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Sample records for 1alpha pgc-1alpha mitochondrial

  1. The transcriptional coactivator PGC-1alpha is essential for maximal and efficient cardiac mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lehman, John J; Boudina, Sihem; Banke, Natasha Hausler; Sambandam, Nandakumar; Han, Xianlin; Young, Deanna M; Leone, Teresa C; Gross, Richard W; Lewandowski, E Douglas; Abel, E Dale; Kelly, Daniel P

    2008-07-01

    High-capacity mitochondrial ATP production is essential for normal function of the adult heart, and evidence is emerging that mitochondrial derangements occur in common myocardial diseases. Previous overexpression studies have shown that the inducible transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator (PGC)-1alpha is capable of activating postnatal cardiac myocyte mitochondrial biogenesis. Recently, we generated mice deficient in PGC-1alpha (PGC-1alpha(-/-) mice), which survive with modestly blunted postnatal cardiac growth. To determine if PGC-1alpha is essential for normal cardiac energy metabolic capacity, mitochondrial function experiments were performed on saponin-permeabilized myocardial fibers from PGC-1alpha(-/-) mice. These experiments demonstrated reduced maximal (state 3) palmitoyl-l-carnitine respiration and increased maximal (state 3) pyruvate respiration in PGC-1alpha(-/-) mice compared with PGC-1alpha(+/+) controls. ATP synthesis rates obtained during maximal (state 3) respiration in permeabilized myocardial fibers were reduced for PGC-1alpha(-/-) mice, whereas ATP produced per oxygen consumed (ATP/O), a measure of metabolic efficiency, was decreased by 58% for PGC-1alpha(-/-) fibers. Ex vivo isolated working heart experiments demonstrated that PGC-1alpha(-/-) mice exhibited lower cardiac power, reduced palmitate oxidation, and increased reliance on glucose oxidation, with the latter likely a compensatory response. (13)C NMR revealed that hearts from PGC-1alpha(-/-) mice exhibited a limited capacity to recruit triglyceride as a source for lipid oxidation during beta-adrenergic challenge. Consistent with reduced mitochondrial fatty acid oxidative enzyme gene expression, the total triglyceride content was greater in hearts of PGC-1alpha(-/-) mice relative to PGC-1alpha(+/+) following a fast. Overall, these results demonstrate that PGC-1alpha is essential for the maintenance of maximal, efficient cardiac

  2. mTOR controls mitochondrial oxidative function through a YY1-PGC-1alpha transcriptional complex.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, John T; Rodgers, Joseph T; Arlow, Daniel H; Vazquez, Francisca; Mootha, Vamsi K; Puigserver, Pere

    2007-11-29

    Transcriptional complexes that contain peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor coactivator (PGC)-1alpha control mitochondrial oxidative function to maintain energy homeostasis in response to nutrient and hormonal signals. An important component in the energy and nutrient pathways is mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a kinase that regulates cell growth, size and survival. However, it is unknown whether and how mTOR controls mitochondrial oxidative activities. Here we show that mTOR is necessary for the maintenance of mitochondrial oxidative function. In skeletal muscle tissues and cells, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin decreased the gene expression of the mitochondrial transcriptional regulators PGC-1alpha, oestrogen-related receptor alpha and nuclear respiratory factors, resulting in a decrease in mitochondrial gene expression and oxygen consumption. Using computational genomics, we identified the transcription factor yin-yang 1 (YY1) as a common target of mTOR and PGC-1alpha. Knockdown of YY1 caused a significant decrease in mitochondrial gene expression and in respiration, and YY1 was required for rapamycin-dependent repression of those genes. Moreover, mTOR and raptor interacted with YY1, and inhibition of mTOR resulted in a failure of YY1 to interact with and be coactivated by PGC-1alpha. We have therefore identified a mechanism by which a nutrient sensor (mTOR) balances energy metabolism by means of the transcriptional control of mitochondrial oxidative function. These results have important implications for our understanding of how these pathways might be altered in metabolic diseases and cancer. PMID:18046414

  3. PGC-1alpha plays a functional role in exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis but not fiber-type transformation in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Geng, Tuoyu; Li, Ping; Okutsu, Mitsuharu; Yin, Xinhe; Kwek, Jyeyi; Zhang, Mei; Yan, Zhen

    2010-03-01

    Endurance exercise stimulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) expression in skeletal muscle, and forced expression of PGC-1alpha changes muscle metabolism and exercise capacity in mice. However, it is unclear if PGC-1alpha is indispensible for endurance exercise-induced metabolic and contractile adaptations in skeletal muscle. In this study, we showed that endurance exercise-induced expression of mitochondrial enzymes (cytochrome oxidase IV and cytochrome c) and increases of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31)-positive endothelial cells in skeletal muscle, but not IIb-to-IIa fiber-type transformation, were significantly attenuated in muscle-specific Pgc-1alpha knockout mice. Interestingly, voluntary running effectively restored the compromised mitochondrial integrity and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) protein expression in skeletal muscle in Pgc-1alpha knockout mice. Thus, PGC-1alpha plays a functional role in endurance exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis, but not IIb-to-IIa fiber-type transformation in mouse skeletal muscle, and the improvement of mitochondrial morphology and antioxidant defense in response to endurance exercise may occur independently of PGC-1alpha function. We conclude that PGC-1alpha is required for complete skeletal muscle adaptations induced by endurance exercise in mice. PMID:20032509

  4. Impaired coactivator activity of the Gly{sub 482} variant of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) on mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yon-Sik; Hong, Jung-Man; Lim, Sunny; Ko, Kyung Soo; Pak, Youngmi Kim . E-mail: ymkimpak@amc.seoul.kr

    2006-06-09

    Mitochondrial dysfunction may cause diabetes or insulin resistance. Peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}) coactivator-1 {alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) increases mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) resulting in mitochondrial DNA content increase. An association between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), G1444A(Gly482Ser), of PGC-1{alpha} coding region and insulin resistance has been reported in some ethnic groups. In this study, we investigated whether a change of glycine to serine at codon 482 of PGC-1{alpha} affected the Tfam promoter activity. The cDNA of PGC-1{alpha} variant bearing either glycine or serine at 482 codon was transfected into Chang human hepatocyte cells. The PGC-1{alpha} protein bearing glycine had impaired coactivator activity on Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase. We analyzed the PGC-1{alpha} genotype G1444A and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number from 229 Korean leukocyte genomic DNAs. Subjects with Gly/Gly had a 20% lower amount of peripheral blood mtDNA than did subjects with Gly/Ser and Ser/Ser (p < 0.05). No correlation was observed between diabetic parameters and PGC-1{alpha} genotypes in Koreans. These results suggest that PGC-1{alpha} variants with Gly/Gly at 482nd amino acid may impair the Tfam transcription, a regulatory function of mitochondrial biogenesis, resulting in dysfunctional mtDNA replication.

  5. Transcription Factor Tfe3 Directly Regulates Pgc-1alpha in Muscle.

    PubMed

    Salma, Nunciada; Song, Jun S; Arany, Zoltan; Fisher, David E

    2015-10-01

    The microphthalmia (MiT) family of transcription factors is an important mediator of metabolism. Family members Mitf and Tfeb directly regulate the expression of the master regulator of metabolism, peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (Pgc-1alpha), in melanomas and in the liver, respectively. Pgc-1alpha is enriched in tissues with high oxidative capacity and plays an important role in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and cellular metabolism. In skeletal muscle, Pgc-1alpha affects many aspects of muscle functionally such as endurance, fiber-type switching, and insulin sensitivity. Tfe3 also regulates muscle metabolic genes that enhance insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle. Tfe3 has not yet been shown to regulate Pgc-1alpha expression. Our results reported here show that Tfe3 directly regulates Pgc-1alpha expression in myotubes. Tfe3 ectopic expression induces Pgc-1alpha, and Tfe3 silencing suppresses Pgc-1alpha expression. This regulation is direct, as shown by Tfe3's binding to E-boxes on the Pgc-1alpha proximal promoter. We conclude that Tfe3 is a critical transcription factor that regulates Pgc-1alpha gene expression in myotubes. Since Pgc-1alpha coactivates numerous biological programs in diverse tissues, the regulation of its expression by upstream transcription factors such Tfe3 implies potential opportunities for the treatment of diseases where modulation of Pgc-1alpha expression may have important clinical outcomes.

  6. Melatonin Improves Mitochondrial Function by Promoting MT1/SIRT1/PGC-1 Alpha-Dependent Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Cadmium-Induced Hepatotoxicity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Pan; Pi, Huifeng; Xu, Shangcheng; Zhang, Lei; Li, Yuming; Li, Min; Cao, Zhengwang; Tian, Li; Xie, Jia; Li, Renyan; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Liu, Chuan; Duan, Weixia; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is an indolamine synthesized in the pineal gland that has a wide range of physiological functions, and it has been under clinical investigation for expanded applications. Increasing evidence demonstrates that melatonin can ameliorate cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the potentially protective effects of melatonin against cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity and the underlying mechanisms of this protection remain unclear. This study investigates the protective effects of melatonin pretreatment on cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity and elucidates the potential mechanism of melatonin-mediated protection. We exposed HepG2 cells to different concentrations of cadmium chloride (2.5, 5, and 10μM) for 12 h. We found that Cd stimulated cytotoxicity, disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species production, and decreased mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial DNA content. Consistent with this finding, Cd exposure was associated with decreased Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein expression and activity, thus promoted acetylation of PGC-1 alpha, a key enzyme involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function, although Cd did not disrupt the interaction between SIRT1 and PGC-1 alpha. However, all cadmium-induced mitochondrial oxidative injuries were efficiently attenuated by melatonin pretreatment. Moreover, Sirtinol and SIRT1 siRNA each blocked the melatonin-mediated elevation in mitochondrial function by inhibiting SIRT1/ PGC-1 alpha signaling. Luzindole, a melatonin receptor antagonist, was found to partially block the ability of melatonin to promote SIRT1/ PGC-1 alpha signaling. In summary, our results indicate that SIRT1 plays an essential role in the ability of moderate melatonin to stimulate PGC-1 alpha and improve mitochondrial biogenesis and function at least partially through melatonin receptors in cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:25159133

  7. Identification of novel targets for PGC-1{alpha} and histone deacetylase inhibitors in neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Rita M. Talati, Pratik; Blake, Kathryn R.; Meador-Woodruff, James H.; Russell, James W.

    2009-02-06

    Recent evidence suggests that the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator activated receptor {gamma} coactivator 1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) is involved in the pathology of Huntington's Disease (HD). While animals lacking PGC-1{alpha} express lower levels of genes involved in antioxidant defense and oxidative phosphorylation in the brain, little is known about other targets for PGC-1{alpha} in neuronal cells and whether there are ways to pharmacologically target PGC-1{alpha} in neurons. Here, PGC-1{alpha} overexpression in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells upregulated expression of genes involved in mitochondrial function, glucose transport, fatty acid metabolism, and synaptic function. Overexpression also decreased vulnerability to hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death and caspase 3 activation. Treatment of cells with the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi's) trichostatin A and valproic acid upregulated PGC-1{alpha} and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). These results suggest that PGC-1{alpha} regulates multiple pathways in neurons and that HDACi's may be good candidates to target PGC-1{alpha} and GLUT4 in HD and other neurological disorders.

  8. Identification and characterization of an alternative promoter of the human PGC-1{alpha} gene

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshioka, Toyo; Inagaki, Kenjiro; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Sakai, Mashito; Ogawa, Wataru; Hosooka, Tetsuya; Iguchi, Haruhisa; Watanabe, Eijiro; Matsuki, Yasushi; Hiramatsu, Ryuji; Kasuga, Masato

    2009-04-17

    The transcriptional regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) controls mitochondrial biogenesis and energy homeostasis. Although physical exercise induces PGC-1{alpha} expression in muscle, the underlying mechanism of this effect has remained incompletely understood. We recently identified a novel muscle-enriched isoform of PGC-1{alpha} transcript (designated PGC-1{alpha}-b) that is derived from a previously unidentified first exon. We have now cloned and characterized the human PGC-1{alpha}-b promoter. The muscle-specific transcription factors MyoD and MRF4 transactivated this promoter through interaction with a proximal E-box motif. Furthermore, either forced expression of Ca{sup 2+}- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV), calcineurin A, or the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) kinase MKK6 or the intracellular accumulation of cAMP activated the PGC-1{alpha}-b promoter in cultured myoblasts through recruitment of cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) to a putative CRE located downstream of the E-box. Our results thus reveal a potential molecular basis for isoform-specific regulation of PGC-1{alpha} expression in contracting muscle.

  9. Mitochondrial-related gene expression profiles suggest an important role of PGC-1alpha in the compensatory mechanism of endemic dilated cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    He, Shu-Lan; Tan, Wu-Hong; Zhang, Zeng-Tie; Zhang, Feng; Qu, Cheng-Juan; Lei, Yan-Xia; Zhu, Yan-He; Yu, Han-Jie; Xiang, You-Zhang; and others

    2013-10-15

    Keshan disease (KD) is an endemic dilated cardiomyopathy with unclear etiology. In this study, we compared mitochondrial-related gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from 16 KD patients and 16 normal controls in KD areas. Total RNA was isolated, amplified, labeled and hybridized to Agilent human 4×44k whole genome microarrays. Mitochondrial-related genes were screened out by the Third-Generation Human Mitochondria-Focused cDNA Microarray (hMitChip3). Quantitative real-time PCR, immunohistochemical and biochemical parameters related mitochondrial metabolism were conducted to validate our microarray results. In KD samples, 34 up-regulated genes (ratios≥2.0) were detected by significance analysis of microarrays and ingenuity systems pathway analysis (IPA). The highest ranked molecular and cellular functions of the differentially regulated genes were closely related to amino acid metabolism, free radical scavenging, carbohydrate metabolism, and energy production. Using IPA, 40 significant pathways and four significant networks, involved mainly in apoptosis, mitochondrion dysfunction, and nuclear receptor signaling were identified. Based on our results, we suggest that PGC-1alpha regulated energy metabolism and anti-apoptosis might play an important role in the compensatory mechanism of KD. Our results may lead to the identification of potential diagnostic biomarkers for KD in PBMCs, and may help to understand the pathogenesis of KD. Highlights: • Thirty-four up-regulated genes were detected in KD versus health controls. • Forty pathways and four networks were detected in KD. • PGC-1alpha regulated energy metabolism and anti-apoptosis in KD.

  10. PGC-1{alpha} accelerates cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance without disturbing Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in cardiac myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Min; Wang, Yanru; Qu, Aijuan

    2010-06-11

    Energy metabolism and Ca{sup 2+} handling serve critical roles in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1{alpha}) is a multi-functional coactivator that is involved in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial functional capacity and cellular energy metabolism. However, the regulation of PGC-1{alpha} in cardiac Ca{sup 2+} signaling has not been fully elucidated. To address this issue, we combined confocal line-scan imaging with off-line imaging processing to characterize calcium signaling in cultured adult rat ventricular myocytes expressing PGC-1{alpha} via adenoviral transduction. Our data shows that overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} improved myocyte contractility without increasing the amplitude of Ca{sup 2+} transients, suggesting that myofilament sensitivity to Ca{sup 2+} increased. Interestingly, the decay kinetics of global Ca{sup 2+} transients and Ca{sup 2+} waves accelerated in PGC-1{alpha}-expressing cells, but the decay rate of caffeine-elicited Ca{sup 2+} transients showed no significant change. This suggests that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (SERCA2a), but not Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange (NCX) contribute to PGC-1{alpha}-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance. Furthermore, PGC-1{alpha} induced the expression of SERCA2a in cultured cardiac myocytes. Importantly, overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} did not disturb cardiac Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis, because SR Ca{sup 2+} load and the propensity for Ca{sup 2+} waves remained unchanged. These data suggest that PGC-1{alpha} can ameliorate cardiac Ca{sup 2+} cycling and improve cardiac work output in response to physiological stress. Unraveling the PGC-1{alpha}-calcium handing pathway sheds new light on the role of PGC-1{alpha} in the therapy of cardiac diseases.

  11. Effect of chronic alcohol consumption on Hepatic SIRT1 and PGC-1{alpha} in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, Charles S. Leo, Maria A.; Wang Xiaolei; DeCarli, Leonore M.

    2008-05-23

    The nuclear genes, NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirtuis 1 (SIRT1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} coactivator1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) are regulators of energy metabolism. Here, we studied the role of alcohol consumption in expression of these sensing molecules. Alcohol significantly reduced hepatic SIRT1 mRNA by 50% and PGC-1{alpha} mRNA by 46% and it significantly inhibited the protein expression of SIRT1 and PGC-1{alpha}, while the transcription factor PPAR-{gamma} remained unchanged. However, when the lipid composition of the alcohol diet was changed by replacing long-chain triglycerides (LCT) with medium chain triglycerides (MCT), SIRT1 and PGC-1{alpha} mRNA were restored to near control levels. This study demonstrates that alcohol reduces key energy sensing proteins and that replacement of LCT by MCT affects the transcription of these genes. Since there is a pathophysiological link between SIRT1 and PGC-1{alpha} and mitochondrial energy, the implication of the study is that mitochondrial dysfunction due to alcohol abuse can be treated by dietary modifications.

  12. Regulation of homocysteine homeostasis through the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Li, Siming; Arning, Erland; Liu, Chang; Vitvitsky, Victor; Hernandez, Carlos; Banerjee, Ruma; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Lin, Jiandie D

    2009-03-01

    Plasma homocysteine (Hcy) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Hcy is a nonprotein amino acid derivative that is generated from the methionine cycle, which provides the methyl group for essentially all biological methylation reactions. Although plasma Hcy levels are elevated in patients with cardiovascular disease, the mechanisms that regulate Hcy homeostasis remain poorly defined. In this study, we found that the expression of key enzymes involved in Hcy metabolism is induced in the liver in response to fasting. This induction coincides with increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator (PGC)-1alpha, a transcriptional coactivator that regulates hepatic gluconeogenesis and mitochondrial function. PGC-1alpha stimulates the expression of genes involved in Hcy metabolism in cultured primary hepatocytes as well as in the liver. Adenoviral-mediated expression of PGC-1alpha in vivo leads to elevated plasma Hcy levels. In contrast, mice deficient in PGC-1alpha have lower plasma Hcy concentrations. These results define a novel role for the PGC-1alpha coactivator pathway in the regulation of Hcy homeostasis and suggest a potential pathogenic mechanism that contributes to hyperhomocysteinemia.

  13. Thermoregulatory and metabolic defects in Huntington's disease transgenic mice implicate PGC-1alpha in Huntington's disease neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Weydt, Patrick; Pineda, Victor V; Torrence, Anne E; Libby, Randell T; Satterfield, Terrence F; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Gilbert, Merle L; Morton, Gregory J; Bammler, Theodor K; Strand, Andrew D; Cui, Libin; Beyer, Richard P; Easley, Courtney N; Smith, Annette C; Krainc, Dimitri; Luquet, Serge; Sweet, Ian R; Schwartz, Michael W; La Spada, Albert R

    2006-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal, dominantly inherited disorder caused by polyglutamine repeat expansion in the huntingtin (htt) gene. Here, we observe that HD mice develop hypothermia associated with impaired activation of brown adipose tissue (BAT). Although sympathetic stimulation of PPARgamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) was intact in BAT of HD mice, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP-1) induction was blunted. In cultured cells, expression of mutant htt suppressed UCP-1 promoter activity; this was reversed by PGC-1alpha expression. HD mice showed reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure, with dysfunctional BAT mitochondria. PGC-1alpha is a known regulator of mitochondrial function; here, we document reduced expression of PGC-1alpha target genes in HD patient and mouse striatum. Mitochondria of HD mouse brain show reduced oxygen consumption rates. Finally, HD striatal neurons expressing exogenous PGC-1alpha were resistant to 3-nitropropionic acid treatment. Altered PGC-1alpha function may thus link transcription dysregulation and mitochondrial dysfunction in HD. PMID:17055784

  14. The transcriptional coactivator PGC-1alpha mediates exercise-induced angiogenesis in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Chinsomboon, Jessica; Ruas, Jorge; Gupta, Rana K; Thom, Robyn; Shoag, Jonathan; Rowe, Glenn C; Sawada, Naoki; Raghuram, Srilatha; Arany, Zoltan

    2009-12-15

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects 5 million people in the US and is the primary cause of limb amputations. Exercise remains the single best intervention for PAD, in part thought to be mediated by increases in capillary density. How exercise triggers angiogenesis is not known. PPARgamma coactivator (PGC)-1alpha is a potent transcriptional co-activator that regulates oxidative metabolism in a variety of tissues. We show here that PGC-1alpha mediates exercise-induced angiogenesis. Voluntary exercise induced robust angiogenesis in mouse skeletal muscle. Mice lacking PGC-1alpha in skeletal muscle failed to increase capillary density in response to exercise. Exercise strongly induced expression of PGC-1alpha from an alternate promoter. The induction of PGC-1alpha depended on beta-adrenergic signaling. beta-adrenergic stimulation also induced a broad program of angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This induction required PGC-1alpha. The orphan nuclear receptor ERRalpha mediated the induction of VEGF by PGC-1alpha, and mice lacking ERRalpha also failed to increase vascular density after exercise. These data demonstrate that beta-adrenergic stimulation of a PGC-1alpha/ERRalpha/VEGF axis mediates exercise-induced angiogenesis in skeletal muscle.

  15. SCFCdc4 acts antagonistically to the PGC-1alpha transcriptional coactivator by targeting it for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Olson, Brian L; Hock, M Benjamin; Ekholm-Reed, Susanna; Wohlschlegel, James A; Dev, Kumlesh K; Kralli, Anastasia; Reed, Steven I

    2008-01-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) is a highly regulated transcriptional coactivator that coordinates energy metabolism in mammals. Misregulation of PGC-1alpha has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, including diabetes, obesity, and neurological disorders. We identified SCF(Cdc4) as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates PGC-1alpha through ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. PGC-1alpha contains two Cdc4 phosphodegrons that bind Cdc4 when phosphorylated by Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) and p38 MAPK, leading to SCF(Cdc4)-dependent ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation of PGC-1alpha. Furthermore, SCF(Cdc4) negatively regulates PGC-1alpha-dependent transcription. We demonstrate that RNAi-mediated reduction of Cdc4 in primary neurons results in an increase of endogenous PGC-1alpha protein, while ectopic expression of Cdc4 leads to a reduction of endogenous PGC-1alpha protein. Finally, under conditions of oxidative stress in neurons, Cdc4 levels are decreased, leading to an increase in PGC-1alpha protein and PGC-1alpha-dependent transcription. These results suggest that attenuation of SCF(Cdc4)-dependent proteasomal degradation of PGC-1alpha has a role in mediating the PGC-1alpha-dependent transcriptional response to oxidative stress.

  16. The orphan nuclear receptor SHP regulates PGC-1alpha expression and energy production in brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Jun; Saha, Pradip; Huang, Jiansheng; Chan, Lawrence; Spiegelman, Bruce; Moore, David D

    2005-10-01

    Brown adipocytes increase energy production in response to induction of PGC-1alpha, a dominant regulator of energy metabolism. We have found that the orphan nuclear receptor SHP (NR0B2) is a negative regulator of PGC-1alpha expression in brown adipocytes. Mice lacking SHP show increased basal expression of PGC-1alpha, increased energy expenditure, and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Increased PGC-1alpha expression in SHP null brown adipose tissue is not due to beta-adrenergic activation, since it is also observed in primary cultures of SHP(-/-) brown adipocytes that are not exposed to such stimuli. In addition, acute inhibition of SHP expression in cultured wild-type brown adipocytes increases basal PGC-1alpha expression, and SHP overexpression in SHP null brown adipocytes decreases it. The orphan nuclear receptor ERRgamma is expressed in BAT and its transactivation of the PGC-1alpha promoter is potently inhibited by SHP. We conclude that SHP functions as a negative regulator of energy production in BAT.

  17. Coordinated balancing of muscle oxidative metabolism through PGC-1{alpha} increases metabolic flexibility and preserves insulin sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Summermatter, Serge; Santos, Gesa

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} PGC-1{alpha} enhances muscle oxidative capacity. {yields} PGC-1{alpha} promotes concomitantly positive and negative regulators of lipid oxidation. {yields} Regulator abundance enhances metabolic flexibility and balances oxidative metabolism. {yields} Balanced oxidation prevents detrimental acylcarnitine and ROS generation. {yields} Absence of detrimental metabolites preserves insulin sensitivity -- Abstract: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator 1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) enhances oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. Excessive lipid oxidation and electron transport chain activity can, however, lead to the accumulation of harmful metabolites and impair glucose homeostasis. Here, we investigated the effect of over-expression of PGC-1{alpha} on metabolic control and generation of insulin desensitizing agents in extensor digitorum longus (EDL), a muscle that exhibits low levels of PGC-1{alpha} in the untrained state and minimally relies on oxidative metabolism. We demonstrate that PGC-1{alpha} induces a strictly balanced substrate oxidation in EDL by concomitantly promoting the transcription of activators and inhibitors of lipid oxidation. Moreover, we show that PGC-1{alpha} enhances the potential to uncouple oxidative phosphorylation. Thereby, PGC-1{alpha} boosts elevated, yet tightly regulated oxidative metabolism devoid of side products that are detrimental for glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, PI3K activity, an early phase marker for insulin resistance, is preserved in EDL muscle. Our findings suggest that PGC-1{alpha} coordinately coactivates the simultaneous transcription of gene clusters implicated in the positive and negative regulation of oxidative metabolism and thereby increases metabolic flexibility. Thus, in mice fed a normal chow diet, over-expression of PGC-1{alpha} does not alter insulin sensitivity and the metabolic adaptations elicited by PGC-1{alpha} mimic the beneficial effects of endurance training

  18. Coactivator PGC-1{alpha} regulates the fasting inducible xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme CYP2A5 in mouse primary hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Arpiainen, Satu; Jaervenpaeae, Sanna-Mari; Manninen, Aki; Viitala, Pirkko; Lang, Matti A.; Pelkonen, Olavi; Hakkola, Jukka

    2008-10-01

    The nutritional state of organisms and energy balance related diseases such as diabetes regulate the metabolism of xenobiotics such as drugs, toxins and carcinogens. However, the mechanisms behind this regulation are mostly unknown. The xenobiotic-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2A5 enzyme has been shown to be induced by fasting and by glucagon and cyclic AMP (cAMP), which mediate numerous fasting responses. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator (PGC)-1{alpha} triggers many of the important hepatic fasting effects in response to elevated cAMP levels. In the present study, we were able to show that cAMP causes a coordinated induction of PGC-1{alpha} and CYP2A5 mRNAs in murine primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, the elevation of the PGC-1{alpha} expression level by adenovirus mediated gene transfer increased CYP2A5 transcription. Co-transfection of Cyp2a5 5' promoter constructs with the PGC-1{alpha} expression vector demonstrated that PGC-1{alpha} is able to activate Cyp2a5 transcription through the hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4{alpha} response element in the proximal promoter of the Cyp2a5 gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that PGC-1{alpha} binds, together with HNF-4{alpha}, to the same region at the Cyp2a5 proximal promoter. In conclusion, PGC-1{alpha} mediates the expression of CYP2A5 induced by cAMP in mouse hepatocytes through coactivation of transcription factor HNF-4{alpha}. This strongly suggests that PGC-1{alpha} is the major factor mediating the fasting response of CYP2A5.

  19. The inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on platelet-derived growth factor-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration through up-regulating PGC-1{alpha} expression

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wei; Guo, Ting; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yongxian; Zen, Ke; Yu, Bo; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2011-05-01

    Dexamethasone has been shown to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, which is required for preventing restenosis. However, the mechanism underlying effect of dexamethasone remains unknown. We have previously demonstrated that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1{alpha}) can inhibit VSMC migration and proliferation. Here, we investigated the role of PGC-1{alpha} in dexamethasone-reduced VSMC migration and explored the possible mechanism. We first examined PGC-1{alpha} expression in cultured rat aortic VSMCs. The results revealed that incubation of VSMCs with dexamethasone could significantly elevate PGC-1{alpha} mRNA expression. In contrast, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) decreased PGC-1{alpha} expression while stimulating VSMC migration. Mechanistic study showed that suppression of PGC-1{alpha} by small interfering RNA strongly abrogated the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on VSMC migration, whereas overexpression of PGC-1{alpha} had the opposite effect. Furthermore, an analysis of MAPK signal pathways showed that dexamethasone inhibited ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation in VSMCs. Overexpression of PGC-1{alpha} decreased both basal and PDGF-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation, but it had no effect on ERK phosphorylation. Finally, inhibition of PPAR{gamma} activation by a PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 abolished the suppressive effects of PGC-1{alpha} on p38 MAPK phosphorylation and VSMC migration. These effects of PGC-1{alpha} were enhanced by a PPAR{gamma} agonist troglitazone. Collectively, our data indicated for the first time that one of the anti-migrated mechanisms of dexamethasone is due to the induction of PGC-1{alpha} expression. PGC-1{alpha} suppresses PDGF-induced VSMC migration through PPAR{gamma} coactivation and, consequently, p38 MAPK inhibition.

  20. Protection against dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy is related to modulation by testosterone of FOXO1 and PGC-1{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Weiping; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Bauman, William A.; Cardozo, Christopher

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} In rat gastrocnemius muscle, dexamethasone reduced PGC-1{alpha} cellular and nuclear levels without altering mRNA levels for this factor. {yields} Dexamethasone reduced phosphorylating of p38 MAPK, which stabilizes PGC-1{alpha} and promotes its nuclear entry. {yields} Co-administration of testosterone with dexamethasone increased cellular and nuclear levels of PGC-1{alpha} protein without changing its mRNA levels. {yields} Co-administration of testosterone restored p38 MAPK levels to those of controls. -- Abstract: Glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy results from muscle protein catabolism and reduced protein synthesis, associated with increased expression of two muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases (MAFbx and MuRF1), and of two inhibitors of protein synthesis, REDD1 and 4EBP1. MAFbx, MuRF1, REDD1 and 4EBP1 are up-regulated by the transcription factors FOXO1 and FOXO3A. The transcriptional co-activator PGC-1{alpha} has been shown to attenuate many forms of muscle atrophy and to repress FOXO3A-mediated transcription of atrophy-specific genes. Dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy can be prevented by testosterone, which blocks up-regulation by dexamethasone of FOXO1. Here, an animal model of dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy was used to further characterize effects of testosterone to abrogate adverse actions of dexamethasone on FOXO1 levels and nuclear localization, and to determine how these agents affect PGC-1{alpha}, and its upstream activators, p38 MAPK and AMPK. In rat gastrocnemius muscle, testosterone blunted the dexamethasone-mediated increase in levels of FOXO1 mRNA, and FOXO1 total and nuclear protein. Dexamethasone reduced total and nuclear PGC-1{alpha} protein levels in the gastrocnemius; co-administration of testosterone with dexamethasone increased total and nuclear PGC-1{alpha} levels above those present in untreated controls. Testosterone blocked dexamethasone-induced decreases in activity of p38 MAPK in the gastrocnemius

  1. Fasting induces basolateral uptake transporters of the SLC family in the liver via HNF4alpha and PGC1alpha.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Christoph G; Martin, Ina V; Porn, Anne C; Voigt, Sebastian; Gartung, Carsten; Trautwein, Christian; Geier, Andreas

    2007-09-01

    Fasting induces numerous adaptive changes in metabolism by several central signaling pathways, the most important represented by the HNF4alpha/PGC-1alpha-pathway. Because HNF4alpha has been identified as central regulator of basolateral bile acid transporters and a previous study reports increased basolateral bile acid uptake into the liver during fasting, we hypothesized that HNF4alpha is involved in fasting-induced bile acid uptake via upregulation of basolateral bile acid transporters. In rats, mRNA of Ntcp, Oatp1, and Oatp2 were significantly increased after 48 h of fasting. Protein expression as determined by Western blot showed significant increases for all three transporters 72 h after the onset of fasting. Whereas binding activity of HNF1alpha in electrophoretic mobility shift assays remained unchanged, HNF4alpha binding activity to the Ntcp promoter was increased significantly. In line with this result, we found significantly increased mRNA expression of HNF4alpha and PGC-1alpha. Functional studies in HepG2 cells revealed an increased endogenous NTCP mRNA expression upon cotransfection with either HNF4alpha, PGC-1alpha, or a combination of both. We conclude that upregulation of the basolateral bile acid transporters Ntcp, Oatp1, and Oatp2 in fasted rats is mediated via the HNF4alpha/PGC-1alpha pathway. PMID:17640976

  2. Fasting induces basolateral uptake transporters of the SLC family in the liver via HNF4alpha and PGC1alpha.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Christoph G; Martin, Ina V; Porn, Anne C; Voigt, Sebastian; Gartung, Carsten; Trautwein, Christian; Geier, Andreas

    2007-09-01

    Fasting induces numerous adaptive changes in metabolism by several central signaling pathways, the most important represented by the HNF4alpha/PGC-1alpha-pathway. Because HNF4alpha has been identified as central regulator of basolateral bile acid transporters and a previous study reports increased basolateral bile acid uptake into the liver during fasting, we hypothesized that HNF4alpha is involved in fasting-induced bile acid uptake via upregulation of basolateral bile acid transporters. In rats, mRNA of Ntcp, Oatp1, and Oatp2 were significantly increased after 48 h of fasting. Protein expression as determined by Western blot showed significant increases for all three transporters 72 h after the onset of fasting. Whereas binding activity of HNF1alpha in electrophoretic mobility shift assays remained unchanged, HNF4alpha binding activity to the Ntcp promoter was increased significantly. In line with this result, we found significantly increased mRNA expression of HNF4alpha and PGC-1alpha. Functional studies in HepG2 cells revealed an increased endogenous NTCP mRNA expression upon cotransfection with either HNF4alpha, PGC-1alpha, or a combination of both. We conclude that upregulation of the basolateral bile acid transporters Ntcp, Oatp1, and Oatp2 in fasted rats is mediated via the HNF4alpha/PGC-1alpha pathway.

  3. Aqueous Extract of Paris polyphylla (AEPP) Inhibits Ovarian Cancer via Suppression of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-Gamma Coactivator (PGC)-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Woei; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Choong, Chen-Yen; Lin, Yu-Chun; Lee, Bao-Hong; Shi, Yeu-Ching; Tai, Chen-Jei

    2016-06-03

    Chemotherapy, a major approach was used in carcinoma treatment, always involves the development of drug resistance as well as side-effects that affect the quality of patients' lives. An association between epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and chemotherapy resistance was established recently. We demonstrate in this paper that the aqueous extract of Paris polyphylla (AEPP)-a traditional Chinese medicine-can be used in various cancer types for suppression of carcinogenesis. We evaluated the suppressions of EMT and mitochondrial activity by AEPP treatment in a high-glucose (HG) induced-human ovarian carcinoma cell line (OVCAR-3 cells). The mitochondrial morphology was investigated using MitoTracker Deep Red FM staining. Our results indicated that AEPP reduced the viability of OVCAR-3 cells considerably through induction of apoptosis. However, this inhibitory potential of AEPP was attenuated by HG induction in OVCAR-3 cells. The levels of estrogen-related receptor (ERR)-alpha activator and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator (PGC)-1alpha were elevated by HG induction, but were suppressed by AEPP treatment. Down-regulations of cell survival and EMT were oberved in OVCAR-3 cells through suppression of PGC-1alpha by AEPP treatment. These results were confirmed through PGC-1alpha knockdown and overexpression in OVCAR-3 cells. Thus, AEPP can be beneficial for treating ovarian cancer and has potential for development of an integrative cancer therapy against ovarian cancer proliferation, metastasis, and migration.

  4. Aqueous Extract of Paris polyphylla (AEPP) Inhibits Ovarian Cancer via Suppression of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-Gamma Coactivator (PGC)-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Woei; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Choong, Chen-Yen; Lin, Yu-Chun; Lee, Bao-Hong; Shi, Yeu-Ching; Tai, Chen-Jei

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy, a major approach was used in carcinoma treatment, always involves the development of drug resistance as well as side-effects that affect the quality of patients' lives. An association between epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and chemotherapy resistance was established recently. We demonstrate in this paper that the aqueous extract of Paris polyphylla (AEPP)-a traditional Chinese medicine-can be used in various cancer types for suppression of carcinogenesis. We evaluated the suppressions of EMT and mitochondrial activity by AEPP treatment in a high-glucose (HG) induced-human ovarian carcinoma cell line (OVCAR-3 cells). The mitochondrial morphology was investigated using MitoTracker Deep Red FM staining. Our results indicated that AEPP reduced the viability of OVCAR-3 cells considerably through induction of apoptosis. However, this inhibitory potential of AEPP was attenuated by HG induction in OVCAR-3 cells. The levels of estrogen-related receptor (ERR)-alpha activator and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator (PGC)-1alpha were elevated by HG induction, but were suppressed by AEPP treatment. Down-regulations of cell survival and EMT were oberved in OVCAR-3 cells through suppression of PGC-1alpha by AEPP treatment. These results were confirmed through PGC-1alpha knockdown and overexpression in OVCAR-3 cells. Thus, AEPP can be beneficial for treating ovarian cancer and has potential for development of an integrative cancer therapy against ovarian cancer proliferation, metastasis, and migration. PMID:27271583

  5. Multiple Binding Modes between HNF4[alpha] and the LXXLL Motifs of PGC-1[alpha] Lead to Full Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Rha, Geun Bae; Wu, Guangteng; Shoelson, Steven E.; Chi, Young-In

    2010-04-15

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) is a novel nuclear receptor that participates in a hierarchical network of transcription factors regulating the development and physiology of such vital organs as the liver, pancreas, and kidney. Among the various transcriptional coregulators with which HNF4{alpha} interacts, peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator 1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) represents a novel coactivator whose activation is unusually robust and whose binding mode appears to be distinct from that of canonical coactivators such as NCoA/SRC/p160 family members. To elucidate the potentially unique molecular mechanism of PGC-1{alpha} recruitment, we have determined the crystal structure of HNF4{alpha} in complex with a fragment of PGC-1{alpha} containing all three of its LXXLL motifs. Despite the presence of all three LXXLL motifs available for interactions, only one is bound at the canonical binding site, with no additional contacts observed between the two proteins. However, a close inspection of the electron density map indicates that the bound LXXLL motif is not a selected one but an averaged structure of more than one LXXLL motif. Further biochemical and functional studies show that the individual LXXLL motifs can bind but drive only minimal transactivation. Only when more than one LXXLL motif is involved can significant transcriptional activity be measured, and full activation requires all three LXXLL motifs. These findings led us to propose a model wherein each LXXLL motif has an additive effect, and the multiple binding modes by HNF4{alpha} toward the LXXLL motifs of PGC-1{alpha} could account for the apparent robust activation by providing a flexible mechanism for combinatorial recruitment of additional coactivators and mediators.

  6. Analysis of PGC-1{alpha} variants Gly482Ser and Thr612Met concerning their PPAR{gamma}2-coactivation function

    SciTech Connect

    Nitz, Inke . E-mail: initz@molnut.uni-kiel.de; Ewert, Agnes; Klapper, Maja; Doering, Frank

    2007-02-09

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) is a cofactor involved in adaptive thermogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and gluconeogenesis. Dysfunctions of this protein are likely to contribute to the development of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. This is in part but not definitely confirmed by results of population studies. The aim of this study was to investigate if common genetic variants rs8192678 (Gly482Ser) and rs3736265 (Thr612Met) in the PGC-1{alpha} gene lead to a functional consequence in cofactor activity using peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} 2 (PPAR{gamma}2) as interacting transcription factor. Reporter gene assays in HepG2 cells with wildtype and mutant proteins of both PGC1{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}2 (Pro12Ala, rs1801282) using the acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) promoter showed no difference in coactivator activity. This is First study implicating that the Gly482Ser and Thr612Met polymorphisms in PGC-1{alpha} and Pro12Ala polymorphism in PPAR{gamma}2 do not affect the functional integrity of these proteins.

  7. Ubiquitin proteasome-dependent degradation of the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1{alpha} via the N-terminal pathway.

    PubMed

    Trausch-Azar, Julie; Leone, Teresa C; Kelly, Daniel P; Schwartz, Alan L

    2010-12-17

    PGC-1α is a potent, inducible transcriptional coactivator that exerts control on mitochondrial biogenesis and multiple cellular energy metabolic pathways. PGC-1α levels are controlled in a highly dynamic manner reflecting regulation at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Here, we demonstrate that PGC-1α is rapidly degraded in the nucleus (t(½ 0.3 h) via the ubiquitin proteasome system. An N-terminal deletion mutant of 182 residues, PGC182, as well as a lysine-less mutant form, are nuclear and rapidly degraded (t(½) 0.5 h), consistent with degradation via the N terminus-dependent ubiquitin subpathway. Both PGC-1α and PGC182 degradation rates are increased in cells under low serum conditions. However, a naturally occurring N-terminal splice variant of 270 residues, NT-PGC-1α is cytoplasmic and stable (t(½>7 h), providing additional evidence that PGC-1α is degraded in the nucleus. These results strongly suggest that the nuclear N terminus-dependent ubiquitin proteasome pathway governs PGC-1α cellular degradation. In contrast, the cellular localization of NT-PCG-1α results in a longer-half-life and possible distinct temporal and potentially biological actions.

  8. Ligand-dependent coactivation of the human bile acid receptor FXR by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Savkur, Rajesh S; Thomas, Jeffrey S; Bramlett, Kelli S; Gao, Yunling; Michael, Laura F; Burris, Thomas P

    2005-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) has been shown to play an important role in energy metabolism by coordinating transcriptional programs involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, adaptive thermogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and fatty acid oxidation. PGC-1alpha also plays a crucial role in cholesterol metabolism by serving as a coactivator of the liver X receptor-alpha and inducing the expression of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase. Here, we demonstrate that PGC-1alpha also functions as an effective coactivator of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), the bile acid receptor. Transient cotransfection assays demonstrate that PGC-1alpha enhances ligand-mediated FXR transcription when either full-length FXR or Gal4 DNA binding domain-FXR-ligand binding domain chimeras were analyzed. Mammalian two-hybrid analyses, glutathione S-transferase affinity chromatography and biochemical coactivator recruitment assays demonstrate ligand-dependent interaction between the two proteins both in vivo and in vitro. PGC-1alpha-mediated coactivation of FXR was highly ligand-dependent and absolutely required an intact activation function-2 (AF-2) domain of FXR and the LXXLL motif in PGC-1alpha. The integrity of the charge clamp was required, further illustrating the role of the ligand binding domain of FXR in PGC-1alpha recognition. Together, these results indicate that PGC-1alpha functions as a potent coactivator for FXR and further implicates its role in the regulation of genes that are involved in bile acid and lipid metabolism.

  9. Coactivation of the human vitamin D receptor by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Savkur, Rajesh S; Bramlett, Kelli S; Stayrook, Keith R; Nagpal, Sunil; Burris, Thomas P

    2005-08-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) belongs to the superfamily of steroid/thyroid hormone receptors that is activated by 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3). Traditional targets for 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) action include tissues involved in the maintenance of calcium homeostasis and bone development and remodeling. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha), a transcriptional coactivator that plays a role in mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism, is predominantly expressed in kidney, heart, liver, and skeletal muscle. Because VDR and PGC-1alpha display an overlapping pattern of expression, we investigated the possibility that PGC-1alpha could serve as a coactivator for VDR. Transient cotransfection assays demonstrate that PGC-1alpha augments ligand-dependent VDR transcription when either full-length VDR or Gal4 DNA binding domain-VDR-ligand binding domain chimeras were analyzed. Furthermore, mammalian two-hybrid assays, coimmunoprecipitation analyses, and biochemical coactivator recruitment assays demonstrate a ligand-dependent interaction between the two proteins both in cells and in vitro. The coactivation potential of PGC-1alpha requires an intact AF-2 domain of VDR and the LXXLL motif in PGC-1alpha. Taken together, these results indicate that PGC-1alpha serves as a coactivator for VDR.

  10. Transcriptional coactivator PGC-1alpha promotes peroxisomal remodeling and biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bagattin, Alessia; Hugendubler, Lynne; Mueller, Elisabetta

    2010-11-23

    Mitochondria and peroxisomes execute some analogous, nonredundant functions including fatty acid oxidation and detoxification of reactive oxygen species, and, in response to select metabolic cues, undergo rapid remodeling and division. Although these organelles share some components of their division machinery, it is not known whether a common regulator coordinates their remodeling and biogenesis. Here we show that in response to thermogenic stimuli, peroxisomes in brown fat tissue (BAT) undergo selective remodeling and expand in number and demonstrate that ectopic expression of the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α recapitulates these effects on the peroxisomal compartment, both in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, β-adrenergic stimulation of PGC-1α(-/-) cells results in blunted induction of peroxisomal gene expression. Surprisingly, PPARα was not required for the induction of critical biogenesis factors, suggesting that PGC-1α orchestrates peroxisomal remodeling through a PPARα-independent mechanism. Our data suggest that PGC-1α is critical to peroxisomal physiology, establishing a role for this factor as a fundamental orchestrator of cellular adaptation to energy demands.

  11. Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} is essential for the expression of antioxidant protection genes and mitochondrial function

    SciTech Connect

    Rangwala, Shamina M. . E-mail: shamina.rangwala@novartis.com; Li, Xiaoyan; Lindsley, Loren; Wang, Xiaomei; Shaughnessy, Stacey; Daniels, Thomas G.; Szustakowski, Joseph; Nirmala, N.R.; Wu, Zhidan; Stevenson, Susan C.

    2007-05-25

    Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} (ERR{alpha}) is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function. To investigate the transcriptional network controlling these phenomena, we investigated mitochondrial gene expression in embryonic fibroblasts isolated from ERR{alpha} null mice. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) stimulated mitochondrial gene expression program in control cells, but not in the ERR{alpha} null cells. Interestingly, the induction of levels of mitochondrial oxidative stress protection genes in response to increased PGC-1{alpha} levels was dependent on ERR{alpha}. Furthermore, we found that the PGC-1{alpha}-mediated induction of estrogen-related receptor {gamma} and nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), was dependent on the presence of ERR{alpha}. Basal levels of NRF-2 were decreased in the absence of ERR{alpha}. The absence of ERR{alpha} resulted in a decrease in citrate synthase enzyme activity in response to PGC-1{alpha} overexpression. Our results indicate an essential role for ERR{alpha} as a key regulator of oxidative metabolism.

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha activation of CYP7A1 during food restriction and diabetes is still inhibited by small heterodimer partner.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Ju; Osborne, Timothy F

    2008-05-30

    Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the classic pathway of hepatic bile acid biosynthesis from cholesterol. During fasting and in type I diabetes, elevated levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) induce expression of the Cyp7A1 gene and overexpression of PGC-1alpha in hepatoma cells stimulates bile acid synthesis. Using Ad-PGC-1alpha-RNA interference to induce acute disruption of PGC-1alpha in mice, here we show that PGC-1alpha is necessary for fasting-mediated induction of CYP7A1. Co-immunoprecipitation and promoter activation studies reveal that the induction of CYP7A1 is mediated by direct interaction between PGC-1alpha and the AF2 domain of liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1). In contrast, the very similar PGC-1beta could not substitute for PGC-1alpha. We also show that transactivation of PGC-1alpha and LRH-1 is repressed by the small heterodimer partner (SHP). Treatment of mice with GW4064, a synthetic agonist for farnesoid X receptor, induced SHP expression and decreased both the recruitment of PGC-1alpha to the Cyp7A1 promoter and the fasting-induced expression of CYP7A1 mRNA. These data suggest that PGC-1alpha is an important co-activator for LRH-1 and that SHP targets the interaction between LRH-1 and PGC-1alpha to inhibit CYP7A1 expression. Overall, these studies provide further evidence for the important role of PGC-1alpha in bile acid homeostasis and suggest that pharmacological targeting of farnesoid X receptor in vivo can be used to reverse the increase in CYP7A1 associated with adverse metabolic conditions.

  13. Maternal low protein diets decrease skeletal muscle growth, PGC-1alpha mRNA expression and mitochondrial oxidative respiration and increase obesity and insulin resistance in obesity prone Sprague-Dawley rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malnutrition during the fetal growth period followed by postnatal catch-up growth results in obesity and the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). To determine whether a prenatal low protein diet followed by postnatal high fat diet increases propensity for obesity and T2D in offspring, obese-prone f...

  14. p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} deficiency induces mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ae Jeong; Jee, Hye Jin; Song, Naree; Kim, Minjee; Jeong, Seon-Young; Yun, Jeanho

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells exhibited an increase in mitochondrial mass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression levels of PGC-1{alpha} and AMPK were upregulated in p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proliferation of p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells in galactose medium was significantly impaired. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21 may play a role in maintaining proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function. -- Abstract: p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression. However, the role of p21 in mitochondrial function remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the effect of p21 deficiency on mitochondrial function in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. We found that there was a significant increase in the mitochondrial mass of p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells, as measured by 10-N-nonyl-acridine orange staining, as well as an increase in the mitochondrial DNA content. In contrast, p53{sup -/-} cells had a mitochondrial mass comparable to that of wild-type HCT116 cells. In addition, the expression levels of the mitochondrial biogenesis regulators PGC-1{alpha} and TFAM and AMPK activity were also elevated in p21{sup -/-} cells, indicating that p21 deficiency induces the rate of mitochondrial biogenesis through the AMPK-PGC-1{alpha} axis. However, the increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in p21{sup -/-} cells did not accompany an increase in the cellular steady-state level of ATP. Furthermore, p21{sup -/-} cells exhibited significant proliferation impairment in galactose medium, suggesting that p21 deficiency induces a defect in the mitochondrial respiratory chain in HCT116 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of p21 results in an aberrant increase in the mitochondrial mass and in mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 cells, indicating that p21 is required to maintain proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function.

  15. Evidence of a bigenomic regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by thyroid hormone during rat brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Pathak, Amrita; Mohan, Vishwa; Babu, Satish; Pal, Amit; Khare, Drirh; Godbole, Madan M.

    2010-07-02

    Hypothyroidism during early mammalian brain development is associated with decreased expression of various mitochondrial encoded genes along with evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, in-spite of the similarities between neurological disorders caused by perinatal hypothyroidism and those caused by various genetic mitochondrial defects we still do not know as to how thyroid hormone (TH) regulates mitochondrial transcription during development and whether this regulation by TH is nuclear mediated or through mitochondrial TH receptors? We here in rat cerebellum show that hypothyroidism causes reduction in expression of nuclear encoded genes controlling mitochondrial biogenesis like PGC-1{alpha}, NRF-1{alpha} and Tfam. Also, we for the first time demonstrate a mitochondrial localization of thyroid hormone receptor (mTR) isoform in developing brain capable of binding a TH response element (DR2) present in D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA. These results thus indicate an integrated nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk in regulation of mitochondrial transcription by TH during brain development.

  16. A polymorphic autoregulatory hormone response element in the human estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) promoter dictates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha control of ERRalpha expression.

    PubMed

    Laganière, Josée; Tremblay, Gilles B; Dufour, Catherine R; Giroux, Sylvie; Rousseau, François; Giguère, Vincent

    2004-04-30

    The orphan nuclear estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) and transcriptional cofactor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) are involved in the regulation of energy metabolism. Recently, extensive cross-talk between PGC-1alpha and ERRalpha has been demonstrated. The presence of PGC-1alpha is associated with an elevated expression of ERRalpha, and the two proteins can influence the transcriptional activities of one another. Using a candidate gene approach to detect regulatory variants within genes encoding nuclear receptors, we have identified a 23-bp sequence (ESRRA23) containing two nuclear receptor recognition half-site motifs that is present in 1-4 copies within the promoter of the human ESRRA gene encoding ERRalpha. The ESRRA23 sequence contains a functional ERR response element that is specifically bound by ERRalpha, and chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that endogenous ERRalpha occupies its own promoter in vivo. Strikingly, introduction of PGC-1alpha in HeLa cells by transient transfection induces the activity of the ESRRA promoter in a manner that is dependent on the presence of the ESRRA23 element and on its dosage. Coexpression of ERRalpha and PGC-1alpha results in a synergistic activation of the ESRRA promoter. In experiments using ERRalpha null fibroblasts, the ability of PGC-1alpha to stimulate the ESRRA promoter is considerably reduced but can be restored by addition of ERRalpha. Taken together, these results demonstrate that an interdependent ERRalpha/PGC-1alpha-based transcriptional pathway targets the ESRRA23 element to dictate the level of ERRalpha expression. This study further suggests that this regulatory polymorphism may provide differential responses to ERRalpha/PGC-1alpha-mediated metabolic cues in the human population.

  17. Alcohol alters hepatic FoxO1, p53, and mitochondrial SIRT5 deacetylation function

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, Charles S. Leo, Maria Anna; Wang, Xiaolei; DeCarli, Leonore M.

    2008-08-22

    Chronic alcohol consumption affects the gene expression of a NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirtuis 1 (SIRT1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} coactivator1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}). Our aim was to verify that it also alters the forkhead (FoxO1) and p53 transcription factor proteins, critical in the hepatic response to oxidative stress and regulated by SIRT1 through its deacetylating capacity. Accordingly, rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli alcohol-containing liquid diets for 28 days. Alcohol increased hepatic mRNA expression of FoxO1 (p = 0.003) and p53 (p = 0.001) while corresponding protein levels remained unchanged. However phospho-FoxO1 and phospho-Akt (protein kinase) were both decreased by alcohol consumption (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively) while hepatic p53 was found hyperacetylated (p = 0.017). Furthermore, mitochondrial SIRT5 was reduced (p = 0.0025), and PGC-1{alpha} hyperacetylated (p = 0.027), establishing their role in protein modification. Thus, alcohol consumption disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial interactions by post-translation protein modifications, which contribute to alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis through the newly discovered reduction of SIRT5.

  18. Mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase. Molecular cloning of the E1 alpha subunit and expression analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Grof, C P; Winning, B M; Scaysbrook, T P; Hill, S A; Leaver, C J

    1995-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-based approach was used to isolate cDNA clones encoding the E1 alpha subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase from higher plants. Putative full-length clones were identified on the basis of similarity to E1 alpha sequences from nonplant sources. Southern blot analysis revealed a small family of genes in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), whereas in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) there are only one or two genes. Tissue-specific variation in the relative amounts of E1 alpha mRNA was observed in northern blot analysis of different potato tissues, with the highest steady-state transcript levels found in floral tissue. Measurement of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in cucumber cotyledons showed that there is a transient increase to a maximum at 4 to 5 d postimbibition. Western blot analysis revealed that the amount of E1 alpha protein also peaks at this time. Steady-state transcript levels in germinating cucumber cotyledons also show transient accumulation, peaking 2 d postimbibition. These data are consistent with regulation of E1 alpha at the level of transcription and/or mRNA stability in postgerminative cucumber cotyledons. PMID:7659754

  19. An amino acid substitution in the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} gene, affecting mitochondrial import of the precursor protein

    SciTech Connect

    Takakubo, F.; Thorburn, D.R.; Dahl, H.H.M.

    1995-10-01

    A mutation in the mitochondrial targeting sequence was characterized in a male patient with X chromosome-linked pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} deficiency. The mutation was a base substitution of G by C at nucleotide 134 in the mitochondrial targeting sequence of the PDHA1 gene, resulting in an arginine-to-proline substitution at codon 10 (R10P). Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in cultured skin fibroblasts was 28% of the control value, and immunoblot analysis revealed a decreased level of pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha}immunoreactivity. Chimeric constructs in which the normal and mutant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} targeting sequences were attached to the mitochondrial matrix protein ornithine transcarbamylase were synthesized in a cell free translation system, and mitochondrial import of normal and mutant proteins was compared in vitro. The results show that ornithine transcarbamylase targeted by the mutant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} sequence was translocated into the mitochondrial matrix at a reduced rate, suggesting that defective import is responsible for the reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase level in mitochondria. The mutation was also present in an affected brother and the mildly affected mother. The clinical presentations of this X chromosome-linked disorder in affected family members are discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an amino acid substitution in a mitochondrial targeting sequence resulting in a human genetic disease. 58 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Long-term fasting decreases mitochondrial avian UCP-mediated oxygen consumption in hypometabolic king penguins.

    PubMed

    Rey, Benjamin; Halsey, Lewis G; Dolmazon, Virginie; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Roussel, Damien; Handrich, Yves; Butler, Patrick J; Duchamp, Claude

    2008-07-01

    In endotherms, regulation of the degree of mitochondrial coupling affects cell metabolic efficiency. Thus it may be a key contributor to minimizing metabolic rate during long periods of fasting. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether variation in mitochondrial avian uncoupling proteins (avUCP), as putative regulators of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, may contribute to the ability of king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) to withstand fasting for several weeks. After 20 days of fasting, king penguins showed a reduced rate of whole animal oxygen consumption (Vo2; -33%) at rest, together with a reduced abundance of avUCP and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC1-alpha) mRNA in pectoralis muscle (-54%, -36%, respectively). These parameters were restored after the birds had been refed for 3 days. Furthermore, in recently fed, but not in fasted penguins, isolated muscle mitochondria showed a guanosine diphosphate-inhibited, fatty acid plus superoxide-activated respiration, indicating the presence of a functional UCP. It was calculated that variation in mitochondrial UCP-dependent respiration in vitro may contribute to nearly 20% of the difference in resting Vo2 between fed or refed penguins and fasted penguins measured in vivo. These results suggest that the lowering of avUCP activity during periods of long-term energetic restriction may contribute to the reduction in metabolic rate and hence the ability of king penguins to face prolonged periods of fasting. PMID:18495832

  1. HIF-1-alpha links mitochondrial perturbation to the dynamic acquisition of breast cancer tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ching-Ying; Cheng, Chun-Ting; Hou, Peifeng; Lin, Yi-Pei; Ma, Huimin; Chung, Yiyin; Chi, Kevin; Chen, Yuan; Li, Wei; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Ann, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), even in normoxia, is a common feature of solid malignancies. However, the mechanisms of increased HIF-1α abundance, and its role in regulating breast cancer plasticity are not fully understood. We have previously demonstrated that dimethyl-2-ketoglutarate (DKG), a widely used cell membrane-permeable α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) analogue, transiently stabilizes HIF-1α by inhibiting prolyl hydroxylase 2. Here, we report that breast cancer tumorigenicity can be acquired through prolonged treatment with DKG. Our results indicate that, in response to prolonged DKG treatment, mitochondrial respiration becomes uncoupled, leading to the accumulation of succinate and fumarate in breast cancer cells. Further, we found that an early increase in the oxygen flux rate was accompanied by a delayed enhancement of glycolysis. Together, our results indicate that these events trigger a dynamic enrichment for cells with pluripotent/stem-like cell markers and tumorsphere-forming capacity. Moreover, DKG-mediated metabolic reprogramming results in HIF-1α induction and reductive carboxylation pathway activation. Both HIF-1α accumulation and the tumor-promoting metabolic state are required for DKG-promoted tumor repopulation capacity in vivo. Our data suggest that mitochondrial adaptation to DKG elevates the ratio of succinate or fumarate to α-KG, which in turn stabilizes HIF-1α and reprograms breast cancer cells into a stem-like state. Therefore, our results demonstrate that metabolic regulation, with succinate and/or fumarate accumulation, governs the dynamic transition of breast cancer tumorigenic states and we suggest that HIF-1α is indispensable for breast cancer tumorigenicity. PMID:27058900

  2. Mitochondrial gene expression and increased oxidative metabolism: role in increased lifespan of fat-specific insulin receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Katic, Masa; Kennedy, Adam R; Leykin, Igor; Norris, Andrew; McGettrick, Aileen; Gesta, Stephane; Russell, Steven J; Bluher, Matthias; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Kahn, C Ronald

    2007-12-01

    Caloric restriction, leanness and decreased activity of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor signaling are associated with increased longevity in a wide range of organisms from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. Fat-specific insulin receptor knock-out (FIRKO) mice represent an interesting dichotomy, with leanness and increased lifespan, despite normal or increased food intake. To determine the mechanisms by which a lack of insulin signaling in adipose tissue might exert this effect, we performed physiological and gene expression studies in FIRKO and control mice as they aged. At the whole body level, FIRKO mice demonstrated an increase in basal metabolic rate and respiratory exchange ratio. Analysis of gene expression in white adipose tissue (WAT) of FIRKO mice from 6 to 36 months of age revealed persistently high expression of the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes involved in glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, beta-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation as compared to expression of the same genes in WAT from controls that showed a tendency to decline in expression with age. These changes in gene expression were correlated with increased cytochrome c and cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV at the protein level, increased citrate synthase activity, increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and PGC-1beta, and an increase in mitochondrial DNA in WAT of FIRKO mice. Together, these data suggest that maintenance of mitochondrial activity and metabolic rates in adipose tissue may be important contributors to the increased lifespan of the FIRKO mouse.

  3. Cybrid models of Parkinson's disease show variable mitochondrial biogenesis and genotype-respiration relationships.

    PubMed

    Keeney, Paula M; Dunham, Lisa D; Quigley, Caitlin K; Morton, Stephanie L; Bergquist, Kristen E; Bennett, James P

    2009-12-01

    Sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD) is a nervous system-wide disease that presents with a bradykinetic movement disorder and frequently progresses to include depression and cognitive impairment. Cybrid models of sPD are based on expression of sPD platelet mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in neural cells and demonstrate some similarities to sPD brains. In sPD and CTL cybrids we characterized aspects of mitochondrial biogenesis, mtDNA genomics, composition of the respirasome and the relationships among isolated mitochondrial and intact cell respiration. Cybrid mtDNA levels varied and correlated with expression of PGC-1 alpha, a transcriptional co-activator regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Levels of mtDNA heteroplasmic mutations were asymmetrically distributed across the mitochondrial genome; numbers of heteroplasmies were more evenly distributed. Neither levels nor numbers of heteroplasmies distinguished sPD from CTL. sPD cybrid mitochondrial ETC subunit protein levels were not altered. Isolated mitochondrial complex I respiration rates showed limited correlation with whole cell complex I respiration rates in both sPD and CTL cybrids. Intact cell respiration during the normoxic-anoxic transition yielded K(m) values for oxygen that directly related to respiration rates in CTL but not in sPD cell lines. Both sPD and CTL cybrid cells are substantially heterogeneous in mitochondrial genomic and physiologic properties. Our results suggest that mtDNA depletion may occur in sPD neurons and could reflect impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis. Cybrids remain a valuable model for some aspects of sPD but their heterogeneity mitigates against a simple designation of sPD phenotype in this cell model.

  4. Methyl-Arginine Profile of Brain from Aged PINK1-KO+A53T-SNCA Mice Suggests Altered Mitochondrial Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Auburger, Georg; Gispert, Suzana; Brehm, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary Parkinson's disease can be triggered by an autosomal dominant overdose of alpha-Synuclein (SNCA) or the autosomal recessive deficiency of PINK1. We recently showed that the combination of PINK1-knockout with overexpression of A53T-SNCA in double mutant (DM) mice potentiates phenotypes and reduces survival. Now we studied brain hemispheres of DM mice at age of 18 months in a hypothesis-free approach, employing a quantitative label-free global proteomic mass spectrometry scan of posttranslational modifications focusing on methyl-arginine. The strongest effects were documented for the adhesion modulator CMAS, the mRNA decapping/deadenylation factor PATL1, and the synaptic plasticity mediator CRTC1/TORC1. In addition, an intriguing effect was observed for the splicing factor PSF/SFPQ, known to interact with the dopaminergic differentiation factor NURR1 as well as with DJ-1, the protein responsible for the autosomal recessive PARK7 variant of PD. CRTC1, PSF, and DJ-1 are modulators of PGC1alpha and of mitochondrial biogenesis. This pathway was further stressed by dysregulations of oxygen sensor EGLN3 and of nuclear TMPO. PSF and TMPO cooperate with dopaminergic differentiation factors LMX1B and NURR1. Further dysregulations concerned PRR18, TRIO, HNRNPA1, DMWD, WAVE1, ILDR2, DBNDD1, and NFM. Thus, we report selective novel endogenous stress responses in brain, which highlight early dysregulations of mitochondrial homeostasis and midbrain vulnerability.

  5. Methyl-Arginine Profile of Brain from Aged PINK1-KO+A53T-SNCA Mice Suggests Altered Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Auburger, Georg; Gispert, Suzana

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary Parkinson's disease can be triggered by an autosomal dominant overdose of alpha-Synuclein (SNCA) or the autosomal recessive deficiency of PINK1. We recently showed that the combination of PINK1-knockout with overexpression of A53T-SNCA in double mutant (DM) mice potentiates phenotypes and reduces survival. Now we studied brain hemispheres of DM mice at age of 18 months in a hypothesis-free approach, employing a quantitative label-free global proteomic mass spectrometry scan of posttranslational modifications focusing on methyl-arginine. The strongest effects were documented for the adhesion modulator CMAS, the mRNA decapping/deadenylation factor PATL1, and the synaptic plasticity mediator CRTC1/TORC1. In addition, an intriguing effect was observed for the splicing factor PSF/SFPQ, known to interact with the dopaminergic differentiation factor NURR1 as well as with DJ-1, the protein responsible for the autosomal recessive PARK7 variant of PD. CRTC1, PSF, and DJ-1 are modulators of PGC1alpha and of mitochondrial biogenesis. This pathway was further stressed by dysregulations of oxygen sensor EGLN3 and of nuclear TMPO. PSF and TMPO cooperate with dopaminergic differentiation factors LMX1B and NURR1. Further dysregulations concerned PRR18, TRIO, HNRNPA1, DMWD, WAVE1, ILDR2, DBNDD1, and NFM. Thus, we report selective novel endogenous stress responses in brain, which highlight early dysregulations of mitochondrial homeostasis and midbrain vulnerability. PMID:27034888

  6. Oxysterols induce mitochondrial impairment and hepatocellular toxicity in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bellanti, Francesco; Mitarotonda, Domenica; Tamborra, Rosanna; Blonda, Maria; Iannelli, Giuseppina; Petrella, Antonio; Sanginario, Vittorio; Iuliano, Luigi; Vendemiale, Gianluigi; Serviddio, Gaetano

    2014-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic hepatic disorder affecting up to 25% of the general population. Several intracellular events leading to NAFLD and progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) have been identified, including lipid accumulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Emerging evidence links both hepatic free fatty acids (FFAs) and cholesterol (FC) accumulation in NAFLD development; in particular oxysterols, the oxidative products of cholesterol, may contribute to liver injury. We performed a targeted lipidomic analysis of oxysterols in the liver of male Wistar rats fed a high-fat (HF), high-cholesterol (HC) or high-fat/high-cholesterol (HF/HC) diet. Both HF and HC diets caused liver steatosis, but the HF/HC diet resulted in steatohepatitis with associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Above all, the oxysterol cholestane-3beta,5alpha,6beta-triol (triol) was particularly increased in the liver of rats fed diets rich in cholesterol. To verify the molecular mechanism involved in mitochondrial dysfunction and hepatocellular toxicity, Huh7 and primary rat hepatocytes were exposed to palmitic acid (PA) and/or oleic acid (OA), with or without triol. This compound induced apoptosis in cells co-exposed to both PA and OA, and this was associated with impaired mitochondrial respiration as well as down-regulation of PGC1-alpha, mTFA and NRF1.In conclusion, our data show that hepatic free fatty acid or oxysterols accumulation per se induce low hepatocellular toxicity. On the contrary, hepatic accumulation of both fatty acids and toxic oxysterols such as triol are determinant in the impairment of mitochondrial function and biogenesis, contributing to liver pathology in NAFLD. PMID:26461297

  7. Ablation of PGC-1beta results in defective mitochondrial activity, thermogenesis, hepatic function, and cardiac performance.

    PubMed

    Lelliott, Christopher J; Medina-Gomez, Gema; Petrovic, Natasa; Kis, Adrienn; Feldmann, Helena M; Bjursell, Mikael; Parker, Nadeene; Curtis, Keira; Campbell, Mark; Hu, Ping; Zhang, Dongfang; Litwin, Sheldon E; Zaha, Vlad G; Fountain, Kimberly T; Boudina, Sihem; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Blount, Margaret; Lopez, Miguel; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Storlien, Leonard; Strömstedt, Maria; Snaith, Michael; Oresic, Matej; Abel, E Dale; Cannon, Barbara; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2006-11-01

    The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1beta (PGC-1beta) has been implicated in important metabolic processes. A mouse lacking PGC-1beta (PGC1betaKO) was generated and phenotyped using physiological, molecular, and bioinformatic approaches. PGC1betaKO mice are generally viable and metabolically healthy. Using systems biology, we identified a general defect in the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial function and, specifically, the electron transport chain. This defect correlated with reduced mitochondrial volume fraction in soleus muscle and heart, but not brown adipose tissue (BAT). Under ambient temperature conditions, PGC-1beta ablation was partially compensated by up-regulation of PGC-1alpha in BAT and white adipose tissue (WAT) that lead to increased thermogenesis, reduced body weight, and reduced fat mass. Despite their decreased fat mass, PGC1betaKO mice had hypertrophic adipocytes in WAT. The thermogenic role of PGC-1beta was identified in thermoneutral and cold-adapted conditions by inadequate responses to norepinephrine injection. Furthermore, PGC1betaKO hearts showed a blunted chronotropic response to dobutamine stimulation, and isolated soleus muscle fibres from PGC1betaKO mice have impaired mitochondrial function. Lack of PGC-1beta also impaired hepatic lipid metabolism in response to acute high fat dietary loads, resulting in hepatic steatosis and reduced lipoprotein-associated triglyceride and cholesterol content. Altogether, our data suggest that PGC-1beta plays a general role in controlling basal mitochondrial function and also participates in tissue-specific adaptive responses during metabolic stress. PMID:17090215

  8. Cloning of the rat pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 gene promoter: activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke; Zhang, Yi; Elam, Marshall B; Cook, George A; Park, Edwards A

    2005-08-19

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and is a key regulatory enzyme in the metabolism of glucose to acetyl-CoA. Phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK) inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity. There are four PDK isoforms, and expression of PDK4 and PDK2 genes is elevated in starvation and diabetes, allowing glucose to be conserved while fatty acid oxidation is increased. In these studies we have investigated the transcriptional mechanisms by which the expression of the PDK4 gene is increased. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1alpha) stimulates the expression of genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. We have found that PGC-1alpha will induce the expression of both the PDK2 and PDK4 genes in primary rat hepatocytes and ventricular myocytes. We cloned the promoter for the rat PDK4 gene. Hepatic nuclear factor 4 (HNF4), which activates many genes in the liver, will induce PDK4 expression. Although HNF4 and PGC-1alpha interact to stimulate several genes encoding gluconeogenic enzymes, the induction of PDK4 does not involve interactions of PGC-1alpha with HNF4. Using the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we have demonstrated that HNF4 and PGC-1alpha are associated with the PDK4 gene in vivo. Our data suggest that by inducing PDK genes PGC-1alpha will direct pyruvate away from metabolism into acetyl-CoA and toward the formation of oxaloacetate and into the gluconeogenic pathway. PMID:15967803

  9. PDE5 inhibitors protect against post-infarction heart failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Shuang; Zeng, Cao; Yu, Wenjun; Shen, Mingzhi; Zhang, Rongqing; Li, Congye; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Haichang

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the main causes for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This study was designed to examine the effect of PDE-5 inhibition on cardiac geometry, function and apoptosis in post-infarct HF. Our data revealed that treatment of the PDE-5 inhibitor sildenafil, beginning 3 days after left anterior descending coronary artery ligation, attenuated LV remodeling, cardiac dysfunction, cardiomyocyte apoptosis and mitochondrial anomalies including ATP production, mitochondrial respiratory defects, decline of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and compromised mitochondrial ultrastructure. Sildenafil partially ameliorated the downregulation of Sirt3 protein and acetylation of PGC-1alpha in peri-infarct myocardial regions. In cultured neonatal mouse ventricular myocytes subjected to hypoxia for 24 hrs, sildenafil suppressed apoptosis, promoted ATP production and elevated MMP, along with the increased Sirt3 protein expression and decreased PGC-1alpha acetylation. Interestingly, knock down of Sirt3 attenuated or nullified sildenafil-offered beneficial effects. Our findings demonstrated that sildenafil exerts its cardioprotective effect against post-infarction injury by improving mitochondrial ultrastructure and function via the Sirt3/PGC-1alpha pathway. This observation should shed some lights towards application of sildenafil in energy-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27100500

  10. Molecular targets of a human HNF1 alpha mutation responsible for pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Antinozzi, P A; Hagenfeldt, K A; Maechler, P; Wollheim, C B

    2000-08-15

    The reverse tetracycline-dependent transactivator system was employed in insulinoma INS-1 cells to achieve controlled inducible expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 alpha (HNF1 alpha)-P291fsinsC, the most common mutation associated with subtype 3 of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY3). Nuclear localized HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC protein exerts its dominant-negative effects by competing with endogenous HNF1 alpha for the cognate DNA-binding site. HNF1 alpha controls multiple genes implicated in pancreatic beta-cell function and notably in metabolism- secretion coupling. In addition to reduced expression of the genes encoding insulin, glucose transporter-2, L-pyruvate kinase, aldolase B and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, induction of HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC also significantly inhibits expression of mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH) E1 subunit mRNA and protein. OGDH enzyme activity and [(14)C]pyruvate oxidation were also reduced. In contrast, the mRNA and protein levels of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 were dramatically increased by HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC induction. As predicted from this altered gene expression profile, HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC also inhibits insulin secretory responses to glucose and leucine, correlated with impaired nutrient-evoked mitochondrial ATP production and mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization. These unprecedented results suggest the molecular mechanism of HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC causing beta-cell dysfunction. PMID:10944108

  11. Extrarenal expression of 25-hydroxyvitamin d(3)-1 alpha-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Zehnder, D; Bland, R; Williams, M C; McNinch, R W; Howie, A J; Stewart, P M; Hewison, M

    2001-02-01

    The mitochondrial enzyme 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3)-1 alpha-hydroxylase (1 alpha-hydroxylase) plays an important role in calcium homeostasis by catalyzing synthesis of the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), in the kidney. However, enzyme activity assays indicate that 1 alpha-hydroxylase is also expressed in a variety of extrarenal tissues; recent cloning of cDNAs for 1 alpha-hydroxylase in different species suggests that a similar gene product is found at both renal and extrarenal sites. Using specific complementary ribonucleic acid probes and antisera to 1 alpha-hydroxylase, we have previously reported the distribution of messenger ribonucleic acid and protein for the enzyme along the mouse and human nephron. Here we describe further immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses that detail for the first time the extrarenal distribution of 1 alpha-hydroxylase in both normal and diseased tissues. Specific staining for 1 alpha-hydroxylase was detected in skin (basal keratinocytes, hair follicles), lymph nodes (granulomata), colon (epithelial cells and parasympathetic ganglia), pancreas (islets), adrenal medulla, brain (cerebellum and cerebral cortex), and placenta (decidual and trophoblastic cells). Further studies using psoriatic skin highlighted overexpression of 1 alpha-hydroxylase throughout the dysregulated stratum spinosum. Increased expression of skin 1alpha-hydroxylase was also associated with sarcoidosis. In lymph nodes and skin from these patients 1 alpha-hydroxylase expression was observed in cells positive for the surface antigen CD68 (macrophages). The data presented here confirm the presence of protein for 1 alpha-hydroxylase in several extrarenal tissues, such as skin, placenta, and lymph nodes. The function of this enzyme at novel extrarenal sites, such as adrenal medulla, brain, pancreas, and colon, remains to be determined. However, the discrete patterns of staining in these tissues emphasizes a possible role for 1 alpha

  12. The effect of transcutaneous application of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) on skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Oe, Keisuke; Ueha, Takeshi; Sakai, Yoshitada; Niikura, Takahiro; Lee, Sang Yang; Koh, Akihiro; Hasegawa, Takumi; Tanaka, Masaya; Miwa, Masahiko; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields} PGC-1{alpha} is up-regulated as a result of exercise such as mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle fiber-type switching, and up-regulation of VEGF. {yields} We demonstrated transcutaneous application of CO{sub 2} up-regulated the gene expression of PGC-1{alpha}, SIRT1 and VEGF, and instance of muscle fiber switching. {yields} Transcutaneous application of CO{sub 2} may cause similar effect to aerobic exercise in skeletal muscle. -- Abstract: In Europe, carbon dioxide therapy has been used for cardiac disease and skin problems for a long time. However there have been few reports investigating the effects of carbon dioxide therapy on skeletal muscle. Peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) is up-regulated as a result of exercise and mediates known responses to exercise, such as mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle fiber-type switching, and neovascularization via up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It is also known that silent mating type information regulation 2 homologs 1 (SIRT1) enhances PGC-1{alpha}-mediated muscle fiber-type switching. Previously, we demonstrated transcutaneous application of CO{sub 2} increased blood flow and a partial increase of O{sub 2} pressure in the local tissue known as the Bohr effect. In this study, we transcutaneously applied CO{sub 2} to the lower limbs of rats, and investigated the effect on the fast muscle, tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. The transcutaneous CO{sub 2} application caused: (1) the gene expression of PGC-1{alpha}, silent mating type information regulation 2 homologs 1 (SIRT1) and VEGF, and increased the number of mitochondria, as proven by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, (2) muscle fiber switching in the TA muscle, as proven by isolation of myosin heavy chain and ATPase staining. Our results suggest the transcutaneous application of CO{sub 2} may have therapeutic potential for muscular strength recovery resulting from disuse

  13. Induction of the nuclear factor HIF-1{alpha} in acetaminophen toxicity: Evidence for oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    James, Laura P. . E-mail: jameslaurap@uams.edu; Donahower, Brian; Burke, Angela S.; McCullough, Sandra; Hinson, Jack A.

    2006-04-28

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) controls the transcription of genes involved in angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, glycolysis, and cell survival. HIF-1{alpha} levels are a critical determinant of HIF activity. The induction of HIF-1{alpha} was examined in the livers of mice treated with a toxic dose of APAP (300 mg/kg IP) and sacrificed at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 h. HIF-1{alpha} was induced at 1-12 h and induction occurred prior to the onset of toxicity. Pre-treatment of mice with N-acetylcysteine (1200 mg/kg IP) prevented toxicity and HIF-1{alpha} induction. In further studies, hepatocyte suspensions were incubated with APAP (1 mM) in the presence of an oxygen atmosphere. HIF-1{alpha} was induced at 1 h, prior to the onset of toxicity. Inclusion of cyclosporine A (10 {mu}M), an inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition, oxidative stress, and toxicity, prevented the induction of HIF-1{alpha}. Thus, HIF-1{alpha} is induced before APAP toxicity and can occur under non-hypoxic conditions. The data suggest a role for oxidative stress in the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in APAP toxicity.

  14. Dietary phosphorus transcriptionally regulates 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1alpha-hydroxylase gene expression in the proximal renal tubule.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Martin Y H; Wang, Xuemei; Wang, Jonathan T; Compagnone, Nathalie A; Mellon, Synthia H; Olson, Jean L; Tenenhouse, Harriet S; Miller, Walter L; Portale, Anthony A

    2002-02-01

    Synthesis of the hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, the biologically active form of vitamin D, occurs in the kidney and is catalyzed by the mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzyme, 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1alpha-hydroxylase (1alpha-hydroxylase). We sought to characterize the effects of changes in dietary phosphorus on the kinetics of renal mitochondrial 1alpha-hydroxylase activity and the renal expression of P450c1alpha and P450c24 mRNA, to localize the nephron segments involved in such regulation, and to determine whether transcriptional mechanisms are involved. In intact mice, restriction of dietary phosphorus induced rapid, sustained, approximately 6- to 8-fold increases in renal mitochondrial 1alpha-hydroxylase activity and renal P450c1alpha mRNA abundance. Immunohistochemical analysis of renal sections from mice fed the control diet revealed the expression of 1alpha-hydroxylase protein in the proximal convoluted and straight tubules, epithelial cells of Bowman's capsule, thick ascending limb of Henle's loop, distal tubule, and collecting duct. In mice fed a phosphorus-restricted diet, immunoreactivity was significantly increased in the proximal convoluted and proximal straight tubules and epithelial cells of Bowman's capsule, but not in the distal nephron. Dietary phosphorus restriction induced a 2-fold increase in P450c1alpha gene transcription, as shown by nuclear run-on assays. Thus, the increase in renal synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D induced in normal mice by restricting dietary phosphorus can be attributed to an increase in the renal abundance of P450c1alpha mRNA and protein. The increase in P450c1alpha gene expression, which occurs exclusively in the proximal renal tubule, is due at least in part to increased transcription of the P450c1alpha gene.

  15. Protein phylogeny of translation elongation factor EF-1 alpha suggests microsporidians are extremely ancient eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kamaishi, T; Hashimoto, T; Nakamura, Y; Nakamura, F; Murata, S; Okada, N; Okamoto, K; Shimizu, M; Hasegawa, M

    1996-02-01

    Partial regions of the mRNA encoding a major part of translation elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) from a mitochondrion-lacking protozoan, Glugea plecoglossi, that belongs to microsporidians, were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and their primary structures were analyzed. The deduced amino acid sequence was highly divergent from typical EF-1 alpha's of eukaryotes, although it clearly showed a eukaryotic feature when aligned with homologs of the three primary kingdoms. Maximum likelihood (ML) analyses on the basis of six different stochastic models of amino acid substitutions and a maximum parsimony (MP) analysis consistently suggest that among eukaryotic species being analyzed, G. plecoglossi is likely to represent the earliest offshoot of eukaryotes. Microsporidians might be the extremely ancient eukaryotes which have diverged before an occurrence of mitochondrial symbiosis. PMID:8919877

  16. Complex effects of IL1A polymorphism and calpain inhibitors on interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) mRNA levels and secretion of IL-1 alpha protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Temple, S; Roberts, S; Price, P

    2008-07-01

    Alleles of IL1A-889(C>T) and IL1A+4845(G>T) are in linkage disequilibrium. Interleukin 1alpha (IL-1alpha) is produced as a precursor protein and cleaved at positions 117-118 by calpain, generating a mature protein for export. IL1A+4845 affects amino acids expressed at position 114 and hence may modulate calpain-mediated cleavage. We sought evidence for this mechanism in intact cells. Blood leukocytes from heterozygous donors released more IL-1alpha protein than cells from IL1A(1,1) donors, while release from IL1A(2,2) cells was variable. Genotype did not affect levels of IL-1alpha mRNA, so differential cleavage of the precursor is a feasible mechanism. However, genotype also had no effect on inhibition of IL-1alpha release by pretreatment with calpain inhibitors, and calpain inhibitors reduced IL-1alpha and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA levels. Hence, calpain inhibitors probably affect inhibition of signal transduction pathway rather than cleavage of IL-1alpha protein. As ratios of mu-calpain/calpastatin were lowest in heterozygous donors, genetically determined IL-1alpha levels may modulate transcription of calpain and calpastatin. This could reduce the impact of IL1A genotype on IL-1alpha secretion and amplify individual variation in levels generated in culture.

  17. Genetics of vitamin D 1alpha-hydroxylase deficiency in 17 families.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J T; Lin, C J; Burridge, S M; Fu, G K; Labuda, M; Portale, A A; Miller, W L

    1998-01-01

    Vitamin D-dependent rickets type I (VDDR-I), also known as pseudo-vitamin D-deficiency rickets, appears to result from deficiency of renal vitamin D 1alpha-hydroxylase activity. Prior work has shown that the affected gene lies on 12q13.3. We recently cloned the cDNA and gene for this enzyme, mitochondrial P450c1alpha, and we and others have found mutations in its gene in a few patients. To determine whether all patients with VDDR-I have mutations in P450c1alpha, we have analyzed the P450c1alpha gene in 19 individuals from 17 families representing various ethnic groups. The whole gene was PCR amplified and subjected to direct sequencing; candidate mutations were confirmed by repeat PCR of the relevant exon from genomic DNA from the patients and their parents. Microsatellite haplotyping with the markers D12S90, D12S305, and D12S104 was also done in all families. All patients had P450c1alpha mutations on both alleles. In the French Canadian population, among whom VDDR-I is common, 9 of 10 alleles bore the haplotype 4-7-1 and carried the mutation 958DeltaG. This haplotype and mutation were also seen in two other families and are easily identified because the mutation ablates a TaiI/MaeII site. Six families of widely divergent ethnic backgrounds carried a 7-bp duplication in association with four different microsatellite haplotypes, indicating a mutational hot spot. We found 14 different mutations, including 7 amino acid replacement mutations. When these missense mutations were analyzed by expressing the mutant enzyme in mouse Leydig MA-10 cells and assaying 1alpha-hydroxylase activity, none retained detectable 1alpha-hydroxylase activity. These studies show that most if not all patients with VDDR-I have severe mutations in P450c1alpha, and hence the disease should be referred to as "1alpha-hydroxylase deficiency." PMID:9837822

  18. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1{alpha} induction in acetaminophen toxicity in mice occurs without hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S.; Hennings, Leah; Letzig, Lynda; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hinson, Jack A.; James, Laura P.

    2011-05-01

    HIF-1{alpha} is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1{alpha}. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2 h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48 h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the sites of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10 mg/kg) reduced HIF-1{alpha} induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4 h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1{alpha} induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism.

  19. Novel gene mutations in patients with 1alpha-hydroxylase deficiency that confer partial enzyme activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemei; Zhang, Martin Y H; Miller, Walter L; Portale, Anthony A

    2002-06-01

    The rate-limiting, hormonally regulated step in the biological activation of vitamin D is its 1alpha-hydroxylation to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25-(OH)(2)D] in the kidney, catalyzed by the mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzyme, P450c1alpha. We previously cloned the human P450c1alpha cDNA and gene, and identified 14 different mutations, including 7 missense, in 19 patients with 1alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, also known as vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1. None of the missense mutations encoded a protein with detectable enzymatic activity in vitro. Although there is phenotypic variation among such patients, the molecular basis of this variation is unknown. We analyzed 6 additional patients with clinical and radiographic features of rickets; in 4 patients the laboratory abnormalities were typical of 1alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, but in 2 they were unusually mild [mild hypocalcemia and normal serum 1,25-(OH)(2)D concentration]. Direct sequencing revealed that all patients had P450c1alpha mutations on both alleles. Five new and 2 known mutations were identified. The new mutations included a 5-bp deletion with a 6-bp novel insertion causing a frameshift in exon 2, and a G to A change at +1 of intron 2; a minigene experiment proved that this intronic mutation prevented proper splicing. Three new missense mutations were found and tested by expressing the mutant cDNA in mouse Leydig MA-10 cells. The R389G mutant was totally inactive, but mutant L343F retained 2.3% of wild-type activity, and mutant E189G retained 22% of wild-type activity. The two mutations that confer partial enzyme activity in vitro were found in the 2 patents with mild laboratory abnormalities, suggesting that such mutations contribute to the phenotypic variation observed in patients with 1alpha-hydroxylase deficiency.

  20. Acute exercise induces biphasic increase in respiratory mRNA in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Shin-ichi; Kizaki, Takako; Haga, Shukoh; Ohno, Hideki; Takemasa, Tohru

    2008-04-04

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) promotes the expression of oxidative enzymes in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that activation of the p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) in response to exercise was associated with exercise-induced PGC-1{alpha} and respiratory enzymes expression and aimed to demonstrate this under the physiological level. We subjected mice to a single bout of treadmill running and found that the exercise induced a biphasic increase in the expression of respiratory enzymes mRNA. The second phase of the increase was accompanied by an increase in PGC-1{alpha} protein, but the other was not. Administration of SB203580 (SB), an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suppressed the increase in PGC-1{alpha} expression and respiratory enzymes mRNA in both phases. These data suggest that p38 MAPK is associated with the exercise-induced expression of PGC-1{alpha} and biphasic increase in respiratory enzyme mRNAs in mouse skeletal muscle under physiological conditions.

  1. In situ assessment of mRNA accessibility in heterogeneous tissue samples using elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha).

    PubMed

    Gruber, A D; Levine, R A

    1997-05-01

    Elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) is an evolutionarily highly conserved universal cofactor of protein synthesis in all living cells. In this study, its use as a positive control in situ hybridization assays for specific detection of mRNA sequences was evaluated. Northern blot analysis of various non-neoplastic and neoplastic cultured cells of different stages of confluence, cell shape, and cell cycle status revealed that EF-1 alpha had a lower and more homogeneous expression than did beta-actin. In situ hybridization assays using digoxigenin-labeled riboprobes for the detection of EF-1 alpha mRNA in routinely formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections showed that EF-1 alpha is a suitable positive control in all types of cells. However, variation of protease pretreatments demonstrated distinct and sometimes mutually exclusive digestion conditions for different cell types within the same tissue sample. Our results indicate that detection of EF-1 alpha mRNA is an appropriate internal standard for in situ hybridization assays and that it is useful to control artifacts such as false negatives caused by inappropriate protease pretreatments. The observed variability of optimal protease pretreatments for different cell types within the same tissue section strengthens the importance of a positive control in in situ hybridization assays.

  2. The metabolic activator FOXO1 binds hepatitis B virus DNA and activates its transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Shlomai, Amir; Shaul, Yosef

    2009-04-17

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a small DNA virus that targets the liver and infects humans worldwide. Recently we have shown that the metabolic regulator PGC-1{alpha} coactivates HBV transcription thereby rendering the virus susceptible to fluctuations in the nutritional status of the liver. PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV is mediated through the liver-enriched nuclear receptor HNF4{alpha} and through another yet unknown transcription factor(s). Here we show that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1, a known target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation and a central mediator of glucose metabolism in the liver, binds HBV core promoter and activates its transcription. This activation is further enhanced in the presence of PGC-1{alpha}, implying that FOXO1 is a target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV transcription. Thus, our results identify another key metabolic regulator as an activator of HBV transcription, thereby supporting the principle that HBV gene expression is regulated in a similar way to key hepatic metabolic genes.

  3. Disordered regulation of renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1alpha-hydroxylase gene expression by phosphorus in X-linked hypophosphatemic (hyp) mice.

    PubMed

    Azam, Nasreen; Zhang, Martin Y H; Wang, Xuemei; Tenenhouse, Harriet S; Portale, Anthony A

    2003-08-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic (Hyp) mice exhibit hypophosphatemia, impaired renal phosphate reabsorption, defective skeletal mineralization, and disordered regulation of vitamin D metabolism: In Hyp mice, restriction of dietary phosphorus induces a decrease in serum concentration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and renal activity of 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1alpha-hydroxylase (1alpha-hydroxylase), and induces an increase in renal activity of 25-hydroxyvitamin D-24-hydroxylase (24-hydroxylase). In contrast, in wild-type mice, phosphorus restriction stimulates renal 1alpha-hydroxylase gene expression and suppresses that of 24-hydroxylase. To determine the molecular basis for the disordered regulation of vitamin D metabolism in Hyp mice, we determined renal mitochondrial 1alpha-hydroxylase activity and the renal abundance of p450c1alpha and p450c24 mRNA in wild-type and Hyp mice fed either control, low-, or high-phosphorus diets for 5 d. In wild-type mice, phosphorus restriction increased 1alpha-hydroxylase activity and p450c1alpha mRNA expression by 6-fold and 3-fold, respectively, whereas in the Hyp strain the same diet induced changes of similar magnitude but opposite in direction. Phosphorus supplementation was without effect in wild-type mice, whereas in Hyp mice the same diet induced 3-fold and 2-fold increases, respectively, in enzyme activity and p450c1alpha mRNA abundance. In wild-type mice, both renal 1alpha-hydroxylase activity and p450c1alpha mRNA abundance varied inversely and significantly with serum phosphorus concentrations, whereas in Hyp mice the relationship between both renal parameters and serum phosphorus concentration was direct. In Hyp mice, phosphorus restriction induced a significant increase in renal p450c24 mRNA abundance, in contrast to the lack of effect observed in wild-type mice. The present findings demonstrate that regulation of both the p450c1alpha and p45024 genes by phosphorus is disordered in Hyp mice at the level of renal 1alpha

  4. Expression and modulation of IL-1 alpha in murine keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ansel, J.C.; Luger, T.A.; Lowry, D.; Perry, P.; Roop, D.R.; Mountz, J.D.

    1988-04-01

    Murine and human keratinocytes produce an IL-1-like factor that appears to be similar if not identical to monocyte-derived IL-1. IL-1 may be an important mediator in cutaneous inflammatory responses, however, little is currently known concerning factors that may modulate IL-1 expression in keratinocytes. To address this issue we examined the effect of LPS, UV, and the cell differentiation state on murine keratinocyte IL-1 mRNA expression. Our results indicated that as with the murine P388D1 monocyte cell line, PAM 212 keratinocytes constitutively express abundant amounts of IL-1 alpha mRNA. On exposure to LPS (100 micrograms/ml) for 8 h there was more than 10 times the increase in PAM 212 IL-1 alpha mRNA which was accompanied by a sixfold increase in supernatant IL-1 activity. Similarly UV irradiation had a significant effect on keratinocyte IL-1 alpha expression. High dose UV (300 mJ/cm2) inhibited PAM 212 IL-1 alpha expression at 4, 8, 24, 48 h post-UV whereas a lower dose of UV (100 mJ/cm2) inhibited UV at 4 and 8 h post-UV, but induced IL-1 expression at 24 and 48 h post-UV. The expression of IL-1 alpha varied with the differentiation state of the keratinocytes. Freshly removed newborn murine keratinocytes were found to constitutively express IL-1 alpha mRNA. Keratinocytes grown in low (Ca2+) tissue culture media (0.05 mM) for 6 days, functionally and phenotypically become undifferentiated and express increased quantities of IL-1 alpha mRNA, whereas cells grown in high (Ca2+) media (1.2 mM) for 6 days become terminally differentiated and IL-1 expression ceased. Keratinocytes cultured for 3 days in low (Ca2+) conditions expressed an intermediate level of IL-1 alpha. In contrast, little or no IL-1 beta mRNA was detected in either the PAM 212 cells or newborn murine keratinocytes.

  5. Murine elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) is posttranslationally modified by novel amide-linked ethanolamine-phosphoglycerol moieties. Addition of ethanolamine-phosphoglycerol to specific glutamic acid residues on EF-1 alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteheart, S.W.; Shenbagamurthi, P.; Chen, L.; Cotter, R.J.; Hart, G.W. )

    1989-08-25

    Elongation Factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha), an important eukaryotic translation factor, transports charged aminoacyl-tRNA from the cytosol to the ribosomes during poly-peptide synthesis. Metabolic radiolabeling with ({sup 3}H) ethanolamine shows that, in all cells examined, EF-1 alpha is the major radiolabeled protein. Radiolabeled EF-1 alpha has an apparent Mr = 53,000 and a basic isoelectric point. It is cytosolic and does not contain N-linked oligosaccharides. Trypsin digestion of murine EF-1 alpha generated two major ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine-labeled peptides. Three peptides were sequenced and were identical to two distinct regions of the human EF-1 alpha protein. Blank sequencing cycles coinciding with glutamic acid in the human cDNA-derived sequence were also found to release ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine, and compositional analysis of these peptides confirmed the presence of glutamic acid. Dansylation analysis demonstrates that the amine group of the ethanolamine is blocked. These results indicate that EF-1 alpha is posttranslationally modified by the covalent attachment of ethanolamine via an amide bond to at least two specific glutamic acid residues (Glu-301 and Glu-374). The hydroxyl group of the attached ethanolamine was shown by mass spectrometry and compositional analysis, to be further modified by the addition of a phosphoglycerol unit. This novel posttranslational modification may represent an important alteration of EF-1 alpha, comparable to the regulatory effects of posttranslational methylation of EF-1 alpha lysine residues.

  6. Transplantation of neural stem cells expressing hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) improves behavioral recovery in a rat stroke model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wanfu; Chen, Xiu; Hu, Changlin; Li, Jinfang; Yu, Zhen; Cai, Wenqin

    2010-01-01

    We explored the possibility that hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) might contribute to the therapeutic effect of neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation in cerebral ischemia. The relative efficacy of modified NSC to promote behavioral recovery was investigated in a rat model of stroke induced by a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). A recombinant adenovirus (Ad-HIF-1alpha) was engineered to express HIF-1alpha. Control NSC infected with control adenovirus (NSC-Ad), recombinant adenovirus Ad-HIF-1alpha, or NSC infected by Ad-HIF-1alpha (NSC-Ad-HIF-1alpha), were used for intraventricular transplantion into rat brain 24 hours after MCAO. Neurological deficits were assessed over 4 weeks using the modified neurological severity scale (NSS) score. Long-term in vivo expression of HIF-1alpha was demonstrated by Western blotting and immunocytochemistry, and derivatives of nestin-positive transplanted cells contributed to both neuronal (neurofilament-positive) and astroglial (glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive) lineages. All animals showed functional improvement. Improvement was accelerated in animals receiving either NSC-Ad or Ad-HIF-1alpha, while improvement at all times between 7 days and 28 days post MCAO was significantly greater in animals transplanted with NSC-Ad-HIF-1alpha than for other treated animals. NSC-Ad-HIF-1alpha cells also increased the number of factor VIII-positive cells in the region of ischemic injury, indicating that HIF-1alpha expression can promote angiogenesis. Gene-modified NSC expressing HIF-1alpha have therapeutic potential in ischemic stroke.

  7. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha and multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Bhupendra Nath

    2016-01-01

    Rapid tumor growth creates a state of hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment and results in release of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HiF-1α) in the local milieu. Hypoxia inducible factor activity is deregulated in many human cancers, especially those that are highly hypoxic. In multiple myeloma (MM) in initial stages of disease establishment, the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment supports the initial survival and growth of the myeloma cells. Hypoxic tumour cells are usually resistant to radiotherapy and most conventional chemotherapeutic agents, rendering them highly aggressive and metastatic. Therefore, HIF is an attractive, although challenging, therapeutic target in MM directly or indirectly in recent years. PMID:26900575

  8. Hydroxytyrosol promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial function in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jiejie; Shen, Weili; Yu, Guangli; Jia, Haiqun; Li, Xuesen; Feng, Zhihui; Wang, Ying; Weber, Peter; Wertz, Karin; Sharman, Edward; Liu, Jiankang

    2010-07-01

    Hydroxytyrosol (HT) in extra-virgin olive oil is considered one of the most important polyphenolic compounds responsible for the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet for lowering incidence of cardiovascular disease, the most common and most serious complication of diabetes. We propose that HT may prevent these diseases by a stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis that leads to enhancement of mitochondrial function and cellular defense systems. In the present study, we investigated effects of HT that stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and promote mitochondrial function in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. HT over the concentration range of 0.1-10 micromol/L stimulated the promoter transcriptional activation and protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) coactivator 1 alpha (PPARGC1 alpha, the central factor for mitochondrial biogenesis) and its downstream targets; these included nuclear respiration factors 1 and 2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, which leads to an increase in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and in the number of mitochondria. Knockdown of Ppargc1 alpha by siRNA blocked HT's stimulating effect on Complex I expression and mtDNA copy number. The HT treatment resulted in an enhancement of mitochondrial function, including an increase in activity and protein expression of Mitochondrial Complexes I, II, III and V; increased oxygen consumption; and a decrease in free fatty acid contents in the adipocytes. The mechanistic study of the PPARGC1 alpha activation signaling pathway demonstrated that HT is an activator of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase and also up-regulates gene expression of PPAR alpha, CPT-1 and PPAR gamma. These data suggest that HT is able to promote mitochondrial function by stimulating mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:19576748

  9. Bundling of actin filaments by elongation factor 1 alpha inhibits polymerization at filament ends

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1 alpha) is an abundant protein that binds aminoacyl-tRNA and ribosomes in a GTP-dependent manner. EF1 alpha also interacts with the cytoskeleton by binding and bundling actin filaments and microtubules. In this report, the effect of purified EF1 alpha on actin polymerization and depolymerization is examined. At molar ratios present in the cytosol, EF1 alpha significantly blocks both polymerization and depolymerization of actin filaments and increases the final extent of actin polymer, while at high molar ratios to actin, EF1 alpha nucleates actin polymerization. Although EF1 alpha binds actin monomer, this monomer-binding activity does not explain the effects of EF1 alpha on actin polymerization at physiological molar ratios. The mechanism for the inhibition of polymerization is related to the actin-bundling activity of EF1 alpha. Both ends of the actin filament are inhibited for polymerization and both bundling and the inhibition of actin polymerization are affected by pH within the same physiological range; at high pH both bundling and the inhibition of actin polymerization are reduced. Additionally, it is seen that the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA to EF1 alpha releases EF1 alpha's inhibiting effect on actin polymerization. These data demonstrate that EF1 alpha can alter the assembly of F-actin, a filamentous scaffold on which non- membrane-associated protein translation may be occurring in vivo. PMID:8947553

  10. Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} modulates the expression of adipogenesis-related genes during adipocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ijichi, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Yagi, Ken; Okazaki, Yasushi; Inoue, Satoshi . E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-07-06

    Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} (ERR{alpha}) is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates cellular energy metabolism by modulating gene expression involved in fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue. However, the physiological role of ERR{alpha} in adipogenesis and white adipose tissue development has not been well studied. Here, we show that ERR{alpha} and ERR{alpha}-related transcriptional coactivators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) and PGC-1{beta}, can be up-regulated in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes at mRNA levels under the adipogenic differentiation condition including the inducer of cAMP, glucocorticoid, and insulin. Gene knockdown by ERR{alpha}-specific siRNA results in mRNA down-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 4, PPAR{gamma}, and PGC-1{alpha} in 3T3-L1 cells in the adipogenesis medium. ERR{alpha} and PGC-1{beta} mRNA expression can be also up-regulated in another preadipocyte lineage DFAT-D1 cells and a pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2 under the differentiation condition. Furthermore, stable expression of ERR{alpha} in 3T3-L1 cells up-regulates adipogenic marker genes and promotes triglyceride accumulation during 3T3-L1 differentiation. These results suggest that ERR{alpha} may play a critical role in adipocyte differentiation by modulating the expression of various adipogenesis-related genes.

  11. Bone marrow plasma macrophage inflammatory protein protein-1 alpha(MIP-1 alpha) and sclerostin in multiple myeloma: relationship with bone disease and clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Tao; He, Yu-Chan; Zhou, Si-Yao; Jiang, Jing-zi; Huang, Yu-Mei; Liang, Yu-Zhen; Lai, Yong-Rong

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the expression of MIP-1 alpha and sclerostin in bone marrow of patients with multiple myeloma (MM), the possible association of the sclerostin and MIP-1 alpha with MBD and the clinical characteristics. 53 patients (29 M, 24 F), median age 64 years was studied. MIP-1 alpha, sclerostin and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (bALP) levels were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Sclerostin and MIP-1 alpha mRNA expression was determined by RT-PCR. PTH and 1,25(OH) 2D3 levels were measured with an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. The sclerostin and MIP-1 alpha concentrations in patients with MM were higher than those in the controls. RT-PCR analysis verified that the bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) of most patients showed sclerostin and MIP-1 alpha mRNA expression. The sclerostin and MIP-1 alpha levels in patients with ISS stage III disease were significantly higher than those in patients with ISS stage II disease (p=0.01 and 0.06). The sclerostin and MIP-1 alpha levels in patients with BMD in group C were significantly higher than those in group A+B. There was positive correlation between sclerostin levels and MIP-1 alpha, beta2-microglobulin and aCa levels. A negative association was seen between sclerostin levels and bALP, HB and ALB levels. The MM patients with high sclerostin levels (>0.72 ng/ml) had significantly shorter median survival than those with low sclerostin levels (≤0.72 ng/ml) (χ(2)=7.574, p=0.006). Our findings support the positive relationship between sclerostin levels and MIP-1alpha levels deserve further detailed research.

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi elongation factor 1-alpha: nuclear localization in parasites undergoing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Billaut-Mulot, O; Fernandez-Gomez, R; Loyens, M; Ouaissi, A

    1996-09-26

    The cloning and sequencing of the gene coding for Trypanosoma cruzi elongation factor 1 alpha (TcEF-1 alpha) was performed by screening a T. cruzi genomic library with a probe obtained through the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of T. cruzi DNA using two oligonucleotides deduced from the sequence of T. brucei EF-1 alpha. Southern blot analysis of T. cruzi digested genomic DNA and Northern blot hybridized with the labeled probe revealed that one copy of TcEF-1 alpha exist in the genome of the parasite. Indirect immunofluorescence technique using anti-EF-1 alpha antibodies and epimastigotes harvested after different days of in vitro culture showed that EF-1 alpha is localised in the cytoplasm of the parasites from the exponential growth phase. Surprisingly, during the stationary phase (ageing parasites), EF-1 alpha was found in the nucleus. Furthermore, treatment of parasites with the antibiotic drug geneticin (G418) which induces the death of epimastigotes by apoptosis showed selective localization of EF-1 alpha in the nucleus of dying parasites. This observation supports the notion already reported in the case of mammalian cells that EF-1 alpha could participate in the transcription processes and possibly in the case of T. cruzi, in the expression regulation of genes involved in the control of cell death. The possible transfection and genomic manipulation of T. cruzi may provide a model to study the role of TcEF-1 alpha in this phenomenon. PMID:8863724

  13. Transformation of 25- and 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 to 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 by using Streptomyces sp. strains.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, J; Mikami, A; Mizoue, K; Omura, S

    1991-01-01

    To enzymatically synthesize vitamin D derivatives, we screened about 300 Streptomyces sp. strains. Streptomyces sclerotialus FERM BP-1370 and Streptomyces roseoporus FERM BP-1574 were found to have the ability to convert 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3, respectively, to 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. The average rates of 1 alpha hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 were 6.9 micrograms liter-1 min-1 with FERM BP-1370 and 7.0 micrograms liter-1 min-1 with FERM BP-1574. The specific cytochrome P-450 inhibitors carbon monoxide, SKF-525-A, and metyrapone inhibited the hydroxylation of 1 alpha- and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 to 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 by FERM BP-1370 and FERM BP-1574. The cytochromes P-450 of these strains were detected by reduced CO difference spectra in the whole-cell suspensions. The appearance of cytochrome P-450 suggests that the cytochromes P-450 of FERM BP-1370 and FERM BP-1574 carry out the hydroxylation of 25- and 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 to 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. PMID:1746944

  14. A Xenopus laevis gene encoding EF-1 alpha S, the somatic form of elongation factor 1 alpha: sequence, structure, and identification of regulatory elements required for embryonic transcription.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A D; Krieg, P A

    1995-01-01

    Transcription of the Xenopus laevis EF-1 alpha S gene commences at the mid-blastula stage of embryonic development and then continues constitutively in all somatic tissues. The EF-1 alpha S promoter is extremely active in the early Xenopus embryo where EF-1 alpha S transcripts account for as much as 40% of all new polyadenylated transcripts. We have isolated the Xenopus EF-1 alpha S gene and used microinjection techniques to identify promoter elements responsible for embryonic transcription. These in vivo expression studies have identified an enhancer fragment, located approximately 4.4 kb upstream of the transcription start site, that is required for maximum expression from the EF-1 alpha S promoter. The enhancer fragment contains both an octamer and a G/C box sequence, but mutation studies indicate that the octamer plays no significant role in regulation of EF-1 alpha S expression in the embryo. The presence of a G/C element in the enhancer and of multiple G/C boxes in the proximal promoter region suggests that the G/C box binding protein, Sp1, plays a major role in the developmental regulation of EF-1 alpha S promoter activity. PMID:8565334

  15. Three genes for the elongation factor EF-1 alpha in Mucor racemosus.

    PubMed

    Linz, J E; Katayama, C; Sypherd, P S

    1986-02-01

    We cloned three genes from Mucor racemosus coding for protein synthesis elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha). A 110-base-pair (bp) EF-1 alpha-specific cDNA clone was identified by hybrid-selected translation. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA showed significant homology to a region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes for EF-1 alpha (TEF1 and TEF2). The cDNA was used to isolate an 850-bp EcoRI genomic DNA fragment containing a portion of the EF-1 alpha gene. Screening of a lambda/M. racemosus genomic DNA bank with the 850-bp EcoRI probe resulted in the identification of three DNA fragments containing a common 850-bp EcoRI fragment within a short overlapping region. S1 nuclease analysis of the three EF-1 alpha DNA fragments showed that the EF-1 alpha transcript covered the short overlapping region in the clones. Restriction fragments purified from flanking regions in each clone were used to probe a HindIII digest of M. racemosus genomic DNA. Each flanking probe hybridized to one of three DNA fragments which hybridized to the 850-bp EF-1 alpha-specific probe. Nucleotide sequence data from two random "shotgun clones" of one of the three genes show good homology to two regions of S. cerevisiae TEF1. The data indicate the presence of three genes for EF-1 alpha in M. racemosus located at unique sites in the genome. PMID:2946933

  16. Flavonoids induce HIF-1alpha but impair its nuclear accumulation and activity.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, Anastasia; Mylonis, Ilias; Simos, George; Bonanou, Sophia; Tsakalof, Andreas

    2008-02-15

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) is the regulatory subunit of the transcription factor HIF-1, which is highly involved in the pathology of diseases associated with tissue hypoxia. In this study we investigated the ability of plant flavonoids to induce HIF-1alpha and regulate HIF-1 transcriptional activity in HeLa cells. We demonstrate for the first time that the flavonoids baicalein, luteolin and fisetin, as well as the previously investigated quercetin, induce HIF-1alpha under normal oxygen pressure, whereas kaempferol, taxifolin, and rutin are inactive. We further reveal that the capability of flavonoids to bind efficiently intracellular iron and their lipophilicity are essential for HIF-1alpha induction. Despite the ability of flavonoids to stabilize HIF-1alpha, the transcriptional activity of HIF-1 induced by flavonoids was significantly lower than that observed with the iron chelator and known HIF-1 inducer, desferrioxamine (DFO). Furthermore, when cells in which HIF-1 had been induced by DFO were also treated with flavonoids, the transcriptional activity of HIF-1 was strongly impaired without simultaneous reduction in HIF-1alpha protein levels. Localization of HIF-1alpha by immuno- and direct fluorescence microscopy and in vitro phosphorylation assays suggest that flavonoids inhibit HIF-1 activity by impairing the MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of HIF-1alpha, thereby decreasing its nuclear accumulation.

  17. Tumour-derived interleukin 1alpha (IL-1alpha) up-regulates the release of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) by endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fonsatti, E.; Altomonte, M.; Coral, S.; Cattarossi, I.; Nicotra, M. R.; Gasparollo, A.; Natali, P. G.; Maio, M.

    1997-01-01

    Levels of circulating soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) are elevated in patients affected by solid malignancies; however, the cellular sources generating high levels of sICAM-1 remain to be characterized. Using conditioned media (CM) from seven ICAM-1-positive or -negative neoplastic cells, we demonstrate that tumour-derived interleukin 1alpha (IL-1alpha) significantly (P < 0.05) up-regulates the release of sICAM-1 by human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The intensity of the effect correlated with the amounts of IL-1alpha detectable in CM. Levels of ICAM-1 mRNA were also up-regulated by tumour-secreted IL-1alpha. The up-regulation of the shedding of sICAM-1 and of its expression at protein and mRNA level were completely reversed by the addition of anti-IL-1alpha neutralizing antibodies. Consistent with the in vitro data, tumour endothelia were strongly stained for ICAM-1 compared with autologous normal tissue endothelia. Taken altogether, our observations reveal an IL-1alpha-mediated tumour-endothelium relationship sustaining the shedding of sICAM-1 by endothelial cells. This is a general phenomenon in solid malignancies that correlates with the ability of neoplastic cells to secrete IL-1alpha rather than with their expression of ICAM-1 and/or histological origin. sICAM-1 has been previously shown to inhibit LFA-1/ICAM-1-mediated cell-cell interactions; therefore, the ability of neoplastic cells to secrete IL-1alpha is likely to represent a mechanism for their escape from immune interaction. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9374368

  18. Transcriptional regulation of collagenase-3 by interleukin-1 alpha in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Samuel; Canalis, Ernesto

    2003-12-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1)alpha is an autocrine/paracrine agent of the skeletal tissue and it regulates bone remodeling. Collagenase-3 or matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 is expressed in osteoblasts and its expression is modulated by several cytokines including IL-1alpha. Because the molecular mechanism of increased synthesis of collagenase-3 in bone cells by IL-1alpha is not known, we investigated if collagenase-3 expression by IL-1alpha in osteoblasts is mediated by transcriptional or post-transcriptional mechanisms. Exposure of rat osteoblastic cultures (Ob cells) to IL-1alpha at concentrations higher than 0.5 nM increased the synthesis of collagenase-3 mRNA up to eightfold and the secretion of immunoreactive protein up to 21-fold. The effects of IL-1alpha on collagenase-3 were time- and dose-dependent. Although prostaglandins stimulate collagenase-3 expression, stimulation of collagenase-3 in Ob cells by IL-1alpha was not mediated through increased biosynthesis of prostaglandins. The half-life of collagenase-3 mRNA from control and IL-1alpha-treated Ob cells was similar suggesting that the stabilization of collagenase-3 mRNA did not contribute to the increase in collagenase-3. However, IL-1alpha stimulated the rate of transcription of the collagenase-3 gene by twofold to fourfold indicating regulation of collagenase-3 expression in Ob cells at the transcriptional level. Stimulation of collagenase-3 by IL-1alpha in osteoblasts may in part mediate the effects of IL-1alpha in bone metabolism.

  19. The pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 alpha gene is testosterone and prolactin regulated in prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Costello, L C; Liu, Y; Zou, J; Franklin, R B

    2000-02-01

    The prostate gland of humans and other animals has the unique function of accumulating and secreting extraordinarily high levels of citrate. The prostate secretory epithelial cells synthesize citrate which, due to a limiting mitochondrial (m-) aconitase, accumulates rather than being oxidized. Thus citrate is essentially an end product of metabolism in prostate. For continued net citrate production, a continual source of oxaloacetate (OAA) and acetyl CoA is required. Glucose via pyruvate oxidation provides the source of Acetyl CoA. In prostate cells, citrate production is regulated by testosterone and/or by prolactin. Both hormones selectively regulate the level and activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 alpha (E1a) in animal prostate cells; thereby regulating the availability of acetyl CoA for citrate synthesis. Studies were conducted to determine if testosterone and prolactin might regulate the expression of the E1a gene in prostate epithelial cells. Prolactin treatment of rat ventral and lateral prostate cells and human PC3 cells increased the levels of E1a mRNA and the rates of transcription of the E1a gene. Testosterone also increased the mRNA level and transcription of E1a in rat ventral prostate cells, and in PC3 cells transfected with androgen receptor. However, testosterone treatment resulted in a repression of E1a gene expression in lateral prostate cells. Evidence is presented which supports the view that prolactin regulation of E1a is mediated via PKC. The rapidity of the effects of both hormones is representative of an immediate-early gene response. To our knowledge this represents the first report in any mammalian cells that, in addition to its constitutive expression in all mammalian cells, the E1a gene is a hormonally-regulated gene in specifically targeted prostate epithelial cells. PMID:10711720

  20. Castration Therapy of Prostate Cancer Results in Downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ubaidi, Firas L.T.; Schultz, Niklas; Egevad, Lars; Granfors, Torvald; Helleday, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Background and Purpose: Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation in combination with radiotherapy of prostate cancer is used to improve radioresponsiveness and local tumor control. Currently, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Because hypoxia causes resistance to radiotherapy, we wanted to test whether castration affects the degree of hypoxia in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In 14 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, six to 12 prostatic needle core biopsy specimens were taken prior to castration therapy. Bilateral orchidectomy was performed in 7 patients, and 7 were treated with a GnRH-agonist (leuprorelin). After castrationm two to four prostatic core biopsy specimens were taken, and the level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in cancer was determined by immunofluorescence. Results: Among biopsy specimens taken before castration, strong HIF-1{alpha} expression (mean intensity above 30) was shown in 5 patients, weak expression (mean intensity 10-30) in 3 patients, and background levels of HIF-1{alpha} (mean intensity 0-10) in 6 patients. Downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} expression after castration was observed in all 5 patients with strong HIF-1{alpha} precastration expression. HIF-1{alpha} expression was also reduced in 2 of 3 patients with weak HIF-1{alpha} precastration expression. Conclusions: Our data suggest that neoadjuvant castration decreases tumor cell hypoxia in prostate cancer, which may explain increased radiosensitivity after castration.

  1. Interaction between HP1{alpha} and replication proteins in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Auth, Tanja . E-mail: tauth@uni-bonn.de; Kunkel, Elisabeth; Grummt, Friedrich . E-mail: grummt@biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2006-10-15

    HP1 is an essential heterochromatin-associated protein known to play an important role in the organization of heterochromatin as well as in the transcriptional regulation of heterochromatic and euchromatic genes both in repression and activation. Using the yeast two-hybrid system and immunoprecipitation, we report here that murine HP1{alpha} interacts with the preRC proteins ORC1, ORC2 and CDC6. Immunofluorescence staining and EGFP/DsRed fusion proteins revealed a colocalization of HP1{alpha} with ORC1, ORC2 and CDC6 in heterochromatin, supporting the notion that ORC and probably CDC6 play an important role in murine HP1{alpha} function. Besides that, we also observed a colocalization of HP1{alpha} with {gamma}-tubulin suggesting a centrosomal localization of HP1{alpha} in murine cells. To gain insight into HP1{alpha} function, we applied the RNAi technique. Depletion of HP1{alpha} leads to a slow down of cell proliferation, an aberrant cell cycle progression as well as to multinucleated cells with insufficiently organized microtubule. These results together indicate that HP1{alpha} exerts functions in mitosis and cytokinesis.

  2. A DC-81-indole conjugate agent suppresses melanoma A375 cell migration partially via interrupting VEGF production and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha}-mediated signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Ming-Chu; Hu, Wan-Ping; Yu, Hsin-Su; Wu, Wen-Chuan; Chang, Long-Sen; Kao, Ying-Hsien; Wang, Jeh-Jeng

    2011-09-01

    Pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBD) chemicals are antitumor antibiotics inhibiting nucleic acid synthesis. An indole carboxylate-PBD hybrid with six-carbon spacer structure (IN6CPBD) has been previously demonstrated to induce melanoma cell apoptosis and reduce metastasis in mouse lungs. This study aimed at investigating the efficacy of the other hybrid compound with four-carbon spacer (IN4CPBD) and elucidating its anti-metastatic mechanism. Human melanoma A375 cells with IN4CPBD treatment underwent cytotoxicity and apoptosis-associated assays. Transwell migration assay, Western blotting, and ELISA were used for mechanistic study. IN4CPBD exhibited potent melanoma cytotoxicity through interrupting G1/S cell cycle progression, increasing DNA fragmentation and hypodipoidic DNA contents, and reducing mitochondrial membrane potential. Caspase activity elevation suggested that both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways were involved in IN4CPBD-induced melanoma apoptosis. IN4CPBD up-regulated p53 and p21, thereby concomitantly derailing the equilibrium between Bcl-2 and Bax levels. Transwell migration assay demonstrated that stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}) stimulated A375 cell motility, while kinase inhibitors treatment confirmed that Rho/ROCK, Akt, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK pathways were involved in SDF-1{alpha}-enhanced melanoma migration. IN4CPBD not only abolished the SDF-1{alpha}-enhanced chemotactic motility but also suppressed constitutive MMP-9 and VEGF expression. Mechanistically, IN4CPBD down-regulated Akt, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK total proteins and MYPT1 phosphorylation. In conclusion, beyond the fact that IN4CPBD induces melanoma cell apoptosis at cytotoxic dose, the interruption in the VEGF expression and the SDF-1{alpha}-related signaling at cytostatic dose may partially constitute the rationale for its in vivo anti-metastatic potency. - Research Highlights: > A novel carboxylate-PBD hybrid as anti-melanoma drug. > IN4CPBD interrupts melanoma cell

  3. Augmentation of host resistance to microbial infections by recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Minami, A; Fujimoto, K; Ozaki, Y; Nakamura, S

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha augmented resistance of mice to microbial infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella typhimurium, and Candida albicans. The effective doses of interleukin-1 alpha ranged from 0.01 to 10 micrograms per mouse, depending on the infecting organism, route of administration, and challenge dose. Intravenous interleukin-1 alpha was, dose for dose, more effective than intravenous muramyl dipeptide and lentinan against the P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae infections. Augmentation by interleukin-1 alpha of resistance to infection was also observed in P. aeruginosa-infected mice in a state of cyclophosphamide-induced leucopenia. Interleukin-1 alpha may be useful for controlling obstinate infections not curable by antimicrobial agents alone. PMID:3263325

  4. Modulation of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-membrane associated, rapid response steroid binding protein expression in mouse odontoblasts by 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3.

    PubMed

    Teillaud, Christophe; Nemere, Ilka; Boukhobza, Florine; Mathiot, Claire; Conan, Nicole; Oboeuf, Martine; Hotton, Dominique; Macdougall, Mary; Berdal, Ariane

    2005-01-01

    The rapid, nongenomic effects of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1alpha,25-(OH)2D3 have been related to a 1,25D3-membrane associated, rapid response steroid binding protein or 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp, with a molecular weight of 65 kDa, in several tissues and species. Currently, no information is available concerning the nongenomic responses to 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3 in dental tissues. In order to investigate the expression of 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp in dental cells, in the presence or absence of 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3, we have used rabbit polyclonal antibodies directed against the N-terminus of the 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp (Ab099) that recognizes the 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3 binding protein in chick intestinal basolateral membranes and a mouse odontoblast-like cell line (MO6-G3). Western blotting and flow cytometric analyses with Ab099 specifically detected 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp in MO6-G3 cells. Moreover, 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp was up-regulated, in vivo, in differentiated dental cells. Electron microscopic analysis confirmed the plasma membrane localization of this binding protein and also showed its intracellular presence. Incubation of MO6-G3 cells with different doses of 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3 for 36 h resulted in an inhibition of 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp expression with a maximal effect at 50 nM steroid. In addition, the culture media of MO6-G3 cells contains immunoreactive 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp. Immunogold positive membrane vesicle-like structures are present in the extracellular matrix of MO6-G3 cells. Altogether, these results indicate that the 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp expression in MO6-G3 cells is modulated by 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3. In conclusion, this 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3 binding protein could play an important role in the rapid, nongenomic responses to 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3 in dental cells.

  5. NF-{kappa}B suppresses HIF-1{alpha} response by competing for P300 binding

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonca, Daniela B.S.; Mendonca, Gustavo; Aragao, Francisco J.L.; Cooper, Lyndon F.

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} p65 completely blocked HIF-1{alpha} activity at the HRE on different cell lines. {yields} p65 caused minor changes in HIF-1{alpha} and HIF-1{alpha} target genes mRNA expression. {yields} p65 reduced transcription of VEGF promoter. {yields} p65 competes with HIF-1{alpha} for p300. -- Abstract: Hypoxia has emerged as a key determinant of osteogenesis. HIF-1{alpha} is the transcription factor mediating hypoxia responses that include induction of VEGF and related bone induction. Inflammatory signals antagonize bone repair via the NF-{kappa}B pathway. The present investigation explored the functional relationship of hypoxia (HIF-1{alpha} function) and inflammatory signaling (NF-{kappa}B) in stem like and osteoprogenitor cell lines. The potential interaction between HIF-1{alpha} and NF-{kappa}B signaling was explored by co-transfection studies in hFOB with p65, HIF-1{alpha} and 9x-HRE-luc or HIF-1{alpha} target genes reporter plasmids. Nuclear cross-talk was directly tested using the mammalian Gal4/VP16 two-hybrid, and confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation/western blotting assays. The results show that inflammatory stimulation (TNF-{alpha} treatment) causes a marked inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} function at the HRE in all cell lines studied. Also, co-transfection with p65 expression vector leads to reduced hVEGFp transcription after DFO-induced hypoxia. However, TNF-{alpha} treatment had little effect on HIF-1{alpha} mRNA levels. The functional interaction of Gal4-HIF-1{alpha} and VP16-p300 fusion proteins is effectively blocked by expression of p65 in a dose dependent manner. It was concluded that NF-{kappa}B-mediated inflammatory signaling is able to block HIF-1{alpha} transactivation at HRE-encoding genes by direct competition for p300 binding at the promoter. Inflammation may influence the stem cell niche and tissue regeneration by influencing cellular responses to hypoxia.

  6. Expression of elongation factor-1 alpha and S1 in young and old human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Welle, S; Thornton, C; Bhatt, K; Krym, M

    1997-09-01

    Previous research has indicated that reduced expression of elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) may be an important determinant of the reduced rate of protein synthesis in senescent animals and cultured cells. The present study examined whether expression of EF-1 alpha or S1, a homologous protein found exclusively in postmitotic tissues, is reduced in senescent human skeletal muscle. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscles of healthy young (22-31 yr old) and old (61-74 yr old) subjects. As reported previously, myofibrillar protein synthesis was approximately 40% slower in the older muscle (p < .001) as determined by incorporation of a stable isotope. Immunoblotting revealed no difference in the concentration of EF-1 alpha + S1 between younger and older muscle. RT-PCR assays indicated that S1 mRNA was much more abundant than EF-1 alpha mRNA in muscles of both age groups, with no reduction in either EF-1 alpha or S1 mRNA abundance in older muscles. We conclude that expression of EF-1 alpha and S1 is not diminished in older muscles and does not explain the age-related slowing of protein synthesis in human skeletal muscle. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that the activity of these proteins declines during senescence due to post-translational modifications. PMID:9310071

  7. Interleukin-1 alpha has antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic activities in a rat neuropathic pain model.

    PubMed

    Mika, Joanna; Korostynski, Michal; Kaminska, Dorota; Wawrzczak-Bargiela, Agnieszka; Osikowicz, Maria; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocki, Ryszard; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2008-09-15

    Nerve injury and the consequent release of interleukins (ILs) are processes implicated in pain transmission. To study the potential role of IL-1 in the pathogenesis of allodynia and hyperalgesia, IL-1alpha and comparative IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNA levels were quantified using competitive RT-PCR of the lumbar spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG; L5-L6) three and seven days after chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Microglial and astroglial activation in the ipsilateral spinal cord and DRG were observed after injury. In naive and CCI-exposed rats, IL-1alpha mRNA and protein were not detected in the spinal cord. IL-1beta and IL-6 mRNAs were strongly ipsilaterally elevated on day seven after CCI. In the ipsilateral DRG, IL-1alpha, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNA levels were increased on days three and seven; IL-1beta was elevated only on day seven. Western blot analysis revealed both the presence of IL-1alpha proteins (45 and 31 kDa) in the DRG and the down-regulation of these proteins after CCI. Intrathecal administration of IL-1alpha (50-500 ng) in naive rats did not influence nociceptive transmission, but IL-1beta (50-500 ng) induced hyperalgesia. In rats exposed to CCI, an IL-1alpha or IL-1 receptor antagonist dose-dependently attenuated symptoms of neuropathic pain; however, no effect of IL-1beta was observed. In sum, the first days after CCI showed a high abundance of IL-1alpha in the DRG. Together with the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects observed after IL-1alpha administration, this finding indicates an important role for IL-1alpha in the development of neuropathic pain symptoms.

  8. Design and synthesis of a series of novel pyrazolopyridines as HIF-1alpha prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Warshakoon, Namal C; Wu, Shengde; Boyer, Angelique; Kawamoto, Richard; Renock, Sean; Xu, Kevin; Pokross, Matthew; Evdokimov, Artem G; Zhou, Songtao; Winter, Carol; Walter, Richard; Mekel, Marlene

    2006-11-01

    Recently resolved X-ray crystal structure of HIF-1alpha prolyl hydroxylase was used to design and develop a novel series of pyrazolopyridines as potent HIF-1alpha prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors. The activity of these compounds was determined in a human EGLN-1 assay. Structure-based design aided in optimizing the potency of the initial lead (2, IC(50) of 11 microM) to a potent (11l, 190 nM) EGLN-1 inhibitor. Several of these analogs were potent VEGF inducers in a cell-based assay. These pyrazolopyridines were also effective in stabilizing HIF-1alpha.

  9. Elongation factor 1 alpha concentration is highly correlated with the lysine content of maize endosperm.

    PubMed Central

    Habben, J E; Moro, G L; Hunter, B G; Hamaker, B R; Larkins, B A

    1995-01-01

    Lysine is the most limiting essential amino acid in cereals, and for many years plant breeders have attempted to increase its concentration to improve the nutritional quality of these grains. The opaque2 mutation in maize doubles the lysine content in the endosperm, but the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. We show that elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) is overexpressed in opaque2 endosperm compared with its normal counterpart and that there is a highly significant correlation between EF-1 alpha concentration and the total lysine content of the endosperm. This relationship is also true for two other cereals, sorghum and barley. It appears that genetic selection for genotypes with a high concentration of EF-1 alpha can significantly improve the nutritional quality of maize and other cereals. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7567989

  10. USP14 inhibits ER-associated degradation via interaction with IRE1{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Atsushi; Kadowaki, Hisae; Maruyama, Takeshi; Takeda, Kohsuke; Nishitoh, Hideki Ichijo, Hidenori

    2009-02-20

    Accumulation of unfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen induces ER stress. Eukaryotic cells possess the ER quality control systems, the unfolded protein response (UPR), to adapt to ER stress. IRE1{alpha} is one of the ER stress receptors and mediates the UPR. Here, we identified ubiquitin specific protease (USP) 14 as a binding partner of IRE1{alpha}. USP14 interacted with the cytoplasmic region of IRE1{alpha}, and the endogenous interaction between USP14 and IRE1{alpha} was inhibited by ER stress. Overexpression of USP14 inhibited the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway, and USP14 depletion by small interfering RNA effectively activated ERAD. These findings suggest that USP14 is a novel player in the UPR by serving as a physiological inhibitor of ERAD under the non-stressed condition.

  11. Diabetes mutations delineate an atypical POU domain in HNF-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Chi, Young-In; Frantz, J Daniel; Oh, Byung-Chul; Hansen, Lone; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Shoelson, Steven E

    2002-11-01

    Mutations in Hnf-1alpha are the most common Mendelian cause of diabetes mellitus. To elucidate the molecular function of a mutational hotspot, we cocrystallized human HNF-1alpha 83-279 with a high-affinity promoter and solved the structure of the complex. Two identical protein molecules are bound to the promoter. Each contains a homeodomain and a second domain structurally similar to POU-specific domains that was not predicted on the basis of amino acid sequence. Atypical elements in both domains create a stable interface that further distinguishes HNF-1alpha from other flexible POU-homeodomain proteins. The numerous diabetes-causing mutations in HNF-1alpha thus identified a previously unrecognized POU domain which was used as a search model to identify additional POU domain proteins in sequence databases. PMID:12453420

  12. Inhibition of GSK3beta by indirubins restores HIF-1alpha accumulation under prolonged periods of hypoxia/anoxia.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, Steffen E; Schmid, Tobias; Zhou, Jie; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Brüne, Bernhard

    2005-01-17

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1 is regulated by the appearance of the HIF-1alpha subunit. HIF-1alpha is subjected to proteasomal destruction or enhanced protein translation, which requires the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. We investigated how PI3K/Akt and glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) affect HIF-1alpha in human RKO cells under prolonged periods of severe hypoxia/anoxia. 16- to 32-h lasting incubations attenuated Akt activity and decreased HIF-1alpha protein. This was reproduced by blocking PI3K with LY294002. GSK3beta inhibition by indirubins circumvented the effect of hypoxia/anoxia or LY294002 on HIF-1alpha. Ruling stability regulation of HIF-1alpha protein and/or enhanced transcription of HIF-1alpha mRNA via GSK3beta inhibition out is suggestive for translational modulation of HIF-1alpha under the influence of GSK3beta.

  13. IL-1 alpha (-889) promoter polymorphism is a risk factor for osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Asensi, Víctor; Alvarez, Victoria; Valle, Eulalia; Meana, Alvaro; Fierer, Joshua; Coto, Eliecer; Carton, José Antonio; Maradona, José Antonio; Paz, José; Dieguez, Maria Angeles; de la Fuente, Belén; Moreno, Alfonso; Rubio, Silvino; Tuya, Maria José; Sarasúa, Julián; Llames, Sara; Arribas, José Manuel

    2003-06-01

    As osteomyelitis (OM) induces the synthesis of inflammatory cytokines and IL-1 mediates bone resorption by osteoclasts we determined if there is an association between certain common polymorphisms of the genes encoding proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1 alpha and beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha) and OM in adults. The IL-1 alpha (-889) TT genotype was significantly more frequent among 52 OM patients than in 109 healthy controls (13/52, [25.0%] vs. 9/109, [8.3%], P = 0.0081, chi(2) = 7.01, OR = 3.7, 95% CI, 1.35-10.34). Patients who were homozygous for the T allele were younger than the rest of the OM patients (mean age 35.7 +/- 11.5 vs. 58.1 +/- 18.6 years, P = 0.001). IL-1 beta TT (+3953) polymorphism was also more frequent in OM patients (P = 0.014, chi(2) = 5.12, OR = 5.1, 95% CI, 1.21-52.14), but IL-1 beta is in linkage disequilibrium with the IL-1 alpha *T (P < 0.001). Route of infection, chronicity of the infection, type of microorganism isolated, and frequency of relapses were similar in patients with and without the IL-1 alpha TT genotype. There were no associations between OM and polymorphisms of other cytokines genes. IL-1 alpha serum levels were significantly increased in all the OM patients independently of their IL-1 genotype compared to the controls (P = 0.021). Although IL-1 alpha serum levels were not significantly higher in patients with the IL-1 alpha (-889) polymorphism, this does not exclude a difference in production of IL-1 alpha by osteoclasts or other inflammatory cells at the site of infection.

  14. Mouse neurexin-1alpha deletion causes correlated electrophysiological and behavioral changes consistent with cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Etherton, Mark R; Blaiss, Cory A; Powell, Craig M; Südhof, Thomas C

    2009-10-20

    Deletions in the neurexin-1alpha gene were identified in large-scale unbiased screens for copy-number variations in patients with autism or schizophrenia. To explore the underlying biology, we studied the electrophysiological and behavioral phenotype of mice lacking neurexin-1alpha. Hippocampal slice physiology uncovered a defect in excitatory synaptic strength in neurexin-1alpha deficient mice, as revealed by a decrease in miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) frequency and in the input-output relation of evoked postsynaptic potentials. This defect was specific for excitatory synaptic transmission, because no change in inhibitory synaptic transmission was observed in the hippocampus. Behavioral studies revealed that, compared with littermate control mice, neurexin-1alpha deficient mice displayed a decrease in prepulse inhibition, an increase in grooming behaviors, an impairment in nest-building activity, and an improvement in motor learning. However, neurexin-1alpha deficient mice did not exhibit any obvious changes in social behaviors or in spatial learning. Together, these data indicate that the neurexin-1alpha deficiency induces a discrete neural phenotype whose extent correlates, at least in part, with impairments observed in human patients.

  15. Reduced serum levels of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D during long-term total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Klein, G L; Horst, R L; Norman, A W; Ament, M E; Slatopolsky, E; Coburn, J W

    1981-05-01

    Painful bone disease, characterized by patchy osteomalacia and inactive bone, can develop in patients treated with total parenteral nutrition for more than 3 months. Serum levels of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1 alpha, 25(OH)2D), 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured in seven adults and five children treated with parenteral nutrition for 9 to 60 months. Serum levels of 1 alpha, 25(OH)2D were markedly reduced, while levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were normal. Serum calcium and phosphorus levels were normal or slightly increased, and immunoreactive parathyroid hormone levels were normal or low. Renal function was normal or minimally reduced. Skeletal symptoms disappeared and serum 1 alpha, 25(OH)2D levels rose to normal in one patient when nutrient infusions were discontinued for 6 weeks. Removal of calcium from the nutrient solution for 2 to 4 days was associated with no change in serum 1 alpha, 25(OH)2D in two patients. The cause of the reduction in serum levels of 1 alpha, 25(OH)2D and its role in the pathogenesis of bone disease in these patients remain uncertain. PMID:6786151

  16. Whole-body irradiation transiently diminishes the adrenocorticotropin response to recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Perlstein, R.S.; Mehta, N.R.; Neta, R.; Whitnall, M.H.; Mougey, E.H.

    1995-03-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha} (rhIL-1{alpha}) has significant potential as a radioprotector and/or treatment for radiation-induced hematopoietic injury. Both IL-1 and whole-body ionizing irradiation acutely stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. We therefore assessed the interaction of whole-body irradiation and rhIL-1{alpha} in altering the functioning of the axis in mice. Specifically, we determined the adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone responses to rhIL-1{alpha} administered just before and hours to days after whole-body or sham irradiation. Our results indicate that whole-body irradiation does not potentiate the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in ACTH levels at the doses used. In fact, the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in plasma ACTH is transiently impaired when the cytokine is administered 5 h after, but not 1 h before, exposure to whole-body irradiation. The ACTH response may be inhibited by elevated corticosterone levels after whole-body irradiation, or by other radiation-induced effects on the pituitary gland and hypothalamus. 36 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Mitochondrial Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Mitochondrial diseases are a group of metabolic disorders. Mitochondria are ... cells and cause damage. The symptoms of mitochondrial disease can vary. It depends on how many mitochondria ...

  18. [Concept and clinical characteristics of diabetes mellitus in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Yokono, Koichi

    2013-11-01

    Both decreased insulin secretion and insulin resistance are two major factors of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in the elderly. Up to now, decreased lean body mass and relatively increased fat mass, so-called sarcopenia or sarcopenic obesity, contribute to insulin resistance in the elderly. However, recent reports indicate that muscle mitochondrial function is reduced in aging, and this age-associated decline in mitochondrial function contributes to insulin resistance in the elderly. In addition, exercise intervention to IGT in the elderly is more effective to reduce in the incidence of type 2 diabetes than in younger people. Exercise seems to improve insulin resistance through mitochondrial function by activating AMP-activated protein kinase(AMPK) and PPARgamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha). Because cognitive impairment is a most crucial factor plunging into frailty in diabetic elderly, diabetic control would be very important in preventing cognitive decline as well as vascular events. However, comprehensive management of diabetes, including dyslipidemia and hypertension, might contribute to the prevention of declines in cognitive function in older diabetic patients.

  19. P70S6K 1 regulation of angiogenesis through VEGF and HIF-1{alpha} expression

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Chuan-Xiu; Shi, Zhumei; Meng, Qiao; Jiang, Yue; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} P70S6K1 regulates VEGF expression; {yields} P70S6K1 induces transcriptional activation through HIF-1{alpha} binding site; {yields} P70S6K1 regulates HIF-1{alpha}, but not HIF-1{beta} protein expression; {yields} P70S6K1 mediates tumor growth and angiogenesis through HIF-1{alpha} and VEGF expression. -- Abstract: The 70 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K1), a downstream target of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), is an important regulator of cell cycle progression, and cell proliferation. Recent studies indicated an important role of p70S6K1 in PTEN-negative and AKT-overexpressing tumors. However, the mechanism of p70S6K1 in tumor angiogenesis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we specifically inhibited p70S6K1 activity in ovarian cancer cells using vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) against p70S6K1. We found that knockdown of p70S6K1 significantly decreased VEGF protein expression and VEGF transcriptional activation through the HIF-1{alpha} binding site at its enhancer region. The expression of p70S6K1 siRNA specifically inhibited HIF-1{alpha}, but not HIF-1{beta} protein expression. We also found that p70S6K1 down-regulation inhibited ovarian tumor growth and angiogenesis, and decreased cell proliferation and levels of VEGF and HIF-1{alpha} expression in tumor tissues. Our results suggest that p70S6K1 is required for tumor growth and angiogenesis through HIF-1{alpha} and VEGF expression, providing a molecular mechanism of human ovarian cancer mediated by p70S6K1 signaling.

  20. HIF-1alpha involvement in low temperature and anoxia survival by a freeze tolerant insect.

    PubMed

    Morin, Pier; McMullen, David C; Storey, Kenneth B

    2005-12-01

    Winter survival for many insect species relies on the ability to endure the freezing of extracellular body fluids. Because freezing impedes oxygen delivery to tissues, one component of natural freeze tolerance is a well-developed anoxia/ischemia resistance. The present study explores the responses of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) to cold, freezing and anoxia exposures in the freeze tolerant goldenrod gall fly larva, Eurosta solidaginis. Reverse transcription-PCR was used to quantify hif-1alpha transcript levels; transcripts were significantly elevated by approximately 70% in chilled (3 ( composite function)C), frozen (-16 ( composite function)C) and thawed (returned to 3 ( composite function)C) insects, compared with 15 ( composite function)C controls. Transcripts also rose by approximately 3-fold in insects given anoxia exposure under a nitrogen gas atmosphere. Cold and freezing exposure also elevated HIF-1alpha protein content in the larvae and HIF-1alpha levels increased over the winter months in insects sampled from an outdoor population; levels peaked in February at 2.1-fold higher than in September. A partial sequence of HIF-1alpha that covers the bHLH and PAS domains of the protein was obtained from E. solidaginis and sequence analysis revealed that this segment shared 62% identity overall with Drosophila melanogaster HIF-1alpha and higher percent identities within specific domains: 76% within the bHLH domain and 70% within the PAS domain. The data provide the first documentation of a potential role for HIF-1 in regulating the expression of genes that can aid freezing survival in a cold-hardy animal.

  1. Blastocystis elongation factor-1alpha: genomic organization, taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships.

    PubMed

    Ho, L C; Armiugam, A; Jeyaseelan, K; Yap, E H; Singh, M

    2000-08-01

    The elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1alpha) is a highly conserved ubiquitous protein that is involved in translation and is desirable for use in phylogenetic studies on Blastocystis, an enigmatic intestinal parasite with a contentious taxonomic position. In the present study, a PCR product (BEalpha) that codes for a major part of the coding region of the EF-lalpha protein was amplified. Genome walking experiments together with cloning were implemented to elucidate the 5' and 3' ends of the EF-1alpha gene of the human isolate, Blastocystis hominis C. The genomic organization and the potential transcription factor binding sites of the 5' end of B. hominis C EF-1alpha were identified. A comparative study on the deduced amino acid sequences of BEalpha of 13 Blastocystis isolates from various hosts was done to evaluate the phylogenetic relationship among the species. A phylogenetic reconstruction analysis with other eukaryotic EF-1alpha sequences was carried out to trace the phylogenetic position of Blastocystis among eukaryotic organisms. PMID:11085233

  2. Quantitative analysis of interleukin-1-alpha gene expression in middle ear cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Bujía, J; Kim, C; Boyle, D; Hammer, C; Firestein, G; Kastenbauer, E

    1996-02-01

    Regardless of its origin, cholesteatoma is characterized by the presence of a keratinizing epithelium with an hyperproliferative behavior leading to a very important bone resorption. Previous studies have demonstrated overexpression of interleukin-1 (IL-1 protein in middle ear cholesteatoma by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, suggesting a significant role for IL-1-alpha. In this study, the presence of IL-1-alpha messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) was quantified by in situ hybridization on frozen sections (n = 10) and by computer-assisted image analysis. Human skin obtained from the external ear canal (n = 10) was used as the control. A higher percentage of cells hybridized for the antisense probes IL-1-alpha mRNA was found in cholesteatoma epithelium. Furthermore, keratinocytes of the suprabasal cell layers were also found to contain specific hybridizations. Some cells in cholesteatoma stroma also contained IL-1-alpha mRNA transcripts. The results of this study confirm the central role of IL-1-alpha in the epithelium hyperproliferation and bone resorption observed in middle ear cholesteatoma.

  3. New tritium-release assay for 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1 alpha-hydroxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.J.; Perlman, K.; Schnoes, H.K.; DeLuca, H.F.

    1987-08-01

    A new, rapid assay for 1 alpha-hydroxylase has been developed using 25-hydroxy-(1 alpha-/sup 3/H)vitamin D3 as the substrate. Using the solubilized and reconstituted chick 1 alpha-hydroxylase, conversion of this substrate to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 causes the release of tritium into the aqueous medium. This /sup 3/H/sub 2/O can be easily separated from the labeled substrate by passing the reaction mixture through a reverse-phase silica cartridge. The release of tritium is stereospecific as evidenced by the lack of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formed when 25-hydroxy-(1 beta-/sup 3/H)vitamin D3 is used as the substrate. In parallel reactions containing the 25-hydroxy-(26,27-/sup 3/H)vitamin D3 substrate, production of labeled 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 was assessed by extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography and found to agree very closely with the amount of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O produced from 25-hydroxy-(1 alpha-/sup 3/H)vitamin D3, validating the accuracy of the new assay. Finally, a major advantage of the tritium-release assay for 1 alpha-hydroxylase is that the results are not affected by further metabolism of the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D formed in the incubations.

  4. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Hattab, Ayman W.; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20–40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27504452

  5. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20-40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27504452

  6. Mitochondrial vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Zarrouk-Mahjoub, Sinda

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are usually multisystem disorders (mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome) either on from onset or starting at a point during the disease course. Most frequently affected tissues are those with a high oxygen demand such as the central nervous system, the muscle, endocrine glands, or the myocardium. Recently, it has been shown that rarely also the arteries may be affected (mitochondrial arteriopathy). This review focuses on the type, diagnosis, and treatment of mitochondrial vasculopathy in MID patients. A literature search using appropriate search terms was carried out. Mitochondrial vasculopathy manifests as either microangiopathy or macroangiopathy. Clinical manifestations of mitochondrial microangiopathy include leukoencephalopathy, migraine-like headache, stroke-like episodes, or peripheral retinopathy. Mitochondrial macroangiopathy manifests as atherosclerosis, ectasia of arteries, aneurysm formation, dissection, or spontaneous rupture of arteries. The diagnosis relies on the documentation and confirmation of the mitochondrial metabolic defect or the genetic cause after exclusion of non-MID causes. Treatment is not at variance compared to treatment of vasculopathy due to non-MID causes. Mitochondrial vasculopathy exists and manifests as micro- or macroangiopathy. Diagnosing mitochondrial vasculopathy is crucial since appropriate treatment may prevent from severe complications. PMID:27231520

  7. Identification of high-affinity anti-IL-1. alpha. autoantibodies in normal human serum as an interfering substance in a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for IL-1. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Mae, N.; Liberato, D.J.; Chizzonite, R.; Satoh, H. )

    1991-04-01

    A highly reproducible, sensitive, and specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for recombinant human IL-1 {alpha} (rhIL-1 alpha) has been developed. Results from this ELISA have demonstrated that the concentration of rhIL-1 {alpha} added to normal human serum (NHS) decreased by 16.3% after 3 h and 24.9% after 6 h at room temperature. Molecular exclusion column chromatography with Sephacryl S-300 HR revealed that 125I-labeled IL-1 {alpha} added to normal human serum rapidly formed higher molecular weight complexes without indication of proteolytic degradation. The observed reduction in immunoreactivity was correlated with this protein complex formation and accounted for the apparent instability of rhIL-1 {alpha} in NHS. Immunoblot analysis indicated that the molecular weight of the binding protein was 150-160K, and the IL-1 {alpha} binding activity was removed and recovered from NHS by Protein-G affinity chromatography; indicating that the binding protein was IL-1 {alpha}-specific IgG. The binding of 125I-labeled IL-1 {alpha} to the serum binding proteins could be inhibited by unlabeled IL-1 alpha (IC50 = 7.4 {times} 10(-11) M) but not by unlabeled IL-1 {beta}. Kinetic analysis with 125I-labeled IL-1 alpha revealed that the average binding affinity of these IL-1 {alpha}-specific IgGs was 4.7 {times} 10(10) M-1. These results suggest that these autoantibodies may interfere with the detection of IL-1 {alpha} in human serum by various assay systems and also could be a regulator of circulating IL-1 {alpha}.

  8. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 alpha, and interleukin-6 during murine coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R A; Magee, D M

    1995-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were induced in mice infected with Coccidioides immitis. Analyses of the cytokine profiles of two inbred mouse strains which differ in their susceptibility to pulmonary challenge with C. immitis revealed higher levels of IL-6 in lungs from DBA/2 mice (resistant strain) than in those from BALB/c mice (susceptible strain) beginning at day 6 and continuing through day 15 postinfection. Spleen cells from both mouse strains secreted TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, and IL-6 in vitro in response to stimulation with killed spherules but differed in that spleen cells from the resistant strain produced increased levels of these cytokines earlier after pulmonary challenge and at increased levels throughout the course of the disease. PMID:7558338

  9. Phylogeny of the Glomerales and Diversisporales (fungi: Glomeromycota) from actin and elongation factor 1-alpha sequences.

    PubMed

    Helgason, Thorunn; Watson, Irene J; Young, J Peter W

    2003-12-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have been elevated to the phylum Glomeromycota based on a ribosomal gene phylogeny. In order to test this phylogeny, we amplified and sequenced small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSUrRNA), actin and elongation factor 1 (EF1)-alpha gene fragments from single spores of Acaulospora laevis, Glomus caledonium, Gigaspora margarita, and Scutellospora dipurpurescens. Sequence variation within and among spores of an isolate was low except for SSUrRNA in S. dipurpurescens, and the actin amino acid sequence was more conserved than that of EF1-alpha. The AM fungal sequences were more similar to one another than to any other fungal group. Joint phylogenetic analysis of the actin and EF1-alpha sequences suggested that the sister group to the AM fungi was a Zygomycete order, the Mortierellales.

  10. HIF-1{alpha} is necessary to support gluconeogenesis during liver regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Toshihide; Goda, Nobuhito; Fujiki, Natsuko; Hishiki, Takako; Nishiyama, Yasumasa; Senoo-Matsuda, Nanami; Shimazu, Motohide; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Johnson, Randall S.; Suematsu, Makoto

    2009-10-02

    Coordinated recovery of hepatic glucose metabolism is prerequisite for normal liver regeneration. To examine roles of hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) for hepatic glucose homeostasis during the reparative process, we inactivated the gene in hepatocytes in vivo. Following partial hepatectomy (PH), recovery of residual liver weight was initially retarded in the mutant mice by down-regulation of hepatocyte proliferation, but occurred comparably between the mutant and control mice at 72 h after PH. At this time point, the mutant mice showed lowered blood glucose levels with enhanced accumulation of glycogen in the liver. The mutant mice exhibited impairment of hepatic gluconeogenesis as assessed by alanine tolerance test. This appeared to result from reduced expression of PGK-1 and PEPCK since 3-PG, PEP and malate were accumulated to greater extents in the regenerated liver. In conclusion, these findings provide evidence for roles of HIF-1{alpha} in the regulation of gluconeogenesis under liver regeneration.

  11. Interaction of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase with a homolog of eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    A chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was previously cloned and characterized in this laboratory. To investigate the biological functions of CCaMK, the yeast two-hybrid system was used to isolate genes encoding proteins that interact with CCaMK. One of the cDNA clones obtained from the screening (LlEF-1alpha1) has high similarity with the eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha). CCaMK phosphorylated LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. The phosphorylation site for CCaMK (Thr-257) was identified by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, Thr-257 is located in the putative tRNA-binding region of LlEF-1alpha1. An isoform of Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) phosphorylated multiple sites of LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-dependent but calmodulin-independent manner. Unlike CDPK, CCaMK phosphorylated only one site, and this site is different from CDPK phosphorylation sites. This suggests that the phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by these two kinases may have different functional significance. Although the phosphorylation of LlEF-1alpha1 by CCaMK is Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent, in vitro binding assays revealed that CCaMK binds to LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-independent manner. This was further substantiated by coimmunoprecipitation of CCaMK and EF-1alpha using the protein extract from lily anthers. Dissociation of CCaMK from EF-1alpha by Ca2+ and phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by CCaMK in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner suggests that these interactions may play a role in regulating the biological functions of EF-1alpha.

  12. Management of the aging risk factor for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Phillipson, Oliver T

    2014-04-01

    The aging risk factor for Parkinson's disease is described in terms of specific disease markers including mitochondrial and gene dysfunctions relevant to energy metabolism. This review details evidence for the ability of nutritional agents to manage these aging risk factors. The combination of alpha lipoic acid, acetyl-l-carnitine, coenzyme Q10, and melatonin supports energy metabolism via carbohydrate and fatty acid utilization, assists electron transport and adenosine triphosphate synthesis, counters oxidative and nitrosative stress, and raises defenses against protein misfolding, inflammatory stimuli, iron, and other endogenous or xenobiotic toxins. These effects are supported by gene expression via the antioxidant response element (ARE; Keap/Nrf2 pathway), and by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1 alpha (PGC-1 alpha), a transcription coactivator, which regulates gene expression for energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis, and maintains the structural integrity of mitochondria. The effectiveness and synergies of the combination against disease risks are discussed in relation to gene action, dopamine cell loss, and the accumulation and spread of pathology via misfolded alpha-synuclein. In addition there are potential synergies to support a neurorestorative role via glial derived neurotrophic factor expression.

  13. Evidence for a slightly deleterious effect of intron polymorphisms at the EF1alpha gene in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent bivalve Bathymodiolus.

    PubMed

    Faure, B; Bierne, N; Tanguy, A; Bonhomme, F; Jollivet, D

    2007-12-30

    A multilocus analysis was initiated in order to infer the general effect of demography and the indirect effect of positive selection on some chromosome segments in Bathymodiolus. Mussels of the genus Bathymodiolus inhabit the very hostile, fragmented and variable environment of deep-sea hydrothermal vents which is thought to cause recurrent population bottlenecks via extinction/colonisation processes and adaptation to new environmental conditions. In the course of this work we discovered that the assumption of neutrality of non-coding polymorphisms usually made in genome scan experiments was likely to be violated at one of the loci we analysed. The direct effect of slight purifying selection on non-coding polymorphisms shares many resemblances with the indirect effect of positive selection through genetic hitchhiking. Combining polymorphism with divergence data for several closely related species allowed us to obtain different expectations for the direct effect of negative selection and the indirect effect of positive selection. We observed a strong excess of rare non-coding polymorphisms at the second intron of the EF1alpha gene in the two species Bathymodiolus azoricus and Bathymodiolus thermophilus, while two other loci, the mitochondrial COI gene and an intron of the Lysozyme gene, did not exhibit such a deviation. In addition, the divergence rate of the EF1alpha intron was estimated to be unexpectedly low when calibrated using the closure of the Panama Isthmus that interrupted gene flow between the two species. The polymorphism to divergence ratio was similar to the one observed for the other two loci, in accordance to the hypothesis of purifying selection. We conclude that slight purifying selection is likely to act on polymorphic intronic mutations of the EF1alpha second intron and discuss the possible relationship with the specific biology of Bathymodiolus mussels.

  14. Lack of association between interleukin-1 alpha, beta polymorphisms and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Jun; Feng, Ren-Nan; Luo, Chao; Bi, Sheng

    2010-08-16

    The associations between interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1alpha-889) and beta (IL-1beta-511) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the risk for Parkinson's disease (PD) are still controversial and ambiguous. The aim of this study was to determine a more precise estimation of the relationship by meta-analysis. We searched databases through March 2010 for all publications on the association between these variations and PD. A total of 11 studies including 2803 PD patients and 2539 healthy controls were identified. The overall and geographic subgroups analysis was conducted, and odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated in the fixed- or random-effects model. We found that the overall OR (95% CI) for TT and CT genotypes versus CC genotype for IL-1alpha-889 was 1.01 (0.88-1.16), while the overall OR (95% CI) for TT and CT genotypes versus CC genotype for IL-1beta-511 was 1.19 (0.87-1.62). The sensitivity analysis strengthened our confidence in the validity of these null associations. There was no publication bias observed in this study. To sum up, there were no associations found between the SNPs of IL-1alpha-889, IL-1beta-511 and risk for PD.

  15. HIV-1-infected macrophages induce astrogliosis by SDF-1{alpha} and matrix metalloproteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Mika; Wang, Xin; Baba, Masanori . E-mail: baba@m.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp

    2005-11-04

    Brain macrophages/microglia and astrocytes are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). To clarify their interaction and contribution to the pathogenesis, HIV-1-infected or uninfected macrophages were used as a model of brain macrophages/microglia, and their effects on human astrocytes in vitro were examined. The culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected or uninfected macrophages induced significant astrocyte proliferation, which was annihilated with a neutralizing antibody to stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1{alpha} or a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor. In these astrocytes, CXCR4, MMP, and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase mRNA expression and SDF-1{alpha} production were significantly up-regulated. The supernatants of infected macrophages were always more effective than those of uninfected cells. Moreover, the enhanced production of SDF-1{alpha} was suppressed by the MMP inhibitor. These results indicate that the activated and HIV-1-infected macrophages can indirectly induce astrocyte proliferation through up-regulating SDF-1{alpha} and MMP production, which implies a mechanism of astrogliosis in HAD.

  16. P70S6K 1 regulation of angiogenesis through VEGF and HIF-1alpha expression.

    PubMed

    Bian, Chuan-Xiu; Shi, Zhumei; Meng, Qiao; Jiang, Yue; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2010-07-30

    The 70kDa ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K1), a downstream target of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), is an important regulator of cell cycle progression, and cell proliferation. Recent studies indicated an important role of p70S6K1 in PTEN-negative and AKT-overexpressing tumors. However, the mechanism of p70S6K1 in tumor angiogenesis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we specifically inhibited p70S6K1 activity in ovarian cancer cells using vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) against p70S6K1. We found that knockdown of p70S6K1 significantly decreased VEGF protein expression and VEGF transcriptional activation through the HIF-1alpha binding site at its enhancer region. The expression of p70S6K1 siRNA specifically inhibited HIF-1alpha, but not HIF-1beta protein expression. We also found that p70S6K1 down-regulation inhibited ovarian tumor growth and angiogenesis, and decreased cell proliferation and levels of VEGF and HIF-1alpha expression in tumor tissues. Our results suggest that p70S6K1 is required for tumor growth and angiogenesis through HIF-1alpha and VEGF expression, providing a molecular mechanism of human ovarian cancer mediated by p70S6K1 signaling.

  17. Separate necdin domains bind ARNT2 and HIF1{alpha} and repress transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Eitan R.; Fan Chenming

    2007-11-09

    PWS is caused by the loss of expression of a set of maternally imprinted genes including NECDIN (NDN). NDN is expressed in post-mitotic neurons and plays an essential role in PWS as mouse models lacking only the Ndn gene mimic aspects of this disease. Patients haploid for SIM1 develop a PW-like syndrome. Here, we report that NDN directly interacts with ARNT2, a bHLH-PAS protein and dimer partner for SIM1. We also found that NDN can interact with HIF1{alpha}. We showed that NDN can repress transcriptional activation mediated by ARNT2:SIM1 as well as ARNT2:HIF1{alpha}. The N-terminal 115 residues of NDN are sufficient for interaction with the bHLH domains of ARNT2 or HIF1{alpha} but not for transcriptional repression. Using GAL4-NDN fusion proteins, we determined that NDN possesses multiple repression domains. We thus propose that NDN regulates neuronal function and hypoxic response by regulating the activities of the ARNT2:SIM1 and ARNT2:HIF1{alpha} dimers, respectively.

  18. Interleukin-1 alpha, interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-8 gene expression in human aural cholesteatomas.

    PubMed

    Kim, C S; Lee, C H; Chung, J W; Kim, C D

    1996-03-01

    Bone destruction is a common characteristic feature of chronic otitis media, especially aural cholesteatoma. A number of immunohistochemical studies have suggested that interleukin-1 (IL-1) may be responsible for cholesteatomatous bone destruction. We designed this study to present the mRNA expression patterns of IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-8, which can induce and activate the leukocyte, the major reservoir of potent proteolytic enzymes. Total RNAs were extracted from aural cholesteatomas, external auditory canal skin (EACS), postauricular skin (PAS), and granulation tissues and transcribed into cDNAs. cDNAs were amplified by using PCR technique with primers for IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-8, and beta-actin. Amplified products were hybridized with each internal probe and the relative density was measured. In granulation tissues, the relative density of IL-1 alpha was greater than that of other tissues. The ratio of IL-1 beta and IL-8 of aural cholesteatoma was significantly higher than that of EACS and PAS. We suggest that both of IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta may play a role in the pathological changes, and that IL-8, which is mainly produced from cholesteatomatous epithelium, may have an important role in the pathological changes of cholesteatomas.

  19. Inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} activity by BP-1 ameliorates adjuvant induced arthritis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, J.; Thippegowda, P.B.; Kanum, S.A.

    2009-09-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory, angiogenic disease. Inflamed synovitis is a hallmark of RA which is hypoxic in nature. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), one of the key regulators of angiogenesis, is overexpressed in the pathogenesis of RA. VEGF expression is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), a master regulator of homeostasis which plays a pivotal role in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. In this study we show that synthetic benzophenone analogue, 2-benzoyl-phenoxy acetamide (BP-1) can act as a novel anti-arthritic agent in an experimental adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) rat model by targeting VEGF and HIF-1{alpha}. BP-1 administered hypoxic endothelial cells and arthritic animals clearly showed down regulation of VEGF expression. Further, BP-1 inhibits nuclear translocation of HIF-1{alpha}, which in turn suppresses transcription of the VEGF gene. These results suggest a further possible clinical application of the BP-1 derivative as an anti-arthritic agent in association with conventional chemotherapeutic agents.

  20. Sequence-based identification of Japanese Armillaria species using the elongation factor-1 alpha gene.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Eri; Ota, Yuko; Hattori, Tsutomu; Kikuchi, Taisei

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the sequences of three DNA regions-the translation elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and intergenic spacer (IGS) regions of ribosomal DNA-to compare their accuracy in identifying species of Japanese Armillaria. We studied 49 isolates of eight Armillaria species, A. mellea, A. ostoyae, A. nabsnona, A. cepistipes, A. gallica, A. sinapina, A. tabescens and the biological species Nagasawa E (Nag. E). Phylogenetic analyses of the ITS and IGS data helped in identifying A. mellea, A. ostoyae, A. nabsnona, A. tabescens and Nag. E but could not be used to identify A. gallica, A. cepistipes and A. sinapina. Nevertheless our analysis showed that the EF-1 alpha gene was clearly different in the eight examined species. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) of the IGS-1 region could be used to distinguish most species, but the RFLP profiles of some isolates of A. cepistipes and A. sinapina were the same even with four different restriction enzymes. In conclusion, among the techniques examined in this study, analyzing the EF-1 alpha sequence was found to be the most suitable method for identifying different species of Japanese Armillaria. PMID:20648756

  1. EFL GTPase in cryptomonads and the distribution of EFL and EF-1alpha in chromalveolates.

    PubMed

    Gile, Gillian H; Patron, Nicola J; Keeling, Patrick J

    2006-10-01

    EFL (EF-like protein) is a member of the GTPase superfamily that includes several translation factors. Because it has only been found in a few eukaryotic lineages and its presence correlates with the absence of the related core translation factor EF-1alpha, its distribution is hypothesized to be the result of lateral gene transfer and replacement of EF-1alpha. In one supergroup of eukaryotes, the chromalveolates, two major lineages were found to contain EFL (dinoflagellates and haptophytes), while the others encode EF-1alpha (apicomplexans, ciliates, heterokonts and cryptomonads). For each of these groups, this distribution was deduced from whole genome sequence or expressed sequence tag (EST) data from several species, with the exception of cryptomonads from which only a single EF-1alpha PCR product from one species was known. By sequencing ESTs from two cryptomonads, Guillardia theta and Rhodomonas salina, and searching for all GTPase translation factors, we revealed that EFL is present in both species, but, contrary to expectations, we found EF-1alpha in neither. On balance, we suggest the previously reported EF-1alpha from Rhodomonas salina is likely an artefact of contamination. We also identified EFL in EST data from two members of the dinoflagellate lineage, Karlodinium micrum and Oxyrrhis marina, and from an ongoing genomic sequence project from a third, Perkinsus marinus. Karlodinium micrum is a symbiotic pairing of two lineages that would have both had EFL (a dinoflagellate and a haptophyte), but only the dinoflagellate gene remains. Oxyrrhis marina and Perkinsus marinus are early diverging sister-groups to dinoflagellates, and together show that EFL originated early in this lineage. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that these genes are all EFL homologues, and showed that cryptomonad genes are not detectably related to EFL from other chromalveolates, which collectively form several distinct groups. The known distribution of EFL now includes a third group

  2. Modulation of the Bovine Innate Immune Response by Production of 1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 in Bovine Monocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In cattle, the kidney has been the only known site for production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25[OH]2D3) from 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 25(OH)D3 by 1alpha-hydroxylase (1alpha-OHase). However, recent studies have shown that human monocytes express 1alpha-OHase and produce 1,25(OH)2D3 in response to to...

  3. Genes for the dimerization cofactor of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha] (DCOH) are on human and murine chromsomes 10

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovich, A.; Mendel, D.B.; Crabtree, G.R.; Francke, U. )

    1993-04-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha] (HNF-1[alpha]; gene symbol, TCF1) forms dimers with itself as well as with HNF-1[beta] and regulates the expression of several liver-specific genes. Recently, a dimerization cofactor of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha], called DCOH, has been identified. Here, the authors report the chromosomal localization of the genes for this cofactor to chromosomes 10 in both humans and mice by Southern blot analyses of somatic cell hybrids. 25 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Mitochondrial cytopathies.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform a variety of essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Most of mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear DNA (nDNA) whereas a very small fraction is encoded by the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes can result in mitochondrial dysfunction which leads to a wide range of cellular perturbations including aberrant calcium homeostasis, excessive reactive oxygen species production, dysregulated apoptosis, and insufficient energy generation to meet the needs of various organs, particularly those with high energy demand. Impaired mitochondrial function in various tissues and organs results in the multi-organ manifestations of mitochondrial diseases including epilepsy, intellectual disability, skeletal and cardiac myopathies, hepatopathies, endocrinopathies, and nephropathies. Defects in nDNA genes can be inherited in an autosomal or X-linked manners, whereas, mtDNA is maternally inherited. Mitochondrial diseases can result from mutations of nDNA genes encoding subunits of the electron transport chain complexes or their assembly factors, proteins associated with the mitochondrial import or networking, mitochondrial translation factors, or proteins involved in mtDNA maintenance. MtDNA defects can be either point mutations or rearrangements. The diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders can be challenging in many cases and is based on clinical recognition, biochemical screening, histopathological studies, functional studies, and molecular genetic testing. Currently, there are no satisfactory therapies available for mitochondrial disorders that significantly alter the course of the disease. Therapeutic options include symptomatic treatment, cofactor supplementation, and exercise. PMID:26996063

  5. Stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}/CXCL12) stimulates ovarian cancer cell growth through the EGF receptor transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Porcile, Carola; Bajetto, Adriana . E-mail: bajetto@cba.unige.it; Barbieri, Federica; Barbero, Simone; Bonavia, Rudy; Biglieri, Marianna; Pirani, Paolo; Florio, Tullio . E-mail: florio@cba.unige.it; Schettini, Gennaro

    2005-08-15

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the leading cause of death in gynecologic diseases in which there is evidence for a complex chemokine network. Chemokines are a family of proteins that play an important role in tumor progression influencing cell proliferation, angiogenic/angiostatic processes, cell migration and metastasis, and, finally, regulating the immune cells recruitment into the tumor mass. We previously demonstrated that astrocytes and glioblastoma cells express both the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), and that SDF-1{alpha} treatment induced cell proliferation, supporting the hypothesis that chemokines may play an important role in tumor cells' growth in vitro. In the present study, we report that CXCR4 and SDF-1 are expressed in OC cell lines. We demonstrate that SDF-1{alpha} induces a dose-dependent proliferation in OC cells, by the specific interaction with CXCR4 and a biphasic activation of ERK1/2 and Akt kinases. Our results further indicate that CXCR4 activation induces EGF receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation that in turn was linked to the downstream intracellular kinases activation, ERK1/2 and Akt. In addition, we provide evidence for cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase (c-Src) involvement in the SDF-1/CXCR4-EGFR transactivation. These results suggest a possible important 'cross-talk' between SDF-1/CXCR4 and EGFR intracellular pathways that may link signals of cell proliferation in ovarian cancer.

  6. KNK437, abrogates hypoxia-induced radioresistance by dual targeting of the AKT and HIF-1{alpha} survival pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Oommen, Deepu; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KNK437, a benzylidene lactam compound, is a novel radiosensitizer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KNK437 inhibits AKT signaling and abrogates the accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} under hypoxia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KNK437 abrogates hypoxia induced resistance to radiation. -- Abstract: KNK437 is a benzylidene lactam compound known to inhibit stress-induced synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs promote radioresistance and play a major role in stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}). HIF-1{alpha} is widely responsible for tumor resistance to radiation under hypoxic conditions. We hypothesized that KNK437 sensitizes cancer cells to radiation and overrides hypoxia-induced radioresistance via destabilizing HIF-1{alpha}. Treatment of human cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and T98G with KNK437 sensitized them to ionizing radiation (IR). Surprisingly, IR did not induce HSPs in these cell lines. As hypothesized, KNK437 abrogated the accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} in hypoxic cells. However, there was no induction of HSPs under hypoxic conditions. Moreover, the proteosome inhibitor MG132 did not restore HIF-1{alpha} levels in KNK437-treated cells. This suggested that the absence of HIF-1{alpha} in hypoxic cells was not due to the enhanced protein degradation. HIF-1{alpha} is mainly regulated at the level of post-transcription and AKT is known to modulate the translation of HIF-1{alpha} mRNA. Interestingly, pre-treatment of cells with KNK437 inhibited AKT signaling. Furthermore, down regulation of AKT by siRNA abrogated HIF-1{alpha} levels under hypoxia. Interestingly, KNK437 reduced cell survival in hypoxic conditions and inhibited hypoxia-induced resistance to radiation. Taken together, these data suggest that KNK437 is an effective radiosensitizer that targets multiple pro-survival stress response pathways.

  7. Mitochondrial Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with ragged-red fibers, and mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes. The symptoms of ... riboflavin, coenzyme Q, and carnitine (a specialized amino acid) may provide subjective improvement in fatigue and energy ...

  8. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  9. Mitochondrial Myopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... line and are therefore called the electron transport chain, and complex V actually churns out ATP, so ... coQ10 , is a component of the electron transport chain, which uses oxygen to manufacture ATP. Some mitochondrial ...

  10. Elongation factor-1 alpha is a selective regulator of growth factor withdrawal and ER stress-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Talapatra, S; Wagner, J D O; Thompson, C B

    2002-08-01

    To identify genes that contribute to apoptotic resistance, IL-3 dependent hematopoietic cells were transfected with a cDNA expression library and subjected to growth factor withdrawal. Transfected cells were enriched for survivors over two successive rounds of IL-3 withdrawal and reconstitution, resulting in the identification of a full-length elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1alpha) cDNA. Ectopic EF-1alpha expression conferred protection from growth factor withdrawal and agents that induce endoplasmic reticulum stress, but not from nuclear damage or death receptor signaling. Overexpression of EF-1alpha did not lead to growth factor independent cell proliferation or global alterations in protein levels or rates of synthesis. These findings suggest that overexpression of EF-1alpha results in selective resistance to apoptosis induced by growth factor withdrawal and ER stress. PMID:12107828

  11. Mitochondrial genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, Patrick Francis; Hudson, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the last 10 years the field of mitochondrial genetics has widened, shifting the focus from rare sporadic, metabolic disease to the effects of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in a growing spectrum of human disease. The aim of this review is to guide the reader through some key concepts regarding mitochondria before introducing both classic and emerging mitochondrial disorders. Sources of data In this article, a review of the current mitochondrial genetics literature was conducted using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/). In addition, this review makes use of a growing number of publically available databases including MITOMAP, a human mitochondrial genome database (www.mitomap.org), the Human DNA polymerase Gamma Mutation Database (http://tools.niehs.nih.gov/polg/) and PhyloTree.org (www.phylotree.org), a repository of global mtDNA variation. Areas of agreement The disruption in cellular energy, resulting from defects in mtDNA or defects in the nuclear-encoded genes responsible for mitochondrial maintenance, manifests in a growing number of human diseases. Areas of controversy The exact mechanisms which govern the inheritance of mtDNA are hotly debated. Growing points Although still in the early stages, the development of in vitro genetic manipulation could see an end to the inheritance of the most severe mtDNA disease. PMID:23704099

  12. The Structure of Neurexin 1[alpha] Reveals Features Promoting a Role as Synaptic Organizer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Fang; Venugopal, Vandavasi; Murray, Beverly; Rudenko, Gabby

    2014-10-02

    {alpha}-Neurexins are essential synaptic adhesion molecules implicated in autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. The {alpha}-neurexin extracellular domain consists of six LNS domains interspersed by three EGF-like repeats and interacts with many different proteins in the synaptic cleft. To understand how {alpha}-neurexins might function as synaptic organizers, we solved the structure of the neurexin 1{alpha} extracellular domain (n1{alpha}) to 2.65 {angstrom}. The L-shaped molecule can be divided into a flexible repeat I (LNS1-EGF-A-LNS2), a rigid horseshoe-shaped repeat II (LNS3-EGF-B-LNS4) with structural similarity to so-called reelin repeats, and an extended repeat III (LNS5-EGF-B-LNS6) with controlled flexibility. A 2.95 {angstrom} structure of n1{alpha} carrying splice insert SS3 in LNS4 reveals that SS3 protrudes as a loop and does not alter the rigid arrangement of repeat II. The global architecture imposed by conserved structural features enables {alpha}-neurexins to recruit and organize proteins in distinct and variable ways, influenced by splicing, thereby promoting synaptic function.

  13. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha} in modulating cobalt-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Saini, Yogesh; Kim, Kyung Y; Lewandowski, Ryan; Bramble, Lori A; Harkema, Jack R; Lapres, John J

    2010-02-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in development, cellular homeostasis, and pathological conditions, such as cancer and stroke. There is also growing evidence that hypoxia is an important modulator of the inflammatory process. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are a family of proteins that regulate the cellular response to oxygen deficit, and loss of HIFs impairs inflammatory cell function. There is little known, however, about the role of epithelial-derived HIF signaling in modulating inflammation. Cobalt is capable of eliciting an allergic response and promoting HIF signaling. To characterize the inflammatory function of epithelial-derived HIF in response to inhaled cobalt, a conditional lung-specific HIF1alpha, the most ubiquitously expressed HIF, deletion mouse, was created. Control mice showed classic signs of metal-induced injury following cobalt exposure, including fibrosis and neutrophil infiltration. In contrast, HIF1alpha-deficient mice displayed a Th2 response that resembled asthma, including increased eosinophilic infiltration, mucus cell metaplasia, and chitinase-like protein expression. The results suggest that epithelial-derived HIF signaling has a critical role in establishing a tissue's inflammatory response, and compromised HIF1alpha signaling biases the tissue towards a Th2-mediated reaction. PMID:19915160

  14. Identification of two genes coding for the translation elongation factor EF-1 alpha of S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Schirmaier, F; Philippsen, P

    1984-12-20

    The translation elongation factor EF-1 alpha of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is coded for by two genes, called TEF1 and TEF2. Both genes were cloned. TEF1 maps on chromosome II close to LYS2. The location of TEF2 is unknown. TEF2 alone is sufficient to promote growth of the cells as shown with a strain deleted for TEF1. TEF1 and TEF2 were originally identified as two strongly transcribed genes, which most likely code for an identical or nearly identical protein as judged from S1 nuclease protection experiments with mRNA-DNA hybrids. The DNA sequence analysis of TEF1 allowed the prediction of the protein sequence. This was shown, by a search in the Dayhoff protein data bank, to represent the translation elongation factor EF-1 alpha due to the striking similarity to EF-1 alpha from the shrimp Artemia. A search for TEF1 homologous sequences in several yeast species shows, in most cases, duplicated genes and a much higher sequence conservation than among genes encoding amino acid biosynthetic enzymes. PMID:6396088

  15. Extended ischemia prevents HIF1alpha degradation at reoxygenation by impairing prolyl-hydroxylation: role of Krebs cycle metabolites.

    PubMed

    Serra-Pérez, Anna; Planas, Anna M; Núñez-O'Mara, Analía; Berra, Edurne; García-Villoria, Judit; Ribes, Antònia; Santalucía, Tomàs

    2010-06-11

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a heterodimeric transcription factor that activates the cellular response to hypoxia. The HIF1alpha subunit is constantly synthesized and degraded under normoxia, but degradation is rapidly inhibited when oxygen levels drop. Oxygen-dependent hydroxylation by prolyl-4-hydroxylases (PHD) mediates HIF1alpha proteasome degradation. Brain ischemia limits the availability not only of oxygen but also of glucose. We hypothesized that this circumstance could have a modulating effect on HIF. We assessed the separate involvement of oxygen and glucose in HIF1alpha regulation in differentiated neuroblastoma cells subjected to ischemia. We report higher transcriptional activity and HIF1alpha expression under oxygen deprivation in the presence of glucose (OD), than in its absence (oxygen and glucose deprivation, OGD). Unexpectedly, HIF1alpha was not degraded at reoxygenation after an episode of OGD. This was not due to impairment of proteasome function, but was associated with lower HIF1alpha hydroxylation. Krebs cycle metabolites fumarate and succinate are known inhibitors of PHD, while alpha-ketoglutarate is a co-substrate of the reaction. Lack of HIF1alpha degradation in the presence of oxygen was accompanied by a very low alpha-ketoglutarate/fumarate ratio. Furthermore, treatment with a fumarate analogue prevented HIF1alpha degradation under normoxia. In all, our data suggest that postischemic metabolic alterations in Krebs cycle metabolites impair HIF1alpha degradation in the presence of oxygen by decreasing its hydroxylation, and highlight the involvement of metabolic pathways in HIF1alpha regulation besides the well known effects of oxygen.

  16. Enhanced type 1alpha metabotropic glutamate receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide signaling after pertussis toxin treatment.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, A M; Challiss, R A; Mistry, R; Saunders, R; Thomsen, C; Nahorski, S R

    1997-09-01

    The regulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis by the type 1alpha metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1alpha) was investigated in stably transfected baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. Incubation of the cells with L-glutamate, quisqualate, and 1-aminocyclopentane-1S, 3R-dicarboxylic acid resulted in a marked accumulation of [3H]inositol monophosphate (InsP1) and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] mass in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment of BHK-mGluR1alpha cells with pertussis toxin [ 100 ng/ml, 24 hr] led to a dramatic 12-16-fold increase in the accumulation of [3H]InsP1 and a 2-fold increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 in the absence of added agonist. Although only very low levels (/=75%, and the EC50 shifted leftward by 65-fold [-log EC50 values (molar), 7.26 +/- 0.23 versus 5.45 +/- 0.07; n = 4) in PTX-treated compared with control cells. In contrast, antagonist effects on agonist-stimulated [3H]InsP1 responses were similar in control and PTX-treated BHK-mGluR1alpha cells. These changes in the concentration-effect curves for mGluR agonists are consistent with a model in which the receptor associates with PTX-sensitive inhibitory (Gi/o) and PTX-insensitive stimulatory (Gq/11) G proteins that can each influence PIC activity. The present observations are consistent with a dual regulation of mGluR1alpha-mediated PIC activity that could be fundamental in

  17. Knockdown of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha increased apoptosis of human endometrial cancer HEC-1A cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Yang, Rui; Liu, Hao; Ren, Zhongqian; Wang, Cuicui; Li, Da; Ma, Xiaoxin

    2016-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) coactivates multiple transcription factors and regulates several metabolic processes. In this study, we focused on the roles of PGC-1α in the apoptosis of endometrial cancer HEC-1A cells. Materials and methods PGC-1a expression in the HEC-1A cells was detected with real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Small interfering RNA directed against PGC-1α was designed and synthesized, and RNA interference technology was used to knock down PGC-1α mRNA and protein expression. Cell apoptosis, cell cycle, and mitochondrial membrane potential were then analyzed using flow cytometry. The expression of apoptotic proteins, Bcl-2 and Bax, was detected with Western blot. Results The specific downregulation of PGC-1α expression in the HEC-1A cells increased their apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by reducing the expression of Bcl-2 and increasing the expression of Bax. Conclusion These results suggest that PGC-1α influences the apoptosis of HEC-1A cells and also provides a molecular basis for further investigation of the apoptotic mechanism in human endometrial cancer.

  18. Assay of 25-hydroxy vitamin D3-1 alpha-hydroxylase in pig kidney mitochondria using isotope dilution-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Holmberg, I.; Saarem, K.; Pedersen, J.I.; Bjoerkhem, I.

    1986-12-01

    An assay of 1 alpha-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 in pig kidney mitochondria, based on selected ion monitoring, has been developed. Trideuterium-labeled 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 was synthesized and used as internal standard. This standard was added immediately after incubation of 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 with the mitochondrial fraction. The incubation extracts were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography. After formation of the trimethylsilyl derivative, the product was quantitated by mass fragmentography using the ion at m/z 452 and m/z 455. With the use of this assay it was found that formation of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 was linear with the amount of mitochondrial protein and time of incubation. Substrate saturation was obtained at about 20 microM of 25-hydroxy vitamin D3. The maximal rate of conversion obtained under the conditions employed was about 0.1 pmol/mg protein X minute.

  19. Knockdown of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha increased apoptosis of human endometrial cancer HEC-1A cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Yang, Rui; Liu, Hao; Ren, Zhongqian; Wang, Cuicui; Li, Da; Ma, Xiaoxin

    2016-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) coactivates multiple transcription factors and regulates several metabolic processes. In this study, we focused on the roles of PGC-1α in the apoptosis of endometrial cancer HEC-1A cells. Materials and methods PGC-1a expression in the HEC-1A cells was detected with real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Small interfering RNA directed against PGC-1α was designed and synthesized, and RNA interference technology was used to knock down PGC-1α mRNA and protein expression. Cell apoptosis, cell cycle, and mitochondrial membrane potential were then analyzed using flow cytometry. The expression of apoptotic proteins, Bcl-2 and Bax, was detected with Western blot. Results The specific downregulation of PGC-1α expression in the HEC-1A cells increased their apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by reducing the expression of Bcl-2 and increasing the expression of Bax. Conclusion These results suggest that PGC-1α influences the apoptosis of HEC-1A cells and also provides a molecular basis for further investigation of the apoptotic mechanism in human endometrial cancer. PMID:27601924

  20. Mitochondrial Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Viewed through the lens of the genome it contains, the mitochondrion is of unquestioned bacterial ancestry, originating from within the bacterial phylum α-Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria). Accordingly, the endosymbiont hypothesis—the idea that the mitochondrion evolved from a bacterial progenitor via symbiosis within an essentially eukaryotic host cell—has assumed the status of a theory. Yet mitochondrial genome evolution has taken radically different pathways in diverse eukaryotic lineages, and the organelle itself is increasingly viewed as a genetic and functional mosaic, with the bulk of the mitochondrial proteome having an evolutionary origin outside Alphaproteobacteria. New data continue to reshape our views regarding mitochondrial evolution, particularly raising the question of whether the mitochondrion originated after the eukaryotic cell arose, as assumed in the classical endosymbiont hypothesis, or whether this organelle had its beginning at the same time as the cell containing it. PMID:22952398

  1. Estrogen-related receptors stimulate pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 4 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Ma, Ke; Sadana, Prabodh; Chowdhury, Farhana; Gaillard, Stephanie; Wang, Fang; McDonnell, Donald P; Unterman, Terry G; Elam, Marshall B; Park, Edwards A

    2006-12-29

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and is a key regulatory enzyme in the oxidation of glucose to acetyl-CoA. Phosphorylation of PDC by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK2 and PDK4) inhibits PDC activity. Expression of the PDK genes is elevated in diabetes, leading to the decreased oxidation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. In these studies we have investigated the transcriptional regulation of the PDK4 gene by the estrogen-related receptors (ERRalpha and ERRgamma). The ERRs are orphan nuclear receptors whose physiological roles include the induction of fatty acid oxidation in heart and muscle. Previously, we found that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1alpha) stimulates the expression of PDK4. Here we report that ERRalpha and ERRgamma stimulate the PDK4 gene in hepatoma cells, suggesting a novel role for ERRs in controlling pyruvate metabolism. In addition, both ERR isoforms recruit PGC-1alpha to the PDK4 promoter. Insulin, which decreases the expression of the PDK4 gene, inhibits the induction of PDK4 by ERRalpha and ERRgamma. The forkhead transcription factor (FoxO1) binds the PDK4 gene and contributes to the induction of PDK4 by ERRs and PGC-1alpha. Insulin suppresses PDK4 expression in part through the dissociation of FoxO1 and PGC-1alpha from the PDK4 promoter. Our data demonstrate a key role for the ERRs in the induction of hepatic PDK4 gene expression. PMID:17079227

  2. [Rat cardiomyocyte remodeling after neonatal cryptosporidiosis. II. Elongation, excessive polyploidization and HIF-1alpha overexpression].

    PubMed

    Anatskaia, O V; Sidorenko, N V; Matveev, I V; Kropotov, A V; Vinogradov, A E

    2012-01-01

    Retrospective epidemyological studies evidence that infant diseases leave survivors with an increased susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases in later life. At the same time, the mechanisms of this link remain poorly understood. Based on medical statistics reporting that infectious gastroenteritis is the most common cause of maladies in babies, infants and children, we analysed the effects of moderate cryptosporidial gastroenteritis on the heart and ventricular cardiomyocyte remodelling in rats of the first month of life. The disease was challenged by a worldwide human protozoic pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum (Apicomplexa, Sporozoa). The main symptoms manifested in the growth retardation moderate diarrhea. Using real-time PCR, cytophotometry, confocal microscopy and image analysis, we indicated that cryptosporidiosis was associated, with the atrophy heart and the elongation, narrowing, protein content decrease and hyperpolyploidization of cardiomyocytes and the moderate overexpression of hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) mRNA. Cardiomyocyte shape remodeling and heart atrophy presented in all age groups. The severity of these changes, hovewer, declined gradually from younger to older groups. In contrast, hyperpolyploidization and HIF-1alpha mRNA overexpression were registered mainly among animals aged between 6 and 13 days, and were barely detected and non-significant in older age groups. In the rat the time period covering 6-13 days after birth is known to coincide with the intensive cardiomyocyte polyploidization and the switch from proliferation to hypertrophy. Thus, our data indicate that neonatal cryptosporidiosis may be potential cardiovascular diseases risk factor and that one of the critical time windows for the growing heart covers the time period when cardiomyocyte undergo polyploidization. PMID:23074852

  3. Identification of Tetrahymena 14-nm filament-associated protein as elongation factor 1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Kurasawa, Y; Numata, O; Katoh, M; Hirano, H; Chiba, J; Watanabe, Y

    1992-11-01

    Tetrahymena 14-nm filament-forming protein has dual functions as a citrate synthase in mitochondria and as a cytoskeletal protein involved in oral morphogenesis and in pronuclear behavior during conjugation. By immunoblotting using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies following two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we demonstrated that the 14-nm filament protein fraction contained two 49-kDa proteins whose isoelectric points were 8.0 and 9.0; a monoclonal antibody (MAb) 26B4 and a polyclonal antibody 49KI reacted only to a pI 8.0 protein, while two other MAbs, 11B6 and 11B8, reacted only to a pI 9.0 protein. From the N-terminal amino acid sequences, the pI 8.0 protein was identified as the previously reported 14-nm filament-forming protein/citrate synthase, but the pI 9.0 protein N-terminal sequence had no similarity with that of the pI 8.0 protein. The pI 9.0 protein is considered to be a 14-nm filament-associated protein since the pI 9.0 protein copurifies with the pI 8.0 protein during two cycles of an assembly and disassembly purification protocol. Cloning and sequencing the pI 9.0 protein gene from a Tetrahymena pyriformis cDNA library, we identified the pI 9.0 protein as elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) based on it sharing 73-76% sequence identity with EF-1 alpha from several species. PMID:1385189

  4. Modulation of the IL-1 cytokine network in keratinocytes by intracellular IL-1 alpha and IL-1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Phillips, W G; Feldmann, M; Breathnach, S M; Brennan, F M

    1995-07-01

    The IL-1 cytokine network in epidermal cells was studied in vitro, using the spontaneously transformed HaCAT human keratinocyte line. Intracellular (ic) IL-1 alpha and IL-1 receptor antagonist protein (IL-1Ra) following cell lysis were readily identified assayed using a capture ELISA; whereas in culture supernatants IL-1Ra was not detected, and IL-1 alpha was present at only very low levels. Confluent cultures of HaCAT cells were shown to provide optimal conditions for the study, since confluence increased the icIL-1Ra:IL-1 alpha ratio to a level as seen in vivo, which was independent of Ca2+ concentration in the culture medium. The IL-1Ra extracted from HaCAT cell lysates was functionally active, as demonstrated in the mouse thymocyte co-proliferation assay which could be blocked using a rabbit anti-IL-1Ra antibody. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta 1) stimulated a dose-dependent increase in HaCAT cell IL-1 alpha without changing IL-1Ra concentration, with a resultant reduction in the icIL-1Ra: IL-1 alpha ratio from 320:1 to 100:1. Similarly, TGF-alpha, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), IL-6, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) substantially increased HaCAT cell IL-1 alpha, but had no effect on the IL-1Ra, with a concomitant reduction in the icIL-1Ra:IL-1 alpha ratio. In contrast to their effects on monocytes, IL-4 and IL-10 at biologically active levels had no effect on IL-1 alpha, IL-1Ra or the icIL-1Ra: IL-1 alpha ratio in confluent HaCAT cells. Hydrocortisone reduced IL-1 alpha to below the limit of sensitivity of the ELISA, and induced a small increase in IL-1Ra of questionable biological significance. Thus, regulation of the IL-1 cytokine network in keratinocytes involves modulation of icIL-1 alpha rather than of icIL-1Ra levels, and is markedly different from that noted in monocytes.

  5. Interaction of the human cytomegalovirus particle with the host cell induces hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Steven; Nicholl, Mary Jane; Sutherland, Jane S.; Preston, Chris M.

    2011-05-25

    The cellular protein hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) was induced after infection of human fibroblasts with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). HCMV irradiated with ultraviolet light (uv-HCMV) also elicited the effect, demonstrating that the response was provoked by interaction of the infecting virion with the cell and that viral gene expression was not required. Although induction of HIF-1{alpha} was initiated by an early event, accumulation of the protein was not detected until 9 hours post infection, with levels increasing thereafter. Infection with uv-HCMV resulted in increased abundance of HIF-1{alpha}-specific RNA, indicating stimulation of transcription. In addition, greater phosphorylation of the protein kinase Akt was observed, and the activity of this enzyme was required for induction of HIF-1{alpha} to occur. HIF-1{alpha} controls the expression of many cellular gene products; therefore the findings reveal new ways in which interaction of the HCMV particle with the host cell may cause significant alterations to cellular physiology.

  6. Increased serum levels of MIP-1alpha correlate with bone disease and angiogenic cytokines in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Tsirakis, George; Roussou, Parascevi; Pappa, Constantina A; Kolovou, Anna; Vasilokonstantaki, Chrysoula; Miminas, Ioannis; Kyriakaki, Stavroula; Alegakis, Athanasios; Alexandrakis, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Many cytokines possess variable roles in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) is an osteoclast-activating factor with a major role in myeloma bone disease. The aim of the study was to examine its participation in the angiogenic process of the disease. We measured, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, its serum levels in 56 newly diagnosed myeloma patients, in several skeletal grades and stages of the disease and in 25 healthy controls. Concurrently, we measured serum levels of the angiogenic cytokines basic-fibroblast growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and interleukin-18. All the above cytokines were higher in myeloma patients (p < 0.001 for all cases) and were increasing in parallel with disease stage (p < 0.001 for all cases) and skeletal grade (p < 0.04 for MIP-1alpha and p < 0.001 for the other cases). Moreover, positive correlations between MIP-1alpha and all the angiogenic cytokines were noted (p < 0.001 for all cases). MIP-1alpha seems to be a predominant factor responsible for the enhancement of bone resorption and increased angiogenesis. The positive correlation between MIP-1alpha and the angiogenic chemoattractants supports the involvement of these factors in the biology of myeloma cell growth. Moreover, they could be used as possible therapeutic targets as well as markers of disease activity.

  7. [Expressions of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 in chronic myeloid leukemia cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Liang; Shen, Ti; Hui, Yu-Rong; Gu, Xi-Chun; Li, Rong-Sheng

    2006-06-01

    This study was aimed to explore the expression of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 in bcr/abl fusion gene positive CML cells, and to study the effects of P210(bcr/abl) fusion protein tyrosine kinase on expression of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 mRNAs in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. The expression levels of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 mRNA were detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in bcr/abl negative cells, bcr/abl positive cells, and P210(bcr/abl)-Rb-C-Box positive cells. The results showed that MIP-1alpha and CCR-1 mRNAs were expressed in bcr/abl negative cells, but not in positive cells. Both MCP-1 and CCR-2 mRNA cannot be detected in both bcr/abl positive and negative cells. After inhibiting P210(bcr/abl) tyrosine kinase activity by Rb-C-Box, expressions of MIP-1alpha and CCR-1 mRNAs were restored to normal (similar to P210(bcr/abl) negative cells). It is concluded that P210(bcr/abl) fusion protein inhibits the expression of MIP-1alpha and CCR-1 in chronic myeloid leukemia cells, but does not inhibit MCP-1 and CCR-2 mRNA expressions in these leukemia cells.

  8. Mutations in elongation factor EF-1 alpha affect the frequency of frameshifting and amino acid misincorporation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sandbaken, M G; Culbertson, M R

    1988-12-01

    A mutational analysis of the eukaryotic elongation factor EF-1 alpha indicates that this protein functions to limit the frequency of errors during genetic code translation. We found that both amino acid misincorporation and reading frame errors are controlled by EF-1 alpha. In order to examine the function of this protein, the TEF2 gene, which encodes EF-1 alpha in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was mutagenized in vitro with hydroxylamine. Sixteen independent TEF2 alleles were isolated by their ability to suppress frameshift mutations. DNA sequence analysis identified eight different sites in the EF-1 alpha protein that elevate the frequency of mistranslation when mutated. These sites are located in two different regions of the protein. Amino acid substitutions located in or near the GTP-binding and hydrolysis domain of the protein cause suppression of frameshift and nonsense mutations. These mutations may effect mistranslation by altering the binding or hydrolysis of GTP. Amino acid substitutions located adjacent to a putative aminoacyl-tRNA binding region also suppress frameshift and nonsense mutations. These mutations may alter the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA by EF-1 alpha. The identification of frameshift and nonsense suppressor mutations in EF-1 alpha indicates a role for this protein in limiting amino acid misincorporation and reading frame errors. We suggest that these types of errors are controlled by a common mechanism or closely related mechanisms. PMID:3066688

  9. [Expressions of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 in chronic myeloid leukemia cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Liang; Shen, Ti; Hui, Yu-Rong; Gu, Xi-Chun; Li, Rong-Sheng

    2006-06-01

    This study was aimed to explore the expression of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 in bcr/abl fusion gene positive CML cells, and to study the effects of P210(bcr/abl) fusion protein tyrosine kinase on expression of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 mRNAs in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. The expression levels of MIP-1alpha, MCP-1 and their receptors CCR-1, CCR-2 mRNA were detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in bcr/abl negative cells, bcr/abl positive cells, and P210(bcr/abl)-Rb-C-Box positive cells. The results showed that MIP-1alpha and CCR-1 mRNAs were expressed in bcr/abl negative cells, but not in positive cells. Both MCP-1 and CCR-2 mRNA cannot be detected in both bcr/abl positive and negative cells. After inhibiting P210(bcr/abl) tyrosine kinase activity by Rb-C-Box, expressions of MIP-1alpha and CCR-1 mRNAs were restored to normal (similar to P210(bcr/abl) negative cells). It is concluded that P210(bcr/abl) fusion protein inhibits the expression of MIP-1alpha and CCR-1 in chronic myeloid leukemia cells, but does not inhibit MCP-1 and CCR-2 mRNA expressions in these leukemia cells. PMID:16800914

  10. Aβ25-35 Suppresses Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Primary Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weiguo; Wang, Feng; Guo, Wanqing; Zheng, Xuehua; Chen, Yue; Zhang, Wenguang; Shi, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is involved in the regulation of mitochondrial content, morphology, and function. Impaired mitochondrial biogenesis has been observed in Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-β (Aβ) has been shown to cause mitochondrial dysfunction in cultured neurons, but its role in mitochondrial biogenesis in neurons remains poorly defined. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) are key energy-sensing molecules regulating mitochondrial biogenesis. In addition, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, is a target for SIRT1 deacetylase activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of Aβ25-35 on mitochondrial biogenesis in cultured hippocampal neurons and the underlying mechanisms. In primary hippocampal neurons, we found that 24-h incubation with Aβ25-35 suppressed both phosphorylations of AMPK and SIRT1 expression and increased PGC-1α acetylation expression. In addition, Aβ25-35 also resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number, as well as decreases in the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors (PGC-1α, NRF 1, NRF 2, and Tfam). Taken together, these data show that Aβ25-35 suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis in hippocampal neurons. Aβ25-35-induced impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis may be associated with the inhibition of the AMPK-SIRT1-PGC-1α pathway.

  11. Molecular basis of maple syrup urine disease: Novel mutations at the E1[alpha] locus that impair E1([alpha][sub 2][beta][sub 2]) assembly or decrease steady-state E1[alpha] mRNA levels of branched-chain [alpha]-keto acid dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.L.; Fisher, C.R.; Chuang, D.T.; Cox, R.P. )

    1994-08-01

    The authors report the occurrence of three novel mutations in the E1[alpha] (BCKDHA) locus of the branched-chain [alpha]-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKAD) complex that cause maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). An 8-bp deletion in exon 7 is present in one allele of a compound-heterozygous patient (GM-649). A single C nucleotide insertion in exon 2 occurs in one allele of an intermediate-MSUD patient (Lo). The second allele of patient Lo carries an A-to-G transition in exon 9 of the E1[alpha] gene. This missense mutation changes Tyr-368 to Cys (Y368C) in the E1[alpha] subunit. Both the 8-bp deletion and the single C insertion generate a downstream nonsense codon. Both mutations appear to be associated with a low abundance of the mutant E1[alpha] mRNA, as determined by allele-specific oligonucleotide probing. Transfection studies strongly suggest that the Y368C substitution in the E1[alpha] subunit impairs its proper assembly with the normal E1[beta]. Unassembled as well as misassembled E1[alpha] and E1[beta] subunits are degraded in the cell. 32 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Interleukin-1 alpha production during Rickettsia rickettsii infection of cultured endothelial cells: potential role in autocrine cell stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Sporn, L A; Marder, V J

    1996-01-01

    Rickettsia rickettsii infection results in numerous responses by cultured endothelial cells, among them a rapid, transient increase in steady-state levels of tissue factor mRNA (L.A. Sporn, P.J. Haidaris, R.-J. Shi, Y. Nemerson, D.J. Silverman, and V.J. Marder, Blood 83:1527-1534, 1994). In this study, production of interleukin-1 (IL-1) was measured during infection and its potential role in autocrine cell stimulation was investigated. A fivefold increase in levels of IL-1 alpha antigen was measured in cell lysate samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at 18 h of infection. The majority of IL-1 alpha remained cell associated, as no significant increase was detected in culture medium. No IL-1 beta antigen was detected in cell lysates or culture medium from either control or infected cultures. A dramatic increase in the levels of IL-1 alpha mRNA occurred following infection, as measured by reverse transcriptase PCR, which revealed the appearance of the expected 421-kb product with RNA extracted from cells infected for 4 h and no detectable product from control cell samples. The presence of functional, cell-associated IL-1 alpha activity in infected cells was confirmed, following disruption, by the ability of the infected cells to induce tissue factor expression in target endothelial cells. Such induction was eliminated by pretreatment of the disrupted cell samples with neutralizing antibodies against IL-1 alpha but not against IL-1 beta. To investigate whether endogenously produced IL-1 participates in the stimulation of tissue factor expression, neutralizing antibodies against IL-1 or the IL-1 receptor antagonist were added to culture medium during infection. Both anti-IL-1 alpha and the IL-1 receptor antagonist resulted in approximately 40% inhibition of tissue factor expression, thus implicating IL-1 alpha in autocrine cell stimulation. PMID:8613368

  13. Modulation of in vitro porcine natural killer cell activity by recombinant interleukin-1 alpha, interleukin-2 and interleukin-4.

    PubMed Central

    Knoblock, K F; Canning, P C

    1992-01-01

    In order to understand better how cytokines modulate porcine lymphocyte-mediated natural cytotoxicity and to develop a rapid and reliable colorimetric assay to study that activity in young pigs, we studied inherent and cytokine induced in vitro natural killer (NK) activity. The cytokines we studied were human recombinant interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-2, IL-4 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Natural killer activity by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), reported as per cent specific lysis (%SL), was determined by the colorimetric measurement of lactate dehydrogenase released from tumour cell targets, YAC-1 and K562. Inherent NK activity was low and remained relatively unchanged by alterations of assay length or effector cell concentration. Low NK activity was also observed in response to IL-4 and IFN-gamma. IL-2 and, to a lesser extent, IL-1 alpha induced significant NK activity with trends towards increasing %SL with increasing cytokine dose. Optimal IL-1 alpha- and IL-2-induced NK activity could be observed at 18 hr, with significant activity stimulated by IL-2 as early as 4 hr. IL-2-induced NK activity was sensitive to effector cell concentration; %SL decreased as the effector to target ratio decreased. IL-1 alpha- and IL-2-induced NK activities were decreased in the presence of IL-4. These results indicate porcine PBMC are sensitive to in vitro modulation by human recombinant IL-1 alpha, IL-2 and IL-4. The ability of IL-1 alpha and IL-2 to induce swine NK activity and the ability of IL-4 to inhibit that activity are similar to the actions of those cytokines in human NK systems. PMID:1634252

  14. Curcumin Attenuates Gentamicin-Induced Kidney Mitochondrial Alterations: Possible Role of a Mitochondrial Biogenesis Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Negrette-Guzmán, Mario; García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Tapia, Edilia; Zazueta, Cecilia; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Aparicio-Trejo, Omar Emiliano; Madero, Magdalena; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that curcumin (CUR), a polyphenol derived from Curcuma longa, exerts a protective effect against gentamicin- (GM-) induced nephrotoxicity in rats, associated with a preservation of the antioxidant status. Although mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark in the GM-induced renal injury, the role of CUR in mitochondrial protection has not been studied. In this work, LLC-PK1 cells were preincubated 24 h with CUR and then coincubated 48 h with CUR and 8 mM GM. Treatment with CUR attenuated GM-induced drop in cell viability and led to an increase in nuclear factor (erythroid-2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear accumulation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) cell expression attenuating GM-induced losses in these proteins. In vivo, Wistar rats were injected subcutaneously with GM (75 mg/Kg/12 h) during 7 days to develop kidney mitochondrial alterations. CUR (400 mg/Kg/day) was administered orally 5 days before and during the GM exposure. The GM-induced mitochondrial alterations in ultrastructure and bioenergetics as well as decrease in activities of respiratory complexes I and IV and induction of calcium-dependent permeability transition were mostly attenuated by CUR. Protection of CUR against GM-induced nephrotoxicity could be in part mediated by maintenance of mitochondrial functions and biogenesis with some participation of the nuclear factor Nrf2. PMID:26345660

  15. The distribution of Elongation Factor-1 Alpha (EF-1alpha), Elongation Factor-Like (EFL), and a non-canonical genetic code in the ulvophyceae: discrete genetic characters support a consistent phylogenetic framework.

    PubMed

    Gile, Gillian H; Novis, Philip M; Cragg, David S; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C; Keeling, Patrick J

    2009-01-01

    The systematics of the green algal class Ulvophyceae have been difficult to resolve with ultrastructural and molecular phylogenetic analyses. Therefore, we investigated relationships among ulvophycean orders by determining the distribution of two discrete genetic characters previously identified only in the order Dasycladales. First, Acetabularia acetabulum uses the core translation GTPase Elongation Factor 1alpha (EF-1alpha) while most Chlorophyta instead possess the related GTPase Elongation Factor-Like (EFL). Second, the nuclear genomes of dasycladaleans A. acetabulum and Batophora oerstedii use a rare non-canonical genetic code in which the canonical termination codons TAA and TAG instead encode glutamine. Representatives of Ulvales and Ulotrichales were found to encode EFL, while Caulerpales, Dasycladales, Siphonocladales, and Ignatius tetrasporus were found to encode EF-1alpha, in congruence with the two major lineages previously proposed for the Ulvophyceae. The EF-1alpha of I. tetrasporus supports its relationship with Caulerpales/Dasycladales/Siphonocladales, in agreement with ultrastructural evidence, but contrary to certain small subunit rRNA analyses that place it with Ulvales/Ulotrichales. The same non-canonical genetic code previously described in A. acetabulum was observed in EF-1alpha sequences from Parvocaulis pusillus (Dasycladales), Chaetomorpha coliformis, and Cladophora cf. crinalis (Siphonocladales), whereas Caulerpales use the universal code. This supports a sister relationship between Siphonocladales and Dasycladales and further refines our understanding of ulvophycean phylogeny.

  16. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  17. Pro-gliogenic effect of IL-1alpha in the differentiation of embryonic neural precursor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ajmone-Cat, Maria Antonietta; Cacci, Emanuele; Ragazzoni, Ylenia; Minghetti, Luisa; Biagioni, Stefano

    2010-05-01

    Inflammation is regarded as a main obstacle to brain regeneration. Major detrimental effects are attributed to microglial/macrophagic products, such as TNF-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6. The role of cytokines of the IL-1 family, particularly of IL-1alpha, in the modulation of neural precursor cell (NPC) properties is less characterized. IL-1alpha is one of the most abundant cytokines released upon acute stimulation of microglia with lipopolysaccharide and is down-regulated upon chronic stimulation. As we recently demonstrated, acutely activated microglia reduces NPC survival, prevent neuronal differentiation and promote glial differentiation. Chronically activated microglia are instead permissive to NPC survival and neuronal differentiation, and less effective in promoting astrocytic differentiation. We thus investigated whether IL-1alpha could contribute to the effects of acutely activated microglia on NPC. We found that NPC express functional IL-1 receptors and that exposure to recombinant IL-1alpha strongly enhances NPC differentiation into astrocytes, without affecting cell viability and neuronal differentiation. In the same conditions, recombinant IL-1beta has pro-gliogenic effects at concentrations 10-fold higher than those found in activated microglial conditioned media. Interestingly, immunodepletion of IL-1alpha in activated microglial conditioned media fails to revert microglial pro-gliogenic action and slightly enhances neuronal differentiation, revealing that other microglial-derived factors contribute to the modulation of NPC properties. PMID:20236219

  18. Different production of interleukin-1alpha, interleukin-1beta and interleukin-8 from cholesteatomatous and normal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chung, J W; Yoon, T H

    1998-06-01

    Cholesteatomatous bone destruction is caused by an increase in collagenase activity and activation of the osteoclasts. Cytokines. such as interleukins (IL), are important in intercellular communication in the mechanism of bone destruction. Middle ear cholesteatomas and external auditory canal skins (EACS) can be surgically obtained and cultured. The quantities of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta and IL-8 secretions were measured in the supernatant of each culture series. On the 2nd day of culture, the level of IL-1alpha was 0.60+/-0.13 (pg/microg of total protein) in cholesteatoma, and 0.25+/-0.02 in EACS. The levels of IL-1beta in cholesteatoma and EACS were 0.41+/-0.06 and 0.24+/-0.02, respectively. The levels of IL-8 in cholesteatoma and EACS were 146.50+/-32.37 and 50.40+/-6.24, respectively. After 2 days, the levels of IL-1alpha and IL-8 of each tissue decreased. The value from fibroblasts did not show a significant difference between cholesteatoma and EACS, and the values did not change as time passed. We can conclude that the IL-1alpha and IL-8 from the cholesteatomatous epithelium are responsible for the cholesteatomatous bone destruction and certain substances from the subepithelial granulation tissue can stimulate the cholesteatoma to produce IL-1alpha and IL-8.

  19. Nesprin-1{alpha} contributes to the targeting of mAKAP to the cardiac myocyte nuclear envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Pare, Genevieve C.; Easlick, Juliet L.; Mislow, John M.; McNally, Elizabeth M.; Kapiloff, Michael S. . E-mail: kapiloff@ohsu.edu

    2005-02-15

    Muscle A-kinase anchoring protein (mAKAP) is a scaffold protein found principally at the nuclear envelope of striated myocytes. mAKAP maintains a complex consisting of multiple signal transduction molecules including the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A, the ryanodine receptor calcium release channel, phosphodiesterase type 4D3, and protein phosphatase 2A. By an unknown mechanism, a domain containing spectrin repeats is responsible for targeting mAKAP to the nuclear envelope. We now demonstrate that the integral membrane protein nesprin-1{alpha} serves as a receptor for mAKAP on the nuclear envelope in cardiac myocytes. Nesprin-1{alpha} is inserted into the nuclear envelope by a conserved, C-terminal, klarsicht-related transmembrane domain and forms homodimers by the binding of an amino-terminal spectrin repeat domain. Through the direct binding of the nesprin-1{alpha} amino-terminal dimerization domain to the third mAKAP spectrin repeat, nesprin-1{alpha} targets mAKAP to the nuclear envelope. In turn, overexpression of these spectrin repeat domains in myocytes can displace mAKAP from nesprin-1{alpha}.

  20. Taraxacum officinale induces cytotoxicity through TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha secretion in Hep G2 cells.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Hong, Seung-Heon; Song, Bong-Keun; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Yoo, Young-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-01-16

    Taraxacum officinale (TO) has been frequently used as a remedy for women's disease (e.g. breast and uterus cancer) and disorders of the liver and gallbladder. Several earlier studies have indicated that TO exhibits anti-tumor properties, but its mechanism remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the effect of TO on the cytotoxicity and production of cytokines in human hepatoma cell line, Hep G2. Our results show that TO decreased the cell viability by 26%, and significantly increased the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-1alpha production compared with media control (about 1.6-fold for TNF-alpha, and 2.4-fold for IL-1alpha, P < 0.05). Also, TO strongly induced apoptosis of Hep G2 cells as determined by flow cytometry. Increased amounts of TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha contributed to TO-induced apoptosis. Anti-TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha antibodies almost abolished it. These results suggest that TO induces cytotoxicity through TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha secretion in Hep G2 cells.

  1. The role and regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha expression in brain development and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiyong; Heijnen, Cobi J; van der Kooij, Michael A; Groenendaal, Floris; van Bel, Frank

    2009-12-11

    During neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, activation of transcription of a series of genes is induced to stimulate erythropoiesis, anti-apoptosis, apoptosis, necrosis and angiogenesis. A key factor mediating these gene transcriptions is hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha). During hypoxia, HIF-1alpha protein is stabilized and heterodimerizes with HIF-1beta to form HIF-1, subsequently regulating the expression of target genes. HIF-1alpha participates in early brain development and proliferation of neuronal precursor cells. Under pathological conditions, HIF-1alpha is known to play an important role in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury: on the one hand, HIF-1alpha has neuroprotective effects whereas it can also have neurotoxic effects. HIF-1alpha regulates the transcription of erythropoietin (EPO), which induces several pathways associated with neuroprotection. HIF-1alpha also promotes the expression of vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF), which is related to neovascularization in hypoxic-ischemic brain areas. In addition, HIF-1alpha has an anti-apoptotic effect by increasing the expression of anti-apoptotic factors such as EPO during mild hypoxia. The neurotoxic effects of HIF-1alpha are represented by its participation in the apoptotic process by increasing the stability of the tumor suppressor protein p53 during severe hypoxia. Moreover, HIF-1alpha plays a role in cell necrosis, by interacting with calcium and calpain. HIF-1alpha can also exacerbate brain edema via increasing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Given these properties, HIF-1alpha has both neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects after hypoxia-ischemia. These events are cell type specific and related to the severity of hypoxia. Unravelling of the complex functions of HIF-1alpha may be important when designing neuroprotective therapies for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

  2. The mitochondrial F1ATPase alpha-subunit is necessary for efficient import of mitochondrial precursors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, H; Douglas, M G

    1992-07-25

    The mitochondrial import and assembly of the F1ATPase subunits requires, respectively, the participation of the molecular chaperones hsp70SSA1 and hsp70SSC1 and other components operating on opposite sides of the mitochondrial membrane. In previous studies, both the homology and the assembly properties of the F1ATPase alpha-subunit (ATP1p) compared to the groEL homologue, hsp60, have led to the proposal that this subunit could exhibit chaperone-like activity. In this report the extent to which this subunit participates in protein transport has been determined by comparing import into mitochondria that lack the F1ATPase alpha-subunit (delta ATP1) versus mitochondria that lack the other major catalytic subunit, the F1ATPase beta-subunit (delta ATP2). Yeast mutants lacking the alpha-subunit but not the beta-subunit grow much more slowly than expected on fermentable carbon sources and exhibit delayed kinetics of protein import for several mitochondrial precursors such as the F1 beta subunit, hsp60MIF4 and subunits 4 and 5 of the cytochrome oxidase. In vitro and in vivo the F1 beta-subunit precursor accumulates as a translocation intermediate in absence of the F1 alpha-subunit. In the absence of both the ATPase subunits yeast grows at the same rate as a strain lacking only the beta-subunit, and import of mitochondrial precursors is restored to that of wild type. These data indicate that the F1 alpha-subunit likely functions as an "assembly partner" to influence protein import rather than functioning directly as a chaperone. These data are discussed in light of the relationship between the import and assembly of proteins in mitochondria.

  3. Virus binding to a plasma membrane receptor triggers interleukin-1 alpha-mediated proinflammatory macrophage response in vivo.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, Nelson C; Miao, Edward A; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Murali-Krishna, Kaja; Aderem, Alan; Flavell, Richard A; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M

    2009-07-17

    The recognition of viral components by host pattern-recognition receptors triggers the induction of the antiviral innate immune response. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and NLRP3 inflammasome were shown to be the principal specific sensors of viral double-stranded DNA. Here we present evidence that macrophages in vivo activated an innate immune response to a double-stranded DNA virus, adenovirus (Ad), independently of TLR9 or NLRP3 inflammasome. In response to Ad, macrophage-derived IL-1 alpha triggered IL-1RI-dependent production of a defined set of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The IL-1 alpha-mediated response required a selective interaction of virus arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motifs with macrophage beta(3) integrins. Thus, these data identify IL-1 alpha-IL-1RI as a key pathway allowing for the activation of proinflammatory responses to the virus, independently of its genomic nucleic acid recognition.

  4. Stromal derived growth factor-1alpha as a beacon for stem cell homing in development and injury.

    PubMed

    Claps, Christopher M; Corcoran, Kelly E; Cho, Kyung Jin; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2005-10-01

    This review extrapolates the functions of SDF-1alpha and its receptor, CXCR4, as regulators of hematopoietic stem cells and discusses their potential roles in the development and regeneration of tissues. The discussion focuses on the repair of neural tissues while parallels are made with bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells. Overall, the organization links the basic biology of SDF-1alpha and CXCR4 to topics in medicine and show how any disease processes involving the SDF-1alpha-CXCR4 system could be central points in medicine. Discussions focused on potential therapies for SDF-1 and CXCR4 in clinical disorders. Breast and prostate cancers are selected as examples of solid tumors while leukemia is discussed as an example of hematological malignancies. Diffuse macular edema is discussed as potential therapy for a non-malignant disease.

  5. Impaired mitochondrial fat oxidation induces adaptive remodeling of muscle metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wicks, Shawna E.; Vandanmagsar, Bolormaa; Haynie, Kimberly R.; Fuller, Scott E.; Warfel, Jaycob D.; Stephens, Jacqueline M.; Wang, Miao; Han, Xianlin; Zhang, Jingying; Noland, Robert C.; Mynatt, Randall L.

    2015-01-01

    The correlations between intramyocellular lipid (IMCL), decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and insulin resistance have led to the hypothesis that impaired FAO causes accumulation of lipotoxic intermediates that inhibit muscle insulin signaling. Using a skeletal muscle-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 KO model, we show that prolonged and severe mitochondrial FAO inhibition results in increased carbohydrate utilization, along with reduced physical activity; increased circulating nonesterified fatty acids; and increased IMCLs, diacylglycerols, and ceramides. Perhaps more importantly, inhibition of mitochondrial FAO also initiates a local, adaptive response in muscle that invokes mitochondrial biogenesis, compensatory peroxisomal fat oxidation, and amino acid catabolism. Loss of its major fuel source (lipid) induces an energy deprivation response in muscle coordinated by signaling through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α) to maintain energy supply for locomotion and survival. At the whole-body level, these adaptations result in resistance to obesity. PMID:26056297

  6. Competence for collagenase gene expression by tissue fibroblasts requires activation of an interleukin 1 alpha autocrine loop.

    PubMed Central

    West-Mays, J A; Strissel, K J; Sadow, P M; Fini, M E

    1995-01-01

    The enzyme collagenase (EC 3.4.24.7), a key mediator in biological remodeling, can be induced in early-passage fibroblasts by a wide variety of agents and conditions. In contrast, at least some primary tissue fibroblasts are incompetent to synthesize collagenase in response to many of these stimulators. In this study, we investigate mechanisms controlling response to two of the conditions in question: (i) trypsin or cytochalasin B, which disrupt actin stress fibers, or (ii) phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), which activates growth factor signaling pathways. We demonstrate that collagenase expression stimulated by trypsin or cytochalasin B is regulated entirely through an autocrine cytokine, interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha). The IL-1 alpha intermediate also constitutes the major mechanism by which PMA stimulates collagenase expression, although a second signaling pathway(s) contributes to a minor extent. Elevation of the IL-1 alpha level in response to stimulators is found to be sustained by means of an autocrine feedback loop in early-passage fibroblast cultures. In contrast, fibroblasts freshly isolated from the tissue are incompetent to activate and sustain the IL-1 alpha feedback loop, even though they synthesize collagenase in response to exogenous IL-1. We conclude that this is the reason why tissue fibroblasts are limited, in comparison with subcultured fibroblasts, in their capacity to synthesize collagenase. Activation of the IL-1 alpha feedback loop, therefore, seems likely to be an important mechanism by which resident tissue cells adopt the remodeling phenotype. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7624317

  7. Prognostic Significance of Tumor Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1{alpha} Expression for Outcome After Radiotherapy in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Priyamal; Slevin, Nick J.; Sloan, Philip; Valentine, Helen; Cresswell, Jo; Ryder, David; Price, Patricia; Homer, Jarrod J.; West, Catharine

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents a heterogeneous group of patients in terms of subsite, treatment, and biology. Currently most management decisions are based on clinical parameters with little appreciation of patient differences in underlying tumor biology. We investigated the prognostic significance of clinicopathologic features and tumor hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) expression in a homogeneous series of patients who underwent radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: An audit identified 133 consecutive patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil or tongue base. All patients received primary radiotherapy between 1996 and 2001. Tumor HIF-1{alpha} expression was examined in 79 patients. Results: Features associated with poor locoregional control were low Hb level (p = 0.05) and advancing T (p = 0.008), N (p = 0.03), and disease (p = 0.008) stage. HIF-1{alpha} expression was a more significant adverse prognostic factor in the tonsil (hazard ratio [HR], 23.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]. 3.04-176.7) than the tongue-base tumor (HR, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.14-7.19) group (p = 0.03, test for interaction). High tumor HIF-1{alpha} expression was associated with low blood Hb levels (p = 0.03). In a multivariate analysis HIF-1{alpha} expression retained prognostic significance for locoregional control (HR, 7.10; 95% CI, 3.07-16.43) and cancer-specific survival (HR, 9.19; 95% CI, 3.90-21.6). Conclusions: There are significant differences in radiation therapy outcome within a homogeneous subsite of the oropharynx related to molecular marker expression. The work highlights the importance of studying homogeneous groups of patients in HNSCC, and the complex interrelationships between tumor biology and clinicopathologic factors. The establishment of tumor-type specific markers would represent a major advance in this area.

  8. The effect of interleukin-1alpha polymorphisms on bone mineral density and the risk of vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, S; Harsløf, T; Husted, L B; Carstens, M; Stenkjaer, L; Langdahl, B L

    2007-01-01

    Interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha) stimulates bone resorption via osteoclasts. Mononuclear cells from patients with osteoporosis show increased IL-1alpha production, and IL-1alpha mRNA is more often detected in bone biopsies from osteoporotic compared to normal postmenopausal women. Polymorphisms have been identified in the IL-1alpha gene; however, none of these has been examined for an effect on bone phenotypes in Caucasians. We investigated if the polymorphisms in the IL-1alpha gene affect the risk of osteoporotic fractures, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone turnover in 462 osteoporotic patients and 336 normal controls. Based on previous studies of polymorphisms in the gene and data from the International Hap-Map Project, four polymorphisms needed examination in order to investigate the effect of known polymorphisms in the IL-1alpha gene. We examined C(-1202)-T(rs1800794), C(-889)-T(rs1800587), T(155 + 209)-C(rs2071373), C(155 + 320)-T(rs2856838), and G(398)-T(rs 17561) by Taqman and restriction fragment-length polymorphism assays. BMD was examined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone turnover was evaluated by serum osteocalcin, serum carboxy-terminal propeptide of human type I procollagen, serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, serum carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen, and urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine. Genotype distributions were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. All polymorphisms were in strong linkage disequilibrium. The C allele of the C(155 + 320)-T polymorphism tended to be more common among patients with vertebral fractures (P = 0.06) and patients with BMD T score <-2.5 (P = 0.05). Furthermore, haplotype 1 was associated with reduced risk of having BMD T score <-2.5 (P = 0.02). None of the other polymorphisms or haplotypes was associated with fracture risk or BMD T score <-2.5. BMD and bone turnover were not associated with any of the genetic variants. In conclusion, all the polymorphisms within the IL-1alpha gene are in strong

  9. Central activation of thermogenesis and fever by interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-1 alpha involves different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Busbridge, N J; Dascombe, M J; Tilders, F J; van Oers, J W; Linton, E A; Rothwell, N J

    1989-07-31

    Interleukin-1 exists in two forms (alpha and beta) which are assumed to act on the same receptor. Both forms of the molecule stimulated fever and thermogenesis in the rat when injected into the brain, but interleukin-1 beta was more effective, and combined injection of alpha and beta elicited additive responses. The actions of interleukin-1 beta were inhibited by pretreatment of the animals with either a receptor antagonist or monoclonal antibody to corticotrophin releasing factor. The effects of interleukin-1 alpha were unaltered by these treatments. The results indicate that brain corticotrophin releasing factor mediates thermogenesis and fever induced by interleukin-1 beta but not by interleukin-1 alpha.

  10. The nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for the elongation factor 1 alpha in Sulfolobus solfataricus. Homology of the product with related proteins.

    PubMed

    Arcari, P; Gallo, M; Ianniciello, G; Dello Russo, A; Bocchini, V

    1994-04-01

    The cloning and sequencing of the gene coding for the archaebacterial elongation factor 1 alpha (aEF-1 alpha) was performed by screening a Sulfolobus solfataricus genomic library using a probe constructed from the eptapeptide KNMITGA that is conserved in all the EF-1 alpha/EF-Tu known so far. The isolated recombinant phage contained the part of the aEF-1 alpha gene from amino acids 1 to 171. The other part (amino acids 162-435) was obtained through the amplification of the S. solfataricus DNA by PCR. The codon usage by the aEF-1 alpha gene showed a preference for triplets ending in A and/or T. This behavior was almost identical to that of the S. acidocaldarius EF-1 alpha gene but differed greatly from that of EF-1 alpha/EF-Tu genes in other archaebacteria eukaryotes and eubacteria. The translated protein is made of 435 amino acid residues and contains sequence motifs for the binding of GTP, tRNA and ribosome. Alignments of aEF-1 alpha with several EF-1 alpha/EF-Tu revealed that aEF-1 alpha is more similar to its eukaryotic than to its eubacterial counterparts. PMID:8148382

  11. Enhancement of antibacterial resistance of neutropenic, bone marrow-suppressed mice by interleukin-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, K W; Unowsky, J; DeLorenzo, W; Benjamin, W

    1989-01-01

    The effect of recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1) on the resistance of normal and bone marrow-suppressed mice against bacterial infection was evaluated. IL-1 induced neutrophilia and enhanced the resistance of normal mice against acute, systemic intraperitoneal infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Mice with cyclophosphamide-induced bone marrow suppression were neutropenic and exhibited increased susceptibility to infection. Treatment of neutropenic C57BL/6 and C3H/HeJ mice with IL-1 before infection accelerated recovery of peripheral neutrophil counts and stimulated resistance against infection. Increases in neutrophils and enhancement of resistance induced by IL-1 were both dose and time dependent. Both neutrophilia and augmented resistance to infection were eliminated by a second dose of cyclophosphamide administered during the IL-1 treatments. Bone marrow-suppressed mice treated with IL-1 showed, at 4 h postinfection, greater increases in peripheral blood neutrophils and in numbers of peritoneal exudate neutrophils than suppressed mice treated with vehicle. The data suggest that the IL-1-stimulated recovery of myelopoiesis is an important factor in the enhancement of antibacterial resistance in bone marrow-suppressed, neutropenic mice. These findings indicate that IL-1 may be efficacious in limiting the duration of the neutropenia and of the increased risk for the development of bacterial infection associated with bone marrow suppression. PMID:2783314

  12. Interleukin-1 alpha blockade prevents hyperkeratosis in an in vitro model of lamellar ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L; Choudhary, Ishaan; Harper, John I

    2010-07-01

    The autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses are a family of related diseases, causing a severe defect in the barrier function of the epidermis. Neonates are usually born as collodion babies, but later form scales characteristic of the disease, due to a combination of thickening of the cornified layer and an increase in the production of non-polar lipids. Current treatments of choice are exfoliative creams and moisturizing agents and the use of oral retinoids. The skin condition and treatment impact significantly on quality of life and, with oral retinoids, there are potential complications associated with long-term use. A greater understanding of the mechanisms that result in scaling should lead to better directed therapies, not only for the inherited ichthyoses, but also other hyperkeratotic disorders. Using siRNA knockdown of the principle gene mutated in lamellar ichthyosis (LI), transglutaminase-1, in rat keratinocytes, we created an in vitro organotypic culture model that closely mimics the disease. Interleukin-1 alpha (IL1A) expression was increased and there was a lack of loricrin cross-linking. All LI patients tested had an increased IL1A and treatment of wild-type organotypic cultures with IL1A was sufficient to induce hyperkeratosis. Treatment of disease mimic organotypic cultures with IL-1 receptor antagonist led to a dose-dependent decrease in hyperkeratosis without a reduction in non-polar lipids in the cornified layer, which has the potential to reduce scaling without the requirement to constantly apply emollients.

  13. Drosophila glucome screening identifies Ck1alpha as a regulator of mammalian glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ugrankar, Rupali; Berglund, Eric; Akdemir, Fatih; Tran, Christopher; Kim, Min Soo; Noh, Jungsik; Schneider, Rebekka; Ebert, Benjamin; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating carbohydrates are an essential energy source, perturbations in which are pathognomonic of various diseases, diabetes being the most prevalent. Yet many of the genes underlying diabetes and its characteristic hyperglycaemia remain elusive. Here we use physiological and genetic interrogations in D. melanogaster to uncover the ‘glucome', the complete set of genes involved in glucose regulation in flies. Partial genomic screens of ∼1,000 genes yield ∼160 hyperglycaemia ‘flyabetes' candidates that we classify using fat body- and muscle-specific knockdown and biochemical assays. The results highlight the minor glucose fraction as a physiological indicator of metabolism in Drosophila. The hits uncovered in our screen may have conserved functions in mammalian glucose homeostasis, as heterozygous and homozygous mutants of Ck1alpha in the murine adipose lineage, develop diabetes. Our findings demonstrate that glucose has a role in fly biology and that genetic screenings carried out in flies may increase our understanding of mammalian pathophysiology. PMID:25994086

  14. Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase caused by novel and known mutations in the E1alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jessie M; Levandovskiy, Valeriy; Mackay, Neviana; Tein, Ingrid; Robinson, Brian H

    2004-11-15

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH)-complex deficiency (OMIM 312170) is a clinically heterogeneous disorder, with phenotypes ranging from fatal lactic acidosis (LA) in the newborn to chronic neurological dysfunction. To date, over 80 different mutations have been identified in the PDHA1 gene in patients with PDH complex deficiency, which are thus thought to contribute to the PDH deficient phenotype. We have identified 14 additional patients with total PDH complex deficiency, all of whom were found to contain mutations within the PDHA1 gene (E(1)alpha subunit). The mutations include both missense mutations and duplications. Eight of these patients had novel mutations, and the remaining had mutations that have been identified previously in PDH complex deficient patients, with residual fibroblast activity ranging from 2.4 to 69% of control values. The nature of these mutations illustrates the variability in phenotype for a given gene defect, with intermittent ataxia being the mildest presentation, Leigh syndrome being the most common and severe neonatal LA the most severe.

  15. HIF-1alpha Deficiency Attenuates the Cardiomyogenesis of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kudová, Jana; Procházková, Jiřina; Vašiček, Ondřej; Perečko, Tomáš; Sedláčková, Miroslava; Pešl, Martin; Pacherník, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac cell formation, cardiomyogenesis, is critically dependent on oxygen availability. It is known that hypoxia, a reduced oxygen level, modulates the in vitro differentiation of pluripotent cells into cardiomyocytes via hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α)-dependent mechanisms. However, the direct impact of HIF-1α deficiency on the formation and maturation of cardiac-like cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) in vitro remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that HIF-1α deficiency significantly altered the quality and quantity of mESC-derived cardiomyocytes. It was accompanied with lower mRNA and protein levels of cardiac cell specific markers (myosin heavy chains 6 and 7) and with a decreasing percentage of myosin heavy chain α and β, and cardiac troponin T-positive cells. As to structural aspects of the differentiated cardiomyocytes, the localization of contractile proteins (cardiac troponin T, myosin heavy chain α and β) and the organization of myofibrils were also different. Simultaneously, HIF-1α deficiency was associated with a lower percentage of beating embryoid bodies. Interestingly, an observed alteration in the in vitro differentiation scheme of HIF-1α deficient cells was accompanied with significantly lower expression of the endodermal marker (hepatic nuclear factor 4 alpha). These findings thus suggest that HIF-1α deficiency attenuates spontaneous cardiomyogenesis through the negative regulation of endoderm development in mESC differentiating in vitro. PMID:27355368

  16. [Prednisolone, 1 alpha hydroxyvitamin D3 and androgens in the management in patients with refractory anemias].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Y; Yamagishi, M

    1988-04-01

    In a cooperative trial, 99 patients with refractory anemias were treated according to a standard protocol consisting of successive administration of prednisolone (PSL), 1 alpha hydroxyvitamin D3 (D3) and androgens. The primary objective of this protocol was to ameliorate peripheral cytopenia and to assess the value of the 3 drugs, claimed to be of some value, in the management of patients with refractory anemias. In principle, patients were initially treated with oral PSL 40-60 mg/day. Patients not responding to PSL within 4 weeks had an 8-week trial of D3 starting with 1 microgram/day, increasing to 3 micrograms/day. Those not responding to either of the two were given AS. Although the number of evaluable courses is limited as yet for each drug, the preliminary results suggest 1) a slight to moderate increase in hemoglobin in 20-25% of patients on PSL, 2) a partial increase in granulocyte and/or platelets and a reduction of marrow blasts in 10-20% of patients during the administration of D3 and 3) the effects are poorer in cases of severe cytopenia. In addition, the improvement was mostly transient. The treatment was well tolerated in the majority of patients.

  17. Mitochondrial Dynamics and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wada, Jun; Nakatsuka, Atsuko

    2016-06-01

    The mitochondria are involved in active and dynamic processes, such as mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy to maintain mitochondrial and cellular functions. In obesity and type 2 diabetes, impaired oxidation, reduced mitochondrial contents, lowered rates of oxidative phosphorylation and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production have been reported. Mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated by various transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), estrogen-related receptors (ERRs), and nuclear respiratory factors (NRFs). Mitochondrial fusion is promoted by mitofusin 1 (MFN1), mitofusin 2 (MFN2) and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), while fission is governed by the recruitment of dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) by adaptor proteins such as mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), mitochondrial dynamics proteins of 49 and 51 kDa (MiD49 and MiD51), and fission 1 (FIS1). Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and PARKIN promote DRP1-dependent mitochondrial fission, and the outer mitochondrial adaptor MiD51 is required in DRP1 recruitment and PARKIN-dependent mitophagy. This review describes the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial dynamics, its abnormality in diabetes and obesity, and pharmaceuticals targeting mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy. PMID:27339203

  18. Sequences of elongation factors-1 alpha and -1 gamma and stimulation by juvenile hormone in Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Zhou, S; Zhang, J; Fam, M D; Wyatt, G R; Walker, V K

    2002-11-01

    Two cDNAs encoding the alpha and gamma subunits of translation elongation factor-1 (EF-1) have been cloned and sequenced from the African migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. Southern blotting and real-time PCR analyses indicated that these sequences represent single copy genes. Comparison with sequences from other species indicated greater conservation for EF-1 alpha than for EF-1 gamma. The developmental profiles for EF-1 alpha and -1 gamma mRNA expression in the fat body paralleled reported changes in the hemolymph juvenile hormone (JH) titer in the fifth instar and were elevated during early reproductive maturation in the female adult. In maturing adults, there was a greater accumulation of EF-1 alpha and -1 gamma transcripts in females than in males. The levels of both transcripts were greatly increased by an enriched diet, previously shown to elevate JH titers and accelerate vitellogenin production. Treating JH-deprived adult females with the JH analog, methoprene, resulted in more than doubling of transcript levels of both genes, supporting the hypothesis that JH could stimulate the accumulation of LmEF-1 alpha and -1 gamma transcripts. We suggest that production of elongation factors, increased by JH, may contribute to the massive protein synthesis required for egg production. PMID:12530224

  19. Activation of JAK2/STAT1-alpha-dependent signaling events during Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Mauricio; Olivier, Martin; García, Luis F

    2002-01-01

    Induction of apoptosis by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in murine macrophage involves TNF-alpha and nitric oxide (NO) production and caspase cascade activation; however, the intracellular signaling pathways implicated remain to be established. Our results indicate that infection of the B10R murine macrophage line with M. tuberculosis induces apoptosis independent of mycobacterial phagocytosis and that M. tuberculosis induces protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity, JAK2/STAT1-alpha phosphorylation, and STAT1-alpha nuclear translocation. Inhibitors of PTK (AG-126), or JAK2 (AG-490) inhibited TNF-alpha and NO production, caspase 1 activation and apoptosis, suggesting that M. tuberculosis-induction of these events depends on JAK2/STAT1-alpha activation. In addition, we have obtained evidence that ManLAM capacity to inhibit M. tuberculosis-induced apoptosis involves the activation of the PTP SHP-1. The finding that M. tuberculosis infection activate JAK2/STAT1-alpha pathway suggests that M. tuberculosis might mimic macrophage-activating stimuli.

  20. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 1alpha-hydroxylase splice variants in benign and malignant ovarian cell lines and tissue.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Dorothea; Thomé, Marlene; Becker, Steffi; Cordes, Tim; Diedrich, Klaus; Friedrich, Michael; Thill, Marc

    2009-09-01

    Calcitriol is judged to have a positive effect on control of the immune system, cell growth and differentiation and therefore, the prevention of cancer genesis. The aim of this study was to detect any possible differences in the 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1alpha-hydroxylase (1alphaOHase)-expression between benign and malignant ovarian tissue and cell lines. The analysis was conducted quantitatively, by means of nested "touchdown" PCR and Western blot, and qualitatively, with the use of real-time PCR and Western blot. The gene structure was sequenced. Compared to the benign cell line, the malignant cell lines showed a significantly higher expression of 1alphaOHase at the RNA level. A statistically lower expression of the 1alphaOHase protein was found in the malignant tissue. In the malignant cell lines and tissues, divergent bands were detected, which led to various splice variants on sequencing. Their increased expression in malignancy is possibly bound to the reduction of enzyme activity, which may lead to the genesis of ovarian cancer. In the future, preventive and therapeutic activities may result from these findings. PMID:19667158

  1. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha is required for expression but dispensable for histone acetylation of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Tjalling; van Wering, Herbert M; Gielen, Marieke; Dowling, Lauren N; Fialkovich, John J; Piaseckyj, Christina M; Gonzalez, Frank J; Akiyama, Taro E; Montgomery, Robert K; Grand, Richard J; Krasinski, Stephen D

    2006-05-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha (HNF-1alpha) is a modified homeodomain-containing transcription factor that has been implicated in the regulation of intestinal genes. To define the importance and underlying mechanism of HNF-1alpha for the regulation of intestinal gene expression in vivo, we analyzed the expression of the intestinal differentiation markers and putative HNF-1alpha targets lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI) in hnf1alpha null mice. We found that in adult jejunum, LPH mRNA in hnf1alpha(-/-) mice was reduced 95% compared with wild-type controls (P < 0.01, n = 4), whereas SI mRNA was virtually identical to that in wild-type mice. Furthermore, SI mRNA abundance was unchanged in the absence of HNF-1alpha along the length of the adult mouse small intestine as well as in newborn jejunum. We found that HNF-1alpha occupies the promoters of both the LPH and SI genes in vivo. However, in contrast to liver and pancreas, where HNF-1alpha regulates target genes by recruitment of histone acetyl transferase activity to the promoter, the histone acetylation state of the LPH and SI promoters was not affected by the presence or absence of HNF-1alpha. Finally, we showed that a subset of hypothesized intestinal target genes is regulated by HNF-1alpha in vivo and that this regulation occurs in a defined tissue-specific and developmental context. These data indicate that HNF-1alpha is an activator of a subset of intestinal genes and induces these genes through an alternative mechanism in which it is dispensable for chromatin remodeling.

  2. SU-C-303-02: Correlating Metabolic Response to Radiation Therapy with HIF-1alpha Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, D; Peeters, W; Nickel, K; Eliceiri, K; Kimple, R; Van Der Kogel, A; Kissick, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To understand radiation induced alterations in cellular metabolism which could be used to assess treatment or normal tissue response to aid in patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. This work aims to compare the metabolic response of two head and neck cell lines, one malignant (UM-SCC-22B) and one benign (Normal Oral Keratinocyte), to ionizing radiation. Responses are compared to alterations in HIF-1alpha expression. These dynamics can potentially serve as biomarkers in assessing treatment response allowing for patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Measurements of metabolism and HIF-1alpha expression were taken before and X minutes after a 10 Gy dose of radiation delivered via an orthovoltage x-ray source. In vitro changes in metabolic activity were measured via fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to assess the mean lifetime of NADH autofluorescence following a dose of 10 Gy. HIF-1alpha expression was measured via immunohistochemical staining of in vitro treated cells and expression was quantified using the FIJI software package. Results: FLIM demonstrated a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH by 100 ps following 10 Gy indicating a shift towards glycolytic pathways for malignant cells; whereas this benign cell line showed little change in metabolic signature. Immunohistochemical analysis showed significant changes in HIF-1alpha expression in response to 10 Gy of radiation that correlate to metabolic profiles. Conclusion: Radiation induces significant changes in metabolic activity and HIF-1alpha expression. These alterations occur on time scales approximating the duration of common radiation treatments (approximately tens of minutes). Further understanding these dynamics has important implications with regard to improvement of therapy and biomarkers of treatment response.

  3. Interaction between the homeodomain proteins Cdx2 and HNF1alpha mediates expression of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene.

    PubMed

    Mitchelmore, C; Troelsen, J T; Spodsberg, N; Sjöström, H; Norén, O

    2000-03-01

    Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase is a brush-border enzyme which is specifically expressed in the small intestine where it hydrolyses lactose, the main carbohydrate found in milk. We have previously demonstrated in transgenic mice that the tissue-specific and developmental expression of lactase is controlled by a 1 kb upstream region of the pig lactase gene. Two homeodomain transcription factors, caudal-related homeodomain protein (Cdx2) and hepatic nuclear factor 1alpha (HNF1alpha), are known to bind to regulatory cis elements in the promoters for several intestine-specific genes, including lactase, and are present in mammalian intestinal epithelia from an early stage in development. In the present study, we examined whether Cdx2 and HNF1alpha physically interact and co-operatively activate transcription from the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase promoter. We show that the presence of both factors leads to a much higher level of transcription than the sum of the activation by either factor alone. The N-terminal activation domain of Cdx2 is required for maximal synergy with HNF1alpha. With the use of pull-down assays, we demonstrate a direct protein-protein interaction between Cdx2 and HNF1alpha. The interaction domain includes the homeodomain region of both proteins. This is the first demonstration of a functional interaction between two transcription factors involved in the activation of a number of intestine-specific genes. Synergistic interaction between tissue-restricted factors is likely to be an important mechanism for reinforcing developmental and tissue-specific gene expression within the intestine.

  4. Hyperinsulinemia may boost both hematocrit and iron absorption by up-regulating activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    2003-01-01

    There is growing evidence that increases in both hematocrit and body iron stores are components of the insulin resistance syndrome. The ability of insulin and of IGF-I - whose effective activity is increased in the context of insulin resistance - to boost activity of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), may be at least partially responsible for this association. HIF-1alpha, which functions physiologically as a detector of both hypoxia and iron-deficiency, promotes synthesis of erythropoietin, and may also mediate the up-regulatory impact of hypoxia on intestinal iron absorption. Insulin/IGF-I may also influence erythropoiesis more directly, as they are growth factors for developing reticulocytes. Conversely, the activation of HIF-1alpha associated with iron deficiency may be responsible for the increased glucose tolerance noted in iron-deficient animals; HIF-1alpha promotes efficient glucose uptake and glycolysis - a sensible adaptation to hypoxia - by inducing increased synthesis of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes. Recent reports that phlebotomy can increase the efficiency of muscle glucose uptake in lean healthy omnivores are intriguing and require further confirmation. Whether increased iron stores contribute to the elevated vascular risk associated with insulin resistance is doubtful, inasmuch as most prospective studies fail to correlate serum ferritin or transferrin saturation with subsequent vascular events. However, current data are reasonably consistent with the possibility that moderately elevated iron stores are associated with increased overall risk for cancer - and for colorectal cancer in particular; free iron may play a catalytic role in 'spontaneous' mutagenesis. Thus, iron excess may mediate at least some of the increased cancer risk associated with insulin resistance and heme-rich diets. People who are insulin resistant can minimize any health risk associated with iron overload by avoiding heme

  5. Exogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 alpha increase resistance to Salmonella typhimurium: efficacy is influenced by the Ity and Lps loci.

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, P J; Charrier, K; Vogel, S N

    1995-01-01

    Interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) administered prior to infection with Salmonella typhimurium increases survival in mice that are Ityr, not in susceptible Lpsd or Itys mice. Combined IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha pretreatment results in greater survival than that seen with either cytokine alone in Ityr mice. Treatment after infection with TNF-alpha and/or IL-1 alpha increases the mean time to death but not the survival fraction of Lpsd mice and was ineffective in either Ityr or Itys mice. PMID:7622247

  6. Localization of S1 and elongation factor-1 alpha mRNA in rat brain and liver by non-radioactive in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Stollar, E; Wang, E

    1993-07-01

    Elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) is a ubiquitous, highly conserved protein that functions in peptide elongation during mRNA translation. We recently reported that, as do lower species, mammals also contain a second EF-1 alpha-like gene (S1). Unlike EF-1 alpha, which is present in all tissues, S1 mRNA is detected only in brain, heart, and muscle by Northern analysis and RNAse protection assays. In this report we present the identification of S1 and EF-1 alpha messages by non-radioactive in situ hybridization in brain and liver. We show that with this technique we can detected S1 mRNA only in certain cells in brain, mostly neurons; on the other hand, EF-1 alpha is present in all cell types that we have studied so far. We demonstrate that although EF-1 alpha mRNA can be detected in S1-negative cells it is also present in high abundance in S1-positive cells. The results presented here correlate with our previous finding that mammalian species contain a tissue-specific EF-1 alpha-like gene, S1. The presence of a second EF-1 alpha-like transcript within fully differentiated cells suggests a novel cell type-specific gene expression whose function may be related to the permanent growth-arrested state of cells in brain, heart, and muscle. PMID:8515051

  7. Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 Alpha Is Expressed in Germ Cells throughout the Murine Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Lauren H.; Mathews, Juanita; Yamazaki, Yuki; Allsopp, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells of the early embryo, and germ line cells, are essential to ensure uncompromised development to adulthood as well as species propagation, respectively. Recently, the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (Hif1α) has been shown to have important roles in embryonic stem cells; in particular, regulation of conversion to glycolytic metabolism and, as we have shown, maintenance of functional levels of telomerase. In the present study, we sought to assess whether Hif1α was also expressed in the primitive cells of the murine embryo. We observed expression of Hif1α in pre-implantation embryos, specifically the 2-cell stage, morula, and blastocyst. Robust Hif1α expression was also observed in male and female primordial germ cells. We subsequently assessed whether Hif1α was expressed in adult male and female germ cells. In the testis, Hif1α was robustly expressed in spermatogonial cells, in both juvenile (6-week old) and adult (3-month old) males. In the ovaries, Hif1α was expressed in mature oocytes from adult females, as assessed both in situ and in individual oocytes flushed from super-ovulated females. Analysis of Hif1α transcript levels indicates a mechanism of regulation during early development that involves stockpiling of Hif1α protein in mature oocytes, presumably to provide protection from hypoxic stress until the gene is re-activated at the blastocyst stage. Together, these observations show that Hif1α is expressed throughout the life-cycle, including both the male and female germ line, and point to an important role for Hif1α in early progenitor cells. PMID:27148974

  8. Wortmannin influences hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha expression and glycolysis in esophageal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ling; Zhou, Hai-Yun; Tang, Na-Na; Zhang, Wei-Feng; He, Gui-Jun; Hao, Bo; Feng, Ya-Dong; Zhu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT)-HIF-1α signaling pathway on glycolysis in esophageal carcinoma cells under hypoxia. METHODS: Esophageal carcinoma cell lines Eca109 and TE13 were cultured under hypoxia environment, and the protein, mRNA and activity levels of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), glucose transporter 1, hexokinase-II, phosphofructokinase 2 and lactate dehydrogenase-A were determined. Supernatant lactic acid concentrations were also detected. The PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was then inhibited with wortmannin, and the effects of hypoxia on the expression or activities of HIF-1α, associated glycolytic enzymes and lactic acid concentrations were observed. Esophageal carcinoma cells were then transfected with interference plasmid with HIF-1α-targeting siRNA to assess impact of the high expression of HIF-1α on glycolysis. RESULTS: HIF-1α is highly expressed in the esophageal carcinoma cell lines tested, and with decreasing levels of oxygen, the expression of HIF-1α and the associated glycolytic enzymes and the extracellular lactic acid concentration were enhanced in the esophageal carcinoma cell lines Eca109 and TE13. In both normoxia and hypoxic conditions, the level of glycolytic enzymes and the secretion of lactic acid were both reduced by wortmannin. The expression and activities of glycolytic enzymes and the lactic acid concentration in cells were reduced by inhibiting HIF-1α, especially the decreasing level of glycolysis was significant under hypoxic conditions. CONCLUSION: The PI3K/AKT pathway and HIF-1α are both involved in the process of glycolysis in esophageal cancer cells. PMID:27239113

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 {alpha} expression predicts superior survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with R-CHOP.

    PubMed

    Evens, Andrew M; Sehn, Laurie H; Farinha, Pedro; Nelson, Beverly P; Raji, Adekunle; Lu, Yi; Brakman, Adam; Parimi, Vamsi; Winter, Jane N; Schumacker, Paul T; Gascoyne, Randy D; Gordon, Leo I

    2010-02-20

    PURPOSE Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) controls the expression of genes in response to hypoxia, as well as a wide range of other cellular processes. We previously showed constitutive stabilization of HIF-1alpha in the majority of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To our knowledge, the prognostic significance of HIF in lymphoma has never been investigated. PATIENTS AND METHODS We studied the immunohistochemical protein expression of HIF-1alpha on tissue microarrays from 153 patients with DLBCL treated in sequential cohorts with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, oncovin, and prednisone (CHOP) or rituximab-CHOP (R-CHOP) from 1999 to 2002. Results were correlated with patient outcome. Results Median follow-up for all patients was 80 months. Among all patients, HIF-1alpha was expressed in 62% of germinal center and 59% of non-germinal center patients. With HIF-1alpha analyzed as a dependent variable, there were no survival differences in CHOP-treated patients. In the R-CHOP group, however, HIF-1alpha protein expression correlated with significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Five-year PFS for HIF-1alpha-positive patients was 71% v 43% for HIF-1alpha-negative patients (P = .0187), whereas 5-year OS was 75% and 54%, respectively (P = .025). In multivariate analysis with International Prognostic Index criteria, HIF-1alpha remained a significant predictor for PFS (P = .026) and OS (P = .043). Compared with other biomarkers, HIF-1alpha correlated only with BCL6 (P = .004). In terms of gene expression, we found several common gene associations of HIF-1alpha and the stromal-1 signature with genes predominantly involved in regulation of the extracellular matrix (eg, BGN, COL1A2, COL5A1, and PLOD2). CONCLUSION The expression of HIF-1alpha protein is an important independent favorable prognostic factor for survival in patients with DLBCL treated with R-CHOP. PMID:20048181

  10. Chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha}, suppress amyloid {beta}-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Milatovic, Snjezana-Zaja; Milatovic, Dejan; Fan, Guo-Huang; Richmond, Ann

    2011-11-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and accumulation of neurotoxic oligomeric peptides amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}). Although the molecular events are not entirely known, it has become evident that inflammation, environmental and other risk factors may play a causal, disruptive and/or protective role in the development of AD. The present study investigated the ability of the chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}), the respective ligands for chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4, to suppress A{beta}-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment with MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} significantly protected neurons from A{beta}-induced dendritic regression and apoptosis in vitro through activation of Akt, ERK1/2 and maintenance of metalloproteinase ADAM17 especially with SDF-1{alpha}. Intra-cerebroventricular (ICV) injection of A{beta} led to reduction in dendritic length and spine density of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and increased oxidative damage 24 h following the exposure. The A{beta}-induced morphometric changes of neurons and increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes, were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with the chemokines MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha}. Additionally, MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} was able to suppress the aberrant mislocalization of p21-activated kinase (PAK), one of the proteins involved in the maintenance of dendritic spines. Furthermore, MIP-2 also protected neurons against A{beta} neurotoxicity in CXCR2-/- mice, potentially through observed up regulation of CXCR1 mRNA. Understanding the neuroprotective potential of chemokines is crucial in defining the role for their employment during the early stages of neurodegeneration. -- Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuroprotective ability of the chemokines MIP2 and CXCL12 against A{beta} toxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MIP-2 or

  11. Kaempferol is an estrogen-related receptor alpha and gamma inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjian; Fang, Fang; Huang, Zhiyan; Wang, Yanfei; Wong, Chiwai

    2009-02-18

    Kaempferol is a dietary flavonoid that is thought to function as a selective estrogen receptor modulator. In this study, we established that kaempferol also functions as an inverse agonist for estrogen-related receptors alpha and gamma (ERRalpha and ERRgamma). We demonstrated that kaempferol binds to ERRalpha and ERRgamma and blocks their interaction with coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha). Kaempferol also suppressed the expressions of ERR-target genes pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 and 4 (PDK2 and PDK4). This evidence suggests that kaempferol may exert some of its biological effect through both estrogen receptors and estrogen-related receptors. PMID:19171140

  12. Structure-based design, synthesis, and SAR evaluation of a new series of 8-hydroxyquinolines as HIF-1alpha prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Warshakoon, Namal C; Wu, Shengde; Boyer, Angelique; Kawamoto, Richard; Sheville, Justin; Renock, Sean; Xu, Kevin; Pokross, Matthew; Zhou, Songtao; Winter, Carol; Walter, Richard; Mekel, Marlene; Evdokimov, Artem G

    2006-11-01

    A new series of potent 8-hydroxyquinolines was designed based on the newly resolved X-ray crystal structure of EGLN-1. Both alkyl and aryl 8-hydroxyquinoline-7-carboxyamides were good HIF-1alpha prolyl hydroxylase (EGLN) inhibitors. In subsequent VEGF induction assays, these exhibited potent VEGF activity. In addition, this class of compounds did show the ability to stabilize HIF-1alpha.

  13. Direct chemical synthesis of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxy(26,27-3H) vitamin D3 with high specific activity: its use in receptor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Napoli, J.L.; Mellon, W.S.; Fivizzani, M.A.; Schnoes, H.K.; DeLuca, H.F.

    1980-05-01

    The first direct chemical synthesis of radiolabeled 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 is reported. Unlike all previous syntheses, the new approach does not rely on enzymatic 1 alpha-hydroxylation of radiolabeled precursors. Rather, isotope is introduced in the last synthetic step by reaction of (3H) -methylmagnesium bromide with methyl 1 alpha-hydroxy-26,27-dinorvitamin D3-25-carboxylate to give 1 alpha,25-dihydroxy-(26,27-3H) vitamin D3 with a specific activity of 160 Ci/mmol. Mass spectroscopy confirmed that the radiohormone consists of a single isomer with six tritium atoms bound to carbons 26 and 27. Synthetically produced 1 alpha,25-dihydroxy (26,27-3H) vitamin D3 is indistinguishable from 1 alpha,25-dihydroxy-(26,27-3H) vitamin D3 obtained from the enzymatic 1 alpha-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxy(26,27-3H) vitamin D3 (160 Ci/mmol) by high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis and in the competitive binding assay using chick intestinal cytosol as the receptor source. Equilibrium dissociation constant measurements with the high specific activity radiohormone indicate a Kd of 8.2 x 10(-11) M for the chick intestinal cytosol 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor--a value considerably lower than the constants in the range of (1-5) x 10(-9) M previously reported.

  14. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein hFis1 regulates mitochondrial morphology and fission through self-interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serasinghe, Madhavika N.; Yoon, Yisang

    2008-11-15

    Mitochondrial fission in mammals is mediated by at least two proteins, DLP1/Drp1 and hFis1. DLP1 mediates the scission of mitochondrial membranes through GTP hydrolysis, and hFis1 is a putative DLP1 receptor anchored at the mitochondrial outer membrane by a C-terminal single transmembrane domain. The cytosolic domain of hFis1 contains six {alpha}-helices ({alpha}1-{alpha}6) out of which {alpha}2-{alpha}5 form two tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) folds. In this study, by using chimeric constructs, we demonstrated that the cytosolic domain contains the necessary information for hFis1 function during mitochondrial fission. By using transient expression of different mutant forms of the hFis1 protein, we found that hFis1 self-interaction plays an important role in mitochondrial fission. Our results show that deletion of the {alpha}1 helix greatly increased the formation of dimeric and oligomeric forms of hFis1, indicating that {alpha}1 helix functions as a negative regulator of the hFis1 self-interaction. Further mutational approaches revealed that a tyrosine residue in the {alpha}5 helix and the linker between {alpha}3 and {alpha}4 helices participate in hFis1 oligomerization. Mutations causing oligomerization defect greatly reduced the ability to induce not only mitochondrial fragmentation by full-length hFis1 but also the formation of swollen ball-shaped mitochondria caused by {alpha}1-deleted hFis1. Our data suggest that oligomerization of hFis1 in the mitochondrial outer membrane plays a role in mitochondrial fission, potentially through participating in fission factor recruitment.

  15. Nitrate-containing beetroot enhances myocyte metabolism and mitochondrial content

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Roger A.; Gannon, Nicholas P.; Carriker, Colin R.

    2015-01-01

    Beetroot (甜菜 tián cài) juice consumption is of current interest for improving aerobic performance by acting as a vasodilator and possibly through alterations in skeletal muscle metabolism and physiology. This work explored the effects of a commercially available beetroot supplement on metabolism, gene expression, and mitochondrial content in cultured myocytes. C2C12 myocytes were treated with various concentrations of the beetroot supplement for various durations. Glycolytic metabolism and oxidative metabolism were quantified via measurement of extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption, respectively. Metabolic gene expression was measured using quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, and mitochondrial content was assessed with flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Cells treated with beetroot exhibited significantly increased oxidative metabolism, concurrently with elevated metabolic gene expression including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha, nuclear respiratory factor 1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, and glucose transporter 4, leading to increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Our data show that treatment with a beetroot supplement increases basal oxidative metabolism. Our observations are also among the first to demonstrate that beetroot extract is an inducer of metabolic gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis. These observations support the need for further investigation into the therapeutic and pharmacological effects of nitrate-containing supplements for health and athletic benefits. PMID:26870674

  16. Nitrate-containing beetroot enhances myocyte metabolism and mitochondrial content.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Roger A; Gannon, Nicholas P; Carriker, Colin R

    2016-01-01

    Beetroot ( tián cài) juice consumption is of current interest for improving aerobic performance by acting as a vasodilator and possibly through alterations in skeletal muscle metabolism and physiology. This work explored the effects of a commercially available beetroot supplement on metabolism, gene expression, and mitochondrial content in cultured myocytes. C2C12 myocytes were treated with various concentrations of the beetroot supplement for various durations. Glycolytic metabolism and oxidative metabolism were quantified via measurement of extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption, respectively. Metabolic gene expression was measured using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and mitochondrial content was assessed with flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Cells treated with beetroot exhibited significantly increased oxidative metabolism, concurrently with elevated metabolic gene expression including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha, nuclear respiratory factor 1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, and glucose transporter 4, leading to increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Our data show that treatment with a beetroot supplement increases basal oxidative metabolism. Our observations are also among the first to demonstrate that beetroot extract is an inducer of metabolic gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis. These observations support the need for further investigation into the therapeutic and pharmacological effects of nitrate-containing supplements for health and athletic benefits. PMID:26870674

  17. The conserved amino-terminal domain of hSRP1 alpha is essential for nuclear protein import.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, K; Ryder, U; Lamond, A I

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear proteins are targeted through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in an energy-dependent reaction. The import reaction is mediated by nuclear localization sequences (NLS) in the substrate which are recognized by heterodimeric cytoplasmic receptors. hSRP1 alpha is an NLS-binding subunit of the human NLS receptor complex and is complexed in vivo with a second subunit of 97 kDa (p97). We show here that a short amino-terminal domain in hSRP1 alpha is necessary and sufficient for its interaction with p97. This domain is conserved in other SRP1-like proteins and its fusion to a cytoplasmic reporter protein is sufficient to promote complete nuclear import, circumventing the usual requirement for an NLS receptor interaction. The same amino-terminal domain inhibits import of NLS-containing proteins when added to an in vitro nuclear transport assay. While full-length hSRP alpha is able to leave the nucleus, the amino-terminal domain alone is not sufficient to promote exit. We conclude that hSRP1 alpha functions as an adaptor to tether NLS-containing substrates to the protein import machinery. Images PMID:8617227

  18. Possible role of interleukin 1 alpha and interleukin 1 beta in the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Schilling, V; Negri, B; Bujía, J; Schulz, P; Kastenbauer, E

    1992-07-01

    Cholesteatoma of the middle ear is characterized by the presence of hyperproliferative keratinizing squamous epithelium in the middle ear cavity and destruction of adjacent bone. Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is an autocrine growth factor for normal keratinocytes and is capable of inducing bone degradation. The distribution of two molecular species of IL-1, IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta, was investigated immunohistochemically in the hyperproliferative epithelium of cholesteatoma, in normal epidermis of the auditory canal and of the retroauricular region, and in nonkeratinizing tonsillar epithelium. In all squamous epithelia examined, IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta were present in comparable amounts. The IL-1 content of cholesteatoma epithelium was clearly increased in relation to normal skin keratinocytes. All cellular layers of cholesteatoma epithelium stained strongly and uniformly for Il-1 alpha and IL-1 beta, whereas the keratin layer was negative for IL-1. No particularly strong reaction with basal cells was detected. In the connective tissue under the squamous epithelium of cholesteatoma, intensely positive cells were scattered between negative stromal cells. Our results suggest that IL-1 could be liberated from disintegrating keratinocytes and cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, stimulate the proliferation of the cholesteatoma epithelium in an autocrine manner, and contribute to the enhancement of bone destruction in the presence of cholesteatoma.

  19. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jourdain, Alexis A.; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey

    2016-01-01

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized “mitochondrial RNA granules,” mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  20. Parathyroidectomy reduces 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1 alpha-hydroxylase activity in the hypocalcemic vitamin D-deficient chick.

    PubMed Central

    Booth, B E; Tsai, H C; Morris, R C

    1977-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that in the vitamin D-deficient state the activity of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1 alpha-hydroxylase (25-OHD3-1 alpha-hydroxylase) is modulated by parathyroid hormone and the plasma concentration of phosphate only in the presence of small amounts of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (or some other metabolite of vitamin D), we measured the activity of this enzyme 24 h after parathyroidectomy (PTX) in frankly hypocalcemic, vitamin D-deficient chicks that were not supplemented with vitamin D or one of its metabolites. The otherwise predictable complications of PTX in this metabolic setting (hypocalcemia of increasing severity, tetany, moribundity, and death) were prevented by continuous intravenous administration of calcium (as a solution of calcium chloride/calcium gluconate 1:1) through a catheter in the external jugular vein placed at the time of PTX. The findings were as follows: (a) The activity of 25-OHD3-1 alpha-hydroxylase was significantly less in the parathyroidectomized group than in the sham-operated control chicks (P less than 0.001). (b) The reductive effect of PTX on the activity of this enzyme was significantly attenuated when hypophosphatemia was increased in severity by administration of glucose. (c) In the post-PTX state the activity of 25-OHD3-1 alpha-hydroxylase and plasma concentration of phosphate were significantly, inversely related (P less than 0.001). (d) In the sham-operated control group the activity of this enzyme and the plasma concentration of phosphate were not significantly correlated. These findings indicate that in the vitamin D-deficient state, both circulating parathyroid hormone and the plasma concentration of phosphate can significantly modulate the activity of 25-OHD3-1 alpha-hydroxylase in the absence of vitamin D or its metabolites. The findings also suggest that in the vitamin D-deficient state the plasma concentration of phosphate modulates the activity of this enzyme only when the concentration of circulating

  1. Mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} identified in MODY3 and MODY5 downregulate DPP-IV gene expression in Caco-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Ning; Adachi, Tetsuya; Matsunaga, Tetsuro; Takeda, Jun; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Ishihara, Akihiko; Yasuda, Koichiro; Tsuda, Kinsuke . E-mail: jinkan@tom.life.h.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-08-04

    Dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a well-documented drug target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNF)-1{alpha} and HNF-1{beta}, known as the causal genes of MODY3 and MODY5, respectively, have been reported to be involved in regulation of DPP-IV gene expression. But, it is not completely clear (i) that they play roles in regulation of DPP-IV gene expression, and (ii) whether DPP-IV gene activity is changed by mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} in MODY3 and MODY5. To explore these questions, we investigated transactivation effects of wild HNF-1{alpha} and 13 mutant HNF-1{alpha}, as well as wild HNF-1{beta} and 2 mutant HNF-1{beta}, on DPP-IV promoter luciferase gene in Caco-2 cells by means of a transient experiment. Both wild HNF-1{alpha} and wild HNF-1{beta} significantly transactivated DPP-IV promoter, but mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} exhibited low transactivation activity. Moreover, to study whether mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} change endogenous DPP-IV enzyme activity, we produced four stable cell lines from Caco-2 cells, in which wild HNF-1{alpha} or wild HNF-1{beta}, or else respective dominant-negative mutant HNF-1{alpha}T539fsdelC or dominant-negative mutant HNF-1{beta}R177X, was stably expressed. We found that DPP-IV gene expression and enzyme activity were significantly increased in wild HNF-1{alpha} cells and wild HNF-1{beta} cells, whereas they decreased in HNF-1{alpha}T539fsdelC cells and HNF-1{beta}R177X cells, compared with DPP-IV gene expression and enzyme activity in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that both wild HNF-1{alpha} and wild HNF-1{beta} have a stimulatory effect on DPP-IV gene expression, but that mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} attenuate the stimulatory effect.

  2. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  3. Evaluation of plasma and urinary levels of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha as a marker for asymptomatic myxomatous mitral valve disease in dogs.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Caroline E; Sundqvist, Anna V; Kjempff, Christina T; Tarnow, Inge; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Kamstrup, Thea S; Sterup, Anne-Lise; Soerensen, Tina M; Olsen, Lisbeth H

    2010-05-01

    Endothelial dysfunction might be involved in the pathogenesis of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). The aims of this study were (1) to validate an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for canine 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F(1alpha) (prostacyclin metabolite and marker for endothelial function) and (2) to compare plasma and urinary 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) in dogs with asymptomatic MMVD. The study included two breeds predisposed to MMVD and two control groups (Cairn terriers and dogs of different breeds). Echocardiography was used to estimate the severity of MMVD. The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were between 3.1% and 24.5% in the assay range. No echocardiographic parameter was correlated with plasma or urinary 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) (P>0.05), but all control dogs had lower urinary 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) (P<0.02) and the Cairn terriers had higher plasma 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) (P<0.02). The EIA appeared valid for measuring canine 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) in plasma and urine. It is suggested that 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) levels are related to breed and not MMVD in asymptomatic stages.

  4. Physical interaction between GATA-5 and hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha results in synergistic activation of the human lactase-phlorizin hydrolase promoter.

    PubMed

    van Wering, Herbert M; Huibregtse, Inge L; van der Zwan, Sanne M; de Bie, Maartje S; Dowling, Lauren N; Boudreau, Francois; Rings, Edmond H H M; Grand, Richard J; Krasinski, Stephen D

    2002-08-01

    GATA-4, -5, and -6 zinc finger and hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha (HNF-1alpha) homeodomain transcription factors are expressed in the intestinal epithelium and synergistically activate the promoter of intestinal genes. Here, we demonstrate that GATA-5 and HNF-1alpha physically associate both in vivo and in vitro and that this interaction is necessary for cooperative activation of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase promoter. Furthermore, physical association is mediated by the C-terminal zinc finger of GATA factors and the homeodomain of HNF-1alpha. Deletion of HNF-1alpha activation domains or interruption of HNF-1-binding sites in the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase promoter resulted in a complete loss of cooperativity, whereas deletion of GATA-5 activation domains or interruption of GATA-binding sites resulted in a reduction, but not an elimination, of cooperativity. We hypothesize that GATA/HNF-1alpha cooperativity is mediated by HNF-1alpha through its activation domains, which are oriented for high levels of activation through binding to DNA and physical association with GATA factors. These data suggest a paradigm whereby intestine-specific gene expression is regulated by unique interactions among tissue-restricted transcription factors coexpressed in the intestine. Parallel mechanisms in other tissues as well as in Drosophila suggest that zinc finger/homeodomain interactions are an efficient pathway of cooperative activation of gene transcription that has been conserved throughout evolution.

  5. Functional defect of truncated hepatocyte nuclear factor-1{alpha} (G554fsX556) associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young

    SciTech Connect

    Kooptiwut, Suwattanee; Sujjitjoon, Jatuporn; Plengvidhya, Nattachet; Boonyasrisawat, Watip; Chongjaroen, Nalinee; Jungtrakoon, Prapapron; Semprasert, Namoiy; Furuta, Hiroto; Nanjo, Kishio; Banchuin, Napatawn; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2009-05-22

    A novel frameshift mutation attributable to 14-nucleotide insertion in hepatocyte nuclear factor-1{alpha} (HNF-1{alpha}) encoding a truncated HNF-1{alpha} (G554fsX556) with 76-amino acid deletion at its carboxyl terminus was identified in a Thai family with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). The wild-type and mutant HNF-1{alpha} proteins were expressed by in vitro transcription and translation (TNT) assay and by transfection in HeLa cells. The wild-type and mutant HNF-1{alpha} could similarly bind to human glucose-transporter 2 (GLUT2) promoter examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). However, the transactivation activities of mutant HNF-1{alpha} on human GLUT2 and rat L-type pyruvate kinase (L-PK) promoters in HeLa cells determined by luciferase reporter assay were reduced to approximately 55-60% of the wild-type protein. These results suggested that the functional defect of novel truncated HNF-1{alpha} (G554fsX556) on the transactivation of its target-gene promoters would account for the {beta}-cell dysfunction associated with the pathogenesis of MODY.

  6. Role of ERO1-alpha-mediated stimulation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor activity in endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Mongillo, Marco; Chin, King-Tung; Harding, Heather; Ron, David; Marks, Andrew R; Tabas, Ira

    2009-09-21

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis is involved in many diseases, but the mechanisms linking ER stress to apoptosis are incompletely understood. Based on roles for C/EPB homologous protein (CHOP) and ER calcium release in apoptosis, we hypothesized that apoptosis involves the activation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R) via CHOP-induced ERO1-alpha (ER oxidase 1 alpha). In ER-stressed cells, ERO1-alpha is induced by CHOP, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of ERO1-alpha suppresses apoptosis. IP3-induced calcium release (IICR) is increased during ER stress, and this response is blocked by siRNA-mediated silencing of ERO1-alpha or IP3R1 and by loss-of-function mutations in Ero1a or Chop. Reconstitution of ERO1-alpha in Chop(-/-) macrophages restores ER stress-induced IICR and apoptosis. In vivo, macrophages from wild-type mice but not Chop(-/-) mice have elevated IICR when the animals are challenged with the ER stressor tunicamycin. Macrophages from insulin-resistant ob/ob mice, another model of ER stress, also have elevated IICR. These data shed new light on how the CHOP pathway of apoptosis triggers calcium-dependent apoptosis through an ERO1-alpha-IP3R pathway.

  7. Interleukin 1. alpha. inhibits prostaglandin E sub 2 release to suppress pulsatile release of luteinizing hormone but not follicle-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Rettori, V.; McCann, S.M. ); Gimeno, M.F. ); Karara, A. ); Gonzalez, M.C. )

    1991-04-01

    Interleukin 1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), a powerful endogenous pyrogen released from monocytes and macrophages by bacterial endotoxin, stimulates corticotropin, prolactin, and somatotropin release and inhibits thyrotropin release by hypothalamic action. The authors injected recombinant human IL-1{alpha} into the third cerebral ventricle, to study its effect on the pulsatile release of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in conscious, freely moving, ovariectomized rats. Intraventricular injection of 0.25 pmol of IL-1{alpha} caused an almost immediate reduction of plasma LH concentration. To determine the mechanism of the suppression of LH release, mediobasal hypothalamic fragments were incubated in vitro with IL-1{alpha} (10 pM) and the release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} into the medium was measured by RIA in the presence or absence of nonrepinephrine. 1{alpha} reduced basal LHRH release and blocked LHRH release induced by nonrepinephrine. In conclusion, IL-1{alpha} suppresses LH but not FSH release by an almost complete cessation of pulsatile release of LH in the castrated rat. The mechanism of this effect appears to be by inhibition of prostaglandin E{sub 2}-mediated release of LHRH.

  8. Signal transduction in hypoxic cells: inducible nuclear translocation and recruitment of the CBP/p300 coactivator by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Kallio, P J; Okamoto, K; O'Brien, S; Carrero, P; Makino, Y; Tanaka, H; Poellinger, L

    1998-11-16

    In response to decreased cellular oxygen concentrations the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/PAS (Per, Arnt, Sim) hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, HIF-1alpha, mediates activation of networks of target genes involved in angiogenesis, erythropoiesis and glycolysis. Here we demonstrate that the mechanism of activation of HIF-1alpha is a multi-step process which includes hypoxia-dependent nuclear import and activation (derepression) of the transactivation domain, resulting in recruitment of the CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300 coactivator. Inducible nuclear accumulation was shown to be dependent on a nuclear localization signal (NLS) within the C-terminal end of HIF-1alpha which also harbors the hypoxia-inducible transactivation domain. Nuclear import of HIF-1alpha was inhibited by either deletion or a single amino acid substitution within the NLS sequence motif and, within the context of the full-length protein, these mutations also resulted in inhibition of the transactivation activity of HIF-1alpha and recruitment of CBP. However, nuclear localization per se was not sufficient for transcriptional activation, since fusion of HIF-1alpha to the heterologous GAL4 DNA-binding domain generated a protein which showed constitutive nuclear localization but required hypoxic stimuli for function as a CBP-dependent transcription factor. Thus, hypoxia-inducible nuclear import and transactivation by recruitment of CBP can be functionally separated from one another and play critical roles in signal transduction by HIF-1alpha.

  9. Andrographolide down-regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hui-Hsuan; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chou, Fen-Pi; Wang, Chau-Jong; Hsuan, Shu-Wen; Wang, Cheng-Kun; Chen, Jing-Hsien

    2011-02-01

    Andrographolide (Andro), a diterpenoid lactone isolated from a traditional herbal medicine Andrographis paniculata, is known to possess multiple pharmacological activities. In our previous study, Andro had been shown to inhibit non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cell migration and invasion via down-regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Here we demonstrated that Andro inhibited the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in A549 cells. HIF-1{alpha} plays an important role in tumor growth, angiogenesis and lymph node metastasis of NSCLC. The Andro-induced decrease of cellular protein level of HIF-1{alpha} was correlated with a rapid ubiquitin-dependent degradation of HIF-1{alpha}, and was accompanied by increased expressions of hydroxyl-HIF-1{alpha} and prolyl hydroxylase (PHD2), and a later decrease of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) upon the treatment of Andro. The Andro-inhibited VEGF expression appeared to be a consequence of HIF-1{alpha} inactivation, because its DNA binding activity was suppressed by Andro. Molecular data showed that all these effects of Andro might be mediated via TGF{beta}1/PHD2/HIF-1{alpha} pathway, as demonstrated by the transfection of TGF{beta}1 overexpression vector and PHD2 siRNA, and the usage of a pharmacological MG132 inhibitor. Furthermore, we elucidated the involvement of Andro in HIF-1{alpha} transduced VEGF expression in A549 cells and other NSCLC cell lines. In conclusion, these results highlighted the potential effects of Andro, which may be developed as a chemotherapeutic or an anti-angiogenesis agent for NSCLC in the future.

  10. Aerobic Interval Training Attenuates Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Rats Post-Myocardial Infarction: Roles of Mitochondrial Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong-Ke; Wang, You-Hua; Sun, Lei; He, Xi; Zhao, Mei; Feng, Zhi-Hui; Yu, Xiao-Jiang; Zang, Wei-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic interval training (AIT) can favorably affect cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of AIT on post-myocardial infarction (MI)—associated mitochondrial dysfunctions remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of AIT on myocardial mitochondria in post-MI rats by focusing on mitochondrial dynamics (fusion and fission). Mitochondrial respiratory functions (as measured by the respiratory control ratio (RCR) and the ratio of ADP to oxygen consumption (P/O)); complex activities; dynamic proteins (mitofusin (mfn) 1/2, type 1 optic atrophy (OPA1) and dynamin-related protein1 (DRP1)); nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α); and the oxidative signaling of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and P53 were observed. Post-MI rats exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction and adverse mitochondrial network dynamics (reduced fusion and increased fission), which was associated with activated ERK1/2-JNK-P53 signaling and decreased nuclear PGC-1α. After AIT, MI-associated mitochondrial dysfunction was improved (elevated RCR and P/O and enhanced complex I, III and IV activities); in addition, increased fusion (mfn2 and OPA1), decreased fission (DRP1), elevated nuclear PGC-1α and inactivation of the ERK1/2-JNK-P53 signaling were observed. These data demonstrate that AIT may restore the post-MI mitochondrial function by inhibiting dynamics pathological remodeling, which may be associated with inactivation of ERK1/2-JNK-P53 signaling and increase in nuclear PGC-1α expression. PMID:24675698

  11. Listeriolysin O-dependent bacterial entry into the cytoplasm is required for calpain activation and interleukin-1 alpha secretion in macrophages infected with Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Dewamitta, Sita R; Nomura, Takamasa; Kawamura, Ikuo; Hara, Hideki; Tsuchiya, Kohsuke; Kurenuma, Takeshi; Shen, Yanna; Daim, Sylvia; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Qu, Huixin; Sakai, Shunsuke; Xu, Yanting; Mitsuyama, Masao

    2010-05-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO), an hly-encoded cytolysin of Listeria monocytogenes, plays an essential role in the entry of L. monocytogenes into the host cell cytoplasm. L. monocytogenes-infected macrophages produce various proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), that contribute to the host immune response. In this study, we have examined IL-1 alpha production in macrophages infected with wild-type L. monocytogenes or a nonescaping mutant strain deficient for LLO (Delta hly). Expression of IL-1 alpha mRNA and accumulation of pro-IL-1 alpha in the cytoplasm were induced by both strains. In contrast, the secretion of the mature form of IL-1 alpha from infected macrophages was observed in infection with wild-type L. monocytogenes but not with the Delta hly mutant. A recovery of the ability to induce IL-1 alpha secretion was shown in a mutant strain complemented with the hly gene. The Toll-like receptor (TLR)/MyD88 signaling pathway was exclusively required for the expression of pro-IL-1 alpha, independently of LLO-mediated cytoplasmic entry of L. monocytogenes. The LLO-dependent secretion of mature IL-1 alpha was abolished by addition of calcium chelators, and only LLO-producing L. monocytogenes strains were able to induce elevation of the intracellular calcium level in infected macrophages. A calcium-dependent protease, calpain, was implicated in the maturation and secretion of IL-1 alpha induced by LLO-producing L. monocytogenes strains based on the effect of calpain inhibitor. Functional activation of calpain was detected in macrophages infected with LLO-producing L. monocytogenes strains but not with a mutant strain lacking LLO. These results clearly indicated that LLO-mediated cytoplasmic entry of bacteria could induce the activation of intracellular calcium signaling, which is essential for maturation and secretion of IL-1 alpha in macrophages during L. monocytogenes infection through activation of a calcium-dependent calpain protease. In

  12. 1-alpha-Hydroxyvitamin D3 treatment decreases bone turnover and modulates calcium-regulating hormones in early postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Chen, J T; Shiraki, M; Hasumi, K; Tanaka, N; Katase, K; Kato, T; Hirai, Y; Nakamura, T; Ogata, E

    1997-06-01

    50 Japanese women within 10 years after menopause (mean age 52.5 years) were studied to determine the effects of 0.75 microgram of 1-alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 [1-alpha-(OH)D3] with calcium (150 mg/day) (treated group: N = 25) and calcium only (control group: N = 25) for 12 months on bone mass and metabolism. Their L2-4 BMD measurements were 1.5 SD below the mean value of Japanese young, normal women. L2-4 BMDs increased significantly in the treated group (+2.1%; p < 0.01), but decreased significantly in controls (-2.1%; p < 0.01). Although serum calcium and creatinine remained unchanged in both groups, phosphorus levels increased significantly in the treated group (p < 0.01). Urinary calcium/creatinine (Cr) increased in both groups. Urinary pyridinoline/Cr and deoxypyridinoline/Cr decreased significantly in the treated group (p < 0.05), but not in the control group. Serum osteocalcin levels remained unchanged in both groups. Intact parathyroid hormone levels decreased significantly (p < 0.05) and calcitonin levels significantly increased in the treated group (p < 0.05), but these changes were not observed in the control group. These data clearly demonstrate that 0.75 microgram of 1-alpha-(OH)D3 maintained bone mass by reducing bone resorption by modulation of calcium-regulating hormones. Temporarily increased urinary calcium excretion was observed in control group, but did not appear to be effective in modulating bone turnover. PMID:9177871

  13. Noscapine inhibits hypoxia-mediated HIF-1alpha expression andangiogenesis in vitro: a novel function for an old drug.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Elizabeth W; Lukyanov, Yevgeniy; Schnee, Tona; Ali, M Aktar; Lan, Li; Zagzag, David

    2006-05-01

    Overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a common feature in solid malignancies related to oxygen deficiency. Since increased HIF-1 expression correlates with advanced disease stage, increased angiogenesis and poor prognosis, HIF-1 and its signaling pathway have become targets for cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we identified noscapine to be a novel small molecule inhibitor of the HIF-1 pathway based on its structure-function relation-ships with HIF-1 pathway inhibitors belonging to the benzylisoquinoline class of plant metabolites and/or to microtubule binding agents. We demonstrate that noscapine treatment of human glioma U87MG and T98G cell lines exposed to the hypoxic mimetic agent, CoCl2, inhibits hypoxia-mediated HIF-1alpha expression and transcriptional activity as measured by decreased secretion of VEGF, a HIF-1 target gene. Inhibition of hypoxia-mediated HIF-1alpha expression was due, in part, to its ability to inhibit accumulation of HIF-1alpha in the nucleus and target it for degradation via the proteasome. One mechanism of action of microtubule binding agents is their antiangiogenic activity associated with disruption of endothelial tubule formation. We show that noscapine has similar properties in vitro. Thus, noscapine may possess novel antiangiogenic activity associated with two broad mechanisms of action: first, by decreasing HIF-1alpha expression in hypoxic tumor cells, upregulation of target genes, such as VEGF, would be decreased concomitant with its associated angiogenic activity; second, by inhibiting endothelial cells from forming blood vessels in response to VEGF stimulation, it may limit the process of neo-vascularization, correlating with antitumor activity in vivo. For more than 75 years, noscapine has traditionally been used as an oral cough suppressant with no known toxic side effects in man. Thus, the studies reported here have found a novel function for an old drug. Given its low toxicity profile, its demonstrated

  14. Organization and nucleotide sequence of a gene cluster comprising the translation elongation factor 1 alpha, ribosomal protein S10 and tRNA(Ala) from Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Itoh, T

    1995-09-01

    Lambda EMBL clone containing a gene cluster coding for the translation elongation factor 1alpha, ribosomal protein S10 and tRNA(ala) was identified in a genomic library for the halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium using a PCR probe amplified by two oligonucleotide primers for conserved amino acid sequences of the elongation factor 1 alpha family. The gene coding for elongation factor EF-2 was also found 4.3kb upstream from the 5'end of the elongation factor 1 alpha by hybridization analysis using a DNA fragment specific for EF-2 from Halobacterium halobium [1]. Halobacterial and eukaryotic elongation factor 1 alpha homologues are very similar in sequence and in length and appear to be more closely related to each other than to the eubacterial protein. PMID:8653072

  15. Evolution of translational elongation factor (EF) sequences: reliability of global phylogenies inferred from EF-1 alpha(Tu) and EF-2(G) proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Creti, R; Ceccarelli, E; Bocchetta, M; Sanangelantoni, A M; Tiboni, O; Palm, P; Cammarano, P

    1994-01-01

    The EF-2 coding genes of the Archaea Pyrococcus woesei and Desulfurococcus mobilis were cloned and sequenced. Global phylogenies were inferred by alternative tree-making methods from available EF-2(G) sequence data and contrasted with phylogenies constructed from the more conserved but shorter EF-1 alpha(Tu) sequences. Both the monophyly (sensu Hennig) of Archaea and their subdivision into the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota are consistently inferred by analysis of EF-2(G) sequences, usually at a high bootstrap confidence level. In contrast, EF-1 alpha(Tu) phylogenies tend to be inconsistent with one another and show low bootstrap confidence levels. While evolutionary distance and DNA maximum parsimony analyses of EF-1 alpha(Tu) sequences do show archaeal monophyly, protein parsimony and DNA maximum-likelihood analyses of these data do not. In no case, however, do any of the tree topologies inferred from EF-1 alpha(Tu) sequence analyses receive significant bootstrap support. PMID:8159735

  16. Anti-interleukin-1 alpha autoantibodies in humans: Characterization, isotype distribution, and receptor-binding inhibition--higher frequency in Schnitzler's syndrome (urticaria and macroglobulinemia)

    SciTech Connect

    Saurat, J.H.; Schifferli, J.; Steiger, G.; Dayer, J.M.; Didierjean, L. )

    1991-08-01

    Since autoantibodies (Abs) to cytokines may modify their biologic activities, high-affinity binding factors for interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha BF) were characterized in human sera. IL-1 alpha BF was identified as IgG (1) by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation followed by immunodiffusion autoradiography, (2) by ligand-blotting method, (3) by ligand binding to affinity-immobilized serum IgG, and (4) by IgG affinity purification followed by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation. IL-1 alpha binding activity resided in the F(ab)2 fragment. The apparent equilibrium constant was in the range of IgG found after immunization with conventional antigens (i.e., 10(-9) to 10(-10) mol/L). Anti-IL-1 alpha IgG auto-Abs represented only an extremely small fraction of total IgG (less than 1/10(-5)). Some sera with IL-1 alpha BF and purified IgG thereof were able to inhibit by 96% to 98% the binding of human recombinant IL-1 alpha to its receptor on murine thymoma EL4-6.1 cells, whereas other sera did not. When 125I-labeled anti-IL-1 alpha IgG complexes were injected into rats, they prolonged the plasma half-life of 125I-labeled IL-1 alpha several fold and altered its tissue distribution. The predominant class was IgG (12/19), mainly IgG4 (9/19), but in five of the sera, anti-IL-1 alpha IgA was also detected. In a screening of 271 sera, IL-1 alpha BF was detected in 17/98 normal subjects and was not more frequent in several control groups of patients, except in patients with Schnitzler's syndrome (fever, chronic urticaria, bone pain, and monoclonal IgM paraprotein) (6/9; p less than 0.005). The pathologic significance of these auto-Abs remains to be determined.

  17. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Meets Senescence.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Suchira; Gil, Jesús

    2016-03-01

    Cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction are hallmarks of ageing, but until now their relationship has not been clear. Recent work by Wiley et al. shows that mitochondrial defects can cause a distinct senescence phenotype termed MiDAS (mitochondrial dysfunction-associated senescence). MiDAS has a specific secretome that is able to drive some of the aging phenotypes. These findings suggest novel therapeutic opportunities for treating age-related pathologies. PMID:26874922

  18. Synergistic effect of interleukin 1 alpha on nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-induced up-regulation of human beta-defensin 2 in middle ear epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung-Kyun; Lee, Haa-Yung; Pan, Huiqi; Takeshita, Tamotsu; Park, Raekil; Cha, Kiweon; Andalibi, Ali; Lim, David J

    2006-01-01

    Background We recently showed that beta-defensins have antimicrobial activity against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and that interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) up-regulates the transcription of beta-defensin 2 (DEFB4 according to new nomenclature of the Human Genome Organization) in human middle ear epithelial cells via a Src-dependent Raf-MEK1/2-ERK signaling pathway. Based on these observations, we investigated if human middle ear epithelial cells could release IL-1 alpha upon exposure to a lysate of NTHi and if this cytokine could have a synergistic effect on beta-defensin 2 up-regulation by the bacterial components. Methods The studies described herein were carried out using epithelial cell lines as well as a murine model of acute otitis media (OM). Human cytokine macroarray analysis was performed to detect the released cytokines in response to NTHi exposure. Real time quantitative PCR was done to compare the induction of IL-1 alpha or beta-defensin 2 mRNAs and to identify the signaling pathways involved. Direct activation of the beta-defensin 2 promoter was monitored using a beta-defensin 2 promoter-Luciferase construct. An IL-1 alpha blocking antibody was used to demonstrate the direct involvement of this cytokine on DEFB4 induction. Results Middle ear epithelial cells released IL-1 alpha when stimulated by NTHi components and this cytokine acted in an autocrine/paracrine synergistic manner with NTHi to up-regulate beta-defensin 2. This synergistic effect of IL-1 alpha on NTHi-induced beta-defensin 2 up-regulation appeared to be mediated by the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Conclusion We demonstrate that IL-1 alpha is secreted by middle ear epithelial cells upon exposure to NTHi components and that it can synergistically act with certain of these molecules to up-regulate beta-defensin 2 via the p38 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:16433908

  19. Correlation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1{alpha} with Angiogenesis in Liver Tumors After Transcatheter Arterial Embolization in an Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Bin; Zheng Chuansheng Feng, Gan-Sheng; Wu Hanping; Wang Yong; Zhao Hui; Qian Jun; Liang Huimin

    2010-08-15

    This study sought to determine the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) and its relation to angiogenesis in liver tumors after transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in an animal model. A total of 20 New Zealand White rabbits were implanted with VX2 tumor in liver. TAE-treated group animals (n = 10) received TAE with polyvinyl alcohol particles. Control group animals (n = 10) received sham embolization with distilled water. Six hours or 3 days after TAE, animals were humanely killed, and tumor samples were collected. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to evaluate HIF-1{alpha} and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein expression and microvessel density (MVD). Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to examine VEGF mRNA levels. The levels of HIF-1{alpha} protein were significantly higher in TAE-treated tumors than those in the control tumors (P = 0.001). HIF-1{alpha} protein was expressed in viable tumor cells that were located predominantly at the periphery of necrotic tumor regions. The levels of VEGF protein and mRNA, and mean MVD were significantly increased in TAE-treated tumors compared with the control tumors (P = 0.001, 0.000, and 0.001, respectively). HIF-1{alpha} protein level was significantly correlated with VEGF mRNA (r = 0.612, P = 0.004) and protein (r = 0.554, P = 0.011), and MVD (r = 0.683, P = 0.001). We conclude that HIF-1{alpha} is overexpressed in VX2 tumors treated with TAE as a result of intratumoral hypoxia generated by the procedure and involved in activation of the TAE-associated tumor angiogenesis. HIF-1{alpha} might represent a promising therapeutic target for antiangiogenesis in combination with TAE against liver tumors.

  20. Inflammatory skin disease in transgenic mice that express high levels of interleukin 1 alpha in basal epidermis.

    PubMed Central

    Groves, R W; Mizutani, H; Kieffer, J D; Kupper, T S

    1995-01-01

    Resting epidermal keratinocytes contain large amounts of interleukin 1 (IL-1), but the function of this cytokine in the skin remains unclear. To further define the role of IL-1 in cutaneous biology, we have generated two lines of transgenic mice (TgIL-1.1 and TgIL-1.2) which overexpress IL-1 alpha in basal keratinocytes. There was high-level tissue-specific expression of transgene mRNA and protein and large quantities of IL-1 alpha were liberated into the circulation from epidermis in both lines. TgIL-1.1 mice, which had the highest level of transgene expression, developed a spontaneous skin disease characterized by hair loss, scaling, and focal inflammatory skin lesions. Histologically, nonlesional skin of these animals was characterized by hyperkeratosis and a dermal mononuclear cell infiltrate of macrophage/monocyte lineage. Inflammatory lesions were marked by a mixed cellular infiltrate, acanthosis, and, in some cases, parakeratosis. These findings confirm the concept of IL-1 as a primary cytokine, release of which is able to initiate and localize an inflammatory reaction. Furthermore, these mice provide the first definitive evidence that inflammatory mediators can be released from the epidermis to enter the systemic circulation and thereby influence, in a paracrine or endocrine fashion, a wide variety of other cell types. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8524866

  1. MYC and Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Morrish, Fionnuala; Hockenbery, David

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell, face two imperatives concerning biogenesis. The first is the requirement for dividing cells to replicate their mitochondrial content by growth of existing mitochondria. The second is the dynamic regulation of mitochondrial content in response to organismal and cellular cues (e.g., exercise, caloric restriction, energy status, temperature). MYC provides the clearest example of a programmed expansion of mitochondrial content linked to the cell cycle. As an oncogene, MYC also presents intriguing questions about the role of its mitochondrial targets in cancer-related phenotypes, such as the Warburg effect and MYC-dependent apoptosis. PMID:24789872

  2. Investigating complex I deficiency in Purkinje cells and synapses in patients with mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Chrysostomou, Alexia; Grady, John P.; Laude, Alex; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Doug M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Cerebellar ataxia is common in patients with mitochondrial disease, and despite previous neuropathological investigations demonstrating vulnerability of the olivocerebellar pathway in patients with mitochondrial disease, the exact neurodegenerative mechanisms are still not clear. We use quantitative quadruple immunofluorescence to enable precise quantification of mitochondrial respiratory chain protein expression in Purkinje cell bodies and their synaptic terminals in the dentate nucleus. Methods We investigated NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] 1 alpha subcomplex subunit 13 protein expression in 12 clinically and genetically defined patients with mitochondrial disease and ataxia and 10 age‐matched controls. Molecular genetic analysis was performed to determine heteroplasmy levels of mutated mitochondrial DNA in Purkinje cell bodies and inhibitory synapses. Results Our data reveal that complex I deficiency is present in both Purkinje cell bodies and their inhibitory synapses which surround dentate nucleus neurons. Inhibitory synapses are fewer and enlarged in patients which could represent a compensatory mechanism. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy demonstrated similarly high levels of mutated mitochondrial DNA in cell bodies and synapses. Conclusions This is the first study to use a validated quantitative immunofluorescence technique to determine complex I expression in neurons and presynaptic terminals, evaluating the distribution of respiratory chain deficiencies and assessing the degree of morphological abnormalities affecting synapses. Respiratory chain deficiencies detected in Purkinje cell bodies and their synapses and structural synaptic changes are likely to contribute to altered cerebellar circuitry and progression of ataxia. PMID:26337858

  3. Differential expression and upregulation of interleukin-1alpha, interleukin-1beta and interleukin-6 by freshly isolated human small intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal-Estebas, Laura; Doherty, Derek G; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid P; Feighery, Conleth; O'Farrelly, Cliona

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Small intestinal epithelial cells (SIEC) may contribute to local immune regulation. AIM: To examine production of interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6 by freshly isolated human SIEC. METHODS: IL-1alpha and IL-1beta mRNA in epithelial layers (EL) prepared from small intestine and in intestinal epithelial cell (EC) lines were examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. IL-1alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6 protein expression by SIEC was examined by flow cytometry before and after activation with lipopolysaccharide and epithelial growth factor. RESULTS: IL-1alpha and IL-1beta mRNA was detected in EL and EC lines. Background expression of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta protein by SIEC was observed, which did not increase even following activation. IL-6 protein was expressed by SIEC, in a proportion that increased in two out of three samples following activation. CONCLUSIONS: IL-6 expression and the presence of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta mRNA suggest a role for SIEC in the regulation of local inflammation. PMID:12467524

  4. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II modulates endothelial cell responses by degrading hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha through interaction with PSMA7, a component of the proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Tandle, Anita T.; Calvani, Maura; Uranchimeg, Badarch; Zahavi, David; Melillo, Giovanni; Libutti, Steven K.

    2009-07-01

    The majority of human tumors are angiogenesis dependent. Understanding the specific mechanisms that contribute to angiogenesis may offer the best approach to develop therapies to inhibit angiogenesis in cancer. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II (EMAP-II) is an anti-angiogenic cytokine with potent effects on endothelial cells (ECs). It inhibits EC proliferation and cord formation, and it suppresses primary and metastatic tumor growth in-vivo. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind the anti-angiogenic activity of EMAP-II. In the present study, we explored the molecular mechanism behind the anti-angiogenic activity exerted by this protein on ECs. Our results demonstrate that EMAP-II binds to the cell surface {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin receptor. The cell surface binding of EMAP-II results in its internalization into the cytoplasmic compartment where it interacts with its cytoplasmic partner PSMA7, a component of the proteasome degradation pathway. This interaction increases hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) degradation under hypoxic conditions. The degradation results in the inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} mediated transcriptional activity as well as HIF-1{alpha} mediated angiogenic sprouting of ECs. HIF-1{alpha} plays a critical role in angiogenesis by activating a variety of angiogenic growth factors. Our results suggest that one of the major anti-angiogenic functions of EMAP-II is exerted through its inhibition of the HIF-1{alpha} activities.

  5. TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha induce apoptosis in subconfluent rat mesangial cells. Evidence for the involvement of hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxidation as second messengers.

    PubMed

    Böhler, T; Waiser, J; Hepburn, H; Gaedeke, J; Lehmann, C; Hambach, P; Budde, K; Neumayer, H H

    2000-07-01

    Apoptosis of mesangial cells (MC) plays a role in glomerulonephritis (GN). In this study we investigated cytokine-induced apoptosis of cultured rat MC by morphological and biochemical features. TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha induced apoptosis in rat MC in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion. RT-PCR experiments revealed that MC express the TNF-receptor 1 (p60) gene constitutively. TNF-alpha as well as IL-1alpha stimulated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induced lipid peroxidation. Coincubation with catalase inhibited TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha induced apoptosis as well as lipid peroxidation. TNF-alpha, but not IL-1alpha increased the expression of c-jun. These results provide evidence that TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha induce apoptosis in rat MC with hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxidation as second messengers. Increased c-jun expression may be a downstream intracellular signal of TNF-alpha-, but not IL-1alpha-induced apoptosis.

  6. Follicular development and expression of nuclear respiratory factor-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1 alpha in ovaries of fetal and neonatal doelings.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Z; Wan, Y; Zhang, Y; Wang, Z; Jia, R; Fan, Y; Nie, H; Ying, S; Huang, P; Wang, F

    2012-11-01

    In livestock, the ovarian reserve of follicles is established during the fetal stage. However, at least two-thirds of the oocytes present in the reserve die because of apoptosis before birth. Notably, mitochondria have been reported to play a crucial role in the fate (life/death) of oocytes. In this study, mitochondrial regulators nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) and PPAR γ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) were examined during this period of follicle development to investigate their effects on follicular development and apoptosis. Fetal and neonatal Capra haimen were used, ranging in age from 60 d postcoitum (dpc) to 30 d postpartum (dpp). Our data demonstrated that egg nests were the earliest recognizable gamete cells in ovaries of fetal and neonatal doelings. Proportions of egg nests decreased from 92.68 to 25.08% whereas single follicles increased from 7.32 to 74.92% between 60 and 120 dpc. Subsequently, between 90 and 120 dpc, the proportion of primordial follicles increased from 9.98 to 61.56% (P < 0.01). However, it did not change between 1 and 30 dpp (P = 0.12). The proportion of primary follicles increased from 1.23 to 37.93% between 90 dpc to 1 dpp (P = 0.01) but did not change between 1 and 30 dpp (P = 0.11). Meanwhile, proportions of secondary and tertiary follicles increased in an age-dependent manner. In addition, results of this study suggested that NRF-1 and PGC-1α proteins are mainly localized in germ cells of egg nests, cytoplasm of oocytes, and granulosa cells of follicles ranging from primordial to tertiary follicles. The transcript abundance of NRF-1 mRNA was up-regulated in 60-dpc-old ovaries compared with 1-dpp-old ovaries (P < 0.05), but the PGC-1α mRNA expression pattern did not change (P = 0.05). Nevertheless, the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase UTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) positive cells and caspase-3 activity in 60-dpc-old ovaries was less than those in 1-dpp-old ovaries (P < 0.01, P = 0.01). In conclusion, our results

  7. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Aged Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Gregory P.; Sepe, Joseph J.; McKiernan, Susan H.; Aiken, Judd M.; Diffee, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cardiac function. Exercise intervention has been suggested as a way to improve this decrement. Age-related decline in cardiac function is associated with decreases in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. The molecular mechanisms involved with age-related changes in mitochondrial function and substrate metabolism are poorly understood. We determined gene expression differences in hearts of Young (6 mo), Old (33 mo), and old exercise trained (Old + EXE) (34 mo) FBN rats, using Qiagen PCR arrays for Glucose, Fatty acid, and Mitochondrial metabolism. Old rats demonstrated decreased (p < 0.05) expression for key genes in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMPK signaling. There were no differences in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism with age. These gene expression changes occurred prior to altered protein translation as we found no differences in the protein content of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivators 1 alpha (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and AMPKα2 between young and old hearts. Four months of exercise training did not attenuate the decline in the gene expression in aged hearts. Despite this lack of change in gene expression, exercise-trained rats demonstrated increased exercise capacity compared to their sedentary counterparts. Taken together, our results show that differential expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function decrease in the aging heart which may play a role in age-related declines in fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and mitochondrial function in the heart. PMID:27601998

  8. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Aged Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Gregory P.; Sepe, Joseph J.; McKiernan, Susan H.; Aiken, Judd M.; Diffee, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cardiac function. Exercise intervention has been suggested as a way to improve this decrement. Age-related decline in cardiac function is associated with decreases in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. The molecular mechanisms involved with age-related changes in mitochondrial function and substrate metabolism are poorly understood. We determined gene expression differences in hearts of Young (6 mo), Old (33 mo), and old exercise trained (Old + EXE) (34 mo) FBN rats, using Qiagen PCR arrays for Glucose, Fatty acid, and Mitochondrial metabolism. Old rats demonstrated decreased (p < 0.05) expression for key genes in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMPK signaling. There were no differences in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism with age. These gene expression changes occurred prior to altered protein translation as we found no differences in the protein content of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivators 1 alpha (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and AMPKα2 between young and old hearts. Four months of exercise training did not attenuate the decline in the gene expression in aged hearts. Despite this lack of change in gene expression, exercise-trained rats demonstrated increased exercise capacity compared to their sedentary counterparts. Taken together, our results show that differential expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function decrease in the aging heart which may play a role in age-related declines in fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and mitochondrial function in the heart.

  9. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Aged Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Barton, Gregory P; Sepe, Joseph J; McKiernan, Susan H; Aiken, Judd M; Diffee, Gary M

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cardiac function. Exercise intervention has been suggested as a way to improve this decrement. Age-related decline in cardiac function is associated with decreases in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. The molecular mechanisms involved with age-related changes in mitochondrial function and substrate metabolism are poorly understood. We determined gene expression differences in hearts of Young (6 mo), Old (33 mo), and old exercise trained (Old + EXE) (34 mo) FBN rats, using Qiagen PCR arrays for Glucose, Fatty acid, and Mitochondrial metabolism. Old rats demonstrated decreased (p < 0.05) expression for key genes in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMPK signaling. There were no differences in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism with age. These gene expression changes occurred prior to altered protein translation as we found no differences in the protein content of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivators 1 alpha (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and AMPKα2 between young and old hearts. Four months of exercise training did not attenuate the decline in the gene expression in aged hearts. Despite this lack of change in gene expression, exercise-trained rats demonstrated increased exercise capacity compared to their sedentary counterparts. Taken together, our results show that differential expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function decrease in the aging heart which may play a role in age-related declines in fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and mitochondrial function in the heart. PMID:27601998

  10. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Sandra C.; Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper; Dole, William P.

    2011-07-08

    peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) by 1.4-fold. Treatment of human adipocytes with fatty acids and tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF{alpha}) induced insulin resistance and down-regulation of mitochondrial genes, which was restored by ANP treatment. These results show that ANP regulates lipid catabolism and enhances energy dissipation through AMPK activation in human adipocytes.

  11. In vitro modulation of keratinocyte-derived interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) and peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived IL-1 beta release in response to cutaneous commensal microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, C E; Ingham, E; Eady, E A; Cove, J H; Kearney, J N; Cunliffe, W J

    1995-01-01

    The ability of a range of skin commensal microorganisms to modulate interleukin-1 (IL-1) release by cultured human keratinocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was investigated by a combination of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and bioassays. Three fractions (formaldehyde-treated whole cells, culture supernatants, and cellular fractions) were prepared from Propionibacterium acnes, Propionibacterium granulosum, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus capitis, Staphylococcus hominis, and Malassezia furfur serovar B. The levels of immunochemical IL-1 alpha released by cultured keratinocytes during coincubations with these microbial fractions ranged from 0 to 136 pg/ml and were maximal after 72 h. No microbial fraction consistently upregulated immunochemical IL-1 alpha release by freshly isolated keratinocytes from two donors and a transformed cell line, all of which produced the cytokine constitutively to various extents. Bioassays revealed that most of the IL-1 released was biologically inactive. In contrast, whole cells of formaldehyde-treated P. granulosum and S. epidermidis significantly stimulated release of IL-1 beta by PBMCs from three donors compared with the negative control (culture medium). Release was maximal at 24 h. Coincubation with intact cells of the yeast M. furfur significantly decreased levels of IL-1 beta below the values for the negative control by PBMCs from all three donors. There was good correlation between bioassay data and immunoassay data for IL-1 beta, and the depressive effect of M. furfur cells on cytokine production by all three cultures of PBMCs was mirrored in the levels of bioactive cytokine. This reduction in IL-1 beta release by PBMCs by M. furfur may provide an explanation why dermatoses thought to be caused by this yeast are essentially noninflammatory or only mildly inflammatory. PMID:7890376

  12. Twin Mitochondrial Sequence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouhlal, Yosr; Martinez, Selena; Gong, Henry; Dumas, Kevin; Shieh, Joseph T C

    2013-09-01

    When applying genome-wide sequencing technologies to disease investigation, it is increasingly important to resolve sequence variation in regions of the genome that may have homologous sequences. The human mitochondrial genome challenges interpretation given the potential for heteroplasmy, somatic variation, and homologous nuclear mitochondrial sequences (numts). Identical twins share the same mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from early life, but whether the mitochondrial sequence remains similar is unclear. We compared an adult monozygotic twin pair using high throughput-sequencing and evaluated variants with primer extension and mitochondrial pre-enrichment. Thirty-seven variants were shared between the twin individuals, and the variants were verified on the original genomic DNA. These studies support highly identical genetic sequence in this case. Certain low-level variant calls were of high quality and homology to the mitochondrial DNA, and they were further evaluated. When we assessed calls in pre-enriched mitochondrial DNA templates, we found that these may represent numts, which can be differentiated from mtDNA variation. We conclude that twin identity extends to mitochondrial DNA, and it is critical to differentiate between numts and mtDNA in genome sequencing, particularly since significant heteroplasmy could influence genome interpretation. Further studies on mtDNA and numts will aid in understanding how variation occurs and persists. PMID:24040623

  13. Clinical mitochondrial genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, P.; Howell, N.; Andrews, R.; Turnbull, D.

    1999-01-01

    The last decade has been an age of enlightenment as far as mitochondrial pathology is concerned. Well established nuclear genetic diseases, such as Friedreich's ataxia,12 Wilson disease,3 and autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia,4 have been shown to have a mitochondrial basis, and we are just starting to unravel the complex nuclear genetic disorders which directly cause mitochondrial dysfunction (table 1). However, in addition to the 3 billion base pair nuclear genome, each human cell typically contains thousands of copies of a small, 16.5 kb circular molecule of double stranded DNA (fig 1). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) accounts for only 1% of the total cellular nucleic acid content. It encodes for 13 polypeptides which are essential for aerobic metabolism and defects of the mitochondrial genome are an important cause of human disease.9293 Since the characterisation of the first pathogenic mtDNA defects in 1988,513 over 50 point mutations and well over 100 rearrangements of the mitochondrial genome have been associated with human disease9495 (http://www.gen.emory.edu/mitomap.html). These disorders form the focus of this article.


Keywords: mitochondrial DNA; mitochondrial disease; heteroplasmy; genetic counselling PMID:10874629

  14. Mitochondrial regulation of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Bernd; Oberbauer, Rainer

    2003-06-01

    Mitochondria play a central part in cellular survival and apoptotic death. These processes are highly regulated by pro- and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 superfamily members. A key feature within apoptosis cascades is disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and apoptogenic protein release, caused by opening of the permeability transition pore (PT). New data, however, indicate that mitochondrial apoptosis may occur without PT involvement.

  15. Mitochondrial Therapeutics for Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Raquel S.; Lee, Pamela; Gottlieb, Roberta A.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria represent approximately one-third of the mass of the heart and play a critical role in maintaining cellular function—however, they are also a potent source of free radicals and pro-apoptotic factors. As such, maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis is essential to cell survival. As the dominant source of ATP, continuous quality control is mandatory to ensure their ongoing optimal function. Mitochondrial quality control is accomplished by the dynamic interplay of fusion, fission, autophagy, and mitochondrial biogenesis. This review examines these processes in the heart and considers their role in the context of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Interventions that modulate mitochondrial turnover, including pharmacologic agents, exercise, and caloric restriction are discussed as a means to improve mitochondrial quality control, ameliorate cardiovascular dysfunction, and enhance longevity. PMID:21718247

  16. SIRT1, AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and downstream kinases in response to a single bout of sprint exercise: influence of glucose ingestion.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Borja; Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Fuentes, Teresa; Ponce-González, Jesús Gustavo; Morales-Alamo, David; Olmedillas, Hugo; Guillén-Salgado, José; Santana, Alfredo; Calbet, José A L

    2010-07-01

    This study was designed to examine potential in vivo mechanisms of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation inhibition and its downstream signaling consequences during the recovery period after a single bout of sprint exercise. Sprint exercise induces Thr(172)-AMPK phosphorylation and increased PGC-1alpha mRNA, by an unknown mechanism. Muscle biopsies were obtained in 15 young healthy men in response to a 30-s sprint exercise (Wingate test) randomly distributed into two groups: the fasting (n = 7, C) and the glucose group (n = 8, G), who ingested 75 g of glucose 1 h before exercising to inhibit AMPKalpha phosphorylation. Exercise elicited different patterns of Ser(221)-ACCbeta, Ser(473)-Akt and Thr(642)-AS160 phosphorylation, during the recovery period after glucose ingestion. Thirty minutes after the control sprint, Ser(485)-AMPKalpha1/Ser(491)-AMPKalpha2 phosphorylation was reduced by 33% coinciding with increased Thr(172)-AMPKalpha phosphorylation (both, P < 0.05). Glucose abolished the 30-min Thr(172)-AMPKalpha phosphorylation. Ser(221)-ACCbeta phosphorylation was elevated immediately following and 30 min after exercise in C and G, implying a dissociation between Thr(172)-AMPKalpha and Ser(221)-ACCbeta phosphorylation. Two hours after the sprint, PGC-1alpha protein expression remained unchanged while SIRT1 (its upstream deacetylase) was increased. Glucose ingestion abolished the SIRT1 response without any significant effect on PGC-1alpha protein expression. In conclusion, glucose ingestion prior to a sprint exercise profoundly affects Thr(172)-AMPKalpha phosphorylation and its downstream signaling during the recovery period.

  17. Kinetic Stability May Determine the Interaction Dynamics of the Bifunctional Protein DCoH1, the Dimerization Cofactor of the Transcription Factor HNF-1[alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Rho, H.; Jones, C.N.; Rose, R.B.

    2010-12-07

    The two disparate functions of DCoH1 (dimerization cofactor of HNF-1)/PCD (pterin-4a-carbinolamine dehydratase) are associated with a change in oligomeric state. DCoH dimers enhance the activity of the diabetes-associated transcription factor HNF-1{alpha} (hepatocyte nuclear factor-1{alpha}), while the PCD activity of DCoH1 homotetramers aids in aromatic amino acid metabolism. These complexes compete for the same interface of the DCoH dimer. Formation of the DCoH1/HNF-1{alpha} complex requires cofolding. The homotetramer of the DCoH1 paralogue, DCoH2, interacts with HNF-1{alpha} through simple mixing. To further investigate regulation of DCoH/HNF-1{alpha} complex formation, we measured the stability of the DCoH1 homotetramer through unfolding studies by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. DCoH2 unfolding is reversible. Surprisingly, the DCoH1 homotetramer is resistant to guanidine unfolding but refolds at a much lower guanidine concentration. We show that a point mutation at the DCoH1 tetramer interface, Thr 51 Ser, overcomes the dissociation barrier of the homotetramer and increases the interaction with HNF-1{alpha}. The 1.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of DCoH1 T51S shows the presence of an ordered water molecule at the tetramer interface, as in DCoH2, which may destabilize the homotetramer. The equilibrium unfolding data were fit to a two-state model with no apparent intermediate. Folding intermediates were detectable by size exclusion chromatography. For wild-type DCoH1 the intermediates changed with time, suggesting a kinetic origin for the unfolding barrier of the homotetramer. We propose an unfolding pathway in which the tetramer unfolds slowly, but the dimer folds reversibly. Implications for regulation of DCoH1/HNF-1{alpha} complex formation are discussed.

  18. Nonstructural protein 1{alpha} subunit-based inhibition of NF-{kappa}B activation and suppression of interferon-{beta} production by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    SciTech Connect

    Song Cheng; Krell, Peter; Yoo, Dongwan

    2010-11-25

    Induction of type I interferon (IFN-{alpha}/{beta}) is an early antiviral response of the host, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been reported to downregulate the IFN response during infection in cells and pigs. We report that the PRRSV nonstructural protein 1{alpha} (Nsp1{alpha}) subunit of Nsp1 is a nuclear-cytoplasmic protein distributed to the nucleus and contains a strong suppressive activity for IFN-{beta} production that is mediated through the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling pathway. Nsp1{alpha} suppressed the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B when stimulated with dsRNA or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, and NF-{kappa}B suppression was RIG-I-dependent. The suppression of NF-{kappa}B activation was associated with the poor production of IFN-{beta} during PRRSV infection. The C-terminal 14 amino acids of the Nsp1{alpha} subunit were critical in maintaining immunosuppressive activity of Nsp1{alpha} for both IFN-{beta} and NF-{kappa}B, suggesting that the newly identified zinc finger configuration comprising of Met180 may be crucial for inhibitory activities. Nsp1{alpha} inhibited I{kappa}B phosphorylation and as a consequence NF-{kappa}B translocation to the nucleus was blocked, leading to the inhibition of NF-{kappa}B stimulated gene expression. Our results suggest that PRRSV Nsp1{alpha} is a multifunctional nuclear protein participating in the modulation of the host IFN system.

  19. Effect of phorbol ester on 6-keto PGF sup 1. alpha. production in aorta from control-salt and aldosterone-salt hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.; Jones, A.W. )

    1991-03-11

    The authors have previously shown that norepinephrine (NE) stimulated 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} and thromboxane B{sub 2}(TXB{sub 2}) production in aorta from control-salt (CSR) and aldosterone-salt hypertensive rats (AHR) through the alpha-1 adrenoceptor (A1AR). While there was no difference in NE-stimulated TXB{sub 2} production between CSR and AHR, 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} production was attenuated in aorta from AHR compared tissues. The authors were interested in whether the source of the arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites was through direct coupling of the A1AR and PLA{sub 2} or secondary to activation of PLC. One approach to answering this question was to bypass the receptor and activate protein kinase-C (PKC) directly. PMA caused a time-dependent increase in both 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} and TXB{sub 2}. The time course was much slower than NE-stimulated production of these metabolites, but the pattern was similar with TXB{sub 2} appearing before 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}}. The PMA concentration-response curves for 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} production for CSR and AHR were nearly superimposable. Staurosporine inhibited PMA stimulated 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} production in CSR and AHR with nearly equal potency. Thus, while activation of PKC results in increases in AA metabolites, alterations in this pathway do not appear to be responsible for the differences observed with NE-stimulated 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} production. These data support the concept of direct coupling between the A1AR and PLA{sub 2} in vascular smooth muscle.

  20. A study of the pyrogenic actions of interleukin-1 alpha and interleukin-1 beta: interactions with a steroidal and a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J; Milton, A S; Rotondo, D

    1990-07-01

    1. The pyrogenic effects of intravenously administered human recombinant interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) and IL-1 beta were studied in the rabbit. 2. Both cytokines produced dose-related increases in body temperature. At all doses studied (100-5000 u kg-1) both cytokines elicited a monophasic increase in body temperature, beginning 15 min and reaching a maximum 45 min after administration. 3. A comparison of thermal response index (TRI2, the magnitude of febrile responses over 2 h obtained by integrating the change in temperature in degrees C against time in hours) values indicated that IL-1 beta (500 u kg-1, TRI2 = 0.69 +/- 0.04, n = 4) was approximately 5 fold more potent than IL-1 alpha (2500 u kg-1, TRI2 = 0.73 +/- 0.07, n = 4, all values are means +/- s.e.means) in elevating body temperature. delta Tmax values for the above doses of IL-1 beta and IL-1 alpha were 0.60 +/- 0.06 and 0.61 +/- 0.03 respectively. When IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta were heated for 30 min at 60 degrees C prior to administration no biological activity was observed. 4. A cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, ketoprofen (3 mg kg-1) administered 15 min before either cytokine completely abolished the fever induced by both IL-1 alpha (2500 u kg-1) and IL-1 beta (500 u kg-1). 5. Intravenous administration of the steroidal anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone (3 mg kg-1) 1 h before either cytokine attenuated the fever induced by IL-1 alpha (2500 u kg-1) and IL-1 beta (500 u kg-1). 6. The effects of ketoprofen and dexamethasone on IL-I pyrogenicity indicate that prostanoids are almost certainly involved in the responses. The different potencies of IL-l alpha and IL-1 beta may be related to their relative ability to stimulate prostanoid biosynthesis.

  1. Differential role of p38 in IL-1alpha induction of MMP-9 and MMP-13 in an established liver myofibroblast cell line.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Miau, Luo-Hwa; Chen, Chien-Hung; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Huang, Guan-Tarn; Yang, Pei-Ming; Sheu, Jin-Chuan

    2003-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) has been implicated in the regulation of the expression of various matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in many mesenchymal cell types, but its role in liver myofibroblasts (MFs) has not been elucidated. A myofibroblast-like cell line, MG2, was derived from an isolate of rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). These cells expressed desmin, vimentin, smooth muscle alpha-actin, and fibulin-2. Using a recombinant IL-1alpha at 5 ng/ml, it was shown that IL-1alpha would upregulate, while IL-1Ra, an IL-1 receptor antagonist, would down-regulate the expression of IL-1alpha mRNA in MG2 cells, indicating the presence of an autostimulatory loop of IL-1alpha in these cells. Besides, a paracrine source of IL-1 may be produced from Kupffer cells, as we showed primarily cultured Kupffer cells responded much more remarkably than MG2 cells to lipopolysaccharide stimuli to produce both IL-1alpha and IL-1beta. Recombinant IL-1alpha upregulated the expression of both MMP-9 and -13, and the induction of MMP-13 but not MMP-9 could be inhibited by SB203580, an inhibitor of p38. Similarly, in primarily cultured human liver MFs, upregulation of MMP-1 by IL-1alpha was also shown to be inhibited by SB203580. All of these data suggested that, during liver inflammation, IL-1 produced by an autocrine model from MFs or by a paracrine model from Kupffer cells might play a crucial role in the remodeling of liver fibrosis through an either p38-dependent or p38-independent pathway to regulate the expression of various MMPs by liver MFs.

  2. Glucose-induced insulin secretion in uremia: role of 1 alpha,25(HO)2-vitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Allegra, V; Luisetto, G; Mengozzi, G; Martimbianco, L; Vasile, A

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the role and mechanism of action of calcitriol on glucose-induced insulin secretion in uremia, 17 patients with severe chronic renal failure were studied. Glucose metabolism was investigated by the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) before and after treatment for 21 days with 0.5 microgram/day of calcitriol and 500 mg/day of calcium (C+Ca) (6 cases) or 0.5 microgram/day of calcitriol alone (C) (11 cases). After these evaluations the patients on C+Ca were shifted to C and 6 patients on C were shifted to C+Ca, and IVGTT was repeated 21 days after the shift. For each test plasma glucose (G), immunoreactive insulin (IRI) and C-peptide (C-p) were measured at -30, 0, 2, 5, 15, 30, 45, 60 min, and baseline plasma values of 1 alpha,25(HO)2-vitamin D3, C-terminal parathyroid hormone (PTH-C), intact parathyroid hormone (PTH-I), calcitonin, and serum values of total and ionized calcium were dosed. Also, glucose constant decay (K-G), insulin response (IRI area), C-p production (C-p area), insulinogenic index (IGI) and insulin resistance index (RI) were calculated. A historical group of 21 healthy volunteers formed the normal controls. 1 alpha,25(HO)2-vitamin D3 plasma levels in uremic patients before treatment were significantly lower than normal range. As compared to controls, uremic patients showed significantly lower K-G, IRI area and IGI values and significantly higher RI values. After treatment with C or C+Ca, the insulin response improved significantly at 2 and 5 min and G decrement was more marked at 30, 45 and 60 min.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. The effects of HIF-1alpha on gene expression profiles of NCI-H446 human small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene targeted therapy refers to any therapy focused on one of the many biological features of the tumor. Such features are mediated by specific genes that are involved in tumor metastasis, recurrence, poor response to chemotherapy and others. Hypoxia is an important pathognomonic feature of many malignant tumors including SCLC (small cell lung cancer). HIF-1alpha, which is induced by hypoxia, is the most important regulatory factor of many specific genes that can influence the biological features of tumors. Methods In this study, we tried to elucidate the changes in gene expression profiles of SCLC NCI-H446 cells mediated by HIF-1alpha. According to different treatments of cells, three experimental pairwise comparisons were designed: hypoxia group vs. control group, Ad5-HIF-1alpha group vs. Ad5 group, and Ad5-siHIF-1 alpha group Vs Ad5 group. Results Results from the analysis of gene expression profiles indicated that there were 65 genes upregulated and 28 genes downregulated more than two-fold in all three experimental pairwise comparisons. These genes were involved in transport, signal-transduction, cell adhesion/motility, growth factor/cytokines, transcription, inflammatory response, metabolic process, in addition to others. SOCS1, IGFBP5, IL-6 and STAT3 were also upregulated at protein level. SOCS1 could significantly induce apoptosis and suppress growth of NCI-H446 cells but HIF-1alpha could induce growth and suppress apoptosis. Conclusions Through this research, we are trying to find novel functional genes that are mediated by HIF-1alpha and provide the theoretical basis for new therapeutic targets. HIF-1 alpha maybe upregulate the expression of SOCS1 through mediation of STAT3 and IL-6. In addition, SOCS1 could significantly induce apoptosis and suppress growth of NCI-H446 cells. This was contrary to HIF-1alpha and it indicated that there might be an antagonism effect between HIF-1alpha and SOCS1 on regulating growth and apoptosis of NCI-H446

  4. Localization of neuregulin-1alpha (heregulin-alpha) and one of its receptors, ErbB-4 tyrosine kinase, in developing and adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Lendeckel, Uwe; Bertram, Iris; Bukowska, Alicja; Kanakis, Dimitrios; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Stauch, Renate; Krell, Dieter; Mawrin, Christian; Budinger, Eike; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2006-05-15

    Using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and RT-polymerase chain reaction, we studied the distribution of neuregulin-1 splice variant alpha (NRG-1alpha) and one of its putative receptors, ErbB-4 tyrosine kinase, in human brain. In the pre- and perinatal human brain immunoreactivity was confined to numerous neurons, with the highest cell density found in cortical gray matter, hypothalamus and cerebellum. In the adult brain, single cortical gray and white matter neurons showed NRG-1alpha immunoreactivity. Occasionally, immunoreactive oligodendrocytes were observed. NRG-1alpha-expressing neurons were also found in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, basal ganglia and brain stem. Application of two antibodies recognizing alpha and beta isoforms revealed a different distribution pattern in that many cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons were labeled. ErbB-4 immunoreactivity was expressed in both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Our data show that NRG-1alpha expression is lower in the adult human brain than in the developing brain, and, therefore, support a role for NRG-1alpha in brain development.

  5. Phylogenetic position of symbiotic protist Dinenympha [correction of Dinemympha] exilis in the hindgut of the termite Reticulitermes speratus inferred from the protein phylogeny of elongation factor 1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Moriya, S; Ohkuma, M; Kudo, T

    1998-04-14

    The phylogenetic position of the symbiotic oxymonad Dinenympha exilis, found in the hindgut of the lower termite Reticulitermes speratus, was determined by analysis of translation elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha). cDNA corresponding to a major part of the amino acid coding region of EF-1 alpha mRNA was amplified by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method from total mRNA of termite hindgut microorganisms without cultivation. The product was cloned into a plasmid vector, pGEM-T, and the clones were isolated and sequenced. One of the EF-1 alpha clones isolated was assigned to the protist D. exilis by whole-cell in-situ hybridization using a specific oligonucleotide probe with enzymatic signal amplification. The deduced amino acid sequence was aligned with those of other eukaryotic and archaeabacterial EF-1 alpha s, and the phylogenetic relationships among early branching eukaryotes were inferred by using the distance matrix method and the maximum parsimony method. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that the D. exilis offshoot occurred before mitochondria-containing organisms and D. exilis branched out after the diplomonads clade. These results indicate that the oxymonad D. exilis is one of the early branching organisms and suggest that the oxymonads form a lineage independent of other early branching organisms. PMID:9573371

  6. Identification and biological activities of a new antiangiogenic small molecule that suppresses mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Park, Ju Yeol; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} YCG063 was screened as a new angiogenesis inhibitor which suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation in a phenotypic cell-based screening of a small molecule-focused library. {yields} The compound inhibited in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. {yields} This new small molecule tool will provide a basis for a better understanding of angiogenesis driven under hypoxic conditions. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with multiple cellular functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In particular, high levels of mitochondrial ROS in hypoxic cells regulate many angiogenesis-related diseases, including cancer and ischemic disorders. Here we report a new angiogenesis inhibitor, YCG063, which suppressed mitochondrial ROS generation in a phenotypic cell-based screening of a small molecule-focused library with an ArrayScan HCS reader. YCG063 suppressed mitochondrial ROS generation under a hypoxic condition in a dose-dependent manner, leading to the inhibition of in vitro angiogenic tube formation and chemoinvasion as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) at non-toxic doses. In addition, YCG063 decreased the expression levels of HIF-1{alpha} and its target gene, VEGF. Collectively, a new antiangiogenic small molecule that suppresses mitochondrial ROS was identified. This new small molecule tool will provide a basis for a better understanding of angiogenesis driven under hypoxic conditions.

  7. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS

  8. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS

  9. Non-penetrance in a MODY 3 family with a mutation in the hepatic nuclear factor 1alpha gene: implications for predictive testing.

    PubMed

    Miedzybrodzka, Z; Hattersley, A T; Ellard, S; Pearson, D; de Silva, D; Harvey, R; Haites, N

    1999-09-01

    The most common cause of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a mutation in the hepatic nuclear factor 1alpha (HNF1alpha) gene (MODY3). We describe a family in which a missense mutation causing a Thr-Ile substitution at codon 620 has been found in all affected members. The mutation is not fully penetrant as two family members aged 87 and 46 have the mutation but do not have diabetes. The severity and age of diagnosis of diabetes varies widely within the family, and most presented over the age of 25. HNF1alpha mutation screening should be considered in any family with autosomal dominant inheritance of diabetes where one member has presented with diabetes before the age of 25. Predictive testing is now possible within the majority of MODY families, and is of clinical benefit, but the possibility of non-penetrance should be addressed during counselling and interpretation of results. PMID:10482964

  10. United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Mitochondrial Disease FAQ's MitoFirst Handbook More Information Mito 101 Symposium Archives Get Connected Find an Event Adult Advisory Council Team Ask The Mito Doc Grand Rounds Kids & Teens Medical Child Abuse ...

  11. Interleukin 1 alpha and tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulate autocrine amphiregulin expression and proliferation of human papillomavirus-immortalized and carcinoma-derived cervical epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, C D; McMullin, E; Iglesias, M; Plowman, G D

    1995-01-01

    Infection with multiple sexually transmitted agents has been associated with inflammation of the cervix and an increased risk of cervical cancer in women infected with human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Two proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), inhibited proliferation of normal epithelial cells cultured from human cervix. In contrast, both cytokines significantly stimulated proliferation of cervical cell lines (5 of 7) immortalized by transfection with HPV-16 or -18 DNAs or lines derived from cervical carcinomas (7 of 11). Stimulation was dose dependent from 0.01 to 1.0 nM and was blocked by specific inhibitors, such as the IL-1 receptor antagonist or the TNF type 1 or 2 soluble receptors. Growth stimulation by IL-1 alpha or TNF-alpha was accompanied by a 6- to 10-fold increase in RNA encoding amphiregulin, an epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor ligand. Recombinant human amphiregulin (0.1 nM) was as effective as IL-1 alpha or TNF-alpha in promoting proliferation. Monoclonal antibodies that blocked signal transduction by the EGF receptor or that neutralized amphiregulin activity prevented mitogenic stimulation by IL-1 alpha or TNF-alpha. These studies indicate that IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha stimulate proliferation of immortal and malignant cervical epithelial cells by an EGF receptor-dependent pathway requiring autocrine stimulation by amphiregulin. Furthermore, they suggest that chronic inflammation and release of proinflammatory cytokines might provide a selective growth advantage for abnormal cervical cells in vivo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:7708734

  12. [The roles of interleukin-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and parathyroid hormone-related protein in bone resorption of cholesteatoma otitis].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, K

    1994-08-01

    It is well known that cholesteatoma otitis is characterized by bone destruction, but the mechanisms of this destruction remain to be clarified. Interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) were immunohistologically demonstrated in the epithelia of cholesteatoma tissues obtained from patients with cholesteatoma, at ear surgery, in the present study. The staining for IL-1 alpha was marked in epithelial keratinocytes. The existence of PTHrP was demonstrated in the keratinocytes of cholesteatoma epithelium. PTHrP contents in keratinocytes on spinous layers had accumulated to a greater extent than those in basal layers. Compared with the staining of PTHrP in external ear canal epidermis, cholesteatomatous keratinocytes were more strongly stained. Further more, the effects of cholesteatomatous debris on generation of IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha in cholesteatoma keratinocytes and normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK), derived from chest skin, were examined. Near-confluent medium after seven days incubation of cholesteatomatous keratinocytes and NHEK was discarded and fresh medium was added. Filtrated debris medium, obtained with a milli-pore filter, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or keratin were added to the incubation culture medium. After 48 hours, the titers of IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha in the culture medium were measured with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Debris filtrated medium showed a marked increase in IL-1 alpha, in both cholesteatomatous keratinocytes and NHEK culture, as compared with the effects of LPS, keratin and medium alone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Caveolae and caveolin-1 are implicated in 1alpha,25(OH)2-vitamin D3-dependent modulation of Src, MAPK cascades and VDR localization in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Claudia; Boland, Ricardo

    2010-07-01

    We previously reported that 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 induces non-transcriptional rapid responses through activation of MAPKs in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. However, there is little information on the molecular mechanism underlying the initiation of 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 signaling through this pathway. Plasma membrane components have been involved in some non-genomic effects. In this work, we investigated the role of caveolae and caveolin-1 (cav-1) in 1alpha,25(OH)2D3-stimulation of c-Src and MAPKs. When proliferating cells were pretreated with methyl beta cyclodextrin (MbetaCD), a caveolae disrupting agent, under conditions in which cell morphology is not affected and no signs of apoptosis are observed, 1alpha,25(OH)2D3-dependent activation of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK and c-Src was suppressed. Similar results were obtained by siRNA technology whereby silencing of cav-1 expression abolished activation of c-Src and MAPKs induced by the hormone. By confocal immunocytochemistry it was observed that cav-1 colocalizes with c-Src in the periplasma membrane zone at basal conditions. Hormone treatment disrupted the colocalization of these proteins and redistributed them into cytoplasm and nucleus. Co-immunoprecipitation assays corroborated these observations. Changes in VDR localization after 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 exposure were also investigated. Confocal microscopy images showed that the hormone induces VDR translocation to the plasma membrane, and this effect is abolished by MbetaCD. Altogether, these data suggest that caveolae is involved upstream in c-Src-MAPKs activation by 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 and that VDR and cav-1 participate in the rapid signaling elicited by the hormone.

  14. The Drosophila nuclear receptors FTZ-F1 alpha and FTZ-F1 beta compete as monomers for binding to a site in the fushi tarazu gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, C K; Ueda, H; Petkovich, M

    1994-01-01

    The striped pattern of fushi tarazu (ftz) expression found in the blastoderm of the Drosophila melanogaster embryo is generated largely through complex interactions between multiple transcription factors that bind to the zebra element of the ftz gene. A motif in the zebra element, the FTZ-F1 recognition element (F1RE), has been shown to bind a transcription factor, FTZ-F1 alpha, that is a member of the nuclear receptor family. We recently identified a second, related member of this family, FTZ-F1 beta, that also binds to this motif. To investigate the possibility that FTZ-F1 alpha and FTZ-F1 beta coregulate ftz transcription through the F1RE, we have studied the DNA binding properties of FTZ-F1 alpha and FTZ-F1 beta. We demonstrate that recombinant FTZ-F1 alpha and FTZ-F1 beta proteins produce similar in vitro DNase I footprint patterns on a 14-nucleotide region of the zebra element and bind to this site with similar affinities and sequence specificities. Using wild-type and N-terminally truncated receptors, we have determined that FTZ-F1 alpha and FTZ-F1 beta both bind as monomers to the 9-bp F1RE in the zebra element, as well as to an imperfect inverted F1RE repeat present in the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase gene. A polyclonal antibody raised against FTZ-F1 beta identifies a predominant F1RE-binding component in embryonic nuclear extracts. Although FTZ-F1 alpha is also present in these extracts, FTZ-F1 alpha and FTZ-F1 beta do not appear to form heterodimers with each other. Cotransfection assays in mammalian cell culture indicate that both receptors contribute to the net transcriptional activity of a reporter gene through their direct interaction with the F1RE. These data suggest that FTZ-F1 alpha and FTZ-F1 beta likely coregulate common target genes by competition for binding to a 9-bp recognition element. Images PMID:8164672

  15. Abnormal parathyroid hormone stimulation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1 alpha-hydroxylase activity in the hypophosphatemic mouse. Evidence for a generalized defect of vitamin D metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, T; Drezner, M K; Lobaugh, B

    1986-01-01

    Abnormal regulation of vitamin D metabolism is a feature of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets in man and of the murine homologue of the disease in the hypophosphatemic (Hyp)-mouse. We previously reported that mutant mice have abnormally low renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1 alpha-hydroxylase (1 alpha-hydroxylase) activity for the prevailing degree of hypophosphatemia. To further characterize this defect, we examined whether Hyp-mouse renal 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity responds normally to other stimulatory and inhibitory controls of enzyme function. We studied stimulation by parathyroid hormone (PTH) using: (a) a calcium-deficient (0.02% Ca) diet to raise endogenous PTH; or (b) 24-h continuous infusion of 0.25 IU/h bovine PTH via osmotic minipump. In both cases enzyme activity of identically treated normal mice increased to greater levels than those attained by Hyp-mice. The relative inability of PTH to stimulate 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity is not a function of the hypophosphatemia in the Hyp-mouse since PTH-infused, phosphate-depleted normal mice sustained a level of enzyme activity greater than that of normal and Hyp-mice. In further studies we investigated inhibition of enzyme activity by using: (a) a calcium-loaded (1.2% Ca) diet to suppress endogenous PTH; or (b) 24-h continuous infusion of 0.2 ng/h 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). The 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity of normal and Hyp-mice was significantly reduced to similar absolute levels following maintenance on the calcium-loaded diet. Further, infusion of 1,25(OH)2D3 caused a comparable reduction of 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity in normal, Hyp-, and phosphate-depleted normal mice. These observations indicate that the inhibitory control of 1 alpha-hydroxylase by reduced levels of PTH or increased 1,25(OH)2D3 concentrations is intact in the mutants. However, the inability of PTH and hypophosphatemia to stimulate enzyme activity in a manner analogous to that in normal and phosphate-depleted mice indicates

  16. Overexpression of Intrinsic Hypoxia Markers HIF1{alpha} and CA-IX Predict for Local Recurrence in Stage T1-T2 Glottic Laryngeal Carcinoma Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schrijvers, M.L.; Laan, B.F.A.M. van der; Bock, G.H. de; Pattje, W.J.; Mastik, M.F.; Menkema, L.; Langendijk, J.A.; Kluin, P.M.; Schuuring, E.; Wal, J.E. van der

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To examine the prognostic value of three endogenous hypoxia markers (hypoxia inducible factor 1 {alpha} subunit [HIF1{alpha}], carbonic anhydrase IX [CA-IX], and glucose transporter type 1 [GLUT-1]) on the clinical outcome in patients with early-stage glottic carcinoma primarily treated with radiotherapy (RT) and to determine the predictive hypoxic profile to choose the optimal treatment of early-stage laryngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry for HIF1{alpha}, CA-IX, and GLUT-1 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, pretreatment tissue samples of 91 glottic squamous cell carcinoma specimens. The patient group consisted only of those with early-stage (T1-T2) glottic carcinoma, and all patients were treated with RT only. Relative tumor staining was scored on the tissue samples. Receiver operating curve analysis was performed to determine the optimal cutoff value for each tumor marker. Cox regression analyses for the variables HIF1{alpha}, CA-IX, GLUT-1, gender, age, hemoglobin level, T category, N category, tobacco use, and alcohol use were performed with local control and overall survival as endpoints. Results: HIF1{alpha} overexpression in early-stage glottic carcinoma correlated significantly with worse local control (hazard ratio [HR], 3.05; p = 0.021) and overall survival (HR, 2.92; p = 0.016). CA-IX overexpression correlated significantly with worse local control (HR, 2.93; p = 0.020). GLUT-1 overexpression did not show any correlation with the clinical outcome parameters. Tumors with a nonhypoxic profile (defined as low HIF1{alpha} and low CA-IX expression) had significantly better local control (HR, 6.32; p 0.013). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that early-stage glottic laryngeal carcinomas with low HIF1{alpha} and CA-IX expression are highly curable with RT. For this group, RT is a good treatment option. For tumors with HIF1{alpha} or CA-IX overexpression, hypoxic modification before RT or primary

  17. Profound defects in pancreatic beta-cell function in mice with combined heterozygous mutations in Pdx-1, Hnf-1alpha, and Hnf-3beta.

    PubMed

    Shih, David Q; Heimesaat, Markus; Kuwajima, Satoru; Stein, Roland; Wright, Christopher V E; Stoffel, Markus

    2002-03-19

    Defects in pancreatic beta-cell function contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes, a polygenic disease that is characterized by insulin resistance and compromised insulin secretion. Hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNFs) -1alpha, -3beta, -4alpha, and Pdx-1 contribute in the complex transcriptional circuits within the pancreas that are involved in beta-cell development and function. In mice, a heterozygous mutation in Pdx-1 alone, but not Hnf-1alpha(+/-), Hnf-3beta(+/-), or Hnf-4alpha(+/-), causes impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in mice. To investigate the possible functional relationships between these transcription factors on beta-cell activity in vivo, we generated mice with the following combined heterozygous mutations: Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-1alpha(+/-), Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-3beta(+/-), Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-4alpha(+/-), Hnf-1alpha(+/-)/Hnf-4alpha(+/-), and Hnf-3beta(+/-)/Hnf-4alpha(+/-). The greatest loss in function was in combined heterozygous null alleles of Pdx-1 and Hnf-1alpha (Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-1alpha(+/-)), or Pdx-1 and Hnf-3beta (Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-3beta(+/-)). Both double mutants develop progressively impaired glucose tolerance and acquire a compromised first- and second-phase insulin secretion profile in response to glucose compared with Pdx-1(+/-) mice alone. The loss in beta-cell function in Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-3beta(+/-) mice was associated with decreased expression of Nkx-6.1, glucokinase (Gck), aldolase B (aldo-B), and insulin, whereas Nkx2.2, Nkx-6.1, Glut-2, Gck, aldo-B, the liver isoform of pyruvate kinase, and insulin expression was reduced in Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-1alpha(+/-) mice. The islet cell architecture was also abnormal in Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-3beta(+/-) and Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-1alpha(+/-) mice, with glucagon-expressing cells scattered throughout the islet, a defect that may be connected to decreased E-cadherin expression. Our data suggest that functional interactions between key islet regulatory factors play an important role in maintaining islet architecture and

  18. Distribution of mGluR1alpha and SMI 311 immunoreactive Lugaro cells in the kitten cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Víg, Julianna; Takács, József; Vastagh, Csaba; Baldauf, Zsolt; Veisenberger, Eleonóra; Hámori, József

    2003-03-01

    The Lugaro cell is a feedback interneuron of the cerebellar cortex, recognizable by its characteristic morphology. Postnatal neuronal migration to the cortex has been described for several cerebellar interneurons. Since in our previous studies we observed Lugaro-like cells (LCs) in the white matter (WM) and internal granular layer (IGL) of the cerebellum of young cats, we assumed that a proportion of these cells migrate also postnatally to their destination. In the present study using and immunostaining for the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1alpha and neurofilament protein SMI 311 the number and spatial distribution of LCs at different postnatal days were investigated. We found that the number and distribution of both mGluR1a-immunoreactive (ir) and of SMI 311-ir LCs changed with age in the developing cerebellar cortex of kittens: developing LCs express mGluR1alpha already in the newborn, while expression of SMI 311-ir in LCs appears only about a week later. At postnatal day 1 (P1) relatively few mGluR1-ir LCs were detected in the WM and at the border of WM and IGL. Later, their number increased sharply until P15 (6-7 fold) and decreased continuously between P15 and P135. SMI 311-ir LCs were not present at P1 and even at P8 only a few were observed in the WM or in infraganglionic positions. Their number increased gradually (12-14 fold) until adulthood when their number was stabilized at 8.000-10.000/cerebellum. At the same time the number of probably ectopic SMI 311-ir LCs decreased with age: at P22 about one third of them was found in "ectopic" position, whereas in the adult cat only about 10-12% of LCs's was either in the WM or scattered in the whole depth of the granular layer. These results suggest that: (1) most LCs appear in the cerebellar cortex postnatally; and (2) postnatal migration and incorporation of LCs to the cortex is a much longer process than previously expected, occurring even after the cytoarchitectonic built-up (about P65-P70 in cat) of

  19. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting; Zheng, Ruimao; Zhu, Shigong

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 14,15-EET inhibits OGD-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. • Mitochondrial biogenesis of cortical neurons is promoted by 14,15-EET. • 14,15-EET preserves mitochondrial function of cortical neurons under OGD. • CREB mediates effect of 14,15-EET on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. - Abstract: 14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  20. 1. alpha. ,25-dihydroxyvitamin D sub 3 regulates the expression of carbonic anhydrase II in nonerythroid avian bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Billecocq, A.; Emanuel, J.R.; Levenson, R.; Baron, R. )

    1990-08-01

    1{alpha},25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}), the active metabolite of the steroid hormone vitamin D, is a potent regulator of macrophage and osteoclast differentiation. The mature osteoclast, unlike the circulating monocyte or the tissue macrophage, expresses high levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CAII). This enzyme generates protons and bicarbonate from water and carbon dioxide and is involved in bone resorption and acid-base regulation. To test whether 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} could induce the differentiation of myelomonocytic precursors toward osteoclasts rather than macrophages, analyzed its effects on the expression of CAII in bone marrow cultures containing precursors common to both cell types. The expression of CAII was markedly increased by 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} in a dose-and time-dependent manner. In bone marrow, this increase occurred at the mRNA and protein levels and was detectable as early as 24 hr after stimulation. 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} was also found to induce CAII expression in a transformed myelomonocytic avian cell line. These results suggest that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} regulates the level at which myelomonocytic precursors express CAII, an enzyme that is involved in the function of the mature osteoclast.

  1. Genetic polymorphisms of interleukin-1 alpha and the vitamin d receptor in mexican mestizo patients with intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cervin Serrano, Salvador; González Villareal, Dalia; Aguilar-Medina, Maribel; Romero-Navarro, Jose Guillermo; Romero Quintana, Jose Geovanni; Arámbula Meraz, Eliakym; Osuna Ramírez, Ignacio; Picos-Cárdenas, Veronica; Granados, Julio; Estrada-García, Iris; Sánchez-Schmitz, Guzman; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the most common diagnosis in patients with back pain, a leading cause of musculoskeletal disability worldwide. Several conditions, such as occupational activities, gender, age, and obesity, have been associated with IDD. However, the development of this disease has strong genetic determinants. In this study, we explore the possible association between rs1800587 (c.-949C>T) of interleukin-1 alpha (IL1A) and rs2228570 (c.2T>V) and rs731236 (c.1056T>C) of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and the development of IDD in northwestern Mexican Mestizo population. Gene polymorphisms were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism, in two groups matched by age and gender: patients with symptomatic lumbar IDD (n = 100) and subjects with normal lumbar-spine MRI-scans (n = 100). Distribution of the mutated alleles in patients and controls was 27.0% versus 28.0% (P = 0.455) for T of rs1800587 (IL1A); 53.0% versus 58.0% (P = 0.183) for V of rs2228570 (VDR); and 18.0% versus 21.0% (P = 0.262) for C of rs731236 (VDR). Our results showed no association between the studied polymorphisms and IDD in this population. This is the first report on the contribution of gene polymorphisms on IDD in a Mexican population.

  2. Interleukin-1 alpha genotype and outcome of unrelated donor haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for chronic myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Parinda A.; Eapen, Mary; Klein, John P.; Gandham, Sharavi; Elliott, James; Zamzow, Tiffany; Combs, Michelle; Aplenc, Richard; MacMillan, Margaret L.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Petersdorf, Effie; Davies, Stella M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is implicated in the initiation/maintenance of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and the immune response to infection. A cytosine (C) to thymine (T) transition at position −889 is believed to influence gene transcription. A previous single institution study showed that the presence of at least one IL1A T allele in the donor was associated with improved survival after unrelated donor haematopoietic stem cell transplant and lower transplant-related mortality if the donor and recipient each possessed the IL1A T allele. The present study sought to confirm these results in a larger homogeneous population. Thus the study population included 426 patients older than 18 years with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), transplanted in first chronic phase and receiving a total body irradiation and cyclophosphamide preparative regimen. Donor recipient pairs were categorised into four groups according to the presence or absence of an IL1A T allele in the donor and recipient. There were no significant differences in patient, donor and transplant characteristics between the groups. We did not observe an association with IL-1α genotype in donor and/or recipient and transplant-outcome. These data suggest that the outcome of unrelated donor transplant for CML is not influenced by IL-1α genotype. PMID:17391495

  3. Lack of association between interleukin-1 alpha rs1800587 polymorphism and Alzheimer's disease in two Independent European samples.

    PubMed

    Serretti, Alessandro; Olgiati, Paolo; Politis, Antonis; Malitas, Petros; Albani, Diego; Dusi, Sabrina; Polito, Letizia; De Mauro, Stefania; Zisaki, Aikaterini; Piperi, Christina; Liappas, Ioannis; Stamouli, Evangelia; Mailis, Antonis; Atti, Anna Rita; Morri, Monica; Ujkaj, Manjola; Batelli, Sara; Forloni, Gianluigi; Soldatos, Costantine R; Papadimitriou, George N; De Ronchi, Diana; Kalofoutis, Anastasios

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL1) can contribute to pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by promoting deposition of amyloid-beta in the brain. The gene encoding IL1 alpha (IL1A) has a common polymorphism in its 5' regulatory region (rs1800587) with possible functional effects. IL1A T/T genotype has been associated with AD but the overall effect is modest and negative studies have been published. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the IL1A rs1800587 polymorphism with AD in two independent case-control groups from Greece (Athens) and Italy (Faenza and Granarolo). Preliminary results from the ongoing sample (110 patients with sporadic AD and 130 nonpsychiatric controls) showed no association between IL1A variants and AD, however C/T heterozygotes had more severe depression in AD (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia) compared to other genotypes (F = 4.56, d.f = 1, p = 0.037) after controlling for age, illness duration and cognitive impairment (MMSE). Despite the small sample size and the possibility of a false negative finding, our preliminary data support the hypothesis the IL1A rs1800587 variants are not associated with AD. The effect of the IL1A on depressive symptomatology warrants further investigations, however the lack of a gene-dose relationship would suggest a false positive.

  4. Genetic Polymorphisms of Interleukin-1 Alpha and the Vitamin D Receptor in Mexican Mestizo Patients with Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cervin Serrano, Salvador; González Villareal, Dalia; Aguilar-Medina, Maribel; Romero-Navarro, Jose Guillermo; Romero Quintana, Jose Geovanni; Arámbula Meraz, Eliakym; Osuna Ramírez, Ignacio; Picos-Cárdenas, Veronica; Granados, Julio; Estrada-García, Iris; Sánchez-Schmitz, Guzman; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the most common diagnosis in patients with back pain, a leading cause of musculoskeletal disability worldwide. Several conditions, such as occupational activities, gender, age, and obesity, have been associated with IDD. However, the development of this disease has strong genetic determinants. In this study, we explore the possible association between rs1800587 (c.-949C>T) of interleukin-1 alpha (IL1A) and rs2228570 (c.2T>V) and rs731236 (c.1056T>C) of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and the development of IDD in northwestern Mexican Mestizo population. Gene polymorphisms were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism, in two groups matched by age and gender: patients with symptomatic lumbar IDD (n = 100) and subjects with normal lumbar-spine MRI-scans (n = 100). Distribution of the mutated alleles in patients and controls was 27.0% versus 28.0% (P = 0.455) for T of rs1800587 (IL1A); 53.0% versus 58.0% (P = 0.183) for V of rs2228570 (VDR); and 18.0% versus 21.0% (P = 0.262) for C of rs731236 (VDR). Our results showed no association between the studied polymorphisms and IDD in this population. This is the first report on the contribution of gene polymorphisms on IDD in a Mexican population. PMID:25506053

  5. The expression of interleukin-1 alpha, TNF and VEGF in corneal cells of patients with bullous keratopathy.

    PubMed

    Grzetić-Lenac, Renata; Merlak, Maja; Balog, Tihomir; Markusić, Vedran; Dekaris, Iva

    2011-09-01

    Bullous keratopathy (BK) is a chronic corneal edema with or without subepithelial bullae as a result of a loss of the endothelial cells. 15 patients with BK after cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation, due to Fuchs dystrophy (n = 3) or corneal endothelial trauma (n = 12) were included in the study. All patients were treated by amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT). Corneal epithelial cells in patients suffering from BK secreted 3.91 +/- 3.09 pg/mL of IL-1 alpha, 4446 +/- 16.8 pg/mL of TNF and 81.43 +/- 37.81 pg/mL of VEGF-I. Levels of all 3 investigated cytokines were significantly higher as compared to controls (p < 0.005). Amniotic membranes that were used to treat investigated patients contained 638.98 +/- 613.98 pg/mL of IL-1ra, 0.026 +/- 0.009 pg/mL of sTNF and 81.39 +/- 21.01 pg/mL of VEGF-R. Beneficial clinical effect of the AMT in treating BK could be explained by its natural production of pro-inflammatory cytokine antagonists such as IL-ra, sTNF antagonist and VEGF-R.

  6. Crystallization of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4 alpha) in complex with the HNF1 alpha promoter element.

    PubMed

    Lu, Peng; Liu, Jianguo; Melikishvili, Manana; Fried, Michael G; Chi, Young-In

    2008-04-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that plays a central role in organ development and metabolic functions. Mutations on HNF4alpha cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY), a dominant monogenic cause of diabetes. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of promoter recognition and the molecular basis of disease-causing mutations, the recombinant HNF4alpha DNA-binding domain was prepared and used in a study of its binding properties and in crystallization with a 21-mer DNA fragment that contains the promoter element of another MODY gene, HNF1alpha. The HNF4alpha protein displays a cooperative and specific DNA-binding activity towards its target gene-recognition elements. Crystals of the complex diffract to 2.0 A using a synchrotron-radiation source under cryogenic (100 K) conditions and belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 121.63, b = 35.43, c = 70.99 A, beta = 119.36 degrees . A molecular-replacement solution has been obtained and structure refinement is in progress. This structure and the binding studies will provide the groundwork for detailed functional and biochemical studies of the MODY mutants. PMID:18391435

  7. Sequence and expression of the chicken membrane-associated phospholipases A1 alpha (LIPH) and beta (LIPI).

    PubMed

    Hesse, Manuela; Willscher, Edith; Schmiedel, Benjamin J; Posch, Stefan; Golbik, Ralph P; Staege, Martin S

    2012-01-01

    Cancer/testis antigens (CTA) are a heterogeneous group of antigens that are expressed preferentially in tumor cells and testis. Based on this definition the human membrane-associated phospholipase A1 beta (lipase family member I, LIPI) has been identified as CTA. The high homology of LIPI and the membrane-associated phospholipase A1 alpha (lipase family member H, LIPH) suggests that both genes are derived from a common ancestor by gene duplication. In contrast to human LIPI, human LIPH is expressed in several tissues. LIPI sequences have only been identified in mammals. Here, we describe the identification of LIPI in non-mammalian vertebrates. Based on the conserved genomic organization of LIPI and LIPH we identified sequences for both lipases in birds and fishes. In all vertebrates the LIPI locus is neighbored by a member of the RNA binding motif (RBM) family, RBM11. By sequencing of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction products we determined the sequences of LIPI and LIPH messenger RNA from broilers. We found that the sequence homology between LIPI and LIPH is much higher in non-mammalian species than in mammals. In addition, we found broad expression of LIPI in broilers, resembling the expression profile of LIPH. Our data suggest that LIPI is a CTA only in mammalian species and that the unique sequence features of the mammalian LIPI/RBM11 locus have evolved together with the CTA-like expression pattern of LIPI.

  8. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α) improves neural recovery after spinal cord contusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Zendedel, Adib; Nobakht, Maliheh; Bakhtiyari, Mehrdad; Beyer, Cordian; Kipp, Markus; Baazm, Maryam; Joghataie, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-09-14

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α) is an important cytokine, implicated in the control of stem cell trafficking and bone marrow-derived stem cell mobilization. Generally, SDF-1α regulates multiple physiological processes such as embryonic development and organ homeostasis. There is also good evidence that SDF-1α and its receptor CXCR4(1) are key regulators of neurorepair processes after brain ischemia and spinal cord injury. In this study, we investigated the influence of chronic intrathecal delivery of SDF-1α after spinal cord contusion. After contusion T9, male Wistar rats at the age of 12 weeks were intrathecally treated with SDF-1α in different doses (100, 500 and 1000 ng/ml) via an osmotic pump for 28 days. Thereafter, animals were subjected to an open field locomotor test. Behavioral scores were significantly higher in SDF-1α treated animals compared to placebo-treated groups. In addition, we evaluated histopathological changes in the spinal cord in the presence or absence of SDF-1α. Chronic delivery of SDF-1α decreased numbers of apoptotic cells, boosted astroglia and microglia response, induced angiogenesis, and potentiated the number of proliferating cells in a dose-dependent manner. These results clearly indicate an improved functional CNS long-term recovery after spinal cord injury. This behavioral restoration was paralleled by a reduction of apoptosis and changes in neuroinflammatory cells.

  9. How mitochondrial dynamism orchestrates mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Shirihai, Orian; Song, Moshi; Dorn, Gerald W

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic, except in adult cardiomyocytes. Yet, the fission and fusion-promoting proteins that mediate mitochondrial dynamism are highly expressed in, and essential to the normal functioning of, hearts. Here, we review accumulating evidence supporting important roles for mitochondrial fission and fusion in cardiac mitochondrial quality control, focusing on the PINK1-Parkin mitophagy pathway.Based in part on recent findings from in vivo mouse models in which mitofusin-mediated mitochondrial fusion or Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission were conditionally interrupted in cardiac myocytes, we propose several new concepts that may provide insight into the cardiac mitochondrial dynamism-mitophagy interactome. PMID:25999423

  10. The Spectrum of Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Defects in Mitochondrial Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Amy E; Ng, Yi Shiau; White, Kathryn; Davey, Tracey; Mannella, Carmen; Falkous, Gavin; Feeney, Catherine; Schaefer, Andrew M; McFarland, Robert; Gorman, Grainne S; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M; Picard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are intrinsically linked to their morphology and membrane ultrastructure. Characterizing abnormal mitochondrial structural features may thus provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of inherited and acquired mitochondrial diseases. Following a systematic literature review on ultrastructural defects in mitochondrial myopathy, we investigated skeletal muscle biopsies from seven subjects with genetically defined mtDNA mutations. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology were characterized using two complimentary approaches: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and serial block face scanning EM (SBF-SEM) with 3D reconstruction. Six ultrastructural abnormalities were identified including i) paracrystalline inclusions, ii) linearization of cristae and abnormal angular features, iii) concentric layering of cristae membranes, iv) matrix compartmentalization, v) nanotunelling, and vi) donut-shaped mitochondria. In light of recent molecular advances in mitochondrial biology, these findings reveal novel aspects of mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology in human tissues with implications for understanding the mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to disease. PMID:27506553

  11. The Spectrum of Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Defects in Mitochondrial Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Amy E.; Ng, Yi Shiau; White, Kathryn; Davey, Tracey; Mannella, Carmen; Falkous, Gavin; Feeney, Catherine; Schaefer, Andrew M.; McFarland, Robert; Gorman, Grainne S.; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Picard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are intrinsically linked to their morphology and membrane ultrastructure. Characterizing abnormal mitochondrial structural features may thus provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of inherited and acquired mitochondrial diseases. Following a systematic literature review on ultrastructural defects in mitochondrial myopathy, we investigated skeletal muscle biopsies from seven subjects with genetically defined mtDNA mutations. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology were characterized using two complimentary approaches: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and serial block face scanning EM (SBF-SEM) with 3D reconstruction. Six ultrastructural abnormalities were identified including i) paracrystalline inclusions, ii) linearization of cristae and abnormal angular features, iii) concentric layering of cristae membranes, iv) matrix compartmentalization, v) nanotunelling, and vi) donut-shaped mitochondria. In light of recent molecular advances in mitochondrial biology, these findings reveal novel aspects of mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology in human tissues with implications for understanding the mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to disease. PMID:27506553

  12. Low-dose radiation pretreatment improves survival of human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) under hypoxia via HIF-1 alpha and MMP-2 induction

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Naoki; Kubota, Yoshitaka; Kosaka, Kentarou; Akita, Shinsuke; Sasahara, Yoshitarou; Kira, Tomoe; Kuroda, Masayuki; Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Bujo, Hideaki; Satoh, Kaneshige

    2015-08-07

    Poor survival is a major problem of adipocyte transplantation. We previously reported that VEGF and MMPs secreted from transplanted adipocytes are essential for angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Pretreatment with low-dose (5 Gy) radiation (LDR) increased VEGF, MMP-2, and HIF-1 alpha mRNA expression in human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (hccdPAs). Gene expression after LDR differed between adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and hccdPAs. Pretreatment with LDR improved the survival of hccdPAs under hypoxia, which is inevitable in the early stages after transplantation. Upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 after LDR in hccdPAs is mediated by HIF-1 alpha expression. Our results suggest that pretreatment with LDR may improve adipocyte graft survival in a clinical setting through upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 via HIF-1 alpha. - Highlights: • Ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) react to radiation. • Low-dose radiation (LDR) pretreatment improves survival of ccdPAs under hypoxia. • Gene expression after LDR differs between ccdPAs and adipose-derived stem cells. • LDR-induced increase in MMP-2 and VEGF is dependent on HIF-1 alpha induction. • LDR pretreatment may improve the adipocyte graft survival rate in clinical settings.

  13. Molecular mimicry in Lyme arthritis demonstrated at the single cell level: LFA-1 alpha L is a partial agonist for outer surface protein A-reactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Trollmo, C; Meyer, A L; Steere, A C; Hafler, D A; Huber, B T

    2001-04-15

    Antibiotic treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease that follows infection with Borrelia burgdorferi (BB:). A marked Ab and T cell response to BB: outer surface protein A (OspA) often develops during prolonged episodes of arthritis. Furthermore, cross-reaction between the bacterial OspA and human LFA-1alpha(L) at the T cell level and the inability to detect BB: in the joint implicate an autoimmune mechanism. To analyze the nature of response to OspA and LFA-1alpha(L), we used OspA-specific T cell hybrids from DR4 transgenic mice, as well as cloned human cells specific for OspA(165-184), the immunodominant epitope, from five DRB1*0401(+) patients, using OspA-MHC class II tetramers. Although OspA(165-184) stimulated nearly all OspA-specific human T cell clones tested to proliferate and secrete IFN-gamma and IL-13, LFA-1alpha(L326-345) stimulated approximately 10% of these clones to proliferate and a greater percentage to secrete IL-13. Assays with LFA- or OspA-DR4 monomers revealed that higher concentrations of LFA-DR4 were needed to stimulate dual-reactive T cell hybrids. Our analysis at the clonal level demonstrates that human LFA-1alpha(L326-345) behaves as a partial agonist, perhaps playing a role in perpetuating symptoms of arthritis.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of EF-1 alpha gene sequences from isolates of Microdochium nivale leads to elevation of varieties majus and nivale to species status.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Neil C; Hare, Martin C; Parry, David W; Edwards, Simon G

    2005-08-01

    Degenerate PCR primers were designed based on EF-1 alpha (EF-1alpha) gene sequences of several filamentous fungi retrieved from sequence databases. These primers were used to isolate a partial sequence, approximately 830 bp in length of the EF-1alpha from isolates of Microdochium nivale obtained from various geographic locations across the world. Two distinct groups of isolates were evident among those isolates examined. Sequence homology for comparisons within group was 99.7% for group A and 99.8% for group B. Primers specific to either group A or group B sequences were designed and tested on isolates from around the world. Comparisons were made with primers previously reported for the two varieties of M. nivale and revealed that Group A type isolates correlated with M. nivale var. majus and group B isolates with M. nivale var. nivale. The primers from this study and those previously reported were in agreement for all isolates with the exception of one isolate (NRRL 3289) which failed to amplify with previously published M. nivale primers. Sequence analysis of NRRL 3289 suggested that it was an isolate of M. nivale var. nivale as indicated by the EF-1alpha based primers developed in this study. This study provides sequence based phylogenetic evidence of two species and when taken together with biological differences reported, leads to the recognition of M. majus comb. nov. (syn. Fusarium nivale var. majus). Descriptions of the two species are provided. PMID:16175789

  15. Messenger RNA transcripts of the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha gene containing premature termination codons are subject to nonsense-mediated decay.

    PubMed

    Harries, Lorna W; Hattersley, Andrew T; Ellard, Sian

    2004-02-01

    Mutations in the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha (HNF-1a) gene cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). Approximately 30% of these mutations generate mRNA transcripts harboring premature termination codons (PTCs). Degradation of such transcripts by the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) pathway has been reported for many genes. To determine whether PTC mutant transcripts of the HNF-1alpha gene elicit NMD, we have developed a novel quantitative RT-PCR assay. We performed quantification of ectopically expressed mutant transcripts relative to normal transcripts in lymphoblastoid cell lines using a coding single nucleotide polymorphism (cSNP) as a marker. The nonsense mutations R171X, I414G415ATCG-->CCA, and P291fsinsC showed reduced mutant mRNA expression to 40% (P = 0.009), <0.01% (P 1alpha PTC mutations may be subject to NMD. Mutations that result in significant reduction of protein levels due to NMD will not have dominant-negative activity in vivo. Haploinsufficiency is therefore likely to be the most important mutational mechanism of HNF-1alpha mutations causing MODY. PMID:14747304

  16. Exponential Decay of Correlations for Nonuniformly Hyperbolic Flows with a ${{C(1+alpha}}) $ C 1 + α Stable Foliation, Including the Classical Lorenz Attractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, Vitor; Melbourne, Ian

    2016-11-01

    We prove exponential decay of correlations for a class of $C^{1+\\alpha}$ uniformly hyperbolic skew product flows, subject to a uniform nonintegrability condition. In particular, this establishes exponential decay of correlations for an open set of geometric Lorenz attractors. As a special case, we show that the classical Lorenz attractor is robustly exponentially mixing.

  17. Acquired and congenital cholesteatoma: determination of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-1-alpha and lymphocyte functional antigen-1 in the inflammatory process.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, R; Pawankar, R; Yagi, T; Baba, S

    2000-01-01

    The molecular and cellular factors resulting in the pathologic features of acquired and congenital cholesteatomas are not completely known. Recently, proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) have been shown to induce bone resorption, in vitro. To elucidate the key molecules involved in bone resorption and cell infiltration associated with cholesteatoma, we examined the in vivo levels of IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and lymphocyte functional antigen-1 (LFA-1) in acquired and congenital cholesteatomas, by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA. Increased levels of IL-1 and TNF-alpha were detected in both types of cholesteatomas as compared to normal skin. Increased ICAM-1 expression and LFA-1+ cells were detected in acquired but not congenital cholesteatoma. Strong correlation was detected between TNF-alpha and bone resorption in both types of cholesteatoma, and between TNF-alpha and ICAM, TNF-alpha and severity of infection, or cell infiltration in acquired cholesteatoma. No correlation existed between various parameters and IL-1 alpha. These results suggest that TNF-alpha may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of both acquired and congenital cholesteatomas by regulating bone resorption and cell infiltration.

  18. Crystal structure of the second LNS/LG domain from neurexin 1alpha: Ca2+ binding and the effects of alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Sheckler, Lauren R; Henry, Lisa; Sugita, Shuzo; Südhof, Thomas C; Rudenko, Gabby

    2006-08-11

    Neurexins mediate protein interactions at the synapse, playing an essential role in synaptic function. Extracellular domains of neurexins, and their fragments, bind a distinct profile of different proteins regulated by alternative splicing and Ca2+. The crystal structure of n1alpha_LNS#2 (the second LNS/LG domain of bovine neurexin 1alpha) reveals large structural differences compared with n1alpha_LNS#6 (or n1beta_LNS), the only other LNS/LG domain for which a structure has been determined. The differences overlap the so-called hyper-variable surface, the putative protein interaction surface that is reshaped as a result of alternative splicing. A Ca2+-binding site is revealed at the center of the hyper-variable surface next to splice insertion sites. Isothermal titration calorimetry indicates that the Ca2+-binding site in n1alpha_LNS#2 has low affinity (Kd approximately 400 microm). Ca2+ binding ceases to be measurable when an 8- or 15-residue splice insert is present at the splice site SS#2 indicating that alternative splicing can affect Ca2+-binding sites of neurexin LNS/LG domains. Our studies initiate a framework for the putative protein interaction sites of neurexin LNS/LG domains. This framework is essential to understand how incorporation of alternative splice inserts expands the information from a limited set of neurexin genes to produce a large array of synaptic adhesion molecules with potentially very different synaptic function.

  19. Protecting Neural Structures and Cognitive Function During Prolonged Space Flight by Targeting the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Molecular Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, M. A.; Goodwin, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the main activity-dependent neurotrophin in the human nervous system. BDNF is implicated in production of new neurons from dentate gyrus stem cells (hippocampal neurogenesis), synapse formation, sprouting of new axons, growth of new axons, sprouting of new dendrites, and neuron survival. Alterations in the amount or activity of BDNF can produce significant detrimental changes to cortical function and synaptic transmission in the human brain. This can result in glial and neuronal dysfunction, which may contribute to a range of clinical conditions, spanning a number of learning, behavioral, and neurological disorders. There is an extensive body of work surrounding the BDNF molecular network, including BDNF gene polymorphisms, methylated BDNF gene promoters, multiple gene transcripts, varied BDNF functional proteins, and different BDNF receptors (whose activation differentially drive the neuron to neurogenesis or apoptosis). BDNF is also closely linked to mitochondrial biogenesis through PGC-1alpha, which can influence brain and muscle metabolic efficiency. BDNF AS A HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT COUNTERMEASURE TARGET Earth-based studies reveal that BDNF is negatively impacted by many of the conditions encountered in the space environment, including oxidative stress, radiation, psychological stressors, sleep deprivation, and many others. A growing body of work suggests that the BDNF network is responsive to a range of diet, nutrition, exercise, drug, and other types of influences. This section explores the BDNF network in the context of 1) protecting the brain and nervous system in the space environment, 2) optimizing neurobehavioral performance in space, and 3) reducing the residual effects of space flight on the nervous system on return to Earth

  20. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Michelle L.; Chourasia, Aparajita H.; Macleod, Kay F.

    2013-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell growth and tumorigenesis is emerging beyond Warburg as an area of research that is under-explored in terms of its significance for clinical management of cancer. Work discussed in this review focuses less on the Warburg effect and more on mitochondria and how dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cell cycle, gene expression, metabolism, cell viability, and other established aspects of cell growth and stress responses. There is increasing evidence that key oncogenes and tumor suppressors modulate mitochondrial dynamics through important signaling pathways and that mitochondrial mass and function vary between tumors and individuals but the significance of these events for cancer are not fully appreciated. We explore the interplay between key molecules involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion and in apoptosis, as well as in mitophagy, biogenesis, and spatial dynamics of mitochondria and consider how these distinct mechanisms are coordinated in response to physiological stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Importantly, we examine how deregulation of these processes in cancer has knock on effects for cell proliferation and growth. We define major forms of mitochondrial dysfunction and address the extent to which the functional consequences of such dysfunction can be determined and exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24350057

  1. Defect of mitochondrial respiratory chain is a mechanism of ROS overproduction in a rat model of alcoholic liver disease: role of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Wenliang; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2016-02-01

    Morphological and functional alterations of hepatic mitochondria have been documented in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Our recent study demonstrated that zinc level was decreased in whole liver and mitochondria by chronic alcohol feeding. The present study was undertaken to determine whether zinc deficiency mediates alcohol-induced mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) defect and whether defective ETC function may lead to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Male Wistar rats were pair fed with the Lieber-DeCarli control or ethanol diet for 5 mo. Chronic alcohol exposure increased hepatic triglyceride, free fatty acid, and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) levels; meanwhile hepatic mitochondrial 4HNE level was also increased. Moreover, hepatic mitochondrial respiratory complexes I, III, IV, and V and hepatic ATP production were decreased by chronic alcohol exposure. Chronic alcohol feeding decreased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1-alpha (PGC1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and mitochondrial DNA. HepG2 cells were treated with N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN) for 6 h. Zinc deficiency significantly decreased mitochondrial respiratory complexes I, III, and IV. In addition, PGC1α, NRF1, and TFAM levels as well as mitochondrial DNA were significantly decreased by TPEN treatment. Knockdown of mitochondrial respiratory complexes I, III, or IV by shRNA caused a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in ROS production. These results suggest that alcohol-induced hepatic zinc deficiency could inactivate mitochondrial biogenesis pathway and decrease mitochondrial DNA replication, which, in turn, decreases mitochondrial complex protein expression. The defect of mitochondrial respiratory complexes may worsen alcohol-induced ROS production.

  2. Mitochondrial fusion and inheritance of the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hiroyoshi; Onoue, Kenta; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2010-03-01

    Although maternal or uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial genomes is a general rule, biparental inheritance is sometimes observed in protists and fungi,including yeasts. In yeast, recombination occurs between the mitochondrial genomes inherited from both parents.Mitochondrial fusion observed in yeast zygotes is thought to set up a space for DNA recombination. In the last decade,a universal mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been uncovered, using yeast as a model. On the other hand, an alternative mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been identified in the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum.A specific mitochondrial plasmid, mF, has been detected as the genetic material that causes mitochondrial fusion in P. polycephalum. Without mF, fusion of the mitochondria is not observed throughout the life cycle, suggesting that Physarum has no constitutive mitochondrial fusion mechanism.Conversely, mitochondria fuse in zygotes and during sporulation with mF. The complete mF sequence suggests that one gene, ORF640, encodes a fusogen for Physarum mitochondria. Although in general, mitochondria are inherited uniparentally, biparental inheritance occurs with specific sexual crossing in P. polycephalum.An analysis of the transmission of mitochondrial genomes has shown that recombinations between two parental mitochondrial genomes require mitochondrial fusion,mediated by mF. Physarum is a unique organism for studying mitochondrial fusion. PMID:20196232

  3. Mitochondrial fusion and inheritance of the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hiroyoshi; Onoue, Kenta; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2010-03-01

    Although maternal or uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial genomes is a general rule, biparental inheritance is sometimes observed in protists and fungi,including yeasts. In yeast, recombination occurs between the mitochondrial genomes inherited from both parents.Mitochondrial fusion observed in yeast zygotes is thought to set up a space for DNA recombination. In the last decade,a universal mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been uncovered, using yeast as a model. On the other hand, an alternative mitochondrial fusion mechanism has been identified in the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum.A specific mitochondrial plasmid, mF, has been detected as the genetic material that causes mitochondrial fusion in P. polycephalum. Without mF, fusion of the mitochondria is not observed throughout the life cycle, suggesting that Physarum has no constitutive mitochondrial fusion mechanism.Conversely, mitochondria fuse in zygotes and during sporulation with mF. The complete mF sequence suggests that one gene, ORF640, encodes a fusogen for Physarum mitochondria. Although in general, mitochondria are inherited uniparentally, biparental inheritance occurs with specific sexual crossing in P. polycephalum.An analysis of the transmission of mitochondrial genomes has shown that recombinations between two parental mitochondrial genomes require mitochondrial fusion,mediated by mF. Physarum is a unique organism for studying mitochondrial fusion.

  4. Role of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors 1alpha and 2alpha in the regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression in a human trophoblast cell line.

    PubMed

    Meade, E S; Ma, Y Y; Guller, S

    2007-10-01

    The plasminogen activator inhibitors (PAIs) play critical roles in regulating hemostatic and invasive functions of trophoblasts through suppression of plasmin-dependent fibrinolysis and extracellular matrix degradation. The expression of PAI-1 is increased under hypoxic conditions, although the mechanism remains incompletely understood. In the current study we used HTR-8/SVneo cells, a first trimester extravillous trophoblast cell line, and siRNA technology to examine the role of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs)-1alpha and -2alpha in the regulation of PAI-1 expression. Using serum-containing and serum-free media culture media it was initially noted that levels of PAI-1, but not PAI-2 protein, were markedly induced by hypoxic (2-3% oxygen) treatment. Under hypoxic conditions, Western blotting revealed that the presence of siRNAs to HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha suppressed expression of their respective proteins, whereas treatment with non-targeting and cyclophilin B siRNAs did not. Importantly, incubation with siRNA to HIF-1alpha or HIF-2alpha alone reduced PAI-1 protein levels to a similar extent, with the combined treatment inducing a more profound effect. The presence of HIF siRNAs reduced levels of PAI-1 mRNA as measured by quantitative real-time PCR, indicating that HIF-1alpha and HIF-2 alpha regulate PAI-1 expression at a transcriptional level. These results indicate that both HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha play important and similar roles in hypoxia-mediated stimulation of PAI-1 expression in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Our findings provide insight into the physiological regulation of trophoblast PAI-1 expression in early pregnancy when placental oxygen levels are low, as well as a mechanism for over-expression of placental PAI-1 noted in pregnancies with preeclampsia.

  5. Biosynthetic incorporation of [3H]ethanolamine into protein synthesis elongation factor 1 alpha reveals a new post-translational protein modification.

    PubMed

    Rosenberry, T L; Krall, J A; Dever, T E; Haas, R; Louvard, D; Merrick, W C

    1989-05-01

    Biosynthetic incorporation of [3H]ethanolamine into proteins was assessed in the human erythroleukemia cell line K562. A single predominant labeled protein of about 50 kDa was observed following electrophoresis of cell extracts on polyacrylamide gels in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Subcellular fractionation showed this protein to distribute similarly to a 46-kDa [3H]ethanolamine-labeled protein reported previously (Tisdale, E. J., and Tartakoff, A. M. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 8244-8252). In particular, the protein was enriched in cytosolic and microsomal fractions relative to plasma membrane and thus did not appear to correspond to the class of proteins with glycoinositol phospholipid anchors, the only post-translational protein modification involving ethanolamine that had been described previously. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel analysis involving isoelectric focusing followed by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate indicated that the protein was very basic, and nitrocellulose blots of one- and two-dimensional gels subjected to 3H autoradiography and immunostaining with antisera to purified rabbit elongation factor (EF) 1 alpha revealed that the protein was EF-1 alpha. Copurification of rabbit EF-1 alpha and the [3H]ethanolamine-labeled protein from K562 cells further supported this identification. Analysis of tryptic fragments produced from the copurified proteins by reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography showed two radiolabeled peptides. Amino acid analysis demonstrated 1 residue of ethanolamine in each peptide, and peptide sequencing revealed that the ethanolamine-containing component(s) was attached to Glu301 and Glu374 in the EF-1 alpha protein sequence deduced from a human EF-1 alpha cDNA. These data confirm a new class of post-translational protein modifications involving ethanolamine. PMID:2708357

  6. Adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sola, J.; Casademont, J.; Grau, J. M.; Graus, F.; Cardellach, F.; Pedrol, E.; Urbano-Marquez, A.

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are polymorphic entities which may affect many organs and systems. Skeletal muscle involvement is frequent in the context of systemic mitochondrial disease, but adult-onset pure mitochondrial myopathy appears to be rare. We report 3 patients with progressive skeletal mitochondrial myopathy starting in adult age. In all cases, the proximal myopathy was the only clinical feature. Mitochondrial pathology was confirmed by evidence of ragged-red fibres in muscle histochemistry, an abnormal mitochondrial morphology in electron microscopy and by exclusion of other underlying diseases. No deletions of mitochondrial DNA were found. We emphasize the need to look for a mitochondrial disorder in some non-specific myopathies starting in adult life. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1589382

  7. Renal Mitochondrial Cytopathies

    PubMed Central

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Salviati, Leonardo; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Renal diseases in mitochondrial cytopathies are a group of rare diseases that are characterized by frequent multisystemic involvement and extreme variability of phenotype. Most frequently patients present a tubular defect that is consistent with complete De Toni-Debré-Fanconi syndrome in most severe forms. More rarely, patients present with chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal diseases, or primary glomerular involvement. In recent years, two clearly defined entities, namely 3243 A > G tRNALEU mutations and coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis defects, have been described. The latter group is particularly important because it represents the only treatable renal mitochondrial defect. In this paper, the physiopathologic bases of mitochondrial cytopathies, the diagnostic approaches, and main characteristics of related renal diseases are summarized. PMID:21811680

  8. Mitophagy is required for mitochondrial biogenesis and myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Jon; Andres, Allen M.; Taylor, David J. R.; Weston, Thomas; Hiraumi, Yoshimi; Stotland, Aleksandr; Kim, Brandon J.; Huang, Chengqun; Doran, Kelly S.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Myogenesis is a crucial process governing skeletal muscle development and homeostasis. Differentiation of primitive myoblasts into mature myotubes requires a metabolic switch to support the increased energetic demand of contractile muscle. Skeletal myoblasts specifically shift from a highly glycolytic state to relying predominantly on oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) upon differentiation. We have found that this phenomenon requires dramatic remodeling of the mitochondrial network involving both mitochondrial clearance and biogenesis. During early myogenic differentiation, autophagy is robustly upregulated and this coincides with DNM1L/DRP1 (dynamin 1-like)-mediated fragmentation and subsequent removal of mitochondria via SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1)-mediated mitophagy. Mitochondria are then repopulated via PPARGC1A/PGC-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha)-mediated biogenesis. Mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1 (optic atrophy 1 [autosomal dominant]) is then briskly upregulated, resulting in the reformation of mitochondrial networks. The final product is a myotube replete with new mitochondria. Respirometry reveals that the constituents of these newly established mitochondrial networks are better primed for OXPHOS and are more tightly coupled than those in myoblasts. Additionally, we have found that suppressing autophagy with various inhibitors during differentiation interferes with myogenic differentiation. Together these data highlight the integral role of autophagy and mitophagy in myogenic differentiation. PMID:26566717

  9. Interleukin 1 Alpha (IL1A) Is a Novel Regulator of the Blood-Testis Barrier in the Rat1

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Oli; Mathur, Premendu P.; Cheng, C. Yan; Mruk, Dolores D.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout spermatogenesis, leptotene spermatocytes must traverse the blood-testis barrier (BTB) at stages VIII–XI to gain entry into the adluminal compartment for continued development. However, the mechanism underlying BTB restructuring remains somewhat elusive. In this study, interleukin 1 alpha (IL1A) was administered intratesticularly to adult rats in order to assess its effects on spermatogenesis. IL1A was shown to perturb Sertoli-germ cell adhesion, resulting in germ cell loss from ~50% of seminiferous tubules by 15 days posttreatment. Equally important, the functional integrity of the BTB was compromised when inulin-fluorescein isothiocyanate was detected in the adluminal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium following its administration via the jugular vein. Interestingly, IL1A did not affect the steady-state levels of proteins that confer BTB function, namely OCLN, CLDN1, F11R, TJP1, and CDH2. Instead, the localizations of OCLN, F11R, and TJP1 in the seminiferous epithelium were altered; these proteins appeared to move away from sites of cell-cell contact. Moreover, IL1A was shown to perturb the orderly arrangement of filamentous actin at the BTB and apical ectoplasmic specialization with distinct areas illustrating loss of actin filaments. Taken collectively, these results suggest that IL1A-induced BTB disruption is not mediated via the reduction of target protein levels. Instead, IL1A’s primary cellular target appears to be the Sertoli cell actin cytoskeleton. It is possible that localized production of IL1A by Sertoli and/or germ cells in vivo results in BTB restructuring, and this may facilitate the movement of leptotene spermatocytes across the BTB. PMID:18057314

  10. A role for interleukin-1 alpha in the 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 response in mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maund, Sophia L; Shi, Lihong; Cramer, Scott D

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy in American women, and better preventative strategies are needed. Epidemiological and laboratory studies point to vitamin D3 as a promising chemopreventative agent for breast cancer. Vitamin D3 metabolites induce anti-proliferative effects in breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, but few studies have investigated their effects in normal mammary epithelial cells. We hypothesized that 1,25(OH)2D3, the metabolically active form of vitamin D3, is growth suppressive in normal mouse mammary epithelial cells. In addition, we have previously established a role for the cytokine interleukin-1 alpha (IL1α) in the anti-proliferative effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 in normal prostate cells, and so we hypothesized that IL1α is involved in the 1,25(OH)2D3 response in mammary cells. Evaluation of cell viability, clonogenicity, senescence, and induction of cell cycle regulators p21 and p27 supported an anti-proliferative role for 1,25(OH)2D3 in mammary epithelial cells. Furthermore, 1,25(OH)2D3 increased the intracellular expression of IL1α, which was necessary for the anti-proliferative effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 in mammary cells. Together, these findings support the chemopreventative potential of vitamin D3 in the mammary gland and present a role for IL1α in regulation of mammary cell proliferation by 1,25(OH)2D3.

  11. A Role for Interleukin-1 Alpha in the 1,25 Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Response in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maund, Sophia L.; Shi, Lihong; Cramer, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy in American women, and better preventative strategies are needed. Epidemiological and laboratory studies point to vitamin D3 as a promising chemopreventative agent for breast cancer. Vitamin D3 metabolites induce anti-proliferative effects in breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, but few studies have investigated their effects in normal mammary epithelial cells. We hypothesized that 1,25(OH)2D3, the metabolically active form of vitamin D3, is growth suppressive in normal mouse mammary epithelial cells. In addition, we have previously established a role for the cytokine interleukin-1 alpha (IL1α) in the anti-proliferative effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 in normal prostate cells, and so we hypothesized that IL1α is involved in the 1,25(OH)2D3 response in mammary cells. Evaluation of cell viability, clonogenicity, senescence, and induction of cell cycle regulators p21 and p27 supported an anti-proliferative role for 1,25(OH)2D3 in mammary epithelial cells. Furthermore, 1,25(OH)2D3 increased the intracellular expression of IL1α, which was necessary for the anti-proliferative effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 in mammary cells. Together, these findings support the chemopreventative potential of vitamin D3 in the mammary gland and present a role for IL1α in regulation of mammary cell proliferation by 1,25(OH)2D3. PMID:24244740

  12. Interleukin 1 alpha stimulates hemopoiesis but not tumor cell proliferation and protects mice from lethal total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Constine, L.S.; Harwell, S.; Keng, P.; Lee, F.; Rubin, P.; Siemann, D. )

    1991-03-01

    Interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1) is a polypeptide/glycoprotein growth factor with multiple functions including the modulation of hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation. In vivo studies were performed with C57BL/6J mice injected with 0, 0.2, or 2.0 micrograms of IL-1 24 hr before or after lethal total body irradiation (TBI) (9.5 Gy). More mice in the groups administered IL-1 before TBI survived (90% of the 2.0 micrograms group) than those treated 2 or 24 hr after TBI, which was still slightly superior to the uninjected group, which all died within 15 days (p = .0001). Proliferation of bone marrow granulocyte/macrophage colonies following split dose TBI was also greatest for mouse groups treated with IL-1 prior to TBI. These experiments support data from other investigators that IL-1 stimulation of BM is related to IL-1 timing with respect to TBI. Stimulation of hemopoiesis was also assessed in terms of changes in peripheral blood and BM cell numbers and cell cycle kinetics using an electronic particle counter and flow cytometric techniques. Mice injected with 2 micrograms of IL-1 showed an initial decline (at 3-6 hr) and then a selective proliferation (24-48 hr) of early and more committed progenitor cells to 125% and 200% of control values, respectively. Peripheral blood counts rose accordingly. Cells in S and G2/M phases increased over 10 hr and then declined in number. It thus appeared that some synchronization of cell cycling occurred, which might place cells in a more radioresistant phase of the cell cycle. The glutathione (GSH) content and synthesis in BM cells were measured by isocratic paired-ion high performance liquid chromatography and 35S-labelled cysteine incorporation into the GSH tripeptide. An increase in cellular GSH content and synthesis was demonstrated following IL-1 which lasted 24 hr.

  13. Polymorphisms in the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha gene in Mexican patients with preeclampsia: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the etiology of preeclampsia is still unclear, recent work suggests that changes in circulating angiogenic factors play a key role in its pathogenesis. In the trophoblast of women with preeclampsia, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) is over-expressed, and induces the expression of non-angiogenic factors and inhibitors of trophoblast differentiation. This observation prompted the study of HIF-1α and its relation to preeclampsia. It has been described that the C1772T (P582S) and G1790A (A588T) polymorphisms of the HIF1A gene have significantly greater transcriptional activity, correlated with an increased expression of their proteins, than the wild-type sequence. In this work, we studied whether either or both HIF1A variants contribute to preeclampsia susceptibility. Results Genomic DNA was isolated from 150 preeclamptic and 105 healthy pregnant women. Exon 12 of the HIF1A gene was amplified by PCR, and the genotypes of HIF1A were determined by DNA sequencing. In preeclamptic women and controls, the frequencies of the T allele for C1772T were 4.3 vs. 4.8%, and the frequencies of the A allele for G1790A were 0.0 vs. 0.5%, respectively. No significant differences were found between groups. Conclusion The frequency of the C1772T and G1790A polymorphisms of the HIF1A gene is very low, and neither polymorphism is associated with the development of preeclampsia in the Mexican population. PMID:21414224

  14. Cancer: Mitochondrial Origins.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M

    2015-12-01

    The primacy of glucose derived from photosynthesis as an existential source of chemical energy across plant and animal phyla is universally accepted as a core principle in the biological sciences. In mammalian cells, initial processing of glucose to triose phosphate intermediates takes place within the cytosolic glycolytic pathway and terminates with temporal transport of reducing equivalents derived from pyruvate metabolism by membrane-associated respiratory complexes in the mitochondrial matrix. The intra-mitochondrial availability of molecular oxygen as the ultimate electron acceptor drives the evolutionary fashioned chemiosmotic production of ATP as a high-efficiency biological process. The mechanistic bases of carcinogenesis have demonstrated profound alteration of normative mitochondrial function, notably dysregulated respiratory processes. Accordingly, the classic Warburg effect functionally links aerobic glycolysis, aberrant production and release of lactate, and metabolic down-regulation of mitochondrial oxidative processes with the carcinogenetic phenotype. We surmise, however, that aerobic fermentation by cancer cells may also represent a developmental re-emergence of an evolutionarily conserved early phenotype, which was "sidelined" with the emergence of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation as a primary mechanism for ATP production in normal cells. Regardless of state-dependent physiological status in mixed populations of cancer cells, it has been established that mitochondria are functionally linked to the initiation of cancer and its progression. Biochemical, molecular, and physiological differences in cancer cell mitochondria, notably mtDNA heteroplasmy and allele-specific expression of selected nuclear genes, may represent major focal points for novel targeting and elimination of cancer cells in metastatic disease afflicting human populations. To date, and despite considerable research efforts, the practical realization of advanced mitochondrial

  15. Cancer: Mitochondrial Origins

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, George B.; Kream, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    The primacy of glucose derived from photosynthesis as an existential source of chemical energy across plant and animal phyla is universally accepted as a core principle in the biological sciences. In mammalian cells, initial processing of glucose to triose phosphate intermediates takes place within the cytosolic glycolytic pathway and terminates with temporal transport of reducing equivalents derived from pyruvate metabolism by membrane-associated respiratory complexes in the mitochondrial matrix. The intra-mitochondrial availability of molecular oxygen as the ultimate electron acceptor drives the evolutionary fashioned chemiosmotic production of ATP as a high-efficiency biological process. The mechanistic bases of carcinogenesis have demonstrated profound alteration of normative mitochondrial function, notably dysregulated respiratory processes. Accordingly, the classic Warburg effect functionally links aerobic glycolysis, aberrant production and release of lactate, and metabolic down-regulation of mitochondrial oxidative processes with the carcinogenetic phenotype. We surmise, however, that aerobic fermentation by cancer cells may also represent a developmental re-emergence of an evolutionarily conserved early phenotype, which was “sidelined” with the emergence of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation as a primary mechanism for ATP production in normal cells. Regardless of state-dependent physiological status in mixed populations of cancer cells, it has been established that mitochondria are functionally linked to the initiation of cancer and its progression. Biochemical, molecular, and physiological differences in cancer cell mitochondria, notably mtDNA heteroplasmy and allele-specific expression of selected nuclear genes, may represent major focal points for novel targeting and elimination of cancer cells in metastatic disease afflicting human populations. To date, and despite considerable research efforts, the practical realization of advanced

  16. Mitochondrial calcium uptake.

    PubMed

    Williams, George S B; Boyman, Liron; Chikando, Aristide C; Khairallah, Ramzi J; Lederer, W J

    2013-06-25

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) uptake into the mitochondrial matrix is critically important to cellular function. As a regulator of matrix Ca(2+) levels, this flux influences energy production and can initiate cell death. If large, this flux could potentially alter intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) signals. Despite years of study, fundamental disagreements on the extent and speed of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake still exist. Here, we review and quantitatively analyze mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake fluxes from different tissues and interpret the results with respect to the recently proposed mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) candidate. This quantitative analysis yields four clear results: (i) under physiological conditions, Ca(2+) influx into the mitochondria via the MCU is small relative to other cytosolic Ca(2+) extrusion pathways; (ii) single MCU conductance is ∼6-7 pS (105 mM [Ca(2+)]), and MCU flux appears to be modulated by [Ca(2+)]i, suggesting Ca(2+) regulation of MCU open probability (P(O)); (iii) in the heart, two features are clear: the number of MCU channels per mitochondrion can be calculated, and MCU probability is low under normal conditions; and (iv) in skeletal muscle and liver cells, uptake per mitochondrion varies in magnitude but total uptake per cell still appears to be modest. Based on our analysis of available quantitative data, we conclude that although Ca(2+) critically regulates mitochondrial function, the mitochondria do not act as a significant dynamic buffer of cytosolic Ca(2+) under physiological conditions. Nevertheless, with prolonged (superphysiological) elevations of [Ca(2+)]i, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake can increase 10- to 1,000-fold and begin to shape [Ca(2+)]i dynamics.

  17. Late Mitochondrial Acquisition, Really?

    PubMed Central

    Degli Esposti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a timely critique of a recent Nature paper by Pittis and Gabaldón that has suggested a late origin of mitochondria in eukaryote evolution. It shows that the inferred ancestry of many mitochondrial proteins has been incorrectly assigned by Pittis and Gabaldón to bacteria other than the aerobic proteobacteria from which the ancestor of mitochondria originates, thereby questioning the validity of their suggestion that mitochondrial acquisition may be a late event in eukaryote evolution. The analysis and approach presented here may guide future studies to resolve the true ancestry of mitochondria. PMID:27289097

  18. Pharmacologic Effects on Mitochondrial Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Bruce H.

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of energy necessary for cellular function is produced in mitochondria. Free-radical production and apoptosis are other critical mitochondrial functions. The complex structure, electrochemical properties of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM), and genetic control from both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) are…

  19. Restriction enzyme analysis of the mitochondrial genome in mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, J; Turnbull, D M; Mehta, A B; Wilson, J; Gardiner, R M

    1988-01-01

    The mitochondrial myopathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders some of which may be caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome. Mitochondrial DNA from 10 patients with mitochondrial myopathy and their mothers was analysed using five restriction enzymes and 11 mitochondrial probes in bacteriophage M13. No abnormalities were found in seven out of the 10 patients. Polymorphisms which have not previously been reported were detected in three patients and two of their mothers. These results exclude the presence of deletions or insertions of greater than 60 bp in the region of the mitochondrial genome examined. Any causative mitochondrial DNA mutations in these disorders are therefore likely to be point mutations or small structural rearrangements. Images PMID:2903249

  20. Fibroblast growth factor 23 impairs phosphorus and vitamin D metabolism in vivo and suppresses 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1alpha-hydroxylase expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Perwad, Farzana; Zhang, Martin Y H; Tenenhouse, Harriet S; Portale, Anthony A

    2007-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) is critical to the pathogenesis of a distinct group of renal phosphate wasting disorders: tumor-induced osteomalacia, X-linked hypophosphatemia, and autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets. Excess circulating FGF-23 is responsible for their major phenotypic features which include hypophosphatemia due to renal phosphate wasting and inappropriately low serum 1,25(OH)2D concentrations. To characterize the effects of FGF-23 on renal sodium-phosphate (Na/P(i)) cotransport and vitamin D metabolism, we administered FGF-23(R176Q) to normal mice. A single injection (0.33 microg/g body wt) induced significant hypophosphatemia, 20 and 29% decreases (P < 0.001) in brush-border membrane (BBM) Na/Pi cotransport at 5 and 17 h after injection, respectively, and comparable decreases in the abundance of type IIa Na/P(i) cotransporter protein in BBM. Multiple injections (6, 12, and 24 mug/day for 4 days) induced dose-dependent decreases (38, 63, and 75%, respectively) in renal abundance of 1alpha-hydroxylase mRNA (P < 0.05). To determine whether FGF-23(R176Q) exerts a direct action on 1alpha-hydroxylase gene expression, we examined its effects in cultured human (HKC-8) and mouse (MCT) renal proximal tubule cells. FGF-23(R176Q) (1 to 10 ng/ml) induced a dose-dependent decrease in 1alpha-hydroxylase mRNA with a maximum suppression of 37% (P < 0.05). Suppression was detectable after 6 h of exposure and maximal after 21 h. In MCT cells, FGF-23(R176Q) suppressed 1alpha-hydroxylase mRNA and activated the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. The MAPK inhibitor PD98059 effectively abolished FGF-23-induced suppression of 1alpha-hydroxylase mRNA by blocking signal transduction via ERK1/2. These novel findings provide evidence that FGF-23 directly regulates renal 1alpha-hydroxylase gene expression via activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  1. Biochemical characterization of endothelin-converting enzyme-1alpha in cultured skin-derived cells and its postulated role in the stimulation of melanogenesis in human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Akira; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Takema, Yoshinori; Imokawa, Genji

    2002-02-15

    The vasoconstrictive peptide endothelin-1 (ET-1) is expressed in human epidermis at the gene and protein levels and plays an important role in stimulating pigmentation via its increased secretion by keratinocytes following ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. However, one or more biological mechanisms underlying the secretion of ET-1 by keratinocytes in human skin have never been evaluated. In mammalian endothelial cells, a membrane-bound neutral metalloproteinase, termed endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE), catalyzes the specific cleavage of the inactive precursor Big ET to produce mature active ET, which leads in turn to the secretion of ET by those cells. To clarify the potential involvement of ECE in the processing and secretion of ET-1 by human keratinocytes, we synthesized the N-terminal peptide of human ECE-1alpha and generated a rabbit polyclonal antibody (alphaPEPT6) that specifically recognizes ECE-1alpha. Reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting analysis revealed that significant expression of ECE-1 transcripts and ECE-1alpha protein occurs in human keratinocytes. When ECE activity was assayed in extracts of human keratinocytes at pHs ranging from 5.0 to 8.0, the enzymatic profile had an optimal neutral pH of 7.0 and was sharply pH-dependent. Furthermore, when extracts of human keratinocytes were treated with alphaPEPT6, ECE activity was significantly reduced compared with extracts treated with the prebleed serum of alphaPEPT6, which supports the notion that ECE-1alpha is a major metalloproteinase with ECE activity in human keratinocytes. The exogenous addition of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1alpha significantly increased expression of ECE-1 transcripts in cultured human keratinocytes, which suggests an association with post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that ECE-1alpha is expressed at significant levels in various types of human skin cells (including keratinocytes) and that it

  2. Leptin stimulates fibroblast growth factor 23 expression in bone and suppresses renal 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 synthesis in leptin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kiyomi; Maeda, Toyonobu; Kawane, Tetsuya; Matsunuma, Ayako; Horiuchi, Noboru

    2010-08-01

    Leptin is the LEP (ob) gene product secreted by adipocytes. We previously reported that leptin decreases renal expression of the 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) 1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) gene through the leptin receptor (ObRb) by indirectly acting on the proximal tubules. This study focused on bone-derived fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) as a mediator of the influence of leptin on renal 1alpha-hydroxylase mRNA expression in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Exposure to leptin (200 ng/mL) for 24 hours stimulated FGF-23 expression by primary cultured rat osteoblasts. Administration of leptin (4 mg/kg i.p. at 12-hour intervals for 2 days) to ob/ob mice markedly increased the serum FGF-23 concentration while significantly reducing the serum levels of calcium, phosphate, and 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)]. Administration of FGF-23 (5 microg i.p. at 12-hour intervals for 2 days) to ob/ob mice suppressed renal 1alpha-hydroxylase mRNA expression. The main site of FGF-23 mRNA expression was the bone, and leptin markedly increased the FGF-23 mRNA level in ob/ob mice. In addition, leptin significantly reduced 1alpha-hydroxylase and sodium-phosphate cotransporters (NaP(i)-IIa and NaP(i)-IIc) mRNA levels but did not affect Klotho mRNA expression in the kidneys of ob/ob mice. Furthermore, the serum FGF-23 level and renal expression of 1alpha-hydroxylase mRNA were not influenced by administration of leptin to leptin receptor-deficient (db/db) mice. These results indicate that leptin directly stimulates FGF-23 synthesis by bone cells in ob/ob mice, suggesting that inhibition of renal 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) synthesis in these mice is at least partly due to elevated bone production of FGF-23.

  3. Preventive mitochondrial replacement.

    PubMed

    Orgel, L E

    1997-03-01

    Techniques used recently to clone a sheep generate chimeras with the genome of the donor cell and mainly the mitochondria of the acceptor egg. The use of the same techniques should allow a mother carrying a mitochondrial defect to bear a normal child with normal mitochondria.

  4. Modeling mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Robert S

    2006-12-01

    The mitochondrion represents a unique opportunity to apply mathematical modeling to a complex biological system. Understanding mitochondrial function and control is important since this organelle is critical in energy metabolism as well as playing key roles in biochemical synthesis, redox control/signaling, and apoptosis. A mathematical model, or hypothesis, provides several useful insights including a rigorous test of the consensus view of the operation of a biological process as well as providing methods of testing and creating new hypotheses. The advantages of the mitochondrial system for applying a mathematical model include the relative simplicity and understanding of the matrix reactions, the ability to study the mitochondria as a independent contained organelle, and, most importantly, one can dynamically measure many of the internal reaction intermediates, on line. The developing ability to internally monitor events within the metabolic network, rather than just the inflow and outflow, is extremely useful in creating critical bounds on complex mathematical models using the individual reaction mechanisms available. However, many serious problems remain in creating a working model of mitochondrial function including the incomplete definition of metabolic pathways, the uncertainty of using in vitro enzyme kinetics, as well as regulatory data in the intact system and the unknown chemical activities of relevant molecules in the matrix. Despite these formidable limitations, the advantages of the mitochondrial system make it one of the best defined mammalian metabolic networks that can be used as a model system for understanding the application and use of mathematical models to study biological systems.

  5. ENERGETICS, EPIGENETICS, MITOCHONDRIAL GENETICS

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Fan, Weiwei

    2011-01-01

    The epigenome has been hypothesized to provide the interface between the environment and the nuclear DNA (nDNA) genes. Key factors in the environment are the availability of calories and demands on the organism’s energetic capacity. Energy is funneled through glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), the cellular bioenergetic systems. Since there are thousands of bioenergetic genes dispersed across the chromosomes and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), both cis and trans regulation of the nDNA genes is required. The bioenergetic systems convert environmental calories into ATP, acetyl-Coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM), and reduced NAD+. When calories are abundant, ATP and acetyl-CoA phosphorylate and acetylate chromatin, opening the nDNA for transcription and replication. When calories are limiting, chromatin phosphorylation and acetylation are lost and gene expression is suppressed. DNA methylaton via SAM can also be modulated by mitochondrial function. Phosphorylation and acetylation are also pivotal to regulating cellular signal transduction pathways. Therefore, bioenergetics provides the interface between the environment and the epigenome. Consistent with this conclusion, the clinical phenotypes of bioenergetic diseases are strikingly similar to those observed in epigenetic diseases (Angelman, Rett, Fragile X Syndromes, the laminopathies, cancer, etc.), and an increasing number of epigenetic diseases are being associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. This bioenergetic-epigenomic hypothesis has broad implications for the etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of a wide range of common diseases. PMID:19796712

  6. Anaplasma marginale msp1alpha genotypes evolved under positive selection pressure but are not markers for geographic isolates.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, José; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A; Prado, Tulio M; Kocan, Katherine M

    2003-04-01

    and protein sequences of 13 isolates from Oklahoma in comparison with those of 7 Latin American and 13 isolates from the United States by MP and ML analyses demonstrated no geographic clustering and provided evidence that this gene is under positive selection pressure. The results indicate that msp1alpha is not a marker for the characterization of A. marginale geographic isolates and suggest that the genetic heterogeneity observed among isolates of A. marginale within Oklahoma could be explained by cattle movement and the maintenance of different genotypes by independent transmission events. PMID:12682152

  7. Extrahepatic synthesis of plasminogen in the human cornea is up-regulated by interleukins-1alpha and -1beta.

    PubMed Central

    Twining, S S; Wilson, P M; Ngamkitidechakul, C

    1999-01-01

    The avascular cornea has limited access to plasma proteins, including plasminogen, a protein that is synthesized by the liver and supplied to most tissues via the blood. Recent experiments by others using plasminogen-deficient mice revealed the importance of plasmin, the active form of plasminogen, for the maintenance of the normal cornea and for corneal wound healing [Kao, Kao, Bugge, Kaufman, Kombrinck, Converse, Good and Degan (1998) Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 39, 502-508; Drew, Kaufman, Kombrinck, Danton, Daugherty, Degen and Bugge (1998) Blood 91, 1616-1624]. In the present experiments, plasmin was identified as a major serine proteinase in the human cornea. The major plasminogen and plasmin forms on non-reducing zymograms and Western blots had Mr values of 76x10(3) and 85x10(3), with minor forms of Mr 200x10(3), 135x10(3), 68x10(3) and 45x10(3). Angiostatin-like peptides with Mrs of 48x10(3), 45x10(3) and 38x10(3) were observed which bound to lysine-Sepharose and reacted with anti-plasminogen monoclonal antibodies directed towards kringle domains 1-3 of plasminogen. The cornea contained 1.1+/-0.15 microgram of plasminogen+plasmin/cornea, or 0.54+/-0.05 microgram of plasminogen+plasmin/mg of protein. Cornea conditioned medium contained nine times the amount of plasminogen+plasmin that could be extracted from the cornea. These data suggested that corneal cells, unlike most extrahepatic cells, synthesize plasminogen. The synthesis of plasminogen by the cornea was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of metabolically labelled plasminogen, sequencing of its cDNA obtained by reverse transcriptase-PCR and inhibition of protein synthesis. Interleukins-1alpha and -1beta stimulated corneal plasminogen synthesis 2-3-fold; however, interleukin-6 decreased corneal plasminogen synthesis by approx. 40% at early times after addition of the cytokine. By 24 h of culture, no differences were noted in the presence and absence of interleukin-6. Thus the cornea can synthesize

  8. [The mitochondrial genome of protists].

    PubMed

    Odintsova, M S; Iurina, N P

    2002-06-01

    The data on the structure and functions of the mitochondrial genomes of protists (Protozoa and unicellular red and green algae) are reviewed. It is emphasized that mitochondrial gene structure and composition, as well as organization of mitochondrial genomes in protists are more diverse than in multicellular eukaryotes. The gene content of mitochondrial genomes of protists are closer to those of plants than animals or fungi. In the protist mitochondrial DNA, both the universal (as in higher plants) and modified (as in animals and fungi) genetic codes are used. In the overwhelming majority of cases, protist mitochondrial genomes code for the major and minor rRNA components, some tRNAs, and about 30 proteins of the respiratory chain and ribosomes. Based on comparison of the mitochondrial genomes of various protists, the origin and evolution of mitochondria are briefly discussed.

  9. Ginsenoside Rg3 improves cardiac mitochondrial population quality: Mimetic exercise training

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Mengwei; Huang, Chenglin; Wang, Cheng; Zheng, Jianheng; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Yangshu; Chen, Hong; Shen, Weili

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Rg3 is an ergogenic aid. •Rg3 improves mitochondrial antioxidant capacity. •Rg3 regulates mitochondria dynamic remodeling. •Rg3 alone matches some the benefits of aerobic exercise. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates exercise training could mediate mitochondrial quality control through the improvement of mitochondrial dynamics. Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), one of the active ingredients in Panax ginseng, is well known in herbal medicine as a tonic and restorative agent. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of Rg3 has been elusive. In the present study, we compared the effects of Rg3 administration with aerobic exercise on mitochondrial adaptation in cardiac muscle tissue of Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. Three groups of SD rats were studied: (1) sedentary control, (2) Rg3-treated and (3) aerobic exercise trained. Both aerobic exercise training and Rg3 supplementation enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) and nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels in cardiac muscle. The activation of PGC-1α led to increased mRNA levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1(Nrf1), these changes were accompanied by increases in mitochondrial DNA copy number and complex protein levels, while activation of Nrf2 increased levels of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1), superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase. Aerobic exercise also enhanced mitochondrial autophagy pathway activity, including increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and greater expression of beclin1 and autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7), these effects of aerobic exercise are comparable to that of Rg3. These results demonstrate that Rg3 mimics improved cardiac adaptations to exercise by regulating mitochondria dynamic remodeling and enhancing the quantity and quality of mitochondria.

  10. Thyroid Hormone Stimulation of Autophagy Is Essential for Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Activity in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Lesmana, Ronny; Sinha, Rohit A; Singh, Brijesh K; Zhou, Jin; Ohba, Kenji; Wu, Yajun; Yau, Winifred W Y; Bay, Boon-Huat; Yen, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) and autophagy share similar functions in regulating skeletal muscle growth, regeneration, and differentiation. Although TH recently has been shown to increase autophagy in liver, the regulation and role of autophagy by this hormone in skeletal muscle is not known. Here, using both in vitro and in vivo models, we demonstrated that TH induces autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner in skeletal muscle. TH induction of autophagy involved reactive oxygen species (ROS) stimulation of 5'adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-Unc-51-like kinase 1 (Ulk1) signaling. TH also increased mRNA and protein expression of key autophagy genes, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), Sequestosome 1 (p62), and Ulk1, as well as genes that modulated autophagy and Forkhead box O (FOXO) 1/3a. TH increased mitochondrial protein synthesis and number as well as basal mitochondrial O2 consumption, ATP turnover, and maximal respiratory capacity. Surprisingly, mitochondrial activity and biogenesis were blunted when autophagy was blocked in muscle cells by Autophagy-related gene (Atg)5 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Induction of ROS and 5'adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) by TH played a significant role in the up-regulation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PPARGC1A), the key regulator of mitochondrial synthesis. In summary, our findings showed that TH-mediated autophagy was essential for stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and activity in skeletal muscle. Moreover, autophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis were coupled in skeletal muscle via TH induction of mitochondrial activity and ROS generation. PMID:26562261

  11. Identification of nuclear factors which interact with the 5' flanking region of the EF-1 alpha O gene in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Olesen, O F; Frydenberg, J

    1992-11-30

    The EF-1 alpha O gene of Xenopus laevis is a stage-specific gene, being transcribed in oogonia and oocytes, but not in postmeiotic germ cells and terminally differentiated cells. We found that two trans-acting factors from oocyte nuclear extract are able to interact with a DNA sequence in the 5'-upstream region of the EF-1 alpha O gene. Methylation interference experiments suggested that the two factors recognised the same DNA element. Gel retardation assays indicated that part of the protein binding site could be confined to a 21 bp sequence, located between -51 and -72, relative to the cap site. Interestingly, this region shares great homology to a negative regulatory segment in the promoter of the TFIIIA gene, another developmentally regulated gene. PMID:1446735

  12. Matairesinol inhibits angiogenesis via suppression of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Boram; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation during hypoxia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol could be a basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) are involved in cancer initiation and progression and function as signaling molecules in many aspects of hypoxia and growth factor-mediated signaling. Here we report that matairesinol, a natural small molecule identified from the cell-based screening of 200 natural plants, suppresses mROS generation resulting in anti-angiogenic activity. A non-toxic concentration of matairesinol inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The compound also suppressed in vitro angiogenesis of tube formation and chemoinvasion, as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. Furthermore, matairesinol decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in hypoxic HeLa cells. These results demonstrate that matairesinol could function as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor by suppressing mROS signaling.

  13. Increased size of solid organs in patients with Chuvash polycythemia and in mice with altered expression of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Donghoon; Okhotin, David V; Kim, Bumjun; Okhotina, Yulia; Okhotin, Daniel J; Miasnikova, Galina Y; Sergueeva, Adelina I; Polyakova, Lydia A; Maslow, Alexei; Lee, Yonggu; Semenza, Gregg L; Prchal, Josef T; Gordeuk, Victor R

    2010-05-01

    Chuvash polycythemia, the first hereditary disease associated with dysregulated oxygen-sensing to be recognized, is characterized by a homozygous germ-line loss-of-function mutation of the VHL gene (VHL(R200W)) resulting in elevated hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha and HIF-2alpha levels, increased red cell mass and propensity to thrombosis. Organ volume is determined by the size and number of cells, and the underlying molecular control mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Work from several groups has demonstrated that the proliferation of cells is regulated in opposite directions by HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha. HIF-1alpha inhibits cell proliferation by displacing MYC from the promoter of the gene encoding the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21(Cip1), thereby inducing its expression. In contrast, HIF-2alpha promotes MYC activity and cell proliferation. Here we report that the volumes of liver, spleen, and kidneys relative to body mass were larger in 30 individuals with Chuvash polycythemia than in 30 matched Chuvash controls. In Hif1a(+/-) mice, which are heterozygous for a null (knockout) allele at the locus encoding HIF-1alpha, hepatic HIF-2alpha mRNA was increased (2-fold) and the mass of the liver was increased, compared with wild-type littermates, without significant difference in cell volume. Hepatic p21(Cip1) mRNA levels were 9.5-fold lower in Hif1a(+/-) mice compared with wild-type littermates. These data suggest that, in addition to increased red cell mass, the sizes of liver, spleen, and kidneys are increased in Chuvash polycythemia. At least in the liver, this phenotype may result from increased HIF-2alpha and decreased p21(Cip1) levels leading to increased hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:20140661

  14. DP97, a DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase, is a target gene-selective co-regulator of the constitutive androstane receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Serikawa, Takafumi; Inajima, Jun; Inouye, Yoshio

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DP97 interacts with nuclear receptor CAR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DP97 enhances CAR-mediated transcriptional activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DP97 synergistically enhances transactivity of CAR by the co-expression of SRC-1 or PGC1{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DP97 is a gene-selective co-activator for hCAR. -- Abstract: The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) plays a key role in the expression of xenobiotic/steroid and drug metabolizing enzymes and their transporters. In this study, we demonstrated that DP97, a member of the DEAD box DNA/RNA helicase protein family, is a novel CAR-interacting protein. Using HepG2 cells expressing human CAR in the presence of tetracycline, we showed that knockdown of DP97 with small interfering RNAs suppressed tetracycline-inducible mRNA expression of CYP2B6 and UGT1A1 but not CYP3A4. Thus, DP97 was found to be a gene (or promoter)-selective co-activator for hCAR. DP97-mediated CAR transactivation was synergistically enhanced by the co-expression of SRC-1 or PGC1{alpha}, therefore it might act as mediator between hCAR and appropriate co-activators.

  15. The activation process of Arabidopsis thaliana A1 gene encoding the translation elongation factor EF-1 alpha is conserved among angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Curie, C; Liboz, T; Montané, M H; Rouan, D; Axelos, M; Lescure, B

    1992-04-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the activation process of the A1 EF-1 alpha gene depends on several elements. Using the GUS reporter gene, transient expression experiments have shown that mutations of upstream cis-acting elements of the A1 promoter, or the deletion of an intron located within the 5' non-coding region, similarly affect expression in dicot or monocot protoplasts. The results reported here strongly suggest that this 5' intron is properly spliced in Zea mays. We show that two trans-acting factors, specifically interacting with an upstream activating sequence (the TEF 1 box), are present in nuclear extracts prepared from A. thaliana, Brassica rapa, Nicotiana tabacum and Z. mays. In addition, a DNA sequence homologous to the TEF 1 box, found at approximately the same location within a Lycopersicon esculentum EF-1 alpha promoter, interacts with the same trans-acting factors. Homologies found between the A. thaliana and L. esculentum TEF 1 box sequences have allowed us to define mutations of this upstream element which affect the interaction with the corresponding trans-acting factors. These results support the notion that the activation processes of A. thaliana EF-1 alpha genes have been conserved among angiosperms and provide interesting data on the functional structure of the TEF 1 box.

  16. Vascular expression of E-selectin is increased in estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer: a role for tumor-cell-secreted interleukin-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, M.; Corless, C. L.; Kräling, B. M.; Tran, C.; Atha, T.; Bischoff, J.; Barsky, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in breast cancer growth and metastasis. Multiple adhesion molecules have been shown to perform critical functions in the process of angiogenesis. In this study, we analyzed 15 benign and 22 malignant estrogen-receptor-negative and estrogen-receptor-positive breast specimens for the presence of the endothelial cell adhesion molecules E-selectin and P-selectin. We found that E-selectin's expression was increased in the malignant breast tumors compared with their benign counterparts (23.86% of blood vessels versus 2.47%; P = 0.0005). Furthermore, E-selectin staining was found to be significantly increased in the estrogen-receptor-negative carcinomas compared with the estrogen-receptor-positive ones (P = 0.005). In vitro findings strongly correlated with the in vivo findings and showed a higher degree of E-selectin induction in endothelial cells exposed to conditioned media from estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer cell lines than from estrogen-receptor-positive ones. The degree of E-selectin induction correlated with the amount of interleukin-1 alpha in the tumor-conditioned media. Neutralizing antibodies to interleukin-1 alpha significantly inhibited the E-selectin expression in endothelial cells exposed to tumor-conditioned media. The results indicate that the endothelial E-selectin expression during angiogenesis is related to breast carcinoma progression in vivo and that this component of angiogenesis may be due directly to tumor-cell-secreted interleukin-1 alpha. Images Figure 1 PMID:9094987

  17. Identification and characterization of CMP-NeuAc:GalNAc-IgA1 alpha2,6-sialyltransferase in IgA1-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Raska, Milan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Brown, Rhubell; Kulhavy, Rose; Andrasi, Judit; Hall, Stacy; Vu, Huong L; Carlsson, Fredric; Lindahl, Gunnar; Tomana, Milan; Julian, Bruce A; Wyatt, Robert J; Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan

    2007-05-25

    Glycosylation defects occur in several human diseases. In IgA nephropathy, IgA1 contains O-glycans that are galactose-deficient and consist mostly of core 1 alpha2,6 sialylated N-acetylgalactosamine, a configuration suspected to prevent beta1,3 galactosylation. We confirmed the same aberrancy in IgA1 secreted by the human DAKIKI B cell line. Biochemical assays indicated CMP-NeuAc:GalNAc-IgA1 alpha2,6-sialyltransferase activity in this cell line. However, a candidate enzyme, ST6-GalNAcI, was not transcribed in DAKIKI cells, B cells isolated from blood, or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-immortalized IgA1-producing cells from the blood of IgAN patients and healthy controls. Instead, ST6-GalNAcII transcription was detected at a high level. Expression of the ST6-GalNAcII gene and activity of the CMP-NeuAc:GalNAc-IgA1 alpha2,6-sialyltransferase were higher in IgA1-producing cell lines from IgAN patients than in such cells from healthy controls. These data are the first evidence that human cells that lack ST6-GalNAcI can sialylate core 1 GalNAc-Ser/Thr.

  18. Differential screening of a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma lambda gt11 expression library has identified increased transcription of elongation factor EF-1 alpha in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Grant, A G; Flomen, R M; Tizard, M L; Grant, D A

    1992-03-12

    A human pancreatic adenocarcinoma lambda gt11 expression library was differentially screened with mRNA derived from normal and cancerous pancreatic tissues. Five clones preferentially hybridized with pancreatic adenocarcinoma mRNA. cDNA inserts from 4 of these clones were amplified by PCR, labelled with alpha 32P and used in Northern blot analysis against mRNA prepared from a variety of tumour and normal tissues. lambda GER-4 identified a pancreas-associated mRNA (greater than 10 kb) with no homology with known sequences at either the nucleic or amino-acid level. lambda GER-2 identified a 1.7-kb mRNA transcript that was over-expressed in mRNA prepared from pancreas, colon, breast, lung and gastric tumours relative to normal tissues. Sequence analysis and restriction-enzyme mapping showed that this clone was completely homologous with the active form of human elongation factor EF-1 alpha. This high level of EF-1 alpha-mRNA expression in tumour tissues lends support to the increasing evidence that EF-1 alpha is an important regulator of the cell cycle. PMID:1544708

  19. A comparative study of leukaemia inhibitory factor and interleukin-1alpha intracellular content in a human keratinocyte cell line after exposure to cosmetic fragrances and sodium dodecyl sulphate.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Alessandro; Sanguineti, Roberta; Catalano, Mariafrancesca; Penco, Susanna; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Scanarotti, Chiara; Bassi, Anna Maria

    2010-02-01

    According to European laws animal testing in cosmetic industry will be prohibited in a few years and it will be replaced by alternative methods based on cell and tissue culture. Many ingredients of cosmetic formulations are potentially causes of skin inflammation and sensibilization. Since cytotoxicity is known, among other factors, to trigger irritation, in an alternative model for evaluation of skin irritation, it can be considered also the precocious release of inflammatory mediators, i.e. cytokines, originating mainly from keratinocytes. In this in vitro study we have analysed some parameters directly or indirectly related to irritation/inflammation, in NCTC 2544 human keratinocytes during short-time exposure to some potential irritants cosmetic fragrances, included in the European Laws 2003/15/EEC. IIC50 was extrapolated by MTT and NRU viability indexes after exposure of cell ultures to Geraniol Limonene and Benzylic Alcohol for 1, 3 and 6h. NCTC cells were then exposed to sub-toxic doses of selected compounds and interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha) and leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) expressions were analysed as early proinflammatory cytokines. To our knowledge our findings demonstrated for the first time that NCTC cells synthesize and modulate LIF after exposure to selected irritating stimuli. Moreover, our results give evidence on LIF role as in vitro precocious endpoint for the assessment of the risk in cosmetic field, because its response under irritation stimuli is very quick and comparable to IL-1alpha.

  20. A novel thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide, attenuates allergic airway disease by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Seoung Ju; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Ka Young; Choe, Yeong Hun; Hong, Sang Hyun; Han, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young Rae; Kim, Jong Suk; Atlas, Daphne; Lee, Yong Chul

    2007-12-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Recent studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are able to reduce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in animal models of allergic airway disease. A newly developed antioxidant, small molecular weight thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide (AD4) has been shown to increase cellular levels of glutathione and to attenuate oxidative stress related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, the effects of AD4 on allergic airway disease such as asthma are unknown. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled mice to evaluate the role of AD4 in allergic airway disease. In this study with OVA-inhaled mice, the increased ROS generation, the increased levels of Th2 cytokines and VEGF, the increased vascular permeability, the increased mucus production, and the increased airway resistance in the lungs were significantly reduced by the administration of AD4. We also found that the administration of AD4 decreased the increases of the NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) levels in nuclear protein extracts of lung tissues after OVA inhalation. These results suggest that AD4 attenuates airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha as well as reducing ROS generation in allergic airway disease. PMID:18160846

  1. Bone destruction mechanisms in chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma: specific production by cholesteatoma tissue in culture of bone-resorbing activity attributable to interleukin-1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, A; Toshima, M; Yuasa, R; Takasaka, T

    1991-12-01

    To clarify specific mechanisms underlying cholesteatoma-induced bone destruction, surgical specimens of middle ear inflammatory granulation tissue with or without cholesteatoma were maintained in vitro and the bone-resorbing activity in their culture supernatants was analyzed by means of calcium release from mouse calvaria. Almost the same levels of bone-resorbing activity and prostaglandin (PG) E2 were found in the supernatants of both types of tissue. By contrast, aural polyp tissue yielded hardly any such activity or PGE2. Under the influence of indomethacin, however, only tissue with cholesteatoma produced considerable bone resorption activity, whereas PGE2 production was suppressed completely. Such activity in the cholesteatoma culture supernatant was not due to contamination of endotoxin and proved to be blocked by the introduction of anti-interleukin (IL)-1 alpha antibody into the calvarial assay system. Anti-IL-1 beta antibody had no effect on such activity. Interleukin-1 alpha was detected only in cholesteatoma tissue culture supernatants by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by bioassay. These data suggest that the bone destruction in otitis media with cholesteatoma may be attributed to IL-1 alpha in addition to PGE2.

  2. Accumulation of Krebs cycle intermediates and over-expression of HIF1alpha in tumours which result from germline FH and SDH mutations.

    PubMed

    Pollard, P J; Brière, J J; Alam, N A; Barwell, J; Barclay, E; Wortham, N C; Hunt, T; Mitchell, M; Olpin, S; Moat, S J; Hargreaves, I P; Heales, S J; Chung, Y L; Griffiths, J R; Dalgleish, A; McGrath, J A; Gleeson, M J; Hodgson, S V; Poulsom, R; Rustin, P; Tomlinson, I P M

    2005-08-01

    The nuclear-encoded Krebs cycle enzymes, fumarate hydratase (FH) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB, -C and -D), act as tumour suppressors. Germline mutations in FH predispose individuals to leiomyomas and renal cell cancer (HLRCC), whereas mutations in SDH cause paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas (HPGL). In this study, we have shown that FH-deficient cells and tumours accumulate fumarate and, to a lesser extent, succinate. SDH-deficient tumours principally accumulate succinate. In situ analyses showed that these tumours also have over-expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF1alpha), activation of HIF1alphatargets (such as vascular endothelial growth factor) and high microvessel density. We found no evidence of increased reactive oxygen species in our cells. Our data provide in vivo evidence to support the hypothesis that increased succinate and/or fumarate causes stabilization of HIF1alpha a plausible mechanism, inhibition of HIF prolyl hydroxylases, has previously been suggested by in vitro studies. The basic mechanism of tumorigenesis in HPGL and HLRCC is likely to be pseudo-hypoxic drive, just as it is in von Hippel-Lindau syndrome.

  3. Adenovirus E4-ORF3-dependent relocalization of TIF1{alpha} and TIF1{gamma} relies on access to the Coiled-Coil motif

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Elizabeth I.; Yondola, Mark A.; Wu, Kai; Hearing, Patrick

    2012-01-20

    The adenovirus E4-ORF3 protein promotes viral replication by relocalizing cellular proteins into nuclear track structures, interfering with potential anti-viral activities. E4-ORF3 targets transcriptional intermediary factor 1 alpha (TIF1{alpha}), but not homologous TIF1{beta}. Here, we introduce TIF1{gamma} as a novel E4-ORF3-interacting partner. E4-ORF3 relocalizes endogenous TIF1{gamma} in virus-infected cells in vivo and binds to TIF1{gamma} in vitro. We used the homologous nature, yet differing binding capabilities, of these proteins to study how E4-ORF3 targets proteins for track localization. We mapped the ability of E4-ORF3 to interact with specific TIF1 subdomains, demonstrating that E4-ORF3 interacts with the Coiled-Coil domains of TIF1{alpha}, TIF1{beta}, and TIF1{gamma}, and that the C-terminal half of TIF1{beta} interferes with this interaction. The results of E4-ORF3-directed TIF1 protein relocalization assays performed in vivo were verified using coimmunoprecipitation assays in vitro. These results suggest that E4-ORF3 targets proteins for relocalization through a loosely homologous sequence dependent on accessibility.

  4. A novel thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide, attenuates allergic airway disease by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Seoung Ju; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Ka Young; Choe, Yeong Hun; Hong, Sang Hyun; Han, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young Rae; Kim, Jong Suk; Atlas, Daphne; Lee, Yong Chul

    2007-12-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Recent studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are able to reduce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in animal models of allergic airway disease. A newly developed antioxidant, small molecular weight thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide (AD4) has been shown to increase cellular levels of glutathione and to attenuate oxidative stress related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, the effects of AD4 on allergic airway disease such as asthma are unknown. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled mice to evaluate the role of AD4 in allergic airway disease. In this study with OVA-inhaled mice, the increased ROS generation, the increased levels of Th2 cytokines and VEGF, the increased vascular permeability, the increased mucus production, and the increased airway resistance in the lungs were significantly reduced by the administration of AD4. We also found that the administration of AD4 decreased the increases of the NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) levels in nuclear protein extracts of lung tissues after OVA inhalation. These results suggest that AD4 attenuates airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha as well as reducing ROS generation in allergic airway disease.

  5. The modulation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 alpha and glucose levels with GMDP and other analogues of muramyl dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, T A; Moreno, C; Ivanyi, J; Aston, R

    1994-02-01

    Immunomodulatory agent muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and seven of its analogues were tested for ability to counteract the toxic actions of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in experimental mouse models. Female BALB/c mice were presensitized with Corynebacterium parvum (P. acnes) and given MDP or equimolar doses of one of its analogues after 2 weeks, followed by intravenous challenge with LPS 18 h later. This treatment produced a sharp increase in blood cytokine (TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha) levels 4 h after LPS administration followed by a decline to control values after 6 h. Four analogues, GMDP, threonylMDP, GMDPBenz and GMDPOBut, were able to reduce the level of cytokines induced with LPS. For most of the analogues, the higher doses reduced the levels of TNF-alpha but slightly increased the concomitant IL-1 alpha levels. GMDP was the most effective compound tested in terms of reduction of TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha levels, as well as for reduction of the hypoglycaemia caused by the administration of LPS. PMID:8167010

  6. The development of mitochondrial medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Luft, R

    1994-01-01

    Primary defects in mitochondrial function are implicated in over 100 diseases, and the list continues to grow. Yet the first mitochondrial defect--a myopathy--was demonstrated only 35 years ago. The field's dramatic expansion reflects growth of knowledge in three areas: (i) characterization of mitochondrial structure and function, (ii) elucidation of the steps involved in mitochondrial biosynthesis, and (iii) discovery of specific mitochondrial DNA. Many mitochondrial diseases are accompanied by mutations in this DNA. Inheritance is by maternal transmission. The metabolic defects encompass the electron transport complexes, intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and substrate transport. The clinical manifestations are protean, most often involving skeletal muscle and the central nervous system. In addition to being a primary cause of disease, mitochondrial DNA mutations and impaired oxidation have now been found to occur as secondary phenomena in aging as well as in age-related degenerative diseases such as Parkinson, Alzheimer, and Huntington diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and cardiomyopathies, atherosclerosis, and diabetes mellitus. Manifestations of both the primary and secondary mitochondrial diseases are thought to result from the production of oxygen free radicals. With increased understanding of the mechanisms underlying the mitochondrial dysfunctions has come the beginnings of therapeutic strategies, based mostly on the administration of antioxidants, replacement of cofactors, and provision of nutrients. At the present accelerating pace of development of what may be called mitochondrial medicine, much more is likely to be achieved within the next few years. Images PMID:8090715

  7. Platyzoan mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Wey-Fabrizius, Alexandra R; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Herlyn, Holger; Hankeln, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Platyzoa is a putative lophotrochozoan (spiralian) subtaxon within the protostome clade of Metazoa, comprising a range of biologically diverse, mostly small worm-shaped animals. The monophyly of Platyzoa, the relationships between the putative subgroups Platyhelminthes, Gastrotricha and Gnathifera (the latter comprising at least Gnathostomulida, "Rotifera" and Acanthocephala) as well as some aspects of the internal phylogenies of these subgroups are highly debated. Here we review how complete mitochondrial (mt) genome data contribute to these debates. We highlight special features of the mt genomes and discuss problems in mtDNA phylogenies of the clade. Mitochondrial genome data seem to be insufficient to resolve the position of the platyzoan clade within the Spiralia but can help to address internal phylogenetic questions. The present review includes a tabular survey of all published platyzoan mt genomes. PMID:23274056

  8. Platyzoan mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Wey-Fabrizius, Alexandra R; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Herlyn, Holger; Hankeln, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Platyzoa is a putative lophotrochozoan (spiralian) subtaxon within the protostome clade of Metazoa, comprising a range of biologically diverse, mostly small worm-shaped animals. The monophyly of Platyzoa, the relationships between the putative subgroups Platyhelminthes, Gastrotricha and Gnathifera (the latter comprising at least Gnathostomulida, "Rotifera" and Acanthocephala) as well as some aspects of the internal phylogenies of these subgroups are highly debated. Here we review how complete mitochondrial (mt) genome data contribute to these debates. We highlight special features of the mt genomes and discuss problems in mtDNA phylogenies of the clade. Mitochondrial genome data seem to be insufficient to resolve the position of the platyzoan clade within the Spiralia but can help to address internal phylogenetic questions. The present review includes a tabular survey of all published platyzoan mt genomes.

  9. Endosymbionts and mitochondrial origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility is put forth that the mitochondrion did not originate from an endosymbiosis 1-2 billion years ago involving an aerobic bacterium. Rather, it arose by endosymbiosis in a much earlier anaerobic period and was initially a photosynthetic organelle analogous to the modern chloroplast. This suggestion arises from a reconsideration of the nature of endosymbiosis. It explains the remarkable diversity in mitochondrial information storage and processing systems.

  10. Topical glucocorticoids application induced an augmentation in the expression of IL-1alpha while inhibiting the expression of IL-10 in the epidermis in murine contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Igawa, K; Yokozeki, H; Miyazaki, Y; Minatohara, K; Satoh, T; Katayama, I; Nishioka, K

    2001-03-01

    The repeated application of glucocorticoids (GC) on the skin augmented the inflammatory response of both allergic and irritant contact dermatitis in our studies. In order to further clarify the mechanism of such an augmentation of contact hypersensitivity (CHS), we investigated the modulatory effects of cytokines in the epidermis after the administration of GC at challenged sites in CHS. Diflucortolone valerate was applied to BALB/c mice on alternate days for a total of nine times. On day 12, they were contact sensitized with dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB). Next, on day 17, one day after the last application of GC, they were challenged with DNFB on the ear. The whole challenged ear lobes were removed after a hapten challenge and then were analysed by the RT-PCR method or underwent an immunohistochemical analysis. To clarify the modulatory effects of cytokines in vivo, DNFB sensitized mice pre-treated with GC were injected with rIL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist (ra) and anti-IL-1alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb) and thereafter were challenged with DNFB. A RT-PCR analysis has demonstrated IL-10 mRNA to be detected in the challenged skin of non-GC-pretreated mice but not in that of GC-pre-treated mice after challenge. On the other hand, the expression of IL-1alpha mRNA in the challenged skin of mice pretreated with GC was more strongly detected that that in mice without GC-pretreatment. Furthermore, an immuno-histochemical analysis in the challenge showed the expression of IL-10 in the skin showed the expression of IL-10 in the challenged epidermis of the non-GC-pretreated mice but not in the GC-pretreated mice and IL-1alpha was also strongly expressed in the epidermis of the GC-pretreated mice. A subcutaneous injection of anti-IL-1alpha mAb or IL-1 ra inhibited the augmented CHS reaction in the GC-pretreated mice. A subcutaneous injection of rIL-10 also inhibited the augmentation of the CHS reaction in the GC-pretreated mice; however, no such inhibition was observed in the

  11. Identification of the sites in the eukaryotic elongation factor 1 alpha involved in the binding of elongation factor 1 beta and aminoacyl-tRNA.

    PubMed

    van Damme, H T; Amons, R; Möller, W

    1992-08-01

    In this article we report the identification of the sites which are involved in the binding of the GDP-exchange factor EF-1 beta and aminoacyl tRNA to the alpha-subunit of the eukaryotic elongation factor 1 (EF-1) from Artemia. For this purpose the polypeptide chain of EF-1 alpha, having 461 amino acid residues, was proteolytically cleaved into large fragments by distinct proteases. Under well defined conditions, a mixture of two large fragments, free from intact EF-1 alpha and with molecular masses of 37 kDa and 43 kDa, was obtained. The 37-kDa and 43-kDa fragments comprise the residues 129-461 and 69-461, respectively. However, in aqueous solution and under non-denaturing conditions, the mixture still contained a short amino-terminal peptide, encompassing the residues 1-36, that remained tightly bound. The ability of the mixture of the 37+43-kDa fragments, including this amino-terminal peptide 1-36, to bind GDP or to facilitate aminoacyl tRNA binding to salt-washed ribosomes was severely reduced, compared to intact EF-1 alpha. However, both of these complexes were able to bind to the GDP-exchange-stimulating subunit EF-1 beta. A 30-kDa fragment, comprising the residues 1-287, was generated after treatment of the protein with endoproteinase Glu-C. This fragment contained the complete guanine nucleotide binding pocket. Although it was able to bind GDP and to transport aminoacyl tRNA to the ribosome, no affinity towards EF-1 beta was observed. We propose that the guanine-nucleotide-exchange stimulation by EF-1 beta is induced through binding of this factor to the carboxy-terminal part of EF-1 alpha. As a result, a decreased susceptibility towards trypsin of the guanine-nucleotide-binding pocket of EF-1 alpha, especially in the region of its presumed effector loop is induced. PMID:1499548

  12. Human Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Ian J.; Reyes, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of DNA replication in mitochondria is in its infancy. For many years, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome was regarded as greatly simplified compared to the nucleus. Mammalian mitochondria were reported to lack all DNA repair systems, to eschew DNA recombination, and to possess but a single DNA polymerase, polymerase γ. Polγ was said to replicate mitochondrial DNA exclusively via one mechanism, involving only two priming events and a handful of proteins. In this “strand-displacement model,” leading strand DNA synthesis begins at a specific site and advances approximately two-thirds of the way around the molecule before DNA synthesis is initiated on the “lagging” strand. Although the displaced strand was long-held to be coated with protein, RNA has more recently been proposed in its place. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA molecules with all the features of products of conventional bidirectional replication have been documented, suggesting that the process and regulation of replication in mitochondria is complex, as befits a genome that is a core factor in human health and longevity. PMID:23143808

  13. Standardized Boesenbergia pandurata Extract Stimulates Exercise Endurance Through Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoon; Kim, Mi-Bo; Kim, Changhee; Jung, Hoe-Yune; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the effect of standardized Boesenbergia pandurata (Roxb.) Schltr. (fingerroot) ethanol extract on exercise endurance was investigated in L6 rat skeletal muscle cells and C57BL/6J mice. Standardized B. pandurata ethanol extract (BPE) increased mitochondrial mass and stimulated the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) in vitro. BPE also elevated the mRNA expression of key factors of mitochondrial biogenesis and function, which are activated by PGC-1α, such as estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). In animal models, both normal and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice treated with BPE ran much longer than their respective controls. In addition, BPE increased the protein expressions of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), PGC-1α, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ), which are stimulated by exercise. These results indicate that B. pandurata could be a potential nutraceutical candidate for enhancing exercise endurance based on its mitochondrial biogenesis and exercise-mimicking effects. PMID:27331877

  14. Genetic polymorphisms of Echinococcus tapeworms in China as determined by mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences ✩

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Minoru; Li, Tiaoying; Han, Xiumin; Ma, Xiumin; Xiao, Ning; Qiu, Jiamin; Wang, Hu; Yanagida, Tetsuya; Mamuti, Wulamu; Wen, Hao; Moro, Pedro L.; Giraudoux, Patrick; Craig, Philip S.; Ito, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The genetic polymorphisms of Echinococcus spp. in the eastern Tibetan Plateau and the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region were evaluated by DNA sequencing analyses of genes for mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and nuclear elongation factor-1 alpha (ef1a). We collected 68 isolates of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.) from Xinjiang and 113 isolates of E. granulosus s. s., 49 isolates of Echinococcus multilocularis and 34 isolates of Echinococcus shiquicus from the Tibetan Plateau. The results of molecular identification by mitochondrial and nuclear markers were identical, suggesting the infrequency of introgressive hybridization. A considerable intraspecific variation was detected in mitochondrial cox1 sequences. The parsimonious network of cox1 haplotypes showed star-like features in E. granulosus s. s. and E. multilocularis, but a divergent feature in E. shiquicus. The cox1 neutrality indexes computed by Tajima's D and Fu's Fs tests showed high negative values in E. granulosus s. s. and E. multilocularis, indicating significant deviations from neutrality. In contrast, the low positive values of both tests were obtained in E. shiquicus. These results suggest the following hypotheses: (i) recent founder effects arose in E. granulosus and E. multilocularis after introducing particular individuals into the endemic areas by anthropogenic movement or natural migration of host mammals, and (ii) the ancestor of E. shiquicus was segregated into the Tibetan Plateau by colonizing alpine mammals and its mitochondrial locus has evolved without bottleneck effects. PMID:19800346

  15. Mitochondrial DNA damage and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Emma P K; Bennett, Martin R

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondria are often regarded as the cellular powerhouses through their ability to generate ATP, the universal fuel for metabolic processes. However, in recent years mitochondria have been recognised as critical regulators of cell death, inflammation, metabolism, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction directly promotes cell death, inflammation, and oxidative stress and alters metabolism. These are key processes in atherosclerosis and there is now evidence that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and promotes atherosclerosis directly. In this review we discuss the recent evidence for and mechanisms linking mtDNA defects and atherosclerosis and suggest areas of mitochondrial biology that are potential therapeutic targets.

  16. Electron Transport Disturbances and Neurodegeneration: From Albert Szent-Györgyi's Concept (Szeged) till Novel Approaches to Boost Mitochondrial Bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Szalárdy, Levente; Zádori, Dénes; Klivényi, Péter; Toldi, József; Vécsei, László

    2015-01-01

    Impaired function of certain mitochondrial respiratory complexes has long been linked to the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. Furthermore, genetic alterations of mitochondrial genome or nuclear genes encoding proteins playing essential roles in maintaining proper mitochondrial function can lead to the development of severe systemic diseases associated with neurodegeneration and vacuolar myelinopathy. At present, all of these diseases lack effective disease modifying therapy. Following a brief commemoration of Professor Albert Szent-Györgyi, a Nobel Prize laureate who pioneered in the field of cellular respiration, antioxidant processes, and the roles of free radicals in health and disease, the present paper overviews the current knowledge on the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in central nervous system diseases associated with neurodegeneration including Parkinson's and Huntington's disease as well as mitochondrial encephalopathies. The review puts special focus on the involvement and the potential therapeutic relevance of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), a nuclear-encoded master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant responses in these disorders, the transcriptional activation of which may hold novel therapeutic value as a more system-based approach aiming to restore mitochondrial functions in neurodegenerative processes. PMID:26301042

  17. Reduction of hypoxia-induced transcription through the repression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha/aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator DNA binding by the 90-kDa heat-shock protein inhibitor radicicol.

    PubMed

    Hur, Eunseon; Kim, Hong-Hee; Choi, Su Mi; Kim, Jin Hee; Yim, Sujin; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Choi, Youngyeon; Kim, Dae Kyong; Lee, Mi-Ock; Park, Hyunsung

    2002-11-01

    Under low oxygen tension, cells increase the transcription of specific genes involved in angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, and glycolysis. Hypoxia-induced gene expression depends primarily on stabilization of the alpha subunit of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1alpha), which acts as a heterodimeric trans-activator with the nuclear protein known as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (Arnt). The resulting heterodimer (HIF-1alpha/Arnt) interacts specifically with the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE), thereby increasing transcription of the genes under HRE control. Our results indicate that the 90-kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90) inhibitor radicicol reduces the hypoxia-induced expression of both endogenous vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and HRE-driven reporter plasmids. Radicicol treatment (0.5 microg/ml) does not significantly change the stability of the HIF-1alpha protein and does not inhibit the nuclear localization of HIF-1alpha. However, this dose of radicicol significantly reduces HRE binding by the HIF-1alpha/Arnt heterodimer. Our results, the first to show that radicicol specifically inhibits the interaction between the HIF-1alpha/Arnt heterodimer and HRE, suggest that Hsp90 modulates the conformation of the HIF-1alpha/Arnt heterodimer, making it suitable for interaction with HRE. Furthermore, we demonstrate that radicicol reduces hypoxia-induced VEGF expression to decrease hypoxia-induced angiogenesis.

  18. Cannabidiol Protects against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Modulating Mitochondrial Function and Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Enkui; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Cao, Zongxian; Erdélyi, Katalin; Holovac, Eileen; Liaudet, Lucas; Lee, Wen-Shin; Haskó, György; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pál

    2015-01-06

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used, potent chemotherapeutic agent; however, its clinical application is limited because of its dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX's cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative/nitrative stress, impaired mitochondrial function in cardiomyocytes/endothelial cells and cell death. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychotropic constituent of marijuana, which is well tolerated in humans, with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and recently discovered antitumor properties. We aimed to explore the effects of CBD in a well-established mouse model of DOX-induced cardiomyopathy. DOX-induced cardiomyopathy was characterized by increased myocardial injury (elevated serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels), myocardial oxidative and nitrative stress (decreased total glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase 1 activity, increased lipid peroxidation, 3-nitrotyrosine formation and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA), myocardial cell death (apoptotic and poly[ADP]-ribose polymerase 1 [PARP]-dependent) and cardiac dysfunction (decline in ejection fraction and left ventricular fractional shortening). DOX also impaired myocardial mitochondrial biogenesis (decreased mitochondrial copy number, mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-alpha, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, estrogen-related receptor alpha), reduced mitochondrial function (attenuated complex I and II activities) and decreased myocardial expression of uncoupling protein 2 and 3 and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA. Treatment with CBD markedly improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction, oxidative/nitrative stress and cell death. CBD also enhanced the DOX-induced impaired cardiac mitochondrial function and biogenesis. These data suggest that CBD may represent a novel cardioprotective strategy against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, and the above-described effects on mitochondrial function and biogenesis may

  19. Cannabidiol Protects against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Modulating Mitochondrial Function and Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Enkui; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Cao, Zongxian; Erdélyi, Katalin; Holovac, Eileen; Liaudet, Lucas; Lee, Wen-Shin; Haskó, György; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pál

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used, potent chemotherapeutic agent; however, its clinical application is limited because of its dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX’s cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative/nitrative stress, impaired mitochondrial function in cardiomyocytes/endothelial cells and cell death. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychotropic constituent of marijuana, which is well tolerated in humans, with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and recently discovered antitumor properties. We aimed to explore the effects of CBD in a well-established mouse model of DOX-induced cardiomyopathy. DOX-induced cardiomyopathy was characterized by increased myocardial injury (elevated serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels), myocardial oxidative and nitrative stress (decreased total glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase 1 activity, increased lipid peroxidation, 3-nitrotyrosine formation and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA), myocardial cell death (apoptotic and poly[ADP]-ribose polymerase 1 [PARP]-dependent) and cardiac dysfunction (decline in ejection fraction and left ventricular fractional shortening). DOX also impaired myocardial mitochondrial biogenesis (decreased mitochondrial copy number, mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-alpha, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, estrogen-related receptor alpha), reduced mitochondrial function (attenuated complex I and II activities) and decreased myocardial expression of uncoupling protein 2 and 3 and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA. Treatment with CBD markedly improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction, oxidative/nitrative stress and cell death. CBD also enhanced the DOX-induced impaired cardiac mitochondrial function and biogenesis. These data suggest that CBD may represent a novel cardioprotective strategy against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, and the above-described effects on mitochondrial function and biogenesis may

  20. Cannabidiol Protects against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Modulating Mitochondrial Function and Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Enkui; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Cao, Zongxian; Erdélyi, Katalin; Holovac, Eileen; Liaudet, Lucas; Lee, Wen-Shin; Haskó, György; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pál

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used, potent chemotherapeutic agent; however, its clinical application is limited because of its dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX's cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative/nitrative stress, impaired mitochondrial function in cardiomyocytes/endothelial cells and cell death. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychotropic constituent of marijuana, which is well tolerated in humans, with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and recently discovered antitumor properties. We aimed to explore the effects of CBD in a well-established mouse model of DOX-induced cardiomyopathy. DOX-induced cardiomyopathy was characterized by increased myocardial injury (elevated serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels), myocardial oxidative and nitrative stress (decreased total glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase 1 activity, increased lipid peroxidation, 3-nitrotyrosine formation and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA), myocardial cell death (apoptotic and poly[ADP]-ribose polymerase 1 [PARP]-dependent) and cardiac dysfunction (decline in ejection fraction and left ventricular fractional shortening). DOX also impaired myocardial mitochondrial biogenesis (decreased mitochondrial copy number, mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-alpha, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, estrogen-related receptor alpha), reduced mitochondrial function (attenuated complex I and II activities) and decreased myocardial expression of uncoupling protein 2 and 3 and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA. Treatment with CBD markedly improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction, oxidative/nitrative stress and cell death. CBD also enhanced the DOX-induced impaired cardiac mitochondrial function and biogenesis. These data suggest that CBD may represent a novel cardioprotective strategy against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, and the above-described effects on mitochondrial function and biogenesis may

  1. Mitochondrial toxicity and HIV therapy

    PubMed Central

    White, A.

    2001-01-01

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) remain the cornerstone of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) combination regimens. However, it has been known for some time that these agents have the potential to cause varied side effects, many of which are thought to be due to their effects on mitochondria. Mitochondria, the key energy generating organelles in the cell, are unique in having their own DNA, a double stranded circular genome of about 16 000 bases. There is a separate enzyme present inside the cell that replicates mitochondrial DNA, polymerase gamma. NRTIs can affect the function of this enzyme and this may lead to depletion of mitochondrial DNA or qualitative changes. The study of inherited mitochondrial diseases has led to further understanding of the consequences of mutations or depletion in mitochondrial DNA. Key among these is the realisation that there may be substantial heteroplasmy among mitochondria within a given cell, and among cells in a particular tissue. The unpredictable nature of mitochondrial segregation during cellular replication makes it difficult to predict the likelihood of dysfunction in a given tissue. In addition, there is a threshold effect for the expression of mitochondrial dysfunction, both at the mitochondrial and cellular level. Various clinical and in vitro studies have suggested that NRTIs are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in different tissues, although the weight of evidence is limited in many cases. The heterogeneity in the tissues affected by the different drugs raises interesting questions, and possible explanations include differential distribution or activation of these agents. This article reviews the major recognised toxicities associated with NRTI therapy and evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in these complications. Data were identified through searching of online databases including Medline and Current Contents for relevant articles, along with abstracts and posters from recent

  2. Activation of RAF-1 through Ras and protein kinase Calpha mediates 1alpha,25(OH)2-vitamin D3 regulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Claudia Graciela; Pardo, Veronica González; de Boland, Ana R; Boland, Ricardo

    2003-01-24

    We have previously shown that stimulation of proliferation of avian embryonic muscle cells (myoblasts) by 1alpha,25(OH)(2)-vitamin D(3) (1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)) is mediated by activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK; ERK1/2). To understand how 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) up-regulates the MAPK cascade, we have investigated whether the hormone acts upstream through stimulation of Raf-1 and the signaling mechanism by which this effect might take place. Treatment of chick myoblasts with 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) (1 nm) caused a fast increase of Raf-1 serine phosphorylation (1- and 3-fold over basal at 1 and 2 min, respectively), indicating activation of Raf-1 by the hormone. These effects were abolished by preincubation of cells with a specific Ras inhibitor peptide that involves Ras in 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) stimulation of Raf-1. 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) rapidly induced tyrosine de-phosphorylation of Ras-GTPase-activating protein, suggesting that inhibition of Ras-GTP hydrolysis is part of the mechanism by which 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) activates Ras in myoblasts. The protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors calphostin C, bisindolylmaleimide I, and Ro 318220 blocked 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)-induced Raf-1 serine phosphorylation, revealing that hormone stimulation of Raf-1 also involves PKC. In addition, transfection of muscle cells with an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide against PKCalpha mRNA suppressed serine phosphorylation by 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3). The increase in MAPK activity and tyrosine phosphorylation caused by 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) could be abolished by Ras inhibitor peptide, compound PD 98059, which prevents the activation of MEK by Raf-1, or incubation of cell lysates before 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) exposure with an anti-Raf-1 antibody. In conclusion, these results demonstrate for the first time in a 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) target cell that activation of Raf-1 via Ras and PKCalpha-dependent serine phosphorylation plays a central role in hormone stimulation of the MAPK-signaling pathway

  3. Sealing the mitochondrial respirasome.

    PubMed

    Winge, Dennis R

    2012-07-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is organized within an array of supercomplexes that function to minimize the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during electron transfer reactions. Structural models of supercomplexes are now known. Another recent advance is the discovery of non-OXPHOS complex proteins that appear to adhere to and seal the individual respiratory complexes to form stable assemblages that prevent electron leakage. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the structures of supercomplexes and the factors that mediate their stability.

  4. Mitochondrial form and function

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Nunnari, Jodi

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are one of the major ancient endomembrane systems in eukaryotic cells. Owing to their ability to produce ATP through respiration, they became a driving force in evolution. As an essential step in the process of eukaryotic evolution, the size of the mitochondrial chromosome was drastically reduced, and the behaviour of mitochondria within eukaryotic cells radically changed. Recent advances have revealed how the organelle’s behaviour has evolved to allow the accurate transmission of its genome and to become responsive to the needs of the cell and its own dysfunction. PMID:24429632

  5. Post-natal changes in testicular concentrations of interleukin-1 alpha and beta and interleukin-6 during sexual maturation in bulls.

    PubMed

    Bagu, E T; Gordon, J R; Rawlings, N C

    2010-04-01

    Based on observations in laboratory animals interleukins could be regulators of testicular development. The objects of this study were to see if interleukins (IL-1 and IL-6) are present in the developing bull testis and to establish the temporal patterns of concentrations of IL-1 and IL-6 in the bovine testis during development. Separate groups of six bull calves were castrated every 4 weeks from 5 to 33 weeks of age, and at 56 weeks of age. Mean testicular IL-1 alpha concentrations decreased (p < 0.01) from 5 to 9 weeks of age and 13 to 21 weeks of age. Mean testicular IL-1 beta concentrations decreased (p < 0.01) from 13 to 17 weeks of age and from 29 to 33 weeks of age. Mean IL-1 bioactivity increased from 13 to 17 weeks of age, decreased to 21 weeks, increased to 25 weeks, decreased to 29 weeks and decreased from 33 to 56 weeks of age (p < 0.05). Mean testicular IL-6 concentrations decreased (p < 0.05) from 9 to 13 weeks of age, increased (p < 0.05) to 21 weeks, decreased (p < 0.05) to 25 weeks, increased (p < 0.05) to 29 weeks and decreased (p < 0.01) to 56 weeks of age. In conclusion, testicular IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 were found in the bovine testis and concentrations were age dependent. Testicular IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta concentrations were highest in the early post-natal period; however, IL-1 bioactivity and IL-6 concentrations were greatest in the immediate pre-pubertal period. These findings suggest a functional role for interleukins in testicular development in the bull.

  6. Heat acclimation increases hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha and erythropoietin receptor expression: implication for neuroprotection after closed head injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Shein, Na'ama A; Horowitz, Michal; Alexandrovich, Alexander G; Tsenter, Jeanna; Shohami, Esther

    2005-11-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that long-term exposure to moderately high ambient temperature (heat acclimation, HA) mediates cross-tolerance to various types of subsequently applied stress. The transcriptional activator hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) has been implicated in playing a critical role in HA. It also regulates the expression of Erythropoietin (Epo), whose neuroprotective effects have been shown in a variety of brain injuries. The aim of the present study was to examine whether HA exerts a beneficial effect on the outcome of closed head injury (CHI) in mice and to explore the possible involvement of HIF-1 and Epo in this process. Heat acclimated mice and matched normothermic controls were subjected to CHI or sham surgery. Postinjury motor and cognitive parameters of acclimated mice were compared with those of controls. Mice were killed at various time points after injury or sham surgery and brain levels of HIF-1alpha, the inducible subunit of HIF-1, Epo, and the specific erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) were analyzed by Western immunoblotting. Motor and cognitive functions of acclimated mice were significantly better than those of controls. Heat acclimation was found to induce a significant increase in expression of nuclear HIF-1alpha and EpoR. The EpoR/Epo ratio was also significantly higher in acclimated mice as compared with controls. Nuclear HIF-1alpha and EpoR were higher in the acclimated group at 4 h after injury as well. The improved outcome of acclimated mice taken together with the basal and postinjury upregulation of the examined proteins suggests the involvement of this pathway in HA-induced neuroprotection.

  7. Inhibitory effects of 1alpha, 25dihydroxyvitamin D3 and Ajuga iva extract on oxidative stress, toxicity and hypo-fertility in diabetic rat testes.

    PubMed

    Hamden, K; Carreau, S; Jamoussi, K; Ayadi, F; Garmazi, F; Mezgenni, N; Elfeki, A

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the current study is to investigate the therapeutic and preventive effects of 1alpha, 25dihydroxyvitaminD3 (1,25 (OH)2 D3) and Afuga iva (AI) extract on diabetes toxicity in rats testes. Thus diabetic rats were treated with 1alpha, 25dihydroxyvitaminD3 or Ajuga iva extract as both therapeutic and preventive treatments on diabetes toxicity in rats testes. Our results showed that diabetes induced a decrease in testosterone and 17beta-estradiol levels in testes and plasma. Besides, a fall in testicular antioxidant capacity appeared by a decrease in both antioxidant (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities) and nonenzymatic antioxidant (copper (Cu), magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe) levels). All theses changes enhanced testicular toxicity (increase in testicular aspartate amino transaminase (AST), alanine amino transaminase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities and the lipid peroxidation and triglyceride (TG) levels). In addition, a decrease in testicular total cholesterol (TCh) level was observed in diabetic rats testes. All the changes lead to a decrease in the total number and mobility of epididymal spermatozoa. The administration of 1alpha,25dihydroxyvitaminD3 and Ajuga iva extract three weeks before and after diabetes induction interfered and prevented diabetes toxicity in the reproductive system. 1,25 (OH)2 D3 and Ajuga iva extract blunted all changes observed in diabetic rats. To sum up, the data suggested that 1,25 (OH)2 D3 and Ajuga iva extract have a protective effect on alloxan-induced damage in reproductive system by enhancing the testosterone and 17beta-estradiol levels, consequently protecting from oxidative stress, cellular toxicity and maintaining the number and motility of spermatozoids.

  8. The inhibitory effect of an extract of Sanguisorba officinalis L. on ultraviolet B-induced pigmentation via the suppression of endothelin-converting enzyme-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Hachiya, A; Kobayashi, A; Ohuchi, A; Kitahara, T; Takema, Y

    2001-06-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been reported to be expressed in human epidermis at both the gene and protein levels. ET-1 plays a pivotal role in ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced pigmentation due to its accentuated secretion after UVB irradiation and its function as a mitogen and as a melanogen for human melanocytes. We have recently found that endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE)-1alpha plays a constitutive role in the secretion of ET-1 by human keratinocytes and that an extract of Sanguisorba officinalis L. inhibits ECE activity in human endothelial cells, which predominantly express ECE-1alpha. In this report, to clarify the potential use of this botanical extract as a whitening agent, we examined whether this extract inhibits UVB-induced pigmentation in vivo. When this extract was applied to human keratinocytes after UVB irradiation, secretion of ET-1 by those cells was reduced, and this was accompanied by a concomitant increase in the secretion of inactive precursor Big endothelin-1. When hairless mice were exposed to UVB light and were treated with the extract, it suppressed the induction of ET-1 in the UVB-irradiated epidermis. In the course of UVB-induced pigmentation of brownish guinea pig skin, this extract significantly diminished pigmentation in UVB-exposed areas. These findings indicate that ECE-1alpha in keratinocytes plays a pivotal role in the induction of pigmentation following UVB irradiation and that an extract of S. officinalis, which inhibits ET-1 production in human keratinocytes, is a good ingredient for a whitening agent.

  9. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-polysaccharide-like polysaccharide promotes osteoclast-like cell formation by interleukin-1 alpha production in mouse marrow cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, T; Ueda, N; Amano, K; Ishihara, Y; Hayakawa, H; Kuroyanagi, T; Ohsaki, Y; Nagata, K; Noguchi, T

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of osteoclast-like cell formation induced by periodontopathic bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 (serotype b) capsular-polysaccharide-like polysaccharide (capsular-like polysaccharide) was examined in a mouse bone marrow culture system. When mouse bone marrow cells were cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide for 9 days, many multinucleated cells were formed. The multinucleated cells showed several characteristics of osteoclasts, including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) and the ability to resorb the calcified dentine. In this study, we examined the effects of antisera to interleukins on the formation of osteoclast-like cells induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. Monospecific anti-mouse recombinant interleukin-1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha) serum completely inhibited the formation of osteoclast-like cells in the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. However, anti-mouse rIL-1 beta and anti-mouse rIL-6 sera showed no effect on osteoclast-like cell formation. IL-1 receptor antagonist significantly inhibited the osteoclast-like cell formation mediated by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide in mouse marrow cultures. The bioactive IL-1 was detected in the culture media of mouse bone marrow cells stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. These results indicate that IL-1 alpha is involved in the mechanism of the formation of osteoclast-like cells induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. We sought to determine whether osteoclast-like cell formation induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide could be modulated by the protein kinase inhibitors H8 and HA1004. The formation of osteoclast-like cells was suppressed by H8 and HA1004. These findings suggest that the signals by protein kinases may regulate osteoclast-like cell formation induced by A

  10. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders (RCDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases because of the fact that protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis, structure, and function of mitochondria, including DNA…

  11. CCN6 regulates mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Patra, Milan; Mahata, Sushil K; Padhan, Deepesh K; Sen, Malini

    2016-07-15

    Despite established links of CCN6, or Wnt induced signaling protein-3 (WISP3), with progressive pseudo rheumatoid dysplasia, functional characterization of CCN6 remains incomplete. In light of the documented negative correlation between accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and CCN6 expression, we investigated whether CCN6 regulates ROS accumulation through its influence on mitochondrial function. We found that CCN6 localizes to mitochondria, and depletion of CCN6 in the chondrocyte cell line C-28/I2 by using siRNA results in altered mitochondrial electron transport and respiration. Enhanced electron transport chain (ETC) activity of CCN6-depleted cells was reflected by increased mitochondrial ROS levels in association with augmented mitochondrial ATP synthesis, mitochondrial membrane potential and Ca(2+) Additionally, CCN6-depleted cells display ROS-dependent PGC1α (also known as PPARGC1A) induction, which correlates with increased mitochondrial mass and volume density, together with altered mitochondrial morphology. Interestingly, transcription factor Nrf2 (also known as NFE2L2) repressed CCN6 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that CCN6 acts as a molecular brake, which is appropriately balanced by Nrf2, in regulating mitochondrial function. PMID:27252383

  12. Mitochondrial genomes as living 'fossils'.

    PubMed

    Small, Ian

    2013-04-15

    The huge variation between mitochondrial genomes makes untangling their evolutionary histories difficult. Richardson et al. report on the remarkably unaltered 'fossil' genome of the tulip tree, giving us many clues as to how the mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants have evolved over the last 150 million years, and raising questions about how such extraordinary sequence conservation can be maintained.

  13. [Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease].

    PubMed

    Benureau, A; Meyer, P; Maillet, O; Leboucq, N; Legras, S; Jeziorski, E; Fournier-Favre, S; Jeandel, C; Gaignard, P; Slama, A; Rivier, F; Roubertie, A; Carneiro, M

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease (MNGIE) is a rare autosomal-recessive syndrome, resulting from mutations in the TYMP gene, located at 22q13. The mutation induces a thymidine phosphorylase (TP) deficit, which leads to a nucleotide pool imbalance and to instability of the mitochondrial DNA. The clinical picture regroups gastrointestinal dysmotility, cachexia, ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, peripheral neuropathy, and asymptomatic leukoencephalopathy. The prognosis is unfavorable. We present the case of a 14-year-old Caucasian female whose symptoms started in early childhood. The diagnosis was suspected after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), performed given the atypical features of mental anorexia, which revealed white matter abnormalities. She presented chronic vomiting, postprandial abdominal pain, and problems gaining weight accompanied by cachexia. This diagnosis led to establishing proper care, in particular an enteral and parenteral nutrition program. There is no known specific effective treatment, but numerous studies are in progress. In this article, after reviewing the existing studies, we discuss the main diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the disease. We argue for the necessity of performing a cerebral MRI given the atypical features of a patient with suspected mental anorexia (or when the clinical pattern of a patient with mental anorexia seems atypical), so that MNGIE can be ruled out. PMID:25282463

  14. The Inflammasome and the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Are Involved in the Staphylococcus aureus-Mediated Induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Lena; Gläser, Regine; Harder, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is an important pathogen causing various infections including those of the skin. Keratinocytes are able to sense invading S. aureus and to initiate a fast defense reaction by the rapid release of innate defense mediators such as antimicrobial peptides and cytokines. There is increasing evidence that the cytokines IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, which both signal through the IL-1 receptor, play an important role in cutaneous defense against S. aureus. The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the underlying mechanisms leading to the S. aureus-induced IL-1alpha and IL-1beta expression in keratinocytes. Infection of human primary keratinocytes with S. aureus led to the induction of gene expression and protein secretion of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta. Full S. aureus-induced IL-1 protein release required the inflammasome components caspase-1 and ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD) whereas gene induction of IL-1alpha and IL-beta by S. aureus was not dependent on caspase-1 and ASC. Since patients receiving anti-cancer therapy by inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) often suffer from skin infections caused by S. aureus we additionally evaluated whether the EGFR pathway may be involved in the IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction by S. aureus. Inactivation of the EGFR with a blocking antibody decreased the S. aureus-mediated IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction in primary keratinocytes. Moreover, the use of siRNA experiments revealed that ADAM17 (A Disintegrin and A Metalloprotease 17), a metalloproteinase known to mediate the shedding and release of EGFR ligands, was required for full induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in keratinocytes infected with S. aureus. A failure of keratinocytes to adequately upregulate IL-1alpha and IL-1beta may promote S. aureus skin infections. PMID:26808616

  15. Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites induce an inflammatory cytokine response by cultured human cells through the paracrine action of cytolytically released interleukin-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Eckmann, L; Reed, S L; Smith, J R; Kagnoff, M F

    1995-01-01

    Infection with the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica results in a high mortality worldwide. To initiate infection, E. histolytica trophozoites in the bowel lumen penetrate the epithelium, and cause extensive lysis of host cells. The acute amebic lesions in animal models are characterized by infiltration with inflammatory cells, particularly neutrophils. The acute host response is likely important for determining whether the infection will spread systemically, but little is known regarding the signals which initiate an acute inflammatory response to E. histolytica. In the studies reported herein, we used an in vitro model system to define the proinflammatory signals produced by epithelial and other host cells in response to infection with E. histolytica trophozoites. Coculture of human epithelial and stromal cells and cell lines with trophozoites is shown to increase expression and secretion of an array of chemoattractant and proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-8, GRO alpha, GM-CSF, IL-1 alpha, and IL-6. Moreover, high-level secretion of those cytokines is regulated by the paracrine action of cytolytically released IL-1 alpha. A second mechanism for trophozoite-induced IL-8 production involves trophozoite-target cell contact via a galactose-inhibitable amebic adherence protein, and appears to be mediated through increased intracellular calcium levels. These studies define novel mechanisms through which acute inflammation can be initiated in the host in response to a cytolytic pathogen, such as E. histolytica. PMID:7657801

  16. Heightened expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 alpha, and glial fibrillary acidic protein in experimental Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kordek, R; Nerurkar, V R; Liberski, P P; Isaacson, S; Yanagihara, R; Gajdusek, D C

    1996-01-01

    The ultrastructural pathology of myelinated axons in mice infected experimentally with the Fujisaki strain of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) virus is characterized by myelin sheath vacuolation that closely resembles that induced in murine spinal cord organotypic cultures by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), a cytokine produced by astrocytes and macrophages. To clarify the role of TNF-alpha in experimental CJD, we investigated the expression of TNF-alpha in brain tissues from CJD virus-infected mice at weekly intervals after inoculation by reverse transcription-coupled PCR, Northern and Western blot analyses, and immunocytochemical staining. Neuropathological findings by electron microscopy, as well as expression of interleukin 1 alpha and glial fibrillary acidic protein, were concurrently monitored. As determined by reverse transcription-coupled PCR, the expression of TNF-alpha, interleukin 1 alpha, and glial fibrillary acidic protein was increased by approximately 200-fold in the brains of CJD virus-inoculated mice during the course of disease. By contrast, beta-actin expression remained unchanged. Progressively increased expression of TNF-alpha in CJD virus-infected brain tissues was verified by Northern and Western blot analyses, and astrocytes in areas with striking myelin sheath vacuolation were intensely stained with an antibody against murine TNF-alpha. The collective findings of TNF-alpha overexpression during the course of clinical disease suggest that TNF-alpha may mediate the myelin sheath vacuolation observed in experimental CJD. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8790403

  17. Recombinant tumor necrosis factor. alpha. and interleukin 1. alpha. increase expression of c-abl protooncogene mRNA in cultured human marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, D.F. III; Nemunaitis, J.J.; Singer, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    Analysis of protooncogene RNA expression in marrow stromal cells from long-term marrow culture demonstrated high levels of c-abl 5-, 6-, and 7-kilobase (kb) RNA transcripts. In experiments on three independently derived simian virus 40-transformed marrow stromal cell lines, the expression of these c-abl transcripts was further increased in response to recombinant tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (1,000 units/ml) and interleukin 1{alpha} (10 units/ml). Although lymphocyte-conditioned medium predominantly up-regulated the 5-kb transcript, interleukin 1{alpha} primarily affected the 6-kb transcript. The up-regulation of the 5-kb c-abl message correlated with up-regulation of the granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor transcript and down-regulation of procollagen I transcripts in transformed cells. These data suggest that c-abl plays roles in the regulation of extracellular matrix expression and in the regulation of hematopoietic growth factors by stromal cells.

  18. Cis and trans-acting elements involved in the activation of Arabidopsis thaliana A1 gene encoding the translation elongation factor EF-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Curie, C; Liboz, T; Bardet, C; Gander, E; Médale, C; Axelos, M; Lescure, B

    1991-01-01

    In A. thaliana the translation elongation factor EF-1 alpha is encoded by a small multigenic family of four members (A1-A4). The A1 gene promoter has been dissected and examined in a transient expression system using the GUS reporter gene. Deletion analysis has shown that several elements are involved in the activation process. One cis-acting domain, the TEF 1 box, has been accurately mapped 100 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. This domain is the target for trans-acting factors identified in nuclear extracts prepared from A. thaliana. Homologies are found between the TEF 1 box and sequences present at the same location within the A2, A3 and A4 promoters. This observation, together with those obtained from gel retardation assays performed using DNA fragments from the A4 promoter, suggest that the activation process mediated by the TEF 1 element is conserved among the A. thaliana EF-1 alpha genes. Analysis of nearly full length cDNA clones has shown that in addition to a single intron located within the coding region, the A1 gene contains a second intron located within the 5' non coding region. Such an intron is also present within the A2, A3 and A4 genes. This 5' intervening sequence appears to be essential to obtain a maximum GUS activity driven by the A1 gene promoter. Images PMID:1840652

  19. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist gene polymorphism in normal weight obese syndrome: relationship to body composition and IL-1 alpha and beta plasma levels.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Laura; Bigioni, Mario; Del Gobbo, Vera; Premrov, Maria Grazia; Barbini, Ugo; Di Lorenzo, Nicola; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2007-02-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist concentration is upregulated in the plasma of patients with obese related disease, and its synthesis is under genetic control. We tested the hypothesis that the polymorphism in the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene second intron might be associated with normal weight obese syndrome. The polymorphism of intron 2 in the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene, containing a variable numbers of a tandem repeat (VNTR), and interleukin-1alpha and beta plasma levels were evaluated in 110 Caucasian Italian women, divided in three groups: non-obese, normal weight obese and preobese-obese. The allele 1 frequency was not significantly different in the three groups. The alleles 3 and 4 were not observed in any group. The allele 2 frequency in normal weight obese woman (12.5%) and preobese-obese (17.5%) groups were significantly different in comparison with the non-obese group (6.7%). The allele 5 was observed exclusively in non-obese and normal weight obese subjects (13.3 and 7.5%, respectively). In normal weight obese women, plasma concentrations of interleukin-1 alpha and interleukin-1 beta were significantly higher than in non-obese. The allele 2 was observed in normal weight obese as well as a significant association between the increase of interleukin-1 beta plasma amount and the allele 2 carrier. Our findings suggest that the allele 2 might be an important high-risk genetic marker for normal weight obese syndrome and obesity related diseases.

  20. The phylogenetic position of the pelobiont Mastigamoeba balamuthi based on sequences of rDNA and translation elongation factors EF-1alpha and EF-2.

    PubMed

    Arisue, Nobuko; Hashimot, Tetsuo; Lee, Jennifer A; Moore, Dorothy V; Gordon, Paul; Sensen, Christoph W; Gaasterland, Terry; Hasegawa, Masami; Müller, Miklós

    2002-01-01

    The taxonomic position and phylogenetic relationships of the Pelobionta, an amitochondriate amoeboflagellate group, are not yet completely settled. To provide more information, we obtained sequences for the large subunit rDNA gene, the gene for translation elongation factor 1alpha, and for a large part of the gene encoding translation elongation factor 2 from a representative of this group, Mastigamoeba balamuthi (formerly Phreatamoeba balamuthi). The gene for the large subunit rDNA was unusually large compared to those of other protists, a phenomenon that had previously been observed for the gene encoding the small subunit rDNA. Phylogenetic reconstruction using a maximum likelihood method was performed with these sequences, as well as the gene encoding the small subunit rDNA. When evaluated individually, the M. balamuthi genes for the small and large subunit rDNAs and elongation factor 1alpha had a most recent common ancestor with either the Mycetozoa (slime molds) or with Entamoeba histolytica. A clade formed by M. balamuthi, E. histolytica, and Mycetozoa was not rejected statistically for any of the sequences. A combined maximum likelihood analysis using 3,935 positions from all molecules suggested that these three taxonomic units form a robust clade. We were unable to resolve the closest group to this clade using the combined analysis. These findings support the notion, which had previously been proposed primarily on cytological evidence, that both M. balamuthi and E. histolytica are closely related to the Mycetozoa and that these three together represent a major eukaryotic lineage.

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rosca, Mariana G; Hoppel, Charles L

    2013-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF, several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cyclic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction.

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus, and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cylic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22948484

  3. Role and Treatment of Mitochondrial DNA-Related Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Sporadic Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2012-01-01

    Several sporadic neurodegenerative diseases display phenomena that directly or indirectly relate to mitochondrial function. Data suggesting altered mitochondrial function in these diseases could arise from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are reviewed. Approaches for manipulating mitochondrial function and minimizing the downstream consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction are discussed. PMID:21902672

  4. Mitochondrial Quality Control in Cardiac Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Juliane C.; Bozi, Luiz H. M.; Bechara, Luiz R. G.; Lima, Vanessa M.; Ferreira, Julio C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis is a hallmark of cardiac diseases. Therefore, maintenance of mitochondrial integrity through different surveillance mechanisms is critical for cardiomyocyte survival. In this review, we discuss the most recent findings on the central role of mitochondrial quality control processes including regulation of mitochondrial redox balance, aldehyde metabolism, proteostasis, dynamics, and clearance in cardiac diseases, highlighting their potential as therapeutic targets.

  5. Respiratory active mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Peleato, Maria Luisa; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Enriquez, Jose Antonio

    2008-11-21

    The structural organization of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes as four big independently moving entities connected by the mobile carriers CoQ and cytochrome c has been challenged recently. Blue native gel electrophoresis reveals the presence of high-molecular-weight bands containing several respiratory complexes and suggesting an in vivo assembly status of these structures (respirasomes). However, no functional evidence of the activity of supercomplexes as true respirasomes has been provided yet. We have observed that (1) supercomplexes are not formed when one of their component complexes is absent; (2) there is a temporal gap between the formation of the individual complexes and that of the supercomplexes; (3) some putative respirasomes contain CoQ and cytochrome c; (4) isolated respirasomes can transfer electrons from NADH to O(2), that is, they respire. Therefore, we have demonstrated the existence of a functional respirasome and propose a structural organization model that accommodates these findings.

  6. Protecting the mitochondrial powerhouse.

    PubMed

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fang, Evandro F; Croteau, Deborah L; Wilson, David M; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondria are the oxygen-consuming power plants of cells. They provide a critical milieu for the synthesis of many essential molecules and allow for highly efficient energy production through oxidative phosphorylation. The use of oxygen is, however, a double-edged sword that on the one hand supplies ATP for cellular survival, and on the other leads to the formation of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Different quality control pathways maintain mitochondria function including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and repair, fusion-fission dynamics, free radical scavenging, and mitophagy. Further, failure of these pathways may lead to human disease. We review these pathways and propose a strategy towards a treatment for these often untreatable disorders.

  7. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  8. Integrating mitochondrial translation into the cellular context.

    PubMed

    Richter-Dennerlein, Ricarda; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system assemble with nuclear-encoded subunits into enzymatic complexes. Recent findings showed that mitochondrial translation is linked to other mitochondrial functions, as well as to cellular processes. The supply of mitochondrial-encoded proteins is coordinated by the coupling of mitochondrial protein synthesis with assembly of respiratory chain complexes. MicroRNAs imported from the cytoplasm into mitochondria were, surprisingly, found to act as regulators of mitochondrial translation. In turn, translation in mitochondria controls cellular proliferation, and mitochondrial ribosomal subunits contribute to the cytoplasmic stress response. Thus, translation in mitochondria is apparently integrated into cellular processes. PMID:26535422

  9. [Is glaucoma a mitochondrial neurodegenerative disease].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Ma, J M; Wang, N L

    2016-09-11

    The retinal ganglion cell, due to peculiar structural and energetic constraints, appears acutely susceptible to mitochondrial dysfunction. Emerging evidence suggests that changes in the mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA)and in nuclear DNA genes that encode mitochondrial proteins may influence mitochondrial structure and function and, therefore, contribute to the pathogenesis of primary open angle glaucoma. As the main glaucoma risk factors are elevated intraocular pressure and older age, we discuss their relationship with mitochondrial dysfunction. If the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to glaucoma pathogenesis is further established, emerging therapies aiming to optimize mitochondrial function represent potential clinical treatments. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 714-717). PMID:27647253

  10. The mitochondrial nucleoid: integrating mitochondrial DNA into cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gilkerson, Robert; Bravo, Liliana; Garcia, Iraselia; Gaytan, Norma; Herrera, Alan; Maldonado, Alicia; Quintanilla, Brandi

    2013-05-01

    The packaging of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into DNA-protein assemblies called nucleoids provides an efficient segregating unit of mtDNA, coordinating mtDNA's involvement in cellular metabolism. From the early discovery of mtDNA as "extranuclear" genetic material, its organization into nucleoids and integration into both the mitochondrial organellar network and the cell at large via a variety of signal transduction pathways, mtDNA is a crucial component of the cell's homeostatic network. The mitochondrial nucleoid is composed of a set of DNA-binding core proteins involved in mtDNA maintenance and transcription, and a range of peripheral factors, which are components of signaling pathways controlling mitochondrial biogenesis, metabolism, apoptosis, and retrograde mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling. The molecular interactions of nucleoid components with the organellar network and cellular signaling pathways provide exciting clues to the dynamic integration of mtDNA into cellular metabolic homeostasis.

  11. Sirtuins: Novel targets for metabolic disease in drug development

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Weijian

    2008-08-29

    Calorie restriction extends lifespan and produces a metabolic profile desirable for treating diseases such as type 2 diabetes. SIRT1, an NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylase, is a principal modulator of pathways downstream of calorie restriction that produces beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Activation of SIRT1 leads to enhanced activity of multiple proteins, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) and FOXO which helps to mediate some of the in vitro and in vivo effects of sirtuins. Resveratrol, a polyphenolic SIRT1 activator, mimics the effects of calorie restriction in lower organisms and in mice fed a high-fat diet ameliorates insulin resistance. In this review, we summarize recent research advances in unveiling the molecular mechanisms that underpin sirtuin as therapeutic candidates and discuss the possibility of using resveratrol as potential drug for treatment of diabetes.

  12. Oxysterols in the orchestra of liver cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Serviddio, Gaetano; Bellanti, Francesco; Vendemiale, Gianluigi

    2014-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic hepatic disorder affecting up to 25% of the general population. Several intracellular events leading to NAFLD and progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) have been identified, including lipid accumulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Emerging evidence has suggested the cooperation of both hepatic free fatty acids (FFAs) and cholesterol (FC) accumulation in NAFLD development. Oxysterols, oxidized derivatives of cholesterol were reported as activating ligands of Liver X Receptors. Interestingly, serum levels of agonist oxysterols such as 25-HC and 27-HC are significantly increased in NAFLD patients. By contrast, 22-s- HC is considered an antagonist ligand of LXRα. 22-s-Hc down-regulated expression of the FAS gene through an LXRE located in the promoter and abolished the effect of the synthetic LXRα agonist. In addition it has been reported that 22-s-HC attenuated hepatic steatogenesis in a mouse model of high-fat-induced fatty liver. Very recently, it has been demonstrated that the inhibition of LXRα by 22-s-HC dramatically represses steatosis and HIF-1 mediated activation of MCP-1 in ethanol-induced fatty liver injury in hepatocytes as well as in Kupferr cells. Our data demonstrated that High fat diet (HF) caused liver steatosis while an atherogenic diet (ATH) diet induced hepatocellular ballooning, but only the Ath+HF diet resulted in steatohepatitis with associated mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired mitochondriogenesis. We identified in the the oxysterol cholestane-3beta,5alpha,6beta-triol (Triol) the molecule able to impair mitochondrial respiration and mitochondriogenesis by down-regulation of PGC1-alpha, mTFA and NRF1 signal. It seems that the role of oxysterols in the pathogenesis of human diseases, particularly in fat induced injury, should take into account the possible disruption of the balance between activation and inhibition of LXR signalling. Development of

  13. Caffeic acid attenuates rat liver reperfusion injury through sirtuin 3-dependent regulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Mu, Hong-Na; Li, Quan; Pan, Chun-Shui; Liu, Yu-Ying; Yan, Li; Hu, Bai-He; Sun, Kai; Chang, Xin; Zhao, Xin-Rong; Fan, Jing-Yu; Han, Jing-Yan

    2015-08-01

    Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) plays critical roles in regulating mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. However, whether Sirt3 is involved in liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury remains elusive. Caffeic acid (CA) is a natural antioxidant derived from Salvia miltiorrhiza. Whether CA protects against liver I/R injury through regulating Sirt3 and the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) is unclear. This study investigated the effect of CA on liver I/R injury, microcirculatory disturbance, and potential mechanisms, particularly focusing on Sirt3-dependent MRC. Liver I/R of male Sprague-Dawley rats was established by occlusion of portal area vessels for 30 min followed by 120 min of reperfusion. CA (15 mg/kg/h) was continuously infused via the femoral vein starting 30 min before ischemia. After I/R, Sirt3 expression, and MRC activity decreased, acetylation of NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] 1 alpha subcomplex subunit 9 and succinate dehydrogenase complex, subunit A, flavoprotein variant provoked, and the liver microcirculatory disturbance and injury were observed. Treatment with CA attenuated liver injury, inhibited Sirt3 down-expression, and up-regulated MRC activity. CA attenuated rat liver microcirculatory disturbance and oxidative injury through regulation of Sirt3 and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. PMID:25960048

  14. The novel hypoxic cytotoxin, TX-2098 has antitumor effect in pancreatic cancer; possible mechanism through inhibiting VEGF and hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} targeted gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Kotaro; Nishioka, Masanori; Imura, Satoru; Batmunkh, Erdenebulgan; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nagasawa, Hideko; Hori, Hitoshi; Shimada, Mitsuo

    2012-08-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been considered to be a potential therapeutic target, because hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of a novel hypoxic cytotoxin, 3-[2-hydroxyethyl(methyl)amino]-2-quinoxalinecarbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (TX-2098) in inhibiting the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), and consequently vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) expression in pancreatic cancer. The antitumor effects of TX-2098 under hypoxia were tested against various human pancreatic cancer cell lines using WST-8 assay. VEGF protein induced pancreatic cancer was determined on cell-free supernatant by ELISA. Moreover, nude mice bearing subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopically implanted human SUIT-2 were treated with TX-2098. Tumor volume, survival and expression of HIF-1 and associated molecules were evaluated in treatment versus control groups. In vitro, TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of various pancreatic cancer cell lines. In s.c model, tumors from nude mice injected with pancreatic cancer cells and treated with TX-2098 showed significant reductions in volume (P < 0.01 versus control). Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that TX-2098 significantly inhibited mRNA expression of the HIF-1 associated molecules, VEGF, glucose transporter 1 and Aldolase A (P < 0.01 versus control). These treatments also prolong the survival in orthotopic models. These results suggest that the effect of TX-2098 in pancreatic cancer might be correlated with the expression of VEGF and HIF-1 targeted molecules. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed and synthesized novel hypoxic cytoxin, TX-2098. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 reduced VEGF protein level than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098

  15. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and interleukin-1 alpha on matrix synthesis in osteoarthritic cartilage of the temporo-mandibular joint in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, I; Laufer, D; Livne, E

    1997-04-01

    Osteoarthritic lesions were observed in the mandibular condyle cartilage of mice aged 7 months and older. These lesions appeared as fibrillations along the articular surface and were accompanied by reduced extracellular matrix synthesis and chondrocyte proliferation. Explants of mandibular condyle cartilage were cultured in serum-free BGJb medium supplemented with ascorbic acid (300 micrograms/ml), penicillin (100 U/ml) and streptomycin (100 micrograms/ml) for up to 72 h. Cultures were further supplemented with either hTGF-beta 1 (0.1-5.0 ng/ml) or human IL-1 alpha (40 U/ml). [3H]thymidine (2 microCi/ml) and [35S]SO4 (10 microCi/ml) were added to the culture medium for the last 24 h of culture and incorporation into DNA and sulfated proteoglycans, respectively, studied. The results indicated that protein and DNA contents, [3H]thymidine and [35S]SO4 incorporation, as well as the specific activity of alkaline phosphatase, were increased by TGF-beta 1. Addition of 1.0 or 5.0 ng/ml hTGF-beta 1 to the cultures for 48 h, had the most stimulatory effect on matrix synthesis and cell proliferation, whereas 0.1 ng/ml hTGF-beta 1 appeared to be inhibitory when compared to controls. Increased [35S]SO4 labeling of chondrocyte clusters was observed by autoradiography in tissue sections from cultures treated with TGF-beta 1 (1.0 and 5.0 ng/ml). In contrast, IL-1 alpha exerted inhibitory effects on cell proliferation and matrix synthesis. However, it induced the activity of acid phosphatase in these cultures. The results of the present study show that IL-1 alpha had catabolic effect on his tissue, while TGF-beta 1 enhanced proliferation and induced synthetic activity of the cartilage cells. Such action by TGF-beta suggests the existance of a possible repair process in osteoarthritic cartilage of the temporo-mandibular joint of aged mice.

  16. A Beauveria phylogeny inferred from nuclear ITS and EF1-alpha sequences: evidence for cryptic diversification and links to Cordyceps teleomorphs.

    PubMed

    Rehner, Stephen A; Buckley, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    Beauveria is a globally distributed genus of soil-borne entomopathogenic hyphomycetes of interest as a model system for the study of entomopathogenesis and the biological control of pest insects. Species recognition in Beauveria is difficult due to a lack of taxonomically informative morphology. This has impeded assessment of species diversity in this genus and investigation of their natural history. A gene-genealogical approach was used to investigate molecular phylogenetic diversity of Beauveria and several presumptively related Cordyceps species. Analyses were based on nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and elongation factor 1-alpha (EF1-alpha) sequences for 86 exemplar isolates from diverse geographic origins, habitats and insect hosts. Phylogenetic trees were inferred using maximum parsimony and Bayesian likelihood methods. Six well supported clades within Beauveria, provisionally designated A-F, were resolved in the EF1-alpha and combined gene phylogenies. Beauveria bassiana, a ubiquitous species that is characterized morphologically by globose to subglobose conidia, was determined to be non-monophyletic and consists of two unrelated lineages, clades A and C. Clade A is globally distributed and includes the Asian teleomorph Cordyceps staphylinidaecola and its probable synonym C. bassiana. All isolates contained in Clade C are anamorphic and originate from Europe and North America. Clade B includes isolates of B. brongniartii, a Eurasian species complex characterized by ellipsoidal conidia. Clade D includes B. caledonica and B. vermiconia, which produce cylindrical and comma-shaped conidia, respectively. Clade E, from Asia, includes Beauveria anamorphs and a Cordyceps teleomorph that both produce ellipsoidal conidia. Clade F, the basal branch in the Beauveria phylogeny includes the South American species B. amorpha, which produces cylindrical conidia. Lineage diversity detected within clades A, B and C suggests that prevailing morphological

  17. The clinical maze of mitochondrial neurology

    PubMed Central

    DiMauro, Salvatore; Schon, Eric A.; Carelli, Valerio; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases involve the respiratory chain, which is under the dual control of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The complexity of mitochondrial genetics provides one explanation for the clinical heterogeneity of mitochondrial diseases, but our understanding of disease pathogenesis remains limited. Classification of Mendelian mitochondrial encephalomyopathies has been laborious, but whole-exome sequencing studies have revealed unexpected molecular aetiologies for both typical and atypical mitochondrial disease phenotypes. Mendelian mitochondrial defects can affect five components of mitochondrial biology: subunits of respiratory chain complexes (direct hits); mitochondrial assembly proteins; mtDNA translation; phospholipid composition of the inner mitochondrial membrane; or mitochondrial dynamics. A sixth category—defects of mtDNA maintenance—combines features of Mendelian and mitochondrial genetics. Genetic defects in mitochondrial dynamics are especially important in neurology as they cause optic atrophy, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease. Therapy is inadequate and mostly palliative, but promising new avenues are being identified. Here, we review current knowledge on the genetics and pathogenesis of the six categories of mitochondrial disorders outlined above, focusing on their salient clinical manifestations and highlighting novel clinical entities. An outline of diagnostic clues for the various forms of mitochondrial disease, as well as potential therapeutic strategies, is also discussed. PMID:23835535

  18. Bioenergetic roles of mitochondrial fusion.

    PubMed

    Silva Ramos, Eduardo; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Mourier, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are bioenergetic hotspots, producing the bulk of ATP by the oxidative phosphorylation process. Mitochondria are also structurally dynamic and undergo coordinated fusion and fission to maintain their function. Recent studies of the mitochondrial fusion machinery have provided new evidence in detailing their role in mitochondrial metabolism. Remarkably, mitofusin 2, in addition to its role in fusion, is important for maintaining coenzyme Q levels and may be an integral player in the mevalonate synthesis pathway. Here, we review the bioenergetic roles of mitochondrial dynamics and emphasize the importance of the in vitro growth conditions when evaluating mitochondrial respiration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016,' edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060252

  19. Pathological Significance of Mitochondrial Glycation

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Pamela Boon Li; Murphy, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Glycation, the nonenzymatic glycosylation of biomolecules, is commonly observed in diabetes and ageing. Reactive dicarbonyl species such as methylglyoxal and glyoxal are thought to be major physiological precursors of glycation. Because these dicarbonyls tend to be formed intracellularly, the levels of advanced glycation end products on cellular proteins are higher than on extracellular ones. The formation of glycation adducts within cells can have severe functional consequences such as inhibition of protein activity and promotion of DNA mutations. Although several lines of evidence suggest that there are specific mitochondrial targets of glycation, and mitochondrial dysfunction itself has been implicated in disease and ageing, it is unclear if glycation of biomolecules specifically within mitochondria induces dysfunction and contributes to disease pathology. We discuss here the possibility that mitochondrial glycation contributes to disease, focussing on diabetes, ageing, cancer, and neurodegeneration, and highlight the current limitations in our understanding of the pathological significance of mitochondrial glycation. PMID:22778743

  20. Mitochondrial control of nuclear apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Anucleate cells can be induced to undergo programmed cell death (PCD), indicating the existence of a cytoplasmic PCD pathway that functions independently from the nucleus. Cytoplasmic structures including mitochondria have been shown to participate in the control of apoptotic nuclear disintegration. Before cells exhibit common signs of nuclear apoptosis (chromatin condensation and endonuclease-mediated DNA fragmentation), they undergo a reduction of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (delta psi m) that may be due to the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition (PT) pores. Here, we present direct evidence indicating that mitochondrial PT constitutes a critical early event of the apoptotic process. In a cell-free system combining purified mitochondria and nuclei, mitochondria undergoing PT suffice to induce chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Induction of PT by pharmacological agents augments the apoptosis-inducing potential of mitochondria. In contrast, prevention of PT by pharmacological agents impedes nuclear apoptosis, both in vitro and in vivo. Mitochondria from hepatocytes or lymphoid cells undergoing apoptosis, but not those from normal cells, induce disintegration of isolated Hela nuclei. A specific ligand of the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), bongkreik acid, inhibits PT and reduces apoptosis induction by mitochondria in a cell-free system. Moreover, it inhibits the induction of apoptosis in intact cells. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the proto-oncogene product Bcl-2 inhibits apoptosis by preventing mitochondrial PT. First, to inhibit nuclear apoptosis, Bcl-2 must be localized in mitochondrial but not nuclear membranes. Second, transfection-enforced hyperexpression of Bcl-2 directly abolishes the induction of mitochondrial PT in response to a protonophore, a pro- oxidant, as well as to the ANT ligand atractyloside, correlating with its apoptosis-inhibitory effect. In conclusion, mitochondrial PT appears

  1. Mitochondrial division in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Gandre, Shilpa; van der Bliek, Alexander M

    2007-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial division proteins has largely focused on yeast and mammalian cells. We describe methods to use Caenorhabditis elegans as an alternative model for studying mitochondrial division, taking advantage of the many wonderful resources provided by the C. elegans community. Our methods are largely based on manipulation of gene expression using classic and molecular genetic techniques combined with fluorescence microscopy. Some biochemical methods are also included. As antibodies become available, these biochemical methods are likely to become more sophisticated. PMID:18314747

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  3. p-Benzoquinone, a reactive metabolite of benzene, prevents the processing of pre-interleukins-1 alpha and -1 beta to active cytokines by inhibition of the processing enzymes, calpain, and interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Kalf, G F; Renz, J F; Niculescu, R

    1996-01-01

    Chronic exposure of humans of benzene affects hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and leads to aplastic anemia. The stromal macrophage, a target of benzene toxicity, secretes interleukin-1 (IL-1), which induces the stromal fibroblast to synthesize hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors. In a mouse model, benzene causes an acute marrow hypocellularity that can be prevented by the concomitant administration of IL-1 alpha. The ability of benzene to interfere with the production and secretion of IL-1 alpha was tested. Stromal macrophages from benzene-treated mice were capable of the transcription to the IL-1 alpha gene and the translation of the message but showed an inability to process the 34-kDa pre-IL-1 alpha precursor to the 17-kDa biologically active cytokine. Treatment of normal murine stromal macrophages in culture with hydroquinone (HQ) also showed an inhibition in processing of pre-IL-1 alpha. Hydroquinone is oxidized by a peroxidase-mediated reaction in the stromal macrophage to p-benzoquinone, which interacts with the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of proteins and was shown to completely inhibit the activity of calpain, the SH-dependent protease that cleaves pre-IL-1 alpha. In a similar manner, HQ, via peroxidase oxidation to p-benzoquinone, was capable of preventing the IL-1 beta autocrine stimulation of growth of human B1 myeloid tumor cells by preventing the processing of pre-IL-1 beta to mature cytokine. Benzoquinone was also shown to completely inhibit the ability of the SH-dependent IL-1 beta converting enzyme. Thus benzene-induced bone marrow hypocellularity may result from apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitor cells brought about by lack of essential cytokines and deficient IL-1 alpha production subsequent to the inhibition of calpain by p-benzoquinone and the prevention of pre-IL-1 processing. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. PMID:9118901

  4. p-Benzoquinone, a reactive metabolite of benzene, prevents the processing of pre-interleukins-1{alpha} and -1{beta} to active cytokines by inhibition of the processing enzymes, calpain, and interleukin-1{beta} converting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Kalf, G.F.; Renz, J.F.; Niculescu, R.

    1996-12-01

    Chronic exposure of humans to benzene affects hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and leads to aplastic anemia. The stromal macrophage, a target of benzene toxicity, secretes interieukin-1 (IL-1), which induces the stromal fibroblast to synthesize hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors. In a mouse model, benzene causes an acute marrow hypocellularity that can be prevented by the concomitant administration of IL-1{alpha}. The ability of benzene to interfere with the production and secretion of IL-1{alpha} was tested. Stromal macrophages from benzene-treated mice were capable of the transcription of the IL-1{alpha} gene and the translation of the message but showed an inability to process the 34-kDa pre-IL-1{alpha} precursor to the 17-kDa biologically active cytokine. Treatment of normal murine stromal macrophages in culture with hydroquinone (HQ) also showed an inhibition in processing of pre-IL-1{alpha}. Hydroquinone is oxidized by a peroxidase-mediated reaction in the stromal macrophage to p-benzoquinone, which interacts with the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of proteins and was shown to completely inhibit the activity of calpain, the SH-dependent protease that cleaves pre-IL-1{alpha}. In a similar manner, HQ, via peroxidase oxidation to p-benzoquinone, was capable of preventing the IL-1{beta} autocrine stimulation of growth of human B1 myeloid tumor cells by preventing the processing of pre-IL-1{beta} to mature cytokine. Benzoquinone was also shown to completely inhibit the ability of the SH-dependent IL-1{beta} converting enzyme. Thus benzene-induced bone marrow hypocellularity may result from apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitor cells brought about by lack of essential cylokines and deficient IL-1{alpha} production subsequent to the inhibition of calpain by p-benzoquinone and the prevention of pre-IL-1 processing. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Immunohistochemical detection of osteopontin in advanced head-and-neck cancer: Prognostic role and correlation with oxygen electrode measurements, hypoxia-inducible-factor-1{alpha}-related markers, and hemoglobin levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bache, Matthias; Reddemann, Rolf; Said, Harun M.; Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen; Taubert, Helge; Becker, Axel; Kuhnt, Thomas; Haensgen, Gabriele; Dunst, Juergen; Vordermark, Dirk . E-mail: vordermark_d@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: The tumor-associated glycoprotein osteopontin (OPN) is discussed as a plasma marker of tumor hypoxia. However, the association of immunohistochemical OPN expression in tumor sections with tumor oxygenation parameters (HF5, median pO{sub 2}), the hypoxia-related markers hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), or hemoglobin and systemic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels has not been investigated. Methods and Materials: Tumor tissue sections of 34 patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with radiotherapy were assessed by immunochemistry for the expression of OPN, HIF-1{alpha}, and CA IX. Relationship of OPN expression with tumor oxygenation parameters (HF5, median pO{sub 2}), HIF-1{alpha} and CA IX expression, hemoglobin and serum VEGF level, and clinical parameters was studied. Results: Bivariate analysis showed a significant correlation of positive OPN staining with low hemoglobin level (p = 0.02), high HIF-1{alpha} expression (p = 0.02), and high serum vascular endothelial growth factor level (p = 0.02) for advanced head-and-neck cancer. Furthermore, considering the 31 Stage IV patients, the median pO{sub 2} correlated significantly with the OPN expression (p = 0.02). OPN expression alone had only a small impact on prognosis. However, in a univariate Cox proportional hazard regression model, the expression of either OPN or HIF-1{alpha} or CA IX was associated with a 4.1-fold increased risk of death (p = 0.02) compared with negativity of all three markers. Conclusion: Osteopontin expression detected immunohistochemically is associated with oxygenation parameters in advanced head-and-neck cancer. When the results of OPN, HIF-1{alpha}, and CA IX immunohistochemistry are combined into a hypoxic profile, a strong and statistically significant impact on overall survival is found.

  6. Inhibition of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and other skin tumor-promoter-caused induction of epidermal interleukin-1 alpha mRNA and protein expression in SENCAR mice by green tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, S K; Rupp, C O; Korman, N J; Agarwal, R; Mukhtar, H

    1995-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that topical application of the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) to murine skin results in increased expression of the highly inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1 alpha in the epidermis. This has led to the suggestion that IL-1 alpha directly or indirectly mediates the inflammatory and hyperplastic responses elicited by TPA and possibly by other skin tumor promoters. In the current study, we investigated the effect of skin application of a polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea (GTP) to SENCAR mice on skin tumor-promoter-caused induction of cutaneous edema and hyperplasia, and IL-1 alpha mRNA expression. Pretreatment of the skin with GTP 30 min before that of anthralin, benzoyl peroxide, mezerein, and TPA resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) inhibition of cutaneous edema and epidermal hyperplasia caused by each of these tumor promoters. Northern blot analysis indicated that topical application of TPA, anthralin, mezerein, or benzoyl peroxide to SENCAR mice resulted in an increased expression of epidermal IL-1 alpha mRNA. Pretreatment of the skin with GTP or individual epicatechin derivatives (ECDs) present therein, 30 min before that of TPA, resulted in a significant inhibition of enhanced expression of epidermal IL-1 alpha mRNA caused by skin application of TPA. These inhibitory effects were found to be dependent on the dose of GTP. Among four epicatechin derivatives present in GTP, (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate were more effective than (-)-epigallocatechin and (-)-epicatechin in affording this inhibition. Preapplication of GTP was also found to afford inhibition against anthralin-, benzoyl peroxide-, and mezerein-caused increased expression of epidermal IL-1 alpha mRNA and protein. Our study suggests that the inhibition of tumor-promoter-induced IL-1 alpha mRNA and protein expression in mouse epidermis by green tea in combination with other inhibitory effects may be

  7. Mitochondrial efficiency and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance, "a relative impairment in the ability of insulin to exert its effects on glucose, protein and lipid metabolism in target tissues," has many detrimental effects on metabolism and is strongly correlated to deposition of lipids in non-adipose tissues. Mitochondria are the main cellular sites devoted to ATP production and fatty acid oxidation. Therefore, a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the onset of skeletal muscle insulin resistance has been proposed and many studies have dealt with possible alteration in mitochondrial function in obesity and diabetes, both in humans and animal models. Data reporting evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in type two diabetes mellitus are numerous, even though the issue that this reduced mitochondrial function is causal in the development of the disease is not yet solved, also because a variety of parameters have been used in the studies carried out on this subject. By assessing the alterations in mitochondrial efficiency as well as the impact of this parameter on metabolic homeostasis of skeletal muscle cells, we have obtained results that allow us to suggest that an increase in mitochondrial efficiency precedes and therefore can contribute to the development of high-fat-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. PMID:25601841

  8. Mitochondrial Epigenetics and Environmental Exposure.

    PubMed

    Lambertini, Luca; Byun, Hyang-Min

    2016-09-01

    The rising toll of chronic and debilitating diseases brought about by the exposure to an ever expanding number of environmental pollutants and socio-economic factors is calling for action. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the effects of environmental exposures can lead to the development of biomarkers that can support the public health fields of both early diagnosis and intervention to limit the burden of environmental diseases. The study of mitochondrial epigenetics carries high hopes to provide important biomarkers of exposure and disease. Mitochondria are in fact on the frontline of the cellular response to the environment. Modifications of the epigenetic factors regulating the mitochondrial activity are emerging as informative tools that can effectively report on the effects of the environment on the phenotype. Here, we will discuss the emerging field of mitochondrial epigenetics. This review describes the main epigenetic phenomena that modify the activity of the mitochondrial DNA including DNA methylation, long and short non-coding RNAs. We will discuss the unique pattern of mitochondrial DNA methylation, describe the challenges of correctly measuring it, and report on the existing studies that have analysed the correlation between environmental exposures and mitochondrial DNA methylation. Finally, we provide a brief account of the therapeutic approaches targeting mitochondria currently under consideration.

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qingsong; Wang, Guanghui

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, which is characterized by loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the formation of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in surviving DA neurons in most cases. Although the cause of PD is still unclear, the remarkable advances have been made in understanding the possible causative mechanisms of PD pathogenesis. Numerous studies showed that dysfunction of mitochondria may play key roles in DA neuronal loss. Both genetic and environmental factors that are associated with PD contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction and PD pathogenesis. The induction of PD by neurotoxins that inhibit mitochondrial complex I provides direct evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction to PD. Decrease of mitochondrial complex I activity is present in PD brain and in neurotoxin- or genetic factor-induced PD cellular and animal models. Moreover, PINK1 and parkin, two autosomal recessive PD gene products, have important roles in mitophagy, a cellular process to clear damaged mitochondria. PINK1 activates parkin to ubiquitinate outer mitochondrial membrane proteins to induce a selective degradation of damaged mitochondria by autophagy. In this review, we summarize the factors associated with PD and recent advances in understanding mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. PMID:27453777

  10. CFTR activity and mitochondrial function☆

    PubMed Central

    Valdivieso, Angel Gabriel; Santa-Coloma, Tomás A.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR). Before the discovery of the CFTR gene, several hypotheses attempted to explain the etiology of this disease, including the possible role of a chloride channel, diverse alterations in mitochondrial functions, the overexpression of the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase and a deficiency in the cytosolic enzyme glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because of the diverse mitochondrial changes found, some authors proposed that the affected gene should codify for a mitochondrial protein. Later, the CFTR cloning and the demonstration of its chloride channel activity turned the mitochondrial, lysosomal and cytosolic hypotheses obsolete. However, in recent years, using new approaches, several investigators reported similar or new alterations of mitochondrial functions in Cystic Fibrosis, thus rediscovering a possible role of mitochondria in this disease. Here, we review these CFTR-driven mitochondrial defects, including differential gene expression, alterations in oxidative phosphorylation, calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, apoptosis and innate immune response, which might explain some characteristics of the complex CF phenotype and reveals potential new targets for therapy. PMID:24024153

  11. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart.

    PubMed

    Lesnefsky, Edward J; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L

    2016-05-13

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III and IV, which account for the decrease in respiration. Furthermore, aging decreases mitochondrial content among the myofibrils. The end result is that in the interfibrillar area, there is ≈50% decrease in mitochondrial function, affecting all substrates. The defective mitochondria persist in the aged heart, leading to enhanced oxidant production and oxidative injury and the activation of oxidant signaling for cell death. Aging defects in mitochondria represent new therapeutic targets, whether by manipulation of the mitochondrial proteome, modulation of electron transport, activation of biogenesis or mitophagy, or the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion. These mechanisms provide new ways to attenuate cardiac disease in elders by preemptive treatment of age-related defects, in contrast to the treatment of disease-induced dysfunction. PMID:27174952

  12. Neurons derived from human mesenchymal stem cells show synaptic transmission and can be induced to produce the neurotransmitter substance P by interleukin-1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung Jin; Trzaska, Katarzyna A; Greco, Steven J; McArdle, Joseph; Wang, Fu Shun; Ye, Jiang-Hong; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2005-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibit immune-suppressive properties, follow a pattern of multilineage differentiation, and exhibit transdifferentiation potential. Ease in expansion from adult bone marrow, as well as its separation from ethical issues, makes MSCs appealing for clinical application. MSCs treated with retinoic acid resulted in synaptic transmission, based on immunostaining of synaptophysin and electrophysiological studies. In situ hybridization indicated that the neurotransmitter gene preprotachykinin-I was expressed in these cells. However, translation of this gene only occurred after stimulation with interleukin (IL)-1 alpha. This effect was blunted by costimulation with IL-1 receptor antagonist. This study reports on the ability of MSCs to be transdifferentiated into neurons with functional synapses with the potential to become polarized towards producing specific neurotransmitters.

  13. Mushroom acidic glycosphingolipid induction of cytokine secretion from murine T cells and proliferation of NK1.1 {alpha}/{beta} TCR-double positive cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, Hirofumi; Itonori, Saki; Sugita, Mutsumi; Nakamura, Kimihide; Ohba, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Akemi; Kushi, Yasunori

    2008-08-29

    Interferon (IFN)-{gamma} and interleukin (IL)-4 regulate many types of immune responses. Here we report that acidic glycosphingolipids (AGLs) of Hypsizigus marmoreus and Pleurotus eryngii induced secretion of IFN- {gamma} and IL-4 from T cells in a CD11c-positive cell-dependent manner similar to that of {alpha}-galactosylceramide ({alpha}-GalCer) and isoglobotriaosylceramide (iGb3), although activated T cells by AGLs showed less secretion of cytokine than those activated by {alpha}-GalCer. In addition, stimulation of these mushroom AGLs induced proliferation of NK1.1 {alpha}/{beta} TCR-double positive cells in splenocytes. Administration of a mixture of {alpha}-GalCer and AGLs affected the stimulation of {alpha}-GalCer and generally induced a subtle Th1 bias for splenocytes but induced an extreme Th2 bias for thymocytes. These results suggested that edible mushroom AGLs contribute to immunomodulation.

  14. Integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}, {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} effectors p130Cas, Src and talin regulate carcinoma invasion and chemoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Sansing, Hope A.; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R.; Patel, Vyomesh; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Berrier, Allison L.

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Proteomics of clustered integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}, {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} receptors in oral carcinoma. {yields} p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin regulate oral carcinoma invasion. {yields} p130Cas, talin, Src and zyxin regulate oral carcinoma resistance to cisplatin. -- Abstract: Ligand engagement by integrins induces receptor clustering and formation of complexes at the integrin cytoplasmic face that controls cell signaling and cytoskeletal dynamics critical for adhesion-dependent processes. This study searches for a subset of integrin effectors that coordinates both tumor cell invasion and resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin in oral carcinomas. Candidate integrin effectors were identified in a proteomics screen of proteins recruited to clustered integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta} or {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} receptors in oral carcinomas. Proteins with diverse functions including microtubule and actin binding proteins, and factors involved in trafficking, transcription and translation were identified in oral carcinoma integrin complexes. Knockdown of effectors in the oral carcinoma HN12 cells revealed that p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin were required for invasion through Matrigel. Disruption of talin or p130Cas by RNA interference increased resistance to cisplatin, whereas targeting Dek, Src or zyxin reduced HN12 resistance to cisplatin. Analysis of the spreading of HN12 cells on collagen I and laminin I revealed that a decrease in p130Cas or talin expression inhibited spreading on both matrices. Interestingly, a reduction in zyxin expression enhanced spreading on laminin I and inhibited spreading on collagen I. Reduction of Dek, Src, talin or zyxin expression reduced HN12 proliferation by 30%. Proliferation was not affected by a reduction in p130Cas expression. We conclude that p130Cas, Src and talin function in both oral carcinoma invasion and resistance to cisplatin.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 alpha stimulate late shedding of p75 TNF receptors but not p55 TNF receptors from human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Joyce, D A; Steer, J H

    1995-11-01

    Soluble receptors for TNF (sTNF-R) are present at elevated concentrations in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. They are presumably released by cells of the synovial membrane, including the monocyte-derived synovial macrophages. Cytokines from the synovium, including IL-1 and TNF-alpha, may stimulate release. We therefore examined the release of sTNF-R from monocytes exposed to IL-1 and TNF-alpha. Elutriator-purified human blood monocytes spontaneously released both the p75 and the p55 sTNF-R (1011 +/- 199 and 177 +/- 20 pg/10(6) cells, respectively, mean +/- SEM) during 48 h of in vitro culture. TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha induced time- and concentration-dependent increases in the release of sTNF-R75 from monocytes, but neither had a measurable effect on the release of sTNF-R55. The release of sTNF-R75 was inhibited by cycloheximide. Neither lymphocytes nor polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) released measurable sTNF-R spontaneously or in response to stimulation with IL-1 alpha, but TNF-alpha stimulated the release of small amounts of sTNF-R75 by PMN. The timing, cycloheximide sensitivity, and selectivity of stimulated release of TNF-R75 by monocytes are consistent with previous observations on other cell types of late (8-20 h) increased synthesis and turnover of cell surface TNF-R75, but not TNF-R55, after stimulation with TNF-alpha or IL-1. These observations help to explain why elevated levels of sTNF-R in synovial fluid coexist with enhanced expression of cell surface TNF-R on synovial macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:8590306

  16. Decreased in vitro mitochondrial function is associated with enhanced brain metabolism, blood flow, and memory in Surf1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Pulliam, Daniel A; Deepa, Sathyaseelan S; Halloran, Jonathan J; Hussong, Stacy A; Burbank, Raquel R; Bresnen, Andrew; Liu, Yuhong; Podlutskaya, Natalia; Soundararajan, Anuradha; Muir, Eric; Duong, Timothy Q; Bokov, Alex F; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Richardson, Arlan G; Van Remmen, Holly; Fox, Peter T; Galvan, Veronica

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have challenged the prevailing view that reduced mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress are correlated with reduced longevity. Mice carrying a homozygous knockout (KO) of the Surf1 gene showed a significant decrease in mitochondrial electron transport chain Complex IV activity, yet displayed increased lifespan and reduced brain damage after excitotoxic insults. In the present study, we examined brain metabolism, brain hemodynamics, and memory of Surf1 KO mice using in vitro measures of mitochondrial function, in vivo neuroimaging, and behavioral testing. We show that decreased respiration and increased generation of hydrogen peroxide in isolated Surf1 KO brain mitochondria are associated with increased brain glucose metabolism, cerebral blood flow, and lactate levels, and with enhanced memory in Surf1 KO mice. These metabolic and functional changes in Surf1 KO brains were accompanied by higher levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha, and by increases in the activated form of cyclic AMP response element-binding factor, which is integral to memory formation. These findings suggest that Surf1 deficiency-induced metabolic alterations may have positive effects on brain function. Exploring the relationship between mitochondrial activity, oxidative stress, and brain function will enhance our understanding of cognitive aging and of age-related neurologic disorders.

  17. Molecular phylogeny of the tribe Sphodrini (Coleoptera: Carabidae) based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Carlos; Jordal, Bjarte; Serrano, José

    2009-01-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of 6.4 kb of nucleotide sequence data from seven genes (mitochondrial cox1-cox2 and tRNA(leu), and nuclear Ef-1alpha C0, Ef-1alpha C1, 28S, and 18S) was done to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships of the ground-beetle tribe Sphodrini. Gene regions of variable nucleotide length were aligned using both a secondary structure model, Clustal W, and a combination of the two. Sensitivity analysis was performed in order to explore the effect of alignment methods. The ribosomal and protein-coding genes were largely congruent based on the ILD test and partitioned Bremer support measures. MtDNA analysis provided high resolution and high support for most clades. The tribe Sphodrini and the related tribes Platynini, Pterostichini and Zabrini made up monophyletic clades, but the relationship between them was weakly resolved and sensitive to alignment strategy. Previously suggested relationships between subtribes of Sphodrini were not corroborated, and only the subtribe Atranopsina revealed high support as the sister clade to the other subtribes. The analyses clearly demonstrated the importance of exploring effects of alignment methods that may become particularly important in resolving polytomies and nodes with low support.

  18. Yeast Mitochondrial Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Mathilde; Darzacq, Xavier; Devaux, Frederic; Singer, Robert H.; Jacq, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Although 30 years ago it was strongly suggested that some cytoplasmic ribosomes are bound to the surface of yeast mitochondria, the mechanisms and the raison d’ětre of this process are not understood. For instance, it is not perfectly known which of the several hundred nuclearly encoded genes have to be translated to the mitochondrial vicinity to guide the import of the corresponding proteins. One can take advantage of several modern methods to address a number of aspects of the site-specific translation process of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) coding for proteins imported into mitochondria. Three complementary approaches are presented to analyze the spatial distribution of mRNAs coding for proteins imported into mitochondria. Starting from biochemical purifications of mitochondria-bound polysomes, we describe a genomewide approach to classify all the cellular mRNAs according to their physical proximity with mitochondria; we also present real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction monitoring of mRNA distribution to provide a quantified description of this localization. Finally, a fluorescence microscopy approach on a single living cell is described to visualize the in vivo localization of mRNAs involved in mitochondria biogenesis. PMID:18314748

  19. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and its Consequences for Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    How mitochondria process DNA damage and whether a change in the steady-state level of mitochondrial DNA damage (mtDNA) contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction are questions that fuel burgeoning areas of research into aging and disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, researchers have identified and measured various forms of endogenous and environmental mtDNA damage and have elucidated mtDNA repair pathways. Interestingly, mitochondria do not appear to contain the full range of DNA repair mechanisms that operate in the nucleus, although mtDNA contains types of damage that are targets of each nuclear DNA repair pathway. The reduced repair capacity may, in part, explain the high mutation frequency of the mitochondrial chromosome. Since mtDNA replication is dependent on transcription, mtDNA damage may alter mitochondrial gene expression at three levels: by causing DNA polymerase γ nucleotide incorporation errors leading to mutations, by interfering with the priming of mtDNA replication by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, or by inducing transcriptional mutagenesis or premature transcript termination. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA damage, its repair, and its effects on mtDNA integrity and gene expression. PMID:22728831

  20. BDE-154 induces mitochondrial permeability transition and impairs mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Lílian Cristina; Miranda, Luiz Felippe Cabral; de Souza, Alecsandra Oliveira; Dorta, Daniel Junqueira

    2014-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants are used in various consumer goods to make these materials difficult to burn. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE), which are representative of this class of retardants, consist of two benzene rings linked by an oxygen atom, and contain between 1 and 10 bromine atoms in their chemical structure, with the possibility of up to 209 different congeners. Among these congeners, BDE-154 (hexa-BDE) is persistent in the environment and easy to detect in the biota, but no apparent information regarding the mechanism underlying action and toxicity is available. Mitochondria, as the main energy-producing organelles, play an important role in the maintenance of various cellular functions. Therefore, mitochondria were used in the present study as an experimental model to determine the effects of BDE-154 congener at concentrations ranging from 0.1 μM to 50 μM. Our results demonstrated that BDE-154 interacts with the mitochondrial membrane, preferably by inserting into the hydrophobic core of the mitochondrial membrane, which partially inhibits respiration, dissipates Δψ, and permeabilizes the inner mitochondrial membrane to deplete ATP. These effects are more pronounced at concentrations equal to or higher than 10 μM. Results also showed that BDE-154 did not induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation within the mitochondria, indicating the absence of oxidative stress. Therefore, BDE-154 impairs mitochondrial bioenergetics and permeabilizes the mitochondrial membrane, potentially leading to cell death but not via mechanisms involving oxidative stress. PMID:24555644

  1. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schenkel, Laila Cigana

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:24578708

  2. Mitochondrial drug targets in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyoun

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is the main culprit in neurodegenerative diseases. Given the fact that mitochondria participate in diverse cellular processes, including energetics, metabolism, and death, the consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction in neuronal cells are inevitable. In fact, new strategies targeting mitochondrial dysfunction are emerging as potential alternatives to current treatment options for neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on mitochondrial proteins that are directly associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. We also examine recently identified small molecule modulators of these mitochondrial targets and assess their potential in research and therapeutic applications.

  3. Importing Mitochondrial Proteins: Machineries and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chacinska, Agnieszka; Koehler, Carla M.; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Lithgow, Trevor; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Most mitochondrial proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and must be imported across one or both mitochondrial membranes. There is an amazingly versatile set of machineries and mechanisms, and at least four different pathways, for the importing and sorting of mitochondrial precursor proteins. The translocases that catalyze these processes are highly dynamic machines driven by the membrane potential, ATP, or redox reactions, and they cooperate with molecular chaperones and assembly complexes to direct mitochondrial proteins to their correct destinations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the importing and sorting of mitochondrial proteins and their contributions to mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:19703392

  4. Interactive Effects of Dietary Lipid and Phenotypic Feed Efficiency on the Expression of Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genes Involved in the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Eya, Jonathan C.; Ukwuaba, Vitalis O.; Yossa, Rodrigue; Gannam, Ann L.

    2015-01-01

    A 2 × 3 factorial study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary lipid level on the expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in all-female rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Three practical diets with a fixed crude protein content of 40%, formulated to contain 10% (40/10), 20% (40/20) and 30% (40/30) dietary lipid, were fed to apparent satiety to triplicate groups of either low-feed efficient (F120; 217.66 ± 2.24 g initial average mass) or high-feed efficient (F136; 205.47 ± 1.27 g) full-sib families of fish, twice per day, for 90 days. At the end of the experiment, the results showed that there is an interactive effect of the dietary lipid levels and the phenotypic feed efficiency (growth rate and feed efficiency) on the expression of the mitochondrial genes nd1 (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1), cytb (Cytochrome b), cox1 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 1), cox2 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 2) and atp6 (ATP synthase subunit 6) and nuclear genes ucp2α (uncoupling proteins 2 alpha), ucp2β (uncoupling proteins 2 beta), pparα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha), pparβ (peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor beta) and ppargc1α (proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha) in fish liver, intestine and muscle, except on ppargc1α in the muscle which was affected by the diet and the family separately. Also, the results revealed that the expression of mitochondrial genes is associated with that of nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in fish liver, intestine and muscle. Furthermore, this work showed that the expression of mitochondrial genes parallels with the expression of genes encoding uncoupling proteins (UCP) in the liver and the intestine of rainbow trout. This study for the first time presents the molecular basis of the effects of dietary lipid level on mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport chain in fish. PMID:25853266

  5. Overview of mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Vitor M C

    2012-01-01

    Bioenergetic Science started in seventh century with the pioneer works by Joseph Priestley and Antoine Lavoisier on photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. New developments were implemented by Pasteur in 1860s with the description of fermentations associated to microorganisms, further documented by Buchner brothers who discovered that fermentations also occurred in cell extracts in the absence of living cells. In the beginning of twentieth century, Harden and Young demonstrated that orthophosphate and other heat-resistant compounds (cozymase), later identified as NAD, ADP, and metal ions, were mandatory in the fermentation of glucose. The full glycolysis pathway has been detailed in 1940s with the contributions of Embden, Meyeroff, Parnas, Warburg, among others. Studies on the citric acid cycle started in 1910 (Thunberg) and were elucidated by Krebs et al. in the 1940s. Mitochondrial bioenergetics gained emphasis in the late 1940s and 1950s with the works of Lenhinger, Racker, Chance, Boyer, Ernster, and Slater, among others. The prevalent "chemical coupling hypothesis" of energy conservation in oxidative phosphorylation was challenged and replaced by the "chemiosmotic hypothesis" originally formulated in 1960s by Mitchell and later substantiated and extended to energy conservation in bacteria and chloroplasts, besides mitochondria, with clear-cut identification of molecular proton pumps. After identification of most reactive mechanisms, emphasis has been directed to structure resolution of molecular complex clusters, e.g., cytochrome c oxidase, complex III, complex II, ATP synthase, photosystem I, photosynthetic water splitting center, and energy collecting antennæ of several photosynthetic systems. Modern trends concern to the reactivity of radical and other active species in association with bioenergetic activities. A promising trend concentrates on the cell redox status quantified in terms of redox potentials. In spite of significant development and

  6. Hypoxamirs and Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cottrill, Katherine A.; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Chronic hypoxia can drive maladaptive responses in numerous organ systems, leading to a multitude of chronic mammalian diseases. Oxygen homeostasis is intimately linked with mitochondrial metabolism, and dysfunction in these systems can combine to form the backbone of hypoxic-ischemic injury in multiple tissue beds. Increased appreciation of the crucial roles of hypoxia-associated miRNA (hypoxamirs) in metabolism adds a new dimension to our understanding of the regulation of hypoxia-induced disease. Recent Advances: Myriad factors related to glycolysis (e.g., aldolase A and hexokinase II), tricarboxylic acid cycle function (e.g., glutaminase and iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein 1/2), and apoptosis (e.g., p53) have been recently implicated as targets of hypoxamirs. In addition, several hypoxamirs have been implicated in the regulation of the master transcription factor of hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, clarifying how the cellular program of hypoxia is sustained and resolved. Critical Issues: Central to the discussion of metabolic change in hypoxia is the Warburg effect, a shift toward anaerobic metabolism that persists after normal oxygen levels have been restored. Many newly discovered targets of hypoxia-driven microRNA converge on pathways known to be involved in this pathological phenomenon and the apoptosis-resistant phenotype associated with it. Future Directions: The often synergistic functions of miRNA may make them ideal therapeutic targets. The use of antisense inhibitors is currently being considered in diseases in which hypoxia and metabolic dysregulation predominate. In addition, exploration of pleiotripic miRNA functions will likely continue to offer unique insights into the mechanistic relationships of their downstream target pathways and associated hypoxic phenotypes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1189–1201. PMID:24111795

  7. Overview of mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Vitor M C

    2012-01-01

    Bioenergetic Science started in seventh century with the pioneer works by Joseph Priestley and Antoine Lavoisier on photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. New developments were implemented by Pasteur in 1860s with the description of fermentations associated to microorganisms, further documented by Buchner brothers who discovered that fermentations also occurred in cell extracts in the absence of living cells. In the beginning of twentieth century, Harden and Young demonstrated that orthophosphate and other heat-resistant compounds (cozymase), later identified as NAD, ADP, and metal ions, were mandatory in the fermentation of glucose. The full glycolysis pathway has been detailed in 1940s with the contributions of Embden, Meyeroff, Parnas, Warburg, among others. Studies on the citric acid cycle started in 1910 (Thunberg) and were elucidated by Krebs et al. in the 1940s. Mitochondrial bioenergetics gained emphasis in the late 1940s and 1950s with the works of Lenhinger, Racker, Chance, Boyer, Ernster, and Slater, among others. The prevalent "chemical coupling hypothesis" of energy conservation in oxidative phosphorylation was challenged and replaced by the "chemiosmotic hypothesis" originally formulated in 1960s by Mitchell and later substantiated and extended to energy conservation in bacteria and chloroplasts, besides mitochondria, with clear-cut identification of molecular proton pumps. After identification of most reactive mechanisms, emphasis has been directed to structure resolution of molecular complex clusters, e.g., cytochrome c oxidase, complex III, complex II, ATP synthase, photosystem I, photosynthetic water splitting center, and energy collecting antennæ of several photosynthetic systems. Modern trends concern to the reactivity of radical and other active species in association with bioenergetic activities. A promising trend concentrates on the cell redox status quantified in terms of redox potentials. In spite of significant development and

  8. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeira, Carlos M. Rolo, Anabela P.; Berthiaume, Jessica; Bjork, James A.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2007-12-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes.

  9. Mitochondrial Stress: A Bridge between Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Metabolic Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fang; Liu, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Under pathophysiological conditions such as obesity, excessive oxidation of nutrients may induce mitochondrial stress, leading to mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and initiation of a retrograde stress signaling pathway. Defects in the UPRmt and the retrograde signaling pathways may disrupt the integrity and homeostasis of the mitochondria, resulting endoplasmic reticulum stress and insulin resistance. Improving the capacity of mitochondria to reduce stress may be an effective approach to improve mitochondria function and to suppress obesity-induced metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21616143

  10. Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer Patients: Rise in Interleukin 6 (IL-6) but not IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, Tumor Necrosis Factor-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira Lopes, Carlos; Callera, Fernando

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on serum levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}), macrophage inflammatory protein-1-alpha (MIP-1-{alpha}) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in patients with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty eight patients with prostate cancer received three-dimensional conformal blocking radiation therapy with a linear accelerator. IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF levels were measured by the related immunoassay kit 1 day before the beginning of RT and during RT at days 15 and 30. Results: The mean IL-2 values were elevated before and during the RT in contrast with those of IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF, which were within the normal range under the same conditions. Regarding markers IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF, comparisons among the three groups (before treatment and 15 and 30 days during RT) did not show significant differences. Although values were within the normal range, there was a significant rise in IL-6 levels at day 15 of RT (p = 0.0049) and a decline at day 30 to levels that were similar to those observed before RT. Conclusions: IL-6 appeared to peak after 15 days of RT before returning to pre-RT levels. In contrast, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-{alpha}, MIP-1-{alpha}, and LIF levels were not sensitive to irradiation. The increased levels of IL-6 following RT without the concurrent elevation of other cytokines involved in the acute phase reaction did not suggest a classical inflammatory response to radiation exposure. Further studies should be designed to elucidate the role of IL-6 levels in patients with prostate cancer treated with RT.

  11. Hyperresponsive febrile reactions to interleukin (IL) 1alpha and IL-1beta, and altered brain cytokine mRNA and serum cytokine levels, in IL-1beta-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Alheim, K; Chai, Z; Fantuzzi, G; Hasanvan, H; Malinowsky, D; Di Santo, E; Ghezzi, P; Dinarello, C A; Bartfai, T

    1997-03-18

    IL-1beta is an endogenous pyrogen that is induced during systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or IL-1-induced fever. We have examined the fever and cytokine responses following i.p. injection of IL-1 agonists, IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, and compared these with response to LPS (i.p.) in wild-type and IL-1beta-deficient mice. The IL-1beta deficient mice appear to have elevated body temperature but exhibit a normal circadian temperature cycle. Exogenously injected IL-1beta, IL-1alpha, or LPS induced hyperresponsive fevers in the IL-1beta-deficient mice. We also observed phenotypic differences between wild-type and IL-1beta-deficient mice in hypothalamic basal mRNA levels for IL-1alpha and IL-6, but not for IL-1beta-converting enzyme or IL-1 receptor type I or type II. The IL-1alpha mRNA levels were down-regulated, whereas the IL-6 mRNA levels were up-regulated in the hypothalamus of IL-1beta-deficient mice as compared with wild-type mice. The IL-1beta-deficient mice also responded to LPS challenge with significantly higher serum corticosterone and with lower serum tumor necrosis factor type alpha levels than the wild-type mice. The data suggest that, in the redundant cascade of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1beta plays an important but not obligatory role in fever induction by LPS or IL-1alpha, as well as in the induction of serum tumor necrosis factor type alpha and corticosterone responses either by LPS or by IL-1alpha or IL-1beta.

  12. Pharmacological approaches to restore mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Andreux, Pénélope A.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Auwerx, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is not only a hallmark of rare inherited mitochondrial disorders, but is also implicated in age-related diseases, including those that affect the metabolic and nervous system, such as type 2 diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. Numerous pathways maintain and/or restore proper mitochondrial function, including mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy, and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. New and powerful phenotypic assays in cell-based models, as well as multicellular organisms, have been developed to explore these different aspects of mitochondrial function. Modulating mitochondrial function has therefore emerged as an attractive therapeutic strategy for a range of diseases, which has spurred active drug discovery efforts in this area. PMID:23666487

  13. Mitochondrial DNA and Cancer Epidemiology Workshop

    Cancer.gov

    A workshop to review the state-of-the science in the mitochondrial DNA field and its use in cancer epidemiology, and to develop a concept for a research initiative on mitochondrial DNA and cancer epidemiology.

  14. Mitochondrial role in cell aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, J.; Fleming, J.; Economos, A. C.; Johnson, J. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental studies on the mitochondria of insect and mammalian cells are examined with a view to an analysis of intrinsic mitochondrial senescence, and its relation to the age-related changes in other cell organelles. The fine structural and biochemical data support the concept that the mitochondria of fixed postmitotic cells may be the site of intrinsic aging because of the attack by free radicals and lipid peroxides originating in the organelles as a by-product of oxygen reduction during respiration. Although the cells have numerous mechanisms for counteracting lipid peroxidation injury, there is a slippage in the antioxidant protection. Intrinsic mitochondrial aging could thus be considered as a specific manifestation of oxygen toxicity. It is proposed that free radical injury renders an increasing number of the mitochondria unable to divide, probably because of damage to the lipids of the inner membrane and to mitochondrial DNA.

  15. The Mitochondrial Basis of Aging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Nuo; Youle, Richard J; Finkel, Toren

    2016-03-01

    A decline in mitochondrial quality and activity has been associated with normal aging and correlated with the development of a wide range of age-related diseases. Here, we review the evidence that a decline in mitochondria function contributes to aging. In particular, we discuss how mitochondria contribute to specific aspects of the aging process, including cellular senescence, chronic inflammation, and the age-dependent decline in stem cell activity. Signaling pathways regulating the mitochondrial unfolded protein response and mitophagy are also reviewed, with particular emphasis placed on how these pathways might, in turn, regulate longevity. Taken together, these observations suggest that mitochondria influence or regulate a number of key aspects of aging and suggest that strategies directed at improving mitochondrial quality and function might have far-reaching beneficial effects.

  16. Redox Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Handy, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Redox-dependent processes influence most cellular functions, such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Mitochondria are at the center of these processes, as mitochondria both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that drive redox-sensitive events and respond to ROS-mediated changes in the cellular redox state. In this review, we examine the regulation of cellular ROS, their modes of production and removal, and the redox-sensitive targets that are modified by their flux. In particular, we focus on the actions of redox-sensitive targets that alter mitochondrial function and the role of these redox modifications on metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, receptor-mediated signaling, and apoptotic pathways. We also consider the role of mitochondria in modulating these pathways, and discuss how redox-dependent events may contribute to pathobiology by altering mitochondrial function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1323–1367. PMID:22146081

  17. [Metabolic syndrome, a mitochondrial disease?].

    PubMed

    Gastaldi, G; Giacobino, J P; Ruiz, J

    2008-06-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic risk factors including: atherogenic dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, high plasma glucose and a prothrombotic and proinflammatory state, frequently associated to overweight. Impaired cell metabolism has been suggested as a relevant pathophysiological process. Indeed, the accumulation of intracellular fatty acylCoA and diacylglycerol, which then activate critical signal transduction pathways that ultimatly lead to suppression of insulin signalisation. Therefore a defect in mitochondrial function may be responsible for insulin resistance. Moreover, mitochondrial dysfunction has been found to take place in organs such as skeletal muscle, liver, pancreas and smoth vascular cells suggesting that mitochondrial defect could play a critical role in the occurence of cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Emerging therapies for mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Helen; Pfeffer, Gerald; Bargiela, David; Horvath, Rita; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are a diverse group of debilitating conditions resulting from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA mutations that affect multiple organs, often including the central and peripheral nervous system. Despite major advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms, effective treatments have not been forthcoming. For over five decades patients have been treated with different vitamins, co-factors and nutritional supplements, but with no proven benefit. There is therefore a clear need for a new approach. Several new strategies have been proposed acting at the molecular or cellular level. Whilst many show promise in vitro, the clinical potential of some is questionable. Here we critically appraise the most promising preclinical developments, placing the greatest emphasis on diseases caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations. With new animal and cellular models, longitudinal deep phenotyping in large patient cohorts, and growing interest from the pharmaceutical industry, the field is poised to make a breakthrough. PMID:27190030

  19. Emerging therapies for mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Helen; Pfeffer, Gerald; Bargiela, David; Horvath, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are a diverse group of debilitating conditions resulting from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA mutations that affect multiple organs, often including the central and peripheral nervous system. Despite major advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms, effective treatments have not been forthcoming. For over five decades patients have been treated with different vitamins, co-factors and nutritional supplements, but with no proven benefit. There is therefore a clear need for a new approach. Several new strategies have been proposed acting at the molecular or cellular level. Whilst many show promise in vitro, the clinical potential of some is questionable. Here we critically appraise the most promising preclinical developments, placing the greatest emphasis on diseases caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations. With new animal and cellular models, longitudinal deep phenotyping in large patient cohorts, and growing interest from the pharmaceutical industry, the field is poised to make a breakthrough. PMID:27190030

  20. Nanodelivery System for Mitochondrial Targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoong, Sia Lee; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondria are indispensable in cellular functions such as energy production and death execution. They are emerging as intriguing therapeutic target as their dysregulation was found to be monumental in diseases such as neurodegenerative disease, obesity, and cancer etc. Despite tremendous interest being focused on therapeutically intervening mitochondrial function, few mito-active drugs were successfully developed, particularly due to challenges in delivering active compound to this organelle. In this review, effort in utilizing nanotechnology for targeted mitochondrial delivery of compound is expounded based on the nature of the nanomaterial used. The advantage and potential offered are discussed alongside the limitation. Finally the review is concluded with perspectives of the application of nanocarrier in mitochondrial medicine, given the unresolved concern on potential complications.

  1. Analysis of the local kinetics and localization of interleukin-1 alpha, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and transforming growth factor-beta, during the course of experimental pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Pando, R; Orozco, H; Arriaga, K; Sampieri, A; Larriva-Sahd, J; Madrid-Marina, V

    1997-01-01

    A mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis induced by the intratracheal instillation of live and virulent mycobacteria strain H37-Rv was used to examine the relationship of the histopathological findings with the local kinetics production and cellular distribution of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). The histopathological and immunological studies showed two phases of the disease: acute or early and chronic or advanced. The acute phase was characterized by inflammatory infiltrate in the alveolar-capillary interstitium, blood vessels and bronchial wall with formation of granulomas. During this acute phase, which lasted from 1 to 28 days, high percentages of TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha immunostained activated macrophages were observed principally in the interstium-intralveolar inflammatory infiltrate and in granulomas. Electron microscopy studies of these cells, showed extensive rough endoplasmic reticulum, numerous lysosomes and occasional mycobacteria. Double labelling with colloid gold showed that TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha were present in the same cells, but were confined to separate vacuoles near the Golgi area, and mixed in larger vacuoles near to cell membrane. The concentration of TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha as well as their respective mRNAs were elevated in the early phase, particularly at day 3 when the bacillary count decreased. A second peak was seen at days 14 and 21-28 when granulomas appeared and evolved to full maturation. In contrast, TGF-beta production and numbers of immunoreactive cells were low in comparison with the advanced phase of the disease. The chronic phase was characterized by histopathological changes indicative of more severity (i.e. pneumonia, focal necrosis and extensive interstitial fibrosis) with a decrease in the TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha production that coincided with the highest level of TGF-beta. The bacillary counts were highest as the macrophages

  2. Allergen-specific IgE in Icelandic horses with insect bite hypersensitivity and healthy controls, assessed by FcepsilonR1alpha-based serology.

    PubMed

    Frey, Rebecka; Bergvall, Kerstin; Egenvall, Agneta

    2008-11-15

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) and atopy can both be causes of pruritus in horses and are associated with allergen-specific IgE to biting insects and environmental allergens respectively. Information with respect to differences in IgE levels in diseased and healthy animals is crucial in enabling an understanding of the clinical relevance of results of allergen-specific IgE tests. The aim of this study was (i) to evaluate and compare levels of allergen-specific IgE, using an ELISA method, in Icelandic horses, with and without IBH, from Iceland and Sweden respectively; (ii) to investigate patterns of allergen-specific IgE to insects, pollens, moulds and mites in those groups of horses; and (iii) to investigate the clinical significance of employing two different cut-off levels for the ELISA. The study compromised a total number of 99 horses from Iceland and Sweden, with and without IBH, divided in 5 groups. Sera from the horses were analysed blindly with the use of Allercept , a non-competitive, solid-phase ELISA-test, designed to detect the presence of allergen-specific IgE in sera using the recombinant alpha chain of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonR1alpha). The distribution of the ELISA values was shown for each insect, mould, mite and pollen allergen, in the different groups using 10th, 50th and 90th percentiles. The use of two cut-off levels, 150 EA and 300 EA, did not eliminate the false positives. Horses with IBH had a higher number of positive reactions, counting all the 29 allergens, than healthy controls and this was borderline significant (P=0.053). In this study it was shown that serological testing with an ELISA that uses the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonR1alpha) is presently not suitable as a tool for establishing a diagnosis of IBH or equine atopy. The importance of establishing a correct cut-off level for the ELISA for the different allergens is emphasised.

  3. Mitochondrial Ion Channels in Cancer Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Madamba, Stephen M.; Damri, Kevin N.; Dejean, Laurent M.; Peixoto, Pablo M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer transformation involves reprograming of mitochondrial function to avert cell death mechanisms, monopolize energy metabolism, accelerate mitotic proliferation, and promote metastasis. Mitochondrial ion channels have emerged as promising therapeutic targets because of their connection to metabolic and apoptotic functions. This mini review discusses how mitochondrial channels may be associated with cancer transformation and expands on the possible involvement of mitochondrial protein import complexes in pathophysiological process. PMID:26090338

  4. Ethics of mitochondrial therapy for deafness.

    PubMed

    Legge, Michael; Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    2014-11-07

    Mitochondrial therapy may provide the relief to many families with inherited mitochondrial diseases. However, it also has the potential for use in non-fatal disorders such as inherited mitochondrial deafness, providing an option for correction of the deafness using assisted reproductive technology. In this paper we discuss the potential for use in correcting mitochondrial deafness and consider some of the issues for the deaf community.

  5. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Johri, Ashu

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a large group of disabling disorders of the nervous system, characterized by the relative selective death of neuronal subtypes. In most cases, there is overwhelming evidence of impaired mitochondrial function as a causative factor in these diseases. More recently, evidence has emerged for impaired mitochondrial dynamics (shape, size, fission-fusion, distribution, movement etc.) in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. Here, we provide a concise overview of the major findings in recent years highlighting the importance of healthy mitochondria for a healthy neuron. PMID:22700435

  6. Metabolic regulation of mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are renowned for their central bioenergetic role in eukaryotic cells, where they act as powerhouses to generate adenosine triphosphate from oxidation of nutrients. At the same time, these organelles are highly dynamic and undergo fusion, fission, transport, and degradation. Each of these dynamic processes is critical for maintaining a healthy mitochondrial population. Given the central metabolic function of mitochondria, it is not surprising that mitochondrial dynamics and bioenergetics reciprocally influence each other. We review the dynamic properties of mitochondria, with an emphasis on how these processes respond to cellular signaling events and how they affect metabolism. PMID:26858267

  7. Mitochondrial dysfunction in migraine.

    PubMed

    Yorns, William R; Hardison, H Huntley

    2013-09-01

    Migraine is the most frequent type of headache in children. In the 1980s, scientists first hypothesized a connection between migraine and mitochondrial (mt) disorders. More recent studies have suggested that at least some subtypes of migraine may be related to a mt defect. Different types of evidence support a relationship between mitochondria (mt) and migraine: (1) Biochemical evidence: Abnormal mt function translates into high intracellular penetration of Ca(2+), excessive production of free radicals, and deficient oxidative phosphorylation, which ultimately causes energy failure in neurons and astrocytes, thus triggering migraine mechanisms, including spreading depression. The mt markers of these events are low activity of superoxide dismutase, activation of cytochrome-c oxidase and nitric oxide, high levels of lactate and pyruvate, and low ratios of phosphocreatine-inorganic phosphate and N-acetylaspartate-choline. (2) Morphologic evidence: mt abnormalities have been shown in migraine sufferers, the most characteristic ones being direct observation in muscle biopsy of ragged red and cytochrome-c oxidase-negative fibers, accumulation of subsarcolemmal mt, and demonstration of giant mt with paracrystalline inclusions. (3) Genetic evidence: Recent studies have identified specific mutations responsible for migraine susceptibility. However, the investigation of the mtDNA mutations found in classic mt disorders (mt encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes, myoclonus epilepsy with ragged red fibers, Kearns-Sayre syndrome, and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy) has not demonstrated any association. Recently, 2 common mtDNA polymorphisms (16519C→T and 3010G→A) have been associated with pediatric cyclic vomiting syndrome and migraine. Also, POLG mutations (eg, p.T851 A, p.N468D, p.Y831C, p.G517V, and p.P163S) can cause disease through impaired replication of mtDNA, including migraine. Further studies to investigate the relationship between mt

  8. Mitochondrial retrograde signaling regulates neuronal function

    PubMed Central

    Cagin, Umut; Duncan, Olivia F.; Gatt, Ariana P.; Dionne, Marc S.; Sweeney, Sean T.; Bateman, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are key regulators of cellular homeostasis, and mitochondrial dysfunction is strongly linked to neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Mitochondria communicate their bioenergetic status to the cell via mitochondrial retrograde signaling. To investigate the role of mitochondrial retrograde signaling in neurons, we induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the Drosophila nervous system. Neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction causes reduced viability, defects in neuronal function, decreased redox potential, and reduced numbers of presynaptic mitochondria and active zones. We find that neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction stimulates a retrograde signaling response that controls the expression of several hundred nuclear genes. We show that the Drosophila hypoxia inducible factor alpha (HIFα) ortholog Similar (Sima) regulates the expression of several of these retrograde genes, suggesting that Sima mediates mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Remarkably, knockdown of Sima restores neuronal function without affecting the primary mitochondrial defect, demonstrating that mitochondrial retrograde signaling is partly responsible for neuronal dysfunction. Sima knockdown also restores function in a Drosophila model of the mitochondrial disease Leigh syndrome and in a Drosophila model of familial Parkinson’s disease. Thus, mitochondrial retrograde signaling regulates neuronal activity and can be manipulated to enhance neuronal function, despite mitochondrial impairment. PMID:26489648

  9. Mechanisms involved in 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-mediated inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Dawit A P; Lira, Eduardo C; Baviera, Amanda M; Cao, Peirang; Zanon, Neusa M; Arany, Zoltan; Bedard, Nathalie; Tanksale, Preeti; Wing, Simon S; Lecker, Stewart H; Kettelhut, Isis C; Navegantes, Luiz C C

    2009-12-01

    Although it is well known that catecholamines inhibit skeletal muscle protein degradation, the molecular underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of beta(2)-adrenoceptors (AR) and cAMP in regulating the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in skeletal muscle. We report that increased levels of cAMP in isolated muscles, promoted by the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine was accompanied by decreased activity of the UPS, levels of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, and expression of atrogin-1, a key ubiquitin-protein ligase involved in muscle atrophy. In cultured myotubes, atrogin-1 induction after dexamethasone treatment was completely prevented by isobutylmethylxanthine. Furthermore, administration of clenbuterol, a selective beta(2)-agonist, to mice increased muscle cAMP levels and suppressed the fasting-induced expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, atrogin-1 mRNA being much more responsive to clenbuterol. Moreover, clenbuterol increased the phosphorylation of muscle Akt and Foxo3a in fasted rats. Similar responses were observed in muscles exposed to dibutyryl-cAMP. The stimulatory effect of clenbuterol on cAMP and Akt was abolished in muscles from beta(2)-AR knockout mice. The suppressive effect of beta(2)-agonist on atrogin-1 was not mediated by PGC-1alpha (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1alpha known to be induced by beta(2)-agonists and previously shown to inhibit atrogin-1 expression), because food-deprived PGC-1alpha knockout mice were still sensitive to clenbuterol. These findings suggest that the cAMP increase induced by stimulation of beta(2)-AR in skeletal muscles from fasted mice is possibly the mechanism by which catecholamines suppress atrogin-1 and the UPS, this effect being mediated via phosphorylation of Akt and thus inactivation of Foxo3.

  10. High-fat feeding in cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARdelta knockout mice leads to cardiac overexpression of lipid metabolic genes but fails to rescue cardiac phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuquan; Cheng, Lihong; Qin, Qianhong; Liu, Jian; Lo, Woo-kuen; Brako, Lowrence A; Yang, Qinglin

    2009-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARdelta) is an essential determinant of basal myocardial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and bioenergetics. We wished to determine whether increased lipid loading affects the PPARdelta deficient heart in transcriptional regulation of FAO and in the development of cardiac pathology. Cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARdelta knockout (CR-PPARdelta(-/-)) and control (alpha-MyHC-Cre) mice were subjected to 48 h of fasting and to a long-term maintenance on a (28 weeks) high-fat diet (HFD). The expression of key FAO proteins in heart was examined. Serum lipid profiles, cardiac pathology, and changes of various transduction signaling pathways were also examined. Mice subjected to fasting exhibited upregulated transcript expression of FAO genes in the CR-PPARdelta(-/-) hearts. Moreover, long-term HFD in CR-PPARdelta(-/-) mice induced a strikingly greater transcriptional response. After HFD, genes encoding key FAO enzymes were expressed remarkably more in CR-PPARdelta(-/-) hearts than in those of control mice. Despite the marked rise of FAO gene expression, corresponding protein expression remained low in the CR-PPARdelta(-/-) heart, accompanied by abnormalities in sarcomere structures and mitochondria that were similar to those of CR-PPARdelta(-/-) hearts with regular chow feeding. The CR-PPARdelta(-/-) mice displayed increased expression of PPARgamma co-activator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and PPARalpha in the heart with deactivated Akt and p42/44 MAPK signaling in response to HFD. We conclude that PPARdelta is an essential determinant of myocardial FAO. Increased lipid intake activates cardiac expression of FAO genes via PPARalpha/PGC-1alpha pathway, albeit it is not sufficient to improve cardiac pathology due to PPARdelta deficiency.

  11. Differential effects of self-reported lifetime marijuana use on interleukin-1 alpha and tumor necrosis factor in African American adults.

    PubMed

    Keen, Larry; Turner, Arlener D

    2015-06-01

    It is unknown how lifetime marijuana use affects different proinflammatory cytokines. The purpose of the current study is to explore potential differential effects of lifetime marijuana use on interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1α) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in a community based sample. Participants included 168 African American adults (51 % female, median age = 47 years). Upon study entry, blood was drawn and the participants completed questions regarding illicit drug use history whose answers were used to create three groups: lifetime non-drug users (n = 77), lifetime marijuana only users (n = 46) and lifetime marijuana and other drug users (n = 45). In the presence of demographic and physiological covariates, non-drug users were approximately two times more likely (AOR 2.73, CI 1.18, 6.31; p = .03) to have higher TNF levels than marijuana only users. Drug use was not associated with IL-1α. The influence of marijuana may be selective in nature, potentially localizing around innate immunity and the induction of cellular death.

  12. Differential Effects of Self-Reported Lifetime Marijuana Use on Interleukin-1 Alpha and Tumor Necrosis Factor in African American Adults

    PubMed Central

    Keen, Larry; Turner, Arlener D.; Callender, Clive; Campbell, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown how lifetime marijuana use affects different proinflammatory cytokines. The purpose of the current study is to explore potential differential effects of lifetime marijuana use on interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1α) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in a community based sample. Participants included 168 African American adults (51% female, median age= 47 years). Upon study entry, blood was drawn and the participants completed questions regarding illicit drug use history whose answers were used to create three groups: lifetime non-drug users (n= 77), lifetime marijuana only users (n= 46) and lifetime marijuana and other drug users (n= 45). In the presence of demographic and physiological covariates, non-drug users were approximately two times more likely (AOR= 2.73, CI= 1.18, 6.31; p= .03) to have higher TNF levels than marijuana only users. Drug use was not associated with IL-1α. The influence of marijuana may be selective in nature, potentially localizing around innate immunity and the induction of cellular death. PMID:25731665

  13. Interleukin-1 alpha mediates the anti-proliferative effects of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 in prostate progenitor/stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Maund, Sophia L.; Barclay, Wendy W.; Hover, Laura D.; Axanova, Linara S.; Sui, Guangchao; Hipp, Jason D.; Fleet, James C.; Thorburn, Andrew; Cramer, Scott D.

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D3 is a promising preventative and therapeutic agent for prostate cancer, but its implementation is hampered by a lack of understanding about its mechanism of action. Upon treatment with 1α,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 (vitamin D3), the metabolically active form of vitamin D3, adult prostate progenitor/stem cells (PrP/SC) undergo cell-cycle arrest, senescence, and differentiation to an androgen receptor-positive luminal epithelial cell fate. Microarray analyses of control- and vitamin D3-treated PrP/SC revealed global gene expression signatures consistent with induction of differentiation. Interestingly, one of the most highly-upregulated genes by vitamin D3 was the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 alpha (IL1α). Systems biology analyses supported a central role for IL1α in the vitamin D3 response in PrP/SC. siRNA-mediated knockdown of IL1α abrogated vitamin D3-induced growth suppression, establishing a requirement for IL1α in the anti-proliferative effects of vitamin D3 in PrP/SC. These studies establish a system to study the molecular profile of PrP/SC differentiation, proliferation, and senescence, and they point to an important new role for IL1α in vitamin D3 signaling in prostate progenitor/stem cells. PMID:21653679

  14. Mutations and polymorphisms in the gene encoding regulatory subunit type 1-alpha of protein kinase A (PRKAR1A): an update.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Anélia; Bertherat, Jérôme; Groussin, Lionel; Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Tsang, Kitman; Cazabat, Laure; Libé, Rosella; Remmers, Elaine; René-Corail, Fernande; Faucz, Fabio Rueda; Clauser, Eric; Calender, Alain; Bertagna, Xavier; Carney, J Aidan; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-04-01

    PRKAR1A encodes the regulatory subunit type 1-alpha (RIalpha) of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Inactivating PRKAR1A mutations are known to be responsible for the multiple neoplasia and lentiginosis syndrome Carney complex (CNC). To date, at least 117 pathogenic variants in PRKAR1A have been identified (online database: http://prkar1a.nichd.nih.gov). The majority are subject to nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD), leading to RIalpha haploinsufficiency and, as a result, activated cAMP signaling. Recently, it became apparent that CNC may be caused not only by RIalpha haploinsufficiency, but also by the expression of altered RIalpha protein, as proven by analysis of expressed mutations in the gene, consisting of amino acid substitutions and in-frame genetic alterations. In addition, a new subgroup of mutations that potentially escape NMD and result in CNC through altered (rather than missing) protein has been analyzed-these are frame-shifts in the 3' end of the coding sequence that shift the stop codon downstream of the normal one. The mutation detection rate in CNC patients is recently estimated at above 60%; PRKAR1A mutation-negative CNC patients are characterized by significant phenotypic heterogeneity. In this report, we present a comprehensive analysis of all presently known PRKAR1A sequence variations and discuss their molecular context and clinical phenotype. PMID:20358582

  15. Romance of the three kingdoms: RORgammat allies with HIF1alpha against FoxP3 in regulating T cell metabolism and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tsun, Andy; Chen, Zuojia; Li, Bin

    2011-10-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells play an essential role in immune homeostasis by controlling the function of various immune effector cells, including RAR-related orphan receptor gammat(+) (RORγt(+)) T helper 17 (Th17) cells. Foekhead box P(3) (FoxP(3)) is the master regulator of Treg cell function, while RORγt is the key transcription factor for the induction of the interleukin (IL)-17 family of cytokines during Th17 cell differentiation. FoxP3 can directly interact with and negatively regulate the function of RORγt, to determine the balance between induced Treg (iTreg) and Th17 cell polarization. Two recent independent studies from the Pan and Chi Labs have shown how hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1α) is able to tip the balance of T cell differentiation toward the Th17 lineage by responding to the local changes in metabolic shift or an increase in proinflammatory mediators in the microenvironment. By allying with HIF1α, RORγt wins the fight against FoxP3 and Treg cell commitment.

  16. Effects of thyroid status on the characteristics of alpha sub 1 -, alpha sub 2 -, beta, imipramine and GABA receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Sandrini, M.; Marrama, D.; Vergoni, A.V.; Bertolini, A. )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of a chronic treatment with L-triiodothyronine or with propylthiouracil on the characteristics of alpha{sub 1}, alpha{sub 2}, beta, imipramine and GABA binding sites in different brain areas of the adult rat have been studied. T{sub 3}-treatment caused an increase in the number of ({sup 3}H)dihydroalprenolol and a decrease in the number of ({sup 3}H)muscimol binding sites in the cerebral cortex. PTU-treatment caused a decrease in the number of ({sup 3}H)prazosin, ({sup 3}H)yohimbine and ({sup 3}H)dihydroalprenolol binding sites in the cerebral cortex, while the number of ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding sites was reduced in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus, and increased in the hippocampus. Affinity constants were never modified. Concurrent experiments showed that the in vitro addition of T{sub 3} and PTU did not influence the binding of any of the ligands employed to control rat brain membranes. The present data further support the view that neurotransmission in the CNS is influenced by the thyroid status.

  17. Allicin inhibits SDF-1alpha-induced T cell interactions with fibronectin and endothelial cells by down-regulating cytoskeleton rearrangement, Pyk-2 phosphorylation and VLA-4 expression.

    PubMed

    Sela, Uri; Ganor, Sharon; Hecht, Iris; Brill, Alexander; Miron, Talia; Rabinkov, Aharon; Wilchek, Meir; Mirelman, David; Lider, Ofer; Hershkoviz, Rami

    2004-04-01

    Allicin, a major ingredient of fresh garlic extract that is produced during the crushing of garlic cloves, exerts various beneficial biological effects, including a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, antihyperlipidaemic and antihypertensive effects. However, how allicin affects the immune system is less well known, and its effect on human T cells has never been studied. Here, we examined the in-vitro effects of allicin on the functioning of T cells related to their entry to inflamed extravascular sites. We found that allicin (20-100 microm) inhibits the SDF-1alpha (CXCL12)-induced T cell migration through fibronectin (FN), and that this inhibition is mediated by the down-regulation of (i) the reorganization of cortical actin and the subsequent T cell polarization, and (ii) T cell adhesion to FN. Moreover, allicin also inhibited T cell adhesion to endothelial cells and transendothelial migration. The mechanisms underlying these inhibitory effects of allicin are associated with its ability to down-regulate the phosphorylation of Pyk2, an intracellular member of the focal adhesion kinases, and to reduce the expression of the VCAM-1- and FN-specific alpha4beta1-integrin (VLA-4). The ability of allicin to down-regulate these chemokine-induced and VLA-4-mediated T cell functions explains its beneficial biological effects in processes where T cells play an important role and suggests that allicin may be used therapeutically with chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:15056375

  18. Interactions between 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 and residues in the ligand-binding pocket of the vitamin D receptor: a correlated fragment molecular orbital study.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Kenji; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Makishima, Makoto; Yamada, Sachiko

    2010-07-01

    To provide physicochemical insight into the role of each residue in the ligand-binding pocket (LBP) of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), we evaluated the energies of the interactions between the LBP residues and 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 by using an ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method at the Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2) level. This FMO-MP2 method can be used to correctly evaluate both electrostatic and van der Waals dispersion interactions, and it affords these interaction energies separately. We deduced the nature of each interaction and determined the importance of all the LBP residues involved in ligand recognition by the VDR. We previously reported the results of alanine-scanning mutational analysis (ASMA) of all 34 non-alanine residues lining the LBP of the human VDR. The theoretical results in combination with the ASMA results enabled us to assign the role of each LBP residue. We concluded that electrostatic interactions are the major determinant of the ligand-binding activity and ligand recognition specificity and that van der Waals interactions are important for protein folding and, in turn, for cofactor binding.

  19. Romance of the three kingdoms: RORgammat allies with HIF1alpha against FoxP3 in regulating T cell metabolism and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tsun, Andy; Chen, Zuojia; Li, Bin

    2011-10-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells play an essential role in immune homeostasis by controlling the function of various immune effector cells, including RAR-related orphan receptor gammat(+) (RORγt(+)) T helper 17 (Th17) cells. Foekhead box P(3) (FoxP(3)) is the master regulator of Treg cell function, while RORγt is the key transcription factor for the induction of the interleukin (IL)-17 family of cytokines during Th17 cell differentiation. FoxP3 can directly interact with and negatively regulate the function of RORγt, to determine the balance between induced Treg (iTreg) and Th17 cell polarization. Two recent independent studies from the Pan and Chi Labs have shown how hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1α) is able to tip the balance of T cell differentiation toward the Th17 lineage by responding to the local changes in metabolic shift or an increase in proinflammatory mediators in the microenvironment. By allying with HIF1α, RORγt wins the fight against FoxP3 and Treg cell commitment. PMID:22058032

  20. Assignment of human elongation factor 1{alpha} genes: EEF1A maps to chromosome 6q14 and EEF1A2 to 20q13.3

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, A.; Clark, B.; Knudsen, S.M.

    1996-09-01

    The human elongation factor 1 {alpha} gene family consists of at least 2 actively transcribed genes, EEF1A and EEF1A2, and more than 18 homologous loci. EEF1A2 is expressed ubiquitously, and both of them can function in translation. An EEF1A cDNA probe has previously been shown to cross-hybridize with several human chromosomes, but the location of the functional gene has not been established. We have mapped the functional EEF1A gene to 6q14 by combined fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR analysis of a somatic cell hybrid panel and mapped EEF1A2 to 20q13.3 by FISH. In addition, the 11 strongest cross-hybridizing loci (EEF1AL2-EEF1AL13) were mapped by FISH to 12p12, 9q34, 7p15-p21, 19q13, 3q26-q27, 7q33-q35, 1p13-p22, 2q12-q14, 5p12-q11, 1q31-q32, and Xq21. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. In Vivo Therapeutic Silencing of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Alpha (HIF-1α) Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Noncovalently Coated with siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey; Cherukuri, Paul; Kingston, John; Cognet, Laurent; Lemos, Robert; Leeuw, Tonya K.; Gumbiner-Russo, Laura; Weisman, R. Bruce; Powis, Garth

    2009-01-01

    A new approach is described for delivering small interfering RNA (siRNA) into cancer cells by noncovalently complexing unmodified siRNA with pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The complexes were prepared by simple sonication of pristine SWCNTs in a solution of siRNA, which then served both as the cargo and as the suspending agent for the SWCNTs. When complexes containing siRNA targeted to hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) were added to cells growing in serum containing culture media, there was strong specific inhibition of cellular HIF-1α activity. The ability to obtain a biological response to SWCNT/siRNA complexes was seen in a wide variety of cancer cell types. Moreover, intratumoral administration of SWCNT-HIF-1α siRNA complexes in mice bearing MiaPaCa-2/HRE tumors significantly inhibited the activity of tumor HIF-1α. As elevated levels of HIF-1α are found in many human cancers and are associated with resistance to therapy and decreased patient survival, these results imply that SWCNT/siRNA complexes may have value as therapeutic agents. PMID:20052401

  2. Coenzyme Q and Mitochondrial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinzii, Catarina M.; Hirano, Michio

    2010-01-01

    Coenzyme Q[subscript 10] (CoQ[subscript 10]) is an essential electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and an important antioxidant. Deficiency of CoQ[subscript 10] is a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous syndrome, which, to date, has been found to be autosomal recessive in inheritance and generally responsive to CoQ[subscript…

  3. Modeling of Mitochondrial Donut Formation

    PubMed Central

    Long, Qi; Zhao, Danyun; Fan, Weimin; Yang, Liang; Zhou, Yanshuang; Qi, Juntao; Wang, Xin; Liu, Xingguo

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic cell organelles. Continual cycles of fusion and fission play an important role in mitochondrial metabolism and cellular signaling. Previously, a novel mitochondrial morphology, the donut, was reported in cells after hypoxia-reoxygenation or osmotic pressure changes. However, the mechanism of donut formation remained elusive. Here, we obtained the distribution of donut diameters (D = 2R) and found that 95% are >0.8 μm. We also performed highly precise measurements of the mitochondrial tubule diameters using superresolution and electron microscopy. Then, we set up a model by calculating the mitochondrial bending energy and osmotic potential during donut formation. It shows that the bending energy is increased as the radius of curvature, R, gets smaller in the process of donut formation, especially for radii <0.4 μm, creating a barrier to donut formation. The calculations also show that osmotic potential energy release can balance the rising bending energy through volume expansion. Finally, we revealed the donut formation process in a Gibbs free-energy-dependent model combining calculations and measurements. PMID:26331247

  4. Historical Perspective on Mitochondrial Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMauro, Salvatore; Garone, Caterina

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we trace the origins and follow the development of mitochondrial medicine from the premolecular era (1962-1988) based on clinical clues, muscle morphology, and biochemistry into the molecular era that started in 1988 and is still advancing at a brisk pace. We have tried to stress conceptual advances, such as endosymbiosis,…

  5. Computational Modeling of Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Cortassa, Sonia; Aon, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    The advent of techniques with the ability to scan massive changes in cellular makeup (genomics, proteomics, etc.) has revealed the compelling need for analytical methods to interpret and make sense of those changes. Computational models built on sound physico-chemical mechanistic basis are unavoidable at the time of integrating, interpreting, and simulating high-throughput experimental data. Another powerful role of computational models is predicting new behavior provided they are adequately validated. Mitochondrial energy transduction has been traditionally studied with thermodynamic models. More recently, kinetic or thermo-kinetic models have been proposed, leading the path toward an understanding of the control and regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism and its interaction with cytoplasmic and other compartments. In this work, we outline the methods, step-by-step, that should be followed to build a computational model of mitochondrial energetics in isolation or integrated to a network of cellular processes. Depending on the question addressed by the modeler, the methodology explained herein can be applied with different levels of detail, from the mitochondrial energy producing machinery in a network of cellular processes to the dynamics of a single enzyme during its catalytic cycle. PMID:22057575

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal diseases.