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Sample records for 1a glycan determined

  1. Databases of Conformations and NMR Structures of Glycan Determinants.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anita; Drouillard, Sophie; Rivet, Alain; Perez, Serge

    2015-12-01

    The present study reports a comprehensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) characterization and a systematic conformational sampling of the conformational preferences of 170 glycan moieties of glycosphingolipids as produced in large-scale quantities by bacterial fermentation. These glycans span across a variety of families including the blood group antigens (A, B and O), core structures (Types 1, 2 and 4), fucosylated oligosaccharides (core and lacto-series), sialylated oligosaccharides (Types 1 and 2), Lewis antigens, GPI-anchors and globosides. A complementary set of about 100 glycan determinants occurring in glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans has also been structurally characterized using molecular mechanics-based computation. The experimental and computational data generated are organized in two relational databases that can be queried by the user through a user-friendly search engine. The NMR ((1)H and (13)C, COSY, TOCSY, HMQC, HMBC correlation) spectra and 3D structures are available for visualization and download in commonly used structure formats. Emphasis has been given to the use of a common nomenclature for the structural encoding of the carbohydrates and each glycan molecule is described by four different types of representations in order to cope with the different usages in chemistry and biology. These web-based databases were developed with non-proprietary software and are open access for the scientific community available at http://glyco3d.cermav.cnrs.fr.

  2. Recent advances in Employing Molecular Modelling to Determine the Specificity of Glycan-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Oliver C.; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Impressive improvements in docking performance can be achieved by applying energy bonuses to poses in which glycan hydroxyl groups occupy positions otherwise preferred by bound waters. In addition, inclusion of glycosidic conformational energies allows unlikely glycan conformations to be appropriately penalized. A method for predicting the binding specificity of glycan-binding proteins has been developed, which is based on grafting glycan branches onto a minimal binding determinant in the binding site. Grafting can be used either to screen virtual libraries of glycans, such as the known glycome, or to identify docked poses of minimal binding determinants that are consistent with specificity data. The reviewed advances allow accurate modelling of carbohydrate-protein 3D co-complexes, but challenges remain in ranking the affinity of congeners. PMID:25108191

  3. Glycan binding avidity determines the systemic fate of adeno-associated virus type 9.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shen; Bryant, Kelli D; Sun, Junjiang; Brown, Sarah M; Troupes, Andrew; Pulicherla, Nagesh; Asokan, Aravind

    2012-10-01

    Glycans are key determinants of host range and transmissibility in several pathogens. In the case of adeno-associated viruses (AAV), different carbohydrates serve as cellular receptors in vitro; however, their contributions in vivo are less clear. A particularly interesting example is adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9), which displays systemic tropism in mice despite low endogenous levels of its primary receptor (galactose) in murine tissues. To understand this further, we studied the effect of modulating glycan binding avidity on the systemic fate of AAV9 in mice. Intravenous administration of recombinant sialidase increased tissue levels of terminally galactosylated glycans in several murine tissues. These conditions altered the systemic tropism of AAV9 into a hepatotropic phenotype, characterized by markedly increased sequestration within the liver sinusoidal endothelium and Kupffer cells. In contrast, an AAV9 mutant with decreased glycan binding avidity displayed a liver-detargeted phenotype. Altering glycan binding avidity also profoundly affected AAV9 persistence in blood circulation. Our results support the notion that high glycan receptor binding avidity appears to impart increased liver tropism, while decreased avidity favors systemic spread of AAV vectors. These findings may not only help predict species-specific differences in tropism for AAV9 on the basis of tissue glycosylation profiles, but also provide a general approach to tailor AAV vectors for systemic or hepatic gene transfer by reengineering capsid-glycan interactions. PMID:22787229

  4. Glycan structure determinants for cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor binding and cellular uptake of a recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qun; Avila, Luis Z; Konowicz, Paul A; Harrahy, John; Finn, Patrick; Kim, Jennifer; Reardon, Michael R; Kyazike, Josephine; Brunyak, Elizabeth; Zheng, Xiaoyang; Patten, Scott M Van; Miller, Robert J; Pan, Clark Q

    2013-12-18

    The cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) plays a critical role in intracellular transport of lysosomal enzymes as well as the uptake of recombinant proteins. To define the minimal glycan structure determinants necessary for receptor binding and cellular uptake, we synthesized a series of glycans containing mono-, di-, tri-, tetra-, and hexamannoses terminated with either one or two phosphates for conjugating to a model protein, recombinant human acid α-glucosidase. A high affinity interaction with the CI-MPR can be achieved for the enzyme conjugated to a dimannose glycan with a single phosphate. However, tightest binding to a CI-MPR affinity column was observed with a hexamannose structure containing two phosphates. Moreover, maximal cellular uptake and a 5-fold improvement in in vivo potency were achieved when the bisphosphorylated hexamannose glycan is conjugated to the protein by a β linker. Nevertheless, even a monophosphorylated dimannose glycan conjugate showed stronger binding to the receptor affinity column, higher cellular uptake, and significantly greater in vivo efficacy compared to the unconjugated protein which contains a low level of high affinity glycan structure. These results demonstrate that the phosphorylated dimannose moiety appears to be the minimal structure determinant for enhanced CI-MPR binding and that the orientation of the glycan is critical for maximum receptor interaction. In summary, we have improved the understanding of the mechanism of CI-MPR binding and developed a simple alternative for CI-MPR targeting.

  5. beta-D-Glucose 1-phosphate. A structural unit and an immunological determinant of a glycan from streptococcal cell walls.

    PubMed

    Pazur, J H

    1982-01-25

    Glycose 1-phosphate moieties are emerging as important structural units of macromolecular substances imparting special biological functions to these molecules. In the present study, beta-D-glucose 1-phosphate moieties are shown to be structural units and immunological determinants of a bacterial glycan. The glycan is a tetraheteroglycan from the cell wall of Streptococcus faecalis, strain N and is composed of glucose, galactose, rhamnose, N-acetylgalactosamine, and phosphate. Several lines of evidence have been obtained for the presence of beta-D-glucose 1-phosphate units in the glycan, including the liberation of glucose by mild acid hydrolysis, the inhibition of the precipitin reaction by beta-D-glucose 1-phosphate, and the formation of levoglucosan on treatment of the glycan with alkali. Work on the preparation of affinity adsorbents for isolating the new types of antibodies directed at the beta-D-glucose 1-phosphate moieties is in progress. PMID:6172422

  6. Parvovirus glycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Halder, Sujata; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2014-08-01

    Members of the Parvoviridae utilize glycan receptors for cellular attachment and subsequent interactions determine transduction efficiency or pathogenic outcome. This review focuses on the identity of the glycan receptors utilized, their capsid binding footprints, and a discussion of the overlap of these sites with tropism, transduction, and pathogenicity determinants. Despite high sequence diversity between the different genera, most parvoviruses bind to negatively charged glycans, such as sialic acid and heparan sulfate, abundant on cell surface membranes. The capsid structure of these viruses exhibit high structural homology enabling common regions to be utilized for glycan binding. At the same time the sequence diversity at the common footprints allows for binding of different glycans or differential binding of the same glycan.

  7. Parvovirus Glycan Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Halder, Sujata; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Parvoviridae utilize glycan receptors for cellular attachment and subsequent interactions determine transduction efficiency or pathogenic outcome. This review focuses on the identity of the glycan receptors utilized, their capsid binding footprints, and a discussion of the overlap of these sites with tropism, transduction, and pathogenicity determinants. Despite high sequence diversity between the different genera, most parvoviruses bind to negatively charged glycans, such as sialic acid and heparan sulfate, abundant on cell surface membranes. The capsid structure of these viruses exhibit high structural homology enabling common regions to be utilized for glycan binding and at the same time the sequence diversity at the common footprints allows for binding of different glycans or differential binding of the same glycan. PMID:25047752

  8. Extensive determination of glycan heterogeneity reveals an unusual abundance of high mannose glycans in enriched plasma membranes of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    An, Hyun Joo; Gip, Phung; Kim, Jaehan; Wu, Shuai; Park, Kun Wook; McVaugh, Cheryl T; Schaffer, David V; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2012-04-01

    Most cell membrane proteins are known or predicted to be glycosylated in eukaryotic organisms, where surface glycans are essential in many biological processes including cell development and differentiation. Nonetheless, the glycosylation on cell membranes remains not well characterized because of the lack of sensitive analytical methods. This study introduces a technique for the rapid profiling and quantitation of N- and O-glycans on cell membranes using membrane enrichment and nanoflow liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry of native structures. Using this new method, the glycome analysis of cell membranes isolated from human embryonic stem cells and somatic cell lines was performed. Human embryonic stem cells were found to have high levels of high mannose glycans, which contrasts with IMR-90 fibroblasts and a human normal breast cell line, where complex glycans are by far the most abundant and high mannose glycans are minor components. O-Glycosylation affects relatively minor components of cell surfaces. To verify the quantitation and localization of glycans on the human embryonic stem cell membranes, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry were performed. Proteomics analyses were also performed and confirmed enrichment of plasma membrane proteins with some contamination from endoplasmic reticulum and other membranes. These findings suggest that high mannose glycans are the major component of cell surface glycosylation with even terminal glucoses. High mannose glycans are not commonly presented on the surfaces of mammalian cells or in serum yet may play important roles in stem cell biology. The results also mean that distinguishing stem cells from other mammalian cells may be facilitated by the major difference in the glycosylation of the cell membrane. The deep structural analysis enabled by this new method will enable future mechanistic studies on the biological significance of high mannose glycans on stem cell membranes and provide a general tool to examine

  9. Glycan-independent role of calnexin in the intracellular retention of Charcot-Marie-tooth 1A Gas3/PMP22 mutants.

    PubMed

    Fontanini, Alessandra; Chies, Romina; Snapp, Erik L; Ferrarini, Moreno; Fabrizi, Gian Maria; Brancolini, Claudio

    2005-01-21

    Missense point mutations in Gas3/PMP22 are responsible for the peripheral neuropathies Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A and Dejerine Sottas syndrome. These mutations induce protein misfolding with the consequent accumulation of the proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum and the formation of aggresomes. During folding, Gas3/PMP22 associates with the lectin chaperone calnexin. Here, we show that calnexin interacts with the misfolded transmembrane domains of Gas3/PMP22, fused to green fluorescent protein, in a glycan-independent manner. In addition, photobleaching experiments in living cells revealed that Gas3/PMP22-green fluorescent protein mutants are mobile but diffuse at almost half the diffusion coefficient of wild type protein. Our results support emerging models for a glycan-independent chaperone role for calnexin and for the mechanism of retention of misfolded membrane proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:15537650

  10. Preferential transfer of the complete glycan is determined by the oligosaccharyltransferase complex and not by the catalytic subunit

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Olga; Movsichoff, Federico; Parodi, Armando J.

    2006-01-01

    Most eukaryotic cells show a strong preference for the transfer in vivo and in vitro of the largest dolichol-P-P-linked glycan (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2) to protein chains over that of biosynthetic intermediates that lack the full complement of glucose units. The oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) is a multimeric complex containing eight different proteins, one of which (Stt3p) is the catalytic subunit. Trypanosomatid protozoa lack an OST complex and express only this last protein. Contrary to the OST complex from most eukaryotic cells, the Stt3p subunit of these parasites transfers in cell-free assays glycans with Man7–9GlcNAc2 and Glc1–3Man9GlcNAc2 compositions at the same rate. We have replaced Saccharomyces cerevisiae Stt3p by the Trypanosoma cruzi homologue and found that the complex that is formed preferentially transfers the complete glycan both in vivo and in vitro. Thus, preference for Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 is a feature that is determined by the complex and not by the catalytic subunit. PMID:17001015

  11. Glycan:glycan interactions: High affinity biomolecular interactions that can mediate binding of pathogenic bacteria to host cells

    PubMed Central

    Day, Christopher J.; Tran, Elizabeth N.; Semchenko, Evgeny A.; Tram, Greg; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Ng, Preston S. K.; King, Rebecca M.; Ulanovsky, Rachel; McAtamney, Sarah; Apicella, Michael A.; Tiralongo, Joe; Morona, Renato; Korolik, Victoria; Jennings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Cells from all domains of life express glycan structures attached to lipids and proteins on their surface, called glycoconjugates. Cell-to-cell contact mediated by glycan:glycan interactions have been considered to be low-affinity interactions that precede high-affinity protein–glycan or protein–protein interactions. In several pathogenic bacteria, truncation of surface glycans, lipooligosaccharide (LOS), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported to significantly reduce bacterial adherence to host cells. Here, we show that the saccharide component of LOS/LPS have direct, high-affinity interactions with host glycans. Glycan microarrays reveal that LOS/LPS of four distinct bacterial pathogens bind to numerous host glycan structures. Surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the affinity of these interactions and revealed 66 high-affinity host–glycan:bacterial–glycan pairs with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) ranging between 100 nM and 50 µM. These glycan:glycan affinity values are similar to those reported for lectins or antibodies with glycans. Cell assays demonstrated that glycan:glycan interaction-mediated bacterial adherence could be competitively inhibited by either host cell or bacterial glycans. This is the first report to our knowledge of high affinity glycan:glycan interactions between bacterial pathogens and the host. The discovery of large numbers of glycan:glycan interactions between a diverse range of structures suggests that these interactions may be important in all biological systems. PMID:26676578

  12. Glycan:glycan interactions: High affinity biomolecular interactions that can mediate binding of pathogenic bacteria to host cells.

    PubMed

    Day, Christopher J; Tran, Elizabeth N; Semchenko, Evgeny A; Tram, Greg; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E; Ng, Preston S K; King, Rebecca M; Ulanovsky, Rachel; McAtamney, Sarah; Apicella, Michael A; Tiralongo, Joe; Morona, Renato; Korolik, Victoria; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-12-29

    Cells from all domains of life express glycan structures attached to lipids and proteins on their surface, called glycoconjugates. Cell-to-cell contact mediated by glycan:glycan interactions have been considered to be low-affinity interactions that precede high-affinity protein-glycan or protein-protein interactions. In several pathogenic bacteria, truncation of surface glycans, lipooligosaccharide (LOS), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported to significantly reduce bacterial adherence to host cells. Here, we show that the saccharide component of LOS/LPS have direct, high-affinity interactions with host glycans. Glycan microarrays reveal that LOS/LPS of four distinct bacterial pathogens bind to numerous host glycan structures. Surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the affinity of these interactions and revealed 66 high-affinity host-glycan:bacterial-glycan pairs with equilibrium dissociation constants (K(D)) ranging between 100 nM and 50 µM. These glycan:glycan affinity values are similar to those reported for lectins or antibodies with glycans. Cell assays demonstrated that glycan:glycan interaction-mediated bacterial adherence could be competitively inhibited by either host cell or bacterial glycans. This is the first report to our knowledge of high affinity glycan:glycan interactions between bacterial pathogens and the host. The discovery of large numbers of glycan:glycan interactions between a diverse range of structures suggests that these interactions may be important in all biological systems. PMID:26676578

  13. Automated Motif Discovery from Glycan Array Data

    PubMed Central

    Cholleti, Sharath R.; Agravat, Sanjay; Morris, Tim; Saltz, Joel H.; Song, Xuezheng

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Assessing interactions of a glycan-binding protein (GBP) or lectin with glycans on a microarray generates large datasets, making it difficult to identify a glycan structural motif or determinant associated with the highest apparent binding strength of the GBP. We have developed a computational method, termed GlycanMotifMiner, that uses the relative binding of a GBP with glycans within a glycan microarray to automatically reveal the glycan structural motifs recognized by a GBP. We implemented the software with a web-based graphical interface for users to explore and visualize the discovered motifs. The utility of GlycanMotifMiner was determined using five plant lectins, SNA, HPA, PNA, Con A, and UEA-I. Data from the analyses of the lectins at different protein concentrations were processed to rank the glycans based on their relative binding strengths. The motifs, defined as glycan substructures that exist in a large number of the bound glycans and few non-bound glycans, were then discovered by our algorithm and displayed in a web-based graphical user interface (http://glycanmotifminer.emory.edu). The information is used in defining the glycan-binding specificity of GBPs. The results were compared to the known glycan specificities of these lectins generated by manual methods. A more complex analysis was also carried out using glycan microarray data obtained for a recombinant form of human galectin-8. Results for all of these lectins show that GlycanMotifMiner identified the major motifs known in the literature along with some unexpected novel binding motifs. PMID:22877213

  14. Automated motif discovery from glycan array data.

    PubMed

    Cholleti, Sharath R; Agravat, Sanjay; Morris, Tim; Saltz, Joel H; Song, Xuezheng; Cummings, Richard D; Smith, David F

    2012-10-01

    Assessing interactions of a glycan-binding protein (GBP) or lectin with glycans on a microarray generates large datasets, making it difficult to identify a glycan structural motif or determinant associated with the highest apparent binding strength of the GBP. We have developed a computational method, termed GlycanMotifMiner, that uses the relative binding of a GBP with glycans within a glycan microarray to automatically reveal the glycan structural motifs recognized by a GBP. We implemented the software with a web-based graphical interface for users to explore and visualize the discovered motifs. The utility of GlycanMotifMiner was determined using five plant lectins, SNA, HPA, PNA, Con A, and UEA-I. Data from the analyses of the lectins at different protein concentrations were processed to rank the glycans based on their relative binding strengths. The motifs, defined as glycan substructures that exist in a large number of the bound glycans and few non-bound glycans, were then discovered by our algorithm and displayed in a web-based graphical user interface ( http://glycanmotifminer.emory.edu ). The information is used in defining the glycan-binding specificity of GBPs. The results were compared to the known glycan specificities of these lectins generated by manual methods. A more complex analysis was also carried out using glycan microarray data obtained for a recombinant form of human galectin-8. Results for all of these lectins show that GlycanMotifMiner identified the major motifs known in the literature along with some unexpected novel binding motifs. PMID:22877213

  15. Loss of Core 1-derived O-Glycans Decreases Breast Cancer Development in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kai; Herzog, Brett H.; Fu, Jianxin; Sheng, Minjia; Bergstrom, Kirk; McDaniel, J. Michael; Kondo, Yuji; McGee, Samuel; Cai, Xiaofeng; Li, Ping; Chen, Hong; Xia, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    Mucin-type core 1-derived O-glycans, one of the major types of O-glycans, are highly expressed in mammary gland epithelium. Abnormal O-glycans such as Tn antigen are found in over 90% of breast cancers; however, the in vivo role of these aberrant O-glycans in the etiology of breast cancer is unclear. We generated mice with mammary epithelial specific deletion of core 1-derived O-glycans. By crossing with two spontaneous mouse breast cancer models, we determined that loss of core 1-derived O-glycans delays the onset and progression of breast cancer development. Deficiency of core 1 O-glycosylation impaired the localization of Muc1, a major O-glycoprotein, on the apical surfaces of mammary epithelium. Signaling mediated by Muc1, which is critical for breast cancer development, was also defective in the absence of core 1 O-glycans. This study reveals an unexpected role of core 1-derived O-glycans in breast cancer development in mice. PMID:26124270

  16. Identification of Antigenic Glycans from Schistosoma mansoni by Using a Shotgun Egg Glycan Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Mickum, Megan L.; Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Song, Xuezheng; Dorabawila, Nelum; Mandalasi, Msano; Lasanajak, Yi; Luyai, Anthony; Secor, W. Evan; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Van Die, Irma; Smith, David F.; Nyame, A. Kwame

    2016-01-01

    Infection of mammals by the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni induces antibodies to glycan antigens in worms and eggs, but the differential nature of the immune response among infected mammals is poorly understood. To better define these responses, we used a shotgun glycomics approach in which N-glycans from schistosome egg glycoproteins were prepared, derivatized, separated, and used to generate an egg shotgun glycan microarray. This array was interrogated with sera from infected mice, rhesus monkeys, and humans and with glycan-binding proteins and antibodies to gather information about the structures of antigenic glycans, which also were analyzed by mass spectrometry. A major glycan antigen targeted by IgG from different infected species is the FLDNF epitope [Fucα3GalNAcβ4(Fucα3)GlcNAc-R], which is also recognized by the IgG monoclonal antibody F2D2. The FLDNF antigen is expressed by all life stages of the parasite in mammalian hosts, and F2D2 can kill schistosomula in vitro in a complement-dependent manner. Different antisera also recognized other glycan determinants, including core β-xylose and highly fucosylated glycans. Thus, the natural shotgun glycan microarray of schistosome eggs is useful in identifying antigenic glycans and in developing new anti-glycan reagents that may have diagnostic applications and contribute to developing new vaccines against schistosomiasis. PMID:26883596

  17. Glycans In The Immune system and The Altered Glycan Theory of Autoimmunity: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Maverakis, Emanual; Kim, Kyoungmi; Shimoda, Michiko; Gershwin, M. Eric; Patel, Forum; Wilken, Reason; Raychaudhuri, Siba; Ruhaak, L. Renee; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2015-01-01

    Herein we will review the role of glycans in determining the functionality and specificity of various components of the immune system. Specific topics covered include: the specific glycosylation sites of IgE, IgM, IgD, IgE, IgA, and IgG; how glycans can encode “self” identity by functioning as either danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or self-associated molecular patterns (SAMPs); the role of glycans as markers of protein integrity and age; how the glycocalyx can dictate the migration pattern of immune cells; and how the combination of Fc N-glycans and Ig isotype dictate the effector function of immunoglobulins. We speculate that the latter may be responsible for the well-documented association between alterations of the serum glycome and autoimmunity. Due to technological limitations, the extent of these autoimmune-associated glycan alterations and their role in disease pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated to date. Thus, we also review the current technologies available for glycan analysis, placing an emphasis on Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM), a rapid high-throughput technology that has great potential for glycan biomarker research. Finally, we put forth The Altered Glycan Theory of Autoimmunity, which states that each autoimmune disease will have a unique glycan signature characterized by the site-specific relative abundances of individual glycan structures on immune cells and serum proteins, especially the site-specific glycosylation patterns of specific antibody classes and subclasses. PMID:25578468

  18. Combining 3D structure with glycan array data provides insight into the origin of glycan specificity.

    PubMed

    Grant, Oliver C; Tessier, Matthew B; Meche, Lawrence; Mahal, Lara K; Foley, Bethany L; Woods, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Defining how a glycan-binding protein (GBP) specifically selects its cognate glycan from among the ensemble of glycans within the cellular glycome is an area of intense study. Powerful insight into recognition mechanisms can be gained from 3D structures of GBPs complexed to glycans; however, such structures remain difficult to obtain experimentally. Here an automated 3D structure generation technique, called computational carbohydrate grafting, is combined with the wealth of specificity information available from glycan array screening. Integration of the array data with modeling and crystallography allows generation of putative co-complex structures that can be objectively assessed and iteratively altered until a high level of agreement with experiment is achieved. Given an accurate model of the co-complexes, grafting is also able to discern which binding determinants are active when multiple potential determinants are present within a glycan. In some cases, induced fit in the protein or glycan was necessary to explain the observed specificity, while in other examples a revised definition of the minimal binding determinants was required. When applied to a collection of 10 GBP-glycan complexes, for which crystallographic and array data have been reported, grafting provided a structural rationalization for the binding specificity of >90% of 1223 arrayed glycans. A webtool that enables researchers to perform computational carbohydrate grafting is available at www.glycam.org/gr (accessed 03 March 2016).

  19. Combining 3D structure with glycan array data provides insight into the origin of glycan specificity.

    PubMed

    Grant, Oliver C; Tessier, Matthew B; Meche, Lawrence; Mahal, Lara K; Foley, Bethany L; Woods, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Defining how a glycan-binding protein (GBP) specifically selects its cognate glycan from among the ensemble of glycans within the cellular glycome is an area of intense study. Powerful insight into recognition mechanisms can be gained from 3D structures of GBPs complexed to glycans; however, such structures remain difficult to obtain experimentally. Here an automated 3D structure generation technique, called computational carbohydrate grafting, is combined with the wealth of specificity information available from glycan array screening. Integration of the array data with modeling and crystallography allows generation of putative co-complex structures that can be objectively assessed and iteratively altered until a high level of agreement with experiment is achieved. Given an accurate model of the co-complexes, grafting is also able to discern which binding determinants are active when multiple potential determinants are present within a glycan. In some cases, induced fit in the protein or glycan was necessary to explain the observed specificity, while in other examples a revised definition of the minimal binding determinants was required. When applied to a collection of 10 GBP-glycan complexes, for which crystallographic and array data have been reported, grafting provided a structural rationalization for the binding specificity of >90% of 1223 arrayed glycans. A webtool that enables researchers to perform computational carbohydrate grafting is available at www.glycam.org/gr (accessed 03 March 2016). PMID:26911287

  20. Glycan and lectin biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  1. Glycan and lectin biosensors.

    PubMed

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav; Tkáč, Ján

    2016-06-30

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  2. Preparation of Glycan Arrays Using Pyridylaminated Glycans.

    PubMed

    Nakakita, Shin-Ichi; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We describe the method to prepare neoglycoproteins from the conjugation of bovine serum albumin and pyridylaminated glycans. Large quantities of glycans (>1 mg) can be pyridylaminated and then converted to their 1-amino-1-deoxy derivatives by reaction with hydrogen followed by hydrazine. These pyridylaminated glycans can then be conjugated to bovine serum albumin via esterification with N-( m-maleimidobenzoyloxy)succinimide to form a neoglycoprotein, e.g., glycosylated bovine serum albumin. As a demonstration, we prepared High-mannose bovine serum albumin, which was immobilized on an activated glass slide. Then, we showed that the neoglycoprotein bind to Cy3-labeled Lens culinaris agglutinin, a mannose-specific plant lectin, as detected using an evanescent-field-activated fluorescence scanner system. PMID:26614079

  3. Direct glycan structure determination of intact N-linked glycopeptides by low-energy collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry and predicted spectral library searching.

    PubMed

    Pai, Pei-Jing; Hu, Yingwei; Lam, Henry

    2016-08-31

    Intact glycopeptide MS analysis to reveal site-specific protein glycosylation is an important frontier of proteomics. However, computational tools for analyzing MS/MS spectra of intact glycopeptides are still limited and not well-integrated into existing workflows. In this work, a new computational tool which combines the spectral library building/searching tool, SpectraST (Lam et al. Nat. Methods2008, 5, 873-875), and the glycopeptide fragmentation prediction tool, MassAnalyzer (Zhang et al. Anal. Chem.2010, 82, 10194-10202) for intact glycopeptide analysis has been developed. Specifically, this tool enables the determination of the glycan structure directly from low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra of intact glycopeptides. Given a list of possible glycopeptide sequences as input, a sample-specific spectral library of MassAnalyzer-predicted spectra is built using SpectraST. Glycan identification from CID spectra is achieved by spectral library searching against this library, in which both m/z and intensity information of the possible fragmentation ions are taken into consideration for improved accuracy. We validated our method using a standard glycoprotein, human transferrin, and evaluated its potential to be used in site-specific glycosylation profiling of glycoprotein datasets from LC-MS/MS. In addition, we further applied our method to reveal, for the first time, the site-specific N-glycosylation profile of recombinant human acetylcholinesterase expressed in HEK293 cells. For maximum usability, SpectraST is developed as part of the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP), a freely available and open-source software suite for MS data analysis.

  4. Direct glycan structure determination of intact N-linked glycopeptides by low-energy collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry and predicted spectral library searching.

    PubMed

    Pai, Pei-Jing; Hu, Yingwei; Lam, Henry

    2016-08-31

    Intact glycopeptide MS analysis to reveal site-specific protein glycosylation is an important frontier of proteomics. However, computational tools for analyzing MS/MS spectra of intact glycopeptides are still limited and not well-integrated into existing workflows. In this work, a new computational tool which combines the spectral library building/searching tool, SpectraST (Lam et al. Nat. Methods2008, 5, 873-875), and the glycopeptide fragmentation prediction tool, MassAnalyzer (Zhang et al. Anal. Chem.2010, 82, 10194-10202) for intact glycopeptide analysis has been developed. Specifically, this tool enables the determination of the glycan structure directly from low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra of intact glycopeptides. Given a list of possible glycopeptide sequences as input, a sample-specific spectral library of MassAnalyzer-predicted spectra is built using SpectraST. Glycan identification from CID spectra is achieved by spectral library searching against this library, in which both m/z and intensity information of the possible fragmentation ions are taken into consideration for improved accuracy. We validated our method using a standard glycoprotein, human transferrin, and evaluated its potential to be used in site-specific glycosylation profiling of glycoprotein datasets from LC-MS/MS. In addition, we further applied our method to reveal, for the first time, the site-specific N-glycosylation profile of recombinant human acetylcholinesterase expressed in HEK293 cells. For maximum usability, SpectraST is developed as part of the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP), a freely available and open-source software suite for MS data analysis. PMID:27506355

  5. Are glycan biosensors an alternative to glycan microarrays?

    PubMed Central

    Hushegyi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates (glycans) play an important role in nature and study of their interaction with proteins or intact cells can be useful for understanding many physiological and pathological processes. Such interactions have been successfully interrogated in a highly parallel way using glycan microarrays, but this technique has some limitations. Thus, in recent years glycan biosensors in numerous progressive configurations have been developed offering distinct advantages compared to glycan microarrays. Thus, in this review advances achieved in the field of label-free glycan biosensors are discussed. PMID:27231487

  6. Salmonella Degrades the Host Glycocalyx Leading to Altered Infection and Glycan Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Arabyan, Narine; Park, Dayoung; Foutouhi, Soraya; Weis, Allison M; Huang, Bihua C; Williams, Cynthia C; Desai, Prerak; Shah, Jigna; Jeannotte, Richard; Kong, Nguyet; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Weimer, Bart C

    2016-01-01

    Complex glycans cover the gut epithelial surface to protect the cell from the environment. Invasive pathogens must breach the glycan layer before initiating infection. While glycan degradation is crucial for infection, this process is inadequately understood. Salmonella contains 47 glycosyl hydrolases (GHs) that may degrade the glycan. We hypothesized that keystone genes from the entire GH complement of Salmonella are required to degrade glycans to change infection. This study determined that GHs recognize the terminal monosaccharides (N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), galactose, mannose, and fucose) and significantly (p < 0.05) alter infection. During infection, Salmonella used its two GHs sialidase nanH and amylase malS for internalization by targeting different glycan structures. The host glycans were altered during Salmonella association via the induction of N-glycan biosynthesis pathways leading to modification of host glycans by increasing fucosylation and mannose content, while decreasing sialylation. Gene expression analysis indicated that the host cell responded by regulating more than 50 genes resulting in remodeled glycans in response to Salmonella treatment. This study established the glycan structures on colonic epithelial cells, determined that Salmonella required two keystone GHs for internalization, and left remodeled host glycans as a result of infection. These data indicate that microbial GHs are undiscovered virulence factors. PMID:27389966

  7. Salmonella Degrades the Host Glycocalyx Leading to Altered Infection and Glycan Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Arabyan, Narine; Park, Dayoung; Foutouhi, Soraya; Weis, Allison M.; Huang, Bihua C.; Williams, Cynthia C.; Desai, Prerak; Shah, Jigna; Jeannotte, Richard; Kong, Nguyet; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Weimer, Bart C.

    2016-01-01

    Complex glycans cover the gut epithelial surface to protect the cell from the environment. Invasive pathogens must breach the glycan layer before initiating infection. While glycan degradation is crucial for infection, this process is inadequately understood. Salmonella contains 47 glycosyl hydrolases (GHs) that may degrade the glycan. We hypothesized that keystone genes from the entire GH complement of Salmonella are required to degrade glycans to change infection. This study determined that GHs recognize the terminal monosaccharides (N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), galactose, mannose, and fucose) and significantly (p < 0.05) alter infection. During infection, Salmonella used its two GHs sialidase nanH and amylase malS for internalization by targeting different glycan structures. The host glycans were altered during Salmonella association via the induction of N-glycan biosynthesis pathways leading to modification of host glycans by increasing fucosylation and mannose content, while decreasing sialylation. Gene expression analysis indicated that the host cell responded by regulating more than 50 genes resulting in remodeled glycans in response to Salmonella treatment. This study established the glycan structures on colonic epithelial cells, determined that Salmonella required two keystone GHs for internalization, and left remodeled host glycans as a result of infection. These data indicate that microbial GHs are undiscovered virulence factors. PMID:27389966

  8. Loss of intestinal O-glycans promotes spontaneous duodenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Nan; Bergstrom, Kirk; Fu, Jianxin; Xie, Biao; Chen, Weichang; Xia, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    Mucin-type O-glycans, primarily core 1- and core 3-derived O-glycans, are the major mucus barrier components throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Previous reports identified the biological role of O-glycans in the stomach and colon. However, the biological function of O-glycans in the small intestine remains unknown. Using mice lacking intestinal core 1- and core 3-derived O-glycans [intestinal epithelial cell C1galt1(-/-);C3GnT(-/-) or double knockout (DKO)], we found that loss of O-glycans predisposes DKO mice to spontaneous duodenal tumorigenesis by ∼1 yr of age. Tumor incidence did not increase with age; however, tumors advanced in aggressiveness by 20 mo. O-glycan deficiency was associated with reduced luminal mucus in DKO mice before tumor development. Altered intestinal epithelial homeostasis with enhanced baseline crypt proliferation characterizes these phenotypes as assayed by Ki67 staining. In addition, fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis reveals a significantly lower bacterial burden in the duodenum compared with the large intestine. This phenotype is not reduced with antibiotic treatment, implying O-glycosylation defects, rather than bacterial-induced inflammation, which causes spontaneous duodenal tumorigenesis. Moreover, inflammatory responses in DKO duodenal mucosa are mild as assayed with histology, quantitative PCR for inflammation-associated cytokines, and immunostaining for immune cells. Importantly, inducible deletion of intestinal O-glycans in adult mice leads to analogous spontaneous duodenal tumors, although with higher incidence and heightened severity compared with mice with O-glycans constitutive deletion. In conclusion, these studies reveal O-glycans within the small intestine are critical determinants of duodenal cancer risk. Future studies will provide insights into the pathogenesis in the general population and those at risk for this rare but deadly cancer.

  9. Structures and biosynthesis of the N- and O-glycans of recombinant human oviduct-specific glycoprotein expressed in human embryonic kidney cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojing; Tao, Shujuan; Orlando, Ron; Brockhausen, Inka; Kan, Frederick W.K.

    2012-01-01

    Oviduct-specific glycoprotein (OVGP1) is a major mucin-like glycoprotein synthesized and secreted exclusively by non-ciliated secretory cells of mammalian oviduct. In vitro functional studies showed that OVGP1 plays important roles during fertilization and early embryo development. We have recently produced recombinant human oviduct-specific glycoprotein (rhOVGP1) in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. The present study was undertaken to characterize the structures and determine the biosynthetic pathways of the N- and O-glycans of rhOVGP1. Treatment of the stable rhOVGP1-expressing HEK293 cells with either GalNAcα-Bn to block O-glycan extension, tunicamycin to block N-glycosylation, or neuraminidase increased the electrophoretic mobility of rhOVGP1. A detailed analysis of O- and N-linked glycans of rhOVGP1 by mass spectrometry showed a broad range of many simple and complex glycan structures. In order to identify the enzymes involved in the glycosylation of rhOVGP1, we assayed glycosyltransferase activities involved in the assembly of O- and N-glycans in HEK293 cells, and compared these to those from the immortalized human oviductal cells (OE-E6/E7). Our results demonstrate that HEK293 and OE-E6/E7 cells exhibit a similar spectrum of glycosyltransferase activities that can synthesize elongated and sialylated O-glycans with core 1 and 2 structures, as well as complex multiantennary N-glycans. It is anticipated that the knowledge gained from the present study will facilitate future studies of the role of the glycans of human OVGP1 in fertilization and early embryo development. PMID:22817996

  10. Structures and biosynthesis of the N- and O-glycans of recombinant human oviduct-specific glycoprotein expressed in human embryonic kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaojing; Tao, Shujuan; Orlando, Ron; Brockhausen, Inka; Kan, Frederick W K

    2012-09-01

    Oviduct-specific glycoprotein (OVGP1) is a major mucin-like glycoprotein synthesized and secreted exclusively by non-ciliated secretory cells of mammalian oviduct. In vitro functional studies showed that OVGP1 plays important roles during fertilization and early embryo development. We have recently produced recombinant human oviduct-specific glycoprotein (rhOVGP1) in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. The present study was undertaken to characterize the structures and determine the biosynthetic pathways of the N- and O-glycans of rhOVGP1. Treatment of the stable rhOVGP1-expressing HEK293 cells with either GalNAcα-Bn to block O-glycan extension, tunicamycin to block N-glycosylation, or neuraminidase increased the electrophoretic mobility of rhOVGP1. A detailed analysis of O- and N-linked glycans of rhOVGP1 by mass spectrometry showed a broad range of many simple and complex glycan structures. In order to identify the enzymes involved in the glycosylation of rhOVGP1, we assayed glycosyltransferase activities involved in the assembly of O- and N-glycans in HEK293 cells, and compared these to those from the immortalized human oviductal cells (OE-E6/E7). Our results demonstrate that HEK293 and OE-E6/E7 cells exhibit a similar spectrum of glycosyltransferase activities that can synthesize elongated and sialylated O-glycans with core 1 and 2 structures, as well as complex multiantennary N-glycans. It is anticipated that the knowledge gained from the present study will facilitate future studies of the role of the glycans of human OVGP1 in fertilization and early embryo development.

  11. The analysis of sialylation, N-glycan branching, and expression of O-glycans in seminal plasma of infertile men.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Ewa M; Kałuża, Anna; Zimmer, Mariusz; Ferens-Sieczkowska, Mirosława

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates are known to mediate some events involved in successful fertilization. Although some studies on the glycosylation of seminal plasma proteins are available, the total glycan profile was rarely analyzed as a feature influencing fertilization potential. In this work we aimed to compare some glycosylation traits in seminal plasma glycoproteins of fertile and infertile men. The following findings emerge from our studies: (1) in human seminal plasma the presence and alterations of O-linked glycans were observed; (2) the expression of SNA-reactive sialic acid significantly differs between asthenozoospermia and both normozoospermic (fertile and infertile) groups; (3) the expression of PHA-L-reactive highly branched N-glycans was significantly lower in oligozoospermic patients than in both normozoospermic groups. Indication of the appropriate lectins that would enable the possibly precise determination of the glycan profile seems to be a good supplement to mass spectrum analysis. Extension of the lectin panel is useful for the further research.

  12. Human Milk Contains Novel Glycans That Are Potential Decoy Receptors for Neonatal Rotaviruses*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Mickum, Megan L.; Ashline, David J.; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Estes, Mary K.; Reinhold, Vernon N.; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Human milk contains a rich set of soluble, reducing glycans whose functions and bioactivities are not well understood. Because human milk glycans (HMGs) have been implicated as receptors for various pathogens, we explored the functional glycome of human milk using shotgun glycomics. The free glycans from pooled milk samples of donors with mixed Lewis and Secretor phenotypes were labeled with a fluorescent tag and separated via multidimensional HPLC to generate a tagged glycan library containing 247 HMG targets that were printed to generate the HMG shotgun glycan microarray (SGM). To investigate the potential role of HMGs as decoy receptors for rotavirus (RV), a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children, we interrogated the HMG SGM with recombinant forms of VP8* domains of the RV outer capsid spike protein VP4 from human neonatal strains N155(G10P[11]) and RV3(G3P[6]) and a bovine strain, B223(G10P[11]). Glycans that were bound by RV attachment proteins were selected for detailed structural analyses using metadata-assisted glycan sequencing, which compiles data on each glycan based on its binding by antibodies and lectins before and after exo- and endo-glycosidase digestion of the SGM, coupled with independent MSn analyses. These complementary structural approaches resulted in the identification of 32 glycans based on RV VP8* binding, many of which are novel HMGs, whose detailed structural assignments by MSn are described in a companion report. Although sialic acid has been thought to be important as a surface receptor for RVs, our studies indicated that sialic acid is not required for binding of glycans to individual VP8* domains. Remarkably, each VP8* recognized specific glycan determinants within a unique subset of related glycan structures where specificity differences arise from subtle differences in glycan structures. PMID:25048705

  13. Blood Plasma-Derived Anti-Glycan Antibodies to Sialylated and Sulfated Glycans Identify Ovarian Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pochechueva, Tatiana; Chinarev, Alexander; Schoetzau, Andreas; Fedier, André; Bovin, Nicolai V.; Hacker, Neville F.; Jacob, Francis; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Altered levels of naturally occurring anti-glycan antibodies (AGA) circulating in human blood plasma are found in different pathologies including cancer. Here the levels of AGA directed against 22 negatively charged (sialylated and sulfated) glycans were assessed in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC, n = 22) patients and benign controls (n = 31) using our previously developed suspension glycan array (SGA). Specifically, the ability of AGA to differentiate between controls and HGSOC, the most common and aggressive type of ovarian cancer with a poor outcome was determined. Results were compared to CA125, the commonly used ovarian cancer biomarker. AGA to seven glycans that significantly (P<0.05) differentiated between HGSOC and control were identified: AGA to top candidates SiaTn and 6-OSulfo-TF (both IgM) differentiated comparably to CA125. The area under the curve (AUC) of a panel of AGA to 5 glycans (SiaTn, 6-OSulfo-TF, 6-OSulfo-LN, SiaLea, and GM2) (0.878) was comparable to CA125 (0.864), but it markedly increased (0.985) when combined with CA125. AGA to SiaTn and 6-OSulfo-TF were also valuable predictors for HGSOC when CA125 values appeared inconclusive, i.e. were below a certain threshold. AGA-glycan binding was in some cases isotype-dependent and sensitive to glycosidic linkage switch (α2–6 vs. α2–3), to sialylation, and to sulfation of the glycans. In conclusion, plasma-derived AGA to sialylated and sulfated glycans including SiaTn and 6-OSulfo-TF detected by SGA present a valuable alternative to CA125 for differentiating controls from HGSOC patients and for predicting the likelihood of HGSOC, and may be potential HGSOC tumor markers. PMID:27764122

  14. Quantitation of Permethylated N-Glycans through Multiple-Reaction Monitoring (MRM) LC-MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiyue; Hu, Yunli; DeSantos-Garcia, Janie L.; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-04-01

    The important biological roles of glycans and their implications in disease development and progression have created a demand for the development of sensitive quantitative glycomics methods. Quantitation of glycans existing at low abundance is still analytically challenging. In this study, an N-linked glycans quantitation method using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) on a triple quadrupole instrument was developed. Optimum normalized collision energy (CE) for both sialylated and fucosylated N-glycan was determined to be 30%, whereas it was found to be 35% for either fucosylated or sialylated N-glycans. The optimum CE for mannose and complex type N-glycan was determined to be 35%. Additionally, the use of three transitions was shown to facilitate reliable quantitation. A total of 88 N-glycan compositions in human blood serum were quantified using this MRM approach. Reliable detection and quantitation of these glycans was achieved when the equivalence of 0.005 μL of blood serum was analyzed. Accordingly, N-glycans down to the 100th of a μL level can be reliably quantified in pooled human blood serum, spanning a dynamic concentration range of three orders of magnitude. MRM was also effectively utilized to quantitatively compare the expression of N-glycans derived from brain-targeting breast carcinoma cells (MDA-MB-231BR) and metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). Thus, the described MRM method of permethylated N-glycan enables a rapid and reliable identification and quantitation of glycans derived from glycoproteins purified or present in complex biological samples.

  15. Dual modifications strategy to quantify neutral and sialylated N-glycans simultaneously by MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Warren, Peter G; Froehlich, John W; Lee, Richard S

    2014-07-01

    Differences in ionization efficiency among neutral and sialylated glycans prevent direct quantitative comparison by their respective mass spectrometric signals. To overcome this challenge, we developed an integrated chemical strategy, Dual Reactions for Analytical Glycomics (DRAG), to quantitatively compare neutral and sialylated glycans simultaneously by MALDI-MS. Initially, two glycan samples to be compared undergo reductive amination with 2-aminobenzoic acid and 2-(13)[C6]-aminobenzoic acid, respectively. The different isotope-incorporated glycans are then combined and subjected to the methylamidation of the sialic acid residues in one mixture, homogenizing the ionization responses for all neutral and sialylated glycans. By this approach, the expression change of relevant glycans between two samples is proportional to the ratios of doublet signals with a static 6 Da mass difference in MALDI-MS and the change in relative abundance of any glycan within samples can also be determined. The strategy was chemically validated using well-characterized N-glycans from bovine fetuin and IgG from human serum. By comparing the N-glycomes from a first morning (AM) versus an afternoon (PM) urine sample obtained from a single donor, we further demonstrated the ability of DRAG strategy to measure subtle quantitative differences in numerous urinary N-glycans.

  16. Plasma High-Mannose and Complex/Hybrid N-Glycans Are Associated with Hypercholesterolemia in Humans and Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Liang; Li, Qianwei; Li, Lingmei; Lin, Yan; Zhao, Sihai; Wang, Weirong; Wang, Rong; Li, Yongqin; Yuan, Jiangbei; Wang, Chengjian; Wang, Zhongfu; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2016-01-01

    N-glycans play important roles in various pathophysiological processes and can be used as clinical diagnosis markers. However, plasma N-glycans change and their pathophysiological significance in the setting of hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, is unknown. Here, we collected plasma from both hypercholesterolemic patients and cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits, and determined the changes in the whole-plasma N-glycan profile by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We found that both the hypercholesterolemic patients and rabbits showed a dramatic change in their plasma glycan profile. Compared with healthy subjects, the hypercholesterolemic patients exhibited higher plasma levels of a cluster of high-mannose and complex/hybrid N-glycans (mainly including undecorated or sialylated glycans), whereas only a few fucosylated or fucosylated and sialylated N-glycans were increased. Additionally, cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits also displayed increased plasma levels of high-mannose in addition to high complex/hybrid N-glycan levels. The whole-plasma glycan profiles revealed that the plasma N-glycan levels were correlated with the plasma cholesterol levels, implying that N-glycans may be a target for treatment of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26999365

  17. Plasma High-Mannose and Complex/Hybrid N-Glycans Are Associated with Hypercholesterolemia in Humans and Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liang; Li, Qianwei; Li, Lingmei; Lin, Yan; Zhao, Sihai; Wang, Weirong; Wang, Rong; Li, Yongqin; Yuan, Jiangbei; Wang, Chengjian; Wang, Zhongfu; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2016-01-01

    N-glycans play important roles in various pathophysiological processes and can be used as clinical diagnosis markers. However, plasma N-glycans change and their pathophysiological significance in the setting of hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, is unknown. Here, we collected plasma from both hypercholesterolemic patients and cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits, and determined the changes in the whole-plasma N-glycan profile by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We found that both the hypercholesterolemic patients and rabbits showed a dramatic change in their plasma glycan profile. Compared with healthy subjects, the hypercholesterolemic patients exhibited higher plasma levels of a cluster of high-mannose and complex/hybrid N-glycans (mainly including undecorated or sialylated glycans), whereas only a few fucosylated or fucosylated and sialylated N-glycans were increased. Additionally, cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits also displayed increased plasma levels of high-mannose in addition to high complex/hybrid N-glycan levels. The whole-plasma glycan profiles revealed that the plasma N-glycan levels were correlated with the plasma cholesterol levels, implying that N-glycans may be a target for treatment of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26999365

  18. Common glycoproteins expressing polylactosamine-type glycans on matched patient primary and metastatic melanoma cells show different glycan profiles.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Mitsui, Yosuke; Kakoi, Naotaka; Yamada, Keita; Hayakawa, Takao; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2014-02-01

    Recently, we reported comparative analysis of glycoproteins which express cancer-specific N-glycans on various cancer cells and identified 24 glycoproteins having polylactosamine (polyLacNAc)-type N-glycans that are abundantly present in malignant cells [ Mitsui et al., J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 2012 , 70 , 718 - 726 ]. In the present study, we applied the technique to comparative studies on common glycoproteins present in the matched patient primary and metastatic melanoma cell lines. Metastatic melanoma cells (WM266-4) contained a large amount of polyLacNAc-type N-glycans in comparison with primary melanoma cells (WM115). To identify the glycoproteins expressing these N-glycans, glycopeptides having polyLacNAc-type N-glycans were captured by a Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA)-immobilized agarose column. The captured glycopeptides were analyzed by LC/MS after removing N-glycans, and some glycoproteins such as basigin, lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) were identified in both WM115 and WM266-4 cells. The expression level of polyLacNAc of CSPG4 in WM266-4 cells was significantly higher than that in WM115 cells. In addition, sulfation patterns of chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains in CSPG4 showed dramatic changes between these cell lines. These data show that characteristic glycans attached to common proteins observed in different stages of cancer cells will be useful markers for determining degree of malignancies of tumor cells. PMID:24354860

  19. Engineering galectin–glycan interactions for immunotherapy and immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Shaheen A

    2016-01-01

    Galectins, a 15-member family of soluble carbohydrate-binding proteins, are receiving increasing interest as therapeutic targets for immunotherapy and immunomodulation due to their role as extracellular signals that regulate innate and adaptive immune cell phenotype and function. However, different galectins can have redundant, synergistic, or antagonistic signaling activity in normal immunological responses, such as resolution of inflammation and induction of antigen-specific tolerance. In addition, certain galectins can be hijacked to promote progression of immunopathologies, such as tumor immune privilege, metastasis, and viral infection, while others can inhibit these processes. Thus, eliciting a desired immunological outcome will likely necessitate therapeutics that can precisely enhance or inhibit particular galectin–glycan interactions. Multivalency is an important determinant of the affinity and specificity of natural galectin–glycan interactions, and is emerging as a key design element for therapeutics that can effectively manipulate galectin bioactivity. This minireview surveys current molecular and biomaterial engineering approaches to create therapeutics that can stabilize galectin multivalency or recapitulate natural glycan multivalency (i.e. “the glycocluster effect”). In particular, we highlight examples of using natural and engineered multivalent galectins for immunosuppression and immune tolerance, with a particular emphasis on treating autoimmune diseases or avoiding transplant rejection. In addition, we present examples of multivalent inhibitors of galectin–glycan interactions to maintain or restore T-cell function, with a particular emphasis on promoting antitumor immunity. Finally, we discuss emerging opportunities to further engineer galectin–glycan interactions for immunotherapy and immunomodulation. PMID:27229902

  20. Engineering galectin-glycan interactions for immunotherapy and immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Shaheen A; Hudalla, Gregory A

    2016-05-01

    Galectins, a 15-member family of soluble carbohydrate-binding proteins, are receiving increasing interest as therapeutic targets for immunotherapy and immunomodulation due to their role as extracellular signals that regulate innate and adaptive immune cell phenotype and function. However, different galectins can have redundant, synergistic, or antagonistic signaling activity in normal immunological responses, such as resolution of inflammation and induction of antigen-specific tolerance. In addition, certain galectins can be hijacked to promote progression of immunopathologies, such as tumor immune privilege, metastasis, and viral infection, while others can inhibit these processes. Thus, eliciting a desired immunological outcome will likely necessitate therapeutics that can precisely enhance or inhibit particular galectin-glycan interactions. Multivalency is an important determinant of the affinity and specificity of natural galectin-glycan interactions, and is emerging as a key design element for therapeutics that can effectively manipulate galectin bioactivity. This minireview surveys current molecular and biomaterial engineering approaches to create therapeutics that can stabilize galectin multivalency or recapitulate natural glycan multivalency (i.e. "the glycocluster effect"). In particular, we highlight examples of using natural and engineered multivalent galectins for immunosuppression and immune tolerance, with a particular emphasis on treating autoimmune diseases or avoiding transplant rejection. In addition, we present examples of multivalent inhibitors of galectin-glycan interactions to maintain or restore T-cell function, with a particular emphasis on promoting antitumor immunity. Finally, we discuss emerging opportunities to further engineer galectin-glycan interactions for immunotherapy and immunomodulation. PMID:27229902

  1. Serum antibody screening by surface plasmon resonance using a natural glycan microarray.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Arjen R; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M; Wuhrer, M

    2008-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based natural glycan microarray was developed for screening of interactions between glycans and carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBPs). The microarray contained 144 glycan samples and allowed the real-time and simultaneous screening for recognition by CBPs without the need of fluorescent labeling. Glycans were released from their natural source and coupled by reductive amination with the fluorescent labels 2-aminobenzamide (2AB) or anthranilic acid (AA) followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation making use of the fluorescent tag. The released and labeled glycans, in addition to fluorescently labeled synthetic glycans and (neo)glycoproteins, were printed on an epoxide-activated chip at fmol amounts. This resulted in covalent immobilization, with the epoxide groups forming covalent bonds to the secondary amine groups present on the fluorescent glycoconjugates. The generated SPR glycan array presented a subset of the glycan repertoire of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. In order to demonstrate the usefulness of the array in the simultaneous detection of glycan-specific serum antibodies, the anti-glycan antibody profiles from sera of S. mansoni-infected individuals as well as from non-endemic uninfected controls were recorded. The SPR screening was sensitive for differences between infection sera and control sera, and revealed antibody titers and antibody classes (IgG or IgM). All SPR analyses were performed with a single SPR array chip, which required regeneration and blocking of the chip before the application of a serum sample. Our results indicate that SPR-based arrays constructed from glycans of natural or synthetic origin, pure or as mixture, can be used for determining serum antibody profiles as possible markers for the infection status of an individual.

  2. Glycan Profiling Shows Unvaried N-Glycomes in MSC Clones with Distinct Differentiation Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Katherine M.; Thomas-Oates, Jane E.; Genever, Paul G.; Ungar, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Different cell types have different N-glycomes in mammals. This means that cellular differentiation is accompanied by changes in the N-glycan profile. Yet when the N-glycomes of cell types with differing fates diverge is unclear. We have investigated the N-glycan profiles of two different clonal populations of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). One clone (Y101), when differentiated into osteoblasts, showed a marked shift in the glycan profile toward a higher abundance of complex N-glycans and more core fucosylation. Yet chemical inhibition of complex glycan formation during osteogenic differentiation did not prevent the formation of functional osteoblasts. However, the N-glycan profile of another MSC clone (Y202), which cannot differentiate into osteoblasts, was not significantly different from that of the clone that can. Interestingly, incubation of Y202 cells in osteogenic medium caused a similar reduction of oligomannose glycan content in this non-differentiating cell line. Our analysis implies that the N-glycome changes seen upon differentiation do not have direct functional links to the differentiation process. Thus N-glycans may instead be important for self-renewal rather than for cell fate determination. PMID:27303666

  3. Structural Characterization of Serum N-Glycans by Methylamidation, Fluorescent Labeling, and Analysis by Microchip Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Indranil; Snyder, Christa M; Zhou, Xiaomei; Campos, Margit I; Alley, William R; Novotny, Milos V; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2016-09-20

    To characterize the structures of N-glycans derived from human serum, we report a strategy that combines microchip electrophoresis, standard addition, enzymatic digestion, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). We compared (i) electrophoretic mobilities of known N-glycans from well-characterized (standard) glycoproteins through standard addition, (ii) the electrophoretic mobilities of N-glycans with their molecular weights determined by MALDI-MS, and (iii) electrophoretic profiles of N-glycans enzymatically treated with fucosidase. The key step to identify the sialylated N-glycans was to quantitatively neutralize the negative charge on both α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids by covalent derivatization with methylamine. Both neutralized and nonsialylated N-glycans from these samples were then reacted with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (APTS) to provide a fluorescent label and a triple-negative charge, separated by microchip electrophoresis, and detected by laser-induced fluorescence. The methylamidation step leads to a 24% increase in the peak capacity of the separation and direct correlation of electrophoretic and MALDI-MS results. In total, 37 unique N-glycan structures were assigned to 52 different peaks recorded in the electropherograms of the serum samples. This strategy ensures the needed separation efficiency and detectability, easily resolves linkage and positional glycan isomers, and is highly reproducible.

  4. Comprehensive analysis of the N-glycan biosynthetic pathway using bioinformatics to generate UniCorn: A theoretical N-glycan structure database.

    PubMed

    Akune, Yukie; Lin, Chi-Hung; Abrahams, Jodie L; Zhang, Jingyu; Packer, Nicolle H; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Campbell, Matthew P

    2016-08-01

    Glycan structures attached to proteins are comprised of diverse monosaccharide sequences and linkages that are produced from precursor nucleotide-sugars by a series of glycosyltransferases. Databases of these structures are an essential resource for the interpretation of analytical data and the development of bioinformatics tools. However, with no template to predict what structures are possible the human glycan structure databases are incomplete and rely heavily on the curation of published, experimentally determined, glycan structure data. In this work, a library of 45 human glycosyltransferases was used to generate a theoretical database of N-glycan structures comprised of 15 or less monosaccharide residues. Enzyme specificities were sourced from major online databases including Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Glycan, Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG), Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZy), GlycoGene DataBase (GGDB) and BRENDA. Based on the known activities, more than 1.1 million theoretical structures and 4.7 million synthetic reactions were generated and stored in our database called UniCorn. Furthermore, we analyzed the differences between the predicted glycan structures in UniCorn and those contained in UniCarbKB (www.unicarbkb.org), a database which stores experimentally described glycan structures reported in the literature, and demonstrate that UniCorn can be used to aid in the assignment of ambiguous structures whilst also serving as a discovery database.

  5. Exquisite specificity of mitogenic lectin from Cephalosporium curvulum to core fucosylated N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Shashikala R; Eligar, Sachin M; Ballal, Suhas; Belur, Shivakumar; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Swamy, Bale M

    2016-02-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins that are gaining attention as important tools for the identification of specific glycan markers expressed during different stages of the cancer. We earlier reported the purification of a mitogenic lectin from human pathogenic fungus Cephalosporium curvulum (CSL) that has complex sugar specificity when analysed by hapten inhibition assay. In the present study, we report the fine sugar specificity of CSL as determined by glycan array analysis. The results revealed that CSL has exquisite specificity towards core fucosylated N-glycans. Fucosylated trimannosyl core is the basic structure required for the binding of CSL. The presence of fucose in the side chain further enhances the avidity of CSL towards such glycans. The affinity of CSL is drastically reduced towards the non-core fucosylated glycans, in spite of their side chain fucosylation. CSL showed no binding to the tested O-glycans and monosaccharides. These observations suggest the unique specificity of CSL towards core fucosylated N-glycans, which was further validated by binding of CSL to human colon cancer epithelial and hepatocarcinoma cell lines namely HT29 and HepG2, respectively, that are known to express core fucosylated N-glycans, using AOL and LCA as positive controls. LCA and AOL are fucose specific lectins that are currently being used clinically for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinomas. Most of the gastrointestinal markers express core fucosylated N-glycans. The high affinity and exclusive specificity of CSL towards α1-6 linkage of core fucosylated glycans compared to other fucose specific lectins, makes it a promising molecule that needs to be further explored for its application in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancer.

  6. Glycan variation and evolution in the eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Corfield, Anthony P; Berry, Monica

    2015-07-01

    In this review, we document the evolution of common glycan structures in the eukaryotes, and illustrate the considerable variety of oligosaccharides existing in these organisms. We focus on the families of N- and O-glycans, glycosphingolipids, glycosaminoglycans, glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors, sialic acids (Sias), and cytoplasmic and nuclear glycans. We also outline similar and divergent aspects of the glycans during evolution within the groups, which include inter- and intraspecies differences, molecular mimicry, viral glycosylation adaptations, glycosyltransferase specificity relating to function, and the natural dynamism powering these events. Finally, we present an overview of the patterns of glycosylation found within the groups comprising the Eukaryota, namely the Deuterostomia, Fungi, Viridiplantae, Nematoda, and Arthropoda.

  7. Glycan Engineering for Cell and Developmental Biology

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Matthew E.; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-surface glycans are a diverse class of macromolecules that participate in many key biological processes, including cell-cell communication, development, and disease progression. Thus, the ability to modulate the structures of glycans on cell surfaces provides a powerful means not only to understand fundamental processes but also to direct activity and elicit desired cellular responses. Here, we describe methods to sculpt glycans on cell surfaces and highlight recent successes in which artificially engineered glycans have been employed to control biological outcomes such as the immune response and stem cell fate. PMID:26933739

  8. The evolution of N-glycan-dependent endoplasmic reticulum quality control factors for glycoprotein folding and degradation.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sulagna; Vishwanath, Prashanth; Cui, Jike; Kelleher, Daniel J; Gilmore, Reid; Robbins, Phillips W; Samuelson, John

    2007-07-10

    Asn-linked glycans (N-glycans) play important roles in the quality control (QC) of glycoprotein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen and in ER-associated degradation (ERAD) of proteins by cytosolic proteasomes. A UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase glucosylates N-glycans of misfolded proteins, which are then bound and refolded by calreticulin and/or calnexin in association with a protein disulfide isomerase. Alternatively, an alpha-1,2-mannosidase (Mns1) and mannosidase-like proteins (ER degradation-enhancing alpha-mannosidase-like proteins 1, 2, and 3) are part of a process that results in the dislocation of misfolded glycoproteins into the cytosol, where proteins are degraded in the proteasome. Recently we found that numerous protists and fungi contain 0-11 sugars in their N-glycan precursors versus 14 sugars in those of animals, plants, fungi, and Dictyostelium. Our goal here was to determine what effect N-glycan precursor diversity has on N-glycan-dependent QC systems of glycoprotein folding and ERAD. N-glycan-dependent QC of folding (UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase, calreticulin, and/or calnexin) was present and active in some but not all protists containing at least five mannose residues in their N-glycans and was absent in protists lacking Man. In contrast, N-glycan-dependent ERAD appeared to be absent from the majority of protists. However, Trypanosoma and Trichomonas genomes predicted ER degradation-enhancing alpha-mannosidase-like protein and Mns1 orthologs, respectively, each of which had alpha-mannosidase activity in vitro. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that the diversity of N-glycan-dependent QC of glycoprotein folding (and possibly that of ERAD) was best explained by secondary loss. We conclude that N-glycan precursor length has profound effects on N-glycan-dependent QC of glycoprotein folding and ERAD.

  9. The detection and discovery of glycan motifs in biological samples using lectins and antibodies: new methods and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Huiyuan; Hsueh, Peter; Kletter, Doron; Bern, Marshall; Haab, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Recent research is uncovering unexpected ways that glycans contribute to biology, as well as new strategies for combatting disease using approaches involving glycans. To make full use of glycans for clinical applications, we need more detailed information on the location, nature, and dynamics of glycan expression in vivo. Such studies require the use of specimens acquired directly from patients. Effective studies of clinical specimens require low-volume assays, high precision measurements, and the ability to process many samples. Assays using affinity reagents—lectins and glycan-binding antibodies—can meet these requirements, but further developments are needed to make the methods routine and effective. Recent advances in the use of glycan-binding proteins could meet that need. The advances involve improved determination of specificity using glycan arrays; the availability of databases for mining and analyzing glycan array data; lectin engineering methods; and the ability to quantitatively interpret lectin measurements. Here we describe many of the challenges and opportunities involved in the application of these new approaches to the study of biological samples. The new tools hold promise for developing methods to improve the outcomes of patients afflicted with diseases characterized by aberrant glycan expression. PMID:25727148

  10. Structure of ten free N-glycans in ripening tomato fruit. Arabinose is a constituent of a plant N-glycan.

    PubMed Central

    Priem, B; Gitti, R; Bush, C A; Gross, K C

    1993-01-01

    The concentration-dependent stimulatory and inhibitory effect of N-glycans on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit ripening was recently reported (B. Priem and K.C. Gross [1992] Plant Physiol 98: 399-401). We report here the structure of 10 free N-glycans in mature green tomatoes. N-Glycans were purified from fruit pericarp by ethanolic extraction, desalting, concanavalin A-Sepharose chromatography, and amine-bonded silica high performance liquid chromatography. N-Glycan structures were determined using 500 MHz 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, and glycosyl linkage methylation analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A novel arabinosyl-containing N-glycan, Man alpha 1-->6(Ara alpha 1-->2)Man beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->4(Fuc alpha 1-->3)GlcNAc, was purified from a retarded concanavalin A fraction. The location of the arabinosyl residue was the same as the xylosyl residue in complex N-glycans. GlcNAc[5']Man3(Xyl)GlcNAc(Fuc)GlcNAc and GlcNAc[5']Man2GlcNAc(Fuc)GlcNAc were also purified from the weakly retained fraction. The oligomannosyl N-glycans Man5GlcNAc, Man6GlcNAc, Man7GlcNAc, and Man8GlcNAc were purified from a strongly retained concanavalin A fraction. The finding of free Man5GlcNAc in situ was important physiologically because previously we had described it as a promoter of tomato ripening when added exogenously. Mature green pericarp tissue contained more than 1 microgram of total free N-glycan/g fresh weight. Changes in N-glycan composition were determined during ripening by comparing glycosyl and glycosyl-linkage composition of oligosaccharidic extracts from fruit at different developmental stages. N-Glycans were present in pericarp tissue at all stages of development. However, the amount increased during ripening, as did the relative amount of xylosyl-containing N-glycans. PMID:8108510

  11. Oxidative Release of Natural Glycans for Functional Glycomics

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Ju, Hong; Lasanajak, Yi; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Glycans have essential roles in biology and the etiology of many diseases. A major hurdle in studying glycans through functional glycomics is the lack of methods to release glycans from diverse types of biological samples. Here we describe an elegant yet simple oxidative strategy using household bleach to release all types of free reducing N-glycans and O-glycan-acids from glycoproteins, and glycan nitriles from glycosphingolipids. Released glycans are directly useful in glycomic analyses and can be derivatized fluorescently for functional glycomics. This chemical method overcomes the limitations in glycan generation and promotes archiving and characterization of human and animal glycomes and their functions. PMID:27135973

  12. Structural basis of glycan specificity in neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant rotavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Czako, Rita; Sankaran, Banumathi; Yu, Ying; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.; Estes, Mary K.; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.

    2015-09-30

    We report that strain-dependent variation of glycan recognition during initial cell attachment of viruses is a critical determinant of host specificity, tissue-tropism and zoonosis. Rotaviruses (RVs), which cause life-threatening gastroenteritis in infants and children, display significant genotype-dependent variations in glycan recognition resulting from sequence alterations in the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4. The structural basis of this genotype-dependent glycan specificity, particularly in human RVs, remains poorly understood. Here, from crystallographic studies, we show how genotypic variations configure a novel binding site in the VP8* of a neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant to uniquely recognize either type I or type II precursor glycans, and to restrict type II glycan binding in the bovine counterpart. In conclusion, such a distinct glycan-binding site that allows differential recognition of the precursor glycans, which are developmentally regulated in the neonate gut and abundant in bovine and human milk provides a basis for age-restricted tropism and zoonotic transmission of G10P[11] rotaviruses.

  13. Structural basis of glycan specificity in neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant rotavirus

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Czako, Rita; Sankaran, Banumathi; Yu, Ying; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.; Estes, Mary K.; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.

    2015-09-30

    We report that strain-dependent variation of glycan recognition during initial cell attachment of viruses is a critical determinant of host specificity, tissue-tropism and zoonosis. Rotaviruses (RVs), which cause life-threatening gastroenteritis in infants and children, display significant genotype-dependent variations in glycan recognition resulting from sequence alterations in the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4. The structural basis of this genotype-dependent glycan specificity, particularly in human RVs, remains poorly understood. Here, from crystallographic studies, we show how genotypic variations configure a novel binding site in the VP8* of a neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant to uniquely recognize either type I or type IImore » precursor glycans, and to restrict type II glycan binding in the bovine counterpart. In conclusion, such a distinct glycan-binding site that allows differential recognition of the precursor glycans, which are developmentally regulated in the neonate gut and abundant in bovine and human milk provides a basis for age-restricted tropism and zoonotic transmission of G10P[11] rotaviruses.« less

  14. Structural basis of glycan specificity in neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Czako, Rita; Sankaran, Banumathi; Yu, Ying; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.; Estes, Mary K.; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.

    2015-01-01

    Strain-dependent variation of glycan recognition during initial cell attachment of viruses is a critical determinant of host specificity, tissue-tropism and zoonosis. Rotaviruses (RVs), which cause life-threatening gastroenteritis in infants and children, display significant genotype-dependent variations in glycan recognition resulting from sequence alterations in the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4. The structural basis of this genotype-dependent glycan specificity, particularly in human RVs, remains poorly understood. Here, from crystallographic studies, we show how genotypic variations configure a novel binding site in the VP8* of a neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant to uniquely recognize either type I or type II precursor glycans, and to restrict type II glycan binding in the bovine counterpart. Such a distinct glycan-binding site that allows differential recognition of the precursor glycans, which are developmentally regulated in the neonate gut and abundant in bovine and human milk provides a basis for age-restricted tropism and zoonotic transmission of G10P[11] rotaviruses. PMID:26420502

  15. The logic of automated glycan assembly.

    PubMed

    Seeberger, Peter H

    2015-05-19

    Carbohydrates are the most abundant biopolymers on earth and part of every living creature. Glycans are essential as materials for nutrition and for information transfer in biological processes. To date, in few cases a detailed correlation between glycan structure and glycan function has been established. A molecular understanding of glycan function will require pure glycans for biological, immunological, and structural studies. Given the immense structural complexity of glycans found in living organisms and the lack of amplification methods or expression systems, chemical synthesis is the only means to access usable quantities of pure glycan molecules. While the solid-phase synthesis of DNA and peptides has become routine for decades, access to glycans has been technically difficult, time-consuming and confined to a few expert laboratories. In this Account, the development of a comprehensive approach to the automated synthesis of all classes of mammalian glycans, including glycosaminoglycans and glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchors, as well as bacterial and plant carbohydrates is described. A conceptual advance concerning the logic of glycan assembly was required in order to enable automated execution of the synthetic process. Based on the central glycosidic bond forming reaction, a general concept for the protecting groups and leaving groups has been developed. Building blocks that can be procured on large scale, are stable for prolonged periods of time, but upon activation result in high yields and selectivities were identified. A coupling-capping and deprotection cycle was invented that can be executed by an automated synthesis instrument. Straightforward postsynthetic protocols for cleavage from the solid support as well as purification of conjugation-ready oligosaccharides have been established. Introduction of methods to install selectively a wide variety of glycosidic linkages has enabled the rapid assembly of linear and branched oligo- and

  16. JASON-1: a New Reference for Precise Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthias, Jean-Paul; Broca, Patrick; Ferrier, Christophe; Gratton, Serge

    - The French-American satellite Jason-1 was launched in December 2001 to continue the mission of the TOPEX/Poseïdon satellite. Following the same ground track as its famous predecessor since January 14, 2002, Jason-1 continues the collection of high precision altimeter data over the oceans that contributes to our understanding of how oceans influence global climate processes. One of the key features of both the TOPEX/Poseïdon and the Jason missions is the precision of the orbit determination, better than 3 cm RMS on the radial component, which is without equal today. This is the result of many years of improvements in the knowledge of the Earth gravity field, as well as a very important efforts in the design of the satellites and in the modeling of the surface forces. It also benefits from the use of the most sophisticated tracking instrument available today . Equipped with the most advanced DORIS receiver, with a high quality Laser retroreflector array and with a top of the line dual frequency GPS receiver, Jason has become the new laboratory for precision orbit determination and for comparing the performances of tracking systems. The availability of the altimeter data offers a valuable additional source of validation of the orbits. Results show that these combined efforts are paying off. Orbits computed by many POD groups associated with the Jason project compare to the few centimeter level. Furthermore, orbits computed independantly with each of the available data types compare to within 2 cm RMS radially without any tuning of spacecraft models or excessive use of empirical accelerations. The combination of DORIS, SLR and GPS data now appears feasible and meaningful. In this paper, we will present the principles behind the Jason precise orbit determination, the current results and the efforts underway to improve the orbit precision.

  17. Mucin glycan foraging in the human gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Tailford, Louise E.; Crost, Emmanuelle H.; Kavanaugh, Devon; Juge, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The availability of host and dietary carbohydrates in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a key role in shaping the structure-function of the microbiota. In particular, some gut bacteria have the ability to forage on glycans provided by the mucus layer covering the GI tract. The O-glycan structures present in mucin are diverse and complex, consisting predominantly of core 1-4 mucin-type O-glycans containing α- and β- linked N-acetyl-galactosamine, galactose and N-acetyl-glucosamine. These core structures are further elongated and frequently modified by fucose and sialic acid sugar residues via α1,2/3/4 and α2,3/6 linkages, respectively. The ability to metabolize these mucin O-linked oligosaccharides is likely to be a key factor in determining which bacterial species colonize the mucosal surface. Due to their proximity to the immune system, mucin-degrading bacteria are in a prime location to influence the host response. However, despite the growing number of bacterial genome sequences available from mucin degraders, our knowledge on the structural requirements for mucin degradation by gut bacteria remains fragmented. This is largely due to the limited number of functionally characterized enzymes and the lack of studies correlating the specificity of these enzymes with the ability of the strain to degrade and utilize mucin and mucin glycans. This review focuses on recent findings unraveling the molecular strategies used by mucin-degrading bacteria to utilize host glycans, adapt to the mucosal environment, and influence human health. PMID:25852737

  18. GlycoBase and autoGU: resources for interpreting HPLC-glycan data.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Matthew P; Royle, Lousie; Rudd, Pauline M

    2015-01-01

    The biological relevance of protein glycosylation has made glycomics, the comprehensive study to identify all glycans in an organism, indispensable in many research fields. Determining the structure and functional relationship of glycoproteins requires the comprehensive characterization of glycan structures by a range of analytical methods. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a well-established technology commonly used for the complete structural elucidation of N- and O-linked glycans; however, the analysis of data is a major bottleneck and robust bioinformatic solutions are required. This chapter describes the availability of databases and tools, GlycoBase and autoGU developed in conjunction with the EUROCarbDB initiative, to assist the interpretation of HPLC-glycan data collections.

  19. Improved method for drawing of a glycan map, and the first page of glycan atlas, which is a compilation of glycan maps for a whole organism.

    PubMed

    Natsuka, Shunji; Masuda, Mayumi; Sumiyoshi, Wataru; Nakakita, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Glycan Atlas is a set of glycan maps over the whole body of an organism. The glycan map that includes data of glycan structure and quantity displays micro-heterogeneity of the glycans in a tissue, an organ, or cells. The two-dimensional glycan mapping is widely used for structure analysis of N-linked oligosaccharides on glycoproteins. In this study we developed a comprehensive method for the mapping of both N- and O-glycans with and without sialic acid. The mapping data of 150 standard pyridylaminated glycans were collected. The empirical additivity rule which was proposed in former reports was able to adapt for this extended glycan map. The adapted rule is that the elution time of pyridylamino glycans on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is expected to be the simple sum of the partial elution times assigned to each monosaccharide residue. The comprehensive mapping method developed in this study is a powerful tool for describing the micro-heterogeneity of the glycans. Furthermore, we prepared 42 pyridylamino (PA-) glycans from human serum and were able to draw the map of human serum N- and O-glycans as an initial step of Glycan Atlas editing.

  20. 21 CFR 172.898 - Bakers yeast glycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bakers yeast glycan. 172.898 Section 172.898 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.898 Bakers yeast glycan. Bakers yeast glycan may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast glycan is the comminuted, washed, pasteurized,...

  1. Recognition of Microbial Glycans by Human Intelectin

    PubMed Central

    Wesener, Darryl A.; Wangkanont, Kittikhun; McBride, Ryan; Song, Xuezheng; Kraft, Matthew B.; Hodges, Heather L.; Zarling, Lucas C.; Splain, Rebecca A.; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.; Paulson, James C.; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    The glycans displayed on mammalian cells can differ markedly from those on microbes. Such differences could, in principle, be read by carbohydrate-binding proteins, or lectins. We used glycan microarrays to show that human intelectin-1 (hIntL-1) does not bind known human glycan epitopes but interacts with multiple glycan epitopes found exclusively on microbes: β-linked d-galactofuranose (β-Galf), d-phospho-glycerol-modified glycans, heptoses, d-glycero-d-talo-oct-2-ulosonic acid (KO) and 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct–2-ulosonic acid (KDO). The 1.6 Å resolution crystal structure of hIntL-1 bound to β-Galf revealed that hIntL-1 uses a bound calcium ion to coordinate terminal exocyclic 1,2-diols. N-Acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), a sialic acid widespread in human glycans, possesses an exocyclic 1,2-diol but does not bind hInt-1, likely due to unfavorable steric and electronic effects. Human IntL-1 marks only Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes that display surface glycans with terminal 1,2-diol groups. This ligand selectivity suggests hIntL-1 functions in microbial surveillance. PMID:26148048

  2. Differentiation of Cancer Cell Origin and Molecular Subtype by Plasma Membrane N-Glycan Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Serenus; Saunders, Mary; Dimapasoc, Lauren M.; Jeong, Seung Hyup; Kim, Bum Jin; Kim, Suhee; So, Minkyung; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Kim, Jae Han; Lam, Kit S.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; An, Hyun Joo

    2014-01-01

    In clinical settings, biopsies are routinely used to determine cancer type and grade based on tumor cell morphology, as determined via histochemical or immunohistochemical staining. Unfortunately, in a significant number of cases, traditional biopsy results are either inconclusive or do not provide full subtype differentiation, possibly leading to inefficient or ineffective treatment. Glycomic profiling of the cell membrane offers an alternate route towards cancer diagnosis. In this study, isomer-sensitive nano-LC/MS was used to directly obtain detailed profiles of the different N-glycan structures present on cancer cell membranes. Membrane N-glycans were extracted from cells representing various subtypes of breast, lung, cervical, ovarian, and lymphatic cancer. Chip-based porous graphitized carbon nano-LC/MS was used to separate, identify, and quantify the native N-glycans. Structure-sensitive N-glycan profiling identified hundreds of glycan peaks per cell line, including multiple isomers for most compositions. Hierarchical clusterings based on Pearson correlation coefficients were used to quickly compare and separate each cell line according to originating organ and disease subtype. Based simply on the relative abundances of broad glycan classes (e.g. high mannose, complex/hybrid fucosylated, complex/hybrid sialylated, etc.) most cell lines were readily differentiated. More closely-related cell lines were differentiated based on several-fold differences in the abundances of individual glycans. Based on characteristic N-glycan profiles, primary cancer origins and molecular subtypes could be distinguished. These results demonstrate that stark differences in cancer cell membrane glycosylation can be exploited to create an MS-based biopsy, with potential applications towards cancer diagnosis and direction of treatment. PMID:24303873

  3. Comprehensive analysis of protein glycosylation by solid-phase extraction of N-linked glycans and glycosite-containing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shisheng; Shah, Punit; Eshghi, Shadi Toghi; Yang, Weiming; Trikannad, Namita; Yang, Shuang; Chen, Lijun; Aiyetan, Paul; Höti, Naseruddin; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive characterization of protein glycosylation is critical for understanding the structure and function of glycoproteins. However, due to the complexity and heterogeneity of glycoprotein conformations, current glycoprotein analyses focus mainly on either the de-glycosylated glycosylation site (glycosite)-containing peptides or the released glycans. Here, we describe a chemoenzymatic method called solid phase extraction of N-linked glycans and glycosite-containing peptides (NGAG) for the comprehensive characterization of glycoproteins that is able to determine glycan heterogeneity for individual glycosites in addition to providing information about the total N-linked glycan, glycosite-containing peptide and glycoprotein content of complex samples. The NGAG method can also be applied to quantitatively detect glycoprotein alterations in total and site-specific glycan occupancies. PMID:26571101

  4. Cellular O-Glycome Reporter/Amplification to Explore O-Glycans of Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kudelka, Matthew R.; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Wang, Yingchun; Duong, Duc M.; Song, Xuezheng; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M.; Cummings, Richard D.; Ju, Tongzhong

    2015-01-01

    Protein O-glycosylation plays key roles in many biological processes, but the repertoire of O-glycans synthesized by cells is difficult to determine. Here we describe a new approach termed Cellular O-Glycome Reporter/Amplification (CORA), a sensitive method to amplify and profile mucin-type O-glycans synthesized by living cells. Cells incubated with peracetylated benzyl-α-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc-α-Benzyl) convert it to a large variety of modified O-glycan derivatives that are secreted from cells, allowing easy purification for analysis by HPLC and mass spectrometry (MS). CORA results in ~100–1000-fold increase in sensitivity over conventional O-glycan analyses and identifies a more complex repertoire of O-glycans in more than a dozen cell types from Homo sapiens and Mus musculus. Furthermore, CORA coupled with computational modeling allows predictions on the diversity of the human O-glycome and offers new opportunities to identify novel glycan biomarkers for human diseases. PMID:26619014

  5. Comprehensive analysis of glycosyltransferases in eukaryotic genomes for structural and functional characterization of glycans.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kosuke; Tokimatsu, Toshiaki; Kawano, Shin; Yoshizawa, Akiyasu C; Okuda, Shujiro; Goto, Susumu; Kanehisa, Minoru

    2009-05-12

    Glycosyltransferases comprise highly divergent groups of enzymes, which play a central role in the synthesis of complex glycans. Because the repertoire of glycosyltransferases in the genome determines the range of synthesizable glycans, and because the increasing amount of genome sequence data is now available, it is essential to examine these enzymes across organisms to explore possible structures and functions of the glycoconjugates. In this study, we systematically investigated 36 eukaryotic genomes and obtained 3426 glycosyltransferase homologs for biosynthesis of major glycans, classified into 53 families based on sequence similarity. The families were further grouped into six functional categories based on the biosynthetic pathways, which revealed characteristic patterns among organism groups in the degree of conservation and in the number of paralogs. The results also revealed a strong correlation between the number of glycosyltransferases and the number of coding genes in each genome. We then predicted the ability to synthesize major glycan structures including N-glycan precursors and GPI-anchors in each organism from the combination of the glycosyltransferase families. This indicates that not only parasitic protists but also some algae are likely to synthesize smaller structures than the structures known to be conserved among a wide range of eukaryotes. Finally we discuss the functions of two large families, sialyltransferases and beta 4-glycosyltransferases, by performing finer classifications into subfamilies. Our findings suggest that universality and diversity of glycans originate from two types of evolution of glycosyltransferase families, namely conserved families with few paralogs and diverged families with many paralogs.

  6. Plant-type N-glycans containing fucose and xylose in Bryophyta (mosses) and Tracheophyta (ferns).

    PubMed

    Mega, Tomohiro

    2007-12-01

    The presence of typical plant-type N-glycans (eg, M3FX, Gn2M3FX, and Le(a)2M3FX) in mosses, ferns, and other organisms was examined to determine which plant initially acquired glycosyltransferases to produce plant-type N-glycans during organic evolution. No M3FX-type N-glycan was detected in lichens (Cladonia humilis) or in any one of the three preland plants Enteromorpha prolifera, Ulva pertusa Kjellman, and Chara braunii Gmelin. In Bryophyta, M3FX-type N-glycan was detected at trace amounts in Anthocerotopsida (hornworts) and at certain amounts in Bryopsida (mosses), but not in Hepaticopsida (liverworts). Le(a)2M3FX was detected in some Bryopsida of relatively high M3FX content. Most Tracheophyta (ferns and higher plants) contained the three typical M3FX-type glycans as the main N-glycans in different ratios. These results suggest that organisms acquired xylosyltransferase and fucosyltransferase during the development of mosses from liverworts, and that later all plants retained both enzymes. Bryopsida have also obtained galactosyltransferase and fucosyltransferase to synthesize the Le(a) antigen.

  7. Glycans as targets for therapeutic antitumor antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rabu, Catherine; McIntosh, Richard; Jurasova, Zuzana; Durrant, Lindy

    2012-08-01

    Glycans represent a vast class of molecules that modify either proteins or lipids. They exert and regulate important and complex functions in both normal and cancer cell metabolism. As such, the most immunogenic glycans have been targeted in passive and active immunotherapy in human cancer for the past 25 years but it is only recently that techniques have become available to uncover novel glycan targets. The main focus of this review article is to highlight why and how monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing glycans, and in particular the glycans expressed on glycolipids, are being used in various strategies to target and kill cancer cells. The article reports on the historical use of mAbs and on very recent progress made in antitumor therapy using the anti-GD2 mAb and the antiganglioside mAbs, anti-N-glycolylneuraminic acid mAb and anti-Lewis mAb. Anti-GD2 is showing great promise in Phase III clinical trials in adjuvant treatment of neuroblastoma. Racotumomab, an anti-idiotypic mAb mimicking N-glycolylneuraminic acid-containing gangliosides, is currently being tested in a randomized, controlled Phase II/III clinical trial. This article also presents various strategies used by different groups to develop mAbs against these naturally poorly immunogenic glycans.

  8. Solid-phase glycan isolation for glycomics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuang; Zhang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most significant protein PTMs. The biological activities of proteins are dramatically changed by the glycans associated with them. Thus, structural analysis of the glycans of glycoproteins in complex biological or clinical samples is critical in correlation with the functions of glycans with diseases. Profiling of glycans by HPLC-MS is a commonly used technique in analyzing glycan structures and quantifying their relative abundance in different biological systems. Methods relied on MS require isolation of glycans from negligible salts and other contaminant ions since salts and ions may interfere with the glycans, resulting in poor glycan ionization. To accomplish those objectives, glycan isolation and clean-up methods including SPE, liquid-phase extraction, chromatography, and electrophoresis have been developed. Traditionally, glycans are isolated from proteins or peptides using a combination of hydrophobic and hydrophilic columns: proteins and peptides remain on hydrophobic absorbent while glycans, salts, and other hydrophilic reagents are collected as flowthrough. The glycans in the flowthrough are then purified through graphite-activated carbon column by hydrophilic interaction LC. Yet, the drawback in these affinity-based approaches is nonspecific binding. As a result, chemical methods by hydrazide or oxime have been developed for solid-phase isolation of glycans with high specificity and yield. Combined with high-resolution MS, specific glycan isolation techniques provide tremendous potentials as useful tools for glycomics analysis. PMID:23090885

  9. Structural bases for N-glycan processing by mannoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Ladevèze, Simon; Cioci, Gianluca; Roblin, Pierre; Mourey, Lionel; Tranier, Samuel; Potocki-Véronèse, Gabrielle

    2015-06-01

    The first crystal structure of Uhgb_MP, a β-1,4-mannopyranosyl-chitobiose phosphorylase belonging to the GH130 family which is involved in N-glycan degradation by human gut bacteria, was solved at 1.85 Å resolution in the apo form and in complex with mannose and N-acetylglucosamine. SAXS and crystal structure analysis revealed a hexameric structure, a specific feature of GH130 enzymes among other glycoside phosphorylases. Mapping of the -1 and +1 subsites in the presence of phosphate confirmed the conserved Asp104 as the general acid/base catalytic residue, which is in agreement with a single-step reaction mechanism involving Man O3 assistance for proton transfer. Analysis of this structure, the first to be solved for a member of the GH130_2 subfamily, revealed Met67, Phe203 and the Gly121-Pro125 loop as the main determinants of the specificity of Uhgb_MP and its homologues towards the N-glycan core oligosaccharides and mannan, and the molecular bases of the key role played by GH130 enzymes in the catabolism of dietary fibre and host glycans.

  10. Structural bases for N-glycan processing by mannoside phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Ladevèze, Simon; Cioci, Gianluca; Roblin, Pierre; Mourey, Lionel; Tranier, Samuel; Potocki-Véronèse, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    The first crystal structure of Uhgb_MP, a β-1,4-mannopyranosyl-chitobiose phosphorylase belonging to the GH130 family which is involved in N-glycan degradation by human gut bacteria, was solved at 1.85 Å resolution in the apo form and in complex with mannose and N-acetylglucosamine. SAXS and crystal structure analysis revealed a hexameric structure, a specific feature of GH130 enzymes among other glycoside phosphorylases. Mapping of the −1 and +1 subsites in the presence of phosphate confirmed the conserved Asp104 as the general acid/base catalytic residue, which is in agreement with a single-step reaction mechanism involving Man O3 assistance for proton transfer. Analysis of this structure, the first to be solved for a member of the GH130_2 subfamily, revealed Met67, Phe203 and the Gly121–Pro125 loop as the main determinants of the specificity of Uhgb_MP and its homologues towards the N-glycan core oligosaccharides and mannan, and the molecular bases of the key role played by GH130 enzymes in the catabolism of dietary fibre and host glycans. PMID:26057673

  11. Structural determinants of odorant recognition by the human olfactory receptors OR1A1 and OR1A2.

    PubMed

    Schmiedeberg, Kristin; Shirokova, Elena; Weber, Hans-Peter; Schilling, Boris; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Krautwurst, Dietmar

    2007-09-01

    An interaction of odorants with olfactory receptors is thought to be the initial step in odorant detection. However, ligands have been reported for only 6 out of 380 human olfactory receptors, with their structural determinants of odorant recognition just beginning to emerge. Guided by the notion that amino acid positions that interact with specific odorants would be conserved in orthologs, but variable in paralogs, and based on the prediction of a set of 22 of such amino acid positions, we have combined site-directed mutagenesis, rhodopsin-based homology modelling, and functional expression in HeLa/Olf cells of receptors OR1A1 and OR1A2. We found that (i) their odorant profiles are centred around citronellic terpenoid structures, (ii) two evolutionary conserved amino acid residues in transmembrane domain 3 are necessary for the responsiveness of OR1A1 and the mouse ortholog Olfr43 to (S)-(-)-citronellol, (iii) changes at these two positions are sufficient to account for the differential (S)-(-)-citronellol responsiveness of the paralogs OR1A1 and OR1A2, and (iv) the interaction sites for (S)-(-)-citronellal and (S)-(-)-citronellol differ in both human receptors. Our results show that the orientation of odorants within a homology modelling-derived binding pocket of olfactory receptor orthologs is defined by evolutionary conserved amino acid positions.

  12. Notable Aspects of Glycan-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    This mini review highlights several interesting aspects of glycan-mediated interactions that are common between cells, bacteria, and viruses. Glycans are ubiquitously found on all living cells, and in the extracellular milieu of multicellular organisms. They are known to mediate initial binding and recognition events of both immune cells and pathogens with their target cells or tissues. The host target tissues are hidden under a layer of secreted glycosylated decoy targets. In addition, pathogens can utilize and display host glycans to prevent identification as foreign by the host's immune system (molecular mimicry). Both the host and pathogens continually evolve. The host evolves to prevent infection and the pathogens evolve to evade host defenses. Many pathogens express both glycan-binding proteins and glycosidases. Interestingly, these proteins are often located at the tip of elongated protrusions in bacteria, or in the leading edge of the cell. Glycan-protein interactions have low affinity and, as a result, multivalent interactions are often required to achieve biologically relevant binding. These enable dynamic forms of adhesion mechanisms, reviewed here, and include rolling (cells), stick and roll (bacteria) or surfacing (viruses). PMID:26340640

  13. Notable Aspects of Glycan-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    This mini review highlights several interesting aspects of glycan-mediated interactions that are common between cells, bacteria, and viruses. Glycans are ubiquitously found on all living cells, and in the extracellular milieu of multicellular organisms. They are known to mediate initial binding and recognition events of both immune cells and pathogens with their target cells or tissues. The host target tissues are hidden under a layer of secreted glycosylated decoy targets. In addition, pathogens can utilize and display host glycans to prevent identification as foreign by the host’s immune system (molecular mimicry). Both the host and pathogens continually evolve. The host evolves to prevent infection and the pathogens evolve to evade host defenses. Many pathogens express both glycan-binding proteins and glycosidases. Interestingly, these proteins are often located at the tip of elongated protrusions in bacteria, or in the leading edge of the cell. Glycan-protein interactions have low affinity and, as a result, multivalent interactions are often required to achieve biologically relevant binding. These enable dynamic forms of adhesion mechanisms, reviewed here, and include rolling (cells), stick and roll (bacteria) or surfacing (viruses). PMID:26340640

  14. N-glycans of Human Protein C Inhibitor: Tissue-Specific Expression and Function

    PubMed Central

    Engström, Åke; Sooriyaarachchi, Sanjeewani; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Hreinsson, Julius; Wånggren, Kjell; Clark, Gary F.; Dell, Anne; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Protein C inhibitor (PCI) is a serpin type of serine protease inhibitor that is found in many tissues and fluids in human, including blood plasma, seminal plasma and urine. This inhibitor displays an unusually broad protease specificity compared with other serpins. Previous studies have shown that the N-glycan(s) and the NH2-terminus affect some blood-related functions of PCI. In this study, we have for the first time determined the N-glycan profile of seminal plasma PCI, by mass spectrometry. The N-glycan structures differed markedly compared with those of both blood-derived and urinary PCI, providing evidence that the N-glycans of PCI are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. The most abundant structure (m/z 2592.9) had a composition of Fuc3Hex5HexNAc4, consistent with a core fucosylated bi-antennary glycan with terminal Lewisx. A major serine protease in semen, prostate specific antigen (PSA), was used to evaluate the effects of N-glycans and the NH2-terminus on a PCI function related to the reproductive tract. Second-order rate constants for PSA inhibition by PCI were 4.3±0.2 and 4.1±0.5 M−1s−1 for the natural full-length PCI and a form lacking six amino acids at the NH2-terminus, respectively, whereas these constants were 4.8±0.1 and 29±7 M−1s−1 for the corresponding PNGase F-treated forms. The 7–8-fold higher rate constants obtained when both the N-glycans and the NH2-terminus had been removed suggest that these structures jointly affect the rate of PSA inhibition, presumably by together hindering conformational changes of PCI required to bind to the catalytic pocket of PSA. PMID:22205989

  15. The VP8* Domain of Neonatal Rotavirus Strain G10P[11] Binds to Type II Precursor Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Sasirekha; Cortes-Penfield, Nicolas W.; Hu, Liya; Crawford, Sue E.; Czako, Rita; Smith, David F.; Kang, Gagandeep; Ramig, Robert F.; Le Pendu, Jacques; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses with a P[11] VP4 genotype exhibit a tropism for neonates. Interaction of the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4 with sialic acid was thought to be the key mediator for rotavirus infectivity. However, recent studies have indicated a role for nonsialylated glycoconjugates, including histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), in the infectivity of human rotaviruses. We sought to determine if the bovine rotavirus-derived VP8* of a reassortant neonatal G10P[11] virus interacts with hitherto uncharacterized glycans. In an array screen of >600 glycans, VP8* P[11] showed specific binding to glycans with the Galβ1-4GlcNAc motif, which forms the core structure of type II glycans and is the precursor of H type II HBGA. The specificity of glycan binding was confirmed through hemagglutination assays; GST-VP8* P[11] hemagglutinates type O, A, and B red blood cells as well as pooled umbilical cord blood erythrocytes. Further, G10P[11] infectivity was significantly enhanced by the expression of H type II HBGA in CHO cells. The bovine-origin VP4 was confirmed to be essential for this increased infectivity, using laboratory-derived reassortant viruses generated from sialic acid binding rotavirus SA11-4F and a bovine G10P[11] rotavirus, B223. The binding to a core glycan unit has not been reported for any rotavirus VP4. Core glycan synthesis is constitutive in most cell types, and modification of these glycans is thought to be developmentally regulated. These studies provide the first molecular basis for understanding neonatal rotavirus infections, indicating that glycan modification during neonatal development may mediate the age-restricted infectivity of neonatal viruses. PMID:23616650

  16. Glycans in Medicinal Chemistry: An Underexploited Resource.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; Cañada, F Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2015-08-01

    The biological relevance of glycans as mediators of key physiological processes, including disease-related mechanisms, makes them attractive targets for a wide range of medical applications. Despite their important biological roles, especially as molecular recognition elements, carbohydrates have not been fully exploited as therapeutics mainly due to the scarcity of structure-activity correlations and their non-drug-like properties. A more detailed understanding of the complex carbohydrate structures and their associated functions should contribute to the development of new glycan-based pharmaceuticals. Recent significant progress in oligosaccharide synthesis and chemical glycobiology has renewed the interest of the medicinal chemistry community in carbohydrates. This promises to increase our possibilities to harness them in drug discovery efforts for the development of new and more effective, synthetic glycan-based therapeutics and vaccines.

  17. Exploring the specificities of glycan-binding proteins using glycan array data and the GlycoSearch software

    PubMed Central

    Kletter, Doron; Curnutte, Bryan; Maupin, Kevin; Bern, Marshall; Haab, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The glycan array is a powerful tool for investigating the specificities of glycan-binding proteins. By incubating a glycan-binding protein on a glycan array, the relative binding to hundreds of different oligosaccharides can be quantified in parallel. Based on these data, much information can be obtained about the preference of a glycan-binding protein for specific subcomponents of oligosaccharides, or motifs. In many cases the analysis and interpretation of glycan array data can be time consuming and imprecise if done manually. Recently we developed software, called GlycoSearch, to facilitate the analysis and interpretation of glycan array data based on the previously developed methods called Motif Segregation and Outlier Motif Analysis. Here we describe the principles behind the software, the use of the software, and an example application. The automated, objective, and precise analysis of glycan array data should enhance the value of the data for a broad range of research applications. PMID:25753713

  18. Glycobiology simplified: diverse roles of glycan recognition in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schnaar, Ronald L

    2016-06-01

    Glycans and complementary glycan-binding proteins are essential components in the language of cell-cell interactions in immunity. The study of glycan function is the purview of glycobiology, which has often been presented as an unusually complex discipline. In fact, the human glycome, composed of all of its glycans, is built primarily from only 9 building blocks that are combined by enzymes (writers) with specific and limited biosynthetic capabilities into a tractable and increasingly accessible number of potential glycan patterns that are functionally read by several dozen human glycan-binding proteins (readers). Nowhere is the importance of glycan recognition better understood than in infection and immunity, and knowledge in this area has already led to glycan mimetic anti-infective and anti-inflammatory drugs. This review includes a brief tutorial on human glycobiology and a limited number of specific examples of glycan-binding protein-glycan interactions that initiate and regulate inflammation. Examples include representatives from different glycan-binding protein families, including the C-type lectins (E-selectin, P-selectin, dectin-1, and dectin-2), sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins 8 and 9), galectins (galectin-1, galectin-3, and galectin-9), as well as hyaluronic acid-binding proteins. As glycoscience technologies advance, opportunities for enhanced understanding of glycans and their roles in leukocyte cell biology provide increasing opportunities for discovery and therapeutic intervention. PMID:27004978

  19. Glycobiology simplified: diverse roles of glycan recognition in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schnaar, Ronald L

    2016-06-01

    Glycans and complementary glycan-binding proteins are essential components in the language of cell-cell interactions in immunity. The study of glycan function is the purview of glycobiology, which has often been presented as an unusually complex discipline. In fact, the human glycome, composed of all of its glycans, is built primarily from only 9 building blocks that are combined by enzymes (writers) with specific and limited biosynthetic capabilities into a tractable and increasingly accessible number of potential glycan patterns that are functionally read by several dozen human glycan-binding proteins (readers). Nowhere is the importance of glycan recognition better understood than in infection and immunity, and knowledge in this area has already led to glycan mimetic anti-infective and anti-inflammatory drugs. This review includes a brief tutorial on human glycobiology and a limited number of specific examples of glycan-binding protein-glycan interactions that initiate and regulate inflammation. Examples include representatives from different glycan-binding protein families, including the C-type lectins (E-selectin, P-selectin, dectin-1, and dectin-2), sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins 8 and 9), galectins (galectin-1, galectin-3, and galectin-9), as well as hyaluronic acid-binding proteins. As glycoscience technologies advance, opportunities for enhanced understanding of glycans and their roles in leukocyte cell biology provide increasing opportunities for discovery and therapeutic intervention.

  20. Comparisons of Caenorhabditis Fucosyltransferase Mutants Reveal a Multiplicity of Isomeric N-Glycan Structures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shi; Jin, Chunsheng; Wilson, Iain B H; Paschinger, Katharina

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have shown a remarkable degree of plasticity in the N-glycome of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans; ablation of glycosylation-relevant genes can result in radically altered N-glycan profiles despite only minor biological phenotypic effects. Up to four fucose residues and five different linkages of fucose are known on the N-glycans of C. elegans. Due to the complexity in the wild type, we established three mutant strains defective in two core fucosyltransferases each (fut-1;fut-6, fut-1;fut-8, and fut-6;fut-8). Enzymatically released N-glycans were subject to HPLC and MALDI-TOF MS/MS, in combination with various treatments, to verify structural details. The N-glycome of the fut-1;fut-6 mutant was the most complex of the three double-mutant strains due to the extension of the core α1,6-fucose as well as the presence of fucose on the bisecting galactose. In contrast, maximally two fucoses were found on N-glycans of the fut-1;fut-8 and fut-6;fut-8 strains. The different locations and capping of fucose meant that up to 13 isomeric structures, many highly galactosylated, were determined for some single masses. These data not only show the high variability of the N-glycomic capacity of a "simple" nematode but also exemplify the need for multiple approaches to reveal individual glycan structures within complex invertebrate glycomes.

  1. A Novel Method for Relative Quantitation of N-Glycans by Isotopic Labeling Using 18O-Water

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shujuan; Orlando, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Quantitation is an essential aspect of comprehensive glycomics study. Here, a novel isotopic-labeling method is described for N-glycan quantitation using 18O-water. The incorporation of the 18O-labeling into the reducing end of N-glycans is simply and efficiently achieved during peptide-N4-(N-acetyl-β-glucosaminyl) asparagine amidase F release. This process provides a 2-Da mass difference compared with the N-glycans released in 16O-water. A mathematical calculation method was also developed to determine the 18O/16O ratios from isotopic peaks. Application of this method to several standard glycoprotein mixtures and human serum demonstrated that this method can facilitate the relative quantitation of N-glycans over a linear dynamic range of two orders, with high accuracy and reproducibility. PMID:25365792

  2. Automated glycan assembly of xyloglucan oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Dallabernardina, Pietro; Schuhmacher, Frank; Seeberger, Peter H; Pfrengle, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    We report the automated glycan assembly of oligosaccharide fragments related to the hemicellulose xyloglucan (XG). Iterative addition of monosaccharide and disaccharide building blocks to a solid support provided seven cellulose and xyloglucan fragments including XXGG- and XXXG-type oligosaccharides. PMID:26553949

  3. Glycotherapy: New Advances Inspire a Reemergence of Glycans in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hudak, Jason E.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2014-01-01

    The beginning of the 20th century marked the dawn of modern medicine with glycan-based therapies at the forefront. However, glycans quickly became overshadowed as DNA- and protein-focused treatments became readily accessible. The recent development of new tools and techniques to study and produce structurally defined carbohydrates has spurred renewed interest in the therapeutic applications of glycans. This review focuses on advances within the past decade that are bringing glycan-based treatments back to the forefront of medicine and the technologies that are driving these efforts. These include the use of glycans themselves as therapeutic molecules as well as engineering protein and cell surface glycans to suit clinical applications. Glycan therapeutics offer a rich and promising frontier for developments in the academic, biopharmaceutical, and medical fields. PMID:24269151

  4. Kinetic characterization of a novel endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase on concentrated bovine colostrum whey to release bioactive glycans.

    PubMed

    Karav, Sercan; Parc, Annabelle Le; de Moura Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega; Rouquié, Camille; Mills, David A; Barile, Daniela; Block, David E

    2015-09-01

    EndoBI-1 is a recently isolated endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase, which cleaves the N-N'-diacetyl chitobiose moiety found in the N-glycan core of high mannose, hybrid and complex N-glycans. These N-glycans have selective prebiotic activity for a key infant gut microbe, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis. The broad specificity of EndoBI-1 suggests the enzyme may be useful for many applications, particularly for deglycosylating milk glycoproteins in dairy processing. To facilitate its commercial use, we determined kinetic parameters for EndoBI-1 on the model substrates ribonuclease B and bovine lactoferrin, as well as on concentrated bovine colostrum whey. Km values ranging from 0.25 to 0.49, 0.43 to 1.00 and 0.90 to 3.18 mg/mL and Vmax values ranging from 3.5×10(-3) to 5.09×10(-3), 4.5×10(-3) to 7.75×10(-3) and 1.9×10(-2)to 5.2×10(-2) mg/mL×min were determined for ribonuclease B, lactoferrin and whey, respectively. In general, EndoBI-1 showed the highest apparent affinity for ribonuclease B, while the maximum reaction rate was the highest for concentrated whey. EndoBI-1-released N-glycans were quantified by a phenol-sulphuric total carbohydrate assay and the resultant N-glycan structures monitored by nano-LC-Chip-Q-TOF MS. The kinetic parameters and structural characterization of glycans released suggest EndoBI-1 can facilitate large-scale release of complex, bioactive glycans from a variety of glycoprotein substrates. Moreover, these results suggest that whey, often considered as a waste product, can be used effectively as a source of prebiotic N-glycans. PMID:26138399

  5. Kinetic characterization of a novel endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase on concentrated bovine colostrum whey to release bioactive glycans

    PubMed Central

    Karav, Sercan; Le Parc, Annabelle; de Moura Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega; Rouquié, Camille; Mills, David A.; Barile, Daniela; Block, David E.

    2016-01-01

    EndoBI-1 is a recently isolated endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase, which cleaves the N-N′-diacetyl chitobiose moiety found in the N-glycan core of high mannose, hybrid and complex N-glycans. These N-glycans have selective prebiotic activity for a key infant gut microbe, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis. The broad specificity of EndoBI-1 suggests the enzyme may be useful for many applications, particularly for deglycosylating milk glycoproteins in dairy processing. To facilitate its commercial use, we determined kinetic parameters for EndoBI-1 on the model substrates ribonuclease B and bovine lactoferrin, as well as on concentrated bovine colostrum whey. Km values ranging from 0.25 to 0.49, 0.43 to 1.00 and 0.90 to 3.18 mg/mL and Vmax values ranging from 3.5 × 10−3 to 5.09 × 10−3, 4.5 × 10−3 to 7.75 × 10−3 and 1.9 × 10−2 to 5.2 × 10−2 mg/mL × min were determined for ribonuclease B, lactoferrin and whey, respectively. In general, EndoBI-1 showed the highest apparent affinity for ribonuclease B, while the maximum reaction rate was the highest for concentrated whey. EndoBI-1-released N-glycans were quantified by a phenol-sulphuric total carbohydrate assay and the resultant N-glycan structures monitored by nano-LC-Chip-Q–TOF MS. The kinetic parameters and structural characterization of glycans released suggest EndoBI-1 can facilitate large-scale release of complex, bioactive glycans from a variety of glycoprotein substrates. Moreover, these results suggest that whey, often considered as a waste product, can be used effectively as a source of prebiotic N-glycans. PMID:26138399

  6. Proximal glycans outside of the epitopes regulate the presentation of HIV-1 envelope gp120 helper epitopes1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hualin; Xu, Chong-Feng; Blais, Steven; Wan, Qi; Zhang, Hui-Tang; Landry, Samuel J.; Hioe, Catarina E.

    2010-01-01

    Glycosylation of HIV-1 envelope gp120 determines not only the proper structure, but also the immune responses against this antigen. While glycans may be part of specific epitopes or shield other epitopes from T cells and antibodies, this study provides evidence for a different immunomodulatory function of glycans associated with gp120 residues N230 and N448. These glycans are required for efficient MHC class II-restricted presentation of nearby CD4 T-cell epitopes, even though they are not part of the epitopes. The glycans do not affect CD4 T cell recognition of more distant epitopes, and are not essential for the proper folding and function of gp120. Data on CD4 T-cell recognition of N448 mutants combined with proteolysis analyses and surface electrostatic potential calculation around residue N448 support the notion that N448-glycan near the epitope's C-terminus renders the site to be surface accessible and allows its efficient processing. In contrast, the N230-glycan contributes to the nearby epitope presentation at a step other than the proteolytic processing of the epitope. Hence, N-glycans can determine CD4 T-cell recognition of nearby gp120 epitopes by regulating the different steps in the MHC class II processing and presentation pathway after APCs acquire the intact gp120 antigen exogenously. Modifications of amino acids bearing glycans at the C termini of gp120 helper epitopes may prove to be a useful strategy for enhancing the immunogenicity of HIV-1 envelope gp120. PMID:19414790

  7. Regulation of glycan structures in murine embryonic stem cells: combined transcript profiling of glycan-related genes and glycan structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Nairn, Alison V; Aoki, Kazuhiro; dela Rosa, Mitche; Porterfield, Mindy; Lim, Jae-Min; Kulik, Michael; Pierce, J Michael; Wells, Lance; Dalton, Stephen; Tiemeyer, Michael; Moremen, Kelley W

    2012-11-01

    The abundance and structural diversity of glycans on glycoproteins and glycolipids are highly regulated and play important roles during vertebrate development. Because of the challenges associated with studying glycan regulation in vertebrate embryos, we have chosen to study mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as they differentiate into embryoid bodies (EBs) or into extraembryonic endodermal (ExE) cells as a model for cellular differentiation. We profiled N- and O-glycan structures isolated from these cell populations and examined transcripts encoding the corresponding enzymatic machinery for glycan biosynthesis in an effort to probe the mechanisms that drive the regulation of glycan diversity. During differentiation from mouse ES cells to either EBs or ExE cells, general trends were detected. The predominance of high mannose N-glycans in ES cells shifted to an equal abundance of complex and high mannose structures, increased sialylation, and increased α-Gal termination in the differentiated cell populations. Whereas core 1 O-glycan structures predominated in all three cell populations, increased sialylation and increased core diversity characterized the O-glycans of both differentiated cell types. Increased polysialylation was also found in both differentiated cell types. Differences between the two differentiated cell types included greater sialylation of N-glycans in EBs, whereas α-Gal-capped structures were more prevalent in ExE cells. Changes in glycan structures generally, but not uniformly, correlated with alterations in transcript abundance for the corresponding biosynthetic enzymes, suggesting that transcriptional regulation contributes significantly to the regulation of glycan expression. Knowledge of glycan structural diversity and transcript regulation should provide greater understanding of the roles of protein glycosylation in vertebrate development.

  8. Characterizing the release of bioactive N-glycans from dairy products by a novel endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase.

    PubMed

    Karav, Sercan; Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega De Moura; Le Parc, Annabelle; Liu, Yan; Mills, David A; Block, David E; Barile, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase isolated from B. infantis ATCC 15697 (EndoBI-1) is a novel enzyme that cleaves N-N'-diacetyl chitobiose moieties found in the N-glycan core of high mannose, hybrid, and complex N-glycans. These conjugated N-glycans are recently shown as a new prebiotic source that stimulates the growth of a key infant gut microbe, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. Infantis. The effects of pH (4.45-8.45), temperature (27.5-77.5°C), reaction time (15-475 min), and enzyme/protein ratio (1:3,000-1:333) were evaluated on the release of N-glycans from bovine colostrum whey by EndoBI-1. A central composite design was used, including a two-level factorial design (2(4)) with four center points and eight axial points. In general, low pH values, longer reaction times, higher enzyme/protein ratio, and temperatures around 52°C resulted in the highest yield. The results demonstrated that bovine colostrum whey, considered to be a by/waste product, can be used as a glycan source with a yield of 20 mg N-glycan/g total protein under optimal conditions for the ranges investigated. Importantly, these processing conditions are suitable to be incorporated into routine dairy processing activities, opening the door for an entirely new class of products (released bioactive glycans and glycan-free milk). The new enzyme's activity was also compared with a commercially available enzyme, showing that EndoBI-1 is more active on native proteins than PNGase F and can be efficiently used during pasteurization, streamlining its integration into existing processing strategies. PMID:26097235

  9. Characterizing the Release of Bioactive N-Glycans from Dairy Products by a Novel Endo-β-N-Acetylglucosaminidase

    PubMed Central

    Karav, Sercan; Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega De Moura; Le Parc, Annabelle; Liu, Yan; Mills, David A.; Block, David E.; Barile, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase isolated from B. infantis ATCC 15697 (EndoBI-1) is a novel enzyme that cleaves N-N′-diacetyl chitobiose moieties found in the N-glycan core of high mannose, hybrid, and complex N-glycans. These conjugated N-glycans are recently shown as a new prebiotic source that stimulates the growth of a key infant gut microbe, Bifi-dobacterium longum subsp. Infantis. The effects of pH (4.45–8.45), temperature (27.5–77.5°C), reaction time (15–475 min), and enzyme/protein ratio (1:3,000–1:333) were evaluated on the release of N-glycans from bovine colostrum whey by EndoBI-1. A central composite design was used, including a two-level factorial design (24) with four center points and eight axial points. In general, low pH values, longer reaction times, higher enzyme/protein ratio, and temperatures around 52°C resulted in the highest yield. The results demonstrated that bovine colostrum whey, considered to be a by/waste product, can be used as a glycan source with a yield of 20 mg N-glycan/g total protein under optimal conditions for the ranges investigated. Importantly, these processing conditions are suitable to be incorporated into routine dairy processing activities, opening the door for an entirely new class of products (released bioactive glycans and glycan-free milk). The new enzyme’s activity was also compared with a commercially available enzyme, showing that EndoBI-1 is more active on native proteins than PNGase F and can be efficiently used during pasteurization, streamlining its integration into existing processing strategies. PMID:26097235

  10. A Panel of Recombinant Mucins Carrying a Repertoire of Sialylated O-Glycans Based on Different Core Chains for Studies of Glycan Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Reeja Maria; Jin, Chunsheng; Liu, Jining; Karlsson, Niclas G; Holgersson, Jan

    2015-08-12

    Sialylated glycans serve as key elements of receptors for many viruses, bacteria, and bacterial toxins. The microbial recognition and their binding specificity can be affected by the linkage of the terminal sugar residue, types of underlying sugar chains, and the nature of the entire glycoconjugate. Owing to the pathobiological significance of sialylated glycans, we have engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to secrete mucin-type immunoglobulin-fused proteins carrying terminal α2,3- or α2,6-linked sialic acid on defined O-glycan core saccharide chains. Besides stably expressing P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/mouse immunoglobulin G2b cDNA (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), CHO cells were stably transfected with plasmids encoding glycosyltransferases to synthesize core 2 (GCNT1), core 3 (B3GNT6), core 4 (GCNT1 and B3GNT6), or extended core 1 (B3GNT3) chains with or without the type 1 chain-encoding enzyme B3GALT5 and ST6GAL1. Western blot and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of core 1, 2, 3, 4, and extended core 1 chains carrying either type 1 (Galb3GlcNAc) or type 2 (Galb4GlcNAc) outer chains with or without α2,6-linked sialic acids. This panel of recombinant mucins carrying a repertoire of sialylated O-glycans will be important tools in studies aiming at determining the fine O-glycan binding specificity of sialic acid-specific microbial adhesins and mammalian lectins.

  11. A Panel of Recombinant Mucins Carrying a Repertoire of Sialylated O-Glycans Based on Different Core Chains for Studies of Glycan Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Maria Cherian, Reeja; Jin, Chunsheng; Liu, Jining; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Holgersson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Sialylated glycans serve as key elements of receptors for many viruses, bacteria, and bacterial toxins. The microbial recognition and their binding specificity can be affected by the linkage of the terminal sugar residue, types of underlying sugar chains, and the nature of the entire glycoconjugate. Owing to the pathobiological significance of sialylated glycans, we have engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to secrete mucin-type immunoglobulin-fused proteins carrying terminal α2,3- or α2,6-linked sialic acid on defined O-glycan core saccharide chains. Besides stably expressing P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/mouse immunoglobulin G2b cDNA (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), CHO cells were stably transfected with plasmids encoding glycosyltransferases to synthesize core 2 (GCNT1), core 3 (B3GNT6), core 4 (GCNT1 and B3GNT6), or extended core 1 (B3GNT3) chains with or without the type 1 chain-encoding enzyme B3GALT5 and ST6GAL1. Western blot and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of core 1, 2, 3, 4, and extended core 1 chains carrying either type 1 (Galβ3GlcNAc) or type 2 (Galβ4GlcNAc) outer chains with or without α2,6-linked sialic acids. This panel of recombinant mucins carrying a repertoire of sialylated O-glycans will be important tools in studies aiming at determining the fine O-glycan binding specificity of sialic acid-specific microbial adhesins and mammalian lectins. PMID:26274979

  12. Plasma Anti-Glycan Antibody Profiles Associated with Nickel level in Urine.

    PubMed

    Vuskovic, Marko; Barbuti, Anna-Maria; Goldsmith-Rooney, Emma; Glassman, Laura; Bovin, Nicolai; Pass, Harvey; Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng; Chen, Meichi; Yan, Bing; Niu, Jingping; Qu, Qingshan; Costa, Max; Huflejt, Margaret

    2013-12-30

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are widely used in industrial and commercial products including household and cooking utensils, jewelry, dental appliances and implants. Occupational exposure to nickel is associated with an increased risk for lung and nasal cancers, is the most common cause of contact dermatitis and has an extensive effect on the immune system. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (i) to evaluate immune response to the occupational exposure to nickel measured by the presence of anti-glycan antibodies (AGA) using a new biomarker-discovery platform based on printed glycan arrays (PGA), and (ii) to evaluate and compile a sequence of bioinformatics and statistical methods which are specifically relevant to PGA-derived information and to identification of putative "Ni toxicity signature". The PGAs are similar to DNA microarrays, but contain deposits of various carbohydrates (glycans) instead of spotted DNAs. The study uses data derived from a set of 89 plasma specimens and their corresponding demographic information. The study population includes three subgroups: subjects directly exposed to Nickel that work in a refinery, subjects environmentally exposed to Nickel that live in a city where the refinery is located and subjects that live in a remote location. The paper describes the following sequence of nine data processing and analysis steps: (1) Analysis of inter-array reproducibility based on benchmark sera; (2) Analysis of intra-array reproducibility; (3) Screening of data - rejecting glycans which result in low intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), high coefficient of variation and low fluorescent intensity; (4) Analysis of inter-slide bias and choice of data normalization technique; (5) Determination of discriminatory subsamples based on multiple bootstrap tests; (6) Determination of the optimal signature size (cardinality of selected feature set) based on multiple cross-validation tests; (7) Identification of the top discriminatory glycans and their

  13. Mass Spectrometric Screening of Ovarian Cancer with Serum Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Han; Park, Chang Won; Um, Dalho; Baek, Ki Hwang; Jo, Yohahn; An, Hyunjoo; Kim, Yangsun; Kim, Tae Jin

    2014-01-01

    Changes of glycosylation pattern in serum proteins have been linked to various diseases including cancer, suggesting possible development of novel biomarkers based on the glycomic analysis. In this study, N-linked glycans from human serum were quantitatively profiled by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) and compared between healthy controls and ovarian cancer patients. A training set consisting of 40 healthy controls and 40 ovarian cancer cases demonstrated an inverse correlation between P value of ANOVA and area under the curve (AUC) of each candidate biomarker peak from MALDI-TOF MS, providing standards for the classification. A multibiomarker panel composed of 15 MALDI-TOF MS peaks resulted in AUC of 0.89, 80~90% sensitivity, and 70~83% specificity in the training set. The performance of the biomarker panel was validated in a separate blind test set composed of 23 healthy controls and 37 ovarian cancer patients, leading to 81~84% sensitivity and 83% specificity with cut-off values determined by the training set. Sensitivity of CA-125, the most widely used ovarian cancer marker, was 74% in the training set and 78% in the test set, respectively. These results indicate that MALDI-TOF MS-mediated serum N-glycan analysis could provide critical information for the screening of ovarian cancer. PMID:24648610

  14. Glycan-based biomarkers for mucopolysaccharidoses

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Roger; Brown, Jillian R.; Lorey, Fred; Dickson, Patricia I.; Crawford, Brett E.; Esko, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) result from attenuation or loss of enzyme activities required for lysosomal degradation of the glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronan, heparan sulfate, chondroitin/dermatan sulfate, and keratan sulfate. This review provides a summary of glycan biomarkers that have been used to characterize animal models of MPS, for diagnosis of patients, and for monitoring therapy based on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and enzyme replacement therapy. Recent advances have focused on the non-reducing terminus of the glycosaminoglycans that accumulate as biomarkers, using a combination of enzymatic digestion with bacterial enzymes followed by quantitative liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. These new methods provide a simple, rapid diagnostic strategy that can be applied to samples of urine, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, cultured cells and dried blood spots from newborn infants. Analysis of the non-reducing end glycans provides a method for monitoring enzyme replacement and substrate reduction therapies and serves as a discovery tool for uncovering novel biomarkers and new forms of mucopolysaccharidoses. PMID:23958290

  15. Glycans pattern the phase behaviour of lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Guidotti, Guido; Manoharan, Vinothan N.; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-02-01

    Hydrated networks of glycans (polysaccharides)—in the form of cell walls, periplasms or gel-like matrices—are ubiquitously present adjacent to cellular plasma membranes. Yet, despite their abundance, the function of glycans in the extracellular milieu is largely unknown. Here we show that the spatial configuration of glycans controls the phase behaviour of multiphase model lipid membranes: inhomogeneous glycan networks stabilize large lipid domains at the characteristic length scale of the network, whereas homogeneous networks suppress macroscopic lipid phase separation. We also find that glycan-patterned phase separation is thermally reversible—thus indicating that the effect is thermodynamic rather than kinetic—and that phase patterning probably results from a preferential interaction of glycans with ordered lipid phases. These findings have implications for membrane-mediated transport processes, potentially rationalize long-standing observations that differentiate the behaviour of native and model membranes and may indicate an intimate coupling between cellular lipidomes and glycomes.

  16. Glycan Evolution in Response to Collaboration, Conflict, and Constraint*

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Stevan A.; Gagneux, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Glycans, oligo- and polysaccharides secreted or attached to proteins and lipids, cover the surfaces of all cells and have a regulatory capacity and structural diversity beyond any other class of biological molecule. Glycans may have evolved these properties because they mediate cellular interactions and often face pressure to evolve new functions rapidly. We approach this idea two ways. First, we discuss evolutionary innovation. Glycan synthesis, regulation, and mode of chemical interaction influence the spectrum of new forms presented to evolution. Second, we describe the evolutionary conflicts that arise when alleles and individuals interact. Glycan regulation and diversity are integral to these biological negotiations. Glycans are tasked with such an amazing diversity of functions that no study of cellular interaction can begin without considering them. We propose that glycans predominate the cell surface because their physical and chemical properties allow the rapid innovation required of molecules on the frontlines of evolutionary conflict. PMID:23329843

  17. Enhanced Aromatic Sequons Increase Oligosaccharyltransferase Glycosylation Efficiency and Glycan Homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Murray, Amber N; Chen, Wentao; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Hanson, Sarah R; Wiseman, R Luke; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M; Powers, David L; Powers, Evan T; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2015-08-20

    N-Glycosylation plays an important role in protein folding and function. Previous studies demonstrate that a phenylalanine residue introduced at the n-2 position relative to an Asn-Xxx-Thr/Ser N-glycosylation sequon increases the glycan occupancy of the sequon in insect cells. Here, we show that any aromatic residue at n-2 increases glycan occupancy in human cells and that this effect is dependent upon oligosaccharyltransferase substrate preferences rather than differences in other cellular processing events such as degradation or trafficking. Moreover, aromatic residues at n-2 alter glycan processing in the Golgi, producing proteins with less complex N-glycan structures. These results demonstrate that manipulating the sequence space surrounding N-glycosylation sequons is useful both for controlling glycosylation efficiency, thus enhancing glycan occupancy, and for influencing the N-glycan structures produced. PMID:26190824

  18. Glycan labeling strategies and their use in identification and quantification

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. R.; Zauner, G.; Huhn, C.; Bruggink, C.; Deelder, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Most methods for the analysis of oligosaccharides from biological sources require a glycan derivatization step: glycans may be derivatized to introduce a chromophore or fluorophore, facilitating detection after chromatographic or electrophoretic separation. Derivatization can also be applied to link charged or hydrophobic groups at the reducing end to enhance glycan separation and mass-spectrometric detection. Moreover, derivatization steps such as permethylation aim at stabilizing sialic acid residues, enhancing mass-spectrometric sensitivity, and supporting detailed structural characterization by (tandem) mass spectrometry. Finally, many glycan labels serve as a linker for oligosaccharide attachment to surfaces or carrier proteins, thereby allowing interaction studies with carbohydrate-binding proteins. In this review, various aspects of glycan labeling, separation, and detection strategies are discussed. Figure MALDI-FTICR-MS of 2AA-labeled total plasma N-glycans PMID:20225063

  19. Capture and characterization of influenza A virus from primary samples using glycan bead arrays.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Miriam; Fisher, Christopher J; Huang, Mia L; Lindsay, LeAnn L; Plancarte, Magdalena; Boyce, Walter M; Godula, Kamil; Gagneux, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) utilize sialylated host glycans as ligands for binding and infection. The glycan-binding preference of IAV hemagglutinin (HA) is an important determinant of host specificity. Propagation of IAV in embryonated chicken eggs and cultured mammalian cells yields viruses with amino acid substitutions in the HA that can alter the binding specificity. Therefore, it is important to determine the binding specificity of IAV directly in primary samples since it reflects the actual tropism of virus in nature. We developed a novel platform for analysis of IAV binding specificity in samples that contain very low virus titers. This platform consists of a high-density flexible glycan display on magnetic beads, which promotes multivalent interactions with the viral HA. Glycan-bound virus is detected by quantifying the viral neuraminidase activity via a fluorogenic reporter, 2'-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid. This method eliminates the need for labeling the virus and significantly enhances the sensitivity of detection.

  20. Regulation of Glycan Structures in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nairn, Alison V.; Aoki, Kazuhiro; dela Rosa, Mitche; Porterfield, Mindy; Lim, Jae-Min; Kulik, Michael; Pierce, J. Michael; Wells, Lance; Dalton, Stephen; Tiemeyer, Michael; Moremen, Kelley W.

    2012-01-01

    The abundance and structural diversity of glycans on glycoproteins and glycolipids are highly regulated and play important roles during vertebrate development. Because of the challenges associated with studying glycan regulation in vertebrate embryos, we have chosen to study mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as they differentiate into embryoid bodies (EBs) or into extraembryonic endodermal (ExE) cells as a model for cellular differentiation. We profiled N- and O-glycan structures isolated from these cell populations and examined transcripts encoding the corresponding enzymatic machinery for glycan biosynthesis in an effort to probe the mechanisms that drive the regulation of glycan diversity. During differentiation from mouse ES cells to either EBs or ExE cells, general trends were detected. The predominance of high mannose N-glycans in ES cells shifted to an equal abundance of complex and high mannose structures, increased sialylation, and increased α-Gal termination in the differentiated cell populations. Whereas core 1 O-glycan structures predominated in all three cell populations, increased sialylation and increased core diversity characterized the O-glycans of both differentiated cell types. Increased polysialylation was also found in both differentiated cell types. Differences between the two differentiated cell types included greater sialylation of N-glycans in EBs, whereas α-Gal-capped structures were more prevalent in ExE cells. Changes in glycan structures generally, but not uniformly, correlated with alterations in transcript abundance for the corresponding biosynthetic enzymes, suggesting that transcriptional regulation contributes significantly to the regulation of glycan expression. Knowledge of glycan structural diversity and transcript regulation should provide greater understanding of the roles of protein glycosylation in vertebrate development. PMID:22988249

  1. Glycan array data management at Consortium for Functional Glycomics.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Maha; Sasisekharan, Ram; Raman, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Glycomics or the study of structure-function relationships of complex glycans has reshaped post-genomics biology. Glycans mediate fundamental biological functions via their specific interactions with a variety of proteins. Recognizing the importance of glycomics, large-scale research initiatives such as the Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG) were established to address these challenges. Over the past decade, the Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG) has generated novel reagents and technologies for glycomics analyses, which in turn have led to generation of diverse datasets. These datasets have contributed to understanding glycan diversity and structure-function relationships at molecular (glycan-protein interactions), cellular (gene expression and glycan analysis), and whole organism (mouse phenotyping) levels. Among these analyses and datasets, screening of glycan-protein interactions on glycan array platforms has gained much prominence and has contributed to cross-disciplinary realization of the importance of glycomics in areas such as immunology, infectious diseases, cancer biomarkers, etc. This manuscript outlines methodologies for capturing data from glycan array experiments and online tools to access and visualize glycan array data implemented at the CFG.

  2. Chemical Probing of Glycans in Cells and Organisms†

    PubMed Central

    Rouhanifard, Sara H.; Nordstrøm, Lars Ulrik; Zheng, Tianqing; Wu, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Among the four major building blocks of life, glycans play essential roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Due to their non-templated biosynthesis, advances towards elucidating the molecular details of glycan functions are relatively slow compared with the pace of protein and nucleic acid research. Over the past 30 years, chemical tools have emerged as powerful allies to genetics and molecular biology in the study of glycans in their native environment. This tutorial review will provide an overview of the recent technological developments in the field, as well as the progress in the application of these techniques to probe glycans in cells and organisms. PMID:23257905

  3. Chemical probing of glycans in cells and organisms.

    PubMed

    Rouhanifard, Sara H; Nordstrøm, Lars Ulrik; Zheng, Tianqing; Wu, Peng

    2013-05-21

    Among the four major building blocks of life, glycans play essential roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Due to their non-templated biosynthesis, advances towards elucidating the molecular details of glycan functions are relatively slow compared with the pace of protein and nucleic acid research. Over the past 30 years, chemical tools have emerged as powerful allies to genetics and molecular biology in the study of glycans in their native environment. This tutorial review will provide an overview of the recent technological developments in the field, as well as the progress in the application of these techniques to probe glycans in cells and organisms.

  4. Several N-Glycans on the HIV Envelope Glycoprotein gp120 Preferentially Locate Near Disulphide Bridges and Are Required for Efficient Infectivity and Virus Transmission.

    PubMed

    Mathys, Leen; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 contains nine disulphide bridges and is highly glycosylated, carrying on average 24 N-linked glycans. Using a probability calculation, we here demonstrate that there is a co-localization of disulphide bridges and N-linked glycans in HIV-1 gp120, with a predominance of N-linked glycans in close proximity to disulphide bridges, at the C-terminal side of the involved cysteines. Also, N-glycans are frequently found immediately adjacent to disulphide bridges in gp120 at the N-terminal side of the involved cysteines. In contrast, N-glycans at positions close to, but not immediately neighboring disulphide bridges seem to be disfavored at the N-terminal side of the involved cysteines. Such a pronounced co-localization of disulphide bridges and N-glycans was also found for the N-glycans on glycoprotein E1 of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) but not for other heavily glycosylated proteins such as E2 from HCV and the surface GP from Ebola virus. The potential functional role of the presence of N-glycans near disulphide bridges in HIV-1 gp120 was studied using site-directed mutagenesis, either by deleting conserved N-glycans or by inserting new N-glycosylation sites near disulphide bridges. The generated HIV-1NL4.3 mutants were subjected to an array of assays, determining the envelope glycoprotein levels in mutant viral particles, their infectivity and the capture and transmission efficiencies of mutant virus particles by DC-SIGN. Three N-glycans located nearby disulphide bridges were found to be crucial for the preservation of several of these functions of gp120. In addition, introduction of new N-glycans upstream of several disulphide bridges, at locations where there was a significant absence of N-glycans in a broad variety of virus strains, was found to result in a complete loss of viral infectivity. It was shown that the N-glycan environment around well-defined disulphide bridges of gp120 is highly critical to allow efficient viral infection

  5. Glycomic Analysis of Life Stages of the Human Parasite Schistosoma mansoni Reveals Developmental Expression Profiles of Functional and Antigenic Glycan Motifs*

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Cornelis H.; van Diepen, Angela; Nguyen, D. Linh; Wuhrer, Manfred; Hoffmann, Karl F.; Deelder, André M.; Hokke, Cornelis H.

    2015-01-01

    Glycans present on glycoproteins and glycolipids of the major human parasite Schistosoma mansoni induce innate as well as adaptive immune responses in the host. To be able to study the molecular characteristics of schistosome infections it is therefore required to determine the expression profiles of glycans and antigenic glycan-motifs during a range of critical stages of the complex schistosome lifecycle. We performed a longitudinal profiling study covering schistosome glycosylation throughout worm- and egg-development using a mass spectrometry-based glycomics approach. Our study revealed that during worm development N-glycans with Galβ1–4(Fucα1–3)GlcNAc (LeX) and core-xylose motifs were rapidly lost after cercariae to schistosomula transformation, whereas GalNAcβ1–4GlcNAc (LDN)-motifs gradually became abundant and predominated in adult worms. LeX-motifs were present on glycolipids up to 2 weeks of schistosomula development, whereas glycolipids with mono- and multifucosylated LDN-motifs remained present up to the adult worm stage. In contrast, expression of complex O-glycans diminished to undetectable levels within days after transformation. During egg development, a rich diversity of N-glycans with fucosylated motifs was expressed, but with α3-core fucose and a high degree of multifucosylated antennae only in mature eggs and miracidia. N-glycan antennae were exclusively LDN-based in miracidia. O-glycans in the mature eggs were also diverse and contained LeX- and multifucosylated LDN, but none of these were associated with miracidia in which we detected only the Galβ1–3(Galβ1–6)GalNAc core glycan. Immature eggs also exhibited short O-glycan core structures only, suggesting that complex fucosylated O-glycans of schistosome eggs are derived primarily from glycoproteins produced by the subshell envelope in the developed egg. Lipid glycans with multifucosylated GlcNAc repeats were present throughout egg development, but with the longer highly

  6. Glycomic Analysis of Life Stages of the Human Parasite Schistosoma mansoni Reveals Developmental Expression Profiles of Functional and Antigenic Glycan Motifs.

    PubMed

    Smit, Cornelis H; van Diepen, Angela; Nguyen, D Linh; Wuhrer, Manfred; Hoffmann, Karl F; Deelder, André M; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2015-07-01

    Glycans present on glycoproteins and glycolipids of the major human parasite Schistosoma mansoni induce innate as well as adaptive immune responses in the host. To be able to study the molecular characteristics of schistosome infections it is therefore required to determine the expression profiles of glycans and antigenic glycan-motifs during a range of critical stages of the complex schistosome lifecycle. We performed a longitudinal profiling study covering schistosome glycosylation throughout worm- and egg-development using a mass spectrometry-based glycomics approach. Our study revealed that during worm development N-glycans with Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (LeX) and core-xylose motifs were rapidly lost after cercariae to schistosomula transformation, whereas GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (LDN)-motifs gradually became abundant and predominated in adult worms. LeX-motifs were present on glycolipids up to 2 weeks of schistosomula development, whereas glycolipids with mono- and multifucosylated LDN-motifs remained present up to the adult worm stage. In contrast, expression of complex O-glycans diminished to undetectable levels within days after transformation. During egg development, a rich diversity of N-glycans with fucosylated motifs was expressed, but with α3-core fucose and a high degree of multifucosylated antennae only in mature eggs and miracidia. N-glycan antennae were exclusively LDN-based in miracidia. O-glycans in the mature eggs were also diverse and contained LeX- and multifucosylated LDN, but none of these were associated with miracidia in which we detected only the Galβ1-3(Galβ1-6)GalNAc core glycan. Immature eggs also exhibited short O-glycan core structures only, suggesting that complex fucosylated O-glycans of schistosome eggs are derived primarily from glycoproteins produced by the subshell envelope in the developed egg. Lipid glycans with multifucosylated GlcNAc repeats were present throughout egg development, but with the longer highly fucosylated

  7. N-glycan MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry on Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Enables the Delineation of Ovarian Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Everest-Dass, Arun V; Briggs, Matthew T; Kaur, Gurjeet; Oehler, Martin K; Hoffmann, Peter; Packer, Nicolle H

    2016-09-01

    Ovarian cancer is a fatal gynaecological malignancy in adult women with a five-year overall survival rate of only 30%. Glycomic and glycoproteomic profiling studies have reported extensive protein glycosylation pattern alterations in ovarian cancer. Therefore, spatio-temporal investigation of these glycosylation changes may unearth tissue-specific changes that occur in the development and progression of ovarian cancer. A novel method for investigating tissue-specific N-linked glycans is using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections that can spatially profile N-glycan compositions released from proteins in tissue-specific regions. In this study, tissue regions of interest (e.g. tumor, stroma, adipose tissue and necrotic areas) were isolated from FFPE tissue sections of advanced serous ovarian cancers (n = 3). PGC-LC-ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-MSI were used as complementary techniques to firstly generate structural information on the tissue-specific glycans in order to then obtain high resolution images of the glycan structure distribution in ovarian cancer tissue. The N-linked glycan repertoires carried by the proteins in these tissue regions were structurally characterized for the first time in FFPE ovarian cancer tissue regions, using enzymatic peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) release of N-glycans. The released glycans were analyzed by porous graphitized carbon liquid chromatography (PGC-LC) and collision induced electrospray negative mode MS fragmentation analysis. The N-glycan profiles identified by this analysis were then used to determine the location and distribution of each N-glycan on FFPE ovarian cancer sections that were treated with PNGase F using high resolution MALDI-MSI. A tissue-specific distribution of N-glycan structures identified particular regions of the ovarian cancer sections. For example, high mannose glycans were predominantly expressed in the

  8. Several N-Glycans on the HIV Envelope Glycoprotein gp120 Preferentially Locate Near Disulphide Bridges and Are Required for Efficient Infectivity and Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Mathys, Leen; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 contains nine disulphide bridges and is highly glycosylated, carrying on average 24 N-linked glycans. Using a probability calculation, we here demonstrate that there is a co-localization of disulphide bridges and N-linked glycans in HIV-1 gp120, with a predominance of N-linked glycans in close proximity to disulphide bridges, at the C-terminal side of the involved cysteines. Also, N-glycans are frequently found immediately adjacent to disulphide bridges in gp120 at the N-terminal side of the involved cysteines. In contrast, N-glycans at positions close to, but not immediately neighboring disulphide bridges seem to be disfavored at the N-terminal side of the involved cysteines. Such a pronounced co-localization of disulphide bridges and N-glycans was also found for the N-glycans on glycoprotein E1 of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) but not for other heavily glycosylated proteins such as E2 from HCV and the surface GP from Ebola virus. The potential functional role of the presence of N-glycans near disulphide bridges in HIV-1 gp120 was studied using site-directed mutagenesis, either by deleting conserved N-glycans or by inserting new N-glycosylation sites near disulphide bridges. The generated HIV-1NL4.3 mutants were subjected to an array of assays, determining the envelope glycoprotein levels in mutant viral particles, their infectivity and the capture and transmission efficiencies of mutant virus particles by DC-SIGN. Three N-glycans located nearby disulphide bridges were found to be crucial for the preservation of several of these functions of gp120. In addition, introduction of new N-glycans upstream of several disulphide bridges, at locations where there was a significant absence of N-glycans in a broad variety of virus strains, was found to result in a complete loss of viral infectivity. It was shown that the N-glycan environment around well-defined disulphide bridges of gp120 is highly critical to allow efficient viral infection

  9. N-glycan MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry on Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Enables the Delineation of Ovarian Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Everest-Dass, Arun V; Briggs, Matthew T; Kaur, Gurjeet; Oehler, Martin K; Hoffmann, Peter; Packer, Nicolle H

    2016-09-01

    Ovarian cancer is a fatal gynaecological malignancy in adult women with a five-year overall survival rate of only 30%. Glycomic and glycoproteomic profiling studies have reported extensive protein glycosylation pattern alterations in ovarian cancer. Therefore, spatio-temporal investigation of these glycosylation changes may unearth tissue-specific changes that occur in the development and progression of ovarian cancer. A novel method for investigating tissue-specific N-linked glycans is using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections that can spatially profile N-glycan compositions released from proteins in tissue-specific regions. In this study, tissue regions of interest (e.g. tumor, stroma, adipose tissue and necrotic areas) were isolated from FFPE tissue sections of advanced serous ovarian cancers (n = 3). PGC-LC-ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-MSI were used as complementary techniques to firstly generate structural information on the tissue-specific glycans in order to then obtain high resolution images of the glycan structure distribution in ovarian cancer tissue. The N-linked glycan repertoires carried by the proteins in these tissue regions were structurally characterized for the first time in FFPE ovarian cancer tissue regions, using enzymatic peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) release of N-glycans. The released glycans were analyzed by porous graphitized carbon liquid chromatography (PGC-LC) and collision induced electrospray negative mode MS fragmentation analysis. The N-glycan profiles identified by this analysis were then used to determine the location and distribution of each N-glycan on FFPE ovarian cancer sections that were treated with PNGase F using high resolution MALDI-MSI. A tissue-specific distribution of N-glycan structures identified particular regions of the ovarian cancer sections. For example, high mannose glycans were predominantly expressed in the

  10. BMP Receptor 1A Determines the Cell Fate of the Postnatal Growth Plate

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Junjun; Ren, Yinshi; Zong, Zhaowen; Liu, Chuanju; Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Mishina, Yuji; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Xuedong; Feng, Jian Q.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) are critical for both chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Previous studies reported that embryos deficient in Bmp receptor (Bmpr)1a or Bmpr1b in cartilage display subtle skeletal defects; however, double mutant embryos develop severe skeletal defects, suggesting a functional redundancy that is essential for early chondrogenesis. In this study, we examined the postnatal role of Bmpr1a in cartilage. In the Bmpr1a conditional knockout (cKO, a cross between Bmpr1a flox and aggrecan-CreERT2 induced by a one-time-tamoxifen injection at birth and harvested at ages of 2, 4, 8 and 20 weeks), there was essentially no long bone growth with little expression of cartilage markers such as SOX9, IHH and glycoproteins. Unexpectedly, the null growth plate was replaced by bone-like tissues, supporting the notions that the progenitor cells in the growth plate, which normally form cartilage, can form other tissues such as bone and fibrous; and that BMPR1A determines the cell fate. A working hypothesis is proposed to explain the vital role of BMPR1A in postnatal chondrogenesis. PMID:24163588

  11. Consequences of individual N-glycan deletions and of proteasomal inhibition on secretion of active BACE.

    PubMed

    Vanoni, Omar; Paganetti, Paolo; Molinari, Maurizio

    2008-10-01

    BACE is an aspartic protease involved in the production of a toxic peptide accumulating in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. After attainment of the native structure in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), BACE is released into the secretory pathway. To better understand the mechanisms regulating protein biogenesis in the mammalian ER, we determined the fate of five variants of soluble BACE with 4, 3, 2, 1, or 0 N-linked glycans. The number of N-glycans displayed on BACE correlated directly with folding and secretion rates and with the yield of active BACE harvested from the cell culture media. Addition of a single N-glycan was sufficient to recruit the calnexin chaperone system and/or for oligosaccharide de-glucosylation by the ER-resident alpha-glucosidase II. Addition of 1-4 N-glycans progressively enhanced the dissociation rate from BiP and reduced the propensity of newly synthesized BACE to enter aberrant soluble and insoluble aggregates. Finally, inhibition of the proteasome increased the yield of active BACE. This shows that active protein normally targeted for destruction can be diverted for secretion, as if for BACE the quality control system would be acting too stringently in the ER lumen, thus causing loss of functional polypeptides. PMID:18632981

  12. Structure and Glycan Binding of a New Cyanovirin-N Homolog.

    PubMed

    Matei, Elena; Basu, Rohan; Furey, William; Shi, Jiong; Calnan, Conor; Aiken, Christopher; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2016-09-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 is heavily glycosylated and bears numerous high mannose sugars. These sugars can serve as targets for HIV-inactivating compounds, such as antibodies and lectins, which bind to the glycans and interfere with viral entry into the target cell. We determined the 1.6 Å x-ray structure of Cyt-CVNH, a recently identified lectin from the cyanobacterium Cyanothece(7424), and elucidated its glycan specificity by NMR. The Cyt-CVNH structure and glycan recognition profile are similar to those of other CVNH proteins, with each domain specifically binding to Manα(1-2)Manα units on the D1 and D3 arms of high mannose glycans. However, in contrast to CV-N, no cross-linking and precipitation of the cross-linked species in solution was observed upon Man-9 binding, allowing, for the first time, investigation of the interaction of Man-9 with a member of the CVNH family by NMR. HIV assays showed that Cyt-CVNH is able to inhibit HIV-1 with ∼4-fold higher potency than CV-N(P51G), a stabilized version of wild type CV-N. Therefore, Cyt-CVNH may qualify as a valuable lectin for potential microbicidal use. PMID:27402833

  13. Delineating diseases by IMS-MS profiling of serum N-linked glycans.

    PubMed

    Isailovic, Dragan; Plasencia, Manolo D; Gaye, Maissa M; Stokes, Sarah T; Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Pungpapong, Vitara; Zhang, Min; Kyselova, Zuzana; Goldman, Radoslav; Mechref, Yehia; Novotny, Milos V; Clemmer, David E

    2012-02-01

    Altered branching and aberrant expression of N-linked glycans is known to be associated with disease states such as cancer. However, the complexity of determining such variations hinders the development of specific glycomic approaches for assessing disease states. Here, we examine a combination of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS) measurements, with principal component analysis (PCA) for characterizing serum N-linked glycans from 81 individuals: 28 with cirrhosis of the liver, 25 with liver cancer, and 28 apparently healthy. Supervised PCA of combined ion-mobility profiles for several, to as many as 10 different mass-to-charge ratios for glycan ions, improves the delineation of diseased states. This extends an earlier study [J. Proteome Res.2008, 7, 1109-1117] of isomers associated with a single glycan (S(1)H(5)N(4)) in which PCA analysis of the IMS profiles appeared to differentiate the liver cancer group from the other samples. Although performed on a limited number of test subjects, the combination of IMS-MS for different combinations of ions and multivariate PCA analysis shows promise for characterizing disease states.

  14. Transduction of Glycan-Lectin Binding using Near Infrared Fluorescent Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Glycan Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuel, Nigel; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Kim, Jong-Ho; Zhang, Jingqing; Boghossian, Ardemis; Mahal, Lara; Strano, Michael

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a sensor array employing recombinant lectins as glycan recognition sites tethered via Histidine tags to Ni2+ complexes that act as fluorescent quenchers for semi-conducting single walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a chitosan to measure binding kinetics of model glycans. Two higher-affined glycan-lectin pairs are explored: fucose (Fuc) to PA-IIL and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to GafD. The dissociation constants (KD) for these pairs as free glycans (106 and 19 μM respectively) and streptavidin-tethered (142 and 50 μM respectively) were found. The absolute detection limit for the current platform was found to be 2 μg of glycosylated protein or 100 ng of free glycan to 20 μg of lectin. Glycan detection is demonstrated at the single nanotube level (GlcNAc to GafD). Over a population of 1000 nanotubes, 289 of the SWNT sensors had signals strong enough to yield kinetic information (KD of 250 ± 10 μM). We are also able to identify the locations of ``strong-transducers'' on the basis of dissociation constant (4 sensors with KD < 10 μM) or overall signal modulation (8 sensors with > 5% quench response). The ability to pinpoint strong-binding, single sensors is promising to build a nanoarray of glycan-lectin transducers as a method to profile glycans without protein labeling or glycan liberation pretreatment steps.

  15. Total syntheses of disulphated glycosphingolipid SB1a and the related monosulphated SM1a

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Haruka; Tamai, Hideki; Gao, Chao; Imamura, Akihiro; Ando, Hiromune; Ishida, Hideharu; Feizi, Ten; Kiso, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Total syntheses of two natural sulphoglycolipids, disulphated glycosphingolipid SB1a and the structurally related monosulphated SM1a, are described. They have common glycan sequences and ceramide moiety and are associated with human epithelial carcinomas. The syntheses featured efficient glycan assembly and the glucosyl ceramide cassette as a versatile building block. The binding of the synthetic sulphoglycolipids by the carcinoma-specific monoclonal antibody AE3 was investigated using carbohydrate microarray technology. PMID:26399908

  16. Site occupancy and glycan compositional analysis of two soluble recombinant forms of the attachment glycoprotein of Hendra virus.

    PubMed

    Colgrave, Michelle L; Snelling, Hayley J; Shiell, Brian J; Feng, Yan-Ru; Chan, Yee-Peng; Bossart, Katharine N; Xu, Kai; Nikolov, Dimitar B; Broder, Christopher C; Michalski, Wojtek P

    2012-04-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) continues to cause morbidity and mortality in both humans and horses with a number of sporadic outbreaks. HeV has two structural membrane glycoproteins that mediate the infection of host cells: the attachment (G) and the fusion (F) glycoproteins that are essential for receptor binding and virion-host cell membrane fusion, respectively. N-linked glycosylation of viral envelope proteins are critical post-translation modifications that have been implicated in roles of structural integrity, virus replication and evasion of the host immune response. Deciphering the glycan composition and structure on these glycoproteins may assist in the development of glycan-targeted therapeutic intervention strategies. We examined the site occupancy and glycan composition of recombinant soluble G (sG) glycoproteins expressed in two different mammalian cell systems, transient human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and vaccinia virus (VV)-HeLa cells, using a suite of biochemical and biophysical tools: electrophoresis, lectin binding and tandem mass spectrometry. The N-linked glycans of both VV and HEK293-derived sG glycoproteins carried predominantly mono- and disialylated complex-type N-glycans and a smaller population of high mannose-type glycans. All seven consensus sequences for N-linked glycosylation were definitively found to be occupied in the VV-derived protein, whereas only four sites were found and characterized in the HEK293-derived protein. We also report, for the first time, the existence of O-linked glycosylation sites in both proteins. The striking characteristic of both proteins was glycan heterogeneity in both N- and O-linked sites. The structural features of G protein glycosylation were also determined by X-ray crystallography and interactions with the ephrin-B2 receptor are discussed.

  17. Fast and efficient online release of N-glycans from glycoproteins facilitating liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry glycomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Jmeian, Yazen; Hammad, Loubna A; Mechref, Yehia

    2012-10-16

    A novel online enzyme reactor incorporating peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) on a monolithic polymer support has been developed to allow the rapid simultaneous release of both neutral and acidic N-linked glycans from glycoproteins. The PNGase F monolithic reactor was fabricated in a fused silica using glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate polymer. The reactor was coupled to a C8 trap and a porous graphitic carbon (PGC) HPLC-chip. This arrangement was interfaced to an ion trap mass spectrometer for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses. The performance of the PNGase F reactor was optimized using the MS signal for the disialylated biantennary N-glycan derived from fetuin. Optimum conditions for glycan release were attained at room temperature using a loading flow rate of 2 μL/min and a reaction time of 6 min. The loading capacity of the reactor was determined to be around 2 pmol of glycoprotein. The online digestion and MS characterization experiments resulted in sensitivities as high as 100 fmol of glycoprotein and 0.1 μL of human blood serum. The enzyme reactor activity was also shown to remain stable after 1 month of continuous use. Both small and large glycoproteins as well as glycoproteins containing high-mannose glycans, fucolsylated glycans, sialylated glycans, and hybrid structures were studied. The model glycoproteins included ribonuclease B, fetuin, α(1)-acid glycoprotein, immunoglobulin, and thyroglobulin. All N-glycans associated with these model glycoproteins were detected using the online PNGase F reactor setup.

  18. Multivalent display of minimal Clostridium difficile glycan epitopes mimics antigenic properties of larger glycans

    PubMed Central

    Broecker, Felix; Hanske, Jonas; Martin, Christopher E.; Baek, Ju Yuel; Wahlbrink, Annette; Wojcik, Felix; Hartmann, Laura; Rademacher, Christoph; Anish, Chakkumkal; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic cell-surface glycans are promising vaccine candidates against Clostridium difficile. The complexity of large, highly antigenic and immunogenic glycans is a synthetic challenge. Less complex antigens providing similar immune responses are desirable for vaccine development. Based on molecular-level glycan–antibody interaction analyses, we here demonstrate that the C. difficile surface polysaccharide-I (PS-I) can be resembled by multivalent display of minimal disaccharide epitopes on a synthetic scaffold that does not participate in binding. We show that antibody avidity as a measure of antigenicity increases by about five orders of magnitude when disaccharides are compared with constructs containing five disaccharides. The synthetic, pentavalent vaccine candidate containing a peptide T-cell epitope elicits weak but highly specific antibody responses to larger PS-I glycans in mice. This study highlights the potential of multivalently displaying small oligosaccharides to achieve antigenicity characteristic of larger glycans. The approach may result in more cost-efficient carbohydrate vaccines with reduced synthetic effort. PMID:27091615

  19. Predominant Expression of Hybrid N-Glycans Has Distinct Cellular Roles Relative to Complex and Oligomannose N-Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Hall, M. Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A.; Zhu, Yong; Dayal, Sahil; Whitman, Austin A.; Schwalbe, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation modulates growth, maintenance, and stress signaling processes. Consequently, altered N-glycosylation is associated with reduced fitness and disease. Therefore, expanding our understanding of N-glycans in altering biological processes is of utmost interest. Herein, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/caspase9 (CRISPR/Cas9) technology was employed to engineer a glycosylation mutant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell line, K16, which expresses predominantly hybrid type N-glycans. This newly engineered cell line enabled us to compare N-glycan effects on cellular properties of hybrid type N-glycans, to the well-established Pro−5 and Lec1 cell lines, which express complex and oligomannose types of N-glycans, respectively. Lectin binding studies revealed the predominant N-glycan expressed in K16 is hybrid type. Cell dissociation and migration assays demonstrated the greatest strength of cell–cell adhesion and fastest migratory rates for oligomannose N-glycans, and these properties decreased as oligomannose type were converted to hybrid type, and further decreased upon conversion to complex type. Next, we examined the roles of three general types of N-glycans on ectopic expression of E-cadherin, a cell–cell adhesion protein. Microscopy revealed more functional E-cadherin at the cell–cell border when N-glycans were oligomannose and these levels decreased as the oligomannose N-glycans were processed to hybrid and then to complex. Thus, we provide evidence that all three general types of N-glycans impact plasma membrane architecture and cellular properties. PMID:27304954

  20. LC-MS/MS analysis of permethylated free oligosaccharides and N-glycans derived from human, bovine, and goat milk samples.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xue; Zhou, Shiyue; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-06-01

    Oligosaccharides in milk not only provide nutrition to the infants but also have significant immune biofunctions such as inhibition of pathogen binding to the host cell. The main component in milk oligosaccharides is free oligosaccharides. Since the proteins in milk are highly glycosylated, N-glycans in milk also play an import role. In this study, we investigated the permethylated free oligosaccharides and N-glycans extracted from bovine, goat, and human milks using LC-MS/MS. Quantitation profiles of free oligosaccharides and N-glycans were reported. The number of free oligosaccharides observed in bovine, goat, and human milk samples (without isomeric consideration) were 11, 8, and 11, respectively. Human milk had more complex free oligosaccharides structures than the other two milk samples. Totally 58, 21, and 43 N-glycan structures (without isomeric consideration) were associated with whey proteins extracted from bovine, goat, and human milk samples, respectively. Bovine milk free oligosaccharides and N-glycans from whey proteins were highly sialylated and to a lesser extend fucosylated. Goat and human milk free oligosaccharides and N-glycans from whey proteins were both highly fucosylated. Also, the isomeric glycans in milk samples were determined by porous graphitic carbon LC at elevated temperatures. For example, separation of human milk free oligosaccharide Gal-GlcNAc-(Fuc)-Gal-Glc and Gal-GlcNAc-Gal-Glc-Fuc isomers was achieved using porous graphitic carbon column. Permethylation of the glycan structures facilitated the interpretation of MS/MS. For example, internal cleavage and glycosidic bond cleavage are readily distinguished in the tandem mass spectra of permethylated glycans. This feature resulted in the identification of several isomers. PMID:26959529

  1. LC-MS/MS analysis of permethylated free oligosaccharides and N-glycans derived from human, bovine, and goat milk samples.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xue; Zhou, Shiyue; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-06-01

    Oligosaccharides in milk not only provide nutrition to the infants but also have significant immune biofunctions such as inhibition of pathogen binding to the host cell. The main component in milk oligosaccharides is free oligosaccharides. Since the proteins in milk are highly glycosylated, N-glycans in milk also play an import role. In this study, we investigated the permethylated free oligosaccharides and N-glycans extracted from bovine, goat, and human milks using LC-MS/MS. Quantitation profiles of free oligosaccharides and N-glycans were reported. The number of free oligosaccharides observed in bovine, goat, and human milk samples (without isomeric consideration) were 11, 8, and 11, respectively. Human milk had more complex free oligosaccharides structures than the other two milk samples. Totally 58, 21, and 43 N-glycan structures (without isomeric consideration) were associated with whey proteins extracted from bovine, goat, and human milk samples, respectively. Bovine milk free oligosaccharides and N-glycans from whey proteins were highly sialylated and to a lesser extend fucosylated. Goat and human milk free oligosaccharides and N-glycans from whey proteins were both highly fucosylated. Also, the isomeric glycans in milk samples were determined by porous graphitic carbon LC at elevated temperatures. For example, separation of human milk free oligosaccharide Gal-GlcNAc-(Fuc)-Gal-Glc and Gal-GlcNAc-Gal-Glc-Fuc isomers was achieved using porous graphitic carbon column. Permethylation of the glycan structures facilitated the interpretation of MS/MS. For example, internal cleavage and glycosidic bond cleavage are readily distinguished in the tandem mass spectra of permethylated glycans. This feature resulted in the identification of several isomers.

  2. Comprehensive N-Glycan Profiling of Avian Immunoglobulin Y.

    PubMed

    Gilgunn, Sarah; Millán Martín, Silvia; Wormald, Mark R; Zapatero-Rodríguez, Julia; Conroy, Paul J; O'Kennedy, Richard J; Rudd, Pauline M; Saldova, Radka

    2016-01-01

    Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has highlighted its suitability for the generation of high-quality, high-affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic and biotechnological applications. The glycosylation profile of potential immunoglobulin therapeutics is species specific and is heavily influenced by the cell-line/culture conditions used for production. Hence, knowledge of the carbohydrate moieties present on immunoglobulins is essential as certain glycan structures can adversely impact their physicochemical and biological properties. This study describes the detailed N-glycan profile of IgY polyclonal antibodies from the serum of leghorn chickens using a fully quantitative high-throughput N-glycan analysis approach, based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) separation of released glycans. Structural assignments revealed serum IgY to contain complex bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary glycans with or without core fucose and bisects, hybrid and high mannose glycans. High sialic acid content was also observed, with the presence of rare sialic acid structures, likely polysialic acids. It is concluded that IgY is heavily decorated with complex glycans; however, no known non-human or immunogenic glycans were identified. Thus, IgY is a potentially promising candidate for immunoglobulin-based therapies for the treatment of various infectious diseases.

  3. Site-specific protein glycosylation analysis with glycan isomer differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hua, Serenus; Nwosu, Charles C; Strum, John S; Seipert, Richard R; An, Hyun Joo; Zivkovic, Angela M; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2012-05-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most common yet diverse post-translational modifications. Information on glycan heterogeneity and glycosite occupancy is increasingly recognized as crucial to understanding glycoprotein structure and function. Yet, no approach currently exists with which to holistically consider both the proteomic and glycomic aspects of a system. Here, we developed a novel method of comprehensive glycosite profiling using nanoflow liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (nano-LC/MS) that shows glycan isomer-specific differentiation on specific sites. Glycoproteins were digested by controlled non-specific proteolysis in order to produce informative glycopeptides. High-resolution, isomer-sensitive chromatographic separation of the glycopeptides was achieved using microfluidic chip-based capillaries packed with graphitized carbon. Integrated LC/MS/MS not only confirmed glycopeptide composition but also differentiated glycan and peptide isomers and yielded structural information on both the glycan and peptide moieties. Our analysis identified at least 13 distinct glycans (including isomers) corresponding to five compositions at the single N-glycosylation site on bovine ribonuclease B, 59 distinct glycans at five N-glycosylation sites on bovine lactoferrin, 13 distinct glycans at one N-glycosylation site on four subclasses of human immunoglobulin G, and 20 distinct glycans at five O-glycosylation sites on bovine κ-casein. Porous graphitized carbon provided effective separation of glycopeptide isomers. The integration of nano-LC with MS and MS/MS of non-specifically cleaved glycopeptides allows quantitative, isomer-sensitive, and site-specific glycoprotein analysis.

  4. Comprehensive N-Glycan Profiling of Avian Immunoglobulin Y

    PubMed Central

    Millán Martín, Silvia; Wormald, Mark R.; Zapatero-Rodríguez, Julia; Conroy, Paul J.; O’Kennedy, Richard J.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Saldova, Radka

    2016-01-01

    Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has highlighted its suitability for the generation of high-quality, high-affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic and biotechnological applications. The glycosylation profile of potential immunoglobulin therapeutics is species specific and is heavily influenced by the cell-line/culture conditions used for production. Hence, knowledge of the carbohydrate moieties present on immunoglobulins is essential as certain glycan structures can adversely impact their physicochemical and biological properties. This study describes the detailed N-glycan profile of IgY polyclonal antibodies from the serum of leghorn chickens using a fully quantitative high-throughput N-glycan analysis approach, based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) separation of released glycans. Structural assignments revealed serum IgY to contain complex bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary glycans with or without core fucose and bisects, hybrid and high mannose glycans. High sialic acid content was also observed, with the presence of rare sialic acid structures, likely polysialic acids. It is concluded that IgY is heavily decorated with complex glycans; however, no known non-human or immunogenic glycans were identified. Thus, IgY is a potentially promising candidate for immunoglobulin-based therapies for the treatment of various infectious diseases. PMID:27459092

  5. Comprehensive N-Glycan Profiling of Avian Immunoglobulin Y.

    PubMed

    Gilgunn, Sarah; Millán Martín, Silvia; Wormald, Mark R; Zapatero-Rodríguez, Julia; Conroy, Paul J; O'Kennedy, Richard J; Rudd, Pauline M; Saldova, Radka

    2016-01-01

    Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has highlighted its suitability for the generation of high-quality, high-affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic and biotechnological applications. The glycosylation profile of potential immunoglobulin therapeutics is species specific and is heavily influenced by the cell-line/culture conditions used for production. Hence, knowledge of the carbohydrate moieties present on immunoglobulins is essential as certain glycan structures can adversely impact their physicochemical and biological properties. This study describes the detailed N-glycan profile of IgY polyclonal antibodies from the serum of leghorn chickens using a fully quantitative high-throughput N-glycan analysis approach, based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) separation of released glycans. Structural assignments revealed serum IgY to contain complex bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary glycans with or without core fucose and bisects, hybrid and high mannose glycans. High sialic acid content was also observed, with the presence of rare sialic acid structures, likely polysialic acids. It is concluded that IgY is heavily decorated with complex glycans; however, no known non-human or immunogenic glycans were identified. Thus, IgY is a potentially promising candidate for immunoglobulin-based therapies for the treatment of various infectious diseases. PMID:27459092

  6. Identifying and applying a highly selective probe to simultaneously determine the O-glucuronidation activity of human UGT1A3 and UGT1A4.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Liang, Si-Cheng; Wang, Chao; Ge, Guang-Bo; Huo, Xiao-Kui; Qi, Xiao-Yi; Deng, Sa; Liu, Ke-Xin; Ma, Xiao-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Glucuronidation mediated by uridine 5'-diphospho (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase is an important detoxification pathway. However, identifying a selective probe of UDP- glucuronosyltransferase is complicated because of the significant overlapping substrate specificity displayed by the enzyme. In this paper, desacetylcinobufagin (DACB) 3-O- and 16-O-glucuronidation were found to be isoform-specific probe reactions for UGT1A4 and UGT1A3, respectively. DACB was well characterized as a probe for simultaneously determining the catalytic activities of O-glucuronidation mediated by UGT1A3 and UGT1A4 from various enzyme sources, through a sensitive analysis method. PMID:25884245

  7. O-Glycan analysis of cellobiohydrolase I from Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu-Lun; Bubner, Patricia; Bauer, Stefan; Somerville, Chris R

    2016-06-01

    We describe here the composition of the O-linked glycans on the Neurospora crassa cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI), which accounts for approximately 40% of the protein secreted by cells growing in the presence of cellulose. CBHI is O-glycosylated with six types of linear, and three types of branched, O-glycans containing approximately equal amounts of mannose and galactose. In addition to the classic fungal O-glycans with reducing end mannoses, we also identified reducing end galactoses which suggest the existence of a protein-O-galactosyltransferase in N. crassa Because of the excellent genetic resources available for N. crassa, the knowledge of the CBHI O-glycans may enable the future evaluation of the role of O-glycosylation on cellulase function and the development of directed O-glycan/cellulase engineering. PMID:26762173

  8. O-Glycan analysis of cellobiohydrolase I from Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu-Lun; Bubner, Patricia; Bauer, Stefan; Somerville, Chris R

    2016-06-01

    We describe here the composition of the O-linked glycans on the Neurospora crassa cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI), which accounts for approximately 40% of the protein secreted by cells growing in the presence of cellulose. CBHI is O-glycosylated with six types of linear, and three types of branched, O-glycans containing approximately equal amounts of mannose and galactose. In addition to the classic fungal O-glycans with reducing end mannoses, we also identified reducing end galactoses which suggest the existence of a protein-O-galactosyltransferase in N. crassa Because of the excellent genetic resources available for N. crassa, the knowledge of the CBHI O-glycans may enable the future evaluation of the role of O-glycosylation on cellulase function and the development of directed O-glycan/cellulase engineering.

  9. N-linked glycan characterization of heterologous proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Huijuan; Miele, Robert G; Mitchell, Teresa I; Gerngross, Tillman U

    2007-01-01

    Our laboratory has focused on the re-engineered of the secretory pathway of Pichia pastoris to perform glycosylation reactions that mimic processing of N-glycans in humans and other higher mammals (1,2). A reporter protein with a single N-linked glycosylation site, a His-tagged Kringle 3 domain of human plasminogen (K3), was used to identify combinations of optimal leader/catalytic domain(s) to recreate human N-glycan processing in the Pichia system. In this chapter we describe detailed protocols for high-throughput purification of K3, enzymatic release of N-glycans, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the released N-glycans. The developed protocols can be adapted to the characterization of N-glycans from any purified protein expressed in P. pastoris.

  10. Contribution of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Sukun; Hu, Kai; He, Siyi; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Mudan; Huang, Xin; Du, Tao; Zheng, Chunfu; Liu, Yalan; Hu, Qinxue

    2015-09-15

    HSV-2 is the major cause of genital herpes and its infection increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition and transmission. HSV-2 glycoprotein B together with glycoproteins D, H and L are indispensable for viral entry, of which gB, as a class III fusogen, plays an essential role. HSV-2 gB has seven potential N-linked glycosylation (N-CHO) sites, but their significance has yet to be determined. For the first time, we systematically analyzed the contributions of N-linked glycans on gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry. Our results demonstrated that, of the seven potential N-CHO sites on gB, mutation at N390, N483 or N668 decreased cell–cell fusion and viral entry, while mutation at N133 mainly affected protein expression and the production of infectious virus particles by blocking the transport of gB from the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi. Our findings highlight the significance of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB expression and function. - Highlights: • N-linked glycan at N133 is important for gB intracellular trafficking and maturation. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal cell–cell fusion. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal viral entry.

  11. Red meat allergic patients have a selective IgE response to the α-Gal glycan.

    PubMed

    Apostolovic, D; Tran, T A T; Sánchez-Vidaurre, S; Cirkovic Velickovic, T; Starkhammar, M; Hamsten, C; van Hage, M

    2015-11-01

    Galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) is a mammalian carbohydrate with significance in a novel type of food allergy. Patients with IgE against α-Gal report severe allergic symptoms 3-6 h after consumption of red meat. We investigated whether IgE from red meat allergic patients recognizes other mammalian glycans than α-Gal or glycans from the plant kingdom and insects of importance in allergy. We found that none of the 24 red meat allergic patients investigated had an IgE antibody response against the other abundant mammalian glycan N-glycolylneuraminic acid or against cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants from plant or venom sources (nCup a 1, nArt v 1, and MUXF3). Deglycosylation of an α-Gal-containing protein, bovine thyroglobulin, significantly reduced the IgE response. In conclusion, we show that red meat allergic patients have a selective IgE response to the α-Gal glycan found in red meat. Other common glycans reactive in allergic disease are not targets of red meat allergic patients' IgE.

  12. Glycan characterization of biopharmaceuticals: Updates and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Planinc, Ana; Bones, Jonathan; Dejaegher, Bieke; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Delporte, Cédric

    2016-05-19

    Therapeutic proteins are rapidly becoming the most promising class of pharmaceuticals on the market due to their successful treatment of a vast array of serious diseases, such as cancers and immune disorders. Therapeutic proteins are produced using recombinant DNA technology. More than 60% of therapeutic proteins are posttranslationally modified following biosynthesis by the addition of N- or O-linked glycans. Glycosylation is the most common posttranslational modifications of proteins. However, it is also the most demanding and complex posttranslational modification from the analytical point of view. Moreover, research has shown that glycosylation significantly impacts stability, half-life, mechanism of action and safety of a therapeutic protein. Considering the exponential growth of biotherapeutics, this present review of the literature (2009-2015) focuses on the characterization of protein glycosylation, which has witnessed an improvement in methodology. Furthermore, it discusses current issues in the fields of production and characterization of therapeutic proteins. This review also highlights the problem of non-standard requirements for the approval of biosimilars with regard to their glycosylation and discusses recent developments and perspectives for improved glycan characterization.

  13. Sulfated glycans in sea urchin fertilization.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2015-02-01

    Fertilization is a controlled cell-cell interaction event that ultimately leads to the union of the gametes involved in reproduction. Fertilization is characterized by three major steps: (i) sperm binding to the extracellular matrix that coats the egg, inducing thereby the acrosome reaction; (ii) penetration of the acrosome-reacted sperm through the egg coat until its contact with the egg plasma membrane; and (iii) adhesion and fusion of the cell membranes of both gametes and the interchange of genetic materials. The acrosome reaction in the first step is important because it ensures that fertilization occurs only between gametes of homologous species. This specificity is primarily driven by the structure of egg jelly coat glycans recognized by a lectin-like binding protein (receptor) in the sperm membrane. Sea urchin fertilization is the best model utilized for understanding carbohydrate-mediated acrosome reactions. This report aims at describing the biochemical basis of regulatory mechanisms exerted by sea urchin sulfated fucans and galactans of well-defined chemical structures on the egg-sperm recognition process during fertilization of this invertebrate. Flagellasialin, a sulfated polysialic acid-containing glycoprotein found in sea urchin sperm flagella, is another sulfated glycan example also involved in fertilization of the echinoderm.

  14. Glycan characterization of biopharmaceuticals: Updates and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Planinc, Ana; Bones, Jonathan; Dejaegher, Bieke; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Delporte, Cédric

    2016-05-19

    Therapeutic proteins are rapidly becoming the most promising class of pharmaceuticals on the market due to their successful treatment of a vast array of serious diseases, such as cancers and immune disorders. Therapeutic proteins are produced using recombinant DNA technology. More than 60% of therapeutic proteins are posttranslationally modified following biosynthesis by the addition of N- or O-linked glycans. Glycosylation is the most common posttranslational modifications of proteins. However, it is also the most demanding and complex posttranslational modification from the analytical point of view. Moreover, research has shown that glycosylation significantly impacts stability, half-life, mechanism of action and safety of a therapeutic protein. Considering the exponential growth of biotherapeutics, this present review of the literature (2009-2015) focuses on the characterization of protein glycosylation, which has witnessed an improvement in methodology. Furthermore, it discusses current issues in the fields of production and characterization of therapeutic proteins. This review also highlights the problem of non-standard requirements for the approval of biosimilars with regard to their glycosylation and discusses recent developments and perspectives for improved glycan characterization. PMID:27126786

  15. Association analyses of large-scale glycan microarray data reveal novel host-specific substructures in influenza A virus binding glycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nan; Martin, Brigitte E.; Yang, Chun-Kai; Luo, Feng; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-10-01

    Influenza A viruses can infect a wide variety of animal species and, occasionally, humans. Infection occurs through the binding formed by viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and certain types of glycan receptors on host cell membranes. Studies have shown that the α2,3-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,3Gal) in avian, equine, and canine species; the α2,6-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,6Gal) in humans; and SA2,3Gal and SA2,6Gal in swine are responsible for the corresponding host tropisms. However, more detailed and refined substructures that determine host tropisms are still not clear. Thus, in this study, we applied association mining on a set of glycan microarray data for 211 influenza viruses from five host groups: humans, swine, canine, migratory waterfowl, and terrestrial birds. The results suggest that besides Neu5Acα2-6Galβ, human-origin viruses could bind glycans with Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Ac and Neu5Gcα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc substructures; Galβ and GlcNAcβ terminal substructures, without sialic acid branches, were associated with the binding of human-, swine-, and avian-origin viruses; sulfated Neu5Acα2-3 substructures were associated with the binding of human- and swine-origin viruses. Finally, through three-dimensional structure characterization, we revealed that the role of glycan chain shapes is more important than that of torsion angles or of overall structural similarities in virus host tropisms.

  16. Association analyses of large-scale glycan microarray data reveal novel host-specific substructures in influenza A virus binding glycans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nan; Martin, Brigitte E; Yang, Chun-Kai; Luo, Feng; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses can infect a wide variety of animal species and, occasionally, humans. Infection occurs through the binding formed by viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and certain types of glycan receptors on host cell membranes. Studies have shown that the α2,3-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,3Gal) in avian, equine, and canine species; the α2,6-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,6Gal) in humans; and SA2,3Gal and SA2,6Gal in swine are responsible for the corresponding host tropisms. However, more detailed and refined substructures that determine host tropisms are still not clear. Thus, in this study, we applied association mining on a set of glycan microarray data for 211 influenza viruses from five host groups: humans, swine, canine, migratory waterfowl, and terrestrial birds. The results suggest that besides Neu5Acα2-6Galβ, human-origin viruses could bind glycans with Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Ac and Neu5Gcα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc substructures; Galβ and GlcNAcβ terminal substructures, without sialic acid branches, were associated with the binding of human-, swine-, and avian-origin viruses; sulfated Neu5Acα2-3 substructures were associated with the binding of human- and swine-origin viruses. Finally, through three-dimensional structure characterization, we revealed that the role of glycan chain shapes is more important than that of torsion angles or of overall structural similarities in virus host tropisms. PMID:26508590

  17. Recognition of microbial glycans by human intelectin-1.

    PubMed

    Wesener, Darryl A; Wangkanont, Kittikhun; McBride, Ryan; Song, Xuezheng; Kraft, Matthew B; Hodges, Heather L; Zarling, Lucas C; Splain, Rebecca A; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D; Paulson, James C; Forest, Katrina T; Kiessling, Laura L

    2015-08-01

    The glycans displayed on mammalian cells can differ markedly from those on microbes. Such differences could, in principle, be 'read' by carbohydrate-binding proteins, or lectins. We used glycan microarrays to show that human intelectin-1 (hIntL-1) does not bind known human glycan epitopes but does interact with multiple glycan epitopes found exclusively on microbes: β-linked D-galactofuranose (β-Galf), D-phosphoglycerol-modified glycans, heptoses, D-glycero-D-talo-oct-2-ulosonic acid (KO) and 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (KDO). The 1.6-Å-resolution crystal structure of hIntL-1 complexed with β-Galf revealed that hIntL-1 uses a bound calcium ion to coordinate terminal exocyclic 1,2-diols. N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), a sialic acid widespread in human glycans, has an exocyclic 1,2-diol but does not bind hIntL-1, probably owing to unfavorable steric and electronic effects. hIntL-1 marks only Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes that display surface glycans with terminal 1,2-diol groups. This ligand selectivity suggests that hIntL-1 functions in microbial surveillance. PMID:26148048

  18. Complex N-Glycans Influence the Spatial Arrangement of Voltage Gated Potassium Channels in Membranes of Neuronal-Derived Cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, M Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A; Edwards, Michael A J; Schwalbe, Ruth A

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic electrical properties of a neuron depend on expression of voltage gated potassium (Kv) channel isoforms, as well as their distribution and density in the plasma membrane. Recently, we showed that N-glycosylation site occupancy of Kv3.1b modulated its placement in the cell body and neurites of a neuronal-derived cell line, B35 neuroblastoma cells. To extrapolate this mechanism to other N-glycosylated Kv channels, we evaluated the impact of N-glycosylation occupancy of Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 channels. Western blots revealed that wild type Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 α-subunits had complex and oligomannose N-glycans, respectively, and that abolishment of the N-glycosylation site(s) generated Kv proteins without N-glycans. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images revealed that N-glycans of Kv3.1a contributed to its placement in the cell membrane while N-glycans had no effect on the distribution of Kv1.1. Based on particle analysis of EGFP-Kv proteins in the adhered membrane, glycosylated forms of Kv3.1a, Kv1.1, and Kv3.1b had differences in the number, size or density of Kv protein clusters in the cell membrane of neurites and cell body of B35 cells. Differences were also observed between the unglycosylated forms of the Kv proteins. Cell dissociation assays revealed that cell-cell adhesion was increased by the presence of complex N-glycans of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, whereas cell adhesion was similar in the oligomannose and unglycosylated Kv1.1 subunit containing B35 cells. Our findings provide direct evidence that N-glycans of Kv3.1 splice variants contribute to the placement of these glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of neuronal-derived cells while those of Kv1.1 were absent. Further when the cell membrane distribution of the Kv channel was modified by N-glycans then the cell-cell adhesion properties were altered. Our study demonstrates that N-glycosylation of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, provides a mechanism for the distribution of these proteins to the cell

  19. Modifications of Glycans: Biological Significance and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Muthana, Saddam M.; Campbell, Christopher; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a central role in a wide range of biological processes. As with nucleic acids and proteins, modifications of specific sites within the glycan chain can modulate a carbohydrate’s overall biological function. For example, acylation, methylation, sulfation, epimerization, and phosphorylation can occur at various positions within a carbohydrate to modulate bioactivity. Therefore, there is significant interest in identifying discrete carbohydrate modifications and understanding their biological effects. Additionally, enzymes that catalyze those modifications and proteins that bind modified glycans provide numerous targets for therapeutic intervention. This review will focus on modifications of glycans that occur after the oligomer/polymer has been assembled, generally referred to as postglycosylational modifications. PMID:22195988

  20. Systems Analysis of N-Glycan Processing in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hossler, Patrick; Mulukutla, Bhanu Chandra; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2007-01-01

    N-glycosylation plays a key role in the quality of many therapeutic glycoprotein biologics. The biosynthesis reactions of these oligosaccharides are a type of network in which a relatively small number of enzymes give rise to a large number of N-glycans as the reaction intermediates and terminal products. Multiple glycans appear on the glycoprotein molecules and give rise to a heterogeneous product. Controlling the glycan distribution is critical to the quality control of the product. Understanding N-glycan biosynthesis and the etiology of microheterogeneity would provide physiological insights, and facilitate cellular engineering to enhance glycoprotein quality. We developed a mathematical model of glycan biosynthesis in the Golgi and analyzed the various reaction variables on the resulting glycan distribution. The Golgi model was modeled as four compartments in series. The mechanism of protein transport across the Golgi is still controversial. From the viewpoint of their holding time distribution characteristics, the two main hypothesized mechanisms, vesicular transport and Golgi maturation models, resemble four continuous mixing-tanks (4CSTR) and four plug-flow reactors (4PFR) in series, respectively. The two hypotheses were modeled accordingly and compared. The intrinsic reaction kinetics were first evaluated using a batch (or single PFR) reactor. A sufficient holding time is needed to produce terminally-processed glycans. Altering enzyme concentrations has a complex effect on the final glycan distribution, as the changes often affect many reaction steps in the network. Comparison of the glycan profiles predicted by the 4CSTR and 4PFR models points to the 4PFR system as more likely to be the true mechanism. To assess whether glycan heterogeneity can be eliminated in the biosynthesis of biotherapeutics the 4PFR model was further used to assess whether a homogeneous glycan profile can be created through metabolic engineering. We demonstrate by the spatial

  1. Systemic Fluorescence Imaging of Zebrafish Glycans with Bioorthogonal Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Paresh; Beahm, Brendan J.; Shieh, Peyton

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate glycans constitute a large, important, and dynamic set of post-translational modifications that are notoriously difficult to manipulate and image. Although the chemical reporter strategy has been used in conjunction with bioorthogonal chemistry to image the external glycosylation state of live zebrafish and detect tumor-associated glycans in mice, the ability to image glycans systemically within a live organism has remained elusive. Here, we report a method that combines the metabolic incorporation of a cyclooctyne-functionalized sialic acid derivative with a ligation reaction of a fluorogenic tetrazine, allowing for the imaging of sialylated glycoconjugates within live zebrafish embryos. PMID:26230529

  2. Multiple Novel Functions of Henipavirus O-glycans: The First O-glycan Functions Identified in the Paramyxovirus Family

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jacquelyn A.; Nicola, Anthony V.; Baum, Linda G.; Aguilar, Hector C.

    2016-01-01

    O-linked glycosylation is a ubiquitous protein modification in organisms belonging to several kingdoms. Both microbial and host protein glycans are used by many pathogens for host invasion and immune evasion, yet little is known about the roles of O-glycans in viral pathogenesis. Reportedly, there is no single function attributed to O-glycans for the significant paramyxovirus family. The paramyxovirus family includes many important pathogens, such as measles, mumps, parainfluenza, metapneumo- and the deadly Henipaviruses Nipah (NiV) and Hendra (HeV) viruses. Paramyxoviral cell entry requires the coordinated actions of two viral membrane glycoproteins: the attachment (HN/H/G) and fusion (F) glycoproteins. O-glycan sites in HeV G were recently identified, facilitating use of the attachment protein of this deadly paramyxovirus as a model to study O-glycan functions. We mutated the identified HeV G O-glycosylation sites and found mutants with altered cell-cell fusion, G conformation, G/F association, viral entry in a pseudotyped viral system, and, quite unexpectedly, pseudotyped viral F protein incorporation and processing phenotypes. These are all important functions of viral glycoproteins. These phenotypes were broadly conserved for equivalent NiV mutants. Thus our results identify multiple novel and pathologically important functions of paramyxoviral O-glycans, paving the way to study O-glycan functions in other paramyxoviruses and enveloped viruses. PMID:26867212

  3. Complex N-Glycans Are Essential, but Core 1 and 2 Mucin O-Glycans, O-Fucose Glycans, and NOTCH1 Are Dispensable, for Mammalian Spermatogenesis1

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Frank; Lu, Linchao; Williams, Suzannah A.; Stanley, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT To identify roles in spermatogenesis for major subclasses of N- and O-glycans and Notch signaling, male mice carrying floxed C1galt1, Pofut1, Notch1 or Mgat1 alleles and a testis-specific Cre recombinase transgene were generated. T-synthase (C1GALT1) transfers Gal to generate core 1 and core 2 mucin O-glycans; POFUT1 transfers O-fucose to particular epidermal growth factor-like repeats and is essential for canonical Notch signaling; and MGAT1 (GlcNAcT-I) transfers GlcNAc to initiate hybrid and complex N-glycan synthesis. Cre recombinase transgenes driven by various promoters were investigated, including Stra8-iCre expressed in spermatogonia, Sycp1-Cre expressed in spermatocytes, Prm1-Cre expressed in spermatids, and AMH-Cre expressed in Sertoli cells. All Cre transgenes deleted floxed alleles, but efficiencies varied widely. Stra8-iCre was the most effective, deleting floxed Notch1 and Mgat1 alleles with 100% efficiency and floxed C1galt1 and Pofut1 alleles with ∼80% efficiency, based on transmission of deleted alleles. Removal of C1galt1, Pofut1, or Notch1 in spermatogonia had no effect on testicular weight, histology, or fertility. However, males in which the synthesis of complex N-glycans was blocked by deletion of Mgat1 in spermatogonia did not produce sperm. Spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and spermatids were generated, but most spermatids formed giant multinucleated cells or symplasts, and apoptosis was increased. Therefore, although core 1 and 2 mucin O-glycans, NOTCH1, POFUT1, O-fucose glycans, and Notch signaling are dispensable, MGAT1 and complex N-glycans are essential for spermatogenesis. PMID:22492969

  4. Integrated Omics and Computational Glycobiology Reveal Structural Basis for Influenza A Virus Glycan Microheterogeneity and Host Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Kshitij; Klein, Joshua A.; White, Mitchell R.; Grant, Oliver C.; Leymarie, Nancy; Woods, Robert J.; Zaia, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Despite sustained biomedical research effort, influenza A virus remains an imminent threat to the world population and a major healthcare burden. The challenge in developing vaccines against influenza is the ability of the virus to mutate rapidly in response to selective immune pressure. Hemagglutinin is the predominant surface glycoprotein and the primary determinant of antigenicity, virulence and zoonotic potential. Mutations leading to changes in the number of HA glycosylation sites are often reported. Such genetic sequencing studies predict at best the disruption or creation of sequons for N-linked glycosylation; they do not reflect actual phenotypic changes in HA structure. Therefore, combined analysis of glycan micro and macro-heterogeneity and bioassays will better define the relationships among glycosylation, viral bioactivity and evolution. We present a study that integrates proteomics, glycomics and glycoproteomics of HA before and after adaptation to innate immune system pressure. We combined this information with glycan array and immune lectin binding data to correlate the phenotypic changes with biological activity. Underprocessed glycoforms predominated at the glycosylation sites found to be involved in viral evolution in response to selection pressures and interactions with innate immune-lectins. To understand the structural basis for site-specific glycan microheterogeneity at these sites, we performed structural modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. We observed that the presence of immature, high-mannose type glycans at a particular site correlated with reduced accessibility to glycan remodeling enzymes. Further, the high mannose glycans at sites implicated in immune lectin recognition were predicted to be capable of forming trimeric interactions with the immune-lectin surfactant protein-D. PMID:26984886

  5. Upregulation of glycans containing 3' fucose in a subset of pancreatic cancers uncovered using fusion-tagged lectins.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhir; Pal, Kuntal; Yadav, Jessica; Tang, Huiyuan; Partyka, Katie; Kletter, Doron; Hsueh, Peter; Ensink, Elliot; Kc, Birendra; Hostetter, Galen; Xu, H Eric; Bern, Marshall; Smith, David F; Mehta, Anand S; Brand, Randall; Melcher, Karsten; Haab, Brian B

    2015-06-01

    The fucose post-translational modification is frequently increased in pancreatic cancer, thus forming the basis for promising biomarkers, but a subset of pancreatic cancer patients does not elevate the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We hypothesized that such patients elevate glycan motifs with fucose in linkages and contexts different from the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We used a database of glycan array data to identify the lectins CCL2 to detect glycan motifs with fucose in a 3' linkage; CGL2 for motifs with fucose in a 2' linkage; and RSL for fucose in all linkages. We used several practical methods to test the lectins and determine the optimal mode of detection, and we then tested whether the lectins detected glycans in pancreatic cancer patients who did not elevate the sialyl-Lewis A glycan, which is upregulated in ∼75% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Patients who did not upregulate sialyl-Lewis A, which contains fucose in a 4' linkage, tended to upregulate fucose in a 3' linkage, as detected by CCL2, but they did not upregulate total fucose or fucose in a 2' linkage. CCL2 binding was high in cancerous epithelia from pancreatic tumors, including areas negative for sialyl-Lewis A and a related motif containing 3' fucose, sialyl-Lewis X. Thus, glycans containing 3' fucose may complement sialyl-Lewis A to contribute to improved detection of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the use of panels of recombinant lectins may uncover details about glycosylation that could be important for characterizing and detecting cancer.

  6. Analysis of Asn-linked glycans from vegetable foodstuffs: widespread occurrence of Lewis a, core alpha1,3-linked fucose and xylose substitutions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, I B; Zeleny, R; Kolarich, D; Staudacher, E; Stroop, C J; Kamerling, J P; Altmann, F

    2001-04-01

    The N-glycans from 27 "plant" foodstuffs, including one from a gymnospermic plant and one from a fungus, were prepared by a new procedure and examined by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). For several samples, glycan structures were additionally investigated by size-fractionation and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography in conjunction with exoglycosidase digests and finally also (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The glycans found ranged from the typical vacuolar "horseradish peroxidase" type and oligomannose to complex Le(a)-carrying structures. Though the common mushroom exclusively contained N-glycans of the oligomannosidic type, all plant foods contained mixtures of the above-mentioned types. Apple, asparagus, avocado, banana, carrot, celery, hazelnut, kiwi, onion, orange, pear, pignoli, strawberry, and walnut were particularly rich in Le(a)-carrying N-glycans. Although traces of Le(a)-containing structures were also present in almond, pistachio, potato, and tomato, no such glycans could be found in cauliflower. Coconut exhibited almost exclusively N-glycans containing only xylose but no fucose. Oligomannosidic N-glycans dominated in buckwheat and especially in the legume seeds mung bean, pea, peanut, and soybean. Papaya presented a unique set of hybrid type structures partially containing the Le(a) determinant. These results are not only compatible with the hypothesis that the carbohydrate structures are another potential source of immunological cross-reaction between different plant allergens, but they also demonstrate that the Le(a)-type structure is very widespread among plants. PMID:11358875

  7. Analysis of Asn-linked glycans from vegetable foodstuffs: widespread occurrence of Lewis a, core alpha1,3-linked fucose and xylose substitutions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, I B; Zeleny, R; Kolarich, D; Staudacher, E; Stroop, C J; Kamerling, J P; Altmann, F

    2001-04-01

    The N-glycans from 27 "plant" foodstuffs, including one from a gymnospermic plant and one from a fungus, were prepared by a new procedure and examined by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). For several samples, glycan structures were additionally investigated by size-fractionation and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography in conjunction with exoglycosidase digests and finally also (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The glycans found ranged from the typical vacuolar "horseradish peroxidase" type and oligomannose to complex Le(a)-carrying structures. Though the common mushroom exclusively contained N-glycans of the oligomannosidic type, all plant foods contained mixtures of the above-mentioned types. Apple, asparagus, avocado, banana, carrot, celery, hazelnut, kiwi, onion, orange, pear, pignoli, strawberry, and walnut were particularly rich in Le(a)-carrying N-glycans. Although traces of Le(a)-containing structures were also present in almond, pistachio, potato, and tomato, no such glycans could be found in cauliflower. Coconut exhibited almost exclusively N-glycans containing only xylose but no fucose. Oligomannosidic N-glycans dominated in buckwheat and especially in the legume seeds mung bean, pea, peanut, and soybean. Papaya presented a unique set of hybrid type structures partially containing the Le(a) determinant. These results are not only compatible with the hypothesis that the carbohydrate structures are another potential source of immunological cross-reaction between different plant allergens, but they also demonstrate that the Le(a)-type structure is very widespread among plants.

  8. Oligosaccharide Binding Proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis Reveal a Preference for Host Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Daniel; Kim, Jae Han; German, J. Bruce; Raybould, Helen E.; Mills, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs), part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have used the Mammalian Glycan Array to determine the specific affinities of these proteins. This was correlated with binding protein expression induced by different prebiotics including HMO. Half of the F1SBPs in B. infantis were determined to bind mammalian oligosaccharides. Their affinities included different blood group structures and mucin oligosaccharides. Related to HMO, other proteins were specific for oligomers of lacto-N-biose (LNB) and polylactosamines with different degrees of fucosylation. Growth on HMO induced the expression of specific binding proteins that import HMO isomers, but also bind blood group and mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting coregulated transport mechanisms. The prebiotic inulin induced other family 1 binding proteins with affinity for intestinal glycans. Most of the host glycan F1SBPs in B. infantis do not have homologs in other bifidobacteria. Finally, some of these proteins were found to be adherent to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study represents further evidence for the particular adaptations of B. infantis to the infant gut environment, and helps to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. PMID:21423604

  9. Fc glycans of therapeutic antibodies as critical quality attributes

    PubMed Central

    Reusch, Dietmar; Tejada, Max L

    2015-01-01

    Critical quality attributes (CQA) are physical, chemical, biological or microbiological properties or characteristics that must be within an appropriate limit, range or distribution to ensure the desired product quality, safety and efficacy. For monoclonal antibody therapeutics that rely on fraction crystalizable (Fc)-mediated effector function for their clinical activity, the terminal sugars of Fc glycans have been shown to be critical for safety or efficacy. Different glycosylation variants have also been shown to influence the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic behavior while other Fc glycan structural elements may be involved in adverse immune reactions. This review focuses on the role of Fc glycans as CQAs. Fc glycan information from the published literature is summarized and evaluated for impact on patient safety, immunogenicity, bioactivity and pharmacodynamics/pharmacokinetics. PMID:26263923

  10. Identification of the S-layer glycoproteins and their covalently linked glycans in the halophilic archaeon Haloarcula hispanica.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua; Lü, Yang; Ren, Jinwei; Wang, Zhongfu; Wang, Qian; Luo, Yuanming; Han, Jing; Xiang, Hua; Du, Yuguo; Jin, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Haloarcula hispanica is one of members of the Halobacteriaceae, which displays particularly low restriction activity and is therefore important as one of the most tractable haloarchaea for archaeal genetic research. Although the Har. hispanica S-layer protein has been reported glycosylated, the S-layer glycoprotein and its glycosylation have not been investigated yet. In this study, the S-layer proteins of Har. hispanica were extracted and characterized. The S-layer was found containing two different glycoproteins which shared highly similar amino acid sequences. The genes coding for these two S-layer glycoproteins were found next to each other in the genome. Moreover, the N- and O-linked glycans were released from these two S-layer glycoproteins for structural determination. Based on the mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance, the N-glycan was determined as a branched trisaccharide containing a 225 Da residue corresponded to a 2-amino-6-sulfo-2, 6-dideoxy-quinovose, which was the first time that a naturally occurring form of sulfoquinovosamine was identified. Besides, the O-glycan was characterized as a Glcα-1,4-Gal disaccharide by mass spectrometry combined with monosaccharide composition analysis and glycosidase treatment. The determination of the N- and O-glycan structure will be helpful for studying the diverse protein glycosylation pathways in archaea utilizing H. hispanica as a new model.

  11. Profiling IgG N-glycans as potential biomarker of chronological and biological ages

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinwei; Wang, Youxin; Kristic, Jasminka; Dong, Jing; Chu, Xi; Ge, Siqi; Wang, Hao; Fang, Honghong; Gao, Qing; Liu, Di; Zhao, Zhongyao; Peng, Hongli; Pucic Bakovic, Maja; Wu, Lijuan; Song, Manshu; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Lauc, Gordan; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As an important post-translation modifying process, glycosylation significantly affects the structure and function of immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules and is essential in many steps of the inflammatory cascade. Studies have demonstrated the potential of using glycosylation features of IgG as a component of predictive biomarkers for chronological age in several European populations, whereas no study has been reported in Chinese. Herein, we report various patterns of changes in IgG glycosylation associated with age by analyzing IgG glycosylation in 701 community-based Han Chinese (244 males, 457 females; 23–68 years old). Eleven IgG glycans, including FA2B, A2G1, FA2[6]G1, FA2[3]G1, FA2[6]BG1, FA2[3]BG1, A2G2, A2BG2, FA2G2, FA2G2S1, and FA2G2S2, change considerably with age and specific combinations of these glycan features can explain 23.3% to 45.4% of the variance in chronological age in this population. This indicates that these combinations of glycan features provide more predictive information than other single markers of biological age such as telomere length. In addition, the clinical traits such as fasting plasma glucose and aspartate aminotransferase associated with biological age are strongly correlated with the combined glycan features. We conclude that IgG glycosylation appears to correlate with both chronological and biological ages, and thus its possible role in the aging process merits further study. PMID:27428197

  12. Reduced immunogenicity of Arabidopsis hgl1 mutant N-glycans caused by altered accessibility of xylose and core fucose epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kaulfürst-Soboll, Heidi; Rips, Stephan; Koiwa, Hisashi; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; von Schaewen, Antje

    2011-07-01

    Arabidopsis N-glycosylation mutants with enhanced salt sensitivity show reduced immunoreactivity of complex N-glycans. Among them, hybrid glycosylation 1 (hgl1) alleles lacking Golgi α-mannosidase II are unique, because their glycoprotein N-glycans are hardly labeled by anti-complex glycan antibodies, even though they carry β1,2-xylose and α1,3-fucose epitopes. To dissect the contribution of xylose and core fucose residues to plant stress responses and immunogenic potential, we prepared Arabidopsis hgl1 xylT double and hgl1 fucTa fucTb triple mutants by crossing previously established T-DNA insertion lines and verified them by mass spectrometry analyses. Root growth assays revealed that hgl1 fucTa fucTb but not hgl1 xylT plants are more salt-sensitive than hgl1, hinting at the importance of core fucose modification and masking of xylose residues. Detailed immunoblot analyses with anti-β1,2-xylose and anti-α1,3-fucose rabbit immunoglobulin G antibodies as well as cross-reactive carbohydrate determinant-specific human immunoglobulin E antibodies (present in sera of allergy patients) showed that xylose-specific reactivity of hgl1 N-glycans is indeed reduced. Based on three-dimensional modeling of plant N-glycans, we propose that xylose residues are tilted by 30° because of untrimmed mannoses in hgl1 mutants. Glycosidase treatments of protein extracts restored immunoreactivity of hgl1 N-glycans supporting these models. Furthermore, among allergy patient sera, untrimmed mannoses persisting on the α1,6-arm of hgl1 N-glycans were inhibitory to immunoreaction with core fucoses to various degrees. In summary, incompletely trimmed glycoprotein N-glycans conformationally prevent xylose and, to lesser extent, core fucose accessibility. Thus, in addition to N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I, Golgi α-mannosidase II emerges as a so far unrecognized target for lowering the immunogenic potential of plant-derived glycoproteins.

  13. Importance of ALDH1A enzymes in determining human testicular retinoic acid concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Samuel L.; Kent, Travis; Hogarth, Cathryn A.; Schlatt, Stefan; Prasad, Bhagwat; Haenisch, Michael; Walsh, Thomas; Muller, Charles H.; Griswold, Michael D.; Amory, John K.; Isoherranen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, is required for spermatogenesis and many other biological processes. RA formation requires irreversible oxidation of retinal to RA by aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes of the 1A family (ALDH1A). While ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3 all form RA, the expression pattern and relative contribution of these enzymes to RA formation in the testis is unknown. In this study, novel methods to measure ALDH1A protein levels and intrinsic RA formation were used to accurately predict RA formation velocities in individual human testis samples and an association between RA formation and intratesticular RA concentrations was observed. The distinct localization of ALDH1A in the testis suggests a specific role for each enzyme in controlling RA formation. ALDH1A1 was found in Sertoli cells, while only ALDH1A2 was found in spermatogonia, spermatids, and spermatocytes. In the absence of cellular retinol binding protein (CRBP)1, ALDH1A1 was predicted to be the main contributor to intratesticular RA formation, but when CRBP1 was present, ALDH1A2 was predicted to be equally important in RA formation as ALDH1A1. This study provides a comprehensive novel methodology to evaluate RA homeostasis in human tissues and provides insight to how the individual ALDH1A enzymes mediate RA concentrations in specific cell types. PMID:25502770

  14. Neutral glycans from sandfish skin can reduce friction of polymers.

    PubMed

    Vihar, Boštjan; Hanisch, Franz Georg; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-03-01

    The lizardScincus scincus, also known as sandfish, can move through aeolian desert sand in a swimming-like manner. A prerequisite for this ability is a special integument, i.e. scales with a very low friction for sand and a high abrasion resistance. Glycans in the scales are causally related to the low friction. Here, we analysed the glycans and found that neutral glycans with five to nine mannose residues are important. If these glycans were covalently bound to acrylic polymers like poly(methyl methacrylate) or acrylic car coatings at a density of approximately one molecule per 4 nm², friction for and adhesion of sand particles could be reduced to levels close to those observed with sandfish scales. This was also found true, if the glycans were isolated from sources other than sandfish scales like plants such as almonds or mistletoe. We speculate that these neutral glycans act as low density spacers separating sand particles from the dense scales thereby reducing van der Waals forces. PMID:27030038

  15. Human DC-SIGN Binds Specific Human Milk Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Alexander J.; Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Duska-McEwen, Geralyn; Buck, Rachael H.; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Human milk glycans (HMGs) are prebiotics, pathogen receptor decoys, and regulators of host physiology and immune responses. Mechanistically, human lectins (glycan-binding proteins, hGBPs) expressed by dendritic cells (DC) are of major interest, as these cells directly contact HMGs. To explore such interactions, we screened many C-type lectins and Siglecs expressed by DC for glycan binding on microarrays presenting over 200 HMGs. Unexpectedly, DC-SIGN showed robust binding to many HMGs, whereas other C-type lectins failed to bind, and Siglecs-5 and -9 showed weak binding to a few glycans. By contrast, most hGBPs bound to multiple glycans on other microarrays lacking HMGs. An α-linked fucose residue was characteristic of HMGs bound by DC-SIGN. Binding of DC-SIGN to the simple HMGs 2′-fucosyllactose (2′-FL) and 3-fucosyllactose (3-FL) was confirmed by flow cytometry to beads conjugated with 2′-FL or 3-FL, as well as the ability of the free glycans to inhibit DC-SIGN binding. 2′-FL had an IC50 of ~1 mM for DC-SIGN, which is within the physiological concentration of 2′-FL in human milk. These results demonstrate that DC-SIGN among the many hGBPs expressed by DC binds to α-fucosylated HMGs, and suggest that such interactions may be important in influencing immune responses in the developing infant. PMID:26976925

  16. Sugars Communicate through Water: Oriented Glycans Induce Water Structuring

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M.; Fontani, Giacomo; Reusch, Frieder B.; Roba, Marcella; Spencer, Nicholas D.; Crockett, Rowena

    2013-01-01

    Cells are coated with a glycocalyx—a layer of carbohydrate-containing biomolecules, such as glycoproteins. Although the structure and orientation of the cell-surface glycans are frequently regarded as being random, we have found, using α-1-acid glycoprotein and antitrypsin as model systems for surface glycans, that this is not the case. A glycoprotein monolayer was adsorbed onto hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. Surface-force measurements revealed that the orientation of the glycans with respect to the aqueous solution has a profound effect on the structure of vicinal water. The glycan antennae of the surface-adsorbed glycoproteins apparently impose an ordering on the water, resulting in a strong repulsive force over some tens of nanometers with superposed film-thickness transitions ranging from ≈0.7 to 1.8 nm. When the glycan orientation is modified by chemical means, this long-range repulsion disappears. These results may provide an explanation as to why the multiantennary structure is ubiquitous in glycoproteins. Although direct, specific interactions between glycans and other biomolecules are essential for their functionality, these results indicate that glycans’ long-range structuring of water may also influence their ability to interact with biomolecules in their vicinity. PMID:23790377

  17. Neutral glycans from sandfish skin can reduce friction of polymers

    PubMed Central

    Vihar, Boštjan; Hanisch, Franz Georg; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The lizard Scincus scincus, also known as sandfish, can move through aeolian desert sand in a swimming-like manner. A prerequisite for this ability is a special integument, i.e. scales with a very low friction for sand and a high abrasion resistance. Glycans in the scales are causally related to the low friction. Here, we analysed the glycans and found that neutral glycans with five to nine mannose residues are important. If these glycans were covalently bound to acrylic polymers like poly(methyl methacrylate) or acrylic car coatings at a density of approximately one molecule per 4 nm², friction for and adhesion of sand particles could be reduced to levels close to those observed with sandfish scales. This was also found true, if the glycans were isolated from sources other than sandfish scales like plants such as almonds or mistletoe. We speculate that these neutral glycans act as low density spacers separating sand particles from the dense scales thereby reducing van der Waals forces. PMID:27030038

  18. Vibriocholerae cytolysin recognizes the heptasaccharide core of complex N-glycans with nanomolar affinity

    PubMed Central

    Levan, Sophia; De, Swastik; Olson, Rich

    2013-01-01

    Pathogens selectively target host cells using adhesion molecules and secreted virulence factors that may utilize protein, lipid, or carbohydrate ligands on the cell surface. The human intestinal pathogen Vibrio cholerae secretes a pore-forming toxin, Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC), which contains two domains that are structurally similar to known carbohydrate-binding proteins. These tandem domains are attached to the carboxy-terminus of the cytolytic domain and contain a β-trefoil fold and a β-prism fold. VCC has been shown to bind glycosylated proteins, and removal of the β-prism domain leads to a large decrease in lytic activity against rabbit erythrocytes. Despite these clues, the identity of the glycan receptors of VCC and the role of glycan binding in toxin activity remains unknown. To better understand this specificity, we used a combination of structural and functional approaches to characterize the carbohydrate-binding activity of the VCC toxin. We first probed the monosaccharide-binding activity of VCC and demonstrated that the toxin exhibits millimolar affinity for aldohexoses. To understand this specificity, we solved the crystal structure of the VCC β-prism domain bound to methyl-α-mannose. Next, we utilized a mammalian glycan screen to determine that the β-prism domain preferentially binds complex N-glycans with a heptasaccharide GlcNAc4 Man3 core (NGA2). Fluorescence anisotropy and surface plasmon resonance indicated an approximately 100-nanomolar affinity of the β-prism domain for the heptasaccharide core. Our results suggest that carbohydrate-binding domains on the VCC toxin facilitate high-affinity targeting of mammalian cell membranes, which may contribute to the ability of VCC to lyse cells at picomolar concentrations. PMID:23274141

  19. A multi-method approach toward de novo glycan characterization: a Man-5 case study.

    PubMed

    Prien, Justin M; Prater, Bradley D; Cockrill, Steven L

    2010-05-01

    Regulatory agencies' expectations for biotherapeutic approval are becoming more stringent with regard to product characterization, where minor species as low as 0.1% of a given profile are typically identified. The mission of this manuscript is to demonstrate a multi-method approach toward de novo glycan characterization and quantitation, including minor species at or approaching the 0.1% benchmark. Recently, unexpected isomers of the Man(5)GlcNAc(2) (M(5)) were reported (Prien JM, Ashline DJ, Lapadula AJ, Zhang H, Reinhold VN. 2009. The high mannose glycans from bovine ribonuclease B isomer characterization by ion trap mass spectrometry (MS). J Am Soc Mass Spectrom. 20:539-556). In the current study, quantitative analysis of these isomers found in commercial M(5) standard demonstrated that they are in low abundance (<1% of the total) and therefore an exemplary "litmus test" for minor species characterization. A simple workflow devised around three core well-established analytical procedures: (1) fluorescence derivatization; (2) online rapid resolution reversed-phase separation coupled with negative-mode sequential mass spectrometry (RRRP-(-)-MS(n)); and (3) permethylation derivatization with nanospray sequential mass spectrometry (NSI-MS(n)) provides comprehensive glycan structural determination. All methods have limitations; however, a multi-method workflow is an at-line stopgap/solution which mitigates each method's individual shortcoming(s) providing greater opportunity for more comprehensive characterization. This manuscript is the first to demonstrate quantitative chromatographic separation of the M(5) isomers and the use of a commercially available stable isotope variant of 2-aminobenzoic acid to detect and chromatographically resolve multiple M(5) isomers in bovine ribonuclease B. With this multi-method approach, we have the capabilities to comprehensively characterize a biotherapeutic's glycan array in a de novo manner, including structural isomers at >/=0

  20. Multi-Site N-glycan mapping study 1: Capillary electrophoresis – laser induced fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Szekrényes, Ákos; Park, SungAe Suhr; Santos, Marcia; Lew, Clarence; Jones, Aled; Haxo, Ted; Kimzey, Michael; Pourkaveh, Shiva; Szabó, Zoltán; Sosic, Zoran; Feng, Peng; Váradi, Csaba; de l'Escaille, François; Falmagne, Jean-Bernard; Sejwal, Preeti; Niedringhaus, Thomas; Michels, David; Freckleton, Gordon; Hamm, Melissa; Manuilov, Anastasiya; Schwartz, Melissa; Luo, Jiann-Kae; van Dyck, Jonathan; Leung, Pui-King; Olajos, Marcell; Gu, Yingmei; Gao, Kai; Wang, Wenbo; Wegstein, Jo; Tep, Samnang; Guttman, András

    2016-01-01

    An international team that included 20 independent laboratories from biopharmaceutical companies, universities, analytical contract laboratories and national authorities in the United States, Europe and Asia was formed to evaluate the reproducibility of sample preparation and analysis of N-glycans using capillary electrophoresis of 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (APTS)-labeled glycans with laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection (16 sites) and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC, 12 sites; results to be reported in a subsequent publication). All participants used the same lot of chemicals, samples, reagents, and columns/capillaries to run their assays. Migration time, peak area and peak area percent values were determined for all peaks with >0.1% peak area. Our results demonstrated low variability and high reproducibility, both, within any given site as well across all sites, which indicates that a standard N-glycan analysis platform appropriate for general use (clone selection, process development, lot release, etc.) within the industry can be established. PMID:26466659

  1. Multi-Site N-glycan mapping study 1: Capillary electrophoresis - laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Szekrényes, Ákos; Park, SungAe Suhr; Santos, Marcia; Lew, Clarence; Jones, Aled; Haxo, Ted; Kimzey, Michael; Pourkaveh, Shiva; Szabó, Zoltán; Sosic, Zoran; Feng, Peng; Váradi, Csaba; de l'Escaille, François; Falmagne, Jean-Bernard; Sejwal, Preeti; Niedringhaus, Thomas; Michels, David; Freckleton, Gordon; Hamm, Melissa; Manuilov, Anastasiya; Schwartz, Melissa; Luo, Jiann-Kae; van Dyck, Jonathan; Leung, Pui-King; Olajos, Marcell; Gu, Yingmei; Gao, Kai; Wang, Wenbo; Wegstein, Jo; Tep, Samnang; Guttman, András

    2016-01-01

    An international team that included 20 independent laboratories from biopharmaceutical companies, universities, analytical contract laboratories and national authorities in the United States, Europe and Asia was formed to evaluate the reproducibility of sample preparation and analysis of N-glycans using capillary electrophoresis of 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (APTS)-labeled glycans with laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection (16 sites) and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC, 12 sites; results to be reported in a subsequent publication). All participants used the same lot of chemicals, samples, reagents, and columns/capillaries to run their assays. Migration time, peak area and peak area percent values were determined for all peaks with >0.1% peak area. Our results demonstrated low variability and high reproducibility, both, within any given site as well across all sites, which indicates that a standard N-glycan analysis platform appropriate for general use (clone selection, process development, lot release, etc.) within the industry can be established.

  2. Glycans and cancer: role of N-glycans in cancer biomarker, progression and metastasis, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Kizuka, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation is catalyzed by various glycosyltransferase enzymes which are mostly located in the Golgi apparatus in cells. These enzymes glycosylate various complex carbohydrates such as glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans. The enzyme activity of glycosyltransferases and their gene expression are altered in various pathophysiological situations including cancer. Furthermore, the activity of glycosyltransferases is controlled by various factors such as the levels of nucleotide sugars, acceptor substrates, nucleotide sugar transporters, chaperons, and endogenous lectin in cancer cells. The glycosylation results in various functional changes of glycoproteins including cell surface receptors and adhesion molecules such as E-cadherin and integrins. These changes confer the unique characteristic phenotypes associated with cancer cells. Therefore, glycans play key roles in cancer progression and treatment. This review focuses on glycan structures, their biosynthetic glycosyltransferases, and their genes in relation to their biological significance and involvement in cancer, especially cancer biomarkers, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cancer progression and metastasis, and therapeutics. Major N-glycan branching structures which are directly related to cancer are β1,6-GlcNAc branching, bisecting GlcNAc, and core fucose. These structures are enzymatic products of glycosyltransferases, GnT-V, GnT-III, and Fut8, respectively. The genes encoding these enzymes are designated as MGAT5 (Mgat5), MGAT3 (Mgat3), and FUT8 (Fut8) in humans (mice in parenthesis), respectively. GnT-V is highly associated with cancer metastasis, whereas GnT-III is associated with cancer suppression. Fut8 is involved in expression of cancer biomarker as well as in the treatment of cancer. In addition to these enzymes, GnT-IV and GnT-IX (GnT-Vb) will be also discussed in relation to cancer.

  3. Glycans Are a Novel Biomarker of Chronological and Biological Ages

    PubMed Central

    Krištić, Jasminka; Vučković, Frano; Menni, Cristina; Klarić, Lucija; Keser, Toma; Beceheli, Ivona; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Novokmet, Mislav; Mangino, Massimo; Thaqi, Kujtim; Rudan, Pavao; Novokmet, Natalija; Šarac, Jelena; Missoni, Saša; Kolčić, Ivana; Polašek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Hayward, Caroline; Aulchenko, Yurii; Valdes, Ana; Wilson, James F.; Gornik, Olga; Primorac, Dragan; Zoldoš, Vlatka; Spector, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Fine structural details of glycans attached to the conserved N-glycosylation site significantly not only affect function of individual immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules but also mediate inflammation at the systemic level. By analyzing IgG glycosylation in 5,117 individuals from four European populations, we have revealed very complex patterns of changes in IgG glycosylation with age. Several IgG glycans (including FA2B, FA2G2, and FA2BG2) changed considerably with age and the combination of these three glycans can explain up to 58% of variance in chronological age, significantly more than other markers of biological age like telomere lengths. The remaining variance in these glycans strongly correlated with physiological parameters associated with biological age. Thus, IgG glycosylation appears to be closely linked with both chronological and biological ages. Considering the important role of IgG glycans in inflammation, and because the observed changes with age promote inflammation, changes in IgG glycosylation also seem to represent a factor contributing to aging. Significance Statement Glycosylation is the key posttranslational mechanism that regulates function of immunoglobulins, with multiple systemic repercussions to the immune system. Our study of IgG glycosylation in 5,117 individuals from four European populations has revealed very extensive and complex changes in IgG glycosylation with age. The combined index composed of only three glycans explained up to 58% of variance in age, considerably more than other biomarkers of age like telomere lengths. The remaining variance in these glycans strongly correlated with physiological parameters associated with biological age; thus, IgG glycosylation appears to be closely linked with both chronological and biological ages. The ability to measure human biological aging using molecular profiling has practical applications for diverse fields such as disease prevention and treatment, or forensics. PMID:24325898

  4. 76 FR 27374 - Determination and Certification Under Section 490(b)(1)(A) of the Foreign Assistance Act Relating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Determination and Certification Under Section 490(b)(1)(A) of the Foreign Assistance Act Relating to the Largest Exporting and Importing Countries of Certain Precursor Chemicals Pursuant to Section 490(b)(1)(A) of...

  5. Comprehensive Profiling of Glycosphingolipid Glycans Using a Novel Broad Specificity Endoglycoceramidase in a High-Throughput Workflow.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Simone; Vainauskas, Saulius; Stöckmann, Henning; McManus, Ciara; Taron, Christopher H; Rudd, Pauline M

    2016-05-01

    The biological function of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) is largely determined by their glycan headgroup moiety. This has placed a renewed emphasis on detailed GSL headgroup structural analysis. Comprehensive profiling of GSL headgroups in biological samples requires the use of endoglycoceramidases with broad substrate specificity and a robust workflow that enables their high-throughput analysis. We present here the first high-throughput glyco-analytical platform for GSL headgroup profiling. The workflow features enzymatic release of GSL glycans with a novel broad-specificity endoglycoceramidase I (EGCase I) from Rhodococcus triatomea, selective glycan capture on hydrazide beads on a robotics platform, 2AB-fluorescent glycan labeling, and analysis by UPLC-HILIC-FLD. R. triatomea EGCase I displayed a wider specificity than known EGCases and was able to efficiently hydrolyze gangliosides, globosides, (n)Lc-type GSLs, and cerebrosides. Our workflow was validated on purified GSL standard lipids and was applied to the characterization of GSLs extracted from several mammalian cell lines and human serum. This study should facilitate the analytical workflow in functional glycomics studies and biomarker discovery. PMID:27033327

  6. Mass spectrometric characterization of glycosylation of Hepatitis C virus E2 envelope glycoprotein reveals extended microheterogeneity of N-glycans

    PubMed Central

    Iacob, Roxana E.; Perdivara, Irina; Przybylski, Michael; Tomer, Kenneth B.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes acute and chronic liver disease in humans, including chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The polyprotein encoded in the HCV genome is co- and posttranslationally processed by host and viral peptidases, generating the structural proteins Core, E1, E2 and p7, and five non-structural proteins. The two envelope proteins E1 and E2 are heavily glycosylated. Studying the glycan moieties attached to the envelope E2 glycoprotein is important because the N-linked glycans on E2 envelope protein are involved in the interaction with some human neutralizing antibodies, and may also have a direct or indirect effect on protein folding. In the present study we report the mass spectrometric characterization of the glycan moieties attached to the E2 glycoprotein. The mass spectrometric analysis clearly identified the nature, composition and microheterogeneity of the sugars attached to the E2 glycopeptides. All 11 sites of glycosylation on E2 protein were characterized, and the majority of these sites proved to be occupied by high mannose glycans. However, complex type oligosaccharides, which have not been previously identified, were exclusively observed at two N-linked sites and their identity and heterogeneity were determined. PMID:18187336

  7. Concept, strategy and realization of lectin-based glycan profiling.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-08-01

    Lectins are a diverse group of carbohydrate-binding proteins. Each lectin has its own specificity profile. It is believed that lectins exist in all living organisms that produce glycans. From a practical viewpoint, lectins have been used extensively in biochemical fields including proteomics due to their usefulness as detection and enrichment tools for specific glycans. Nevertheless, they have often been underestimated as probes, especially compared with antibodies, because of their low affinity and broad specificity. However, together with the concept of glycomics, such properties of lectins are now considered to be suitable for the task of 'profiling' in order to cover a wider range of ligands. Recently there has been rapid movement in the field of proteomics aimed at the investigation of glycan-related biomarkers. This is partly because of limitations of the present approach of simply following changes in protein-level expression, without paying sufficient attention to the fact and effects of glycosylation. The trend is reflected in the frequent use of lectins in the contexts of glycoprotein enrichment and glycan profiling. However, there are many aspects to be considered in using lectins, which differ considerably from antibodies. In this article, the author, as a developer of two unique methodologies, frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) and the lectin microarray, describes critical points concerning the use of lectins, together with the concept, strategy and means to achieve advances in these emerging glycan profiling technologies. PMID:18390573

  8. Sulfated glycans in network rewiring and plasticity after neuronal injuries.

    PubMed

    Kadomatsu, Kenji; Sakamoto, Kazuma

    2014-01-01

    Biopolymers in the human body belong to three major classes: polynucleotides (DNA, RNA), polypeptides (proteins) and polysaccharides (glycans). Although striking progress in our understanding of neurobiology has been achieved through a focus on polypeptides as the main players, important biological functions are also expected to be attributable to glycans. Nonetheless, the significance of glycans remains largely unexplored. In this review, we focus on the roles of sulfated glycans. Axonal regeneration/sprouting after injuries does not easily occur in the adult mammalian central nervous system. This is due to the low intrinsic potential of regeneration and the emerging inhibitory molecules. The latter include the sulfated long glycans chondroitin sulfate (CS) and keratan sulfate (KS). Enzymatic ablation of CS or KS, and genetic ablation of KS promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury. Interestingly, the combination of CS and KS ablations exhibits neither additive nor synergistic effects. Thus, KS and CS work in the same pathway in inhibition of axonal regeneration/sprouting. Furthermore, CS has been implicated in neural plasticity as a functional component of the perineuronal nets surrounding inhibitory interneurons. Elucidation of the mechanisms of action for KS and CS will pave the way to treatments to promote network rewiring and plasticity after neuronal injuries.

  9. Approaches toward High-Mannose-Type Glycan Libraries.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Kohki; Seko, Akira; Takeda, Yoichi; Ito, Yukishige

    2016-02-01

    Asparagine-linked (N-linked) sugar chains are widely found in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which has attracted renewed attention because of its participation in the glycoprotein quality control process. In the ER, newly formed glycoproteins are properly folded to higher-order structures by the action of a variety of lectin chaperones and processing enzymes and are transported into the Golgi, while terminally misfolded glycoproteins are carried into the cytosol for degradation. A group of proteins related to this system are known to recognize subtle differences in the high-mannose-type oligosaccharide structures of glycoproteins; however, their molecular foundations are still unclear. In order to gain a more precise understanding, our group has established a strategy for the systematic synthesis of high-mannose-type glycans. More recently, we have developed "top-down" chemoenzymatic approaches that allow expeditious access to theoretically all types of high-mannose glycans. This strategy comprehensively delivered 37 high-mannose-type glycans, including G1M9-M3 glycans, and opened up the possibility of the elucidation of structure-function relationships with a series of high-mannose-type glycans. PMID:26493153

  10. Arenavirus Glycan Shield Promotes Neutralizing Antibody Evasion and Protracted Infection.

    PubMed

    Sommerstein, Rami; Flatz, Lukas; Remy, Melissa M; Malinge, Pauline; Magistrelli, Giovanni; Fischer, Nicolas; Sahin, Mehmet; Bergthaler, Andreas; Igonet, Sebastien; Ter Meulen, Jan; Rigo, Dorothée; Meda, Paolo; Rabah, Nadia; Coutard, Bruno; Bowden, Thomas A; Lambert, Paul-Henri; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pinschewer, Daniel D

    2015-11-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa virus (LASV) can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. As a major impediment to vaccine development, delayed and weak neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses represent a unifying characteristic of both natural infection and all vaccine candidates tested to date. To investigate the mechanisms underlying arenavirus nAb evasion we engineered several arenavirus envelope-chimeric viruses and glycan-deficient variants thereof. We performed neutralization tests with sera from experimentally infected mice and from LASV-convalescent human patients. NAb response kinetics in mice correlated inversely with the N-linked glycan density in the arenavirus envelope protein's globular head. Additionally and most intriguingly, infection with fully glycosylated viruses elicited antibodies, which neutralized predominantly their glycan-deficient variants, both in mice and humans. Binding studies with monoclonal antibodies indicated that envelope glycans reduced nAb on-rate, occupancy and thereby counteracted virus neutralization. In infected mice, the envelope glycan shield promoted protracted viral infection by preventing its timely elimination by the ensuing antibody response. Thus, arenavirus envelope glycosylation impairs the protective efficacy rather than the induction of nAbs, and thereby prevents efficient antibody-mediated virus control. This immune evasion mechanism imposes limitations on antibody-based vaccination and convalescent serum therapy. PMID:26587982

  11. Arenavirus Glycan Shield Promotes Neutralizing Antibody Evasion and Protracted Infection

    PubMed Central

    Malinge, Pauline; Magistrelli, Giovanni; Fischer, Nicolas; Sahin, Mehmet; Bergthaler, Andreas; Igonet, Sebastien; ter Meulen, Jan; Rigo, Dorothée; Meda, Paolo; Rabah, Nadia; Coutard, Bruno; Bowden, Thomas A.; Lambert, Paul-Henri; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pinschewer, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa virus (LASV) can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. As a major impediment to vaccine development, delayed and weak neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses represent a unifying characteristic of both natural infection and all vaccine candidates tested to date. To investigate the mechanisms underlying arenavirus nAb evasion we engineered several arenavirus envelope-chimeric viruses and glycan-deficient variants thereof. We performed neutralization tests with sera from experimentally infected mice and from LASV-convalescent human patients. NAb response kinetics in mice correlated inversely with the N-linked glycan density in the arenavirus envelope protein’s globular head. Additionally and most intriguingly, infection with fully glycosylated viruses elicited antibodies, which neutralized predominantly their glycan-deficient variants, both in mice and humans. Binding studies with monoclonal antibodies indicated that envelope glycans reduced nAb on-rate, occupancy and thereby counteracted virus neutralization. In infected mice, the envelope glycan shield promoted protracted viral infection by preventing its timely elimination by the ensuing antibody response. Thus, arenavirus envelope glycosylation impairs the protective efficacy rather than the induction of nAbs, and thereby prevents efficient antibody-mediated virus control. This immune evasion mechanism imposes limitations on antibody-based vaccination and convalescent serum therapy. PMID:26587982

  12. Structural evolution of glycan recognition by a family of potent HIV antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Garces, Fernando; Sok, Devin; Kong, Leopold; McBride, Ryan; Kim, Helen J.; Saye-Francisco, Karen F.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Hua, Yuanzi; Cupo, Albert; Moore, John P.; Paulson, James C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) is densely covered with self-glycans that should help shield it from recognition by the human immune system. Here we examine how a particularly potent family of broadly neutralizing antibodies (Abs) has evolved common and distinct structural features to counter the glycan shield and interact with both glycan and protein components of HIV Env. The inferred germline antibody already harbors potential binding pockets for a glycan and a short protein segment. Affinity maturation then leads to divergent evolutionary branches that either focus on a single glycan and protein segment (e.g. Ab PGT124) or engage multiple glycans (e.g. Abs PGT121-123). Furthermore, other surrounding glycans are avoided by selecting an appropriate initial antibody shape that prevents steric hindrance. Such molecular recognition lessons are important for engineering proteins that can recognize or accommodate glycans. PMID:25259921

  13. Improving N-Glycan Coverage using HPLC-MS with Electrospray Ionization at Subambient Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Marginean, Ioan; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Moore, Ronald J.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-01

    Human serum glycan profiling with mass spectrometry (MS) has been employed to study several disease conditions and is demonstrating promise for e.g. clinical biomarker discovery. However, the poor glycan ionization efficiency and the large dynamic range of glycan concentrations in human sera hinder comprehensive profiling. In particular, large glycans are problematic because they are present at low concentrations and prone to fragmentation. Here we show that the sub-ambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN)-MS can expand the serum glycome profile when compared with the conventional atmospheric pressure electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS with a heated capillary inlet. Notably, the ions generated by the SPIN interface were observed at higher charge states for 50% of the annotated glycans. Out of a total of 130 detected glycans, 34 were only detected with the SPIN-MS, resulting in improved coverage of glycan families as well as of glycans with larger numbers of labile monosaccharides.

  14. Glycobiology of cell death: when glycans and lectins govern cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, R G; Rabinovich, G A

    2013-01-01

    Although one typically thinks of carbohydrates as associated with cell growth and viability, glycosylation also has an integral role in many processes leading to cell death. Glycans, either alone or complexed with glycan-binding proteins, can deliver intracellular signals or control extracellular processes that promote initiation, execution and resolution of cell death programs. Herein, we review the role of glycans and glycan-binding proteins as essential components of the cell death machinery during physiologic and pathologic settings. PMID:23703323

  15. Individuality Normalization when Labeling with Isotopic Glycan Hydrazide Tags (INLIGHT): A Novel Glycan-Relative Quantification Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. Hunter; Taylor, Amber D.; Muddiman, David C.

    2013-09-01

    The Individuality Normalization when Labeling with Isotopic Glycan Hydrazide Tags (INLIGHT) strategy for the sample preparation, data analysis, and relative quantification of N-linked glycans is presented. Glycans are derivatized with either natural (L) or stable-isotope labeled (H) hydrazide reagents and analyzed using reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled online to a Q Exactive mass spectrometer. A simple glycan ladder, maltodextrin, is first used to demonstrate the relative quantification strategy in samples with negligible analytical and biological variability. It is shown that after a molecular weight correction attributable to isotopic overlap and a post-acquisition normalization of the data to account for any systematic bias, a plot of the experimental H:L ratio versus the calculated H:L ratio exhibits a correlation of unity for maltodextrin samples mixed in different ratios. We also demonstrate that the INLIGHT approach can quantify species over four orders of magnitude in ion abundance. The INLIGHT strategy is further demonstrated in pooled human plasma, where it is shown that the post-acquisition normalization is more effective than using a single spiked-in internal standard. Finally, changes in glycosylation are able to be detected in complex biological matrices, when spiked with a glycoprotein. The ability to spike in a glycoprotein and detect change at the glycan level validates both the sample preparation and data analysis strategy, making INLIGHT an invaluable relative quantification strategy for the field of glycomics.

  16. Complicated N-linked glycans in simple organisms

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Birgit; Hykollari, Alba; Yan, Shi; Paschinger, Katharina; Wilson, Iain B. H.

    2013-01-01

    Although countless genomes have now been sequenced, the glycomes of the vast majority of eukaryotes still present a series of unmapped frontiers. However, strides are being made in a few groups of invertebrate and unicellular organisms as regards their N-glycans and N-glycosylation pathways. Thereby, the traditional classification of glycan structures inevitably approaches its boundaries. Indeed, the glycomes of these organisms are rich in surprises including a multitude of modifications of the core regions of N-glycans and unusual antennae. From the actually rather limited glycomic information we have, it is nevertheless obvious that the biotechnological, developmental and immunological relevance of these modifications, especially in insect cell lines, model organisms and parasites means that deciphering unusual glycomes is of more than just academic interest. PMID:22944671

  17. Unique N-glycan moieties of the 66-kDa cell wall glycoprotein from the red microalga Porphyridium sp.

    PubMed

    Levy-Ontman, Oshrat; Arad, Shoshana Malis; Harvey, David J; Parsons, Thomas B; Fairbanks, Antony; Tekoah, Yoram

    2011-06-17

    We report here the structural determination of the N-linked glycans in the 66-kDa glycoprotein, part of the unique sulfated complex cell wall polysaccharide of the red microalga Porphyridium sp. Structures were elucidated by a combination of normal phase/reverse phase HPLC, positive ion MALDI-TOF MS, negative ion electrospray ionization, and MS/MS. The sugar moieties of the glycoprotein consisted of at least four fractions of N-linked glycans, each composed of the same four monosaccharides, GlcNAc, Man, 6-O-MeMan, and Xyl, with compositions Man(8-9)Xyl(1-2)Me(3)GlcNAc(2). The present study is the first report of N-glycans with the terminal Xyl attached to the 6-mannose branch of the 6-antenna and to the 3-oxygen of the penultimate (core) GlcNAc. Another novel finding was that all four glycans contain three O-methylmannose residues in positions that have never been reported before. Although it is known that some lower organisms are able to methylate terminal monosaccharides in glycans, the present study on Porphyridium sp. is the first describing an organism that is able to methylate non-terminal mannose residues. This study will thus contribute to understanding of N-glycosylation in algae and might shed light on the evolutionary development from prokaryotes to multicellular organisms. It also may contribute to our understanding of the red algae polysaccharide formation. The additional importance of this research lies in its potential for biotechnological applications, especially in evaluating the use of microalgae as cell factories for the production of therapeutic proteins.

  18. Using CRISPR-Cas9 to quantify the contributions of O-glycans, N-glycans and Glycosphingolipids to human leukocyte-endothelium adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Stolfa, Gino; Mondal, Nandini; Zhu, Yuqi; Yu, Xinheng; Buffone, Alexander; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    There is often interest in dissecting the relative contributions of the N-glycans, O-glycans and glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in regulating complex biological traits like cell signaling, adhesion, development and metastasis. To address this, we developed a CRISPR-Cas9 toolkit to selectively truncate each of these commonly expressed glycan-types. Here, O-glycan biosynthesis was truncated by knocking-out Core 1 β3Gal-T Specific Molecular Chaperone (COSMC), N-glycans by targeting the β1,2 GlcNAc-transferase (MGAT1) and GSLs by deleting UDP-glucose ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG). These reagents were applied to reveal the glycoconjugates regulating human myeloid cell adhesion to selectins under physiological shear-flow observed during inflammation. These functional studies show that leukocyte rolling on P- and L-selectin is ablated in cells lacking O-glycans, with N-glycan truncation also increasing cell rolling velocity on L-selectin. All three glycan families contributed to E-selectin dependent cell adhesion with N-glycans contributing to all aspects of the leukocyte adhesion cascade, O-glycans only being important during initial recruitment, and GSLs stabilizing slow cell rolling and the transition to firm arrest. Overall, the genome editing tools developed here may be broadly applied in studies of cellular glycosylation. PMID:27458028

  19. Glycan Node Analysis: A Bottom-up Approach to Glycomics.

    PubMed

    Zaare, Sahba; Aguilar, Jesús S; Hu, Yueming; Ferdosi, Shadi; Borges, Chad R

    2016-05-22

    Synthesized in a non-template-driven process by enzymes called glycosyltransferases, glycans are key players in various significant intra- and extracellular events. Many pathological conditions, notably cancer, affect gene expression, which can in turn deregulate the relative abundance and activity levels of glycoside hydrolase and glycosyltransferase enzymes. Unique aberrant whole glycans resulting from deregulated glycosyltransferase(s) are often present in trace quantities within complex biofluids, making their detection difficult and sometimes stochastic. However, with proper sample preparation, one of the oldest forms of mass spectrometry (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, GC-MS) can routinely detect the collection of branch-point and linkage-specific monosaccharides ("glycan nodes") present in complex biofluids. Complementary to traditional top-down glycomics techniques, the approach discussed herein involves the collection and condensation of each constituent glycan node in a sample into a single independent analytical signal, which provides detailed structural and quantitative information about changes to the glycome as a whole and reveals potentially deregulated glycosyltransferases. Improvements to the permethylation and subsequent liquid/liquid extraction stages provided herein enhance reproducibility and overall yield by facilitating minimal exposure of permethylated glycans to alkaline aqueous conditions. Modifications to the acetylation stage further increase the extent of reaction and overall yield. Despite their reproducibility, the overall yields of N-acetylhexosamine (HexNAc) partially permethylated alditol acetates (PMAAs) are shown to be inherently lower than their expected theoretical value relative to hexose PMAAs. Calculating the ratio of the area under the extracted ion chromatogram (XIC) for each individual hexose PMAA (or HexNAc PMAA) to the sum of such XIC areas for all hexoses (or HexNAcs) provides a new normalization method that

  20. Glycan Analysis by Reversible Reaction to Hydrazide Beads and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuang J.; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Investigation into glycoproteins and their associated glycans is the key to understanding the function of glycoproteins in biological pathways and disease development. Current methods for glycan analysis are generally based on multiple preparation processes to separate glycans from proteins and other molecules prior to analysis. During the multistep purification processes, glycans are continuously lost and the procedure increases the difficulty for accurate quantitative analysis of glycans. Here we describe the development of a novel technique, which uses hydrazide beads to capture glycans. It is based on the conjugation of glycans to hydrazide beads through the formation of reversible hydrazone, washing out unbound nonglycans, then releasing captured glycans by acids. The results showed that the glycans were able to be isolated from concatenate peptides by using hydrazide beads. This technique was also applied to the analysis of glycans from sera sample. The integrated capture-release on the solid-phase simplifies the procedure for glycan preparation from a complex mixture and can be a powerful tool for glycan analysis. PMID:22304307

  1. Glycan analysis by reversible reaction to hydrazide beads and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang J; Zhang, Hui

    2012-03-01

    Investigation into glycoproteins and their associated glycans is the key to understanding the function of glycoproteins in biological pathways and disease development. Current methods for glycan analysis are generally based on multiple preparation processes to separate glycans from proteins and other molecules prior to analysis. During the multistep purification processes, glycans are continuously lost and the procedure increases the difficulty for accurate quantitative analysis of glycans. Here we describe the development of a novel technique, which uses hydrazide beads to capture glycans. It is based on the conjugation of glycans to hydrazide beads through the formation of reversible hydrazone, washing out unbound nonglycans, then releasing captured glycans by acids. The results showed that the glycans were able to be isolated from concatenate peptides by using hydrazide beads. This technique was also applied to the analysis of glycans from sera sample. The integrated capture-release on the solid-phase simplifies the procedure for glycan preparation from a complex mixture and can be a powerful tool for glycan analysis. PMID:22304307

  2. Implications of plant glycans in the development of innovative vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Salazar-González, Jorge A; Decker, Eva L; Reski, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    Plant glycans play a central role in vaccinology: they can serve as adjuvants and/or delivery vehicles or backbones for the synthesis of conjugated vaccines. In addition, genetic engineering is leading to the development of platforms for the production of novel polysaccharides in plant cells, an approach with relevant implications for the design of new types of vaccines. This review contains an updated outlook on this topic and provides key perspectives including a discussion on how the molecular pharming field can be linked to the production of innovative glycan-based and conjugate vaccines.

  3. GlycoPattern: a web platform for glycan array mining

    PubMed Central

    Agravat, Sanjay B.; Saltz, Joel H.; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: GlycoPattern is Web-based bioinformatics resource to support the analysis of glycan array data for the Consortium for Functional Glycomics. This resource includes algorithms and tools to discover structural motifs, a heatmap visualization to compare multiple experiments, hierarchical clustering of Glycan Binding Proteins with respect to their binding motifs and a structural search feature on the experimental data. Availability and implementation: GlycoPattern is freely available on the Web at http://glycopattern.emory.edu with all major browsers supported. Contact: sanjay.agravat@emory.edu PMID:25143288

  4. Implications of plant glycans in the development of innovative vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Salazar-González, Jorge A; Decker, Eva L; Reski, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    Plant glycans play a central role in vaccinology: they can serve as adjuvants and/or delivery vehicles or backbones for the synthesis of conjugated vaccines. In addition, genetic engineering is leading to the development of platforms for the production of novel polysaccharides in plant cells, an approach with relevant implications for the design of new types of vaccines. This review contains an updated outlook on this topic and provides key perspectives including a discussion on how the molecular pharming field can be linked to the production of innovative glycan-based and conjugate vaccines. PMID:26890067

  5. N-glycan transition of the early developmental stage in Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Risa; Hirotsu, Naoki; Miyanishi, Nobumitsu

    2016-08-26

    N-Glycosylation is one of the post-translational modifications. In animals, N-glycans linked to proteins function in cell-cell recognition, sorting, transport, and other biological phenomena. However, in plants, N-glycan-mediated biological functions remain obscure. In a previous study, we showed that the main type of N-glycan transition is from the paucimannosidic to complex type before and after germination in Oryza sativa, suggesting that transitions of N-glycan, including those of glycoproteins and glycosyltransferases, are closely associated with plant growth. To further elucidate the relationship between N-glycan structure and plant growth, we analyzed the structures of N-glycans expressed in O. sativa seedlings grown under light conditions and performed comparative analyses of the structures in the shoot and root. The analyses show that fundamental N-glycan structures are common to the shoot and root, whereas paucimannosidic-type N-glycans dramatically decreased in the root grown under light conditions. Further, to investigate the effects of light on N-glycan structures in O. sativa seedlings, we analyzed N-glycan structures in O. sativa seedlings grown in the dark. Understandably, N-glycan expression in the root was almost unaffected by light. However, despite a marked difference in phenotype, N-glycan expression in the shoot was also unaffected by light. This result suggests that the shoot and root of O. sativa have different glycoproteins and distinct N-glycan synthetic systems. Thus, we propose that the N-glycan synthetic system of the O. sativa shoot is almost unaffected by light conditions and that many photosynthesis-related proteins are not modified by N-glycans.

  6. Lgn1, a gene that determines susceptibility to Legionella pneumophila, maps to mouse chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, W.F.; Damron, D.M.; Lander, E.S.

    1995-04-10

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila is unable to replicate in macrophages derived from most inbred mouse strains. Here, we report the mapping of a gene, called Lgn1, that determines whether mouse macrophages are permissive for the intracellular replication of L. pneumophila. Although Lgn1 has been previously reported to map to mouse chromosome 15, we show here that it actually maps to chromosome 13, between D13Mit128 and D13Mit70. In the absence of any regional candidates for Lgn1, this map position will facilitate positional cloning attempts directed at this gene. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Structural characterization by multistage mass spectrometry (MSn) of human milk glycans recognized by human rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Ashline, David J; Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Prasad, Venkataram; Estes, Mary K; Cummings, Richard D; Smith, David F; Reinhold, Vernon N

    2014-11-01

    We have shown that recombinant forms of VP8* domains of the human rotavirus outer capsid spike protein VP4 from human neonatal strains (N155(G10P[11]) and RV3(G3P[6]) and a bovine strain (B223) recognize unique glycans within the repertoire of human milk glycans. The accompanying study by Yu et al.(2), describes a human milk glycan shotgun glycan microarray that led to the identification of 32 specific glycans in the human milk tagged glycan library that were recognized by these human rotaviruses. These microarray analyses also provided a variety of metadata about the recognized glycan structures compiled from anti-glycan antibody and lectin binding before and after specific glycosidase digestions, along with compositional information from mass analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry. To deduce glycan sequence and utilize information predicted by analyses of metadata from each glycan, 28 of the glycan targets were retrieved from the tagged glycan library for detailed sequencing using sequential disassembly of glycans by ion-trap mass spectrometry. Our aim is to obtain a deeper structural understanding of these key glycans using an orthogonal approach for structural confirmation in a single ion trap mass spectrometer. This sequential ion disassembly strategy details the complexities of linkage and branching in multiple compositions, several of which contained isomeric mixtures including several novel structures. The application of this approach exploits both library matching with standard materials and de novo approaches. This combination together with the metadata generated from lectin and antibody-binding data before and after glycosidase digestions provide a heretofore-unavailable level of analytical detail to glycan structure analysis. The results of these studies showed that, among the 28 glycan targets analyzed, 27 unique structures were identified, and 23 of the human milk glycans recognized by human rotaviruses represent

  8. Analysis of site-specific N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi.

    PubMed

    Hang, Ivan; Lin, Chia-wei; Grant, Oliver C; Fleurkens, Susanna; Villiger, Thomas K; Soos, Miroslav; Morbidelli, Massimo; Woods, Robert J; Gauss, Robert; Aebi, Markus

    2015-12-01

    The hallmark of N-linked protein glycosylation is the generation of diverse glycan structures in the secretory pathway. Dynamic, non-template-driven processes of N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi provide the cellular setting for structural diversity. We applied newly developed mass spectrometry-based analytics to quantify site-specific N-glycan remodeling of the model protein Pdi1p expressed in insect cells. Molecular dynamics simulation, mutational analysis, kinetic studies of in vitro processing events and glycan flux analysis supported the defining role of the protein in N-glycan processing. PMID:26240167

  9. Current Protocols in Chemical Biology Construction and Use of Glycan Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Christopher T.; Zhang, Yalong; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylation is an important post-translational modification that influences many biological processes critical for development, normal physiologic function, and diseases. Unfortunately, progress towards understanding the roles of glycans in biology has been slow due to the challenges of studying glycans and the proteins that interact with them. Glycan microarrays provide a high-throughput approach for the rapid analysis of carbohydrate-macromolecule interactions. Protocols detailed here are intended to help laboratories with basic familiarity of DNA or protein microarrays to begin printing and performing assays using glycan microarrays. Basic and advanced data processing are also detailed, along with strategies for improving reproducibility of data collected with glycan arrays. PMID:23836542

  10. Is Income Inequality a Determinant of Population Health? Part 1. A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, John; Smith, George Davey; Harper, Sam; Hillemeier, Marianne; Ross, Nancy; Kaplan, George A; Wolfson, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews 98 aggregate and multilevel studies examining the associations between income inequality and health. Overall, there seems to be little support for the idea that income inequality is a major, generalizable determinant of population health differences within or between rich countries. Income inequality may, however, directly influence some health outcomes, such as homicide in some contexts. The strongest evidence for direct health effects is among states in the United States, but even that is somewhat mixed. Despite little support for a direct effect of income inequality on health per se, reducing income inequality by raising the incomes of the most disadvantaged will improve their health, help reduce health inequalities, and generally improve population health. PMID:15016244

  11. Is income inequality a determinant of population health? Part 1. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lynch, John; Smith, George Davey; Harper, Sam; Hillemeier, Marianne; Ross, Nancy; Kaplan, George A; Wolfson, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews 98 aggregate and multilevel studies examining the associations between income inequality and health. Overall, there seems to be little support for the idea that income inequality is a major, generalizable determinant of population health differences within or between rich countries. Income inequality may, however, directly influence some health outcomes, such as homicide in some contexts. The strongest evidence for direct health effects is among states in the United States, but even that is somewhat mixed. Despite little support for a direct effect of income inequality on health per se, reducing income inequality by raising the incomes of the most disadvantaged will improve their health, help reduce health inequalities, and generally improve population health.

  12. Evidence for PPC1, a determinant of the pilei-pellis color of Agaricus bisporus fruitbodies.

    PubMed

    Callac, P; Moquet, F; Imbernon, M; Guedes-Lafargue, M R; Mamoun, M; Olivier, J M

    1998-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the genetic basis of mushroom cap color. In first generation hybrids between a brown isolate and the white commercial hybrid U 1, the white trait was recessive. Color was determined using color meter technology in second generation hybrids obtained by crossing the homokaryotic progeny of a first generation hybrid with a homokaryon from U 1. Statistical analysis revealed a bimodal distribution describing two classes of white and not-white hybrids. We postulate that a recessive allele at a single locus (PPC1) encodes the white pilei-pellis color. Joint segregation analyses indicated that PPC1 was linked to the ADH (alcohol dehydrogenase) locus. Through the analysis of the heterokaryotic progeny of the first generation hybrid, a recombination model is proposed in which PPC1 is located between the centromere and the ADH locus. PMID:9578631

  13. Glycans on influenza hemagglutinin affect receptor binding and immune response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Juine-Ruey; Tseng, Yung-Chieh; Hsu, Che-Hsiung; Hung, Yu-Fu; Chen, Shih-Wei; Chen, Chin-Mei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Cheng, Ting-Jen; Cheng, Yih-Shyun E.; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Wu, Chung-Yi; Ma, Che; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2009-01-01

    Recent cases of avian influenza H5N1 and the swine-origin 2009 H1N1 have caused a great concern that a global disaster like the 1918 influenza pandemic may occur again. Viral transmission begins with a critical interaction between hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein, which is on the viral coat of influenza, and sialic acid (SA) containing glycans, which are on the host cell surface. To elucidate the role of HA glycosylation in this important interaction, various defined HA glycoforms were prepared, and their binding affinity and specificity were studied by using a synthetic SA microarray. Truncation of the N-glycan structures on HA increased SA binding affinities while decreasing specificity toward disparate SA ligands. The contribution of each monosaccharide and sulfate group within SA ligand structures to HA binding energy was quantitatively dissected. It was found that the sulfate group adds nearly 100-fold (2.04 kcal/mol) in binding energy to fully glycosylated HA, and so does the biantennary glycan to the monoglycosylated HA glycoform. Antibodies raised against HA protein bearing only a single N-linked GlcNAc at each glycosylation site showed better binding affinity and neutralization activity against influenza subtypes than the fully glycosylated HAs elicited. Thus, removal of structurally nonessential glycans on viral surface glycoproteins may be a very effective and general approach for vaccine design against influenza and other human viruses. PMID:19822741

  14. Plasmon waveguide resonance for sensing glycan-lectin interactions.

    PubMed

    Alves, Isabel; Kurylo, Ievgen; Coffinier, Yannick; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Zaitsev, Vladimir; Harté, Etienne; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2015-05-11

    Carbohydrate-modified interfaces have been shown to be valuable tools for the study of protein-glycan recognition events. Label-free approache such as plasmonic based techniques are particularly attractive. This paper describes a new analytical platform for the sensitive and selective screening of carbohydrate-lectin interactions using plasmon waveguide resonance. Planar optical waveguides (POW), consisting of glass prisms coated with silver (50 nm) and silica (460 nm) layers were derivatized with mannose or lactose moieties. The specific association of the resulting interface with selected lectins was assessed by following the changes in its plasmonic response. The immobilization strategy investigated in this work is based on the formation of a covalent bond between propargyl-functionalized glycans and surface-linked azide groups via a Cu(I) "click" chemistry. Optimization of the surface architecture through the introduction of an oligo(ethylene glycol) spacer between the plasmonic surface and the glycan ligands provided an interface which allowed screening of glycan-lectin interactions in a highly selective manner. The limit of detection (LOD) of this method for this particular application was found to be in the subnanomolar range (0.5 nM), showing it to constitute a promising analytical platform for future development and use in a pharmaceutical or biomedical setting.

  15. 21 CFR 172.898 - Bakers yeast glycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bakers yeast glycan. 172.898 Section 172.898 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives §...

  16. 21 CFR 172.898 - Bakers yeast glycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bakers yeast glycan. 172.898 Section 172.898 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  17. Structural basis of glycan interaction in gastroenteric viral pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, B.V. Venkataram; Shanker, Sreejesh; Hu, Liya; Choi, Jae-Mun; Crawford, Sue E; Ramani, Sasirekha; Czako, Rita; Atmar, Robert L; Estes, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    A critical event in the life cycle of a virus is its initial attachment to host cells. This involves recognition by the viruses of specific receptors on the cell surface, including glycans. Viruses typically exhibit strain-dependent variations in recognizing specific glycan receptors, a feature that contributes significantly to cell tropism, host specificity, host adaptation and interspecies transmission. Examples include influenza viruses, noroviruses, rotaviruses, and parvoviruses. Both rotaviruses and noroviruses are well known gastroenteric pathogens that are of significant global health concern. While rotaviruses, in the family Reoviridae, are the major causative agents of life-threatening diarrhea in children, noroviruses, which belong to Caliciviridae family, cause epidemic and sporadic cases of acute gastroenteritis across all age groups. Both exhibit enormous genotypic and serotypic diversity. Consistent with this diversity each exhibits strain-dependent variations in the types of glycans they recognize for cell attachment. This chapter reviews current status of the structural biology of such strain-dependent glycan specificities in these two families of viruses. PMID:25073118

  18. Structural Heterogeneity of Terminal Glycans in Campylobacter jejuni Lipooligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Semchenko, Evgeny A.; Day, Christopher J.; Moutin, Marc; Wilson, Jennifer C.; Tiralongo, Joe; Korolik, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Lipooligosaccharides of the gastrointestinal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni are regarded as a major virulence factor and are implicated in the production of cross-reactive antibodies against host gangliosides, which leads to the development of autoimmune neuropathies such as Guillain-Barré and Fisher Syndromes. C. jejuni strains are known to produce diverse LOS structures encoded by more than 19 types of LOS biosynthesis clusters. This study demonstrates that the final C. jejuni LOS structure cannot always be predicted from the genetic composition of the LOS biosynthesis cluster, as determined by novel lectin array analysis of the terminal LOS glycans. The differences were shown to be partially facilitated by the differential on/off status of three genes wlaN, cst and cj1144-45. The on/off status of these genes was also analysed in C. jejuni strains grown in vitro and in vivo, isolated directly from the host animal without passaging, using immunoseparation. Importantly, C. jejuni strains 331, 421 and 520 encoding cluster type C were shown to produce different LOS, mimicking asialo GM1, asialo GM2 and a heterogeneous mix of gangliosides and other glycoconjugates respectively. In addition, individual C. jejuni colonies were shown to consistently produce heterogeneous LOS structures, irrespective of the cluster type and the status of phase variable genes. Furthermore we describe C. jejuni strains (351 and 375) with LOS clusters that do not match any of the previously described LOS clusters, yet are able to produce LOS with asialo GM2-like mimicries. The LOS biosynthesis clusters of these strains are likely to contain genes that code for LOS biosynthesis machinery previously not identified, yet capable of synthesising LOS mimicking gangliosides. PMID:22815868

  19. Structural heterogeneity of terminal glycans in Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Semchenko, Evgeny A; Day, Christopher J; Moutin, Marc; Wilson, Jennifer C; Tiralongo, Joe; Korolik, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Lipooligosaccharides of the gastrointestinal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni are regarded as a major virulence factor and are implicated in the production of cross-reactive antibodies against host gangliosides, which leads to the development of autoimmune neuropathies such as Guillain-Barré and Fisher Syndromes. C. jejuni strains are known to produce diverse LOS structures encoded by more than 19 types of LOS biosynthesis clusters. This study demonstrates that the final C. jejuni LOS structure cannot always be predicted from the genetic composition of the LOS biosynthesis cluster, as determined by novel lectin array analysis of the terminal LOS glycans. The differences were shown to be partially facilitated by the differential on/off status of three genes wlaN, cst and cj1144-45. The on/off status of these genes was also analysed in C. jejuni strains grown in vitro and in vivo, isolated directly from the host animal without passaging, using immunoseparation. Importantly, C. jejuni strains 331, 421 and 520 encoding cluster type C were shown to produce different LOS, mimicking asialo GM(1), asialo GM(2) and a heterogeneous mix of gangliosides and other glycoconjugates respectively. In addition, individual C. jejuni colonies were shown to consistently produce heterogeneous LOS structures, irrespective of the cluster type and the status of phase variable genes. Furthermore we describe C. jejuni strains (351 and 375) with LOS clusters that do not match any of the previously described LOS clusters, yet are able to produce LOS with asialo GM(2)-like mimicries. The LOS biosynthesis clusters of these strains are likely to contain genes that code for LOS biosynthesis machinery previously not identified, yet capable of synthesising LOS mimicking gangliosides. PMID:22815868

  20. The glycan keratan sulfate in inner ear crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Martin, D. S.; Li, Y. T.; Li, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    The otoconial matrix (OM) of chicks (Gallus domesticus) inner ear was analyzed. Histochemically the OM was reacted with phosphotungstic acid (PTA) and immunohistochemically with the monoclonal antibody antikeratan sulfate (antiKS). The OM was digested with the enzyme endo-beta-galactosidase (E beta Galase) or separated by 1D and 2D gel electrophoresis. PTA which reacts with glycoproteins precipitated the OM, suggesting that the OM contains glycoproteins. A central core in each crystal had no PTA staining, suggesting that the core lacked glycoproteins. Anti KS antibody stained the OM with increased density in older embryos as determined by color thresholding. E beta Galase, which cleaves the lactosamine repeating units in KS, decreased the immunostain by 30% in the OM and by 20% in the cartilage. The OM from the utricle, saccule and macula lagena contained similar molecular weight bands. Five dense bands in the OM were less dense in tissue and blood controls, suggesting that such bands are enriched in the OM. Isoelectric focusing of the OM showed a negatively charged high molecular weight smear not present in blood and faint in tissue controls. The high affinity of the OM for the cationic PTA stain, the strong immunohistochemical reaction of the OM with anti KS antibody and high molecular weight negative smear in 2D gels taken together suggest that: a) the OM contains large amounts of glycoproteins and glycans, one of which is keratan sulfate, because its immuno stain with antiKS antibody was decreased by the enzyme E beta Galase, b) the utricle, saccule and macula lagena may have similar composition, and c) the concentration of KS may increase gradually until complete mineralization of the OM is reached.

  1. A Bitter Sweet Symphony: Immune Responses to Altered O-glycan Epitopes in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Lenneke A.M.; Van Vliet, Sandra J.

    2016-01-01

    The appearance of aberrant glycans on the tumor cell surface is one of the emerging hallmarks of cancer. Glycosylation is an important post-translation modification of proteins and lipids and is strongly affected by oncogenesis. Tumor-associated glycans have been extensively characterized regarding their composition and tumor-type specific expression patterns. Nevertheless whether and how tumor-associated glycans contribute to the observed immunomodulatory actions by tumors has not been extensively studied. Here, we provide a detailed overview of the current knowledge on how tumor-associated O-glycans affect the anti-tumor immune response, thereby focusing on truncated O-glycans present on epithelial tumors and mucins. These tumor-associated O-glycans and mucins bind a variety of lectin receptors on immune cells to facilitate the subsequently induction of tolerogenic immune responses. We, therefore, postulate that tumor-associated glycans not only support tumor growth, but also actively contribute to immune evasion. PMID:27153100

  2. A Bitter Sweet Symphony: Immune Responses to Altered O-glycan Epitopes in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Lenneke A M; Van Vliet, Sandra J

    2016-01-01

    The appearance of aberrant glycans on the tumor cell surface is one of the emerging hallmarks of cancer. Glycosylation is an important post-translation modification of proteins and lipids and is strongly affected by oncogenesis. Tumor-associated glycans have been extensively characterized regarding their composition and tumor-type specific expression patterns. Nevertheless whether and how tumor-associated glycans contribute to the observed immunomodulatory actions by tumors has not been extensively studied. Here, we provide a detailed overview of the current knowledge on how tumor-associated O-glycans affect the anti-tumor immune response, thereby focusing on truncated O-glycans present on epithelial tumors and mucins. These tumor-associated O-glycans and mucins bind a variety of lectin receptors on immune cells to facilitate the subsequently induction of tolerogenic immune responses. We, therefore, postulate that tumor-associated glycans not only support tumor growth, but also actively contribute to immune evasion.

  3. A distinct sodium channel voltage-sensor locus determines insect selectivity of the spider toxin Dc1a.

    PubMed

    Bende, Niraj S; Dziemborowicz, Sławomir; Mobli, Mehdi; Herzig, Volker; Gilchrist, John; Wagner, Jordan; Nicholson, Graham M; King, Glenn F; Bosmans, Frank

    2014-07-11

    β-Diguetoxin-Dc1a (Dc1a) is a toxin from the desert bush spider Diguetia canities that incapacitates insects at concentrations that are non-toxic to mammals. Dc1a promotes opening of German cockroach voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels (BgNav1), whereas human Nav channels are insensitive. Here, by transplanting commonly targeted S3b-S4 paddle motifs within BgNav1 voltage sensors into Kv2.1, we find that Dc1a interacts with the domain II voltage sensor. In contrast, Dc1a has little effect on sodium currents mediated by PaNav1 channels from the American cockroach even though their domain II paddle motifs are identical. When exploring regions responsible for PaNav1 resistance to Dc1a, we identified two residues within the BgNav1 domain II S1-S2 loop that when mutated to their PaNav1 counterparts drastically reduce toxin susceptibility. Overall, our results reveal a distinct region within insect Nav channels that helps determine Dc1a sensitivity, a concept that will be valuable for the design of insect-selective insecticides.

  4. A distinct sodium channel voltage-sensor locus determines insect selectivity of the spider toxin Dc1a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bende, Niraj S.; Dziemborowicz, Sławomir; Mobli, Mehdi; Herzig, Volker; Gilchrist, John; Wagner, Jordan; Nicholson, Graham M.; King, Glenn F.; Bosmans, Frank

    2014-07-01

    β-Diguetoxin-Dc1a (Dc1a) is a toxin from the desert bush spider Diguetia canities that incapacitates insects at concentrations that are non-toxic to mammals. Dc1a promotes opening of German cockroach voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels (BgNav1), whereas human Nav channels are insensitive. Here, by transplanting commonly targeted S3b-S4 paddle motifs within BgNav1 voltage sensors into Kv2.1, we find that Dc1a interacts with the domain II voltage sensor. In contrast, Dc1a has little effect on sodium currents mediated by PaNav1 channels from the American cockroach even though their domain II paddle motifs are identical. When exploring regions responsible for PaNav1 resistance to Dc1a, we identified two residues within the BgNav1 domain II S1-S2 loop that when mutated to their PaNav1 counterparts drastically reduce toxin susceptibility. Overall, our results reveal a distinct region within insect Nav channels that helps determine Dc1a sensitivity, a concept that will be valuable for the design of insect-selective insecticides.

  5. A distinct sodium channel voltage-sensor locus determines insect selectivity of the spider toxin Dc1a

    PubMed Central

    Bende, Niraj S; Dziemborowicz, Slawomir; Mobli, Mehdi; Herzig, Volker; Gilchrist, John; Wagner, Jordan; Nicholson, Graham M; King, Glenn F; Bosmans, Frank

    2014-01-01

    β-Diguetoxin-Dc1a (Dc1a) is a toxin from the desert bush spider Diguetia canities that incapacitates insects at concentrations that are non-toxic to mammals. Dc1a promotes opening of German cockroach voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels (BgNav1), whereas human Nav channels are insensitive. Here, by transplanting commonly targeted S3b-S4 paddle motifs within BgNav1 voltage sensors into Kv2.1, we find that Dc1a interacts with the domain II voltage sensor. In contrast, Dc1a has little effect on sodium currents mediated by PaNav1 channels from the American cockroach even though their domain II paddle motifs are identical. When exploring regions responsible for PaNav1 resistance to Dc1a, we identified two residues within the BgNav1 domain II S1–S2 loop that when mutated to their PaNav1 counterparts drastically reduce toxin susceptibility. Overall, our results reveal a distinct region within insect Nav channels that helps determine Dc1a sensitivity, aconcept that will be valuable for the design of insect-selective insecticides. PMID:25014760

  6. A Machine Learning Based Approach to de novo Sequencing of Glycans from Tandem Mass Spectrometry Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Kumozaki, Shotaro; Sato, Kengo; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, glycomics has been actively studied and various technologies for glycomics have been rapidly developed. Currently, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is one of the key experimental tools for identification of structures of oligosaccharides. MS/MS can observe MS/MS peaks of fragmented glycan ions including cross-ring ions resulting from internal cleavages, which provide valuable information to infer glycan structures. Thus, the aim of de novo sequencing of glycans is to find the most probable assignments of observed MS/MS peaks to glycan substructures without databases. However, there are few satisfiable algorithms for glycan de novo sequencing from MS/MS spectra. We present a machine learning based approach to de novo sequencing of glycans from MS/MS spectrum. First, we build a suitable model for the fragmentation of glycans including cross-ring ions, and implement a solver that employs Lagrangian relaxation with a dynamic programming technique. Then, to optimize scores for the algorithm, we introduce a machine learning technique called structured support vector machines that enable us to learn parameters including scores for cross-ring ions from training data, i.e., known glycan mass spectra. Furthermore, we implement additional constraints for core structures of well-known glycan types including N-linked glycans and O-linked glycans. This enables us to predict more accurate glycan structures if the glycan type of given spectra is known. Computational experiments show that our algorithm performs accurate de novo sequencing of glycans. The implementation of our algorithm and the datasets are available at http://glyfon.dna.bio.keio.ac.jp/. PMID:26671799

  7. Suggestive evidence for Darwinian Selection against asparagine-linked glycans of Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Bushkin, G Guy; Ratner, Daniel M; Cui, Jike; Banerjee, Sulagna; Duraisingh, Manoj T; Jennings, Cameron V; Dvorin, Jeffrey D; Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Robertson, Seth D; Steffen, Martin; O'Keefe, Barry R; Robbins, Phillips W; Samuelson, John

    2010-02-01

    We are interested in asparagine-linked glycans (N-glycans) of Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii, because their N-glycan structures have been controversial and because we hypothesize that there might be selection against N-glycans in nucleus-encoded proteins that must pass through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) prior to threading into the apicoplast. In support of our hypothesis, we observed the following. First, in protists with apicoplasts, there is extensive secondary loss of Alg enzymes that make lipid-linked precursors to N-glycans. Theileria makes no N-glycans, and Plasmodium makes a severely truncated N-glycan precursor composed of one or two GlcNAc residues. Second, secreted proteins of Toxoplasma, which uses its own 10-sugar precursor (Glc(3)Man(5)GlcNAc(2)) and the host 14-sugar precursor (Glc(3)Man(9)GlcNAc(2)) to make N-glycans, have very few sites for N glycosylation, and there is additional selection against N-glycan sites in its apicoplast-targeted proteins. Third, while the GlcNAc-binding Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II labels ER, rhoptries, and surface of plasmodia, there is no apicoplast labeling. Similarly, the antiretroviral lectin cyanovirin-N, which binds to N-glycans of Toxoplasma, labels ER and rhoptries, but there is no apicoplast labeling. We conclude that possible selection against N-glycans in protists with apicoplasts occurs by eliminating N-glycans (Theileria), reducing their length (Plasmodium), or reducing the number of N-glycan sites (Toxoplasma). In addition, occupation of N-glycan sites is markedly reduced in apicoplast proteins versus some secretory proteins in both Plasmodium and Toxoplasma.

  8. The chemistry of negotiation: Rhythmic, glycan-driven acidification in a symbiotic conversation

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzman, Julia A.; Koch, Eric; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A. C.; Zhou, Lawrence; Kremer, Natacha; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.; Ruby, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    Glycans have emerged as critical determinants of immune maturation, microbial nutrition, and host health in diverse symbioses. In this study, we asked how cyclic delivery of a single host-derived glycan contributes to the dynamic stability of the mutualism between the squid Euprymna scolopes and its specific, bioluminescent symbiont, Vibrio fischeri. V. fischeri colonizes the crypts of a host organ that is used for behavioral light production. E. scolopes synthesizes the polymeric glycan chitin in macrophage-like immune cells called hemocytes. We show here that, just before dusk, hemocytes migrate from the vasculature into the symbiotic crypts, where they lyse and release particulate chitin, a behavior that is established only in the mature symbiosis. Diel transcriptional rhythms in both partners further indicate that the chitin is provided and metabolized only at night. A V. fischeri mutant defective in chitin catabolism was able to maintain a normal symbiont population level, but only until the symbiotic organ reached maturity (∼4 wk after colonization); this result provided a direct link between chitin utilization and symbiont persistence. Finally, catabolism of chitin by the symbionts was also specifically required for a periodic acidification of the adult crypts each night. This acidification, which increases the level of oxygen available to the symbionts, enhances their capacity to produce bioluminescence at night. We propose that other animal hosts may similarly regulate the activities of epithelium-associated microbial communities through the strategic provision of specific nutrients, whose catabolism modulates conditions like pH or anoxia in their symbionts’ habitat. PMID:25550509

  9. Protecting group-free immobilization of glycans for affinity chromatography using glycosylsulfonohydrazide donors.

    PubMed

    Hernandez Armada, Daniel; Santos, Jobette T; Richards, Michele R; Cairo, Christopher W

    2015-11-19

    A variety of applications in glycobiology exploit affinity chromatography through the immobilization of glycans to a solid support. Although several strategies are known, they may provide certain advantages or disadvantages in how the sugar is attached to the affinity matrix. Additionally, the products of some methods may be hard to characterize chemically due to non-specific reactions. The lack of specificity in standard immobilization reactions makes affinity chromatography with expensive oligosaccharides challenging. As a result, methods for specific and efficient immobilization of oligosaccharides remain of interest. Herein, we present a method for the immobilization of saccharides using N'-glycosylsulfonohydrazide (GSH) carbohydrate donors. We have compared GSH immobilization to known strategies, including the use of divinyl sulfone (DVS) and cyanuric chloride (CC), for the generation of affinity matrices. We compared immobilization methods by determining their immobilization efficiency, based on a comparison of the mass of immobilized carbohydrate and the concentration of active binding sites (determined using lectins). Our results indicate that immobilization using GSH donors can provide comparable amounts of carbohydrate epitopes on solid support while consuming almost half of the material required for DVS immobilization. The lectin binding capacity observed for these two methods suggests that GSH immobilization is more efficient. We propose that this method of oligosaccharide immobilization will be an important tool for glycobiologists working with precious glycan samples purified from biological sources. PMID:26454791

  10. Structure of FcγRI in complex with Fc reveals the importance of glycan recognition for high-affinity IgG binding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinghua; Chu, Jonathan; Zou, Zhongcheng; Hamacher, Nels B; Rixon, Mark W; Sun, Peter D

    2015-01-20

    Fc gamma receptor I (FcγRI) contributes to protective immunity against bacterial infections, but exacerbates certain autoimmune diseases. The sole high-affinity IgG receptor, FcγRI plays a significant role in immunotherapy. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of its high-affinity IgG binding, we determined the crystal structure of the extracellular domains of human FcγRI in complex with the Fc domain of human IgG1. FcγRI binds to the Fc in a similar mode as the low-affinity FcγRII and FcγRIII receptors. In addition to many conserved contacts, FcγRI forms additional hydrogen bonds and salt bridges with the lower hinge region of Fc. Unique to the high-affinity receptor-Fc complex, however, is the conformation of the receptor D2 domain FG loop, which enables a charged KHR motif to interact with proximal carbohydrate units of the Fc glycans. Both the length and the charge of the FcγRI FG loop are well conserved among mammalian species. Ala and Glu mutations of the FG loop KHR residues showed significant contributions of His-174 and Arg-175 to antibody binding, and the loss of the FG loop-glycan interaction resulted in an ∼ 20- to 30-fold decrease in FcγRI affinity to all three subclasses of IgGs. Furthermore, deglycosylation of IgG1 resulted in a 40-fold loss in FcγRI binding, demonstrating involvement of the receptor FG loop in glycan recognition. These results highlight a unique glycan recognition in FcγRI function and open potential therapeutic avenues based on antibody glycan engineering or small molecular glycan mimics to target FcγRI for certain autoimmune diseases.

  11. Quantitative determination and validation of avermectin B1a in commercial products using quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhuoni; Liang, Xianrui; Du, Liping; Su, Feng; Su, Weike

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is defined as a quantitative spectroscopic tool that enables a precise determination of the number of substances in liquids as well as in solids. There is few report demonstrating the application of NMR in the quantification of avermectin B1a (AVB1a ); here, a proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H NMR) using benzene [1-methoxy-4-(2-nitroethyl) (PMN)] as an internal standard and deuterochloroform as an NMR solvent was tested for the quantitative determination of AVB1a . The integrated signal of AVB1a at 5.56 ppm and the signal of PMN at 8.14 ppm in the (1) H NMR spectrum were used for quantification purposes. Parameters of specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, intermediate precision, range, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), stability and robustness were validated. The established method was accurate and precise with good recovery (98.86%) and relative standard deviation (RSD) of assay (0.34%) within the linearity of the calibration curve ranging from 5.08 to 13.58 mg/ml (R(2)  = 0.9999). The LOD and LOQ were 0.009 and 0.029 mg/ml, which indicated the excellent sensitivity of the method. The stability of the method was testified by a calculated RSD of 0.11%. The robustness was testified by modification of four different parameters, and the differences among each parameter were all less than 0.1%. Comparing with the assay described by the manufacturer of avermectin tablets, there was no significant difference between the assay obtained by HPLC and quantitative NMR (qNMR), which indicated qNMR was a simple and efficient method for the determination of AVB1a in commercial formulation products. PMID:24943110

  12. Differential Expression of O-Glycans in CD4(+) T Lymphocytes from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Martínez, Edgar; Lascurain, Ricardo; Tenorio, Eda Patricia; Sánchez-González, Antonio; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Jara-Quezada, Luis J; Chávez-Sánchez, Raúl; Zenteno, Edgar; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) show a decreased activation threshold and increased apoptosis. These processes seem to be regulated by glycosylated molecules on the T cell surface. Here, we determined through flow cytometry the expression of mucin-type O-glycans on T helper cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 23 SLE patients and its relation with disease activity. We used lectins specific for the disaccharide Gal-GalNAc, such as Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin (ALL), Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (jacalin) and Arachis hypogaea lectin (peanut agglutinin, PNA), as well as lectins for sialic acid such as Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) and Maakia amurensis agglutinin (MAA). The results showed that ALL, but not jacalin or PNA, identified significant differences in O-glycan expression on T helper cells from active SLE patients (n = 10). Moreover, an inverse correlation was found between the frequency of T helper cells recognized by ALL and SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score in SLE patients. In contrast, SNA and MAA lectins did not identify any differences between CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients. There was no difference in the recognition by ALL on activated T helper cells and T regulatory (Treg) cells. Our findings point out that activation of SLE disease diminishes the expression of O-glycans in T helper cells; ALL could be considered as a marker to determine activity of the disease. PMID:27600584

  13. Differential Expression of O-Glycans in CD4(+) T Lymphocytes from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Martínez, Edgar; Lascurain, Ricardo; Tenorio, Eda Patricia; Sánchez-González, Antonio; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Jara-Quezada, Luis J; Chávez-Sánchez, Raúl; Zenteno, Edgar; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) show a decreased activation threshold and increased apoptosis. These processes seem to be regulated by glycosylated molecules on the T cell surface. Here, we determined through flow cytometry the expression of mucin-type O-glycans on T helper cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 23 SLE patients and its relation with disease activity. We used lectins specific for the disaccharide Gal-GalNAc, such as Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin (ALL), Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (jacalin) and Arachis hypogaea lectin (peanut agglutinin, PNA), as well as lectins for sialic acid such as Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) and Maakia amurensis agglutinin (MAA). The results showed that ALL, but not jacalin or PNA, identified significant differences in O-glycan expression on T helper cells from active SLE patients (n = 10). Moreover, an inverse correlation was found between the frequency of T helper cells recognized by ALL and SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score in SLE patients. In contrast, SNA and MAA lectins did not identify any differences between CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients. There was no difference in the recognition by ALL on activated T helper cells and T regulatory (Treg) cells. Our findings point out that activation of SLE disease diminishes the expression of O-glycans in T helper cells; ALL could be considered as a marker to determine activity of the disease.

  14. Trimeric HIV-1-Env Structures Define Glycan Shields from Clades A, B, and G.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B E; Soto, Cinque; Lemmin, Thomas; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Kong, Rui; Thomas, Paul V; Wagh, Kshitij; Zhou, Tongqing; Behrens, Anna-Janina; Bylund, Tatsiana; Choi, Chang W; Davison, Jack R; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Joyce, M Gordon; Kwon, Young Do; Pancera, Marie; Taft, Justin; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Shivatare, Sachin S; Shivatare, Vidya S; Lee, Chang-Chun D; Wu, Chung-Yi; Bewley, Carole A; Burton, Dennis R; Koff, Wayne C; Connors, Mark; Crispin, Max; Baxa, Ulrich; Korber, Bette T; Wong, Chi-Huey; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D

    2016-05-01

    The HIV-1-envelope (Env) trimer is covered by a glycan shield of ∼90 N-linked oligosaccharides, which comprises roughly half its mass and is a key component of HIV evasion from humoral immunity. To understand how antibodies can overcome the barriers imposed by the glycan shield, we crystallized fully glycosylated Env trimers from clades A, B, and G, visualizing the shield at 3.4-3.7 Å resolution. These structures reveal the HIV-1-glycan shield to comprise a network of interlocking oligosaccharides, substantially ordered by glycan crowding, that encase the protein component of Env and enable HIV-1 to avoid most antibody-mediated neutralization. The revealed features delineate a taxonomy of N-linked glycan-glycan interactions. Crowded and dispersed glycans are differently ordered, conserved, processed, and recognized by antibody. The structures, along with glycan-array binding and molecular dynamics, reveal a diversity in oligosaccharide affinity and a requirement for accommodating glycans among known broadly neutralizing antibodies that target the glycan-shielded trimer.

  15. Property Graph vs RDF Triple Store: A Comparison on Glycan Substructure Search

    PubMed Central

    Alocci, Davide; Mariethoz, Julien; Horlacher, Oliver; Bolleman, Jerven T.; Campbell, Matthew P.; Lisacek, Frederique

    2015-01-01

    Resource description framework (RDF) and Property Graph databases are emerging technologies that are used for storing graph-structured data. We compare these technologies through a molecular biology use case: glycan substructure search. Glycans are branched tree-like molecules composed of building blocks linked together by chemical bonds. The molecular structure of a glycan can be encoded into a direct acyclic graph where each node represents a building block and each edge serves as a chemical linkage between two building blocks. In this context, Graph databases are possible software solutions for storing glycan structures and Graph query languages, such as SPARQL and Cypher, can be used to perform a substructure search. Glycan substructure searching is an important feature for querying structure and experimental glycan databases and retrieving biologically meaningful data. This applies for example to identifying a region of the glycan recognised by a glycan binding protein (GBP). In this study, 19,404 glycan structures were selected from GlycomeDB (www.glycome-db.org) and modelled for being stored into a RDF triple store and a Property Graph. We then performed two different sets of searches and compared the query response times and the results from both technologies to assess performance and accuracy. The two implementations produced the same results, but interestingly we noted a difference in the query response times. Qualitative measures such as portability were also used to define further criteria for choosing the technology adapted to solving glycan substructure search and other comparable issues. PMID:26656740

  16. Bitter-sweet symphony: glycan-lectin interactions in virus biology.

    PubMed

    Van Breedam, Wander; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Favoreel, Herman W; de Groot, Raoul J; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-07-01

    Glycans are carbohydrate modifications typically found on proteins or lipids, and can act as ligands for glycan-binding proteins called lectins. Glycans and lectins play crucial roles in the function of cells and organs, and in the immune system of animals and humans. Viral pathogens use glycans and lectins that are encoded by their own or the host genome for their replication and spread. Recent advances in glycobiological research indicate that glycans and lectins mediate key interactions at the virus-host interface, controlling viral spread and/or activation of the immune system. This review reflects on glycan-lectin interactions in the context of viral infection and antiviral immunity. A short introduction illustrates the nature of glycans and lectins, and conveys the basic principles of their interactions. Subsequently, examples are discussed highlighting specific glycan-lectin interactions and how they affect the progress of viral infections, either benefiting the host or the virus. Moreover, glycan and lectin variability and their potential biological consequences are discussed. Finally, the review outlines how recent advances in the glycan-lectin field might be transformed into promising new approaches to antiviral therapy.

  17. N-glycans and metastasis in galectin-3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    More, Shyam K; Srinivasan, Nithya; Budnar, Srikanth; Bane, Sanjay M; Upadhya, Archana; Thorat, Rahul A; Ingle, Arvind D; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V; Kalraiya, Rajiv D

    2015-05-01

    Poly-N-acetyl-lactosamine (polyLacNAc) on N-glycans facilitate lung specific metastasis of melanoma cells by serving as high affinity ligands for galectin-3, expressed in highest amounts in the lungs, on almost all its tissue compartments including on the surface of vascular endothelium. PolyLacNAc not only aids in initial arrest on the organ endothelium but in all the events of extravasation. Inhibition of polyLacNAc synthesis, or competitive inhibition of its interaction with galectin-3 all inhibited these processes and experimental metastasis. Transgenic galectin-3 mice, viz., gal-3(+/+) (wild type), gal-3(+/-) (hemizygous) and gal-3(-/-) (null) have been used to prove that galectin-3/polyLacNAc interactions are indeed critical for lung specific metastasis. Gal-3(+/-) mice which showed <50% expression of galectin-3 on the lungs also showed proportionate decrease in the number of B16F10 melanoma metastatic colonies affirming that galectin-3 and polyLacNAc interactions are indeed key determinants of lung metastasis. However, surprisingly, the number and size of metastatic colonies in gal-3(-/-) mice was very similar as that seen in gal-3(+/+) mice. The levels of lactose binding lectins on the lungs and the transcripts of other galectins (galectin-1, -8 and -9) which are expressed on lungs and have similar sugar binding specificities as galectins-3, remain unchanged in gal-3(+/+) and gal-3(-/-) mice. Further, inhibition of N-glycosylation with Swainsonine (SW) which drastically reduces metastasis of B16F10 cells in gal-3(+/+) mice, did not affect lung metastasis when assessed in gal-3(-/-) mice. Together, these results rule out the possibility of some other galectin taking over the function of galectin-3 in gal-3(-/-) mice. Chimeric mice generated to assess if absence of any effect on metastasis is due to compromised tumor immunity by replacing bone marrow of gal-3(-/-) mice with that from gal-3(+/+) mice, also failed to impact melanoma metastasis. As galectin-3

  18. Surface Glycans of Candida albicans and Other Pathogenic Fungi: Physiological Roles, Clinical Uses, and Experimental Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Masuoka, James

    2004-01-01

    Although fungi have always been with us as commensals and pathogens, fungal infections have been increasing in frequency over the past few decades. There is a growing body of literature describing the involvement of carbohydrate groups in various aspects of fungal disease. Carbohydrates comprising the cell wall or capsule, or as a component of glycoproteins, are the fungal cell surface entities most likely to be exposed to the surrounding environment. Thus, the fungus-host interaction is likely to involve carbohydrates before DNA, RNA, or even protein. The interaction between fungal and host cells is also complex, and early studies using whole cells or crude cell fractions often produced seemingly conflicting results. What was needed, and what has been developing, is the ability to identify specific glycan structures and determine how they interact with immune system components. Carbohydrate analysis is complicated by the complexity of glycan structures and by the challenges of separating and detecting carbohydrates experimentally. Advances in carbohydrate chemistry have enabled us to move from the foundation of composition analysis to more rapid characterization of specific structures. This, in turn, will lead to a greater understanding of how fungi coexist with their hosts as commensals or exist in conflict as pathogens. PMID:15084502

  19. Glycans affect DNA extraction and induce substantial differences in gut metagenomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Angelakis, Emmanouil; Bachar, Dipankar; Henrissat, Bernard; Armougom, Fabrice; Audoly, Gilles; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Robert, Catherine; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides produced by bacterial species and present in feces are extremely inhibitory to DNA restriction and can cause discrepancies in metagenomic studies. We determined the effects of different DNA extraction methods on the apparent composition of the gut microbiota using Illumina MiSeq deep sequencing technology. DNA was extracted from the stool from an obese female using 10 different methods and the choice of DNA extraction method affected the proportional abundance at the phylum level, species richness (Chao index, 227 to 2,714) and diversity (non parametric Shannon, 1.37 to 4.4). Moreover DNA was extracted from stools obtained from 83 different individuals by the fastest extraction assay and by an extraction assay that degradated exopolysaccharides. The fastest extraction method was able to detect 68% to 100% genera and 42% to 95% species whereas the glycan degradation extraction method was able to detect 56% to 93% genera and 25% to 87% species. To allow a good liberation of DNA from exopolysaccharides commonly presented in stools, we recommend the mechanical lysis of stools plus glycan degradation, used here for the first time. Caution must be taken in the interpretation of current metagenomic studies, as the efficiency of DNA extraction varies widely among stool samples. PMID:27188959

  20. Glycan Side Reaction May Compromise ETD-Based Glycopeptide Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darula, Zsuzsanna; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.

    2014-06-01

    Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) is one of the most frequently used buffer ingredients. Among other things, it is recommended and is usually used for lectin-based affinity enrichment of glycopeptides. Here we report that sialic acid, a common `capping' unit in both N- and O-linked glycans may react with this chemical, and this side reaction may compromise glycopeptide identification when ETD spectra are the only MS/MS data used in the database search. We show that the modification may alter N- as well as O-linked glycans, the Tris-derivative is still prone to fragmentation both in `beam-type' CID (HCD) and ETD experiments, at the same time—since the acidic carboxyl group was `neutralized'—it will display a different retention time than its unmodified counterpart. We also suggest solutions that—when incorporated into existing search engines—may significantly improve the reliability of glycopeptide assignments.

  1. Sweet complementarity: the functional pairing of glycans with lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabius, H-J; Manning, J C; Kopitz, J; André, S; Kaltner, H

    2016-05-01

    Carbohydrates establish the third alphabet of life. As part of cellular glycoconjugates, the glycans generate a multitude of signals in a minimum of space. The presence of distinct glycotopes and the glycome diversity are mapped by sugar receptors (antibodies and lectins). Endogenous (tissue) lectins can read the sugar-encoded information and translate it into functional aspects of cell sociology. Illustrated by instructive examples, each glycan has its own ligand properties. Lectins with different folds can converge to target the same epitope, while intrafamily diversification enables functional cooperation and antagonism. The emerging evidence for the concept of a network calls for a detailed fingerprinting. Due to the high degree of plasticity and dynamics of the display of genes for lectins the validity of extrapolations between different organisms of the phylogenetic tree yet is inevitably limited. PMID:26956894

  2. Marine Non-Glycosaminoglycan Sulfated Glycans as Potential Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Pomin, Vitor H.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfated fucans (SFs) and sulfated galactans (SGs) are currently the marine non-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) sulfated glycans most studied in glycomics. These compounds exhibit therapeutic effects in several pathophysiological systems such as blood coagulation, thrombosis, neovascularization, cancer, inflammation, and microbial infections. As analogs of the largely employed GAGs and due to some limitations of the GAG-based therapies, SFs and SGs comprise new carbohydrate-based therapeutics available for clinical studies. Here, the principal structural features and the major mechanisms of action of the SFs and SGs in the above-mentioned pathophysiological systems are presented. Discussion is also given on the current challenges and the future perspectives in drug development of these marine glycans. PMID:26690451

  3. Host-pathogen co-evolution and glycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Le Pendu, Jacques; Nyström, Kristina; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie

    2014-08-01

    Noroviruses and rotavirus A bind to polymorphic glycans of the histo-blood group type (HBGAs). Norovirus strains that bind to HBGAs can collectively infect all humans but each strain only infects a subgroup of the population, suggesting a past co-evolution that led to a trade-off where the human population is partly protected whilst the virus circulation is maintained. We termed 'Herd Innate Protection' the host species partial protection provided by the HBGAs polymorphism. Given its recent emergence, high virulence and HBGAs attachment, RHDV provides a model for studying calicivirus-host co-evolution. Field observations documented evolution of the virus ability to recognize the host HBGAs diversity and reciprocal strain-dependent selection of HBGA phenotypes following outbreaks, indicating host-pathogen co-evolution involving glycan polymorphisms.

  4. The N-Glycan Cluster from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    PubMed Central

    Dupoiron, Stéphanie; Zischek, Claudine; Ligat, Laetitia; Carbonne, Julien; Boulanger, Alice; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Lautier, Martine; Rival, Pauline; Arlat, Matthieu; Jamet, Elisabeth; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Albenne, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    N-Glycans are widely distributed in living organisms but represent only a small fraction of the carbohydrates found in plants. This probably explains why they have not previously been considered as substrates exploited by phytopathogenic bacteria during plant infection. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the causal agent of black rot disease of Brassica plants, possesses a specific system for GlcNAc utilization expressed during host plant infection. This system encompasses a cluster of eight genes (nixE to nixL) encoding glycoside hydrolases (GHs). In this paper, we have characterized the enzymatic activities of these GHs and demonstrated their involvement in sequential degradation of a plant N-glycan using a N-glycopeptide containing two GlcNAcs, three mannoses, one fucose, and one xylose (N2M3FX) as a substrate. The removal of the α-1,3-mannose by the α-mannosidase NixK (GH92) is a prerequisite for the subsequent action of the β-xylosidase NixI (GH3), which is involved in the cleavage of the β-1,2-xylose, followed by the α-mannosidase NixJ (GH125), which removes the α-1,6-mannose. These data, combined to the subcellular localization of the enzymes, allowed us to propose a model of N-glycopeptide processing by X. campestris pv. campestris. This study constitutes the first evidence suggesting N-glycan degradation by a plant pathogen, a feature shared with human pathogenic bacteria. Plant N-glycans should therefore be included in the repertoire of molecules putatively metabolized by phytopathogenic bacteria during their life cycle. PMID:25586188

  5. Glycan-Targeted Virus-like Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Baksh, Michael; Nycholat, Corwin; Paulson, James C.; Kitagishi, Hiroaki; Finn, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) have proven to be versatile platforms for chemical and functionalization for a variety of purposes in biomedicine, catalysis, and materials science. We here the simultaneous modification of the bacteriophage Qβ VLP with a metalloporphyrin derivative photodynamic therapy and a glycan ligand for specific targeting of cells bearing the CD-22 receptor. This application benefits from the presence of the targeting function and the delivery of a high local concentration of singlet oxygen-generating payload. PMID:22827531

  6. Mucin-type core 1 glycans regulate the localization of neuromuscular junctions and establishment of muscle cell architecture in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Fuwa, Takashi J; Sato, Chikara; Komatsu, Akira; Nishihara, Shoko

    2016-04-01

    T antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr), a core 1 mucin-type O-glycan structure, is synthesized by Drosophila core 1 β1,3-galactosyltrasferase 1 (dC1GalT1) and is expressed in various tissues. We previously reported that dC1GalT1 synthesizes T antigen expressed in hemocytes, lymph glands, and the central nervous system (CNS) and that dC1GalT1 mutant larvae display decreased numbers of circulating hemocytes and excessive differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells in lymph glands. dC1GalT1 mutant larvae have also been shown to have morphological defects in the CNS. However, the functions of T antigen in other tissues remain largely unknown. In this study, we found that glycans contributed to the localization of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) boutons. In dC1GalT1 mutant larvae, NMJs were ectopically formed in the cleft between muscles 6 and 7 and connected with these two muscles. dC1GalT1 synthesized T antigen, which was expressed at NMJs. In addition, we determined the function of mucin-type O-glycans in muscle cells. In dC1GalT1 mutant muscles, myofibers and basement membranes were disorganized. Moreover, ultrastructural defects in NMJs and accumulation of large endosome-like structures within both NMJ boutons and muscle cells were observed in dC1GalT1 mutants. Taken together, these results demonstrated that mucin-type O-glycans synthesized by dC1GalT1 were involved in the localization of NMJ boutons, synaptogenesis of NMJs, establishment of muscle cell architecture, and endocytosis. PMID:26896591

  7. Comparative profiling of N-glycans isolated from serum samples of ovarian cancer patients and analyzed by microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Indranil; Alley, William R; Goetz, John A; Vasseur, Jacqueline A; Novotny, Milos V; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2013-10-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related mortalities for women in the United States and the most lethal gynecological cancer. Aberrant glycosylation has been linked to several human diseases, including ovarian cancer, and accurate measurement of changes in glycosylation may provide relevant diagnostic and prognostic information. In this work, we used microchip electrophoresis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence detection to determine quantitative differences among the N-glycan profiles of control individuals and late-stage recurrent ovarian cancer patients prior to and after an experimental drug treatment that combined docetaxel and imatinib mesylate. N-Glycans were enzymatically released from 5-μL aliquots of serum samples, labeled with the anionic fluorescent tag, 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid, and analyzed on microfluidic devices. A 22-cm long separation channel, operated at 1250 V/cm, generated analysis times less than 100 s, separation efficiencies up to 8 × 10(5) plates (3.6 × 10(6) plates/m), and migration time reproducibilities better than 0.1% relative standard deviation after peak alignment. Principal component analysis (PCA) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests showed significant differences between the control and both pre- and post-treatment cancer samples and subtle differences between the pre- and post-treatment cancer samples. Area-under-the-curve (AUC) values from receiver operating characteristics (ROC) tests were used to evaluate the diagnostic merit of N-glycan peaks, and specific N-glycan peaks used in combination provided AUCs > 0.90 (highly accurate test) when the control and pretreatment cancer samples and control and post-treatment samples were compared.

  8. Structural characterization of the N-glycans of a recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen derived from yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, C.C.Y.; Miller, W.J.; Kubek, D.J. ); Strang, A.M.; van Halbeek, H. ); Piesecki, S.J.; Alhadeff, J.A. )

    1992-01-14

    The N-glycans of purified recombinant middle surface protein (preS2+S) from hepatitis B virus, a candidate vaccine antigen expressed in a mnn9 mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have been characterized structurally. The glycans were released by N-glycanase treatment, isolated by size-exclusion chromatography on Sephadex G-50 and Bio-Gel P-4 columns, and analyzed by 500-MHz {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. The mixture of oligosaccharides was fractionated by HPLC, the major subfractions were isolated, and their carbohydrate compositions were determined by high-pH anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. The combined results suggest that high-mannose oligosaccharides account for all the N-glycans released from preS2+S: structures include Man{sub 7}GlcNAc{sub 2}, Man{sub 8}GlcNAc{sub 2} isomers in the ratios of 3:6:1. Approximately 80% of the oligosaccharides contain the C2, C6-branched trimannosyl structural element typical of yeast high-mannose oligosaccharides but not usually found in high-mannose oligosaccharides in animal glycoproteins.

  9. Isolation and characterization of a new class of acidic glycans implicated in sea urchin embryonal cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Papakonstantinou, E; Misevic, G N

    1993-10-01

    Three major glycan fractions of 580 kDa (g580), 150 kDa (g150), and 2 kDa (g2) were isolated and purified from Lytechinus pictus sea urchin embryos at the mesenchyme blastula stage by gel filtration and high pressure liquid chromatography. Chemical analysis, by gas chromatography, revealed that g580 is highly sulfated and rich in N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, glucuronic acid, and fucose. The g150 fraction is less acidic than g580 and contains high amounts of amino sugars, xylose, and mannose. The g2 fraction is neutral, rich in N-acetylglucosamine, mannose, and galactose. The g580 and g150 fractions are resistant to glycosaminoglycan-degrading enzymes, indicating that they are distinct from the glycosaminoglycans. The g580 fraction resembles, with respect to chemical composition, a previously characterized 200 kDa sponge adhesion glycan (g200). The binding of the monoclonal antibody Block 2, which recognizes a repetitive epitope on g200, as well as of the anti-g580 polyclonal antibodies to both g580 and g200 indicated that these two glycans share similar antigenic determinants. The Fab fragments of the Block 2 antibody, which previously have been shown to inhibit cell adhesion in sponges, also blocked the reaggregation of dissociated sea urchin mesenchyme blastula cells. These results indicate that g580 carries a carbohydrate epitope, similar to the sponge adhesion epitope of g200, which is involved in sea urchin embryonal cell adhesion.

  10. Glycan Moieties as Bait to Fish Plasma Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fei; Zhao, Qun; Sui, Zhigang; Liang, Yu; Jiang, Hao; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-05-17

    Plasma membrane proteome analysis is of significance for screening candidate biomarkers and drug targets. However, due to their low abundance and lack of specific groups that can enable their capture, the plasma membrane proteins (PMPs) are under-represented. On the basis of the fact that PMPs are embedded in or anchored to the phospholipid bilayer of the plasma membrane and the glycan moieties of proteins and lipids located on the plasma membrane are exposed outside of the cell surface, we proposed a strategy to capture PMPs, termed as glycan moieties-directed PMPs enrichment (GMDPE). With the glycan moieties exposed outside of the cells as bait to ensure the selectivity and the phospholipid bilayer as raft to provide the sensitivity, we applied this strategy into the plasma membrane proteome analysis of HeLa cells, and in total, 772 PMPs were identified, increased by 4.5 times compared to those identified by the reported cell surface biotinylation method. Notably, among them, 86 CD antigens and 16 ion channel proteins were confidently identified. All these results demonstrated that our proposed approach has great potential in the large scale plasma membrane proteome profiling.

  11. Identification of glycoproteins containing specific glycans using a lectin-chemical method.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Shah, Punit; De Marzo, Angelo M; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Li, Qianqian; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most common protein modifications. Each glycoprotein can be glycosylated at multiple glycosites, and each glycosites can be modified by different glycans. Due to this heterogeneity of glycosylation, it has proven difficult to study the structure-function relationship of specific glycans and their affected glycoproteins. Here, we report a novel method for rapid and quantitative identification of glycoproteins containing specific glycans. Lectin affinity isolations are followed by chemical immobilization of the captured glycopeptides, allowing the identification of glycoproteins containing specific glycans by subsequent mass spectrometry. The application of the method should be useful to facilitate our understanding of how changes in glycan associate with diseases, and to discover novel glycoproteins with certain glycans that could serve as biomarkers or therapeutic targets.

  12. Metabolic Labeling and Imaging of N-Linked Glycans in Arabidopsis Thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuntao; Wu, Jie; Chen, Xing

    2016-08-01

    Molecular imaging of glycans has been actively pursued in animal systems for the past decades. However, visualization of plant glycans remains underdeveloped, despite that glycosylation is essential for the life cycle of plants. Metabolic glycan labeling in Arabidopsis thaliana by using N-azidoacetylglucosamine (GlcNAz) as the chemical reporter is reported. GlcNAz is metabolized through the salvage pathway of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and incorporated into N-linked glycans, and possibly intracellular O-GlcNAc. Click-labeling with fluorescent probes enables visualization of newly synthesized N-linked glycans. N-glycosylation in the root tissue was discovered to possess distinct distribution patterns in different developmental zones, suggesting that N-glycosylation is regulated in a developmental stage-dependent manner. This work shows the utility of metabolic glycan labeling in elucidating the function of N-linked glycosylation in plants.

  13. Glycan Arrays: From Basic Biochemical Research to Bioanalytical and Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Geissner, Andreas; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-06-12

    A major branch of glycobiology and glycan-focused biomedicine studies the interaction between carbohydrates and other biopolymers, most importantly, glycan-binding proteins. Today, this research into glycan-biopolymer interaction is unthinkable without glycan arrays, tools that enable high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate interaction partners. Glycan arrays offer many applications in basic biochemical research, for example, defining the specificity of glycosyltransferases and lectins such as immune receptors. Biomedical applications include the characterization and surveillance of influenza strains, identification of biomarkers for cancer and infection, and profiling of immune responses to vaccines. Here, we review major applications of glycan arrays both in basic and applied research. Given the dynamic nature of this rapidly developing field, we focus on recent findings. PMID:27306309

  14. Glycan Arrays: From Basic Biochemical Research to Bioanalytical and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissner, Andreas; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2016-06-01

    A major branch of glycobiology and glycan-focused biomedicine studies the interaction between carbohydrates and other biopolymers, most importantly, glycan-binding proteins. Today, this research into glycan-biopolymer interaction is unthinkable without glycan arrays, tools that enable high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate interaction partners. Glycan arrays offer many applications in basic biochemical research, for example, defining the specificity of glycosyltransferases and lectins such as immune receptors. Biomedical applications include the characterization and surveillance of influenza strains, identification of biomarkers for cancer and infection, and profiling of immune responses to vaccines. Here, we review major applications of glycan arrays both in basic and applied research. Given the dynamic nature of this rapidly developing field, we focus on recent findings.

  15. Tracking surface glycans on live cancer cells with single molecule sensitivity**

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hao; English, Brian P.; Hazan, Rachel B.; Wu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Using a combination of metabolically labeled glycans, bioorthogonal Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition and controlled bleaching of fluorescent probes conjugated to azide or alkyne tagged glycans, we achieve a sufficiently low spatial density of dye labeled glycans enabling dynamic single-molecule tracking and super-resolution imaging of N-linked sialic acids and O-linked GalNAc on the membrane of live cells. Analysis of the trajectories of these dye labeled glycans in mammary cancer cells reveal constrained diffusion of both N- and O-linked glycans which we interpret as reflecting the mobility of the glycan rather than caused by transient immobilization due to spatial inhomogeneities on the plasma membrane. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) imaging reveals the structure of dynamic membrane nanotubes. PMID:25515330

  16. Targeting host-derived glycans on enveloped viruses for antibody-based vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Crispin, Max; Doores, Katie J.

    2016-01-01

    The surface of enveloped viruses can be extensively glycosylated. Unlike the glycans coating pathogens such as bacteria and fungi, glycans on viruses are added and processed by the host-cell during biosynthesis. Glycoproteins are typically subjected to α-mannosidase processing and Golgi-mediated glycosyltransferase extension to form complex-type glycans. In envelope viruses, exceptions to this default pathway are common and lead to the presence of oligomannose-type glycan structures on the virion surface. In one extreme example, HIV-1 utilizes a high density of glycans to limit host antibody recognition of protein. However, the high density limits glycan processing and the resulting oligomannose structures can be recognised by broadly neutralising antibodies isolated form HIV-1 infected patients. Here we discuss how divergence from host-cell glycosylation can be targeted for vaccine design. PMID:25747313

  17. Quantitative isomer-specific N-glycan fingerprinting using isotope coded labeling and high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry with graphitic carbon stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Michael, Claudia; Rizzi, Andreas M

    2015-02-27

    Glycan reductive isotope labeling (GRIL) using (12)C6-/(13)C6-aniline as labeling reagent is reported with the aim of quantitative N-glycan fingerprinting. Porous graphitized carbon (PGC) as stationary phase in capillary scale HPLC coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry with time of flight analyzer was applied for the determination of labeled N-glycans released from glycoproteins. The main benefit of using stable isotope-coding in the context of comparative glycomics lies in the improved accuracy and precision of the quantitative analysis in combined samples and in the potential of correcting for structure-dependent incomplete enzymatic release of oligosaccharides when comparing identical target proteins. The method was validated with respect to mobile phase parameters, reproducibility, accuracy, linearity and limit of detection/quantification (LOD/LOQ) using test glycoproteins. It is shown that the developed method is capable of determining relative amounts of N-glycans (including isomers) comparing two samples in one single HPLC-MS run. The analytical potential and usefulness of GRIL in combination with PGC-ESI-TOF-MS is demonstrated comparing glycosylation in human monoclonal antibodies produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) and hybridoma cell lines.

  18. Effects of N-glycan precursor length diversity on quality control of protein folding and on protein glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, John; Robbins, Phillips W

    2015-05-01

    Asparagine-linked glycans (N-glycans) of medically important protists have much to tell us about the evolution of N-glycosylation and of N-glycan-dependent quality control (N-glycan QC) of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. While host N-glycans are built upon a dolichol-pyrophosphate-linked precursor with 14 sugars (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2), protist N-glycan precursors vary from Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 (Acanthamoeba) to Man9GlcNAc2 (Trypanosoma) to Glc3Man5GlcNAc2 (Toxoplasma) to Man5GlcNAc2 (Entamoeba, Trichomonas, and Eimeria) to GlcNAc2 (Plasmodium and Giardia) to zero (Theileria). As related organisms have differing N-glycan lengths (e.g. Toxoplasma, Eimeria, Plasmodium, and Theileria), the present N-glycan variation is based upon secondary loss of Alg genes, which encode enzymes that add sugars to the N-glycan precursor. An N-glycan precursor with Man5GlcNAc2 is necessary but not sufficient for N-glycan QC, which is predicted by the presence of the UDP-glucose:glucosyltransferase (UGGT) plus calreticulin and/or calnexin. As many parasites lack glucose in their N-glycan precursor, UGGT product may be identified by inhibition of glucosidase II. The presence of an armless calnexin in Toxoplasma suggests secondary loss of N-glycan QC from coccidia. Positive selection for N-glycan sites occurs in secreted proteins of organisms with N-glycan QC and is based upon an increased likelihood of threonine but not serine in the +2 position versus asparagine. In contrast, there appears to be selection against N-glycan length in Plasmodium and N-glycan site density in Toxoplasma. Finally, there is suggestive evidence for N-glycan-dependent ERAD in Trichomonas, which glycosylates and degrades the exogenous reporter mutant carboxypeptidase Y (CPY*).

  19. Simultaneous determination of cytochrome P450 1A, 2A and 3A activities in porcine liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Monika; Tomankova, Jana; Li, Shengjie; Zamaratskaia, Galia

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a robust method for the simultaneous determination of the activities of three porcine CYP450 enzymes in hepatic microsomes. A cocktail consisting of three selective CYP450 probe substrates, 7-ethoxyresorufin (CYP1A), coumarin (CYP2A) and 7-benzyloxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin (BFC; CYP3A), was incubated with porcine liver microsomes. The presence of 7-ethoxyresorufin appears to significantly influence the kinetics of coumarin hydroxylation and BFC O-debenzylation. These results indicate that the use of 7-ethoxyresorufin in substrate cocktails together with coumarin and BFC should be avoided.

  20. A Sialylated Glycan Microarray Reveals Novel Interactions of Modified Sialic Acids with Proteins and Viruses*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Lasanajak, Yi; Tappert, Mary M.; Air, Gillian M.; Tiwari, Vinod K.; Cao, Hongzhi; Chokhawala, Harshal A.; Zheng, Haojie; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2011-01-01

    Many glycan-binding proteins in animals and pathogens recognize sialic acid or its modified forms, but their molecular recognition is poorly understood. Here we describe studies on sialic acid recognition using a novel sialylated glycan microarray containing modified sialic acids presented on different glycan backbones. Glycans terminating in β-linked galactose at the non-reducing end and with an alkylamine-containing fluorophore at the reducing end were sialylated by a one-pot three-enzyme system to generate α2–3- and α2–6-linked sialyl glycans with 16 modified sialic acids. The resulting 77 sialyl glycans were purified and quantified, characterized by mass spectrometry, covalently printed on activated slides, and interrogated with a number of key sialic acid-binding proteins and viruses. Sialic acid recognition by the sialic acid-binding lectins Sambucus nigra agglutinin and Maackia amurensis lectin-I, which are routinely used for detecting α2–6- and α2–3-linked sialic acids, are affected by sialic acid modifications, and both lectins bind glycans terminating with 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galactonononic acid (Kdn) and Kdn derivatives stronger than the derivatives of more common N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). Three human parainfluenza viruses bind to glycans terminating with Neu5Ac or Neu5Gc and some of their derivatives but not to Kdn and its derivatives. Influenza A virus also does not bind glycans terminating in Kdn or Kdn derivatives. An especially novel aspect of human influenza A virus binding is its ability to equivalently recognize glycans terminated with either α2–6-linked Neu5Ac9Lt or α2–6-linked Neu5Ac. Our results demonstrate the utility of this sialylated glycan microarray to investigate the biological importance of modified sialic acids in protein-glycan interactions. PMID:21757734

  1. Development of 5-HT1A receptor radioligands to determine receptor density and changes in endogenous 5-HT.

    PubMed

    Jagoda, Elaine M; Lang, Lixin; Tokugawa, Joji; Simmons, Ashlie; Ma, Ying; Contoreggi, Carlo; Kiesewetter, Dale; Eckelman, William C

    2006-05-01

    [(18)F]FCWAY and [(18)F]FPWAY, analogues of the high affinity 5-HT(1A) receptor (5-HT(1A)R) antagonist WAY100635, were evaluated in rodents as potential radiopharmaceuticals for determining 5-HT(1A)R density and changes in receptor occupancy due to changes in endogenous serotonin (5-HT) levels. The in vivo hippocampus specific binding ratio [(hippocampus(uptake)/cerebellum(uptake))-1] of [(18)F]FPWAY was decreased to 32% of the ratio of [(18)F]FCWAY, indicating that [(18)F]FPWAY has lower affinity than [(18)F]FCWAY. The 5-HT(1A)R selectivity of [(18)F]FPWAY was confirmed using ex vivo autoradiography studies with 5-HT(1A)R knockout, heterozygous, and wildtype mice.Pre- or post-treatment of awake rodents in tissue dissection studies with paroxetine had no effect on hippocampal binding of [(18)F]FCWAY or [(18)F]FPWAY compared to controls, indicating neither tracer was sensitive to changes in endogenous 5-HT. In mouse ex vivo autoradiography studies in which awake mice were treated with fenfluramine following the [(18)F]FPWAY, a significant decrease was not observed in the hippocampus specific binding ratios. In rat dissection studies with fenfluramine administered following [(18)F]FPWAY or [(18)F]FBWAY ([(18)F]-MPPF) in awake or urethane-anesthetized rats, no significant differences in the specific binding ratios of the hippocampus were observed compared to their respective controls. [(18)F]FPWAY and [(18)F]FBWAY uptakes in all brain regions were increased variably in the anesthetized group (with the greatest increase in the hippocampus) vs. the awake group, but were decreased in the fenfluramine-treated anesthetized group vs. the anesthetized group. These data are best explained by changes in blood flow caused by urethane and fenfluramine, which varies from region to region in the brain. PMID:16440292

  2. O-glycan inhibitors generate aryl-glycans, induce apoptosis and lead to growth inhibition in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Patsos, Georgios; Hebbe-Viton, Virginie; Robbe-Masselot, Catherine; Masselot, David; San Martin, Raul; Greenwood, Rosemary; Paraskeva, Christos; Klein, Andreas; Graessmann, Monika; Michalski, Jean Claude; Gallagher, Timothy; Corfield, Anthony

    2009-04-01

    Our studies provide direct evidence that O-glycosylation pathways play a role in the regulation of cell growth through apoptosis and proliferation pathways. A series of small molecular weight analogs of the GalNAc-alpha-1-O-serine/threonine structure based on 1-benzyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-O-d-galactopyranoside have been synthesized and tested in the human colorectal cancer cell lines PC/AA/C1/SB10C and HCA7/C29. Three inhibitors, 1-benzyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-O-D-galactopyranoside, and the corresponding 2-azido- and C-glycoside analogs were screened in these colorectal cancer cell lines at 0.5 mM and showed induction of apoptosis and downregulation of proliferation. Treatment of both cell lines with inhibitors led to changes in glycosylation detected with peanut lectin. The inhibition of glycosyltransferase activity in cell homogenates from human colorectal mucosal cells and cultured cell lines could be shown. The competitive action of the inhibitors resulted in the intracellular formation of 28 aryl-glycan products which were identified by MALDI and electrospray mass spectroscopy. The structures showed a differential pattern for each of the inhibitors in both cell lines. Gene array analysis of the glycogenes illustrated a pattern of glycosyltransferases that matched the glycan structures found in glycoproteins and aryl-glycans formed in the PC/AA/C1/SB10C cells; however, there was no action of the three inhibitors on glycogene transcript levels. The inhibitors act at both intermediary metabolic and genomic levels, resulting in altered protein glycosylation and aryl-glycan formation. These events may play a part in growth arrest.

  3. Flagellin Glycans from Two Pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae Contain Rhamnose in d and l Configurations in Different Ratios and Modified 4-Amino-4,6-Dideoxyglucose▿

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Kasumi; Ono, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Mitsuru; Ishii, Tadashi; Katoh, Etsuko; Taguchi, Fumiko; Miki, Ryuji; Murata, Katsuyoshi; Kaku, Hanae; Ichinose, Yuki

    2007-01-01

    Flagellins from Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea race 4 and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605 have been found to be glycosylated. Glycosylation of flagellin is essential for bacterial virulence and is also involved in the determination of host specificity. Flagellin glycans from both pathovars were characterized, and common sites of glycosylation were identified on six serine residues (positions 143, 164, 176, 183, 193, and 201). The structure of the glycan at serine 201 (S201) of flagellin from each pathovar was determined by sugar composition analysis, mass spectrometry, and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. These analyses showed that the S201 glycans from both pathovars were composed of a common unique trisaccharide consisting of two rhamnosyl (Rha) residues and one modified 4-amino-4,6-dideoxyglucosyl (Qui4N) residue, β-d-Quip4N(3-hydroxy-1-oxobutyl)2Me-(1→3)-α-l-Rhap-(1→2)-α-l-Rhap. Furthermore, mass analysis suggests that the glycans on each of the six serine residues are composed of similar trisaccharide units. Determination of the enantiomeric ratio of Rha from the flagellin proteins showed that flagellin from P. syringae pv. tabaci 6605 consisted solely of l-Rha, whereas P. syringae pv. glycinea race 4 flagellin contained both l-Rha and d-Rha at a molar ratio of about 4:1. Taking these findings together with those from our previous study, we conclude that these flagellin glycan structures may be important for the virulence and host specificity of P. syringae. PMID:17644592

  4. Improved nonreductive O-glycan release by hydrazinolysis with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid addition.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Radoslaw P; Royle, Louise; Gardner, Richard A; Bondt, Albert; Fernandes, Daryl L; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2014-05-15

    The study of protein O-glycosylation is receiving increasing attention in biological, medical, and biopharmaceutical research. Improved techniques are required to allow reproducible and quantitative analysis of O-glycans. An established approach for O-glycan analysis relies on their chemical release in high yield by hydrazinolysis, followed by fluorescent labeling at the reducing terminus and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) profiling. However, an unwanted degradation known as "peeling" often compromises hydrazinolysis for O-glycan analysis. Here we addressed this problem using low-molarity solutions of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in hydrazine for O-glycan release. O-linked glycans from a range of different glycoproteins were analyzed, including bovine fetuin, bovine submaxillary gland mucin, and serum immunoglobulin A (IgA). The data for the O-glycans released by hydrazine with anhydrous EDTA or disodium salt dihydrate EDTA show high yields of the native O-glycans compared with the peeled product, resulting in a markedly increased robustness of the O-glycan profiling method. The presented method for O-glycan release demonstrates significant reduction in peeling and reduces the number of sample handling steps prior to release.

  5. N-glycans of growth factor receptors: their role in receptor function and disease implications.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Motoko; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Gao, Congxiao; Kuroki, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Numerous signal-transduction-related molecules are secreted proteins or membrane proteins, and the mechanism by which these molecules are regulated by glycan chains is a very important issue for developing an understanding of the cellular events that transpire. This review covers the functional regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), ErbB3 and the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor by N-glycans. This review shows that the N-glycans play important roles in regulating protein conformation and interactions with carbohydrate recognition molecules. These results point to the possibility of a novel strategy for controlling cell signalling and developing novel glycan-based therapeutics. PMID:27612953

  6. Comparative analysis of N-glycans in the ungerminated and germinated stages of Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Risa; Hirotsu, Naoki; Miyanishi, Nobumitsu

    2015-12-11

    All fundamental information such as signal transduction, metabolic control, infection, cell-to-cell signaling, and cell differentiation related to the growth of plants are preserved in germs. In preserving these information, glycans have a key role and are involved in the development and differentiation of organisms. Glycans which exist in rice germ are expected to have an important role in germination. In this study, we performed structural and correlation analysis of the N-glycans in rice germ before and after germination. Our results confirmed that the N-glycans in the ungerminated stage of the rice germ had low number of N-glycans consisting only of six kinds especially with high-mannose and paucimannose type N-glycans being 16.0% and 76.7%, respectively. On the other hand, after 48 hours germinated germ stage, there was an increase in the complex type N-glycans with the appearance of Lewis a structure, the most complex type and a decrease in paucimannose types. These results suggest that at least six kinds of N-glycans are utilized for long time preservation of rice seed, while the diversification of most complex types of N-glycans is produced an environment dependent for shoot formation of rice. PMID:26513758

  7. Atomic visualization of a flipped-back conformation of bisected glycans bound to specific lectins

    PubMed Central

    Nagae, Masamichi; Kanagawa, Mayumi; Morita-Matsumoto, Kana; Hanashima, Shinya; Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Glycans normally exist as a dynamic equilibrium of several conformations. A fundamental question concerns how such molecules bind lectins despite disadvantageous entropic loss upon binding. Bisected glycan, a glycan possessing bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is potentially a good model for investigating conformational dynamics and glycan-lectin interactions, owing to the unique ability of this sugar residue to alter conformer populations and thus modulate the biological activities. Here we analyzed bisected glycan in complex with two unrelated lectins, Calsepa and PHA-E. The crystal structures of the two complexes show a conspicuous flipped back glycan structure (designated ‘back-fold’ conformation), and solution NMR analysis also provides evidence of ‘back-fold’ glycan structure. Indeed, statistical conformational analysis of available bisected and non-bisected glycan structures suggests that bisecting GlcNAc restricts the conformations of branched structures. Restriction of glycan flexibility by certain sugar residues may be more common than previously thought and impinges on the mechanism of glycoform-dependent biological functions. PMID:26971576

  8. Complete Genome Sequences of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses 1A and 1B Determined Directly from Fatal Cases

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Gavin S.; Watson, Mick; Kerr, Karen; Sanderson, Stephanie; Bouts, Tim; Steinbach, Falko; Dastjerdi, Akbar

    2013-01-01

    A highly lethal hemorrhagic disease associated with infection by elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV) poses a severe threat to Asian elephant husbandry. We have used high-throughput methods to sequence the genomes of the two genotypes that are involved in most fatalities, namely, EEHV1A and EEHV1B (species Elephantid herpesvirus 1, genus Proboscivirus, subfamily Betaherpesvirinae, family Herpesviridae). The sequences were determined from postmortem tissue samples, despite the data containing tiny proportions of viral reads among reads from a host for which the genome sequence was not available. The EEHV1A genome is 180,421 bp in size and consists of a unique sequence (174,601 bp) flanked by a terminal direct repeat (2,910 bp). The genome contains 116 predicted protein-coding genes, of which six are fragmented, and seven paralogous gene families are present. The EEHV1B genome is very similar to that of EEHV1A in structure, size, and gene layout. Half of the EEHV1A genes lack orthologs in other members of subfamily Betaherpesvirinae, such as human cytomegalovirus (genus Cytomegalovirus) and human herpesvirus 6A (genus Roseolovirus). Notable among these are 23 genes encoding type 3 membrane proteins containing seven transmembrane domains (the 7TM family) and seven genes encoding related type 2 membrane proteins (the EE50 family). The EE50 family appears to be under intense evolutionary selection, as it is highly diverged between the two genotypes, exhibits evidence of sequence duplications or deletions, and contains several fragmented genes. The availability of the genome sequences will facilitate future research on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of EEHV-associated disease. PMID:23552421

  9. Editorial overview: Carbohydrate-protein interactions and glycosylation: Glycan synthesis and recognition: finding the perfect partner in a sugar-coated life.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Ten E N; Haltiwanger, Robert S

    2015-10-01

    Oligosaccharides expressed on the surface of cells and in biological fluids as glycoproteins, glycolipids, proteoglycans and polysaccharides can be recognized by partner proteins, and these interactions have been shown to mediate fundamental biological events such as occur in the immune system, signal transduction, development and cancer metastasis. The specificities of these partner proteins (lectins) for their glycan ligands are determined by factors such as glycan composition, shape and density of expression and the involvement of the aglycone moiety as part of the recognition motif. There is increasing knowledge on the mechanisms of these interactions as new secondary binding sites continue to be elucidated adding to the functional awareness of sugar-binding proteins. This issue focuses on recent advances in understanding how C-type lectins in the immune system work, how novel motifs involving asymmetric glycan branch recognition and protein-protein interactions influence critical biological functions including signal transduction and bactericidal pore formation, recent studies on novel glycan-binding proteins produced by bacteriophage, analysis of the interactions between heparin/heparan sulphate and their binding proteins, and recent findings on the molecular interactions between chondroitin-dermatan sulphate and various bioactive protein components. We conclude with a review on a recent fascinating class of processive enzymes responsible for synthesis of high-molecular weight extracellular polysaccharides such as hyaluronic acid, chitin and alginate. PMID:26613983

  10. Editorial overview: Carbohydrate-protein interactions and glycosylation: Glycan synthesis and recognition: finding the perfect partner in a sugar-coated life.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Ten E N; Haltiwanger, Robert S

    2015-10-01

    Oligosaccharides expressed on the surface of cells and in biological fluids as glycoproteins, glycolipids, proteoglycans and polysaccharides can be recognized by partner proteins, and these interactions have been shown to mediate fundamental biological events such as occur in the immune system, signal transduction, development and cancer metastasis. The specificities of these partner proteins (lectins) for their glycan ligands are determined by factors such as glycan composition, shape and density of expression and the involvement of the aglycone moiety as part of the recognition motif. There is increasing knowledge on the mechanisms of these interactions as new secondary binding sites continue to be elucidated adding to the functional awareness of sugar-binding proteins. This issue focuses on recent advances in understanding how C-type lectins in the immune system work, how novel motifs involving asymmetric glycan branch recognition and protein-protein interactions influence critical biological functions including signal transduction and bactericidal pore formation, recent studies on novel glycan-binding proteins produced by bacteriophage, analysis of the interactions between heparin/heparan sulphate and their binding proteins, and recent findings on the molecular interactions between chondroitin-dermatan sulphate and various bioactive protein components. We conclude with a review on a recent fascinating class of processive enzymes responsible for synthesis of high-molecular weight extracellular polysaccharides such as hyaluronic acid, chitin and alginate.

  11. Effects of N-glycan precursor length diversity on quality control of protein folding and on protein glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, John; Robbins, Phillips W.

    2014-01-01

    Asparagine-linked glycans (N-glycans) of medically important protists have much to tell us about the evolution of N-glycosylation and of N-glycan-dependent quality control (N-glycan QC) of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. While host N-glycans are built upon a dolichol-pyrophosphate-linked precursor with 14 sugars (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2), protist N-glycan precursors vary from Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 (Acanthamoeba) to Man9GlcNAc2 (Trypanosoma) to Glc3Man5GlcNAc2 (Toxoplasma) to Man5GlcNAc2 (Entamoeba, Trichomonas, and Eimeria) to GlcNAc2 (Plasmodium and Giardia) to zero (Theileria). As related organisms have differing N-glycan lengths (e.g. Toxoplasma, Eimeria, Plasmodium, and Theileria), the present N-glycan variation is based upon secondary loss of Alg genes, which encode enzymes that add sugars to the N-glycan precursor. An N-glycan precursor with Man5GlcNAc2 is necessary but not sufficient for N-glycan QC, which is predicted by the presence of the UDP-glucose:glucosyltransferase (UGGT) plus calreticulin and/or calnexin. As many parasites lack glucose in their N-glycan precursor, UGGT product may be identified by inhibition of glucosidase II. The presence of an armless calnexin in Toxoplasma suggests secondary loss of N-glycan QC from coccidia. Positive selection for N-glycan sites occurs in secreted proteins of organisms with NG-QC and is based upon an increased likelihood of threonine but not serine in the second position versus asparagine. In contrast, there appears to be selection against N-glycan length in Plasmodium and N-glycan site density in Toxoplasma. Finally, there is suggestive evidence for N-glycan-dependent ERAD in Trichomonas, which glycosylates and degrades the exogenous reporter mutant carboxypeptidase Y (CPY*). PMID:25475176

  12. Global Identification and Differential Distribution Analysis of Glycans in Subcellular Fractions of Bladder Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ganglong; Huang, Luyu; Zhang, Jiaxu; Yu, Hanjie; Li, Zheng; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular components and their associated biological processes is crucial for cellular function. Protein glycosylation provides a basis for diversity of protein functions. Diversity of glycan composition in animal cells remains poorly understood. We used differential centrifugation techniques to isolate four subcellular protein fractions from homogenate of metastatic bladder YTS1 cells, low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer KK47 cells and normal bladder epithelia HCV29 cells: microsomal (Mic), mitochondrial (Mito), nuclear (Nuc), and cytosolic (Cyto). An integrated strategy combining lectin microarray and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis was then applied to evaluate protein glycosylation of the four fractions. Lectin microarray analysis revealed significant differences among the four fractions in terms of glycan binding to the lectins LCA, AAL, MPL, WGA and PWM in YTS1 cell, STL, Jacalin, VVA, LCA and WGA in KK47, and ConA, GNA, VVA and ACA in HCV29 cell. Among a total of 40, 32 and 15 N-glycans in four fractions of three cells detected by MS analysis, high-mannose and fucosylated structures were predominant, 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 5 N-glycans in KK47 and 7 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in all four fractions; and 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 16 N-glycans in KK47, and 3 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in only one fraction. Glycans in the latter category are considered potential markers for the corresponding organelles. The integrated strategy described here allows detailed examination of glycomes subcellular fraction with high resolution and sensitivity, and will be useful for elucidation of the functional roles of glycans and corresponding glycosylated proteins in distinct organelles. PMID:27313494

  13. Pre-embedding Method of Electron Microscopy for Glycan Localization in Mammalian Tissues and Cells Using Lectin Probes.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Takata, Kuniaki; Kawakami, Hayato

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the study of glycans is progressing remarkably by the development of glycan analysis systems using mass spectrometry, glycan profiling systems using lectin microarrays, and glycoprotein analysis by the isotope-coded glycosylation site-specific tagging method. With these methodologies, glycan structures and biological functions are being elucidated. In the study of glycan function as well as disease diagnosis, it is important to examine the localization of glycans in tissues and cells. Histochemical methods using lectin probes can localize glycans in the tissues and cells. This chapter describes a pre-embedding electron microscopic method for glycan localization in which tissue sections and cells are incubated with lectin prior to embedding in resin. PMID:27515086

  14. Graphene based soft nanoreactors for facile "one-step" glycan enrichment and derivatization for MALDI-TOF-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Haihong; Pan, Yiting; Tong, Wei; Zhang, Wanjun; Ren, Xiaojun; Tian, Fang; Peng, Bo; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yangjun; Deng, Yulin; Qin, Weijie; Qian, Xiaohong

    2013-12-15

    Protein glycosylation is involved in the control of many important biological processes and structural alterations of the N-linked glycans are correlated with various kinds of disease. High-throughput N-glycan profiling is a key technique for elucidating the functions of glycans in biological process and disease development as well as discovering new diagnostic biomarkers. However, the low abundance of glycans existing in living organism, the competition/suppression effect of other highly abundant biological molecules and the inherent lack of alkalinity and hydrophobicity of glycans leads to particularly poor detection sensitivity in MS analysis. Here, we demonstrated the first "one-step" approach for highly efficient glycan enrichment and derivatization using reduced graphene oxide as nanoreactors and 1-pyrenebutyric hydrazide for glycan capture and derivatization, which resulted in a 33-fold increase in the glycan detection sensitivity in MALDI-TOF-MS and the identification of 48N-glycoforms from human plasma.

  15. Twenty Years of Mycobacterial Glycans: Furanosides and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Lowary, Todd L

    2016-07-19

    The cell surface (or cell wall) of bacteria is coated with carbohydrate (or glycan) structures that play a number of important roles. These include providing structural integrity, serving as a permeability barrier to extracellular compounds (e.g., drugs) and modulating the immune system of the host. Of interest to this Account is the cell wall structure of mycobacteria. There are a host of different mycobacterial species, some of which cause human disease. The most well-known is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. The mycobacterial cell wall is characterized by the presence of unusual carbohydrate structures that fulfill the roles described above. However, in many cases, a molecular-level understanding of how mycobacterial cell wall glycans mediate these processes is lacking. Inspired by a seminar he heard as a postdoctoral fellow, the author began his independent research program with a focus on the chemical synthesis of mycobacterial glycans. The goals were not only to develop synthetic approaches to these unique structures but also to provide molecules that could be used to probe their biological function. Initial work addressed the preparation of fragments of two key polysaccharides, arabinogalactan and lipoarabinomannan, which contain large numbers of sugar residues in the furanose (five-membered) ring form. At the time these investigations began, there were few methods reported for the synthesis of oligosaccharides containing furanose rings. Thus, early in the program, a major area of interest was methodology development, particularly for the preparation of 1,2-cis-furanosides. To solve this challenge, a range of conformationally restricted donors have been developed, both in the author's group and others, which provide 1,2-cis-furanosidic linkages with high stereoselectivity. These investigations were followed by application of the developed methods to the synthesis of a range of target molecules containing arabinofuranose and

  16. A multivariate approach for high throughput pectin profiling by combining glycan microarrays with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sousa, António G; Ahl, Louise I; Pedersen, Henriette L; Fangel, Jonatan U; Sørensen, Susanne O; Willats, William G T

    2015-05-29

    Pectin-one of the most complex biomacromolecules in nature has been extensively studied using various techniques. This has been done so in an attempt to understand the chemical composition and conformation of pectin, whilst discovering and optimising new industrial applications of the polymer. For the last decade the emergence of glycan microarray technology has led to a growing capacity of acquiring simultaneous measurements related to various carbohydrate characteristics while generating large collections of data. Here we used a multivariate analysis approach in order to analyse a set of 359 pectin samples probed with 14 different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) regression were utilised to obtain the most optimal qualitative and quantitative information from the spotted microarrays. The potential use of microarray technology combined with chemometrics for the accurate determination of degree of methyl-esterification (DM) and degree of blockiness (DB) was assessed. PMID:25950120

  17. Perspectives on Anti-Glycan Antibodies Gleaned from Development of a Community Resource Database

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are used extensively for a wide range of basic research and clinical applications. While an abundant and diverse collection of antibodies to protein antigens have been developed, good monoclonal antibodies to carbohydrates are much less common. Moreover, it can be difficult to determine if a particular antibody has the appropriate specificity, which antibody is best suited for a given application, and where to obtain that antibody. Herein, we provide an overview of the current state of the field, discuss challenges for selecting and using antiglycan antibodies, and summarize deficiencies in the existing repertoire of antiglycan antibodies. This perspective was enabled by collecting information from publications, databases, and commercial entities and assembling it into a single database, referred to as the Database of Anti-Glycan Reagents (DAGR). DAGR is a publicly available, comprehensive resource for anticarbohydrate antibodies, their applications, availability, and quality. PMID:27220698

  18. A simple chromatographic method for determining norfloxacin and enoxacin in pharmacokinetic study assessing CYP1A2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshimi; Homma, Masato; Momo, Kenji; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kohda, Yukinao

    2011-04-01

    We developed a simple assay method for the determination of serum and urine norfloxacin and enoxacin using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and perchloric acid precipitation for sample pre-treatment. Optimized conditions can permit detection of norfloxacin and enoxacin in the same chromatogram, so either compound can be used as an internal standard for another determinant. Supernatants of the precipitated samples were analyzed by the octadecylsilyl silica-gel column under ambient temperature and an ultraviolet wavelength of 272  nm. A mobile phase solvent consisting of 20 mm sodium dihydrogenphosphate (pH 3.0) and acetonitrile (85:15, v/v) was pumped at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The calibration curves for norfloxacin and enoxacin at a concentration of 62.5-1000 ng/mL for serum and 250-4000 ng/mL for urine were linear (r > 0.9997). The recoveries of norfloxacin and enoxacin from serum and urine were >94% with the coefficient of variations (CV) <5%. The CVs for intra- and inter-day assay of norfloxacin and enoxacin were <4.2 and <5.5%, respectively. This method can be applied to the pharmacokinetic study of norfloxacin and enoxacin after repeated administration to assess changes in CYP1A2 activity in healthy subjects.

  19. Coordinate regulation of glycan degradation and polysaccharide capsule biosynthesis by a prominent human gut symbiont.

    PubMed

    Martens, Eric C; Roth, Robyn; Heuser, John E; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2009-07-01

    Bacteria in the distal human gut have evolved diverse abilities to metabolize complex glycans, including the capacity to degrade these compounds as nutrients and to assemble their component sugars into new polymers such as extracellular capsules. The human gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is well endowed with the ability to metabolize both host- and diet-derived glycans. Its genome contains 88 different polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs) for complex glycan catabolism and eight different gene clusters for capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis. Here, we investigate one of the prominent mechanisms by which this gut symbiont regulates many PULs involved in host mucin O-glycan degradation; namely, transcriptional regulation via the concerted interactions of cell-envelope-localized TonB-dependent transporters, extra-cytoplasmic function sigma factors and anti-sigma factors, which participate together in a regulatory pathway termed trans-envelope signaling. Unexpectedly, we found that several different trans-envelope signaling switches involved in PUL-mediated O-glycan degradation also modulate capsular polysaccharide synthesis. A novel regulatory pathway, which is dependent on expression of O-glycan-targeting outer membrane proteins, governs this coordinated regulation of glycan catabolism and capsule synthesis. This latter finding provides a new link in the dynamic interplay between complex glycan metabolism, microbial physiology, and host responses that occurs during colonization of the gut.

  20. Glycomic Analysis of Glycans Released from Glycoproteins Using Chemical Immobilization and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuang; Zhang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of most common protein modifications and is involved in many biological activities. N-linked and O-linked glycosylation not only represents abundant glycan modifications, but also are structurally diverse. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a major method for glycomic analysis. However, glycan extraction from proteins and glycan modification are two critical steps in glycomic analysis of glycans using mass spectrometry. In this protocol, we describe a novel and high-throughput method for isolation and modification of glycans from glycoproteins using a chemoenzymatic approach on solid-phase. Proteins are first immobilized to a solid support and unconjugated molecules are washed away; glycans, while still linked to glycoproteins on the solid support, can be treated enzymatically or chemically on solid-phase for glycan derivatization. Glycans are then released from the solid support for analysis by mass spectrometry. The procedures outlined are robust and useful for high-throughput glycomic analysis from complex biological or clinical samples. PMID:25205566

  1. Serum N-Glycan Profiling Predicts Prognosis in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Maho; Tobisawa, Yuki; Yoneyama, Tohru; Tsushima, Megumi; Hirose, Kazuko; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Koie, Takuya; Saitoh, Hisao; Yamaya, Kanemitsu; Funyu, Tomihisa; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Ohyama, Chikara

    2013-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of serum N-glycan profiling for prognosis in hemodialysis patients. Methods. Serum N-glycan analysis was performed in 100 hemodialysis patients in June 2008 using the glycoblotting method, which allows high-throughput, comprehensive, and quantitative N-glycan analysis. All patients were longitudinally followed up for 5 years. To evaluate the independent predictors for prognosis, patients' background, blood biochemistry, and N-glycans intensity were analyzed using Cox regression multivariate analysis. Selected N-glycans and independent factors were evaluated using the log-rank test with the Kaplan-Meier method to identify the predictive indicators for prognosis. Each patient was categorized according to the number of risk factors to evaluate the predictive potential of the risk criteria for prognosis. Results. In total, 56 N-glycan types were identified in the hemodialysis patients. Cox regression multivariate analysis showed cardiovascular events, body mass index, maximum intima media thickness, and the serum N-glycan intensity of peak number 49 were predictive indicators for overall survival. Risk classification according to the number of independent risk factors revealed significantly poor survival by increasing the number of risk factors. Conclusions. Serum N-glycan profiling may have a potential to predict prognosis in patients undergoing hemodialysis. PMID:24453820

  2. Ultrasensitive detection of influenza viruses with a glycan-based impedimetric biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Hushegyi, András; Pihíková, Dominika; Bertók, Tomáš; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, René; Tkac, Jan

    2016-01-01

    An ultrasensitive impedimetric glycan-based biosensor for reliable and selective detection of inactivated, but intact influenza viruses H3N2 was developed. Such glycan-based approach has a distinct advantage over antibody-based detection of influenza viruses since glycans are natural viral receptors with a possibility to selectively distinguish between potentially pathogenic influenza subtypes by the glycan-based biosensors. Build-up of the biosensor was carefully optimized with atomic force microscopy applied for visualization of the biosensor surface after binding of viruses with the topology of an individual viral particle H3N2 analyzed. The glycan biosensor could detect a glycan binding lectin with a limit of detection (LOD) of 5 aM. The biosensor was finally applied for analysis of influenza viruses H3N2 with LOD of 13 viral particles in 1 μl, what is the lowest LOD for analysis of influenza viral particles by the glycan-based device achieved so far. The biosensor could detect H3N2 viruses selectively with a sensitivity ratio of 30 over influenza viruses H7N7. The impedimetric biosensor presented here is the most sensitive glycan-based device for detection of influenza viruses and among the most sensitive antibody or aptamer based biosensor devices. PMID:26765527

  3. Ultrasensitive detection of influenza viruses with a glycan-based impedimetric biosensor.

    PubMed

    Hushegyi, András; Pihíková, Dominika; Bertok, Tomas; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, René; Tkac, Jan

    2016-05-15

    An ultrasensitive impedimetric glycan-based biosensor for reliable and selective detection of inactivated, but intact influenza viruses H3N2 was developed. Such glycan-based approach has a distinct advantage over antibody-based detection of influenza viruses since glycans are natural viral receptors with a possibility to selectively distinguish between potentially pathogenic influenza subtypes by the glycan-based biosensors. Build-up of the biosensor was carefully optimized with atomic force microscopy applied for visualization of the biosensor surface after binding of viruses with the topology of an individual viral particle H3N2 analyzed. The glycan biosensor could detect a glycan binding lectin with a limit of detection (LOD) of 5 aM. The biosensor was finally applied for analysis of influenza viruses H3N2 with LOD of 13 viral particles in 1 μl, what is the lowest LOD for analysis of influenza viral particles by the glycan-based device achieved so far. The biosensor could detect H3N2 viruses selectively with a sensitivity ratio of 30 over influenza viruses H7N7. The impedimetric biosensor presented here is the most sensitive glycan-based device for detection of influenza viruses and among the most sensitive antibody or aptamer based biosensor devices.

  4. Malonic acid suppresses mucin-type O-glycan degradation during hydrazine treatment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Goso, Yukinobu

    2016-03-01

    Hydrazine treatment is frequently used for releasing mucin-type O-glycans (O-glycans) from glycoproteins because the method provides O-glycans that retain a reducible GalNAc at their reducing end, which is available for fluorescent labeling. However, many O-glycans are degraded by "peeling" during this treatment. In the current study, it was found that malonic acid suppressed O-glycan degradation during hydrazine treatment of bovine fetuin or porcine gastric mucin in both the gas and liquid phases. This is paradoxical because the release of O-glycans from glycoproteins occurs under alkaline conditions. However, malonic acid seems to prevent the degradation through its acidic property given that other weak acids also prevented the degradation. Accordingly, disodium malonate did not suppress O-glycan degradation. Application of this method to rat gastric mucin demonstrated that the majority of the major O-glycans obtained in the presence of malonic acid were intact, whereas those obtained in the absence of malonic acid were degraded. These results suggest that hydrazine treatment in the presence of malonic acid would allow glycomic analysis of native mucin glycoproteins.

  5. Role of Glycans in Cancer Cells Undergoing Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Xin; Tan, Zengqi; Chen, Si; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The term “cancer” refers to a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process whereby epithelial cells lose their cell polarity and cell–cell adhesion ability, and acquire migratory and invasive properties to gain mesenchymal phenotype, is an important step leading to tumor metastasis. Glycans, such as N-glycans, O-glycans, and glycosphingolipids, are involved in numerous biological processes, including inflammation, virus/bacteria–host interactions, cell–cell interactions, morphogenesis, and cancer development and progression. Aberrant expression of glycans has been observed in several EMT models, and the functional roles of such glycans in cancer development and progression has been investigated. We summarize here recent research progress regarding the functions of glycans in cancer cells undergoing EMT. Better understanding of the mechanisms underlying aberrant glycan patterns in EMT and cancer will facilitate the development of such glycans as cancer biomarkers or as targets in design and synthesis of anti-tumor drugs. PMID:26925388

  6. Paper analytical devices for dynamic evaluation of cell surface N-glycan expression via a bimodal biosensor based on multibranched hybridization chain reaction amplification.

    PubMed

    Liang, Linlin; Lan, Feifei; Li, Li; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua; Ren, Na; Liu, Haiyun; Yan, Mei

    2016-12-15

    A novel colorimetric/fluorescence bimodal lab-on-paper cyto-device was fabricated based on concanavalin A (Con A)-integrating multibranched hybridization chain reaction (mHCR). The product of mHCR was modified PtCu nanochains (colorimetric signal label) and graphene quantum dot (fluorescence signal label) for in situ and dynamically evaluating cell surface N-glycan expression. In this strategy, preliminary detection was carried out through colorimetric method, if needed, then the fluorescence method was applied for a precise determination. Au-Ag-paper devices increased the surface areas and active sites for immobilizing larger amount of aptamers, and then specifically and efficiently captured more cancer cells. Moreover, it could effectively reduce the paper background fluorescence. Due to the specific recognition of Con A with mannose and the effective signal amplification of mHCR, the proposed strategy exhibited excellent high sensitivity for the cytosensing of MCF-7 cells ranging from 100 to 1.0×10(7) and 80-5.0×10(7) cellsmL(-1) with the detection limit of 33 and 26 cellsmL(-1) for colorimetric and fluorescence, respectively. More importantly, this strategy was successfully applied to dynamically monitor cell-surface multi-glycans expression on living cells under external stimuli of inhibitors as well as for N-glycan expression inhibitor screening. These results implied that this biosensor has potential in studying complex native glycan-related biological processes and elucidating the N-glycan-related diseases in biological and physiological processes.

  7. A potent and broad neutralizing antibody recognizes and penetrates the HIV glycan shield.

    PubMed

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J; Walker, Laura M; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P; Olson, William C; Ward, Andrew B; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R; Burton, Dennis R; Wilson, Ian A

    2011-11-25

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 and 128 with Man(9) at 1.65 and 1.29 angstrom resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose-binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 angstroms reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short β-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificity. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 immunoglobulin Gs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface. PMID:21998254

  8. A Potent and Broad Neutralizing Antibody Recognizes and Penetrates the HIV Glycan Shield

    SciTech Connect

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J.; Walker, Laura M.; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C.; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P.; Olson, William C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-10-15

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 and 128 with Man{sub 9} at 1.65 and 1.29 angstrom resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose-binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 angstroms reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short {beta}-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificify. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 immunoglobulin Gs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface.

  9. A potent and broad neutralizing antibody recognizes and penetrates the HIV glycan shield.

    PubMed

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J; Walker, Laura M; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P; Olson, William C; Ward, Andrew B; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R; Burton, Dennis R; Wilson, Ian A

    2011-11-25

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 and 128 with Man(9) at 1.65 and 1.29 angstrom resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose-binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 angstroms reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short β-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificity. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 immunoglobulin Gs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface.

  10. Evolutionary Forces Shaping the Golgi Glycosylation Machinery: Why Cell Surface Glycans Are Universal to Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Varki, Ajit

    2011-01-01

    Despite more than 3 billion years since the origin of life on earth, the powerful forces of biological evolution seem to have failed to generate any living cell that is devoid of a dense and complex array of cell surface glycans. Thus, cell surface glycans seem to be as essential for life as having a DNA genetic code, diverse RNAs, structural/functional proteins, lipid-based membranes, and metabolites that mediate energy flux and signaling. The likely reasons for this apparently universal law of biology are considered here, and include the fact that glycans have the greatest potential for generating diversity, and thus evading recognition by pathogens. This may also explain why in striking contrast to the genetic code, glycans show widely divergent patterns between taxa. On the other hand, glycans have also been coopted for myriad intrinsic functions, which can vary in their importance for organismal survival. In keeping with these considerations, a significant percentage of the genes in the typical genome are dedicated to the generation and/or turnover of glycans. Among eukaryotes, the Golgi is the subcellular organelle that serves to generate much of the diversity of cell surface glycans, carrying out various glycan modifications of glycoconjugates that transit through the Golgi, en route to the cell surface or extracellular destinations. Here I present an overview of general considerations regarding the selective forces shaping evolution of the Golgi glycosylation machinery, and then briefly discuss the common types of variations seen in each major class of glycans, finally focusing on sialic acids as an extreme example of evolutionary glycan diversity generated by the Golgi. Future studies need to address both the phylogenetic diversity the Golgi and the molecular mechanisms for its rapid responses to intrinsic and environmental stimuli. PMID:21525513

  11. Marine sulfated glycans with serpin-unrelated anticoagulant properties.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Bianca F; Mourão, Paulo A S; Pomin, Vitor H

    2013-01-01

    Marine organisms are a rich source of sulfated polysaccharides with unique structures. Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FucCS) from the sea cucumber Ludwigothurea grisea and sulfated galactan from the red alga Botryocladia occidentalis are one of these unusual molecules. Besides their uncommon structures, they also exhibit high anticoagulant and antithrombotic effects. Earlier, it was considered that the anticoagulant activities of these two marine glycans were driven mainly by a catalytic serpin-dependent mechanism likewise the mammalian heparins. Its serpin-dependent anticoagulant action relies on promoting thrombin and/or factor Xa inhibition by their specific natural inhibitors (the serpins antithrombin and heparin cofactor II). However, as opposed to heparins, these two previously mentioned marine glycans were proved still capable in promoting coagulation inhibition using serpin-free plasmas. This puzzle observation was further investigated and clearly demonstrated that the cucumber FucCS and the red algal sulfated galactan have an unusual serpin-independent anticoagulant effect by inhibiting the formation of factor Xa and/or thrombin through the procoagulants tenase and prothrombinase complexes, respectively. These marine polysaccharides with unusual anticoagulant effects open clearly new perspectives for the development of new antithrombotic drugs as well as push the glycomics project.

  12. Fucosylated Glycans in α1-Acid Glycoprotein for Monitoring Treatment Outcomes and Prognosis of Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Shin; Takahashi, Ryo; Yokobori, Takehiko; Sano, Rie; Mogi, Akira; Saniabadi, Abby R.; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Asao, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    One standard treatment option for advanced-stage cancer is surgical resection of malignant tumors following by adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Additionally, neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be applied if required. During the time course of treatments, patients are generally followed by computed tomography (CT) surveillance, and by tumor marker diagnosis. However, currently, early evidence of recurrence and/or metastasis of tumors with a clinically relevant biomarker remains a major therapeutic challenge. In particular, there has been no validated biomarker for predicting treatment outcomes in therapeutic settings. Recently, we have looked at glycoforms of serum α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) by using a crossed affinoimmunoelectrophoresis with two lectins and an anti-AGP antibody. The primary glycan structures of AGP were also analyzed by a mass spectrometer and a novel software in a large number of patients with various cancers. Accordingly, the relative abundance of α1,3fucosylated glycans in AGP (FUCAGP) was found to be significantly high in cancer patients as compared with the healthy controls. Further, strikingly elevated levels of FUCAGP were found in patients with poor prognosis but not in patients with good prognosis. In the current study, levels of FUCAGP in serum samples from various cancer patients were analyzed and 17 patients including 13 who had undergone chemotherapy were followed for several years post operation. FUCAGP level determined diligently by using a mass spectrometer was found to change along with disease prognosis as well as with responses to treatments, in particular, to various chemotherapies. Therefore, FUCAGP levels measured during following-up of the patients after operation appeared to be clinically relevant biomarker of treatment intervention. PMID:27295180

  13. Insights into glycan biosynthesis in chemically-induced hepatocellular carcinoma in rats: A glycomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Amr; Bashir, Asma; Zaki, Nazar; McCarthy, Diane; Ahmed, Sanjida; Lotfy, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the qualitative and quantitative changes in N-linked glycosylation, which occurred in association with diethyl nitrosamine-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rodents. METHODS: Liver tissues of (1) normal (non-tumor-bearing) rats; and (2) tumor-bearing rats; were collected and were used for histological and GlycanMap® analyses. Briefly, GlycanMap® analysis is a high-throughput assay that provides a structural and quantitative readout of protein-associated glycans using a unique, automated 96-well assay technology coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and custom bioinformatics. Histopathological studies were carried out to ensure the development of HCC in the tested animals. RESULTS: The N-glycomic analysis revealed 5 glycans; Glc1Man9GlcNAc2, Gal2Man3GlcNac4Fuc1Neu1, Man4GlcNac2, Gal2Man3GlcNac4Neu3OAc3, and Man3GlcNac5Fuc1, which showed significant changes in rat HCC tissues when compared with normal liver tissues. Four glycans were increased (P < 0.05) and Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 was decreased (5.89 ± 0.45 vs 3.54 ± 0.21, P < 0.01) in HCC tissues compared to normal liver tissues. An increase (66.5 ± 1.05 vs 62.7 ± 1.1, P < 0.05) in high-mannose structures in HCC rats was observed compared to normal rats. Importantly, HCC rats showed an increase (P < 0.05) in both tumor-associated carbohydrates and in branched glycans. The changes in glycans correlated well with glycan flow changes reported in the glycan biosynthetic pathway, which indicates the importance of enzyme activities involved in glycan synthesis at different subcellular localizations. CONCLUSION: The reported HCC-associated changes in glycan flow and subcellular localization explain the increase in high mannose glycans and siayl Lewis glycans common in HCC liver tissues. PMID:26034352

  14. Electrostatics and N-glycan-mediated membrane tethering of SCUBE1 is critical for promoting bone morphogenetic protein signalling.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei-Ju; Tsao, Ku-Chi; Yang, Ruey-Bing

    2016-03-01

    SCUBE1 (S1), a secreted and membrane-bound glycoprotein, has a modular protein structure composed of an N-terminal signal peptide sequence followed by nine epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats, a spacer region and three cysteine-rich (CR) motifs with multiple potential N-linked glycosylation sites, and one CUB domain at the C-terminus. Soluble S1 is a biomarker of platelet activation but an active participant of thrombosis via its adhesive EGF-like repeats, whereas its membrane-associated form acts as a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) co-receptor in promoting BMP signal activity. However, the mechanism responsible for the membrane tethering and the biological importance of N-glycosylation of S1 remain largely unknown. In the present study, molecular mapping analysis identified a polycationic segment (amino acids 501-550) in the spacer region required for its membrane tethering via electrostatic interactions possibly with the anionic heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Furthermore, deglycosylation by peptide N-glycosidase F treatment revealed that N-glycans within the CR motif are essential for membrane recruitment through lectin-mediated surface retention. Injection of mRNA encoding zebrafish wild-type but not N-glycan-deficient scube1 restores the expression of haematopoietic and erythroid markers (scl and gata1) in scube1-knockdown embryos. We describe novel mechanisms in targeting S1 to the plasma membrane and demonstrate that N-glycans are required for S1 functions during primitive haematopoiesis in zebrafish. PMID:26699903

  15. Chemical and Structural Analysis of an Antibody Folding Intermediate Trapped during Glycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Human IgG Fc glycosylation modulates immunological effector functions such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and phagocytosis. Engineering of Fc glycans therefore enables fine-tuning of the therapeutic properties of monoclonal antibodies. The N-linked glycans of Fc are typically complex-type, forming a network of noncovalent interactions along the protein surface of the Cγ2 domain. Here, we manipulate the mammalian glycan-processing pathway to trap IgG1 Fc at sequential stages of maturation, from oligomannose- to hybrid- to complex-type glycans, and show that the Fc is structurally stabilized following the transition of glycans from their hybrid- to complex-type state. X-ray crystallographic analysis of this hybrid-type intermediate reveals that N-linked glycans undergo conformational changes upon maturation, including a flip within the trimannosyl core. Our crystal structure of this intermediate reveals a molecular basis for antibody biogenesis and provides a template for the structure-guided engineering of the protein–glycan interface of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:23025485

  16. GlyTouCan 1.0 – The international glycan structure repository

    PubMed Central

    Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko; Agravat, Sanjay; Aoki, Nobuyuki P.; Arpinar, Sena; Cummings, Richard D.; Fujita, Akihiro; Fujita, Noriaki; Hart, Gerald M.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Kawasaki, Toshisuke; Matsubara, Masaaki; Moreman, Kelley W.; Okuda, Shujiro; Pierce, Michael; Ranzinger, René; Shikanai, Toshihide; Shinmachi, Daisuke; Solovieva, Elena; Suzuki, Yoshinori; Tsuchiya, Shinichiro; Yamada, Issaku; York, William S.; Zaia, Joseph; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Glycans are known as the third major class of biopolymers, next to DNA and proteins. They cover the surfaces of many cells, serving as the ‘face’ of cells, whereby other biomolecules and viruses interact. The structure of glycans, however, differs greatly from DNA and proteins in that they are branched, as opposed to linear sequences of amino acids or nucleotides. Therefore, the storage of glycan information in databases, let alone their curation, has been a difficult problem. This has caused many duplicated efforts when integration is attempted between different databases, making an international repository for glycan structures, where unique accession numbers are assigned to every identified glycan structure, necessary. As such, an international team of developers and glycobiologists have collaborated to develop this repository, called GlyTouCan and is available at http://glytoucan.org/, to provide a centralized resource for depositing glycan structures, compositions and topologies, and to retrieve accession numbers for each of these registered entries. This will thus enable researchers to reference glycan structures simply by accession number, as opposed to by chemical structure, which has been a burden to integrate glycomics databases in the past. PMID:26476458

  17. GlyTouCan 1.0--The international glycan structure repository.

    PubMed

    Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko; Agravat, Sanjay; Aoki, Nobuyuki P; Arpinar, Sena; Cummings, Richard D; Fujita, Akihiro; Fujita, Noriaki; Hart, Gerald M; Haslam, Stuart M; Kawasaki, Toshisuke; Matsubara, Masaaki; Moreman, Kelley W; Okuda, Shujiro; Pierce, Michael; Ranzinger, René; Shikanai, Toshihide; Shinmachi, Daisuke; Solovieva, Elena; Suzuki, Yoshinori; Tsuchiya, Shinichiro; Yamada, Issaku; York, William S; Zaia, Joseph; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Glycans are known as the third major class of biopolymers, next to DNA and proteins. They cover the surfaces of many cells, serving as the 'face' of cells, whereby other biomolecules and viruses interact. The structure of glycans, however, differs greatly from DNA and proteins in that they are branched, as opposed to linear sequences of amino acids or nucleotides. Therefore, the storage of glycan information in databases, let alone their curation, has been a difficult problem. This has caused many duplicated efforts when integration is attempted between different databases, making an international repository for glycan structures, where unique accession numbers are assigned to every identified glycan structure, necessary. As such, an international team of developers and glycobiologists have collaborated to develop this repository, called GlyTouCan and is available at http://glytoucan.org/, to provide a centralized resource for depositing glycan structures, compositions and topologies, and to retrieve accession numbers for each of these registered entries. This will thus enable researchers to reference glycan structures simply by accession number, as opposed to by chemical structure, which has been a burden to integrate glycomics databases in the past. PMID:26476458

  18. Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilin glycan contributes to CR3 activation during challenge of primary cervical epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Michael P.; Jen, Freda E.-C.; Roddam, Louise F.; Apicella, Michael A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Expression of type IV pili by Neisseria gonorrhoeae plays a critical role in mediating adherence to human epithelial cells. Gonococcal pilin is modified with an O-linked glycan, which may be present as a di- or monosaccharide because of phase variation of select pilin glycosylation genes. It is accepted that bacterial proteins may be glycosylated; less clear is how the protein glycan may mediate virulence. Using primary, human, cervical epithelial (i.e. pex) cells, we now provide evidence to indicate that the pilin glycan mediates productive cervical infection. In this regard, pilin glycan-deficient mutant gonococci exhibited an early hyper-adhesive phenotype but were attenuated in their ability to invade pex cells. Our data further indicate that the pilin glycan was required for gonococci to bind to the I-domain region of complement receptor 3, which is naturally expressed by pex cells. Comparative, quantitative, infection assays revealed that mutant gonococci lacking the pilin glycan did not bind to the I-domain when it is in a closed, low-affinity conformation and cannot induce an active conformation to complement receptor 3 during pex cell challenge. To our knowledge, these are the first data to directly demonstrate how a protein-associated bacterial glycan may contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:21371235

  19. A nonself sugar mimic of the HIV glycan shield shows enhanced antigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Doores, Katie J.; Fulton, Zara; Hong, Vu; Patel, Mitul K.; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wormald, Mark R.; Finn, M.G.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2011-08-24

    Antibody 2G12 uniquely neutralizes a broad range of HIV-1 isolates by binding the high-mannose glycans on the HIV-1 surface glycoprotein, gp120. Antigens that resemble these natural epitopes of 2G12 would be highly desirable components for an HIV-1 vaccine. However, host-produced (self)-carbohydrate motifs have been unsuccessful so far at eliciting 2G12-like antibodies that cross-react with gp120. Based on the surprising observation that 2G12 binds nonproteinaceous monosaccharide D-fructose with higher affinity than D-mannose, we show here that a designed set of nonself, synthetic monosaccharides are potent antigens. When introduced to the terminus of the D1 arm of protein glycans recognized by 2G12, their antigenicity is significantly enhanced. Logical variation of these unnatural sugars pinpointed key modifications, and the molecular basis of this increased antigenicity was elucidated using high-resolution crystallographic analyses. Virus-like particle protein conjugates containing such nonself glycans are bound more tightly by 2G12. As immunogens they elicit higher titers of antibodies than those immunogenic conjugates containing the self D1 glycan motif. These antibodies generated from nonself immunogens also cross-react with this self motif, which is found in the glycan shield, when it is presented in a range of different conjugates and glycans. However, these antibodies did not bind this glycan motif when present on gp120.

  20. Reconstructed glycan profile for evaluation of operating status of the endoplasmic reticulum glycoprotein quality control.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Shogo; Isoyama, Miho; Hirano, Makoto; Yamaya, Kenta; Ito, Yukishige; Matsuo, Ichiro; Totani, Kiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Glycoprotein oligosaccharides function as tags for protein quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Since most of proteins are glycosylated and function only after they are properly folded, glycoprotein glycan profiles in the ER might be useful to analyze various cellular status including diseases. Here, we examined whether ER glycan-processing profiles in diabetic rats and osteoporotic mice as models might have different cellular status from those of normal controls. Direct analysis of glycoprotein-processing profiles in the ER is often hampered by glycoforms that are retro-translocated to the ER from other cellular compartments. Moreover, when we focus on the mixture of glycoproteins as the processing substrates, the glycan-processing efficiencies are influenced by the aglycon states including their polypeptide folding. To overcome this problem, we reconstructed glycan profiles using ER extracts as an enzymatic source and synthetic glycoprotein mimetic having homogeneous aglycon as a substrate, resulted in disease-specific glycan profiles. To understand such differences, we also analyzed the activity, and expression level, of each glycan-related enzyme. These glycan profiles are expected to be useful indexes for operational status of the ER glycoprotein quality control, and may also give information to classify some diseases.

  1. Comparative studies on glycoproteins expressing polylactosamine-type N-glycans in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Yosuke; Yamada, Keita; Hara, Sayaka; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Hayakawa, Takao; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2012-11-01

    In the series of our previous reports, we showed that some cancer cell lines specifically express polylactosamine-type N-glycans and such glycans were often modified with fucose and sulfate residues. To confirm the proteins expressing these glycans, glycopeptide mixture obtained by digestion of whole protein fractions with trypsin was captured by a polylactosamine-specific lectin, Datura strasmonium agglutinin (DSA). And the peptides and glycans of the captured glycopeptides after digestion with N-glycoamidase F were extensively analyzed by HPLC and MS techniques. We found that some glycoproteins such as CD107a and CD107b commonly contained polylactosamine-type glycans in all the examined cancer cells. But integrin-α5 (CD49e) and carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CD66e) having these glycans were specifically found in U937 (human T-lymphoma) and MKN45 (human gastric cancer) cells, respectively. These data clearly indicate that specific glycans attached to specific proteins will be promising markers for specific tumors with high accuracy. PMID:22795310

  2. GlyTouCan 1.0--The international glycan structure repository.

    PubMed

    Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko; Agravat, Sanjay; Aoki, Nobuyuki P; Arpinar, Sena; Cummings, Richard D; Fujita, Akihiro; Fujita, Noriaki; Hart, Gerald M; Haslam, Stuart M; Kawasaki, Toshisuke; Matsubara, Masaaki; Moreman, Kelley W; Okuda, Shujiro; Pierce, Michael; Ranzinger, René; Shikanai, Toshihide; Shinmachi, Daisuke; Solovieva, Elena; Suzuki, Yoshinori; Tsuchiya, Shinichiro; Yamada, Issaku; York, William S; Zaia, Joseph; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Glycans are known as the third major class of biopolymers, next to DNA and proteins. They cover the surfaces of many cells, serving as the 'face' of cells, whereby other biomolecules and viruses interact. The structure of glycans, however, differs greatly from DNA and proteins in that they are branched, as opposed to linear sequences of amino acids or nucleotides. Therefore, the storage of glycan information in databases, let alone their curation, has been a difficult problem. This has caused many duplicated efforts when integration is attempted between different databases, making an international repository for glycan structures, where unique accession numbers are assigned to every identified glycan structure, necessary. As such, an international team of developers and glycobiologists have collaborated to develop this repository, called GlyTouCan and is available at http://glytoucan.org/, to provide a centralized resource for depositing glycan structures, compositions and topologies, and to retrieve accession numbers for each of these registered entries. This will thus enable researchers to reference glycan structures simply by accession number, as opposed to by chemical structure, which has been a burden to integrate glycomics databases in the past.

  3. Presence of galactosylated core fucose on N-glycans in the planaria Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Wilson, Iain B H

    2011-06-01

    Planarial species are of especial interest to biologists due to the phenomenon of pluripotency and, in comparison to other developmental processes, it can be hypothesised that glycan-lectin interactions may play a role. In order to examine the N-glycans of one of these organisms, Dugesia japonica, peptide:N-glycosidase A was employed and the released glycans were subject to pyridylamination, HPLC and mass spectrometric analysis. A range of oligomannosidic glycans was observed with a trimethylated Man(5) GlcNAc(2) structure being the dominant species. Three glycans were also observed to contain deoxyhexose; in particular, a glycan with the composition Hex(4) HexNAc(2) Fuc(1) Me(2) was revealed by exoglycosidase digestion, in combination with MS/MS, to contain a galactosylated core α1,6-fucose residue, whereas this core modification was found to be capped with a methylhexose residue in the case of a Hex(5) HexNAc(2) Fuc(1) Me(3) structure. This is the first report of these types of structures in a platyhelminth and indicates that the 'GalFuc' modification of N-glycans is not just restricted to molluscs and nematodes.

  4. ANALYSIS OF GLYCANS DERIVED FROM GLYCOCONJUGATES BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Mechref, Yehia

    2012-01-01

    The high structural variation of glycan derived from glycoconjugates, which substantially increases with the molecular size of a protein, contributes to the complexity of glycosylation patterns commonly associated with glycoconjugates. In the case of glycoproteins, such variation originates from the multiple glycosylation sites of proteins and the number of glycan structures associated with each site (microheterogeneity). The ability to comprehensively characterize highly complex mixture of glycans has been analytically stimulating and challenging. Although the most powerful mass spectrometric (MS) and tandem MS techniques are capable of providing a wealth of structural information, they are still not able to readily identify isomeric glycan structures without high order tandem MS (MSn). The analysis of isomeric glycan structures has been attained using several separation methods, including high-pH anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC), hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and gas chromatography (GC). However, capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microfluidics capillary electrophoresis (MCE) offer high separation efficiency and resolutions, allowing the separation of closely related glycan structures. Therefore, interfacing CE and MCE to MS is a powerful analytical approach, allowing potentially comprehensive and sensitive analysis of complex glycan samples. This review describes and discusses the utility of different CE and MCE approaches in the structural characterization of glycoproteins and the feasibility of interfacing these approaches to mass spectrometry. PMID:22180203

  5. The Mechanism by which 146-N-Glycan Affects the Active Site of Neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pi; Wang, Zhonghua; Zhang, Lijie; Li, Dongmei; Lin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    One of the most conserved glycosylation sites of neuraminidase (NA) is 146-N-glycan. This site is adjacent to the 150-cavity of NA, which is found within the active site and thought to be a target for rational drug development against the antiviral resistance of influenza. Here, through a total of 2.4 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we demonstrated that 146-N-glycan can stabilize the conformation of the 150-loop that controls the volume of the 150-cavity. Moreover, with 146-N-glycan, our simulation result was more consistent with crystal structures of NAs than simulations conducted without glycans. Cluster analysis of the MD trajectories showed that 146-N-glycan adopted three distinct conformations: monomer-bridged, dimer-bridged and standing. Of these conformations, the dimer-bridged 146-N-glycan was the most stable one and contributed to stabilization of the 150-loop conformation. Furthermore, our simulation revealed that various standing conformations of 146-N-glycan could block the entrance of the binding pocket. This result was consistent with experimental data and explained the relatively low activity of inhibitors with flexible substituents toward the 150-cavity. Together, our results lead us to hypothesize that rigid and hydrophobic substituents could serve as better inhibitors targeting the 150-cavity. PMID:26267136

  6. Identification of glycan structure alterations on cell membrane proteins in desoxyepothilone B resistant leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Miyako; Saldanha, Rohit; Göbel, Anja; Kavallaris, Maria; Packer, Nicolle H

    2011-11-01

    Resistance to tubulin-binding agents used in cancer is often multifactorial and can include changes in drug accumulation and modified expression of tubulin isotypes. Glycans on cell membrane proteins play important roles in many cellular processes such as recognition and apoptosis, and this study investigated whether changes to the glycan structures on cell membrane proteins occur when cells become resistant to drugs. Specifically, we investigated the alteration of glycan structures on the cell membrane proteins of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cells that were selected for resistance to desoxyepothilone B (CEM/dEpoB). The glycan profile of the cell membrane glycoproteins was obtained by sequential release of N- and O-glycans from cell membrane fraction dotted onto polyvinylidene difluoride membrane with PNGase F and β-elimination respectively. The released glycan alditols were analyzed by liquid chromatography (graphitized carbon)-electrospray ionization tandem MS. The major N-glycan on CEM cell was the core fucosylated α2-6 monosialo-biantennary structure. Resistant CEM/dEpoB cells had a significant decrease of α2-6 linked sialic acid on N-glycans. The lower α2-6 sialylation was caused by a decrease in activity of β-galactoside α2-6 sialyltransferase (ST6Gal), and decreased expression of the mRNA. It is clear that the membrane glycosylation of leukemia cells changes during acquired resistance to dEpoB drugs and that this change occurs globally on all cell membrane glycoproteins. This is the first identification of a specific glycan modification on the surface of drug resistant cells and the mechanism of this downstream effect on microtubule targeting drugs may offer a route to new interventions to overcome drug resistance.

  7. Automated Glycan Sequencing from Tandem Mass Spectra of N-Linked Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuan-Yih; Mayampurath, Anoop; Zhu, Rui; Zacharias, Lauren; Song, Ehwang; Wang, Lei; Mechref, Yehia; Tang, Haixu

    2016-06-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine experimental tool for proteomic biomarker analysis of human blood samples, partly due to the large availability of informatics tools. As one of the most common protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) in mammals, protein glycosylation has been observed to alter in multiple human diseases and thus may potentially be candidate markers of disease progression. While mass spectrometry instrumentation has seen advancements in capabilities, discovering glycosylation-related markers using existing software is currently not straightforward. Complete characterization of protein glycosylation requires the identification of intact glycopeptides in samples, including identification of the modification site as well as the structure of the attached glycans. In this paper, we present GlycoSeq, an open-source software tool that implements a heuristic iterated glycan sequencing algorithm coupled with prior knowledge for automated elucidation of the glycan structure within a glycopeptide from its collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrum. GlycoSeq employs rules of glycosidic linkage as defined by glycan synthetic pathways to eliminate improbable glycan structures and build reasonable glycan trees. We tested the tool on two sets of tandem mass spectra of N-linked glycopeptides cell lines acquired from breast cancer patients. After employing enzymatic specificity within the N-linked glycan synthetic pathway, the sequencing results of GlycoSeq were highly consistent with the manually curated glycan structures. Hence, GlycoSeq is ready to be used for the characterization of glycan structures in glycopeptides from MS/MS analysis. GlycoSeq is released as open source software at https://github.com/chpaul/GlycoSeq/ . PMID:27111718

  8. Identifying human milk glycans that inhibit norovirus binding using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jing; Piskarev, Vladimir E; Xia, Ming; Huang, Pengwei; Jiang, Xi; Likhosherstov, Leonid M; Novikova, Olga S; Newburg, David S; Ratner, Daniel M

    2013-12-01

    Human milk glycans inhibit binding between norovirus and its host glycan receptor; such competitive inhibition by human milk glycans is associated with a reduced risk of infection. The relationship between the presence of specific structural motifs in the human milk glycan and its ability to inhibit binding by specific norovirus strains requires facile, accurate and miniaturized-binding assays. Toward this end, a high-throughput biosensor platform was developed based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) of glycan microarrays. The SPRi was validated, and its utility was tested, by measuring binding specificities between defined human milk glycan epitopes and the capsids of two common norovirus strains, VA387 and Norwalk. Human milk oligosaccharide (HMOS)-based neoglycoconjugates, including chemically derived neoglycoproteins and oligosaccharide-glycine derivatives, were used to represent polyvalent glycoconjugates and monovalent oligosaccharides, respectively, in human milk. SPRi binding results established that the glycan motifs that bind norovirus capsids depend upon strain; VA387 capsid interacts with two neoglycoproteins, whereas Norwalk capsid binds to a different set of HMOS motifs in the form of both polyvalent neoglycoproteins and monovalent oligosaccharides. SPRi competitive binding assays further demonstrated that specific norovirus-binding glycans are able to inhibit norovirus capsid binding to their host receptors. A polyvalent neoglycoconjugate with clustered carbohydrate moieties is required for the inhibition of VA387 capsid binding to host receptor glycans, whereas both monovalent oligosaccharides and polyvalent neoglycoconjugates are able to inhibit Norwalk capsid binding to its host receptor. Binding of HMOS and HMOS-based neoglycoconjugates to norovirus capsids depends upon the specific strain characteristics, implying that HMOS and their polyvalent derivatives are potential anti-adhesive agents for norovirus prophylaxis.

  9. Surface expression patterns of defined glycan antigens change during Schistosoma mansoni cercarial transformation and development of schistosomula.

    PubMed

    Smit, Cornelis H; Homann, Arne; van Hensbergen, Vincent P; Schramm, Gabriele; Haas, Helmut; van Diepen, Angela; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2015-12-01

    During the complex lifecycle of Schistosoma mansoni, a large variety of glycans is expressed. To many of these glycans, antibodies are induced by the infected host and some might be targets for vaccines or diagnostic tests. Spatial changes in glycan expression during schistosome development are largely unexplored. To study the surface-exposed glycans during the important initial stages of infection, we analyzed the binding of a panel of anti-glycan monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to cercariae and schistosomula up to 72 h after transformation by immunofluorescence microscopy. The mAb specificity toward their natural targets was studied using a microarray containing a wide range of schistosomal N-glycans, O-glycans and glycosphingolipid glycans. With the exception of GalNAcβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (LDN-F), mono- and multifucosylated GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (LDN)-motifs were exposed at the surface of all developmental stages studied. Multifucosylated LDN-motifs were present on cercarial glycocalyx-derived O-glycans as well as cercarial glycolipids. In contrast, the Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (Lewis X) and LDN-F-motifs, also expressed on cercarial glycolipids, and in addition on a range of cercarial N- and O-glycans, became surface expressed only after transformation of cercariae to schistosomula. In line with the documented shedding of the O-glycan-rich cercarial glycocalyx after transformation these observations suggest that surface accessible multifucosylated LDN-motifs are mostly expressed by O-glycans in cercariae, but principally by glycosphingolipids in schistosomula. We hypothesize that these temporal changes in surface exposure of glycan antigens are relevant to the interaction with the host during the initial stages of infection with schistosomes and discuss the potential of these glycan antigens as intervention targets. PMID:26347524

  10. In good company: association between fungal glycans generates molecular complexes with unique functions

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Nimrichter, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The biological properties of fungal immunogens have historically utilized testing of isolated molecules. Recent findings, however, indicate that fungal glycans differing in structure and function can interact to form hybrid complexes with unique properties. In the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, chitin-like molecules associate with capsular glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) to form functionally distinct glycan complexes. Such interactions between glycans that result in the formation of structures with different functions strongly suggest that additional molecular complexes with unknown properties may exist in fungal pathogens. Moreover, the identification of these novel complexes has stimulated the search of new immunogens with potential to protect human and animal hosts against systemic mycoses. PMID:22787459

  11. In good company: association between fungal glycans generates molecular complexes with unique functions.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcio L; Nimrichter, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The biological properties of fungal immunogens have historically utilized testing of isolated molecules. Recent findings, however, indicate that fungal glycans differing in structure and function can interact to form hybrid complexes with unique properties. In the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, chitin-like molecules associate with capsular glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) to form functionally distinct glycan complexes. Such interactions between glycans that result in the formation of structures with different functions strongly suggest that additional molecular complexes with unknown properties may exist in fungal pathogens. Moreover, the identification of these novel complexes has stimulated the search of new immunogens with potential to protect human and animal hosts against systemic mycoses.

  12. A refined palate: Bacterial consumption of host glycans in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Marcobal, Angela; Southwick, Audrey M; Earle, Kristen A; Sonnenburg, Justin L

    2013-01-01

    The human intestine houses a dense microbial ecosystem in which the struggle for nutrients creates a continual and dynamic selective force. Host-produced mucus glycans provide a ubiquitous source of carbon and energy for microbial species. Not surprisingly, many gut resident bacteria have become highly adapted to efficiently consume numerous distinct structures present in host glycans. We propose that sophistication in mucus consumption is a trait most likely to be found in gut residents that have co-evolved with hosts, microbes that have adapted to the complexity associated with the host glycan landscape. PMID:23720460

  13. Developments in the Identification of Glycan Biomarkers for the Detection of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. Renee; Miyamoto, Suzanne; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in glycosylation readily occur in cancer and other disease states. Thanks to recent advances in the development of analytical techniques and instrumentation, especially in mass spectrometry, it is now possible to identify blood-derived glycan-based biomarkers using glycomics strategies. This review is an overview of the developments made in the search for glycan-based cancer biomarkers and the technologies currently in use. It is anticipated that the progressing instrumental and bioinformatics developments will allow the identification of relevant glycan biomarkers for the diagnosis, early detection, and monitoring of cancer treatment with sufficient sensitivity and specificity for clinical use. PMID:23365456

  14. Neonatal Gut Microbiota and Human Milk Glycans Cooperate to Attenuate Infection and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Newburg, David S; He, Yingying

    2015-12-01

    Glycans of the intestinal mucosa and oligosaccharides of human milk influence the early colonization of the infant gut and establishment of mucosal homeostasis, and differences in colonization of the gut influence the ontogeny of glycans on the surface of the intestinal mucosa, proinflammatory signaling, homeostasis, and resilience to insult. This interkingdom reciprocal interaction is typical of a mutualistic symbiotic relationship. The period in which the infant gut most needs protection from hypersensitive inflammation overlaps with the recommended period of exclusive nursing; electively substituting artificial formula that lacks human milk protective glycans seems ill advised, especially for premature infants.

  15. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Extracting Spectra of N-Glycans Directly from Incubation Mixtures Following Glycan Release: Application to Glycans from Engineered Glycoforms of Intact, Folded HIV gp120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David J.; Sobott, Frank; Crispin, Max; Wrobel, Antoni; Bonomelli, Camille; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Scarff, Charlotte A.; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Scrivens, James H.

    2011-03-01

    The analysis of glycosylation from native biological sources is often frustrated by the low abundances of available material. Here, ion mobility combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry have been used to extract the spectra of N-glycans released with PNGase F from a serial titration of recombinantly expressed envelope glycoprotein, gp120, from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Analysis was also performed on gp120 expressed in the α-mannosidase inhibitor, and in a matched mammalian cell line deficient in GlcNAc transferase I. Without ion mobility separation, ESI spectra frequently contained no observable ions from the glycans whereas ions from other compounds such as detergents and residual buffer salts were abundant. After ion mobility separation on a Waters T-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer, the N-glycans fell into a unique region of the ion mobility/ m/z plot allowing their profiles to be extracted with good signal:noise ratios. This method allowed N-glycan profiles to be extracted from crude incubation mixtures with no clean-up even in the presence of surfactants such as NP40. Furthermore, this technique allowed clear profiles to be obtained from sub-microgram amounts of glycoprotein. Glycan profiles were similar to those generated by MALDI-TOF MS although they were more susceptible to double charging and fragmentation. Structural analysis could be accomplished by MS/MS experiments in either positive or negative ion mode but negative ion mode gave the most informative spectra and provided a reliable approach to the analysis of glycans from small amounts of glycoprotein.

  16. Glycan complexity dictates microbial resource allocation in the large intestine

    PubMed Central

    Rogowski, Artur; Briggs, Jonathon A.; Mortimer, Jennifer C.; Tryfona, Theodora; Terrapon, Nicolas; Lowe, Elisabeth C.; Baslé, Arnaud; Morland, Carl; Day, Alison M.; Zheng, Hongjun; Rogers, Theresa E.; Thompson, Paul; Hawkins, Alastair R.; Yadav, Madhav P.; Henrissat, Bernard; Martens, Eric C.; Dupree, Paul; Gilbert, Harry J.; Bolam, David N.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the human gut microbiota is controlled primarily through the degradation of complex dietary carbohydrates, but the extent to which carbohydrate breakdown products are shared between members of the microbiota is unclear. We show here, using xylan as a model, that sharing the breakdown products of complex carbohydrates by key members of the microbiota, such as Bacteroides ovatus, is dependent on the complexity of the target glycan. Characterization of the extensive xylan degrading apparatus expressed by B. ovatus reveals that the breakdown of the polysaccharide by the human gut microbiota is significantly more complex than previous models suggested, which were based on the deconstruction of xylans containing limited monosaccharide side chains. Our report presents a highly complex and dynamic xylan degrading apparatus that is fine-tuned to recognize the different forms of the polysaccharide presented to the human gut microbiota. PMID:26112186

  17. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    El Ghazal, Roland; Yin, Xin; Johns, Scott C; Swanson, Lee; Macal, Monica; Ghosh, Pradipta; Zuniga, Elina I; Fuster, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs) in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1) in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21)-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt) were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4-deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  18. Morphological and glycan features of the camel oviduct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Accogli, Gianluca; Monaco, Davide; El Bahrawy, Khalid Ahmed; El-Sayed, Ashraf Abd El-Halim; Ciannarella, Francesca; Beneult, Benedicte; Lacalandra, Giovanni Michele; Desantis, Salvatore

    2014-07-01

    This study describes regional differences in the oviduct of the one-humped camel (Camelus dromedarius) during the growth phase (GP) and the mature phase (MP) of the follicular wave by means of morphometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and glycohistochemistry investigations. Epithelium height significantly increased in the ampulla and decreased in the isthmus passing from the GP to the MP. Under SEM, non-ciliated cells displayed apical blebs (secretory) or short microvilli. Cilia glycocalyx expressed glycans terminating with sialic acid linked α2,6 to Gal/GalNAc (SNA affinity) throughout the oviducts of GP and MP and sialic acid linked α2,3 to Galβ1,3GalNAc (MAL II and KOH-sialidase (K-s)-PNA staining) throughout the MP oviducts. Non-ciliated cells displayed lectin-binding sites from the supra-nuclear cytoplasm to the luminal surface. Ampulla non-ciliated cells showed O-linked (mucin-type) sialoglycans (MAL II and K-s-PNA) during GP and MP and N-linked sialoglycans (SNA) during the MP. Isthmus non-ciliated cells expressed SNA reactivity in GP and MP, also K-s-PNA binders in MP, and MAL II and PNA affinity (Galβ1,3GalNAc) during GP. Galβ1,3GalNAc was sialilated in the non-ciliated cells of GP UTJ. Luminal surface lacked of Galβ1,3GalNAc in GP and MP, whereas it expressed α2,6- and α2,3-linked sialic acids. In GP intraluminal substance reacted with SNA, MAL II, K-s-PNA in ampulla and only with MAL II in the isthmus and UTJ. These results demonstrate that the morphology and the glycan pattern of the camel oviductal epithelium vary during the follicular wave and that could relate to the region-specific functions.

  19. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    El Ghazal, Roland; Yin, Xin; Johns, Scott C; Swanson, Lee; Macal, Monica; Ghosh, Pradipta; Zuniga, Elina I; Fuster, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs) in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1) in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21)-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt) were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4-deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer. PMID:27237321

  20. Specific N-glycans of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Surface and the Abnormal Increase of Core-α-1, 6-fucosylated Triantennary Glycan via N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases-IVa Regulation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Huan; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Yubao; Li, Tingting; Zhan, Chao; Huo, Wenjuan; He, Anshun; Yao, Yuanfei; Jin, Yu; Qu, Youpeng; Sun, Xue-Long; Li, Yu

    2015-11-05

    Glycosylation alterations of cell surface proteins are often observed during the progression of malignancies. The specific cell surface N-glycans were profiled in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with clinical tissues (88 tumor and adjacent normal tissues) and the corresponding serum samples of HCC patients. The level of core-α-1,6-fucosylated triantennary glycan (NA3Fb) increased both on the cell surface and in the serum samples of HCC patients (p < 0.01). Additionally, the change of NA3Fb was not influenced by Hepatitis B virus (HBV)and cirrhosis. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase IVa (GnT-IVa), which was related to the synthesis of the NA3Fb, was substantially increased in HCC tissues. Knockdown of GnT-IVa leads to a decreased level of NA3Fb and decreased ability of invasion and migration in HCC cells. NA3Fb can be regarded as a specific cell surface N-glycan of HCC. The high expression of GnT-IVa is the cause of the abnormal increase of NA3Fb on the HCC cell surface, which regulates cell migration. This study demonstrated the specific N-glycans of the cell surface and the mechanisms of altered glycoform related with HCC. These findings lead to better understanding of the function of glycan and glycosyltransferase in the tumorigenesis, progression and metastasis of HCC.

  1. Modulation of O-glycans and N-glycans on murine CD8 T cells fails to alter annexin V ligand induction by galectin 1.

    PubMed

    Carlow, Douglas A; Williams, Michael J; Ziltener, Hermann J

    2003-11-15

    Thymic negative selection and contraction of responding T cell oligoclones after infection represent important cell ablation processes required for maintaining T cell homeostasis. It has been proposed that galectin 1 contributes to these processes through interaction with lactosyl sequences principally on cell surface glycoproteins bearing core 2 (C2GnT1)-branched O-glycans. According to this model, specific T cell surface proteins cross-linked by galectin 1 induce signaling, ligand redistribution, and apoptosis in both immature thymocytes and activated T cells. The influence of lactosyl residues contained in branched O-glycans or complex N-glycans on galectin 1 binding and induction of annexin V ligand in murine CD8 T cells was assessed. Neither galectin binding nor galectin-induced expression of annexin V ligand was perturbed under conditions in which: 1) C2GnT1 activity was differentially induced by CD8 T cell activation/culture with IL-2 vs IL-4; 2) activated CD8(+) T cells lacked C2GnT1 expression; or 3) complex N-glycan formation was blocked by swainsonine. The maintenance of galectin 1 binding and induced annexin V expression under conditions that alter lactosamine abundance on O- or complex N-glycans suggest that galectin 1-mediated apoptosis is neither a simple function of fluctuating C2GnT1 activity nor a general C2GnT1-dependent mechanism underlying contraction of CD8 T cells subsequent to activation.

  2. Correlation Index-Based Responsible-Enzyme Gene Screening (CIRES), a Novel DNA Microarray-Based Method for Enzyme Gene Involved in Glycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Harumi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Fujinawa, Reiko; Naito, Yuko; Okuno, Yasushi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Suzuki, Akemi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori

    2007-01-01

    Background Glycan biosynthesis occurs though a multi-step process that requires a variety of enzymes ranging from glycosyltransferases to those involved in cytosolic sugar metabolism. In many cases, glycan biosynthesis follows a glycan-specific, linear pathway. As glycosyltransferases are generally regulated at the level of transcription, assessing the overall transcriptional profile for glycan biosynthesis genes seems warranted. However, a systematic approach for assessing the correlation between glycan expression and glycan-related gene expression has not been reported previously. Methodology To facilitate genetic analysis of glycan biosynthesis, we sought to correlate the expression of genes involved in cell-surface glycan formation with the expression of the glycans, as detected by glycan-recognizing probes. We performed cross-sample comparisons of gene expression profiles using a newly developed, glycan-focused cDNA microarray. Cell-surface glycan expression profiles were obtained using flow cytometry of cells stained with plant lectins. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for these profiles and were used to identify enzyme genes correlated with glycan biosynthesis. Conclusions This method, designated correlation index-based responsible-enzyme gene screening (CIRES), successfully identified genes already known to be involved in the biosynthesis of certain glycans. Our evaluation of CIRES indicates that it is useful for identifying genes involved in the biosynthesis of glycan chains that can be probed with lectins using flow cytometry. PMID:18043739

  3. An integrated 3D-printed platform for the automated isolation of N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao-Mao; Laborda, Pedro; Conway, Louis Patrick; Duan, Xu-Chu; Huang, Kun; Liu, Li; Voglmeir, Josef

    2016-10-01

    The development of techniques for the rapid analysis of N-glycans is a key step in enabling the roles of glycoproteins in biological processes to be studied. Analysis is usually performed through the liberation of the carbohydrate moieties from proteins, followed by fluorescent labeling and identification using either standardized HPLC or mass spectrometry techniques. A simple and robust automated process for the release and isolation of N-glycans would greatly improve analytical throughput and reproducibility, and is thus highly desirable. Inspired by the increasing number of reported projects involving open source labware, which allows the design and construction of otherwise inaccessible laboratory equipment using low-cost 3D printers, we used this technique to fabricate a platform for the automated isolation of N-glycans. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated the successful recovery of glycan samples from the glycoprotein model fetuin using our self-made 3D-printed equipment.

  4. Microbe–Host Interactions are Positively and Negatively Regulated by Galectin–Glycan Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Linda G.; Garner, Omai B.; Schaefer, Katrin; Lee, Benhur

    2014-01-01

    Microbe–host interactions are complex processes that are directly and indirectly regulated by a variety of factors, including microbe presentation of specific molecular signatures on the microbial surface, as well as host cell presentation of receptors that recognize these pathogen signatures. Cell surface glycans are one important class of microbial signatures that are recognized by a variety of host cell lectins. Host cell lectins that recognize microbial glycans include members of the galectin family of lectins that recognize specific glycan ligands on viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. In this review, we will discuss the ways that the interactions of microbial glycans with host cell galectins positively and negatively regulate pathogen attachment, invasion, and survival, as well as regulate host responses that mitigate microbial pathogenesis. PMID:24995007

  5. In situ recognition of cell-surface glycans and targeted imaging of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Ding; Cheng, Han; Chen, Wei-Hai; Cheng, Si-Xue; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent sensors capable of recognizing cancer-associated glycans, such as sialyl Lewis X (sLex) tetrasaccharide, have great potential for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Studies on water-soluble and biocompatible sensors for in situ recognition of cancer-associated glycans in live cells and targeted imaging of cancer cells are very limited at present. Here we report boronic acid-functionalized peptide-based fluorescent sensors (BPFSs) for in situ recognition and differentiation of cancer-associated glycans, as well as targeted imaging of cancer cells. By screening BPFSs with different structures, it was demonstrated that BPFS1 with a FRGDF peptide could recognize cell-surface glycan of sLex with high specificity and thereafter fluorescently label and discriminate cancer cells through the cooperation with the specific recognition between RGD and integrins. The newly developed peptide-based sensor will find great potential as a fluorescent probe for cancer diagnosis. PMID:24042097

  6. Glycan clustering stabilizes the mannose patch of HIV-1 and preserves vulnerability to broadly neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Laura K.; Spencer, Daniel I. R.; Royle, Louise; Bonomelli, Camille; Seabright, Gemma E.; Behrens, Anna-Janina; Kulp, Dan; Menis, Sergey; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Dunlop, D. Cameron; Crispin, Daniel J.; Bowden, Thomas A.; Ward, Andrew B.; Schief, William R.; Doores, Katie J.; Crispin, Max

    2015-01-01

    The envelope spike of HIV-1 employs a ‘glycan shield’ to protect itself from antibody-mediated neutralization. Paradoxically, however, potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) have been isolated which target this shield. The unusually high glycan density on the gp120 subunit limits processing during biosynthesis, leaving a region of under-processed oligomannose-type structures which is a primary target of these bnAbs. Here we investigate the contribution of individual glycosylation sites to formation of this so-called intrinsic mannose patch. Deletion of individual sites has a limited effect on the overall size of the intrinsic mannose patch but leads to changes in the processing of neighboring glycans. These structural changes are largely tolerated by a panel of glycan-dependent bnAbs targeting these regions, indicating a degree of plasticity in their recognition. These results support the intrinsic mannose patch as a stable target for vaccine design. PMID:26105115

  7. Glycan clustering stabilizes the mannose patch of HIV-1 and preserves vulnerability to broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Laura K; Spencer, Daniel I R; Royle, Louise; Bonomelli, Camille; Seabright, Gemma E; Behrens, Anna-Janina; Kulp, Daniel W; Menis, Sergey; Krumm, Stefanie A; Dunlop, D Cameron; Crispin, Daniel J; Bowden, Thomas A; Scanlan, Christopher N; Ward, Andrew B; Schief, William R; Doores, Katie J; Crispin, Max

    2015-06-24

    The envelope spike of HIV-1 employs a 'glycan shield' to protect itself from antibody-mediated neutralization. Paradoxically, however, potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that target this shield have been isolated. The unusually high glycan density on the gp120 subunit limits processing during biosynthesis, leaving a region of under-processed oligomannose-type structures, which is a primary target of these bnAbs. Here we investigate the contribution of individual glycosylation sites in the formation of this so-called intrinsic mannose patch. Deletion of individual sites has a limited effect on the overall size of the intrinsic mannose patch but leads to changes in the processing of neighbouring glycans. These structural changes are largely tolerated by a panel of glycan-dependent bnAbs targeting these regions, indicating a degree of plasticity in their recognition. These results support the intrinsic mannose patch as a stable target for vaccine design.

  8. An integrated 3D-printed platform for the automated isolation of N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao-Mao; Laborda, Pedro; Conway, Louis Patrick; Duan, Xu-Chu; Huang, Kun; Liu, Li; Voglmeir, Josef

    2016-10-01

    The development of techniques for the rapid analysis of N-glycans is a key step in enabling the roles of glycoproteins in biological processes to be studied. Analysis is usually performed through the liberation of the carbohydrate moieties from proteins, followed by fluorescent labeling and identification using either standardized HPLC or mass spectrometry techniques. A simple and robust automated process for the release and isolation of N-glycans would greatly improve analytical throughput and reproducibility, and is thus highly desirable. Inspired by the increasing number of reported projects involving open source labware, which allows the design and construction of otherwise inaccessible laboratory equipment using low-cost 3D printers, we used this technique to fabricate a platform for the automated isolation of N-glycans. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated the successful recovery of glycan samples from the glycoprotein model fetuin using our self-made 3D-printed equipment. PMID:27423878

  9. Enzymes for N-Glycan Branching and Their Genetic and Nongenetic Regulation in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    N-glycan, a fundamental and versatile protein modification in mammals, plays critical roles in various physiological and pathological events including cancer progression. The formation of N-glycan branches catalyzed by specific N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases [GnT-III, GnT-IVs, GnT-V, GnT-IX (Vb)] and a fucosyltransferase, Fut8, provides functionally diverse N-glycosylated proteins. Aberrations of these branches are often found in cancer cells and are profoundly involved in cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. In this review, we focus on the GlcNAc and fucose branches of N-glycans and describe how their expression is dysregulated in cancer by genetic and nongenetic mechanisms including epigenetics and nucleotide sugar metabolisms. We also survey the roles that these N-glycans play in cancer progression and therapeutics. Finally, we discuss possible applications of our knowledge on basic glycobiology to the development of medicine and biomarkers for cancer therapy. PMID:27136596

  10. Enzymes for N-Glycan Branching and Their Genetic and Nongenetic Regulation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    N-glycan, a fundamental and versatile protein modification in mammals, plays critical roles in various physiological and pathological events including cancer progression. The formation of N-glycan branches catalyzed by specific N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases [GnT-III, GnT-IVs, GnT-V, GnT-IX (Vb)] and a fucosyltransferase, Fut8, provides functionally diverse N-glycosylated proteins. Aberrations of these branches are often found in cancer cells and are profoundly involved in cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. In this review, we focus on the GlcNAc and fucose branches of N-glycans and describe how their expression is dysregulated in cancer by genetic and nongenetic mechanisms including epigenetics and nucleotide sugar metabolisms. We also survey the roles that these N-glycans play in cancer progression and therapeutics. Finally, we discuss possible applications of our knowledge on basic glycobiology to the development of medicine and biomarkers for cancer therapy. PMID:27136596

  11. The GlycanBuilder and GlycoWorkbench glycoinformatics tools: updates and new developments.

    PubMed

    Damerell, David; Ceroni, Alessio; Maass, Kai; Ranzinger, Rene; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M

    2012-11-01

    During the EUROCarbDB project our group developed the GlycanBuilder and GlycoWorkbench glycoinformatics tools. This short communication summarizes the capabilities of these two tools and updates which have been made since the original publications in 2007 and 2008. GlycanBuilder is a tool that allows for the fast and intuitive drawing of glycan structures; this tool can be used standalone, embedded in web pages and can also be integrated into other programs. GlycoWorkbench has been designed to semi-automatically annotate glycomics data. This tool can be used to annotate mass spectrometry (MS) and MS/MS spectra of free oligosaccharides, N and O-linked glycans, GAGs (glycosaminoglycans) and glycolipids, as well as MS spectra of glycoproteins. PMID:23109548

  12. Exploring the interactions between bacteriophage-encoded glycan binding proteins and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Simpson, David J; Sacher, Jessica C; Szymanski, Christine M

    2015-10-01

    There is an unprecedented interest in glycobiology due to the increasing appreciation of its impact on all aspects of life. Likewise, bacteriophage biology is enjoying a new renaissance as the post-antibiotic era fuels the search for novel ways to control harmful bacteria. Phages have spent the last 3 billion years developing ways of recognizing and manipulating bacterial surface glycans. Therefore, phages comprise a massive reservoir of glycan-binding and -hydrolyzing proteins with the potential to be exploited for glycan analysis, bacterial diagnostics and therapeutics. We discuss phage tail proteins that recognize bacterial surface polysaccharides, endolysins that bind and cleave peptidoglycan, Ig-like proteins that attach to mucin glycans, and phage effector proteins that recognize both bacterial and eukaryotic oligosaccharides.

  13. A general strategy for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of asymmetrically branched N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Chinoy, Zoeisha S; Ambre, Shailesh G; Peng, Wenjie; McBride, Ryan; de Vries, Robert P; Glushka, John; Paulson, James C; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2013-07-26

    A systematic, efficient means of producing diverse libraries of asymmetrically branched N-glycans is needed to investigate the specificities and biology of glycan-binding proteins. To that end, we describe a core pentasaccharide that at potential branching positions is modified by orthogonal protecting groups to allow selective attachment of specific saccharide moieties by chemical glycosylation. The appendages were selected so that the antenna of the resulting deprotected compounds could be selectively extended by glycosyltransferases to give libraries of asymmetrical multi-antennary glycans. The power of the methodology was demonstrated by the preparation of a series of complex oligosaccharides that were printed as microarrays and screened for binding to lectins and influenza-virus hemagglutinins, which showed that recognition is modulated by presentation of minimal epitopes in the context of complex N-glycans. PMID:23888036

  14. Structural characterization and biological implications of sulfated N-glycans in a serine protease from the neotropical moth Hylesia metabus (Cramer [1775]) (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae).

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Gleysin; Salazar, Víctor; Montesino, Raquel; Támbara, Yanet; Struwe, Weston B; Leon, Evelyn; Harvey, David J; Lesur, Antoine; Rincón, Mónica; Domon, Bruno; Méndez, Milagros; Portela, Madelón; González-Hernández, Annia; Triguero, Ada; Durán, Rosario; Lundberg, Ulf; Vonasek, Eva; González, Luis Javier

    2016-03-01

    Contact with the urticating setae from the abdomen of adult females of the neo-tropical moth Hylesia metabus gives rise to an urticating dermatitis, characterized by intense pruritus, generalized malaise and occasionally ocular lesions (lepidopterism). The setae contain a pro-inflammatory glycosylated protease homologous to other S1A serine proteases of insects. Deglycosylation with PNGase F in the presence of a buffer prepared with 40% H2 (18)O allowed the assignment of an N-glycosylation site. Five main paucimannosidic N-glycans were identified, three of which were exclusively α(1-6)-fucosylated at the proximal GlcNAc. A considerable portion of these N-glycans are anionic species sulfated on either the 4- or the 6-position of the α(1-6)-mannose residue of the core. The application of chemically and enzymatically modified variants of the toxin in an animal model in guinea pigs showed that the pro-inflammatory and immunological reactions, e.g. disseminated fibrin deposition and activation of neutrophils, are due to the presence of sulfate-linked groups and not on disulfide bonds, as demonstrated by the reduction and S-alkylation of the toxin. On the other hand, the hemorrhagic vascular lesions observed are attributed to the proteolytic activity of the toxin. Thus, N-glycan sulfation may constitute a defense mechanism against predators.

  15. Structural characterization and biological implications of sulfated N-glycans in a serine protease from the neotropical moth Hylesia metabus (Cramer [1775]) (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae).

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Gleysin; Salazar, Víctor; Montesino, Raquel; Támbara, Yanet; Struwe, Weston B; Leon, Evelyn; Harvey, David J; Lesur, Antoine; Rincón, Mónica; Domon, Bruno; Méndez, Milagros; Portela, Madelón; González-Hernández, Annia; Triguero, Ada; Durán, Rosario; Lundberg, Ulf; Vonasek, Eva; González, Luis Javier

    2016-03-01

    Contact with the urticating setae from the abdomen of adult females of the neo-tropical moth Hylesia metabus gives rise to an urticating dermatitis, characterized by intense pruritus, generalized malaise and occasionally ocular lesions (lepidopterism). The setae contain a pro-inflammatory glycosylated protease homologous to other S1A serine proteases of insects. Deglycosylation with PNGase F in the presence of a buffer prepared with 40% H2 (18)O allowed the assignment of an N-glycosylation site. Five main paucimannosidic N-glycans were identified, three of which were exclusively α(1-6)-fucosylated at the proximal GlcNAc. A considerable portion of these N-glycans are anionic species sulfated on either the 4- or the 6-position of the α(1-6)-mannose residue of the core. The application of chemically and enzymatically modified variants of the toxin in an animal model in guinea pigs showed that the pro-inflammatory and immunological reactions, e.g. disseminated fibrin deposition and activation of neutrophils, are due to the presence of sulfate-linked groups and not on disulfide bonds, as demonstrated by the reduction and S-alkylation of the toxin. On the other hand, the hemorrhagic vascular lesions observed are attributed to the proteolytic activity of the toxin. Thus, N-glycan sulfation may constitute a defense mechanism against predators. PMID:26537504

  16. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo.

  17. Two types of galactosylated fucose motifs are present on N-glycans of Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Wilson, Iain B H

    2015-06-01

    N-Glycans from the nematode Haemonchus contortus (barber pole worm), a parasite of sheep and cattle, were the first to be described to possess up to three fucose residues associated with the N,N'-diacetylchitobiosyl core, two being on the reducing-terminal proximal GlcNAc and one on the distal core GlcNAc residue. The assumption was that truncated glycans from this organism with three hexose residues have the composition Man3GlcNAc2Fuc1-3. In this study, we have performed HPLC and MALDI-TOF MS/MS in combination with selected digestions of N-glycans from Haemonchus. A dominant trifucosylated Hex3HexNAc2Fuc3 glycan was modified not only with α1,6-fucose but also with a proximal core α1,3-fucose and a galactosylated distal α1,3-fucose; thereby, only two of the hexose residues were mannose. Other N-glycans displayed galactosylation of the core α1,6-fucose, antennal fucosylation or modification with phosphorylcholine. Thus, the N-glycans of Haemonchus contain a number of potentially immunogenic glycan epitopes also found in other parasites and our proposed structures are in line with the previously defined specificity of nematode glycosyltransferases as we show that distal fucosylation and the presence of an α1,6-mannose are apparently mutually exclusive. These data are thereby of importance for engineering cell lines capable of mimicking Haemonchus-type N-glycans in the preparation of recombinant proteins as vaccine candidates.

  18. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo. PMID:27503803

  19. Worms to the rescue: can worm glycans protect from autoimmune diseases?

    PubMed

    Kuijk, Loes M; van Die, Irma

    2010-04-01

    Autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases represent a significant health burden, especially in Western societies. For the majority of these diseases, no cure exists. Recently, research on parasitic worms (helminths) has demonstrated great potential for whole worms, their eggs or their excretory/secretory proteins in down-regulating inflammatory responses both in vitro and in vivo, in various disease models and, in some cases, even in clinical trials. The worms are thought to induce Th2 and regulatory T cells, interfere with Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and to down-regulate Th17 and Th1 responses. The molecular mechanisms underlying the worms' ability to modulate the host immune response are not well understood, and many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the observed immune modulation. Increasing evidence suggests that carbohydrate structures (glycans), for example, phosphorylcholine-modified glycans or Galbeta1-4(Fucalpha1-3)GlcNAc- (Lewis X, Le(X)) containing glycans, expressed by the worms contribute to these modulating properties by their interaction with antigen presenting cells. Helminths express a broad variety of protein- and lipid-linked glycans on their surface and on secretory products. These glycans differ in amount and composition and several of these structures are species specific. However, worms also express glycan antigens that are found in a wide variety of different species. Some of these "common" worm glycans are particularly interesting with regard to regulating host responses, because they have the potential to interact with C-type lectins on dendritic cells and thereby may interfere with T-cell polarization. Helminths and helminth-derived molecules form a novel and promising group of therapeutics for autoinflammatory diseases. However, much has to be learned about the molecular mechanisms behind the helminth-mediated antiinflammatory properties. This review will describe some of the emerging evidence in selected disease areas as

  20. Quantitative profiling of O-glycans by electrospray ionization- and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry after in-gel derivatization with isotope-coded 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone.

    PubMed

    Sić, Siniša; Maier, Norbert M; Rizzi, Andreas M

    2016-09-01

    The potential and benefits of isotope-coded labeling in the context of MS-based glycan profiling are evaluated focusing on the analysis of O-glycans. For this purpose, a derivatization strategy using d0/d5-1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) is employed, allowing O-glycan release and derivatization to be achieved in one single step. The paper demonstrates that this release and derivatization reaction can be carried out also in-gel with only marginal loss in sensitivity compared to in-solution derivatization. Such an effective in-gel reaction allows one to extend this release/labeling method also to glycoprotein/glycoform samples pre-separated by gel-electrophoresis without the need of extracting the proteins/digested peptides from the gel. With highly O-glycosylated proteins (e.g. mucins) LODs in the range of 0.4 μg glycoprotein (100 fmol) loaded onto the electrophoresis gel can be attained, with minor glycosylated proteins (like IgAs, FVII, FIX) the LODs were in the range of 80-100 μg (250 pmol-1.5 nmol) glycoprotein loaded onto the gel. As second aspect, the potential of isotope coded labeling as internal standardization strategy for the reliable determination of quantitative glycan profiles via MALDI-MS is investigated. Towards this goal, a number of established and emerging MALDI matrices were tested for PMP-glycan quantitation, and their performance is compared with that of ESI-based measurements. The crystalline matrix 2,6-dihydroxyacetophenone (DHAP) and the ionic liquid matrix N,N-diisopropyl-ethyl-ammonium 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone (DIEA-THAP) showed potential for MALDI-based quantitation of PMP-labeled O-glycans. We also provide a comprehensive overview on the performance of MS-based glycan quantitation approaches by comparing sensitivity, LOD, accuracy and repeatability data obtained with RP-HPLC-ESI-MS, stand-alone nano-ESI-MS with a spray-nozzle chip, and MALDI-MS. Finally, the suitability of the isotope-coded PMP labeling strategy for O-glycan

  1. Methylated glycans as conserved targets of animal and fungal innate defense.

    PubMed

    Wohlschlager, Therese; Butschi, Alex; Grassi, Paola; Sutov, Grigorij; Gauss, Robert; Hauck, Dirk; Schmieder, Stefanie S; Knobel, Martin; Titz, Alexander; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M; Hengartner, Michael O; Aebi, Markus; Künzler, Markus

    2014-07-01

    Effector proteins of innate immune systems recognize specific non-self epitopes. Tectonins are a family of β-propeller lectins conserved from bacteria to mammals that have been shown to bind bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We present experimental evidence that two Tectonins of fungal and animal origin have a specificity for O-methylated glycans. We show that Tectonin 2 of the mushroom Laccaria bicolor (Lb-Tec2) agglutinates Gram-negative bacteria and exerts toxicity toward the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting a role in fungal defense against bacteria and nematodes. Biochemical and genetic analysis of these interactions revealed that both bacterial agglutination and nematotoxicity of Lb-Tec2 depend on the recognition of methylated glycans, namely O-methylated mannose and fucose residues, as part of bacterial LPS and nematode cell-surface glycans. In addition, a C. elegans gene, termed samt-1, coding for a candidate membrane transport protein for the presumptive donor substrate of glycan methylation, S-adenosyl-methionine, from the cytoplasm to the Golgi was identified. Intriguingly, limulus lectin L6, a structurally related antibacterial protein of the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, showed properties identical to the mushroom lectin. These results suggest that O-methylated glycans constitute a conserved target of the fungal and animal innate immune system. The broad phylogenetic distribution of O-methylated glycans increases the spectrum of potential antagonists recognized by Tectonins, rendering this conserved protein family a universal defense armor. PMID:24879441

  2. Glycan Reader: automated sugar identification and simulation preparation for carbohydrates and glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sunhwan; Song, Kevin C; Desaire, Heather; MacKerell, Alexander D; Im, Wonpil

    2011-11-15

    Understanding how glycosylation affects protein structure, dynamics, and function is an emerging and challenging problem in biology. As a first step toward glycan modeling in the context of structural glycobiology, we have developed Glycan Reader and integrated it into the CHARMM-GUI, http://www.charmm-gui.org/input/glycan. Glycan Reader greatly simplifies the reading of PDB structure files containing glycans through (i) detection of carbohydrate molecules, (ii) automatic annotation of carbohydrates based on their three-dimensional structures, (iii) recognition of glycosidic linkages between carbohydrates as well as N-/O-glycosidic linkages to proteins, and (iv) generation of inputs for the biomolecular simulation program CHARMM with the proper glycosidic linkage setup. In addition, Glycan Reader is linked to other functional modules in CHARMM-GUI, allowing users to easily generate carbohydrate or glycoprotein molecular simulation systems in solution or membrane environments and visualize the electrostatic potential on glycoprotein surfaces. These tools are useful for studying the impact of glycosylation on protein structure and dynamics.

  3. Golgi self-correction generates bioequivalent glycans to preserve cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mkhikian, Haik; Mortales, Christie-Lynn; Zhou, Raymond W; Khachikyan, Khachik; Wu, Gang; Haslam, Stuart M; Kavarian, Patil; Dell, Anne; Demetriou, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Essential biological systems employ self-correcting mechanisms to maintain cellular homeostasis. Mammalian cell function is dynamically regulated by the interaction of cell surface galectins with branched N-glycans. Here we report that N-glycan branching deficiency triggers the Golgi to generate bioequivalent N-glycans that preserve galectin-glycoprotein interactions and cellular homeostasis. Galectins bind N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc) units within N-glycans initiated from UDP-GlcNAc by the medial-Golgi branching enzymes as well as the trans-Golgi poly-LacNAc extension enzyme β1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (B3GNT). Marginally reducing LacNAc content by limiting N-glycans to three branches results in T-cell hyperactivity and autoimmunity; yet further restricting branching does not produce a more hyperactive state. Rather, new poly-LacNAc extension by B3GNT maintains galectin binding and immune homeostasis. Poly-LacNAc extension is triggered by redistribution of unused UDP-GlcNAc from the medial to trans-Golgi via inter-cisternal tubules. These data demonstrate the functional equivalency of structurally dissimilar N-glycans and suggest a self-correcting feature of the Golgi that sustains cellular homeostasis. PMID:27269286

  4. Investigation of glycan evolution based on a comprehensive analysis of glycosyltransferases using phylogenetic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Tomono, Takayoshi; Kojima, Hisao; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Tohsato, Yukako; Ito, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Glycans play important roles in such cell-cell interactions as signaling and adhesion, including processes involved in pathogenic infections, cancers, and neurological diseases. Glycans are biosynthesized by multiple glycosyltransferases (GTs), which function sequentially. Excluding mucin-type O-glycosylation, the non-reducing terminus of glycans is biosynthesized in the Golgi apparatus after the reducing terminus is biosynthesized in the ER. In the present study, we performed genome-wide analyses of human GTs by investigating the degree of conservation of homologues in other organisms, as well as by elucidating the phylogenetic relationship between cephalochordates and urochordates, which has long been controversial in deuterostome phylogeny. We analyzed 173 human GTs and functionally linked glycan synthesis enzymes by phylogenetic profiling and clustering, compiled orthologous genes from the genomes of other organisms, and converted them into a binary sequence based on the presence (1) or absence (0) of orthologous genes in the genomes. Our results suggest that the non-reducing terminus of glycans is biosynthesized by newly evolved GTs. According to our analysis, the phylogenetic profiles of GTs resemble the phylogenetic tree of life, where deuterostomes, metazoans, and eukaryotes are resolved into separate branches. Lineage-specific GTs appear to play essential roles in the divergence of these particular lineages. We suggest that urochordates lose several genes that are conserved among metazoans, such as those expressing sialyltransferases, and that the Golgi apparatus acquires the ability to synthesize glycans after the ER acquires this function. PMID:27493855

  5. Golgi self-correction generates bioequivalent glycans to preserve cellular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Mkhikian, Haik; Mortales, Christie-Lynn; Zhou, Raymond W; Khachikyan, Khachik; Wu, Gang; Haslam, Stuart M; Kavarian, Patil; Dell, Anne; Demetriou, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Essential biological systems employ self-correcting mechanisms to maintain cellular homeostasis. Mammalian cell function is dynamically regulated by the interaction of cell surface galectins with branched N-glycans. Here we report that N-glycan branching deficiency triggers the Golgi to generate bioequivalent N-glycans that preserve galectin-glycoprotein interactions and cellular homeostasis. Galectins bind N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc) units within N-glycans initiated from UDP-GlcNAc by the medial-Golgi branching enzymes as well as the trans-Golgi poly-LacNAc extension enzyme β1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (B3GNT). Marginally reducing LacNAc content by limiting N-glycans to three branches results in T-cell hyperactivity and autoimmunity; yet further restricting branching does not produce a more hyperactive state. Rather, new poly-LacNAc extension by B3GNT maintains galectin binding and immune homeostasis. Poly-LacNAc extension is triggered by redistribution of unused UDP-GlcNAc from the medial to trans-Golgi via inter-cisternal tubules. These data demonstrate the functional equivalency of structurally dissimilar N-glycans and suggest a self-correcting feature of the Golgi that sustains cellular homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14814.001 PMID:27269286

  6. Galactosyltransferase 4 is a major control point for glycan branching in N-linked glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Andrew G.; Hayes, Jerrard M.; Bezak, Tania; Głuchowska, Sonia A.; Cosgrave, Eoin F. J.; Struwe, Weston B.; Stroop, Corné J. M.; Kok, Han; van de Laar, Teun; Rudd, Pauline M.; Tipton, Keith F.; Davey, Gavin P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein N-glycosylation is a common post-translational modification that produces a complex array of branched glycan structures. The levels of branching, or antennarity, give rise to differential biological activities for single glycoproteins. However, the precise mechanism controlling the glycan branching and glycosylation network is unknown. Here, we constructed quantitative mathematical models of N-linked glycosylation that predicted new control points for glycan branching. Galactosyltransferase, which acts on N-acetylglucosamine residues, was unexpectedly found to control metabolic flux through the glycosylation pathway and the level of final antennarity of nascent protein produced in the Golgi network. To further investigate the biological consequences of glycan branching in nascent proteins, we glycoengineered a series of mammalian cells overexpressing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). We identified a mechanism in which galactosyltransferase 4 isoform regulated N-glycan branching on the nascent protein, subsequently controlling biological activity in an in vivo model of hCG activity. We found that galactosyltransferase 4 is a major control point for glycan branching decisions taken in the Golgi of the cell, which might ultimately control the biological activity of nascent glycoprotein. PMID:25271059

  7. Recruiting the Host’s Immune System To Target Helicobacter pylori’s Surface Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Kaewsapsak, Pornchai; Esonu, Onyinyechi; Dube, Danielle H.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the increased prevalence of bacterial strains that are resistant to existing antibiotics, there is an urgent need for new antibacterial strategies. Bacterial glycans are an attractive target for new treatments, as they are frequently linked to pathogenesis and contain distinctive structures that are absent in humans. We set out to develop a novel targeting strategy based on surface glycans present on the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori (Hp). In this study, metabolic labeling of bacterial glycans with an azide-containing sugar allowed selective delivery of immune stimulants to azide-covered Hp. We established that Hp’s surface glycans are labeled by treatment with the metabolic substrate peracetylated N-azidoacetylglucosamine (Ac4GlcNAz). By contrast, mammalian cells treated with Ac4GlcNAz exhibit no incorporation of the chemical label within extracellular glycans. We further demonstrated that the Staudinger ligation between azides and phosphines proceeds under acidic conditions with only a small loss of efficiency. We then targeted azide-covered Hp with phosphines conjugated to the immune stimulant 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP), a compound capable of directing a host immune response against these cells. Finally, we report that immune effector cells catalyze selective damage in vitro to DNP-covered Hp in the presence of anti-DNP antibodies. The technology reported herein represents a novel strategy to target Hp based on its glycans. PMID:23512824

  8. The HIV glycan shield as a target for broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Doores, Katie J

    2015-12-01

    The HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the sole target for HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). HIV Env is one of the most heavily glycosylated proteins known, with approximately half of its mass consisting of host-derived N-linked glycans. The high density of glycans creates a shield that impedes antibody recognition but, critically, some of the most potent and broadly active bnAbs have evolved to recognize epitopes formed by these glycans. Although the virus hijacks the host protein synthesis and glycosylation machinery to generate glycosylated HIV Env, studies have shown that HIV Env glycosylation diverges from that typically observed on host-derived glycoproteins. In particular, the high density of glycans leads to a nonself motif of underprocessed oligomannose-type glycans that forms the target of some of the most broad and potent HIV bnAbs. This review discusses the changing perception of the HIV glycan shield, and summarizes the protein-directed and cell-directed factors controlling HIV Env glycosylation that impact on HIV bnAb recognition and HIV vaccine design strategies.

  9. Phylogeny, structure, function, biosynthesis and evolution of sulfated galactose-containing glycans.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-03-01

    Glycans are ubiquitous components of all organisms. The specificity of glycan structures works in molecular recognition in multiple biological processes especially cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling events. These events are mostly driven by functional proteins whose activities are ultimately regulated by interactions with carbohydrate moieties of cell surface glycoconjugates. Galactose is a common composing monosaccharide in glycoconjugates. Sulfation at certain positions of the galactose residues does not only increase affinity for some binding proteins but also makes the structures of the controlling glycans more specific to molecular interactions. Here the phylogenetic distribution of glycans containing the sulfated galactose unit is examined across numerous multicellular organisms. Analysis includes autotrophs and heterotrophs from both terrestrial and marine environments. Information exists more regarding the marine species. Although future investigations in molecular biology must be still performed in order to assure certain hypotheses, empirical evidences based on structural biology of the sulfated galactose-containing glycans among different species particularly their backbone and sulfation patterns clearly indicate great specificity in terms of glycosyltransferase and sulfotransferase activity. This set of information suggests that evolution has shaped the biosynthetic machinery of these glycans somewhat related to their potential functions in the organisms. PMID:26712697

  10. Methylated glycans as conserved targets of animal and fungal innate defense

    PubMed Central

    Wohlschlager, Therese; Butschi, Alex; Grassi, Paola; Sutov, Grigorij; Gauss, Robert; Hauck, Dirk; Schmieder, Stefanie S.; Knobel, Martin; Titz, Alexander; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M.; Hengartner, Michael O.; Aebi, Markus; Künzler, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Effector proteins of innate immune systems recognize specific non-self epitopes. Tectonins are a family of β-propeller lectins conserved from bacteria to mammals that have been shown to bind bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We present experimental evidence that two Tectonins of fungal and animal origin have a specificity for O-methylated glycans. We show that Tectonin 2 of the mushroom Laccaria bicolor (Lb-Tec2) agglutinates Gram-negative bacteria and exerts toxicity toward the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting a role in fungal defense against bacteria and nematodes. Biochemical and genetic analysis of these interactions revealed that both bacterial agglutination and nematotoxicity of Lb-Tec2 depend on the recognition of methylated glycans, namely O-methylated mannose and fucose residues, as part of bacterial LPS and nematode cell-surface glycans. In addition, a C. elegans gene, termed samt-1, coding for a candidate membrane transport protein for the presumptive donor substrate of glycan methylation, S-adenosyl-methionine, from the cytoplasm to the Golgi was identified. Intriguingly, limulus lectin L6, a structurally related antibacterial protein of the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, showed properties identical to the mushroom lectin. These results suggest that O-methylated glycans constitute a conserved target of the fungal and animal innate immune system. The broad phylogenetic distribution of O-methylated glycans increases the spectrum of potential antagonists recognized by Tectonins, rendering this conserved protein family a universal defense armor. PMID:24879441

  11. Analysis of zwitterionic and anionic N-linked glycans from invertebrates and protists by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Wilson, Iain B H

    2016-06-01

    Glycomic analyses over the years have revealed that non-vertebrate eukaryotes express oligosaccharides with inorganic and zwitterionic modifications which are either occurring in different contexts as compared to, or are absent from, mammals. Examples of anionic N-glycans (carrying sulphate or phosphate) are known from amoebae, fungi, molluscs and insects, while zwitterionic modifications by phosphorylcholine, phosphoethanolamine and aminoethylphosphonate occur on N-, O- and lipid-linked glycans from trichomonads, annelids, fungi, molluscs, insects, cestodes and nematodes. For detection of zwitterionic and anionic glycans, mass spectrometry has been a key method, but their ionic character affects the preparation and purification; therefore, as part of a glycomic strategy, the possibility of their presence must be considered in advance. On the other hand, their ionisation and fragmentation in positive and negative ion mode mass spectrometry as well as specific chemical or enzymatic treatments can prove diagnostic to their analysis. In our laboratory, we combine solid-phase extraction, reversed and normal phase HPLC, MALDI-TOF MS, exoglycosidase digests and hydrofluoric acid treatment to reveal N-glycans modified with anionic and zwitterionic moieties in a wide range of organisms. It is to be anticipated that, as more species are glycomically analysed, zwitterionic and anionic modifications of N-glycans will prove rather widespread. This knowledge is - in the longer term - then the basis for understanding the function of this cornucopia of glycan modifications. PMID:26899268

  12. Analysis of zwitterionic and anionic N-linked glycans from invertebrates and protists by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Wilson, Iain B H

    2016-06-01

    Glycomic analyses over the years have revealed that non-vertebrate eukaryotes express oligosaccharides with inorganic and zwitterionic modifications which are either occurring in different contexts as compared to, or are absent from, mammals. Examples of anionic N-glycans (carrying sulphate or phosphate) are known from amoebae, fungi, molluscs and insects, while zwitterionic modifications by phosphorylcholine, phosphoethanolamine and aminoethylphosphonate occur on N-, O- and lipid-linked glycans from trichomonads, annelids, fungi, molluscs, insects, cestodes and nematodes. For detection of zwitterionic and anionic glycans, mass spectrometry has been a key method, but their ionic character affects the preparation and purification; therefore, as part of a glycomic strategy, the possibility of their presence must be considered in advance. On the other hand, their ionisation and fragmentation in positive and negative ion mode mass spectrometry as well as specific chemical or enzymatic treatments can prove diagnostic to their analysis. In our laboratory, we combine solid-phase extraction, reversed and normal phase HPLC, MALDI-TOF MS, exoglycosidase digests and hydrofluoric acid treatment to reveal N-glycans modified with anionic and zwitterionic moieties in a wide range of organisms. It is to be anticipated that, as more species are glycomically analysed, zwitterionic and anionic modifications of N-glycans will prove rather widespread. This knowledge is - in the longer term - then the basis for understanding the function of this cornucopia of glycan modifications.

  13. Control of T Cell-mediated autoimmunity by metabolite flux to N-glycan biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Grigorian, Ani; Lee, Sung-Uk; Tian, Wenqiang; Chen, I-Ju; Gao, Guoyan; Mendelsohn, Richard; Dennis, James W; Demetriou, Michael

    2007-07-01

    Autoimmunity is a complex trait disease where the environment influences susceptibility to disease by unclear mechanisms. T cell receptor clustering and signaling at the immune synapse, T cell proliferation, CTLA-4 endocytosis, T(H)1 differentiation, and autoimmunity are negatively regulated by beta1,6GlcNAc-branched N-glycans attached to cell surface glycoproteins. Beta1,6GlcNAc-branched N-glycan expression in T cells is dependent on metabolite supply to UDP-GlcNAc biosynthesis (hexosamine pathway) and in turn to Golgi N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases Mgat1, -2, -4, and -5. In Jurkat T cells, beta1,6GlcNAc-branching in N-glycans is stimulated by metabolites supplying the hexosamine pathway including glucose, GlcNAc, acetoacetate, glutamine, ammonia, or uridine but not by control metabolites mannosamine, galactose, mannose, succinate, or pyruvate. Hexosamine supplementation in vitro and in vivo also increases beta1,6GlcNAc-branched N-glycans in naïve mouse T cells and suppresses T cell receptor signaling, T cell proliferation, CTLA-4 endocytosis, T(H)1 differentiation, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice. Our results indicate that metabolite flux through the hexosamine and N-glycan pathways conditionally regulates autoimmunity by modulating multiple T cell functionalities downstream of beta1,6GlcNAc-branched N-glycans. This suggests metabolic therapy as a potential treatment for autoimmune disease.

  14. Homology with vesicle fusion mediator syntaxin-1a predicts determinants ofepimorphin/syntaxin-2 function in mammary epithelial morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Connie S.; Nelson, Celeste M.; Khauv, Davitte; Bennett, Simone; Radisky, Evette S.; Hirai, Yohei; Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2009-06-03

    We have shown that branching morphogenesis of mammary ductal structures requires the action of the morphogen epimorphin/syntaxin-2. Epimorphin, originally identified as an extracellular molecule, is identical to syntaxin-2, an intracellular molecule that is a member of the extensively investigated syntaxin family of proteins that mediate vesicle trafficking. We show here that although epimorphin/syntaxin-2 is highly homologous to syntaxin-1a, only epimorphin/syntaxin-2 can stimulate mammary branching morphogenesis. We construct a homology model of epimorphin/syntaxin-2 based on the published structure of syntaxin-1a, and we use this model to identify the structural motif responsible for the morphogenic activity. We identify four residues located within the cleft between helices B and C that differ between syntaxin-1a and epimorphin/syntaxin-2; through site-directed mutagenesis of these four amino acids, we confer the properties of epimorphin for cell adhesion, gene activation, and branching morphogenesis onto the inactive syntaxin-1a template. These results provide a dramatic demonstration of the use of structural information about one molecule to define a functional motif of a second molecule that is related at the sequence level but highly divergent functionally.

  15. A possible structural determinant of selectivity of boldine and derivatives for the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor subtype.

    PubMed Central

    Madrero, Y.; Elorriaga, M.; Martinez, S.; Noguera, M. A.; Cassels, B. K.; D'Ocon, P.; Ivorra, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    1. The selectivity of action of boldine and the related aporphine alkaloids, predicentrine (9-O-methylboldine) and glaucine (2,9-O-dimethylboldine) and alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes was studied by examining [3H]-prazosin competition binding in rat cerebral cortex. WB 4101 and benoxathian were used as selective alpha 1A-adrenoceptor antagonists. 2. In the competition experiments [3H]-prazosin (0.2 nM) binding was inhibited by WB 4101 and benoxathian. The inhibition curves displayed shallow slopes which could be subdivided into high and low affinity components (pKi = 9.92 and 8.29 for WB 4101, 9.35 and 7.94 for benoxathian). The two antagonists recognized approximately 37% of the sites with high affinity from among the total [3H]-prazosin specific binding sites. 3. Boldine, predicentrine and glaucine also competed for [3H]-prazosin (0.2 nM) binding with shallow and biphasic curves recognizing 30-40% of the sites with high affinity. Drug affinities (pKi) at the high and low affinity sites were, 8.31 and 6.50, respectively, for boldine, 8.13 and 6.39 for predicentrine, and 7.12 and 5.92 for glaucine. The relative order of selectivity for alpha 1A-adrenoceptors was boldine (70 fold alpha 1A-selective) = predicentrine (60 fold, alpha 1A-selective) > glaucine (15 fold, alpha 1A-selective). 4. Pretreatment of rat cerebral cortex membranes with chloroethylclonidine (CEC, 10 microM) for 30 min at 37 degrees C followed by thorough washing out reduced specific [3H]-prazosin binding by approximately 70%. The CEC-insensitive [3H]-prazosin binding was inhibited by boldine monophasically (Hill slope = 0.93) with a single pKi value (7.76). 5. These results suggest that whereas the aporphine structure shared by these alkaloids is responsible for their selectively of action for the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor subtype in rat cerebral cortex, defined functional groups, namely the 2-hydroxy function, induces a significant increase in alpha 1A-subtype selectivity and affinity. PMID:8982502

  16. Similarity of "core" structures in two different glycans of tyrosine-linked eubacterial S-layer glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Messner, P; Christian, R; Neuninger, C; Schulz, G

    1995-01-01

    Previously, the repeating-unit structure of the S-layer glycoprotein from the eubacterium Bacillus alvei CCM 2051 has been determined to be [-->3)-beta-D-Galp-(1-->4)-[alpha-D-Glcp-(1-->6)-]-beta-D-ManpNAc- (1-->]n (E. Altman, J.-R. Brisson, P. Messner, and U. B. Sleytr, Biochem. Cell Biol. 69:72-78, 1991). Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic reexamination of this glycan reveals that the O-antigen-like domain of the polysaccharide is [see text] connected with the S-layer polypeptide through the "core" structure -->3)-alpha-L-Rhap-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Rhap-(1-->3)-alpha-L-R hap-(1-->3)-beta-D-Galp-(1-->O)-Tyr. Except for the substitution in position 4 of the nonreducing rhamnose with the modified glyceric acid phosphate residue GroA-2-->OPO2-->4-beta-D-ManpNAc-(1-->, this core is identical to the core of the tyrosine-linked glycan from the S-layer glycoprotein of Thermoanaerobacter thermohydrosulfuricus L111-69 (K. Bock, J. Schuster-Kolbe, E. Altman, G. Allmaier, B. Stahl, R. Christian, U. B. Sleytr, and P. Messner, J. Biol. Chem. 269:7137-7144, 1994). PMID:7721708

  17. Emerging structural insights into glycoprotein quality control coupled with N-glycan processing in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Tadashi; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Kato, Koichi

    2015-01-30

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the sugar chain is initially introduced onto newly synthesized proteins as a triantennary tetradecasaccharide (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2). The attached oligosaccharide chain is subjected to stepwise trimming by the actions of specific glucosidases and mannosidases. In these processes, the transiently expressed N-glycans, as processing intermediates, function as signals for the determination of glycoprotein fates, i.e., folding, transport, or degradation through interactions of a series of intracellular lectins. The monoglucosylated glycoforms are hallmarks of incompletely folded states of glycoproteins in this system, whereas the outer mannose trimming leads to ER-associated glycoprotein degradation. This review outlines the recently emerging evidence regarding the molecular and structural basis of this glycoprotein quality control system, which is regulated through dynamic interplay among intracellular lectins, glycosidases, and glycosyltransferase. Structural snapshots of carbohydrate-lectin interactions have been provided at the atomic level using X-ray crystallographic analyses. Conformational ensembles of uncomplexed triantennary high-mannose-type oligosaccharides have been characterized in a quantitative manner using molecular dynamics simulation in conjunction with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. These complementary views provide new insights into glycoprotein recognition in quality control coupled with N-glycan processing.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum-associated N-glycan degradation of cold-upregulated glycoproteins in response to chilling stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Wang, Dinghe; She, Jessica; Li, Jianming; Zhu, Jian-Kang; She, Yi-Min

    2016-10-01

    N-glycosylation has a great impact on glycoprotein structure, conformation, stability, solubility, immunogenicity and enzyme activity. Structural characterization of N-glycoproteome has been challenging but can provide insights into the extent of protein folding and surface topology. We describe a highly sensitive proteomics method for large-scale identification and quantification of glycoproteins in Arabidopsis through (15) N-metabolic labeling, selective enrichment of glycopeptides, data-dependent MS/MS analysis and automated database searching. In-house databases of Arabidopsis glycoproteins and glycopeptides containing Asn-X-Ser/Thr/Cys motifs were constructed by reducing 20% and 90% of the public database size, respectively, to enable a rapid analysis of large datasets for comprehensive identification and quantification of glycoproteins and heterogeneous N-glycans in a complex mixture. Proteome-wide analysis identified c. 100 stress-related N-glycoproteins, of which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident proteins were examined to be up-regulated. Quantitative measurements provided a molecular signature specific to glycoproteins for determining the degree of plant stress at low temperature. Structural N-glycoproteomics following time-course cold treatments revealed the stress-responsive degradation of high-mannose type N-glycans in ER in response to chilling stress, which may aid in elucidating the cellular mechanisms of protein relocation, transport, trafficking, misfolding and degradation under stress conditions. PMID:27558752

  19. Affinity Maturation of a Potent Family of HIV Antibodies Is Primarily Focused on Accommodating or Avoiding Glycans.

    PubMed

    Garces, Fernando; Lee, Jeong Hyun; de Val, Natalia; de la Pena, Alba Torrents; Kong, Leopold; Puchades, Cristina; Hua, Yuanzi; Stanfield, Robyn L; Burton, Dennis R; Moore, John P; Sanders, Rogier W; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2015-12-15

    The high-mannose patch on the HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoprotein is the epicenter for binding of the potent broadly neutralizing PGT121 family of antibodies, but strategies for generating such antibodies by vaccination have not been defined. We generated structures of inferred antibody intermediates by X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy to elucidate the molecular events that occurred during evolution of this family. Binding analyses revealed that affinity maturation was primarily focused on avoiding, accommodating, or binding the N137 glycan. The overall antibody approach angle to Env was defined very early in the maturation process, yet some variation evolved in the PGT121 family branches that led to differences in glycan specificities in their respective epitopes. Furthermore, we determined a crystal structure of the recombinant BG505 SOSIP.664 HIV-1 trimer with a PGT121 family member at 3.0 Å that, in concert with these antibody intermediate structures, provides insights to advance design of HIV vaccine candidates. PMID:26682982

  20. Sampling of Glycan-Bound Conformers by the Anti-HIV Lectin Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin in the Absence of Sugar.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Marta G; Koharudin, Leonardus M I; Ban, David; Sabo, T Michael; Trigo-Mourino, Pablo; Mazur, Adam; Griesinger, Christian; Gronenborn, Angela M; Lee, Donghan

    2015-05-26

    Lectins from different sources have been shown to interfere with HIV infection by binding to the sugars of viral-envelope glycoproteins. Three-dimensional atomic structures of a number of HIV-inactivating lectins have been determined, both as free proteins and in glycan-bound forms. However, details on the mechanism of recognition and binding to sugars are elusive. Herein we focus on the anti-HIV lectin OAA from Oscillatoria agardhii: We show that in the absence of sugars in solution, both the sugar-free and sugar-bound protein conformations that were observed in the X-ray crystal structures exist as conformational substates. Our results suggest that glycan recognition occurs by conformational selection within the ground state; this model differs from the popular "excited-state" model. Our findings provide further insight into molecular recognition of the major receptor on the HIV virus by OAA. These details can potentially be used for the optimization and/or development of preventive anti-HIV therapeutics. PMID:25873445

  1. Transmembrane and secreted MUC1 probes show trafficking-dependent changes in O-glycan core profiles.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Katja; Kinlough, Carol L; Müller, Stefan; Razawi, Hani; Baldus, Stephan E; Hughey, Rebecca P; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2005-11-01

    The human mucin MUC1 is expressed both as a transmembrane heterodimeric protein complex that recycles via the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and as a secreted isoform. To determine whether differences in cellular trafficking might influence the O-glycosylation profiles on these isoforms, we developed a model system consisting of membrane-bound and secretory-recombinant glycosylation probes. Secretory MUC1-S contains only a truncated repeat domain, whereas in MUC1-M constructs this domain is attached to the native transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of MUC1 either directly (M0) or via an intermitting nonfunctional (M1) or functional sperm protein-enterokinase-agrin (SEA) module (M2); the SEA module contains a putative proteolytic cleavage site and is associated with proteins receiving extensive O-glycosylation. We showed that MUC1-M2 simulates endogenous MUC1 by recycling from the cell surface of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant ldlD14 cells through intracellular compartments where its glycosylation continues. The profiles of O-linked glycans on MUC1-S secreted by epithelial EBNA-293 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells revealed patterns dominated by core 2-based oligosaccharides. In contrast, the respective membrane-shed probes expressed in the same cells showed a complete shift to patterns dominated by sialyl core 1. In conclusion, glycan core profiles reflected the subcellular trafficking pathways of the secretory or membranous probes and the modifying activities of the resident glycosyltransferases.

  2. Cyto-sensing in electrochemical lab-on-paper cyto-device for in-situ evaluation of multi-glycan expressions on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Min; Ge, Lei; Kong, Qingkun; Zheng, Xiaoxiao; Ge, Shenguang; Li, Nianqiang; Yu, Jinghua; Yan, Mei

    2015-01-15

    A novel electrochemical lab-on-paper cyto-device (ELPCD) was fabricated to demonstrate sensitive and specific cancer cell detection as well as in-situ monitoring of multi-glycans on living cancer cells. In this ELPCD, aptamers modified three-dimensional macroporous Au-paper electrode (Au-PE) was employed as the working electrode for specific and efficient cancer cell capture. Using a sandwich format, sensitive and reproducible cell detection was achieved in this ELPCD on the basis of the electrochemical signal amplification of the Au-PE and the horseradish peroxidase-lectin electrochemical probe. The ELPCD displayed excellent analytical performance for the detection of four K562 cells with a wide linear calibration range from 550 to 2.0×10(7) cells mL(-1). Then, this ELPCD was successfully applied to determine cell-surface multi-glycans in parallel and in-situ monitor multi-glycans expression on living cells in response to drug treatment through in-electrode 3D cell culture. The proposed method provides promising application in decipherment of the glycomic codes as well as clinical diagnosis and treatment in early process of cancer.

  3. Modular synthesis of N-glycans and arrays for the hetero-ligand binding analysis of HIV antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivatare, Sachin S.; Chang, Shih-Huang; Tsai, Tsung-I.; Tseng, Susan Yu; Shivatare, Vidya S.; Lin, Yih-Shyan; Cheng, Yang-Yu; Ren, Chien-Tai; Lee, Chang-Chun David; Pawar, Sujeet; Tsai, Charng-Sheng; Shih, Hao-Wei; Zeng, Yi-Fang; Liang, Chi-Hui; Kwong, Peter D.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2016-04-01

    A new class of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) from HIV donors has been reported to target the glycans on gp120—a glycoprotein found on the surface of the virus envelope—thus renewing hope of developing carbohydrate-based HIV vaccines. However, the version of gp120 used in previous studies was not from human T cells and so the glycosylation pattern could be somewhat different to that found in the native system. Moreover, some antibodies recognized two different glycans simultaneously and this cannot be detected with the commonly used glycan microarrays on glass slides. Here, we have developed a glycan microarray on an aluminium-oxide-coated glass slide containing a diverse set of glycans, including homo- and mixed N-glycans (high-mannose, hybrid and complex types) that were prepared by modular chemo-enzymatic methods to detect the presence of hetero-glycan binding behaviours. This new approach allows rapid screening and identification of optimal glycans recognized by neutralizing antibodies, and could speed up the development of HIV-1 vaccines targeting cell surface glycans.

  4. Isolation of oligomannose-type glycans from bean glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Ye, J; Wold, F

    1993-02-15

    We have isolated individual oligosaccharyl-asparagine derivatives from the total soluble glycoproteins from kidney beens (Phaseolus vulgaris) and from lima beans (Phaseolus limensis). The protein/glycoprotein mixture was digested exhaustively by pronase, and the glycan-containing fractions were separated from free amino acids and peptides by gel filtration. The oligosaccharyl-asparagine derivatives were finally fractionated on Dowex 50 (C. C. Huang, H.E. Meyer, and R. Montgomery, Carbohydr. Res. 13, 127-137, 1970), and the individual fractions were characterized by mass spectrometry, NMR, and ion exchange chromatography. With the procedures described, only oligomannose derivatives were obtained from the beans. In the case of kidney beans, six different derivatives were observed and characterized, Man9GlcNAc2Asn, two positional isomers of Man8GlcNAc2Asn, two positional isomers of Man7GlcNAc2Asn, and Man6GlcNAc2Asn. Under identical conditions the lima beans yielded primarily the Man9GlcNAc2Asn derivative along with a small amount of the two Man8GlcNAc2Asn derivatives. The oligomannose structures can be isolated in reasonable quantities (2-20 mg) from about 200 g of dry beans. PMID:8465965

  5. Systems glycobiology: biochemical reaction networks regulating glycan structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Neelamegham, Sriram; Liu, Gang

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing use of bioinformatics based methods in the field of Glycobiology. These have been used largely to curate glycan structures, organize array-based experimental data and display existing knowledge of glycosylation-related pathways in silico. Although the cataloging of vast amounts of data is beneficial, it is often a challenge to gain meaningful mechanistic insight from this exercise alone. The development of specific analysis tools to query the database is necessary. If these queries can integrate existing knowledge of glycobiology, new insights may be gained. Such queries that couple biochemical knowledge and mathematics have been developed in the field of Systems Biology. The current review summarizes the current state of the art in the application of computational modeling in the field of Glycobiology. It provides (i) an overview of experimental and online resources that can be used to construct glycosylation reaction networks, (ii) mathematical methods to formulate the problem including a description of ordinary differential equation and logic-based reaction networks, (iii) optimization techniques that can be applied to fit experimental data for the purpose of model reconstruction and for evaluating unknown model parameters, (iv) post-simulation analysis methods that yield experimentally testable hypotheses and (v) a summary of available software tools that can be used by non-specialists to perform many of the above functions. PMID:21436236

  6. Comparison of human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a typing by solid phase red cell adherence to HPA-1 allotypes determined by allele-specific restriction enzyme analysis.

    PubMed

    McGann, M J; Procter, J L; Honda, J; Matsuo, K; Stroncek, D F

    2000-01-01

    Phenotype results for human platelet antigen (HPA)-1 by Capture-P(R), (Immucor, Inc., Norcross, GA) solid phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) were compared to results of allele-specific restriction enzyme analysis (ASRA) for the determination of HPA-1 allotype. Because the expression of HPA-1a and HPA-1b is determined by a single nucleotide substitution of thymine --> cytosine at position 196 of the gene encoding membrane glycoprotein (GP)-IIIa, it is possible to distinguish the alternate forms of the gene using ASRA. Primers (5'- GCTCCAATGTACGGGGTAAACTC-3' and 5'-CAGACCTCCACCTTGTGCTCTATG- 3') were designed to amplify the region of DNA that contains the polymorphism and a restriction enzyme (Nci I) was used to cleave the DNA in a predictable manner. Platelet-rich plasma for immunophenotying and anticoagulated whole blood for DNA extraction were obtained from 159 platepheresis donors. Of 159 SPRCA tests, 138 were valid and 21 were invalid due to positive autologous controls. For 135 HPA-1a-positive and 2 HPA-1a-negative phenotype tests the DNA typing results correlated: 135 positive samples were either HPA-1a/a or HPA-1a/b and 2 negative samples were HPA-1b/b. One donor that typed as HPA-1b/b by ASRA had a positive result of 2+ on SPRCA. This donor had been previously typed by SPRCA as HPA-1a-negative and DNA typed as HPA-1b/b by our laboratory. Based on these findings results of = 3+ by SPRCA are interpreted as HPA-1a-positive for donor screening purposes. SPRCA test results of = 2+ are considered equivocal and the HPA-1 allotype is determined by ASRA. HPA-1a-negative donors by SPRCA must be confirmed as HPA-1b/b by ASRA prior to issue for a patient that requires HPA-1anegative platelets.

  7. Amino acid residue 247 in canine sulphotransferase SULT1D1: a new determinant of substrate selectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Tsoi, Carrie; Widersten, Mikael; Morgenstern, Ralf; Swedmark, Stellan

    2004-01-01

    The SULT (sulphotransferase) family plays a critical role in the detoxification and activation of endogenous and exogenous compounds as well as in the regulation of steroid hormone actions and neurotransmitter functions. The structure-activity relationships of the human SULTs have been investigated with focus on the amino acid 146 in hSULT1A3 and its impact on dopamine/PNP (p-nitrophenol) specificity. In the present study, we have generated canine SULT1D1 (cSULT1D1) variants with mutations at amino acid residues in the substrate-binding pocket [A146E (Ala-146-->Glu), A146D, A146Q, I86D or D247L]. These mutation sites were chosen with regard to their possible contribution to the marked dopamine/PNP preference of cSULT1D1. After characterization, we found that the overall sulphation efficiencies for the cSULT1D1 A146 and the I86 mutants were strongly decreased for both substrates compared with wild-type cSULT1D1 but the substrate preference was unchanged. In contrast, the D247L mutant was found to be more than 21-fold better at sulphating PNP (120-fold decrease in K(m) value) but 54-fold less efficient in sulphating dopamine (8-fold increase in K(m) value) and the preference was switched from dopamine to PNP, indicating the importance of this amino acid in the dopamine/PNP preference in cSULT1D1. Our results show that Asp-247 has a pronounced effect on the substrate specificity of cSULT1D1 and thus we have identified a previously unrecognized contributor to active-site selectivity. PMID:14614767

  8. Characterization of the N-glycans of female Angiostrongylus cantonensis worms.

    PubMed

    Veríssimo, Carolina M; Morassutti, Alessandra L; von Itzstein, Mark; Sutov, Grigorij; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren; McAtamney, Sarah; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Glycoconjugates play a crucial role in the host-parasite relationships of helminthic infections, including angiostrongyliasis. It has previously been shown that the antigenicity of proteins from female Angiostrongylus cantonensis worms may depend on their associated glycan moieties. Here, an N-glycan profile of A. cantonensis is reported. A total soluble extract (TE) was prepared from female A. cantonensis worms and was tested by western blot before and after glycan oxidation or N- and O-glycosidase treatment. The importance of N-glycans for the immunogenicity of A. cantonensis was demonstrated when deglycosylation of the TE with PNGase F completely abrogated IgG recognition. The TE was also fractionated using various lectin columns [Ulex europaeus (UEA), concanavalin A (Con A), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Triticum vulgaris (WGA) and Lycopersicon esculentum (LEA)], and then each fraction was digested with PNGase F. Released N-glycans were analyzed with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS) and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS. Complex-type, high mannose, and truncated glycan structures were identified in all five fractions. Sequential MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis of the major MS peaks identified complex-type structures, with a α1-6 fucosylated core and truncated antennas. Glycoproteins in the TE were labeled with BodipyAF558-SE dye for a lectin microarray analysis. Fluorescent images were analyzed with ProScanArray imaging software followed by statistical analysis. A total of 29 lectins showed positive binding to the TE. Of these, Bandeiraea simplicifolia (BS-I), PNA, and Wisteria floribunda (WFA), which recognize galactose (Gal) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), exhibited high affinity binding. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that female A. cantonensis worms have characteristic helminth N-glycans.

  9. N-glycans modulate the function of human corticosteroid-binding globulin.

    PubMed

    Sumer-Bayraktar, Zeynep; Kolarich, Daniel; Campbell, Matthew P; Ali, Sinan; Packer, Nicolle H; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten

    2011-08-01

    Human corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), a heavily glycosylated protein containing six N-linked glycosylation sites, transports cortisol and other corticosteroids in blood circulation. Here, we investigate the biological importance of the N-glycans of CBG derived from human serum by performing a structural and functional characterization of CBG N-glycosylation. Liquid chromatography-tandem MS-based glycoproteomics and glycomics combined with exoglycosidase treatment revealed 26 complex type N-glycoforms, all of which were terminated with α2,3-linked neuraminic acid (NeuAc) residues. The CBG N-glycans showed predominantly bi- and tri-antennary branching, but higher branching was also observed. N-glycans from all six N-glycosylation sites were identified with high site occupancies (70.5-99.5%) and glycoforms from all sites contained a relatively low degree of core-fucosylation (0-34.9%). CBG showed site-specific glycosylation and the site-to-site differences in core-fucosylation and branching could be in silico correlated with the accessibility to the individual glycosylation sites on the maturely folded protein. Deglycosylated and desialylated CBG analogs were generated to investigate the biological importance of CBG N-glycans. As a functional assay, MCF-7 cells were challenged with native and glycan-modified CBG and the amount of cAMP, which is produced as a quantitative response upon CBG binding to its cell surface receptor, was used to evaluate the CBG:receptor interaction. The removal of both CBG N-glycans and NeuAc residues increased the production of cAMP significantly. This confirms that N-glycans are involved in the CBG:receptor interaction and indicates that the modulation is performed by steric and/or electrostatic means through the terminal NeuAc residues.

  10. Symbiotic Human Gut Bacteria with Variable Metabolic Priorities for Host Mucosal Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Pudlo, Nicholas A.; Urs, Karthik; Kumar, Supriya Suresh; German, J. Bruce; Mills, David A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many symbiotic gut bacteria possess the ability to degrade multiple polysaccharides, thereby providing nutritional advantages to their hosts. Like microorganisms adapted to other complex nutrient environments, gut symbionts give different metabolic priorities to substrates present in mixtures. We investigated the responses of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a common human intestinal bacterium that metabolizes more than a dozen different polysaccharides, including the O-linked glycans that are abundant in secreted mucin. Experiments in which mucin glycans were presented simultaneously with other carbohydrates show that degradation of these host carbohydrates is consistently repressed in the presence of alternative substrates, even by B. thetaiotaomicron previously acclimated to growth in pure mucin glycans. Experiments with media containing systematically varied carbohydrate cues and genetic mutants reveal that transcriptional repression of genes involved in mucin glycan metabolism is imposed by simple sugars and, in one example that was tested, is mediated through a small intergenic region in a transcript-autonomous fashion. Repression of mucin glycan-responsive gene clusters in two other human gut bacteria, Bacteroides massiliensis and Bacteroides fragilis, exhibited variable and sometimes reciprocal responses compared to those of B. thetaiotaomicron, revealing that these symbionts vary in their preference for mucin glycans and that these differences occur at the level of controlling individual gene clusters. Our results reveal that sensing and metabolic triaging of glycans are complex processes that vary among species, underscoring the idea that these phenomena are likely to be hidden drivers of microbiota community dynamics and may dictate which microorganisms preferentially commit to various niches in a constantly changing nutritional environment. PMID:26556271

  11. Characterization of the N-glycans of female Angiostrongylus cantonensis worms.

    PubMed

    Veríssimo, Carolina M; Morassutti, Alessandra L; von Itzstein, Mark; Sutov, Grigorij; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren; McAtamney, Sarah; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Glycoconjugates play a crucial role in the host-parasite relationships of helminthic infections, including angiostrongyliasis. It has previously been shown that the antigenicity of proteins from female Angiostrongylus cantonensis worms may depend on their associated glycan moieties. Here, an N-glycan profile of A. cantonensis is reported. A total soluble extract (TE) was prepared from female A. cantonensis worms and was tested by western blot before and after glycan oxidation or N- and O-glycosidase treatment. The importance of N-glycans for the immunogenicity of A. cantonensis was demonstrated when deglycosylation of the TE with PNGase F completely abrogated IgG recognition. The TE was also fractionated using various lectin columns [Ulex europaeus (UEA), concanavalin A (Con A), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Triticum vulgaris (WGA) and Lycopersicon esculentum (LEA)], and then each fraction was digested with PNGase F. Released N-glycans were analyzed with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS) and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS. Complex-type, high mannose, and truncated glycan structures were identified in all five fractions. Sequential MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis of the major MS peaks identified complex-type structures, with a α1-6 fucosylated core and truncated antennas. Glycoproteins in the TE were labeled with BodipyAF558-SE dye for a lectin microarray analysis. Fluorescent images were analyzed with ProScanArray imaging software followed by statistical analysis. A total of 29 lectins showed positive binding to the TE. Of these, Bandeiraea simplicifolia (BS-I), PNA, and Wisteria floribunda (WFA), which recognize galactose (Gal) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), exhibited high affinity binding. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that female A. cantonensis worms have characteristic helminth N-glycans. PMID:27107931

  12. Structure determination by MALDI-IRMPD mass spectrometry and exoglycosidase digestions of O-linked oligosaccharides from Xenopus borealis egg jelly

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bensheng; Russell, Scott C; Zhang, Jinhua; Hedrick, Jerry L; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2011-01-01

    Differences in the fertilization behavior of Xenopus borealis from X. laevis and X. tropicalis suggest differences in the glycosylation of the egg jellies. To test this assumption, O-linked glycans were chemically released from the egg jelly coat glycoproteins of X. borealis. Over 50 major neutral glycans were observed, and no anionic glycans were detected from the released O-glycan pool. Preliminary structures of ∼30 neutral oligosaccharides were determined using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) infrared multiphoton dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (MS). The mass fingerprint of a group of peaks for the core-2 structure of O-glycans was conserved in the tandem mass spectra and was instrumental in rapid and efficient structure determination. Among the 29 O-glycans, 22 glycans contain the typical core-2 structure, 3 glycans have the core-1 structure and 2 glycans contained a previously unobserved core structure with hexose at the reducing end. There were seven pairs of structural isomers observed in the major O-linked oligosaccharides. To further elucidate the structures of a dozen O-linked glycans, specific and targeted exoglycosidase digestions were carried out and the products were monitored with MALDI-MS. Reported here are the elucidated structures of O-linked oligosaccharides from glycoproteins of X. borealis egg jelly coats. The structural differences in O-glycans from jelly coats of X. borealis and its close relatives may provide a better understanding of the structure–function relationships and the role of glycans in the fertilization process within Xenopodinae. PMID:21220250

  13. Distinct phosphorylation sites on the ghrelin receptor, GHSR1a, establish a code that determines the functions of ß-arrestins.

    PubMed

    Bouzo-Lorenzo, Monica; Santo-Zas, Icía; Lodeiro, Maria; Nogueiras, Rubén; Casanueva, Felipe F; Castro, Marian; Pazos, Yolanda; Tobin, Andrew B; Butcher, Adrian J; Camiña, Jesús P

    2016-03-03

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor, GHSR1a, mediates the biological activities of ghrelin, which includes the secretion of growth hormone, as well as the stimulation of appetite, food intake and maintenance of energy homeostasis. Mapping phosphorylation sites on GHSR1a and knowledge of how these sites control specific functional consequences unlocks new strategies for the development of therapeutic agents targeting individual functions. Herein, we have identified the phosphorylation of different sets of sites within GHSR1a which engender distinct functionality of ß-arrestins. More specifically, the Ser(362), Ser(363) and Thr(366) residues at the carboxyl-terminal tail were primarily responsible for ß-arrestin 1 and 2 binding, internalization and ß-arrestin-mediated proliferation and adipogenesis. The Thr(350) and Ser(349) are not necessary for ß-arrestin recruitment, but are involved in the stabilization of the GHSR1a-ß-arrestin complex in a manner that determines the ultimate cellular consequences of ß-arrestin signaling. We further demonstrated that the mitogenic and adipogenic effect of ghrelin were mainly dependent on the ß-arrestin bound to the phosphorylated GHSR1a. In contrast, the ghrelin function on GH secretion was entirely mediated by G protein signaling. Our data is consistent with the hypothesis that the phosphorylation pattern on the C terminus of GHSR1a determines the signaling and physiological output.

  14. Distinct phosphorylation sites on the ghrelin receptor, GHSR1a, establish a code that determines the functions of ß-arrestins

    PubMed Central

    Bouzo-Lorenzo, Monica; Santo-Zas, Icía; Lodeiro, Maria; Nogueiras, Rubén; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Castro, Marian; Pazos, Yolanda; Tobin, Andrew B; Butcher, Adrian J.; Camiña, Jesús P.

    2016-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor, GHSR1a, mediates the biological activities of ghrelin, which includes the secretion of growth hormone, as well as the stimulation of appetite, food intake and maintenance of energy homeostasis. Mapping phosphorylation sites on GHSR1a and knowledge of how these sites control specific functional consequences unlocks new strategies for the development of therapeutic agents targeting individual functions. Herein, we have identified the phosphorylation of different sets of sites within GHSR1a which engender distinct functionality of ß-arrestins. More specifically, the Ser362, Ser363 and Thr366 residues at the carboxyl-terminal tail were primarily responsible for ß-arrestin 1 and 2 binding, internalization and ß-arrestin-mediated proliferation and adipogenesis. The Thr350 and Ser349 are not necessary for ß-arrestin recruitment, but are involved in the stabilization of the GHSR1a-ß-arrestin complex in a manner that determines the ultimate cellular consequences of ß-arrestin signaling. We further demonstrated that the mitogenic and adipogenic effect of ghrelin were mainly dependent on the ß-arrestin bound to the phosphorylated GHSR1a. In contrast, the ghrelin function on GH secretion was entirely mediated by G protein signaling. Our data is consistent with the hypothesis that the phosphorylation pattern on the C terminus of GHSR1a determines the signaling and physiological output. PMID:26935831

  15. Single, context-specific glycans can target misfolded glycoproteins for ER-associated degradation

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Eric D.; Ng, Davis T.W.

    2005-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) maintains an environment essential for secretory protein folding. Consequently, the premature transport of polypeptides would be harmful to the cell. To avert this scenario, mechanisms collectively termed “ER quality control” prevent the transport of nascent polypeptides until they properly fold. Irreversibly misfolded molecules are sorted for disposal by the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. To better understand the relationship between quality control and ERAD, we studied a new misfolded variant of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY). The molecule was recognized and retained by ER quality control but failed to enter the ERAD pathway. Systematic analysis revealed that a single, specific N-linked glycan of CPY was required for sorting into the pathway. The determinant is dependent on the putative lectin-like receptor Htm1/Mnl1p. The discovery of a similar signal in misfolded proteinase A supported the generality of the mechanism. These studies show that specific signals embedded in glycoproteins can direct their degradation if they fail to fold. PMID:15809311

  16. Imaging of N-Linked Glycans from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Sections Using MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is associated with most of the diseases. Direct imaging and profiling of N-glycans on tissue sections can reveal tissue-specific and/or disease-associated N-glycans, which not only could serve as molecular signatures for diagnosis but also shed light on the functional roles of these biomolecules. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool that has been used to correlate peptides, proteins, lipids, and metabolites with their underlying histopathology in tissue sections. Here, we report an MSI technique for direct analysis of N-glycans from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. This technique consists of sectioning FFPE tissues, deparaffinization, and rehydration of the sections, denaturing tissue proteins, releasing N-linked glycans from proteins by printing peptide-N-glycosidase F over the sections, spray-coating the tissue with matrix, and analyzing N-glycans by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Brain sections from a C57BL/6 mouse were imaged using this technique at a resolution of 100 μm. Forty-two N-glycans were analyzed from the mouse brain section. The mass spectrometry images were used to study the relative abundance of oligomannose, nonfucosylated, and fucosylated complex N-glycans in different brain areas including isocortex, hippocampal formation, and brainstem and specific glycans associated with different areas of the brain were identified. Furthermore, glioblastoma tumor xenografts in a NOD/SCID mouse were imaged. Several glycans with differential expression in tumor versus normal brain tissues were identified. The MSI technique allows for imaging of N-glycans directly from FFPE sections. This method can potentially identify tissue-specific and/or disease-associated glycans coexpressed with other molecular signatures or within certain histological structures. PMID:25029481

  17. The N-glycans of Trichomonas vaginalis contain variable core and antennal modifications.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Hykollari, Alba; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Greenwell, Pamela; Leitsch, David; Walochnik, Julia; Wilson, Iain B H

    2012-02-01

    Trichomonad species are widespread unicellular flagellated parasites of vertebrates which interact with their hosts through carbohydrate-lectin interactions. In the past, some data have been accumulated regarding their lipo(phospho)glycans, a major glycoconjugate on their cell surfaces; on the other hand, other than biosynthetic aspects, few details about their N-linked oligosaccharides are known. In this study, we present both mass spectrometric and high-performance liquid chromatography data about the N-glycans of different strains of Trichomonas vaginalis, a parasite of the human reproductive tract. The major structure in all strains examined is a truncated oligomannose form (Man(5)GlcNAc(2)) with α1,2-mannose residues, compatible with a previous bioinformatic examination of the glycogenomic potential of T. vaginalis. In addition, dependent on the strain, N-glycans modified by pentose residues, phosphate or phosphoethanolamine and terminal N-acetyllactosamine (Galβ1,4GlcNAc) units were found. The modification of N-glycans by N-acetyllactosamine in at least some strains is shared with the lipo(phospho)glycan and may represent a further interaction partner for host galectins, thereby playing a role in binding of the parasite to host epithelia. On the other hand, the variation in glycosylation between strains may be the result of genetic diversity within this species. PMID:21983210

  18. Comprehensive profiling of accessible surface glycans of mammalian sperm using a lectin microarray

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that cell surface glycans or glycocalyx play important roles in sperm motility, maturation and fertilization. A comprehensive profile of the sperm surface glycans will greatly facilitate both basic research (sperm glycobiology) and clinical studies, such as diagnostics of infertility. As a group of natural glycan binders, lectin is an ideal tool for cell surface glycan profiling. However, because of the lack of effective technology, only a few lectins have been tested for lectin-sperm binding profiles. To address this challenge, we have developed a procedure for high-throughput probing of mammalian sperm with 91 lectins on lectin microarrays. Normal sperm from human, boar, bull, goat and rabbit were collected and analyzed on the lectin microarrays. Positive bindings of a set of ~50 lectins were observed for all the sperm of 5 species, which indicated a wide range of glycans are on the surface of mammalian sperm. Species specific lectin bindings were also observed. Clustering analysis revealed that the distances of the five species according to the lectin binding profiles are consistent with that of the genome sequence based phylogenetic tree except for rabbit. The procedure that we established in this study could be generally applicable for sperm from other species or defect sperm from the same species. We believe the lectin binding profiles of the mammalian sperm that we established in this study are valuable for both basic research and clinical studies. PMID:24629138

  19. N-Glycans influence the in vitro adhesive and invasive behaviour of three metastatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bironaite, D; Nesland, J M; Dalen, H; Risberg, B; Bryne, M

    2000-01-01

    Alterations in cellular glycosylation may play a key role in metastatic behaviour of tumour cells. We studied three metastatic cell lines, LOX (malignant melanoma), FEMX (malignant melanoma) and MA-11 (mammary carcinoma). These cell lines have a very different metastatic behaviour in vivo, and different glycans have been postulated to be partly responsible for these differences. To further investigate the functional role of carbohydrates, these three cell lines have been treated with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of the biosynthesis of N-glycans and benzyl- alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine (benzyl-alpha-GalNAc; BnGalNAc), an inhibitor of mature O-linked glycans. Various in vitro adhesion and invasion assays were undertaken for functional studies. Tunicamycin significantly inhibited adhesion to laminin, but only slightly affected cell adhesion to collagen IV. The same compound significantly decreased cellular invasiveness through a Matrigel invasion chamber. Moreover, tunicamycin reduced homotypic aggregation of cells. BnGalNAc had generally little effect on cell behaviour in in vitro assay. The effects of the inhibitors were, however, to some extent cell line-specific. We conclude that N-glycans, but probably not mature O-glycans have important in vitro functions in cell adhesion to laminin, cell invasion through Matrigel and cellular aggregation in the studied cell lines. These results support the view that carbohydrates are functionally involved in several steps of the metastatic process. PMID:10754467

  20. Glycosylated proteins preserved over millennia: N-glycan analysis of Tyrolean Iceman, Scythian Princess and Warrior

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Sureyya; Kim, Bum Jin; Ro, Grace; Kim, Jae-Han; Bereuter, Thomas L.; Reiter, Christian; Dimapasoc, Lauren; Garrido, Daniel; Mills, David A.; Grimm, Rudolf; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; An, Hyun Joo

    2014-01-01

    An improved understanding of glycosylation will provide new insights into many biological processes. In the analysis of oligosaccharides from biological samples, a strict regime is typically followed to ensure sample integrity. However, the fate of glycans that have been exposed to environmental conditions over millennia has not yet been investigated. This is also true for understanding the evolution of the glycosylation machinery in humans as well as in any other biological systems. In this study, we examined the glycosylation of tissue samples derived from four mummies which have been naturally preserved: – the 5,300 year old “Iceman called Oetzi”, found in the Tyrolean Alps; the 2,400 year old “Scythian warrior” and “Scythian Princess”, found in the Altai Mountains; and a 4 year old apartment mummy, found in Vienna/Austria. The number of N-glycans that were identified varied both with the age and the preservation status of the mummies. More glycan structures were discovered in the contemporary sample, as expected, however it is significant that glycan still exists in the ancient tissue samples. This discovery clearly shows that glycans persist for thousands of years, and these samples provide a vital insight into ancient glycosylation, offering us a window into the distant past. PMID:24831691

  1. SugarBindDB, a resource of glycan-mediated host–pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mariethoz, Julien; Khatib, Khaled; Alocci, Davide; Campbell, Matthew P.; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Packer, Nicolle H.; Mullen, Elaine H.; Lisacek, Frederique

    2016-01-01

    The SugarBind Database (SugarBindDB) covers knowledge of glycan binding of human pathogen lectins and adhesins. It is a curated database; each glycan–protein binding pair is associated with at least one published reference. The core data element of SugarBindDB is a set of three inseparable components: the pathogenic agent, a lectin/adhesin and a glycan ligand. Each entity (agent, lectin or ligand) is described by a range of properties that are summarized in an entity-dedicated page. Several search, navigation and visualisation tools are implemented to investigate the functional role of glycans in pathogen binding. The database is cross-linked to protein and glycan-relaled resources such as UniProtKB and UniCarbKB. It is tightly bound to the latter via a substructure search tool that maps each ligand to full structures where it occurs. Thus, a glycan–lectin binding pair of SugarBindDB can lead to the identification of a glycan-mediated protein–protein interaction, that is, a lectin–glycoprotein interaction, via substructure search and the knowledge of site-specific glycosylation stored in UniCarbKB. SugarBindDB is accessible at: http://sugarbind.expasy.org. PMID:26578555

  2. Integrated glycoprotein immobilization method for glycopeptide and glycan analysis of cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Mishra, Sumita; Chen, Lijun; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Chan, Daniel W; Chatterjee, Subroto; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins can have a major role in disease initiation and progression. Incredible efforts have recently been made to study the regulation of glycoproteins for disease prognosis and diagnosis. It is essential to elucidate glycans and intact glycoproteins to understand the role of glycosylation in diseases. Sialylated N-glycans play crucial roles in physiological and pathological processes; however, it is laborious to study sialylated glycoproteins due to the labile nature of sialic acid residues. In this study, an integrated platform is developed for the analysis of intact glycoproteins and glycans using a chemoenzymatic approach for immobilization and derivatization of sialic acids. N-Glycans, deglycosylated proteins, and intact glycoproteins from heart tissues of wild type (WT) and transverse aortic constriction (TAC) mouse models were analyzed. We identified 291 unique glycopeptides from 195 glycoproteins; the comparative studies between WT and TAC mice indicate the overexpression of extracellular proteins for heart matrix remodeling and the down-regulation of proteins associated with energy metabolism in cardiac hypertrophy. The integrated platform is a powerful tool for the analysis of glycans and glycoproteins in the discovery of potential cardiac hypertrophy biomarkers.

  3. Regulation of Notch signaling during T- and B-cell development by O-fucose glycans.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Pamela; Guidos, Cynthia J

    2009-07-01

    Notch signaling is required for the development of all T cells and marginal zone (MZ) B cells. Specific roles in T- and B-cell differentiation have been identified for different Notch receptors, the canonical Delta-like (Dll) and Jagged (Jag) Notch ligands, and downstream effectors of Notch signaling. Notch receptors and ligands are post-translationally modified by the addition of glycans to extracellular domain epidermal growth factor-like (EGF) repeats. The O-fucose glycans of Notch cell-autonomously modulate Notch-ligand interactions and the strength of Notch signaling. These glycans are initiated by protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (Pofut1), and elongated by the transfer of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to the fucose by beta1,3GlcNAc-transferases termed lunatic, manic, or radical fringe. This review discusses T- and B-cell development from progenitors deficient in O-fucose glycans. The combined data show that Lfng and Mfng regulate T-cell development by enhancing the interactions of Notch1 in T-cell progenitors with Dll4 on thymic epithelial cells. In the spleen, Lfng and Mfng cooperate to modify Notch2 in MZ B progenitors, enhancing their interaction with Dll1 on endothelial cells and regulating MZ B-cell production. Removal of O-fucose affects Notch signaling in myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis, and the O-fucose glycan in the Notch1 ligand-binding domain is required for optimal T-cell development.

  4. Synthesis and microarray-assisted binding studies of core xylose and fucose containing N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Brzezicka, Katarzyna; Echeverria, Begoña; Serna, Sonia; van Diepen, Angela; Hokke, Cornelis H; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2015-05-15

    The synthesis of a collection of 33 xylosylated and core-fucosylated N-glycans found only in nonmammalian organisms such as plants and parasitic helminths has been achieved by employing a highly convergent chemo-enzymatic approach. The influence of these core modifications on the interaction with plant lectins, with the human lectin DC-SIGN (Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Nonintegrin), and with serum antibodies from schistosome-infected individuals was studied. Core xylosylation markedly reduced or completely abolished binding to several mannose-binding plant lectins and to DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor present on antigen presenting cells. Employing the synthetic collection of core-fucosylated and core-xylosylated N-glycans in the context of a larger glycan array including structures lacking these core modifications, we were able to dissect core xylose and core fucose specific antiglycan antibody responses in S. mansoni infection sera, and we observed clear and immunologically relevant differences between children and adult groups infected with this parasite. The work presented here suggests that, quite similar to bisecting N-acetylglucosamine, core xylose distorts the conformation of the unsubstituted glycan, with important implications for the immunogenicity and protein binding properties of complex N-glycans.

  5. Role of sulfated glycans in adherence of the microsporidian Encephalitozoon intestinalis to host cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hayman, J Russell; Southern, Timothy R; Nash, Theodore E

    2005-02-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular opportunistic protists that infect a wide variety of animals, including humans, via environmentally resistant spores. Infection requires that spores be in close proximity to host cells so that the hollow polar tube can pierce the cell membrane and inject the spore contents into the cell cytoplasm. Like other eukaryotic microbes, microsporidia may use specific mechanisms for adherence in order to achieve target cell proximity and increase the likelihood of successful infection. Our data show that Encephalitozoon intestinalis exploits sulfated glycans such as the cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in selection of and attachment to host cells. When exogenous sulfated glycans are used as inhibitors in spore adherence assays, E. intestinalis spore adherence is reduced by as much as 88%. However, there is no inhibition when nonsulfated glycans are used, suggesting that E. intestinalis spores utilize sulfated host cell glycans in adherence. These studies were confirmed by exposure of host cells to xylopyranoside, which limits host cell surface GAGs, and sodium chlorate, which decreases surface sulfation. Spore adherence studies with CHO mutant cell lines that are deficient in either surface GAGs or surface heparan sulfate also confirmed the necessity of sulfated glycans. Furthermore, when spore adherence is inhibited, host cell infection is reduced, indicating a direct association between spore adherence and infectivity. These data show that E. intestinalis specifically adheres to target cells by way of sulfated host cell surface GAGs and that this mechanism serves to enhance infectivity.

  6. Glycosylated proteins preserved over millennia: N-glycan analysis of Tyrolean Iceman, Scythian Princess and Warrior.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Sureyya; Kim, Bum Jin; Ro, Grace; Kim, Jae-Han; Bereuter, Thomas L; Reiter, Christian; Dimapasoc, Lauren; Garrido, Daniel; Mills, David A; Grimm, Rudolf; Lebrilla, Carlito B; An, Hyun Joo

    2014-05-16

    An improved understanding of glycosylation will provide new insights into many biological processes. In the analysis of oligosaccharides from biological samples, a strict regime is typically followed to ensure sample integrity. However, the fate of glycans that have been exposed to environmental conditions over millennia has not yet been investigated. This is also true for understanding the evolution of the glycosylation machinery in humans as well as in any other biological systems. In this study, we examined the glycosylation of tissue samples derived from four mummies which have been naturally preserved: - the 5,300 year old "Iceman called Oetzi", found in the Tyrolean Alps; the 2,400 year old "Scythian warrior" and "Scythian Princess", found in the Altai Mountains; and a 4 year old apartment mummy, found in Vienna/Austria. The number of N-glycans that were identified varied both with the age and the preservation status of the mummies. More glycan structures were discovered in the contemporary sample, as expected, however it is significant that glycan still exists in the ancient tissue samples. This discovery clearly shows that glycans persist for thousands of years, and these samples provide a vital insight into ancient glycosylation, offering us a window into the distant past.

  7. Mass Spectrometric Quantification of N-Linked Glycans by Reference to Exogenous Standards.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Nickita; Porterfield, Mindy; Struwe, Weston B; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Rudd, Pauline M; Tiemeyer, Michael; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Environmental and metabolic processes shape the profile of glycoprotein glycans expressed by cells, whether in culture, developing tissues, or mature organisms. Quantitative characterization of glycomic changes associated with these conditions has been achieved historically by reductive coupling of oligosaccharides to various fluorophores following release from glycoprotein and subsequent HPLC or capillary electrophoretic separation. Such labeling-based approaches provide a robust means of quantifying glycan amount based on fluorescence yield. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, has generally been limited to relative quantification in which the contribution of the signal intensity for an individual glycan is expressed as a percent of the signal intensity summed over the total profile. Relative quantification has been valuable for highlighting changes in glycan expression between samples; sensitivity is high, and structural information can be derived by fragmentation. We have investigated whether MS-based glycomics is amenable to absolute quantification by referencing signal intensities to well-characterized oligosaccharide standards. We report the qualification of a set of N-linked oligosaccharide standards by NMR, HPLC, and MS. We also demonstrate the dynamic range, sensitivity, and recovery from complex biological matrices for these standards in their permethylated form. Our results indicate that absolute quantification for MS-based glycomic analysis is reproducible and robust utilizing currently available glycan standards. PMID:27432553

  8. Benchmark study of automatic annotation of MALDI-TOF N-glycan profiles.

    PubMed

    Brito, Alejandro E; Kletter, Doron; Singhal, Mudita; Bern, Marshall

    2015-11-01

    Human experts can annotate peaks in MALDI-TOF profiles of detached N-glycans with some degree of accuracy. Even though MALDI-TOF profiles give only intact masses without any fragmentation information, expert knowledge of the most common glycans and biosynthetic pathways in the biological system can point to a small set of most likely glycan structures at the "cartoon" level of detail. Cartoonist is a recently developed, fully automatic annotation tool for MALDI-TOF glycan profiles. Here we benchmark Cartoonist's automatic annotations against human expert annotations on human and mouse N-glycan data from the Consortium for Functional Glycomics. We find that Cartoonist and expert annotations largely agree, but the expert tends to annotate more specifically, meaning fewer suggested structures per peak, and Cartoonist more comprehensively, meaning more annotated peaks. On peaks for which both Cartoonist and the expert give unique cartoons, the two cartoons agree in over 90% of all cases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics.

  9. Myrosinases TGG1 and TGG2 from Arabidopsis thaliana contain exclusively oligomannosidic N-glycans

    PubMed Central

    Liebminger, Eva; Grass, Josephine; Jez, Jakub; Neumann, Laura; Altmann, Friedrich; Strasser, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In all eukaryotes N-glycosylation is the most prevalent protein modification of secretory and membrane proteins. Although the N-glycosylation capacity and the individual steps of the N-glycan processing pathway have been well studied in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, little attention has been paid to the characterization of the glycosylation status of individual proteins. We report here the structural analysis of all N-glycans present on the endogenous thioglucoside glucohydrolases (myrosinases) TGG1 and TGG2 from A. thaliana. All nine glycosylation sites of TGG1 and all four glycosylation sites of TGG2 are occupied by oligomannosidic structures with Man5GlcNAc2 as the major glycoform. Analysis of the oligomannosidic isomers from wild-type plants and mannose trimming deficient mutants by liquid chromatography with porous graphitic carbon and mass spectrometry revealed that the N-glycans from both myrosinases are processed by Golgi-located α-mannosidases. PMID:23009876

  10. Therapeutic Targeting of Siglecs using Antibody- and Glycan-Based Approaches.

    PubMed

    Angata, Takashi; Nycholat, Corwin M; Macauley, Matthew S

    2015-10-01

    The sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are a family of immunomodulatory receptors whose functions are regulated by their glycan ligands. Siglecs are attractive therapeutic targets because of their cell type-specific expression pattern, endocytic properties, high expression on certain lymphomas/leukemias, and ability to modulate receptor signaling. Siglec-targeting approaches with therapeutic potential encompass antibody- and glycan-based strategies. Several antibody-based therapies are in clinical trials and continue to be developed for the treatment of lymphoma/leukemia and autoimmune disease, while the therapeutic potential of glycan-based strategies for cargo delivery and immunomodulation is a promising new approach. Here we review these strategies with special emphasis on emerging approaches and disease areas that may benefit from targeting the Siglec family. PMID:26435210

  11. The Sweet Side of Immune Evasion: Role of Glycans in the Mechanisms of Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Nardy, Ana Flávia Fernandes Ribas; Freire-de-Lima, Leonardo; Freire-de-Lima, Célio Geraldo; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Glycans are part of the essential components of a cell. These compounds play a fundamental role in several physiopathological processes, including cell differentiation, adhesion, motility, signal transduction, host–pathogen interactions, tumor cell invasion, and metastasis development. Glycans are also able to exert control over the changes in tumor immunogenecity, interfering with tumor editing events and leading to immune-resistant cancer cells. The involvement of glycans in cancer progression is related to glycosylation alterations. Understanding such changes is, therefore, extremely useful to set the stage for their use as biomarkers, improving the diagnostics and therapeutic strategies. Herein, we discuss the basis of how modifications in glycosylation patterns may contribute to cancer genesis and progression as well as their importance in oncology field. PMID:27014629

  12. When Galectins Recognize Glycans: From Biochemistry to Physiology and Back Again

    PubMed Central

    Di Lella, Santiago; Sundblad, Victoria; Cerliani, Juan P.; Guardia, Carlos M.; Estrin, Dario A.; Vasta, Gerardo R.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, increasing efforts have been devoted to the study of galectins, a family of evolutionarily conserved glycan-binding proteins with multifunctional properties. Galectins function, either intracellularly or extracellularly, as key biological mediators capable of monitoring changes occurring on the cell surface during fundamental biological processes such as cellular communication, inflammation, development, and differentiation. Their highly conserved structures, exquisite carbohydrate specificity, and ability to modulate a broad spectrum of biological processes have captivated a wide range of scientists from a wide spectrum of disciplines, including biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, and physiology. However, in spite of enormous efforts to dissect the functions and properties of these glycan-binding proteins, limited information about how structural and biochemical aspects of these proteins can influence biological functions is available. In this review, we aim to integrate structural, biochemical, and functional aspects of this bewildering and ancient family of glycan-binding proteins and discuss their implications in physiologic and pathologic settings. PMID:21848324

  13. Biophysical characterization of lectin-glycan interactions for therapeutics, vaccines and targeted drug-delivery.

    PubMed

    Christie, Michelle P; Toth, Istvan; Simerská, Pavla

    2014-01-01

    Lectin-glycan interactions play a role in biological processes, host-pathogen interactions and in disease. A more detailed understanding of these interactions is not only useful for the elucidation of their biological function but can also be applied in immunology, drug development and delivery and diagnostics. We review some commonly used biophysical techniques for studying lectin-glycan interactions; namely: frontal affinity chromatography, glycan/lectin microarray, surface plasmon resonance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescent assays, enzyme linked lectin sorbent assay and saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Each method is evaluated on efficiency, cost and throughput. We also consider the advantages and limitations of each technique and provide examples of their application in biology, drug discovery and delivery, immunology, glycoprofiling and biosensing. PMID:25531972

  14. Impact of sialic acids on the molecular dynamic of bi-antennary and tri-antennary glycans

    PubMed Central

    Guillot, Alexandre; Dauchez, Manuel; Belloy, Nicolas; Jonquet, Jessica; Duca, Laurent; Romier, Beatrice; Maurice, Pascal; Debelle, Laurent; Martiny, Laurent; Durlach, Vincent; Baud, Stephanie; Blaise, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Sialic acids (SA) are monosaccharides that can be located at the terminal position of glycan chains on a wide range of proteins. The post-translational modifications, such as N-glycan chains, are fundamental to protein functions. Indeed, the hydrolysis of SA by specific enzymes such as neuraminidases can lead to drastic modifications of protein behavior. However, the relationship between desialylation of N-glycan chains and possible alterations of receptor function remains unexplored. Thus, the aim of the present study is to establish the impact of SA removal from N-glycan chains on their conformational behavior. We therefore undertook an in silico investigation using molecular dynamics to predict the structure of an isolated glycan chain. We performed, for the first time, 3 independent 500 ns simulations on bi-antennary and tri-antennary glycan chains displaying or lacking SA. We show that desialylation alters both the preferential conformation and the flexibility of the glycan chain. This study suggests that the behavior of glycan chains induced by presence or absence of SA may explain the changes in the protein function. PMID:27759083

  15. Isomer-Specific Analysis of Released N-Glycans by LC-ESI MS/MS with Porous Graphitized Carbon.

    PubMed

    Kolarich, Daniel; Windwarder, Markus; Alagesan, Kathirvel; Altmann, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    The combination of porous graphitized carbon (PGC) liquid chromatography (LC) with mass spectrometric (MS) detection probably constitutes the most elaborate single stage analysis for isomer-specific N-glycan analysis. Here, we describe sample preparation and analysis procedures for the identification of released N-glycans using PGC-LC-ESI-MS and MS/MS.

  16. LC-MS/MS Peptide Mapping with Automated Data Processing for Routine Profiling of N-Glycans in Immunoglobulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Bhavana; Jiang, Xinzhao Grace; Chen, Louise; Zhang, Zhongqi

    2014-06-01

    Protein N-Glycan analysis is traditionally performed by high pH anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC), reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), or hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) on fluorescence-labeled glycans enzymatically released from the glycoprotein. These methods require time-consuming sample preparations and do not provide site-specific glycosylation information. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) peptide mapping is frequently used for protein structural characterization and, as a bonus, can potentially provide glycan profile on each individual glycosylation site. In this work, a recently developed glycopeptide fragmentation model was used for automated identification, based on their MS/MS, of N-glycopeptides from proteolytic digestion of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Experimental conditions were optimized to achieve accurate profiling of glycoforms. Glycan profiles obtained from LC-MS/MS peptide mapping were compared with those obtained from HPAEC, RPLC, and HILIC analyses of released glycans for several mAb molecules. Accuracy, reproducibility, and linearity of the LC-MS/MS peptide mapping method for glycan profiling were evaluated. The LC-MS/MS peptide mapping method with fully automated data analysis requires less sample preparation, provides site-specific information, and may serve as an alternative method for routine profiling of N-glycans on immunoglobulins as well as other glycoproteins with simple N-glycans.

  17. The two endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana encode cytoplasmic enzymes controlling free N-glycan levels.

    PubMed

    Fischl, Richard M; Stadlmann, Johannes; Grass, Josephine; Altmann, Friedrich; Léonard, Renaud

    2011-10-01

    Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidases (ENGases) cleave N-glycans from proteins and/or peptides by hydrolyzing the O-glycosidic linkage between the two core-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residues. Although, two homologous genes potentially encoding ENGases have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, their respective substrate specificity, their subcellular and their organ specific localization was hitherto unknown. In order to investigate the role of ENGases in this model plant species, we transiently expressed the two A. thaliana genes in Nicotiana benthamiana and determined the substrate specificities, as well as the Km values, of the purified recombinant enzymes. The assumed predominantly cytosolic localisation of both enzymes, here referred to as AtENGase85A and AtENGase85B, was determined by confocal microscopy of plant leaves expressing the respective GFP-fusion constructs. For the individual characterization of the two enzymes expression patterns in planta, single knock-out plants were selected for both genes. Although both enzymes are present in most organs, only AtENGase85A (At5g05460) was expressed in stems and no ENGase activity was detected in siliques. A double knock-out was generated by crossing but-like single knock-out plants-no apparent phenotype was observed. In contrast, in this double knock-out, free N-glycans carrying a single GlcNAc at the reducing end are completely absent and their counterparts with two GlcNAc-visible only at a trace level in wild type-accumulated dramatically.

  18. C-Terminus Glycans with Critical Functional Role in the Maturation of Secretory Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Petrescu, Andrei-Jose; Petrescu, Stefana M.

    2011-01-01

    The N-glycans of membrane glycoproteins are mainly exposed to the extracellular space. Human tyrosinase is a transmembrane glycoprotein with six or seven bulky N-glycans exposed towards the lumen of subcellular organelles. The central active site region of human tyrosinase is modeled here within less than 2.5 Å accuracy starting from Streptomyces castaneoglobisporus tyrosinase. The model accounts for the last five C-terminus glycosylation sites of which four are occupied and indicates that these cluster in two pairs - one in close vicinity to the active site and the other on the opposite side. We have analyzed and compared the roles of all tyrosinase N-glycans during tyrosinase processing with a special focus on the proximal to the active site N-glycans, s6:N337 and s7:N371, versus s3:N161 and s4:N230 which decorate the opposite side of the domain. To this end, we have constructed mutants of human tyrosinase in which its seven N-glycosylation sites were deleted. Ablation of the s6:N337 and s7:N371 sites arrests the post-translational productive folding process resulting in terminally misfolded mutants subjected to degradation through the mannosidase driven ERAD pathway. In contrast, single mutants of the other five N-glycans located either opposite to the active site or into the N-terminus Cys1 extension of tyrosinase are temperature-sensitive mutants and recover enzymatic activity at the permissive temperature of 31°C. Sites s3 and s4 display selective calreticulin binding properties. The C-terminus sites s7 and s6 are critical for the endoplasmic reticulum retention and intracellular disposal. Results herein suggest that individual N-glycan location is critical for the stability, regional folding control and secretion of human tyrosinase and explains some tyrosinase gene missense mutations associated with oculocutaneous albinism type I. PMID:21625599

  19. A Miniaturized Glycan Microarray Assay for Assessing Avidity and Specificity of Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinins.

    PubMed

    McBride, Ryan; Paulson, James C; de Vries, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinins recognize sialic acids on the cell surface as functional receptors to gain entry into cells. Wild waterfowl are the natural reservoir for IAV, but IAV can cross the species barrier to poultry, swine, horses and humans. Avian viruses recognize sialic acid attached to a penultimate galactose by a α2-3 linkage (avian-type receptors) whereas human viruses preferentially recognize sialic acid with a α2-6 linkage (human-type receptors). To monitor if avian viruses are adapting to human type receptors, several methods can be used. Glycan microarrays with diverse libraries of synthetic sialosides are increasingly used to evaluate receptor specificity. However, this technique is not used for measuring avidities. Measurement of avidity is typically achieved by evaluating the binding of serially diluted hemagglutinin or virus to glycans adsorbed to conventional polypropylene 96-well plates. In this assay, glycans with α2-3 or α2-6 sialic acids are coupled to biotin and adsorbed to streptavidin plates, or are coupled to polyacrylamide (PAA) which directly adsorb to the plastic. We have significantly miniaturized this assay by directly printing PAA-linked sialosides and their non PAA-linked counterparts on micro-well glass slides. This set-up, with 48 arrays on a single slide, enables simultaneous assays of 6 glycan binding proteins at 8 dilutions, interrogating 6 different glycans, including two non-sialylated controls. This is equivalent to 18x 96-well plates in the traditional plate assay. The glycan array format decreases consumption of compounds and biologicals and thus greatly enhances efficiency. PMID:27284789

  20. Quantitative Characterization of Glycan-Receptor Binding of H9N2 Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Karunya; Raman, Rahul; Jayaraman, Akila; Viswanathan, Karthik; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2013-01-01

    Avian influenza subtypes such as H5, H7 and H9 are yet to adapt to the human host so as to establish airborne transmission between humans. However, lab-generated reassorted viruses possessing hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from an avian H9 isolate and other genes from a human-adapted (H3 or H1) subtype acquired two amino acid changes in HA and a single amino acid change in NA that confer respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets. We previously demonstrated for human-adapted H1, H2 and H3 subtypes that quantitative binding affinity of their HA to α2→6 sialylated glycan receptors correlates with respiratory droplet transmissibility of the virus in ferrets. Such a relationship remains to be established for H9 HA. In this study, we performed a quantitative biochemical characterization of glycan receptor binding properties of wild-type and mutant forms of representative H9 HAs that were previously used in context of reassorted viruses in ferret transmission studies. We demonstrate here that distinct molecular interactions in the glycan receptor-binding site of different H9 HAs affect the glycan-binding specificity and affinity. Further we show that α2→6 glycan receptor-binding affinity of a mutant H9 HA carrying Thr-189→Ala amino acid change correlates with the respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets conferred by this change. Our findings contribute to a framework for monitoring the evolution of H9 HA by understanding effects of molecular changes in HA on glycan receptor-binding properties. PMID:23626667

  1. Metabolic Reprogramming by Hexosamine Biosynthetic and Golgi N-Glycan Branching Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ryczko, Michael C.; Pawling, Judy; Chen, Rui; Abdel Rahman, Anas M.; Yau, Kevin; Copeland, Julia K.; Zhang, Cunjie; Surendra, Anu; Guttman, David S.; Figeys, Daniel; Dennis, James W.

    2016-01-01

    De novo uridine-diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) biosynthesis requires glucose, glutamine, acetyl-CoA and uridine, however GlcNAc salvaged from glycoconjugate turnover and dietary sources also makes a significant contribution to the intracellular pool. Herein we ask whether dietary GlcNAc regulates nutrient transport and intermediate metabolism in C57BL/6 mice by increasing UDP-GlcNAc and in turn Golgi N-glycan branching. GlcNAc added to the drinking water showed a dose-dependent increase in growth of young mice, while in mature adult mice fat and body-weight increased without affecting calorie-intake, activity, energy expenditure, or the microbiome. Oral GlcNAc increased hepatic UDP-GlcNAc and N-glycan branching on hepatic glycoproteins. Glucose homeostasis, hepatic glycogen, lipid metabolism and response to fasting were altered with GlcNAc treatment. In cultured cells GlcNAc enhanced uptake of glucose, glutamine and fatty-acids, and enhanced lipid synthesis, while inhibition of Golgi N-glycan branching blocked GlcNAc-dependent lipid accumulation. The N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase enzymes of the N-glycan branching pathway (Mgat1,2,4,5) display multistep ultrasensitivity to UDP-GlcNAc, as well as branching-dependent compensation. Indeed, oral GlcNAc rescued fat accumulation in lean Mgat5−/− mice and in cultured Mgat5−/− hepatocytes, consistent with N-glycan branching compensation. Our results suggest GlcNAc reprograms cellular metabolism by enhancing nutrient uptake and lipid storage through the UDP-GlcNAc supply to N-glycan branching pathway. PMID:26972830

  2. Heligmosomoides polygyrus elicits a dominant nonprotective antibody response directed against restricted glycan and peptide epitopes.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, James P; Filbey, Kara J; Grainger, John R; Dowle, Adam A; Pearson, Mark; Murray, Janice; Harcus, Yvonne; Maizels, Rick M

    2011-11-01

    Heligmosomoides polygyrus is a widely used gastrointestinal helminth model of long-term chronic infection in mice, which has not been well-characterized at the antigenic level. We now identify the major targets of the murine primary Ab response as a subset of the secreted products in H. polygyrus excretory-secretory (HES) Ag. An immunodominant epitope is an O-linked glycan (named glycan A) carried on three highly expressed HES glycoproteins (venom allergen Ancylostoma-secreted protein-like [VAL]-1, -2, and -5), which stimulates only IgM Abs, is exposed on the adult worm surface, and is poorly represented in somatic parasite extracts. A second carbohydrate epitope (glycan B), present on both a non-protein high molecular mass component and a 65-kDa molecule, is widely distributed in adult somatic tissues. Whereas the high molecular mass component and 65-kDa molecules bear phosphorylcholine, the glycan B epitope itself is not phosphorylcholine. Class-switched IgG1 Abs are found to glycan B, but the dominant primary IgG1 response is to the polypeptides of VAL proteins, including also VAL-3 and VAL-4. Secondary Ab responses include the same specificities while also recognizing VAL-7. Although vaccination with HES conferred complete protection against challenge H. polygyrus infection, mAbs raised against each of the glycan epitopes and against VAL-1, VAL-2, and VAL-4 proteins were unable to do so, even though these specificities (with the exception of VAL-2) are also secreted by tissue-phase L4 larvae. The primary immune response in susceptible mice is, therefore, dominated by nonprotective Abs against a small subset of antigenic epitopes, raising the possibility that these act as decoy specificities that generate ineffective humoral immunity. PMID:21964031

  3. Cervical mucins carry alpha(1,2)fucosylated glycans that partly protect from experimental vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Domino, Steven E; Hurd, Elizabeth A; Thomsson, Kristina A; Karnak, David M; Holmén Larsson, Jessica M; Thomsson, Elisabeth; Bäckström, Malin; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2009-12-01

    Cervical mucins are glycosylated proteins that form a protective cervical mucus. To understand the role of mucin glycans in Candida albicans infection, oligosaccharides from mouse cervical mucins were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Cervical mucins carry multiple alpha(1-2)fucosylated glycans, but alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase Fut2-null mice are devoid of these epitopes. Epithelial cells in vaginal lavages from Fut2-null mice lacked Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-I) staining for alpha(1-2)fucosylated glycans. Hysterectomy to remove cervical mucus eliminated UEA-I and acid mucin staining in vaginal epithelial cells from wild type mice indicating the cervix as the source of UEA-I positive epithelial cells. To assess binding of alpha(1-2) fucosylated glycans on C. albicans infection, an in vitro adhesion assay was performed with vaginal epithelial cells from wild type and Fut2-null mice. Vaginal epithelial cells from Fut2-null mice were found to bind increased numbers of C. albicans compared to vaginal epithelial cells obtained from wild type mice. Hysterectomy lessened the difference between Fut2-null and wild type mice in binding of C. ablicans in vitro and susceptibility to experimental C. albicans vaginitis in vivo. We generated a recombinant fucosylated MUC1 glycanpolymer to test whether the relative protection of wild type mice compared to Fut2-null mice could be mimicked with exogenous mucin. While a small portion of the recombinant MUC1 epitopes displayed alpha(1-2)fucosylated glycans, the predominant epitopes were sialylated due to endogenous sialyltransferases in the cultured cells. Intravaginal instillation of recombinant MUC1 glycanpolymer partially reduced experimental yeast vaginitis suggesting that a large glycanpolymer, with different glycan epitopes, may affect fungal burden.

  4. Holes in the Glycan Shield of the Native HIV Envelope Are a Target of Trimer-Elicited Neutralizing Antibodies.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Laura E; van Gils, Marit J; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Messmer, Terrence; Briney, Bryan; Voss, James E; Kulp, Daniel W; Macauley, Matthew S; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Menis, Sergey; Cottrell, Christopher A; Torres, Jonathan L; Hsueh, Jessica; Schief, William R; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B; Sanders, Rogier W; Burton, Dennis R

    2016-08-30

    A major advance in the search for an HIV vaccine has been the development of a near-native Envelope trimer (BG505 SOSIP.664) that can induce robust autologous Tier 2 neutralization. Here, potently neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nAbs) from rabbits immunized with BG505 SOSIP.664 are shown to recognize an immunodominant region of gp120 centered on residue 241. Residue 241 occupies a hole in the glycan defenses of the BG505 isolate, with fewer than 3% of global isolates lacking a glycan site at this position. However, at least one conserved glycan site is missing in 89% of viruses, suggesting the presence of glycan holes in most HIV isolates. Serum evidence is consistent with targeting of holes in natural infection. The immunogenic nature of breaches in the glycan shield has been under-appreciated in previous attempts to understand autologous neutralizing antibody responses and has important potential consequences for HIV vaccine design.

  5. Holes in the Glycan Shield of the Native HIV Envelope Are a Target of Trimer-Elicited Neutralizing Antibodies.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Laura E; van Gils, Marit J; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Messmer, Terrence; Briney, Bryan; Voss, James E; Kulp, Daniel W; Macauley, Matthew S; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Menis, Sergey; Cottrell, Christopher A; Torres, Jonathan L; Hsueh, Jessica; Schief, William R; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B; Sanders, Rogier W; Burton, Dennis R

    2016-08-30

    A major advance in the search for an HIV vaccine has been the development of a near-native Envelope trimer (BG505 SOSIP.664) that can induce robust autologous Tier 2 neutralization. Here, potently neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nAbs) from rabbits immunized with BG505 SOSIP.664 are shown to recognize an immunodominant region of gp120 centered on residue 241. Residue 241 occupies a hole in the glycan defenses of the BG505 isolate, with fewer than 3% of global isolates lacking a glycan site at this position. However, at least one conserved glycan site is missing in 89% of viruses, suggesting the presence of glycan holes in most HIV isolates. Serum evidence is consistent with targeting of holes in natural infection. The immunogenic nature of breaches in the glycan shield has been under-appreciated in previous attempts to understand autologous neutralizing antibody responses and has important potential consequences for HIV vaccine design. PMID:27545891

  6. Greedy feature selection for glycan chromatography data with the generalized Dirichlet distribution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycoproteins are involved in a diverse range of biochemical and biological processes. Changes in protein glycosylation are believed to occur in many diseases, particularly during cancer initiation and progression. The identification of biomarkers for human disease states is becoming increasingly important, as early detection is key to improving survival and recovery rates. To this end, the serum glycome has been proposed as a potential source of biomarkers for different types of cancers. High-throughput hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) technology for glycan analysis allows for the detailed quantification of the glycan content in human serum. However, the experimental data from this analysis is compositional by nature. Compositional data are subject to a constant-sum constraint, which restricts the sample space to a simplex. Statistical analysis of glycan chromatography datasets should account for their unusual mathematical properties. As the volume of glycan HILIC data being produced increases, there is a considerable need for a framework to support appropriate statistical analysis. Proposed here is a methodology for feature selection in compositional data. The principal objective is to provide a template for the analysis of glycan chromatography data that may be used to identify potential glycan biomarkers. Results A greedy search algorithm, based on the generalized Dirichlet distribution, is carried out over the feature space to search for the set of “grouping variables” that best discriminate between known group structures in the data, modelling the compositional variables using beta distributions. The algorithm is applied to two glycan chromatography datasets. Statistical classification methods are used to test the ability of the selected features to differentiate between known groups in the data. Two well-known methods are used for comparison: correlation-based feature selection (CFS) and recursive partitioning (rpart). CFS

  7. Promiscuous glycan site recognition by antibodies to the high-mannose patch of gp120 broadens neutralization of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Sok, Devin; Doores, Katie J.; Briney, Bryan; Le, Khoa M.; Saye-Francisco, Karen F.; Ramos, Alejandra; Kulp, Daniel W.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Menis, Sergey; Wickramasinghe, Lalinda; Seaman, Michael S.; Schief, William R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) that target the high-mannose patch centered around the glycan at position 332 on HIV Env are promising vaccine leads and therapeutic candidates as they effectively protect against mucosal SHIV challenge and strongly suppress SHIV viraemia in established infection in macaque models. However, these antibodies demonstrate varying degrees of dependency on the N332 glycan site and the origins of their neutralization breadth are not always obvious. By measuring neutralization on an extended range of glycan site viral variants, we found that some bnMAbs can utilize alternate N-linked glycans in the absence of the N332 glycan site and therefore neutralize a substantial number of viruses lacking the site. Furthermore, many of the antibodies can neutralize viruses in which the N332 glycan site is shifted to the 334 position. Finally, we found that a combination of three antibody families that target the high-mannose patch can lead to 99% neutralization coverage of a large panel of viruses containing the N332/334 glycan site and up to 66% coverage for viruses that lack the N332/334 glycan site. The results indicate that a diverse response against the high-mannose patch may provide near equivalent coverage as a combination of bnMAbs targeting multiple epitopes. Additionally, the ability of some bnMAbs to utilize other N-linked glycan sites can help counter neutralization escape mediated by shifting of glycosylation sites. Overall, this work highlights the importance of promiscuous glycan binding properties in bnMAbs to the high-mannose patch for optimal anti-viral activity either in protective or therapeutic modalities. PMID:24828077

  8. Promiscuous glycan site recognition by antibodies to the high-mannose patch of gp120 broadens neutralization of HIV.

    PubMed

    Sok, Devin; Doores, Katie J; Briney, Bryan; Le, Khoa M; Saye-Francisco, Karen L; Ramos, Alejandra; Kulp, Daniel W; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Menis, Sergey; Wickramasinghe, Lalinda; Seaman, Michael S; Schief, William R; Wilson, Ian A; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R

    2014-05-14

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnmAbs) that target the high-mannose patch centered around the glycan at position 332 on HIV Env are promising vaccine leads and therapeutic candidates because they effectively protect against mucosal SHIV challenge and strongly suppress SHIV viremia in established infection in macaque models. However, these antibodies demonstrate varying degrees of dependency on the N332 glycan site, and the origins of their neutralization breadth are not always obvious. By measuring neutralization on an extended range of glycan site viral variants, we found that some bnmAbs can use alternate N-linked glycans in the absence of the N332 glycan site and therefore neutralize a substantial number of viruses lacking the site. Furthermore, many of the antibodies can neutralize viruses in which the N332 glycan site is shifted to the 334 position. Finally, we found that a combination of three antibody families that target the high-mannose patch can lead to 99% neutralization coverage of a large panel of viruses containing the N332/N334 glycan site and up to 66% coverage for viruses that lack the N332/N334 glycan site. The results indicate that a diverse response against the high-mannose patch may provide near-equivalent coverage as a combination of bnmAbs targeting multiple epitopes. Additionally, the ability of some bnmAbs to use other N-linked glycan sites can help counter neutralization escape mediated by shifting of glycosylation sites. Overall, this work highlights the importance of promiscuous glycan binding properties in bnmAbs to the high-mannose patch for optimal antiviral activity in either protective or therapeutic modalities.

  9. Antibodies elicited by yeast glycoproteins recognize HIV-1 virions and potently neutralize virions with high mannose N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Fu, Hu; Luallen, Robert J; Liu, Bingfen; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W; Geng, Yu

    2015-09-22

    The glycan shield on the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein has drawn attention as a target for HIV-1 vaccine design given that an increasing number of potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) recognize epitopes entirely or partially comprised of high mannose type N-linked glycans. In an attempt to generate immunogens that target the glycan shield of HIV-1, we previously engineered a triple mutant (TM) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that results in exclusive presentation of high mannose type N-glycans, and identified five TM yeast glycoproteins that support strong binding of 2G12, a bNAb that targets a cluster of high mannose glycans on the gp120 subunit of Env. Here, we further analyzed the antigenicity and immunogenicity of these proteins in inducing anti-HIV responses. Our study demonstrated that the 2G12-reactive TM yeast glycoproteins efficiently bound to recently identified bNAbs including PGT125-130 and PGT135 that recognize high mannose glycan-dependent epitopes. Immunization of rabbits with a single TM yeast glycoprotein (Gp38 or Pst1), when conjugated to a promiscuous T-cell epitope peptide and coadministered with a Toll-like receptor 2 agonist, induced glycan-specific HIV-1 Env cross-reactive antibodies. The immune sera bound to both synthetic mannose oligosaccharides and gp120 proteins from a broad range of HIV-1 strains. The purified antibodies recognized and captured virions that contain both complex- and high mannose-type of N-glycans, and potently neutralized virions from different HIV-1 clades but only when the virions were enforced to retain high mannose N-glycans. This study provides insights into the elicitation of anti-carbohydrate, HIV-1 Env-cross reactive antibodies with a heterologous glycoprotein and may have applications in the design and administration of immunogens that target the viral glycan shield for development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:26277072

  10. The effects of five different glycans on innate immune responses by phagocytes of hybrid tilapia and Japanese eels Anguilla japonica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Way-Shyan; Hung, Shao-Wen; Lin, Yu-Hsing; Tu, Ching-Yu; Wong, Min-Liang; Chiou, Shiow-Her; Shieh, Meng-Tong

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune responses in hybrid tilapia (Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus x Mozambique tilapia O. mossambicus) and Japanese eels Anguilla japonica after treatment with five glycans: barley, krestin, MacroGard, scleroglucan, and zymosan. The effects of the glycans on the innate immune responses of the fish were investigated using the phagocytic index (PI), lysozyme activity, complement opsonization, and activation assay. The results of the lysozyme assay demonstrated that the lysozyme activities increased after treatment with glycans. Moreover, based on the PI, treatment with each of the five glycans resulted in increased phagocytic activities in anterior kidney and peripheral blood phagocytes in both tilapia and Japanese eels. The opsonic effect of complement on phagocytosis in tilapia and Japanese eels were investigated using baker's yeast, which served as the activator in the classical complement pathway (CCP) and in the alternative complement pathway (ACP). Tilapia and Japanese eel sera that were treated with glycans greatly enhanced phagocytosis. The classical pathway--hemolytic complement titer (CH50) of Japanese eels treated with glycans was slightly increased in vitro and in vivo. While glycan treatment enhanced the CCP of both species in vitro and in vivo, the alternative pathway-hemolytic complement titer (ACH50) was only increased in vitro and in vivo in glycan-treated tilapia. Thus, it follows that the ACP must have been activated in tilapia treated with glycans. However, in Japanese eels, the ACH50 of the ACP activation assay was undetected in vitro or in vivo due to possible unknown factors in the Japanese eel serum that caused lysis of the rabbit red blood cells. Our study investigated the effects of glycans used to enhance phagocytosis and activate both of the complement pathways involved in stimulating the innate immune responses of Japanese eels and tilapia. PMID:18236632

  11. Novel O-linked methylated glycan antigens decorate secreted immunodominant glycoproteins from the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, James P; Nguyen, D Linh; van Diepen, Angela; Smit, Cornelis H; Koeleman, Carolien A; McSorley, Henry J; Murray, Janice; Maizels, Rick M; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2016-03-01

    Glycan molecules from helminth parasites have been associated with diverse biological functions ranging from interactions with neighbouring host cell populations to down-modulation of specific host immunity. Glycoproteins secreted by the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus are of particular interest as the excretory-secretory products (termed HES) of this parasite contain both heat-labile and heat-stable components with immunomodulatory effects. We used MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-MS/MS to analyse the repertoire of N- and O-linked glycans released from Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory-secretory products by PNGase A and F, β-elimination and hydrazinolysis revealing a broad range of structures including novel methylhexose- and methylfucose-containing glycans. Monoclonal antibodies to two immunodominant glycans of H. polygyrus, previously designated Glycans A and B, were found to react by glycan array analysis to a methyl-hexose-rich fraction and to a sulphated LacDiNAc (LDN; GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc) structure, respectively. We also analysed the glycan repertoire of a major glycoprotein in Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory-secretory products, VAL-2, which contains many glycan structures present in Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory-secretory products including Glycan A. However, it was found that this set of glycans is not responsible for the heat-stable immunomodulatory properties of Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory-secretory products, as revealed by the inability of VAL-2 to inhibit allergic lung inflammation. Taken together, these studies reveal that H. polygyrus secretes a diverse range of antigenic glycoconjugates, and provides a framework to explore the biological and immunomodulatory roles they may play within the mammalian host. PMID:26688390

  12. Novel O-linked methylated glycan antigens decorate secreted immunodominant glycoproteins from the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, James P.; Nguyen, D. Linh; van Diepen, Angela; Smit, Cornelis H.; Koeleman, Carolien A.; McSorley, Henry J.; Murray, Janice; Maizels, Rick M.; Hokke, Cornelis H.

    2016-01-01

    Glycan molecules from helminth parasites have been associated with diverse biological functions ranging from interactions with neighbouring host cell populations to down-modulation of specific host immunity. Glycoproteins secreted by the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus are of particular interest as the excretory–secretory products (termed HES) of this parasite contain both heat-labile and heat-stable components with immunomodulatory effects. We used MALDI-TOF-MS and LC–MS/MS to analyse the repertoire of N- and O-linked glycans released from Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory–secretory products by PNGase A and F, β-elimination and hydrazinolysis revealing a broad range of structures including novel methylhexose- and methylfucose-containing glycans. Monoclonal antibodies to two immunodominant glycans of H. polygyrus, previously designated Glycans A and B, were found to react by glycan array analysis to a methyl-hexose-rich fraction and to a sulphated LacDiNAc (LDN; GalNAcβ1–4GlcNAc) structure, respectively. We also analysed the glycan repertoire of a major glycoprotein in Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory–secretory products, VAL-2, which contains many glycan structures present in Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory–secretory products including Glycan A. However, it was found that this set of glycans is not responsible for the heat-stable immunomodulatory properties of Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory–secretory products, as revealed by the inability of VAL-2 to inhibit allergic lung inflammation. Taken together, these studies reveal that H. polygyrus secretes a diverse range of antigenic glycoconjugates, and provides a framework to explore the biological and immunomodulatory roles they may play within the mammalian host. PMID:26688390

  13. Complexity of the Ruminococcus flavefaciens cellulosome reflects an expansion in glycan recognition

    PubMed Central

    Venditto, Immacolata; Luis, Ana S.; Rydahl, Maja; Schückel, Julia; Fernandes, Vânia O.; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Bule, Pedro; Goyal, Arun; Pires, Virginia M. R.; Dourado, Catarina G.; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Henrissat, Bernard; Knox, J. Paul; Baslé, Arnaud; Najmudin, Shabir; Gilbert, Harry J.; Willats, William G. T.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The breakdown of plant cell wall (PCW) glycans is an important biological and industrial process. Noncatalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) fulfill a critical targeting function in PCW depolymerization. Defining the portfolio of CBMs, the CBMome, of a PCW degrading system is central to understanding the mechanisms by which microbes depolymerize their target substrates. Ruminococcus flavefaciens, a major PCW degrading bacterium, assembles its catalytic apparatus into a large multienzyme complex, the cellulosome. Significantly, bioinformatic analyses of the R. flavefaciens cellulosome failed to identify a CBM predicted to bind to crystalline cellulose, a key feature of the CBMome of other PCW degrading systems. Here, high throughput screening of 177 protein modules of unknown function was used to determine the complete CBMome of R. flavefaciens. The data identified six previously unidentified CBM families that targeted β-glucans, β-mannans, and the pectic polysaccharide homogalacturonan. The crystal structures of four CBMs, in conjunction with site-directed mutagenesis, provide insight into the mechanism of ligand recognition. In the CBMs that recognize β-glucans and β-mannans, differences in the conformation of conserved aromatic residues had a significant impact on the topology of the ligand binding cleft and thus ligand specificity. A cluster of basic residues in CBM77 confers calcium-independent recognition of homogalacturonan, indicating that the carboxylates of galacturonic acid are key specificity determinants. This report shows that the extended repertoire of proteins in the cellulosome of R. flavefaciens contributes to an extended CBMome that supports efficient PCW degradation in the absence of CBMs that specifically target crystalline cellulose. PMID:27298375

  14. Determination of the CYP1A-inducing potential of single substances, mixtures and extracts of samples in the micro-EROD assay with H4IIE cells.

    PubMed

    Schiwy, Andreas; Brinkmann, Markus; Thiem, Ines; Guder, Gabriele; Winkens, Kerstin; Eichbaum, Kathrin; Nüßer, Leonie; Thalmann, Beat; Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Thoms, Brigitte; Hollert, Henner

    2015-11-01

    This protocol describes a quantitative and robust 96-well-plate-reader-based assay for the measurement of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity using the rat hepatoma cell line H4IIE. The assay can be used to determine the cytochrome P450 subfamily 1A (CYP1A)-inducing potential of single substances, as well as of mixtures and extracts of samples. It is based on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated induction of cytochrome P450 enzymes (subfamily 1A) in cells after exposure to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds. One enzymatic reaction catalyzed by CYP1A is the deethylation of the exogenous substrate 7-ethoxyresorufin to the fluorescent product resorufin, which is measured as EROD activity in the assay. The CYP1A-inducing potential of a sample can be reliably quantified by comparing the EROD activity with the concentration-response curve of the standard substance 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, which can be detected at concentrations down to the picogram per liter range. A researcher familiar with the procedure can process up to 160 samples with four wells each within 3 d. The series described uses four plates with three concentrations per sample, which can be easily scaled to accommodate different sample sizes. PMID:26448361

  15. Groove-type recognition of chlamydiaceae-specific lipopolysaccharide antigen by a family of antibodies possessing an unusual variable heavy chain N-linked glycan.

    PubMed

    Haji-Ghassemi, Omid; Müller-Loennies, Sven; Saldova, Radka; Muniyappa, Mohankumar; Brade, Lore; Rudd, Pauline M; Harvey, David J; Kosma, Paul; Brade, Helmut; Evans, Stephen V

    2014-06-13

    The structure of the antigen binding fragment of mAb S25-26, determined to 1.95 Å resolution in complex with the Chlamydiaceae family-specific trisaccharide antigen Kdo(2→8)Kdo(2→4)Kdo (Kdo = 3-deoxy-α-d-manno-oct-2-ulopyranosonic acid), displays a germ-line-coded paratope that differs significantly from previously characterized Chlamydiaceae-specific mAbs despite being raised against the identical immunogen. Unlike the terminal Kdo recognition pocket that promotes cross-reactivity in S25-2-type antibodies, S25-26 and the closely related S25-23 utilize a groove composed of germ-line residues to recognize the entire trisaccharide antigen and so confer strict specificity. Interest in S25-23 was sparked by its rare high μm affinity and strict specificity for the family-specific trisaccharide antigen; however, only the related antibody S25-26 proved amenable to crystallization. The structures of three unliganded forms of S25-26 have a labile complementary-determining region H3 adjacent to significant glycosylation of the variable heavy chain on asparagine 85 in Framework Region 3. Analysis of the glycan reveals a heterogeneous mixture with a common root structure that contains an unusually high number of terminal αGal-Gal moieties. One of the few reported structures of glycosylated mAbs containing these epitopes is the therapeutic antibody Cetuximab; however, unlike Cetuximab, one of the unliganded structures in S25-26 shows significant order in the glycan with appropriate electron density for nine residues. The elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of an αGal-containing N-linked glycan on a mAb variable heavy chain has potential clinical interest, as it has been implicated in allergic response in patients receiving therapeutic antibodies.

  16. Groove-type Recognition of Chlamydiaceae-specific Lipopolysaccharide Antigen by a Family of Antibodies Possessing an Unusual Variable Heavy Chain N-Linked Glycan*

    PubMed Central

    Haji-Ghassemi, Omid; Müller-Loennies, Sven; Saldova, Radka; Muniyappa, Mohankumar; Brade, Lore; Rudd, Pauline M.; Harvey, David J.; Kosma, Paul; Brade, Helmut; Evans, Stephen V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of the antigen binding fragment of mAb S25-26, determined to 1.95 Å resolution in complex with the Chlamydiaceae family-specific trisaccharide antigen Kdo(2→8)Kdo(2→4)Kdo (Kdo = 3-deoxy-α-d-manno-oct-2-ulopyranosonic acid), displays a germ-line-coded paratope that differs significantly from previously characterized Chlamydiaceae-specific mAbs despite being raised against the identical immunogen. Unlike the terminal Kdo recognition pocket that promotes cross-reactivity in S25-2-type antibodies, S25-26 and the closely related S25-23 utilize a groove composed of germ-line residues to recognize the entire trisaccharide antigen and so confer strict specificity. Interest in S25-23 was sparked by its rare high μm affinity and strict specificity for the family-specific trisaccharide antigen; however, only the related antibody S25-26 proved amenable to crystallization. The structures of three unliganded forms of S25-26 have a labile complementary-determining region H3 adjacent to significant glycosylation of the variable heavy chain on asparagine 85 in Framework Region 3. Analysis of the glycan reveals a heterogeneous mixture with a common root structure that contains an unusually high number of terminal αGal-Gal moieties. One of the few reported structures of glycosylated mAbs containing these epitopes is the therapeutic antibody Cetuximab; however, unlike Cetuximab, one of the unliganded structures in S25-26 shows significant order in the glycan with appropriate electron density for nine residues. The elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of an αGal-containing N-linked glycan on a mAb variable heavy chain has potential clinical interest, as it has been implicated in allergic response in patients receiving therapeutic antibodies. PMID:24682362

  17. Utilisation of Mucin Glycans by the Human Gut Symbiont Ruminococcus gnavus Is Strain-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Crost, Emmanuelle H.; Tailford, Louise E.; Le Gall, Gwenaelle; Fons, Michel; Henrissat, Bernard; Juge, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Commensal bacteria often have an especially rich source of glycan-degrading enzymes which allow them to utilize undigested carbohydrates from the food or the host. The species Ruminococcus gnavus is present in the digestive tract of ≥90% of humans and has been implicated in gut-related diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Here we analysed the ability of two R. gnavus human strains, E1 and ATCC 29149, to utilize host glycans. We showed that although both strains could assimilate mucin monosaccharides, only R. gnavus ATCC 29149 was able to grow on mucin as a sole carbon source. Comparative genomic analysis of the two R. gnavus strains highlighted potential clusters and glycoside hydrolases (GHs) responsible for the breakdown and utilization of mucin-derived glycans. Transcriptomic and functional activity assays confirmed the importance of specific GH33 sialidase, and GH29 and GH95 fucosidases in the mucin utilisation pathway. Notably, we uncovered a novel pathway by which R. gnavus ATCC 29149 utilises sialic acid from sialylated substrates. Our results also demonstrated the ability of R. gnavus ATCC 29149 to produce propanol and propionate as the end products of metabolism when grown on mucin and fucosylated glycans. These new findings provide molecular insights into the strain-specificity of R. gnavus adaptation to the gut environment advancing our understanding of the role of gut commensals in health and disease. PMID:24204617

  18. Beyond gangliosides: Multiple forms of glycan mimicry exhibited by Campylobacter jejuni in its lipooligosaccharide (LOS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter jejuni is well known for synthesizing ganglioside mimics within the glycan component of its lipooligosaccharide (LOS), which have been implicated in triggering Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). We now confirm that this pathogen is capable of synthesizing a much broader spectrum of host g...

  19. Azahar: a PyMOL plugin for construction, visualization and analysis of glycan molecules.

    PubMed

    Arroyuelo, Agustina; Vila, Jorge A; Martin, Osvaldo A

    2016-08-01

    Glycans are key molecules in many physiological and pathological processes. As with other molecules, like proteins, visualization of the 3D structures of glycans adds valuable information for understanding their biological function. Hence, here we introduce Azahar, a computing environment for the creation, visualization and analysis of glycan molecules. Azahar is implemented in Python and works as a plugin for the well known PyMOL package (Schrodinger in The PyMOL molecular graphics system, version 1.3r1, 2010). Besides the already available visualization and analysis options provided by PyMOL, Azahar includes 3 cartoon-like representations and tools for 3D structure caracterization such as a comformational search using a Monte Carlo with minimization routine and also tools to analyse single glycans or trajectories/ensembles including the calculation of radius of gyration, Ramachandran plots and hydrogen bonds. Azahar is freely available to download from http://www.pymolwiki.org/index.php/Azahar and the source code is available at https://github.com/agustinaarroyuelo/Azahar . PMID:27549814

  20. Biological functions of glycosyltransferase genes involved in O-fucose glycan synthesis.

    PubMed

    Okajima, Tetsuya; Matsuura, Aiko; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    2008-07-01

    Rare types of glycosylation often occur in a domain-specific manner and are involved in specific biological processes. Well-known examples of such modification are O-linked fucose (O-fucose) and O-linked glucose (O-glucose) glycans on epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains. In particular, O-fucose glycans are reported to regulate the functions of EGF domain-containing proteins such as urinary-type plasminogen activator and Notch receptors. Two glycosyltransferases catalyze the initiation and elongation of O-fucose glycans. The initiation process is catalyzed by O-fucosyltransferase 1, which is essential for Notch signalling in both Drosophila and mice. O-fucosyltransferase 1 can affect the folding, ligand interaction and endocytosis of Notch receptors, and both the glycosyltransferase and non-catalytic activities of O-fucosyltransferase 1 have been reported. The elongation of O-fucose monosaccharide is catalyzed by Fringe-related genes, which differentially modulate the interaction between Notch and two classes of ligands, namely, Delta and Serrate/Jagged. In this article, we have reviewed the recent reports addressing the distinctive features of the glycosyltransferases and O-glycans present on the EGF domains.

  1. Nuclear repartitioning of galectin-1 by an extracellular glycan switch regulates mammary morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ramray; Belardi, Brian; Mori, Hidetoshi; Kuo, Peiwen; Tam, Andrew; Hines, William C; Le, Quynh-Thu; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Bissell, Mina J

    2016-08-16

    Branching morphogenesis in the mammary gland is achieved by the migration of epithelial cells through a microenvironment consisting of stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM). Here we show that galectin-1 (Gal-1), an endogenous lectin that recognizes glycans bearing N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc) epitopes, induces branching migration of mammary epithelia in vivo, ex vivo, and in 3D organotypic cultures. Surprisingly, Gal-1's effects on mammary patterning were independent of its glycan-binding ability and instead required localization within the nuclei of mammary epithelia. Nuclear translocation of Gal-1, in turn, was regulated by discrete cell-surface glycans restricted to the front of the mammary end buds. Specifically, α2,6-sialylation of terminal LacNAc residues in the end buds masked Gal-1 ligands, thereby liberating the protein for nuclear translocation. Within mammary epithelia, Gal-1 localized within nuclear Gemini bodies and drove epithelial invasiveness. Conversely, unsialylated LacNAc glycans, enriched in the epithelial ducts, sequestered Gal-1 in the extracellular environment, ultimately attenuating invasive potential. We also found that malignant breast cells possess higher levels of nuclear Gal-1 and α2,6-SA and lower levels of LacNAc than nonmalignant cells in culture and in vivo and that nuclear localization of Gal-1 promotes a transformed phenotype. Our findings suggest that differential glycosylation at the level of tissue microanatomy regulates the nuclear function of Gal-1 in the context of mammary gland morphogenesis and in cancer progression. PMID:27496330

  2. Glycan-specific whole cell affinity chromatography: A versatile microbial adhesion platform

    PubMed Central

    Van Tassell, Maxwell L.; Price, Neil P.J.; Miller, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    We have sought a universal platform for elucidating and exploiting specificity of glycan-mediated adhesion by potentially uncharacterized microorganisms. Several techniques exist to explore microbial interactions with carbohydrate structures. Many are unsuitable for investigating specific mechanisms or uncharacterized organisms, requiring pure cultures, labeling techniques, expensive equipment, or other limitations such as questionable stability, stereospecificity, or scalability. We have adapted an affinity chromatography resin as a model to overcome these drawbacks, among others. It readily allows for the quantification, selection, and manipulation of target organisms based on interactions with glycan ligands. To maximize its utility as a selective screening method, we have constructed the tool such that it:•Promotes whole-cell interactions using viable, unaltered cells.•Provides robust spatial interactions with target glycans, presented with controlled stereo-specificity, for high affinity/avidity interactions that reflect a complex in vivo matrix.•Has the ability to utilize any reducing glycan, is quick, efficient, safe, and affordable to construct, and is scalable and reusable for multiple applications. PMID:26150959

  3. Host Tissue and Glycan Binding Specificities of Avian Viral Attachment Proteins Using Novel Avian Tissue Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de Vries, Robert P.; Eggert, Amber M.; Wandee, Nantaporn; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Gröne, Andrea; Verheije, Monique H.

    2015-01-01

    The initial interaction between viral attachment proteins and the host cell is a critical determinant for the susceptibility of a host for a particular virus. To increase our understanding of avian pathogens and the susceptibility of poultry species, we developed novel avian tissue microarrays (TMAs). Tissue binding profiles of avian viral attachment proteins were studied by performing histochemistry on multi-species TMA, comprising of selected tissues from ten avian species, and single-species TMAs, grouping organ systems of each species together. The attachment pattern of the hemagglutinin protein was in line with the reported tropism of influenza virus H5N1, confirming the validity of TMAs in profiling the initial virus-host interaction. The previously believed chicken-specific coronavirus (CoV) M41 spike (S1) protein displayed a broad attachment pattern to respiratory tissues of various avian species, albeit with lower affinity than hemagglutinin, suggesting that other avian species might be susceptible for chicken CoV. When comparing tissue-specific binding patterns of various avian coronaviral S1 proteins on the single-species TMAs, chicken and partridge CoV S1 had predominant affinity for the trachea, while pigeon CoV S1 showed marked preference for lung of their respective hosts. Binding of all coronaviral S1 proteins was dependent on sialic acids; however, while chicken CoV S1 preferred sialic acids type I lactosamine (Gal(1-3)GlcNAc) over type II (Gal(1-4)GlcNAc), the fine glycan specificities of pigeon and partridge CoVs were different, as chicken CoV S1-specific sialylglycopolymers could not block their binding to tissues. Taken together, TMAs provide a novel platform in the field of infectious diseases to allow identification of binding specificities of viral attachment proteins and are helpful to gain insight into the susceptibility of host and organ for avian pathogens. PMID:26035584

  4. Glycan profile of oviductal isthmus epithelium in normal and superovulated ewes.

    PubMed

    Desantis, Salvatore; Accogli, Gianluca; Silvestre, Fabio; Binetti, Francesco; Cox, Sharon Natasha; Roscino, Mariateresa; Caira, Michele; Lacalandra, Giovanni Michele

    2016-04-01

    Glycans of oviductal isthmus are implicated in sperm-isthmus interaction, sperm storage, survival, and capacitation. Isthmus morphology and glycoprotein production are controlled by sex steroids, which could be responsible for alterations of some reproductive events in the superovulated ewes (SE). In this study, the oviductal isthmus epithelium was evaluated in normal and in SE using morphologic and lectin histochemical analysis. The epithelium of normal isthmi was significantly taller in folds than in crypts, whereas it significantly decreased in the folds of SE. Nonciliated cells (NCs) from normal, showed apical blebs revealing apocrine secretory activity, which was missing in SE. The quantitative analysis of lectin staining revealed higher Con A, DBA, and PNA reactivity but lower affinity to KOH-sialidase- (Ks)WGA, GSA II, LTA, UEA I, SBA, GSA I-B4, RCA120, KsPNA, MAL II, SNA in control isthmi compared with superovulated ones. The NCs apical blebs showed terminal fucose (Fuc), N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), galactose (Gal), lactosamine, and O- and N-sialoglycans. In normal isthmi, the luminal surface of NCs and ciliated cells expressed Fuc, highly mannosilated N-glycans terminating with lactosamine as well as O-glycans ending with N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and GalNAc. Moreover, NCs microvilli contained Gal and α2-3-linked sialic acids. In SE, the luminal surface lacked Gal and GalNAcα1, 3(LFucα1,2)Galβ1,3/4GlcNAcβ1, whereas it was enriched with Fuc in the folds and with α2-3sialo-mucins both in crypts and in folds. The apical surface showed additional O- and N-linked sialoglycans in NCs and αGal in the cilia, which expressed α2-6-linked sialic acid only in the folds. The cytoplasm of control NCs showed highly mannosilated N-glycans throughout the epithelium and GlcNAc in the folds. After superovulation treatment, NCs expressed cytoplasmic terminal Fuc, βGalNAc, lactosamine, α2-3-, and α2-6-linked sialic acids in the folds. The cytoplasm of normal

  5. Processing of complex N-glycans in IgG Fc-region is affected by core fucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Castilho, Alexandra; Gruber, Clemens; Thader, Andreas; Oostenbrink, Chris; Pechlaner, Maria; Steinkellner, Herta; Altmann, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    We investigated N-glycan processing of immunoglobulin G1 using the monoclonal antibody cetuximab (CxMab), which has a glycosite in the Fab domain in addition to the conserved Fc glycosylation, as a reporter. Three GlcNAc (Gn) terminating bi-antennary glycoforms of CxMab differing in core fucosylation (α1,3- and α1,6-linkage) were generated in a plant-based expression platform. These GnGn, GnGnF3, and GnGnF6 CxMab variants were subjected in vivo to further processing toward sialylation and GlcNAc diversification (bisected and branching structures). Mass spectrometry-based glycan analyses revealed efficient processing of Fab glycans toward envisaged structures. By contrast, Fc glycan processing largely depend on the presence of core fucose. A particularly strong support of glycan processing in the presence of plant-specific core α1,3-fucose was observed. Consistently, molecular modeling suggests changes in the interactions of the Fc carbohydrate chain depending on the presence of core fucose, possibly changing the accessibility. Here, we provide data that reveal molecular mechanisms of glycan processing of IgG antibodies, which may have implications for the generation of glycan-engineered therapeutic antibodies with improved efficacies. PMID:26067753

  6. Characterization of goat milk lactoferrin N-glycans and comparison with the N-glycomes of human and bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Le Parc, Annabelle; Dallas, David C; Duaut, Solene; Leonil, Joelle; Martin, Patrice; Barile, Daniela

    2014-06-01

    Numerous milk components, such as lactoferrin, are recognized as health-promoting compounds. A growing body of evidence suggests that glycans could mediate lactoferrin's bioactivity. Goat milk lactoferrin is a candidate for infant formula supplementation because of its high homology with its human counterpart. The aim of this study was to characterize the glycosylation pattern of goat milk lactoferrin. After the protein was isolated from milk by affinity chromatography, N-glycans were enzymatically released and a complete characterization of glycan composition was carried out by advanced MS. The glycosylation of goat milk lactoferrin was compared with that of human and bovine milk glycoproteins. Nano-LC-Chip-Q-TOF MS data identified 65 structures, including high mannose, hybrid, and complex N-glycans. Among the N-glycan compositions, 37% were sialylated and 34% were fucosylated. The results demonstrated the existence of similar glycans in human and goat milk but also identified novel glycans in goat milk that were not present in human milk. These data suggest that goat milk could be a source of bioactive compounds, including lactoferrin that could be used as functional ingredients for food products beneficial to human nutrition.

  7. A novel endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase releases specific N-glycans depending on different reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Le Parc, Annabelle; Karav, Sercan; Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega De Moura; Frese, Steven A; Liu, Yan; Mills, David A; Block, David E; Barile, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Milk glycoproteins are involved in different functions and contribute to different cellular processes, including adhesion and signaling, and shape the development of the infant microbiome. Methods have been developed to study the complexities of milk protein glycosylation and understand the role of N-glycans in protein functionality. Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (EndoBI-1) isolated from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 is a recently isolated heat-stable enzyme that cleaves the N-N'-diacetyl chitobiose moiety found in the N-glycan core. The effects of different processing conditions (pH, temperature, reaction time, and enzyme/protein ratio) were evaluated for their ability to change EndoBI-1 activity on bovine colostrum whey glycoproteins using advanced mass spectrometry. This study shows that EndoBI-1 is able to cleave a high diversity of N-glycan structures. Nano-LC-Chip-Q-TOF MS data also revealed that different reaction conditions resulted in different N-glycan compositions released, thus modifying the relative abundance of N-glycan types. In general, more sialylated N-glycans were released at lower temperatures and pH values. These results demonstrated that EndoBI-1 is able to release a wide variety of N-glycans, whose compositions can be selectively manipulated using different processing conditions. PMID:26101185

  8. Protein N-glycosylation and N-glycan trimming are required for postembryonic development of the pest beetle Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    Walski, Tomasz; Van Damme, Els J. M.; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Christiaens, Olivier; De Pauw, Edwin; Smagghe, Guy

    2016-01-01

    In holometabolous insects the transition from larva to adult requires a complete body reorganization and relies on N-glycosylated proteins. N-glycosylation is an important posttranslational modification that influences protein activity but its impact on the metamorphosis has not been studied yet. Here we used the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, to perform a first comprehensive study on the involvement of the protein N-glycosylation pathway in metamorphosis. The transcript levels for genes encoding N-glycan processing enzymes increased during later developmental stages and, in turn, transition from larva to adult coincided with an enrichment of more extensively modified paucimannose glycans, including fucosylated ones. Blockage of N-glycan attachment resulted in larval mortality, while RNAi of α-glucosidases involved in early N-glycan trimming and quality control disrupted the larva to pupa transition. Additionally, simultaneous knockdown of multiple genes responsible for N-glycan processing towards paucimannose structures revealed their novel roles in pupal appendage formation and adult eclosion. Our findings revealed that, next to hormonal control, insect post-embryonic development and metamorphosis depend on protein N-glycan attachment and efficient N-glycan processing. Consequently, disruption of these processes could be an effective new approach for insect control. PMID:27731363

  9. Bacterial SPOR domains are recruited to septal peptidoglycan by binding to glycan strands that lack stem peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yahashiri, Atsushi; Jorgenson, Matthew A.; Weiss, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial SPOR domains bind peptidoglycan (PG) and are thought to target proteins to the cell division site by binding to “denuded” glycan strands that lack stem peptides, but uncertainties remain, in part because septal-specific binding has yet to be studied in a purified system. Here we show that fusions of GFP to SPOR domains from the Escherichia coli cell-division proteins DamX, DedD, FtsN, and RlpA all localize to septal regions of purified PG sacculi obtained from E. coli and Bacillus subtilis. Treatment of sacculi with an amidase that removes stem peptides enhanced SPOR domain binding, whereas treatment with a lytic transglycosylase that removes denuded glycans reduced SPOR domain binding. These findings demonstrate unequivocally that SPOR domains localize by binding to septal PG, that the physiologically relevant binding site is indeed a denuded glycan, and that denuded glycans are enriched in septal PG rather than distributed uniformly around the sacculus. Accumulation of denuded glycans in the septal PG of both E. coli and B. subtilis, organisms separated by 1 billion years of evolution, suggests that sequential removal of stem peptides followed by degradation of the glycan backbone is an ancient feature of PG turnover during bacterial cell division. Linking SPOR domain localization to the abundance of a structure (denuded glycans) present only transiently during biogenesis of septal PG provides a mechanism for coordinating the function of SPOR domain proteins with the progress of cell division. PMID:26305949

  10. Structural Feature Ions for Distinguishing N- and O-Linked Glycan Isomers by LC-ESI-IT MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everest-Dass, Arun V.; Abrahams, Jodie L.; Kolarich, Daniel; Packer, Nicolle H.; Campbell, Matthew P.

    2013-06-01

    Glycomics is the comprehensive study of glycan expression in an organism, cell, or tissue that relies on effective analytical technologies to understand glycan structure-function relationships. Owing to the macro- and micro-heterogeneity of oligosaccharides, detailed structure characterization has required an orthogonal approach, such as a combination of specific exoglycosidase digestions, LC-MS/MS, and the development of bioinformatic resources to comprehensively profile a complex biological sample. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) has emerged as a key tool in the structural analysis of oligosaccharides because of its high sensitivity, resolution, and robustness. Here, we present a strategy that uses LC-ESI-MS/MS to characterize over 200 N- and O-glycans from human saliva glycoproteins, complemented by sequential exoglycosidase treatment, to further verify the annotated glycan structures. Fragment-specific substructure diagnostic ions were collated from an extensive screen of the literature available on the detailed structural characterization of oligosaccharides and, together with other specific glycan structure feature ions derived from cross-ring and glycosidic-linkage fragmentation, were used to characterize the glycans and differentiate isomers. The availability of such annotated mass spectrometric fragmentation spectral libraries of glycan structures, together with such substructure diagnostic ions, will be key inputs for the future development of the automated elucidation of oligosaccharide structures from MS/MS data.

  11. Two-Dimensional N-Glycan Distribution Mapping of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Tissues by MALDI-Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Powers, Thomas W; Holst, Stephanie; Wuhrer, Manfred; Mehta, Anand S; Drake, Richard R

    2015-01-01

    A new mass spectrometry imaging approach to simultaneously map the two-dimensional distribution of N-glycans in tissues has been recently developed. The method uses Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) to spatially profile the location and distribution of multiple N-linked glycan species released by peptide N-glycosidase F in frozen or formalin-fixed tissues. Multiple formalin-fixed human hepatocellular carcinoma tissues were evaluated with this method, resulting in a panel of over 30 N-glycans detected. An ethylation reaction of extracted N-glycans released from adjacent slides was done to stabilize sialic acid containing glycans, and these structures were compared to N-glycans detected directly from tissue profiling. In addition, the distribution of singly fucosylated N-glycans detected in tumor tissue microarray cores were compared to the histochemistry staining pattern of a core fucose binding lectin. As this MALDI-IMS workflow has the potential to be applied to any formalin-fixed tissue block or tissue microarray, the advantages and limitations of the technique in context with other glycomic methods are also summarized. PMID:26501333

  12. TARGETTED RELEASE AND FRACTIONATION REVEAL GLUCURONYLATED AND SULPHATED N- AND O-GLYCANS IN LARVAE OF DIPTERAN INSECTS

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Simone; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Jin, Chunsheng; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Tiemeyer, Michael; Wilson, Iain B.H.; Paschinger, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes are important vectors of parasitic and viral diseases with Anopheles gambiae transmitting malaria and Aedes aegypti spreading yellow and Dengue fevers. Using two different approaches (solid-phase extraction and reversed-phase or hydrophilic interaction HPLC fractionation followed by MALDI-TOF MS or permethylation followed by NSI-MS), we examined the N-glycans of both A. gambiae and A. aegypti larvae and demonstrate the presence of a range of paucimannosidic glycans as well as bi- and tri-antennary glycans, some of which are modified with fucose or with sulphate or glucuronic acid residues; the latter anionic modifications were also found on N-glycans of larvae from another dipteran species (Drosophila melanogaster). The sulphate groups are attached primarily to core α-mannose residues (especially the α1,6-linked mannose), whereas the glucuronic acid residues are linked to non-reducing β1,3-galactose. Also, O-glycans were found to possess glucuronic acid and sulphate as well as phosphoethanolamine modifications. The presence of sulphated and glucuronylated N-glycans is a novel feature in dipteran glycomes; these structures have the potential to act as additional anionic glycan ligands involved in parasite interactions with the vector host. PMID:26047717

  13. A Novel Endo-β-N-Acetylglucosaminidase Releases Specific N-Glycans Depending on Different Reaction Conditions

    PubMed Central

    De Moura Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega; Frese, Steven A.; Liu, Yan; Mills, David A.; Block, David E.; Barile, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Milk glycoproteins are involved in different functions and contribute to different cellular processes, including adhesion and signaling, and shape the development of the infant micro-biome. Methods have been developed to study the complexities of milk protein glycosylation and understand the role of N-glycans in protein functionality. Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (EndoBI-1) isolated from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 is a recently isolated heat-stable enzyme that cleaves the N-N′-diacetyl chitobiose moiety found in the N-glycan core. The effects of different processing conditions (pH, temperature, reaction time, and enzyme/protein ratio) were evaluated for their ability to change EndoBI-1 activity on bovine colostrum whey glycoproteins using advanced mass spectrometry. This study shows that EndoBI-1 is able to cleave a high diversity of N-glycan structures. Nano-LC-Chip–Q-TOF MS data also revealed that different reaction conditions resulted in different N-glycan compositions released, thus modifying the relative abundance of N-glycan types. In general, more sialylated N-glycans were released at lower temperatures and pH values. These results demonstrated that EndoBI-1 is able to release a wide variety of N-glycans, whose compositions can be selectively manipulated using different processing conditions. PMID:26101185

  14. The relationship between glycan structures and expression levels of an endoplasmic reticulum-resident glycoprotein, UDP-glucose: Glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Daikoku, Shusaku; Seko, Akira; Son, Sang-Hyun; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Ito, Yukishige; Kanie, Osamu

    2015-06-19

    In this article, we report a relationship between glycan structures and expression levels of a recombinant ER-resident glycoprotein, uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT1). The function of glycan structures attached to a glycoprotein is actively studied; however, the glycan structures of recombinant, and not endogenous, glycoproteins have not been examined. In this study, we indicate a relationship between the glycan structure and the level of protein expression. Expression levels were controlled utilizing a series of vectors (pFN21K, pFN22K, pFN23K, and pFN24K HaloTag CMV Flexi Vectors). Qualitative and semi-quantitative confirmation of glycan structures was achieved with tandem mass spectrometry. The results of this study indicate that glycan structures are similar to endogenous glycans at low expression levels.

  15. Production of active human glucocerebrosidase in seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana complex-glycan-deficient (cgl) plants.

    PubMed

    He, Xu; Galpin, Jason D; Tropak, Michael B; Mahuran, Don; Haselhorst, Thomas; von Itzstein, Mark; Kolarich, Daniel; Packer, Nicolle H; Miao, Yansong; Jiang, Liwen; Grabowski, Gregory A; Clarke, Lorne A; Kermode, Allison R

    2012-04-01

    There is a clear need for efficient methods to produce protein therapeutics requiring mannose-termination for therapeutic efficacy. Here we report on a unique system for production of active human lysosomal acid β-glucosidase (glucocerebrosidase, GCase, EC 3.2.1.45) using seeds of the Arabidopsis thaliana complex-glycan-deficient (cgl) mutant, which are deficient in the activity of N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase I (EC 2.4.1.101). Gaucher disease is a prevalent lysosomal storage disease in which affected individuals inherit mutations in the gene (GBA1) encoding GCase. A gene cassette optimized for seed expression was used to generate the human enzyme in seeds of the cgl (C5) mutant, and the recombinant GCase was mainly accumulated in the apoplast. Importantly, the enzymatic properties including kinetic parameters, half-maximal inhibitory concentration of isofagomine and thermal stability of the cgl-derived GCase were comparable with those of imiglucerase, a commercially available recombinant human GCase used for enzyme replacement therapy in Gaucher patients. N-glycan structural analyses of recombinant cgl-GCase showed that the majority of the N-glycans (97%) were mannose terminated. Additional purification was required to remove ∼15% of the plant-derived recombinant GCase that possessed potentially immunogenic (xylose- and/or fucose-containing) N-glycans. Uptake of cgl-derived GCase by mouse macrophages was similar to that of imiglucerase. The cgl seed system requires no addition of foreign (non-native) amino acids to the mature recombinant GCase protein, and the dry transgenic seeds represent a stable repository of the therapeutic protein. Other strategies that may completely prevent plant-like complex N-glycans are discussed, including the use of a null cgl mutant. PMID:22061999

  16. Structural Sampling of Glycan Interaction Profiles Reveals Mucosal Receptors for Fimbrial Adhesins of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lonardi, Emanuela; Moonens, Kristof; Buts, Lieven; de Boer, Arjen R.; Olsson, Johan D. M.; Weiss, Manfred S.; Fabre, Emeline; Guérardel, Yann; Deelder, André M.; Oscarson, Stefan; Wuhrer, Manfred; Bouckaert, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Fimbriae are long, proteinaceous adhesion organelles expressed on the bacterial envelope, evolutionarily adapted by Escherichia coli strains for the colonization of epithelial linings. Using glycan arrays of the Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG), the lectin domains were screened of the fimbrial adhesins F17G and FedF from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and of the FimH adhesin from uropathogenic E. coli. This has led to the discovery of a more specific receptor for F17G, GlcNAcβ1,3Gal. No significant differences emerged from the glycan binding profiles of the F17G lectin domains from five different E. coli strains. However, strain-dependent amino acid variations, predominantly towards the positively charged arginine, were indicated by sulfate binding in FedF and F17G crystal structures. For FedF, no significant binders could be observed on the CFG glycan array. Hence, a shotgun array was generated from microvilli scrapings of the distal jejunum of a 3-week old piglet about to be weaned. On this array, the blood group A type 1 hexasaccharide emerged as a receptor for the FedF lectin domain and remarkably also for F18-fimbriated E. coli. F17G was found to selectively recognize glycan species with a terminal GlcNAc, typifying intestinal mucins. In conclusion, F17G and FedF recognize long glycan sequences that could only be identified using the shotgun approach. Interestingly, ETEC strains display a large capacity to adapt their fimbrial adhesins to ecological niches via charge-driven interactions, congruent with binding to thick mucosal surfaces displaying an acidic gradient along the intestinal tract. PMID:24833052

  17. A Recombinant Fungal Lectin for Labeling Truncated Glycans on Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hurbin, Amandine; Boos, Irene; Unverzagt, Carlo; Bouras, Mourad; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Coll, Jean-Luc; Varrot, Annabelle; Le Pendu, Jacques; Busser, Benoit; Imberty, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface glycoconjugates present alterations of their structures in chronic diseases and distinct oligosaccharide epitopes have been associated with cancer. Among them, truncated glycans present terminal non-reducing β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residues that are rare on healthy tissues. Lectins from unconventional sources such as fungi or algi provide novel markers that bind specifically to such epitopes, but their availability may be challenging. A GlcNAc-binding lectin from the fruiting body of the fungus Psathyrella velutina (PVL) has been produced in good yield in bacterial culture. A strong specificity for terminal GlcNAc residues was evidenced by glycan array. Affinity values obtained by microcalorimetry and surface plasmon resonance demonstrated a micromolar affinity for GlcNAcβ1-3Gal epitopes and for biantennary N-glycans with GlcNAcβ1-2Man capped branches. Crystal structure of PVL complexed with GlcNAcβ1-3Gal established the structural basis of the specificity. Labeling of several types of cancer cells and use of inhibitors of glycan metabolism indicated that rPVL binds to terminal GlcNAc but also to sialic acid (Neu5Ac). Analysis of glycosyltransferase expression confirmed the higher amount of GlcNAc present on cancer cells. rPVL binding is specific to cancer tissue and weak or no labeling is observed for healthy ones, except for stomach glands that present unique αGlcNAc-presenting mucins. In lung, breast and colon carcinomas, a clear delineation could be observed between cancer regions and surrounding healthy tissues. PVL is therefore a useful tool for labeling agalacto-glycans in cancer or other diseases. PMID:26042789

  18. Structural Sampling of Glycan Interaction Profiles Reveals Mucosal Receptors for Fimbrial Adhesins of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lonardi, Emanuela; Moonens, Kristof; Buts, Lieven; de Boer, Arjen R; Olsson, Johan D M; Weiss, Manfred S; Fabre, Emeline; Guérardel, Yann; Deelder, André M; Oscarson, Stefan; Wuhrer, Manfred; Bouckaert, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Fimbriae are long, proteinaceous adhesion organelles expressed on the bacterial envelope, evolutionarily adapted by Escherichia coli strains for the colonization of epithelial linings. Using glycan arrays of the Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG), the lectin domains were screened of the fimbrial adhesins F17G and FedF from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and of the FimH adhesin from uropathogenic E. coli. This has led to the discovery of a more specific receptor for F17G, GlcNAcb1,3Gal. No significant differences emerged from the glycan binding profiles of the F17G lectin domains from five different E. coli strains. However, strain-dependent amino acid variations, predominantly towards the positively charged arginine, were indicated by sulfate binding in FedF and F17G crystal structures. For FedF, no significant binders could be observed on the CFG glycan array. Hence, a shotgun array was generated from microvilli scrapings of the distal jejunum of a 3-week old piglet about to be weaned. On this array, the blood group A type 1 hexasaccharide emerged as a receptor for the FedF lectin domain and remarkably also for F18-fimbriated E. coli. F17G was found to selectively recognize glycan species with a terminal GlcNAc, typifying intestinal mucins. In conclusion, F17G and FedF recognize long glycan sequences that could only be identified using the shotgun approach. Interestingly, ETEC strains display a large capacity to adapt their fimbrial adhesins to ecological niches via charge-driven interactions, congruent with binding to thick mucosal surfaces displaying an acidic gradient along the intestinal tract. PMID:24833052

  19. Isolation of a mutant Arabidopsis plant that lacks N-acetyl glucosaminyl transferase I and is unable to synthesize Golgi-modified complex N-linked glycans.

    PubMed Central

    von Schaewen, A; Sturm, A; O'Neill, J; Chrispeels, M J

    1993-01-01

    The complex asparagine-linked glycans of plant glycoproteins, characterized by the presence of beta 1-->2 xylose and alpha 1-->3 fucose residues, are derived from typical mannose9(N-acetylglucosamine)2 (Man9GlcNAc2) N-linked glycans through the activity of a series of glycosidases and glycosyl transferases in the Golgi apparatus. By screening leaf extracts with an antiserum against complex glycans, we isolated a mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that is blocked in the conversion of high-manne to complex glycans. In callus tissues derived from the mutant plants, all glycans bind to concanavalin A. These glycans can be released by treatment with endoglycosidase H, and the majority has the same size as Man5GlcNAc1 glycans. In the presence of deoxymannojirimycin, an inhibitor of mannosidase I, the mutant cells synthesize Man9GlcNAc2 and Man8GlcNAc2 glycans, suggesting that the biochemical lesion in the mutant is not in the biosynthesis of high-mannose glycans in the endoplasmic reticulum but in their modification in the Golgi. Direct enzyme assays of cell extracts show that the mutant cells lack N-acetyl glucosaminyl transferase I, the first enzyme in the pathway of complex glycan biosynthesis. The mutant plants are able to complete their development normally under several environmental conditions, suggesting that complex glycans are not essential for normal developmental processes. By crossing the complex-glycan-deficient strain of A. thaliana with a transgenic strain that expresses the glycoprotein phytohemagglutinin, we obtained a unique strain that synthesizes phytohemagglutinin with two high-mannose glycans, instead of one high-mannose and one complex glycan. PMID:8278542

  20. Isolation of a mutant Arabidopsis plant that lacks N-aetyl glucosaminyl transferase I and is unable to synthesize Golgi-modified complex N-linked glycans

    SciTech Connect

    Schaewen, A. von; O'Neill, J.; Chrispeels, M.J. ); Sturm, A. )

    1993-08-01

    The complex asparagine-linked glycans of plant glycoproteins, characterized by the presence of [beta]1[yields]2 xylose and [alpha]1[yields]3 fucose residues, are derived from typical mannose[sub 9](N-acetylglucosamine)[sub 2] (Man[sub 9]GlcNAc[sub 2]) N-linked glycans through the activity of a series of glycosidases and glycosyl transferases in the Golgi apparatus. By screening leaf extracts with an antiserum against complex glycans, we isolated a mutant of Arbidopsis thaliana that is blocked in the conversion of high-manne to complex glycans. In callus tissues derived from the mutant plants, all glycans bind to concanavalin A. These glycans can be released by treatment with endoglycosidase H, and the majority has the same size as Man[sub 5]GlcNAc[sub 1] glycans. In the presence of deoxymannojirimycin, an inhibitor of mannosidase I, the mutant cells synthesize Man[sub 9]GlcNAc[sub 2] and Man[sub 8]GlcNAc[sub 2] glycans, suggesting that the biochemical lesion in the mutant is not in the biosynthesis of high-mannose glycans in the endoplasmic reticulum but in their modification in the Golgi. Direct enzyme assays of cell extracts show that the mutant cells lack N-acetyl glucosaminyl transferase I, the first enzyme in the pathway of complex glycan biosynthesis. The mutant plants are able to complete their development normally under several environmental conditions, suggesting that complex glycans are not essential for normal developmental processes. By crossing the complex-glycan-deficient strain of A. thaliana with a transgenic strain that expresses the glycoprotein phytohemagglutinin, a unique strain was obtained that synthesizes phytohemagglutinin with two high-mannose glycans, instead of one high-mannose and one complex glycan. 42 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Design and on-orbit performance of the attitude determination and control system for the ZDPS-1A pico-satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Tian; Meng, Tao; Wang, Hao; Han, Ke; Jin, Zhong-He

    2012-08-01

    The ZDPS-1A pico-satellite, developed by the Zhejiang University, is featured with a three-axis stabilizing capability. It is 15×15×15 cm3 cube-shaped satellite with a total mass of 3.5 kg. ZDPS-1A is the first pico-satellite that has been launched successfully in China. The mission of ZDPS-1A is on-orbit system verification of student-build pico-satellite and wide range earth observation with a micro panoramic camera. A miniature momentum wheel is employed to offer gyro stiffness stability in the pitch (orbit normal) axis. Magnetic coils are employed to generate control torques to achieve the three-axis stabilization of nadir-pointing. The attitude sensors employed in the design include two three-axis magnetometers (TAMs), a three-axis gyro, and two sun sensors. Both ground simulations and on-orbit testing are conducted to verify the feasibility of the given attitude determination and control system (ADCS).

  2. The extent and determinants of changes in CYP2D6 and CYP1A2 activities with therapeutic doses of sertraline.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, V; Naranjo, C A; Herrmann, N; Shulman, R W; Sellers, E M; Reed, K; Kalow, W

    1998-02-01

    The extent of changes in CYP2D6 and CYP1A2 activities with higher therapeutic dosages (>50 mg/day) of sertraline is not well established in vivo. This study assessed the extent and determinants of changes in CYP2D6 and CYP1A2 isozyme activities after treatment with clinically relevant doses of sertraline. Patients and healthy volunteers aged 19 to 85 years (N = 21) were treated with sertraline for 5 to 55 days. The dosage of sertraline ranged from 25 to 150 mg/day (93.5+/-26.4 mg/day; mean +/- SD). All subjects had an extensive metabolizer phenotype for CYP2D6 and received a single oral dose of dextromethorphan (30 mg) and caffeine (100 mg) before and after sertraline treatment. The log O-demethylation ratio (ODMR) of dextromethorphan and the caffeine metabolic ratio (CMR) in overnight urine were used as in vivo indices of the CYP2D6 and CYP1A2 isozyme activities, respectively. Concurrent medications and lifestyle habits (e.g., smoking and diet) were monitored during the study. Baseline log ODMR (-2.33+/-0.45) but not CMR (5.1+/-1.9) (mean +/- SD) significantly changed after sertraline treatment (-2.19+/-0.62; 4.5+/-1.6, respectively) (p: ODMR = 0.04, CMR = 0.10). There was no significant effect of age, dose, duration of treatment, gender, sertraline and/or desmethylsertraline plasma concentration, subject type (patient or volunteer), and weight on the extent of changes in log ODMR or CMR (p > 0.05). In conclusion, sertraline treatment at a mean daily dosage of 94.0 mg did not significantly change CYP1A2 activity and resulted in a modest inhibition of CYP2D6 activity.

  3. Large-Scale Identification of N-Glycan Glycoproteins Carrying Lewis x and Site-Specific N-Glycan Alterations in Fut9 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Noro, Erika; Togayachi, Akira; Sato, Takashi; Tomioka, Azusa; Fujita, Mika; Sukegawa, Masako; Suzuki, Nami; Kaji, Hiroyuki; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2015-09-01

    The Lewis x (Le(x)) structure (Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc-R) is a carbohydrate epitope comprising the stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1) and CD15, and it is synthesized by α1,3-fucosyltransferase 9 (Fut9). Fut9 is expressed specifically in the stomach, kidney, brain, and in leukocytes, suggesting a specific function in these tissues. In this study, the N-linked glycan mass spectrometry profile of wild-type mouse kidney glycoproteins revealed the presence of abundant terminal fucoses, which were lost following knockout of the Fut9 gene; the terminal fucose was therefore concluded to be Le(x). These results suggested that Le(x) presence is widespread rather than being limited to specific proteins. We endeavored to comprehensively identify the Le(x) carriers in the mouse kidney. Glycopeptides carrying fucosylated glycans were collected by Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) affinity chromatography from kidney homogenates of wild-type and Fut9 knockout mice. The site-specific N-glycomes on the glycopeptides were subsequently analyzed by adopting a new glycoproteomic technology composed of dissociation-independent assignment of glycopeptide signals and accurate mass-based prediction of the N-glycome on the glycopeptides. Our analyses demonstrated that 24/32 glycoproteins contained the Le(x) N-glycan structure in wild-type kidney; of these, Le(x) was lost from 21 in the knockout mice. This is the first report of large-scale identification of Le(x)-carrying glycoproteins from a native sample based on the site-specific glycome analysis.

  4. Phytohemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA-E) displays a novel glycan recognition mode using a common legume lectin fold.

    PubMed

    Nagae, Masamichi; Soga, Keisuke; Morita-Matsumoto, Kana; Hanashima, Shinya; Ikeda, Akemi; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2014-04-01

    Phytohemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA-E), a legume lectin, has an unusual specificity toward biantennary galactosylated N-glycan with bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). To investigate the interaction in detail, we have solved the crystal structures of PHA-E without ligand and in complex with biantennary N-glycan derivatives. PHA-E interacts with the trisaccharide unit (Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-2Man) in a manner completely different from that of mannose/glucose-specific legume lectins. The inner mannose residue binds to a novel site on the protein, and its rotation is opposite to that occurring in the monosaccharide-binding site of other lectins around the sugar O3 axis. Saturation-transfer difference NMR using biantennary di-galactosylated and bisected glycans reveals that PHA-E interacts with both antennas almost equally. The unique carbohydrate interaction explains the glycan-binding specificity and high affinity.

  5. Community-Based Network Study of Protein-Carbohydrate Interactions in Plant Lectins Using Glycan Array Data

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Adeel; Lee, Juyong; Lee, Jooyoung

    2014-01-01

    Lectins play major roles in biological processes such as immune recognition and regulation, inflammatory responses, cytokine signaling, and cell adhesion. Recently, glycan microarrays have shown to play key roles in understanding glycobiology, allowing us to study the relationship between the specificities of glycan binding proteins and their natural ligands at the omics scale. However, one of the drawbacks in utilizing glycan microarray data is the lack of systematic analysis tools to extract information. In this work, we attempt to group various lectins and their interacting carbohydrates by using community-based analysis of a lectin-carbohydrate network. The network consists of 1119 nodes and 16769 edges and we have identified 3 lectins having large degrees of connectivity playing the roles of hubs. The community based network analysis provides an easy way to obtain a general picture of the lectin-glycan interaction and many statistically significant functional groups. PMID:24755681

  6. Design and application of an open tubular capillary reactor for solid-phase permethylation of glycans in glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaodi; Zhang, Lingyi; Zhang, Weibing; Zhao, Liang

    2015-03-01

    The permethylation derivatization method for structural analysis of glycans is important for characterizing glycoproteins in the study of glycomics. An open tubular capillary reactor coated with NaOH was designed and constructed for solid-phase permethylation of glycans in glycoproteins. The flow rate, capillary length, and inner diameter of the reactor were optimized. The permethylation rate of the model sample β-cyclodextrin reached 81% with a flow rate of 1 μL min(-1) in a 32 cm long capillary reactor (i.d. 500 μm). A trace amount of mucin O-glycans was permethylated by the open tubular reactor under low pressure without interference from the freezing of DMSO. Analysis indicates that using this open tubular reactor is a fast, convenient, and efficient method for the permethylation of protein O-glycan.

  7. Toward the generation of an aminonaphthalene trisulfonate labeled N-glycan database for capillary gel electrophoresis analysis of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Kerékgyártó, Márta; Guttman, András

    2014-08-01

    There is an increasing trend to develop therapeutic glycoproteins, mostly antibodies that require high resolution bioanalytical tools to address the challenging aspects of comprehensive carbohydrate characterization. In this paper we introduce an initial version of a glucose unit database for 8-aminonaphthalene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid-labeled glycans. At this stage we mainly focused on therapeutic IgG derived glycans of core fucosylated biantennary structures with and without sialic acid residues, as well as high mannose structures. Currently 25 oligosaccharides represent this first set of the database that shows the abbreviated names of the individual sugar structures with their graphic representation, precise molecular mass and glucose unit (GU) values with corresponding SDs. The database will provide a quick glycan analysis tool for preliminary data interpretation of rapid (around 200 s) CGE-LED-induced fluorescence (CGE-LEDIF) based glycan profiling runs.

  8. Identification and characterization of isomeric N-glycans of human alfa-acid-glycoprotein by stable isotope labelling and ZIC-HILIC-MS in combination with exoglycosidase digestion.

    PubMed

    Mancera-Arteu, Montserrat; Giménez, Estela; Barbosa, José; Sanz-Nebot, Victòria

    2016-10-12

    In this study, a ZIC-HILIC-MS methodology for the analysis of N-glycan isomers was optimized to obtain greater detection sensitivity and thus identify more glycan structures in hAGP. In a second step, this method was combined with glycan reductive isotope labelling (GRIL) through [(12)C6]/[(13)C6]-aniline and exoglycosidase digestion to characterize the different glycan isomers. The GRIL method allows the peak areas resulting from two different labelled samples to be compared, since neither retention time shifts nor variations in the ionization of glycans between these samples are obtained. First, sialic acid linkage assignations were performed for most hAGP glycan isomers with α2-3 sialidase digestion. Bi-, tri- and tetraantennary glycan isomers with different terminal sialic acid linkages to galactose (α2-3 or α2-6) were assigned, and the potential of this technique for the structural characterization of isobaric isomers was therefore demonstrated. Furthermore, fucose linkage isomers of hAGP glycans were also characterized using this isotope-labelling approach in combination with α1-3,4 fucosidase and β1-4 galactosidase digestion. α1-3 antennary fucoses and α1-6 core fucosylation were detected in hAGP fucosylated glycans. These established methodologies can be extremely useful for patho-glycomic studies to characterize glycoproteins of biomedical interest and find novel glycan isomers that could be used as biomarkers in cancer research. PMID:27662763

  9. First determination of the incidence of the unique TOR1A gene mutation, c.907delGAG, in a Mediterranean population.

    PubMed

    Frédéric, Mélissa; Lucarz, Estelle; Monino, Christine; Saquet, Céline; Thorel, Delphine; Claustres, Mireille; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie; Collod-Béroud, Gwenaelle

    2007-04-30

    The c.907delGAG mutation in the TOR1A gene (also named DYT1) is the most common cause of early-onset primary dystonia. The mutation frequency and prevalence have so far been only estimated from rare clinical epidemiological reports in some populations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence at birth of the c.907delGAG mutation in a French-representative mixed population of newborn from South-Eastern France. We applied an automated high-throughput genotyping method to dried blood spot samples from 12,000 newborns registered in Hérault between 2004 and 2005. Only one allele was found to carry the mutation, which allows to determine its incidence at birth as 1/12,000 per year in this area.

  10. How hydrophobicity and the glycosylation site of glycans affect protein folding and stability: a molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Diannan; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Zheng

    2012-01-12

    Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in the biosynthesis of protein, but its effect on the protein conformational transitions underpinning folding and stabilization is poorly understood. In this study, we present a coarse-grained off-lattice 46-β barrel model protein glycosylated by glycans with different hydrophobicity and glycosylation sites to examine the effect of glycans on protein folding and stabilization using a Langevin dynamics simulation, in which an H term was proposed as the index of the hydrophobicity of glycan. Compared with its native counterpart, introducing glycans of suitable hydrophobicity (0.1 < H < 0.4) at flexible peptide residues of this model protein not only facilitated folding of the protein but also increased its conformation stability significantly. On the contrary, when glycans were introduced at the restricted peptide residues of the protein, only those hydrophilic (H = 0) or very weak hydrophobic (H < 0.2) ones contributed slightly to protein stability but hindered protein folding due to increased free energy barriers. The glycosylated protein retained the two-step folding mechanism in terms of hydrophobic collapse and structural rearrangement. Glycan chains located in a suitable site with an appropriate hydrophobicity facilitated both collapse and rearrangement, whereas others, though accelerating collapse, hindered rearrangement. In addition to entropy effects, that is, narrowing the space of the conformations of the unfolded state, the presence of glycans with suitable hydrophobicity at suitable glycosylation site strengthened the folded state via hydrophobic interaction, that is, the enthalpy effect. The simulations have shown both the stabilization and the destabilization effects of glycosylation, as experimentally reported in the literature, and provided molecular insight into glycosylated proteins. The understanding of the effects of glycans with different hydrophobicities on the folding

  11. Glucosidase II and N-glycan mannose content regulate the half-lives of monoglucosylated species in vivo.

    PubMed

    Stigliano, Ivan D; Alculumbre, Solana G; Labriola, Carlos A; Parodi, Armando J; D'Alessio, Cecilia

    2011-06-01

    Glucosidase II (GII) sequentially removes the two innermost glucose residues from the glycan (Glc(3)Man(9)GlcNAc(2)) transferred to proteins. GII also participates in cycles involving the lectin/chaperones calnexin (CNX) and calreticulin (CRT) as it removes the single glucose unit added to folding intermediates and misfolded glycoproteins by the UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT). GII is a heterodimer in which the α subunit (GIIα) bears the active site, and the β subunit (GIIβ) modulates GIIα activity through its C-terminal mannose 6-phosphate receptor homologous (MRH) domain. Here we report that, as already described in cell-free assays, in live Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells a decrease in the number of mannoses in the glycan results in decreased GII activity. Contrary to previously reported cell-free experiments, however, no such effect was observed in vivo for UGGT. We propose that endoplasmic reticulum α-mannosidase-mediated N-glycan demannosylation of misfolded/slow-folding glycoproteins may favor their interaction with the lectin/chaperone CNX present in S. pombe by prolonging the half-lives of the monoglucosylated glycans (S. pombe lacks CRT). Moreover, we show that even N-glycans bearing five mannoses may interact in vivo with the GIIβ MRH domain and that the N-terminal GIIβ G2B domain is involved in the GIIα-GIIβ interaction. Finally, we report that protists that transfer glycans with low mannose content to proteins have nevertheless conserved the possibility of displaying relatively long-lived monoglucosylated glycans by expressing GIIβ MRH domains with a higher specificity for glycans with high mannose content.

  12. Structural basis for diverse N-glycan recognition by HIV-1-neutralizing V1-V2-directed antibody PG16.

    PubMed

    Pancera, Marie; Shahzad-Ul-Hussan, Syed; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; McLellan, Jason S; Bailer, Robert T; Dai, Kaifan; Loesgen, Sandra; Louder, Mark K; Staupe, Ryan P; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Parks, Robert; Eudailey, Joshua; Lloyd, Krissey E; Blinn, Julie; Alam, S Munir; Haynes, Barton F; Amin, Mohammed N; Wang, Lai-Xi; Burton, Dennis R; Koff, Wayne C; Nabel, Gary J; Mascola, John R; Bewley, Carole A; Kwong, Peter D

    2013-07-01

    HIV-1 uses a diverse N-linked-glycan shield to evade recognition by antibody. Select human antibodies, such as the clonally related PG9 and PG16, recognize glycopeptide epitopes in the HIV-1 V1-V2 region and penetrate this shield, but their ability to accommodate diverse glycans is unclear. Here we report the structure of antibody PG16 bound to a scaffolded V1-V2, showing an epitope comprising both high mannose-type and complex-type N-linked glycans. We combined structure, NMR and mutagenesis analyses to characterize glycan recognition by PG9 and PG16. Three PG16-specific residues, arginine, serine and histidine (RSH), were critical for binding sialic acid on complex-type glycans, and introduction of these residues into PG9 produced a chimeric antibody with enhanced HIV-1 neutralization. Although HIV-1-glycan diversity facilitates evasion, antibody somatic diversity can overcome this and can provide clues to guide the design of modified antibodies with enhanced neutralization.

  13. Glycan Degradation (GlyDeR) Analysis Predicts Mammalian Gut Microbiota Abundance and Host Diet-Specific Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Zarecki, Raphy; Oberhardt, Matthew; Ursell, Luke K.; Kupiec, Martin; Knight, Rob; Gophna, Uri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycans form the primary nutritional source for microbes in the human gut, and understanding their metabolism is a critical yet understudied aspect of microbiome research. Here, we present a novel computational pipeline for modeling glycan degradation (GlyDeR) which predicts the glycan degradation potency of 10,000 reference glycans based on either genomic or metagenomic data. We first validated GlyDeR by comparing degradation profiles for genomes in the Human Microbiome Project against KEGG reaction annotations. Next, we applied GlyDeR to the analysis of human and mammalian gut microbial communities, which revealed that the glycan degradation potential of a community is strongly linked to host diet and can be used to predict diet with higher accuracy than sequence data alone. Finally, we show that a microbe’s glycan degradation potential is significantly correlated (R = 0.46) with its abundance, with even higher correlations for potential pathogens such as the class Clostridia (R = 0.76). GlyDeR therefore represents an important tool for advancing our understanding of bacterial metabolism in the gut and for the future development of more effective prebiotics for microbial community manipulation. PMID:25118239

  14. Automated Solution-Phase Synthesis of Insect Glycans to Probe the Binding Affinity of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu-Lun; Linz, Lucas B; Bonning, Bryony C; Pohl, Nicola L B

    2015-11-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV)--a plant RNA virus transmitted exclusively by aphids--causes disease in multiple food crops. However, the aphid-virus interactions required for disease transmission are poorly understood. For virus transmission, PEMV binds to a heavily glycosylated receptor aminopeptidase N in the pea aphid gut and is transcytosed across the gut epithelium into the aphid body cavity prior to release in saliva as the aphid feeds. To investigate the role of glycans in PEMV-aphid interactions and explore the possibility of viral control through blocking a glycan interaction, we synthesized insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides by automated solution-phase synthesis. The route features a mannose building block with C-5 ester enforcing a β-linkage, which also provides a site for subsequent chain extension. The resulting insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides with fluorous tags were used in a fluorous microarray to analyze binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled PEMV; however, no specific binding between the insect glycan and PEMV was detected. To confirm these microarray results, we removed the fluorous tag from the trimannosides for isothermal titration calorimetry studies with unlabeled PEMV. The ITC studies confirmed the microarray results and suggested that this particular glycan-PEMV interaction is not involved in virus uptake and transport through the aphid. PMID:26457763

  15. Reliable LC-MS quantitative glycomics using iGlycoMab stable isotope labeled glycans as internal standards.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiyue; Tello, Nadia; Harvey, Alex; Boyes, Barry; Orlando, Ron; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-06-01

    Glycans have numerous functions in various biological processes and participate in the progress of diseases. Reliable quantitative glycomic profiling techniques could contribute to the understanding of the biological functions of glycans, and lead to the discovery of potential glycan biomarkers for diseases. Although LC-MS is a powerful analytical tool for quantitative glycomics, the variation of ionization efficiency and MS intensity bias are influencing quantitation reliability. Internal standards can be utilized for glycomic quantitation by MS-based methods to reduce variability. In this study, we used stable isotope labeled IgG2b monoclonal antibody, iGlycoMab, as an internal standard to reduce potential for errors and to reduce variabililty due to sample digestion, derivatization, and fluctuation of nanoESI efficiency in the LC-MS analysis of permethylated N-glycans released from model glycoproteins, human blood serum, and breast cancer cell line. We observed an unanticipated degradation of isotope labeled glycans, tracked a source of such degradation, and optimized a sample preparation protocol to minimize degradation of the internal standard glycans. All results indicated the effectiveness of using iGlycoMab to minimize errors originating from sample handling and instruments. PMID:26913967

  16. Structural basis for diverse N-glycan recognition by HIV-1-neutralizing V1-V2-directed antibody PG16

    SciTech Connect

    Pancera, Marie; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; McLellan, Jason S.; Bailer, Robert T.; Dai, Kaifan; Loesgen, Sandra; Louder, Mark K.; Staupe, Ryan P.; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Parks, Robert; Eudailey, Joshua; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Blinn, Julie; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Amin, Mohammed N.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Mascola, John R.; Bewley, Carole A; Kwong, Peter D.

    2013-08-05

    HIV-1 uses a diverse N-linked-glycan shield to evade recognition by antibody. Select human antibodies, such as the clonally related PG9 and PG16, recognize glycopeptide epitopes in the HIV-1 V1–V2 region and penetrate this shield, but their ability to accommodate diverse glycans is unclear. Here we report the structure of antibody PG16 bound to a scaffolded V1–V2, showing an epitope comprising both high mannose–type and complex-type N-linked glycans. We combined structure, NMR and mutagenesis analyses to characterize glycan recognition by PG9 and PG16. Three PG16-specific residues, arginine, serine and histidine (RSH), were critical for binding sialic acid on complex-type glycans, and introduction of these residues into PG9 produced a chimeric antibody with enhanced HIV-1 neutralization. Although HIV-1–glycan diversity facilitates evasion, antibody somatic diversity can overcome this and can provide clues to guide the design of modified antibodies with enhanced neutralization.

  17. Automated Solution-Phase Synthesis of Insect Glycans to Probe the Binding Affinity of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu-Lun; Linz, Lucas B; Bonning, Bryony C; Pohl, Nicola L B

    2015-11-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV)--a plant RNA virus transmitted exclusively by aphids--causes disease in multiple food crops. However, the aphid-virus interactions required for disease transmission are poorly understood. For virus transmission, PEMV binds to a heavily glycosylated receptor aminopeptidase N in the pea aphid gut and is transcytosed across the gut epithelium into the aphid body cavity prior to release in saliva as the aphid feeds. To investigate the role of glycans in PEMV-aphid interactions and explore the possibility of viral control through blocking a glycan interaction, we synthesized insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides by automated solution-phase synthesis. The route features a mannose building block with C-5 ester enforcing a β-linkage, which also provides a site for subsequent chain extension. The resulting insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides with fluorous tags were used in a fluorous microarray to analyze binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled PEMV; however, no specific binding between the insect glycan and PEMV was detected. To confirm these microarray results, we removed the fluorous tag from the trimannosides for isothermal titration calorimetry studies with unlabeled PEMV. The ITC studies confirmed the microarray results and suggested that this particular glycan-PEMV interaction is not involved in virus uptake and transport through the aphid.

  18. Structural studies on a non-toxic homologue of type II RIPs from bitter gourd: Molecular basis of non-toxicity, conformational selection and glycan structure.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Thyageshwar; Sharma, Alok; Vijayan, M

    2015-12-01

    The structures of nine independent crystals of bitter gourd seed lectin (BGSL), a non-toxic homologue of type II RIPs, and its sugar complexes have been determined. The four-chain, two-fold symmetric, protein is made up of two identical two-chain modules, each consisting of a catalytic chain and a lectin chain, connected by a disulphide bridge. The lectin chain is made up of two domains. Each domain carries a carbohydrate binding site in type II RIPs of known structure. BGSL has a sugar binding site only on one domain, thus impairing its interaction at the cell surface. The adenine binding site in the catalytic chain is defective. Thus, defects in sugar binding as well as adenine binding appear to contribute to the non-toxicity of the lectin. The plasticity of the molecule is mainly caused by the presence of two possible well defined conformations of a surface loop in the lectin chain. One of them is chosen in the sugar complexes, in a case of conformational selection, as the chosen conformation facilitates an additional interaction with the sugar, involving an arginyl residue in the loop. The N-glycosylation of the lectin involves a plant-specific glycan while that in toxic type II RIPs of known structure involves a glycan which is animal as well as plant specific. PMID:26648038

  19. Biocompatible copper(I) catalysts for in vivo imaging of glycans

    PubMed Central

    Amo, David Soriano del; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Hao; Besanceney, Christen; Yan, Amos; Levy, Matthew; Liu, Yi; Marlow, Florence L.; Wu, Peng

    2010-01-01

    The Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) is the standard method for bioorthogonal conjugation. However, current Cu(I) catalyst formulations are toxic, hindering their use in living systems. Here we report that BTTES, a tris(triazolylmethyl)amine-based ligand for Cu(I), promotes the cycloaddition reaction rapidly in living systems without apparent toxicity. This catalyst allows, for the first time, noninvasive imaging of fucosylated glycans during zebrafish early embryogenesis. We microinjected embryos with alkyne-bearing GDP-fucose at the one-cell stage and detected the metabolically incorporated unnatural sugars using the biocompatible click chemistry. Labeled glycans could be imaged in the enveloping layer of zebrafish embryos between blastula and early larval stages. This new method paves the way for rapid, noninvasive imaging of biomolecules in living organisms. PMID:21062072

  20. Novel structural features of the immunocompetent ceramide phospho-inositol glycan core from Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Christian; Wang, Zhirui; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; Fichorova, Raina N; Singh, Bibhuti N

    2016-01-01

    The ceramide phosphoinositol glycan core (CPI-GC) of the lipophosphoglycan of Trichomonas vaginalis is a major virulent factor of this common genitourinary parasite. While its carbohydrate composition has been reported before, its structure has remained largely unknown. We isolated the glycan portions of CPI-GC by nitrous acid deamination and hydrofluoric acid treatment and investigated their structures by methylation analysis and 1- and 2-D NMR. We found that the α-anomer of galactose is a major constituent of CPI-GC. The β-anomer was found exclusively at the non-reducing end of CPI-GC side chains. Furthermore the data showed that the rhamnan backbone is more complex than previously thought and that the inositol residue at the reducing end is linked to a 4-linked α-glucuronic acid (GlcA) residue. This appears to be the most striking and novel feature of this GPI-anchor type molecule.

  1. Immune recruitment or suppression by glycan engineering of endogenous and therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Le, Ngoc Phuong Lan; Bowden, Thomas A; Struwe, Weston B; Crispin, Max

    2016-08-01

    Human serum IgG contains multiple glycoforms which exhibit a range of binding properties to effector molecules such as cellular Fc receptors. Emerging knowledge of how the Fc glycans contribute to the antibody structure and effector functions has opened new avenues for the exploitation of defined antibody glycoforms in the treatment of diseases. Here, we review the structure and activity of antibody glycoforms and highlight developments in antibody glycoengineering by both the manipulation of the cellular glycosylation machinery and by chemoenzymatic synthesis. We discuss wide ranging applications of antibody glycoengineering in the treatment of cancer, autoimmunity and inflammation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Glycans in personalised medicine" Guest Editor: Professor Gordan Lauc. PMID:27105835

  2. Contribution of leptin receptor N-linked glycans to leptin binding.

    PubMed

    Kamikubo, Yuichi; Dellas, Claudia; Loskutoff, David J; Quigley, James P; Ruggeri, Zaverio M

    2008-03-15

    The extracellular domain of the human leptin receptor (Ob-R) contains 20 potential N-glycosylation sites whose role in leptin binding remains to be elucidated. We found that a mammalian cell-expressed sOb-R (soluble Ob-R) fragment (residues 22-839 of the extracellular domain) bound leptin with a dissociation constant of 1.8 nM. This binding was inhibited by Con A (concanavalin A) or wheatgerm agglutinin. Treatment of sOb-R with peptide N-glycosidase F reduced leptin binding by approximately 80% concurrently with N-linked glycan removal. The human megakaryoblastic cell line, MEG-01, expresses two forms of the Ob-R, of approx. 170 and 130 kDa molecular mass. Endo H (endoglycosidase H) treatment and cell culture with alpha-glucosidase inhibitors demonstrated that N-linked glycans are of the complex mature type in the 170 kDa form and of the high-mannose type in the 130 kDa form. Both isoforms bound leptin, but not after peptide N-glycosidase F treatment. An insect-cell-expressed sOb-R fragment, consisting of the Ig (immunoglobulin), CRH2 (second cytokine receptor homology) and FNIII (fibronectin type III) domains, bound leptin with affinity similar to that of the entire extracellular domain, but this function was abolished after N-linked glycan removal. The same treatment had no effect on the leptin-binding activity of the isolated CRH2 domain. Our findings show that N-linked glycans within Ig and/or FNIII domains regulate Ob-R function, but are not involved in essential interactions with the ligand.

  3. Quantitative Description of Glycan-Receptor Binding of Influenza A Virus H7 Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Karunya; Raman, Rahul; Jayaraman, Akila; Viswanathan, Karthik; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2013-01-01

    In the context of recently emerged novel influenza strains through reassortment, avian influenza subtypes such as H5N1, H7N7, H7N2, H7N3 and H9N2 pose a constant threat in terms of their adaptation to the human host. Among these subtypes, it was recently demonstrated that mutations in H5 and H9 hemagglutinin (HA) in the context of lab-generated reassorted viruses conferred aerosol transmissibility in ferrets (a property shared by human adapted viruses). We previously demonstrated that the quantitative binding affinity of HA to α2→6 sialylated glycans (human receptors) is one of the important factors governing human adaptation of HA. Although the H7 subtype has infected humans causing varied clinical outcomes from mild conjunctivitis to severe respiratory illnesses, it is not clear where the HA of these subtypes stand in regard to human adaptation since its binding affinity to glycan receptors has not yet been quantified. In this study, we have quantitatively characterized the glycan receptor-binding specificity of HAs from representative strains of Eurasian (H7N7) and North American (H7N2) lineages that have caused human infection. Furthermore, we have demonstrated for the first time that two specific mutations; Gln226→Leu and Gly228→Ser in glycan receptor-binding site of H7 HA substantially increase its binding affinity to human receptor. Our findings contribute to a framework for monitoring the evolution of H7 HA to be able to adapt to human host. PMID:23437033

  4. PEGylation of microbead surfaces reduces unspecific antibody binding in glycan-based suspension array.

    PubMed

    Pochechueva, Tatiana; Chinarev, Alexander; Bovin, Nicolai; Fedier, André; Jacob, Francis; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2014-10-01

    Glycan-based suspension array (SGA) is an "in-house" developed multi-target immunoassay, employing commercially available fluorescent microbeads as a solid support for unique chemically synthesized glycopolymers which capture naturally occurring human anti-glycan antibodies. SGA is a sensitive and reliable tool for the high-throughput screening of anti-glycan antibody alterations characteristic for a vast number of human diseases including cancer. However, unspecific background binding, for instance binding of non-target antibodies, is a common obstacle in such immunoassays. In an attempt to reduce unspecific background binding of serum (or plasma) antibodies, we prepared glycosylated microbeads modified with linear poly(ethylene glycols) (PEGs) of different lengths. We compared several kinds of PEG modifications: (a) partial side-chain substitution of glycopolymers by PEGs of different lengths, (b) end-point addition of biotin-linked PEGs to glycopolymer-coupled beads, and (c) linking of heterobifunctional PEGs to the bead surface prior to glycopolymer immobilization. Among the various modifications investigated, the direct modification of the bead surface with linear heterobifunctional PEGs, consisting of 23- and 60PEG-units significantly reduced the background binding. The end-point addition of biotin-linked PEGs, especially in the case of PEG consisting from 50PEG-units, helped to repel non-target binding caused by endogenous biotin. We observed unspecific binding predominantly for antibodies of IgG but of IgM class. The novel design of fluorescent microbeads allows the detection of human anti-glycan antibodies with increased specificity and opens new horizons for practical application of SGA as a diagnostic tool.

  5. Modifying an Insect Cell N-Glycan Processing Pathway Using CRISPR-Cas Technology.

    PubMed

    Mabashi-Asazuma, Hideaki; Kuo, Chu-Wei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Jarvis, Donald L

    2015-10-16

    Fused lobes (FDL) is an enzyme that simultaneously catalyzes a key trimming reaction and antagonizes elongation reactions in the insect N-glycan processing pathway. Accordingly, FDL function accounts, at least in part, for major differences in the N-glycosylation patterns of glycoproteins produced by insect and mammalian cells. In this study, we used the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit the fdl gene in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells. CRISPR-Cas9 editing produced a high frequency of site-specific nucleotide insertions and deletions, reduced the production of insect-type, paucimannosidic products (Man3GlcNAc2), and led to the production of partially elongated, mammalian-type complex N-glycans (GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc2) in S2 cells. As CRISPR-Cas9 has not been widely used to analyze or modify protein glycosylation pathways or edit insect cell genes, these results underscore its broad utility as a tool for these purposes. Our results also confirm the key role of FDL at the major branch point distinguishing insect and mammalian N-glycan processing pathways. Finally, the new FDL-deficient S2 cell derivative produced in this study will enable future bottom-up glycoengineering efforts designed to isolate insect cell lines that can efficiently produce recombinant glycoproteins with chemically predefined oligosaccharide side-chain structures. PMID:26241388

  6. An Adenovirus Vector Incorporating Carbohydrate Binding Domains Utilizes Glycans for Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masaharu; Ak, Ferhat; Ugai, Hideyo; Curiel, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5) continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene delivery. Aberrant glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids is a central feature of malignant transformation, and tumor-associated glycoforms are recognized as cancer biomarkers. On this basis, we hypothesized that cancer-specific cell-surface glycans could be the basis of a novel paradigm in HAdV-5-based vector targeting. Methodology/Principal Findings As a first step toward this goal, we constructed a novel HAdV-5 vector encoding a unique chimeric fiber protein that contains the tandem carbohydrate binding domains of the fiber protein of the NADC-1 strain of porcine adenovirus type 4 (PAdV-4). This glycan-targeted vector displays augmented CAR-independent gene transfer in cells with low CAR expression. Further, we show that gene transfer is markedly decreased in cells with genetic glycosylation defects and by inhibitors of glycosylation in normal cells. Conclusions/Significance These data provide the initial proof-of-concept for HAdV-5 vector-mediated gene delivery based on the presence of cell-surface carbohydrates. Further development of this new targeting paradigm could provide targeted gene delivery based on vector recognition of disease-specific glycan biomarkers. PMID:23383334

  7. Functioning of the dimeric GABA(B) receptor extracellular domain revealed by glycan wedge scanning.

    PubMed

    Rondard, Philippe; Huang, Siluo; Monnier, Carine; Tu, Haijun; Blanchard, Bertrand; Oueslati, Nadia; Malhaire, Fanny; Li, Ying; Trinquet, Eric; Labesse, Gilles; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Liu, Jianfeng

    2008-05-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by the neurotransmitter GABA is made up of two subunits, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2). GABA(B1) binds agonists, whereas GABA(B2) is required for trafficking GABA(B1) to the cell surface, increasing agonist affinity to GABA(B1), and activating associated G proteins. These subunits each comprise two domains, a Venus flytrap domain (VFT) and a heptahelical transmembrane domain (7TM). How agonist binding to the GABA(B1) VFT leads to GABA(B2) 7TM activation remains unknown. Here, we used a glycan wedge scanning approach to investigate how the GABA(B) VFT dimer controls receptor activity. We first identified the dimerization interface using a bioinformatics approach and then showed that introducing an N-glycan at this interface prevents the association of the two subunits and abolishes all activities of GABA(B2), including agonist activation of the G protein. We also identified a second region in the VFT where insertion of an N-glycan does not prevent dimerization, but blocks agonist activation of the receptor. These data provide new insight into the function of this prototypical GPCR and demonstrate that a change in the dimerization interface is required for receptor activation.

  8. Expanding the universe of cytokines and pattern recognition receptors: galectins and glycans in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Cerliani, Juan P; Stowell, Sean R; Mascanfroni, Iván D; Arthur, Connie M; Cummings, Richard D; Rabinovich, Gabriel A

    2011-02-01

    Effective immunity relies on the recognition of pathogens and tumors by innate immune cells through diverse pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that lead to initiation of signaling processes and secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Galectins, a family of endogenous lectins widely expressed in infected and neoplastic tissues have emerged as part of the portfolio of soluble mediators and pattern recognition receptors responsible for eliciting and controlling innate immunity. These highly conserved glycan-binding proteins can control immune cell processes through binding to specific glycan structures on pathogens and tumors or by acting intracellularly via modulation of selective signaling pathways. Recent findings demonstrate that various galectin family members influence the fate and physiology of different innate immune cells including polymorphonuclear neutrophils, mast cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Moreover, several pathogens may actually utilize galectins as a mechanism of host invasion. In this review, we aim to highlight and integrate recent discoveries that have led to our current understanding of the role of galectins in host-pathogen interactions and innate immunity. Challenges for the future will embrace the rational manipulation of galectin-glycan interactions to instruct and shape innate immunity during microbial infections, inflammation, and cancer.

  9. Modifying an Insect Cell N-Glycan Processing Pathway Using CRISPR-Cas Technology.

    PubMed

    Mabashi-Asazuma, Hideaki; Kuo, Chu-Wei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Jarvis, Donald L

    2015-10-16

    Fused lobes (FDL) is an enzyme that simultaneously catalyzes a key trimming reaction and antagonizes elongation reactions in the insect N-glycan processing pathway. Accordingly, FDL function accounts, at least in part, for major differences in the N-glycosylation patterns of glycoproteins produced by insect and mammalian cells. In this study, we used the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit the fdl gene in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells. CRISPR-Cas9 editing produced a high frequency of site-specific nucleotide insertions and deletions, reduced the production of insect-type, paucimannosidic products (Man3GlcNAc2), and led to the production of partially elongated, mammalian-type complex N-glycans (GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc2) in S2 cells. As CRISPR-Cas9 has not been widely used to analyze or modify protein glycosylation pathways or edit insect cell genes, these results underscore its broad utility as a tool for these purposes. Our results also confirm the key role of FDL at the major branch point distinguishing insect and mammalian N-glycan processing pathways. Finally, the new FDL-deficient S2 cell derivative produced in this study will enable future bottom-up glycoengineering efforts designed to isolate insect cell lines that can efficiently produce recombinant glycoproteins with chemically predefined oligosaccharide side-chain structures.

  10. Comparison of analytical methods for profiling N- and O-linked glycans from cultured cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Togayachi, Akira; Azadi, Parastoo; Ishihara, Mayumi; Geyer, Rudolf; Galuska, Christina; Geyer, Hildegard; Kakehi, Kazuaki; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Jin, Chunsheng; Kato, Koichi; Yagi, Hirokazu; Kondo, Sachiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Hashii, Noritaka; Kolarich, Daniel; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Packer, Nicolle H.; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Nakano, Miyako; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Kurimoto, Ayako; Wada, Yoshinao; Tajiri, Michiko; Yang, Pengyuan; Cao, Weiqian; Li, Hong; Rudd, Pauline M.; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    The Human Disease Glycomics/Proteome Initiative (HGPI) is an activity in the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) supported by leading researchers from international institutes and aims at development of disease-related glycomics/glycoproteomics analysis techniques. Since 2004, the initiative has conducted three pilot studies. The first two were N- and O-glycan analyses of purified transferrin and immunoglobulin-G and assessed the most appropriate analytical approach employed at the time. This paper describes the third study, which was conducted to compare different approaches for quantitation of N- and O-linked glycans attached to proteins in crude biological samples. The preliminary analysis on cell pellets resulted in wildly varied glycan profiles, which was probably the consequence of variations in the pre-processing sample preparation methodologies. However, the reproducibility of the data was not improved dramatically in the subsequent analysis on cell lysate fractions prepared in a specified method by one lab. The study demonstrated the difficulty of carrying out a complete analysis of the glycome in crude samples by any single technology and the importance of rigorous optimization of the course of analysis from preprocessing to data interpretation. It suggests that another collaborative study employing the latest technologies in this rapidly evolving field will help to realize the requirements of carrying out the large-scale analysis of glycoproteins in complex cell samples. PMID:26511985

  11. Glycopolymer brushes for specific lectin binding by controlled multivalent presentation of N-acetyllactosamine glycan oligomers.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunji; Rosencrantz, Ruben R; Elling, Lothar; Böker, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    A new multivalent glycopolymer platform for lectin recognition is introduced in this work by combining the controlled growth of glycopolymer brushes with highly specific glycosylation reactions. Glycopolymer brushes, synthetic polymers with pendant saccharides, are prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of 2-O-(N-acetyl-β-d-glucosamine)ethyl methacrylate (GlcNAcEMA). Here, the fabrication of multivalent glycopolymers consisting of poly(GlcNAcEMA) is reported with additional biocatalytic elongation of the glycans directly on the silicon substrate by specific glycosylation using recombinant glycosyltransferases. The bioactivity of the surface-grafted glycans is investigated by fluorescence-linked lectin assay. Due to the multivalency of glycan ligands, the glycopolymer brushes show very selective, specific, and strong interactions with lectins. The multiarrays of the glycopolymer brushes have a large potential as a screening device to define optimal-binding environments of specific lectins or as new simplified diagnostic tools for the detection of cancer-related lectins in blood serum. PMID:25354386

  12. Glycan heterogeneity on gold nanoparticles increases lectin discrimination capacity in label-free multiplexed bioassays†

    PubMed Central

    Otten, Lucienne; Vlachou, Denise; Richards, Sarah-Jane; Gibson, Matthew I.

    2016-01-01

    The development of new analytical tools as point-of-care biosensors is crucial to combat the spread of infectious diseases, especially in the context of drug-resistant organisms, or to detect biological warfare agents. Glycan/lectin interactions drive a wide range of recognition and signal transduction processes within nature and are often the first site of adhesion/recognition during infection making them appealing targets for biosensors. Glycosylated gold nanoparticles have been developed that change colour from red to blue upon interaction with carbohydrate-binding proteins and may find use as biosensors, but are limited by the inherent promiscuity of some of these interactions. Here we mimic the natural heterogeneity of cell-surface glycans by displaying mixed monolayers of glycans on the surface of gold nanoparticles. These are then used in a multiplexed, label-free bioassay to create ‘barcodes’ which describe the lectin based on its binding profile. The increased information content encoded by using complex mixtures of a few sugars, rather than increased numbers of different sugars makes this approach both scalable and accessible. These nanoparticles show increased lectin identification power at a range of lectin concentrations, relative to single-channel sensors. It was also found that some information about the concentration of the lectins can be extracted, all from just a simple colour change, taking this technology closer to being a realistic biosensor. PMID:27181289

  13. Lectin-Glycan Interaction Network-Based Identification of Host Receptors of Microbial Pathogenic Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    Ielasi, Francesco S.; Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Donohue, Dagmara; Claes, Sandra; Sahli, Hichem; Schols, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The first step in the infection of humans by microbial pathogens is their adherence to host tissue cells, which is frequently based on the binding of carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectin-like adhesins) to human cell receptors that expose glycans. In only a few cases have the human receptors of pathogenic adhesins been described. A novel strategy—based on the construction of a lectin-glycan interaction (LGI) network—to identify the potential human binding receptors for pathogenic adhesins with lectin activity was developed. The new approach is based on linking glycan array screening results of these adhesins to a human glycoprotein database via the construction of an LGI network. This strategy was used to detect human receptors for virulent Escherichia coli (FimH adhesin), and the fungal pathogens Candida albicans (Als1p and Als3p adhesins) and C. glabrata (Epa1, Epa6, and Epa7 adhesins), which cause candidiasis. This LGI network strategy allows the profiling of potential adhesin binding receptors in the host with prioritization, based on experimental binding data, of the most relevant interactions. New potential targets for the selected adhesins were predicted and experimentally confirmed. This methodology was also used to predict lectin interactions with envelope glycoproteins of human-pathogenic viruses. It was shown that this strategy was successful in revealing that the FimH adhesin has anti-HIV activity. PMID:27406561

  14. Glycan composition of follicle (Sertoli) cells of the amphibian Pleurodeles waltl. A lectin histochemical study

    PubMed Central

    SÁEZ, FRANCISCO JOSÉ; MADRID, JUAN FRANCISCO; ALONSO, EDURNE; HERNÁNDEZ, FRANCISCO

    2001-01-01

    The glycan composition of the N- and O-linked oligosaccharides of the follicle (Sertoli) cells of the urodele amphibian Pleurodeles waltl testis were identified by lectin histochemistry, performed alone or in combination with enzymatic and chemical deglycosylation methods. The follicle cells were shown to contain: (1) Fuc, Galβ(1,4)GlcNAc, GalNAc and Neu5Acα(2,3)Galβ(1,4)GlcNAc in both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides; (2) Man in N-linked glycans; and (3) Galβ(1,3)GalNAc in O-linked sugar chains. The follicle cells at the pre- and postmeiotic stages showed some differences in the UEA-I-positive Fuc characterisation, suggesting differences in the glycan composition. In addition, the sequence Neu5Acα(2,6)Gal/GalNAc was shown in the follicle cells only after spermiation, in the sperm-empty lobules of the developing glandular tissue. These results suggest that the follicle cells modify their glycoprotein content, probably for the performance of new roles, as the spermatogenetic cells develop. Thus the follicle cells surrounding male germ cells at different spermatogenetic stages would contain different glycoproteins involved in specific roles during male germ cell proliferation and maturation. PMID:11465860

  15. Glycan heterogeneity on gold nanoparticles increases lectin discrimination capacity in label-free multiplexed bioassays.

    PubMed

    Otten, Lucienne; Vlachou, Denise; Richards, Sarah-Jane; Gibson, Matthew I

    2016-07-21

    The development of new analytical tools as point-of-care biosensors is crucial to combat the spread of infectious diseases, especially in the context of drug-resistant organisms, or to detect biological warfare agents. Glycan/lectin interactions drive a wide range of recognition and signal transduction processes within nature and are often the first site of adhesion/recognition during infection making them appealing targets for biosensors. Glycosylated gold nanoparticles have been developed that change colour from red to blue upon interaction with carbohydrate-binding proteins and may find use as biosensors, but are limited by the inherent promiscuity of some of these interactions. Here we mimic the natural heterogeneity of cell-surface glycans by displaying mixed monolayers of glycans on the surface of gold nanoparticles. These are then used in a multiplexed, label-free bioassay to create 'barcodes' which describe the lectin based on its binding profile. The increased information content encoded by using complex mixtures of a few sugars, rather than increased numbers of different sugars makes this approach both scalable and accessible. These nanoparticles show increased lectin identification power at a range of lectin concentrations, relative to single-channel sensors. It was also found that some information about the concentration of the lectins can be extracted, all from just a simple colour change, taking this technology closer to being a realistic biosensor. PMID:27181289

  16. Putting the pieces into place: Properties of intact zinc metallothionein 1A determined from interaction of its isolated domains with carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Tyler B J; Stillman, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    Mammalian metallothioneins (MTs) bind up to seven Zn(2+) using a large number of cysteine residues relative to their small size and can act as zinc-chaperones. In metal-saturated Zn7-MTs, the seven zinc ions are co-ordinated tetrahedrally into two distinct clusters separated by a linker; the N-terminal β-domain [(Zn3Cys9)(3-)] and C-terminal α-domain [(Zn4Cys11)(3-)]. We report on the competitive zinc metalation of apo-carbonic anhydrase [CA; metal-free CA (apo-CA)] in the presence of apo-metallothionein 1A domain fragments to identify domain specific determinants of zinc binding and zinc donation in the intact two-domain Znn-βαMT1A (human metallothionein 1A isoform; n=0-7). The apo-CA is shown to compete effectively only with Zn2-3-βMT and Zn4-αMT. Detailed modelling of the ESI mass spectral data have revealed the zinc-binding affinities of each of the zinc-binding sites in the two isolated fragments. The three calculated equilibrium zinc affinities [log(KF)] of the isolated β-domain were: 12.2, 11.7 and 11.4 and the four isolated α-domain affinities were: 13.5, 13.2, 12.7 and 12.6. These data provide guidance in identification of the location of the strongest-bound and weakest-bound zinc in the intact two-domain Zn7βαMT. The β-domain has the weakest zinc-binding site and this is where zinc ions are donated from in the Zn7-βαMT. The α-domain with the highest affinity binds the first zinc, which we propose leads to an unscrambling of the cysteine ligands from the apo-peptide bundle. We propose that stabilization of the intact Zn6-MT and Zn7-MT, relative to that of the sum of the separated fragments, is due to the availability of additional cysteine ligand orientations (through interdomain interactions) to support the clustered structures.

  17. A Paracoccidioides brasiliensis glycan shares serologic and functional properties with cryptococcal glucuronoxylomannan

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Priscila C.; Cordero, Radames J.B.; Fonseca, Fernanda L.; da Silva, Roberta Peres; Ramos, Caroline L.; Miranda, Kildare R.; Casadevall, Arturo; Puccia, Rosana; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Guimaraes, Allan J.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall of the yeast form of the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is enriched with α1,3-glucans. In Cryptococcus neoformans, α1,3-glucans interact with glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), a hetero polysaccharide that is essential for fungal virulence. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of P. brasiliensis glycans sharing properties with cryptococcal GXM. Protein database searches in P. brasiliensis revealed the presence of sequences homologous to those coding for enzymes involved in the synthesis of GXM and capsular architecture in C. neoformans. In addition, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised to cryptococcal GXM bound to P. brasiliensis cells. Using protocols that were previously established for extraction and analysis of C. neoformans GXM, we recovered a P. brasiliensis glycan fraction composed of mannose and galactose, in addition to small amounts of glucose, xylose and rhamnose. In comparison with the C. neoformans GXM, the P. brasiliensis glycan fraction components had smaller molecular dimensions. The P. brasiliensis components, nevertheless, reacted with different GXM-binding mAbs. Extracellular vesicle fractions of P. brasiliensis also reacted with a GXM-binding mAb, suggesting that the polysaccharide-like molecule is exported to the extracellular space in secretory vesicles. An acapsular mutant of C. neoformans incorporated molecules from the P. brasiliensis extract onto the cell wall, resulting in the formation of surface networks that resembled the cryptococcal capsule. Coating the C. neoformans acapsular mutant with the P. brasiliensis glycan fraction resulted in protection against phagocytosis by murine macrophages. These results suggest that P. brasiliensis and C. neoformans share metabolic pathways required for the synthesis of similar polysaccharides and that P. brasiliensis yeast cell walls have molecules that mimic certain aspects of C. neoformans GXM. These findings are important because they provide additional evidence

  18. Exclusive Decoration of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Env with High-Mannose Type N-Glycans Is Not Compatible with Mucosal Transmission in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Karsten, Christina B.; Buettner, Falk F. R.; C