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Sample records for 1a glycan determined

  1. Glycan Determinants of Heparin-Tau Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Huvent, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy; Eliezer, David; Zhang, Anqiang; Li, Quanhong; Tessier, Peter; Linhardt, Robert J; Zhang, Fuming; Wang, Chunyu

    2017-03-14

    Tau aggregates into paired helical filaments within neurons, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Heparin promotes tau aggregation and recently has been shown to be involved in the cellular uptake of tau aggregates. Although the tau-heparin interaction has been extensively studied, little is known about the glycan determinants of this interaction. Here, we used surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and NMR spectroscopy to characterize the interaction between two tau fragments, K18 and K19, and several polysaccharides, including heparin, heparin oligosaccharides, chemically modified heparin, and related glycans. Using a heparin-immobilized chip, SPR revealed that tau K18 and K19 bind heparin with a KD of 0.2 and 70 μM, respectively. In SPR competition experiments, N-desulfation and 2-O-desulfation had no effect on heparin binding to K18, whereas 6-O-desulfation severely reduced binding, suggesting a critical role for 6-O-sulfation in the tau-heparin interaction. The tau-heparin interaction became stronger with longer-chain heparin oligosaccharides. As expected for an electrostatics-driven interaction, a moderate amount of salt (0.3 M NaCl) abolished binding. NMR showed the largest chemical-shift perturbation (CSP) in R2 in tau K18, which was absent in K19, revealing differential binding sites in K18 and K19 to heparin. Dermatan sulfate binding produced minimal CSP, whereas dermatan disulfate, with the additional 6-O-sulfo group, induced much larger CSP. 2-O-desulfated heparin induced much larger CSP in K18 than 6-O-desulfated heparin. Our data demonstrate a crucial role for the 6-O-sulfo group in the tau-heparin interaction, which to our knowledge has not been reported before.

  2. Databases of Conformations and NMR Structures of Glycan Determinants.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anita; Drouillard, Sophie; Rivet, Alain; Perez, Serge

    2015-12-01

    The present study reports a comprehensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) characterization and a systematic conformational sampling of the conformational preferences of 170 glycan moieties of glycosphingolipids as produced in large-scale quantities by bacterial fermentation. These glycans span across a variety of families including the blood group antigens (A, B and O), core structures (Types 1, 2 and 4), fucosylated oligosaccharides (core and lacto-series), sialylated oligosaccharides (Types 1 and 2), Lewis antigens, GPI-anchors and globosides. A complementary set of about 100 glycan determinants occurring in glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans has also been structurally characterized using molecular mechanics-based computation. The experimental and computational data generated are organized in two relational databases that can be queried by the user through a user-friendly search engine. The NMR ((1)H and (13)C, COSY, TOCSY, HMQC, HMBC correlation) spectra and 3D structures are available for visualization and download in commonly used structure formats. Emphasis has been given to the use of a common nomenclature for the structural encoding of the carbohydrates and each glycan molecule is described by four different types of representations in order to cope with the different usages in chemistry and biology. These web-based databases were developed with non-proprietary software and are open access for the scientific community available at http://glyco3d.cermav.cnrs.fr. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. An Accurate de novo Algorithm for Glycan Topology Determination from Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Shi, Bing; Tian, Guangdong; Li, YanBo; Wang, Bing; Zhou, MengChu

    2015-01-01

    Determining the glycan topology automatically from mass spectra represents a great challenge. Existing methods fall into approximate and exact ones. The former including greedy and heuristic ones can reduce the computational complexity, but suffer from information lost in the procedure of glycan interpretation. The latter including dynamic programming and exhaustive enumeration are much slower than the former. In the past years, nearly all emerging methods adopted a tree structure to represent a glycan. They share such problems as repetitive peak counting in reconstructing a candidate structure. Besides, tree-based glycan representation methods often have to give different computational formulas for binary and ternary glycans. We propose a new directed acyclic graph structure for glycan representation. Based on it, this work develops a de novo algorithm to accurately reconstruct the tree structure iteratively from mass spectra with logical constraints and some known biosynthesis rules, by a single computational formula. The experiments on multiple complex glycans extracted from human serum show that the proposed algorithm can achieve higher accuracy to determine a glycan topology than prior methods without increasing computational burden.

  4. Sialidase specificity determined by chemoselective modification of complex sialylated glycans.

    PubMed

    Parker, Randy B; McCombs, Janet E; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2012-09-21

    Sialidases hydrolytically remove sialic acids from sialylated glycoproteins and glycolipids. Sialidases are widely distributed in nature and sialidase-mediated desialylation is implicated in normal and pathological processes. However, mechanisms by which sialidases exert their biological effects remain obscure, in part because sialidase substrate preferences are poorly defined. Here we report the design and implementation of a sialidase substrate specificity assay based on chemoselective labeling of sialosides. We show that this assay identifies components of glycosylated substrates that contribute to sialidase specificity. We demonstrate that specificity of sialidases can depend on structure of the underlying glycan, a characteristic difficult to discern using typical sialidase assays. Moreover, we discovered that Streptococcus pneumoniae sialidase NanC strongly prefers sialosides containing the Neu5Ac form of sialic acid versus those that contain Neu5Gc. We propose using this approach to evaluate sialidase preferences for diverse potential substrates.

  5. IgG N-glycans as potential biomarkers for determining galactose tolerance in Classical Galactosaemia.

    PubMed

    Coss, K P; Byrne, J C; Coman, D J; Adamczyk, B; Abrahams, J L; Saldova, R; Brown, A Y; Walsh, O; Hendroff, U; Carolan, C; Rudd, P M; Treacy, E P

    2012-02-01

    N-glycan processing and assembly defects have been demonstrated in untreated and partially treated patients with Classical Galactosaemia. These defects may contribute to the ongoing pathophysiology of this disease. The aim of this study was to develop an informative method of studying differential galactose tolerance levels and diet control in individuals with Galactosaemia, compared to the standard biochemical markers. Ten Galactosaemia adults with normal intellectual outcomes were analyzed in the study. Five subjects followed galactose liberalization, increments of 300 mg to 4000 mg/day over 16 weeks, and were compared to five adult Galactosaemia controls on a galactose restricted diet. All study subjects underwent clinical and biochemical monitoring of red blood cell galactose-1-phosphate (RBC Gal-1-P) and urinary galactitol levels. Serum N-glycans were isolated and analyzed by normal phase high-performance liquid chromatography (NP-HPLC) with galactosylation of IgG used as a specific biomarker of galactose tolerance. IgG N-glycan profiles showed consistent individual alterations in response to diet liberalization. The individual profiles were improved for all, but one study subject, at a galactose intake of 1000 mg/day, with decreases in agalactosylated (G0) and increases in digalactosylated (G2) N-glycans. We conclude that IgG N-glycan profiling is an improved method of monitoring variable galactosylation and determining individual galactose tolerance in Galactosaemia compared to the standard methods.

  6. Parvovirus Glycan Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Halder, Sujata; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Parvoviridae utilize glycan receptors for cellular attachment and subsequent interactions determine transduction efficiency or pathogenic outcome. This review focuses on the identity of the glycan receptors utilized, their capsid binding footprints, and a discussion of the overlap of these sites with tropism, transduction, and pathogenicity determinants. Despite high sequence diversity between the different genera, most parvoviruses bind to negatively charged glycans, such as sialic acid and heparan sulfate, abundant on cell surface membranes. The capsid structure of these viruses exhibit high structural homology enabling common regions to be utilized for glycan binding and at the same time the sequence diversity at the common footprints allows for binding of different glycans or differential binding of the same glycan. PMID:25047752

  7. Parvovirus glycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Halder, Sujata; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2014-08-01

    Members of the Parvoviridae utilize glycan receptors for cellular attachment and subsequent interactions determine transduction efficiency or pathogenic outcome. This review focuses on the identity of the glycan receptors utilized, their capsid binding footprints, and a discussion of the overlap of these sites with tropism, transduction, and pathogenicity determinants. Despite high sequence diversity between the different genera, most parvoviruses bind to negatively charged glycans, such as sialic acid and heparan sulfate, abundant on cell surface membranes. The capsid structure of these viruses exhibit high structural homology enabling common regions to be utilized for glycan binding. At the same time the sequence diversity at the common footprints allows for binding of different glycans or differential binding of the same glycan.

  8. Glycan analysis of therapeutic glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are glycoproteins produced by living cell systems. The glycan moieties attached to the proteins can directly affect protein stability, bioactivity, and immunogenicity. Therefore, glycan variants of a glycoprotein product must be adequately analyzed and controlled to ensure product quality. However, the inherent complexity of protein glycosylation poses a daunting analytical challenge. This review provides an update of recent advances in glycan analysis, including the potential utility of lectin-based microarray for high throughput glycan profiling. Emphasis is placed on comparison of the major types of analytics for use in determining unique glycan features such as glycosylation site, glycan structure, and content. PMID:26599345

  9. Contribution of galectin-1, a glycan-binding protein, to gastrointestinal tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Bacigalupo, María L; Carabias, Pablo; Troncoso, María F

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal cancer is a group of tumors that affect multiple sites of the digestive system, including the stomach, liver, colon and pancreas. These cancers are very aggressive and rapidly metastasize, thus identifying effective targets is crucial for treatment. Galectin-1 (Gal-1) belongs to a family of glycan-binding proteins, or lectins, with the ability to cross-link specific glycoconjugates. A variety of biological activities have been attributed to Gal-1 at different steps of tumor progression. Herein, we summarize the current literature regarding the roles of Gal-1 in gastrointestinal malignancies. Accumulating evidence shows that Gal-1 is drastically up-regulated in human gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal cancer and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues, both in tumor epithelial and tumor-associated stromal cells. Moreover, Gal-1 makes a crucial contribution to the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal malignancies, favoring tumor development, aggressiveness, metastasis, immunosuppression and angiogenesis. We also highlight that alterations in Gal-1-specific glycoepitopes may be relevant for gastrointestinal cancer progression. Despite the findings obtained so far, further functional studies are still required. Elucidating the precise molecular mechanisms modulated by Gal-1 underlying gastrointestinal tumor progression, might lead to the development of novel Gal-1-based diagnostic methods and/or therapies. PMID:28839427

  10. Contribution of galectin-1, a glycan-binding protein, to gastrointestinal tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, María L; Carabias, Pablo; Troncoso, María F

    2017-08-07

    Gastrointestinal cancer is a group of tumors that affect multiple sites of the digestive system, including the stomach, liver, colon and pancreas. These cancers are very aggressive and rapidly metastasize, thus identifying effective targets is crucial for treatment. Galectin-1 (Gal-1) belongs to a family of glycan-binding proteins, or lectins, with the ability to cross-link specific glycoconjugates. A variety of biological activities have been attributed to Gal-1 at different steps of tumor progression. Herein, we summarize the current literature regarding the roles of Gal-1 in gastrointestinal malignancies. Accumulating evidence shows that Gal-1 is drastically up-regulated in human gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal cancer and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues, both in tumor epithelial and tumor-associated stromal cells. Moreover, Gal-1 makes a crucial contribution to the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal malignancies, favoring tumor development, aggressiveness, metastasis, immunosuppression and angiogenesis. We also highlight that alterations in Gal-1-specific glycoepitopes may be relevant for gastrointestinal cancer progression. Despite the findings obtained so far, further functional studies are still required. Elucidating the precise molecular mechanisms modulated by Gal-1 underlying gastrointestinal tumor progression, might lead to the development of novel Gal-1-based diagnostic methods and/or therapies.

  11. Study on systematizing the synthesis of the a-series ganglioside glycans GT1a, GD1a, and GM1 using the newly developed N-Troc-protected GM3 and GalN intermediates.

    PubMed

    Komori, Tatsuya; Imamura, Akihiro; Ando, Hiromune; Ishida, Hideharu; Kiso, Makoto

    2009-08-17

    A first systematic synthesis of the glycan parts of the a-series gangliosides (GT1a, GD1a, and GM1) utilizing the newly developed N-Troc-protected GM3 and galactosaminyl building blocks is described. The key processes, including the assembly of the GM2 sequence and its conversion into the 3-hydroxy acceptor, were facilitated mainly by the high degree of participation and chemoselective cleavability of the Troc group in the galactosaminyl unit. Furthermore, the novel GM2 acceptor served as a good coupling partner during glycosylation with galactosyl, sialyl galactosyl, and disialyl galactosyl donors, successfully producing the GM1, GD1a, and GT1a glycans.

  12. Extensive determination of glycan heterogeneity reveals an unusual abundance of high mannose glycans in enriched plasma membranes of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    An, Hyun Joo; Gip, Phung; Kim, Jaehan; Wu, Shuai; Park, Kun Wook; McVaugh, Cheryl T; Schaffer, David V; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2012-04-01

    Most cell membrane proteins are known or predicted to be glycosylated in eukaryotic organisms, where surface glycans are essential in many biological processes including cell development and differentiation. Nonetheless, the glycosylation on cell membranes remains not well characterized because of the lack of sensitive analytical methods. This study introduces a technique for the rapid profiling and quantitation of N- and O-glycans on cell membranes using membrane enrichment and nanoflow liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry of native structures. Using this new method, the glycome analysis of cell membranes isolated from human embryonic stem cells and somatic cell lines was performed. Human embryonic stem cells were found to have high levels of high mannose glycans, which contrasts with IMR-90 fibroblasts and a human normal breast cell line, where complex glycans are by far the most abundant and high mannose glycans are minor components. O-Glycosylation affects relatively minor components of cell surfaces. To verify the quantitation and localization of glycans on the human embryonic stem cell membranes, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry were performed. Proteomics analyses were also performed and confirmed enrichment of plasma membrane proteins with some contamination from endoplasmic reticulum and other membranes. These findings suggest that high mannose glycans are the major component of cell surface glycosylation with even terminal glucoses. High mannose glycans are not commonly presented on the surfaces of mammalian cells or in serum yet may play important roles in stem cell biology. The results also mean that distinguishing stem cells from other mammalian cells may be facilitated by the major difference in the glycosylation of the cell membrane. The deep structural analysis enabled by this new method will enable future mechanistic studies on the biological significance of high mannose glycans on stem cell membranes and provide a general tool to examine

  13. Recognition of protein-linked glycans as a determinant of peptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Noach, Ilit; Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Stuart, Christopher; Jenkins, Meredith L; Brochu, Denis; Buenbrazo, Nakita; Wakarchuk, Warren; Burke, John E; Gilbert, Michel; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2017-01-31

    The vast majority of proteins are posttranslationally altered, with the addition of covalently linked sugars (glycosylation) being one of the most abundant modifications. However, despite the hydrolysis of protein peptide bonds by peptidases being a process essential to all life on Earth, the fundamental details of how peptidases accommodate posttranslational modifications, including glycosylation, has not been addressed. Through biochemical analyses and X-ray crystallographic structures we show that to hydrolyze their substrates, three structurally related metallopeptidases require the specific recognition of O-linked glycan modifications via carbohydrate-specific subsites immediately adjacent to their peptidase catalytic machinery. The three peptidases showed selectivity for different glycans, revealing protein-specific adaptations to particular glycan modifications, yet always cleaved the peptide bond immediately preceding the glycosylated residue. This insight builds upon the paradigm of how peptidases recognize substrates and provides a molecular understanding of glycoprotein degradation.

  14. 2'-fucosyllactose: an abundant, genetically determined soluble glycan present in human milk.

    PubMed

    Castanys-Muñoz, Esther; Martin, Maria J; Prieto, Pedro Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Lactose is the preeminent soluble glycan in milk and a significant source of energy for most newborn mammals. Elongation of lactose with additional monosaccharides gives rise to a varied repertoire of free soluble glycans such as 2'-fucosyllactose (2'-FL), which is the most abundant oligosaccharide in human milk. In infants, 2'-FL is resistant to digestion and reaches the colon where it is partially fermented, behaving as soluble prebiotic fiber. Evidence also suggests that portions of small soluble milk glycans, including 2'-FL, are absorbed, thus raising the possibility of systemic biological effects. 2'-FL bears an epitope of the Secretor histo-blood group system; approximately 70-80% of all milk samples contain 2'-FL, since its synthesis depends on a fucosyltransferase that is not uniformly expressed. The fact that some infants are not exposed to 2'-FL has helped researchers to retrospectively probe for biological activities of this glycan. This review summarizes the attributes of 2'-FL in terms of its occurrence in mammalian phylogeny, its postulated biological activities, and its variability in human milk.

  15. Glycan OH Exchange Rate Determination in Aqueous Solution: Seeking Evidence for Transient Hydrogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Battistel, Marcos D; Azurmendi, Hugo F; Freedberg, Darón I

    2017-02-02

    Hydrogen bonds (Hbonds) are important stabilizing forces in biomolecules. However, for glycans in aqueous solution, direct NMR detection of Hbonds is elusive because of their transient nature. Here, we present Isotope-based Natural-abundance TOtal correlation eXchange SpectroscopY (INTOXSY), a new (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear single quantum coherence-total correlation spectroscopy based method, to extract OH groups' exchange rate constants (kex) for molecules in natural (13)C abundance and show that OH Hbonds can be inferred from "slower" H/D kex. We evaluate kex measured with INTOXSY in light of those extracted with line-shape analysis. Subsequently, we use a set of common glycans to establish a kex reference basis set and to infer the existence of transient Hbonds involving OH donor groups. Then, we report kex values for a series of mono- and disaccharides, as well as for oligosaccharides sialyl Lewis X and β-cyclodextrin, and compare the results with those from the reference set to extract Hbond information. Finally, we utilize NMR experimental data in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations to establish donor and acceptor Hbond pairs. Our exchange rate measurements indicate that OH/OD exchange rates, kHD, values <10 s(-1) are consistent with transient Hbond OH groups and potential acceptor groups can be uncovered through MD simulations.

  16. Complex N-Linked Glycans Serve as a Determinant for Exosome/Microvesicle Cargo Recruitment*

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yaxuan; Eng, William S.; Colquhoun, David R.; Dinglasan, Rhoel R.; Graham, David R.; Mahal, Lara K.

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes, also known as microvesicles (EMVs), are nano-sized membranous particles secreted from nearly all mammalian cell types. These nanoparticles play critical roles in many physiological processes including cell-cell signaling, immune activation, and suppression and are associated with disease states such as tumor progression. The biological functions of EMVs are highly dependent on their protein composition, which can dictate pathogenicity. Although some mechanisms have been proposed for the regulation of EMV protein trafficking, little attention has been paid to N-linked glycosylation as a potential sorting signal. Previous work from our laboratory found a conserved glycan signature for EMVs, which differed from that of the parent cell membranes, suggesting a potential role for glycosylation in EMV biogenesis. In this study, we further explore the role of glycosylation in EMV protein trafficking. We identify EMV glycoproteins and demonstrate alteration of their recruitment as a function of their glycosylation status upon pharmacological manipulation. Furthermore, we show that genetic manipulation of the glycosylation levels of a specific EMV glycoprotein, EWI-2, directly impacts its recruitment as a function of N-linked glycan sites. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that N-linked glycosylation directs glycoprotein sorting into EMVs. PMID:25261472

  17. Complex N-linked glycans serve as a determinant for exosome/microvesicle cargo recruitment.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yaxuan; Eng, William S; Colquhoun, David R; Dinglasan, Rhoel R; Graham, David R; Mahal, Lara K

    2014-11-21

    Exosomes, also known as microvesicles (EMVs), are nano-sized membranous particles secreted from nearly all mammalian cell types. These nanoparticles play critical roles in many physiological processes including cell-cell signaling, immune activation, and suppression and are associated with disease states such as tumor progression. The biological functions of EMVs are highly dependent on their protein composition, which can dictate pathogenicity. Although some mechanisms have been proposed for the regulation of EMV protein trafficking, little attention has been paid to N-linked glycosylation as a potential sorting signal. Previous work from our laboratory found a conserved glycan signature for EMVs, which differed from that of the parent cell membranes, suggesting a potential role for glycosylation in EMV biogenesis. In this study, we further explore the role of glycosylation in EMV protein trafficking. We identify EMV glycoproteins and demonstrate alteration of their recruitment as a function of their glycosylation status upon pharmacological manipulation. Furthermore, we show that genetic manipulation of the glycosylation levels of a specific EMV glycoprotein, EWI-2, directly impacts its recruitment as a function of N-linked glycan sites. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that N-linked glycosylation directs glycoprotein sorting into EMVs.

  18. SagB Glucosaminidase Is a Determinant of Staphylococcus aureus Glycan Chain Length, Antibiotic Susceptibility, and Protein Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yvonne G. Y.; Frankel, Matthew B.; Missiakas, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The envelope of Staphylococcus aureus is comprised of peptidoglycan and its attached secondary polymers, teichoic acid, capsular polysaccharide, and protein. Peptidoglycan synthesis involves polymerization of lipid II precursors into glycan strands that are cross-linked at wall peptides. It is not clear whether peptidoglycan structure is principally determined during polymerization or whether processive enzymes affect cell wall structure and function, for example, by generating conduits for protein secretion. We show here that S. aureus lacking SagB, a membrane-associated N-acetylglucosaminidase, displays growth and cell-morphological defects caused by the exaggerated length of peptidoglycan strands. SagB cleaves polymerized glycan strands to their physiological length and modulates antibiotic resistance in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Deletion of sagB perturbs protein trafficking into and across the envelope, conferring defects in cell wall anchoring and secretion, as well as aberrant excretion of cytoplasmic proteins. IMPORTANCE Staphylococcus aureus is thought to secrete proteins across the plasma membrane via the Sec pathway; however, protein transport across the cell wall envelope has heretofore not been studied. We report that S. aureus sagB mutants generate elongated peptidoglycan strands and display defects in protein secretion as well as aberrant excretion of cytoplasmic proteins. These results suggest that the thick peptidoglycan layer of staphylococci presents a barrier for protein secretion and that SagB appears to extend the Sec pathway across the cell wall envelope. PMID:26811319

  19. Glycan analysis of glycoprotein pharmaceuticals: Evaluation of analytical approaches to Z number determination in pharmaceutical erythropoietin products.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Chun-Ting; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Qing-Zhou; Hou, Ji-Feng; Bristow, Adrian; Wang, Jun-Zhi

    2011-11-01

    N-Glycosylation of many glycoprotein drugs is important for biological activity and should therefore be the target of specific and quantitative analytical methods. In this study, we focus on the two N-glycan mapping approaches that are used in pharmacopoeial monograph to analyse N-glycans released from fifteen preparations of recombinant human erythropoietin supplied by ten Chinese manufacturers. Underivatised N-glycans were analysed by high performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection and fluorophore-labelled N-glycans were analysed by weak anion-exchange and normal-phase high performance liquid chromatography. N-glycans were also analysed by matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation mass spectrometry. The release of N-glycans by PNGase F was shown to be consistent. Z number, a mathematical expression of the total negatively charged N-glycans composition has provided a convenient way to summarise the complex dataset and it might be suitable for product consistency monitoring. However, this Z number reduces the information of individual acidic N-glycan structure and is also found to be method dependent. Therefore, its use requires clear specification and validation. In this study, we only found weak but positive correlation between the Z number and its bioactivity. Wide range of N-glycans yields were obtained from the fifteen preparations but the significance of their differences is unclear. Copyright © 2011 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of N-glycan structures and biofunction of anti-colorectal cancer monoclonal antibody CO17-1A produced in baculovirus-insect cell expression system.

    PubMed

    Song, Mira; Park, Da-Young; Kim, Youngkwan; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Lu, Zhe; Ko, Kinarm; Choo, Young Kug; Han, Yeon Soo; Ahn, Mi-Hyun; Oh, Doo-Byoung; Ko, Kisung

    2010-08-01

    Advantages of the baculovirus insect cell expression system for production of recombinant proteins include high capacity, flexibility, and glycosylation capability. In this study, this expression system was exploited to produce anti-cancer monoclonal antibody (mAb) CO17-1A, which recognizes the antigen GA733. The heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) genes of mAb CO17-1A were cloned under the control of P(10) and Polyhedrin promoters in the pFastBac dual vector, respectively. Gene expression cassettes carrying the HC and LC genes were transposed into a bacmid in Escherichia coli (DH10Bac). The transposed bacmid was transfected to Sf9 insect cells to generate baculovirus expressing mAb CO17-1A. Confocal immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses confirmed expression of mAb CO17-1A in baculovirus-infected insect cells. The optimum conditions for mAb expression were evaluated at 24, 48, and 72 h after the virus infection at an optimum virus multiplicity of infection of 1. Expression of mAb CO17-1A in insect cells significantly increased at 72 h after infection. HPLC analysis of glycosylation status revealed that the insect-derived mAb (mAb(I)) CO17-1A had insect specific glycan structures. ELISA showed that the purified mAb(I) from cell culture supernatant specifically bound to SW948 human colorectal cancer cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis showed that, although mAb(I) had insect specific glycan structures that differed from their mammalian counterparts, mAb(I) similarly interacted with CD64 (FcgammaRI) and Fc of IgG, compared to the interactions of mammalian-derived mAb. These results suggest that the baculovirus insect cell expression system is able to express, assemble, and secrete biofunctional full size mAb.

  1. Travelling wave ion mobility and negative ion fragmentation for the structural determination of N-linked glycans.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David J; Scarff, Charlotte A; Edgeworth, Matthew; Crispin, Max; Scanlan, Christopher N; Sobott, Frank; Allman, Sarah; Baruah, Kavitha; Pritchard, Laura; Scrivens, James H

    2013-08-01

    Travelling wave ion mobility was investigated for its ability to separate N-glycans from other compounds and for resolution of isomers. Charged glycans, exemplified by sialylated complex N-glycans released from bovine fetuin and ionised by electrospray, could be separated from residual glycopeptides allowing the minor, more highly sialylated compounds to be detected where their ions were obscured by ions from other compounds in different charge states. This technique was also found to be excellent for extracting the N-glycan profiles from contaminated samples. Structural identification of the glycans was performed by negative ion CID fragmentation, a method that provides a wealth of structurally diagnostic ions. However, fragment ions can also appear in the glycan profiles where they can be mistaken for glycan molecular ions. Fragments and molecular ions were frequently shown to have different drift time profiles, allowing them to be differentiated. Some separation of isomers was found but only for the smallest compounds. Differentiation from conformers was achieved by plotting drift time profiles of the fragments; these profiles matched those of the precursor ions where conformers were present. The techniques were applied to investigations of N-glycans released from the fungus Piptoporus betulinus where the technique was used to separate different carbohydrate types present in biological extracts. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Glycans in magnetic resonance imaging: determinants of relaxivity to smart agents, and potential applications in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Cipolla, Laura; Gregori, Maria; So, Po-Wah

    2011-01-01

    Carbohydrate chemistry and glycobiology have become a "hot" subject. These extensive, complex structures serve essential roles in cell surface phenomena, but we are only beginning to understand what some of these functions are; any advances in the development of synthetic and/or analytical tools for glycobiology are extremely useful for our understanding of the roles of carbohydrates in biology, and as biomarkers of physiological/pathological states. This review provides an outlook of the potential of carbohydrate chemistry/biology in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a major important and prominent technique in diagnostic clinical medicine and biomedical research. During the last 30 years, MRI has developed from an intriguing research project to an essential diagnostic method in the clinic. Although MRI contrast in endogenous tissues provides excellent sensitivity for detecting subtle changes in anatomy and function, MRI still has poor specificity for attributing image contrast to specific biological processes. To overcome this limitation, MRI methods are being developed that induce changes in MR image contrast in response to molecular compositions and functions that serve as early biomarkers of pathologies. Carbohydrates with their intriguing chemistry, not only can provide structures for novel MRI probes for imaging specific biological processes, but can themselves provide novel targets/biomarkers. For example, the glycan structure can simply provide a molecular scaffold for modulating the physicochemical properties of the imaging contrast agent, or can be used for the design of novel MR agents with the ability to disclose relevant physiological or pathological cellular events.

  3. Loss of Core 1-derived O-Glycans Decreases Breast Cancer Development in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kai; Herzog, Brett H.; Fu, Jianxin; Sheng, Minjia; Bergstrom, Kirk; McDaniel, J. Michael; Kondo, Yuji; McGee, Samuel; Cai, Xiaofeng; Li, Ping; Chen, Hong; Xia, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    Mucin-type core 1-derived O-glycans, one of the major types of O-glycans, are highly expressed in mammary gland epithelium. Abnormal O-glycans such as Tn antigen are found in over 90% of breast cancers; however, the in vivo role of these aberrant O-glycans in the etiology of breast cancer is unclear. We generated mice with mammary epithelial specific deletion of core 1-derived O-glycans. By crossing with two spontaneous mouse breast cancer models, we determined that loss of core 1-derived O-glycans delays the onset and progression of breast cancer development. Deficiency of core 1 O-glycosylation impaired the localization of Muc1, a major O-glycoprotein, on the apical surfaces of mammary epithelium. Signaling mediated by Muc1, which is critical for breast cancer development, was also defective in the absence of core 1 O-glycans. This study reveals an unexpected role of core 1-derived O-glycans in breast cancer development in mice. PMID:26124270

  4. Complexes of Oligoribonucleotides with D-Mannitol Inhibit Hemagglutinin-Glycan Interaction and Suppress Influenza A Virus H1N1 (A/FM/1/47) Infectivity In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Melnichuk, Nataliia; Semernikova, Larisa; Tkachuk, Zenoviy

    2017-08-09

    The influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) mediates both receptor (glycan) binding and membrane fusion for cell entry and has been the basis for subtyping influenza viruses. The oligoribonucleotides-d-mannitol (ORNs-d-M) complexes possess an anti-influenza activity in vitro and in vivo. In the present studies, we have found that ORNs-d-M interferes with hemagglutinin (HA)-glycan interaction and suppress viral infection in host cells. HA-glycan interactions were evaluated to indirectly quantify the amount of influenza virus titer by an agglutination assay. Influenza virus infectivity was determined by TCID50 assay. The direct virucidal action of the complexes was evaluated by both cytopathic effects (CPE) reduction assay and cell MTT assay. We found that ORNs-d-M hinders interaction between HA and glycan. These complexes decreased the infectivity of influenza virus and had a direct virucidal action. ORNs-d-M reduces influenza virus infectivity, affecting the HA-glycan interaction in vitro. By suppressing the influenza viral infection, the ORNs-d-M can have direct virucidal action.

  5. Identification of Antigenic Glycans from Schistosoma mansoni by Using a Shotgun Egg Glycan Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Mickum, Megan L.; Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Song, Xuezheng; Dorabawila, Nelum; Mandalasi, Msano; Lasanajak, Yi; Luyai, Anthony; Secor, W. Evan; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Van Die, Irma; Smith, David F.; Nyame, A. Kwame

    2016-01-01

    Infection of mammals by the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni induces antibodies to glycan antigens in worms and eggs, but the differential nature of the immune response among infected mammals is poorly understood. To better define these responses, we used a shotgun glycomics approach in which N-glycans from schistosome egg glycoproteins were prepared, derivatized, separated, and used to generate an egg shotgun glycan microarray. This array was interrogated with sera from infected mice, rhesus monkeys, and humans and with glycan-binding proteins and antibodies to gather information about the structures of antigenic glycans, which also were analyzed by mass spectrometry. A major glycan antigen targeted by IgG from different infected species is the FLDNF epitope [Fucα3GalNAcβ4(Fucα3)GlcNAc-R], which is also recognized by the IgG monoclonal antibody F2D2. The FLDNF antigen is expressed by all life stages of the parasite in mammalian hosts, and F2D2 can kill schistosomula in vitro in a complement-dependent manner. Different antisera also recognized other glycan determinants, including core β-xylose and highly fucosylated glycans. Thus, the natural shotgun glycan microarray of schistosome eggs is useful in identifying antigenic glycans and in developing new anti-glycan reagents that may have diagnostic applications and contribute to developing new vaccines against schistosomiasis. PMID:26883596

  6. Glycans In The Immune system and The Altered Glycan Theory of Autoimmunity: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Maverakis, Emanual; Kim, Kyoungmi; Shimoda, Michiko; Gershwin, M. Eric; Patel, Forum; Wilken, Reason; Raychaudhuri, Siba; Ruhaak, L. Renee; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2015-01-01

    Herein we will review the role of glycans in determining the functionality and specificity of various components of the immune system. Specific topics covered include: the specific glycosylation sites of IgE, IgM, IgD, IgE, IgA, and IgG; how glycans can encode “self” identity by functioning as either danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or self-associated molecular patterns (SAMPs); the role of glycans as markers of protein integrity and age; how the glycocalyx can dictate the migration pattern of immune cells; and how the combination of Fc N-glycans and Ig isotype dictate the effector function of immunoglobulins. We speculate that the latter may be responsible for the well-documented association between alterations of the serum glycome and autoimmunity. Due to technological limitations, the extent of these autoimmune-associated glycan alterations and their role in disease pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated to date. Thus, we also review the current technologies available for glycan analysis, placing an emphasis on Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM), a rapid high-throughput technology that has great potential for glycan biomarker research. Finally, we put forth The Altered Glycan Theory of Autoimmunity, which states that each autoimmune disease will have a unique glycan signature characterized by the site-specific relative abundances of individual glycan structures on immune cells and serum proteins, especially the site-specific glycosylation patterns of specific antibody classes and subclasses. PMID:25578468

  7. Glycan and lectin biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  8. Mixed-Linkage Glucan Oligosaccharides Produced by Automated Glycan Assembly Serve as Tools To Determine the Substrate Specificity of Lichenase.

    PubMed

    Dallabernardina, Pietro; Schuhmacher, Frank; Seeberger, Peter H; Pfrengle, Fabian

    2017-03-02

    The mixed-linkage (1→3),(1→4)-d-glucan (MLG) specific glycosyl hydrolase lichenase is an important biochemical tool for the structural characterization of MLGs. It holds potential for application in the brewery, animal feed, and biofuel industries. Several defined MLG oligosaccharides obtained by automated glycan assembly are used to analyze the substrate specificities of Bacillus subtilis lichenase. Two glucose building blocks (BBs), equipped with a temporary fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl chloride (Fmoc) protecting group in the C-3 or C-4 position, served to assemble different oligosaccharides by using an automated oligosaccharide synthesizer. Light-induced cleavage of the glycan products from the solid support followed by global deprotection provided seven MLG oligosaccharides of different length and connectivity. After incubation of the MLG oligosaccharides with lichenase, the digestion products were analyzed by HPLC-MS. These digestion experiments provided insights into the enzyme's active site that is in line with other recent evidence suggesting that the substrate specificity of lichenases has to be reconsidered. These results demonstrate that synthetic MLG oligosaccharides are useful tools to analyze mixed-linkage β-glucanases.

  9. Chemistry of Natural Glycan Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Glycan microarrays have become indispensable tools for studying protein-glycan interactions. Along with chemo-enzymatic synthesis, glycans isolated from natural sources have played important roles in array development and will continue to be a major source of glycans. N- and O-glycans from glycoproteins, and glycans from glycosphingolipids can be released from corresponding glycoconjugates with relatively mature methods, although isolation of large numbers and quantities of glycans are still very challenging. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchors and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are less represented on current glycan microarrays. Glycan microarray development has been greatly facilitated by bifunctional fluorescent linkers, which can be applied in a “Shotgun Glycomics” approach to incorporate isolated natural glycans. Glycan presentation on microarrays may affect glycan binding by GBPs, often through multivalent recognition by the GBP. PMID:24487062

  10. Quantitative analysis of glycoprotein glycans.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Ron

    2013-01-01

    The ability to quantitatively determine changes in the N- and O-linked glycans is an essential component of comparative glycomics. Multiple strategies are available to by which this can be accomplished, including; both label free approaches and isotopic labeling strategies. The focus of this chapter is to describe each of these approaches while providing insight into their strengths and weaknesses, so that glycomic investigators can make an educated choice of the strategy that is best suited for their particular application.

  11. Enzymatic Basis for N-Glycan Sialylation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lu; Forouhar, Farhad; Thieker, David; Gao, Zhongwei; Ramiah, Annapoorani; Moniz, Heather; Xiang, Yong; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Milaninia, Sahand; Su, Min; Bridger, Robert; Veillon, Lucas; Azadi, Parastoo; Kornhaber, Gregory; Wells, Lance; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Woods, Robert J.; Tong, Liang; Moremen, Kelley W.

    2013-01-01

    Glycan structures on glycoproteins and glycolipids play critical roles in biological recognition, targeting, and modulation of functions in animal systems. Many classes of glycan structures are capped with terminal sialic acid residues, which contribute to biological functions by either forming or masking glycan recognition sites on the cell surface or secreted glycoconjugates. Sialylated glycans are synthesized in mammals by a single conserved family of sialyltransferases that have diverse linkage and acceptor specificities. We examined the enzymatic basis for glycan sialylation in animal systems by determining the crystal structures of rat ST6GAL1, an enzyme that creates terminal α2,6-sialic acid linkages on complex-type N-glycans, at 2.4 Å resolution. Crystals were obtained from enzyme preparations generated in mammalian cells. The resulting structure revealed an overall protein fold broadly resembling the previously determined structure of pig ST3GAL1, including a CMP-sialic acid-binding site assembled from conserved sialylmotif sequence elements. Significant differences in structure and disulfide bonding patterns were found outside the sialylmotif sequences, including differences in residues predicted to interact with the glycan acceptor. Computational substrate docking and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to predict and evaluate the CMP-sialic acid donor and glycan acceptor interactions, and the results were compared with kinetic analysis of active site mutants. Comparisons of the structure with pig ST3GAL1 and a bacterial sialyltransferase revealed a similar positioning of donor, acceptor, and catalytic residues that provide a common structural framework for catalysis by the mammalian and bacterial sialyltransferases. PMID:24155237

  12. Galectins are human milk glycan receptors

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Alexander J; Gourdine, Jean-Philippe; Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    The biological recognition of human milk glycans (HMGs) is poorly understood. Because HMGs are rich in galactose we explored whether they might interact with human galectins, which bind galactose-containing glycans and are highly expressed in epithelial cells and other cell types. We screened a number of human galectins for their binding to HMGs on a shotgun glycan microarray consisting of 247 HMGs derived from human milk, as well as to a defined HMG microarray. Recombinant human galectins (hGal)-1, -3, -4, -7, -8 and -9 bound selectively to glycans, with each galectin recognizing a relatively unique binding motif; by contrast hGal-2 did not recognize HMGs, but did bind to the human blood group A Type 2 determinants on other microarrays. Unlike other galectins, hGal-7 preferentially bound to glycans expressing a terminal Type 1 (Galβ1-3GlcNAc) sequence, a motif that had eluded detection on non-HMG glycan microarrays. Interactions with HMGs were confirmed in a solution setting by isothermal titration microcalorimetry and hapten inhibition experiments. These results demonstrate that galectins selectively bind to HMGs and suggest the possibility that galectin–HMG interactions may play a role in infant immunity. PMID:26747425

  13. Capillary-based lectin affinity electrophoresis for interaction analysis between lectins and glycans.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Capillary affinity electrophoresis (CAE) is a powerful technique for glycan analysis, and one of the analytical approaches for analyzing the interaction between lectins and glycans. The method is based on the high-resolution separation of fluorescently labeled glycans by capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser-induced fluorescence detection (LIF) in the presence of lectins (or glycan binding proteins). CAE allows simultaneous determination of glycan structures in a complex mixture of glycans. In addition, we can calculate the binding kinetics on a specific glycan in the complex mixture of glycans with a lectin. Here, we show detailed procedures for capillary affinity electrophoresis of fluorescently labeled glycans with lectins using CE-LIF apparatus. Its application to screening a sialic acid binding protein in plant barks is also shown.

  14. Glycan Microarrays of Fluorescently-Tagged Natural Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the challenges facing research in ‘functional glycomics’ and the novel technologies that are being developed to advance the field. The structural complexity of glycans and glycoconjugates makes studies of both their structures and recognition difficult. However, these intricate structures can be captured from their natural sources, isolated and fluorescently-tagged for detailed structural analysis and for presentation on glycan microarrays for functional recognition by glycan-binding proteins. These advances in glycan preparation and manipulation enable the streamlining of functional glycomics studies and will help to propel the field forward in studying natural, biologically relevant glycans. PMID:25877830

  15. Are glycan biosensors an alternative to glycan microarrays?

    PubMed Central

    Hushegyi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates (glycans) play an important role in nature and study of their interaction with proteins or intact cells can be useful for understanding many physiological and pathological processes. Such interactions have been successfully interrogated in a highly parallel way using glycan microarrays, but this technique has some limitations. Thus, in recent years glycan biosensors in numerous progressive configurations have been developed offering distinct advantages compared to glycan microarrays. Thus, in this review advances achieved in the field of label-free glycan biosensors are discussed. PMID:27231487

  16. Salmonella Degrades the Host Glycocalyx Leading to Altered Infection and Glycan Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Arabyan, Narine; Park, Dayoung; Foutouhi, Soraya; Weis, Allison M.; Huang, Bihua C.; Williams, Cynthia C.; Desai, Prerak; Shah, Jigna; Jeannotte, Richard; Kong, Nguyet; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Weimer, Bart C.

    2016-01-01

    Complex glycans cover the gut epithelial surface to protect the cell from the environment. Invasive pathogens must breach the glycan layer before initiating infection. While glycan degradation is crucial for infection, this process is inadequately understood. Salmonella contains 47 glycosyl hydrolases (GHs) that may degrade the glycan. We hypothesized that keystone genes from the entire GH complement of Salmonella are required to degrade glycans to change infection. This study determined that GHs recognize the terminal monosaccharides (N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), galactose, mannose, and fucose) and significantly (p < 0.05) alter infection. During infection, Salmonella used its two GHs sialidase nanH and amylase malS for internalization by targeting different glycan structures. The host glycans were altered during Salmonella association via the induction of N-glycan biosynthesis pathways leading to modification of host glycans by increasing fucosylation and mannose content, while decreasing sialylation. Gene expression analysis indicated that the host cell responded by regulating more than 50 genes resulting in remodeled glycans in response to Salmonella treatment. This study established the glycan structures on colonic epithelial cells, determined that Salmonella required two keystone GHs for internalization, and left remodeled host glycans as a result of infection. These data indicate that microbial GHs are undiscovered virulence factors. PMID:27389966

  17. GS-align for glycan structure alignment and similarity measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hui Sun; Jo, Sunhwan; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Park, Sang-Jun; Skolnick, Jeffrey; Lee, Jooyoung; Im, Wonpil

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Glycans play critical roles in many biological processes, and their structural diversity is key for specific protein-glycan recognition. Comparative structural studies of biological molecules provide useful insight into their biological relationships. However, most computational tools are designed for protein structure, and despite their importance, there is no currently available tool for comparing glycan structures in a sequence order- and size-independent manner. Results: A novel method, GS-align, is developed for glycan structure alignment and similarity measurement. GS-align generates possible alignments between two glycan structures through iterative maximum clique search and fragment superposition. The optimal alignment is then determined by the maximum structural similarity score, GS-score, which is size-independent. Benchmark tests against the Protein Data Bank (PDB) N-linked glycan library and PDB homologous/non-homologous N-glycoprotein sets indicate that GS-align is a robust computational tool to align glycan structures and quantify their structural similarity. GS-align is also applied to template-based glycan structure prediction and monosaccharide substitution matrix generation to illustrate its utility. Availability and implementation: http://www.glycanstructure.org/gsalign. Contact: wonpil@ku.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25857669

  18. Selectivity of the cleavage/attachment site of phosphatidylinositol-glycan-anchored membrane proteins determined by site-specific mutagenesis at Asp-484 of placental alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Micanovic, R; Gerber, L D; Berger, J; Kodukula, K; Udenfriend, S

    1990-01-01

    Many proteins are now known to be anchored to the plasma membrane by a phosphatidylinositol-glycan (PI-G) moiety that is attached to their COOH termini. Placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) has been used as a model for investigating mechanisms involved in the COOH-terminal processing of PI-G-tailed proteins. The COOH-terminal domain of pre-pro-PLAP provides a signal for processing during which a largely hydrophobic 29-residue COOH-terminal peptide is removed, and the PI-G moiety is added to the newly exposed Asp-484 terminus. This cleavage/attachment site was subjected to an almost saturation mutagenesis, and the enzymatic activities, COOH-terminal processing, and cellular localizations of the various mutant PLAP forms were determined. Substitution of Asp-484 by glycine, alanine, cysteine, asparagine, or serine (category I) resulted in PI-G-tailed and enzymatically active proteins. However, not all category I mutant proteins were PI-G tailed to the same extent. Pre-pro-PLAP with other substituents at position 484 (threonine, proline, methionine, valine, leucine, tyrosine, tryptophan, lysine, glutamic acid, and glutamine; category II) were expressed, as well as the category I amino acids, but there was little or no processing to the PI-G-tailed form, and this latter group exhibited very low enzyme activity. The bulk of the PLAP protein produced by category II mutants and some produced by category I mutants were sequestered within the cell, apparently in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Most likely, certain amino acids at residue 484 are preferred because they yield better substrates for the putative "transamidating" enzyme. In transfected COS cells, at least, posttranslational PI-G-tail processing does not go to completion even for preferred substrates. Apparently PI-G tailing is a requisite for transport from the ER and for PLAP enzyme activity. Proteins that are not transamidated are apparently retained in the ER in an inactive conformation. Images PMID:2153284

  19. Loss of intestinal O-glycans promotes spontaneous duodenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Nan; Bergstrom, Kirk; Fu, Jianxin; Xie, Biao; Chen, Weichang; Xia, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    Mucin-type O-glycans, primarily core 1- and core 3-derived O-glycans, are the major mucus barrier components throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Previous reports identified the biological role of O-glycans in the stomach and colon. However, the biological function of O-glycans in the small intestine remains unknown. Using mice lacking intestinal core 1- and core 3-derived O-glycans [intestinal epithelial cell C1galt1(-/-);C3GnT(-/-) or double knockout (DKO)], we found that loss of O-glycans predisposes DKO mice to spontaneous duodenal tumorigenesis by ∼1 yr of age. Tumor incidence did not increase with age; however, tumors advanced in aggressiveness by 20 mo. O-glycan deficiency was associated with reduced luminal mucus in DKO mice before tumor development. Altered intestinal epithelial homeostasis with enhanced baseline crypt proliferation characterizes these phenotypes as assayed by Ki67 staining. In addition, fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis reveals a significantly lower bacterial burden in the duodenum compared with the large intestine. This phenotype is not reduced with antibiotic treatment, implying O-glycosylation defects, rather than bacterial-induced inflammation, which causes spontaneous duodenal tumorigenesis. Moreover, inflammatory responses in DKO duodenal mucosa are mild as assayed with histology, quantitative PCR for inflammation-associated cytokines, and immunostaining for immune cells. Importantly, inducible deletion of intestinal O-glycans in adult mice leads to analogous spontaneous duodenal tumors, although with higher incidence and heightened severity compared with mice with O-glycans constitutive deletion. In conclusion, these studies reveal O-glycans within the small intestine are critical determinants of duodenal cancer risk. Future studies will provide insights into the pathogenesis in the general population and those at risk for this rare but deadly cancer.

  20. Structures and biosynthesis of the N- and O-glycans of recombinant human oviduct-specific glycoprotein expressed in human embryonic kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaojing; Tao, Shujuan; Orlando, Ron; Brockhausen, Inka; Kan, Frederick W K

    2012-09-01

    Oviduct-specific glycoprotein (OVGP1) is a major mucin-like glycoprotein synthesized and secreted exclusively by non-ciliated secretory cells of mammalian oviduct. In vitro functional studies showed that OVGP1 plays important roles during fertilization and early embryo development. We have recently produced recombinant human oviduct-specific glycoprotein (rhOVGP1) in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. The present study was undertaken to characterize the structures and determine the biosynthetic pathways of the N- and O-glycans of rhOVGP1. Treatment of the stable rhOVGP1-expressing HEK293 cells with either GalNAcα-Bn to block O-glycan extension, tunicamycin to block N-glycosylation, or neuraminidase increased the electrophoretic mobility of rhOVGP1. A detailed analysis of O- and N-linked glycans of rhOVGP1 by mass spectrometry showed a broad range of many simple and complex glycan structures. In order to identify the enzymes involved in the glycosylation of rhOVGP1, we assayed glycosyltransferase activities involved in the assembly of O- and N-glycans in HEK293 cells, and compared these to those from the immortalized human oviductal cells (OE-E6/E7). Our results demonstrate that HEK293 and OE-E6/E7 cells exhibit a similar spectrum of glycosyltransferase activities that can synthesize elongated and sialylated O-glycans with core 1 and 2 structures, as well as complex multiantennary N-glycans. It is anticipated that the knowledge gained from the present study will facilitate future studies of the role of the glycans of human OVGP1 in fertilization and early embryo development.

  1. Common glycoproteins expressing polylactosamine-type glycans on matched patient primary and metastatic melanoma cells show different glycan profiles.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Mitsui, Yosuke; Kakoi, Naotaka; Yamada, Keita; Hayakawa, Takao; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2014-02-07

    Recently, we reported comparative analysis of glycoproteins which express cancer-specific N-glycans on various cancer cells and identified 24 glycoproteins having polylactosamine (polyLacNAc)-type N-glycans that are abundantly present in malignant cells [ Mitsui et al., J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 2012 , 70 , 718 - 726 ]. In the present study, we applied the technique to comparative studies on common glycoproteins present in the matched patient primary and metastatic melanoma cell lines. Metastatic melanoma cells (WM266-4) contained a large amount of polyLacNAc-type N-glycans in comparison with primary melanoma cells (WM115). To identify the glycoproteins expressing these N-glycans, glycopeptides having polyLacNAc-type N-glycans were captured by a Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA)-immobilized agarose column. The captured glycopeptides were analyzed by LC/MS after removing N-glycans, and some glycoproteins such as basigin, lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) were identified in both WM115 and WM266-4 cells. The expression level of polyLacNAc of CSPG4 in WM266-4 cells was significantly higher than that in WM115 cells. In addition, sulfation patterns of chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains in CSPG4 showed dramatic changes between these cell lines. These data show that characteristic glycans attached to common proteins observed in different stages of cancer cells will be useful markers for determining degree of malignancies of tumor cells.

  2. Fluorescently labelled glycans and their applications.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongbin; Yalagala, Ravi Shekar; Yan, Fengyang

    2015-11-01

    This review summarises the literature on the synthesis and applications of fluorescently labelled carbohydrates. Due to the sensitivity of fluorescent detection, this approach provides a useful tool to study processes involving glycans. A few general categories of labelling are presented, in situ labelling of carbohydrates with fluorophores, fluorescently labelled glycolipids, fluorogenic glycans, pre-formed fluorescent glycans for intracellular applications, glycan-decorated fluorescent polymers, fluorescent glyconanoparticles, and other functional fluorescent glycans.

  3. Human milk contains novel glycans that are potential decoy receptors for neonatal rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Mickum, Megan L; Ashline, David J; Prasad, B V Venkataram; Estes, Mary K; Reinhold, Vernon N; Cummings, Richard D; Smith, David F

    2014-11-01

    Human milk contains a rich set of soluble, reducing glycans whose functions and bioactivities are not well understood. Because human milk glycans (HMGs) have been implicated as receptors for various pathogens, we explored the functional glycome of human milk using shotgun glycomics. The free glycans from pooled milk samples of donors with mixed Lewis and Secretor phenotypes were labeled with a fluorescent tag and separated via multidimensional HPLC to generate a tagged glycan library containing 247 HMG targets that were printed to generate the HMG shotgun glycan microarray (SGM). To investigate the potential role of HMGs as decoy receptors for rotavirus (RV), a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children, we interrogated the HMG SGM with recombinant forms of VP8* domains of the RV outer capsid spike protein VP4 from human neonatal strains N155(G10P[11]) and RV3(G3P[6]) and a bovine strain, B223(G10P[11]). Glycans that were bound by RV attachment proteins were selected for detailed structural analyses using metadata-assisted glycan sequencing, which compiles data on each glycan based on its binding by antibodies and lectins before and after exo- and endo-glycosidase digestion of the SGM, coupled with independent MS(n) analyses. These complementary structural approaches resulted in the identification of 32 glycans based on RV VP8* binding, many of which are novel HMGs, whose detailed structural assignments by MS(n) are described in a companion report. Although sialic acid has been thought to be important as a surface receptor for RVs, our studies indicated that sialic acid is not required for binding of glycans to individual VP8* domains. Remarkably, each VP8* recognized specific glycan determinants within a unique subset of related glycan structures where specificity differences arise from subtle differences in glycan structures.

  4. An Intact Reducing Glycan Promotes the Specific Immune Response to Lacto-N-neotetraose-BSA Neoglycoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Prasanphanich, Nina S.; Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Luyai, Anthony E.; Lasanajak, Yi; Cutler, Christopher E.; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian immune system responds to eukaryotic glycan antigens during infections, cancer, and autoimmune disorders, but the immunological bases for such responses are unclear. Conjugate vaccines containing bacterial polysaccharides linked to carrier proteins (neoglycoconjugates) have proven successful, but these often contain repeating epitopes and the reducing end of the glycan is less important, unlike typical glycan determinants in eukaryotes, which are shorter in length and may include the reducing end. Here we have compared the effects of two linkage methods, one that opens the ring at the reducing end of the glycan, and one that leaves the reducing end closed, on the glycan specificity of the vaccine response in rabbits and mice. We immunized rabbits and mice with bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugates of synthetic open- and closed-ring forms (OR versus CR) of a simple tetrasaccharide lacto-N-neo-tetraose (LNnT, Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-3Galβ1-4Glc), and tested reactivity to the immunogens and several related glycans in both OR and CR versions on glycan microarrays. We found that in rabbits the immune response to the CR conjugate was directed toward the glycan, whereas the OR conjugate elicited antibodies to the reducing end of the glycan and linker region but not specifically to the glycan itself. Unexpectedly, mice did not generate a glycan-specific response to the CR conjugate. Our findings indicate that the reducing end of the sugar is crucial for generation of a glycan-specific response to some eukaryotic vaccine epitopes, and that there are species-specific differences in the ability to make a glycan-specific response to some glycoconjugates. These findings warrant further investigation with regard to rational design of glycoconjugate vaccines. PMID:25671348

  5. Human Milk Contains Novel Glycans That Are Potential Decoy Receptors for Neonatal Rotaviruses*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Mickum, Megan L.; Ashline, David J.; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Estes, Mary K.; Reinhold, Vernon N.; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Human milk contains a rich set of soluble, reducing glycans whose functions and bioactivities are not well understood. Because human milk glycans (HMGs) have been implicated as receptors for various pathogens, we explored the functional glycome of human milk using shotgun glycomics. The free glycans from pooled milk samples of donors with mixed Lewis and Secretor phenotypes were labeled with a fluorescent tag and separated via multidimensional HPLC to generate a tagged glycan library containing 247 HMG targets that were printed to generate the HMG shotgun glycan microarray (SGM). To investigate the potential role of HMGs as decoy receptors for rotavirus (RV), a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children, we interrogated the HMG SGM with recombinant forms of VP8* domains of the RV outer capsid spike protein VP4 from human neonatal strains N155(G10P[11]) and RV3(G3P[6]) and a bovine strain, B223(G10P[11]). Glycans that were bound by RV attachment proteins were selected for detailed structural analyses using metadata-assisted glycan sequencing, which compiles data on each glycan based on its binding by antibodies and lectins before and after exo- and endo-glycosidase digestion of the SGM, coupled with independent MSn analyses. These complementary structural approaches resulted in the identification of 32 glycans based on RV VP8* binding, many of which are novel HMGs, whose detailed structural assignments by MSn are described in a companion report. Although sialic acid has been thought to be important as a surface receptor for RVs, our studies indicated that sialic acid is not required for binding of glycans to individual VP8* domains. Remarkably, each VP8* recognized specific glycan determinants within a unique subset of related glycan structures where specificity differences arise from subtle differences in glycan structures. PMID:25048705

  6. Blood Plasma-Derived Anti-Glycan Antibodies to Sialylated and Sulfated Glycans Identify Ovarian Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pochechueva, Tatiana; Chinarev, Alexander; Schoetzau, Andreas; Fedier, André; Bovin, Nicolai V.; Hacker, Neville F.; Jacob, Francis; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Altered levels of naturally occurring anti-glycan antibodies (AGA) circulating in human blood plasma are found in different pathologies including cancer. Here the levels of AGA directed against 22 negatively charged (sialylated and sulfated) glycans were assessed in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC, n = 22) patients and benign controls (n = 31) using our previously developed suspension glycan array (SGA). Specifically, the ability of AGA to differentiate between controls and HGSOC, the most common and aggressive type of ovarian cancer with a poor outcome was determined. Results were compared to CA125, the commonly used ovarian cancer biomarker. AGA to seven glycans that significantly (P<0.05) differentiated between HGSOC and control were identified: AGA to top candidates SiaTn and 6-OSulfo-TF (both IgM) differentiated comparably to CA125. The area under the curve (AUC) of a panel of AGA to 5 glycans (SiaTn, 6-OSulfo-TF, 6-OSulfo-LN, SiaLea, and GM2) (0.878) was comparable to CA125 (0.864), but it markedly increased (0.985) when combined with CA125. AGA to SiaTn and 6-OSulfo-TF were also valuable predictors for HGSOC when CA125 values appeared inconclusive, i.e. were below a certain threshold. AGA-glycan binding was in some cases isotype-dependent and sensitive to glycosidic linkage switch (α2–6 vs. α2–3), to sialylation, and to sulfation of the glycans. In conclusion, plasma-derived AGA to sialylated and sulfated glycans including SiaTn and 6-OSulfo-TF detected by SGA present a valuable alternative to CA125 for differentiating controls from HGSOC patients and for predicting the likelihood of HGSOC, and may be potential HGSOC tumor markers. PMID:27764122

  7. Clickable Polymeric Coating for Glycan Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Zilio, Caterina; Sola, Laura; Cretich, Marina; Bernardi, Anna; Chiari, Marcella

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of carbohydrates with a variety of biological targets, including antibodies, proteins, viruses, and cells are of utmost importance in many aspects of biology. Glycan microarrays are increasingly used to determine the binding specificity of glycan-binding proteins. In this study, a novel microarray support is reported for the fabrication of glycan arrays that combines the higher sensitivity of a layered Si-SiO2 surface with a novel polymeric coating easily modifiable by subsequent click reaction. The alkyne-containing copolymer, adsorbed from an aqueous solution, produces a coating by a single step procedure and serves as a soft, tridimensional support for the oriented immobilization of carbohydrates via azide/alkyne Cu (I) catalyzed "click" reaction. The advantages of a functional 3D polymer coating making use of a click chemistry immobilization are combined with the high fluorescence sensitivity and superior signal-to-noise ratio of a Si-SiO2 substrate. The proposed approach enables the attachment of complex sugars on a silicon oxide surface by a method that does not require skilled personnel and chemistry laboratories.

  8. Quantitation of Permethylated N-Glycans through Multiple-Reaction Monitoring (MRM) LC-MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiyue; Hu, Yunli; DeSantos-Garcia, Janie L.; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-04-01

    The important biological roles of glycans and their implications in disease development and progression have created a demand for the development of sensitive quantitative glycomics methods. Quantitation of glycans existing at low abundance is still analytically challenging. In this study, an N-linked glycans quantitation method using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) on a triple quadrupole instrument was developed. Optimum normalized collision energy (CE) for both sialylated and fucosylated N-glycan was determined to be 30%, whereas it was found to be 35% for either fucosylated or sialylated N-glycans. The optimum CE for mannose and complex type N-glycan was determined to be 35%. Additionally, the use of three transitions was shown to facilitate reliable quantitation. A total of 88 N-glycan compositions in human blood serum were quantified using this MRM approach. Reliable detection and quantitation of these glycans was achieved when the equivalence of 0.005 μL of blood serum was analyzed. Accordingly, N-glycans down to the 100th of a μL level can be reliably quantified in pooled human blood serum, spanning a dynamic concentration range of three orders of magnitude. MRM was also effectively utilized to quantitatively compare the expression of N-glycans derived from brain-targeting breast carcinoma cells (MDA-MB-231BR) and metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). Thus, the described MRM method of permethylated N-glycan enables a rapid and reliable identification and quantitation of glycans derived from glycoproteins purified or present in complex biological samples.

  9. Glycan gimmickry by parasitic helminths: a strategy for modulating the host immune response?

    PubMed

    van Die, Irma; Cummings, Richard D

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic helminths (worms) co-evolved with vertebrate immune systems to enable long-term survival of worms in infected hosts. Among their survival strategies, worms use their glycans within glycoproteins and glycolipids, which are abundant on helminth surfaces and in their excretory/ secretory products, to regulate and suppress host immune responses. Many helminths express unusual and antigenic (nonhost-like) glycans, including those containing polyfucose, tyvelose, terminal GalNAc, phosphorylcholine, methyl groups, and sugars in unusual linkages. In addition, some glycan antigens are expressed that share structural features with those in their intermediate and vertebrate hosts (host-like glycans), including Le(X) (Galbeta1-4[Fucalpha1-3]GlcNAc-), LDNF (GalNAcbeta1-4[Fucalpha1-3]GlcNAc-), LDN (GalNAcbeta1-4GlcNAc-), and Tn (GalNAcalpha1-O-Thr/Ser) antigens. The expression of host-like glycan determinants is remarkable and suggests that helminths may gain advantages by synthesizing such glycans. The expression of host-like glycans by parasites previously led to the concept of "molecular mimicry," in which molecules are either derived from the pathogen or acquired from the host to evade recognition by the host immune system. However, recent discoveries into the potential of host glycan-binding proteins (GBPs), such as C-type lectin receptors and galectins, to functionally interact with various host-like helminth glycans provide new insights. Host GBPs through their interactions with worm-derived glycans participate in shaping innate and adaptive immune responses upon infection. We thus propose an alternative concept termed "glycan gimmickry," which is defined as an active strategy of parasites to use their glycans to target GBPs within the host to promote their survival.

  10. Roles of glycans in interactions between gp120 and HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yifei; Jo, Sunhwan; Im, Wonpil

    2016-03-01

    Many novel broadly neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been identified during the past decade, providing promising templates for the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Structural studies reveal that the epitopes of some of these antibodies involve one or more crucial glycans, without which the binding is completely abolished. In this study, we have investigated the critical roles of glycans in interactions between HIV-1 gp120 and two broadly neutralizing antibodies PG9 (targeting V1/V2) and PGT128 (targeting V3) that are able to neutralize more than 70% of HIV-1 isolates. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of a number of systems including antibody-gp120 complex with and without glycans, antibody, gp120 with and without glycans, and glycan-only systems. The simulation results show that the complex structures are stabilized by the glycans, and the multivalent interactions between the antibody and gp120 promote cooperativities to further enhance the binding. In the free gp120, the glycans increase the flexibility of the V1/V2 and V3 loops, which likely increases the entropy cost of the antibody recognition. However, the antibodies are able to bind the flexible interface by recognizing the preexisting glycan conformation, and penetrating the glycan shield with flexible complementarity determining region loops that sample the bound conformations occasionally.

  11. Dual Modifications Strategy to Quantify Neutral and Sialylated N-Glycans Simultaneously by MALDI-MS

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Differences in ionization efficiency among neutral and sialylated glycans prevent direct quantitative comparison by their respective mass spectrometric signals. To overcome this challenge, we developed an integrated chemical strategy, Dual Reactions for Analytical Glycomics (DRAG), to quantitatively compare neutral and sialylated glycans simultaneously by MALDI-MS. Initially, two glycan samples to be compared undergo reductive amination with 2-aminobenzoic acid and 2-13[C6]-aminobenzoic acid, respectively. The different isotope-incorporated glycans are then combined and subjected to the methylamidation of the sialic acid residues in one mixture, homogenizing the ionization responses for all neutral and sialylated glycans. By this approach, the expression change of relevant glycans between two samples is proportional to the ratios of doublet signals with a static 6 Da mass difference in MALDI-MS and the change in relative abundance of any glycan within samples can also be determined. The strategy was chemically validated using well-characterized N-glycans from bovine fetuin and IgG from human serum. By comparing the N-glycomes from a first morning (AM) versus an afternoon (PM) urine sample obtained from a single donor, we further demonstrated the ability of DRAG strategy to measure subtle quantitative differences in numerous urinary N-glycans. PMID:24766348

  12. Mass + retention time = structure: a strategy for the analysis of N-glycans by carbon LC-ESI-MS and its application to fibrin N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Martin; Bondili, Jayakumar Singh; Stadlmann, Johannes; Mach, Lukas; Altmann, Friedrich

    2007-07-01

    Analysis of the numerous possible, often isobaric structures of protein-bound oligosaccharides calls for a high-performance two-dimensional method that combines liquid chromatography's ability to separate isomers and mass spectrometry's ability to determine glycan composition. Here we investigate the usefulness of porous graphitic carbon columns coupled to ESI-MS for the separation of N-glycans with two or more sialic acids. Internal standards helped to rectify retention time fluctuations and thus allowed elution times to play an essential role in the structural assignment of peaks. For generation of a retention time library, standards representing the possible isomers of diantennary non-, mono-, and disialylated N-glycans, differing in the linkage of galactose and sialic acids as well as isobaric hybrid-type N-glycans, were produced using recombinant glycosyltransferases. Once the retention times library was established, isomers could be identified by LC-ESI-MS in the positive mode without additional MS/MS experiments. The method was applied for the detailed structural analysis of fibrin(ogen) N-glycans from various species (human, cow, pig, mouse, rat, cat, dog, Chinese hamster, horse, sheep, and chicken). All fibrins contained diantennary N-glycans. They differed in the occurrence of beta1,3-linked galactose, alpha2,3-linked sialic acids, and N-glycolylneuraminic acid, in the mono/diantennary glycan ratio, and in the O-acetylation of neuraminic acids. The separation system's potential for analyzing tri- and tetrasialylated N-glycans was demonstrated.

  13. Plasma High-Mannose and Complex/Hybrid N-Glycans Are Associated with Hypercholesterolemia in Humans and Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liang; Li, Qianwei; Li, Lingmei; Lin, Yan; Zhao, Sihai; Wang, Weirong; Wang, Rong; Li, Yongqin; Yuan, Jiangbei; Wang, Chengjian; Wang, Zhongfu; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2016-01-01

    N-glycans play important roles in various pathophysiological processes and can be used as clinical diagnosis markers. However, plasma N-glycans change and their pathophysiological significance in the setting of hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, is unknown. Here, we collected plasma from both hypercholesterolemic patients and cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits, and determined the changes in the whole-plasma N-glycan profile by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We found that both the hypercholesterolemic patients and rabbits showed a dramatic change in their plasma glycan profile. Compared with healthy subjects, the hypercholesterolemic patients exhibited higher plasma levels of a cluster of high-mannose and complex/hybrid N-glycans (mainly including undecorated or sialylated glycans), whereas only a few fucosylated or fucosylated and sialylated N-glycans were increased. Additionally, cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits also displayed increased plasma levels of high-mannose in addition to high complex/hybrid N-glycan levels. The whole-plasma glycan profiles revealed that the plasma N-glycan levels were correlated with the plasma cholesterol levels, implying that N-glycans may be a target for treatment of hypercholesterolemia.

  14. Plasma High-Mannose and Complex/Hybrid N-Glycans Are Associated with Hypercholesterolemia in Humans and Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Liang; Li, Qianwei; Li, Lingmei; Lin, Yan; Zhao, Sihai; Wang, Weirong; Wang, Rong; Li, Yongqin; Yuan, Jiangbei; Wang, Chengjian; Wang, Zhongfu; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2016-01-01

    N-glycans play important roles in various pathophysiological processes and can be used as clinical diagnosis markers. However, plasma N-glycans change and their pathophysiological significance in the setting of hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, is unknown. Here, we collected plasma from both hypercholesterolemic patients and cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits, and determined the changes in the whole-plasma N-glycan profile by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We found that both the hypercholesterolemic patients and rabbits showed a dramatic change in their plasma glycan profile. Compared with healthy subjects, the hypercholesterolemic patients exhibited higher plasma levels of a cluster of high-mannose and complex/hybrid N-glycans (mainly including undecorated or sialylated glycans), whereas only a few fucosylated or fucosylated and sialylated N-glycans were increased. Additionally, cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits also displayed increased plasma levels of high-mannose in addition to high complex/hybrid N-glycan levels. The whole-plasma glycan profiles revealed that the plasma N-glycan levels were correlated with the plasma cholesterol levels, implying that N-glycans may be a target for treatment of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26999365

  15. Histochemical identification of sialylated glycans in Xenopus laevis testis

    PubMed Central

    Valbuena, Galder; Alonso, Edurne; Ubago, María Martínez; Madrid, Juan Francisco; Díaz-Flores, Lucio; Sáez, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate chains of glycoprotein and glycosphingolipids are highly diverse molecules involved in many cell functions, including cell recognition, adhesion and signalling. Sialylated glycans are of special interest because the terminal position of sialic acid (NeuAc) in glycans linked by different ways to subterminal monosaccharides has been shown to be involved in several biological processes, as occurs with gangliosides, which have been reported as being essential in spermatogenesis in mammals. Some glycan-binding proteins, the lectins, which specifically recognize glycan sequences, have been extensively used to characterize tissue and cell carbohydrates by means of cytochemical techniques. The aim of the present work was to determine the presence of NeuAc by means of histochemical techniques in the testis of Xenopus laevis, an animal model widely used in cell and molecular biology research. However, considering that some NeuAc-binding lectins are capable of binding to N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), other GlcNAc-binding lectins were also assayed. The results showed that NeuAc is mainly expressed in the interstitium, and only a weak labelling in the male germ cells was observed. Most NeuAc was located in O-linked oligosaccharides, but some masked NeuAc in N-glycans were identified in primary and secondary spermatogonia and spermatocytes. By contrast, GlcNAc was widely expressed in all germ cell types. Deglycosylative pre-treatments suggest that both N- and O-glycans and/or glycolipids could be responsible for this labelling. In addition, GlcNAc in O-linked oligosaccharides has been identified in spermatogonial cells. The acrosome of spermatids was always negative. Variations of glycan expression have been found in different cell types, suggesting that glycosylation is modified during spermatogenetic development. PMID:22881213

  16. Engineering galectin–glycan interactions for immunotherapy and immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Shaheen A

    2016-01-01

    Galectins, a 15-member family of soluble carbohydrate-binding proteins, are receiving increasing interest as therapeutic targets for immunotherapy and immunomodulation due to their role as extracellular signals that regulate innate and adaptive immune cell phenotype and function. However, different galectins can have redundant, synergistic, or antagonistic signaling activity in normal immunological responses, such as resolution of inflammation and induction of antigen-specific tolerance. In addition, certain galectins can be hijacked to promote progression of immunopathologies, such as tumor immune privilege, metastasis, and viral infection, while others can inhibit these processes. Thus, eliciting a desired immunological outcome will likely necessitate therapeutics that can precisely enhance or inhibit particular galectin–glycan interactions. Multivalency is an important determinant of the affinity and specificity of natural galectin–glycan interactions, and is emerging as a key design element for therapeutics that can effectively manipulate galectin bioactivity. This minireview surveys current molecular and biomaterial engineering approaches to create therapeutics that can stabilize galectin multivalency or recapitulate natural glycan multivalency (i.e. “the glycocluster effect”). In particular, we highlight examples of using natural and engineered multivalent galectins for immunosuppression and immune tolerance, with a particular emphasis on treating autoimmune diseases or avoiding transplant rejection. In addition, we present examples of multivalent inhibitors of galectin–glycan interactions to maintain or restore T-cell function, with a particular emphasis on promoting antitumor immunity. Finally, we discuss emerging opportunities to further engineer galectin–glycan interactions for immunotherapy and immunomodulation. PMID:27229902

  17. Classical galactosaemia: novel insights in IgG N-glycosylation and N-glycan biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Maratha, Ashwini; Stockmann, Henning; Coss, Karen P; Estela Rubio-Gozalbo, M; Knerr, Ina; Fitzgibbon, Maria; McVeigh, Terri P; Foley, Patricia; Moss, Catherine; Colhoun, Hugh-Owen; van Erven, Britt; Stephens, Kelly; Doran, Peter; Rudd, Pauline; Treacy, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    Classical galactosaemia (OMIM #230400), a rare disorder of carbohydrate metabolism, is caused by a deficient activity of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (EC 2.7.7.12). The pathophysiology of the long-term complications, mainly cognitive, neurological and female fertility problems remains poorly understood. The lack of validated biomarkers to determine prognosis, monitor disease progression and responses to new therapies, pose a huge challenge. We report the detailed analysis of an automated robotic hydrophilic interaction ultra-performance liquid chromatography N-glycan analytical method of high glycan peak resolution applied to serum IgG. This has revealed specific N-glycan processing defects observed in 40 adult galactosaemia patients (adults and adolescents), in comparison with 81 matched healthy controls. We have identified a significant increase in core fucosylated neutral glycans (P<0.0001) and a significant decrease in core fucosylated (P<0.001), non-fucosylated (P<0.0001) bisected glycans and, of specific note, decreased N-linked mannose-5 glycans (P<0.0001), in galactosaemia patients. We also report the abnormal expression of a number of related relevant N-glycan biosynthesis genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 32 adult galactosaemia patients. We have noted significant dysregulation of two key N-glycan biosynthesis genes: ALG9 upregulated (P<0.001) and MGAT1 downregulated (P<0.01) in galactosaemia patients, which may contribute to its ongoing pathophysiology. Our data suggest that the use of IgG N-glycosylation analysis with matched N-glycan biosynthesis gene profiles may provide useful biomarkers for monitoring response to therapy and interventions. They also indicate potential gene modifying steps in this N-glycan biosynthesis pathway, of relevance to galactosaemia and related N-glycan biosynthesis disorders. PMID:26733289

  18. Classical galactosaemia: novel insights in IgG N-glycosylation and N-glycan biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Maratha, Ashwini; Stockmann, Henning; Coss, Karen P; Estela Rubio-Gozalbo, M; Knerr, Ina; Fitzgibbon, Maria; McVeigh, Terri P; Foley, Patricia; Moss, Catherine; Colhoun, Hugh-Owen; van Erven, Britt; Stephens, Kelly; Doran, Peter; Rudd, Pauline; Treacy, Eileen

    2016-07-01

    Classical galactosaemia (OMIM #230400), a rare disorder of carbohydrate metabolism, is caused by a deficient activity of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (EC 2.7.7.12). The pathophysiology of the long-term complications, mainly cognitive, neurological and female fertility problems remains poorly understood. The lack of validated biomarkers to determine prognosis, monitor disease progression and responses to new therapies, pose a huge challenge. We report the detailed analysis of an automated robotic hydrophilic interaction ultra-performance liquid chromatography N-glycan analytical method of high glycan peak resolution applied to serum IgG. This has revealed specific N-glycan processing defects observed in 40 adult galactosaemia patients (adults and adolescents), in comparison with 81 matched healthy controls. We have identified a significant increase in core fucosylated neutral glycans (P<0.0001) and a significant decrease in core fucosylated (P<0.001), non-fucosylated (P<0.0001) bisected glycans and, of specific note, decreased N-linked mannose-5 glycans (P<0.0001), in galactosaemia patients. We also report the abnormal expression of a number of related relevant N-glycan biosynthesis genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 32 adult galactosaemia patients. We have noted significant dysregulation of two key N-glycan biosynthesis genes: ALG9 upregulated (P<0.001) and MGAT1 downregulated (P<0.01) in galactosaemia patients, which may contribute to its ongoing pathophysiology. Our data suggest that the use of IgG N-glycosylation analysis with matched N-glycan biosynthesis gene profiles may provide useful biomarkers for monitoring response to therapy and interventions. They also indicate potential gene modifying steps in this N-glycan biosynthesis pathway, of relevance to galactosaemia and related N-glycan biosynthesis disorders.

  19. Sentinel-1A - First precise orbit determination results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, H.; Jäggi, A.; Fernández, J.; Escobar, D.; Ayuga, F.; Arnold, D.; Wermuth, M.; Hackel, S.; Otten, M.; Simons, W.; Visser, P.; Hugentobler, U.; Féménias, P.

    2017-09-01

    Sentinel-1A is the first satellite of the European Copernicus programme. Equipped with a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) instrument the satellite was launched on April 3, 2014. Operational since October 2014 the satellite delivers valuable data for more than two years. The orbit accuracy requirements are given as 5 cm in 3D. In order to fulfill this stringent requirement the precise orbit determination (POD) is based on the dual-frequency GPS observations delivered by an eight-channel GPS receiver. The Copernicus POD (CPOD) Service is in charge of providing the orbital and auxiliary products required by the PDGS (Payload Data Ground Segment). External orbit validation is regularly performed by comparing the CPOD Service orbits to orbit solutions provided by POD expert members of the Copernicus POD Quality Working Group (QWG). The orbit comparisons revealed systematic orbit offsets mainly in radial direction (approx. 3 cm). Although no independent observation technique (e.g. DORIS, SLR) is available to validate the GPS-derived orbit solutions, comparisons between the different antenna phase center variations and different reduced-dynamic orbit determination approaches used in the various software packages helped to detect the cause of the systematic offset. An error in the given geometry information about the satellite has been found. After correction of the geometry the orbit validation shows a significant reduction of the radial offset to below 5 mm. The 5 cm orbit accuracy requirement in 3D is fulfilled according to the results of the orbit comparisons between the different orbit solutions from the QWG.

  20. Stage-specific expression and antigenicity of glycoprotein glycans isolated from the human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini.

    PubMed

    Talabnin, Krajang; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Saichua, Prasert; Wongkham, Sopit; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Boons, Geert-Jan; Sripa, Banchob; Tiemeyer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Infection by Opisthorchis viverrini (liver fluke) is a major public health problem in southeastern Asia, resulting in hepatobiliary disease and cholangiocarcinoma. Fluke surface glycoconjugates are prominently presented to the host, thereby constituting a crucial immunological interface that can determine the parasite's success in establishing infection. Therefore, N- and O-linked glycoprotein glycan profiles of the infective metacercarial stage and of the mature adult were investigated by nanospray ionisation-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (NSI-MS(n)). Glycan immunogenicity was investigated by immunoblotting with serum from infected humans. Metacercariae and adult parasites exhibit similar glycan diversity, although the prevalence of individual glycans and glycan classes varies by stage. The N-glycans of the metacercaria are mostly high mannose and monofucosylated, truncated-type oligosaccharides (62.7%), with the remainder processed to complex and hybrid type glycans (37.3%). The N-linked glycan profile of the adult is also dominated by high mannose and monofucosylated, truncated-type oligosaccharides (80.0%), with a smaller contribution from complex and hybrid type glycans (20.0%). At both stages, complex and hybrid type glycans are detected as mono-, bi-, tri-, or tetra-antennary structures. In metacercariae and adults, O-linked glycans are detected as mono- to pentasaccharides. The mucin type core 1 structure, Galβ1-3GalNAc, predominates in both stages but is less prevalent in the adult than in the metacercaria. Immunogenic recognition of liver fluke glycoproteins is reduced after deglycosylation but infected human serum was unable to recognise glycans released from peptides. Therefore, the most potent liver fluke antigenic epitopes are mixed determinants, comprised of glycan and polypeptide elements. Copyright © 2012 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Direct Enzymatic Branch-End Extension of Glycocluster-Presented Glycans: An Effective Strategy for Programming Glycan Bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Bayón, Carlos; He, Ning; Deir-Kaspar, Mario; Blasco, Pilar; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Rumbero, Ángel; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Fessner, Wolf-Dieter; Hernáiz, María J

    2017-01-31

    The sequence of a glycan and its topology of presentation team up to determine the specificity and selectivity of recognition by saccharide receptors (lectins). Structure-activity analysis would be furthered if the glycan part of a glycocluster could be efficiently elaborated in situ while keeping all other parameters constant. By using a bacterial α2,6-sialyltransferase and a small library of bi- to tetravalent glycoclusters, we illustrate the complete conversion of scaffold-presented lactoside units into two different sialylated ligands based on N-acetyl/glycolyl-neuraminic acid incorporation. We assess the ensuing effect on their bioactivity for a plant toxin, and present an analysis of the noncovalent substrate binding contacts that the added sialic acid moiety makes to the lectin. Enzymatic diversification of a scaffold-presented glycan can thus be brought to completion in situ, offering a versatile perspective for rational glycocluster engineering. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Glycan Profiling Shows Unvaried N-Glycomes in MSC Clones with Distinct Differentiation Potentials.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Katherine M; Thomas-Oates, Jane E; Genever, Paul G; Ungar, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Different cell types have different N-glycomes in mammals. This means that cellular differentiation is accompanied by changes in the N-glycan profile. Yet when the N-glycomes of cell types with differing fates diverge is unclear. We have investigated the N-glycan profiles of two different clonal populations of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). One clone (Y101), when differentiated into osteoblasts, showed a marked shift in the glycan profile toward a higher abundance of complex N-glycans and more core fucosylation. Yet chemical inhibition of complex glycan formation during osteogenic differentiation did not prevent the formation of functional osteoblasts. However, the N-glycan profile of another MSC clone (Y202), which cannot differentiate into osteoblasts, was not significantly different from that of the clone that can. Interestingly, incubation of Y202 cells in osteogenic medium caused a similar reduction of oligomannose glycan content in this non-differentiating cell line. Our analysis implies that the N-glycome changes seen upon differentiation do not have direct functional links to the differentiation process. Thus N-glycans may instead be important for self-renewal rather than for cell fate determination.

  3. Analysis of the N-glycans of recombinant human Factor IX purified from transgenic pig milk

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Geun-Cheol; Velander, William H; Van Cott, Kevin E

    2008-01-01

    Glycosylation of recombinant proteins is of particular importance because it can play significant roles in the clinical properties of the glycoprotein. In this work, the N-glycan structures of recombinant human Factor IX (tg-FIX) produced in the transgenic pig mammary gland were determined. The majority of the N-glycans of transgenic pig-derived Factor IX (tg-FIX) are complex, bi-antennary with one or two terminal N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) moieties. We also found that the N-glycan structures of tg-FIX produced in the porcine mammary epithelial cells differed with respect to N-glycans from glycoproteins produced in other porcine tissues. tg-FIX contains no detectable Neu5Gc, the sialic acid commonly found in porcine glycoproteins produced in other tissues. Additionally, we were unable to detect glycans in tg-FIX that have a terminal Galα(1,3)Gal disaccharide sequence, which is strongly antigenic in humans. The N-glycan structures of tg-FIX are also compared to the published N-glycan structures of recombinant human glycoproteins produced in other transgenic animal species. While tg-FIX contains only complex structures, antithrombin III (goat), C1 inhibitor (rabbit), and lactoferrin (cow) have both high mannose and complex structures. Collectively, these data represent a beginning point for the future investigation of species-specific and tissue/cell-specific differences in N-glycan structures among animals used for transgenic animal bioreactors. PMID:18456721

  4. Analysis of the N-glycans of recombinant human Factor IX purified from transgenic pig milk.

    PubMed

    Gil, Geun-Cheol; Velander, William H; Van Cott, Kevin E

    2008-07-01

    Glycosylation of recombinant proteins is of particular importance because it can play significant roles in the clinical properties of the glycoprotein. In this work, the N-glycan structures of recombinant human Factor IX (tg-FIX) produced in the transgenic pig mammary gland were determined. The majority of the N-glycans of transgenic pig-derived Factor IX (tg-FIX) are complex, bi-antennary with one or two terminal N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) moieties. We also found that the N-glycan structures of tg-FIX produced in the porcine mammary epithelial cells differed with respect to N-glycans from glycoproteins produced in other porcine tissues. tg-FIX contains no detectable Neu5Gc, the sialic acid commonly found in porcine glycoproteins produced in other tissues. Additionally, we were unable to detect glycans in tg-FIX that have a terminal Galalpha(1,3)Gal disaccharide sequence, which is strongly antigenic in humans. The N-glycan structures of tg-FIX are also compared to the published N-glycan structures of recombinant human glycoproteins produced in other transgenic animal species. While tg-FIX contains only complex structures, antithrombin III (goat), C1 inhibitor (rabbit), and lactoferrin (cow) have both high mannose and complex structures. Collectively, these data represent a beginning point for the future investigation of species-specific and tissue/cell-specific differences in N-glycan structures among animals used for transgenic animal bioreactors.

  5. Glycan profiling of proteins using lectin binding by Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Soriano, Brian; Chen, Qing

    2017-09-22

    Glycan profiling of proteins was studied through their lectin binding activity by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). To validate the method, we monitored specific lectin binding with sequential removal of sugar moieties from human transferrin using specific glycosidases. The results clearly indicated that glycans on the protein can be identified by their selective binding activity to various lectins. Using this method, we characterized Fc glycosylation profiles of therapeutic peptibodies and antibodies expressed in mammalian cells (CHO and HEK 293 6E cells), with E. coli expressed proteins as the negative controls. We observed that antibodies expressed in CHO cells did not contain any sialic acid, while antibodies expressed in 293 6E cells contained sialic acid. CHO cell expressed antibodies were also more heavily fucosylated than the ones expressed by 293 6E cells. We further applied this method to measure the fucose composition of glycan engineered mouse antibodies, as well as to determine mannose composition of human antibody variants with depletion or enrichment of high mannose. The glycan profiles generated using this method were comparable to results from 2-AB labeled glycan analysis of normal-phase separated glycans, and Fc gamma receptor binding activity of the glycan engineered antibodies were consistent with their glycan profiles. Hence, we demonstrated that SPR lectin binding analysis can be a quick alternative method to profile protein glycosylation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Glycan Profiling Shows Unvaried N-Glycomes in MSC Clones with Distinct Differentiation Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Katherine M.; Thomas-Oates, Jane E.; Genever, Paul G.; Ungar, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Different cell types have different N-glycomes in mammals. This means that cellular differentiation is accompanied by changes in the N-glycan profile. Yet when the N-glycomes of cell types with differing fates diverge is unclear. We have investigated the N-glycan profiles of two different clonal populations of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). One clone (Y101), when differentiated into osteoblasts, showed a marked shift in the glycan profile toward a higher abundance of complex N-glycans and more core fucosylation. Yet chemical inhibition of complex glycan formation during osteogenic differentiation did not prevent the formation of functional osteoblasts. However, the N-glycan profile of another MSC clone (Y202), which cannot differentiate into osteoblasts, was not significantly different from that of the clone that can. Interestingly, incubation of Y202 cells in osteogenic medium caused a similar reduction of oligomannose glycan content in this non-differentiating cell line. Our analysis implies that the N-glycome changes seen upon differentiation do not have direct functional links to the differentiation process. Thus N-glycans may instead be important for self-renewal rather than for cell fate determination. PMID:27303666

  7. Identification of methylated GnTI-dependent N-glycans in Botryococcus brauni.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Stefan; Urzica, Eugen; Reijnders, Maarten J M F; van de Geest, Henri; Warris, Sven; Bakker, Linda V; Fufezan, Christian; Martins Dos Santos, Vitor A P; Schaap, Peter J; Peters, Sander A; Hippler, Michael

    2017-09-01

    In contrast to mammals and vascular plants, microalgae show a high diversity in the N-glycan structures of complex N-glycoproteins. Although homologues for β1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GnTI), a key enzyme in the formation of complex N-glycans, have been identified in several algal species, GnTI-dependent N-glycans have not been detected so far. We have performed an N-glycoproteomic analysis of the hydrocarbon oils accumulating green microalgae Botryococcus braunii. Thereby, the analysis of intact N-glycopeptides allowed the determination of N-glycan compositions. Furthermore, insights into the role of N-glycosylation in B. braunii were gained from functional annotation of the identified N-glycoproteins. In total, 517 unique N-glycosylated peptides have been identified, including intact N-glycopeptides that harbored N-acetylhexosamine (HexNAc) at the nonreducing end. Surprisingly, these GnTI-dependent N-glycans were also found to be modified with (di)methylated hexose. The identification of GnTI-dependent N-glycans in combination with N-glycan methylation in B. braunii revealed an uncommon type of N-glycan processing in this microalgae. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Fluorescent glycosylamides produced by microscale derivatization of free glycans for natural glycan microarrays.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuezheng; Lasanajak, Yi; Xia, Baoyun; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D

    2009-09-18

    A novel strategy for creating naturally derived glycan microarrays has been developed. Glycosylamines are prepared from free reducing glycans and stabilized by reaction with acryloyl chloride to generate a glycosylamide in which the reducing monosaccharide has a closed-ring structure. Ozonolysis of the protected glycan yields an active aldehyde, to which a bifunctional fluorescent linker is coupled by reductive amination. The fluorescent derivatives are easily coupled through a residual primary alkylamine to generate glycan microarrays. This strategy preserves structural features of glycans required for antibody recognition and allows development of natural arrays of fluorescent glycans in which the cyclic pyranose structure of the reducing-end sugar residue is retained.

  9. Fluorescent Glycosylamides Produced by Microscale Derivatization of Free Glycans for Natural Glycan Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Lasanajak, Yi; Xia, Baoyun; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    A novel strategy for creating naturally-derived glycan microarrays has been developed. Glycosylamines are prepared from free reducing glycans and stabilized by reaction with acryloyl chloride to generate a glycosylamide in which the reducing monosaccharide has a closed ring structure. Ozonolysis of the protected glycan yields an active aldehyde, to which a bifunctional fluorescent linker is coupled by reductive amination. The fluorescent derivatives are easily coupled through a residual primary alkylamine to generate glycan microarrays. This strategy preserves structural features of glycans required for antibody recognition, and allows development of natural arrays of fluorescent glycans in which the cyclic pyranose structure of the reducing-end sugar residue is retained. PMID:19618966

  10. Implementation of GlycanBuilder to draw a wide variety of ambiguous glycans.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Shinichiro; Aoki, Nobuyuki P; Shinmachi, Daisuke; Matsubara, Masaaki; Yamada, Issaku; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2017-06-05

    GlyTouCan version 1.0 was released in 2015 as the international glycan structure repository, and a new sequence format called WURCS (Web3 Unique Representation of Carbohydrate Structures) was proposed during the early stages of the GlyTouCan project. GlyTouCan uses WURCS as its base representation for glycans because existing formats were insufficient in their flexibility to represent any and all glycans universally. Therefore, in order to obtain WURCS strings for existing or new glycan structures, conversion tools or glycan structure editors that can export WURCS became necessary. GlycanBuilder was an obvious choice to extend due to its wide usage by the community. However, GlycanBuilder was limited because it was originally developed to support mammalian glycans. It also did not support the newly proposed monosaccharide symbol standard called Symbol Nomenclature for Glycans (SNFG). Therefore in this work, we implemented a new version of GlycanBuilder to greatly increase its usability. The glycan rendering system was refactored so that cyclic glycans, nested repeating units, monosaccharide compositions and cross-linked glycan structures can be represented. Both import and export utilities for WURCS were also implemented and SNFG symbols were incorporated to allow glycans to be exported as graphics using the latest glycan symbol nomenclature. This new version of GlycanBuilder called "GlycanBuilder2", is able to support a wide variety of ambiguous glycans, including structures containing monosaccharides from bacteria and plants. These glycans can also be displayed using the new SNFG symbols. This tool can aid researchers in communicating about the complex, diverse, and ambiguous structures of glycans more rapidly. Moreover, the new GlycanBuilder can now easily output WURCS sequences from glycans drawn on the canvas. Most importantly, because GlyTouCan employs WURCS as the basic format for registration and searching of glycan information, a wider variety of glycans

  11. Comprehensive analysis of the N-glycan biosynthetic pathway using bioinformatics to generate UniCorn: A theoretical N-glycan structure database.

    PubMed

    Akune, Yukie; Lin, Chi-Hung; Abrahams, Jodie L; Zhang, Jingyu; Packer, Nicolle H; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Campbell, Matthew P

    2016-08-05

    Glycan structures attached to proteins are comprised of diverse monosaccharide sequences and linkages that are produced from precursor nucleotide-sugars by a series of glycosyltransferases. Databases of these structures are an essential resource for the interpretation of analytical data and the development of bioinformatics tools. However, with no template to predict what structures are possible the human glycan structure databases are incomplete and rely heavily on the curation of published, experimentally determined, glycan structure data. In this work, a library of 45 human glycosyltransferases was used to generate a theoretical database of N-glycan structures comprised of 15 or less monosaccharide residues. Enzyme specificities were sourced from major online databases including Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Glycan, Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG), Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZy), GlycoGene DataBase (GGDB) and BRENDA. Based on the known activities, more than 1.1 million theoretical structures and 4.7 million synthetic reactions were generated and stored in our database called UniCorn. Furthermore, we analyzed the differences between the predicted glycan structures in UniCorn and those contained in UniCarbKB (www.unicarbkb.org), a database which stores experimentally described glycan structures reported in the literature, and demonstrate that UniCorn can be used to aid in the assignment of ambiguous structures whilst also serving as a discovery database.

  12. Restricted N-glycan Conformational Space in the PDB and Its Implication in Glycan Structure Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Sunhwan; Lee, Hui Sun; Skolnick, Jeffrey; Im, Wonpil

    2013-01-01

    Understanding glycan structure and dynamics is central to understanding protein-carbohydrate recognition and its role in protein-protein interactions. Given the difficulties in obtaining the glycan's crystal structure in glycoconjugates due to its flexibility and heterogeneity, computational modeling could play an important role in providing glycosylated protein structure models. To address if glycan structures available in the PDB can be used as templates or fragments for glycan modeling, we present a survey of the N-glycan structures of 35 different sequences in the PDB. Our statistical analysis shows that the N-glycan structures found on homologous glycoproteins are significantly conserved compared to the random background, suggesting that N-glycan chains can be confidently modeled with template glycan structures whose parent glycoproteins share sequence similarity. On the other hand, N-glycan structures found on non-homologous glycoproteins do not show significant global structural similarity. Nonetheless, the internal substructures of these N-glycans, particularly, the substructures that are closer to the protein, show significantly similar structures, suggesting that such substructures can be used as fragments in glycan modeling. Increased interactions with protein might be responsible for the restricted conformational space of N-glycan chains. Our results suggest that structure prediction/modeling of N-glycans of glycoconjugates using structure database could be effective and different modeling approaches would be needed depending on the availability of template structures. PMID:23516343

  13. Exquisite specificity of mitogenic lectin from Cephalosporium curvulum to core fucosylated N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Shashikala R; Eligar, Sachin M; Ballal, Suhas; Belur, Shivakumar; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Swamy, Bale M

    2016-02-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins that are gaining attention as important tools for the identification of specific glycan markers expressed during different stages of the cancer. We earlier reported the purification of a mitogenic lectin from human pathogenic fungus Cephalosporium curvulum (CSL) that has complex sugar specificity when analysed by hapten inhibition assay. In the present study, we report the fine sugar specificity of CSL as determined by glycan array analysis. The results revealed that CSL has exquisite specificity towards core fucosylated N-glycans. Fucosylated trimannosyl core is the basic structure required for the binding of CSL. The presence of fucose in the side chain further enhances the avidity of CSL towards such glycans. The affinity of CSL is drastically reduced towards the non-core fucosylated glycans, in spite of their side chain fucosylation. CSL showed no binding to the tested O-glycans and monosaccharides. These observations suggest the unique specificity of CSL towards core fucosylated N-glycans, which was further validated by binding of CSL to human colon cancer epithelial and hepatocarcinoma cell lines namely HT29 and HepG2, respectively, that are known to express core fucosylated N-glycans, using AOL and LCA as positive controls. LCA and AOL are fucose specific lectins that are currently being used clinically for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinomas. Most of the gastrointestinal markers express core fucosylated N-glycans. The high affinity and exclusive specificity of CSL towards α1-6 linkage of core fucosylated glycans compared to other fucose specific lectins, makes it a promising molecule that needs to be further explored for its application in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancer.

  14. Vaccine Elicitation of High Mannose-Dependent Neutralizing Antibodies against the V3-Glycan Broadly Neutralizing Epitope in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Kevin O; Nicely, Nathan I; Wiehe, Kevin; Bonsignori, Mattia; Meyerhoff, R Ryan; Parks, Robert; Walkowicz, William E; Aussedat, Baptiste; Wu, Nelson R; Cai, Fangping; Vohra, Yusuf; Park, Peter K; Eaton, Amanda; Go, Eden P; Sutherland, Laura L; Scearce, Richard M; Barouch, Dan H; Zhang, Ruijun; Von Holle, Tarra; Overman, R Glenn; Anasti, Kara; Sanders, Rogier W; Moody, M Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B; Korber, Bette; Desaire, Heather; Santra, Sampa; Letvin, Norman L; Nabel, Gary J; Montefiori, David C; Tomaras, Georgia D; Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S Munir; Danishefsky, Samuel J; Haynes, Barton F

    2017-02-28

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that target HIV-1 envelope (Env) is a goal of HIV-1 vaccine development. A bnAb target is the Env third variable loop (V3)-glycan site. To determine whether immunization could induce antibodies to the V3-glycan bnAb binding site, we repetitively immunized macaques over a 4-year period with an Env expressing V3-high mannose glycans. Env immunizations elicited plasma antibodies that neutralized HIV-1 expressing only high-mannose glycans-a characteristic shared by early bnAb B cell lineage members. A rhesus recombinant monoclonal antibody from a vaccinated macaque bound to the V3-glycan site at the same amino acids as broadly neutralizing antibodies. A structure of the antibody bound to glycan revealed that the three variable heavy-chain complementarity-determining regions formed a cavity into which glycan could insert and neutralized multiple HIV-1 isolates with high-mannose glycans. Thus, HIV-1 Env vaccination induced mannose-dependent antibodies with characteristics of V3-glycan bnAb precursors.

  15. Glycan Engineering for Cell and Developmental Biology

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Matthew E.; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-surface glycans are a diverse class of macromolecules that participate in many key biological processes, including cell-cell communication, development, and disease progression. Thus, the ability to modulate the structures of glycans on cell surfaces provides a powerful means not only to understand fundamental processes but also to direct activity and elicit desired cellular responses. Here, we describe methods to sculpt glycans on cell surfaces and highlight recent successes in which artificially engineered glycans have been employed to control biological outcomes such as the immune response and stem cell fate. PMID:26933739

  16. Glycan Engineering for Cell and Developmental Biology.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Matthew E; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C

    2016-01-21

    Cell-surface glycans are a diverse class of macromolecules that participate in many key biological processes, including cell-cell communication, development, and disease progression. Thus, the ability to modulate the structures of glycans on cell surfaces provides a powerful means not only to understand fundamental processes but also to direct activity and elicit desired cellular responses. Here, we describe methods to sculpt glycans on cell surfaces and highlight recent successes in which artificially engineered glycans have been employed to control biological outcomes such as the immune response and stem cell fate.

  17. HIV-1 Glycan Density Drives the Persistence of the Mannose Patch within an Infected Individual

    PubMed Central

    Coss, Karen P.; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Pritchard, Laura K.; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Glaze, Molly; Madzorera, Sharon; Moore, Penny L.

    2016-01-01

    anti-HIV bnAbs and is therefore under constant pressure from the host immune system, leading to changes in both glycan site frequency and location. This study aimed to determine whether these genetic changes impacted the eventual processing of glycans on the HIV Env and the susceptibility of the virus to neutralization. We show that despite this variation in glycan site positioning and frequency over the course of HIV infection, the mannose patch is a conserved feature throughout, making it a stable target for HIV vaccine design. PMID:27707925

  18. The detection and discovery of glycan motifs in biological samples using lectins and antibodies: new methods and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huiyuan; Hsueh, Peter; Kletter, Doron; Bern, Marshall; Haab, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has uncovered unexpected ways that glycans contribute to biology, as well as new strategies for combatting disease using approaches involving glycans. To make full use of glycans for clinical applications, we need more detailed information on the location, nature, and dynamics of glycan expression in vivo. Such studies require the use of specimens acquired directly from patients. Effective studies of clinical specimens require low-volume assays, high precision measurements, and the ability to process many samples. Assays using affinity reagents-lectins and glycan-binding antibodies-can meet these requirements, but further developments are needed to make the methods routine and effective. Recent advances in the use of glycan-binding proteins involve improved determination of specificity using glycan arrays; the availability of databases for mining and analyzing glycan array data; lectin engineering methods; and the ability to quantitatively interpret lectin measurements. Here, we describe many of the challenges and opportunities involved in the application of these new approaches to the study of biological samples. The new tools hold promise for developing methods to improve the outcomes of patients afflicted with diseases characterized by aberrant glycan expression. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The detection and discovery of glycan motifs in biological samples using lectins and antibodies: new methods and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Huiyuan; Hsueh, Peter; Kletter, Doron; Bern, Marshall; Haab, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Recent research is uncovering unexpected ways that glycans contribute to biology, as well as new strategies for combatting disease using approaches involving glycans. To make full use of glycans for clinical applications, we need more detailed information on the location, nature, and dynamics of glycan expression in vivo. Such studies require the use of specimens acquired directly from patients. Effective studies of clinical specimens require low-volume assays, high precision measurements, and the ability to process many samples. Assays using affinity reagents—lectins and glycan-binding antibodies—can meet these requirements, but further developments are needed to make the methods routine and effective. Recent advances in the use of glycan-binding proteins could meet that need. The advances involve improved determination of specificity using glycan arrays; the availability of databases for mining and analyzing glycan array data; lectin engineering methods; and the ability to quantitatively interpret lectin measurements. Here we describe many of the challenges and opportunities involved in the application of these new approaches to the study of biological samples. The new tools hold promise for developing methods to improve the outcomes of patients afflicted with diseases characterized by aberrant glycan expression. PMID:25727148

  20. Oxidative Release of Natural Glycans for Functional Glycomics

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Ju, Hong; Lasanajak, Yi; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Glycans have essential roles in biology and the etiology of many diseases. A major hurdle in studying glycans through functional glycomics is the lack of methods to release glycans from diverse types of biological samples. Here we describe an elegant yet simple oxidative strategy using household bleach to release all types of free reducing N-glycans and O-glycan-acids from glycoproteins, and glycan nitriles from glycosphingolipids. Released glycans are directly useful in glycomic analyses and can be derivatized fluorescently for functional glycomics. This chemical method overcomes the limitations in glycan generation and promotes archiving and characterization of human and animal glycomes and their functions. PMID:27135973

  1. Oxidative release of natural glycans for functional glycomics.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuezheng; Ju, Hong; Lasanajak, Yi; Kudelka, Matthew R; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    Glycans have essential roles in biology and the etiology of many diseases. A major hurdle in studying glycans through functional glycomics is the lack of methods to release glycans from diverse types of biological samples. Here we describe an oxidative strategy using household bleach to release all types of free reducing N-glycans and O-glycan-acids from glycoproteins, and glycan nitriles from glycosphingolipids. Released glycans are directly useful in glycomic analyses and can be derivatized fluorescently for functional glycomics. This chemical method overcomes the limitations in glycan generation and promotes archiving and characterization of human and animal glycomes and their functions.

  2. Structural basis of glycan specificity in neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant rotavirus

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Czako, Rita; ...

    2015-09-30

    We report that strain-dependent variation of glycan recognition during initial cell attachment of viruses is a critical determinant of host specificity, tissue-tropism and zoonosis. Rotaviruses (RVs), which cause life-threatening gastroenteritis in infants and children, display significant genotype-dependent variations in glycan recognition resulting from sequence alterations in the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4. The structural basis of this genotype-dependent glycan specificity, particularly in human RVs, remains poorly understood. Here, from crystallographic studies, we show how genotypic variations configure a novel binding site in the VP8* of a neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant to uniquely recognize either type I or type IImore » precursor glycans, and to restrict type II glycan binding in the bovine counterpart. In conclusion, such a distinct glycan-binding site that allows differential recognition of the precursor glycans, which are developmentally regulated in the neonate gut and abundant in bovine and human milk provides a basis for age-restricted tropism and zoonotic transmission of G10P[11] rotaviruses.« less

  3. Structural basis of glycan specificity in neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant rotavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Czako, Rita; Sankaran, Banumathi; Yu, Ying; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.; Estes, Mary K.; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.

    2015-09-30

    We report that strain-dependent variation of glycan recognition during initial cell attachment of viruses is a critical determinant of host specificity, tissue-tropism and zoonosis. Rotaviruses (RVs), which cause life-threatening gastroenteritis in infants and children, display significant genotype-dependent variations in glycan recognition resulting from sequence alterations in the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4. The structural basis of this genotype-dependent glycan specificity, particularly in human RVs, remains poorly understood. Here, from crystallographic studies, we show how genotypic variations configure a novel binding site in the VP8* of a neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant to uniquely recognize either type I or type II precursor glycans, and to restrict type II glycan binding in the bovine counterpart. In conclusion, such a distinct glycan-binding site that allows differential recognition of the precursor glycans, which are developmentally regulated in the neonate gut and abundant in bovine and human milk provides a basis for age-restricted tropism and zoonotic transmission of G10P[11] rotaviruses.

  4. Engineering galectin-glycan interactions for immunotherapy and immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Shaheen A; Hudalla, Gregory A

    2016-05-01

    Galectins, a 15-member family of soluble carbohydrate-binding proteins, are receiving increasing interest as therapeutic targets for immunotherapy and immunomodulation due to their role as extracellular signals that regulate innate and adaptive immune cell phenotype and function. However, different galectins can have redundant, synergistic, or antagonistic signaling activity in normal immunological responses, such as resolution of inflammation and induction of antigen-specific tolerance. In addition, certain galectins can be hijacked to promote progression of immunopathologies, such as tumor immune privilege, metastasis, and viral infection, while others can inhibit these processes. Thus, eliciting a desired immunological outcome will likely necessitate therapeutics that can precisely enhance or inhibit particular galectin-glycan interactions. Multivalency is an important determinant of the affinity and specificity of natural galectin-glycan interactions, and is emerging as a key design element for therapeutics that can effectively manipulate galectin bioactivity. This minireview surveys current molecular and biomaterial engineering approaches to create therapeutics that can stabilize galectin multivalency or recapitulate natural glycan multivalency (i.e. "the glycocluster effect"). In particular, we highlight examples of using natural and engineered multivalent galectins for immunosuppression and immune tolerance, with a particular emphasis on treating autoimmune diseases or avoiding transplant rejection. In addition, we present examples of multivalent inhibitors of galectin-glycan interactions to maintain or restore T-cell function, with a particular emphasis on promoting antitumor immunity. Finally, we discuss emerging opportunities to further engineer galectin-glycan interactions for immunotherapy and immunomodulation. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  5. Mucin glycan foraging in the human gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Tailford, Louise E.; Crost, Emmanuelle H.; Kavanaugh, Devon; Juge, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The availability of host and dietary carbohydrates in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a key role in shaping the structure-function of the microbiota. In particular, some gut bacteria have the ability to forage on glycans provided by the mucus layer covering the GI tract. The O-glycan structures present in mucin are diverse and complex, consisting predominantly of core 1-4 mucin-type O-glycans containing α- and β- linked N-acetyl-galactosamine, galactose and N-acetyl-glucosamine. These core structures are further elongated and frequently modified by fucose and sialic acid sugar residues via α1,2/3/4 and α2,3/6 linkages, respectively. The ability to metabolize these mucin O-linked oligosaccharides is likely to be a key factor in determining which bacterial species colonize the mucosal surface. Due to their proximity to the immune system, mucin-degrading bacteria are in a prime location to influence the host response. However, despite the growing number of bacterial genome sequences available from mucin degraders, our knowledge on the structural requirements for mucin degradation by gut bacteria remains fragmented. This is largely due to the limited number of functionally characterized enzymes and the lack of studies correlating the specificity of these enzymes with the ability of the strain to degrade and utilize mucin and mucin glycans. This review focuses on recent findings unraveling the molecular strategies used by mucin-degrading bacteria to utilize host glycans, adapt to the mucosal environment, and influence human health. PMID:25852737

  6. N-linked glycans of the human insulin receptor and their distribution over the crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Lindsay G; Lawrence, Michael C; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Strike, Phillip M; Robinson, Christine P; McKern, Neil M; Ward, Colin W

    2008-04-01

    The human insulin receptor (IR) homodimer is heavily glycosylated and contains a total of 19 predicted N-linked glycosylation sites in each monomer. The recent crystal structure of the IR ectodomain shows electron density consistent with N-linked glycosylation at the majority of sites present in the construct. Here, we describe a refined structure of the IR ectodomain that incorporates all of the N-linked glycans and reveals the extent to which the attached glycans mask the surface of the IR dimer from interaction with antibodies or other potential therapeutic binding proteins. The usefulness of Fab complexation in the crystallization of heavily glycosylated proteins is also discussed. The compositions of the glycans on IR expressed in CHO-K1 cells and the glycosylation deficient Lec8 cell line were determined by protease digestion, glycopeptide purification, amino acid sequence analysis, and mass spectrometry. Collectively the data reveal: multiple species of complex glycan at residues 25, 255, 295, 418, 606, 624, 742, 755, and 893 (IR-B numbering); multiple species of high-mannose glycan at residues 111 and 514; a single species of complex glycan at residue 671; and a single species of high-mannose glycan at residue 215. Residue 16 exhibited a mixture of complex, hybrid, and high-mannose glycan species. Of the remaining five predicted N-linked sites, those at residues 397 and 906 were confirmed by amino acid sequencing to be glycosylated, while that at residue 78 and the atypical (NKC) site at residue 282 were not glycosylated. The peptide containing the final site at residue 337 was not recovered but is seen to be glycosylated in the electron density maps of the IR ectodomain. The model of the fully glycosylated IR reveals that the sites carrying high-mannose glycans lie at positions of relatively low steric accessibility.

  7. Assessment of glycan interactions of clinical and avian isolates of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Campylobacter jejuni strain 11168 was demonstrated to have a broad specificity for eukaryotic surface glycosylation using glycan array analysis. The initial screen indicated that sialic acid and mannose are important binding partners after environmental stress, while galactose and fucose structures are likely to be involved in persistent infection. Results In this broader study, five additional human/clinical isolates and six chicken isolates were fully assessed to determine their glycan binding capacity using an extended glycan array. C. jejuni 11168 was rescreened here due to the presence of glycoaminoglycan (GAG) and other structures that were not available on our previous glycan array. The current array analysis of additional C. jejuni strains confirmed the growth condition dependent differences in glycan binding that was previously observed for C. jejuni 11168. We noted strain to strain variations, particularly for the human isolates C. jejuni 520 and 81116 and the chicken isolate C. jejuni 331, with the majority of differences observed in galactose, mannose and GAG binding. Chicken isolates were found to bind to a broader range of glycans compared to the human isolates, recognising branched mannose and carageenan (red seaweed) glycans. Glycan array data was confirmed using cell-based lectin inhibition assays with the fucose (UEA-I) and mannose (ConA) binding lectins. Conclusions This study confirms that all C. jejuni strains tested bind to a broad range of glycans, with the majority of strains (all except 81116) altering recognition of sialic acid and mannose after environmental stress. Galactose and fucose structures were bound best by all strains when C. jejuni was grown under host like conditions confirming the likelihood of these structures being involved in persistent infection. PMID:24119179

  8. Glycans in the immune system and The Altered Glycan Theory of Autoimmunity: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Maverakis, Emanual; Kim, Kyoungmi; Shimoda, Michiko; Gershwin, M Eric; Patel, Forum; Wilken, Reason; Raychaudhuri, Siba; Ruhaak, L Renee; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2015-02-01

    Herein we will review the role of glycans in the immune system. Specific topics covered include: the glycosylation sites of IgE, IgM, IgD, IgE, IgA, and IgG; how glycans can encode "self" identity by functioning as either danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or self-associated molecular patterns (SAMPs); the role of glycans as markers of protein integrity and age; how the glycocalyx can dictate the migration pattern of immune cells; and how the combination of Fc N-glycans and Ig isotype dictate the effector function of immunoglobulins. We speculate that the latter may be responsible for the well-documented association between alterations of the serum glycome and autoimmunity. Due to technological limitations, the extent of these autoimmune-associated glycan alterations and their role in disease pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated. Thus, we also review the current technologies available for glycan analysis, placing an emphasis on Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM), a rapid high-throughput technology that has great potential for glycan biomarker research. Finally, we put forth The Altered Glycan Theory of Autoimmunity, which states that each autoimmune disease will have a unique glycan signature characterized by the site-specific relative abundances of individual glycan structures on immune cells and extracellular proteins, especially the site-specific glycosylation patterns of the different immunoglobulin(Ig) classes and subclasses.

  9. Improved method for drawing of a glycan map, and the first page of glycan atlas, which is a compilation of glycan maps for a whole organism.

    PubMed

    Natsuka, Shunji; Masuda, Mayumi; Sumiyoshi, Wataru; Nakakita, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Glycan Atlas is a set of glycan maps over the whole body of an organism. The glycan map that includes data of glycan structure and quantity displays micro-heterogeneity of the glycans in a tissue, an organ, or cells. The two-dimensional glycan mapping is widely used for structure analysis of N-linked oligosaccharides on glycoproteins. In this study we developed a comprehensive method for the mapping of both N- and O-glycans with and without sialic acid. The mapping data of 150 standard pyridylaminated glycans were collected. The empirical additivity rule which was proposed in former reports was able to adapt for this extended glycan map. The adapted rule is that the elution time of pyridylamino glycans on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is expected to be the simple sum of the partial elution times assigned to each monosaccharide residue. The comprehensive mapping method developed in this study is a powerful tool for describing the micro-heterogeneity of the glycans. Furthermore, we prepared 42 pyridylamino (PA-) glycans from human serum and were able to draw the map of human serum N- and O-glycans as an initial step of Glycan Atlas editing.

  10. GlycoBase and autoGU: resources for interpreting HPLC-glycan data.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Matthew P; Royle, Lousie; Rudd, Pauline M

    2015-01-01

    The biological relevance of protein glycosylation has made glycomics, the comprehensive study to identify all glycans in an organism, indispensable in many research fields. Determining the structure and functional relationship of glycoproteins requires the comprehensive characterization of glycan structures by a range of analytical methods. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a well-established technology commonly used for the complete structural elucidation of N- and O-linked glycans; however, the analysis of data is a major bottleneck and robust bioinformatic solutions are required. This chapter describes the availability of databases and tools, GlycoBase and autoGU developed in conjunction with the EUROCarbDB initiative, to assist the interpretation of HPLC-glycan data collections.

  11. Recognition of Microbial Glycans by Human Intelectin

    PubMed Central

    Wesener, Darryl A.; Wangkanont, Kittikhun; McBride, Ryan; Song, Xuezheng; Kraft, Matthew B.; Hodges, Heather L.; Zarling, Lucas C.; Splain, Rebecca A.; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.; Paulson, James C.; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    The glycans displayed on mammalian cells can differ markedly from those on microbes. Such differences could, in principle, be read by carbohydrate-binding proteins, or lectins. We used glycan microarrays to show that human intelectin-1 (hIntL-1) does not bind known human glycan epitopes but interacts with multiple glycan epitopes found exclusively on microbes: β-linked d-galactofuranose (β-Galf), d-phospho-glycerol-modified glycans, heptoses, d-glycero-d-talo-oct-2-ulosonic acid (KO) and 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct–2-ulosonic acid (KDO). The 1.6 Å resolution crystal structure of hIntL-1 bound to β-Galf revealed that hIntL-1 uses a bound calcium ion to coordinate terminal exocyclic 1,2-diols. N-Acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), a sialic acid widespread in human glycans, possesses an exocyclic 1,2-diol but does not bind hInt-1, likely due to unfavorable steric and electronic effects. Human IntL-1 marks only Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes that display surface glycans with terminal 1,2-diol groups. This ligand selectivity suggests hIntL-1 functions in microbial surveillance. PMID:26148048

  12. Pyroglutamate and O-linked glycan determine functional production of anti-IL17A and anti-IL22 peptide-antibody bispecific genetic fusions.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaotian; Kieras, Elizabeth; Sousa, Eric; D'Antona, Aaron; Baber, J Christian; He, Tao; Desharnais, Joel; Wood, Lauren; Luxenberg, Deborah; Stahl, Mark; Kriz, Ronald; Lin, Laura; Somers, Will; Fitz, Lori J; Wright, Jill F

    2013-01-11

    Protein biosynthesis and extracellular secretion are essential biological processes for therapeutic protein production in mammalian cells, which offer the capacity for correct folding and proper post-translational modifications. In this study, we have generated bispecific therapeutic fusion proteins in mammalian cells by combining a peptide and an antibody into a single open reading frame. A neutralizing peptide directed against interleukin-17A (IL17A) was genetically fused to the N termini of an anti-IL22 antibody, through either the light chain, the heavy chain, or both chains. Although the resulting fusion proteins bound and inhibited IL22 with the same affinity and potency as the unmodified anti-IL22 antibody, the peptide modality in the fusion scaffold was not active in the cell-based assay due to the N-terminal degradation. When a glutamine residue was introduced at the N terminus, which can be cyclized to form pyroglutamate in mammalian cells, the IL17A neutralization activity of the fusion protein was restored. Interestingly, the mass spectroscopic analysis of the purified fusion protein revealed an unexpected O-linked glycosylation modification at threonine 5 of the anti-IL17A peptide. The subsequent removal of this post-translational modification by site-directed mutagenesis drastically enhanced the IL17A binding affinity and neutralization potency for the resulting fusion protein. These results provide direct experimental evidence that post-translational modifications during protein biosynthesis along secretory pathways play critical roles in determining the structure and function of therapeutic proteins produced by mammalian cells. The newly engineered peptide-antibody genetic fusion is promising for therapeutically targeting multiple antigens in a single antibody-like molecule.

  13. Novel Fluorescent Glycan Microarray Strategy Reveals Ligands for Galectins

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Xia, Baoyun; Stowell, Sean R.; Lasanajak, Yi; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Galectin-1 (Gal-1) and galectin-3 (Gal-3) are widely expressed galectins with immunoregulatory functions in animals. To explore their glycan specificity, we developed microarrays of naturally occurring glycans using a novel bifunctional fluorescent linker, 2-amino-N-(2-aminoethyl)-benzamide (AEAB), directly conjugated through its arylamine group by reductive amination to free glycans to form glycan-AEABs (GAEABs). Glycans from natural sources were used to prepare over 200 GAEABs, which were purified by multidimensional HPLC and covalently immobilized onto NHS-activated glass slides via their free alkylamine. Fluorescence-based screening demonstrated that Gal-1 recognizes a wide variety of complex N-glycans, whereas Gal-3 primarily recognizes poly-N-acetyllactosamine-containing glycans independent of N-glycan presentation. GAEABs provide a general solution to glycan microarray preparation from natural sources for defining the specificity of glycan-binding proteins. PMID:19171304

  14. Differentiation of cancer cell origin and molecular subtype by plasma membrane N-glycan profiling.

    PubMed

    Hua, Serenus; Saunders, Mary; Dimapasoc, Lauren M; Jeong, Seung Hyup; Kim, Bum Jin; Kim, Suhee; So, Minkyung; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Kim, Jae Han; Lam, Kit S; Lebrilla, Carlito B; An, Hyun Joo

    2014-02-07

    In clinical settings, biopsies are routinely used to determine cancer type and grade based on tumor cell morphology, as determined via histochemical or immunohistochemical staining. Unfortunately, in a significant number of cases, traditional biopsy results are either inconclusive or do not provide full subtype differentiation, possibly leading to inefficient or ineffective treatment. Glycomic profiling of the cell membrane offers an alternate route toward cancer diagnosis. In this study, isomer-sensitive nano-LC/MS was used to directly obtain detailed profiles of the different N-glycan structures present on cancer cell membranes. Membrane N-glycans were extracted from cells representing various subtypes of breast, lung, cervical, ovarian, and lymphatic cancer. Chip-based porous graphitized carbon nano-LC/MS was used to separate, identify, and quantify the native N-glycans. Structure-sensitive N-glycan profiling identified hundreds of glycan peaks per cell line, including multiple isomers for most compositions. Hierarchical clusterings based on Pearson correlation coefficients were used to quickly compare and separate each cell line according to originating organ and disease subtype. Based simply on the relative abundances of broad glycan classes (e.g., high mannose, complex/hybrid fucosylated, complex/hybrid sialylated, etc.), most cell lines were readily differentiated. More closely related cell lines were differentiated based on several-fold differences in the abundances of individual glycans. Based on characteristic N-glycan profiles, primary cancer origins and molecular subtypes could be distinguished. These results demonstrate that stark differences in cancer cell membrane glycosylation can be exploited to create an MS-based biopsy, with potential applications toward cancer diagnosis and direction of treatment.

  15. Plant-type N-glycans containing fucose and xylose in Bryophyta (mosses) and Tracheophyta (ferns).

    PubMed

    Mega, Tomohiro

    2007-12-01

    The presence of typical plant-type N-glycans (eg, M3FX, Gn2M3FX, and Le(a)2M3FX) in mosses, ferns, and other organisms was examined to determine which plant initially acquired glycosyltransferases to produce plant-type N-glycans during organic evolution. No M3FX-type N-glycan was detected in lichens (Cladonia humilis) or in any one of the three preland plants Enteromorpha prolifera, Ulva pertusa Kjellman, and Chara braunii Gmelin. In Bryophyta, M3FX-type N-glycan was detected at trace amounts in Anthocerotopsida (hornworts) and at certain amounts in Bryopsida (mosses), but not in Hepaticopsida (liverworts). Le(a)2M3FX was detected in some Bryopsida of relatively high M3FX content. Most Tracheophyta (ferns and higher plants) contained the three typical M3FX-type glycans as the main N-glycans in different ratios. These results suggest that organisms acquired xylosyltransferase and fucosyltransferase during the development of mosses from liverworts, and that later all plants retained both enzymes. Bryopsida have also obtained galactosyltransferase and fucosyltransferase to synthesize the Le(a) antigen.

  16. N-Linked Glycan Profiling of Mature Human Milk by High Performance Microfluidic Chip Liquid Chromatography Time-of-Flight Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C.; Martin, William F.; Strum, John S.; Zivkovic, Angela M.; Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Underwood, Mark A.; Affolter, Michael; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; German, J. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    N-linked glycans of skim human milk proteins were determined for three mothers. N-linked glycans are linked to immune defense, cell growth, and cell-cell adhesion, but their functions in human milk are undetermined. Protein-bound N-linked glycans were released with Peptidyl N-glycosidase F (PNGase F), enriched by graphitized carbon chromatography and analyzed with Chip-TOF MS. To be defined as N-glycans, compounds were required, in all three procedural replicates, to match, within 6 ppm, against a theoretical human N-glycan library, be at least two-fold higher in abundance in PNGase F-treated than in control samples. Fifty-two N-linked glycan compositions were identified and 24 were confirmed via tandem mass spectra analysis. Twenty-seven compositions have been found previously in human milk and 25 are novel compositions. By abundance, 84% of N-glycans were fucosylated and 47% were sialylated. The majority (70%) of total N-glycan abundance was comprised of N-glycans found in all three milk samples. PMID:21384928

  17. Serum Aberrant N-Glycan Profile as a Marker Associated with Early Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Patients Receiving a Living Donor Kidney Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Tobisawa, Yuki; Mori, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Koie, Takuya; Tanaka, Masakazu; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Sasaki, Hideo; Saito, Mitsuru; Harada, Hiroshi; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Satoh, Shigeru; Ohyama, Chikara

    2017-01-01

    We determined if the serum N-glycan profile can be used as a diagnostic marker of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in living donor kidney transplant (LKTx) recipients. Glycoblotting, combined with mass spectrometry, was used to retrospectively examine N-glycan levels in the postoperative sera of 197 LKTx recipients of whom 16 recipients had ABMR with or without T-cell-mediated rejection (TCMR), 40 recipients had TCMR, and 141 recipients had no adverse events. Multivariate discriminant analysis for prediction of ABMR was performed by inputting an ABMR event as an explanatory variable and sex, age, and serum N-glycan level as objective variables. The N-glycan score was calculated by multiplying the level of candidate objective variables by objective function values. The ABMR predictive performance of the N-glycan score was assessed by receiver operator characteristic curve and Kaplan–Meier curve analyses. The N-glycan score discriminated ABMR with 81.25% sensitivity, 87.85% specificity, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.892 that was far superior to that of preformed donor-specific antibody status (AUC, 0.761). Recipients with N-glycan-positive scores >0.8770 had significantly shorter ABMR survival than that of recipients with N-glycan-negative scores. Although the limitations of our study includ its small sample size and retrospective nature, the serum N-glycan score may contribute to prediction of ABMR. PMID:28786963

  18. Serum Aberrant N-Glycan Profile as a Marker Associated with Early Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Patients Receiving a Living Donor Kidney Transplant.

    PubMed

    Noro, Daisuke; Yoneyama, Tohru; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Tobisawa, Yuki; Mori, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Koie, Takuya; Tanaka, Masakazu; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Sasaki, Hideo; Saito, Mitsuru; Harada, Hiroshi; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Satoh, Shigeru; Ohyama, Chikara

    2017-08-08

    We determined if the serum N-glycan profile can be used as a diagnostic marker of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in living donor kidney transplant (LKTx) recipients. Glycoblotting, combined with mass spectrometry, was used to retrospectively examine N-glycan levels in the postoperative sera of 197 LKTx recipients of whom 16 recipients had ABMR with or without T-cell-mediated rejection (TCMR), 40 recipients had TCMR, and 141 recipients had no adverse events. Multivariate discriminant analysis for prediction of ABMR was performed by inputting an ABMR event as an explanatory variable and sex, age, and serum N-glycan level as objective variables. The N-glycan score was calculated by multiplying the level of candidate objective variables by objective function values. The ABMR predictive performance of the N-glycan score was assessed by receiver operator characteristic curve and Kaplan-Meier curve analyses. The N-glycan score discriminated ABMR with 81.25% sensitivity, 87.85% specificity, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.892 that was far superior to that of preformed donor-specific antibody status (AUC, 0.761). Recipients with N-glycan-positive scores >0.8770 had significantly shorter ABMR survival than that of recipients with N-glycan-negative scores. Although the limitations of our study includ its small sample size and retrospective nature, the serum N-glycan score may contribute to prediction of ABMR.

  19. Notable Aspects of Glycan-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    This mini review highlights several interesting aspects of glycan-mediated interactions that are common between cells, bacteria, and viruses. Glycans are ubiquitously found on all living cells, and in the extracellular milieu of multicellular organisms. They are known to mediate initial binding and recognition events of both immune cells and pathogens with their target cells or tissues. The host target tissues are hidden under a layer of secreted glycosylated decoy targets. In addition, pathogens can utilize and display host glycans to prevent identification as foreign by the host’s immune system (molecular mimicry). Both the host and pathogens continually evolve. The host evolves to prevent infection and the pathogens evolve to evade host defenses. Many pathogens express both glycan-binding proteins and glycosidases. Interestingly, these proteins are often located at the tip of elongated protrusions in bacteria, or in the leading edge of the cell. Glycan-protein interactions have low affinity and, as a result, multivalent interactions are often required to achieve biologically relevant binding. These enable dynamic forms of adhesion mechanisms, reviewed here, and include rolling (cells), stick and roll (bacteria) or surfacing (viruses). PMID:26340640

  20. Generation of a Natural Glycan Microarray Using 9-Fluorenylmethyl Chloroformate (FmocCl) as a Cleavable Fluorescent Tag

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Lasanajak, Yi; Rivera-Marrero, Carlos; Luyai, Anthony; Willard, Margaret; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Glycan microarray technology has become a successful tool for studying protein-carbohydrate interactions, but a limitation has been the laborious synthesis of glycan structures by enzymatic and chemical methods. Here we describe a new method to generate quantifiable glycan libraries from natural sources by combining widely used protease digestion of glycoproteins and Fmoc chemistry. Glycoproteins including chicken ovalbumin, bovine fetuin, and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were digested by pronase, protected by FmocCl, and efficiently separated by 2D-HPLC. We show that glycans from HRP glycopeptides separated by HPLC and fluorescence monitoring retained their natural reducing end structures, mostly core α1,3-fucose and core α1,2-xylose. After simple Fmoc-deprotection, the glycans were printed on NHS-activated glass slides. The glycans were interrogated using plant lectins and antibodies in sera from mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni, which revealed the presence of both IgM and IgG antibody responses to HRP-glycopeptides. This simple approach to glycopeptide purification and conjugation allows for the development of natural glycopeptide microarrays without the need to remove and derivatize glycans and potentially compromise their reducing end determinants. PMID:19699706

  1. Generation of a natural glycan microarray using 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (FmocCl) as a cleavable fluorescent tag.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuezheng; Lasanajak, Yi; Rivera-Marrero, Carlos; Luyai, Anthony; Willard, Margaret; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D

    2009-12-15

    Glycan microarray technology has become a successful tool for studying protein-carbohydrate interactions, but a limitation has been the laborious synthesis of glycan structures by enzymatic and chemical methods. Here we describe a new method to generate quantifiable glycan libraries from natural sources by combining widely used protease digestion of glycoproteins and Fmoc chemistry. Glycoproteins including chicken ovalbumin, bovine fetuin, and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were digested by Pronase, protected by FmocCl, and efficiently separated by 2D-HPLC. We show that glycans from HRP glycopeptides separated by HPLC and fluorescence monitoring retained their natural reducing end structures, mostly core alpha1,3-fucose and core alpha1,2-xylose. After simple Fmoc deprotection, the glycans were printed on NHS-activated glass slides. The glycans were interrogated using plant lectins and antibodies in sera from mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni, which revealed the presence of both IgM and IgG antibody responses to HRP glycopeptides. This simple approach to glycopeptide purification and conjugation allows for the development of natural glycopeptide microarrays without the need to remove and derivatize glycans and potentially compromise their reducing end determinants.

  2. Glycans in Medicinal Chemistry: An Underexploited Resource.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; Cañada, F Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2015-08-01

    The biological relevance of glycans as mediators of key physiological processes, including disease-related mechanisms, makes them attractive targets for a wide range of medical applications. Despite their important biological roles, especially as molecular recognition elements, carbohydrates have not been fully exploited as therapeutics mainly due to the scarcity of structure-activity correlations and their non-drug-like properties. A more detailed understanding of the complex carbohydrate structures and their associated functions should contribute to the development of new glycan-based pharmaceuticals. Recent significant progress in oligosaccharide synthesis and chemical glycobiology has renewed the interest of the medicinal chemistry community in carbohydrates. This promises to increase our possibilities to harness them in drug discovery efforts for the development of new and more effective, synthetic glycan-based therapeutics and vaccines.

  3. The antiviral lectin cyanovirin-N: probing multivalency and glycan recognition through experimental and computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Woodrum, Brian W; Maxwell, Jason D; Bolia, Ashini; Ozkan, S Banu; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2013-10-01

    CVN (cyanovirin-N), a small lectin isolated from cyanobacteria, exemplifies a novel class of anti-HIV agents that act by binding to the highly glycosylated envelope protein gp120 (glycoprotein 120), resulting in inhibition of the crucial viral entry step. In the present review, we summarize recent work in our laboratory and others towards determining the crucial role of multivalency in the antiviral activity, and we discuss features that contribute to the high specificity and affinity for the glycan ligand observed in CVN. An integrated approach that encompasses structural determination, mutagenesis analysis and computational work holds particular promise to clarify aspects of the interactions between CVN and glycans.

  4. The VP8* Domain of Neonatal Rotavirus Strain G10P[11] Binds to Type II Precursor Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Sasirekha; Cortes-Penfield, Nicolas W.; Hu, Liya; Crawford, Sue E.; Czako, Rita; Smith, David F.; Kang, Gagandeep; Ramig, Robert F.; Le Pendu, Jacques; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses with a P[11] VP4 genotype exhibit a tropism for neonates. Interaction of the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4 with sialic acid was thought to be the key mediator for rotavirus infectivity. However, recent studies have indicated a role for nonsialylated glycoconjugates, including histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), in the infectivity of human rotaviruses. We sought to determine if the bovine rotavirus-derived VP8* of a reassortant neonatal G10P[11] virus interacts with hitherto uncharacterized glycans. In an array screen of >600 glycans, VP8* P[11] showed specific binding to glycans with the Galβ1-4GlcNAc motif, which forms the core structure of type II glycans and is the precursor of H type II HBGA. The specificity of glycan binding was confirmed through hemagglutination assays; GST-VP8* P[11] hemagglutinates type O, A, and B red blood cells as well as pooled umbilical cord blood erythrocytes. Further, G10P[11] infectivity was significantly enhanced by the expression of H type II HBGA in CHO cells. The bovine-origin VP4 was confirmed to be essential for this increased infectivity, using laboratory-derived reassortant viruses generated from sialic acid binding rotavirus SA11-4F and a bovine G10P[11] rotavirus, B223. The binding to a core glycan unit has not been reported for any rotavirus VP4. Core glycan synthesis is constitutive in most cell types, and modification of these glycans is thought to be developmentally regulated. These studies provide the first molecular basis for understanding neonatal rotavirus infections, indicating that glycan modification during neonatal development may mediate the age-restricted infectivity of neonatal viruses. PMID:23616650

  5. Modification of the Campylobacter jejuni N-linked glycan by EptC protein-mediated addition of phosphoethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Scott, Nichollas E; Nothaft, Harald; Edwards, Alistair V G; Labbate, Maurizio; Djordjevic, Steven P; Larsen, Martin R; Szymanski, Christine M; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2012-08-24

    Campylobacter jejuni is the major worldwide cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. C. jejuni possesses an extensive repertoire of carbohydrate structures that decorate both protein and non-protein surface-exposed structures. An N-linked glycosylation system encoded by the pgl gene cluster mediates the synthesis of a rigidly conserved heptasaccharide that is attached to protein substrates or released as free oligosaccharide in the periplasm. Removal of N-glycosylation results in reduced virulence and impeded host cell attachment. Since the N-glycan is conserved, the N-glycosylation system is also an attractive option for glycoengineering recombinant vaccines in Escherichia coli. To determine whether non-canonical N-glycans are present in C. jejuni, we utilized high throughput glycoproteomics to characterize C. jejuni JHH1 and identified 93 glycosylation sites, including 34 not previously reported. Interrogation of these data allowed the identification of a phosphoethanolamine (pEtN)-modified variant of the N-glycan that was attached to multiple proteins. The pEtN moiety was attached to the terminal GalNAc of the canonical N-glycan. Deletion of the pEtN transferase eptC removed all evidence of the pEtN-glycan but did not globally influence protein reactivity to patient sera, whereas deletion of the pglB oligosaccharyltransferase significantly reduced reactivity. Transfer of eptC and the pgl gene cluster to E. coli confirmed the addition of the pEtN-glycan to a target C. jejuni protein. Significantly reduced, yet above background levels of pEtN-glycan were also observed in E. coli not expressing eptC, suggesting that endogenous E. coli pEtN transferases can mediate the addition of pEtN to N-glycans. The addition of pEtN must be considered in the context of glycoengineering and may alter C. jejuni glycan-mediated structure-function interactions.

  6. Modification of the Campylobacter jejuni N-Linked Glycan by EptC Protein-mediated Addition of Phosphoethanolamine*

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Nichollas E.; Nothaft, Harald; Edwards, Alistair V. G.; Labbate, Maurizio; Djordjevic, Steven P.; Larsen, Martin R.; Szymanski, Christine M.; Cordwell, Stuart J.

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the major worldwide cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. C. jejuni possesses an extensive repertoire of carbohydrate structures that decorate both protein and non-protein surface-exposed structures. An N-linked glycosylation system encoded by the pgl gene cluster mediates the synthesis of a rigidly conserved heptasaccharide that is attached to protein substrates or released as free oligosaccharide in the periplasm. Removal of N-glycosylation results in reduced virulence and impeded host cell attachment. Since the N-glycan is conserved, the N-glycosylation system is also an attractive option for glycoengineering recombinant vaccines in Escherichia coli. To determine whether non-canonical N-glycans are present in C. jejuni, we utilized high throughput glycoproteomics to characterize C. jejuni JHH1 and identified 93 glycosylation sites, including 34 not previously reported. Interrogation of these data allowed the identification of a phosphoethanolamine (pEtN)-modified variant of the N-glycan that was attached to multiple proteins. The pEtN moiety was attached to the terminal GalNAc of the canonical N-glycan. Deletion of the pEtN transferase eptC removed all evidence of the pEtN-glycan but did not globally influence protein reactivity to patient sera, whereas deletion of the pglB oligosaccharyltransferase significantly reduced reactivity. Transfer of eptC and the pgl gene cluster to E. coli confirmed the addition of the pEtN-glycan to a target C. jejuni protein. Significantly reduced, yet above background levels of pEtN-glycan were also observed in E. coli not expressing eptC, suggesting that endogenous E. coli pEtN transferases can mediate the addition of pEtN to N-glycans. The addition of pEtN must be considered in the context of glycoengineering and may alter C. jejuni glycan-mediated structure-function interactions. PMID:22761430

  7. Exploring the specificities of glycan-binding proteins using glycan array data and the GlycoSearch software.

    PubMed

    Kletter, Doron; Curnutte, Bryan; Maupin, Kevin A; Bern, Marshall; Haab, Brian B

    2015-01-01

    The glycan array is a powerful tool for investigating the specificities of glycan-binding proteins. By incubating a glycan-binding protein on a glycan array, the relative binding to hundreds of different oligosaccharides can be quantified in parallel. Based on these data, much information can be obtained about the preference of a glycan-binding protein for specific subcomponents of oligosaccharides or motifs. In many cases, the analysis and interpretation of glycan array data can be time consuming and imprecise if done manually. Recently we developed software, called GlycoSearch, to facilitate the analysis and interpretation of glycan array data based on the previously developed methods called Motif Segregation and Outlier Motif Analysis. Here we describe the principles behind the software, the use of the software, and an example application. The automated, objective, and precise analysis of glycan array data should enhance the value of the data for a broad range of research applications.

  8. Comparisons of Caenorhabditis Fucosyltransferase Mutants Reveal a Multiplicity of Isomeric N-Glycan Structures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown a remarkable degree of plasticity in the N-glycome of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans; ablation of glycosylation-relevant genes can result in radically altered N-glycan profiles despite only minor biological phenotypic effects. Up to four fucose residues and five different linkages of fucose are known on the N-glycans of C. elegans. Due to the complexity in the wild type, we established three mutant strains defective in two core fucosyltransferases each (fut-1;fut-6, fut-1;fut-8, and fut-6;fut-8). Enzymatically released N-glycans were subject to HPLC and MALDI-TOF MS/MS, in combination with various treatments, to verify structural details. The N-glycome of the fut-1;fut-6 mutant was the most complex of the three double-mutant strains due to the extension of the core α1,6-fucose as well as the presence of fucose on the bisecting galactose. In contrast, maximally two fucoses were found on N-glycans of the fut-1;fut-8 and fut-6;fut-8 strains. The different locations and capping of fucose meant that up to 13 isomeric structures, many highly galactosylated, were determined for some single masses. These data not only show the high variability of the N-glycomic capacity of a “simple” nematode but also exemplify the need for multiple approaches to reveal individual glycan structures within complex invertebrate glycomes. PMID:26538210

  9. Comparisons of Caenorhabditis Fucosyltransferase Mutants Reveal a Multiplicity of Isomeric N-Glycan Structures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shi; Jin, Chunsheng; Wilson, Iain B H; Paschinger, Katharina

    2015-12-04

    Recent studies have shown a remarkable degree of plasticity in the N-glycome of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans; ablation of glycosylation-relevant genes can result in radically altered N-glycan profiles despite only minor biological phenotypic effects. Up to four fucose residues and five different linkages of fucose are known on the N-glycans of C. elegans. Due to the complexity in the wild type, we established three mutant strains defective in two core fucosyltransferases each (fut-1;fut-6, fut-1;fut-8, and fut-6;fut-8). Enzymatically released N-glycans were subject to HPLC and MALDI-TOF MS/MS, in combination with various treatments, to verify structural details. The N-glycome of the fut-1;fut-6 mutant was the most complex of the three double-mutant strains due to the extension of the core α1,6-fucose as well as the presence of fucose on the bisecting galactose. In contrast, maximally two fucoses were found on N-glycans of the fut-1;fut-8 and fut-6;fut-8 strains. The different locations and capping of fucose meant that up to 13 isomeric structures, many highly galactosylated, were determined for some single masses. These data not only show the high variability of the N-glycomic capacity of a "simple" nematode but also exemplify the need for multiple approaches to reveal individual glycan structures within complex invertebrate glycomes.

  10. Analysis of O-glycans as 9-fluorenylmethyl derivatives and its application to the studies on glycan array.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Keita; Hirabayashi, Jun; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2013-03-19

    A method is proposed for the analysis of O-glycans as 9-fluorenylmethyl (Fmoc) derivatives. After releasing the O-glycans from the protein backbone in the presence of ammonia-based media, the glycosylamines thus formed are conveniently labeled with Fmoc-Cl and analyzed by HPLC and MALDI-TOF MS after easy purification. Fmoc labeled O-glycans showed 3.5 times higher sensitivities than those labeled with 2-aminobenzoic acid in fluorescent detection. Various types of O-glycans having sialic acids, fucose, and/or sulfate residues were successfully labeled with Fmoc and analyzed by HPLC and MALDI-TOF MS. The method was applied to the comprehensive analysis of O-glycans expressed on MKN45 cells (human gastric adenocarcinoma). In addition, Fmoc-derivatized O-glycans were easily converted to free hemiacetal or glycosylamine-form glycans that are available for fabrication of glycan array and neoglycoproteins. To demonstrate the availability of our methods, we fabricate the glycan array with Fmoc labeled glycans derived from mucin samples and cancer cells. The model studies using the glycan array showed clear interactions between immobilized glycans and some lectins.

  11. Comparison of orthogonal chromatographic and lectin-affinity microarray methods for glycan profiling of a therapeutic monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Cook, Matthew C; Kaldas, Sherif J; Muradia, Gauri; Rosu-Myles, Michael; Kunkel, Jeremy P

    2015-08-01

    The N-linked glycosylation of four lots of a marketed human therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) was assessed by three orthogonal chromatographic methods and a commercial lectin microarray. For chromatography, the N-glycans were removed enzymatically from the mAbs using PNGase F. Native glycans were determined by HPAEC-PAD using a panel of 21 N-glycan standards and a multi-stage linear gradient eluent profile for sequential analyses of typical neutral and sialylated glycans in one chromatographic run. The monosaccharide contents of these glycans following acid hydrolysis were confirmed by HPAEC-PAD with monosaccharide standards. Glycosylation analysis by HILIC-FD after stoichiometric labelling with two different fluorescent tags (2-AA and 2-AB) enabled direct quantitation. The 2-AA- and 2-AB-labelled versions of the same glycan standard panel yielded distinctive separation profiles suitable for orthogonal identification of mAb glycans. Glycan profiling with the lectin microarray required partial denaturation of the intact mAbs to expose the sequestered Fc N-glycans. Glycosylation fingerprints were obtained using a fluorescently labelled antibody directed against human IgG Fc. Fluorescence intensities from the fingerprints were deconvoluted with a proprietary algorithm to obtain semi-quantitative "glycan structural class" information. Glycosylation analyses of the four mAb lots by these four methods, which separate and detect oligosaccharides according to different principles, provided complementary and corroboratory qualitative and quantitative information. The predominant N-linked structures were core-fucosylated asialo diantennary structures with varying galactosylation. There were also trace amounts of afucosyl and bisected glycans, but no detectable sialylation by any of the four methods. The therapeutic mAb demonstrated a high degree of consistency in the types and amounts of N-linked glycans in the four lots (<6% CV), and between all four analysis methods

  12. Cell Surface Glycan Alterations in Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition Process of Huh7 Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xiaonan; Sun, Chun; Jiang, Kai; Huang, Li; Lu, Yu; Sui, Jingzhe; Qin, Xue; Liu, Yinkun

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Due to recurrence and metastasis, the mortality of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is high. It is well known that the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and glycan of cell surface glycoproteins play pivotal roles in tumor metastasis. The goal of this study was to identify HCC metastasis related differential glycan pattern and their enzymatic basis using a HGF induced EMT model. Methodology HGF was used to induce HCC EMT model. Lectin microarray was used to detect the expression of cell surface glycan and the difference was validated by lectin blot and fluorescence cell lectin-immunochemistry. The mRNA expression levels of glycotransferases were determined by qRT-PCR. Results After HGF treatment, the Huh7 cell lost epithelial characteristics and obtained mesenchymal markers. These changes demonstrated that HGF could induce a typical cell model of EMT. Lectin microarray analysis identified a decreased affinity in seven lectins ACL, BPL, JAC, MPL, PHA-E, SNA, and SBA to the glycan of cell surface glycoproteins. This implied that glycan containing T/Tn-antigen, NA2 and bisecting GlcNAc, Siaα2-6Gal/GalNAc, terminal α or βGalNAc structures were reduced. The binding ability of thirteen lectins, AAL, LCA, LTL, ConA, NML, NPL, DBA, HAL, PTL II, WFL, ECL, GSL II and PHA-L to glycan were elevated, and a definite indication that glycan containing terminal αFuc and ± Sia-Le, core fucose, α-man, gal-β(α) GalNAc, β1,6 GlcNAc branching and tetraantennary complex oligosaccharides structures were increased. These results were further validated by lectin blot and fluorescence cell lectin-immunochemistry. Furthermore, the mRNA expression level of Mgat3 decreased while that of Mgat5, FucT8 and β3GalT5 increased. Therefore, cell surface glycan alterations in the EMT process may coincide with the expression of glycosyltransferase. Conclusions The findings of this study systematically clarify the alterations of cell surface glycan in cancer EMT, and

  13. Substrate recognition and catalysis by GH47 α-mannosidases involved in Asn-linked glycan maturation in the mammalian secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yong; Karaveg, Khanita; Moremen, Kelley W.

    2016-01-01

    Maturation of Asn-linked oligosaccharides in the eukaryotic secretory pathway requires the trimming of nascent glycan chains to remove all glucose and several mannose residues before extension into complex-type structures on the cell surface and secreted glycoproteins. Multiple glycoside hydrolase family 47 (GH47) α-mannosidases, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) α-mannosidase I (ERManI) and Golgi α-mannosidase IA (GMIA), are responsible for cleavage of terminal α1,2-linked mannose residues to produce uniquely trimmed oligomannose isomers that are necessary for ER glycoprotein quality control and glycan maturation. ERManI and GMIA have similar catalytic domain structures, but each enzyme cleaves distinct residues from tribranched oligomannose glycan substrates. The structural basis for branch-specific cleavage by ERManI and GMIA was explored by replacing an essential enzyme-bound Ca2+ ion with a lanthanum (La3+) ion. This ion swap led to enzyme inactivation while retaining high-affinity substrate interactions. Cocrystallization of La3+-bound enzymes with Man9GlcNAc2 substrate analogs revealed enzyme–substrate complexes with distinct modes of glycan branch insertion into the respective enzyme active-site clefts. Both enzymes had glycan interactions that extended across the entire glycan structure, but each enzyme engaged a different glycan branch and used different sets of glycan interactions. Additional mutagenesis and time-course studies of glycan cleavage probed the structural basis of enzyme specificity. The results provide insights into the enzyme catalytic mechanisms and reveal structural snapshots of the sequential glycan cleavage events. The data also indicate that full steric access to glycan substrates determines the efficiency of mannose-trimming reactions that control the conversion to complex-type structures in mammalian cells. PMID:27856750

  14. Global Comparisons of Lectin–Glycan Interactions Using a Database of Analyzed Glycan Array Data*

    PubMed Central

    Kletter, Doron; Singh, Sudhir; Bern, Marshall; Haab, Brian B.

    2013-01-01

    Lectin–glycan interactions have critical functions in multiple normal and pathological processes, but the binding partners and functions for many glycans and lectins are not known. An important step in better understanding glycan–lectin biology is enabling systematic quantification and analysis of the interactions. Glycan arrays can provide the experimental information for such analyses, and the thousands of glycan array datasets available through the Consortium for Functional Glycomics provide the opportunity to extend the analyses to a broad scale. We developed software, based on our previously described Motif Segregation algorithm, for the automated analysis of glycan array data, and we analyzed the entire storehouse of 2883 datasets from the Consortium for Functional Glycomics. We mined the resulting database to make comparisons of specificities across multiple lectins and comparisons between glycans in their lectin receptors. Of the lectins in the database, viral lectins were the most different from other organism types, with specificities nearly always restricted to sialic acids, and mammalian lectins had the most diverse range of specificities. Certain mammalian lectins were unique in their specificities for sulfated glycans. Simple modifications to a lactosamine core structure radically altered the types of lectins that were highly specific for the glycan. Unmodified lactosamine was specifically recognized by plant, fungal, viral, and mammalian lectins; sialylation shifted the binding mainly to viral lectins; and sulfation resulted in mainly mammalian lectins with the highest specificities. We anticipate that this analysis program and database will be valuable in fundamental glycobiology studies, detailed analyses of lectin specificities, and practical applications in translational research. PMID:23399549

  15. Modulation of Cellular Tropism and Innate Antiviral Response by Viral Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Kristin M.; Heise, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are a significant cause of human and animal disease worldwide. Multiple interactions between virus and the host innate immune system ultimately determine the pathogenesis and clinical outcome of the infection. Evidence is rapidly emerging that suggests viral glycans play a key role in viral pathogenesis by regulating host cell tropism and interactions with the host innate immune response. Glycan-mediated interactions are especially important for arboviruses which must adapt to variable glycosylation systems and cellular receptors within both vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. This review focuses on emerging evidence which supports a crucial role for viral glycans in mediating host cell tropism and regulating the innate antiviral response. PMID:20375598

  16. Solution structure of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchor glycan of Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Homans, S.W.; Edge, C.J.; Ferguson, M.A.J.; Dwek, R.A.; Rademacher, T.W. )

    1989-04-04

    The average solution conformation of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) membrane anchor of Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) has been determined by using a combination of two-dimensional {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H NMR methods together with molecular orbital calculations and restrained molecular dynamics simulations. This allows the generation of a model to describe the orientation of the glycan with respect to the membrane. This shows that the glycan exists in an extended configuration along the plane of the membrane and spans an area of 600 {angstrom}{sup 2}, which is similar to the cross-sectional area of a monomeric N-terminal VSG domain. Taken together, these observations suggest a possible space-filling role for the GPI anchor that may maintain the integrity of the VSG coat. The potential importance of the GPI glycan as a chemotherapeutic target is discussed in light of these observations.

  17. Glycotherapy: New Advances Inspire a Reemergence of Glycans in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hudak, Jason E.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2014-01-01

    The beginning of the 20th century marked the dawn of modern medicine with glycan-based therapies at the forefront. However, glycans quickly became overshadowed as DNA- and protein-focused treatments became readily accessible. The recent development of new tools and techniques to study and produce structurally defined carbohydrates has spurred renewed interest in the therapeutic applications of glycans. This review focuses on advances within the past decade that are bringing glycan-based treatments back to the forefront of medicine and the technologies that are driving these efforts. These include the use of glycans themselves as therapeutic molecules as well as engineering protein and cell surface glycans to suit clinical applications. Glycan therapeutics offer a rich and promising frontier for developments in the academic, biopharmaceutical, and medical fields. PMID:24269151

  18. Regulation of glycan structures in murine embryonic stem cells: combined transcript profiling of glycan-related genes and glycan structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Nairn, Alison V; Aoki, Kazuhiro; dela Rosa, Mitche; Porterfield, Mindy; Lim, Jae-Min; Kulik, Michael; Pierce, J Michael; Wells, Lance; Dalton, Stephen; Tiemeyer, Michael; Moremen, Kelley W

    2012-11-02

    The abundance and structural diversity of glycans on glycoproteins and glycolipids are highly regulated and play important roles during vertebrate development. Because of the challenges associated with studying glycan regulation in vertebrate embryos, we have chosen to study mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as they differentiate into embryoid bodies (EBs) or into extraembryonic endodermal (ExE) cells as a model for cellular differentiation. We profiled N- and O-glycan structures isolated from these cell populations and examined transcripts encoding the corresponding enzymatic machinery for glycan biosynthesis in an effort to probe the mechanisms that drive the regulation of glycan diversity. During differentiation from mouse ES cells to either EBs or ExE cells, general trends were detected. The predominance of high mannose N-glycans in ES cells shifted to an equal abundance of complex and high mannose structures, increased sialylation, and increased α-Gal termination in the differentiated cell populations. Whereas core 1 O-glycan structures predominated in all three cell populations, increased sialylation and increased core diversity characterized the O-glycans of both differentiated cell types. Increased polysialylation was also found in both differentiated cell types. Differences between the two differentiated cell types included greater sialylation of N-glycans in EBs, whereas α-Gal-capped structures were more prevalent in ExE cells. Changes in glycan structures generally, but not uniformly, correlated with alterations in transcript abundance for the corresponding biosynthetic enzymes, suggesting that transcriptional regulation contributes significantly to the regulation of glycan expression. Knowledge of glycan structural diversity and transcript regulation should provide greater understanding of the roles of protein glycosylation in vertebrate development.

  19. Kinetic characterization of a novel endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase on concentrated bovine colostrum whey to release bioactive glycans

    PubMed Central

    Karav, Sercan; Le Parc, Annabelle; de Moura Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega; Rouquié, Camille; Mills, David A.; Barile, Daniela; Block, David E.

    2016-01-01

    EndoBI-1 is a recently isolated endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase, which cleaves the N-N′-diacetyl chitobiose moiety found in the N-glycan core of high mannose, hybrid and complex N-glycans. These N-glycans have selective prebiotic activity for a key infant gut microbe, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis. The broad specificity of EndoBI-1 suggests the enzyme may be useful for many applications, particularly for deglycosylating milk glycoproteins in dairy processing. To facilitate its commercial use, we determined kinetic parameters for EndoBI-1 on the model substrates ribonuclease B and bovine lactoferrin, as well as on concentrated bovine colostrum whey. Km values ranging from 0.25 to 0.49, 0.43 to 1.00 and 0.90 to 3.18 mg/mL and Vmax values ranging from 3.5 × 10−3 to 5.09 × 10−3, 4.5 × 10−3 to 7.75 × 10−3 and 1.9 × 10−2 to 5.2 × 10−2 mg/mL × min were determined for ribonuclease B, lactoferrin and whey, respectively. In general, EndoBI-1 showed the highest apparent affinity for ribonuclease B, while the maximum reaction rate was the highest for concentrated whey. EndoBI-1-released N-glycans were quantified by a phenol-sulphuric total carbohydrate assay and the resultant N-glycan structures monitored by nano-LC-Chip-Q–TOF MS. The kinetic parameters and structural characterization of glycans released suggest EndoBI-1 can facilitate large-scale release of complex, bioactive glycans from a variety of glycoprotein substrates. Moreover, these results suggest that whey, often considered as a waste product, can be used effectively as a source of prebiotic N-glycans. PMID:26138399

  20. Kinetic characterization of a novel endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase on concentrated bovine colostrum whey to release bioactive glycans.

    PubMed

    Karav, Sercan; Parc, Annabelle Le; de Moura Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega; Rouquié, Camille; Mills, David A; Barile, Daniela; Block, David E

    2015-09-01

    EndoBI-1 is a recently isolated endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase, which cleaves the N-N'-diacetyl chitobiose moiety found in the N-glycan core of high mannose, hybrid and complex N-glycans. These N-glycans have selective prebiotic activity for a key infant gut microbe, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis. The broad specificity of EndoBI-1 suggests the enzyme may be useful for many applications, particularly for deglycosylating milk glycoproteins in dairy processing. To facilitate its commercial use, we determined kinetic parameters for EndoBI-1 on the model substrates ribonuclease B and bovine lactoferrin, as well as on concentrated bovine colostrum whey. Km values ranging from 0.25 to 0.49, 0.43 to 1.00 and 0.90 to 3.18 mg/mL and Vmax values ranging from 3.5×10(-3) to 5.09×10(-3), 4.5×10(-3) to 7.75×10(-3) and 1.9×10(-2)to 5.2×10(-2) mg/mL×min were determined for ribonuclease B, lactoferrin and whey, respectively. In general, EndoBI-1 showed the highest apparent affinity for ribonuclease B, while the maximum reaction rate was the highest for concentrated whey. EndoBI-1-released N-glycans were quantified by a phenol-sulphuric total carbohydrate assay and the resultant N-glycan structures monitored by nano-LC-Chip-Q-TOF MS. The kinetic parameters and structural characterization of glycans released suggest EndoBI-1 can facilitate large-scale release of complex, bioactive glycans from a variety of glycoprotein substrates. Moreover, these results suggest that whey, often considered as a waste product, can be used effectively as a source of prebiotic N-glycans.

  1. N-Glycan matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging protocol for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Matthew T; Ho, Yin Ying; Kaur, Gurjeet; Oehler, Martin K; Everest-Dass, Arun V; Packer, Nicolle H; Hoffmann, Peter

    2017-05-30

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) of the proteome of a tissue has been an established technique for the past decade. In the last few years, MALDI-MSI of the N-glycome has emerged as a novel MALDI-MSI technique. To assess the accuracy and clinical significance of the N-linked glycan spatial distribution, we have developed a method that utilises MALDI-MSI followed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) in order to assign glycan structures to the differentiating MALDI-MSI glycan masses released from the tissue glycoproteins. Our workflow presents a comprehensive list of instructions on how to (i) apply MALDI-MSI to spatially map the N-glycome across formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) clinical samples, (ii) structurally characterise N-glycans extracted from consecutive FFPE tissue sections by LC/MS/MS, and (iii) match relevant N-glycan masses from MALDI-MSI with confirmed N-glycan structures determined by LC/MS/MS. Our protocol provides groups that are new to this technique with instructions how to establish N-glycan MALDI-MSI in their laboratory. Furthermore, the method assigns N-glycan structural detail to the masses obtained in the MALDI-MS image. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Deciphering the Glycan Preference of Bacterial Lectins by Glycan Array and Molecular Docking with Validation by Microcalorimetry and Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Topin, Jeremie; Arnaud, Julie; Sarkar, Anita; Audfray, Aymeric; Gillon, Emilie; Perez, Serge; Jamet, Helene; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne; Thomas, Aline

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in glycobiology revealed the essential role of lectins for deciphering the glycocode by specific recognition of carbohydrates. Integrated multiscale approaches are needed for characterizing lectin specificity: combining on one hand high-throughput analysis by glycan array experiments and systematic molecular docking of oligosaccharide libraries and on the other hand detailed analysis of the lectin/oligosaccharide interaction by x-ray crystallography, microcalorimetry and free energy calculations. The lectins LecB from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and BambL from Burkholderia ambifaria are part of the virulence factors used by the pathogenic bacteria to invade the targeted host. These two lectins are not related but both recognize fucosylated oligosaccharides such as the histo-blood group oligosaccharides of the ABH(O) and Lewis epitopes. The specificities were characterized using semi-quantitative data from glycan array and analyzed by molecular docking with the Glide software. Reliable prediction of protein/oligosaccharide structures could be obtained as validated by existing crystal structures of complexes. Additionally, the crystal structure of BambL/Lewis x was determined at 1.6 Å resolution, which confirms that Lewis x has to adopt a high-energy conformation so as to bind to this lectin. Free energies of binding were calculated using a procedure combining the Glide docking protocol followed by free energy rescoring with the Prime/Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-GBSA) method. The calculated data were in reasonable agreement with experimental free energies of binding obtained by titration microcalorimetry. The established predictive protocol is proposed to rationalize large sets of data such as glycan arrays and to help in lead discovery projects based on such high throughput technology. PMID:23976992

  3. IBD-Associated TL1A Gene (TNFSF15) Haplotypes Determine Increased Expression of TL1A Protein

    PubMed Central

    Michelsen, Kathrin S.; Thomas, Lisa S.; Taylor, Kent D.; Yu, Qi T.; Mei, Ling; Landers, Carol J.; Derkowski, Carrie; McGovern, Dermot P. B.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Targan, Stephan R.

    2009-01-01

    Background The recently identified member of the TNF superfamily TL1A (TNFSF15) increases IFN-γ production by T cells in peripheral and mucosal CCR9+ T cells. TL1A and its receptor DR3 are up-regulated during chronic intestinal inflammation in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease (CD). TL1A gene haplotypes increase CD susceptibility in Japanese, European, and US cohorts. Methodology and Principal Findings Here we report that the presence of TL1A gene haplotype B increases risk in Jewish CD patients with antibody titers for the E. coli outer membrane porin C (OmpC+) (Haplotype B frequency in Jewish CD patients: 24.9% for OmpC negative and 41.9% for OmpC positive patients, respectively, P≤0.001). CD14+ monocytes isolated from Jewish OmpC+ patients homozygous for TL1A gene haplotype B express higher levels of TL1A in response to FcγR stimulation, a known inducing pathway of TL1A, as measured by ELISA. Furthermore, the membrane expression of TL1A is increased on peripheral monocytes from Jewish but not non-Jewish CD patients with the risk haplotype. Conclusions and Significance These findings suggest that TL1A gene variation exacerbates induction of TL1A in response to FcγR stimulation in Jewish CD patients and this may lead to chronic intestinal inflammation via overwhelming T cell responses. Thus, TL1A may provide an important target for therapeutic intervention in this subgroup of IBD patients. PMID:19262684

  4. IBD-associated TL1A gene (TNFSF15) haplotypes determine increased expression of TL1A protein.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, Kathrin S; Thomas, Lisa S; Taylor, Kent D; Yu, Qi T; Mei, Ling; Landers, Carol J; Derkowski, Carrie; McGovern, Dermot P B; Rotter, Jerome I; Targan, Stephan R

    2009-01-01

    The recently identified member of the TNF superfamily TL1A (TNFSF15) increases IFN-gamma production by T cells in peripheral and mucosal CCR9+ T cells. TL1A and its receptor DR3 are up-regulated during chronic intestinal inflammation in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease (CD). TL1A gene haplotypes increase CD susceptibility in Japanese, European, and US cohorts. Here we report that the presence of TL1A gene haplotype B increases risk in Jewish CD patients with antibody titers for the E. coli outer membrane porin C (OmpC+) (Haplotype B frequency in Jewish CD patients: 24.9% for OmpC negative and 41.9% for OmpC positive patients, respectively, P< or =0.001). CD14+ monocytes isolated from Jewish OmpC+ patients homozygous for TL1A gene haplotype B express higher levels of TL1A in response to FcgammaR stimulation, a known inducing pathway of TL1A, as measured by ELISA. Furthermore, the membrane expression of TL1A is increased on peripheral monocytes from Jewish but not non-Jewish CD patients with the risk haplotype. These findings suggest that TL1A gene variation exacerbates induction of TL1A in response to FcgammaR stimulation in Jewish CD patients and this may lead to chronic intestinal inflammation via overwhelming T cell responses. Thus, TL1A may provide an important target for therapeutic intervention in this subgroup of IBD patients.

  5. Using pulse field gradient NMR diffusion measurements to define molecular size distributions in glycan preparations.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle C; Klyosov, Anatole; Platt, David; Mayo, Kevin H

    2009-07-06

    Glycans comprise perhaps the largest biomass in nature, and more and more glycans are used in a number of applications, including those as pharmaceutical agents in the clinic. However, defining glycan molecular weight distributions during and after their preparation is not always straightforward. Here, we use pulse field gradient (PFG) (1)H NMR self-diffusion measurements to assess molecular weight distributions in various glycan preparations. Initially, we derived diffusion coefficients, D, on a series of dextrans with reported weight-average molecular weights from about 5 kDa to 150 kDa. For each dextran sample, we analyzed 15 diffusion decay curves, one from each of the 15 major (1)H resonance envelopes, to provide diffusion coefficients. By measuring D as a function of dextran concentration, we determined D at infinite dilution, D(inf), which allowed estimation of the hydrodynamic radius, R(h), using the Stokes-Einstein relationship. A plot of log D(inf) versus log R(h) was linear and provided a standard calibration curve from which R(h) is estimated for other glycans. We then applied this methodology to investigate two other glycans, an alpha-(1-->2)-L-rhamnosyl-alpha-(1-->4)-D-galacturonosyl with quasi-randomly distributed, mostly terminal beta(1-->4)-linked galactose side-chains (GRG) and an alpha(1-->6)-D-galacto-beta(1-->4)-D-mannan (Davanat), which is presently being tested against cancer in the clinic. Using the dextran-derived calibration curve, we find that average R(h) values for GRG and Davanat are 76+/-6 x 10(-10) m and 56+/-3 x 10(-10) m, with GRG being more polydispersed than Davanat. Results from this study will be useful to investigators requiring knowledge of polysaccharide dispersity, needing to study polysaccharides under various solution conditions, or wanting to follow degradation of polysaccharides during production.

  6. Functional contributions of N- and O-glycans to L-selectin ligands in murine and human lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Arata-Kawai, Hanayo; Singer, Mark S; Bistrup, Annette; Zante, Annemieke van; Wang, Yang-Qing; Ito, Yuki; Bao, Xingfeng; Hemmerich, Stefan; Fukuda, Minoru; Rosen, Steven D

    2011-01-01

    L-selectin initiates lymphocyte interactions with high endothelial venules (HEVs) of lymphoid organs through binding to ligands with specific glycosylation modifications. 6-Sulfo sLe(x), a sulfated carbohydrate determinant for L-selectin, is carried on core 2 and extended core 1 O-glycans of HEV-expressed glycoproteins. The MECA-79 monoclonal antibody recognizes sulfated extended core 1 O-glycans and partially blocks lymphocyte-HEV interactions in lymphoid organs. Recent evidence has identified the contribution of 6-sulfo sLe(x) carried on N-glycans to lymphocyte homing in mice. Here, we characterize CL40, a novel IgG monoclonal antibody. CL40 equaled or surpassed MECA-79 as a histochemical staining reagent for HEVs and HEV-like vessels in mouse and human. Using synthetic carbohydrates, we found that CL40 bound to 6-sulfo sLe(x) structures, on both core 2 and extended core 1 structures, with an absolute dependency on 6-O-sulfation. Using transfected CHO cells and gene-targeted mice, we observed that CL40 bound its epitope on both N-glycans and O-glycans. Consistent with its broader glycan-binding, CL40 was superior to MECA-79 in blocking lymphocyte-HEV interactions in both wild-type mice and mice deficient in forming O-glycans. This superiority was more marked in human, as CL40 completely blocked lymphocyte binding to tonsillar HEVs, whereas MECA-79 inhibited only 60%. These findings extend the evidence for the importance of N-glycans in lymphocyte homing in mouse and indicate that this dependency also applies to human lymphoid organs.

  7. Structural basis for sulfation-dependent self-glycan recognition by the human immune-inhibitory receptor Siglec-8

    PubMed Central

    Pröpster, Johannes M.; Yang, Fan; Rabbani, Said; Ernst, Beat; Allain, Frédéric H.-T.

    2016-01-01

    Siglec-8 is a human immune-inhibitory receptor that, when engaged by specific self-glycans, triggers eosinophil apoptosis and inhibits mast cell degranulation, providing an endogenous mechanism to down-regulate immune responses of these central inflammatory effector cells. Here we used solution NMR spectroscopy to dissect the fine specificity of Siglec-8 toward different sialylated and sulfated carbohydrate ligands and determined the structure of the Siglec-8 lectin domain in complex with its prime glycan target 6′-sulfo sialyl Lewisx. A canonical motif for sialic acid recognition, extended by a secondary motif formed by unique loop regions, recognizing 6-O–sulfated galactose dictates tight specificity distinct from other Siglec family members and any other endogenous glycan recognition receptors. Structure-guided mutagenesis revealed key contacts of both interfaces to be equally essential for binding. Our work provides critical structural and mechanistic insights into how Siglec-8 selectively recognizes its glycan target, rationalizes the functional impact of site-specific glycan sulfation in modulating this lectin–glycan interaction, and will enable the rational design of Siglec-8–targeted agonists to treat eosinophil- and mast cell-related allergic and inflammatory diseases, such as asthma. PMID:27357658

  8. Glycosylation of proteins: a computer based method for the rapid exploration of conformational space of N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Bohne, A; von der Lieth, C W

    2002-01-01

    Inspection of protein databases suggests that as many as 70% of proteins have potential N-glycosylation sites. Unfortunately glycoproteins often refuse to crystallize and NMR techniques do not allow an unambiguous determination of the complete conformation of the sugar part. Therefore, time-consuming complex simulation methods are often used to explore the conformational space of N-glycans. The generation of a comprehensive data base describing the conformational space of larger fragments of N-glycans taking into account the effects of branching is presented. High-temperature molecular dynamics simulations of essential N-glycan fragments are performed until conformational equilibrium has been reached. Free energy landscapes are calculated for each glycosidic linkage. All possible conformations for each N-glycan fragment are automatically assigned, ranked according to their relative population and stored in a database. These values are recalled for the generation of a complete set of all possible conformations for a given N-glycan topology. The constructed conformations are ranked according to their energy content. Since this approach allows to explore the complete conformational space of a given N-glycan within a few minutes of CPU-time on a standard PC, it is well suited to be used as a Web-Based application.

  9. Qrator: A web-based curation tool for glycan structures

    PubMed Central

    Eavenson, Matthew; Kochut, Krys J; Miller, John A; Ranzinger, René; Tiemeyer, Michael; Aoki, Kazuhiro; York, William S

    2015-01-01

    Most currently available glycan structure databases use their own proprietary structure representation schema and contain numerous annotation errors. These cause problems when glycan databases are used for the annotation or mining of data generated in the laboratory. Due to the complexity of glycan structures, curating these databases is often a tedious and labor-intensive process. However, rigorously validating glycan structures can be made easier with a curation workflow that incorporates a structure-matching algorithm that compares candidate glycans to a canonical tree that embodies structural features consistent with established mechanisms for the biosynthesis of a particular class of glycans. To this end, we have implemented Qrator, a web-based application that uses a combination of external literature and database references, user annotations and canonical trees to assist and guide researchers in making informed decisions while curating glycans. Using this application, we have started the curation of large numbers of N-glycans, O-glycans and glycosphingolipids. Our curation workflow allows creating and extending canonical trees for these classes of glycans, which have subsequently been used to improve the curation workflow. PMID:25165068

  10. Multivalent display of minimal Clostridium difficile glycan epitopes mimics antigenic properties of larger glycans.

    PubMed

    Broecker, Felix; Hanske, Jonas; Martin, Christopher E; Baek, Ju Yuel; Wahlbrink, Annette; Wojcik, Felix; Hartmann, Laura; Rademacher, Christoph; Anish, Chakkumkal; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-04-19

    Synthetic cell-surface glycans are promising vaccine candidates against Clostridium difficile. The complexity of large, highly antigenic and immunogenic glycans is a synthetic challenge. Less complex antigens providing similar immune responses are desirable for vaccine development. Based on molecular-level glycan-antibody interaction analyses, we here demonstrate that the C. difficile surface polysaccharide-I (PS-I) can be resembled by multivalent display of minimal disaccharide epitopes on a synthetic scaffold that does not participate in binding. We show that antibody avidity as a measure of antigenicity increases by about five orders of magnitude when disaccharides are compared with constructs containing five disaccharides. The synthetic, pentavalent vaccine candidate containing a peptide T-cell epitope elicits weak but highly specific antibody responses to larger PS-I glycans in mice. This study highlights the potential of multivalently displaying small oligosaccharides to achieve antigenicity characteristic of larger glycans. The approach may result in more cost-efficient carbohydrate vaccines with reduced synthetic effort.

  11. Plasma Anti-Glycan Antibody Profiles Associated with Nickel level in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Vuskovic, Marko; Barbuti, Anna-Maria; Goldsmith-Rooney, Emma; Glassman, Laura; Bovin, Nicolai; Pass, Harvey; Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng; Chen, Meichi; Yan, Bing; Niu, Jingping; Qu, Qingshan; Costa, Max; Huflejt, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are widely used in industrial and commercial products including household and cooking utensils, jewelry, dental appliances and implants. Occupational exposure to nickel is associated with an increased risk for lung and nasal cancers, is the most common cause of contact dermatitis and has an extensive effect on the immune system. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (i) to evaluate immune response to the occupational exposure to nickel measured by the presence of anti-glycan antibodies (AGA) using a new biomarker-discovery platform based on printed glycan arrays (PGA), and (ii) to evaluate and compile a sequence of bioinformatics and statistical methods which are specifically relevant to PGA-derived information and to identification of putative “Ni toxicity signature”. The PGAs are similar to DNA microarrays, but contain deposits of various carbohydrates (glycans) instead of spotted DNAs. The study uses data derived from a set of 89 plasma specimens and their corresponding demographic information. The study population includes three subgroups: subjects directly exposed to Nickel that work in a refinery, subjects environmentally exposed to Nickel that live in a city where the refinery is located and subjects that live in a remote location. The paper describes the following sequence of nine data processing and analysis steps: (1) Analysis of inter-array reproducibility based on benchmark sera; (2) Analysis of intra-array reproducibility; (3) Screening of data - rejecting glycans which result in low intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), high coefficient of variation and low fluorescent intensity; (4) Analysis of inter-slide bias and choice of data normalization technique; (5) Determination of discriminatory subsamples based on multiple bootstrap tests; (6) Determination of the optimal signature size (cardinality of selected feature set) based on multiple cross-validation tests; (7) Identification of the top discriminatory glycans and

  12. Glycoconjugate Data Bank: Structures--an annotated glycan structure database and N-glycan primary structure verification service.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Taku; Hashimoto, Ryo; Nakagawa, Hiroaki; Monde, Kenji; Miura, Nobuaki; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2008-01-01

    Glycobiology has been brought to public attention as a frontier in the post-genomic era. Structural information about glycans has been accumulating in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for years. It has been recognized, however, that there are many questionable glycan models in the PDB. A tool for verifying the primary structures of glycan 3D structures is evidently required, yet there have been no such publicly available tools. The Glycoconjugate Data Bank:Structures (GDB:Structures, http://www.glycostructures.jp) is an annotated glycan structure database, which also provides an N-glycan primary structure (or glycoform) verification service. All the glycan 3D structures are detected and annotated by an in-house program named 'getCARBO'. When an N-glycan is detected in a query coordinate by getCARBO, the primary structure of the glycan is compared with the most similar entry in the glycan primary structure database (KEGG GLYCAN), and unmatched substructure(s) are indicated if observed. The results of getCARBO are stored and presented in GDB:Structures.

  13. Glycan labeling strategies and their use in identification and quantification

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. R.; Zauner, G.; Huhn, C.; Bruggink, C.; Deelder, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Most methods for the analysis of oligosaccharides from biological sources require a glycan derivatization step: glycans may be derivatized to introduce a chromophore or fluorophore, facilitating detection after chromatographic or electrophoretic separation. Derivatization can also be applied to link charged or hydrophobic groups at the reducing end to enhance glycan separation and mass-spectrometric detection. Moreover, derivatization steps such as permethylation aim at stabilizing sialic acid residues, enhancing mass-spectrometric sensitivity, and supporting detailed structural characterization by (tandem) mass spectrometry. Finally, many glycan labels serve as a linker for oligosaccharide attachment to surfaces or carrier proteins, thereby allowing interaction studies with carbohydrate-binding proteins. In this review, various aspects of glycan labeling, separation, and detection strategies are discussed. Figure MALDI-FTICR-MS of 2AA-labeled total plasma N-glycans PMID:20225063

  14. Glycan evolution in response to collaboration, conflict, and constraint.

    PubMed

    Springer, Stevan A; Gagneux, Pascal

    2013-03-08

    Glycans, oligo- and polysaccharides secreted or attached to proteins and lipids, cover the surfaces of all cells and have a regulatory capacity and structural diversity beyond any other class of biological molecule. Glycans may have evolved these properties because they mediate cellular interactions and often face pressure to evolve new functions rapidly. We approach this idea two ways. First, we discuss evolutionary innovation. Glycan synthesis, regulation, and mode of chemical interaction influence the spectrum of new forms presented to evolution. Second, we describe the evolutionary conflicts that arise when alleles and individuals interact. Glycan regulation and diversity are integral to these biological negotiations. Glycans are tasked with such an amazing diversity of functions that no study of cellular interaction can begin without considering them. We propose that glycans predominate the cell surface because their physical and chemical properties allow the rapid innovation required of molecules on the frontlines of evolutionary conflict.

  15. N-Glycan structures of an osteopontin from human bone.

    PubMed

    Masuda, K; Takahashi, N; Tsukamoto, Y; Honma, H; Kohri, K

    2000-02-24

    N-Glycan structures of osteopontin (a bone matrix protein) from human bone (lumbar vertabrate) are reported in detail. Asn-linked glycan portion was released from 100 microg of osteopontin by digestion with glycoamidase A (from sweet almond), and the reducing ends of the N-glycans were reductively aminated with 2-aminopyridine. The derivatized N-glycans were separated and structurally identified by a multidimensional mapping technique on HPLC columns. Two major N-glycan structures were also confirmed by mass spectrometry. The proposed structures are shown below. The result should permit future comparison with the N-glycan structures of osteopontins obtained from other sources (kidney tissues, macrophages, urinary stones, human milk, etc.).

  16. Nonenzymatic release of free reducing glycans from glycosphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuezheng; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D

    2012-10-01

    A major limitation in studying the structures and functions of glycans in glycosphingolipids is the difficulty in releasing free glycans for analysis and derivatization. Here we show that reducing glycans can be released nonenzymatically from glycosphingolipids after a brief treatment with ozone followed by heating in neutral aqueous buffer (pHs 6.0-8.0). The released free reducing glycans are then available for glycomic analyses, including fluorescent labeling, permethylation, and mass spectrometry. This procedure is simple and highly efficient, with no base-catalyzed "peeling" reaction by-products observed.

  17. Synthesis of glycans and glycopolymers through engineered enzymes.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Zachary; Withers, Stephen G

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of defined glycans enables us to further understand their roles in a biological context. Although useful chemical methods have been developed for the synthesis of glycans, these typically require complex protection and deprotection steps along with challenging control of anomeric stereochemistry. Enzymatic methods offer an attractive alternative to chemical synthesis. In particular, the use of glycosynthases and thioglycoligases, classes of engineered glycoside hydrolases, offers an enticing approach to the stereo- and regioselective synthesis of glycans without the need for protecting groups. Herein, we describe recent progress in the use of glycosynthases and thioglycoligases for the synthesis of glycans and glycopolymers. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Glycan antagonists and inhibitors: a fount for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jillian R; Crawford, Brett E; Esko, Jeffrey D

    2007-01-01

    Glycans, the carbohydrate chains of glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and glycolipids, represent a relatively unexploited area for drug development compared with other macromolecules. This review describes the major classes of glycans synthesized by animal cells, their mode of assembly, and available inhibitors for blocking their biosynthesis and function. Many of these agents have proven useful for studying the biological activities of glycans in isolated cells, during embryological development, and in physiology. Some are being used to develop drugs for treating metabolic disorders, cancer, and infection, suggesting that glycans are excellent targets for future drug development.

  19. N-linked glycan profiling of GGTA1/CMAH knockout pigs identifies new potential carbohydrate xenoantigens

    PubMed Central

    Burlak, Christopher; Bern, Marshall; Brito, Alejandro E.; Isailovic, Dragan; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Estrada, Jose L.; Li, Ping; Tector, A. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background The temporary or long-term xenotransplantation of pig organs into people would save thousands of lives each year if not for the robust human antibody response to pig carbohydrates. Genetically engineered pigs deficient in galactose α1,3 galactose (gene modified: GGTA1) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (gene modified: CMAH) have significantly improved cell survival when challenged by human antibody and complement in vitro. There remains, however, a significant portion of human antibody binding. Methods To uncover additional xenoantigens we compared the asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycome from serum proteins of humans, domestic pigs, GGTA1 knockout pigs and GGTA1/CMAH knockout pigs using mass spectrometry. Carbohydrate structures were determined with assistance from GlycoWorkbench, Cartoonist, and SimGlycan software by comparison to existing database entries and collision-induced dissociation fragmentation data. Results Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis of reduced and solid-phase permethylated glycans resulted in the detection of high mannose, hybrid, and complex type N-linked glycans in the 1000 to 4500 m/z ion range. GGTA1/CMAH knockout pig samples had increased relative amounts of high-mannose, incomplete and xylosylated N-linked glycans. All pig samples had significantly higher amounts of core and possibly antennae fucosylation. Conclusions We provide for the first time a comparison of the serum protein glycomes of the human, domestic pig and genetically modified pigs important to xenotransplantation. PMID:24033743

  20. Rapid high-resolution characterization of functionally important monoclonal antibody N-glycans by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Zoltan; Guttman, András; Bones, Jonathan; Karger, Barry L

    2011-07-01

    Characterization of the N-glycosylation present in the Fc region of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies requires rapid, high-resolution separation methods to guarantee product safety and efficacy during all stages of process development. Determination of fucosylated oligosaccharides is particularly important during clone selection, product characterization, and lot release as fucose has been shown to adversely affect the ability of mAbs to induce antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Here, we apply a general capillary electrophoresis optimization strategy to separate functionally relevant fucosylated and afucosylated glycans on mononclonal antibody products in the presence of several high mannose oligosaccharides. The N-glycans chosen represent those most commonly reported on CHO cell derived therapeutic antibodies. A rapid (<7 min) high-resolution separation of 12 commonly reported and functionally important IgG glycans was developed by systematically evaluating the effects of selectivity (boric acid) and efficiency (linear polyacrylamide) enhancing additives. The approach can be used to rapidly optimize capillary electrophoresis separation of other glycan mixtures. Following optimization, the method was applied to overnight sample processing for automated 96 well plate-based glycosylation analyses of two nonproprietary therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, demonstrating ruggedness and suitability for high-throughput process and product monitoring applications.

  1. Serum protein N-glycans profiling for the discovery of potential biomarkers for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cuiying; Schmilovitz-Weiss, Hemda; Liu, Xue-en; Pappo, Orit; Halpern, Marisa; Sulkes, Jaqueline; Braun, Marius; Cohen, Maya; Barak, Nir; Tur-Kaspa, Ran; Vanhooren, Valerie; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Libert, Claude; Contreras, Roland; Ben-Ari, Ziv

    2009-02-01

    The hepatic histology in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease can vary from isolated hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis can progress to cirrhosis and liver-related death. The aim was to evaluate the use of blood serum N-glycan fingerprinting as a tool for differential diagnosis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis from steatosis. A group of 47 patients with NAFLD was diagnosed by clinical laboratory analysis and ultrasonography, and was studied histologically using the Brunt's scoring system. The control group included 13 healthy individuals. N-glycan profiles of serum proteins were determined by DNA sequencer-based carbohydrate analytical profiling. We have found that the concentrations of two glycans (NGA2F and NA2) and their logarithm ratio of NGA2F versus NA2 (named GlycoNashTest) were associated with the degree of NASH-related fibrosis, but had no correlation with the grade of inflammation nor steatosis severity. When used to screen NAFLD patients, GlycoNashTest could identify advanced NASH-related fibrosis (F3-F4) with the diagnosis sensitivity of 89.5% and specificity of 71.4%. The serum N-glycan profile is a promising noninvasive method for detecting NASH or NASH-related fibrosis in NAFLD patients, which could be a valuable supplement to other markers currently used in diagnosis of NASH.

  2. Delineating Diseases by IMS-MS Profiling of Serum N-linked Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Isailovic, Dragan; Plasencia, Manolo D.; Gaye, Maissa M.; Stokes, Sarah T.; Kurulugama, Ruwan. T.; Pungpapong, Vitara; Zhang, Min; Kyselova, Zuzana; Goldman, Radoslav; Mechref, Yehia; Novotny, Milos V.; Clemmer, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Altered branching and aberrant expression of N-linked glycans is known to be associated with disease states such as cancer. However, the complexity of determining such variations hinders the development of specific glycomic approaches for assessing disease states. Here, we examine a combination of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS) measurements, with principal component analysis (PCA) for characterizing serum N-linked glycans from 81 individuals: 28 with cirrhosis of the liver; 25 with liver cancer; and 28 apparently healthy. Supervised PCA of combined ion-mobility profiles for several, to as many as ten different mass-to-charge ratios for glycan ions, improves the delineation of diseased states. This extends an earlier study [J.Proteome Res. 2008, 7, 1109-1117] of isomers associated with a single glycan (S1H5N4) in which PCA analysis of the IMS profiles appeared to differentiate the liver cancer group from the other samples. Although performed on a limited number of test subjects, the combination of IMS-MS for different combinations of ions and multivariate PCA analysis shows promise for characterizing disease states. PMID:22148953

  3. Several N-Glycans on the HIV Envelope Glycoprotein gp120 Preferentially Locate Near Disulphide Bridges and Are Required for Efficient Infectivity and Virus Transmission.

    PubMed

    Mathys, Leen; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 contains nine disulphide bridges and is highly glycosylated, carrying on average 24 N-linked glycans. Using a probability calculation, we here demonstrate that there is a co-localization of disulphide bridges and N-linked glycans in HIV-1 gp120, with a predominance of N-linked glycans in close proximity to disulphide bridges, at the C-terminal side of the involved cysteines. Also, N-glycans are frequently found immediately adjacent to disulphide bridges in gp120 at the N-terminal side of the involved cysteines. In contrast, N-glycans at positions close to, but not immediately neighboring disulphide bridges seem to be disfavored at the N-terminal side of the involved cysteines. Such a pronounced co-localization of disulphide bridges and N-glycans was also found for the N-glycans on glycoprotein E1 of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) but not for other heavily glycosylated proteins such as E2 from HCV and the surface GP from Ebola virus. The potential functional role of the presence of N-glycans near disulphide bridges in HIV-1 gp120 was studied using site-directed mutagenesis, either by deleting conserved N-glycans or by inserting new N-glycosylation sites near disulphide bridges. The generated HIV-1NL4.3 mutants were subjected to an array of assays, determining the envelope glycoprotein levels in mutant viral particles, their infectivity and the capture and transmission efficiencies of mutant virus particles by DC-SIGN. Three N-glycans located nearby disulphide bridges were found to be crucial for the preservation of several of these functions of gp120. In addition, introduction of new N-glycans upstream of several disulphide bridges, at locations where there was a significant absence of N-glycans in a broad variety of virus strains, was found to result in a complete loss of viral infectivity. It was shown that the N-glycan environment around well-defined disulphide bridges of gp120 is highly critical to allow efficient viral infection

  4. N-glycan MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry on Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Enables the Delineation of Ovarian Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Everest-Dass, Arun V; Briggs, Matthew T; Kaur, Gurjeet; Oehler, Martin K; Hoffmann, Peter; Packer, Nicolle H

    2016-09-01

    Ovarian cancer is a fatal gynaecological malignancy in adult women with a five-year overall survival rate of only 30%. Glycomic and glycoproteomic profiling studies have reported extensive protein glycosylation pattern alterations in ovarian cancer. Therefore, spatio-temporal investigation of these glycosylation changes may unearth tissue-specific changes that occur in the development and progression of ovarian cancer. A novel method for investigating tissue-specific N-linked glycans is using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections that can spatially profile N-glycan compositions released from proteins in tissue-specific regions. In this study, tissue regions of interest (e.g. tumor, stroma, adipose tissue and necrotic areas) were isolated from FFPE tissue sections of advanced serous ovarian cancers (n = 3). PGC-LC-ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-MSI were used as complementary techniques to firstly generate structural information on the tissue-specific glycans in order to then obtain high resolution images of the glycan structure distribution in ovarian cancer tissue. The N-linked glycan repertoires carried by the proteins in these tissue regions were structurally characterized for the first time in FFPE ovarian cancer tissue regions, using enzymatic peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) release of N-glycans. The released glycans were analyzed by porous graphitized carbon liquid chromatography (PGC-LC) and collision induced electrospray negative mode MS fragmentation analysis. The N-glycan profiles identified by this analysis were then used to determine the location and distribution of each N-glycan on FFPE ovarian cancer sections that were treated with PNGase F using high resolution MALDI-MSI. A tissue-specific distribution of N-glycan structures identified particular regions of the ovarian cancer sections. For example, high mannose glycans were predominantly expressed in the

  5. Glycomic Analysis of Life Stages of the Human Parasite Schistosoma mansoni Reveals Developmental Expression Profiles of Functional and Antigenic Glycan Motifs*

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Cornelis H.; van Diepen, Angela; Nguyen, D. Linh; Wuhrer, Manfred; Hoffmann, Karl F.; Deelder, André M.; Hokke, Cornelis H.

    2015-01-01

    Glycans present on glycoproteins and glycolipids of the major human parasite Schistosoma mansoni induce innate as well as adaptive immune responses in the host. To be able to study the molecular characteristics of schistosome infections it is therefore required to determine the expression profiles of glycans and antigenic glycan-motifs during a range of critical stages of the complex schistosome lifecycle. We performed a longitudinal profiling study covering schistosome glycosylation throughout worm- and egg-development using a mass spectrometry-based glycomics approach. Our study revealed that during worm development N-glycans with Galβ1–4(Fucα1–3)GlcNAc (LeX) and core-xylose motifs were rapidly lost after cercariae to schistosomula transformation, whereas GalNAcβ1–4GlcNAc (LDN)-motifs gradually became abundant and predominated in adult worms. LeX-motifs were present on glycolipids up to 2 weeks of schistosomula development, whereas glycolipids with mono- and multifucosylated LDN-motifs remained present up to the adult worm stage. In contrast, expression of complex O-glycans diminished to undetectable levels within days after transformation. During egg development, a rich diversity of N-glycans with fucosylated motifs was expressed, but with α3-core fucose and a high degree of multifucosylated antennae only in mature eggs and miracidia. N-glycan antennae were exclusively LDN-based in miracidia. O-glycans in the mature eggs were also diverse and contained LeX- and multifucosylated LDN, but none of these were associated with miracidia in which we detected only the Galβ1–3(Galβ1–6)GalNAc core glycan. Immature eggs also exhibited short O-glycan core structures only, suggesting that complex fucosylated O-glycans of schistosome eggs are derived primarily from glycoproteins produced by the subshell envelope in the developed egg. Lipid glycans with multifucosylated GlcNAc repeats were present throughout egg development, but with the longer highly

  6. Transduction of Glycan-Lectin Binding using Near Infrared Fluorescent Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Glycan Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuel, Nigel; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Kim, Jong-Ho; Zhang, Jingqing; Boghossian, Ardemis; Mahal, Lara; Strano, Michael

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a sensor array employing recombinant lectins as glycan recognition sites tethered via Histidine tags to Ni2+ complexes that act as fluorescent quenchers for semi-conducting single walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a chitosan to measure binding kinetics of model glycans. Two higher-affined glycan-lectin pairs are explored: fucose (Fuc) to PA-IIL and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to GafD. The dissociation constants (KD) for these pairs as free glycans (106 and 19 μM respectively) and streptavidin-tethered (142 and 50 μM respectively) were found. The absolute detection limit for the current platform was found to be 2 μg of glycosylated protein or 100 ng of free glycan to 20 μg of lectin. Glycan detection is demonstrated at the single nanotube level (GlcNAc to GafD). Over a population of 1000 nanotubes, 289 of the SWNT sensors had signals strong enough to yield kinetic information (KD of 250 ± 10 μM). We are also able to identify the locations of ``strong-transducers'' on the basis of dissociation constant (4 sensors with KD < 10 μM) or overall signal modulation (8 sensors with > 5% quench response). The ability to pinpoint strong-binding, single sensors is promising to build a nanoarray of glycan-lectin transducers as a method to profile glycans without protein labeling or glycan liberation pretreatment steps.

  7. Sensing lectin-glycan interactions using lectin super-microarrays and glycans labeled with dye-doped silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Matei, Elena; Deng, Lingquan; Koharudin, Leonardus; Gronenborn, Angela M; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2013-09-15

    A new microarray platform, based on lectin super-microarrays and glycans labeled with dye-doped nanoparticles, has been developed to study glycan-lectin interactions. Glycan ligands were conjugated onto fluorescein-doped silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) using a general photocoupling chemistry to afford FSNP-labeled glycan probes. Lectins were printed on epoxy slides in duplicate sets to generate lectin super-microarrays where multiple assays could be carried out simultaneously in each lectin microarray. Thus, the lectin super-microarray was treated with FSNP-labeled glycans to screen for specific binding pairs. Furthermore, a series of ligand competition assays were carried out on a single lectin super-microarray to generate the dose-response curve for each glycan-lectin pair, from which the apparent affinity constants were obtained. Results showed 4-7 orders of magnitude increase in affinity over the free glycans with the corresponding lectins. Thus, the glycan epitope structures having weaker affinity than the parent glycans could be readily identified and analyzed from the lectin super-microarrays. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Application of negative ion MS/MS to the identification of N-glycans released from carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1).

    PubMed

    Harvey, David J; Baruah, Kavitha; Scanlan, Christopher N

    2009-01-01

    Structures of N-glycans released from rat CEACAM1 expressed in human embryonic kidney cells were determined by MALDI and negative ion nanospray MS/MS techniques. The major carbohydrates were bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary complex glycans with and without sialic acid, fucose and bisecting GlcNAc residues. High-mannose glycans, predominantly Man(5)GlcNAc(2), were also found. The negative ion fragmentation technique easily identified the branching pattern of the triantennary glycans (mainly branched on the 6-antenna) and the presence of 'bisecting' GlcNAc residues (attached to the 4-position of the core mannose), features that are difficult to determine by traditional techniques. Sialic acids were in both alpha2-3 and alpha2-6 linkage as determined by MALDI-TOF MS following linkage-specific derivatization. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Sugar-binding proteins from fish: selection of high affinity "lambodies" that recognize biomedically relevant glycans.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xia; Ma, Mark Z; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Chowdhury, Sudipa; Barchi, Joseph J; Mariuzza, Roy A; Murphy, Michael B; Mao, Li; Pancer, Zeev

    2013-01-18

    Glycan-binding proteins are important for a wide variety of basic research and clinical applications, but proteins with high affinity and selectivity for carbohydrates are difficult to obtain. Here we describe a facile and cost-effective strategy to generate monoclonal lamprey antibodies, called lambodies, that target glycan determinants. We screened a library of yeast surface-displayed (YSD) lamprey variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR) for clones that can selectively bind various biomedically important glycotopes. These glycoconjugates included tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (Tn and TFα), Lewis antigens (LeA and LeX), N-glycolylneuraminic acid, targets of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies (poly-Man9 and the HIV gp120), and the glycoproteins asialo-ovine submaxillary mucin (aOSM) and asialo-human glycophorin A (aGPA). We isolated clones that bind each of these targets in a glycan-dependent manner and with very strong binding constants, for example, 6.2 nM for Man9 and 44.7 nM for gp120, determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). One particular lambody, VLRB.aGPA.23, was shown by glycan array analysis to be selective for the blood group H type 3 trisaccharide (BG-H3, Fucα1-2Galβ1-3GalNAcα), aGPA, and TFα (Galβ1-3GalNAcα), with affinity constants of 0.2, 1, and 8 nM, respectively. In human tissue microarrays this lambody selectively detected cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens in 14 different types of cancers. It stained 27% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples in a pattern that correlated with poor patient survival. Lambodies with exquisite affinity and selectivity for glycans may find myriad uses in glycobiology and biomedical research.

  10. Capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for rapid and sensitive N-glycan analysis of glycoproteins as 9-fluorenylmethyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Miyako; Higo, Daisuke; Arai, Etsuo; Nakagawa, Takatoshi; Kakehi, Kazuaki; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Kondo, Akihiro

    2009-02-01

    It is well known that most protein therapeutics such as monoclonal antibody pharmaceuticals and other biopharmaceuticals including cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins, and thus the development of high-throughput and sensitive analytical methods for glycans is essential in terms of their determination and quality control. We previously reported a novel alternative labeling method for glycans involving 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (Fmoc-Cl) instead of the conventional reductive amination procedure. The derivatives were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) (Kamoda S, Nakano M, Ishikawa R, Suzuki S, Kakehi K. 2005. Rapid and sensitive screening of N-glycans as 9-fluorenylmethyl derivatives by high-performance liquid chromatography: A method which can recover free oligosaccharides after analysis. J Proteome Res. 4:146-152). This method was rapid and simple; however, it was time-consuming in terms of analysis by HPLC and did not provide so much information such as the detailed structures and mass numbers of glycans. Here we have developed a high-throughput and highly sensitive method. It comprises three steps, i.e., release of glycans, derivatization with Fmoc, and capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CE-ESI MS) analysis. We analyzed several glycoproteins such as fetuin, alpha1 acid glycoprotein, IgG, and transferrin in order to validate this method. We were able to analyze the above glycoproteins with the three-step procedure within only 5 h, which provided detailed N-glycan patterns. Moreover, the MS/MS analysis allowed identification of the N-glycan structures. As novel applications, the method was employed for the analysis of N-glycans derived from monoclonal antibody pharmaceuticals and also from alpha-fetoprotein; the latter is known as one of the tumor markers of hepatocellular carcinomas. We were able to easily and rapidly determine the detailed structures of the N-glycans. The present method is very useful

  11. High throughput quantification of N-glycans using one-pot sialic acid modification and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Geun-Cheol; Iliff, Bryce; Cerny, Ron; Velander, William H.; Van Cott, Kevin E.

    2010-01-01

    Appropriate glycosylation of recombinant therapeutic glycoproteins has been emphasized in biopharmaceutical industries because the carbohydrate component can affect safety, efficacy, and consistency of the glycoproteins. Reliable quantification methods are essential to ensure consistency of their products with respect to glycosylation, particularly sialylation. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a popular tool to analyze glycan profiles and structures, showing high resolution and sensitivity with structure identification ability. However, quantification of sialylated glycans using MS is not as reliable because of the different ionization efficiency between neutral and acidic glycans. We report here that amidation in mild acidic conditions can be used to neutralize acidic N-glycans still attached to the protein. The resulting amidated N-glycans can then released from the protein using PNGase F, and labeled with permanent charges on the reducing end to avoid any modification and the formation of metal adducts during MS analysis. The N-glycan modification, digestion, and desalting steps were performed using a single-pot method that can be done in microcentrifuge tubes or 96-well microfilter plates, enabling high throughput glycan analysis. Using this method we were able to perform quantitative MALDI-TOF MS of a recombinant human glycoprotein to determine changes in fucosylation and changes in sialylation that were in very good agreement with a normal phase HPLC oligosaccharide mapping method. PMID:20586471

  12. Multivalent display of minimal Clostridium difficile glycan epitopes mimics antigenic properties of larger glycans

    PubMed Central

    Broecker, Felix; Hanske, Jonas; Martin, Christopher E.; Baek, Ju Yuel; Wahlbrink, Annette; Wojcik, Felix; Hartmann, Laura; Rademacher, Christoph; Anish, Chakkumkal; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic cell-surface glycans are promising vaccine candidates against Clostridium difficile. The complexity of large, highly antigenic and immunogenic glycans is a synthetic challenge. Less complex antigens providing similar immune responses are desirable for vaccine development. Based on molecular-level glycan–antibody interaction analyses, we here demonstrate that the C. difficile surface polysaccharide-I (PS-I) can be resembled by multivalent display of minimal disaccharide epitopes on a synthetic scaffold that does not participate in binding. We show that antibody avidity as a measure of antigenicity increases by about five orders of magnitude when disaccharides are compared with constructs containing five disaccharides. The synthetic, pentavalent vaccine candidate containing a peptide T-cell epitope elicits weak but highly specific antibody responses to larger PS-I glycans in mice. This study highlights the potential of multivalently displaying small oligosaccharides to achieve antigenicity characteristic of larger glycans. The approach may result in more cost-efficient carbohydrate vaccines with reduced synthetic effort. PMID:27091615

  13. Human milk secretory immunoglobulin a and lactoferrin N-glycans are altered in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Totten, Sarah M; Huang, Jincui; Grapov, Dmitry; Durham, Holiday A; Lammi-Keefe, Carol J; Lebrilla, Carlito; German, J Bruce

    2013-12-01

    Very little is known about the effects of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on lactation and milk components. Recent reports suggested that hyperglycemia during pregnancy was associated with altered breast milk immune factors. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) and N-glycans of milk immune-modulatory proteins are implicated in modulation of infant immunity. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of GDM on HMO and protein-conjugated glycan profiles in breast milk. Milk was collected at 2 wk postpartum from women diagnosed with (n = 8) or without (n = 16) GDM at week 24-28 in pregnancy. Milk was analyzed for HMO abundances, protein concentrations, and N-glycan abundances of lactoferrin and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA). HMOs and N-glycans were analyzed by mass spectrometry and milk lactoferrin and sIgA concentrations were analyzed by the Bradford assay. The data were analyzed using multivariate modeling confirmed with univariate statistics to determine differences between milk of women with compared with women without GDM. There were no differences in HMOs between milk from women with vs. without GDM. Milk from women with GDM compared with those without GDM was 63.6% lower in sIgA protein (P < 0.05), 45% higher in lactoferrin total N-glycans (P < 0.0001), 36-72% higher in lactoferrin fucose and sialic acid N-glycans (P < 0.01), and 32-43% lower in sIgA total, mannose, fucose, and sialic acid N-glycans (P < 0.05). GDM did not alter breast milk free oligosaccharide abundances but decreased total protein and glycosylation of sIgA and increased glycosylation of lactoferrin in transitional milk. The results suggest that maternal glucose dysregulation during pregnancy has lasting consequences that may influence the innate immune protective functions of breast milk.

  14. Human Milk Secretory Immunoglobulin A and Lactoferrin N-Glycans Are Altered in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus123

    PubMed Central

    Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Totten, Sarah M.; Huang, Jincui; Grapov, Dmitry; Durham, Holiday A.; Lammi-Keefe, Carol J.; Lebrilla, Carlito; German, J. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the effects of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on lactation and milk components. Recent reports suggested that hyperglycemia during pregnancy was associated with altered breast milk immune factors. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) and N-glycans of milk immune-modulatory proteins are implicated in modulation of infant immunity. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of GDM on HMO and protein-conjugated glycan profiles in breast milk. Milk was collected at 2 wk postpartum from women diagnosed with (n = 8) or without (n = 16) GDM at week 24–28 in pregnancy. Milk was analyzed for HMO abundances, protein concentrations, and N-glycan abundances of lactoferrin and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA). HMOs and N-glycans were analyzed by mass spectrometry and milk lactoferrin and sIgA concentrations were analyzed by the Bradford assay. The data were analyzed using multivariate modeling confirmed with univariate statistics to determine differences between milk of women with compared with women without GDM. There were no differences in HMOs between milk from women with vs. without GDM. Milk from women with GDM compared with those without GDM was 63.6% lower in sIgA protein (P < 0.05), 45% higher in lactoferrin total N-glycans (P < 0.0001), 36–72% higher in lactoferrin fucose and sialic acid N-glycans (P < 0.01), and 32–43% lower in sIgA total, mannose, fucose, and sialic acid N-glycans (P < 0.05). GDM did not alter breast milk free oligosaccharide abundances but decreased total protein and glycosylation of sIgA and increased glycosylation of lactoferrin in transitional milk. The results suggest that maternal glucose dysregulation during pregnancy has lasting consequences that may influence the innate immune protective functions of breast milk. PMID:24047700

  15. Fast and efficient online release of N-glycans from glycoproteins facilitating liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry glycomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Jmeian, Yazen; Hammad, Loubna A; Mechref, Yehia

    2012-10-16

    A novel online enzyme reactor incorporating peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) on a monolithic polymer support has been developed to allow the rapid simultaneous release of both neutral and acidic N-linked glycans from glycoproteins. The PNGase F monolithic reactor was fabricated in a fused silica using glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate polymer. The reactor was coupled to a C8 trap and a porous graphitic carbon (PGC) HPLC-chip. This arrangement was interfaced to an ion trap mass spectrometer for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses. The performance of the PNGase F reactor was optimized using the MS signal for the disialylated biantennary N-glycan derived from fetuin. Optimum conditions for glycan release were attained at room temperature using a loading flow rate of 2 μL/min and a reaction time of 6 min. The loading capacity of the reactor was determined to be around 2 pmol of glycoprotein. The online digestion and MS characterization experiments resulted in sensitivities as high as 100 fmol of glycoprotein and 0.1 μL of human blood serum. The enzyme reactor activity was also shown to remain stable after 1 month of continuous use. Both small and large glycoproteins as well as glycoproteins containing high-mannose glycans, fucolsylated glycans, sialylated glycans, and hybrid structures were studied. The model glycoproteins included ribonuclease B, fetuin, α(1)-acid glycoprotein, immunoglobulin, and thyroglobulin. All N-glycans associated with these model glycoproteins were detected using the online PNGase F reactor setup.

  16. Glycan family analysis for deducing N-glycan topology from single MS

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, David; Bern, Marshall; North, Simon J.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Dell, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: In the past few years, mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as the premier tool for identification and quantification of biological molecules such as peptides and glycans. There are two basic strategies: single-MS, which uses a single round of mass analysis, and MS/MS (or higher order MSn), which adds one or more additional rounds of mass analysis, interspersed with fragmentation steps. Single-MS offers higher throughput, broader mass coverage and more direct quantitation, but generally much weaker identification. Single-MS, however, does work fairly well for the case of N-glycan identification, which are more constrained than other biological polymers. We previously demonstrated single-MS identification of N-glycans to the level of ‘cartoons’ (monosaccharide composition and topology) by a system that incorporates an expert's detailed knowledge of the biological sample. In this article, we explore the possibility of ab initio single-MS N-glycan identification, with the goal of extending single-MS, or primarily-single-MS, identification to non-expert users, novel conditions and unstudied tissues. Results: We propose and test three cartoon-assignment algorithms that make inferences informed by biological knowledge about glycan synthesis. To test the algorithms, we used 71 single-MS spectra from a variety of tissues and organisms, containing more than 2800 manually annotated peaks. The most successful of the algorithms computes the most richly connected subgraph within a ‘cartoon graph’. This algorithm uniquely assigns the correct cartoon to more than half of the peaks in 41 out of the 71 spectra. Contact: goldberg@parc.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19073587

  17. Determination of SCN1A genetic variants in Mexican patients with refractory epilepsy and Dravet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Arredondo, R E; Brambila-Tapia, A J L; Mercado-Silva, F M; Magaña-Torres, M T; Figuera, L E

    2017-05-18

    Mutations in the SCN1A gene can result in syndromes associated with epilepsy, including the Dravet syndrome (DS). However, the prevalence of such mutations in these diseases varies widely between different studies, and has not been examined in Mexican patients with epilepsy. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the frequency of SCN1A mutations (in the exon 26) in a cohort of Mexican patients with DS and refractory epilepsy (RE). We recruited 24 Mexican patients (14 males and 10 females), of which 15 were diagnosed with RE and 9 were diagnosed with DS. The SCN1A gene was sequenced to uncover mutations in exon 26. We detected 2 novel genotypes in 2 DS patients. One was a synonymous variant, c.5418 G > A (E1806E), and the other was a missense variant, c. 5324 T > C (L1775P). The missense mutation was predicted to be damaging with a score of 100% by the PolyPhen-2 program. The frequency of pathogenic variants was 4.17% in all the patients and 11.1% in DS patients, which, together with other publications, emphasize that specific and more severe phenotypes are associated with SCN1A mutations.

  18. Predominant Expression of Hybrid N-Glycans Has Distinct Cellular Roles Relative to Complex and Oligomannose N-Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Hall, M. Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A.; Zhu, Yong; Dayal, Sahil; Whitman, Austin A.; Schwalbe, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation modulates growth, maintenance, and stress signaling processes. Consequently, altered N-glycosylation is associated with reduced fitness and disease. Therefore, expanding our understanding of N-glycans in altering biological processes is of utmost interest. Herein, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/caspase9 (CRISPR/Cas9) technology was employed to engineer a glycosylation mutant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell line, K16, which expresses predominantly hybrid type N-glycans. This newly engineered cell line enabled us to compare N-glycan effects on cellular properties of hybrid type N-glycans, to the well-established Pro−5 and Lec1 cell lines, which express complex and oligomannose types of N-glycans, respectively. Lectin binding studies revealed the predominant N-glycan expressed in K16 is hybrid type. Cell dissociation and migration assays demonstrated the greatest strength of cell–cell adhesion and fastest migratory rates for oligomannose N-glycans, and these properties decreased as oligomannose type were converted to hybrid type, and further decreased upon conversion to complex type. Next, we examined the roles of three general types of N-glycans on ectopic expression of E-cadherin, a cell–cell adhesion protein. Microscopy revealed more functional E-cadherin at the cell–cell border when N-glycans were oligomannose and these levels decreased as the oligomannose N-glycans were processed to hybrid and then to complex. Thus, we provide evidence that all three general types of N-glycans impact plasma membrane architecture and cellular properties. PMID:27304954

  19. Site-specific protein glycosylation analysis with glycan isomer differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hua, Serenus; Nwosu, Charles C; Strum, John S; Seipert, Richard R; An, Hyun Joo; Zivkovic, Angela M; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2012-05-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most common yet diverse post-translational modifications. Information on glycan heterogeneity and glycosite occupancy is increasingly recognized as crucial to understanding glycoprotein structure and function. Yet, no approach currently exists with which to holistically consider both the proteomic and glycomic aspects of a system. Here, we developed a novel method of comprehensive glycosite profiling using nanoflow liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (nano-LC/MS) that shows glycan isomer-specific differentiation on specific sites. Glycoproteins were digested by controlled non-specific proteolysis in order to produce informative glycopeptides. High-resolution, isomer-sensitive chromatographic separation of the glycopeptides was achieved using microfluidic chip-based capillaries packed with graphitized carbon. Integrated LC/MS/MS not only confirmed glycopeptide composition but also differentiated glycan and peptide isomers and yielded structural information on both the glycan and peptide moieties. Our analysis identified at least 13 distinct glycans (including isomers) corresponding to five compositions at the single N-glycosylation site on bovine ribonuclease B, 59 distinct glycans at five N-glycosylation sites on bovine lactoferrin, 13 distinct glycans at one N-glycosylation site on four subclasses of human immunoglobulin G, and 20 distinct glycans at five O-glycosylation sites on bovine κ-casein. Porous graphitized carbon provided effective separation of glycopeptide isomers. The integration of nano-LC with MS and MS/MS of non-specifically cleaved glycopeptides allows quantitative, isomer-sensitive, and site-specific glycoprotein analysis.

  20. Protein-Linked Glycan Degradation in Infants Fed Human Milk

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C.; Sela, David; Underwood, Mark A.; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito

    2014-01-01

    Many human milk proteins are glycosylated. Glycosylation is important in protecting bioactive proteins and peptide fragments from digestion. Protein-linked glycans have a variety of functions; however, there is a paucity of information on protein-linked glycan degradation in either the infant or the adult digestive system. Human digestive enzymes can break down dietary disaccharides and starches, but most of the digestive enzymes required for complex protein-linked glycan degradation are absent from both human digestive secretions and the external brush border membrane of the intestinal lining. Indeed, complex carbohydrates remain intact throughout their transit through the stomach and small intestine, and are undegraded by in vitro incubation with either adult pancreatic secretions or intact intestinal brush border membranes. Human gastrointestinal bacteria, however, produce a wide variety of glycosidases with regio- and anomeric specificities matching those of protein-linked glycan structures. These bacteria degrade a wide array of complex carbohydrates including various protein-linked glycans. That bacteria possess glycan degradation capabilities, whereas the human digestive system, perse, does not, suggests that most dietary protein-linked glycan breakdown will be of bacterial origin. In addition to providing a food source for specific bacteria in the colon, protein-linked glycans from human milk may act as decoys for pathogenic bacteria to prevent invasion and infection of the host. The composition of the intestinal microbiome may be particularly important in the most vulnerable humans-the elderly, the immunocompromised, and infants (particularly premature infants). PMID:24533224

  1. Comprehensive N-Glycan Profiling of Avian Immunoglobulin Y

    PubMed Central

    Millán Martín, Silvia; Wormald, Mark R.; Zapatero-Rodríguez, Julia; Conroy, Paul J.; O’Kennedy, Richard J.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Saldova, Radka

    2016-01-01

    Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has highlighted its suitability for the generation of high-quality, high-affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic and biotechnological applications. The glycosylation profile of potential immunoglobulin therapeutics is species specific and is heavily influenced by the cell-line/culture conditions used for production. Hence, knowledge of the carbohydrate moieties present on immunoglobulins is essential as certain glycan structures can adversely impact their physicochemical and biological properties. This study describes the detailed N-glycan profile of IgY polyclonal antibodies from the serum of leghorn chickens using a fully quantitative high-throughput N-glycan analysis approach, based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) separation of released glycans. Structural assignments revealed serum IgY to contain complex bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary glycans with or without core fucose and bisects, hybrid and high mannose glycans. High sialic acid content was also observed, with the presence of rare sialic acid structures, likely polysialic acids. It is concluded that IgY is heavily decorated with complex glycans; however, no known non-human or immunogenic glycans were identified. Thus, IgY is a potentially promising candidate for immunoglobulin-based therapies for the treatment of various infectious diseases. PMID:27459092

  2. Production, characterization, and pharmacokinetic properties of antibodies with N-linked mannose-5 glycans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Marcella; Brown, Darren; Reed, Chae; Chung, Shan; Lutman, Jeff; Stefanich, Eric; Wong, Anne; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Bayer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The effector functions of therapeutic antibodies are strongly affected by the specific glycans added to the Fc domain during post-translational processing. Antibodies bearing high levels of N-linked mannose-5 glycan (Man5) have been reported to exhibit enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) compared with antibodies with fucosylated complex or hybrid glycans. To better understand the relationship between antibodies with high levels of Man5 and their biological activity in vivo, we developed an approach to generate substantially homogeneous antibodies bearing the Man5 glycoform. A mannosidase inhibitor, kifunensine, was first incorporated in the cell culture process to generate antibodies with a distribution of high mannose glycoforms. Antibodies were then purified and treated with a mannosidase for trimming to Man5 in vitro. This 2-step approach can consistently generate antibodies with > 99% Man5 glycan. Antibodies bearing varying levels of Man5 were studied to compare ADCC and Fcγ receptor binding, and they showed enhanced ADCC activity and increased binding affinity to the FcγRIIIA. In addition, the clearance rate of antibodies bearing Man8/9 and Man5 glycans was determined in a pharmacokinetics study in mice. When compared with historical data, the antibodies bearing the high mannose glycoform exhibited faster clearance rate compared with antibodies bearing the fucosylated complex glycoform, while the pharmacokinetic properties of antibodies with Man8/9 and Man5 glycoforms appeared similar. In addition, we identified the presence of a mannosidase in mouse serum that converted most Man8/9 to Man6 after 24 h.

  3. Production, characterization and pharmacokinetic properties of antibodies with N-linked Mannose-5 glycans

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Marcella; Brown, Darren; Reed, Chae; Chung, Shan; Lutman, Jeff; Stefanich, Eric; Wong, Anne; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Bayer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The effector functions of therapeutic antibodies are strongly affected by the specific glycans added to the Fc domain during post-translational processing. Antibodies bearing high levels of N-linked mannose-5 glycan (Man5) have been reported to exhibit enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) compared with antibodies with fucosylated complex or hybrid glycans. To better understand the relationship between antibodies with high levels of Man5 and their biological activity in vivo, we developed an approach to generate substantially homogeneous antibodies bearing the Man5 glycoform. A mannosidase inhibitor, kifunensine, was first incorporated in the cell culture process to generate antibodies with a distribution of high mannose glycoforms. Antibodies were then purified and treated with a mannosidase for trimming to Man5 in vitro. This 2-step approach can consistently generate antibodies with > 99% Man5 glycan. Antibodies bearing varying levels of Man5 were studied to compare ADCC and Fcγ receptor binding, and they showed enhanced ADCC activity and increased binding affinity to the FcγRIIIA. In addition, the clearance rate of antibodies bearing Man8/9 and Man5 glycans was determined in a pharmacokinetics study in mice. When compared with historical data, the antibodies bearing the high mannose glycoform exhibited faster clearance rate compared with antibodies bearing the fucosylated complex glycoform, while the pharmacokinetic properties of antibodies with Man8/9 and Man5 glycoforms appeared similar. In addition, we identified the presence of a mannosidase in mouse serum that converted most Man8/9 to Man6 after 24 h. PMID:22699308

  4. Multistep Fractionation and Mass Spectrometry Reveal Zwitterionic and Anionic Modifications of the N- and O-glycans of a Marine Snail*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chunsheng; Abed-Navandi, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Various studies in the past have revealed that molluscs can produce a wide range of rather complex N-glycan structures, which vary from those occurring in other invertebrate animals; particularly methylated glycans have been found in gastropods, and there are some reports of anionic glycans in bivalves. Due to the high variability in terms of previously described structures and methodologies, it is a major challenge to establish glycomic workflows that yield the maximum amount of detailed structural information from relatively low quantities of sample. In this study, we apply differential release with peptide:N-glycosidases F and A followed by solid-phase extraction on graphitized carbon and reversed-phase materials to examine the glycome of Volvarina rubella (C. B. Adams, 1845), a margin snail of the clade Neogastropoda. The resulting four pools of N-glycans were fractionated on a fused core RP-HPLC column and subject to MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS in conjunction with chemical and enzymatic treatments. In addition, selected N-glycan fractions, as well as O-glycans released by β-elimination, were analyzed by porous graphitized carbon-LC-MS and MSn. This comprehensive approach enabled us to determine a number of novel modifications of protein-linked glycans, including N-methyl-2-aminoethylphosphonate on mannose and N-acetylhexosamine residues, core β1,3-linked mannose, zwitterionic moieties on core Galβ1,4Fuc motifs, additional mannose residues on oligomannosidic glycans, and bisubstituted antennal fucose; furthermore, typical invertebrate N-glycans with sulfate and core fucose residues are present in this gastropod. PMID:26598642

  5. LC-MS/MS analysis of permethylated free oligosaccharides and N-glycans derived from human, bovine, and goat milk samples.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xue; Zhou, Shiyue; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-06-01

    Oligosaccharides in milk not only provide nutrition to the infants but also have significant immune biofunctions such as inhibition of pathogen binding to the host cell. The main component in milk oligosaccharides is free oligosaccharides. Since the proteins in milk are highly glycosylated, N-glycans in milk also play an import role. In this study, we investigated the permethylated free oligosaccharides and N-glycans extracted from bovine, goat, and human milks using LC-MS/MS. Quantitation profiles of free oligosaccharides and N-glycans were reported. The number of free oligosaccharides observed in bovine, goat, and human milk samples (without isomeric consideration) were 11, 8, and 11, respectively. Human milk had more complex free oligosaccharides structures than the other two milk samples. Totally 58, 21, and 43 N-glycan structures (without isomeric consideration) were associated with whey proteins extracted from bovine, goat, and human milk samples, respectively. Bovine milk free oligosaccharides and N-glycans from whey proteins were highly sialylated and to a lesser extend fucosylated. Goat and human milk free oligosaccharides and N-glycans from whey proteins were both highly fucosylated. Also, the isomeric glycans in milk samples were determined by porous graphitic carbon LC at elevated temperatures. For example, separation of human milk free oligosaccharide Gal-GlcNAc-(Fuc)-Gal-Glc and Gal-GlcNAc-Gal-Glc-Fuc isomers was achieved using porous graphitic carbon column. Permethylation of the glycan structures facilitated the interpretation of MS/MS. For example, internal cleavage and glycosidic bond cleavage are readily distinguished in the tandem mass spectra of permethylated glycans. This feature resulted in the identification of several isomers.

  6. Identifying and applying a highly selective probe to simultaneously determine the O-glucuronidation activity of human UGT1A3 and UGT1A4

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Liang, Si-Cheng; Wang, Chao; Ge, Guang-Bo; Huo, Xiao-Kui; Qi, Xiao-Yi; Deng, Sa; Liu, Ke-Xin; Ma, Xiao-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Glucuronidation mediated by uridine 5′-diphospho (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase is an important detoxification pathway. However, identifying a selective probe of UDP- glucuronosyltransferase is complicated because of the significant overlapping substrate specificity displayed by the enzyme. In this paper, desacetylcinobufagin (DACB) 3-O- and 16-O-glucuronidation were found to be isoform-specific probe reactions for UGT1A4 and UGT1A3, respectively. DACB was well characterized as a probe for simultaneously determining the catalytic activities of O-glucuronidation mediated by UGT1A3 and UGT1A4 from various enzyme sources, through a sensitive analysis method. PMID:25884245

  7. Total syntheses of disulphated glycosphingolipid SB1a and the related monosulphated SM1a

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Haruka; Tamai, Hideki; Gao, Chao; Imamura, Akihiro; Ando, Hiromune; Ishida, Hideharu; Feizi, Ten; Kiso, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Total syntheses of two natural sulphoglycolipids, disulphated glycosphingolipid SB1a and the structurally related monosulphated SM1a, are described. They have common glycan sequences and ceramide moiety and are associated with human epithelial carcinomas. The syntheses featured efficient glycan assembly and the glucosyl ceramide cassette as a versatile building block. The binding of the synthetic sulphoglycolipids by the carcinoma-specific monoclonal antibody AE3 was investigated using carbohydrate microarray technology. PMID:26399908

  8. Glycan microarray profiling of parasite infection sera identifies the LDNF glycan as a potential antigen for serodiagnosis of Trichinellosis

    PubMed Central

    Aranzamendi, Carmen; Tefsen, Boris; Jansen, Montse; Chiumiento, Lorena; Bruschi, Fabrizio; Kortbeek, Titia; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.; Pinelli, Elena; Die, Irma Van

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic methods for parasite infections still highly depend on the identification of the parasites by direct methods such as microscopic examination of blood, stool and tissue biopsies. Serodiagnosis is often carried out to complement the direct methods, however few synthetic antigens with sufficient sensitivity and specificity are available. Here we evaluated a glycan microarray approach to select for synthetic glycan antigens that could be used for serodiagnosis of parasitic infections. Using a glycan array containing over 250 different glycan antigens, we identified GalNAcβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc-R (LDNF) as a glycan antigen that is recognized by antibodies from Trichinella-infected individuals. We synthesized a neoglycoconjugate, consisting of 5 LDNF molecules covalently coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA), and used this neoglycoconjugate as an antigen to develop a highly sensitive total-Ig ELISA for serological screening of trichinellosis. The results indicate that glycan microarrays constitute a promising technology for fast and specific identification of parasite glycan antigens to improve serodiagnosis of different parasitic infections, either using an ELISA format, or parasite-specific glycan-arrays. PMID:21893057

  9. Glycan microarray profiling of parasite infection sera identifies the LDNF glycan as a potential antigen for serodiagnosis of trichinellosis.

    PubMed

    Aranzamendi, Carmen; Tefsen, Boris; Jansen, Montse; Chiumiento, Lorena; Bruschi, Fabrizio; Kortbeek, Titia; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D; Pinelli, Elena; Van Die, Irma

    2011-11-01

    Diagnostic methods for parasite infections still highly depend on the identification of the parasites by direct methods such as microscopic examination of blood, stool and tissue biopsies. Serodiagnosis is often carried out to complement the direct methods; however, few synthetic antigens with sufficient sensitivity and specificity are available. Here we evaluated a glycan microarray approach to select for synthetic glycan antigens that could be used for serodiagnosis of parasitic infections. Using a glycan array containing over 250 different glycan antigens, we identified GalNAcβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc-R (LDNF) as a glycan antigen that is recognized by antibodies from Trichinella-infected individuals. We synthesized a neoglycoconjugate, consisting of five LDNF molecules covalently coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA), and used this neoglycoconjugate as an antigen to develop a highly sensitive total-Ig ELISA for serological screening of trichinellosis. The results indicate that glycan microarrays constitute a promising technology for fast and specific identification of parasite glycan antigens to improve serodiagnosis of different parasitic infections, either using an ELISA format, or parasite-specific glycan arrays. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The GlycanBuilder: a fast, intuitive and flexible software tool for building and displaying glycan structures.

    PubMed

    Ceroni, Alessio; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M

    2007-08-07

    Carbohydrates play a critical role in human diseases and their potential utility as biomarkers for pathological conditions is a major driver for characterization of the glycome. However, the additional complexity of glycans compared to proteins and nucleic acids has slowed the advancement of glycomics in comparison to genomics and proteomics. The branched nature of carbohydrates, the great diversity of their constituents and the numerous alternative symbolic notations, make the input and display of glycans not as straightforward as for example the amino-acid sequence of a protein. Every glycoinformatic tool providing a user interface would benefit from a fast, intuitive, appealing mechanism for input and output of glycan structures in a computer readable format. A software tool for building and displaying glycan structures using a chosen symbolic notation is described here. The "GlycanBuilder" uses an automatic rendering algorithm to draw the saccharide symbols and to place them on the drawing board. The information about the symbolic notation is derived from a configurable graphical model as a set of rules governing the aspect and placement of residues and linkages. The algorithm is able to represent a structure using only few traversals of the tree and is inherently fast. The tool uses an XML format for import and export of encoded structures. The rendering algorithm described here is able to produce high-quality representations of glycan structures in a chosen symbolic notation. The automated rendering process enables the "GlycanBuilder" to be used both as a user-independent component for displaying glycans and as an easy-to-use drawing tool. The "GlycanBuilder" can be integrated in web pages as a Java applet for the visual editing of glycans. The same component is available as a web service to render an encoded structure into a graphical format. Finally, the "GlycanBuilder" can be integrated into other applications to create intuitive and appealing user

  11. The GlycanBuilder: a fast, intuitive and flexible software tool for building and displaying glycan structures

    PubMed Central

    Ceroni, Alessio; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M

    2007-01-01

    Background Carbohydrates play a critical role in human diseases and their potential utility as biomarkers for pathological conditions is a major driver for characterization of the glycome. However, the additional complexity of glycans compared to proteins and nucleic acids has slowed the advancement of glycomics in comparison to genomics and proteomics. The branched nature of carbohydrates, the great diversity of their constituents and the numerous alternative symbolic notations, make the input and display of glycans not as straightforward as for example the amino-acid sequence of a protein. Every glycoinformatic tool providing a user interface would benefit from a fast, intuitive, appealing mechanism for input and output of glycan structures in a computer readable format. Results A software tool for building and displaying glycan structures using a chosen symbolic notation is described here. The "GlycanBuilder" uses an automatic rendering algorithm to draw the saccharide symbols and to place them on the drawing board. The information about the symbolic notation is derived from a configurable graphical model as a set of rules governing the aspect and placement of residues and linkages. The algorithm is able to represent a structure using only few traversals of the tree and is inherently fast. The tool uses an XML format for import and export of encoded structures. Conclusion The rendering algorithm described here is able to produce high-quality representations of glycan structures in a chosen symbolic notation. The automated rendering process enables the "GlycanBuilder" to be used both as a user-independent component for displaying glycans and as an easy-to-use drawing tool. The "GlycanBuilder" can be integrated in web pages as a Java applet for the visual editing of glycans. The same component is available as a web service to render an encoded structure into a graphical format. Finally, the "GlycanBuilder" can be integrated into other applications to create

  12. Contribution of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Sukun; Hu, Kai; He, Siyi; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Mudan; Huang, Xin; Du, Tao; Zheng, Chunfu; Liu, Yalan; Hu, Qinxue

    2015-09-15

    HSV-2 is the major cause of genital herpes and its infection increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition and transmission. HSV-2 glycoprotein B together with glycoproteins D, H and L are indispensable for viral entry, of which gB, as a class III fusogen, plays an essential role. HSV-2 gB has seven potential N-linked glycosylation (N-CHO) sites, but their significance has yet to be determined. For the first time, we systematically analyzed the contributions of N-linked glycans on gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry. Our results demonstrated that, of the seven potential N-CHO sites on gB, mutation at N390, N483 or N668 decreased cell–cell fusion and viral entry, while mutation at N133 mainly affected protein expression and the production of infectious virus particles by blocking the transport of gB from the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi. Our findings highlight the significance of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB expression and function. - Highlights: • N-linked glycan at N133 is important for gB intracellular trafficking and maturation. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal cell–cell fusion. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal viral entry.

  13. Red meat allergic patients have a selective IgE response to the α-Gal glycan.

    PubMed

    Apostolovic, D; Tran, T A T; Sánchez-Vidaurre, S; Cirkovic Velickovic, T; Starkhammar, M; Hamsten, C; van Hage, M

    2015-11-01

    Galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) is a mammalian carbohydrate with significance in a novel type of food allergy. Patients with IgE against α-Gal report severe allergic symptoms 3-6 h after consumption of red meat. We investigated whether IgE from red meat allergic patients recognizes other mammalian glycans than α-Gal or glycans from the plant kingdom and insects of importance in allergy. We found that none of the 24 red meat allergic patients investigated had an IgE antibody response against the other abundant mammalian glycan N-glycolylneuraminic acid or against cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants from plant or venom sources (nCup a 1, nArt v 1, and MUXF3). Deglycosylation of an α-Gal-containing protein, bovine thyroglobulin, significantly reduced the IgE response. In conclusion, we show that red meat allergic patients have a selective IgE response to the α-Gal glycan found in red meat. Other common glycans reactive in allergic disease are not targets of red meat allergic patients' IgE.

  14. Differentiation of isomeric N-glycan structures by normal-phase liquid chromatography-MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maslen, Sarah; Sadowski, Pawel; Adam, Alex; Lilley, Kathryn; Stephens, Elaine

    2006-12-15

    The detailed characterization of protein N-glycosylation is very demanding given the many different glycoforms and structural isomers that can exist on glycoproteins. Here we report a fast and sensitive method for the extensive structure elucidation of reducing-end labeled N-glycan mixtures using a combination of capillary normal-phase HPLC coupled off-line to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and TOF/TOF-MS/MS. Using this method, isobaric N-glycans released from honey bee phospholipase A2 and Arabidopsis thaliana glycoproteins were separated by normal-phase chromatography and subsequently identified by key fragment ions in the MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectra. In addition, linkage and branching information were provided by abundant cross-ring and "elimination" fragment ions in the MALDI-CID spectra that gave extensive structural information. Furthermore, the fragmentation characteristics of N-glycans reductively aminated with 2-aminobenzoic acid and 2-aminobenzamide were compared. The identification of N-glycans containing 3-linked core fucose was facilitated by distinctive ions present only in the MALDI-CID spectra of 2-aminobenzoic acid-labeled oligosaccharides. To our knowledge, this is the first MS/MS-based technique that allows confident identification of N-glycans containing 3-linked core fucose, which is a major allergenic determinant on insect and plant glycoproteins.

  15. Orthogonal Assessment of Biotherapeutic Glycosylation: A Case Study Correlating N-Glycan Core Afucosylation of Herceptin with Mechanism of Action.

    PubMed

    Upton, Rosie; Bell, Leonard; Guy, Colin; Caldwell, Paul; Estdale, Sian; Barran, Perdita E; Firth, David

    2016-10-18

    In the development of therapeutic antibodies and biosimilars, an appropriate biopharmaceutical CMC control strategy that connects critical quality attributes with mechanism of action should enable product assessment at an early stage of development in order to mitigate risk. Here we demonstrate a new analytical workflow using trastuzumab which comprises "middle-up" analysis using a combination of IdeS and the endoglycosidases EndoS and EndoS2 to comprehensively map the glycan content. Enzymatic cleavage between the two N-acetyl glucosamine residues of the chitobiose core of N-glycans significantly simplifies the oligosaccharide component enabling facile distinction of GlcNAc from GlcNAc with core fucose. This approach facilitates quantitative determination of total Fc-glycan core-afucosylation, which was in turn correlated with receptor binding affinity by surface plasmon resonance and in vitro ADCC potency with a cell based bioassay. The strategy also quantifies Fc-glycan occupancy and the relative contribution from high mannose glycans.

  16. Novel cleavage of reductively aminated glycan-tags by N-bromosuccinimide to regenerate free, reducing glycans.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuezheng; Johns, Brian A; Ju, Hong; Lasanajak, Yi; Zhao, Chunmei; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D

    2013-11-15

    Glycans that are fluorescently tagged by reductive amination have been useful for functional glycomic studies. However, the existing tags can introduce unwanted properties to the glycans and complicate structural and functional studies. Here, we describe a facile method using N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) to remove the tags and efficiently regenerate free reducing glycans. The regenerated free reducing glycans can be easily analyzed by routine mass spectrometry or retagged with different tags for further studies. This new method can be used to efficiently remove a variety of fluorescent tags installed by reductive amination, including 2-aminobenzoic acid and 2-aminopyridine. NBS treatment essentially transforms the commonly used 2-aminobenzoic linkage to a cleavable linkage. It can be used to cleave printed glycans from microarrays and cleave neoglycopeptides containing a 2-aminobenzoic linker.

  17. Association analyses of large-scale glycan microarray data reveal novel host-specific substructures in influenza A virus binding glycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nan; Martin, Brigitte E.; Yang, Chun-Kai; Luo, Feng; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-10-01

    Influenza A viruses can infect a wide variety of animal species and, occasionally, humans. Infection occurs through the binding formed by viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and certain types of glycan receptors on host cell membranes. Studies have shown that the α2,3-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,3Gal) in avian, equine, and canine species; the α2,6-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,6Gal) in humans; and SA2,3Gal and SA2,6Gal in swine are responsible for the corresponding host tropisms. However, more detailed and refined substructures that determine host tropisms are still not clear. Thus, in this study, we applied association mining on a set of glycan microarray data for 211 influenza viruses from five host groups: humans, swine, canine, migratory waterfowl, and terrestrial birds. The results suggest that besides Neu5Acα2-6Galβ, human-origin viruses could bind glycans with Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Ac and Neu5Gcα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc substructures; Galβ and GlcNAcβ terminal substructures, without sialic acid branches, were associated with the binding of human-, swine-, and avian-origin viruses; sulfated Neu5Acα2-3 substructures were associated with the binding of human- and swine-origin viruses. Finally, through three-dimensional structure characterization, we revealed that the role of glycan chain shapes is more important than that of torsion angles or of overall structural similarities in virus host tropisms.

  18. Association analyses of large-scale glycan microarray data reveal novel host-specific substructures in influenza A virus binding glycans

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Martin, Brigitte E.; Yang, Chun-Kai; Luo, Feng; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses can infect a wide variety of animal species and, occasionally, humans. Infection occurs through the binding formed by viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and certain types of glycan receptors on host cell membranes. Studies have shown that the α2,3-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,3Gal) in avian, equine, and canine species; the α2,6-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,6Gal) in humans; and SA2,3Gal and SA2,6Gal in swine are responsible for the corresponding host tropisms. However, more detailed and refined substructures that determine host tropisms are still not clear. Thus, in this study, we applied association mining on a set of glycan microarray data for 211 influenza viruses from five host groups: humans, swine, canine, migratory waterfowl, and terrestrial birds. The results suggest that besides Neu5Acα2–6Galβ, human-origin viruses could bind glycans with Neu5Acα2–8Neu5Acα2–8Neu5Ac and Neu5Gcα2–6Galβ1–4GlcNAc substructures; Galβ and GlcNAcβ terminal substructures, without sialic acid branches, were associated with the binding of human-, swine-, and avian-origin viruses; sulfated Neu5Acα2–3 substructures were associated with the binding of human- and swine-origin viruses. Finally, through three-dimensional structure characterization, we revealed that the role of glycan chain shapes is more important than that of torsion angles or of overall structural similarities in virus host tropisms. PMID:26508590

  19. Immunization with recombinantly expressed glycan antigens from Schistosoma mansoni induces glycan-specific antibodies against the parasite

    PubMed Central

    Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Luyai, Anthony E; Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Mandalasi, Msano; Mickum, Megan; Smith, David F; Nyame, A Kwame; Cummings, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by infection with parasitic helminths of Schistosoma spp. is a major global health problem due to inadequate treatment and lack of a vaccine. The immune response to schistosomes includes glycan antigens, which could be valuable diagnostic markers and vaccine targets. However, no precedent exists for how to design vaccines targeting eukaryotic glycoconjugates. The di- and tri-saccharide motifs LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4GlcNAc; LDN) and fucosylated LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc; LDNF) are the basis for several important schistosome glycan antigens. They occur in monomeric form or as repeating units (poly-LDNF) and as part of a variety of different glycoconjugates. Because chemical synthesis and conjugation of such antigens is exceedingly difficult, we sought to develop a recombinant expression system for parasite glycans. We hypothesized that presentation of parasite glycans on the cell surface would induce glycan-specific antibodies. We generated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) Lec8 cell lines expressing poly-LDN (L8-GT) and poly-LDNF (L8-GTFT) abundantly on their membrane glycoproteins. Sera from Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice were highly cross-reactive with the cells and with cell-surface N-glycans. Immunizing mice with L8-GT and L8-GTFT cells induced glycan-specific antibodies. The L8-GTFT cells induced a sustained booster response, with antibodies that bound to S. mansoni lysates and recapitulated the exquisite specificity of the anti-parasite response for particular presentations of LDNF antigen. In summary, this recombinant expression system promotes successful generation of antibodies to the glycans of S. mansoni, and it can be adapted to study the role of glycan antigens and anti-glycan immune responses in many other infections and pathologies. PMID:24727440

  20. Immunization with recombinantly expressed glycan antigens from Schistosoma mansoni induces glycan-specific antibodies against the parasite.

    PubMed

    Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Luyai, Anthony E; Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Mandalasi, Msano; Mickum, Megan; Smith, David F; Nyame, A Kwame; Cummings, Richard D

    2014-07-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by infection with parasitic helminths of Schistosoma spp. is a major global health problem due to inadequate treatment and lack of a vaccine. The immune response to schistosomes includes glycan antigens, which could be valuable diagnostic markers and vaccine targets. However, no precedent exists for how to design vaccines targeting eukaryotic glycoconjugates. The di- and tri-saccharide motifs LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4GlcNAc; LDN) and fucosylated LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc; LDNF) are the basis for several important schistosome glycan antigens. They occur in monomeric form or as repeating units (poly-LDNF) and as part of a variety of different glycoconjugates. Because chemical synthesis and conjugation of such antigens is exceedingly difficult, we sought to develop a recombinant expression system for parasite glycans. We hypothesized that presentation of parasite glycans on the cell surface would induce glycan-specific antibodies. We generated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) Lec8 cell lines expressing poly-LDN (L8-GT) and poly-LDNF (L8-GTFT) abundantly on their membrane glycoproteins. Sera from Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice were highly cross-reactive with the cells and with cell-surface N-glycans. Immunizing mice with L8-GT and L8-GTFT cells induced glycan-specific antibodies. The L8-GTFT cells induced a sustained booster response, with antibodies that bound to S. mansoni lysates and recapitulated the exquisite specificity of the anti-parasite response for particular presentations of LDNF antigen. In summary, this recombinant expression system promotes successful generation of antibodies to the glycans of S. mansoni, and it can be adapted to study the role of glycan antigens and anti-glycan immune responses in many other infections and pathologies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Recognition of microbial glycans by human intelectin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wesener, Darryl A.; Wangkanont, Kittikhun; McBride, Ryan; Song, Xuezheng; Kraft, Matthew B.; Hodges, Heather L.; Zarling, Lucas C.; Splain, Rebecca A.; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.; Paulson, James C.; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2015-07-06

    The glycans displayed on mammalian cells can differ markedly from those on microbes. Such differences could, in principle, be 'read' by carbohydrate-binding proteins, or lectins. In this paper, we used glycan microarrays to show that human intelectin-1 (hIntL-1) does not bind known human glycan epitopes but does interact with multiple glycan epitopes found exclusively on microbes: β-linked D-galactofuranose (β-Galf), D-phosphoglycerol–modified glycans, heptoses, D-glycero-D-talo-oct-2-ulosonic acid (KO) and 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (KDO). The 1.6-Å-resolution crystal structure of hIntL-1 complexed with β-Galf revealed that hIntL-1 uses a bound calcium ion to coordinate terminal exocyclic 1,2-diols. N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), a sialic acid widespread in human glycans, has an exocyclic 1,2-diol but does not bind hIntL-1, probably owing to unfavorable steric and electronic effects. hIntL-1 marks only Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes that display surface glycans with terminal 1,2-diol groups. Finally, this ligand selectivity suggests that hIntL-1 functions in microbial surveillance.

  2. Recognition of microbial glycans by human intelectin-1.

    PubMed

    Wesener, Darryl A; Wangkanont, Kittikhun; McBride, Ryan; Song, Xuezheng; Kraft, Matthew B; Hodges, Heather L; Zarling, Lucas C; Splain, Rebecca A; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D; Paulson, James C; Forest, Katrina T; Kiessling, Laura L

    2015-08-01

    The glycans displayed on mammalian cells can differ markedly from those on microbes. Such differences could, in principle, be 'read' by carbohydrate-binding proteins, or lectins. We used glycan microarrays to show that human intelectin-1 (hIntL-1) does not bind known human glycan epitopes but does interact with multiple glycan epitopes found exclusively on microbes: β-linked D-galactofuranose (β-Galf), D-phosphoglycerol-modified glycans, heptoses, D-glycero-D-talo-oct-2-ulosonic acid (KO) and 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (KDO). The 1.6-Å-resolution crystal structure of hIntL-1 complexed with β-Galf revealed that hIntL-1 uses a bound calcium ion to coordinate terminal exocyclic 1,2-diols. N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), a sialic acid widespread in human glycans, has an exocyclic 1,2-diol but does not bind hIntL-1, probably owing to unfavorable steric and electronic effects. hIntL-1 marks only Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes that display surface glycans with terminal 1,2-diol groups. This ligand selectivity suggests that hIntL-1 functions in microbial surveillance.

  3. Recognition of microbial glycans by human intelectin-1

    DOE PAGES

    Wesener, Darryl A.; Wangkanont, Kittikhun; McBride, Ryan; ...

    2015-07-06

    The glycans displayed on mammalian cells can differ markedly from those on microbes. Such differences could, in principle, be 'read' by carbohydrate-binding proteins, or lectins. In this paper, we used glycan microarrays to show that human intelectin-1 (hIntL-1) does not bind known human glycan epitopes but does interact with multiple glycan epitopes found exclusively on microbes: β-linked D-galactofuranose (β-Galf), D-phosphoglycerol–modified glycans, heptoses, D-glycero-D-talo-oct-2-ulosonic acid (KO) and 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (KDO). The 1.6-Å-resolution crystal structure of hIntL-1 complexed with β-Galf revealed that hIntL-1 uses a bound calcium ion to coordinate terminal exocyclic 1,2-diols. N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), a sialic acid widespread in humanmore » glycans, has an exocyclic 1,2-diol but does not bind hIntL-1, probably owing to unfavorable steric and electronic effects. hIntL-1 marks only Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes that display surface glycans with terminal 1,2-diol groups. Finally, this ligand selectivity suggests that hIntL-1 functions in microbial surveillance.« less

  4. N-linked glycan truncation causes enhanced clearance of plasma-derived von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, J M; Aguila, S; McRae, E; Ward, S E; Rawley, O; Fallon, P G; Brophy, T M; Preston, R J S; Brady, L; Sheils, O; Chion, A; O'Donnell, J S

    2016-12-01

    Essentials von Willebrands factor (VWF) glycosylation plays a key role in modulating in vivo clearance. VWF glycoforms were used to examine the role of specific glycan moieties in regulating clearance. Reduction in sialylation resulted in enhanced VWF clearance through asialoglycoprotein receptor. Progressive VWF N-linked glycan trimming resulted in increased macrophage-mediated clearance. Click to hear Dr Denis discuss clearance of von Willebrand factor in a free presentation from the ISTH Academy SUMMARY: Background Enhanced von Willebrand factor (VWF) clearance is important in the etiology of both type 1 and type 2 von Willebrand disease (VWD). In addition, previous studies have demonstrated that VWF glycans play a key role in regulating in vivo clearance. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying VWF clearance remain poorly understood. Objective To define the molecular mechanisms through which VWF N-linked glycan structures influence in vivo clearance. Methods By use of a series of exoglycosidases, different plasma-derived VWF (pd-VWF) glycoforms were generated. In vivo clearance of these glycoforms was then assessed in VWF(-/-) mice in the presence or absence of inhibitors of asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR), or following clodronate-induced macrophage depletion. Results Reduced amounts of N-linked and O-linked sialylation resulted in enhanced pd-VWF clearance modulated via ASGPR. In addition to this role of terminal sialylation, we further observed that progressive N-linked glycan trimming also resulted in markedly enhanced VWF clearance. Furthermore, these additional N-linked glycan effects on clearance were ASGPR-independent, and instead involved enhanced macrophage clearance that was mediated, at least in part, through LDL receptor-related protein 1. Conclusion The carbohydrate determinants expressed on VWF regulate susceptibility to proteolysis by ADAMTS-13. In addition, our findings now further demonstrate that non-sialic acid carbohydrate

  5. Array-assisted Characterization of a Fucosyltransferase Required for the Biosynthesis of Complex Core Modifications of Nematode N-Glycans*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shi; Serna, Sonia; Reichardt, Niels-Christian; Paschinger, Katharina; Wilson, Iain B. H.

    2013-01-01

    Fucose is a common monosaccharide component of cell surfaces and is involved in many biological recognition events. Therefore, definition and exploitation of the specificity of the enzymes (fucosyltransferases) involved in fucosylation is a recurrent theme in modern glycosciences. Despite various studies, the specificities of many fucosyltransferases are still unknown, so new approaches are required to study these. The model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans expresses a wide range of fucosylated glycans, including N-linked oligosaccharides with unusual complex core modifications. Up to three fucose residues can be present on the standard N,N′-diacetylchitobiose unit of these N-glycans, but only the fucosyltransferases responsible for transfer of two of these (the core α1,3-fucosyltransferase FUT-1 and the core α1,6-fucosyltransferase FUT-8) were previously characterized. By use of a glycan library in both array and solution formats, we were able to reveal that FUT-6, another C. elegans α1,3-fucosyltransferase, modifies nematode glycan cores, specifically the distal N-acetylglucosamine residue; this result is in accordance with glycomic analysis of fut-6 mutant worms. This core-modifying activity of FUT-6 in vitro and in vivo is in addition to its previously determined ability to synthesize Lewis X epitopes in vitro. A larger scale synthesis of a nematode N-glycan core in vitro using all three fucosyltransferases was performed, and the nature of the glycosidic linkages was determined by NMR. FUT-6 is probably the first eukaryotic glycosyltransferase whose specificity has been redefined with the aid of glycan microarrays and so is a paradigm for the study of other unusual glycosidic linkages in model and parasitic organisms. PMID:23754284

  6. Array-assisted characterization of a fucosyltransferase required for the biosynthesis of complex core modifications of nematode N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shi; Serna, Sonia; Reichardt, Niels-Christian; Paschinger, Katharina; Wilson, Iain B H

    2013-07-19

    Fucose is a common monosaccharide component of cell surfaces and is involved in many biological recognition events. Therefore, definition and exploitation of the specificity of the enzymes (fucosyltransferases) involved in fucosylation is a recurrent theme in modern glycosciences. Despite various studies, the specificities of many fucosyltransferases are still unknown, so new approaches are required to study these. The model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans expresses a wide range of fucosylated glycans, including N-linked oligosaccharides with unusual complex core modifications. Up to three fucose residues can be present on the standard N,N'-diacetylchitobiose unit of these N-glycans, but only the fucosyltransferases responsible for transfer of two of these (the core α1,3-fucosyltransferase FUT-1 and the core α1,6-fucosyltransferase FUT-8) were previously characterized. By use of a glycan library in both array and solution formats, we were able to reveal that FUT-6, another C. elegans α1,3-fucosyltransferase, modifies nematode glycan cores, specifically the distal N-acetylglucosamine residue; this result is in accordance with glycomic analysis of fut-6 mutant worms. This core-modifying activity of FUT-6 in vitro and in vivo is in addition to its previously determined ability to synthesize Lewis X epitopes in vitro. A larger scale synthesis of a nematode N-glycan core in vitro using all three fucosyltransferases was performed, and the nature of the glycosidic linkages was determined by NMR. FUT-6 is probably the first eukaryotic glycosyltransferase whose specificity has been redefined with the aid of glycan microarrays and so is a paradigm for the study of other unusual glycosidic linkages in model and parasitic organisms.

  7. Modifications of Glycans: Biological Significance and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Muthana, Saddam M.; Campbell, Christopher; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a central role in a wide range of biological processes. As with nucleic acids and proteins, modifications of specific sites within the glycan chain can modulate a carbohydrate’s overall biological function. For example, acylation, methylation, sulfation, epimerization, and phosphorylation can occur at various positions within a carbohydrate to modulate bioactivity. Therefore, there is significant interest in identifying discrete carbohydrate modifications and understanding their biological effects. Additionally, enzymes that catalyze those modifications and proteins that bind modified glycans provide numerous targets for therapeutic intervention. This review will focus on modifications of glycans that occur after the oligomer/polymer has been assembled, generally referred to as postglycosylational modifications. PMID:22195988

  8. Systemic Fluorescence Imaging of Zebrafish Glycans with Bioorthogonal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Paresh; Beahm, Brendan J; Shieh, Peyton; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2015-09-21

    Vertebrate glycans constitute a large, important, and dynamic set of post-translational modifications that are notoriously difficult to manipulate and image. Although the chemical reporter strategy has been used in conjunction with bioorthogonal chemistry to image the external glycosylation state of live zebrafish and detect tumor-associated glycans in mice, the ability to image glycans systemically within a live organism has remained elusive. Here, we report a method that combines the metabolic incorporation of a cyclooctyne-functionalized sialic acid derivative with a ligation reaction of a fluorogenic tetrazine, allowing for the imaging of sialylated glycoconjugates within live zebrafish embryos.

  9. Decoding the Role of Glycans in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Pollyanna S.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Morrot, Alexandre; Freire-de-Lima, Celio G.

    2017-01-01

    Complications arising from malaria are a concern for public health authorities worldwide, since the annual caseload in humans usually exceeds millions. Of more than 160 species of Plasmodium, only 4 infect humans, with the most severe cases ascribed to Plasmodium falciparum and the most prevalent to Plasmodium vivax. Over the past 70 years, since World War II, when the first antimalarial drugs were widely used, many efforts have been made to combat this disease, including vectorial control, new drug discoveries and genetic and molecular approaches. Molecular approaches, such as glycobiology, may lead to new therapeutic targets (both in the host and the parasites), since all interactions are mediated by carbohydrates or glycan moieties decorating both cellular surfaces from parasite and host cells. In this review, we address the carbohydrate-mediated glycobiology that directly affects Plasmodium survival or host resistance. PMID:28649240

  10. Glycans from avian influenza virus are recognized by chicken dendritic cells and are targets for the humoral immune response in chicken.

    PubMed

    de Geus, Eveline D; Tefsen, Boris; van Haarlem, Daphne A; van Eden, Willem; van Die, Irma; Vervelde, Lonneke

    2013-12-01

    To increase our understanding of the interaction between avian influenza virus and its chicken host, we identified receptors for putative avian influenza virus (AIV) glycan determinants on chicken dendritic cells. Chicken dendritic cells (DCs) were found to recognize glycan determinants containing terminal αGalNAc, Galα1-3Gal, GlcNAcβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-4GlcNAcβ (chitotriose) and Galα1-2Gal. Infection of chicken dendritic cells with either low pathogenic (LP) or highly pathogenic (HP) AIV results in elevated mRNA expression of homologs of the mouse C-type lectins DEC205 and macrophage mannose receptor (MMR), whereas expression levels of the human dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) homolog remained unchanged. Following uptake and subsequent presentation of avian influenza virus by DCs, adaptive immunity, including humoral immune responses are induced. We have investigated the antibody responses against virus glycan epitopes after avian influenza virus infection. Using glycan micro-array analysis we showed that chicken contained antibodies that predominantly recognize terminal Galα1-3Gal-R, chitotriose and Fucα1-2Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R (H-type 2). After influenza-infection, glycan array analysis showed that both levels and repertoire of glycan-recognizing antibodies decreased. However, analysis of the sera by ELISA indicated that the levels of different isotypes of anti-glycan Abs against specific glycan antigens was increased after influenza-infection, suggesting that the presentation of the glycan antigens and iso-type of the Abs are critical parameters to take into account when measuring anti-glycan Abs. This novel approach in avian influenza research may contribute to the development of a broad spectrum vaccine and improves our mechanistic understanding of innate and adaptive responses to glycans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Multiple Novel Functions of Henipavirus O-glycans: The First O-glycan Functions Identified in the Paramyxovirus Family.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jacquelyn A; Nicola, Anthony V; Baum, Linda G; Aguilar, Hector C

    2016-02-01

    O-linked glycosylation is a ubiquitous protein modification in organisms belonging to several kingdoms. Both microbial and host protein glycans are used by many pathogens for host invasion and immune evasion, yet little is known about the roles of O-glycans in viral pathogenesis. Reportedly, there is no single function attributed to O-glycans for the significant paramyxovirus family. The paramyxovirus family includes many important pathogens, such as measles, mumps, parainfluenza, metapneumo- and the deadly Henipaviruses Nipah (NiV) and Hendra (HeV) viruses. Paramyxoviral cell entry requires the coordinated actions of two viral membrane glycoproteins: the attachment (HN/H/G) and fusion (F) glycoproteins. O-glycan sites in HeV G were recently identified, facilitating use of the attachment protein of this deadly paramyxovirus as a model to study O-glycan functions. We mutated the identified HeV G O-glycosylation sites and found mutants with altered cell-cell fusion, G conformation, G/F association, viral entry in a pseudotyped viral system, and, quite unexpectedly, pseudotyped viral F protein incorporation and processing phenotypes. These are all important functions of viral glycoproteins. These phenotypes were broadly conserved for equivalent NiV mutants. Thus our results identify multiple novel and pathologically important functions of paramyxoviral O-glycans, paving the way to study O-glycan functions in other paramyxoviruses and enveloped viruses.

  12. Multiple Novel Functions of Henipavirus O-glycans: The First O-glycan Functions Identified in the Paramyxovirus Family

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jacquelyn A.; Nicola, Anthony V.; Baum, Linda G.; Aguilar, Hector C.

    2016-01-01

    O-linked glycosylation is a ubiquitous protein modification in organisms belonging to several kingdoms. Both microbial and host protein glycans are used by many pathogens for host invasion and immune evasion, yet little is known about the roles of O-glycans in viral pathogenesis. Reportedly, there is no single function attributed to O-glycans for the significant paramyxovirus family. The paramyxovirus family includes many important pathogens, such as measles, mumps, parainfluenza, metapneumo- and the deadly Henipaviruses Nipah (NiV) and Hendra (HeV) viruses. Paramyxoviral cell entry requires the coordinated actions of two viral membrane glycoproteins: the attachment (HN/H/G) and fusion (F) glycoproteins. O-glycan sites in HeV G were recently identified, facilitating use of the attachment protein of this deadly paramyxovirus as a model to study O-glycan functions. We mutated the identified HeV G O-glycosylation sites and found mutants with altered cell-cell fusion, G conformation, G/F association, viral entry in a pseudotyped viral system, and, quite unexpectedly, pseudotyped viral F protein incorporation and processing phenotypes. These are all important functions of viral glycoproteins. These phenotypes were broadly conserved for equivalent NiV mutants. Thus our results identify multiple novel and pathologically important functions of paramyxoviral O-glycans, paving the way to study O-glycan functions in other paramyxoviruses and enveloped viruses. PMID:26867212

  13. Complex N-Glycans Influence the Spatial Arrangement of Voltage Gated Potassium Channels in Membranes of Neuronal-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hall, M. Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A.; Edwards, Michael A. J.; Schwalbe, Ruth A.

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic electrical properties of a neuron depend on expression of voltage gated potassium (Kv) channel isoforms, as well as their distribution and density in the plasma membrane. Recently, we showed that N-glycosylation site occupancy of Kv3.1b modulated its placement in the cell body and neurites of a neuronal-derived cell line, B35 neuroblastoma cells. To extrapolate this mechanism to other N-glycosylated Kv channels, we evaluated the impact of N-glycosylation occupancy of Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 channels. Western blots revealed that wild type Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 α-subunits had complex and oligomannose N-glycans, respectively, and that abolishment of the N-glycosylation site(s) generated Kv proteins without N-glycans. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images revealed that N-glycans of Kv3.1a contributed to its placement in the cell membrane while N-glycans had no effect on the distribution of Kv1.1. Based on particle analysis of EGFP-Kv proteins in the adhered membrane, glycosylated forms of Kv3.1a, Kv1.1, and Kv3.1b had differences in the number, size or density of Kv protein clusters in the cell membrane of neurites and cell body of B35 cells. Differences were also observed between the unglycosylated forms of the Kv proteins. Cell dissociation assays revealed that cell-cell adhesion was increased by the presence of complex N-glycans of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, whereas cell adhesion was similar in the oligomannose and unglycosylated Kv1.1 subunit containing B35 cells. Our findings provide direct evidence that N-glycans of Kv3.1 splice variants contribute to the placement of these glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of neuronal-derived cells while those of Kv1.1 were absent. Further when the cell membrane distribution of the Kv channel was modified by N-glycans then the cell-cell adhesion properties were altered. Our study demonstrates that N-glycosylation of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, provides a mechanism for the distribution of these proteins to the cell

  14. Complex N-Glycans Influence the Spatial Arrangement of Voltage Gated Potassium Channels in Membranes of Neuronal-Derived Cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, M Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A; Edwards, Michael A J; Schwalbe, Ruth A

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic electrical properties of a neuron depend on expression of voltage gated potassium (Kv) channel isoforms, as well as their distribution and density in the plasma membrane. Recently, we showed that N-glycosylation site occupancy of Kv3.1b modulated its placement in the cell body and neurites of a neuronal-derived cell line, B35 neuroblastoma cells. To extrapolate this mechanism to other N-glycosylated Kv channels, we evaluated the impact of N-glycosylation occupancy of Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 channels. Western blots revealed that wild type Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 α-subunits had complex and oligomannose N-glycans, respectively, and that abolishment of the N-glycosylation site(s) generated Kv proteins without N-glycans. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images revealed that N-glycans of Kv3.1a contributed to its placement in the cell membrane while N-glycans had no effect on the distribution of Kv1.1. Based on particle analysis of EGFP-Kv proteins in the adhered membrane, glycosylated forms of Kv3.1a, Kv1.1, and Kv3.1b had differences in the number, size or density of Kv protein clusters in the cell membrane of neurites and cell body of B35 cells. Differences were also observed between the unglycosylated forms of the Kv proteins. Cell dissociation assays revealed that cell-cell adhesion was increased by the presence of complex N-glycans of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, whereas cell adhesion was similar in the oligomannose and unglycosylated Kv1.1 subunit containing B35 cells. Our findings provide direct evidence that N-glycans of Kv3.1 splice variants contribute to the placement of these glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of neuronal-derived cells while those of Kv1.1 were absent. Further when the cell membrane distribution of the Kv channel was modified by N-glycans then the cell-cell adhesion properties were altered. Our study demonstrates that N-glycosylation of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, provides a mechanism for the distribution of these proteins to the cell

  15. Complex N-Glycans Are Essential, but Core 1 and 2 Mucin O-Glycans, O-Fucose Glycans, and NOTCH1 Are Dispensable, for Mammalian Spermatogenesis1

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Frank; Lu, Linchao; Williams, Suzannah A.; Stanley, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT To identify roles in spermatogenesis for major subclasses of N- and O-glycans and Notch signaling, male mice carrying floxed C1galt1, Pofut1, Notch1 or Mgat1 alleles and a testis-specific Cre recombinase transgene were generated. T-synthase (C1GALT1) transfers Gal to generate core 1 and core 2 mucin O-glycans; POFUT1 transfers O-fucose to particular epidermal growth factor-like repeats and is essential for canonical Notch signaling; and MGAT1 (GlcNAcT-I) transfers GlcNAc to initiate hybrid and complex N-glycan synthesis. Cre recombinase transgenes driven by various promoters were investigated, including Stra8-iCre expressed in spermatogonia, Sycp1-Cre expressed in spermatocytes, Prm1-Cre expressed in spermatids, and AMH-Cre expressed in Sertoli cells. All Cre transgenes deleted floxed alleles, but efficiencies varied widely. Stra8-iCre was the most effective, deleting floxed Notch1 and Mgat1 alleles with 100% efficiency and floxed C1galt1 and Pofut1 alleles with ∼80% efficiency, based on transmission of deleted alleles. Removal of C1galt1, Pofut1, or Notch1 in spermatogonia had no effect on testicular weight, histology, or fertility. However, males in which the synthesis of complex N-glycans was blocked by deletion of Mgat1 in spermatogonia did not produce sperm. Spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and spermatids were generated, but most spermatids formed giant multinucleated cells or symplasts, and apoptosis was increased. Therefore, although core 1 and 2 mucin O-glycans, NOTCH1, POFUT1, O-fucose glycans, and Notch signaling are dispensable, MGAT1 and complex N-glycans are essential for spermatogenesis. PMID:22492969

  16. Upregulation of glycans containing 3' fucose in a subset of pancreatic cancers uncovered using fusion-tagged lectins.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhir; Pal, Kuntal; Yadav, Jessica; Tang, Huiyuan; Partyka, Katie; Kletter, Doron; Hsueh, Peter; Ensink, Elliot; Kc, Birendra; Hostetter, Galen; Xu, H Eric; Bern, Marshall; Smith, David F; Mehta, Anand S; Brand, Randall; Melcher, Karsten; Haab, Brian B

    2015-06-05

    The fucose post-translational modification is frequently increased in pancreatic cancer, thus forming the basis for promising biomarkers, but a subset of pancreatic cancer patients does not elevate the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We hypothesized that such patients elevate glycan motifs with fucose in linkages and contexts different from the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We used a database of glycan array data to identify the lectins CCL2 to detect glycan motifs with fucose in a 3' linkage; CGL2 for motifs with fucose in a 2' linkage; and RSL for fucose in all linkages. We used several practical methods to test the lectins and determine the optimal mode of detection, and we then tested whether the lectins detected glycans in pancreatic cancer patients who did not elevate the sialyl-Lewis A glycan, which is upregulated in ∼75% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Patients who did not upregulate sialyl-Lewis A, which contains fucose in a 4' linkage, tended to upregulate fucose in a 3' linkage, as detected by CCL2, but they did not upregulate total fucose or fucose in a 2' linkage. CCL2 binding was high in cancerous epithelia from pancreatic tumors, including areas negative for sialyl-Lewis A and a related motif containing 3' fucose, sialyl-Lewis X. Thus, glycans containing 3' fucose may complement sialyl-Lewis A to contribute to improved detection of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the use of panels of recombinant lectins may uncover details about glycosylation that could be important for characterizing and detecting cancer.

  17. Integrated Omics and Computational Glycobiology Reveal Structural Basis for Influenza A Virus Glycan Microheterogeneity and Host Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Kshitij; Klein, Joshua A.; White, Mitchell R.; Grant, Oliver C.; Leymarie, Nancy; Woods, Robert J.; Zaia, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Despite sustained biomedical research effort, influenza A virus remains an imminent threat to the world population and a major healthcare burden. The challenge in developing vaccines against influenza is the ability of the virus to mutate rapidly in response to selective immune pressure. Hemagglutinin is the predominant surface glycoprotein and the primary determinant of antigenicity, virulence and zoonotic potential. Mutations leading to changes in the number of HA glycosylation sites are often reported. Such genetic sequencing studies predict at best the disruption or creation of sequons for N-linked glycosylation; they do not reflect actual phenotypic changes in HA structure. Therefore, combined analysis of glycan micro and macro-heterogeneity and bioassays will better define the relationships among glycosylation, viral bioactivity and evolution. We present a study that integrates proteomics, glycomics and glycoproteomics of HA before and after adaptation to innate immune system pressure. We combined this information with glycan array and immune lectin binding data to correlate the phenotypic changes with biological activity. Underprocessed glycoforms predominated at the glycosylation sites found to be involved in viral evolution in response to selection pressures and interactions with innate immune-lectins. To understand the structural basis for site-specific glycan microheterogeneity at these sites, we performed structural modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. We observed that the presence of immature, high-mannose type glycans at a particular site correlated with reduced accessibility to glycan remodeling enzymes. Further, the high mannose glycans at sites implicated in immune lectin recognition were predicted to be capable of forming trimeric interactions with the immune-lectin surfactant protein-D. PMID:26984886

  18. Upregulation of Glycans Containing 3’ Fucose in a Subset of Pancreatic Cancers Uncovered Using Fusion-Tagged Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhir; Pal, Kuntal; Yadav, Jessica; Tang, Huiyuan; Partyka, Katie; Kletter, Doron; Hsueh, Peter; Ensink, Elliot; Birendra, KC; Hostetter, Galen; Xu, H. Eric; Bern, Marshall; Smith, David F.; Mehta, Anand S.; Brand, Randall; Melcher, Karsten; Haab, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    The fucose post-translational modification is frequently increased in pancreatic cancer, thus forming the basis for promising biomarkers, but a subset of pancreatic cancer patients does not elevate the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We hypothesized that such patients elevate glycan motifs with fucose in linkages and contexts different from the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We used a database of glycan array data to identify the lectins CCL2 to detect glycan motifs with fucose in a 3’ linkage; CGL2 for motifs with fucose in a 2’ linkage; and RSL for fucose in all linkages. We used several practical methods to test the lectins and determine the optimal mode of detection, and we then tested whether the lectins detected glycans in pancreatic cancer patients who did not elevate the sialyl-Lewis A glycan, which is upregulated in ~75% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Patients who did not upregulate sialyl-Lewis A, which contains fucose in a 4’ linkage, tended to upregulate fucose in a 3’ linkage, as detected by CCL2, but they did not upregulate total fucose or fucose in a 2’ linkage. CCL2 binding was high in cancerous epithelia from pancreatic tumors, including areas negative for sialyl-Lewis A and a related motif containing 3’ fucose, sialyl-Lewis X. Thus glycans containing 3’ fucose may complement sialyl-Lewis A to contribute to improved detection of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the use of panels of recombinant lectins may uncover details about glycosylation that could be important for characterizing and detecting cancer. PMID:25938165

  19. Oligosaccharide binding proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis reveal a preference for host glycans.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Daniel; Kim, Jae Han; German, J Bruce; Raybould, Helen E; Mills, David A

    2011-03-15

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs), part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have used the Mammalian Glycan Array to determine the specific affinities of these proteins. This was correlated with binding protein expression induced by different prebiotics including HMO. Half of the F1SBPs in B. infantis were determined to bind mammalian oligosaccharides. Their affinities included different blood group structures and mucin oligosaccharides. Related to HMO, other proteins were specific for oligomers of lacto-N-biose (LNB) and polylactosamines with different degrees of fucosylation. Growth on HMO induced the expression of specific binding proteins that import HMO isomers, but also bind blood group and mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting coregulated transport mechanisms. The prebiotic inulin induced other family 1 binding proteins with affinity for intestinal glycans. Most of the host glycan F1SBPs in B. infantis do not have homologs in other bifidobacteria. Finally, some of these proteins were found to be adherent to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study represents further evidence for the particular adaptations of B. infantis to the infant gut environment, and helps to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in this process.

  20. Oligosaccharide Binding Proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis Reveal a Preference for Host Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Daniel; Kim, Jae Han; German, J. Bruce; Raybould, Helen E.; Mills, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs), part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have used the Mammalian Glycan Array to determine the specific affinities of these proteins. This was correlated with binding protein expression induced by different prebiotics including HMO. Half of the F1SBPs in B. infantis were determined to bind mammalian oligosaccharides. Their affinities included different blood group structures and mucin oligosaccharides. Related to HMO, other proteins were specific for oligomers of lacto-N-biose (LNB) and polylactosamines with different degrees of fucosylation. Growth on HMO induced the expression of specific binding proteins that import HMO isomers, but also bind blood group and mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting coregulated transport mechanisms. The prebiotic inulin induced other family 1 binding proteins with affinity for intestinal glycans. Most of the host glycan F1SBPs in B. infantis do not have homologs in other bifidobacteria. Finally, some of these proteins were found to be adherent to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study represents further evidence for the particular adaptations of B. infantis to the infant gut environment, and helps to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. PMID:21423604

  1. Core2 O-glycan structure is essential for the cell surface expression of sucrase isomaltase and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV during intestinal cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Ho; Yu, Shin-Yi; Nakayama, Jun; Khoo, Kai-Hooi; Stone, Erica L; Fukuda, Michiko N; Marth, Jamey D; Fukuda, Minoru

    2010-11-26

    Alterations in glycosylation play an important role during intestinal cell differentiation. Here, we compared expression of mucin-type O-glycan synthases from proliferating and differentiated HT-29 and Caco-2 cells. Mucin-type O-glycan structures were analyzed at both stages by mass spectrometry. Core2 β1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-2 (C2GnT-2) was markedly increased in differentiated HT-29 and Caco-2 cells, but the core3 structure was hardly detectable. To determine whether such differential expression of mucin-type O-glycan structures has physiological significance in intestinal cell differentiation, expression of sucrase isomaltase (SI) and dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP-IV), two well known intestinal differentiation markers, was examined. Interestingly, the fully glycosylated mature form of SI was decreased in C2GnT-2 knock-out mice but not in core2 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-3 (C2GnT-3) nulls. In addition, expression of SI and DPP-IV was dramatically reduced in C2GnT-1-3 triple knock-out mice. These patterns were confirmed by RNAi analysis; C2GnT-2 knockdown significantly reduced cell surface expression of SI and DPP-IV in Caco-2 cells. Similarly, overexpression of the core3 structure in HT-29 cells attenuated cell surface expression of both enzymes. These findings indicate that core3 O-glycan structure regulates cell surface expression of SI and DPP-IV and that core2 O-glycan is presumably an essential mucin-type O-glycan structure found in both molecules in vivo. Finally, goblet cells in the upper part of the crypt showed impaired maturation in the core2 O-glycan-deficient mice. These studies are the first to clearly identify functional mucin-type O-glycan structures modulating cell surface expression of SI and DPP-IV during the intestinal cell differentiation.

  2. Changes to serum sample tube and processing methodology does not cause Intra-Individual [corrected] variation in automated whole serum N-glycan profiling in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Ventham, Nicholas T; Gardner, Richard A; Kennedy, Nicholas A; Shubhakar, Archana; Kalla, Rahul; Nimmo, Elaine R; Fernandes, Daryl L; Satsangi, Jack; Spencer, Daniel I R

    2015-01-01

    Serum N-glycans have been identified as putative biomarkers for numerous diseases. The impact of different serum sample tubes and processing methods on N-glycan analysis has received relatively little attention. This study aimed to determine the effect of different sample tubes and processing methods on the whole serum N-glycan profile in both health and disease. A secondary objective was to describe a robot automated N-glycan release, labeling and cleanup process for use in a biomarker discovery system. 25 patients with active and quiescent inflammatory bowel disease and controls had three different serum sample tubes taken at the same draw. Two different processing methods were used for three types of tube (with and without gel-separation medium). Samples were randomised and processed in a blinded fashion. Whole serum N-glycan release, 2-aminobenzamide labeling and cleanup was automated using a Hamilton Microlab STARlet Liquid Handling robot. Samples were analysed using a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography/ethylene bridged hybrid(BEH) column on an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography instrument. Data were analysed quantitatively by pairwise correlation and hierarchical clustering using the area under each chromatogram peak. Qualitatively, a blinded assessor attempted to match chromatograms to each individual. There was small intra-individual variation in serum N-glycan profiles from samples collected using different sample processing methods. Intra-individual correlation coefficients were between 0.99 and 1. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering and principal coordinate analyses accurately matched samples from the same individual. Qualitative analysis demonstrated good chromatogram overlay and a blinded assessor was able to accurately match individuals based on chromatogram profile, regardless of disease status. The three different serum sample tubes processed using the described methods cause minimal inter-individual variation in serum whole N-glycan

  3. Fc glycans of therapeutic antibodies as critical quality attributes

    PubMed Central

    Reusch, Dietmar; Tejada, Max L

    2015-01-01

    Critical quality attributes (CQA) are physical, chemical, biological or microbiological properties or characteristics that must be within an appropriate limit, range or distribution to ensure the desired product quality, safety and efficacy. For monoclonal antibody therapeutics that rely on fraction crystalizable (Fc)-mediated effector function for their clinical activity, the terminal sugars of Fc glycans have been shown to be critical for safety or efficacy. Different glycosylation variants have also been shown to influence the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic behavior while other Fc glycan structural elements may be involved in adverse immune reactions. This review focuses on the role of Fc glycans as CQAs. Fc glycan information from the published literature is summarized and evaluated for impact on patient safety, immunogenicity, bioactivity and pharmacodynamics/pharmacokinetics. PMID:26263923

  4. Recognition of microbial glycans by soluble human lectins.

    PubMed

    Wesener, Darryl A; Dugan, Amanda; Kiessling, Laura L

    2017-06-01

    Human innate immune lectins that recognize microbial glycans can conduct microbial surveillance and thereby help prevent infection. Structural analysis of soluble lectins has provided invaluable insight into how these proteins recognize their cognate carbohydrate ligands and how this recognition gives rise to biological function. In this opinion, we cover the structural features of lectins that allow them to mediate microbial recognition, highlighting examples from the collectin, Reg protein, galectin, pentraxin, ficolin and intelectin families. These analyses reveal how some lectins (e.g., human intelectin-1) can recognize glycan epitopes that are remarkably diverse, yet still differentiate between mammalian and microbial glycans. We additionally discuss strategies to identify lectins that recognize microbial glycans and highlight tools that facilitate these discovery efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Immunity to schistosomiasis: glycans are potential antigenic targets for immune intervention.

    PubMed

    Nyame, A Kwame; Lewis, Fred A; Doughty, Barbara L; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Cummings, Richard D

    2003-01-01

    The major humoral immune responses in animals infected with Schistosoma mansoni are directed toward carbohydrate antigens. Among these antigens are complex-type N-glycans expressing LDN [GalNAcbeta1-4GlcNAc-R], LDNF [GalNAcbeta1-4(Fucalpha1-3)GlcNAc-R], and polymeric Lewis x (Lex) [Galbeta1-4(Fucalpha1-3)GlcNAc]n-R epitopes. We have now evaluated the potential of the three glycan antigens as targets for immune-mediated intervention of infections and serodiagnosis. A variety of approaches were employed, including ELISA, Western blot, immunohistology, and in vitro complement lysis assays, to determine the immunogenicity of the glycans in infected humans, their localization on the parasites and their efficacy as targets for parasite lysis. Our results show that S. mansoni-infected patients, with either intestinal or hepatosplenic disease, generate predominantly IgM, but also IgG and IgA, antibodies to LDN, LDNF, and Lex. However, immune responses to Lex are generally lower than responses to LDN and LDNF and less specific to schistosome infections. Western blot analysis with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to LDN, LDNF, and Lex determinants show that the glycan antigens occur on multiple glycoproteins from cercariae, 3-h, 48-h, and lung stage schistosomula, as well as adults and eggs. Immunohistological studies demonstrate that LDN, LDNF, and Lex are expressed on the parasite surface at all stages of development in the vertebrate host. Importantly, a mAb to LDN in the presence of complement efficiently kills schistosomula in vitro, as demonstrated by flow-cytometric assays that quantify cytolysis by propidium iodide uptake into damaged parasites. These findings raise the possibility that LDN and LDNF may be targets for vaccination and/or serodiagnosis of chronic schistosomiasis in humans.

  6. Importance of ALDH1A enzymes in determining human testicular retinoic acid concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Samuel L.; Kent, Travis; Hogarth, Cathryn A.; Schlatt, Stefan; Prasad, Bhagwat; Haenisch, Michael; Walsh, Thomas; Muller, Charles H.; Griswold, Michael D.; Amory, John K.; Isoherranen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, is required for spermatogenesis and many other biological processes. RA formation requires irreversible oxidation of retinal to RA by aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes of the 1A family (ALDH1A). While ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3 all form RA, the expression pattern and relative contribution of these enzymes to RA formation in the testis is unknown. In this study, novel methods to measure ALDH1A protein levels and intrinsic RA formation were used to accurately predict RA formation velocities in individual human testis samples and an association between RA formation and intratesticular RA concentrations was observed. The distinct localization of ALDH1A in the testis suggests a specific role for each enzyme in controlling RA formation. ALDH1A1 was found in Sertoli cells, while only ALDH1A2 was found in spermatogonia, spermatids, and spermatocytes. In the absence of cellular retinol binding protein (CRBP)1, ALDH1A1 was predicted to be the main contributor to intratesticular RA formation, but when CRBP1 was present, ALDH1A2 was predicted to be equally important in RA formation as ALDH1A1. This study provides a comprehensive novel methodology to evaluate RA homeostasis in human tissues and provides insight to how the individual ALDH1A enzymes mediate RA concentrations in specific cell types. PMID:25502770

  7. Polylactosaminoglycan glycomics: enhancing the detection of high-molecular-weight N-glycans in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight profiles by matched filtering.

    PubMed

    Bern, Marshall; Brito, Alejandro E; Pang, Poh-Choo; Rekhi, Angad; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M

    2013-04-01

    For over 30 years, protocols based on the mass spectrometry (MS) of permethylated derivatives, complemented by enzymatic degradations, have underpinned glycomic experiments aimed at defining the structures of individual glycans present in the complex mixtures that are characteristic of biological samples. Both MS instrumentation and sample handling have improved markedly in recent years, enabling greater sensitivity and better signal-to-noise ratios, thereby facilitating the detection of glycans at much higher masses than could be achieved in the past. The latter is especially important for the characterization of the biologically important class of N-glycans that carry polylactosaminoglycan chains. Such advances in data acquisition heighten the need for informatics tools to assist in glycan structure assignment. Here, utilizing mouse lung tissue as a model system, we present evidence of polylactosaminoglycan-containing N-glycans with permethylated molecular weights exceeding 13 kDa. We show that antennae branching patterns and lengths can be successfully determined at these high masses via MS/MS experiments, even when MS ion counts are very low. We also describe the development and application of a matched filtering algorithm for assisting high-molecular-weight glycan detection and structure assignment.

  8. Polylactosaminoglycan Glycomics: Enhancing the Detection of High-molecular-weight N-glycans in Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-flight Profiles by Matched Filtering*

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Marshall; Brito, Alejandro E.; Pang, Poh-Choo; Rekhi, Angad; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M.

    2013-01-01

    For over 30 years, protocols based on the mass spectrometry (MS) of permethylated derivatives, complemented by enzymatic degradations, have underpinned glycomic experiments aimed at defining the structures of individual glycans present in the complex mixtures that are characteristic of biological samples. Both MS instrumentation and sample handling have improved markedly in recent years, enabling greater sensitivity and better signal-to-noise ratios, thereby facilitating the detection of glycans at much higher masses than could be achieved in the past. The latter is especially important for the characterization of the biologically important class of N-glycans that carry polylactosaminoglycan chains. Such advances in data acquisition heighten the need for informatics tools to assist in glycan structure assignment. Here, utilizing mouse lung tissue as a model system, we present evidence of polylactosaminoglycan-containing N-glycans with permethylated molecular weights exceeding 13 kDa. We show that antennae branching patterns and lengths can be successfully determined at these high masses via MS/MS experiments, even when MS ion counts are very low. We also describe the development and application of a matched filtering algorithm for assisting high-molecular-weight glycan detection and structure assignment. PMID:23325768

  9. Analysis of glycan polymers produced by peptidoglycan glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Dianah; Wang, Tsung-Shing Andrew; Yuan, Yanqiu; Zhang, Yi; Kahne, Daniel; Walker, Suzanne

    2007-11-02

    Bacterial cells are surrounded by a cross-linked polymer called peptidoglycan, the integrity of which is necessary for cell survival. The carbohydrate chains that form the backbone of peptidoglycan are made by peptidoglycan glycosyltransferases (PGTs), highly conserved membrane-bound enzymes that are thought to be excellent targets for the development of new antibacterials. Although structural information on these enzymes recently became available, their mechanism is not well understood because of a dearth of methods to monitor PGT activity. Here we describe a direct, sensitive, and quantitative SDS-PAGE method to analyze PGT reactions. We apply this method to characterize the substrate specificity and product length profile for two different PGT domains, PBP1A from Aquifex aeolicus and PBP1A from Escherichia coli. We show that both disaccharide and tetrasaccharide diphospholipids (Lipid II and Lipid IV) serve as substrates for these PGTs, but the product distributions differ significantly depending on which substrate is used as the starting material. Reactions using the disaccharide substrate are more processive and yield much longer glycan products than reactions using the tetrasaccharide substrate. We also show that the SDS-PAGE method can be applied to provide information on the roles of invariant residues in catalysis. A comprehensive mutational analysis shows that the biggest contributor to turnover of 14 mutated residues is an invariant glutamate located in the center of the active site cleft. The assay and results described provide new information about the process by which PGTs assemble bacterial cell walls.

  10. Production of sialylated O-linked glycans in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Stephen R; Cook, W James; Gomathinayagam, Sujatha; Burnina, Irina; Bukowski, John; Hopkins, Daniel; Schwartz, Shaina; Du, Min; Sharkey, Nathan J; Bobrowicz, Piotr; Wildt, Stefan; Li, Huijuan; Stadheim, Terrance A; Nett, Juergen H

    2013-10-01

    The methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris, is an important organism used for the production of therapeutic proteins. Previously, we have reported the glycoengineering of this organism to produce human-like N-linked glycans but up to now no one has addressed engineering the O-linked glycosylation pathway. Typically, O-linked glycans produced by wild-type P. pastoris are linear chains of four to five α-linked mannose residues, which may be capped with β- or phospho-mannose. Previous genetic engineering of the N-linked glycosylation pathway of P. pastoris has eliminated both of these two latter modifications, resulting in O-linked glycans which are linear α-linked mannose structures. Here, we describe a method for the co-expression of an α-1,2-mannosidase, which reduces these glycans to primarily a single O-linked mannose residue. In doing so, we have reduced the potential of these glycans to interact with carbohydrate-binding proteins, such as dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin. Furthermore, the introduction of the enzyme protein-O-linked-mannose β-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1, resulted in the capping of the single O-linked mannose residues with N-acetylglucosamine. Subsequently, this glycoform was extended into human-like sialylated glycans, similar in structure to α-dystroglycan-type glycoforms. As such, this represents the first example of sialylated O-linked glycans being produced in yeast and extends the utility of the P. pastoris production platform beyond N-linked glycosylated biotherapeutics to include molecules possessing O-linked glycans.

  11. Targeted N-glycan deletion at the receptor-binding site retains HIV Env NFL trimer integrity and accelerates the elicited antibody response.

    PubMed

    Dubrovskaya, Viktoriya; Guenaga, Javier; de Val, Natalia; Wilson, Richard; Feng, Yu; Movsesyan, Arlette; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Ward, Andrew B; Wyatt, Richard T

    2017-09-13

    Extensive shielding by N-glycans on the surface of the HIV envelope glycoproteins (Env) restricts B cell recognition of conserved neutralizing determinants. Elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) in selected HIV-infected individuals reveals that Abs capable of penetrating the glycan shield can be generated by the B cell repertoire. Accordingly, we sought to determine if targeted N-glycan deletion might alter antibody responses to Env. We focused on the conserved CD4 binding site (CD4bs) since this is a known neutralizing determinant that is devoid of glycosylation to allow CD4 receptor engagement, but is ringed by surrounding N-glycans. We selectively deleted potential N-glycan sites (PNGS) proximal to the CD4bs on well-ordered clade C 16055 native flexibly linked (NFL) trimers to potentially increase recognition by naïve B cells in vivo. We generated glycan-deleted trimer variants that maintained native-like conformation and stability. Using a panel of CD4bs-directed bNAbs, we demonstrated improved accessibility of the CD4bs on the N-glycan-deleted trimer variants. We showed that pseudoviruses lacking these Env PNGSs were more sensitive to neutralization by CD4bs-specific bNAbs but remained resistant to non-neutralizing mAbs. We performed rabbit immunogenicity experiments using two approaches comparing glycan-deleted to fully glycosylated NFL trimers. The first was to delete 4 PNGS sites and then boost with fully glycosylated Env; the second was to delete 4 sites and gradually re-introduce these N-glycans in subsequent boosts. We demonstrated that the 16055 PNGS-deleted trimers more rapidly elicited serum antibodies that more potently neutralized the CD4bs-proximal-PNGS-deleted viruses in a statistically significant manner and strongly trended towards increased neutralization of fully glycosylated autologous virus. This approach elicited serum IgG capable of cross-neutralizing selected tier 2 viruses lacking N-glycans at residue N276 (natural or

  12. Identification of the S-layer glycoproteins and their covalently linked glycans in the halophilic archaeon Haloarcula hispanica.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua; Lü, Yang; Ren, Jinwei; Wang, Zhongfu; Wang, Qian; Luo, Yuanming; Han, Jing; Xiang, Hua; Du, Yuguo; Jin, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Haloarcula hispanica is one of members of the Halobacteriaceae, which displays particularly low restriction activity and is therefore important as one of the most tractable haloarchaea for archaeal genetic research. Although the Har. hispanica S-layer protein has been reported glycosylated, the S-layer glycoprotein and its glycosylation have not been investigated yet. In this study, the S-layer proteins of Har. hispanica were extracted and characterized. The S-layer was found containing two different glycoproteins which shared highly similar amino acid sequences. The genes coding for these two S-layer glycoproteins were found next to each other in the genome. Moreover, the N- and O-linked glycans were released from these two S-layer glycoproteins for structural determination. Based on the mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance, the N-glycan was determined as a branched trisaccharide containing a 225 Da residue corresponded to a 2-amino-6-sulfo-2, 6-dideoxy-quinovose, which was the first time that a naturally occurring form of sulfoquinovosamine was identified. Besides, the O-glycan was characterized as a Glcα-1,4-Gal disaccharide by mass spectrometry combined with monosaccharide composition analysis and glycosidase treatment. The determination of the N- and O-glycan structure will be helpful for studying the diverse protein glycosylation pathways in archaea utilizing H. hispanica as a new model.

  13. Profiling IgG N-glycans as potential biomarker of chronological and biological ages

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinwei; Wang, Youxin; Kristic, Jasminka; Dong, Jing; Chu, Xi; Ge, Siqi; Wang, Hao; Fang, Honghong; Gao, Qing; Liu, Di; Zhao, Zhongyao; Peng, Hongli; Pucic Bakovic, Maja; Wu, Lijuan; Song, Manshu; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Lauc, Gordan; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As an important post-translation modifying process, glycosylation significantly affects the structure and function of immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules and is essential in many steps of the inflammatory cascade. Studies have demonstrated the potential of using glycosylation features of IgG as a component of predictive biomarkers for chronological age in several European populations, whereas no study has been reported in Chinese. Herein, we report various patterns of changes in IgG glycosylation associated with age by analyzing IgG glycosylation in 701 community-based Han Chinese (244 males, 457 females; 23–68 years old). Eleven IgG glycans, including FA2B, A2G1, FA2[6]G1, FA2[3]G1, FA2[6]BG1, FA2[3]BG1, A2G2, A2BG2, FA2G2, FA2G2S1, and FA2G2S2, change considerably with age and specific combinations of these glycan features can explain 23.3% to 45.4% of the variance in chronological age in this population. This indicates that these combinations of glycan features provide more predictive information than other single markers of biological age such as telomere length. In addition, the clinical traits such as fasting plasma glucose and aspartate aminotransferase associated with biological age are strongly correlated with the combined glycan features. We conclude that IgG glycosylation appears to correlate with both chronological and biological ages, and thus its possible role in the aging process merits further study. PMID:27428197

  14. Human DC-SIGN Binds Specific Human Milk Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Alexander J.; Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Duska-McEwen, Geralyn; Buck, Rachael H.; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Human milk glycans (HMGs) are prebiotics, pathogen receptor decoys, and regulators of host physiology and immune responses. Mechanistically, human lectins (glycan-binding proteins, hGBPs) expressed by dendritic cells (DC) are of major interest, as these cells directly contact HMGs. To explore such interactions, we screened many C-type lectins and Siglecs expressed by DC for glycan binding on microarrays presenting over 200 HMGs. Unexpectedly, DC-SIGN showed robust binding to many HMGs, whereas other C-type lectins failed to bind, and Siglecs-5 and -9 showed weak binding to a few glycans. By contrast, most hGBPs bound to multiple glycans on other microarrays lacking HMGs. An α-linked fucose residue was characteristic of HMGs bound by DC-SIGN. Binding of DC-SIGN to the simple HMGs 2′-fucosyllactose (2′-FL) and 3-fucosyllactose (3-FL) was confirmed by flow cytometry to beads conjugated with 2′-FL or 3-FL, as well as the ability of the free glycans to inhibit DC-SIGN binding. 2′-FL had an IC50 of ~1 mM for DC-SIGN, which is within the physiological concentration of 2′-FL in human milk. These results demonstrate that DC-SIGN among the many hGBPs expressed by DC binds to α-fucosylated HMGs, and suggest that such interactions may be important in influencing immune responses in the developing infant. PMID:26976925

  15. Neutral glycans from sandfish skin can reduce friction of polymers

    PubMed Central

    Vihar, Boštjan; Hanisch, Franz Georg; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The lizard Scincus scincus, also known as sandfish, can move through aeolian desert sand in a swimming-like manner. A prerequisite for this ability is a special integument, i.e. scales with a very low friction for sand and a high abrasion resistance. Glycans in the scales are causally related to the low friction. Here, we analysed the glycans and found that neutral glycans with five to nine mannose residues are important. If these glycans were covalently bound to acrylic polymers like poly(methyl methacrylate) or acrylic car coatings at a density of approximately one molecule per 4 nm², friction for and adhesion of sand particles could be reduced to levels close to those observed with sandfish scales. This was also found true, if the glycans were isolated from sources other than sandfish scales like plants such as almonds or mistletoe. We speculate that these neutral glycans act as low density spacers separating sand particles from the dense scales thereby reducing van der Waals forces. PMID:27030038

  16. Modulation of glycan detection on specific glycoproteins by lectin multimerization.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Partyka, Katie; McDonald, Mitchell; Brouhard, Elizabeth; Hincapie, Marina; Brand, Randall E; Hancock, William S; Haab, Brian B

    2013-02-05

    Improved methods for studying glycans could spur significant advances in the understanding and application of glycobiology. The use of affinity reagents such as lectins and glycan-binding antibodies is a valuable complement to methods involving mass spectrometry and chromatography. Many lectins, however, are not useful as analytic tools due to low affinity in vitro. As an approach to increasing lectin avidity to targeted glycans, we tested the use of lectin multimerization. Several biotinylated lectins were linked together through streptavidin interactions. The binding of certain lectins for purified glycoproteins and glycoproteins captured directly out of biological solutions was increased using multimerization, resulting in the detection of lower concentrations of glycoprotein than possible using monomeric detection. The analysis of glycoproteins in plasma samples showed that the level of binding enhancement through multimerization was not equivalent across patient samples. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) reactive glycans on fibronectin and thrombospondin-5 were preferentially bound by multimers in pancreatic cancer patient samples relative to control samples, suggesting a cancer-associated change in glycan density that could be detected only through lectin multimerization. This strategy could lead to the more sensitive and informative detection of glycans in biological samples and a broader spectrum of lectins that are useful as analytical reagents.

  17. Reduced immunogenicity of Arabidopsis hgl1 mutant N-glycans caused by altered accessibility of xylose and core fucose epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kaulfürst-Soboll, Heidi; Rips, Stephan; Koiwa, Hisashi; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; von Schaewen, Antje

    2011-07-01

    Arabidopsis N-glycosylation mutants with enhanced salt sensitivity show reduced immunoreactivity of complex N-glycans. Among them, hybrid glycosylation 1 (hgl1) alleles lacking Golgi α-mannosidase II are unique, because their glycoprotein N-glycans are hardly labeled by anti-complex glycan antibodies, even though they carry β1,2-xylose and α1,3-fucose epitopes. To dissect the contribution of xylose and core fucose residues to plant stress responses and immunogenic potential, we prepared Arabidopsis hgl1 xylT double and hgl1 fucTa fucTb triple mutants by crossing previously established T-DNA insertion lines and verified them by mass spectrometry analyses. Root growth assays revealed that hgl1 fucTa fucTb but not hgl1 xylT plants are more salt-sensitive than hgl1, hinting at the importance of core fucose modification and masking of xylose residues. Detailed immunoblot analyses with anti-β1,2-xylose and anti-α1,3-fucose rabbit immunoglobulin G antibodies as well as cross-reactive carbohydrate determinant-specific human immunoglobulin E antibodies (present in sera of allergy patients) showed that xylose-specific reactivity of hgl1 N-glycans is indeed reduced. Based on three-dimensional modeling of plant N-glycans, we propose that xylose residues are tilted by 30° because of untrimmed mannoses in hgl1 mutants. Glycosidase treatments of protein extracts restored immunoreactivity of hgl1 N-glycans supporting these models. Furthermore, among allergy patient sera, untrimmed mannoses persisting on the α1,6-arm of hgl1 N-glycans were inhibitory to immunoreaction with core fucoses to various degrees. In summary, incompletely trimmed glycoprotein N-glycans conformationally prevent xylose and, to lesser extent, core fucose accessibility. Thus, in addition to N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I, Golgi α-mannosidase II emerges as a so far unrecognized target for lowering the immunogenic potential of plant-derived glycoproteins.

  18. N-linked glycans within the A2 domain of von Willebrand factor modulate macrophage-mediated clearance.

    PubMed

    Chion, Alain; O'Sullivan, Jamie M; Drakeford, Clive; Bergsson, Gudmundur; Dalton, Niall; Aguila, Sonia; Ward, Soracha; Fallon, Padraic G; Brophy, Teresa M; Preston, Roger J S; Brady, Lauren; Sheils, Orla; Laffan, Michael; McKinnon, Thomas A J; O'Donnell, James S

    2016-10-13

    Enhanced von Willebrand factor (VWF) clearance is important in the etiology of von Willebrand disease. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying VWF clearance remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of VWF domains and specific glycan moieties in regulating in vivo clearance. Our findings demonstrate that the A1 domain of VWF contains a receptor-recognition site that plays a key role in regulating the interaction of VWF with macrophages. In A1-A2-A3 and full-length VWF, this macrophage-binding site is cryptic but becomes exposed following exposure to shear or ristocetin. Previous studies have demonstrated that the N-linked glycans within the A2 domain play an important role in modulating susceptibility to ADAMTS13 proteolysis. We further demonstrate that these glycans presented at N1515 and N1574 also play a critical role in protecting VWF against macrophage binding and clearance. Indeed, loss of the N-glycan at N1515 resulted in markedly enhanced VWF clearance that was significantly faster than that observed with any previously described VWF mutations. In addition, A1-A2-A3 fragments containing the N1515Q or N1574Q substitutions also demonstrated significantly enhanced clearance. Importantly, clodronate-induced macrophage depletion significantly attenuated the increased clearance observed with N1515Q and N1574Q in both full-length VWF and A1-A2-A3. Finally, we further demonstrate that loss of these N-linked glycans does not enhance clearance in VWF in the presence of a structurally constrained A2 domain. Collectively, these novel findings support the hypothesis that conformation of the VWF A domains plays a critical role in modulating macrophage-mediated clearance of VWF in vivo.

  19. Structure of the flexible amino terminal domain of prion protein bound to a sulfated glycan

    PubMed Central

    Taubner, Lara M.; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A.; Copié, Valérie; Caughey, Byron

    2010-01-01

    The intrinsically disordered amino-proximal domain of hamster prion protein (PrP) contains four copies of a highly conserved octapeptide sequence PHGGGWGQ that is flanked by two polycationic residue clusters. This N-terminal domain mediates the binding of sulfated glycans, which can profoundly influence the conversion of PrP to pathological forms and the progression of prion disease. To investigate the structural consequences of sulfated glycan binding, we performed multidimensional heteronuclear (1H, 13C, 15N) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence studies on hamster PrP residues 23–106 (PrP 23–106) and fragments thereof when bound to pentosan polysulfate (PPS). While the majority of PrP 23–106 remains disordered upon PPS binding, the octarepeat region adopts a repeating loop-turn structure that we have determined by NMR. The β-like turns within the repeats are corroborated by CD data, which demonstrate that these turns are also present, although less pronounced, without PPS. Binding to PPS exposes a hydrophobic surface composed of aligned tryptophan sidechains, the spacing and orientation of which are consistent with a self-association or ligand binding site. The unique tryptophan motif was probed by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, which displayed enhanced fluorescence of PrP 23–106 when bound to PPS, consistent with the alignment of tryptophan sidechains. Chemical shift mapping identified binding sites on PrP 23–106 for PPS, which include the octarepeat histidine and an N-terminal basic cluster previously linked to sulfated glycan binding. These data may in part explain how sulfated glycans modulate PrP conformational conversions and oligomerizations. PMID:19913031

  20. Antibody blood-brain barrier efflux is modulated by glycan modification.

    PubMed

    Finke, John M; Ayres, Kari R; Brisbin, Ryan P; Hill, Hali A; Wing, Emily E; Banks, William A

    2017-09-01

    Drug delivery to the brain is a major roadblock to treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Recent results of the PRIME study indicate that increasing brain penetration of antibody drugs improves Alzheimer's treatment outcomes. New approaches are needed to better accomplish this goal. Based on prior evidence, the hypothesis that glycan modification alters antibody blood-brain barrier permeability was tested here. The blood-brain barrier permeability coefficient Pe of different glycosylated states of anti-amyloid IgG was measured using in vitro models of brain microvascular endothelial cells. Monoclonal antibodies 4G8, with sialic acid, and 6E10, lacking sialic acid, were studied. The amount of sialic acid was determined using quantitative and semi-quantitative surface plasmon resonance methods. Influx of IgG was not saturable and was largely insensitive to IgG species and glycosylation state. By contrast, efflux of 4G8 efflux was significantly lower than both albumin controls and 6E10. Removal of α2,6-linked sialic acid group present on 12% of 4G8 completely restored efflux to that of 6E10 but increasing the α2,6-sialylated fraction to 15% resulted in no change. Removal of the Fc glycan from 4G8 partially restored efflux. Alternate sialic acid groups with α2,3 and α2,8 linkages, nor on the Fc glycan, were not detected at significant levels on either 4G8 or 6E10. These results support a model in which surface-sialylated 4G8 inhibits its own efflux and that of asialylated 4G8. Glycan modification has the potential to increase antibody drug penetration into the brain through efflux inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Structure of the flexible amino-terminal domain of prion protein bound to a sulfated glycan.

    PubMed

    Taubner, Lara M; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A; Copié, Valérie; Caughey, Byron

    2010-01-22

    The intrinsically disordered amino-proximal domain of hamster prion protein (PrP) contains four copies of a highly conserved octapeptide sequence, PHGGGWGQ, that is flanked by two polycationic residue clusters. This N-terminal domain mediates the binding of sulfated glycans, which can profoundly influence the conversion of PrP to pathological forms and the progression of prion disease. To investigate the structural consequences of sulfated glycan binding, we performed multidimensional heteronuclear ((1)H, (13)C, (15)N) NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence studies on hamster PrP residues 23-106 (PrP 23-106) and fragments thereof when bound to pentosan polysulfate (PPS). While the majority of PrP 23-106 remain disordered upon PPS binding, the octarepeat region adopts a repeating loop-turn structure that we have determined by NMR. The beta-like turns within the repeats are corroborated by CD data demonstrating that these turns are also present, although less pronounced, without PPS. Binding to PPS exposes a hydrophobic surface composed of aligned tryptophan side chains, the spacing and orientation of which are consistent with a self-association or ligand binding site. The unique tryptophan motif was probed by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, which displayed enhanced fluorescence of PrP 23-106 when bound to PPS, consistent with the alignment of tryptophan side chains. Chemical-shift mapping identified binding sites on PrP 23-106 for PPS, which include the octarepeat histidine and an N-terminal basic cluster previously linked to sulfated glycan binding. These data may in part explain how sulfated glycans modulate PrP conformational conversions and oligomerizations. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Effect of Sialylated O-Glycans in Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide Stability

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jingjing; Pristera, Nicole; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiumei; Wu, Qingyu

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atrial-, brain- and C-type natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP, and CNP) are important in regulating a variety of cardiovascular and cellular functions. In cells, these peptides are made as pro-forms that are converted to mature forms. BNP and its related peptides are biomarkers for the diagnosis of heart failure. In this study, we examined glycosylation in pro-ANP, pro-BNP and pro-CNP, which may alter their biochemical and metabolic properties. METHODS Human pro-ANP, pro-BNP, and pro-CNP were expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and murine HL-1 cardiomyocytes, and analyzed by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. Deglycosylation enzymes were used to determine the carbohydrate content on these peptides. The effects of inhibiting O-glycosylation on cellular expression and stability of the peptides also were examined. RESULTS In HEK 293 and HL-1 cells, pro-BNP, but not pro-ANP and pro-CNP, from the culture medium had a greater molecular mass than that from cell lysate. Digestion with PNGase F, O-glycosidase and sialidase A indicated that pro-BNP contained O-glycans but not N-glycans. The O-glycans on pro-BNP had sialic acids at their termini, protecting it from O-glycosidase digestion. In contrast, pro-ANP and pro-CNP contained no detectable amounts of N- or O-glycans. Inhibition of O-glycosylation on pro-BNP did not prevent its expression in the cells. However, partially O-glycosylated pro-BNP was much less stable than fully O-glycosylated pro-BNP. CONCLUSIONS O-glycosylation is not necessary for pro-BNP expression but important for its stability. PMID:20348402

  3. Discrimination of epimeric glycans and glycopeptides using IM-MS and its potential for carbohydrate sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Both, P.; Green, A. P.; Gray, C. J.; Šardzík, R.; Voglmeir, J.; Fontana, C.; Austeri, M.; Rejzek, M.; Richardson, D.; Field, R. A.; Widmalm, G.; Flitsch, S. L.; Eyers, C. E.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is the primary analytical technique used to characterize the complex oligosaccharides that decorate cell surfaces. Monosaccharide building blocks are often simple epimers, which when combined produce diastereomeric glycoconjugates indistinguishable by mass spectrometry. Structure elucidation frequently relies on assumptions that biosynthetic pathways are highly conserved. Here, we show that biosynthetic enzymes can display unexpected promiscuity, with human glycosyltransferase pp-α-GanT2 able to utilize both uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine and uridine diphosphate N-acetylgalactosamine, leading to the synthesis of epimeric glycopeptides in vitro. Ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) was used to separate these structures and, significantly, enabled characterization of the attached glycan based on the drift times of the monosaccharide product ions generated following collision-induced dissociation. Finally, ion-mobility mass spectrometry following fragmentation was used to determine the nature of both the reducing and non-reducing glycans of a series of epimeric disaccharides and the branched pentasaccharide Man3 glycan, demonstrating that this technique may prove useful for the sequencing of complex oligosaccharides.

  4. Multi-Site N-glycan mapping study 1: Capillary electrophoresis – laser induced fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Szekrényes, Ákos; Park, SungAe Suhr; Santos, Marcia; Lew, Clarence; Jones, Aled; Haxo, Ted; Kimzey, Michael; Pourkaveh, Shiva; Szabó, Zoltán; Sosic, Zoran; Feng, Peng; Váradi, Csaba; de l'Escaille, François; Falmagne, Jean-Bernard; Sejwal, Preeti; Niedringhaus, Thomas; Michels, David; Freckleton, Gordon; Hamm, Melissa; Manuilov, Anastasiya; Schwartz, Melissa; Luo, Jiann-Kae; van Dyck, Jonathan; Leung, Pui-King; Olajos, Marcell; Gu, Yingmei; Gao, Kai; Wang, Wenbo; Wegstein, Jo; Tep, Samnang; Guttman, András

    2016-01-01

    An international team that included 20 independent laboratories from biopharmaceutical companies, universities, analytical contract laboratories and national authorities in the United States, Europe and Asia was formed to evaluate the reproducibility of sample preparation and analysis of N-glycans using capillary electrophoresis of 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (APTS)-labeled glycans with laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection (16 sites) and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC, 12 sites; results to be reported in a subsequent publication). All participants used the same lot of chemicals, samples, reagents, and columns/capillaries to run their assays. Migration time, peak area and peak area percent values were determined for all peaks with >0.1% peak area. Our results demonstrated low variability and high reproducibility, both, within any given site as well across all sites, which indicates that a standard N-glycan analysis platform appropriate for general use (clone selection, process development, lot release, etc.) within the industry can be established. PMID:26466659

  5. Multi-Site N-glycan mapping study 1: Capillary electrophoresis - laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Szekrényes, Ákos; Park, SungAe Suhr; Santos, Marcia; Lew, Clarence; Jones, Aled; Haxo, Ted; Kimzey, Michael; Pourkaveh, Shiva; Szabó, Zoltán; Sosic, Zoran; Feng, Peng; Váradi, Csaba; de l'Escaille, François; Falmagne, Jean-Bernard; Sejwal, Preeti; Niedringhaus, Thomas; Michels, David; Freckleton, Gordon; Hamm, Melissa; Manuilov, Anastasiya; Schwartz, Melissa; Luo, Jiann-Kae; van Dyck, Jonathan; Leung, Pui-King; Olajos, Marcell; Gu, Yingmei; Gao, Kai; Wang, Wenbo; Wegstein, Jo; Tep, Samnang; Guttman, András

    2016-01-01

    An international team that included 20 independent laboratories from biopharmaceutical companies, universities, analytical contract laboratories and national authorities in the United States, Europe and Asia was formed to evaluate the reproducibility of sample preparation and analysis of N-glycans using capillary electrophoresis of 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (APTS)-labeled glycans with laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection (16 sites) and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC, 12 sites; results to be reported in a subsequent publication). All participants used the same lot of chemicals, samples, reagents, and columns/capillaries to run their assays. Migration time, peak area and peak area percent values were determined for all peaks with >0.1% peak area. Our results demonstrated low variability and high reproducibility, both, within any given site as well across all sites, which indicates that a standard N-glycan analysis platform appropriate for general use (clone selection, process development, lot release, etc.) within the industry can be established.

  6. High Performance IT-MSn Sequencing of Glycans (Spatial Resolution of Ovalbumin Isomers)

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jenny; Zhang, Hailong; Reinhold, Vernon N.

    2011-01-01

    This report outlines and applies a high performance sequencing technology to evaluate the glycome of a common model glycoprotein, ovalbumin. The targets were the N-linked glycans enzymatically released from the protein, the N-glycoproteome. These product glycans were reduced, methylated and directly infused into the MS using a chip-based nanoelectrospray with the ions structurally characterized by sequential disassembly. Ten major ions were selected for detailed analysis. Isomer topologies (glycan connectivity) were determined from ion pathways of disassembly. Linkage information was revealed by specific cross-ring cleavage fragments within smaller oligomers. Both connectivity and linkage features were assisted with described bioinformatic tools and details confirmed with a standards library of fragments. The number of isomeric structures found within these 10 parent ions were 37, more than double earlier reports, and setting a new goal for developing technology. In this non-chromatographic, high performance spatial approach, the focus has been patterned to be comprehensive, and stay within the bounds of a plausible high throughput strategy consistent with automation. Selective structures are described in the text to appraise readers of the general approach; a more comprehensive coverage has been included in supplemental material. PMID:21686090

  7. Diversity in prokaryotic glycosylation: an archaeal-derived N-linked glycan contains legionaminic acid.

    PubMed

    Kandiba, Lina; Aitio, Olli; Helin, Jari; Guan, Ziqiang; Permi, Perttu; Bamford, Dennis H; Eichler, Jerry; Roine, Elina

    2012-05-01

    VP4, the major structural protein of the haloarchaeal pleomorphic virus, HRPV-1, is glycosylated. To define the glycan structure attached to this protein, oligosaccharides released by β-elimination were analysed by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Such analyses showed that the major VP4-derived glycan is a pentasaccharide comprising glucose, glucuronic acid, mannose, sulphated glucuronic acid and a terminal 5-N-formyl-legionaminic acid residue. This is the first observation of legionaminic acid, a sialic acid-like sugar, in an archaeal-derived glycan structure. The importance of this residue for viral infection was demonstrated upon incubation with N-acetylneuraminic acid, a similar monosaccharide. Such treatment reduced progeny virus production by half 4 h post infection. LC-ESI/MS analysis confirmed the presence of pentasaccharide precursors on two different VP4-derived peptides bearing the N-glycosylation signal, NTT. The same sites modified by the native host, Halorubrum sp. strain PV6, were also recognized by the Haloferax volcanii N-glycosylation apparatus, as determined by LC-ESI/MS of heterologously expressed VP4. Here, however, the N-linked pentasaccharide was the same as shown to decorate the S-layer glycoprotein in this species. Hence, N-glycosylation of the haloarchaeal viral protein, VP4, is host-specific. These results thus present additional examples of archaeal N-glycosylation diversity and show the ability of Archaea to modify heterologously expressed proteins.

  8. The chemistry of negotiation: rhythmic, glycan-driven acidification in a symbiotic conversation.

    PubMed

    Schwartzman, Julia A; Koch, Eric; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; Zhou, Lawrence; Kremer, Natacha; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Ruby, Edward G

    2015-01-13

    Glycans have emerged as critical determinants of immune maturation, microbial nutrition, and host health in diverse symbioses. In this study, we asked how cyclic delivery of a single host-derived glycan contributes to the dynamic stability of the mutualism between the squid Euprymna scolopes and its specific, bioluminescent symbiont, Vibrio fischeri. V. fischeri colonizes the crypts of a host organ that is used for behavioral light production. E. scolopes synthesizes the polymeric glycan chitin in macrophage-like immune cells called hemocytes. We show here that, just before dusk, hemocytes migrate from the vasculature into the symbiotic crypts, where they lyse and release particulate chitin, a behavior that is established only in the mature symbiosis. Diel transcriptional rhythms in both partners further indicate that the chitin is provided and metabolized only at night. A V. fischeri mutant defective in chitin catabolism was able to maintain a normal symbiont population level, but only until the symbiotic organ reached maturity (∼ 4 wk after colonization); this result provided a direct link between chitin utilization and symbiont persistence. Finally, catabolism of chitin by the symbionts was also specifically required for a periodic acidification of the adult crypts each night. This acidification, which increases the level of oxygen available to the symbionts, enhances their capacity to produce bioluminescence at night. We propose that other animal hosts may similarly regulate the activities of epithelium-associated microbial communities through the strategic provision of specific nutrients, whose catabolism modulates conditions like pH or anoxia in their symbionts' habitat.

  9. Uncovering Cryptic Glycan Markers in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Denong; Bhat, Roopa; Sobel, Raymond A.; Huang, Wei; Wang, Lai-Xi; Olsson, Tomas; Steinman, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Strategy, Management and Health PolicyEnabling Technology, Genomics, ProteomicsPreclinical ResearchPreclinical Development Toxicology, Formulation Drug Delivery, PharmacokineticsClinical Development Phases I-III Regulatory, Quality, ManufacturingPostmarketing Phase IV Using an integrated antigen microarray approach, we observed epitope-spreading of autoantibody responses to a variety of antigenic structures in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and in the serum of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). These included previously described protein- and lipid-based antigenic targets and newly discovered autoimmunogenic sugar moieties, notably, autoantibodies specific for the oligomannoses in both MS patient CSF and the sera of mice with EAE. These glycans are often masked by other sugar moieties and belong to a class of cryptic autoantigens. We further determined that these targets are highly expressed on multiple cell types in MS and EAE lesions. Co-immunization of SJL/J mice with a Man9-KLH conjugate at the time of EAE induction elicited highly significant levels of anti-Man9-cluster autoantibodies. Nevertheless, this anti-glycan autoantibody response was associated with a significantly reduced clinical severity of EAE. The potential of these cryptic glycan markers and targeting antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions of neurological disorders has yet to be explored. PMID:24648292

  10. Glycans and cancer: role of N-glycans in cancer biomarker, progression and metastasis, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Kizuka, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation is catalyzed by various glycosyltransferase enzymes which are mostly located in the Golgi apparatus in cells. These enzymes glycosylate various complex carbohydrates such as glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans. The enzyme activity of glycosyltransferases and their gene expression are altered in various pathophysiological situations including cancer. Furthermore, the activity of glycosyltransferases is controlled by various factors such as the levels of nucleotide sugars, acceptor substrates, nucleotide sugar transporters, chaperons, and endogenous lectin in cancer cells. The glycosylation results in various functional changes of glycoproteins including cell surface receptors and adhesion molecules such as E-cadherin and integrins. These changes confer the unique characteristic phenotypes associated with cancer cells. Therefore, glycans play key roles in cancer progression and treatment. This review focuses on glycan structures, their biosynthetic glycosyltransferases, and their genes in relation to their biological significance and involvement in cancer, especially cancer biomarkers, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cancer progression and metastasis, and therapeutics. Major N-glycan branching structures which are directly related to cancer are β1,6-GlcNAc branching, bisecting GlcNAc, and core fucose. These structures are enzymatic products of glycosyltransferases, GnT-V, GnT-III, and Fut8, respectively. The genes encoding these enzymes are designated as MGAT5 (Mgat5), MGAT3 (Mgat3), and FUT8 (Fut8) in humans (mice in parenthesis), respectively. GnT-V is highly associated with cancer metastasis, whereas GnT-III is associated with cancer suppression. Fut8 is involved in expression of cancer biomarker as well as in the treatment of cancer. In addition to these enzymes, GnT-IV and GnT-IX (GnT-Vb) will be also discussed in relation to cancer. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibody responses to the fucosylated LacdiNAc glycan antigen in Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice and expression of the glycan among schistosomes.

    PubMed

    Nyame, A K; Leppänen, A M; Bogitsh, B J; Cummings, R D

    2000-12-01

    Infections of animals with parasitic worms, such as Schistosoma mansoni, induce humoral immune responses to carbohydrate antigens, raising the possibility that such antigens might be useful targets for the development of vaccines and new diagnostic approaches. Here we describe the identification of fucosylated LacdiNAc (LDNF) [GalNAc beta 1-4(Fuc alpha 1-3)GlcNAc-R] as a new carbohydrate antigen in S. mansoni that induces humoral immune responses in infected mice. The presence of antibodies was determined by ELISA using a neoglycoconjugate synthesized to express LDNF sequences. Sera from S. mansoni-infected, but not uninfected, mice contain IgM, IgG, IgA, and IgE antibodies to LDNF. The IgG antibodies are primarily of the IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses, with no detectable levels of the complement-fixing IgG2a and IgG2b isotypes. An IgM monoclonal antibody, designated SMLDNF1, was generated from the spleens of S. mansoni-infected mice, and the antibody exhibits specific recognition of LDNF sequences, but not other fucosylated glycans tested. Immunocytochemical analysis demonstrates that LDNF antigens are localized on the tegumental surface of adult S. mansoni. Western blot analysis indicates that LDNF sequences are expressed on numerous high-molecular-weight glycoproteins from the three major human schistosome species, as well as the bird schistosome Trichobilharzia ocellata. The identification of LDNF antigen on the tegumental glycoproteins of schistosomes and the ability to synthesize LDNF conjugates should aid in the development of glycan-based vaccines and immunodiagnostic tests for schistosomiasis and in determining the role(s) of the glycans in worm development and pathogenesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  12. N-glycan maturation is crucial for cytokinin-mediated development and cellulose synthesis in Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Fanata, Wahyu Indra Duwi; Lee, Kyoung Hwan; Son, Bo Hwa; Yoo, Jae Yong; Harmoko, Rikno; Ko, Ki Seong; Ramasamy, Nirmal Kumar; Kim, Kyung Hwa; Oh, Doo-Byoung; Jung, Hyun Suk; Kim, Jae-Yean; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kyun Oh

    2013-03-01

    To explore the physiological significance of N-glycan maturation in the plant Golgi apparatus, gnt1, a mutant with loss of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GnTI) function, was isolated in Oryza sativa. gnt1 exhibited complete inhibition of N-glycan maturation and accumulated high-mannose N-glycans. Phenotypic analyses revealed that gnt1 shows defective post-seedling development and incomplete cell wall biosynthesis, leading to symptoms such as failure in tiller formation, brittle leaves, reduced cell wall thickness, and decreased cellulose content. The developmental defects of gnt1 ultimately resulted in early lethality without transition to the reproductive stage. However, callus induced from gnt1 seeds could be maintained for periods, although it exhibited a low proliferation rate, small size, and hypersensitivity to salt stress. Shoot regeneration and dark-induced leaf senescence assays indicated that the loss of GnTI function results in reduced sensitivity to cytokinin in rice. Reduced expression of A-type O. sativa response regulators that are rapidly induced by cytokinins in gnt1 confirmed that cytokinin signaling is impaired in the mutant. These results strongly support the proposed involvement of N-glycan maturation in transport as well as in the function of membrane proteins that are synthesized via the endomembrane system.

  13. Glycans Are a Novel Biomarker of Chronological and Biological Ages

    PubMed Central

    Krištić, Jasminka; Vučković, Frano; Menni, Cristina; Klarić, Lucija; Keser, Toma; Beceheli, Ivona; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Novokmet, Mislav; Mangino, Massimo; Thaqi, Kujtim; Rudan, Pavao; Novokmet, Natalija; Šarac, Jelena; Missoni, Saša; Kolčić, Ivana; Polašek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Hayward, Caroline; Aulchenko, Yurii; Valdes, Ana; Wilson, James F.; Gornik, Olga; Primorac, Dragan; Zoldoš, Vlatka; Spector, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Fine structural details of glycans attached to the conserved N-glycosylation site significantly not only affect function of individual immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules but also mediate inflammation at the systemic level. By analyzing IgG glycosylation in 5,117 individuals from four European populations, we have revealed very complex patterns of changes in IgG glycosylation with age. Several IgG glycans (including FA2B, FA2G2, and FA2BG2) changed considerably with age and the combination of these three glycans can explain up to 58% of variance in chronological age, significantly more than other markers of biological age like telomere lengths. The remaining variance in these glycans strongly correlated with physiological parameters associated with biological age. Thus, IgG glycosylation appears to be closely linked with both chronological and biological ages. Considering the important role of IgG glycans in inflammation, and because the observed changes with age promote inflammation, changes in IgG glycosylation also seem to represent a factor contributing to aging. Significance Statement Glycosylation is the key posttranslational mechanism that regulates function of immunoglobulins, with multiple systemic repercussions to the immune system. Our study of IgG glycosylation in 5,117 individuals from four European populations has revealed very extensive and complex changes in IgG glycosylation with age. The combined index composed of only three glycans explained up to 58% of variance in age, considerably more than other biomarkers of age like telomere lengths. The remaining variance in these glycans strongly correlated with physiological parameters associated with biological age; thus, IgG glycosylation appears to be closely linked with both chronological and biological ages. The ability to measure human biological aging using molecular profiling has practical applications for diverse fields such as disease prevention and treatment, or forensics. PMID:24325898

  14. High-Mannose Glycans are Elevated during Breast Cancer Progression*

    PubMed Central

    de Leoz, Maria Lorna A.; Young, Lawrence J. T.; An, Hyun Joo; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Kim, Jaehan; Miyamoto, Suzanne; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Chew, Helen K.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2011-01-01

    Alteration in glycosylation has been observed in cancer. However, monitoring glycosylation changes during breast cancer progression is difficult in humans. In this study, we used a well-characterized transplantable breast tumor mouse model, the mouse mammary tumor virus-polyoma middle T antigen, to observe early changes in glycosylation. We have previously used the said mouse model to look at O-linked glycosylation changes with breast cancer. In this glycan biomarker discovery study, we examined N-linked glycan variations during breast cancer progression of the mouse model but this time doubling the number of mice and blood draw points. N-glycans from total mouse serum glycoproteins were profiled using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry at the onset, progression, and removal of mammary tumors. We observed four N-linked glycans, m/z 1339.480 (Hex3HexNAc), 1485.530 (Hex3HexNAc4Fuc), 1809.639 (Hex5HexNAc4Fuc), and 1905.630 (Man9), change in intensity in the cancer group but not in the control group. In a separate study, N-glycans from total human serum glycoproteins of breast cancer patients and controls were also profiled. Analysis of human sera using an internal standard showed the alteration of the low-abundant high-mannose glycans, m/z 1419.475, 1581.528, 1743.581, 1905.634 (Man6–9), in breast cancer patients. A key observation was the elevation of a high-mannose type glycan containing nine mannoses, Man9, m/z 1905.630 in both mouse and human sera in the presence of breast cancer, suggesting an incompletion of the glycosylation process that normally trims back Man9 to produce complex and hybrid type oligosaccharides. PMID:21097542

  15. Envelope glycans of immunodeficiency virions are almost entirely oligomannose antigens

    PubMed Central

    Doores, Katie J.; Bonomelli, Camille; Harvey, David J.; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Dwek, Raymond A.; Burton, Dennis R.; Crispin, Max; Scanlan, Christopher N.

    2010-01-01

    The envelope spike of HIV is one of the most highly N-glycosylated structures found in nature. However, despite extensive research revealing essential functional roles in infection and immune evasion, the chemical structures of the glycans on the native viral envelope glycoprotein gp120—as opposed to recombinantly generated gp120—have not been described. Here, we report on the identity of the N-linked glycans from primary isolates of HIV-1 (clades A, B, and C) and from the simian immunodeficiency virus. MS analysis reveals a remarkably simple and highly conserved virus-specific glycan profile almost entirely devoid of medial Golgi-mediated processing. In stark contrast to recombinant gp120, which shows extensive exposure to cellular glycosylation enzymes (>70% complex type glycans), the native envelope shows barely detectable processing beyond the biosynthetic intermediate Man5GlcNAc2 (<2% complex type glycans). This oligomannose (Man5–9GlcNAc2) profile is conserved across primary isolates and geographically divergent clades but is not reflected in the current generation of gp120 antigens used for vaccine trials. In the context of vaccine design, we also note that Manα1→2Man-terminating glycans (Man6–9GlcNAc2) of the type recognized by the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV antibody 2G12 are 3-fold more abundant on the native envelope than on the recombinant monomer and are also found on isolates not neutralized by 2G12. The Manα1→2Man residues of gp120 therefore provide a vaccine target that is physically larger and antigenically more conserved than the 2G12 epitope itself. This study revises and extends our understanding of the glycan shield of HIV with implications for AIDS vaccine design. PMID:20643940

  16. Use of the U1A protein to facilitate crystallization and structure determination of large RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ferré-D’Amaré, Adrian R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The preparation of well-ordered crystals of RNAs with complex three-dimensional architecture can be facilitated by engineering a binding site for the spliceosomal protein U1A into a functionally and structurally dispensable stem-loop of the RNA of interest. Once suitable crystals are obtained, the U1A protein, of known structure, can be employed to facilitate preparation of heavy atom or anomalously scattering atom derivatives, or as a source of partial model phases for the molecular replacement method. Here, we describe the methods for making U1A preparations suitable for cocrystallization with RNA. As an example, the cocrystallization of the tetracycline aptamer with U1A is also described. PMID:26227038

  17. The acinar differentiation determinant PTF1A inhibits initiation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Krah, Nathan M; De La O, Jean-Paul; Swift, Galvin H; Hoang, Chinh Q; Willet, Spencer G; Chen Pan, Fong; Cash, Gabriela M; Bronner, Mary P; Wright, Christopher VE; MacDonald, Raymond J; Murtaugh, L Charles

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the initiation and progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may provide therapeutic strategies for this deadly disease. Recently, we and others made the surprising finding that PDAC and its preinvasive precursors, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), arise via reprogramming of mature acinar cells. We therefore hypothesized that the master regulator of acinar differentiation, PTF1A, could play a central role in suppressing PDAC initiation. In this study, we demonstrate that PTF1A expression is lost in both mouse and human PanINs, and that this downregulation is functionally imperative in mice for acinar reprogramming by oncogenic KRAS. Loss of Ptf1a alone is sufficient to induce acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, potentiate inflammation, and induce a KRAS-permissive, PDAC-like gene expression profile. As a result, Ptf1a-deficient acinar cells are dramatically sensitized to KRAS transformation, and reduced Ptf1a greatly accelerates development of invasive PDAC. Together, these data indicate that cell differentiation regulators constitute a new tumor suppressive mechanism in the pancreas. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07125.001 PMID:26151762

  18. Sugar-Binding Proteins from Fish: Selection of High Affnity “Lambodies” That Recognize Biomedically Relevant Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xia; Ma, Mark Z.; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.; Chowdhury, Sudipa; Barchi, Joseph J.; Mariuzza, Roy A.; Murphy, Michael B.; Mao, Li; Pancer, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    Glycan-binding proteins are important for a wide variety of basic research and clinical applications, but proteins with high affnity and selectivity for carbohydrates are diffcult to obtain. Here we describe a facile and cost-effective strategy to generate monoclonal lamprey antibodies, called lambodies, that target glycan determinants. We screened a library of yeast surface-displayed (YSD) lamprey variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR) for clones that can selectively bind various biomedically important glycotopes. These glycoconjugates included tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (Tn and TFα), Lewis antigens (LeA and LeX), N-glycolylneuraminic acid, targets of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies (poly-Man9 and the HIV gp120), and the glycoproteins asialo-ovine submaxillary mucin (aOSM) and asialo-human glycophorin A (aGPA). We isolated clones that bind each of these targets in a glycan-dependent manner and with very strong binding constants, for example, 6.2 nM for Man9 and 44.7 nM for gp120, determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). One particular lambody, VLRB.aGPA.23, was shown by glycan array analysis to be selective for the blood group H type 3 trisaccharide (BG-H3, Fucα1-2Galβ1-3GalNAcα), aGPA, and TFα (Galβ1-3GalNAcα), with affnity constants of 0.2, 1, and 8 nM, respectively. In human tissue microarrays this lambody selectively detected cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens in 14 different types of cancers. It stained 27% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples in a pattern that correlated with poor patient survival. Lambodies with exquisite affnity and selectivity for glycans may find myriad uses in glycobiology and biomedical research. PMID:23030719

  19. Arenavirus Glycan Shield Promotes Neutralizing Antibody Evasion and Protracted Infection.

    PubMed

    Sommerstein, Rami; Flatz, Lukas; Remy, Melissa M; Malinge, Pauline; Magistrelli, Giovanni; Fischer, Nicolas; Sahin, Mehmet; Bergthaler, Andreas; Igonet, Sebastien; Ter Meulen, Jan; Rigo, Dorothée; Meda, Paolo; Rabah, Nadia; Coutard, Bruno; Bowden, Thomas A; Lambert, Paul-Henri; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pinschewer, Daniel D

    2015-11-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa virus (LASV) can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. As a major impediment to vaccine development, delayed and weak neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses represent a unifying characteristic of both natural infection and all vaccine candidates tested to date. To investigate the mechanisms underlying arenavirus nAb evasion we engineered several arenavirus envelope-chimeric viruses and glycan-deficient variants thereof. We performed neutralization tests with sera from experimentally infected mice and from LASV-convalescent human patients. NAb response kinetics in mice correlated inversely with the N-linked glycan density in the arenavirus envelope protein's globular head. Additionally and most intriguingly, infection with fully glycosylated viruses elicited antibodies, which neutralized predominantly their glycan-deficient variants, both in mice and humans. Binding studies with monoclonal antibodies indicated that envelope glycans reduced nAb on-rate, occupancy and thereby counteracted virus neutralization. In infected mice, the envelope glycan shield promoted protracted viral infection by preventing its timely elimination by the ensuing antibody response. Thus, arenavirus envelope glycosylation impairs the protective efficacy rather than the induction of nAbs, and thereby prevents efficient antibody-mediated virus control. This immune evasion mechanism imposes limitations on antibody-based vaccination and convalescent serum therapy.

  20. Arenavirus Glycan Shield Promotes Neutralizing Antibody Evasion and Protracted Infection

    PubMed Central

    Malinge, Pauline; Magistrelli, Giovanni; Fischer, Nicolas; Sahin, Mehmet; Bergthaler, Andreas; Igonet, Sebastien; ter Meulen, Jan; Rigo, Dorothée; Meda, Paolo; Rabah, Nadia; Coutard, Bruno; Bowden, Thomas A.; Lambert, Paul-Henri; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pinschewer, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa virus (LASV) can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. As a major impediment to vaccine development, delayed and weak neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses represent a unifying characteristic of both natural infection and all vaccine candidates tested to date. To investigate the mechanisms underlying arenavirus nAb evasion we engineered several arenavirus envelope-chimeric viruses and glycan-deficient variants thereof. We performed neutralization tests with sera from experimentally infected mice and from LASV-convalescent human patients. NAb response kinetics in mice correlated inversely with the N-linked glycan density in the arenavirus envelope protein’s globular head. Additionally and most intriguingly, infection with fully glycosylated viruses elicited antibodies, which neutralized predominantly their glycan-deficient variants, both in mice and humans. Binding studies with monoclonal antibodies indicated that envelope glycans reduced nAb on-rate, occupancy and thereby counteracted virus neutralization. In infected mice, the envelope glycan shield promoted protracted viral infection by preventing its timely elimination by the ensuing antibody response. Thus, arenavirus envelope glycosylation impairs the protective efficacy rather than the induction of nAbs, and thereby prevents efficient antibody-mediated virus control. This immune evasion mechanism imposes limitations on antibody-based vaccination and convalescent serum therapy. PMID:26587982

  1. Glycan profiling of endometrial cancers using lectin microarray.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Sugiyama, Taro; Miyazawa, Masaki; Muramatsu, Toshinari; Nakamura, Kyoko; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Mikami, Mikio

    2012-10-01

    Cell surface glycans change during the process of malignant transformation. To characterize and distinguish endometrial cancer and endometrium, we performed glycan profiling using an emerging modern technology, lectin microarray analysis. The three cell lines, two from endometrial cancers [well-differentiated type (G1) and poorly differentiated type (G3)] and one from normal endometrium, were successfully categorized into three independent groups by 45 lectins. Furthermore, in cancer cells, a clear difference between G1 and G3 type was observed for the glycans recognized with six lectins, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), Sambucus sieboldiana agglutinin (SSA), Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), Trichosanthes japonica agglutinin I (TJA-I), Amaranthus caudatus agglutinin (ACA), and Bauhinia purpurea lectin (BPL). The lectin microarray analysis using G3 type tissues demonstrated that stage I and stage III or IV were distinguished depending on signal pattern of three lectins, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), BPL, and ACA. In addition, the analysis of the glycans on the ovarian cancer cells showed that only anticancer drug-sensitive cell lines had almost no activities to specific three lectins. Glycan profiling by the lectin microarray may be used to assess the characteristics of tumors and potentially to predict the success of chemotherapy treatment.

  2. N-glycan abnormalities in children with galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Coss, Karen P; Hawkes, Colin P; Adamczyk, Barbara; Stöckmann, Henning; Crushell, Ellen; Saldova, Radka; Knerr, Ina; Rubio-Gozalbo, Maria E; Monavari, Ardeshir A; Rudd, Pauline M; Treacy, Eileen P

    2014-02-07

    Galactose intoxication and over-restriction in galactosemia may affect glycosylation pathways and cause multisystem effects. In this study, we describe an applied hydrophilic interaction chromatography ultra-performance liquid chromatography high-throughput method to analyze whole serum and extracted IgG N-glycans with measurement of agalactosylated (G0), monogalactosylated (G1), and digalactosylated (G2) structures as a quantitative measure of galactose incorporation. This was applied to nine children with severe galactosemia (genotype Q188R/Q188R) and one child with a milder variant (genotype S135L/S135L). The profiles were also compared with those obtained from three age-matched children with PMM2-CDG (congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia) and nine pediatric control samples. We have observed that severe N-glycan assembly defects correct in the neonate following dietary restriction of galactose. However, treated adult galactosemia patients continue to exhibit ongoing N-glycan processing defects. We have now applied informative galactose incorporation ratios as a method of studying the presence of N-glycan processing defects in children with galactosemia. We identified N-glycan processing defects present in galactosemia children from an early age. For G0/G1, G0/G2, and (G0/G1)/G2 ratios, the difference noted between galactosemia patients and controls was found to be statistically significant (p = 0.002, 0.01, and 0.006, respectively).

  3. Improving N-Glycan Coverage using HPLC-MS with Electrospray Ionization at Subambient Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Marginean, Ioan; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Moore, Ronald J.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-01

    Human serum glycan profiling with mass spectrometry (MS) has been employed to study several disease conditions and is demonstrating promise for e.g. clinical biomarker discovery. However, the poor glycan ionization efficiency and the large dynamic range of glycan concentrations in human sera hinder comprehensive profiling. In particular, large glycans are problematic because they are present at low concentrations and prone to fragmentation. Here we show that the sub-ambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN)-MS can expand the serum glycome profile when compared with the conventional atmospheric pressure electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS with a heated capillary inlet. Notably, the ions generated by the SPIN interface were observed at higher charge states for 50% of the annotated glycans. Out of a total of 130 detected glycans, 34 were only detected with the SPIN-MS, resulting in improved coverage of glycan families as well as of glycans with larger numbers of labile monosaccharides.

  4. Quantitative fingerprinting of O-linked glycans released from proteins using isotopic coded labeling with deuterated 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone.

    PubMed

    Sić, Siniša; Maier, Norbert M; Rizzi, Andreas M

    2015-08-21

    Investigation of oligosaccharides attached to proteins as post-translational modification remains an important research field in the area of glycoproteomics as well as in biotechnology. The development of new tools for qualitative and quantitative analysis of glycans has gained high importance in recent years. This is particularly true with O-glycans for which quantitative data are still underrepresented in literature. This fact is probably due to the absence of an enzyme for general release of O-linked saccharides from glycoproteins and due to their low ionization yield in mass spectrometry (MS). In this paper, a method is established aimed at improved qualitative and quantitative analysis of mucin-type O-glycans. A chemical reaction combining release and derivatization of O-glycans in one step is combined here with mass spectrometric quantification. For the purpose of improved quantitative analysis, stable-isotope coded labeling by d0/d5 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolidone (PMP) was performed. The "heavy"-version of this label, penta-deutero (d5)-PMP, was synthesized for this purpose. Beneath improving the reproducibility of quantitation, PMP derivatization contributed to an enhancement of ionization yields in MS. By introducing an internal standard (e.g. GlcNAc3) the reproducibility for quantification can be improved. For higher abundant O-glycans a mean coefficient of variation (CV) less than 6% could be attained, for very low abundant CV values between 15 and 20%. For the determination of O-glycan profiles in mixtures, a HPLC separation was combined with a high resolution Qq-oaTOF instrument. RP-type stationary phases were successful in separating glycan species including some of isomeric ones. This separation step was particularly useful for removing of salts avoiding so the presence of various sodium clusters in the MS spectrum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Follistatin-like-1, a diffusible mesenchymal factor determines the fate of epithelium.

    PubMed

    Umezu, Tomohiro; Yamanouchi, Hiromi; Iida, Yusuke; Miura, Masataka; Tomooka, Yasuhiro

    2010-03-09

    Mesenchyme is generally believed to play critical roles in "secondary induction" during organogenesis. Because of the complexity of tissue interactions in secondary inductions, however, little is known about the precise mechanisms at the cellular and molecular levels. We have demonstrated that, in mouse oviductal development, the mesenchyme determines the fate of undetermined epithelial cells to become secretory or cilial cells. We have established a model for studying secondary induction by establishing clonal epithelial and mesenchymal cell lines from perinatal p53(-/-) mouse oviducts. The signal sequence trap method collected candidate molecules secreted from mesenchymal cell lines. Naive epithelial cells exposed to Follistatin-like-1 (Fstl1), one of the candidates, became irreversibly committed to expressing a cilial epithelial marker and differentiated into ciliated cells. We concluded that Fstl1 is one of the mesenchymal factors determining oviductal epithelial cell fate. This is a unique demonstration that the determination of epithelial cell fate is induced by a single diffusible factor.

  6. Individuality Normalization when Labeling with Isotopic Glycan Hydrazide Tags (INLIGHT): A Novel Glycan-Relative Quantification Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. Hunter; Taylor, Amber D.; Muddiman, David C.

    2013-09-01

    The Individuality Normalization when Labeling with Isotopic Glycan Hydrazide Tags (INLIGHT) strategy for the sample preparation, data analysis, and relative quantification of N-linked glycans is presented. Glycans are derivatized with either natural (L) or stable-isotope labeled (H) hydrazide reagents and analyzed using reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled online to a Q Exactive mass spectrometer. A simple glycan ladder, maltodextrin, is first used to demonstrate the relative quantification strategy in samples with negligible analytical and biological variability. It is shown that after a molecular weight correction attributable to isotopic overlap and a post-acquisition normalization of the data to account for any systematic bias, a plot of the experimental H:L ratio versus the calculated H:L ratio exhibits a correlation of unity for maltodextrin samples mixed in different ratios. We also demonstrate that the INLIGHT approach can quantify species over four orders of magnitude in ion abundance. The INLIGHT strategy is further demonstrated in pooled human plasma, where it is shown that the post-acquisition normalization is more effective than using a single spiked-in internal standard. Finally, changes in glycosylation are able to be detected in complex biological matrices, when spiked with a glycoprotein. The ability to spike in a glycoprotein and detect change at the glycan level validates both the sample preparation and data analysis strategy, making INLIGHT an invaluable relative quantification strategy for the field of glycomics.

  7. Individuality Normalization when Labeling with Isotopic Glycan Hydrazide Tags (INLIGHT): a novel glycan-relative quantification strategy.

    PubMed

    Walker, S Hunter; Taylor, Amber D; Muddiman, David C

    2013-09-01

    The Individuality Normalization when Labeling with Isotopic Glycan Hydrazide Tags (INLIGHT) strategy for the sample preparation, data analysis, and relative quantification of N-linked glycans is presented. Glycans are derivatized with either natural (L) or stable-isotope labeled (H) hydrazide reagents and analyzed using reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled online to a Q Exactive mass spectrometer. A simple glycan ladder, maltodextrin, is first used to demonstrate the relative quantification strategy in samples with negligible analytical and biological variability. It is shown that after a molecular weight correction attributable to isotopic overlap and a post-acquisition normalization of the data to account for any systematic bias, a plot of the experimental H:L ratio versus the calculated H:L ratio exhibits a correlation of unity for maltodextrin samples mixed in different ratios. We also demonstrate that the INLIGHT approach can quantify species over four orders of magnitude in ion abundance. The INLIGHT strategy is further demonstrated in pooled human plasma, where it is shown that the post-acquisition normalization is more effective than using a single spiked-in internal standard. Finally, changes in glycosylation are able to be detected in complex biological matrices, when spiked with a glycoprotein. The ability to spike in a glycoprotein and detect change at the glycan level validates both the sample preparation and data analysis strategy, making INLIGHT an invaluable relative quantification strategy for the field of glycomics.

  8. Glycan-Based Cell Targeting To Modulate Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Johannssen, Timo; Lepenies, Bernd

    2017-04-01

    Glycosylation is an integral post-translational modification present in more than half of all eukaryotic proteins. It affects key protein functions, including folding, stability, and immunogenicity. Glycoengineering approaches, such as the use of bacterial N-glycosylation systems, or expression systems, including yeasts, insect cells, and mammalian cells, have enabled access to defined and homogenous glycoproteins. Given that glycan structures on proteins can be recognized by host lectin receptors, they may facilitate cell-specific targeting and immune modulation. Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) expressed by antigen-presenting cells are attractive targets to shape immune responses. Multivalent glycan display on nanoparticles, liposomes, or dendrimers has successfully enabled CLR targeting. In this review, we discuss novel strategies to access defined glycan structures and highlight CLR targeting approaches for immune modulation.

  9. Emerging Technologies for Making Glycan-Defined Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lai-Xi; Lomino, Joseph V.

    2011-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is a common and complex posttranslational modification of proteins, which expands functional diversity while boosting structural heterogeneity. Glycoproteins, the end products of such a modification, are typically produced as mixtures of glycoforms possessing the same polypeptide backbone but differ in the site of glycosylation and/or in the structures of pendant glycans, from which single glycoforms are difficult to isolate. The urgent need for glycan-defined glycoproteins in both detailed structure-function relationship studies and therapeutic applications has stimulated an extensive interest in developing various methods for manipulating protein glycosylation. This review highlights emerging technologies that hold great promise in making a variety of glycan-defined glycoproteins, with a particular emphasis in the following three areas: specific glycoengineering of host biosynthetic pathways, in vitro chemoenzymatic glycosylation remodeling, and chemo-selective and site-specific glycosylation of proteins. PMID:22141574

  10. Complicated N-linked glycans in simple organisms

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Birgit; Hykollari, Alba; Yan, Shi; Paschinger, Katharina; Wilson, Iain B. H.

    2013-01-01

    Although countless genomes have now been sequenced, the glycomes of the vast majority of eukaryotes still present a series of unmapped frontiers. However, strides are being made in a few groups of invertebrate and unicellular organisms as regards their N-glycans and N-glycosylation pathways. Thereby, the traditional classification of glycan structures inevitably approaches its boundaries. Indeed, the glycomes of these organisms are rich in surprises including a multitude of modifications of the core regions of N-glycans and unusual antennae. From the actually rather limited glycomic information we have, it is nevertheless obvious that the biotechnological, developmental and immunological relevance of these modifications, especially in insect cell lines, model organisms and parasites means that deciphering unusual glycomes is of more than just academic interest. PMID:22944671

  11. Glycan involvement in the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to tears.

    PubMed

    Kautto, Liisa; Nguyen-Khuong, Terry; Everest-Dass, Arun; Leong, Andrea; Zhao, Zhenjun; Willcox, Mark D P; Packer, Nicolle H; Peterson, Robyn

    2016-04-01

    The human eye is constantly bathed by tears, which protect the ocular surface via a variety of mechanisms. The O-linked glycans of tear mucins have long been considered to play a role in binding to pathogens and facilitating their removal in the tear flow. Other conjugated glycans in tears could similarly contribute to pathogen binding and removal but have received less attention. In the work presented here we assessed the contribution of glycan moieties, in particular the protein attached N-glycans, presented by the broad complement of tear proteins to the adhesion of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a leading cause of microbial keratitis and ulceration of the cornea. Our adhesion assay involved immobilising the macromolecular components of tears into the wells of a polyvinyl difluoride (PVDF) microtitre filter plate and probing the binding of fluorescently labelled bacteria. Three P. aeruginosa strains were studied: a cytotoxic strain (6206) and an invasive strain (6294) from eye infections, and an invasive strain (320) from a urinary tract infection (UTI). The ocular isolates adhered two to three times more to human tears than to human saliva or porcine gastric mucin, suggesting ocular niche-specific adaptation. Support for the role of the N-glycans carried by human tear proteins in the binding and removal of P. aeruginosa from the eye was shown by: 1) pre-incubation of the bacteria with free component sugars, galactose, mannose, fucose and sialyl lactose (or combination thereof) inhibiting adhesion of all the P. aeruginosa strains to the immobilised tear proteins, with the greatest inhibition of binding of the ocular cytotoxic 6206 and least for the invasive 6294 strain; 2) pre-incubation of the bacteria with N-glycans released from the commercially available human milk lactoferrin, an abundant protein that carries N-linked glycans in tears, inhibiting the adhesion to tears of the ocular bacteria by up to 70%, which was significantly more

  12. Parallel quantification of lectin-glycan interaction using ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yoichi; Seko, Akira; Sakono, Masafumi; Hachisu, Masakazu; Koizumi, Akihiko; Fujikawa, Kohki; Ito, Yukishige

    2013-06-28

    Using ultrafiltration membrane, a simple method for screening protein-ligand interaction was developed. The procedure comprises three steps: mixing ligand with protein, ultrafiltration of the solution, and quantification of unbound ligands by HPLC. By conducting analysis with variable protein concentrations, affinity constants were easily obtained. Multiple ligands can be analyzed simultaneously as a mixture, when concentration of ligands was controlled. Feasibility of this method for lectin-glycan interaction analysis was examined using fluorescently labeled high-mannose-type glycans and recombinant intracellular lectins or endo-α-mannosidase mutants. Estimated Ka values of malectin and VIP36 were in good agreement indeed with those evaluated by conventional methods such as isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) or frontal affinity chromatography (FAC). Finally, several mutants of endo-α-mannosidase were produced and their affinities to monoglucosylated glycans were evaluated.

  13. Bridging Innate and Adaptive Antitumor Immunity Targeting Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Pashov, Anastas; Monzavi-Karbassi, Bejatolah; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Effective immunotherapy for cancer depends on cellular responses to tumor antigens. The role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in T-cell recognition and T-cell receptor repertoire selection has become a central tenet in immunology. Structurally, this does not contradict earlier findings that T-cells can differentiate between small hapten structures like simple glycans. Understanding T-cell recognition of antigens as defined genetically by MHC and combinatorially by T cell receptors led to the “altered self” hypothesis. This notion reflects a more fundamental principle underlying immune surveillance and integrating evolutionarily and mechanistically diverse elements of the immune system. Danger associated molecular patterns, including those generated by glycan remodeling, represent an instance of altered self. A prominent example is the modification of the tumor-associated antigen MUC1. Similar examples emphasize glycan reactivity patterns of antigen receptors as a phenomenon bridging innate and adaptive but also humoral and cellular immunity and providing templates for immunotherapies. PMID:20617150

  14. Glycobiology of cell death: when glycans and lectins govern cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, R G; Rabinovich, G A

    2013-01-01

    Although one typically thinks of carbohydrates as associated with cell growth and viability, glycosylation also has an integral role in many processes leading to cell death. Glycans, either alone or complexed with glycan-binding proteins, can deliver intracellular signals or control extracellular processes that promote initiation, execution and resolution of cell death programs. Herein, we review the role of glycans and glycan-binding proteins as essential components of the cell death machinery during physiologic and pathologic settings. PMID:23703323

  15. Using CRISPR-Cas9 to quantify the contributions of O-glycans, N-glycans and Glycosphingolipids to human leukocyte-endothelium adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Stolfa, Gino; Mondal, Nandini; Zhu, Yuqi; Yu, Xinheng; Buffone, Alexander; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    There is often interest in dissecting the relative contributions of the N-glycans, O-glycans and glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in regulating complex biological traits like cell signaling, adhesion, development and metastasis. To address this, we developed a CRISPR-Cas9 toolkit to selectively truncate each of these commonly expressed glycan-types. Here, O-glycan biosynthesis was truncated by knocking-out Core 1 β3Gal-T Specific Molecular Chaperone (COSMC), N-glycans by targeting the β1,2 GlcNAc-transferase (MGAT1) and GSLs by deleting UDP-glucose ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG). These reagents were applied to reveal the glycoconjugates regulating human myeloid cell adhesion to selectins under physiological shear-flow observed during inflammation. These functional studies show that leukocyte rolling on P- and L-selectin is ablated in cells lacking O-glycans, with N-glycan truncation also increasing cell rolling velocity on L-selectin. All three glycan families contributed to E-selectin dependent cell adhesion with N-glycans contributing to all aspects of the leukocyte adhesion cascade, O-glycans only being important during initial recruitment, and GSLs stabilizing slow cell rolling and the transition to firm arrest. Overall, the genome editing tools developed here may be broadly applied in studies of cellular glycosylation. PMID:27458028

  16. Glycan Node Analysis: A Bottom-up Approach to Glycomics.

    PubMed

    Zaare, Sahba; Aguilar, Jesús S; Hu, Yueming; Ferdosi, Shadi; Borges, Chad R

    2016-05-22

    Synthesized in a non-template-driven process by enzymes called glycosyltransferases, glycans are key players in various significant intra- and extracellular events. Many pathological conditions, notably cancer, affect gene expression, which can in turn deregulate the relative abundance and activity levels of glycoside hydrolase and glycosyltransferase enzymes. Unique aberrant whole glycans resulting from deregulated glycosyltransferase(s) are often present in trace quantities within complex biofluids, making their detection difficult and sometimes stochastic. However, with proper sample preparation, one of the oldest forms of mass spectrometry (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, GC-MS) can routinely detect the collection of branch-point and linkage-specific monosaccharides ("glycan nodes") present in complex biofluids. Complementary to traditional top-down glycomics techniques, the approach discussed herein involves the collection and condensation of each constituent glycan node in a sample into a single independent analytical signal, which provides detailed structural and quantitative information about changes to the glycome as a whole and reveals potentially deregulated glycosyltransferases. Improvements to the permethylation and subsequent liquid/liquid extraction stages provided herein enhance reproducibility and overall yield by facilitating minimal exposure of permethylated glycans to alkaline aqueous conditions. Modifications to the acetylation stage further increase the extent of reaction and overall yield. Despite their reproducibility, the overall yields of N-acetylhexosamine (HexNAc) partially permethylated alditol acetates (PMAAs) are shown to be inherently lower than their expected theoretical value relative to hexose PMAAs. Calculating the ratio of the area under the extracted ion chromatogram (XIC) for each individual hexose PMAA (or HexNAc PMAA) to the sum of such XIC areas for all hexoses (or HexNAcs) provides a new normalization method that

  17. Human DC-SIGN binds specific human milk glycans.

    PubMed

    Noll, Alexander J; Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Duska-McEwen, Geralyn; Buck, Rachael H; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D

    2016-05-15

    Human milk glycans (HMGs) are prebiotics, pathogen receptor decoys and regulators of host physiology and immune responses. Mechanistically, human lectins (glycan-binding proteins, hGBP) expressed by dendritic cells (DCs) are of major interest, as these cells directly contact HMGs. To explore such interactions, we screened many C-type lectins and sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) expressed by DCs for glycan binding on microarrays presenting over 200 HMGs. Unexpectedly, DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) showed robust binding to many HMGs, whereas other C-type lectins failed to bind, and Siglec-5 and Siglec-9 showed weak binding to a few glycans. By contrast, most hGBP bound to multiple glycans on other microarrays lacking HMGs. An α-linked fucose residue was characteristic of HMGs bound by DC-SIGN. Binding of DC-SIGN to the simple HMGs 2'-fucosyl-lactose (2'-FL) and 3-fucosyl-lactose (3-FL) was confirmed by flow cytometry to beads conjugated with 2'-FL or 3-FL, as well as the ability of the free glycans to inhibit DC-SIGN binding. 2'-FL had an IC50 of ∼1 mM for DC-SIGN, which is within the physiological concentration of 2'-FL in human milk. These results demonstrate that DC-SIGN among the many hGBP expressed by DCs binds to α-fucosylated HMGs, and suggest that such interactions may be important in influencing immune responses in the developing infant. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  18. Anti-glycan antibodies as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Dotan, N; Altstock, R T; Schwarz, M; Dukler, A

    2006-01-01

    Glycans (sugars or carbohydrates) are predominant surface components of cells such as erythrocytes, immune cells and microorganisms. As such, they give rise to high levels of anti-glycan antibodies of all classes. Antibodies to certain defined mono, di and oligosaccharides that are common in bacterial, fungal and parasite cells exist in human sera and can be profiled using glycan arrays. The use of glycan arrays for systematic screening of blood samples from multiple sclerosis (MS) and Crohn's disease (CD) patients in versus to blood samples from control groups, have lead to the discovery of a few anti glycan antibodies biomarkers enabling diagnosis and prognosis in MS and CD patients. Anti-Glc(alpha1,4)Glc(alpha) IgM antibodies were found to be specific for MS patients, enabling differentiation between MS patients and patients with other neurological diseases, with 54% sensitivity and 85% specificity. Anti-Glc(alpha1,4)Glc(alpha) IgM were found to be predictive for the conversion of patients in first acute neurological event to clinically defined MS. Anti-laminaribioside (ALCA), anti-mannobioside (AMCA) and anti-chitobioside (ACCA) antibodies were found to be specific for CD. The combined use of these antibodies enables improved diagnosis of CD versus ulcerative colitis and other gastrointestinal diseases, as well as stratification of CD patients with a more complicated disease and high risk for surgery. Anti-glycan antibodies profiling (AGAP) is a new and promising approach for development of biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis.

  19. Unique N-Glycan Moieties of the 66-kDa Cell Wall Glycoprotein from the Red Microalga Porphyridium sp.

    PubMed Central

    Levy-Ontman, Oshrat; Arad, Shoshana (Malis); Harvey, David J.; Parsons, Thomas B.; Fairbanks, Antony; Tekoah, Yoram

    2011-01-01

    We report here the structural determination of the N-linked glycans in the 66-kDa glycoprotein, part of the unique sulfated complex cell wall polysaccharide of the red microalga Porphyridium sp. Structures were elucidated by a combination of normal phase/reverse phase HPLC, positive ion MALDI-TOF MS, negative ion electrospray ionization, and MS/MS. The sugar moieties of the glycoprotein consisted of at least four fractions of N-linked glycans, each composed of the same four monosaccharides, GlcNAc, Man, 6-O-MeMan, and Xyl, with compositions Man8–9Xyl1–2Me3GlcNAc2. The present study is the first report of N-glycans with the terminal Xyl attached to the 6-mannose branch of the 6-antenna and to the 3-oxygen of the penultimate (core) GlcNAc. Another novel finding was that all four glycans contain three O-methylmannose residues in positions that have never been reported before. Although it is known that some lower organisms are able to methylate terminal monosaccharides in glycans, the present study on Porphyridium sp. is the first describing an organism that is able to methylate non-terminal mannose residues. This study will thus contribute to understanding of N-glycosylation in algae and might shed light on the evolutionary development from prokaryotes to multicellular organisms. It also may contribute to our understanding of the red algae polysaccharide formation. The additional importance of this research lies in its potential for biotechnological applications, especially in evaluating the use of microalgae as cell factories for the production of therapeutic proteins. PMID:21515680

  20. Production of glucocerebrosidase with terminal mannose glycans for enzyme replacement therapy of Gaucher's disease using a plant cell system.

    PubMed

    Shaaltiel, Yoseph; Bartfeld, Daniel; Hashmueli, Sharon; Baum, Gideon; Brill-Almon, Einat; Galili, Gad; Dym, Orly; Boldin-Adamsky, Swetlana A; Silman, Israel; Sussman, Joel L; Futerman, Anthony H; Aviezer, David

    2007-09-01

    Gaucher's disease, a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding glucocerebrosidase (GCD), is currently treated by enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant GCD (Cerezyme) expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. As complex glycans in mammalian cells do not terminate in mannose residues, which are essential for the biological uptake of GCD via macrophage mannose receptors in human patients with Gaucher's disease, an in vitro glycan modification is required in order to expose the mannose residues on the glycans of Cerezyme. In this report, the production of a recombinant human GCD in a carrot cell suspension culture is described. The recombinant plant-derived GCD (prGCD) is targeted to the storage vacuoles, using a plant-specific C-terminal sorting signal. Notably, the recombinant human GCD expressed in the carrot cells naturally contains terminal mannose residues on its complex glycans, apparently as a result of the activity of a special vacuolar enzyme that modifies complex glycans. Hence, the plant-produced recombinant human GCD does not require exposure of mannose residues in vitro, which is a requirement for the production of Cerezyme. prGCD also displays a level of biological activity similar to that of Cerezyme produced in CHO cells, as well as a highly homologous high-resolution three-dimensional structure, determined by X-ray crystallography. A single-dose toxicity study with prGCD in mice demonstrated the absence of treatment-related adverse reactions or clinical findings, indicating the potential safety of prGCD. prGCD is currently undergoing clinical studies, and may offer a new and alternative therapeutic option for Gaucher's disease.

  1. Precise orbit determination of Compass-M1: a primary result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baoqi

    On April 13, 2007, the first experiment satellite, Compass-M1, of China's the second generation Compass Navigation system was successfully launched. Unlike previous Compass satellites, Compass-M1 is the first satellite in medium earth orbit (MEO), and broadcast navigation signals in multi-frequencies in L-band. If signals were received from more than four satellites, users can determine their locations in a passive manner like using GPS. A primary result of precise orbit determination of Compass-M1 is presented in this paper. Five tracking stations, all located in China, are used. Double-frequency code and carrier phase observations are processed in zero-difference mode. Receiver and satellite clocks are modeled by linear or quadratic polynomial. The radiation pressure model is the so-called extended CODE orbit model, and an a priori model is introduced according to the size and physical attribute of Compass-M1. The solution is based on 3-day arc dynamical precise orbit determination. Estimated parameters include six keplerian orbit elements, two radiation pressure model parameters and clock polynomial coefficients. Orbit overlap difference and validating with SLR indicate that the accuracy of the precise orbit is quite exciting and exceeds our expectation.

  2. Evidence for PPC1, a determinant of the pilei-pellis color of Agaricus bisporus fruitbodies.

    PubMed

    Callac, P; Moquet, F; Imbernon, M; Guedes-Lafargue, M R; Mamoun, M; Olivier, J M

    1998-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the genetic basis of mushroom cap color. In first generation hybrids between a brown isolate and the white commercial hybrid U 1, the white trait was recessive. Color was determined using color meter technology in second generation hybrids obtained by crossing the homokaryotic progeny of a first generation hybrid with a homokaryon from U 1. Statistical analysis revealed a bimodal distribution describing two classes of white and not-white hybrids. We postulate that a recessive allele at a single locus (PPC1) encodes the white pilei-pellis color. Joint segregation analyses indicated that PPC1 was linked to the ADH (alcohol dehydrogenase) locus. Through the analysis of the heterokaryotic progeny of the first generation hybrid, a recombination model is proposed in which PPC1 is located between the centromere and the ADH locus.

  3. Is Income Inequality a Determinant of Population Health? Part 1. A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, John; Smith, George Davey; Harper, Sam; Hillemeier, Marianne; Ross, Nancy; Kaplan, George A; Wolfson, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews 98 aggregate and multilevel studies examining the associations between income inequality and health. Overall, there seems to be little support for the idea that income inequality is a major, generalizable determinant of population health differences within or between rich countries. Income inequality may, however, directly influence some health outcomes, such as homicide in some contexts. The strongest evidence for direct health effects is among states in the United States, but even that is somewhat mixed. Despite little support for a direct effect of income inequality on health per se, reducing income inequality by raising the incomes of the most disadvantaged will improve their health, help reduce health inequalities, and generally improve population health. PMID:15016244

  4. N-glycan transition of the early developmental stage in Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Risa; Hirotsu, Naoki; Miyanishi, Nobumitsu

    2016-08-26

    N-Glycosylation is one of the post-translational modifications. In animals, N-glycans linked to proteins function in cell-cell recognition, sorting, transport, and other biological phenomena. However, in plants, N-glycan-mediated biological functions remain obscure. In a previous study, we showed that the main type of N-glycan transition is from the paucimannosidic to complex type before and after germination in Oryza sativa, suggesting that transitions of N-glycan, including those of glycoproteins and glycosyltransferases, are closely associated with plant growth. To further elucidate the relationship between N-glycan structure and plant growth, we analyzed the structures of N-glycans expressed in O. sativa seedlings grown under light conditions and performed comparative analyses of the structures in the shoot and root. The analyses show that fundamental N-glycan structures are common to the shoot and root, whereas paucimannosidic-type N-glycans dramatically decreased in the root grown under light conditions. Further, to investigate the effects of light on N-glycan structures in O. sativa seedlings, we analyzed N-glycan structures in O. sativa seedlings grown in the dark. Understandably, N-glycan expression in the root was almost unaffected by light. However, despite a marked difference in phenotype, N-glycan expression in the shoot was also unaffected by light. This result suggests that the shoot and root of O. sativa have different glycoproteins and distinct N-glycan synthetic systems. Thus, we propose that the N-glycan synthetic system of the O. sativa shoot is almost unaffected by light conditions and that many photosynthesis-related proteins are not modified by N-glycans.

  5. Characterization of the maize gene sugary1, a determinant of starch composition in kernels.

    PubMed Central

    James, M G; Robertson, D S; Myers, A M

    1995-01-01

    In maize kernels, mutations in the gene sugary1 (su1) result in (1) increased sucrose concentration; (2) decreased concentration of amylopectin, the branched component of starch; and (3) accumulation of the highly branched glucopolysaccharide phytoglycogen. To investigate further the mechanisms of storage carbohydrate synthesis in maize, part of the su1 gene locus and a cDNA copy of the su1 transcript were characterized. Five new su1 mutations were isolated in a Mutator background, and the mutant allele su1-R4582::Mu1 was isolated by transposon tagging. The identity of the cloned element as the su1 gene locus was confirmed by the cosegregation of restriction fragment length polymorphisms in the same or nearby genomic intervals with three additional, independent su1 mutations. Pedigree analysis was also used to confirm the identity of su1. A 2.8-kb mRNA that is homologous to the cloned gene was detected in maize kernels, and a 2.7-kb cDNA clone was isolated based on hybridization to the genomic DNA. Specific portions of the cDNA hybridized with multiple segments of the maize genome, suggesting that su1 is part of a multigene family. The cDNA sequence specified a polypeptide of at least 742 amino acids, which is highly similar in amino acid sequence to bacterial enzymes that hydrolyze alpha-(1-->6) glucosyl linkages of starch. Therefore, debranching of glucopolysaccharides is seemingly part of the normal process of starch biosynthesis, and the final degree of branch linkages in starch most likely arises from the combined actions of branching and debranching enzymes. PMID:7773016

  6. Characterization of the maize gene sugary1, a determinant of starch composition in kernels.

    PubMed

    James, M G; Robertson, D S; Myers, A M

    1995-04-01

    In maize kernels, mutations in the gene sugary1 (su1) result in (1) increased sucrose concentration; (2) decreased concentration of amylopectin, the branched component of starch; and (3) accumulation of the highly branched glucopolysaccharide phytoglycogen. To investigate further the mechanisms of storage carbohydrate synthesis in maize, part of the su1 gene locus and a cDNA copy of the su1 transcript were characterized. Five new su1 mutations were isolated in a Mutator background, and the mutant allele su1-R4582::Mu1 was isolated by transposon tagging. The identity of the cloned element as the su1 gene locus was confirmed by the cosegregation of restriction fragment length polymorphisms in the same or nearby genomic intervals with three additional, independent su1 mutations. Pedigree analysis was also used to confirm the identity of su1. A 2.8-kb mRNA that is homologous to the cloned gene was detected in maize kernels, and a 2.7-kb cDNA clone was isolated based on hybridization to the genomic DNA. Specific portions of the cDNA hybridized with multiple segments of the maize genome, suggesting that su1 is part of a multigene family. The cDNA sequence specified a polypeptide of at least 742 amino acids, which is highly similar in amino acid sequence to bacterial enzymes that hydrolyze alpha-(1-->6) glucosyl linkages of starch. Therefore, debranching of glucopolysaccharides is seemingly part of the normal process of starch biosynthesis, and the final degree of branch linkages in starch most likely arises from the combined actions of branching and debranching enzymes.

  7. Structural characterization by multistage mass spectrometry (MSn) of human milk glycans recognized by human rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Ashline, David J; Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Prasad, Venkataram; Estes, Mary K; Cummings, Richard D; Smith, David F; Reinhold, Vernon N

    2014-11-01

    We have shown that recombinant forms of VP8* domains of the human rotavirus outer capsid spike protein VP4 from human neonatal strains (N155(G10P[11]) and RV3(G3P[6]) and a bovine strain (B223) recognize unique glycans within the repertoire of human milk glycans. The accompanying study by Yu et al.(2), describes a human milk glycan shotgun glycan microarray that led to the identification of 32 specific glycans in the human milk tagged glycan library that were recognized by these human rotaviruses. These microarray analyses also provided a variety of metadata about the recognized glycan structures compiled from anti-glycan antibody and lectin binding before and after specific glycosidase digestions, along with compositional information from mass analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry. To deduce glycan sequence and utilize information predicted by analyses of metadata from each glycan, 28 of the glycan targets were retrieved from the tagged glycan library for detailed sequencing using sequential disassembly of glycans by ion-trap mass spectrometry. Our aim is to obtain a deeper structural understanding of these key glycans using an orthogonal approach for structural confirmation in a single ion trap mass spectrometer. This sequential ion disassembly strategy details the complexities of linkage and branching in multiple compositions, several of which contained isomeric mixtures including several novel structures. The application of this approach exploits both library matching with standard materials and de novo approaches. This combination together with the metadata generated from lectin and antibody-binding data before and after glycosidase digestions provide a heretofore-unavailable level of analytical detail to glycan structure analysis. The results of these studies showed that, among the 28 glycan targets analyzed, 27 unique structures were identified, and 23 of the human milk glycans recognized by human rotaviruses represent

  8. Analysis of site-specific N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Ivan; Lin, Chia-wei; Grant, Oliver C; Fleurkens, Susanna; Villiger, Thomas K; Soos, Miroslav; Morbidelli, Massimo; Woods, Robert J; Gauss, Robert; Aebi, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The hallmark of N-linked protein glycosylation is the generation of diverse glycan structures in the secretory pathway. Dynamic, non-template-driven processes of N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi provide the cellular setting for structural diversity. We applied newly developed mass spectrometry-based analytics to quantify site-specific N-glycan remodeling of the model protein Pdi1p expressed in insect cells. Molecular dynamics simulation, mutational analysis, kinetic studies of in vitro processing events and glycan flux analysis supported the defining role of the protein in N-glycan processing. PMID:26240167

  9. Cryogenic Vibrational Spectroscopy Provides Unique Fingerprints for Glycan Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masellis, Chiara; Khanal, Neelam; Kamrath, Michael Z.; Clemmer, David E.; Rizzo, Thomas R.

    2017-06-01

    The structural characterization of glycans by mass spectrometry is particularly challenging. This is because of the high degree of isomerism in which glycans of the same mass can differ in their stereochemistry, attachment points, and degree of branching. Here we show that the addition of cryogenic vibrational spectroscopy to mass and mobility measurements allows one to uniquely identify and characterize these complex biopolymers. We investigate six disaccharide isomers that differ in their stereochemistry, attachment point of the glycosidic bond, and monosaccharide content, and demonstrate that we can identify each one unambiguously. Even disaccharides that differ by a single stereogenic center or in the monosaccharide sequence order show distinct vibrational fingerprints that would clearly allow their identification in a mixture, which is not possible by ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry alone. Moreover, this technique can be applied to larger glycans, which we demonstrate by distinguishing isomeric branched and linear pentasaccharides. The creation of a database containing mass, collision cross section, and vibrational fingerprint measurements for glycan standards should allow unambiguous identification and characterization of these biopolymers in mixtures, providing an enabling technology for all fields of glycoscience.

  10. Cryogenic Vibrational Spectroscopy Provides Unique Fingerprints for Glycan Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masellis, Chiara; Khanal, Neelam; Kamrath, Michael Z.; Clemmer, David E.; Rizzo, Thomas R.

    2017-10-01

    The structural characterization of glycans by mass spectrometry is particularly challenging. This is because of the high degree of isomerism in which glycans of the same mass can differ in their stereochemistry, attachment points, and degree of branching. Here we show that the addition of cryogenic vibrational spectroscopy to mass and mobility measurements allows one to uniquely identify and characterize these complex biopolymers. We investigate six disaccharide isomers that differ in their stereochemistry, attachment point of the glycosidic bond, and monosaccharide content, and demonstrate that we can identify each one unambiguously. Even disaccharides that differ by a single stereogenic center or in the monosaccharide sequence order show distinct vibrational fingerprints that would clearly allow their identification in a mixture, which is not possible by ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry alone. Moreover, this technique can be applied to larger glycans, which we demonstrate by distinguishing isomeric branched and linear pentasaccharides. The creation of a database containing mass, collision cross section, and vibrational fingerprint measurements for glycan standards should allow unambiguous identification and characterization of these biopolymers in mixtures, providing an enabling technology for all fields of glycoscience. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Profiling glycosyltransferase activities by tritium imaging of glycan microarrays.

    PubMed

    Serna, Sonia; Hokke, Cornelis H; Weissenborn, Martin; Flitsch, Sabine; Martin-Lomas, Manuel; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2013-05-10

    High-throughput microarray technology has been combined with ultrasensitive and high-resolution tritium autoradiography to create a new platform for the quantitative detection of glycosyltransferase activity on glycan arrays. In addition, we show full compatibility with the use of fluorescently labeled lectins to help with the stereochemical assignment of newly formed glycoside linkages.

  12. Fucosyltransferases produce N-glycans containing core l-galactose.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Takao; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Misaki, Ryo; Kitamura, Shinichi; Fujiyama, Kazuhito

    2017-01-29

    l-Galactose (l-Gal) containing N-glycans and cell wall polysaccharides have been detected in the l-Fuc deficient mur1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana. The l-Gal residue is thought to be transferred from GDP-l-Gal, which is a structurally related analog of GDP-l-Fuc, but in vitrol-galactosylation activity has never been detected. In this study, we carried out preparative scale GDP-l-Gal synthesis using recombinant A. thaliana GDP-mannose-3',5'-epimerase. We also demonstrated the l-galactosylation assay of mouse α1,6-fucosyltransferase (MmFUT8) and A. thaliana α1,3-fucosyltransferase (AtFucTA). Both fucosyltransferases showed l-galactosylation activity from GDP-l-Gal to asparagine-linked N-acetyl-β-d-glucosamine of asialo-agalacto-bi-antennary N-glycan instead of l-fucosylation. In addition, the apparent Km values of MmFUT8 and AtFucTA suggest that l-Fuc was preferentially transferred to N-glycan compared with l-Gal by fucosyltransferases. Our results clearly demonstrate that MmFUT8 and AtFucTA transfer l-Gal residues from GDP-l-Gal and synthesize l-Gal containing N-glycan in vitro.

  13. Computationally Discovered Potentiating Role of Glycans on NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sinitskiy, Anton V.; Stanley, Nathaniel H.; Hackos, David H.; Hanson, Jesse E.; Sellers, Benjamin D.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2017-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are glycoproteins in the brain central to learning and memory. The effects of glycosylation on the structure and dynamics of NMDARs are largely unknown. In this work, we use extensive molecular dynamics simulations of GluN1 and GluN2B ligand binding domains (LBDs) of NMDARs to investigate these effects. Our simulations predict that intra-domain interactions involving the glycan attached to residue GluN1-N440 stabilize closed-clamshell conformations of the GluN1 LBD. The glycan on GluN2B-N688 shows a similar, though weaker, effect. Based on these results, and assuming the transferability of the results of LBD simulations to the full receptor, we predict that glycans at GluN1-N440 might play a potentiator role in NMDARs. To validate this prediction, we perform electrophysiological analysis of full-length NMDARs with a glycosylation-preventing GluN1-N440Q mutation, and demonstrate an increase in the glycine EC50 value. Overall, our results suggest an intramolecular potentiating role of glycans on NMDA receptors. PMID:28378791

  14. Cryogenic Vibrational Spectroscopy Provides Unique Fingerprints for Glycan Identification.

    PubMed

    Masellis, Chiara; Khanal, Neelam; Kamrath, Michael Z; Clemmer, David E; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2017-06-22

    The structural characterization of glycans by mass spectrometry is particularly challenging. This is because of the high degree of isomerism in which glycans of the same mass can differ in their stereochemistry, attachment points, and degree of branching. Here we show that the addition of cryogenic vibrational spectroscopy to mass and mobility measurements allows one to uniquely identify and characterize these complex biopolymers. We investigate six disaccharide isomers that differ in their stereochemistry, attachment point of the glycosidic bond, and monosaccharide content, and demonstrate that we can identify each one unambiguously. Even disaccharides that differ by a single stereogenic center or in the monosaccharide sequence order show distinct vibrational fingerprints that would clearly allow their identification in a mixture, which is not possible by ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry alone. Moreover, this technique can be applied to larger glycans, which we demonstrate by distinguishing isomeric branched and linear pentasaccharides. The creation of a database containing mass, collision cross section, and vibrational fingerprint measurements for glycan standards should allow unambiguous identification and characterization of these biopolymers in mixtures, providing an enabling technology for all fields of glycoscience. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Computationally Discovered Potentiating Role of Glycans on NMDA Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitskiy, Anton V.; Stanley, Nathaniel H.; Hackos, David H.; Hanson, Jesse E.; Sellers, Benjamin D.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2017-04-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are glycoproteins in the brain central to learning and memory. The effects of glycosylation on the structure and dynamics of NMDARs are largely unknown. In this work, we use extensive molecular dynamics simulations of GluN1 and GluN2B ligand binding domains (LBDs) of NMDARs to investigate these effects. Our simulations predict that intra-domain interactions involving the glycan attached to residue GluN1-N440 stabilize closed-clamshell conformations of the GluN1 LBD. The glycan on GluN2B-N688 shows a similar, though weaker, effect. Based on these results, and assuming the transferability of the results of LBD simulations to the full receptor, we predict that glycans at GluN1-N440 might play a potentiator role in NMDARs. To validate this prediction, we perform electrophysiological analysis of full-length NMDARs with a glycosylation-preventing GluN1-N440Q mutation, and demonstrate an increase in the glycine EC50 value. Overall, our results suggest an intramolecular potentiating role of glycans on NMDA receptors.

  16. The glycan keratan sulfate in inner ear crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Martin, D. S.; Li, Y. T.; Li, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    The otoconial matrix (OM) of chicks (Gallus domesticus) inner ear was analyzed. Histochemically the OM was reacted with phosphotungstic acid (PTA) and immunohistochemically with the monoclonal antibody antikeratan sulfate (antiKS). The OM was digested with the enzyme endo-beta-galactosidase (E beta Galase) or separated by 1D and 2D gel electrophoresis. PTA which reacts with glycoproteins precipitated the OM, suggesting that the OM contains glycoproteins. A central core in each crystal had no PTA staining, suggesting that the core lacked glycoproteins. Anti KS antibody stained the OM with increased density in older embryos as determined by color thresholding. E beta Galase, which cleaves the lactosamine repeating units in KS, decreased the immunostain by 30% in the OM and by 20% in the cartilage. The OM from the utricle, saccule and macula lagena contained similar molecular weight bands. Five dense bands in the OM were less dense in tissue and blood controls, suggesting that such bands are enriched in the OM. Isoelectric focusing of the OM showed a negatively charged high molecular weight smear not present in blood and faint in tissue controls. The high affinity of the OM for the cationic PTA stain, the strong immunohistochemical reaction of the OM with anti KS antibody and high molecular weight negative smear in 2D gels taken together suggest that: a) the OM contains large amounts of glycoproteins and glycans, one of which is keratan sulfate, because its immuno stain with antiKS antibody was decreased by the enzyme E beta Galase, b) the utricle, saccule and macula lagena may have similar composition, and c) the concentration of KS may increase gradually until complete mineralization of the OM is reached.

  17. Chinks in the armor of the HIV-1 Envelope glycan shield: Implications for immune escape from anti-glycan broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Moyo, Thandeka; Ferreira, Roux-Cil; Davids, Reyaaz; Sonday, Zarinah; Moore, Penny L; Travers, Simon A; Wood, Natasha T; Dorfman, Jeffrey R

    2017-01-15

    Glycans on HIV-1 Envelope serve multiple functions including blocking epitopes from antibodies. We show that removal of glycan 301, a major target of anti-V3/glycan antibodies, has substantially different effects in two viruses. While glycan 301 on Du156.12 blocks epitopes commonly recognized by sera from chronically HIV-1-infected individuals, it does not do so on CAP45.G3, suggesting that removing the 301 glycan has a smaller effect on the integrity of the glycan shield in CAP45.G3. Changes in sensitivity to broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies suggest that the interaction between glycan 301 and the CD4 binding site differ substantially between these 2 viruses. Molecular modeling suggests that removal of glycan 301 likely exposes a greater surface area of the V3 and C4 regions in Du156.12. Our data indicate that the contribution of the 301 glycan to resistance to common neutralizing antibodies varies between viruses, allowing for easier selection for its loss in some viruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A distinct sodium channel voltage-sensor locus determines insect selectivity of the spider toxin Dc1a

    PubMed Central

    Bende, Niraj S; Dziemborowicz, Slawomir; Mobli, Mehdi; Herzig, Volker; Gilchrist, John; Wagner, Jordan; Nicholson, Graham M; King, Glenn F; Bosmans, Frank

    2014-01-01

    β-Diguetoxin-Dc1a (Dc1a) is a toxin from the desert bush spider Diguetia canities that incapacitates insects at concentrations that are non-toxic to mammals. Dc1a promotes opening of German cockroach voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels (BgNav1), whereas human Nav channels are insensitive. Here, by transplanting commonly targeted S3b-S4 paddle motifs within BgNav1 voltage sensors into Kv2.1, we find that Dc1a interacts with the domain II voltage sensor. In contrast, Dc1a has little effect on sodium currents mediated by PaNav1 channels from the American cockroach even though their domain II paddle motifs are identical. When exploring regions responsible for PaNav1 resistance to Dc1a, we identified two residues within the BgNav1 domain II S1–S2 loop that when mutated to their PaNav1 counterparts drastically reduce toxin susceptibility. Overall, our results reveal a distinct region within insect Nav channels that helps determine Dc1a sensitivity, aconcept that will be valuable for the design of insect-selective insecticides. PMID:25014760

  19. A distinct sodium channel voltage-sensor locus determines insect selectivity of the spider toxin Dc1a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bende, Niraj S.; Dziemborowicz, Sławomir; Mobli, Mehdi; Herzig, Volker; Gilchrist, John; Wagner, Jordan; Nicholson, Graham M.; King, Glenn F.; Bosmans, Frank

    2014-07-01

    β-Diguetoxin-Dc1a (Dc1a) is a toxin from the desert bush spider Diguetia canities that incapacitates insects at concentrations that are non-toxic to mammals. Dc1a promotes opening of German cockroach voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels (BgNav1), whereas human Nav channels are insensitive. Here, by transplanting commonly targeted S3b-S4 paddle motifs within BgNav1 voltage sensors into Kv2.1, we find that Dc1a interacts with the domain II voltage sensor. In contrast, Dc1a has little effect on sodium currents mediated by PaNav1 channels from the American cockroach even though their domain II paddle motifs are identical. When exploring regions responsible for PaNav1 resistance to Dc1a, we identified two residues within the BgNav1 domain II S1-S2 loop that when mutated to their PaNav1 counterparts drastically reduce toxin susceptibility. Overall, our results reveal a distinct region within insect Nav channels that helps determine Dc1a sensitivity, a concept that will be valuable for the design of insect-selective insecticides.

  20. Glycan-based high-affinity ligands for toxins and pathogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashish A; Weiss, Alison A; Iyer, Suri S

    2010-03-01

    Glycans decorate over 95% of the mammalian cell surface in the form of glycolipids and glycoproteins. Several toxins and pathogens bind to these glycans to enter the cells. Understanding the fundamentals of the complex interplay between microbial pathogens and their glycan receptors at the molecular level could lead to the development of novel therapeutics and diagnostics. Using Shiga toxin and influenza virus as examples, we describe the complex biological interface between host glycans and these infectious agents, and recent strategies to develop glycan-based high-affinity ligands. These molecules are expected to ultimately be incorporated into diagnostics and therapeutics, and can be used as probes to study important biological processes. Additionally, by focusing on the specific glycans that microbial pathogens target, we can begin to decipher the "glycocode" and how these glycans participate in normal and aberrant cellular communication.

  1. A Bitter Sweet Symphony: Immune Responses to Altered O-glycan Epitopes in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Lenneke A.M.; Van Vliet, Sandra J.

    2016-01-01

    The appearance of aberrant glycans on the tumor cell surface is one of the emerging hallmarks of cancer. Glycosylation is an important post-translation modification of proteins and lipids and is strongly affected by oncogenesis. Tumor-associated glycans have been extensively characterized regarding their composition and tumor-type specific expression patterns. Nevertheless whether and how tumor-associated glycans contribute to the observed immunomodulatory actions by tumors has not been extensively studied. Here, we provide a detailed overview of the current knowledge on how tumor-associated O-glycans affect the anti-tumor immune response, thereby focusing on truncated O-glycans present on epithelial tumors and mucins. These tumor-associated O-glycans and mucins bind a variety of lectin receptors on immune cells to facilitate the subsequently induction of tolerogenic immune responses. We, therefore, postulate that tumor-associated glycans not only support tumor growth, but also actively contribute to immune evasion. PMID:27153100

  2. Glycan-Dependent Immunogenicity of Recombinant Soluble Trimeric Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Robert P.; Smit, Cornelis H.; de Bruin, Erwin; Rigter, Alan; de Vries, Erik; Cornelissen, Lisette A. H. M.; Eggink, Dirk; Chung, Nancy P. Y.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Koopmans, Marion; Rottier, Peter J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant soluble trimeric influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (sHA3) has proven an effective vaccine antigen against IAV. Here, we investigate to what extent the glycosylation status of the sHA3 glycoprotein affects its immunogenicity. Different glycosylation forms of subtype H5 trimeric HA protein (sH53) were produced by expression in insect cells and different mammalian cells in the absence and presence of inhibitors of N-glycan-modifying enzymes or by enzymatic removal of the oligosaccharides. The following sH53 preparations were evaluated: (i) HA proteins carrying complex glycans produced in HEK293T cells; (ii) HA proteins carrying Man9GlcNAc2 moieties, expressed in HEK293T cells treated with kifunensine; (iii) HA proteins containing Man5GlcNAc2 moieties derived from HEK293S GnTI(−) cells; (iv) insect cell-produced HA proteins carrying paucimannosidic N-glycans; and (v) HEK293S GnTI(−) cell-produced HA proteins treated with endoglycosidase H, thus carrying side chains composed of only a single N-acetylglucosamine each. The different HA glycosylation states were confirmed by comparative electrophoretic analysis and by mass spectrometric analysis of released glycans. The immunogenicity of the HA preparations was studied in chickens and mice. The results demonstrate that HA proteins carrying terminal mannose moieties induce significantly lower hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers than HA proteins carrying complex glycans or single N-acetylglucosamine side chains. However, the glycosylation state of the HA proteins did not affect the breadth of the antibody response as measured by an HA1 antigen microarray. We conclude that the glycosylation state of recombinant antigens is a factor of significant importance when developing glycoprotein-based vaccines, such as recombinant HA proteins. PMID:22915811

  3. Characterization of recombinant human lactoferrin N-glycans expressed in the milk of transgenic cows

    PubMed Central

    Rouquié, Camille; Maga, Elizabeth A.; Bunyatratchata, Apichaya; Barile, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is one of the most abundant bioactive glycoproteins in human milk. Glycans attached through N-glycosidic bonds may contribute to Lactoferrin functional activities. In contrast, LF is present in trace amounts in bovine milk. Efforts to increase LF concentration in bovine milk led to alternative approaches using transgenic cows to express human lactoferrin (hLF). This study investigated and compared N-glycans in recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF), bovine lactoferrin (bLF) and human lactoferrin by Nano-LC-Chip-Q-TOF Mass Spectrometry. The results revealed a high diversity of N-glycan structures, including fucosylated and sialylated complex glycans that may contribute additional bioactivities. rhLF, bLF and hLF had 23, 27 and 18 N-glycans respectively with 8 N-glycan in common overall. rhLF shared 16 N-glycan with bLF and 9 N-glycan with hLF while bLF shared 10 N-glycan with hLF. Based on the relative abundances of N-glycan types, rhLF and hLF appeared to contain mostly neutral complex/hybrid N-glycans (81% and 52% of the total respectively) whereas bLF was characterized by high mannose glycans (65%). Interestingly, the majority of hLF N-glycans were fucosylated (88%), whereas bLF and rhLF had only 9% and 20% fucosylation, respectively. Overall, this study suggests that rhLF N-glycans share more similarities to bLF than hLF. PMID:28170415

  4. A Machine Learning Based Approach to de novo Sequencing of Glycans from Tandem Mass Spectrometry Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Kumozaki, Shotaro; Sato, Kengo; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, glycomics has been actively studied and various technologies for glycomics have been rapidly developed. Currently, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is one of the key experimental tools for identification of structures of oligosaccharides. MS/MS can observe MS/MS peaks of fragmented glycan ions including cross-ring ions resulting from internal cleavages, which provide valuable information to infer glycan structures. Thus, the aim of de novo sequencing of glycans is to find the most probable assignments of observed MS/MS peaks to glycan substructures without databases. However, there are few satisfiable algorithms for glycan de novo sequencing from MS/MS spectra. We present a machine learning based approach to de novo sequencing of glycans from MS/MS spectrum. First, we build a suitable model for the fragmentation of glycans including cross-ring ions, and implement a solver that employs Lagrangian relaxation with a dynamic programming technique. Then, to optimize scores for the algorithm, we introduce a machine learning technique called structured support vector machines that enable us to learn parameters including scores for cross-ring ions from training data, i.e., known glycan mass spectra. Furthermore, we implement additional constraints for core structures of well-known glycan types including N-linked glycans and O-linked glycans. This enables us to predict more accurate glycan structures if the glycan type of given spectra is known. Computational experiments show that our algorithm performs accurate de novo sequencing of glycans. The implementation of our algorithm and the datasets are available at http://glyfon.dna.bio.keio.ac.jp/.

  5. Three N-Glycosylation Sites of Human Acetylcholinesterase Shares Similar Glycan Composition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miranda L; Luk, Wilson K W; Lau, Kei M; Bi, Cathy W C; Cheng, Anthony W M; Gong, Amy G W; Lin, Huangquan; Tsim, Karl W K

    2015-12-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7) is a glycoprotein possessing three conserved N-linked glycosylation sites in mammalian species, locating at 296, 381, and 495 residues of the human sequence. Several lines of evidence demonstrated that N-glycosylation of AChE affected the enzymatic activity, as well as its biosynthesis. In order to determine the role of three N-glycosylation sites in AChE activity and glycan composition, the site-directed mutagenesis of N-glycosylation sites in wild-type human AChE(T) sequence was employed to generate the single-site mutants (i.e., AChE(T) (N296Q), AChET (N381Q), and AChE(T) (N495Q)) and all site mutant (i.e., AChE(T) (3N→3Q)). The mutation did not affect AChE protein expression in the transfected cells. The mutants, AChE(T) (3N→3Q) and AChE(T) (N381Q), showed very minimal enzymatic activity, while the other mutants showed reduced activity. By binding to lectins, Con A, and SNA, the glycosylation profile was revealed in those mutated AChE. The binding affinity with lectins showed no significant difference between various N-glycosylation mutants, which suggested that similar glycan composition should be resulted from different N-glycosylation sites. Although the three glycosylation sites within AChE sequence have different extent in affecting the enzymatic activity, their glycan compositions are very similar.

  6. Rat mammary-gland transferrin: nucleotide sequence, phylogenetic analysis and glycan structure.

    PubMed Central

    Escrivá, H; Pierce, A; Coddeville, B; González, F; Benaissa, M; Léger, D; Wieruszeski, J M; Spik, G; Pamblanco, M

    1995-01-01

    The complete cDNA for rat mammary-gland transferrin (Tf) has been sequenced and also the native protein isolated from milk in order to analyse the structure of the main glycan variants present. A lactating-rat mammary-gland cDNA library in lambda gt10 was screened with a partial cDNA copy of rat liver Tf and subsequently rescreened with 5' fragments of the longest clones. This produced a 2275 bp insert coding for an open reading frame of 695 amino acid residues. This includes a 19-amino acid signal sequence and the mature protein containing 676 amino acids and one N-glycosylation site in the C-terminal domain at residue 490. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out using 14 translated Tf nucleotide sequences, and the derived evolutionary tree shows that at least three gene duplication events have occurred during Tf evolution, one of which generated the N- and C-terminal domains and occurred before separation of arthropods and chordates. The two halves of human melanotransferrin are more similar to each other than to any other sequence, which contrasts with the pattern shown by the remaining sequences. Native rat milk Tf is separated into four bands on native PAGE that differ only in their sialic acid content: one biantennary glycan is present containing either no sialic acid residues or up to three. The complete structures of the two major variants were determined by methylation, m.s. and 400 MHz 1H-n.m.r. spectroscopy. They contain either one or two neuraminic acid residues (alpha 2-->6)-linked to galactose in conventional biantennary N-acetyl-lactosamine-type glycans. Most contain fucose (alpha 1-->6)-linked to the terminal non-reducing N-acetylglucosamine. Images Figure 4 PMID:7717992

  7. The chemistry of negotiation: Rhythmic, glycan-driven acidification in a symbiotic conversation

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzman, Julia A.; Koch, Eric; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A. C.; Zhou, Lawrence; Kremer, Natacha; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.; Ruby, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    Glycans have emerged as critical determinants of immune maturation, microbial nutrition, and host health in diverse symbioses. In this study, we asked how cyclic delivery of a single host-derived glycan contributes to the dynamic stability of the mutualism between the squid Euprymna scolopes and its specific, bioluminescent symbiont, Vibrio fischeri. V. fischeri colonizes the crypts of a host organ that is used for behavioral light production. E. scolopes synthesizes the polymeric glycan chitin in macrophage-like immune cells called hemocytes. We show here that, just before dusk, hemocytes migrate from the vasculature into the symbiotic crypts, where they lyse and release particulate chitin, a behavior that is established only in the mature symbiosis. Diel transcriptional rhythms in both partners further indicate that the chitin is provided and metabolized only at night. A V. fischeri mutant defective in chitin catabolism was able to maintain a normal symbiont population level, but only until the symbiotic organ reached maturity (∼4 wk after colonization); this result provided a direct link between chitin utilization and symbiont persistence. Finally, catabolism of chitin by the symbionts was also specifically required for a periodic acidification of the adult crypts each night. This acidification, which increases the level of oxygen available to the symbionts, enhances their capacity to produce bioluminescence at night. We propose that other animal hosts may similarly regulate the activities of epithelium-associated microbial communities through the strategic provision of specific nutrients, whose catabolism modulates conditions like pH or anoxia in their symbionts’ habitat. PMID:25550509

  8. Specific Contactin N-Glycans Are Implicated in Neurofascin Binding and Autoimmune Targeting in Peripheral Neuropathies*

    PubMed Central

    Labasque, Marilyne; Hivert, Bruno; Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; Querol, Luis; Illa, Isabel; Faivre-Sarrailh, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play a crucial role in the formation of the nodes of Ranvier and in the rapid propagation of the nerve impulses along myelinated axons. These CAMs are the targets of autoimmunity in inflammatory neuropathies. We recently showed that a subgroup of patients with aggressive chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) shows autoantibodies to contactin (1). The complex of contactin·Caspr·neurofascin-155 (NF155) enables the formation of paranodal junctions, suggesting that antibody attack against paranodes may participate in the severity of CIDP. In the present study, we mapped the molecular determinants of contactin targeted by the autoantibodies. In three patients, immunoreactivity was directed against the Ig domains of contactin and was dependent on N-glycans. The serum of one patient was selectively directed against contactin bearing mannose-rich N-glycans. Strikingly, the oligomannose type sugars of contactin are required for association with its glial partner NF155 (2). To investigate precisely the role of contactin N-glycans, we have mutated each of the nine consensus N-glycosylation sites independently. We found that the mutation of three sites (N467Q/N473Q/N494Q) in Ig domain 5 of contactin prevented soluble NF155-Fc binding. In contrast, these mutations did not abolish cis-association with Caspr. Next, we showed that the cluster of N-glycosylation sites (Asn-467, Asn-473, and Asn-494) was required for immunoreactivity in one patient. Using cell aggregation assays, we showed that the IgGs from the four CIDP patients prevented adhesive interaction between contactin·Caspr and NF155. Importantly, we showed that the anti-contactin autoantibodies induced alteration of paranodal junctions in myelinated neuronal culture. These results strongly suggest that antibodies to CAMs may be pathogenic and induce demyelination via functional blocking activity. PMID:24497634

  9. Intramolecular N-Glycan/Polypeptide Interactions Observed at Multiple N-Glycan Remodeling Steps through [13C,15N]-N-Acetylglucosamine Labeling of Immunoglobulin G1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Asparagine-linked (N) glycosylation is a common eukaryotic protein modification that affects protein folding, function, and stability through intramolecular interactions between N-glycan and polypeptide residues. Attempts to characterize the structure–activity relationship of each N-glycan are hindered by inherent properties of the glycoprotein, including glycan conformational and compositional heterogeneity. These limitations can be addressed by using a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance techniques following enzymatic glycan remodeling to simultaneously generate homogeneous glycoforms. However, widely applicable methods do not yet exist. To address this technological gap, immature glycoforms of the immunoglobulin G1 fragment crystallizable (Fc) were isolated in a homogeneous state and enzymatically remodeled with [13C,15N]-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). UDP-[13C,15N]GlcNAc was synthesized enzymatically in a one-pot reaction from [13C]glucose and [15N-amido]glutamine. Modifying Fc with recombinantly expressed glycosyltransferases (Gnt1 and Gnt2) and UDP-[13C,15N]GlcNAc resulted in complete glycoform conversion as judged by mass spectrometry. Two-dimensional heteronuclear single-quantum coherence spectra of the Gnt1 product, containing a single [13C,15N]GlcNAc residue on each N-glycan, showed that the N-glycan is stabilized through interactions with polypeptide residues. Similar spectra of homogeneous glycoforms, halted at different points along the N-glycan remodeling pathway, revealed the presence of an increased level of interaction between the N-glycan and polypeptide at each step, including mannose trimming, as the N-glycan was converted to a complex-type, biantennary form. Thus, conformational restriction increases as Fc N-glycan maturation proceeds. Gnt1 and Gnt2 catalyze fundamental reactions in the synthesis of every glycoprotein with a complex-type N-glycan; thus, the strategies presented herein can be applied to a broad range of glycoprotein

  10. Glycoengineered Monoclonal Antibodies with Homogeneous Glycan (M3, G0, G2, and A2) Using a Chemoenzymatic Approach Have Different Affinities for FcγRIIIa and Variable Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Activities

    PubMed Central

    Kurogochi, Masaki; Mori, Masako; Osumi, Kenji; Tojino, Mami; Sugawara, Shu-ichi; Takashima, Shou; Hirose, Yuriko; Tsukimura, Wataru; Mizuno, Mamoru; Amano, Junko; Matsuda, Akio; Tomita, Masahiro; Takayanagi, Atsushi; Shoda, Shin-Ichiro; Shirai, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic antibodies have been developed, and IgG antibodies have been extensively generated in various cell expression systems. IgG antibodies contain N-glycans at the constant region of the heavy chain (Fc domain), and their N-glycosylation patterns differ during various processes or among cell expression systems. The Fc N-glycan can modulate the effector functions of IgG antibodies, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). To control Fc N-glycans, we performed a rearrangement of Fc N-glycans from a heterogeneous N-glycosylation pattern to homogeneous N-glycans using chemoenzymatic approaches with two types of endo-β-N-acetyl glucosaminidases (ENG’ases), one that works as a hydrolase to cleave all heterogeneous N-glycans, another that is used as a glycosynthase to generate homogeneous N-glycans. As starting materials, we used an anti-Her2 antibody produced in transgenic silkworm cocoon, which consists of non-fucosylated pauci-mannose type (Man2-3GlcNAc2), high-mannose type (Man4-9GlcNAc2), and complex type (Man3GlcNAc3-4) N-glycans. As a result of the cleavage of several ENG’ases (endoS, endoM, endoD, endoH, and endoLL), the heterogeneous glycans on antibodies were fully transformed into homogeneous-GlcNAc by a combination of endoS, endoD, and endoLL. Next, the desired N-glycans (M3; Man3GlcNAc1, G0; GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1, G2; Gal2GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1, A2; NeuAc2Gal2GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1) were transferred from the corresponding oxazolines to the GlcNAc residue on the intact anti-Her2 antibody with an ENG’ase mutant (endoS-D233Q), and the glycoengineered anti-Her2 antibody was obtained. The binding assay of anti-Her2 antibody with homogenous N-glycans with FcγRIIIa-V158 showed that the glycoform influenced the affinity for FcγRIIIa-V158. In addition, the ADCC assay for the glycoengineered anti-Her2 antibody (mAb-M3, mAb-G0, mAb-G2, and mAb-A2) was performed using SKBR-3 and BT-474 as target cells

  11. Glycoengineered Monoclonal Antibodies with Homogeneous Glycan (M3, G0, G2, and A2) Using a Chemoenzymatic Approach Have Different Affinities for FcγRIIIa and Variable Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Activities.

    PubMed

    Kurogochi, Masaki; Mori, Masako; Osumi, Kenji; Tojino, Mami; Sugawara, Shu-Ichi; Takashima, Shou; Hirose, Yuriko; Tsukimura, Wataru; Mizuno, Mamoru; Amano, Junko; Matsuda, Akio; Tomita, Masahiro; Takayanagi, Atsushi; Shoda, Shin-Ichiro; Shirai, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic antibodies have been developed, and IgG antibodies have been extensively generated in various cell expression systems. IgG antibodies contain N-glycans at the constant region of the heavy chain (Fc domain), and their N-glycosylation patterns differ during various processes or among cell expression systems. The Fc N-glycan can modulate the effector functions of IgG antibodies, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). To control Fc N-glycans, we performed a rearrangement of Fc N-glycans from a heterogeneous N-glycosylation pattern to homogeneous N-glycans using chemoenzymatic approaches with two types of endo-β-N-acetyl glucosaminidases (ENG'ases), one that works as a hydrolase to cleave all heterogeneous N-glycans, another that is used as a glycosynthase to generate homogeneous N-glycans. As starting materials, we used an anti-Her2 antibody produced in transgenic silkworm cocoon, which consists of non-fucosylated pauci-mannose type (Man2-3GlcNAc2), high-mannose type (Man4-9GlcNAc2), and complex type (Man3GlcNAc3-4) N-glycans. As a result of the cleavage of several ENG'ases (endoS, endoM, endoD, endoH, and endoLL), the heterogeneous glycans on antibodies were fully transformed into homogeneous-GlcNAc by a combination of endoS, endoD, and endoLL. Next, the desired N-glycans (M3; Man3GlcNAc1, G0; GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1, G2; Gal2GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1, A2; NeuAc2Gal2GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1) were transferred from the corresponding oxazolines to the GlcNAc residue on the intact anti-Her2 antibody with an ENG'ase mutant (endoS-D233Q), and the glycoengineered anti-Her2 antibody was obtained. The binding assay of anti-Her2 antibody with homogenous N-glycans with FcγRIIIa-V158 showed that the glycoform influenced the affinity for FcγRIIIa-V158. In addition, the ADCC assay for the glycoengineered anti-Her2 antibody (mAb-M3, mAb-G0, mAb-G2, and mAb-A2) was performed using SKBR-3 and BT-474 as target cells, and

  12. N-glycan structures of human transferrin produced by Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth)cells using the LdMNPV expression system

    Treesearch

    One Choi; Noboru Tomiya; Jung H. Kim; James M. Slavicek; Michael J. Betenbaugh; Yuan C. Lee

    2003-01-01

    N-glycan structures of recombinant human serum transferrin (hTf) expressed by Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) 652Y cells were determined. The gene encoding hTf was incorporated into a Lymantria dispar nucleopolyhedrovirus (LdMNPV) under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. This virus was then...

  13. Energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation pathways of model N-linked glycopeptides: implications for capturing glycan connectivity and peptide sequence in a single experiment.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Venkata; Dodds, Eric D

    2014-05-07

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of glycopeptides stands among the principal analytical approaches for assessing protein glycosylation in a site-specific manner. The aims of such experiments are often to determine the monosaccharide connectivity of the glycan, the amino acid sequence of the peptide, and the site of glycan attachment. This level of detail is often difficult to achieve using any single ion dissociation method; however, precedent does exist for use of collision-induced dissociation (CID) to establish either the connectivity of the oligosaccharide or the sequence of the polypeptide depending upon the applied collision energy. Unfortunately, the relative energy requirements for glycan and peptide cleavage have not been thoroughly characterized with respect to specific physicochemical characteristics of the precursor ions. This report describes case studies on the energy-resolved CID pathways of model tryptic glycopeptides derived from Erythrina cristagalli lectin and bovine ribonuclease B. While glycopeptide ions having disparate physical and chemical characteristics shared strikingly similar qualitative responses to increasing vibrational energy deposition, the absolute collision energies at which either glycan or peptide fragmentations were accessed varied substantially among the precursor ions examined. Nevertheless, these data suggest that the energy requirements for peptide and glycan cleavage may be somewhat predictable based on characteristics of the precursor ion. The practical usefulness of these observations was demonstrated through implementation of online collision energy modulation such that both glycan and peptide fragmentation were captured in the same spectrum, providing near-exhaustive glycopeptide characterization in a single experiment. Overall, these results highlight the potential to further extend the capabilities of CID in the context of glycoproteomics.

  14. Structure of FcγRI in complex with Fc reveals the importance of glycan recognition for high-affinity IgG binding

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jinghua; Chu, Jonathan; Zou, Zhongcheng; Hamacher, Nels B.; Rixon, Mark W.; Sun, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Fc gamma receptor I (FcγRI) contributes to protective immunity against bacterial infections, but exacerbates certain autoimmune diseases. The sole high-affinity IgG receptor, FcγRI plays a significant role in immunotherapy. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of its high-affinity IgG binding, we determined the crystal structure of the extracellular domains of human FcγRI in complex with the Fc domain of human IgG1. FcγRI binds to the Fc in a similar mode as the low-affinity FcγRII and FcγRIII receptors. In addition to many conserved contacts, FcγRI forms additional hydrogen bonds and salt bridges with the lower hinge region of Fc. Unique to the high-affinity receptor-Fc complex, however, is the conformation of the receptor D2 domain FG loop, which enables a charged KHR motif to interact with proximal carbohydrate units of the Fc glycans. Both the length and the charge of the FcγRI FG loop are well conserved among mammalian species. Ala and Glu mutations of the FG loop KHR residues showed significant contributions of His-174 and Arg-175 to antibody binding, and the loss of the FG loop–glycan interaction resulted in an ∼20- to 30-fold decrease in FcγRI affinity to all three subclasses of IgGs. Furthermore, deglycosylation of IgG1 resulted in a 40-fold loss in FcγRI binding, demonstrating involvement of the receptor FG loop in glycan recognition. These results highlight a unique glycan recognition in FcγRI function and open potential therapeutic avenues based on antibody glycan engineering or small molecular glycan mimics to target FcγRI for certain autoimmune diseases. PMID:25561553

  15. Potent glycan inhibitors of myelin-associated glycoprotein enhance axon outgrowth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Alka A; Blixt, Ola; Paulson, James C; Schnaar, Ronald L

    2005-04-22

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG, Siglec-4) is one of several endogenous axon regeneration inhibitors that limit recovery from central nervous system injury and disease. Molecules that block such inhibitors may enhance axon regeneration and functional recovery. MAG, a member of the Siglec family of sialic acid-binding lectins, binds to sialoglycoconjugates on axons and particularly to gangliosides GD1a and GT1b, which may mediate some of the inhibitory effects of MAG. In a prior study, we identified potent monovalent sialoside inhibitors of MAG using a novel screening platform. In the current study, the most potent of these were tested for their ability to reverse MAG-mediated inhibition of axon outgrowth from rat cerebellar granule neurons in vitro. Monovalent sialoglycans enhanced axon regeneration in proportion to their MAG binding affinities. The most potent glycoside was disialyl T antigen (NeuAcalpha2-3Galbeta1-3[NeuAcalpha2-6]GalNAc-R), followed by 3-sialyl T antigen (NeuAcalpha2-3Galbeta1-3GalNAc-R), structures expressed on O-linked glycoproteins as well as on gangliosides. Prior studies indicated that blocking gangliosides reversed MAG inhibition. In the current study, blocking O-linked glycoprotein sialylation with benzyl-alpha-GalNAc had no effect. The ability to reverse MAG inhibition with monovalent glycosides encourages further exploration of glycans and glycan mimetics as blockers of MAG-mediated axon outgrowth inhibition.

  16. Highly sensitive glycosylamine labelling of O-glycans using non-reductive β-elimination.

    PubMed

    Furuki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa; Ban, Kazutoshi

    2017-01-14

    When developing biopharmaceuticals, glycans are the most important posttranslational protein modifications that must be addressed because they affect the between-protein interactions that maintain homeostasis. The glycan profile may be defined as a critical quality attribute of a biopharmaceutical. Comprehensive analysis of protein glycosylation must overcome challenges such as the release, labelling, separation and detection of O-glycans. In contrast, N-glycans can be readily released non-reductively from peptide backbones using an enzyme such as peptide N-glycosidase F. We developed a highly sensitive protocol using RapiFluor-MS to label glycosylamines for O-glycan analysis combined with a non-enzyme treatment for efficient release of the reduced O-glycans from the glycoproteins. Here we used the cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated protein 4-immunoglobulin G (Ig) fusion protein and fetuin as models for O-glycan analysis and compared the analytical methods glycopeptide mapping, 2-AB labelling and RapiFluor-MS labelling. The structures of major O-glycans and low-abundance O-glycans were successfully identified using the third technique, which detected the O-glycans with high sensitivity.

  17. Property Graph vs RDF Triple Store: A Comparison on Glycan Substructure Search.

    PubMed

    Alocci, Davide; Mariethoz, Julien; Horlacher, Oliver; Bolleman, Jerven T; Campbell, Matthew P; Lisacek, Frederique

    2015-01-01

    Resource description framework (RDF) and Property Graph databases are emerging technologies that are used for storing graph-structured data. We compare these technologies through a molecular biology use case: glycan substructure search. Glycans are branched tree-like molecules composed of building blocks linked together by chemical bonds. The molecular structure of a glycan can be encoded into a direct acyclic graph where each node represents a building block and each edge serves as a chemical linkage between two building blocks. In this context, Graph databases are possible software solutions for storing glycan structures and Graph query languages, such as SPARQL and Cypher, can be used to perform a substructure search. Glycan substructure searching is an important feature for querying structure and experimental glycan databases and retrieving biologically meaningful data. This applies for example to identifying a region of the glycan recognised by a glycan binding protein (GBP). In this study, 19,404 glycan structures were selected from GlycomeDB (www.glycome-db.org) and modelled for being stored into a RDF triple store and a Property Graph. We then performed two different sets of searches and compared the query response times and the results from both technologies to assess performance and accuracy. The two implementations produced the same results, but interestingly we noted a difference in the query response times. Qualitative measures such as portability were also used to define further criteria for choosing the technology adapted to solving glycan substructure search and other comparable issues.

  18. Bitter-sweet symphony: glycan-lectin interactions in virus biology.

    PubMed

    Van Breedam, Wander; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Favoreel, Herman W; de Groot, Raoul J; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-07-01

    Glycans are carbohydrate modifications typically found on proteins or lipids, and can act as ligands for glycan-binding proteins called lectins. Glycans and lectins play crucial roles in the function of cells and organs, and in the immune system of animals and humans. Viral pathogens use glycans and lectins that are encoded by their own or the host genome for their replication and spread. Recent advances in glycobiological research indicate that glycans and lectins mediate key interactions at the virus-host interface, controlling viral spread and/or activation of the immune system. This review reflects on glycan-lectin interactions in the context of viral infection and antiviral immunity. A short introduction illustrates the nature of glycans and lectins, and conveys the basic principles of their interactions. Subsequently, examples are discussed highlighting specific glycan-lectin interactions and how they affect the progress of viral infections, either benefiting the host or the virus. Moreover, glycan and lectin variability and their potential biological consequences are discussed. Finally, the review outlines how recent advances in the glycan-lectin field might be transformed into promising new approaches to antiviral therapy. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantification by isobaric labeling (QUIBL) for the comparative glycomic study of O-linked glycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botelho, Julianne Cook; Atwood, James A., III; Cheng, Lei; Alvarez-Manilla, Gerardo; York, William S.; Orlando, Ron

    2008-12-01

    Quantification by isobaric labeling (QUIBL) has recently been described as a tool for the relative quantification of N-linked glycans in glycomic studies. In this paper we expand the application of QUIBL to the relative quantification of O-linked glycans. Fetuin, which contains two O-linked glycans, NeuAc-Hex-HexNAc and NeuAc2-Hex-HexNAc, was used to validate this studyE The glycans were released by [beta]-elimination and permethylated with the isobaric labeling reagents, 13CH3I and 12CH2DI. The exact mass difference between the isobaric labels is minimal (0.00292 Da), but since glycans contain multiple permethylation sites, the mass difference can be resolved with a high resolution mass spectrometer, such as an FTMS. Quantitative data were obtained by comparing the signal intensities from various mixtures of isobarically labeled O-linked glycans of fetuin. Five different ratios of 13CH3 to 12CH2D ranging from 10:1 to 1:10 were analyzed for linearity and reproducibility of the QUIBL method on the standard glycan. QUIBL was also evaluated using porcine mucin, a sample with a larger variety of more complex O-linked glycans. These results indicate that QUIBL allows for the relative quantification of O-linked glycans over a linear dynamic range of at least two orders of magnitude, validating QUIBL as an applicable quantitative glycomics approach for both N-linked and O-linked glycans.

  20. Property Graph vs RDF Triple Store: A Comparison on Glycan Substructure Search

    PubMed Central

    Alocci, Davide; Mariethoz, Julien; Horlacher, Oliver; Bolleman, Jerven T.; Campbell, Matthew P.; Lisacek, Frederique

    2015-01-01

    Resource description framework (RDF) and Property Graph databases are emerging technologies that are used for storing graph-structured data. We compare these technologies through a molecular biology use case: glycan substructure search. Glycans are branched tree-like molecules composed of building blocks linked together by chemical bonds. The molecular structure of a glycan can be encoded into a direct acyclic graph where each node represents a building block and each edge serves as a chemical linkage between two building blocks. In this context, Graph databases are possible software solutions for storing glycan structures and Graph query languages, such as SPARQL and Cypher, can be used to perform a substructure search. Glycan substructure searching is an important feature for querying structure and experimental glycan databases and retrieving biologically meaningful data. This applies for example to identifying a region of the glycan recognised by a glycan binding protein (GBP). In this study, 19,404 glycan structures were selected from GlycomeDB (www.glycome-db.org) and modelled for being stored into a RDF triple store and a Property Graph. We then performed two different sets of searches and compared the query response times and the results from both technologies to assess performance and accuracy. The two implementations produced the same results, but interestingly we noted a difference in the query response times. Qualitative measures such as portability were also used to define further criteria for choosing the technology adapted to solving glycan substructure search and other comparable issues. PMID:26656740

  1. Identification of aberrantly expressed glycans in gastric cancer by integrated lectin microarray and mass spectrometric analyses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Guan, Feng; Li, Dongliang; Tan, Zengqi; Yang, Ganglong; Wu, Yanli; Huang, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Cancer progression is usually associated with alterations of glycan expression patterns. Little is known regarding global glycomics in gastric cancer, the most common type of epithelial cancer. We integrated lectin microarray and mass spectrometry (MS) methods to profile glycan expression in three gastric cancer cell lines (SGC-7901, HGC-27, and MGC-803) and one normal gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1). Significantly altered glycans were confirmed by lectin staining and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. The three cancer cell lines showed increased levels of core-fucosylated N-glycans, GalNAcα-Ser/Thr (Tn antigen), and Sia2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc N-glycans, but reduced levels of biantennary N-glycans, Galβ1-3GalNAcα-Ser/Thr (T antigen), and (GlcNAc)n N-glycans. Lectin histochemistry was used to validate aberrant expression of four representative glycans (core-fucosylation, Sia2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc, biantennary N-glycans, T antigen, recognized respectively by lectins LCA, SNA, PHA-E+L, and ACA) in clinical gastric cancer samples. Lower binding capacity for ACA was correlated with significantly poorer patient prognosis. Our findings indicate for the first time that glycans recognized by LCA, ACA, and PHA-E+L are aberrantly expressed in gastric cancer, and suggest that ACA is a potential prognostic factor for gastric cancer. PMID:27895315

  2. Chemo-Enzymatic Synthesis of (13)C Labeled Complex N-Glycans As Internal Standards for the Absolute Glycan Quantification by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Begoña; Etxebarria, Juan; Ruiz, Nerea; Hernandez, Álvaro; Calvo, Javier; Haberger, Markus; Reusch, Dietmar; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2015-11-17

    Methods for the absolute quantification of glycans are needed in glycoproteomics, during development and production of biopharmaceuticals and for the clinical analysis of glycan disease markers. Here we present a strategy for the chemo-enzymatic synthesis of (13)C labeled N-glycan libraries and provide an example for their use as internal standards in the profiling and absolute quantification of mAb glycans by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. A synthetic biantennary glycan precursor was (13)C-labeled on all four amino sugar residues and enzymatically derivatized to produce a library of 15 glycan isotopologues with a mass increment of 8 Da over the natural products. Asymmetrically elongated glycans were accessible by performing enzymatic reactions on partially protected UV-absorbing intermediates, subsequent fractionation by preparative HPLC, and final hydrogenation. Using a preformulated mixture of eight internal standards, we quantified the glycans in a monoclonal therapeutic antibody with excellent precision and speed.

  3. N-glycans and metastasis in galectin-3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    More, Shyam K; Srinivasan, Nithya; Budnar, Srikanth; Bane, Sanjay M; Upadhya, Archana; Thorat, Rahul A; Ingle, Arvind D; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V; Kalraiya, Rajiv D

    2015-05-01

    Poly-N-acetyl-lactosamine (polyLacNAc) on N-glycans facilitate lung specific metastasis of melanoma cells by serving as high affinity ligands for galectin-3, expressed in highest amounts in the lungs, on almost all its tissue compartments including on the surface of vascular endothelium. PolyLacNAc not only aids in initial arrest on the organ endothelium but in all the events of extravasation. Inhibition of polyLacNAc synthesis, or competitive inhibition of its interaction with galectin-3 all inhibited these processes and experimental metastasis. Transgenic galectin-3 mice, viz., gal-3(+/+) (wild type), gal-3(+/-) (hemizygous) and gal-3(-/-) (null) have been used to prove that galectin-3/polyLacNAc interactions are indeed critical for lung specific metastasis. Gal-3(+/-) mice which showed <50% expression of galectin-3 on the lungs also showed proportionate decrease in the number of B16F10 melanoma metastatic colonies affirming that galectin-3 and polyLacNAc interactions are indeed key determinants of lung metastasis. However, surprisingly, the number and size of metastatic colonies in gal-3(-/-) mice was very similar as that seen in gal-3(+/+) mice. The levels of lactose binding lectins on the lungs and the transcripts of other galectins (galectin-1, -8 and -9) which are expressed on lungs and have similar sugar binding specificities as galectins-3, remain unchanged in gal-3(+/+) and gal-3(-/-) mice. Further, inhibition of N-glycosylation with Swainsonine (SW) which drastically reduces metastasis of B16F10 cells in gal-3(+/+) mice, did not affect lung metastasis when assessed in gal-3(-/-) mice. Together, these results rule out the possibility of some other galectin taking over the function of galectin-3 in gal-3(-/-) mice. Chimeric mice generated to assess if absence of any effect on metastasis is due to compromised tumor immunity by replacing bone marrow of gal-3(-/-) mice with that from gal-3(+/+) mice, also failed to impact melanoma metastasis. As galectin-3

  4. Host-pathogen co-evolution and glycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Le Pendu, Jacques; Nyström, Kristina; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie

    2014-08-01

    Noroviruses and rotavirus A bind to polymorphic glycans of the histo-blood group type (HBGAs). Norovirus strains that bind to HBGAs can collectively infect all humans but each strain only infects a subgroup of the population, suggesting a past co-evolution that led to a trade-off where the human population is partly protected whilst the virus circulation is maintained. We termed 'Herd Innate Protection' the host species partial protection provided by the HBGAs polymorphism. Given its recent emergence, high virulence and HBGAs attachment, RHDV provides a model for studying calicivirus-host co-evolution. Field observations documented evolution of the virus ability to recognize the host HBGAs diversity and reciprocal strain-dependent selection of HBGA phenotypes following outbreaks, indicating host-pathogen co-evolution involving glycan polymorphisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. GUcal: An integrated application for capillary electrophoresis based glycan analysis.

    PubMed

    Jarvas, Gabor; Szigeti, Marton; Guttman, Andras

    2015-12-01

    Recent emergence in the use of monoclonal antibody therapeutics and other glycoprotein biopharmaceuticals requires high-throughput, robust, and automated techniques for their glycosylation analysis. Capillary electrophoresis is one of the high-performance methods of choice; however, while the necessary instrumentation is well developed, the related bioinformatics tools are lacked behind. In this paper, we introduce an integrated toolset dubbed as GUcal, to automatically calculate the glucose unit (GU) values for all sample components of interest in an electropherogram with a concomitant database search for structural assignment. The database comprises CE GUs and suggested structures of N-glycans released from human IgG. The app is freely available online (www.lendulet.uni-pannon.hu/gucal) and readily facilitates CE-based glycan analysis.

  6. Sweet complementarity: the functional pairing of glycans with lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabius, H-J; Manning, J C; Kopitz, J; André, S; Kaltner, H

    2016-05-01

    Carbohydrates establish the third alphabet of life. As part of cellular glycoconjugates, the glycans generate a multitude of signals in a minimum of space. The presence of distinct glycotopes and the glycome diversity are mapped by sugar receptors (antibodies and lectins). Endogenous (tissue) lectins can read the sugar-encoded information and translate it into functional aspects of cell sociology. Illustrated by instructive examples, each glycan has its own ligand properties. Lectins with different folds can converge to target the same epitope, while intrafamily diversification enables functional cooperation and antagonism. The emerging evidence for the concept of a network calls for a detailed fingerprinting. Due to the high degree of plasticity and dynamics of the display of genes for lectins the validity of extrapolations between different organisms of the phylogenetic tree yet is inevitably limited.

  7. Surface Glycans: A Therapeutic Opportunity for Kinetoplastid Diseases.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Acosta, Víctor M; Balzarini, Jan; González-Pacanowska, Dolores

    2017-10-01

    Trypanosomal diseases are in need of innovative therapies that exploit novel mechanisms of action. The cell surface of trypanosomatid parasites is characterized by a dense coat of glycoconjugates with important functions in host cell recognition, immune evasion, infectivity, and cell function. The nature of parasite surface glycans is highly dynamic and changes during differentiation and in response to different stimuli through the action of glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Here we propose a new approach to antiparasitic drug discovery that involves the use of carbohydrate-binding agents that bind specifically to cell-surface glycans, giving rise to cytotoxic events and parasite death. The potential and limitations of this strategy are addressed with a specific focus on the treatment of sleeping sickness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Glycan Side Reaction May Compromise ETD-Based Glycopeptide Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darula, Zsuzsanna; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.

    2014-06-01

    Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) is one of the most frequently used buffer ingredients. Among other things, it is recommended and is usually used for lectin-based affinity enrichment of glycopeptides. Here we report that sialic acid, a common `capping' unit in both N- and O-linked glycans may react with this chemical, and this side reaction may compromise glycopeptide identification when ETD spectra are the only MS/MS data used in the database search. We show that the modification may alter N- as well as O-linked glycans, the Tris-derivative is still prone to fragmentation both in `beam-type' CID (HCD) and ETD experiments, at the same time—since the acidic carboxyl group was `neutralized'—it will display a different retention time than its unmodified counterpart. We also suggest solutions that—when incorporated into existing search engines—may significantly improve the reliability of glycopeptide assignments.

  9. Allosteric modulation of the HIV-1 gp120-gp41 association site by adjacent gp120 variable region 1 (V1) N-glycans linked to neutralization sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Drummer, Heidi E; Hill, Melissa K; Maerz, Anne L; Wood, Stephanie; Ramsland, Paul A; Mak, Johnson; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 gp120-gp41 complex, which mediates viral fusion and cellular entry, undergoes rapid evolution within its external glycan shield to enable escape from neutralizing antibody (NAb). Understanding how conserved protein determinants retain functionality in the context of such evolution is important for their evaluation and exploitation as potential drug and/or vaccine targets. In this study, we examined how the conserved gp120-gp41 association site, formed by the N- and C-terminal segments of gp120 and the disulfide-bonded region (DSR) of gp41, adapts to glycan changes that are linked to neutralization sensitivity. To this end, a DSR mutant virus (K601D) with defective gp120-association was sequentially passaged in peripheral blood mononuclear cells to select suppressor mutations. We reasoned that the locations of suppressors point to structural elements that are functionally linked to the gp120-gp41 association site. In culture 1, gp120 association and viral replication was restored by loss of the conserved glycan at Asn¹³⁶ in V1 (T138N mutation) in conjunction with the L494I substitution in C5 within the association site. In culture 2, replication was restored with deletion of the N¹³⁹INN sequence, which ablates the overlapping Asn¹⁴¹-Asn¹⁴²-Ser-Ser potential N-linked glycosylation sequons in V1, in conjunction with D601N in the DSR. The 136 and 142 glycan mutations appeared to exert their suppressive effects by altering the dependence of gp120-gp41 interactions on the DSR residues, Leu⁵⁹³, Trp⁵⁹⁶ and Lys⁶⁰¹. The 136 and/or 142 glycan mutations increased the sensitivity of HIV-1 pseudovirions to the glycan-dependent NAbs 2G12 and PG16, and also pooled IgG obtained from HIV-1-infected individuals. Thus adjacent V1 glycans allosterically modulate the distal gp120-gp41 association site. We propose that this represents a mechanism for functional adaptation of the gp120-gp41 association site to an evolving glycan shield in a

  10. Glycans affect DNA extraction and induce substantial differences in gut metagenomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Angelakis, Emmanouil; Bachar, Dipankar; Henrissat, Bernard; Armougom, Fabrice; Audoly, Gilles; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Robert, Catherine; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides produced by bacterial species and present in feces are extremely inhibitory to DNA restriction and can cause discrepancies in metagenomic studies. We determined the effects of different DNA extraction methods on the apparent composition of the gut microbiota using Illumina MiSeq deep sequencing technology. DNA was extracted from the stool from an obese female using 10 different methods and the choice of DNA extraction method affected the proportional abundance at the phylum level, species richness (Chao index, 227 to 2,714) and diversity (non parametric Shannon, 1.37 to 4.4). Moreover DNA was extracted from stools obtained from 83 different individuals by the fastest extraction assay and by an extraction assay that degradated exopolysaccharides. The fastest extraction method was able to detect 68% to 100% genera and 42% to 95% species whereas the glycan degradation extraction method was able to detect 56% to 93% genera and 25% to 87% species. To allow a good liberation of DNA from exopolysaccharides commonly presented in stools, we recommend the mechanical lysis of stools plus glycan degradation, used here for the first time. Caution must be taken in the interpretation of current metagenomic studies, as the efficiency of DNA extraction varies widely among stool samples. PMID:27188959

  11. Surface Glycans of Candida albicans and Other Pathogenic Fungi: Physiological Roles, Clinical Uses, and Experimental Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Masuoka, James

    2004-01-01

    Although fungi have always been with us as commensals and pathogens, fungal infections have been increasing in frequency over the past few decades. There is a growing body of literature describing the involvement of carbohydrate groups in various aspects of fungal disease. Carbohydrates comprising the cell wall or capsule, or as a component of glycoproteins, are the fungal cell surface entities most likely to be exposed to the surrounding environment. Thus, the fungus-host interaction is likely to involve carbohydrates before DNA, RNA, or even protein. The interaction between fungal and host cells is also complex, and early studies using whole cells or crude cell fractions often produced seemingly conflicting results. What was needed, and what has been developing, is the ability to identify specific glycan structures and determine how they interact with immune system components. Carbohydrate analysis is complicated by the complexity of glycan structures and by the challenges of separating and detecting carbohydrates experimentally. Advances in carbohydrate chemistry have enabled us to move from the foundation of composition analysis to more rapid characterization of specific structures. This, in turn, will lead to a greater understanding of how fungi coexist with their hosts as commensals or exist in conflict as pathogens. PMID:15084502

  12. The combination of simple MALDI matrices for the improvement of intact glycoproteins and glycans analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastovicková, Markéta; Chmelik, Josef; Bobalova, Janette

    2009-03-01

    The choice of matrix has fundamental importance in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis of glycoproteins. Therefore, a set of selected matrices has been tested. The attention was focused on new binary matrices, that were a combination of matrices commonly used for carbohydrates or proteins analysis such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB), 2,5-dihydroxyacetophenone (DHAP), 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP), [alpha]-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), and sinapinic acid (SA). The binary matrices 2,5-DHB/CHCA and 2,5-DHB/SA have been proved the mass spectra with the best quality and showed an universal applicability. Application of these matrices enabled to quickly screen the microheterogeneity of glycan moieties for either intact glycoproteins, or a mixture of deglycosylated glycoproteins together with free, underivatized glycans. Moreover, these binary matrices were more tolerant to the presence of salts in studied samples. Our results suggest that a combination of two matrix compounds could be useful for an improved determination of the molecular mass values of analytes coming from complex biological samples, especially for the structural characterization of glycoproteins of pharmaceutical interest.

  13. Canine distemper viruses expressing a hemagglutinin without N-glycans lose virulence but retain immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; von Messling, Veronika

    2010-03-01

    Paramyxovirus glycoproteins are posttranslationally modified by the addition of N-linked glycans, which are often necessary for correct folding, processing, and cell surface expression. To establish the contribution of N glycosylation to morbillivirus attachment (H) protein function and overall virulence, we first determined the use of the potential N-glycosylation sites in the canine distemper virus (CDV) H proteins. Biochemical characterization revealed that the three sites conserved in all strains were N glycosylated, whereas only two of the up to five additional sites present in wild-type strains are used. A wild-type virus with an H protein reproducing the vaccine strain N-glycosylation pattern remained lethal in ferrets but with a prolonged course of disease. In contrast, introduction of the vaccine H protein in the wild-type context resulted in complete attenuation. To further characterize the role of N glycosylation in CDV pathogenesis, the N-glycosylation sites of wild-type H proteins were successively deleted, including a nonstandard site, to ultimately generate a nonglycosylated H protein. Despite reduced expression levels, this protein remained fully functional. Recombinant viruses expressing N-glycan-deficient H proteins no longer caused disease, even though their immunosuppressive capacities were retained, indicating that reduced N glycosylation contributes to attenuation without affecting immunosuppression.

  14. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of multivalent neoglycoconjugates carrying the helminth glycan antigen LDNF.

    PubMed

    Tefsen, Boris; van Stijn, Caroline M W; van den Broek, Marloes; Kalay, Hakan; Knol, Jaco C; Jimenez, Connie R; van Die, Irma

    2009-08-17

    Several parasitic helminthes, such as the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni, express glycoconjugates that contain terminal GalNAc beta1-4(Fuc alpha1-3)GlcNAc beta-R (LDNF) moieties. These LDNF glycans are dominant antigens of the parasite and are recognized by human dendritic cells via the C-type lectin DC-SIGN. To study the functional role of the LDNF antigen in interaction with the immune system, we have developed an easy chemoenzymatic method to synthesize multivalent neoglycoconjugates carrying defined amounts of LDNF antigens. An acceptor substrate providing a terminal N-acetylglucosamine was prepared by coupling a fluorescent hydrophobic aglycon, 2,6-diaminopyridine (DAP), to N,N'-diacetylchitobiose. By the subsequent action of recombinant Caenorhabditis elegans beta1,4-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase and human alpha1,3-fucosyltransferase VI (FucT-VI), this substrate was converted to the LDNF antigen. We showed that human FucT-VI has a relatively high affinity for the unusual substrate GalNAc beta1-4GlcNAc (LDN), and this enzyme was used to produce micromolar amounts of LDNF-DAP. The synthesized LDNF-DAP was coupled to carrier protein via activation of the DAP moiety by diethyl squarate. By varying the molar glycan:protein ratio, neoglycoconjugates were constructed with defined amounts of LDNF, as was determined by MALDI-TOF analysis and ELISA using an anti-LDNF antibody.

  15. Characterization of the Secondary Binding Sites of Maclura pomifera agglutinin by Glycan Array and Crystallographic Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    J Huang; Z Xu; D Wang; C Ogata; K Palczewski; X Lee; N Young

    2011-12-31

    The Maclura pomifera agglutinin (MPA) recognizes the T-antigen disaccharide Gal{beta}1,3GalNAc mainly through interaction of the {alpha}-GalNAc moiety with its primary site, but the interactions of the two flanking subsites A and B with aglycones and substituents other than Gal, respectively, are not well understood. We therefore characterized the specificity of MPA in more detail by glycan microarray analysis and determined the crystal structures of MPA without ligand and in complexes with Gal{beta}1,3GalNAc and p-nitrophenyl {alpha}-GalNAc. In both sugar complexes, pairs of ligands created inter-tetramer hydrogen-bond bridging networks. While subsite A showed increased affinity for hydrophobic aglycones, it also accommodated several sugar substituents. Notably, a GalNAc-O-tripeptide, a Tn-antigen mimic, showed lower affinity than these compounds in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiments. The glycan array data that showed subsite B accepted compounds in which the O3 position of the GalNAc was substituted with various sugars other than Gal, but substitutions at O6 led to inactivity. Additions to the Gal moiety of the disaccharide also had only small effects on reactivity. These results are all compatible with the features seen in the crystal structures.

  16. A spin column-free approach to sodium hydroxide-based glycan permethylation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yueming; Borges, Chad R

    2017-07-24

    Glycan permethylation was introduced as a tool to facilitate the study of glycans in 1903. Since that time, permethylation procedures have been continually modified to improve permethylation efficiency and qualitative applicability. Typically, however, either laborious preparation steps or cumbersome and uneconomical spin columns have been needed to obtain decent permethylation yields on small glycan samples. Here we describe a spin column-free (SCF) glycan permethylation procedure that is applicable to both O- and N-linked glycans and can be employed upstream to intact glycan analysis by MALDI-MS, ESI-MS, or glycan linkage analysis by GC-MS. The SCF procedure involves neutralization of NaOH beads by acidified phosphate buffer, which eliminates the risk of glycan oxidative degradation and avoids the use of spin columns. Optimization of the new permethylation procedure provided high permethylation efficiency for both hexose (>98%) and HexNAc (>99%) residues-yields which were comparable to (or better than) those of some widely-used spin column-based procedures. A light vs. heavy labelling approach was employed to compare intact glycan yields from a popular spin-column based approach to the SCF approach. Recovery of intact N-glycans was significantly better with the SCF procedure (p < 0.05), but overall yield of O-glycans was similar or slightly diminished (p < 0.05 for tetrasaccharides or smaller). When the SCF procedure was employed upstream to hydrolysis, reduction and acetylation for glycan linkage analysis of pooled glycans from unfractionated blood plasma, analytical reproducibility was on par with that from previous spin column-based "glycan node" analysis results. When applied to blood plasma samples from stage III-IV breast cancer patients (n = 20) and age-matched controls (n = 20), the SCF procedure facilitated identification of three glycan nodes with significantly different distributions between the cases and controls (ROC c-statistics > 0.75; p < 0

  17. DNA display of glycoconjugates to emulate oligomeric interactions of glycans

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Glycans (carbohydrate portion of glycoproteins and glycolipids) frequently exert their function through oligomeric interactions involving multiple carbohydrate units. In efforts to recapitulate the diverse spatial arrangements of the carbohydrate units, assemblies based on hybridization of nucleic acid conjugates have been used to display simplified ligands with tailored interligand distances and valences. The programmability of the assemblies lends itself to a combinatorial display of multiple ligands. Recent efforts in the synthesis and applications of such conjugates are discussed. PMID:26113879

  18. The N-Glycan Cluster from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    PubMed Central

    Dupoiron, Stéphanie; Zischek, Claudine; Ligat, Laetitia; Carbonne, Julien; Boulanger, Alice; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Lautier, Martine; Rival, Pauline; Arlat, Matthieu; Jamet, Elisabeth; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Albenne, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    N-Glycans are widely distributed in living organisms but represent only a small fraction of the carbohydrates found in plants. This probably explains why they have not previously been considered as substrates exploited by phytopathogenic bacteria during plant infection. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the causal agent of black rot disease of Brassica plants, possesses a specific system for GlcNAc utilization expressed during host plant infection. This system encompasses a cluster of eight genes (nixE to nixL) encoding glycoside hydrolases (GHs). In this paper, we have characterized the enzymatic activities of these GHs and demonstrated their involvement in sequential degradation of a plant N-glycan using a N-glycopeptide containing two GlcNAcs, three mannoses, one fucose, and one xylose (N2M3FX) as a substrate. The removal of the α-1,3-mannose by the α-mannosidase NixK (GH92) is a prerequisite for the subsequent action of the β-xylosidase NixI (GH3), which is involved in the cleavage of the β-1,2-xylose, followed by the α-mannosidase NixJ (GH125), which removes the α-1,6-mannose. These data, combined to the subcellular localization of the enzymes, allowed us to propose a model of N-glycopeptide processing by X. campestris pv. campestris. This study constitutes the first evidence suggesting N-glycan degradation by a plant pathogen, a feature shared with human pathogenic bacteria. Plant N-glycans should therefore be included in the repertoire of molecules putatively metabolized by phytopathogenic bacteria during their life cycle. PMID:25586188

  19. N-linked glycan profiling in neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunli; Mayampurath, Anoop; Khan, Saira; Cohen, Joanna K; Mechref, Yehia; Volchenboum, Samuel L

    2015-05-01

    Although MYCN amplification has been associated with aggressive neuroblastoma, the molecular mechanisms that differentiate low-risk, MYCN-nonamplified neuroblastoma from high-risk, MYCN-amplified disease are largely unknown. Genomic and proteomic studies have been limited in discerning differences in signaling pathways that account for this heterogeneity. N-Linked glycosylation is a common protein modification resulting from the attachment of sugars to protein residues and is important in cell signaling and immune response. Aberrant N-linked glycosylation has been routinely linked to various cancers. In particular, glycomic markers have often proven to be useful in distinguishing cancers from precancerous conditions. Here, we perform a systematic comparison of N-linked glycomic variation between MYCN-nonamplified SY5Y and MYCN-amplified NLF cell lines with the aim of identifying changes in sugar abundance linked to high-risk neuroblastoma. Through a combination of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis, we identified 16 glycans that show a statistically significant change in abundance between NLF and SY5Y samples. Closer examination revealed the preference for larger (in terms of total monosaccharide count) and more sialylated glycan structures in the MYCN-amplified samples in comparison to smaller, nonsialylated glycans that are more dominant in the MYCN-nonamplified samples. These results offer clues for deriving marker candidates for accurate neuroblastoma risk diagnosis.

  20. Mucin-type core 1 glycans regulate the localization of neuromuscular junctions and establishment of muscle cell architecture in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Fuwa, Takashi J; Sato, Chikara; Komatsu, Akira; Nishihara, Shoko

    2016-04-01

    T antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr), a core 1 mucin-type O-glycan structure, is synthesized by Drosophila core 1 β1,3-galactosyltrasferase 1 (dC1GalT1) and is expressed in various tissues. We previously reported that dC1GalT1 synthesizes T antigen expressed in hemocytes, lymph glands, and the central nervous system (CNS) and that dC1GalT1 mutant larvae display decreased numbers of circulating hemocytes and excessive differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells in lymph glands. dC1GalT1 mutant larvae have also been shown to have morphological defects in the CNS. However, the functions of T antigen in other tissues remain largely unknown. In this study, we found that glycans contributed to the localization of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) boutons. In dC1GalT1 mutant larvae, NMJs were ectopically formed in the cleft between muscles 6 and 7 and connected with these two muscles. dC1GalT1 synthesized T antigen, which was expressed at NMJs. In addition, we determined the function of mucin-type O-glycans in muscle cells. In dC1GalT1 mutant muscles, myofibers and basement membranes were disorganized. Moreover, ultrastructural defects in NMJs and accumulation of large endosome-like structures within both NMJ boutons and muscle cells were observed in dC1GalT1 mutants. Taken together, these results demonstrated that mucin-type O-glycans synthesized by dC1GalT1 were involved in the localization of NMJ boutons, synaptogenesis of NMJs, establishment of muscle cell architecture, and endocytosis.

  1. Structural characterization of the N-glycans of a recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen derived from yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, C.C.Y.; Miller, W.J.; Kubek, D.J. ); Strang, A.M.; van Halbeek, H. ); Piesecki, S.J.; Alhadeff, J.A. )

    1992-01-14

    The N-glycans of purified recombinant middle surface protein (preS2+S) from hepatitis B virus, a candidate vaccine antigen expressed in a mnn9 mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have been characterized structurally. The glycans were released by N-glycanase treatment, isolated by size-exclusion chromatography on Sephadex G-50 and Bio-Gel P-4 columns, and analyzed by 500-MHz {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. The mixture of oligosaccharides was fractionated by HPLC, the major subfractions were isolated, and their carbohydrate compositions were determined by high-pH anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. The combined results suggest that high-mannose oligosaccharides account for all the N-glycans released from preS2+S: structures include Man{sub 7}GlcNAc{sub 2}, Man{sub 8}GlcNAc{sub 2} isomers in the ratios of 3:6:1. Approximately 80% of the oligosaccharides contain the C2, C6-branched trimannosyl structural element typical of yeast high-mannose oligosaccharides but not usually found in high-mannose oligosaccharides in animal glycoproteins.

  2. alpha-mannosidase involved in turnover of plant complex type N-glycans in tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) fruits.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Anowar; Nakamura, Kosuke; Kimura, Yoshinobu

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we purified and characterized an alpha-mannosidase to homogeneity from mature red tomato fruits. Purified alpha-mannosidase (alpha-Man LE-1) gave two separate bands, of molecular masses of 70 kDa (L-subunit) and 47 kDa (S-subunit), on SDS-PAGE under non-reducing and reducing conditions. On the other hand, the molecular weight was estimated to be 230 kDa by gel filtration, indicating that alpha-Man LE-1 functions in a tetrameric structure in plant cells. The N-terminal sequence of the L-subunit and the S-subunit were determined to be L-Y-M-V-Y-M-T-K-Q-G- and X-X-L-E-Q/K-S-F-S-Y-Y respectively. When pyridylaminated N-glycans were used as substrates, alpha-Man LE-1 showed optimum activity at about pH 6 and at 40 degrees C, and the activity was completely inhibited by both swainsonine and 1-deoxy-mannojirimycin. alpha-Man LE-1 hydrolyzed the alpha-mannosidic linkages from both high-mannose type and plant complex type N-glycan, but preferred a truncated plant complex type structure to high-mannose type N-glycans bearing alpha1-2 mannosyl residues.

  3. Investigations of the toxic effects of glycans-based silver nanoparticles on different types of human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzarini, E.; Mariano, S.; Dini, L.

    2017-08-01

    The effects of glycans-capped AgNPs (30±5 nm average diameter, spherical shape) on biocompatibility and uptake was studied in relation to the glycan capping (glucose AgNPs-G, glucose/sucrose AgNPs-GS, glucose/fructose AgNPs-GF), and to the cell types (HeLa cells, lymphocytes, and HepG2 cells). Glycan capping and type of cells drive morphological changes, viability loss and type and extent of cell death induction; in addition cells response is largely influenced by the AgNPs amount. The MTT photometric method to determine cell metabolism and the analysis of the membrane integrity by Annexin V-Propidium Iodide labelling were used to quantify cell viability and cell death with different concentrations of NPs. It turns out that i) AgNPs-GF are the most toxic, whereas ii) AgNPs-GS are the less toxic NPs, probably due to the stability of glucose/sucrose capping up to 5 days in culture medium; iii) HepG2 cells are the most sensitive to the presence of NPs. A deeper investigation is necessary to explain the interesting PBLs proliferation increase observed in the presence of AgNPs-GS.

  4. Glycan Arrays: From Basic Biochemical Research to Bioanalytical and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissner, Andreas; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2016-06-01

    A major branch of glycobiology and glycan-focused biomedicine studies the interaction between carbohydrates and other biopolymers, most importantly, glycan-binding proteins. Today, this research into glycan-biopolymer interaction is unthinkable without glycan arrays, tools that enable high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate interaction partners. Glycan arrays offer many applications in basic biochemical research, for example, defining the specificity of glycosyltransferases and lectins such as immune receptors. Biomedical applications include the characterization and surveillance of influenza strains, identification of biomarkers for cancer and infection, and profiling of immune responses to vaccines. Here, we review major applications of glycan arrays both in basic and applied research. Given the dynamic nature of this rapidly developing field, we focus on recent findings.

  5. The relative protein abundance of UGT1A alternative splice variants as a key determinant of glucuronidation activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rouleau, Mélanie; Roberge, Joannie; Falardeau, Sarah-Ann; Villeneuve, Lyne; Guillemette, Chantal

    2013-04-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is one of the most significant components of the functional complexity of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes (UGTs), particularly for the UGT1A gene, which represents one of the best examples of a drug-metabolizing gene regulated by AS. Shorter UGT1A isoforms [isoform 2 (i2)] are deficient in glucuronic acid transferase activity but function as negative regulators of enzyme activity through protein-protein interaction. Their abundance, relative to active UGT1A enzymes, is expected to be a determinant of the global transferase activity of cells and tissues. Here we tested whether i2-mediated inhibition increases with greater abundance of the i2 protein relative to the isoform 1 (i1) enzyme, using the extrahepatic UGT1A7 as a model and a series of 23 human embryonic kidney 293 clonal cell lines expressing variable contents of i1 and i2 proteins. Upon normalization for i1, a significant reduction of 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin glucuronide formation was observed for i1+i2 clones (mean of 53%) compared with the reference i1 cell line. In these clones, the i2 protein content varied greatly (38-263% relative to i1) and revealed two groups: 17 clones with i2 < i1 (60% ± 3%) and 6 clones with i2 ≥ i1 (153% ± 24%). The inhibition induced by i2 was more substantial for clones displaying i2 ≥ i1 (74.5%; P = 0.001) compared with those with i2 < i1 (45.5%). Coimmunoprecipitation supports a more substantial i1-i2 complex formation when i2 exceeds i1. We conclude that the relative abundance of regulatory i2 proteins has the potential to drastically alter the local drug metabolism in the cells, particularly when i2 surpasses the protein content of i1.

  6. Fucosyltransferases as synthetic tools: glycan array based substrate selection and core fucosylation of synthetic N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Serna, Sonia; Yan, Shi; Martin-Lomas, Manuel; Wilson, Iain B H; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2011-10-19

    Two recombinant fucosyltransferases were employed as synthetic tools in the chemoenzymatic synthesis of core fucosylated N-glycan structures. Enzyme substrates were rapidly identified by incubating a microarray of synthetic N-glycans with the transferases and detecting the presence of core fucose with four lectins and one antibody. Selected substrates were then enzymatically fucosylated in solution on a preparative scale and characterized by NMR and MS. With this approach the chemoenzymatic synthesis of a series of α1,3-, α1,6-, and difucosylated structures was accomplished in very short time and with high yields, which otherwise would have required extensive additional synthetic effort and a complete redesign of existing synthetic routes. In addition, valuable information was gathered regarding the specificities of the lectins employed in this study.

  7. Association of Anti-glycan Antibodies and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Course.

    PubMed

    Paul, S; Boschetti, G; Rinaudo-Gaujous, M; Moreau, A; Del Tedesco, E; Bonneau, J; Presles, E; Mounsef, F; Clavel, L; Genin, C; Flourié, B; Phelip, J-M; Nancey, S; Roblin, X

    2015-06-01

    The usefulness of anti-glycan antibodies alone or combined with anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae [ASCA] or perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic [pANCA] antibodies for diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], differentiation between Crohn's disease [CD] and ulcerative colitis [UC], disease stratification including IBD phenotype, and also for determination of the course of the disease, remain unclear. A large panel of serological anti-glycan carbohydrate antibodies, including anti-mannobioside IgG antibodies [AMCA], anti-chitobioside IgA [ACCA], anti-laminaribioside IgG antibodies [ALCA], anti-laminarin [anti-L] and anti-chitine [anti-C] were measured in the serum from a cohort of 195 patients with IBD] [107 CD and 88 UC]. The respective accuracy of isolated or combined markers for diagnosis, disease differentiation, stratification disease phenotype, and severity of the disease course, defined by a wide panel of criteria obtained from the past medical history, was assessed. The positivity of at least one anti-glycan antibody was detected in a significant higher proportion of CD and UC compared with healthy controls [p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0007, respectively]. Whereas ASCA and ANCA antibody status had the highest efficacy to be associated with CD in comparison with UC (area under receiver operating characteristic curve [AUROC] = 0.70 for each], the adjunction of anti-laminarin antibody substantially improved the differentiation between CD and UC [AUROC = 0.77]. Titres of ACCA [> 51U/ml] and anti-laminarin [> 31U/ml] were significantly linked with a higher association with steroid dependency (odds ratio [OR] =2.0 [1.0-4.0], p = 0.03 and OR = 2.4 [1.1-5.2], p = 0.02, respectively]. We further defined the respective performance of anti-glycan antibodies to discriminate between patients with severe or not severe CD and UC course and determined the associated optimal cut-off values: severe CD course was significantly more likely in case of AMCA > 77U/ml [OR = 4.3; p = 0

  8. Differential expression of anti-glycan antibodies in schistosome-infected humans, rhesus monkeys and mice

    PubMed Central

    Luyai, Anthony E; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Mickum, Megan L; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Nyame, A Kwame; Wilkins, Patricia; Rivera-Marrero, Carlos A; Smith, David F; Van Die, Irma; Secor, W Evan; Cummings, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a debilitating parasitic disease of humans, endemic in tropical areas, for which no vaccine is available. Evidence points to glycan antigens as being important in immune responses to infection. Here we describe our studies on the comparative humoral immune responses to defined schistosome-type glycan epitopes in Schistosoma mansoni-infected humans, rhesus monkeys and mice. Rhesus anti-glycan responses over the course of infection were screened on a defined glycan microarray comprising semi-synthetic glycopeptides terminating with schistosome-associated or control mammalian-type glycan epitopes, as well as a defined glycan microarray of mammalian-type glycans representing over 400 glycan structures. Infected rhesus monkeys generated a high immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response to the core xylose/core α3 fucose epitope of N-glycans, which peaked at 8–11 weeks post infection, coinciding with maximal ability to kill schistosomula in vitro. By contrast, infected humans generated low antibody levels to this epitope. At 18 months following praziquantel therapy to eliminate the parasite, antibody levels were negligible. Mice chronically infected with S. mansoni generated high levels of anti-fucosylated LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1, 4(Fucα1, 3)GlcNAc) IgM antibodies, but lacked a robust response to the core xylose/core α3 fucose N-glycan antigens compared with other species studied, and their sera demonstrated an intermediate level of schistosomula killing in vitro. These differential responses to parasite glycan antigens may be related to the ability of rhesus monkeys to self-cure in contrast to the chronic infection seen in humans and mice. Our results validate defined glycan microarrays as a useful technology to evaluate diagnostic and vaccine antigens for schistosomiasis and perhaps other infections. PMID:24727442

  9. Context-specific target definition in influenza a virus hemagglutinin-glycan receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Shriver, Zachary; Raman, Rahul; Viswanathan, Karthik; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2009-08-28

    Protein-glycan interactions are important regulators of a variety of biological processes, ranging from immune recognition to anticoagulation. An important area of active research is directed toward understanding the role of host cell surface glycans as recognition sites for pathogen protein receptors. Recognition of cell surface glycans is a widely employed strategy for a variety of pathogens, including bacteria, parasites, and viruses. We present here a representative example of such an interaction: the binding of influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) to specific sialylated glycans on the cell surface of human upper airway epithelial cells, which initiates the infection cycle. We detail a generalizable strategy to understand the nature of protein-glycan interactions both structurally and biochemically, using HA as a model system. This strategy combines a top-down approach using available structural information to define important contacts between glycans and HA, with a bottom-up approach using data-mining and informatics approaches to identify the common motifs that distinguish glycan binders from nonbinders. By probing protein-glycan interactions simultaneously through top-down and bottom-up approaches, we can scientifically validate a series of observations. This in turn provides additional confidence and surmounts known challenges in the study of protein-glycan interactions, such as accounting for multivalency, and thus truly defines concepts such as specificity, affinity, and avidity. With the advent of new technologies for glycomics-including glycan arrays, data-mining solutions, and robust algorithms to model protein-glycan interactions-we anticipate that such combination approaches will become tractable for a wide variety of protein-glycan interactions.

  10. Premature Ovarian Failure in Mice with Oocytes Lacking Core 1-Derived O-Glycans and Complex N-Glycans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) affects up to 1.4% of women under the age of 40 yr and less than 30% of cases have a known cause. Here we describe a new mouse model of POF resulting from oocyte-specific ablation of core 1-derived (mucin) O-glycans and complex and hybrid N-glycans. Females carrying floxed alleles of both the C1galt1 (T-syn) and Mgat1 glycosyltransferase genes and a ZP3Cre transgene, generate oocytes lacking complex O- and N-glycans following oocyte-specific deletion at the primary follicle stage. We previously showed that few double-mutant females are fertile, and those produce only a single small litter. Here we show that ovarian function declined rapidly in double-mutant females with less than 1% ovulating at 11 wk of age after superovulation with exogenous gonadotropins. Ovary weight was significantly decreased in double-mutant females by 3 months of age, consistent with a decrease in the number of developing follicles. FSH levels in double-mutant females were elevated at 3 months of age, and testosterone and inhibin A were decreased, showing that the loss of complex N- and O-glycans from oocyte glycoproteins affected hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal feedback loops. The absence of developing follicles, ovary dysfunction, reduced testosterone and inhibin A, and elevated FSH in double-mutant females lacking C1galt1 and Mgat1 in oocytes represents a new mouse model for the study of follicular POF. PMID:21239444

  11. The N-Glycan cluster from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris: a toolbox for sequential plant N-glycan processing.

    PubMed

    Dupoiron, Stéphanie; Zischek, Claudine; Ligat, Laetitia; Carbonne, Julien; Boulanger, Alice; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Lautier, Martine; Rival, Pauline; Arlat, Matthieu; Jamet, Elisabeth; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Albenne, Cécile

    2015-03-06

    N-Glycans are widely distributed in living organisms but represent only a small fraction of the carbohydrates found in plants. This probably explains why they have not previously been considered as substrates exploited by phytopathogenic bacteria during plant infection. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the causal agent of black rot disease of Brassica plants, possesses a specific system for GlcNAc utilization expressed during host plant infection. This system encompasses a cluster of eight genes (nixE to nixL) encoding glycoside hydrolases (GHs). In this paper, we have characterized the enzymatic activities of these GHs and demonstrated their involvement in sequential degradation of a plant N-glycan using a N-glycopeptide containing two GlcNAcs, three mannoses, one fucose, and one xylose (N2M3FX) as a substrate. The removal of the α-1,3-mannose by the α-mannosidase NixK (GH92) is a prerequisite for the subsequent action of the β-xylosidase NixI (GH3), which is involved in the cleavage of the β-1,2-xylose, followed by the α-mannosidase NixJ (GH125), which removes the α-1,6-mannose. These data, combined to the subcellular localization of the enzymes, allowed us to propose a model of N-glycopeptide processing by X. campestris pv. campestris. This study constitutes the first evidence suggesting N-glycan degradation by a plant pathogen, a feature shared with human pathogenic bacteria. Plant N-glycans should therefore be included in the repertoire of molecules putatively metabolized by phytopathogenic bacteria during their life cycle.

  12. The C. elegans sex-determining GLI protein TRA-1A is regulated by sex-specific proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Schvarzstein, Mara; Spence, Andrew M

    2006-11-01

    TRA-1A is the sole representative in Caenorhabditis elegans of the Gli transcription factor family. Its activity is required to specify all somatic female cell fates in XX hermaphrodites. We have found that TRA-1 protein levels are much higher in hermaphrodites than in males, and that the difference is attributable to the predominance in hermaphrodites of C-terminally truncated isoforms that are nearly undetectable in males. Our results support a model in which TRA-1A is negatively regulated by male-specific proteolysis that depends upon specific TRA-1A protein sequences and upon the activity of the fem genes. C-terminally truncated TRA-1 isoforms are stable and can inappropriately feminize XO males, suggesting that they escape this negative regulation. Thus, although C. elegans appears to lack a Hedgehog-signaling pathway, our results indicate that proteolytic processing and degradation of Gli family transcription factors, commonly seen during Hedgehog signaling in other organisms, also control C. elegans sex determination.

  13. Chemoenzymatic synthesis and lectin array characterization of a class of N-glycan clusters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Denong; Yamada, Masao; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2009-12-16

    N-Glycans are major components of many glycoproteins. These sugar moieties are frequently involved in important physiological and disease processes via their interactions with a variety of glycan-binding proteins (GBP). Clustering effect is an important feature in many glycan-lectin interactions. We describe in this paper a chemoenzymatic synthesis of novel N-glycan clusters using a tandem endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation. It was found that the internal beta-1,2-linked GlcNAc moieties in the N-glycan core, once exposed in the nonreducing terminus, was able to serve as acceptors for transglycosylation catalyzed by Endo-A and EndoM-N175A. This efficient chemoenzymatic method allows a quick extension of the sugar chains to form a class of glycan clusters in which sugar residues are all connected by native glycosidic linkages found in natural N-glycans. In addition, a discriminative enzymatic reaction at the two GlcNAc residues could be fulfilled to afford novel hybrid clusters. Lectin microarray studies revealed unusual properties in glyco-epitope expression by this panel of structurally well-defined synthetic N-glycans. These new compounds are likely valuable for functional glycomics studies to unveil new functions of both glycans and carbohydrate-binding proteins.

  14. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis and Lectin Array Characterization of a Class of N-Glycan Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Denong; Yamada, Masao; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2009-01-01

    N-glycans are major components of many glycoproteins. These sugar moieties are frequently involved in important physiological and disease processes via their interactions with a variety of glycan-binding proteins (GBP). Clustering effect is an important feature in many glycan-lectin interactions. We describe in this paper a chemoenzymatic synthesis of novel N-glycan clusters using a tandem endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation. It was found that the internal β-1,2-linked GlcNAc moieties in the N-glycan core, once exposed in the non-reducing terminus, was able to serve as acceptors for transglycosylation catalyzed by Endo-A and EndoM-N175A. This efficient chemoenzymatic method allows a quick extension of the sugar chains to form a class of glycan clusters in which sugar residues are all connected by native glycosidic linkages found in natural N-glycans. In addition, a discriminative enzymatic reaction at the two GlcNAc residues could be fulfilled to afford novel hybrid clusters. Lectin microarray studies revealed unusual properties in glyco-epitope expression by this panel of structurally well-defined synthetic N-glycans. These new compounds are likely valuable for functional glycomics studies to unveil new functions of both glycans and carbohydrate-binding proteins. PMID:19916512

  15. Cell Surface-Specific N-Glycan Profiling in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuanfei; Maitikabili, Alaiyi; Qu, Youpeng; Shi, Shuliang; Chen, Cuiying; Li, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant changes in specific glycans have been shown to be associated with immunosurveillance, tumorigenesis, tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, the N-glycan profiling of membrane proteins from human breast cancer cell lines and tissues was detected using modified DNA sequencer-assisted fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (DSA-FACE). The N-glycan profiles of membrane proteins were analyzed from 7 breast cancer cell lines and MCF 10A, as well as from 100 pairs of breast cancer and corresponding adjacent tissues. The results showed that, compared with the matched adjacent normal tissue samples, two biantennary N-glycans (NA2 and NA2FB) were significantly decreased (p <0.0001) in the breast cancer tissue samples, while the triantennary glycan (NA3FB) and a high-mannose glycan (M8) were dramatically increased (p = 0.001 and p <0.0001, respectively). Moreover, the alterations in these specific N-glycans occurred through the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. These results suggested that the modified method based on DSA-FACE is a high-throughput detection technology that is suited for analyzing cell surface N-glycans. These cell surface-specific N-glycans may be helpful in recognizing the mechanisms of tumor cell immunologic escape and could be potential targets for new breast cancer drugs. PMID:24009699

  16. Comparative analysis of N-glycans in the ungerminated and germinated stages of Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Risa; Hirotsu, Naoki; Miyanishi, Nobumitsu

    2015-12-11

    All fundamental information such as signal transduction, metabolic control, infection, cell-to-cell signaling, and cell differentiation related to the growth of plants are preserved in germs. In preserving these information, glycans have a key role and are involved in the development and differentiation of organisms. Glycans which exist in rice germ are expected to have an important role in germination. In this study, we performed structural and correlation analysis of the N-glycans in rice germ before and after germination. Our results confirmed that the N-glycans in the ungerminated stage of the rice germ had low number of N-glycans consisting only of six kinds especially with high-mannose and paucimannose type N-glycans being 16.0% and 76.7%, respectively. On the other hand, after 48 hours germinated germ stage, there was an increase in the complex type N-glycans with the appearance of Lewis a structure, the most complex type and a decrease in paucimannose types. These results suggest that at least six kinds of N-glycans are utilized for long time preservation of rice seed, while the diversification of most complex types of N-glycans is produced an environment dependent for shoot formation of rice.

  17. High-Throughput Profiling of Anti-Glycan Humoral Responses to SIV Vaccination and Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Christopher T.; Llewellyn, Sean R.; Damberg, Thorsten; Morgan, Ian L.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress toward an HIV vaccine highlights both the potential of vaccines to end the AIDS pandemic and the need to boost efficacy by incorporating additional vaccine strategies. Although many aspects of the immune response can contribute to vaccine efficacy, the key factors have not been defined fully yet. A particular area that may yield new insights is anti-glycan immune responses, such as those against the glycan shield that HIV uses to evade the immune system. In this study, we used glycan microarray technology to evaluate anti-glycan antibody responses induced by SIV vaccination and infection in a non-human primate model of HIV infection. This comprehensive profiling of circulating anti-glycan antibodies found changes in anti-glycan antibody levels after both vaccination with the Ad5hr-SIV vaccine and SIV infection. Notably, SIV infection produced generalized declines in anti-glycan IgM antibodies in a number of animals. Additionally, some infected animals generated antibodies to the Tn antigen, which is a cryptic tumor-associated antigen exposed by premature termination of O-linked glycans; however, the Ad5hr-SIV vaccine did not induce anti-Tn IgG antibodies. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential contributions that glycan microarrays can make for HIV vaccine development. PMID:24086502

  18. Atomic visualization of a flipped-back conformation of bisected glycans bound to specific lectins

    PubMed Central

    Nagae, Masamichi; Kanagawa, Mayumi; Morita-Matsumoto, Kana; Hanashima, Shinya; Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Glycans normally exist as a dynamic equilibrium of several conformations. A fundamental question concerns how such molecules bind lectins despite disadvantageous entropic loss upon binding. Bisected glycan, a glycan possessing bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is potentially a good model for investigating conformational dynamics and glycan-lectin interactions, owing to the unique ability of this sugar residue to alter conformer populations and thus modulate the biological activities. Here we analyzed bisected glycan in complex with two unrelated lectins, Calsepa and PHA-E. The crystal structures of the two complexes show a conspicuous flipped back glycan structure (designated ‘back-fold’ conformation), and solution NMR analysis also provides evidence of ‘back-fold’ glycan structure. Indeed, statistical conformational analysis of available bisected and non-bisected glycan structures suggests that bisecting GlcNAc restricts the conformations of branched structures. Restriction of glycan flexibility by certain sugar residues may be more common than previously thought and impinges on the mechanism of glycoform-dependent biological functions. PMID:26971576

  19. Differential Fragmentation of Mobility-Selected Glycans via Ultraviolet Photodissociation and Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Kelsey A.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2017-06-01

    The alternative dissociation pathways initiated by ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) compared with collision-induced dissociation (CID) may provide useful diagnostic fragments for biomolecule identification, including glycans. However, underivatized glycans do not commonly demonstrate strong UV absorbance, resulting in low fragmentation yields for UVPD spectra. In contrast to UVPD experiments that leverage covalent modification of glycans, we detail the capacity of metal adduction to yield comparatively rich UVPD fragmentation patterns and enhance separation factors for an isomeric glycan set in a drift tube ion mobility system. Ion mobility and UVPD-MS spectra for two N-acetyl glycan isomers were examined, each adducted with sodium or cobalt cations, with the latter providing fragment yield gains of an order of magnitude versus sodium adducts. Furthermore, our glycan analysis incorporated front-end ion mobility separation such that the structural glycan isomers could still be identified even as a mixture and not simply composite spectra of isomeric standards. Cobalt adduction proved influential in the glycan separation by yielding an isomer resolution of 0.78 when analyzed simultaneously versus no discernable separation obtained with the sodium adducts. It is the combined enhancement of both isomeric drift time separation and isomer distinction with improved UVPD fragment ion yields that further bolster multivalent metal adduction for advancing glycan IM-MS experiments. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Complete Genome Sequences of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses 1A and 1B Determined Directly from Fatal Cases

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Gavin S.; Watson, Mick; Kerr, Karen; Sanderson, Stephanie; Bouts, Tim; Steinbach, Falko; Dastjerdi, Akbar

    2013-01-01

    A highly lethal hemorrhagic disease associated with infection by elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV) poses a severe threat to Asian elephant husbandry. We have used high-throughput methods to sequence the genomes of the two genotypes that are involved in most fatalities, namely, EEHV1A and EEHV1B (species Elephantid herpesvirus 1, genus Proboscivirus, subfamily Betaherpesvirinae, family Herpesviridae). The sequences were determined from postmortem tissue samples, despite the data containing tiny proportions of viral reads among reads from a host for which the genome sequence was not available. The EEHV1A genome is 180,421 bp in size and consists of a unique sequence (174,601 bp) flanked by a terminal direct repeat (2,910 bp). The genome contains 116 predicted protein-coding genes, of which six are fragmented, and seven paralogous gene families are present. The EEHV1B genome is very similar to that of EEHV1A in structure, size, and gene layout. Half of the EEHV1A genes lack orthologs in other members of subfamily Betaherpesvirinae, such as human cytomegalovirus (genus Cytomegalovirus) and human herpesvirus 6A (genus Roseolovirus). Notable among these are 23 genes encoding type 3 membrane proteins containing seven transmembrane domains (the 7TM family) and seven genes encoding related type 2 membrane proteins (the EE50 family). The EE50 family appears to be under intense evolutionary selection, as it is highly diverged between the two genotypes, exhibits evidence of sequence duplications or deletions, and contains several fragmented genes. The availability of the genome sequences will facilitate future research on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of EEHV-associated disease. PMID:23552421

  1. Rapid quantitative profiling of N-glycan by the glycan-labeling method using 3-aminoquinoline/α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Kaoru; Watanabe, Makoto; Terasawa, Kazuya; Uchimura, Hiromasa; Fukuyama, Yuko; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Sato, Taka-Aki; Shimizu, Kazuharu; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Tanaka, Koichi

    2012-08-21

    Protein glycosylation is a crucial phenomenon for understanding protein functions, since its patterns and degree are associated with many biological processes, such as intercellular signaling and immune response. We previously reported a novel glycan-labeling method using a 3-ainoquinoline/α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (3-AQ/CHCA) liquid matrix for highly sensitive detection by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-mass spectrometry (MS). In the present study, we examined the practicality of this method for qualitative and quantitative glycan profile analysis. We first investigated the reproducibility of the data for 16 N-glycans prepared from human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2). All of the data obtained in intra-assays and interassays were highly correlated with statistical significance (R(2) > 0.9, p < 0.05). In addition, the HER2 glycosylation pattern differed significantly between different breast cancer cell lines SK-BR-3 and BT474 in a comparative analysis of profile data. Finally, the quantitative capability of this method was examined by using PA-labeled monosialylated N-glycan as an internal standard (IS). Using IS for AQ-labeled neutral and sialylated standard glycans, the ion peak intensity was highly linear (R(2) > 0.9) from 0.5 to 5000 fmol. Furthermore, using IS for HER2 N-glycans, all of the N-glycans were highly linear with their dilution factors (R(2) > 0.9). These results suggest that our developed AQ labeling method enabled rapid qualitative and quantitative analyses of glycans. This glycan analysis method should contribute to the field of biomarker discovery and biomedicine in applications such as quality control of biotechnology-based drugs.

  2. Major glycan structure underlying expression of the Lewis X epitope in the developing brain is O-mannose-linked glycans on phosphacan/RPTPβ.

    PubMed

    Yaji, Shohei; Manya, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Naoki; Takematsu, Hiromu; Endo, Tamao; Kannagi, Reiji; Yoshihara, Toru; Asano, Masahide; Oka, Shogo

    2015-04-01

    Glycosylation is a major protein modification. Although proteins are glycosylated/further modulated by several glycosyltransferases during trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, a certain glycan epitope has only been detected on a limited number of proteins. Of these glycan epitopes, Lewis X is highly expressed in the early stage of a developing brain and plays important roles in cell-cell interaction. The Lewis X epitope is comprised of a trisaccharide (Galβ1-4 (Fucα1-3) GlcNAc), and a key enzyme for the expression of this epitope is α1,3-fucosyltransferase 9. However, the scaffolding glycan structure responsible for the formation of the Lewis X epitope as well as its major carrier protein has not been fully characterized in the nervous system. Here we showed that the Lewis X epitope was mainly expressed on phosphacan/receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β (RPTPβ) in the developing mouse brain. Expression of the Lewis X epitope was markedly reduced in β1,4-galactosyltransferase 2 (β4GalT2) gene-deficient mice, which indicated that β4GalT2 is a major galactosyltransferase required for the Lewis X epitope. We also showed that the Lewis X epitope almost disappeared due to the knockout of protein O-mannose β1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1, an N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase essential for the synthesis of O-mannosylated glycans, which indicated that the O-mannosylated glycan is responsible for presenting the Lewis X epitope. Since O-mannosylated glycans on phosphacan/RPTPβ could also present human natural killer-1, another glycan epitope specifically expressed in the nervous system, our results revealed the importance of O-mannosylated glycan chains in the presentation of functional glycan epitopes in the brain. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Online nanoliquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and nanofluorescence detection for high-resolution quantitative N-glycan analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalay, Hakan; Ambrosini, Martino; van Berkel, Patrick H C; Parren, Paul W H I; van Kooyk, Yvette; García Vallejo, Juan J

    2012-04-01

    The characterization of the repertoire of glycans at the quantitative and qualitative levels on cells and glycoproteins is a necessary step to the understanding of glycan functions in biology. In addition, there is an increasing demand in the field of biotechnology for the monitoring of glycosylation of recombinant glycoproteins, an important issue with regard to their safety and biological activity. The enzymatic release followed by fluorescent derivatization of glycans and separation by normal phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has proven for many years to be a powerful approach to the quantification of glycans. Characterization of glycans has classically been performed by mass spectrometry (MS) with external standardization. Here, we report a new method for the simultaneous quantification and characterization of the N-glycans on glycoproteins without the need for external standardization. This method, which we call glycan nanoprofiling, uses nanoLC-coupled electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS with an intercalated nanofluorescence reader and provides effective single glycan separation with subpicomolar sensitivity. The method relies on the isolation and coumaric derivatization of enzymatically released glycans collected by solid phase extraction with porous graphitized carbon and their separation over polyamide-based nanoHPLC prior to serial nanofluorescence and nanoelectrospray mass spectrometric analysis. Glycan nanoprofiling is a broadly applicable and powerful approach that is sufficient to identify and quantify many glycan oligomers in a single run. Glycan nanoprofiling was successfully applied to resolve the glycans of monoclonal antibodies, showing that this method is a fast and sensitive alternative to available methods.

  4. Editorial overview: Carbohydrate-protein interactions and glycosylation: Glycan synthesis and recognition: finding the perfect partner in a sugar-coated life.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Ten E N; Haltiwanger, Robert S

    2015-10-01

    Oligosaccharides expressed on the surface of cells and in biological fluids as glycoproteins, glycolipids, proteoglycans and polysaccharides can be recognized by partner proteins, and these interactions have been shown to mediate fundamental biological events such as occur in the immune system, signal transduction, development and cancer metastasis. The specificities of these partner proteins (lectins) for their glycan ligands are determined by factors such as glycan composition, shape and density of expression and the involvement of the aglycone moiety as part of the recognition motif. There is increasing knowledge on the mechanisms of these interactions as new secondary binding sites continue to be elucidated adding to the functional awareness of sugar-binding proteins. This issue focuses on recent advances in understanding how C-type lectins in the immune system work, how novel motifs involving asymmetric glycan branch recognition and protein-protein interactions influence critical biological functions including signal transduction and bactericidal pore formation, recent studies on novel glycan-binding proteins produced by bacteriophage, analysis of the interactions between heparin/heparan sulphate and their binding proteins, and recent findings on the molecular interactions between chondroitin-dermatan sulphate and various bioactive protein components. We conclude with a review on a recent fascinating class of processive enzymes responsible for synthesis of high-molecular weight extracellular polysaccharides such as hyaluronic acid, chitin and alginate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Lan3-2 glycoepitope of Hirudo medicinalis consists of beta-(1,4)-linked mannopyranose: cell type-specific glycans of H. medicinalis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Linjuan; Hollingsworth, Rawle I; Haslam, Stuart M; Morris, Howard R; Dell, Anne; Zipser, Birgit

    2008-12-01

    While glycosyltransferases are restrictively expressed in invertebrate model organisms, little is known of their glycan end products. One such restrictively expressed glycoepitope was localized to sensory and epithelial cells of leech and Caenorhabditis elegans using the Lan3-2 monoclonal antibody. A biological function for the neural Lan3-2 epitope was previously determined in the leech. Here we report on the chemical structure of this mannosidic epitope harvested from whole Hirudo medicinalis. Crude glycans were liberated from glycoproteins by hydrazinolysis. Re-N-acetylated glycans were subjected to immunoaffinity purification. The affinity-purified glycans were fractioned by size chromatography into oligosaccharides and polysaccharides. Lan3-2 oligosaccharide structure was characterized by gas chromatography of alditol acetates, methylation analysis, 500 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, and electrospray ionization tandem MS-MS of permethylated derivatives. The predominant components of the Lan3-2 oligosaccharide fraction were a series of linear beta-(1,4)-linked mannose polymers. The homologous expression of the Lan3-2 epitope in C. elegans will facilitate the exploration of its glycosylation pathway. Other invertebrates expressing the Lan3-2 epitope are Planaria dugesia, Capitella sp. I and Lumbriculus variegatus. The glycoepitope was not detected in the diploblastic animals Hydra littoralis and Aptaisia sp. or in deuterostomes.

  6. Global Identification and Differential Distribution Analysis of Glycans in Subcellular Fractions of Bladder Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ganglong; Huang, Luyu; Zhang, Jiaxu; Yu, Hanjie; Li, Zheng; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular components and their associated biological processes is crucial for cellular function. Protein glycosylation provides a basis for diversity of protein functions. Diversity of glycan composition in animal cells remains poorly understood. We used differential centrifugation techniques to isolate four subcellular protein fractions from homogenate of metastatic bladder YTS1 cells, low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer KK47 cells and normal bladder epithelia HCV29 cells: microsomal (Mic), mitochondrial (Mito), nuclear (Nuc), and cytosolic (Cyto). An integrated strategy combining lectin microarray and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis was then applied to evaluate protein glycosylation of the four fractions. Lectin microarray analysis revealed significant differences among the four fractions in terms of glycan binding to the lectins LCA, AAL, MPL, WGA and PWM in YTS1 cell, STL, Jacalin, VVA, LCA and WGA in KK47, and ConA, GNA, VVA and ACA in HCV29 cell. Among a total of 40, 32 and 15 N-glycans in four fractions of three cells detected by MS analysis, high-mannose and fucosylated structures were predominant, 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 5 N-glycans in KK47 and 7 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in all four fractions; and 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 16 N-glycans in KK47, and 3 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in only one fraction. Glycans in the latter category are considered potential markers for the corresponding organelles. The integrated strategy described here allows detailed examination of glycomes subcellular fraction with high resolution and sensitivity, and will be useful for elucidation of the functional roles of glycans and corresponding glycosylated proteins in distinct organelles. PMID:27313494

  7. Mass spectrometric profiling reveals association of N-glycan patterns with epithelial ovarian cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huanhuan; Deng, Zaian; Huang, Chuncui; Wu, Hongmei; Zhao, Xia; Li, Yan

    2017-07-01

    Aberrant changes of N-glycan modifications on proteins have been linked to various diseases including different cancers, suggesting possible avenue for exploring their etiologies based on N-glycomic analysis. Changes in N-glycan patterns during epithelial ovarian cancer development have so far been investigated mainly using serum, plasma, ascites, and cell lines. However, changes in patterns of N-glycans in tumor tissues during epithelial ovarian cancer progression have remained largely undefined. To investigate whether changes in N-glycan patterns correlate with oncogenesis and progression of epithelial ovarian cancer, we profiled N-glycans from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue slides using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and quantitatively compared among different pathological grades of epithelial ovarian cancer and healthy controls. Our results show that among the 80 compositions of N-glycan detected, expression levels of high-mannose type were higher in epithelial ovarian cancer samples than that observed in healthy controls, accompanied by reduced levels of hybrid-type glycans. By applying receiver operating characteristic analysis, we show that a combined panel composed of four high-mannose and three fucosylated neutral complex N-glycans allows for good discrimination of epithelial ovarian cancer from healthy controls. Furthermore, using a statistical analysis of variance assay, we found that different N-glycan patterns, including 2 high-mannose-type, 2 fucosylated and sialylated complex structures, and 10 fucosylated neutral complex N-glycans, exhibited specific changes in N-glycan abundance across epithelial ovarian cancer grades. Together, our results provide strong evidence that N-glycomic changes are a strong indicator for epithelial ovarian cancer pathological grades and should provide avenues to identify novel biomarkers for epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosis and monitoring.

  8. Differentiation between isomeric triantennary N-linked glycans by negative ion tandem mass spectrometry and confirmation of glycans containing galactose attached to the bisecting (beta1-4-GlcNAc) residue in N-glycans from IgG.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David J; Crispin, Max; Scanlan, Chris; Singer, Bernhard B; Lucka, Lothar; Chang, Veronica T; Radcliffe, Catherine M; Thobhani, Smita; Yuen, Chun-Ting; Rudd, Pauline M

    2008-04-01

    Negative ion tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectra of three isomeric triantennary N-linked glycans provided clear differentiation between the isomers and confirmed the occurrence of an isomer that was substituted with galactose on a bisecting GlcNAc (1 --> 4-substituted on the core mannose) residue recently reported by Takegawa et al. from N-glycans released from human immunoglobulin G (IgG). We extend this analysis of human serum IgG to reveal an analogue of the fucosylated triantennary glycan reported by Takegawa et al. together with a third compound that lacked both the sialic acid and the fucose residues. In addition, we demonstrate the biosynthesis of bisected hybrid-type glycans with the galactose modification, with and without core fucose, on the stem cell marker glycoprotein, 19A, expressed in a partially ricin-resistant human embryonic kidney cell line. It would appear, therefore, that this modification of N-linked glycans containing a galactosylated bisecting GlcNAc residue may be more common than originally thought. Negative ion MS/MS analysis of glycans is likely to prove an invaluable tool in the analysis and monitoring of therapeutic glycoproteins. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. A simple chromatographic method for determining norfloxacin and enoxacin in pharmacokinetic study assessing CYP1A2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshimi; Homma, Masato; Momo, Kenji; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kohda, Yukinao

    2011-04-01

    We developed a simple assay method for the determination of serum and urine norfloxacin and enoxacin using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and perchloric acid precipitation for sample pre-treatment. Optimized conditions can permit detection of norfloxacin and enoxacin in the same chromatogram, so either compound can be used as an internal standard for another determinant. Supernatants of the precipitated samples were analyzed by the octadecylsilyl silica-gel column under ambient temperature and an ultraviolet wavelength of 272  nm. A mobile phase solvent consisting of 20 mm sodium dihydrogenphosphate (pH 3.0) and acetonitrile (85:15, v/v) was pumped at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The calibration curves for norfloxacin and enoxacin at a concentration of 62.5-1000 ng/mL for serum and 250-4000 ng/mL for urine were linear (r > 0.9997). The recoveries of norfloxacin and enoxacin from serum and urine were >94% with the coefficient of variations (CV) <5%. The CVs for intra- and inter-day assay of norfloxacin and enoxacin were <4.2 and <5.5%, respectively. This method can be applied to the pharmacokinetic study of norfloxacin and enoxacin after repeated administration to assess changes in CYP1A2 activity in healthy subjects. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Assessment of weak sugar-binding ability using lectin tetramer and membrane-based glycans.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    To consider biological significance of glycosylation of proteins, it is necessary to evaluate the importance of sugar-recognition processes mediated by lectins. Though the interaction between sugars and proteins, especially animal lectins, is quite weak with K d approximately 10(-4) M, cellular and molecular recognitions mediated via sugar-protein interaction increase their avidity by 1-3 orders of magnitude by the self-association of both receptors and their ligands on cell surfaces. To assess the weak interaction between lectins and their sugar ligands, we established lectin tetramer binding to cell surface glycans using flow cytometry. This strategy is highly sensitive, and useful to determine whether or not a putative lectin domain may have sugar-binding ability.

  11. Perspectives on Anti-Glycan Antibodies Gleaned from Development of a Community Resource Database

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are used extensively for a wide range of basic research and clinical applications. While an abundant and diverse collection of antibodies to protein antigens have been developed, good monoclonal antibodies to carbohydrates are much less common. Moreover, it can be difficult to determine if a particular antibody has the appropriate specificity, which antibody is best suited for a given application, and where to obtain that antibody. Herein, we provide an overview of the current state of the field, discuss challenges for selecting and using antiglycan antibodies, and summarize deficiencies in the existing repertoire of antiglycan antibodies. This perspective was enabled by collecting information from publications, databases, and commercial entities and assembling it into a single database, referred to as the Database of Anti-Glycan Reagents (DAGR). DAGR is a publicly available, comprehensive resource for anticarbohydrate antibodies, their applications, availability, and quality. PMID:27220698

  12. Automated synthesis of arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides enables characterization of antibodies that recognize plant cell wall glycans.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Deborah; Schuhmacher, Frank; Geissner, Andreas; Seeberger, Peter H; Pfrengle, Fabian

    2015-04-07

    Monoclonal antibodies that recognize plant cell wall glycans are used for high-resolution imaging, providing important information about the structure and function of cell wall polysaccharides. To characterize the binding epitopes of these powerful molecular probes a library of eleven plant arabinoxylan oligosaccharides was produced by automated solid-phase synthesis. Modular assembly of oligoarabinoxylans from few building blocks was enabled by adding (2-naphthyl)methyl (Nap) to the toolbox of orthogonal protecting groups for solid-phase synthesis. Conjugation-ready oligosaccharides were obtained and the binding specificities of xylan-directed antibodies were determined on microarrays. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Perspectives on Anti-Glycan Antibodies Gleaned from Development of a Community Resource Database.

    PubMed

    Sterner, Eric; Flanagan, Natalie; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C

    2016-07-15

    Antibodies are used extensively for a wide range of basic research and clinical applications. While an abundant and diverse collection of antibodies to protein antigens have been developed, good monoclonal antibodies to carbohydrates are much less common. Moreover, it can be difficult to determine if a particular antibody has the appropriate specificity, which antibody is best suited for a given application, and where to obtain that antibody. Herein, we provide an overview of the current state of the field, discuss challenges for selecting and using antiglycan antibodies, and summarize deficiencies in the existing repertoire of antiglycan antibodies. This perspective was enabled by collecting information from publications, databases, and commercial entities and assembling it into a single database, referred to as the Database of Anti-Glycan Reagents (DAGR). DAGR is a publicly available, comprehensive resource for anticarbohydrate antibodies, their applications, availability, and quality.

  14. Piperidine-based glycodendrons as protein N-glycan prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Jason E; Belardi, Brian; Appel, Mason J; Solania, Angelo; Robinson, Peter V; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2016-10-15

    The generation of homogeneously glycosylated proteins is essential for defining glycoform-specific activity and improving protein-based therapeutics. We present a novel glycodendron prosthetic which can be site-selectively appended to recombinant proteins to create 'N-glycosylated' glycoprotein mimics. Using computational modeling, we designed the dendrimer scaffold and protein attachment point to resemble the native N-glycan architecture. Three piperidine-melamine glycodendrimers were synthesized via a chemoenzymatic route and attached to human growth hormone and the Fc region of human IgG. These products represent a new class of engineered biosimilars bearing novel glycodendrimer structures.

  15. Regulating billions of blood platelets: glycans and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Grozovsky, Renata; Giannini, Silvia; Falet, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    The human body produces and removes 1011 platelets daily to maintain a normal steady state platelet count. Platelet production must be regulated to avoid spontaneous bleeding or arterial occlusion and organ damage. Multifaceted and complex mechanisms control platelet production and removal in physiological and pathological conditions. This review will focus on different mechanisms of platelet senescence and clearance with specific emphasis on the role of posttranslational modifications. It will also briefly address platelet transfusion and the role of glycans in the clearance of stored platelets. PMID:26330242

  16. Clinical implications of serum N-glycan profiling as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in germ-cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Narita, Takuma; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Yoneyama, Tohru; Narita, Shintaro; Yamashita, Shinichi; Mitsuzuka, Koji; Sakurai, Toshihiko; Kawamura, Sadafumi; Tochigi, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Tobisawa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Hayato; Koie, Takuya; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Habuchi, Tomonori; Arai, Yoichi; Ohyama, Chikara

    2017-03-20

    Serum biomarker monitoring is essential for management of germ-cell tumors (GCT). However, not all GCT are positive for conventional tumor markers. We examined whether serum N-glycan-based biomarkers can be applied for detection and prognosis in patients with GCT. We performed a comprehensive N-glycan structural analysis of sera from 54 untreated GCT patients and 103 age-adjusted healthy volunteers using glycoblotting methods and mass spectrometry. Candidate N-glycans were selected from those with the highest association; cutoff concentration values were established, and an N-glycan score was created based on the number of positive N-glycans present. The validity of this score for diagnosis and prognosis was analyzed using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. We identified five candidate N-glycans significantly associated with GCT patients. The accuracy of the N-glycan score for GCT was significant with an area-under-the-curve (AUC) value of 0.87. Diagnostically, the N-glycan score detected 10 of 12 (83%) patients with negative conventional tumor markers. Prognostically, the N-glycan score comprised four candidate N-glycans. The predictive value of the prognostic N-glycan score was significant, with an AUC value of 0.89. A high value prognostic N-glycan score was significantly associated with poor prognosis. Finally, to identify a potential carrier protein, immunoglobulin (Ig) fractions of sera were subjected to N-glycan analysis and compared to whole sera. Candidate N-glycans in Ig-fractions were significantly decreased; therefore, the carrier protein for candidate N-glycans is likely not an immunoglobulin. In summary, our newly developed N-glycan score seems to be a practical diagnostic and prognostic method for GCT.

  17. Substrate specificity of FUT8 and chemoenzymatic synthesis of core-fucosylated asymmetric N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Angie D; Liu, Yunpeng; Li, Xu; Wang, Xuan; Chen, Xi; Li, Lei; Wang, Peng G

    2016-04-26

    Substrate specificity studies of human FUT8 using 77 structurally-defined N-glycans as acceptors showed a strict requirement towards the α1,3-mannose branch, but a great promiscuity towards the α1,6-mannose branch. Accordingly, a chemoenzymatic strategy was developed for the efficient synthesis of core-fucosylated asymmetric N-glycans.

  18. Xylose Migration During Tandem Mass Spectrometry of N-Linked Glycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Elizabeth S.; Loziuk, Philip L.; Muddiman, David C.

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the rearrangement of gas-phase ions via tandem mass spectrometry is critical to improving manual and automated interpretation of complex datasets. N-glycan analysis may be carried out under collision induced (CID) or higher energy collision dissociation (HCD), which favors cleavage at the glycosidic bond. However, fucose migration has been observed in tandem MS, leading to the formation of new bonds over four saccharide units away. In the following work, we report the second instance of saccharide migration ever to occur for N-glycans. Using horseradish peroxidase as a standard, the beta-1,2 xylose was observed to migrate from a hexose to a glucosamine residue on the (Xyl)Man3GlcNac2 glycan. This investigation was followed up in a complex N-linked glycan mixture derived from stem differentiating xylem tissue, and the rearranged product ion was observed for 75% of the glycans. Rearrangement was not favored in isomeric glycans with a core or antennae fucose and unobserved in glycans predicted to have a permanent core-fucose modification. As the first empirical observation of this rearrangement, this work warrants dissemination so it may be searched in de novo sequencing glycan workflows.

  19. Glycan arrays containing synthetic Clostridium difficile lipoteichoic acid oligomers as tools toward a carbohydrate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christopher E; Broecker, Felix; Eller, Steffen; Oberli, Matthias A; Anish, Chakkumkal; Pereira, Claney L; Seeberger, Peter H

    2013-08-18

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of severe nosocomial infections. Cell-surface carbohydrate antigens are promising vaccine candidates. Here we report the first total synthesis of oligomers of the lipoteichoic acid antigen repeating unit. Synthetic glycan microarrays revealed anti-glycan antibodies in the blood of patients that help to define epitopes for vaccine development.

  20. Malonic acid suppresses mucin-type O-glycan degradation during hydrazine treatment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Goso, Yukinobu

    2016-03-01

    Hydrazine treatment is frequently used for releasing mucin-type O-glycans (O-glycans) from glycoproteins because the method provides O-glycans that retain a reducible GalNAc at their reducing end, which is available for fluorescent labeling. However, many O-glycans are degraded by "peeling" during this treatment. In the current study, it was found that malonic acid suppressed O-glycan degradation during hydrazine treatment of bovine fetuin or porcine gastric mucin in both the gas and liquid phases. This is paradoxical because the release of O-glycans from glycoproteins occurs under alkaline conditions. However, malonic acid seems to prevent the degradation through its acidic property given that other weak acids also prevented the degradation. Accordingly, disodium malonate did not suppress O-glycan degradation. Application of this method to rat gastric mucin demonstrated that the majority of the major O-glycans obtained in the presence of malonic acid were intact, whereas those obtained in the absence of malonic acid were degraded. These results suggest that hydrazine treatment in the presence of malonic acid would allow glycomic analysis of native mucin glycoproteins.

  1. Serum glycoprotein-derived N- and O-linked glycans as cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Ying; Hao, Cui; Zeng, Xuan; He, Yanli; Zeng, Pengjiao; Guo, Zhihua; Zhang, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of cancer is the key to improving survival. Since most clinically used serum cancer biomarkers are either glycoproteins or glycan structures that can be recognized by specific monoclonal antibodies, developing glycan structure-based biomarkers from human serum/plasma glycoproteins through mass spectrometry (MS) analysis are active research field during the past decades. Numerous studies have shown that changes in serum/plasma glycan structures occur during cancer initiation, progression, and treatment. This review describes N- and O-linked glycan structures identified from serum/plasma glycoprotein (s) by MS analysis with focus on alterations associated with different types of human cancers. The global changes in serum N- and O-linked glycan structures, especially the glycans that are not made by cancer cells such as B lymphocyte-derived IgG and liver-synthesized haptoglobin and α1 acid glycoprotein, suggest that glycans might be the long sought diagnostic biomarkers associated with system malfunction in the blood circulation of cancer patients. Therefore, N- and O-linked glycan structures have great potential to serve as cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment monitoring biomarkers to facilitate personalized medicine. PMID:27904760

  2. N-Linked glycans on dengue viruses grown in mammalian and insect cells

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Kari; White, Laura; de Silva, Aravinda M.

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the ability of mosquito and mammalian cell-derived dengue virus (DENV) to infect human dendritic cell-specific ICAM3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN)-expressing cells and characterized the structure of envelope (E) protein N-linked glycans on DENV derived from the two cell types. DENVs derived from both cell types were equally effective at infecting DC-SIGN-expressing human monocytes and dendritic cells. The N-linked glycans on mosquito cell-derived virus were a mix of high-mannose and paucimannose glycans. In virus derived from mammalian cells, the N-linked glycans were a mix of high-mannose and complex glycans. These results indicate that N-linked glycans are incompletely processed during DENV egress from cells, resulting in high-mannose glycans on viruses derived from both cell types. Studies with full-length and truncated E protein demonstrated that incomplete processing was most likely a result of the poor accessibility of glycans on the membrane-anchored protein. PMID:19494052

  3. Glycosylation with ribitol-phosphate in mammals: New insights into the O-mannosyl glycan.

    PubMed

    Manya, Hiroshi; Endo, Tamao

    2017-10-01

    O-mannosyl glycans have been found in a limited number of glycoproteins of the brain, nerves, and skeletal muscles, particularly in α-dystroglycan (α-DG). Defects in O-mannosyl glycan on α-DG are the primary cause of a group of congenital muscular dystrophies, which are collectively termed α-dystroglycanopathy. Recent studies have revealed various O-mannosyl glycan structures, which can be classified as core M1, core M2, and core M3 glycans. Although many dystroglycanopathy genes are involved in core M3 processing, the structure and biosynthesis of core M3 glycan remains only partially understood. This review presents recent findings about the structure, biosynthesis, and pathology of O-mannosyl glycans. Recent studies have revealed that the entire structure of core M3 glycan, including ribitol-5-phosphate, is a novel structure in mammals; its unique biosynthetic pathway has been elucidated by the identification of new causative genes for α-dystroglycanopathies and their functions. O-mannosyl glycan has a novel, unique structure that is important for the maintenance of brain and muscle functions. These findings have opened up a new field in glycoscience. These studies will further contribute to the understanding of the pathomechanism of α-dystroglycanopathy and the development of glycotherapeutics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neuro-glycoscience, edited by Kenji Kadomatsu and Hiroshi Kitagawa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultrasensitive detection of influenza viruses with a glycan-based impedimetric biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Hushegyi, András; Pihíková, Dominika; Bertók, Tomáš; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, René; Tkac, Jan

    2016-01-01

    An ultrasensitive impedimetric glycan-based biosensor for reliable and selective detection of inactivated, but intact influenza viruses H3N2 was developed. Such glycan-based approach has a distinct advantage over antibody-based detection of influenza viruses since glycans are natural viral receptors with a possibility to selectively distinguish between potentially pathogenic influenza subtypes by the glycan-based biosensors. Build-up of the biosensor was carefully optimized with atomic force microscopy applied for visualization of the biosensor surface after binding of viruses with the topology of an individual viral particle H3N2 analyzed. The glycan biosensor could detect a glycan binding lectin with a limit of detection (LOD) of 5 aM. The biosensor was finally applied for analysis of influenza viruses H3N2 with LOD of 13 viral particles in 1 μl, what is the lowest LOD for analysis of influenza viral particles by the glycan-based device achieved so far. The biosensor could detect H3N2 viruses selectively with a sensitivity ratio of 30 over influenza viruses H7N7. The impedimetric biosensor presented here is the most sensitive glycan-based device for detection of influenza viruses and among the most sensitive antibody or aptamer based biosensor devices. PMID:26765527

  5. Xylose Migration During Tandem Mass Spectrometry of N-Linked Glycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Elizabeth S.; Loziuk, Philip L.; Muddiman, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the rearrangement of gas-phase ions via tandem mass spectrometry is critical to improving manual and automated interpretation of complex datasets. N-glycan analysis may be carried out under collision induced (CID) or higher energy collision dissociation (HCD), which favors cleavage at the glycosidic bond. However, fucose migration has been observed in tandem MS, leading to the formation of new bonds over four saccharide units away. In the following work, we report the second instance of saccharide migration ever to occur for N-glycans. Using horseradish peroxidase as a standard, the beta-1,2 xylose was observed to migrate from a hexose to a glucosamine residue on the (Xyl)Man3GlcNac2 glycan. This investigation was followed up in a complex N-linked glycan mixture derived from stem differentiating xylem tissue, and the rearranged product ion was observed for 75% of the glycans. Rearrangement was not favored in isomeric glycans with a core or antennae fucose and unobserved in glycans predicted to have a permanent core-fucose modification. As the first empirical observation of this rearrangement, this work warrants dissemination so it may be searched in de novo sequencing glycan workflows.

  6. An update on pathobiologic roles of anti-glycan antibodies in Guillain-Barré syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gang

    2010-01-01

    Anti-glycan antibodies directed against gangliosides are now considered the major immune effectors that induce damage to intact nerve fibers in some variants of the monophasic neuropathic disorders that comprise Guillain-Barré syndrome. Recent experimental studies elucidating the complexity of anti-glycan antibody-mediated pathobiologic effects on intact and injured nerves undergoing repair are discussed. PMID:20948812

  7. Polysaccharide mimicry of the epitope of the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV antibody, 2G12, induces enhanced antibody responses to self oligomannose glycans

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, D Cameron; Bonomelli, Camille; Mansab, Fatma; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Doores, Katie J; Wormald, Mark R; Palma, Angelina S; Feizi, Ten; Harvey, David J; Dwek, Raymond A; Crispin, Max; Scanlan, Christopher N

    2010-01-01

    Immunologically, “self” carbohydrates protect the HIV-1 surface glycoprotein, gp120, from antibody recognition. However, one broadly neutralizing antibody, 2G12, neutralizes primary viral isolates by direct recognition of Manα1→2Man motifs formed by the host-derived oligomannose glycans of the viral envelope. Immunogens, capable of eliciting antibodies of similar specificity to 2G12, are therefore candidates for HIV/AIDS vaccine development. In this context, it is known that the yeast mannan polysaccharides exhibit significant antigenic mimicry with the glycans of HIV-1. Here, we report that modulation of yeast polysaccharide biosynthesis directly controls the molecular specificity of cross-reactive antibodies to self oligomannose glycans. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannans are typically terminated by α1→3-linked mannoses that cap a Manα1→2Man motif that otherwise closely resembles the part of the oligomannose epitope recognized by 2G12. Immunization with S. cerevisiae deficient for the α1→3 mannosyltransferase gene (ΔMnn1), but not with wild-type S. cerevisiae, reproducibly elicited antibodies to the self oligomannose glycans. Carbohydrate microarray analysis of ΔMnn1 immune sera revealed fine carbohydrate specificity to Manα1→2Man units, closely matching that of 2G12. These specificities were further corroborated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with chemically defined glycoforms of gp120. These antibodies exhibited remarkable similarity in the carbohydrate specificity to 2G12 and displayed statistically significant, albeit extremely weak, neutralization of HIV-1 compared to control immune sera. These data confirm the Manα1→2Man motif as the primary carbohydrate neutralization determinant of HIV-1 and show that the genetic modulation of microbial polysaccharides is a route towards immunogens capable of eliciting antibody responses to the glycans of HIV-1. PMID:20181792

  8. Differential expression of LacdiNAc, fucosylated LacdiNAc, and Lewis x glycan antigens in intramolluscan stages of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Nyame, A Kwame; Yoshino, Timothy P; Cummings, Richard D

    2002-10-01

    We report the expression of 3 well-characterized adult Schistosoma mansoni glycan antigens among molluscan stages of the parasite. These antigens are LacdiNAc (LDN; GalNAcbeta1-4GlcNAc-R), fucosylated LacdiNAc (LDNF; GalNAc[Fucal-3]beta1-4GlcNAc-R), and Lewis x (Le(x); Gal[Fucalpha1-3]beta1-4GlcNAc-R). The presence of the glycans was determined by both immunoblot and immunohistological methods using monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize each glycan epitope. Immunoblot analyses reveal that LDN and LDNF epitopes are expressed on many different glycoproteins, including eggs, mother sporocysts, daughter sporocysts, and cercariae, although LDN expression among daughter sporocysts is greatly reduced. LDN and LDNF epitopes are localized on the tegument and in the intrasporocyst cell masses of both in vitro-derived and in vivo-derived mother sporocysts and in the daughter sporocysts derived on day 16 after infection. Unexpectedly, high levels of LDN and LDNF glycans were detected in the infected, but not in the uninfected, snail hemolymph, suggesting that the infecting larvae secrete LDN and LDNF glycoconjugates into the snail hosts. In contrast, the expression of Le(x) antigen among the molluscan stages is highly restricted. Le(x) is present on a few high-molecular weight glycoproteins in eggs and cercariae but is undetectable in mother and daughter sporocysts. Taken together with our earlier studies on vertebrate stages of S. mansoni, these results show that LDN and LDNF glycans are conserved during schistosome development. The study further extends the evidence that Le(x) is a developmentally regulated antigen in schistosomes.

  9. Paper analytical devices for dynamic evaluation of cell surface N-glycan expression via a bimodal biosensor based on multibranched hybridization chain reaction amplification.

    PubMed

    Liang, Linlin; Lan, Feifei; Li, Li; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua; Ren, Na; Liu, Haiyun; Yan, Mei

    2016-12-15

    A novel colorimetric/fluorescence bimodal lab-on-paper cyto-device was fabricated based on concanavalin A (Con A)-integrating multibranched hybridization chain reaction (mHCR). The product of mHCR was modified PtCu nanochains (colorimetric signal label) and graphene quantum dot (fluorescence signal label) for in situ and dynamically evaluating cell surface N-glycan expression. In this strategy, preliminary detection was carried out through colorimetric method, if needed, then the fluorescence method was applied for a precise determination. Au-Ag-paper devices increased the surface areas and active sites for immobilizing larger amount of aptamers, and then specifically and efficiently captured more cancer cells. Moreover, it could effectively reduce the paper background fluorescence. Due to the specific recognition of Con A with mannose and the effective signal amplification of mHCR, the proposed strategy exhibited excellent high sensitivity for the cytosensing of MCF-7 cells ranging from 100 to 1.0×10(7) and 80-5.0×10(7) cellsmL(-1) with the detection limit of 33 and 26 cellsmL(-1) for colorimetric and fluorescence, respectively. More importantly, this strategy was successfully applied to dynamically monitor cell-surface multi-glycans expression on living cells under external stimuli of inhibitors as well as for N-glycan expression inhibitor screening. These results implied that this biosensor has potential in studying complex native glycan-related biological processes and elucidating the N-glycan-related diseases in biological and physiological processes.

  10. Direct imaging of glycans in Arabidopsis roots via click labeling of metabolically incorporated azido-monosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hoogenboom, Jorin; Berghuis, Nathalja; Cramer, Dario; Geurts, Rene; Zuilhof, Han; Wennekes, Tom

    2016-10-10

    Carbohydrates, also called glycans, play a crucial but not fully understood role in plant health and development. The non-template driven formation of glycans makes it impossible to image them in vivo with genetically encoded fluorescent tags and related molecular biology approaches. A solution to this problem is the use of tailor-made glycan analogs that are metabolically incorporated by the plant into its glycans. These metabolically incorporated probes can be visualized, but techniques documented so far use toxic copper-catalyzed labeling. To further expand our knowledge of plant glycobiology by direct imaging of its glycans via this method, there is need for novel click-compatible glycan analogs for plants that can be bioorthogonally labelled via copper-free techniques. Arabidopsis seedlings were incubated with azido-containing monosaccharide analogs of N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, L-fucose, and L-arabinofuranose. These azido-monosaccharides were metabolically incorporated in plant cell wall glycans of Arabidopsis seedlings. Control experiments indicated active metabolic incorporation of the azido-monosaccharide analogs into glycans rather than through non-specific absorption of the glycan analogs onto the plant cell wall. Successful copper-free labeling reactions were performed, namely an inverse-electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction using an incorporated N-acetylglucosamine analog, and a strain-promoted azide-alkyne click reaction. All evaluated azido-monosaccharide analogs were observed to be non-toxic at the used concentrations under normal growth conditions. Our results for the metabolic incorporation and fluorescent labeling of these azido-monosaccharide analogs expand the possibilities for studying plant glycans by direct imaging. Overall we successfully evaluated five azido-monosaccharide analogs for their ability to be metabolically incorporated in Arabidopsis roots and their imaging after fluorescent labeling. This expands

  11. Benchmark Study of Automatic Annotation of MALDI-TOF N-Glycan Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Alejandro E.; Kletter, Doron; Singhal, Mudita; Bern, Marshall

    2015-01-01

    Human experts can annotate peaks in MALDI-TOF profiles of detached N-glycans with some degree of accuracy. Even though MALDI-TOF profiles give only intact masses without any fragmentation information, expert knowledge of the most common glycans and biosynthetic pathways in the biological system can point to a small set of most likely glycan structures at the “cartoon” level of detail. Cartoonist is a recently developed, fully automatic annotation tool for MALDI-TOF glycan profiles. Here we benchmark Cartoonist’s automatic annotations against human expert annotations on human and mouse N-glycan data from the Consortium for Functional Glycomics. We find that Cartoonist and expert annotations largely agree, but the expert tends to annotate more specifically, meaning fewer suggested structures per peak, and Cartoonist more comprehensively, meaning more annotated peaks. On peaks for which both Cartoonist and the expert give unique cartoons, the two cartoons agree in over 90% of all cases. PMID:26047718

  12. A Potent and Broad Neutralizing Antibody Recognizes and Penetrates the HIV Glycan Shield

    SciTech Connect

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J.; Walker, Laura M.; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C.; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P.; Olson, William C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-10-15

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 and 128 with Man{sub 9} at 1.65 and 1.29 angstrom resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose-binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 angstroms reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short {beta}-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificify. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 immunoglobulin Gs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface.

  13. A potent and broad neutralizing antibody recognizes and penetrates the HIV glycan shield.

    PubMed

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J; Walker, Laura M; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P; Olson, William C; Ward, Andrew B; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R; Burton, Dennis R; Wilson, Ian A

    2011-11-25

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 and 128 with Man(9) at 1.65 and 1.29 angstrom resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose-binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 angstroms reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short β-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificity. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 immunoglobulin Gs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface.

  14. A potent and broad neutralizing antibody recognizes and penetrates the HIV glycan shield

    PubMed Central

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J.; Walker, Laura M.; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C.; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P.; Olson, William C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of Fabs PGT 127 and 128 with Man9 at 1.65 and 1.29 Å resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully-glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 Å reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short β-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificify. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 IgGs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface. PMID:21998254

  15. Ligand identification of carbohydrate-binding proteins employing a biotinylated glycan binding assay and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wuhrer, Manfred; van Remoortere, Alexandra; Balog, Crina I A; Deelder, André M; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2010-11-15

    Characterization of protein-carbohydrate interactions at the molecular level is important for understanding many glycan-mediated processes. Here we present a method for the identification of glycan ligands of carbohydrate-binding proteins. The glycans released from natural sources are labeled with biotinamidocaproyl hydrazide (BACH) and subsequently fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Glycan fractions are screened for binding to carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBPs) using a microtitration plate binding assay; CBPs are immobilized, BACH-glycan fractions are added, and bound BACH-glycans are detected using alkaline phosphatase-conjugated streptavidin. The glycan structures in binding fractions are studied by (tandem) mass spectrometry, exoglycosidase treatment, and rechromatography, thereby revealing the glycan motifs recognized by the CBPs. Subsequent surface plasmon resonance experiments using a reverse setup with immobilization of the BACH-glycan ligands on streptavidin-coated surfaces provide more information on glycan-CBP interactions via association and dissociation curves. The presented method is easy and fast, and the required instrumentation is available in many laboratories. The assay is very sensitive given that both the mass spectrometric analysis and the microtitration plate binding assay can be performed on femtomole amounts of BACH-glycans. This approach should be generally applicable to study and structurally identify carbohydrate ligands of anti-glycan antibodies and lectins.

  16. N-acetylgalactosamine glycans function in cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells: A role for truncated O-glycans in metastatic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bapu, Deepashree; Runions, John; Kadhim, Munira; Brooks, Susan Ann

    2016-06-01

    Failure in O-glycan chain extension exposing Tn antigen (GalNAc-O-Ser/Thr) is clinically associated with cancer metastasis. This study provides evidence of a functional role for aberrant GalNAc-glycans in cancer cell capture from blood flow and/or adhesion to endothelium. Adhesion of breast cancer cells to human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers was modelled under sweeping flow. Adhesion of metastatic, GalNAc glycan-rich, MCF7 and ZR 75 1 cells to endothelium increased over timepoints up to 1.5 hour, after which it plateaued. Adhesion was significantly inhibited (p < 0.001) when cell surface GalNAc-glycans were masked, an effect not seen in GalNAc glycan-poor, non-metastatic BT 474 cells. Masking irrelevant galactose- and mannose-glycans had no inhibitory effect. Imaging of cells post-adhesion over a 24 hour time course using confocal and scanning electron microscopy revealed that up to 6 hours post-adhesion, motile, rounded cancer cells featuring lamellipodia-like processes crawled on an intact endothelial monolayer. From 6-12 hours post-adhesion, cancer cells became stationary, adopted a smooth, circular flattened morphology, and endothelial cells retracted from around them leaving cleared zones in which the cancer cells proceeded to form colonies through cell division.

  17. Regulation of eosinophilia and allergic airway inflammation by the glycan-binding protein galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiao Na; Ha, Sung Gil; Greenberg, Yana G; Rao, Amrita; Bastan, Idil; Blidner, Ada G; Rao, Savita P; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Sriramarao, P

    2016-08-16

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1), a glycan-binding protein with broad antiinflammatory activities, functions as a proresolving mediator in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders. However, its role in allergic airway inflammation has not yet been elucidated. We evaluated the effects of Gal-1 on eosinophil function and its role in a mouse model of allergic asthma. Allergen exposure resulted in airway recruitment of Gal-1-expressing inflammatory cells, including eosinophils, as well as increased Gal-1 in extracellular spaces in the lungs. In vitro, extracellular Gal-1 exerted divergent effects on eosinophils that were N-glycan- and dose-dependent. At concentrations ≤0.25 µM, Gal-1 increased eosinophil adhesion to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, caused redistribution of integrin CD49d to the periphery and cell clustering, but inhibited ERK(1/2) activation and eotaxin-1-induced migration. Exposure to concentrations ≥1 µM resulted in ERK(1/2)-dependent apoptosis and disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton. At lower concentrations, Gal-1 did not alter expression of adhesion molecules (CD49d, CD18, CD11a, CD11b, L-selectin) or of the chemokine receptor CCR3, but decreased CD49d and CCR3 was observed in eosinophils treated with higher concentrations of this lectin. In vivo, allergen-challenged Gal-1-deficient mice exhibited increased recruitment of eosinophils and CD3(+) T lymphocytes in the airways as well as elevated peripheral blood and bone marrow eosinophils relative to corresponding WT mice. Further, these mice had an increased propensity to develop airway hyperresponsiveness and displayed significantly elevated levels of TNF-α in lung tissue. This study suggests that Gal-1 can limit eosinophil recruitment to allergic airways and suppresses airway inflammation by inhibiting cell migration and promoting eosinophil apoptosis.

  18. The multiple roles of epidermal growth factor repeat O-glycans in animal development

    PubMed Central

    Haltom, Amanda R; Jafar-Nejad, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeat is a common, evolutionarily conserved motif found in secreted proteins and the extracellular domain of transmembrane proteins. EGF repeats harbor six cysteine residues which form three disulfide bonds and help generate the three-dimensional structure of the EGF repeat. A subset of EGF repeats harbor consensus sequences for the addition of one or more specific O-glycans, which are initiated by O-glucose, O-fucose or O-N-acetylglucosamine. These glycans are relatively rare compared to mucin-type O-glycans. However, genetic experiments in model organisms and cell-based assays indicate that at least some of the glycosyltransferases involved in the addition of O-glycans to EGF repeats play important roles in animal development. These studies, combined with state-of-the-art biochemical and structural biology experiments have started to provide an in-depth picture of how these glycans regulate the function of the proteins to which they are linked. In this review, we will discuss the biological roles assigned to EGF repeat O-glycans and the corresponding glycosyltransferases. Since Notch receptors are the best studied proteins with biologically-relevant O-glycans on EGF repeats, a significant part of this review is devoted to the role of these glycans in the regulation of the Notch signaling pathway. We also discuss recently identified proteins other than Notch which depend on EGF repeat glycans to function properly. Several glycosyltransferases involved in the addition or elongation of O-glycans on EGF repeats are mutated in human diseases. Therefore, mechanistic understanding of the functional roles of these carbohydrate modifications is of interest from both basic science and translational perspectives. PMID:26175457

  19. Human antibody response to N-glycans present on plant-made influenza virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ward, Brian J; Landry, Nathalie; Trépanier, Sonia; Mercier, Geneviève; Dargis, Michèle; Couture, Manon; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Vézina, Louis-P

    2014-10-21

    Plant-made biotherapeutics are gathering momentum and some plant glycoproteins are allergens. Glycans with core β1-2xylose and α1,3fucose motifs and antennae terminated by mannose residues (e.g.: MMXF) are found on several plant allergens and can cross-react with glyco-epitopes from other sources. To date, reactivity to these cross-reactive determinants has not been associated with clinical symptoms. We produced VLP vaccines bearing the hemagglutinin(HA) of H5(A/Indonesia/5/05) or H1(A/California/07/09) influenza viruses by transfection of Nicotiana benthamiana. Subjects enrolled in Phase I/II trials were followed for evidence of allergy/hypersensitivity and development of antibodies against plant glyco-epitopes. A total of 280/349 subjects received either one (H1) or 2 doses (H5) of vaccine (5-45 μg of HA/dose) intramuscularly including 40 with pre-existing plant allergies. Subjects were monitored for 6 months. IgG and IgE to plant glyco-epitopes were measured by ELISA using corn-/egg-derived avidin and bromelain as target antigens. No subject developed allergic/hypersensitivity symptoms. Some (34%) developed transient IgG and, in some cases IgE, to plant glyco-epitopes but no subject mounted an IgE response to the MMXF motif. Antibodies returned to baseline by 6 months in most subjects. VLP vaccines bearing influenza HA glycoproteins can elicit transient IgG and, in some cases, IgE responses that are not associated with either the development or worsening of allergic/hypersensitivity symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Glycoproteomic probes for fluorescent imaging of fucosylated glycans in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sawa, Masaaki; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Itoh, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Hanson, Sarah R.; Vogt, Peter K.; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2006-01-01

    Glycomics is emerging as a new field for the biology of complex glycoproteins and glycoconjugates. The lack of versatile glycan-labeling methods has presented a major obstacle to visualizing at the cellular level and studying glycoconjugates. To address this issue, we developed a fluorescent labeling technique based on the Cu(I)-catalyzed [3 + 2] cycloaddition, or click chemistry, which allows rapid, versatile, and specific covalent labeling of cellular glycans bearing azide groups. The method entails generating a fluorescent probe from a nonfluorescent precursor, 4-ethynyl-N-ethyl-1,8-naphthalimide, by clicking the fluorescent trigger, the alkyne at the 4 position, with an azido-modified sugar. Using this click-activated fluorescent probe, we demonstrate incorporation of an azido-containing fucose analog into glycoproteins via the fucose salvage pathway. Distinct fluorescent signals were observed by flow cytometry when cells treated with 6-azidofucose were labeled with the click-activated fluorogenic probe or biotinylated alkyne. The intracellular localization of fucosylated glycoconjugates was visualized by using fluorescence microscopy. This technique will allow dynamic imaging of cellular fucosylation and facilitate studies of fucosylated glycoproteins and glycolipids. PMID:16895981

  1. Identification of a Conserved Glycan Signature for Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Bianca S.; Eng, William S.; Pilobello, Kanoelani T.; Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D.; Mahal, Lara K.

    2011-01-01

    Microvesicles (exosomes) are important mediators of intercellular communication, playing a role in immune regulation, cancer progression and the spread of infectious agents. The biological functions of these small vesicles are dependent upon their composition, which is regulated by mechanisms that are not well understood. Although numerous proteomic studies of these particles exist, little is known about their glycosylation. Carbohydrates are involved in protein trafficking and cellular recognition. Glycomic analysis may thus provide valuable insights into microvesicle biology. In this study, we analyzed glycosylation patterns of microvesicles derived from a variety of biological sources using lectin microarray technology. Comparison of the microvesicle glycomes with their parent cell membranes revealed both enrichment and depletion of specific glycan epitopes in these particles. These include enrichment in high mannose, polylactosamine, α-2,6 sialic acid, and complex N-linked glycans and exclusion of terminal blood group A and B antigens. The polylactosamine signature derives from distinct glycoprotein cohorts in microvesicles of different origins. Taken together our data point to the emergence of microvesicles from a specific membrane microdomain, implying a role for glycosylation in microvesicle protein sorting. PMID:21859146

  2. Glycan microarray analysis of Candida glabrata adhesin ligand specificity.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Margaret L; Frieman, Matthew; Smith, David; Alvarez, Richard A; Cummings, Richard D; Cormack, Brendan P

    2008-05-01

    The Candida glabrata genome encodes at least 23 members of the EPA (epithelial adhesin) family responsible for mediating adherence to host cells. To better understand the mechanism by which the Epa proteins contribute to pathogenesis, we have used glycan microarray analysis to characterize their carbohydrate-binding specificities. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains surface-expressing the N-terminal ligand-binding domain of the Epa proteins, we found that the three Epa family members functionally identified as adhesins in Candida glabrata (Epa1, Epa6 and Epa7) bind to ligands containing a terminal galactose residue. However, the specificity of the three proteins for glycans within this class varies, with Epa6 having a broader specificity range than Epa1 or Epa7. This result is intriguing given the close homology between Epa6 and Epa7, which are 92% identical at the amino acid level. We have mapped a five-amino-acid region within the N-terminal ligand-binding domain that accounts for the difference in specificity of Epa6 and Epa7 and show that these residues contribute to adherence to both epithelial and endothelial cell lines in vitro.

  3. Fucosylated Glycans in α1-Acid Glycoprotein for Monitoring Treatment Outcomes and Prognosis of Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Shin; Takahashi, Ryo; Yokobori, Takehiko; Sano, Rie; Mogi, Akira; Saniabadi, Abby R.; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Asao, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    One standard treatment option for advanced-stage cancer is surgical resection of malignant tumors following by adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Additionally, neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be applied if required. During the time course of treatments, patients are generally followed by computed tomography (CT) surveillance, and by tumor marker diagnosis. However, currently, early evidence of recurrence and/or metastasis of tumors with a clinically relevant biomarker remains a major therapeutic challenge. In particular, there has been no validated biomarker for predicting treatment outcomes in therapeutic settings. Recently, we have looked at glycoforms of serum α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) by using a crossed affinoimmunoelectrophoresis with two lectins and an anti-AGP antibody. The primary glycan structures of AGP were also analyzed by a mass spectrometer and a novel software in a large number of patients with various cancers. Accordingly, the relative abundance of α1,3fucosylated glycans in AGP (FUCAGP) was found to be significantly high in cancer patients as compared with the healthy controls. Further, strikingly elevated levels of FUCAGP were found in patients with poor prognosis but not in patients with good prognosis. In the current study, levels of FUCAGP in serum samples from various cancer patients were analyzed and 17 patients including 13 who had undergone chemotherapy were followed for several years post operation. FUCAGP level determined diligently by using a mass spectrometer was found to change along with disease prognosis as well as with responses to treatments, in particular, to various chemotherapies. Therefore, FUCAGP levels measured during following-up of the patients after operation appeared to be clinically relevant biomarker of treatment intervention. PMID:27295180

  4. Rational Design of a New Trypanosoma rangeli Trans-Sialidase for Efficient Sialylation of Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Jers, Carsten; Michalak, Malwina; Larsen, Dorte M.; Kepp, Kasper P.; Li, Haiying; Guo, Yao; Kirpekar, Finn; Meyer, Anne S.; Mikkelsen, Jørn D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports rational engineering of Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase to develop an effective enzyme for a potentially important type of reactivity: production of sialylated prebiotic glycans. The Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase and the homologous T. rangeli sialidase has previously been used to investigate the structural requirements for trans-sialidase activity. We observed that the T. cruzi trans-sialidase has a seven-amino-acid motif (197–203) at the border of the substrate binding cleft. The motif differs substantially in chemical properties and substitution probability from the homologous sialidase, and we hypothesised that this motif is important for trans-sialidase activity. The 197–203 motif is strongly positively charged with a marked change in hydrogen bond donor capacity as compared to the sialidase. To investigate the role of this motif, we expressed and characterised a T. rangeli sialidase mutant, Tr13. Conditions for efficient trans-sialylation were determined, and Tr13's acceptor specificity demonstrated promiscuity with respect to the acceptor molecule enabling sialylation of glycans containing terminal galactose and glucose and even monomers of glucose and fucose. Sialic acid is important in association with human milk oligosaccharides, and Tr13 was shown to sialylate a number of established and potential prebiotics. Initial evaluation of prebiotic potential using pure cultures demonstrated, albeit not selectively, growth of Bifidobacteria. Since the 197–203 motif stands out in the native trans-sialidase, is markedly different from the wild-type sialidase compared to previous mutants, and is shown here to confer efficient and broad trans-sialidase activity, we suggest that this motif can serve as a framework for future optimization of trans-sialylation towards prebiotic production. PMID:24404142

  5. Embryos generated from oocytes lacking complex N- and O-glycans have compromised development and implantation

    PubMed Central

    Grasa, Patricia; Kaune, Heidy; Williams, Suzannah A

    2012-01-01

    Female mice generating oocytes lacking complex N- and O-glycans (double mutants (DM)) produce only one small litter before undergoing premature ovarian failure (POF) by 3 months. Here we investigate the basis of the small litter by evaluating ovulation rate and embryo development in DM (Mgat1F/FC1galt1F/F:ZP3Cre) and Control (Mgat1F/FC1galt1F/F) females. Surprisingly, DM ovulation rate was normal at 6 weeks, but declined dramatically by 9 weeks. In vitro development of zygotes to blastocysts was equivalent to Controls although all embryos from DM females lacked a normal zona pellucida (ZP) and ∼30% lacked a ZP entirely. In contrast, in vivo preimplantation development resulted in less embryos recovered from DM females compared with Controls at 3.5 days post coitum (dpc) (3.2±1.3 vs 7.0±0.6). Furthermore, only 45% of mated DM females contained embryos at 3.5 dpc. Of the preimplantation embryos collected from DM females, approximately half were morulae unlike Controls where the majority were blastocysts, indicating delayed embryo development in DM females. Post-implantation development in DM females was analysed to determine whether delayed preimplantation development affected subsequent development. In DM females at 5.5 dpc, only ∼40% of embryos found at 3.5 dpc had implanted. However, at 6.5 dpc, implantation sites in DM females corresponded to embryo numbers at 3.5 dpc indicating delayed implantation. At 9.5 dpc, the number of decidua corresponded to embryo numbers 6 days earlier indicating that all implanted embryos progress to midgestation. Therefore, a lack of complex N- and O-glycans in oocytes during development impairs early embryo development and viability in vivo leading to delayed implantation and a small litter. PMID:22919046

  6. Rational design of a new Trypanosoma rangeli trans-sialidase for efficient sialylation of glycans.

    PubMed

    Jers, Carsten; Michalak, Malwina; Larsen, Dorte M; Kepp, Kasper P; Li, Haiying; Guo, Yao; Kirpekar, Finn; Meyer, Anne S; Mikkelsen, Jørn D

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports rational engineering of Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase to develop an effective enzyme for a potentially important type of reactivity: production of sialylated prebiotic glycans. The Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase and the homologous T. rangeli sialidase has previously been used to investigate the structural requirements for trans-sialidase activity. We observed that the T. cruzi trans-sialidase has a seven-amino-acid motif (197-203) at the border of the substrate binding cleft. The motif differs substantially in chemical properties and substitution probability from the homologous sialidase, and we hypothesised that this motif is important for trans-sialidase activity. The 197-203 motif is strongly positively charged with a marked change in hydrogen bond donor capacity as compared to the sialidase. To investigate the role of this motif, we expressed and characterised a T. rangeli sialidase mutant, Tr13. Conditions for efficient trans-sialylation were determined, and Tr13's acceptor specificity demonstrated promiscuity with respect to the acceptor molecule enabling sialylation of glycans containing terminal galactose and glucose and even monomers of glucose and fucose. Sialic acid is important in association with human milk oligosaccharides, and Tr13 was shown to sialylate a number of established and potential prebiotics. Initial evaluation of prebiotic potential using pure cultures demonstrated, albeit not selectively, growth of Bifidobacteria. Since the 197-203 motif stands out in the native trans-sialidase, is markedly different from the wild-type sialidase compared to previous mutants, and is shown here to confer efficient and broad trans-sialidase activity, we suggest that this motif can serve as a framework for future optimization of trans-sialylation towards prebiotic production.

  7. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry of complex carbohydrates: collision cross sections of sodiated N-linked glycans.

    PubMed

    Pagel, Kevin; Harvey, David J

    2013-05-21

    Currently, the vast majority of complex carbohydrates are characterized using mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques. Measuring the molecular mass of a sugar, however, immediately poses a fundamental problem: entire classes of the constituting monosaccharide building blocks exhibit an identical atomic composition and, consequently, also an identical mass. Therefore, carbohydrate MS data can be highly ambiguous and often it is simply not possible to clearly assign a particular molecular structure. A promising approach to overcome the above-mentioned limitation is to implement an additional gas-phase separation dimension using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), which is a method in which molecules of identical mass and structure but different structure can be separated according to their shape and collision cross section (CCS). With the emergence of commercially available hybrid ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) instruments in 2006, IMS technology became readily available. Because of the nonhomogeneous, traveling wave (TW) field utilized in these instruments, however, CCS values currently cannot be determined directly from the drift times measured. Instead, an external calibration using compounds of known CCS and similar molecular identity is required. Here, we report a calibration protocol for TW IMS instruments using a series of sodiated N-glycans that were released from commercially available glycoproteins using an easy-to-follow protocol. The underlying CCS values were determined using a modified Synapt HDMS instrument with a linear drift tube, which was described in detail previously. Our data indicate that, under in-source fragmentation conditions, only a few glycans are required to obtain a TW IMS calibration of sufficient quality. In this context, however, the type of glycan was shown to be of tremendous importance. Furthermore, our data clearly demonstrate that carbohydrate isomers with identical mass but different conformation can be distinguished based

  8. Structural diversity and specific distribution of O-glycans in normal human mucins along the intestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Purified human mucins from different parts of the intestinal tract (ileum, cecum, transverse and sigmoid colon and rectum) were isolated from two individuals with blood group ALeb (A-Lewisb). After alkaline borohydride treatment the released oligosaccharides were structurally characterized by nano-ESI Q-TOF MS/MS (electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem MS) without prior fractionation or derivatization. More than 100 different oligosaccharides, with up to ten monosaccharide residues, were identified using this technique. Oligosaccharides based on core 3 structures, GlcNAc(β1-3)GalNAc (where GlcNAc is N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and GalNAc is N-acetylgalactosamine), were widely distributed in human intestinal mucins. Core 5 structures, GalNAc(α1-3)GalNAc, were also recovered in all fractions. Moreover, a comparison of the oligosaccharide repertoire, with respect to size, diversity and expression of glycans and terminal epitopes, showed a high level of mucin-specific glycosylation: highly fucosylated glycans, found specifically in the small intestine, were mainly based on core 4 structures, GlcNAc-(β1-3)[GlcNAc(β1-6)]GalNAc, whereas the sulpho-LeX determinant carrying core 2 glycans, Gal(β1-3)[GlcNAc(β1-6)]-GalNAc (where Gal is galactose), was recovered mainly in the distal colon. Blood group H and A antigenic determinants were present exclusively in the ileum and cecum, whereas blood group Sda/Cad related epitopes, GalNAc(β1-4)[NeuAc(α2-3)]Gal (where NeuAc is N-acetylneuraminate), were found to increase along the length of the colon. Our findings suggest that mucins create an enormous repertoire of potential binding sites for micro-organisms that could explain the regio-specific colonization of bacteria in the human intestinal tract. PMID:15361072

  9. Electrostatics and N-glycan-mediated membrane tethering of SCUBE1 is critical for promoting bone morphogenetic protein signalling.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei-Ju; Tsao, Ku-Chi; Yang, Ruey-Bing

    2016-03-01

    SCUBE1 (S1), a secreted and membrane-bound glycoprotein, has a modular protein structure composed of an N-terminal signal peptide sequence followed by nine epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats, a spacer region and three cysteine-rich (CR) motifs with multiple potential N-linked glycosylation sites, and one CUB domain at the C-terminus. Soluble S1 is a biomarker of platelet activation but an active participant of thrombosis via its adhesive EGF-like repeats, whereas its membrane-associated form acts as a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) co-receptor in promoting BMP signal activity. However, the mechanism responsible for the membrane tethering and the biological importance of N-glycosylation of S1 remain largely unknown. In the present study, molecular mapping analysis identified a polycationic segment (amino acids 501-550) in the spacer region required for its membrane tethering via electrostatic interactions possibly with the anionic heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Furthermore, deglycosylation by peptide N-glycosidase F treatment revealed that N-glycans within the CR motif are essential for membrane recruitment through lectin-mediated surface retention. Injection of mRNA encoding zebrafish wild-type but not N-glycan-deficient scube1 restores the expression of haematopoietic and erythroid markers (scl and gata1) in scube1-knockdown embryos. We describe novel mechanisms in targeting S1 to the plasma membrane and demonstrate that N-glycans are required for S1 functions during primitive haematopoiesis in zebrafish. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  10. Functional Glycomic Analysis of Human Milk Glycans Reveals the Presence of Virus Receptors and Embryonic Stem Cell Biomarkers*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Mishra, Shreya; Song, Xuezheng; Lasanajak, Yi; Bradley, Konrad C.; Tappert, Mary M.; Air, Gillian M.; Steinhauer, David A.; Halder, Sujata; Cotmore, Susan; Tattersall, Peter; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2012-01-01

    Human milk contains a large diversity of free glycans beyond lactose, but their functions are not well understood. To explore their functional recognition, here we describe a shotgun glycan microarray prepared from isolated human milk glycans (HMGs), and our studies on their recognition by viruses, antibodies, and glycan-binding proteins (GBPs), including lectins. The total neutral and sialylated HMGs were derivatized with a bifunctional fluorescent tag, separated by multidimensional HPLC, and archived in a tagged glycan library, which was then used to print a shotgun glycan microarray (SGM). This SGM was first interrogated with well defined GBPs and antibodies. These data demonstrated both the utility of the array and provided preliminary structural information (metadata) about this complex glycome. Anti-TRA-1 antibodies that recognize human pluripotent stem cells specifically recognized several HMGs that were then further structurally defined as novel epitopes for these antibodies. Human influenza viruses and Parvovirus Minute Viruses of Mice also specifically recognized several HMGs. For glycan sequencing, we used a novel approach termed metadata-assisted glycan sequencing (MAGS), in which we combine information from analyses of glycans by mass spectrometry with glycan interactions with defined GBPs and antibodies before and after exoglycosidase treatments on the microarray. Together, these results provide novel insights into diverse recognition functions of HMGs and show the utility of the SGM approach and MAGS as resources for defining novel glycan recognition by GBPs, antibodies, and pathogens. PMID:23115247

  11. Introducing N-glycans into natural products through a chemoenzymatic approach**

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Ochiai, Hirofumi; Zhang, Xinyu; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2008-01-01

    The present study describes an efficient chemoenzymatic method for introducing a core N-glycan of glycoprotein origin into various lipophilic natural products. It was found that the endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Arthrobactor protophormiae (Endo-A) had broad substrate specificity and can accommodate a wide range of glucose (Glc)- or N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-containing natural products as acceptors for transglycosylation, when an N-glycan oxazoline was used as a donor substrate. Using lithocholic acid as a model compound, we have shown that introduction of an N-glycan could be achieved by a two-step approach: chemical glycosylation to introduce a monosaccharide (Glc or GlcNAc) as a handle, and then Endo-A catalyzed transglycosylation to accomplish the site-specific N-glycan attachment. For those natural products that already carry terminal Glc or GlcNAc residues, direct enzymatic transglycosylation using sugar oxazoline as the donor substrate was achievable to introduce an N-glycan. It was also demonstrated that simultaneous double glycosylation could be fulfilled when the natural product contains two Glc residues. This chemoenzymatic method is concise, site-specific, and highly convergent. Because N-glycans of glycoprotein origin can serve as ligands for diverse lectins and cell-surface receptors, introduction of a defined N-glycan into biologically significant natural products may bestow novel properties onto these natural products for drug discovery and development. PMID:18805520

  12. ANALYSIS OF GLYCANS DERIVED FROM GLYCOCONJUGATES BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Mechref, Yehia

    2012-01-01

    The high structural variation of glycan derived from glycoconjugates, which substantially increases with the molecular size of a protein, contributes to the complexity of glycosylation patterns commonly associated with glycoconjugates. In the case of glycoproteins, such variation originates from the multiple glycosylation sites of proteins and the number of glycan structures associated with each site (microheterogeneity). The ability to comprehensively characterize highly complex mixture of glycans has been analytically stimulating and challenging. Although the most powerful mass spectrometric (MS) and tandem MS techniques are capable of providing a wealth of structural information, they are still not able to readily identify isomeric glycan structures without high order tandem MS (MSn). The analysis of isomeric glycan structures has been attained using several separation methods, including high-pH anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC), hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and gas chromatography (GC). However, capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microfluidics capillary electrophoresis (MCE) offer high separation efficiency and resolutions, allowing the separation of closely related glycan structures. Therefore, interfacing CE and MCE to MS is a powerful analytical approach, allowing potentially comprehensive and sensitive analysis of complex glycan samples. This review describes and discusses the utility of different CE and MCE approaches in the structural characterization of glycoproteins and the feasibility of interfacing these approaches to mass spectrometry. PMID:22180203

  13. Presence of galactosylated core fucose on N-glycans in the planaria Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Wilson, Iain B H

    2011-06-01

    Planarial species are of especial interest to biologists due to the phenomenon of pluripotency and, in comparison to other developmental processes, it can be hypothesised that glycan-lectin interactions may play a role. In order to examine the N-glycans of one of these organisms, Dugesia japonica, peptide:N-glycosidase A was employed and the released glycans were subject to pyridylamination, HPLC and mass spectrometric analysis. A range of oligomannosidic glycans was observed with a trimethylated Man(5) GlcNAc(2) structure being the dominant species. Three glycans were also observed to contain deoxyhexose; in particular, a glycan with the composition Hex(4) HexNAc(2) Fuc(1) Me(2) was revealed by exoglycosidase digestion, in combination with MS/MS, to contain a galactosylated core α1,6-fucose residue, whereas this core modification was found to be capped with a methylhexose residue in the case of a Hex(5) HexNAc(2) Fuc(1) Me(3) structure. This is the first report of these types of structures in a platyhelminth and indicates that the 'GalFuc' modification of N-glycans is not just restricted to molluscs and nematodes.

  14. Glycomics: an integrated systems approach to structure-function relationships of glycans.

    PubMed

    Raman, Rahul; Raguram, S; Venkataraman, Ganesh; Paulson, James C; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2005-11-01

    In comparison with genomics and proteomics, the advancement of glycomics has faced unique challenges in the pursuit of developing analytical and biochemical tools and biological readouts to investigate glycan structure-function relationships. Glycans are more diverse in terms of chemical structure and information density than are DNA and proteins. This diversity arises from glycans' complex nontemplate-based biosynthesis, which involves several enzymes and isoforms of these enzymes. Consequently, glycans are expressed as an 'ensemble' of structures that mediate function. Moreover, unlike protein-protein interactions, which can be generally viewed as 'digital' in regulating function, glycan-protein interactions impinge on biological functions in a more 'analog' fashion that can in turn 'fine-tune' a biological response. This fine-tuning by glycans is achieved through the graded affinity, avidity and multivalency of their interactions. Given the importance of glycomics, this review focuses on areas of technologies and the importance of developing a bioinformatics platform to integrate the diverse datasets generated using the different technologies to allow a systems approach to glycan structure-function relationships.

  15. Immunization with Outer Membrane Vesicles Displaying Designer Glycotopes Yields Class-Switched, Glycan-Specific Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Jenny L; Chen, Linxiao; Perregaux, Emily C; Weyant, Kevin B; Rosenthal, Joseph A; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Fisher, Adam C; Putnam, David; Moe, Gregory R; Merritt, Judith H; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2016-06-23

    The development of antibodies against specific glycan epitopes poses a significant challenge due to difficulties obtaining desired glycans at sufficient quantity and purity, and the fact that glycans are usually weakly immunogenic. To address this challenge, we leveraged the potent immunostimulatory activity of bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) to deliver designer glycan epitopes to the immune system. This approach involved heterologous expression of two clinically important glycans, namely polysialic acid (PSA) and Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (T antigen) in hypervesiculating strains of non-pathogenic Escherichia coli. The resulting glycOMVs displayed structural mimics of PSA or T antigen on their surfaces, and induced high titers of glycan-specific IgG antibodies following immunization in mice. In the case of PSA glycOMVs, serum antibodies potently killed Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB), whose outer capsule is PSA, in a serum bactericidal assay. These findings demonstrate the potential of glycOMVs for inducing class-switched, humoral immune responses against glycan antigens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A lectin-based isolation/enrichment strategy for improved coverage of N-glycan analysis.

    PubMed

    Guan, Feng; Tan, Zengqi; Li, Xiang; Pang, Xingchen; Zhu, Yunlin; Li, Dongliang; Yang, Ganglong

    2015-10-30

    Glycomics provides an increasingly useful research tool as the genomes and proteomes of more and more animal species are elucidated. In view of the general complexity and heterogeneity of glycans, improved depth-of-coverage and sensitivity are required for glycosylation analysis. In this study, we established the lectin-based isolation/enrichment strategy for total glycomic information. Specific lectins are added onto the filter to capture corresponding glycans prior to release of N-glycans by peptide N-glycosidase F (PNGase F). Non-bound glycans and bound glycans are released and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), respectively. Application of the strategy to chicken ovalbumin, normal mouse mammary epithelial cells (NMuMG), and human serum resulted in detection of 5, 6, and 11 additional N-glycan structures, respectively. The strategy facilitates identification of intact N-glycans in biological samples, and can be extended to detailed analysis of O-glycome or glycoproteome.

  17. Immunization with outer membrane vesicles displaying designer glycotopes yields class-switched, glycan-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Jenny L.; Chen, Linxiao; Perregaux, Emily C.; Weyant, Kevin B.; Rosenthal, Joseph A.; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Fisher, Adam C.; Putnam, David; Moe, Gregory R.; Merritt, Judith H.; DeLisa, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The development of antibodies against specific glycan epitopes poses a significant challenge due to difficulties obtaining desired glycans at sufficient quantity and purity, and the fact that glycans are usually weakly immunogenic. To address this challenge, we leveraged the potent immunostimulatory activity of bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) to deliver designer glycan epitopes to the immune system. This approach involved heterologous expression of two clinically important glycans, namely polysialic acid (PSA) and Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (T antigen) in hypervesiculating strains of non-pathogenic Escherichia coli. The resulting glycOMVs displayed structural mimics of PSA or T antigen on their surfaces, and induced high titers of glycan-specific IgG antibodies following immunization in mice. In the case of PSA glycOMVs, serum antibodies potently killed Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB), whose outer capsule is PSA, in a serum bactericidal assay. These findings demonstrate the potential of glycOMVs for inducing class-switched, humoral immune responses against glycan antigens. PMID:27341433

  18. A nonself sugar mimic of the HIV glycan shield shows enhanced antigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Doores, Katie J.; Fulton, Zara; Hong, Vu; Patel, Mitul K.; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wormald, Mark R.; Finn, M.G.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2011-08-24

    Antibody 2G12 uniquely neutralizes a broad range of HIV-1 isolates by binding the high-mannose glycans on the HIV-1 surface glycoprotein, gp120. Antigens that resemble these natural epitopes of 2G12 would be highly desirable components for an HIV-1 vaccine. However, host-produced (self)-carbohydrate motifs have been unsuccessful so far at eliciting 2G12-like antibodies that cross-react with gp120. Based on the surprising observation that 2G12 binds nonproteinaceous monosaccharide D-fructose with higher affinity than D-mannose, we show here that a designed set of nonself, synthetic monosaccharides are potent antigens. When introduced to the terminus of the D1 arm of protein glycans recognized by 2G12, their antigenicity is significantly enhanced. Logical variation of these unnatural sugars pinpointed key modifications, and the molecular basis of this increased antigenicity was elucidated using high-resolution crystallographic analyses. Virus-like particle protein conjugates containing such nonself glycans are bound more tightly by 2G12. As immunogens they elicit higher titers of antibodies than those immunogenic conjugates containing the self D1 glycan motif. These antibodies generated from nonself immunogens also cross-react with this self motif, which is found in the glycan shield, when it is presented in a range of different conjugates and glycans. However, these antibodies did not bind this glycan motif when present on gp120.

  19. Chemical and Structural Analysis of an Antibody Folding Intermediate Trapped during Glycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Human IgG Fc glycosylation modulates immunological effector functions such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and phagocytosis. Engineering of Fc glycans therefore enables fine-tuning of the therapeutic properties of monoclonal antibodies. The N-linked glycans of Fc are typically complex-type, forming a network of noncovalent interactions along the protein surface of the Cγ2 domain. Here, we manipulate the mammalian glycan-processing pathway to trap IgG1 Fc at sequential stages of maturation, from oligomannose- to hybrid- to complex-type glycans, and show that the Fc is structurally stabilized following the transition of glycans from their hybrid- to complex-type state. X-ray crystallographic analysis of this hybrid-type intermediate reveals that N-linked glycans undergo conformational changes upon maturation, including a flip within the trimannosyl core. Our crystal structure of this intermediate reveals a molecular basis for antibody biogenesis and provides a template for the structure-guided engineering of the protein–glycan interface of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:23025485

  20. High-Throughput N-Glycan Analysis with Rapid Magnetic Bead-Based Sample Preparation.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, Marton; Guttman, Andras

    2017-01-01

    N-glycan profiling of therapeutic glycoproteins is essential to ensure the activity and efficacy of these promising new-generation drugs. The N-linked glycan moieties of these entities highly affect circulation half-life, immunogenicity and receptor-binding activity as well as physicochemical and thermal stability properties. In addition, more than half of the biopharmaceuticals are glycoproteins representing multibillion dollar worldwide business, further emphasizing the importance of their analysis. In the biomedical field, on the other hand, revealing disease-related glycan structure alterations holds the promise of the discovery of new biomarkers for early diagnostics. Therefore, there is a great demand for widely applicable, high-throughput sample preparation and analysis methods for N-glycan profiling of glycoproteins. One of the newest exciting developments of the field is the magnetic bead based glycoprotein sample preparation technique. A detailed protocol of this method is given in this chapter in conjunction with rapid capillary electrophoresis analysis of the prepared samples by laser induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF). N-glycans are digested by the endoglycosidase PNGase F and the released carbohydrates are labeled with the charged fluorophore dye of aminopyrenetrisulfonate (APTS). Effective glycan capture by magnetic microparticles enabled fast, easily automated sample preparation both in individual (single vial) and 96-well plate formats, including excess dye removal. Rapid separation of APTS labeled IgG glycans is also shown utilizing an optimized CE-LIF protocol.

  1. LacdiNAc-glycans constitute a parasite pattern for galectin-3-mediated immune recognition.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Timo K; Honing, Henk; Franke, Niels; van Remoortere, Alexandra; Schiphorst, Wietske E C M; Liu, Fu-Tong; Deelder, André M; Cummings, Richard D; Hokke, Cornelis H; van Die, Irma

    2004-08-01

    Although Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc (LacNAc) moieties are the most common constituents of N-linked glycans on vertebrate proteins, GalNAc beta 1-4GlcNAc (LacdiNAc, LDN)-containing glycans are widespread in invertebrates, such as helminths. We postulated that LDN might be a molecular pattern for recognition of helminth parasites by the immune system. Using LDN-based affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, we have identified galectin-3 as the major LDN-binding protein in macrophages. By contrast, LDN binding was not observed with galectin-1. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis and a solid phase binding assay demonstrated that galectin-3 binds directly to neoglycoconjugates carrying LDN glycans. In addition, galectin-3 bound to Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg Ags and a mAb against the LDN glycan inhibited this binding, suggesting that LDN glycans within S. mansoni soluble egg Ags contribute to galectin-3 binding. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated high levels of galectin-3 in liver granulomas of S. mansoni-infected hamsters, and a colocalization of galectin-3 and LDN glycans was observed on the parasite eggshells. Finally, we demonstrate that galectin-3 can mediate recognition and phagocytosis of LDN-coated particles by macrophages. These findings provide evidence that LDN-glycans constitute a parasite pattern for galectin-3-mediated immune recognition.

  2. Loss of intestinal core 1-derived O-glycans causes spontaneous colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianxin; Wei, Bo; Wen, Tao; Johansson, Malin E V; Liu, Xiaowei; Bradford, Emily; Thomsson, Kristina A; McGee, Samuel; Mansour, Lilah; Tong, Maomeng; McDaniel, J Michael; Sferra, Thomas J; Turner, Jerrold R; Chen, Hong; Hansson, Gunnar C; Braun, Jonathan; Xia, Lijun

    2011-04-01

    Mucin-type O-linked oligosaccharides (O-glycans) are primary components of the intestinal mucins that form the mucus gel layer overlying the gut epithelium. Impaired expression of intestinal O-glycans has been observed in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), but its role in the etiology of this disease is unknown. Here, we report that mice with intestinal epithelial cell-specific deficiency of core 1-derived O-glycans, the predominant form of O-glycans, developed spontaneous colitis that resembled human UC, including massive myeloid infiltrates and crypt abscesses. The colitis manifested in these mice was also characterized by TNF-producing myeloid infiltrates in colon mucosa in the absence of lymphocytes, supporting an essential role for myeloid cells in colitis initiation. Furthermore, induced deletion of intestinal core 1-derived O-glycans caused spontaneous colitis in adult mice. These data indicate a causal role for the loss of core 1-derived O-glycans in colitis. Finally, we detected a biosynthetic intermediate typically exposed in the absence of core 1 O-glycan, Tn antigen, in the colon epithelium of a subset of UC patients. Somatic mutations in the X-linked gene that encodes core 1 β1,3-galactosyltransferase-specific chaperone 1 (C1GALT1C1, also known as Cosmc), which is essential for core 1 O-glycosylation, were found in Tn-positive epithelia. These data suggest what we believe to be a new molecular mechanism for the pathogenesis of UC.

  3. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging of N-Linked Glycans in Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Drake, R R; Powers, T W; Jones, E E; Bruner, E; Mehta, A S; Angel, P M

    2017-01-01

    Glycosylated proteins account for a majority of the posttranslation modifications of cell surface, secreted, and circulating proteins. Within the tumor microenvironment, the presence of immune cells, extracellular matrix proteins, cell surface receptors, and interactions between stroma and tumor cells are all processes mediated by glycan binding and recognition reactions. Changes in glycosylation during tumorigenesis are well documented to occur and affect all of these associated adhesion and regulatory functions. A MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) workflow for profiling N-linked glycan distributions in fresh/frozen tissues and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues has recently been developed. The key to the approach is the application of a molecular coating of peptide-N-glycosidase to tissues, an enzyme that cleaves asparagine-linked glycans from their protein carrier. The released N-linked glycans can then be analyzed by MALDI-IMS directly on tissue. Generally 40 or more individual glycan structures are routinely detected, and when combined with histopathology localizations, tumor-specific glycans are readily grouped relative to nontumor regions and other structural features. This technique is a recent development and new approach in glycobiology and mass spectrometry imaging research methodology; thus, potential uses such as tumor-specific glycan biomarker panels and other applications are discussed. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydrazino-s-triazine based labelling reagents for highly sensitive glycan analysis via liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming-Zhe; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Yuan, Fang; Deng, Yan; Liu, Jing-Xin; Zhou, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Xin-Xiang

    2015-11-01

    Labelling strategy plays an important role in mass spectrometry (MS) based glycan analysis due to the high hydrophilicity and low ionization efficiency of glycans. Ten hydrazino-s-triazine based labelling reagents were synthesized under facile and controllable conditions for highly sensitive liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry glycan analysis in this work. Attached to N-glycans through non-reductive reactions, these new labelling reagents were evaluated in aspect of the differently enhanced glycan response to mass spectrometry. Three of the ten labelling reagents demonstrated to be reliable and remarkable for glycan analysis with satisfactory linearity and lowered limits of detection using maltoheptaose (DP7) as model. Furthermore, the most optimal labelling reagent was taken as an example for highly sensitive profiling of N-linked glycans both cleaved from chicken avidin and glycoproteins in human serum, indicating prospective availability for these labelling reagents in frontier of glycomics researches.

  5. Identifying human milk glycans that inhibit norovirus binding using surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jing; Piskarev, Vladimir E; Xia, Ming; Huang, Pengwei; Jiang, Xi; Likhosherstov, Leonid M; Novikova, Olga S; Newburg, David S; Ratner, Daniel M

    2013-01-01

    Human milk glycans inhibit binding between norovirus and its host glycan receptor; such competitive inhibition by human milk glycans is associated with a reduced risk of infection. The relationship between the presence of specific structural motifs in the human milk glycan and its ability to inhibit binding by specific norovirus strains requires facile, accurate and miniaturized-binding assays. Toward this end, a high-throughput biosensor platform was developed based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) of glycan microarrays. The SPRi was validated, and its utility was tested, by measuring binding specificities between defined human milk glycan epitopes and the capsids of two common norovirus strains, VA387 and Norwalk. Human milk oligosaccharide (HMOS)-based neoglycoconjugates, including chemically derived neoglycoproteins and oligosaccharide-glycine derivatives, were used to represent polyvalent glycoconjugates and monovalent oligosaccharides, respectively, in human milk. SPRi binding results established that the glycan motifs that bind norovirus capsids depend upon strain; VA387 capsid interacts with two neoglycoproteins, whereas Norwalk capsid binds to a different set of HMOS motifs in the form of both polyvalent neoglycoproteins and monovalent oligosaccharides. SPRi competitive binding assays further demonstrated that specific norovirus-binding glycans are able to inhibit norovirus capsid binding to their host receptors. A polyvalent neoglycoconjugate with clustered carbohydrate moieties is required for the inhibition of VA387 capsid binding to host receptor glycans, whereas both monovalent oligosaccharides and polyvalent neoglycoconjugates are able to inhibit Norwalk capsid binding to its host receptor. Binding of HMOS and HMOS-based neoglycoconjugates to norovirus capsids depends upon the specific strain characteristics, implying that HMOS and their polyvalent derivatives are potential anti-adhesive agents for norovirus prophylaxis. PMID:24026239

  6. Identifying human milk glycans that inhibit norovirus binding using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jing; Piskarev, Vladimir E; Xia, Ming; Huang, Pengwei; Jiang, Xi; Likhosherstov, Leonid M; Novikova, Olga S; Newburg, David S; Ratner, Daniel M

    2013-12-01

    Human milk glycans inhibit binding between norovirus and its host glycan receptor; such competitive inhibition by human milk glycans is associated with a reduced risk of infection. The relationship between the presence of specific structural motifs in the human milk glycan and its ability to inhibit binding by specific norovirus strains requires facile, accurate and miniaturized-binding assays. Toward this end, a high-throughput biosensor platform was developed based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) of glycan microarrays. The SPRi was validated, and its utility was tested, by measuring binding specificities between defined human milk glycan epitopes and the capsids of two common norovirus strains, VA387 and Norwalk. Human milk oligosaccharide (HMOS)-based neoglycoconjugates, including chemically derived neoglycoproteins and oligosaccharide-glycine derivatives, were used to represent polyvalent glycoconjugates and monovalent oligosaccharides, respectively, in human milk. SPRi binding results established that the glycan motifs that bind norovirus capsids depend upon strain; VA387 capsid interacts with two neoglycoproteins, whereas Norwalk capsid binds to a different set of HMOS motifs in the form of both polyvalent neoglycoproteins and monovalent oligosaccharides. SPRi competitive binding assays further demonstrated that specific norovirus-binding glycans are able to inhibit norovirus capsid binding to their host receptors. A polyvalent neoglycoconjugate with clustered carbohydrate moieties is required for the inhibition of VA387 capsid binding to host receptor glycans, whereas both monovalent oligosaccharides and polyvalent neoglycoconjugates are able to inhibit Norwalk capsid binding to its host receptor. Binding of HMOS and HMOS-based neoglycoconjugates to norovirus capsids depends upon the specific strain characteristics, implying that HMOS and their polyvalent derivatives are potential anti-adhesive agents for norovirus prophylaxis.

  7. Identification of glycan structure alterations on cell membrane proteins in desoxyepothilone B resistant leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Miyako; Saldanha, Rohit; Göbel, Anja; Kavallaris, Maria; Packer, Nicolle H

    2011-11-01

    Resistance to tubulin-binding agents used in cancer is often multifactorial and can include changes in drug accumulation and modified expression of tubulin isotypes. Glycans on cell membrane proteins play important roles in many cellular processes such as recognition and apoptosis, and this study investigated whether changes to the glycan structures on cell membrane proteins occur when cells become resistant to drugs. Specifically, we investigated the alteration of glycan structures on the cell membrane proteins of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cells that were selected for resistance to desoxyepothilone B (CEM/dEpoB). The glycan profile of the cell membrane glycoproteins was obtained by sequential release of N- and O-glycans from cell membrane fraction dotted onto polyvinylidene difluoride membrane with PNGase F and β-elimination respectively. The released glycan alditols were analyzed by liquid chromatography (graphitized carbon)-electrospray ionization tandem MS. The major N-glycan on CEM cell was the core fucosylated α2-6 monosialo-biantennary structure. Resistant CEM/dEpoB cells had a significant decrease of α2-6 linked sialic acid on N-glycans. The lower α2-6 sialylation was caused by a decrease in activity of β-galactoside α2-6 sialyltransferase (ST6Gal), and decreased expression of the mRNA. It is clear that the membrane glycosylation of leukemia cells changes during acquired resistance to dEpoB drugs and that this change occurs globally on all cell membrane glycoproteins. This is the first identification of a specific glycan modification on the surface of drug resistant cells and the mechanism of this downstream effect on microtubule targeting drugs may offer a route to new interventions to overcome drug resistance.

  8. LARGE glycans on dystroglycan function as a tunable matrix scaffold to prevent dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Goddeeris, Matthew M.; Wu, Biming; Venzke, David; Yoshida-Moriguchi, Takako; Saito, Fumiaki; Matsumura, Kiichiro; Moore, Steven A.; Campbell, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    The dense glycan coat that surrounds every cell is essential for cellular development and physiological function1, and it is becoming appreciated that its composition is highly dynamic. Post-translational addition of the polysaccharide repeating unit [-3-xylose-α1,3-glucuronic acid-β1-]n by like-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (LARGE) is required for the glycoprotein dystroglycan to function as a receptor for proteins in the extracellular matrix2,3. Reductions in the amount of [-3-xylose-α1,3-glucuronic acid-β1-]n (hereafter referred to as LARGE-glycan) on dystroglycan result in heterogeneous forms of muscular dystrophy4. However, neither patient nor mouse studies has revealed a clear correlation between glycosylation status and phenotype5,6. This disparity can be attributed to our lack of knowledge of the cellular function of the LARGE-glycan repeat. Here we show that coordinated upregulation of Large and dystroglycan in differentiating mouse muscle facilitates rapid extension of LARGE-glycan repeat chains. Using synthesized LARGE-glycan repeats we show a direct correlation between LARGE-glycan extension and its binding capacity for extracellular matrix ligands. Blocking Large upregulation during muscle regeneration results in the synthesis of dystroglycan with minimal LARGE-glycan repeats in association with a less compact basement membrane, immature neuromuscular junctions and dysfunctional muscle predisposed to dystrophy. This was consistent with the finding that patients with increased clinical severity of disease have fewer LARGE-glycan repeats. Our results reveal that the LARGE-glycan of dystroglycan serves as a tunable extracellular matrix protein scaffold, the extension of which is required for normal skeletal muscle function. PMID:24132234

  9. Chromatofocusing fails to separate hFSH isoforms on the basis of glycan structure.

    PubMed

    Bousfield, George R; Butnev, Vladimir Y; Bidart, Jean-Michel; Dalpathado, Dilusha; Irungu, Janet; Desaire, Heather

    2008-02-12

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) glycosylation is regulated by feedback from the gonads, resulting in an array of glycans associated with FSH preparations derived from pools of pituitary or urine extracts. FSH glycosylation varies due to inhibition of FSHbeta N-glycosylation, elaboration of 1-4 branches possessed by mature N-glycans, and the number and linkage of terminal sialic acid residues. To characterize FSH glycosylation, FSH isoforms in pituitary gland extracts and a variety of physiological fluids are commonly separated by chromatofocusing. Variations in the ratios of immunological and biological activities in the resulting FSH isoform preparations are generally attributed to changes in glycosylation, which are most often defined in terms of sialic acid content. Using Western blotting to assess human FSHbeta glycosylation inhibition revealed 30-47% nonglycosylated hFSHbeta associated with four of six hFSH isoform preparations derived by chromatofocusing. Glycopeptide mass spectrometry assessment of glycan branching in these isoforms extensively characterized two N-glycosylation sites, one at alphaAsn52, the critical glycan for FSH function, and the other at betaAsn24. With two to four N-glycans per FSH molecule, many combinations of charges distributed over these sites can provide the same isoelectric point. Indeed, several glycans were common to all isoform fractions that were analyzed. There was no trend showing predominantly monoantennary glycans associated with the high-pI fractions, nor were predominantly tri- and tetra-antennary glycans associated with low-pI fractions. Thus, differences in receptor binding activity could not be associated with any specific glycan type or location in the hormone. FSH aggregation was associated with reduced receptor binding activity but did not affect immunological activity. However, as gel filtration indicated sufficient heterodimer was present in each isoform preparation to generate complete inhibition curves, the

  10. Automated Glycan Sequencing from Tandem Mass Spectra of N-Linked Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuan-Yih; Mayampurath, Anoop; Zhu, Rui; Zacharias, Lauren; Song, Ehwang; Wang, Lei; Mechref, Yehia; Tang, Haixu

    2016-06-07

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine experimental tool for proteomic biomarker analysis of human blood samples, partly due to the large availability of informatics tools. As one of the most common protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) in mammals, protein glycosylation has been observed to alter in multiple human diseases and thus may potentially be candidate markers of disease progression. While mass spectrometry instrumentation has seen advancements in capabilities, discovering glycosylation-related markers using existing software is currently not straightforward. Complete characterization of protein glycosylation requires the identification of intact glycopeptides in samples, including identification of the modification site as well as the structure of the attached glycans. In this paper, we present GlycoSeq, an open-source software tool that implements a heuristic iterated glycan sequencing algorithm coupled with prior knowledge for automated elucidation of the glycan structure within a glycopeptide from its collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrum. GlycoSeq employs rules of glycosidic linkage as defined by glycan synthetic pathways to eliminate improbable glycan structures and build reasonable glycan trees. We tested the tool on two sets of tandem mass spectra of N-linked glycopeptides cell lines acquired from breast cancer patients. After employing enzymatic specificity within the N-linked glycan synthetic pathway, the sequencing results of GlycoSeq were highly consistent with the manually curated glycan structures. Hence, GlycoSeq is ready to be used for the characterization of glycan structures in glycopeptides from MS/MS analysis. GlycoSeq is released as open source software at https://github.com/chpaul/GlycoSeq/ .

  11. Enhanced sensitivity of LC-MS analysis of permethylated N-glycans through online purification.

    PubMed

    Desantos-Garcia, Janie L; Khalil, Sarah I; Hussein, Ahmed; Hu, Yunli; Mechref, Yehia

    2011-12-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of proteins and lipids has been implicated in many human diseases, thus prompting the need for reliable analytical methods that permit dependable quantification of glycans originating from biological specimens. MS of permethylated glycans is currently employed to monitor disease-related aberrant glycosylation of proteins and lipids. However, enhancing the sensitivity of this type of analysis is still needed. Here, analysis of permethylated glycans at enhanced sensitivity is attained through miniaturized solid-phase permethylation and online solid-phase purification. Solid-phase permethylation method was miniaturized by reducing the amount of sodium hydroxide beads (one-third the original amount) packed in microspin columns. The efficiency of glycan permethylation was not adversely affected by this reduction. Online solid-phase purification of permethylated N-glycans derived from model glycoproteins, such as fetuin, α-1 acid glycoprotein and ribonuclease B, offered more sensitive and reproducible results than offline liquid-liquid and solid-phase extractions. Online solid-phase purification method described here permitted a 75% increase in signal intensities of permethylated glycans relative to offline purification methods. This is mainly due to the minimized sample handling associated with an online cleaning procedure. The efficiency and utility of online solid-phase purification was also demonstrated here for N-glycans derived from human blood serum. Online solid-phase purification permitted the detection of 73 N-glycan structures, while only 63 glycan structures were detected in the case of samples purified through liquid-liquid extraction. The intensities of the 63 structures that were detected in both cases were 75% higher for samples that were purified through the online method.

  12. Suggestive Evidence for Darwinian Selection against Asparagine-Linked Glycans of Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bushkin, G. Guy; Ratner, Daniel M.; Cui, Jike; Banerjee, Sulagna; Duraisingh, Manoj T.; Jennings, Cameron V.; Dvorin, Jeffrey D.; Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Robertson, Seth D.; Steffen, Martin; O'Keefe, Barry R.; Robbins, Phillips W.; Samuelson, John

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in asparagine-linked glycans (N-glycans) of Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii, because their N-glycan structures have been controversial and because we hypothesize that there might be selection against N-glycans in nucleus-encoded proteins that must pass through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) prior to threading into the apicoplast. In support of our hypothesis, we observed the following. First, in protists with apicoplasts, there is extensive secondary loss of Alg enzymes that make lipid-linked precursors to N-glycans. Theileria makes no N-glycans, and Plasmodium makes a severely truncated N-glycan precursor composed of one or two GlcNAc residues. Second, secreted proteins of Toxoplasma, which uses its own 10-sugar precursor (Glc3Man5GlcNAc2) and the host 14-sugar precursor (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2) to make N-glycans, have very few sites for N glycosylation, and there is additional selection against N-glycan sites in its apicoplast-targeted proteins. Third, while the GlcNAc-binding Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II labels ER, rhoptries, and surface of plasmodia, there is no apicoplast labeling. Similarly, the antiretroviral lectin cyanovirin-N, which binds to N-glycans of Toxoplasma, labels ER and rhoptries, but there is no apicoplast labeling. We conclude that possible selection against N-glycans in protists with apicoplasts occurs by eliminating N-glycans (Theileria), reducing their length (Plasmodium), or reducing the number of N-glycan sites (Toxoplasma). In addition, occupation of N-glycan sites is markedly reduced in apicoplast proteins versus some secretory proteins in both Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. PMID:19783771

  13. Surface expression patterns of defined glycan antigens change during Schistosoma mansoni cercarial transformation and development of schistosomula.

    PubMed

    Smit, Cornelis H; Homann, Arne; van Hensbergen, Vincent P; Schramm, Gabriele; Haas, Helmut; van Diepen, Angela; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2015-12-01

    During the complex lifecycle of Schistosoma mansoni, a large variety of glycans is expressed. To many of these glycans, antibodies are induced by the infected host and some might be targets for vaccines or diagnostic tests. Spatial changes in glycan expression during schistosome development are largely unexplored. To study the surface-exposed glycans during the important initial stages of infection, we analyzed the binding of a panel of anti-glycan monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to cercariae and schistosomula up to 72 h after transformation by immunofluorescence microscopy. The mAb specificity toward their natural targets was studied using a microarray containing a wide range of schistosomal N-glycans, O-glycans and glycosphingolipid glycans. With the exception of GalNAcβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (LDN-F), mono- and multifucosylated GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (LDN)-motifs were exposed at the surface of all developmental stages studied. Multifucosylated LDN-motifs were present on cercarial glycocalyx-derived O-glycans as well as cercarial glycolipids. In contrast, the Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (Lewis X) and LDN-F-motifs, also expressed on cercarial glycolipids, and in addition on a range of cercarial N- and O-glycans, became surface expressed only after transformation of cercariae to schistosomula. In line with the documented shedding of the O-glycan-rich cercarial glycocalyx after transformation these observations suggest that surface accessible multifucosylated LDN-motifs are mostly expressed by O-glycans in cercariae, but principally by glycosphingolipids in schistosomula. We hypothesize that these temporal changes in surface exposure of glycan antigens are relevant to the interaction with the host during the initial stages of infection with schistosomes and discuss the potential of these glycan antigens as intervention targets.

  14. A Second β-Hexosaminidase Encoded in the Streptococcus pneumoniae Genome Provides an Expanded Biochemical Ability to Degrade Host Glycans*

    PubMed Central

    Robb, Melissa; Robb, Craig S.; Higgins, Melanie A.; Hobbs, Joanne K.; Paton, James C.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2015-01-01

    An important facet of the interaction between the pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) and its human host is the ability of this bacterium to process host glycans. To achieve cleavage of the glycosidic bonds in host glycans, S. pneumoniae deploys a wide array of glycoside hydrolases. Here, we identify and characterize a new family 20 glycoside hydrolase, GH20C, from S. pneumoniae. Recombinant GH20C possessed the ability to hydrolyze the β-linkages joining either N-acetylglucosamine or N-acetylgalactosamine to a wide variety of aglycon residues, thus revealing this enzyme to be a generalist N-acetylhexosaminidase in vitro. X-ray crystal structures were determined for GH20C in a ligand-free form, in complex with the N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine products of catalysis and in complex with both gluco- and galacto-configured inhibitors O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosylidene)amino N-phenyl carbamate (PUGNAc), O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-galactopyranosylidene)amino N-phenyl carbamate (GalPUGNAc), N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-thiazoline (NGT), and N-acetyl-d-galactosamine-thiazoline (GalNGT) at resolutions from 1.84 to 2.7 Å. These structures showed N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine to be recognized via identical sets of molecular interactions. Although the same sets of interaction were maintained with the gluco- and galacto-configured inhibitors, the inhibition constants suggested preferred recognition of the axial O4 when an aglycon moiety was present (Ki for PUGNAc > GalPUGNAc) but preferred recognition of an equatorial O4 when the aglycon was absent (Ki for GalNGT > NGT). Overall, this study reveals GH20C to be another tool that is unique in the arsenal of S. pneumoniae and that it may implement the effort of the bacterium to utilize and/or destroy the wide array of host glycans that it may encounter. PMID:26491009

  15. Neonatal Gut Microbiota and Human Milk Glycans Cooperate to Attenuate Infection and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Newburg, David S; He, Yingying

    2015-12-01

    Glycans of the intestinal mucosa and oligosaccharides of human milk influence the early colonization of the infant gut and establishment of mucosal homeostasis, and differences in colonization of the gut influence the ontogeny of glycans on the surface of the intestinal mucosa, proinflammatory signaling, homeostasis, and resilience to insult. This interkingdom reciprocal interaction is typical of a mutualistic symbiotic relationship. The period in which the infant gut most needs protection from hypersensitive inflammation overlaps with the recommended period of exclusive nursing; electively substituting artificial formula that lacks human milk protective glycans seems ill advised, especially for premature infants.

  16. The neutral N-linked glycans of the ustilaginomycete yeast Sympodiomycopsis paphiopedili.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ronilo Jose D; Ohashi, Takao; Kawasaki, Hiroko; Fujiyama, Kazuhito

    2017-07-01

    Sympodiomycopsis paphiopedili is a basidiomycetous yeast under the subphylum Ustilaginomycotina and is a commensal organism originally isolated from the nectar of a plant species in Japan. In this study, the neutral N-linked glycans of S. paphiopedili were prepared and structurally analysed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS). Glycosidase digestion analyses were also performed to verify certain glycan linkages. HPLC and MS analyses revealed the presence of neutral N-linked glycans ranging from Man3 GlcNAc2 -PA to Man9 GlcNAc2 -PA in length. The most abundant neutral N-linked glycan structure in this species was found to be the Manα1-2Manα1-6(Manα1-3)Manα1-6(Manα1-2Manα1-2Manα1-3)Manβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (M8A). Moreover, the second and third most abundant neutral N-linked glycan in S. paphiopedili were the Manα1-2Manα1-6(Manα1-2Manα1-3)Manα1-6(Manα1-2Manα1-2Manα1-3)Manβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (M9A) and the Manα1-6(Manα1-3)Manβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (M3B). On the other hand, the effect of the combination of glycoprotein extraction methods (citrate buffer extraction or bead extraction) and the subsequent glycan release methods (hydrazinolysis or PNGase F digestion) on the detection of N-linked glycan peaks was also examined for S. paphiopedili and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in order to avoid under-representation of N-linked glycan structures. High mannose and possible hypermannosylated glycan peaks were detected in all method combinations in S. cerevisiae with the citrate buffer extraction-hydrazinolysis method giving the highest peak yields as compared with the other methods. Here we report the first account of the structural analysis of the neutral N-linked glycan of S. paphiopedili and the comparison of the effect of combinations of glycoprotein extraction methods and glycan release methods with that of the glycan analysis in S. paphiopedili and S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  17. Glycan complexity dictates microbial resource allocation in the large intestine

    PubMed Central

    Rogowski, Artur; Briggs, Jonathon A.; Mortimer, Jennifer C.; Tryfona, Theodora; Terrapon, Nicolas; Lowe, Elisabeth C.; Baslé, Arnaud; Morland, Carl; Day, Alison M.; Zheng, Hongjun; Rogers, Theresa E.; Thompson, Paul; Hawkins, Alastair R.; Yadav, Madhav P.; Henrissat, Bernard; Martens, Eric C.; Dupree, Paul; Gilbert, Harry J.; Bolam, David N.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the human gut microbiota is controlled primarily through the degradation of complex dietary carbohydrates, but the extent to which carbohydrate breakdown products are shared between members of the microbiota is unclear. We show here, using xylan as a model, that sharing the breakdown products of complex carbohydrates by key members of the microbiota, such as Bacteroides ovatus, is dependent on the complexity of the target glycan. Characterization of the extensive xylan degrading apparatus expressed by B. ovatus reveals that the breakdown of the polysaccharide by the human gut microbiota is significantly more complex than previous models suggested, which were based on the deconstruction of xylans containing limited monosaccharide side chains. Our report presents a highly complex and dynamic xylan degrading apparatus that is fine-tuned to recognize the different forms of the polysaccharide presented to the human gut microbiota. PMID:26112186

  18. Fc glycan-modulated immunoglobulin G effector functions.

    PubMed

    Quast, Isaak; Lünemann, Jan D

    2014-07-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules are glycoproteins and residues in the sugar moiety attached to the IgG constant fragment (Fc) are essential for IgG functionality such as binding to cellular Fc receptors and complement activation. The core of this sugar moiety consists of a bi-antennary heptameric structure of mannose and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), further decorated with terminal and branching residues including galactose, sialic acid, fucose, and GlcNAc. Presence or absence of distinct residues such as fucose and sialic acid can dramatically alter pro- and anti-inflammatory IgG activities which could be harnessed for immunotherapeutic purposes. Here we review recent advances in understanding the role of the IgG-Fc glycan during immune responses and for immunotherapy with a focus on sialic acid and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment.

  19. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Extracting Spectra of N-Glycans Directly from Incubation Mixtures Following Glycan Release: Application to Glycans from Engineered Glycoforms of Intact, Folded HIV gp120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David J.; Sobott, Frank; Crispin, Max; Wrobel, Antoni; Bonomelli, Camille; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Scarff, Charlotte A.; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Scrivens, James H.

    2011-03-01

    The analysis of glycosylation from native biological sources is often frustrated by the low abundances of available material. Here, ion mobility combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry have been used to extract the spectra of N-glycans released with PNGase F from a serial titration of recombinantly expressed envelope glycoprotein, gp120, from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Analysis was also performed on gp120 expressed in the α-mannosidase inhibitor, and in a matched mammalian cell line deficient in GlcNAc transferase I. Without ion mobility separation, ESI spectra frequently contained no observable ions from the glycans whereas ions from other compounds such as detergents and residual buffer salts were abundant. After ion mobility separation on a Waters T-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer, the N-glycans fell into a unique region of the ion mobility/ m/z plot allowing their profiles to be extracted with good signal:noise ratios. This method allowed N-glycan profiles to be extracted from crude incubation mixtures with no clean-up even in the presence of surfactants such as NP40. Furthermore, this technique allowed clear profiles to be obtained from sub-microgram amounts of glycoprotein. Glycan profiles were similar to those generated by MALDI-TOF MS although they were more susceptible to double charging and fragmentation. Structural analysis could be accomplished by MS/MS experiments in either positive or negative ion mode but negative ion mode gave the most informative spectra and provided a reliable approach to the analysis of glycans from small amounts of glycoprotein.

  20. Ion mobility mass spectrometry for extracting spectra of N-glycans directly from incubation mixtures following glycan release: application to glycans from engineered glycoforms of intact, folded HIV gp120.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David J; Sobott, Frank; Crispin, Max; Wrobel, Antoni; Bonomelli, Camille; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Scanlan, Christopher N; Scarff, Charlotte A; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Scrivens, James H

    2011-03-01

    The analysis of glycosylation from native biological sources is often frustrated by the low abundances of available material. Here, ion mobility combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry have been used to extract the spectra of N-glycans released with PNGase F from a serial titration of recombinantly expressed envelope glycoprotein, gp120, from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Analysis was also performed on gp120 expressed in the α-mannosidase inhibitor, and in a matched mammalian cell line deficient in GlcNAc transferase I. Without ion mobility separation, ESI spectra frequently contained no observable ions from the glycans whereas ions from other compounds such as detergents and residual buffer salts were abundant. After ion mobility separation on a Waters T-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer, the N-glycans fell into a unique region of the ion mobility/m/z plot allowing their profiles to be extracted with good signal:noise ratios. This method allowed N-glycan profiles to be extracted from crude incubation mixtures with no clean-up even in the presence of surfactants such as NP40. Furthermore, this technique allowed clear profiles to be obtained from sub-microgram amounts of glycoprotein. Glycan profiles were similar to those generated by MALDI-TOF MS although they were more susceptible to double charging and fragmentation. Structural analysis could be accomplished by MS/MS experiments in either positive or negative ion mode but negative ion mode gave the most informative spectra and provided a reliable approach to the analysis of glycans from small amounts of glycoprotein. © American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2011

  1. Clustered O-Glycans of IgA1

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazuo; Wall, Stephanie B.; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Smith, Archer D.; Hall, Stacy; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens; Mobley, James A.; Julian, Bruce A.; Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan; Renfrow, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis in the world. Aberrantly glycosylated IgA1, with galactose (Gal)-deficient hinge region (HR) O-glycans, plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of the disease. It is not known whether the glycosylation defect occurs randomly or preferentially at specific sites. We have described the utility of activated ion-electron capture dissociation (AI-ECD) mass spectrometric analysis of IgA1 O-glycosylation. However, locating and characterizing the entire range of O-glycan attachment sites are analytically challenging due to the clustered serine and threonine residues in the HR of IgA1 heavy chain. To address this problem, we analyzed all glycoforms of the HR glycopeptides of a Gal-deficient IgA1 myeloma protein, mimicking the aberrant IgA1 in patients with IgAN, by use of a combination of IgA-specific proteases + trypsin and AI-ECD Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The IgA-specific proteases provided a variety of IgA1 HR fragments that allowed unambiguous localization of all O-glycosylation sites in the six most abundant glycoforms, including the sites deficient in Gal. Additionally, this protocol was adapted for on-line liquid chromatography (LC)-AI-ECD MS/MS and LC-electron transfer dissociation MS/MS analysis. Our results thus represent a new clinically relevant approach that requires ECD/electron transfer dissociation-type fragmentation to define the molecular events leading to pathogenesis of a chronic kidney disease. Furthermore, this work offers generally applicable principles for the analysis of clustered sites of O-glycosylation. PMID:20823119

  2. Specific N-glycans of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Surface and the Abnormal Increase of Core-α-1, 6-fucosylated Triantennary Glycan via N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases-IVa Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Huan; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Yubao; Li, Tingting; Zhan, Chao; Huo, Wenjuan; He, Anshun; Yao, Yuanfei; Jin, Yu; Qu, Youpeng; Sun, Xue-Long; Li, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation alterations of cell surface proteins are often observed during the progression of malignancies. The specific cell surface N-glycans were profiled in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with clinical tissues (88 tumor and adjacent normal tissues) and the corresponding serum samples of HCC patients. The level of core-α-1,6-fucosylated triantennary glycan (NA3Fb) increased both on the cell surface and in the serum samples of HCC patients (p < 0.01). Additionally, the change of NA3Fb was not influenced by Hepatitis B virus (HBV)and cirrhosis. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase IVa (GnT-IVa), which was related to the synthesis of the NA3Fb, was substantially increased in HCC tissues. Knockdown of GnT-IVa leads to a decreased level of NA3Fb and decreased ability of invasion and migration in HCC cells. NA3Fb can be regarded as a specific cell surface N-glycan of HCC. The high expression of GnT-IVa is the cause of the abnormal increase of NA3Fb on the HCC cell surface, which regulates cell migration. This study demonstrated the specific N-glycans of the cell surface and the mechanisms of altered glycoform related with HCC. These findings lead to better understanding of the function of glycan and glycosyltransferase in the tumorigenesis, progression and metastasis of HCC. PMID:26537865

  3. Specific N-glycans of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Surface and the Abnormal Increase of Core-α-1, 6-fucosylated Triantennary Glycan via N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases-IVa Regulation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Huan; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Yubao; Li, Tingting; Zhan, Chao; Huo, Wenjuan; He, Anshun; Yao, Yuanfei; Jin, Yu; Qu, Youpeng; Sun, Xue-Long; Li, Yu

    2015-11-05

    Glycosylation alterations of cell surface proteins are often observed during the progression of malignancies. The specific cell surface N-glycans were profiled in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with clinical tissues (88 tumor and adjacent normal tissues) and the corresponding serum samples of HCC patients. The level of core-α-1,6-fucosylated triantennary glycan (NA3Fb) increased both on the cell surface and in the serum samples of HCC patients (p < 0.01). Additionally, the change of NA3Fb was not influenced by Hepatitis B virus (HBV)and cirrhosis. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase IVa (GnT-IVa), which was related to the synthesis of the NA3Fb, was substantially increased in HCC tissues. Knockdown of GnT-IVa leads to a decreased level of NA3Fb and decreased ability of invasion and migration in HCC cells. NA3Fb can be regarded as a specific cell surface N-glycan of HCC. The high expression of GnT-IVa is the cause of the abnormal increase of NA3Fb on the HCC cell surface, which regulates cell migration. This study demonstrated the specific N-glycans of the cell surface and the mechanisms of altered glycoform related with HCC. These findings lead to better understanding of the function of glycan and glycosyltransferase in the tumorigenesis, progression and metastasis of HCC.

  4. Intracellular and extracellular free N-glycans produced by plant cells: occurrence of unusual plant complex-type free N-glycans in extracellular spaces.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Megumi; Kimura, Mariko; Kimura, Yoshinobu

    2010-12-01

    As a part of the study to reveal the biological significance of de-N-glycosylation in plants, we analysed the structural features of free N-glycans (FNGs) accumulated inside cells and secreted to the extracellular space using a rice cell culture system. The structural analysis of FNGs obtained from the intracellular fraction revealed that the high-mannose type N-glycans with one GlcNAc residue (GN1-type) occurred at a concentration of ∼10 nmol/g, while the truncated complex type N-glycans with a N, N'-diacetylchitobiosyl unit (GN2-type) occurred at a concentration of ∼1 nmol/g. This result suggested that two kinds of glycoenzymes, cytosolic endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (ENGase) and intracellular acidic peptide:N-glycanse (PNGase), are involved in the production of FNGs in rice cell as well as in other plant cells. On the other hand, in the culture medium, Lewis a epitope-containing complex and high-mannose type FNGs with the N, N'-diacetylchitobiosyl unit were found, suggesting extracellular acidic PNGase to be involved in the release of N-glycans from folded/processed glycoproteins in extracellular space. Furthermore, in the culture medium, we found unusual GN1-FNGs that have a biantennary complex type structure harbouring the Lewis a epitope, suggesting cytosolic ENGase and golgi N-glycan-processing enzymes to be involved in the production of these plant complex type FNGs.

  5. Correlation Index-Based Responsible-Enzyme Gene Screening (CIRES), a Novel DNA Microarray-Based Method for Enzyme Gene Involved in Glycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Harumi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Fujinawa, Reiko; Naito, Yuko; Okuno, Yasushi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Suzuki, Akemi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori

    2007-01-01

    Background Glycan biosynthesis occurs though a multi-step process that requires a variety of enzymes ranging from glycosyltransferases to those involved in cytosolic sugar metabolism. In many cases, glycan biosynthesis follows a glycan-specific, linear pathway. As glycosyltransferases are generally regulated at the level of transcription, assessing the overall transcriptional profile for glycan biosynthesis genes seems warranted. However, a systematic approach for assessing the correlation between glycan expression and glycan-related gene expression has not been reported previously. Methodology To facilitate genetic analysis of glycan biosynthesis, we sought to correlate the expression of genes involved in cell-surface glycan formation with the expression of the glycans, as detected by glycan-recognizing probes. We performed cross-sample comparisons of gene expression profiles using a newly developed, glycan-focused cDNA microarray. Cell-surface glycan expression profiles were obtained using flow cytometry of cells stained with plant lectins. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for these profiles and were used to identify enzyme genes correlated with glycan biosynthesis. Conclusions This method, designated correlation index-based responsible-enzyme gene screening (CIRES), successfully identified genes already known to be involved in the biosynthesis of certain glycans. Our evaluation of CIRES indicates that it is useful for identifying genes involved in the biosynthesis of glycan chains that can be probed with lectins using flow cytometry. PMID:18043739

  6. Analysis of knock-out mice to determine the role of HPC-1/syntaxin 1A in expressing synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Tomonori; Mishima, Tatsuya; Kofuji, Takefumi; Chiba, Tomoki; Tanaka, Keiji; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Akagawa, Kimio

    2006-05-24

    The protein HPC-1/syntaxin 1A is abundantly expressed in neurons and localized in the neuronal plasma membrane. It forms a complex with SNAP-25 (25 kDa synaptosomal-associated protein) and VAMP-2 (vesicle-associated membrane protein)/synaptobrevin called SNARE (a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor) complex, which is considered essential for synaptic vesicle exocytosis; thus, HPC-1/syntaxin 1A is considered crucial for synaptic transmission. To examine the physiological function of HPC-1/syntaxin 1A in vivo, we produced knock-out (KO) mice by targeted gene disruption. Although HPC-1/syntaxin 1A expression was completely depleted without any effect on the expression of other SNARE proteins, the KO mice were viable. They grew normally, were fertile, and displayed no difference in appearance compared with control littermate. In cultured hippocampal neurons derived from the KO mice, the basic synaptic transmission in vitro was normal. However, the mutant mice had impaired long-term potentiation in the hippocampal slice. Also, although KO mice exhibited normal spatial memory in the hidden platform test, consolidation of conditioned fear memory was impaired. Interestingly, the KO mice had impaired conditioned fear memory extincti