liver lesions, low ceruloplasmin, increased free serum copper, high Cu volumes in urine, KayserFleischer ring). The dia-gnosis is confirmed by a high Cu level in liver tissue or genetic proof. Untreated Wilsons disease causes death of the patient. If treated properly the survival rate approximates to the survival rate of the common population. The treatment concerns either removal of copper from the body using chelating agents excreted into the urine (Penicillamine, Trientine) or limitation of copper absorption from the intestine and reducing the toxicity of copper (zinc, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate). In the Czech Republic, Penicillamine or zinc is used. A liver transplant is indicated in patients with fulminant hepatic failure or decompensated liver cirrhosis. In the family all siblings of the affected individual need to be screened in order to treat any asymptomatic subjects. PMID:23909262

  10. Venereal Disease. Consumer Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension Service.

    Designed to be used by health educators when teaching youths and their parents about the control of veneral disease (syphilis and gonorrhea), this booklet includes the following: (1) a two-page teaching plan consisting of objectives for both youths and adults along with notes on subject matter, methods (including titles of films and printed…

  11. Beryllium disease

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-20

    After two workers at the nuclear weapons plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee were diagnosed earlier this year with chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a rare and sometimes fatal scarring of the lungs, the Department of Energy ordered up a 4-year probe. Now, part of that probe has begun - tests conducted by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities' Center for Epidemiological Research measuring beryllium sensitivity in 3,000 people who've been exposed to the metal's dust since Manhattan Project managers opened the Y-12 plant at Oak Ridge in 1943. Currently, 119 Y-12 employees process beryllium, which has a number of industrial uses, including rocket heat shields and nuclear weapon and electrical components. The disease often takes 20 to 25 years to develop, and the stricken employees haven't worked with beryllium for years. There is no cure for CBD, estimated to strike 2% of people exposed to the metal. Anti-inflammatory steroids alleviate such symptoms as a dry cough, weight loss, and fatigue. Like other lung-fibrosis diseases that are linked to lung cancer, some people suspect CBD might cause some lung cancer. While difficult to diagnose, about 900 cases of CBD have been reported since a Beryllium Case Registry was established in 1952. The Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that about 10,000 DOE employees and 800,000 people in private industry have worked with beryllium.

  12. Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Loudianos, G; Gitlin, J D

    2000-01-01

    Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism resulting from the absence or dysfunction of a copper transporting P-type ATPase encoded on chromosome 13. This ATPase is expressed in hepatocytes where it is localized to the trans-Golgi network and transports copper into the secretory pathway for incorporation into ceruloplasmin and excretion into the bile. Under physiologic circumstances, biliary excretion represents the sole mechanism for copper excretion, and thus affected individuals have progressive copper accumulation in the liver. When the capacity for hepatic storage is exceeded, cell death ensues with copper release into the plasma, hemolysis, and tissue deposition. Presentation in childhood may include chronic hepatitis, asymptomatic cirrhosis, or acute liver failure. In young adults, neuropsychiatric symptoms predominate and include dystonia, tremor, personality changes, and cognitive impairments secondary to copper accumulation in the central nervous system. The laboratory diagnosis of Wilson's disease is confirmed by decreased serum ceruloplasmin, increased urinary copper content, and elevated hepatic copper concentration. Molecular genetic analysis is complex as more than 100 unique mutations have been identified and most individuals are compound heterozygotes. Copper chelation with penicillamine is an effective therapy in most patients and hepatic transplantation is curative in individuals presenting with irreversible liver failure. Elucidation of the molecular genetic basis of Wilson's disease has permitted new insights into the mechanisms of cellular copper homeostasis.

  13. Genomic and clinical characteristics of microduplications in chromosome 17.

    PubMed

    Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Cheung, S W; Lupski, J R

    2010-05-01

    Genomic disorders have been increasingly recognized as a significant source of clinically relevant phenotypes largely fostered by advances in technologies for genome-wide analyses. Molecular and clinical studies of copy number variants involving chromosome 17 began with locus-specific studies of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A, OMIM #118220) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP, OMIM #162500), which laid the foundation for the paradigm of duplication/deletion and gene-dosage for our understanding of genomic disorders. With the clinical introduction of high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) the number of recognized genomic disorders including microduplications has been increasing rapidly. A relatively high proportion of disease-associated copy number variants map to chromosome 17. This may result from its unique structural features, such as relative abundance of segmental duplications and interspersed repetitive elements, high gene content, and the presence of dosage-sensitive genes. These genomic rearrangements are mediated by diverse mechanisms including Non-Allelic Homologous Recombination (NAHR), Non-Homologous End-Joining (NHEJ), and Fork Stalling and Template Switching (FoSTeS). We provide specific examples of chromosome 17 microduplications with the emphasis on their phenotype, specific clinical features aiding in their diagnosis, and counseling. PMID:20425816

  14. Fumonisin B(1): a neurotoxic mycotoxin.

    PubMed

    Domijan, Ana-Marija

    2012-12-01

    Fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium spp. moulds that contaminate crop, predominantly maize, all around the world. More than 15 types of fumonisins have been indentified so far, but FB(1) is the most abundant and toxicologically the most significant one. FB(1) has a wide range of toxic effects, depending on animal species. In horses FB(1) causes equine leukoencephalomalacia (ELEM), in pigs pulmonary oedema and in experimental rodents nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. In humans exposure to FB(1) is linked with higher incidence of primary liver cancer and oesophageal cancer, which are frequent in certain regions of the world (such as Transkei region in South Africa) where maize is staple food. The occurrence of neural tube defect in children in some countries of Central America (such as Mexico and Honduras) is connected with the consumption of FB(1)-contaminated maize-based food. However, possible involvement of FB(1) in the development of human diseases is not clear. Nevertheless, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified FB(1) as a possible carcinogen to humans (group 2B). FB(1) is a causative agent of ELEM, a brain disorder in equines, indicating that brain is a target organ of FB(1) toxicity. Several studies on experimental animals or on cell cultures of neural origin have established that FB(1) has a neurodegenerative potential, although the mechanism of its neurotoxicity is still vague. The aim of this article is to give an overview of available literature on FB(1) neurotoxicity and involved mechanisms, and to offer a new perspective for future studies.

  15. Association of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A) haplotypes with listening to music.

    PubMed

    Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa; Oikkonen, Jaana; Onkamo, Päivi; Karma, Kai; Raijas, Pirre; Järvelä, Irma

    2011-04-01

    Music is listened in all cultures. We hypothesize that willingness to produce and perceive sound and music is social communication that needs musical aptitude. Here, listening to music was surveyed using a web-based questionnaire and musical aptitude using the auditory structuring ability test (Karma Music test) and Carl Seashores tests for pitch and for time. Three highly polymorphic microsatellite markers (RS3, RS1 and AVR) of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A) gene, previously associated with social communication and attachment, were genotyped and analyzed in 31 Finnish families (n=437 members) using family-based association analysis. A positive association between the AVPR1A haplotype (RS1 and AVR) and active current listening to music (permuted P=0.0019) was observed. Other AVPR1A haplotype (RS3 and AVR) showed association with lifelong active listening to music (permuted P=0.0022). In addition to AVPR1A, two polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR and variable number of tandem repeat) of human serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), a candidate gene for many neuropsychiatric disorders and previously associated with emotional processing, were analyzed. No association between listening to music and the polymorphisms of SLC6A4 were detected. The results suggest that willingness to listen to music is related to neurobiological pathways affecting social affiliation and communication.

  16. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of the Human TL1A Ectodomain

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, C.; Yan, Q; Patskovsky, Y; Li, Z; Toro, R; Meyer, A; Cheng, H; Brenowitz, M; Nathenson, S; Almo, S

    2009-01-01

    TNF-like 1A (TL1A) is a newly described member of the TNF superfamily that is directly implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, atherosclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. We report the crystal structure of the human TL1A extracellular domain at a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom}, which reveals a jelly-roll fold typical of the TNF superfamily. This structural information, in combination with complementary mutagenesis and biochemical characterization, provides insights into the binding interface and the specificity of the interactions between TL1A and the DcR3 and DR3 receptors. These studies suggest that the mode of interaction between TL1A and DcR3 differs from other characterized TNF ligand/receptor complexes. In addition, we have generated functional TL1A mutants with altered disulfide bonding capability that exhibit enhanced solution properties, which will facilitate the production of materials for future cell-based and whole animal studies. In summary, these studies provide insights into the structure and function of TL1A and provide the basis for the rational manipulation of its interactions with cognate receptors.

  17. Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Sherry L; Fry, Rick; Cheung, Angela; Stewart, Donna E

    2004-01-01

    Health Issue Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in Canadian women and men. In general, women present with a wider range of symptoms, are more likely to delay seeking medial care and are less likely to be investigated and treated with evidence-based medications, angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft than men. Key Findings In 1998, 78,964 Canadians died from CVD, almost half (39,197) were women. Acute myocardial infarction, which increases significantly after menopause, was the leading cause of death among women. Cardiovascular disease accounted for 21% of all hospital admissions for Canadian women over age 50 in 1999. Admissions to hospital for ischemic heart disease were more frequent for men, but the mean length of hospital stay was longer for women. Mean blood pressure increases with age in both men and women. After age 65, however, high blood pressure is more common among Canadian women. More than one-third of postmenopausal Canadian women have hypertension. Diabetes increases the mortality and morbidity associated with CVD in women more than it does in men. Depression also contributes to the incidence and recovery from CVD, particularly for women who experience twice the rate of depression as men. Data Gaps and Recommendations CVD needs to be recognized as a woman's health issue given Canadian mortality projections (particularly heart failure). Health professionals should be trained to screen, track, and address CVD risk factors among women, including hypertension, elevated lipid levels, smoking, physical inactivity, depression, diabetes and low socio-economic status. PMID:15345078

  18. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  19. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is.

  20. [Bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2016-01-13

    Calcium intake shows a small impact on bone mineral density and fracture risk. Denosumab is a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption than zoledronate. Abaloparatide, PTHrP analog, increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture incidence. Teriparatide could be delivered via a transdermic device. Romosozumab and odanacatib improve calculated bone strength. Sequential or combined treatments with denosumab and teriparatide could be of interest, but not denosumab followed by teriparatide. Fibrous dysplasia, Paget disease and hypophosphatasia are updated, as well as atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw.

  1. Novel European SLC1A4 variant: infantile spasms and population ancestry analysis.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Judith; Allen, Nicholas M; Gorman, Kathleen; O'Halloran, Eoghan; Shahwan, Amre; Lynch, Bryan; Lynch, Sally A; Ennis, Sean; King, Mary D

    2016-08-01

    SLC1A4 deficiency is a recently described neurodevelopmental disorder associated with microcephaly, global developmental delay, abnormal myelination, thin corpus callosum and seizures. It has been mainly reported in the Ashkenazi-Jewish population with affected individuals homozygous for the p.Glu256Lys variant. Exome sequencing performed in an Irish proband identified a novel homozygous nonsense SLC1A4 variant [p.Trp453*], confirming a second case of SLC1A4-associated infantile spasms. As this is the first European identified, population ancestry analysis of the Exome Aggregation Consortium database was performed to determine the wider ethnic background of SLC1A4 deficiency carriers. p.Glu256Lys was found in Hispanic and South Asian populations. Other potential disease-causing variants were also identified. Investigation for SLC1A4 deficiency should be performed regardless of ethnicity and extend to include unexplained early-onset epileptic encephalopathy.

  2. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Goldings, E A; Jericho, J

    1986-08-01

    Although initially considered a localized epidemic form of arthritis. Lyme disease is now known to have protean manifestation (skin, joint, heart, nervous system) and worldwide distribution. It is caused by infection with the spirochaete Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted by a variety of hard ticks and, in some localities, fleas. Antigenic variation between isolates may determine the differences in clinical expression observed between cases in North America and Europe. The reservoir in the animal kingdom is primarily in deer and mice but house pets have also been implicated. The disease is easily treated with oral antibiotics (tetracycline or penicillin) at an early stage but requires parenteral penicillin and can become refractory to medication at late stages. Prompt diagnosis assures the best outcome. Whereas the classic rash, erythema chronicum migrans, is pathognomonic, diagnosis in its absence may rest on serological tests. Bacteriological isolation is seldom successful and is lengthy (Shrestha et al, 1985). Since cloning of the DNA for several of B. burgdorferi antigens has been accomplished, utilization of hybridization techniques may allow rapid detection of the presence of the organism and confirm difficult cases in the future.

  3. Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Murray, Joseph A

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize recent advances in celiac disease (CD) published between August 2008 and July 2009. Recent findings CD affects ~1% of most populations but remains largely unrecognized. In the last year, work has shown that the prevalence of CD has increased dramatically, not simply due to increased detection. Also, undiagnosed CD may be associated with increased mortality. Significant progress has been made in understanding how gliadin peptides can cross the intestinal border and access the immune system. New genetic loci and candidate genes that may contribute to the risk of CD and its overlap with type 1 diabetes mellitus have been identified. New deamidated gliadin peptides antibodies have better diagnostic accuracy over native gliadin-based tests. The inclusion of duodenal bulb biopsy specimens may increase the rate of CD detection. The spectrum of CD likely includes a minority of patients with mild enteropathy. A practical 7-item instrument may facilitate standardized evaluation of gluten-free diet adherence. Finally, refractory CD, whilst rare, is associated with a poor prognosis. Summary Celiac disease is a global health problem that requires a multidisciplinary and increasingly cooperative multinational research effort. PMID:20040864

  4. [Refsum disease].

    PubMed

    Bernscherer, G; Berényi, E; Karabélyos, C; László, A; Dávid, Z; Hollódy, K; Tóth, E Z

    2000-01-01

    For the first time in literature the authors interpret the pathography of Refsum's disease, in the case of their patient, as pseudo-hypervitaminosis A. The biochemical basis of the clinical picture is a defect in the activity of phytanic-acid-alpha-hydrolase belonging to the peroxisomal system. As a consequence, phytanic acid accumulates in the serum and in the parenchymal tissues. Retinol, an alcohol with high molecular weight, is a natural ligand of nuclear RXR (retinoid-X-receptor), which plays an important role in the regulation of peroxisoma synthesis. In Refsum's disease the phytanic acid accumulated because of the enzyme defect competes with the biotransformation derivates (all-trans-retinoic acid, 9-cis-retinoic acid) of the all-trans-retinol (vitamin A) for the nuclear RX receptor binding sites, and as a very potent receptoractivator it causes the intestinal symptoms of hypervitaminosis A. The authors review the procedure of fatty-acid chromatography necessary for the establishment of the diagnosis and discuss--in addition to dietary restrictions--recent therapeutic possibilities, like plasmapheresis, cascade filtration, lipapheresis and oral batylalcohol treatment.

  5. Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tanowitz, H B; Kirchhoff, L V; Simon, D; Morris, S A; Weiss, L M; Wittner, M

    1992-01-01

    Chagas' disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of morbidity in many countries in Latin America. The important modes of transmission are by the bite of the reduviid bug and blood transfusion. The organism exists in three morphological forms: trypomastigotes, amastigotes, and epimastigotes. The mechanism of transformation and differentiation is currently being explored, and signal transduction pathways of the parasites may be involved in this process. Parasite adherence to and invasion of host cells is a complex process involving complement, phospholipase, penetrin, neuraminidase, and hemolysin. Two clinical forms of the disease are recognized, acute and chronic. During the acute stage pathological damage is related to the presence of the parasite, whereas in the chronic stage few parasites are found. In recent years the roles of tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, and the interleukins in the pathogenesis of this infection have been reported. The common manifestations of chronic cardiomyopathy are arrhythmias and thromboembolic events. Autoimmune, neurogenic, and microvascular factors may be important in the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathy. The gastrointestinal tract is another important target, and "mega syndromes" are common manifestations. The diagnosis and treatment of this infection are active areas of investigation. New serological and molecular biological techniques have improved the diagnosis of chronic infection. Exacerbations of T. cruzi infection have been reported for patients receiving immuno-suppressive therapy and for those with AIDS. Images PMID:1423218

  6. Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    De-Paula, Vanessa J; Radanovic, Marcia; Diniz, Breno S; Forlenza, Orestes V

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease with well-defined pathophysiological mechanisms, mostly affecting medial temporal lobe and associative neocortical structures. Neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles represent the pathological hallmarks of AD, and are respectively related to the accumulation of the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) in brain tissues, and to cytoskeletal changes that arise from the hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated Tau protein in neurons. According to the amyloid hypothesis of AD, the overproduction of Aβ is a consequence of the disruption of homeostatic processes that regulate the proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Genetic, age-related and environmental factors contribute to a metabolic shift favoring the amyloidogenic processing of APP in detriment of the physiological, secretory pathway. Aβ peptides are generated by the successive cleavage of APP by beta-secretase (BACE-1) and gamma-secretase, which has been recently characterized as part of the presenilin complex. Among several beta-amyloid isoforms that bear subtle differences depending on the number of C-terminal amino acids, Aβ (1-42) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD. The neurotoxic potential of the Aβ peptide results from its biochemical properties that favor aggregation into insoluble oligomers and protofibrils. These further originate fibrillary Aβ species that accumulate into senile and neuritic plaques. These processes, along with a reduction of Aβ clearance from the brain, leads to the extracellular accumulation of Aβ, and the subsequent activation of neurotoxic cascades that ultimately lead to cytoskeletal changes, neuronal dysfunction and cellular death. Intracerebral amyloidosis develops in AD patients in an age-dependent manner, but recent evidence indicate that it may be observed in some subjects as early as in the third or fourth decades of life, with increasing magnitude in late middle age

  7. [Erdheim-Chester disease].

    PubMed

    Haroche, Julien; Amoura, Zahir; Wechsler, Bertrand; Veyssier-Belot, Catherine; Charlotte, Frédéric; Piette, Jean-Charles

    2007-11-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease is a non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, classically thought to be rare, but diagnosed more frequently nowadays (250 published cases). Histiocytes of Erdheim-Chester disease are positive for CD68 but not for CD1a, contrary to Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Two signs highly evocative of this diagnosis are nearly constant tracer uptake by the long bones on (99)Tc bone scintigraphy and a "hairy kidney" appearance on abdominal CT scan. A more "elegant" diagnostic method is ultrasound-guided biopsy of the perirenal infiltration. Cardiovascular involvement, which affects the aorta ("coated aorta") as well as all the cardiac layers, leads to one third of the deaths related to this disease. Central nervous system infiltration (especially cerebellar) is severe and difficult to treat. The prognosis is extremely variable and is often worse when there is a cardiovascular and/or central nervous system involvement. The treatment, decided upon on a case-by-case basis at a specialist center, often begins with interferon alpha. PMID:17618076

  8. Various ARID1A expression patterns and their clinical significance in gastric cancers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Bae; Ham, In-Hye; Hur, Hoon; Lee, Dakeun

    2016-03-01

    AT-rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A) is frequently mutated in gastric cancers, and loss of ARID1A expression is considered a poor prognostic factor in various cancers. However, in practice, ARID1A shows various expression patterns, and our understanding of its significance is limited. We performed immunohistochemistry for ARID1A, MLH1, and pS6 using whole tissue blocks of 350 gastric cancers and classified the ARID1A expression as follows: retained (63.7%), reduced (17.7%), complete loss (14.9%), and partial loss (3.7%). Complete/partial loss was more common in poorly differentiated histology (P < .001), and reduced or complete loss of ARID1A was frequent in cases with MLH1 loss (P < .001). The ARID1A-reduced group showed only slightly inferior disease-free survival (DFS; P = .254) and overall survival (OS; P = .377) compared to those of the ARID1A-retained group, whereas the group with complete loss showed significantly worse DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.732; P = .015) and OS (HR, 1.751; P = .013). Worse DFS (HR, 2.672; P = .005) and OS (HR, 2.531; P = .002) were also noted in the group with partial loss. High expression of pS6 was observed more frequently in groups showing altered ARID1A expression patterns (P < .001). In conclusion, reduced ARID1A expression is not a major prognostic determinant, although it may lead to AKT pathway activation. Tumor cells lacking ARID1A expression may influence the prognosis even if they constitute only a small proportion of the tumor sample. Our data provide an enhanced roadmap for understanding ARID1A with implications for future research and therapeutics. PMID:26826411

  9. Understanding the Multifaceted Role of Human Down Syndrome Kinase DYRK1A.

    PubMed

    Kay, L J; Smulders-Srinivasan, T K; Soundararajan, M

    2016-01-01

    The dual-specificity tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation-regulated kinase DYRK1A, also known as Down syndrome (DS) kinase, is a dosage-dependent signaling kinase that was originally shown to be highly expressed in DS patients as a consequence of trisomy 21. Although this was evident some time ago, it is only in recent investigations that the molecular roles of DYRK1A in a wide range of cellular processes are becoming increasingly apparent. Since initial knowledge on DYRK1A became evident through minibrain mnb, the Drosophila homolog of DYRK1A, this review will first summarize the scientific reports on minibrain and further expand on the well-established neuronal functions of mammalian and human DYRK1A. Recent investigations across the current decade have provided rather interesting and compelling evidence in establishing nonneuronal functions for DYRK1A, including its role in infection, immunity, cardiomyocyte biology, cancer, and cell cycle control. The latter part of this review will therefore focus in detail on the emerging nonneuronal functions of DYRK1A and summarize the regulatory role of DYRK1A in controlling Tau and α-synuclein. Finally, the emerging role of DYRK1A in Parkinson's disease will be outlined. PMID:27567487

  10. Loss of Tumor Suppressor ARID1A Protein Expression Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Patients with Primary Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Deuk; Lee, Jong Eun; Jung, Hae Yoen; Oh, Mee-Hye; Lee, Ji-Hye; Jang, Si-Hyong; Kim, Kyung-Ju; Han, Sun Wook; Kim, Sung Yong; Kim, Han Jo; Bae, Sang Byung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Somatic mutations of the chromatin remodeling AT-rich interactive domain 1A (SWI-like) gene (ARID1A) have been identified in many human cancers, including breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nuclear expression of ARID1A in breast cancers by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and to correlate the findings to clinicopathologic variables including prognostic significance. Methods IHC was performed on tissue microarrays of 476 cases of breast cancer. Associations between ARID1A expression and clinicopathologic characteristics and molecular subtype were retrospectively analyzed. Results Low expression of ARID1A was found in 339 of 476 (71.2%) cases. Low expression of ARID1A significantly correlated with positive lymph node metastasis (p=0.027), advanced pathologic stage (p=0.001), low Ki-67 labeling index (p=0.003), and negative p53 expression (p=0.017). The ARID1A low expression group had significantly shorter disease-free and overall survival than the ARID1A high expression group (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that low expression of ARID1A was a significant independent predictive factor for poor disease-free and overall survival in patients with breast cancer (disease-free survival: hazard ratio, 0.38, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20-0.73, p=0.004; overall survival: hazard ratio, 0.11, 95% CI, 0.03-0.46, p=0.003). In patients with luminal A type disease, patients with low ARID1A expression had significantly shorter disease-free and overall survival rates than patients with high ARID1A expression (p=0.022 and p=0.018, respectively). Conclusion Low expression of ARID1A is an independent prognostic factor for disease-free and overall survival in breast cancer patients and may be associated with luminal A type disease. Although the biologic function of ARID1A in breast cancer remains unknown, low expression of ARID1A can provide valuable prognostic information. PMID:26770240

  11. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  12. Disease Activity Measures in Paediatric Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Nadia J.; Feldman, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Disease activity refers to potentially reversible aspects of a disease. Measurement of disease activity in paediatric rheumatic diseases is a critical component of patient care and clinical research. Disease activity measures are developed systematically, often involving consensus methods. To be useful, a disease activity measure must be feasible, valid, and interpretable. There are several challenges in quantifying disease activity in paediatric rheumatology; namely, the conditions are multidimensional, the level of activity must be valuated in the context of treatment being received, there is no gold standard for disease activity, and it is often difficult to incorporate the patient's perspective of their disease activity. To date, core sets of response variables are defined for juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus, and juvenile dermatomyositis, as well as definitions for improvement in response to therapy. Several specific absolute disease activity measures also exist for each condition. Further work is required to determine the optimal disease activity measures in paediatric rheumatology. PMID:24089617

  13. Vibroacoustic disease.

    PubMed

    Branco, N A A Castelo; Alves-Pereira, M

    2004-01-01

    Vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is a whole-body, systemic pathology, characterized by the abnormal proliferation of extra-cellular matrices, and caused by excessive exposure to low frequency noise (LFN). VAD has been observed in LFN-exposed professionals, such as, aircraft technicians, commercial and military pilots and cabin crewmembers, ship machinists, restaurant workers, and disk-jockeys. VAD has also been observed in several populations exposed to environmental LFN. This report summarizes what is known to date on VAD, LFN-induced pathology, and related issues. In 1987, the first autopsy of a deceased VAD patient was performed. The extent of LFN induced damage was overwhelming, and the information obtained is, still today, guiding many of the associated and ongoing research projects. In 1992, LFN-exposed animal models began to be studied in order to gain a deeper knowledge of how tissues respond to this acoustic stressor. In both human and animal models, LFN exposure causes thickening of cardiovascular structures. Indeed, pericardial thickening with no inflammatory process, and in the absence of diastolic dysfunction, is the hallmark of VAD. Depressions, increased irritability and aggressiveness, a tendency for isolation, and decreased cognitive skills are all part of the clinical picture of VAD. LFN is a demonstrated genotoxic agent, inducing an increased frequency of sister chromatid exchanges in both human and animal models. The occurrence of malignancies among LFN-exposed humans, and of metaplastic and displastic appearances in LFN-exposed animals, clearly corroborates the mutagenic outcome of LFN exposure. The inadequacy of currently established legislation regarding noise assessments is a powerful hindrance to scientific advancement. VAD can never be fully recognized as an occupational and environmental pathology unless the agent of disease--LFN--is acknowledged and properly evaluated. The worldwide suffering of LFN-exposed individuals is staggering and it is

  14. [Thyroid disease].

    PubMed

    Ashitaka, Y

    1990-08-01

    The incidence of pregnant women with thyroid dysfunction has been reported to be around 0.1-0.4%. Graves' disease accounts for more than half of these disorders. The main cause of thyroid disease in pregnancy and puerperium is autoimmune dysfunction. Whether there may be goitre or exophthalmus present, clinical signs as inappropriate weight gain, high systolic pressure, palpitation (greater than or equal to 110/min), emotional lability, fatigue, acceleration of suppression of the Achilles' tendon reflex should induce changes in the biochemical thyroid function tests. Parameters for the diagnosis and management for hyperthyroidism are serum levels of free T4 and TSH, while those of T3, reverse T3, and TSH are for hypothyroidism. Serum anti-microsomal antibodies and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies which have no effect on the fetus are also good markers for severity. The transplacental transfer of maternal TSH receptor antibodies consisting of stimulatory and inhibitory immunoglobulins and maternal thyroid-binding inhibiting immunoglobulins play roles in the development of transient neonatal hyper- or hypothyroidism. Fetal control is achieved by optimal maternal management. Untreated hyperthyroidism may be associated with fetal malformations. This risk may be reduced by antithyroid drug treatment of up to 150 mg/day of propylthiouracil which has less chance of placental passage and less secretion into the mother's milk than methyl-mercapto-imidazol. Maternal thyroid function should be kept in the upper limit of normal range, taking into consideration the fetal dysfunction induced by over-administration of the drug which passes through placenta. Children of hypothyroid women taking inadequate replacement therapy manifested lower IQ values compared to the progeny of euthyroid or hypothyroid women taking adequate therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. A brief review of recent Charcot-Marie-Tooth research and priorities.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Litterman, Nadia K; Arnold, Renée J G; Burgess, Robert W; Freundlich, Joel S; Gray, Steven J; Higgins, Joseph J; Langley, Brett; Willis, Dianna E; Notterpek, Lucia; Pleasure, David; Sereda, Michael W; Moore, Allison

    2015-01-01

    This brief review of current research progress on Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a summary of discussions initiated at the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF) scientific advisory board meeting on November 7, 2014. It covers recent published and unpublished in vitro and in vivo research. We discuss recent promising preclinical work for CMT1A, the development of new biomarkers, the characterization of different animal models, and the analysis of the frequency of gene mutations in patients with CMT. We also describe how progress in related fields may benefit CMT therapeutic development, including the potential of gene therapy and stem cell research. We also discuss the potential to assess and improve the quality of life of CMT patients. This summary of CMT research identifies some of the gaps which may have an impact on upcoming clinical trials. We provide some priorities for CMT research and areas which HNF can support. The goal of this review is to inform the scientific community about ongoing research and to avoid unnecessary overlap, while also highlighting areas ripe for further investigation. The general collaborative approach we have taken may be useful for other rare neurological diseases.

  16. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies: Understanding molecular pathogenesis could lead to future treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Jerath, Nivedita U; Shy, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies, like many other degenerative disorders, have been challenging to treat. At this point, there is little specific therapy for the inherited neuropathies other than genetic counseling as well as symptomatic treatment and rehabilitation. In the past, ascorbic acid, progesterone antagonists, and subcutaneous neurotrophin-3 (NT3) injections have demonstrated improvement in animal models of CMT 1A, the most common inherited neuropathy, but have failed to translate any effect in humans. Given the difficulty in treatment, it is important to understand the molecular pathogenesis of hereditary neuropathies in order to strategize potential future therapies. The hereditary neuropathies are in an era of molecular insight and over the past 20 years, more than 78 subtypes of Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) have been identified and extensively studied to understand the biological pathways in greater detail. Next generation molecular sequencing has also improved the diagnosis as well as the understanding of CMT. A greater understanding of the molecular pathways will help pave the way to future therapeutics of CMT. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:25108281

  17. A brief review of recent Charcot-Marie-Tooth research and priorities

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, Sean; Litterman, Nadia K.; Arnold, Renée J.G.; Burgess, Robert W.; Freundlich, Joel S.; Gray, Steven J.; Higgins, Joseph J.; Langley, Brett; Willis, Dianna E.; Notterpek, Lucia; Pleasure, David; Sereda, Michael W.; Moore, Allison

    2015-01-01

    This brief review of current research progress on Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a summary of discussions initiated at the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF) scientific advisory board meeting on November 7, 2014. It covers recent published and unpublished in vitro and in vivo research. We discuss recent promising preclinical work for CMT1A, the development of new biomarkers, the characterization of different animal models, and the analysis of the frequency of gene mutations in patients with CMT. We also describe how progress in related fields may benefit CMT therapeutic development, including the potential of gene therapy and stem cell research. We also discuss the potential to assess and improve the quality of life of CMT patients. This summary of CMT research identifies some of the gaps which may have an impact on upcoming clinical trials. We provide some priorities for CMT research and areas which HNF can support. The goal of this review is to inform the scientific community about ongoing research and to avoid unnecessary overlap, while also highlighting areas ripe for further investigation. The general collaborative approach we have taken may be useful for other rare neurological diseases. PMID:25901280

  18. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Conditions Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... L. Goldstein, MD, MMSc (February 01, 2016) Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease. This ...

  19. American Lyme Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infectious Diseases, 35: 451-464, 2002) What is Lyme Disease? Lyme disease (LD) is an infection caused by ... mission with your own tax-deductible contribution. American Lyme Disease Foundation, Inc. PO Box 466 Lyme, CT 06371 ...

  20. Motor Neuron Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Motor Neuron Diseases Information Page Condensed from Motor Neuron Diseases ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Motor Neuron Diseases? The motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are a ...

  1. Natalizumab plus interferon beta-1a reduces lesion formation in relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Stuart, William H; Calabresi, Peter A; Confavreux, Christian; Galetta, Steven L; Rudick, Richard A; Lublin, Fred D; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Wynn, Daniel R; Fisher, Elizabeth; Papadopoulou, Athina; Lynn, Frances; Panzara, Michael A; Sandrock, Alfred W

    2010-05-15

    The SENTINEL study showed that the addition of natalizumab improved outcomes for patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) who had experienced disease activity while receiving interferon beta-1a (IFNbeta-1a) alone. Previously unreported secondary and tertiary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures are presented here. Patients received natalizumab 300 mg (n=589) or placebo (n=582) intravenously every 4 weeks plus IFNbeta-1a 30 microg intramuscularly once weekly. Annual MRI scans allowed comparison of a range of MRI end points versus baseline. Over 2 years, 67% of patients receiving natalizumab plus IFNbeta-1a remained free of new or enlarging T2-lesions compared with 30% of patients receiving IFNbeta-1a alone. The mean change from baseline in T2 lesion volume over 2 years decreased in patients receiving natalizumab plus IFNbeta-1a and increased in those receiving IFNbeta-1a alone (-277.5mm(3) versus 525.6mm(3); p<0.001). Compared with IFNbeta-1a alone, add-on natalizumab therapy resulted in a smaller increase in mean T1-hypointense lesion volume after 2 years (1821.3mm(3) versus 2210.5mm(3); p<0.001), a smaller mean number of new T1-hypointense lesions over 2 years (2.3 versus 4.1; p<0.001), and a slower rate of brain atrophy during the second year of therapy (-0.31% versus -0.40%; p=0.020). Natalizumab add-on therapy reduced gadolinium-enhancing, T1-hypointense, and T2 MRI lesion activity and slowed brain atrophy progression in patients with relapsing MS who experienced disease activity despite treatment with IFNbeta-1a alone. PMID:20236661

  2. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 circumscribes high invasive glioma cells and predicts poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sen-Lin; Liu, Sha; Cui, Wei; Shi, Yu; Liu, Qin; Duan, Jiang-Jie; Yu, Shi-Cang; Zhang, Xia; Cui, You-Hong; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Bian, Xiu-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most aggressive brain tumor with high invasiveness and poor prognosis. More reliable, sensitive and practical biomarkers to reveal glioma high invasiveness remain to be explored for the guidance of therapy. We herein evaluated the diagnostic and prognostic value of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) in the glioma specimens from 237 patients, and found that ADLH1A1 was frequently overexpressed in the high-grade glioma (WHO grade III-IV) as compared to the low-grade glioma (WHO grade I-II) patients. The tumor cells with ALDH1A1 expression were more abundant in the region between tumor and the borderline of adjacent tissue as compared to the central part of the tumor. ALDH1A1 overexpression was associated with poor differentiation and dismal prognosis. Notably, the overall and disease-free survivals of the patients who had ALDH1A1+ tumor cells sparsely located in the adjacent tissue were much worse. Furthermore, ALDH1A1 expression was correlated with the “classical-like” (CL) subtype as we examined GBM specimens from 72 patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that ALDH1A1 was an independent marker for glioma patients’ outcome. Mechanistically, both in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that ALDH1A1+ cells isolated from either a glioblastoma cell line U251 or primary glioblastoma cells displayed significant invasiveness, clonogenicity, and proliferation as compared to ALDH1A1- cells, due to increased levels of mRNA and protein for matrix metalloproteinase 2, 7 and 9 (MMP2, MMP7 and MMP9). These results indicate that ALDH1A1+ cells contribute to the progression of glioma including invasion, proliferation and poor prognosis, and suggest that targeting ALDH1A1 may have important implications for the treatment of highly invasive glioma. PMID:26101711

  3. Prefrontal deficits in a murine model overexpressing the down syndrome candidate gene dyrk1a.

    PubMed

    Thomazeau, Aurore; Lassalle, Olivier; Iafrati, Jillian; Souchet, Benoit; Guedj, Fayçal; Janel, Nathalie; Chavis, Pascale; Delabar, Jean; Manzoni, Olivier J

    2014-01-22

    The gene Dyrk1a is the mammalian ortholog of Drosophila minibrain. Dyrk1a localizes in the Down syndrome (DS) critical region of chromosome 21q22.2 and is a major candidate for the behavioral and neuronal abnormalities associated with DS. PFC malfunctions are a common denominator in several neuropsychiatric diseases, including DS, but the contribution of DYRK1A in PFC dysfunctions, in particular the synaptic basis for impairments of executive functions reported in DS patients, remains obscure. We quantified synaptic plasticity, biochemical synaptic markers, and dendritic morphology of deep layer pyramidal PFC neurons in adult mBACtgDyrk1a transgenic mice that overexpress Dyrk1a under the control of its own regulatory sequences. We found that overexpression of Dyrk1a largely increased the number of spines on oblique dendrites of pyramidal neurons, as evidenced by augmented spine density, higher PSD95 protein levels, and larger miniature EPSCs. The dendritic alterations were associated with anomalous NMDAR-mediated long-term potentiation and accompanied by a marked reduction in the pCaMKII/CaMKII ratio in mBACtgDyrk1a mice. Retrograde endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression (eCB-LTD) was ablated in mBACtgDyrk1a mice. Administration of green tea extracts containing epigallocatechin 3-gallate, a potent DYRK1A inhibitor, to adult mBACtgDyrk1a mice normalized long-term potentiation and spine anomalies but not eCB-LTD. However, inhibition of the eCB deactivating enzyme monoacylglycerol lipase normalized eCB-LTD in mBACtgDyrk1a mice. These data shed light on previously undisclosed participation of DYRK1A in adult PFC dendritic structures and synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, they suggest its involvement in DS-related endophenotypes and identify new potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:24453307

  4. A chemical with proven clinical safety rescues Down-syndrome-related phenotypes in through DYRK1A inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeongki; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Ae-Kyeong; Choi, Miri; Choi, Kwangman; Kang, Mingu; Chi, Seung-Wook; Lee, Min-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Lee, So-Young; Song, Woo-Joo; Yu, Kweon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DYRK1A is important in neuronal development and function, and its excessive activity is considered a significant pathogenic factor in Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. Thus, inhibition of DYRK1A has been suggested to be a new strategy to modify the disease. Very few compounds, however, have been reported to act as inhibitors, and their potential clinical uses require further evaluation. Here, we newly identify CX-4945, the safety of which has been already proven in the clinical setting, as a potent inhibitor of DYRK1A that acts in an ATP-competitive manner. The inhibitory potency of CX-4945 on DYRK1A (IC50=6.8 nM) in vitro was higher than that of harmine, INDY or proINDY, which are well-known potent inhibitors of DYRK1A. CX-4945 effectively reverses the aberrant phosphorylation of Tau, amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1) in mammalian cells. To our surprise, feeding with CX-4945 significantly restored the neurological and phenotypic defects induced by the overexpression of minibrain, an ortholog of human DYRK1A, in the Drosophila model. Moreover, oral administration of CX-4945 acutely suppressed Tau hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus of DYRK1A-overexpressing mice. Our research results demonstrate that CX-4945 is a potent DYRK1A inhibitor and also suggest that it has therapeutic potential for DYRK1A-associated diseases. PMID:27483355

  5. A chemical with proven clinical safety rescues Down-syndrome-related phenotypes in through DYRK1A inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeongki; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Ae-Kyeong; Choi, Miri; Choi, Kwangman; Kang, Mingu; Chi, Seung-Wook; Lee, Min-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Lee, So-Young; Song, Woo-Joo; Yu, Kweon; Cho, Sungchan

    2016-08-01

    DYRK1A is important in neuronal development and function, and its excessive activity is considered a significant pathogenic factor in Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. Thus, inhibition of DYRK1A has been suggested to be a new strategy to modify the disease. Very few compounds, however, have been reported to act as inhibitors, and their potential clinical uses require further evaluation. Here, we newly identify CX-4945, the safety of which has been already proven in the clinical setting, as a potent inhibitor of DYRK1A that acts in an ATP-competitive manner. The inhibitory potency of CX-4945 on DYRK1A (IC50=6.8 nM) in vitro was higher than that of harmine, INDY or proINDY, which are well-known potent inhibitors of DYRK1A. CX-4945 effectively reverses the aberrant phosphorylation of Tau, amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1) in mammalian cells. To our surprise, feeding with CX-4945 significantly restored the neurological and phenotypic defects induced by the overexpression of minibrain, an ortholog of human DYRK1A, in the Drosophila model. Moreover, oral administration of CX-4945 acutely suppressed Tau hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus of DYRK1A-overexpressing mice. Our research results demonstrate that CX-4945 is a potent DYRK1A inhibitor and also suggest that it has therapeutic potential for DYRK1A-associated diseases. PMID:27483355

  6. Early phenotypical diagnoses in Trembler-J mice model.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Gonzalo; Cal, Karina; Canclini, Lucía; Damián, Juan Pablo; Ruiz, Paul; Rodríguez, Héctor; Sotelo, José Roberto; Vazquez, Cristina; Kun, Alejandra

    2010-06-30

    Pmp-22 mutant mice (Trembler-J: B6.D2-Pmp22/J), are used as a model to study Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A). The identification of individual genotypes is a routine in the management of the Tr(J) colony. The earliest phenotypic manifestation of the pmp-22 mutation is just about 20th postnatal days, when pups begin to tremble. In this study, a rapid and simple diagnostic method was developed by modifying the Tail Suspension Test (MTST) to determine the difference between the Tr(J) and the wild-type mice phenotype. The animal behavioral phenotypes generated during the test were consistent with the specific genotype of each animal. The MTST allowed us to infer the heterozygous genotype in early postnatal stages, at 11 days after birth. The motor impairment of Tr(J) mice was also analyzed by a Fixed Bar Test (FBT), which revealed the disease evolution according to age. The main advantages of MTST are its objectivity, simplicity, and from the viewpoint of animal welfare, it is a non-invasive technique that combined with his rapidity show its very well applicability for use from an early age in these mice.

  7. KIF1A inhibition immortalizes brain stem cells but blocks BDNF-mediated neuronal migration

    PubMed Central

    Carabalona, Aurelie; Hu, Daniel Jun-Kit; B. Vallee1, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Brain neural stem cells (RGPs) undergo a mysterious form of cell cycle-entrained “interkinetic” nuclear migration (INM), driven apically by cytoplasmic dynein and basally by the kinesin KIF1A, which has recently been implicated in human brain developmental disease. To understand the consequences of altered basal INM and the roles of KIF1A in disease, we performed constitutive and conditional RNAi and expressed mutant KIF1A in E16-P7 rat RGPs and neurons. RGPs inhibited in basal INM still showed normal cell cycle progression, though neurogenic divisions were severely reduced. Postmitotic neuronal migration was independently disrupted at the multipolar stage, accompanied by premature ectopic expression of neuronal differentiation markers. Similar effects were unexpectedly observed throughout the layer of surrounding control cells, mimicked by Bdnf or Dcx RNAi, and rescued by BDNF application. These results identify novel, sequential, and independent roles for KIF1A and provide an important new approach for reversing the effects of human disease. PMID:26752160

  8. Polymorphisms of UGT1A1*6, UGT1A1*27 & UGT1A1*28 in three major ethnic groups from Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Teh, L. K.; Hashim, H.; Zakaria, Z. A.; Salleh, M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Genetic polymorphisms of uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) have been associated with a wide variation of responses among patients prescribed with irinotecan. Lack of this enzyme is known to be associated with a high incidence of severe toxicity. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of three different variants of UGT1A1 (UGT1A1*6, UGT1A1*27 and UGT1A1*28), which are associated with reduced enzyme activity and increased irinotecan toxicity, in the three main ethnic groups in Malaysia (Malays, Chinese and Indians). Methods: A total of 306 healthy unrelated volunteers were screened for UGT1A1*28, UGT1A1*6 and UGT1A1*27. Blood samples (5 ml) were obtained from each subject and DNA was extracted. PCR based methods were designed and validated for detection of UGT1A1*6, UGT1A1*27 and UGT1A1*28. Direct DNA sequencing was performed to validate the results of randomly selected samples. Results: Malays and Indian have two-fold higher frequency of homozygous of UGT1A1*28 (7TA/7TA) which was 8 and 8.8 per cent, respectively compared to the Chinese (4.9%). However, the distribution of UGT1A1*6 and UGT1A1*27 showed no significant differences among them. UGT1A1*27 which has not been detected in Caucasian and African American population, was found in the Malaysian Malays (3.33%) and Malaysian Chinese (2.0%). Interpretation & conclusions: There was interethnic variability in the frequency of UGT1A1*28 in the Malaysian population. Our results suggest that genotyping of UGT1A1*6, UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A1*27 need to be performed before patients are prescribed with irinotecan due to their high prevalence of allelic variant which could lead to adverse drug reaction. PMID:22960892

  9. Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Tsutomu; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Arroll, Megan A; Casselbrant, Margaretha L; Foster, Carol A; Manzoor, Nauman F; Megerian, Cliff A; Naganawa, Shinji; Young, Yi-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Meniere's disease (MD) is a disorder of the inner ear that causes vertigo attacks, fluctuating hearing loss, tinnitus and aural fullness. The aetiology of MD is multifactorial. A characteristic sign of MD is endolymphatic hydrops (EH), a disorder in which excessive endolymph accumulates in the inner ear and causes damage to the ganglion cells. In most patients, the clinical symptoms of MD present after considerable accumulation of endolymph has occurred. However, some patients develop symptoms in the early stages of EH. The reason for the variability in the symptomatology is unknown and the relationship between EH and the clinical symptoms of MD requires further study. The diagnosis of MD is based on clinical symptoms but can be complemented with functional inner ear tests, including audiometry, vestibular-evoked myogenic potential testing, caloric testing, electrocochleography or head impulse tests. MRI has been optimized to directly visualize EH in the cochlea, vestibule and semicircular canals, and its use is shifting from the research setting to the clinic. The management of MD is mainly aimed at the relief of acute attacks of vertigo and the prevention of recurrent attacks. Therapeutic options are based on empirical evidence and include the management of risk factors and a conservative approach as the first line of treatment. When medical treatment is unable to suppress vertigo attacks, intratympanic gentamicin therapy or endolymphatic sac decompression surgery is usually considered. This Primer covers the pathophysiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, management, quality of life and prevention of MD. PMID:27170253

  10. [Castleman disease].

    PubMed

    Belletti, Gerardo A; Savio, Verónica; Minoldo, Daniel; Caminos, Susana; Yorio, Marcelo A

    2004-01-01

    A 66 years female, who was since last year under astenia, arthralgias, pimply lesions in spread plates and tests showing eritrosedimentation over 100 mm, anemi, leucocitosis with neutrofilia, policlonal hypergammaglobulinemia, slight proteinuria and IgE on 900. This patient was sporadically treated with corticoids. When made the medical consult had lost 34lb., was under anorexy, as well as dyspepsia. Hemoglobyn 6.9 gr/dl, leucocytes 20000/mm3, neutrofils at 90%, proteinogram the same as former, with hypoalbuminemia. She was taking prednisona, 16 mg/day. When examined showed depress of conscience, astenia, and dermic lesions already quoted. 4 cm nonpainful right axillary adenopaty adhered to deep planes. Medulogram with increased iron, hyperegenerative. Ganglionar biopsia: linfoid hyperplasic process linked to inmune response. Toracoabdominal tomography with adenomegalia in torax and retroperitoneo. Skin biopsia: neutrofilic vasculitis. The patient suspends the 16 mg of prednisona and fever as well as generalized adenopatias come up. After laying aside other ethiologies, and understanding as Castleman Multicentric disease, it is started to supply prednisona 1 mg/kg of weight with a clinical and biochemical fast and outstanding response. After 7 months it was progressively suspended the esteroids and 60 days later, the process fall back; for that, corticoids are restarted, with a good evolution. The illness of Castleman although it is not very frequent, it should be considered as differential diagnosis in those clinical cases that are accompanied with important general commitment, linphadenopaties and respons to steroid therapy.

  11. A gene for Usher syndrome type I (USH1A) maps to chromosome 14q

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.; Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M.; Delrieu, O.; Briard, M.L.; Dollfus, H.; Frezal, J.; Munnich, A. ); Bonneau, D. ); Ghazi, I. )

    1992-12-01

    Usher syndrome (US) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by congenital hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa. It is the most frequent cause of deaf-blindness in adults and accounts for 3 to 6% of deaf children. Here, the authors report the genetic mapping of a gene for US type I (USH1A), the most severe form of the disease, to the long arm of chromosome 14, by linkage to probe MLJ14 at the D14S13 locus in 10 families of Western France ancestry ([cflx Z] = 4.13 at [cflx [theta

  12. Dimerization of human uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase allozymes 1A1 and 1A9 alters their quercetin glucuronidation activities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Qing; Yuan, Ling-Min; Gao, Zhang-Zhao; Xiao, Yong-Sheng; Sun, Hong-Ying; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su

    2016-01-01

    Uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A (UGT1A) is a major phase II drug-metabolism enzyme superfamily involved in the glucuronidation of endobiotics and xenobiotics in humans. Many polymorphisms in UGT1A genes are reported to inhibit or decrease UGT1A activity. In this study, two UGT1A1 allozymes, UGT1A1 wild-type and a splice mutant, as well as UGT1A9 wild-type and its three UGT1A9 allozymes, UGT1A9*2(C3Y), UGT1A9*3(M33T), and UGT1A9*5(D256N) were single- or double-expressed in a Bac-to-Bac expression system. Dimerization of UGT1A1 or UGT1A9 allozymes was observed via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and co-immunoprecipitation analysis. SNPs of UGT1A altered the ability of protein-protein interaction, resulting in differential FRET efficiencies and donor-acceptor r distances. Dimerization changed the chemical regioselectivity, substrate-binding affinity, and enzymatic activity of UGT1A1 and UGT1A9 in glucuronidation of quercetin. These findings provide molecular insights into the consequences of homozygous and heterozygous UGT1A1 and UGT1A9 allozymes expression on quercetin glucuronidation. PMID:27025983

  13. Dimerization of human uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase allozymes 1A1 and 1A9 alters their quercetin glucuronidation activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Qing; Yuan, Ling-Min; Gao, Zhang-Zhao; Xiao, Yong-Sheng; Sun, Hong-Ying; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su

    2016-01-01

    Uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A (UGT1A) is a major phase II drug-metabolism enzyme superfamily involved in the glucuronidation of endobiotics and xenobiotics in humans. Many polymorphisms in UGT1A genes are reported to inhibit or decrease UGT1A activity. In this study, two UGT1A1 allozymes, UGT1A1 wild-type and a splice mutant, as well as UGT1A9 wild-type and its three UGT1A9 allozymes, UGT1A9*2(C3Y), UGT1A9*3(M33T), and UGT1A9*5(D256N) were single- or double-expressed in a Bac-to-Bac expression system. Dimerization of UGT1A1 or UGT1A9 allozymes was observed via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and co-immunoprecipitation analysis. SNPs of UGT1A altered the ability of protein-protein interaction, resulting in differential FRET efficiencies and donor-acceptor r distances. Dimerization changed the chemical regioselectivity, substrate-binding affinity, and enzymatic activity of UGT1A1 and UGT1A9 in glucuronidation of quercetin. These findings provide molecular insights into the consequences of homozygous and heterozygous UGT1A1 and UGT1A9 allozymes expression on quercetin glucuronidation. PMID:27025983

  14. Electronic spectroscopy of the A1A'' <-- X1A' system of CDF.

    PubMed

    Tao, Chong; Deselnicu, Mihaela; Fan, Haiyan; Mukarakate, Calvin; Ionescu, Ionela; Reid, Scott A

    2006-02-14

    To further investigate the Renner-Teller (RT) effect and barriers to linearity and dissociation in the simplest singlet carbene, we recorded fluorescence excitation spectra of bands involving the pure bending levels 2(n)(0) with n = 0-9 and the combination states 1(1)(0)2(n)(0) with n = 1-8 and 2(n)(0)3(1)(0) with n = 0-5 in the A(1)A''<-- X(1)A' system of CDF, in addition to some weak hot bands. The spectra were measured under jet-cooled conditions using a pulsed discharge source, and rotationally analyzed to yield precise values for the band origins and rotational constants; fluorescence lifetimes were also measured to probe for lifetime lengthening effects due to the RT interaction. The derived A state parameters are compared with previous results for CHF and with predictions of ab initio electronic structure theory. The approach to linearity in the A state is evidenced in a sharp increase in the A rotational constant with bending excitation, and a minimum in the vibrational intervals near 2(9). A fit of the vibrational intervals for the pure bending levels yields an A state barrier to linearity in good agreement both with that previously derived for CHF and ab initio predictions. From the spectra and lifetime measurements, the onset of extensive RT perturbations is found to occur at a higher energy than in CHF, consistent with the smaller A constant.

  15. MISR Level 1A CCD Science data, all cameras (MIL1A_V2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    The Level 1A data are raw MISR data that are decommutated, reformatted 12-bit Level 0 data shifted to byte boundaries, i.e., reversal of square-root encoding applied and converted to 16 bit, and annotated (e.g., with time information). These data are used by the Level 1B1 processing algorithm to generate calibrated radiances. The science data output preserves the spatial sampling rate of the Level 0 raw MISR CCD science data. CCD data are collected during routine science observations of the sunlit portion of the Earth. Each product represents one 'granule' of data. A 'granule' is defined to be the smallest unit of data required for MISR processing. Also, included in the Level 1A product are pointers to calibration coefficient files provided for Level 1B processing. [Location=GLOBAL] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=2000-02-24; Stop_Date=] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180].

  16. MISR Level 1A CCD Science data, all cameras (MIL1A_V1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    The Level 1A data are raw MISR data that are decommutated, reformatted 12-bit Level 0 data shifted to byte boundaries, i.e., reversal of square-root encoding applied and converted to 16 bit, and annotated (e.g., with time information). These data are used by the Level 1B1 processing algorithm to generate calibrated radiances. The science data output preserves the spatial sampling rate of the Level 0 raw MISR CCD science data. CCD data are collected during routine science observations of the sunlit portion of the Earth. Each product represents one 'granule' of data. A 'granule' is defined to be the smallest unit of data required for MISR processing. Also, included in the Level 1A product are pointers to calibration coefficient files provided for Level 1B processing. [Location=GLOBAL] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=2000-02-24; Stop_Date=] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180].

  17. The kinase DYRK1A reciprocally regulates the differentiation of Th17 and regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Khor, Bernard; Gagnon, John D; Goel, Gautam; Roche, Marly I; Conway, Kara L; Tran, Khoa; Aldrich, Leslie N; Sundberg, Thomas B; Paterson, Alison M; Mordecai, Scott; Dombkowski, David; Schirmer, Melanie; Tan, Pauline H; Bhan, Atul K; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Restifo, Nicholas P; O'Shea, John J; Medoff, Benjamin D; Shamji, Alykhan F; Schreiber, Stuart L; Sharpe, Arlene H; Shaw, Stanley Y; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2015-01-01

    The balance between Th17 and T regulatory (Treg) cells critically modulates immune homeostasis, with an inadequate Treg response contributing to inflammatory disease. Using an unbiased chemical biology approach, we identified a novel role for the dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase DYRK1A in regulating this balance. Inhibition of DYRK1A enhances Treg differentiation and impairs Th17 differentiation without affecting known pathways of Treg/Th17 differentiation. Thus, DYRK1A represents a novel mechanistic node at the branch point between commitment to either Treg or Th17 lineages. Importantly, both Treg cells generated using the DYRK1A inhibitor harmine and direct administration of harmine itself potently attenuate inflammation in multiple experimental models of systemic autoimmunity and mucosal inflammation. Our results identify DYRK1A as a physiologically relevant regulator of Treg cell differentiation and suggest a broader role for other DYRK family members in immune homeostasis. These results are discussed in the context of human diseases associated with dysregulated DYRK activity. PMID:25998054

  18. The kinase DYRK1A reciprocally regulates the differentiation of Th17 and regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Bernard; Gagnon, John D; Goel, Gautam; Roche, Marly I; Conway, Kara L; Tran, Khoa; Aldrich, Leslie N; Sundberg, Thomas B; Paterson, Alison M; Mordecai, Scott; Dombkowski, David; Schirmer, Melanie; Tan, Pauline H; Bhan, Atul K; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Restifo, Nicholas P; O'Shea, John J; Medoff, Benjamin D; Shamji, Alykhan F; Schreiber, Stuart L; Sharpe, Arlene H; Shaw, Stanley Y; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2015-01-01

    The balance between Th17 and T regulatory (Treg) cells critically modulates immune homeostasis, with an inadequate Treg response contributing to inflammatory disease. Using an unbiased chemical biology approach, we identified a novel role for the dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase DYRK1A in regulating this balance. Inhibition of DYRK1A enhances Treg differentiation and impairs Th17 differentiation without affecting known pathways of Treg/Th17 differentiation. Thus, DYRK1A represents a novel mechanistic node at the branch point between commitment to either Treg or Th17 lineages. Importantly, both Treg cells generated using the DYRK1A inhibitor harmine and direct administration of harmine itself potently attenuate inflammation in multiple experimental models of systemic autoimmunity and mucosal inflammation. Our results identify DYRK1A as a physiologically relevant regulator of Treg cell differentiation and suggest a broader role for other DYRK family members in immune homeostasis. These results are discussed in the context of human diseases associated with dysregulated DYRK activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05920.001 PMID:25998054

  19. Design and synthesis of thiazolo[5,4-f]quinazolines as DYRK1A inhibitors, part II.

    PubMed

    Foucourt, Alicia; Hédou, Damien; Dubouilh-Benard, Carole; Girard, Angélique; Taverne, Thierry; Casagrande, Anne-Sophie; Désiré, Laurent; Leblond, Bertrand; Besson, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    The convenient synthesis of a focused library (forty molecules) of novel 6,6,5-tricyclic thiazolo[5,4-f]quinazolines was realized mainly under microwave irradiation. A novel 6-aminobenzo[d]thiazole-2,7-dicarbonitrile (1) was used as a versatile molecular platform for the synthesis of various derivatives. Kinase inhibition, of the obtained final compounds, was evaluated on a panel of two kinases (DYRK1A/1B) together with some known reference DYRK1A and DYRK1B inhibitors (harmine, TG003, NCGC-00189310 and leucettine L41). Compound IC50 values were obtained and compared. Five of the novel thiazolo[5,4-f]quinazoline derivatives prepared, EHT 5372 (8c), EHT 6840 (8h), EHT 1610 (8i), EHT 9851 (8k) and EHT 3356 (9b) displayed single-digit nanomolar or subnanomolar IC50 values and are among the most potent DYRK1A/1B inhibitors disclosed to date. DYRK1A/1B kinases are known to be involved in the regulation of various molecular pathways associated with oncology, neurodegenerative diseases (such as Alzheimer disease, AD, or other tauopathies), genetic diseases (such as Down Syndrome, DS), as well as diseases involved in abnormal pre-mRNA splicing. The compounds described in this communication constitute a highly potent set of novel molecular probes to evaluate the biology/pharmacology of DYR1A/1B in such diseases. PMID:25264830

  20. Erdheim-Chester disease.

    PubMed

    Haroche, Julien; Arnaud, Laurent; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Hervier, Baptiste; Charlotte, Frédéric; Emile, Jean-François; Amoura, Zahir

    2014-04-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare (approximately 500 known cases worldwide), non-inherited, non-Langerhans form of histiocytosis of unknown origin, first described in 1930. It is characterized by xanthomatous or xanthogranulomatous infiltration of tissues by foamy histiocytes, "lipid-laden" macrophages, or histiocytes, surrounded by fibrosis. Diagnosis of ECD involves the analysis of histiocytes in tissue biopsies: these are typically foamy and CD68+ CD1a- in ECD, whereas in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) they are CD68+ CD1a+. ⁹⁹Technetium bone scintigraphy revealing nearly constant tracer uptake by the long bones is highly suggestive of ECD, and a "hairy kidney" appearance on abdominal CT scan is observed in approximately half of ECD cases. Central nervous system involvement is a strong prognostic factor and an independent predictor of death in cases of ECD. Optimum initial therapy for ECD seems to be administration of interferon α (or pegylated interferon α), and prolonged treatment significantly improves survival; however, tolerance may be poor. Cases of ECD present with strong systemic immune activation, involving IFNα, IL-1/IL1-RA, IL-6, IL-12, and MCP-1, consistent with the systemic immune Th-1-oriented disturbance associated with the disease. More than half of ECD patients carry the BRAF(V600E) mutation, an activating mutation of the proto-oncogene BRAF. A small number of patients harboring this mutation and with severe multisystemic and refractory ECD have been treated with vemurafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, which was proved very beneficial. PMID:24532298

  1. Inflammatory bowel disease and airway diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vutcovici, Maria; Brassard, Paul; Bitton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Airway diseases are the most commonly described lung manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the similarities in disease pathogenesis and the sharing of important environmental risk factors and genetic susceptibility suggest that there is a complex interplay between IBD and airway diseases. Recent evidence of IBD occurrence among patients with airway diseases and the higher than estimated prevalence of subclinical airway injuries among IBD patients support the hypothesis of a two-way association. Future research efforts should be directed toward further exploration of this association, as airway diseases are highly prevalent conditions with a substantial public health impact. PMID:27678355

  2. Association between periodontal diseases and systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, Patrícia; Cimões, Renata; Pannuti, Claudio Mendes; Oppermann, Rui Vicente

    2008-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that periodontal disease may be associated with systemic diseases. This paper reviewed the published data about the relationship between periodontal disease and cardiovascular diseases, adverse pregnancy outcomes, diabetes and respiratory diseases, focusing on studies conducted in the Brazilian population. Only a few studies were found in the literature focusing on Brazilians (3 concerning cardiovascular disease, 7 about pregnancy outcomes, 9 about diabetes and one regarding pneumonia). Although the majority of them observed an association between periodontitis and systemic conditions, a causal relationship still needs to be demonstrated. Further studies, particularly interventional well-designed investigations, with larger sample sizes, need to be conducted in Brazilian populations. PMID:19838549

  3. Inflammatory bowel disease and airway diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vutcovici, Maria; Brassard, Paul; Bitton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Airway diseases are the most commonly described lung manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the similarities in disease pathogenesis and the sharing of important environmental risk factors and genetic susceptibility suggest that there is a complex interplay between IBD and airway diseases. Recent evidence of IBD occurrence among patients with airway diseases and the higher than estimated prevalence of subclinical airway injuries among IBD patients support the hypothesis of a two-way association. Future research efforts should be directed toward further exploration of this association, as airway diseases are highly prevalent conditions with a substantial public health impact.

  4. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with adaptor-related protein complex 1 {mu}1A (AP-1 mu1A)

    SciTech Connect

    Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Junking, Mutita; Ngaojanlar, Piengpaga; Sukomon, Nattakan; Ungsupravate, Duangporn; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Akkarapatumwong, Varaporn; Noisakran, Sansanee; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Trafficking defect of kAE1 is a cause of dRTA but trafficking pathway of kAE1 has not been clearly described. {yields} Adaptor-related protein complex 1 {mu}1A (AP-1 mu1A) was firstly reported to interact with kAE1. {yields} The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXO motif. {yields} AP-1 mu1A knockdown showed a marked reduction of kAE1 on the cell membrane and its accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum. {yields} AP-1 mu1A has a critical role in kAE1 trafficking to the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) mediates chloride (Cl{sup -}) and bicarbonate (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) exchange at the basolateral membrane of kidney {alpha}-intercalated cells. Impaired trafficking of kAE1 leads to defect of the Cl{sup -}/HCO{sub 3}{sup -} exchange at the basolateral membrane and failure of proton (H{sup +}) secretion at the apical membrane, causing a kidney disease - distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). To gain a better insight into kAE1 trafficking, we searched for proteins physically interacting with the C-terminal region of kAE1 (Ct-kAE1), which contains motifs crucial for intracellular trafficking, by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. An adaptor-related protein complex 1 {mu}1A (AP-1 mu1A) subunit was found to interact with Ct-kAE1. The interaction between either Ct-kAE1 or full-length kAE1 and AP-1 mu1A were confirmed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T by co-immunoprecipitation, affinity co-purification, co-localization, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-based protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) and GST pull-down assay. The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXO motif. Interestingly, suppression of endogenous AP-1 mu1A in HEK 293T by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased membrane localization of kAE1 and increased its intracellular accumulation, suggesting for the first time that AP-1 mu1A is involved in the kAE1

  5. Murine lupus susceptibility locus Sle1a requires the expression of two sub-loci to induce inflammatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Cuda, C M; Zeumer, L; Sobel, E S; Croker, B P; Morel, L

    2010-10-01

    The NZM2410-derived Sle1a lupus susceptibility locus induces activated autoreactive CD4(+) T cells and reduces the number and function of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). In this study, we first showed that Sle1a contributes to autoimmunity by increasing antinuclear antibody production when expressed on either NZB or NZW heterozygous genomes, and by enhancing the chronic graft versus host disease response indicating an expansion of the autoreactive B-cell pool. Screening two non-overlapping recombinants, the Sle1a.1 and Sle1a.2 intervals that cover the entire Sle1a locus, revealed that both Sle1a.1 and Sle1a.2 were necessary for the full Sle1a phenotype. Sle1a.1, and to a lesser extent Sle1a.2, significantly affected CD4(+) T-cell activation as well as Treg differentiation and function. Sle1a.2 also increased the production of autoreactive B cells. As the Sle1a.1 and Sle1a.2 intervals contain only 1 and 15 known genes, respectively, this study considerably reduces the number of candidate genes responsible for the production of autoreactive T cells. These results also show that the Sle1 locus is an excellent model for the genetic architecture of lupus, in which a major obligate phenotype results from the coexpression of multiple genetic variants with individual weak effects.

  6. NEK2 mediates ALDH1A1-dependent drug resistance in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jiliang; Gu, Zhimin; Wendlandt, Erik; Zhan, Xin; Janz, Siegfried; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2014-01-01

    We reported previously that increased expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) in multiple myeloma (MM) is a marker of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) that is further associated with chromosomal instability (CIN). Here we demonstrate that member A1 of the ALDH1 family of proteins, ALDH1A1, is most abundantly expressed in myeloma. Enforced expression of ALDH1A1 in myeloma cells led to increased clonogenicity, tumor formation in mice, and resistance to myeloma drugs in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism underlying these phenotypes included the ALDH1A1-dependent activation of drug-efflux pump, ABCB1, and survival proteins, AKT and BCL2. Over expression of ALDH1A1 in myeloma cells led to increased mRNA and protein levels of NIMA-related kinase 2 (NEK2), whereas shRNA-mediated knock down of NEK2 decreased drug efflux pump activity and drug resistance. The activation of NEK2 in myeloma cells relied on the ALDH1A1-dependent generation of the retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) ligand, 9-cis retinoic acid (9CRA) – not the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) ligand, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). These findings implicate the ALDH1A1-RXRα-NEK2 pathway in drug resistance and disease relapse in myeloma and suggest that specific inhibitors of ALDH1A1 are worthy of consideration for clinical development of new approaches to overcome drug resistance in myeloma. PMID:25230277

  7. Higd1a is a positive regulator of cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Takaharu; Asano, Yoshihiro; Shintani, Yasunori; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Kioka, Hidetaka; Tsukamoto, Osamu; Hikita, Masahide; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Takafuji, Kazuaki; Higo, Shuichiro; Kato, Hisakazu; Yamazaki, Satoru; Matsuoka, Ken; Nakano, Atsushi; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Asakura, Masanori; Minamino, Tetsuo; Goto, Yu-ichi; Ogura, Takashi; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Komuro, Issei; Sakata, Yasushi; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Takashima, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is the only enzyme that uses oxygen to produce a proton gradient for ATP production during mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Although CcO activity increases in response to hypoxia, the underlying regulatory mechanism remains elusive. By screening for hypoxia-inducible genes in cardiomyocytes, we identified hypoxia inducible domain family, member 1A (Higd1a) as a positive regulator of CcO. Recombinant Higd1a directly integrated into highly purified CcO and increased its activity. Resonance Raman analysis revealed that Higd1a caused structural changes around heme a, the active center that drives the proton pump. Using a mitochondria-targeted ATP biosensor, we showed that knockdown of endogenous Higd1a reduced oxygen consumption and subsequent mitochondrial ATP synthesis, leading to increased cell death in response to hypoxia; all of these phenotypes were rescued by exogenous Higd1a. These results suggest that Higd1a is a previously unidentified regulatory component of CcO, and represents a therapeutic target for diseases associated with reduced CcO activity. PMID:25605899

  8. The Arabidopsis DJ-1a protein confers stress protection through cytosolic SOD activation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiang Ming; Lin, Hong; Maple, Jodi; Björkblom, Benny; Alves, Guido; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2010-05-15

    Mutations in the DJ-1 gene (also known as PARK7) cause inherited Parkinson's disease, which is characterized by neuronal death. Although DJ-1 is thought to be an antioxidant protein, the underlying mechanism by which loss of DJ-1 function contributes to cell death is unclear. Human DJ-1 and its Arabidopsis thaliana homologue, AtDJ-1a, are evolutionarily conserved proteins, indicating a universal function. To gain further knowledge of the molecular features associated with DJ-1 dysfunction, we have characterized AtDJ-1a. We show that AtDJ-1a levels are responsive to stress treatment and that AtDJ-1a loss of function results in accelerated cell death in aging plants. By contrast, transgenic plants with elevated AtDJ-1a levels have increased protection against environmental stress conditions, such as strong light, H(2)O(2), methyl viologen and copper sulfate. We further identify superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and glutathione peroxidase 2 (GPX2) as interaction partners of both AtDJ-1a and human DJ-1, and show that this interaction results in AtDJ-1a- and DJ-1-mediated cytosolic SOD1 activation in a copper-dependent fashion. Our data have highlighted a conserved molecular mechanism for DJ-1 and revealed a new protein player in the oxidative stress response of plants. PMID:20406884

  9. Nuclear Localization of the Mitochondrial Factor HIGD1A during Metabolic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ameri, Kurosh; Rajah, Anthony M.; Nguyen, Vien; Sanders, Timothy A.; Jahangiri, Arman; DeLay, Michael; Donne, Matthew; Choi, Hwa J.; Tormos, Kathryn V.; Yeghiazarians, Yerem; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Rinaudo, Paolo F.; Rowitch, David H.; Aghi, Manish; Maltepe, Emin

    2013-01-01

    Cellular stress responses are frequently governed by the subcellular localization of critical effector proteins. Apoptosis-inducing Factor (AIF) or Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH), for example, can translocate from mitochondria to the nucleus, where they modulate apoptotic death pathways. Hypoxia-inducible gene domain 1A (HIGD1A) is a mitochondrial protein regulated by Hypoxia-inducible Factor-1α (HIF1α). Here we show that while HIGD1A resides in mitochondria during physiological hypoxia, severe metabolic stress, such as glucose starvation coupled with hypoxia, in addition to DNA damage induced by etoposide, triggers its nuclear accumulation. We show that nuclear localization of HIGD1A overlaps with that of AIF, and is dependent on the presence of BAX and BAK. Furthermore, we show that AIF and HIGD1A physically interact. Additionally, we demonstrate that nuclear HIGD1A is a potential marker of metabolic stress in vivo, frequently observed in diverse pathological states such as myocardial infarction, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), and different types of cancer. In summary, we demonstrate a novel nuclear localization of HIGD1A that is commonly observed in human disease processes in vivo. PMID:23646141

  10. The TNF-Family Cytokine TL1A Promotes Allergic Immunopathology through Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meylan, Françoise; Hawley, Eric T.; Barron, Luke; Barlow, Jillian L.; Penumetcha, Pallavi; Pelletier, Martin; Sciumè, Giuseppe; Richard, Arianne C.; Hayes, Erika T.; Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; Chen, Xi; Paul, William E.; Wynn, Thomas A.; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.; Siegel, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The TNF-family cytokine TL1A (TNFSF15) costimulates T cells and promotes diverse T-cell dependent models of autoimmune disease through its receptor DR3. TL1A polymorphisms also confer susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease. Here we find that allergic pathology driven by constitutive TL1A expression depends on IL-13, but not T, NKT, mast cells or commensal intestinal flora. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) express surface DR3 and produce IL-13 and other type 2 cytokines in response to TL1A. DR3 is required for ILC2 expansion and function in the setting of T cell dependent and independent models of allergic disease. By contrast, DR3 deficient ILC2 can still differentiate, expand and produce IL-13 when stimulated by IL-25 or IL-33, and mediate expulsion of intestinal helminths. These data identify costimulation of ILC2 as a novel function of TL1A important for allergic lung disease, and suggest that TL1A may be a therapeutic target in these settings. PMID:24368564

  11. The Ã1A'- X˜1A' single vibronic level fluorescence spectrum of styrene vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollas, J. Michael; Ridley, Trevor

    1981-09-01

    Single vibronic level (SVL) fluorescence spectra following excitation into the 0 00 band and many sequence and cross-sequence bands in the Ã1A'- X˜1A' system of styrene have been recorded and assigned. The technique is shown to be very powerful in obtaining accurate energy levels for low-wavenumber vibrations, particularly in the X˜ state, where it is capable of giving information regarding vibrational levels inaccessible by conventional infrared or Raman spectroscopy. Interpretation of the spectra leads to many new assignments in the absorption spectrum and to an accurate knowledge of many vibrational energy levels. An important reassignment is that of the 41 0142 01 band previously assigned to 40 02 ( ν40, ν41, and ν42 are all a″ vibrations). The two most important pieces of information which derive from analysis of the SVL spectra are (a) the first five vibrational levels of ν42, the C(1)- C( α) torsional vibration, in the X˜ state, each accurate to about ±0.2 cm -1, and (b) the fact that the normal coordinates of ν42 and ν41, an out-of-plane substituent vibration, are very heavily mixed in the Ã, relative to the X˜, state—an extreme case of the Duschinsky effect. As a result of analysis of the SVL spectra, analysis of the absorption spectrum is now so complete that we can be confident that the Hui and Rice proposal that the CH 2 group of the substituent is perpendicular to the plane of the rest of the molecule in the à state has no evidence to support it.

  12. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  13. High frequency of mutations in codon 98 of the peripheral myelin protein Po gene in 20 French CMT1 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Rougher, H.; LeGuern, E. Gouider, R.

    1996-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, characterized by distal muscle weakness and amyotrophy, decreased or absent tendon reflexes, and high arched feet, is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy, with a prevalence of 1 in 2,500. Two types of CMT have been distinguished on the basis of nerve conduction velocities. CMT type 1 is the most frequent, with markedly slowed velocities ({<=}40 m/s) associated with hypertrophic onion bulb changes on nerve biopsy. Autosomal dominant CMT1 is genetically heterogeneous: CMT1A is caused by a 1.5-Mb duplication in 17p11.2 and, more rarely, by a point mutation in tha PMP22 (peripheral myelin protein, 22 kD) gene located in the duplicated region; CMT1B results from mutations in the Po (peripheral myelin protein zero) gene in 1q22-23. Forty-five percent (7/16) of the published mutations associated with CMT1 occur in exon 3 of Po. In order to determine the cause of CMT1 in 20 unrelated patients without 17p11.2 duplications, mutations were sought in exon 3 of Po with three techniques: nonradioactive SSCP, automated sequencing, and PCR enzymatic restriction. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  14. A Mutation in PMP2 Causes Dominant Demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Young Se; Kwak, Geon; Choi, Yu-Ri; Yeo, Ha Kyung; Jwa, Dong Hwan; Kim, Eun Ja; Mo, Won Min; Nam, Soo Hyun; Kim, Sung Min; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Koo, Heasoo; Park, Hwan Tae; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies with diverse genetic causes. In this study, we identified p.I43N mutation in PMP2 from a family exhibiting autosomal dominant demyelinating CMT neuropathy by whole exome sequencing and characterized the clinical features. The age at onset was the first to second decades and muscle atrophy started in the distal portion of the leg. Predominant fatty replacement in the anterior and lateral compartment was similar to that in CMT1A caused by PMP22 duplication. Sural nerve biopsy showed onion bulbs and degenerating fibers with various myelin abnormalities. The relevance of PMP2 mutation as a genetic cause of dominant CMT1 was assessed using transgenic mouse models. Transgenic mice expressing wild type or mutant (p.I43N) PMP2 exhibited abnormal motor function. Electrophysiological data revealed that both mice had reduced motor nerve conduction velocities (MNCV). Electron microscopy revealed that demyelinating fibers and internodal lengths were shortened in both transgenic mice. These data imply that overexpression of wild type as well as mutant PMP2 also causes the CMT1 phenotype, which has been documented in the PMP22. This report might expand the genetic and clinical features of CMT and a further mechanism study will enhance our understanding of PMP2-associated peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26828946

  15. Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) Subtypes and Genetic Testing Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Anita S.D.; Sottile, Stephanie L.; Miller, Lindsey J.; Feely, Shawna M.E.; Siskind, Carly E; Shy, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) affects one in 2500 people and is caused by mutations in more than 30 genes. Identifying the genetic cause of CMT is often necessary for family planning, natural history studies and for entry into clinical trials. However genetic testing can be both expensive and confusing to patients and physicians. Methods We analyzed data from 1024 of our patients to determine the percentage and features of each CMT subtype within this clinic population. We identified distinguishing clinical and physiological features of the subtypes that could be used to direct genetic testing for patients with CMT. Findings Of 1024 patients evaluated, 787 received CMT diagnoses. Five hundred twenty-seven patients with CMT (67%) received a genetic subtype, while 260 did not have a mutation identified. The most common CMT subtypes were CMT1A, CMT1X, HNPP, CMT1B, and CMT2A. All other subtypes accounted for less than 1% each. Eleven patients had more than one genetically identified subtype of CMT. Patients with genetically identified CMT were separable into specific groups based on age of onset and the degree of slowing of motor nerve conduction velocities. Interpretation Combining features of the phenotypic and physiology groups allowed us to identify patients who were highly likely to have specific subtypes of CMT. Based on these results, we propose a strategy of focused genetic testing for CMT illustrated in a series of flow diagrams created as testing guides. PMID:21280073

  16. Treatment of Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mission Statement Press Releases 2015 CSA Youth Ambassador PEER Grants Awarded Bountiful Pantry DNI Group, LLC Earth ... for Celiac Disease International Symposium Celiac Disease 2013 Peer Review Research Application History of Gluten Induced Diseases ...

  17. Lipid Storage Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Lipid Storage Diseases Information Page Condensed from Lipid Storage ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Lipid Storage Diseases? Lipid storage diseases are a group ...

  18. Tay-Sachs Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... metabolic disease caused by the harmful buildup of lipids (fatty materials such as oils and acids) in ... management, and therapy of rare diseases, including the lipid storage diseases. Additional research funded by the NINDS ...

  19. Tay-Sachs Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Tay-Sachs disease is a rare, inherited disease. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. It causes too ... cells, causing mental and physical problems. . Infants with Tay-Sachs disease appear to develop normally for the first few ...

  20. Sickle Cell Disease Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... False: People with sickle cell disease cannot get malaria. A True B False 4. True or False: ... False: People with sickle cell disease cannot get malaria. False People with sickle cell disease can get ...

  1. Digestive Diseases Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIDDK Health Information NIDDK Home NIDDK Image Library Digestive Disease, Nutrition, and Weight-control Materials Healthy eating, ... Materials Statistics Tip Sheets Catalog Home | Diabetes Materials | Digestive Diseases Materials | Kidney and Urologic Diseases Materials Online ...

  2. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  3. Parkinson disease - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads to ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may come ...

  4. Peripheral Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Center Back to previous page En español Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy ... blockage including peripheral artery disease or PAD Aortic aneurysms Buerger's Disease Raynaud's Phenomenon Disease of the veins ...

  5. Fibrocystic breast disease

    MedlinePlus

    Fibrocystic breast disease; Mammary dysplasia; Diffuse cystic mastopathy; Benign breast disease; Glandular breast changes ... FF, Fort GG, et al, eds. Fibrocystic breast disease. In: Ferri FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015 . ...

  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    COPD; Chronic obstructive airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... can do to relieve symptoms and keep the disease from getting worse. If you smoke, now is ...

  7. Ebola Virus Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Fact sheets Features Commentaries 2014 Multimedia Contacts Ebola virus disease Fact sheet Updated January 2016 Key ... for survivors of Ebola virus disease Symptoms of Ebola virus disease The incubation period, that is, the ...

  8. Lyme disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to the ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a deer ...

  9. Kidney disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - kidney disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on kidney disease: National Kidney Disease Education Program -- www.nkdep.nih.gov National Kidney Foundation -- www.kidney.org National ...

  10. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease

  11. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs ...

  12. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Kidney Disease What are my kidneys and ... urine until releasing it through urination. How can diabetes affect my kidneys? Too much glucose , also called ...

  13. Adult Still's disease

    MedlinePlus

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  14. 26 CFR 1.148-1A - Definitions and elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definitions and elections. 1.148-1A Section 1.148-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX....148-1A Definitions and elections. (a) . For guidance see § 1.148-1. (b) Certain...

  15. 26 CFR 1.148-1A - Definitions and elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definitions and elections. 1.148-1A Section 1.148-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX....148-1A Definitions and elections. (a) . For guidance see § 1.148-1. (b) Certain...

  16. 26 CFR 1.148-1A - Definitions and elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definitions and elections. 1.148-1A Section 1.148-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX....148-1A Definitions and elections. (a) . For guidance see § 1.148-1. (b) Certain...

  17. 26 CFR 1.148-1A - Definitions and elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions and elections. 1.148-1A Section 1.148-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX....148-1A Definitions and elections. (a) . For guidance see § 1.148-1. (b) Certain...

  18. 7 CFR 1a.5 - Responsibility of the Inspector General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibility of the Inspector General. 1a.5 Section 1a.5 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture LAW ENFORCEMENT AUTHORITIES § 1a.5 Responsibility of the Inspector General. The Inspector General shall: (a) Issue directives conforming to...

  19. Cholestatic liver disease masquerading as Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Sood, Vikrant; Rawat, Dinesh; Khanna, Rajeev; Alam, Seema

    2015-03-01

    Wilson disease and cholestatic liver diseases may present as a diagnostic dilemma if standard guidelines incorporating markers of copper overload are followed. We hereby present a series of four cases of sclerosing cholangitis masquerading as Wilson disease. True Wilson disease cases had significantly lower ceruloplasmin (6 vs. 16 mg/dL) and higher 24-hour urinary copper (322.3 vs. 74.5 μg/day) as compared to mimickers. Initial low serum ceruloplasmin levels normalized in mimickers on follow up, and this may used as a diagnostic indicator. Standard Wilson disease diagnostic criteria thus need further modification especially in developing countries to help avoid mismanagement.

  20. Atheroembolic renal disease

    MedlinePlus

    Renal disease - atheroembolic; Cholesterol embolization syndrome; Atheroemboli - renal; Atherosclerotic disease - renal ... disorder of the arteries. It occurs when fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up in the walls ...

  1. Wt1a, Foxc1a, and the Notch mediator Rbpj Physically Interact and Regulate the Formation of Podocytes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Lori L.; Grimaldi, Michael; Kostun, Zachary; Wingert, Rebecca A.; Selleck, Rori; Davidson, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Podocytes help form the glomerular blood filtration barrier in the kidney and their injury or loss leads to renal disease. The Wilms’ tumor suppressor-1 (Wt1) and the FoxC1/2 transcription factors, as well as Notch signaling, have been implicated as important regulators of podocyte fate. It is not known whether these factors work in parallel or sequentially on different gene targets, or as higher-order transcriptional complexes on common genes. Here, we use the zebrafish to demonstrate that embryos treated with morpholinos against wt1a, foxc1a, or the Notch transcriptional mediator rbpj develop fewer podocytes, as determined by wt1b, hey1 and nephrin expression, while embryos deficient in any two of these factors completely lack podocytes. From GST-pull-downs and co-immunoprecipitation experiments we show that Wt1a, Foxc1a, and Rbpj can physically interact with each other, whereas only Rbpj binds to the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). In transactivation assays, combinations of Wt1, FoxC1/2, and NICD synergistically induce the Hey1 promoter, and have additive or repressive effects on the Podocalyxin promoter, depending on dosage. Taken together, these data suggest that Wt1, FoxC1/2, and Notch signaling converge on common target genes where they physically interact to regulate a podocyte-specific gene program. These findings further our understanding of the transcriptional circuitry responsible for podocyte formation and differentiation during kidney development. PMID:21871448

  2. The phylogeography of Y-chromosome haplogroup h1a1a-m82 reveals the likely Indian origin of the European Romani populations.

    PubMed

    Rai, Niraj; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Tamang, Rakesh; Pathak, Ajai Kumar; Singh, Vipin Kumar; Karmin, Monika; Singh, Manvendra; Rani, Deepa Selvi; Anugula, Sharath; Yadav, Brijesh Kumar; Singh, Ashish; Srinivasagan, Ramkumar; Yadav, Anita; Kashyap, Manju; Narvariya, Sapna; Reddy, Alla G; van Driem, George; Underhill, Peter A; Villems, Richard; Kivisild, Toomas; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2012-01-01

    Linguistic and genetic studies on Roma populations inhabited in Europe have unequivocally traced these populations to the Indian subcontinent. However, the exact parental population group and time of the out-of-India dispersal have remained disputed. In the absence of archaeological records and with only scanty historical documentation of the Roma, comparative linguistic studies were the first to identify their Indian origin. Recently, molecular studies on the basis of disease-causing mutations and haploid DNA markers (i.e. mtDNA and Y-chromosome) supported the linguistic view. The presence of Indian-specific Y-chromosome haplogroup H1a1a-M82 and mtDNA haplogroups M5a1, M18 and M35b among Roma has corroborated that their South Asian origins and later admixture with Near Eastern and European populations. However, previous studies have left unanswered questions about the exact parental population groups in South Asia. Here we present a detailed phylogeographical study of Y-chromosomal haplogroup H1a1a-M82 in a data set of more than 10,000 global samples to discern a more precise ancestral source of European Romani populations. The phylogeographical patterns and diversity estimates indicate an early origin of this haplogroup in the Indian subcontinent and its further expansion to other regions. Tellingly, the short tandem repeat (STR) based network of H1a1a-M82 lineages displayed the closest connection of Romani haplotypes with the traditional scheduled caste and scheduled tribe population groups of northwestern India.

  3. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with adaptor-related protein complex 1 μ1A (AP-1 mu1A).

    PubMed

    Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Junking, Mutita; Ngaojanlar, Piengpaga; Sukomon, Nattakan; Ungsupravate, Duangporn; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Akkarapatumwong, Varaporn; Noisakran, Sansanee; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai

    2010-10-01

    Kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) mediates chloride (Cl⁻) and bicarbonate (HCO₃⁻) exchange at the basolateral membrane of kidney α-intercalated cells. Impaired trafficking of kAE1 leads to defect of the Cl⁻/HCO₃⁻ exchange at the basolateral membrane and failure of proton (H+) secretion at the apical membrane, causing a kidney disease--distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). To gain a better insight into kAE1 trafficking, we searched for proteins physically interacting with the C-terminal region of kAE1 (Ct-kAE1), which contains motifs crucial for intracellular trafficking, by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. An adaptor-related protein complex 1 μ1A (AP-1 mu1A) subunit was found to interact with Ct-kAE1. The interaction between either Ct-kAE1 or full-length kAE1 and AP-1 mu1A were confirmed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T by co-immunoprecipitation, affinity co-purification, co-localization, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-based protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) and GST pull-down assay. The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXØ motif. Interestingly, suppression of endogenous AP-1 mu1A in HEK 293T by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased membrane localization of kAE1 and increased its intracellular accumulation, suggesting for the first time that AP-1 mu1A is involved in the kAE1 trafficking of kidney α-intercalated cells. PMID:20833140

  4. The Phylogeography of Y-Chromosome Haplogroup H1a1a-M82 Reveals the Likely Indian Origin of the European Romani Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ajai Kumar; Singh, Vipin Kumar; Karmin, Monika; Singh, Manvendra; Rani, Deepa Selvi; Anugula, Sharath; Yadav, Brijesh Kumar; Singh, Ashish; Srinivasagan, Ramkumar; Yadav, Anita; Kashyap, Manju; Narvariya, Sapna; Reddy, Alla G.; Underhill, Peter A.; Villems, Richard; Kivisild, Toomas; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2012-01-01

    Linguistic and genetic studies on Roma populations inhabited in Europe have unequivocally traced these populations to the Indian subcontinent. However, the exact parental population group and time of the out-of-India dispersal have remained disputed. In the absence of archaeological records and with only scanty historical documentation of the Roma, comparative linguistic studies were the first to identify their Indian origin. Recently, molecular studies on the basis of disease-causing mutations and haploid DNA markers (i.e. mtDNA and Y-chromosome) supported the linguistic view. The presence of Indian-specific Y-chromosome haplogroup H1a1a-M82 and mtDNA haplogroups M5a1, M18 and M35b among Roma has corroborated that their South Asian origins and later admixture with Near Eastern and European populations. However, previous studies have left unanswered questions about the exact parental population groups in South Asia. Here we present a detailed phylogeographical study of Y-chromosomal haplogroup H1a1a-M82 in a data set of more than 10,000 global samples to discern a more precise ancestral source of European Romani populations. The phylogeographical patterns and diversity estimates indicate an early origin of this haplogroup in the Indian subcontinent and its further expansion to other regions. Tellingly, the short tandem repeat (STR) based network of H1a1a-M82 lineages displayed the closest connection of Romani haplotypes with the traditional scheduled caste and scheduled tribe population groups of northwestern India. PMID:23209554

  5. [UGT1A1 Genotyping for Proper Use of Irinotecan].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Ayumu; Ando, Yuichi

    2015-07-01

    Irinotecan is a camptothecin analog used worldwide for a broad range of solid tumors, including colorectal and lung cancers. It can cause severe adverse drug reactions, such as neutropenia or diarrhea. Irinotecan is metabolized to form active SN-38, which is further conjugated and detoxified by the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 enzyme. Recent pharmacogenetic studies on irinotecan have revealed the impact of UGT1A1 polymorphisms on severe adverse effects. A variant in the promoter of the UGT1A1 gene, the UGT1A1 *28 allele, has been extensively studied, and pharmacogenetic relationships between the variant and severe toxicities of irinotecan have been reported. The US FDA and pharmaceutical companies revised the irinotecan label in 2005, and it now includes homozygosity for the UGT1A1*28 genotype as one of the risk factors for severe neutropenia. A variant in exon 1 of the UGT1A1 gene, the UGT1A1*6 allele, mainly found in East Asians, is also an important risk factor associated with severe neutropenia. The concurrence of UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A1*6, even when heterozygous, markedly alters the disposition of irinotecan, potentially increasing toxicity, which is now written on the label of irinotecan in Japan. For patients showing homozygosity for UGT1A1*28, *6, or compound heterozygosity for UGT1A1*6 and *28, dose reduction of irinotecan is strongly recommended. Genotyping tests for UGT1A1 *6 and *28 have been approved in Japan and are currently used in oncology practice. Moreover, a recent Phase 2 trial for FOLFIRINOX in Japan excluded patients who showed homozygosity for UGT1A1*28, *6, or compound heterozygosity for UGT1A1*6 and *28. At present, irinotecan chemotherapy based on a patient's UGT1A1 genetic status is scientifically reasonable. PMID:26591441

  6. A novel SCN1A mutation associated with severe GEFS+ in a large South American pedigree.

    PubMed

    Pineda-Trujillo, N; Carrizosa, J; Cornejo, W; Arias, W; Franco, C; Cabrera, D; Bedoya, G; Ruíz-Linares, A

    2005-03-01

    Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is an inherited epileptic syndrome with a marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Here we report the molecular characterization of a large pedigree with a severe clinical form of GEFS+. Genetic linkage analysis implied the involvement of the FEB3 in the disease phenotype of this family (parametric two-point lod-score of 2.2). Sequencing of the SCN1A gene revealed a novel aspartic acid for glycine substitution at position 1742 of this sodium channel subunit. The amino-acid replacement lies in the pore-forming region of domain IV of SCN1A. Our observations are consistent with the genotype-phenotype correlation studies suggesting that mutations in the pore-forming loop of SCN1A can lead to a clinically more severe epileptic syndrome. PMID:15694566

  7. Accurate identification of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) inhibitors using UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua; Zhou, Xiaotong; Wu, Baojian

    2015-01-01

    1. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) plays an irreplaceable role in detoxification of bilirubin and many drugs (e.g., SN-38). Here we aimed to explore the potential of UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells (or HeLa1A1 cells) as a tool to accurately identify UGT1A1 inhibitors. 2. Determination of glucuronidation rates (β-estradiol and SN-38 as the substrates) was performed using HeLa1A1 cells and uridine diphosphoglucuronic acid (UDPGA)-supplemented cDNA expressed UGT1A1 enzyme (or microsomes). The inhibitory effects (IC50 values) of 20 structurally diverse compounds on the UGT1A1 activity were determined using HeLa1A1 cells and microsomal incubations. 3. In HeLa1A1 cells, the IC50 values for inhibition of β-estradiol glucuronidation by the tested compounds ranged from 0.33 to 94.6 µM. In the microsomal incubations, the IC50 values ranged from 0.47 to 155 µM. It was found that the IC50 values of all test compounds derived from the cells were well consistent with those from the microsomes (deviated by less than two-fold). Further, the IC50 values from the cells were strongly correlated with those from microsomes (r = 0.944, p < 0.001). Likewise, the IC50 values (0.37-77.3 µM) for inhibition of SN-38 glucuronidation in the cells were close to those (0.42-122 µM) for glucuronidation inhibition in microsomes. A strong correlation was also observed between the two sets of IC50 values (r = 0.978, p < 0.001). 4. In conclusion, UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells were an appropriate tool to accurately depict the inhibition profiles of chemicals against UGT1A1. PMID:26068529

  8. Mapping of the gene for the Mel{sub 1a}-melatonin receptor to human chromosome 4 (MTNR1A) and mouse chromosome 8 (Mtnr1a)

    SciTech Connect

    Slaugenhaupt, S.A. |; Liebert, C.B.; Altherr, M.R.

    1995-05-20

    The pineal hormone melatonin elicits potent circadian and reproductive effects in mammals. The authors report the chromosomal location of the gene for the Mel{sub 1a}-melatonin receptor that likely mediates these circadian and reproductive actions. PCR analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids showed that the receptor gene (MTNR1A) maps to human chromosome 4q35.1. An interspecific backcross analysis revealed that the mouse gene (Mtnr1a) maps to the proximal portion of chromosome 8. These loci may be involved in genetically based circadian and neuroendocrine disorders. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene polymorphisms: susceptibility to oxidative damage and cancer?

    PubMed

    Grant, D J; Bell, D A

    2000-12-01

    The UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene product catalyzes the glucuronidation of serum bilirubin as part of normal heme catabolism. Recently, TA repeat polymorphisms containing five, six, seven, and eight TA dinucleotides in a putative TATA box in the promoter region of the UGT1A1 gene have been described. TA repeat number modulates UGT1A1 transcriptional activity and the quantity of enzyme available to conjugate serum bilirubin. Serum bilirubin is a known antioxidant, and low serum bilirubin has been associated with increased risk for coronary artery disease and inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced damage to erythrocytes in vitro. We hypothesize that the UGT1A1 TA repeats or other functional polymorphisms resulting in lower serum bilirubin levels may be predictive of genetic susceptibility to oxidative damage and cancer. Exposure-related or endogenous production of ROS may impact the integrity of cellular macromolecules and infrastructure, lead to DNA base changes or chromosomal aberrations, and induce toxicity or apoptosis. ROS damage to lipoproteins may be a factor in formation of atherogenic plaques in coronary heart disease. Thus, cellular oxidative stress could contribute to tumorigenesis through mutagenic or epigenetic pathways, and higher serum bilirubin levels should inhibit this process. No definitive studies have been performed, but in a small prospective study of colon cancer, serum bilirubin levels were observed to be lower in these cases. Another study has suggested a link between UGT1A1 alleles, estrogen metabolism, and risk in breast cancer. Epidemiologic studies examining variation in ROS metabolism, ROS damage, bilirubin, and cancer risk will demonstrate the value of this hypothesis. PMID:11170257

  10. Strong synergistic induction of CYP1A1 expression by andrographolide plus typical CYP1A inducers in mouse hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaruchotikamol, Atika; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan Sirisangtrakul, Wanna; Sakuma, Tsutomu; Kawasaki, Yuki; Nemoto, Nobuo

    2007-10-15

    The effects of andrographolide, the major diterpenoid constituent of Andrographis paniculata, on the expression of cytochrome P450 superfamily 1 members, including CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1, as well as on aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) expression in primary cultures of mouse hepatocytes were investigated in comparison with the effects of typical CYP1A inducers, including benz[a]anthracene, {beta}-naphthoflavone, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. Andrographolide significantly induced the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNAs in a concentration-dependent manner, as did the typical CYP1A inducers, but did not induce that of CYP1B1 or AhR. Interestingly, andrographolide plus the typical CYP1A inducers synergistically induced CYP1A1 expression, and the synergism was blocked by an AhR antagonist, resveratrol. The CYP1A1 enzyme activity showed a similar pattern of induction. This is the first report that shows that andrographolide has a potency to induce CYP1A1 enzyme and indicates that andrographolide could be a very useful compound for investigating the regulatory mechanism of the CYP1A1 induction pathway. In addition, our findings suggest preparing advice for rational administration of A. paniculata, according to its ability to induce CYP1A1 expression.

  11. The Growth and Tumor Suppressors NORE1A and RASSF1A Are Targets for Calpain-Mediated Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Sergey; Khokhlatchev, Andrei V.

    2008-01-01

    Background NORE1A and RASSF1A are growth and tumour suppressors inactivated in a variety of cancers. Methylation of NORE1A and RASSF1A promoters is the predominant mechanism for downregulation of these proteins; however, other mechanisms are likely to exist. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a proteolysis of NORE1A and RASSF1A by calpains as alternative mechanism of their downregulation. Extracts of H358 cell line, a human bronchoalveolar carcinoma, and H460, a large cell carcinoma, were capable of proteolysis of NORE1A protein in the calpain-dependent manner. Likewise, RASSF1A tumor suppressor was proteolyzed by the H358 cell extract. Addition of calpain inhibitor to H358 and H460 cells growing in tissue culture resulted in re-expression of endogenous NORE1A. A survey of 10 human lung tumours revealed that three of them contain an activity capable of inducing NORE1A degradation. Conclusions/Significance Thus, degradation by calpains is a novel mechanism for downregulation of NORE1A and RASSF1A proteins and might be the mechanism allowing cancer cells to escape growth suppression. PMID:19098985

  12. Effects of Hypoxia Exposure on Hepatic Cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) Expression in Atlantic Croaker: Molecular Mechanisms of CYP1A Down-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Saydur; Thomas, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α) and cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) are biomarkers of environmental exposure to hypoxia and organic xenobiotic chemicals that act through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, respectively. Many aquatic environments heavily contaminated with organic chemicals, such as harbors, are also hypoxic. Recently, we and other scientists reported HIF-α genes are upregulated by hypoxia exposure in aquatic organisms, but the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia regulation of CYP1A expression have not been investigated in teleost fishes. As a first step in understanding the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia modulation of CYP1A expression in fish, we characterized CYP1A cDNA from croaker liver. Hypoxia exposure (dissolved oxygen, DO: 1.7 mg/L for 2 to 4 weeks) caused significant decreases in hepatic CYP1A mRNA and protein levels compared to CYP1A levels in fish held in normoxic conditions. In vivo studies showed that the nitric oxide (NO)-donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine, significantly decreased CYP1A expression in croaker livers, whereas the competitive inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS), Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, restored CYP1A mRNA and protein levels in hypoxia-exposed (1.7 mg DO/L for 4 weeks) fish. In vivo hypoxia exposure also markedly increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β, a cytokine), HIF-2α mRNA and endothelial NOS (eNOS) protein levels in croaker livers. Pharmacological treatment with vitamin E, an antioxidant, lowered the IL-1β, HIF-2α mRNA and eNOS protein levels in hypoxia-exposed fish and completely reversed the down-regulation of hepatic CYP1A mRNA and protein levels in response to hypoxia exposure. These results suggest that hypoxia-induced down-regulation of CYP1A is due to alterations of NO and oxidant status, and cellular IL-1β and HIF-α levels. Moreover, the present study provides the first evidence of a role for antioxidants in hepatic eNOS and IL-1β regulation in aquatic vertebrates during hypoxic stress. PMID:22815834

  13. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  14. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sames, Lori; Moore, Allison; Arnold, Renee; Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN) is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL) assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN) could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF), Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF), The Neuropathy Association (TNA) and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM) can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies, we can

  15. Effects of β-Naphthoflavone on Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 Expression in Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Yukiko; Katoh, Miki; Kondo, Yuya; Nadai, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) catalyzes a major phase II reaction in a drug-metabolizing enzyme system. Although the UGT1A subfamily is expressed mainly in the liver, it is also expressed in the brain. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the effect of β-naphthoflavone (BNF), one of the major inducers of drug-metabolizing enzymes, on Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 mRNA expression and their glucuronidation in the rat brain. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated intraperitoneally with BNF (80 mg/kg), once daily for 7 d. Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 mRNA expression increased in the cerebellum and hippocampus (Ugt1a6: 2.1- and 2.3-fold, respectively; Ugt1a7: 1.7- and 2.8-fold, respectively); acetaminophen glucuronidation also increased in the same regions by 4.1- and 2.7-fold, respectively. BNF induced Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 mRNA expression and their glucuronidation, and the degree of induction differed among 9 regions. BNF also upregulated CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1 mRNAs in the rat brain. Since the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway was activated by BNF, it is indicated that Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 were induced via AhR in the rat brain. This study clarified that Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 mRNA expression and their enzyme activities were altered by BNF, suggesting that these changes may lead to alteration in the pharmacokinetics of UGT substrate in rat brain. PMID:26725430

  16. Effects of β-Naphthoflavone on Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 Expression in Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Yukiko; Katoh, Miki; Kondo, Yuya; Nadai, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) catalyzes a major phase II reaction in a drug-metabolizing enzyme system. Although the UGT1A subfamily is expressed mainly in the liver, it is also expressed in the brain. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the effect of β-naphthoflavone (BNF), one of the major inducers of drug-metabolizing enzymes, on Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 mRNA expression and their glucuronidation in the rat brain. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated intraperitoneally with BNF (80 mg/kg), once daily for 7 d. Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 mRNA expression increased in the cerebellum and hippocampus (Ugt1a6: 2.1- and 2.3-fold, respectively; Ugt1a7: 1.7- and 2.8-fold, respectively); acetaminophen glucuronidation also increased in the same regions by 4.1- and 2.7-fold, respectively. BNF induced Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 mRNA expression and their glucuronidation, and the degree of induction differed among 9 regions. BNF also upregulated CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1 mRNAs in the rat brain. Since the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway was activated by BNF, it is indicated that Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 were induced via AhR in the rat brain. This study clarified that Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 mRNA expression and their enzyme activities were altered by BNF, suggesting that these changes may lead to alteration in the pharmacokinetics of UGT substrate in rat brain.

  17. Mutations in the gene encoding KRIT1, a Krev-1/rap1a binding protein, cause cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM1).

    PubMed

    Sahoo, T; Johnson, E W; Thomas, J W; Kuehl, P M; Jones, T L; Dokken, C G; Touchman, J W; Gallione, C J; Lee-Lin, S Q; Kosofsky, B; Kurth, J H; Louis, D N; Mettler, G; Morrison, L; Gil-Nagel, A; Rich, S S; Zabramski, J M; Boguski, M S; Green, E D; Marchuk, D A

    1999-11-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are congenital vascular anomalies of the brain that can cause significant neurological disabilities, including intractable seizures and hemorrhagic stroke. One locus for autosomal dominant CCM ( CCM1 ) maps to chromosome 7q21-q22. Recombination events in linked family members define a critical region of approximately 2 Mb and a shared disease haplotype associated with a presumed founder effect in families of Mexican-American descent points to a potentially smaller region of interest. Using a genomic sequence-based positional cloning strategy, we have identified KRIT1, encoding a protein that interacts with the Krev-1/rap1a tumor suppressor, as the CCM1 gene. Seven different KRIT1 mutations have been identified in 23 distinct CCM1 families. The identical mutation is present in 16 of 21 Mexican-American families analyzed, substantiating a founder effect in this population. Other Mexican-American and non-Hispanic Caucasian CCM1 kindreds harbor other KRIT1 mutations. Identification of a common Mexican-American mutation has potential clinical significance for presymptomatic diagnosis of CCM in this population. In addition, these data point to a key role for the Krev-1/rap1a signaling pathway in angiogenesis and cerebrovascular disease.

  18. The integrated disease network.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Buchan, Natalie; Larminie, Chris; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-11-01

    The growing body of transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic and genomic data generated from disease states provides a great opportunity to improve our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving diseases and shared between diseases. The use of both clinical and molecular phenotypes will lead to better disease understanding and classification. In this study, we set out to gain novel insights into diseases and their relationships by utilising knowledge gained from system-level molecular data. We integrated different types of biological data including genome-wide association studies data, disease-chemical associations, biological pathways and Gene Ontology annotations into an Integrated Disease Network (IDN), a heterogeneous network where nodes are bio-entities and edges between nodes represent their associations. We also introduced a novel disease similarity measure to infer disease-disease associations from the IDN. Our predicted associations were systemically evaluated against the Medical Subject Heading classification and a statistical measure of disease co-occurrence in PubMed. The strong correlation between our predictions and co-occurrence associations indicated the ability of our approach to recover known disease associations. Furthermore, we presented a case study of Crohn's disease. We demonstrated that our approach not only identified well-established connections between Crohn's disease and other diseases, but also revealed new, interesting connections consistent with emerging literature. Our approach also enabled ready access to the knowledge supporting these new connections, making this a powerful approach for exploring connections between diseases.

  19. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and scarring make it hard to ... air is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among ...

  20. [Wilson's disease: clinical spectrum of liver disease].

    PubMed

    Ochoa Palominos, Alejandra; Ibáñez Samaniego, Luis; Catalina Rodríguez, María-Vega; Pajares Díaz, José; Clemente Ricote, Gerardo

    2013-02-01

    Wilson's disease is a hereditary autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism,characterized by copper accumulation in the liver and brain. This rare entity, which has a broad clinical spectrum, is often difficult to diagnose and should therefore always be suspected in patients with liver disease of unclear cause. We describe two types of manifestation of liver disease in two patients; the first developed fulminant hepatic failure requiring urgent liver transplantation and the second showed advanced chronic liver disease and received standard medical treatment. The objective of this clinical observation is to analyze the diagnosis of Wilson's disease in two patients with distinct onset, illustrating the broad clinical spectrum of the disease, and its treatment.

  1. Cardiovascular disease biomarkers across autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ahearn, Joseph; Shields, Kelly J; Liu, Chau-Ching; Manzi, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is increasingly recognized as a major cause of premature mortality among those with autoimmune disorders. There is an urgent need to identify those patients with autoimmune disease who are at risk for CVD so as to optimize therapeutic intervention and ultimately prevention. Accurate identification, monitoring and stratification of such patients will depend upon a panel of biomarkers of cardiovascular disease. This review will discuss some of the most recent biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases in autoimmune disease, including lipid oxidation, imaging biomarkers to characterize coronary calcium, plaque, and intima media thickness, biomarkers of inflammation and activated complement, genetic markers, endothelial biomarkers, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Clinical implementation of these biomarkers will not only enhance patient care but also likely accelerate the pharmaceutical pipeline for targeted intervention to reduce or eliminate cardiovascular disease in the setting of autoimmunity.

  2. Orally administered extract from Prunella vulgaris attenuates spontaneous colitis in mdr1a-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Haarberg, Kelley MK; Wymore Brand, Meghan J; Overstreet, Anne-Marie C; Hauck, Catherine C; Murphy, Patricia A; Hostetter, Jesse M; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E; Wannemuehler, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of a Prunella vulgaris (P. vulgaris) ethanolic extract to attenuate spontaneous typhlocolitis in mdr1a-/- mice. METHODS: Vehicle (5% ethanol) or P. vulgaris ethanolic extract (2.4 mg/d) were administered daily by oral gavage to mdr1a-/- or wild type FVBWT mice from 6 wk of age up to 20 wk of age. Clinical signs of disease were noted by monitoring weight loss. Mice experiencing weight loss in excess of 15% were removed from the study. At the time mice were removed from the study, blood and colon tissue were collected for analyses that included histological evaluation of lesions, inflammatory cytokine levels, and myeloperoxidase activity. RESULTS: Administration of P. vulgaris extracts to mdr1a-/- mice delayed onset of colitis and reduced severity of mucosal inflammation when compared to vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Oral administration of the P. vulgaris extract resulted in reduced (P < 0.05) serum levels of IL-10 (4.6 ± 2 vs 19.4 ± 4), CXCL9 (1319.0 ± 277 vs 3901.0 ± 858), and TNFα (9.9 ± 3 vs 14.8 ± 1) as well as reduced gene expression by more than two-fold for Ccl2, Ccl20, Cxcl1, Cxcl9, IL-1α, Mmp10, VCAM-1, ICAM, IL-2, and TNFα in the colonic mucosa of mdr1a-/- mice compared to vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Histologically, several microscopic parameters were reduced (P < 0.05) in P. vulgaris-treated mdr1a-/- mice, as was myeloperoxidase activity in the colon (2.49 ± 0.16 vs 3.36 ± 0.06, P < 0.05). The numbers of CD4+ T cells (2031.9 ± 412.1 vs 5054.5 ± 809.5) and germinal center B cells (2749.6 ± 473.7 vs 4934.0 ± 645.9) observed in the cecal tonsils of P. vulgaris-treated mdr1a-/- were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) from vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice were found to produce serum antibodies to antigens derived from members of the intestinal microbiota, indicative of severe colitis and a loss of adaptive tolerance to the members of the microbiota. These serum antibodies were greatly

  3. Human disease genes.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Sanchez, G; Childs, B; Valle, D

    2001-02-15

    The complete human genome sequence will facilitate the identification of all genes that contribute to disease. We propose that the functional classification of disease genes and their products will reveal general principles of human disease. We have determined functional categories for nearly 1,000 documented disease genes, and found striking correlations between the function of the gene product and features of disease, such as age of onset and mode of inheritance. As knowledge of disease genes grows, including those contributing to complex traits, more sophisticated analyses will be possible; their results will yield a deeper understanding of disease and an enhanced integration of medicine with biology.

  4. Organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1a4 (Oatp1a4) is important for secondary bile acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youcai; Csanaky, Iván L; Selwyn, Felcy Pavithra; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2013-08-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (human: OATPs; rodent: Oatps) were thought to have important functions in bile acid (BA) transport. Oatp1a1, 1a4, and 1b2 are the three major Oatp1 family members in rodent liver. Our previous studies have characterized the BA homeostasis in Oatp1a1-null and Oatp1b2-null mice. The present study investigated the physiological role of Oatp1a4 in BA homeostasis by using Oatp1a4-null mice. Oatp1a4 expression is female-predominant in livers of mice, and thereby it was expected that female Oatp1a4-null mice will have more prominent changes than males. Interestingly, the present study demonstrated that female Oatp1a4-null mice had no significant alterations in BA concentrations in serum or liver, though they had increased mRNA of hepatic BA efflux transporters (Mrp4 and Ostα/β) and ileal BA transporters (Asbt and Ostα/β). In contrast, male Oatp1a4-null mice showed significantly altered BA homeostasis, including increased concentrations of deoxycholic acid (DCA) in serum, liver and intestinal contents. After feeding a DCA-supplemented diet, male but not female Oatp1a4-null mice had higher concentrations of DCA in serum and livers than their WT controls. This suggested that Oatp1a4 is important for intestinal absorption of secondary BAs in male mice. Furthermore, loss of Oatp1a4 function did not decrease BA accumulation in serum or livers of bile-duct-ligated mice, suggesting that Oatp1a4 is not likely a BA uptake transporter. In summary, the present study for the first time demonstrates that Oatp1a4 does not appear to mediate the hepatic uptake of BAs, but plays an important male-predominant role in secondary BA metabolism in mice.

  5. Intracellular distribution of differentially phosphorylated dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A).

    PubMed

    Kaczmarski, Wojciech; Barua, Madhabi; Mazur-Kolecka, Bozena; Frackowiak, Janusz; Dowjat, Wieslaw; Mehta, Pankaj; Bolton, David; Hwang, Yu-Wen; Rabe, Ausma; Albertini, Giorgio; Wegiel, Jerzy

    2014-02-01

    The gene encoding dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) is located within the Down syndrome (DS) critical region of chromosome 21. DYRK1A interacts with a plethora of substrates in the cytosol, cytoskeleton, and nucleus. Its overexpression is a contributing factor to the developmental alterations and age-associated pathology observed in DS. We hypothesized that the intracellular distribution of DYRK1A and cell-compartment-specific functions are associated with DYRK1A posttranslational modifications. Fractionation showed that, in both human and mouse brain, almost 80% of DYRK1A was associated with the cytoskeleton, and the remaining DYRK1A was present in the cytosolic and nuclear fractions. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed that DYRK1A in the brain cytoskeleton fraction forms complexes with filamentous actin, neurofilaments, and tubulin. Two-dimensional gel analysis of the fractions revealed DYRK1A with distinct isoelectric points: 5.5-6.5 in the nucleus, 7.2-8.2 in the cytoskeleton, and 8.7 in the cytosol. Phosphate-affinity gel electrophoresis demonstrated several bands of DYRK1A with different mobility shifts for nuclear, cytoskeletal, and cytosolic DYRK1A, indicating modification by phosphorylation. Mass spectrometry analysis disclosed one phosphorylated site in the cytosolic DYRK1A and multiple phosphorylated residues in the cytoskeletal DYRK1A, including two not previously described. This study supports the hypothesis that intracellular distribution and compartment-specific functions of DYRK1A may depend on its phosphorylation pattern. PMID:24327345

  6. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity.

  7. Genome-wide association analysis of coffee drinking suggests association with CYP1A1/CYP1A2 and NRCAM

    PubMed Central

    Amin, N; Byrne, E; Johnson, J; Chenevix-Trench, G; Walter, S; Nolte, I M; Vink, J M; Rawal, R; Mangino, M; Teumer, A; Keers, J C; Verwoert, G; Baumeister, S; Biffar, R; Petersmann, A; Dahmen, N; Doering, A; Isaacs, A; Broer, L; Wray, N R; Montgomery, G W; Levy, D; Psaty, B M; Gudnason, V; Chakravarti, A; Sulem, P; Gudbjartsson, D F; Kiemeney, L A; Thorsteinsdottir, U; Stefansson, K; van Rooij, F J A; Aulchenko, Y S; Hottenga, J J; Rivadeneira, F R; Hofman, A; Uitterlinden, A G; Hammond, C J; Shin, S-Y; Ikram, A; Witteman, J C M; Janssens, A C J W; Snieder, H; Tiemeier, H; Wolfenbuttel, B H R; Oostra, B A; Heath, A C; Wichmann, E; Spector, T D; Grabe, H J; Boomsma, D I; Martin, N G; van Duijn, C M

    2012-01-01

    Coffee consumption is a model for addictive behavior. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) on coffee intake from 8 Caucasian cohorts (N=18 176) and sought replication of our top findings in a further 7929 individuals. We also performed a gene expression analysis treating different cell lines with caffeine. Genome-wide significant association was observed for two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 15q24 region. The two SNPs rs2470893 and rs2472297 (P-values=1.6 × 10−11 and 2.7 × 10−11), which were also in strong linkage disequilibrium (r2=0.7) with each other, lie in the 23-kb long commonly shared 5′ flanking region between CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 genes. CYP1A1 was found to be downregulated in lymphoblastoid cell lines treated with caffeine. CYP1A1 is known to metabolize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are important constituents of coffee, whereas CYP1A2 is involved in the primary metabolism of caffeine. Significant evidence of association was also detected at rs382140 (P-value=3.9 × 10−09) near NRCAM—a gene implicated in vulnerability to addiction, and at another independent hit rs6495122 (P-value=7.1 × 10−09)—an SNP associated with blood pressure—in the 15q24 region near the gene ULK3, in the meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts. Our results from GWASs and expression analysis also strongly implicate CAB39L in coffee drinking. Pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed significantly enriched ubiquitin proteasome (P-value=2.2 × 10−05) and Parkinson's disease pathways (P-value=3.6 × 10−05). PMID:21876539

  8. 26 CFR 1.666(a)-1A - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.666(a)-1A Section 1.666(a... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(a)-1A Amount allocated. (a) In general. In the case of a trust that....665(e)-1A(a)(1)(ii) as those beginning after December 31, 1968) according to the amount...

  9. Photodissociation of N2O: excitation of 1A" states.

    PubMed

    Schinke, Reinhard; Schmidt, Johan A

    2012-11-26

    We investigate the contributions of the lowest two (1)A" states in the UV photodissociation of N(2)O employing three-dimensional potential energy surfaces and transition dipole moment functions. Because the transition dipole moments are much smaller than for the 2 (1)A' state, we conclude that excitation of the (1)A" states has a marginal effect. The dense vibrational spectrum of the quasi-bound 2(1)A" state possibly explains some of the tiny, noise-like structures of the measured absorption spectrum. PMID:22536943

  10. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 in stem cells and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kaori; Tanaka, Takuji; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The human genome contains 19 putatively functional aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes, which encode enzymes critical for detoxification of endogenous and exogenous aldehyde substrates through NAD(P)+-dependent oxidation. ALDH1 has three main isotypes, ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3, and is a marker of normal tissue stem cells (SC) and cancer stem cells (CSC), where it is involved in self-renewal, differentiation and self-protection. Experiments with murine and human cells indicate that ALDH1 activity, predominantly attributed to isotype ALDH1A1, is tissue- and cancer-specific. High ALDH1 activity and ALDH1A1 overexpression are associated with poor cancer prognosis, though high ALDH1 and ALDH1A1 levels do not always correlate with highly malignant phenotypes and poor clinical outcome. In cancer therapy, ALDH1A1 provides a useful therapeutic CSC target in tissue types that normally do not express high levels of ALDH1A1, including breast, lung, esophagus, colon and stomach. Here we review the functions and mechanisms of ALDH1A1, the key ALDH isozyme linked to SC populations and an important contributor to CSC function in cancers, and we outline its potential in future anticancer strategies. PMID:26783961

  11. Stiffness of modified Type 1a linear external skeletal fixators.

    PubMed

    Reaugh, H F; Rochat, M C; Bruce, C W; Galloway, D S; Payton, M E

    2007-01-01

    Modifications of a Type 1a external skeletal fixator (ESF) frame were evaluated by alternately placing transfixation pins on opposite sides of the connecting rod (Type 1a-MOD) or by placing additional connecting rods on either of the two inside (Type 1a-INSIDE) or two outside (Type 1a-OUTSIDE) transfixation pins. The objective of this study was to evaluate the stiffness of these modifications in terms of axial compression (AC), cranial-caudal bending (CCB), and medial-lateral bending (MLB). We hypothesized that these designs would allow significant increase in unilateral frame stiffness, over Type 1a, without proportional increase in frame complexity or technical difficulty of application. All of the ESF frames were constructed using large IMEX SKtrade mark clamps, 3.2 mm threaded fixation pins, 9.5 mm carbon fibre connecting rods and Delrin rods as bone models. Nine, eight pin frames of each design were constructed, and subjected to repetitive non-destructive loading forces (AC, CCB, MLB) using a materials testing machine. Frame construct stiffness for each force (AC, CCB, MLB) was derived from load-deformation curve analysis and displayed in N/mm. Data revealed the 1a-MOD and 1a-OUTSIDE constructs had significantly increased stiffness in CCB and AC as compared to the Type 1a constructs while all of the modified constructs were significantly stiffer in MLB than the Type 1a constructs. PMID:18038001

  12. Mutations in the 1A domain of keratin 9 in patients with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    PubMed

    Rothnagel, J A; Wojcik, S; Liefer, K M; Dominey, A M; Huber, M; Hohl, D; Roop, D R

    1995-03-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma is an autosomal dominant skin disorder characterized by hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles. Ultrastructurally the disease exhibits abnormal keratin filament networks and tonofilament clumping like that found in the keratin disorders of epidermolysis bullosa simplex and epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. The disease has been mapped to chromosome 17q11-q23 in the region of the type 1 keratin gene locus and more recently mutations have been found in the palmoplantar specific keratin, keratin 9. We have analyzed six unrelated incidences of epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma for mutations in their keratin 9 genes. In two of these, we have identified mutations that alter critical residues within the highly conserved helix initiation motif at the beginning of the rod domain of keratin 9. In a three-generation Middle Eastern kindred we found a C to T transition at codon 162 that results in an arginine to tryptophan substitution at position 10 of the 1A alpha-helical domain, thus confirming this codon as a hot spot for mutation in keratin 9. The other mutation found involves a T to C transition at codon 167 that results in the expression of a serine residue in place of the normal leucine at position 15 of the 1A segment and is the first documentation of this mutation in this gene. The identification of these substitutions extends the current catalog of disease causing mutations in keratin 9.

  13. Synthetic Lethal Targeting of ARID1A-Mutant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumors with Dasatinib.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rowan E; Brough, Rachel; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Williamson, Chris T; McDade, Simon; Campbell, James; Kigozi, Asha; Rafiq, Rumana; Pemberton, Helen; Natrajan, Rachel; Joel, Josephine; Astley, Holly; Mahoney, Claire; Moore, Jonathan D; Torrance, Chris; Gordan, John D; Webber, James T; Levin, Rebecca S; Shokat, Kevan M; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2016-07-01

    New targeted approaches to ovarian clear cell carcinomas (OCCC) are needed, given the limited treatment options in this disease and the poor response to standard chemotherapy. Using a series of high-throughput cell-based drug screens in OCCC tumor cell models, we have identified a synthetic lethal (SL) interaction between the kinase inhibitor dasatinib and a key driver in OCCC, ARID1A mutation. Imposing ARID1A deficiency upon a variety of human or mouse cells induced dasatinib sensitivity, both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that this is a robust synthetic lethal interaction. The sensitivity of ARID1A-deficient cells to dasatinib was associated with G1-S cell-cycle arrest and was dependent upon both p21 and Rb. Using focused siRNA screens and kinase profiling, we showed that ARID1A-mutant OCCC tumor cells are addicted to the dasatinib target YES1. This suggests that dasatinib merits investigation for the treatment of patients with ARID1A-mutant OCCC. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1472-84. ©2016 AACR.

  14. Modulation of anxiety by cortical serotonin 1A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Piszczek, Lukasz; Piszczek, Agnieszka; Kuczmanska, Joanna; Audero, Enrica; Gross, Cornelius T.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) plays an important role in the modulation of behavior across animal species. The serotonin 1A receptor (Htr1a) is an inhibitory G-protein coupled receptor that is expressed both on serotonin and non-serotonin neurons in mammals. Mice lacking Htr1a show increased anxiety behavior suggesting that its activation by serotonin has an anxiolytic effect. This outcome can be mediated by either Htr1a population present on serotonin (auto-receptor) or non-serotonin neurons (hetero-receptor), or both. In addition, both transgenic and pharmacological studies have shown that serotonin acts on Htr1a during development to modulate anxiety in adulthood, demonstrating a function for this receptor in the maturation of anxiety circuits in the brain. However, previous studies have been equivocal about which Htr1a population modulates anxiety behavior, with some studies showing a role of Htr1a hetero-receptor and others implicating the auto-receptor. In particular, cell-type specific rescue and suppression of Htr1a expression in either forebrain principal neurons or brainstem serotonin neurons reached opposite conclusions about the role of the two populations in the anxiety phenotype of the knockout. One interpretation of these apparently contradictory findings is that the modulating role of these two populations depends on each other. Here we use a novel Cre-dependent inducible allele of Htr1a in mice to show that expression of Htr1a in cortical principal neurons is sufficient to modulate anxiety. Together with previous findings, these results support a hetero/auto-receptor interaction model for Htr1a function in anxiety. PMID:25759645

  15. A high-performance liquid chromatography assay for Dyrk1a, a Down syndrome-associated kinase.

    PubMed

    Bui, Linh C; Tabouy, Laure; Busi, Florent; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Janel, Nathalie; Planque, Chris; Delabar, Jean-Maurice; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando; Dairou, Julien

    2014-03-15

    Down syndrome is the most common aneuploidy. It is caused by the presence of an extra copy of chromosome 21. Several studies indicate that aberrant expression of the kinase Dyrk1a (dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1a) is implicated in Down syndrome, in particular in the onset of mental retardation. Moreover, elevated Dyrk1a activity may also be a risk factor for other neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Over the past years, Dyrk1a has appeared as a potential drug target. Availability of sensitive and quantitative enzyme assays is of prime importance to understand the role of Dyrk1a and to develop specific inhibitors. Here, we describe a new method to measure Dyrk1a activity based on the separation and quantification of specific fluorescent peptides (substrate and phosphorylated product) by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Kinetic and mechanistic analyses using well-known inhibitors of Dyrk1a confirmed the reliability of this approach. In addition, this assay was further validated using brain extracts of mice models expressing different copies of the Dyrk1a gene. Our results indicate that this novel Dyrk1a assay is simple, sensitive, and specific. It avoids the use of radioactivity-based approaches that, until now, have been widely employed to measure Dyrk1a activity. PMID:24374000

  16. Etiology of gas bubble disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bouck, G.R.

    1980-11-01

    Gas bubble disease is a noninfectious, physically induced process caused by uncompensated hyperbaric pressure of total dissolved gases. When pressure compensation is inadequate, dissolved gases may form emboli (in blood) and emphysema (in tissues). The resulting abnormal physical presence of gases can block blood vessels (hemostasis) or tear tissues, and may result in death. Population mortality is generally skewed, in that the median time to death occurs well before the average time to death. Judged from mortality curves, three stages occur in gas bubble disease: (1) a period of gas pressure equilibrium, nonlethal cavitation, and increasing morbidity; (2) a period of rapid and heavy mortality; and (3) a period of protracted survival, despite lesions, and dysfunction that eventually terminates in total mortality. Safe limits for gas supersaturation depend on species tolerance and on factors that differ among hatcheries and rivers, between continuous and intermittent exposures, and across ranges of temperature and salinity.

  17. Genome characterization and genetic diversity of Sweet potato symptomless virus 1: a mastrevirus with an unusual nonanucleotide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next generation sequencing of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) revealed the presence of Sweet potato symptomless virus 1 (SPSMV-1), a recently described virus in the genus Mastrevirus of the family Geminiviridae, in both a diseased and a symptomless sweet potato plant. Its full-length genome of 2602 ...

  18. Prion diseases as transmissible zoonotic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, Su Yeon; Hwang, Kyu Jam; Ju, Young Ran; Woo, Hee-Jong

    2013-02-01

    Prion diseases, also called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), lead to neurological dysfunction in animals and are fatal. Infectious prion proteins are causative agents of many mammalian TSEs, including scrapie (in sheep), chronic wasting disease (in deer and elk), bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE; in cattle), and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD; in humans). BSE, better known as mad cow disease, is among the many recently discovered zoonotic diseases. BSE cases were first reported in the United Kingdom in 1986. Variant CJD (vCJD) is a disease that was first detected in 1996, which affects humans and is linked to the BSE epidemic in cattle. vCJD is presumed to be caused by consumption of contaminated meat and other food products derived from affected cattle. The BSE epidemic peaked in 1992 and decreased thereafter; this decline is continuing sharply owing to intensive surveillance and screening programs in the Western world. However, there are still new outbreaks and/or progression of prion diseases, including atypical BSE, and iatrogenic CJD and vCJD via organ transplantation and blood transfusion. This paper summarizes studies on prions, particularly on prion molecular mechanisms, BSE, vCJD, and diagnostic procedures. Risk perception and communication policies of the European Union for the prevention of prion diseases are also addressed to provide recommendations for appropriate government policies in Korea. PMID:24159531

  19. Prion Diseases as Transmissible Zoonotic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, Su Yeon; Hwang, Kyu Jam; Ju, Young Ran; Woo, Hee-Jong

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases, also called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), lead to neurological dysfunction in animals and are fatal. Infectious prion proteins are causative agents of many mammalian TSEs, including scrapie (in sheep), chronic wasting disease (in deer and elk), bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE; in cattle), and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD; in humans). BSE, better known as mad cow disease, is among the many recently discovered zoonotic diseases. BSE cases were first reported in the United Kingdom in 1986. Variant CJD (vCJD) is a disease that was first detected in 1996, which affects humans and is linked to the BSE epidemic in cattle. vCJD is presumed to be caused by consumption of contaminated meat and other food products derived from affected cattle. The BSE epidemic peaked in 1992 and decreased thereafter; this decline is continuing sharply owing to intensive surveillance and screening programs in the Western world. However, there are still new outbreaks and/or progression of prion diseases, including atypical BSE, and iatrogenic CJD and vCJD via organ transplantation and blood transfusion. This paper summarizes studies on prions, particularly on prion molecular mechanisms, BSE, vCJD, and diagnostic procedures. Risk perception and communication policies of the European Union for the prevention of prion diseases are also addressed to provide recommendations for appropriate government policies in Korea. PMID:24159531

  20. Obesity and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, E

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of mortality in rich countries and today it has the same meaning for health care as the epidemics of past centuries had for medicine in earlier times: 50% of the population in these countries die of cardiovascular disease. The amount of cardiovascular disease is also increasing in the developing countries together with economic growth. By 2015 one in three deaths will globally be due to cardiovascular diseases. Coronary heart disease is a chronic disease that starts in childhood, even if the symptoms first occur in the middle age. The risks for coronary heart disease are well-known: lipid disorders, especially high serum LDL-cholesterol concentration, high blood pressure, tobacco smoking, obesity, diabetes, male gender and physical inactivity. Obesity is both an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease but is also closely connected with several other risk factors. This review focuses on the connection between overweight or obesity and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25387321

  1. Monoclonal antibodies specific for adenovirus early region 1A proteins: extensive heterogeneity in early region 1A products.

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, E; Franza, B R; Schley, C

    1985-01-01

    Hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies specific for the adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) proteins were prepared from BALB/c mice immunized with a bacterial trpE-E1A fusion protein. This protein is encoded by a hybrid gene that joins a portion of the Escherichia coli trpE gene and a cDNA copy of the E1A 13S mRNA (Spindler et al., J. Virol. 49:132-141, 1984). Eighty-three hybridomas that secrete antibodies which recognize the immunogen were isolated and single cell cloned. Twenty-nine of these antibodies are specific for the E1A portion of the fusion protein. Only 12 of the monoclonal antibodies can efficiently immunoprecipitate E1A polypeptides from detergent lysates of infected cells. E1A polypeptides were analyzed on one-dimensional, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and two-dimensional, isoelectric focusing polyacrylamide gels. The E1A proteins that are specifically immunoprecipitated by the monoclonal antibodies are heterogeneous in size and charge and can be resolved into approximately 60 polypeptide species. This heterogeneity is due not only to synthesis from multiple E1A mRNAs, but also at least in part to post-translational modification. Several of the monoclonal antibodies divide the E1A polypeptides into immunological subclasses based on the ability of the antibodies to bind to the antigen. In particular, two of the monoclonal antibodies bind to the polypeptides synthesized from the 13S E1A mRNA, but not to other E1A proteins. Images PMID:3894685

  2. The roles of CC2D1A and HTR1A gene expressions in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Sener, Elif Funda; Cıkılı Uytun, Merve; Korkmaz Bayramov, Keziban; Zararsiz, Gokmen; Oztop, Didem Behice; Canatan, Halit; Ozkul, Yusuf

    2016-06-01

    Classical autism belongs to a group of heterogeneous disorders known as autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Autism is defined as a neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by repetitive stereotypic behaviors or restricted interests, social withdrawal, and communication deficits. Numerous susceptibility genes and chromosomal abnormalities have been reported in association with autism but the etiology of this disorder is unknown in many cases. CC2D1A gene has been linked to mental retardation (MR) in a family with a large deletion before. Intellectual disability (ID) is a common feature of autistic cases. Therefore we aimed to investigate the expressions of CC2D1A and HTR1A genes with the diagnosis of autism in Turkey. Forty-four autistic patients (35 boys, 9 girls) and 27 controls were enrolled and obtained whole blood samples to isolate RNA samples from each participant. CC2D1A and HTR1A gene expressions were assessed by quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) in Genome and Stem Cell Center, Erciyes University. Both expressions of CC2D1A and HTR1A genes studied on ASD cases and controls were significantly different (p < 0.001). The expression of HTR1A was undetectable in the ASD samples. Comparison of ID and CC2D1A gene expression was also found statistically significant (p = 0.028). CC2D1A gene expression may be used as a candidate gene for ASD cases with ID. Further studies are needed to investigate the potential roles of these CC2D1A and HTR1A genes in their related pathways in ASD.

  3. 26 CFR 1.669(a)-1A - Amount allocated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amount allocated. 1.669(a)-1A Section 1.669(a... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.669(a)-1A Amount allocated. (a) In general. After a trust has... preceding taxable year is the amount of undistributed capital gain for that preceding taxable year....

  4. Paresev 1-A and Tow Plane with Crew and Pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    With the Paresev 1-A and the 450-hp Stearman Sport Biplane as a backdrop the pilot and crew pose for this picture in 1962. Starting at left: On the motorcycle is Walter Whiteside, in the Paresev 1-A is test pilot Milton Thompson, Frank Fedor, Richard Klein, Victor Horton, Tom Kelly, Jr., Fred Harris, owner of the Stearman, John Orahood, and Gary Layton.

  5. Microarray analysis of Xenopus endoderm expressing Ptf1a

    PubMed Central

    Bilogan, Cassandra K.; Horb, Marko E.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreas specific transcription factor 1a (Ptf1a), a bHLH transcription factor, has two temporally distinct functions during pancreas development; initially it is required for early specification of the entire pancreas, while later it is required for proper differentiation and maintenance of only acinar cells. The importance of Ptf1a function was revealed by the fact that loss of Ptf1a leads to pancreas agenesis in humans. While Ptf1a is one of the most important pancreatic transcription factors, little is known about the differences between the regulatory networks it controls during initial specification of the pancreas as opposed to acinar cell development, and to date no comprehensive analysis of its downstream targets has been published. In this paper, we use Xenopus embryos to identify putative downstream targets of Ptf1a. We isolated anterior endoderm tissue overexpressing Ptf1a at two early stages, NF32 and NF36, and compared their gene expression profiles using microarrays. Our results revealed that Ptf1a regulates genes with a wide variety of functions, providing insight into the complexity of the regulatory network required for pancreas specification. PMID:22815262

  6. The protein kinase A regulatory subunit R1A (Prkar1a) plays critical roles in peripheral nerve development.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Lee, Audrey A; Rizvi, Tilat A; Ratner, Nancy; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2013-11-13

    Signaling through cAMP has been implicated in Schwann cell (SC) proliferation and myelination, but the signaling pathway components downstream of cAMP required for SC function remain unknown. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a potential downstream effector of cAMP. Here, we induced loss of Prkar1a, the gene encoding the type 1A regulatory subunit of PKA, in SC to study its role in nerve development; loss of Prkar1a is predicted to elevate PKA activity. Conditional Prkar1a knock-out in mouse SC (Prkar1a-SCKO) resulted in a dramatic and persistent axonal sorting defect, and unexpectedly decreased SC proliferation in Prkar1a-SCKO nerves in vivo. Effects were cell autonomous as they were recapitulated in vitro in Prkar1a-SCKO SC, which showed elevated PKA activity. In the few SCs sorted into 1:1 relationships with axons in vivo, SC myelination was premature in Prkar1a-SCKO nerves, correlating with global increase in the cAMP-regulated transcription factor Oct-6 and expression of myelin basic protein. These data reveal a previously unknown role of PKA in axon sorting, an unexpected inhibitory role of PKA on SC cell proliferation in vivo and define the importance of Prkar1a in peripheral nerve development. PMID:24227708

  7. Environmental enrichment rescues DYRK1A activity and hippocampal adult neurogenesis in TgDyrk1A.

    PubMed

    Pons-Espinal, Meritxell; Martinez de Lagran, Maria; Dierssen, Mara

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal adult neurogenesis disruptions have been suggested as one of the neuronal plasticity mechanisms underlying learning and memory impairment in Down syndrome (DS). However, it remains unknown whether specific candidate genes are implicated in these phenotypes in the multifactorial context of DS. Here we report that transgenic mice (TgDyrk1A) with overdosage of Dyrk1A, a DS candidate gene, show important alterations in adult neurogenesis including reduced cell proliferation rate, altered cell cycle progression and reduced cell cycle exit leading to premature migration, differentiation and reduced survival of newly born cells. In addition, less proportion of newborn hippocampal TgDyrk1A neurons are activated upon learning, suggesting reduced integration in learning circuits. Some of these alterations were DYRK1A kinase-dependent since we could rescue those using a DYRK1A inhibitor, epigallocatechin-3-gallate. Environmental enrichment also normalized DYRK1A kinase overdosage in the hippocampus, and rescued adult neurogenesis alterations in TgDyrk1A mice. We conclude that Dyrk1A is a good candidate to explain neuronal plasticity deficits in DS and that normalizing the excess of DYRK1A kinase activity either pharmacologically or using environmental stimulation can correct adult neurogenesis defects in DS.

  8. Environmental enrichment rescues DYRK1A activity and hippocampal adult neurogenesis in TgDyrk1A.

    PubMed

    Pons-Espinal, Meritxell; Martinez de Lagran, Maria; Dierssen, Mara

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal adult neurogenesis disruptions have been suggested as one of the neuronal plasticity mechanisms underlying learning and memory impairment in Down syndrome (DS). However, it remains unknown whether specific candidate genes are implicated in these phenotypes in the multifactorial context of DS. Here we report that transgenic mice (TgDyrk1A) with overdosage of Dyrk1A, a DS candidate gene, show important alterations in adult neurogenesis including reduced cell proliferation rate, altered cell cycle progression and reduced cell cycle exit leading to premature migration, differentiation and reduced survival of newly born cells. In addition, less proportion of newborn hippocampal TgDyrk1A neurons are activated upon learning, suggesting reduced integration in learning circuits. Some of these alterations were DYRK1A kinase-dependent since we could rescue those using a DYRK1A inhibitor, epigallocatechin-3-gallate. Environmental enrichment also normalized DYRK1A kinase overdosage in the hippocampus, and rescued adult neurogenesis alterations in TgDyrk1A mice. We conclude that Dyrk1A is a good candidate to explain neuronal plasticity deficits in DS and that normalizing the excess of DYRK1A kinase activity either pharmacologically or using environmental stimulation can correct adult neurogenesis defects in DS. PMID:23969234

  9. Glucuronidation of OTS167 in Humans Is Catalyzed by UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Jacqueline; Mirkov, Snezana; House, Larry K.

    2015-01-01

    OTS167 is a potent maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase inhibitor undergoing clinical testing as antineoplastic agent. We aimed to identify the UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) involved in OTS167 metabolism, study the relationship between UGT genetic polymorphisms and hepatic OTS167 glucuronidation, and investigate the inhibitory potential of OTS167 on UGTs. Formation of a single OTS167-glucuronide (OTS167-G) was observed in pooled human liver (HLM) (Km = 3.4 ± 0.2 µM), intestinal microsomes (HIM) (Km = 1.7 ± 0.1 µM), and UGTs. UGT1A1 (64 µl/min/mg) and UGT1A8 (72 µl/min/mg) exhibited the highest intrinsic clearances (CLint) for OTS167, followed by UGT1A3 (51 µl/min/mg) and UGT1A10 (47 µl/min/mg); UGT1A9 was a minor contributor. OTS167 glucuronidation in HLM was highly correlated with thyroxine glucuronidation (r = 0.91, P < 0.0001), SN-38 glucuronidation (r = 0.79, P < 0.0001), and UGT1A1 mRNA (r = 0.72, P < 0.0001). Nilotinib (UGT1A1 inhibitor) and emodin (UGT1A8 and UGT1A10 inhibitor) exhibited the highest inhibitory effects on OTS167-G formation in HLM (68%) and HIM (47%). We hypothesize that OTS167-G is an N-glucuronide according to mass spectrometry. A significant association was found between rs6706232 and reduced OTS167-G formation (P = 0.03). No or weak UGT inhibition (range: 0–21%) was observed using clinically relevant OTS167 concentrations (0.4–2 µM). We conclude that UGT1A1 and UGT1A3 are the main UGTs responsible for hepatic formation of OTS167-G. Intestinal UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10 may contribute to first-pass OTS167 metabolism after oral administration. PMID:25870101

  10. Outline of the microgravity experiment rocket (TR-1A)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochiyama, Jiro

    1990-06-01

    In 1989, the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) decided to conduct the space processing experiment project, using the new microgravity experiment rocket (TR-1A), for the effective utilization of the Japanese Experiment Module, one part of the international space station. The project goal is to obtain the basic know-how of microgravity experiments and experimental devices through the flight opportunity of TR-1A (Test Rocket-1A) rocket. This TR-1A rocket can project a 1500 kg gross payload to about 270 km altitude and remain in a free fall condition about six minutes or more. Obtained microgravity condition is less than 10(exp -9)G. The first flight will be held in 1991, and now the development of the rocket and experimental devices are ongoing. This report describes an outline of the microgravity experiment rocket (TR-1A) and its standing point and prospect in the test rocket family.

  11. Molecular dynamics studies of U1A-RNA complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, C M; Kollman, P A

    1999-01-01

    The U1A protein binds to a hairpin RNA and an internal-loop RNA with picomolar affinities. To probe the molecular basis of U1A binding, we performed state-of-the-art nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations on both complexes. The good agreement with experimental structures supports the protocols used in the simulations. We compare the dynamics, hydrogen-bonding occupancies, and interfacial flexibility of both complexes and also describe a rigid-body motion in the U1A-internal loop complex that is not observed in the U1A-hairpin simulation. We relate these observations to experimental mutational studies and highlight their significance in U1A binding affinity and specificity. PMID:10024175

  12. Exonic duplication CNV of NDRG1 associated with autosomal-recessive HMSN-Lom/CMT4D

    PubMed Central

    Pehlivan, Davut; Beck, Christine R.; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Muzny, Donna M.; Atik, Mehmed M.; Carvalho, Claudia M.B.; Matur, Zeliha; Bayraktar, Serife; Boone, Philip M.; Akyuz, Kaya; Gibbs, Richard A.; Battaloglu, Esra; Parman, Yesim; Lupski, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Copy-number variations as a mutational mechanism contribute significantly to human disease. Approximately one-half of the patients with Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) disease have a 1.4 Mb duplication copy-number variation as the cause of their neuropathy. However, non-CMT1A neuropathy patients rarely have causative copy-number variations, and to date, autosomal-recessive CMT disease has not been associated with copy-number variation as a mutational mechanism. Methods We performed Agilent 8 × 60K array comparative genomic hybridization on DNA from 12 recessive Turkish families with CMT disease. Additional molecular studies were conducted to detect breakpoint junctions and to evaluate gene expression levels in a family in which we detected an intragenic duplication copy-number variation. Results We detected an ~6.25 kb homozygous intragenic duplication in NDRG1, a gene known to be causative for recessive HMSNL/CMT4D, in three individuals from a Turkish family with CMT neuropathy. Further studies showed that this intragenic copy-number variation resulted in a homozygous duplication of exons 6–8 that caused decreased mRNA expression of NDRG1. Conclusion Exon-focused high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization enables the detection of copy-number variation carrier states in recessive genes, particularly small copy-number variations encompassing or disrupting single genes. In families for whom a molecular diagnosis has not been elucidated by conventional clinical assays, an assessment for copy-number variations in known CMT genes might be considered. PMID:24136616

  13. Toponymous diseases of Australia.

    PubMed

    Appuhamy, Ranil D; Tent, Jan; Mackenzie, John S

    Names are more than just labels used to identify diseases. They can be windows into the discovery, characteristics and attributes of the disease. Toponymous diseases are diseases that are named after places. Hendra, Ross River, Bairnsdale, Murray Valley and Barmah Forest are all examples of Australian places that have had diseases named after them. They all have unique and interesting stories that provide a glimpse into their discovery, history and culture. Because of perceived negative connotations, the association of diseases with placenames has sometimes generated controversy. PMID:21143049

  14. Dyrk1A-mediated phosphorylation of RCAN1 promotes the formation of insoluble RCAN1 aggregates.

    PubMed

    Song, Woo-Joo; Song, Eun-Ah Christine; Choi, Sun-Hee; Baik, Hyung-Hwan; Jin, Byung Kwan; Kim, Jeong Hee; Chung, Sul-Hee

    2013-10-25

    The mechanisms underlying aggregate formation in age-related neurodegenerative diseases remain not well understood. Here we investigated whether dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) is involved in the formation of regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) aggregates. We show that RCAN1 self-associates and forms multimers, and that this process is promoted by the Dyrk1A-mediated phosphorylation of RCAN1 at the Thr(192) residue. Transgenic mice that overexpress the Dyrk1A exhibited lower levels of phospho-Thr(192)-RCAN1 in 10-month-old-group compared to littermate controls, when analyzed with soluble hippocampus lysates. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of RCAN1 by Dyrk1A stimulates the formation of insoluble aggregates upon aging. PMID:24021800

  15. Effects of Phenobarbital on Expression of UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1a6 and 1a7 in Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Yukiko; Katoh, Miki; Kondo, Yuya; Nadai, Masayuki

    2016-03-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), a phase II drug-metabolizing enzyme, is expressed in the brain and can catalyze glucuronidation of endogenous and exogenous substrates in the brain. Thus, changes in UGT1A expression could affect homeostasis and drug efficacy. Phenobarbital (PB), a typical inducer of drug-metabolizing enzymes, has been reported to induce oxidative stress and epigenetic changes, which could alter UGT expression in the brain. Here, we aimed to clarify the effects of PB on Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 gene expression in rat brains. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated intraperitoneally with PB (80 mg/kg), once daily for 7 days. Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 mRNA expression levels were increased in the striatum and thalamus (Ugt1a6, 3.0- and 2.9-fold, respectively; Ugt1a7, 2.6- and 2.6-fold, respectively). Acetaminophen glucuronidation was also increased in the medulla oblongata and thalamus by 1.8- and 1.2-fold, respectively. The induction rates within different brain regions were correlated with Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 mRNA expression, and the degree of induction also correlated with that of NF-E2-related factor-2 mRNA. Measurement of oxidative stress markers suggested that PB induced oxidative stress in brain regions in which Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 mRNAs were increased. Moreover, histone modifications were altered by PB treatment, resulting in increased histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation in the striatum and thalamus and decreased histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation in the thalamus. These results suggested that oxidative stress and histone modifications may promote transcriptional activation of Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 genes. In summary, Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 mRNA levels were increased by PB treatment, which may alter pharmacokinetics in the brain.

  16. HIF1A regulates xenophagic degradation of adherent and invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC)

    PubMed Central

    Mimouna, Sanda; Bazin, Marie; Mograbi, Baharia; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Brest, Patrick; Hofman, Paul; Vouret-Craviari, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    The hypoxia inducible transcription factor HIF1 activates autophagy, a general catabolic pathway involved in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Dysfunction in both autophagy and HIF1 has been implicated in an increasing number of human diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn disease (CD). Adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) colonize ileal mucosa of CD patients and strongly promote gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders by activation of HIF-dependent responses. Here, we aim to characterize the contribution of HIF1 in xenophagy, a specialized form of autophagy involved in the degradation of intracellular bacteria. Our results showed that endogenous HIF1A knockdown increased AIEC survival in intestinal epithelial cells. We demonstrate that the increase in survival rate correlates with a dramatic impairment of the autophagic flux at the autolysosomal maturation step. Furthermore, we show that AIEC remained within single-membrane LC3-II-positive vesicles and that they were unable to induce the phosphorylation of ULK1. These results suggested that, in the absence of HIF1A, AIEC were found within LC3-associated phagosomes. Using blocking antibodies against TLR5 and CEACAM6, the 2 well-known AIEC-bound receptors, we showed that downstream receptor signaling was necessary to mediate ULK1 phosphorylation. Finally, we provide evidence that HIF1 mediates CEACAM6 expression and that CEACAM6 is necessary to recruit ULK1 in a bacteria-containing signaling hub. Collectively, these results identify a new function for HIF1 in AIEC-dedicated xenophagy, and suggest that coactivation of autophagy and HIF1A expression may be a potential new therapy to resolve AIEC infection in CD patients. PMID:25484075

  17. Treatment with didemnin B, an elongation factor 1A inhibitor, improves hepatic lipotoxicity in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Hetherington, Alexandra M; Sawyez, Cynthia G; Sutherland, Brian G; Robson, Debra L; Arya, Rigya; Kelly, Karen; Jacobs, René L; Borradaile, Nica M

    2016-09-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor EEF1A1 is induced by oxidative and ER stress, and contributes to subsequent cell death in many cell types, including hepatocytes. We recently showed that blocking the protein synthesis activity of EEF1A1 with the peptide inhibitor, didemnin B, decreases saturated fatty acid overload-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. In light of this and other recent work suggesting that limiting protein synthesis may be beneficial in treating ER stress-related disease, we hypothesized that acute intervention with didemnin B would decrease hepatic ER stress and lipotoxicity in obese mice with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Hyperphagic male ob/ob mice were fed semipurified diet for 4 weeks, and during week 5 received i.p. injections of didemnin B or vehicle on days 1, 4, and 7. Interestingly, we observed that administration of this compound modestly decreased food intake without evidence of illness or distress, and thus included an additional control group matched for food consumption with didemnin B-treated animals. Treatment with didemnin B improved several characteristics of hepatic lipotoxicity to a greater extent than the effects of caloric restriction alone, including hepatic steatosis, and some hepatic markers of ER stress and inflammation (GRP78, Xbp1s, and Mcp1). Plasma lipid and lipoprotein profiles and histopathological measures of NAFLD, including lobular inflammation, and total NAFLD activity score were also improved by didemnin B. These data indicate that acute intervention with the EEF1A inhibitor, didemnin B, improves hepatic lipotoxicity in obese mice with NAFLD through mechanisms not entirely dependent on decreased food intake, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for this ER stress-related disease. PMID:27613825

  18. HIF1A regulates xenophagic degradation of adherent and invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC).

    PubMed

    Mimouna, Sanda; Bazin, Marie; Mograbi, Baharia; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Brest, Patrick; Hofman, Paul; Vouret-Craviari, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxia inducible transcription factor HIF1 activates autophagy, a general catabolic pathway involved in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Dysfunction in both autophagy and HIF1 has been implicated in an increasing number of human diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn disease (CD). Adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) colonize ileal mucosa of CD patients and strongly promote gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders by activation of HIF-dependent responses. Here, we aim to characterize the contribution of HIF1 in xenophagy, a specialized form of autophagy involved in the degradation of intracellular bacteria. Our results showed that endogenous HIF1A knockdown increased AIEC survival in intestinal epithelial cells. We demonstrate that the increase in survival rate correlates with a dramatic impairment of the autophagic flux at the autolysosomal maturation step. Furthermore, we show that AIEC remained within single-membrane LC3-II-positive vesicles and that they were unable to induce the phosphorylation of ULK1. These results suggested that, in the absence of HIF1A, AIEC were found within LC3-associated phagosomes. Using blocking antibodies against TLR5 and CEACAM6, the 2 well-known AIEC-bound receptors, we showed that downstream receptor signaling was necessary to mediate ULK1 phosphorylation. Finally, we provide evidence that HIF1 mediates CEACAM6 expression and that CEACAM6 is necessary to recruit ULK1 in a bacteria-containing signaling hub. Collectively, these results identify a new function for HIF1 in AIEC-dedicated xenophagy, and suggest that coactivation of autophagy and HIF1A expression may be a potential new therapy to resolve AIEC infection in CD patients.

  19. Treatment with didemnin B, an elongation factor 1A inhibitor, improves hepatic lipotoxicity in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Hetherington, Alexandra M; Sawyez, Cynthia G; Sutherland, Brian G; Robson, Debra L; Arya, Rigya; Kelly, Karen; Jacobs, René L; Borradaile, Nica M

    2016-09-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor EEF1A1 is induced by oxidative and ER stress, and contributes to subsequent cell death in many cell types, including hepatocytes. We recently showed that blocking the protein synthesis activity of EEF1A1 with the peptide inhibitor, didemnin B, decreases saturated fatty acid overload-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. In light of this and other recent work suggesting that limiting protein synthesis may be beneficial in treating ER stress-related disease, we hypothesized that acute intervention with didemnin B would decrease hepatic ER stress and lipotoxicity in obese mice with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Hyperphagic male ob/ob mice were fed semipurified diet for 4 weeks, and during week 5 received i.p. injections of didemnin B or vehicle on days 1, 4, and 7. Interestingly, we observed that administration of this compound modestly decreased food intake without evidence of illness or distress, and thus included an additional control group matched for food consumption with didemnin B-treated animals. Treatment with didemnin B improved several characteristics of hepatic lipotoxicity to a greater extent than the effects of caloric restriction alone, including hepatic steatosis, and some hepatic markers of ER stress and inflammation (GRP78, Xbp1s, and Mcp1). Plasma lipid and lipoprotein profiles and histopathological measures of NAFLD, including lobular inflammation, and total NAFLD activity score were also improved by didemnin B. These data indicate that acute intervention with the EEF1A inhibitor, didemnin B, improves hepatic lipotoxicity in obese mice with NAFLD through mechanisms not entirely dependent on decreased food intake, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for this ER stress-related disease.

  20. Low expression of ARID1A correlates with poor prognosis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Song-Zhu; Wang, An-Qiang; Du, Juan; Wang, Jian-Tao; Yu, Wei-Wei; Liu, Qing; Wu, Yan-Fang; Chen, Shu-Guang

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between ARID1A expression and clinicopathologic parameters, as well as its prognostic value, for patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC). METHODS: We assessed ARID1A protein and mRNA expression in IHCC tissues and paracarcinomatous (PC) tissues from 57 patients with IHCC using western blot and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. We used Fisher’s exact and χ2 tests to analyze relationships between clinicopathological parameters and ARID1A expression. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression were used to analyze survival. RESULTS: The mean ARID1A protein level in IHCC tissues was 1.16 ± 0.36 relative units (RU), which was significantly lower than that in PC tissues (1.26 ± 0.21 RU, P < 0.01) and NL tissues (1.11 ± 0.31, P < 0.001). The mean ARID1A mRNA level in IHCC tissues (1.20 ± 0.18) was also lower than that in PC tissues (1.27 ± 0.15, P < 0.001) and normal liver tissues (1.15 ± 0.34, P < 0.001). Low ARID1A expression was significantly associated with tumor nodules, vein invasion, and recurrence. Median overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) for the low ARID1A expression group was 15.0 and 7.0 mo, respectively, which were significantly shorter than those for the high ARID1A expression group at 25.0 and 22.0 mo (OS: P < 0.01; DFS: P < 0.001), respectively. Low ARID1A expression was significantly associated with worse OS (HR = 3.967, 95%CI: 1.299-12.118, P = 0.016) in multivariate analyses. CONCLUSION: Low expression of ARID1A is associated with poor prognosis in patients with IHCC, and thus may be a potential prognostic biomarker candidate in IHCC. PMID:27433094