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Sample records for 1alpha inhibits prostaglandin

  1. Interleukin 1. alpha. inhibits prostaglandin E sub 2 release to suppress pulsatile release of luteinizing hormone but not follicle-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Rettori, V.; McCann, S.M. ); Gimeno, M.F. ); Karara, A. ); Gonzalez, M.C. )

    1991-04-01

    Interleukin 1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), a powerful endogenous pyrogen released from monocytes and macrophages by bacterial endotoxin, stimulates corticotropin, prolactin, and somatotropin release and inhibits thyrotropin release by hypothalamic action. The authors injected recombinant human IL-1{alpha} into the third cerebral ventricle, to study its effect on the pulsatile release of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in conscious, freely moving, ovariectomized rats. Intraventricular injection of 0.25 pmol of IL-1{alpha} caused an almost immediate reduction of plasma LH concentration. To determine the mechanism of the suppression of LH release, mediobasal hypothalamic fragments were incubated in vitro with IL-1{alpha} (10 pM) and the release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} into the medium was measured by RIA in the presence or absence of nonrepinephrine. 1{alpha} reduced basal LHRH release and blocked LHRH release induced by nonrepinephrine. In conclusion, IL-1{alpha} suppresses LH but not FSH release by an almost complete cessation of pulsatile release of LH in the castrated rat. The mechanism of this effect appears to be by inhibition of prostaglandin E{sub 2}-mediated release of LHRH.

  2. Production of prostaglandins by the pseudopregnant rat uterus, in vitro, and the effect of tamoxifen with the identification of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha as a major product.

    PubMed Central

    Fenwick, L; Jones, R L; Naylor, B; Poyser, N L; Wilson, N H

    1977-01-01

    1 Prostaglandin production by rat uterus homogenates has been studied, in vitro, on days 2 to 13 of pseudopregnancy. 2 The highest production of prostaglandins occurred on day 5. 3 The amounts of prostaglandins F and D formed were higher than the amounts of prostaglandin E on every day studied. 4 The ratios of prostglandins F and D to prostaglandin E produced steadily decreased up to day 6. It then increased with the highest values occurring between days 10 and 13, 5 Progesterone levels in peripheral plasma increased rapidly from days 2 to 5, remained high up to day 9, then steadily decreased between days 10 and 13. 6 The anti-oestrogenic drug, tamoxifen administered on day 2, significantly inhibited the increase of prostaglandin production which occurred on day 5. Prostaglandin E production was inhibited more than the production of prostaglandins F and D. 7 Analysis of the uterine extracts by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry showed prostaglandin F2alpha, F1alpha (in trace amounts), E2 and D2 to be present. 8 The major product detected was 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha. Its identification forms an addendum to the paper. 9 Also present as a major product was 6(9)-oxy-11,15-dihydroxyprosta-7,13-dienoic acid. PMID:836998

  3. 15-Deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin-J(2) reveals a new pVHL-independent, lysosomal-dependent mechanism of HIF-1alpha degradation.

    PubMed

    Olmos, Gemma; Arenas, María I; Bienes, Raquel; Calzada, María Jose; Aragonés, Julián; Garcia-Bermejo, Maria Laura; Landazuri, Manuel O; Lucio-Cazaña, Javier

    2009-07-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) protein is degraded under normoxia by its association to von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL) and further proteasomal digestion. However, human renal cells HK-2 treated with 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin-J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) accumulate HIF-1alpha in normoxic conditions. Thus, we aimed to investigate the mechanism involved in this accumulation. We found that 15d-PGJ(2) induced an over-accumulation of HIF-1alpha in RCC4 cells, which lack pVHL and in HK-2 cells treated with inhibitors of the pVHL-proteasome pathway. These results indicated that pVHL-proteasome-independent mechanisms are involved, and therefore we aimed to ascertain them. We have identified a new lysosomal-dependent mechanism of HIF-1alpha degradation as a target for 15d-PGJ(2) based on: (1) HIF-1alpha colocalized with the specific lysosomal marker Lamp-2a, (2) 15d-PGJ(2) inhibited the activity of cathepsin B, a lysosomal protease, and (3) inhibition of lysosomal activity did not result in over-accumulation of HIF-1alpha in 15d-PGJ(2)-treated cells. Therefore, expression of HIF-1alpha is also modulated by lysosomal degradation.

  4. Bundling of actin filaments by elongation factor 1 alpha inhibits polymerization at filament ends

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1 alpha) is an abundant protein that binds aminoacyl-tRNA and ribosomes in a GTP-dependent manner. EF1 alpha also interacts with the cytoskeleton by binding and bundling actin filaments and microtubules. In this report, the effect of purified EF1 alpha on actin polymerization and depolymerization is examined. At molar ratios present in the cytosol, EF1 alpha significantly blocks both polymerization and depolymerization of actin filaments and increases the final extent of actin polymer, while at high molar ratios to actin, EF1 alpha nucleates actin polymerization. Although EF1 alpha binds actin monomer, this monomer-binding activity does not explain the effects of EF1 alpha on actin polymerization at physiological molar ratios. The mechanism for the inhibition of polymerization is related to the actin-bundling activity of EF1 alpha. Both ends of the actin filament are inhibited for polymerization and both bundling and the inhibition of actin polymerization are affected by pH within the same physiological range; at high pH both bundling and the inhibition of actin polymerization are reduced. Additionally, it is seen that the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA to EF1 alpha releases EF1 alpha's inhibiting effect on actin polymerization. These data demonstrate that EF1 alpha can alter the assembly of F-actin, a filamentous scaffold on which non- membrane-associated protein translation may be occurring in vivo. PMID:8947553

  5. Topical sulfur mustard induces changes in prostaglandins and interleukin-1 alpha in isolated perfused porcine skin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Riviere, J.E.; Monteiro-Rivier, N.A.

    1995-12-01

    Su1fur mustard BIS(2-CHLOROETHYL) SULFIDE, HD is an alkylating agent that causes severe cutaneous injury. The isolated perfused porcine skin flap (IPPSF) is an in vitro model that has been utilized in cutaneous toxicity research. The objective of this study was to characterize the local IPPSF inflammatory response after topical exposure to 5.0 and 10.0 mg/ml of I (n = 5/treatment, n = 5/control). Biochemical markers of viability CUMULATIVE GLUCOSE UTILIZATION (CGU), vascular resistance (VR), morphological parameters, and venous flux of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), prostaglandin F2% (PGF2%, and interleukin la (IL la)) were determined. HD caused a dose-related response in the formation of gross blisters, and epidermal-dermal separation. Decreases in CGU and an increase in VR were seen in all HD-treated IPPsFs. Increase of both PGE2 and PGF2a was observed only in 5.0 mg/ml HD treatment, which showed the greatest increase in VR, while the 10.0 mg/nil concentration of HD enhanced the release of IL-1a. These results suggest that HD is a potent dermal toxic agent that induces alterations in glucose metabolism and vascular resistance, which resulted in dose-specific patterns of PGE2, PGF2a and IL-la release.

  6. Effect of acetylsalicylic acid, paracetamol, caffeine and a combination of these substances on the renal prostaglandin E2, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha, water, creatinine and electrolyte excretion of the rat.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, G

    1996-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (CAS 50-78-2, ASA), paracetamol (CAS 103-90-2) and caffeine (CAS 58-08-2) and a combination of these substances on the renal prostaglandin excretion of rats loaded with water. In addition to the effects on the renal excretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1 alpha), the effect on the electrolyte, creatinine and water excretion was measured. Even in low doses ASA led to a dose-dependent reduction in the renal PGE2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha excretion. In oral doses up to 200 mg/kg paracetamol did not have any effect on the renal prostanoid excretion. In the combination it did not change the effect of ASA on the prostaglandin excretion. Caffeine caused a marked dose-dependent increase in the PGE2 excretion. The effect of caffeine on the renal 6-keto-PGF1 alpha excretion was less marked. In combination with ASA, with and without the addition of paracetamol, caffeine reduced the inhibitory effect of ASA on the excretion of arachidonic acid metabolites. The values for the renal prostaglandin excretion did not show any clear correlation with the other parameters of diuresis.

  7. Prostaglandin synthesis inhibition and postprandial intestinal hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Gallavan, R H; Chou, C C

    1982-02-01

    The effect of prostaglandin synthesis inhibition on the postprandial intestinal hyperemia was examined in the jejunum of anesthetized dogs. Both intravenous and intra-arterial infusion of the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin and mefenamic acid reduced resting jejunal blood flow and markedly enhanced the food-induced jejunal hyperemia. The jejunal vascular response to food did not change after either intravenous or intra-arterial infusion of the carrier solutions or intra-arterial infusion of angiotensin II. The enhancement of the jejunal hyperemia was associated with an increase in the food-induced increase in jejunal oxygen consumption. Infusion of the cyclooxygenase inhibitors increased the mean amplitude of the monophasic intestinal contractions; however, this did not appear to play a role in the enhancement of the food-induced hyperemia. The study indicates that inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis has a marked effect on the postprandial intestinal hyperemia and that this may be due to its enhancement of the jejunal metabolic response to food. The prostaglandins involved and their mechanism of action are unknown.

  8. Antisense inhibition of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase E1alpha subunit in anther tapetum causes male sterility.

    PubMed

    Yui, Rika; Iketani, Satoru; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2003-04-01

    We hypothesized that cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in sugar beet may be the consequence of mitochondrial dysfunctions affecting normal anther development. To test the hypothesis, we attempted to mimic the sugar beet CMS phenotype by inhibiting the expression of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), which is essential for the operation of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Screening with a cDNA library of sugar beet flower buds allowed the identification of two PDH E1alpha subunit genes (bvPDH_E1alpha-1 and bvPDH_E1alpha-2). bvPDH_E1alpha-1 was found to be highly expressed in tap roots, whereas bvPDH_E1alpha-2 was expressed most abundantly in flower buds. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion of bvPDH_E1alpha revealed mitochondrial targeting properties. A 300-bp bvPDH_E1alpha-1 cDNA sequence (from +620 to +926) was connected to a tapetum-specific promoter in the antisense orientation and then introduced into tobacco. Antisense expression of bvPDH_E1alpha-1 resulted in conspicuously decreased endogenous bvPDH_E1alpha-1 transcripts and male sterility. The tapetum in the male-sterile anthers showed swelling or abnormal vacuolation. It is also worth noting that in the sterile anthers, cell organelles, such as elaioplasts, tapetosomes and orbicules were poorly formed and microspores exhibited aberrant exine development. These features are shared by sugar beet CMS. The results thus clearly indicate that inhibition of PDH activity in anther tapetum is sufficient to cause male sterility, a phenocopy of the sugar beet CMS.

  9. Grape seed extract inhibits VEGF expression via reducing HIF-1alpha protein expression.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianming; Zhang, Keqiang; Chen, Shiuan; Wen, Wei

    2009-04-01

    Grape seed extract (GSE) is a widely consumed dietary supplement that has antitumor activity. Here, we have investigated the inhibitory effect of GSE on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the mechanism underlying this action. We found that GSE inhibited VEGF messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in U251 human glioma cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. GSE inhibited transcriptional activation of the VEGF gene through reducing protein but not mRNA expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1alpha. The inhibitory effect of GSE on HIF-1alpha expression was mainly through inhibiting HIF-1alpha protein synthesis rather than promoting protein degradation. Consistent with this result, GSE-suppressed phosphorylation of several important components involved in HIF-1alpha protein synthesis, such as Akt, S6 kinase and S6 protein. Furthermore, in the MDA-MB-231 tumor, we found that GSE treatment inhibited the expression of VEGF and HIF-1alpha and the phosphorylation of S6 kinase without altering the subcellular localization of HIF-1alpha, correlating with reduced vessel density and tumor size. Depletion of polyphenol with polyvinylpyrrolidone abolished the inhibitory activity of GSE, suggesting a water-soluble fraction of polyphenol in GSE is responsible for the inhibitory activity. Taken together, our results indicate that GSE inhibits VEGF expression by reducing HIF-1alpha protein synthesis through blocking Akt activation. This finding provides new insight into the mechanisms of anticancer activity of GSE and reveals a novel molecular mechanism underlying the antiangiogenic action of GSE.

  10. Increased concentrations of arachidonic acid, prostaglandins E2, D2, and 6-oxo-F1 alpha, and histamine in human skin following UVA irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, J.L.; Black, A.K.; Jaenicke, K.F.; Barr, R.M.; Soter, N.A.; Mallett, A.I.; Gilchrest, B.A.; Hensby, C.N.; Parrish, J.A.; Greaves, M.W.

    1983-06-01

    The buttock skin of clinically normal human subjects was subjected to approximately 2.5 minimal erythema doses of ultraviolet A irradiation. Deep red erythema developed during irradiation, faded slightly within the next few hours, increased to maximum intensity between 9-15 h, and decreased gradually thereafter although still persisting strongly at 48 h. Suction blister exudates were obtained at 0, 5, 9, 15, 24, and 48 h after irradiation as well as suction blister exudates from a contralateral control site and assayed for arachidonic acid, prostaglandins D2 and E2, and the prostacyclin breakdown product 6-oxo-prostaglandin F1 alpha by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and for histamine by radioenzyme assay. Increased concentrations of arachidonic acid and prostaglandins D2, E2, and 6-oxo-prostaglandin F1 alpha were found maximally between 5-9 h after irradiation, preceding the phase of maximal erythema. Elevations of histamine concentration occurred 9-15 h after irradiation, preceding and coinciding with the phase of maximal erythema. At 24 h, still at the height of the erythemal response, all values had returned to near control levels. Hence increased concentrations of arachidonic acid and its products from the cyclooxygenase pathway, and of histamine, accompany the early stages up to 24 h. A causal role in production of the erythema seems likely for these substances although other mediators are almost certainly involved.

  11. D-Glucosamine down-regulates HIF-1{alpha} through inhibition of protein translation in DU145 prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jee-Young; Park, Jong-Wook; Suh, Seong-Il; Baek, Won-Ki

    2009-04-24

    D-Glucosamine has been reported to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells in culture and in vivo. In this study we report a novel response to D-glucosamine involving the translation regulation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1{alpha} expression. D-Glucosamine caused a decreased expression of HIF-1{alpha} under normoxic and hypoxic conditions without affecting HIF-1{alpha} mRNA expression in DU145 prostate cancer cells. D-Glucosamine inhibited HIF-1{alpha} accumulation induced by proteasome inhibitor MG132 and prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor DMOG suggesting D-glucosamine reduces HIF-1{alpha} protein expression through proteasome-independent pathway. Metabolic labeling assays indicated that D-glucosamine inhibits translation of HIF-1{alpha} protein. In addition, D-glucosamine inhibited HIF-1{alpha} expression induced by serum stimulation in parallel with inhibition of p70S6K suggesting D-glucosamine inhibits growth factor-induced HIF-1{alpha} expression, at least in part, through p70S6K inhibition. Taken together, these results suggest that D-glucosamine inhibits HIF-1{alpha} expression through inhibiting protein translation and provide new insight into a potential mechanism of the anticancer properties of D-glucosamine.

  12. Inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} activity by BP-1 ameliorates adjuvant induced arthritis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, J.; Thippegowda, P.B.; Kanum, S.A.

    2009-09-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory, angiogenic disease. Inflamed synovitis is a hallmark of RA which is hypoxic in nature. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), one of the key regulators of angiogenesis, is overexpressed in the pathogenesis of RA. VEGF expression is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), a master regulator of homeostasis which plays a pivotal role in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. In this study we show that synthetic benzophenone analogue, 2-benzoyl-phenoxy acetamide (BP-1) can act as a novel anti-arthritic agent in an experimental adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) rat model by targeting VEGF and HIF-1{alpha}. BP-1 administered hypoxic endothelial cells and arthritic animals clearly showed down regulation of VEGF expression. Further, BP-1 inhibits nuclear translocation of HIF-1{alpha}, which in turn suppresses transcription of the VEGF gene. These results suggest a further possible clinical application of the BP-1 derivative as an anti-arthritic agent in association with conventional chemotherapeutic agents.

  13. Concentrations of prostaglandins E2, F2 alpha and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha in the utero-ovarian venous plasma of nonpregnant and early pregnant ewes.

    PubMed

    Silvia, W J; Ottobre, J S; Inskeep, E K

    1984-05-01

    The effect of pregnancy on concentrations of prostaglandins E2, F2 alpha and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (PGE2, PGF2 alpha and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha) in utero-ovarian venous plasma was examined in ewes on Days 10 through 14 after estrus, an interval which includes the critical period for maternal recognition of pregnancy. The utero-ovarian vein ipsilateral to a corpus luteum was catheterized on Day 9 or 10 in 6 pregnant and 8 nonpregnant ewes. Five blood samples were collected at 30-min intervals for 2 h beginning at 0500 and 1700 h daily. Sampling began at 0500 h on the day after catheterization. The mean and variance within each 2-h collection period were calculated for each ewe. The natural logarithm of the variance in each collection period (ln variance) was used as an estimate of the fluctuations in secretory activity by the endometrial-conceptus complex. Patterns of the mean concentrations of PGE2 were different between pregnant and nonpregnant ewes (P less than 0.01); PGE2 being higher in the pregnant ewes beginning on Day 13. There was a trend for the patterns of ln variance in PGE2 to differ (P less than 0.1) with pregnancy status over the entire period; ln variance was greater in pregnant ewes beginning on Day 13. The patterns of the mean concentrations and ln variances for PGF2 alpha and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha did not differ between pregnant and nonpregnant ewes. There were significant increases in both of these prostaglandins over time, independent of pregnancy status (P less than 0.01). The association of higher concentrations of PGE2 in utero-ovarian venous plasma with early pregnancy is consistent with the hypothesis that PGE2, originating from the uterus and/or conceptus, is one factor involved in maintenance of the corpus luteum of pregnancy.

  14. [Prostaglandins].

    PubMed

    1973-01-01

    The mode of action of prostaglandins (PGs) is today well known; PGs behave as tissular hormones, and exercise their action near the place of their biosynthesis. Such action is exercised through the adenosine cyclic 3',5' monophosphate system. They play an extremely important role in endocrine physiology and pathology, but their pharmaceutical action is mostly evident in inducing delivery at term and in inducing abortion. Several ways of administration, vaginal, intraamniotic, and intrauterine, as well as several modes of dosage have been tried to eliminate the side effects of PGs. PG induced abortion is recommended only between the 15th and the 22nd week of pregnancy; before that time the other classical techniques of abortion are better suited. PGs may induce abortion either by direct action on the myometrium, or by luteolytic destruction of the corpus luteum, thus inhibiting progesterone secretion. PGs may also be used for postcoital contraception since they intervene in induction of menstruation; side effects, however, are very important. If it is true, as it has been reported, that PGE1 and PGE2 can inhibit spermatogenesis and sperm transport, they may eventually be used in male contraception. Aspirin has been proven to inhibit PGs liberation.

  15. Inhibition of Prostaglandin D Synthase Suppresses Muscular Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohri, Ikuko; Aritake, Kosuke; Taniguchi, Hidetoshi; Sato, Yo; Kamauchi, Shinya; Nagata, Nanae; Maruyama, Toshihiko; Taniike, Masako; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2009-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a fatal muscle wasting disease that is characterized by a deficiency in the protein dystrophin. Previously, we reported that the expression of hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase (HPGDS) appeared in necrotic muscle fibers from patients with either Duchenne muscular dystrophy or polymyositis. HPGDS is responsible for the production of the inflammatory mediator, prostaglandin D2. In this paper, we validated the hypothesis that HPGDS has a role in the etiology of muscular necrosis. We investigated the expression of HPGDS/ prostaglandin D2 signaling using two different mouse models of muscle necrosis, that is, bupivacaine-induced muscle necrosis and the mdx mouse, which has a genetic muscular dystrophy. We treated each mouse model with the HPGDS-specific inhibitor, HQL-79, and measured both necrotic muscle volume and selected cytokine mRNA levels. We confirmed that HPGDS expression was induced in necrotic muscle fibers in both bupivacaine-injected muscle and mdx mice. After administration of HQL-79, necrotic muscle volume was significantly decreased in both mouse models. Additionally, mRNA levels of both CD11b and transforming growth factor β1 were significantly lower in HQL-79-treated mdx mice than in vehicle-treated animals. We also demonstrated that HQL-79 suppressed prostaglandin D2 production and improved muscle strength in the mdx mouse. Our results show that HPGDS augments inflammation, which is followed by muscle injury. Furthermore, the inhibition of HPGDS ameliorates muscle necrosis even in cases of genetic muscular dystrophy. PMID:19359520

  16. Role of seminal prostaglandins in male fertility. II. Effects of prostaglandin synthesis inhibition on spermatogenesis in man.

    PubMed

    Conte, D; Nordio, M; Romanelli, F; Manganelli, F; Giovenco, P; Dondero, F; Isidori, A

    1985-08-01

    The effect of prostaglandin biosynthesis inhibition has been studied in two groups of infertile oligozoospermic patients with high or normal-low seminal prostaglandin (PG) levels. PGE and 19-OH PGE were assayed by means of a gas chromatographic method and the most important seminal parameters (volume, concentration, motility and morphology of spermatozoa) were evaluated in basal conditions and at the end of indomethacin treatment, at a daily oral dose of 100 mg for thirty days. A drop in prostaglandin levels following indomethacin was observed in both groups of patients but only in the group with high concentrations of prostanoid derivates the prostaglandin inhibition was correlated with a significant improvement in sperm count and motility.

  17. Inhibition of prostaglandin E(2) signaling through the EP(1) receptor does not affect prostacyclin production in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Tatsuya; Okumura, Masae; Maalouf, Samer; Uflacker, Andre; Maruyama, Takayuki; Kawamori, Toshihiko

    2009-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) may play an important role in colon carcinogenesis. Thus, blockage of this pathway may be a suitable strategy for colon cancer chemoprevention. Recent clinical studies suggest that COX-2 inhibitors cause adverse cardiovascular effects due to prostacyclin (PGI(2)) inhibition. To test our hypothesis that inhibition of PGE(2) signaling through E-prostanoid (EP) receptors may offer a safer cardiovascular profile than COX-2 inhibition, we analyzed expression of 6-keto PGF(1alpha), a hydrated form of PGI(2) and PGI(2) synthase, which was stimulated with cytokines in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with the EP(1) receptor antagonist ONO-8711 or the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. ONO-8711 did not inhibit both 6-keto PGF(1alpha) production and PGIS expression, whereas celecoxib did in HUVECs. ONO-8711 also inhibited cytokine-induced tissue factor expression in HUVECs. These results suggest that ONO-8711 may be a safer chemopreventive agent with respect to cardiovascular events.

  18. Noscapine inhibits hypoxia-mediated HIF-1alpha expression andangiogenesis in vitro: a novel function for an old drug.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Elizabeth W; Lukyanov, Yevgeniy; Schnee, Tona; Ali, M Aktar; Lan, Li; Zagzag, David

    2006-05-01

    Overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a common feature in solid malignancies related to oxygen deficiency. Since increased HIF-1 expression correlates with advanced disease stage, increased angiogenesis and poor prognosis, HIF-1 and its signaling pathway have become targets for cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we identified noscapine to be a novel small molecule inhibitor of the HIF-1 pathway based on its structure-function relation-ships with HIF-1 pathway inhibitors belonging to the benzylisoquinoline class of plant metabolites and/or to microtubule binding agents. We demonstrate that noscapine treatment of human glioma U87MG and T98G cell lines exposed to the hypoxic mimetic agent, CoCl2, inhibits hypoxia-mediated HIF-1alpha expression and transcriptional activity as measured by decreased secretion of VEGF, a HIF-1 target gene. Inhibition of hypoxia-mediated HIF-1alpha expression was due, in part, to its ability to inhibit accumulation of HIF-1alpha in the nucleus and target it for degradation via the proteasome. One mechanism of action of microtubule binding agents is their antiangiogenic activity associated with disruption of endothelial tubule formation. We show that noscapine has similar properties in vitro. Thus, noscapine may possess novel antiangiogenic activity associated with two broad mechanisms of action: first, by decreasing HIF-1alpha expression in hypoxic tumor cells, upregulation of target genes, such as VEGF, would be decreased concomitant with its associated angiogenic activity; second, by inhibiting endothelial cells from forming blood vessels in response to VEGF stimulation, it may limit the process of neo-vascularization, correlating with antitumor activity in vivo. For more than 75 years, noscapine has traditionally been used as an oral cough suppressant with no known toxic side effects in man. Thus, the studies reported here have found a novel function for an old drug. Given its low toxicity profile, its demonstrated

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha activation of CYP7A1 during food restriction and diabetes is still inhibited by small heterodimer partner.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Ju; Osborne, Timothy F

    2008-05-30

    Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the classic pathway of hepatic bile acid biosynthesis from cholesterol. During fasting and in type I diabetes, elevated levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) induce expression of the Cyp7A1 gene and overexpression of PGC-1alpha in hepatoma cells stimulates bile acid synthesis. Using Ad-PGC-1alpha-RNA interference to induce acute disruption of PGC-1alpha in mice, here we show that PGC-1alpha is necessary for fasting-mediated induction of CYP7A1. Co-immunoprecipitation and promoter activation studies reveal that the induction of CYP7A1 is mediated by direct interaction between PGC-1alpha and the AF2 domain of liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1). In contrast, the very similar PGC-1beta could not substitute for PGC-1alpha. We also show that transactivation of PGC-1alpha and LRH-1 is repressed by the small heterodimer partner (SHP). Treatment of mice with GW4064, a synthetic agonist for farnesoid X receptor, induced SHP expression and decreased both the recruitment of PGC-1alpha to the Cyp7A1 promoter and the fasting-induced expression of CYP7A1 mRNA. These data suggest that PGC-1alpha is an important co-activator for LRH-1 and that SHP targets the interaction between LRH-1 and PGC-1alpha to inhibit CYP7A1 expression. Overall, these studies provide further evidence for the important role of PGC-1alpha in bile acid homeostasis and suggest that pharmacological targeting of farnesoid X receptor in vivo can be used to reverse the increase in CYP7A1 associated with adverse metabolic conditions.

  20. Both microtubule-stabilizing and microtubule-destabilizing drugs inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha accumulation and activity by disrupting microtubule function.

    PubMed

    Escuin, Daniel; Kline, Erik R; Giannakakou, Paraskevi

    2005-10-01

    We have recently identified a mechanistic link between disruption of the microtubule cytoskeleton and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis via the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) pathway. Based on this model, we hypothesized that other microtubule-targeting drugs may have a similar effect on HIF-1alpha. To test that hypothesis, we studied the effects of different clinically relevant microtubule-disrupting agents, including taxotere, epothilone B, discodermolide, vincristine, 2-methoxyestradiol, and colchicine. In all cases, HIF-1alpha protein, but not mRNA, was down-regulated in a drug dose-dependent manner. In addition, HIF-1alpha transcriptional activity was also inhibited by all drugs tested. To further examine whether these effects were dependent on microtubule network disruption, we tested the ability of epothilone B to inhibit HIF-1alpha protein in the human ovarian cancer cell line 1A9 and its beta-tubulin mutant epothilone-resistant subclone 1A9/A8. Our data showed that epothilone B treatment down-regulated HIF-1alpha protein in the parental 1A9 cells but had no effect in the resistant 1A9/A8 cells. These observations were confirmed by confocal microscopy, which showed impaired nuclear accumulation of HIF-1alpha in parental 1A9 cells at epothilone B concentrations that induced extensive microtubule stabilization. In contrast, epothilone B treatment had no effect on either microtubules or HIF-1alpha nuclear accumulation in the resistant 1A9/A8 cells. Furthermore, epothilone B inhibited HIF-1 transcriptional activity in 1A9 cells, as evidenced by a hypoxia response element-luciferase reporter assay, but had no effect on HIF-1 activity in the resistant 1A9/A8 cells. These data directly link beta-tubulin drug binding with HIF-1alpha protein inhibition. Our results further provide a strong rationale for testing taxanes and epothilones in clinical trials targeting HIF-1 in cancer patients.

  1. Celecoxib improves host defense through prostaglandin inhibition during Histoplasma capsulatum infection.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscilla Aparecida Tartari; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; Secatto, Adriana; Nicolete, Roberto; Peres-Buzalaf, Camila; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Sadikot, Ruxana; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandins act as mediators of inflammation and, similar to cytokines, function as immune modulators during innate and adaptive immune responses. Therefore, using a pharmacological inhibitor, celecoxib, we investigated the role of prostaglandins in host defense against Histoplasma capsulatum infection in C57BL/6 mice. Our results showed that treatment with celecoxib inhibited cyclooxygenase 2, reduced the total fungal burden, and reduced the concentration of PGE2, cytokines, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and mononuclear cells in the bronchoalveolar space and lung parenchyma. In addition, celecoxib treatment increased the synthesis of nitric oxide, IFN- γ, LTB4, and the phagocytic capacity of alveolar macrophages. Moreover, celecoxib treatment increased the survival of mice after infection with a lethal inoculum of H. capsulatum. These results suggest that prostaglandins alter the host immune response and play an important role in the pathogenesis of histoplasmosis. Thus, the inhibition of prostaglandins could be a valuable immunomodulatory strategy and antifungal therapy for histoplasmosis treatment.

  2. Uncoupling of stem cell inhibition from monocyte chemoattraction in MIP-1alpha by mutagenesis of the proteoglycan binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, G J; Wilkinson, P C; Nibbs, R J; Lowe, S; Kolset, S O; Parker, A; Freshney, M G; Tsang, M L; Pragnell, I B

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the role of proteoglycans in the function of Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1 alpha (MIP-1alpha), a member of the proteoglycan binding chemokine family. Sequence and peptide analysis has identified a basic region within MIP-1alpha which appears to be the major determinant of proteoglycan binding and we have now produced a mutant of MIP-1alpha lacking the basic charges on two of the amino acids within this proteoglycan binding site. This mutant (Hep Mut) appears to have lost the ability to bind to proteoglycans. Bioassay of Hep Mut indicates that it has retained stem cell inhibitory properties but has a compromised activity as a monocyte chemoattractant, thus suggesting uncoupling of these two properties of MIP-1alpha. Receptor studies have indicated that the inactivity of Hep Mut on human monocytes correlates with its inability to bind to CCR1, a cloned human MIP-1alpha receptor. In addition, studies using proteoglycan deficient cells transfected with CCR1 have indicated that the proteoglycan binding site in MIP-1alpha is a site that is also involved in the docking of MIP-1alpha to the monocyte receptor. The site for interaction with the stem cell receptor must therefore be distinct, suggesting that MIP-1alpha utilizes different receptors for these two different biological processes. Images PMID:8978677

  3. Uncoupling of stem cell inhibition from monocyte chemoattraction in MIP-1alpha by mutagenesis of the proteoglycan binding site.

    PubMed

    Graham, G J; Wilkinson, P C; Nibbs, R J; Lowe, S; Kolset, S O; Parker, A; Freshney, M G; Tsang, M L; Pragnell, I B

    1996-12-02

    We have studied the role of proteoglycans in the function of Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1 alpha (MIP-1alpha), a member of the proteoglycan binding chemokine family. Sequence and peptide analysis has identified a basic region within MIP-1alpha which appears to be the major determinant of proteoglycan binding and we have now produced a mutant of MIP-1alpha lacking the basic charges on two of the amino acids within this proteoglycan binding site. This mutant (Hep Mut) appears to have lost the ability to bind to proteoglycans. Bioassay of Hep Mut indicates that it has retained stem cell inhibitory properties but has a compromised activity as a monocyte chemoattractant, thus suggesting uncoupling of these two properties of MIP-1alpha. Receptor studies have indicated that the inactivity of Hep Mut on human monocytes correlates with its inability to bind to CCR1, a cloned human MIP-1alpha receptor. In addition, studies using proteoglycan deficient cells transfected with CCR1 have indicated that the proteoglycan binding site in MIP-1alpha is a site that is also involved in the docking of MIP-1alpha to the monocyte receptor. The site for interaction with the stem cell receptor must therefore be distinct, suggesting that MIP-1alpha utilizes different receptors for these two different biological processes.

  4. Ethacrynic acid and 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 cooperatively inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Makishima, M; Honma, Y

    1996-09-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3), inhibits proliferation and induces differentiation of leukemia cells, but its clinical use is limited by the adverse effect of hypercalcemia. In this study we found that the loop diuretic ethacrynic acid, which is used to treat hypercalcemia, enhanced the differentiation of human leukemia cells induced by VD3. Ethacrynic acid alone inhibited the proliferation of human promyelocytic HL-60 cells while only slightly increasing differentiation markers such as nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-reducing and lysozyme activities. Ethacrynic acid effectively enhanced the growth-inhibiting action of VD3. In the presence of ethacrynic acid, VD3 increased the NBT-reducing and lysozyme activities and the CD11b expression of HL-60 cells more effectively than VD3 alone. Other loop diuretics, furosemide and bumetanide, also enhanced the differentiation of HL-60 cells induced by VD3, but to a lesser extent than ethacrynic acid. The differentiation of HL-60 cells induced by all-trans retinoic acid, dimethyl sulfoxide or phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate was also enhanced by ethacrynic acid with increasing NBT-reducing and lysozyme activities and the expression of CD11b or CD14 surface antigen. Morphologically, ethacrynic acid enhanced the monocytic differentiation of HL-60 cells induced by VD3 and phorbol ester and the granulocytic differentiation by retinoic acid and dimethyl sulfoxide. Other human myelomonocytic leukemia ML-1, U937, P39/TSU and P31/FUJ cells were induced to differentiate by VD3 and this was also enhanced by ethacrynic acid. The long-term culture of HL-60 cells showed that ethacrynic acid plus VD3 induced the complete growth arrest of HL-60 cells. Therefore ethacrynic acid, which is used to treat hypercalcemia, enhanced the proliferation-inhibiting and differentiation-inducing activities of VD3 and the combination of ethacrynic acid and VD3 may be useful in therapy for myeloid leukemia.

  5. Anti-interleukin-1 alpha autoantibodies in humans: Characterization, isotype distribution, and receptor-binding inhibition--higher frequency in Schnitzler's syndrome (urticaria and macroglobulinemia)

    SciTech Connect

    Saurat, J.H.; Schifferli, J.; Steiger, G.; Dayer, J.M.; Didierjean, L. )

    1991-08-01

    Since autoantibodies (Abs) to cytokines may modify their biologic activities, high-affinity binding factors for interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha BF) were characterized in human sera. IL-1 alpha BF was identified as IgG (1) by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation followed by immunodiffusion autoradiography, (2) by ligand-blotting method, (3) by ligand binding to affinity-immobilized serum IgG, and (4) by IgG affinity purification followed by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation. IL-1 alpha binding activity resided in the F(ab)2 fragment. The apparent equilibrium constant was in the range of IgG found after immunization with conventional antigens (i.e., 10(-9) to 10(-10) mol/L). Anti-IL-1 alpha IgG auto-Abs represented only an extremely small fraction of total IgG (less than 1/10(-5)). Some sera with IL-1 alpha BF and purified IgG thereof were able to inhibit by 96% to 98% the binding of human recombinant IL-1 alpha to its receptor on murine thymoma EL4-6.1 cells, whereas other sera did not. When 125I-labeled anti-IL-1 alpha IgG complexes were injected into rats, they prolonged the plasma half-life of 125I-labeled IL-1 alpha several fold and altered its tissue distribution. The predominant class was IgG (12/19), mainly IgG4 (9/19), but in five of the sera, anti-IL-1 alpha IgA was also detected. In a screening of 271 sera, IL-1 alpha BF was detected in 17/98 normal subjects and was not more frequent in several control groups of patients, except in patients with Schnitzler's syndrome (fever, chronic urticaria, bone pain, and monoclonal IgM paraprotein) (6/9; p less than 0.005). The pathologic significance of these auto-Abs remains to be determined.

  6. Nonstructural protein 1{alpha} subunit-based inhibition of NF-{kappa}B activation and suppression of interferon-{beta} production by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    SciTech Connect

    Song Cheng; Krell, Peter; Yoo, Dongwan

    2010-11-25

    Induction of type I interferon (IFN-{alpha}/{beta}) is an early antiviral response of the host, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been reported to downregulate the IFN response during infection in cells and pigs. We report that the PRRSV nonstructural protein 1{alpha} (Nsp1{alpha}) subunit of Nsp1 is a nuclear-cytoplasmic protein distributed to the nucleus and contains a strong suppressive activity for IFN-{beta} production that is mediated through the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling pathway. Nsp1{alpha} suppressed the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B when stimulated with dsRNA or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, and NF-{kappa}B suppression was RIG-I-dependent. The suppression of NF-{kappa}B activation was associated with the poor production of IFN-{beta} during PRRSV infection. The C-terminal 14 amino acids of the Nsp1{alpha} subunit were critical in maintaining immunosuppressive activity of Nsp1{alpha} for both IFN-{beta} and NF-{kappa}B, suggesting that the newly identified zinc finger configuration comprising of Met180 may be crucial for inhibitory activities. Nsp1{alpha} inhibited I{kappa}B phosphorylation and as a consequence NF-{kappa}B translocation to the nucleus was blocked, leading to the inhibition of NF-{kappa}B stimulated gene expression. Our results suggest that PRRSV Nsp1{alpha} is a multifunctional nuclear protein participating in the modulation of the host IFN system.

  7. TISSUE REGENERATION. Inhibition of the prostaglandin-degrading enzyme 15-PGDH potentiates tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongyou; Desai, Amar; Yang, Sung Yeun; Bae, Ki Beom; Antczak, Monika I; Fink, Stephen P; Tiwari, Shruti; Willis, Joseph E; Williams, Noelle S; Dawson, Dawn M; Wald, David; Chen, Wei-Dong; Wang, Zhenghe; Kasturi, Lakshmi; Larusch, Gretchen A; He, Lucy; Cominelli, Fabio; Di Martino, Luca; Djuric, Zora; Milne, Ginger L; Chance, Mark; Sanabria, Juan; Dealwis, Chris; Mikkola, Debra; Naidoo, Jacinth; Wei, Shuguang; Tai, Hsin-Hsiung; Gerson, Stanton L; Ready, Joseph M; Posner, Bruce; Willson, James K V; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2015-06-12

    Agents that promote tissue regeneration could be beneficial in a variety of clinical settings, such as stimulating recovery of the hematopoietic system after bone marrow transplantation. Prostaglandin PGE2, a lipid signaling molecule that supports expansion of several types of tissue stem cells, is a candidate therapeutic target for promoting tissue regeneration in vivo. Here, we show that inhibition of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), a prostaglandin-degrading enzyme, potentiates tissue regeneration in multiple organs in mice. In a chemical screen, we identify a small-molecule inhibitor of 15-PGDH (SW033291) that increases prostaglandin PGE2 levels in bone marrow and other tissues. SW033291 accelerates hematopoietic recovery in mice receiving a bone marrow transplant. The same compound also promotes tissue regeneration in mouse models of colon and liver injury. Tissues from 15-PGDH knockout mice demonstrate similar increased regenerative capacity. Thus, 15-PGDH inhibition may be a valuable therapeutic strategy for tissue regeneration in diverse clinical contexts.

  8. The effect of prostaglandin inhibition on the development of pulmonary pathology associated with dead Dirofilaria immitis.

    PubMed

    Tarish, J H; Atwell, R B

    1993-09-01

    Flunixin meglumine was used to examine the effect of prostaglandin inhibition on the pathogenesis of Dirofilaria immitis in the pulmonary arteries of dogs. Immunopathological reactions to dead filariae were monitored by light and transmission electron microscopy and serology. Lung lesions in prostaglandin-inhibited dogs exposed to dead filariae were enhanced compared to control dogs. This was associated with the persistence of parasitic antigen in lung tissue and in the blood. Serology demonstrated that after insertion of D. immitis in treated dogs, antibody levels did not change, while immune complex and antigen levels increased. These results indicate that prostaglandin may have a protective effect on the way the lung reacts to dead D. immitis, and that altered dynamics of the antigen processing may well contribute to the associated lung lesions.

  9. Interleukin-1 beta, -1 alpha, and -6 and prostaglandins in vaginal/cervical fluids of pregnant women before and during labor.

    PubMed

    Cox, S M; King, M R; Casey, M L; MacDonald, P C

    1993-09-01

    Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) is not detected in the amniotic fluid of normal human pregnancies before the initiation of parturition, but during labor, both at term and preterm, this cytokine is present in the amniotic fluid of 25-40% of pregnancies. A critical question, however, is whether this finding is indicative of a role for IL-1 beta (directly or indirectly) in the initiation of parturition or is the result of IL-1 beta formation and entry into amniotic fluid as a natural sequela of normal labor. The forebag of the amniotic sac is formed during labor in response to cervical dilatation, and on the decidual surface, the tissues of this structure become exposed and bathed by vaginal fluids as the cervix opens. Microorganisms and bacterial toxins are present in vaginal fluid before labor begins; these agents should act upon the exposed tissues of the forebag to cause inflammation and evoke an inflammatory response. This study was conducted to examine the likelihood that the inflammatory mediators found in amniotic fluid in increased amounts at parturition are produced in forebag tissues after the onset of labor because of obliged inflammation in these tissues. Vaginal/cervical fluids were collected by lavage from nonpregnant women and from pregnant women at term before and during labor. The amount of immunoreactive IL-1 beta in vaginal/cervical fluids of pregnant women during labor (mean +/- SEM, 91.5 +/- 16.9 ng; n = 17) was significantly greater (P < 0.001) than that in fluids collected before labor (7.8 +/- 3 ng; n = 14). The in vivo rate of IL-1 beta secretion directly from the decidua lining the forebag during labor was brisk (1.71 +/- 0.88 ng/cm2.min; n = 4), consistent with previous observations of higher levels of pro-IL-1 beta mRNA in decidual tissues adherent to the forebag compared with those in decidua adherent to chorion laeve of the upper compartment of the amnionic sac. The vaginal fluid content of prostaglandins (PGs) during labor [PGE2, 82

  10. Inhibition of the Prostaglandin Transporter PGT Lowers Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yuling; Jasmin, Jean-Francois; Seki, Yoshinori; Lisanti, Michael P.; Charron, Maureen J.; Lefer, David J.; Schuster, Victor L.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibiting the synthesis of endogenous prostaglandins with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs exacerbates arterial hypertension. We hypothesized that the converse, i.e., raising the level of endogenous prostaglandins, might have anti-hypertensive effects. To accomplish this, we focused on inhibiting the prostaglandin transporter PGT (SLCO2A1), which is the obligatory first step in the inactivation of several common PGs. We first examined the role of PGT in controlling arterial blood pressure blood pressure using anesthetized rats. The high-affinity PGT inhibitor T26A sensitized the ability of exogenous PGE2 to lower blood pressure, confirming both inhibition of PGT by T26A and the vasodepressor action of PGE2 T26A administered alone to anesthetized rats dose-dependently lowered blood pressure, and did so to a greater degree in spontaneously hypertensive rats than in Wistar-Kyoto control rats. In mice, T26A added chronically to the drinking water increased the urinary excretion and plasma concentration of PGE2 over several days, confirming that T26A is orally active in antagonizing PGT. T26A given orally to hypertensive mice normalized blood pressure. T26A increased urinary sodium excretion in mice and, when added to the medium bathing isolated mouse aortas, T26A increased the net release of PGE2 induced by arachidonic acid, inhibited serotonin-induced vasoconstriction, and potentiated vasodilation induced by exogenous PGE2. We conclude that pharmacologically inhibiting PGT-mediated prostaglandin metabolism lowers blood pressure, probably by prostaglandin-induced natriuresis and vasodilation. PGT is a novel therapeutic target for treating hypertension. PMID:26121580

  11. Neutrophil activation: an alternative to prostaglandin inhibition as the mechanism of action for NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Altman, R D

    1990-02-01

    Experimental findings suggest that inhibition of neutrophil activation rather than suppression of prostaglandin formation may represent the principal mechanism of action of antiinflammatory drugs. This theory would account for the effectiveness of prostaglandin preserving agents, such as the nonacetylated salicylate salsalate, in the treatment of rheumatic disease. Results of the controlled clinical trials described in other papers contained in this supplement indicate that salsalate is equally effective as aspirin and the newer NSAID naproxen in relieving the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. The damage to the gastric mucosa associated with NSAID use is believed to be attributable to impairment of mucosal defense mechanisms resulting from the inhibition of gastroprotective prostaglandins. Confirmation of neutrophil activation as the mechanism of action of NSAIDs would explain the efficacy of salsalate in light of its lower incidence of gastrointestinal side effects in controlled clinical trials with aspirin and naproxen. Establishment of such a mechanism would also suggest that the other adverse effects related to prostaglandin inhibition, such as hypersensitivity reactions, platelet dysfunction, and a reduction in renal function, are not necessary correlates of effective antiinflammatory therapy.

  12. Inhibition of Mayaro virus replication by prostaglandin A1 and B2 in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, D; Marcicano, F G; Rebello, M A

    1998-09-01

    The effect of prostaglandins (PGA1 and PGB2) on the replication of Mayaro virus was studied in Vero cells. PGA1 and PGB2 antiviral activity was found to be dose-dependent. However, while 10 micrograms/ml PGB2 inhibited virus yield by 60%, at the same dose PGA1 suppressed virus replication by more than 90%. SDS-PAGE analysis of [35S]-methionine-labelled proteins showed that PGA1 did not alter cellular protein synthesis. In infected cells, PGA1 slightly inhibited the synthesis of protein C, while drastically inhibiting the synthesis of glycoproteins E1 and E2.

  13. Inhibition of Mayaro virus replication by prostaglandin A(1) in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Burlandy, F M; Rebello, M A

    2001-01-01

    Prostaglandins exhibit antiviral activity against a wide variety of RNA and DNA viruses. In the present report, we describe the effect of cyclopentenone prostaglandin A(1) (PGA(1)) on Mayaro virus replication in Vero cells. Virus yield was significantly reduced at nontoxic concentrations which did not suppress DNA, RNA or protein synthesis in uninfected or infected cells. Antiviral action decreased if PGA(1) was added at later times after infection. In Mayaro virus-infected cells, PGA(1) inhibited the synthesis of virus proteins. This effect is accompanied by the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs). Actinomycin D treatment not only inhibited the induction of HSPs but also partially prevented PGA(1) antiviral activity.

  14. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis and its effect on uterine activity during established premature labor in sheep.

    PubMed

    Scott, J E; Grigsby, P L; Hirst, J J; Jenkin, G

    2001-01-01

    Continuous infusion of the selective prostaglandin synthase type-2 inhibitor nimesulide, together with the oxytocin receptor antagonist atosiban, inhibits glucocorticoid induction of labor in sheep. We evaluated the effectiveness of this treatment commencing after the onset of premature labor when prostaglandin concentrations are already significantly elevated. Premature labor was induced in chronically cannulated fetuses by constant fetal dexamethasone infusion. After the onset of active labor in each ewe, defined as uterine electromyographic (EMG) activity twice basal levels, ewes received combined nimesulide and atosiban (20.0 and 4.12 mg/kg per day, respectively; n = 6) or vehicle (n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone and saline each 1 mL/hour; n = 4) infusions for 48 hours. Maternal and fetal plasma PGFM (13,14-dihydro-15-keto PGF2alpha, the stable metabolite of prostaglandin (PG) F2alpha) and PGE2 concentrations were measured before, during, and after infusions. Four nimesulide- and atosiban-treated ewes successfully completed the 48-hour infusion period with no deliveries occurring during inhibitor treatment, or up to 6 hours after inhibitor treatment. Delivery was delayed in two other ewes, compared with control animals. Uterine EMG activity in nimesulide- and atosiban-treated ewes (n = 4) was significantly reduced during the 48-hour inhibitor treatment period. Maternal and fetal prostaglandin concentrations were significantly decreased in inhibitor-treated ewes during and after the infusions. The combination of nimesulide and atosiban treatment for 48 hours successfully inhibited the progression of active premature labor to delivery. This study further supports the potential value of this treatment regime for the inhibition of premature labor.

  15. Monocyte prostaglandins inhibit procollagen secretion by human vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for plaque stability.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, C; Proudfoot, D; Bowyer, D E

    1999-02-01

    Extracellular matrix remodelling occurs during atherosclerosis dictating the structure of the plaque and thus the resistance to rupture. Monocytes and macrophages are believed to play a role in this remodelling. In the present study, filter-separated co-culture has been used to study the effect of monocytes on procollagen turnover by human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In this system, freshly isolated human peripheral blood monocytes inhibited procollagen secretion from VSMC without affecting either degradation of procollagen, or DNA synthesis by the VSMC. Insertion of a 12 kDa dialysis membrane between the two cell types and treatment with indomethacin showed that the inhibitory factor was of low molecular weight and was cyclooxygenase-dependent. Pre-incubation of each cell type with indomethacin demonstrated that monocyte, but not VSMC cyclooxygenase was required. Thus, the inhibitory effect on procollagen secretion was due, most likely, to monocyte prostaglandins. Neither inhibition of thromboxane synthetase, nor blocking IL-1 activity, reduced the inhibitory activity. Addition of prostaglandins PGE1, PGE2 and PGF2alpha to VSMC cultures caused a reduction in procollagen secretion which was equivalent to, but was not additive with, the maximal effect achieved by monocytes. Monocytes and macrophages are a major source of prostaglandins and these molecules are likely to play an important role in collagen turnover within lesions.

  16. The active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726, inhibits the production of prostaglandin E(2), matrix metalloproteinase 1 and interleukin 6 in human fibroblast-like synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    Burger, D; Begué-Pastor, N; Benavent, S; Gruaz, L; Kaufmann, M-T; Chicheportiche, R; Dayer, J-M

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the effects of the active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726, on fibroblast-like synoviocytes. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synoviocytes participate in tissue destruction by producing metalloproteinases (MMP), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and interleukin (IL) 6, which are involved in extracellular matrix degradation, resorption of the mineral phase and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Human synoviocytes were stimulated with IL-1alpha or tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in the presence of A77 1726. Culture supernatants were analysed for production of interstitial collagenase (MMP-1), tissue-inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1), PGE(2) and IL-6. Total RNA was isolated and analysed for steady-state levels of MMP-1, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and IL-6 mRNA. A77 1726 inhibited the production of PGE(2) in synoviocytes activated by TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha with median inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of 7 and 3 microM respectively. In contrast, MMP-1 and IL-6 production was inhibited at high A77 1726 concentrations (> 10 microM), whereas TIMP-1 was not affected. The inhibition of MMP-1 and IL-6 production was due to the known inhibitory effect of A77 1726 on pyrimidine synthesis, as it was reversed by the addition of uridine. This did not apply to PGE(2) production, which was inhibited via direct action of A77 1726 on COX-2, as shown by the increasing amount of substrate (arachidonic acid) in the culture medium. This study shows that some of the beneficial effect of leflunomide in RA patients may be due to the inhibition of PGE(2), IL-6 and MMP-1 production in synoviocytes. This effect, coupled with its multiple inhibitory effects on T lymphocyte functions, might account for the significant reduction in the rate of disease progression in RA patients treated with leflunomide.

  17. Is tartrazine-induced asthma related to inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis?

    PubMed

    Vargaftig, B B; Bessot, J C; Pauli, G

    1980-01-01

    Since it has been suggested that aspirin-induced asthma is due to inhibition of prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis, the present investigation was undertaken to determine whether tartrazine would display a similar profile. Use was made of the exquisite sensitivity of blood platelets, both in humans and in rats, to aggregating substances generated from arachidonic acid during PG biosynthesis and of the ability of aspirin to inhibit aggregation and generation of those substances. Failure to affect aggregation by arachidonic acid as well as the accompanying formation of thromboxane A2, demonstrates that neither tartrazine nor its metabolite sulfanilic acid inhibit platelet PG synthesis. It seems unlikely that tartrazine-induced asthma results from inhibition of PG biosynthesis.

  18. Inhibition of ADH-stimulated water flow by stable prostaglandin endoperoxide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ludens, J H; Taylor, C J

    1982-02-01

    The synthetic prostaglandin endoperoxide analogues 15-hydroxy-9,11-(epoxymethano)prosta-5,13-dien-1-oic acid (EPA-I) and 15-hydroxy-11,9-(epoxymethano)prosta-5,13-dien-1-oic acid (EPA-II) inhibited ADH-induced water flow in the isolated urinary bladder of the toad. In certain other biologic systems, EPA-I appeared to possess "thromboxane-like" activity. Thromboxanes, therefore, as well as the classical E prostaglandins may be modulators of the ADH response. To further characterize the effect of EPA-I on ADH, interaction studies were conducted with a related endoperoxide analogue found to be devoid of anti-ADH activity, 9,11-(epoxymethano)prostan-1-oic acid (EPA-III), and a prostanoid found to be a PGE antagonist in isolated toad bladder, 7-oxa-13-prostynoic acid. EPA-III reversed the anti-ADH activity of EPA-I but not that of PGE2. In contrast, 7-oxa-13-prostynoic acid reversed the anti-ADH activity of PGE2 but not that of an equieffective concentration of EPA-I. These findings suggest that the anti-ADH activity of EPA-I, and by inference thromboxane A2, may be mediated via a different receptor and/or pathway than that of the E prostaglandins.

  19. Inhibition of prostaglandin-H-synthase by o-phenylphenol and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Freyberger, A; Degen, G H

    1998-10-01

    Chronic administration of o-phenylphenol (OPP) is known to induce urinary bladder tumours in the Fischer rat. The underlying toxic mechanism is poorly understood. Recently, arachidonic acid (ARA)-dependent, prostaglandin-H-synthase (PHS)-catalysed metabolic activation of the OPP metabolite phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) to a genotoxic species was suggested to be involved in OPP toxicity. To investigate this hypothesis in more detail, we have studied the effects of OPP and its metabolites on PHS. When microsomal PHS from ovine seminal vesicles (OSV) was used as enzyme source, both OPP, PHQ, and 2-phenyl-1,4-benzoquinone (PBQ) inhibited PHS-cyclooxygenase. The inhibitory potency was inversely related to the ARA concentration in the assay; at 7 microM ARA IC50-values were: 13 microM (OPP), 17 microM (PHQ), and 190 microM (PBQ). In cells cultured from OSV, which express high PHS activity, 40 microM OPP almost completely suppressed prostaglandin formation. Studies with microsomal PHS demonstrated that PHQ was an excellent substrate for PHS-peroxidase; both ARA and hydrogen peroxide supported oxidation to PBQ. OPP was only a poor substrate for PHS, but inhibited the ARA-mediated and to a lesser extent also the hydrogen peroxide-mediated in vitro oxidation of PHQ. Moreover, PHQ at up to moderately cytotoxic concentrations (50 microM) did not induce micronuclei in OSV cell cultures. Taken together, our findings do not provide evidence for an ARA-dependent, PHS-catalysed formation of genotoxic species from PHQ. Moreover, it seems to be questionable whether such activation can effectively occur in vivo, since OPP and PHQ turned out to be efficient cyclooxygenase inhibitors, and high levels of OPP and PHQ were found at least in the urine of OPP-treated rats. On the other hand, inhibition of the formation of cytoprotective prostaglandins in the urogenital tract may play a crucial role in OPP-induced bladder carcinogenesis.

  20. Prostaglandin A1 inhibits replication of Mayaro virus in Aedes albopictus cells.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, J A; Rebello, M A

    1995-01-01

    Prostaglandin A1 (PGA1) reduced Mayaro virus replication in Aedes albopictus (mosquito) cells in culture. The highest nontoxic dose of PGA1, 7.5 microM, decreased virus production by 90%. In Mayaro virus-infected cells, PGA1 inhibited virus-specific protein synthesis. However, in mock-infected cells the presence of PGA1 stimulated the synthesis of several proteins with molecular masses of 70, 57 and 23 kDa, respectively. The data obtained from this study show that PGA1 plays a role in the metabolic regulation of Aedes albopictus cells, blocking the synthesis of Mayaro virus and inducing the synthesis of cellular polypeptides.

  1. Aspirin inhibits interleukin 1-induced prostaglandin H synthase expression in cultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.K.; Sanduja, R.; Tsai, A.L.; Ferhanoglu, B.; Loose-Mitchell, D.S. )

    1991-03-15

    Prostaglandin H (PGH) synthase is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxane, and prostacyclin. In cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells, interleukin 1 (IL-1) is known to induce the synthesis of this enzyme, thereby raising the level of PGH synthase protein severalfold over the basal level. Pretreatment with aspirin at low concentrations inhibited more than 60% of the enzyme mass and also the cyclooxygenase activity in IL-1-induced cells with only minimal effects on the basal level of the synthase enzyme in cells without IL-1. Sodium salicylate exhibited a similar inhibitory action whereas indomethacin had no apparent effect. Similarly low levels of aspirin inhibited the increased L-({sup 35}S)methionine incorporation into PGH synthase that was induced by IL0-1 and also suppressed expression of the 2.7-kilobase PGH synthase mRNA. These results suggest that in cultured endothelial cells a potent inhibition of eicosanoid biosynthetic capacity can be effected by aspirin or salicylate at the level of PGH synthase gene expression. The aspirin effect may well be due to degradation of salicylate.

  2. Prostaglandin D2 inhibits wound-induced hair follicle neogenesis through the receptor, Gpr44.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Amanda M; Loy, Dorothy E; Lawson, John A; Katseff, Adiya S; Fitzgerald, Garret A; Garza, Luis A

    2013-04-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are key inflammatory mediators involved in wound healing and regulating hair growth; however, their role in skin regeneration after injury is unknown. Using wound-induced hair follicle neogenesis (WIHN) as a marker of skin regeneration, we hypothesized that PGD2 decreases follicle neogenesis. PGE2 and PGD2 were elevated early and late, respectively, during wound healing. The levels of WIHN, lipocalin-type prostaglandin D2 synthase (Ptgds), and its product PGD2 each varied significantly among background strains of mice after wounding, and all correlated such that the highest Ptgds and PGD2 levels were associated with the lowest amount of regeneration. In addition, an alternatively spliced transcript variant of Ptgds missing exon 3 correlated with high regeneration in mice. Exogenous application of PGD2 decreased WIHN in wild-type mice, and PGD2 receptor Gpr44-null mice showed increased WIHN compared with strain-matched control mice. Furthermore, Gpr44-null mice were resistant to PGD2-induced inhibition of follicle neogenesis. In all, these findings demonstrate that PGD2 inhibits hair follicle regeneration through the Gpr44 receptor and imply that inhibition of PGD2 production or Gpr44 signaling will promote skin regeneration.

  3. Prostaglandin D2 inhibits wound-induced hair follicle neogenesis through the receptor, Gpr44

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Amanda M.; Loy, Dorothy E.; Lawson, John A.; Katseff, Adiya S.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Garza, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are key inflammatory mediators involved in wound healing and regulating hair growth; however, their role in skin regeneration after injury is unknown. Using wound-induced hair follicle neogenesis (WIHN) as a marker of skin regeneration, we hypothesized that PGD2 decreases follicle neogenesis. PGE2 and PGD2 were elevated early and late respectively during wound healing. The levels of WIHN, lipocalin-type prostaglandin D2 synthase (Ptgds) and its product PGD2 each varied significantly among background strains of mice after wounding and all correlated such that the highest Ptgds and PGD2 levels were associated with the lowest amount of regeneration. Additionally, an alternatively spliced transcript variant of Ptgds missing exon 3 correlated with high regeneration in mice. Exogenous application of PGD2 decreased WIHN in wild type mice and PGD2 receptor Gpr44 null mice showed increased WIHN compared to strain-matched control mice. Furthermore, Gpr44 null mice were resistant to PGD2-induced inhibition of follicle neogenesis. In all, these findings demonstrate that PGD2 inhibits hair follicle regeneration through the Gpr44 receptor and imply that inhibition of PGD2 production or Gpr44 signaling will promote skin regeneration. PMID:23190891

  4. R-Flurbiprofen Traps Prostaglandins within Cells by Inhibition of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein-4

    PubMed Central

    Wobst, Ivonne; Ebert, Lisa; Birod, Kerstin; Wegner, Marthe-Susanna; Hoffmann, Marika; Thomas, Dominique; Angioni, Carlo; Parnham, Michael J.; Steinhilber, Dieter; Tegeder, Irmgard; Geisslinger, Gerd; Grösch, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    R-flurbiprofen is the non-COX-inhibiting enantiomer of flurbiprofen and is not converted to S-flurbiprofen in human cells. Nevertheless, it reduces extracellular prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in cancer or immune cell cultures and human extracellular fluid. Here, we show that R-flurbiprofen acts through a dual mechanism: (i) it inhibits the translocation of cPLA2α to the plasma membrane and thereby curtails the availability of arachidonic acid and (ii) R-flurbiprofen traps PGE2 inside of the cells by inhibiting multidrug resistance–associated protein 4 (MRP4, ABCC4), which acts as an outward transporter for prostaglandins. Consequently, the effects of R-flurbiprofen were mimicked by RNAi-mediated knockdown of MRP4. Our data show a novel mechanism by which R-flurbiprofen reduces extracellular PGs at physiological concentrations, particularly in cancers with high levels of MRP4, but the mechanism may also contribute to its anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties and suggests that it reduces PGs in a site- and context-dependent manner. PMID:28042832

  5. The novel hypoxic cytotoxin, TX-2098 has antitumor effect in pancreatic cancer; possible mechanism through inhibiting VEGF and hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} targeted gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Kotaro; Nishioka, Masanori; Imura, Satoru; Batmunkh, Erdenebulgan; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nagasawa, Hideko; Hori, Hitoshi; Shimada, Mitsuo

    2012-08-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been considered to be a potential therapeutic target, because hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of a novel hypoxic cytotoxin, 3-[2-hydroxyethyl(methyl)amino]-2-quinoxalinecarbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (TX-2098) in inhibiting the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), and consequently vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) expression in pancreatic cancer. The antitumor effects of TX-2098 under hypoxia were tested against various human pancreatic cancer cell lines using WST-8 assay. VEGF protein induced pancreatic cancer was determined on cell-free supernatant by ELISA. Moreover, nude mice bearing subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopically implanted human SUIT-2 were treated with TX-2098. Tumor volume, survival and expression of HIF-1 and associated molecules were evaluated in treatment versus control groups. In vitro, TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of various pancreatic cancer cell lines. In s.c model, tumors from nude mice injected with pancreatic cancer cells and treated with TX-2098 showed significant reductions in volume (P < 0.01 versus control). Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that TX-2098 significantly inhibited mRNA expression of the HIF-1 associated molecules, VEGF, glucose transporter 1 and Aldolase A (P < 0.01 versus control). These treatments also prolong the survival in orthotopic models. These results suggest that the effect of TX-2098 in pancreatic cancer might be correlated with the expression of VEGF and HIF-1 targeted molecules. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed and synthesized novel hypoxic cytoxin, TX-2098. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 reduced VEGF protein level than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098

  6. The 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, zileuton, suppresses prostaglandin biosynthesis by inhibition of arachidonic acid release in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, A; Pergola, C; Koeberle, A; Hoffmann, M; Dehm, F; Bramanti, P; Cuzzocrea, S; Werz, O; Sautebin, L

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Zileuton is the only 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitor marketed as a treatment for asthma, and is often utilized as a selective tool to evaluate the role of 5-LOX and leukotrienes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of zileuton on prostaglandin (PG) production in vitro and in vivo. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Peritoneal macrophages activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon γ (LPS/IFNγ), J774 macrophages and human whole blood stimulated with LPS were used as in vitro models and rat carrageenan-induced pleurisy as an in vivo model. KEY RESULTS Zileuton suppressed PG biosynthesis by interference with arachidonic acid (AA) release in macrophages. We found that zileuton significantly reduced PGE2 and 6-keto prostaglandin F1α (PGF1α) levels in activated mouse peritoneal macrophages and in J774 macrophages. This effect was not related to 5-LOX inhibition, because it was also observed in macrophages from 5-LOX knockout mice. Notably, zileuton inhibited PGE2 production in LPS-stimulated human whole blood and suppressed PGE2 and 6-keto PGF1α pleural levels in rat carrageenan-induced pleurisy. Interestingly, zileuton failed to inhibit the activity of microsomal PGE2 synthase1 and of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and did not affect COX-2 expression. However, zileuton significantly decreased AA release in macrophages accompanied by inhibition of phospholipase A2 translocation to cellular membranes. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATION Zileuton inhibited PG production by interfering at the level of AA release. Its mechanism of action, as well as its use as a pharmacological tool, in experimental models of inflammation should be reassessed. PMID:20880396

  7. Tick saliva inhibits the chemotactic function of MIP-1alpha and selectively impairs chemotaxis of immature dendritic cells by down-regulating cell-surface CCR5.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carlo José F; Cavassani, Karen A; Moré, Daniela D; Garlet, Gustavo P; Aliberti, Julio C; Silva, João S; Ferreira, Beatriz R

    2008-05-01

    Ticks are blood-feeding arthropods that secrete immunomodulatory molecules through their saliva to antagonize host inflammatory and immune responses. As dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in host immune responses, we studied the effects of Rhipicephalus sanguineus tick saliva on DC migration and function. Bone marrow-derived immature DCs pre-exposed to tick saliva showed reduced migration towards macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-1beta and regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) chemokines in a Boyden microchamber assay. This inhibition was mediated by saliva which significantly reduced the percentage and the average cell-surface expression of CC chemokine receptor CCR5. In contrast, saliva did not alter migration of DCs towards MIP-3beta, not even if the cells were induced for maturation. Next, we evaluated the effect of tick saliva on the activity of chemokines related to DC migration and showed that tick saliva per se inhibits the chemotactic function of MIP-1alpha, while it did not affect RANTES, MIP-1beta and MIP-3beta. These data suggest that saliva possibly reduces immature DC migration, while mature DC chemotaxis remains unaffected. In support of this, we have analyzed the percentage of DCs on mice 48h after intradermal inoculation with saliva and found that the DC turnover in the skin was reduced compared with controls. Finally, to test the biological activity of the saliva-exposed DCs, we transferred DCs pre-cultured with saliva and loaded with the keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) antigen to mice and measured their capacity to induce specific T cell cytokines. Data showed that saliva reduced the synthesis of both T helper (Th)1 and Th2 cytokines, suggesting the induction of a non-polarised T cell response. These findings propose that the inhibition of DCs migratory ability and function may be a relevant mechanism used by ticks to subvert the immune response of the host.

  8. TGF-beta 1 inhibits both endotoxin-induced prostaglandin synthesis and expression of the TIS10/prostaglandin synthase 2 gene in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S T; Gilbert, R S; Xie, W; Luner, S; Herschman, H R

    1994-02-01

    Activated macrophages produce substantial quantities of paracrine mediators, including cytokines, nitric oxide, and prostaglandins. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta) is a potent modulator of immune function. TGF-beta inhibits the cytotoxic activity of endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophage cell lines and primary macrophage cultures, reducing their expression of cytokines and nitric oxide. In this report we demonstrate that TGF-beta also attenuates the LPS-induced synthesis and secretion of prostaglandin E2 in murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Macrophage activation also induces accumulation of the recently described ligand-responsive prostaglandin synthase (PGS) TIS10/PGS-2. While TGF-beta alone has no effect on expression from the TIS10/PGS-2 gene, this cytokine inhibits LPS-induced TIS10/PGS-2 protein accumulation and synthesis, as well as LPS-induced TIS10/PGS-2 message accumulation in RAW 264.7 cells. TGF-beta concentrations in the range of 0.1-1.0 ng/ml (4-40 pM) maximally inhibit LPS-induced TIS10/PGS-2 message accumulation. In contrast, neither LPS nor TGF-beta has any effect on the level of PGS-1 (EC 1.14.99.1) message. TGF-beta also attenuates LPS-induced accumulation of unspliced TIS10/PGS-2 transcripts in RAW 264.7 cells, suggesting that this cytokine exerts its effects on TIS10/PGS-2 expression at the transcriptional level. TGF-beta inhibits the LPS-induced accumulation of TIS10/PGS-2 protein and message in cultured murine peritoneal macrophages, as well as in macrophage cell lines.

  9. The influence of inhibited prostaglandin biosynthesis on post-ovulatory oviductal ova transport in sows.

    PubMed

    Hultén, F; Tantasuparuk, W; Englund, P; Kindahl, H; Einarsson, S

    2000-04-15

    Changes in prostaglandin and progesterone concentrations after ovulation seem to affect reproductive functions in the sow. The influence of lowered prostaglandin levels on ova transport velocity through the isthmus part of the oviduct, and on progesterone concentrations, was studied during the second estrus after weaning in thirteen purebred Yorkshire multiparous sows. To determine the time of ovulation transrectal ultrasonographic examination was performed. In the second estrus, six sows were given intravenous injections of flunixin meglumine (2.2 mg/kg body weight) every sixth hour from 4 to 8 h after time of ovulation until about 48 h after ovulation, at which time the sows were slaughtered. Blood samples were collected every second hour from about 12 h before ovulation until slaughter. Progesterone and prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) metabolite levels were determined. Immediately after slaughter the isthmus part of the oviducts were cut into 3 equally long segments and the number of ova in each segment, and in the upper part of the uterine horns, was determined. Before start of treatment, PGF2alpha metabolite levels were similar in the 2 groups (P=0.84). In the treatment group, PGF2alpha values dropped to below the detection limit immediately after start of treatment, whereas in the control group the concentrations were quite stable throughout the sampling period (P=0.005). Ova recovery rate was 94% in the treatment group and 95 % in the control group. At time of slaughter, in the treatment group ova had on average passed 2.1 segments whereas in the control group the ova had passed 2.5 segments (P=0.57). The progesterone levels increased continuously in both groups after ovulation but there was no difference in the mean progesterone concentrations between the two groups before (P=0.96) or after (P=0.58) ovulation. It can be concluded that the transport of ova through the isthmus part of the oviduct is unaffected by an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis

  10. Prostaglandin A1 metabolism and inhibition of cyclic AMP extrusion by avian erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Heasley, L.E.; Brunton, L.L.

    1985-09-25

    Prostaglandins (PG) inhibit active cyclic AMP export from pigeon red cells, PGA1 and PGA2 most potently. To probe the mechanism of this action of PGA1, the authors have studied the interaction of (TH)PGA1 with suspensions of pigeon red cells. The interaction of PGA1 with pigeon red cells is a multistep process of uptake, metabolism, and secretion. (TH) PGA1 rapidly enters red cells and is promptly metabolized to a compound(s) that remains in the aqueous layer after ethylacetate extraction. The glutathione-depleting agent, diamide, inhibits formation of the PGA1 metabolite. The red cells secrete the polar metabolite of PGA1 by a saturable mechanism that lowered temperatures inhibit. Because uptake and metabolism progress with much greater rates than metabolite secretion, red cells transiently concentrate the polar compound intracellularly. Onset and reversal of inhibition of cyclic AMP export by PGA1 coincide with accumulation and secretion of PGA1 metabolite, suggesting that the polar metabolite acts at an intracellular site to inhibit cyclic AMP efflux.

  11. Export of cyclic AMP by avian red cells and inhibition by prostaglandin A/sub 1/

    SciTech Connect

    Heasley, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism by which PGA/sub 1/ inhibits cAMP export by avian red cells was studied, to provide details on the molecular mechanism of a prostaglandin action and on the process of cAMP export itself. The interaction of PGA/sub 1/ with pigeon red cells is a multi-step process of uptake, metabolism and secretion. (/sup 3/H)PGA rapidly enters red cells and is promptly metabolized (V/sub max/ greater than or equal to 1 nmol/min/10/sup 7/ cells) to a compound (5) that remains in the aqueous layer after ethyl acetate extraction. Chromatographic analyses, amino acid content and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry reveal that the polar metabolite is conjugated with glutathione (PGA/sub 1/-GSH) at C-11 via a thioether bond and is largely (80%) reduced to the C-9 hydroxyl derivative.

  12. Staphylococcal exopolysaccharides inhibit lymphocyte proliferative responses by activation of monocyte prostaglandin production.

    PubMed Central

    Stout, R D; Ferguson, K P; Li, Y N; Lambe, D W

    1992-01-01

    The glycocalyx (exopolysaccharides) of Staphylococcus epidermidis has been reported to inhibit a variety of host defense mechanisms. We have examined the inhibitory effects of glycocalyx on the proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the mechanism of this inhibition. Glycocalyx isolated and partially purified under endotoxin-free conditions from defined liquid medium cultures of S. epidermidis and Staphylococcus lugdunensis inhibited the proliferative response of PBMC when added to cultures at 10 to 100 micrograms/ml. Glycocalyx-mediated inhibition of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated proliferation of PBMC required the presence of plastic-adherent peripheral blood monocytes. Culture supernatants of monocytes stimulated with glycocalyx contained a soluble factor that inhibited the proliferation of monocyte-depleted PBMC. This soluble inhibitory factor was not produced in the absence of glycocalyx or in the presence of both glycocalyx and indomethacin. Analysis of the supernatants of cultures of adherent monocytes revealed that glycocalyx from S. epidermidis and from S. lugdunensis could activate monocyte production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), human interleukin-1, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. The addition of purified PGE2, at the same levels of PGE2 (greater than or equal to 10(-9) M) generated in the monocyte cultures, to PBMC cultures resulted in a similar inhibition of proliferative responses. It is concluded that, contrary to previous suggestions, the bacterial glycocalyx does not have a direct inhibitory effect on T lymphocytes. However, it does appear that glycocalyx from coagulase-negative staphylococci can activate monocyte PGE2 production and that it is this activity that in turn contributes to the inhibition of T-cell proliferation. PMID:1541565

  13. Myrtucommulone, a natural acylphloroglucinol, inhibits microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1

    PubMed Central

    Koeberle, A; Pollastro, F; Northoff, H; Werz, O

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The selective inhibition of prostaglandin (PG)E2 formation via interference with microsomal PGE2 synthase (mPGES)-1 could have advantages in the treatment of PGE2-associated diseases, such as inflammation, fever and pain, compared with a general suppression of all PG biosynthesis, provided by inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and 2. Here, we addressed whether the naturally occurring acylphloroglucinol myrtucommulone (MC) from Myrtus communis L. (myrtle) affected mPGES-1. Experimental approach: The effect of MC on PGE2 formation was investigated in a cell-free assay by using microsomal preparations of interleukin-1β-stimulated A549 cells as the source of mPGES-1, in intact A549 cells, and in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human whole blood. Inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 activity in cellular and cell-free assays was assessed by measuring 12(S)-hydroxy-5-cis-8,10-trans-heptadecatrienoic acid and 6-oxo PGF1α formation. Key results: MC concentration-dependently inhibited cell-free mPGES-1-mediated conversion of PGH2 to PGE2 (IC50 = 1 µmol·L−1). PGE2 formation was also diminished in intact A549 cells as well as in human whole blood at low micromolar concentrations. Neither COX-2 activity in A549 cells nor isolated human recombinant COX-2 was significantly affected by MC up to 30 µmol·L−1, and only moderate inhibition of cellular or cell-free COX-1 was evident (IC50 > 15 µmol·L−1). Conclusions and implications: MC is the first natural product to inhibit mPGES-1 that efficiently suppresses PGE2 formation without significant inhibition of the COX enzymes. This provides an interesting pharmacological profile suitable for interventions in inflammatory disorders, without the typical side effects of coxibs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:19298395

  14. Inhibition of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 by aminothiazoles decreases prostaglandin E2 synthesis in vitro and ameliorates experimental periodontitis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kats, Anna; Båge, Tove; Georgsson, Pierre; Jönsson, Jörgen; Quezada, Hernán Concha; Gustafsson, Anders; Jansson, Leif; Lindberg, Claes; Näsström, Karin; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay

    2013-01-01

    The potent inflammatory mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is implicated in the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory conditions, including periodontitis. The inducible enzyme microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), catalyzing the terminal step of PGE2 biosynthesis, is an attractive target for selective PGE2 inhibition. To identify mPGES-1 inhibitors, we investigated the effect of aminothiazoles on inflammation-induced PGE2 synthesis in vitro, using human gingival fibroblasts stimulated with the cytokine IL-1β and a cell-free mPGES-1 activity assay, as well as on inflammation-induced bone resorption in vivo, using ligature-induced experimental periodontitis in Sprague-Dawley rats. Aminothiazoles 4-([4-(2-naphthyl)-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]amino)phenol (TH-848) and 4-(3-fluoro-4-methoxyphenyl)-N-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-1,3-thiazol-2-amine (TH-644) reduced IL-1β-induced PGE2 production in fibroblasts (IC50 1.1 and 1.5 μM, respectively) as well as recombinant mPGES-1 activity, without affecting activity or expression of the upstream enzyme cyclooxygenase-2. In ligature-induced experimental periodontitis, alveolar bone loss, assessed by X-ray imaging, was reduced by 46% by local treatment with TH-848, compared to vehicle, without any systemic effects on PGE2, 6-keto PGF1α, LTB4 or cytokine levels. In summary, these results demonstrate that the aminothiazoles represent novel mPGES-1 inhibitors for inhibition of PGE2 production and reduction of bone resorption in experimental periodontitis, and may be used as potential anti-inflammatory drugs for treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases, including periodontitis.—Kats, A., Båge, T., Georgsson, P., Jönsson, J., Quezada, H. C., Gustafsson, A., Jansson, L., Lindberg, C., Näsström, K., Yucel-Lindberg, T. Inhibition of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 by aminothiazoles decreases prostaglandin E2 synthesis in vitro and ameliorates experimental periodontitis in vivo. PMID:23447581

  15. Prostaglandins inhibit secretion of histamine and pancreastatin from isolated rat stomach ECL cells

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Erik; Håkanson, Rolf

    1998-01-01

    The present study examines the effect of naturally occurring prostanoids and prostaglandin (PG) congeners on gastrin- and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP)-evoked histamine and pancreastatin secretion from isolated rat stomach ECL cells. ECL cells (75–85% purity) were isolated from rat stomach using pronase digestion followed by repeated counter-flow elutriation and cultured for 48 h before secretion experiments. The release of histamine and pancreastatin was determined by radioimmunoassay. None of the PGs tested stimulated the release of either histamine or pancreastatin. PGE1 and PGE2 inhibited both gastrin- and PACAP-evoked histamine and pancreastatin secretion (IC50=1–2×10−10 M). Most other naturally occuring prostanoids and PG congeners had no or little inhibitory effect. The PGE analogues misoprostol and sulprostone were more potent (IC50=0.9×10−11 M and 2×10−11 M respectively) than PGE1 and PGE2. The rank order of potency was misoprostol>sulprostone>PGE1=PGE2, suggesting the involvement of the so-called EP3 receptor. The effects of PGs on the stomach ECL cells may be direct or indirect, for instance through the stimulated release of somatostatin from contaminating D cells (2–3%). However, the amount of somatostatin in the cell culture after 48 h was below the limit of detection, and somatostatin immunoneutralization did not prevent misoprostol from inhibiting secretion from the ECL cells. The misoprostol-induced inhibition was reversed by pertussis toxin suggesting the involvement of G-protein subunits Gα0 and/or Gαi. In view of the potency by which PGE1, PGE2, misoprostol and sulprostone inhibited the stimulated release of histamine and pancreastatin, we suggest that the ECL cells represent a primary target for prostaglandins acting via an EP3 receptor in the oxyntic mucosa. The results suggest that the clinically useful effect of misoprostol as an anti-ulcer drug reflects its ability to inhibit stomach ECL

  16. p-Benzoquinone, a reactive metabolite of benzene, prevents the processing of pre-interleukins-1{alpha} and -1{beta} to active cytokines by inhibition of the processing enzymes, calpain, and interleukin-1{beta} converting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Kalf, G.F.; Renz, J.F.; Niculescu, R.

    1996-12-01

    Chronic exposure of humans to benzene affects hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and leads to aplastic anemia. The stromal macrophage, a target of benzene toxicity, secretes interieukin-1 (IL-1), which induces the stromal fibroblast to synthesize hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors. In a mouse model, benzene causes an acute marrow hypocellularity that can be prevented by the concomitant administration of IL-1{alpha}. The ability of benzene to interfere with the production and secretion of IL-1{alpha} was tested. Stromal macrophages from benzene-treated mice were capable of the transcription of the IL-1{alpha} gene and the translation of the message but showed an inability to process the 34-kDa pre-IL-1{alpha} precursor to the 17-kDa biologically active cytokine. Treatment of normal murine stromal macrophages in culture with hydroquinone (HQ) also showed an inhibition in processing of pre-IL-1{alpha}. Hydroquinone is oxidized by a peroxidase-mediated reaction in the stromal macrophage to p-benzoquinone, which interacts with the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of proteins and was shown to completely inhibit the activity of calpain, the SH-dependent protease that cleaves pre-IL-1{alpha}. In a similar manner, HQ, via peroxidase oxidation to p-benzoquinone, was capable of preventing the IL-1{beta} autocrine stimulation of growth of human B1 myeloid tumor cells by preventing the processing of pre-IL-1{beta} to mature cytokine. Benzoquinone was also shown to completely inhibit the ability of the SH-dependent IL-1{beta} converting enzyme. Thus benzene-induced bone marrow hypocellularity may result from apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitor cells brought about by lack of essential cylokines and deficient IL-1{alpha} production subsequent to the inhibition of calpain by p-benzoquinone and the prevention of pre-IL-1 processing. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production by flavone and its related compounds.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Tadayoshi; Chiba, Hiroshige; Horie, Norio; Kato, Takao; Kobayashi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ken; Kusama, Kaoru; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that among 12 major ingredients of Sairei-to, Scutellariae radix inhibited prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated mouse macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells more efficiently than other ingredients, and wogonin, a major flavonoid from Scutellariae radix, showed greater inhibitory activity and membrane permeability than baicalein and baicalin. Here the effects of six other flavonoids, with similar structures, on membrane permeability and PGE(2) production were investigated. 7-Methoxyflavone inhibited the LPS-stimulated PGE(2) production to the greatest extent, followed by flavone>wogonin (5,7-dihydroxy-8-methoxyflavone)> 7,8-dimethoxyflavone>chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone)> baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone)>chromone. 7-Methoxyflavone also showed the highest membrane permeability, followed by flavone>chrysin>7,8-dimethoxy-flavone>wogonin>baicalein. When PGE(2) inhibitory activity was expressed per molecule incorporated into the cells, wogonin produced the greatest inhibition, further substantiating its anti-inflammatory potency.

  18. Prostaglandin E₂ inhibits human lung fibroblast chemotaxis through disparate actions on different E-prostanoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Ji; Wang, Xing-Qi; Sato, Tadashi; Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Nakanishi, Masanori; Kim, Miok; Michalski, Joel; Nelson, Amy J; Sun, Jian-Hong; Farid, Maha; Basma, Hesham; Patil, Amol; Toews, Myron L; Liu, Xiangde; Rennard, Stephen I

    2011-01-01

    The migration of fibroblasts is believed to play a key role in both normal wound repair and abnormal tissue remodeling. Prostaglandin E (PGE)(2), a mediator that can inhibit many fibroblast functions including chemotaxis, was reported to be mediated by the E-prostanoid (EP) receptor EP2. PGE(2), however, can act on four receptors. This study was designed to determine if EP receptors, in addition to EP2, can modulate fibroblast chemotaxis. Using human fetal lung fibroblasts, the expression of all four EP receptors was demonstrated by Western blotting. EP2-selective and EP4-selective agonists inhibited both chemotaxis toward fibronectin in the blindwell assay and migration in a wound-closure assay. In contrast, EP1-selective and EP3-selective agonists stimulated cell migration in both assay systems. These results were confirmed using EP-selective antagonists. The role of both EP2 and EP4 receptors in mediating the PGE(2) inhibition of chemotaxis was also confirmed by small interfering RNA suppression. Furthermore, the role of EP receptors was confirmed by blocking the expected signaling pathways. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PGE(2) can act on multiple EP receptors in human lung fibroblasts, to exert disparate effects. Alterations in EP receptor expression may have the potential to alter PGE(2) action. Targeting specific EP receptors may offer therapeutic opportunities in conditions characterized by abnormal tissue repair and remodeling.

  19. Characterization of scavengers of γ-ketoaldehydes that do not inhibit prostaglandin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zagol-Ikapitte, Irene; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Bala, Manju; Roberts, L. Jackson; Oates, John A.; Boutaud, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is associated with the development of many pathologic conditions. The product of COX-2, prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) can spontaneously rearrange to form reactive γ-ketoaldehydes called levuglandins (LGs). This γ-ketoaldehyde structure confers a high degree of reactivity on the LGs, which rapidly form covalent adducts with primary amines of protein residues. Formation of LG adducts of proteins has been demonstrated in pathologic conditions (e.g. increased levels in the hippocampus in Alzheimer’s disease) and during physiologic function (platelet activation). Based on knowledge that lipid modification of proteins is known to cause their translocation and to alter their function, we hypothesize that modification of proteins by LG could have functional consequences. Testing this hypothesis requires an experimental approach that discriminates between the effects of protein modification by LG and the effects of cyclooxygenase-derived prostanoids acting through their G-protein coupled receptors. To achieve this goal, we have synthesized and evaluated a series of scavengers that react with LG with a potency more than two orders of magnitude greater than with the ε-amine of lysine. A subset of these scavengers are shown to block formation of LG adducts of proteins in cells without inhibiting the catalytic activity of the cyclooxygenases. Ten of these selective scavengers did not produce cytotoxicity. These results demonstrate that small molecules can scavenge LGs in cells without interfering with the formation of prostaglandins. They also provide a working hypothesis for the development of pharmacologic agents that could be used in experimental animals in vivo to assess the pathophysiological contribution of levuglandins in diseases associated with cyclooxygenase up-regulation. PMID:20041722

  20. Mechanism of selective inhibition of the inducible isoform of prostaglandin G/H synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, R A; Williams, J M; Giannaras, J; Nurnberg, S; Covington, M; Pinto, D; Pick, S; Trzaskos, J M

    1994-01-01

    Selective inhibition of the inducible isoform of prostaglandin G/H synthase (cyclooxygenase-2; COX2; EC 1.14.99.1) can be achieved with compounds of the general form of aryl methyl sulfonyls and aryl methyl sulfonamides. DuP 697 and NS-398 are representative examples of these compounds. Both inhibit the constitute (COX1) and inducible (COX2) isoforms of the enzyme with equal potency shortly after mixing, but their potencies increase with time for COX2 selectively. This time-dependent inhibition follows first-order kinetics, and the rate constant for inactivation of COX2 is dose dependent for both compounds. Kinetic analysis allows us to determine KI and kinact (the maximal rate of inactivation) for each inhibitor. The potency of both compounds is substrate concentration dependent, as expected for time-dependent competitive inhibitors. COX2 that has been incubated with these inhibitors, and then extensively dialyzed against buffer, shows no recovery of enzyme activity, while complete recovery of activity is seen for COX1. Thus, these inhibitors irreversibly inactivate COX2 with time, while showing minimal reversible inhibition of COX1. We isolated these inhibitors after long incubation with excess enzyme and subsequent denaturation of the enzyme. Both inhibitors showed no loss of potency resulting from interactions with COX2, suggesting that inhibition is not mediated by covalent modification of the enzyme. These data suggest that binding of these inhibitors to COX2 induces a slow structural transition of the enzyme that results in its selective inactivation. PMID:7972034

  1. ENMD-1198, a novel tubulin-binding agent reduces HIF-1alpha and STAT3 activity in human hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) cells, and inhibits growth and vascularization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moser, Christian; Lang, Sven A; Mori, Akira; Hellerbrand, Claus; Schlitt, Hans J; Geissler, Edward K; Fogler, William E; Stoeltzing, Oliver

    2008-07-23

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents a highly vascularized tumor entity and the process of angiogenesis is essential for the growth of HCC. Importantly, the pro-angiogenic transcription factors HIF-1alpha and STAT3 have been implicated in HCC progression, thus representing interesting targets for molecular targeted therapy. We hypothesized that therapeutic inhibition of HIF-1alpha could be achieved by using a novel tubulin-binding agent (ENMD-1198). ENMD-1198 is an analog of 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) with antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activity. The human HCC cell lines HUH-7 and HepG2 were used for experiments. Effects of ENMD-1198 on constitutive and inducible (hypoxia, growth factors) activation of signaling cascades, including HIF-1alpha and STAT3, were investigated by Western blotting. Changes in VEGF expression were determined by real-time PCR. Effects of ENMD-1198 on cancer cell migration and invasion were evaluated in in vitro-assays. The growth-inhibitory effects of ENMD-1198 (200 mg/kg/day) were determined in a subcutaneous tumor model (HUH-7). ENMD-1198 inhibited the phosphorylation of MAPK/Erk, PI-3K/Akt and FAK. Moreover, activation of HIF-1alpha and STAT3 was dramatically reduced by ENMD-1198, which resulted in lower VEGF mRNA expression (P < 0.05). In addition, tumor cell migratory and invasive properties were significantly inhibited (P < 0.05, for both). In vivo, treatment with ENMD-1198 led to a significant reduction in tumor growth, tumor vascularization, and numbers of proliferating tumor cells (P < 0.05 for all). The novel microtubule destabilizing agent ENMD-1198 is suitable for inhibiting HIF-1alpha and STAT3 in human HCC cells and leads to reduced tumor growth and vascularization in vivo. Hence, inhibition of HIF-1alpha and STAT3 could prove valuable for therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  2. 15-deoxy prostaglandin J2, the nonenzymatic metabolite of prostaglandin D2, induces apoptosis in keratinocytes of human hair follicles: a possible explanation for prostaglandin D2-mediated inhibition of hair growth.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyun Woo; Kang, Yoo Ri; Kwack, Mi Hee; Sung, Young Kwan

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and its nonenzymatic metabolite, 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15-dPGJ2), inhibit in vitro growth of explanted human hair follicles and inhibit hair growth in mice through the GPR44 (DP2). However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we first investigated the expression of DP2 in human hair follicles and in cultured follicular cells. We found that DP2 is strongly expressed in the outer root sheath (ORS) cells and weakly expressed in the dermal papilla (DP) cells. We observed slight growth stimulation when ORS and DP cells were treated with PGD2. We also observed slight growth stimulation when DP and ORS cells were treated with low concentrations (0.5 and 1 μM) of 15-dPGJ2. However, 5 μM 15-dPGJ2 inhibited the viability and caused apoptosis of both cell types. Exposure of cultured human hair follicles to 15-dPGJ2 resulted in significant apoptosis in follicular keratinocytes. Altogether, our data provide an evidence that 15-dPGJ2 promotes apoptosis in follicular keratinocytes and provide rationale for developing remedies for the prevention and treatment of hair loss based on DP2 antagonism.

  3. Effect of substrate concentration on inhibition of prostaglandin synthetase of bull seminal vesicles by anti-inflammatory drugs and fenamic acid analogs.

    PubMed

    Cushman, D W; Cheung, H S

    1976-03-26

    Although microsomes of bull seminal vesicle synthesize prostaglandins F2alpha, E2 and D2 from arachidonic acid under suitable assay conditions, prostaglandin E2 is the only significant product at either low concentration of arachidonic acid or high concentration of microsomes. Studies of inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis in vitro by anti-inflammatory drugs at both high (1 mM) and low (1 muM) concentrations of arachidonic acid, suggest three distinct mechanisms of inhibition. Benzydamine and flazalone are non-competitive or weakly competitive with arachidonic acid and, at high concentrations of arachidonic acid, they augment sythesis of prostaglandin E2 while inhibiting production of prostaglandins F2alpha and D2. Niflumic acid and the arylacetic acids naproxen and ibuprofen are competitive inhibiting all products equally, but with 100-500-fold greater potency at the low substrate concentration. The fenamic acids, indomethacin, aspirin, and phenylbutazone also inhibit equally all prostaglandin products, but are only 20--50 times more potent at the low substrate concentration. Studies with analogs of the fenamic acids indicate that the diphenylamine protion of their structure is essential for inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, whereas the o-carboxyl and m-alkul substitutents greatly enhance inhibitory potency.

  4. Microsomal Prostaglandin E Synthase-1-Derived PGE2 Inhibits Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Calcification.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cheng; Fu, Yi; Li, Yanhui; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Lu; Yu, Fang; Xu, Susanna S; Xu, Qingbo; Zhu, Yi; Guan, Youfei; Wang, Xian; Kong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Chronic administration of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors leads to an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction and stroke. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification, a common complication of chronic kidney disease, is directly related to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Here, we tested whether specific COX-2 inhibition affects vascular calcification during chronic renal failure. The COX-2-specific inhibitors NS398 and SC236 significantly increased high-phosphate (Pi)-induced VSMC calcification. Similarly, COX-2(-/-) VSMCs, COX-2(-/-) aortas rings treated with high Pi and adenine diet-induced COX-2(-/-) chronic renal failure mice displayed enhanced calcium deposition. Metabolomic analysis revealed the differential suppression of PGE2 production by COX-1- and COX-2-specific inhibitors in high-Pi-stimulated VSMCs, indicating the involvement of PGE2 during COX-2 inhibition-aggravated vascular calcification. Indeed, exogenous PGE2 reduced alkaline phosphatase activity, osteogenic transdifferentiation, apoptosis, and calcification of VSMCs. In accordance, downregulation of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES)-1 in VSMCs, mPGES-1(-/-) aorta with high-Pi stimulation and mPGES-1(-/-) chronic renal failure mice resulted in enhanced vascular mineralization. Further applications of RNAi and specific antagonists for PGE2 receptors indicated EP4 may mediate PGE2-inhibited vascular calcification. Our data revealed the pivotal role of COX-2-mPGES-1-PGE2 axis in vascular calcification. The selective inhibition of COX-2 or mPGES-1 may increase the risk of calcification and subsequent adverse cardiovascular events during chronic renal failure. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Inhibition of oxygen-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha degradation unmasks estradiol induction of vascular endothelial growth factor expression in ECC-1 cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Molitoris, Kristin Happ; Kazi, Armina A; Koos, Robert D

    2009-12-01

    Estradiol (E(2)) rapidly and strongly induces vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) transcription in uterine endometrial epithelial cells in vivo. We have shown that this is mediated by both the estrogen receptor-alpha and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha. By contrast, E(2) induces little or no VEGF expression in cultured breast or endometrial cancer cells, which lack HIF-1alpha due to the abnormally high concentration of oxygen ( approximately 20%) to which they are exposed. To test the hypothesis that restoring HIF-1alpha in cultured cells would restore the ability of E(2) to induce VEGF expression, we treated human endometrial cancer cells (ECC-1) with cobalt chloride (CoCl(2);100 microm), which prevents oxygen-induced HIF-1alpha degradation. HIF-1alpha was absent in untreated ECC-1 cells but detectable by 4 h after treatment with CoCl(2) alone, as was a significant increase in VEGF mRNA. E(2) plus CoCl(2) induced detectable HIF-1alpha expression at 2 h and an even higher level than that induced by CoCl(2) alone at 4 h; this HIF-1alpha was localized in the nuclei. This was accompanied by increasing VEGF expression, with the increase at 4 h severalfold higher than that induced by CoCl(2) alone and was concurrent with recruitment of both HIF-1alpha and estrogen receptor-alpha to the VEGF promoter. These results confirm that HIF-1alpha plays an essential role in E(2)-induced expression of VEGF. Through the induction of increased microvascular permeability and the consequent exudation of plasma growth factors, VEGF in turn may play an essential role in cancer cell proliferation in vivo.

  6. Effect of inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production on pancreatic infection in experimental acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Ana Maria M.; Sampietre, Sandra; Patzina, Rosely; Jukemura, Jose; Cunha, Jose Eduardo M.; Machado, Marcel C.C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Acute pancreatitis is one the important causes of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). SIRS results in gut barrier dysfunction that allows bacterial translocation and pancreatic infection to occur. Indomethacin has been used to reduce inflammatory process and bacterial translocation in experimental models. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production on pancreatic infection. Materials and methods. An experimental model of severe acute pancreatitis (AP) was utilized. The animals were divided into three groups: sham (surgical procedure without AP induction); pancreatitis (AP induction); and indomethacin (AP induction plus administration of 3 mg/kg of indomethacin). Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10, PGE2, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured 2 h after the induction of AP. We analyzed the occurrence of pancreatic infection with bacterial cultures performed 24 h after the induction of AP. The occurrence of pancreatic infection (considered positive when the CFU/g was >105), pancreatic histologic analysis, and mortality rate were studied. Results. In spite of the reduction of IL-6, IL-10, and PGE2 levels in the indomethacin group, TNF-α level, bacterial translocation, and pancreatic infection were not influenced by administration of indomethacin. The inhibition of PGE2 production did not reduce pancreatic infection, histologic score, or mortality rate. Conclusion. The inhibition of PGE2 production was not able to reduce the occurrence of pancreatic infection and does not have any beneficial effect in this experimental model. Further investigations will be necessary to discover a specific inhibitor that would make it possible to develop an anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:18345325

  7. Carnosol and carnosic acids from Salvia officinalis inhibit microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Julia; Kuehnl, Susanne; Rollinger, Judith M; Scherer, Olga; Northoff, Hinnak; Stuppner, Hermann; Werz, Oliver; Koeberle, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), the most relevant eicosanoid promoting inflammation and tumorigenesis, is formed by cyclooxygenases (COXs) and PGE(2) synthases from free arachidonic acid. Preparations of the leaves of Salvia officinalis are commonly used in folk medicine as an effective antiseptic and anti-inflammatory remedy and possess anticancer activity. Here, we demonstrate that a standard ethyl acetate extract of S. officinalis efficiently suppresses the formation of PGE(2) in a cell-free assay by direct interference with microsomal PGE(2) synthase (mPGES)-1. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the extract yielded closely related fractions that potently suppressed mPGES-1 with IC(50) values between 1.9 and 3.5 μg/ml. Component analysis of these fractions revealed the diterpenes carnosol and carnosic acid as potential bioactive principles inhibiting mPGES-1 activity with IC(50) values of 5.0 μM. Using a human whole-blood assay as a robust cell-based model, carnosic acid, but not carnosol, blocked PGE(2) generation upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (IC(50) = 9.3 μM). Carnosic acid neither inhibited the concomitant biosynthesis of other prostanoids [6-keto PGF(1α), 12(S)-hydroxy-5-cis-8,10-trans-heptadecatrienoic acid, and thromboxane B(2)] in human whole blood nor affected the activities of COX-1/2 in a cell-free assay. Together, S. officinalis extracts and its ingredients carnosol and carnosic acid inhibit PGE(2) formation by selectively targeting mPGES-1. We conclude that the inhibitory effect of carnosic acid on PGE(2) formation, observed in the physiologically relevant whole-blood model, may critically contribute to the anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties of S. officinalis.

  8. Functional interaction of hepatic nuclear factor-4 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1alpha in CYP7A1 regulation is inhibited by a key lipogenic activator, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c.

    PubMed

    Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Fang, Sungsoon; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2007-11-01

    Insulin inhibits transcription of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), a key gene in bile acid synthesis, and the hepatic nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4) site in the promoter was identified as a negative insulin response sequence. Using a fasting/feeding protocol in mice and insulin treatment in HepG2 cells, we explored the inhibition mechanisms. Expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), an insulin-induced lipogenic factor, inversely correlated with Cyp7a1 expression in mouse liver. Interaction of HNF-4 with its coactivator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha), was observed in livers of fasted mice and was reduced after feeding. Conversely, HNF-4 interaction with SREBP-1c was increased after feeding. In vitro studies suggested that SREBP-1c competed with PGC-1alpha for direct interaction with the AF2 domain of HNF-4. Reporter assays showed that SREBP-1c, but not of a SREBP-1c mutant lacking the HNF-4 interacting domain, inhibited HNF-4/PGC-1alpha transactivation of Cyp7a1. SREBP-1c also inhibited PGC-1alpha-coactivation of estrogen receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, pregnane X receptor, and farnesoid X receptor, implying inhibition of HNF-4 by SREBP-1c could extend to other nuclear receptors. In chromatin immunoprecipitation studies, HNF-4 binding to the promoter was not altered, but PGC-1alpha was dissociated, SREBP-1c and histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2) were recruited, and acetylation of histone H3 was decreased upon feeding. Adenovirus-mediated expression of a SREBP-1c dominant-negative mutant, which blocks the interaction of SREBP-1c and HNF-4, partially but significantly reversed the inhibition of Cyp7a1 after feeding. Our data show that SREBP-1c functions as a non-DNA-binding inhibitor and mediates, in part, suppression of Cyp7a1 by blocking functional interaction of HNF-4 and PGC-1alpha. This mechanism may be relevant to known repression of many other HNF-4 target genes upon

  9. Targeted prostaglandin E2 inhibition enhances antiviral immunity through induction of type I interferon and apoptosis in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Coulombe, François; Jaworska, Joanna; Verway, Mark; Tzelepis, Fanny; Massoud, Amir; Gillard, Joshua; Wong, Gary; Kobinger, Gary; Xing, Zhou; Couture, Christian; Joubert, Philippe; Fritz, Jörg H; Powell, William S; Divangahi, Maziar

    2014-04-17

    Aspirin gained tremendous popularity during the 1918 Spanish Influenza virus pandemic, 50 years prior to the demonstration of their inhibitory action on prostaglandins. Here, we show that during influenza A virus (IAV) infection, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was upregulated, which led to the inhibition of type I interferon (IFN) production and apoptosis in macrophages, thereby causing an increase in virus replication. This inhibitory role of PGE2 was not limited to innate immunity, because both antigen presentation and T cell mediated immunity were also suppressed. Targeted PGE2 suppression via genetic ablation of microsomal prostaglandin E-synthase 1 (mPGES-1) or by the pharmacological inhibition of PGE2 receptors EP2 and EP4 substantially improved survival against lethal IAV infection whereas PGE2 administration reversed this phenotype. These data demonstrate that the mPGES-1-PGE2 pathway is targeted by IAV to evade host type I IFN-dependent antiviral immunity. We propose that specific inhibition of PGE2 signaling might serve as a treatment for IAV.

  10. Diesel exhaust particle extracts and associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons inhibit Cox-2-dependent prostaglandin synthesis in murine macrophages and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Rudra-Ganguly, Nandini; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Korge, Paavo; Herschman, Harvey R

    2002-10-18

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and their organic constituents modulate the immune system and exacerbate allergic airway inflammation. We investigated the role of DEP extract and associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on prostaglandin synthesis in endotoxin-activated murine macrophages and in mitogen-stimulated fibroblasts. In both macrophages and fibroblasts, DEP extract, phenanthrene, anthracene, phenanthrenequinone, and beta-napthoflavone inhibit prostaglandin production from endogenous arachidonic acid in response to ligand stimulation. However, DEP extract and PAHs do not block ligand induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein, either in mitogen-stimulated fibroblasts or endotoxin-treated macrophages. Release of total arachidonic acid and total lipid products is not reduced by DEP or PAHs following ligand stimulation of macrophages or fibroblasts. DEP extract and the PAHs inhibit the activity of purified COX-2 enzyme in vitro but do not inhibit COX-1 activity. Thus, DEP and PAHs do not affect ligand-induced COX-2 gene expression, phospholipase activation, or arachidonic acid release in macrophages and fibroblasts but exert their inhibitory effect on prostaglandin production by preferentially blocking COX-2 enzyme activity.

  11. Curine, an alkaloid isolated from Chondrodendron platyphyllum inhibits prostaglandin E2 in experimental models of inflammation and pain.

    PubMed

    Leite, Fagner Carvalho; Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Costa, Hermann Ferreira; Salgado, Paula Regina Rodrigues; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Carneiro, Alan Brito; de Almeida, Reinaldo Nobrega; Dias, Celidarque da Silva; Bozza, Patricia T; Piuvezam, Marcia Regina

    2014-08-01

    Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that is isolated from Chondrodendron platyphyllum, a plant that is used to treat malaria, inflammation, and pain. Recent reports have demonstrated the antiallergic effects of curine at nontoxic doses. However, its anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties remain to be elucidated. This study investigated the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of curine in mice. We analyzed the effects of an oral treatment with curine in the formation of paw edema, vascular permeability, abdominal contortion, licking behavior, and hyperalgesia using different inflammatory stimuli. Curine significantly inhibited the formation of paw edema by decreasing vascular permeability, inhibited the acetic acid-induced writhing response, inhibited the licking behavior during inflammation but not during the neurogenic phase of the formalin test, and inhibited carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia. Finally, curine inhibited prostaglandin E2 production in vitro without affecting cyclooxygenase-2 expression. The effects of curine treatment were similar to the effects of indomethacin, but were different from the effects of morphine treatment, suggesting that the analgesic effects of curine do not result from the direct inhibition of neuronal activation but instead depend on anti-inflammatory mechanisms that, at least in part, result from the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. In conclusion, curine presents anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects at nontoxic doses and has the potential for use in anti-inflammatory drug development.

  12. Prostaglandin mediates IL-23/IL-17-induced neutrophil migration in inflammation by inhibiting IL-12 and IFNgamma production.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Henrique P; Grespan, Renata; Vieira, Silvio M; Cunha, Thiago M; Verri, Waldiceu A; Fernandes, Karla S S; Souto, Fabricio O; McInnes, Iain B; Ferreira, Sergio H; Liew, Foo Y; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2009-04-07

    IL-23/IL-17-induced neutrophil recruitment plays a pivotal role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the mechanism of the neutrophil recruitment is obscure. Here we report that prostaglandin enhances the IL-23/IL-17-induced neutrophil migration in a murine model of RA by inhibiting IL-12 and IFN gamma production. Methylated BSA (mBSA) and IL-23-induced neutrophil migration was inhibited by anti-IL-23 and anti-IL-17 antibodies, COX inhibitors, IL-12, or IFNgamma but was enhanced by prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). IL-23-induced IL-17 production was increased by PGE(2) and suppressed by COX-inhibition or IL-12. Furthermore, COX inhibition failed to reduce IL-23-induced neutrophil migration in IL-12- or IFNgamma-deficient mice. IL-17-induced neutrophil migration was not affected by COX inhibitors, IL-12, or IFNgamma but was inhibited by MK886 (a leukotriene synthesis inhibitor), anti-TNFalpha, anti-CXCL1, and anti-CXCL5 antibodies and by repertaxin (a CXCR1/2 antagonist). These treatments all inhibited mBSA- or IL-23-induced neutrophil migration. IL-17 induced neutrophil chemotaxis through a CXC chemokines-dependent pathway. Our results suggest that prostaglandin plays an important role in IL-23-induced neutrophil migration in arthritis by enhancing IL-17 synthesis and by inhibiting IL-12 and IFNgamma production. We thus provide a mechanism for the pathogenic role of the IL-23/IL-17 axis in RA and also suggest an additional mechanism of action for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  13. Prostaglandin mediates IL-23/IL-17-induced neutrophil migration in inflammation by inhibiting IL-12 and IFNγ production

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Henrique P.; Grespan, Renata; Vieira, Silvio M.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Verri, Waldiceu A.; Fernandes, Karla S. S.; Souto, Fabricio O.; McInnes, Iain B.; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Liew, Foo Y.; Cunha, Fernando Q.

    2009-01-01

    IL-23/IL-17-induced neutrophil recruitment plays a pivotal role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the mechanism of the neutrophil recruitment is obscure. Here we report that prostaglandin enhances the IL-23/IL-17-induced neutrophil migration in a murine model of RA by inhibiting IL-12 and IFN γ production. Methylated BSA (mBSA) and IL-23-induced neutrophil migration was inhibited by anti-IL-23 and anti-IL-17 antibodies, COX inhibitors, IL-12, or IFNγ but was enhanced by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). IL-23-induced IL-17 production was increased by PGE2 and suppressed by COX-inhibition or IL-12. Furthermore, COX inhibition failed to reduce IL-23-induced neutrophil migration in IL-12- or IFNγ-deficient mice. IL-17-induced neutrophil migration was not affected by COX inhibitors, IL-12, or IFNγ but was inhibited by MK886 (a leukotriene synthesis inhibitor), anti-TNFα, anti-CXCL1, and anti-CXCL5 antibodies and by repertaxin (a CXCR1/2 antagonist). These treatments all inhibited mBSA- or IL-23-induced neutrophil migration. IL-17 induced neutrophil chemotaxis through a CXC chemokines-dependent pathway. Our results suggest that prostaglandin plays an important role in IL-23-induced neutrophil migration in arthritis by enhancing IL-17 synthesis and by inhibiting IL-12 and IFNγ production. We thus provide a mechanism for the pathogenic role of the IL-23/IL-17 axis in RA and also suggest an additional mechanism of action for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:19289819

  14. Hyaluronan inhibits prostaglandin E2 production via CD44 in U937 human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Tadashi

    2010-03-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is one of the key mediators of inflammation in affected joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Intra-articular injection of high molecular weight hyaluronan (HA) into RA knee joints relieves arthritic pain. Although HA has been shown to inhibit PGE(2) production in cytokine-stimulated synovial fibroblasts, it remains unclear how HA suppresses PGE(2) production in activated cells. Furthermore, HA effect on macrophages has rarely been investigated in spite of their contribution to RA joint pathology. This study was aimed to investigate the inhibitory mechanism of HA on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated PGE(2) production in U937 human macrophages. Stimulation of U937 macrophages with LPS enhanced PGE(2) production in association with increased protein levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Pretreatment with HA of 2,700 kDa resulted in suppression of the LPS-mediated induction of COX-2, leading to a decrease in PGE(2) production. Likewise, the LPS-stimulated PGE(2) production was inhibited by the pretreatment with a specific COX2 inhibitor, NS-398, or a specific inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, BAY11-7085. HA also decreased the degree of phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB enhanced by LPS. Fluorescence cytochemistry demonstrated that HA bound to CD44, the principal HA receptor, on U937 macrophages. Anti-CD44 antibody reversed the inhibitory effects of HA on the LPS-mediated increase in PGE(2) production, COX-2 induction, and activation of NF-kappaB. These results indicate that HA suppresses the LPS-stimulated PGE(2) production via CD44 through down-regulation of NF-kappaB. Administration of HA into RA joints may decrease PGE(2) production by activated macrophages, which could result in improvement of arthritic pain.

  15. Coactivation of liver receptor homologue-1 by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha on aromatase promoter II and its inhibition by activated retinoid X receptor suggest a novel target for breast-specific antiestrogen therapy.

    PubMed

    Safi, Rachid; Kovacic, Agnes; Gaillard, Stéphanie; Murata, Yoko; Simpson, Evan R; McDonnell, Donald P; Clyne, Colin D

    2005-12-15

    Aromatase inhibitors target the production of estrogen in breast adipose tissue, but in doing so, also decrease estrogen formation in bone and other sites, giving rise to deleterious side effects, such as bone loss and arthralgia. Thus, it would be clinically useful to selectively inhibit aromatase production in breast. In this regard, we have determined that the orphan nuclear receptor liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH-1) is a specific transcriptional activator of aromatase gene expression in human breast preadipocytes but not in other tissues of postmenopausal women. In this study, we show that the coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) is a physiologically relevant modulator of LRH-1, and that its transcriptional activity can be inhibited effectively using receptor-interacting peptide antagonists that prevent PGC-1alpha recruitment. Interestingly, we note that all of these peptides also interact in an agonist-dependent manner with retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha), suggesting that these two receptors may compete for limiting cofactors within target cells. In support of this hypothesis, we show that 9-cis-retinoic acid, acting through RXR, inhibits both the basal and PGC-1alpha-induced transcriptional activity of LRH-1. The importance of this finding was confirmed by showing that LRH-1-dependent, PGC-1alpha-stimulated regulation of aromatase gene expression in primary human breast preadipocytes was effectively suppressed by RXR agonists. We infer from these data that LRH-1 is a bona fide target whose inhibition would selectively block aromatase expression in breast, while sparing other sites of expression.

  16. Inhibition of brain prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase-2 prevents the preparturient increase in fetal adrenocorticotropin secretion in the sheep fetus.

    PubMed

    Gersting, Jason; Schaub, Christine E; Keller-Wood, Maureen; Wood, Charles E

    2008-08-01

    Maturation of the fetal hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis is critical for the timely somatic development of the fetus and readiness for birth. Recently, we proposed that prostaglandin generation within the fetal central nervous system is critical for the modulation of hypotension-induced fetal ACTH secretion. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that the preparturient increase in fetal ACTH secretion is dependent upon fetal central nervous system prostaglandin synthesis mediated by the activity of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase (PGHS)-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) in the fetal brain. We performed two studies in chronically catheterized fetal sheep. In the first study, we infused nimesulide or vehicle intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v) into singleton fetal sheep and collected blood samples until spontaneous parturition. Nimesulide significantly delayed parturition, and inhibited fetal ACTH and proopiomelanocortin secretion but did not prevent the preparturient increase in fetal plasma cortisol concentration. In the second study, we used twin fetuses. One fetus received intracerebroventricular nimesulide and the other intracerebroventricular vehicle. Nimesulide reduced brain tissue concentrations of prostaglandin estradiol, while not affecting plasma prostaglandin E(2) concentrations, demonstrating an action restricted to the fetal brain. Nimesulide reduced PGHS-2 mRNA and increased PGHS-2 protein, while not altering PGHS-1 mRNA or protein in most brain regions, suggesting an effect of the inhibitor on PGHS-2 turnover and relative specificity for PGHS-2 in vivo. We conclude that the preparturient increase in fetal ACTH and proopiomelanocortin is dependent upon the activity of PGHS-2 in the fetal brain. However, we also conclude that the timing of parturition is not solely dependent upon ACTH in this species.

  17. Prostaglandin I2 Signaling and Inhibition of Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weisong; Toki, Shinji; Zhang, Jian; Goleniewksa, Kasia; Newcomb, Dawn C.; Cephus, Jacqueline Y.; Dulek, Daniel E.; Bloodworth, Melissa H.; Stier, Matthew T.; Polosuhkin, Vasiliy; Gangula, Rama D.; Mallal, Simon A.; Broide, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) robustly produce IL-5 and IL-13, cytokines central to the asthma phenotype; however, the effect of prostaglandin (PG) I2 on ILC2 function is unknown. Objectives: To determine the effect of PGI2 on mouse and human ILC2 cytokine expression in vitro and the effect of endogenous PGI2 and the PGI2 analog cicaprost on lung ILC2s in vivo. Methods: Flow-sorted bone marrow ILC2s of wild-type (WT) and PGI2 receptor–deficient (IP−/−) mice were cultured with IL-33 and treated with the PGI2 analog cicaprost. WT and IP−/− mice were challenged intranasally with Alternaria alternata extract for 4 consecutive days to induce ILC2 responses, and these were quantified. Prior to A. alternata extract, challenged WT mice were treated with cicaprost. Human flow-sorted peripheral blood ILC2s were cultured with IL-33 and IL-2 and treated with the PGI2 analog cicaprost. Measurement and Main Results: We demonstrate that PGI2 inhibits IL-5 and IL-13 protein expression by IL-33–stimulated ILC2s purified from mouse bone marrow in a manner that was dependent on signaling through the PGI2 receptor IP. In a mouse model of 4 consecutive days of airway challenge with an extract of A. alternata, a fungal aeroallergen associated with severe asthma exacerbations, endogenous PGI2 signaling significantly inhibited lung IL-5 and IL-13 protein expression, and reduced the number of lung IL-5– and IL-13–expressing ILC2s, as well as the mean fluorescence intensity of IL-5 and IL-13 staining. In addition, exogenous administration of a PGI2 analog inhibited Alternaria extract–induced lung IL-5 and IL-13 protein expression, and reduced the number of lung IL-5– and IL-13–expressing ILC2s and the mean fluorescence intensity of IL-5 and IL-13 staining. Finally, a PGI2 analog inhibited IL-5 and IL-13 expression by human ILC2s that were stimulated with IL-2 and IL-33. Conclusions: These results suggest that PGI2 may be a potential therapy to reduce

  18. Panaxynol protects cortical neurons from ischemia-like injury by up-regulation of HIF-1alpha expression and inhibition of apoptotic cascade.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Hui; Sun, Ke; Yan, Zhong-Hong; Suo, Wen-Hao; Fu, Guo-Hui; Lu, Yang

    2010-01-05

    Apoptosis is one of the major characteristics of delayed neuronal degeneration in neuronal injury following cerebral ischemia. Hypoxia-induced apoptosis may be co-regulated by HIF-1alpha as well as many other factors. In recent years, numerous studies concerning panaxynol (PNN) have been reported. However, whether PNN can show anti-hypoxia properties is still unknown. In this study, the protective effects of PNN on OGD-induced neuronal apoptosis and potential mechanisms were investigated. Pretreatment of the cells with PNN for 24h following exposure to OGD resulted in a significant elevation of cell survival determined by MTT assay, LDH assay, Hoechst staining and flow cytometric assessment. In addition to enhancing the expression of HIF-1alpha, PNN also normalized the caspase-3 expression/activation and increased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. In our study, the increased level of HIF-1alpha with decreased cellular apoptosis suggested an important role for HIF-1alpha in hypoxic neurons. These results indicated that the neuroprotective effects of PNN on hypoxic neurons were at least partly due to up-regulation of HIF-1alpha and raised the possibility that PNN might reduce neurodegenerative disorders and ischemic brain diseases.

  19. Effects of inhibition of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase-2 in chronic gastro-intestinal ulcer models in rats

    PubMed Central

    Schmassmann, Adrian; Peskar, Brigitta M; Stettler, Christian; Netzer, Peter; Stroff, Thomas; Flogerzi, Beatrice; Halter, Fred

    1998-01-01

    In the stomach, prostaglandins protect the gastric mucosa against injuries. One rate-limiting step in prostaglandin synthesis is mediated by prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase (PGHS), the target enzyme of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Two isoforms of PGHS exist: a constitutive (PGHS-1) and an inducible (PGHS-2) enzyme. PGHS-1 is the major source of gastric prostaglandins under physiological conditions. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis by traditional NSAIDs such as indomethacin and diclofenac which non-selectively inhibit both PGHS-1 and PGHS-2, causes gastric and intestinal ulceration and delays gastric ulcer healing in chronic models. It has been shown that selective PGHS-2 inhibitors such as L-745,337 (5-methanesulphonamide-6-(2,4-difluorothio-phenyl)-1-indanone) are not ulcerogenic and do not inhibit gastro-intestinal prostaglandin synthesis. However, minimal information is available on the long-term effects of PGHS-2 inhibitors on the healing of previously established gastric injuries. We assessed the cellular localization and expression of PGHS-1 and PGHS-2 during gastric ulcer healing and assessed the effects of L-745,337 on previously established cryoulcers in the rat gastric stomach.PGHS-1 and PGHS-2 were located and quantified by immunohistochemistry during experimental gastric ulcer healing. PGHS-2 immunoreactivity was only negligible in the normal gastric wall, but after gastric ulcerations, it was strongly detected in monocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts and endothelial cells below and between the regenerative glands. PGHS-1 immunoreactivity detected in normal gastric mucosa, disappeared after gastric ulceration in the mucosa adjacent to the ulcer crater. However, it reappeared in the regenerative glands from day 5 onwards. Thus, PGHS-1 and PGHS-2 were located at different sites and their maximal expression followed a different time-sequence.We assessed the effects of L-745,337, indomethacin and diclofenac on gastric ulcer healing

  20. Prostaglandin D2 inhibits hair growth and is elevated in bald scalp of men with androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Garza, Luis A; Liu, Yaping; Yang, Zaixin; Alagesan, Brinda; Lawson, John A; Norberg, Scott M; Loy, Dorothy E; Zhao, Tailun; Blatt, Hanz B; Stanton, David C; Carrasco, Lee; Ahluwalia, Gurpreet; Fischer, Susan M; FitzGerald, Garret A; Cotsarelis, George

    2012-03-21

    Testosterone is necessary for the development of male pattern baldness, known as androgenetic alopecia (AGA); yet, the mechanisms for decreased hair growth in this disorder are unclear. We show that prostaglandin D(2) synthase (PTGDS) is elevated at the mRNA and protein levels in bald scalp compared to haired scalp of men with AGA. The product of PTGDS enzyme activity, prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)), is similarly elevated in bald scalp. During normal follicle cycling in mice, Ptgds and PGD(2) levels increase immediately preceding the regression phase, suggesting an inhibitory effect on hair growth. We show that PGD(2) inhibits hair growth in explanted human hair follicles and when applied topically to mice. Hair growth inhibition requires the PGD(2) receptor G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide)-coupled receptor 44 (GPR44), but not the PGD(2) receptor 1 (PTGDR). Furthermore, we find that a transgenic mouse, K14-Ptgs2, which targets prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 expression to the skin, demonstrates elevated levels of PGD(2) in the skin and develops alopecia, follicular miniaturization, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia, which are all hallmarks of human AGA. These results define PGD(2) as an inhibitor of hair growth in AGA and suggest the PGD(2)-GPR44 pathway as a potential target for treatment.

  1. Prostaglandin D2 Inhibits Hair Growth and Is Elevated in Bald Scalp of Men with Androgenetic Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Luis A.; Liu, Yaping; Yang, Zaixin; Alagesan, Brinda; Lawson, John A.; Norberg, Scott M.; Loy, Dorothy E.; Zhao, Tailun; Blatt, Hanz B.; Stanton, David C.; Carrasco, Lee; Ahluwalia, Gurpreet; Fischer, Susan M.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Cotsarelis, George

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone is necessary for the development of male pattern baldness, known as androgenetic alopecia (AGA); yet, the mechanisms for decreased hair growth in this disorder are unclear. We show that prostaglandin D2 synthase (PTGDS) is elevated at the mRNA and protein levels in bald scalp compared to haired scalp of men with AGA. The product of PTGDS enzyme activity, prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), is similarly elevated in bald scalp. During normal follicle cycling in mice, Ptgds and PGD2 levels increase immediately preceding the regression phase, suggesting an inhibitory effect on hair growth. We show that PGD2 inhibits hair growth in explanted human hair follicles and when applied topically to mice. Hair growth inhibition requires the PGD2 receptor G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide)–coupled receptor 44 (GPR44), but not the PGD2 receptor 1 (PTGDR). Furthermore, we find that a transgenic mouse, K14-Ptgs2, which targets prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 expression to the skin, demonstrates elevated levels of PGD2 in the skin and develops alopecia, follicular miniaturization, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia, which are all hallmarks of human AGA. These results define PGD2 as an inhibitor of hair growth in AGA and suggest the PGD2-GPR44 pathway as a potential target for treatment. PMID:22440736

  2. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits Tr1 cell differentiation through suppression of c-Maf

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Kirsten Mary; Kong, Weimin

    2017-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major lipid mediator abundant at inflammatory sites, acts as a proinflammatory agent in models of inflammatory/autoimmune diseases by promoting CD4 Th1/Th17 differentiation. Regulatory T cells, including the IL-10 producing Tr1 cells counterbalance the proinflammatory activity of effector Th1/Th17 cells. Tr1 cell differentiation and function are induced by IL-27, and depend primarily on sustained expression of c-Maf in addition to AhR and Blimp-1. In agreement with the in vivo proinflammatory role of PGE2, here we report for the first time that PGE2 inhibits IL-27-induced differentiation and IL-10 production of murine CD4+CD49b+LAG-3+Foxp3- Tr1 cells. The inhibitory effect of PGE2 was mediated through EP4 receptors and induction of cAMP, leading to a significant reduction in c-Maf expression. Although PGE2 reduced IL-21 production in differentiating Tr1 cells, its inhibitory effect on Tr1 differentiation and c-Maf expression also occurred independent of IL-21 signaling. PGE2 did not affect STAT1/3 activation, AhR expression and only marginally reduced Egr-2/Blimp-1 expression. The effect of PGE2 on CD4+CD49b+LAG-3+ Tr1 differentiation was not associated with either induction of Foxp3 or IL-17 production, suggesting a lack of transdifferentiation into Foxp3+ Treg or effector Th17 cells. We recently reported that PGE2 inhibits the expression and production of IL-27 from activated conventional dendritic cells (cDC) in vivo and in vitro. The present study indicates that PGE2 also reduces murine Tr1 differentiation and function directly by acting on IL-27-differentiating Tr1 cells. Together, the ability of PGE2 to inhibit IL-27 production by cDC, and the direct inhibitory effect on Tr1 differentiation mediated through reduction in c-Maf expression, represent a new mechanistic perspective for the proinflammatory activity of PGE2. PMID:28604806

  3. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-stimulated cell proliferation through a prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype in rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Koide, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Oki, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2004-09-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2 inhibits hepatic stellate cell (HSC) mitogenesis. PGE-specific receptors are divided into four subtypes that are coupled either to Ca2+ mobilization (EP1 and EP3) or to the stimulation of adenyl cyclase (EP2 and EP4). The aims of the current study were to identify PGE receptor subtypes in cultured rat HSC and to examine which PGE receptor subtype(s) mediates the inhibitory effect of PGE2 on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated proliferation. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to detect PGE receptor subtype mRNA expression. Cell proliferation was determined by measuring [3H]thymidine incorporation, and intracellular cyclic AMP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Cultured rat HSC expressed mRNAs for all four subtypes of PGE receptor. PGE2- and EP2-selective agonist produced dose-dependent inhibitory effects on PDGF-stimulated proliferation. Neither EP1-, EP3-, nor EP4-selective agonists showed any inhibitory effect. An adenylate cyclase inhibitor strongly blunted the inhibition of DNA synthesis elicited by PGE2 and the EP2 agonist. The EP2 agonist generated higher and more prolonged increases in intracellular cyclic AMP than the EP4 agonist. Activation of the PGE EP2 receptor has an antiproliferative effect in HSC that may be mediated by cyclic AMP-related signal transduction pathways.

  4. Cigarette smoke condensate inhibits collagen gel contraction and prostaglandin E2 production in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Romero, A; Cáceres, M; Arancibia, R; Silva, D; Couve, E; Martínez, C; Martínez, J; Smith, P C

    2015-06-01

    Granulation tissue remodeling and myofibroblastic differentiation are critically important events during wound healing. Tobacco smoking has a detrimental effect in gingival tissue repair. However, studies evaluating the effects of cigarette smoke on these events are lacking. We used gingival fibroblasts cultured within free-floating and restrained collagen gels to simulate the initial and final steps of the granulation tissue phase during tissue repair. Collagen gel contraction was stimulated with serum or transforming growth factor-β1. Cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) was used to evaluate the effects of tobacco smoke on gel contraction. Protein levels of alpha-smooth muscle actin, β1 integrin, matrix metalloproteinase-3 and connective tissue growth factor were evaluated through Western blot. Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) levels were determined through ELISA. Actin organization was evaluated through confocal microscopy. CSC reduced collagen gel contraction induced by serum and transforming growth factor-β1 in restrained collagen gels. CSC also altered the development of actin stress fibers in fibroblasts cultured within restrained collagen gels. PGE(2) levels were strongly diminished by CSC in three-dimensional cell cultures. However, other proteins involved in granulation tissue remodeling and myofibroblastic differentiation such as alpha-smooth muscle actin, β1 integrin, matrix metalloproteinase-3 and connective tissue growth factor, were unmodified by CSC. CSC may alter the capacity of gingival fibroblasts to remodel and contract a collagen matrix. Inhibition of PGE(2) production and alterations of actin stress fibers in these cells may impair proper tissue maturation during wound healing in smokers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Lanreotide inhibits human jejunal secretion induced by prostaglandin E1 in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, I; René, E; Ramdani, A; Bayod, F; Sabbagh, L C; Thomas, F; Mignon, M

    1996-02-01

    1. Somatostatin inhibits hormonal secretions in the gastrointestinal tract. Somatostatin analogues are used in the treatment of VIPome-related watery diarrhoea. In addition, more than 10% of patients with AIDS suffer from diarrhoea likely due to the increased intestinal secretion of water and ions. However, the direct effect of somatostatin on the flux of water and ions in the intestine has not been, so far, analyzed in vivo. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of lanreotide, a somatostatin analogue, on the movements of water and ions in the jejunum in man. 2. Accordingly, 10 healthy volunteers (age 18-35 years, mean 27) and two patients with AIDS (26 and 33 years) suffering from water diarrhoea (> 800 ml day-1) underwent intestinal perfusion using a four lumen tube with proximal occluding balloon. The segment tested was 25 cm long. The jejunum was infused by an isotonic control saline solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) as nonabsorbable marker. Basal jejunal secretions were measured in all subjects. Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) was administered intraluminally to stimulate jejunal secretion in healthy volunteers. The effect of intravenous lanreotide on the jejunal PGE1-induced secretions of water and electrolytes was analysed in healthy subjects and on the basal secretions in AIDS patients. Each period was analyzed on the basis of three (10 min) successive intestinal juice collections after 20-30 min equilibration time. The antisecretory effect of lanreotide was evaluated in each subject as the difference between fluxes compared to the control period. 3. In healthy volunteers, PGE1 induced secretion of H2O, Na+, K+ and Cl- in the jejunum and lanreotide reduced significantly PGE1-induced response. In both AIDS patients basal fluxes of water and ions were reduced by lanreotide in a dose-dependent manner. 4. Somatostatin can reduce stimulated-jejunal secretion of ions and water in normal subjects and may improve water diarrhoea in AIDS

  6. Rocuronium Bromide Inhibits Inflammation and Pain by Suppressing Nitric Oxide Production and Enhancing Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Rocuronium bromide is a nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking drug and has been used as an adjunct for relaxation or paralysis of the skeletal muscles, facilitation of endotracheal intubation, and improving surgical conditions during general anesthesia. However, intravenous injection of rocuronium bromide induces injection pain or withdrawal movement. The exact mechanism of rocuronium bromide-induced injection pain or withdrawal movement is not yet understood. We investigated whether rocuronium bromide treatment is involved in the induction of inflammation and pain in vascular endothelial cells. Methods For this study, calf pulmonary artery endothelial (CPAE) cells were used, and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, Western blot, nitric oxide detection, and prostaglandin E2 immunoassay were conducted. Results Rocuronium bromide treatment inhibited endothelial nitric oxide synthase and suppressed nitric oxide production in CPAE cells. Rocuronium bromide activated cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase and increased prostaglandin E2 synthesis in CPAE cells. Conclusions Rocuronium bromide induced inflammation and pain in CPAE cells. Suppressing nitric oxide production and enhancing prostaglandin E2 synthesis might be associated with rocuronium bromide-induced injection pain or withdrawal movement. PMID:28043117

  7. Decreased cyclooxygenase inhibition by aspirin in polymorphic variants of human prostaglandin H synthase-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Kulmacz, Richard J

    2012-07-01

    Aspirin (ASA), a major antiplatelet and cancer-preventing drug, irreversibly blocks the cyclooxygenase (COX) activity of prostaglandin H synthase-1 (PGHS-1). Considerable differences in ASA effectiveness are observed between individuals, and some of this variability may be due to PGHS-1 protein variants. Our overall aim is to determine which, if any, of the known variants in the mature PGHS-1 protein lead to functional alterations in COX catalysis or inhibition by ASA. The present study targeted four PGHS-1 variants: R53H, R108Q, L237M, and V481I. Wild-type human PGHS-1 and the four polymorphic variants were expressed as histidine-tagged, homodimeric proteins in insect cells using baculovirus vectors, solubilized with a detergent, and purified by affinity chromatography. The purified proteins were characterized in vitro to evaluate COX and peroxidase (POX) catalytic parameters and the kinetics of COX inhibition by ASA and NS-398. Compared with the wild type, several variants showed a higher COX/POX ratio (up to 1.5-fold, for R108Q), an elevated arachidonate Km (up to 1.9-fold, for R108Q), and/or a lower ASA reactivity (up to 60% less, for R108Q). The decreased ASA reactivity in R108Q reflected both a 70% increase in the Ki for ASA and a 30% decrease in the rate constant for acetyl group transfer to the protein. Computational modeling of the brief ASA pulses experienced by PGHS-1 in circulating platelets during daily ASA dosing predicted that the 60% lower ASA reactivity in R108Q yields a 15-fold increase in surviving COX activity; smaller, approximately two-fold increases in surviving COX activity were predicted for L237M and V481I. NS-398 competitively inhibited COX catalysis of the wild type (Ki=6 µmol/l) and inhibited COX inactivation by 1.0 mmol/l ASA in both the wild type (IC50=0.8 µmol/l) and R108Q (IC50=2.1 µmol/l). Of the four PGHS-1 variants examined, R108Q exerts the largest functional effects, with evidence for impaired interactions with a COX

  8. Decreased cyclooxygenase inhibition by aspirin in polymorphic variants of human prostaglandin H synthase-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Kulmacz, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Aspirin, a major anti-platelet and cancer preventing drug, irreversibly blocks the cyclooxygenase activity of prostaglandin H synthase-1 (PGHS-1). Considerable differences in aspirin effectiveness are observed between individuals, and some of this variability may be due to PGHS-1 protein variants. Our overall aim is to determine which, if any, of the known variants in the mature PGHS-1 protein lead to functional alterations in cyclooxygenase catalysis or inhibition by aspirin. The present study targeted four PGHS-1 variants: R53H, R108Q, L237M and V481I. Methods Wildtype human PGHS-1 and the four polymorphic variants were expressed as histidine-tagged, homodimeric proteins in insect cells using baculovirus vectors, solubilized with detergent, and purified by affinity chromatography. The purified proteins were characterized in vitro to evaluate cyclooxygenase and peroxidase catalytic parameters and the kinetics of cyclooxygenase inhibition by aspirin and NS-398. Results Compared to wildtype, several variants exhibited a higher COX/POX ratio (up to 1.5-fold, for R108Q), an elevated arachidonate Km (up to 1.9-fold, for R108Q), and/or a lower aspirin reactivity (up to 60% less, for R108Q). The decreased aspirin reactivity in R108Q reflected both a 70% increase in the Ki for aspirin and a 30% decrease in the rate constant for acetyl group transfer to the protein. Computational modeling of the brief aspirin pulses experienced by PGHS-1 in circulating platelets during daily aspirin dosing predicted that the 60% lower aspirin reactivity in R108Q gives a 15-fold increase in surviving cyclooxygenase activity; smaller, ~2-fold increases in surviving cyclooxygenase activity were predicted for L237M and V481I. NS-398 competitively inhibited cyclooxygenase catalysis of the wildtype (Ki = 6 μM) and inhibited cyclooxygenase inactivation by 1.0 mM aspirin in both wildtype (IC50 = 0.8 μM) and R108Q (IC50 = 2.1 μM). Conclusions Of the four PGHS-1 variants examined, R108

  9. Prostaglandin synthesis in human T cells: its partial inhibition by lectins and anti-CD3 antibodies as a possible step in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Aussel, C; Mary, D; Fehlmann, M

    1987-05-15

    The human leukemic T cell line Jurkat was used to study arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism. We demonstrated that Jurkat cells are able to convert AA into prostaglandins (PG) and thromboxanes. The presence of tritiated 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGE2, PGA2 (B2), and thromboxane B2 in the culture medium was shown either by thin-layer chromatography after a 4-hr incubation period of [3H]AA-prelabeled Jurkat cells or by using specific radioimmuno assays. PG synthesis was inhibited by both indomethacin and niflumic acid, two cyclooxygenase inhibitors. AA metabolism through the cyclooxygenase pathway was followed during T cell activation. T cells were activated by lectins or anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to trigger the T3-Ti complex and by 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) to mimic IL 1-dependent pathways. Our results show that lectins and anti-CD3 mAb both reduce the amount of PG released by the cells, whereas TPA did not. We confirmed that a combination of TPA and lectins or TPA and anti-CD3 mAb is necessary to obtain full activation of Jurkat cells if this event is monitored by using measurement of IL 2 synthesis. In addition, lectins and anti-CD3 mAb can be replaced by the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin or niflumic acid. Indeed, a combination of TPA and one of these two drugs induced maximal IL 2 synthesis. These results thus suggest that a reduction in PG synthesis might be a prerequisite to allow the cascade of events involved in T cell activation.

  10. ERbeta impedes prostate cancer EMT by destabilizing HIF-1alpha and inhibiting VEGF-mediated snail nuclear localization: implications for Gleason grading.

    PubMed

    Mak, Paul; Leav, Irwin; Pursell, Bryan; Bae, Donggoo; Yang, Xiaofang; Taglienti, Cherie A; Gouvin, Lindsey M; Sharma, Vishva M; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2010-04-13

    High Gleason grade prostate carcinomas are aggressive, poorly differentiated tumors that exhibit diminished estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) expression. We report that a key function of ERbeta and its specific ligand 5alpha-androstane-3beta,17beta-diol (3beta-adiol) is to maintain an epithelial phenotype and repress mesenchymal characteristics in prostate carcinoma. Stimuli (TGF-beta and hypoxia) that induce an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) diminish ERbeta expression, and loss of ERbeta is sufficient to promote an EMT. The mechanism involves ERbeta-mediated destabilization of HIF-1alpha and transcriptional repression of VEGF-A. The VEGF-A receptor neuropilin-1 drives the EMT by promoting Snail1 nuclear localization. Importantly, this mechanism is manifested in high Gleason grade cancers, which exhibit significantly more HIF-1alpha and VEGF expression, and Snail1 nuclear localization compared to low Gleason grade cancers. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of the prostaglandin receptor EP2 following status epilepticus reduces delayed mortality and brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianxiong; Quan, Yi; Ganesh, Thota; Pouliot, Wendy A; Dudek, F Edward; Dingledine, Raymond

    2013-02-26

    Prostaglandin E2 is now widely recognized to play critical roles in brain inflammation and injury, although the responsible prostaglandin receptors have not been fully identified. We developed a potent and selective antagonist for the prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype EP2, TG6-10-1, with a sufficient pharmacokinetic profile to be used in vivo. We found that in the mouse pilocarpine model of status epilepticus (SE), systemic administration of TG6-10-1 completely recapitulates the effects of conditional ablation of cyclooxygenase-2 from principal forebrain neurons, namely reduced delayed mortality, accelerated recovery from weight loss, reduced brain inflammation, prevention of blood-brain barrier opening, and neuroprotection in the hippocampus, without modifying seizures acutely. Prolonged SE in humans causes high mortality and morbidity that are associated with brain inflammation and injury, but currently the only effective treatment is to stop the seizures quickly enough with anticonvulsants to prevent brain damage. Our results suggest that the prostaglandin receptor EP2 is critically involved in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration, and point to EP2 receptor antagonism as an adjunctive therapeutic strategy to treat SE.

  12. Inhibition of the prostaglandin receptor EP2 following status epilepticus reduces delayed mortality and brain inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jianxiong; Quan, Yi; Ganesh, Thota; Pouliot, Wendy A.; Dudek, F. Edward; Dingledine, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 is now widely recognized to play critical roles in brain inflammation and injury, although the responsible prostaglandin receptors have not been fully identified. We developed a potent and selective antagonist for the prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype EP2, TG6-10-1, with a sufficient pharmacokinetic profile to be used in vivo. We found that in the mouse pilocarpine model of status epilepticus (SE), systemic administration of TG6-10-1 completely recapitulates the effects of conditional ablation of cyclooxygenase-2 from principal forebrain neurons, namely reduced delayed mortality, accelerated recovery from weight loss, reduced brain inflammation, prevention of blood–brain barrier opening, and neuroprotection in the hippocampus, without modifying seizures acutely. Prolonged SE in humans causes high mortality and morbidity that are associated with brain inflammation and injury, but currently the only effective treatment is to stop the seizures quickly enough with anticonvulsants to prevent brain damage. Our results suggest that the prostaglandin receptor EP2 is critically involved in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration, and point to EP2 receptor antagonism as an adjunctive therapeutic strategy to treat SE. PMID:23401547

  13. Evidence for the presence of prostaglandin H synthase like enzyme in female Setaria cervi and its inhibition by diethylcarbamazine.

    PubMed

    Rathaur, Sushma; Singh, Alka; Yadav, Marshleen; Rai, Reeta

    2009-07-01

    Experimental evidence has shown that Setaria cervi a bovine filarial parasite contains significant amount of prostaglandin H synthase like activity in the somatic extract of its different life stages. A protein with characteristics of prostaglandin H synthase was purified to homogeneity from female somatic extract using a combination of affinity and gel filtration chromatography. Molecular weight of purified enzyme was 70kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE. Purified enzyme showed high activity with arachidonic acid and TMPD substrates suggests the presence of both cyclooxygenase and peroxidase activity in enzyme. Fluorescence spectroscopy and hemin-associated peroxidase activity confirmed presence of heme in purified enzyme. The K(m) and V(max) values using arachidonic acid were determined to be 79+/-1.5microM and 0.165+/-0.2U/ml, respectively. Further, indomethacin and aspirin, specific inhibitors for PGHS, significantly inhibited the enzyme activity. Diethylcarbamazine, an antifilarial drug inhibited the microfilarial PGHS like activity as well as their motility. Here we are reporting for the first time PGHS like activity in filarial parasite and its inhibition with DEC which provide that this enzyme could be used as a drug target.

  14. Aqueous Extract of Paris polyphylla (AEPP) Inhibits Ovarian Cancer via Suppression of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-Gamma Coactivator (PGC)-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Woei; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Choong, Chen-Yen; Lin, Yu-Chun; Lee, Bao-Hong; Shi, Yeu-Ching; Tai, Chen-Jei

    2016-06-03

    Chemotherapy, a major approach was used in carcinoma treatment, always involves the development of drug resistance as well as side-effects that affect the quality of patients' lives. An association between epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and chemotherapy resistance was established recently. We demonstrate in this paper that the aqueous extract of Paris polyphylla (AEPP)-a traditional Chinese medicine-can be used in various cancer types for suppression of carcinogenesis. We evaluated the suppressions of EMT and mitochondrial activity by AEPP treatment in a high-glucose (HG) induced-human ovarian carcinoma cell line (OVCAR-3 cells). The mitochondrial morphology was investigated using MitoTracker Deep Red FM staining. Our results indicated that AEPP reduced the viability of OVCAR-3 cells considerably through induction of apoptosis. However, this inhibitory potential of AEPP was attenuated by HG induction in OVCAR-3 cells. The levels of estrogen-related receptor (ERR)-alpha activator and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator (PGC)-1alpha were elevated by HG induction, but were suppressed by AEPP treatment. Down-regulations of cell survival and EMT were oberved in OVCAR-3 cells through suppression of PGC-1alpha by AEPP treatment. These results were confirmed through PGC-1alpha knockdown and overexpression in OVCAR-3 cells. Thus, AEPP can be beneficial for treating ovarian cancer and has potential for development of an integrative cancer therapy against ovarian cancer proliferation, metastasis, and migration.

  15. Hyperforin, an Anti-Inflammatory Constituent from St. John's Wort, Inhibits Microsomal Prostaglandin E(2) Synthase-1 and Suppresses Prostaglandin E(2) Formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Koeberle, Andreas; Rossi, Antonietta; Bauer, Julia; Dehm, Friederike; Verotta, Luisella; Northoff, Hinnak; Sautebin, Lidia; Werz, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    The acylphloroglucinol hyperforin (Hyp) from St. John's wort possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties which were ascribed among others to the inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase. Here, we investigated whether Hyp also interferes with prostanoid generation in biological systems, particularly with key enzymes participating in prostaglandin (PG)E(2) biosynthesis, i.e., cyclooxygenases (COX)-1/2 and microsomal PGE(2) synthase (mPGES)-1 which play key roles in inflammation and tumorigenesis. Similar to the mPGES-1 inhibitors MK-886 and MD-52, Hyp significantly suppressed PGE(2) formation in whole blood assays starting at 0.03-1 μM, whereas the concomitant generation of COX-derived 12(S)-hydroxy-5-cis-8,10-trans-heptadecatrienoic acid, thromboxane B(2), and 6-keto PGF(1α) was not significantly suppressed up to 30 μM. In cell-free assays, Hyp efficiently blocked the conversion of PGH(2) to PGE(2) mediated by mPGES-1 (IC(50) = 1 μM), and isolated COX enzymes were not (COX-2) or hardly (COX-1) suppressed. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of Hyp (4 mg kg(-1)) to rats impaired exudate volume and leukocyte numbers in carrageenan-induced pleurisy associated with reduced PGE(2) levels, and Hyp (given i.p.) inhibited carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema formation (ED(50) = 1 mg kg(-1)) being superior over indomethacin (ED(50) = 5 mg kg(-1)). We conclude that the suppression of PGE(2) biosynthesis in vitro and in vivo by acting on mPGES-1 critically contributes to the anti-inflammatory efficiency of Hyp.

  16. Prostaglandins and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ricciotti, Emanuela; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2011-01-01

    Prostaglandins are lipid autacoids derived from arachidonic acid. They both sustain homeostatic functions and mediate pathogenic mechanisms, including the inflammatory response. They are generated from arachidonate by the action of cyclooxygenase (COX) isoenzymes and their biosynthesis is blocked by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including those selective for inhibition of COX-2. Despite the clinical efficacy of NSAIDs, prostaglandins may function in both the promotion and resolution of inflammation. This review summarizes insights into the mechanisms of prostaglandin generation and the roles of individual mediators and their receptors in modulating the inflammatory response. Prostaglandin biology has potential clinical relevance for atherosclerosis, the response to vascular injury and aortic aneurysm. PMID:21508345

  17. Two squamous cell carcinomas not associated with humoral hypercalcemia produce a potent bone resorption-stimulating factor which is interleukin-1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Fried, R M; Voelkel, E F; Rice, R H; Levine, L; Gaffney, E V; Tashjian, A H

    1989-08-01

    Conditioned medium (CM) from two squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, SCC-9 and SCC-13, stimulated bone resorption in neonatal mouse calvariae in organ culture. Enhanced bone resorption induced by CM was associated with an increased production of prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) by the calvariae. Complete inhibition of stimulated PGE2 synthesis by indomethacin only partially inhibited bone resorption-stimulating activity (BRSA) in the CM. Neither SCC-9 nor SCC-13 CM stimulated cAMP production in rat osteosarcoma cells (ROS 17/2.8). The BRSA in CM was completely inhibited by an antibody to interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha). Fractionation of SCC-9 CM by gel filtration and HPLC ion exchange chromatography revealed a single peak of BRSA and PGE2 synthesis-stimulating activity at 17-20K (termed SCMII). In mouse calvariae, SCMII increased medium Ca2+ and PGE2 in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations from 20 ng protein/ml to a maximum of 500 ng protein/ml. Preincubation of SCMII with antibody to IL-1 alpha completely inhibited SCMII-induced bone resorption. SCMII also enhanced thymocyte proliferation with activity that was equivalent to 353 U/ml IL-1. Antibodies to IL-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor had no effect on SCMII-induced bone resorption. Using specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta, IL-1 alpha was measured in high concentrations in both crude and partially purified fractions of SCC-9 and SCC-13 CM. In contrast, IL-1 beta was either undetectable or present in amounts below those that stimulate bone resorption. In addition, SCMII did not enhance cAMP production in bone cells. We conclude that the BRSA produced by the two squamous cell carcinoma cell lines SCC-9 and SCC-13 is IL-1 alpha.

  18. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation through EP4 receptor and intracellular cAMP in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yueqin; Martinez-Anton, Asuncion; Qi, Hai-Yan; Logun, Carolea; Alsaaty, Sara; Park, Yong Hwan; Kastner, Daniel L.; Chae, Jae Jin; Shelhamer, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a potent lipid mediator involved in maintaining homeostasis but also promotion of acute inflammation or immune suppression in chronic inflammation and cancer. NLRP3 inflammasome plays an important role in host defense. Uncontrolled activation of NLRP3 inflammasome, due to mutations in the NLRP3 gene causes cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Here, we showed that NLRP3 inflammasome activation is inhibited by PGE2 in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. This effect was mediated through prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP4) and an increase in intracellular cAMP, independently of protein kinase A (PKA) or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac). A specific agonist of EP4 mimicked, while its antagonist or EP4 knockdown reversed PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. PGE2 caused an increase in intracellular cAMP. Blockade of adenylate cyclase by its inhibitor reversed PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. Increase of intracellular cAMP by an activator of adenylate cyclase or an analog of cAMP, or a blockade of cAMP degradation by phosphodiesterase inhibitor decreased NLRP3 activation. PKA or Epac agonists did not mimic and their antagonists did not reverse PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. In addition, constitutive IL-1β secretion from LPS-primed PBMCs of CAPS patients was substantially reduced by high doses of PGE2. Moreover, blocking cytosolic phospholipase A2α by its inhibitor or siRNA or inhibiting cyclooxygenase 2, resulting in inhibition of endogenous PGE2 production, caused an increase in NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our results suggest that PGE2 might play a role in maintaining homeostasis during the resolution phase of inflammation and might serve as an autocrine and paracrine regulator. PMID:25917098

  19. Inhibition of Prostaglandin Transporter (PGT) Promotes Perfusion and Vascularization and Accelerates Wound Healing in Non-Diabetic and Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongbo; Benard, Outhiriaradjou; Syeda, Mahrukh M.; Schuster, Victor L.; Chi, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral ischemia, resulting from diminished arterial flow and defective local vascularization, is one of the main causes of impaired wound healing in diabetes. Vasodilatory prostaglandins (PGs), including PGE2 and PGI2, regulate blood flow in peripheral tissues. PGs also stimulate angiogenesis by inducing vascular endothelial growth factor. However, PG levels are reduced in diabetes mainly due to enhanced degradation. We hypothesized that inhibition of the prostaglandin transporter (PGT) (SLCO2A1), which mediates the degradation of PGs, would increase blood flow and stimulate vascularization, thereby mitigating peripheral ischemia and accelerating wound healing in diabetes. Here we report that inhibiting PGT with intravenously injected PGT inhibitor, T26A, increased blood flow in ischemic hind limbs created in non-diabetic rats and streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Systemic, or combined with topical, T26A accelerated closure of cutaneous wounds. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that inhibition of PGT enhanced vascularization (marked by larger numbers of vessels formed by CD34+ cells), and accelerated re-epithelialization of cutaneous wounds. In cultured primary human bone marrow CD34+ cells and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKs) either inhibiting or silencing PGT increased migration in both cell lines. Thus PGT directly regulates mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and HEKs, which could contribute to PGT-mediated vascularization and re-epithelialization. At the molecular level, systemic inhibition of PGT raised circulating PGE2. Taken together, our data demonstrate that PGT modulates arterial blood flow, mobilization of EPCs and HEKs, and vascularization and epithelialization in wound healing by regulating vasodilatory and pro-angiogenic PGs. PMID:26230411

  20. The anti-inflammatory compound palmitoylethanolamide inhibits prostaglandin and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid production by a macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Linda; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Häggström, Jenny; Alhouayek, Mireille; Fowler, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    The anti-inflammatory agent palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) reduces cyclooxygenase (COX) activity in vivo in a model of inflammatory pain. It is not known whether the compound reduces prostaglandin production in RAW264.7 cells, whether such an action is affected by compounds preventing the breakdown of endogenous PEA, whether other oxylipins are affected, or whether PEA produces direct effects upon the COX-2 enzyme. RAW264.7 cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ to induce COX-2. At the level of mRNA, COX-2 was induced >1000-fold following 24 h of the treatment. Coincubation with PEA (10 μmol/L) did not affect the levels of COX-2, but reduced the levels of prostaglandins D2 and E2 as well as 11- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, which can also be synthesised by a COX-2 pathway in macrophages. These effects were retained when hydrolysis of PEA to palmitic acid was blocked. Linoleic acid-derived oxylipin levels were not affected by PEA. No direct effects of PEA upon the oxygenation of either arachidonic acid or 2-arachidonoylglycerol by COX-2 were found. It is concluded that in lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, PEA reduces the production of COX-2-derived oxylipins in a manner that is retained when its metabolism to palmitic acid is inhibited.

  1. Prostaglandin E2 Suppresses Antifungal Immunity by Inhibiting Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 Function and Interleukin-17 Expression in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Patricia A.; Vithayathil, Paul J.; Janelsins, Brian M.; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Williamson, Peter R.; Datta, Sandip K.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY T helper 17 (Th17) cells play an important role in mucosal host defense through production of the signature cytokines IL-17 and IL-22. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been shown to enhance IL-17 production by mature Th17 cells. However, when present during Th17 differentiation, we found that PGE2 inhibited the transcription factor IRF4 and suppressed production of IL-17 but not IL-22. We show that IRF4 was required for IL-17 expression but inhibited IL-22 expression, highlighting the potential for discordant regulation of these two cytokines in Th17 cells. The pathogenic fungus, Cryptococcus neoformans, produces PGE2 and we found that it uses PGE2- and IRF4-dependent mechanisms to specifically inhibit induction of IL-17 during Th17 differentiation. Blockade of host PGE2 during infection led to increased IL-17 production from CD4+T cells and increased survival of mice. These findings suggest that host- or pathogen-derived PGE2 can act directly on Th17 cells during differentiation to inhibit IL-17-dependent anti-microbial responses. PMID:22464170

  2. Inhibition of premature labor in sheep by a combined treatment of nimesulide, a prostaglandin synthase type 2 inhibitor, and atosiban, an oxytocin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Grigsby, P L; Poore, K R; Hirst, J J; Jenkin, G

    2000-09-01

    delivery or scheduled death. These results indicate that the combination of an inhibitor of prostaglandin endoperoxidase H synthase type 2 with an oxytocin receptor antagonist is more effective in inhibition of preterm labor than is treatment with a prostaglandin endoperoxidase H synthase type 2 inhibitor alone. The clinical use of atosiban to prevent the oxytocin-stimulated increase in uterine activity associated with labor in combination with nimesulide may permit reduction of the dose of nimesulide used to a level that has minimal impact on fetal well-being.

  3. Autocatalytic Nitration of Prostaglandin Endoperoxide Synthase-2 by Nitrite Inhibits Prostanoid Formation in Rat Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Karreman, Christiaan; Daiber, Andreas; Zhao, Cheng; Hamacher, Jürg; Perlman, David; Jung, Birgit; van der Loo, Bernd; O'Connor, Peter; Leist, Marcel; Ullrich, Volker; Bachschmid, Markus Michael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Prostaglandin endoperoxide H2 synthase (PGHS) is a well-known target for peroxynitrite-mediated nitration. In several experimental macrophage models, however, the relatively late onset of nitration failed to coincide with the early peak of endogenous peroxynitrite formation. In the present work, we aimed to identify an alternative, peroxynitrite-independent mechanism, responsible for the observed nitration and inactivation of PGHS-2 in an inflammatory cell model. Results: In primary rat alveolar macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), PGHS-2 activity was suppressed after 12 h, although the prostaglandin endoperoxide H2 synthase (PGHS-2) protein was still present. This coincided with a nitration of the enzyme. Coincubation with a nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2) inhibitor preserved PGHS-2 nitration and at the same time restored thromboxane A2 (TxA2) synthesis in the cells. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was maximal at 4 h and then returned to baseline levels. Nitrite (NO2−) production occurred later than ROS generation. This rendered generation of peroxynitrite and the nitration of PGHS-2 unlikely. We found that the nitrating agent was formed from NO2−, independent from superoxide (•O2−). Purified PGHS-2 treated with NO2− was selectively nitrated on the active site Tyr371, as identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Exposure to peroxynitrite resulted in the nitration not only of Tyr371, but also of other tyrosines (Tyr). Innovation and Conclusion: The data presented here point to an autocatalytic nitration of PGHS-2 by NO2−, catalyzed by the enzyme's endogenous peroxidase activity and indicate a potential involvement of this mechanism in the termination of prostanoid formation under inflammatory conditions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1393–1406. PMID:22578329

  4. Echinacea Species and Alkamides Inhibit Prostaglandin E2 Production in RAW264.7 Mouse Macrophage Cells

    PubMed Central

    LaLone, Carlie A.; Hammer, Kimberly D. P.; Wu, Lankun; Bae, Jaehoon; Leyva, Norma; Liu, Yi; Solco, Avery K. S.; Kraus, George A.; Murphy, Patricia A.; Wurtele, Eve S.; kim, Ok-Kyung; Seo, Kwon; Widrlechner, Mark P.; Birt, Diane F.

    2008-01-01

    Inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cells was assessed with an enzyme immunoassay following treatments with Echinacea extracts or synthesized alkamides. Results indicated that ethanol extracts diluted in media to a concentration of 15 μg/mL from E. angustifolia, E. pallida, E. simulata, and E. sanguinea significantly inhibited PGE2 production. In further studies, PGE2 production was significantly reduced by all synthesized alkamides assayed at 50 μM, by Bauer alkamides 8, 12A analogue, and 14, Chen alkamide 2, and Chen alkamide 2 analogue at 25 μM and by Bauer alkamide 14 at 10 μM. Cytotoxicity did not play a role in the noted reduction of PGE2 production in either the Echinacea extracts or synthesized alkamides. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis identified individual alkamides present at concentrations below 2.8 μM in the extracts from the six Echinacea species (15 μg/mL crude extract). Because active extracts contained <2.8 μM of specific alkamide and the results showed that synthetic alkamides must have a minimum concentration of 10 μM to inhibit PGE2, it is likely that alkamides may contribute toward the anti-inflammatory activity of Echinacea in a synergistic or additive manner. PMID:17696440

  5. Selective inhibition of virus protein synthesis by prostaglandin A1: a translational block associated with HSP70 synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Amici, C; Giorgi, C; Rossi, A; Santoro, M G

    1994-01-01

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins are potent inhibitors of virus replication. The antiviral activity has been associated with the induction of 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) synthesis. In this report, we describe that in African green monkey kidney cells infected with Sendai virus (SV) and treated with prostaglandin A1 (PGA1), SV protein synthesis was selectively blocked as long as HSP70 was being synthesized by the host cell. The block appeared to be at the translational level, as indicated by the following (i) PGA1 had no effect on SV primary transcription, and a dramatic decrease in the abundance of SV mRNA occurred only at later stages of infection; and (ii) treatment with PGA1 started at 6 h postinfection, at which time SV mRNA had already accumulated in infected cells, did not suppress the levels of NP mRNA, but it reduced the amount of ribosome-bound NP mRNA and caused a dramatic decrease in the level of genomic RNA. The PGA1-induced block of SV protein synthesis appeared to be cell mediated, since it was prevented by actinomycin D, while PGA1 had no effect on SV mRNA translation in vitro. The possibility that HSP70 could be a mediator of the antiviral effect is suggested by the fact that treatment with other classical inducers of HSP70, including sodium arsenite, cadmium, and heat shock at 42 degrees C for 5 h, also selectively prevented SV protein synthesis as long as heat shock protein synthesis occurred. Moreover, SV protein synthesis was not inhibited by PGA1 in murine Friend erythroleukemic cells, which lack the ability to induce HSP70 expression in response to PGA1. Images PMID:7933069

  6. Suppression of prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype EP2 by PPARgamma ligands inhibits human lung carcinoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Han, ShouWei; Roman, Jesse

    2004-02-20

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), a major cyclooxygenase (COX-2) metabolite, plays important roles in tumor biology and its functions are mediated through one or more of its receptors EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. We have shown that the matrix glycoprotein fibronectin stimulates lung carcinoma cell proliferation via induction of COX-2 expression with subsequent PGE(2) protein biosynthesis. Ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) inhibited this effect and induced cellular apoptosis. Here, we explore the role of the PGE(2) receptor EP2 in this process and whether the inhibition observed with PPARgamma ligands is related to effects on this receptor. We found that human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines (H1838 and H2106) express EP2 receptors, and that the inhibition of cell growth by PPARgamma ligands (GW1929, PGJ2, ciglitazone, troglitazone, and rosiglitazone [also known as BRL49653]) was associated with a significant decrease in EP2 mRNA and protein levels. The inhibitory effects of BRL49653 and ciglitazone, but not PGJ2, were reversed by a specific PPARgamma antagonist GW9662, suggesting the involvement of PPARgamma-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PPARgamma ligand treatment was associated with phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (Erk), and inhibition of EP2 receptor expression by PPARgamma ligands was prevented by PD98095, an inhibitor of the MEK-1/Erk pathway. Butaprost, an EP2 agonist, like exogenous PGE(2) (dmPGE(2)), increased lung carcinoma cell growth, however, GW1929 and troglitazone blocked their effects. Our studies reveal a novel role for EP2 in mediating the proliferative effects of PGE(2) on lung carcinoma cells. PPARgamma ligands inhibit human lung carcinoma cell growth by decreasing the expression of EP2 receptors through Erk signaling and PPARgamma-dependent and -independent pathways.

  7. Celastrol inhibits prostaglandin E2-induced proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of fibroblasts isolated from ankylosing spondylitis hip tissues in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yu-Cong; Yang, Xian-Wen; Yuan, Shi-Guo; Zhang, Pei; Li, Yi-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background Heterotopic ossification on the enthesis, which develops after subsequent inflammation, is one of the most distinctive features in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) serves as a key mediator of inflammation and bone remodeling in AS. Celastrol, a well-known Chinese medicinal herb isolated from Tripterygium wilfordii, is widely used in treating inflammatory diseases, including AS. It has been proven that it can inhibit lipopolysac-charide-induced expression of various inflammation mediators, such as PGE-2. However, the mechanism by which celastrol inhibits inflammation-induced bone forming in AS is unclear. Objective To investigate whether celastrol could inhibit isolated AS fibroblast osteogenesis induced by PGE-2. Methods Hip synovial tissues were obtained from six AS patients undergoing total hip replacement in our hospital. Fibroblasts were isolated, primarily cultured, and then treated with PGE-2 for osteogenic induction. Different doses of celastrol and indometacin were added to observe their effects on osteogenic differentiation. Cell proliferation, osteogenic markers, alizarin red staining as well as the activity of alkaline phosphatase were examined in our study. Results Celastrol significantly inhibits cell proliferation of isolated AS fibroblasts and in vitro osteogenic differentiation compared with control groups in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that celastrol could inhibit isolated AS fibroblast proliferation and in vitro osteogenic differentiation. The interaction of PI3K/AKT signaling and Wnt protein may be involved in the process. Further studies should be performed in vivo and animal models to identify the potential effect of celastrol on the bone metabolism of AS patients. PMID:27022241

  8. Molecular basis for the direct inhibition of AP-1 DNA binding by 15-deoxy-Delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Cañada, F Javier

    2003-12-19

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins may interfere with cellular functions by multiple mechanisms. The cyclopentenone 15-deoxy-Delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) has been reported to inhibit the activity of the transcription factor AP-1 in several experimental settings. We have explored the possibility of a direct interaction of 15d-PGJ2 with AP-1 proteins. Here we show that 15d-PGJ2 covalently modifies c-Jun and directly inhibits the DNA binding activity of AP-1. The modification of c-Jun occurs both in vitro and in intact cells as detected by labeling with biotinylated 15d-PGJ2 and mass spectrometry analysis. Attachment of the cyclopentenone prostaglandin occurs at cysteine 269, which is located in the c-Jun DNA binding domain. In addition, 15d-PGJ2 can promote the oligomerization of a fraction of c-Jun through the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds or 15d-PGJ2-bonded dimers. Our results identify a novel site of interaction of 15d-PGJ2 with the AP-1 activation pathway that may contribute to the complex effects of cyclopentenone prostaglandins on the cellular response to pro-inflammatory agents. They also show the first evidence for the induction of protein cross-linking by 15d-PGJ2.

  9. Interleukin-4 inhibits cyclo-oxygenase-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 production by human mature dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Teloni, Raffaela; Giannoni, Federico; Rossi, Paolo; Nisini, Roberto; Gagliardi, Maria Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is considered the key cytokine for inducing T helper type 2 (Th2) cell differentiation, while interferon-γ and IL-12 are pivotal cytokines for Th1 immune responses. Paradoxically, IL-4 has also been demonstrated to enhance IL-12 production by dendritic cells, suggesting an IL-4-dependent regulatory feedback of the Th1/Th2 system. In addition, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a lipid mediator of inflammation, has been implicated in the enhancement of Th2-type responses acting directly on T and B lymphocytes. PGE2 synthesis is dependent on the serial engagement of various enzymes, among which the inducible cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) exerts a critical role in monocytes and dendritic cells. In this study we demonstrate that IL-4 inhibits COX-2 gene expression and consequently prevents secretion of PGE2 by mature human dendritic cells. We also show that PGE2 does not regulate IL-12 and IL-10 production by dendritic cells in an autocrine fashion. Hence, we suggest that IL-4 may exploit an IL-12-independent regulatory feedback of the Th1/Th2 system through PGE2 inhibition. PMID:17059508

  10. [The involvement of prostaglandins in the inhibiting effect of endotoxin on the myoelectric activity of the gastrointestinal system in pigs].

    PubMed

    Wechsung, E

    1996-01-01

    The probable involvement of prostaglandins in the myoelectrical response of the antrum pylori and small intestine to endotoxin (LPS) was studied in the piglet. In these experiments the influence of I.V. infusion of PGF2 alpha and PGE2 and of I.V. injection of LPS, without and with indomethacin (INDO) pretreatment, on myoelectrical activity of the antrum pylori, duodenum, jejunum and ileum as well as on some clinical and haematological parameters was studied. Infusion of the 2 PG's, especially PGE2, inhibited myoelectrical activity of the antrum pylori. PGE2 also reduced duodenal activity. PGF2 alpha was without effect on duodenal and jejunal activity, but stimulated ileal activity. Both PG's induced fever, nausea, vomiting and sedation or excitation. With the higher dose of PGE2 diarrhoea was also observed. Injection of LPS induced identical myoelectrical and clinical changes, as described for PGE2. However, endotoxin did not induce diarrhoea. Depending on the dose, administration of LPS resulted in a leukocytosis or a leukopenia together with an increase in band neutrophils. Following pretreatment with INDO the effects of LPS on gastrointestinal electrical activity were reduced and its clinical symptoms were nearly completely inhibited. The haematological changes induced by LPS, however, were not influenced by INDO. These experiments suggest a possible involvement of the PG's in the clinical symptoms and in the initial inhibitory effect of LPS on myoelectrical activity especially of the antrum. However, the induced haematological changes are probably not mediated by the arachidonic acid pathway.

  11. Curcumin induces apoptosis and inhibits prostaglandin E(2) production in synovial fibroblasts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheol; Moon, Dong-Oh; Choi, Il-Whan; Choi, Byung Tae; Nam, Taek-Jeong; Rhu, Chung-Ho; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Lee, Won Ho; Kim, Gi-Young; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2007-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that is characterized by hyperplasia of the synovial fibroblasts, which is partly the result of decreased apoptosis. This study investigated the mechanisms through which curcumin, a polyphenolic compound from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, exerts its anti-proliferative action in the synovial fibroblasts obtained from patients with RA. Exposure of the synovial fibroblasts to curcumin resulted in growth inhibition and the induction of apoptosis, as measured by MTT assay, fluorescent microscopy and Annexin-V-based assay. RT-PCR and immunoblotting showed that treating the cells with curcumin resulted in the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and the X-linked inhibitor of the apoptosis protein as well as the up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Curcumin-induced apoptosis was also associated with the proteolytic activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, and the concomitant degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase protein. Furthermore, curcumin decreased the expression levels of the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 mRNA and protein without causing significant changes in the COX-1 levels, which was correlated with the inhibition of prostaglandin E(2) synthesis. These results show that curcumin might help identify a new therapeutic pathway against hyperplasia of the synovial fibroblasts in RA.

  12. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits mast cell-dependent bronchoconstriction in human small airways through the E prostanoid subtype 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Säfholm, Jesper; Manson, Martijn L; Bood, Johan; Delin, Ingrid; Orre, Ann-Charlotte; Bergman, Per; Al-Ameri, Mamdoh; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Adner, Mikael

    2015-11-01

    Inhaled prostaglandin (PG) E2 might inhibit asthmatic responses, but the mechanisms involved remain undefined. We sought to characterize the direct and indirect effects of PGE2 on human small airways with particular reference to the receptors mediating the responses. Contraction and relaxation were studied in isolated human bronchi with an inner diameter of 1 mm or less. Low concentrations of PGE2 (0.01-1 μmol/L) relaxed the bronchi precontracted by histamine. The bronchodilator response was inhibited by the E prostanoid (EP) subtype 4 receptor antagonist ONO-AE3-208 but unaffected by the EP2 receptor antagonist PF-04418948. Higher concentrations of PGE2 (10-100 μmol/L) contracted the small airways. However, the TP receptor agonists U-46,619, PGF2α, and PGD2 were more potent than PGE2. Moreover, the bronchoconstrictor responses to PGE2 and all other tested prostanoids, including the EP1/EP3 receptor agonist 17-phenyl trinor PGE2 and the partial FP receptor agonist AL-8810, were uniformly abolished by the TP receptor antagonist SQ-29,548. In the presence of TP and EP4 antagonists, PGE2 inhibited the mast cell-mediated bronchoconstriction resulting from anti-IgE challenge. Measurement of the release of histamine and cysteinyl leukotrienes documented that this bronchoprotective action of PGE2 was mediated by the EP2 receptor, unrelated to bronchodilation, and increased with time of exposure. The pharmacology of PGE2 in isolated human small airways was different from its profile in animal models. This first demonstration of powerful EP2 receptor-mediated inhibition of IgE-dependent contractions in human airways introduces a new selective target for the treatment of asthma. This EP2 control of mast cell-mediated bronchoconstriction is presumably exaggerated in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Normal Human Lung Epithelial Cells Inhibit Transforming Growth Factor-β Induced Myofibroblast Differentiation via Prostaglandin E2

    PubMed Central

    Epa, Amali P.; Thatcher, Thomas H.; Pollock, Stephen J.; Wahl, Lindsay A.; Lyda, Elizabeth; Kottmann, R. M.; Phipps, Richard P.; Sime, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressive disease with very few effective treatments. The key effector cells in fibrosis are believed to be fibroblasts, which differentiate to a contractile myofibroblast phenotype with enhanced capacity to proliferate and produce extracellular matrix. The role of the lung epithelium in fibrosis is unclear. While there is evidence that the epithelium is disrupted in IPF, it is not known whether this is a cause or a result of the fibroblast pathology. We hypothesized that healthy epithelial cells are required to maintain normal lung homeostasis and can inhibit the activation and differentiation of lung fibroblasts to the myofibroblast phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we employed a novel co-culture model with primary human lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts to investigate whether epithelial cells inhibit myofibroblast differentiation. Measurements and Main Results In the presence of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, fibroblasts co-cultured with epithelial cells expressed significantly less α-smooth muscle actin and collagen and showed marked reduction in cell migration, collagen gel contraction, and cell proliferation compared to fibroblasts grown without epithelial cells. Epithelial cells from non-matching tissue origins were capable of inhibiting TGF-β induced myofibroblast differentiation in lung, keloid and Graves’ orbital fibroblasts. TGF-β promoted production of prostaglandin (PG) E2 in lung epithelial cells, and a PGE2 neutralizing antibody blocked the protective effect of epithelial cell co-culture. Conclusions We provide the first direct experimental evidence that lung epithelial cells inhibit TGF-β induced myofibroblast differentiation and pro-fibrotic phenotypes in fibroblasts. This effect is not restricted by tissue origin, and is mediated, at least in part, by PGE2. Our data support the hypothesis that the epithelium plays a crucial role in maintaining lung homeostasis

  14. Prostaglandin E1 inhibits collagenase gene expression in rabbit synoviocytes and human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Salvatori, R; Guidon, P T; Rapuano, B E; Bockman, R S

    1992-07-01

    Cartilage breakdown, as seen in inflammatory and degenerative joint diseases, can be mediated by proteolytic enzymes, such as the metalloproteinase collagenase, the only enzyme able to digest collagen at neutral pH. In vitro collagenase gene expression can be stimulated by the phorbol ester tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate. We have investigated the effect of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) on 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate-stimulated collagenase mRNA levels in the rabbit synoviocyte cell line HIG-82. PGE1, but not PGE2 or PGF2 alpha, was able to selectively reduce collagenase mRNA levels in a dose-dependent fashion. PGE1 markedly increased intracellular levels of cAMP, while PGE2 and PGF2 alpha had little or no effect on cAMP production in the HIG-82 synoviocytes. Agents known to increase intracellular cAMP levels, such as the adenyl cyclase activator forskolin and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), mimicked the effect of PGE1, on collagenase mRNA levels. PGE1, forskolin, and IBMX also decreased collagenase mRNA levels in human skin fibroblasts, demonstrating that this observation was not unique to the HIG-82 cell line. Transient transfection experiments carried out in HIG-82 cells using a 1.2-kilobase portion of the 5'-flanking region of the human collagenase gene linked to the reporter gene luciferase demonstrated that PGE1, forskolin, and IBMX exert their inhibitory effect on the promoter region of the collagenase gene.

  15. 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24R,25(OH)2D3] controls growth plate development by inhibiting apoptosis in the reserve zone and stimulating response to 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 in hypertrophic cells.

    PubMed

    Boyan, B D; Hurst-Kennedy, J; Denison, T A; Schwartz, Z

    2010-07-01

    Previously we showed that costochondral growth plate resting zone (RC) chondrocytes response primarily to 24R,25(OH)2D3 whereas prehypertrophic and hypertrophic (GC) cells respond to 1alpha,25(OH)2D3. 24R,25(OH)2D3 increases RC cell proliferation and inhibits activity of matrix processing enzymes, suggesting it stabilizes cells in the reserve zone, possibly by inhibiting the matrix degradation characteristic of apoptotic hypertrophic GC cells. To test this, apoptosis was induced in rat RC cells by treatment with exogenous inorganic phosphate (Pi). 24R,25(OH)2D3 blocked apoptotic effects in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, apoptosis was induced in ATDC5 cell cultures and 24R,25(OH)2D3 blocked this effect. Further studies indicated that 24R,25(OH)2D3 acts via at least two independent pathways. 24R,25(OH)2D3 increases LPA receptor-1 (LPA R1) expression and production of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and subsequent LPA R1/3-dependent signaling, thereby decreasing p53 abundance. LPA also increases the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. In addition, 24R,25(OH)2D3 acts by increasing PKC activity. 24R,25(OH)2D3 stimulates 1-hydroxylase activity, resulting in increased levels of 1,25(OH)2D3, and it increases levels of phospholipase A2 activating protein, which is required for rapid 1alpha,25(OH)2D3-dependent activation of PKC in GC cells. These results suggest that 24R,25(OH)2D3 modulates growth plate development by controlling the rate and extent of RC chondrocyte transition to a GC chondrocyte phenotype.

  16. The cyclopentenone prostaglandin 15d-PGJ2 inhibits the NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasomes.

    PubMed

    Maier, Nolan K; Leppla, Stephen H; Moayeri, Mahtab

    2015-03-15

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic protein complexes that respond to diverse danger signals by activating caspase-1. The sensor components of the inflammasome, often proteins of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) family, detect stress, danger stimuli, and pathogen-associated molecular patterns. We report that the eicosanoid 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2) and related cyclopentenone PGs inhibit caspase-1 activation by the NLR family leucine-rich repeat protein (NLRP)1 and NLRP3 inflammasomes. This inhibition was independent of the well-characterized role of 15d-PGJ2 as a peroxisome proliferator receptor-γ agonist, its activation of NF erythroid 2-related factor 2, or its anti-inflammatory function as an inhibitor of NF-κB. Instead, 15d-PGJ2 prevents the autoproteolytic activation of caspase-1 and the maturation of IL-1β through induction of a cellular state inhibitory to caspase-1 proteolytic function. The eicosanoid does not directly modify or inactivate the caspase-1 enzyme. Rather, inhibition is dependent on de novo protein synthesis. In a mouse peritonitis model of gout, using monosodium urate crystals to activate NLRP3, 15d-PGJ2 caused a significant inhibition of cell recruitment and associated IL-1β release. Furthermore, in a murine anthrax infection model, 15d-PGJ2 reversed anthrax lethal toxin-mediated NLRP1-dependent resistance. The findings reported in this study suggest a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory properties of the cyclopentenone PGs through inhibition of caspase-1 and the inflammasome.

  17. Prostaglandin D2 generation by rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated with Datura stramonium agglutinin and its inhibition by haptenic sugar and wheat germ agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Nishimura, Tamiko; Uchida, Masaatsu K

    2002-09-01

    The production of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) by rat peritoneal mast cells incubated with N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) oligomer-specific Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA) for 10 min in the presence of 0.3 mM Ca2+ was examined. Previously, our group reported that the incubation of rat mast cells with DSA (5 - 100 microg/ml) under similar conditions resulted in a calcium influx and histamine release via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein pathway of the mast cells, and the histamine release was inhibited by haptenic sugar chitooligosaccharides or GlcNAc-specific lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) (K. Matsuda et al., Jpn J Pharmacol 66, 195 - 204 (1994)). DSA (5 - 100 microg/ml) dose-dependently stimulated the mast cells to generate PGD2. Chitooligosaccharides (1% w/v) and WGA (100 microg/ml) inhibited the production of PGD2 induced by 100 microg/ml of DSA, suggesting that the effect of DSA is sugar-specific. A prostaglandin G/H synthase inhibitor NS-398 (N-[cyclohexyloxy-4-nitrophenyl] methanesulfonamide) (10 microM) inhibited the formation of PGD2 induced by DSA (20 microg/ml). These results suggest that the binding of DSA to the corresponding sugar residues on the mast cell surface mediates the signaling of the prostaglandin G/H synthase pathway.

  18. Prostaglandin E(2) inhibits calcium current in two sub-populations of acutely isolated mouse trigeminal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Borgland, Stephanie L; Connor, Mark; Ryan, Renae M; Ball, Helen J; Christie, MacDonald J

    2002-03-01

    Prostaglandins are important mediators of pain and inflammation. We have examined the effects of prostanoids on voltage-activated calcium currents (I(Ca)) in acutely isolated mouse trigeminal sensory neurons, using standard whole cell voltage clamp techniques. Trigeminal neurons were divided into two populations based on the presence (Type 2) or absence (Type 1) of low voltage-activated T-type I(Ca). The absence of T-type I(Ca) is highly correlated with sensitivity to mu-opioid agonists and the VR1 agonist capsaicin. In both populations of cells, high voltage-activated I(Ca) was inhibited by PGE(2) with an EC(50) of about 35 nM, to a maximum of 30 %. T-type I(Ca) was not inhibited by PGE(2). Pertussis toxin pre-treatment abolished the effects of PGE(2) in Type 2 cells, but not in Type 1 cells, whereas treatment with cholera toxin prevented the effects of PGE(2) in Type 1 cells, but not in Type 2 cells. Inhibition of I(Ca) by PGE(2) was associated with slowing of current activation and could be relieved with a large positive pre-pulse, consistent with inhibition of I(Ca) by G protein betagamma subunits. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of mRNA from trigeminal ganglia indicated that all four EP prostanoid receptors were present. However, in both Type 1 and Type 2 cells the effects of PGE(2) were only mimicked by the selective EP(3) receptor agonist ONO-AE-248, and not by selective agonists for EP(1) (ONO-DI-004), EP(2) (ONO-AE1-259) and EP(4) (ONO-AE1-329) receptors. These data indicate that two populations of neurons in trigeminal ganglia differing in their calcium channel expression, sensitivity to mu-opioids and capsaicin also have divergent mechanisms of PGE(2)-mediated inhibition of calcium channels, with Gi/Go type G proteins involved in one population, and Gs type G proteins in the other.

  19. Nonselective inhibition of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase by naproxen ameliorates hepatic injury in animals with acute or chronic liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Bahde, Ralf; Kapoor, Sorabh; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    The rising prevalence of hepatic injury due to toxins, metabolites, viruses, etc., necessitates development of further mechanisms for protecting the liver and for treating acute or chronic liver diseases. To examine whether inhibition of inflammation directed by cyclo-oxygenase pathways, we performed animal studies with naproxen, which inhibits prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthases 1 and 2 and is in extensive clinical use. We administered carbon tetrachloride to induce acute liver injury and ligated the common bile duct to induce chronic liver injury in adult rats. These experimental manipulations produced abnormalities in liver tests, tissue necrosis, compensatory hepatocyte or biliary proliferation, and onset of fibrosis, particularly after bile duct ligation. After carbon tetrachloride-induced acute injury, naproxen decreased liver test abnormalities, tissue necrosis and compensatory hepatocellular proliferation. After bile duct ligation-induced chronic injury, naproxen decreased liver test abnormalities, tissue injury and compensatory biliary hyperplasia. Moreover, after bile duct ligation, naproxen-treated rats showed more periductular oval liver cells, which have been classified as hepatic progenitor cells. In naproxen-treated rats, we found greater expression in hepatic stellate cells and mononuclear cells of cytoprotective factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor. The ability of naproxen to induce expression of vascular endothelial growth factor was verified in cell culture studies with CFSC-8B clone of rat hepatic stellate cells. Whereas assays for carbon tetrachloride toxicity using cultured primary hepatocytes established that naproxen was not directly cytoprotective, we found conditioned medium containing vascular endothelial growth factor from naproxen-treated CFSC-8B cells protected hepatocytes from carbon tetrachloride toxicity. Therefore, naproxen was capable of ameliorating toxic liver injury, which involved naproxen-induced release of

  20. [Effect of dominant negative HIF-1alpha (dn HIF-1alpha) on biological characteristics of uterine cervix cancer cells].

    PubMed

    Tang, Bin-Zhi; Zhao, Feng-Yan; Wei, Ting; Mu, De-Zhi; Mao, Meng; Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Lin; Qu, Yia

    2008-05-01

    To explore the effect of dominant negative HIF-1alpha (dn HIF-1alpha) on biological characteristics of uterine cervix cancer cell SiHa and elucidate the related mechanism. pcDNA3. 1-dn HIF-1alpha was transfected into SiHa cells. The expression of HIF-1alpha and VEGF protein were detected by immunocytochemical method and Western Blotting. The growth proliferation of cells was surveyed by the MTT assay and cell apoptosis was detected through TUNEL after treated with CoCl2, meanwhile the results were compared with the group transfected with mock plasmid and untransfected group. After successfully transfected with relevant plasmid, there's no obvious difference of expression of HIF-1alpha among dn HIF-1alpha group, pcDNA3. 1 group, and untransfected group, however the expression of VEGF of dn HIF-1alpha group was significantly lower than that of the others (P < 0. 05). The proliferation ability of dn HIF-1alpha group was obviously lower than that of the other two (P < 0.05), whether it was under normoxia or chemical hypoxia induced by CoCl2. The characteristic apoptotic morphology was most significantly apparent in dn HIF-1alpha group among these three (P < 0.05). Domain negative HIF-1alpha can inhibit the proliferation of uterine cervix cancer cell and accelerate its apoptosis under hypoxia induced by CoCl2, as well as decrease the expression of VEGF protein. The implications of all this were that the domain negative HIF-1alpha may play an important role in the therapy of uterine cervix cancer.

  1. Inhibition of IkappaB kinase and IkappaB phosphorylation by 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) in activated murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Castrillo, A; Díaz-Guerra, M J; Hortelano, S; Martín-Sanz, P; Boscá, L

    2000-03-01

    Activation of the macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) induces the expression of gene products involved in host defense, among them type 2 nitric oxide synthase. Treatment of cells with 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15dPGJ(2)) inhibited the LPS- and IFN-gamma-dependent synthesis of NO, a process that was not antagonized by similar concentrations of prostaglandin J(2), prostaglandin E(2), or rosiglitazone, a peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma ligand. Incubation of activated macrophages with 15dPGJ(2) inhibited the degradation of IkappaBalpha and IkappaBbeta and increased their levels in the nuclei. NF-kappaB activity, as well as the transcription of NF-kappaB-dependent genes, such as those encoding type 2 nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2, was impaired under these conditions. Analysis of the steps leading to IkappaB phosphorylation showed an inhibition of IkappaB kinase by 15dPGJ(2) in cells treated with LPS and IFN-gamma, resulting in an impaired phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha, at least in the serine 32 residue required for targeting and degradation of this protein. Incubation of partially purified activated IkappaB kinase with 2 microM 15dPGJ(2) reduced by 83% the phosphorylation in serine 32 of IkappaBalpha, suggesting that this prostaglandin exerts direct inhibitory effects on the activity of the IkappaB kinase complex. These results show rapid actions of 15dPGJ(2), independent of peroxisomal proliferator receptor gamma activation, in macrophages challenged with low doses of LPS and IFN-gamma.

  2. Delta12-Prostaglandin J2 inhibits the ubiquitin hydrolase UCH-L1 and elicits ubiquitin-protein aggregation without proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongmin; Melandri, Francesco; Berdo, Ingrid; Jansen, Marlon; Hunter, Lavonne; Wright, Saundrene; Valbrun, Danielle; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E

    2004-07-09

    To investigate molecular mechanisms linking inflammation with neurodegeneration, we treated neuronal cultures with prostaglandins (PGs), which are mediators of inflammation. PGA1, D2, J2, and Delta12-PGJ2, but not PGE2, reduced the viability and raised the levels of ubiquitinated proteins in the neuronal cells. PGJ2 and its metabolite, Delta12-PGJ2, were the most potent of the four neurotoxic PGs tested in inducing both effects. To address the mechanism by which these agents lead to the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, we tested their effects on neuronal ubiquitin hydrolases UCH-L1 and UCH-L3 as well as on proteasome activity. Notably, Delta12-PGJ2 inhibited the activities of UCH-L1 (K(i) approximately 3.5 microM) and UCH-L3 (K(i) approximately 8.1 microM) without affecting proteasome activity. Intracellular aggregates containing ubiquitinated proteins were detected in Delta12-PGJ2-treated cells, indicating that these aggregates can form independently of proteasome inhibition. In conclusion, impairment of ubiquitin hydrolase activity, such as triggered by Delta12-PGJ2, may be an important contributor to neurodegeneration associated with accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and inflammation.

  3. Specific inhibition by prostaglandins E2 and I2 of histamine-stimulated [14C]aminopyrine accumulation and cyclic adenosine monophosphate generation by isolated canine parietal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Soll, A H

    1980-01-01

    The effects of prostaglandins E2 and I2 on accumulation of [14C]aminopyrine and the generation of cyclic AMP by fractions of dispersed canine gastric mucosal cells, enriched in their content of parietal cells, have been studied. The parietal cell content of the fractions was enriched to between 43 and 70% using an elutriator rotor. The accumulation of [14C]aminopyrine was used as the index of parietal cell response to stimulation. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 0.1 nM-0.1 mM) inhibited histamine stimulated aminopyrine uptake but did not block the response to carbachol, gastrin, or dibuturyl cyclic AMP. PGE2 did, however, inhibit aminopyrine uptake stimulated by carbachol and gastrin when the response to these agents was potentiated by histamine. PGE2 (0.1 NM-0.1 mM) inhibited histamine-stimulated cyclic AMP production in a dose-dependent fashion with maximal inhibition at 1 microM PGE2. Prostacyclin also inhibited both histamine-stimulated aminopyrine accumulation and histamine-stimulated cyclic AMP production. In the absence of added histamine, PGE2 in concentrations above 1 microM and prostacyclin in concentrations above 10 microM stimulated cyclic AMP production, probably by acting on the nonparietal cells as shown in previous studies. These present data are consistent with the hypothesis that prostaglandins E2 and I2 inhibit the response of isolated parietal cells to histamine by specifically blocking histamine-stimulated cyclic AMP production. PMID:6154063

  4. 15-Deoxy-Delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2 inhibition of NF-kappaB-DNA binding through covalent modification of the p50 subunit.

    PubMed

    Cernuda-Morollón, E; Pineda-Molina, E; Cañada, F J; Pérez-Sala, D

    2001-09-21

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins display anti-inflammatory activities and interfere with the signaling pathway that leads to activation of transcription factor NF-kappaB. Here we explore the possibility that the NF-kappaB subunit p50 may be a target for the cyclopentenone 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)). This prostaglandin inhibited the DNA binding ability of recombinant p50 in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition required the cyclopentenone moiety and could be prevented but not reverted by glutathione and dithiothreitol. Moreover, a p50 mutant with a C62S mutation was resistant to inhibition, indicating that the effect of 15d-PGJ(2) was probably due to its interaction with cysteine 62 in p50. The covalent modification of p50 by 15d-PGJ(2) was demonstrated by reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis that showed an increase in retention time and in the molecular mass of 15d-PGJ(2)-treated p50, respectively. The interaction between p50 and 15d-PGJ(2) was relevant in intact cells. 15d-PGJ(2) effectively inhibited cytokine-elicited NF-kappaB activity in HeLa without reducing IkappaBalpha degradation or nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB subunits. 15d-PGJ(2) reduced NF-kappaB DNA binding activity in isolated nuclear extracts, suggesting a direct effect on NF-kappaB proteins. Finally, treatment of HeLa with biotinylated-15d-PGJ(2) resulted in the formation of a 15d-PGJ(2)-p50 adduct as demonstrated by neutravidin binding and immunoprecipitation. These results clearly show that p50 is a target for covalent modification by 15d-PGJ(2) that results in inhibition of DNA binding.

  5. Inhibition of human periodontal prostaglandin E2 synthesis with selected agents.

    PubMed

    Offenbacher, S; Odle, B M; Green, M D; Mayambala, C S; Smith, M A; Fritz, M E; van Dyke, T E; Yeh, K C; Sena, F J

    1990-03-01

    Considerable evidence has demonstrated the importance of PGE2 synthesis in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Although various cyclooxygenase inhibitors have been known to block periodontal PGE2 synthesis and prevent disease progression in animal models, there are few reports comparing relative efficacies of various inhibitors of arachidonic acid (ARA) metabolism. We have developed a sensitive in vitro assay to measure PGE2 synthesis in periodontal tissues. The apparent IC50 values (i.e. the concentration of drug which causes 50% inhibition of maximum PGE2 synthesis) have been determined for a series of arachidonic acid analogues as well as competitive and non-competitive cyclooxygenase inhibitors. Periodontal tissue homogenates were incubated in the presence of 3H-arachidonic acid for 45 min at 37 degrees C. Inhibitors were tested at 10(-10)-10(-4) M and at zero concentration to measure conversion of 3H-arachidonate to 3H-PGE2. Log or half log dilutions of inhibitors were tested in triplicate for each assay. Radiolabeled PGE2 was extracted from homogenates, purified by reverse phase chromatography and quantitated by double antibody capture. RIA was performed on each homogenate to determine the amount of endogenous unlabeled PGE2 present in the sample to correct for antibody capture recovery. The apparent IC50 values were determined for each drug by averaging two or more replicate assays. Specific total enzymatic activity of periodontal tissue homogenates was typically 5-11 pg PGE2/min/mg tissue.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Nicotine stereoisomers and cotinine stimulate prostaglandin E2 but inhibit thromboxane B2 and leukotriene E4 synthesis in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Saareks, V; Mucha, I; Sievi, E; Vapaatalo, H; Riutta, A

    1998-07-17

    The effects of (-)-nicotine (0.0005-500 microM), (+)-nicotine (0.0005-50 microM) and (-)-cotinine (0.0005-500 microM) on arachidonic acid metabolism were investigated in Ca2+ ionophore A23187 (calcimycin)-stimulated human whole blood in vitro. (-)-Nicotine and (-)-cotinine stimulated prostaglandin E2 but inhibited thromboxane B2 synthesis, as has been observed previously in A23187-stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes and platelet-rich plasma [Saareks, V., Riutta, A., Mucha, I., Alanko, J., Vapaatalo, H., 1993. Nicotine and cotinine modulate eicosanoid production in human leukocytes and platelet rich plasma. Eur. J. Pharmacol., 248, 345-349.]. (+)-Nicotine also stimulated prostaglandin E2 but inhibited thromboxane B2 synthesis. High concentrations of (-)-nicotine and (-)-cotinine and even nanomolar concentrations of (+)-nicotine inhibited leukotriene E4 synthesis. These results indicate that (-)-nicotine and (-)-cotinine stimulate cyclooxygenase but inhibit thromboxane synthase and 5-lipoxygenase in whole blood in vitro. (+)-Nicotine is capable of affecting in the same direction as well.

  7. Increased renal sodium absorption by inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis during fasting in healthy man. A possible role of the epithelial sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Treatment with prostaglandin inhibitors can reduce renal function and impair renal water and sodium excretion. We tested the hypotheses that a reduction in prostaglandin synthesis by ibuprofen treatment during fasting decreased renal water and sodium excretion by increased absorption of water and sodium via the aquaporin2 water channels and the epithelial sodium channels. Methods The effect of ibuprofen, 600 mg thrice daily, was measured during fasting in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded crossover study of 17 healthy humans. The subjects received a standardized diet on day 1, fasted at day 2, and received an IV infusion of 3% NaCl on day 3. The effect variables were urinary excretions of aquaporin2 (u-AQP2), the beta-fraction of the epithelial sodium channel (u-ENaCbeta), cyclic-AMP (u-cAMP), prostaglandin E2 (u-PGE2). Free water clearance (CH2O), fractional excretion of sodium (FENa), and plasma concentrations of vasopressin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, atrial-, and brain natriuretic peptide. Results Ibuprofen decreased u-AQP2, u-PGE2, and FENa at all parts of the study. During the same time, ibuprofen significantly increased u-ENaCbeta. Ibuprofen did not change the response in p-AVP, u-c-AMP, urinary output, and free water clearance during any of these periods. Atrial-and brain natriuretic peptide were higher. Conclusion During inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, urinary sodium excretion decreased in parallel with an increase in sodium absorption and increase in u-ENaCbeta. U-AQP2 decreased indicating that water transport via AQP2 fell. The vasopressin-c-AMP-axis did not mediate this effect, but it may be a consequence of the changes in the natriuretic peptide system and/or the angiotensin-aldosterone system Trial Registration Clinical Trials Identifier: NCT00281762 PMID:21029429

  8. Augmented skeletal muscle hyperaemia during hypoxic exercise in humans is blunted by combined inhibition of nitric oxide and vasodilating prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Crecelius, Anne R; Kirby, Brett S; Voyles, Wyatt F; Dinenno, Frank A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Exercise hyperaemia in hypoxia is augmented relative to the same level of exercise in normoxia. At moderate exercise intensities, the mechanism(s) underlying this augmented response are currently unclear. We tested the hypothesis that endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) and vasodilating prostaglandins (PGs) contribute to the augmented muscle blood flow during hypoxic exercise relative to normoxia. In 10 young healthy adults, we measured forearm blood flow (FBF; Doppler ultrasound) and calculated the vascular conductance (FVC) responses during 5 min of rhythmic handgrip exercise at 20% maximal voluntary contraction in normoxia (NormEx) and isocapnic hypoxia (HypEx; O2 saturation ∼85%) before and after local intra-brachial combined blockade of NO synthase (NOS; via NG-monomethyl-l-arginine: l-NMMA) and cyclooxygenase (COX; via ketorolac). All trials were performed during local α- and β-adrenoceptor blockade to eliminate sympathoadrenal influences on vascular tone and thus isolate local vasodilatation. Arterial and deep venous blood gases were measured and oxygen consumption () was calculated. In control (saline) conditions, FBF after 5 min of exercise in hypoxia was greater than in normoxia (345 ± 21 ml min−1vs. 297 ± 18 ml min−1; P < 0.05). After NO–PG block, the compensatory increase in FBF during hypoxic exercise was blunted ∼50% and thus was reduced compared with control hypoxic exercise (312 ± 19 ml min−1; P < 0.05), but this was not the case in normoxia (289 ± 15 ml min−1; P = 0.33). The lower FBF during hypoxic exercise was associated with a compensatory increase in O2 extraction, and thus was maintained at normal control levels (P = 0.64–0.99). We conclude that under the experimental conditions employed, NO and PGs have little role in normoxic exercise hyperaemia whereas combined NO–PG inhibition reduces hypoxic exercise hyperaemia and abolishes hypoxic vasodilatation at rest. Additionally, of the tissue was maintained in

  9. Structure-based QSAR study on differential inhibition of human prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthase-2 (COX-2) by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Pouplana, R; Lozano, J J; Pérez, C; Ruiz, J

    2002-10-01

    The prostaglandin-endoperoxide H synthase-1 (PGHS- 1) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide H synthase-2 (PGHS-2) are the targets of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). It appears that the high degree of selectivity for inhibition of PGHS-2 shown by certain compounds is the result of two mechanisms (time-dependent, time-independent inhibition), by which they interact with each isoform. Molecular models of the complexes formed by indomethacin, sulindac, fenamates, 2-phenylpropionic acids and selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors with the cyclooxygenase active site of human PGHS-2 have been built, paying particular attention to water molecules that participate in the hydrogen-bonding network at the polar active site entrance. The stability of the complexes has been assessed by molecular dynamics simulations and interaction energy decomposition analysis, and their biological significance has been discussed in light of available X-ray crystallographic and kinetic results. The selective PGHS-2 inhibitors exploit the extra space of a side-pocket in the active site of PGHS-2 that is not found in PGHS-1. The results suggest that active site hydration together with residues Tyr355, Glu524, Arg120 and Arg513 are crucial to understand the time-dependent inhibition mechanism. A marked relationship between the isoform selectivity and tightly interactions with residues into the side pocket bordered by Val523 is also found.

  10. Structure-based QSAR study on differential inhibition of human prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthase-2 (COX-2) by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouplana, R.; Lozano, J. J.; Pérez, C.; Ruiz, J.

    2002-10-01

    The prostaglandin-endoperoxide H synthase-1 (PGHS-1) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide H synthase-2 (PGHS-2) are the targets of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) .It appears that the high degree of selectivity for inhibition of PGHS-2 shown by certain compounds is the result of two mechanisms (time-dependent, time-independent inhibition), by which they interact with each isoform. Molecular models of the complexes formed by indomethacin, sulindac, fenamates, 2-phenylpropionic acids and selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors with the cyclooxygenase active site of human PGHS-2 have been built, paying particular attention to water molecules that participate in the hydrogen-bonding network at the polar active site entrance. The stability of the complexes has been assessed by molecular dynamics simulations and interaction energy decomposition analysis, and their biological significance has been discussed in light of available X-ray crystallographic and kinetic results. The selective PGHS-2 inhibitors exploit the extra space of a side-pocket in the active site of PGHS-2 that is not found in PGHS-1. The results suggest that active site hydration together with residues Tyr355, Glu524, Arg120 and Arg513 are crucial to understand the time-dependent inhibition mechanism. A marked relationship between the isoform selectivity and tightly interactions with residues into the side pocket bordered by Val523 is also found.

  11. Regulation of prostaglandin production in intact fetal membranes by interleukin-1 and its receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Brown, N L; Alvi, S A; Elder, M G; Bennett, P R; Sullivan, M H

    1998-12-01

    There is strong evidence for the involvement of inflammatory mediators such as interleukin (IL)-1 in the biochemical mechanisms of parturition. Therefore the effects of the IL-1 family (IL-1alpha (1 ng/ml), IL-1beta (1 ng/ml) and the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) (10 ng/ml)) on the regulation of prostaglandin synthesis in term human fetal membranes were investigated. It was found that, after 4 h of culture, IL-1beta increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) output approximately twofold. This was associated with both a significant increase in cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA levels (approximately fourfold compared with control) and translocation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) from the cytosol to the membrane fraction. IL-1alpha was less effective than IL-1beta at stimulating PGE2 production through similar mechanisms. IL-1ra had no effect on PGE2 output. However, in combination treatments, IL-1ra did not inhibit IL-1alpha- or IL-1beta-stimulated PGE2 output, and increased PGE2 production further compared with IL-1beta alone. IL-1ra decreased IL-1beta-induced COX-2 mRNA expression by about half and significantly increased cPLA2 protein levels, as detected by immunoblotting, when used alone and together with IL-1beta. These results suggest that IL-1ra has partial agonist properties when used together with IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in fetal membranes by increasing cPLA2 protein levels, which leads to an increase in the production of prostaglandins.

  12. Gastroprotective Activities of Sennoside A and Sennoside B via the Up-Regulation of Prostaglandin E2 and the Inhibition of H+/K+-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, In Young; Jeong, Choon Sik

    2015-01-01

    Sennoside A (erythro) and sennoside B (threo) are dianthrone glycosides and diastereomers. We investigated their abilities to prevent the gastric lesions associated with diseases, such as, gastritis and gastric ulcer. To elucidate their gastroprotective effects, the inhibitions of HCl•EtOH-induced gastritis and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcers were assessed in rats. It was observed that both sennoside A and sennoside B increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels and inhibited H+/K+-ATPase (proton pump). In a rat model, both compounds reduced gastric juice, total acidity and increased pH, indicating that proton pump inhibition reduces gastric acid secretion. Furthermore, sennoside A and B increased PGE2 in a concentration-dependent manner. In a gastric emptying and intestinal transporting rate experiment, both sennoside A and sennoside B accelerated motility. Our results thus suggest that sennoside A and sennoside B possess significant gastroprotective activities and they might be useful for the treatment of gastric disease. PMID:26336586

  13. Intrauterine inhibition of prostaglandin transporter protein blocks release of luteolytic PGF2alpha pulses without suppressing endometrial expression of estradiol or oxytocin receptor in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Lee, JeHoon; McCracken, John A; Banu, Sakhila K; Arosh, Joe A

    2013-08-01

    In ruminants, prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2(alpha)) is synthesized and released in a pulsatile pattern from the endometria luminal epithelial (LE) cells during the process of luteolysis. Prostaglandin transporter (PGT) is a 12-transmembrane solute carrier organic anion transporter protein that facilitates transport of PGF2(alpha). The present study determined the effects of inhibition of PGT protein on pulsatile release of luteolytic PGF2(alpha) and the underlined cell-signaling mechanisms. The results indicate that intrauterine inhibition of the PGT protein inhibits the pulsatile release of PGF2(alpha) from the endometrium and maintains a functional corpus luteum. Surprisingly, inhibition of PGT-mediated luteolytic pulses is not associated with spatial regulation of estrogen and oxytocin receptors in the LE of the endometrium and is also not accompanied by decreased biosynthesis of PGF2(alpha) or increased catabolism of PGF2(alpha) by the endometrium. Importantly, PGT inhibitor increases expression of pERK1/2 proteins in the LE of the endometrium. Knock down of ERK1/2 genes in LE cells reverses the inhibitory effects of PGT inhibitor on release of PGF2(alpha). In conclusion, intrauterine inhibition of PGT inhibits the pulsatile release of PGF2(alpha) from the endometrium without modulating spatial expressions of estrogen and oxytocin receptor proteins and metabolism of PGF2(alpha) at the time of luteolysis. Activation of ERK1/2 pathways and interactions between ERK1/2 and PGT protein appear to be important cell-signaling mechanisms that control PGT-mediated efflux transport function. PGT emerges as an important final component in the luteolytic machinery that controls the release of luteolytic pulses of PGF2(alpha) from the endometrium in sheep.

  14. Class II histone deacetylases are associated with VHL-independent regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Qian, David Z; Kachhap, Sushant K; Collis, Spencer J; Verheul, Henk M W; Carducci, Michael A; Atadja, Peter; Pili, Roberto

    2006-09-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha) plays a critical role in transcriptional gene activation involved in tumor angiogenesis. A novel class of agents, the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, has been shown to inhibit tumor angiogenesis and HIF-1 alpha protein expression. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for this inhibition remains to be elucidated. In the current study, we investigated the molecular link between HIF-1 alpha inhibition and HDAC inhibition. Treatment of the VHL-deficient human renal cell carcinoma cell line UMRC2 with the hydroxamic HDAC inhibitor LAQ824 resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of HIF-1 alpha protein via a VHL-independent mechanism and reduction of HIF-1 alpha transcriptional activity. HIF-1 alpha inhibition by LAQ824 was associated with HIF-1 alpha acetylation and polyubiquitination. HIF-1 alpha immunoprecipitates contained HDAC activity. Then, we tested different classes of HDAC inhibitors with diverse inhibitory activity of class I versus class II HDACs and assessed their capability of targeting HIF-1 alpha. Hydroxamic acid derivatives with known activity against both class I and class II HDACs were effective in inhibiting HIF-1 alpha at low nanomolar concentrations. In contrast, valproic acid and trapoxin were able to inhibit HIF-1 alpha only at concentrations that are effective against class II HDACs. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that class II HDAC4 and HDAC6 were associated with HIF-1 alpha protein. Inhibition by small interfering RNA of HDAC4 and HDAC6 reduced HIF-1 alpha protein expression and transcriptional activity. Taken together, these results suggest that class II HDACs are associated with HIF-1 alpha stability and provide a rationale for targeting HIF-1 alpha with HDAC inhibitors against class II isozymes.

  15. Flavan-3-ols isolated from some medicinal plants inhibiting COX-1 and COX-2 catalysed prostaglandin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Noreen, Y; Serrano, G; Perera, P; Bohlin, L

    1998-08-01

    Extracts from the four plant species Atuna racemosa Raf. ssp. racemosa, Syzygium corynocarpum (A. Gray) C. Muell., Syzygium malaccense (L.) Merr. & Perry and Vantanea peruviana Macbr., traditionally used for inflammatory conditions, were fractionated using a cyclooxygenase-1 catalysed prostaglandin biosynthesis in vitro assay. The flavan-3-ol derivatives (+)-catechin, (+)-gallocatechin, 4'-O-Me-ent-gallocatechin, ouratea-catechin and ouratea-proanthocynidin A were isolated as active principles. The IC50 values ranged from 3.3 microM to 138 microM whilst indomethacin under the same test conditions had an IC50 value of 1.1 microM. The flavonol rhamnosides mearnsitrin, myricitrin and quercitrin were also isolated. When further tested for inhibitory effect on cyclooxygenase-2 catalysed prostaglandin biosynthesis, the five flavan-3-ol derivatives exhibited from equal to weaker inhibitory potencies, as compared to their cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitory effects. The flavonol rhamnosides were inactive towards both enzymes.

  16. Endogenous prostaglandin endoperoxides and prostacyclin modulate the thrombolytic activity of tissue plasminogen activator. Effects of simultaneous inhibition of thromboxane A2 synthase and blockade of thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptors in a canine model of coronary thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Golino, P; Rosolowsky, M; Yao, S K; McNatt, J; De Clerck, F; Buja, L M; Willerson, J T

    1990-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that simultaneous inhibition of TxA2 synthase and blockade of TxA2/PHG2 receptors is more effective in enhancing thrombolysis and preventing reocclusion after discontinuation of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) than either intervention alone. Coronary thrombosis was induced in 35 dogs by placing a copper coil into the left anterior descending coronary artery. Coronary flow was measured with a Doppler flow probe. 30 min after thrombus formation, the animals received saline (controls, n = 10); SQ 29548 (0.4 mg/kg bolus + 0.4 mg/kg per h infusion), a TxA2/PGH2 receptor antagonist (n = 8); dazoxiben (5 mg/kg bolus + 5 mg/kg per h infusion), a TxA2 synthase inhibitor (n = 9); or R 68070 (5 mg/kg bolus + 5 mg/kg per h infusion), a drug that blocks TxA2/PGH2 receptors and inhibits TxA2 synthase (n = 8). Then, all dogs received heparin (200 U/kg) and a bolus of t-PA (80 micrograms/kg) followed by a continuous infusion (8 micrograms/kg per min) for up to 90 min or until reperfusion was achieved. The time to thrombolysis did not change significantly in SQ 29548-treated dogs as compared with controls (42 +/- 5 vs. 56 +/- 7 min, respectively, P = NS), but it was significantly shortened by R 68070 and dazoxiben (11 +/- 2 and 25 +/- 6 min, respectively, P less than 0.001 vs. controls and SQ 29548-treated dogs). R 68070 administration resulted in a lysis time significantly shorter than that observed in the dazoxiben-treated group (P less than 0.01). Reocclusion was observed in eight of eight control dogs, five of seven SQ 29548-treated dogs, seven of nine dazoxiben-treated dogs, and zero of eight R 68070-treated animals (P less than 0.001). TxB2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, measured in blood samples obtained from the coronary artery distal to the thrombus, were significantly increased at reperfusion and at reocclusion in control animals and in dogs receiving SQ 29548. R 68070 and dazoxiben prevented the increase in plasma TxB2 levels, whereas 6-keto-PGF1

  17. Prostaglandin E2 inhibition of secretagogue-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine accumulation in rat parietal cells: a model for its mechanism of action

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, G.C.

    1986-05-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) differentially inhibited histamine and isoproterenol stimulation of (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine accumulation in rat parietal cell preparations. Low concentrations of PGE2 decreased the maximum response to isoproterenol whereas higher concentrations increased the EC50 of histamine with only a modest effect on the maximum response. Also, PGE2 potentiated dibutyryl cyclic AMP stimulation of aminopyrine accumulation in either the absence or presence of carbachol. In contrast, PGE2 inhibited potentiation between carbachol and histamine due to its inhibitory effect on histamine and possibly also to an inhibitory effect on cholinergic activity. Islet activating protein prevented the inhibitory actions of PGE2. To account for these results a model is presented based on the recent proposal by Gilman of an interaction between components of adenylyl cyclase stimulatory and inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding proteins.

  18. Differential effect of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyrone on prostaglandin production in human fibroblast cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Lüthy, C.; Multhaupt, M.; Oetliker, O.; Perisic, M.

    1983-01-01

    Human skin fibroblasts incubated with arachidonic acid in culture show basal release of prostaglandins. They produce the same prostaglandins after stimulation with bradykinin. Basal release of prostaglandins I2 (6-oxo-PGF1 alpha), F2 alpha and E2 is inhibited dose-dependently by both acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and dipyrone (P less than 0.05). The examined dose-range was 10(-7) to 10(-4) M for both drugs. During the first 5 min after removal of the drugs from the incubation medium, bradykinin-stimulated release remains dose-dependently inhibited (P less than 0.001) in ASA-, but not in dipyrone-treated cultures. The difference between the effects of ASA and of dipyrone is highly significant (P less than 0.0001), whereas the dipyrone-treated cultures are not different from controls. The findings are consistent with cyclo-oxygenase inhibition by ASA as well as by dipyrone. However, the data demonstrate rapid reversibility of the effect of dipyrone. This suggests that in contrast to ASA, dipyrone does not inhibit cyclo-oxygenase by binding covalently to the enzyme. PMID:6418250

  19. Pre-treatment with Toll-like receptor 4 antagonist inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced preterm uterine contractility, cytokines, and prostaglandins in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Persing, David; Novy, Miles J.; Sadowsky, Drew W.; Gravett, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Intra-uterine infection, which occurs in the majority of early preterm births, triggers an immune response culminating in preterm labor. We hypothesized that blockade of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immune responses by a Toll-like receptor 4 antagonist (TLR4A) would prevent elevations in amniotic fluid (AF) cytokines, prostaglandins, and uterine contractility. Chronically catheterized rhesus monkeys at 128-147 days gestation received intra-amniotic infusions of either: 1) saline (n=6), 2) LPS (0.15-10μg; n=4), or 3) TLR4A pre-treatment with LPS (10 μg) one hour later (n=4). AF cytokines, prostaglandins, and uterine contractility were compared using oneway ANOVA with Bonferroni-adjusted pairwise comparisons. Compared to saline controls, LPS induced significant elevations in AF IL-8, TNF-α, PGE2, PGF2α, and uterine contractility (p<0.05). In contrast, TLR4A pre-treatment inhibited LPS-induced uterine activity and was associated with significantly lower AF IL-8, TNF-α, PGE2, and PGF2α versus LPS alone (p<0.05). Toll-like receptor antagonists, together with antibiotics, may delay or prevent infection-associated preterm birth. PMID:18187405

  20. Protein thiol modification by 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 addition in mesangial cells: role in the inhibition of pro-inflammatory genes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Stamatakis, Konstantinos; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2004-11-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin and PPARgamma agonist 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) displays anti-inflammatory effects in several experimental models. Direct modification of protein thiols is arising as an important mechanism of cyclopentenone prostaglandin action. However, little is known about the extent or specificity of this process. Mesangial cells (MC) play a key role in glomerulonephritis. In this work, we have studied the selectivity of protein modification by 15d-PGJ(2) in MC, and the correlation with the modulation of several proinflammatory genes. MC incubation with biotinylated 15d-PGJ(2) results in the labeling of a distinct set of proteins as evidenced by two-dimensional electrophoresis. 15d-PGJ(2) binds to nuclear and cytosolic targets as detected by fluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation. The pattern of biotinylated 15d-PGJ(2)-modified polypeptides is readily distinguishable from that of total protein staining or labeling with biotinylated iodoacetamide. 15d-PGJ(2) addition requires the double bond in the cyclopentane ring. 9,10-Dihydro-15d-PGJ(2), a 15d-PGJ(2) analog that shows the same potency as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonist in MC but lacks the cyclopentenone moiety, displays reduced ability to modify proteins and to block 15d-PGJ(2) binding. Micromolar concentrations of 15d-PGJ(2) inhibit cytokine-elicited levels of inducible nitricoxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in MC. In contrast, 9,10-dihydro-15d-PGJ(2) does not reproduce this inhibition. 15d-PGJ(2) effect is not blocked by the PPARgamma antagonist 2-chloro-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide (GW9662). Moreover, compounds possessing an alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl group, like 2-cyclopenten-1-one and 2-cyclohexen-1-one, reduce pro-inflammatory gene expression. These observations indicate that covalent modification of cellular thiols by 15d-PGJ(2) is a selective process that plays an important

  1. Inhibition of Prostaglandin E2 Production by Anti-inflammatory Hypericum perforatum Extracts and Constituents in RAW264.7 Mouse Macrophage Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Kimberly D. P.; Hillwig, Matthew L.; Solco, Avery K. S.; Dixon, Philip M.; Delate, Kathleen; Murphy, Patricia A.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Birt, Diane F.

    2008-01-01

    Hypericum perforatum (Hp) is commonly known for its antiviral, antidepressant, and cytotoxic properties, but traditionally Hp was also used to treat inflammation. In this study, the anti-inflammatory activity and cytotoxicity of different Hp extractions and accessions and constituents present within Hp extracts were characterized. In contrast to the antiviral activity of Hp, the anti-inflammatory activity observed with all Hp extracts was light-independent. When pure constituents were tested, the flavonoids, amentoflavone, hyperforin, and light-activated pseudohypericin, displayed anti-inflammatory activity, albeit at concentrations generally higher than the amount present in the Hp extracts. Constituents that were present in the Hp extracts at concentrations that inhibited the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were pseudohypericin and hyperforin, suggesting that they are the primary anti-inflammatory constituents along with the flavonoids, and perhaps the interactions of these constituents and other unidentified compounds are important for the anti-inflammatory activity of the Hp extracts. PMID:17696442

  2. Linoleic Acid-Induced Growth Inhibition of Human Gastric Epithelial Adenocarcinoma AGS Cells is Associated with Down-Regulation of Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis and Telomerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Linoleic acid is the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acid in human nutrition and found in most vegetable oils and certain food products. In the present study, we investigated the effects of linoleic acid on the growth of human epithelial adenocarcinoma AGS cells. Methods: MTT assay, flow cytometry, RT-PCR and Western-blot analyses were used to investigate the effects and underlying mechanisms of linoleic acid on AGS cells. The effects of this compound were also tested on prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and telomerase activity. Results: Our data indicated that growth inhibition of AGS cells by linoleic acid treatment was associated with induction of apoptosis. Linoleic acid treatment decreased the expression levels of the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 mRNA and protein without causing significant changes in the COX-1 levels, which was correlated with the inhibition of PGE2 synthesis. Linoleic acid treatment also decreased the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), a main determinant of the telomerase enzymatic activity, and activity of telomerase, with inhibiting the expression of c-myc in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusions: Taken together, our results indicate that linoleic acid inhibits the production of PGE2 and activity of telomerase by suppressing COX-2 and hTERT expression. PMID:25337570

  3. Inhibition of prostaglandin D2 clearance in rat hepatocytes by the thromboxane receptor antagonists daltroban and ifetroban and the thromboxane synthase inhibitor furegrelate.

    PubMed

    Pestel, Sabine; Nath, Annegret; Jungermann, Kurt; Schieferdecker, Henrike L

    2003-08-15

    Prostanoids, i.e. prostaglandins and thromboxane, regulate liver-specific functions both in homeostasis and during defense reactions. For example, prostanoids are released from Kupffer cells, the resident liver macrophages, in response to the inflammatory mediator anaphylatoxin C5a, and mediate an enhanced glucose output from hepatocytes as energy supply. In perfused rat livers, the thromboxane receptor antagonist daltroban enhanced C5a-induced prostanoid overflow and reduced glucose output. It was the aim of this study to elucidate whether daltroban interfered with prostanoid release from Kupffer cells or prostanoid clearance by hepatocytes, and/or whether it directly influenced prostanoid-dependent glucose metabolism in these cells. In perfused rat livers, daltroban enhanced prostaglandin (PG)D(2) overflow not only after infusion of C5a (15-fold), but also after PGD(2) (10-fold). Neither daltroban nor another receptor antagonist, ifetroban, or the thromboxane synthase inhibitor furegrelate enhanced prostanoid release from Kupffer cells. In contrast, all inhibitors reduced clearance, i.e. uptake and degradation, of PGD(2) by hepatocytes: within 5 min uptake of 1 nmol/L PGD(2) was reduced from 43+/-5 fmol (controls) to 22+/-6 fmol (daltroban), 24+/-6 fmol (ifetroban) and 21+/-6 fmol (furegrelate). PGD(2) in the medium was reduced to 39+/-7% in the controls, but remained at 93+/-9%, 93+/-11% and 60+/-3% in the presence of the inhibitors. PGD(2)-dependent glucose output in the perfused liver or activation of glycogen phosphorylase in isolated hepatocytes remained unaffected by daltroban. These data clearly demonstrate that the thromboxane-inhibitors reduced PGD(2) clearance by hepatocytes, presumably by inhibition of prostanoid transport into the cells. In contrast, they did not interfere with PGD(2)-dependent glucose metabolism, suggesting an independent mechanism for the inhibition of glucose output from the liver.

  4. Expression and modulation of IL-1 alpha in murine keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ansel, J.C.; Luger, T.A.; Lowry, D.; Perry, P.; Roop, D.R.; Mountz, J.D.

    1988-04-01

    Murine and human keratinocytes produce an IL-1-like factor that appears to be similar if not identical to monocyte-derived IL-1. IL-1 may be an important mediator in cutaneous inflammatory responses, however, little is currently known concerning factors that may modulate IL-1 expression in keratinocytes. To address this issue we examined the effect of LPS, UV, and the cell differentiation state on murine keratinocyte IL-1 mRNA expression. Our results indicated that as with the murine P388D1 monocyte cell line, PAM 212 keratinocytes constitutively express abundant amounts of IL-1 alpha mRNA. On exposure to LPS (100 micrograms/ml) for 8 h there was more than 10 times the increase in PAM 212 IL-1 alpha mRNA which was accompanied by a sixfold increase in supernatant IL-1 activity. Similarly UV irradiation had a significant effect on keratinocyte IL-1 alpha expression. High dose UV (300 mJ/cm2) inhibited PAM 212 IL-1 alpha expression at 4, 8, 24, 48 h post-UV whereas a lower dose of UV (100 mJ/cm2) inhibited UV at 4 and 8 h post-UV, but induced IL-1 expression at 24 and 48 h post-UV. The expression of IL-1 alpha varied with the differentiation state of the keratinocytes. Freshly removed newborn murine keratinocytes were found to constitutively express IL-1 alpha mRNA. Keratinocytes grown in low (Ca2+) tissue culture media (0.05 mM) for 6 days, functionally and phenotypically become undifferentiated and express increased quantities of IL-1 alpha mRNA, whereas cells grown in high (Ca2+) media (1.2 mM) for 6 days become terminally differentiated and IL-1 expression ceased. Keratinocytes cultured for 3 days in low (Ca2+) conditions expressed an intermediate level of IL-1 alpha. In contrast, little or no IL-1 beta mRNA was detected in either the PAM 212 cells or newborn murine keratinocytes.

  5. Endogenous levels of Echinacea alkylamides and ketones are important contributors to the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide production in cultured macrophages

    PubMed Central

    LaLone, Carlie A.; Rizshsky, Ludmila; Hammer, Kimberly D.P.; Wu, Lankun; Solco, Avery K.S.; Yum, Manyu; Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Murphy, Patricia A.; Kim, Meehye; Birt, Diane F.

    2009-01-01

    Due to the popularity of Echinacea as a dietary supplement, researchers have been actively investigating which Echinacea constituent or groups of constituents are necessary for immune modulating bioactivities. Our prior studies indicate that alkylamides may play an important role in the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. HPLC fractionation, employed to elucidate interacting anti-inflammatory constituents from ethanol extracts of E. purpurea, E. angustifolia, E. pallida, and E. tennesseensis identified fractions containing alkylamides and ketones as key anti-inflammatory contributors using lipopolysaccharide induced PGE2 production in RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cells. Nitric oxide (NO) production and parallel cytotoxicity screens were also employed to substantiate an anti-inflammatory response. Echinacea pallida showed significant inhibition of PGE2 with a first round fraction, containing GC-MS peaks for Bauer Ketones 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24, with 23 and 24 identified as significant contributors to this PGE2 inhibition. Chemically synthesized Bauer Ketones 21 and 23 at 1 μM each significantly inhibited both PGE2 and NO production. Three rounds of fractionation were produced from an E. angustifolia extract. GC-MS analysis identified the presence of Bauer Ketone 23 in third round Fraction 3D32 and Bauer Alkylamide 11 making up 96% of third round Fraction 3E40. Synthetic Bauer Ketone 23 inhibited PGE2 production to 83 % of control and synthetic Bauer Alkylamide 11 significantly inhibited PGE2 and NO production at the endogenous concentrations determined to be present in their respective fraction, thus each constituent partially explained the in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of their respective fraction. From this study two key contributors to the anti-inflammatory properties of E. angustifolia were identified as Bauer Alkylamide 11 and Bauer Ketone 23. PMID:19807154

  6. Pseudohypericin is necessary for the Light-Activated Inhibition of Prostaglandin E2 pathways by a 4 component system mimicking an Hypericum perforatum fraction

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Kimberly D. P.; Hillwig, Matthew L.; Neighbors, Jeffrey D.; Sim, Young-Je; Kohut, Marian L.; Wiemer, David F.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Birt, Diane F.

    2008-01-01

    Hypericum perforatum (Hp) has been used medicinally to treat a variety of conditions including mild-to-moderate depression. Recently, several anti-inflammatory activities of Hp have been reported. An ethanol extract of Hp was fractionated with the guidance of an anti-inflammatory bioassay (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced prostaglandin E2 production (PGE2)), and four constituents were identified. When combined together at concentrations detected in the Hp fraction to make a 4 component system, these constituents (0.1 µM chlorogenic acid, 0.08 µM amentoflavone, 0.07 µM quercetin, and 0.03 µM pseudohypericin) explained the majority of the activity of the fraction when activated by light, but only partially explained the activity of this Hp fraction in dark conditions. One of the constituents, light-activated pseudohypericin, was necessary, but not sufficient to explain the reduction in LPS-induced PGE2 of the 4 component system. The Hp fraction and the 4 component system inhibited lipoxygenase and cytosolic phospholipase A2, two enzymes in the PGE2-mediated inflammatory response. The 4 component system inhibited the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and the Hp fraction inhibited the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). Thus, the Hp fraction and selected constituents from this fraction showed evidence of blocking pro-inflammatory mediators but not enhancing inflammation-suppressing mediators. PMID:18707743

  7. Tulathromycin Exerts Proresolving Effects in Bovine Neutrophils by Inhibiting Phospholipases and Altering Leukotriene B4, Prostaglandin E2, and Lipoxin A4 Production

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Carrie D.; Duquette, Stephanie C.; Renaux, Bernard S.; Feener, Troy D.; Morck, Douglas W.; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Lucas, Merlyn J.

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of neutrophils and proinflammatory mediators, such as leukotriene B4 (LTB4), is a classic marker of inflammatory disease. The clearance of apoptotic neutrophils, inhibition of proinflammatory signaling, and production of proresolving lipids (including lipoxins, such as lipoxin A4 [LXA4]) are imperative for resolving inflammation. Tulathromycin (TUL), a macrolide used to treat bovine respiratory disease, confers immunomodulatory benefits via mechanisms that remain unclear. We recently reported the anti-inflammatory properties of TUL in bovine phagocytes in vitro and in Mannheimia haemolytica-challenged calves. The findings demonstrated that this system offers a powerful model for investigating novel mechanisms of pharmacological immunomodulation. In the present study, we examined the effects of TUL in a nonbacterial model of pulmonary inflammation in vivo and characterized its effects on lipid signaling. In bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples from calves challenged with zymosan particles (50 mg), treatment with TUL (2.5 mg/kg of body weight) significantly reduced pulmonary levels of LTB4 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In calcium ionophore (A23187)-stimulated bovine neutrophils, TUL inhibited phospholipase D (PLD), cytosolic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity, and the release of LTB4. In contrast, TUL promoted the secretion of LXA4 in resting and A23187-stimulated neutrophils, while levels of its precursor, 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid [15(S)-HETE], were significantly lower. These findings indicate that TUL directly modulates lipid signaling by inhibiting the production of proinflammatory eicosanoids and promoting the production of proresolving lipoxins. PMID:24820086

  8. Gefitinib circumvents hypoxia-induced drug resistance by the modulation of HIF-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Rho, Jin Kyung; Choi, Yun Jung; Lee, Jin Kyung; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Na, Im Ii; Yang, Sung Hyun; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Yoo, Young Do; Lee, Jae Cheol

    2009-03-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) is a transcriptional factor which is activated by hypoxia and associated with cell survival, proliferation and drug resistance. Recent studies have shown that the down-stream molecules of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal are involved in the hypoxia-dependent or -independent HIF-1alpha protein accumulation. Thus, we hypothesized that an EGFR-TK inhibitor, gefitinib, might circumvent the hypoxia-induced drug resistance via the regulation of HIF-1alpha expression. In our data, treatment of gefitinib suppressed induced HIF-1alpha by hypoxia. This action of gefitinib was caused by reduced protein stability without any change in the level of HIF-1alpha mRNA. The effect of gefitinib on down-regulation of HIF-1alpha was reversed by transfection of constitutively active form of Akt. The cellular response to gefitinib was similar in both normoxia and hypoxia condition. However, the response to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs decreased >50% under hypoxia condition and they did not change HIF-1alpha expression. In addition, the suppression of HIF-1alpha using siRNA overcame partially hypoxia-induced drug resistance. In conclusion, gefitinib was able to circumvent hypoxia-induced drug resistance suggesting that the effective suppression of HIF-1alpha by the inhibition of EGFR-Akt pathway may overcome the hypoxia-induced drug resistance.

  9. Tartrazine and the prostaglandin system.

    PubMed

    Gerber, J G; Payne, N A; Oelz, O; Nies, A S; Oates, J A

    1979-04-01

    The effect of tartrazine on prostaglandin production was evaluated in several in vitro systems in order to elucidate the interrelationship between aspirin-sensitive asthma and tartrazine. Unlike the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tartrazine did not inhibit cyclooxygenase activity in sheep seminal vesicles, guinea pig lung microsomes, and human platelets. Tartrazine had no effect on the activation of acyl hydrolase, which is the rate-limiting step in prostaglandin production. The major metabolite of tartrazine, sulfanilic acid, also had no inhibitory effect on the sheep seminal vesicle cyclooxygenase. In view of these findings, if there is a cross-sensitivity between tartrazine and aspirin in aspirin-sensitive asthmatics, it is unlikely to be on the basis of prostaglandin inhibition.

  10. Inhibition of microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 as a molecular basis for the anti-inflammatory actions of boswellic acids from frankincense

    PubMed Central

    Siemoneit, U; Koeberle, A; Rossi, A; Dehm, F; Verhoff, M; Reckel, S; Maier, TJ; Jauch, J; Northoff, H; Bernhard, F; Doetsch, V; Sautebin, L; Werz, O

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Frankincense, the gum resin derived from Boswellia species, showed anti-inflammatory efficacy in animal models and in pilot clinical studies. Boswellic acids (BAs) are assumed to be responsible for these effects but their anti-inflammatory efficacy in vivo and their molecular modes of action are incompletely understood. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH A protein fishing approach using immobilized BA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy were used to reveal microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (mPGES1) as a BA-interacting protein. Cell-free and cell-based assays were applied to confirm the functional interference of BAs with mPGES1. Carrageenan-induced mouse paw oedema and rat pleurisy models were utilized to demonstrate the efficacy of defined BAs in vivo. KEY RESULTS Human mPGES1 from A549 cells or in vitro-translated human enzyme selectively bound to BA affinity matrices and SPR spectroscopy confirmed these interactions. BAs reversibly suppressed the transformation of prostaglandin (PG)H2 to PGE2 mediated by mPGES1 (IC50 = 3–10 µM). Also, in intact A549 cells, BAs selectively inhibited PGE2 generation and, in human whole blood, β-BA reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced PGE2 biosynthesis without affecting formation of the COX-derived metabolites 6-keto PGF1α and thromboxane B2. Intraperitoneal or oral administration of β-BA (1 mg·kg−1) suppressed rat pleurisy, accompanied by impaired levels of PGE2 and β-BA (1 mg·kg−1, given i.p.) also reduced mouse paw oedema, both induced by carrageenan. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Suppression of PGE2 formation by BAs via interference with mPGES1 contribute to the anti-inflammatory effectiveness of BAs and of frankincense, and may constitute a biochemical basis for their anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:20840544

  11. Prostaglandin E2 Inhibits Histamine-Evoked Ca2+ Release in Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells through Hyperactive cAMP Signalling Junctions and Protein Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Emily J A; Pantazaka, Evangelia; Shelley, Kathryn L; Taylor, Colin W

    2017-09-06

    In human aortic smooth muscle cells (ASMC), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) stimulates adenylyl cyclase (AC) and attenuates the increase in intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) evoked by activation of histamine H1 receptors. The mechanisms are not resolved. We show that cAMP mediates inhibition of histamine-evoked Ca(2+) signals by PGE2 Exchange proteins activated by cAMP (EPACs) were not required, but the effects were attenuated by inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). PGE2 had no effect on the Ca(2+) signals evoked by protease-activated receptors, heterologously expressed muscarinic M3 receptors, or by direct activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors by photolysis of caged IP3 The rate of Ca(2+) removal from the cytosol was unaffected by PGE2, but PGE2 attenuated histamine-evoked IP3 accumulation. Substantial inhibition of AC had no effect on the concentration-dependent inhibition of Ca(2+) signals by PGE2 or butaprost (to selectively activate EP2 receptors), but it modestly attenuated responses to EP4 receptors, activation of which generated less cAMP than EP2 receptors. We conclude that inhibition of histamine-evoked Ca(2+) signals by PGE2 occurs through 'hyperactive signalling junctions', wherein cAMP is locally delivered to PKA at super-saturating concentrations to cause uncoupling of H1 receptors from phospholipase C. This sequence allows digital signalling from PGE2 receptors, through cAMP and PKA, to histamine-evoked Ca(2+) signals. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. Angiotensin II and renal prostaglandin release in the dog. Interactions in controlling renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate.

    PubMed

    Bugge, J F; Stokke, E S

    1994-04-01

    The relationship between angiotensin II and renal prostaglandins, and their interactions in controlling renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were investigated in 18 anaesthetized dogs with acutely denervated kidneys. Intrarenal angiotensin II infusion increased renal PGE2 release (veno-arterial concentration difference times renal plasma flow) from 1.7 +/- 0.9 to 9.1 +/- 0.4 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha release from 0.1 +/- 0.1 to 5.3 +/- 2.1 pmol min-1. An angiotensin II induced reduction in RBF of 20% did not measurably change GFR whereas a 30% reduction reduced GFR by 18 +/- 8%. Blockade of prostaglandin synthesis approximately doubled the vasoconstrictory action of angiotensin II, and all reductions in RBF were accompanied by parallel reductions in GFR. When prostaglandin release was stimulated by infusion of arachidonic acid (46.8 +/- 13.3 and 15.9 +/- 5.4 pmol min-1 for PGE2, and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, respectively), angiotensin II did not change prostaglandin release, but had similar effects on the relationship between RBF and GFR as during control. In an ureteral occlusion model with stopped glomerular filtration measurements of ureteral pressure and intrarenal venous pressure permitted calculations of afferent and efferent vascular resistances. Until RBF was reduced by 25-30% angiotensin II increased both afferent and efferent resistances almost equally, keeping the ureteral pressure constant. At greater reductions in RBF, afferent resistance increased more than the efferent leading to reductions in ureteral pressure. This pattern was not changed by blockade of prostaglandin synthesis indicating no influence of prostaglandins on the distribution of afferent and efferent vascular resistances during angiotensin II infusion. In this ureteral occlusion model glomerular effects of angiotensin II will not be detected, and it might well be that the shift from an effect predominantly on RBF to a combined effect on both RBF and GFR induced by inhibition

  13. Ethanol extract of Angelica gigas inhibits croton oil-induced inflammation by suppressing the cyclooxygenase - prostaglandin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sunhee; Joo, Seong Soo; Park, Dongsun; Jeon, Jeong Hee; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kim, Jeong Seon; Park, Sung Kyeong

    2010-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of an ethanol extract of Angelica gigas (EAG) were investigated in vitro and in vivo using croton oil-induced inflammation models. Croton oil (20 µg/mL) up-regulated mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-I and COX-II in the macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, resulting in the release of high concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). EAG (1~10 µg/mL) markedly suppressed croton oil-induced COX-II mRNA expression and PGE2 production. Application of croton oil (5% in acetone) to mouse ears caused severe local erythema, edema and vascular leakage, which were significantly attenuated by oral pre-treatment with EAG (50~500 mg/kg). Croton oil dramatically increased blood levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and PGE2 without affecting tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-α and nitric oxide (NO) levels. EAG pre-treatment remarkably lowered IL-6 and PGE2, but did not alter TNF-α or NO concentrations. These results indicate that EAG attenuates inflammatory responses in part by blocking the COX-PGE2 pathway. Therefore, EAG could be a promising candidate for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:20195064

  14. [Prostaglandin inhibitor indomethacin inhibits afferent activities of Adelta and C units in the saphenous nerve of diabetic hyperalgesic rats].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Qiao-Jun; Guo, Bei-Chuan; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Wang, Ke-Mo

    2002-10-25

    The effects of a non-selective inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) indomethacin, and exogenous prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) on A(delta) units and C units in the saphenous nerve of diabetic hyperalgesic rats were studied. The results showed that the conduction velocity of A(delta) units and C units and their mechanical threshold in diabetic hyperalgesic rats were obviously decreased, and a small number of A(delta) units (4/24) and C units (2/18) produced increased spontaneous activities. Intraperitoneal injection of indomethacin in diabetic hyperalgesic rats significantly relieved mechanical hyperalgesia, and resulted in a decrease in spontaneous afferent activities of the A(delta) units and C units. Subcutaneous injection of exogenous PGE(2) into the diabetic hyperalgesic and control rats produced a significant decrease in mechanical threshold of the A(delta) units and C units, and elicited discharge from 3 A(delta) units (3/24) and 1 C unit (1/18) in diabetic hyperalgesic rats and from 2 A(delta) units (2/13) in control rats. The present data suggest that the synthesis and release of PGs are increased in diabetic neuropathy, PGs can sensitize and /or activate A(delta) units and C units and elicit hyperalgesia and allodynia in diabetic rats.

  15. Diallyl disulfide inhibits proliferation and transdifferentiation of lung fibroblasts through induction of cyclooxygenase and synthesis of prostaglandin E₂.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Cao, Rong; Wei, Bo; Chai, Xiaoyu; Sun, Dan; Guan, Y; Liu, Xin-min

    2014-08-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) are critically involved in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis by inducing the proliferation and transdifferentiation of lung fibroblasts. In the present study, we examined the impact of diallyl disulfide (DADS), a garlic-derived compound, on such pathological conditions. DADS showed profound inhibitory effects on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation of human and mouse lung fibroblasts. DADS also abrogated the TGF-β1-induced expression of α-smooth muscle actin, type I collagen and fibronectin. Following treatment with DADS, the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the synthesis of prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) were found to be markedly enhanced, which in turn led to elevated cAMP levels in lung fibroblasts. Notably, the effect of DADS was largely abolished in the presence of either COX inhibitor indomethacin or siRNA-targeting COX-2, or in the absence of the PGE₂ receptor EP2, supporting an essential role for the COX-2-PGE₂-cAMP autocrine loop. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the upregulated expression of COX-2 was a result of increased level of histone 3 acetylation at COX-2 locus in DADS-treated cells. Together, these results suggest that DADS, by inducing COX-2 expression, may have therapeutic potential in treating lung fibrosis.

  16. Protective effect of prostaglandin E₁ on radiation-induced proliferative inhibition and apoptosis in keratinocytes and healing of radiation-induced skin injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Takikawa, Megumi; Sumi, Yuki; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Nambu, Masaki; Doumoto, Takashi; Yanagibayashi, Satoshi; Azuma, Ryuichi; Yamamoto, Naoto; Kishimoto, Satoko; Ishihara, Masayuki; Kiyosawa, Tomoharu

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of prostaglandin E₁ (PGE₁) on radiation-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis in keratinocytes and healing of radiation-induced skin injury in a rat model. PGE₁ had a protective effect on radiation-induced growth inhibition in keratinocytes in vitro, but not in fibroblasts. Varying concentrations of PGE₁ were subcutaneously administered into the posterior neck region. X-irradiation at a dose of 20 Gy was administrated to the lower part of the back using a lead sheet with two holes 30 min to 1 h before or after the administration of PGE₁. Although X-irradiation induced epilation, minor erosions, or skin ulcers in almost all rats, PGE₁ administration prior to irradiation reduced these irradiation injuries. Staining with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling showed that proportions of apoptotic keratinocytes in the X-irradiated skin of PGE₁-administered rats were significantly lower than for those in the skin of rats which did not receive PGE₁. Cutaneous full-thickness defective wounds were then formed in X-irradiated areas to examine the time course of wound healing. Wound healing was significantly delayed because of X-irradiation, but PGE₁ administration prior to irradiation led to a significantly shorter delay in wound healing compared with controls. Decreasing delay in wound healing was correlated with concentration of PGE₁ administrated. Thus, PGE₁-administration may potentially alleviate the radiation-induced skin injury.

  17. Inhibition of the stress response to breast cancer surgery by regional anesthesia and analgesia does not affect vascular endothelial growth factor and prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    O'Riain, S C; Buggy, D J; Kerin, M J; Watson, R W G; Moriarty, D C

    2005-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for breast cancer metastases formation and is mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). We hypothesized that serum levels of VEGF and PGE2 are increased by the stress response to breast cancer surgery and attenuated by paravertebral anesthesia and analgesia (PVAA). Thirty women undergoing mastectomy were enrolled in this prospective, randomized study, to receive general anesthesia (GA) and postoperative opioid analgesia (morphine 0.1 mg/kg bolus and patient-controlled infusion) or GA and PVAA (72-h infusion). All patients received rectal diclofenac. Venous blood samples were taken preoperatively and at 4 and 24 h postoperatively for serum glucose, cortisol, C-reactive protein, VEGF, and PGE2. PVAA inhibited the surgical stress response, as indicated by significantly less plasma glucose, cortisol, and C-reactive protein. VEGF and PGE2 values did not differ significantly between the groups. Mean (SD) percentage change in VEGF at 4 and 24 h respectively were 3% +/- 44% versus 9% +/- 80%, P=0.29 and 5% +/- 43% versus -10% +/- 63%, P=0.41 for patients with combined general and PVAA and GA alone, respectively. Mean percentage change in postoperative PGE2 at 4 and 24 h respectively was 10% +/- 17% versus 11% +/- 69%, P=0.29 and 34% +/- 19% versus 47% +/- 18%, P=0.15. We conclude that despite inhibiting the surgical stress response, PVAA had no effect on serum levels of putative breast cancer angiogenic factors, VEGF and PGE2.

  18. Arecoline inhibits interleukin-2 secretion in Jurkat cells by decreasing the expression of alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Hwang, G S; Hu, S; Lin, Y H; Chen, S T; Tang, T K; Wang, P S; Wang, S W

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the effect of arecoline on phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion, the expression of alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChRs), prostaglandin E2(PGE2) protein, and IL-2 mRNA in human lymphocyte cells (Jurkat cell line). The IL-2 and PGE2 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expressions of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and α7-nAChRs were determined by Western blotting. The level of IL-2 mRNA was determined by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Arecoline, in a dose-dependent manner, significantly decreased IL-2 and PGE2 secretion by Jurkat cells incubated with 0 or 5 μg/ml 5 μg/ml PHA. PGE2 also significantly inhibited IL-2 secretion by Jurkat cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, reduced expression of PHA-induced ERK phosphorylation was observed in Jurkat cells treated with arecoline. PHA-enhanced IL-2 mRNA expression was also inhibited by arecoline. These results imply that arecoline inhibits the release of PGE2 and PHA-induced IL-2 secretion by Jurkat cells and that these effects seem to occur, at least in part, either through the attenuation of ERK in conjunction with a decrease of PHA-induced IL-2 mRNA expression. These results imply that arecoline inhibits the protein expression of α7-nAChRs , the release of PGE2 and PHA-induced IL-2 secretion by Jurkat cells.

  19. Inhibition by prostaglandin E(2) of anaphylatoxin C5a- but not zymosan-induced prostanoid release from rat Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Pestel, Sabine; Jungermann, Kurt; Götze, Otto; Schieferdecker, Henrike L

    2002-04-01

    The proinflammatory anaphylatoxin C5a induces the release of prostanoids, ie, prostaglandins (PG) and thromboxane (TX), from the resident liver macrophages (Kupffer cells [KC]). Because KC themselves express prostanoid receptors, prostanoids--besides having paracrine functions--might regulate their own release in an autocrine loop. So far, such a possible feedback regulation has not been investigated systematically, probably because of methodological difficulties to measure newly synthesized prostanoids in the presence of added prostanoids. Here, after prelabeling of phospholipids with [(14)C]arachidonate, cellularly formed [(14)C]prostanoids were determined in the presence of added unlabelled prostanoids by thin layer chromatography. In cultured KC, recombinant rat C5a (rrC5a) rapidly increased PGD(2), PGE(2), and TXA(2) release, which was strongly reduced by PGE(2), but neither by PGD(2) nor by the TXA(2) analog U46619. The inhibitory effect of PGE(2) was mimicked by cAMP, indicating that the G(s)-coupled PGE(2) receptors type 2 or 4 were involved. Zymosan also enhanced prostanoid release from KC, but with slightly slower kinetics; this action was neither inhibited by PGE(2) nor by cAMP. Also in perfused rat livers, rrC5a enhanced prostanoid release from KC as shown by prostanoid overflow and thereby indirectly increased glucose output from hepatocytes. Again, PGE(2), but not PGD(2), inhibited rrC5a-elicited prostanoid overflow. This resulted in a complete inhibition of rrC5a-induced, prostanoid-mediated glucose output. Thus, PGE(2) can inhibit specifically the C5a-induced prostanoid release from KC via a feedback mechanism and thereby limit prostanoid-mediated hepatocellular defense reactions, eg, glucose release.

  20. Inhibition of gastric mucosal prostaglandin synthetase activity by mercaptomethylimidazole, an inducer of gastric acid secretion--plausible involvement of endogenous H2O2.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, M; Chakraborty, T; Ganguly, C; Banerjee, R K

    1998-10-01

    We have reported earlier that mercaptomethylimidazole (MMI), an antithyroid drug of thionamide group, induces gastric acid secretion at least partially through the liberation of histamine, sensitive to cimetidine. Now, we show that the drug has a significant inhibitory effect on the cyclooxygenase and peroxidase activity of the prostaglandin (PG) synthetase of the gastric mucosal microsomal preparation. The effect can also be mimicked by low concentrations of H2O2. While studying the possible intracellular effect of MMI on acid secretion, a cell fraction (F3) enriched in parietal cell was isolated by controlled digestion of the mucosa with protease. This cell fraction is activated by MMI as measured by increased O2 consumption. The activation is sensitive to omeprazole, a proton-pump inhibitor, indicating that the activation is due to increased acid secretion by MMI. MMI was also found to directly inhibit the peroxidase activity of the F3 cell fraction and may thus increase the intracellular level of H2O2. The cyclooxygenase activity of the PG synthetase of the F3 cell fraction is also inhibited by MMI and the effect can be reproduced by low concentrations of H2O2. Both MMI and H2O2 can also inhibit the peroxidase activity of the PG synthetase. We suggest that in addition to the activation of the parietal cell by MMI possibly through endogenous H2O2, MMI induces acid secretion in vivo by inactivating the PG synthetase thereby inhibiting the biosynthesis of PG and removing its inhibitory influence on acid secretion so that the histamine released by MMI can stimulate acid secretion with maximum efficiency.

  1. Surfactant protein-A (SP-A) selectively inhibits prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) production in term decidua: implications for the onset of labor.

    PubMed

    Snegovskikh, Victoria V; Bhandari, Vineet; Wright, Jo Rae; Tadesse, Serkalem; Morgan, Thomas; Macneill, Colin; Foyouzi, Nastaran; Park, Joong Shin; Wang, Yuguang; Norwitz, Errol R

    2011-04-01

    Labor is characterized by "decidual activation" with production of inflammatory mediators. Recent data suggest that surfactant protein-A (SP-A) may be critical to the onset of labor in mice. Whether this is also true in humans is unclear. The aim was to investigate: 1) the expression of SP-A at the maternal-fetal interface; 2) the effect of SP-A on the production of inflammatory mediators by human decidua; and 3) the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms in maternal SP-A genes and spontaneous preterm birth. In situ expression of SP-A was investigated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. Term decidual stromal cells were isolated, purified, and treated with/without SP-A (1-100 μg/ml), IL-1β, and/or thrombin. Levels of inflammatory mediators [IL-6, IL-8, TNFα, matrix metalloproteinase-3, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-1β, PGE(2), prostaglandin F(2α) (PGF(2α))] and angiogenic factors (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1, vascular endothelial growth factor) were measured in conditioned supernatant by ELISA and corrected for protein content. The effect of SP-A on eicosanoid gene expression was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. SP-A localized to endometrium/decidua. High-dose SP-A (100 μg/ml) inhibited PGF(2α) by term decidual stromal cells without affecting the production of other inflammatory mediators, and this effect occurred at a posttranscriptional level. Decidual SP-A expression decreased significantly with labor. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the SP-A genes do not appear to be associated with preterm birth. SP-A is produced by human endometrium/decidua, where it significantly and selectively inhibits PGF(2α) production. Its expression decreases with labor. These novel observations suggest that decidual SP-A likely plays a critical role in regulating prostaglandin production within the uterus, culminating at term in decidual activation and the onset of labor.

  2. Novel anti-acne actions of nadifloxacin and clindamycin that inhibit the production of sebum, prostaglandin E(2) and promatrix metalloproteinase-2 in hamster sebocytes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takashi; Shirane, Tatsuhiko; Noguchi, Norihisa; Sasatsu, Masanori; Ito, Akira

    2012-09-01

    Acne vulgaris is characteristic of excess sebum production and the induction of inflammatory reactions, for example, the augmentation of cytokine, prostaglandin (PG) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production in sebaceous glands and pilosebaceous units. As Propionibacterium acnes is considered to be involved in the aggravation of acne vulgaris, antimicrobial agents have been found to be effective for treating acne leading to the remission of inflammation. However, it is not fully understood whether antimicrobial agents influence sebum production and/or the inflammatory reactions in sebaceous gland cells (sebocytes). In the present study, topical antimicrobial agents such as nadifloxacin (NDFX) and clindamycin (CLDM) decreased the production of triacylglycerols (TG), which are a major component of sebum in insulin-differentiated hamster sebocytes. These antibiotics also suppressed insulin-augmented gene expression and the production of perilipin, by which intracellular lipid droplet formation was concomitantly inhibited. On the other hand, peptidoglycan (PGN) from Gram-positive bacteria dose-dependently increased TG production in hamster sebocytes. The augmented TG production was decreased by treating NDFX or CLDM. Furthermore, NDFX and CLDM inhibited the PGN-augmented PGE(2) production in the sebocytes. Moreover, NDFX, but not CLDM, suppressed the PGN-augmented gene expression and production of pro-MMP-2/progelatinase A in hamster sebocytes. Therefore, these results provide novel evidence that NDFX and CLDM exhibit anti-lipogenesis and anti-inflammatory activities against insulin- or PGN-activated sebocytes which at least partly mimic acne pathology in vitro. Moreover, NDFX for acne therapy is likely to be effective in not only inhibiting microbial proliferation but also in preventing the onset of acne scar formation. © 2012 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  3. Inhibition of the prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 prevents status epilepticus-induced deficits in the novel object recognition task in rats.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Asheebo; Ganesh, Thota; Manji, Zahra; O'neill, Theon; Dingledine, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Survivors of exposure to an organophosphorus nerve agent may develop a number of complications including long-term cognitive deficits (Miyaki et al., 2005; Nishiwaki et al., 2001). We recently demonstrated that inhibition of the prostaglandin E2 receptor, EP2, attenuates neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration caused by status epilepticus (SE) induced by the soman analog, diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), which manifest within hours to days of the initial insult. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DFP exposure leads to a loss of cognitive function in rats that is blocked by early, transient EP2 inhibition. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered vehicle or the competitive EP2 antagonist, TG6-10-1, (ip) at various times relative to DFP-induced SE. DFP administration resulted in prolonged seizure activity as demonstrated by cortical electroencephalography (EEG). A single intraperitoneal injection of TG6-10-1 or vehicle 1 h prior to DFP did not alter the development of seizures, the latency to SE or the duration of SE. Rats administered six injections of TG6-10-1 starting 90 min after the onset of DFP-induced SE could discriminate between a novel and familiar object 6-12 weeks after SE, unlike vehicle treated rats which showed no preference for the novel object. By contrast, behavioral changes in the light-dark box and open field assays were not affected by TG6-10-1. Delayed mortality after DFP was also unaffected by TG6-10-1. Thus, selective inhibition of the EP2 receptor may prevent SE-induced memory impairment in rats caused by exposure to a high dose of DFP.

  4. 15-Deoxy-Delta-12,14-Prostaglandin J2 Inhibits Lung Inflammation and Remodeling in Distinct Murine Models of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Diego S.; Anjos-Valotta, Edna A.; do Nascimento, Caio V. M. F.; Pires, Ana Lucia A.; Napimoga, Marcelo H.; Carvalho, Vinícius F.; Torres, Rafael C.; e Silva, Patrícia M. R.; Martins, Marco A.

    2017-01-01

    15-deoxy-Δ-12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) has been described as an anti-inflammatory lipid mediator in several in vitro and in vivo studies, but its effect on allergic pulmonary inflammation remains elusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of 15d-PGJ2 based on distinct murine models of allergic asthma triggered by either ovalbumin (OVA) or house dust mite extract (HDM). Characteristics of lung inflammation, airway hyper-reactivity (AHR), mucus exacerbation, and lung remodeling in sensitized A/J mice treated or not with 15d-PGJ2 were assessed. 15d-PGJ2 treatments were carried out systemically or topically given via subcutaneous injection or intranasal instillation, respectively. Analyses were carried out 24 h after the last allergen provocation. Irrespective of the route of administration, 15d-PGJ2 significantly inhibited the peribronchial accumulation of eosinophils and neutrophils, subepithelial fibrosis and also mucus exacerbation caused by either OVA or HDM challenge. The protective effect of 15d-PGJ2 occurred in parallel with inhibition of allergen-induced AHR and lung tissue production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, IL-17, and TNF-α. Finally, 15d-PGJ2 was found effective in inhibiting NF-κB phosphorylation upon HDM challenge as measured by Western blotting. In conclusion, our findings suggest that 15d-PGJ2 can reduce crucial features of asthma, including AHR, lung inflammation, and remodeling in distinct murine models of the disease. These effects are associated with a decrease in lung tissue generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines by a mechanism related to downregulation of NF-κB phosphorylation. PMID:28713373

  5. Role of seminal prostaglandins in male fertility. I. Relationship of prostaglandin E and 19-OH prostaglandin E with seminal parameters.

    PubMed

    Isidori, A; Conte, D; Laguzzi, G; Giovenco, P; Dondero, F

    1980-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E and 19-OH PGE, now considered to be the most important of the human seminal prostaglandins, were assayed in infertile and normal men. In the 15 volunteers PGE and 19-OH PGE levels were 23-89 microgram/ml, respectively. In the 4 groups of infertile patients in whom either PGE or 19-OH PGE levels were increased or decreased with respect to normal, sperm concentration and motility were significantly reduced. The negative effects of low levels of seminal prostaglandins on sperm concentration and motility might be correlated respectively with decreased adenylcyclase and testicular androgen activity. The negative effects of high levels of prostaglandins on the seminal fluid might be due either to an inhibition in testicular DNA synthesis or to a decreased sensitivity of the receptors to high titers of prostaglandins.

  6. NO2 inhalation promotes Alzheimer’s disease-like progression: cyclooxygenase-2-derived prostaglandin E2 modulation and monoacylglycerol lipase inhibition-targeted medication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei; Yun, Yang; Ku, Tingting; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2016-03-01

    Air pollution has been reported to be associated with increased risks of cognitive impairment and neurodegenerative diseases. Because NO2 is a typical primary air pollutant and an important contributor to secondary aerosols, NO2-induced neuronal functional abnormalities have attracted greater attention, but the available experimental evidence, modulating mechanisms, and targeting medications remain ambiguous. In this study, we exposed C57BL/6J and APP/PS1 mice to dynamic NO2 inhalation and found for the first time that NO2 inhalation caused deterioration of spatial learning and memory, aggravated amyloid β42 (Aβ42) accumulation, and promoted pathological abnormalities and cognitive defects related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The microarray and bioinformation data showed that the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-mediated arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) played a key role in modulating this aggravation. Furthermore, increasing endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) by inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) prevented PGE2 production, neuroinflammation-associated Aβ42 accumulation, and neurodegeneration, indicating a therapeutic target for relieving cognitive impairment caused by NO2 exposure.

  7. Activation of prostaglandin E2-receptor EP2 and EP4 pathways induces growth inhibition in human gastric carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, T; Ishihara, S; Sato, H; Rumi, M A K; Kawashima, K; Miyaoka, Y; Suetsugu, H; Kazumori, H; Cava, C F Ortega; Kadowaki, Y; Fukuda, R; Kinoshita, Y

    2002-08-01

    The effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells is still unclear. PGE2 receptors are divided into four subtypes - EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4 - which are coupled to three different intracellular signal-transduction systems. Stimulation of EP2 and EP4 is linked with cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). In some human gastric cancer cells, PGE2 has been suggested to have an antiproliferative effect by way of increased cAMP production. Expression of EP2 and EP4 in human gastric carcinoma cells, however, has not been examined. We examined the expression of EP2 and EP4 and the antiproliferative effects of specific EP2 and EP4 agonists on four different human gastric cancer cell lines. Our data clarified that all the cell lines investigated in this study expressed EP2 and EP4 and that the specific agonists of these receptors induced growth inhibition with an accompanying increase in cAMP production. In summary, gastric cancer cells have EP2 and EP4 receptors, and their selective activation is linked with the decreased cell proliferation.

  8. Prostaglandin E(2) fever mediated by inhibition of the GABAergic transmission in the region immediately adjacent to the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Toshimasa

    2008-08-01

    Unilateral microinjection of prostaglandin (PG)E(2) into a region immediately adjacent to the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (peri-OVLT) in the preoptic area elicited thermogenic, tachycardic, cutaneous vasoconstrictive, and hyperthermic responses simultaneously in urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats. The magnitude of these responses increased dose-dependently over the range of 57 fmol-2.8 pmol, except for the vasoconstrictive response. Microinjection of a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, bicuculline methiodide or gabazine (5-20 pmol), into the PGE(2)-sensitive site in the peri-OVLT region also elicited responses similar to those induced by PGE(2). Although administration of a GABA(A) receptor agonist, muscimol (10 pmol), microinjected into the same site alone usually had no effect on the rate of whole-body O(2) consumption, heart rate or colon and skin temperatures, all PGE(2)-induced responses were blocked 10 min after the muscimol pretreatment and recovered at 50-90 min. Pretreatment with the vehicle, saline, had no effect on the PGE(2)-induced responses. These results suggest that spontaneous release of GABA and tonic activation of GABA(A) receptors in the peri-OVLT region prevent the elevation in the body core temperature under normal circumstances and that PGE(2)-induced febrile responses are mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of the GABAergic transmission in this area.

  9. Bauer Ketones 23 and 24 from Echinacea paradoxa var. paradoxa Inhibit Lipopolysaccharide-induced Nitric Oxide, Prostaglandin E2 and Cytokines in RAW 264.7 Mouse Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaozhu; Rizshsky, Ludmila; Hauck, Catherine; Qu, Luping; Widrlechner, Mark P.; Nikolau, Basil J.; Murphy, Patricia A.; Birt, Diane F.

    2011-01-01

    Among the nine Echinacea species, E. purpurea, E. angustifolia and E. pallida, have been widely used to treat the common cold, flu and other infections. In our study, ethanol extracts of these three Echinacea species and E. paradoxa, including its typical variety, E. paradoxa var. paradoxa, were screened in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophage cells to assess potential anti-inflammatory activity. Echinacea paradoxa var. paradoxa, rich in polyenes/polyacetylenes, was an especially efficient inhibitor of LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by 46%, 32%, 53% and 26%, respectively, when tested at 20 μg/ml in comparison to DMSO control. By bioactivity-guided fractionation, pentadeca-8Z-ene-11, 13-diyn-2-one (Bauer ketones 23, compound 1) and pentadeca-8Z, 13Z-dien-11-yn-2-one (Bauer ketone 24, compound 2) from E. paradoxa var. paradoxa were found primarily responsible for inhibitory effects on NO and PGE2 production. Moreover, Bauer ketone 24 (compound 2) was the major contributor to inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production in LPS-induced mouse macrophage cells. These results provide a rationale for exploring the medicinal effects of the Bauer ketone-rich taxon, E. paradoxa var. paradoxa, and confirm the anti-inflammatory properties of Bauer ketones 23 and 24. PMID:22133644

  10. Prostaglandin and myokine involvement in the cyclooxygenase-inhibiting drug enhancement of skeletal muscle adaptations to resistance exercise in older adults.

    PubMed

    Trappe, Todd A; Standley, Robert A; Jemiolo, Bozena; Carroll, Chad C; Trappe, Scott W

    2013-02-01

    Twelve weeks of resistance training (3 days/wk) combined with daily consumption of the cyclooxygenase-inhibiting drugs acetaminophen (4.0 g/day; n = 11, 64 ± 1 yr) or ibuprofen (1.2 g/day; n = 13, 64 ± 1 yr) unexpectedly promoted muscle mass and strength gains 25-50% above placebo (n = 12, 67 ± 2 yr). To investigate the mechanism of this adaptation, muscle biopsies obtained before and ∼72 h after the last training bout were analyzed for mRNA levels of prostaglandin (PG)/cyclooxygenase pathway enzymes and receptors [arachidonic acid synthesis: cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) and secreted phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)); PGF(2α) synthesis: PGF(2α) synthase and PGE(2) to PGF(2α) reductase; PGE(2) synthesis: PGE(2) synthase-1, -2, and -3; PGF(2α) receptor and PGE(2) receptor-4], cytokines and myokines involved in skeletal muscle adaptation (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10), and regulators of muscle growth [myogenin, myogenic regulatory factor-4 (MRF4), myostatin] and atrophy [Forkhead box O3A (FOXO3A), atrogin-1, muscle RING finger protein 1 (MuRF-1), inhibitory κB kinase β (IKKβ)]. Training increased (P < 0.05) cPLA(2), PGF(2α) synthase, PGE(2) to PGF(2α) reductase, PGE(2) receptor-4, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, and IKKβ. However, the PGF(2α) receptor was upregulated (P < 0.05) only in the drug groups, and the placebo group upregulation (P < 0.05) of IL-6, IL-10, and MuRF-1 was eliminated in both drug groups. These results highlight prostaglandin and myokine involvement in the adaptive response to exercise in older individuals and suggest two mechanisms underlying the enhanced muscle mass gains in the drug groups: 1) The drug-induced PGF(2α) receptor upregulation helped offset the drug suppression of PGF(2α)-stimulated protein synthesis after each exercise bout and enhanced skeletal muscle sensitivity to this stimulation. 2) The drug-induced suppression of intramuscular PGE(2) production increased net muscle protein balance after each exercise bout

  11. Potent inhibition of human 5-lipoxygenase and microsomal prostaglandin E₂ synthase-1 by the anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory agent embelin.

    PubMed

    Schaible, Anja M; Traber, Heidi; Temml, Veronika; Noha, Stefan M; Filosa, Rosanna; Peduto, Antonella; Weinigel, Christina; Barz, Dagmar; Schuster, Daniela; Werz, Oliver

    2013-08-15

    Embelin (2,5-dihydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-benzoquinone) possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties in vivo, and these features have been related to interference with multiple targets including XIAPs, NFκB, STAT-3, Akt and mTOR. However, interference with these proteins requires relatively high concentrations of embelin (IC₅₀>4 μM) and cannot fully explain its bioactivity observed in several functional studies. Here we reveal human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) and microsomal prostaglandin E₂ synthase (mPGES)-1 as direct molecular targets of embelin. Thus, embelin potently suppressed the biosynthesis of eicosanoids by selective inhibition of 5-LO and mPGES-1 with IC₅₀=0.06 and 0.2 μM, respectively. In intact human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes, embelin consistently blocked the biosynthesis of various 5-LO products regardless of the stimulus (fMLP or A23187) with IC₅₀=0.8-2 μM. Neither the related human 12- and 15-LO nor the cyclooxygenases-1 and -2 or cytosolic phospholipase A₂ were significantly affected by 10 μM embelin. Inhibition of 5-LO and mPGES-1 by embelin was (I) essentially reversible after wash-out, (II) not impaired at higher substrate concentrations, (III) unaffected by inclusion of Triton X-100, and (IV) did not correlate to its proposed antioxidant properties. Docking simulations suggest concrete binding poses in the active sites of both 5-LO and mPGES-1. Because 5-LO- and mPGES-1-derived eicosanoids play roles in inflammation and cancer, the interference of embelin with these enzymes may contribute to its biological effects and suggests embelin as novel chemotype for development of dual 5-LO/mPGES-1 inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Low Concentrations of o,p’-DDT Inhibit Gene Expression and Prostaglandin Synthesis by Estrogen Receptor-Independent Mechanism in Rat Ovarian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Zhao, Meirong; Zhuang, Shulin; Yang, Yan; Yang, Ye; Liu, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    o,p’-DDT is an infamous xenoestrogen as well as a ubiquitous and persistent pollutant. Biomonitoring studies show that women have been internally exposed to o,p’-DDT at range of 0.3–500 ng/g (8.46×10−10 M−1.41×10−6 M) in blood and other tissues. However, very limited studies have investigated the biological effects and mechanism(s) of o,p’-DDT at levels equal to or lower than current exposure levels in human. In this study, using primary cultures of rat ovarian granulosa cells, we determined that very low doses of o,p’-DDT (10−12−10−8 M) suppressed the expression of ovarian genes and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In vivo experiments consistently demonstrated that o,p’-DDT at 0.5–1 mg/kg inhibited the gene expression and PGE2 levels in rat ovary. The surprising results from the receptor inhibitors studies showed that these inhibitory effects were exerted independently of either classical estrogen receptors (ERs) or G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30). Instead, o,p’-DDT altered gene expression or hormone action via inhibiting the activation of protein kinase A (PKA), rather than protein kinase C (PKC). We further revealed that o,p’-DDT directly interfered with the PKA catalytic subunit. Our novel findings support the hypothesis that exposure to low concentrations of o,p’-DDT alters gene expression and hormone synthesis through signaling mediators beyond receptor binding, and imply that the current exposure levels of o,p’-DDT observed in the population likely poses a health risk to female reproduction. PMID:23209616

  13. Low concentrations of o,p'-DDT inhibit gene expression and prostaglandin synthesis by estrogen receptor-independent mechanism in rat ovarian cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhao, Meirong; Zhuang, Shulin; Yang, Yan; Yang, Ye; Liu, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    o,p'-DDT is an infamous xenoestrogen as well as a ubiquitous and persistent pollutant. Biomonitoring studies show that women have been internally exposed to o,p'-DDT at range of 0.3-500 ng/g (8.46×10(-10) M-1.41×10(-6) M) in blood and other tissues. However, very limited studies have investigated the biological effects and mechanism(s) of o,p'-DDT at levels equal to or lower than current exposure levels in human. In this study, using primary cultures of rat ovarian granulosa cells, we determined that very low doses of o,p'-DDT (10(-12)-10(-8) M) suppressed the expression of ovarian genes and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In vivo experiments consistently demonstrated that o,p'-DDT at 0.5-1 mg/kg inhibited the gene expression and PGE2 levels in rat ovary. The surprising results from the receptor inhibitors studies showed that these inhibitory effects were exerted independently of either classical estrogen receptors (ERs) or G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30). Instead, o,p'-DDT altered gene expression or hormone action via inhibiting the activation of protein kinase A (PKA), rather than protein kinase C (PKC). We further revealed that o,p'-DDT directly interfered with the PKA catalytic subunit. Our novel findings support the hypothesis that exposure to low concentrations of o,p'-DDT alters gene expression and hormone synthesis through signaling mediators beyond receptor binding, and imply that the current exposure levels of o,p'-DDT observed in the population likely poses a health risk to female reproduction.

  14. 15-Deoxy-Δ{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2} inhibits IL-13 production in T cells via an NF-κB-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Marie-Christine; Tremblay, Sarah; Dumais, Nancy

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► 15d-PGJ{sub 2} decreased IL-13 mRNA transcription and secretion in activated T cells. ► IL-13 inhibition by 15d-PGJ{sub 2} is independent of PPAR-γ. ► The nuclear factor-κB mediates the 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-dependent down regulation of IL-13. -- Abstract: Interleukin (IL)-13 is a cytokine produced by activated CD4{sup +} T cells that plays a critical role in promoting allergic responses and tumor cell growth. The 15-deoxy-Δ{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ{sub 2}) is a natural ligand for the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ), a known regulator of anti-inflammatory activities. We determined the effects of 15d-PGJ{sub 2} on IL-13 expression in the Jurkat E6.1 T-cell line and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that treatment of activated T cells with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} significantly decreased IL-13 mRNA transcription and secretion, respectively. This inhibition by 15d-PGJ{sub 2} was independent of PPAR-γ since treatment with GW9662, an irreversible antagonist of the nuclear receptor, produced no effect. Our data also revealed the involvement of nuclear factor-κB in mediating 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-dependent down regulation of IL-13 expression. Collectively, these results demonstrate the potential of 15d-PGJ{sub 2} in attenuating expression and production of IL-13 in activated T cells.

  15. Menthol Enhances an Antiproliferative Activity of 1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D(3) in LNCaP Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Kim, Su-Hwa; Kim, Byung-Joo; Kim, Sung-Young; So, Insuk; Jeon, Ju-Hong

    2009-03-01

    1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)], the most active form of vitamin D(3), and its analogues have therapeutic benefits for prostate cancer treatment. However, the development of hypercalcemia is an obstacle to clinical applications of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) for cancer therapy. In this study, we provide evidence that menthol, a key component of peppermint oil, increases an anti-proliferation activity of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. We found that menthol per se does not exhibit antiproliferative activity, but it is able to enhance 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)-mediated growth inhibition in LNCaP cells. Fluorometric assays using Fura-2 showed that 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) does not induce acute Ca(2+) response, whereas menthol evokes an increase in [Ca(2+)](i), which suggests that cross-talks of menthol-induced Ca(2+) signaling with 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)-mediated growth inhibition pathways. In addition, Western blot analysis revealed that 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) and menthol cooperatively modulate the expression of bcl-2 and p21 which provides the insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the enhanced 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)-mediated growth inhibition by menthol. Thus, our findings suggest that menthol may be a useful natural compound to enhance therapeutic effects of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3).

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced inhibition of phosphatidylcholine synthesis by human type II pneumocytes is partially mediated by prostaglandins.

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Díaz, J; Vara, E; García, C; Balibrea, J L

    1994-01-01

    TNF alpha seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis of adult respiratory distress syndrome. We studied the effect of TNF alpha on phospholipid synthesis by isolated type II pneumocytes and attempted to characterize the role of arachidonate metabolites and the influence of pentoxifylline on such an effect. Lung tissue obtained from both multiple organ donors (n = 14) and lung cancer patients (n = 11) was used for cell isolation. Surfactant synthesis was measured by the incorporation of D-[U-14C]glucose into phosphatidylcholine (PC). The basal PC synthesis was higher in the donor group than in the malignant group (3.44 +/- 0.19 vs 2.15 +/- 0.15 pmol/microgram protein x 120 min, P < 0.01), and, in the presence of 100 ng/ml of TNF alpha, the incorporation of labeled glucose into PC was reduced significantly in both donor (1.13 +/- 0.11 vs 3.44 +/- 0.19 pmol/microgram protein x 120 min, P < 0.01) and cancer (0.99 +/- 0.11 vs 2.15 +/- 0.15 pmol/microgram protein x 120 min, P < 0.01) groups. Indomethacin was able to completely block the cytokine-induced decrease in PC synthesis by pneumocytes from the malignant group and to attenuate the inhibitory effect of TNF alpha in those from donors, nordihydroguaiaretic acid having a similar effect. The TNF alpha effect can be blocked by pentoxifylline (100 micrograms/ml), a substance which can even succeed in reverting the basal secretory inhibition of cancer patients' pneumocytes to levels similar to those of the donor group. TNF alpha may contribute to the pathophysiology of adult respiratory distress syndrome by inhibiting the synthesis of surfactant. TNF alpha might be produced in lung tumors, resulting in chronic paracrine or systemic exposure of pneumocytes to low concentrations of the cytokine. The TNF alpha effect was not prevented completely by the blockage of the arachidonic acid metabolism, hence other mediators should also be implicated. PMID:8040266

  17. Acanthopanax koreanum fruit waste inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eun-Jin; Moon, Ji-Young; Lee, Jung-Soon; Koh, Jaesook; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Chang-Gu

    2010-01-01

    The Acanthopanax koreanum fruit is a popular fruit in Jeju Island, but the byproducts of the alcoholic beverage prepared using this fruit are major agricultural wastes. The fermentability of this waste causes many economic and environmental problems. Therefore, we investigated the suitability of using A. koreanum fruit waste (AFW) as a source of antiinflammatory agents. AFWs were extracted with 80% EtOH. The ethanolic extract was then successively partitioned with hexane, CH(2)Cl(2), EtOAc, BuOH, and water. The results indicate that the CH(2)Cl(2) fraction (100 microg/mL) of AFW inhibited the LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production in RAW 264.7 cells by 79.6% and 39.7%, respectively. These inhibitory effects of the CH(2)Cl(2) fraction of AFWs were accompanied by decreases in the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) proteins and iNOS and COX-2 mRNA in a dose-dependent pattern. The CH(2)Cl(2) fraction of AFWs also prevented degradation of IkappaB-alpha in a dose-dependent manner. Ursolic acid was identified as major compound present in AFW, and CH(2)Cl(2) extracts by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Furthermore using pure ursolic acid as standard and by HPLC, AFW and CH(2)Cl(2) extracts was found to contain 1.58 mg/g and 1.75 mg/g, respectively. Moreover, we tested the potential application of AFW extracts as a cosmetic material by performing human skin primary irritation tests. In these tests, AFW extracts did not induce any adverse reactions. Based on these results, we suggest that AFW extracts be considered possible anti-inflammatory candidates for topical application.

  18. Inhibition of lysyl oxidase by prostaglandin E2 via EP2/EP4 receptors in human amnion fibroblasts: Implications for parturition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Wangsheng; Li, Wenjiao; Shu, Qun; Chen, Zi-Jiang; Myatt, Leslie; Sun, Kang

    2016-03-15

    The underlying mechanism leading to rupture of the membranes at parturition is not fully understood. Lysyl oxidase (LOX) cross-links collagen fibrils thereby increasing the tensile strength of the membranes. Thus, understanding the regulation of LOX expression may be of crucial importance for elucidation of the process of rupture of the fetal membranes. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), mainly produced in the amnion, plays crucial roles during human parturition. However it is not known whether PGE2 regulates LOX expression in the fetal membranes. Using primary human amnion fibroblasts, we showed that addition of PGE2 decreased LOX mRNA and protein levels, which were blocked by inhibition of EP2/EP4 receptors and the receptor-coupled cAMP/PKA pathway. EP2/EP4 receptor agonists and stimulators of the cAMP/PKA pathway consistently decreased LOX expression. Furthermore, PGE2 induced cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, a key enzyme in PGE2 production, via an EP2 and EP4 receptor-coupled cAMP/PKA pathway. Small interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of COX-2 expression significantly increased the basal expression of LOX. In addition, an increase in COX-2 and a reciprocal decrease in LOX abundance occurred in amnion tissue following labor at term. In conclusion, we have revealed a feed-forward loop of induction of COX-2 and reduction in LOX expression by PGE2 acting via an EP2/EP4 receptor-coupled cAMP/PKA pathway in human amnion fibroblasts toward the end of gestation, which may play a significant role in the rupture of fetal membranes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits in-vitro mineral deposition by human periodontal ligament cells via modulating the expression of TWIST1 and RUNX2.

    PubMed

    Manokawinchoke, J; Pimkhaokhum, A; Everts, V; Pavasant, P

    2014-12-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been shown to be able to influence both bone formation and resorption. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of PGE2 on the osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament (HPDL) cells. HPDL cells were cultured with 0.001-1 μm PGE2 in osteogenic medium. In-vitro mineral deposition was determined by Alizarin Red S staining, and gene expression was determined by real-time PCR. PGE2 inhibited in-vitro mineral deposition by HPDL cells in a dose-dependent manner. PCR analyses showed that PGE2 upregulated the expression of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), but had no effect on osteocalcin expression. Upregulation of TWIST-related protein1 (TWIST1), a functional antagonist of RUNX2, was also observed. In addition, increased levels of RUNX2 and TWIST1 proteins, induced by PGE2, were detected by western blot analysis. Using a chemical activator of E prostanoid (EP) receptors as well as small interfering RNA against an EP receptor, it was shown that PGE2 regulated RUNX2 and TWIST1 via the EP2 receptor. The role of protein kinase A in the inductive effect of PGE2 was also demonstrated. The results of this study revealed that PGE2 modulates the osteogenic differentiation of HPDL cells via regulating the expression of RUNX2 and TWIST1. The results suggest a possible role for PGE2 in regulating the homeostasis of periodontal ligament tissue. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Inhibition of mitochondrial division through covalent modification of Drp1 protein by 15 deoxy-{Delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J2

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Nandita; Kar, Rekha; Singha, Prajjal K.; Venkatachalam, Manjeri A.; McEwen, Donald G.; Saikumar, Pothana

    2010-04-23

    Arachidonic acid derived endogenous electrophile 15d-PGJ2 has gained much attention in recent years due to its potent anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory actions mediated through thiol modification of cysteine residues in its target proteins. Here, we show that 15d-PGJ2 at 1 {mu}M concentration converts normal mitochondria into large elongated and interconnected mitochondria through direct binding to mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and partial inhibition of its GTPase activity. Mitochondrial elongation induced by 15d-PGJ2 is accompanied by increased assembly of Drp1 into large oligomeric complexes through plausible intermolecular interactions. The role of decreased GTPase activity of Drp1 in the formation of large oligomeric complexes is evident when Drp1 is incubated with a non-cleavable GTP analog, GTP{gamma}S or by a mutation that inactivated GTPase activity of Drp1 (K38A). The mutation of cysteine residue (Cys644) in the GTPase effector domain, a reported target for modification by reactive electrophiles, to alanine mimicked K38A mutation induced Drp1 oligomerization and mitochondrial elongation, suggesting the importance of cysteine in GED to regulate the GTPase activity and mitochondrial morphology. Interestingly, treatment of K38A and C644A mutants with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in super oligomerization of both mutant Drp1s indicating that 15d-PGJ2 may further stabilize Drp1 oligomers formed by loss of GTPase activity through covalent modification of middle domain cysteine residues. The present study documents for the first time the regulation of a mitochondrial fission activity by a prostaglandin, which will provide clues for understanding the pathological and physiological consequences of accumulation of reactive electrophiles during oxidative stress, inflammation and degeneration.

  1. Inhibition of mitochondrial division through covalent modification of Drp1 protein by 15 deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J2.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Nandita; Kar, Rekha; Singha, Prajjal K; Venkatachalam, Manjeri A; McEwen, Donald G; Saikumar, Pothana

    2010-04-23

    Arachidonic acid derived endogenous electrophile 15d-PGJ2 has gained much attention in recent years due to its potent anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory actions mediated through thiol modification of cysteine residues in its target proteins. Here, we show that 15d-PGJ2 at 1 microM concentration converts normal mitochondria into large elongated and interconnected mitochondria through direct binding to mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and partial inhibition of its GTPase activity. Mitochondrial elongation induced by 15d-PGJ2 is accompanied by increased assembly of Drp1 into large oligomeric complexes through plausible intermolecular interactions. The role of decreased GTPase activity of Drp1 in the formation of large oligomeric complexes is evident when Drp1 is incubated with a non-cleavable GTP analog, GTPgammaS or by a mutation that inactivated GTPase activity of Drp1 (K38A). The mutation of cysteine residue (Cys644) in the GTPase effector domain, a reported target for modification by reactive electrophiles, to alanine mimicked K38A mutation induced Drp1 oligomerization and mitochondrial elongation, suggesting the importance of cysteine in GED to regulate the GTPase activity and mitochondrial morphology. Interestingly, treatment of K38A and C644A mutants with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in super oligomerization of both mutant Drp1s indicating that 15d-PGJ2 may further stabilize Drp1 oligomers formed by loss of GTPase activity through covalent modification of middle domain cysteine residues. The present study documents for the first time the regulation of a mitochondrial fission activity by a prostaglandin, which will provide clues for understanding the pathological and physiological consequences of accumulation of reactive electrophiles during oxidative stress, inflammation and degeneration.

  2. Inhibition of mitochondrial division through covalent modification of Drp1 protein by 15 Deoxy- Δ12,14 - Prostaglandin J2

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nandita; Kar, Rekha; Singha, Prajjal K.; Venkatachalam, Manjeri A.; McEwen, Donald G.; Saikumar, Pothana

    2010-01-01

    Arachidonic acid derived endogenous electrophile 15d-PGJ2 has gained much attention in recent years due to its potent anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory actions mediated through thiol modification of cysteine residues in its target proteins. Here, we show that 15d-PGJ2 at 1µM concentration converts normal mitochondria into large elongated and interconnected mitochondria through direct binding to mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and partial inhibition of its GTPase activity. Mitochondrial elongation induced by 15d-PGJ2 is accompanied by increased assembly of Drp1 into large oligomeric complexes through plausible intermolecular interactions. The role of decreased GTPase activity of Drp1 in the formation of large oligomeric complexes is evident when Drp1 is incubated with a non-cleavable GTP analog, GTPγS or by a mutation that inactivated GTPase activity of Drp1 (K38A). The mutation of cysteine residue (Cys644) in the GTPase effector domain, a reported target for modification by reactive electrophiles, to alanine mimicked K38A mutation induced Drp1 oligomerization and mitochondrial elongation, suggesting the importance of cysteine in GED to regulate the GTPase activity and mitochondrial morphology. Interestingly, treatment of K38A and C644A mutants with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in super oligomerization of both mutant Drp1s indicating that 15d-PGJ2 may further stabilize Drp1 oligomers formed by loss of GTPase activity through covalent modification of middle domain cysteine residues. The present study documents for the first time the regulation of a mitochondrial fission activity by a prostaglandin, which will provide clues for understanding the pathological and physiological consequences of accumulation of reactive electrophiles during oxidative stress, inflammation and degeneration. PMID:20307494

  3. Crosstalk between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in human breast cancer cells: PPAR{gamma} binds to VDR and inhibits 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} mediated transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Alimirah, Fatouma; Peng, Xinjian; Yuan, Liang; Mehta, Rajeshwari R.; Knethen, Andreas von; Choubey, Divaker; Mehta, Rajendra G.

    2012-11-15

    Heterodimerization and cross-talk between nuclear hormone receptors often occurs. For example, estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) physically binds to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and inhibits its transcriptional activity. The interaction between PPAR{gamma} and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) however, is unknown. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms linking PPAR{gamma} and VDR signaling, and for the first time we show that PPAR{gamma} physically associates with VDR in human breast cancer cells. We found that overexpression of PPAR{gamma} decreased 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) mediated transcriptional activity of the vitamin D target gene, CYP24A1, by 49% and the activity of VDRE-luc, a vitamin D responsive reporter, by 75% in T47D human breast cancer cells. Deletion mutation experiments illustrated that helices 1 and 4 of PPAR{gamma}'s hinge and ligand binding domains, respectively, governed this suppressive function. Additionally, abrogation of PPAR{gamma}'s AF2 domain attenuated its repressive action on 1,25D{sub 3} transactivation, indicating that this domain is integral in inhibiting VDR signaling. PPAR{gamma} was also found to compete with VDR for their binding partner retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR{alpha}). Overexpression of RXR{alpha} blocked PPAR{gamma}'s suppressive effect on 1,25D{sub 3} action, enhancing VDR signaling. In conclusion, these observations uncover molecular mechanisms connecting the PPAR{gamma} and VDR pathways. -- Highlights: PPAR{gamma}'s role on 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} transcriptional activity is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} physically binds to VDR and inhibits 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma}'s hinge and ligand binding domains are important for this inhibitory effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} competes with VDR for the availability of their binding partner, RXR{alpha}.

  4. ENMD-1198, a novel tubulin-binding agent reduces HIF-1alpha and STAT3 activity in human hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) cells, and inhibits growth and vascularization in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Christian; Lang, Sven A; Mori, Akira; Hellerbrand, Claus; Schlitt, Hans J; Geissler, Edward K; Fogler, William E; Stoeltzing, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents a highly vascularized tumor entity and the process of angiogenesis is essential for the growth of HCC. Importantly, the pro-angiogenic transcription factors HIF-1α and STAT3 have been implicated in HCC progression, thus representing interesting targets for molecular targeted therapy. We hypothesized that therapeutic inhibition of HIF-1α could be achieved by using a novel tubulin-binding agent (ENMD-1198). ENMD-1198 is an analog of 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) with antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activity. Methods The human HCC cell lines HUH-7 and HepG2 were used for experiments. Effects of ENMD-1198 on constitutive and inducible (hypoxia, growth factors) activation of signaling cascades, including HIF-1α and STAT3, were investigated by Western blotting. Changes in VEGF expression were determined by real-time PCR. Effects of ENMD-1198 on cancer cell migration and invasion were evaluated in in vitro-assays. The growth-inhibitory effects of ENMD-1198 (200 mg/kg/day) were determined in a subcutaneous tumor model (HUH-7). Results ENMD-1198 inhibited the phosphorylation of MAPK/Erk, PI-3K/Akt and FAK. Moreover, activation of HIF-1α and STAT3 was dramatically reduced by ENMD-1198, which resulted in lower VEGF mRNA expression (P < 0.05). In addition, tumor cell migratory and invasive properties were significantly inhibited (P < 0.05, for both). In vivo, treatment with ENMD-1198 led to a significant reduction in tumor growth, tumor vascularization, and numbers of proliferating tumor cells (P < 0.05 for all). Conclusion The novel microtubule destabilizing agent ENMD-1198 is suitable for inhibiting HIF-1α and STAT3 in human HCC cells and leads to reduced tumor growth and vascularization in vivo. Hence, inhibition of HIF-1α and STAT3 could prove valuable for therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:18651980

  5. Cyclooxygenase inhibition lowers prostaglandin E2 release from articular cartilage and reduces apoptosis but not proteoglycan degradation following an impact load in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, Janet E; Aspden, Richard M

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) from cartilage following an impact load in vitro and the possible chondroprotective effect of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Explants of human articular cartilage were subjected to a single impact load in a drop tower, and then cultured for 6 days in the presence of either a selective COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib; 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10 μM) or a non-selective COX inhibitor (indomethacin; 0.1 and 10 μM). The concentrations of PGE2 and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), a measure of cartilage breakdown, were measured in the explant culture medium at 3 and 6 days post-impact. Apoptotic cell death was measured in frozen explant sections by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) method. PGE2 levels were increased by more than 20-fold in the medium of explants at both 3 (p = 0.012) and 6 days (p = 0.004) following impact, compared with unloaded controls. In the presence of celecoxib and indomethacin, the PGE2 levels were reduced in a dose-related manner. These inhibitors, however, had no effect in reducing the impact-induced release of GAGs from the cartilage matrix. Addition of celecoxib and indomethacin significantly reduced the number of trauma-induced apoptotic chondrocytes in cartilage explant sections. In this study, a marked increase in PGE2 was measured in the medium following an impact load on articular cartilage, which was abolished by the selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, and non-selective indomethacin. These inhibitors reduced chondrocyte apoptosis but no change was observed in the release of GAGs from the explants, suggesting that the COX/PGE2 pathway is not directly responsible for cartilage breakdown following traumatic injury. Our in vitro study demonstrates that it is unlikely that COX-2 inhibition alone would slow down or prevent the development of secondary osteoarthritis. PMID:18096078

  6. KNK437, abrogates hypoxia-induced radioresistance by dual targeting of the AKT and HIF-1{alpha} survival pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Oommen, Deepu; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KNK437, a benzylidene lactam compound, is a novel radiosensitizer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KNK437 inhibits AKT signaling and abrogates the accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} under hypoxia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KNK437 abrogates hypoxia induced resistance to radiation. -- Abstract: KNK437 is a benzylidene lactam compound known to inhibit stress-induced synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs promote radioresistance and play a major role in stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}). HIF-1{alpha} is widely responsible for tumor resistance to radiation under hypoxic conditions. We hypothesized that KNK437 sensitizes cancer cells to radiation and overrides hypoxia-induced radioresistance via destabilizing HIF-1{alpha}. Treatment of human cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and T98G with KNK437 sensitized them to ionizing radiation (IR). Surprisingly, IR did not induce HSPs in these cell lines. As hypothesized, KNK437 abrogated the accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} in hypoxic cells. However, there was no induction of HSPs under hypoxic conditions. Moreover, the proteosome inhibitor MG132 did not restore HIF-1{alpha} levels in KNK437-treated cells. This suggested that the absence of HIF-1{alpha} in hypoxic cells was not due to the enhanced protein degradation. HIF-1{alpha} is mainly regulated at the level of post-transcription and AKT is known to modulate the translation of HIF-1{alpha} mRNA. Interestingly, pre-treatment of cells with KNK437 inhibited AKT signaling. Furthermore, down regulation of AKT by siRNA abrogated HIF-1{alpha} levels under hypoxia. Interestingly, KNK437 reduced cell survival in hypoxic conditions and inhibited hypoxia-induced resistance to radiation. Taken together, these data suggest that KNK437 is an effective radiosensitizer that targets multiple pro-survival stress response pathways.

  7. NF-{kappa}B suppresses HIF-1{alpha} response by competing for P300 binding

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonca, Daniela B.S.; Mendonca, Gustavo; Aragao, Francisco J.L.; Cooper, Lyndon F.

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} p65 completely blocked HIF-1{alpha} activity at the HRE on different cell lines. {yields} p65 caused minor changes in HIF-1{alpha} and HIF-1{alpha} target genes mRNA expression. {yields} p65 reduced transcription of VEGF promoter. {yields} p65 competes with HIF-1{alpha} for p300. -- Abstract: Hypoxia has emerged as a key determinant of osteogenesis. HIF-1{alpha} is the transcription factor mediating hypoxia responses that include induction of VEGF and related bone induction. Inflammatory signals antagonize bone repair via the NF-{kappa}B pathway. The present investigation explored the functional relationship of hypoxia (HIF-1{alpha} function) and inflammatory signaling (NF-{kappa}B) in stem like and osteoprogenitor cell lines. The potential interaction between HIF-1{alpha} and NF-{kappa}B signaling was explored by co-transfection studies in hFOB with p65, HIF-1{alpha} and 9x-HRE-luc or HIF-1{alpha} target genes reporter plasmids. Nuclear cross-talk was directly tested using the mammalian Gal4/VP16 two-hybrid, and confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation/western blotting assays. The results show that inflammatory stimulation (TNF-{alpha} treatment) causes a marked inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} function at the HRE in all cell lines studied. Also, co-transfection with p65 expression vector leads to reduced hVEGFp transcription after DFO-induced hypoxia. However, TNF-{alpha} treatment had little effect on HIF-1{alpha} mRNA levels. The functional interaction of Gal4-HIF-1{alpha} and VP16-p300 fusion proteins is effectively blocked by expression of p65 in a dose dependent manner. It was concluded that NF-{kappa}B-mediated inflammatory signaling is able to block HIF-1{alpha} transactivation at HRE-encoding genes by direct competition for p300 binding at the promoter. Inflammation may influence the stem cell niche and tissue regeneration by influencing cellular responses to hypoxia.

  8. Prostaglandins in reproductive physiology*

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Gillian M.

    1975-01-01

    The role of prostaglandins in reproductive physiology is reviewed with particular emphasis on their possible importance in ovulation in humans. A possible interaction between gonadal steroids, biogenic amines and prostaglandins at hypothalamic-pituitary level, in relation to the release of luteinizing hormone releasing factor, and LH, is discussed. Anomalies regarding the role of oestrogens in LH release are noted, and it is suggested that high oestrogen levels may release prostaglandins from the uterus and/or centrally in humans, in connection with the mid-cycle LH surge and ovulation. A hypothetical role for prostaglandins in sexual behaviour and premenstrual changes is discussed. The hypotheses open up new areas for clinical research to establish the role of prostaglandins in human endocrinology. The need for measurement of prostaglandin metabolites in blood and urine is emphasized. PMID:1089972

  9. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits p53 in human breast adipose stromal cells: a novel mechanism for the regulation of aromatase in obesity and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuyi; Docanto, Maria M; Sasano, Hironobu; Lo, Camden; Simpson, Evan R; Brown, Kristy A

    2015-02-15

    Obesity is a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer and the majority of these cancers are estrogen dependent. Aromatase converts androgens into estrogens and its increased expression in breast adipose stromal cells (ASC) is a major driver of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. In particular, obesity-associated and tumor-derived factors, such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), have been shown to drive the expression of aromatase by stimulating the activity of the proximal promoter II (PII). The tumor-suppressor p53 is a key regulator of cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis and is frequently mutated in breast cancer. Mutations in p53 are rare in tumor-associated ASCs. Therefore, it was hypothesized that p53 is regulated by PGE2 and involved in the PGE2-mediated regulation of aromatase. Results demonstrate that PGE2 causes a significant decrease in p53 transcript and nuclear protein expression, as well as phosphorylation at Ser15 in primary human breast ASCs. Stabilization of p53 with RITA leads to a significant decrease in the PGE2-stimulated aromatase mRNA expression and activity, and PII activity. Interaction of p53 with PII was demonstrated and this interaction is decreased in the presence of PGE2. Moreover, mutation of the identified p53 response element leads to an increase in the basal activity of the promoter. Immunofluorescence on clinical samples demonstrates that p53 is decreased in tumor-associated ASCs compared with ASCs from normal breast tissue, and that there is a positive association between perinuclear (inactive) p53 and aromatase expression in these cells. Furthermore, aromatase expression is increased in breast ASCs from Li-Fraumeni patients (germline TP53 mutations) compared with non-Li-Fraumeni breast tissue. Overall, our results demonstrate that p53 is a negative regulator of aromatase in the breast and its inhibition by PGE2 provides a novel mechanism for aromatase regulation in obesity and breast cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer

  10. IL-1. alpha. increases arachidonyl-CoA: Lysophospholipid acyltransterase activity and stimulates ( sup 3 H) arachidonate incorporation into phospholipids in rat mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazato, Y.; Sedor, J.R. )

    1992-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1{alpha} is a potent stimulus of prostaglandin synthesis. The authors have previously shown that IL-1 amplifies mesangial cell prostaglandin synthesis by inducing synthesis of a non-pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2}. Phospholipase A{sub 2}. Phospholipase A{sub 2} activation results in the formation of lysophospholipids and free fatty acids. They now investigate the effects of IL-1{alpha} on reacylation of lysophospholipids. Incubations with IL-1{alpha} for 24 hours significantly stimulated mesangial cell ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid incorporation but not ({sup 3}H)oleic acid incorporation into phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine. Lysophospholipid acyltransferase activity was measured in vitro. Cytokine treatment increased enzyme activity when lysophosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine and lysophosphatidylinositol were used as exogenous substrates. They conclude that IL-1 promotes cellular phospholipid remodeling by stimulating the deacylation and reacylation of phospholipids.

  11. Unidirectional transfer of prostaglandin endoperoxides between platelets and endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, A I; Crawford, D D; Gimbrone, M A

    1984-01-01

    An important determinant of platelet-vessel wall interactions is the local balance of production of endothelial prostacyclin (PGI2) and platelet thromboxane (TX) A2, labile eicosanoids with opposing effects on hemostasis. Disputed evidence suggests that platelet-derived prostaglandin endoperoxide intermediates may be utilized as substrates for vascular PGI2 synthesis. Using several different approaches, we have found that platelets can transfer endoperoxides to cultured endothelial cells for efficient conversion to PGI2, but a reciprocal transfer of endothelial endoperoxides for utilization by platelet thromboxane synthetase does not occur under the same experimental conditions. However, platelets can utilize arachidonic acid released by endothelial cells for lipoxygenase metabolism. We have directly demonstrated the production of [3H]6-keto-PGF1 alpha (the breakdown product of [3H]PGI2) by aspirin-treated endothelial cells in the presence of platelets stimulated with [3H]arachidonic acid. In coincubation experiments using either arachidonate or ionophore A23187 as a stimulus, radioimmunoassay of the net production of arachidonic acid metabolites showed that 6-keto-PGF1 alpha generation by aspirin-treated endothelial cells in the presence of platelets may actually exceed its generation by uninhibited endothelial cells alone. In functional assays, platelet aggregation was inhibited in the presence of aspirin-treated endothelial cells after stimulation with either arachidonate or ionophore A23187. In contrast, the inverse experiments, using aspirin-treated platelets and uninhibited endothelial cells, failed to demonstrate platelet utilization of endothelial endoperoxides for TXA2 production by any of the above methods. These studies thus provide evidence that efficient unidirectional transfer and utilization of platelet-derived endoperoxides for endothelial PGI2 production can occur. This process may serve to amplify PGI2 generation adjacent to areas of vascular

  12. P70S6K 1 regulation of angiogenesis through VEGF and HIF-1{alpha} expression

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Chuan-Xiu; Shi, Zhumei; Meng, Qiao; Jiang, Yue; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} P70S6K1 regulates VEGF expression; {yields} P70S6K1 induces transcriptional activation through HIF-1{alpha} binding site; {yields} P70S6K1 regulates HIF-1{alpha}, but not HIF-1{beta} protein expression; {yields} P70S6K1 mediates tumor growth and angiogenesis through HIF-1{alpha} and VEGF expression. -- Abstract: The 70 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K1), a downstream target of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), is an important regulator of cell cycle progression, and cell proliferation. Recent studies indicated an important role of p70S6K1 in PTEN-negative and AKT-overexpressing tumors. However, the mechanism of p70S6K1 in tumor angiogenesis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we specifically inhibited p70S6K1 activity in ovarian cancer cells using vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) against p70S6K1. We found that knockdown of p70S6K1 significantly decreased VEGF protein expression and VEGF transcriptional activation through the HIF-1{alpha} binding site at its enhancer region. The expression of p70S6K1 siRNA specifically inhibited HIF-1{alpha}, but not HIF-1{beta} protein expression. We also found that p70S6K1 down-regulation inhibited ovarian tumor growth and angiogenesis, and decreased cell proliferation and levels of VEGF and HIF-1{alpha} expression in tumor tissues. Our results suggest that p70S6K1 is required for tumor growth and angiogenesis through HIF-1{alpha} and VEGF expression, providing a molecular mechanism of human ovarian cancer mediated by p70S6K1 signaling.

  13. A study on the effects of inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis with flunixin meglumine and later administration of prostaglandin F2 alpha on the intraluminal pressure variations in the isthmus of the oviduct in unrestrained gilts.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, A; Einarsson, S; Kindahl, H

    1993-01-01

    Three gilts were each equipped with 2 ultra-miniature pressure sensors, placed at 2 different points along the same isthmus of the oviduct. Following base recordings of isthmic intraluminal pressure, the gilts were treated with 2.2 mg flunixin meglumine (FM) per kg body weight. After FM treatment, the peripheral plasma levels of 15-ketodihydro-PGF2 alpha, the major metabolite of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha), decreased within 30 min. The frequency of the phasic pressure fluctuations in the isthmus of the oviduct decreased after FM treatment. Exogenous administration of PGF2 alpha increased the peripheral plasma levels of 15-ketodihydro-PGF2 alpha. When administered at a dose of 0.1 mg, PGF2 alpha produced an increase in the frequency of the phasic pressure fluctuations in the oviductal isthmus. When the PGF2 alpha dose was increased to 0.5 mg, a marked increase in the base and total pressures was seen in addition to the increase in the frequency of the phasic pressure fluctuations.

  14. Impaired PGC-1alpha function in muscle in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Rajnish K; Adhihetty, Peter; Shukla, Shubha; Hennessy, Thomas; Calingasan, Noel; Yang, Lichuan; Starkov, Anatoly; Kiaei, Mahmoud; Cannella, Milena; Sassone, Jenny; Ciammola, Andrea; Squitieri, Fernando; Beal, M Flint

    2009-08-15

    We investigated the role of PPAR gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) in muscle dysfunction in Huntington's disease (HD). We observed reduced PGC-1alpha and target genes expression in muscle of HD transgenic mice. We produced chronic energy deprivation in HD mice by administering the catabolic stressor beta-guanidinopropionic acid (GPA), a creatine analogue that reduces ATP levels, activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which in turn activates PGC-1alpha. Treatment with GPA resulted in increased expression of AMPK, PGC-1alpha target genes, genes for oxidative phosphorylation, electron transport chain and mitochondrial biogenesis, increased oxidative muscle fibers, numbers of mitochondria and motor performance in wild-type, but not in HD mice. In muscle biopsies from HD patients, there was decreased PGC-1alpha, PGC-1beta and oxidative fibers. Oxygen consumption, PGC-1alpha, NRF1 and response to GPA were significantly reduced in myoblasts from HD patients. Knockdown of mutant huntingtin resulted in increased PGC-1alpha expression in HD myoblast. Lastly, adenoviral-mediated delivery of PGC-1alpha resulted increased expression of PGC-1alpha and markers for oxidative muscle fibers and reversal of blunted response for GPA in HD mice. These findings show that impaired function of PGC-1alpha plays a critical role in muscle dysfunction in HD, and that treatment with agents to enhance PGC-1alpha function could exert therapeutic benefits. Furthermore, muscle may provide a readily accessible tissue in which to monitor therapeutic interventions.

  15. Whole-body irradiation transiently diminishes the adrenocorticotropin response to recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Perlstein, R.S.; Mehta, N.R.; Neta, R.; Whitnall, M.H.; Mougey, E.H.

    1995-03-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha} (rhIL-1{alpha}) has significant potential as a radioprotector and/or treatment for radiation-induced hematopoietic injury. Both IL-1 and whole-body ionizing irradiation acutely stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. We therefore assessed the interaction of whole-body irradiation and rhIL-1{alpha} in altering the functioning of the axis in mice. Specifically, we determined the adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone responses to rhIL-1{alpha} administered just before and hours to days after whole-body or sham irradiation. Our results indicate that whole-body irradiation does not potentiate the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in ACTH levels at the doses used. In fact, the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in plasma ACTH is transiently impaired when the cytokine is administered 5 h after, but not 1 h before, exposure to whole-body irradiation. The ACTH response may be inhibited by elevated corticosterone levels after whole-body irradiation, or by other radiation-induced effects on the pituitary gland and hypothalamus. 36 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Effect of chronic alcohol consumption on Hepatic SIRT1 and PGC-1{alpha} in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, Charles S. Leo, Maria A.; Wang Xiaolei; DeCarli, Leonore M.

    2008-05-23

    The nuclear genes, NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirtuis 1 (SIRT1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} coactivator1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) are regulators of energy metabolism. Here, we studied the role of alcohol consumption in expression of these sensing molecules. Alcohol significantly reduced hepatic SIRT1 mRNA by 50% and PGC-1{alpha} mRNA by 46% and it significantly inhibited the protein expression of SIRT1 and PGC-1{alpha}, while the transcription factor PPAR-{gamma} remained unchanged. However, when the lipid composition of the alcohol diet was changed by replacing long-chain triglycerides (LCT) with medium chain triglycerides (MCT), SIRT1 and PGC-1{alpha} mRNA were restored to near control levels. This study demonstrates that alcohol reduces key energy sensing proteins and that replacement of LCT by MCT affects the transcription of these genes. Since there is a pathophysiological link between SIRT1 and PGC-1{alpha} and mitochondrial energy, the implication of the study is that mitochondrial dysfunction due to alcohol abuse can be treated by dietary modifications.

  17. HNF1alpha is involved in tissue-specific regulation of CFTR gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Mouchel, Nathalie; Henstra, Sytse A; McCarthy, Victoria A; Williams, Sarah H; Phylactides, Marios; Harris, Ann

    2004-01-01

    The CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene shows a complex pattern of expression with tissue-specific and temporal regulation. However, the genetic elements and transcription factors that control CFTR expression are largely unidentified. The CFTR promoter does not confer tissue specificity on gene expression, suggesting that there are regulatory elements outside the upstream region. Analysis of potential regulatory elements defined as DNase 1-hypersensitive sites within introns of the gene revealed multiple predicted binding sites for the HNF1alpha (hepatocyte nuclear factor 1alpha) transcription factor. HNF1alpha, which is expressed in many of the same epithelial cell types as CFTR and shows similar differentiation-dependent changes in gene expression, bound to these sites in vitro. Overexpression of heterologous HNF1alpha augmented CFTR transcription in vivo. In contrast, antisense inhibition of HNF1 alpha transcription decreased the CFTR mRNA levels. Hnf1 alpha knockout mice showed lower levels of CFTR mRNA in their small intestine in comparison with wild-type mice. This is the first report of a transcription factor, which confers tissue specificity on the expression of this important disease-associated gene. PMID:14656222

  18. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha signaling in aquaporin upregulation after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jamie Y; Kreipke, Christian W; Speirs, Susan L; Schafer, Patrick; Schafer, Steven; Rafols, José A

    2009-03-27

    Previous studies have demonstrated that traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes brain edema via aquaporins (AQPs), the water-transporting proteins. In the present study, we determined the role of hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), which is a transcription factor in response to physiological hypoxia, in regulating expression of AQP4 and AQP9. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (400-425g) received a closed head injury using the Marmarou weight drop model with a 450g weight and survived for 1, 4, 24 and 48h. Some animals were administered 30min after injury with 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2), a naturally occurring metabolite of estradiol which is known to post-transcriptionally down-regulate HIF-1alpha expression, and sacrificed 4h after injury. Real-time PCR and Western blot were used, respectively, to detect gene and protein expressions of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD, showing hypoxic stress), HIF-1alpha, AQP4, and AQP9. ANOVA analysis demonstrated a significant (p<0.05) increase in gene expression of MnSOD, HIF-1alpha, AQP4, and AQP9, starting at 1h after injury through 48h. Western blot analysis further indicated a significant (p<0.05) increase in protein expression of these molecules at the same time points. Pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1alpha by 2ME2 reduced the up-regulated levels of AQP4 and AQP9 after TBI. The present study suggests that hypoxic conditions determined by MnSOD expression after closed head injury contribute to HIF-1alpha expression. HIF-1alpha, in turn, up-regulates expression of AQP4 and AQP9. These results characterize the pathophysiological mechanisms, and suggest possible therapeutic targets for TBI patients.

  19. The inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on platelet-derived growth factor-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration through up-regulating PGC-1{alpha} expression

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wei; Guo, Ting; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yongxian; Zen, Ke; Yu, Bo; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2011-05-01

    Dexamethasone has been shown to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, which is required for preventing restenosis. However, the mechanism underlying effect of dexamethasone remains unknown. We have previously demonstrated that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1{alpha}) can inhibit VSMC migration and proliferation. Here, we investigated the role of PGC-1{alpha} in dexamethasone-reduced VSMC migration and explored the possible mechanism. We first examined PGC-1{alpha} expression in cultured rat aortic VSMCs. The results revealed that incubation of VSMCs with dexamethasone could significantly elevate PGC-1{alpha} mRNA expression. In contrast, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) decreased PGC-1{alpha} expression while stimulating VSMC migration. Mechanistic study showed that suppression of PGC-1{alpha} by small interfering RNA strongly abrogated the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on VSMC migration, whereas overexpression of PGC-1{alpha} had the opposite effect. Furthermore, an analysis of MAPK signal pathways showed that dexamethasone inhibited ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation in VSMCs. Overexpression of PGC-1{alpha} decreased both basal and PDGF-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation, but it had no effect on ERK phosphorylation. Finally, inhibition of PPAR{gamma} activation by a PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 abolished the suppressive effects of PGC-1{alpha} on p38 MAPK phosphorylation and VSMC migration. These effects of PGC-1{alpha} were enhanced by a PPAR{gamma} agonist troglitazone. Collectively, our data indicated for the first time that one of the anti-migrated mechanisms of dexamethasone is due to the induction of PGC-1{alpha} expression. PGC-1{alpha} suppresses PDGF-induced VSMC migration through PPAR{gamma} coactivation and, consequently, p38 MAPK inhibition.

  20. Isobutyrylshikonin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 production in BV2 microglial cells by suppressing the PI3K/Akt-mediated nuclear transcription factor-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Jayasooriya, Rajapaksha Gedara Prasad Tharanga; Lee, Kyoung-Tae; Kang, Chang-Hee; Dilshara, Matharage Gayani; Lee, Hak-Ju; Choi, Yung Hyun; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Gi-Young

    2014-12-01

    Microglia are important macrophages to defend against pathogens in the central nervous system (CNS); however, persistent or acute inflammation of microglia lead to CNS disorders via neuronal cell death. Therefore, we theorized that a good strategy for the treatment of CNS disorders would be to target inflammatory mediators from microglia in disease. Consequently, we investigated whether isobutyrylshikonin (IBS) attenuates the production of proinflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. Treatment with IBS inhibited the secretion of NO and prostaglandin E2 (as well as the expression of their key regulatory genes), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Isobutyrylshikonin also suppressed LPS-induced DNA-binding activity of nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB), by inhibiting the nuclear translocation of p50 and p65 in addition to blocking the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. Pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a specific NF-κB inhibitor, showed the down-regulation of LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 messenger RNA by suppressing NF-κB activity. This indirectly suggests that IBS-mediated NF-κB inhibition is the main signaling pathway involved in the inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 expression. In addition, IBS attenuated LPS-induced phosphorylation of PI3K and Akt, which are upstream molecules of NF-κB, in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. The functional aspects of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway were analyzed with LY294002, which is a specific PI3K/Akt inhibitor that attenuated LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression by suppressing NF-κB activity. These data suggest that an IBS-mediated anti-inflammatory effect may be involved in suppressing the PI3K/Akt-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway.

  1. Acetylsalicylic acid regulates MMP-2 activity and inhibits colorectal invasion of murine B16F0 melanoma cells in C57BL/6J mice: effects of prostaglandin F(2)alpha.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chin-Shaw Stella; Luo, Shue-Fen; Ning, Chung-Chu; Lin, Chien-Liang; Jiang, Ming-Chung; Liao, Ching-Fong

    2009-08-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that acetylsalicylic acid may reduce the risk of mortality due to colon cancers. Metastasis is the major cause of cancer death. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play important roles in tumor invasion regulation, and prostaglandin F(2)alpha (PGF(2)alpha) is a key stimulator of MMP production. Thus, we investigated whether acetylsalicylic acid regulated MMP activity and the invasion of cancer cells and whether PGF(2)alpha attenuated acetylsalicylic acid-inhibited invasion of cancer cells. Gelatin-based zymography assays showed that acetylsalicylic acid inhibited the MMP-2 activity of B16F0 melanoma cells. Matrigel-based chemoinvasion assays showed that acetylsalicylic acid inhibited the invasion of B16F0 cells. Acetylsalicylic acid can inhibit PGF(2)alpha synthesis and PGF(2)alpha is a key stimulator of MMP-2 production. Our data showed that PGF(2)alpha treatment attenuated the acetylsalicylic acid-inhibited invasion of B16F0 cells. In animal experiments, acetylsalicylic acid reduced colorectal metastasis of B16F0 cells in C57BL/6J mice by 44%. Our results suggest that PGF(2)alpha is a therapeutic target for metastasis inhibition and acetylsalicylic acid may possess anti-metastasis ability.

  2. [Problems of assessing the biological value of prostaglandin in vitro (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tullberg, K; Jacobi, H

    1978-01-01

    Isolated rat stomach strips were used to study the antagonism between psychotropic drugs and prostaglandin. It was found that the inhibited prostaglandin effect registered under the influence of psychotropic drugs in due not so much to the inhibition of synthetase action but rather to an inhibitory action on liberated prostaglandin. An atropine-like effect of the psychotropic drugs or an inhibition in the formation of endogenic prostaglandin in the walls are ruled out as possible explanations. The following possible explanations were discussed: a) the tested psychotropic drugs block prostaglandin receptors in the stomach; b) the test substances react with prostaglandin in the nutritive solution; c) the substances stimulate metabolic processes in the stomach wall that break down prostaglandin.

  3. Effects of Common Pesticides on Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) Inhibition in SC5 Mouse Sertoli Cells, Evidence of Binding at the COX-2 Active Site, and Implications for Endocrine Disruption.

    PubMed

    Kugathas, Subramaniam; Audouze, Karine; Ermler, Sibylle; Orton, Frances; Rosivatz, Erika; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    , Scholze M, Kortenkamp A. 2016. Effects of common pesticides on prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) inhibition in SC5 mouse Sertoli cells, evidence of binding at the COX-2 active site, and implications for endocrine disruption. Environ Health Perspect 124:452-459; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409544.

  4. Effects of Common Pesticides on Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) Inhibition in SC5 Mouse Sertoli Cells, Evidence of Binding at the COX-2 Active Site, and Implications for Endocrine Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Kugathas, Subramaniam; Audouze, Karine; Ermler, Sibylle; Orton, Frances; Rosivatz, Erika; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    . Citation: Kugathas S, Audouze K, Ermler S, Orton F, Rosivatz E, Scholze M, Kortenkamp A. 2016. Effects of common pesticides on prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) inhibition in SC5 mouse Sertoli cells, evidence of binding at the COX-2 active site, and implications for endocrine disruption. Environ Health Perspect 124:452–459; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409544 PMID:26359731

  5. Nobiletin, a polymethoxy flavonoid, suppresses bone resorption by inhibiting NFκB-dependent prostaglandin E synthesis in osteoblasts and prevents bone loss due to estrogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Harada, Suguru; Tominari, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Chiho; Hirata, Michiko; Takita, Morichika; Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2011-01-01

    Nobiletin, a polymethoxy flavonoid, prevents cancer and inflammation, but the roles of nobiletin in bone are unclear. We examined the effects of nobiletin on bone resorption in vitro and on bone mass in ovariectomized (OVX) mice in vivo. In vitro, nobiletin suppressed osteoclast formation and bone resorption induced by interleukin (IL)-1. Nobiletin suppressed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, NFκB-dependent transcription, and prostaglandin E (PGE) production induced by IL-1 in osteoblasts. OVX mice showed severe bone loss in the femur by increased bone resorption due to estrogen deficiency, and nobiletin significantly restored the bone mass. Nobiletin could be beneficial to bone health in postmenopausal women.

  6. Expression of HIF-1alpha and VEGF in skeletal muscle of plateau animals in response to hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Xie, H-C; He, J-P; Zhu, J-F; Li, J-G

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) transcriptionally regulates expression of several target genes in protecting tissues against hypoxia. With hypoxic stress, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a signal protein produced by cells and further contributes to improvement of vascular functions and restoring the oxygen supply to tissues. In this current study, we first hypothesized that the protein levels of HIF-1alpha and VEGF are reduced in skeletal muscles of plateau animals [China Qinghai-Tibetan plateau pikas (ochotona curzoniae)] in response to hypoxia as compared with control animals [normal lowland Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats]. We further hypothesized that HIF-1alpha plays a role in regulating expression of VEGF in skeletal muscle. Note that HIF-1alpha and VEGF were determined by using two-site immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA) methods. Our results demonstrated that hypoxic stress induced by exposure of lower O(2) (6 h) significantly increased the levels of HIF-1alpha and VEGF in the oxidative and glycolytic muscles of SD rats and pikas (P<0.05 vs. normoxic conditions). Notably, the increases in HIF-1alpha and VEGF were significantly less in pikas (P<0.05, vs. SD controls) than in SD rats. In addition, a linear relationship was observed between amplified HIF-1alpha and VEGF in oxidative muscle (r=0.76 and P<0.01) and glycolytic muscle (r=0.72 and P<0.01) and inhibiting HIF-1alpha significantly decreased expression of VEGF induced by hypoxic stress in skeletal muscles (P<0.05). Overall, our findings suggest that (1) responsiveness of HIF-1alpha and VEGF in skeletal muscles to hypoxic stress is blunted in plateau animals, and (2) HIF-1alpha has a regulatory effect on VEGF under hypoxic environment.

  7. Manassantin B isolated from Saururus chinensis inhibits cyclooxygenase-2-dependent prostaglandin D2 generation by blocking Fyn-mediated nuclear factor-kappaB and mitogen activated protein kinase pathways in bone marrow derived-mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Hwang, Seung-Lark; Son, Jong Keun; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of manassantin B (Man B) isolated from Saururus chinensis (S. chinensis) on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-dependent prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) generation in mouse bone marrow derived-mast cells (BMMCs). Man B inhibited the generation of PGD2 dose-dependently by inhibiting COX-2 expression in immunoglobulin E (IgE)/Ag-stimulated BMMCs. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for the inhibition of COX-2 expression by Man B, the effects of Man B on the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB), a transcription factor essential and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) for COX-2 induction, were examined. Man B attenuated the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and its DNA-binding activity by inhibiting inhibitors of kappa Bα (IκBα) degradation and concomitantly suppressing IκB kinase (IKK) phosphorylation. In addition, Man B suppressed phosphorylation of MAPKs including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. It was also found that Man B suppressed Fyn kinase activation and consequent downstream signaling processes, including those involving Syk, Gab2, and Akt. Taken together, the present results suggest that Man B suppresses COX-2 dependent PGD2 generation by primarily inhibiting Fyn kinase in FcεRI-mediated mast cells.

  8. Effects of cocoa powder and dark chocolate on LDL oxidative susceptibility and prostaglandin concentrations in humans.

    PubMed

    Wan, Y; Vinson, J A; Etherton, T D; Proch, J; Lazarus, S A; Kris-Etherton, P M

    2001-11-01

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds of plant origin with antioxidant effects. Flavonoids inhibit LDL oxidation and reduce thrombotic tendency in vitro. Little is known about how cocoa powder and dark chocolate, rich sources of polyphenols, affect these cardiovascular disease risk factors. We evaluated the effects of a diet high in cocoa powder and dark chocolate (CP-DC diet) on LDL oxidative susceptibility, serum total antioxidant capacity, and urinary prostaglandin concentrations. We conducted a randomized, 2-period, crossover study in 23 healthy subjects fed 2 diets: an average American diet (AAD) controlled for fiber, caffeine, and theobromine and an AAD supplemented with 22 g cocoa powder and 16 g dark chocolate (CP-DC diet), providing approximately 466 mg procyanidins/d. LDL oxidation lag time was approximately 8% greater (P = 0.01) after the CP-DC diet than after the AAD. Serum total antioxidant capacity measured by oxygen radical absorbance capacity was approximately 4% greater (P = 0.04) after the CP-DC diet than after the AAD and was positively correlated with LDL oxidation lag time (r = 0.32, P = 0.03). HDL cholesterol was 4% greater after the CP-DC diet (P = 0.02) than after the AAD; however, LDL-HDL ratios were not significantly different. Twenty-four-hour urinary excretion of thromboxane B(2) and 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1)(alpha) and the ratio of the 2 compounds were not significantly different between the 2 diets. Cocoa powder and dark chocolate may favorably affect cardiovascular disease risk status by modestly reducing LDL oxidation susceptibility, increasing serum total antioxidant capacity and HDL-cholesterol concentrations, and not adversely affecting prostaglandins.

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha suppresses the expression of macrophage scavenger receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Shirato, Ken; Kizaki, Takako; Sakurai, Takuya; Ogasawara, Jun-Etsu; Ishibashi, Yoshinaga; Iijima, Takehiko; Okada, Chikako; Noguchi, Izumi; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Ohno, Hideki

    2009-11-01

    Macrophages are distributed in all peripheral tissues and play a critical role in the first line of the innate immune defenses against bacterial infection by phagocytosis of bacterial pathogens through the macrophage scavenger receptor 1 (MSR1). Within tissues, the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) decreases depending on the distance of cells from the closest O2-supplying blood vessel. However, it is not clear how the expression of MSR1 in macrophages is regulated by low pO2. On the other hand, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha is well known to control hypoxic responses through regulation of hypoxia-inducible genes. Therefore, we investigated the effects of hypoxia and HIF-1alpha on MSR1 expression and function in the macrophage cell line RAW264. Exposure to 1% O2 or treatment with the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride (CoCl2) significantly suppressed the expression of MSR1 mRNA, accompanied by a markedly increase in levels of nuclear HIF-1alpha protein. The overexpression of HIF-1alpha in RAW264 cells suppressed the expression of MSR1 mRNA and protein, transcriptional activity of the MSR1 gene, and phagocytic capacity against the Gram-positive bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. The suppression of MSR1 mRNA by hypoxia or CoCl2 was inhibited by YC-1, an inhibitor of HIF-1alpha, or by the depletion of HIF-1alpha expression by small interference RNA. These results indicate that hypoxia transcriptionally suppresses MSR1 expression through HIF-1alpha.

  10. [Effects of the chemokine MIP-1alpha on anemia and inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Kullich, Werner; Niksic, Franz; Burmucic, Katharina; Pöllmann, Georg; Klein, Gert

    2002-10-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) is an interesting chemokine because in addition to its variety proinflammatory activities including chemotaxis and immunomodulation, it is a potent inhibitor of hematopoetic stem cell proliferation. Inhibition of erythroid progenitor cells due to MIP-1alpha or other cytokines can play a role in the pathogenesis of anemia which is one of the most common extra-articular features of active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In 84 patients with RA, serological and immunological parameters were assessed to detect inflammatory mechanisms and anemia in relation to the serum concentrations of MIP-1alpha. All patients fulfilled the ACR criteria for the diagnosis of a definite or classic RA. We used a quantitative enzyme immuno assay for the detection of MIP-1alpha as well as for the measurement of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA), the erythropoiesis inducer erythropoietin (EPO) and the transferrin receptor (TfR). The immune activation marker neopterin was measured radioimmunologically. Half of the patients with RA were anemic with hemoglobin values below 12 g/dl. MIP-1alpha was found to be elevated significantly in serum of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis and in patients with anemia. Most of the anemic patients with markedly elevated acute phase reactions had an anemia with chronic diseases and not a functional iron deficiency alone. TfR correlated with EPO. The results show that enhanced expression of MIP-1alpha is indicative of systemic inflammation in RA. Moreover, besides the regulation of inflammatory processes, this chemokine may influence the pathogenesis of anemia in RA patients.

  11. NF-kappaB links innate immunity to the hypoxic response through transcriptional regulation of HIF-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Rius, Jordi; Guma, Monica; Schachtrup, Christian; Akassoglou, Katerina; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; Nizet, Victor; Johnson, Randall S; Haddad, Gabriel G; Karin, Michael

    2008-06-05

    The hypoxic response is an ancient stress response triggered by low ambient oxygen (O2) (ref. 1) and controlled by hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1 (HIF-1), whose alpha subunit is rapidly degraded under normoxia but stabilized when O2-dependent prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs) that target its O2-dependent degradation domain are inhibited. Thus, the amount of HIF-1alpha, which controls genes involved in energy metabolism and angiogenesis, is regulated post-translationally. Another ancient stress response is the innate immune response, regulated by several transcription factors, among which NF-kappaB plays a central role. NF-kappaB activation is controlled by IkappaB kinases (IKK), mainly IKK-beta, needed for phosphorylation-induced degradation of IkappaB inhibitors in response to infection and inflammation. IKK-beta is modestly activated in hypoxic cell cultures when PHDs that attenuate its activation are inhibited. However, defining the relationship between NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha has proven elusive. Using in vitro systems, it was reported that HIF-1alpha activates NF-kappaB, that NF-kappaB controls HIF-1alpha transcription and that HIF-1alpha activation may be concurrent with inhibition of NF-kappaB. Here we show, with the use of mice lacking IKK-beta in different cell types, that NF-kappaB is a critical transcriptional activator of HIF-1alpha and that basal NF-kappaB activity is required for HIF-1alpha protein accumulation under hypoxia in cultured cells and in the liver and brain of hypoxic animals. IKK-beta deficiency results in defective induction of HIF-1alpha target genes including vascular endothelial growth factor. IKK-beta is also essential for HIF-1alpha accumulation in macrophages experiencing a bacterial infection. Hence, IKK-beta is an important physiological contributor to the hypoxic response, linking it to innate immunity and inflammation.

  12. Antiasthmatic activity of luteolin-7-O-glucoside from Ailanthus altissima through the downregulation of T helper 2 cytokine expression and inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production in an ovalbumin-induced asthma model.

    PubMed

    Jin, Meihua; Yang, Ju Hye; Lee, Eunkyung; Lu, Yue; Kwon, Soonyoul; Son, Kun Ho; Son, Jong Keun; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2009-09-01

    Previously, we reported that an ethanol extract of Ailanthus altissima has antiinflammatory activity in an ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized murine asthmatic model. To determine the biological compounds from this plant, luteolin-7-O-glucoside (L7G) was isolated and its antiasthmatic activity was evaluated in an in vivo murine asthmatic model. L7G (10 to 100 mg/kg, per os (p.o.)) reduced the amount of eosinophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in a dose-dependent manner. In comparison, dexamethasone (5 mg/kg, p.o.), which was used as a positive control, also strongly inhibited the number of infiltrating eosinophils. L7G inhibited both the prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and serum immunoglobulin E level in BAL fluid in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, L7G inhibited the transcript profiles of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and IL-13 mRNA expression levels in the murine asthma model, as determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). These results suggest that the antiasthmatic activity of L7G in OVA-induced lung inflammation may occur in part via the downregulation of T helper 2 cytokine transcripts as well as the inhibition of PGE(2) production.

  13. Insulin-regulated hepatic gluconeogenesis through FOXO1-PGC-1alpha interaction.

    PubMed

    Puigserver, Pere; Rhee, James; Donovan, Jerry; Walkey, Christopher J; Yoon, J Cliff; Oriente, Francesco; Kitamura, Yukari; Altomonte, Jennifer; Dong, Hengjiang; Accili, Domenico; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2003-05-29

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is absolutely required for survival during prolonged fasting or starvation, but is inappropriately activated in diabetes mellitus. Glucocorticoids and glucagon have strong gluconeogenic actions on the liver. In contrast, insulin suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis. Two components known to have important physiological roles in this process are the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 (also known as FKHR) and peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-gamma co-activator 1 (PGC-1alpha; also known as PPARGC1), a transcriptional co-activator; whether and how these factors collaborate has not been clear. Using wild-type and mutant alleles of FOXO1, here we show that PGC-1alpha binds and co-activates FOXO1 in a manner inhibited by Akt-mediated phosphorylation. Furthermore, FOXO1 function is required for the robust activation of gluconeogenic gene expression in hepatic cells and in mouse liver by PGC-1alpha. Insulin suppresses gluconeogenesis stimulated by PGC-1alpha but co-expression of a mutant allele of FOXO1 insensitive to insulin completely reverses this suppression in hepatocytes or transgenic mice. We conclude that FOXO1 and PGC-1alpha interact in the execution of a programme of powerful, insulin-regulated gluconeogenesis.

  14. Extended ischemia prevents HIF1alpha degradation at reoxygenation by impairing prolyl-hydroxylation: role of Krebs cycle metabolites.

    PubMed

    Serra-Pérez, Anna; Planas, Anna M; Núñez-O'Mara, Analía; Berra, Edurne; García-Villoria, Judit; Ribes, Antònia; Santalucía, Tomàs

    2010-06-11

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a heterodimeric transcription factor that activates the cellular response to hypoxia. The HIF1alpha subunit is constantly synthesized and degraded under normoxia, but degradation is rapidly inhibited when oxygen levels drop. Oxygen-dependent hydroxylation by prolyl-4-hydroxylases (PHD) mediates HIF1alpha proteasome degradation. Brain ischemia limits the availability not only of oxygen but also of glucose. We hypothesized that this circumstance could have a modulating effect on HIF. We assessed the separate involvement of oxygen and glucose in HIF1alpha regulation in differentiated neuroblastoma cells subjected to ischemia. We report higher transcriptional activity and HIF1alpha expression under oxygen deprivation in the presence of glucose (OD), than in its absence (oxygen and glucose deprivation, OGD). Unexpectedly, HIF1alpha was not degraded at reoxygenation after an episode of OGD. This was not due to impairment of proteasome function, but was associated with lower HIF1alpha hydroxylation. Krebs cycle metabolites fumarate and succinate are known inhibitors of PHD, while alpha-ketoglutarate is a co-substrate of the reaction. Lack of HIF1alpha degradation in the presence of oxygen was accompanied by a very low alpha-ketoglutarate/fumarate ratio. Furthermore, treatment with a fumarate analogue prevented HIF1alpha degradation under normoxia. In all, our data suggest that postischemic metabolic alterations in Krebs cycle metabolites impair HIF1alpha degradation in the presence of oxygen by decreasing its hydroxylation, and highlight the involvement of metabolic pathways in HIF1alpha regulation besides the well known effects of oxygen.

  15. Regulation of prostaglandin production by nitric oxide; an in vivo analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Salvemini, D; Settle, S L; Masferrer, J L; Seibert, K; Currie, M G; Needleman, P

    1995-01-01

    1. Endotoxin E. Coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treatment in conscious, restrained rats increased plasma and urinary prostaglandin (PG) and nitric oxide (NO) production. Inducible cyclo-oxygenase (COX-2) and nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression accounted for the LPS-induced PG and NO release since the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone inhibited both effects. Thus, LPS (4 mg kg-1) increased the plasma levels of nitrite/nitrate from 14 +/- 1 to 84 +/- 7 microM within 3 h and this rise was inhibited to 35 +/- 1 microM by dexamethasone. Levels of 6-keto PGF1 alpha in the plasma were below the detection limit of the assay (< 0.2 ng ml-1). However, 3 h after the injection of LPS these levels rose to 2.6 +/- 0.2 ng ml-1 and to 0.7 +/- 0.01 ng ml-1 after LPS in rats that received dexamethasone. 2. The induced enzymes were inhibited in vivo with selective COX and NOS inhibitors. Furthermore, NOS inhibitors, that did not affect COX activity in vitro markedly suppressed PG production in the LPS-treated animals. For instance, the LPS-induced increased in plasma nitrite/nitrate and 6-keto PGF1 alpha at 3 h was decreased to 18 +/- 2 microM and 0.5 +/- 0.02 ng ml-1, 23 +/- 1 microM and 0.7 +/- 0.01 ng ml-1, 29 +/- 2 microM and 1 +/- 0.01 ng ml-1 in rats treated with LPS in the presence of the NOS inhibitors NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, NG-nitro arginine methyl ester and aminoguanidine, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7542531

  16. Modulation of macrophage activation by prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Carnuccio, R.; D'Acquisto, F.; Rosa, M. Di

    1996-01-01

    The effect of prostaglandtn E2, iloprost and cAMP on both nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-α release in J774 macrophages has been studied. Both prostaglandin E2 and iloprost inhibited, in a concentration-dependent fashion, the lipopolysaccharide-induced generation of nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-α. The inhibitory effect of these prostanoids seems to be mediated by an increase of the second messenger cAMP since it was mimicked by dibutyryl cAMP and potentiated by the selective type IV phosphodiesterase inhibitor RO-20-1724. Our results suggest that the inhibition of nitric oxide release by prostaglandin E2 and iloprost in lipopolysaccharide-activated J774 macrophages may be secondary to the inhibition of tumour necrosis factor-α generation, which in turn is likely to be mediated by cAMP. PMID:18475691

  17. The cellular and behavioral consequences of interleukin-1 alpha penetration through the blood-brain barrier of neonatal rats: a critical period for efficacy.

    PubMed

    Tohmi, M; Tsuda, N; Zheng, Y; Mizuno, M; Sotoyama, H; Shibuya, M; Kawamura, M; Kakita, A; Takahashi, H; Nawa, H

    2007-11-30

    Proinflammatory cytokines circulating in the periphery of early postnatal animals exert marked influences on their subsequent cognitive and behavioral traits and are therefore implicated in developmental psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia. Here we examined the relationship between the permeability of the blood-brain barrier to interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) in neonatal and juvenile rats and their later behavioral performance. Following s.c. injection of IL-1 alpha into rat neonates, IL-1 alpha immunoreactivity was first detected in the choroid plexus, brain microvessels, and olfactory cortex, and later diffused to many brain regions such as neocortex and hippocampus. In agreement, IL-1 alpha administration to the periphery resulted in a marked increase in brain IL-1 alpha content of neonates. Repeatedly injecting IL-1 alpha to neonates triggered astrocyte proliferation and microglial activation, followed by behavioral abnormalities in startle response and putative prepulse inhibition at the adult stage. Analysis of covariance with a covariate of startle amplitude suggested that IL-1 alpha administration may influence prepulse inhibition. However, adult rats treated with IL-1 alpha as neonates exhibited normal learning ability as measured by contextual fear conditioning, two-way passive shock avoidance, and a radial maze task and had no apparent sign of structural abnormality in the brain. In comparison, when IL-1 alpha was administered to juveniles, the blood-brain barrier permeation was limited. The increases in brain IL-1 alpha content and immunoreactivity were less pronounced following IL-1 alpha administration and behavioral abnormalities were not manifested at the adult stage. During early development, therefore, circulating IL-1 alpha efficiently crosses the blood-brain barrier to induce inflammatory reactions in the brain and influences later behavioral traits.

  18. In cultured astrocytes, p53 and MDM2 do not alter hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha function regardless of the presence of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Rempe, David A; Lelli, Katherine M; Vangeison, Grace; Johnson, Randall S; Federoff, Howard J

    2007-06-01

    A principal molecular mechanism by which cells respond to hypoxia is by activation of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha). Several studies describe a binding of p53 to HIF-1alpha in a protein complex, leading to attenuated function, half-life, and abundance of HIF-1alpha. However, these reports almost exclusively utilized transformed cell lines, and many employed transfection of p53 or HIF-1alpha plasmid constructs and/or p53 and HIF-1alpha reporter constructs as surrogates for endogenous protein activity and target expression, respectively. Thus, it remains an open and important question as to whether p53 inhibits HIF-1alpha-mediated transactivation of endogenous HIF-1alpha targets in nontransformed cells. After determining in primary astrocyte cultures the HIF-1alpha targets that were most dependent on HIF-1alpha function, we examined the effect of the loss of p53 function either alone or in combination with MDM2 on expression of these targets. Although p53 null astrocyte cultures resulted in markedly increased HIF-1alpha-dependent target expression compared with controls, this altered expression was determined to be the result of increased cell density of p53 null cultures and the accompanying acidosis, not loss of p53 protein. Although activation of p53 by DNA damage induced p53 target expression in astrocytes, it did not alter hypoxia-induced HIF-1alpha target expression. Finally, a combined loss of MDM2 and p53 did not alter HIF-1alpha target expression compared with loss of p53 alone. These data strongly suggest that p53 and MDM2 do not influence the hypoxia-induced transactivation of HIF-1alpha targets, regardless of p53 activation, in primary astrocytes.

  19. HNF-1alpha participates in glucose regulation of sucrase-isomaltase gene expression in epithelial intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ning; Adachi, Tetsuya; Matsunaga, Tetsuro; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Ishihara, Akihiko; Yasuda, Koichiro; Tsuda, Kinsuke

    2007-02-16

    Sucrase-isomaltase (SI) gene expression is negatively regulated by glucose, but its molecular mechanism is not completely clear. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether HNF-1alpha and HNF-1beta contribute to glucose regulation of SI gene expression. To explore this question, we examined the association of gene expressions between SI and HNF-1alpha and HNF-1beta in Caco-2 cells cultured in medium containing 2.0 and 16.7 mM glucose. We found that gene expression of HNF-1alpha but not HNF-1beta exhibits a positive correlation with that of SI regulated by glucose. Moreover, to elucidate whether glucose regulation of SI gene expression is changed when HNF-1alpha and HNF-1beta are inhibited, we produced three stable cell lines, in which dominant-negative mutant HNF-1alphaT539fsdelC, mutant HNF-1betaR177X, and empty vector (as a control), respectively, were stably expressed. We found that the glucose regulation of SI gene expression was significantly attenuated in HNF-1alphaT539fsdelC cells, but it was well maintained in empty vector and HNF-1betaR177X cells. These results suggest that HNF-1alpha participates in glucose regulation of SI gene expression.

  20. Human eosinophils can express the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, J J; Matossian, K; Resnick, M B; Beil, W J; Wong, D T; Gordon, J R; Dvorak, A M; Weller, P F; Galli, S J

    1993-01-01

    By in situ hybridization, 44-100% of the blood eosinophils from five patients with hypereosinophilia and four normal subjects exhibited intense hybridization signals for TNF-alpha mRNA. TNF-alpha protein was detectable by immunohistochemistry in blood eosinophils of hypereosinophilic subjects, and purified blood eosinophils from three atopic donors exhibited cycloheximide-inhibitable spontaneous release of TNF-alpha in vitro. Many blood eosinophils (39-91%) from hypereosinophilic donors exhibited intense labeling for macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) mRNA, whereas eosinophils of normal donors demonstrated only weak or undetectable hybridization signals for MIP-1 alpha mRNA. Most tissue eosinophils infiltrating nasal polyps were strongly positive for both TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha mRNA. By Northern blot analysis, highly enriched blood eosinophils from a patient with the idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome exhibited differential expression of TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha mRNA. These findings indicate that human eosinophils represent a potential source of TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha, that levels of expression of mRNA for both cytokines are high in the blood eosinophils of hypereosinophilic donors and in eosinophils infiltrating nasal polyps, that the eosinophils of normal subjects express higher levels of TNF-alpha than MIP-1 alpha mRNA, and that eosinophils purified from the blood of atopic donors can release TNF-alpha in vitro. Images PMID:8514874

  1. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1{alpha} induction in acetaminophen toxicity in mice occurs without hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S.; Hennings, Leah; Letzig, Lynda; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hinson, Jack A.; James, Laura P.

    2011-05-01

    HIF-1{alpha} is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1{alpha}. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2 h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48 h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the sites of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10 mg/kg) reduced HIF-1{alpha} induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4 h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1{alpha} induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism.

  2. Role of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in prostaglandin E(1)- and E(2)-induced inhibition of the adrenergic response in human vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Medina, Pascual; Segarra, Gloria; Mauricio, María Dolores; Vila, José M; Chuan, Pascual; Lluch, Salvador

    2011-07-01

    We studied the role of K(+) channels and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in the presynaptic inhibitory effects of prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1)) and PGE(2) on the adrenergic responses of human vas deferens. Furthermore, we determined the effects of increasing extracellular K(+) concentrations ([K(+)](o)) and inhibition of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase on neurogenic and norepinephrine-induced contractile responses. Ring segments of the epididymal part of the vas deferens were taken from 45 elective vasectomies and mounted in organ baths for isometric recording of tension. The neuromodulatory effects of PGEs were tested in the presence of K(+) channel blockers. PGE(1) and PGE(2) (10(-8) to 10(-6)M) induced inhibition of adrenergic contractions. The presence of tetraethylammonium (10(-3)M), charybdotoxin (10(-7)M), or iberiotoxin (10(-7)M), prevented the inhibitory effects of PGE(1) and PGE(2) on the adrenergic contraction. Both glibenclamide (10(-5)M) and apamin (10(-6)M) failed to antagonize PGE(1) and PGE(2) effects. Raising the [K(+)](o) from 15.8mM to 25.8mM caused inhibition of the neurogenic contractions. Ouabain at a concentration insufficient to alter the resting tension (10(-6)M) increased contractions induced by electrical stimulation but did not alter the contractions to norepinephrine. The inhibition of neurogenic responses induced PGE(1), PGE(2) and increased extracellular concentration of K(+) was almost completely prevented by ouabain (10(-6)M). The results demonstrate that PGE(1) and PGE(2) inhibit adrenergic responses by a prejunctional mechanism that involves the activation of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase.

  3. Effects of medicinal cake-separated moxibustion on plasma 6-keto-PGF1alpha and TXB2 contents in the rabbit of hyperlipemia.

    PubMed

    Xiaorong, Chang; Jie, Yan; Zenghui, Yue; Jing, Shen; Yaping, Lin; Shouxiang, Yi; Xiangping, Cao

    2005-06-01

    Hyperlipemia rabbit models established with high cholesterol and fat diet were treated with direct moxibustion and medicinal cake-separated moxibustion. The post-treatment plasma 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha (6-keto-PGF1alpha) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) contents were determined by radioimmunoassay. Results indicated that the plasma 6-keto-PGF1alpha content significantly increased, the TXB2 level decreased (P < 0.05) and the TXB2 /6-keto-PGF1alpha ratio also decreased (P < 0.01) in the medicinal cake-separated moxibustion group as compared with those in the model group respectively, but there was no significant difference between the medicinal cake-separated moxibustion group and the direct moxibustion group (P > 0.05), suggesting that both the medicinal cake-separated moxibustion and direct moxibustion can regulate the plasma 6-keto-PGF1alpha and TXB2 contents, and the TXB2/6-keto-PGF1alpha ratio with similar actions, and have a certain protective action on endothelial cells of the aorta in the rabbit of hyperlipemia.

  4. Prostaglandin A1 inhibits avian influenza virus replication at a postentry level: Effect on virus protein synthesis and NF-κB activity.

    PubMed

    Carta, Stefania; La Frazia, Simone; Donatelli, Isabella; Puzelli, Simona; Rossi, Antonio; Santoro, M Gabriella

    2014-12-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) have the potential to cause devastating pandemics. In recent years, the emergence of new avian strains able to infect humans represents a serious threat to global human health. The increase in drug-resistant IAV strains underscores the need for novel approaches to anti-influenza chemotherapy. Herein we show that prostaglandin-A1 (PGA1) possesses antiviral activity against avian IAV, including H5N9, H7N1 and H1N1 strains, acting at a level different from the currently available anti-influenza drugs. PGA1 acts at postentry level, causing dysregulation of viral protein synthesis and preventing virus-induced disassembly of host microtubular network and activation of pro-inflammatory factor NF-κB. The antiviral activity is dependent on the presence of a cyclopentenone ring structure and is associated with activation of a cytoprotective heat shock response in infected cells. The results suggest that cyclopentenone prostanoids or prostanoids-derived molecules may represent a new tool to combat avian influenza virus infection.

  5. Inhibition of thalidomide teratogenicity by acetylsalicylic acid: evidence for prostaglandin H synthase-catalyzed bioactivation of thalidomide to a teratogenic reactive intermediate.

    PubMed

    Arlen, R R; Wells, P G

    1996-06-01

    Thalidomide is a teratogenic sedative-hypnotic drug that is structurally similar to phenytoin, which is thought to be bioactivated by prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) and other peroxidases to a teratogenic reactive intermediate. The relevance of this mechanism to thalidomide teratogenicity was evaluated in pregnant New Zealand White rabbits treated with thalidomide at 11:00 A.M. on gestational days 8 to 11, with day 0 indicating the time when sperm were observed in the vaginal fluid. Thalidomide (7.5 mg/kg i.v.) produced mainly fetal limb anomalies analogous to those observed in humans. Thalidomide (25-200 mg/kg i.p.), produced a dose-related increase in a spectrum of fetal anomalies, and in postpartum lethality, but did not produce a reliable incidence of limb anomalies. In subsequent studies, pregnant does received the irreversible PHS inhibitor acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 75 mg/kg i.p., or its vehicle, followed 2 hr later by thalidomide, 7.5 mg/kg i.v., or its vehicle. ASA pretreatment was remarkably embryoprotective, resulting in respective 61.2 and 61.4% decreases in thalidomide-initiated fetal limb anomalies (P = .002) and postpartum fetal lethality (P < .02), and a small but significant reduction in thalidomide-initiated fetal weight loss. ASA alone did not produce significant embryopathy. These results show that ASA can protect the embryo from thalidomide teratogenicity, suggesting that thalidomide may be bioactivated by PHS to a teratogenic reactive intermediate.

  6. Menopause-induced uterine epithelium atrophy results from arachidonic acid/prostaglandin E2 axis inhibition-mediated autophagic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shengtao; Zhao, Linjie; Yi, Tao; Wei, Yuquan; Zhao, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Women experience menopause later in life. Menopause is characterized by dramatically decreased circulating estrogen level secondary to loss of ovarian function and atrophic state of genital organs. However, the molecular mechanisms for this process are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential molecular mechanisms that underlie menopause-induced uterine endometrial atrophy. Our data showed that autophagy was activated in the uterine epithelial cells of both ovariectomized rats and peri-menopausal females. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress occurred even prior to autophagy induction. Integrated bioinformatics analysis revealed that ER stress induced downstream decreased release of arachidonic acid (AA) and downregulation of AA/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) axis, which led to Akt/mTOR signaling pathway inactivation. Consequently, autophagosomes were recruited and LC3-dependent autophagy was induced in uterine epithelial cells. Treatment with exogenous E2, PGE2, salubrinal or RNAi-mediated silencing of key autophagy genes could effectively counteract estrogen depletion-induced autophagy. Collectively, autophagy is a critical regulator of the uterine epithelium that accounts for endometrial atrophy after menopause. PMID:27506466

  7. Structure and expression of elongation factor 1 alpha in tomato.

    PubMed Central

    Pokalsky, A R; Hiatt, W R; Ridge, N; Rasmussen, R; Houck, C M; Shewmaker, C K

    1989-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone, LeEF-1, has been isolated from tomato for the alpha subunit of elongation factor 1 (EF-1 alpha), a polypeptide which plays a central role in protein synthesis. The 448 amino acid protein encoded by this cDNA appears highly homologous to other EF-1 alpha s having a high degree of similarity (75-78%) to EF1 alpha previously described from both lower eukaryotes and animals. Southern analysis indicated that EF-1 alpha belongs to a small multigene family of 4-8 members in tomato. The pattern of expression of EF-1 alpha mRNA in various tomato tissues was analyzed by Northern analysis, in vitro translation and in situ hybridization. EF-1 alpha mRNA is an abundant species and higher levels of mRNA were found in developing tissues such as young leaves and green fruit compared to the mRNA levels observed in older tissues. The increased levels of EF-1 alpha mRNA therefore appear to correlate with higher levels of protein synthesis in developing tissues. Images PMID:2748335

  8. Decreased production of interleukin-6 and prostaglandin E2 associated with inhibition of delta-5 desaturation of omega6 fatty acids in mice fed safflower oil diets supplemented with sesamol.

    PubMed

    Chavali, S R; Forse, R A

    1999-12-01

    The differences in the immune responses in mice fed sesame oil diets and those fed sesamin may be attributed to the presence of other lignans in the non-fat portion of the oil. The fatty acid composition (mean +/- SD mol. %) of liver membrane phospholipids and the levels of endotoxin-induced prostaglandin (PG) E2, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were determined in mice fed diets supplemented with 5% safflower oil (SO) in the absence or presence of 1% sesamol. The levels of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (20:3omega6) were markedly higher (P<0.025) in the livers from mice fed sesamol supplemented SO diets (1.6 +/- 0.1) compared to the controls (1.4 +/- 0.1). These data suggest that sesamol or its metabolite could inhibit the in vivo delta-5 desaturation of omega6 fatty acids. Further, in animals fed sesamol supplemented SO diets, the levels of PGE2 (228 +/- 41 pg/ml) were markedly lower (P<0.01) compared to those fed SO diet alone (1355 +/- 188 pg/ml). Concomitantly, the concentrations of IL-6 were also lower (P<0.01) in mice fed sesamol diet (63 +/- 11 ng/ml) compared to the controls (143 +/- 22 ng/ml). A marked reduction in the levels of PGE2 in animals fed sesamol diets suggests that sesamol or its metabolite could inhibit the activity of cyclooxygenase enzyme.

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma-independent inhibition of macrophage activation by the non-thiazolidinedione agonist L-796,449. Comparison with the effects of 15-deoxy-delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2).

    PubMed

    Castrillo, A; Mojena, M; Hortelano, S; Boscá, L

    2001-09-07

    The effects of L-796,449 (3-chloro-4-(3-(3-phenyl-7-propylbenzofuran-6-yloxy)propylthio)phenylacetic acid; referred to henceforth as compound G), a thiazolidinedione-unrelated peroxisome proliferator activated-receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) agonist, on early signaling in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages were analyzed and compared with those elicited by 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) and the thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone. Compound G inhibited the activation of nuclear factor kappa B through the impairment of the targeting and degradation of I kappa B proteins and promoted a redistribution of I kappa B alpha and I kappa B beta in the nucleus of activated cells. Compound G inhibited I kappa B kinase (IKK) activity both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting a direct mechanism of interaction between this molecule and the IKK complex. The effect of compound G on IKK activity was independent of PPAR-gamma engagement because RAW 264.7 cells expressed negligible levels of this nuclear receptor, and rosiglitazone failed to mimic these actions. Moreover, treatment of activated macrophages with compound G enhanced the synthesis of superoxide anion, which, in combination with the NO produced under activation conditions, triggered apoptosis through the intracellular synthesis of peroxynitrite. These results suggest that compound G might contribute to the resolution of inflammation by favoring the induction of apoptosis through mechanisms independent of PPAR-gamma engagement.

  10. The Connectivity Map links Iron Response Protein-1 (IRP1)-mediated inhibition of HIF2a translation to the anti-inflammatory 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-Prostaglandin J2

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Michael; Lamb, Justin; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Lynch, Mary; Neil, Christopher; Schmidt, Emmett; Golub, Todd R.; Iliopoulos, Othon

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia Inducible Factors 1 and 2 (HIF1 and HIF2) are heterodimeric transcription factors consisting of alpha regulatory subunits and a constitutively expressed beta subunit. The expression of alpha regulatory subunits is promoted by hypoxia, cancer-associated mutations and inflammatory cytokines. Thus, HIF1 and HIF2 provide a molecular link between cancer and inflammation. We have recently identified novel small molecules that selectively inhibit translation of the HIF2a message and thereby powerfully inhibit the expression of HIF2a target genes. We report here that Connectivity Map analysis links three of these compounds to the anti-inflammatory cytokine 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-Prostaglandin J2 (PGJ2). As with our identified compounds, PGJ2 inhibits translation of the HIF2a message in an mTOR independent manner by promoting the binding of Iron Regulatory Protein-1 (IRP1) to a non-canonical Iron Responsive Element (IRE) embedded within the 5′-UTR of the HIF2a message. The IRE is necessary and sufficient for mediating the effect. Mutation of the IRE sequence, or down regulation of IRP1 expression, blocks the effect of PGJ2 on HIF2a translation. This is the first report of an endogenous natural molecule regulating HIF2a translation and it suggests that part of the anti-inflammatory and putative anti-neoplastic effects of PGJ2 may be mediated through inhibition of HIF2a within tumor epithelial cells themselves and/or mesenchymal cells of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:20354189

  11. Involvement of multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 in efflux transport of prostaglandin E(2) across mouse blood-brain barrier and its inhibition by intravenous administration of cephalosporins.

    PubMed

    Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Hosoya, Ken-ichi; Ito, Shingo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2010-06-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) acts as a modulator of synaptic signaling and excitability in the brain. Because PGE(2) is barely inactivated enzymatically in adult brain, its brain level is considered to be controlled by efflux transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The purpose of the present study was to clarify the efflux transport of PGE(2) at the BBB and the interaction of various drugs with this process. [(3)H]PGE(2) was eliminated from brain across the BBB with a half-life of 16.3 min, and the elimination was inhibited by 3 mM unlabeled PGE(2). Multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4) was reported to be localized at the luminal membrane of the BBB. MRP4-expressing membrane vesicles showed significant uptake of [(3)H]PGE(2) and the uptake was inhibited by cefmetazole with an IC(50) value of 10.2 microM. At the concentration of 20 microM, several drugs, including cefazolin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and ketoprofen, significantly inhibited [(3)H]PGE(2) uptake into MRP4-expressing membrane vesicles. Using the brain efflux index method, preadministration of cefmetazole, cefazolin, ceftriaxone, and cefotaxime was found to inhibit [(3)H]PGE(2) efflux from brain across the BBB. Furthermore, intravenous administration of the cefmetazole dose dependently reduced [(3)H]PGE(2) elimination across the BBB (ID(50) = 120 mg/kg). These results indicate that PGE(2) is eliminated from the brain by MRP4-mediated efflux transport at the BBB, and peripheral administration of cefmetazole decreases the efflux transport of PGE(2) at the BBB; this interaction may influence brain function.

  12. The connectivity map links iron regulatory protein-1-mediated inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-2a translation to the anti-inflammatory 15-deoxy-delta12,14-prostaglandin J2.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Michael; Lamb, Justin; Ebert, Benjamin L; Lynch, Mary; Neil, Christopher; Schmidt, Emmett; Golub, Todd R; Iliopoulos, Othon

    2010-04-15

    Hypoxia-inducible factors 1 and 2 (HIF1 and HIF2) are heterodimeric transcription factors consisting of alpha regulatory subunits and a constitutively expressed beta subunit. The expression of alpha regulatory subunits is promoted by hypoxia, cancer-associated mutations, and inflammatory cytokines. Thus, HIF1 and HIF2 provide a molecular link between cancer and inflammation. We have recently identified novel small molecules that selectively inhibit translation of the HIF2a message and thereby powerfully inhibit the expression of HIF2a target genes. We report here that Connectivity Map analysis links three of these compounds to the anti-inflammatory cytokine 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (PGJ(2)). As with our identified compounds, PGJ(2) inhibits translation of the HIF2a message in a mammalian target of rapamycin-independent manner by promoting the binding of iron regulatory protein-1 (IRP1) to a noncanonical iron responsive element (IRE) embedded within the 5'-untranslated region of the HIF2a message. The IRE is necessary and sufficient for mediating the effect. Mutation of the IRE sequence, or downregulation of IRP1 expression, blocks the effect of PGJ(2) on HIF2a translation. This is the first report of an endogenous natural molecule regulating HIF2a translation, and it suggests that part of the anti-inflammatory and putative antineoplastic effects of PGJ(2) may be mediated through inhibition of HIF2a within tumor epithelial cells themselves and/or mesenchymal cells of the tumor microenvironment.

  13. Synapse loss regulated by matrix metalloproteinases in traumatic brain injury is associated with hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha expression.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jamie Y; Kreipke, Christian W; Schafer, Patrick; Schafer, Steven; Speirs, Susan L; Rafols, José A

    2009-05-01

    The present study assessed the role of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 in synapse loss after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the role of hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), a transcription factor up-regulated during hypoxia, in the regulation of MMP-2 and -9 expression post-TBI. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=6 per group, 400 g-425 g) were injured using Marmarou's closed-head acceleration impact model and allowed to survive for 1, 4, 24 and 48 h. In another set of experiments, 30 min after TBI, animals were treated with Minocycline (inhibitor of MMPs), or 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2, inhibitor of HIF-1alpha) and sacrificed at 4 h after injury. Relative amounts of synaptophysin, a presynaptic vesicular protein, HIF-1alpha, as well as MMP-2 and -9 were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Activity levels of MMP-2 and -9 were determined by zymography. Synaptophysin expression was significantly (p<0.05) decreased at 1 h through 48 h after TBI. A significant increase in gene and protein expressions of HIF-1alpha, MMP-2 and -9, as well as enzyme activity of MMP-2 and -9 at the same time points was also detected. Inhibition of either MMPs or HIF-1alpha significantly reversed the TBI-induced decrease in synaptophysin. Inhibition of HIF-1alpha reduced expression of MMP-2 and -9. This study showed an early detection of a correlation between synaptic loss and MMP expression after TBI. The data also supports a role for HIF-1alpha in the MMP regulatory cascade in synapse loss after TBI, suggesting potential targets for reducing loss of synaptic terminals.

  14. Comparison of blocking effects of monoclonal antibodies anti-MO1-alpha and anti-LFA1-alpha on human neutrophil functions.

    PubMed Central

    Pham Huu, T; Chollet-Martin, S; Perianin, A; Marquetty, C; Sourbier, P; Babin-Chevaye, C; Olive, D; Gougerot-Pocidalo, M A; Debre, P; Hakim, J

    1987-01-01

    In order to analyse the role of LFA1 and MO1 on neutrophil functions, the blocking effects of two monoclonal antibodies (MAb), one (anti-MO1) recognizing an epitope of the MO1-alpha chain and the other (25.31) an epitope of the LFA1-alpha chain, were measured. Adherence of 51Cr-labelled control neutrophils was 66 + 8% (mean +/- 1 SD) on plastic nuclon plates; this figure decreased to 33 +/- 5% and 23 +/- 6% of control adherence when the neutrophils had been pretreated with anti-LFA1-alpha (anti-alpha L) and anti-MO1-alpha (anti-alpha M), respectively. On another support (plastic culture chambers), 84 +/- 6% of control neutrophils adhered and the adherence of neutrophils pretreated with anti-alpha L or anti-alpha M was 10% and 43% of the control figure, respectively. These results show that adherence of neutrophils is dependent upon the plastic used. Moreover, inhibition of adhesion by the two MAbs was also dependent upon the support used for the assay, suggesting that MO1 and LFA1 may be surface proteins with different specificities. Both antigens capped upon adhesion, while they were randomly distributed in resting neutrophils. Anti-alpha L inhibited (congruent to 50%) locomotion more than did anti-alpha M (congruent to 25%), without altering chemoattractant-induced shape changes. These results suggest that the two MAbs inhibit chemokinesis but not chemotaxis. Many other adherence-associated functions, such as ingestion of opsonized Klebsiella pneumoniae, and cytotoxicity towards K/562 cells were decreased more by anti-alpha L than by anti-alpha M. In contrast, chemiluminescence and iodination induced by opsonized zymosan were inhibited more by anti-alpha M than by anti-alpha L. Degranulation induced by zymosan or opsonized zymosan was altered by anti-alpha M only, and this alteration involved azurophilic and not specific granules. Chemiluminescence induced by phorbol myristate acetate was inhibited to a greater extent by anti-alpha M than by anti-alpha L, while

  15. Intrafollicular treatment with prostaglandins PGE2 and PGF2α inhibits the formation of luteinised unruptured follicles and restores normal ovulation in mares treated with flunixin-meglumine.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Boví, R; Cuervo-Arango, J

    2016-03-01

    Haemorrhagic anovulatory follicle is the most common pathological anovulatory condition in the mare, but its cause remains unknown. An experimental model to induce luteinised unruptured follicles (LUF) with flunixin-meglumine (FM) has been developed. Luteinised unruptured follicles share similar morphological and hormonal characteristics with haemorrhagic anovulatory follicles. To test the effect of intrafollicular administration of prostaglandins PGE2 and PGF2α during the periovulatory period on ovulation and pregnancy in FM-treated mares. In vivo experiment in a crossover design. Five mares were followed during 2 oestrous cycles each. All mares were given FM at 1.7 mg/kg bwt i.v. every 12 h from Hour 0 (Hour 0 = human chorionic gonadotrophin treatment) to Hour 36. In treatment cycles (n = 5), at Hour 32 the preovulatory follicle was punctured and 0.5 ml of a solution containing 500 μg of PGE2 and 125 μg of PGF2α was deposited within the follicle. In control cycles, water for injection was administered into the follicle at the same time. In 3 control and 3 treatment cycles, mares were also inseminated at Hour 24. Diagnosis of ovulation/LUF formation and pregnancy was performed by ultrasound examination between Hours 36 and 72 and 14 days after ovulation/LUF formation, respectively. During the treatment cycles, all mares ovulated normally (100% ovulation rate) 36-48 h after human chorionic gonadotrophin, while in 4 of 5 control cycles the mares developed an LUF (80%, P<0.05). All 3 inseminated mares became pregnant in the treatment cycles, but not in the control cycles. Intrafollicular treatment with PGE2 and PGF2α overcame the anovulatory effect of FM. This sheds new insights into the knowledge on the possible therapeutic options for ovulatory failure in the mare. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  16. Histamine stimulation of prostaglandin and HETE synthesis in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Revtyak, G.E.; Hughes, M.J.; Johnson, A.R.; Campbell, W.B.

    1988-08-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) cultured from human umbilical artery (UA) and vein (UV) metabolized (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid to prostaglandins (PGs), monohydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Major radioactive products were identified as 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGE2, PGF2 alpha, 12-hydroxy heptadecatrienoic acid, 15-HETE, and 11-HETE. In addition, extracts from UV ECs contained 12-HETE, 5-HETE, 14,15-EET, and 5,6-EET as minor products, whereas extracts from UA ECs contained only 12-HETE as a minor product. UA ECs also produced metabolites comigrating with 14,15-EET, 11,12-EET, 8,9-EET, and 5,6-EET. Histamine increased the release of (/sup 14/C)PGs and (/sup 14/C)HETEs from (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid-labeled ECs. Indomethacin, aspirin, and nordihydroguauretic acid completely inhibited synthesis of both (/sup 14/C)PGs and (/sup 14/C)HETEs from exogenous (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid in these cells. Microsomes metabolized (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid to the same (/sup 14/C)PGs and (/sup 14/C)HETEs as intact cells. Pretreatment of microsomes with indomethacin completely inhibited formation of these products. These data indicate that UA ECs and UV ECs metabolize endogenous and exogenous arachidonic acid to both PGs and HETEs. Also 15-HETE and 11-HETE appear to be synthesized by a microsomal enzyme with the properties of cyclooxygenase.

  17. Lithium increases PGC-1alpha expression and mitochondrial biogenesis in primary bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Struewing, Ian T; Barnett, Corey D; Tang, Tao; Mao, Catherine D

    2007-06-01

    Lithium is a therapeutic agent commonly used to treat bipolar disorder and its beneficial effects are thought to be due to a combination of activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway via inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and depletion of the inositol pool via inhibition of the inositol monophosphatase-1. We demonstrated that lithium in primary endothelial cells induced an increase in mitochondrial mass leading to an increase in ATP production without any significant change in mitochondrial efficiency. This increase in mitochondrial mass was associated with an increase in the mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis transcription factors: nuclear respiratory factor-1 and -2beta, as well as mitochondrial transcription factors A and B2, which lead to the coordinated upregulation of oxidative phosphorylation components encoded by either the nuclear or mitochondrial genome. These effects of lithium on mitochondrial biogenesis were independent of the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and independent of inositol depletion. Also, expression of the coactivator PGC-1alpha was increased, whereas expression of the coactivator PRC was not affected. Lithium treatment rapidly induced a decrease in activating Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation and inhibitory Forkhead box class O (FOXO1)-Thr24 phosphorylation, as well as an increase in activating c-AMP responsive element binding (CREB)-Ser133 phosphorylation, two mechanisms known to control PGC-1alpha expression. Together, our results show that lithium induces mitochondrial biogenesis via CREB/PGC-1alpha and FOXO1/PGC-1alpha cascades, which highlight the pleiotropic effects of lithium and reveal also novel beneficial effects via preservation of mitochondrial functions.

  18. The anti-asthma herbal medicine ASHMI acutely inhibits airway smooth muscle contraction via prostaglandin E2 activation of EP2/EP4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Kamal; Sampson, Hugh A; Emala, Charles W; Li, Xiu-Min

    2013-12-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the anti-asthma traditional Chinese medicine herbal formula ASHMI (anti-asthma simplified herbal medicine intervention) inhibits acetylcholine-induced contractions of tracheal rings from ovalbumin-sensitized and naive mice in a β-adrenoceptor-independent manner. We sought to determine whether acute in vivo ASHMI administration inhibits airway hyperreactivity (AHR) in a murine model of allergic asthma and acetylcholine-induced tracheal ring constriction ex vivo and to elucidate the cellular mechanisms underlying these effects. Ovalbumin-sensitized mice received a single oral ASHMI dose 2 h before intravenous acetylcholine challenge. AHR was determined by invasive airway measurements. Myography was used to determine the effects of ASHMI on acetylcholine-induced constriction of tracheal rings from asthmatic mice with or without epithelial denudation. The effect of cyclooxygenase inhibition and EP2/EP4 receptor blockade on ASHMI attenuation of acetylcholine contractions was evaluated. Tracheal cAMP and PGE2 levels were measured by ELISA. A single acute oral dose of ASHMI dramatically reduced AHR in response to acetylcholine provocation in ovalbumin-sensitized mice (P < 0.001). In ex vivo experiments, ASHMI significantly and dose-dependently reduced tracheal ring constriction to acetylcholine (P < 0.05-0.001), which was epithelium independent and associated with elevated cAMP levels. This effect was abrogated by cyclooxygenase inhibition or EP2/EP4 receptor blockade. ASHMI also inhibited contraction to high K(+) (P < 0.001). ASHMI increased tracheal ring PGE2 release in response to acetylcholine or high K(+) (P < 0.05 for both). ASHMI produced direct and acute inhibition of AHR in vivo and blocked acetylcholine-induced tracheal ring constriction via the EP2/EP4 receptor pathway, identifying the mechanism by which ASHMI is an orally active bronchoprotective agent.

  19. Prostaglandin E1 inhibits N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-mediated depolarization responses by decreasing the proportion of responsive cells without affecting chemotaxin-induced forward light scatter changes.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, M P

    1987-12-15

    Hypaque-Ficoll-purified human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) equilibrated with the membrane potential-sensitive probe 3,3'dipentyloxacarbocyanine [di-O-C(5)(3)] were incubated with buffer or cytochalasin B (cyto B) followed by incubation with prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) (0 to 10(-5) M) for 5 min at 37 degrees C. The cells were then stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) (0 to 10(-5) M). Changes in forward light scatter (FWD-SC), 90 degrees scatter (90 degrees -SC), and fluorescence intensity were measured by flow cytometry to determine the effects of PGE1 on FMLP-induced shape change, secretion, and membrane potential responses, respectively. In other experiments, the effects of PGE1 preincubation on FMLP +/- cyto B and phorbol myristate acetate-induced (O2) production were measured by superoxide dismutase-inhibitable cyto c reduction. PGE1 had no direct effects on the FWD-SC, 90 degrees-SC, or resting potential fluorescence of unstimulated or cyto B-pretreated PMN. PGE1 produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the proportion of depolarizing PMN in response to FMLP, which was maximal at 10(-6) M (42.1 +/- 6.9% inhibition, p less than 0.005), but was apparent at 10(-8) M. The PGE1-induced inhibition was maximal after 30 sec of incubation at 37 degrees C and was caused by a decrease in the maximal percentage of depolarizing PMN without a significant change in the FMLP dose-response curve (Km = 2.43 vs 3.62 X 10(-8) M, control vs PGE1-treated) or an inhibition in the degree of depolarization by the responding subpopulation. PGE1 also inhibited the loss of 90 degrees-SC induced by FMLP in cyto B-pretreated cells (secretion response) (46.2 +/- 16.5% inhibition of the maximal 90 degrees-SC loss, n = 5, p less than 0.005), but did not affect the increase in FWD-SC seen with FMLP-induced PMN activation or the ability of cyto B to recruit more PMN to depolarize. PGE1 also inhibited FMLP +/- cyto B-induced O2 production in a dose-dependent fashion

  20. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha enhances antiproliferative activity of 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine in cancer cells through induction of uridine phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xingxing; Fan, Heng; Liu, Xiaojun; Wang, Rui; Liang, Jichao; Gupta, Nishith; Chen, Yong; Fang, Fude; Chang, Yongsheng

    2009-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) is capable of coactivating several nuclear receptors and transcription factors that participate in the regulation of multiple metabolic processes, including gluconeogenesis, mitochondrial biogenesis, and adaptive thermogenesis. Uridine phosphorylase (UPase) catalyzes the reversible conversion of uridine into uracil and contributes to the antineoplastic activity of 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-DFUR) and homeostasis of uridine levels in plasma and tissues. This study demonstrates uridine phosphorylase as a novel target gene of PGC-1alpha, which induces the transcription and enzymatic activity of UPase in various cancer cells and thus augments their susceptibility to 5'-DFUR. PGC-1alpha-induced activation of UPase expression occurs at its transcription level that is mediated by an estrogen-related receptor (ERR) binding site (-1078 to -1070 base pairs) mapped in the promoter region of UPase gene. Our mutational studies using luciferase reporter construct together with electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirm the binding of ERR to PGC-1alpha-responsive element. Moreover, the inhibition of PGC-1alpha/ERRalpha-dependent signaling by 3-[4-(2,4-bis-trifluoromethylbenzyloxy)-3-methoxyphenyl]-2-cyano-N-(5-trifluoromethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)acrylamide (XCT790) compromises the ability of PGC-1alpha to induce the transcript of UPase, indicating PGC-1alpha-dependent and ERRalpha-mediated up-regulation of UPase. Finally, the overexpression of PGC-1alpha sensitizes breast and colon cancer cells to growth inhibition by 5'-DFUR presumably by inducing apoptosis in tumor cells and XCT790 can inhibit the process. Taken together, our results corroborate the regulatory function of PGC-1alpha in uridine homeostasis and imply its links with the energy metabolism. The mechanistic elucidation of this association between both cellular pathways should advance the clinical use of 5-fluorouracil

  1. Resveratrol exerts pharmacological preconditioning by activating PGC-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai; Guan, Hua-Shi

    2008-11-01

    Resveratrol (RSV), a polyphenol phytoalexin abundantly found in grape skins and in wines, is currently the focus of intense research as a pharmacological preconditioning agent in kidney, heart, and brain from ischemic injury. However, the exact molecular mechanism of RSV preconditioning remains obscure. The data from current studies indicate that pharmacological preconditioning with RSV were attributed to its role as intracellular antioxidant, anti-inflammatory agent, its ability to induce nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression, its ability to induce angiogenesis, and its ability to increases sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activity. Peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma co-activator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) is a member of a family of transcription coactivators that owns mitochondrial biogenesis, antioxidation, growth factor signaling regulation, and angiogenesis activities. And, almost all the signaling pathways activated by RVS involve in PGC-1alpha activity. Moreover, it has been proofed that RVS could mediate an increase PGC-1alpha activity. These significant conditions support the hypothesis that RSV exerts pharmacological preconditioning by activating PGC-1alpha. Attempts to confirm this hypothesis will provide new directions in the study of pharmaceutical preconditioning and the development of new treatment approaches for reducing the extent of ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  2. UVB light upregulates prostaglandin synthases and prostaglandin receptors in mouse keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Adrienne T.; Gray, Joshua P.; Shakarjian, Michael P.; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Debra L.; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2008-10-01

    Prostaglandins belong to a class of cyclic lipid-derived mediators synthesized from arachidonic acid via COX-1, COX-2 and various prostaglandin synthases. Members of this family include prostaglandins such as PGE{sub 2}, PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, PGD{sub 2} and PGI{sub 2} (prostacyclin) as well as thromboxane. In the present studies we analyzed the effects of UVB on prostaglandin production and prostaglandin synthase expression in primary cultures of undifferentiated and calcium-differentiated mouse keratinocytes. Both cell types were found to constitutively synthesize PGE{sub 2}, PGD{sub 2} and the PGD{sub 2} metabolite PGJ{sub 2}. Twenty-four hours after treatment with UVB (25 mJ/cm{sup 2}), production of PGE{sub 2} and PGJ{sub 2} increased, while PGD{sub 2} production decreased. This was associated with increased expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein. UVB (2.5-25 mJ/cm{sup 2}) also caused marked increases in mRNA expression for the prostanoid synthases PGDS, mPGES-1, mPGES-2, PGFS and PGIS, as well as expression of receptors for PGE{sub 2} (EP1 and EP2), PGD{sub 2} (DP and CRTH2) and prostacyclin (IP). UVB was more effective in inducing COX-2 and DP in differentiated cells and EP1 and IP in undifferentiated cells. UVB readily activated keratinocyte PI-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, JNK and p38 MAP signaling pathways which are known to regulate COX-2 expression. While inhibition of PI3K suppressed UVB-induced mPGES-1 and CRTH2 expression, JNK inhibition suppressed mPGES-1, PGIS, EP2 and CRTH2, and p38 kinase inhibition only suppressed EP1 and EP2. These data indicate that UVB modulates expression of prostaglandin synthases and receptors by distinct mechanisms. Moreover, both the capacity of keratinocytes to generate prostaglandins and their ability to respond to these lipid mediators are stimulated by exposure to UVB.

  3. The ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevented colitis-associated carcinogenesis through blocking dissociation of β-catenin complex, inhibiting COX-2 through repressing NF-κB, and inducing 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Min; Jeong, Migyeung; Park, Jong-Min; Kim, Mi-Young; Go, Eun-Jin; Cha, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Jo; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-09-27

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that diets containing an increased ratio of ω-6 : ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are a risk factor for colon cancer and might affect tumorigenesis. Therefore, dietary ω-3 PUFA administration may be a preventive strategy against colon cancer. Until now, the exact molecular mechanisms and required dietary doses of ω-3 PUFAs for cancer prevention were unknown. In this study, we explored the anti-tumorigenic mechanisms of ω-3 PUFAs against a colitis-associated cancer (CAC) model. Through in vitro cell models involving docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) administration, down-regulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and up-regulation of Bax, accompanied by blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation, the main mechanisms responsible for DHA-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells were determined. Results included significant reduction in azoxymethane-initiated, dextran sodium sulfate-promoted CACs, as well as significant preservation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) and significant inhibition of Cyclooxyganase-2 (COX-2) and Prostaglandin E2(P < 0.01). Additional mechanisms and significant induction of apoptosis in both tumor and non-tumor tissues were also noted in fat-1 transgenic (TG) mice. The lipid profiles of colon tissues measured in all specimens revealed that intake greater than 3 g ω-3 PUFA/60 kg of body weight showed tissue levels similar to those seen in fat-1 TG mice, preventing cancer. Our study concluded that COX-2 inhibition, 15-PGDH preservation, apoptosis induction, and blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation contributed to the anti-tumorigenesis effect of ω-3 PUFAs, and an intake higher than 3g ω-3 PUFAs/60 kg of body weight can assist in CAC prevention.

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of the butanolic fraction of Byrsonima verbascifolia leaves: Mechanisms involving inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha, prostaglandin E(2) production and migration of polymorphonuclear leucocyte in vivo experimentation.

    PubMed

    Saldanha, Aline Aparecida; de Siqueira, João Máximo; Castro, Ana Hortência Fonsêca; de Azambuja Ribeiro, Rosy Iara Maciel; de Oliveira, Flávio Martins; de Oliveira Lopes, Débora; Pinto, Flávia Carmo Horta; Silva, Denise Brentan; Soares, Adriana Cristina

    2016-02-01

    The leaves of Byrsonima verbascifolia (Malpighiaceae) are traditionally used to treat various diseases including inflammatory conditions. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of the polar constituents from the butanolic fraction of B. verbascifolia leaves (BvBF), as well as to investigate the mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory activity. The polar constituents were identified by liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detector and mass spectrometry (LC-DAD–MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization – time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to obtain a complete chemical profile of the fraction. Forty-five compounds were detected in the BvBF by LC-DAD–MS/MS, including condensed tannins, phenolic acids, flavonoids (flavones and flavonols) and other compounds. In addition, several condensed tannins were identified by MALDI-MS/MS, which are composed predominantly by procyanidin units (PCY) and up to six flavan-3-ol units. The BvBF exhibited significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The BvBF inhibited paw edema and polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte migration to the footpad and pleural cavity induced by carrageenan. Furthermore, a minor dose (12.50 mg/kg) of BvBF effectively decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in the footpad. These findings suggest that the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory action in the BvBF is linked to the inhibition of the production of inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α and PGE2 and the PMN cell migration.

  5. The ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevented colitis-associated carcinogenesis through blocking dissociation of β-catenin complex, inhibiting COX-2 through repressing NF-κB, and inducing 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Han, Young-Min; Jeong, Migyeung; Park, Jong-Min; Kim, Mi-Young; Go, Eun-Jin; Cha, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Jo; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that diets containing an increased ratio of ω-6 : ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are a risk factor for colon cancer and might affect tumorigenesis. Therefore, dietary ω-3 PUFA administration may be a preventive strategy against colon cancer. Until now, the exact molecular mechanisms and required dietary doses of ω-3 PUFAs for cancer prevention were unknown. In this study, we explored the anti-tumorigenic mechanisms of ω-3 PUFAs against a colitis-associated cancer (CAC) model. Through in vitro cell models involving docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) administration, down-regulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and up-regulation of Bax, accompanied by blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation, the main mechanisms responsible for DHA-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells were determined. Results included significant reduction in azoxymethane-initiated, dextran sodium sulfate-promoted CACs, as well as significant preservation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) and significant inhibition of Cyclooxyganase-2 (COX-2) and Prostaglandin E2(P < 0.01). Additional mechanisms and significant induction of apoptosis in both tumor and non-tumor tissues were also noted in fat-1 transgenic (TG) mice. The lipid profiles of colon tissues measured in all specimens revealed that intake greater than 3 g ω-3 PUFA/60 kg of body weight showed tissue levels similar to those seen in fat-1 TG mice, preventing cancer. Our study concluded that COX-2 inhibition, 15-PGDH preservation, apoptosis induction, and blockage of β-catenin complex dissociation contributed to the anti-tumorigenesis effect of ω-3 PUFAs, and an intake higher than 3g ω-3 PUFAs/60 kg of body weight can assist in CAC prevention. PMID:27566583

  6. Inhibition of the prostaglandin EP2 receptor is neuroprotective and accelerates functional recovery in a rat model of organophosphorus induced status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Asheebo; Ganesh, Thota; Lelutiu, Nadia; Gueorguieva, Paoula; Dingledine, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of organophosphorus compounds (OP) can induce status epilepticus (SE) in humans and rodents via acute cholinergic toxicity, leading to neurodegeneration and brain inflammation. Currently there is no treatment to combat the neuropathologies associated with OP exposure. We recently demonstrated that inhibition of the EP2 receptor for PGE2 reduces neuronal injury in mice following pilocarpine-induced SE. Here, we investigated the therapeutic effects of an EP2 inhibitor (TG6-10-1) in a rat model of SE using diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP). We tested the hypothesis that EP2 receptor inhibition initiated well after the onset of DFP-induced SE reduces the associated neuropathologies. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with pyridostigmine bromide (0.1 mg/kg, sc) and atropine methylbromide (20 mg/kg, sc) followed by DFP (9.5 mg/kg, ip) to induce SE. DFP administration resulted in prolonged upregulation of COX-2. The rats were administered TG6-10-1 or vehicle (ip) at various time points relative to DFP exposure. Treatment with TG6-10-1 or vehicle did not alter the observed behavioral seizures, however six doses of TG6-10-1 starting 80-150 min after the onset of DFP-induced SE significantly reduced neurodegeneration in the hippocampus, blunted the inflammatory cytokine burst, reduced microglial activation and decreased weight loss in the days after status epilepticus. By contrast, astrogliosis was unaffected by EP2 inhibition 4 d after DFP. Transient treatments with the EP2 antagonist 1 h before DFP, or beginning 4 h after DFP, were ineffective. Delayed mortality, which was low (10%) after DFP, was unaffected by TG6-10-1. Thus, selective inhibition of the EP2 receptor within a time window that coincides with the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 by DFP is neuroprotective and accelerates functional recovery of rats. PMID:25656476

  7. Activation of phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10 mediates the inhibition of FcgammaR phagocytosis by prostaglandin E2 in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Canetti, Claudio; Serezani, Carlos H; Atrasz, Rachelle G; White, Eric S; Aronoff, David M; Peters-Golden, Marc

    2007-12-15

    PGE2 has important inhibitory effects on the macrophage host defense functions of phagocytosis and killing, yet the molecular mechanisms involved remain to be fully elucidated. PGE2 causes an elevation of cAMP in alveolar macrophages (AMs), which in turn activates the cAMP effector targets, protein kinase A and the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac)-1. We now report that FcgammaR-induced PI3K/Akt and ERK-1/2 activation are inhibited by PGE2 in AMs. By specifically inhibiting the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) in AMs, we attenuated the inhibitory effects of both PGE2 and a specific Epac-1 agonist (8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP) on FcgammaR-mediated phagocytosis and Akt/ERK-1/2 activation; PTEN inhibition also decreased PGE2-induced suppression of bacterial killing by AMs. Moreover, PGE2 and the Epac-1 agonist induced an increase in PTEN lipid phosphatase activity, and this was associated with decreased tyrosine phosphorylation on PTEN-a mechanism known to regulate PTEN activity. Using a pharmacological approach, we demonstrated a role for Src homology 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 in the PGE2-induced tyrosine dephosphorylation of PTEN. Collectively, these data reveal that PGE2, via Epac-1 activation, enhances SHP-1 activity, resulting in increased PTEN activity. We suggest that this mechanism contributes to the ability of PGE2 to inhibit PI3K-dependent innate immune signaling in primary macrophages.

  8. The Bitter Barricading of Prostaglandin Biosynthesis Pathway: Understanding the Molecular Mechanism of Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibition by Amarogentin, a Secoiridoid Glycoside from Swertia chirayita

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Durai; Thorat, Sunil S.

    2014-01-01

    Swertia chirayita, a medicinal herb inhabiting the challenging terrains and high altitudes of the Himalayas, is a rich source of essential phytochemical isolates. Amarogentin, a bitter secoiridoid glycoside from S. chirayita, shows varied activity in several patho-physiological conditions, predominantly in leishmaniasis and carcinogenesis. Experimental analysis has revealed that amarogentin downregulates the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity and helps to curtail skin carcinogenesis in mouse models; however, there exists no account on selective inhibition of the inducible cyclooxygenase (COX) isoform by amarogentin. Hence the computer-aided drug discovery methods were used to unravel the COX-2 inhibitory mechanism of amarogentin and to check its selectivity for the inducible isoform over the constitutive one. The generated theoretical models of both isoforms were subjected to molecular docking analysis with amarogentin and twenty-one other Food and Drug Authority (FDA) approved lead molecules. The post-docking binding energy profile of amarogentin was comparable to the binding energy profiles of the FDA approved selective COX-2 inhibitors. Subsequent molecular dynamics simulation analysis delineated the difference in the stability of both complexes, with amarogentin-COX-2 complex being more stable after 40ns simulation. The total binding free energy calculated by MMGBSA for the amarogentin-COX-2 complex was −52.35 KCal/mol against a binding free energy of −8.57 KCal/mol for amarogentin-COX-1 complex, suggesting a possible selective inhibition of the COX-2 protein by the natural inhibitor. Amarogentin achieves this potential selectivity by small, yet significant, structural differences inherent to the binding cavities of the two isoforms. Hypothetically, it might block the entry of the natural substrates in the hydrophobic binding channel of the COX-2, inhibiting the cyclooxygenation step. To sum up briefly, this work highlights the mechanism of the possible

  9. Acetylation of prostaglandin synthase by aspirin.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, G J; Stanford, N; Majerus, P W

    1975-01-01

    When microsomes of sheep or bovine seminal vesicles are incubated with [acetyl-3H]aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid), 200 Ci/mol, we observe acetylation of a single protein, as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The protein has a molecular weight of 85,000 and corresponds to a similar acetylated protein found in the particulate fraction of aspirin-treated human platelets. The aspirin-mediated acetylation reaction proceeds with the same time course and at the same concentration as does the inhibition of prostaglandin synthase (cyclo-oxygenase) (EC 1.14.99.1; 8,11,14-eicosatrienoate, hydrogen-donor:oxygen oxidoreductase) by the drug. At 100 muM aspirin, 50% inhibition of prostaglandin synthase and 50% of maximal acetylation are observed after 15 min at 37 degrees. Furthermore, the substrate for cyclo-oxygenase, arachidonic acid, inhibits protein acetylation by aspirin at concentrations (50% inhibition at 10-30 muM) which correlate with the Michaelis constant of arachidonic acid as a substrate for cyclooxygenase. Arachidonic acid analogues and indomethacin inhibit the acetylation reaction in proportion to their effectiveness as cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors. The results suggest that aspirin acts as an active-site acetylating agent for the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase. This action of aspirin may account for its anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet action. PMID:810797

  10. The effect of prostaglandin E1 analog misoprostol on chronic cyclosporin nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    John, E G; Fornell, L C; Radhakrishnan, J; Anutrakulchai, S; Jonasson, O

    1993-11-01

    Cyclosporin A has markedly improved graft survival in transplant patients but its side effects, such as renal toxicity and hypertension, pose management problems in transplant recipients. This toxicity has been attributed to prostaglandin inhibition. Concurrent administration of misoprostol (a prostaglandin E1 analog) prevents chronic cyclosporin A-induced nephrotoxicity but not hypertension in rats.

  11. The Endocannabinoid Metabolite Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-Glycerol Inhibits Human Neutrophil Functions: Involvement of Its Hydrolysis into PGE2 and EP Receptors.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Caroline; Zarini, Simona; Jean, Stéphanie; Martin, Cyril; Murphy, Robert C; Marsolais, David; Laviolette, Michel; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Flamand, Nicolas

    2017-04-15

    The endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol and N-arachidonoyl-ethanolamine mediate an array of pro- and anti-inflammatory effects. These effects are related, in part, to their metabolism by eicosanoid biosynthetic enzymes. For example, N-arachidonoyl-ethanolamine and 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol can be metabolized by cyclooxygenase-2 into PG-ethanolamide (PG-EA) and PG-glycerol (PG-G), respectively. Although PGE2 is a recognized suppressor of neutrophil functions, the impact of cyclooxygenase-derived endocannabinoids such as PGE2-EA or PGE2-G on neutrophils is unknown. This study's aim was to define the effects of these mediators on neutrophil functions and the underlying cellular mechanisms involved. We show that PGE2-G, but not PGE2-EA, inhibits leukotriene B4 biosynthesis, superoxide production, migration, and antimicrobial peptide release. The effects of PGE2-G were prevented by EP1/EP2 receptor antagonist AH-6809 but not the EP4 antagonist ONO-AE2-227. The effects of PGE2-G required its hydrolysis into PGE2, were not observed with the non-hydrolyzable PGE2-serinol amide, and were completely prevented by methyl-arachidonoyl-fluorophosphate and palmostatin B, and partially prevented by JZL184 and WWL113. Although we could detect six of the documented PG-G hydrolases in neutrophils by quantitative PCR, only ABHD12 and ABHD16A were detected by immunoblot. Our pharmacological data, combined with our protein expression data, did not allow us to pinpoint one PGE2-G lipase, and rather support the involvement of an uncharacterized lipase and/or of multiple hydrolases. In conclusion, we show that PGE2-G inhibits human neutrophil functions through its hydrolysis into PGE2, and by activating the EP2 receptor. This also indicates that neutrophils could regulate inflammation by altering the balance between PG-G and PG levels in vivo. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha improves immunomodulation by dental mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Victor G; Ontoria-Oviedo, Imelda; Ricardo, Carolina P; Harding, Sian E; Sacedon, Rosa; Varas, Alberto; Zapata, Agustin; Sepulveda, Pilar; Vicente, Angeles

    2017-09-29

    Human dental mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered as highly accessible and attractive MSCs for use in regenerative medicine, yet some of their features are not as well characterized as other MSCs. Hypoxia-preconditioning and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) alpha overexpression significantly improves MSC therapeutics, but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. In the present study, we characterize immunomodulatory properties of dental MSCs and determine changes in their ability to modulate adaptive and innate immune populations after HIF-1 alpha overexpression. Human dental MSCs were stably transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSCs) or GFP-HIF-1 alpha lentivirus vectors (HIF-MSCs). A hypoxic-like metabolic profile was confirmed by mitochondrial and glycolysis stress test. Capacity of HIF-MSCs to modulate T-cell activation, dendritic cell differentiation, monocyte migration, and polarizations towards macrophages and natural killer (NK) cell lytic activity was assessed by a number of functional assays in co-cultures. The expression of relevant factors were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). While HIF-1 alpha overexpression did not modify the inhibition of T-cell activation by MSCs, HIF-MSCs impaired dendritic cell differentiation more efficiently. In addition, HIF-MSCs showed a tendency to induce higher attraction of monocytes, which differentiate into suppressor macrophages, and exhibited enhanced resistance to NK cell-mediated lysis, which supports the improved therapeutic capacity of HIF-MSCs. HIF-MSCs also displayed a pro-angiogenic profile characterized by increased expression of CXCL12/SDF1 and CCL5/RANTES and complete loss of CXCL10/IP10 transcription. Immunomodulation and expression of trophic factors by dental MSCs make them perfect candidates for cell therapy. Overexpression of HIF-1 alpha enhances these features and increases their resistance to allogenic NK

  13. Molecular architecture of leishmania EF-1alpha reveals a novel site that may modulate protein translation: a possible target for drug development.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Martin; Cherkasov, Artem; Nandan, Devki

    2007-05-18

    Elongation factor-1alpha plays an essential role in eukaryotic protein biosynthesis. Recently, we have shown by protein structure modeling the presence of a hairpin-loop of 12 amino acids in mammalian EF-1alpha that is absent in the leishmania homologue [D. Nandan, A. Cherkasov, R. Sabouti, T. Yi, N.E. Reiner, Molecular cloning, biochemical and structural analysis of elongation factor-1 alpha from Leishmania donovani: comparison with the mammalian homologue, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 302 (2003) 646-652]. As a consequence of this deletion, an exposed region is available on the main body of leishmania EF-1alpha. Here we report the generation of an anti-EF-1alpha antibody (DN-3) which bound selectively to the exposed region of leishmania EF-1alpha, with no reactivity with human EF-1alpha. In a leishmania cell-free protein translation system, DN-3 substantially inhibited protein translation. A similar inhibitory effect was observed when a specific peptide based on the exposed region was used in the cell-free protein translation assay. The application of structure-based in silico methods to identify potential ligands to target the exposed region identified a small molecule that selectively attenuated in vitro translation using leishmania extracts. Moreover, this small molecule showed selective suppressive effect on multiplication of leishmania in culture. Taken together, these findings identify a novel, exposed region in leishmania EF-1alpha that may be involved in protein synthesis and a potential site for drug targeting.

  14. Anti-IL-1 alpha autoantibodies in patients with rheumatic diseases and in healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, H; Ayabe, T; Kamimura, J; Kashiwagi, H

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a quantitative assay for IgG autoantibodies against IL-1 alpha using protein A-Sepharose CL-4B. We examined the autoantibodies in sera from 107 healthy subjects, 151 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 64 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 16 patients with systemic sclerosis. The frequency of positive sera for the autoantibodies in patients with RA was 16.6%, which was about three times more frequent (P less than 0.01) than that in healthy subjects (5.6%) or that in patients with SLE (4.7%). Only one serum of 16 patients with systemic sclerosis was positive for the autoantibodies. Neutralizing activity of the autoantibodies was demonstrated by murine thymocyte proliferation assay. The concentrations of IgG at 50% inhibition of IL-1 alpha (15 pM) induced thymocyte proliferation ranged between 0.1 and 0.5 mg/ml. A time-course study showed fluctuations of the titres of the autoantibodies in parallel with the disease activity of RA. These results suggest that the anti-IL-1 alpha autoantibodies present in the sera and possibly some other body fluids may be involved in the regulation of IL-1 activity in vivo. Images Fig. 2 PMID:1893621

  15. Modulation of in vitro porcine natural killer cell activity by recombinant interleukin-1 alpha, interleukin-2 and interleukin-4.

    PubMed Central

    Knoblock, K F; Canning, P C

    1992-01-01

    In order to understand better how cytokines modulate porcine lymphocyte-mediated natural cytotoxicity and to develop a rapid and reliable colorimetric assay to study that activity in young pigs, we studied inherent and cytokine induced in vitro natural killer (NK) activity. The cytokines we studied were human recombinant interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-2, IL-4 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Natural killer activity by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), reported as per cent specific lysis (%SL), was determined by the colorimetric measurement of lactate dehydrogenase released from tumour cell targets, YAC-1 and K562. Inherent NK activity was low and remained relatively unchanged by alterations of assay length or effector cell concentration. Low NK activity was also observed in response to IL-4 and IFN-gamma. IL-2 and, to a lesser extent, IL-1 alpha induced significant NK activity with trends towards increasing %SL with increasing cytokine dose. Optimal IL-1 alpha- and IL-2-induced NK activity could be observed at 18 hr, with significant activity stimulated by IL-2 as early as 4 hr. IL-2-induced NK activity was sensitive to effector cell concentration; %SL decreased as the effector to target ratio decreased. IL-1 alpha- and IL-2-induced NK activities were decreased in the presence of IL-4. These results indicate porcine PBMC are sensitive to in vitro modulation by human recombinant IL-1 alpha, IL-2 and IL-4. The ability of IL-1 alpha and IL-2 to induce swine NK activity and the ability of IL-4 to inhibit that activity are similar to the actions of those cytokines in human NK systems. PMID:1634252

  16. Andrographolide down-regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hui-Hsuan; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chou, Fen-Pi; Wang, Chau-Jong; Hsuan, Shu-Wen; Wang, Cheng-Kun; Chen, Jing-Hsien

    2011-02-01

    Andrographolide (Andro), a diterpenoid lactone isolated from a traditional herbal medicine Andrographis paniculata, is known to possess multiple pharmacological activities. In our previous study, Andro had been shown to inhibit non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cell migration and invasion via down-regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Here we demonstrated that Andro inhibited the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in A549 cells. HIF-1{alpha} plays an important role in tumor growth, angiogenesis and lymph node metastasis of NSCLC. The Andro-induced decrease of cellular protein level of HIF-1{alpha} was correlated with a rapid ubiquitin-dependent degradation of HIF-1{alpha}, and was accompanied by increased expressions of hydroxyl-HIF-1{alpha} and prolyl hydroxylase (PHD2), and a later decrease of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) upon the treatment of Andro. The Andro-inhibited VEGF expression appeared to be a consequence of HIF-1{alpha} inactivation, because its DNA binding activity was suppressed by Andro. Molecular data showed that all these effects of Andro might be mediated via TGF{beta}1/PHD2/HIF-1{alpha} pathway, as demonstrated by the transfection of TGF{beta}1 overexpression vector and PHD2 siRNA, and the usage of a pharmacological MG132 inhibitor. Furthermore, we elucidated the involvement of Andro in HIF-1{alpha} transduced VEGF expression in A549 cells and other NSCLC cell lines. In conclusion, these results highlighted the potential effects of Andro, which may be developed as a chemotherapeutic or an anti-angiogenesis agent for NSCLC in the future.

  17. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II modulates endothelial cell responses by degrading hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha through interaction with PSMA7, a component of the proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Tandle, Anita T.; Calvani, Maura; Uranchimeg, Badarch; Zahavi, David; Melillo, Giovanni; Libutti, Steven K.

    2009-07-01

    The majority of human tumors are angiogenesis dependent. Understanding the specific mechanisms that contribute to angiogenesis may offer the best approach to develop therapies to inhibit angiogenesis in cancer. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II (EMAP-II) is an anti-angiogenic cytokine with potent effects on endothelial cells (ECs). It inhibits EC proliferation and cord formation, and it suppresses primary and metastatic tumor growth in-vivo. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind the anti-angiogenic activity of EMAP-II. In the present study, we explored the molecular mechanism behind the anti-angiogenic activity exerted by this protein on ECs. Our results demonstrate that EMAP-II binds to the cell surface {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin receptor. The cell surface binding of EMAP-II results in its internalization into the cytoplasmic compartment where it interacts with its cytoplasmic partner PSMA7, a component of the proteasome degradation pathway. This interaction increases hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) degradation under hypoxic conditions. The degradation results in the inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} mediated transcriptional activity as well as HIF-1{alpha} mediated angiogenic sprouting of ECs. HIF-1{alpha} plays a critical role in angiogenesis by activating a variety of angiogenic growth factors. Our results suggest that one of the major anti-angiogenic functions of EMAP-II is exerted through its inhibition of the HIF-1{alpha} activities.

  18. Continuous infusion of macrophage inflammatory protein MIP-1alpha enhances leucocyte recovery and haemopoietic progenitor cell mobilization after cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, E.; Woolford, L. B.; Lord, B. I.

    1997-01-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha (MIP-1alpha) inhibits haemopoietic stem cell proliferation. This property has been exploited in a murine chemotherapy model and has been shown to ameliorate cytotoxic-induced myelosuppression after S-phase-specific cytotoxic therapy. We have now shown that BB-10010, a stable mutant of MIP-1alpha, (a) is more effective when administered as a continuous infusion than when bolus injected and (b), when administered via a 7-day infusion during and after cyclophosphamide treatment, results in an earlier recovery of leucocyte numbers. This effect was accompanied by progenitor cell mobilization into the peripheral blood and included primitive cells with marrow-repopulating ability (MRA). Maximal mobilization and recovery of leucocytes occurred when MIP-1alpha was combined with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy. The findings suggest that MIP1-alpha used alone or in combination with G-CSF may allow delivery of a greater chemotherapy dose intensity as a consequence of both accelerated leucocyte recovery and maintenance of high-quality mobilized progenitor cells for harvesting and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. PMID:9192972

  19. Involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha-induced lymphocyte polarization and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Manzanares, M; Rey, M; Jones, D R; Sancho, D; Mellado, M; Rodriguez-Frade, J M; del Pozo, M A; Yáñez-Mó, M; de Ana, A M; Martínez-A, C; Mérida, I; Sánchez-Madrid, F

    1999-10-01

    The role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), an important enzyme involved in signal transduction events, has been studied in the polarization and chemotaxis of lymphocytes induced by the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1 alpha). This chemokine was able to directly activate p85/p110 PI3-kinase in whole human PBL and to induce the association of PI3-kinase to the SDF-1 alpha receptor, CXCR4, in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. Two unrelated chemical inhibitors of PI3-kinase, wortmannin and Ly294002, prevented ICAM-3 and ERM protein moesin polarization as well as the chemotaxis of PBL in response to SDF-1 alpha. However, they did not interfere with the reorganization of either tubulin or the actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, the transient expression of a dominant negative form of the PI3-kinase 85-kDa regulatory subunit in the constitutively polarized Peer T cell line inhibited ICAM-3 polarization and markedly reduced SDF-1 alpha-induced chemotaxis. Conversely, overexpression of a constitutively activated mutant of the PI3-kinase 110-kDa catalytic subunit in the round-shaped PM-1 T cell line induced ICAM-3 polarization. These results underline the role of PI3-kinase in the regulation of lymphocyte polarization and motility and indicate that PI3-kinase plays a selective role in the regulation of adhesion and ERM proteins redistribution in the plasma membrane of lymphocytes.

  20. Functional response to SDF1 alpha through over-expression of CXCR4 on adult subventricular zone progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian Shuang; Chopp, Michael; Santra, Manoranjan; Hozeska-Solgot, Ann; Zhang, Rui Lan; Wang, Lei; Teng, Hua; Lu, Mei; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2008-08-21

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand, stromal cell derived factor-1 alpha (SDF1 alpha) regulate neuroblast migration towards the ischemic boundary after stroke. Using loss- and gain-function, we investigated the biological effect of CXCR4/SDF1 alpha on neural progenitor cells. Neural progenitor cells, from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult rat, were transfected with rat CXCR4-pLEGFP-C1 and pSIREN-RetroQ-CXCR4-siRNA retroviral vectors. Migration assay analysis showed that inhibition of CXCR4 by siRNA significantly reduced cell migration compared to the empty vector, indicating that CXCR4 mediated neural progenitor cell motility. When neural progenitor cells were cultured in growth medium containing bFGF (20 ng/ml), over-expression of CXCR4 significantly reduced the cell proliferation as measured by the number of bromodeoxyuridine+ (BrdU+) cells (26.4%) compared with the number in the control group (54.0%). Addition of a high concentration of SDF1 alpha (500 ng/ml) into the progenitor cells with over-expression of CXCR4 reversed the cell proliferation back to the control levels (57.6%). Immunostaining analysis showed that neither over-expression nor inhibition of CXCR4 altered the population of neurons and astrocytes, when neural progenitor cells were cultured in differentiation medium. These in vitro results suggest that CXCR4/SDF1 alpha primarily regulates adult neural progenitor cell motility but not differentiation, while over-expression of CXCR4 in the absence of SDF1 alpha decreases neural progenitor cell proliferation.

  1. Contrasting effects of rh-MIP-1 alpha and TGF-beta 1 on chronic myeloid leukemia progenitors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Holyoake, T L; Freshney, M G; Sproul, A M; Richmond, L J; Alcorn, M J; Steward, W P; Fitzsimons, E; Dunlop, D J; Franklin, I M; Pragnell, I B

    1993-10-01

    In chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) an abnormality at the stem cell level results in unregulated expansion of myeloid progenitors. The mechanism underlying this uncontrolled proliferation remains unclear. An in vitro clonogenic assay which detects the human counterpart of the murine colony forming unit (CFU) CFU-A/CFU-S day 12 was described in a report of our recent findings. CML bone marrow samples were found to proliferate in the CFU-A assay, producing colonies morphologically indistinguishable from normal controls. The bcr/abl transcripts were sought in the RNA from individual colonies using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). For the five CML samples tested to date, the majority of CFU-A colonies at diagnosis or in early chronic phase were found to be bcr/abl positive. For normal controls both macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) inhibited the proliferation of CFU-A colonies when directly added to the assay. In contrast, CML progenitors responded normally to TGF-beta 1, but showed no response to MIP-1 alpha. In suicide assays, for five normal bone marrow samples, CFU-A progenitors induced into S-phase returned to a quiescent state after treatment with MIP-1 alpha. CML progenitors demonstrated inherently high cycle status which showed no definite response to MIP-1 alpha. However, TGF-beta 1 resulted in quiescence of CML progenitor cycling. In conclusion, the primitive progenitors from CML samples were inhibited normally by TGF-beta 1 but showed no response to MIP-1 alpha.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Stretch-induced prostaglandins and protein turnover in cultured skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.; Hatfaludy, Sophia; Sohar, Istvan; Shansky, Janet

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine whether mechanical stimulation of cultured muscle cells influences prostaglandin efflux rates and whether they are related to stretch-induced alterations in protein turnover rates. The materials and methods of the experiment, including cell cultures, mechanical stimulation, protein synthesis, and degradation assays are outlined, and emphasis is placed on the effect of short-term mechanical stimulation in basal medium prostaglandin efflux from cultured skeletal muscle and stretch-induced alterations in prostaglandins efflux in complete medium. The major finding of the study is that mechanical stimulation of tissue-cultured skeletal-muscle cells under conditions inducing skeletal-muscle hypertropy increases the efflux of PGE(2) and PGE(2-alpha) but not 6-keto-PGF(1-alpha), the prostacyclin product.

  3. Stretch-induced prostaglandins and protein turnover in cultured skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.; Hatfaludy, Sophia; Sohar, Istvan; Shansky, Janet

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine whether mechanical stimulation of cultured muscle cells influences prostaglandin efflux rates and whether they are related to stretch-induced alterations in protein turnover rates. The materials and methods of the experiment, including cell cultures, mechanical stimulation, protein synthesis, and degradation assays are outlined, and emphasis is placed on the effect of short-term mechanical stimulation in basal medium prostaglandin efflux from cultured skeletal muscle and stretch-induced alterations in prostaglandins efflux in complete medium. The major finding of the study is that mechanical stimulation of tissue-cultured skeletal-muscle cells under conditions inducing skeletal-muscle hypertropy increases the efflux of PGE(2) and PGE(2-alpha) but not 6-keto-PGF(1-alpha), the prostacyclin product.

  4. Prostaglandins: pharmacology and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Karim, S M; Hillier, K

    1974-01-01

    Prostaglandin research has been 1 of the most stimulating features of biomedical investigation in the past decade. Interest developed at a time of expanding knowledge of hormonal and neurohormonal behavior and research work received a tremendous impetus in the early 1960s with the elucidation in Sweden of the chemical structures of prostaglandins, followed by the discovery of their biosynthetic pathways. The original findings of large amounts of prostaglandin in the male accessory genital glands and their secretions, and subsequent discovery in the menstrual and amniotic fluids linked these substances with human production. As a result of further investigation, clinical applications of prostaglandins for the induction of labor and termination of early unwanted pregnancies have been developed. Apart from the functions of the prostaglandins in the reproductive area, they have been shown to have a widespread distribution in the body and produce many different pharmacological effects. Prostaglandins are thought to be involved in the regulation of blood pressure and through their vascular effects have therapeutic potential in the treatment of hypertension and peripheral vascular disease. Through their bronchodilator effect, some prostaglandins may become useful in the treatment of asthma.

  5. [Prostaglandins, insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Giugliano, D; Torella, R; Scheen, A J; Lefebvre, P J; D'Onofrio, F

    1988-12-01

    The islets of Langerhans have the enzymatic equipment permitting the synthesis of the metabolites of arachidonic acid: cyclo-oxygenase and lipo-oxygenase. Numerous studies have shown that cyclo-oxygenase derivatives, mainly PGE2, reduce the insulin response to glucose whereas lipo-oxygenase derivatives, mainly 15-HPETE, stimulate insulin secretion. So, for instance, drugs that increase prostaglandins synthesis as colchicine or furosemide inhibit insulin secretion while non steroid anti-inflammator drugs, mainly salicylates, which inhibit cyclo-oxygenase, enhance the insulin response to various stimuli. In type-2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes, an increased sensitivity to endogenous prostaglandins has been proposed as a possible cause for the insulin secretion defect which characterizes this disease. Play in favor of this hypothesis the fact that the administration of PGE inhibits the insulin response to arginine in type-2 diabetics but not in normal subject and the fact that the administration of salicylates could improve the insulin response to glucose in some of these patients.

  6. [Prostaglandins in gynecology and obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Klausch, B; Kyank, H

    1972-06-03

    A review of early research (up through 1970) on prostaglandins (PGs) is presented. Their chemical structure and classification based on their ring-structure is detailed as well as various analytic methods of mammalian tissues and body fluids. For clinical use PGE1 and 2, PGF2alpha and PGA1 are the most significant ones because of their properties. PGs have many physiological activities encompassing many organ systems. Their pharmacological actions include: 1) stimulation of nonvascular smooth muscle; 2) peripheral vasodilation (excluding PGFs which cause vasoconstriction); 3) inhibition of lipolysis; 4) inhibition of platelet aggregation; 5) inhibition of gastric peristalsis and gastric juice secretion; 6) bronchodilation; and 7) inhibition of spontaneous CNS activity. The level of PGEs in semen is closely related to the degree of fertility; normally fertile men have 55 mcg PGE/ml and never less than 11 mcg/ml. Current studies are under way on the effect of PGE in artificial insemination of sperm of subfertile men. PGF2alpha and PGE2 stimulate menstruation and uterine contraction; other PGs inhibit uterine contraction. PGs from semen have a role in sperm transport and possibly act on fallopian tube motility aiding sperm capacitation, and ovum retention and transport. Early trials with PGs point to a possible action as an abortifacient, as a once-a-month contraceptive, or a postconception contraceptive agent. PGF2alpha is found in variable concentrations in maternal blood during contraction of the pregnant uterus; levels increase as labor progresses. PGs have been used for labor induction, for induction of abortion and in mole pregnancy. Given as a constant intravenous infusion they produce regular contractions leading to natural expulsion of the fetus and causing very few side effects in the woman with no adverse effects on the fetus. PGs' action compares favorably with that of oxytocin and is preferable for labor induction in certain pregnancy complications. PGE1

  7. Macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha enhances in a different manner adhesion of hematopoietic progenitor cells from bone marrow, cord blood, and mobilized peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Y; Muta, K; Umemura, T; Abe, Y; Nishimura, J; Nawata, H

    1999-11-01

    Regulatory mechanisms governing adhesion of hematopoietic progenitor cells to the stromal nische are poorly understood. Growth factors such as stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and thrombopoietin were reported to upregulate the adhesion of hematopoietic progenitors to immobilized fibronectin through activation of integrin alpha4beta1 and alpha5beta1. Macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha is a C-C chemokine that suppresses colony formation by stem/progenitor cells in vitro. We asked if MIP-1alpha would modulate the adhesive phenotype of colony-forming cells (CFCs) obtained from healthy donor bone marrow (BM), cord blood (CB), and mobilized peripheral blood (mPB) CD34+ cells, in comparison with SCF, using immobilized fibronectin. SCF significantly increased the level of adhesion of CFCs from BM, CB, and mPB. On the other hand, MIP-1alpha significantly increased the level of adhesion of CFCs from BM and CB, but less so from mPB. The effects of MIP-1alpha were inhibited by blocking antibodies to integrin alpha4, alpha5, or beta1, and polymerization plus rearrangement of F-actin were observed in affected cells by labeling with rhodamine-conjugated phalloidine. These data indicate that the effect of MIP-1alpha on the adhesive phenotype of CFCs is mediated by modulation of the organization of integrin. The amount of MIP-1alpha receptor on mPB was less than for BM or CB, which may explain the distinct characteristics in the adhesive response induced by MIP-1alpha. We suggest that hematopoietic progenitor cells from different sources may be heterogeneous with respect to maturation, integrin affinity, MIP-1alpha receptor expression, and regulation of MIP-1alpha signaling. Our data indicate that MIP-1alpha may affect migration, homing, and mobilization of hematopoietic progenitors by modulating the adhesive phenotype of these cells.

  8. Activation of JAK2/STAT1-alpha-dependent signaling events during Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Mauricio; Olivier, Martin; García, Luis F

    2002-01-01

    Induction of apoptosis by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in murine macrophage involves TNF-alpha and nitric oxide (NO) production and caspase cascade activation; however, the intracellular signaling pathways implicated remain to be established. Our results indicate that infection of the B10R murine macrophage line with M. tuberculosis induces apoptosis independent of mycobacterial phagocytosis and that M. tuberculosis induces protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity, JAK2/STAT1-alpha phosphorylation, and STAT1-alpha nuclear translocation. Inhibitors of PTK (AG-126), or JAK2 (AG-490) inhibited TNF-alpha and NO production, caspase 1 activation and apoptosis, suggesting that M. tuberculosis-induction of these events depends on JAK2/STAT1-alpha activation. In addition, we have obtained evidence that ManLAM capacity to inhibit M. tuberculosis-induced apoptosis involves the activation of the PTP SHP-1. The finding that M. tuberculosis infection activate JAK2/STAT1-alpha pathway suggests that M. tuberculosis might mimic macrophage-activating stimuli.

  9. Prostaglandins, Lysosomes, and Radiation Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    SCIENTIFIC REPORT Prostaglandins, lysosomes, and radiation injury 7 P. J. Trocha <G. N. Catravas DTI.C A DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY -LL ARMED FORCES...been shown to be altered with tissue injury . Yet no studies have been performed to monitor lysosomal enzyme activi- ties and PG levels simultaneously...nd R. Pi olm. Raven Pra& New Yort- D 980. Prostaglandins, Lysosomes, and Radiation Injury Paul J. Trocha and George N. Catravas Armed Forces

  10. [Value of prostaglandins in andrology].

    PubMed

    Kreysel, C O

    1994-05-20

    In humans, the highest concentration of prostaglandins is found in the seminal fluid, where they are stored. They probably act as hormones by exercising--via receptors--an influence on cell function. Views on the role of prostaglandins in fertility vary. An explanation for this may be the methodological differences discussed. It remains for future research to establish the true functions of this highly versatile class of compounds in the area of fertility.

  11. A Pak- and Pix-dependent branch of the SDF-1alpha signalling pathway mediates T cell chemotaxis across restrictive barriers.

    PubMed

    Volinsky, Natalia; Gantman, Anna; Yablonski, Deborah

    2006-07-01

    Pak (p21-activated kinase) serine/threonine kinases have been shown to mediate directional sensing of chemokine gradients. We hypothesized that Pak may also mediate chemokine-induced shape changes, to facilitate leucocyte chemotaxis through restrictive barriers, such as the extracellular matrix. A potent inhibitor, Pak(i), was characterized and used to probe the role of Pak-family kinases in SDF-1alpha (stromal-cell derived factor-1alpha/CXCL12)-induced chemotaxis in a T cell model. Pak(i) potently inhibited SDF-1alpha-induced Pak activation by a bivalent mechanism, as indicated by its complete inactivation upon point mutation of two binding sites, but partial inactivation upon mutation of either site alone. Importantly, Pak(i) was not toxic to cells over the time frame of our experiments, since it did not substantially affect cell surface expression of CXCR4 (CXC chemokine receptor 4) or integrins, cell cycle progression, or a number of ligand-induced responses. Pak(i) produced dose-dependent inhibition of SDF-1alpha-induced migration through rigid filters bearing small pores; but unexpectedly, did not substantially affect the magnitude or kinetics of chemotaxis through filters bearing larger pores. SDF-1alpha-induced Pak activation was partly dependent on PIX (Pak-interactive exchange factor); correspondingly, an allele of beta-PIX that cannot bind Pak inhibited SDF-1alpha-induced chemotaxis through small, but not large pores. By contrast, other key players in chemotaxis: G(i), PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase), and the Rho-family G-proteins, Rac and Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42), were required for SDF-1alpha-induced migration regardless of the barrier pore-size. These studies have revealed a distinct branch of the SDF-1alpha signalling pathway, in which the Rac/Cdc42 effector, Pak, and its partner, PIX, specifically regulate the cellular events required for chemokine-induced migration through restrictive barriers.

  12. Pro-inflammatory prostaglandins and progression of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dingzhi; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for several gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric, hepatic, pancreatic and colorectal cancer. It has long been known that long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the relative risk of developing colorectal cancer. NSAIDs exert their anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor effects primarily by inhibiting activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. Cyclooxygenase enzymes catalyze the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostanoids, including prostaglandins (PGs) and thromboxanes (TXs). Emerging evidence demonstrates that prostaglandins play an important role in inflammation and cancer. In this review, we highlight recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the roles of the different prostaglandins in colorectal cancer (CRC) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These findings may provide a rationale for the development of new anti-inflammatory therapeutic approaches to cancer prevention and/or treatment. PMID:18406516

  13. The influence of prostaglandins on sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, W; Rotermund, S; Färber, G; Nieschlag, E

    1981-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 and F2 alpha were measured in ejaculates from 10 fertile and 55 infertile men. Prostaglandin F2 alpha was negatively correlated with motility (r = 0.77; p less than 0.01) in normal men. In patients with disturbed fertility, prostaglandin F2 alpha was always higher than in the controls, while prostaglandin E2 was elevated only in patients with persisting varicocele and in those with very low sperm counts and severely impaired motility. There was neither de novo synthesis of prostaglandins in spermatozoa nor were binding sites for prostaglandin E2 and F2 alpha detectable. Inactivation of seminal prostaglandins by incubation with prostaglandin 15-hydroxydehydrogenase resulted in a dramatic fall in motility. The results suggest that prostaglandin F2 alpha act on motility, but the action is not mediated by receptors.

  14. Characterization of yeast EF-1 alpha: non-conservation of post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Cavallius, J; Zoll, W; Chakraburtty, K; Merrick, W C

    1993-04-21

    Elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) is an abundant cellular protein and its amino-acid sequence has been inferred from numerous organisms, including bacteria, archaebacteria, plants and animals. In large measure, it would appear that the overall structure has probably been maintained given the 33% identity and 56% similarity of Escherichia coli EF-Tu with human EF-1 alpha. Chemical sequencing of EF-Tu and EF-1 alpha has revealed that these proteins are post-translationally modified. In order to assess the possible function of these modifications, we have chemically sequenced the EF-1 alpha from the lower eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). To our surprise, the methylation pattern of yeast EF-1 alpha was quite different from either rabbit or brine shrimp EF-1 alpha with only the trimethyllysine at position 79 conserved although the yeast protein is 81% identical to rabbit EF-1 alpha. A dimethyllysine was observed at position 316 which corresponds to a trimethyllysine in brine shrimp and rabbit EF-1 alpha. The other positions in yeast EF-1 alpha which were methylated were unrelated to the other six possible positions for modification observed in brine shrimp or rabbit EF-1 alpha. In addition, the unique glyceryl-phosphorylethanolamine observed in mammalian EF-1 alpha and suspected in brine shrimp EF-1 alpha was not found in yeast EF-1 alpha.

  15. Prostaglandins in swine reproduction.

    PubMed

    Kingston, D J

    1982-05-01

    A review is presented of the roles of prostaglandins in swine reproduction. PGE and PGF are both produced in the ovary. PGE is thought to mediate steroidogenic activity of L.H. on the development of the granulosa cells leading to increased progesterone production in the preovulatory phase of the oestrus cycle. PGF2 acts on the theca cells leading to increased oestradiol and oestrus manifestation. The PG blocker indomethacin prevents oocyte rupture, but not maturation. The L.H. surges in the follicular phase stimulate ovarian PG production which initiates oestrus and ovulation. The uterus produces PGF2alpha. Disorders leading to abortion usually result in excess PGF2alpha production at the endometrium leading to luteolysis. With normal gestation circulatory progesterone levels fall during the last two weeks of pregnancy associated with increased circulatory foetal corticoid levels. The foetal corticoids are thought to trigger endometrial PGF2alpha levels leading to luteolysis and parturition. The use of exogenous PGF2alpha for induction of oestrus and abortion, parturition, semen collection and resolution of anoestrus is reviewed.

  16. Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 induces synthesis of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, Naohiro; Kondo, Satoru; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu; Murono, Shigeyuki; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Pagano, Joseph S

    2004-06-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimeric basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor composed of HIF-1 alpha and HIF-1 beta that is the central regulator of responses to hypoxia. The specific binding of HIF-1 to the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) induces the transcription of genes that respond to hypoxic conditions, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Here we report that expression of HIF-1 alpha is increased in diverse Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected type II and III cell lines, which express EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), the principal EBV oncoprotein, as well as other latency proteins, but not in the parental EBV-negative cell lines. We show first that transfection of an LMP1 expression plasmid into Ad-AH cells, an EBV-negative nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line, induces synthesis of HIF-1 alpha protein without increasing its stability or mRNA level. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase inhibitor PD98059 markedly reduces induction of HIF-1 alpha by LMP1. Catalase, an H(2)O(2) scavenger, strongly suppresses LMP1-induced production of H(2)O(2), which results in a decrease in the expression of HIF-1 alpha induced by LMP1. Inhibition of the NF-kappa B, c-jun N-terminal kinase, p38 MAPK, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways did not affect HIF-1 alpha expression. Moreover, LMP1 induces HIF-1 DNA binding activity and upregulates HRE and VEGF promoter transcriptional activity. Finally, LMP1 increases the appearance of VEGF protein in extracellular fluids; induction of VEGF is suppressed by PD98059 or catalase. These results suggest that LMP1 increases HIF-1 activity through induction of HIF-1 alpha protein expression, which is controlled by p42/p44 MAPK activity and H(2)O(2). The ability of EBV, and specifically its major oncoprotein, LMP1, to induce HIF-1 alpha along with other invasiveness and angiogenic factors reported previously discloses additional oncogenic properties of this tumor virus.

  17. Effects of antirheumatic drugs on the interleukin-1 alpha induced synthesis and activation of proteinases in articular cartilage explants in culture.

    PubMed

    Arsenis, C; McDonnell, J

    1989-06-01

    Three human cytokines (interleukin-1 alpha, interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha), added into the medium of bovine or rabbit articular cartilage explant cultures, stimulated the synthesis and activation of various proteinases. Proteoglycan degradation, measured by assaying for sulfated glycosaminoglycans released into the medium, was correlated with the proteinase stimulation. Several antirheumatic drugs were tested in a similar tissue culture system as potential inhibitors of the interleukin-1 alpha mediated stimulation of proteinase and PGE2 syntheses. Arteparon, Dexamethasone, Ibuprofen, Indomethacin, Levamisole, Naproxen, Phenylbutazone, Prednisolone, Piroxicam, Rumalon, Tamoxifen and Diclofenac were essentially ineffective in inhibiting the interleukin-1 alpha mediated induction of proteinase synthesis and sulfated glycosaminoglycan release, although some of them inhibited PGE2 synthesis. Two antimalarial drugs showed some inhibition, but only at higher concentrations.

  18. Effects of indomethacin on plasma homovanillic acid concentration in normal subjects: a study of prostaglandin-dopamine interactions.

    PubMed

    Kahn, R S; Davidson, M; Kanof, P; McQueeney, R T; Singh, R R; Davis, K L

    1991-01-01

    In laboratory animals, prostaglandins have been shown to act as endogenous neuromodulators of central dopamine (DA) activity. To examine the interaction between prostaglandins and DA in man, the effect of a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor, indomethacin, was studied on plasma concentrations of the DA metabolite, homovanillic acid (pHVA). Indomethacin (150 mg PO) as compared to placebo significantly elevated mean pHVA concentrations in eight normal subjects. Results of this study support the hypothesis that, as in animals, inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis increases central DA turnover in man.

  19. 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 causes a rapid increase in phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC-beta activity via phospholipase A2-dependent production of lysophospholipid.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Z; Shaked, D; Hardin, R R; Gruwell, S; Dean, D D; Sylvia, V L; Boyan, B D

    2003-05-01

    1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) activates protein kinase C (PKC) in rat growth plate chondrocytes via mechanisms involving phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)). The purpose of this study was to determine if 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) activates PI-PLC directly or through a PLA(2)-dependent mechanism. We determined which PLC isoforms are present in the growth plate chondrocytes, and determined which isoform(s) of PLC is(are) regulated by 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3). Inhibitors and activators of PLA(2) were used to assess the inter-relationship between these two phospholipid-signaling pathways. PI-PLC activity in lysates of prehypertrophic and upper hypertrophic zone (growth zone) cells that were incubated with 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), was increased within 30s with peak activity at 1-3 min. PI-PLC activity in resting zone cells was unaffected by 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3). 1beta,25(OH)(2)D(3), 24R,25(OH)(2)D(3), actinomycin D and cycloheximide had no effect on PLC in lysates of growth zone cells. Thus, 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) regulation of PI-PLC enzyme activity is stereospecific, cell maturation-dependent, and nongenomic. PLA(2)-activation (mastoparan or melittin) increased PI-PLC activity to the same extent as 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3); PLA(2)-inhibition (quinacrine, oleyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (OEPC), or AACOCF(3)) reduced the effect of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3). Neither arachidonic acid (AA) nor its metabolites affected PI-PLC. In contrast, lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE) activated PI-PLC (LPE>LPC). 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) stimulated PI-PLC and PKC activities via Gq; GDPbetaS inhibited activity, but pertussis toxin did not. RT-PCR showed that the cells express PLC-beta1a, PLC-beta1b, PLC-beta3 and PLC-gamma1 mRNA. Antibodies to PLC-beta1 and PLC-beta3 blocked the 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) effect; antibodies to PLC-delta and PLC-gamma did not. Thus, 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) regulates PLC-beta through PLA(2)-dependent production of

  20. The effects of E and A prostaglandins on gastric mucosal blood flow and acid secretion in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Main, I. H. M.; Whittle, B. J. R.

    1973-01-01

    1. The effects of prostaglandins E1, E2, A1 and A2 on gastric acid secretion and mucosal blood flow were studied by means of a [14C]-aniline clearance technique in the anaesthetized rat. 2. During intravenous administration of these prostaglandins, in doses which almost completely inhibited pentagastrin- and histamine-induced acid secretion, a fall in clearance was observed. 3. Clearance per unit acid secretion increased during prostaglandin administration, precluding a primary reduction in mucosal blood flow as the mechanism of the antisecretory action. 4. Prostaglandins increased clearance during basal secretion, indicating a direct vasodilator effect on the gastric mucosa. 5. The possibility that endogenous prostaglandins contribute to functional vasodilatation in the gastric mucosa and that exogenous prostaglandins may be of clinical value in the treatment of peptic ulcer is discussed. PMID:4149696

  1. Biosynthesis of prostaglandins in gingiva of patients with chronic periodontitis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendieta, C.F.; Reeve, C.M.; Romero, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the ability of inflamed and normal gingival tissues to synthesize prostaglandins (PGs) from the precursor arachidonic acid. Thirteen samples of inflamed human gingival tissue and six samples of normal human gingival tissue were studied. The inflammation was characterized histologically. After incubation of the tissue with (/sup 14/C)arachidonate, PG metabolites were separated by thin-layer chromatography and identified by comparison with co-chromatographed standards. Inflamed gingival tissue synthesized significantly larger amounts, compared to normal tissue, of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (P less than 0.05), thromboxane B2, PGD2, and PGA2. Some unidentified metabolites, possibly lipoxygenase products were detected in significantly larger amounts in inflamed than in normal tissue.

  2. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha suppresses squamous carcinogenic progression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Scortegagna, Marzia; Martin, Rebecca J; Kladney, Raleigh D; Neumann, Robert G; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2009-03-15

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a known cancer progression factor, promoting growth, spread, and metastasis. However, in selected contexts, HIF-1 is a tumor suppressor coordinating hypoxic cell cycle suppression and apoptosis. Prior studies focused on HIF-1 function in established malignancy; however, little is known about its role during the entire process of carcinogenesis from neoplasia induction to malignancy. Here, we tested HIF-1 gain of function during multistage murine skin chemical carcinogenesis in K14-HIF-1alpha(Pro402A564G) (K14-HIF-1alphaDPM) transgenic mice. Transgenic papillomas appeared earlier and were more numerous (6 +/- 3 transgenic versus 2 +/- 1.5 nontransgenic papillomas per mouse), yet they were more differentiated, their proliferation was lower, and their malignant conversion was profoundly inhibited (7% in transgenic versus 40% in nontransgenic mice). Moreover, transgenic cancers maintained squamous differentiation whereas epithelial-mesenchymal transformation was frequent in nontransgenic malignancies. Transgenic basal keratinocytes up-regulated the HIF-1 target N-myc downstream regulated gene-1, a known tumor suppressor gene in human malignancy, and its expression was maintained in transgenic papillomas and cancer. We also discovered a novel HIF-1 target gene, selenium binding protein-1 (Selenbp1), a gene of unknown function whose expression is lost in human cancer. Thus, HIF-1 can function as a tumor suppressor through transactivation of genes that are themselves targets for negative selection in human cancers.

  3. Prostaglandin E3 metabolism and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peiying; Jiang, Yan; Fischer, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    The anticancer activity of n-3 fatty acids, especially those derived from fish, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid) (DHA), has been studied for centuries. While there is a growing body of evidence that EPA and DHA may influence cancer initiation and development through targeting multiple events of tumor development, the underlying mechanisms responsible for these activities are still not fully understood. A number of studies have suggested that the anticancer activities of EPA and DHA are associated with their effects on eicosanoid metabolism by which they inhibit prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. In contrast to DHA, EPA can function as a substrate for cyclooxygenases (COXs) to synthesize unique 3-series prostaglandin compounds, especially PGE3. With advance technology in mass spectrometry, there is renewed interest in studying the role of PGE3 in EPA elicited anti-proliferative activity in various cancers, with some promising results. Here, we summarize the regulation of PGE3 synthesis in cancer cells and its role in EPA elicited anticancer activity. The development of PGE3 and its metabolites as potential biomarkers for future clinical evaluation of EPA and fish oil in cancer care is discussed. PMID:24657656

  4. HSP72 protects cells from ER stress-induced apoptosis via enhancement of IRE1alpha-XBP1 signaling through a physical interaction.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjeev; Deepti, Ayswaria; Deegan, Shane; Lisbona, Fernanda; Hetz, Claudio; Samali, Afshin

    2010-07-06

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a feature of secretory cells and of many diseases including cancer, neurodegeneration, and diabetes. Adaptation to ER stress depends on the activation of a signal transduction pathway known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). Enhanced expression of Hsp72 has been shown to reduce tissue injury in response to stress stimuli and improve cell survival in experimental models of stroke, sepsis, renal failure, and myocardial ischemia. Hsp72 inhibits several features of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Hsp72 expression inhibits ER stress-induced apoptosis are not clearly understood. Here we show that Hsp72 enhances cell survival under ER stress conditions. The UPR signals through the sensor IRE1alpha, which controls the splicing of the mRNA encoding the transcription factor XBP1. We show that Hsp72 enhances XBP1 mRNA splicing and expression of its target genes, associated with attenuated apoptosis under ER stress conditions. Inhibition of XBP1 mRNA splicing either by dominant negative IRE1alpha or by knocking down XBP1 specifically abrogated the inhibition of ER stress-induced apoptosis by Hsp72. Regulation of the UPR was associated with the formation of a stable protein complex between Hsp72 and the cytosolic domain of IRE1alpha. Finally, Hsp72 enhanced the RNase activity of recombinant IRE1alpha in vitro, suggesting a direct regulation. Our data show that binding of Hsp72 to IRE1alpha enhances IRE1alpha/XBP1 signaling at the ER and inhibits ER stress-induced apoptosis. These results provide a physical connection between cytosolic chaperones and the ER stress response.

  5. [Construction of recombinant baculovirus vectors started by EF1alpha].

    PubMed

    Gao, Dongni; Jin, Liying; Ge, Jingping; Wang, Kun; An, Qi; Ping, Wenxiang; Lou, Zhuangwei

    2014-06-04

    To improve the transduction efficiency of baculovirus and exogenous gene expression level, we chose a mammalian cell-specific promoter-human extension factor 1alpha promoter (EF1-alpha), used virus pseudotyped tools--truncated vessicular stomatitis virus protein G (VSV-GED), added woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE) and adenovirus inverted terminal repeats (ITRs). We constructed two improved recombinant baculoviruses transfer vectors named pWK and pWK-ITR with the pFB-VSV-GED-WPRE. The recombinant transfer vectors pWK-eGFP, pWK-ITR-eGFP and pWK (-)-eGFP were constructed by inserting the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) reporter gene into the downstream of EF1alpha promoter. Constructed recombinant plasmid transfected Sf9 insect cells, and observed the expression of green fluorescent protein by using the inverted fluorescence microscope. The fluorescence expression rate of BV-WK-eGFP, BV-WK-ITR-eGFP containing WPRE and ITRs was significantly higher than the negative control, ITRs can effectively extend the expression time of eGFP, the expression time of eGFP in BV-WK-eGFP and BV-WK-ITR-eGFP increased 72 hours compared to the negative control BV-WK (-) -eGFP. The transduction time of VSV-GED pseudotyped baculovirus BV-WK-eGFP, BV-WK-ITR-eGFP was obviously shorten in OL cells, and reduced 24 hours compared to the negative control BV-WK (-) -eGFP, transduction efficiency were higher 25.7% and 36.5% than the negative control BV-WK (-) -eGFP, respectively. The experiments proved that the VSV-GED could effectively improve the transduction efficiency of baculovirus, WPRE could enhance the expression efficiency of the exogenous gene significantly, and ITRs extend the expression time. The research will lay a foundation to explore improved recombinant baculovirus express exogenous genes in vertebrate cells and research the new recombinant live vector vaccine.

  6. SAG/ROC2/RBX2 is a HIF-1 target gene that promotes HIF-1 alpha ubiquitination and degradation.

    PubMed

    Tan, M; Gu, Q; He, H; Pamarthy, D; Semenza, G L; Sun, Y

    2008-02-28

    SAG (sensitive to apoptosis gene) or ROC2/RBX2 is the second family member of ROC1/RBX1, a component of SCF (Skp1, Cullin, F-box protein) and VCB (von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), Cullin and Elongin B/C) E3 ubiquitin ligases. SAG protected cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis when overexpressed. We report here that SAG was subjected to hypoxia induction at the levels of mRNA and protein. Hypoxia induction of SAG was largely HIF-1alpha dependent. A consensus HIF-1-binding site, GCGTG was identified in the first intron of the SAG gene. In response to hypoxia, HIF-1 bound to this site and transactivated SAG expression. SAG transactivation required both the intact binding site in cis and HIF-1alpha in trans. On the other hand, like its family member, ROC1, SAG promoted VHL-mediated HIF-1alpha ubiquitination and degradation, which was significantly inhibited upon small interfering RNA silencing of SAG or ROC1. Furthermore, the endogenous HIF-1alpha at both basal and hypoxia-induced levels was significantly increased upon SAG silencing. Finally, SAG forms in vivo complex with Cul-5 and VHL under hypoxia condition. These results suggest an HIF-1-SAG feedback loop in response to hypoxia, as follows: hypoxia induces HIF-1 to transactivate SAG. Induced SAG then promotes HIF-1alpha ubiquitination and degradation. This feedback loop may serve as a cellular defensive mechanism to reduce potential cytotoxic effects of prolonged HIF-1 activation under hypoxia.

  7. Hypoxia stimulates the autocrine regulation of migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via HIF-1alpha-dependent expression of thrombospondin-1.

    PubMed

    Osada-Oka, Mayuko; Ikeda, Takako; Akiba, Satoshi; Sato, Takashi

    2008-08-01

    The migration of vascular smooth muscle cells from the media to intima and their subsequent proliferation are critical causes of arterial wall thickening. In atherosclerotic lesions increases in the thickness of the vascular wall and the impairment of oxygen diffusion capacity result in the development of hypoxic lesions. We investigated the effect of hypoxia on the migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMCs) via HIF-1alpha-dependent expression of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1). When the cells were cultured under hypoxic conditions, mRNA and protein levels of TSP-1, and mRNA levels of integrin beta(3) were increased with the increase in HIF-1alpha protein. DNA synthesis and migration of the cells were stimulated under the conditions, and a neutralizing anti-TSP-1 antibody apparently suppressed the migration, but not DNA synthesis. The migration was also inhibited by RGD peptide that binds to integrin beta(3). Furthermore, the migration was completely suppressed in HIF-1alpha-knockdown cells exposed to hypoxia, while it was significantly enhanced in HIF-1alpha-overexpressing cells. These results suggest that the hypoxia induces the migration of CASMCs, and that the migration is elicited by TSP-1 of which induction is fully dependent on the stabilization of HIF-1alpha, in autocrine regulation. Thus we suggest that HIF-1alpha plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  8. Ovine cardiac Na,K-ATPase: isolation by means of selective solubilization in Lubrol and the effect of 1 alpha,2 alpha-epoxyscillirosidin on this enzyme.

    PubMed

    Venter, P A; Naudé, R J; Oelofsen, W; Swan, G E

    1997-01-01

    The inhibition of cardiac Na,K-ATPase by 1 alpha,2 alpha-epoxyscillirosidin is the principal cause of poisoning of cattle by the tulip, Homeria pallida. The ultimate goals of this study were to study the interaction between 1 alpha,2 alpha-epoxyscillirosidin and ovine Na,K-ATPase by means of inhibition and displacement binding studies. Ovine cardiac Na,K-ATPase was isolated in membrane-bound form by means of deoxycholate treatment, high-speed ultracentrifugation, NaI treatment and selective solubilization in Lubrol. The inhibition of ovine cardiac and commercial porcine cerebral cortex Na,K-ATPase by 1 alpha,2 alpha-epoxyscilirosidin and ouabain was studied using a discontinuous Na,K-ATPase assay. The binding of 1 alpha,2 alpha-epoxyscillirosidin, ouabain and digoxin to the above enzymes was compared using a displacement binding assay with [3H] oubain. The Lubrol-solubilized ovine cardiac Na,K-ATPase showed a specific activity of 0.3 U/mg with no ouabain insensitive activity. I50 values of 2.1 x 10(-8) and 2.7 x 10(-8) were obtained for the inhibition of this enzyme by 1 alpha,2 alpha-epoxyscillirosidin and ouabain, respectively. 1 alpha,2 alpha-Epoxyscillirosidin has a much higher KD value (1.5 x 10(-7) M), however, than ouabain (9.5 x 10(-9) M) and digoxin (1.7 x 10(-8) M) in displacement binding studies with [3H]ouabain. 1 alpha,2 alpha-Epoxyscillirosidin is a potent inhibitor of ovine cardiac Na,K-ATPase and is a slightly stronger inhibitor of the enzyme than ouabain. The anomalous result for the displacement of 1 alpha,2 alpha-epoxyscillirosidin from its receptor is either a result of different affinities that K+ has for the enzyme ouabain and enzyme-1 alpha,2 alpha-epoxyscillirosidin complexes or because of different complex stabilities of these complexes.

  9. [Prolonged pregnancy--prostaglandins as the cause of labor onset].

    PubMed

    Rath, W

    1994-01-01

    The causes of prolonged pregnancy are still largely unknown and their investigation requires a detailed observation of potential birth-initiating stimuli on the endocrine and biomolecular level. A large number of clinical and biochemical studies point to the central importance of prostaglandins for the beginning of human birth. The main places of origin of the intensified prostaglandin formation and release are the amnion and the decidua which has "macrophage-like" properties and functions. The superordinate regulation and trigger mechanisms for intensified uterine prostaglandin production has not been sufficiently investigated either. Possible factors currently being debated include local changes in estrogen and progesterone biosynthesis in fetal membranes and decidua, subclinical inflammatory reactions with the activation of macrophages and the consecutive release of cytokines, and a loss of maternal immune tolerance with a time-determined rejection reaction. In addition, the substances inhibiting and stimulating prostaglandin synthesis have been detected in the amniotic fluid, fetal membranes and decidua. The fetus itself also plays an important part in the initiation of labor. Prolongation may be due to anatomic functional disturbances of the one hand which prevent the activation of the fetal hypothalamic-hypophyseal-adrenal axis and the release of the birth-initiating stimuli originating in the fetus; on the other hand, an elevated immune tolerance with a delayed rejection reaction or the lack of "bacterial stimulus" may inhibit the activation of the macrophages and hence the formation of cytokines. The consequences would be the development and release of a quantity of prostaglandins from the fetal membranes and decidua insufficient to overcome the pregnancy-maintaining safety systems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Theophylline prevents the inhibitory effect of prostaglandin E2 on glucose-induced insulin secretion in man.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, D; Cozzolino, D; Salvatore, T; Giunta, R; Torella, R

    1988-06-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the mechanism by which prostaglandins of the E series inhibit glucose-induced insulin secretion in man. Acute insulin response (mean change 3-10 min) to iv glucose (0.33 g/kg) was decreased by 40% during the infusion of prostaglandin E2 (10 micrograms/min) and glucose disappearance rates were reduced (P less than 0.05). Insulin response to arginine (5 g iv) and tolbutamide (1 g iv) were not affected by the same rate of prostaglandin E2 infusion. The inhibitory effect of prostaglandin E2 on glucose-induced insulin secretion was prevented by theophylline (100 mg as a loading dose followed by a 5 mg/min infusion), a drug that increases the intracellular cAMP concentrations by inhibiting phosphodiesterase activity. Our data suggest the involvement of the adenylate cyclase system in the inhibitory action of prostaglandin E2 on glucose-induced insulin secretion in man.

  11. Recovery of prostacyclin synthesis by rabbit aortic endothelium and other tissues after inhibition by aspirin.

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, C. E.; Ritter, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of aspirin on prostacyclin (PGI2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) synthesis was studied in rabbits. Tissues were removed from animals killed at intervals after injection of aspirin, and incubated with Hanks' solution. PGI2 synthesis was monitored by radioimmunoassay of its hydrolysis product, 6-oxo-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-oxo-PGF1 alpha). TXB2 production in clotted blood, also measured by radioimmunoassay, was determined as an index of platelet cyclo-oxygenase activity. 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha and TXB2 production 0.5 h after aspirin were similarly inhibited to less than 5% of control in all incubations. Subsequent recovery of PGI2 synthesis occurred more rapidly in aortic endothelium than in other tissues, including aorta denuded of endothelium. Recovery of TXB2 production was slower than that of PGI2. Intravenous cycloheximide prevented the partial recovery of PGI2 synthesis that otherwise occurred 6 h after aspirin, while intravenous epidermal growth factor increased recovery. It is concluded that in the rabbit, cyclo-oxygenase is synthesized more rapidly in aortic endothelium than in deep layers of aorta, or in the other tissues studied. PMID:3297227

  12. [A brief review of recent achievements concerning biochemistry and physiology of prostaglandins in the eye].

    PubMed

    Kahán, L I; Dekov, A M; Pálfalvi, M; Imre, G

    1999-11-28

    Two prostaglandin molecules have important physiological and pathophysiological role in the tissues of the eye. Prostaglandin F2 alpha takes part in mediating intraocular pressure, prostaglandin E2 is the mediator of inflammation. In case of increased intraocular pressure, latanoprost a derivative of prostaglandin F2 alpha can be applied. Numerous data are available on the favourable intraocular pressure lowering effect of latanoprost. It can be applied as a single hypotensive or it can be combined with eye-drops currently used in glaucoma. It exerts its therapeutic effect by increasing uveoscleral outflow. Inflammation in the eye can be diminished by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs similarly to inflammations in other tissues of the organism. Literature on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is enormous. Molecules of different structures inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins. Primarily they are useful anti-inflammatory agents, reduce intraocular pressure in secundary glaucoma, inhibit intraocular miosis and prevent development of cystoid macula oedema. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs do not exert their effects on prostaglandins themselves, but inhibit their synthesis. Hence the use of both, latanoprost and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs simultaneously, improves safety of therapy in case of patients prone to uveitis.

  13. Multiple roles for the active zone protein RIM1alpha in late stages of neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Calakos, Nicole; Schoch, Susanne; Südhof, Thomas C; Malenka, Robert C

    2004-06-24

    The active zone protein RIM1alpha interacts with multiple active zone and synaptic vesicle proteins and is implicated in short- and long-term synaptic plasticity, but it is unclear how RIM1alpha's biochemical interactions translate into physiological functions. To address this question, we analyzed synaptic transmission in autaptic neurons cultured from RIM1alpha-/- mice. Deletion of RIM1alpha causes a large reduction in the readily releasable pool of vesicles, alters short-term plasticity, and changes the properties of evoked asynchronous release. Lack of RIM1alpha, however, had no effect on synapse formation, spontaneous release, overall Ca2+ sensitivity of release, or synaptic vesicle recycling. These results suggest that RIM1alpha modulates sequential steps in synaptic vesicle exocytosis through serial protein-protein interactions and that this modulation is the basis for RIM1alpha's role in synaptic plasticity. Copyright 2004 Cell Press

  14. Elongation factor-1 alpha occurs as two copies in bees: implications for phylogenetic analysis of EF-1 alpha sequences in insects.

    PubMed

    Danforth, B N; Ji, S

    1998-03-01

    We report the complete sequence of a paralogous copy of elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) in the honeybee, Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae). This copy differs from a previously described copy in the positions of five introns and in 25% of the nucleotide sites in the coding regions. The existence of two paralogous copies of EF-1 alpha in Drosophila and Apis suggests that two copies of EF-1 alpha may be widespread in the holometabolous insect orders. To distinguish between a single, ancient gene duplication and parallel, independent fly and bee gene duplications, we performed a phylogenetic analysis of hexapod EF-1 alpha sequences. Unweighted parsimony analysis of nucleotide sequences suggests an ancient gene duplication event, whereas weighted parsimony analysis of nucleotides and unweighted parsimony analysis of amino acids suggests the contrary: that EF-1 alpha underwent parallel gene duplications in the Diptera and the Hymenoptera. The hypothesis of parallel gene duplication is supported both by congruence among nucleotide and amino acid data sets and by topology-dependent permutation tail probability (T-PTP) tests. The resulting tree topologies are also congruent with current views on the relationships among the holometabolous orders included in this study (Diptera, Hymenoptera, and Lepidoptera). More sequences, from diverse orders of holometabolous insects, will be needed to more accurately assess the historical patterns of gene duplication in EF-1 alpha.

  15. Regulation of protein kinase CK1alphaLS by dephosphorylation in response to hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Bedri, Shahinaz; Cizek, Stephanie M; Rastarhuyeva, Iryna; Stone, James R

    2007-10-15

    Low levels of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) are mitogenic to mammalian cells and stimulate the hyperphosphorylation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP-C) by protein kinase CK1alpha. However, the mechanisms by which CK1alpha is regulated have been unclear. Here it is demonstrated that low levels of H(2)O(2) stimulate the rapid dephosphorylation of CK1alphaLS, a nuclear splice form of CK1alpha. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that either treatment of endothelial cells with H(2)O(2), or dephosphorylation of CK1alphaLS in vitro enhances the association of CK1alphaLS with hnRNP-C. In addition, dephosphorylation of CK1alphaLS in vitro enhances the kinase's ability to phosphorylate hnRNP-C. While CK1alpha appears to be present in all metazoans, analysis of CK1alpha genomic sequences from several species reveals that the alternatively spliced nuclear localizing L-insert is unique to vertebrates, as is the case for hnRNP-C. These observations indicate that CK1alphaLS and hnRNP-C represent conserved components of a vertebrate-specific H(2)O(2)-responsive nuclear signaling pathway.

  16. Assessing functional divergence in EF-1alpha and its paralogs in eukaryotes and archaebacteria.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Yuji; Blouin, Christian; Susko, Edward; Roger, Andrew J

    2003-07-15

    A number of methods have recently been published that use phylogenetic information extracted from large multiple sequence alignments to detect sites that have changed properties in related protein families. In this study we use such methods to assess functional divergence between eukaryotic EF-1alpha (eEF-1alpha), archaebacterial EF-1alpha (aEF-1alpha) and two eukaryote-specific EF-1alpha paralogs-eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3) and Hsp70 subfamily B suppressor 1 (HBS1). Overall, the evolutionary modes of aEF-1alpha, HBS1 and eRF3 appear to significantly differ from that of eEF-1alpha. However, functionally divergent (FD) sites detected between aEF-1alpha and eEF-1alpha only weakly overlap with sites implicated as putative EF-1beta or aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) binding residues in EF-1alpha, as expected based on the shared ancestral primary translational functions of these two orthologs. In contrast, FD sites detected between eEF-1alpha and its paralogs significantly overlap with the putative EF-1beta and/or aa-tRNA binding sites in EF-1alpha. In eRF3 and HBS1, these sites appear to be released from functional constraints, indicating that they bind neither eEF-1beta nor aa-tRNA. These results are consistent with experimental observations that eRF3 does not bind to aa-tRNA, but do not support the 'EF-1alpha-like' function recently proposed for HBS1. We re-assess the available genetic data for HBS1 in light of our analyses, and propose that this protein may function in stop codon-independent peptide release.

  17. Variable patterns in the molecular evolution of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1alpha) gene in teleost fishes and mammals.

    PubMed

    Rytkönen, Kalle T; Ryynänen, Heikki J; Nikinmaa, Mikko; Primmer, Craig R

    2008-08-15

    The hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1alpha) protein is the major regulator of oxygen-dependent gene expression and a member of the bHLH-PAS family of transcription factors. In this study we compared and contrasted the rate and mode of HIF-1alpha molecular evolution between teleost fishes and mammals, as well as within teleost fishes and mammals. Various likelihood methods for estimating codon substitutions were used to detect different modes of selection. Although the overall evolutionary rate in teleost HIF-1alpha was at least twice as fast as in mammalian HIF-1alpha, the crucial interaction domains were observed to be under stringent negative selection in all vertebrates. Relaxed negative selection on less crucial regions of teleost HIF-1alpha compared to mammalian HIF-1alpha was detected, but no evidence for positive selection that was supported by all methods was found. We suggest that the relaxed selective constraints in teleost HIF-1alpha may be associated with the variable environmental oxygen levels to which teleosts have been exposed during their evolutionary history. However, in teleosts the positions with partial support for positive selection were not found in the vicinity of the HIF-1alpha domains which confer the oxygen sensitivity, but in the bHLH-PAS domain responsible for DNA binding and dimerization. The pattern of selection in the bHLH-PAS domain has some similarities with the patterns observed in the adaptive evolution of the homeodomain of Hox genes and may be typical in the molecular evolution of transcription factors.

  18. The role of prostaglandin E2 in tumor-associated immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dingzhi; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated inflammation can create an immunosuppressive microenvironment allowing tumor cells to escape immunosurveillance. Inhibiting immunosuppression remains one of the major challenges in cancer immunotherapy via checkpoint inhibitors. Recent preclinical data from Reis e Sousa's group may provide a strong rationale for developing new therapeutics to subvert tumor-induced immunosuppression via prostaglandin inhibition. PMID:26711015

  19. Effect of lactate-buffered peritoneal dialysis fluids on human peritoneal mesothelial cell interleukin-6 and prostaglandin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Witowski, J; Topley, N; Jörres, A; Liberek, T; Coles, G A; Williams, J D

    1995-01-01

    The present study focused on the evaluation of constitutive and cytokine-stimulated human peritoneal mesothelial cell (HPMC) IL-6 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha release following pre-exposure to peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF). Exposure of HPMC to PDF pH 5.2 resulted in a time-dependent increase in cell cytotoxicity [as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release] and concomitant inhibition of constitutive and IL-1 beta stimulated IL-6 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha synthesis. After 15 minutes of exposure to PDF constitutive and IL-1 beta stimulated IL-6 release were reduced by 32.0 +/- 9.7% and 76.0 +/- 7.4% (N = 6, P < 0.046 and P < 0.027, respectively). PCR amplification of reverse transcribed mRNA from HPMC pre-exposed to PDF pH 5.2 demonstrated suppression of IL-1 beta stimulated IL-6 and cyclooxygenase (Cox-1 and Cox-2) transcripts. In order to mimic the dialysis cycle in vivo, an in vitro dialysis system was established. HPMC were exposed first to control medium, PDF pH 5.2 or PDF 7.3 for 15 minutes and then sequentially to pooled spent peritoneal dialysis effluent for up to four hours. The cells were subsequently allowed to recover in control medium for 12 hours in the presence or absence of IL-1 beta or TNF-alpha (both at 1000 pg/ml). There was no evidence of significant cell toxicity as assessed by LDH release during either the 'in vitro dialysis' or 'recovery' phases. Under these conditions short term exposure to PDF pH 5.2 followed by 'in vitro dialysis' resulted in significant inhibition of cytokine stimulated IL-6 (69.6 +/- 18.2 vs. 96.7 +/- 27.9 pg/microgram, N = 13; P < 0.020 for IL-1 beta) and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (197.5 +/- 89.2 vs. 289.6 +/- 114.5 pg/microgram, N = 13; P < 0.020 for IL-1 beta) and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (197.5 +/- 89.2 vs. 289.6 +/- 114.5 pg/microgram, N = 13; P < 0.003) release when compared to cells incubated in control medium. Adjustment of the pH of PDF to 7.3 reversed its inhibitory effects. We conclude that short-term exposure to PDF pH 5

  20. The role of prostaglandins in human parturition.

    PubMed

    Gibb, W

    1998-06-01

    Parturition is the process of giving birth, and the molecular mechanisms involved are still to be elucidated. Among the various factors involved prostaglandins appear to have an important role. They are synthesized within the human fetal membranes (amnion and chorion) and decidua and act to ripen the cervix, change membrane structure and contract the myometrium. Prostaglandin concentrations increase in amniotic fluid prior to myometrial contractions, and the activity of prostaglandin H synthase (PGHS) increases in the chorion laeve and amnion at labour. This increase is due to increased expression of the PGHS-2 isoenzyme rather than the PGHS-1 isoenzyme. In animal pregnancy, there is also an increase in the expression of the PGHS-2 isoenzyme, and in both human and animal pregnancies this increase appears to occur in the fetal tissues rather than in the maternal tissues. Prostaglandin metabolism also plays an important role in altering prostaglandin output by the human fetal membranes. Prostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH) activity decreases in certain cases of preterm labour, and at term it decreases in the area of the chorion laeve covering the cervix. This may allow active prostaglandins produced by the amnion and chorion to access the cervix and myometrium. Recent studies have indicated that glucocorticoids may be important in regulating prostaglandin formation within the human fetal membranes by increasing expression of PGHS-2 in the amnion and decreasing PGDH activity in the chorion. Prostaglandin formation is also important in infection-induced preterm labour and both phospholipase and PGHS-2 activities can be increased by various cytokines. Prostaglandins are important for the onset of both term and preterm parturition and their effects may result from changes in prostaglandin synthesis, prostaglandin metabolism and expression of various prostaglandin receptors.

  1. Chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha}, suppress amyloid {beta}-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Milatovic, Snjezana-Zaja; Milatovic, Dejan; Fan, Guo-Huang; Richmond, Ann

    2011-11-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and accumulation of neurotoxic oligomeric peptides amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}). Although the molecular events are not entirely known, it has become evident that inflammation, environmental and other risk factors may play a causal, disruptive and/or protective role in the development of AD. The present study investigated the ability of the chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}), the respective ligands for chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4, to suppress A{beta}-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment with MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} significantly protected neurons from A{beta}-induced dendritic regression and apoptosis in vitro through activation of Akt, ERK1/2 and maintenance of metalloproteinase ADAM17 especially with SDF-1{alpha}. Intra-cerebroventricular (ICV) injection of A{beta} led to reduction in dendritic length and spine density of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and increased oxidative damage 24 h following the exposure. The A{beta}-induced morphometric changes of neurons and increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes, were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with the chemokines MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha}. Additionally, MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} was able to suppress the aberrant mislocalization of p21-activated kinase (PAK), one of the proteins involved in the maintenance of dendritic spines. Furthermore, MIP-2 also protected neurons against A{beta} neurotoxicity in CXCR2-/- mice, potentially through observed up regulation of CXCR1 mRNA. Understanding the neuroprotective potential of chemokines is crucial in defining the role for their employment during the early stages of neurodegeneration. -- Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuroprotective ability of the chemokines MIP2 and CXCL12 against A{beta} toxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MIP-2 or

  2. [The importance of oxytocin and prostaglandins to the mechanism of labor in humans].

    PubMed

    Husslein, P

    1984-01-01

    In the present work an attempt is made to get a deeper insight into the mechanism of labor and the events leading to the onset of labor by means of radioimmunological measurements of OT, PGE, PGF, PGEM and PGFM and by determining the oxytocin sensitivity and the concentration of oxytocin receptors. Prostaglandins play a major role for the mechanism of labor in labor of spontaneous onset as well as in several forms of induced labor (intravenous infusion of OT, amniotomy, local application of PGE2). The reason for this seems to be the 3 fold action of prostaglandins: stimulation of myometrial contractions, cervical softening, induction of gap junctions. Moreover prostaglandins produced in the placenta play a major role in the mechanism of placental separation and expulsion. Oxytocin seems to be of importance for the initiation of labor and the final expulsion of the fetus. Immediately before the onset of regular contractions a marked increase of oxytocin sensitivity can be demonstrated which correlates very well with an increase of oxytocin receptor concentration in the myometrium and decidua. Due to this increase in oxytocin sensitivity no rise in oxytocin plasma levels is necessary to induce labor. Apart from the induction of myometrial contractions oxytocin leads via receptors in the decidua to a stimulation of prostaglandin synthesis which can also be demonstrated in vitro. In cases of premature contractions the same mechanisms seem to be operational as at term, oxytocin and prostaglandins again playing a major role. Inhibition of contractions with ethanol is based on the capacity of alcohol to inhibit oxytocin secretion. The contractions inhibiting effect of ritodrine is mediated through the cAMP induced relaxation of the myometrium although possibly a direct reduction of prostaglandin synthesis by ritodrine is possible. Increasing estrogen and decreasing progesterone activities at term lead to multiple subtile changes leading to an increased prostaglandin

  3. Role of mucosal prostaglandins and DNA synthesis in gastric cytoprotection by luminal epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, S J; Brzozowski, T; Piastucki, I; Dembinski, A; Radecki, T; Dembinska-Kiec, A; Zmuda, A; Gregory, H

    1981-01-01

    This study compares the effect of epidermal growth factor and prostaglandins (PGE2 or PGI2), applied topically to gastric mucosa, on gastric secretion and formation of ASA-induced gastric ulcerations in rats. Epidermal growth factor given topically in non-antisecretory doses prevented dose-dependently the formation of ASA-induced ulcers without affecting prostaglandin generation but with a significant rise in DNA synthesis in the oxyntic mucosa. The anti-ulcer effect of topical prostaglandins was also accompanied by an increase in DNA synthesis. This study indicates that topical epidermal growth factor, like PGE2 or PGI2, is cytoprotective and that this cytoprotection is not mediated by the inhibition of gastric secretion or prostaglandin formation but related to the increase in DNA synthesis in oxyntic mucosa. PMID:7030877

  4. Role of prostaglandins in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Colina-Chourio, J A; Godoy-Godoy, N; Avila-Hernández, R M

    2000-04-01

    The role of prostaglandins (PGs) in hypertension (HT) is reviewed, emphasising their biochemical characteristics, physiological effects and functions, especially in the cardiovascular area, and the current evidence of their participation in the antihypertensive activity of a balanced mechanism to maintain normal blood pressure. Also, the clinical use of PGs and the future of such autacoids in the treatment of HT and other diseases or conditions is mentioned.

  5. The conserved amino-terminal domain of hSRP1 alpha is essential for nuclear protein import.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, K; Ryder, U; Lamond, A I

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear proteins are targeted through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in an energy-dependent reaction. The import reaction is mediated by nuclear localization sequences (NLS) in the substrate which are recognized by heterodimeric cytoplasmic receptors. hSRP1 alpha is an NLS-binding subunit of the human NLS receptor complex and is complexed in vivo with a second subunit of 97 kDa (p97). We show here that a short amino-terminal domain in hSRP1 alpha is necessary and sufficient for its interaction with p97. This domain is conserved in other SRP1-like proteins and its fusion to a cytoplasmic reporter protein is sufficient to promote complete nuclear import, circumventing the usual requirement for an NLS receptor interaction. The same amino-terminal domain inhibits import of NLS-containing proteins when added to an in vitro nuclear transport assay. While full-length hSRP alpha is able to leave the nucleus, the amino-terminal domain alone is not sufficient to promote exit. We conclude that hSRP1 alpha functions as an adaptor to tether NLS-containing substrates to the protein import machinery. Images PMID:8617227

  6. Studies on the 1alpha, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-like activity in a calcinogenic plant. Cestrum diurnum, in the chick.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, R H; Corradino, R A; Krook, L; Hughes, M R; Haussler, M R

    1976-04-01

    Cestrum diurnum (day-blooming jessamine) has been proposed to cause calcinosis in horses and cattle in Florida. The present studies investigated some physiological properties of the plant, using the chick as the experimental animal. The inclusion of dried leaf powder in a rachitogenic diet restored intestinal calcium-binding protein synthesis (CaBP) and increased calcium absorption in the cholecalciferol-deficient chick. The estimated level of cholecalciferol-equivalents in the dried leaf was about 30,000 to 35,000 IU/kg. Most of the activity was extractable with methanol:chloroform (2:1), indicating that the major cholecalciferol-like component in C. diurnum was different from the water soluble factor(s) in Solanum malacoxylon. The time course of effect of C. diurnum extract in rachitic chicks was similar to that ot 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol but the former had a longer lag time. The strontium fed chick, in which the kidney 25-hydroxycholecalciferol-1alpha-hydroxylase is inhibited, responded to C. diurnum extract, confirming the 1alpha,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-like character of the Cestrum factor. The extract also appeared to interact with the intestinal 1 alpha,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol cytosol receptor although this observation is preliminary. These findings indicate that the l alpha,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-like principle in C. diurnum many cause excessive calcium and phosphate absorption leading to calcinosis.

  7. Screening of Zulu medicinal plants for prostaglandin-synthesis inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jäger, A K; Hutchings, A; van Staden, J

    1996-06-01

    Aqueous and ethanolic extracts of 39 plants used in traditional Zulu medicine to treat headache or inflammatory diseases were screened for prostaglandin-synthesis inhibitors. Extracts were tested in an in vitro assay for cyclooxygenase inhibitors. In general, ethanolic extracts caused higher inhibition than aqueous extracts. Two-thirds of the plants screened had high inhibitory activity. The highest inhibition was obtained with ethanolic extracts of Bidens pilosa, Eucomis autumnalis, Harpephyllum caffrum, Helichrysum nudifolium, Leonotis intermedia, L. leonorus, Ocotea bullata, Rumex saggitatus, Solanum mauritianum, Synadenium cupulare and Trichilia dregeana.

  8. Effects of nonhypotensive endotoxemia in conscious rats: Role of prostaglandins

    SciTech Connect

    Burnier, M.; Waeber, B.; Aubert, J.F.; Nussberger, J.; Brunner, H.R. )

    1988-03-01

    A nonhypotensive dose of endotoxin was administered to normal conscious rats to evaluate the vascular and humoral effects of endotoxemia per se. Mean blood pressure and heart rate remained stable during the 45 min infusion of Escherichia coli endotoxin. However, a marked increase in plasma renin activity plasma epinephrine and plasma norepinephrine was observed during infusion in endotoxin-treated rats when compared with the vehicle-treated animals. In addition, the blood pressure response to exogenous norepinephrine was significantly reduced during nonhypotensive endotoxemia. Significant changes in regional blood flow distribution, as assessed by radiolabeled microspheres, were observed in endotoxemic rats; in particular a decrease in renal blood flow, and an increase in coronary blood flow were found. The role of prostaglandins in the vascular and humoral alterations induced by nonhypotensive endotoxemia was also examined. Pretreatment with indomethacin (5 mg) prevent the increase in plasma renin activity as well as plasma catecholamine levels. On the contrary, the decreased vascular reactivity and the reduction in renal blood flow observed during endotoxemia were not affected by prostaglandin synthesis inhibition. Thus significant vascular and humoral changes have been found during endotoxemia even in absence of hypotension. The humoral but not the vascular effects of endotoxemia were abolished when prostaglandin synthesis was inhibited.

  9. Prostaglandins for preventing postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tunçalp, Özge; Hofmeyr, G Justus; Gülmezoglu, A Metin

    2012-08-15

    Prostaglandins have mainly been used for postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) when other measures fail. Misoprostol, a new and inexpensive prostaglandin E1 analogue, has been suggested as an alternative for routine management of the third stage of labour. To assess the effects of prophylactic prostaglandin use in the third stage of labour. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (7 January 2011). We updated this search on 25 May 2012 and added the results to the awaiting classification section. Randomised trials comparing a prostaglandin agent with another uterotonic or no prophylactic uterotonic (nothing or placebo) as part of management of the third stage of labour. The primary outcomes were blood loss 1000 mL or more and the use of additional uterotonics. Two review authors independently assessed eligibility and trial quality and extracted data. We included 72 trials (52,678 women). Oral or sublingual misoprostol compared with placebo is effective in reducing severe PPH (oral: seven trials, 6225 women, not totalled due to significant heterogeneity; sublingual: risk ratio (RR) 0.66; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.45 to 0.98; one trial, 661 women) and blood transfusion (oral: RR 0.31; 95% CI 0.10 to 0.94; four trials, 3519 women).Compared with conventional injectable uterotonics, oral misoprostol was associated with higher risk of severe PPH (RR 1.33; 95% CI 1.16 to 1.52; 17 trials, 29,797 women) and use of additional uterotonics, but with a trend to fewer blood transfusions (RR 0.84; 95% CI 0.66 to 1.06; 15 trials; 28,213 women). Additional uterotonic data were not totalled due to heterogeneity. Misoprostol use is associated with significant increases in shivering and a temperature of 38º Celsius compared with both placebo and other uterotonics. Oral or sublingual misoprostol shows promising results when compared with placebo in reducing blood loss after delivery. The margin of benefit may be affected by whether other components of the

  10. Recovery of Prostaglandins in Human Cutaneous Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Malcolm W.; Søndergaard, Jørgen; McDonald-Gibson, Wendy

    1971-01-01

    An in-vivo skin perfusion technique has been used to study the pharmacological activity in inflamed skin of patients with allergic contact eczema. Perfusates from 35 out of 45 patients contained a smooth-muscle-contracting agent with prostaglandin-like properties. Solvent partition followed by thinlayer chromatography revealed this activity to be due to a mixture of prostaglandins E and F. This direct evidence supports the view that prostaglandins mediate inflammation in man. PMID:5572386

  11. HIF-1alpha mediates the induction of IL-8 and VEGF expression on infection with Afa/Dr diffusely adhering E. coli and promotes EMT-like behaviour.

    PubMed

    Cane, Gaëlle; Ginouvès, Amandine; Marchetti, Sandrine; Buscà, Roser; Pouysségur, Jacques; Berra, Edurne; Hofman, Paul; Vouret-Craviari, Valérie

    2010-05-01

    Microbes regulate a large panel of intracellular signalling events that can promote inflammation and/or enhance tumour progression. Indeed, it has been shown that infection of human intestinal cells with the Afa/Dr diffusely adhering E. coli C1845 strain induces expression of pro-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory genes. Here, we demonstrate that exposure of cryptic-like intestinal epithelial cells to C1845 bacteria induces HIF-1alpha protein levels. This effect depends on the binding of F1845 adhesin to the membrane-associated DAF receptor that initiates signalling cascades promoting translational mechanisms. Indeed, inhibition of MAPK and PI-3K decreases HIF-1alpha protein levels and blocks C1845-induced phosphorylation of the ribosomal S6 protein. Using RNA interference we show that bacteria-induced HIF-1alpha regulates the expression of IL-8, VEGF and Twist1, thereby pointing to a role for HIF-1 in angiogenesis and inflammation. In addition, infection correlates with a loss of E-cadherin and cytokeratin 18 and a rise in fibronectin, suggesting that bacteria may induce an epithelial to mesenchymal transition-like phenotype. Since HIF-1alpha silencing results in reversion of bacteria-induced EMT markers, we speculate that HIF-1alpha plays a key role linking bacterial infection to angiogenesis, inflammation and some aspects of cancer initiation.

  12. Pyrithione-zinc Prevents UVB-induced Epidermal Hyperplasia by Inducing HIF-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Suk; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Park, Jong-Wan

    2010-04-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes overgrow in response to ultraviolet-B (UVB), which may be associated with skin photoaging and cancer development. Recently, we found that HIF-1alpha controls the keratinocyte cell cycle and thereby contributes to epidermal homeostasis. A further study demonstrated that HIF-1alpha is down-regulated by UVB and that this process is involved in UVB-induced skin hyperplasia. Therefore, we hypothesized that the forced expression of HIF-1alpha in keratinocytes would prevent UVB-induced keratinocyte overgrowth. Among several agents known to induce HIF-1alpha, pyrithione-zinc (Py-Zn) overcame the UVB suppression of HIF-1alpha in cultured keratinocytes. Mechanistically, Py-Zn blocked the degradation of HIF-1alpha protein in keratinocytes, while it did not affect the synthesis of HIF-1alpha. Moreover, the p21 cell cycle inhibitor was down-regulated after UVB exposure, but was robustly induced by Py-Zn. In mice repeatedly irradiated with UVB, the epidermis became hyperplastic and HIF-1alpha disappeared from nuclei of epidermal keratinocytes. However, a cream containing Py-Zn effectively prevented the skin thickening and up-regulated HIF-1alpha to the normal level. These results suggest that Py-Zn is a potential agent to prevent UVB-induced photoaging and skin cancer development. This work also provides insight into a molecular target for treatment of UVB-induced skin diseases.

  13. Identification of novel targets for PGC-1{alpha} and histone deacetylase inhibitors in neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Rita M. Talati, Pratik; Blake, Kathryn R.; Meador-Woodruff, James H.; Russell, James W.

    2009-02-06

    Recent evidence suggests that the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator activated receptor {gamma} coactivator 1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) is involved in the pathology of Huntington's Disease (HD). While animals lacking PGC-1{alpha} express lower levels of genes involved in antioxidant defense and oxidative phosphorylation in the brain, little is known about other targets for PGC-1{alpha} in neuronal cells and whether there are ways to pharmacologically target PGC-1{alpha} in neurons. Here, PGC-1{alpha} overexpression in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells upregulated expression of genes involved in mitochondrial function, glucose transport, fatty acid metabolism, and synaptic function. Overexpression also decreased vulnerability to hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death and caspase 3 activation. Treatment of cells with the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi's) trichostatin A and valproic acid upregulated PGC-1{alpha} and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). These results suggest that PGC-1{alpha} regulates multiple pathways in neurons and that HDACi's may be good candidates to target PGC-1{alpha} and GLUT4 in HD and other neurological disorders.

  14. Protein synthesis elongation factor EF-1 alpha expression and longevity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Shikama, N; Ackermann, R; Brack, C

    1994-01-01

    It has been proposed that the decline in protein synthesis observed in aging organisms may result from a decrease in elongation factor EF-1 alpha. Transgenic Drosophila melanogaster flies carrying an additional copy of the EF-1 alpha gene under control of a heat-inducible promoter have an extended lifespan, further indicating that the EF-1 alpha gene may play an important role in determining longevity. To test this hypothesis, we have quantitated EF-1 alpha mRNA, EF-1 alpha protein, and the EF-1 alpha complex-formation activity in these transgenic flies. Furthermore, we have tested whether the transgene construct is functional--i.e., whether transgenic mRNA is induced when flies are grown at higher temperature. The results show that although there is a clear difference in mean lifespan between the EF-1 alpha transgenic (E) flies and the control transgenic (C) flies, E flies do not express more EF-1 alpha protein or mRNA than C flies kept at the same experimental conditions. Although the transgene can be induced when E flies are heat-shocked at 37 degrees C, transgenic mRNA is not detectable in E flies aged at 29 degrees C. In both lines, the loss in catalytic activity with age is the same. We conclude that the E flies examined here do not live longer because of overexpressing the EF-1 alpha gene. Images PMID:8183891

  15. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha regulates the expression of nucleotide excision repair proteins in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Mahfouf, Walid; Ali, Nsrein; Chemin, Cecile; Ged, Cecile; Kim, Arianna L; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Bickers, David R; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of DNA repair enzymes is crucial for cancer prevention, initiation, and therapy. We have studied the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation on the expression of the two nucleotide excision repair factors (XPC and XPD) in human keratinocytes. We show that hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) is involved in the regulation of XPC and XPD. Early UVB-induced downregulation of HIF-1alpha increased XPC mRNA expression due to competition between HIF-1alpha and Sp1 for their overlapping binding sites. Late UVB-induced enhanced phosphorylation of HIF-1alpha protein upregulated XPC mRNA expression by direct binding to a separate hypoxia response element (HRE) in the XPC promoter region. HIF-1alpha also regulated XPD expression by binding to a region of seven overlapping HREs in its promoter. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed putative HREs in the genes encoding other DNA repair proteins (XPB, XPG, CSA and CSB), suggesting that HIF-1alpha is a key regulator of the DNA repair machinery. Analysis of the repair kinetics of 6-4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers also revealed that HIF-1alpha downregulation led to an increased rate of immediate removal of both photolesions but attenuated their late removal following UVB irradiation, indicating the functional effects of HIF-1alpha in the repair of UVB-induced DNA damage.

  16. Prostaglandin release in canine acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, G; Bennett, A

    1976-01-01

    Acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis was induced in greyhound dogs by a bile salt/trypsin injection into the main pancreatic duct. Prostaglandin-like activity in the pancreatic venous blood, right atrial blood, and arterial blood was measured by bioassay. Activity rose significantly in the pancreatic venous blood of test dogs but not in controls. Chromatographic analysis of the peritoneal exudate from the dogs with pancreatitis showed high levels of prostaglandin E-like material (mean 43 ng/ml prostaglandin E2 equivalents). It seems likely that prostaglandins contribute to the induced pancreatitis. PMID:1269976

  17. Prostaglandin E, pessaries for induction of labour.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M; Shepherd, J H; Sims, C D

    1979-03-17

    Vaginal pessaries containing 3 mg of prostaglandin E2 were used to induce labour in 200 patients with variable induction features. Prostaglandin-induced labour was augmented where necessary by synthetic oxytocin. There was on failed induction. Only 23% of patients with favourable induction features and 53% of patients with unfavourable features needed oxytocin. There were no adverse fetal or maternal effects. The prostaglandin E2 pessary was as effective in inducing labour as 350 microgram extra-amniotic prostaglandin E2 in tylose in a comparable group of 200 patients in which there were 4 failed inductions.

  18. Prostacyclin: its pathogenic role in essential hypertension and the class effect of ACE inhibitors on prostaglandin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, J L; Villa, E; Serrano, M; Gallardo, J; García-Robles, R

    1999-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) block degradation of bradykinin, and bradykinin stimulates prostacyclin synthesis. Therefore, we set out to determine whether the effects of ACE inhibitors on prostaglandin production in essential hypertensive patients are class effects or are dependent on ACE inhibitor structure. In addition, we studied whether hypertensives show an impaired capacity to synthesize vasodilator prostaglandins. To address these questions, we compared the effects of captopril (sulfhydryl-containing inhibitor), enalapril and ramipril (carboxyl-containing inhibitors) and fosinopril (phosphoryl-containing inhibitor) on blood pressure and urinary excretion of 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG) F1-alpha (the breakdown product of prostacyclin) in 44 mild-to-moderate essential hypertensive subjects before and 8 weeks after administration of an ACEI. We also studied prostacyclin excretion in 15 normotensive healthy controls. Levels of urinary 6-keto-PGF1-alpha (pg/ml) were measured by specific radioimmunoassay. Hypertensive subjects showed a lower excretion of 6-keto-PGF1-alpha than normotensive controls (212+/-147 vs 353+/-98 pg/ml, p < 0.001). All ACEI induced a significant decrease in MAP and increased the rate of excretion of the prostacyclin metabolite: C, 211+/-200 to 338+/-250 pg/ml, p < 0.05; E, 202+/-133 to 296+/-207 pg/ml, p < 0.05; R, 205+/-127 to 342+/-211 pg/ml, p < 0.05; F, 235+/-128 to 347+/-241 pg/ml, p < 0.05. In hypertensives (n = 44) the decrease in blood pressure correlated negatively with the rise in 6-keto-PGF1-alpha excretion (r = -0.51, p < 0.001). These data suggest that impaired prostacyclin biosynthesis in hypertensive patients could account for haemodynamic changes leading to the hypertensive state. Moreover, the hypotensive mechanisms of ACEI may be mediated by an increase in prostacyclin production; this effect seems to be class-dependent.

  19. Different effect of prostaglandin E2 on B-cell activation by two distinct B-cell differentiation factors, B151-TRF1/IL-5 and B151-TRF2: selective inhibition of B151-TRF2-induced antibody response through increases in intracellular cyclic AMP levels

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, K.; Ono, S.; Takahama, Y.; Hirayama, F.; Hirano, H.; Itoh, K.; Dobashi, K.; Murakami, S.; Katoh, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Hamaoka, T.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on murine B-cell activation induced by two distinct B-cell differentiation factors, B151-TRF1/IL-5 and B151-TRF2, were examined. A final differentiation of unprimed B cells into IgM-producing cells induced by B151-TRF2 was markedly inhibited by PGE2 at physiological concentrations (around 10-8 M), whereas B151-TRF1/IL-5-induced antibody responses of unprimed as well as activated B cells were not affected by PGE2, even at 10-6 M. B-cell responses induced by B151-TRF2-like factors from autoimmune-prone MRL/1pr mice were also inhibited by PGE2. Biphasic increases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels were induced by culturing B cells with 10-6 or 10-8 M PGE2: rapid increases within 8 min and delayed increases around 16 hr. The direct addition of dibutyryl cAMP to cultures of B cells resulted in marked inhibition of antibody responses when stimulated with B151-TRF2 but not with B151-TRF1/IL-5. The B151-TRF2-induced antibody responses were also inhibited by cAMP-elevating reagents such as forskolin, cholera toxin and theophyline. Furthermore, 2′, 5′-dideoxyadenosine, which is an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, prevented the PGE2-mediated cAMP accumulation in unprimed B cells as well as the PGE2-mediated inhibition of B151-TRF2-induced B-cell responses when added at the initiation of culture. These results suggest that PGE2 inhibits B151-TRF2-induced antibody responses through the activation of adenylate cyclase and subsequent accumulation of intracellular cAMP, whereas B151-TRF1/IL-5-responsive B cells are resistant to the inhibitory effect of PGE2 and cAMP. PMID:2553585

  20. Sex, drugs and sports: prostaglandins, epitestosterone and sexual development.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Bryan K

    2007-01-01

    Amateau and McCarthy's findings published in Nature Neuroscience (June 2004) are noteworthy for suggesting a role for prostaglandins in sexual development. However, evidence suggests that in manipulating PGE2, they unknowingly implicated 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase [E.C. 1.1.1.50], 3(or 17)alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase [E.C. 1.1.1.209] and their respective products, androsterone (ADT) and epitestosterone (EpiT), in the developmental masculinization of sex behavior. EpiT is generally regarded as a hormonally inactive 17alpha-epimer of testosterone (T). In rats, the kidney is the primary site of EpiT formation, whereas in humans it originates from the gonads, with only a small contribution secreted by the adrenals. Because the ratio of T to EpiT is nearly constant, it is presently used for assessing steroid abuse in competitive sports, where the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) considers a T/EpiT ratio >4 evidence of T doping. Despite its central role in the detection of illict anabolic steroid use, our knowledge of factors effecting EpiT production is poor. Clues in the literature, however, reveal that prostaglandin-mediated processes, such as LHRH release, may influence its production. Antimycotics, NSAIDs, and opioid analgesics used in sports medicine are all known to effect prostaglandin E2 synthesis. Primary PGs are potent inhibitors of ADT oxidation, while indomethacin, a prostaglandin blocker, powerfully inhibits 3alpha-HSD reduction and ADT oxidation. This is significant because ADT inhibits the oxidation of EpiT, and may modulate its antiandrogenic and neuroprotective effects. It is hypothesized that the T/EpiT ratio is increased by COX-2 inhibitors and opiod analgesics, and decreased by antimycotics that do not impair testosterone biosynthesis. Given the devastating personal and career consequences that may result from false positive drug tests, substantive research on the effects of PGE2 manipulations on EpiT is warranted.

  1. Prostaglandin dehydrogenase and the initiation of labor.

    PubMed

    Challis, J R; Patel, F A; Pomini, F

    1999-01-01

    In summary, these studies have suggested that prostaglandin dehydrogenase may have a central role to play in the mechanisms which determine biologically active prostaglandin concentrations within human fetal membranes and placenta at the time of labor, at term or preterm. Moreover, our studies indicate that the regulation of PGDH may by multifactorial (figure 3). In certain regions of the membranes, we suggest that PGDH expression may be influenced by levels of anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In other regions of the membranes, we suggest that PGDH may be regulated at a transcriptional level by competing activities of progesterone and cortisol. The action of progesterone could be effected through systemically-derived steroid, or by locally synthesized steroid, acting in a paracrine and/or autocrine fashion. The effects of cortisol in placenta must be due to glucocorticoid derived from the maternal or fetal compartment, since the placenta lacks the hydroxylases required for endogenous cortisol production. However, metabolism of cortisol by 11 beta-HSD-2 reduces the potency of this glucocorticoid in placental tissue. In chorion however, cortisol may be formed locally, from cortisone, in addition to its being derived from the maternal circulation and/or from the amniotic fluid. Our current studies do not allow us to delineate whether the effects of progesterone and cortisol on PGDH are exerted through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) or progesterone receptor (PR) or both. It is possible that through pregnancy, PGDH activity is maintained by progesterone acting either through low levels of PR in membranes, or, more likely, acting through GR. At term, elevated levels of cortisol compete with and displace progesterone from GR, resulting in inhibition of PGDH transcription and activity. In this way, local withdrawal of progesterone action would be effected within human intrauterine tissues, without requiring changes in systemic, circulating progesterone

  2. Effects of renin inhibition in systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P W; Do, Y S; Schambelan, M; Horton, R; Boger, R S; Luther, R R; Hsueh, W A

    1990-12-01

    The effect of the direct renin inhibitor enalkiren (Abbott Laboratories) was examined in 8 healthy patients with essential hypertension. With an unrestricted sodium diet, plasma renin concentration was inhibited within 10 minutes by intravenous enalkiren and remained essentially undetectable for greater than or equal to 6 hours (11.9 +/- 4 to 1.0 +/- 0.6 ng angiotensin I/ml/hour, p less than 0.05). Mean arterial blood pressure declined gradually (108 +/- 5 to 84 +/- 4 mm Hg, p = 0.02), as did plasma aldosterone concentration (14.4 +/- 3.8 to 4.4 +/- 0.8 ng/dl, p = 0.03), whereas plasma immunoreactive active renin concentration increased progressively (35 +/- 14 to 160 +/- 60 pg/ml, p greater than 0.05). Urinary excretion of the stable metabolite of prostacyclin (6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha) decreased slightly, but not significantly (42 +/- 10 to 33 +/- 11 ng/g creatinine, p = 0.13). The addition of a diuretic decreased baseline blood pressure and increased baseline plasma renin and aldosterone values. Blood pressure responses to enalkiren were slightly (though not significantly) greater than those observed before diuretic administration. We conclude that enalkiren is effective in decreasing blood pressure and in inhibiting the renin system, without significantly altering urinary prostacyclin excretion, in patients with essential hypertension. These results suggest that the renin system contributes to the maintenance of elevated blood pressure in some patients with essential hypertension.

  3. Lonchocarpus sericeus lectin decreases leukocyte migration and mechanical hypernociception by inhibiting cytokine and chemokines production.

    PubMed

    Napimoga, Marcelo H; Cavada, Benildo S; Alencar, Nylane M N; Mota, Mário L; Bittencourt, Flávio S; Alves-Filho, José C; Grespan, Renata; Gonçalves, Reginaldo B; Clemente-Napimoga, Juliana T; de Freitas, Andressa; Parada, Carlos A; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2007-06-01

    In this study, we tested the potential use of a lectin from Lonchocarpus sericeus seeds (LSL), to control neutrophil migration and inflammatory hypernociception (decrease of nociceptive threshold). Pretreatment of the animals intravenously (15 min before) with LSL inhibited neutrophil migration to the peritoneal cavity in a dose-dependent fashion confirmed by an inhibition of rolling and adhesion of leukocytes by intravital microscopy. We also tested the ability of the pretreatment with LSL to inhibit neutrophil migration on immunised mice, and it was observed that a strong inhibition of neutrophil migration induced by ovoalbumin in immunized mice. Another set of experiments showed that pretreatment of the animals with LSL, inhibited the mechanical hypernociception in mice induced by the i.pl. injection of OVA in immunized mice and of carrageenan in naïve mice, but not that induced by prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) or formalin. This anti-nociceptive effect correlated with an effective blockade of neutrophil influx, as assessed by the hind paw tissue myeloperoxidase levels. In addition, we measured cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-1beta) and chemokines (MIP-1alpha [CCL3] and KC [CXCL1]) from the peritoneal exudates and i.pl. tissue. Animals treated with LSL showed inhibition of cytokines and chemokines release in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of LSL on neutrophil migration and mechanical inflammatory hypernocicepetion are associated with the inhibition of the production of cytokines and chemokines.

  4. EF-1[alpha] Is Associated with a Cytoskeletal Network Surrounding Protein Bodies in Maize Endosperm Cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clore, A. M.; Dannenhoffer, J. M.; Larkins, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    By using indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, we documented changes in the distribution of elongation factor-1[alpha] (EF-1[alpha]), actin, and microtubules during the development of maize endosperm cells. In older interphase cells actively forming starch grains and protein bodies, the protein bodies are enmeshed in EF-1[alpha] and actin and are found juxtaposed with a multidirectional array of microtubules. Actin and EF-1[alpha] appear to exist in a complex, because we observed that the two are colocalized, and treatment with cytochalasin D resulted in the redistribution of EF-1[alpa]. These data suggest that EF-1[alpha] and actin are associated in maize endosperm cells and may help to explain the basis of the correlation we found between the concentration of EF-1[alpha] and lysine content. The data also support the hypothesis that the cytoskeleton plays a role in storage protein deposition. The distributions of EF-1[alpha] actin, and microtubules change during development. We observed that in young cells before the accumulation of starch and storage protein, EF-1[alpha], actin, and microtubules are found mainly in the cell cortex or in association with nuclei. PMID:12239373

  5. Interaction between HP1{alpha} and replication proteins in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Auth, Tanja . E-mail: tauth@uni-bonn.de; Kunkel, Elisabeth; Grummt, Friedrich . E-mail: grummt@biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2006-10-15

    HP1 is an essential heterochromatin-associated protein known to play an important role in the organization of heterochromatin as well as in the transcriptional regulation of heterochromatic and euchromatic genes both in repression and activation. Using the yeast two-hybrid system and immunoprecipitation, we report here that murine HP1{alpha} interacts with the preRC proteins ORC1, ORC2 and CDC6. Immunofluorescence staining and EGFP/DsRed fusion proteins revealed a colocalization of HP1{alpha} with ORC1, ORC2 and CDC6 in heterochromatin, supporting the notion that ORC and probably CDC6 play an important role in murine HP1{alpha} function. Besides that, we also observed a colocalization of HP1{alpha} with {gamma}-tubulin suggesting a centrosomal localization of HP1{alpha} in murine cells. To gain insight into HP1{alpha} function, we applied the RNAi technique. Depletion of HP1{alpha} leads to a slow down of cell proliferation, an aberrant cell cycle progression as well as to multinucleated cells with insufficiently organized microtubule. These results together indicate that HP1{alpha} exerts functions in mitosis and cytokinesis.

  6. Induction of the nuclear factor HIF-1{alpha} in acetaminophen toxicity: Evidence for oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    James, Laura P. . E-mail: jameslaurap@uams.edu; Donahower, Brian; Burke, Angela S.; McCullough, Sandra; Hinson, Jack A.

    2006-04-28

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) controls the transcription of genes involved in angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, glycolysis, and cell survival. HIF-1{alpha} levels are a critical determinant of HIF activity. The induction of HIF-1{alpha} was examined in the livers of mice treated with a toxic dose of APAP (300 mg/kg IP) and sacrificed at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 h. HIF-1{alpha} was induced at 1-12 h and induction occurred prior to the onset of toxicity. Pre-treatment of mice with N-acetylcysteine (1200 mg/kg IP) prevented toxicity and HIF-1{alpha} induction. In further studies, hepatocyte suspensions were incubated with APAP (1 mM) in the presence of an oxygen atmosphere. HIF-1{alpha} was induced at 1 h, prior to the onset of toxicity. Inclusion of cyclosporine A (10 {mu}M), an inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition, oxidative stress, and toxicity, prevented the induction of HIF-1{alpha}. Thus, HIF-1{alpha} is induced before APAP toxicity and can occur under non-hypoxic conditions. The data suggest a role for oxidative stress in the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in APAP toxicity.

  7. Castration Therapy of Prostate Cancer Results in Downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ubaidi, Firas L.T.; Schultz, Niklas; Egevad, Lars; Granfors, Torvald; Helleday, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Background and Purpose: Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation in combination with radiotherapy of prostate cancer is used to improve radioresponsiveness and local tumor control. Currently, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Because hypoxia causes resistance to radiotherapy, we wanted to test whether castration affects the degree of hypoxia in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In 14 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, six to 12 prostatic needle core biopsy specimens were taken prior to castration therapy. Bilateral orchidectomy was performed in 7 patients, and 7 were treated with a GnRH-agonist (leuprorelin). After castrationm two to four prostatic core biopsy specimens were taken, and the level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in cancer was determined by immunofluorescence. Results: Among biopsy specimens taken before castration, strong HIF-1{alpha} expression (mean intensity above 30) was shown in 5 patients, weak expression (mean intensity 10-30) in 3 patients, and background levels of HIF-1{alpha} (mean intensity 0-10) in 6 patients. Downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} expression after castration was observed in all 5 patients with strong HIF-1{alpha} precastration expression. HIF-1{alpha} expression was also reduced in 2 of 3 patients with weak HIF-1{alpha} precastration expression. Conclusions: Our data suggest that neoadjuvant castration decreases tumor cell hypoxia in prostate cancer, which may explain increased radiosensitivity after castration.

  8. Fruit flies with additional expression of the elongation factor EF-1 alpha live longer.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, J C; Walldorf, U; Hug, P; Gehring, W J

    1989-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the decrease in protein synthesis that accompanies aging is preceded by a decrease in elongation factor EF-1 alpha protein and mRNA. Here we show that Drosophila transformed with a P-element vector containing an EF-1 alpha gene under control of hsp70 regulatory sequences have a longer life-span than control flies. Images PMID:2508089

  9. Distribution of elongation factor-1alpha in larval tissues of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Javad; Goodman, Cynthia L; Stuart, Melissa K

    2006-01-01

    Elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha) promotes the delivery of aminoacyl-tRNA to the acceptor site of the ribosome during protein synthesis. The enzyme has a number of additional functions, including regulation of apoptosis and interaction with the cytoskeleton. We determined the distribution of EF-1alpha in larval tissues of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda , with a monoclonal antibody generated to EF-1alpha from Sf21 cells, a cell line developed from ovarian tissue of S. frugiperda. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that EF-1alpha comprised 1.9-9.9% of the total protein within the tissues that were examined, which included fat body, Malpighian tubules, midgut, muscle, salivary glands, trachea, and ventral nerve cord. To a certain extent, EF-1alpha concentrations reflected the expected metabolic activity level of each of the represented tissues. Closer examination by immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that EF-1alpha concentrations varied among different cell types within a given tissue, i.e. midgut columnar epithelial cells yielded strong signals, while goblet cells failed to react with the EF-1alpha-specific antibody.

  10. Identification and characterization of an alternative promoter of the human PGC-1{alpha} gene

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshioka, Toyo; Inagaki, Kenjiro; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Sakai, Mashito; Ogawa, Wataru; Hosooka, Tetsuya; Iguchi, Haruhisa; Watanabe, Eijiro; Matsuki, Yasushi; Hiramatsu, Ryuji; Kasuga, Masato

    2009-04-17

    The transcriptional regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) controls mitochondrial biogenesis and energy homeostasis. Although physical exercise induces PGC-1{alpha} expression in muscle, the underlying mechanism of this effect has remained incompletely understood. We recently identified a novel muscle-enriched isoform of PGC-1{alpha} transcript (designated PGC-1{alpha}-b) that is derived from a previously unidentified first exon. We have now cloned and characterized the human PGC-1{alpha}-b promoter. The muscle-specific transcription factors MyoD and MRF4 transactivated this promoter through interaction with a proximal E-box motif. Furthermore, either forced expression of Ca{sup 2+}- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV), calcineurin A, or the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) kinase MKK6 or the intracellular accumulation of cAMP activated the PGC-1{alpha}-b promoter in cultured myoblasts through recruitment of cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) to a putative CRE located downstream of the E-box. Our results thus reveal a potential molecular basis for isoform-specific regulation of PGC-1{alpha} expression in contracting muscle.

  11. Comparative study of antiinflammatory drugs and sulphasalazine in relation to prostaglandin E and 19 hydroxylated prostaglandin E levels and human male fertility.

    PubMed

    Freixa, R; Roselló Catafau, J; Gelpí, E; Iglesias Cortit, J L; Ballescá, J L; de Paz, J L; Iglesias Guiu, J; Gonzalez Merlo, J; Puig Parellada, P

    1984-12-01

    The effect of lysine salicylate, flurbiprofen and sulphasalazine on human seminal prostaglandin profiles of six normal individuals was studied. All of them were treated with pharmacological doses of the three agents for four days with rest periods of eighteen days in between. Sulphasalazine produced less prostaglandin (PG) inhibition relative to the other two antiinflammatory drugs but in contrast only sulphasalazine induced sperm changes. Infertility status associated with the ingestion of therapeutic levels of sulphasalaziane is not directly related to the endogenous PGEs and 19-OH PGEs, the major prostanoids in human semen. PG determinations were carried out using gas chromatographic (GC) techniques.

  12. Partnership of PGC-1alpha and HNF4alpha in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rhee, James; Ge, Hongfei; Yang, Wenli; Fan, Melina; Handschin, Christoph; Cooper, Marcus; Lin, Jiandie; Li, Cai; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2006-05-26

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) is a transcriptional coactivator involved in several aspects of energy metabolism. It is induced or activated under different stimuli in a highly tissue-specific manner and subsequently partners with certain transcription factors in those tissues to execute various biological programs. In the fasted liver, PGC-1alpha is induced and interacts with hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha) and other transcription factors to activate gluconeogenesis and increase hepatic glucose output. Given the broad spectrum of liver genes responsive to HNF4alpha, we sought to determine those that were specifically targeted by the combination of PGC-1alpha and HNF4alpha. Coexpression of these two molecules in murine stem cells reveals a high induction of mRNA for apolipoproteins A-IV and C-II. Forced expression of PGC-1alpha in mouse and human hepatoma cells increases the mRNA of a subset of apolipoproteins implicated in very low density lipoprotein and triglyceride metabolism, including apolipoproteins A-IV, C-II, and C-III. Coactivation of the apoC-III/A-IV promoter region by PGC-1alpha occurs through a highly conserved HNF4alpha response element, the loss of which completely abolishes activation by PGC-1alpha and HNF4alpha. Adenoviral infusion of PGC-1alpha into live mice increases hepatic expression of apolipoproteins A-IV, C-II, and C-III and increases serum and very low density lipoprotein triglyceride levels. Conversely, knock down of PGC-1alpha in vivo causes a decrease in both apolipoprotein expression and serum triglyceride levels. These data point to a crucial role for the PGC-1alpha/HNF4alpha partnership in hepatic lipoprotein metabolism.

  13. PGC-1alpha activates CYP7A1 and bile acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Ju; Campos, Jose A; Gil, Gregorio; Osborne, Timothy F

    2003-12-12

    Cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the key enzyme that commits cholesterol to the neutral bile acid biosynthesis pathway and is highly regulated. In the current studies, we have uncovered a role for the transcriptional co-activator PGC-1alpha in CYP7A1 gene transcription. PGC-1alpha plays a vital role in adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue and stimulates genes important to mitochondrial function and oxidative metabolism. It is also involved in the activation of hepatic gluconeogenesic gene expression during fasting. Because the mRNA for CYP7A1 was also induced in mouse liver by fasting, we reasoned that PGC-1alpha might be an important co-activator for CYP7A1. Here we show that PGC-1alpha and CYP7A1 are also co-induced in livers of mice in response to streptozotocin induced diabetes. Additionally, infection of cultured HepG2 cells with a recombinant adenovirus expressing PGC-1alpha directly activates CYP7A1 gene expression and increases bile acid biosynthesis as well. Furthermore, we show that PGC-1alpha activates the CYP7A1 promoter directly in transient transfection assays in cultured cells. Thus, PGC-1alpha is a key activator of CYP7A1 and bile acid biosynthesis and is likely responsible for the fasting and diabetes dependent induction of CYP7A1. PGC-1alpha has already been shown to be a critical activator of several other oxidative processes including adaptive thermogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. Our studies provide further evidence of the fundamental role played by PGC-1alpha in oxidative metabolism and define PGC-1alpha as a link between diabetes and bile acid metabolism.

  14. MIP-1alpha as a critical macrophage chemoattractant in murine wound repair.

    PubMed Central

    DiPietro, L A; Burdick, M; Low, Q E; Kunkel, S L; Strieter, R M

    1998-01-01

    At sites of injury, macrophages secrete growth factors and proteins that promote tissue repair. While this central role of the macrophage has been well studied, the specific stimuli that recruit macrophages into sites of injury are not well understood. This study examines the role of macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha (MIP-1alpha), a C-C chemokine with monocyte chemoattractant capability, in excisional wound repair. Both MIP-1alpha mRNA and protein were detectable in murine wounds from 12 h through 5 d after injury. MIP-1alpha protein levels peaked 3 d after injury, coinciding with maximum macrophage infiltration. The contribution of MIP-1alpha to monocyte recruitment into wounds was assessed by treating mice with neutralizing anti-MIP-1alpha antiserum before injury. Wounds of mice treated with anti-MIP-1alpha antiserum had significantly fewer macrophages than control (41% decrease, P < 0. 01). This decrease in wound macrophages was paralleled by decreased angiogenic activity and collagen synthesis. When tested in the corneal micropocket assay, wound homogenates from mice treated with anti-MIP-1alpha contained significantly less angiogenic activity than control wound homogenates (27% positive for angiogenic activity versus 91% positive in the control group, P < 0.01). Collagen production was also significantly reduced in the wounds from anti-MIP-1alpha treated animals (29% decrease, P < 0.05). The results demonstrate that MIP-1alpha plays a critical role in macrophage recruitment into wounds, and suggest that appropriate tissue repair is dependent upon this recruitment. PMID:9541500

  15. Regulation of activator protein-1 by 8-iso-prostaglandin E2 in a thromboxane A2 receptor-dependent and -independent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas J.; Markillie, Lye MENG.

    2003-05-01

    The thromboxane (TX) A{sub 2} receptor (TP) encompasses two alternatively spliced forms, termed the platelet/placental (TP-P) and endothelial (TP-E) type receptors. Experimental evidence suggests that TP activity may be modulated by novel ligands, termed the isoprostanes, that paradoxically act as TP agonists in smooth muscle and TP antagonists in platelet preparations. Here we have investigated whether prototypical isoprostanes 8-iso-prostaglandin (PG)F{sub 2{alpha}} and 8-iso-PGE{sub 2} regulate the activity of TP isoforms expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using activator protein-1 (AP-1)-luciferase activity as a reporter. AP-1-luciferase activity was increased by a TP agonist [9,11-dideoxy-9{alpha},11{alpha}-methanoepoxy PGF{sub 2{alpha}} (U46619)] in CHO cells transfected with the human TP-P and TP-E receptors, and this response was fully inhibited by TP antagonists [1S-[1{alpha},2{beta}(Z),3{alpha},5{alpha}

  16. Tannin 1-alpha-O-galloylpunicalagin induces the calcium-dependent activation of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lih-Geeng; Liu, Yen-Chin; Hsieh, Chia-Wen; Liao, Being-Chyuan; Wung, Being-Sun

    2008-10-01

    Many polyphenols have been found to increase endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production. In our present study, we investigated the effects of 1-alpha-O-galloylpunicalagin upon endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity in endothelial cells (ECs). Both 1-alpha-O-galloylpunicalagin and punicalagin induced NO production in a dose-dependent manner in ECs. Despite having similar chemical structures, punicalagin induced lower levels of NO production than 1-alpha-O-galloylpunicalagin. After 1-alpha-O-galloylpunicalagin addition, a rise in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration preceded NO production. The Ca(2+) ionophore A23187 stimulated eNOS phosphorylation and augmented NO production. Pretreatment with Ca(2+) chelators inhibited 1-alpha-O-galloylpunicalagin-induced eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. Treatment with 1-alpha-O-galloylpunicalagin did not alter the eNOS protein levels but, unlike punicalagin, induced a sustained activation of eNOS Ser(1179) phosphorylation. 1-alpha-O-galloylpunicalagin was also found to activate ERK1/2, JNK and Akt in ECs. Moreover, simultaneous treatment of these cells with specific phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitors significantly inhibited the observed increases in eNOS activity and phosphorylation levels. In contrast, the inhibition of (ERK)1/2, JNK and p38 had no influence on eNOS Ser(1179) phosphorylation. Our present results thus indicate that the 1-alpha-O-galloylpunicalagin-induced calcium-dependent activation of eNOS is primarily mediated via a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt-dependent increase in eNOS activity, and occurs independently of the eNOS protein content.

  17. Bioproduction of prostaglandins in a transgenic liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Miho; Kanamoto, Hirosuke; Nagaya, Shingo; Ohyama, Kanji

    2013-10-01

    Prostaglandins are biologically active substances used in a wide range of medical treatments. Prostaglandins have been supplied mainly by chemical synthesis; nevertheless, the high cost of prostaglandin production remains a factor. To lower the cost of prostaglandin production, we attempted to produce prostaglandins using a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha L., which accumulates arachidonic acid, which is known as a substrate of prostaglandins. Here we report the first bioproduction of prostaglandins in plant species by introducing a cyclooxygenase gene from a red alga, Gracilaria vermiculophylla into the liverwort. The transgenic liverworts accumulated prostaglandin F2α, prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin D2 which were not detected in the wild-type liverwort. Moreover, we succeeded in drastically increasing the bioproduction of prostaglandins using an in vitro reaction system with the extracts of transgenic liverworts.

  18. Self-renewal and pluripotency is maintained in human embryonic stem cells by co-culture with human fetal liver stromal cells expressing hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lei; Liu, Yu-xiao; Yang, Chao; Yue, Wen; Shi, Shuang-shuang; Bai, Ci-xian; Xi, Jia-fei; Nan, Xue; Pei, Xue-Tao

    2009-10-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells are typically maintained on mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) feeders or with MEF-conditioned medium. However, these xenosupport systems greatly limit the therapeutic applications of hES cells because of the risk of cross-transfer of animal pathogens. The stem cell niche is a unique tissue microenvironment that regulates the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. Recent evidence suggests that stem cells are localized in the microenvironment of low oxygen. We hypothesized that hypoxia could maintain the undifferentiated phenotype of embryonic stem cells. We have co-cultured a human embryonic cell line with human fetal liver stromal cells (hFLSCs) feeder cells stably expressing hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1alpha), which is known as the key transcription factor in hypoxia. The results suggested HIF-1alpha was critical for preventing differentiation of hES cells in culture. Consistent with this observation, hypoxia upregulated the expression of Nanog and Oct-4, the key factors expressed in undifferentiated stem cells. We further demonstrated that HIF-1alpha could upregulate the expression of some soluble factors including bFGF and SDF-1alpha, which are released into the microenvironment to maintain the undifferentiated status of hES cells. This suggests that the targets of HIF-1alpha are secreted soluble factors rather than a cell-cell contact mechanism, and defines an important mechanism for the inhibition of hESCs differentiation by hypoxia. Our findings developed a transgene feeder co-culture system and will provide a more reliable alternative for future therapeutic applications of hES cells.

  19. Pyrroloquinoline quinone stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis through cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation and increased PGC-1alpha expression.

    PubMed

    Chowanadisai, Winyoo; Bauerly, Kathryn A; Tchaparian, Eskouhie; Wong, Alice; Cortopassi, Gino A; Rucker, Robert B

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive compounds reported to stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis are linked to many health benefits such increased longevity, improved energy utilization, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Previously studies have shown that mice and rats fed diets lacking in pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) have reduced mitochondrial content. Therefore, we hypothesized that PQQ can induce mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse hepatocytes. Exposure of mouse Hepa1-6 cells to 10-30 microm PQQ for 24-48 h resulted in increased citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase activity, Mitotracker staining, mitochondrial DNA content, and cellular oxygen respiration. The induction of this process occurred through the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha), a pathway known to regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. PQQ exposure stimulated phosphorylation of CREB at serine 133, activated the promoter of PGC-1alpha, and increased PGC-1alpha mRNA and protein expression. PQQ did not stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis after small interfering RNA-mediated reduction in either PGC-1alpha or CREB expression. Consistent with activation of the PGC-1alpha pathway, PQQ increased nuclear respiratory factor activation (NRF-1 and NRF-2) and Tfam, TFB1M, and TFB2M mRNA expression. Moreover, PQQ protected cells from mitochondrial inhibition by rotenone, 3-nitropropionic acid, antimycin A, and sodium azide. The ability of PQQ to stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis accounts in part for action of this compound and suggests that PQQ may be beneficial in diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.

  20. Prostaglandin E production and hypercalcaemia in rats bearing the Walker carcinosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Seyberth, H W; Bonsch, G; Müller, H; Minne, H W; Erlenmaier, T; Strein, K; Imbeck, H; Mrongovius, R

    1980-09-01

    The hypothesis that there is prostaglandin-mediated hypercalcaemia associated with the Walker carcinosarcoma in the rat was tested by measuring PGE production during the development of the hypercalcaemia, and determining the effects of inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis on serum calcium concentration. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) activity was estimated by the determination of the serum concentration of immunoreactive PTH. There was a 3-fold increase in the urinary excretion of 7α-hydroxy-5,11-diketotetranor-prostane-1,16-dioic acid (PGE-M), a major urinary metabolite of the E prostaglandins from basal levels. Treatment with indomethacin, a potent inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, did not lower serum calcium concentrations with two different doses (1·6 mg/kg/day orally and 5 mg/kg/day i.m.); effective inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis was demonstrated by the suppression of PGE-M excretion rates below basal levels. Serum concentrations of immunoreactive PTH were not significantly altered by either tumour growth or indomethacin. Dexamethasone (0·5 mg/kg/day i.m.) attenuated both the increased urinary excretion of PGE-M and the rise in serum calcium concentration, suggesting that one or several lipoxygenase products might be the actual mediators of the hypercalcaemia. We conclude that the hypercalcaemia in the rat with Walker carcinosarcoma is probably not mediated by E-prostaglandins and probably not by any other product of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. The increased PGE turnover may be considered as a biochemical marker of tumour load, but not as an indicator of a prostaglandin-mediated hypercalcaemia.

  1. Prostaglandin E production and hypercalcaemia in rats bearing the Walker carcinosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Seyberth, H. W.; Bonsch, G.; Müller, H.; Minne, H. W.; Erlenmaier, T.; Strein, K.; Imbeck, H.; Mrongovius, R.

    1980-01-01

    The hypothesis that there is prostaglandin-mediated hypercalcaemia associated with the Walker carcinosarcoma in the rat was tested by measuring PGE production during the development of the hypercalcaemia, and determining the effects of inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis on serum calcium concentration. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) activity was estimated by the determination of the serum concentration of immunoreactive PTH. There was a 3-fold increase in the urinary excretion of 7α-hydroxy-5,11-diketotetranor-prostane-1,16-dioic acid (PGE-M), a major urinary metabolite of the E prostaglandins from basal levels. Treatment with indomethacin, a potent inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, did not lower serum calcium concentrations with two different doses (1·6 mg/kg/day orally and 5 mg/kg/day i.m.); effective inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis was demonstrated by the suppression of PGE-M excretion rates below basal levels. Serum concentrations of immunoreactive PTH were not significantly altered by either tumour growth or indomethacin. Dexamethasone (0·5 mg/kg/day i.m.) attenuated both the increased urinary excretion of PGE-M and the rise in serum calcium concentration, suggesting that one or several lipoxygenase products might be the actual mediators of the hypercalcaemia. We conclude that the hypercalcaemia in the rat with Walker carcinosarcoma is probably not mediated by E-prostaglandins and probably not by any other product of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. The increased PGE turnover may be considered as a biochemical marker of tumour load, but not as an indicator of a prostaglandin-mediated hypercalcaemia. PMID:7426347

  2. Two genes encode related cytoplasmic elongation factors 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) in Drosophila melanogaster with continuous and stage specific expression.

    PubMed Central

    Hovemann, B; Richter, S; Walldorf, U; Cziepluch, C

    1988-01-01

    We have characterized two previously cloned genes, F1 and F2 (1) that code for elongation factor EF - 1 alpha of Drosophila melanogaster. Genomic Southern blot hybridization revealed that they are the only gene copies present. We isolated cDNA clones of both transcripts from embryonal and pupal stage of development that cover the entire transcription unit. The 5' ends of both genes have been determined by primer extension and for F1 also by RNA sequencing. These start sites have been shown to be used consistently during development. Comparison of cDNA and genomic sequences revealed that EF - 1 alpha,F1 consists of two and EF - 1 alpha,F2 of five exons. The two described elongation factor genes exhibit several regions of strong sequence conservation when compared to five recently cloned eucaryotic elongation factors. Images PMID:3131735

  3. Inflammation-induced anorexia and fever are elicited by distinct prostaglandin dependent mechanisms, whereas conditioned taste aversion is prostaglandin independent.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Anna; Wilhelms, Daniel Björk; Mirrasekhian, Elahe; Jaarola, Maarit; Blomqvist, Anders; Engblom, David

    2017-03-01

    Systemic inflammation evokes an array of brain-mediated responses including fever, anorexia and taste aversion. Both fever and anorexia are prostaglandin dependent but it has been unclear if the cell-type that synthesizes the critical prostaglandins is the same. Here we show that pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, but not of COX-1, attenuates inflammation-induced anorexia. Mice with deletions of COX-2 selectively in brain endothelial cells displayed attenuated fever, as demonstrated previously, but intact anorexia in response to peripherally injected lipopolysaccharide (10μg/kg). Whereas intracerebroventricular injection of a cyclooxygenase inhibitor markedly reduced anorexia, deletion of COX-2 selectively in neural cells, in myeloid cells or in both brain endothelial and neural cells had no effect on LPS-induced anorexia. In addition, COX-2 in myeloid and neural cells was dispensable for the fever response. Inflammation-induced conditioned taste aversion did not involve prostaglandin signaling at all. These findings collectively show that anorexia, fever and taste aversion are triggered by distinct routes of immune-to-brain signaling.

  4. Effects of endothelin on hemodynamics, prostaglandins, blood coagulation and renal function.

    PubMed

    Schulz, E; Ruschitzka, F; Lueders, S; Heydenbluth, R; Schrader, J; Müller, G A

    1995-03-01

    The interaction of the endogenous vasoconstrictors endothelin (ET), angiotensin II (Ang II) and catecholamines with the kallikrein-kinin-, prostaglandin and renin-aldosterone systems in the pathogenesis of acute renal failure (ARF) is still to be defined. In 18 anesthesized pigs the influence of i.v. bolus applications of ET (2 micrograms/kg), Ang II (10 micrograms/kg) and norepinephrine (NE; 20 micrograms/kg) on hemodynamics, plasmatic coagulation and fibrinolysis system, prostaglandins and renal function was studied. ET induced a biphasic change in blood pressure, starting with an initial short-lasting reduction followed by a long-lasting elevation of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Endothelin bolus resulted in a significant increase of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGE2 and TXB2 plasma levels (P < 0.05 against preinjection values), whereas prostaglandins remained unchanged in the Ang II and NE groups. There was a distinct correlation between the plasma ET and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha levels (r = 0.82). In contrast to Ang II or NE, ET induced a shortening of the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and increase of antithrombin III levels (ATIII), fibrin monomers (FM), prekallikrein (PKK) and factor VIII activity at the beginning. Finally a pronounced decrease of ATIII, FM and PKK occurred, indicating a consumptive coagulopathy. At the end of the experiment, elevated plasma renin activity and pCO2, significantly decreased creatinine clearance, blood pH, pO2, base excess, HCO3-, oxygen saturation (P < 0.01), a distinct glomerular proteinuria, and a final anuria were observated. These results reveal that ET activates the plasmatic coagulation system and induces an ARF accompanied by impairment of pulmonary function.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Immunohistochemical expression of HIF-1alpha in response to early myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Blanco Pampín, José; García Rivero, Sonia Aranzazu; Otero Cepeda, Xosé Luis; Vázquez Boquete, Angel; Forteza Vila, Jerónimo; Hinojal Fonseca, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of ischemia on the myocardial fibers and the expression of the transcriptional factor for angiogenesis hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1alpha) in human heart specimens. We have prospectively analyzed the HIF-1alpha expression in human ischemic hearts with the ABC-inmunohistochemistry technique and amplification by biotinylated tyramide. The relationship between the expression of HIF-1alpha and the temporal evolution of ischemia has also been evaluated. As pathomorphological diagnosis of early myocardial ischemia has many problems in human autopsy material with less than 4 to 6 h after clinical onset, we suggest that HIF-1alpha is helpful in the early acute myocardial infarction diagnosis, so it stains necrotic areas within the first 2 h. The amplification procedure provides a higher intensity of the final staining without losing specificity. It is concluded that in normal cardiac fibers, basal expression of HIF-1alpha is not appreciable, but it steadily increases after ischemia. With regard to the practical applicability in forensic field, our observations suggest that positive immunohistochemical expression of HIF-1alpha on heart samples may be used as a reliable indicator of myocardial damage in cases without cardiac lesion evidence, using conventional microscopy. This method is especially useful and may provide definitive proof of myocardial ischemia in unexpected deaths without previous symptoms, or in forensic cases with a short period of clinical manifestations. In addition, it may have been involved in possible future cardiovascular therapies.

  6. Effects of continuously administered murine interleukin-1 alpha: tolerance development and granuloma formation.

    PubMed Central

    Otterness, I G; Golden, H W; Brissette, W H; Seymour, P A; Daumy, G O

    1989-01-01

    Continuous infusion of murine recombinant interleukin-1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha) into rats by using intraperitoneally implanted osmotic pumps led to marked decreases in body weight, liver enzymes (serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase, and sorbitol dehydrogenase), appetite, and mobility and increases in drinking, blood urea nitrogen, and total peripheral blood leukocytes within 3 days. Granuloma formation was found in the local area of rIL-1 alpha release. As early as day 3, a focal infiltrate of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, mononuclear leukocytes, and plasma cells filled the area; by day 6, extensive fibrosis was found. A loss of rIL-1 alpha-induced changes, with the exception of granuloma formation, occurred by day 10. A marked decrease in the response to rIL-1 alpha was also observed when animals were challenged by implantation of new pumps containing rIL-1 alpha, with monitoring of body weight, or by subcutaneous injection of rIL-1 alpha, with monitoring of serum colony-stimulating factor production. We propose that, even in the continuous presence of interleukin-1, replacement of the acute responses to interleukin-1 by restoration of more normal physiology may be advantageous upon acquisition of specific immunity. Images PMID:2788137

  7. Polymorphism of IL-1alpha(-889) Gene and Its Association with Aggressive Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Zahra; Tavakkol-Afshari, Jalil; Hojjat, Hamed; Arab, Hamid Reza; Radvar, Mehrdad; Sadeghizadeh, Mehrdad; Ebadian, Ahmad Reza

    2009-06-01

    Adult periodontitis is a complex multifactorial disease whose etiology is not well defined. The pro-inflammatory and bone resorption properties of Interleukine-1alpha (IL-1alpha) strongly suggest a role for this cytokine in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Eighty Iranian adult patients with periodontitis and 80 Iranian controls were investigated in this study.In this study we report that the frequency of IL-1alpha genotypes including allele 2 of the IL-1alpha(-889) restriction fragment length bi-allele polymorphism were significantly increased in patients with advanced aggressive adult periodontitis compared to those with early and moderate disease. Furthermore, allele 2 was associated with increased production of IL-1alpha by activated peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells of patients with advanced disease, although this increase failed to reach statistical significance. Finally, the data obtained revealed significant linkage disequilibrium between allele 2 of the IL-1alpha (-889) polymorphism and allele 2 of the bi-allelic IL-1beta (+3953) polymorphism in both patients and orally normal controls. These findings provide new insight into the possible rate of IL-1alpha and beta genes polymorphism in the susceptibility to adult periodontitis.

  8. Phenytoin potentiates interleukin-1-induced prostaglandin biosynthesis in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Modéer, T.; Brunius, G.; Iinuma, M.; Lerner, U. H.

    1992-01-01

    1. The effect of phenytoin (PHT) on prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) biosynthesis in human gingival fibroblasts stimulated by interleukin-1 (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta) or by tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) was studied. 2. IL-1 alpha (1.5-6.0 ng ml-1) and IL-1 beta (30-300 pg ml-1), dose-dependently, stimulated PGE2 formation, in 24 h cultures, with IL-beta being the most potent agonist. 3. PHT (2.5-20 micrograms ml-1) did not induce PGE2 formation itself but potentiated IL-1 alpha- and IL-1 beta-induced PGE2 formation in the gingival fibroblasts in a manner dependent on the concentrations of both IL-1 and PHT. 4. IL-1 beta (0.1-1.0 ng ml-1) induced release of [3H]-arachidonic acid ([3H]-AA) from prelabelled fibroblasts that was potentiated by PHT (20 micrograms ml-1). 5. TNF-alpha (greater than or equal to 0.01 micrograms ml-1) significantly stimulated the biosynthesis of PGE2 by a process that was potentiated by PHT. 6. Addition of exogenous arachidonic acid (AA) (greater than or equal to 1 microM) caused an increase of PGE2 formation in the fibroblasts that was not potentiated by PHT (20 micrograms ml-1). 7. The results indicate that treatment with PHT results in upregulation of prostaglandin biosynthesis in gingival fibroblasts challenged with IL-1 or TNF alpha, at least partly due to enhanced level of phospholipase A2 activity. PMID:1504741

  9. Interleukin-1 alpha has antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic activities in a rat neuropathic pain model.

    PubMed

    Mika, Joanna; Korostynski, Michal; Kaminska, Dorota; Wawrzczak-Bargiela, Agnieszka; Osikowicz, Maria; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocki, Ryszard; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2008-09-15

    Nerve injury and the consequent release of interleukins (ILs) are processes implicated in pain transmission. To study the potential role of IL-1 in the pathogenesis of allodynia and hyperalgesia, IL-1alpha and comparative IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNA levels were quantified using competitive RT-PCR of the lumbar spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG; L5-L6) three and seven days after chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Microglial and astroglial activation in the ipsilateral spinal cord and DRG were observed after injury. In naive and CCI-exposed rats, IL-1alpha mRNA and protein were not detected in the spinal cord. IL-1beta and IL-6 mRNAs were strongly ipsilaterally elevated on day seven after CCI. In the ipsilateral DRG, IL-1alpha, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNA levels were increased on days three and seven; IL-1beta was elevated only on day seven. Western blot analysis revealed both the presence of IL-1alpha proteins (45 and 31 kDa) in the DRG and the down-regulation of these proteins after CCI. Intrathecal administration of IL-1alpha (50-500 ng) in naive rats did not influence nociceptive transmission, but IL-1beta (50-500 ng) induced hyperalgesia. In rats exposed to CCI, an IL-1alpha or IL-1 receptor antagonist dose-dependently attenuated symptoms of neuropathic pain; however, no effect of IL-1beta was observed. In sum, the first days after CCI showed a high abundance of IL-1alpha in the DRG. Together with the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects observed after IL-1alpha administration, this finding indicates an important role for IL-1alpha in the development of neuropathic pain symptoms.

  10. Pharmacogenomics of Prostaglandin and Leukotriene Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo-García, José A.; Perkins, James R.; Jurado-Escobar, Raquel; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A.; Viguera, Enrique; Pérez-Sánchez, Natalia; Blanca-López, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Individual genetic background together with environmental effects are thought to be behind many human complex diseases. A number of genetic variants, mainly single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), have been shown to be associated with various pathological and inflammatory conditions, representing potential therapeutic targets. Prostaglandins (PTGs) and leukotrienes (LTs) are eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid and related polyunsaturated fatty acids that participate in both normal homeostasis and inflammatory conditions. These bioactive lipid mediators are synthesized through two major multistep enzymatic pathways: PTGs by cyclooxygenase and LTs by 5-lipoxygenase. The main physiological effects of PTGs include vasodilation and vascular leakage (PTGE2); mast cell maturation, eosinophil recruitment, and allergic responses (PTGD2); vascular and respiratory smooth muscle contraction (PTGF2), and inhibition of platelet aggregation (PTGI2). LTB4 is mainly involved in neutrophil recruitment, vascular leakage, and epithelial barrier function, whereas cysteinyl LTs (CysLTs) (LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4) induce bronchoconstriction and neutrophil extravasation, and also participate in vascular leakage. PTGs and LTs exert their biological functions by binding to cognate receptors, which belong to the seven transmembrane, G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. SNPs in genes encoding these receptors may influence their functionality and have a role in disease susceptibility and drug treatment response. In this review we summarize SNPs in PTGs and LTs receptors and their relevance in human diseases. We also provide information on gene expression. Finally, we speculate on future directions for this topic. PMID:27708579

  11. A viral vector expressing hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha inhibits hippocampal neuronal apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Xiqing; Kong, Weina; Liu, Lingyun; Yu, Wenguo; Zhang, Zhenqing; Sun, Yimin

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) attenuates amyloid-beta protein neurotoxicity and decreases apoptosis induced by oxidative stress or hypoxia in cortical neurons. In this study, we constructed a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the human HIF-1α gene (rAAV-HIF-1α), and tested the assumption that rAAV-HIF-1α represses hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by amyloid-beta protein. Our results confirmed that rAAV-HIF-1α significantly reduces apoptosis induced by amyloid-beta protein in primary cultured hippocampal neurons. Direct intracerebral rAAV-HIF-1α administration also induced robust and prolonged HIF-1α production in rat hippocampus. Single rAAV-HIF-1α administration resulted in decreased apoptosis of hippocampal neurons in an Alzheimer's disease rat model established by intracerebroventricular injection of aggregated amyloid-beta protein (25–35). Our in vitro and in vivo findings demonstrate that HIF-1 has potential for attenuating hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by amyloid-beta protein, and provides experimental support for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases using gene therapy. PMID:25206774

  12. Wortmannin influences hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha expression and glycolysis in esophageal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ling; Zhou, Hai-Yun; Tang, Na-Na; Zhang, Wei-Feng; He, Gui-Jun; Hao, Bo; Feng, Ya-Dong; Zhu, Hong

    2016-05-28

    To investigate the influence of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT)-HIF-1α signaling pathway on glycolysis in esophageal carcinoma cells under hypoxia. Esophageal carcinoma cell lines Eca109 and TE13 were cultured under hypoxia environment, and the protein, mRNA and activity levels of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), glucose transporter 1, hexokinase-II, phosphofructokinase 2 and lactate dehydrogenase-A were determined. Supernatant lactic acid concentrations were also detected. The PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was then inhibited with wortmannin, and the effects of hypoxia on the expression or activities of HIF-1α, associated glycolytic enzymes and lactic acid concentrations were observed. Esophageal carcinoma cells were then transfected with interference plasmid with HIF-1α-targeting siRNA to assess impact of the high expression of HIF-1α on glycolysis. HIF-1α is highly expressed in the esophageal carcinoma cell lines tested, and with decreasing levels of oxygen, the expression of HIF-1α and the associated glycolytic enzymes and the extracellular lactic acid concentration were enhanced in the esophageal carcinoma cell lines Eca109 and TE13. In both normoxia and hypoxic conditions, the level of glycolytic enzymes and the secretion of lactic acid were both reduced by wortmannin. The expression and activities of glycolytic enzymes and the lactic acid concentration in cells were reduced by inhibiting HIF-1α, especially the decreasing level of glycolysis was significant under hypoxic conditions. The PI3K/AKT pathway and HIF-1α are both involved in the process of glycolysis in esophageal cancer cells.

  13. Prostaglandins in labor--a translational approach.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul H; Carson, Ray J; Nelson, Scott M

    2008-05-01

    The mechanisms involved in the initiation of human labor are largely unknown. Understanding the molecular pathways is fundamental in both the development of effective therapeutic strategies and intervention to prevent preterm labor. Prostaglandins are bioactive lipids and members of the eicosanoids family, derived from arachidonic acid, which act in a paracrine or autocrine manner and function via binding to specific G-protein-coupled receptors, activating intracellular signaling and gene transcription. Prostaglandins have a central role in the maintenance of pregnancy and initiation of labor, with the change from uterine quiescence to a contractile state facilitated by differential expression of prostaglandin receptors within the myometrium and fetal membranes. Clinical evidence for the key role of prostaglandins in human parturition is evident from their successful exploitation as exogenous agents for the induction of labor and the role of prostaglandin synthase inhibitors as a preventative therapy for preterm labor. This review aims to focus on prostaglandin synthesis and metabolism and how differential regulation of prostaglandins and their receptors in gestational tissues interact in the initiation of labor.

  14. Combination effect of recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha with antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, S; Minami, A; Fujimoto, K; Kojima, T

    1989-01-01

    Combination effects of recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha with ceftazidime, moxalactam, gentamicin, enoxacin, amphotericin B, miconazole, or an immunoglobulin preparation were evaluated in systemic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Candida albicans in normal mice and systemic infection with P. aeruginosa in mice with leukopenia induced by preadministration of cyclophosphamide. Synergistic effects were generally observed at interleukin-1 alpha doses as low as 1 to 30 ng per mouse with most combinations. The results show the possibility that recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha could be of help for treating obstinate infections not successfully treated with antimicrobial agents alone. PMID:2589847

  15. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha. A novel chemotactic cytokine for macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A E; Kunkel, S L; Harlow, L A; Mazarakis, D D; Haines, G K; Burdick, M D; Pope, R M; Strieter, R M

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that human macrophages (m phi s) play an important role in the elaboration of chemotactic cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (Koch, A. E., S. L. Kunkel, J. C. Burrows, H. L. Evanoff, G. K. Haines, R. M. Pope, and R. M. Strieter. 1991. J. Immunol. 147:2187; Koch, A. E., S. L. Kunkel, L. A. Harlow, B. Johnson, H. L. Evanoff, G. K. Haines, M. D. Burdick, R. M. Pope, and R. M. Strieter. 1992. J. Clin. Invest. 90:772; Koch, A. E., P. J. Polverini, S. L. Kunkel, L. A. Harlow, L. A. DiPietro, V. M. Elner, S. G. Elner, and R. M. Strieter. 1992. Science (Wash. DC). 258:1798). Recently, m phi inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1 alpha), a cytokine with chemotactic activity for m phi s and neutrophils (PMNs), has been described. We have examined the production of MIP-1 alpha using sera, synovial fluid (SF), and synovial tissue (ST) from 63 arthritic patients. MIP-1 alpha was higher in RA SF (mean, 29 +/- 8 ng/ml [SE]) compared with other forms of arthritis (2.8 +/- 1.7), or osteoarthritis (0.7 +/- 0.4; P < 0.05). RA SF MIP-1 alpha was greater than that found in either RA or normal peripheral blood (PB) (P < 0.05). Anti-MIP-1 alpha neutralized 36 +/- 3% (mean +/- SE) of the chemotactic activity for m phi s, but not PMNs, found in RA SFs. RA SF and PB mononuclear cells produced antigenic MIP-1 alpha. Mononuclear cell MIP-1 alpha production was augmented with phytohemagglutinin or LPS. Isolated RA ST fibroblast production of antigenic MIP-1 alpha was augmented upon incubation of cells with LPS, and to a lesser extent with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Isolated RA ST m phi s expressed constitutive MIP-1 alpha mRNA and antigenic MIP-1 alpha. Using ST immunohistochemistry, MIP-1 alpha+ cells from RA compared with normal were predominantly m phi s and lining cells (P < 0.05). These results suggest that MIP-1 alpha plays a role in the selective recruitment of m phi s in synovial inflammation associated with RA. Images PMID:8132778

  16. Double blind controlled study on the effect of sucralfate on gastric prostaglandin formation and microbleeding in normal and aspirin treated man.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, S J; Kwiecień, N; Obtułowicz, W; Kopp, B; Oleksy, J

    1986-01-01

    Two groups A and B each comprising 12 healthy young male subjects were used in a double blind, placebo controlled trial to assess the effects of 1.0 g sucralfate qid on prostaglandin (PG) generation and mucosal integrity in the intact and aspirin-treated stomach. Mucosal formation and luminal release of PGE2, 6-keto-PGE1 alpha and thromboxane B2, gastric microbleeding and DNA loss (integrity indicators) and basal and pentagastrin induced acid secretion were measured after placebo and sucralfate treatment in subjects without (group A) and with administration of 2.5 g aspirin (group B). Sucralfate significantly reduced spontaneous gastric microbleeding and DNA loss in group A and prevented blood loss but not DNA loss caused by aspirin in group B. The protective effects of sucralfate on spontaneous gastric microbleeding were accompanied by increased mucosal biosynthesis and luminal release of PGE2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha with a reduction in release of thromboxane B2. In aspirin treated subjects both mucosal generation and luminal release of prostaglandins and thromboxane B2 were greatly suppressed although sucralfate treatment did not influence these prostaglandins in spite of the reduction in mucosal damage. It is concluded that sucralfate has a potent protective action on spontaneous and aspirin treated gastric microbleeding in man and that this protection may be partly because of the increased mucosal biosynthesis of prostaglandins. PMID:3492413

  17. Enhancement of scleral macromolecular permeability with prostaglandins.

    PubMed Central

    Weinreb, R N

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is proposed that the sclera is a metabolically active and pharmacologically responsive tissue. These studies were undertaken to determine whether prostaglandin exposure can enhance scleral permeability to high-molecular-weight substances. METHODS: Topical prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) was administered to monkeys to determine if this altered the amount of scleral matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Experiments also were performed to determine whether the prostaglandin F (FP) receptor and gene transcripts are expressed in normal human sclera. Permeability of organ-cultured human sclera following prostaglandin exposure then was studied and the amount of MMP released into the medium measured. Finally, the permeability of human sclera to basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) was determined following prostaglandin exposure. RESULTS: Topical prostaglandin administration that reduced scleral collagen also increased scleral MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-3 by 63 +/- 35%, 267 +/- 210%, and 729 +/- 500%, respectively. FP receptor protein was localized in scleral fibroblasts, and FP receptor gene transcript was identified in sclera. Exposure to prostaglandin F2 alpha, 17-phenyltrinor, PGF2 alpha, or latanoprost acid increased scleral permeability by up to 124%, 183%, or 213%, respectively. In these cultures, MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-3 were increased by up to 37%, 267%, and 96%, respectively. Finally, transscleral absorption of FGF-2 was increased by up to 126% with scleral exposure to latanoprost. CONCLUSIONS: These studies demonstrate that the sclera is metabolically active and pharmacologically responsive to prostaglandins. Further, they demonstrate the feasibility of cotreatment with prostaglandin to enhance transscleral delivery of peptides, such as growth factors and high-molecular-weight substances, to the posterior segment of the eye. PMID:11797317

  18. Anti-inflammatory R-prostaglandins from Caribbean Colombian soft coral Plexaura homomalla.

    PubMed

    Reina, Eduardo; Ramos, Freddy A; Castellanos, Leonardo; Aragón, Marcela; Ospina, Luis F

    2013-11-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of prostaglandins isolated from soft coral Plexaura homomalla, collected in Colombian Caribbean Sea, on in vivo and in vitro inflammation models. Extracts from P. homomalla were fractionated and sequentially chromatographed to obtain the prostaglandins: (15R)-PGA2 (1), (15R)-PGA2 -Me (2), (15R)-O-Ac-PGA2 (3), (15R)-O-Ac-PGA2 -Me (4) and (15R)-PGE2 (5) in addition to three semi-synthetic prostaglandins obtained by transformations of the natural products. The anti-inflammatory properties of natural and semi-synthetic compounds were determined in vivo using 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced mouse ear oedema model and in vitro leucocyte degranulation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and elastase enzymatic activities from human polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs). The cell viability was evaluated by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. In the in vivo assay, (15R)-PGE2 (1) and (15R)-O-Ac-PGA2 (3) showed anti-inflammatory activity, as well as in vitro inhibition of elastase release from PMNs. In the PMNs degranulation assay, (15R)-PGE2 (5), was the most active compound in the inhibition of MPO release. Finally, all the tested prostaglandins showed moderate inhibition for elastase enzyme activity, whereas none of the prostaglandins exhibit significative inhibition on MPO activity. (15R)-PGE2 (1) and (15R)-O-Ac-PGA2 (3) present significant inhibition on three important events related to the topical inflammatory response induced by TPA: the oedema formation, the PMNs degranulation, events that modulate MPO and elastase levels at inflammation site, and the inhibition of the enzyme activity. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  19. Toxic effects of cobalt in primary cultures of mouse astrocytes. Similarities with hypoxia and role of HIF-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Karovic, Olga; Tonazzini, Ilaria; Rebola, Nelson; Edström, Erik; Lövdahl, Cecilia; Fredholm, Bertil B; Daré, Elisabetta

    2007-03-01

    Cobalt is suspected to cause memory deficit in humans and was reported to induce neurotoxicity in animal models. We have studied the effects of cobalt in primary cultures of mouse astrocytes. CoCl(2) (0.2-0.8mM) caused dose-dependent ATP depletion, apoptosis (cell shrinkage, phosphatidylserine externalization and chromatin rearrangements) and secondary necrosis. The mitochondria appeared to be a main target of cobalt toxicity, as shown by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) and release from the mitochondria of apoptogenic factors, e.g. apoptosis inducing factor (AIF). Pre-treatment with bongkrekic acid reduced ATP depletion, implicating the involvement of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. Cobalt increased the generation of oxygen radicals, but antioxidants did not prevent toxicity. There was also an impaired response to ATP stimulation, evaluated as a lower raise in intracellular calcium. Similarly to hypoxia and dymethyloxallyl glycine (DMOG), cobalt triggered stabilization of the alpha-subunit of hypoxia-inducible factor HIF-1 (HIF-1alpha). This early event was followed by an increased expression of HIF-1 regulated genes, e.g. stress protein HO-1, pro-apoptotic factor Nip3 and iNOS. Although all of the three stimuli activated the HIF-1alpha pathway and decreased ATP levels, the downstream effects were different. DMOG only inhibited cell proliferation, whereas the other two conditions caused cell death by apoptosis and necrosis. This points to cobalt and hypoxia not only inducing HIF-1alpha regulated genes but also affecting similarly other cellular functions, including metabolism.

  20. Prostaglandins and reproduction in female farm animals.

    PubMed

    Weems, C W; Weems, Y S; Randel, R D

    2006-03-01

    Prostaglandins impact on ovarian, uterine, placental, and pituitary function to regulate reproduction in female livestock. They play important roles in ovulation, luteal function, maternal recognition of pregnancy, implantation, maintenance of gestation, microbial-induced abortion, parturition, postpartum uterine and ovarian infections, and resumption of postpartum ovarian cyclicity. Prostaglandins have both positive and negative effects on reproduction; they are used to synchronize oestrus, terminate pseudopregnancy in mares, induce parturition, and treat retained placenta, luteinized cysts, pyometra, and chronic endometritis. Improved therapeutic uses for prostaglandins will be developed when we understand better their involvement in implantation, maintenance of luteal function, and establishment and maintenance of pregnancy.

  1. Prostaglandins. A review of neurophysiology and psychiatric implications.

    PubMed

    Gross, H A; Dunner, D L; Lafleur, D; Meltzer, H L; Muhlbauer, H L; Fieve, R R

    1977-10-01

    This article reviews the function of prostaglandins (PGs) in the nervous system and discusses the possible alterations in PG metabolism as relating to mental illness. The PGs are a unique group of cyclic fatty acids whose immediate precursors are thought to function postsynaptically by inhibition or facillitation of neurotransmission through cyclase inhibition or activation, and by means of a negative feedback loop to inhibit further release of neurotransmitter from the presynaptic nerve. A review of PGs in psychiatric conditions is presented as well as a discussion of the interaction of psychoactive drugs with the PGs. The concluding section of this review discusses possible future strategies to provide insight into PG physiology as it relates to synaptic transmission in normal and pathological conditions in man.

  2. Arrangement of Kv1 alpha subunits dictates sensitivity to tetraethylammonium.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabi, Ahmed; Shamotienko, Oleg; Dhochartaigh, Sorcha Ni; Muniyappa, Nagesh; Le Berre, Marie; Shaban, Hamdy; Wang, Jiafu; Sack, Jon T; Dolly, J Oliver

    2010-09-01

    Shaker-related Kv1 channels contain four channel-forming alpha subunits. Subfamily member Kv1.1 often occurs oligomerized with Kv1.2 alpha subunits in synaptic membranes, and so information was sought on the influence of their positions within tetramers on the channels' properties. Kv1.1 and 1.2 alpha genes were tandem linked in various arrangements, followed by expression as single-chain proteins in mammalian cells. As some concatenations reported previously seemed not to reliably position Kv1 subunits in their assemblies, the identity of expressed channels was methodically evaluated. Surface protein, isolated by biotinylation of intact transiently transfected HEK-293 cells, gave Kv1.1/1.2 reactivity on immunoblots with electrophoretic mobilities corresponding to full-length concatenated tetramers. There was no evidence of protein degradation, indicating that concatemers were delivered intact to the plasmalemma. Constructs with like genes adjacent (Kv1.1-1.1-1.2-1.2 or Kv1.2-1.2-1.1-1.1) yielded delayed-rectifying, voltage-dependent K(+) currents with activation parameters and inactivation kinetics slightly different from the diagonally positioned genes (Kv1.1-1.2-1.1-1.2 or 1.2-1.1-1.2-1.1). Pore-blocking petidergic toxins, alpha dendrotoxin, agitoxin-1, tityustoxin-Kalpha, and kaliotoxin, were unable to distinguish between the adjacent and diagonal concatamers. Unprecedentedly, external application of the pore-blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA) differentially inhibited the adjacent versus diagonal subunit arrangements, with diagonal constructs having enhanced susceptibility. Concatenation did not directly alter the sensitivities of homomeric Kv1.1 or 1.2 channels to TEA or the toxins. TEA inhibition of currents generated by channels made up from dimers (Kv1.1-1.2 and/or Kv1.2-1.1) was similar to the adjacently arranged constructs. These collective findings indicate that assembly of alpha subunits can be directed by this optimized concatenation, and that subunit

  3. The role of prostaglandins in reproductive physiology.

    PubMed

    Bardin, T P

    1970-10-01

    Research on the physiopathologic and biochemical nature of prostaglandins (PGs) suggest that PGs play a role in reproductive physiology. In vitro studies show that the PGE series decrease the motility of the human uterus, fallopian tubes, and ureter, and produce vasodilatation. PGFs cause vasoconstriction and increased motility of the uterus, fallopian tubes, ureter, and gastrointestinal muscle. PGs are also known to inhibit lipolysis, platelet aggregation, and gastric secretion. The exact mechanism of PGs are not fully understood, but evidence suggests that many responses can be attributed to interference with the enzyme adenyl cyclase, which catalyzes the formation of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) from adenosine triphosphate. The adenyl cyclase-cyclic AMP system mediates lipolysis, steroidogenesis, gastric secretion, certain smooth muscle motility responses, and increase in permeability due to vasopressin. Early studies of the myometrial effects of PGs showed that the PGE series inhibited the motility of the human myometrium in vitro while the PGF series produced mixed responses. The role of PGF2alpha in parturition has not been established but evidence suggests that it has a potential role as an oxytocic in cases of therapeutic abortion. In the area of human fertility, the physiologic role of PGs in seminal fluid is hypothesized to facilitate the migration of spermatozoa from the vagina into the uterine cavity. Karolinska Institute researchers have found that some infertile males have low PG levels in their ejaculates and are now working with methods of improving the PG levels to improve their fertility. Pickles et al. proposed a potential role for PGs in the etiology of dysmenorrhea, having found a significantly higher ratio of PGF to PGE in a series of patients with severe dysmenorrhea than in a comparable series of normal patients. The luteolytic and antinidatory effects of PGF2alpha are being investigated and studies appear encouraging. PGs have

  4. Homologous desensitization to prostaglandins in rabbit ileum

    SciTech Connect

    Musch, M.W.; Field, M.; Miller, R.J.; Stoff, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PG's) increase short-circuit current (I/sub sc/), inhibit NaCl absorption, and stimulate Cl secretion in rabbit ileum. These changes occur with the following PGs; E/sub 3/, E/sub 1/, nitrilo-I/sub 2/ and, to a lesser extent, with A/sub 2/, D/sub 2/, and F/sub 2..cap alpha../. Arachidonic acid (AA) also stimulates secretion. The PG- or AA-stimulated I/sub sc/ does not persist, however, and on prolonged exposure tachyphylaxis develops. Resensitization of the I/sub sc/ response to PGE/sub 2/ is rapid, being essentially complete in 15 min after the PG is removed. Desensitization to AA is not reflected by diminished PG generation. PGE/sub 2/ release from the mucosa after AA addition is constant, although the AA-stimulated I/sub sc/ decreases. I/sub sc/ measurements indicate that PGE/sub 2/ at slightly below its EC/sub 50/ partially desensitizes and a near-maximal concentration completely desensitizes to PGE/sub 2/ but does not, however, inhibit the subsequent change in I/sub sc/ caused by theophylline or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) measurements suggest that desensitization applies to cAMP production. PGE/sub 2/ (10/sup -5/ M) increases mucosal cAMP three- to sevenfold, but this elevation is transient; a second challenge dose, which fails to elicit a I/sub sc/ change, also fails to increase mucosal cAMP. Adenylate cyclase measurements from untreated and PGE/sub 2/-treated enterocytes demonstrate a decrease in stimulation by PGE/sub 2/ but not in stimulation by VIP, fluoride, or 5-guanylylimidodiphosphate.

  5. Inhibition of estrogen receptor {beta}-mediated human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene transcription via the suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling plays an important role in 15-deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2}-induced apoptosis in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kondoh, Kei; Tsuji, Naoki; Asanuma, Koichi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Watanabe, Naoki

    2007-10-01

    The nuclear hormone receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{gamma} plays a role in cancer development in addition to its role in glucose metabolism. The natural ligand of PPAR-{gamma}, namely, 15-deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ{sub 2}), has been shown to possess antineoplastic activity in cancer cells. However, the mechanism underlying its antineoplastic activity remains to be elucidated. Inhibition of the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), a major determinant of telomerase activity, reportedly induces rapid apoptosis in cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of 15d-PGJ{sub 2} on hTERT expression. We found that 15d-PGJ{sub 2} induced apoptosis in the MIAPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells and dose-dependently decreased hTERT mRNA and protein expression. Down-regulation of hTERT expression by hTERT-specific small inhibitory RNA also induced apoptosis. Furthermore, 15d-PGJ{sub 2} attenuated the DNA binding of estrogen receptor (ER). MIAPaCa-2 expressed only ER{beta}, and although its expression did not decrease due to 15d-PGJ{sub 2}, its phosphorylation was suppressed. Additionally, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase inhibitor decreased ER{beta} phosphorylation, and 15d-PGJ{sub 2} attenuated MAPK activity. We conclude that hTERT down-regulation by 15d-PGJ{sub 2} plays an important role in the proapoptotic property of the latter. Furthermore, 15d-PGJ{sub 2} inhibits ER{beta}-mediated hTERT gene transcription by suppressing ER{beta} phosphorylation via the inhibition of MAP kinase signaling.

  6. Elongation factor 1 alpha concentration is highly correlated with the lysine content of maize endosperm.

    PubMed Central

    Habben, J E; Moro, G L; Hunter, B G; Hamaker, B R; Larkins, B A

    1995-01-01

    Lysine is the most limiting essential amino acid in cereals, and for many years plant breeders have attempted to increase its concentration to improve the nutritional quality of these grains. The opaque2 mutation in maize doubles the lysine content in the endosperm, but the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. We show that elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) is overexpressed in opaque2 endosperm compared with its normal counterpart and that there is a highly significant correlation between EF-1 alpha concentration and the total lysine content of the endosperm. This relationship is also true for two other cereals, sorghum and barley. It appears that genetic selection for genotypes with a high concentration of EF-1 alpha can significantly improve the nutritional quality of maize and other cereals. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7567989

  7. IL-1 alpha (-889) promoter polymorphism is a risk factor for osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Asensi, Víctor; Alvarez, Victoria; Valle, Eulalia; Meana, Alvaro; Fierer, Joshua; Coto, Eliecer; Carton, José Antonio; Maradona, José Antonio; Paz, José; Dieguez, Maria Angeles; de la Fuente, Belén; Moreno, Alfonso; Rubio, Silvino; Tuya, Maria José; Sarasúa, Julián; Llames, Sara; Arribas, José Manuel

    2003-06-01

    As osteomyelitis (OM) induces the synthesis of inflammatory cytokines and IL-1 mediates bone resorption by osteoclasts we determined if there is an association between certain common polymorphisms of the genes encoding proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1 alpha and beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha) and OM in adults. The IL-1 alpha (-889) TT genotype was significantly more frequent among 52 OM patients than in 109 healthy controls (13/52, [25.0%] vs. 9/109, [8.3%], P = 0.0081, chi(2) = 7.01, OR = 3.7, 95% CI, 1.35-10.34). Patients who were homozygous for the T allele were younger than the rest of the OM patients (mean age 35.7 +/- 11.5 vs. 58.1 +/- 18.6 years, P = 0.001). IL-1 beta TT (+3953) polymorphism was also more frequent in OM patients (P = 0.014, chi(2) = 5.12, OR = 5.1, 95% CI, 1.21-52.14), but IL-1 beta is in linkage disequilibrium with the IL-1 alpha *T (P < 0.001). Route of infection, chronicity of the infection, type of microorganism isolated, and frequency of relapses were similar in patients with and without the IL-1 alpha TT genotype. There were no associations between OM and polymorphisms of other cytokines genes. IL-1 alpha serum levels were significantly increased in all the OM patients independently of their IL-1 genotype compared to the controls (P = 0.021). Although IL-1 alpha serum levels were not significantly higher in patients with the IL-1 alpha (-889) polymorphism, this does not exclude a difference in production of IL-1 alpha by osteoclasts or other inflammatory cells at the site of infection.

  8. Hypoxic regulation of VEGF, HIF-1(alpha) in coronary collaterals development.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ki Chul; Kim, Kyung Soo; Lee, Sang

    2005-12-01

    The interindividual variability for the development of collaterals in coronary artery disease is dependent on the hypoxic induction level of VEGF. To determine whether the hypoxic induction of VEGF is controlled by the transcription of HIF-1 (alpha), the VEGF and HIF-1 (alpha) m-RNA levels were correlated to hypoxia in monocytes harvested from patients with coronary artery disease. The collateral scoring system used was modified from the TIMI system. The mononuclear cell layer of the patients' blood was cultured in hypoxia (1% O2, 5% CO2, 94%N2) and normoxia (5% CO2, 95% room air) for 17 hours. The VEGF and HIF-1 (alpha) mRNA levels were measured using a RT-PCR technique. We calculated the fold inductionsof VEGF, HIF-1 (alpha) mRNA with hypoxia by dividing the hypoxic and the normoxic values. We found significantly higher hypoxic inductions of VEGF m-RNA in patients with collaterals compared to patients with no collaterals. However, there was no differencein the hypoxic inductions of HIF-1 (alpha) between the two groups (VEGF m-RNA mean fold inductions 3.71 +/- 3.30 versus 1.65 +/- 0.62, p=0.012, HIF-1(alpha) mRNA 1.42 +/- 0.58 versus 1.20 +/- 0.39, p=0.165). We concluded that the interindividual variability in the hypoxic inductions of VEGF m-RNA in monocytes in patients is not controlled by the transcriptional levels of HIF-1 (alpha) with hypoxia. These findings suggest that a mechanism such as the post-transcriptional modification of HIF-1(alpha) is involved in the hypoxic inductions of VEGF.

  9. Melittin stimulates liver glycogenolysis and the release of prostaglandin D2 and thromboxane B2.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M; Macías-Silva, M

    1990-01-01

    Melittin stimulates glycogenolysis and induces vasoconstriction in perfused rat liver. The effect was rapid and associated with production and release of prostaglandin D2 and thromboxane B2. Indomethacin blocked the release of these eicosanoids and the stimulation of glycogenolysis induced by melittin. Ibuprofen blocked the release of prostaglandin D2 induced by melittin and markedly attenuated that of thromboxane B2. Interestingly, the initial burst of glucose output induced by melittin was not inhibited by ibuprofen, although the duration of the glycogenolytic action of the peptide was greatly diminished. PMID:2375756

  10. Induction of hypervascularity without leakage or inflammation in transgenic mice overexpressing hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Elson, D A; Thurston, G; Huang, L E; Ginzinger, D G; McDonald, D M; Johnson, R S; Arbeit, J M

    2001-10-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) transactivates genes required for energy metabolism and tissue perfusion and is necessary for embryonic development and tumor explant growth. HIF-1alpha is overexpressed during carcinogenesis, myocardial infarction, and wound healing; however, the biological consequences of HIF-1alpha overexpression are unknown. Here, transgenic mice expressing constitutively active HIF-1alpha in epidermis displayed a 66% increase in dermal capillaries, a 13-fold elevation of total vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and a six- to ninefold induction of each VEGF isoform. Despite marked induction of hypervascularity, HIF-1alpha did not induce edema, inflammation, or vascular leakage, phenotypes developing in transgenic mice overexpressing VEGF cDNA in skin. Remarkably, blood vessel leakage resistance induced by HIF-1alpha overexpression was not caused by up-regulation of angiopoietin-1 or angiopoietin-2. Hypervascularity induced by HIF-1alpha could improve therapy of tissue ischemia.

  11. Increased muscle PGC-1alpha expression protects from sarcopenia and metabolic disease during aging.

    PubMed

    Wenz, Tina; Rossi, Susana G; Rotundo, Richard L; Spiegelman, Bruce M; Moraes, Carlos T

    2009-12-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for metabolic disease and loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength, a condition known as sarcopenia. Both conditions present a major health burden to the elderly population. Here, we analyzed the effect of mildly increased PGC-1alpha expression in skeletal muscle during aging. We found that transgenic MCK-PGC-1alpha animals had preserved mitochondrial function, neuromuscular junctions, and muscle integrity during aging. Increased PGC-1alpha levels in skeletal muscle prevented muscle wasting by reducing apoptosis, autophagy, and proteasome degradation. The preservation of muscle integrity and function in MCK-PGC-1alpha animals resulted in significantly improved whole-body health; both the loss of bone mineral density and the increase of systemic chronic inflammation, observed during normal aging, were prevented. Importantly, MCK-PGC-1alpha animals also showed improved metabolic responses as evident by increased insulin sensitivity and insulin signaling in aged mice. Our results highlight the importance of intact muscle function and metabolism for whole-body homeostasis and indicate that modulation of PGC-1alpha levels in skeletal muscle presents an avenue for the prevention and treatment of a group of age-related disorders.

  12. Statins enhance peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha activity to regulate energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenxian; Wong, Chi-Wai

    2010-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) serves as an inducible coactivator for a number of transcription factors to control energy metabolism. Insulin signaling through Akt kinase has been demonstrated to phosphorylate PGC-1alpha at serine 571 and downregulate its activity in the liver. Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that reduce cholesterol synthesis in the liver. In this study, we found that statins reduced the active form of Akt and enhanced PGC-1alpha activity. Specifically, statins failed to activate an S571A mutant of PGC-1alpha. The activation of PGC-1alpha by statins selectively enhanced the expression of energy metabolizing enzymes and regulators including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, acyl-CoA oxidase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1A, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4. Importantly, a constitutively active form of Akt partially reduced the statin-enhanced gene expression. Our study thus provides a plausible mechanistic explanation for the hypolipidemic effect of statin through elevating the rate of beta-oxidation and mitochondrial Kreb's cycle capacity to enhance fatty acid utilization while reducing the rate of glycolysis.

  13. [Effect of HIF-1alpha on sex hormone levels and germ cell apoptosis of mice].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Mei; Xiong, Yan-Lei; Gong, Hui; Xu, Cheng-Li

    2013-07-01

    To study the effect of hypoxia on hypothalamus-adenohypophysis-testis axis hormone levels, germ cell apoptosis and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) expression in testis of adolescent mice, and explore HIF-1alpha regulation on the reproductive function of male mice. Eighty SPF grade adolescent C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into normoxia group, hypoxia 3, 7, 14 and 28 d groups. The level of serum testosterone (T), free testosterone (FT), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) was analyzed by ELISA. Detected the sperm count, motility rate and abnormal sperm rate of epididymal sperm suspension. The apoptosis cells in testis were determined using TUNEL method. The expression of HIF-1alpha was analyzed using Western blot. Compared with corresponding normoxia group, serum T, FT, FSH and LH concentrations in hypoxia 3 d group were significantly higher (P < 0.05); T and LH concentrations in hypoxia 14 d group were significantly lower (P < 0.05). Sperm count and motility rate in hypoxia 7 and 14 d groups significantly declined (P < 0.05); abnormal sperm rate in all hypoxia groups significantly increased (P < 0.05). The apoptosis index (AI) of germ cells in hypoxia 7, 14 and 28 d groups significantly increased (P < 0.05), and the levels of HIF-1alpha protein expression were significantly higher (P < 0.05). HIF-1alpha protein highly expressed in mice testis could induce germ cell apoptosis increased in chronic hypoxia environment.

  14. Prostaglandin F{sub 2{alpha}} regulates cytokine responses of mast cells through the receptors for prostaglandin E

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Izumi; Hishinuma, Takanori; Suzuki, Kaori; Owada, Yuji; Kitanaka, Noriko; Kondo, Hisatake; Goto, Junichi; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Ono, Masao

    2008-03-14

    There is an increasing body of evidence that prostanoids modulate mast cell functions and contribute to the development of allergic inflammation. The present study aimed to identify an undetermined function of prostaglandin (PG) F{sub 2{alpha}} in mast cell activation and the signaling mechanism involved in it. Simultaneous quantification of prostanoids by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry revealed the constitutive release of PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, thromboxane B{sub 2}, and 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} from bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Upon activation of BMMCs by lipopolysaccharide, the cytokine production in BMMCs was enhanced when the culture was supplemented with PGF{sub 2{alpha}}. However, F prostanoid receptor-a selective receptor for PGF{sub 2{alpha}}-was not detected in BMMCs. Further investigations performed using prostanoid receptor antagonists revealed an alternative mechanism wherein the receptors for PGE species-E prostanoid receptors-mediated the PGF{sub 2{alpha}} signal in BMMCs. The present study provides an insight into a novel function of PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, i.e., an autocrine accelerator for mast cell activation.

  15. Histamine and prostaglandin interaction in regulation of oxytocin and vasopressin secretion.

    PubMed

    Knigge, U; Kjaer, A; Kristoffersen, U; Madsen, K; Toftegaard, C; Jørgensen, H; Warberg, J

    2003-10-01

    Prostaglandins and histamine in the hypothalamus are involved in the regulation of oxytocin and vasopressin secretion, and appear to be involved in the mediation of pituitary hormone responses to immunochallenges. Therefore, we investigated in conscious male rats: (i) whether blockade of H1 or H2 receptors affected the oxytocin and vasopressin responses to prostaglandins and (ii) whether blockade of prostaglandin synthesis affected the oxytocin and vasopressin responses to histamine or to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in order to determine any interaction between prostaglandins and histamine in the hypothalamus. Oxytocin secretion was dose-dependently stimulated by intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 or 5 microg of PGE1, PGE2 or PGF2alpha, with PGE2 being the most potent of the compounds used. Prior central infusion of the H1 receptor antagonist mepyramine or the H2 receptor antagonist cimetidine significantly inhibited the oxytocin response to all three prostaglandins by approximately 50%. Vasopressin secretion was increased by PGE1 but not by PGE2 or PGF2alpha. The stimulatory effect of PGE1 was almost annihilated by prior administration of mepyramine or cimetidine. Central infusion of histamine or immunochallenge with LPS administered intraperitoneally increased oxytocin and vasopressin secretion four- and two-fold, respectively. Pretreatment with systemic injection of the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor indomethacin dose-dependently reduced the oxytocin response and prevented the vasopressin response to histamine or LPS. We conclude that histamine and PGE1, PGE2 or PGF2alpha interact in the regulation of oxytocin secretion, whereas histamine and only PGE1 interact in the regulation of vasopressin secretion. Furthermore, histamine as well as LPS may affect oxytocin and vasopressin neurones via activation of prostaglandins, probably in the hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus.

  16. Prostaglandin E2-induced inflammation: Relevance of prostaglandin E receptors.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Kohichi; Hohjoh, Hirofumi; Inazumi, Tomoaki; Tsuchiya, Soken; Sugimoto, Yukihiko

    2015-04-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is one of the most typical lipid mediators produced from arachidonic acid (AA) by cyclooxygenase (COX) as the rate-limiting enzyme, and acts on four kinds of receptor subtypes (EP1-EP4) to elicit its diverse actions including pyrexia, pain sensation, and inflammation. Recently, the molecular mechanisms underlying the PGE2 actions mediated by each EP subtype have been elucidated by studies using mice deficient in each EP subtype as well as several compounds highly selective to each EP subtype, and their findings now enable us to discuss how PGE2 initiates and exacerbates inflammation at the molecular level. Here, we review the recent advances in PGE2 receptor research by focusing on the activation of mast cells via the EP3 receptor and the control of helper T cells via the EP2/4 receptor, which are the molecular mechanisms involved in PGE2-induced inflammation that had been unknown for many years. We also discuss the roles of PGE2 in acute inflammation and inflammatory disorders, and the usefulness of anti-inflammatory therapies that target EP receptors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Oxygenated metabolism of PUFA: analysis and biological relevance". Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of Potent and Selective Indomethacin Analogues for the Inhibition of AKR1C3 (Type 5 17β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase/Prostaglandin F Synthase) in Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a fatal, metastatic form of prostate cancer. CRPC is characterized by reactivation of the androgen axis due to changes in androgen receptor signaling and/or adaptive intratumoral androgen biosynthesis. AKR1C3 is upregulated in CRPC where it catalyzes the formation of potent androgens. This makes AKR1C3 a target for the treatment of CRPC. AKR1C3 inhibitors should not inhibit AKR1C1/AKR1C2, which inactivate 5α-dihydrotestosterone. Indomethacin, used to inhibit cyclooxygenase, also inhibits AKR1C3 and displays selectivity over AKR1C1/AKR1C2. Parallel synthetic strategies were used to generate libraries of indomethacin analogues, which exhibit reduced cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity but retain AKR1C3 inhibitory potency and selectivity. The lead compounds inhibited AKR1C3 with nanomolar potency, displayed >100-fold selectivity over AKR1C1/AKR1C2, and blocked testosterone formation in LNCaP-AKR1C3 cells. The AKR1C3·NADP+·2′-des-methyl-indomethacin crystal structure was determined, and it revealed a unique inhibitor binding mode. The compounds reported are promising agents for the development of therapeutics for CRPC. PMID:23432095

  18. IFN-gamma and prostaglandin E2 inhibit IL-4-induced expression of Fc epsilon R2/CD23 on B lymphocytes through different mechanisms without altering binding of IL-4 to its receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Galizzi, J.P.; Cabrillat, H.; Rousset, F.; Menetrier, C.; de Vries, J.E.; Banchereau, J.

    1988-09-15

    Human rIL-4 specifically induces the expression of the low affinity receptor for IgE (Fc epsilon R2/CD23) on normal B cells and on the Burkitt lymphoma cell line Jijoye. IL-4 does not induce the generation of the second messenger cAMP in Jijoye cells. PGE2 (at 10(-7) M) was found to inhibit by 50% the IL-4 mediated Fc epsilon R2/CD23 induction on Jijoye cells. The PGE2 half maximum inhibitory concentration (1 nM) was comparable to that inducing a half maximal increase of intracellular cAMP (4nM PGE2). 8-bromo-cAMP (10(-3) M), forskolin (10(-5) M), and cholera toxin (100 ng/ml), which increase intracellular cAMP levels, also inhibited by 40 to 80% the IL-4 induced Fc epsilon R2/CD23 expression on Jijoye cells. PGE2 8-bromo-cAMP, forskolin, and cholera toxin also inhibited the IL-4-induced Fc epsilon R2/CD23 expression on normal B lymphocytes. Taken together these data suggest that PGE2 inhibits the IL-4 induced Fc epsilon R2/CD23 through an increase of intracellular cAMP. In contrast, IFN-gamma, which strongly inhibits IL-4-mediated Fc epsilon R2/CD23 expression on Jijoye cells, did not increase intracellular cAMP levels and thus probably acts through another mechanism. IFN-gamma and PGE2 did not inhibit binding of IL-4 to its receptor. It could be excluded that IFN-gamma and PGE2 were acting via an alteration/desensitization of the IL-4R inasmuch as 24 h pre-incubation of Jijoye cells with these agents affected neither the affinity of 125I-IL-4 for its receptor (Kd = 0.8 to 1.5 x 10(-10) M) nor the maximal number of binding sites per Jijoye cells (Bmax = 390 to 550). Furthermore, IFN-gamma and PGE2 did not affect the internalization and degradation of 125I-IL-4. These data demonstrate that PGE2 and IFN-gamma inhibit the IL-4-mediated induction of Fc epsilon R2/CD23 on B lymphocytes via different mechanisms that do not alter the interaction of IL-4 with its receptor.

  19. O6.09PROSTAGLANDIN E RECEPTOR-4 ACTIVATION REGULATES TRYPTOPHAN METABOLISM IN HUMAN MALIGNANT GLIOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, K.; Ott, M.; Rauschenbach, K.J.; Sahm, F.; Opitz, C.A.; von Deimling, A.; Wick, W.; Platten, M.

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas generate a local immunosuppressive microenvironment as well as systemic immunosuppression. Tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO)-mediated tryptophan metabolism and the production of immunosuppressive prostaglandins relevantly contribute to this inhibition of anti-glioma immune responses. We now connect these two critical immunosuppressive pathways by demonstrating that prostaglandins enhance TDO expression and enzymatic activity in malignant gliomas via activation of prostaglandin E receptor-4 (EP4). Stimulation with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentration-dependently upregulates TDO-mediated kynurenine release in human glioma cell lines, while knockdown of the PGE2 receptor EP4 inhibits TDO expression and activity. In tissue of human malignant gliomas expression of the PGE2-producing enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and its receptor EP4 are associated with TDO expression both on transcript and protein level. Of clinical relevance, high expression of EP4 correlates with poor survival in patients with gliomas of the WHO grades III and IV. Importantly, treatment of glioma cells with an EP4 inhibitor decreased TDO expression and activity. In summary targeting EP4 may inhibit both immunosuppressive COX-2 signaling as well as tryptophan degradation and thus could provide a novel immunotherapeutic avenue for the treatment of malignant gliomas.

  20. Prostaglandin J2: a potential target for halting inflammation-induced neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E.; Corwin, Chuhyon; Babich, John

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandins are produced via cyclooxygenases, which are enzymes that play a major role in neuroinflammation. Epidemiological studies show that chronic treatment with low levels of cyclooxygenase inhibitors (NSAIDs) lowers the risk for Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) diseases by as much as 50%. Unfortunately, inhibiting cyclooxygenases with NSAIDs blocks the synthesis of downstream neuroprotective and neurotoxic prostaglandins, thus producing adverse side effects. We focus on prostaglandin J2 (PGJ2) because it is highly neurotoxic compared to PGA1, D2, and E2. Unlike other prostaglandins, PGJ2 and its metabolites have a cyclopentenone ring with reactive α,β-unsaturated carbonyl groups that form covalent Michael adducts with key cysteines in proteins and GSH. Cysteine-binding electrophiles such as PGJ2 are considered to play an important role in determining whether neurons will live or die. We discuss in vitro and in vivo studies showing that PGJ2 induces pathological processes relevant to neurodegenerative disorders such as AD and PD. Furthermore, we found that increasing intracellular cAMP with the lipophilic peptide PACAP27 counteracts some of the PGJ2-induced detrimental effects. In conclusion, new therapeutic strategies that neutralize the effects of specific neurotoxic prostaglandins downstream from cyclooxygenases could have a significant impact on the treatment of chronic neurodegenerative disorders with fewer adverse side effects. PMID:26748744

  1. Effect of diarachidonin on prostaglandin E2 synthesis in rabbit kidney medulla slices.

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Y; Uno, H; Kagen, C; Ueno, T; Fujita, T

    1985-01-01

    The effect of diarachidonin on the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 in rabbit kidney medulla slices was examined. The addition of diarachidonin stimulated prostaglandin E2 production in a dose-dependent manner. At three concentrations (10, 50 and 100 microM), increases in prostaglandin E2 formation induced by exogenous diarachidonin were 2-fold greater than those induced by exogenous arachidonic acid. Diacylglycerol or phosphatidic acid from egg lecithin had little or no effect on prostaglandin E2 production. Moreover, EGTA failed to inhibit diarachidonin-stimulated prostaglandin E2 formation, indicating that the stimulatory effect of diarachidonin is not mediated through the activation of endogenous phospholipase A2 (including phosphatidic acid-specific phospholipase A2). These results are discussed in the light of our former hypothesis that arachidonic acid release from kidney medulla phospholipids might occur through the sequential action of a phospholipase C coupled to diacylglycerol and monoacylglycerol lipases [Fujimoto, Akamatsu, Hattori & Fujita (1984) Biochem. J. 218, 69-74]. PMID:3937522

  2. Staurosporine, but not Ro 31-8220, induces interleukin 2 production and synergizes with interleukin 1alpha in EL4 thymoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, T M; Matthews, J S; O'Neill, L A

    1997-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) has been implicated in interleukin 1 (IL1) signal transduction in a number of cellular systems, either as a key event in IL1 action or as a negative regulator. Here we have examined the effects of two PKC inhibitors, staurosporine and the more selective agent Ro 31-8220, on IL1 responses in the murine thymoma line EL4.NOB-1. A 1 h pulse of staurosporine was found to strongly potentiate the induction of IL2 by IL1alpha in these cells. In contrast, neither a pulse nor prolonged incubation with Ro 31-8220 affected the response to IL1alpha. Both agents blocked the response to PMA, however. A 1 h pulse of staurosporine was also found to induce IL2 production on its own, activate the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) and increase the expression of a NFkappaB-linked reporter gene. It synergized with IL1alpha in all of these responses. Ro 31-8220 was again without effect, although both staurosporine and Ro 31-8220 blocked the activation of NFkappaB by PMA. Finally, staurosporine caused the translocation of PKC-alpha and -epsilon, and to a lesser extent PKC-beta, but not PKC-θ or -zeta, from the cytosol to the membrane, although a similar effect was observed with Ro 31-8220. The results suggest that PKC is not involved in IL1alpha signalling in EL4 cells. Furthermore, the potentiating effect of staurosporine on IL1alpha action does not involve PKC inhibition, and is likely to be at the level of NFkappaB activation. PMID:9224627

  3. Bone marrow AT1 augments neointima formation by promoting mobilization of smooth muscle progenitors via platelet-derived SDF-1{alpha}.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Hirokazu; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Tsubakimoto, Yoshinori; Takata, Hiroki; Kawahito, Hiroyuki; Kishida, Sou; Kato, Taku; Matsui, Akihiro; Hirai, Hideyo; Ashihara, Eishi; Maekawa, Taira; Iwai, Masaru; Horiuchi, Masatsugu; Ikeda, Kouji; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Okigaki, Mitsuhiko; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and vascular smooth muscle progenitor cells (VPCs) contribute to neointima formation, whereas the angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor (AT(1))-mediated action on BM-derived progenitors remains undefined. A wire-induced vascular injury was performed in the femoral artery of BM-chimeric mice whose BM was repopulated with AT(1)-deficient (BM-Agtr1(-/-)) or wild-type (BM-Agtr1(+/+)) cells. Neointima formation was profoundly reduced by 38% in BM-Agtr1(-/-) mice. Although the number of circulating EPCs (Sca-1(+)Flk-1(+)) and extent of reendothelialization did not differ between the 2 groups, the numbers of both circulating VPCs (c-Kit(-)Sca-1(+)Lin(-)) and tissue VPCs (Sca-1(+)CD31(-)) incorporated into neointima were markedly decreased in BM-Agtr1(-/-) mice. The accumulation of aggregated platelets and their content of stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha) were significantly reduced in BM-Agtr1(-/-) mice, accompanied by a decrease in the serum level of SDF-1alpha. Thrombin-induced platelets aggregation was dose-dependently inhibited (45% at 0.1 IU/mL, P<0.05) in Agtr1(-/-) platelets compared with Agtr1(+/+) platelets, accompanied by the reduced expression and release of SDF-1alpha. The BM-AT(1) receptor promotes neointima formation by regulating the mobilization and homing of BM-derived VPCs in a platelet-derived SDF-1alpha-dependent manner without affecting EPC-mediated reendothelialization.

  4. Melatonin Improves mitochondrial function by promoting MT1/SIRT1/PGC-1 alpha-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis in cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pan; Pi, Huifeng; Xu, Shangcheng; Zhang, Lei; Li, Yuming; Li, Min; Cao, Zhengwang; Tian, Li; Xie, Jia; Li, Renyan; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Liu, Chuan; Duan, Weixia; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-11-01

    Melatonin is an indolamine synthesized in the pineal gland that has a wide range of physiological functions, and it has been under clinical investigation for expanded applications. Increasing evidence demonstrates that melatonin can ameliorate cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the potentially protective effects of melatonin against cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity and the underlying mechanisms of this protection remain unclear. This study investigates the protective effects of melatonin pretreatment on cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity and elucidates the potential mechanism of melatonin-mediated protection. We exposed HepG2 cells to different concentrations of cadmium chloride (2.5, 5, and 10 μM) for 12 h. We found that Cd stimulated cytotoxicity, disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species production, and decreased mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial DNA content. Consistent with this finding, Cd exposure was associated with decreased Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein expression and activity, thus promoted acetylation of PGC-1 alpha, a key enzyme involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function, although Cd did not disrupt the interaction between SIRT1 and PGC-1 alpha. However, all cadmium-induced mitochondrial oxidative injuries were efficiently attenuated by melatonin pretreatment. Moreover, Sirtinol and SIRT1 siRNA each blocked the melatonin-mediated elevation in mitochondrial function by inhibiting SIRT1/ PGC-1 alpha signaling. Luzindole, a melatonin receptor antagonist, was found to partially block the ability of melatonin to promote SIRT1/ PGC-1 alpha signaling. In summary, our results indicate that SIRT1 plays an essential role in the ability of moderate melatonin to stimulate PGC-1 alpha and improve mitochondrial biogenesis and function at least partially through melatonin receptors in cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity. © Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Toxicological Sciences.

  5. Melatonin Improves Mitochondrial Function by Promoting MT1/SIRT1/PGC-1 Alpha-Dependent Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Cadmium-Induced Hepatotoxicity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Pan; Pi, Huifeng; Xu, Shangcheng; Zhang, Lei; Li, Yuming; Li, Min; Cao, Zhengwang; Tian, Li; Xie, Jia; Li, Renyan; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Liu, Chuan; Duan, Weixia; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is an indolamine synthesized in the pineal gland that has a wide range of physiological functions, and it has been under clinical investigation for expanded applications. Increasing evidence demonstrates that melatonin can ameliorate cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the potentially protective effects of melatonin against cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity and the underlying mechanisms of this protection remain unclear. This study investigates the protective effects of melatonin pretreatment on cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity and elucidates the potential mechanism of melatonin-mediated protection. We exposed HepG2 cells to different concentrations of cadmium chloride (2.5, 5, and 10μM) for 12 h. We found that Cd stimulated cytotoxicity, disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species production, and decreased mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial DNA content. Consistent with this finding, Cd exposure was associated with decreased Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein expression and activity, thus promoted acetylation of PGC-1 alpha, a key enzyme involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function, although Cd did not disrupt the interaction between SIRT1 and PGC-1 alpha. However, all cadmium-induced mitochondrial oxidative injuries were efficiently attenuated by melatonin pretreatment. Moreover, Sirtinol and SIRT1 siRNA each blocked the melatonin-mediated elevation in mitochondrial function by inhibiting SIRT1/ PGC-1 alpha signaling. Luzindole, a melatonin receptor antagonist, was found to partially block the ability of melatonin to promote SIRT1/ PGC-1 alpha signaling. In summary, our results indicate that SIRT1 plays an essential role in the ability of moderate melatonin to stimulate PGC-1 alpha and improve mitochondrial biogenesis and function at least partially through melatonin receptors in cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:25159133

  6. A novel partial agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) recruits PPARgamma-coactivator-1alpha, prevents triglyceride accumulation, and potentiates insulin signaling in vitro.

    PubMed

    Burgermeister, Elke; Schnoebelen, Astride; Flament, Angele; Benz, Jörg; Stihle, Martine; Gsell, Bernard; Rufer, Arne; Ruf, Armin; Kuhn, Bernd; Märki, Hans Peter; Mizrahi, Jacques; Sebokova, Elena; Niesor, Eric; Meyer, Markus

    2006-04-01

    Partial agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma), also termed selective PPARgamma modulators, are expected to uncouple insulin sensitization from triglyceride (TG) storage in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. These agents shall thus avoid adverse effects, such as body weight gain, exerted by full agonists such as thiazolidinediones. In this context, we describe the identification and characterization of the isoquinoline derivative PA-082, a prototype of a novel class of non-thiazolidinedione partial PPARgamma ligands. In a cocrystal with PPARgamma it was bound within the ligand-binding pocket without direct contact to helix 12. The compound displayed partial agonism in biochemical and cell-based transactivation assays and caused preferential recruitment of PPARgamma-coactivator-1alpha (PGC1alpha) to the receptor, a feature shared with other selective PPARgamma modulators. It antagonized rosiglitazone-driven transactivation and TG accumulation during de novo adipogenic differentiation of murine C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal stem cells. The latter effect was mimicked by overexpression of wild-type PGC1alpha but not its LXXLL-deficient mutant. Despite failing to promote TG loading, PA-082 induced mRNAs of genes encoding components of insulin signaling and adipogenic differentiation pathways. It potentiated glucose uptake and inhibited the negative cross-talk of TNFalpha on protein kinase B (AKT) phosphorylation in mature adipocytes and HepG2 human hepatoma cells. PGC1alpha is a key regulator of energy expenditure and down-regulated in diabetics. We thus propose that selective recruitment of PGC1alpha to favorable PPARgamma-target genes provides a possible molecular mechanism whereby partial PPARgamma agonists dissociate TG accumulation from insulin signaling.

  7. A DC-81-indole conjugate agent suppresses melanoma A375 cell migration partially via interrupting VEGF production and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha}-mediated signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Ming-Chu; Hu, Wan-Ping; Yu, Hsin-Su; Wu, Wen-Chuan; Chang, Long-Sen; Kao, Ying-Hsien; Wang, Jeh-Jeng

    2011-09-01

    Pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBD) chemicals are antitumor antibiotics inhibiting nucleic acid synthesis. An indole carboxylate-PBD hybrid with six-carbon spacer structure (IN6CPBD) has been previously demonstrated to induce melanoma cell apoptosis and reduce metastasis in mouse lungs. This study aimed at investigating the efficacy of the other hybrid compound with four-carbon spacer (IN4CPBD) and elucidating its anti-metastatic mechanism. Human melanoma A375 cells with IN4CPBD treatment underwent cytotoxicity and apoptosis-associated assays. Transwell migration assay, Western blotting, and ELISA were used for mechanistic study. IN4CPBD exhibited potent melanoma cytotoxicity through interrupting G1/S cell cycle progression, increasing DNA fragmentation and hypodipoidic DNA contents, and reducing mitochondrial membrane potential. Caspase activity elevation suggested that both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways were involved in IN4CPBD-induced melanoma apoptosis. IN4CPBD up-regulated p53 and p21, thereby concomitantly derailing the equilibrium between Bcl-2 and Bax levels. Transwell migration assay demonstrated that stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}) stimulated A375 cell motility, while kinase inhibitors treatment confirmed that Rho/ROCK, Akt, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK pathways were involved in SDF-1{alpha}-enhanced melanoma migration. IN4CPBD not only abolished the SDF-1{alpha}-enhanced chemotactic motility but also suppressed constitutive MMP-9 and VEGF expression. Mechanistically, IN4CPBD down-regulated Akt, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK total proteins and MYPT1 phosphorylation. In conclusion, beyond the fact that IN4CPBD induces melanoma cell apoptosis at cytotoxic dose, the interruption in the VEGF expression and the SDF-1{alpha}-related signaling at cytostatic dose may partially constitute the rationale for its in vivo anti-metastatic potency. - Research Highlights: > A novel carboxylate-PBD hybrid as anti-melanoma drug. > IN4CPBD interrupts melanoma cell

  8. Comparison of effects of aspirin and indomethacin on human platelet prostaglandin synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Crook, D; Collins, A J

    1977-01-01

    Human platelets were incubated in vitro with either aspirin or indomethacin and the prostaglandin synthetase activity of the resultant microsomal fraction from each incubation measured using a radiometric technique. Whereas aspirin produced a dose-related inhibition of the enzyme, indomethacin produced little or no inhibition over the same concentration range (10(-6) mol/l--10(-3) mol/l). Furthermore, administration of aspirin (600 mg) to volunteers produced a highly significant, prolonged inhibition of platelet microsomal prostaglandin synthetase whereas no inhibition was found with indomethacin (50 mg). As indomethacin is considerably more potent than aspirin as an inhibitor of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase in vitro, the results suggest a fundamental difference in the nature of the inhibition produced by each drug, aspirin being an essentially irreversible inhibitor whereas the inhibition produced by indomethacin is reversible. Studies with [3H-acetyl] aspirin have confirmed previous findings (Roth and Majerus, 1975) that aspirin produces an irreversible acetylation of a particulate fraction protein from human platelets. PMID:411427

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha blocks differentiation of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huimin; Li, Yan; Shu, Minfeng; Tang, Jianjun; Huang, Yijun; Zhou, Yuxi; Liang, Yingjie; Yan, Guangmei

    2009-12-01

    Aberrant differentiation is a characteristic feature of neoplastic transformation, while hypoxia in solid tumors is believed to be linked to aggressive behavior and poor prognosis. However, the possible relationship between hypoxia and differentiation in malignancies remains poorly defined. Here we show that rat C6 and primary human malignant glioma cells can be induced to differentiate into astrocytes by the well-known adenylate cyclase activator forskolin. However, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha expression stimulated by the hypoxia mimetics cobalt chloride or deferoxamine blocks this differentiation and this effectiveness is reversible upon withdrawal of the hypoxia mimetics. Importantly, knockdown of hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha by RNA interference restores the differentiation capabilities of the cells, even in the presence of cobalt chloride, whereas stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha through retarded ubiquitination by von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene silence abrogates the induced differentiation. Moreover, targeting of HIF-1 using chetomin, a disrupter of HIF-1 binding to its transcriptional co-activator CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300, abolishes the differentiation-inhibitory effect of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha. Administration of chetomin in combination with forskolin significantly suppresses malignant glioma growth in an in vivo xenograft model. Analysis of 95 human glioma tissues revealed an increase of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha protein expression with progressing tumor grade. Taken together, these findings suggest a key signal transduction pathway involving hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha that contributes to a differentiation defect in malignant gliomas and sheds new light on the differentiation therapy of solid tumors by targeting hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

  10. Immunohistochemical detection of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha in human renal allograft biopsies.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Christian; Pratschke, Johann; Rudolph, Birgit; Heyman, Samuel N; Schindler, Ralf; Babel, Nina; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Frei, Ulrich; Rosen, Seymour; Reinke, Petra

    2007-01-01

    Although it generally is accepted that renal hypoxia may occur in various situations after renal transplantation, direct evidence for such hypoxia is lacking, and possible implications on graft pathophysiology remain obscure. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) are regulated at the protein level by oxygen-dependent enzymes and, hence, allow for tissue hypoxia detection. With the use of high-amplification HIF-1alpha immunohistochemistry in renal biopsies, hypoxia is shown at specific time points after transplantation with clinicohistologic correlations. Immediately after engraftment, in primarily functioning grafts, abundant HIF-1alpha is present and correlates with cold ischemic time >15 h and/or graft age >50 yr (P < 0.04). In contrast, a low HIF-1alpha score correlates with primary nonfunction, likely reflecting loss of oxygen consumption for tubular transport. Protocol biopsies at 2 wk show widespread HIF-1alpha induction, irrespective of histology. Beyond 3 mo, both protocol biopsies and indicated biopsies are virtually void of HIF-1alpha, with the only exception being clinical/subclinical rejection. HIF-derived transcriptional adaptation to hypoxia may counterbalance, at least partly, the negative impact of cold preservation and warm reflow injury. Transient hypoxia at 2 wk may be induced by hyperfiltration, hypertrophy, calcineurin inhibitor-induced toxicity, or a combination of these. Lack of detectable HIF-1alpha at 3 mo and beyond suggests that at this time point, graft oxygen homeostasis occurs. The strong correlation between hypoxia and clinical/subclinical rejection in long-term grafts suggests that hypoxia is involved in such graft dysfunction, and HIF-1alpha immunohistochemistry could enhance the specific diagnosis of acute rejection.

  11. Effects of prenatal malnutrition on GABAA receptor alpha1, alpha3 and beta2 mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Janine L; Alexander, Mark J; Galler, Janina R; Farb, David H; Russek, Shelley J

    2003-09-15

    Exposure of pregnant rats to protein malnutrition throughout pregnancy alters the developing hippocampus, leading to increased inhibition and selective changes in hippocampal-mediated behaviors. Given that GABA mediates most inhibitory neurotransmission, we asked whether selective changes in the levels of GABA receptor subunit mRNAs might result. Quantitative RNase protection profiling of 12 GABAA and GABAB receptor subunit mRNAs show that alpha1 and beta2 decrease in the adult (P90) hippocampal formation of prenatally malnourished rats, while the levels of alpha3 are increased. Moreover, the distribution of alpha1, alpha3 and beta2 mRNAs remains unchanged in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal subfields relative to dentate gyrus. The data suggest that prenatal malnutrition produces global changes of certain GABAA, but not GABAB, receptor mRNAs in the hippocampal formation.

  12. Roles for the heliodynamic hormones, all trans retinoic acid and 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, in control of the hematopoietic cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Blazsek, I; Comisso, M; Farabos, C; Misset, J L

    1991-01-01

    It is now well established that the production of primary hematopoietic cells is controlled at different levels of the biological organization. Bone marrow (BM) stromal cells, the extracellular matrix (ECM), polypeptide hematopoietic growth factors (HGF) as well as endogenous cell-division cycle (CDC) related factors play a dominant role in this control. Recent information suggest that the 2 lipophilic hormones, transRA and 1 alpha,25D3, depending on and/or perhaps mediating solar energy, play a role in the maintenance of BM homeostasis. Here we show that both transRA and 1 alpha,25D3: a) modulate the growth and/or stimulate the adipocytic differentiation of fibroblastic stromal cells (F-CFU); b) inhibit the synthesis and extracellular processing but stimulate the solubilization of matrix collagen; c) modulate the clonal growth of myeloid progenitor cells (GM-CFU) in synergy with HGFs; and d) inhibit the production of lactic acid in standard, normal long-term BM cultures (LTBMC). Comparative analysis of normal, preleukemic and leukemic BM cells in LTBMC indicated a positive correlation between the induction of terminal differentiation and reduced lactate production elicited by transRA or 1 alpha,25D3. These results raise a hypothesis according to which the terminal differentiation induced by the helicodynamic hormones is dependent on the mitochondrial aerobic ATP-generating system whose impairment may be a critical step during the process of leukemic transformation.

  13. A comparison of intraamniotic prostaglandin and extraamniotic prostaglandin gel for midtrimester termination of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smith, D H; Dalrymple, J C

    1983-02-01

    A comparison between midtrimester abortion induced by the intraamniotic injection of prostaglandin F2 alpha and abortion induced by prostaglandin F2 alpha in Tylose gel administered extraamniotically was made in a group of 40 patients. The induction-abortion interval in the extraamniotic group was 12.1 hours which was significantly shorter (P less than 0.001) than the intraamniotic group (27.6 hours). The placenta was expelled completely more often and there were no cervical lacerations using the extraamniotic method whereas 2 patients required repair of cervical lacerations after intraamniotic prostaglandin. Extraamniotic administration of prostaglandin F2 alpha in Tylose gel is recommended as a safe and more effective method for inducing midtrimester abortion than intraamniotic prostaglandin.

  14. Antiproliferative effects of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and vitamin D analogs on tumor-derived endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Ronald J; Johnson, Candace S; Modzelewski, Ruth A; Trump, Donald L

    2002-07-01

    Although there is abundant evidence that 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25-(OH)(2)D(3)] inhibits the growth of several cancer cell types, inhibition of angiogenesis may also play a role in mediating the antitumor effects of 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3.) We examined the ability of 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) to inhibit the growth of tumor-derived endothelial cells (TDECs) and normal endothelial cells and to modulate angiogenic signaling. 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) inhibited the growth of TDECs from two tumor models at nanomolar concentrations, but was less potent against normal aortic or yolk sac endothelial cells. The vitamin D analogs Ro-25-6760, EB1089, and ILX23-7553 were also potent inhibitors of TDEC proliferation. Furthermore, the combination of 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) and dexamethasone had greater activity than either agent alone. 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) increased vitamin D receptor and p27(Kip1) protein levels in TDECs, whereas phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-Akt levels were reduced. These changes were not observed in normal aortic endothelial cells. In squamous cell carcinoma and radiation-induced fibrosarcoma-1 cells, 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) treatment caused a reduction in the angiogenic signaling molecule, angiopoietin-2. In conclusion, 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) and its analogs directly inhibit TDEC proliferation at concentrations comparable to those required to inhibit tumor cells. Further, 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) modulates cell cycle and survival signaling in TDECs and affects angiogenic signaling in cancer cells. Thus, our work supports the hypothesis that angiogenesis inhibition plays a role in the antitumor effects of 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3).

  15. Antenatal administration of Rh-immune globulin causes significant increases in the immunomodulatory cytokines transforming growth factor-beta and prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Branch, Donald R; Shabani, Fariba; Lund, Nicole; Denomme, Gregory A

    2006-08-01

    Production of specific cytokines in response to administration of Rh-immune globulin (RhIG) was examined to assess the mechanism of inhibition of the anti-D production and prevention of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Plasma levels of 17 different cytokines before and 48 hours after antenatal administration of anti-D were measured in 10 women candidates for prophylaxis with RhIG. No striking changes were observed in levels of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 sRII, IL-12 p40, IL-16, or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Levels of IL-4, -5, -10, -13, and -17; macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha; granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor; tumor necrosis factor-beta; and interferon-gamma remained below detection levels both before and after testing. IL-1ra levels, however, showed a slight to moderate decrease in 7 of 10 women after RhIG administration. In contrast, levels of TGF-beta1 increased more than 1.3-fold in 7 of 10 women and more than 2-fold in 4 of 10 women; in 1 instance the increase was more than 5-fold and this woman also had a significant increase in TGF-beta2. In addition to TGF-beta, 5 of 10 women had a modest increase (>1.5-fold) in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Analyses of the combined results of the 10 women showed that increases in both TGF-beta1 and PGE2 after RhIG were significant. These results indicate that RhIG prophylaxis can induce higher than baseline levels of two strongly immunomodulatory cytokines, TGF-beta and PGE2. These findings represent one possible mechanism for the inhibition of the primary immune response to the D antigen in women receiving RhIG prophylaxis for prevention of HDN.

  16. A homology-derived structural model of the murine macrophage inflammatory protein, MIP-1 alpha.

    PubMed

    McKie, J H; Douglas, K T

    1994-01-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha), a monocyte cytokine, has roles postulated for it in neutrophil chemoattraction, the inflammatory response and the control of haemopoietic stem cell proliferation. The three-dimensional structure of MIP-1 alpha has been modelled structurally, based on its sequence similarity to interleukin-8 and related proteins. The predicted dimeric form of MIP-1 alpha contains two symmetry-related antiparallel alpha-helices lying at an angle across a beta-sheet. The interhelical region and the beta-sheet flooring it are discussed as the potential receptor-binding site in terms of the distribution of negatively charged amino-acid side-chains, which contrasts remarkably with the corresponding positively-charged locations for IL-8. The general topographical features of this (alpha + beta) structural family of cytokines and related proteins (including HLA-A2, PF-4) are discussed. The members of this cytokine family fall into two structural groups as the antiparallel helices (N to C directed) mounted across the beta-sheet platform can be located in a clockwise (e.g. HLA-A2) or anticlockwise (e.g. MIP-1 alpha) sense with respect to the beta-floor).

  17. Synthesis of IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta by arterial cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, C. F.; Sajuthi, D.; Tulli, H.; Williams, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) has been implicated as a regulatory protein in the development and clinical sequelae of atherosclerosis. To determine which cells in the atherosclerotic plaque synthesize IL-1 in situ, the authors evaluated histologic sections of iliac arteries from cynomolgus monkeys using probes for IL-1 alpha and beta. A polyclonal antibody to IL-1 alpha and beta was used to determine if proteins were concomitantly produced. The predominant cells expressing IL-1 alpha and beta mRNA were foam cells in the intima. Adherent leukocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) expressed mRNA for IL-1 alpha. Microvascular endothelium expressed mRNA for both IL-1 alpha and beta. IL-1 proteins were located frequently in cells expressing IL-1 mRNA. These results indicate that endothelium and VSMCs, in conjunction with macrophages, serve as localized sources of IL-1 protein synthesis. These findings suggest that vascular cells may contribute directly to the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular disease by actively secreting potent biologic mediators that modify vascular and immune cell function. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:2012178

  18. Structural basis for the recognition of hydroxyproline in HIF-1 alpha by pVHL.

    PubMed

    Hon, Wai-Ching; Wilson, Michael I; Harlos, Karl; Claridge, Timothy D W; Schofield, Christopher J; Pugh, Christopher W; Maxwell, Patrick H; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Stuart, David I; Jones, E Yvonne

    2002-06-27

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a transcriptional complex that controls cellular and systemic homeostatic responses to oxygen availability. HIF-1 alpha is the oxygen-regulated subunit of HIF-1, an alpha beta heterodimeric complex. HIF-1 alpha is stable in hypoxia, but in the presence of oxygen it is targeted for proteasomal degradation by the ubiquitination complex pVHL, the protein of the von Hippel Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor gene and a component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Capture of HIF-1 alpha by pVHL is regulated by hydroxylation of specific prolyl residues in two functionally independent regions of HIF-1 alpha. The crystal structure of a hydroxylated HIF-1 alpha peptide bound to VCB (pVHL, elongins C and B) and solution binding assays reveal a single, conserved hydroxyproline-binding pocket in pVHL. Optimized hydrogen bonding to the buried hydroxyprolyl group confers precise discrimination between hydroxylated and unmodified prolyl residues. This mechanism provides a new focus for development of therapeutic agents to modulate cellular responses to hypoxia.

  19. PGC-1 alpha regulates HO-1 expression, mitochondrial dynamics and biogenesis: Role of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailendra P; Schragenheim, Joseph; Cao, Jian; Falck, John R; Abraham, Nader G; Bellner, Lars

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a risk factor in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, predominantly as a result of cardiovascular complications. Increased adiposity is a systemic condition characterized by increased oxidative stress (ROS), increased inflammation, inhibition of anti-oxidant genes such as HO-1 and increased degradation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). We previously demonstrated that EETs attenuate mitochondrial ROS. We postulate that EETs increase peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), which controls mitochondrial function, oxidative metabolism and induction of HO-1. Cultured murine adipocytes and mice fed a high fat (HF) diet were used to assess functional relationship between EETs, HO-1 and (PGC-1α) using an EET analogue (EET-A) and lentivirus to knock down the PPARGC1A gene. EET-A increased PGC-1α and HO-1 in cultured adipocytes and increased the expression of genes involved in thermogenesis and adipocyte browning (UCP1 and PRDM16, respectively). PGC-1α knockdown prevented EET-A-induced HO-1expression, suggesting that PGC-1α is upstream of HO-1. MRI data obtained from fat tissues showed that EET-A administration to mice on a HF diet significantly reduced total body fat content, subcutaneous and visceral fat deposits and reduced the VAT: SAT ratio. Moreover EET-A normalized the VO2 and RQ (VCO2/VO2) in mice fed a HF diet, an effect that was completely prevented in PGC-1α deficient mice. In addition, EET-A increased mitochondrial biogenesis and function as measured by OPA1, MnSOD, Mfn1, Mfn2, and SIRT3, an effect that was inhibited by knockdown of PGC-1α. Taken together, our findings show that EET-A increased PGC-1α thereby increasing mitochondrial viability, increased fusion potential thereby providing metabolic protection and increased VO2 consumption in HF-induced obesity in mice, thus demonstrating that the EET-mediated increase in HO-1

  20. The transcriptional coactivator PGC-1alpha is essential for maximal and efficient cardiac mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lehman, John J; Boudina, Sihem; Banke, Natasha Hausler; Sambandam, Nandakumar; Han, Xianlin; Young, Deanna M; Leone, Teresa C; Gross, Richard W; Lewandowski, E Douglas; Abel, E Dale; Kelly, Daniel P

    2008-07-01

    High-capacity mitochondrial ATP production is essential for normal function of the adult heart, and evidence is emerging that mitochondrial derangements occur in common myocardial diseases. Previous overexpression studies have shown that the inducible transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator (PGC)-1alpha is capable of activating postnatal cardiac myocyte mitochondrial biogenesis. Recently, we generated mice deficient in PGC-1alpha (PGC-1alpha(-/-) mice), which survive with modestly blunted postnatal cardiac growth. To determine if PGC-1alpha is essential for normal cardiac energy metabolic capacity, mitochondrial function experiments were performed on saponin-permeabilized myocardial fibers from PGC-1alpha(-/-) mice. These experiments demonstrated reduced maximal (state 3) palmitoyl-l-carnitine respiration and increased maximal (state 3) pyruvate respiration in PGC-1alpha(-/-) mice compared with PGC-1alpha(+/+) controls. ATP synthesis rates obtained during maximal (state 3) respiration in permeabilized myocardial fibers were reduced for PGC-1alpha(-/-) mice, whereas ATP produced per oxygen consumed (ATP/O), a measure of metabolic efficiency, was decreased by 58% for PGC-1alpha(-/-) fibers. Ex vivo isolated working heart experiments demonstrated that PGC-1alpha(-/-) mice exhibited lower cardiac power, reduced palmitate oxidation, and increased reliance on glucose oxidation, with the latter likely a compensatory response. (13)C NMR revealed that hearts from PGC-1alpha(-/-) mice exhibited a limited capacity to recruit triglyceride as a source for lipid oxidation during beta-adrenergic challenge. Consistent with reduced mitochondrial fatty acid oxidative enzyme gene expression, the total triglyceride content was greater in hearts of PGC-1alpha(-/-) mice relative to PGC-1alpha(+/+) following a fast. Overall, these results demonstrate that PGC-1alpha is essential for the maintenance of maximal, efficient cardiac

  1. Role of prostaglandins in development of porcine blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Geisert, R D; Rasby, R J; Minton, J E; Wetteman, R P

    1986-02-01

    Rapid elongation of porcine blastocysts between Days 11 to 12 of pregnancy coincides with an increase in uterine luminal content of prostaglandins. The present study evaluated the effect of two prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors (indomethacin and flunixin meglumine) on elongation of porcine blastocysts from spherical to filamentous forms between Day 11 to 12 of pregnancy. Gilts were hemi-hysterectomized on Day 11 of pregnancy. The excised uterine horn was flushed with 0.9% saline and diameter of blastocysts recovered were measured. Immediately following surgery, pregnant gilts were assigned to receive either: 1) vehicle every 4 h, 2) flunixin meglumine (banamine) every 4 h, or 3) indomethacin every 12 h. The remaining uterine horn was removed and flushed after the time of blastocyst elongation estimated for each gilt on basis of blastocyst development in the first horn. Uterine flushings were analyzed for total calcium, protein, acid phosphatase activity, estrone, estradiol-17 beta and prostaglandin F. Pretreatment blastocyst diameter was similar for all groups and ranged from 1 mm to 20 mm. Treatment of gilts with either banamine or indomethacin effectively inhibited (P less than 0.001) the increase in uterine luminal content of PGF. Total calcium, estrone and estradiol-17 beta were not influenced by treatment. Total uterine luminal protein and acid phosphatase activity were reduced (P less than 0.05) in banamine treated gilts compared to those receiving vehicle or indomethacin treatments. Although total PGF recovered in uterine flushings was reduced during the period of blastocyst elongation, treatment with PGF synthetase inhibitors failed to block rapid elongation of blastocysts from the spherical to filamentous forms.

  2. Suppression of interleukin 2-dependent human T cell growth in vitro by prostaglandin E (PGE) and their precursor fatty acids. Evidence for a PGE-independent mechanism of inhibition by the fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Santoli, D; Phillips, P D; Colt, T L; Zurier, R B

    1990-01-01

    PGE represent oxygenation products of polyunsaturated essential fatty acids and are important regulators of cell-mediated immune responses. Because oils enriched in such fatty acids reduce inflammation and tissue injury in vivo, we examined the effects of these PGE precursors on IL-2-driven growth of human T lymphocytes. Dihomogamma linoleic acid (DGLA), AA, and their metabolites (PGE1 and PGE2, respectively) strongly inhibited short- and long-term growth of IL-2-dependent T cell cultures; EPA was much less inhibitory and its product, PGE3, failed to suppress IL-2 responses. Short-term pretreatment of the cells with DGLA or AA and removal of the fatty acids before the proliferation assay resulted in a smaller reduction in [3H]TdR incorporation. PGE and fatty acids did not alter the number of high affinity IL-2 binding sites on the T cell cultures but reduced the percentage of cells expressing CD25 and HLA class II molecules. No PGE was detected in supernatants from the fatty acid-treated cultures. Moreover, indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, did not reverse the antiproliferative effects of the fatty acids. Together, these findings indicate that fatty acids can inhibit IL-2-driven T cell growth via a PGE-independent mechanism and might be relevant to inflammatory diseases associated with persistent T cell activation. Images PMID:2298918

  3. Prostaglandin transporter mutations cause pachydermoperiostosis with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Diggle, Christine P; Parry, David A; Logan, Clare V; Laissue, Paul; Rivera, Carolina; Restrepo, Carlos Martín; Fonseca, Dora J; Morgan, Joanne E; Allanore, Yannick; Fontenay, Michaela; Wipff, Julien; Varret, Mathilde; Gibault, Laure; Dalantaeva, Nadezhda; Korbonits, Márta; Zhou, Bowen; Yuan, Gang; Harifi, Ghita; Cefle, Kivanc; Palanduz, Sukru; Akoglu, Hadim; Zwijnenburg, Petra J; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; Aubry-Rozier, Bérengère; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Accadia, Maria; Brancati, Francesco; Sheridan, Eamonn G; Taylor, Graham R; Carr, Ian M; Johnson, Colin A; Markham, Alexander F; Bonthron, David T

    2012-08-01

    Pachydermoperiostosis, or primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO), is an inherited multisystem disorder, whose features closely mimic the reactive osteoarthropathy that commonly accompanies neoplastic and inflammatory pathologies. We previously described deficiency of the prostaglandin-degrading enzyme 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) as a cause of this condition, implicating elevated circulating prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) as causative of PHO, and perhaps also as the principal mediator of secondary HO. However, PHO is genetically heterogeneous. Here, we use whole-exome sequencing to identify recessive mutations of the prostaglandin transporter SLCO2A1, in individuals lacking HPGD mutations. We performed exome sequencing of four probands with severe PHO, followed by conventional mutation analysis of SLCO2A1 in nine others. Biallelic SLCO2A1 mutations were identified in 12 of the 13 families. Affected individuals had elevated urinary PGE(2), but unlike HPGD-deficient patients, also excreted considerable quantities of the PGE(2) metabolite, PGE-M. Clinical differences between the two groups were also identified, notably that SLCO2A1-deficient individuals have a high frequency of severe anemia due to myelofibrosis. These findings reinforce the key role of systemic or local prostaglandin excess as the stimulus to HO. They also suggest that the induction or maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells by prostaglandin may depend upon transporter activity. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Separation, identification, and estimation of prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J E; Ramwell, P W

    1969-01-01

    The procedures which may be and are being used to provide a basis for the analysis of submicrogram quantitities of prostaglandins are surveyed. Discussion is focused on the following: 1) sources of standards; 2) properties (effect of different pH values, effect of blood, metabolism, solubility); 3) extraction; 4) detection; 5) estimation (ultraviolet, optical rotatory dispersion, densitometry, radioimmunoassay, enzymatic assay, isotopic methods, bioassay); 6) separation of prostaglandins (separation of PGE, PGF, and PGA with PGB compounds, separation of PGA and PGB compounds, and separation of individual prostaglandins); and 6) structural identification. Methods of prostaglandin analysis, with the required sensitivity for application to individual tissue and fluid specimens, are still in the developmental state. Although prostaglandins may be ubiquitous throughout the animal kingdom, no systematic study of their distribution has been made to date. Recent work has shown that PGE1 has a potent effect on the formation of 3',5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) which is widely believed to be an intracellular intermediate in hormone action.

  5. The biochemistry of prostaglandins: a primer.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, C

    1994-06-01

    The membranes of cells serve to endow structural integrity, compartmentalize regions of the cell and allow the generation of a stable intracellular milieu. The lipid component of the membrane forms a matrix for structurally and functionally important proteins. It is also increasingly obvious that these lipids form substrates for the synthesis of a range of molecules which have a central role in cellular communication and regulation. The prostaglandins were the first class of such molecules described and to some extent may serve as an archetype for an understanding of the various classes of lipid mediators. The release of arachidonic acid from lipids (phospholipids in particular) is achieved by lipases (phospholipase A2). Arachidonic acid itself may act directly on cells to modify function. For instance, it may modulate ion channel function. However, it is more often a substrate for cyclooxygenase which produces prostaglandin H2, being the precursor for further prostaglandin and thromboxane synthesis, or for lipoxygenase, to produce the precursor for leukotrienes (a related class of mediators). The prostaglandins may act intracellularly, are readily released from cells to act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion, and may enter the blood vessels or lymphatics to exert endocrine effects. Target cells may contain receptors with relative specificity for various members of the prostaglandin family, thus eliciting some specificity of action by the mediators.

  6. Roles of prostaglandins and nitric oxide in the effect of endothelin-1 on renal hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lin, H; Smith, M J; Young, D B

    1996-09-01

    It is known that endothelin-1 stimulates the release of nitric oxide and prostaglandins in various vascular beds. We designed the present study to analyze the roles of prostaglandins and nitric oxide in the effect of endothelin-1 on the regulation of renal hemodynamics and renin release. We used N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and meclofenamic acid to inhibit the production of nitric oxide and prostaglandins, respectively. With a nonfiltering kidney model, renal blood flow was reduced 21% in dogs treated with L-NAME and 18% in dogs treated with meclofenamic acid. Inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandins, however, produced opposite effects on estimated glomerular hydraulic pressure: L-NAME increased glomerular hydraulic pressure from 63.1 +/- 0.9 to 64.6 +/- 1.3 mm Hg (P < .01), and meclofenamic acid reduced glomerular hydraulic pressure from 63.3 +/- 1.4 to 59.8 +/- 1.6 mm Hg (P < .01). Endothelin-1 infusion produced a dose-dependent reduction in renal blood flow after blockade of nitric oxide and prostaglandins. The responses of glomerular hydraulic pressure were different in the two groups during endothelin-1 infusion. Endothelin-1 progressively reduced glomerular hydraulic pressure in a dose-dependent fashion in the meclofenamic acid group. However, endothelin-1 slightly increased glomerular hydraulic pressure until the infusion rate reached 5.0 ng/kg per minute. At that rate, endothelin-1 reduced glomerular hydraulic pressure from 63.3 +/- 1.4 to 47.0 +/- 1.4 mm Hg in the meclofenamic acid group (P < .01), a more than 25% reduction, whereas at the same dose, endothelin-1 reduced glomerular hydraulic pressure only less than 2% in the L-NAME group. In addition, blockade of nitric oxide and prostaglandins did not alter the inhibitory effect of endothelin-1 on renin release in the non-filtering kidney. Therefore, the present study demonstrates that the release of nitric oxide and prostaglandins might modulate the effects of endothelin-1 on the

  7. HIF-1{alpha} is necessary to support gluconeogenesis during liver regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Toshihide; Goda, Nobuhito; Fujiki, Natsuko; Hishiki, Takako; Nishiyama, Yasumasa; Senoo-Matsuda, Nanami; Shimazu, Motohide; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Johnson, Randall S.; Suematsu, Makoto

    2009-10-02

    Coordinated recovery of hepatic glucose metabolism is prerequisite for normal liver regeneration. To examine roles of hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) for hepatic glucose homeostasis during the reparative process, we inactivated the gene in hepatocytes in vivo. Following partial hepatectomy (PH), recovery of residual liver weight was initially retarded in the mutant mice by down-regulation of hepatocyte proliferation, but occurred comparably between the mutant and control mice at 72 h after PH. At this time point, the mutant mice showed lowered blood glucose levels with enhanced accumulation of glycogen in the liver. The mutant mice exhibited impairment of hepatic gluconeogenesis as assessed by alanine tolerance test. This appeared to result from reduced expression of PGK-1 and PEPCK since 3-PG, PEP and malate were accumulated to greater extents in the regenerated liver. In conclusion, these findings provide evidence for roles of HIF-1{alpha} in the regulation of gluconeogenesis under liver regeneration.

  8. Prostaglandin potentiates 5-HT responses in stomach and ileum innervating visceral afferent sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho

    2015-01-02

    Gastrointestinal disorder is a common symptom induced by diverse pathophysiological conditions that include food tolerance, chemotherapy, and irradiation for therapy. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level increase was often reported during gastrointestinal disorder and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors has been used for ameliorate the symptoms. Exogenous administration of PGE2 induces gastrointestinal disorder, however, the mechanism of action is not known. Therefore, we tested PGE2 effect on visceral afferent sensory neurons of the rat. Interestingly, PGE2 itself did not evoked any response but enhanced serotonin (5-HT)-evoked currents up to 167% of the control level. The augmented 5-HT responses were completely inhibited by a 5-HT type 3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The PGE2-induced potentiation were blocked by a selective E-prostanoid type 4 (EP4) receptors antagonist, L-161,982, but type 1 and 2 receptor antagonist AH6809 has no effect. A membrane permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 also inhibited PGE2 effects. PGE2 induced 5-HT current augmentation was observed on 15% and 21% of the stomach and ileum projecting neurons, respectively. Current results suggest a synergistic signaling in visceral afferent neurons underlying gastrointestinal disorder involving PGE2 potentiation of 5-HT currents. Our findings may open a possibility for screen a new type drugs with lower side effects than currently using steroidal prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors by selectively targeting EP4 receptor/PKA pathway without interrupt prostaglandin synthesis.

  9. The relationship between spontaneous rupture of membranes, labor, and microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity and amniotic fluid concentrations of prostaglandins and thromboxane B2 in term pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Romero, R; Baumann, P; Gomez, R; Salafia, C; Rittenhouse, L; Barberio, D; Behnke, E; Cotton, D B; Mitchell, M D

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between rupture of membranes, labor, and microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity and amniotic fluid concentrations of eicosanoids in patients with spontaneous rupture of membranes at term. Amniotic fluid was retrieved by transabdominal amniocentesis from patients with rupture of membranes and patients with intact membranes at term. Studies to determine the microbial state of the amniotic cavity included culture for bacteria and mycoplasmas, Gram stain, amniotic fluid white blood cell count, and Limulus amebocyte lysate. Eicosanoids (prostaglandin E2, prostaglandin F2 alpha and its stable metabolite, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha, and thromboxane B2) were determined with sensitive and specific radioimmunoassays validated for human amniotic fluid. Statistical inference was conducted with analysis of variance and linear contrast. (1) Spontaneous rupture of membranes at term was associated with a significant increase in amniotic fluid concentrations of all eicosanoids measured in this study except 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha. (2) Early labor in patients with rupture of membranes was associated with a significant increase in the amniotic fluid concentration of all eicosanoids. (3) A significant increase in amniotic fluid eicosanoids in women with microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity could not be documented. Whereas preterm labor in the absence of microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity is not associated with a significant increase in amniotic fluid concentrations of prostaglandins, a clear increase was documented in women with early labor after spontaneous rupture of membranes. These observations suggest that there are fundamental differences in the biochemistry of term and preterm parturition.

  10. Quantitative evaluation of 1-alpha-hydroxycholecalciferol as a cholecalciferol substitute for broilers.

    PubMed

    Edwards, H M; Shirley, R B; Escoe, W B; Pesti, G M

    2002-05-01

    Two experiments were conducted using a corn-soybean meal diet that meets or exceeds the NRC (1984) requirements for all nutrients except cholecalciferol (D3) to determine the effectiveness of 1-alpha-hydroxycholecalciferol (1alpha-OHD3) as a substitute for D3 in the diet of young broilers. Ross x Ross mixed-sex, 1-d-old chicks were reared in Petersime battery brooders not exposed to ultraviolet light with feed and water supplied ad libitum for 16 d. In Experiment 1, D3 was fed at 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 40 microg/kg and one source of 1alpha-OHD3-(Hoffmann-LaRoche, Inc.; HLR) was fed at 0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 5, and 10 microg/kg of diet. In Experiment 2, the D3 was fed at 0, 2.5, 5, and 10 microg and two sources of 1alpha-OHD3-[HLR and Majestic Research Inc. (MRI)] were fed at 0, 0.625, 1.25, and 5 microg/kg of diet. Slope ratio analysis of data from the measurement of 16-d body weight, plasma Ca, rickets, and bone ash indicated bioavailability of the 1alpha-OHD3 as compared to D3 from 1.88 to 21.2. Percentage bone ash gave the most precise values in both experiments. Considering all the data from both experiments, the 1alpha-OHD3 appears to be approximately eight times as effective as D3 for satisfying the requirements of several criteria in two experiments with broiler chickens.

  11. Expression of HIF-1 alpha in irradiated tissue is altered by topical negative-pressure therapy.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Andreas; Dimmler, Arno; Stange, Sebastian; Labanaris, Apostolos; Sauer, Rolf; Grabenbauer, Gerhard; Horch, Raymund E

    2007-03-01

    Despite the enormous therapeutic potential of modern radiotherapy, common side effects such as radiation-induced wound healing disorders remain a well-known clinical phenomenon. Topical negative pressure therapy (TNP) is a novel tool to alleviate intraoperative, percutaneous irradiation or brachytherapy. Since TNP has been shown to positively influence the perfusion of chronic, poorly vascularized wounds, the authors applied this therapeutic method to irradiated wounds and investigated the effect on tissue oxygenation in irradiated tissue in five patients. With informed patients' consent, samples prior to and 4 and 8 days after continuous TNP with -125 mmHg were obtained during routine wound debridements. Granulation tissue was stained with hematoxylin-eosin, and additionally with CD31, HIF-1 alpha (hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha), and D2-40 to detect blood vessels, measure indirect signs of hypoxia, and lymph vessel distribution within the pre- and post-TNP samples. In this first series of experiments, a positive influence of TNP onto tissue oxygenation in radiation-induced wounds could be demonstrated. TNP led to a significant decrease of 53% HIF-1 alpha-positive cell nuclei. At the same time, a slight reduction of CD31-stained capillaries was seen in comparison to samples before TNP. Immunostaining with D2-40 revealed an increased number of lymphatic vessels with distended lumina and an alteration of the parallel orientation within the post-TNP samples. This study is, to the authors' knowledge, the first report on a novel previously not described histological marker to demonstrate the effects of TNP on HIF-1 alpha expression as an indirect marker of tissue oxygenation in irradiated wounds, as demonstrated by a reduction of HIF-1 alpha concentration after TNP. Since this observation may be of significant value to develop possible new strategies to treat radiation-induced tissue injury, further investigations of HIF-1 alpha regulation under TNP are warranted.

  12. Modulation of calprotectin in human keratinocytes by keratinocyte growth factor and interleukin-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Bando, Mika; Hiroshima, Yuka; Kataoka, Masatoshi; Herzberg, Mark C; Ross, Karen F; Shinohara, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Takenori; Nagata, Toshihiko; Kido, Jun-ichi

    2010-01-01

    Calprotectin is an antimicrobial complex composed of the S100A8 and S100A9 protein family subunits. Contributing to innate immunity, calprotectin expression is increased by interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), which modulates keratinocyte differentiation. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is produced by mesenchymal cells and has a mitogenic activity for epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of KGF on calprotectin expression in keratinocytes and modulation by IL-1alpha. Human keratinocytes were cultured with KGF in the presence or absence of a KGF receptor (KGFR) inhibitor or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors. Calprotectin (S100A8/S100A9) expression was determined by northern blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively, whereas MAPK phosphorylation was analyzed by western blot analysis. KGF significantly decreased the expression of S100A8/S100A9-specific mRNAs and calprotectin protein. In the presence of KGF, KGFR inhibitor or extracellular-regulated kinase inhibitor restored KGF-downregulated expression of S100A8/S100A9. KGF increased IL-1alpha expression in keratinocytes, whereas IL-1alpha increased KGF expression in fibroblasts. Cocultured fibroblast and keratinocytes showed lower S100A8/S100A9 mRNA expression than keratinocytes alone in the presence or absence of IL-1alpha or KGF. These results suggest that fibroblast-derived KGF reduces o