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Sample records for 1b subgenomic replicon

  1. Construction and characterization of poliovirus subgenomic replicons.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G; Racaniello, V R

    1988-05-01

    Poliovirus RNAs containing in-frame deletions within the capsid-coding region were produced by in vitro transcription of altered poliovirus type 1 cDNA by using bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Three RNAs were transcribed that contained deletions of 2,317 nucleotides (bases 747 to 3064), 1,781 nucleotides (bases 1,175 to 2,956), and 1,295 nucleotides (bases 1,175 to 2,470). All three subgenomic RNAs replicated after transfection into HeLa cells, demonstrating that sequences encoding the capsid polypeptides are not essential for viral RNA replication in vivo. Viral RNA containing the largest deletion (R1) replicated approximately three times better than full-length RNA produced in vitro. Northern blot (RNA blot) hybridization analysis of total cellular RNA from HeLa cells at different times after transfection with R1 demonstrated the presence of increasing amounts of the expected 5.1-kilobase subgenomic RNA. Analysis by immunoprecipitation of viral proteins induced after transfection of R1 RNA into HeLa cells revealed the presence of proteins 2Apro, 2C, and 3Dpol and its precursors, suggesting that the polyprotein cleavages are similar to those occurring in virus-infected cells. Replication of P2/Lansing virion RNA was inhibited by cotransfection with the R1 replicon, as demonstrated by hybridization analysis with a serotype-specific oligonucleotide probe. A higher level of inhibition of RNA replication was observed when P2/Lansing RNA was cotransfected into HeLa cells with truncated R1 transcripts (R1-PvuII) that were missing 395 3' nucleotides and a poly(A) tail. These internally and terminally deleted RNAs inhibited the replication of subgenomic replicons R1, R2, and R3 and caused a reduction in plaque size when cotransfected with P1/Mahoney or P2/Lansing viral RNA, suggesting that individual cells had received both RNAs. No inhibition of plaque size was observed when replicon RNAs were used that were missing 1,384 or 1,839 3' nucleotides or contained plasmid

  2. Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 5a Subgenomic Replicons for Evaluation of Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wose Kinge, Constance N.; Espiritu, Christine; Prabdial-Sing, Nishi; Sithebe, Nomathamsaqa Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) exists as six major genotypes that differ in geographical distribution, pathogenesis, and response to antiviral therapy. In vitro replication systems for all HCV genotypes except genotype 5 have been reported. In this study, we recovered genotype 5a full-length genomes from four infected voluntary blood donors in South Africa and established a G418-selectable subgenomic replicon system using one of these strains. The replicon derived from the wild-type sequence failed to replicate in Huh-7.5 cells. However, the inclusion of the S2205I amino acid substitution, a cell culture-adaptive change originally described for a genotype 1b replicon, resulted in a small number of G418-resistant cell colonies. HCV RNA replication in these cells was confirmed by quantification of viral RNA and detection of the nonstructural protein NS5A. Sequence analysis of the viral RNAs isolated from multiple independent cell clones revealed the presence of several nonsynonymous mutations, which were localized mainly in the NS3 protein. These mutations, when introduced back into the parental backbone, significantly increased colony formation. To facilitate convenient monitoring of HCV RNA replication levels, the mutant with the highest replication level was further modified to express a fusion protein of firefly luciferase and neomycin phosphotransferase. Using such replicons from genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, 4a, and 5a, we compared the effects of various HCV inhibitors on their replication. In conclusion, we have established an in vitro replication system for HCV genotype 5a, which will be useful for the development of pan-genotype anti-HCV compounds. PMID:24982066

  3. Cell-Free Replication of the Hepatitis C Virus Subgenomic Replicon

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naushad; Tardif, Keith D.; Siddiqui, Aleem

    2002-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) contains a plus-strand RNA genome. The 5′ noncoding region (NCR) of the viral genome functions as an internal ribosome entry site, and its unique 3′ NCR is required for the assembly of the replication complex during initiation of HCV RNA replication. Lohmann et al. (V. Lohmann, F. Korner, J.-O. Koch, U. Herian, L. Theilman, and R. Batenschlager, Science 285:110-113, 1999) developed a subgenomic HCV replicon system, which represents an important tool in studying HCV replication in cultured cells. In this study, we describe a cell-free replication system that utilizes cytoplasmic lysates prepared from Huh-7 cells harboring the HCV subgenomic replicons. These lysates, which contain ribonucleoprotein complexes associated with cellular membranes, were capable of incorporating [α32P]CTP into newly synthesized RNA from subgenomic replicons in vitro. Replicative forms (RFs) and replicative intermediates (RIs) were synthesized from the endogenous HCV RNA templates. Consistent with previous observations, RFs were found to be resistant to RNase A digestion, whereas RIs were sensitive to RNase treatment. The radiolabeled HCV RF-RI complexes contained both minus and plus strands and were specific to the lysates derived from replicon-expressing cells. The availability of a cell-free replication system offers opportunities to probe the mechanism(s) of HCV replication. It also provides a novel assay for potential therapeutic agents. PMID:12414942

  4. Hepatitis C Virus Subgenomic Replicons Induce Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Activating an Intracellular Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tardif, Keith D.; Mori, Kazutoshi; Siddiqui, Aleem

    2002-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicates from a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. The replication activities of the HCV subgenomic replicon are shown here to induce ER stress. In response to this stress, cells expressing HCV replicons induce the unfolded protein response (UPR), an ER-to-nucleus intracellular signaling pathway. The UPR is initiated by the proteolytic cleavage of a transmembrane protein, ATF6. The resulting cytoplasmic protein fragment of ATF6 functions as a transcription factor in the nucleus and activates selective genes required for an ER stress response. ATF6 activation leads to increased transcriptional levels of GRP78, an ER luminal chaperone protein. However, the overall level of GRP78 protein is decreased. While ER stress is also known to affect translational attenuation, cells expressing HCV replicons have lower levels of phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2. Interestingly, cap-independent internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation directed by the 5′ noncoding region of HCV and GRP78 is activated in cells expressing HCV replicons. These studies provide insight into the effects of HCV replication on intracellular events and the mechanisms underlying liver pathogenesis. PMID:12097557

  5. Subgenomic HCV RNA decline during interferon-a treatment is biphasic and dose dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S; Dahari, Harel; Sainz, Bruno; Uprichard, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Although replicon systems have been extensively used to investigate interferon-{alpha} (IFN) treatment a detailed description of genotype -1 b-HCV -sub-genomic replicon (sg 1 b) kinetics in the presence of IFN is still missing. Here, we sought to analyze sg 1 b under various IFN concentrations and define its decay patterns.

  6. Construction of a subgenomic CV-B3 replicon expressing emerald green fluorescent protein to assess viral replication of a cardiotropic enterovirus strain in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Wehbe, Michel; Huguenin, Antoine; Leveque, Nicolas; Semler, Bert L; Hamze, Monzer; Andreoletti, Laurent; Bouin, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    Coxsackieviruses B (CV-B) (Picornaviridae) are a common infectious cause of acute myocarditis in children and young adults, a disease, which is a precursor to 10-20% of chronic myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) cases. The mechanisms involved in the disease progression from acute to chronic myocarditis phase and toward the DCM clinical stage are not fully understood but are influenced by both viral and host factors. Subgenomic replicons of CV-B can be used to assess viral replication mechanisms in human cardiac cells and evaluate the effects of potential antiviral drugs on viral replication activities. Our objectives were to generate a reporter replicon from a cardiotropic prototype CV-B3/28 strain and to characterize its replication properties into human cardiac primary cells. To obtain this replicon, a cDNA plasmid containing the full CV-B3/28 genome flanked by a hammerhead ribozyme sequence and an MluI restriction site was generated and used as a platform for the insertion of sequences encoding emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP) in place of those encoding VP3. In vitro transcribed RNA from this plasmid was transfected into HeLa cells and human primary cardiac cells and was able to produce EmGFP and VP1-containing polypeptides. Moreover, non-structural protein biological activity was assessed by the specific cleavage of eIF4G1 by viral 2A(pro). Viral RNA replication was indirectly demonstrated by inhibition assays, fluoxetine was added to cell culture and prevented the EmGFP synthesis. Our results indicated that the EmGFP CV-B3 replicon was able to replicate and translate as well as the CV-B3/28 prototype strain. Our EmGFP CV-B3 replicon will be a valuable tool to readily investigate CV-B3 replication activities in human target cell models. PMID:26800776

  7. Construction of an infectious molecular clone of Japanese encephalitis virus genotype V and its derivative subgenomic replicon capable of expressing a foreign gene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Abe, Makoto; Masuda, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) genotype V was originally isolated in Malaysia in 1952 and has long been restricted to the area. In 2009, sudden emergence of the genotype V in China and Korea was reported, suggesting expansion of its geographical distribution. Although studies on the genotype V are becoming more important, they have been limited partly due to lack of its infectious molecular clone. In this study, a plasmid carrying cDNA corresponding to the entire genome of JEV Muar strain, which belongs to genotype V, in the downstream of T7 promoter was constructed. Electroporation of viral RNA transcribed by T7 RNA polymerase (T7RNAP) in vitro from the plasmid led to production of progeny viruses both in mammalian and mosquito cells. Also, transfection of the infectious clone plasmid into mammalian cells expressing T7RNAP transiently or stably was demonstrated to generate infectious progenies. When the viral structural protein genes were partially deleted from the full-length cDNA, the subgenomic RNA transcribed in vitro from the modified plasmid was shown to replicate itself in mammalian cells as a replicon. The replicon carrying the firefly luciferase gene in place of the deleted structural protein genes was also shown to efficiently replicate itself and express luciferase in mammalian cells. Compared with the replicon derived from JEV genotype III (Nakayama strain), the genotype V-derived replicon appeared to be more tolerant to introduction of a foreign gene. The infectious clone and the replicons constructed in this study may serve as useful tools for characterizing JEV genotype V. PMID:25451067

  8. A zebrafish model for subgenomic hepatitis C virus replication.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cun-Bao; Zhao, Ye; Zhang, Jing-Pu; Peng, Zong-Gen; Song, Dan-Qing; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2015-03-01

    Persistent infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major risk factor in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The elucidation of the pathogenesis of HCV-associated liver disease is hampered by the absence of an appropriate small animal model. Zebrafish exhibits high genetic homology to mammals, and is easily manipulated experimentally. In this study, we describe the use of a zebrafish model for the analysis of HCV replication mechanisms. As the 5' untranslated region (UTR), the core protein, the non-structural protein 5B (NS5B) and the 3'UTR are essential for HCV replication, we constructed a HCV sub-replicon gene construct including the 4 gene sequences and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene; these genes were transcribed through the mouse hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (mHNF4) promoter. By microinjection of the subgenomic replicon vector into zebrafish larvae, the virus was easily detected by observing EGFP fluorescence in the liver. The positive core and NS5B signals showed positive expression of the HCV gene construct in zebrafish by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis. Importantly, the negative strand sequence of the HCV subgenomic RNA was detected by RT-PCR and hybridization in situ, demonstrating that the HCV sub-replicon has positive replication activity. Furthermore, the hybridization signal mainly appeared in the liver region of larvae, as detected by the sense probe of the core protein or NS5B, which confirmed that the sub-replicon amplification occurred in the zebrafish liver. The amplification of the sub-replicon caused alterations in the expression of certain genes, which is similar to HCV infection in human liver cells. To verify the use of this zebrafish model in drug evaluation, two drugs against HCV used in clinical practice, ribavirin and oxymatrine, were tested and these drugs showed significant inhibition of replication of the HCV sub-replicon in the larvae. In

  9. Proanthocyanidin from Blueberry Leaves Suppresses Expression of Subgenomic Hepatitis C Virus RNA*

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Masahiko; Ishida, Yo-ichi; Akamatsu, Ena; Ohmori, Yusuke; Sudoh, Masayuki; Uto, Hirofumi; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Kataoka, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease such as chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. While searching for new natural anti-HCV agents in agricultural products, we found a potent inhibitor of HCV RNA expression in extracts of blueberry leaves when examined in an HCV subgenomic replicon cell culture system. This activity was observed in a methanol extract fraction of blueberry leaves and was purified by repeated fractionations in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The final purified fraction showed a 63-fold increase in specific activity compared with the initial methanol extracts and was composed only of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Liquid chromatography/mass-ion trap-time of flight analysis and butanol-HCl hydrolysis analysis of the purified fraction revealed that the blueberry leaf-derived inhibitor was proanthocyanidin. Furthermore, structural analysis using acid thiolysis indicated that the mean degree of polymerization of the purified proanthocyanidin was 7.7, consisting predominantly of epicatechin. Proanthocyanidin with a polymerization degree of 8 to 9 showed the greatest potency at inhibiting the expression of subgenomic HCV RNA. Purified proanthocyanidin showed dose-dependent inhibition of expression of the neomycin-resistant gene and the NS-3 protein gene in the HCV subgenome in replicon cells. While characterizing the mechanism by which proanthocyanidin inhibited HCV subgenome expression, we found that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 showed affinity to blueberry leaf-derived proanthocyanidin and was indispensable for HCV subgenome expression in replicon cells. These data suggest that proanthocyanidin isolated from blueberry leaves may have potential usefulness as an anti-HCV compound by inhibiting viral replication. PMID:19531480

  10. Proanthocyanidin from blueberry leaves suppresses expression of subgenomic hepatitis C virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Masahiko; Ishida, Yo-Ichi; Akamatsu, Ena; Ohmori, Yusuke; Sudoh, Masayuki; Uto, Hirofumi; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Kataoka, Hiroaki

    2009-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease such as chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. While searching for new natural anti-HCV agents in agricultural products, we found a potent inhibitor of HCV RNA expression in extracts of blueberry leaves when examined in an HCV subgenomic replicon cell culture system. This activity was observed in a methanol extract fraction of blueberry leaves and was purified by repeated fractionations in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The final purified fraction showed a 63-fold increase in specific activity compared with the initial methanol extracts and was composed only of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Liquid chromatography/mass-ion trap-time of flight analysis and butanol-HCl hydrolysis analysis of the purified fraction revealed that the blueberry leaf-derived inhibitor was proanthocyanidin. Furthermore, structural analysis using acid thiolysis indicated that the mean degree of polymerization of the purified proanthocyanidin was 7.7, consisting predominantly of epicatechin. Proanthocyanidin with a polymerization degree of 8 to 9 showed the greatest potency at inhibiting the expression of subgenomic HCV RNA. Purified proanthocyanidin showed dose-dependent inhibition of expression of the neomycin-resistant gene and the NS-3 protein gene in the HCV subgenome in replicon cells. While characterizing the mechanism by which proanthocyanidin inhibited HCV subgenome expression, we found that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 showed affinity to blueberry leaf-derived proanthocyanidin and was indispensable for HCV subgenome expression in replicon cells. These data suggest that proanthocyanidin isolated from blueberry leaves may have potential usefulness as an anti-HCV compound by inhibiting viral replication. PMID:19531480

  11. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Van't Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  12. Hepatitis C Virus RNA Elimination and Development of Resistance in Replicon Cells Treated with BMS-790052

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunfu; Huang, Haichang; Valera, Lourdes; Sun, Jin-Hua; O'Boyle, Donald R.; Nower, Peter T.; Jia, Lingling; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Xin; Altaf, Aneela; Gao, Min

    2012-01-01

    BMS-790052, a first-in-class hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication complex inhibitor, targeting nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A), displays picomolar to nanomolar potency against genotypes 1 to 5. This exceptional potency translated into robust anti-HCV activity in clinical studies with HCV genotype 1-infected subjects. To date, all BMS-790052-associated resistance mutations have mapped to the N-terminal region of NS5A. To further characterize the antiviral activity of BMS-790052, HCV replicon elimination and colony formation assays were performed. Replicon was cleared from genotype 1a and 1b replicon cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Elimination of the genotype 1a replicon required longer treatment durations and higher concentrations of BMS-790052 than those for the genotype1b replicon. Single amino acid substitutions that conferred relatively low levels of resistance were observed at early time points and at low doses. Higher doses and longer treatment durations yielded mutations that conferred greater levels of resistance, including linked amino acid substitutions. Replicon cells that survived inhibitor treatment remained fully sensitivity to pegylated alpha interferon (pegIFN-α) and other HCV inhibitors. Moreover, genotype 1a replicon elimination was markedly enhanced when pegIFN-α and BMS-790052 were combined. Resistant variants observed in this study were very similar to those observed in a multiple ascending dose (MAD) monotherapy trial of BMS-790052, validating replicon elimination studies as a model to predict clinical resistance. Insights gained from the in vitro anti-HCV activity and resistance profiles of BMS-790052 will be used to help guide the clinical development of this novel HCV inhibitor. PMID:22214777

  13. Rubella virus capsid protein modulation of viral genomic and subgenomic RNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, W.-P.; Frey, Teryl K. . E-mail: tfrey@gsu.edu

    2005-07-05

    The ratio of the subgenomic (SG) to genome RNA synthesized by rubella virus (RUB) replicons expressing the green fluorescent protein reporter gene (RUBrep/GFP) is substantially higher than the ratio of these species synthesized by RUB (4.3 for RUBrep/GFP vs. 1.3-1.4 for RUB). It was hypothesized that this modulation of the viral RNA synthesis was by one of the virus structural protein genes and it was found that introduction of the capsid (C) protein gene into the replicons as an in-frame fusion with GFP resulted in an increase of genomic RNA production (reducing the SG/genome RNA ratio), confirming the hypothesis and showing that the C gene was the moiety responsible for the modulation effect. The N-terminal one-third of the C gene was required for the effect of be exhibited. A similar phenomenon was not observed with the replicons of Sindbis virus, a related Alphavirus. Interestingly, modulation was not observed when RUBrep/GFP was co-transfected with either other RUBrep or plasmid constructs expressing the C gene, demonstrating that modulation could occur only when the C gene was provided in cis. Mutations that prevented translation of the C protein failed to modulate RNA synthesis, indicating that the C protein was the moiety responsible for modulation; consistent with this conclusion, modulation of RNA synthesis was maintained when synonymous codon mutations were introduced at the 5' end of the C gene that changed the C gene sequence without altering the amino acid sequence of the C protein. These results indicate that C protein translated in proximity of viral replication complexes, possibly from newly synthesized SG RNA, participate in regulating the replication of viral RNA.

  14. Ecological adaptation determines functional mammalian olfactory subgenomes

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Sara; Bekaert, Michaël; Crider, Tess A.; Mariani, Stefano; Murphy, William J.; Teeling, Emma C.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to smell is governed by the largest gene family in mammalian genomes, the olfactory receptor (OR) genes. Although these genes are well annotated in the finished human and mouse genomes, we still do not understand which receptors bind specific odorants or how they fully function. Previous comparative studies have been taxonomically limited and mostly focused on the percentage of OR pseudogenes within species. No study has investigated the adaptive changes of functional OR gene families across phylogenetically and ecologically diverse mammals. To determine the extent to which OR gene repertoires have been influenced by habitat, sensory specialization, and other ecological traits, to better understand the functional importance of specific OR gene families and thus the odorants they bind, we compared the functional OR gene repertoires from 50 mammalian genomes. We amplified more than 2000 OR genes in aquatic, semi-aquatic, and flying mammals and coupled these data with 48,000 OR genes from mostly terrestrial mammals, extracted from genomic projects. Phylogenomic, Bayesian assignment, and principle component analyses partitioned species by ecotype (aquatic, semi-aquatic, terrestrial, flying) rather than phylogenetic relatedness, and identified OR families important for each habitat. Functional OR gene repertoires were reduced independently in the multiple origins of aquatic mammals and were significantly divergent in bats. We reject recent neutralist views of olfactory subgenome evolution and correlate specific OR gene families with physiological requirements, a preliminary step toward unraveling the relationship between specific odors and respective OR gene families. PMID:19952139

  15. Characterization of cell lines stably transfected with rubella virus replicons

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Xu, Jie; Frey, Teryl K.

    2012-07-20

    Rubella virus (RUBV) replicons expressing a drug resistance gene and a gene of interest were used to select cell lines uniformly harboring the replicon. Replicons expressing GFP and a virus capsid protein GFP fusion (C-GFP) were compared. Vero or BHK cells transfected with either replicon survived drug selection and grew into a monolayer. However, survival was {approx}9-fold greater following transfection with the C-GFP-replicon than with the GFP-expressing replicon and while the C-GFP-replicon cells grew similarly to non-transfected cells, the GFP-replicon cells grew slower. Neither was due to the ability of the CP to enhance RNA synthesis but survival during drug selection was correlated with the ability of CP to inhibit apoptosis. Additionally, C-GFP-replicon cells were not cured of the replicon in the absence of drug selection. Interferon-alpha suppressed replicon RNA and protein synthesis, but did not cure the cells, explaining in part the ability of RUBV to establish persistent infections.

  16. chr genes from adaptive replicons are responsible for chromate resistance by Burkholderia xenovorans LB400.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Gallegos, Rosa I; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Cervantes, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    The chromate ion transporter (CHR) superfamily includes proteins that confer chromate resistance by extruding toxic chromate ions from cytoplasm. Burkholderia xenovorans strain LB400 encodes six CHR homologues in its multireplicon genome and has been reported as highly chromate-resistant. The objective of this work was to analyze the involvement of chr redundant genes in chromate resistance by LB400. It was found that B. xenovorans plant rhizosphere strains lacking the megaplasmid are chromate-sensitive, suggesting that the chr gene present in this replicon is responsible for the chromate-resistance phenotype of the LB400 strain. Transformation of a chromate-sensitive B. xenovorans strain with each of the six cloned LB400 chr genes showed that genes from 'adaptive replicons' (chrA1b and chr1NCb from chromosome 2 and chrA2 from the megaplasmid) conferred higher chromate resistance levels than chr genes from 'central' chromosome 1 (chrA1a, chrA6, and chr1NCa). An LB400 insertion mutant affected in the chrA2 gene displayed a chromate-sensitive phenotype, which was fully reverted by transferring the chrA2 wild-type gene, and partially reverted by chrA1b or chr1NCb genes. These data indicate that chr genes from adaptive replicons, mainly chrA2 from the megaplasmid, are responsible for the B. xenovorans LB400 chromate-resistance phenotype. PMID:26873556

  17. Model-driven engineering of gene expression from RNA replicons.

    PubMed

    Beal, Jacob; Wagner, Tyler E; Kitada, Tasuku; Azizgolshani, Odisse; Parker, Jordan Moberg; Densmore, Douglas; Weiss, Ron

    2015-01-16

    RNA replicons are an emerging platform for engineering synthetic biological systems. Replicons self-amplify, can provide persistent high-level expression of proteins even from a small initial dose, and, unlike DNA vectors, pose minimal risk of chromosomal integration. However, no quantitative model sufficient for engineering levels of protein expression from such replicon systems currently exists. Here, we aim to enable the engineering of multigene expression from more than one species of replicon by creating a computational model based on our experimental observations of the expression dynamics in single- and multireplicon systems. To this end, we studied fluorescent protein expression in baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells using a replicon derived from Sindbis virus (SINV). We characterized expression dynamics for this platform based on the dose-response of a single species of replicon over 50 h and on a titration of two cotransfected replicons expressing different fluorescent proteins. From this data, we derive a quantitative model of multireplicon expression and validate it by designing a variety of three-replicon systems, with profiles that match desired expression levels. We achieved a mean error of 1.7-fold on a 1000-fold range, thus demonstrating how our model can be applied to precisely control expression levels of each Sindbis replicon species in a system. PMID:24877739

  18. Discovery of SCH446211 (SCH6): A New Ketoamide Inhibitor of the HCV NS3 Serine Protease and HCV Subgenomic RNA Replication

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, Stephane L.; Arasappan, Ashok; Bennett, Frank; Chen, Kevin; Jao, Edwin; Liu, Yi-Tsung; Lovey, Raymond G.; Venkatraman, Srikanth; Pan, Weidong; Parekh, Tajel; Pike, Russel E.; Ruan, Sumei; Liu, Rong; Baroudy, Bahige; Agrawal, Sony; Chase, Robert; Ingravallo, Paul; Pichardo, John; Prongay, Andrew; Brisson, Jean-Marc; Hsieh, Tony Y.; Cheng, Kuo-Chi; Kemp, Scott J.; Levy, Odile E.; Lim-Wilby, Marguerita; Tamura, Susan Y.; Saksena, Anil K.; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor; Njoroge, F. George

    2008-06-30

    Introduction of various modified prolines at P{sub 2} and optimization of the P{sub 1} side chain led to the discovery of SCH6 (24, Table 2), a potent ketoamide inhibitor of the HCV NS3 serine protease. In addition to excellent enzyme potency (K*{sub i} = 3.8 nM), 24 was also found to be a potent inhibitor of HCV subgenomic RNA replication with IC{sub 50} and IC{sub 90} of 40 and 100 nM, respectively. Recently, antiviral activity of 24 was demonstrated with inhibition of the full-length genotype 2a HCV genome. In addition, 24 was found to restore the responsiveness of the interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) in cells containing HCV RNA replicons.

  19. Visualization of DNA replicons by image cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gratzner, H.G. )

    1993-01-01

    Replication of DNA in eukaryotic organisms proceeds bidirectionally along the double helix in replicon substructures. The process can be visualized by autoradiography of spreads of genomic DNA from lysed, whole cells which have been incubated with radioactive DNA precursors. The objective of the present study was to develop techniques to measure DNA strand initiation and elongation using immunofluorescence and image cytometry. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured for 3 days with PHA and then pulsed for 5 or 15 minutes with iododeoxyuridine. Chromatin spreads were then produced on microscope slides by lysing with detergent and slides were immunofluorescently stained by an indirect anti-BrdU technique. Individual replicons of mammalian cells were visualized by immunofluorescence at high resolution and digital images were analyzed to determine the rates of elongation as well as initiation parameters. Elongation rates by the method were approximately 1 [mu]M/min. The methods are applicable to visualization and quantitation of the effects of radiation or other agents on DNA damage or repair.

  20. Multiple replicons constituting the genome of Pseudomonas cepacia 17616.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, H P; Lessie, T G

    1994-01-01

    Macrorestriction fragment analysis of DNA from Pseudomonas cepacia 17616, in conjunction with Southern hybridization experiments using junction fragments containing rare restriction enzyme sites as probes, indicated that this bacterium contains three large circular replicons of 3.4, 2.5, and 0.9 megabases (Mb). Inclusion of the 170-kb cryptic plasmid present in this strain gave an overall estimate of genome size of 7 Mb. Other Southern hybridization experiments indicated that the three large replicons contained rRNA genes as well as insertion sequence elements identified previously in this strain. The distribution of SwaI, PacI, and PmeI sites on the three replicons was determined. A derivative of Tn5-751 carrying a SwaI site was used to inactivate and map genes on the 2.5- and 3.4-Mb replicons. Mutants were isolated in which the 2.5- and 0.9-Mb replicons had been reduced in size to 1.8 and 0.65 Mb, respectively. The loss of DNA from the 2.5-Mb replicon was associated with lysine auxotrophy, beta-lactamase deficiency, and failure to utilize ribitol and trehalose as carbon and energy sources. DNA fragments corresponding in size to randomly linearized forms of the different replicons were detected in unrestricted DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The results provide a framework for further genetic analysis of strain 17616 and for evaluation of the genomic complexities of other P. cepacia isolates. Images PMID:7517389

  1. Plasmid replicon typing of commensal and pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy J; Wannemuehler, Yvonne M; Johnson, Sara J; Logue, Catherine M; White, David G; Doetkott, Curt; Nolan, Lisa K

    2007-03-01

    Despite the critical role of plasmids in horizontal gene transfer, few studies have characterized plasmid relatedness among different bacterial populations. Recently, a multiplex PCR replicon typing protocol was developed for classification of plasmids occurring in members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Here, a simplified version of this replicon typing procedure which requires only three multiplex panels to identify 18 plasmid replicons is described. This method was used to screen 1,015 Escherichia coli isolates of avian, human, and poultry meat origin for plasmid replicon types. Additionally, the isolates were assessed for their content of several colicin-associated genes. Overall, a high degree of plasmid variability was observed, with 221 different profiles occurring among the 1,015 isolates examined. IncFIB plasmids were the most common type identified, regardless of the source type of E. coli. IncFIB plasmids occurred significantly more often in avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) and retail poultry E. coli (RPEC) than in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and avian and human fecal commensal E. coli isolates (AFEC and HFEC, respectively). APEC and RPEC were also significantly more likely than UPEC, HFEC, and AFEC to possess the colicin-associated genes cvaC, cbi, and/or cma in conjunction with one or more plasmid replicons. The results suggest that E. coli isolates contaminating retail poultry are notably similar to APEC with regard to plasmid profiles, with both generally containing multiple plasmid replicon types in conjunction with colicin-related genes. In contrast, UPEC and human and avian commensal E. coli isolates generally lack the plasmid replicons and colicin-related genes seen in APEC and RPEC, suggesting limited dissemination of such plasmids among these bacterial populations. PMID:17277222

  2. Regulation of the CYP1A1 gene by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin but not by beta-naphthoflavone or 3-methylcholanthrene is altered in hepatitis C virus replicon-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Garret R; Hasan, Aliya; Yin, Hao; Qadri, Ishtiaq; Quattrochi, Linda C

    2006-09-01

    Exposure to hepatitis C virus (HCV) can lead to the development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. To examine the effects of long-term HCV infection on hepatic cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression and function, we used a human hepatoma cell line expressing the HCV subgenomic replicon (Huh.8) to evaluate CYP1A1 induction by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). In this study, we demonstrate that the induction of CYP1A1 expression in Huh.8 cells by TCDD but not by beta-naphthoflavone or 3-methylcholanthrene was significantly diminished. TCDD exposure of Huh.8 cells resulted in greater than 55% suppression of CYP1A1 transcription compared with the parent cell line Huh7, whereas protein levels and enzyme activities were further diminished. Suppression of CYP1A1 mRNA expression in TCDD-treated Huh.8 cells was partially reversed after pretreatment with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and nordihydroguaiaretic acid, suggesting a role for oxidative stress. Induced CYP1A1 message, protein, and enzyme activity were partially restored in an Huh7 cell line expressing the HCV replicon containing a deletion in the nonstructural protein NS5A. Furthermore, adenoviral expression of NS5A in Huh7 partially suppressed TCDD-induced CYP1A1 protein and enzyme activity, implicating this protein in the mechanism of suppression. These findings demonstrate that TCDD-mediated AhR signaling is impaired in hepatocytes in which HCV is present and that NS5A alone or in the presence of other nonstructural proteins of the subgenomic replicon is in part responsible. PMID:16788090

  3. Development of a single-replicon miniBYV vector for co-expression of heterologous proteins.

    PubMed

    Prokhnevsky, Alex; Mamedov, Tarlan; Leffet, Brett; Rahimova, Rahila; Ghosh, Ananya; Mett, Vadim; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2015-02-01

    In planta production of recombinant proteins, including vaccine antigens and monoclonal antibodies, continues gaining acceptance. With the broadening range of target proteins, the need for vectors with higher performance is increasing. Here, we have developed a single-replicon vector based on beet yellows virus (BYV) that enables co-delivery of two target genes into the same host cell, resulting in transient expression of each target. This BYV vector maintained genetic stability during systemic spread throughout the host plant, Nicotiana benthamiana. Furthermore, we have engineered a miniBYV vector carrying the sequences encoding heavy and light chains of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against protective antigen (PA) of Bacillius anthracis, and achieved the expression of the full-length functional anti-PA mAb at ~300 mg/kg of fresh leaf tissue. To demonstrate co-expression and functionality of two independent proteins, we cloned the sequences of the Pfs48/45 protein of Plasmodium falciparum and endoglycosidase F (PNGase F) from Flavobacterium meningosepticum into the miniBYV vector under the control of two subgenomic RNA promoters. Agroinfiltration of N. benthamiana with this miniBYV vector resulted in accumulation of biologically active Pfs48/45 that was devoid of N-linked glycosylation and had correct conformation and epitope display. Overall, our findings demonstrate that the new BYV-based vector is capable of co-expressing two functionally active recombinant proteins within the same host cell. PMID:25280556

  4. Epigenetic regulation of subgenome dominance following whole genome triplication in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feng; Sun, Chao; Wu, Jian; Schnable, James; Woodhouse, Margaret R; Liang, Jianli; Cai, Chengcheng; Freeling, Michael; Wang, Xiaowu

    2016-07-01

    Subgenome dominance is an important phenomenon observed in allopolyploids after whole genome duplication, in which one subgenome retains more genes as well as contributes more to the higher expressing gene copy of paralogous genes. To dissect the mechanism of subgenome dominance, we systematically investigated the relationships of gene expression, transposable element (TE) distribution and small RNA targeting, relating to the multicopy paralogous genes generated from whole genome triplication in Brassica rapa. The subgenome dominance was found to be regulated by a relatively stable factor established previously, then inherited by and shared among B. rapa varieties. In addition, we found a biased distribution of TEs between flanking regions of paralogous genes. Furthermore, the 24-nt small RNAs target TEs and are negatively correlated to the dominant expression of individual paralogous gene pairs. The biased distribution of TEs among subgenomes and the targeting of 24-nt small RNAs together produce the dominant expression phenomenon at a subgenome scale. Based on these findings, we propose a bucket hypothesis to illustrate subgenome dominance and hybrid vigor. Our findings and hypothesis are valuable for the evolutionary study of polyploids, and may shed light on studies of hybrid vigor, which is common to most species. PMID:26871271

  5. Olfactory Receptor Subgenomes Linked with Broad Ecological Adaptations in Sauropsida.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Yang, Zhikai; Maldonado, Emanuel; Li, Cai; Zhang, Guojie; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Jarvis, Erich D; O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E; Antunes, Agostinho

    2015-11-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) govern a prime sensory function. Extant birds have distinct olfactory abilities, but the molecular mechanisms underlining diversification and specialization remain mostly unknown. We explored OR diversity in 48 phylogenetic and ecologically diverse birds and 2 reptiles (alligator and green sea turtle). OR subgenomes showed species- and lineage-specific variation related with ecological requirements. Overall 1,953 OR genes were identified in reptiles and 16,503 in birds. The two reptiles had larger OR gene repertoires (989 and 964 genes, respectively) than birds (182-688 genes). Overall, birds had more pseudogenes (7,855) than intact genes (1,944). The alligator had significantly more functional genes than sea turtle, likely because of distinct foraging habits. We found rapid species-specific expansion and positive selection in OR14 (detects hydrophobic compounds) in birds and in OR51 and OR52 (detect hydrophilic compounds) in sea turtle, suggestive of terrestrial and aquatic adaptations, respectively. Ecological partitioning among birds of prey, water birds, land birds, and vocal learners showed that diverse ecological factors determined olfactory ability and influenced corresponding olfactory-receptor subgenome. OR5/8/9 was expanded in predatory birds and alligator, suggesting adaptive specialization for carnivory. OR families 2/13, 51, and 52 were correlated with aquatic adaptations (water birds), OR families 6 and 10 were more pronounced in vocal-learning birds, whereas most specialized land birds had an expanded OR family 14. Olfactory bulb ratio (OBR) and OR gene repertoire were correlated. Birds that forage for prey (carnivores/piscivores) had relatively complex OBR and OR gene repertoires compared with modern birds, including passerines, perhaps due to highly developed cognitive capacities facilitating foraging innovations. PMID:26219582

  6. MULTIPLE REPLICONS CONSTITUTING THE GENOME OF PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA 17616

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macrorestriction fragment analysis of DNA from Pseudomonas cepacia 17616, in conjunction with Southern hybridization experiments using junction n enzyme sites as probes, indicated that this bacterium contains three large circular replicons of 3.4, 2.5, and 0.9 170-kb cryptic plas...

  7. Structural organization of replicon domains during DNA synthetic phase in the mammalian nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, H.; Morita, T.; Sato, C.

    1986-01-01

    In mammalian cells, it has been shown that adjacent multiple DNA replicons, termed a replicon cluster or a replicon domain, are replicated coordinately in a defined temporal order during the DNA synthetic (S) phase. However, no intranuclear structure of this replicon domain has been revealed in the nucleus labelled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine at the limited resolution level of autoradiography. Bu immunofluorescent staining with antibody against 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), we succeeded in detecting novel, intranuclear ring-like structures of replicating replicon domains that were organized temporarily during the S phase of mammalian cells with incorporated BrdU.

  8. Characterization of beet curly top virus subgenomic DNA localizes sequences required for replication.

    PubMed

    Frischmuth, T; Stanley, J

    1992-08-01

    Subgenomic viral DNA is accumulated in Nicotiana benthamiana and Beta vulgaris plants agroinoculated with the geminivirus beet curly top virus. The subgenomic DNA is more abundant in N. benthamiana and is distributed between two broad size groups in this host. Six unique examples, ranging in size from 887 to 1311 nucleotides, have been cloned from viral double-stranded DNA purified from N. benthamiana and analyzed by sequence determination. Deletions are distributed throughout most of the genome and only nucleotides 2946-410 are represented in all subgenomic DNAs. Comparison with a previously characterized subgenomic DNA suggests that cis-acting signals necessary for viral DNA replication are located in a predominantly intergenic region between nucleotides 2946-308. PMID:1641993

  9. Encoded library technology screening of hepatitis C virus NS4B yields a small-molecule compound series with in vitro replicon activity.

    PubMed

    Arico-Muendel, Christopher; Zhu, Zhengrong; Dickson, Hamilton; Parks, Derek; Keicher, Jesse; Deng, Jianghe; Aquilani, Leah; Coppo, Frank; Graybill, Todd; Lind, Kenneth; Peat, Andrew; Thomson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To identify novel antivirals to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4B protein, we utilized encoded library technology (ELT), which enables purified proteins not amenable to standard biochemical screening methods to be tested against large combinatorial libraries in a short period of time. We tested NS4B against several DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries (DEL) and identified a single DEL feature that was subsequently progressed to off-DNA synthesis. The most active of the initial synthesized compounds had 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of 50 to 130 nM in a NS4B radioligand binding assay and 300 to 500 nM in an HCV replicon assay. Chemical optimization yielded compounds with potencies as low as 20 nM in an HCV genotype 1b replicon assay, 500 nM against genotype 1a, and 5 μM against genotype 2a. Through testing against other genotypes and genotype 2a-1b chimeric replicons and from resistance passage using the genotype 1b replicon, we confirmed that these compounds were acting on the proposed first transmembrane region of NS4B. A single sequence change (F98L) was identified as responsible for resistance, and it was thought to largely explain the relative lack of potency of this series against genotype 2a. Unlike other published series that appear to interact with this region, we did not observe sensitivity to amino acid substitutions at positions 94 and 105. The discovery of this novel compound series highlights ELT as a valuable approach for identifying direct-acting antivirals to nonenzymatic targets. PMID:25824229

  10. Morphine Enhances Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Replicon Expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Zhang, Ting; Douglas, Steven D.; Lai, Jian-Ping; Xiao, Wei-Dong; Pleasure, David E.; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2003-01-01

    Little information is available regarding whether substance abuse enhances hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication and promotes HCV disease progression. We investigated whether morphine alters HCV mRNA expression in HCV replicon-containing liver cells. Morphine significantly increased HCV mRNA expression, an effect which could be abolished by either of the opioid receptor antagonists, naltrexone or β-funaltrexamine. Investigation of the mechanism responsible for this enhancement of HCV replicon expression demonstrated that morphine activated NF-κB promoter and that caffeic acid phenethyl ester, a specific inhibitor of the activation of NF-κB, blocked morphine-activated HCV RNA expression. In addition, morphine compromised the anti-HCV effect of interferon alpha (IFN-α). Our in vitro data indicate that morphine may play an important role as a positive regulator of HCV replication in human hepatic cells and may compromise IFN-α therapy. PMID:12937158

  11. Triton 2 (1B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Michelle L.; Meiss, A. G.; Neher, Jason R.; Rudolph, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to perform a detailed design analysis on a conceptually designed preliminary flight trainer. The Triton 2 (1B) must meet the current regulations in FAR Part 23. The detailed design process included the tasks of sizing load carrying members, pulleys, bolts, rivets, and fuselage skin for the safety cage, empennage, and control systems. In addition to the regulations in FAR Part 23, the detail design had to meet established minimums for environmental operating conditions and material corrosion resistance.

  12. The replicon of pSW800 from Pantoea stewartii.

    PubMed

    Wu, C Y; Fu, J F; Liu, S T

    2001-10-01

    A 2019 bp DNA fragment containing the replicon of pSW800 from Pantoea stewartii SW2 was cloned and characterized. This replicon contains two genes--repA and repB, which encode a 36.5 kDa replication initiation protein (RepA) and a peptide of 18 aa, respectively. These two genes overlap by 8 bases with repB situated upstream. The replicon also transcribes an antisense RNA (RNAI) that inhibits the expression of repA and repB. The ribosome-binding sequence (RBS) of repA is likely to be hidden in a stem-loop structure, inhibiting the translation of repA. Furthermore, translation of repB is likely to disrupt the stem-loop structure, which is one of the criteria allowing the translation of repA to begin. A mutagenesis study revealed that a sequence (5'-GCACGGG-3') located 111 nt upstream from repA is crucial; mutation of this sequence prevented the translation of repA. Additionally, this region and the stem-loop structure containing the RBS of repA may form an RNA pseudoknot. Results in this study demonstrate that a mechanism similar to that regulating plasmid replication in the IncB, IncIalpha and IncL/M groups also regulates pSW800 replication. PMID:11577155

  13. 4D Visualization of replication foci in mammalian cells corresponding to individual replicons

    PubMed Central

    Chagin, V. O.; Casas-Delucchi, C. S.; Reinhart, M.; Schermelleh, L.; Markaki, Y.; Maiser, A.; Bolius, J. J.; Bensimon, A.; Fillies, M.; Domaing, P.; Rozanov, Y. M.; Leonhardt, H.; Cardoso, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Since the pioneering proposal of the replicon model of DNA replication 50 years ago, the predicted replicons have not been identified and quantified at the cellular level. Here, we combine conventional and super-resolution microscopy of replication sites in live and fixed cells with computational image analysis. We complement these data with genome size measurements, comprehensive analysis of S-phase dynamics and quantification of replication fork speed and replicon size in human and mouse cells. These multidimensional analyses demonstrate that replication foci (RFi) in three-dimensional (3D) preserved somatic mammalian cells can be optically resolved down to single replicons throughout S-phase. This challenges the conventional interpretation of nuclear RFi as replication factories, that is, the complex entities that process multiple clustered replicons. Accordingly, 3D genome organization and duplication can be now followed within the chromatin context at the level of individual replicons. PMID:27052570

  14. 4D Visualization of replication foci in mammalian cells corresponding to individual replicons.

    PubMed

    Chagin, V O; Casas-Delucchi, C S; Reinhart, M; Schermelleh, L; Markaki, Y; Maiser, A; Bolius, J J; Bensimon, A; Fillies, M; Domaing, P; Rozanov, Y M; Leonhardt, H; Cardoso, M C

    2016-01-01

    Since the pioneering proposal of the replicon model of DNA replication 50 years ago, the predicted replicons have not been identified and quantified at the cellular level. Here, we combine conventional and super-resolution microscopy of replication sites in live and fixed cells with computational image analysis. We complement these data with genome size measurements, comprehensive analysis of S-phase dynamics and quantification of replication fork speed and replicon size in human and mouse cells. These multidimensional analyses demonstrate that replication foci (RFi) in three-dimensional (3D) preserved somatic mammalian cells can be optically resolved down to single replicons throughout S-phase. This challenges the conventional interpretation of nuclear RFi as replication factories, that is, the complex entities that process multiple clustered replicons. Accordingly, 3D genome organization and duplication can be now followed within the chromatin context at the level of individual replicons. PMID:27052570

  15. A cis-acting mutation in the Sindbis virus junction region which affects subgenomic RNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, A; Levis, R; Raju, R; Huang, H V; Rice, C M

    1989-01-01

    The synthesis of Sindbis virus minus-strand and genomic and subgenomic RNAs is believed to require specific cis-acting sequences or structures in the template RNAs and a combination of virus-specific proteins and host components which act in trans. A conserved sequence of about 21 nucleotides in the junction region and encompassing the start site for the subgenomic RNA has been proposed to function as the promoter on the minus-strand template for synthesis of the subgenomic RNA (J.-H. Ou, C. M. Rice, L. Dalgarno, E. G. Strauss, and J. H. Strauss, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79:5235-5239, 1982). We introduced a three-base insertion in this sequence, which also inserts a single amino acid near the COOH terminus of nsP4, in a cDNA clone of Sindbis virus from which infectious RNA transcripts can be generated. The phenotype of this mutant, called Toto1100CR4.1, was studied after RNA transfection of chicken embryo fibroblasts or BHK cells. The mutation leads to a drastic reduction in the level of the subgenomic RNA but does not alter the start site of the RNA. Probably as a consequence of depressed structural-protein synthesis, very few progeny virions are released and the mutant makes tiny or indistinct plaques even after prolonged incubation. The cis-acting effect of this mutation was demonstrated by incorporating either a wild-type or mutant junction region into a defective-interfering RNA and examining the relative synthesis of defective-interfering RNA-derived subgenomic RNA in vivo in the presence of wild-type helper virus. These results show that the junction region is recognized by yet unidentified viral trans-acting components for subgenomic RNA synthesis. When the Toto1100CR4.1 mutant was passaged in culture, plaque morphology variants readily arose. A total of 24 independent revertants were isolated, and 16 were characterized in detail. All revertants analyzed showed an increase in the level of subgenomic RNA synthesis. Sequence analysis of the junction region

  16. A number of subgenomic DNAs are produced following agroinoculation of plants with beet curly top virus.

    PubMed

    Stenger, D C; Stevenson, M C; Hormuzdi, S G; Bisaro, D M

    1992-02-01

    In addition to ss and ds genomic DNA, agroinoculation of Nicotiana benthamiana plants with the Logan strain of the geminivirus beet curly top virus (BCTV) consistently resulted in de novo production of subgenomic DNAs on initial passage. Single-stranded and dsDNA forms representing at least seven size classes (0.8 to 1.8 kb) of subgenomic DNA were observed in total DNA extracts from inoculated plants. Extracts from infected sugar beet and tomato contained variable but usually smaller amounts of subgenomic DNAs, suggesting that their production may be influenced by the host species. Restriction endonuclease mapping and partial nucleotide sequencing of three independent clones of a 1.5 kb size class indicated that this subgenomic DNA is produced from the standard viral genome by two separate deletion events. One deletion of 941 bp includes portions of the leftward open reading frames (ORFs) L1, L2 and L3, while the other deletion of 579 bp encompasses portions of the intergenic region and the rightward ORFs R1, R2 and R3. The data indicate that the 1.5 kb BCTV subgenomic DNA is a defective DNA that has retained cis-elements essential for replication. PMID:1538189

  17. Similarities and differences between the subgenomic and minus-strand promoters of an RNA plant virus.

    PubMed

    Olsthoorn, René C L; Haasnoot, P C Joost; Bol, John F

    2004-04-01

    Promoter regions required for minus-strand and subgenomic RNA synthesis have been mapped for several plus-strand RNA viruses. In general, the two types of promoters do not share structural features even though they are recognized by the same viral polymerase. The minus-strand promoter of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), a plant virus of the family Bromoviridae, consists of a triloop hairpin (hpE) which is attached to a 3' tRNA-like structure (TLS). In contrast, the AMV subgenomic promoter consists of a single triloop hairpin that bears no sequence homology with hpE. Here we show that hpE, when detached from its TLS, can function as a subgenomic promoter in vitro and can replace the authentic subgenomic promoter in the live virus. Thus, the AMV subgenomic and minus-strand promoters are basically the same, but the minus-strand promoter is linked to a 3' TLS to force the polymerase to initiate at the very 3'end. PMID:15047821

  18. A PCR-based protocol for generating West Nile virus replicons.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Junko; Takagi, Hirotaka; Hashimoto, Shingo; Kurane, Ichiro; Maeda, Akihiko

    2008-03-01

    A new protocol for the generation of West Nile virus (WNV) replicons was developed. Fragmented cDNAs that covered the entire WNV RNA sequence, except the sequence corresponding to nucleotides 190-2379, were amplified separately by polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) using primer set franking with overlapping sequences of 40-50 bp at the 5'- and the 3'-ends of each fragment. All amplified fragments were mixed together and annealed to each other at the overlapping sequences. The annealed-DNA fragments were elongated by DNA polymerase and amplified by short-cycle PCRs to generate full-sized WNV replicon cDNAs. The WNV replicons were transcribed in vitro using the replicon cDNAs as templates. When the in vitro-transcribed replicon was introduced into mammalian cells, the viral envelope protein and viral positive- and negative-strand RNAs were detected in the replicon-transfected cells. It is noteworthy that the synthesis of the replicon cDNAs and the replicons took just 1 week, and that the use of a high-fidelity DNA polymerase afforded stability to the sequence of the synthetic replicon. PMID:18242719

  19. Interferon Gamma-1b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Interferon gamma-1b injection is used to reduce the frequency and severity of serious infections in people ... with severe, malignant osteopetrosis (an inherited bone disease). Interferon gamma-1b is in a class of medications ...

  20. Replicon typing of plasmids carrying blaCTX-M-1 in Enterobacteriaceae of animal, environmental and human origin

    PubMed Central

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Jakobi, Gianna; Stephan, Roger; Hächler, Herbert; Nüesch-Inderbinen, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this work was to determine the plasmid replicon profiles of a collection of blaCTX-M-1-positive enterobacterial strains. The isolates originated from chicken in the production pyramid, healthy food-producing animals at slaughter (chicken, calves, and pigs), chicken retail meat, environmental isolates originating from water bodies, and isolates from humans. A selection of IncI and IncN plasmids were characterized by multilocus sequence typing in order to determine their epidemiological relatedness. Methods: Transconjugants of 74 blaCTX-M-1-positive isolates were analyzed by PCR-based replicon typing and by PCR-based plasmid multilocus sequence typing. Results: The incompatibility groups detected among the blaCTX-M-1-harboring plasmids included IncI1, IncN, IncHI1B, IncF, IncFIIS, IncFIB, and IncB/O, with plasmid lineage IncI1/ST3 predominating in isolates from chicken and from humans. Lineage IncN/ST1 was detected mainly in isolates from pigs. For the first time, blaCTX-M-1 genes encoded on IncHI1 plasmids were detected in isolates from cattle and from water bodies. Conclusions: This study identifies plasmid lineages that are contributing to the dissemination of blaCTX-M-1 genes in the food chain, the environment, and humans. PMID:25400623

  1. Beet curly top virus symptom amelioration in Nicotiana benthamiana transformed with a naturally occurring viral subgenomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Frischmuth, T; Stanley, J

    1994-05-01

    Beet curly top virus (BCTV) infection is associated with the de novo synthesis of a heterogeneous population of subgenomic viral DNAs. Nicotiana benthamiana plants transformed with a partial repeat of one such subgenomic DNA remain susceptible to infection but produce ameliorated symptoms when agroinoculated with BCTV. Transgenic plants contained from 10 to 30% of the amount of viral DNA detected in nontransformed control plants showing severe symptoms. Symptom amelioration is associated with the mobilization of subgenomic DNA from the integrated template and its amplification to approximately one third of the total amount of viral DNA. The amplification in transgenic plants of a specific subgenomic DNA rather than a heterogeneous population implies that mobilization from the integrated template frequently occurs during systemic infection, precluding the accumulation of other subgenomic DNA forms. PMID:8178467

  2. EVIDENCE FOR THE CHROMOSOMAL REPLICONS AS UNITS OF SISTER CHROMATID EXCHANGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current hypotheses of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) formation postulate that sites of SCE induction are associated with active replicons or replicon clusters. We have applied the FCC-SCD technique to in vivo studies of mouse bone marrow cells that have been treated with cycloph...

  3. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  4. Subgenomic viral DNA species synthesized in simian cells by human and simian adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, E

    1981-01-01

    DNA synthesized after infection of simian tissue culture cells (BSC-1 or CV-1) with human adenovirus type 2 or 5 or with simian adenovirus 7 was characterized. It was demonstrated that as much as 40% of the virus-specific DNA in nuclei of infected monkey cells consists of subgenomic pieces. No subgenomic viral DNA species were detected in the nuclei of human (HeLa) cells infected with these adenovirus types. Restriction analysis showed that these short viral DNA molecules contain normal amounts of the sequences from the ends of the viral genome, whereas internal regions are underrepresented. The production of subgenomic DNAs is not correlated with semipermissive infection. Although adenovirus types 2 and 5 are restricted in monkey cells, these cells are fully permissive for simian adenovirus 7. HR404, an adenovirus type 5 mutant which is not restricted in monkey cells, produced the same percentage of subgenomic DNAs as did its wild type (restricted) parent, and coinfection of monkey cells with adenovirus type 5 DNAs. The array of predominant size classes among the heterogeneously sized short DNAs is serotype specific. Extensive plaque purification and comparison of wild-type adenovirus type 5 with several viral mutants indicated that the distribution of aberrant sizes of DNA is characteristic of the virus and not a result of random replicative errors and then enrichment of particular species. Images PMID:6261009

  5. Analysis of simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) subgenomic RNAs, junction sequences, and 5' leader.

    PubMed

    Zeng, L; Godeny, E K; Methven, S L; Brinton, M A

    1995-03-10

    Full-length simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) genome RNA (about 15 kb in length) and six subgenomic RNAs, ranging in size from 0.65 to 4.7 kb, were detected by Northern blot hybridization in MA104 cytoplasmic extracts with a 3' genomic antisense probe. The 5' regions of the two smallest subgenomic RNAs (RNAs 6 and 7) were cloned and sequenced. Sequence analysis indicated that these two RNAs contained a common 5' leader sequence joined to the subgenomic RNA bodies via a highly conserved junction sequence; the junction sequence of RNA 7 was 5'-TTAACC-3', while that of RNA 6 was 5'-TCAACC-3'. The complete 5' leader sequence (208 nt) was obtained from genomic RNA. The genomic 5' junction sequence is identical to that of RNA 7. Northern blot hybridization with an antisense 5' leader probe confirmed the presence of the complete leader sequence in all six species of subgenomic RNA. In its virion morphology, genome size, gene order, and replication strategy, SHFV is most similar to viruses such as equine arteritis virus, lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus, and Lelystad virus/porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus. PMID:7886957

  6. Genes identified by visible mutant phenotypes show increased bias toward one of two subgenomes of maize.

    PubMed

    Schnable, James C; Freeling, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Not all genes are created equal. Despite being supported by sequence conservation and expression data, knockout homozygotes of many genes show no visible effects, at least under laboratory conditions. We have identified a set of maize (Zea mays L.) genes which have been the subject of a disproportionate share of publications recorded at MaizeGDB. We manually anchored these "classical" maize genes to gene models in the B73 reference genome, and identified syntenic orthologs in other grass genomes. In addition to proofing the most recent version 2 maize gene models, we show that a subset of these genes, those that were identified by morphological phenotype prior to cloning, are retained at syntenic locations throughout the grasses at much higher levels than the average expressed maize gene, and are preferentially found on the maize1 subgenome even with a duplicate copy is still retained on the opposite subgenome. Maize1 is the subgenome that experienced less gene loss following the whole genome duplication in maize lineage 5-12 million years ago and genes located on this subgenome tend to be expressed at higher levels in modern maize. Links to the web based software that supported our syntenic analyses in the grasses should empower further research and support teaching involving the history of maize genetic research. Our findings exemplify the concept of "grasses as a single genetic system," where what is learned in one grass may be applied to another. PMID:21423772

  7. Potentiation of anthrax vaccines using protective antigen-expressing viral replicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Chao; An, Huai-Jie; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Xu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    DNA vaccines require improvement for human use because they are generally weak stimulators of the immune system in humans. The efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved using a viral replicon as vector to administer antigen of pathogen. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the conventional non-viral DNA, viral replicon DNA or viral replicon particles (VRP) vaccines encoding different forms of anthrax protective antigen (PA) for specific immunity and protective potency against anthrax. Our current results clearly suggested that these viral replicon DNA or VRP vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) induced stronger PA-specific immune responses than the conventional non-viral DNA vaccines when encoding the same antigen forms, which resulted in potent protection against challenge with the Bacillus anthracis strain A16R. Additionally, the naked PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines without the need for high doses or demanding particular delivery regimens elicited robust immune responses and afforded completely protective potencies, which indicated the potential of the SFV replicon as vector of anthrax vaccines for use in clinical application. Therefore, our results suggest that these PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines may be suitable as candidate vaccines against anthrax. PMID:25102364

  8. Radiation effects on DNA synthesis in a defined chromosomal replicon

    SciTech Connect

    Larner, J.M.; Lee, H.; Hamlin, J.L. )

    1994-03-01

    It has recently been shown that the tumor suppressor p53 mediates a signal transduction pathway that responds to DNA damage by arresting cells in the late G[sub 1] period of the cell cycle. However, the operation of this pathway alone cannot explain the 50% reduction in the rate of DNA synthesis that occurs within 30 min of irradiation of an asynchronous cell population. The authors are using the amplified dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) domain in the methotrexate-resistance CHO cell line, CHOC 400, as a model replicon in which to study this acute radiation effect. They first show that the CHOC-400 cell line retains the classical acute-phase response but does not display the late G[sub 1] arrest that characterizes the p53-mediated checkpoint. Using a two-dimensional gel replicon-mapping method, they then show that when asynchronous cultures are irradiated with 900 cGy, initiation in the DHFR locus is completely inhibited within 30 min and does not resume for 3 to 4 h. Since initiation in this locus occurs throughout the first 2 h of the S period, this result implies the existence of a p53-independent S-phase damage-sensing pathway that functions at the level of individual origins. Results obtained with the replication inhibitor mimosine define a position near the G[sub 1]/S boundary beyond which cells are unable to prevent initiation at early-firing origins in response to irradiation. This is the first direct demonstration at a defined chromosomal origin that radiation quantitatively down-regulates initiation. 42 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Analyses of Subgenomic Promoters of Hibiscus Chlorotic Ringspot Virus and Demonstration of 5′ Untranslated Region and 3′-Terminal Sequences Functioning as Subgenomic Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weimin; Wong, Sek-Man

    2006-01-01

    Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV), which belongs to the genus Carmovirus, generates two 3′-coterminal subgenomic RNAs (sgRNAs) of 1.4 kb and 1.7 kb. Transcription start sites of the two sgRNAs were identified at nucleotides (nt) 2178 and 2438, respectively. The full promoter of sgRNA1, a 118-base sequence, is localized between positions +6 and −112 relative to its transcription start site (+1). Similarly, a 132-base sequence, from +6 to −126, defines the sgRNA2 promoter. Computer analysis revealed that both sgRNA promoters share a similar two-stem-loop (SL1 + SL2) structure, immediately upstream of the transcription start site. Mutational analysis of the primary sequence and secondary structures showed further similarities between the two subgenomic promoters. The basal portion of SL2, encompassing the transcription start site, was essential for transcription activity in each promoter, while SL1 and the upper portion of SL2 played a role in transcription enhancement. Both the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) and the last 87 nt at the 3′ UTR of HCRSV genomic RNA are likely to be the putative genomic plus-strand and minus-strand promoters, respectively. They function well as individual sgRNA promoters to produce ectopic subgenomic RNAs in vivo but not to the same levels of the actual sgRNA promoters. This suggests that HCRSV sgRNA promoters share common features with the promoters for genomic plus-strand and minus-strand RNA synthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that both the 5′ UTR and part of the 3′ UTR can be duplicated and function as sgRNA promoters within a single viral genome. PMID:16537607

  10. HANDS: a tool for genome-wide discovery of subgenome-specific base-identity in polyploids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The analysis of polyploid genomes is problematic because homeologous subgenome sequences are closely related. This relatedness makes it difficult to assign individual sequences to the specific subgenome from which they are derived, and hinders the development of polyploid whole genome assemblies. Results We here present a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based approach for assignment of subgenome-specific base-identity at sites containing homeolog-specific polymorphisms (HSPs): ‘HSP base Assignment using NGS data through Diploid Similarity’ (HANDS). We show that HANDS correctly predicts subgenome-specific base-identity at >90% of assayed HSPs in the hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) transcriptome, thus providing a substantial increase in accuracy versus previous methods for homeolog-specific base assignment. Conclusion We conclude that HANDS enables rapid and accurate genome-wide discovery of homeolog-specific base-identity, a capability having multiple applications in polyploid genomics. PMID:24063258

  11. Interferon Beta-1b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... interferon beta-1b injection at around the same time of day each time you inject it. Follow ...

  12. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Plasmid Replicon Typing of Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky isolates recovered from Broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Kentucky has become the predominate serotype recovered from broiler slaughter in the United States and the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has increased dramatically in this serotype. Relationships between AMR, genotype, and plasmid replicon types were characterized for 600 ...

  13. The organization of repeated nucleotide sequences in the replicons of mammalian DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Mattern, M R; Painter, R B

    1977-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells were irradiated with 100-5,000 rads of X-rays and inhibition of the initiation of replicons after irradiation was demonstrated by analyzing nascent DNA sedimented in alkaline sucrose gradients. The renaturation kinetics of DNA synthesized during 60 min of incubation after irradiation was compared with that of DNA synthesized during the 60 min after sham irradiation and with that of parental DNA. Nascent DNA from cells whose replicon initiation was inhibited renatured faster than nascent DNA from control cells in the COt range of repeated nucleotide sequences, suggesting that regions of the replicon not close to origins are enriched in repeated sequences and that regions close to origins are enriched in unique sequences. A class of repeated nucleotide sequences may be involved in the regulation of replicon initiation. PMID:880330

  14. Inhibition of replicon initiation in human cells following stabilization of topoisomerase-DNA cleavable complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, W K; Boyer, J C; Estabrooks, L L; Wilson, S J

    1991-01-01

    Diploid human fibroblast strains were treated for 10 min with inhibitors of type I and type II DNA topoisomerases, and after removal of the inhibitors, the rate of initiation of DNA synthesis at replicon origins was determined. By alkaline elution chromatography, 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide (amsacrine), an inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II, was shown to produce DNA strand breaks. These strand breaks are thought to reflect drug-induced stabilization of topoisomerase-DNA cleavable complexes. Removal of the drug led to a rapid resealing of the strand breaks by dissociation of the complexes. Velocity sedimentation analysis was used to quantify the effects of amsacrine treatment on DNA replication. It was demonstrated that transient exposure to low concentrations of amsacrine inhibited replicon initiation but did not substantially affect DNA chainelongation within operating replicons. Maximal inhibition of replicon initiation occurred 20 to 30 min after drug treatment, and the initiation rate recovered 30 to 90 min later. Ataxia telangiectasia cells displayed normal levels of amsacrine-induced DNA strand breaks during stabilization of cleavable complexes but failed to downregulate replicon initiation after exposure to the topoisomerase inhibitor. Thus, inhibition of replicon initiation in response to DNA damage appears to be an active process which requires a gene product which is defective or missing in ataxia telangiectasia cells. In normal human fibroblasts, the inhibition of DNA topoisomerase I by camptothecin produced reversible DNA strand breaks. Transient exposure to this drug also inhibited replicon initiation. These results suggest that the cellular response pathway which downregulates replicon initiation following genotoxic damage may respond to perturbations of chromatin structure which accompany stabilization of topoisomerase-DNA cleavable complexes. PMID:1646393

  15. Insight into octoploid strawberry (Fragaria) subgenome composition revealed by GISH analysis of pentaploid hybrids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Poulsen, Elizabeth G; Davis, Thomas M

    2016-02-01

    As the product of interspecific hybridization between its two ancestral octoploid (2n = 8x = 56) species (Fragaria chiloensis and F. virginiana), the cultivated strawberry (F. ×ananassa) is among the most genomically complex of crop plants, harboring subgenomic components derived from as many as four different diploid ancestors. To physically visualize the octoploids' subgenome composition(s), we launched molecular cytogenetic studies using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), comparative GISH (cGISH), and rDNA-FISH techniques. First, GISH resolution in Fragaria was tested by using diploid and triploid hybrids with predetermined genome compositions. Then, observation of an octoploid genome was implemented by hybridizing chromosomes of pentaploid (2n = 5x = 35) hybrids from F. vesca × F. virginiana with genomic DNA probes derived from diploids (2n = 2x = 14) F. vesca and F. iinumae, which have been proposed by phylogenetic studies to be closely related to the octoploids yet highly divergent from each other. GISH and cGISH results indicated that octoploid-derived gametes (n = 4x = 28) carried seven chromosomes with hybridization affinities to F. vesca, while the remaining 21 chromosomes displayed varying affinities to F. iinumae, indicating differing degrees of subgenomic contribution to the octoploids by these two putatively ancestral diploids. Combined rDNA-FISH revealed severe 25S rDNA loss in both the F. vesca- and F. iinumae-like chromosome groups, while only the prior group retained its 5S loci. PMID:26835888

  16. Subgenomic promoter recognition by the norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaoyan; Thorne, Lucy; Jin, Zhinan; Hammad, Loubna A.; Li, Serena; Deval, Jerome; Goodfellow, Ian G.; Kao, C. Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The replication enzyme of RNA viruses must preferentially recognize their RNAs in an environment that contains an abundance of cellular RNAs. The factors responsible for specific RNA recognition are not well understood, in part because viral RNA synthesis takes place within enzyme complexes associated with modified cellular membrane compartments. Recombinant RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) from the human norovirus and the murine norovirus (MNV) were found to preferentially recognize RNA segments that contain the promoter and a short template sequence for subgenomic RNA synthesis. Both the promoter and template sequence contribute to stable RdRp binding, accurate initiation of the subgenomic RNAs and efficient RNA synthesis. Using a method that combines RNA crosslinking and mass spectrometry, residues near the template channel of the MNV RdRp were found to contact the hairpin RNA motif. Mutations in the hairpin contact site in the MNV RdRp reduced MNV replication and virus production in cells. This work demonstrates that the specific recognition of the norovirus subgenomic promoter is through binding by the viral RdRp. PMID:25520198

  17. Phylogeography of E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup and analysis of its subclades in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Reguig, Ahmed; Harich, Nourdin; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Rouba, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyzed 295 unrelated Berber-speaking men from northern, central, and southern Morocco to characterize frequency of the E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup and to refine the phylogeny of its subclades: E1b1b1b1-M107, E1b1b1b2-M183, and E1b1b1b2a-M165. For this purpose, we typed four biallelic polymorphisms: M81, M107, M183, and M165. A large majority of the Berber-speaking male lineages belonged to the Y-chromosomal E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup. The frequency ranged from 79.1% to 98.5% in all localities sampled. E1b1b1b2-M183 was the most dominant subclade in our samples, ranging from 65.1% to 83.1%. In contrast, the E1b1b1b1-M107 and E1b1b1b2a-M165 subclades were not found in our samples. Our results suggest a predominance of the E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup among Moroccan Berber-speaking males with a decreasing gradient from south to north. The most prevalent subclade in this haplogroup was E1b1b1b2-M183, for which diffferences among these three groups were statistically significant between central and southern groups. PMID:25397701

  18. Discovery of Thienoimidazole-Based HCV NS5A Genotype 1a and 1b Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Giroux, Simon; Xu, Jinwang; Reddy, T Jagadeeswar; Morris, Mark; Cottrell, Kevin M; Cadilhac, Caroline; Henderson, James A; Nicolas, Oliver; Bilimoria, Darius; Denis, Francois; Mani, Nagraj; Ewing, Nigel; Shawgo, Rebecca; L'Heureux, Lucille; Selliah, Subajini; Chan, Laval; Chauret, Nathalie; Berlioz-Seux, Francoise; Namchuk, Mark N; Grillot, Anne-Laure; Bennani, Youssef L; Das, Sanjoy K; Maxwell, John P

    2014-03-13

    The discovery of potent thienoimidazole-based HCV NS5A inhibitors is herein reported. A novel method to access the thienoimidazole [5,5]-bicyclic system is disclosed. This method gave access to a common key intermediate (6) that was engaged in Suzuki or Sonogashira reactions with coupling partners bearing different linkers. A detailed study of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of the linkers revealed that aromatic linkers with linear topologies are required to achieve high potency for both 1a and 1b HCV genotypes. Compound 20, with a para-phenyl linker, was identified as a potential lead displaying potencies of 17 and 8 pM against genotype 1a and 1b replicons, respectively. PMID:24900811

  19. A personal reflection on the replicon theory: from R1 plasmid to replication timing regulation in human cells.

    PubMed

    Masai, Hisao

    2013-11-29

    Fifty years after the Replicon Theory was originally presented, detailed mechanistic insight into prokaryotic replicons has been obtained and rapid progress is being made to elucidate the more complex regulatory mechanisms of replicon regulation in eukaryotic cells. Here, I present my personal perspectives on how studies of model replicons have contributed to our understanding of the basic mechanisms of DNA replication as well as the evolution of replication regulation in human cells. I will also discuss how replication regulation contributes to the stable maintenance of the genome and how disruption of replication regulation leads to human diseases. PMID:23579064

  20. The Li2 Mutation Results in Reduced Subgenome Expression Bias in Elongating Fibers of Allotetraploid Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Naoumkina, Marina; Thyssen, Gregory; Fang, David D.; Hinchliffe, Doug J.; Florane, Christopher; Yeater, Kathleen M.; Page, Justin T.; Udall, Joshua A.

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (RNA-seq) technology was used to evaluate the effects of the Ligon lintless-2 (Li2) short fiber mutation on transcriptomes of both subgenomes of allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) as compared to its near-isogenic wild type. Sequencing was performed on 4 libraries from developing fibers of Li2 mutant and wild type near-isogenic lines at the peak of elongation followed by mapping and PolyCat categorization of RNA-seq data to the reference D5 genome (G. raimondii) for homeologous gene expression analysis. The majority of homeologous genes, 83.6% according to the reference genome, were expressed during fiber elongation. Our results revealed: 1) approximately two times more genes were induced in the AT subgenome comparing to the DT subgenome in wild type and mutant fiber; 2) the subgenome expression bias was significantly reduced in the Li2 fiber transcriptome; 3) Li2 had a significantly greater effect on the DT than on the AT subgenome. Transcriptional regulators and cell wall homeologous genes significantly affected by the Li2 mutation were reviewed in detail. This is the first report to explore the effects of a single mutation on homeologous gene expression in allotetraploid cotton. These results provide deeper insights into the evolution of allotetraploid cotton gene expression and cotton fiber development. PMID:24598808

  1. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Plasmid Replicon Typing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky Isolates Recovered from Broilers.

    PubMed

    Ladely, Scott R; Meinersmann, Richard J; Ball, Takiyah A; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J

    2016-06-01

    Salmonella Kentucky has become the predominant serovar recovered from broilers slaughtered in the United States, and the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has increased dramatically in this serovar. Relationships between AMR, genotype, and plasmid replicon types were characterized for 600 Salmonella Kentucky isolates recovered from chicken carcasses from 2004 to 2013. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis cluster analysis revealed 112 unique types sharing 79% similarity. Over half of the isolates studies were assigned to two large clusters (unique restriction patterns) consisting of 190 (A) and 151 (B) isolates. The remaining (n = 259) more diverse isolates (110 unique patterns) shall be designated cluster C for discussion. Clusters A had significantly more (p < 0.05) isolates resistant to streptomycin (68.4%) and tetracycline (91.6%) compared to cluster C (50.6% and 40.9% to streptomycin and tetracycline, respectively) or cluster B, which had the least (p < 0.05) resistance (11.9% and 13.2% to streptomycin and tetracycline, respectively). In addition, there was segregation of plasmid replicon types among clusters. Cluster A had significantly more (p < 0.05) replicon type FIB (90.5%) compared to cluster C (37.1%), which had significantly more compared to cluster B (10.6%). Cluster B had significantly more (p < 0.05) replicon type I1 (87.4%) compared to cluster C (68.7%), which had significantly more (p < 0.05) compared to cluster A (32.6%). Cluster C harbored significantly more (p < 0.05) HI2 replicon type (18.1%) compared to clonal clusters A (1.6%) or B (1.3%). The prevalence of plasmid replicon type A/C did not differ among clusters (A, 0.5%; B, 2.0%; C, 0.4%). Both streptomycin and tetracycline resistance were significantly linked (p < 0.05) to plasmid replicon type FIB. In addition, replicon type HI2 was also significantly linked (p < 0.05) to streptomycin resistance. We conclude that the dramatic increase in

  2. Metabolic modelling reveals the specialization of secondary replicons for niche adaptation in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    diCenzo, George C; Checcucci, Alice; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Mengoni, Alessio; Viti, Carlo; Dziewit, Lukasz; Finan, Turlough M; Galardini, Marco; Fondi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The genome of about 10% of bacterial species is divided among two or more large chromosome-sized replicons. The contribution of each replicon to the microbial life cycle (for example, environmental adaptations and/or niche switching) remains unclear. Here we report a genome-scale metabolic model of the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti that is integrated with carbon utilization data for 1,500 genes with 192 carbon substrates. Growth of S. meliloti is modelled in three ecological niches (bulk soil, rhizosphere and nodule) with a focus on the role of each of its three replicons. We observe clear metabolic differences during growth in the tested ecological niches and an overall reprogramming following niche switching. In silico examination of the inferred fitness of gene deletion mutants suggests that secondary replicons evolved to fulfil a specialized function, particularly host-associated niche adaptation. Thus, genes on secondary replicons might potentially be manipulated to promote or suppress host interactions for biotechnological purposes. PMID:27447951

  3. Metabolic modelling reveals the specialization of secondary replicons for niche adaptation in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    diCenzo, George C.; Checcucci, Alice; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Mengoni, Alessio; Viti, Carlo; Dziewit, Lukasz; Finan, Turlough M.; Galardini, Marco; Fondi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The genome of about 10% of bacterial species is divided among two or more large chromosome-sized replicons. The contribution of each replicon to the microbial life cycle (for example, environmental adaptations and/or niche switching) remains unclear. Here we report a genome-scale metabolic model of the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti that is integrated with carbon utilization data for 1,500 genes with 192 carbon substrates. Growth of S. meliloti is modelled in three ecological niches (bulk soil, rhizosphere and nodule) with a focus on the role of each of its three replicons. We observe clear metabolic differences during growth in the tested ecological niches and an overall reprogramming following niche switching. In silico examination of the inferred fitness of gene deletion mutants suggests that secondary replicons evolved to fulfil a specialized function, particularly host-associated niche adaptation. Thus, genes on secondary replicons might potentially be manipulated to promote or suppress host interactions for biotechnological purposes. PMID:27447951

  4. Development of a subgenomic clone system for Kyasanur Forest disease virus.

    PubMed

    Cook, Bradley W M; Nikiforuk, Aidan M; Cutts, Todd A; Kobasa, Darwyn; Court, Deborah A; Theriault, Steven S

    2016-07-01

    Emerging tropical viruses pose an increasing threat to public health because social, economic and environmental factors such as global trade and deforestation allow for their migration into previously unexposed populations and ecological niches. Among such viruses, Kyasanur Forest disease virus (KFDV) deserves particular recognition because it causes hemorrhagic fever. This work describes the completion of an antiviral testing platform (subgenomic system) for KFDV that could be used to quickly and safely screen compounds capable of inhibiting KFDV replication without the requirement for high containment, as the structural genes have been replaced with a luciferase reporter gene precluding the generation of infectious particles. The coordination of KFDV kinetics with the replication characteristics of the subgenomic system has provided additional insight into the timing of flavivirus replication events, as the genetically engineered KFDV genome began replication as early as 2h post cellular entry. Possession of such antiviral testing platforms by public health agencies should accelerate the testing of antiviral drugs against emerging or recently emerged viruses mitigating the effects of their disease and transmission. PMID:27357207

  5. Functional analysis of the plasmid pM4 replicon from Lactobacillus plantarum M4: determination of the minimal replicon and functionality identification of the putative sso.

    PubMed

    Yin, Sheng; Hao, Yanling; Zhai, Zhengyuan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Hui; Wang, Guohong; Shi, Xianli; Luo, Yunbo

    2009-11-01

    In order to determine the minimal replicon and the single strand origin (sso) of the plasmid pM4, different fragments of pM4 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into pBEm, a replication probe vector for Lactobacillus. The deletion analysis results showed that the minimal replicon of pM4 could be determined within a 1280bp fragment consisting of double strand origin (dso) and rep gene encoding replication protein. Based on plasmid segregation stability assay and its ability to convert single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by Southern hybridization, an sso of replication was located at nucleotides -118-92 in the plasmid pM4, about 300bp upstream of dso. In addition, the host range assay indicated that plasmid pM4 could replicate in L. casei 05-21, L. rhamnosus AS 1.2466(T) and L. plantarum 05-19 of all the tested Lactobacillus strains. Analysis of the pM4 replicon will allow its use in constructing a food-grade vector for application in food industry. PMID:19651154

  6. Enhancement of the Replication of Hepatitis C Virus Replicons of Genotypes 1 to 4 by Manipulation of CpG and UpA Dinucleotide Frequencies and Use of Cell Lines Expressing SECL14L2 for Antiviral Resistance Testing.

    PubMed

    Witteveldt, Jeroen; Martin-Gans, Marion; Simmonds, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has improved greatly through the use of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). However, their effectiveness and potential for drug resistance development in non-genotype 1 variants of HCV remain relatively unexplored, as in vitro assays to assess drug susceptibility are poorly developed and unsuited for a transient-transfection format. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of dinucleotide frequency changes in the replicon and the use of a SEC14L2-expressing cell line on the replication of HCVs of different genotypes and evaluated the resulting assay formats for measurements of susceptibility to the DAA sofosbuvir. Removal of CpG and UpA dinucleotides from the luciferase gene used in HCV replicons of genotype 1b (Con1) and genotype 2a (JFH-1) achieved between 10- and 100-fold enhancement of replication over that of the wild type posttransfection. Removal of CpG and UpA dinucleotides in the neomycin gene or deletion of the whole gene in replicons of genotype 3a (S52) and genotype 4a (ED43) enhanced replication, but phenotypic effects on altering luciferase gene composition were minimal. A further 10-fold replication enhancement of replicons from all four genotypes was achieved by using a transgenic Huh7.5 cell line expressing SECL14L2, whose expression showed a dose-dependent effect on HCV replication that was reversible by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of gene expression. By combining these strategies, the 100- to 1,000-fold enhancement of replication allowed the susceptibility of all four genotypes to the RNA polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir to be robustly determined in a transient-transfection assay format. These methods of replication enhancement provide new tools for monitoring the susceptibility and resistance of a wide range of HCV genotypes to DAAs. PMID:26953209

  7. Enhancement of the Replication of Hepatitis C Virus Replicons of Genotypes 1 to 4 by Manipulation of CpG and UpA Dinucleotide Frequencies and Use of Cell Lines Expressing SECL14L2 for Antiviral Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Witteveldt, Jeroen; Martin-Gans, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has improved greatly through the use of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). However, their effectiveness and potential for drug resistance development in non-genotype 1 variants of HCV remain relatively unexplored, as in vitro assays to assess drug susceptibility are poorly developed and unsuited for a transient-transfection format. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of dinucleotide frequency changes in the replicon and the use of a SEC14L2-expressing cell line on the replication of HCVs of different genotypes and evaluated the resulting assay formats for measurements of susceptibility to the DAA sofosbuvir. Removal of CpG and UpA dinucleotides from the luciferase gene used in HCV replicons of genotype 1b (Con1) and genotype 2a (JFH-1) achieved between 10- and 100-fold enhancement of replication over that of the wild type posttransfection. Removal of CpG and UpA dinucleotides in the neomycin gene or deletion of the whole gene in replicons of genotype 3a (S52) and genotype 4a (ED43) enhanced replication, but phenotypic effects on altering luciferase gene composition were minimal. A further 10-fold replication enhancement of replicons from all four genotypes was achieved by using a transgenic Huh7.5 cell line expressing SECL14L2, whose expression showed a dose-dependent effect on HCV replication that was reversible by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of gene expression. By combining these strategies, the 100- to 1,000-fold enhancement of replication allowed the susceptibility of all four genotypes to the RNA polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir to be robustly determined in a transient-transfection assay format. These methods of replication enhancement provide new tools for monitoring the susceptibility and resistance of a wide range of HCV genotypes to DAAs. PMID:26953209

  8. Replicon typing of plasmids encoding resistance to newer beta-lactams.

    PubMed

    Carattoli, Alessandra; Miriagou, Vivi; Bertini, Alessia; Loli, Alexandra; Colinon, Celine; Villa, Laura; Whichard, Jean M; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2006-07-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-based replicon typing represents a novel method to describe the dissemination and follow the evolution of resistance plasmids. We used this approach to study 26 epidemiologically unrelated Enterobacteriaceae and demonstrate the dominance of incompatibility (Inc) A/C or Inc N-related plasmids carrying some emerging resistance determinants to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems. PMID:16836838

  9. Replicon Typing of Plasmids Encoding Resistance to Newer β-Lactams

    PubMed Central

    Miriagou, Vivi; Bertini, Alessia; Loli, Alexandra; Colinon, Celine; Villa, Laura; Whichard, Jean M.; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2006-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction–based replicon typing represents a novel method to describe the dissemination and follow the evolution of resistance plasmids. We used this approach to study 26 epidemiologically unrelated Enterobacteriaceae and demonstrate the dominance of incompatibility (Inc) A/C or Inc N-related plasmids carrying some emerging resistance determinants to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems. PMID:16836838

  10. [IncP-7 plasmids' classification based on structural diversity of their basic replicons].

    PubMed

    Volkova, O V; Panov, A V; Kosheleva, I A; Boronin, A M

    2013-01-01

    The structural diversity of basic replicons and repB gene of the IncP-7 plasmids' collection was firstly assessed on the basis of PCR, restriction analysis and partial sequencing. It has been revealed that DNA fragment containing gene for UvrD-like helicase RepB is a part of all known P-7 replicons, but often serves as hot place for diverse IS-elements invasion. The first system of P-7 plasmids' classification has been worked out on the basis of determined repA-oriV-par WABC nucleotide divergency. Most degradation plasmids established to be belonging to large beta-subgroup, streptomycin resistance plasmid Rms148 (IncP-7 archetype)--to alpha-subgroup, carbazole degradation plasmid pCAR1 and NAH/SAL-plasmids from pY-line (Yamal oil deposits)--to gamma-subgroup and CAP-plasmid pBS270 with potentially reduced P-7 replicon--to delta-subgroup. It has been observed that the type of IncP-7 basic replicon molecular organization does not correlate with fixed phenotypic character in most cases, that is plasmids encoding different phenotypic markers could be members of the same P-7 subgroup. PMID:23808156

  11. Replicon typing of virulence plasmids of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates from cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Mainil, J G; Bex, F; Dreze, P; Kaeckenbeeck, A; Couturier, M

    1992-01-01

    Plasmid DNA hybridization with probes for virulence factors used for basic replicons of plasmids was used to identify the virulence plasmids of a collection of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates from cattle. The virulence probes were derived from the genes coding for the heat-stable enterotoxin STaP and for the F5 (K99) and F41 fimbrial adhesins. The replicon probes were derived from 16 different basic replicons of plasmids (probes repFIA, repFIB, repFIC, repFIIA, repI1, repHI1, repHI2, repL/M, repN, repP, repQ, repT, repU, repW, repX, and repY). The virulence genes coding for the STaP enterotoxin and for the F5 adhesin were located on a single plasmid band in each isolate. The sizes of most of these virulence plasmids were from 65 to 95 MDa. The F41 probe failed to hybridize with any plasmid band. The virulence plasmids had multireplicon types typical of plasmids of the IncF groups. The most common basic replicon association was the triple RepFIA-RepFIB-RepFIC family association. Images PMID:1639505

  12. Do sister forks of bidirectionally growing replicons proceed at unequal rates

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, D.D.; Raman, R.

    1987-02-01

    DNA fibre autoradiography in different tissues of the rodents Bandicota bengalensis and Nesokia indica reveals a high frequency of such bidirectionally replicating replicons whose sister hot tracks are of unequal size. These results suggest intrarepliconic difference in the rates of fork migration in the two directions.

  13. The Li2 mutation results in reduced subgenome expression bias in elongating fibers of allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next generation sequencing (RNA-seq) technology was used to evaluate the effects of the Ligon lintless-2 (Li2) short fiber mutation on transcriptomes of both subgenomes of allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) as compared to its near-isogenic wild type. Sequencing was performed on 4 librari...

  14. The structural basis of pathogenic subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) production.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Erich G; Costantino, David A; Rabe, Jennifer L; Moon, Stephanie L; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Nix, Jay C; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-04-18

    Flaviviruses are emerging human pathogens and worldwide health threats. During infection, pathogenic subgenomic flaviviral RNAs (sfRNAs) are produced by resisting degradation by the 5'→3' host cell exonuclease Xrn1 through an unknown RNA structure-based mechanism. Here, we present the crystal structure of a complete Xrn1-resistant flaviviral RNA, which contains interwoven pseudoknots within a compact structure that depends on highly conserved nucleotides. The RNA's three-dimensional topology creates a ringlike conformation, with the 5' end of the resistant structure passing through the ring from one side of the fold to the other. Disruption of this structure prevents formation of sfRNA during flaviviral infection. Thus, sfRNA formation results from an RNA fold that interacts directly with Xrn1, presenting the enzyme with a structure that confounds its helicase activity. PMID:24744377

  15. The structural basis of pathogenic subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) production

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Erich G.; Costantino, David A.; Rabe, Jennifer L.; Moon, Stephanie L.; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Nix, Jay C.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Flaviviruses are emerging human pathogens and worldwide health threats. During infection, a pathogenic, subgenomic flaviviral RNAs (sfRNAs) are produced by resisting degradation by the 5’→3’ host cell exonuclease Xrn1 through an unknown RNA structure-based mechanism. Here, we present the crystal structure of a complete Xrn1-resistant flaviviral RNA, which contains interwoven pseudoknots within a compact structure that depends on highly-conserved nucleotides. The RNA’s three-dimensional topology creates a ring-like conformation with the 5’ end of the resistant structure passing through the ring from one side of the fold to the other. Disruption of this structure prevents formation of sfRNA during flaviviral infection. Thus, sfRNA formation results from an RNA fold that interacts directly with Xrn1, presenting the enzyme with a structure that confounds its helicase activity. PMID:24744377

  16. Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Unexpected Subgenomic Diversity of Magnetotactic Bacteria within the Phylum Nitrospirae ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei; Jogler, Christian; Schüler, Dirk; Pan, Yongxin

    2011-01-01

    A targeted metagenomic approach was applied to investigate magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) within the phylum Nitrospirae in Lake Miyun near Beijing, China. Five fosmids containing rRNA operons were identified. Comparative sequence analysis of a total of 172 kb provided new insights into their genome organization and revealed unexpected subgenomic diversity of uncultivated MTB in the phylum Nitrospirae. In addition, affiliation of two novel MTB with the phylum Nitrospirae was verified by fluorescence in situ hybridization. One of them was morphologically similar to “Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum,” but the other differed substantially in cell shape and magnetosome organization from all previously described “Ca. Magnetobacterium bavaricum”-like bacteria. PMID:21057016

  17. Complete sequence of RNA1 and subgenomic RNA3 of Atlantic halibut nodavirus (AHNV).

    PubMed

    Sommerset, Ingunn; Nerland, Audun H

    2004-03-10

    The Nodaviridae are divided into the alphanodavirus genus, which infects insects, and the betanodavirus genus, which infects fishes. Betanodaviruses are the causative agent of viral encephalopathy and retinopathy (VER) in a number of cultivated marine fish species. The Nodaviridae are small non-enveloped RNA viruses that contain a genome consisting of 2 single-stranded positivesense RNA segments: RNA1 (3.1 kb), which encodes the viral part of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp); and RNA2 (1.4 kb), which encodes the capsid protein. In addition to RNA1 and RNA2, a subgenomic transcript of RNA1, RNA3, is present in infected cells. We have cloned and sequenced RNA1 from the Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus nodavirus (AHNV), and for the first time, the sequence of a betanodaviral subgenomic RNA3 has been determined. AHNV RNA1 was 3100 nucleotides in length and contained a main open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 981 amino acids. Conservative motifs for RdRp were found in the deduced amino acid sequence. RNA3 was 371 nucleotides in length, and contained an open reading frame encoding a peptide of 75 amino acids corresponding to a hypothetical B2 protein, although sequence alignments with the alphanodavirus B2 proteins showed only marginal similarities. AHNV RNA replication in the fish cell-line SSN-1 (derived from striped snakehead) was analysed by Northern blot analysis, which indicated that RNA3 was synthesised in large amounts (compared to RNA1) at an early point in time post-infection. PMID:15109133

  18. Coronavirus genomic and subgenomic minus-strand RNAs copartition in membrane-protected replication complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Sethna, P B; Brian, D A

    1997-01-01

    The majority of porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus plus-strand RNAs (genome and subgenomic mRNAs), at the time of peak RNA synthesis (5 h postinfection), were not found in membrane-protected complexes in lysates of cells prepared by Dounce homogenization but were found to be susceptible to micrococcal nuclease (85%) or to sediment to a pellet in a cesium chloride gradient (61%). They therefore are probably free molecules in solution or components of easily dissociable complexes. By contrast, the majority of minus-strand RNAs (genome length and subgenomic mRNA length) were found to be resistant to micrococcal nuclease (69%) or to remain suspended in association with membrane-protected complexes following isopycnic sedimentation in a cesium chloride gradient (85%). Furthermore, 35% of the suspended minus strands were in a dense complex (1.20 to 1.24 g/ml) that contained an RNA plus-to-minus-strand molar ratio of approximately 8:1 and viral structural proteins S, M, and N, and 65% were in a light complex (1.15 to 1.17 g/ml) that contained nearly equimolar amounts of plus- and minus-strand RNAs and only trace amounts of proteins M and N. In no instance during fractionation were genome-length minus strands found segregated from sub-genome-length minus strands. These results indicate that all minus-strand species are components of similarly structured membrane-associated replication complexes and support the concept that all are active in the synthesis of plus-strand RNAs. PMID:9311859

  19. Pea (Pisum sativum) cells arrested in G2 have nascent DNA with breaks between replicons and replication clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Van't Hof, J.

    1980-01-01

    DNA fiber autoradiography and alkaline sucrose sedimentation of DNA of cultured pea-root cells (Pisum sativum) arrested in G2 by carbohydrate starvation demonstrated that nascent DNA molecules of replicon (16 to 27 x 10/sup 6/D) and apparent cluster (approx. 330 x 10/sup 6/D) size were not joined. That the arrested cells were in G2 was confirmed by single-cell autoradiography and cytophotometry. In pea there are about 18 replicons per average cluster, 4.2 x 10/sup 3/ clusters, and 7.7 x 10/sup 4/ replicons per genome.

  20. Requirement of the 5'-end genomic sequence as an upstream cis-acting element for coronavirus subgenomic mRNA transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, C L; Lai, M M

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a defective interfering (DI) RNA containing a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene, placed behind an intergenic sequence, for studying subgenomic mRNA transcription of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a prototype coronavirus. Using this system, we have identified the sequence requirement for MHV subgenomic mRNA transcription. We show that this sequence requirement differs from that for RNA replication. In addition to the previously identified requirement for an intergenic (promoter) sequence, additional sequences from the 5' end of genomic RNA are required for subgenomic mRNA transcription. These upstream sequences include the leader RNA and a spacer sequence between the leader and intergenic sequence, which is derived from the 5' untranslated region and part of gene 1. The spacer sequence requirement is specific, since only the sequence derived from the 5' end of RNA genome, but not from other MHV genomic regions or heterologous sequences, could initiate subgenomic transcription from the intergenic sequence. These results strongly suggest that the wild-type viral subgenomic mRNAs (mRNA2 to mRNA7) and probably their counterpart subgenomic negative-sense RNAs cannot be utilized for mRNA amplification. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that a partial leader sequence present at the 5' end of genome, which lacks the leader-mRNA fusion sequence, could still support subgenomic mRNA transcription. In this case, the leader sequences of the subgenomic transcripts were derived exclusively from the wild-type helper virus, indicating that the MHV leader RNA initiates in trans subgenomic mRNA transcription. Thus, the leader sequence can enhance subgenomic transcription even when it cannot serve as a primer for mRNA synthesis. These results taken together suggest that the 5'-end leader sequence of MHV not only provides a trans-acting primer for mRNA initiation but also serves as a cis-acting element required for the transcription of subgenomic mRNAs. The

  1. 18 CFR 1b.5 - Formal investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formal investigations. 1b.5 Section 1b.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.5 Formal investigations....

  2. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  3. 18 CFR 1b.2 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scope. 1b.2 Section 1b.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.2 Scope. This part applies to...

  4. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 1b.1 Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part—...

  5. 18 CFR 1b.6 - Preliminary investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preliminary investigations. 1b.6 Section 1b.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.6 Preliminary investigations....

  6. 18 CFR 1b.21 - Enforcement hotline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enforcement hotline. 1b.21 Section 1b.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.21 Enforcement hotline. (a)...

  7. 18 CFR 1b.14 - Subpoenas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Subpoenas. 1b.14 Section 1b.14 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.14 Subpoenas. (a) Service of a...

  8. 18 CFR 1b.19 - Submissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Submissions. 1b.19 Section 1b.19 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.19 Submissions. In the event...

  9. 7 CFR 1b.2 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Policy. 1b.2 Section 1b.2 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.2 Policy. (a) All policies and programs of the various USDA agencies shall be planned, developed, and implemented so as to achieve the goals...

  10. 7 CFR 1b.2 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Policy. 1b.2 Section 1b.2 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.2 Policy. (a) All policies and programs of the various USDA agencies shall be planned, developed, and implemented so as to achieve the goals...

  11. 7 CFR 1b.2 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Policy. 1b.2 Section 1b.2 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.2 Policy. (a) All policies and programs of the various USDA agencies shall be planned, developed, and implemented so as to achieve the goals...

  12. 7 CFR 1b.2 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Policy. 1b.2 Section 1b.2 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.2 Policy. (a) All policies and programs of the various USDA agencies shall be planned, developed, and implemented so as to achieve the goals...

  13. 7 CFR 1b.3 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Categorical exclusions. 1b.3 Section 1b.3 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.3 Categorical exclusions. (a) The following are categories of activities which have been determined not to have a significant individual or cumulative effect on the...

  14. Orderly Replication and Segregation of the Four Replicons of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315

    PubMed Central

    Kamgoué, Alain; Murray, Heath; Pasta, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial genomes typically consist of a single chromosome and, optionally, one or more plasmids. But whole-genome sequencing reveals about ten per-cent of them to be multipartite, with additional replicons which by size and indispensability are considered secondary chromosomes. This raises the questions of how their replication and partition is managed without compromising genome stability and of how such genomes arose. Vibrio cholerae, with a 1 Mb replicon in addition to its 3 Mb chromosome, is the only species for which maintenance of a multipartite genome has been investigated. In this study we have explored the more complex genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia (strain J2315). It comprises an extra replicon (c2) of 3.21 Mb, comparable in size to the3.87Mb main chromosome (c1), another extra replicon(c3) of 0.87 Mb and a plasmid of 0.09 Mb. The replication origin of c1 is typically chromosomal and those of c2 and c3 are plasmid-like; all are replicated bidirectionally. Fluorescence microscopy of tagged origins indicates that all initiate replication at mid-cell and segregate towards the cell quarter positions sequentially, c1-c2-p1/c3. c2 segregation is as well-phased with the cell cycle as c1, implying that this plasmid-like origin has become subject to regulation not typical of plasmids; in contrast, c3 segregates more randomly through the cycle. Disruption of individual Par systems by deletion of parAB or by addition of parS sites showed each Par system to govern the positioning of its own replicon only. Inactivation of c1, c2 and c3 Par systems not only reduced growth rate, generated anucleate cells and compromised viability but influenced processes beyond replicon partition, notably regulation of replication, chromosome condensation and cell size determination. In particular, the absence of the c1 ParA protein altered replication of all three chromosomes, suggesting that the partition system of the main chromosome is a major participant in the choreography of

  15. Orderly Replication and Segregation of the Four Replicons of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen-Li; Dubarry, Nelly; Passot, Fanny M; Kamgoué, Alain; Murray, Heath; Lane, David; Pasta, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial genomes typically consist of a single chromosome and, optionally, one or more plasmids. But whole-genome sequencing reveals about ten per-cent of them to be multipartite, with additional replicons which by size and indispensability are considered secondary chromosomes. This raises the questions of how their replication and partition is managed without compromising genome stability and of how such genomes arose. Vibrio cholerae, with a 1 Mb replicon in addition to its 3 Mb chromosome, is the only species for which maintenance of a multipartite genome has been investigated. In this study we have explored the more complex genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia (strain J2315). It comprises an extra replicon (c2) of 3.21 Mb, comparable in size to the3.87Mb main chromosome (c1), another extra replicon(c3) of 0.87 Mb and a plasmid of 0.09 Mb. The replication origin of c1 is typically chromosomal and those of c2 and c3 are plasmid-like; all are replicated bidirectionally. Fluorescence microscopy of tagged origins indicates that all initiate replication at mid-cell and segregate towards the cell quarter positions sequentially, c1-c2-p1/c3. c2 segregation is as well-phased with the cell cycle as c1, implying that this plasmid-like origin has become subject to regulation not typical of plasmids; in contrast, c3 segregates more randomly through the cycle. Disruption of individual Par systems by deletion of parAB or by addition of parS sites showed each Par system to govern the positioning of its own replicon only. Inactivation of c1, c2 and c3 Par systems not only reduced growth rate, generated anucleate cells and compromised viability but influenced processes beyond replicon partition, notably regulation of replication, chromosome condensation and cell size determination. In particular, the absence of the c1 ParA protein altered replication of all three chromosomes, suggesting that the partition system of the main chromosome is a major participant in the choreography of

  16. Characterization and replication mode determination of the minimal replicon of Tetragenococcus halophila ATCC33315 plasmid pUCL287.

    PubMed

    Benachour, A; Frère, J; Boutibonnes, P; Auffray, Y

    1995-01-01

    pUCL287 is a cryptic plasmid of Tetragenococcus halophila (formerly Pediococcus halophilus) ATCC33315 of relatively small size (8.7 kb). Its minimal replicon was located on a 1235 bp MamI-EcoRI fragment. This minimal replicon contains a non-translated region, followed by a gene encoding a putative 311 amino acid protein. Deletion experiments showed that the non-translated region corresponds to the replication origin. Determination of the replication mode was carried out in Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2 harboring pUCL287 minimal replicon. The replicating intermediates detected revealed that pUCL287 minimal replicon follows a bidirectional theta replicating mode. PMID:8824766

  17. Dengue Virus Reporter Replicon is a Valuable Tool for Antiviral Drug Discovery and Analysis of Virus Replication Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kato, Fumihiro; Hishiki, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Dengue, the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease, is caused by the dengue virus (DENV), a member of the Flaviviridae family, and is a considerable public health threat in over 100 countries, with 2.5 billion people living in high-risk areas. However, no specific antiviral drug or licensed vaccine currently targets DENV infection. The replicon system has all the factors needed for viral replication in cells. Since the development of replicon systems, transient and stable reporter replicons, as well as reporter viruses, have been used in the study of various virological aspects of DENV and in the identification of DENV inhibitors. In this review, we summarize the DENV reporter replicon system and its applications in high-throughput screening (HTS) for identification of anti-DENV inhibitors. We also describe the use of this system in elucidation of the mechanisms of virus replication and viral dynamics in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27164125

  18. Dengue Virus Reporter Replicon is a Valuable Tool for Antiviral Drug Discovery and Analysis of Virus Replication Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Fumihiro; Hishiki, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Dengue, the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease, is caused by the dengue virus (DENV), a member of the Flaviviridae family, and is a considerable public health threat in over 100 countries, with 2.5 billion people living in high-risk areas. However, no specific antiviral drug or licensed vaccine currently targets DENV infection. The replicon system has all the factors needed for viral replication in cells. Since the development of replicon systems, transient and stable reporter replicons, as well as reporter viruses, have been used in the study of various virological aspects of DENV and in the identification of DENV inhibitors. In this review, we summarize the DENV reporter replicon system and its applications in high-throughput screening (HTS) for identification of anti-DENV inhibitors. We also describe the use of this system in elucidation of the mechanisms of virus replication and viral dynamics in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27164125

  19. Three Replicons of Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234 Harbor Symbiotic Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Margarita; Mavingui, Patrick; Girard, Lourdes; Perret, Xavier; Broughton, William J.; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Dávila, Guillermo; Palacios, Rafael

    1998-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 contains three replicons: the symbiotic plasmid or pNGR234a, a megaplasmid (pNGR234b), and the chromosome. Symbiotic gene sequences not present in pNGR234a were analyzed by hybridization. DNA sequences homologous to the genes fixLJKNOPQGHIS were found on the chromosome, while sequences homologous to nodPQ and exoBDFLK were found on pNGR234b. PMID:9811668

  20. Use of Recombinant Virus Replicon Particles for Vaccination against Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolz, Miriam; Kerber, Sarah; Zimmer, Gert; Pluschke, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer, caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, which is most prevalent in rural regions of West African countries. The majority of clinical presentations seen in patients are ulcers on limbs that can be treated by eight weeks of antibiotic therapy. Nevertheless, scarring and permanent disabilities occur frequently and Buruli ulcer still causes high morbidity. A vaccine against the disease is so far not available but would be of great benefit if used for prophylaxis as well as therapy. In the present study, vesicular stomatitis virus-based RNA replicon particles encoding the M. ulcerans proteins MUL2232 and MUL3720 were generated and the expression of the recombinant antigens characterized in vitro. Immunisation of mice with the recombinant replicon particles elicited antibodies that reacted with the endogenous antigens of M. ulcerans cells. A prime-boost immunization regimen with MUL2232-recombinant replicon particles and recombinant MUL2232 protein induced a strong immune response but only slightly reduced bacterial multiplication in a mouse model of M. ulcerans infection. We conclude that a monovalent vaccine based on the MUL2232 antigen will probably not sufficiently control M. ulcerans infection in humans. PMID:26275222

  1. Differential action of pateamine A on translation of genomic and subgenomic mRNAs from Sindbis virus.

    PubMed

    González-Almela, Esther; Sanz, Miguel Angel; García-Moreno, Manuel; Northcote, Peter; Pelletier, Jerry; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-10-01

    Pateamine A (Pat A) is a natural marine product that interacts specifically with the translation initiation factor eIF4A leading to the disruption of the eIF4F complex. In the present study, we have examined the activity of Pat A on the translation of Sindbis virus (SINV) mRNAs. Translation of genomic mRNA is strongly suppressed by Pat A, as shown by the reduction of nsP1 or nsP2 synthesis. Notably, protein synthesis directed by subgenomic mRNA is resistant to Pat A inhibition when the compound is added at late times following infection; however, subgenomic mRNA is sensitive to Pat A in transfected cells or in cell free systems, indicating that this viral mRNA exhibits a dual mechanism of translation. A detailed kinetic analysis of Pat A inhibition in SINV-infected cells demonstrates that a switch occurs approximately 4h after infection, rendering subgenomic mRNA translation more resistant to Pat A inhibition. PMID:26057151

  2. 7 CFR 1b.2 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Policy. 1b.2 Section 1b.2 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.2 Policy. (a) All policies and programs of the various USDA agencies shall be planned, developed, and implemented so as to achieve the goals and to follow the procedures declared by...

  3. Characterization of two kinds of subgenomic RNAs produced by citrus leaf blotch virus.

    PubMed

    Vives, María C; Galipienso, Luis; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Guerri, José

    2002-04-10

    Citrus leaf blotch virus (CLBV) has a single-stranded, positive-sense, genomic RNA (gRNA) organized in three ORFs, which encode a polyprotein involved in replication (RP), a potential movement protein (MP), and coat protein (CP). Northern blot hybridization of total, virion, or double-stranded RNA with probes of different gRNA regions revealed that CLBV produces two 3'-coterminal and two 5'-coterminal subgenomic RNAs (sgRNAs). The 3'-coterminal sgRNAs contain the MP (3'MP sgRNA) and CP (3'CP sgRNA) genes and untranslated regions (UTRs) of 123 and 284 nt, respectively, at their 5' end. These sgRNAs start with a hexanucleotide which is also present at the 5' terminus of the gRNA. The 5'-coterminal sgRNAs have 6795 and 5798 nt, colinear with the gRNA, and contain ORF1 and most MP gene (5'RPMP sgRNA) and most ORF1 (5'RP sgRNA), respectively. Their 3' termini map 35 and 40 nt upstream of the transcription initiation of the 3'CP and 3'MP sgRNAs, respectively, next to a potential promoter element. Our results suggest that, as in alphaviruses, CLBV internal genes are expressed via 3'-coterminal sgRNAs transcribed from the minus gRNA strand. The 5'-coterminal sgRNAs may result from early termination of the gRNA during the plus-strand synthesis. PMID:12033792

  4. The Murine Norovirus Core Subgenomic RNA Promoter Consists of a Stable Stem-Loop That Can Direct Accurate Initiation of RNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yunus, Muhammad Amir; Lin, Xiaoyan; Bailey, Dalan; Karakasiliotis, Ioannis; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Vashist, Surender; Zhang, Guo; Thorne, Lucy; Kao, C. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT All members of the Caliciviridae family of viruses produce a subgenomic RNA during infection. The subgenomic RNA typically encodes only the major and minor capsid proteins, but in murine norovirus (MNV), the subgenomic RNA also encodes the VF1 protein, which functions to suppress host innate immune responses. To date, the mechanism of norovirus subgenomic RNA synthesis has not been characterized. We have previously described the presence of an evolutionarily conserved RNA stem-loop structure on the negative-sense RNA, the complementary sequence of which codes for the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS7). The conserved stem-loop is positioned 6 nucleotides 3′ of the start site of the subgenomic RNA in all caliciviruses. We demonstrate that the conserved stem-loop is essential for MNV viability. Mutant MNV RNAs with substitutions in the stem-loop replicated poorly until they accumulated mutations that revert to restore the stem-loop sequence and/or structure. The stem-loop sequence functions in a noncoding context, as it was possible to restore the replication of an MNV mutant by introducing an additional copy of the stem-loop between the NS7- and VP1-coding regions. Finally, in vitro biochemical data suggest that the stem-loop sequence is sufficient for the initiation of viral RNA synthesis by the recombinant MNV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, confirming that the stem-loop forms the core of the norovirus subgenomic promoter. IMPORTANCE Noroviruses are a significant cause of viral gastroenteritis, and it is important to understand the mechanism of norovirus RNA synthesis. Here we describe the identification of an RNA stem-loop structure that functions as the core of the norovirus subgenomic RNA promoter in cells and in vitro. This work provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms of norovirus RNA synthesis and the sequences that determine the recognition of viral RNA by the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. PMID:25392209

  5. Virus replicon particle based Chikungunya virus neutralization assay using Gaussia luciferase as readout

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has been responsible for large epidemic outbreaks causing fever, headache, rash and severe arthralgia. So far, no specific treatment or vaccine is available. As nucleic acid amplification can only be used during the viremic phase of the disease, serological tests like neutralization assays are necessary for CHIKV diagnosis and for determination of the immune status of a patient. Furthermore, neutralization assays represent a useful tool to validate the efficacy of potential vaccines. As CHIKV is a BSL3 agent, neutralization assays with infectious virus need to be performed under BSL3 conditions. Our aim was to develop a neutralization assay based on non-infectious virus replicon particles (VRPs). Methods VRPs were produced by cotransfecting baby hamster kidney-21 cells with a CHIKV replicon expressing Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) and two helper RNAs expressing the CHIKV capsid protein or the remaining structural proteins, respectively. The resulting single round infectious particles were used in CHIKV neutralization assays using secreted Gluc as readout. Results Upon cotransfection of a CHIKV replicon expressing Gluc and the helper RNAs VRPs could be produced efficiently under optimized conditions at 32°C. Infection with VRPs could be measured via Gluc secreted into the supernatant. The successful use of VRPs in CHIKV neutralization assays was demonstrated using a CHIKV neutralizing monoclonal antibody or sera from CHIKV infected patients. Comparison of VRP based neutralization assays in 24- versus 96-well format using different amounts of VRPs revealed that in the 96-well format a high multiplicity of infection is favored, while in the 24-well format reliable results are also obtained using lower infection rates. Comparison of different readout times revealed that evaluation of the neutralization assay is already possible at the same day of infection. Conclusions A VRP based CHIKV neutralization assay using Gluc as readout

  6. Characterization of Rhizobium grahamii extrachromosomal replicons and their transfer among rhizobia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rhizobium grahamii belongs to a new phylogenetic group of rhizobia together with Rhizobium mesoamericanum and other species. R. grahamii has a broad-host-range that includes Leucaena leucocephala and Phaseolus vulgaris, although it is a poor competitor for P. vulgaris nodulation in the presence of Rhizobium etli or Rhizobium phaseoli strains. This work analyzed the genome sequence and transfer properties of R. grahamii plasmids. Results Genome sequence was obtained from R. grahamii CCGE502 type strain isolated from Dalea leporina in Mexico. The CCGE502 genome comprises one chromosome and two extrachromosomal replicons (ERs), pRgrCCGE502a and pRgrCCGE502b. Additionally, a plasmid integrated in the CCGE502 chromosome was found. The genomic comparison of ERs from this group showed that gene content is more variable than average nucleotide identity (ANI). Well conserved nod and nif genes were found in R. grahamii and R. mesoamericanum with some differences. R. phaseoli Ch24-10 genes expressed in bacterial cells in roots were found to be conserved in pRgrCCGE502b. Regarding conjugative transfer we were unable to transfer the R. grahamii CCGE502 symbiotic plasmid and its megaplasmid to other rhizobial hosts but we could transfer the symbiotic plasmid to Agrobacterium tumefaciens with transfer dependent on homoserine lactones. Conclusion Variable degrees of nucleotide identity and gene content conservation were found among the different R. grahamii CCGE502 replicons in comparison to R. mesoamericanum genomes. The extrachromosomal replicons from R. grahamii were more similar to those found in phylogenetically related Rhizobium species. However, limited similarities of R. grahamii CCGE502 symbiotic plasmid and megaplasmid were observed in other more distant Rhizobium species. The set of conserved genes in R. grahamii comprises some of those that are highly expressed in R. phaseoli on plant roots, suggesting that they play an important role in root colonization

  7. A glance at subgenomic flavivirus RNAs and microRNAs in flavivirus infections.

    PubMed

    Bavia, Lorena; Mosimann, Ana Luiza Pamplona; Aoki, Mateus Nóbrega; Duarte Dos Santos, Claudia Nunes

    2016-01-01

    The family Flaviviridae comprises a wide variety of viruses that are distributed worldwide, some of which are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. There are neither vaccines nor antivirals for most flavivirus infections, reinforcing the importance of research on different aspects of the viral life cycle. During infection, cytoplasmic accumulation of RNA fragments mainly originating from the 3' UTRs, which have been designated subgenomic flavivirus RNAs (sfRNAs), has been detected. It has been shown that eukaryotic exoribonucleases are involved in viral sfRNA production. Additionally, viral and human small RNAs (sRNAs) have also been found in flavivirus-infected cells, especially microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs were first described in eukaryotic cells and in a mature and functional state present as single-stranded 18-24 nt RNA fragments. Their main function is the repression of translation through base pairing with cellular mRNAs, besides other functions, such as mRNA degradation. Canonical miRNA biogenesis involves Drosha and Dicer, however miRNA can also be generated by alternative pathways. In the case of flaviviruses, alternative pathways have been suggested. Both sfRNAs and miRNAs are involved in viral infection and host cell response modulation, representing interesting targets of antiviral strategies. In this review, we focus on the generation and function of viral sfRNAs, sRNAs and miRNAs in West Nile, dengue, Japanese encephalitis, Murray Valley encephalitis and yellow fever infections, as well as their roles in viral replication, translation and cell immune response evasion. We also give an overview regarding other flaviviruses and the generation of cellular miRNAs during infection. PMID:27233361

  8. Mapping of the Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein and coat protein subgenomic RNA promoters in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grdzelishvili, V Z; Chapman, S N; Dawson, W O; Lewandowski, D J

    2000-09-15

    The Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein (MP) and coat protein (CP) are expressed from 3'-coterminal subgenomic RNAs (sgRNAs). The transcription start site of the MP sgRNA, previously mapped to positions 4838 (Y. Watanabe, T. Meshi, and Y. Okada (1984), FEBS Lett. 173, 247-250) and 4828 (K. Lehto, G. L. Grantham, and W. O. Dawson (1990), Virology 174, 145-157) for the TMV OM and U1 strains, respectively, has been reexamined and mapped to position 4838 for strain U1. Sequences of the MP and CP sgRNA promoters were delineated by deletion analysis. The boundaries for minimal and full MP sgRNA promoter activity were localized between -35 and +10 and -95 and +40, respectively, relative to the transcription start site. The minimal CP sgRNA promoter was mapped between -69 and +12, whereas the boundaries of the fully active promoter were between -157 and +54. Computer analysis predicted two stem-loop structures (SL1 and SL2) upstream of the MP sgRNA transcription start site. Deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis suggested that SL1 secondary structure, but not its sequence, was required for MP sgRNA promoter activity, whereas a 39-nt deletion removing most of the SL2 region increased MP sgRNA accumulation fourfold. Computer-predicted folding of the fully active CP sgRNA promoter revealed one long stem-loop structure. Deletion analysis suggested that the upper part of this stem-loop, located upstream of the transcription start site, was essential for transcription and that the lower part of the stem had an enhancing role. PMID:11017798

  9. Copy Number Variation Burden on Asthma Subgenome in Normal Cohorts Identifies Susceptibility Markers

    PubMed Central

    Vishweswaraiah, Sangeetha; Veerappa, Avinash M; Mahesh, Padukudru A; Jahromi, Sareh R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Asthma is a complex disease caused by interplay of genes and environment on the genome of an individual. Copy number variations (CNVs) are more common compared to the other variations that disrupt genome organization. The effect of CNVs on asthma subgenome has been less studied compared to studies on the other variations. We report the assessments of CNV burden in asthma genes of normal cohorts carried out in different geographical areas of the world and discuss the relevance of the observation with respect to asthma pathogenesis. Methods CNV analysis was performed using Affymerix high-resolution arrays, and various bioinformatics tools were used to understand the influence of genes on asthma pathogenesis. Results This study identified 61 genes associated with asthma and provided various mechanisms and pathways underlying asthma pathogenesis. CCL3L1, ADAM8, and MUC5B were the most prevalent asthma genes. Among them, CCL3L1 was found across all 12 populations in varying copy number states. This study also identified the inheritance of asthma-CNVs from parents to offspring creating the latent period for manifestation of asthma. Conclusions This study revealed CNV burden with varying copy number states and identified susceptibility towards the disease manifestation. It can be hypothesized that primary CNVs may not be the initiating event in the pathogenesis of asthma and additional preceding mutations or CNVs may be required. The initiator or primary CNVs sensitize normal cohorts leading to an increased probability of accumulating mutations or exposure to allergic stimulating agents that can augment the development of asthma. PMID:25749760

  10. Subgenomic mRNA regulation by a distal RNA element in a (+)-strand RNA virus.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, G; Slowinski, V; White, K A

    1999-01-01

    Subgenomic (sg) mRNAs are synthesized by (+)-strand RNA viruses to allow for efficient translation of products encoded 3' in their genomes. This strategy also provides a means for regulating the expression of such products via modulation of sg mRNA accumulation. We have studied the mechanism by which sg mRNAs levels are controlled in tomato bushy stunt virus, a small (+)-strand RNA virus which synthesizes two sg mRNAs during infections. Neither the viral capsid nor movement proteins were found to play any significant role in modulating the accumulation levels of either sg mRNA. Deletion analysis did, however, identify a 12-nt-long RNA sequence located approximately 1,000 nt upstream from the site of initiation of sg mRNA2 synthesis that was required specifically for accumulation of sg mRNA2. Further analysis revealed a potential base-pairing interaction between this sequence and a sequence located just 5' to the site of initiation for sg mRNA2 synthesis. Mutant genomes in which this interaction was either disrupted or maintained were analyzed and the results indicated a positive correlation between the predicted stability of the base-pairing interaction and the efficiency of sg mRNA2 accumulation. The functional significance of the long-distance interaction was further supported by phylogenetic sequence analysis which revealed conservation of base-pairing interactions of similar stability and relative position in the genomes of different tombusviruses. It is proposed that the upstream sequence represents a cis-acting RNA element which facilitates sg mRNA accumulation by promoting efficient synthesis of sg mRNA2 via a long-distance RNA-RNA interaction. PMID:10199571

  11. Development and evaluation of a replicon particle vaccine expressing the E2 glycoprotein of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is one of the most significant and costly viral pathogens of cattle worldwide. Alphavirus-derived replicon particles have been shown to be safe and highly effective vaccine vectors against a variety of human and veterinary pathogens. Replicon particles are non-propagating...

  12. Development of dengue virus replicons expressing HIV-1 gp120 and other heterologous genes: a potential future tool for dual vaccination against dengue virus and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Mingjie; Dayton, Andrew I

    2001-01-01

    Background Toward the goals of providing an additional vector to add to the armamentarium available to HIV vaccinologists and of creating a bivalent vaccine effective against dengue virus and HIV, we have attempted to create vectors which express dengue virus non-structural proteins and HIV immunogens. Previously we reported the successful construction of dengue virus replicons which lack structural genes necessary for virion release and spreading infection in culture but which can replicate intracellularly and abundantly produce dengue non-structural proteins. Here we attempted to express heterologous genetic material from these replicons. Results We cloned into a Δpre-M/E dengue virus replicon genes for either green fluorescent protein (GFP), HIV gp160 or HIV gp120 and tested the ability of these constructs to express dengue virus proteins as well as the heterologous proteins in tissue culture after transfection of replicon RNA. Conclusions Heterologous proteins were readily expressed from these constructs. GFP and gp120 demonstrated minimal or no toxicity. Gp160 expressing replicons were found to express proteins abundantly at 36 hours post transfection, but after 50 hrs of transfection, few replicon positive cells could be found despite the presence of cellular debris positive for replicon proteins. This suggested that gp160 expressed from dengue virus replicons is considerably more toxic than either GFP or gp120. The successful expression of heterologous proteins, including HIV gp120 for long periods in culture suggests this vector system may be useful as a vaccine vector, given appropriate delivery methods. PMID:11747468

  13. Lack of interference with immunogenicity of a chimeric alphavirus replicon particle-based influenza vaccine by preexisting antivector immunity.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Yasushi; Vajdy, Michael; Lian, Ying; Perri, Silvia; Greer, Catherine E; Legg, Harold S; Galli, Grazia; Saletti, Giulietta; Otten, Gillis R; Rappuoli, Rino; Barnett, Susan W; Polo, John M

    2012-07-01

    Antivector immunity has been recognized as a potential caveat of using virus-based vaccines. In the present study, an alphavirus-based replicon particle vaccine platform, which has demonstrated robust immunogenicity in animal models, was tested for effects of antivector immunity on immunogenicity against hemagglutinin of influenza virus as a target antigen and efficacy for protection against lethal challenge with the virus. Chimeric alphavirus-based replicon particles, comprising Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus nonstructural and Sindbis virus structural components, induced efficient protective antibody responses, which were not adversely influenced after multiple immunizations with the same vector expressing various antigens. PMID:22623651

  14. Processing TES Level-1B Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBaca, Richard C.; Sarkissian, Edwin; Madatyan, Mariyetta; Shepard, Douglas; Gluck, Scott; Apolinski, Mark; McDuffie, James; Tremblay, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    TES L1B Subsystem is a computer program that performs several functions for the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). The term "L1B" (an abbreviation of "level 1B"), refers to data, specific to the TES, on radiometric calibrated spectral radiances and their corresponding noise equivalent spectral radiances (NESRs), plus ancillary geolocation, quality, and engineering data. The functions performed by TES L1B Subsystem include shear analysis, monitoring of signal levels, detection of ice build-up, and phase correction and radiometric and spectral calibration of TES target data. Also, the program computes NESRs for target spectra, writes scientific TES level-1B data to hierarchical- data-format (HDF) files for public distribution, computes brightness temperatures, and quantifies interpixel signal variability for the purpose of first-order cloud and heterogeneous land screening by the level-2 software summarized in the immediately following article. This program uses an in-house-developed algorithm, called "NUSRT," to correct instrument line-shape factors.

  15. Two key arginine residues in the coat protein of Bamboo mosaic virus differentially affect the accumulation of viral genomic and subgenomic RNAs.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chien-Jen; Hu, Chung-Chi; Lin, Na-Sheng; Lee, Ya-Chien; Meng, Menghsiao; Tsai, Ching-Hsiu; Hsu, Yau-Heiu

    2014-02-01

    The interactions between viral RNAs and coat proteins (CPs) are critical for the efficient completion of infection cycles of RNA viruses. However, the specificity of the interactions between CPs and genomic or subgenomic RNAs remains poorly understood. In this study, Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) was used to analyse such interactions. Using reversible formaldehyde cross-linking and mass spectrometry, two regions in CP, each containing a basic amino acid (R99 and R227, respectively), were identified to bind directly to the 5' untranslated region of BaMV genomic RNA. Analyses of the alanine mutations of R99 and R227 revealed that the secondary structures of CP were not affected significantly, whereas the accumulation of BaMV genomic, but not subgenomic, RNA was severely decreased at 24 h post-inoculation in the inoculated protoplasts. In the absence of CP, the accumulation levels of genomic and subgenomic RNAs were decreased to 1.1%-1.5% and 33%-40% of that of the wild-type (wt), respectively, in inoculated leaves at 5 days post-inoculation (dpi). In contrast, in the presence of mutant CPs, the genomic RNAs remained about 1% of that of wt, whereas the subgenomic RNAs accumulated to at least 87%, suggesting that CP might increase the accumulation of subgenomic RNAs. The mutations also restricted viral movement and virion formation in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves at 5 dpi. These results demonstrate that R99 and R227 of CP play crucial roles in the accumulation, movement and virion formation of BaMV RNAs, and indicate that genomic and subgenomic RNAs interact differently with BaMV CP. PMID:24393453

  16. Contribution of subgenomes to the transcriptome and their intertwined regulation in the allopolyploid Coffea arabica grown at contrasted temperatures.

    PubMed

    Combes, Marie-Christine; Dereeper, Alexis; Severac, Dany; Bertrand, Benoît; Lashermes, Philippe

    2013-10-01

    Polyploidy has occurred throughout the evolutionary history of plants and led to diversification and plant ecological adaptation. Functional plasticity of duplicate genes is believed to play a major role in the environmental adaptation of polyploids. In this context, we characterized genome-wide homoeologous gene expression in Coffea arabica, a recent allopolyploid combining two subgenomes that derive from two closely related diploid species, and investigated its variation in response to changing environment. The transcriptome of leaves of C. arabica cultivated at different growing temperatures suitable for one or the other parental species was examined using RNA-sequencing. The relative contribution of homoeologs to gene expression was estimated for 9959 and 10,628 genes in warm and cold conditions, respectively. Whatever the growing conditions, 65% of the genes showed equivalent levels of homoeologous gene expression. In 92% of the genes, relative homoeologous gene expression varied < 10% between growing temperatures. The subgenome contributions to the transcriptome appeared to be only marginally altered by the different conditions (involving intertwined regulations of homeologs) suggesting that C. arabica's ability to tolerate a broader range of growing temperatures than its diploid parents does not result from differential use of homoeologs. PMID:23790161

  17. Population genomic analysis reveals differential evolutionary histories and patterns of diversity across subgenomes and subpopulations of Brassica napus L.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gazave, Elodie; Tassone, Erica E.; Ilut, Daniel C.; Wingerson, Megan; Datema, Erwin; Witsenboer, Hanneke M. A.; Davis, James B.; Grant, David; Dyer, John M.; Jenks, Matthew A.; et al

    2016-04-21

    Here, the allotetraploid species Brassica napus L. is a global crop of major economic importance, providing canola oil (seed) and vegetables for human consumption and fodder and meal for livestock feed. Characterizing the genetic diversity present in the extant germplasm pool of B. napus is fundamental to better conserve, manage and utilize the genetic resources of this species. We used sequence-based genotyping to identify and genotype 30,881 SNPs in a diversity panel of 782 B. napus accessions, representing samples of winter and spring growth habits originating from 33 countries across Europe, Asia, and America. We detected strong population structure broadlymore » concordant with growth habit and geography, and identified three major genetic groups: spring (SP), winter Europe (WE), and winter Asia (WA). Subpopulation-specific polymorphism patterns suggest enriched genetic diversity within the WA group and a smaller effective breeding population for the SP group compared to WE. Interestingly, the two subgenomes of B. napus appear to have different geographic origins, with phylogenetic analysis placing WE and WA as basal clades for the other subpopulations in the C and A subgenomes, respectively. Finally, we identified 16 genomic regions where the patterns of diversity differed markedly from the genome-wide average, several of which are suggestive of genomic inversions. The results obtained in this study constitute a valuable resource for worldwide breeding efforts and the genetic dissection and prediction of complex B. napus traits.« less

  18. Population Genomic Analysis Reveals Differential Evolutionary Histories and Patterns of Diversity across Subgenomes and Subpopulations of Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Gazave, Elodie; Tassone, Erica E; Ilut, Daniel C; Wingerson, Megan; Datema, Erwin; Witsenboer, Hanneke M A; Davis, James B; Grant, David; Dyer, John M; Jenks, Matthew A; Brown, Jack; Gore, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The allotetraploid species Brassica napus L. is a global crop of major economic importance, providing canola oil (seed) and vegetables for human consumption and fodder and meal for livestock feed. Characterizing the genetic diversity present in the extant germplasm pool of B. napus is fundamental to better conserve, manage and utilize the genetic resources of this species. We used sequence-based genotyping to identify and genotype 30,881 SNPs in a diversity panel of 782 B. napus accessions, representing samples of winter and spring growth habits originating from 33 countries across Europe, Asia, and America. We detected strong population structure broadly concordant with growth habit and geography, and identified three major genetic groups: spring (SP), winter Europe (WE), and winter Asia (WA). Subpopulation-specific polymorphism patterns suggest enriched genetic diversity within the WA group and a smaller effective breeding population for the SP group compared to WE. Interestingly, the two subgenomes of B. napus appear to have different geographic origins, with phylogenetic analysis placing WE and WA as basal clades for the other subpopulations in the C and A subgenomes, respectively. Finally, we identified 16 genomic regions where the patterns of diversity differed markedly from the genome-wide average, several of which are suggestive of genomic inversions. The results obtained in this study constitute a valuable resource for worldwide breeding efforts and the genetic dissection and prediction of complex B. napus traits. PMID:27148342

  19. Gene profiling of growth factor independence 1B gene (Gfi-1B) in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Koldehoff, Michael; Zakrzewski, Johannes L; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Beelen, Dietrich W; Elmaagacli, Ahmet H

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the molecular effects of growth factor independence 1B (Gfi-1B), a transcription factor essential for the development of hematopoietic cells and differentiation of erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages, the naturally Gfi-1B overexpressing cell line K562 was cultured in the presence of Gfi-1B target-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). SiRNA treatment significantly knocked down Gfi-1B expression with an efficiency of nearly 90%. Analysis of the siRNA silencing protocol by colony-forming units ensured that it was not cytotoxic. Samples from Gfi-1B overexpressing cells and cells with knocked-down Gfi-1B were analyzed by oligonucleotide microarray technology and based upon rigorous statistical analysis of the data; relevant genes were chosen for confirmation by reserve transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, including MYC/MYCBP and CDKN1A. Interestingly, transcripts within components of the signalling cascade of immune cells (PLD1, LAMP1, HSP90, IL6ST), of the tyrosine kinase pathway (TPR, RAC3) and of the transcription factors (RAC3, CEP290, JEM-1, ATR, MYC, SMC3, RARA, RBBP6) were found to be differentially expressed in Gfi-1B overexpressing cells compared to controls. Individual genes such as ZDHHC17, DMXL1, ZNF292 were found to be upregulated in Gfi-1B overexpressing cells. In addition, down-regulated transcripts showed cell signaling transcripts for several chemokine gene members including GNAL, CXCL5, GNL3L, GPR65, TMEM30, BCL11B and transcription factors (GTF2H3, ATXN3). In conclusion, several essential cell signalling factors, as well as transcriptional and post-translational regulation genes were differentially expressed in cells that overexpressed Gfi-1B compared to control cells with knocked-down Gfi-1B. Our data indicate that Gfi-1B signalling is important for commitment and maturation of hematopoietic cell populations. PMID:18224412

  20. Experimental Reproduction of Type 1B Chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, G. E.; Le, L.

    2002-01-01

    We have replicated type 1B chondrule textures and compositions with crystallization experiments in which UOC material was melted at 1400 deg.C and cooled at 5-1000 deg.C/hr using graphite crucibles in evacuated silica tubes to provide a reducing environment. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. A Polyprotein-Expressing Salmonid Alphavirus Replicon Induces Modest Protection in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo Salar) Against Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Azila; Olsen, Christel M.; Hodneland, Kjartan; Rimstad, Espen

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is an important strategy for the control and prevention of infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in the post-smolt stage in sea-water. In this study, a heterologous gene expression system, based on a replicon construct of salmonid alphavirus (SAV), was used for in vitro and in vivo expression of IPN virus proteins. The large open reading frame of segment A, encoding the polyprotein NH2-pVP2-VP4-VP3-COOH, as well as pVP2, were cloned and expressed by the SAV replicon in Chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214) and epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells. The replicon constructs pSAV/polyprotein (pSAV/PP) and pSAV/pVP2 were used to immunize Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) by a single intramuscular injection and tested in a subsequent IPN virus (IPNV) challenge trial. A low to moderate protection against IPN was observed in fish immunized with the replicon vaccine that encoded the pSAV/PP, while the pSAV/pVP2 construct was not found to induce protection. PMID:25606973

  2. Development of porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus replicon vector for foot-and-mouth disease vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Jeeva, Subbiah; Lee, Jung-Ah; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Choi, In-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an economically important global animal disease. To control FMD virus (FMDV) outbreaks, a lot of different novel approaches have been attempted. In this study, we proposed a novel porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) as a replicon vector to express FMDV structural protein. Materials and Methods PRRSV infectious clone (PRRSVK418DM) was used to develop an expression vector through the reverse genetic manipulation of PRRSV; FMDVP12A3C gene of serotype O was synthesized and used for an antigen. MARC-145 cells (African green monkey kidney epithelial cell line) were used for electroporation mediated transfection. The transfection or the expression of P12A3C and N protein of PRRSV was analyzed by either replicon containing PRRSV alone or by co-infection of helper PRRSV. Results We constructed PRRSVK418DM replicon vector containing FMDVP12A3C, and genome sequences were confirmed by subsequent sequence analysis. In vitro expression of P12A3C and PRRSV N protein was confirmed by immunofluorescence antibody assay using antibodies specific for PRRSV N protein (anti-PRRSV N MAb), FMDV-VP1 (anti-VP1 MAb). Conclusion The results indicate that PRRSV replicon vector can be a promising novel vector system to control FMDV and useful for vaccine development in the future. PMID:24427767

  3. Characterization of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli by Plasmid Replicon Typing and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Characterization of plasmids has particular clinical significance because genes encoding important traits such as antimicrobial resistance are frequently present in plasmids. Plasmid replicon typing is a multiplex PCR based method that can be used to classify 18 of the 26 known plasmid t...

  4. Expression of the Novel Hepatitis C Virus Core+1/ARF Protein in the Context of JFH1-Based Replicons

    PubMed Central

    Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Karakasiliotis, Ioannis; Vassilaki, Niki; Sakellariou, Panagiotis; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus contains a second open reading frame within the core gene, designated core+1/ARF. Here we demonstrate for the first time expression of core+1/ARF protein in the context of a bicistronic JFH1-based replicon and report the production of two isoforms, core+1/L (long) and core+1/S (short), with different kinetics. PMID:25694591

  5. Aldo-keto Reductase 1B15 (AKR1B15)

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Susanne; Salabei, Joshua K.; Möller, Gabriele; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Adamski, Jerzy; Barski, Oleg A.

    2015-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) comprise a superfamily of proteins involved in the reduction and oxidation of biogenic and xenobiotic carbonyls. In humans, at least 15 AKR superfamily members have been identified so far. One of these is a newly identified gene locus, AKR1B15, which clusters on chromosome 7 with the other human AKR1B subfamily members (i.e. AKR1B1 and AKR1B10). We show that alternative splicing of the AKR1B15 gene transcript gives rise to two protein isoforms with different N termini: AKR1B15.1 is a 316-amino acid protein with 91% amino acid identity to AKR1B10; AKR1B15.2 has a prolonged N terminus and consists of 344 amino acid residues. The two gene products differ in their expression level, subcellular localization, and activity. In contrast with other AKR enzymes, which are mostly cytosolic, AKR1B15.1 co-localizes with the mitochondria. Kinetic studies show that AKR1B15.1 is predominantly a reductive enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of androgens and estrogens with high positional selectivity (17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity) as well as 3-keto-acyl-CoA conjugates and exhibits strong cofactor selectivity toward NADP(H). In accordance with its substrate spectrum, the enzyme is expressed at the highest levels in steroid-sensitive tissues, namely placenta, testis, and adipose tissue. Placental and adipose expression could be reproduced in the BeWo and SGBS cell lines, respectively. In contrast, AKR1B15.2 localizes to the cytosol and displays no enzymatic activity with the substrates tested. Collectively, these results demonstrate the existence of a novel catalytically active AKR, which is associated with mitochondria and expressed mainly in steroid-sensitive tissues. PMID:25577493

  6. Effects of activated aflatoxin B/sub 1/ and caffeine on DNA replicon initiation in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, P.; Painter, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Afatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB/sub 1/) is activated by a rat microsomal extract (S-9) to form a product that inhibits DNA synthesis in HeLa cells. At 10/sup -7/ M, AFB/sub 1/ inhibited initiation of replicons, as shown in alkaline sucrose gradient profiles 30 min after incubation with the drug. Ninety minutes later, the profile of treated cells was similar to that of control, but 4 h later there was another effect on replicon initiation. At 10/sup -6/ M, the inhibition of initiation was greater than at 10/sup -7/ M and increased progressively. Four hours after removal of the drug, the gradient profile showed low amounts of radioactivity in all size classes of DNA. When cells were incubated in medium containing caffeine (2 mM) even as late as 60 min after incubation with AFB/sub 1/, the inhibition of replicon initiation was prevented. If caffeine was later removed from the medium, replicon initiation was then inhibited. At 10/sup -7/ M or 10/sup -6/ M, AFB/sub 1/ had little immediate effect on chain elongation, but at 10/sup -5/ M, the gradient profiles showed an accumulation of low molecular weight DNA molecules, with no radioactivity in the region of high molecular weight DNA, owing to a block to chain elongation; this was not affected by caffeine. These results suggest that AFB/sub 1/ induces damage that changes the fonformation of chromatin so that initiation of new replicons cannot occur; in the presence of caffeine this change does not occur and DNA replication is not inhibited.

  7. Mutations Conferring a Noncytotoxic Phenotype on Chikungunya Virus Replicons Compromise Enzymatic Properties of Nonstructural Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Utt, Age; Das, Pratyush Kumar; Varjak, Margus; Lulla, Valeria; Lulla, Aleksei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) (genus Alphavirus) has a positive-sense RNA genome. CHIKV nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) proteolytically processes the viral nonstructural polyprotein, possesses nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase), RNA triphosphatase, and RNA helicase activities, and induces cytopathic effects in vertebrate cells. Although alphaviral nsP2 mutations can result in a noncytotoxic phenotype, the effects of such mutations on nsP2 enzymatic activities are not well understood. In this study, we introduced a P718G (PG) mutation and selected for additional mutations in CHIKV nsP2 that resulted in a CHIKV replicon with a noncytotoxic phenotype in BHK-21 cells. Combinations of PG and either an E116K (EK) substitution or a GEEGS sequence insertion after residue T648 (5A) markedly reduced RNA synthesis; however, neither PG nor 5A prevented nsP2 nuclear translocation. Introducing PG into recombinant nsP2 inhibited proteolytic cleavage of nsP1/nsP2 and nsP3/nsP4 sites, reduced GTPase and RNA helicase activities, and abolished RNA stimulation of GTPase activity. 5A and EK modulated the effects of PG. However, only the RNA helicase activity of nsP2 was reduced by both of these mutations, suggesting that defects in this activity may be linked to a noncytotoxic phenotype. These results increase our understanding of the molecular basis for the cytotoxicity that accompanies alphaviral replication. Furthermore, adaptation of the CHIKV replicon containing both 5A and PG allowed the selection of a CHIKV replicon with adaptive mutations in nsP1 and nsP3 that enable persistence in human cell line. Such cell lines represent valuable experimental systems for discovering host factors and for screening inhibitors of CHIKV replication at lower biosafety levels. IMPORTANCE CHIKV is a medically important pathogen that causes febrile illness and can cause chronic arthritis. No approved vaccines or antivirals are available for CHIKV. The attenuation of CHIKV is critical to the

  8. 5' and 3' Untranslated Regions Strongly Enhance Performance of Geminiviral Replicons in Nicotiana benthamiana Leaves.

    PubMed

    Diamos, Andrew G; Rosenthal, Sun H; Mason, Hugh S

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a recombinant protein production system based on a geminivirus replicon that yields high levels of vaccine antigens and monoclonal antibodies in plants. The bean yellow dwarf virus (BeYDV) replicon generates massive amounts of DNA copies, which engage the plant transcription machinery. However, we noticed a disparity between transcript level and protein production, suggesting that mRNAs could be more efficiently utilized. In this study, we systematically evaluated genetic elements from human, viral, and plant sources for their potential to improve the BeYDV system. The tobacco extensin terminator enhanced transcript accumulation and protein production compared to other commonly used terminators, indicating that efficient transcript processing plays an important role in recombinant protein production. Evaluation of human-derived 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) indicated that many provided high levels of protein production, supporting their cross-kingdom function. Among the viral 5' UTRs tested, we found the greatest enhancement with the tobacco mosaic virus omega leader. An analysis of the 5' UTRs from the Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotinana benthamiana photosystem I K genes found that they were highly active when truncated to include only the near upstream region, providing a dramatic enhancement of transgene production that exceeded that of the tobacco mosaic virus omega leader. The tobacco Rb7 matrix attachment region inserted downstream from the gene of interest provided significant enhancement, which was correlated with a reduction in plant cell death. Evaluation of Agrobacterium strains found that EHA105 enhanced protein production and reduced cell death compared to LBA4301 and GV3101. We used these improvements to produce Norwalk virus capsid protein at >20% total soluble protein, corresponding to 1.8 mg/g leaf fresh weight, more than twice the highest level ever reported in a plant system. We also produced the monoclonal antibody

  9. Antibiotic resistance due to an unusual ColE1-type replicon plasmid in Aeromonas salmonicida.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Antony T; Emond-Rheault, Jean-Guillaume; Barbeau, Xavier; Attéré, Sabrina A; Frenette, Michel; Lagüe, Patrick; Charette, Steve J

    2016-06-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is a fish pathogen known to have a rich plasmidome. In the present study, we discovered an isolate of this bacterium bearing an additional unidentified small plasmid. After having sequenced the DNA of that isolate by next-generation sequencing, it appeared that the new small plasmid is a ColE1-type replicon plasmid, named here pAsa7. This plasmid bears a functional chloramphenicol-acetyltransferase-encoding gene (cat-pAsa7) previously unknown in A. salmonicida and responsible for resistance to chloramphenicol. A comparison of pAsa7 with pAsa2, the only known ColE1-type replicon plasmid usually found in A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, revealed that even if both plasmids share a high structural similarity, it is still unclear if pAsa7 is a derivative of pAsa2 since they showed several mutations at the nucleotide level. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the cat-pAsa4 gene, another chloramphenicol-acetyltransferase-encoding gene, found on the large plasmid pAsa4, was significantly more transcribed than cat-pAsa7. This was correlated with a higher chloramphenicol resistance for isolates bearing pAsa4 compared with the one having pAsa7. Finally, a phylogenetic analysis showed that both CAT-pAsa4 and CAT-pAsa7 proteins were in different clusters. The clustering was supported by the identity of residues involved in the catalytic site. In addition, to give a better understanding of the large drug-resistance panel of A. salmonicida, this study reinforces the hypothesis that A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is a considerable reservoir for mobile genetic elements such as plasmids. PMID:27028891

  10. Accumulation of a 5’ proximal subgenomic RNA of Citrus tristeza virus is correlated with encapsidation by the minor coat protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During replication, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) produces large amounts of two unusual subgenomic (sg) RNAs that are positive-stranded and 5' -coterminal. Although these RNAs are produced in similar amounts and are similar in size, with LMT1 (~750 nt) only slightly larger than LMT2 (~650), we found ...

  11. ESA Swarm Mission - Level 1b Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Floberghagen, Rune; Mecozzi, Riccardo; Menard, Yvon

    2014-05-01

    Swarm, a three-satellite constellation to study the dynamics of the Earth's magnetic field and its interactions with the Earth system, has been launched in November 2013. The objective of the Swarm mission is to provide the best ever survey of the geomagnetic field and its temporal evolution, which will bring new insights into the Earth system by improving our understanding of the Earth's interior and environment. The Level 1b Products of the Swarm mission contain time-series of the quality screened, calibrated, corrected, and fully geo-localized measurements of the magnetic field intensity, the magnetic field vector (provided in both instrument and Earth-fixed frames), the plasma density, temperature, and velocity. Additionally, quality screened and pre-calibrated measurements of the nongravitational accelerations are provided. Geo-localization is performed by 24- channel GPS receivers and by means of unique, three head Advanced Stellar Compasses for high-precision satellite attitude information. The Swarm Level 1b data will be provided in daily products separately for each of the three Swarm spacecrafts. This poster will present detailed lists of the contents of the Swarm Level 1b Products and brief descriptions of the processing algorithms used in the generation of these data.

  12. B-1B excels in conventional role

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.B.

    1992-07-01

    A report is presented of an observational flight performed in a USAF B-1B to better understand the operational aspects of the aircraft's new conventional bombing mission as an integral element of a multiaircraft tactical strike package. The basic flight plan consisted of a standard takeoff and climb, cruising to the training area at 22,000 ft, descending for a 400 ft low-level run, making two simulated bomb drops, and climbing back to 25,000 ft for the return to base. Attention is given the new/enhanced avionics, the ALQ-161 defensive electronic warfare system and ripple-release Mk. 82 bombing procedures.

  13. Susceptibilities of Genotype 1a, 1b, and 3 Hepatitis C Virus Variants to the NS5A Inhibitor Elbasvir

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Stephanie; McMonagle, Patricia; Yeh, Wendy W.; Ludmerer, Steven W.; Jumes, Patricia A.; Marshall, William L.; Kong, Stephanie; Ingravallo, Paul; Black, Stuart; Pak, Irene; DiNubile, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Elbasvir is an investigational NS5A inhibitor with in vitro activity against multiple HCV genotypes. Antiviral activity of elbasvir was measured in replicons derived from wild-type or resistant variants of genotypes 1a, 1b, and 3. The barrier to resistance was assessed by the number of resistant colonies selected by exposure to various elbasvir concentrations. In a phase 1b dose-escalating study, virologic responses were determined in 48 noncirrhotic adult men with chronic genotype 1 or 3 infections randomized to placebo or elbasvir from 5 to 50 mg (genotype 1) or 10 to 100 mg (genotype 3) once daily for 5 days. The NS5A gene was sequenced from plasma specimens obtained before, during, and after treatment. Elbasvir suppressed the emergence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs) in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Variants selected by exposure to high elbasvir concentrations typically encoded multiple amino acid substitutions (most commonly involving loci 30, 31, and 93), conferring high-level elbasvir resistance. In the monotherapy study, patients with genotype 1b had greater reductions in HCV RNA levels than patients with genotype 1a at all elbasvir doses; responses in patients with genotype 3 were generally less pronounced than for genotype 1, particularly at lower elbasvir doses. M28T, Q30R, L31V, and Y93H in genotype 1a, L31V and Y93H in genotype 1b, and A30K, L31F, and Y93H in genotype 3 were the predominant RAVs selected by elbasvir monotherapy. Virologic findings in patients were consistent with the preclinical observations. NS5A-RAVs emerged most often at amino acid positions 28, 30, 31, and 93 in both the laboratory and clinical trial. (The MK-8742 P002 trial has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01532973.) PMID:26303801

  14. A sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding the rabies virus glycoprotein elicits immune responses and complete protection in mice from lethal challenge.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sonal; Dahiya, Shyam S; Sonwane, Arvind A; Patel, Chhabi Lal; Saini, Mohini; Rai, A; Gupta, Praveen K

    2008-12-01

    A sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding rabies virus glycoprotein (G) was developed by subcloning rabies G gene into a sindbis virus replicon-based vaccine vector (pAlpha). The self-amplification of RNA transcripts and translation efficiency of rabies G was analyzed in pAlpha-Rab-G-transfected mammalian cells using RT-PCR, SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. The transfected cells also showed induction of apoptosis which is an important event in the enhancement of immune responses. Further, immune responses induced with replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine (pAlpha-Rab-G) was compared with conventional rabies DNA vaccine and commercial cell culture vaccine (Rabipur) in intramuscularly injected mice. The mice immunized with replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine induced humoral and cell mediated immune responses better than conventional rabies DNA vaccine however, comparable to Rabipur vaccine. On challenge with rabies virus CVS strain, replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine conferred complete protection similar to Rabipur. These results demonstrate that replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine is effective in inducing both humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective vaccine against rabies. PMID:18848857

  15. Selection and characterization of hepatitis C virus replicons dually resistant to the polymerase and protease inhibitors HCV-796 and boceprevir (SCH 503034).

    PubMed

    Flint, Mike; Mullen, Stanley; Deatly, Anne M; Chen, Wei; Miller, Lynn Z; Ralston, Robert; Broom, Colin; Emini, Emilio A; Howe, Anita Y M

    2009-02-01

    HCV-796 is a nonnucleoside inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) polymerase, and boceprevir is an inhibitor of the NS3 serine protease. The emergence of replicon variants resistant to the combination of HCV-796 and boceprevir was evaluated. Combining the inhibitors greatly reduced the frequency with which resistant colonies arose; however, some resistant replicon cells could be isolated by the use of low inhibitor concentrations. These replicons were approximately 1,000-fold less susceptible to HCV-796 and 9-fold less susceptible to boceprevir. They also exhibited resistance to anthranilate nonnucleoside inhibitors of NS5B but were fully sensitive to inhibitors of different mechanisms: a pyranoindole, Hsp90 inhibitors, an NS5B nucleoside inhibitor, and pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN). The replicon was cleared from the combination-resistant cells by extended treatment with Peg-IFN. Mutations known to confer resistance to HCV-796 (NS5B C316Y) and boceprevir (NS3 V170A) were present in the combination-resistant replicons. These changes could be selected together and coexist in the same genome. The replicon bearing both changes exhibited reduced sensitivity to inhibition by HCV-796 and boceprevir but had a reduced replicative capacity. PMID:18936191

  16. Selection and Characterization of Hepatitis C Virus Replicons Dually Resistant to the Polymerase and Protease Inhibitors HCV-796 and Boceprevir (SCH 503034) ▿

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Mike; Mullen, Stanley; Deatly, Anne M.; Chen, Wei; Miller, Lynn Z.; Ralston, Robert; Broom, Colin; Emini, Emilio A.; Howe, Anita Y. M.

    2009-01-01

    HCV-796 is a nonnucleoside inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) polymerase, and boceprevir is an inhibitor of the NS3 serine protease. The emergence of replicon variants resistant to the combination of HCV-796 and boceprevir was evaluated. Combining the inhibitors greatly reduced the frequency with which resistant colonies arose; however, some resistant replicon cells could be isolated by the use of low inhibitor concentrations. These replicons were approximately 1,000-fold less susceptible to HCV-796 and 9-fold less susceptible to boceprevir. They also exhibited resistance to anthranilate nonnucleoside inhibitors of NS5B but were fully sensitive to inhibitors of different mechanisms: a pyranoindole, Hsp90 inhibitors, an NS5B nucleoside inhibitor, and pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN). The replicon was cleared from the combination-resistant cells by extended treatment with Peg-IFN. Mutations known to confer resistance to HCV-796 (NS5B C316Y) and boceprevir (NS3 V170A) were present in the combination-resistant replicons. These changes could be selected together and coexist in the same genome. The replicon bearing both changes exhibited reduced sensitivity to inhibition by HCV-796 and boceprevir but had a reduced replicative capacity. PMID:18936191

  17. Skylab Saturn 1B flight manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A Saturn 1B Flight Manual provides launch vehicle systems descriptions and predicted performance data for the Skylab missions. Vehicle SL-2 (SA-206) is the baseline for this manual; but, as a result of the great similarity, the material is representative of SL-3 and SL-4 launch vehicles, also. The Flight Manual is not a control document but is intended primarily as an aid to astronauts who are training for Skylab missions. In order to provide a comprehensive reference for that purpose, the manual also contains descriptions of the ground support interfaces, prelaunch operations, and emergency procedures. Mission variables and constraints are summarized, and mission control monitoring and data flow during launch preparation and flight are discussed.

  18. Self-Amplifying Replicon RNA Vaccine Delivery to Dendritic Cells by Synthetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Kenneth C.; Milona, Panagiota; Thomann-Harwood, Lisa; Démoulins, Thomas; Englezou, Pavlos; Suter, Rolf; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play essential roles determining efficacy of vaccine delivery with respect to immune defence development and regulation. This renders DCs important targets for vaccine delivery, particularly RNA vaccines. While delivery of interfering RNA oligonucleotides to the appropriate intracellular sites for RNA-interference has proven successful, the methodologies are identical for RNA vaccines, which require delivery to RNA translation sites. Delivery of mRNA has benefitted from application of cationic entities; these offer value following endocytosis of RNA, when cationic or amphipathic properties can promote endocytic vesicle membrane perturbation to facilitate cytosolic translocation. The present review presents how such advances are being applied to the delivery of a new form of RNA vaccine, replicons (RepRNA) carrying inserted foreign genes of interest encoding vaccine antigens. Approaches have been developed for delivery to DCs, leading to the translation of the RepRNA and encoded vaccine antigens both in vitro and in vivo. Potential mechanisms favouring efficient delivery leading to translation are discussed with respect to the DC endocytic machinery, showing the importance of cytosolic translocation from acidifying endocytic structures. The review relates the DC endocytic pathways to immune response induction, and the potential advantages for these self-replicating RNA vaccines in the near future. PMID:26344889

  19. Deep sequencing uncovers numerous small RNAs on all four replicons of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Wilms, Ina; Overlöper, Aaron; Nowrousian, Minou; Sharma, Cynthia M.; Narberhaus, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Agrobacterium species are capable of interkingdom gene transfer between bacteria and plants. The genome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens consists of a circular and a linear chromosome, the At-plasmid and the Ti-plasmid, which harbors bacterial virulence genes required for tumor formation in plants. Little is known about promoter sequences and the small RNA (sRNA) repertoire of this and other α-proteobacteria. We used a differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq) approach to map transcriptional start sites of 388 annotated genes and operons. In addition, a total number of 228 sRNAs was revealed from all four Agrobacterium replicons. Twenty-two of these were confirmed by independent RNA gel blot analysis and several sRNAs were differentially expressed in response to growth media, growth phase, temperature or pH. One sRNA from the Ti-plasmid was massively induced under virulence conditions. The presence of 76 cis-antisense sRNAs, two of them on the reverse strand of virulence genes, suggests considerable antisense transcription in Agrobacterium. The information gained from this study provides a valuable reservoir for an in-depth understanding of sRNA-mediated regulation of the complex physiology and infection process of Agrobacterium. PMID:22336765

  20. MISR Level 1A CCD, 1B1, 1B2, and Browse Products

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

    ... Mode L1B2 data processing. Added ProductVersion Attribute to metadata of all products. New ancillary files: ... and AN data, as well as Band-to-Band transform fix. ROI Image Matching improvements to blunder detection algorithm and to Image Coordinate Correction. New ancillary files: ...

  1. Characterization of maltotriose transporters from the Saccharomyces eubayanus subgenome of the hybrid Saccharomyces pastorianus lager brewing yeast strain Weihenstephan 34/70.

    PubMed

    Cousseau, F E M; Alves, S L; Trichez, D; Stambuk, B U

    2013-01-01

    The genome from the Saccharomyces pastorianus industrial lager brewing strain Weihenstephan 34/70, a natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Saccharomyces eubayanus hybrid, indicated the presence of two different maltotriose transporter genes: a new gene in the S. eubayanus subgenome with 81% of homology to the AGT1 permease from S. cerevisiae, and an amplification of the S. eubayanus MTY1 maltotriose permease previously identified in S. pastorianus yeasts. To characterize these S. eubayanus transporter genes, we used a S. cerevisiae strain deleted in the AGT1 permease and introduced the desired permease gene(s) into this locus through homologous recombination. Our results indicate that both the MTY1 and AGT1 genes from the S. eubayanus subgenome encode functional maltotriose transporters that allow fermentation of this sugar by yeast cells, despite their apparent differences in the kinetics of maltotriose-H(+) symport activity. The presence of two maltotriose transporters in the S. eubayanus subgenome not only highlights the importance of sugar transport for efficient maltotriose utilization by industrial yeasts, but these new genes can be used in breeding and/or selection programs aimed at increasing yeast fitness for the efficient fermentation of brewer's wort. PMID:23061413

  2. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein K interacts with Sindbis virus nonstructural proteins and viral subgenomic mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, Andrew J.; Gong, Lei; Hardy, Richard W.

    2007-10-10

    Alphaviruses are a group of arthropod-borne human and animal pathogens that can cause epidemics of significant public health and economic consequence. Alphavirus RNA synthesis requires four virally encoded nonstructural proteins and probably a number of cellular proteins. Using comparative two-dimensional electrophoresis we were able to identify proteins enriched in cytoplasmic membrane fractions containing viral RNA synthetic complexes following infection with Sindbis virus. Our studies demonstrated the following: (i) the host protein hnRNP K is enriched in cytoplasmic membrane fractions following Sindbis virus infection, (ii) viral nonstructural proteins co-immunoprecipitate with hnRNP K, (iii) nsP2 and hnRNP K co-localize in the cytoplasm of Sindbis virus infected cells, (iv) Sindbis virus subgenomic mRNA, but not genomic RNA co-immunoprecipitates with hnRNP K, (v) viral RNA does not appear to be required for the interaction of hnRNP K with the nonstructural proteins. Potential functions of hnRNP K during virus replication are discussed.

  3. Mapping the subgenomic RNA promoter of the Citrus leaf blotch virus coat protein gene by Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation.

    PubMed

    Renovell, Agueda; Gago, Selma; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Velázquez, Karelia; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Vives, Mari Carmen; Guerri, José

    2010-10-25

    Citrus leaf blotch virus has a single-stranded positive-sense genomic RNA (gRNA) of 8747 nt organized in three open reading frames (ORFs). The ORF1, encoding a polyprotein involved in replication, is translated directly from the gRNA, whereas ORFs encoding the movement (MP) and coat (CP) proteins are expressed via 3' coterminal subgenomic RNAs (sgRNAs). We characterized the minimal promoter region critical for the CP-sgRNA expression in infected cells by deletion analyses using Agrobacterium-mediated infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants. The minimal CP-sgRNA promoter was mapped between nucleotides -67 and +50 nt around the transcription start site. Surprisingly, larger deletions in the region between the CP-sgRNA transcription start site and the CP translation initiation codon resulted in increased CP-sgRNA accumulation, suggesting that this sequence could modulate the CP-sgRNA transcription. Site-specific mutational analysis of the transcription start site revealed that the +1 guanylate and the +2 adenylate are important for CP-sgRNA synthesis. PMID:20708769

  4. Practical route to the left wing of CTX1B and total syntheses of CTX1B and 54-deoxyCTX1B.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shuji; Takeuchi, Katsutoshi; Koyama, Takuya; Inoue, Masayuki; Hayashi, Yujiro; Hirama, Masahiro

    2015-02-01

    Ciguatoxins, the principal causative agents of ciguatera seafood poisoning, are extremely large polycyclic ethers. We report herein a reliable route for constructing the left wing of CTX1B, which possesses the acid/base/oxidant-sensitive bisallylic ether moiety, by a 6-exo radical cyclization/ring-closing metathesis strategy. This new route enabled us to achieve the second-generation total synthesis of CTX1B and the first synthesis of 54-deoxyCTX1B. PMID:25529606

  5. 18 CFR 1b.11 - Limitation on participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitation on participation. 1b.11 Section 1b.11 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.11 Limitation...

  6. 18 CFR 1b.11 - Limitation on participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitation on participation. 1b.11 Section 1b.11 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.11 Limitation...

  7. 18 CFR 1b.8 - Requests for Commission investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requests for Commission investigations. 1b.8 Section 1b.8 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.8 Requests for...

  8. 18 CFR 1b.4 - Types of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Types of investigations. 1b.4 Section 1b.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.4 Types of...

  9. 18 CFR 1b.7 - Procedure after investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure after investigation. 1b.7 Section 1b.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.7 Procedure after...

  10. 18 CFR 1b.9 - Confidentiality of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Freedom of Information Act disclosure are set forth in 18 CFR part 3b and § 1b.20. A request for... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Confidentiality of investigations. 1b.9 Section 1b.9 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY...

  11. 18 CFR 1b.10 - By whom conducted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false By whom conducted. 1b.10 Section 1b.10 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.10 By whom conducted....

  12. 18 CFR 1b.3 - Scope of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scope of investigations. 1b.3 Section 1b.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.3 Scope of investigations....

  13. 18 CFR 1b.18 - Right to submit statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Right to submit statements. 1b.18 Section 1b.18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.18 Right to...

  14. 18 CFR 1b.18 - Right to submit statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Right to submit statements. 1b.18 Section 1b.18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.18 Right to...

  15. 18 CFR 1b.18 - Right to submit statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Right to submit statements. 1b.18 Section 1b.18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.18 Right to...

  16. 18 CFR 1b.18 - Right to submit statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Right to submit statements. 1b.18 Section 1b.18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.18 Right to...

  17. 18 CFR 1b.4 - Types of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Types of investigations. 1b.4 Section 1b.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.4 Types of...

  18. 18 CFR 1b.4 - Types of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Types of investigations. 1b.4 Section 1b.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.4 Types of...

  19. 18 CFR 1b.4 - Types of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Types of investigations. 1b.4 Section 1b.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.4 Types of...

  20. 18 CFR 1b.4 - Types of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Types of investigations. 1b.4 Section 1b.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.4 Types of...

  1. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 1b

    PubMed Central

    Cassano-Piché, A; Fan, M; Sabovitch, S; Masino, C; Easty, AC

    2012-01-01

    Background Minimal research has been conducted into the potential patient safety issues related to administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient. Previous research has highlighted that there are a number of related safety risks. In Phase 1a of this study, an analysis of 2 national incident-reporting databases (Institute for Safe Medical Practices Canada and United States Food and Drug Administration MAUDE) found that a high percentage of incidents associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions resulted in patient harm. Objectives The primary objectives of Phase 1b of this study were to identify safety issues with the potential to cause patient harm stemming from the administration of multiple IV infusions; and to identify how nurses are being educated on key principles required to safely administer multiple IV infusions. Data Sources and Review Methods A field study was conducted at 12 hospital clinical units (sites) across Ontario, and telephone interviews were conducted with program coordinators or instructors from both the Ontario baccalaureate nursing degree programs and the Ontario postgraduate Critical Care Nursing Certificate programs. Data were analyzed using Rasmussen’s 1997 Risk Management Framework and a Health Care Failure Modes and Effects Analysis. Results Twenty-two primary patient safety issues were identified with the potential to directly cause patient harm. Seventeen of these (critical issues) were categorized into 6 themes. A cause-consequence tree was established to outline all possible contributing factors for each critical issue. Clinical recommendations were identified for immediate distribution to, and implementation by, Ontario hospitals. Future investigation efforts were planned for Phase 2 of the study. Limitations This exploratory field study identifies the potential for errors, but does not describe the direct observation of such errors, except in a few cases where errors were observed. Not all

  2. Novel diversity-oriented synthesis-derived respiratory syncytial virus inhibitors identified via a high throughput replicon-based screen.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Jeremy R; VerPlank, Lynn; Ludeke, Barbara; McLeod, Sarah M; Lee, Maurice D; Vishwanathan, Karthick; Mulrooney, Carol A; Le Quement, Sebastian; Yu, Qin; Palmer, Michelle A; Fleming, Paul; Fearns, Rachel; Foley, Michael A; Scherer, Christina A

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections affect millions of children and adults every year. Despite the significant disease burden, there are currently no safe and effective vaccines or therapeutics. We employed a replicon-based high throughput screen combined with live-virus triaging assays to identify three novel diversity-oriented synthesis-derived scaffolds with activity against RSV. One of these small molecules is shown to target the RSV polymerase (L protein) to inhibit viral replication and transcription; the mechanisms of action of the other small molecules are currently unknown. The compounds described herein may provide attractive inhibitors for lead optimization campaigns. PMID:27059228

  3. Transformation of microorganisms with the plasmid vector with the replicon from pAC1 from Acetobacter pasteurianus.

    PubMed

    Grones, J; Turna, J

    1995-01-26

    A number of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria species was screened for the expression of the gram-negative plasmid pACK5 and pACT72 with replicon of pAC1 plasmid from Acetobacter pasteurianus. As was described previously, both plasmids were expressed in Escherichia coli, Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter aceti, Shigella spp. and Citrobacter spp. Expressions of plasmids were successful in twelve species tested, Comamonas terrigena, Salmonella typhimurium, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megatericum, Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus helveticus, Micrococcus luteus, Sarcina lutea, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptoccocus feacalis, and the stability of plasmid DNA was tested after cultivation in non-selective conditions. PMID:7832808

  4. Do mutations in SCN1B cause Dravet syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ok; Dibbens, Leanne; Marini, Carla; Suls, Arvid; Chemaly, Nicole; Mei, Davide; McMahon, Jacinta M; Iona, Xenia; Berkovic, Samuel F; De Jonghe, Peter; Guerrini, Renzo; Nabbout, Rima; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2013-01-01

    A homozygous SCN1B mutation was previously identified in a patient with early onset epileptic encephalopathy (EOEE) described as Dravet syndrome (DS) despite a more severe phenotype than DS. We investigated whether SCN1B mutations are a common cause of DS. Patients with DS who did not have a SCN1A sequencing mutation or copy number variation were studied. Genomic DNA was Sanger sequenced for mutations in the 6 exons of SCN1B. In 54 patients with DS recruited from four centres, no SCN1B mutations were identified. SCN1B mutation is not a common cause of DS. PMID:23182416

  5. Association of Neuropeptide Y (NPY), Interleukin-1B (IL1B) Genetic Variants and Correlation of IL1B Transcript Levels with Vitiligo Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Laddha, Naresh C.; Dwivedi, Mitesh; Mansuri, Mohmmad Shoab; Singh, Mala; Patel, Hetanshi H.; Agarwal, Nishtha; Shah, Anish M.; Begum, Rasheedunnisa

    2014-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is a depigmenting disorder resulting from loss of functional melanocytes in the skin. NPY plays an important role in induction of immune response by acting on a variety of immune cells. NPY synthesis and release is governed by IL1B. Moreover, genetic variability in IL1B is reported to be associated with elevated NPY levels. Objectives Aim of the present study was to explore NPY promoter −399T/C (rs16147) and exon2 +1128T/C (rs16139) polymorphisms as well as IL1B promoter −511C/T (rs16944) polymorphism and to correlate IL1B transcript levels with vitiligo. Methods PCR-RFLP method was used to genotype NPY -399T/C SNP in 454 patients and 1226 controls; +1128T/C SNP in 575 patients and 1279 controls and IL1B −511C/T SNP in 448 patients and 785 controls from Gujarat. IL1B transcript levels in blood were also assessed in 105 controls and 95 patients using real-time PCR. Results Genotype and allele frequencies for NPY −399T/C, +1128T/C and IL1B −511C/T SNPs differed significantly (p<0.0001, p<0.0001; p = 0.0161, p = 0.0035 and p<0.0001, p<0.0001) between patients and controls. ‘TC’ haplotype containing minor alleles of NPY polymorphisms was significantly higher in patients and increased the risk of vitiligo by 2.3 fold (p<0.0001). Transcript levels of IL1B were significantly higher, in patients compared to controls (p = 0.0029), in patients with active than stable vitiligo (p = 0.015), also in female patients than male patients (p = 0.026). Genotype-phenotype correlation showed moderate association of IL1B -511C/T polymorphism with higher IL1B transcript levels. Trend analysis revealed significant difference between patients and controls for IL1B transcript levels with respect to different genotypes. Conclusion Our results suggest that NPY −399T/C, +1128T/C and IL1B −511C/T polymorphisms are associated with vitiligo and IL1B −511C/T SNP influences its transcript levels leading to increased risk for vitiligo in

  6. Social dominance in male vasopressin 1b receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Heather K; Dike, Obianuju E; Stevenson, Erica L; Storck, Kathryn; Young, W Scott

    2010-07-01

    We have previously reported that mice with a targeted disruption of their vasopressin 1b receptor gene, Avpr1b, have mild impairments in social recognition and reduced aggression. The reductions in aggression are limited to social forms of aggression, i.e., maternal and inter-male aggression, while predatory aggression remains unaffected. To further clarify the role of the Avpr1b in the regulation of social behavior we first examined anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors in Avpr1b knockout (Avpr1b -/-) mice. We then went on to test the ability of Avpr1b -/- mice to form dominance hierarchies. No major differences were found between Avpr1b -/- and wildtype mice in anxiety-like behaviors, as measured using an elevated plus maze and an open field test, or depression-like behaviors, as measured using a forced swim test. In the social dominance study we found that Avpr1b -/- mice are able to form dominance hierarchies, though in early hierarchy formation dominant Avpr1b -/- mice display significantly more mounting behavior on Day 1 of testing compared to wildtype controls. Further, non-socially dominant Avpr1b -/- mice spend less time engaged in attack behavior than wildtype controls. These findings suggest that while Avpr1b -/- mice may be able to form dominance hierarchies they appear to employ alternate strategies. PMID:20298692

  7. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Substrates and Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bakke, Jesse; Haj, Fawaz G.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis requires integration of complex signaling networks which, when deregulated, contribute to metabolic syndrome and related disorders. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has emerged as a key regulator of signaling networks that are implicated in metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we examine mechanisms that regulate PTP1B-substrate interaction, enzymatic activity and experimental approaches to identify PTP1B substrates. We then highlight findings that implicate PTP1B in metabolic regulation. In particular, insulin and leptin signaling are discussed as well as recently identified PTP1B substrates that are involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell-cell communication, energy balance and vesicle trafficking. In summary, PTP1B exhibits exquisite substrate specificity and is an outstanding pharmaceutical target for obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25263014

  8. pUCL287 plasmid from Tetragenococcus halophila (Pediococcus halophilus) ATCC 33315 represents a new theta-type replicon family of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Benachour, A; Frère, J; Novel, G

    1995-05-01

    A cryptic plasmid, pUCL287, was isolated from Tetragenococcus halophila (Pediococcus halophilus) ATCC 33315. It had a theta-type mechanism of replication in its natural host. Its minimal replicon, Rep287, was isolated on a 1.6-kb EcoRI fragment. The Rep287 host range included the genera Pediococcus, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc but not genus Lactococcus. Plasmids hybridizing to pUCL287 are rare among lactic acid bacteria. As assessed by hybridization, Rep287 is dissimilar to pAM beta 1, pIP501 and pUCL22, representatives of the most common theta-type replicon groups in Gram-positive bacteria. Therefore, pUCL287 appears to represent a new theta-type replicon family from lactic acid bacteria. PMID:7750734

  9. Alphavirus replicon-based adjuvants enhance the immunogenicity and effectiveness of Fluzone ® in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Timothy D; Matzinger, Shannon R; Barro, Mario; Fritts, Linda; McChesney, Michael B; Miller, Christopher J; Johnston, Robert E

    2011-01-29

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) without a transgene (null VRP) have been used to adjuvant effective humoral [1], cellular [2], and mucosal [3] immune responses in mice. To assess the adjuvant activity of null VRP in the context of a licensed inactivated influenza virus vaccine, rhesus monkeys were immunized with Fluzone(®) alone or Fluzone(®) mixed with null VRP and then challenged with a human seasonal influenza isolate, A/Memphis/7/2001 (H1N1). Compared to Fluzone(®) alone, Fluzone(®)+null VRP immunized animals had stronger influenza-specific CD4(+) T cell responses (4.4 fold) with significantly higher levels of virus-specific IFN-γ (7.6 fold) and IL-2 (5.3 fold) producing CD4+ T cells. Fluzone(®)+null VRP immunized animals also had significantly higher plasma anti-influenza IgG (p<0.0001, 1.3 log) and IgA (p<0.05, 1.2 log) levels. In fact, the mean plasma anti-influenza IgG titers after one Fluzone(®)+null VRP immunization was 1.2 log greater (p<0.04) than after two immunizations with Fluzone(®) alone. After virus challenge, only Fluzone(®)+null VRP immunized monkeys had a significantly lower level of viral replication (p<0.001) relative to the unimmunized control animals. Although little anti-influenza antibody was detected in the respiratory secretions after immunization, strong anamnestic anti-influenza IgG and IgA responses were present in secretions of the Fluzone(®)+null VRP immunized monkeys immediately after challenge. There were significant inverse correlations between influenza RNA levels in tracheal lavages and plasma anti-influenza HI and IgG anti-influenza antibody titers prior to challenge. These results demonstrate that null VRP dramatically improve both the immunogenicity and protection elicited by a licensed inactivated influenza vaccine. PMID:21111777

  10. Accumulation of a 5' proximal subgenomic RNA of Citrus tristeza virus is correlated with encapsidation by the minor coat protein.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Siddarame; Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Hilf, Mark E; Dawson, William O

    2009-06-20

    During replication, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) produces large amounts of two unusual subgenomic (sg) RNAs that are positive-stranded and 5' coterminal. Although these RNAs are produced in similar amounts and are similar in size, with LMT1 ( approximately 750 nt) only slightly larger than LMT2 ( approximately 650), we found that the similar sgRNAs are produced differently. We previously showed that the LMT1 RNA is produced by premature termination during genomic RNA synthesis. However, LMT2 production was found to correlate with virion assembly instead of RNA replication. The time course of accumulation of the LMT2 RNA occurred late, coinciding with virion accumulation. The long flexuous virions of CTV contain two coat proteins that encapsidate the virions in a polar manner. The major coat protein encapsidates approximately 97% of the virion, while the minor capsid protein encapsidates the remainder of the genome beginning in the 5' non-translated region with the transition zone at approximately 630 nucleotides from the 5' end. The section of the virion RNA that was encapsidated by CPm was identical in size to the LMT2 RNA, suggesting that the LMT2 RNA represented a portion of the viral RNA protected by CPm encapsidation. Mutations that abrogated encapsidation by CPm also abolished the accumulation of LMT2 RNA. Thus, these two unusual but similar RNAs are produced via different pathways, one from RNA replication and one processed by the virion assembly process. To our knowledge, this represents the first evidence of a viral RNA processed by the assembly mechanism. PMID:19446304

  11. Initiation codon selection is accomplished by a scanning mechanism without crucial initiation factors in Sindbis virus subgenomic mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Translation initiation of alphavirus subgenomic mRNA (sgmRNA) can occur in the absence of several initiation factors (eIFs) in infected cells; however, the precise translation mechanism is still poorly understood. In this study, we have examined the mechanism of initiation and AUG selection in Sindbis virus (SINV) sgmRNA. Our present findings suggest that sgmRNA is translated via a scanning mechanism, since the presence of a hairpin structure before the initiation codon hampers protein synthesis directed by this mRNA. In addition, translation is partially recovered when an in-frame AUG codon is placed upstream of this hairpin. This scanning process takes place without the participation of eIF4A and active eIF2. These results, combined with our findings through modifying the SINV sgmRNA leader sequence, do not support the possibility of a direct initiation from the start codon without previous scanning, or a shunting mechanism. Moreover, studies carried out with sgmRNAs containing two alternative AUG codons within a good context for translation reveal differences in AUG selection which are dependent on the cellular context and the phosphorylation state of eIF2α. Thus, initiation at the additional AUG is strictly dependent on active eIF2, whereas the genuine AUG codon can start translation following eIF2α inactivation. Collectively, our results suggest that SINV sgmRNA is translated by a scanning mechanism without the potential participation of crucial eIFs. A model is presented that explains the mechanism of initiation of mRNAs bearing two alternative initiation codons. PMID:25404563

  12. Initiation codon selection is accomplished by a scanning mechanism without crucial initiation factors in Sindbis virus subgenomic mRNA.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Moreno, Manuel; Sanz, Miguel Angel; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Translation initiation of alphavirus subgenomic mRNA (sgmRNA) can occur in the absence of several initiation factors (eIFs) in infected cells; however, the precise translation mechanism is still poorly understood. In this study, we have examined the mechanism of initiation and AUG selection in Sindbis virus (SINV) sgmRNA. Our present findings suggest that sgmRNA is translated via a scanning mechanism, since the presence of a hairpin structure before the initiation codon hampers protein synthesis directed by this mRNA. In addition, translation is partially recovered when an in-frame AUG codon is placed upstream of this hairpin. This scanning process takes place without the participation of eIF4A and active eIF2. These results, combined with our findings through modifying the SINV sgmRNA leader sequence, do not support the possibility of a direct initiation from the start codon without previous scanning, or a shunting mechanism. Moreover, studies carried out with sgmRNAs containing two alternative AUG codons within a good context for translation reveal differences in AUG selection which are dependent on the cellular context and the phosphorylation state of eIF2α. Thus, initiation at the additional AUG is strictly dependent on active eIF2, whereas the genuine AUG codon can start translation following eIF2α inactivation. Collectively, our results suggest that SINV sgmRNA is translated by a scanning mechanism without the potential participation of crucial eIFs. A model is presented that explains the mechanism of initiation of mRNAs bearing two alternative initiation codons. PMID:25404563

  13. Characterization of a Novel 5′ Subgenomic RNA3a Derived from RNA3 of Brome Mosaic Bromovirus▿

    PubMed Central

    Wierzchoslawski, Rafal; Urbanowicz, Anna; Dzianott, Aleksandra; Figlerowicz, Marek; Bujarski, Jozef J.

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis of 3′ subgenomic RNA4 (sgRNA4) by initiation from an internal sg promoter in the RNA3 segment was first described for Brome mosaic bromovirus (BMV), a model tripartite positive-sense RNA virus (W. A. Miller, T. W. Dreher, and T. C. Hall, Nature 313:68-70, 1985). In this work, we describe a novel 5′ sgRNA of BMV (sgRNA3a) that we propose arises by premature internal termination and that encapsidates in BMV virions. Cloning and sequencing revealed that, unlike any other BMV RNA segment, sgRNA3a carries a 3′ oligo(A) tail, in which respect it resembles cellular mRNAs. Indeed, both the accumulation of sgRNA3a in polysomes and the synthesis of movement protein 3a in in vitro systems suggest active functions of sgRNA3a during protein synthesis. Moreover, when copied in the BMV replicase in vitro reaction, the minus-strand RNA3 template generated the sgRNA3a product, likely by premature termination at the minus-strand oligo(U) tract. Deletion of the oligo(A) tract in BMV RNA3 inhibited synthesis of sgRNA3a during infection. We propose a model in which the synthesis of RNA3 is terminated prematurely near the sg promoter. The discovery of 5′ sgRNA3a sheds new light on strategies viruses can use to separate replication from the translation functions of their genomic RNAs. PMID:17005659

  14. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Puig, Juana M; Lorenzo, María M; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV) are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV) are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses. PMID:24130722

  15. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicon Particle Vaccine Protects Nonhuman Primates from Intramuscular and Aerosol Challenge with Ebolavirus

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Andrew S.; Kuehne, Ana I.; Barth, James F.; Ortiz, Ramon A.; Nichols, Donald K.; Zak, Samantha E.; Stonier, Spencer W.; Muhammad, Majidat A.; Bakken, Russell R.; Prugar, Laura I.; Olinger, Gene G.; Groebner, Jennifer L.; Lee, John S.; Pratt, William D.; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt I.; Smith, Jonathan F.; Hart, Mary Kate

    2013-01-01

    There are no vaccines or therapeutics currently approved for the prevention or treatment of ebolavirus infection. Previously, a replicon vaccine based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) demonstrated protective efficacy against Marburg virus in nonhuman primates. Here, we report the protective efficacy of Sudan virus (SUDV)- and Ebola virus (EBOV)-specific VEEV replicon particle (VRP) vaccines in nonhuman primates. VRP vaccines were developed to express the glycoprotein (GP) of either SUDV or EBOV. A single intramuscular vaccination of cynomolgus macaques with VRP expressing SUDV GP provided complete protection against intramuscular challenge with SUDV. Vaccination against SUDV and subsequent survival of SUDV challenge did not fully protect cynomolgus macaques against intramuscular EBOV back-challenge. However, a single simultaneous intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP combined with VRP expressing EBOV GP did provide complete protection against intramuscular challenge with either SUDV or EBOV in cynomolgus macaques. Finally, intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP completely protected cynomolgus macaques when challenged with aerosolized SUDV, although complete protection against aerosol challenge required two vaccinations with this vaccine. PMID:23408633

  16. Individual chromosome assignment and chromosomal collinearity in Gossypium thurberi, G. trilobum and D subgenome of G. barbadense revealed by BAC-FISH.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yimei; Chen, Dan; Liu, Fang; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Peng, Renhai; Wang, Kunbo

    2011-01-01

    The experiment on individual chromosome assignments and chromosomal diversity was conducted using a multi-probe fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) system in D subgenome of tetraploid Gossypium barbadense (D(b)), G. thurberi (D(1)) and G. trilobum (D(8)), which the later two were the possible subgenome donors of tetraploid cottons. The FISH probes contained a set of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones specific to 13 individual chromosomes from D subgenome of G. hirsutum (D(h)), a D genome centromere-specific BAC clone 150D24, 45S and 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clones, respectively. All tested chromosome orientations were confirmed by the centromere-specific BAC probe. In D(1) and D(8), four 45S rDNA loci were found assigning at the end of the short arm of chromosomes 03, 07, 09 and 11, while one 5S rDNA locus was successfully marked at pericentromeric region of the short arm of chromosome 09. In D(b), three 45S rDNA loci and two 5S rDNA loci were found out. Among them, two 45S rDNA loci were located at the terminal of the short arm of chromosomes D(b)07 and D(b)09, whilst one 5S rDNA locus was found situating near centromeric region of the short arm of chromosome D(b)09. The positions of the BAC clones specific to the 13 individual chromosomes from D(h) were compared between D(1), D(8) and D(b). The result showed the existence of chromosomal collinearity within D(1) and D(8), and as well between them and D(b). The results will serve as a base for understanding chromosome structure of cotton and polyploidy evolution of cotton genome and will provide bio-information for assembling the sequences of finished and the on-going cotton whole genome sequencing projects. PMID:21952206

  17. AMYLOID-β PEPTIDE BINDS TO MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 1B (MAP1B)

    PubMed Central

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18079022

  18. Amyloid-beta peptide binds to microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B).

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-05-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:18079022

  19. MAN1B1 Deficiency: An Unexpected CDG-II

    PubMed Central

    Millón, María B.; Race, Valérie; Sturiale, Luisa; Garozzo, Domenico; Mills, Philippa; Clayton, Peter; Asteggiano, Carla G.; Quelhas, Dulce; Cansu, Ali; Martins, Esmeralda; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Gonçalves-Rocha, Miguel; Topaloglu, Haluk; Jaeken, Jaak; Foulquier, François; Matthijs, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a group of rare metabolic diseases, due to impaired protein and lipid glycosylation. In the present study, exome sequencing was used to identify MAN1B1 as the culprit gene in an unsolved CDG-II patient. Subsequently, 6 additional cases with MAN1B1-CDG were found. All individuals presented slight facial dysmorphism, psychomotor retardation and truncal obesity. Generally, MAN1B1 is believed to be an ER resident alpha-1,2-mannosidase acting as a key factor in glycoprotein quality control by targeting misfolded proteins for ER-associated degradation (ERAD). However, recent studies indicated a Golgi localization of the endogenous MAN1B1, suggesting a more complex role for MAN1B1 in quality control. We were able to confirm that MAN1B1 is indeed localized to the Golgi complex instead of the ER. Furthermore, we observed an altered Golgi morphology in all patients' cells, with marked dilatation and fragmentation. We hypothesize that part of the phenotype is associated to this Golgi disruption. In conclusion, we linked mutations in MAN1B1 to a Golgi glycosylation disorder. Additionally, our results support the recent findings on MAN1B1 localization. However, more work is needed to pinpoint the exact function of MAN1B1 in glycoprotein quality control, and to understand the pathophysiology of its deficiency. PMID:24348268

  20. Two extreme young objects in Barnard 1-b

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Naomi; Liu, Fang-chun

    2014-07-01

    Two submillimeter/millimeter sources in the Barnard 1b (B1-b) core, B1-bN and B1-bS, have been studied in dust continuum, H{sup 13}CO{sup +} J = 1-0, CO J = 2-1, {sup 13}CO J = 2-1, and C{sup 18}O J = 2-1. The spectral energy distributions of these sources from the mid-IR to 7 mm are characterized by very cold temperatures of T {sub dust} < 20 K and low bolometric luminosities of 0.15-0.31 L {sub ☉}. The internal luminosities of B1-bN and B1-bS are estimated to be <0.01-0.03 L {sub ☉} and ∼0.1-0.2 L {sub ☉}, respectively. Millimeter interferometric observations have shown that these sources have already formed central compact objects of ∼100 AU sizes. Both B1-bN and B1-bS are driving the CO outflows with low characteristic velocities of ∼2-4 km s{sup –1}. The fractional abundance of H{sup 13}CO{sup +} at the positions of B1-bN and B1-bS is lower than the canonical value by a factor of four to eight. This implies that a significant fraction of CO is depleted onto dust grains in the dense gas surrounding these sources. The observed physical and chemical properties suggest that B1-bN and B1-bS are in an earlier evolutionary stage than most of the known class 0 protostars. In particular, the properties of B1-bN agree with those of the first hydrostatic core predicted by the MHD simulations. The CO outflow was also detected in the mid-IR source located at ∼15'' from B1-bS. Since the dust continuum emission was not detected in this source, the circumstellar material surrounding this source is less than 0.01 M {sub ☉}. It is likely that the envelope of this source was dissipated by the outflow from the protostar that is located to the southwest of B1-b.

  1. [The interactions between natural products and OATP1B1].

    PubMed

    Shi, Mei-zhi; Liu, Yu; Bian, Jia-lin; Jin, Meng; Gui, Chun-shan

    2015-07-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) is an important liver-specific uptake transporter, which mediates transport of numerous endogenous substances and drugs from blood into hepatocytes. To identify and investigate potential modulators of OATP1B1 from natural products, the effect of 21 frequently used natural compounds and extracts on OATP1B1-mediated fluorescein methotrexate transport was studied by using Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing OATP1B1 (CHO-OATP1B1) in 96-well plates. This method could be used for the screening of large compound libraries. Our studies showed that some flavonoids (e.g., quercetin, quercitrin, rutin, chrysanthemum flavonoids and mulberrin) and triterpenoids (e.g., glycyrrhetinic acid and glycyrrhizic acid) were inhibitors of OATP1B1 with IC50 values less than 16 µmol · L(-1). The IC50 value of glycyrrhetinic acid on OATP1B1 was comparable to its blood concentration in clinics, indicating an OATPlB1-mediated drug-drug interaction could occur. Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that flavonoids had much higher inhibitory activity than their glycosides. Furthermore, the type and length of saccharides had a significant effect on their activity. In addition, we used OATP1B1 substrates fluvastatin and rosuvastatin as probe drugs to investigate the substrate-dependent effect of several natural compounds on the function of OATP1B1 in vitro. Our results demonstrated that the effect of these natural products on the function of OATPlB1 was substrate-dependent. In summary, this study would be conducive to predicting and avoiding potential OATP1B1-mediated drug-drug and drug-food interactions and thus provide the experimental basis and guidance for rational drug use. PMID:26552146

  2. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Endocrinology and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Volat, Fanny; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    The aldose reductase (AR; human AKR1B1/mouse Akr1b3) has been the focus of many research because of its role in diabetic complications. The starting point of these alterations is the massive entry of glucose in polyol pathway where it is converted into sorbitol by this enzyme. However, the issue of AR function in non-diabetic condition remains unresolved. AR-like enzymes (AKR1B10, Akr1b7, and Akr1b8) are highly related isoforms often co-expressed with bona fide AR, making functional analysis of one or the other isoform a challenging task. AKR1B/Akr1b members share at least 65% protein identity and the general ability to reduce many redundant substrates such as aldehydes provided from lipid peroxidation, steroids and their by-products, and xenobiotics in vitro. Based on these properties, AKR1B/Akr1b are generally considered as detoxifying enzymes. Considering that divergences should be more informative than similarities to help understanding their physiological functions, we chose to review specific hallmarks of each human/mouse isoforms by focusing on tissue distribution and specific mechanisms of gene regulation. Indeed, although the AR shows ubiquitous expression, AR-like proteins exhibit tissue-specific patterns of expression. We focused on three organs where certain isoforms are enriched, the adrenal gland, enterohepatic, and adipose tissues and tried to connect recent enzymatic and regulation data with endocrine and metabolic functions of these organs. We presented recent mouse models showing unsuspected physiological functions in the regulation of glucido-lipidic metabolism and adipose tissue homeostasis. Beyond the widely accepted idea that AKR1B/Akr1b are detoxification enzymes, these recent reports provide growing evidences that they are able to modify or generate signal molecules. This conceptually shifts this class of enzymes from unenviable status of scavenger to upper class of messengers. PMID:22876234

  3. Natural products possessing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activity found in the last decades

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Cheng-shi; Liang, Lin-fu; Guo, Yue-wei

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of approximately 300 secondary metabolites with inhibitory activity against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), which were isolated from various natural sources or derived from synthetic process in the last decades. The structure-activity relationship and the selectivity of some compounds against other protein phosphatases were also discussed. Potential pharmaceutical applications of several PTP1B inhibitors were presented. PMID:22941286

  4. The RepA_N replicons of Gram-positive bacteria: a family of broadly distributed but narrow host range plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Keith E.; Kwong, Stephen M.; Firth, Neville; Francia, Maria Victoria

    2009-01-01

    The pheromone-responsive conjugative plasmids of Enterococcus faecalis and the multi-resistance plasmids pSK1 and pSK41 of Staphylococcus aureus are among the best studied plasmids native to Gram-positive bacteria. Although these plasmids seem largely restricted to their native hosts, protein sequence comparison of their replication initiator proteins indicates that they are clearly related. Homology searches indicate that these replicons are representatives of a large family of plasmids and a few phage that are widespread among the low G+C Gram-positive bacteria. We propose to name this family the RepA_N family of replicons after the annotated conserved domain that the initiator protein contains. Detailed sequence comparisons indicate that the initiator protein phylogeny is largely congruent with that of the host, suggesting that the replicons have evolved along with their current hosts and that intergeneric transfer has been rare. However, related proteins were identified on chromosomal regions bearing characteristics indicative of ICE elements, and the phylogeny of these proteins displayed evidence of more frequent intergeneric transfer. Comparison of stability determinants associated with the RepA_N replicons suggests that they have a modular evolution as has been observed in other plasmid families. PMID:19100285

  5. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Adrenal Cortex Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, A. Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AKR1B) proteins are monomeric enzymes, belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. They perform oxidoreduction of carbonyl groups from a wide variety of substrates, such as aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes or ketones. Due to the involvement of human aldose reductases in pathologies, such as diabetic complications and cancer, AKR1B subgroup enzymatic properties have been extensively characterized. However, the issue of AKR1B function in non-pathologic conditions remains poorly resolved. Adrenal activities generated large amount of harmful aldehydes from lipid peroxidation and steroidogenesis, including 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and isocaproaldehyde (4-methylpentanal), which can both be reduced by AKR1B proteins. More recently, some AKR1B isoforms have been shown to be endowed with prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS) activity, suggesting that, in addition to possible scavenger function, they could instigate paracrine signals. Interestingly, the adrenal gland is one of the major sites for human and murine AKR1B expression, suggesting that their detoxifying/signaling activity could be specifically required for the correct handling of adrenal function. Moreover, chronic effects of ACTH result in a coordinated regulation of genes encoding the steroidogenic enzymes and some AKR1B isoforms. This review presents the molecular mechanisms accounting for the adrenal-specific expression of some AKR1B genes. Using data from recent mouse genetic models, we will try to connect their enzymatic properties and regulation with adrenal functions. PMID:27499746

  6. 18 CFR 1b.16 - Rights of witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rights of witnesses. 1b.16 Section 1b.16 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... person, such person shall have the right to appear on the record; and in addition to the rights...

  7. 18 CFR 1b.16 - Rights of witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rights of witnesses. 1b.16 Section 1b.16 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... person, such person shall have the right to appear on the record; and in addition to the rights...

  8. 18 CFR 1b.16 - Rights of witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rights of witnesses. 1b.16 Section 1b.16 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... person, such person shall have the right to appear on the record; and in addition to the rights...

  9. 18 CFR 1b.16 - Rights of witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rights of witnesses. 1b.16 Section 1b.16 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... person, such person shall have the right to appear on the record; and in addition to the rights...

  10. ALDH1B1 links alcohol consumption and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Chen, Ying; Matsumoto, Akiko; Orlicky, David J; Dong, Hongbin; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2015-08-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1B1 (ALDH1B1) is a mitochondrial enzyme sharing 65% and 72% sequence identity with ALDH1A1 and ALDH2 proteins, respectively. Compared to the latter two ALDH isozymes, little is known about the physiological functions of ALDH1B1. Studies in humans indicate that ALDH1B1 may be associated with alcohol sensitivity and stem cells. Our recent in vitro studies using human ALDH1B1 showed that it metabolizes acetaldehyde and retinaldehyde. To investigate the in vivo role of ALDH1B1, we generated and characterized a global Aldh1b1 knockout mouse line. These knockout (KO) mice are fertile and show overtly good health. However, ethanol pharmacokinetic analysis revealed ∼40% increase in blood acetaldehyde levels in KO mice. Interestingly, the KO mice exhibited higher fasting blood glucose levels. Collectively, we show for the first time the functional in vivo role of ALDH1B1 in acetaldehyde metabolism and in maintaining glucose homeostasis. This mouse model is a valuable tool to investigate the mechanism by which alcohol may promote the development of diabetes. PMID:26086111

  11. 18 CFR 1b.20 - Request for confidential treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Request for confidential treatment. 1b.20 Section 1b.20 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... confidential treatment. Any person compelled to produce documents in an investigation may claim that some...

  12. 18 CFR 1b.20 - Request for confidential treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Request for confidential treatment. 1b.20 Section 1b.20 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... confidential treatment. Any person compelled to produce documents in an investigation may claim that some...

  13. 18 CFR 1b.20 - Request for confidential treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Request for confidential treatment. 1b.20 Section 1b.20 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... confidential treatment. Any person compelled to produce documents in an investigation may claim that some...

  14. 18 CFR 1b.20 - Request for confidential treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Request for confidential treatment. 1b.20 Section 1b.20 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... confidential treatment. Any person compelled to produce documents in an investigation may claim that some...

  15. 18 CFR 1b.20 - Request for confidential treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Request for confidential treatment. 1b.20 Section 1b.20 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... confidential treatment. Any person compelled to produce documents in an investigation may claim that some...

  16. Joint Transcriptomic and Metabolomic Analyses Reveal Changes in the Primary Metabolism and Imbalances in the Subgenome Orchestration in the Bread Wheat Molecular Response to Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Nussbaumer, Thomas; Warth, Benedikt; Sharma, Sapna; Ametz, Christian; Bueschl, Christoph; Parich, Alexandra; Pfeifer, Matthias; Siegwart, Gerald; Steiner, Barbara; Lemmens, Marc; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Buerstmayr, Hermann; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Kugler, Karl G.; Schweiger, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium head blight is a prevalent disease of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), which leads to considerable losses in yield and quality. Quantitative resistance to the causative fungus Fusarium graminearum is poorly understood. We integrated transcriptomics and metabolomics data to dissect the molecular response to the fungus and its main virulence factor, the toxin deoxynivalenol in near-isogenic lines segregating for two resistance quantitative trait loci, Fhb1 and Qfhs.ifa-5A. The data sets portrait rearrangements in the primary metabolism and the translational machinery to counter the fungus and the effects of the toxin and highlight distinct changes in the metabolism of glutamate in lines carrying Qfhs.ifa-5A. These observations are possibly due to the activity of two amino acid permeases located in the quantitative trait locus confidence interval, which may contribute to increased pathogen endurance. Mapping to the highly resolved region of Fhb1 reduced the list of candidates to few genes that are specifically expressed in presence of the quantitative trait loci and in response to the pathogen, which include a receptor-like protein kinase, a protein kinase, and an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. On a genome-scale level, the individual subgenomes of hexaploid wheat contribute differentially to defense. In particular, the D subgenome exhibited a pronounced response to the pathogen and contributed significantly to the overall defense response. PMID:26438291

  17. Organic anion transporter 3- and organic anion transporting polypeptides 1B1- and 1B3-mediated transport of catalposide.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kwon, Mihwa; Lee, Yongnam; Yoo, Ji Seok; Shin, Dae Hee; Song, Im-Sook; Lee, Hye Suk

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro transport characteristics of catalposide in HEK293 cells overexpressing organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1), OAT3, organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1), OATP1B3, organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1), OCT2, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The transport mechanism of catalposide was investigated in HEK293 and LLC-PK1 cells overexpressing the relevant transporters. The uptake of catalposide was 319-, 13.6-, and 9.3-fold greater in HEK293 cells overexpressing OAT3, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 transporters, respectively, than in HEK293 control cells. The increased uptake of catalposide via the OAT3, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 transporters was decreased to basal levels in the presence of representative inhibitors such as probenecid, furosemide, and cimetidine (for OAT3) and cyclosporin A, gemfibrozil, and rifampin (for OATP1B1 and OATP1B3). The concentration-dependent OAT3-mediated uptake of catalposide revealed the following kinetic parameters: Michaelis constant (K m) =41.5 μM, maximum uptake rate (V max) =46.2 pmol/minute, and intrinsic clearance (CL int) =1.11 μL/minute. OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-mediated catalposide uptake also showed concentration dependency, with low CL int values of 0.035 and 0.034 μL/minute, respectively. However, the OCT1, OCT2, OAT1, P-gp, and BCRP transporters were apparently not involved in the uptake of catalposide into cells. In addition, catalposide inhibited the transport activities of OAT3, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 with half-maximal inhibitory concentration values of 83, 200, and 235 μM, respectively. However, catalposide did not significantly inhibit the transport activities of OCT1, OCT2, OAT1, P-gp, or BCRP. In conclusion, OAT3, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 are major transporters that may regulate the pharmacokinetic properties and may cause herb-drug interactions of catalposide, although their clinical relevance awaits further evaluation. PMID:25653502

  18. Organic anion transporter 3- and organic anion transporting polypeptides 1B1- and 1B3-mediated transport of catalposide

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kwon, Mihwa; Lee, Yongnam; Yoo, Ji Seok; Shin, Dae Hee; Song, Im-Sook; Lee, Hye Suk

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro transport characteristics of catalposide in HEK293 cells overexpressing organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1), OAT3, organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1), OATP1B3, organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1), OCT2, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The transport mechanism of catalposide was investigated in HEK293 and LLC-PK1 cells overexpressing the relevant transporters. The uptake of catalposide was 319-, 13.6-, and 9.3-fold greater in HEK293 cells overexpressing OAT3, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 transporters, respectively, than in HEK293 control cells. The increased uptake of catalposide via the OAT3, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 transporters was decreased to basal levels in the presence of representative inhibitors such as probenecid, furosemide, and cimetidine (for OAT3) and cyclosporin A, gemfibrozil, and rifampin (for OATP1B1 and OATP1B3). The concentration-dependent OAT3-mediated uptake of catalposide revealed the following kinetic parameters: Michaelis constant (Km) =41.5 μM, maximum uptake rate (Vmax) =46.2 pmol/minute, and intrinsic clearance (CLint) =1.11 μL/minute. OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-mediated catalposide uptake also showed concentration dependency, with low CLint values of 0.035 and 0.034 μL/minute, respectively. However, the OCT1, OCT2, OAT1, P-gp, and BCRP transporters were apparently not involved in the uptake of catalposide into cells. In addition, catalposide inhibited the transport activities of OAT3, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 with half-maximal inhibitory concentration values of 83, 200, and 235 μM, respectively. However, catalposide did not significantly inhibit the transport activities of OCT1, OCT2, OAT1, P-gp, or BCRP. In conclusion, OAT3, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 are major transporters that may regulate the pharmacokinetic properties and may cause herb–drug interactions of catalposide, although their clinical relevance awaits further evaluation. PMID:25653502

  19. A Kunjin Replicon Virus-like Particle Vaccine Provides Protection Against Ebola Virus Infection in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Pyankov, Oleg V; Bodnev, Sergey A; Pyankova, Olga G; Solodkyi, Vladislav V; Pyankov, Stepan A; Setoh, Yin Xiang; Volchkova, Valentina A; Suhrbier, Andreas; Volchkov, Viktor V; Agafonov, Alexander A; Khromykh, Alexander A

    2015-10-01

    The current unprecedented outbreak of Ebola virus (EBOV) disease in West Africa has demonstrated the urgent need for a vaccine. Here, we describe the evaluation of an EBOV vaccine candidate based on Kunjin replicon virus-like particles (KUN VLPs) encoding EBOV glycoprotein with a D637L mutation (GP/D637L) in nonhuman primates. Four African green monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) were injected subcutaneously with a dose of 10(9) KUN VLPs per animal twice with an interval of 4 weeks, and animals were challenged 3 weeks later intramuscularly with 600 plaque-forming units of Zaire EBOV. Three animals were completely protected against EBOV challenge, while one vaccinated animal and the control animal died from infection. We suggest that KUN VLPs encoding GP/D637L represent a viable EBOV vaccine candidate. PMID:25732811

  20. 5′ and 3′ Untranslated Regions Strongly Enhance Performance of Geminiviral Replicons in Nicotiana benthamiana Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Diamos, Andrew G.; Rosenthal, Sun H.; Mason, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a recombinant protein production system based on a geminivirus replicon that yields high levels of vaccine antigens and monoclonal antibodies in plants. The bean yellow dwarf virus (BeYDV) replicon generates massive amounts of DNA copies, which engage the plant transcription machinery. However, we noticed a disparity between transcript level and protein production, suggesting that mRNAs could be more efficiently utilized. In this study, we systematically evaluated genetic elements from human, viral, and plant sources for their potential to improve the BeYDV system. The tobacco extensin terminator enhanced transcript accumulation and protein production compared to other commonly used terminators, indicating that efficient transcript processing plays an important role in recombinant protein production. Evaluation of human-derived 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) indicated that many provided high levels of protein production, supporting their cross-kingdom function. Among the viral 5′ UTRs tested, we found the greatest enhancement with the tobacco mosaic virus omega leader. An analysis of the 5′ UTRs from the Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotinana benthamiana photosystem I K genes found that they were highly active when truncated to include only the near upstream region, providing a dramatic enhancement of transgene production that exceeded that of the tobacco mosaic virus omega leader. The tobacco Rb7 matrix attachment region inserted downstream from the gene of interest provided significant enhancement, which was correlated with a reduction in plant cell death. Evaluation of Agrobacterium strains found that EHA105 enhanced protein production and reduced cell death compared to LBA4301 and GV3101. We used these improvements to produce Norwalk virus capsid protein at >20% total soluble protein, corresponding to 1.8 mg/g leaf fresh weight, more than twice the highest level ever reported in a plant system. We also produced the monoclonal antibody

  1. Infected dendritic cells are sufficient to mediate the adjuvant activity generated by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin, Daniel R; Whitmore, Alan; Johnston, Robert E; Barro, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Replicon particles derived from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) are infectious non-propagating particles which act as a safe and potent systemic, mucosal, and cellular adjuvant when delivered with antigen. VEE and VEE replicon particles (VRP) can target multiple cell types including dendritic cells (DCs). The role of these cell types in VRP adjuvant activity has not been previously evaluated, and for these studies we focused on the contribution of DCs to the response to VRP. By analysis of VRP targeting in the draining lymph node, we found that VRP induced rapid recruitment of TNF-secreting monocyte-derived inflammatory dendritic cells. VRP preferentially infected these inflammatory DCs as well as classical DCs and macrophages, with less efficient infection of other cell types. DC depletion suggested that the interaction of VRP with classical DCs was required for recruitment of inflammatory DCs, induction of high levels of many cytokines, and for stable transport of VRP to the draining lymph node. Additionally, in vitro-infected DCs enhanced antigen-specific responses by CD4 and CD8 T cells. By transfer of VRP-infected DCs into mice we showed that these DCs generated an inflammatory state in the draining lymph node similar to that achieved by VRP injection. Most importantly, VRP-infected DCs were sufficient to establish robust adjuvant activity in mice comparable to that produced by VRP injection. These findings indicate that VRP infect, recruit and activate both classical and inflammatory DCs, and those DCs become mediators of the VRP adjuvant activity. PMID:22531556

  2. Vaccination with Recombinant RNA Replicon Particles Protects Chickens from H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Halbherr, Stefan J.; Brostoff, Terza; Tippenhauer, Merve; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Zimmer, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) of subtype H5N1 not only cause a devastating disease in domestic chickens and turkeys but also pose a continuous threat to public health. In some countries, H5N1 viruses continue to circulate and evolve into new clades and subclades. The rapid evolution of these viruses represents a problem for virus diagnosis and control. In this work, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors expressing HA of subtype H5 were generated. To comply with biosafety issues the G gene was deleted from the VSV genome. The resulting vaccine vector VSV*ΔG(HA) was propagated on helper cells providing the VSV G protein in trans. Vaccination of chickens with a single intramuscular dose of 2×108 infectious replicon particles without adjuvant conferred complete protection from lethal H5N1 infection. Subsequent application of the same vaccine strongly boosted the humoral immune response and completely prevented shedding of challenge virus and transmission to sentinel birds. The vaccine allowed serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) by employing a commercially available ELISA. Immunized chickens produced antibodies with neutralizing activity against multiple H5 viruses representing clades 1, 2.2, 2.5, and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (classical clade). Studies using chimeric H1/H5 hemagglutinins showed that the neutralizing activity was predominantly directed against the globular head domain. In summary, these results suggest that VSV replicon particles are safe and potent DIVA vaccines that may help to control avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry. PMID:23762463

  3. Molecular Smallpox Vaccine Delivered by Alphavirus Replicons Elicits Protective Immunity in Mice and Non-human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Jay W.; Ferro, Anthony M.; Golden, Joseph W.; Silvera, Peter; Dudek, Jeanne; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Rivers, Bryan; Morris, John; Owens, Gary; Smith, Jonathan F.; Kamrud, Kurt I.

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring smallpox was eradicated as a result of successful vaccination campaigns during the 1960s and 70s. Because of its highly contagious nature and high mortality rate, smallpox has significant potential as a biological weapon. Unfortunately, the current vaccine for orthopoxviruses is contraindicated for large portions of the population. Thus, there is a need for new, safe, and effective orthopoxvirus vaccines. Alphavirus replicon vectors, derived from strains of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, are being used to develop alternatives to the current smallpox vaccine. Here, we demonstrated that virus-like replicon particles (VRP) expressing the vaccinia virus A33R, B5R, A27L, and L1R genes elicited protective immunity in mice comparable to vaccination with live-vaccinia virus. Furthermore, cynomolgus macaques vaccinated with a combination of the four poxvirus VRPs (4pox-VRP) developed antibody responses to each antigen. These antibody responses were able to neutralize and inhibit the spread of both vaccinia virus and monkeypox virus. Macaques vaccinated with 4pox-VRP, flu HA VRP (negative control), or live-vaccinia virus (positive control) were challenged intravenously with 5 × 106 PFU of monkeypox virus 1 month after the second VRP vaccination. Four of the six negative control animals succumbed to monkeypox and the remaining two animals demonstrated either severe or grave disease. Importantly, all 10 macaques vaccinated with the 4pox-VRP vaccine survived without developing severe disease. These findings revealed that a single-boost VRP smallpox vaccine shows promise as a safe alternative to the currently licensed live-vaccinia virus smallpox vaccine. PMID:19833247

  4. Burkholderia xernovorans LB400 harbors a multi-replicon, 9.73-Mbp genome shaped for versatility

    SciTech Connect

    Chain, Patrick S. G.; Denef, Vincent; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Vergez, Lisa; Agullo, Loreine; Reyes, Valeria Latorre; Hauser, Loren John; Cordova, Macarena; Gomez, Luis; Gonzalez, Myriam; Land, Miriam L; Lao, Victoria; Larimer, Frank W; LiPuma, John J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Malfatti, Stephanie; Marx, Christopher J; Parnell, J Jacob; Ramette, Alban; Richardson, P M; Seeger, Michael; Smith, Daryl; Spilker, Theodore; Sul, Woo Jun; Tsoi, Tamara V; Zhulin, Igor B; Tiedje, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 (LB400), a well studied, effective polychlorinated biphenyl-degrader, has one of the two largest known bacterial genomes and is the first nonpathogenic Burkholderia isolate sequenced. From an evolutionary perspective, we find significant differences in functional specialization between the three replicons of LB400, as well as a more relaxed selective pressure for genes located on the two smaller vs. the largest replicon. High genomic plasticity, diversity, and specialization within the Burkholderia genus are exemplified by the conservation of only 44% of the genes between LB400 and Burkholderia cepacia complex strain 383. Even among four B. xenovorans strains, genome size varies from 7.4 to 9.73 Mbp. The latter is largely explained by our findings that >20% of the LB400 sequence was recently acquired by means of lateral gene transfer. Although a range of genetic factors associated with in vivo survival and intercellular interactions are present, these genetic factors are likely related to niche breadth rather than determinants of pathogenicity. The presence of at least eleven 'central aromatic' and twenty 'peripheral aromatic' pathways in LB400, among the highest in any sequenced bacterial genome, supports this hypothesis. Finally, in addition to the experimentally observed redundancy in benzoate degradation and formaldehyde oxidation pathways, the fact that 17.6% of proteins have a better LB400 paralog than an ortholog in a different genome highlights the importance of gene duplication and repeated acquirement, which, coupled with their divergence, raises questions regarding the role of paralogs and potential functional redundancies in large-genome microbes.

  5. The role of stat1b in zebrafish hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hao; Yan, Yi-lin; Titus, Tom; He, Xinjun; Postlethwait, John H.

    2011-01-01

    STAT1 mediates response to interferons and regulates immunity, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and sensitivity of Fanconi Anemia cells to apoptosis after interferon signaling; the roles of STAT1 in embryos, however, are not understood. To explore embryonic functions of STAT1, we investigated stat1b, an unstudied zebrafish co-ortholog of human STAT1. Zebrafish stat1a encodes all five domains of the human STAT1-alpha splice form but, like the human STAT1-beta splice variant, stat1b lacks a complete transactivation domain; thus, two unlinked zebrafish paralogs encode protein forms translated from two splice variants of a single human gene, as expected by subfunctionalization after genome duplication. Phylogenetic and conserved synteny studies showed that stat1b and stat1a arose as duplicates in the teleost genome duplication (TGD) and clarified the evolutionary origin of STAT1, STAT2, STAT3, STAT4, STAT5A, STAT5B and STAT6 by tandem and genome duplication. RT-PCR revealed maternal expression of stat1a and stat1b. In situ hybridization detected stat1b but not stat1a expression in embryonic hematopoietic tissues. Morpholino knockdown of stat1b, but not stat1a, decreased expression of the myeloid and granulocyte markers spi and mpo and increased expression of the hematopoietic progenitor marker scl, the erythrocyte marker gata1, and hemoglobin. These results suggest that zebrafish Stat1b promotes myeloid development at the expense of erythroid development. PMID:21914475

  6. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors isolated from Artemisia roxburghiana.

    PubMed

    Shah, Muhammad Raza; Ishtiaq; Hizbullah, Syed Muhammad; Habtemariam, Solomon; Zarrelli, Armando; Muhammad, Akhtar; Collina, Simona; Khan, Inamulllah

    2016-08-01

    Artemisia roxburghiana is used in traditional medicine for treating various diseases including diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of active constituents by using protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a validated target for management of diabetes. Various compounds were isolated as active principles from the crude methanolic extract of aerial parts of A. roxburghiana. All compounds were screened for PTP1B inhibitory activity. Molecular docking simulations were performed to investigate the mechanism behind PTP1B inhibition of the isolated compound and positive control, ursolic acid. Betulinic acid, betulin and taraxeryl acetate were the active PTP1B principles with IC50 values 3.49 ± 0.02, 4.17 ± 0.03 and 87.52 ± 0.03 µM, respectively. Molecular docking studies showed significant molecular interactions of the triterpene inhibitors with Gly220, Cys215, Gly218 and Asp48 inside the active site of PTP1B. The antidiabetic activity of A. roxburghiana could be attributed due to PTP1B inhibition by its triterpene constituents, betulin, betulinic acid and taraxeryl acetate. Computational insights of this study revealed that the C-3 and C-17 positions of the compounds needs extensive optimization for the development of new lead compounds. PMID:26118418

  7. Identification of Novel Inhibitors of Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides 1B1 and 1B3 (OATP1B1 and OATP1B3) Using a Consensus Vote of Six Classification Models

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides 1B1 and 1B3 are transporters selectively expressed on the basolateral membrane of the hepatocyte. Several studies reveal that they are involved in drug–drug interactions, cancer, and hyperbilirubinemia. In this study, we developed a set of classification models for OATP1B1 and 1B3 inhibition based on more than 1700 carefully curated compounds from literature, which were validated via cross-validation and by use of an external test set. After combining several sets of descriptors and classifiers, the 6 best models were selected according to their statistical performance and were used for virtual screening of DrugBank. Consensus scoring of the screened compounds resulted in the selection and purchase of nine compounds as potential dual inhibitors and of one compound as potential selective OATP1B3 inhibitor. Biological testing of the compounds confirmed the validity of the models, yielding an accuracy of 90% for OATP1B1 and 80% for OATP1B3, respectively. Moreover, at least half of the new identified inhibitors are associated with hyperbilirubinemia or hepatotoxicity, implying a relationship between OATP inhibition and these severe side effects. PMID:26469880

  8. Human autoreactive T cells recognize CD1b and phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Van Rhijn, Ildiko; van Berlo, Twan; Hilmenyuk, Tamara; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Wolf, Benjamin J.; Tatituri, Raju V. V.; Uldrich, Adam P.; Napolitani, Giorgio; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Altman, John D.; Willemsen, Peter; Huang, Shouxiong; Rossjohn, Jamie; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Brenner, Michael B.; Godfrey, Dale I.; Moody, D. Branch

    2016-01-01

    In contrast with the common detection of T cells that recognize MHC, CD1a, CD1c, or CD1d proteins, CD1b autoreactive T cells have been difficult to isolate in humans. Here we report the development of polyvalent complexes of CD1b proteins and carbohydrate backbones (dextramers) and their use in identifying CD1b autoreactive T cells from human donors. Activation is mediated by αβ T-cell receptors (TCRs) binding to CD1b-phospholipid complexes, which is sufficient to activate autoreactive responses to CD1b-expressing cells. Using mass spectrometry and T-cell responses to scan through the major classes of phospholipids, we identified phosphatidylglycerol (PG) as the immunodominant lipid antigen. T cells did not discriminate the chemical differences that distinguish mammalian PG from bacterial PG. Whereas most models of T-cell recognition emphasize TCR discrimination of differing self and foreign structures, CD1b autoreactive T cells recognize lipids with dual self and foreign origin. PG is rare in the cellular membranes that carry CD1b proteins. However, bacteria and mitochondria are rich in PG, so these data point to a more general mechanism of immune detection of infection- or stress-associated lipids. PMID:26621732

  9. Identification of Bidentate Salicylic Acid Inhibitors of PTP1B.

    PubMed

    Haftchenary, Sina; Jouk, Andriana O; Aubry, Isabelle; Lewis, Andrew M; Landry, Melissa; Ball, Daniel P; Shouksmith, Andrew E; Collins, Catherine V; Tremblay, Michel L; Gunning, Patrick T

    2015-09-10

    PTP1B is a master regulator in the insulin and leptin metabolic pathways. Hyper-activated PTP1B results in insulin resistance and is viewed as a key factor in the onset of type II diabetes and obesity. Moreover, inhibition of PTP1B expression in cancer cells dramatically inhibits cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we report the computationally guided optimization of a salicylic acid-based PTP1B inhibitor 6, identifying new and more potent bidentate PTP1B inhibitors, such as 20h, which exhibited a > 4-fold improvement in activity. In CHO-IR cells, 20f, 20h, and 20j suppressed PTP1B activity and restored insulin receptor phosphorylation levels. Notably, 20f, which displayed a 5-fold selectivity for PTP1B over the closely related PTPσ protein, showed no inhibition of PTP-LAR, PRL2 A/S, MKPX, or papain. Finally, 20i and 20j displayed nanomolar inhibition of PTPσ, representing interesting lead compounds for further investigation. PMID:26396684

  10. MISR Level 1B2 Terrain Data (MI1B2T_V2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    The MISR instrument consists of nine pushbroom cameras which measure radiance in four spectral bands. Global coverage is achieved in nine days. The cameras are arranged with one camera pointing toward the nadir, four cameras pointing forward and four cameras pointing aftward. It takes 7 minutes for all nine cameras to view the same surface location. The view angles relative to the surface reference ellipsoid, are 0, 26.1, 45.6, 60.0, and 70.5 degrees. The spectral band shapes are nominally gaussian, centered at 443, 555, 670, and 865 nm. The Terrain data are re-projected to the terrain altitude. In this product, surface data from all cameras will appear in the same geographic location. Thus, this product is the primary input to Level 2 aerosol/surface processing, which requires co-registration of the L1B2 imagery at the surface. Clouds will still be displaced due to their elevation above the surface, but this time with respect to the terrain rather than the ellipsoid. (The mountain location T is now assigned the geographic location at T, and the Cloud at F appears at the geographic location T.) In Level 2 aerosol/surface processing, algorithms are applied to screen out the clouds. Terrain data only exist for MISR blocks containing some land. [Location=GLOBAL LAND] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=2000-02-24; Stop_Date=] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=563.2 km (cross-track); Longitude_Resolution=140.8 km (along-track).; Temporal_Resolution=about 15 orbits/day; Temporal_Resolution_Range=about 15 orbits/day].

  11. CYP1B1: a unique gene with unique characteristics.

    PubMed

    Faiq, Muneeb A; Dada, Rima; Sharma, Reetika; Saluja, Daman; Dada, Tanuj

    2014-01-01

    CYP1B1, a recently described dioxin inducible oxidoreductase, is a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily involved in the metabolism of estradiol, retinol, benzo[a]pyrene, tamoxifen, melatonin, sterols etc. It plays important roles in numerous physiological processes and is expressed at mRNA level in many tissues and anatomical compartments. CYP1B1 has been implicated in scores of disorders. Analyses of the recent studies suggest that CYP1B1 can serve as a universal/ideal cancer marker and a candidate gene for predictive diagnosis. There is plethora of literature available about certain aspects of CYP1B1 that have not been interpreted, discussed and philosophized upon. The present analysis examines CYP1B1 as a peculiar gene with certain distinctive characteristics like the uniqueness in its chromosomal location, gene structure and organization, involvement in developmentally important disorders, tissue specific, not only expression, but splicing, potential as a universal cancer marker due to its involvement in key aspects of cellular metabolism, use in diagnosis and predictive diagnosis of various diseases and the importance and function of CYP1B1 mRNA in addition to the regular translation. Also CYP1B1 is very difficult to express in heterologous expression systems, thereby, halting its functional studies. Here we review and analyze these exceptional and startling characteristics of CYP1B1 with inputs from our own experiences in order to get a better insight into its molecular biology in health and disease. This may help to further understand the etiopathomechanistic aspects of CYP1B1 mediated diseases paving way for better research strategies and improved clinical management. PMID:25658124

  12. The COBRA-1B irradiation experiment in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Hins, A.G.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the forthcoming COBRA-1B experiment in EBR-II is to evaluate the effects of fast neutron irradiation on the physical and mechanical properties of candidate fusion structural materials. Of special interest in this experiment will be ITER-relevant temperature and exposure for the test specimens. Approximately 50% of the irradiation test volume will be devoted to vanadium-alloy specimens. Design of the COBRA-1B irradiation experiment began in this reporting period and is in progress. The target reactor insertion date for COBRA-1B is September 1994. Technical and programmatic feasibility approval for the experiment has been granted by EBR-II Operations.

  13. PROBING THE EARLIEST STAGE OF PROTOSTELLAR EVOLUTION-BARNARD 1-bN AND BARNARD 1-bS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yun-Hsin; Hirano, Naomi

    2013-04-01

    Two submm/mm sources in the Barnard 1b (B1-b) core, B1-bN and B1-bS, have been observed with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT). The 1.1 mm continuum map obtained with the SMA reveals that the two sources contain spatially compact components, suggesting that they harbor protostars. The N{sub 2}D{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +} J = 3-2 maps were obtained by combining the SMA and SMT data. The N{sub 2}D{sup +} map clearly shows two peaks at the continuum positions. The N{sub 2}H{sup +} map also peaks at the continuum positions, but is more dominated by the spatially extended component. The N{sub 2}D{sup +}/N{sub 2}H{sup +} ratio was estimated to be {approx}0.2 at the positions of both B1-bN and B1-bS. The derived N{sub 2}D{sup +}/N{sub 2}H{sup +} ratio is comparable to those of the prestellar cores in the late evolutionary stage and the class 0 protostars in the early evolutionary stage. Although B1-bN is bright in N{sub 2}H{sup +} and N{sub 2}D{sup +}, this source was barely seen in H{sup 13}CO{sup +}. This implies that the depletion of carbon-bearing molecules is significant in B1-bN. The chemical property suggests that B1-bN is in the earlier evolutionary stage as compared to B1-bS with the H{sup 13}CO{sup +} counterpart. The N{sub 2}H{sup +} and N{sub 2}D{sup +} lines show that the radial velocities of the two sources are different by {approx}0.9 km s{sup -1}. However, the velocity pattern along the line through B1-bN and B1-bS suggests that these two sources were not formed out of a single rotating cloud. It is likely that the B1-b core consists of two velocity components, each of which harbors a very young source.

  14. Expression Patterns of Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides 1B1 and 1B3 Protein in Human Pediatric Liver.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Margaret M S; Hines, Ronald N; Schuetz, Erin G; Meibohm, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    Determining appropriate pharmacotherapy in young children can be challenging due to uncertainties in the development of drug disposition pathways. With knowledge of the ontogeny of drug-metabolizing enzymes and an emerging focus on drug transporters, the developmental pattern of the uptake transporters organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1 and 1B3 was assessed by relative protein quantification using Western blotting in 80 human pediatric liver specimens covering an age range from 9 days to 12 years. OATP1B3 exhibited high expression at birth, which declined over the first months of life, and then increased again in the preadolescent period. In comparison with children 6-12 years of age, the relative protein expression of highly glycosylated (total) OATP1B3 was 235% (357%) in children <3 months of age, 33% (64%) in the age group from 3 months to 2 years, and 50% (59%) in children 2-6 years of age. The fraction of highly glycosylated to total OATP1B3 increased with age, indicating ontogenic processes not only at the transcriptional level but also at the post-translational level. Similar to OATP1B3, OATP1B1 showed high interindividual variability in relative protein expression but no statistically significant difference among the studied age groups. PMID:27098745

  15. MISR Level 1B1 Radiance Data (MI1B1_V2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    summary, the Level 1B1 Product contains the Data Numbers (DNs) radiometrically-scaled to radiances with no geometric resampling. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=2000-02-24; Stop_Date=] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=1.1 km; Longitude_Resolution=1.1 km; Temporal_Resolution=about 15 orbits/day; Temporal_Resolution_Range=about 15 orbits/day].

  16. CX3CR1(+) B Cells Show Immune Suppressor Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    The immune regulatory functions of B cells are not fully understood yet. The present study aims to characterize a subtype of B cells that expresses CX3CR1. In this study, peripheral blood samples were collected from patients with food allergies and healthy subjects. Peripheral B cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. T cell proliferation was assessed by carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester dilution assay. The results showed that the CX3CR1+ B cells were detected in the peripheral blood samples of healthy subjects and were significantly less in patients with food allergies. CX3CR1+ B cells expressed high levels of TGF-β and integrin αvβ6. CX3CR1+ B cells could efficiently suppress other effector CD4+ T cell activation. We conclude that human peripheral CX3CR1+ B cells have immune suppressor properties. PMID:24970890

  17. Open reading frames 1a and 1b of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) collaboratively initiate viral minus-strand RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Fang, Qiong-Qiong; Liu, Ji-Ting; Wang, Tong-Yun; Wang, Yu; Tao, Ye; Liu, Yong-Gang; Cai, Xue-Hui

    2016-09-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes a persistent threat to the swine industry, especially when highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) emerges. Previous studies have indicated that PRRSV RNA synthesis was correlated with HP-PRRSV virulence. PRRSV RNA synthesis includes genomic RNA and sub-genomic mRNA, and these processes require minus-strand RNA as a template. However, the mechanisms involved in PRRSV minus-strand RNA synthesis are not fully understood. A mini-genome system can be used to assess viral replication mechanisms and to evaluate the effects of potential antiviral drugs on viral replicase activities. In this study, we developed a mini-genome system that uses firefly luciferase as a reporter. Based on this system, we found that PRRSV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase nsp9 alone failed to activate virus minus-strand RNA synthesis. We also demonstrated that combinations of open reading frames 1a (ORF1a) and ORF1b are necessary for viral minus-strand RNA synthesis. PMID:27378424

  18. Recombinant saphenous vein 5-HT1B receptors of the rabbit: comparative pharmacology with human 5-HT1B receptors.

    PubMed

    Wurch, T; Palmier, C; Colpaert, F C; Pauwels, P J

    1997-01-01

    1. The rabbit recombinant saphenous vein 5-hydroxytryptamine1B (r 5-HT1B) receptor stably transfected in rat C6-glial cells was characterized by measuring adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cycle AMP) formation upon exposure to various 5-HT receptor ligands. The effects of agonists and antagonists were compared with their effects determined previously at the human cloned 5-HT1B (h 5-HT1B) receptor under similar experimental conditions. 2. Intact C6-glial cells expressing rb HT1B receptors exhibited [3H]-5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) binding sites with a Kd of 0.80 +/- 0.13 nM and a Bmax between 225 to 570 fmol mg-1 protein. The binding affinities of a series of 5-HT receptor ligands determined in a membrane preparation with [3H]-5-CT or [3H]-N-[4-methoxy-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl]-3-methyl-4-(-4 -pyridyl) benzamide (GR 125,743) were similar. With the exception of ketanserin, ligand affinities were comparable to those determined at the clones h 5-HT1B receptor site. 3. rb 5-HT1B receptors were negatively coupled to cyclic AMP formation upon stimulation with 5-HT agonists. Of the several 5-HT agonists tested, 5-CT was the most potent, the potency rank order being: 5-CT > 5-HT > zolmitriptan > naratriptan > rizatriptan > sumatriptan > R (+)-8-(hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT). The maximal responses of these agonists were similar to those induced by 5-HT. The potency of these agonists showed a positive correlation (r2 = 0.87; P < 0.002) with their potency at the cloned h 5-HT1B receptor subtype. 4. 2'-Methyl-4-(5-methyl-[1,2,4]oxadiazol-3-yl)-biphenyl-4-carboxylic acid [4-methoxy-e-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-yl)-phenyl]-amide (GR 127,935), methiothepin and ketanserin each behaved as silent, competitive antagonists at rb 5HT1B receptors; pKB values were 8.41, 8.32 and 7.05, respectively when naratriptan was used as an agonist. These estimates accorded with their binding affinities and the potencies found on 5-HT and/or sumatriptan

  19. Interaction of digitalis-like compounds with liver uptake transporters NTCP, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3.

    PubMed

    Gozalpour, Elnaz; Greupink, Rick; Wortelboer, Heleen M; Bilos, Albert; Schreurs, Marieke; Russel, Frans G M; Koenderink, Jan B

    2014-06-01

    Digitalis-like compounds (DLCs) such as digoxin, digitoxin, and ouabain, also known as cardiac glycosides, are among the oldest pharmacological treatments for heart failure. The compounds have a narrow therapeutic window, while at the same time, DLC pharmacokinetics is prone to drug-drug interactions at the transport level. Hepatic transporters organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, OATP1B3, and Na(+)-dependent taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) influence the disposition of a variety of drugs by mediating their uptake from blood into hepatocytes. The interaction of digoxin, digitoxin, and ouabain with hepatic uptake transporters has been studied before. However, here, we systematically investigated a much wider range of structurally related DLCs for their capability to inhibit or to be transported by these transporters in order to better understand the relation between the activity and chemical structure of this compound type. We studied the uptake and inhibitory potency of a series of 14 structurally related DLCs in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing NTCP (CHO-NTCP) and human embryonic kidney cells expressing OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 (HEK-OATP1B1 and HEK-OATP1B3). The inhibitory effect of the DLCs was measured against taurocholic acid (TCA) uptake in CHO-NTCP cells and against uptake of β-estradiol 17-β-d-glucuronide (E217βG) in HEK-OATP1B1 and HEK-OATP1B3 cells. Proscillaridin A was the most effective inhibitor of NTCP-mediated TCA transport (IC50 = 22 μM), whereas digitoxin and digitoxigenin were the most potent inhibitors of OATP1B1 and OAPTP1B3, with IC50 values of 14.2 and 36 μM, respectively. Additionally, we found that the sugar moiety and hydroxyl groups of the DLCs play different roles in their interaction with NTCP, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3. The sugar moiety decreases the inhibition of NTCP and OATP1B3 transport activity, whereas it enhances the inhibitory potency against OATP1B1. Moreover, the hydroxyl group at position 12

  20. Novel chromenedione derivatives displaying inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) from Flemingia philippinensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Yuk, Heung Joo; Kim, Jeong Yoon; Kim, Dae Wook; Song, Yeong Hun; Tan, Xue Fei; Curtis-Long, Marcus J; Park, Ki Hun

    2016-01-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is an important target to treat obesity and diabetes due to its key roles in insulin and leptin signaling. The MeOH extracts of the root bark of Flemingia philippinensis yielded eight inhibitory molecules (1-8) capable of targeting PTP1B. Three of them were identified to be novel compounds, philippin A (1), philippin B (2), and philippin C (3) which have a rare 3-phenylpropanoyl chromenedione skeleton. The other compounds (4-8) were known prenylated isoflavones. All compounds (1-8) inhibited PTP1B in a dose dependent manner with IC50s ranging between 2.4 and 29.4μM. The most potent compound emerged to be prenylated isoflavone 5 (IC50=2.4μM). In kinetic studies, chromenedione derivatives (1-3) emerged to be reversible, competitive inhibitors, whereas prenylated isoflavones (5-8) were noncompetitive inhibitors. PMID:26704263

  1. UBC9-dependent Association between Calnexin and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) at the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dukgyu; Kraus, Allison; Prins, Daniel; Groenendyk, Jody; Aubry, Isabelle; Liu, Wen-Xin; Li, Hao-Dong; Julien, Olivier; Touret, Nicolas; Sykes, Brian D.; Tremblay, Michel L.; Michalak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Calnexin is a type I integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, molecular chaperone, and a component of the translocon. We discovered a novel interaction between the calnexin cytoplasmic domain and UBC9, a SUMOylation E2 ligase, which modified the calnexin cytoplasmic domain by the addition of SUMO. We demonstrated that calnexin interaction with the SUMOylation machinery modulates an interaction with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), an ER-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in the negative regulation of insulin and leptin signaling. We showed that calnexin and PTP1B form UBC9-dependent complexes, revealing a previously unrecognized contribution of calnexin to the retention of PTP1B at the ER membrane. This work shows that the SUMOylation machinery links two ER proteins from divergent pathways to potentially affect cellular protein quality control and energy metabolism. PMID:25586181

  2. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase-1b (CPT1b) Deficiency Aggravates Pressure-Overload-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy due to Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    He, Lan; Kim, Teayoun; Long, Qinqiang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Peiyong; Zhou, Yiqun; Ding, Yishu; Prasain, Jeevan; Wood, Philip A.; Yang, Qinglin

    2012-01-01

    Background Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1(CPT1) is a rate-limiting step of mitochondrial β-oxidation by controlling the mitochondrial uptake of long-chain acyl-CoAs. The muscle isoform, CPT1b, is the predominant isoform expressed in the heart. It has been suggested that inhibiting CPT-1 activity by specific CPT-1 inhibitors exerts protective effects against cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. However, clinical and animal studies have shown mixed results, thereby posting concerns on the safety of this class of drugs. Preclinical studies using genetically modified animal models should provide a better understanding of targeting CPT1 in order to evaluate it as a safe and effective therapeutic approach. Methods and Results Heterozygous CPT1b knockout mice (CPT1b+/−) were subjected to transverse aorta constriction (TAC)-induced pressure-overload. These mice showed overtly normal cardiac structure/function under the basal condition. Under a severe pressure-overload condition induced by two weeks of transverse aorta constriction (TAC), CPT1b+/− mice were susceptible to premature death with congestive heart failure. Under a milder pressure-overload condition, CPT1b+/− mice exhibited exacerbated cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling compared with that in wild-type littermates. There were more pronounced impairments of cardiac contraction with greater eccentric cardiac hypertrophy in CPT1b+/− than in controlled mice. Moreover, the CPT1b+/− heart exhibited exacerbated mitochondrial abnormalities and myocardial lipid accumulation with elevated triglycerides and ceramide content, leading to greater cardiomyocytes apoptosis. Conclusions We conclude that CPT1b deficiency can cause lipotoxicity in the heart under pathological stress, leading to exacerbation of cardiac pathology. Therefore, caution should be applied in the clinical use of CPT-1 inhibitors. PMID:22932257

  3. Ferredoxin 1b (Fdx1b) Is the Essential Mitochondrial Redox Partner for Cortisol Biosynthesis in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Aliesha; Parajes, Silvia; Weger, Meltem; Zaucker, Andreas; Taylor, Angela E; O'Neil, Donna M; Müller, Ferenc; Krone, Nils

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes rely on electron transfer from the redox partner ferredoxin 1 (FDX1) for catalytic activity. Key steps in steroidogenesis require mitochondrial CYP enzymes and FDX1. Over 30 ferredoxin mutations have been explored in vitro; however, no spontaneously occurring mutations have been identified in humans leaving the impact of FDX1 on steroidogenesis in the whole organism largely unknown. Zebrafish are an important model to study human steroidogenesis, because they have similar steroid products and endocrine tissues. This study aimed to characterize the influence of ferredoxin on steroidogenic capacity in vivo by using zebrafish. Zebrafish have duplicate ferredoxin paralogs: fdx1 and fdx1b. Although fdx1 was observed throughout development and in most tissues, fdx1b was expressed after development of the zebrafish interrenal gland (counterpart to the mammalian adrenal gland). Additionally, fdx1b was restricted to adult steroidogenic tissues, such as the interrenal, gonads, and brain, suggesting that fdx1b was interacting with steroidogenic CYP enzymes. By using transcription activator-like effector nucleases, we generated fdx1b mutant zebrafish lines. Larvae with genetic disruption of fdx1b were morphologically inconspicuous. However, steroid hormone analysis by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry revealed fdx1b mutants failed to synthesize glucocorticoids. Additionally, these mutants had an up-regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axis and showed altered dark-light adaptation, suggesting impaired cortisol signaling. Antisense morpholino knockdown confirmed Fdx1b is required for de novo cortisol biosynthesis. In summary, by using zebrafish, we generated a ferredoxin knockout model system, which demonstrates for the first time the impact of mitochondrial redox regulation on glucocorticoid biosynthesis in vivo. PMID:26650568

  4. Apoptotic neutrophils in the circulation of patients with glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD1b).

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, Taco W; Maianski, Nikolai A; Tool, Anton T J; Smit, G Peter A; Rake, Jan Peter; Roos, Dirk; Visser, Gepke

    2003-06-15

    Glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD1b) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, and growth retardation, and associated-for unknown reasons- with neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction. In 5 GSD1b patients in whom nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase activity and chemotaxis were defective, we found that the majority of circulating granulocytes bound Annexin-V. The neutrophils showed signs of apoptosis with increased caspase activity, condensed nuclei, and perinuclear clustering of mitochondria to which the proapoptotic Bcl-2 member Bax had translocated already. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) addition to in vitro cultures did not rescue the GSD1b neutrophils from apoptosis as occurs with G-CSF-treated control neutrophils. Moreover, the 2 GSD1b patients on G-CSF treatment did not show significantly lower levels of apoptotic neutrophils in the bloodstream. Current understanding of neutrophil apoptosis and the accompanying functional demise suggests that GSD1b granulocytes are dysfunctional because they are apoptotic. PMID:12576310

  5. Oncolytic Replication of E1b-Deleted Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Pei-Hsin; Wechman, Stephen L.; McMasters, Kelly M.; Zhou, Heshan Sam

    2015-01-01

    Various viruses have been studied and developed for oncolytic virotherapies. In virotherapy, a relatively small amount of viruses used in an intratumoral injection preferentially replicate in and lyse cancer cells, leading to the release of amplified viral particles that spread the infection to the surrounding tumor cells and reduce the tumor mass. Adenoviruses (Ads) are most commonly used for oncolytic virotherapy due to their infection efficacy, high titer production, safety, easy genetic modification, and well-studied replication characteristics. Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in and destroy cancer cells and have been used in multiple clinical trials. H101, one of the E1b55K-deleted Ads, has been used for the treatment of late-stage cancers as the first approved virotherapy agent. However, the mechanism of selective replication of E1b-deleted Ads in cancer cells is still not well characterized. This review will focus on three potential molecular mechanisms of oncolytic replication of E1b55K-deleted Ads. These mechanisms are based upon the functions of the viral E1B55K protein that are associated with p53 inhibition, late viral mRNA export, and cell cycle disruption. PMID:26561828

  6. Oncolytic Replication of E1b-Deleted Adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pei-Hsin; Wechman, Stephen L; McMasters, Kelly M; Zhou, Heshan Sam

    2015-11-01

    Various viruses have been studied and developed for oncolytic virotherapies. In virotherapy, a relatively small amount of viruses used in an intratumoral injection preferentially replicate in and lyse cancer cells, leading to the release of amplified viral particles that spread the infection to the surrounding tumor cells and reduce the tumor mass. Adenoviruses (Ads) are most commonly used for oncolytic virotherapy due to their infection efficacy, high titer production, safety, easy genetic modification, and well-studied replication characteristics. Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in and destroy cancer cells and have been used in multiple clinical trials. H101, one of the E1b55K-deleted Ads, has been used for the treatment of late-stage cancers as the first approved virotherapy agent. However, the mechanism of selective replication of E1b-deleted Ads in cancer cells is still not well characterized. This review will focus on three potential molecular mechanisms of oncolytic replication of E1b55K-deleted Ads. These mechanisms are based upon the functions of the viral E1B55K protein that are associated with p53 inhibition, late viralmRNAexport, and cell cycle disruption. PMID:26561828

  7. Occurrence of 20S RNA and 23S RNA replicons in industrial yeast strains and their variation under nutritional stress conditions.

    PubMed

    López, Victoria; Gil, Rosario; Vicente Carbonell, José; Navarro, Alfonso

    2002-04-01

    We have characterized industrial yeast strains used in the brewing, baking, and winemaking industries for the presence or absence of cytoplasmic single-stranded 20S and 23S RNAs. Furthermore, the variation of intracellular concentrations of these replicons in brewing and laboratory strains under nutritional stress conditions was determined. Our results show a correlation between the relative abundance of these replicons and exposure of yeast to nutritionally stressful conditions, indicating that these RNAs could be employed as molecular probes to evaluate the exposure of 20S(+) and/or 23S(+) yeast strains to stress situations during industrial manipulation. During this study, several 20S(-)23S(+) Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were isolated and identified. This is the first time that a yeast strain containing only 23S RNA has been reported, demonstrating that 20S RNA is not required for 23S RNA replication. PMID:11921103

  8. RNA-Seq Based Transcriptome Analysis of Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Replicon Transfected Huh-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Deepshi; Joshi, Prashant; Durgapal, Hemlata; Panda, Subrat Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is as varied as they appear similar; while HBV causes an acute and/or chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, HEV mostly causes an acute self-limiting disease. In both infections, host responses are crucial in disease establishment and/or virus clearance. In the wake of worsening prognosis described during HEV super-infection over chronic HBV hepatitis, we investigated the host responses by studying alterations in gene expression in liver cells (Huh-7 cell line) by transfection with HEV replicon only (HEV-only), HBV replicon only (HBV-only) and both HBV and HEV replicons (HBV+HEV). Virus replication was validated by strand-specific real-time RT-PCR for HEV and HBsAg ELISA of the culture supernatants for HBV. Indirect immunofluorescence for the respective viral proteins confirmed infection. Transcription profiling was carried out by RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis of the poly-A enriched RNA from the transfected cells. Averages of 600 million bases within 5.6 million reads were sequenced in each sample and ∼15,800 genes were mapped with at least one or more reads. A total of 461 genes in HBV+HEV, 408 in HBV-only and 306 in HEV-only groups were differentially expressed as compared to mock transfection control by two folds (p<0.05) or more. Majority of the significant genes with altered expression clustered into immune-associated, signal transduction, and metabolic process categories. Differential gene expression of functionally important genes in these categories was also validated by real-time RT-PCR based relative gene-expression analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of in vitro replicon transfected RNA-Seq based transcriptome analysis to understand the host responses against HEV and HBV. PMID:24505321

  9. Combinations of various CpG motifs cloned into plasmid backbone modulate and enhance protective immunity of viral replicon DNA anthrax vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Ma, Yao; Xu, Wen-Hui; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2015-08-01

    DNA vaccines are generally weak stimulators of the immune system. Fortunately, their efficacy can be improved using a viral replicon vector or by the addition of immunostimulatory CpG motifs, although the design of these engineered DNA vectors requires optimization. Our results clearly suggest that multiple copies of three types of CpG motifs or combinations of various types of CpG motifs cloned into a viral replicon vector backbone with strong immunostimulatory activities on human PBMC are efficient adjuvants for these DNA vaccines to modulate and enhance protective immunity against anthrax, although modifications with these different CpG forms in vivo elicited inconsistent immune response profiles. Modification with more copies of CpG motifs elicited more potent adjuvant effects leading to the generation of enhanced immunity, which indicated a CpG motif dose-dependent enhancement of antigen-specific immune responses. Notably, the enhanced and/or synchronous adjuvant effects were observed in modification with combinations of two different types of CpG motifs, which provides not only a contribution to the knowledge base on the adjuvant activities of CpG motifs combinations but also implications for the rational design of optimal DNA vaccines with combinations of CpG motifs as "built-in" adjuvants. We describe an efficient strategy to design and optimize DNA vaccines by the addition of combined immunostimulatory CpG motifs in a viral replicon DNA plasmid to produce strong immune responses, which indicates that the CpG-modified viral replicon DNA plasmid may be desirable for use as vector of DNA vaccines. PMID:25265876

  10. Proteome Analysis of Liver Cells Expressing a Full- Length Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Replicon and Biopsy Specimens of Posttransplantation Liver from HCV-Infected Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Chan, Eric Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Qian, Weijun; Stastna, Miroslava; Baas, Tracey; Camp, David G.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2005-06-01

    The development of a reproducible model system for the study of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has the potential to significantly enhance the study of virus-host interactions and provide future direction for modeling the pathogenesis of HCV. While there are studies describing global gene expression changes associated with HCV infection, changes in the proteome have not been characterized. We report the first large scale proteome analysis of the highly permissive Huh-7.5 cell line containing a full length HCV replicon. We detected > 4,400 proteins in this cell line, including HCV replicon proteins, using multidimensional liquid chromatographic (LC) separations coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). The set of Huh-7.5 proteins confidently identified is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive yet reported for a human cell line. Consistent with the literature, a comparison of Huh-7.5 cells (+) and (-) the HCV replicon identified expression changes of proteins involved in lipid metabolism. We extended these analyses to liver biopsy material from HCV-infected patients where > 1,500 proteins were detected from 2 {micro}g protein lysate using the Huh-7.5 protein database and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy. These findings demonstrate the utility of multidimensional proteome analysis of the HCV replicon model system for assisting the determination of proteins/pathways affected by HCV infection. Our ability to extend these analyses to the highly complex proteome of small liver biopsies with limiting protein yields offers the unique opportunity to begin evaluating the clinical significance of protein expression changes associated with HCV infection.

  11. Promiscuous plasmid replication in thermophiles: Use of a novel hyperthermophilic replicon for genetic manipulation of Clostridium thermocellum at its optimum growth temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Groom, Joseph; Chung, Daehwan; Olson, Daniel G.; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.; Westpheling, Janet

    2016-01-29

    Clostridium thermocellum is a leading candidate for the consolidated bioprocessing of lignocellulosic biomass for the production of fuels and chemicals. A limitation to the engineering of this strain is the availability of stable replicating plasmid vectors for homologous and heterologous expression of genes that provide improved and/or novel pathways for fuel production. Current vectors relay on replicons from mesophilic bacteria and are not stable at the optimum growth temperature of C. thermocellum. To develop more thermostable genetic tools for C. thermocellum, we constructed vectors based on the hyperthermophilic Caldicellulosiruptor bescii replicon pBAS2. Autonomously replicating shuttle vectors based on pBAS2 reproduciblymore » transformed C. thermocellum at 60 °C and were maintained in multiple copy. Promoters, selectable markers and plasmid replication proteins from C. bescii were functional in C. thermocellum. Phylogenetic analyses of the proteins contained on pBAS2 revealed that the replication initiation protein RepL is unique among thermophiles. Lastly, these results suggest that pBAS2 may be a broadly useful replicon for other thermophilic Firmicutes.« less

  12. An Alphavirus Replicon-Based Human Metapneumovirus Vaccine Is Immunogenic and Protective in Mice and Cotton Rats▿

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Hoyin; Tollefson, Sharon J.; Podsiad, Amy B.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Johnston, Robert E.; Williams, John V.; Crowe, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a recently discovered paramyxovirus that causes upper and lower respiratory tract infections in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals worldwide. Here, we developed Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRPs) encoding hMPV fusion (F) or attachment (G) glycoproteins and evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of these vaccine candidates in mice and cotton rats. VRPs encoding hMPV F protein, when administered intranasally, induced F-specific virus-neutralizing antibodies in serum and immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies in secretions at the respiratory mucosa. Challenge virus replication was reduced significantly in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts following intranasal hMPV challenge in these animals. However, vaccination with hMPV G protein VRPs did not induce neutralizing antibodies or protect animals from hMPV challenge. Close examination of the histopathology of the lungs of VRP-MPV F-vaccinated animals following hMPV challenge revealed no enhancement of inflammation or mucus production. Aberrant cytokine gene expression was not detected in these animals. Together, these results represent an important first step toward the use of VRPs encoding hMPV F proteins as a prophylactic vaccine for hMPV. PMID:18786987

  13. Profiling of antimicrobial resistance and plasmid replicon types in β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli isolated from Korean beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seung Won; Jung, Myunghwan; Shin, Min-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 78 isolates of Escherichia coli isolated from Korean beef cattle farms were investigated for the production of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and/or AmpC β-lactamase. In the disc diffusion test with ampicillin, amoxicillin, cephalothin, ceftiofur, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, and cefoxitin, 38.5% of the isolates showed resistance to all of ampicillin, amoxicillin, and cephalothin. The double disc synergy method revealed that none of the isolates produced ESBL or AmpC β-lactamases. DNA sequencing showed that all isolates encoded genes for TEM-1-type β-lactamase. Moreover, 78.2% of the isolates transferred the TEM-1-type β-lactamase gene via conjugation. In plasmid replicon typing of all donors, IncFIB and IncFIA were identified in 71.4% and 41.0% of plasmids, respectively. In transconjugants, IncFIB and IncFIA were the most frequent types detected (61.5% and 41.0%, respectively). Overall, the present study indicates that selection pressures of antimicrobials on β-lactamases in beef cattle may be low relative to other livestock animals in Korea. Moreover, to reduce selection pressure and dissemination of β-lactamase, the long-term surveillance of antimicrobial use in domestic beef cattle should be established. PMID:26119172

  14. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Semliki forest virus replicon-based DNA vaccines encoding goatpox virus structural proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Min; Jin Ningyi; Liu Qi; Huo Xiaowei; Li Yang; Hu Bo; Ma Haili; Zhu Zhanbo; Cong Yanzhao; Li Xiao; Jin Minglan; Zhu Guangze

    2009-08-15

    Goatpox, caused by goatpox virus (GTPV), is an acute feverish and contagious disease in goats often associated with high morbidity and high mortality. To resolve potential safety risks and vaccination side effects of existing live attenuated goatpox vaccine (AV41), two Semliki forest virus (SFV) replicon-based bicistronic expression DNA vaccines (pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA) which encode GTPV structural proteins corresponding to the Vaccinia virus proteins A27, L1, A33, and B5, respectively, were constructed. Then, theirs ability to induce humoral and cellular response in mice and goats, and protect goats against virulent virus challenge were evaluated. The results showed that, vaccination with pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA in combination could elicit strong humoral and cellular responses in mice and goats, provide partial protection against viral challenge in goats, and reduce disease symptoms. Additionally, priming vaccination with the above-mentioned DNA vaccines could significantly reduce the goats' side reactions from boosting vaccinations with current live vaccine (AV41), which include skin lesions at the inoculation site and fevers. Data obtained in this study could not only facilitate improvement of the current goatpox vaccination strategy, but also provide valuable guidance to suitable candidates for evaluation and development of orthopoxvirus vaccines.

  15. 9 CFR 73.1b - Quarantine policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.1b... various areas because of cattle scabies and has issued the regulations in this part governing the interstate movement of cattle from such areas. It is the policy of the Department to quarantine...

  16. 9 CFR 73.1b - Quarantine policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.1b... various areas because of cattle scabies and has issued the regulations in this part governing the interstate movement of cattle from such areas. It is the policy of the Department to quarantine...

  17. 9 CFR 73.1b - Quarantine policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.1b... various areas because of cattle scabies and has issued the regulations in this part governing the interstate movement of cattle from such areas. It is the policy of the Department to quarantine...

  18. 9 CFR 73.1b - Quarantine policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.1b... various areas because of cattle scabies and has issued the regulations in this part governing the interstate movement of cattle from such areas. It is the policy of the Department to quarantine...

  19. 9 CFR 73.1b - Quarantine policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.1b... various areas because of cattle scabies and has issued the regulations in this part governing the interstate movement of cattle from such areas. It is the policy of the Department to quarantine...

  20. 18 CFR 1b.18 - Right to submit statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Right to submit... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.18 Right to submit statements. Any person may, at any time during the course of an investigation, submit documents,...

  1. PTP1B: mediating ROS signaling to silence genes

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Benoit; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that normal cells often respond to the activation of oncogenes by undergoing reactive oxygen species-dependent induction of senescence. Here, we discuss our recent publication identifying protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B as an important redox-controlled checkpoint for senescence downstream of oncogenic RAS.

  2. AIRS Level 1b Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H.; Gregorich, D.; Gaiser, S.; Hagan, D.; Pagano, T.; Ting, D.

    2000-01-01

    The level 1b Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD) describes the theoretical bases of the algorithms used to convert the raw detector output (data numbers) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and Humidity Sounder Brazil (HSB) to physical radiance units and, in the case of AIRS, perform in-orbit spectral calibrations.

  3. Leukocyte transcellular diapedesis: Rap1b is in control

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, Marie-Dominique

    2015-01-01

    The neutrophil transmigration across the blood endothelial cell barrier represents the prerequisite step of innate inflammation. It is well known that neutrophils cross the endothelial barrier by transmigrating at the endothelial cell junction (‘paracellular’). However, in vivo and in vitro evidence have clearly demonstrated occurrence of an alternate mode of migration directly through the endothelial cell body (‘transcellular’). Despite our knowledge on mechanisms of transendothelial migration, it remains unclear which factors determine distinct modes of migration. We recently found that the Ras-like Rap1b GTPase limits neutrophil transcellular migration. Rap1b restrains transcellular migration by suppressing Akt-driven invasive protrusions while leaving the paracellular route unaffected. Furthermore, Rap1b limits neutrophil tissue infiltration in mice and prevents hyper susceptibility to endotoxin shock. These findings uncover a novel role for Rap1b in neutrophil migration and inflammation. Importantly, they offer emerging evidences that paracellular and transcellular migration of neutrophils are regulated by separate mechanisms. Here, we discuss the mechanisms of neutrophil transmigration and their clinical importance for vascular integrity and innate inflammation. PMID:26451346

  4. Saturn 1B and Saturn 5 computer programs, software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Information on the progress and development of all Saturn 1B and Saturn 5 computer programs is presented. On-line, operating systems, test programs, and on-line display descriptions are given along with off-line programs. All programs are listed in tabular form.

  5. Listeria meningoencephalitis and anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vergori, A; Masi, G; Donati, D; Ginanneschi, F; Annunziata, P; Cerase, A; Mencarelli, M; Rossetti, B; De Luca, A; Zanelli, G

    2016-08-01

    We report the first case of Listeria monocytogenes meningoencephalitis associated with anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome in an immunocompetent adult. A prompt diagnosis, made thanks to the multidisciplinary contribution, allowed a combined therapeutic approach leading to final favourable outcome, despite several intercurrent complications. PMID:26825308

  6. 20 CFR 655.700 - What statutory provisions govern the employment of H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 nonimmigrants and how do...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (Public Law 106-95) and the regulations issued thereunder, 20 CFR part 655, subparts L and M. (3) E-3... employment of H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 nonimmigrants and how do employers apply for H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 visas... Requirements for Employers Seeking To Employ Nonimmigrants on H-1b Visas in Specialty Occupations and...

  7. 20 CFR 655.700 - What statutory provisions govern the employment of H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 nonimmigrants and how do...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (Public Law 106-95) and the regulations issued thereunder, 20 CFR part 655, subparts L and M. (3) E-3... employment of H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 nonimmigrants and how do employers apply for H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 visas... Requirements for Employers Seeking To Employ Nonimmigrants on H-1b Visas in Specialty Occupations and...

  8. 20 CFR 655.700 - What statutory provisions govern the employment of H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 nonimmigrants and how do...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (Public Law 106-95) and the regulations issued thereunder, 20 CFR part 655, subparts L and M. (3) E-3... employment of H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 nonimmigrants and how do employers apply for H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 visas... Requirements for Employers Seeking To Employ Nonimmigrants on H-1b Visas in Specialty Occupations and...

  9. PTP1B: a new therapeutic target for Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tautz, Lutz

    2015-08-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by successive loss of acquired cognitive, social, and motor skills and development of autistic behavior. RTT affects approximately 1 in 10,000 live female births and is the second most common cause of severe mental retardation in females, after Down syndrome. Currently, there is no cure or effective therapy for RTT. Approved treatment regimens are presently limited to supportive management of specific physical and mental disabilities. In this issue, Krishnan and colleagues reveal that the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is upregulated in patients with RTT and in murine models and provide strong evidence that targeting PTP1B has potential as a viable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of RTT. PMID:26214520

  10. COMMIX-1B. 3-D Single-Phase Thermal Hydraulics

    SciTech Connect

    Wildman, D.J.

    1986-01-31

    COMMIX-1B is designed to perform steady-state or transient, single-phase, three-dimensional analysis of fluid flow with heat transfer in a single-component or multicomponent system. The program was developed for the analysis of heat transfer and fluid flow processes in a nuclear reactor system; however, it can easily be applied to non-nuclear systems requiring heat transfer and/or fluid flow analysis. COMMIX-1B solves the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, and transport equations of turbulence parameters and provides detailed local velocity, temperature, and pressure fields for the problem under consideration. It is capable of solving thermal-hydraulic problems involving either a single component, such as a rod bundle, reactor plenum, piping system, heat exchanger, etc., or a multicomponent system that is a combination of these components.

  11. A Unique Nodavirus with Novel Features: Mosinovirus Expresses Two Subgenomic RNAs, a Capsid Gene of Unknown Origin, and a Suppressor of the Antiviral RNA Interference Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Susan; Zirkel, Florian; Kurth, Andreas; van Cleef, Koen W. R.; Drosten, Christian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insects are a reservoir for many known and novel viruses. We discovered an unknown virus, tentatively named mosinovirus (MoNV), in mosquitoes from a tropical rainforest region in Côte d'Ivoire. The MoNV genome consists of two segments of positive-sense RNA of 2,972 nucleotides (nt) (RNA 1) and 1,801 nt (RNA 2). Its putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase shares 43% amino acid identity with its closest relative, that of the Pariacoto virus (family Nodaviridae). Unexpectedly, for the putative capsid protein, maximal pairwise identity of 16% to Lake Sinai virus 2, an unclassified virus with a nonsegmented RNA genome, was found. Moreover, MoNV virions are nonenveloped and about 50 nm in diameter, larger than any of the known nodaviruses. Mature MoNV virions contain capsid proteins of ∼56 kDa, which do not seem to be cleaved from a longer precursor. Northern blot analyses revealed that MoNV expresses two subgenomic RNAs of 580 nt (RNA 3) and 292 nt (RNA 4). RNA 4 encodes a viral suppressor of RNA interference (RNAi) that shares its mechanism with the B2 RNAi suppressor protein of other nodaviruses despite lacking recognizable similarity to these proteins. MoNV B2 binds long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and, accordingly, inhibits Dicer-2-mediated processing of dsRNA into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Phylogenetic analyses indicate that MoNV is a novel member of the family Nodaviridae that acquired its capsid gene via reassortment from an unknown, distantly related virus beyond the family level. IMPORTANCE The identification of novel viruses provides important information about virus evolution and diversity. Here, we describe an unknown unique nodavirus in mosquitoes, named mosinovirus (MoNV). MoNV was classified as a nodavirus based on its genome organization and on phylogenetic analyses of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Notably, its capsid gene was acquired from an unknown virus with a distant relationship to nodaviruses. Another remarkable feature of Mo

  12. Pharmacophore modeling for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Lee, Keun Woo

    2007-05-01

    A three dimensional chemical feature based pharmacophore model was developed for the inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) using the CATALYST software, which would provide useful knowledge for performing virtual screening to identify new inhibitors targeted toward type II diabetes and obesity. A dataset of 27 inhibitors, with diverse structural properties, and activities ranging from 0.026 to 600 microM, was selected as a training set. Hypol, the most reliable quantitative four featured pharmacophore hypothesis, was generated from a training set composed of compounds with two H-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic aromatic and one ring aromatic features. It has a correlation coefficient, RMSD and cost difference (null cost-total cost) of 0.946, 0.840 and 65.731, respectively. The best hypothesis (Hypol) was validated using four different methods. Firstly, a cross validation was performed by randomizing the data using the Cat-Scramble technique. The results confirmed that the pharmacophore models generated from the training set were valid. Secondly, a test set of 281 molecules was scored, with a correlation of 0.882 obtained between the experimental and predicted activities. Hypol performed well in correctly discriminating the active and inactive molecules. Thirdly, the model was investigated by mapping on two PTP1B inhibitors identified by different pharmaceutical companies. The Hypol model correctly predicted these compounds as being highly active. Finally, docking simulations were performed on few compounds to substantiate the role of the pharmacophore features at the binding site of the protein by analyzing their binding conformations. These multiple validation approaches provided confidence in the utility of this pharmacophore model as a 3D query for virtual screening to retrieve new chemical entities showing potential as potent PTP1B inhibitors. PMID:17615669

  13. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B transporters modulate hydroxyurea pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Cynthia S.; Finkelstein, David; Ware, Russell E.; Sparreboom, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is currently the only FDA-approved drug that ameliorates the pathophysiology of sickle cell anemia. Unfortunately, substantial interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of hydroxyurea may result in variation of the drug's efficacy. However, little is known about mechanisms that modulate hydroxyurea PK. Recent in vitro studies identifying hydroxyurea as a substrate for organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP1B) transporters prompted the current investigation assessing the role of OATP1B transporters in modulating hydroxyurea PK. Using wild-type and Oatp1b knockout (Oatp1b−/−) mice, hydroxyurea PK was analyzed in vivo by measuring [14C]hydroxyurea distribution in plasma, kidney, liver, urine, or the exhaled 14CO2 metabolite. Plasma levels were significantly reduced by 20% in Oatp1b−/− mice compared with wild-type (area under the curve of 38.64 or 48.45 μg·h−1·ml−1, respectively) after oral administration, whereas no difference was observed between groups following intravenous administration. Accumulation in the kidney was significantly decreased by twofold in Oatp1b−/− mice (356.9 vs. 748.1 pmol/g), which correlated with a significant decrease in urinary excretion. Hydroxyurea accumulation in the liver was also decreased (136.6 vs. 107.3 pmol/g in wild-type or Oatp1b−/− mice, respectively) correlating with a decrease in exhaled 14CO2. These findings illustrate that deficiency of Oatp1b transporters alters the absorption, distribution, and elimination of hydroxyurea thus providing the first in vivo evidence that cell membrane transporters may play a significant role in modulating hydroxyurea PK. Future studies to investigate other transporters and their role in hydroxyurea disposition are warranted for understanding the sources of variation in hydroxyurea's PK. PMID:23986199

  14. Lithostratigraphy from downhole logs in Hole AND-1B, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Trevor; Morin, Roger H.; Jarrard, Richard D.; Jackolski, Chris L.; Henrys, Stuart A.; Niessen, Frank; Magens, Diana; Kuhn, Gerhard; Monien, Donata; Powell, Ross D.

    2012-01-01

    The ANDRILL (Antarctic Drilling Project) McMurdo Ice Shelf (MIS) project drilled 1285 m of sediment in Hole AND–1B, representing the past 12 m.y. of glacial history. Downhole geophysical logs were acquired to a depth of 1018 mbsf (meters below seafloor), and are complementary to data acquired from the core. The natural gamma radiation (NGR) and magnetic susceptibility logs are particularly useful for understanding lithological and paleoenvironmental change at ANDRILL McMurdo Ice Shelf Hole AND–1B. NGR logs cover the entire interval from the seafloor to 1018 mbsf, and magnetic susceptibility and other logs covered the open hole intervals between 692 and 1018 and 237–342 mbsf. In the upper part of AND–1B, clear alternations between low and high NGR values distinguish between diatomite (lacking minerals containing naturally radioactive K, U, and Th) and diamictite (containing K-bearing clays, K-feldspar, mica, and heavy minerals). In the lower open hole logged section, NGR and magnetic susceptibility can also distinguish claystones (rich in K-bearing clay minerals, relatively low in magnetite) and diamictites (relatively high in magnetite). Sandstones can be distinguished by their high resistivity values in AND–1B. On the basis of these three downhole logs, diamictite, claystones, and sandstones can be predicted correctly for 74% of the 692–1018 mbsf interval. The logs were then used to predict facies for the 6% of this interval that was unrecovered by coring. Given the understanding of the physical property characteristics of different facies, it is also possible to identify subtle changes in lithology from the physical properties and help refine parts of the lithostratigraphy, for example, the varying terrigenous content of diatomites and the transitions from subice diamictite to open-water diatomite.

  15. Development and characterization of a Rift Valley fever virus cell-cell fusion assay using alphavirus replicon vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Filone, Claire Marie; Heise, Mark; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Bertolotti-Ciarlet, Andrea . E-mail: aciarlet@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-12-20

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Phlebovirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family, is transmitted by mosquitoes and infects both humans and domestic animals, particularly cattle and sheep. Since primary RVFV strains must be handled in BSL-3+ or BSL-4 facilities, a RVFV cell-cell fusion assay will facilitate the investigation of RVFV glycoprotein function under BSL-2 conditions. As for other members of the Bunyaviridae family, RVFV glycoproteins are targeted to the Golgi, where the virus buds, and are not efficiently delivered to the cell surface. However, overexpression of RVFV glycoproteins using an alphavirus replicon vector resulted in the expression of the glycoproteins on the surface of multiple cell types. Brief treatment of RVFV glycoprotein expressing cells with mildly acidic media (pH 6.2 and below) resulted in rapid and efficient syncytia formation, which we quantified by {beta}-galactosidase {alpha}-complementation. Fusion was observed with several cell types, suggesting that the receptor(s) for RVFV is widely expressed or that this acid-dependent virus does not require a specific receptor to mediate cell-cell fusion. Fusion occurred over a broad temperature range, as expected for a virus with both mosquito and mammalian hosts. In contrast to cell fusion mediated by the VSV-G glycoprotein, RVFV glycoprotein-dependent cell fusion could be prevented by treating target cells with trypsin, indicating that one or more proteins (or protein-associated carbohydrate) on the host cell surface are needed to support membrane fusion. The cell-cell fusion assay reported here will make it possible to study the membrane fusion activity of RVFV glycoproteins in a high-throughput format and to screen small molecule inhibitors for the ability to block virus-specific membrane fusion.

  16. Incompatibility of Lactobacillus Vectors with Replicons Derived from Small Cryptic Lactobacillus Plasmids and Segregational Instability of the Introduced Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Posno, M.; Leer, R. J.; van Luijk, N.; van Giezen, M. J. F.; Heuvelmans, P. T. H. M.; Lokman, B. C.; Pouwels, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    Three new Lactobacillus vectors based on cryptic Lactobacillus plasmids were constructed. The shuttle vector pLP3537 consists of a 2.3-kb plasmid from Lactobacillus pentosus MD353, an erythromycin resistance gene from Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pE194, and pUC19 as a replicon for Escherichia coli. The vectors pLPE317 and pLPE323, which do not contain E. coli sequences, were generated by introducing the erythromycin resistance gene of pE194 into a 1.7- and a 2.3-kb plasmid from L. pentosus MD353, respectively. These vectors and the shuttle vector pLP825 (M. Posno, R. J. Leer, J. M. M. van Rijn, B. C. Lokman, and P. H. Pouwels, p. 397-401, in A. T. Ganesan and J. A. Hoch, ed., Genetics and biotechnology of bacilli, vol. 2, 1988) could be introduced by electroporation into Lactobacillus casei, L. pentosus, L. plantarum, L. acidophilus, L. fermentum, and L. brevis strains with similar efficiencies. Transformation efficiencies were strain dependent and varied from 102 to 107 transformants per μg of DNA. Plasmid DNA analysis of L. pentosus MD353 transformants revealed that the introduction of pLP3537 or pLPE323 was invariably accompanied by loss of the endogenous 2.3-kb plasmid. Remarkably, pLPE317 could only be introduced into an L. pentosus MD353 strain that had been previously cured of its endogenous 1.7-kb plasmid. The curing phenomena are most likely to be explained by the incompatibility of the vectors and resident plasmids. Lactobacillus vectors are generally rapidly lost when cells are cultivated in the absence of selective pressure. However, pLPE323 is stable in three of four Lactobacillus strains tested so far. Images PMID:16348515

  17. NICMOS OBSERVATIONS OF THE TRANSITING HOT JUPITER XO-1b

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Christopher J.; McCullough, P. R.; Bergeron, L. E.; Long, Douglas; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Nelan, Edmund P.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Janes, Kenneth A.

    2010-08-20

    We refine the physical parameters of the transiting hot Jupiter planet XO-1b and its stellar host XO-1 using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) NICMOS observations. XO-1b has a radius R{sub p} = 1.21 {+-} 0.03 R{sub J} , and XO-1 has a radius R{sub *} = 0.94 {+-} 0.02 R{sub sun}, where the uncertainty in the mass of XO-1 dominates the uncertainty of R{sub p} and R{sub *}. There are no significant differences in the XO-1 system properties between these broadband NIR observations and previous determinations based upon ground-based optical observations. We measure two transit timings from these observations with 9 s and 15 s precision. As a residual to a linear ephemeris model, there is a 2.0{sigma} timing difference between the two HST visits that are separated by three transit events (11.8 days). These two transit timings and additional timings from the literature are sufficient to rule out the presence of an Earth mass planet orbiting in 2:1 mean motion resonance coplanar with XO-1b. We identify and correct for poorly understood 'gain-like' variations present in NICMOS time series data. This correction reduces the effective noise in time series photometry by a factor of 2 for the case of XO-1.

  18. Viroid RNA turnover: characterization of the subgenomic RNAs of potato spindle tuber viroid accumulating in infected tissues provides insights into decay pathways operating in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Minoia, Sofia; Navarro, Beatriz; Delgado, Sonia; Serio, Francesco Di; Flores, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    While biogenesis of viroid RNAs is well-known, how they decay is restricted to data involving host RNA silencing. Here we report an alternative degradation pathway operating on potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), the type species of nuclear-replicating viroids (family Pospiviroidae). Northern-blot hybridizations with full- and partial-length probes revealed a set of PSTVd (+) subgenomic (sg)RNAs in early-infected eggplant, some partially overlapping and reaching levels comparable to those of the genomic circular and linear forms. Part of the PSTVd (+) sgRNAs were also observed in Nicotiana benthamiana (specifically in the nuclei) and tomato, wherein they have been overlooked due to their low accumulation. Primer extensions of representative (+) sgRNAs failed to detect a common 5′ terminus, excluding that they could result from aborted transcription initiated at one specific site. Supporting this view, 5′- and 3′-RACE indicated that the (+) sgRNAs have 5′-OH and 3′-P termini most likely generated by RNase-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage of longer precursors. These approaches also unveiled PSTVd (−) sgRNAs with features similar to their (+) counterparts. Our results provide a mechanistic insight on how viroid decay may proceed in vivo during replication, and suggest that synthesis and decay of PSTVd strands might be coupled as in mRNA. PMID:25662219

  19. Viroid RNA turnover: characterization of the subgenomic RNAs of potato spindle tuber viroid accumulating in infected tissues provides insights into decay pathways operating in vivo.

    PubMed

    Minoia, Sofia; Navarro, Beatriz; Delgado, Sonia; Di Serio, Francesco; Flores, Ricardo

    2015-02-27

    While biogenesis of viroid RNAs is well-known, how they decay is restricted to data involving host RNA silencing. Here we report an alternative degradation pathway operating on potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), the type species of nuclear-replicating viroids (family Pospiviroidae). Northern-blot hybridizations with full- and partial-length probes revealed a set of PSTVd (+) subgenomic (sg)RNAs in early-infected eggplant, some partially overlapping and reaching levels comparable to those of the genomic circular and linear forms. Part of the PSTVd (+) sgRNAs were also observed in Nicotiana benthamiana (specifically in the nuclei) and tomato, wherein they have been overlooked due to their low accumulation. Primer extensions of representative (+) sgRNAs failed to detect a common 5' terminus, excluding that they could result from aborted transcription initiated at one specific site. Supporting this view, 5'- and 3'-RACE indicated that the (+) sgRNAs have 5'-OH and 3'-P termini most likely generated by RNase-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage of longer precursors. These approaches also unveiled PSTVd (-) sgRNAs with features similar to their (+) counterparts. Our results provide a mechanistic insight on how viroid decay may proceed in vivo during replication, and suggest that synthesis and decay of PSTVd strands might be coupled as in mRNA. PMID:25662219

  20. Identification of the subgenomic promoter of the coat protein gene of cucumber fruit mottle mosaic virus and development of a heterologous expression vector.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Sun-Ju; Jang, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Gung Pyo

    2016-06-01

    Heterologous gene expression using plant virus vectors enables research on host-virus interactions and the production of useful proteins, but the host range of plant viruses limits the practical applications of such vectors. Here, we aimed to develop a viral vector based on cucumber fruit mottle mosaic virus (CFMMV), a member of the genus Tobamovirus, whose members infect cucurbits. The subgenomic promoter (SGP) in the coat protein (CP) gene, which was used to drive heterologous expression, was mapped by analyzing deletion mutants from a CaMV 35S promoter-driven infectious CFMMV clone. The region from nucleotides (nt) -55 to +160 relative to the start codon of the open reading frame (ORF) of CP was found to be a fully active promoter, and the region from nt -55 to +100 was identified as the active core promoter. Based on these SGPs, we constructed a cloning site in the CFMMV vector and successfully expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in Nicotiana benthamiana and watermelon (Citrullus lanatus). Co-inoculation with the P19 suppressor increased EGFP expression and viral replication by blocking degradation of the viral genome. Our CFMMV vector will be useful as an expression vector in cucurbits. PMID:26976138

  1. Replicon-free and markerless methods for genomic insertion of DNAs in phage attachment sites and controlled expression of chromosomal genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chung-Jen; Chen, Po Ting; Chao, Yun-Peng

    2008-12-01

    Genetic manipulation of cells for desired traits is the most appreciable strategy implemented in the field of bioengineering. However, this approach closely relies on the use of plasmids and is commonly afflicted by the potential problem of plasmid instability and safety caution. Meanwhile, it may also lead to the spread of antibiotic-resistant markers with replicons of plasmids to the environment. However, this issue has long been neglected. In this study, we have addressed these subjects by developing replicon-free and markerless methods for chromosomal insertion of genes and controlled expression of genomic genes in Escherichia coli. For the former application, the integration vectors of conditional replication were incorporated with the prophage attachment site and duplicated FRT sites. Their utility was illustrated by site-specific insertion of target genes, the endogenous dxs gene and three heterologous genes consisting of gps, crtI, and crtB, fused to T7 promoter into E. coli genome. For the latter application, the template vectors for promoter replacement were constructed to carry a DNA cassette containing the T7 promoter linked to a selective marker flanked with the FRT site. Subsequently, it was illustrated by replacement of the native promoter of chromosomal pckA by the T7 promoter. Finally, with the aid of FLP recombinase supplied from a helper plasmid, the regions containing replicon and/or selective markers in inserted DNAs were eliminated from integrants for both approaches. As a consequence, the expression of these five genes was subject to control by one response regulator, T7 RNA polymerase, in a regulon way, resulting in a high and stable production of lycopene in the cell. This result indicates the promise of developed methods for genome engineering in E. coli. PMID:18553504

  2. Natural selection of adaptive mutations in non-structural genes increases trans-encapsidation of hepatitis C virus replicons lacking envelope protein genes.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Carole; Helle, François; Descamps, Véronique; Morel, Virginie; François, Catherine; Dedeurwaerder, Sarah; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Duverlie, Gilles; Castelain, Sandrine

    2013-05-01

    A trans-packaging system for hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicons lacking envelope glycoproteins was developed. The replicons were efficiently encapsidated into infectious particles after expression in trans of homologous HCV envelope proteins under the control of an adenoviral vector. Interestingly, expression in trans of core or core, p7 and NS2 with envelope proteins did not enhance trans-encapsidation. Expression of heterologous envelope proteins, in the presence or absence of heterologous core, p7 and NS2, did not rescue single-round infectious particle production. To increase the titre of homologous, single-round infectious particles in our system, successive cycles of trans-encapsidation and infection were performed. Four cycles resulted in a 100-fold increase in the yield of particles. Sequence analysis revealed a total of 16 potential adaptive mutations in two independent experiments. Except for a core mutation in one experiment, all the mutations were located in non-structural regions mainly in NS5A (four in domain III and two near the junction with the NS5B gene). Reverse genetics studies suggested that D2437A and S2443T adaptive mutations, which are located at the NS5A-B cleavage site did not affect viral replication, but enhanced the single-round infectious particles assembly only in trans-encapsidation model. In conclusion, our trans-encapsidation system enables the production of HCV single-round infectious particles. This system is adaptable and can positively select variants. The adapted variants promote trans-encapsidation and should constitute a valuable tool in the development of replicon-based HCV vaccines. PMID:23288424

  3. Unique plasmids generated via pUC replicon mutagenesis in an error-prone thermophile derived from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Jyumpei; Tanabiki, Misaki; Doi, Shohei; Kondo, Akihiko; Ohshiro, Takashi; Suzuki, Hirokazu

    2015-11-01

    The plasmid pGKE75-catA138T, which comprises pUC18 and the catA138T gene encoding thermostable chloramphenicol acetyltransferase with an A138T amino acid replacement (CATA138T), serves as an Escherichia coli-Geobacillus kaustophilus shuttle plasmid that confers moderate chloramphenicol resistance on G. kaustophilus HTA426. The present study examined the thermoadaptation-directed mutagenesis of pGKE75-catA138T in an error-prone thermophile, generating the mutant plasmid pGKE75(αβ)-catA138T responsible for substantial chloramphenicol resistance at 65°C. pGKE75(αβ)-catA138T contained no mutation in the catA138T gene but had two mutations in the pUC replicon, even though the replicon has no apparent role in G. kaustophilus. Biochemical characterization suggested that the efficient chloramphenicol resistance conferred by pGKE75(αβ)-catA138T is attributable to increases in intracellular CATA138T and acetyl-coenzyme A following a decrease in incomplete forms of pGKE75(αβ)-catA138T. The decrease in incomplete plasmids may be due to optimization of plasmid replication by RNA species transcribed from the mutant pUC replicon, which were actually produced in G. kaustophilus. It is noteworthy that G. kaustophilus was transformed with pGKE75(αβ)-catA138T using chloramphenicol selection at 60°C. In addition, a pUC18 derivative with the two mutations propagated in E. coli at a high copy number independently of the culture temperature and high plasmid stability. Since these properties have not been observed in known plasmids, the outcomes extend the genetic toolboxes for G. kaustophilus and E. coli. PMID:26319877

  4. Unique Plasmids Generated via pUC Replicon Mutagenesis in an Error-Prone Thermophile Derived from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Jyumpei; Tanabiki, Misaki; Doi, Shohei; Kondo, Akihiko; Ohshiro, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The plasmid pGKE75-catA138T, which comprises pUC18 and the catA138T gene encoding thermostable chloramphenicol acetyltransferase with an A138T amino acid replacement (CATA138T), serves as an Escherichia coli-Geobacillus kaustophilus shuttle plasmid that confers moderate chloramphenicol resistance on G. kaustophilus HTA426. The present study examined the thermoadaptation-directed mutagenesis of pGKE75-catA138T in an error-prone thermophile, generating the mutant plasmid pGKE75αβ-catA138T responsible for substantial chloramphenicol resistance at 65°C. pGKE75αβ-catA138T contained no mutation in the catA138T gene but had two mutations in the pUC replicon, even though the replicon has no apparent role in G. kaustophilus. Biochemical characterization suggested that the efficient chloramphenicol resistance conferred by pGKE75αβ-catA138T is attributable to increases in intracellular CATA138T and acetyl-coenzyme A following a decrease in incomplete forms of pGKE75αβ-catA138T. The decrease in incomplete plasmids may be due to optimization of plasmid replication by RNA species transcribed from the mutant pUC replicon, which were actually produced in G. kaustophilus. It is noteworthy that G. kaustophilus was transformed with pGKE75αβ-catA138T using chloramphenicol selection at 60°C. In addition, a pUC18 derivative with the two mutations propagated in E. coli at a high copy number independently of the culture temperature and high plasmid stability. Since these properties have not been observed in known plasmids, the outcomes extend the genetic toolboxes for G. kaustophilus and E. coli. PMID:26319877

  5. RELATIVE PHOTOMETRY OF HAT-P-1b OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Beky, Bence; Holman, Matthew J.; Noyes, Robert W.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Winn, Joshua N.

    2013-06-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of two occultations of the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-1b. By measuring the planet to star flux ratio near opposition, we constrain the geometric albedo of the planet, which is strongly linked to its atmospheric temperature gradient. An advantage of HAT-P-1 as a target is its binary companion ADS 16402 A, which provides an excellent photometric reference, simplifying the usual steps in removing instrumental artifacts from HST time-series photometry. We find that without this reference star, we would need to detrend the lightcurve with the time of the exposures as well as the first three powers of HST orbital phase, and this would introduce a strong bias in the results for the albedo. However, with this reference star, we only need to detrend the data with the time of the exposures to achieve the same per-point scatter, therefore we can avoid most of the bias associated with detrending. Our final result is a 2{sigma} upper limit of 0.64 for the geometric albedo of HAT-P-1b between 577 and 947 nm.

  6. OATP1B1 and tumour OATP1B3 modulate exposure, toxicity, and survival after irinotecan-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Teft, W A; Welch, S; Lenehan, J; Parfitt, J; Choi, Y-H; Winquist, E; Kim, R B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment of advanced and metastatic colorectal cancer with irinotecan is hampered by severe toxicities. The active metabolite of irinotecan, SN-38, is a known substrate of drug-metabolising enzymes, including UGT1A1, as well as OATP and ABC drug transporters. Methods: Blood samples (n=127) and tumour tissue (n=30) were obtained from advanced cancer patients treated with irinotecan-based regimens for pharmacogenetic and drug level analysis and transporter expression. Clinical variables, toxicity, and outcomes data were collected. Results: SLCO1B1 521C was significantly associated with increased SN-38 exposure (P<0.001), which was additive with UGT1A1*28. ABCC5 (rs562) carriers had significantly reduced SN-38 glucuronide and APC metabolite levels. Reduced risk of neutropenia and diarrhoea was associated with ABCC2–24C/T (odds ratio (OR)=0.22, 0.06–0.85) and CES1 (rs2244613; OR=0.29, 0.09–0.89), respectively. Progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly longer in SLCO1B1 388G/G patients and reduced in ABCC2–24T/T and UGT1A1*28 carriers. Notably, higher OATP1B3 tumour expression was associated with reduced PFS. Conclusions: Clarifying the association of host genetic variation in OATP and ABC transporters to SN-38 exposure, toxicity and PFS provides rationale for personalising irinotecan-based chemotherapy. Our findings suggest that OATP polymorphisms and expression in tumour tissue may serve as important new biomarkers. PMID:25611302

  7. Down-regulated expression of the protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is associated with aggressive clinicopathologic features and poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Long-Yi; Zhou, Dong-Xun; Lu, Jin; Zhang, Wen-Jun; Zou, Da-Jin

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTP1B protein showed decreased expression in 67.79% of the HCC patients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low PTP1B expression predicts poor prognosis of HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low PTP1B expression is correlated with expansion of OV6{sup +} tumor-initiating cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down-regulation of PTP1B is associated with activation of Wnt/{beta}-Catenin signaling. -- Abstract: The protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a classical non-transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase that plays a key role in metabolic signaling and can exert both tumor suppressing and tumor promoting effects in different cancers depending on the substrate involved and the cellular context. However, the expression level and function of PTP1B in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain unclear. In this study, PTP1B expression was detected by immunohistochemistry in normal liver tissue (n = 16) and hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 169). The correlations between PTP1B expression level and clinicopathologic features and patient survival were also analyzed. One hundred and eleven of 169 HCC patients (65.7%) had negative or low PTP1B expression in tumorous tissues, whereas normal tissues always expressed strong PTP1B. Decreased PTP1B expression was significantly associated with aggressive clinicopathologic features and poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry also showed that low PTP1B expression level was correlated with high percentage of OV6{sup +} tumor-initiating cells (T-ICs) and high frequency of nuclear {beta}-Catenin expression in HCC specimens. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the loss of inhibitory effect of PTP1B may contribute to progression and invasion of HCC through activation of Wnt/{beta}-Catenin signaling and expansion of liver T-ICs. PTP1B may serve as a valuable prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target in HCC.

  8. 50 CFR Table 1b to Part 679 - Discard and Disposition Codes1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Discard and Disposition Codes1 1b Table 1b to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 1b Table 1b to Part...

  9. 50 CFR Table 1b to Part 679 - Discard and Disposition Codes1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Discard and Disposition Codes1 1b Table 1b to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 1b Table 1b to Part...

  10. 40 CFR Table 1b to Subpart Dddd of... - Add-on Control Systems Compliance Options

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Add-on Control Systems Compliance Options 1B Table 1B to Subpart DDDD of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Products Pt. 63, Subpt. DDDD, Table 1B Table 1B to Subpart DDDD of Part 63—Add-on Control...

  11. 40 CFR Table 1b to Subpart Dddd of... - Add-on Control Systems Compliance Options

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Add-on Control Systems Compliance Options 1B Table 1B to Subpart DDDD of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Products Pt. 63, Subpt. DDDD, Table 1B Table 1B to Subpart DDDD of Part 63—Add-on Control...

  12. 40 CFR Table 1b to Subpart Dddd of... - Add-on Control Systems Compliance Options

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Add-on Control Systems Compliance Options 1B Table 1B to Subpart DDDD of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Products Pt. 63, Subpt. DDDD, Table 1B Table 1B to Subpart DDDD of Part 63—Add-on Control...

  13. 50 CFR Table 1b to Part 679 - Discard and Disposition Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discard and Disposition Codes 1b Table 1b... ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 1b Table 1b to Part 679—Discard and Disposition Codes Description Code Confiscation... bait. 95 Whole fish/sold, for human consumption. 60 NOTE: When using whole fish codes, record...

  14. Self-replicating Replicon-RNA Delivery to Dendritic Cells by Chitosan-nanoparticles for Translation In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Kenneth C; Bassi, Isabelle; Milona, Panagiota; Suter, Rolf; Thomann-Harwood, Lisa; Englezou, Pavlos; Démoulins, Thomas; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Self-amplifying replicon RNA (RepRNA) possesses high potential for increasing antigen load within dendritic cells (DCs). The major aim of the present work was to define how RepRNA delivered by biodegradable, chitosan-based nanoparticulate delivery vehicles (nanogel-alginate (NGA)) interacts with DCs, and whether this could lead to translation of the RepRNA in the DCs. Although studies employed virus replicon particles (VRPs), there are no reports on biodegradable, nanoparticulate vehicle delivery of RepRNA. VRP studies employed cytopathogenic agents, contrary to DC requirements—slow processing and antigen retention. We employed noncytopathogenic RepRNA with NGA, demonstrating for the first time the efficiency of RepRNA association with nanoparticles, NGA delivery to DCs, and RepRNA internalization by DCs. RepRNA accumulated in vesicular structures, with patterns typifying cytosolic release. This promoted RepRNA translation, in vitro and in vivo. Delivery and translation were RepRNA concentration-dependent, occurring in a kinetic manner. Including cationic lipids with chitosan during nanoparticle formation enhanced delivery and translation kinetics, but was not required for translation of immunogenic levels in vivo. This work describes for the first time the characteristics associated with chitosan-nanoparticle delivery of self-amplifying RepRNA to DCs, leading to translation of encoded foreign genes, namely influenza virus hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein. PMID:25004099

  15. Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B)-deficient neurons show structural presynaptic deficiencies in vitro and altered presynaptic physiology.

    PubMed

    Bodaleo, Felipe J; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Henríquez, Daniel R; Court, Felipe A; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) is expressed predominantly during the early stages of development of the nervous system, where it regulates processes such as axonal guidance and elongation. Nevertheless, MAP1B expression in the brain persists in adult stages, where it participates in the regulation of the structure and physiology of dendritic spines in glutamatergic synapses. Moreover, MAP1B expression is also found in presynaptic synaptosomal preparations. In this work, we describe a presynaptic phenotype in mature neurons derived from MAP1B knockout (MAP1B KO) mice. Mature neurons express MAP1B, and its deficiency does not alter the expression levels of a subgroup of other synaptic proteins. MAP1B KO neurons display a decrease in the density of presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals, which involves a reduction in the density of synaptic contacts, and an increased proportion of orphan presynaptic terminals. Accordingly, MAP1B KO neurons present altered synaptic vesicle fusion events, as shown by FM4-64 release assay, and a decrease in the density of both synaptic vesicles and dense core vesicles at presynaptic terminals. Finally, an increased proportion of excitatory immature symmetrical synaptic contacts in MAP1B KO neurons was detected. Altogether these results suggest a novel role for MAP1B in presynaptic structure and physiology regulation in vitro. PMID:27425640

  16. Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B)-deficient neurons show structural presynaptic deficiencies in vitro and altered presynaptic physiology

    PubMed Central

    Bodaleo, Felipe J.; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Henríquez, Daniel R.; Court, Felipe A.; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) is expressed predominantly during the early stages of development of the nervous system, where it regulates processes such as axonal guidance and elongation. Nevertheless, MAP1B expression in the brain persists in adult stages, where it participates in the regulation of the structure and physiology of dendritic spines in glutamatergic synapses. Moreover, MAP1B expression is also found in presynaptic synaptosomal preparations. In this work, we describe a presynaptic phenotype in mature neurons derived from MAP1B knockout (MAP1B KO) mice. Mature neurons express MAP1B, and its deficiency does not alter the expression levels of a subgroup of other synaptic proteins. MAP1B KO neurons display a decrease in the density of presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals, which involves a reduction in the density of synaptic contacts, and an increased proportion of orphan presynaptic terminals. Accordingly, MAP1B KO neurons present altered synaptic vesicle fusion events, as shown by FM4-64 release assay, and a decrease in the density of both synaptic vesicles and dense core vesicles at presynaptic terminals. Finally, an increased proportion of excitatory immature symmetrical synaptic contacts in MAP1B KO neurons was detected. Altogether these results suggest a novel role for MAP1B in presynaptic structure and physiology regulation in vitro. PMID:27425640

  17. Photometric observation of the transiting exoplanet WASP-1b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-bin; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Gu, Sheng-hong; Zhang, Li-yun

    2008-05-01

    The extra-solar planet WASP-1b, discovered by SuperWASP consortium in 2006, was observed through R filter using the 1-meter telescope with CCD camera at Yunnan Observatory on November 11, 2006. The systematic errors in photometric data were reduced by means of Tamuz et al. (2005) and Collier Cameron et al. (2006)'s algorithms. In order to estimate the parameters of the system, the MCMC (Markov Chain Monte Carlo) analysis is applied to fit the observed light curve. The following parameters of the system are derived: Rp=1.44RJ, Mp=0.88MJ, R*=1.52R, a=0.0396AU. The new parameters of the planet imply its low density, which agrees to the previous results.

  18. Rubella virus 40S genome RNA specifies a 24S subgenomic mRNA that codes for a precursor to structural proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Oker-Blom, C; Ulmanen, I; Kääriäinen, L; Pettersson, R F

    1984-01-01

    We have analyzed the structure of the rubella virus genome RNA and the virus-specific RNA species synthesized in B-Vero cells infected with rubella virus. A single-stranded, capped, and polyadenylated RNA species sedimenting at 40S in a sucrose gradient was released from purified virions treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate. This RNA species migrated with an Mr of about 3.8 X 10(6) in an agarose gel after denaturation with glyoxal and dimethyl sulfoxide. Infected cells labeled with [3H]uridine in the presence of actinomycin D contained, in addition to the 40S RNA, a single-stranded polyadenylated 24S RNA species as shown by sucrose gradient analysis. In a Northern blot analysis, this RNA hybridized to a cDNA probe derived from the 3' portion of the genomic 40S RNA. In vitro translation of the 24S RNA species yielded a 110,000-dalton polypeptide, in addition to some smaller products which were immunoprecipitated with an antiserum prepared against the structural proteins E1, E2a, E2b, and C. Since the sum of the molecular weights of the nonglycosylated envelope proteins and the capsid protein has been estimated to be about 116,000 (C. Oker-Blom et al., J. Virol. 46:964-973, 1983), these results suggest that the 24S RNA species represents a subgenomic mRNA coding for a precursor (p110) to the structural proteins of rubella virus. Thus, the strategy of gene expression of rubella virus appears to be similar to that of the alphaviruses. Images PMID:6694262

  19. Development of a salicylic acid inducible minimal sub-genomic transcript promoter from Figwort mosaic virus with enhanced root- and leaf-activity using TGACG motif rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Patro, Sunita; Ghosh, Jayasish; Das, Abhimanyu; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2012-07-15

    In Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript promoter (F-Sgt), function of the TGACG-regulatory motif, was investigated in the background of artificially designed promoter sequences. The 131bp (FS, -100 to +31) long F-Sgt promoter sequence containing one TGACG motif [FS-(TGACG)] was engineered to generate a set of three modified promoter constructs: [FS-(TGACG)(2), containing one additional TGACG motif at 7 nucleotides upstream of the original one], [FS-(TGACG)(3), containing two additional TGACG motifs at 7 nucleotides upstream and two nucleotides downstream of the original one] and [FS-(TGCTG)(mu), having a mutated TGACG motif]. EMSA and foot-printing analysis confirmed binding of tobacco nuclear factors with modified TGACG motif/s. The transcription-activation of the GUS gene by the TGACG motif/s in above promoter constructs was examined in transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants and observed that the transcription activation was affected by the spacing/s and number/s of the TGACG motif/s. The FS-(TGACG)(2) promoter showed strongest root-activity compared to other modified and CaMV35S promoters. Also under salicylic acid (SA) stress, the leaf-activity of the said promoter was further enhanced. All above findings were confirmed by real-time and semi-qRT PCR analysis. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrated that the TGACG motif plays an important role in inducing the root-specific expression of the F-Sgt promoter. This study advocates the importance of genetic manipulation of functional cis-motif for amending the tissue specificity of a plant promoter. SA inducible FS-(TGACG)(2) promoter with enhanced activity could be a useful candidate promoter for developing plants with enhanced crop productivity. PMID:22561698

  20. Requirements for eIF4A and eIF2 during translation of Sindbis virus subgenomic mRNA in vertebrate and invertebrate host cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Moreno, Manuel; Sanz, Miguel Angel; Pelletier, Jerry; Carrasco, Luis

    2013-05-01

    We have examined the requirements for the initiation factors (eIFs) eIF4A and eIF2 to translate Sindbis virus (SV) subgenomic mRNA (sgmRNA) in the natural hosts of SV: vertebrate and arthropod cells. Notably, this viral mRNA does not utilize eIF4A in SV-infected mammalian cells. However, eIF4A is required to translate this mRNA in transfected cells. Therefore, SV sgmRNA exhibits a dual mechanism for translation with respect to the use of eIF4A. Interestingly, SV genomic mRNA requires eIF4A for translation during the early phase of infection. In sharp contrast to what is observed in mammalian cells, active eIF2 is necessary to translate SV sgmRNA in mosquito cells. However, eIF4A is not necessary for SV sgmRNA translation in this cell line. In the SV sgmRNA coding region, proximal to the initiation codon is a hairpin structure that confers eIF2 independence only in mammalian cells infected by SV. Strikingly, this structure does not provide independence for eIF4A neither in mammalian nor in mosquito cells. These findings provide the first evidence of different eIF requirements for translation of SV sgmRNA in vertebrate and invertebrate cells. These observations can help to understand the interaction of SV with its host cells. PMID:23189929

  1. Homozygous carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b (muscle isoform) deficiency is lethal in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Shaonin; You, Yun; Kerner, Janos; Hoppel, Charles L.; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Chick, Wallace S.H.; Hamm, Doug A.; Sharer, J. Daniel; Wood, Philip A.

    2008-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of mitochondrial β-oxidation of long chain fatty acids (LCFA), the most abundant fatty acids in mammalian membranes and in energy metabolism. Human deficiency of the muscle isoform CPT-1b is poorly understood. In the current study, embryos with a homozygous knockout of Cpt-1b were lost before embryonic day 9.5 − 11.5. Also, while there were normal percentages of CPT-1b+/−pups born from both male and female CPT-1b+/− mice crossed with wild-type mates, the number of CPT-1b+/− pups from CPT-1b+/− breeding pairs was under-represented (63% of the expected number). Northern blot analysis demonstrated ∼50% Cpt-1b mRNA expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT), heart and skeletal muscles in the CPT-1b+/− male mice. Consistent with tissue-specific expression of Cpt-1b mRNA in muscle but not liver, CPT-1+/− mice had ∼60% CPT-1 activity in skeletal muscle and no change in total liver CPT-1 activity. CPT-1b+/− mice had normal fasting blood glucose concentration. Consistent with expression of CPT-1b in BAT and muscle, ∼7% CPT-1b+/− mice (n=30) developed fatal hypothermia following a 3 hr cold challenge, while none of the CPT-1b+/+ mice (n=30) did. With a prolonged cold challenge (6 hr), significantly more CPT-1b+/− mice developed fatal hypothermia (52% CPT-1b+/− mice vs. 21% CPT-1b+/+ mice), with increased frequency in females of both genotypes (67% female vs. 38% male CPT-1b+/− mice, and 33% female vs. 8% male CPT-1b+/+ mice). Therefore, lethality of homozygous CPT-1b deficiency in the mice is consistent with paucity of human cases. PMID:18023382

  2. Xpbx1b and Xmeis1b play a collaborative role in hindbrain and neural crest gene expression in Xenopus embryos

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Ryu; Ishimura, Akihiko; Mood, Kathleen; Park, Eui Kyun; Buchberg, Arthur M.; Daar, Ira O.

    2002-01-01

    Pbx1 is a homeodomain protein that functions in complexes with other homeodomain-containing proteins to regulate gene expression during embryogenesis and oncogenesis. Pbx proteins bind DNA cooperatively as heterodimers or higher order complexes with Meis family members and Hox proteins and are believed to specify cell identity during development. Here, we present evidence that Pbx1, in partnership with Meis1b, can regulate posterior neural markers and neural crest marker genes during Xenopus development. A Xenopus homolog of the Pbx1b homeodomain protein was isolated and shown to be expressed throughout embryogenesis. Xpbx1b expression overlaps with Xmeis1 in several areas, including the lateral neural folds, caudal branchial arch, hindbrain, and optic cup. When ectopically expressed, Xpbx1b can synergize with Xmeis1b to promote posterior neural and neural crest gene expression in ectodermal explants. Further, a physical interaction between these two homeodomain proteins is necessary for induction of these genes in embryonic tissue. In addition, coexpression of Xmeis1b and Xpbx1b leads to a prominent shift in the localization of Xmeis1b from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, suggesting that nuclear transport or retention of Xmeis1b may depend upon Xpbx1b. Finally, expression of a mutant construct in which Xpbx1b protein is fused to the repressor domain from Drosophila Engrailed inhibits posterior neural and neural crest gene expression. These data indicate that Xpbx1b and its partner, Xmeis1b, function in a transcriptional activation complex during hindbrain and neural crest development. PMID:11960001

  3. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B)-inhibiting constituents from the leaves of Syzygium polyanthum.

    PubMed

    Saifudin, Azis; Tanaka, Ken; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2012-08-01

    A methanol extract of the leaves of Syzygium polyanthum (Wight) Walp. afforded four new acylbenzene derivatives (1-4) together with seven known compounds (5-11). The structures of 1-11 were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods and comparison with the literature data. The new compounds 1-3 and a known compound, campest-4-en-3-one (10), exhibited a significant protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity with IC₅₀ values of 13.1 ± 0.1, 5.77 ± 0.15, 4.01 ± 0.26, and 10.4 ± 0.5 µM, respectively. The inhibitory potency of the new compounds 2 and 3 was comparable to that of a positive control RK-682 (IC₅₀, 5.51 ± 0.04 µM). PMID:22763740

  4. Attenuated Stress Response to Acute Restraint and Forced Swimming Stress in Arginine Vasopressin 1b Receptor Subtype (Avpr1b) Receptor Knockout Mice and Wild-Type Mice Treated with a Novel Avpr1b Receptor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Roper, J A; Craighead, M; O’Carroll, A-M; Lolait, S J

    2010-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) synthesised in the parvocellular region of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and released into the pituitary portal vessels acts on the 1b receptor subtype (Avpr1b) present in anterior pituitary corticotrophs to modulate the release of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). Corticotrophin-releasing hormone is considered the major drive behind ACTH release; however, its action is augmented synergistically by AVP. To determine the extent of vasopressinergic influence in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to restraint and forced swimming stress, we compared the stress hormone levels [plasma ACTH in both stressors and corticosterone (CORT) in restraint stress only] following acute stress in mutant Avpr1b knockout (KO) mice compared to their wild-type controls following the administration of a novel Avpr1b antagonist. Restraint and forced swimming stress-induced increases in plasma ACTH were significantly diminished in mice lacking a functional Avpr1b and in wild-type mice that had been pre-treated with Avpr1b antagonist. A corresponding decrease in plasma CORT levels was also observed in acute restraint-stressed knockout male mice, and in Avpr1b-antagonist-treated male wild-type mice. By contrast, plasma CORT levels were not reduced in acutely restraint-stressed female knockout animals, or in female wild-type animals pre-treated with Avpr1b antagonist. These results demonstrate that pharmacological antagonism or inactivation of Avpr1b causes a reduction in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response, particularly ACTH, to acute restraint and forced swimming stress, and show that Avpr1b knockout mice constitute a model by which to study the contribution of Avpr1b to the HPA axis response to acute stressors. PMID:20846299

  5. Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) inhibits Hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site (HCV IRES)-mediated translation, but does not affect HCV replication.

    PubMed

    Tischendorf, J J W; Beger, C; Korf, M; Manns, M P; Krüger, M

    2004-10-01

    Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) has previously been shown to affect Hepatitis C virus (HCV) IRES-mediated translation. In the present study we investigated the functional role of PTB for HCV translation, replication and chronic HCV infection. Bicistronic HCV IRES reporter plasmids and two different subgenomic replicons (bicistronic: pHCVrep1bBB7 (s1179I); monocistronic: pFK1-389/hyg-ubi/NS3-3'/5.1) were used to analyze the effects of PTB. Following transfection of plasmids expressing PTB RNA in sense or antisense orientation, translational activity and HCV RNA were analyzed by luciferase assay, quantitative real-time RT-PCR and northern blot analysis. Additionally, in liver tissue (n = 53) intrahepatic PTB RNA levels were determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Significant inhibition of HCV IRES activity up to 42.6% was observed upon PTB sense RNA expression for HCV IRES reporter plasmids, while translational activity was enhanced up to 63.8% for PTB antisense RNA expression. In the HCV replicons PTB did not affect replication and no correlation was found between intrahepatic PTB mRNA levels and serum HCV RNA or histological changes in liver tissue of HCV infected patients. Although PTB inhibits HCV IRES-mediated translation from bicistronic reporter constructs, data obtained from two subgenomic HCV replicons and liver tissue do not indicate a significant role of PTB for HCV replication and chronic HCV infection. PMID:15669107

  6. Human adenovirus 2 E1B-19K and E1B-53K tumor antigens: antipeptide antibodies targeted to the NH2 and COOH termini.

    PubMed Central

    Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Lucher, L A; Symington, J S; Kramer, T A

    1983-01-01

    The human adenovirus 2 (Ad2) transforming region is located in the left 11.1% of the viral genome and encodes two early transcription units, E1A and E1B. Based on the amino acid sequence deduced from the Ad2 E1B DNA sequence (Gingeras et al., J. Biol. Chem. 257:13475-13491, 1982), we have prepared antibodies against synthetic peptides, 8 to 16 amino acids in length, encoded at the NH2 and COOH termini of the major E1B-19K and E1B-53K tumor antigens. The antipeptide antibodies immunoprecipitated the targeted E1B-19K or E1B-53K tumor antigens from extracts of Ad2-infected cells. The specificity of the peptide competition studies. Antipeptide antibodies directed to the NH2 and COOH termini immunoprecipitated the E1B-19K and E1B-53K tumor antigens from two Ad2-transformed rat cell lines, F17 and F4, providing evidence that identical tumor antigens are synthesized in Ad2-infected and Ad2-transformed cells. These results show that the E1B-19K and E1B-53K T antigens are not processed proteolytically at either the NH2 or COOH terminus. Our data provide strong evidence at the protein level that the E1B-19K and E1B-53K tumor antigens partially overlap in DNA sequence, with the E1B-19K initiating translation at the first ATG at nucleotide 1711 in translation reading frame 1 and the E1B-53K tumor antigen initiating translation at the second ATG at nucleotide 2016 in reading frame 3. This confirms the results of others on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of E1B-19K and theoretical deductions based on the DNA sequence. Our findings prove that the large E1B-53K T antigen initiates translation at the second ATG at nucleotide 2016 and not at equally plausible initiation codons located farther downstream at nucleotides 2202 and 2235. Thus, the E1B-53K T antigen is another example of a protein which initiates translation at an internal ATG rather than at the 5'-proximal ATG. Images PMID:6632083

  7. Paresev 1-B in flight with tow cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The Paresev 1-B tested the concept of a paraglider, designed to enable a Gemini capsule to fly to a controlled ground landing. This would remove the need to make an ocean splashdown at the end of a spaceflight. Once the paraglider was deployed, the Gemini crew could use it to steer toward a touchdown point and to land on three retractable skids. Because the paraglider represented an unproved technology, approval was given to build a simple test vehicle to try out the concept. The paraglider research vehicle, or Paresev, was built of steel tubing, with a fabric paraglider. The Paresev was unpowered, so it had to be towed aloft either by ground vehicles or aircraft, such as a biplane or a light aircraft. The Paresev was a demanding aircraft to fly. Milt Thompson said that he found it more difficult to handle than the later lifting bodies. Due to technical and cost problems, the Gemini spacecraft never used the paraglider, and all missions made ocean splashdowns.

  8. Serotonin 1B Receptor Imaging in Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jian; Henry, Shannan; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Ropchan, Jim; Neumaier, John F.; Potenza, Marc N.; Sinha, Rajita; Krystal, John H.; Huang, Yiyun; Ding, Yu-Shin; Carson, Richard E.; Neumeister, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Background Although animal models suggest that alcohol dependence (AD) is associated with elevations in the number of serotonin-1B receptors (5HT1BR), 5HT1BR levels have not been investigated in people with AD. The selective 5HT1BR antagonist radioligand, [11C]P943, permits in vivo assessment of central 5HT1BR binding potential (BPND) using positron emission tomography (PET). Because of its central role in AD, we were particularly interested in ventral striatal 5HT1BR BPND values. Methods Twelve medication-free, recently abstinent (at least 4 weeks) patients with AD (mean age 35.2±10.1 years, 5 women) and 12 healthy control subjects (HC) (mean age 30.6±9.2 years, 5 women) completed [11C]P943 PET on a high resolution research tomograph (HRRT). Individual MRI scans were collected to exclude individuals with anatomical abnormalities and for co-registration. Imaging data were analyzed using a multilinear reference tissue model. Results Ventral striatal 5-HT1BR BPND values (2.01±0.57 and 1.55±0.09, 29% between-group difference, p=.006) were increased in AD compared to HC subjects. No influence of demographic or clinical variables or amount of injected radiotracer was observed. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence that AD in humans, like in rodent models, is associated with increased levels of ventral striatal 5HT1BRs. PMID:20172504

  9. Preclinical characterization of GSK2336805, a novel inhibitor of hepatitis C virus replication that selects for resistance in NS5A.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jill; Crosby, Renae; Wang, Amy; Woldu, Ermias; Vamathevan, Jessica; Voitenleitner, Christian; You, Shihyun; Remlinger, Katja; Duan, Maoshang; Kazmierski, Wieslaw; Hamatake, Robert

    2014-01-01

    GSK2336805 is an inhibitor of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with picomolar activity on the standard genotype 1a, 1b, and 2a subgenomic replicons and exhibits a modest serum shift. GSK2336805 was not active on 22 RNA and DNA viruses that were profiled. We have identified changes in the N-terminal region of NS5A that cause a decrease in the activity of GSK2336805. These mutations in the genotype 1b replicon showed modest shifts in compound activity (<13-fold), while mutations identified in the genotype 1a replicon had a more dramatic impact on potency. GSK2336805 retained activity on chimeric replicons containing NS5A patient sequences from genotype 1 and patient and consensus sequences for genotypes 4 and 5 and part of genotype 6. Combination and cross-resistance studies demonstrated that GSK2336805 could be used as a component of a multidrug HCV regimen either with the current standard of care or in combination with compounds with different mechanisms of action that are still progressing through clinical development. PMID:24126581

  10. Preclinical Characterization of GSK2336805, a Novel Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus Replication That Selects for Resistance in NS5A

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Renae; Wang, Amy; Woldu, Ermias; Vamathevan, Jessica; Voitenleitner, Christian; You, Shihyun; Remlinger, Katja; Duan, Maoshang; Kazmierski, Wieslaw; Hamatake, Robert

    2014-01-01

    GSK2336805 is an inhibitor of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with picomolar activity on the standard genotype 1a, 1b, and 2a subgenomic replicons and exhibits a modest serum shift. GSK2336805 was not active on 22 RNA and DNA viruses that were profiled. We have identified changes in the N-terminal region of NS5A that cause a decrease in the activity of GSK2336805. These mutations in the genotype 1b replicon showed modest shifts in compound activity (<13-fold), while mutations identified in the genotype 1a replicon had a more dramatic impact on potency. GSK2336805 retained activity on chimeric replicons containing NS5A patient sequences from genotype 1 and patient and consensus sequences for genotypes 4 and 5 and part of genotype 6. Combination and cross-resistance studies demonstrated that GSK2336805 could be used as a component of a multidrug HCV regimen either with the current standard of care or in combination with compounds with different mechanisms of action that are still progressing through clinical development. PMID:24126581

  11. Cyp1b1 Mediates Periostin Regulation of Trabecular Meshwork Development by Suppression of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun; Wang, Shoujian; Sorenson, Christine M.; Teixeira, Leandro; Dubielzig, Richard R.; Peters, Donna M.; Conway, Simon J.; Jefcoate, Colin R.

    2013-01-01

    Mutation in CYP1B1 has been reported for patients with congenital glaucoma. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show increased diurnal intraocular pressure (IOP) in Cyp1b1-deficient (Cyp1b1−/−) mice. Cyp1b1−/− mice presented ultrastructural irregular collagen distribution in their trabecular meshwork (TM) tissue along with increased oxidative stress and decreased levels of periostin (Postn). Increased levels of oxidative stress and decreased levels of Postn were also detected in human glaucomatous TM tissues. Furthermore, Postn-deficient mice exhibited TM tissue ultrastructural abnormalities similar to those of Cyp1b1−/− mice. Administration of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) restored structural abnormality of TM tissue in Cyp1b1−/− mice. In addition, TM cells prepared from Cyp1b1−/− mice exhibited increased oxidative stress, altered adhesion, and decreased levels of Postn. These aberrant cellular responses were reversed in the presence of NAC or by restoration of Cyp1b1 expression. Cyp1b1 knockdown or inhibition of CYP1B1 activity in Cyp1b1+/+ TM cells resulted in a Cyp1b1−/− phenotype. Thus, metabolic activity of CYP1B1 contributes to oxidative homeostasis and ultrastructural organization and function of TM tissue through modulation of Postn expression. PMID:23979599

  12. Oligouridylate Binding Protein 1b Plays an Integral Role in Plant Heat Stress Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cam Chau; Nakaminami, Kentaro; Matsui, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Kurihara, Yukio; Toyooka, Kiminori; Tanaka, Maho; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs), which are formed in the plant cytoplasm under stress conditions, are transient dynamic sites (particles) for mRNA storage. SGs are actively involved in protecting mRNAs from degradation. Oligouridylate binding protein 1b (UBP1b) is a component of SGs. The formation of microscopically visible cytoplasmic foci, referred to as UBP1b SG, was induced by heat treatment in UBP1b-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants (UBP1b-ox). A detailed understanding of the function of UBP1b, however, is still not clear. UBP1b-ox plants displayed increased heat tolerance, relative to control plants, while ubp1b mutants were more sensitive to heat stress than control plants. Microarray analysis identified 117 genes whose expression was heat-inducible and higher in the UBP1b-ox plants. RNA decay analysis was performed using cordycepin, a transcriptional inhibitor. In order to determine if those genes serve as targets of UBP1b, the rate of RNA degradation of a DnaJ heat shock protein and a stress-associated protein (AtSAP3) in UBP1b-ox plants was slower than in control plants; indicating that the mRNAs of these genes were protected within the UBP1b SG granule. Collectively, these data demonstrate that UBP1b plays an integral role in heat stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27379136

  13. Oligouridylate Binding Protein 1b Plays an Integral Role in Plant Heat Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cam Chau; Nakaminami, Kentaro; Matsui, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Kurihara, Yukio; Toyooka, Kiminori; Tanaka, Maho; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs), which are formed in the plant cytoplasm under stress conditions, are transient dynamic sites (particles) for mRNA storage. SGs are actively involved in protecting mRNAs from degradation. Oligouridylate binding protein 1b (UBP1b) is a component of SGs. The formation of microscopically visible cytoplasmic foci, referred to as UBP1b SG, was induced by heat treatment in UBP1b-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants (UBP1b-ox). A detailed understanding of the function of UBP1b, however, is still not clear. UBP1b-ox plants displayed increased heat tolerance, relative to control plants, while ubp1b mutants were more sensitive to heat stress than control plants. Microarray analysis identified 117 genes whose expression was heat-inducible and higher in the UBP1b-ox plants. RNA decay analysis was performed using cordycepin, a transcriptional inhibitor. In order to determine if those genes serve as targets of UBP1b, the rate of RNA degradation of a DnaJ heat shock protein and a stress-associated protein (AtSAP3) in UBP1b-ox plants was slower than in control plants; indicating that the mRNAs of these genes were protected within the UBP1b SG granule. Collectively, these data demonstrate that UBP1b plays an integral role in heat stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27379136

  14. Inhibition of human acid-sensing ion channel 1b by zinc

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qian; Zha, Xiang-Ming; Chu, Xiang-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channel 1b (ASIC1b) is expressed in peripheral sensory neurons and has been implicated in nociception. Understanding the modulation of ASIC1b will provide important insight into how ASIC1b contributes to pain sensation. In our previous study, we showed that zinc, an important modulator of pain sensation, reduces rat ASIC1b current. However, rat ASIC1b shows several important differences from its recently identified human homolog. Most noticeably, human ASIC1b (hASIC1b) has a sustained component, which may play a role in persistent pain. Therefore, we tested here the hypothesis that zinc modulates the current properties of hASIC1b. Bath application of zinc suppressed the peak amplitude of hASIC1b currents, with a half-maximum inhibitory concentration of 37 μM. However, zinc did not affect the sustained component of hASIC1b currents. The effect of zinc was independent of pH-dependent activation, steady-state desensitization, and extracellular Ca2+, suggesting noncompetitive mechanisms. Further, we found that extracellular site(s) of the hASIC1b subunit is important for the effect of zinc. Mutating cysteine 196, but not cysteine 309, in the extracellular domain of the hASIC1b abolished the zinc inhibition. These results suggest that, through modulating cysteine196, zinc may have a modulatory role in acute pain. PMID:22837807

  15. The Combination of Grazoprevir, a Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS3/4A Protease Inhibitor, and Elbasvir, an HCV NS5A Inhibitor, Demonstrates a High Genetic Barrier to Resistance in HCV Genotype 1a Replicons.

    PubMed

    Lahser, Frederick C; Bystol, Karin; Curry, Stephanie; McMonagle, Patricia; Xia, Ellen; Ingravallo, Paul; Chase, Robert; Liu, Rong; Black, Todd; Hazuda, Daria; Howe, Anita Y M; Asante-Appiah, Ernest

    2016-05-01

    The selection of resistance-associated variants (RAVs) against single agents administered to patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) necessitates that direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) targeting multiple viral proteins be developed to overcome failure resulting from emergence of resistance. The combination of grazoprevir (formerly MK-5172), an NS3/4A protease inhibitor, and elbasvir (formerly MK-8742), an NS5A inhibitor, was therefore studied in genotype 1a (GT1a) replicon cells. Both compounds were independently highly potent in GT1a wild-type replicon cells, with 90% effective concentration (EC90) values of 0.9 nM and 0.006 nM for grazoprevir and elbasvir, respectively. No cross-resistance was observed when clinically relevant NS5A and NS3 RAVs were profiled against grazoprevir and elbasvir, respectively. Kinetic analyses of HCV RNA reduction over 14 days showed that grazoprevir and elbasvir inhibited prototypic NS5A Y93H and NS3 R155K RAVs, respectively, with kinetics comparable to those for the wild-type GT1a replicon. In combination, grazoprevir and elbasvir interacted additively in GT1a replicon cells. Colony formation assays with a 10-fold multiple of the EC90 values of the grazoprevir-elbasvir inhibitor combination suppressed emergence of resistant colonies, compared to a 100-fold multiple for the independent agents. The selected resistant colonies with the combination harbored RAVs that required two or more nucleotide changes in the codons. Mutations in the cognate gene caused greater potency losses for elbasvir than for grazoprevir. Replicons bearing RAVs identified from resistant colonies showed reduced fitness for several cell lines and may contribute to the activity of the combination. These studies demonstrate that the combination of grazoprevir and elbasvir exerts a potent effect on HCV RNA replication and presents a high genetic barrier to resistance. The combination of grazoprevir and elbasvir is currently approved for

  16. Isolation of Modulators of the Liver-Specific Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptides (OATPs) 1B1 and 1B3 from Rollinia emarginata Schlecht (Annonaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Megan; Araya, Juan J.; Timmermann, Barbara N.

    2011-01-01

    Organic anion-transporting polypeptides 1B1 and 1B3 (OATP1B1 and OATP1B3) are liver-specific transporters that mediate the uptake of a broad range of drugs into hepatocytes, including statins, antibiotics, and many anticancer drugs. Compounds that alter transport by one or both of these OATPs could potentially be used to target drugs to hepatocytes or improve the bioavailability of drugs that are cleared by the liver. In this study, we applied a bioassay-guided isolation approach to identify such compounds from the organic extract of Rollinia emarginata Schlecht (Annonaceae). Fractions of the plant extract were screened for effects on OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-mediated transport of the model substrates estradiol-17β-glucuronide and estrone-3-sulfate. We isolated three compounds, ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, and 8-trans-p-coumaroyloxy-α-terpineol, which inhibited estradiol-17β-glucuronide uptake by OATP1B1 but not OATP1B3. In addition, a rare compound, quercetin 3-O-α-l-arabinopyranosyl(1→2) α-l-rhamnopyranoside, was identified that had distinct effects on each OATP. OATP1B1 was strongly inhibited, as was OATP1B3-mediated transport of estradiol-17β-glucuronide. However, OATP1B3-mediated uptake of estrone-3-sulfate was stimulated 4- to 5-fold. Kinetic analysis of this stimulation revealed that the apparent affinity for estrone-3-sulfate was increased (decreased Km), whereas the maximal rate of transport (Vmax) was significantly reduced. These results demonstrate a mechanism through which the hepatic uptake of drug OATP substrates could be stimulated. PMID:21846839

  17. EOS MLS Level 1B Data Processing Software. Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perun, Vincent S.; Jarnot, Robert F.; Wagner, Paul A.; Cofield, Richard E., IV; Nguyen, Honghanh T.; Vuu, Christina

    2011-01-01

    This software is an improvement on Version 2, which was described in EOS MLS Level 1B Data Processing, Version 2.2, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 5 (May 2009), p. 34. It accepts the EOS MLS Level 0 science/engineering data, and the EOS Aura spacecraft ephemeris/attitude data, and produces calibrated instrument radiances and associated engineering and diagnostic data. This version makes the code more robust, improves calibration, provides more diagnostics outputs, defines the Galactic core more finely, and fixes the equator crossing. The Level 1 processing software manages several different tasks. It qualifies each data quantity using instrument configuration and checksum data, as well as data transmission quality flags. Statistical tests are applied for data quality and reasonableness. The instrument engineering data (e.g., voltages, currents, temperatures, and encoder angles) is calibrated by the software, and the filter channel space reference measurements are interpolated onto the times of each limb measurement with the interpolates being differenced from the measurements. Filter channel calibration target measurements are interpolated onto the times of each limb measurement, and are used to compute radiometric gain. The total signal power is determined and analyzed by each digital autocorrelator spectrometer (DACS) during each data integration. The software converts each DACS data integration from an autocorrelation measurement in the time domain into a spectral measurement in the frequency domain, and estimates separately the spectrally, smoothly varying and spectrally averaged components of the limb port signal arising from antenna emission and scattering effects. Limb radiances are also calibrated.

  18. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitors from Morinda citrifolia (Noni) and their insulin mimetic activity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi-Hung; Yang, Jun-Li; Uddin, Mohammad N; Park, So-Lim; Lim, Seong-Il; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R; Oh, Won-Keun

    2013-11-22

    As part of our ongoing search for new antidiabetic agents from medicinal plants, we found that a methanol extract of Morinda citrifolia showed potential stimulatory effects on glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this active extract yielded two new lignans (1 and 2) and three new neolignans (9, 10, and 14), as well as 10 known compounds (3-8, 11-13, and 15). The absolute configurations of compounds 9, 10, and 14 were determined by ECD spectra analysis. Compounds 3, 6, 7, and 15 showed inhibitory effects on PTP1B enzyme with IC50 values of 21.86 ± 0.48, 15.01 ± 0.20, 16.82 ± 0.42, and 4.12 ± 0.09 μM, respectively. Furthermore, compounds 3, 6, 7, and 15 showed strong stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. This study indicated the potential of compounds 3, 6, 7, and 15 as lead molecules for antidiabetic agents. PMID:24224843

  19. 50 CFR Table 1b to Part 679 - Discard and Disposition Codes1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 1b Table 1b to Part 679—Discard and Disposition Codes1 Description Code... salmon or Pacific halibut, otherwise required to be discarded, that is donated to charity under a...

  20. 50 CFR Table 1b to Part 679 - Discard and Disposition Codes1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 1b Table 1b to Part 679—Discard and Disposition Codes1 Description Code... salmon or Pacific halibut, otherwise required to be discarded, that is donated to charity under a...

  1. Virus replicon particles expressing porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus proteins elicit immune priming but do not confer protection from viremia in pigs.

    PubMed

    Eck, Melanie; Durán, Margarita García; Ricklin, Meret E; Locher, Samira; Sarraseca, Javier; Rodríguez, María José; McCullough, Kenneth C; Summerfield, Artur; Zimmer, Gert; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the causative agent of one of the most devastating and economically significant viral disease of pigs worldwide. The vaccines currently available on the market elicit only limited protection. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replicon particles (VRP) have been used successfully to induce protection against influenza A virus (IAV) in chickens and bluetongue virus in sheep. In this study, VSV VRP expressing the PRRSV envelope proteins GP5, M, GP4, GP3, GP2 and the nucleocapsid protein N, individually or in combination, were generated and evaluated as a potential vector vaccine against PRRSV infection. High level expression of the recombinant PRRSV proteins was demonstrated in cell culture. However, none of the PRRSV antigens expressed from VRP, with the exception of the N protein, did induce any detectable antibody response in pigs before challenge infection with PRRSV. After challenge however, the antibody responses against GP5, GP4 and GP3 appeared in average 2 weeks earlier than in pigs vaccinated with the empty control VRP. No reduction of viremia was observed in the vaccinated group compared with the control group. When pigs were co-vaccinated with VRP expressing IAV antigens and VRP expressing PRRSV glycoproteins, only antibody responses to the IAV antigens were detectable. These data show that the VSV replicon vector can induce immune responses to heterologous proteins in pigs, but that the PRRSV envelope proteins expressed from VSV VRP are poorly immunogenic. Nevertheless, they prime the immune system for significantly earlier B-cell responses following PRRSV challenge infection. PMID:26895704

  2. Diagnostic Potential and Antigenic Properties of Recombinant Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Subviral Particles Expressed in Mammalian Cells from Semliki Forest Virus Replicons

    PubMed Central

    Kuivanen, Suvi; Matveev, Andrey; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam; Jääskeläinen-Hakala, Anu; Vapalahti, Olli

    2014-01-01

    The precursor membrane envelope (prME) proteins of all three tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) subtypes were produced based on expression from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicons transcribed from recombinant plasmids. Vero E6 cells transfected by these plasmids showed specific reactivities in immunofluorescence and immunoblot assays by monoclonal antibodies against European and Far-Eastern subtype strains of TBEV, indicating proper folding of the expressed glycoproteins. The prME glycoproteins were secreted into the cell culture supernatant, forming TBEV subviral particles of 20 to 30 nm in diameter. IgM μ-capture and IgG monoclonal antibody (MAb)-capture enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) were developed based on prME Karelia-94 (Siberian subtype) particles. Altogether, 140 human serum samples were tested using these assays, and the results were compared to those obtained with a commercial IgM EIA, an in-house μ-capture IgM assay based on baculovirus-expressed antigen, a commercial IgG EIA, and a hemagglutination inhibition test. Compared to reference enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), the sensitivities of the generated μ-capture IgM SFV-prME and IgG MAb-capture SFV-prME EIAs were 97.4 to 100% and 98.7%, respectively, and the specificities of the two assays were 100%. IgM and IgG immunofluorescence assays (IFAs) were created based on Vero E6 cells transfected with the recombinant plasmid carrying the TBEV Karelia-94 prME glycoproteins. The IgM IFA was 100% concordant with the μ-capture IgM bac-prME ELISA. The IgG IFA sensitivity and specificity were 98.7% and 100%, respectively, compared to those of the commercial ELISA. In conclusion, the tests developed based on SFV replicon-driven expression of TBEV glycoproteins provide safe and robust alternatives for conducting TBEV serology. PMID:24371235

  3. Phosphorylation of eIF2α is responsible for the failure of the picornavirus internal ribosome entry site to direct translation from Sindbis virus replicons.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miguel Angel; Redondo, Natalia; García-Moreno, Manuel; Carrasco, Luis

    2013-04-01

    Translation directed by the poliovirus (PV) or encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) is very inefficient when expressed from Sindbis virus (SV) replicons. This inhibition can be rescued by co-expression of PV 2A protease (2A(pro)). Inhibition correlates with the extensive phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2α induced by SV replication. Confirmation that PV or EMCV IRES-driven translation can function when eIF2α is not phosphorylated was obtained in dsRNA-activated protein kinase knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (PKR(-/-) MEFs), where SV replication cannot induce eIF2α phosphorylation, and in variant S51A MEFs that express an unphosphorylatable eIF2α. In these cells, PV or EMCV IRES-dependent translation operated more efficiently than in wild-type MEFs. However, this translation was potently blocked when eIF2α was phosphorylated by the addition of thapsigargin to PKR(-/-) MEFs. In addition, when wild-type eIF2α was expressed in S51A MEFs or PKR was expressed in PKR(-/-) MEFs, PV IRES-dependent translation decreased. In both cases, the decrease in PV IRES-dependent translation correlated with the phosphorylation of eIF2α. Notably, PV 2A(pro) expression rescued PV IRES-driven translation in thapsigargin-treated PKR(-/-) MEFs. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PV IRES-driven translation can take place from SV replicons if eIF2α remains unphosphorylated. Remarkably, PV IRES-dependent translation was fully functional in this system when PV 2A(pro) was present, even if eIF2α was phosphorylated. PMID:23255624

  4. 20 CFR 655.705 - What Federal agencies are involved in the H-1B and H-1B1 programs, and what are the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CFR 214.2(h)(4)(iii)(B)(2), which specifies the employer will comply with the terms of the LCA for the... Employers Seeking To Employ Nonimmigrants on H-1b Visas in Specialty Occupations and as Fashion Models, and Requirements for Employers Seeking To Employ Nonimmigrants on H-1b1 and E-3 Visas in Specialty...

  5. Four and a Half LIM Domains 1b (Fhl1b) Is Essential for Regulating the Liver versus Pancreas Fate Decision and for β-Cell Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Cui, Jiaxi; Del Campo, Aranzazu; Shin, Chong Hyun

    2016-02-01

    The liver and pancreas originate from overlapping embryonic regions, and single-cell lineage tracing in zebrafish has shown that Bone morphogenetic protein 2b (Bmp2b) signaling is essential for determining the fate of bipotential hepatopancreatic progenitors towards the liver or pancreas. Despite its pivotal role, the gene regulatory networks functioning downstream of Bmp2b signaling in this process are poorly understood. We have identified four and a half LIM domains 1b (fhl1b), which is primarily expressed in the prospective liver anlage, as a novel target of Bmp2b signaling. fhl1b depletion compromised liver specification and enhanced induction of pancreatic cells from endodermal progenitors. Conversely, overexpression of fhl1b favored liver specification and inhibited induction of pancreatic cells. By single-cell lineage tracing, we showed that fhl1b depletion led lateral endodermal cells, destined to become liver cells, to become pancreatic cells. Reversely, when fhl1b was overexpressed, medially located endodermal cells, fated to differentiate into pancreatic and intestinal cells, contributed to the liver by directly or indirectly modulating the discrete levels of pdx1 expression in endodermal progenitors. Moreover, loss of fhl1b increased the regenerative capacity of β-cells by increasing pdx1 and neurod expression in the hepatopancreatic ductal system. Altogether, these data reveal novel and critical functions of Fhl1b in the hepatic versus pancreatic fate decision and in β-cell regeneration. PMID:26845333

  6. Four and a Half LIM Domains 1b (Fhl1b) Is Essential for Regulating the Liver versus Pancreas Fate Decision and for β-Cell Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Cui, Jiaxi; Del Campo, Aranzazu; Shin, Chong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The liver and pancreas originate from overlapping embryonic regions, and single-cell lineage tracing in zebrafish has shown that Bone morphogenetic protein 2b (Bmp2b) signaling is essential for determining the fate of bipotential hepatopancreatic progenitors towards the liver or pancreas. Despite its pivotal role, the gene regulatory networks functioning downstream of Bmp2b signaling in this process are poorly understood. We have identified four and a half LIM domains 1b (fhl1b), which is primarily expressed in the prospective liver anlage, as a novel target of Bmp2b signaling. fhl1b depletion compromised liver specification and enhanced induction of pancreatic cells from endodermal progenitors. Conversely, overexpression of fhl1b favored liver specification and inhibited induction of pancreatic cells. By single-cell lineage tracing, we showed that fhl1b depletion led lateral endodermal cells, destined to become liver cells, to become pancreatic cells. Reversely, when fhl1b was overexpressed, medially located endodermal cells, fated to differentiate into pancreatic and intestinal cells, contributed to the liver by directly or indirectly modulating the discrete levels of pdx1 expression in endodermal progenitors. Moreover, loss of fhl1b increased the regenerative capacity of β-cells by increasing pdx1 and neurod expression in the hepatopancreatic ductal system. Altogether, these data reveal novel and critical functions of Fhl1b in the hepatic versus pancreatic fate decision and in β-cell regeneration. PMID:26845333

  7. Histone Demethylase Jumonji AT-rich Interactive Domain 1B (JARID1B) Controls Mammary Gland Development by Regulating Key Developmental and Lineage Specification Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Mike Ran; Cao, Jian; Liu, Zongzhi; Huh, Sung Jin; Polyak, Kornelia; Yan, Qin

    2014-01-01

    The JmjC domain-containing H3K4 histone demethylase jumonji AT-rich interactive domain 1B (JARID1B) (also known as KDM5B and PLU1) is overexpressed in breast cancer and is a potential target for breast cancer treatment. To investigate the in vivo function of JARID1B, we developed Jarid1b−/− mice and characterized their phenotypes in detail. Unlike previously reported Jarid1b−/− strains, the majority of these Jarid1b−/− mice were viable beyond embryonic and neonatal stages. This allowed us to further examine phenotypes associated with the loss of JARID1B in pubertal development and pregnancy. These Jarid1b−/− mice exhibited decreased body weight, premature mortality, decreased female fertility, and delayed mammary gland development. Related to these phenotypes, JARID1B loss decreased serum estrogen level and reduced mammary epithelial cell proliferation in early puberty. In mammary epithelial cells, JARID1B loss diminished the expression of key regulators for mammary morphogenesis and luminal lineage specification, including FOXA1 and estrogen receptor α. Mechanistically, JARID1B was required for GATA3 recruitment to the Foxa1 promoter to activate Foxa1 expression. These results indicate that JARID1B positively regulates mammary ductal development through both extrinsic and cell-autonomous mechanisms. PMID:24802759

  8. 20 CFR 655.705 - What Federal agencies are involved in the H-1B and H-1B1 programs, and what are the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What Federal agencies are involved in the H-1B and H-1B1 programs, and what are the responsibilities of those agencies and of employers? 655.705 Section 655.705 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT OF FOREIGN WORKERS IN THE...

  9. 77 FR 53912 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; H-1B...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... the Federal Register on January 23, 2012 (77 FR 3284). Interested parties are encouraged to send...; H-1B Technical Skills Training Grants and H-1B Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge Grants... Training Grants and H-1B Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge Grants,'' to the Office of...

  10. 18 CFR 1b.15 - Non-compliance with compulsory processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Non-compliance with compulsory processes. 1b.15 Section 1b.15 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.15 Non-compliance...

  11. 18 CFR 1b.17 - Appearance and practice before the Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Appearance and practice before the Commission. 1b.17 Section 1b.17 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.17...

  12. 49 CFR 178.358-4 - Construction of Specification 21PF-1B overpacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Construction of Specification 21PF-1B overpacks... Construction of Specification 21PF-1B overpacks. (a) Each Specification 21PF-1 overpack for which construction...-1B must be of stainless steel as shown on the drawings referred to in paragraph (a) of this section....

  13. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Jumonji AT-rich Interactive Domain 1B (JARID1B) Histone Demethylase by a Sensitive High Throughput Screen*

    PubMed Central

    Sayegh, Joyce; Cao, Jian; Zou, Mike Ran; Morales, Alfonso; Blair, Lauren P.; Norcia, Michael; Hoyer, Denton; Tackett, Alan J.; Merkel, Jane S.; Yan, Qin

    2013-01-01

    JARID1B (also known as KDM5B or PLU1) is a member of the JARID1 family of histone lysine demethylases responsible for the demethylation of trimethylated lysine 27 in histone H3 (H3K4me3), a mark for actively transcribed genes. JARID1B is overexpressed in several cancers, including breast cancer, prostate cancer, and lung cancer. In addition, JARID1B is required for mammary tumor formation in syngeneic or xenograft mouse models. JARID1B-expressing melanoma cells are associated with increased self-renewal character. Therefore, JARID1B represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Here we characterized JARID1B using a homogeneous luminescence-based demethylase assay. We then conducted a high throughput screen of over 15,000 small molecules to identify inhibitors of JARID1B. From this screen, we identified several known JmjC histone demethylase inhibitors, including 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid and catechols. More importantly, we identified several novel inhibitors, including 2-4(4-methylphenyl)-1,2-benzisothiazol-3(2H)-one (PBIT), which inhibits JARID1B with an IC50 of about 3 μm in vitro. Consistent with this, PBIT treatment inhibited removal of H3K4me3 by JARID1B in cells. Furthermore, this compound inhibited proliferation of cells expressing higher levels of JARID1B. These results suggest that this novel small molecule inhibitor is a lead compound that can be further optimized for cancer therapy. PMID:23408432

  14. Fractionation, rearrangement and subgenome dominance

    PubMed Central

    Sankoff, David; Zheng, Chunfang

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Fractionation is arguably the greatest cause of gene order disruption following whole genome duplication, causing severe biases in chromosome rearrangement-based estimates of evolutionary divergence. Results: We show how to correct for this bias almost entirely by means of a ‘consolidation’ algorithm for detecting and suitably transforming identifiable regions of fractionation. We characterize the process of fractionation and the performance of the algorithm through realistic simulations. We apply our method to a number of core eudicot genomes, we and by studying the fractionation regions detected, are able to address topical issues in polyploid evolution. Availability and implementation: Code for the consolidation algorithm, and sample data, is available at: http://137.122.149.195/Software/Fractionation/fractionation.html Contact: sankoff@uottawa.ca PMID:22962459

  15. CYP1B1 expression, a potential risk factor for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Goth-Goldstein, Regine; Erdmann, Christine A.; Russell, Marion

    2001-05-31

    CYP1B1 expression in non-tumor breast tissue from breast cancer patients and cancer-free individuals was determined to test the hypothesis that high CYP1B1 expression is a risk factor for breast cancer. Large interindividual variations in CYP1B1 expression were found with CYP1B1 levels notably higher in breast cancer patients than cancer-free individuals. The results indicate that CYP1B1 might play a role in breast cancer either through increased PAH activation or through metabolism of endogenous estrogen to a carcinogenic derivative.

  16. Crystal structure of PTP1B complexed with a potent and selective bidentate inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin-Peng; Fedorov, Alexander A; Lee, Seung-Yub; Guo, Xiao-Ling; Shen, Kui; Lawrence, David S; Almo, Steven C; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2003-04-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been implicated as an important regulator in several signaling pathways including those initiated by insulin and leptin. Potent and specific PTP1B inhibitors could serve as useful tools in elucidating the physiological functions of PTP1B and may constitute valuable therapeutics in the treatment of several human diseases. We have determined the crystal structure of PTP1B in complex with compound 2, the most potent and selective PTP1B inhibitor reported to date. The structure at 2.15-A resolution reveals that compound 2 simultaneously binds to the active site and a unique proximal noncatalytic site formed by Lys-41, Arg-47, and Asp-48. The structural data are further corroborated by results from kinetic analyses of the interactions of PTP1B and its site-directed mutants with compound 2 and several of its variants. Although many of the residues important for interactions between PTP1B and compound 2 are not unique to PTP1B, the combinations of all contact residues differ between PTP isozymes, which provide a structural basis for potent and selective PTP1B inhibition. Our data further suggest that potent, yet highly selective, PTP1B inhibitory agents can be acquired by targeting the area defined by residues Lys-41, Arg-47, and Asp-48, in addition to the previously identified second aryl phosphate-binding pocket. PMID:12547827

  17. Pancreatic Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Deficiency Exacerbates Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bettaieb, Ahmed; Koike, Shinichiro; Chahed, Samah; Bachaalany, Santana; Griffey, Stephen; Sastre, Juan; Haj, Fawaz G

    2016-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating gastrointestinal disorder that causes significant morbidity. The disease starts as local inflammation in the pancreas that may progress to systemic inflammation and complications. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is implicated in inflammatory signaling, but its significance in AP remains unclear. To investigate whether PTP1B may have a role in AP, we used pancreas PTP1B knockout (panc-PTP1B KO) mice and determined the effects of pancreatic PTP1B deficiency on cerulein- and arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. We report that PTP1B protein expression was increased in the early phase of AP in mice and rats. In addition, histological analyses of pancreas samples revealed enhanced features of AP in cerulein-treated panc-PTP1B KO mice compared with controls. Moreover, cerulein- and arginine-induced serum amylase and lipase were significantly higher in panc-PTP1B KO mice compared with controls. Similarly, pancreatic mRNA and serum concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1B, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α were increased in panc-PTP1B KO mice compared with controls. Furthermore, panc-PTP1B KO mice exhibited enhanced cerulein- and arginine-induced NF-κB inflammatory response accompanied with increased mitogen-activated protein kinases activation and elevated endoplasmic reticulum stress. Notably, these effects were recapitulated in acinar cells treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of PTP1B. These findings reveal a novel role for pancreatic PTP1B in cerulein- and arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:27461362

  18. The potential of transferrin-pendant-type polyethyleneglycol liposomes encapsulating decahydrodecaborate-{sup 1}B (GB-10) as {sup 1}B-carriers for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro . E-mail: smasuna@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Kasaoka, Satoshi; Maruyama, Kazuo; Nigg, David; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Nagata, Kenji; Suzuki, Minoru; Kinashi, Yuko; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate GB-10-encapsulating transferrin (TF)-pendant-type polyethyleneglycol (PEG) liposomes as tumor-targeting {sup 1}B-carriers for boron neutron capture therapy. Methods and Materials: A free mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate-{sup 1}B (BSH) or decahydrodecaborate-{sup 1}B (GB-10) solution, bare liposomes, PEG liposomes, or TF-PEG liposomes were injected into SCC VII tumor-bearing mice, and {sup 1}B concentrations in the tumors and normal tissues were measured by {gamma}-ray spectrometry. Meanwhile, tumor-bearing mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all intratumor proliferating cells, then injected with these {sup 1}B-carriers containing BSH or GB-10 in the same manner. Right after thermal neutron irradiation, the response of quiescent (Q) cells was assessed in terms of the micronucleus frequency using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The frequency in the total tumor cells was determined from the BrdU nontreated tumors. Results: Transferrin-PEG liposomes showed a prolonged retention in blood circulation, low uptake by reticuloendothelial system, and the most enhanced accumulation of {sup 1}B in solid tumors. In general, the enhancing effects were significantly greater in total cells than Q cells. In both cells, the enhancing effects of GB-10-containing {sup 1}B-carriers were significantly greater than BSH-containing {sup 1}B-carriers, whether loaded in free solution or liposomes. In both cells, whether BSH or GB-10 was employed, the greatest enhancing effect was observed with TF-PEG liposomes followed in decreasing order by PEG liposomes, bare liposomes, and free BSH or GB-10 solution. In Q cells, the decrease was remarkable between PEG and bare liposomes. Conclusions: In terms of biodistribution characteristics and tumor cell-killing effect as a whole, including Q cells, GB-10 TF-PEG liposomes were regarded as promising {sup 1}B-carriers.

  19. Differential epigenetic and transcriptional response of the skeletal muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B (CPT1B) gene to lipid exposure with obesity.

    PubMed

    Maples, Jill M; Brault, Jeffrey J; Witczak, Carol A; Park, Sanghee; Hubal, Monica J; Weber, Todd M; Houmard, Joseph A; Shewchuk, Brian M

    2015-08-15

    The ability to increase fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in response to dietary lipid is impaired in the skeletal muscle of obese individuals, which is associated with a failure to coordinately upregulate genes involved with FAO. While the molecular mechanisms contributing to this metabolic inflexibility are not evident, a possible candidate is carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1B (CPT1B), which is a rate-limiting step in FAO. The present study was undertaken to determine if the differential response of skeletal muscle CPT1B gene transcription to lipid between lean and severely obese subjects is linked to epigenetic modifications (DNA methylation and histone acetylation) that impact transcriptional activation. In primary human skeletal muscle cultures the expression of CPT1B was blunted in severely obese women compared with their lean counterparts in response to lipid, which was accompanied by changes in CpG methylation, H3/H4 histone acetylation, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α transcription factor occupancy at the CPT1B promoter. Methylation of specific CpG sites in the CPT1B promoter that correlated with CPT1B transcript level blocked the binding of the transcription factor upstream stimulatory factor, suggesting a potential causal mechanism. These findings indicate that epigenetic modifications may play important roles in the regulation of CPT1B in response to a physiologically relevant lipid mixture in human skeletal muscle, a major site of fatty acid catabolism, and that differential DNA methylation may underlie the depressed expression of CPT1B in response to lipid, contributing to the metabolic inflexibility associated with severe obesity. PMID:26058865

  20. Detection of Genes Regulated by Lmx1b During Limb Dorsalization

    PubMed Central

    Feenstra, Jennifer M.; Kanaya, Kohei; Pira, Charmaine U; Hoffman, Sarah E.; Eppey, Richard J.; Oberg, Kerby C.

    2012-01-01

    Lmx1b is a homeodomain transcription factor that regulates dorsal identity during limb development. Lmx1b knockout (KO) mice develop distal ventral-ventral limbs. Although induction of Lmx1b is linked to Wnt7a expression in the dorsal limb ectoderm, the downstream targets of Lmx1b that accomplish limb dorsalization are unknown. To identify genes targeted by Lmx1b, we compared gene arrays from Lmx1b KO and wildtype mouse limbs during limb dorsalization, i.e., 11.5, 12.5, and 13.5 days post coitum. We identified 54 target genes differentially expressed in all three stages. Several skeletal targets, including Emx2, Matrilin1 and Matrilin4, demonstrated a loss of scapular expression in the Lmx1b KO mice, supporting a role for Lmx1b in scapula development. Furthermore, the relative abundance of extracellular matrix-related soft tissue targets regulated by Lmx1b, such as collagens and proteoglycans, suggests a mechanism which includes changes in the extracellular matrix composition to accomplish limb dorsalization. Our study provides the most comprehensive characterization of genes regulated by Lmx1b during limb development to-date and provides targets for further investigation. PMID:22417325

  1. Detection of genes regulated by Lmx1b during limb dorsalization.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, Jennifer M; Kanaya, Kohei; Pira, Charmaine U; Hoffman, Sarah E; Eppey, Richard J; Oberg, Kerby C

    2012-05-01

    Lmx1b is a homeodomain transcription factor that regulates dorsal identity during limb development. Lmx1b knockout (KO) mice develop distal ventral-ventral limbs. Although induction of Lmx1b is linked to Wnt7a expression in the dorsal limb ectoderm, the downstream targets of Lmx1b that accomplish limb dorsalization are unknown. To identify genes targeted by Lmx1b, we compared gene arrays from Lmx1b KO and wild type mouse limbs during limb dorsalization, i.e., 11.5, 12.5, and 13.5 days post coitum. We identified 54 target genes that were differentially expressed in all three stages. Several skeletal targets, including Emx2, Matrilin1 and Matrilin4, demonstrated a loss of scapular expression in the Lmx1b KO mice, supporting a role for Lmx1b in scapula development. Furthermore, the relative abundance of extracellular matrix-related soft tissue targets regulated by Lmx1b, such as collagens and proteoglycans, suggests a mechanism that includes changes in the extracellular matrix composition to accomplish limb dorsalization. Our study provides the most comprehensive characterization of genes regulated by Lmx1b during limb development to-date and provides targets for further investigation. PMID:22417325

  2. Recurrent CDKN1B (p27) mutations in hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Sascha; Hüllein, Jennifer; Lee, Stanley Chun-Wei; Hutter, Barbara; Gonzalez, David; Jayne, Sandrine; Dyer, Martin J S; Oleś, Małgorzata; Else, Monica; Liu, Xiyang; Słabicki, Mikołaj; Wu, Bian; Troussard, Xavier; Dürig, Jan; Andrulis, Mindaugas; Dearden, Claire; von Kalle, Christof; Granzow, Martin; Jauch, Anna; Fröhling, Stefan; Huber, Wolfgang; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Torsten; Ho, Anthony D; Richter, Daniela; Brors, Benedikt; Glimm, Hanno; Matutes, Estella; Abdel Wahab, Omar; Zenz, Thorsten

    2015-08-20

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is marked by near 100% mutational frequency of BRAFV600E mutations. Recurrent cooperating genetic events that may contribute to HCL pathogenesis or affect the clinical course of HCL are currently not described. Therefore, we performed whole exome sequencing to explore the mutational landscape of purine analog refractory HCL. In addition to the disease-defining BRAFV600E mutations, we identified mutations in EZH2, ARID1A, and recurrent inactivating mutations of the cell cycle inhibitor CDKN1B (p27). Targeted deep sequencing of CDKN1B in a larger cohort of HCL patients identify deleterious CDKN1B mutations in 16% of patients with HCL (n = 13 of 81). In 11 of 13 patients the CDKN1B mutation was clonal, implying an early role of CDKN1B mutations in the pathogenesis of HCL. CDKN1B mutations were not found to impact clinical characteristics or outcome in this cohort. These data identify HCL as having the highest frequency of CDKN1B mutations among cancers and identify CDNK1B as the second most common mutated gene in HCL. Moreover, given the known function of CDNK1B, these data suggest a novel role for alterations in regulation of cell cycle and senescence in HCL with CDKN1B mutations. PMID:26065650

  3. Consequence of the tumor-associated conversion to cyclin D1b

    PubMed Central

    Augello, Michael A; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Carr, Richard; Yoshida, Akihiro; Dean, Jeffry L; Schiewer, Matthew J; Feng, Felix Y; Tomlins, Scott A; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter J; Benovic, Jeffrey L; Diehl, John Alan; Knudsen, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that cyclin D1b, a variant of cyclin D1, is associated with tumor progression and poor outcome. However, the underlying molecular basis was unknown. Here, novel models were created to generate a genetic switch from cyclin D1 to cyclin D1b. Extensive analyses uncovered overlapping but non-redundant functions of cyclin D1b compared to cyclin D1 on developmental phenotypes, and illustrated the importance of the transcriptional regulatory functions of cyclin D1b in vivo. Data obtained identify cyclin D1b as an oncogene, wherein cyclin D1b expression under the endogenous promoter induced cellular transformation and further cooperated with known oncogenes to promote tumor growth in vivo. Further molecular interrogation uncovered unexpected links between cyclin D1b and the DNA damage/PARP1 regulatory networks, which could be exploited to suppress cyclin D1b-driven tumors. Collectively, these data are the first to define the consequence of cyclin D1b expression on normal cellular function, present evidence for cyclin D1b as an oncogene, and provide pre-clinical evidence of effective methods to thwart growth of cells dependent upon this oncogenic variant. PMID:25787974

  4. PLU-1/JARID1B overexpression predicts proliferation properties in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhibin; Song, Liwei; Hou, Zhaoyuan; Han, Yifan; Hu, Yuhua; Wu, Yadi; Chen, Wantao; Mao, Li

    2015-05-01

    PLU-1/JARID1B (jumonji AT rich interactive domain 1B) is one of the testis cancer antigens and functions as a histone demethylase in the regulation of various human types of cancers. However, its functions in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are rarely reported. The aim of the present study was to examine PLU-1/JARID1B expression levels in HNSCCs and to investigate its role in cancer cell proliferation. In the present study, we found that PLU-1/JARID1B mRNA was upregulated in all tested HNSCC cell lines. Immunohistochemical staining showed that PLU-1/JARID1B protein expression was detected in 87.8% (87/99) of the HNSCC cases. A positive association was observed between high PLU-1/JARID1B expression and higher Ki-67 labeling in the HNSCC samples (Pearson r=0.6514, P=0.0003). Stable PLU-1/JARID1B knockdown by PLU-1-shRNAs in the HNSCC cell lines suppressed cell growth both in the in vitro and in vivo studies. Moreover, PLU-1/JARID1B knockdown resulted in G1 arrest and early apoptosis by suppressing Bcl-2 family members in the HNSCCs. These data indicate that PLU-1/JARID1B is overexpressed in HNSCCs and is associated with tumor proliferation and apoptosis. Therefore, PLU-1/JARID1B represents a candidate proliferation biomarker for HNSCC diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25777981

  5. Ring1b bookmarks genes in pancreatic embryonic progenitors for repression in adult β cells.

    PubMed

    van Arensbergen, Joris; García-Hurtado, Javier; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Correa-Tapia, Miguel; Rutter, Guy A; Vidal, Miguel; Ferrer, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb-mediated gene repression is essential for embryonic development, yet its precise role in lineage-specific programming is poorly understood. Here we inactivated Ring1b, encoding a polycomb-repressive complex 1 subunit, in pancreatic multipotent progenitors (Ring1b(progKO)). This caused transcriptional derepression of a subset of direct Ring1b target genes in differentiated pancreatic islet cells. Unexpectedly, Ring1b inactivation in differentiated islet β cells (Ring1b(βKO)) did not cause derepression, even after multiple rounds of cell division, suggesting a role for Ring1b in the establishment but not the maintenance of repression. Consistent with this notion, derepression in Ring1b(progKO) islets occurred preferentially in genes that were targeted de novo by Ring1b during pancreas development. The results support a model in which Ring1b bookmarks its target genes during embryonic development, and these genes are maintained in a repressed state through Ring1b-independent mechanisms in terminally differentiated cells. This work provides novel insights into how epigenetic mechanisms contribute to shaping the transcriptional identity of differentiated lineages. PMID:23271347

  6. Cytochrome P450 1B1: An Unexpected Modulator of Liver Fatty Acid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Michele Campaigne; Bushkofsky, Justin R.; Gorman, Tyler; Adhami, Vaqar; Mukhtar, Hasan; Wang, Suqing; Reeder, Scott B.; Sheibani, Nader; Jefcoate, Colin R.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 1b1 (Cyp1b1) expression is absent in mouse hepatocytes, but present in liver endothelia and activated stellate cells. Increased expression during adipogenesis suggests a role of Cyp1b1 metabolism in fatty acid homeostasis. Wild-type C57BL/6j (WT) and Cyp1b1-null (Cyp1b1-ko) mice were provided low or high fat diets (LFD and HFD, respectively). Cyp1b1-deletion suppressed HFD-induced obesity, improved glucose tolerance and prevented liver steatosis. Suppression of lipid droplets in sinusoidal hepatocytes, concomitant with enhanced glycogen granules, was a consistent feature of Cyp1b1-ko mice. Cyp1b1 deletion altered the in vivo expression of 560 liver genes, including suppression of PPARγ, stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 (Scd1) and many genes stimulated by PPARα, each consistent with this switch in energy storage mechanism. Ligand activation of PPARα in Cyp1b1-ko mice by WY-14643 was, nevertheless, effective. Seventeen gene changes in Cyp1b1-ko mice correspond to mouse transgenic expression that attenuated diet-induced diabetes. The absence of Cyp1b1 in mouse hepatocytes indicates participation in energy homeostasis through extra-hepatocyte signaling. Extensive sexual dimorphism in hepatic gene expression suggests a developmental impact of estrogen metabolism by Cyp1b1. Suppression of Scd1 and increased leptin turnover support enhanced leptin participation from the hypothalamus. Cyp1b1-mediated effects on vascular cells may underlie these changes. PMID:25703193

  7. RPRD1B promotes tumor growth by accelerating the cell cycle in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Qiu, Haifeng; Hu, Weixu; Li, Shaoru; Yu, Jinjin

    2014-03-01

    RPRD1B, the regulation of nuclear pre-mRNA domain containing 1B gene, functions as a cell cycle manipulator and has been found overexpressed in a small panel of endometrial cancer types. In the present study, we investigated the roles of RPRD1B in endometrial cancer using various in vitro and in vivo experiments. According to our results, RPRD1B mRNA was significantly upregulated in endometrial cancer tissues (P=0.0012). RPRD1B overexpression was correlated with tumor stage (P=0.0004), histology type (P=0.0146) and depth of myometrial invasion (P=0.024). In vitro, RPRD1B promoted cellular proliferation (P=0.032 for MTT assay and P=0.018 for colony formation assay), and accelerated the cell cycle (P=0.007) by upregulating cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6, while knockdown of RPRD1B suppressed cellular proliferation (P=0.02 for MTT assay and P=0.031 for colony formation assay), and led to G1 phase arrest (P=0.025) through downregulating cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6. Consistently, in the nude mice model, RPRD1B overexpression significantly accelerated the tumor xenograft growth (P=0.0012), accompanied by elevated Ki-67 and cyclin D1. In addition, we demonstrated that downregulating RPRD1B could sensitize Ishikawa cells to Raloxifene (P=0.01). In summary, we demonstrated that RPRD1B was frequently overexpressed in human endometrial cancer. Both in vitro and in vivo, over-abundant RPRD1B could promote tumor growth and accelerate cellular cell cycle. In addition, knockdown of RPRD1B also increased cell sensitivity to Raloxifene, making RPRD1B a potent therapeutic target for endometrial cancer, particularly in patients with resistance to the selective ER modulators. PMID:24452636

  8. Arabidopsis HEAT SHOCK TRANSCRIPTION FACTORA1b overexpression enhances water productivity, resistance to drought, and infection.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, Ulrike; Albihlal, Waleed S; Lawson, Tracy; Fryer, Michael J; Sparrow, Penelope A C; Richard, François; Persad, Ramona; Bowden, Laura; Hickman, Richard; Martin, Cathie; Beynon, Jim L; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky; Baker, Neil R; Morison, James I L; Schöffl, Friedrich; Ott, Sascha; Mullineaux, Philip M

    2013-08-01

    Heat-stressed crops suffer dehydration, depressed growth, and a consequent decline in water productivity, which is the yield of harvestable product as a function of lifetime water consumption and is a trait associated with plant growth and development. Heat shock transcription factor (HSF) genes have been implicated not only in thermotolerance but also in plant growth and development, and therefore could influence water productivity. Here it is demonstrated that Arabidopsis thaliana plants with increased HSFA1b expression showed increased water productivity and harvest index under water-replete and water-limiting conditions. In non-stressed HSFA1b-overexpressing (HSFA1bOx) plants, 509 genes showed altered expression, and these genes were not over-represented for development-associated genes but were for response to biotic stress. This confirmed an additional role for HSFA1b in maintaining basal disease resistance, which was stress hormone independent but involved H₂O₂ signalling. Fifty-five of the 509 genes harbour a variant of the heat shock element (HSE) in their promoters, here named HSE1b. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR confirmed binding of HSFA1b to HSE1b in vivo, including in seven transcription factor genes. One of these is MULTIPROTEIN BRIDGING FACTOR1c (MBF1c). Plants overexpressing MBF1c showed enhanced basal resistance but not water productivity, thus partially phenocopying HSFA1bOx plants. A comparison of genes responsive to HSFA1b and MBF1c overexpression revealed a common group, none of which harbours a HSE1b motif. From this example, it is suggested that HSFA1b directly regulates 55 HSE1b-containing genes, which control the remaining 454 genes, collectively accounting for the stress defence and developmental phenotypes of HSFA1bOx. PMID:23828547

  9. Frequent amplification of PTP1B is associated with poor survival of gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; She, Junjun; Liu, Wei; Shi, Jing; Yang, Qi; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a non-transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase, has been implicated in gastric pathogenesis. Several lines of recent evidences have shown that PTP1B is highly amplified in breast and prostate cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate PTP1B amplification in gastric cancer and its association with poor prognosis of gastric cancer patients, and further determine the role of PTP1B in gastric tumorigenesis. Our data demonstrated that PTP1B was significantly up-regulated in gastric cancer tissues as compared with matched normal gastric tissues by using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) assay. In addition, copy number analysis showed that PTP1B was amplified in 68/131 (51.9%) gastric cancer cases, whereas no amplification was found in the control subjects. Notably, PTP1B amplification was positively associated with its protein expression, and was significantly related to poor survival of gastric cancer patients. Knocking down PTP1B expression in gastric cancer cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion, and induced cell cycle arrested and apoptosis. Mechanically, PTP1B promotes gastric cancer cell proliferation, survival and invasiveness through modulating Src-related signaling pathways, such as Src/Ras/MAPK and Src/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways. Collectively, our data demonstrated frequent overexpression and amplification PTP1B in gastric cancer, and further determined the oncogenic role of PTP1B in gastric carcinogenesis. Importantly, PTP1B amplification predicts poor survival of gastric cancer patients. PMID:25590580

  10. Ganglioside GQ1b induces dopamine release through the activation of Pyk2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Chu, Shi-Feng; Mou, Zheng; Gao, Yan; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Wei, Gui-Ning; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Growing evidence indicates that GQ1b, one of the gangliosides members, contributes to synaptic transmission and synapse formation. Previous studies have shown that GQ1b could enhance depolarization induced neurotransmitter release, while the role of GQ1b in asynchronous release is still largely unknown. Here in our result, we found low concentration of GQ1b, but not GT1b or GD1b (which were generated from GQ1b by plasma membrane-associated sialidases), evoked asynchronous dopamine (DA) release from both clonal rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and rat striatal slices significantly. The release peaked at 2min after GQ1b exposure, and lasted for more than 6min. This effect was caused by the enhancement of intracellular Ca(2+) and the activation of Pyk2. Inhibition of Pyk2 by PF-431396 (a dual inhibitor of Pyk2 and FAK) or Pyk2 siRNA abolished DA release induced by GQ1b. Moreover, Pyk2 Y402, but not other tyrosine site, was phosphorylated at the peaking time. The mutant of Pyk2 Y402 (Pyk2-Y402F) was built to confirm the essential role of Y402 activation. Further studies revealed that activated Pyk2 stimulated ERK1/2 and p-38, while only the ERK1/2 activation was indispensable for GQ1b induced DA release, which interacted with Synapsin I directly and led to its phosphorylation, then depolymerization of F-actin, thus contributed to DA release. In conclusion, low concentration of GQ1b is able to enhance asynchronous DA release through Pyk2/ERK/Synapsin I/actin pathway. Our findings provide new insights into the role of GQ1b in neuronal communication, and implicate the potential application of GQ1b in neurological disorders. PMID:26704905

  11. LMX1B is Essential for the Maintenance of Differentiated Podocytes in Adult Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Tillmann; Kastner, Jürgen; Suleiman, Hani; Rivera-Milla, Eric; Stepanova, Natalya; Lottaz, Claudio; Kubitza, Marion; Böger, Carsten A.; Schmidt, Sarah; Gorski, Mathias; de Vries, Uwe; Schmidt, Helga; Hertting, Irmgard; Kopp, Jeffrey; Rascle, Anne; Moser, Markus; Heid, Iris M.; Warth, Richard; Spang, Rainer; Wegener, Joachim; Mierke, Claudia T.; Englert, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of the LMX1B gene cause nail–patella syndrome, a rare autosomal-dominant disorder affecting the development of the limbs, eyes, brain, and kidneys. The characterization of conventional Lmx1b knockout mice has shown that LMX1B regulates the development of podocyte foot processes and slit diaphragms, but studies using podocyte-specific Lmx1b knockout mice have yielded conflicting results regarding the importance of LMX1B for maintaining podocyte structures. In order to address this question, we generated inducible podocyte-specific Lmx1b knockout mice. One week of Lmx1b inactivation in adult mice resulted in proteinuria with only minimal foot process effacement. Notably, expression levels of slit diaphragm and basement membrane proteins remained stable at this time point, and basement membrane charge properties also did not change, suggesting that alternative mechanisms mediate the development of proteinuria in these mice. Cell biological and biophysical experiments with primary podocytes isolated after 1 week of Lmx1b inactivation indicated dysregulation of actin cytoskeleton organization, and time-resolved DNA microarray analysis identified the genes encoding actin cytoskeleton-associated proteins, including Abra and Arl4c, as putative LMX1B targets. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in conditionally immortalized human podocytes and gel shift assays showed that LMX1B recognizes AT-rich binding sites (FLAT elements) in the promoter regions of ABRA and ARL4C, and knockdown experiments in zebrafish support a model in which LMX1B and ABRA act in a common pathway during pronephros development. Our report establishes the importance of LMX1B in fully differentiated podocytes and argues that LMX1B is essential for the maintenance of an appropriately structured actin cytoskeleton in podocytes. PMID:23990680

  12. Impact of Atmospheric and Oceanic De-aliasing Level-1B (AOD1B) products on precise orbits of altimetry satellites and altimetry results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, Sergei; Dettmering, Denise; Esselborn, Saskia; Fagiolini, Elisa; Schöne, Tilo

    2016-03-01

    We have extended backwards from 2001 to 1979 the current release 05 (RL05) of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Atmospheric and Oceanic De-aliasing Level-1B (AOD1B) product and studied the impact of this and a previous release 04 (RL04) of the AOD1B product on precise orbits of five altimetry satellites (ERS-1, ERS-2, TOPEX/Poseidon, Envisat and Jason-1) for the time span 1991-2012, as compared to the case when no AOD1B product is used. We have found that using AOD1B RL05 product reduces root mean square (RMS) fits of satellite laser ranging (SLR) observations by about 1.0-6.4 per cent, 2-d arc overlaps in radial, cross-track and along-track directions by about 1.3-12.0, 0.3-10.0 and 2.0-10.0 per cent, respectively, for various satellites tested, as compared to the case without AOD1B product. Using AOD1B RL05 product instead of RL04 one reduces SLR RMS fits by 0.1-0.7 per cent, 2-d arc overlaps in radial, cross-track and along-track directions by 0.1-0.6, 0.1-1.3 and 0.2-1.2 per cent, respectively, for the satellite orbits tested. The multi-mission crossover analysis shows that the application of an AOD1B product reduces the scatter of radial errors by 0.4-2.8 per cent for the satellite missions studied. At the regions with the most pronounced changes the use of the AOD1B products improves the consistency between the sea level as measured by the TOPEX and ERS-2 missions and by the Jason-1 and Envisat missions by 5 to 10 per cent (globally by about 2 per cent). The results of our study show that extended AOD1B RL05 product performs better than the AOD1B RL04 and improves orbits of altimetry satellites and consistency of sea level products.

  13. 20 CFR 655.700 - What statutory provisions govern the employment of H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 nonimmigrants and how do...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (Public Law 106-95) and the regulations issued thereunder, 20 CFR part 655, subparts L and M. (3) E-3... U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(H)(i)(b1)), under the U.S.-Chile and U.S.-Singapore Free Trade Agreements as long... condition application is for an “E-3 Australia,” “H-1B1 Chile,” or “H-1B1 Singapore” nonimmigrant....

  14. Impaired Intestinal Calcium Absorption in Protein 4.1R-deficient Mice Due to Altered Expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium ATPase 1b (PMCA1b)*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Congrong; Weng, Haibao; Chen, Lixiang; Yang, Shaomin; Wang, Hua; Debnath, Gargi; Guo, Xinhua; Wu, Liancheng; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2013-01-01

    Protein 4.1R was first identified in the erythrocyte membrane skeleton. It is now known that the protein is expressed in a variety of epithelial cell lines and in the epithelia of many tissues, including the small intestine. However, the physiological function of 4.1R in the epithelial cells of the small intestine has not so far been explored. Here, we show that 4.1R knock-out mice exhibited a significantly impaired small intestinal calcium absorption that resulted in secondary hyperparathyroidism as evidenced by increased serum 1,25-(OH)2-vitamin D3 and parathyroid hormone levels, decreased serum calcium levels, hyperplasia of the parathyroid, and demineralization of the bones. 4.1R is located on the basolateral membrane of enterocytes, where it co-localizes with PMCA1b (plasma membrane calcium ATPase 1b). Expression of PMCA1b in enterocytes was decreased in 4.1−/− mice. 4.1R directly associated with PMCA1b, and the association involved the membrane-binding domain of 4.1R and the second intracellular loop and C terminus of PMCA1b. Our findings have enabled us to define a functional role for 4.1R in small intestinal calcium absorption through regulation of membrane expression of PMCA1b. PMID:23460639

  15. Reduced expression of APC-1B but not APC-1A by the deletion of promoter 1B is responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Nagayama, Satoshi; Shimizu, Eigo; Komura, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Rui; Shibuya, Tetsuo; Arai, Masami; Hatakeyama, Seira; Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Ueno, Masashi; Miyano, Satoru; Imoto, Seiya; Furukawa, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene APC are associated with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Here we applied whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to the DNA of a sporadic FAP patient in which we did not find any pathological APC mutations by direct sequencing. WGS identified a promoter deletion of approximately 10 kb encompassing promoter 1B and exon1B of APC. Additional allele-specific expression analysis by deep cDNA sequencing revealed that the deletion reduced the expression of the mutated APC allele to as low as 11.2% in the total APC transcripts, suggesting that the residual mutant transcripts were driven by other promoter(s). Furthermore, cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) demonstrated that the deleted promoter 1B region is responsible for the great majority of APC transcription in many tissues except the brain. The deletion decreased the transcripts of APC-1B to 39-45% in the patient compared to the healthy controls, but it did not decrease those of APC-1A. Different deletions including promoter 1B have been reported in FAP patients. Taken together, our results strengthen the evidence that analysis of structural variations in promoter 1B should be considered for the FAP patients whose pathological mutations are not identified by conventional direct sequencing. PMID:27217144

  16. Role of dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1B (Dyrk1B) in S-phase entry of HPV E7 expressing cells from quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Na; Yuan, Shoudao; Wang, Rongchun; Zhang, Weifang; Chen, Jason J.

    2015-01-01

    The high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent for cervical cancer. The HPV E7 oncogene promotes S-phase entry from quiescent state in the presence of elevated cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1, a function that may contribute to carcinogenesis. However, the mechanism by which HPV E7 induces quiescent cells to entry into S-phase is not fully understood. Interestingly, we found that Dyrk1B, a dual-specificity kinase and negative regulator of cell proliferation in quiescent cells, was upregulated in E7 expressing cells. Surprisingly and in contrast to what was previously reported, Dyrk1B played a positive role in S-phase entry of quiescent HPV E7 expressing cells. Mechanistically, Dyrk1B contributed to p27 phosphorylation (at serine 10 and threonine 198), which was important for the proliferation of HPV E7 expressing cells. Moreover, Dyrk1B up-regulated HPV E7. Taken together, our studies uncovered a novel function of Dyrk1B in high-risk HPV E7-mediated cell proliferation. Dyrk1B may serve as a target for therapy in HPV-associated cancers. PMID:26307683

  17. Reduced expression of APC-1B but not APC-1A by the deletion of promoter 1B is responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Nagayama, Satoshi; Shimizu, Eigo; Komura, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Rui; Shibuya, Tetsuo; Arai, Masami; Hatakeyama, Seira; Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Ueno, Masashi; Miyano, Satoru; Imoto, Seiya; Furukawa, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene APC are associated with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Here we applied whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to the DNA of a sporadic FAP patient in which we did not find any pathological APC mutations by direct sequencing. WGS identified a promoter deletion of approximately 10 kb encompassing promoter 1B and exon1B of APC. Additional allele-specific expression analysis by deep cDNA sequencing revealed that the deletion reduced the expression of the mutated APC allele to as low as 11.2% in the total APC transcripts, suggesting that the residual mutant transcripts were driven by other promoter(s). Furthermore, cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) demonstrated that the deleted promoter 1B region is responsible for the great majority of APC transcription in many tissues except the brain. The deletion decreased the transcripts of APC-1B to 39–45% in the patient compared to the healthy controls, but it did not decrease those of APC-1A. Different deletions including promoter 1B have been reported in FAP patients. Taken together, our results strengthen the evidence that analysis of structural variations in promoter 1B should be considered for the FAP patients whose pathological mutations are not identified by conventional direct sequencing. PMID:27217144

  18. The design strategy of selective PTP1B inhibitors over TCPTP.

    PubMed

    Li, XiangQian; Wang, LiJun; Shi, DaYong

    2016-08-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has already been well studied as a highly validated therapeutic target for diabetes and obesity. However, the lack of selectivity limited further studies and clinical applications of PTP1B inhibitors, especially over T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP). In this review, we enumerate the published specific inhibitors of PTP1B, discuss the structure-activity relationships by analysis of their X-ray structures or docking results, and summarize the characteristic of selectivity related residues and groups. Furthermore, the design strategy of selective PTP1B inhibitors over TCPTP is also proposed. We hope our work could provide an effective way to gain specific PTP1B inhibitors. PMID:27353889

  19. Effects of oxytocin on serotonin 1B agonist-induced autism-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Sarah K; Gray, Andrew C; Woehrle, Nancy S

    2016-11-01

    Social impairments in autism remain poorly understood and without approved pharmacotherapies. Novel animals models are needed to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate novel treatments for the social deficits in autism. Recently, serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1B) agonist challenge in mice was shown to induce autism-like behaviors including perseveration, reduced prepulse inhibition, and delayed alternation deficits. However, the effects of 5-HT1B agonists on autism-related social behaviors in mice remain unknown. Here, we examine the effects of 5-HT1B agonist challenge on sociability and preference for social novelty in mice. We also examine the effects of 5-HT1B agonist treatment on average rearing duration, a putative rodent measure of non-selective attention. Non-selective attention is an associated feature of autism that is also not well understood. We show that 5-HT1B receptor activation reduces sociability, preference for social novelty, and rearing in mice. In addition, we examine the ability of oxytocin, an off-label treatment for the social impairments in autism, to reverse 5-HT1B agonist-induced social and attention deficits in mice. We show that oxytocin restores social novelty preference in mice treated with a 5-HT1B agonist. We also show that oxytocin attenuates 5-HT1B agonist-induced sociability and rearing deficits in mice. Our results suggest that 5-HT1B agonist challenge provides a useful pharmacological mouse model for aspects of autism, and implicate 5-HT1B in autism social and attention deficits. Moreover, our findings suggest that oxytocin may treat the social deficits in autism through a mechanism involving 5-HT1B. PMID:27439030

  20. The pathogenic mechanism of dysbindin-1B toxic aggregation: BLOC-1 and intercellular vesicle trafficking.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Zhu, Chunyan; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qi

    2016-10-01

    DTNBP1, which encodes dysbindin-1, is associated with cognitive impairment. Genetic evidence indicates that the C allele of rs117610176 leads to an increase in DTNBP-1b mRNA splicing in patients with paranoid schizophrenia. In addition, dysbindin-1B, rather than dysbindin-1A/C, exhibits a tendency toward toxic aggregation. In postmortem brains, dysbindin-1B not only aggregates with itself, it also co-aggregates with proteins that interact with it. However, the pathogenic mechanism underlying dysbindin-1B toxic aggregation remains unknown. In the brain, dysbindin-1 is primarily found as a subunit of biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex 1 (BLOC-1), which plays a role in intracellular vesicle trafficking. Therefore, we hypothesized that dysbindin-1B might impair the cognitive function of schizophrenia patients by co-aggregating with BLOC-1 subunits and disturbing the function of BLOC-1. In this study, we investigated the dominant-negative effect of dysbindin-1B on the BLOC-1 complex. We found that in multiple brain areas in Dys1B(+/+) mice, the expression levels of soluble functional BLOC-1 subunits were decreased. Meanwhile, BLOC-1 subunits co-aggregated with dysbindin-1B-myc. Functional studies in primary cortical neurons further revealed the malfunction of BLOC-1 in intercellular vesicle trafficking in Dys1B(+/+) mice. In addition, we used the Morris water maze task to investigate the effects of dysbindin-1B aggregation on cognition. The results demonstrated that Dys1B(+/+) mice exhibited spatial learning and memory deficits, which were accompanied by the shrinkage of apical and basal dendritic branches and the loss of dendritic spines in hippocampal CA1 neurons, as demonstrated by Golgi staining. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that dysbindin-1B toxic aggregation might impair cognition through a dominant-negative effect on BLOC-1. PMID:27421225

  1. LincRNA-p21 acts as a mediator of ING1b-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, U M; Rajarajacholan, U; Soh, J; Kim, T-s; Thalappilly, S; Sensen, C W; Riabowol, K

    2015-01-01

    ING1b is a tumor suppressor that affects transcription, cell cycle control and apoptosis. ING1b is deregulated in disease, and its activity is closely linked to that of p53. In addition to regulating protein-coding genes, we found that ING1b also influences the expression of large intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs). In particular, lincRNA-p21 was significantly induced after DNA-damage stress or by ING1b overexpression. Furthermore, lincRNA-p21 expression in response to DNA damage was significantly attenuated in cells lacking ING1b. LincRNA-p21 is also a target of p53 and can trigger apoptosis in mouse cell models. We found that this function of lincRNA-p21 is conserved in human cell models. Moreover, ING1b and p53 could function independently to influence lincRNA-p21 expression. However, their effects become more additive under conditions of stress. In particular, ING1b regulates lincRNA-p21 levels by binding to its promoter and is required for induction of lincRNA-p21 by p53. The ability of ING1b to cause apoptosis is also impaired in the absence of lincRNA-p21. Surprisingly, deletion of the ING1b plant homeodomain, which allows it to bind histones and regulate chromatin structure, did not alter regulation of lincRNA-p21. Our findings suggest that ING1b induces lincRNA-p21 expression independently of histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation mark recognition and that lincRNA-p21 functions downstream of ING1b. Thus, regulation at the level of lincRNA-p21 may represent the point at which ING1b and p53 pathways converge to induce apoptosis under specific stress conditions. PMID:25741593

  2. Loss of the histone chaperone ASF1B reduces female reproductive capacity in mice.

    PubMed

    Messiaen, S; Guiard, J; Aigueperse, C; Fliniaux, I; Tourpin, S; Barroca, V; Allemand, I; Fouchet, P; Livera, G; Vernet, M

    2016-05-01

    Anti-silencing function 1 (ASF1) is an evolutionarily conserved histone H3-H4 chaperone involved in the assembly/disassembly of nucleosome and histone modification. Two paralogous genes, Asf1a and Asf1b, exist in the mouse genome. Asf1a is ubiquitously expressed and its loss causes embryonic lethality. Conversely, Asf1b expression is more restricted and has been less studied. To determine the in vivo function of Asf1b, we generated a Asf1b-deficient mouse line (Asf1b(GT(ROSA-βgeo)437)) in which expression of the lacZ reporter gene is driven by the Asf1b promoter. Analysis of β-galactosidase activity at early embryonic stages indicated a correlation between Asf1b expression and cell differentiation potential. In the gonads of both male and female, Asf1b expression was specifically detected in the germ cell lineage with a peak expression correlated with meiosis. The viability of Asf1b-null mice suggests that Asf1b is dispensable for mouse development. However, these mice showed reduced reproductive capacity compared with wild-type controls. We present evidence that the timing of meiotic entry and the subsequent gonad development are affected more severely in Asf1b-null female mice than in male mice. In female mice, in addition to subfertility related to altered gamete formation, variable defects compromising the development and/or survival of their offspring were also observed. Altogether, our data indicate the importance of Asf1b expression at the time of meiotic entry, suggesting that chromatin modifications may play a central role in this process. PMID:26850882

  3. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1b Deficient Mice Develop Severe Insulin Resistance After Prolonged High Fat Diet Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Teayoun; Moore, John F; Sharer, Jon D; Yang, Kevin; Wood, Philip A; Yang, Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    Background Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) is the rate-limiting enzyme governing the entry of long-chain acyl-CoAs into mitochondria. Treatments with CPT1 inhibitors protect against insulin resistance in short-term preclinical animal studies. We recently reported that mice with muscle isoform CPT1b deficiency demonstrated improved insulin sensitivity when fed a High Fat-Diet (HFD) for up to 5 months. In this follow up study, we further investigated whether the insulin sensitizing effects of partial CPT1b deficiency could be maintained under a prolonged HFD feeding condition. Methods We investigated the effects of CPT1b deficiency on HFD-induced insulin resistance using heterozygous CPT1b deficient (Cpt1b+/−) mice compared with Wild Type (WT) mice fed a HFD for a prolonged period of time (7 months). We assessed insulin sensitivity using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps. We also examined body composition, skeletal muscle lipid profile, and changes in the insulin signaling pathways of skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue. Results We found that Cpt1b+/− mice became severely insulin resistant after 7 months of HFD feeding. Cpt1b+/− mice exhibited a substantially reduced glucose infusion rate and skeletal muscle glucose uptake. While Cpt1b+/− mice maintained a slower weight gain with less fat mass than WT mice, accumulation of lipid intermediates became evident in the muscle of Cpt1b+/− but not WT mice after 7 months of HFD feeding. Insulin signaling was impaired in the Cpt1b+/− as compared to the WT muscles. Conclusion Partial CPT1b deficiency, mimicking CPT1b inhibition, may lead to impaired insulin signaling and insulin sensitivity under a prolonged HFD feeding condition. Therefore, further studies on the potential detrimental effects of prolonged therapy with CPT1 inhibition are necessary in the development of this potential therapeutic strategy. PMID:25580367

  4. In vivo and in vitro CYP1B mRNA expression in channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Willett, Kristine L; Ganesan, Shobana; Patel, Monali; Metzger, Christine; Quiniou, Sylvie; Waldbieser, Geoff; Scheffler, Brian

    2006-07-01

    Our goal was to study the induction of CYP1B mRNA expression in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). CYP1B belongs to the cytochrome P450 superfamily of genes, is involved in the oxidation of endogenous and exogenous compounds, and could potentially be a useful biomarker in fish for exposure to AhR ligands. The full-length catfish CYP1B cDNA is 2417 nt to the polyA tail and encodes a putative protein of 536 amino acids. It has 67% amino acid similarity to carp and zebrafish CYP1B and 68% similarity to carp CYP1B2. Male channel catfish were collected from three Mississippi Delta sites: Lake Roebuck, Itta Bena; Bee Lake, Thornton; and Sunflower River, Indianola. Total RNA was isolated from wild-caught catfish gill, blood, gonad and liver tissues. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR was used to determine relative induction of CYP1B in wild catfish compared to laboratory control and BaP-exposed catfish (20mg/kg i.p. after 4 days). BaP exposure significantly induced CYP1B message in blood, gonad, and liver of laboratory catfish. In these same tissues of wild catfish from sites with relatively low sediment contaminants, CYP1B message was not statistically increased relative to laboratory control catfish. CYP1B transcript abundance was higher in gills compared to other tissues in both laboratory and wild catfish. When primary cultured gill cells were treated with increasing concentrations of BaP, TCDD, and PCBs 77, 126 and 169, CYP1B mRNA was induced more than 10-fold while PCB153 and 4,4'DDT did not cause significant CYP1B induction. Our results suggest that catfish CYP1B is induced by the classic AhR ligands. PMID:16697458

  5. Depeptidization efforts on P[subscript 3]-P[prime subscript 2] [alpha]-ketoamide inhibitors of HCV NS3-4A serine protease: Effect on HCV replicon activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, Stephane L.; Ruan, Sumei; Liu, Rong; Agrawal, Sony; Pichardo, John; Prongay, Andrew; Baroudy, Bahige; Saksena, Anil K.; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor; Njoroge, F. George

    2008-06-30

    Depeptidization efforts of the P{sub 3}-P{sub 2} region of P{sub 3} capped {alpha}-ketoamide inhibitor of HCV NS3 serine protease 1 are reported. We clearly established that N-methylation of the P{sub 2} nitrogen and modification of the P{prime}{sub 2} carboxylic acid terminus were essential for activity in the replicon assay.

  6. The Mechanism of Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shaoyong; Huang, Wenkang; Geng, Lv; Shen, Qiancheng; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    As the prototypical member of the PTP family, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is an attractive target for therapeutic interventions in type 2 diabetes. The extremely conserved catalytic site of PTP1B renders the design of selective PTP1B inhibitors intractable. Although discovered allosteric inhibitors containing a benzofuran sulfonamide scaffold offer fascinating opportunities to overcome selectivity issues, the allosteric inhibitory mechanism of PTP1B has remained elusive. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, coupled with a dynamic weighted community analysis, were performed to unveil the potential allosteric signal propagation pathway from the allosteric site to the catalytic site in PTP1B. This result revealed that the allosteric inhibitor compound-3 induces a conformational rearrangement in helix α7, disrupting the triangular interaction among helix α7, helix α3, and loop11. Helix α7 then produces a force, pulling helix α3 outward, and promotes Ser190 to interact with Tyr176. As a result, the deviation of Tyr176 abrogates the hydrophobic interactions with Trp179 and leads to the downward movement of the WPD loop, which forms an H-bond between Asp181 and Glu115. The formation of this H-bond constrains the WPD loop to its open conformation and thus inactivates PTP1B. The discovery of this allosteric mechanism provides an overall view of the regulation of PTP1B, which is an important insight for the design of potent allosteric PTP1B inhibitors. PMID:24831294

  7. Characterization of the C-terminal ER membrane anchor of PTP1B

    SciTech Connect

    Anderie, Ines Schulz, Irene; Schmid, Andreas

    2007-09-10

    The tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is an important regulator of cell function. In living cells PTP1B activity is restricted to the vicinity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by post-translational C-terminal attachment of PTP1B to the ER membrane network. In our study we investigated the membrane anchor of PTP1B by use of EGFP fusion proteins. We demonstrate that the membrane anchor of PTP1B cannot be narrowed down to a unique amino acid sequence with a defined start and stop point but rather is moveable within several amino acids. Removal of up to seven amino acids from the C-terminus, as well as exchange of single amino acids in the putative transmembrane sequence did not influence subcellular localization of PTP1B. With the method of bimolecular fluorescence complementation we could demonstrate dimerization of PTP1B in vivo. Homodimerization was, in contrast to other tail-anchored proteins, not dependent on the membrane anchor. Our data demonstrate that the C-terminal membrane anchor of PTP1B is formed by a combination of a single stretch transmembrane domain (TMD) followed by a tail. TMD and tail length are variable and there are no sequence-specific features. Our data for PTP1B are consistent with a concept that explains the ER membrane anchor of tail-anchored proteins as a physicochemical structure.

  8. Yersinia pestis Requires Host Rab1b for Survival in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Michael G.; Pulsifer, Amanda R.; Price, Christopher T.; Abu Kwaik, Yousef; Lawrenz, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes the disease known as plague. During infection of macrophages Y. pestis actively evades the normal phagosomal maturation pathway to establish a replicative niche within the cell. However, the mechanisms used by Y. pestis to subvert killing by the macrophage are unknown. Host Rab GTPases are central mediators of vesicular trafficking and are commonly targeted by bacterial pathogens to alter phagosome maturation and killing by macrophages. Here we demonstrate for the first time that host Rab1b is required for Y. pestis to effectively evade killing by macrophages. We also show that Rab1b is specifically recruited to the Yersinia containing vacuole (YCV) and that Y. pestis is unable to subvert YCV acidification when Rab1b expression is knocked down in macrophages. Furthermore, Rab1b knockdown also altered the frequency of association between the YCV with the lysosomal marker Lamp1, suggesting that Rab1b recruitment to the YCV directly inhibits phagosome maturation. Finally, we show that Rab1b knockdown also impacts the pH of the Legionella pneumophila containing vacuole, another pathogen that recruits Rab1b to its vacuole. Together these data identify a novel role for Rab1b in the subversion of phagosome maturation by intracellular pathogens and suggest that recruitment of Rab1b to the pathogen containing vacuole may be a conserved mechanism to control vacuole pH. PMID:26495854

  9. Distinctive role of vasohibin-1A and its splicing variant vasohibin-1B in tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Horie, S; Suzuki, Y; Kobayashi, M; Kadonosono, T; Kondoh, S; Kodama, T; Sato, Y

    2016-05-01

    Vasohibin-1 (VASH1) was isolated as a negative-feedback regulator of angiogenesis expressed in endothelial cells (ECs). There are two transcripts of VASH1, that is, the full-length VASH1A consisting of seven exons and the splicing variant VASH1B consisting of four exons. Here, we compared the effects of VASH1A and VASH1B on tumor angiogenesis. When ECs were transfected with VASH1A or VASH1B cDNAs, VASH1B transfectants, but not VASH1A ones, induced autophagic cell death of ECs. With sonoporation, the VASH1A or VASH1B gene were transfected specifically in ECs of tumor vessels in mice. Both VASH1A and VASH1B decreased tumor vessel density and inhibited tumor growth. VASH1A normalized the remaining tumor vessels, increased their rate of perfusion, decreased tumor hypoxia and enhanced the efficacy of anticancer chemotherapy, whereas VASH1B pruned tumor vessels without causing normalization, increased tumor hypoxia and tumor necrosis and did not enhance the efficacy of anticancer chemotherapy. The alternate transfection of mice with the VASH1A and VASH1B gene showed the highest effects on antitumor activity and normalization of tumor vessels. Our present findings on VASH1A and VASH1B should provide an innovative approach that would improve the efficacy of antiangiogenic cancer therapy by balancing vascular normalization and pruning. PMID:27080222

  10. The ING1b tumor suppressor facilitates nucleotide excision repair by promoting chromatin accessibility to XPA

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Wei-Hung W.; Wang Yemin; Wong, Ronald P.C.; Campos, Eric I.; Li Gang . E-mail: gangli@interchange.ubc.ca

    2007-05-01

    ING1b is the most studied ING family protein and perhaps the most ubiquitously and abundantly expressed. This protein is involved in the regulation of various biological functions ranging from senescence, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, to DNA repair. ING1b is upregulated by UV irradiation and enhances the removal of bulky nucleic acid photoproducts. In this study, we provide evidence that ING1b mediates nucleotide excision repair by facilitating the access to damaged nucleosomal DNA. We demonstrate that ING1b is not recruited to UV-induced DNA lesions but enhances nucleotide excision repair only in XPC-proficient cells, implying an essential role in early steps of the 'access, repair, restore' model. We also find that ING1b alters histone acetylation dynamics upon exposure to UV radiation and induces chromatin relaxation in microccocal nuclease digestion assay, revealing that ING1b may allow better access to nucleotide excision repair machinery. More importantly, ING1b associates with chromatin in a UV-inducible manner and facilitates DNA access to nucleotide excision repair factor XPA. Furthermore, depletion of the endogenous ING1b results to the sensitization of cells at S-phase to UV irradiation. Taken together, these observations establish a role of ING1b acting as a chromatin accessibility factor for DNA damage recognition proteins upon genotoxic injury.

  11. Mutations in STX1B, encoding a presynaptic protein, cause fever-associated epilepsy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Julian; Siekierska, Aleksandra; Langlois, Mélanie; May, Patrick; Huneau, Clément; Becker, Felicitas; Muhle, Hiltrud; Suls, Arvid; Lemke, Johannes R; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Thiele, Holger; Konrad, Kathryn; Kawalia, Amit; Toliat, Mohammad R; Sander, Thomas; Rüschendorf, Franz; Caliebe, Almuth; Nagel, Inga; Kohl, Bernard; Kecskés, Angela; Jacmin, Maxime; Hardies, Katia; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Riesch, Erik; Dorn, Thomas; Brilstra, Eva H; Baulac, Stephanie; Møller, Rikke S; Hjalgrim, Helle; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Lehman-Horn, Frank; Roach, Jared C; Glusman, Gustavo; Hood, Leroy; Galas, David J; Martin, Benoit; de Witte, Peter A M; Biskup, Saskia; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Balling, Rudi; Nürnberg, Peter; Crawford, Alexander D; Esguerra, Camila V; Weber, Yvonne G; Lerche, Holger

    2014-12-01

    Febrile seizures affect 2-4% of all children and have a strong genetic component. Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2) have been identified that cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy. Here we report the identification of mutations in STX1B, encoding syntaxin-1B, that are associated with both febrile seizures and epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing in independent large pedigrees identified cosegregating STX1B mutations predicted to cause an early truncation or an in-frame insertion or deletion. Three additional nonsense or missense mutations and a de novo microdeletion encompassing STX1B were then identified in 449 familial or sporadic cases. Video and local field potential analyses of zebrafish larvae with antisense knockdown of stx1b showed seizure-like behavior and epileptiform discharges that were highly sensitive to increased temperature. Wild-type human syntaxin-1B but not a mutated protein rescued the effects of stx1b knockdown in zebrafish. Our results thus implicate STX1B and the presynaptic release machinery in fever-associated epilepsy syndromes. PMID:25362483

  12. Yersinia pestis Requires Host Rab1b for Survival in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Connor, Michael G; Pulsifer, Amanda R; Price, Christopher T; Abu Kwaik, Yousef; Lawrenz, Matthew B

    2015-10-01

    Yersinia pestis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes the disease known as plague. During infection of macrophages Y. pestis actively evades the normal phagosomal maturation pathway to establish a replicative niche within the cell. However, the mechanisms used by Y. pestis to subvert killing by the macrophage are unknown. Host Rab GTPases are central mediators of vesicular trafficking and are commonly targeted by bacterial pathogens to alter phagosome maturation and killing by macrophages. Here we demonstrate for the first time that host Rab1b is required for Y. pestis to effectively evade killing by macrophages. We also show that Rab1b is specifically recruited to the Yersinia containing vacuole (YCV) and that Y. pestis is unable to subvert YCV acidification when Rab1b expression is knocked down in macrophages. Furthermore, Rab1b knockdown also altered the frequency of association between the YCV with the lysosomal marker Lamp1, suggesting that Rab1b recruitment to the YCV directly inhibits phagosome maturation. Finally, we show that Rab1b knockdown also impacts the pH of the Legionella pneumophila containing vacuole, another pathogen that recruits Rab1b to its vacuole. Together these data identify a novel role for Rab1b in the subversion of phagosome maturation by intracellular pathogens and suggest that recruitment of Rab1b to the pathogen containing vacuole may be a conserved mechanism to control vacuole pH. PMID:26495854

  13. Utility of a novel Oatp1b2 knockout mouse model for evaluating the role of Oatp1b2 in the hepatic uptake of model compounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cuiping; Stock, Jeffery L; Liu, Xingrong; Shi, Jilin; Van Deusen, Jeffrey W; DiMattia, Debra A; Dullea, Robert G; de Morais, Sonia M

    2008-09-01

    We generated the organic anion transporting polypeptide (Oatp) 1b2 knockout (KO) mouse model and assessed its utility to study hepatic uptake using model compounds: cerivastatin, lovastatin acid, pravastatin, simvastatin acid, rifampicin, and rifamycin SV. A selective panel of liver cytochromes P450 (P450s) (Cyp3a11, Cyp3a13, Cyp3a16, Cyp2c29, and Cyp2c39) and transporters [Oatp1b2, Oatp1a1, Oatp1a4, Oatp1a5; organic anion transporter (Oat) 1, Oat2, Oat3; multidrug resistance gene 1 (Mdr1) a, Mdr1b; bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance associated protein (Mrp) 2, Mrp3; breast cancer resistance protein] were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in both KO and wild-type (WT) male mice. Male KO and WT mice received each model compound s.c. at 3 mg/kg. Blood and liver samples were obtained at 0, 0.5, and 2 h postdose and analyzed using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Liver/plasma concentration ratio (K(p,liver)) was calculated. Student's t test was used to compare the mRNA and K(p,liver) between the KO and WT mice. A similar mRNA expression was observed between the KO and WT for the selected P450s and transporters except for Oatp1b2, for which the level was negligible in the KO but prominent in the WT mice with P < 0.0001. The in vivo results showed a differential effect of Oatp1b2 on hepatic uptake of the model compounds, indicating that Oatp1b2 plays a more significant role in the hepatobiliary disposition of rifampicin and lovastatin than the other compounds tested. This study suggests the Oatp1b2 mouse as a useful in vivo tool to understand drug targeting and disposition in the liver. PMID:18556442

  14. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) polymorphisms exacerbate bladder cancer risk associated with alcohol drinking: gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Ito, Hidemi; Soga, Norihito; Hosono, Satoyo; Oze, Isao; Watanabe, Miki; Tanaka, Hideo; Yokomizo, Akira; Hayashi, Norio; Eto, Masatoshi; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2016-06-01

    Although a range of chemical exposures (cigarette smoking and occupational exposure) are recognized risk factors for the development of bladder cancer (BCa), many epidemiological studies have demonstrated that alcohol drinking is not associated with BCa risk. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2; rs671, Glu504Lys) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B; rs1229984, His47Arg) polymorphisms impact the accumulation of acetaldehyde, resulting in an increased risk of various cancers. To date, however, no studies evaluating the association between BCa risk and alcohol drinking have considered these polymorphisms. Here, we conducted a matched case-control study to investigate whether ALDH2 and ADH1B polymorphisms influence BCa risk associated with alcohol drinking. Cases were 74 BCa patients and controls were 740 first-visit outpatients without cancer at Aichi Cancer Center Hospital between January 2001 and December 2005. Odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI) and gene-environment interaction were assessed by conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustment for potential confounders. Results showed that ALDH2 Glu/Lys was associated with a significantly increased risk of BCa compared with Glu/Glu (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.14-3.62, P = 0.017). In contrast, ALDH2 Glu/Lys showed no increase in risk among the stratum of never drinkers compared with Glu/Glu, indicating a gene-environment interaction. ADH1B His/Arg had an OR of 1.98 (1.20-3.24, P = 0.007) compared with His/His. ADH1B Arg+ showed a similar OR and 95% CI. Individuals with ALDH2 Glu/Lys and ADH1B Arg+ had the highest risk of BCa compared with ALDH2 Glu/Glu and ADH1B His/His [OR 4.00 (1.81-8.87), P = 0.001]. PMID:26992901

  15. 78 FR 5210 - Open Government Initiative: Implementation of the iCERT Labor Certification Registry for the H-1B...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... Certification Registry for the H-1B, H-1B1, E-3, H-2A, H-2B and Permanent Labor Certification Employment-Based... to the general public appropriately redacted copies of H-1B, H-1B1, E-3, H-2A, H-2B and permanent... a labor certification or, in the case of an H-1B, H-1B1, or E-3 visa, a labor condition...

  16. 5-HT1B receptor modulation of the serotonin transporter in vivo: studies using KO mice.

    PubMed

    Montañez, Sylvia; Munn, Jaclyn L; Owens, W Anthony; Horton, Rebecca E; Daws, Lynette C

    2014-07-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) controls the strength and duration of serotonergic neurotransmission by the high-affinity uptake of serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular fluid. SERT is a key target for many psychotherapeutic and abused drugs, therefore understanding how SERT activity and expression are regulated is of fundamental importance. A growing literature suggests that SERT activity is under regulatory control of the 5-HT1B autoreceptor. The present studies made use of mice with a constitutive reduction (5-HT1B+/-) or knockout of 5-HT1B receptors (5-HT1B-/-), as well as mice with a constitutive knockout of SERT (SERT-/-) to further explore the relationship between SERT activity and 5-HT1B receptor expression. High-speed chronoamperometry was used to measure clearance of 5-HT from CA3 region of hippocampus in vivo. Serotonin clearance rate, over a range of 5-HT concentrations, did not differ among 5-HT1B receptor genotypes, nor did [(3)H]cyanoimipramine binding to SERT in this brain region, suggesting that SERT activity is not affected by constitutive reduction or loss of 5-HT1B receptors; alternatively, it might be that other transport mechanisms for 5-HT compensate for loss of 5-HT1B receptors. Consistent with previous reports, we found that the 5-HT1B receptor antagonist, cyanopindolol, inhibited 5-HT clearance in wild-type mice. However, this effect of cyanopindolol was lost in 5-HT1B-/- mice and diminished in 5-HT1B+/- mice, indicating that the 5-HT1B receptor is necessary for cyanopindolol to inhibit 5-HT clearance. Likewise, cyanopindolol was without effect on 5-HT clearance in SERT-/- mice, demonstrating a requirement for the presence of both SERT and 5-HT1B receptors in order for cyanopindolol to inhibit 5-HT clearance in CA3 region of hippocampus. Our findings are consistent with SERT being under the regulatory control of 5-HT1B autoreceptors. Future studies to identify signaling pathways involved may help elucidate novel therapeutic targets for the

  17. PacBio SMRT assembly of a complex multi-replicon genome reveals chlorocatechol degradative operon in a region of genome plasticity.

    PubMed

    Ricker, N; Shen, S Y; Goordial, J; Jin, S; Fulthorpe, R R

    2016-07-25

    We have sequenced a Burkholderia genome that contains multiple replicons and large repetitive elements that would make it inherently difficult to assemble by short read sequencing technologies. We illustrate how the integrated long read correction algorithms implemented through the PacBio Single Molecule Real-Time (SMRT) sequencing technology successfully provided a de novo assembly that is a reasonable estimate of both the gene content and genome organization without making any further modifications. This assembly is comparable to related organisms assembled by more labour intensive methods. Our assembled genome revealed regions of genome plasticity for further investigation, one of which harbours a chlorocatechol degradative operon highly homologous to those previously identified on globally ubiquitous plasmids. In an ideal world, this assembly would still require experimental validation to confirm gene order and copy number of repeated elements. However, we submit that particularly in instances where a polished genome is not the primary goal of the sequencing project, PacBio SMRT sequencing provides a financially viable option for generating a biologically relevant genome estimate that can be utilized by other researchers for comparative studies. PMID:27063562

  18. Overexpression and self-assembly of virus-like particles in Nicotiana benthamiana by a single-vector DNA replicon system.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ki-Beom; Lee, Jisu; Kang, Sebyung; Kim, Moonil; Mason, Hugh S; Jeon, Jae-Heung; Kim, Hyun-Soon

    2014-10-01

    Based on recent developments, virus-like particles (VLPs) are considered to be perfect candidates as nanoplatforms for applications in materials science and medicine. To succeed, mass production of VLPs and self-assembly into a correct form in plant systems are key factors. Here, we report expression of synthesized coat proteins of the three viruses, Brome mosaic virus, Cucumber mosaic virus, and Maize rayado fino virus, in Nicotiana benthamiana and production of self-assembled VLPs by transient expression system using agroinfiltration. Each coat protein was synthesized and cloned into a pBYR2fp single replicon vector. Target protein expression in cells containing p19 was fourfold higher than that of cells lacking p19. After agroinfiltration, protein expression was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and quantitative image analyzer. Quantitative analysis showed that BMVCP, CMVCP, and MRFVCP concentrations were 0.5, 1.0, and 0.8 mg · g(-1) leaf fresh weight, respectively. VLPs were purified by sucrose cushion ultracentrifugation and then analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Our results suggested that BMVCP and CMVCP proteins expressed in N. benthamiana leaves were able to correctly self-assemble into particles. Moreover, we evaluated internal cavity accessibility of VLPs to load foreign molecules. Finally, plant growth conditions after agroinfiltration are critical for increasing heterologous protein expression levels in a transient expression system. PMID:24965559

  19. Sequence analysis and minimal replicon determination of a new haloarchaeal plasmid pHF2 isolated from Haloferax sp. strain Q22.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoxing; Wang, Chuangming; Xiang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    A new cryptic plasmid, pHF2 (2520 bp), was isolated from Haloferax sp. strain Q22 (CGMCC 1.15317), a haloarchaeal strain living in a subterranean halite deposit. Sequence analysis revealed that it is the smallest plasmid in the genus Haloferax so far, and three syntropic open reading frames (ORF1, ORF2, and ORF3) were identified on the same strand. ORF1 encodes a putative replication initiation protein (Rep). Three typical motifs (I, II, and III) were presented in the Rep proteins of rolling-circle replicating (RCR) plasmids. The amino acid sequence of the Rep protein is very similar to that of another haloarchaeal plasmid pNB101 in Natronobacterium sp. AS-7091 (coverage 97%, identity 56%). The minimal replicon (~1000 bp) of pHF2 was determined through the construction of a series of truncated plasmids. Interestingly, we also found that the incomplete rep gene still can drive plasmid replication. This plasmid has provided another valuable extra-chromosomal genetic resource, and deepened our knowledge in DNA replication. PMID:26601892

  20. Structure and Immunogenicity of Alternative Forms of the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Gag Protein Expressed Using Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicon Particles

    PubMed Central

    Cecil, Chad; West, Ande; Collier, Martha; Jurgens, Christy; Madden, Victoria; Whitmore, Alan; Johnston, Robert; Moore, Dominic T.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Davis, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) were engineered to express different forms of SIV Gag to compare expression in vitro, formation of intra- and extracellular structures and induction of humoral and cellular immunity in mice. The three forms examined were full-length myristylated SIV Gag (Gagmyr+), full-length Gag lacking the myristylation signal (Gagmyr-), or a truncated form of Gagmyr- comprising only the matrix and capsid domains (MA/CA). Comparison of VRP-infected primary mouse embryo fibroblasts, mouse L929 cells and primate Vero cells showed comparable expression levels for each protein, as well as extracellular virus-like particles (VRP-Gagmyr+), and distinctive cytoplasmic aggregates (VRP-Gagmyr-) with each cell type. VPR were used to immunize BALB/c mice, and immune responses were compared using an interferon (IFN)-γ ELISPOT assay and a serum antibody ELISA. Although all three VRP generated similar levels of IFN-γ-producing cells at 1 week post-boost, at 10 weeks post-boost the MA/CA-VRP-induced response was maintained at a significantly higher level relative to that induced by Gagmyr+-VRP. Antibody responses to MA/CA-VRP and Gagmyr+-VRP were not significantly different. PMID:17275057

  1. Bicyclic octahydrocyclohepta[b]pyrrol-4(1H)one derivatives as novel selective anti-hepatitis C virus agents.

    PubMed

    Kaushik-Basu, Neerja; Ratmanova, Nina K; Manvar, Dinesh; Belov, Dmitry S; Cevik, Ozge; Basu, Amartya; Yerukhimovich, Mark M; Lukyanenko, Evgeny R; Andreev, Ivan A; Belov, Grigory M; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Cecchetti, Violetta; Frick, David N; Kurkin, Alexander V; Altieri, Andrea; Barreca, Maria Letizia

    2016-10-21

    We report the discovery of the bicyclic octahydrocyclohepta[b]pyrrol-4(1H)-one scaffold as a new chemotype with anti-HCV activity on genotype 1b and 2a subgenomic replicons. The most potent compound 34 displayed EC50 values of 1.8 μM and 4.5 μM in genotype 1b and 2a, respectively, coupled with the absence of any antimetabolic effect (gt 1b SI = 112.4; gt 2a SI = 44.2) in a cell-based assay. Compound 34 did not target HCV NS5B, IRES, NS3 helicase, or selected host factors, and thus future work will involve the unique mechanism of action of these new antiviral compounds. PMID:27376494

  2. Beyond Oncolytics: E1B55K-Deleted Adenovirus as a Vaccine Delivery Vector.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael A; Nyanhete, Tinashe; Tuero, Iskra; Venzon, David; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Type 5 human adenoviruses (Ad5) deleted of genes encoding the early region 1B 55-kDa (E1B55K) protein including Onyx-015 (dl1520) and H101 are best known for their oncolytic potential. As a vaccine vector the E1B55K deletion may allow for the insertion of a transgene nearly 1,000 base pairs larger than now possible. This has the potential of extending the application for which the vectors are clinically known. However, the immune priming ability of E1B55K-deleted vectors is unknown, undermining our ability to gauge their usefulness in vaccine applications. For this reason, we created an E1B55K-deleted Ad5 vector expressing full-length single chain HIVBaLgp120 attached to a flexible linker and the first two domains of rhesus CD4 (rhFLSC) in exchange for the E3 region. In cell-based experiments the E1B55K-deleted vector promoted higher levels of innate immune signals including chemokines, cytokines, and the NKG2D ligands MIC A/B compared to an E1B55K wild-type vector expressing the same immunogen. Based on these results we evaluated the immune priming ability of the E1B55K-deleted vector in mice. The E1B55K-deleted vector promoted similar levels of Ad5-, HIVgp120, and rhFLSC-specific cellular and humoral immune responses as the E1B55K wild-type vector. In pre-clinical HIV-vaccine studies the wild-type vector has been employed as part of a very effective prime-boost strategy. This study demonstrates that E1B55K-deleted adenoviruses may serve as effective vaccine delivery vectors. PMID:27391605

  3. Hnf1b controls pancreas morphogenesis and the generation of Ngn3+ endocrine progenitors

    PubMed Central

    De Vas, Matias G.; Kopp, Janel L.; Heliot, Claire; Sander, Maike; Cereghini, Silvia; Haumaitre, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the human HNF1B gene are associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 (MODY5) and pancreas hypoplasia. In mouse, Hnf1b heterozygous mutants do not exhibit any phenotype, whereas the homozygous deletion in the entire epiblast leads to pancreas agenesis associated with abnormal gut regionalization. Here, we examine the specific role of Hnf1b during pancreas development, using constitutive and inducible conditional inactivation approaches at key developmental stages. Hnf1b early deletion leads to a reduced pool of pancreatic multipotent progenitor cells (MPCs) due to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Lack of Hnf1b either during the first or the secondary transitions is associated with cystic ducts. Ductal cells exhibit aberrant polarity and decreased expression of several cystic disease genes, some of which we identified as novel Hnf1b targets. Notably, we show that Glis3, a transcription factor involved in duct morphogenesis and endocrine cell development, is downstream Hnf1b. In addition, a loss and abnormal differentiation of acinar cells are observed. Strikingly, inactivation of Hnf1b at different time points results in the absence of Ngn3+ endocrine precursors throughout embryogenesis. We further show that Hnf1b occupies novel Ngn3 putative regulatory sequences in vivo. Thus, Hnf1b plays a crucial role in the regulatory networks that control pancreatic MPC expansion, acinar cell identity, duct morphogenesis and generation of endocrine precursors. Our results uncover an unappreciated requirement of Hnf1b in endocrine cell specification and suggest a mechanistic explanation of diabetes onset in individuals with MODY5. PMID:25715395

  4. Beyond Oncolytics: E1B55K-Deleted Adenovirus as a Vaccine Delivery Vector

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Michael A.; Nyanhete, Tinashe; Tuero, Iskra; Venzon, David; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Type 5 human adenoviruses (Ad5) deleted of genes encoding the early region 1B 55-kDa (E1B55K) protein including Onyx-015 (dl1520) and H101 are best known for their oncolytic potential. As a vaccine vector the E1B55K deletion may allow for the insertion of a transgene nearly 1,000 base pairs larger than now possible. This has the potential of extending the application for which the vectors are clinically known. However, the immune priming ability of E1B55K-deleted vectors is unknown, undermining our ability to gauge their usefulness in vaccine applications. For this reason, we created an E1B55K-deleted Ad5 vector expressing full-length single chain HIVBaLgp120 attached to a flexible linker and the first two domains of rhesus CD4 (rhFLSC) in exchange for the E3 region. In cell-based experiments the E1B55K-deleted vector promoted higher levels of innate immune signals including chemokines, cytokines, and the NKG2D ligands MIC A/B compared to an E1B55K wild-type vector expressing the same immunogen. Based on these results we evaluated the immune priming ability of the E1B55K-deleted vector in mice. The E1B55K-deleted vector promoted similar levels of Ad5-, HIVgp120, and rhFLSC-specific cellular and humoral immune responses as the E1B55K wild-type vector. In pre-clinical HIV-vaccine studies the wild-type vector has been employed as part of a very effective prime-boost strategy. This study demonstrates that E1B55K-deleted adenoviruses may serve as effective vaccine delivery vectors. PMID:27391605

  5. 18 CFR 2.1b - Availability in contested cases of information acquired by staff investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Availability in contested cases of information acquired by staff investigation. 2.1b Section 2.1b Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES GENERAL POLICY AND INTERPRETATIONS Statements of...

  6. Myelin protein zero gene mutated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1B patients

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Ying; Li, Lanying; Lepercq, J.; Lebo, R.V. ); Brooks, D.G.; Ravetch, J.V. ); Trofatter, J.A. )

    1993-11-15

    The autosomal dominant of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), whose gene is type 1B (CMT1B), has slow nerve conduction with demyelinated Schwann cells. In this study the abundant peripheral myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene, MPZ, was mapped 130 kb centromeric to the Fc receptor immunoglobulin gene cluster in band 1q22, and a major MPZ point mutation was found to cosegregate with CMT1B in one large CMT1B family. The MPZ point mutation in 18 of 18 related CMT1B pedigree 1 patients converts a positively charged lysine in codon 96 to a negatively charged glutamate. The same MPZ locus cosegregates with the CMT1B disease gene in a second CMT1B family [total multipoint logarithm of odds (lod) = 11.4 at [theta] = 0.00] with a splice junction mutation. Both mutations occur in MPZ protein regions otherwise conserved identically in human, rat, and cow since these species diverged 100 million years ago. MPZ protein, expressed exclusively in myelinated peripheral nerve Schwann cells, constitutes >50% of myelin protein. These mutations are anticipated to disrupt homophilic MPZ binding and result in CMT1B peripheral nerve demyelination.

  7. 18 CFR 1b.13 - Powers of persons conducting formal investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Powers of persons conducting formal investigations. 1b.13 Section 1b.13 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS §...

  8. 18 CFR 1b.13 - Powers of persons conducting formal investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powers of persons conducting formal investigations. 1b.13 Section 1b.13 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS §...

  9. 18 CFR 1b.13 - Powers of persons conducting formal investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powers of persons conducting formal investigations. 1b.13 Section 1b.13 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS §...

  10. Temporal lobe epilepsy and GEFS+ phenotypes associated with SCN1B mutations.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Ingrid E; Harkin, Louise A; Grinton, Bronwyn E; Dibbens, Leanne M; Turner, Samantha J; Zielinski, Marta A; Xu, Ruwei; Jackson, Graeme; Adams, Judith; Connellan, Mary; Petrou, Steven; Wellard, R Mark; Briellmann, Regula S; Wallace, Robyn H; Mulley, John C; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2007-01-01

    SCN1B, the gene encoding the sodium channel beta 1 subunit, was the first gene identified for generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). Only three families have been published with SCN1B mutations. Here, we present four new families with SCN1B mutations and characterize the associated phenotypes. Analysis of SCN1B was performed on 402 individuals with various epilepsy syndromes. Four probands with missense mutations were identified. Detailed electroclinical phenotyping was performed on all available affected family members including quantitative MR imaging in those with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Two new families with the original C121W SCN1B mutation were identified; novel mutations R85C and R85H were each found in one family. The following phenotypes occurred in the six families with SCN1B missense mutations: 22 febrile seizures, 20 febrile seizures plus, five TLE, three other GEFS+ phenotypes, two unclassified and ten unaffected individuals. All individuals with confirmed TLE had the C121W mutation; two underwent temporal lobectomy (one with hippocampal sclerosis and one without) and both are seizure free. We confirm the role of SCN1B in GEFS+ and show that the GEFS+ spectrum may include TLE alone. TLE with an SCN1B mutation is not a contraindication to epilepsy surgery. PMID:17020904

  11. Selective binding modes and allosteric inhibitory effects of lupane triterpenes on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tiantian; Yu, Haibo; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a promising therapeutic target for treating obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers for over a decade. Previous drug design has focused on inhibitors targeting the active site of PTP1B. However, this has not been successful because the active site is positively charged and conserved among the protein tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, it is important to develop PTP1B inhibitors with alternative inhibitory strategies. Using computational studies including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations, we found that lupane triterpenes selectively inhibited PTP1B by targeting its more hydrophobic and less conserved allosteric site. These findings were verified using two enzymatic assays. Furthermore, the cell culture studies showed that lupeol and betulinic acid inhibited the PTP1B activity stimulated by TNFα in neurons. Our study indicates that lupane triterpenes are selective PTP1B allosteric inhibitors with significant potential for treating those diseases with elevated PTP1B activity. PMID:26865097

  12. PTP1B inhibition suggests a therapeutic strategy for Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Navasona; Krishnan, Keerthi; Connors, Christopher R.; Choy, Meng S.; Page, Rebecca; Peti, Wolfgang; Van Aelst, Linda; Shea, Stephen D.; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    The X-linked neurological disorder Rett syndrome (RTT) presents with autistic features and is caused primarily by mutations in a transcriptional regulator, methyl CpG–binding protein 2 (MECP2). Current treatment options for RTT are limited to alleviating some neurological symptoms; hence, more effective therapeutic strategies are needed. We identified the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B as a therapeutic candidate for treatment of RTT. We demonstrated that the PTPN1 gene, which encodes PTP1B, was a target of MECP2 and that disruption of MECP2 function was associated with increased levels of PTP1B in RTT models. Pharmacological inhibition of PTP1B ameliorated the effects of MECP2 disruption in mouse models of RTT, including improved survival in young male (Mecp2–/y) mice and improved behavior in female heterozygous (Mecp2–/+) mice. We demonstrated that PTP1B was a negative regulator of tyrosine phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase TRKB, the receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Therefore, the elevated PTP1B that accompanies disruption of MECP2 function in RTT represents a barrier to BDNF signaling. Inhibition of PTP1B led to increased tyrosine phosphorylation of TRKB in the brain, which would augment BDNF signaling. This study presents PTP1B as a mechanism-based therapeutic target for RTT, validating a unique strategy for treating the disease by modifying signal transduction pathways with small-molecule drugs. PMID:26214522

  13. Extending the Impact of RAC1b Overexpression to Follicular Thyroid Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Faria, Márcia; Capinha, Liliana; Simões-Pereira, Joana; Bugalho, Maria João; Silva, Ana Luísa

    2016-01-01

    RAC1b is a hyperactive variant of the small GTPase RAC1 known to be a relevant molecular player in different cancers. Previous studies from our group lead to the evidence that its overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. In the present study, we intended to extend the analysis of RAC1b expression to thyroid follicular neoplasms and to seek for clinical correlations. RAC1b expression levels were determined by RT-qPCR in thyroid follicular tumor samples comprising 23 follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTCs) and 33 follicular thyroid adenomas (FTAs). RAC1b was found to be overexpressed in 33% of carcinomas while no RAC1b overexpression was documented among follicular adenomas. Patients with a diagnosis of FTC were divided into two groups based on longitudinal evolution and final outcome. RAC1b overexpression was significantly associated with both the presence of distant metastases (P = 0.01) and poorer clinical outcome (P = 0.01) suggesting that, similarly to that previously found in PTCs, RAC1b overexpression in FTCs is also associated with worse outcomes. Furthermore, the absence of RAC1b overexpression in follicular adenomas hints its potential as a molecular marker likely to contribute, in conjunction with other putative markers, to the preoperative differential diagnosis of thyroid follicular lesions. PMID:27127508

  14. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of Fem1b from oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense.

    PubMed

    Rahman, N M A; Fu, H; Qiao, H; Jin, S; Bai, H; Zhang, W; Jiang, F W; Liang, G; Sun, S; Gong, Y; Jiang, F F; Xiong, Y; Wu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Feminization-1 homolog b (Fem1b) is one of the genes essential for male development and play central roles in sex determination of Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we cloned and characterized the full-length Fem1b cDNA from the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium nipponense (MnFem1b) in different tissues and at different developmental stages. Real-time quantitative reverse polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) showed that the MnFem1b gene was expressed in all investigated tissues, with the highest expression level found in the testes. The results revealed that the MnFem1b gene might play roles in aspects of development of the male prawn phenotype. The RT-qPCR also revealed that MnFem1b mRNA expression was significantly increased at 10 days after metamorphosis. The expression levels in all investigated tissues showed a certain degree of sexually dimorphism, the expression levels in males were significantly higher than those in females (P < 0.05). Notably, the highest expression of MnFem1b was found in the testes. The expression of MnFem1b in different tissues indicates that it plays multiple biological functions in M. nipponense. PMID:27323097

  15. Extending the Impact of RAC1b Overexpression to Follicular Thyroid Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Márcia; Capinha, Liliana; Simões-Pereira, Joana; Bugalho, Maria João; Silva, Ana Luísa

    2016-01-01

    RAC1b is a hyperactive variant of the small GTPase RAC1 known to be a relevant molecular player in different cancers. Previous studies from our group lead to the evidence that its overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. In the present study, we intended to extend the analysis of RAC1b expression to thyroid follicular neoplasms and to seek for clinical correlations. RAC1b expression levels were determined by RT-qPCR in thyroid follicular tumor samples comprising 23 follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTCs) and 33 follicular thyroid adenomas (FTAs). RAC1b was found to be overexpressed in 33% of carcinomas while no RAC1b overexpression was documented among follicular adenomas. Patients with a diagnosis of FTC were divided into two groups based on longitudinal evolution and final outcome. RAC1b overexpression was significantly associated with both the presence of distant metastases (P = 0.01) and poorer clinical outcome (P = 0.01) suggesting that, similarly to that previously found in PTCs, RAC1b overexpression in FTCs is also associated with worse outcomes. Furthermore, the absence of RAC1b overexpression in follicular adenomas hints its potential as a molecular marker likely to contribute, in conjunction with other putative markers, to the preoperative differential diagnosis of thyroid follicular lesions. PMID:27127508

  16. PTP1B inhibition suggests a therapeutic strategy for Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Navasona; Krishnan, Keerthi; Connors, Christopher R; Choy, Meng S; Page, Rebecca; Peti, Wolfgang; Van Aelst, Linda; Shea, Stephen D; Tonks, Nicholas K

    2015-08-01

    The X-linked neurological disorder Rett syndrome (RTT) presents with autistic features and is caused primarily by mutations in a transcriptional regulator, methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Current treatment options for RTT are limited to alleviating some neurological symptoms; hence, more effective therapeutic strategies are needed. We identified the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B as a therapeutic candidate for treatment of RTT. We demonstrated that the PTPN1 gene, which encodes PTP1B, was a target of MECP2 and that disruption of MECP2 function was associated with increased levels of PTP1B in RTT models. Pharmacological inhibition of PTP1B ameliorated the effects of MECP2 disruption in mouse models of RTT, including improved survival in young male (Mecp2-/y) mice and improved behavior in female heterozygous (Mecp2-/+) mice. We demonstrated that PTP1B was a negative regulator of tyrosine phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase TRKB, the receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Therefore, the elevated PTP1B that accompanies disruption of MECP2 function in RTT represents a barrier to BDNF signaling. Inhibition of PTP1B led to increased tyrosine phosphorylation of TRKB in the brain, which would augment BDNF signaling. This study presents PTP1B as a mechanism-based therapeutic target for RTT, validating a unique strategy for treating the disease by modifying signal transduction pathways with small-molecule drugs. PMID:26214522

  17. Selective binding modes and allosteric inhibitory effects of lupane triterpenes on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tiantian; Yu, Haibo; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a promising therapeutic target for treating obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers for over a decade. Previous drug design has focused on inhibitors targeting the active site of PTP1B. However, this has not been successful because the active site is positively charged and conserved among the protein tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, it is important to develop PTP1B inhibitors with alternative inhibitory strategies. Using computational studies including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations, we found that lupane triterpenes selectively inhibited PTP1B by targeting its more hydrophobic and less conserved allosteric site. These findings were verified using two enzymatic assays. Furthermore, the cell culture studies showed that lupeol and betulinic acid inhibited the PTP1B activity stimulated by TNFα in neurons. Our study indicates that lupane triterpenes are selective PTP1B allosteric inhibitors with significant potential for treating those diseases with elevated PTP1B activity. PMID:26865097

  18. PTP1B inhibitor promotes endothelial cell motility by activating the DOCK180/Rac1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Yan, Feng; Ye, Qing; Wu, Xiao; Jiang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Promoting endothelial cell (EC) migration is important not only for therapeutic angiogenesis, but also for accelerating re-endothelialization after vessel injury. Several recent studies have shown that inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) may promote EC migration and angiogenesis by enhancing the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) signalling. In the present study, we demonstrated that PTP1B inhibitor could promote EC adhesion, spreading and migration, which were abolished by the inhibitor of Rac1 but not RhoA GTPase. PTP1B inhibitor significantly increased phosphorylation of p130Cas, and the interactions among p130Cas, Crk and DOCK180; whereas the phosphorylation levels of focal adhesion kinase, Src, paxillin, or Vav2 were unchanged. Gene silencing of DOCK180, but not Vav2, abrogated the effects of PTP1B inhibitor on EC motility. The effects of PTP1B inhibitor on EC motility and p130Cas/DOCK180 activation persisted in the presence of the VEGFR2 antagonist. In conclusion, we suggest that stimulation of the DOCK180 pathway represents an alternative mechanism of PTP1B inhibitor-stimulated EC motility, which does not require concomitant VEGFR2 activation as a prerequisite. Therefore, PTP1B inhibitor may be a useful therapeutic strategy for promoting EC migration in cardiovascular patients in which the VEGF/VEGFR functions are compromised. PMID:27052191

  19. New cis-regulatory elements in the Rht-D1b locus region of wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifteen gene-containing BACs with accumulated length of 1.82-Mb from the Rht-D1b locus region weresequenced and compared in detail with the orthologous regions of rice, sorghum, and maize. Our results show that Rht-D1b represents a conserved genomic region as implied by high gene sequence identity...

  20. Interleukin 1B variant -1473G/C (rs1143623) influences triglyceride and interleukin 6 metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interleukin 1b (IL1B or IL-1ß), is a key modulator of the immune response which exerts its functions mainly via interleukin 6 (IL6) regulation. Fatty meals cause transient hypertriglyceridemia and are considered to be proinflammatory, but the extent of these responses shows high interindividual susc...

  1. The vasopressin 1b receptor and the neural regulation of social behavior.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Erica L; Caldwell, Heather K

    2012-03-01

    To date, much of the work in rodents implicating vasopressin (Avp) in the regulation of social behavior has focused on its action via the Avp 1a receptor (Avpr1a). However, there is mounting evidence that the Avp 1b receptor (Avpr1b) also plays a significant role in Avp's modulation of social behavior. The Avpr1b is heavily expressed on the anterior pituitary cortiocotrophs where it acts as an important modulator of the endocrine stress response. In the brain, the Avpr1b is prominent in the CA2 region of the hippocampus, but can also be found in areas such as the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the olfactory bulb. Studies that have employed genetic knockouts or pharmacological manipulation of the Avpr1b point to the importance of central Avpr1b in the modulation of social behavior. However, there continues to be a knowledge gap in our understanding of where in the brain this is occurring, as well as how and if the central actions of Avp acting via the Avpr1b interact with the stress axis. In this review we focus on the genetic and pharmacological studies that have implicated the Avpr1b in the neural regulation of social behaviors, including social forms of aggressive behavior, social memory, and social motivation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin, Vasopressin, and Social Behavior. PMID:22178035

  2. High fat diet deviates PtC-specific B1 B cell phagocytosis in obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Hung; Chiu, Joanna; Allaimo, Danielle; Mao, Changchuin; Wang, Yaqi; Gong, Yuefei; Ow, Hooisweng; Porter, Tyrone; Zhong, Xuemei

    2014-01-01

    Phagocytosis had been attributed predominantly to “professional” phagocytes such as macrophages, which play critical roles in adipose tissue inflammation. However, recently, macrophage-like phagocytic activity has been reported in B1 B lymphocytes. Intrigued by the long-established correlation between high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and immune dysfunction, we investigated how HFD affects B1 B cell phagocytosis. A significant number of B1 B cells recognize phosphatidylcholine (PtC), a common phospholipid component of cell membrane. We report here that unlike macrophages, B1 B cells have a unique PtC-specific phagocytic function. In the presence of both PtC-coated and non-PtC control fluorescent nano-particles, B1 B cells from healthy lean mice selectively engulfed PtC-coated beads, whereas B1 B cells from HFD-fed obese mice non-discriminately phagocytosed both PtC-coated and control beads. Morphologically, B1 B cells from obese mice resembled macrophages, displaying enlarged cytosol and engulfed more beads. Our study suggests for the first time that HFD can affect B1 B cell phagocytosis, substantiating the link of HFD-induced obesity and immune deviation. PMID:25866632

  3. Crystal structure of bovine CD1b3 with endogenously bound ligands1,2

    PubMed Central

    Girardi, Enrico; Wang, Jing; Mac, Thien-Thi; Versluis, Cees; Bhowruth, Veemal; Besra, Gurdyal; Heck, Albert JR; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Zajonc, Dirk M.

    2010-01-01

    The CD1 family of antigen-presenting molecules is able to display lipids to T cells by binding them within a hydrophobic groove connected to the protein surface. In particular, the CD1b isotype is capable of binding ligands with greatly varying alkyl chain lengths through a complex network of interconnected hydrophobic pockets. Interestingly, mycobacterial lipids, such as glucose monomycolate (GMM) exclusively bind to CD1b. We determined the crystal structure of one of the three expressed bovine CD1b proteins, CD1b3, in complex with endogenous ligands, identified by mass spectrometry as a mixture of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, and analyzed the ability of the protein to bind glycolipids in vitro. The structure reveals a complex binding groove architecture, similar to the human ortholog but with consequential differences. Intriguingly, in bovine CD1b3 only the A’, C’ and F’ pockets are present while the T’ pocket previously described in human CD1b is closed. This different pocket conformation could affect the ability of boCD1b3 to recognize lipids with long acyl chains such as GMM. However, even in the absence of a T’ tunnel, bovine CD1b3 is able to bind mycolates from Rhodococcus ruber in vitro. PMID:20519644

  4. JARID1B is a luminal lineage-driving oncogene in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shoji; Wu, Zhenhua; Russnes, Hege G.; Takagi, Shinji; Peluffo, Guillermo; Vaske, Charles; Zhao, Xi; Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; Maruyama, Reo; Ekram, Muhammad B.; Sun, Hanfei; Kim, Jee Hyun; Carver, Kristopher; Zucca, Mattia; Feng, Jianxing; Almendro, Vanessa; Bessarabova, Marina; Rueda, Oscar M.; Nikolsky, Yuri; Caldas, Carlos; Liu, X. Shirley; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Recurrent mutations in histone modifying enzymes imply key roles in tumorigenesis yet their functional relevance is largely unknown. Here we show that JARID1B, encoding a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) demethylase, is frequently amplified and overexpressed in luminal breast tumors and a somatic mutation in a basal-like breast cancer results in the gain of unique chromatin binding and luminal expression and splicing patterns. Downregulation of JARID1B in luminal cells induces basal genes expression and growth arrest, which is rescued by TGFβ pathway inhibitors. Integrated JARID1B chromatin binding, H3K4 methylation, and expression profiles suggest a key function for JARID1B in luminal cell-specific expression programs. High luminal JARID1B activity is associated with poor outcome in patients with hormone receptor positive breast tumors. PMID:24937458

  5. AKR1B7 Is Induced by the Farnesoid X Receptor and Metabolizes Bile Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Daniel R.; Schmidt, Samuel; Holmstrom, Sam R.; Makishima, Makoto; Yu, Ruth T.; Cummins, Carolyn L.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Although bile acids are crucial for the absorption of lipophilic nutrients in the intestine, they are cytotoxic at high concentrations and can cause liver damage and promote colorectal carcinogenesis. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is activated by bile acids and abundantly expressed in enterohepatic tissues, plays a crucial role in maintaining bile acids at safe concentrations. Here, we show that FXR induces expression of Akr1b7 (aldo-keto reductase 1b7) in murine small intestine, colon, and liver by binding directly to a response element in the Akr1b7 promoter. We further show that AKR1B7 metabolizes 3-keto bile acids to 3β-hydroxy bile acids that are less toxic to cultured cells than their 3α-hydroxy precursors. These findings reveal a feed-forward, protective pathway operative in murine enterohepatic tissues wherein FXR induces AKR1B7 to detoxify bile acids. PMID:21081494

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and the on site function of resident PTP1B.

    PubMed

    Popov, Doina

    2012-06-15

    Growing evidence links the stress at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to pathologies such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, liver, heart, renal and neurodegenerative diseases, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Therefore, identification of molecular pathways beyond ER stress and their appropriate modulation might alleviate the stress, and direct toward novel tools to fight this disturbance. An interesting resident of the ER membrane is protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), an enzyme that negatively regulates insulin and leptin signaling, contributing to insulin and leptin resistance. Recently, new functions of PTP1B have been established linked to ER stress response. This review evaluates the novel data on ER stressors, discusses the mechanisms beyond PTP1B function in the ER stress response, and emphasizes the potential therapeutic exploitation of PTP1B to relieve ER stress. PMID:22609202

  7. Substance abuse disorder and major depression are associated with the human 5-HT1B receptor gene (HTR1B) G861C polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yung-yu; Oquendo, Maria A; Friedman, Jill M Harkavy; Greenhill, Lawrence L; Brodsky, Beth; Malone, Kevin M; Khait, Vadim; Mann, J John

    2003-01-01

    The 5-HT(1B) receptor has been implicated in several psychopathologies, including pathological aggression, alcoholism and suicide. To test these and related potential genetic relationships in a single population, the human 5-HT(1B) receptor (h5-HTR(1B)) genotype for the G861C polymorphism was determined in 394 psychiatric patients and 96 healthy volunteers. Structured clinical interviews generated DSM III-R diagnoses. No significant association of the genotype or allele frequencies of the h5-HTR(1B) G861C locus was observed with diagnoses of alcoholism, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or a history of a suicide attempt. Exploratory analyses indicated an association of the genotype and allele frequencies of the h5-HTR(1B) G861C locus with a history of substance abuse disorder (chi(2) = 9.51, df = 2, p = 0.009; chi(2) = 7.31, df = 1, p = 0.007, respectively) and with a diagnosis of a major depressive episode (chi(2) = 6.83, df = 2, p = 0.033; chi(2) = 5.81, df = 1, p = 0.016, respectively). Significant gene dose effects on the risk for substance abuse disorder and a major depressive episode were observed with the 861C allele (Armitage linearity tendency test: chi(2) = 7.20, df = 1, p = 0.008; chi(2) = 6.80, df = 1, p = 0.009, respectively). Substance abuse disorder and major depression appear to be associated with the h5-HTR(1B) G861C locus in the patient population, but other psychopathologies such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, alcoholism, and suicide attempts were not found to be associated with this polymorphism. This preliminary result will need replication, given the limitations of association studies. PMID:12496953

  8. Molecular characterization of a gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) muscle tissue cDNA for carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B (CPT1B).

    PubMed

    Boukouvala, Evridiki; Leaver, Michael J; Favre-Krey, Laurence; Theodoridou, Maria; Krey, Grigorios

    2010-10-01

    Understanding the control of piscine fatty acid metabolism is important for determining the nutritional requirements of fish, and hence for the production of optimal aquaculture diets. The regulation and expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1; EC No 2.3.1.21) are critical processes in the control of fatty acid metabolism, and here we report a cDNA from gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) which encodes a protein with high identity to vertebrate CPT1. This sea bream CPT1 mRNA is predominantly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle, with little expression in other tissues. Phylogenetic analysis of other vertebrate CPT1 sequences show that fish genomes contain a single gene related to mammalian CPT1B, and a further two multi-gene families related to mammalian CPT1A. Genes related to mammalian CPT1C are absent in fish. Therefore, based on both functional and evolutionary orthology to mammalian CPT1B, the sea bream CPT1 reported here is a CPT1B isoform. Sea bream CPT1B mRNA expression progressively decreases in heart and muscle up to 12h after last feeding, but returns to initial, non-fasted levels after 72h. In contrast, in liver non-fasted expression is low, but strongly increases at 24 and 72h after last feeding. In white muscle and liver, CPT1B mRNA expression is highly correlated with the expression of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor beta (PPARbeta). Thus fatty acid metabolism by CPT1B and its control by PPARs are similar in fish and mammals, but multiple genes for CPT1A-like proteins in fish also suggest different and more complex pathways of lipid utilisation than in mammals. PMID:20601065

  9. A functional null mutation of SCN1B in a patient with Dravet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Patino, Gustavo A; Claes, Lieve R F; Lopez-Santiago, Luis F; Slat, Emily A; Dondeti, Raja S R; Chen, Chunling; O'Malley, Heather A; Gray, Charles B B; Miyazaki, Haruko; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Oyama, Fumitaka; De Jonghe, Peter; Isom, Lori L

    2009-08-26

    Dravet syndrome (also called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy) is one of the most severe forms of childhood epilepsy. Most patients have heterozygous mutations in SCN1A, encoding voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.1 alpha subunits. Sodium channels are modulated by beta1 subunits, encoded by SCN1B, a gene also linked to epilepsy. Here we report the first patient with Dravet syndrome associated with a recessive mutation in SCN1B (p.R125C). Biochemical characterization of p.R125C in a heterologous system demonstrated little to no cell surface expression despite normal total cellular expression. This occurred regardless of coexpression of Na(v)1.1 alpha subunits. Because the patient was homozygous for the mutation, these data suggest a functional SCN1B null phenotype. To understand the consequences of the lack of beta1 cell surface expression in vivo, hippocampal slice recordings were performed in Scn1b(-/-) versus Scn1b(+/+) mice. Scn1b(-/-) CA3 neurons fired evoked action potentials with a significantly higher peak voltage and significantly greater amplitude compared with wild type. However, in contrast to the Scn1a(+/-) model of Dravet syndrome, we found no measurable differences in sodium current density in acutely dissociated CA3 hippocampal neurons. Whereas Scn1b(-/-) mice seize spontaneously, the seizure susceptibility of Scn1b(+/-) mice was similar to wild type, suggesting that, like the parents of this patient, one functional SCN1B allele is sufficient for normal control of electrical excitability. We conclude that SCN1B p.R125C is an autosomal recessive cause of Dravet syndrome through functional gene inactivation. PMID:19710327

  10. Chromatin-Remodeling-Factor ARID1B Represses Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, Georgia; Ekici, Arif B; Uebe, Steffen; Zweier, Christiane; Hoyer, Juliane; Engels, Hartmut; Behrens, Jürgen; Reis, André; Hadjihannas, Michel V

    2015-09-01

    The link of chromatin remodeling to both neurodevelopment and cancer has recently been highlighted by the identification of mutations affecting BAF chromatin-remodeling components, such as ARID1B, in individuals with intellectual disability and cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remains unknown. Here, we show that ARID1B is a repressor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Through whole-transcriptome analysis, we find that in individuals with intellectual disability and ARID1B loss-of-function mutations, Wnt/β-catenin target genes are upregulated. Using cellular models of low and high Wnt/β-catenin activity, we demonstrate that knockdown of ARID1B activates Wnt/β-catenin target genes and Wnt/β-catenin-dependent transcriptional reporters in a β-catenin-dependent manner. Reciprocally, forced expression of ARID1B inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling downstream of the β-catenin destruction complex. Both endogenous and exogenous ARID1B associate with β-catenin and repress Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription through the BAF core subunit BRG1. Accordingly, mutations in ARID1B leading to partial or complete deletion of its BRG1-binding domain, as is often observed in intellectual disability and cancers, compromise association with β-catenin, and the resultant ARID1B mutant proteins fail to suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Finally, knockdown of ARID1B in mouse neuroblastoma cells leads to neurite outgrowth through β-catenin. The data suggest that aberrations in chromatin-remodeling factors, such as ARID1B, might contribute to neurodevelopmental abnormalities and cancer through deregulation of developmental and oncogenic pathways, such as the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:26340334

  11. Chromatin-Remodeling-Factor ARID1B Represses Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vasileiou, Georgia; Ekici, Arif B.; Uebe, Steffen; Zweier, Christiane; Hoyer, Juliane; Engels, Hartmut; Behrens, Jürgen; Reis, André; Hadjihannas, Michel V.

    2015-01-01

    The link of chromatin remodeling to both neurodevelopment and cancer has recently been highlighted by the identification of mutations affecting BAF chromatin-remodeling components, such as ARID1B, in individuals with intellectual disability and cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remains unknown. Here, we show that ARID1B is a repressor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Through whole-transcriptome analysis, we find that in individuals with intellectual disability and ARID1B loss-of-function mutations, Wnt/β-catenin target genes are upregulated. Using cellular models of low and high Wnt/β-catenin activity, we demonstrate that knockdown of ARID1B activates Wnt/β-catenin target genes and Wnt/β-catenin-dependent transcriptional reporters in a β-catenin-dependent manner. Reciprocally, forced expression of ARID1B inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling downstream of the β-catenin destruction complex. Both endogenous and exogenous ARID1B associate with β-catenin and repress Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription through the BAF core subunit BRG1. Accordingly, mutations in ARID1B leading to partial or complete deletion of its BRG1-binding domain, as is often observed in intellectual disability and cancers, compromise association with β-catenin, and the resultant ARID1B mutant proteins fail to suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Finally, knockdown of ARID1B in mouse neuroblastoma cells leads to neurite outgrowth through β-catenin. The data suggest that aberrations in chromatin-remodeling factors, such as ARID1B, might contribute to neurodevelopmental abnormalities and cancer through deregulation of developmental and oncogenic pathways, such as the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:26340334

  12. Increased dysbindin-1B isoform expression in schizophrenia and its propensity in aggresome formation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yiliang; Sun, Yuhui; Ye, Haihong; Zhu, Li; Liu, Jianghong; Wu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Le; He, Tingting; Shen, Yan; Wu, Jane Y; Xu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations in the human dysbindin-1 gene (DTNBP1) have been associated with schizophrenia. As a result of alternative splicing, the human DTNBP1 gene generates at least three distinct protein isoforms, dysbindin-1A, -1B and -1C. Significant effort has focused on dysbindin-1A, an important player in multiple steps of neurodevelopment. However, the other isoforms, dysbindin-1B and dysbindin-1C have not been well characterized. Nor have been associated with human diseases. Here we report an increase in expression of DTNBP1b mRNA in patients with paranoid schizophrenia as compared with healthy controls. A single-nucleotide polymorphism located in intron 9, rs117610176, has been identified and associated with paranoid schizophrenia, and its C allele leads to an increase of DTNBP1b mRNA splicing. Our data show that different dysbindin splicing isoforms exhibit distinct subcellular distribution, suggesting their distinct functional activities. Dysbindin-1B forms aggresomes at the perinuclear region, whereas dysbindin-1A and -1C proteins exhibit diffused patterns in the cytoplasm. Dysbindin-1A interacts with dysbindin-1B, getting recruited to the aggresome structure when co-expressed with dysbindin-1B. Moreover, cortical neurons over-expressing dysbindin-1B show reduction in neurite outgrowth, suggesting that dysbindin-1B may interfere with dysbindin-1A function in a dominant-negative manner. Taken together, our study uncovers a previously unknown association of DTNBP1b expression with schizophrenia in addition to its distinct biochemical and functional properties.

  13. Functional characterization of polypeptide release factor 1b in the ciliate Euplotes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Chai, Baofeng; Wang, Wei; Liang, Aihua

    2010-12-01

    In higher eukaryotes, RF-I (class I release factor) [eRF1 (eukaryotic release factor 1)] is responsible for stop codon recognition and promotes nascent polypeptide release from the ribosome. Interestingly, two class I RFs, eRF1a and eRF1b, have been identified among the ciliates Euplotes, which are variant code organisms. In the present study, we analysed the comparative expression of eRF1a and eRF1b in Euplotes cells, demonstrating that the expression of eRF1b was higher than that of eRF1a. An interaction between eRF1b and eRF3 was confirmed, suggesting that an eRF1b function is facilitated by eRF3. Co-localization of both eRF1s indicated that they function in the same subcellular location in Euplotes cells. We also analysed the characteristics of stop codon discrimination by eRF1b. Like eRF1a, eRF1b recognized UAA and UAG as stop codons, but not UGA. This finding disagreed with the deduced characteristics of eRF1a/eRF1b from the classic hypothesis of 'anticodon-mimicry' proposed by Muramatsu et al. [Muramatsu, Heckmann, Kitanaka and Kuchino (2001) FEBS Lett. 488, 105-109]. Mutagenesis experiments indicated that the absolutely conserved amino acid motif 'G31T32' (numbered as for human eRF1) in eRF1b was the key to efficient stop codon recognition by eRF1b. In conclusion, these findings support and improve the 'cavity model' of stop codon discrimination by eRF1 proposed by Bertram et al. [Bertram, Bell, Ritchie, Fullerton and Stansfield (2000) RNA 6, 1236-1247] and Inagaki et al. [Inagaki, Blouin, Doolittle and Roger (2002) Nucleic Acids Res. 30, 532-544]. PMID:20136636

  14. Subtyping of Y-chromosomal haplogroup E-M78 (E1b1b1a) by SNP assay and its forensic application.

    PubMed

    Caratti, S; Gino, S; Torre, C; Robino, C

    2009-07-01

    The continual discovery of new single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has led to an increased resolution of the Y chromosome phylogeny. Some of these Y-SNPs have shown to be restricted to small geographical regions and therefore may prove useful in the forensic field as tools for the prediction of population of origin of unknown casework samples. Here, we describe a system for the molecular dissection of haplogroup E-M78 (E1b1b1a), consisting of multiplex polymerase chain reaction and minisequencing of M78 and nine population-informative Y-SNPs (M148, M224, V12, V13, V19, V22, V27, V32, V65) in a single reaction. Sensitivity and admixture studies demonstrated that the SNP protocol allows robust genotyping from as little as 50 pg of male DNA, even in the presence of 500-fold amounts of female DNA. In order to evaluate the suitability of E1b1b1a, subhaplogrouping for population-of-origin prediction, the distribution of E-M78 and its derived variants was determined in an Italian population sample (n = 326). PMID:19430804

  15. Sulfone-stabilized carbanions for the reversible covalent capture of a posttranslationally-generated cysteine oxoform found in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B).

    PubMed

    Parsons, Zachary D; Ruddraraju, Kasi Viswanatharaju; Santo, Nicholas; Gates, Kent S

    2016-06-15

    Redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) involves oxidative conversion of the active site cysteine thiolate into an electrophilic sulfenyl amide residue. Reduction of the sulfenyl amide by biological thiols regenerates the native cysteine residue. Here we explored fundamental chemical reactions that may enable covalent capture of the sulfenyl amide residue in oxidized PTP1B. Various sulfone-containing carbon acids were found to react readily with a model peptide sulfenyl amide via attack of the sulfonyl carbanion on the electrophilic sulfur center in the sulfenyl amide. Both the products and the rates of these reactions were characterized. The results suggest that capture of a peptide sulfenyl amide residue by sulfone-stabilized carbanions can slow, but not completely prevent, thiol-mediated generation of the corresponding cysteine-containing peptide. Sulfone-containing carbon acids may be useful components in the construction of agents that knock down PTP1B activity in cells via transient covalent capture of the sulfenyl amide oxoform generated during insulin signaling processes. PMID:27132865

  16. Wave-of-Advance Models of the Diffusion of the Y Chromosome Haplogroup R1b1b2 in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Sjödin, Per; François, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Whether or not the spread of agriculture in Europe was accompanied by movements of people is a long-standing question in archeology and anthropology, which has been frequently addressed with the help of population genetic data. Estimates on dates of expansion and geographic origins obtained from genetic data are however sensitive to the calibration of mutation rates and to the mathematical models used to perform inference. For instance, recent data on the Y chromosome haplogroup R1b1b2 (M269) have either suggested a Neolithic origin for European paternal lineages or a more ancient Paleolithic origin depending on the calibration of Y-STR mutation rates. Here we examine the date of expansion and the geographic origin of hgR1b1b2 considering two current estimates of mutation rates in a total of fourteen realistic wave-of-advance models. We report that a range expansion dating to the Paleolithic is unlikely to explain the observed geographical distribution of microsatellite diversity, and that whether the data is informative with respect to the spread of agriculture in Europe depends on the mutation rate assumption in a critical way. PMID:21720564

  17. 20 CFR 655.705 - What Federal agencies are involved in the H-1B and H-1B1 programs, and what are the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CFR 214.2(h)(4)(iii)(B)(2), which specifies the employer will comply with the terms of the LCA for the... petition, whether the occupation named in the labor condition application is a specialty occupation or... § 655.700(d)(4). Each employer seeking an H-1B nonimmigrant in a specialty occupation or as a...

  18. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-1B Negatively Impacts Host Defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection.

    PubMed

    Yue, Lei; Xie, Zhongping; Li, Hua; Pang, Zheng; Junkins, Robert D; Tremblay, Michel L; Chen, Xiaochun; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen in immune-compromised individuals. Mechanisms governing immune responses to P. aeruginosa infection remain incompletely defined. Herein, we demonstrate that protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) is a critical negative regulator in P. aeruginosa infection. PTP1B-deficient mice display greatly enhanced bacterial clearance and reduced disease scores, which are accompanied by increased neutrophil infiltration and cytokine production. Interestingly, PTP1B deficiency mainly up-regulates the production of interferon-stimulated response elements-regulated cytokines and chemokines, including chemokine ligand 5 (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted), CXCL10 (interferon γ-inducible protein 10), and interferon-β production. Further studies reveal that PTP1B deficiency leads to increased interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) expression and activation. These findings demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism of the immune response to P. aeruginosa infection through PTP1B-IRF7 interaction. This novel PTP1B-IRF7-interferon-stimulated response elements pathway may have broader implications in Toll-like receptor-mediated innate immunity. PMID:27105736

  19. Ultrastructural abnormalities of the trabecular meshwork extracellular matrix in Cyp1b1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, L B C; Zhao, Y; Dubielzig, R R; Sorenson, C M; Sheibani, N

    2015-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) is highly expressed in human and murine ocular tissues during development. Mutations in this gene are implicated in the development of primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) in humans. Mice deficient in Cyp1b1 (Cyp1b1(-/-) ) present developmental abnormalities similar to human primary congenital glaucoma. The present work describes the ultrastructural morphology of the iridocorneal angle of 21 eyes from 1-week-old to 8-month-old Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Morphometric and semiquantitative analysis of the data revealed that 3-week-old Cyp1b1(-/-) mice present a significantly (P < .005) decreased amount of trabecular meshwork (TM) collagen and higher TM endothelial cell and collagen lesion scores (P < .005) than age-matched controls. Collagen loss and lesion scores were progressively increased in older animals, with 8-month-old animals presenting severe atrophy of the TM. Our findings advance the understanding of the effects of CYP1B1 mutations in TM development and primary congenital glaucoma, as well as suggest a link between TM morphologic alterations and increased intraocular pressure. PMID:24879660

  20. Mutation of POC1B in a severe syndromic retinal ciliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Bodo B.; Phillips, Jennifer B.; Bartram, Malte P.; Wegner, Jeremy; Thoenes, Michaela; Pannes, Andrea; Sampson, Josephina; Heller, Raoul; Göbel, Heike; Koerber, Friederike; Neugebauer, Antje; Hedergott, Andrea; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Toliat, Mohammad R.; Staubach, Simon; Boycott, Kym M.; Valente, Enza Maria; Janecke, Andreas R.; Eisenberger, Tobias; Bergmann, Carsten; Tebbe, Lars; Wang, Yang; Wu, Yundong; Fry, Andrew M.; Westerfield, Monte; Wolfrum, Uwe; Bolz, Hanno J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a consanguineous Iraqi family with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), Joubert syndrome (JBTS), and polycystic kidney disease. Targeted NGS for excluding mutations in known LCA and JBTS genes, homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense variant, c.317G>C (p.Arg106Pro), in POC1B, a gene essential for ciliogenesis, basal body and centrosome integrity. In silico modeling suggested a requirement of p.Arg106 for formation of the third WD40 repeat and a protein interaction interface. In human and mouse retina, POC1B localized to the basal body and centriole adjacent to the connecting cilium of photoreceptors and in synapses of the outer plexiform layer. Knockdown of Poc1b in zebrafish caused cystic kidneys and retinal degeneration with shortened and reduced photoreceptor connecting cilia, compatible with the human syndromic ciliopathy. A recent study describes homozygosity for p.Arg106ProPOC1B in a family with non-syndromic cone-rod dystrophy. The phenotype associated with homozygous p.Arg106ProPOC1B may thus be highly variable, analogous to homozygous p.Leu710Ser in WDR19 causing either isolated retinitis pigmentosa or Jeune syndrome. Our study indicates that POC1B is required for retinal integrity, and we propose POC1B mutations as a probable cause for JBTS with severe polycystic kidney disease. PMID:25044745

  1. Flavones Inhibit the Activity of AKR1B10, a Promising Therapeutic Target for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zemanova, Lucie; Hofman, Jakub; Novotna, Eva; Musilek, Kamil; Lundova, Tereza; Havrankova, Jana; Hostalkova, Anna; Chlebek, Jakub; Cahlikova, Lucie; Wsol, Vladimír

    2015-11-25

    AKR1B10 is an NADPH-dependent reductase that plays an important function in several physiological reactions such as the conversion of retinal to retinol, reduction of isoprenyl aldehydes, and biotransformation of procarcinogens and drugs. A growing body of evidence points to the important role of the enzyme in the development of several types of cancer (e.g., breast, hepatocellular), in which it is highly overexpressed. AKR1B10 is regarded as a therapeutic target for the treatment of these diseases, and potent and specific inhibitors may be promising therapeutic agents. Several inhibitors of AKR1B10 have been described, but the area of natural plant products has been investigated sparingly. In the present study almost 40 diverse phenolic compounds and alkaloids were examined for their ability to inhibit the recombinant AKR1B10 enzyme. The most potent inhibitors-apigenin, luteolin, and 7-hydroxyflavone-were further characterized in terms of IC50, selectivity, and mode of action. Molecular docking studies were also conducted, which identified putative binding residues important for the interaction. In addition, cellular studies demonstrated a significant inhibition of the AKR1B10-mediated reduction of daunorubicin in intact cells by these inhibitors without a considerable cytotoxic effect. Although these compounds are moderately potent and selective inhibitors of AKR1B10, they constitute a new structural type of AKR1B10 inhibitor and may serve as a template for the development of better inhibitors. PMID:26529431

  2. Targeting the disordered C-terminus of PTP1B with an allosteric inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Navasona; Koveal, Dorothy; Miller, Daniel H.; Xue, Bin; Akshinthala, Sai Dipikaa; Kragelj, Jaka; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Gauss, Carla-Maria; Page, Rebecca; Blackledge, Martin; Muthuswamy, Senthil K.; Peti, Wolfgang; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2014-01-01

    PTP1B, a validated therapeutic target for diabetes and obesity, plays a critical positive role in HER2 signaling in breast tumorigenesis. Efforts to develop therapeutic inhibitors of PTP1B have been frustrated by the chemical properties of the active site. We defined a novel mechanism of allosteric inhibition that targets the C-terminal, non-catalytic segment of PTP1B. We present the first ensemble structure of PTP1B containing this intrinsically disordered segment, within which we identified a binding site for the small molecule inhibitor, MSI-1436. We demonstrate binding to a second site close to the catalytic domain, with cooperative effects between the two sites locking PTP1B in an inactive state. MSI-1436 antagonized HER2 signaling, inhibited tumorigenesis in xenografts and abrogated metastasis in the NDL2 mouse model of breast cancer, validating inhibition of PTP1B as a therapeutic strategy in breast cancer. This new approach to inhibition of PTP1B emphasizes the potential of disordered segments of proteins as specific binding sites for therapeutic small molecules. PMID:24845231

  3. Zinc Resistance Mechanisms of P1B-type ATPases in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mingmei; Li, Zhefei; Liang, Jianqiang; Wei, Yibing; Rensing, Christopher; Wei, Gehong

    2016-01-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti (S. meliloti) strain CCNWSX0020 displayed tolerance to high levels exposures of multiple metals and growth promotion of legume plants grown in metal-contaminated soil. However, the mechanism of metal-resistant strain remains unknown. We used five P1B-ATPases deletions by designating as ∆copA1b, ∆fixI1, ∆copA3, ∆zntA and ∆nia, respectively to investigate the role of P1B-ATPases in heavy metal resistance of S. meliloti. The ∆copA1b and ∆zntA mutants were sensitive to zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in different degree, whereas the other mutants had no significant influence on the metal resistance. Moreover, the expression of zntA was induced by Zn, Cd and Pb whereas copA1b was induced by copper (Cu) and silver (Ag). This two deletions could led to the increased intracellular concentrations of Zn, Pb and Cd, but not of Cu. Complementation of ∆copA1b and ∆zntA mutants showed a restoration of tolerance to Zn, Cd and Pb to a certain extent. Taken together, the results suggest an important role of copA1b and zntA in Zn homeostasis and Cd and Pb detoxification in S. meliloti CCNWSX0020. PMID:27378600

  4. The Role of PTP1B O-GlcNAcylation in Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun; Tang, Zhuqi; Shen, Aiguo; Tao, Tao; Wan, Chunhua; Zhu, Xiaohui; Huang, Jieru; Zhang, Wanlu; Xia, Nana; Wang, Suxin; Cui, Shiwei; Zhang, Dongmei

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), which can directly dephosphorylate both the insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), thereby terminating insulin signaling, reportedly plays an important role in insulin resistance. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that O-GlcNAc modification regulates functions of several important components of insulin signal pathway. In this study, we identified that PTP1B is modified by O-GlcNAcylation at three O-GlcNAc sites (Ser104, Ser201, and Ser386). Palmitate acid (PA) impaired the insulin signaling, indicated by decreased phosphorylation of both serine/threonine-protein kinase B (Akt) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) following insulin administration, and upregulated PTP1B O-GlcNAcylation in HepG2 cells. Compared with the wild-type, intervention PTP1B O-GlcNAcylation by site-directed gene mutation inhibited PTP1B phosphatase activity, resulted in a higher level of phosphorylated Akt and GSK3β, recovered insulin sensitivity, and improved lipid deposition in HepG2 cells. Taken together, our research showed that O-GlcNAcylation of PTP1B can influence insulin signal transduction by modulating its own phosphatase activity, which participates in the process of hepatic insulin resistance. PMID:26402673

  5. Intranuclear location of the adenovirus type 5 E1B 55-kilodalton protein.

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, J K; Young, M A; Flint, S J

    1990-01-01

    The intracellular location of the adenovirus type 5 E1B 55-kilodalton (kDa) protein, particularly the question of whether it is associated with nuclear pore complexes, was examined. Fractionation of adenovirus type 5-infected HeLa cell nuclei by an established procedure (N. Dwyer and G. Blobel, J. Cell. Biol. 70:581-591, 1976) yielded one population of E1B 55-kDa protein molecules released by digestion of nuclei with RNase A and a second population recovered in the pore complex-lamina fraction. Free and E1B 55-kDa protein-bound forms of the E4 34-kDa protein (P. Sarnow, C. A. Sullivan, and A. J. Levine, Virology 120:387-394, 1982) were largely recovered in the pore complex-lamina fraction. Nevertheless, the association of E1B 55-kDa protein molecules with this nuclear envelope fraction did not depend on interaction of the E1B 55-kDa protein with the E4 34-kDa protein. Comparison of the immunofluorescence patterns observed with antibodies recognizing the E1B 55-kDa protein or cellular pore complex proteins and of the behavior of these viral and cellular proteins during in situ fractionation suggests that the E1B 55-kDa protein does not become intimately or stably associated with pore complexes in adenovirus-infected cells. Images PMID:2143545

  6. Hypotonic stimuli enhance proton-gated currents of acid-sensing ion channel-1b

    SciTech Connect

    Ugawa, Shinya Ishida, Yusuke; Ueda, Takashi; Yu, Yong; Shimada, Shoichi

    2008-03-14

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are strong candidates for mammalian mechanoreceptors. We investigated whether mouse acid-sensing ion channel-1b (ASIC1b) is sensitive to mechanical stimuli using oocyte electrophysiology, because ASIC1b is located in the mechanosensory stereocilia of cochlear hair cells. Hypotonic stimuli that induced membrane stretch of oocytes evoked no significant current in ASIC1b-expressing oocytes at pH 7.5. However, acid (pH 4.0 or 5.0)-evoked currents in the oocytes were substantially enhanced by the hypotonicity, showing mechanosensitivity of ASIC1b and possible mechanogating of the channel in the presence of other components. Interestingly, the ASIC1b channel was permeable to K{sup +} (a principal charge carrier for cochlear sensory transduction) and the affinity of the channel for amiloride (IC{sub 50} (inhibition constant) = approximately 48.3 {mu}M) was quite similar to that described for the mouse hair cell mechanotransducer current. Taken together, these data raise the possibility that ASIC1b participates in cochlear mechanoelectrical transduction.

  7. KIF1B promotes glioma migration and invasion via cell surface localization of MT1-MMP.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songyu; Han, Mingzhi; Chen, Weiliang; He, Ying; Huang, Bin; Zhao, Peng; Huang, Qibing; Gao, Liang; Qu, Xun; Li, Xingang

    2016-02-01

    Malignant glioma is notorious for its aggressiveness and poor prognosis, and the invasiveness of glioma cells is the major obstacle. Accumulating evidence indicates that kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) may play key roles in tumor invasiveness, but the mechanisms remained unresolved. Our previous study demonstrated that membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) was involved in Kinesin family member 1B (KIF1B)-modulated invasion of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, the role of KIF1B in glioma cell invasion and its relationship with MT1-MMP were explored in the present study. We found that aberrantly increased expression of KIF1B was associated with worse WHO pathological classification and Karnofsky performance status (KPS), which also showed a trend towards worse prognosis. In the transwell assay, knockdown of KIF1B using siRNA repressed U87MG and A172 glioma cell migration and invasion. Silencing KIF1B inhibited expression of membranal MT1-MMP; however, the amount of MT1-MMP in the whole cell lysate was not affected. In conclusion, targeting KIF1B may be an option for anti-invasive therapies targeting glioma. PMID:26576027

  8. Inherited variation in OATP1B1 is associated with treatment outcome in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Drenberg, C D; Paugh, S W; Pounds, S B; Shi, L; Orwick, S J; Li, L; Hu, S; Gibson, A A; Ribeiro, R C; Rubnitz, J E; Evans, W E; Sparreboom, A; Baker, S D

    2016-06-01

    Using broad interrogation of clinically relevant drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) genes on the DMET platform, we identified a genetic variant in SLCO1B1 (rs2291075; c.597C>T), encoding the transporter OATP1B1, associated with event-free (P = 0.006, hazard ratio = 1.74) and overall survival (P = 0.012, hazard ratio = 1.85) in children with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Lack of SLCO1B1 expression in leukemic blasts suggested the association might be due to an inherited rather than a somatic effect. rs2291075 was in strong linkage with known functional variants rs2306283 (c.388A>G) and rs4149056 (c.521T>C). Functional studies in vitro determined that four AML-directed chemotherapeutics (cytarabine, daunorubicin, etoposide, and mitoxantrone) are substrates for OATP1B1 and the mouse ortholog Oatp1b2. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies using Oatp1b2-deficient mice further confirmed our results. Collectively, these findings demonstrate an important role for OATP1B1 in the systemic pharmacokinetics of multiple drugs used in the treatment of AML and suggest that inherited variability in host transporter function influences the effectiveness of therapy. PMID:26663398

  9. Zinc Resistance Mechanisms of P1B-type ATPases in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingmei; Li, Zhefei; Liang, Jianqiang; Wei, Yibing; Rensing, Christopher; Wei, Gehong

    2016-01-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti (S. meliloti) strain CCNWSX0020 displayed tolerance to high levels exposures of multiple metals and growth promotion of legume plants grown in metal-contaminated soil. However, the mechanism of metal-resistant strain remains unknown. We used five P1B-ATPases deletions by designating as ∆copA1b, ∆fixI1, ∆copA3, ∆zntA and ∆nia, respectively to investigate the role of P1B-ATPases in heavy metal resistance of S. meliloti. The ∆copA1b and ∆zntA mutants were sensitive to zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in different degree, whereas the other mutants had no significant influence on the metal resistance. Moreover, the expression of zntA was induced by Zn, Cd and Pb whereas copA1b was induced by copper (Cu) and silver (Ag). This two deletions could led to the increased intracellular concentrations of Zn, Pb and Cd, but not of Cu. Complementation of ∆copA1b and ∆zntA mutants showed a restoration of tolerance to Zn, Cd and Pb to a certain extent. Taken together, the results suggest an important role of copA1b and zntA in Zn homeostasis and Cd and Pb detoxification in S. meliloti CCNWSX0020. PMID:27378600

  10. Pathogenesis-Related Protein 1b1 (PR1b1) Is a Major Tomato Fruit Protein Responsive to Chilling Temperature and Upregulated in High Polyamine Transgenic Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Tahira; Topuz, Muhamet; Bernadec, Anne; Sicher, Richard; Handa, Avtar K.; Mattoo, Autar K.

    2016-01-01

    Plants execute an array of mechanisms in response to stress which include upregulation of defense-related proteins and changes in specific metabolites. Polyamines – putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd), and spermine (Spm) – are metabolites commonly found associated with abiotic stresses such as chilling stress. We have generated two transgenic tomato lines (556HO and 579HO) that express yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase and specifically accumulate Spd and Spm in fruits in comparison to fruits from control (556AZ) plants (Mehta et al., 2002). Tomato fruits undergo chilling injury at temperatures below 13°C. The high Spd and Spm tomato together with the control azygous line were utilized to address role(s) of polyamines in chilling-injury signaling. Exposure to chilling temperature (2°C) led to several-fold increase in the Put content in all the lines. Upon re-warming of the fruits at 20°C, the levels of Spd and Spm increased further in the fruit of the two transgenic lines, the higher levels remaining stable for 15 days after re-warming as compared to the fruit from the control line. Profiling their steady state proteins before and after re-warming highlighted a protein of ∼14 kD. Using proteomics approach, protein sequencing and immunoblotting, the ∼14-kD protein was identified as the pathogenesis related protein 1b1 (PR1b1). The PR1b1 protein accumulated transiently in the control fruit whose level was barely detectable at d 15 post-warming while in the fruit from both the 556HO and 579HO transgenic lines PR1b1 abundance increased and remained stable till d 15 post warming. PR1b1 gene transcripts were found low in the control fruit with a visible accumulation only on d 15 post warming; however, in both the transgenic lines it accumulated and increased soon after rewarming being several-fold higher on day 2 while in 556HO line this increase continued until d 6 than the control fruit. The chilling-induced increase in PR1b1 protein seems independent

  11. Pathogenesis-Related Protein 1b1 (PR1b1) Is a Major Tomato Fruit Protein Responsive to Chilling Temperature and Upregulated in High Polyamine Transgenic Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravinder K; Fatima, Tahira; Topuz, Muhamet; Bernadec, Anne; Sicher, Richard; Handa, Avtar K; Mattoo, Autar K

    2016-01-01

    Plants execute an array of mechanisms in response to stress which include upregulation of defense-related proteins and changes in specific metabolites. Polyamines - putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd), and spermine (Spm) - are metabolites commonly found associated with abiotic stresses such as chilling stress. We have generated two transgenic tomato lines (556HO and 579HO) that express yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase and specifically accumulate Spd and Spm in fruits in comparison to fruits from control (556AZ) plants (Mehta et al., 2002). Tomato fruits undergo chilling injury at temperatures below 13°C. The high Spd and Spm tomato together with the control azygous line were utilized to address role(s) of polyamines in chilling-injury signaling. Exposure to chilling temperature (2°C) led to several-fold increase in the Put content in all the lines. Upon re-warming of the fruits at 20°C, the levels of Spd and Spm increased further in the fruit of the two transgenic lines, the higher levels remaining stable for 15 days after re-warming as compared to the fruit from the control line. Profiling their steady state proteins before and after re-warming highlighted a protein of ∼14 kD. Using proteomics approach, protein sequencing and immunoblotting, the ∼14-kD protein was identified as the pathogenesis related protein 1b1 (PR1b1). The PR1b1 protein accumulated transiently in the control fruit whose level was barely detectable at d 15 post-warming while in the fruit from both the 556HO and 579HO transgenic lines PR1b1 abundance increased and remained stable till d 15 post warming. PR1b1 gene transcripts were found low in the control fruit with a visible accumulation only on d 15 post warming; however, in both the transgenic lines it accumulated and increased soon after rewarming being several-fold higher on day 2 while in 556HO line this increase continued until d 6 than the control fruit. The chilling-induced increase in PR1b1 protein seems independent of

  12. New Insights In Intestinal Sar1B GTPase Regulation and Role in Cholesterol Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sané, Alain; Seidman, Ernest; Spahis, Schohraya; Lamantia, Valérie; Garofalo, Carole; Montoudis, Alain; Marcil, Valérie; Levy, Emile

    2015-10-01

    Sar1B GTPase is a key component of Coat protein complex II (COPII)-coated vesicles that bud from the endoplasmic reticulum to export newly synthesized proteins. The aims of this study were to determine whether Sar1B responds to lipid regulation and to evaluate its role in cholesterol (CHOL) homeostasis. The influence of lipids on Sar1B protein expression was analyzed in Caco-2/15 cells by Western blot. Our results showed that the presence of CHOL (200 μM) and oleic acid (0.5 mM), bound to albumin, increases Sar1B protein expression. Similarly, supplementation of the medium with micelles composed of taurocholate with monooleylglycerol or oleic acid also stimulated Sar1B expression, but the addition of CHOL (200 μM) to micelle content did not modify its regulation. On the other hand, overexpression of Sar1B impacted on CHOL transport and metabolism in view of the reduced cellular CHOL content along with elevated secretion when incubated with oleic acid-containing micelles for 24 h, thereby disclosing induced CHOL transport. This was accompanied with higher secretion of free- and esterified-CHOL within chylomicrons, which was not the case when oleic acid was replaced with monooleylglycerol or when albumin-bound CHOL was given alone. The aforementioned cellular CHOL depletion was accompanied with a low phosphorylated/non phosphorylated HMG-CoA reductase ratio, indicating elevated enzymatic activity. Combination of Sar1B overexpression with micelle incubation led to reduction in intestinal CHOL transporters (NPC1L1, SR-BI) and metabolic regulators (PCSK9 and LDLR). The present work showed that Sar1B is regulated in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by dietary lipids, suggesting an adaptation to alimentary lipid flux. Our data also suggest that Sar1B overexpression contributes to regulation of CHOL transport and metabolism by facilitating rapid uptake and transport of CHOL. PMID:25826777

  13. Coumarins from Angelica decursiva inhibit α-glucosidase activity and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Yousof; Jannat, Susoma; Jung, Hyun Ah; Jeong, Hyong Oh; Chung, Hae Young; Choi, Jae Sue

    2016-05-25

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-diabetic potential of six natural coumarins, 4-hydroxy Pd-C-III (1), 4'-methoxy Pd-C-I (2), decursinol (3), decursidin (4), umbelliferone 6-carboxylic acid (5), and 2'-isopropyl psoralene (6) isolated from Angelica decursiva and evaluated their inhibitory activities against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), α-glucosidase, and ONOO(-)-mediated protein tyrosine nitration. Coumarins 1-6 showed potent PTP1B and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities with ranges of IC50 values of 5.39-58.90 μM and 65.29-172.10 μM, respectively. In the kinetic study for PTP1B enzyme inhibition, compounds 1, 5, and 6 were competitive, whereas 2 and 4 showed mixed type, and 3 displayed noncompetitive type inhibition. For α-glucosidase enzyme inhibition, compounds 1 and 3 exhibited good mixed-type, while 2, 5, and 6 showed noncompetitive and 4 displayed competitive type inhibition. Furthermore, these coumarins also effectively suppressed ONOO(-)-mediated tyrosine nitration in a dose-dependent manner. To further investigate PTP1B inhibition, we generated a 3D structure of PTP1B using Autodock 4.2 and simulated the binding of compounds 1-6. Docking simulations showed that different residues of PTP1B interacted with different functional groups of compounds 1-6 through hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions. In addition, the binding energies of compounds 1-6 were negative, suggesting that hydrogen bonding may stabilize the open form of the enzyme and potentiate tight binding of the active site of PTP1B, thereby resulting in more effective PTP1B inhibition. These results demonstrate that the whole plant of A. decursiva and its coumarins are useful as potential functional food ingredients for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27085377

  14. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1b Deficiency Protects Mice from Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Teayoun; He, Lan; Johnson, Maria S.; Li, Yan; Zeng, Ling; Ding, Yishu; Long, Qinqiang; Moore, John F.; Sharer, Jon D.; Nagy, Tim R.; Young, Martin E.; Wood, Philip A.; Yang, Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    Background Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase 1 (CPT1) is the rate-limiting enzyme governing long-chain fatty acid entry into mitochondria. CPT1 inhibitors have been developed and exhibited beneficial effects against type II diabetes in short-term preclinical animal studies. However, the long-term effects of treatment remain unclear and potential non-specific effects of these CPT1 inhibitors hamper in-depth understanding of the potential molecular mechanisms involved. Methods We investigated the effects of restricting the activity of the muscle isoform CPT1b in mice using heterozygous CPT1b deficient (Cpt1b+/−) and Wild Type (WT) mice fed with a High Fat Diet (HFD) for 22 weeks. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT), insulin tolerance test and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps. We also examined body weight/composition, tissue and systemic metabolism/energetic status, lipid profile, transcript analysis, and changes in insulin signaling pathways. Results We found that Cpt1b+/− mice were protected from HFD-induced insulin resistance compared to WT littermates. Cpt1b+/− mice exhibited elevated whole body glucose disposal rate and skeletal muscle glucose uptake. Furthermore, Cpt1b+/− skeletal muscle showed diminished ex vivo palmitate oxidative capacity by ~40% and augmented glucose oxidation capacity by ~50% without overt change in whole body energy metabolism. HFD feeding Cpt1b+/− but not WT mice exhibited well-maintained insulin signaling in skeletal muscle, heart, and liver. Conclusion The present study on a genetic model of CPT1b restriction supports the concept that partial CPT1b inhibition is a potential therapeutic strategy. PMID:25309812

  15. Caspase-1 autoproteolysis is differentially required for NLRP1b and NLRP3 inflammasome function.

    PubMed

    Guey, Baptiste; Bodnar, Mélanie; Manié, Serge N; Tardivel, Aubry; Petrilli, Virginie

    2014-12-01

    Inflammasomes are caspase-1-activating multiprotein complexes. The mouse nucleotide-binding domain and leucine rich repeat pyrin containing 1b (NLRP1b) inflammasome was identified as the sensor of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LT) in mouse macrophages from sensitive strains such as BALB/c. Upon exposure to LT, the NLRP1b inflammasome activates caspase-1 to produce mature IL-1β and induce pyroptosis. Both processes are believed to depend on autoproteolysed caspase-1. In contrast to human NLRP1, mouse NLRP1b lacks an N-terminal pyrin domain (PYD), indicating that the assembly of the NLRP1b inflammasome does not require the adaptor apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC). LT-induced NLRP1b inflammasome activation was shown to be impaired upon inhibition of potassium efflux, which is known to play a major role in NLRP3 inflammasome formation and ASC dimerization. We investigated whether NLRP3 and/or ASC were required for caspase-1 activation upon LT stimulation in the BALB/c background. The NLRP1b inflammasome activation was assessed in both macrophages and dendritic cells lacking either ASC or NLRP3. Upon LT treatment, the absence of NLRP3 did not alter the NLRP1b inflammasome activity. Surprisingly, the absence of ASC resulted in IL-1β cleavage and pyroptosis, despite the absence of caspase-1 autoprocessing activity. By reconstituting caspase-1/caspase-11(-/-) cells with a noncleavable or catalytically inactive mutant version of caspase-1, we directly demonstrated that noncleavable caspase-1 is fully active in response to the NLRP1b activator LT, whereas it is nonfunctional in response to the NLRP3 activator nigericin. Taken together, these results establish variable requirements for caspase-1 cleavage depending on the pathogen and the responding NLR. PMID:25404286

  16. Oxidation of PAH trans-Dihydrodiols by Human Aldo-Keto Reductase AKR1B10

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Amy M.; Harvey, Ronald G.; Penning, Trevor M.

    2009-01-01

    AKR1B10 has been identified as a potential biomarker for human non-small cell lung carcinoma and as a tobacco exposure and response gene. AKR1B10 functions as an efficient retinal reductase in vitro, and may regulate retinoic acid homeostasis. However, the possibility that this enzyme is able to activate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) trans-dihydrodiols to form reactive and redox-active o-quinones has not been investigated to date. AKR1B10 was found to oxidize a wide range of PAH trans-dihydrodiol substrates in vitro to yield PAH o-quinones. Reactions of AKR1B10 proceeded with improper stereochemistry, since it was specific for the minor (+)-benzo[a]pyrene-7S,8S-dihydrodiol diastereomer formed in vivo. However, AKR1B10 displayed reasonable activity in the oxidation of both the (−)-R,R and (+)-S,S stereoisomers of benzo[g]chrysene-11,12-dihydrodiol and oxidized the potentially relevant, albeit minor, (+)-benz[a]anthracene-3S,4S-dihydrodiol metabolite. We find that AKR1B10 is therefore likely to play a contributing role in the activation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols in human lung. AKR1B10 retinal reductase activity was confirmed in vitro and found to be 5- to 150-fold greater than the oxidation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols examined. AKR1B10 was highly expressed at the mRNA and protein levels in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, and robust retinal reductase activity was measured in lysates of these cells. The much greater catalytic efficiency of retinal reduction compared to PAH trans-dihydrodiol metabolism suggests AKR1B10 may play a greater role in lung carcinogenesis through dysregulation of retinoic acid homeostasis than through oxidation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols. PMID:18788756

  17. Etv2 and Fli1b Function Together as Key Regulators of Vasculogenesis and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Michael P.; Grajevskaja, Viktorija; Liao, Hsin-Kai; Balciuniene, Jorune; Ekker, Stephen C.; Park, Joo-Seop; Essner, Jeffrey J.; Balciunas, Darius; Sumanas, Saulius

    2015-01-01

    Objective The E26 transformation-specific domain transcription factor Etv2/Etsrp/ER71 is a master regulator of vascular endothelial differentiation during vasculogenesis, although its later role in sprouting angiogenesis remains unknown. Here, we investigated in the zebrafish model a role for Etv2 and related E26 transformation-specific factors, Fli1a and Fli1b in developmental angiogenesis. Approach and Results Zebrafish fli1a and fli1b mutants were obtained using transposon-mediated gene trap approach. Individual fli1a and fli1b homozygous mutant embryos display normal vascular patterning, yet the angiogenic recovery observed in older etv2 mutant embryos does not occur in embryos lacking both etv2 and fli1b. Etv2 and fli1b double-deficient embryos fail to form any angiogenic sprouts and show greatly increased apoptosis throughout the axial vasculature. In contrast, fli1a mutation did not affect the recovery of etv2 mutant phenotype. Overexpression analyses indicate that both etv2 and fli1b, but not fli1a, induce the expression of multiple vascular markers and of each other. Temporal inhibition of Etv2 function using photoactivatable morpholinos indicates that the function of Etv2 and Fli1b during angiogenesis is independent from the early requirement of Etv2 during vasculogenesis. RNA-Seq analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation suggest that Etv2 and Fli1b share the same transcriptional targets and bind to the same E26 transformation-specific sites. Conclusions Our data argue that there are 2 phases of early vascular development with distinct requirements of E26 transformation-specific transcription factors. Etv2 alone is required for early vasculogenesis, whereas Etv2 and Fli1b function redundantly during late vasculogenesis and early embryonic angiogenesis. PMID:25722433

  18. Caspase-1 autoproteolysis is differentially required for NLRP1b and NLRP3 inflammasome function

    PubMed Central

    Guey, Baptiste; Bodnar, Mélanie; Manié, Serge N.; Tardivel, Aubry; Petrilli, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Inflammasomes are caspase-1–activating multiprotein complexes. The mouse nucleotide-binding domain and leucine rich repeat pyrin containing 1b (NLRP1b) inflammasome was identified as the sensor of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LT) in mouse macrophages from sensitive strains such as BALB/c. Upon exposure to LT, the NLRP1b inflammasome activates caspase-1 to produce mature IL-1β and induce pyroptosis. Both processes are believed to depend on autoproteolysed caspase-1. In contrast to human NLRP1, mouse NLRP1b lacks an N-terminal pyrin domain (PYD), indicating that the assembly of the NLRP1b inflammasome does not require the adaptor apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC). LT-induced NLRP1b inflammasome activation was shown to be impaired upon inhibition of potassium efflux, which is known to play a major role in NLRP3 inflammasome formation and ASC dimerization. We investigated whether NLRP3 and/or ASC were required for caspase-1 activation upon LT stimulation in the BALB/c background. The NLRP1b inflammasome activation was assessed in both macrophages and dendritic cells lacking either ASC or NLRP3. Upon LT treatment, the absence of NLRP3 did not alter the NLRP1b inflammasome activity. Surprisingly, the absence of ASC resulted in IL-1β cleavage and pyroptosis, despite the absence of caspase-1 autoprocessing activity. By reconstituting caspase-1/caspase-11−/− cells with a noncleavable or catalytically inactive mutant version of caspase-1, we directly demonstrated that noncleavable caspase-1 is fully active in response to the NLRP1b activator LT, whereas it is nonfunctional in response to the NLRP3 activator nigericin. Taken together, these results establish variable requirements for caspase-1 cleavage depending on the pathogen and the responding NLR. PMID:25404286

  19. Serotonin 1B Receptor Gene (HTR1B) Methylation as a Risk Factor for Callous-Unemotional Traits in Antisocial Boys.

    PubMed

    Moul, Caroline; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Brennan, John; Hawes, David J; Dadds, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    The serotonin system is thought to play a role in the aetiology of callous-unemotional (CU) traits in children. Previous research identified a functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) from the promoter region of the serotonin 1B receptor gene as being associated with CU traits in boys with antisocial behaviour problems. This research tested the hypothesis that CU traits are associated with reduced methylation of the promoter region of the serotonin 1B receptor gene due to the influence of methylation on gene expression. Participants (N = 117) were boys with antisocial behaviour problems aged 3-16 years referred to University of New South Wales Child Behaviour Research Clinics. Participants volunteered a saliva sample from which the genotype of a SNP from the promoter region of the serotonin 1B receptor gene and the methylation levels of 30 CpG sites from 3 CpG regions surrounding the location of this polymorphism were assayed. Lower levels of serotonin 1B receptor gene methylation were associated with higher levels of CU traits. This relationship, however, was found to be moderated by genotype and carried exclusively by two CpG sites for which levels of methylation were negatively associated with overall methylation levels in this region of the gene. Results provide support to the emerging literature that argues for a genetically-driven system-wide alteration in serotonin function in the aetiology of CU traits. Furthermore, the results suggest that there may be two pathways to CU traits that involve methylation of the serotonin 1B receptor gene; one that is driven by a genotypic risk and another that is associated with risk for generally increased levels of methylation. Future research that aims to replicate and further investigate these results is required. PMID:25993020

  20. Interferon β-1b and glatiramer acetate effects on permanent black hole evolution

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, M.A.; Camesasca, F.; Cook, S.; O'Connor, P.; Arnason, B.G.W.; Kappos, L.; Goodin, D.; Jeffery, D.; Hartung, H.-P.; Comi, G.; Wolinsky, J.S.; Bogumil, T.; Pohl, C.; Beckmann, K.; Sandbrink, R.; Croze, E.; Brown, C.; DeSimone, T.M.; Arnold, D.L.; Cutter, G.; Knappertz, V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare interferon β-1b (IFNβ-1b) and glatiramer acetate (GA) on new lesion (NL) (gadolinium-enhancing, new T2) evolution into permanent black holes (PBH)—a marker of irreversible tissue damage—in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods: BEYOND was a large, phase III, clinical trial comparing IFNβ-1b 250 μg, IFNβ-1b 500 μg, and GA (2:2:1). Patient scans were reexamined post hoc for PBH in a rater-blinded manner. Two predefined coprimary endpoints compared IFNβ-1b 250 μg with GA: first, number of PBH per patient at year 2 evolving from year 1 NL, then proportion of year 1 NL evolving into PBH at year 2. IFNβ-1b 500 μg and GA were compared in an exploratory fashion. Results: Approximately 90% (1,957/2,244) of patients had NL at year 1 with follow-up at year 2. Mean numbers of PBH per patient at year 2 evolving from year 1 NL were lower for IFNβ-1b 250 μg than GA (0.30 vs 0.43; p = 0.0451). The proportion of NL evolving into PBH was similar (IFNβ-1b 250 μg vs GA: 21.6% vs 23.5%; p > 0.20). For IFNβ-1b 500 μg, both the mean PBH number per patient at year 2 evolving from year 1 NL (0.26 vs 0.43; p = 0.0037) and proportion of NL evolving into PBH (16.3% vs 23.5%; p = 0.0409) were lower relative to GA. Conclusion: IFNβ-1b affected PBH development to a similar or better extent than GA. IFNβ-1b favorably influences an MRI outcome indicative of permanent tissue destruction in the brains of patients with multiple sclerosis. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that IFNβ-1b is associated with a reduction in MRI PBH formation and evolution compared with GA between years 1 and 2 of treatment. PMID:21464426

  1. Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus: mutation of the sodium channel subunit SCN1B.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R H; Scheffer, I E; Parasivam, G; Barnett, S; Wallace, G B; Sutherland, G R; Berkovic, S F; Mulley, J C

    2002-05-14

    Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS(+)) is an important childhood genetic epilepsy syndrome with heterogeneous phenotypes, including febrile seizures (FS) and generalized epilepsies of variable severity. Forty unrelated GEFS(+) and FS patients were screened for mutations in the sodium channel beta-subunits SCN1B and SCN2B, and the second GEFS(+) family with an SCN1B mutation is described here. The family had 19 affected individuals: 16 with typical GEFS(+) phenotypes and three with other epilepsy phenotypes. Site-specific mutation within SCN1B remains a rare cause of GEFS(+), and the authors found no evidence to implicate SCN2B in this syndrome. PMID:12011299

  2. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicon Particles Encoding Respiratory Syncytial Virus Surface Glycoproteins Induce Protective Mucosal Responses in Mice and Cotton Rats▿

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Hoyin; Lee, Sujin; Utley, Thomas J.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Collier, Martha L.; Davis, Nancy L.; Johnston, Robert E.; Crowe, James E.

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important viral pathogen that causes severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. There are no licensed RSV vaccines to date. To prevent RSV infection, immune responses in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts are required. Previously, immunization with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRPs) demonstrated effectiveness in inducing mucosal protection against various pathogens. In this study, we developed VRPs encoding RSV fusion (F) or attachment (G) glycoproteins and evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of these vaccine candidates in mice and cotton rats. VRPs, when administered intranasally, induced surface glycoprotein-specific virus neutralizing antibodies in serum and immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies in secretions at the respiratory mucosa. In addition, fusion protein-encoding VRPs induced gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting T cells in the lungs and spleen, as measured by reaction with an H-2Kd-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitope. In animals vaccinated with F protein VRPs, challenge virus replication was reduced below the level of detection in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts following intranasal RSV challenge, while in those vaccinated with G protein VRPs, challenge virus was detected in the upper but not the lower respiratory tract. Close examination of histopathology of the lungs of vaccinated animals following RSV challenge revealed no enhanced inflammation. Immunization with VRPs induced balanced Th1/Th2 immune responses, as measured by the cytokine profile in the lungs and antibody isotype of the humoral immune response. These results represent an important first step toward the use of VRPs encoding RSV proteins as a prophylactic vaccine for RSV. PMID:17928349

  3. Viroids, the simplest RNA replicons: How they manipulate their hosts for being propagated and how their hosts react for containing the infection.

    PubMed

    Flores, R; Minoia, S; Carbonell, A; Gisel, A; Delgado, S; López-Carrasco, A; Navarro, B; Di Serio, F

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of viroids about 45 years ago heralded a revolution in Biology: small RNAs comprising around 350 nt were found to be able to replicate autonomously-and to incite diseases in certain plants-without encoding proteins, fundamental properties discriminating these infectious agents from viruses. The initial focus on the pathological effects usually accompanying infection by viroids soon shifted to their molecular features-they are circular molecules that fold upon themselves adopting compact secondary conformations-and then to how they manipulate their hosts to be propagated. Replication of viroids-in the nucleus or chloroplasts through a rolling-circle mechanism involving polymerization, cleavage and circularization of RNA strands-dealt three surprises: (i) certain RNA polymerases are redirected to accept RNA instead of their DNA templates, (ii) cleavage in chloroplastic viroids is not mediated by host enzymes but by hammerhead ribozymes, and (iii) circularization in nuclear viroids is catalyzed by a DNA ligase redirected to act upon RNA substrates. These enzymes (and ribozymes) are most probably assisted by host proteins, including transcription factors and RNA chaperones. Movement of viroids, first intracellularly and then to adjacent cells and distal plant parts, has turned out to be a tightly regulated process in which specific RNA structural motifs play a crucial role. More recently, the advent of RNA silencing has brought new views on how viroids may cause disease and on how their hosts react to contain the infection; additionally, viroid infection may be restricted by other mechanisms. Representing the lowest step on the biological size scale, viroids have also attracted considerable interest to get a tentative picture of the essential characteristics of the primitive replicons that populated the postulated RNA world. PMID:25738582

  4. Co-delivery of antigen and IL-12 by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles enhances antigen-specific immune responses and antitumor effects.

    PubMed

    Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Morse, Michael A; Hubby, Bolyn; Lewis, Whitney; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Yang, Xiao Yi; Hobeika, Amy; Burnett, Bruce; Devi, Gayathri R; Clay, Timothy M; Smith, Jonathan; Kim Lyerly, H

    2012-11-01

    We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-based replicon particle (VRPs) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP-expressing interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and antitumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associated antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (VRP-CEA(6D)), and VRP-IL-12 was also administered at the same site or at a distant location. CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses were measured. To determine antitumor activity, mice were implanted with MC38-CEA-2 cells and immunized with VRP-CEA with and without VRP-IL-12, and tumor growth and mouse survival were measured. VRP-IL-12 greatly enhanced CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses when combined with VRP-CEA(6D) vaccination. VRP-IL-12 was superior to IL-12 protein at enhancing immune responses. Vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) plus VRP-IL-12 was superior to VRP-CEA(6D) or VRP-IL-12 alone in inducing antitumor activity and prolonging survival in tumor-bearing mice. Importantly, local injection of VRP-IL-12 at the VRP-CEA(6D) injection site provided more potent activation of CEA-specific immune responses than that of VRP-IL-12 injected at a distant site from the VRP-CEA injections. Together, this study shows that VRP-IL-12 enhances vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) and was more effective at activating CEA-specific T cell responses when locally expressed at the vaccine site. Clinical trials evaluating the adjuvant effect of VRP-IL-12 at enhancing the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines are warranted. PMID:22488274

  5. Partial Protection against Porcine Influenza A Virus by a Hemagglutinin-Expressing Virus Replicon Particle Vaccine in the Absence of Neutralizing Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Meret E; Vielle, Nathalie J; Python, Sylvie; Brechbühl, Daniel; Zumkehr, Beatrice; Posthaus, Horst; Zimmer, Gert; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-01-01

    This work was initiated by previous reports demonstrating that mismatched influenza A virus (IAV) vaccines can induce enhanced disease, probably mediated by antibodies. Our aim was, therefore, to investigate if a vaccine inducing opsonizing but not neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (HA) of a selected heterologous challenge virus would enhance disease or induce protective immune responses in the pig model. To this end, we immunized pigs with either whole inactivated virus (WIV)-vaccine or HA-expressing virus replicon particles (VRP) vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Both types of vaccines induced virus neutralizing and opsonizing antibodies against homologous virus as shown by a highly sensitive plasmacytoid dendritic cell-based opsonization assay. Opsonizing antibodies showed a broader reactivity against heterologous IAV compared with neutralizing antibodies. Pigs immunized with HA-recombinant VRP vaccine were partially protected from infection with a mismatched IAV, which was not neutralized but opsonized by the immune sera. The VRP vaccine reduced lung lesions, lung inflammatory cytokine responses, serum IFN-α responses, and viral loads in the airways. Only the VRP vaccine was able to prime IAV-specific IFNγ/TNFα dual secreting CD4(+) T cells detectable in the peripheral blood. In summary, this work demonstrates that with the virus pair selected, a WIV vaccine inducing opsonizing antibodies against HA which lack neutralizing activity, is neither protective nor does it induce enhanced disease in pigs. In contrast, VRP-expressing HA is efficacious vaccines in swine as they induced both potent antibodies and T-cell immunity resulting in a broader protective value. PMID:27446083

  6. DNA-Launched Alphavirus Replicons Encoding a Fusion of Mycobacterial Antigens Acr and Ag85B Are Immunogenic and Protective in a Murine Model of TB Infection.

    PubMed

    Dalmia, Neha; Klimstra, William B; Mason, Carol; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for effective prophylactic measures against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, particularly given the highly variable efficacy of Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB). Most studies indicate that cell-mediated immune responses involving both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are necessary for effective immunity against Mtb. Genetic vaccination induces humoral and cellular immune responses, including CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses, against a variety of bacterial, viral, parasitic and tumor antigens, and this strategy may therefore hold promise for the development of more effective TB vaccines. Novel formulations and delivery strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DNA-based vaccines have recently been evaluated, and have shown varying degrees of success. In the present study, we evaluated DNA-launched Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicons (Vrep) encoding a novel fusion of the mycobacterial antigens α-crystallin (Acr) and antigen 85B (Ag85B), termed Vrep-Acr/Ag85B, for their immunogenicity and protective efficacy in a murine model of pulmonary TB. Vrep-Acr/Ag85B generated antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses that persisted for at least 10 wk post-immunization. Interestingly, parenterally administered Vrep-Acr/Ag85B also induced T cell responses in the lung tissues, the primary site of infection, and inhibited bacterial growth in both the lungs and spleens following aerosol challenge with Mtb. DNA-launched Vrep may, therefore, represent an effective approach to the development of gene-based vaccines against TB, particularly as components of heterologous prime-boost strategies or as BCG boosters. PMID:26317509

  7. Partial Protection against Porcine Influenza A Virus by a Hemagglutinin-Expressing Virus Replicon Particle Vaccine in the Absence of Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Meret E.; Vielle, Nathalie J.; Python, Sylvie; Brechbühl, Daniel; Zumkehr, Beatrice; Posthaus, Horst; Zimmer, Gert; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-01-01

    This work was initiated by previous reports demonstrating that mismatched influenza A virus (IAV) vaccines can induce enhanced disease, probably mediated by antibodies. Our aim was, therefore, to investigate if a vaccine inducing opsonizing but not neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (HA) of a selected heterologous challenge virus would enhance disease or induce protective immune responses in the pig model. To this end, we immunized pigs with either whole inactivated virus (WIV)-vaccine or HA-expressing virus replicon particles (VRP) vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Both types of vaccines induced virus neutralizing and opsonizing antibodies against homologous virus as shown by a highly sensitive plasmacytoid dendritic cell-based opsonization assay. Opsonizing antibodies showed a broader reactivity against heterologous IAV compared with neutralizing antibodies. Pigs immunized with HA-recombinant VRP vaccine were partially protected from infection with a mismatched IAV, which was not neutralized but opsonized by the immune sera. The VRP vaccine reduced lung lesions, lung inflammatory cytokine responses, serum IFN-α responses, and viral loads in the airways. Only the VRP vaccine was able to prime IAV-specific IFNγ/TNFα dual secreting CD4+ T cells detectable in the peripheral blood. In summary, this work demonstrates that with the virus pair selected, a WIV vaccine inducing opsonizing antibodies against HA which lack neutralizing activity, is neither protective nor does it induce enhanced disease in pigs. In contrast, VRP-expressing HA is efficacious vaccines in swine as they induced both potent antibodies and T-cell immunity resulting in a broader protective value. PMID:27446083

  8. The new powder diffractometer D1B of the Institut Laue Langevin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puente Orench, I.; Clergeau, J. F.; Martínez, S.; Olmos, M.; Fabelo, O.; Campo, J.

    2014-11-01

    D1B is a medium resolution high flux powder diffractometer located at the Institut Laue Langevin, ILL. D1B a suitable instrument for studying a large variety of polycrystalline materials. D1B runs since 1998 as a CRG (collaborating research group) instrument, being exploited by the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France) and CSIC (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Spain). In 2008 the Spanish CRG started an updating program which included a new detector and a radial oscillating collimator (ROC). The detector, which has a sensitive height of 100mm, covers an angular range of 128°. Its 1280 gold wires provide a neutron detection point every 0.1°. The ROC is made of 198 gadolinium- based absorbing collimation blades, regular placed every 0.67°. Here the present characteristics of D1B are reviewed and the different experimental performances will be presented.

  9. 52. G.E.H. photographer August 1930 1HUM1B #59, OILING OPERATIONS, GEH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. G.E.H. photographer August 1930 1-HUM-1-B #59, OILING OPERATIONS, GEH 8-30. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  10. Dark Matter and neutrino masses from global U(1) B - L symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Manfred; Schmidt, Daniel; Schwetz, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    We present a scenario where neutrino masses and Dark Matter are related due to a global U(1) B - L symmetry. Specifically we consider neutrino mass generation via the Zee-Babu two-loop mechanism, augmented by a scalar singlet whose VEV breaks the global U(1) B - L symmetry. In order to obtain a Dark Matter candidate we introduce two Standard Model singlet fermions. They form a Dirac particle and are stable because of a remnant Z2 symmetry. Hence, in this model the stability of Dark Matter follows from the global U(1) B - L symmetry. We discuss the Dark Matter phenomenology of the model, and compare it to similar models based on gauged U(1) B - L. We argue that in contrast to the gauged versions, the model based on the global symmetry does not suffer from severe constraints from Z‧ searches.

  11. Nature of Pi1B pulsations as inferred from ground and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessard, M. R.; Lund, E. J.; Jones, S. L.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Posch, J. L.; Engebretson, M. J.; Hayashi, K.

    2006-07-01

    The occurrence of Pi1B pulsations is well-documented, including the fact that these pulsations can be observed both on the ground and at geosynchronous orbit at substorm onset, although information about their propagation characteristics has been lacking. In this paper, data are presented from FAST, GOES 9 and various ground stations that show the simultaneous observations of Pi1B pulsations in association with an onset. While the data at GOES 9 show that the pulsations are compressional in nature, data from FAST show the presence of shear mode waves, implying that Pi1B mode conversion of some type must take place in the region between geosynchronous orbit and FAST altitudes. An additional point is that Pi1B pulsations apparently propagate through auroral phenomena routinely, begging the question of what role they may play.

  12. Prediction and verification of novel peptide targets of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Li, Xun; Köhn, Maja

    2016-08-01

    Phosphotyrosine peptides are useful starting points for inhibitor design and for the search for protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) phosphoprotein substrates. To identify novel phosphopeptide substrates of PTP1B, we developed a computational prediction protocol based on a virtual library of protein sequences with known phosphotyrosine sites. To these we applied sequence-based methods, biologically meaningful filters and molecular docking. Five peptides were selected for biochemical testing of their potential as PTP1B substrates. All five peptides were equally good substrates for PTP1B compared to a known peptide substrate whereas appropriate control peptides were not recognized, showing that our protocol can be used to identify novel peptide substrates of PTP1B. PMID:27025565

  13. Gfi1 and Gfi1b Repress Rag Transcription in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Kwan T.; Schulz, Danae; McWhirter, Sarah M.; Schlissel, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Growth factor independence genes (Gfi1 and Gfi1b) repress recombination activating genes (Rag) transcription in developing B lymphocytes. Because all blood lineages originate from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and different lineage progenitors have been shown to share transcription factor networks prior to cell fate commitment, we hypothesized that GFI family proteins may also play a role in repressing Rag transcription or a global lymphoid transcriptional program in other blood lineages. We tested the level of Rag transcription in various blood cells when Gfi1 and Gfi1b were deleted, and observed an upregulation of Rag expression in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Using microarray analysis, we observed that Gfi1 and Gfi1b do not regulate a lymphoid or pDC-specific transcriptional program. This study establishes a role for Gfi1 and Gfi1b in Rag regulation in a non-B lineage cell type. PMID:24086657

  14. Metabolic Profiling Reveals PAFAH1B3 as a Critical Driver of Breast Cancer Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Mulvihill, Melinda M.; Benjamin, Daniel I.; Ji, Xiaodan; Le Scolan, Erwan; Louie, Sharon M.; Shieh, Alice; Green, McKenna; Narasimhalu, Tara; Morris, Patrick J.; Luo, Kunxin; Nomura, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have identified metabolic pathways that underlie cellular transformation, but the metabolic drivers of cancer progression remain less well understood. The Hippo transducer pathway has been shown to confer malignant traits on breast cancer cells. In this study, we used metabolic mapping platforms to identify biochemical drivers of cellular transformation and malignant progression driven through RAS and the Hippo pathway in breast cancer, and identified platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase 1B3 (PAFAH1B3) as a key metabolic driver of breast cancer pathogenicity that is upregulated in primary human breast tumors and correlated with poor prognosis. Metabolomic profiling suggests that PAFAH1B3 inactivation attenuates cancer pathogenicity through enhancing tumor-suppressing signaling lipids. Our studies provide a map of altered metabolism that underlies breast cancer progression and put forth PAFAH1B3 as a critical metabolic node in breast cancer. PMID:24954006

  15. Role of CYP1B1 in PAH-DNA adduct formation and breast cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Goth-Goldstein, Regine; Russell, Marion L.; Muller, A.P.; Caleffi, M.; Eschiletti, J.; Graudenz, M.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that increased exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) increases breast cancer risk. PAHs are products of incomplete burning of organic matter and are present in cigarette smoke, ambient air, drinking water, and diet. PAHs require metabolic transformation to bind to DNA, causing DNA adducts, which can lead to mutations and are thought to be an important pre-cancer marker. In breast tissue, PAHs appear to be metabolized to their cancer-causing form primarily by the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1B1. Because the genotoxic impact of PAH depends on their metabolism, we hypothesized that high CYP1B1 enzyme levels result in increased formation of PAH-DNA adducts in breast tissue, leading to increased development of breast cancer. We have investigated molecular mechanisms of the relationship between PAH exposure, CYP1B1 expression and breast cancer risk in a clinic-based case-control study. We collected histologically normal breast tissue from 56 women (43 cases and 13 controls) undergoing breast surgery and analyzed these specimens for CYP1B1 genotype, PAH-DNA adducts and CYP1B1 gene expression. We did not detect any difference in aromatic DNA adduct levels of cases and controls, only between smokers and non-smokers. CYP1B1 transcript levels were slightly lower in controls than cases, but the difference was not statistically significant. We found no correlation between the levels of CYP1B1 expression and DNA adducts. If CYP1B1 has any role in breast cancer etiology it might be through its metabolism of estrogen rather than its metabolism of PAHs. However, due to the lack of statistical power these results should be interpreted with caution.

  16. BAZ1B is dispensable for H2AX phosphorylation on Tyrosine 142 during spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Broering, Tyler J.; Wang, Yuan-Liang; Pandey, Ram Naresh; Hegde, Rashmi S.; Wang, Shao-Chun; Namekawa, Satoshi H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Meiosis is precisely regulated by the factors involved in DNA damage response in somatic cells. Among them, phosphorylation of H2AX on Serine 139 (γH2AX) is an essential signal for the silencing of unsynapsed sex chromosomes during male meiosis. However, it remains unknown how adjacent H2AX phosphorylation on Tyrosine 142 (pTyr142) is regulated in meiosis. Here we investigate the meiotic functions of BAZ1B (WSTF), the only known Tyr142 kinase in somatic cells, using mice possessing a conditional deletion of BAZ1B. Although BAZ1B deletion causes ectopic γH2AX signals on synapsed autosomes during the early pachytene stage, BAZ1B is dispensable for fertility and critical events during spermatogenesis. BAZ1B deletion does not alter events on unsynapsed axes and pericentric heterochromatin formation. Furthermore, BAZ1B is dispensable for localization of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling protein SMARCA5 (SNF2h) during spermatogenesis despite the complex formation between BAZ1B and SMARCA5, known as the WICH complex, in somatic cells. Notably, pTyr142 is regulated independently of BAZ1B and is dephosphorylated on the sex chromosomes during meiosis in contrast with the presence of adjacent γH2AX. Dephosphorylation of pTyr142 is regulated by MDC1, a binding partner of γH2AX. These results reveal the distinct regulation of two adjacent phosphorylation sites of H2AX during meiosis, and suggest that another kinase mediates Tyr142 phosphorylation. PMID:25979708

  17. Structure and Promoter Characterization of Aldo-Keto Reductase Family 1 B10 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ziwen; Zhong, Linlin; Krishack, Paulette A; Robbins, Sarah; Cao, Julia X; Zhao, Yupei; Chung, Stephen; Cao, Deliang

    2009-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10) is overexpressed in human hepatocellular carcinoma, lung squamous carcinoma, and lung adenocarcinoma in smokers. Our recent studies have showed that AKR1B10 plays a critical role in the growth and proliferation of cancer cells by detoxifying reactive carbonyls and regulating fatty acid biosynthesis. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of AKR1B10 expression. In this study, we determined the structure of AKR1B10 gene and characterized its promoter. The results demonstrated that AKR1B10 consists of 10 exons and 9 introns, stretching approximately 13.8 kb. A 5′-RACE study determined the transcriptional start site of AKR1B10 at 320 bp upstream of the ATG translational start codon. A TATA-like (TAATAA) and a CAAT box are present from −145 to −140 bp and −193 to −190 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site, respectively. Motif analysis recognized multiple putative oncogenic and tumor suppressor protein binding sites in the AKR1B10 promoter, including c-Ets-1, C/EBP, AP-1, and p53, but osmolytic response elements were not found. A -4,091 bp of the 5′-flanking fragment of the AKR1B10 gene was capable of driving GFP and luciferase reporter gene expression in HepG2 cells derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma; progressive 5′-deletions revealed that a −255 bp fragment possesses full promoter activity. PMID:19236911

  18. Cyclin K and cyclin D1b are oncogenic in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 is a common feature in multiple myeloma (MM) and always associated with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). CCND1 gene is alternatively spliced to produce two cyclin D1 mRNA isoforms which are translated in two proteins: cyclin D1a and cyclin D1b. Both isoforms are present in MM cell lines and primary cells but their relative role in the tumorigenic process is still elusive. Results To test the tumorigenic potential of cyclin D1b in vivo, we generated cell clones derived from the non-CCND1 expressing MM LP-1 cell line, synthesizing either cyclin D1b or cyclin K, a structural homolog and viral oncogenic form of cyclin D1a. Immunocompromised mice injected s.c. with LP-1K or LP-1D1b cells develop tumors at the site of injection. Genome-wide analysis of LP-1-derived cells indicated that several cellular processes were altered by cyclin D1b and/or cyclin K expression such as cell metabolism, signal transduction, regulation of transcription and translation. Importantly, cyclin K and cyclin D1b have no major action on cell cycle or apoptosis regulatory genes. Moreover, they impact differently cell functions. Cyclin K-expressing cells have lost their migration properties and display enhanced clonogenic capacities. Cyclin D1b promotes tumorigenesis through the stimulation of angiogenesis. Conclusions Our study indicates that cyclin D1b participates into MM pathogenesis via previously unrevealed actions. PMID:20459741

  19. B1b cells recognize protective antigens after natural infection and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Adam F; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Bobat, Saeeda; Dominguez Medina, Carmen C; Cook, Charlotte N L; Ross, Ewan A; Lopez-Macias, Constantino; Henderson, Ian R

    2014-01-01

    There are multiple, distinct B-cell populations in human beings and other animals such as mice. In the latter species, there is a well-characterized subset of B-cells known as B1 cells, which are enriched in peripheral sites such as the peritoneal cavity but are rare in the blood. B1 cells can be further subdivided into B1a and B1b subsets. There may be additional B1 subsets, though it is unclear if these are distinct populations or stages in the developmental process to become mature B1a and B1b cells. A limitation in understanding B1 subsets is the relative paucity of specific surface markers. In contrast to mice, the existence of B1 cells in human beings is controversial and more studies are needed to investigate the nature of these enigmatic cells. Examples of B1b antigens include pneumococcal polysaccharide and the Vi antigen from Salmonella Typhi, both used routinely as vaccines in human beings and experimental antigens such as haptenated-Ficoll. In addition to inducing classical T-dependent responses some proteins are B1b antigens and can induce T-independent (TI) immunity, examples include factor H binding protein from Borrelia hermsii and porins from Salmonella. Therefore, B1b antigens can be proteinaceous or non-proteinaceous, induce TI responses, memory, and immunity, they exist in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria, and a single species can contain multiple B1b antigens. An unexpected benefit to studying B1b cells is that they appear to have a propensity to recognize protective antigens in bacteria. This suggests that studying B1b cells may be rewarding for vaccine design as immunoprophylactic and immunotherapeutic interventions become more important due to the decreasing efficacy of small molecule antimicrobials. PMID:25400633

  20. Hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase 2B1b expression and localization in normal human brain

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Emily D.; Faye-Petersen, Ona; Falany, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    Steroid sulfonation in the human brain has not been well characterized. The major sulfotransferase (SULT) isoforms that conjugate steroids in humans are SULT1E1, SULT2A1, and SULT2B1b. SULT2B1b catalyzes the sulfonation of 3β-hydroxysteroids, including neurosteroids dehydroepiandrosterone and pregnenolone, as well as cholesterol and several hydroxycholesterols. SULT2B1b mRNA and protein expression were detected in adult and fetal human brain sections, whereas neither mRNA, nor protein expression were identified for SULT1E1 or SULT2A1. Using immunohistochemical analysis, SULT2B1b expression was detected in neurons and oligodendrocytes in adult brain and in epithelial tissues in 28-week-old fetal brain. Sulfonation of cholesterol, oxysterols, and neurosteroids in the brain is apparently catalyzed by SULT2B1b since expression of neither SULT2A1 nor SULT1E1 was detected in human brain sections. SULT2B1b mRNA and protein were also detected in human U373-MG glioblastoma cells. Both mRNA and protein expression of liver X receptor (LXR)-β, but not LXR-α, were detected in U373-MG cells, and LXR-β activation resulted in a decrease in SULT2B1b protein expression. Since hydroxycholesterols are important physiological LXR activators, this suggests a role for regulation of sterol metabolism by LXR and SULT2B1b. Therefore, elucidating key enzymes in the metabolism of cholesterol and neurosteroids could help define the properties of steroid conjugation in the human brain. PMID:24683427

  1. Integrative Bioinformatics Links HNF1B with Clear Cell Carcinoma and Tumor-Associated Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Cuff, Justin; Salari, Keyan; Clarke, Nicole; Esheba, Ghada E.; Forster, Andrew D.; Huang, Stephanie; West, Robert B.; Higgins, John P.; Longacre, Teri A.; Pollack, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is a histologically distinct carcinoma subtype that arises in several organ systems and is marked by cytoplasmic clearing, attributed to abundant intracellular glycogen. Previously, transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-beta (HNF1B) was identified as a biomarker of ovarian CCC. Here, we set out to explore more broadly the relation between HNF1B and carcinomas with clear cell histology. HNF1B expression, evaluated by immunohistochemistry, was significantly associated with clear cell histology across diverse gynecologic and renal carcinomas (P<0.001), as was hypomethylation of the HNF1B promoter (P<0.001). From microarray analysis, an empirically-derived HNF1B signature was significantly enriched for computationally-predicted targets (with HNF1 binding sites) (P<0.03), as well as genes associated with glycogen metabolism, including glucose-6-phophatase, and strikingly the blood clotting cascade, including fibrinogen, prothrombin and factor XIII. Enrichment of the clotting cascade was also evident in microarray data from ovarian CCC versus other histotypes (P<0.01), and HNF1B-associated prothrombin expression was verified by immunohistochemistry (P = 0.015). Finally, among gynecologic carcinomas with cytoplasmic clearing, HNF1B immunostaining was linked to a 3.0-fold increased risk of clinically-significant venous thrombosis (P = 0.043), and with a 2.3-fold increased risk (P = 0.011) in a combined gynecologic and renal carcinoma cohort. Our results define HNF1B as a broad marker of clear cell phenotype, and support a mechanistic link to glycogen accumulation and thrombosis, possibly reflecting (for gynecologic CCC) derivation from secretory endometrium. Our findings also implicate a novel mechanism of tumor-associated thrombosis (a major cause of cancer mortality), based on the direct production of clotting factors by cancer cells. PMID:24040285

  2. B1b Cells Recognize Protective Antigens after Natural Infection and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Adam F.; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Bobat, Saeeda; Dominguez Medina, Carmen C.; Cook, Charlotte N. L.; Ross, Ewan A.; Lopez-Macias, Constantino; Henderson, Ian R.

    2014-01-01

    There are multiple, distinct B-cell populations in human beings and other animals such as mice. In the latter species, there is a well-characterized subset of B-cells known as B1 cells, which are enriched in peripheral sites such as the peritoneal cavity but are rare in the blood. B1 cells can be further subdivided into B1a and B1b subsets. There may be additional B1 subsets, though it is unclear if these are distinct populations or stages in the developmental process to become mature B1a and B1b cells. A limitation in understanding B1 subsets is the relative paucity of specific surface markers. In contrast to mice, the existence of B1 cells in human beings is controversial and more studies are needed to investigate the nature of these enigmatic cells. Examples of B1b antigens include pneumococcal polysaccharide and the Vi antigen from Salmonella Typhi, both used routinely as vaccines in human beings and experimental antigens such as haptenated-Ficoll. In addition to inducing classical T-dependent responses some proteins are B1b antigens and can induce T-independent (TI) immunity, examples include factor H binding protein from Borrelia hermsii and porins from Salmonella. Therefore, B1b antigens can be proteinaceous or non-proteinaceous, induce TI responses, memory, and immunity, they exist in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria, and a single species can contain multiple B1b antigens. An unexpected benefit to studying B1b cells is that they appear to have a propensity to recognize protective antigens in bacteria. This suggests that studying B1b cells may be rewarding for vaccine design as immunoprophylactic and immunotherapeutic interventions become more important due to the decreasing efficacy of small molecule antimicrobials. PMID:25400633

  3. Association Between 5HT1b Receptor Gene and Methamphetamine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Ujike, H; Kishimoto, M; Okahisa, Y; Kodama, M; Takaki, M; Inada, T; Uchimura, N; Yamada, M; Iwata, N; Iyo, M; Sora, I; Ozaki, N

    2011-01-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate serotonergic dysfunction in diverse psychiatric disorders including anxiety, depression, and drug abuse. Mice with a knock-out of the 5HT1b receptor gene (HTR1B) displayed increased locomotor response to cocaine and elevated motivation to self-administer cocaine and alcohol. Previous genetic studies showed significant associations of HTR1B with alcohol dependence and substance abuse, but were followed by inconsistent results. We examined a case-control genetic association study of HTR1B with methamphetamine-dependence patients in a Japanese population. The subjects were 231 patients with methamphetamine dependence, 214 of whom had a co-morbidity of methamphetamine psychosis, and 248 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs130058 (A-165T), rs1228814 (A-700C) and rs1228814 (A+1180G) of HTR1B were genotyped. There was no significant difference in allelic and genotypic distributions of the SNPs between methamphetamine dependence and the control. Genetic associations of HTR1B were tested with several clinical phenotypes of methamphetamine dependence and/or psychosis, such as age at first abuse, duration of latency from the first abuse to onset of psychosis, prognosis of psychosis after therapy, and complication of spontaneous relapse of psychotic state. There was, however, no asscocation between any SNP and the clinical phenotypes. Haplotype analyses showed the three SNPs examined were within linkage disequilibrium, which implied that the three SNPs covered the whole HTR1B, and distribution of estimated haplotype frequency was not different between the groups. The present findings may indicate that HTR1B does not play a major role in individual susceptibility to methamphetamine dependence or development of methamphetamine-induced psychosis. PMID:21886584

  4. MODIS technical report series. Volume 3: MODIS airborne simulator level 1B data user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumley, Liam E.; Hubanks, Paul A.; Masuoka, Edward J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the characteristics of moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) airborne simulator level 1B data, the calibration and geolocation methods used in processing, the structure and format of the level 1B data files, and methods for accessing the data. The MODIS airborne simulator is a scanning spectrometer which flies on a NASA ER-2 and provides spectral information similar to that which will be provided by the MODIS.

  5. Cytochrome P450 CYP1B1 over-expression in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    McFadyen, M C E; Cruickshank, M E; Miller, I D; McLeod, H L; Melvin, W T; Haites, N E; Parkin, D; Murray, G I

    2001-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of death from gynaecological malignancies world wide. Little improvement has been made in the long-term outcome of this disease, with the 5-year survival of patients only 30%. This poor prognosis is due to the late presentation of the disease and to the unpredictable response of ovarian cancer to chemotherapy. The cytochrome P450 enzymes are a superfamily of haemoproteins, known to be involved in the metabolic activation and/or detoxification of a number of anti-cancer drugs. CYP1B1 is a tumour-related form of cytochrome P450 which is over expressed in a wide variety of primary tumours of different histological type. The presence of CYP1B1 may be of importance in the modulation of these tumours to anti-cancer drugs. We have conducted a comprehensive immunohistochemical investigation, into the presence of cytochrome P450 CYP1B1 in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer. The key findings of this study are the increased expression of CYP1B1 in the majority of ovarian cancers investigated (92%), with a strong correlation demonstrated between CYP1B1 expression in both primary and metastatic ovarian cancer (P= 0.005 Spearman's rank correlation test). In contrast no detectable CYP1B1 was found in normal ovary. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11461084

  6. Preparation and characterization of Ni-P/Ni3.1B composite alloy coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yurong; He, Jiawei; Wang, Wenchang; Shi, Jianhua; Mitsuzaki, Naotoshi; Chen, Zhidong

    2014-02-01

    The preparation of Ni-P/Ni3.1B composite alloy coating on the surface of copper was achieved by co-deposition of Ni3.1B nanoparticles with Ni-P coating during electroless plating. Ni-P-B alloy coating was obtained by heat-treating the as-plated Ni-P/Ni3.1B composite coating. The effect of the concentration of sodium alginate, borax, thiourea, Ni3.1B, temperature, and pH value on the deposition rate and B content were investigated and determined to be: 30 g L-1, 10 g L-1, 2 mg L-1, 20 mg L-1, 70 °C and 9.0 , respectively. Sodium alginate and thiourea were played as surfactant for coating Ni3.1B nanoparticles and stabilizer for the plating bath, respectively. Ni-P/Ni3.1B composite coating had good performance such as corrosion resistance and solderability.

  7. SMC1B is present in mammalian somatic cells and interacts with mitotic cohesin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mannini, Linda; Cucco, Francesco; Quarantotti, Valentina; Amato, Clelia; Tinti, Mara; Tana, Luigi; Frattini, Annalisa; Delia, Domenico; Krantz, Ian D.; Jessberger, Rolf; Musio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Cohesin is an evolutionarily conserved protein complex that plays a role in many biological processes: it ensures faithful chromosome segregation, regulates gene expression and preserves genome stability. In mammalian cells, the mitotic cohesin complex consists of two structural maintenance of chromosome proteins, SMC1A and SMC3, the kleisin protein RAD21 and a fourth subunit either STAG1 or STAG2. Meiotic paralogs in mammals were reported for SMC1A, RAD21 and STAG1/STAG2 and are called SMC1B, REC8 and STAG3 respectively. It is believed that SMC1B is only a meiotic-specific cohesin member, required for sister chromatid pairing and for preventing telomere shortening. Here we show that SMC1B is also expressed in somatic mammalian cells and is a member of a mitotic cohesin complex. In addition, SMC1B safeguards genome stability following irradiation whereas its ablation has no effect on chromosome segregation. Finally, unexpectedly SMC1B depletion impairs gene transcription, particularly at genes mapping to clusters such as HOX and PCDHB. Genome-wide analyses show that cluster genes changing in expression are enriched for cohesin-SMC1B binding. PMID:26673124

  8. Impairment of calcium mobilization in phagocytic cells in glycogen storage disease type 1b.

    PubMed

    Korchak, H M; Garty, B Z; Stanley, C A; Baker, L; Douglas, S D; Kilpatrick, L

    1993-01-01

    Patients with glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1b, in contrast to patients with GSD 1a, are susceptible to recurrent bacterial infections suggesting defective phagocytic function. We have demonstrated a selective defect in respiratory burst activity but not in degranulation by phagocytic cells in GSD 1b but not in GSD 1a. The respiratory burst abnormality in phagocytic cells from GSD 1b patients was associated with impaired calcium mobilization, whereas these processes were normal in GSD 1a patients. Therefore, the alteration in calcium mobilization was an indication of a signalling defect in phagocytic cells from GSD 1b. However, calcium mobilization was normal in lymphocytes, indicating that defective calcium mobilization was not a global finding in circulating leukocytes, but was specific to phagocytic cells. Calcium mobilization in response to ionomycin was reduced suggesting decreased calcium stores in GSD 1b neutrophils. Therefore, altered phagocytic cell function in GSD 1b patients appears to be associated with diminished calcium mobilization and defective calcium stores. This defective calcium signalling was associated with a selective defect in respiratory burst activity but not degranulation. PMID:8319725

  9. Jarid1b targets genes regulating development and is involved in neural differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Sandra U; Albert, Mareike; Malatesta, Martina; Morey, Lluis; Johansen, Jens V; Bak, Mads; Tommerup, Niels; Abarrategui, Iratxe; Helin, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    H3K4 methylation is associated with active transcription and in combination with H3K27me3 thought to keep genes regulating development in a poised state. The contribution of enzymes regulating trimethylation of lysine 4 at histone 3 (H3K4me3) levels to embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal and differentiation is just starting to emerge. Here, we show that the H3K4me2/3 histone demethylase Jarid1b (Kdm5b/Plu1) is dispensable for ESC self-renewal, but essential for ESC differentiation along the neural lineage. By genome-wide location analysis, we demonstrate that Jarid1b localizes predominantly to transcription start sites of genes encoding developmental regulators, of which more than half are also bound by Polycomb group proteins. Virtually all Jarid1b target genes are associated with H3K4me3 and depletion of Jarid1b in ESCs leads to a global increase of H3K4me3 levels. During neural differentiation, Jarid1b-depleted ESCs fail to efficiently silence lineage-inappropriate genes, specifically stem and germ cell genes. Our results delineate an essential role for Jarid1b-mediated transcriptional control during ESC differentiation. PMID:22020125

  10. Terra and Aqua moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer collection 6 level 1B algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toller, Gary; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Sun, Junqiang; Wenny, Brian N.; Geng, Xu; Kuyper, James; Angal, Amit; Chen, Hongda; Madhavan, Sriharsha; Wu, Aisheng

    2013-01-01

    The moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) was launched on the Terra spacecraft on Dec.18, 1999 and on Aquaon May 4, 2002. The data acquired by these instruments have contributed to the long-term climate data record for more than a decade and represent a key component of NASA's Earth observing system. Each MODIS instrument observes nearly the whole Earth each day, enabling the scientific characterization of the land, ocean, and atmosphere. The MODIS Level 1B (L1B) algorithms input uncalibrated geo-located observations and convert instrument response into calibrated reflectance and radiance, which are used to generate science data products. The instrument characterization needed to run the L1B code is currently implemented using time-dependent lookup tables. The MODIS characterization support team, working closely with the MODIS Science Team, has improved the product quality with each data reprocessing. We provide an overview of the new L1B algorithm release, designated collection 6. Recent improvements made as a consequence of on-orbit calibration, on-orbit analyses, and operational considerations are described. Instrument performance and the expected impact of L1B changes on the collection 6 L1B products are discussed.

  11. Structural and functional analysis of the mouse mdr1b gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D; Piekarz, R L; Hsu, S I; DePinho, R A; Carrasco, N; Horwitz, S B

    1991-02-01

    The overproduction of P-glycoprotein, an integral membrane protein thought to function as a drug efflux pump, is the hallmark of the multidrug resistance phenotype. In murine multidrug resistant J774.2 cell lines, distinct mdr genes, mdr1a and mdr1b, encode unique P-glycoprotein isoforms. To examine the transcriptional regulation of the mdr1b gene, its promoter was isolated and characterized. The transcription initiation site was mapped by primer extension, and the 5'-flanking region was sequenced. Several potential regulatory elements were identified in this region. A transient expression vector was constructed by fusion of 540 base pairs of 5'-flanking sequence and part of the first untranslated exon to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. When transfected into monkey kidney COS-1, rat pituitary GH3 or T47D human breast cells, the mdr1b 5'-flanking sequences were capable of driving CAT expression. Transient transfection studies using deletion subclones of the mdr1b-CAT construct were done to locate potential cis-acting sequences. The studies indicate the presence of cis-acting elements in the 5'-flanking region of the mdr1b gene. The implications of these findings for expression and regulation of the mdr1b gene are discussed. PMID:1671222

  12. An evolutionarily-conserved role for murine Ly-1 B cells in protection against bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Lalor, P A

    1991-01-01

    The murine Ly-1 B cell lineage, although comprising only a minority of peripheral IgM+ B cells, secretes a major proportion of the IgM antibodies occurring naturally in serum. Ly-1 B cells also seed a large number of IgA+ plasma cells to the gut walls, thereby contributing significantly to production of natural IgA antibodies in response to chronic stimulation by the normal gut flora. Apart from these naturally-produced antibodies, Ly-1 B cells also produce specific antibodies following deliberate immunisation with the bacterial cell wall antigens, phosphorylcholine and dextran. The inability of the X-linked immunodeficient CBA/N mice to produce antibody responses to these two antigens is overcome by reconstitution with normal Ly-1 B cells from the parental CBA strain. Ly-1 B cells therefore appear to play a dominant role in natural immunity and protection against bacterial infections. The compartmentalisation of development and function within murine B cells is suggestive of an evolutionary structuring of the murine immune system, with Ly-1 B cells representing a conserved, primitive B cell lineage and retaining key, associated functions. PMID:1742426

  13. Functional properties of Claramine: a novel PTP1B inhibitor and insulin-mimetic compound.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhaohong; Pandey, Nihar R; Zhou, Xun; Stewart, Chloe A; Hari, Aswin; Huang, Hua; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Brunel, Jean Michel; Chen, Hsiao-Huei

    2015-02-27

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibits insulin signaling, interfering with its control of glucose homeostasis and metabolism. PTP1B activity is elevated in obesity and type 2 diabetes and is a major cause of insulin resistance. Trodusquemine (MSI-1436) is a "first-in-class" highly selective inhibitor of PTP1B that can cross the blood-brain barrier to suppress feeding and promote insulin sensitivity and glycemic control. Trodusquemine is a naturally occurring cholestane that can be purified from the liver of the dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias, but it can also be manufactured synthetically by a fairly laborious process that requires several weeks. Here, we tested a novel easily and rapidly (2 days) synthesized polyaminosteroid derivative (Claramine) containing a spermino group similar to Trodusquemine for its ability to inhibit PTP1B. Like Trodusquemine, Claramine displayed selective inhibition of PTP1B but not its closest related phosphatase TC-PTP. In cultured neuronal cells, Claramine and Trodusquemine both activated key components of insulin signaling, with increased phosphorylation of insulin receptor-β (IRβ), Akt and GSK3β. Intraperitoneal administration of Claramine or Trodusquemine effectively restored glycemic control in diabetic mice as determined by glucose and insulin tolerance tests. A single intraperitoneal dose of Claramine, like an equivalent dose of Trodusquemine, suppressed feeding and caused weight loss without increasing energy expenditure. In summary, Claramine is an alternative more easily manufactured compound for the treatment of type II diabetes. PMID:25623533

  14. The Nuclear Envelope Protein, LAP1B, Is a Novel Protein Phosphatase 1 Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Mariana; Rebelo, Sandra; Van Kleeff, Paula J. M.; Kim, Connie E.; Dauer, William T.; Fardilha, Margarida; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A.; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) binding proteins are quintessential regulators, determining substrate specificity and defining subcellular localization and activity of the latter. Here, we describe a novel PP1 binding protein, the nuclear membrane protein lamina associated polypeptide 1B (LAP1B), which interacts with the DYT1 dystonia protein torsinA. The PP1 binding domain in LAP1B was here identified as the REVRF motif at amino acids 55-59. The LAP1B:PP1 complex can be immunoprecipitated from cells in culture and rat cortex and the complex was further validated by yeast co-transformations and blot overlay assays. PP1, which is enriched in the nucleus, binds to the N-terminal nuclear domain of LAP1B, as shown by immunocolocalization and domain specific binding studies. PP1 dephosphorylates LAP1B, confirming the physiological relevance of this interaction. These findings place PP1 at a key position to participate in the pathogenesis of DYT1 dystonia and related nuclear envelope-based diseases. PMID:24116158

  15. Aryl morpholino triazenes inhibit cytochrome P450 1A1 and 1B1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel; Perez, Pedro; Jackson, William; Chin, Taylor; Galbreath, Michael; Fronczek, Frank R; Isovitsch, Ralph; Iimoto, Devin S

    2016-07-15

    Many cytochrome P450 1A1 and 1B1 (CYP1A1 and CYP1B1) inhibitors, such as resveratrol, have planar, hydrophobic, aromatic rings in their structure and exhibit anti-cancer activity. Aryl morpholino triazenes have similar structural features and in addition contain a triazene unit consisting of three consecutive, conjugated nitrogen atoms. Several aryl morpholino triazenes, including 4-[(E)-2-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)diazenyl]-morpholine (2), were prepared from a reaction involving morpholine and a diazonium ion produced from different aniline derivatives, such as 3,4,5-trimethoxyaniline. The aryl morpholino triazenes were then screened at 100μM for their ability to inhibit CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 using ethoxyresorufin as the substrate. Triazenes that inhibited the enzymes to less than 80% of the uninhibited enzyme activity were assayed to determine their IC50 value. Compound 2 was the only triazene to inhibit both CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 to the same degree as resveratrol with IC50 values of 10μM and 18μM, respectively. Compounds 3 and 6 selectively inhibited CYP1B1 over CYP1A1 with IC values of 2μM and 7μM, respectively. Thus, aryl morpholino triazenes are a new class of compounds that can inhibit CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 and potentially prevent cancer. PMID:27265259

  16. A Contextual Fire Detection Algorithm for Simulated HJ-1B Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yonggang; Yan, Guangjian; Duan, Sibo; Kong, Xiangsheng

    2009-01-01

    The HJ-1B satellite, which was launched on September 6, 2008, is one of the small ones placed in the constellation for disaster prediction and monitoring. HJ-1B imagery was simulated in this paper, which contains fires of various sizes and temperatures in a wide range of terrestrial biomes and climates, including RED, NIR, MIR and TIR channels. Based on the MODIS version 4 contextual algorithm and the characteristics of HJ-1B sensor, a contextual fire detection algorithm was proposed and tested using simulated HJ-1B data. It was evaluated by the probability of fire detection and false alarm as functions of fire temperature and fire area. Results indicate that when the simulated fire area is larger than 45 m2 and the simulated fire temperature is larger than 800 K, the algorithm has a higher probability of detection. But if the simulated fire area is smaller than 10 m2, only when the simulated fire temperature is larger than 900 K, may the fire be detected. For fire areas about 100 m2, the proposed algorithm has a higher detection probability than that of the MODIS product. Finally, the omission and commission error were evaluated which are important factors to affect the performance of this algorithm. It has been demonstrated that HJ-1B satellite data are much sensitive to smaller and cooler fires than MODIS or AVHRR data and the improved capabilities of HJ-1B data will offer a fine opportunity for the fire detection. PMID:22399950

  17. Uroplakin 1b is critical in urinary tract development and urothelial differentiation and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Ashley R; Becknell, M Brian; Ching, Christina B; Cuaresma, Edward J; Chen, Xi; Hains, David S; McHugh, Kirk M

    2016-03-01

    Proper development and maintenance of urothelium is critical to its function. Uroplakins are expressed in developing and mature urothelium where they establish plaques associated with the permeability barrier. Their precise functional role in development and disease is unknown. Here, we disrupted Upk1b in vivo where its loss resulted in urothelial plaque disruption in the bladder and kidney. Upk1b(RFP/RFP) bladder urothelium appeared dysplastic with expansion of the progenitor cell markers, Krt14 and Krt5, increased Shh expression, and loss of terminal differentiation markers Krt20 and uroplakins. Upk1b(RFP/RFP) renal urothelium became stratified with altered cellular composition. Upk1b(RFP/RFP) mice developed age-dependent progressive hydronephrosis. Interestingly, 16% of Upk1b(RFP/RFP) mice possessed unilateral duplex kidneys. Our study expands the role of uroplakins, mechanistically links plaque formation to urinary tract development and function, and provides a tantalizing connection between congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract along with functional deficits observed in a variety of urinary tract diseases. Thus, kidney and bladder urothelium are regionally distinct and remain highly plastic, capable of expansion through tissue-specific progenitor populations. Furthermore, Upk1b plays a previously unknown role in early kidney development representing a novel genetic target for congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. PMID:26880456

  18. Phosphoinositide-specific Phospholipase C β 1b (PI-PLCβ1b) Interactome: Affinity Purification-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of PI-PLCβ1b with Nuclear Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Piazzi, Manuela; Blalock, William L.; Bavelloni, Alberto; Faenza, Irene; D'Angelo, Antonietta; Maraldi, Nadir M.; Cocco, Lucio

    2013-01-01

    Two isoforms of inositide-dependent phospholipase C β1 (PI-PLCβ1) are generated by alternative splicing (PLCβ1a and PLCβ1b). Both isoforms are present within the nucleus, but in contrast to PLCβ1a, the vast majority of PLCβ1b is nuclear. In mouse erythroid leukemia cells, PI-PLCβ1 is involved in the regulation of cell division and the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation. It has been demonstrated that nuclear localization is crucial for the enzymatic function of PI-PLCβ1, although the mechanism by which this nuclear import occurs has never been fully characterized. The aim of this study was to characterize both the mechanism of nuclear localization and the molecular function of nuclear PI-PLCβ1 by identifying its interactome in Friend's erythroleukemia isolated nuclei, utilizing a procedure that coupled immuno-affinity purification with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Using this procedure, 160 proteins were demonstrated to be in association with PI-PLCβ1b, some of which have been previously characterized, such as the splicing factor SRp20 (Srsf3) and Lamin B (Lmnb1). Co-immunoprecipitation analysis of selected proteins confirmed the data obtained via mass spectrometry. Of particular interest was the identification of the nuclear import proteins Kpna2, Kpna4, Kpnb1, Ran, and Rangap1, as well as factors involved in hematological malignancies and several anti-apoptotic proteins. These data give new insight into possible mechanisms of nuclear trafficking and functioning of this critical signaling molecule. PMID:23665500

  19. [OATP1B1 in drug-drug interactions between traditional Chinese medicine Danshensu and rosuvastatin].

    PubMed

    Wen, Jin-hua; Wei, Xiao-hua; Cheng, Xiao-hua; Zuo, Rong; Peng, Hong-wei; Lü, Yan-ni; Zhou, Jian; Zheng, Xue-lian; Cai, Jun; Xiong, Yu-qing; Cao, Li

    2016-01-01

    The study was designed to explore the drug-drug interactions mechanisms mediated by OATP1B1 between traditional Chinese medicine Danshensu and rosuvastatin. First, the changes of rosuvastatin pharmacokinetics were investigated in presence of Danshensu in rats. Then, the primary rat hepatocytes model was established to explore the effects of Danshensu on the uptake of rosuvastatin by hepatocytes. Finally, HEK293T cells with overexpression of OATP1B1*a and OATP1B1*5 were established using a lentiviral delivery system to explore the effects of Danshensu on the uptake of rosuvastatin. Rosuvastatin pharmacokinetic parameters of C(max0, AUCO(0-t), AUC(0-∞) were increased about 123%, 194% and 195%, by Danshensu in rats, while the CL z/F value was decreased by 60%. Uptake of rosuvastatin in the primary rat hepatocytes was decreased by 3.13%, 41.15% and 74.62%, respectively in the presence of 20, 40 and 80 μmol x L(-1) Danshensu. The IC50 parameters was (53.04 ± 2.43) μmol x L(-1). The inhibitory effect of Danshensu on OATP1B1 mediated transport of rosuvastatin was related to the OATP1B1 gene type. In OATP1B1*5-HEK293T mutant cells, transport of rosuvastatin were reduced by (39.11 ± 4.94)% and (63.61 ± 3.94)%, respectively, by Danshensu at 1 and 10 μmol x L(-1). While transport of rosuvastatin was reduced by (8.22 ± 2.40)% and (11.56 ± 3.04)% and in OATP1B1*1a cells, respectively. Danshensu significantly altered the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin in rats, which was related to competitive inhibition of transport by OATPJBI. Danshensu exhibited a significant activity in the inhibition of rosuvastatin transport by OATP1B1*5-HEK293T, but not by OATP1B1*1a, suggesting a dependence on OATP1B1 sequence. PMID:27405165

  20. Injectable interferon beta-1b for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jankovic, Slobodan M

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease with either a progressive (10%–15%) or relapsing-remitting (85%–90%) course. The pathological hallmarks of MS are lesions of both white and grey matter in the central nervous system. The onset of the disease is usually around 30 years of age. The patients experience an acute focal neurologic dysfunction which is not characteristic, followed by partial or complete recovery. Acute episodes of neurologic dysfunction with diverse signs and symptoms will then recur throughout the life of a patient, with periods of partial or complete remission and clinical stability in between. Currently, there are several therapeutic options for MS with disease-modifying properties. Immunomodulatory therapy with interferon beta-1b (IFN-β1b) or -1a, glatiramer and natalizumab shows similar efficacy; in a resistant or intolerant patient, the most recently approved therapeutic option is mitoxantrone. IFN-β1b in patients with MS binds to specific receptors on surface of immune cells, changing the expression of several genes and leading to a decrease in quantity of cell-associated adhesion molecules, inhibition of major histocompatibility complex class II expression and reduction in inflammatory cells migration into the central nervous system. After 2 years of treatment, IFN-β1b reduces the risk of development of clinically defined MS from 45% (with placebo) to 28% (with IFN-β1b). It also reduces relapses for 34% (1.31 exacerbations annually with placebo and 0.9 with higher dose of IFN-β1b) and makes 31% more patients relapse-free. In secondary-progressive disease annual rate of progression is 3% lower with IFN-β1b. In recommended doses IFN-β1b causes the following frequent adverse effects: injection site reactions (redness, discoloration, inflammation, pain, necrosis and non-specific reactions), insomnia, influenza-like syndrome, asthenia, headache, myalgia, hypoesthesia, nausea, paresthesia, myasthenia

  1. Myelin protein zero gene sequencing diagnoses Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1B disease

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.; Zhang, H.; Madrid, R.

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most common genetic neuropathy, affects about 1 in 2600 people in Norway and is found worldwide. CMT Type 1 (CMT1) has slow nerve conduction with demyelinated Schwann cells. Autosomal dominant CMT Type 1B (CMT1B) results from mutations in the myelin protein zero gene which directs the synthesis of more than half of all Schwann cell protein. This gene was mapped to the chromosome 1q22-1q23.1 borderline by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The first 7 of 7 reported CMT1B mutations are unique. Thus the most effective means to identify CMT1B mutations in at-risk family members and fetuses is to sequence the entire coding sequence in dominant or sporadic CMT patients without the CMT1A duplication. Of the 19 primers used in 16 pars to uniquely amplify the entire MPZ coding sequence, 6 primer pairs were used to amplify and sequence the 6 exons. The DyeDeoxy Terminator cycle sequencing method used with four different color fluorescent lables was superior to manual sequencing because it sequences more bases unambiguously from extracted genomic DNA samples within 24 hours. This protocol was used to test 28 CMT and Dejerine-Sottas patients without CMT1A gene duplication. Sequencing MPZ gene-specific amplified fragments identified 9 polymorphic sites within the 6 exons that encode the 248 amino acid MPZ protein. The large number of major CMT1B mutations identified by single strand sequencing are being verified by reverse strand sequencing and when possible, by restriction enzyme analysis. This protocol can be used to distringuish CMT1B patients from othre CMT phenotypes and to determine the CMT1B status of relatives both presymptomatically and prenatally.

  2. Evaluation of Interferon Resistance in Newly Established Genotype 1b Hepatitis C Virus Cell Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Miki; Tasaka-Fujita, Megumi; Nakagawa, Mina; Watanabe, Takako; Kawai-Kitahata, Fukiko; Otani, Satoshi; Goto, Fumio; Nagata, Hiroko; Kaneko, Shun; Nitta, Sayuri; Murakawa, Miyako; Nishimura-Sakurai, Yuki; Azuma, Seishin; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Mori, Kenichi; Yagi, Shintaro; Kakinuma, Sei; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b is known to exhibit treatment resistance with respect to interferon (IFN) therapy. Substitution of amino acids 70 and 91 in the core region of the 1b genotype is a significant predictor of liver carcinogenesis and poor response to pegylated-IFN-α and ribavirin therapy. However, the molecular mechanism has not yet been clearly elucidated because of limitations of the HCV genotype 1b infectious model. Recently, the TPF1-M170T HCV genotype 1b cell culture system was established, in which the clone successfully replicates and infects Huh-7-derived Huh7-ALS32.50 cells. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare IFN resistance in various HCV clones using this system. Methods: HCV core amino acid substitutions R70Q and L91M were introduced to the TPF1-M170T clone and then transfected into Huh7-ALS32.50 cells. To evaluate the production of each virus, intracellular HCV core antigens were measured. Results were confirmed with Western blot analysis using anti-NS5A antibodies, and IFN sensitivity was subsequently measured. Results: Each clone was transfected successfully compared with JFH-1, with a significant difference in intracellular HCV core antigen (p < 0.05), an indicator of continuous HCV replication. Among all clones, L91M showed the highest increase in the HCV core antigen and HCV protein. There was no significant resistance against IFN treatment in core substitutions; however, IFN sensitivity was significantly different between the wildtype core and JFH-1 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: A novel genotype 1b HCV cell culture was constructed with core amino acid substitutions, which demonstrated IFN resistance of genotype 1b. This system will be useful for future analyses into the mechanisms of HCV genotype 1b treatment. PMID:27047766

  3. Seasonally Changing Cryptochrome 1b Expression in the Retinal Ganglion Cells of a Migrating Passerine Bird.

    PubMed

    Nießner, Christine; Gross, Julia Christina; Denzau, Susanne; Peichl, Leo; Fleissner, Gerta; Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes, blue-light absorbing proteins involved in the circadian clock, have been proposed to be the receptor molecules of the avian magnetic compass. In birds, several cryptochromes occur: Cryptochrome 2, Cryptochrome 4 and two splice products of Cryptochrome 1, Cry1a and Cry1b. With an antibody not distinguishing between the two splice products, Cryptochrome 1 had been detected in the retinal ganglion cells of garden warblers during migration. A recent study located Cry1a in the outer segments of UV/V-cones in the retina of domestic chickens and European robins, another migratory species. Here we report the presence of cryptochrome 1b (eCry1b) in retinal ganglion cells and displaced ganglion cells of European Robins, Erithacus rubecula. Immuno-histochemistry at the light microscopic and electron microscopic level showed eCry1b in the cell plasma, free in the cytosol as well as bound to membranes. This is supported by immuno-blotting. However, this applies only to robins in the migratory state. After the end of the migratory phase, the amount of eCry1b was markedly reduced and hardly detectable. In robins, the amount of eCry1b in the retinal ganglion cells varies with season: it appears to be strongly expressed only during the migratory period when the birds show nocturnal migratory restlessness. Since the avian magnetic compass does not seem to be restricted to the migratory phase, this seasonal variation makes a role of eCry1b in magnetoreception rather unlikely. Rather, it could be involved in physiological processes controlling migratory restlessness and thus enabling birds to perform their nocturnal flights. PMID:26953690

  4. Seasonally Changing Cryptochrome 1b Expression in the Retinal Ganglion Cells of a Migrating Passerine Bird

    PubMed Central

    Nießner, Christine; Gross, Julia Christina; Denzau, Susanne; Peichl, Leo; Fleissner, Gerta; Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes, blue-light absorbing proteins involved in the circadian clock, have been proposed to be the receptor molecules of the avian magnetic compass. In birds, several cryptochromes occur: Cryptochrome 2, Cryptochrome 4 and two splice products of Cryptochrome 1, Cry1a and Cry1b. With an antibody not distinguishing between the two splice products, Cryptochrome 1 had been detected in the retinal ganglion cells of garden warblers during migration. A recent study located Cry1a in the outer segments of UV/V-cones in the retina of domestic chickens and European robins, another migratory species. Here we report the presence of cryptochrome 1b (eCry1b) in retinal ganglion cells and displaced ganglion cells of European Robins, Erithacus rubecula. Immuno-histochemistry at the light microscopic and electron microscopic level showed eCry1b in the cell plasma, free in the cytosol as well as bound to membranes. This is supported by immuno-blotting. However, this applies only to robins in the migratory state. After the end of the migratory phase, the amount of eCry1b was markedly reduced and hardly detectable. In robins, the amount of eCry1b in the retinal ganglion cells varies with season: it appears to be strongly expressed only during the migratory period when the birds show nocturnal migratory restlessness. Since the avian magnetic compass does not seem to be restricted to the migratory phase, this seasonal variation makes a role of eCry1b in magnetoreception rather unlikely. Rather, it could be involved in physiological processes controlling migratory restlessness and thus enabling birds to perform their nocturnal flights. PMID:26953690

  5. Which alcohol use disorder criteria contribute to the association of ADH1B with alcohol dependence?

    PubMed

    Hart, Amy B; Lynch, Kevin G; Farrer, Lindsay; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R

    2016-07-01

    Although alcohol dependence (AD) is approximately 50% heritable, little is known about how specific genetic loci affect AD risk. In a genome-wide association study (GWAS), we identified highly significant associations between two population-specific functional variants in the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B gene (ADH1B) and AD in African-Americans (AAs; rs2066702) and European-Americans (EAs; rs1229984). In the current study, we determined which specific diagnostic criteria contributed to the observed associations of ADH1B SNPs with AD. Our analysis included both the DSM-IV and DSM-5 diagnostic systems. We also investigated the relationship of ADH1B variants to the maximum number of drinks consumed in a 24-hour period (MaxDrinks), a presumed intermediate phenotype of AD. We found that, although all criteria made strong individual contributions to the associations, the largest contributions came from those reflecting neuroadaptation: tolerance (rs2066702) and withdrawal (rs1229984). Overall, evidence for association with DSM-5 criteria was slightly stronger than for DSM-IV criteria. For rs2066702, results were similar for DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria. However, the most significant DSM-5 criterion associated with rs1229984 was alcohol-related social/interpersonal problems. Both ADH1B variants were associated with MaxDrinks, a measure of innate tolerance, and MaxDrinks mediated the associations between ADH1B and alcohol outcomes. We replicated the findings for rs2066702 and tolerance in an independent sample of AAs. Taken together, these results suggest that variation in ADH1B affects the adaptation to heavy drinking, highlighting population-specific differences in genetic risk for AUD. They also suggest that the revisions reflected in DSM-5 AUD may enhance the utility of that diagnosis for gene finding. PMID:25828809

  6. Somatic overgrowth associated with homozygous mutations in both MAN1B1 and SEC23A

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Swati; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Wang, Tracy; Dempsey Nunez, Laura; Rosenblatt, David S.; Gibson, William T.; Gilfix, Brian; Bergeron, John J. M.; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A.

    2016-01-01

    Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified homozygous mutations in two unlinked genes, SEC23A c.1200G>C (p.M400I) and MAN1B1 c.1000C>T (p.R334C), associated with congenital birth defects in two patients from a consanguineous family. Patients presented with carbohydrate-deficient transferrin, tall stature, obesity, macrocephaly, and maloccluded teeth. The parents were healthy heterozygous carriers for both mutations and an unaffected sibling with tall stature carried the heterozygous mutation in SEC23A only. Mutations in SEC23A are responsible for craniolenticosultura dysplasia (CLSD). CLSD patients are short, have late-closing fontanels, and have reduced procollagen (pro-COL1A1) secretion because of abnormal pro-COL1A1 retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The mutation we identified in MAN1B1 was previously associated with reduced MAN1B1 protein and congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). CDG patients are also short, are obese, and have abnormal glycan remodeling. Molecular analysis of fibroblasts from the family revealed normal levels of SEC23A in all cells and reduced levels of MAN1B1 in cells with heterozygous or homozygous mutations in SEC23A and MAN1B1. Secretion of pro-COL1A1 was increased in fibroblasts from the siblings and patients, and pro-COL1A1 was retained in Golgi of heterozygous and homozygous mutant cells, although intracellular pro-COL1A1 was increased in patient fibroblasts only. We postulate that increased pro-COL1A1 secretion is responsible for tall stature in these patients and an unaffected sibling, and not previously discovered in patients with mutations in either SEC23A or MAN1B1. The patients in this study share biochemical and cellular characteristics consistent with mutations in MAN1B1 and SEC23A, indicating a digenic disease. PMID:27148587

  7. Somatic overgrowth associated with homozygous mutations in both MAN1B1 and SEC23A.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Swati; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Wang, Tracy; Dempsey Nunez, Laura; Rosenblatt, David S; Gibson, William T; Gilfix, Brian; Bergeron, John J M; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A

    2016-05-01

    Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified homozygous mutations in two unlinked genes, SEC23A c.1200G>C (p.M400I) and MAN1B1 c.1000C>T (p.R334C), associated with congenital birth defects in two patients from a consanguineous family. Patients presented with carbohydrate-deficient transferrin, tall stature, obesity, macrocephaly, and maloccluded teeth. The parents were healthy heterozygous carriers for both mutations and an unaffected sibling with tall stature carried the heterozygous mutation in SEC23A only. Mutations in SEC23A are responsible for craniolenticosultura dysplasia (CLSD). CLSD patients are short, have late-closing fontanels, and have reduced procollagen (pro-COL1A1) secretion because of abnormal pro-COL1A1 retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The mutation we identified in MAN1B1 was previously associated with reduced MAN1B1 protein and congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). CDG patients are also short, are obese, and have abnormal glycan remodeling. Molecular analysis of fibroblasts from the family revealed normal levels of SEC23A in all cells and reduced levels of MAN1B1 in cells with heterozygous or homozygous mutations in SEC23A and MAN1B1. Secretion of pro-COL1A1 was increased in fibroblasts from the siblings and patients, and pro-COL1A1 was retained in Golgi of heterozygous and homozygous mutant cells, although intracellular pro-COL1A1 was increased in patient fibroblasts only. We postulate that increased pro-COL1A1 secretion is responsible for tall stature in these patients and an unaffected sibling, and not previously discovered in patients with mutations in either SEC23A or MAN1B1. The patients in this study share biochemical and cellular characteristics consistent with mutations in MAN1B1 and SEC23A, indicating a digenic disease. PMID:27148587

  8. A functional null mutation of SCN1B in a patient with Dravet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Patino, Gustavo A.; Claes, Lieve R.F.; Lopez-Santiago, Luis; Slat, Emily A.; Dondeti, Raja S. R.; Chen, Chunling; O'Malley, Heather A.; Gray, Charles B.B.; Miyazaki, Haruko; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Oyama, Fumitaka; Jonghe, Peter De; Isom, Lori L.

    2009-01-01

    Dravet syndrome (also called Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy) is one of the most severe forms of childhood epilepsy. Most patients have heterozygous mutations in SCN1A, encoding voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1 α subunits. Sodium channels are modulated by β1 subunits, encoded by SCN1B, a gene also linked to epilepsy. Here we report the first patient with Dravet Syndrome associated with a recessive mutation in SCN1B (p.R125C). Biochemical characterization of p.R125C in a heterologous system demonstrated little to no cell surface expression despite normal total cellular expression. This occurred regardless of co-expression of Nav1.1 α subunits. Because the patient was homozygous for the mutation, these data suggest a functional SCN1B null phenotype. To understand the consequences of the lack of β1 cell surface expression in vivo, hippocampal slice recordings were performed in Scn1b−/− vs. Scn1b+/+ mice. Scn1b−/− CA3 neurons fired evoked action potentials with a significantly higher peak voltage and significantly greater amplitude compared to wildtype. However, in contrast to the Scn1a+/− model of Dravet syndrome, we found no measurable differences in sodium current density in acutely dissociated CA3 hippocampal neurons. While Scn1b−/− mice seize spontaneously, the seizure susceptibility of Scn1b+/− mice was similar to wildtype, suggesting that, like the parents of this patient, one functional SCN1B allele is sufficient for normal control of electrical excitability. We conclude that SCN1B p.R125C is an autosomal recessive cause of Dravet syndrome through functional gene inactivation. PMID:19710327

  9. Haploinsufficiency of BAZ1B contributes to Williams syndrome through transcriptional dysregulation of neurodevelopmental pathways.

    PubMed

    Lalli, Matthew A; Jang, Jiwon; Park, Joo-Hye C; Wang, Yidi; Guzman, Elmer; Zhou, Hongjun; Audouard, Morgane; Bridges, Daniel; Tovar, Kenneth R; Papuc, Sorina M; Tutulan-Cunita, Andreea C; Huang, Yadong; Budisteanu, Magdalena; Arghir, Aurora; Kosik, Kenneth S

    2016-04-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a genomic deletion of ∼28 genes that results in a cognitive and behavioral profile marked by overall intellectual impairment with relative strength in expressive language and hypersocial behavior. Advancements in protocols for neuron differentiation from induced pluripotent stem cells allowed us to elucidate the molecular circuitry underpinning the ontogeny of WS. In patient-derived stem cells and neurons, we determined the expression profile of the Williams-Beuren syndrome critical region-deleted genes and the genome-wide transcriptional consequences of the hemizygous genomic microdeletion at chromosome 7q11.23. Derived neurons displayed disease-relevant hallmarks and indicated novel aberrant pathways in WS neurons including over-activated Wnt signaling accompanying an incomplete neurogenic commitment. We show that haploinsufficiency of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler, BAZ1B, which is deleted in WS, significantly contributes to this differentiation defect. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq) revealed BAZ1B target gene functions are enriched for neurogenesis, neuron differentiation and disease-relevant phenotypes. BAZ1B haploinsufficiency caused widespread gene expression changes in neural progenitor cells, and together with BAZ1B ChIP-seq target genes, explained 42% of the transcriptional dysregulation in WS neurons. BAZ1B contributes to regulating the balance between neural precursor self-renewal and differentiation and the differentiation defect caused by BAZ1B haploinsufficiency can be rescued by mitigating over-active Wnt signaling in neural stem cells. Altogether, these results reveal a pivotal role for BAZ1B in neurodevelopment and implicate its haploinsufficiency as a likely contributor to the neurological phenotypes in WS. PMID:26755828

  10. Distinct Features of Cap Binding by eIF4E1b Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kubacka, Dorota; Miguel, Ricardo Núñez; Minshall, Nicola; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Standart, Nancy; Zuberek, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    eIF4E1b, closely related to the canonical translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E1a), cap-binding protein is highly expressed in mouse, Xenopus and zebrafish oocytes. We have previously characterized eIF4E1b as a component of the CPEB mRNP translation repressor complex along with the eIF4E-binding protein 4E-Transporter, the Xp54/DDX6 RNA helicase and additional RNA-binding proteins. eIF4E1b exhibited only very weak interactions with m7GTP-Sepharose and, rather than binding eIF4G, interacted with 4E-T. Here we undertook a detailed examination of both Xenopus and human eIF4E1b interactions with cap analogues using fluorescence titration and homology modeling. The predicted structure of eIF4E1b maintains the α + β fold characteristic of eIF4E proteins and its cap-binding pocket is similarly arranged by critical amino acids: Trp56, Trp102, Glu103, Trp166, Arg112, Arg157 and Lys162 and residues of the C-terminal loop. However, we demonstrate that eIF4E1b is 3-fold less well able to bind the cap than eIF4E1a, both proteins being highly stimulated by methylation at N7 of guanine. Moreover, eIF4E1b proteins are distinguishable from eIF4E1a by a set of conserved amino acid substitutions, several of which are located near to cap-binding residues. Indeed, eIF4E1b possesses several distinct features, namely, enhancement of cap binding by a benzyl group at N7 position of guanine, a reduced response to increasing length of the phosphate chain and increased binding to a cap separated by a linker from Sepharose, suggesting differences in the arrangement of the protein's core. In agreement, mutagenesis of the amino acids differentiating eIF4E1b from eIF4E1a reduces cap binding by eIF4E1a 2-fold, demonstrating their role in modulating cap binding. PMID:25463438

  11. The host range of RK2 minimal replicon copy-up mutants is limited by species-specific differences in the maximum tolerable copy number.

    PubMed

    Haugan, K; Karunakaran, P; Tøndervik, A; Valla, S

    1995-01-01

    The minimal replicon of the broad-host-range plasmid RK2 consists of a gene, trfA (trans-acting replication), encoding a protein required for initiation of plasmid replication. The TrfA protein binds to iterons in the cis-acting origin of vegetative replication (oriV), but the exact mechanism by which TrfA-mediated replication initiation takes place is not known. We report here the isolation and characterization of five mini RK2 trfA mutant plasmids with an elevated plasmid copy number, four in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and one in Azotobacter vinelandii. The mutations are localized between or downstream of previously reported Escherichia coli copy-up mutations in trfA, and one of the mutations has been described earlier as an independent copy-up isolate in E. coli. The five mutant plasmids were all moderately copy up in both E. coli and their host of origin, in spite of the use of isolation procedures which were expected to select efficiently in favor of plasmid mutants specifying high copy numbers. In contrast, previously described high copy-up mutants isolated in E. coli could not be established in P. aeruginosa and A. vinelandii. These high copy-up mutants were shown to induce cell killing in E. coli under conditions where the plasmid copy number was increased as a physiological response to reduced growth rate. We propose that the reason for this killing effect is that the copy number under these conditions exceeds an upper tolerance level specific for E. coli. By assuming that the corresponding tolerance level is lower in P. aeruginosa and A. vinelandii than in E. coli, and that the mechanism of copy number regulation is similar, the model can explain the phenotypes of all tested copy up mutants in these two hosts. Analogous studies were also performed in Salmonella typhimurium and Acetobacter xylinum. The data obtained in these studies indicate that the above model is probably generally true for gram-negative bacteria, and the results also indicate that the

  12. Evidence supporting a premature termination mechanism for subgenomic RNA transcription in Pelargonium line pattern virus: identification of a critical long-range RNA-RNA interaction and functional variants through mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Pérez, Marta; Hernández, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    Pelargonium line pattern virus (PLPV) is a plus-strand RNA virus that has been proposed as type species of a tentative new genus, Pelarspovirus, in the family Tombusviridae. One of the singular traits of members of this prospective genus is the production of a unique subgenomic (sg) mRNA that is structurally and functionally tricistronic. Here, we have aimed to get insights into the mechanism that governs PLPV sg mRNA transcription. A long-range RNA-RNA interaction that is critical for the process has been identified through RNA folding predictions and mutational analysis of the viral genome. Such interaction seems to occur in the plus-strand, likely acts in cis, and specifically mediates the synthesis of sg RNA-sized minus-strand. The accumulation of this RNA species is easily detectable in plants and its generation can be uncoupled from that of the plus-strand sg mRNA. All these data together with the observation that 5' ends of PLPV genomic and sg mRNAs have sequence resemblances (as expected if both act as promoters in the corresponding minus-strand), support that premature termination is the mechanism underlying PLPV sg mRNA formation. PMID:26990209

  13. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping in Brassica rapa Revealed the Structural and Functional Conservation of Genetic Loci Governing Morphological and Yield Component Traits in the A, B, and C Subgenomes of Brassica Species

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaonan; Ramchiary, Nirala; Dhandapani, Vignesh; Choi, Su Ryun; Hur, Yoonkang; Nou, Ill-Sup; Yoon, Moo Kyoung; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2013-01-01

    Brassica rapa is an important crop species that produces vegetables, oilseed, and fodder. Although many studies reported quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping, the genes governing most of its economically important traits are still unknown. In this study, we report QTL mapping for morphological and yield component traits in B. rapa and comparative map alignment between B. rapa, B. napus, B. juncea, and Arabidopsis thaliana to identify candidate genes and conserved QTL blocks between them. A total of 95 QTL were identified in different crucifer blocks of the B. rapa genome. Through synteny analysis with A. thaliana, B. rapa candidate genes and intronic and exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms in the parental lines were detected from whole genome resequenced data, a few of which were validated by mapping them to the QTL regions. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed differences in the expression levels of a few genes in parental lines. Comparative mapping identified five key major evolutionarily conserved crucifer blocks (R, J, F, E, and W) harbouring QTL for morphological and yield components traits between the A, B, and C subgenomes of B. rapa, B. juncea, and B. napus. The information of the identified candidate genes could be used for breeding B. rapa and other related Brassica species. PMID:23223793

  14. Construction of recombinant DNA molecules by the use of a single stranded DNA generated by the polymerase chain reaction: its application to chimeric hepatitis A virus/poliovirus subgenomic cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wychowski, C; Emerson, S U; Silver, J; Feinstone, S M

    1990-01-01

    In order to study the importance of VP4 in picornavirus replication and translation, we replaced the hepatitis A virus (HAV) VP4 with the poliovirus (PV1) VP4. Using a modification of oligonucleotide site directed mutagenesis and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we created a subgenomic cDNA chimera of hepatitis A virus in which the precise sequences coding for HAV VP4 capsid protein were replaced by the sequences coding for the poliovirus VP4 capsid protein. The method involved the use of PCR primers corresponding to the 3' and 5' ends of the poliovirus VP4 sequence and that had HAV VP4 3' and 5' flanking sequences on their 5'ends. Single stranded DNA of 240 and 242 nt containing the 204 nt coding for the complete poliovirus VP4 were produced by using a limiting amount of one of the primers in a PCR reaction. These single stranded PCR products were used like mutagenic oligonucleotides on a single stranded phagemid containing the first 2070 bases of the HAV genome. Using this technique, we precisely replaced the HAV VP4 gene by the poliovirus VP4 gene as determined by DNA sequencing. The cDNA was transcribed into RNA and translated in vitro. The resulting protein could be precipitated by antibody to poliovirus VP4 but not to HAV VP4. Images PMID:2156236

  15. Adherence to Interferon β-1b Treatment in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Oscar; Agüera, Javier; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Millán-Pascual, Javier; Ramió i Torrentà, Lluis; Oliva, Pedro; Argente, Javier; Berdei, Yasmina; Soler, Jose Maria; Carmona, Olga; Errea, Jose Maria; Farrés, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Background Adherence to interferon β-1b (INFβ-1b) therapy is essential to maximize the beneficial effects of treatment in multiple sclerosis (MS). For that reason, the main objectives of this study are to assess adherence to INFβ-1b in patients suffering from MS in Spain, and to identify the factors responsible for adherence in routine clinical practice. Methodology/Principal Findings This was an observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study including 120 Spanish patients with MS under INFβ-1b treatment. Therapeutic adherence was assessed with Morisky-Green test and with the percentage of doses received. The proportion of adherent patients assessed by Morisky-Green test was 68.3%, being indicative of poor adherence. Nevertheless, the percentage of doses received, which was based on the number of injected medication, was 94.3%. The main reason for missing INFβ-1b injections was forgetting some of the administrations (64%). Therefore, interventions that diminish forgetfulness might have a positive effect in the proportion of adherent patients and in the percentage of doses received. In addition, age and comorbidities had a significant effect in the number of doses injected per month, and should be considered in the management of adherence in MS patients. Conclusion/Significance Among all the available methods for assessing adherence, the overall consumption of the intended dose has to be considered when addressing adherence. PMID:22615737

  16. Genetic interaction between Sox10 and Zfhx1b during enteric nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Stanchina, Laure; Van de Putte, Tom; Goossens, Michel; Huylebroeck, Danny; Bondurand, Nadege

    2010-05-15

    The involvement of SOX10 and ZFHX1B in Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease (hypopigmentation, deafness, and absence of enteric ganglia) and Mowat-Wilson syndrome (mental retardation, facial dysmorphy and variable congenital malformations including Hirschsprung disease) respectively, highlighted the importance of both transcription factors during enteric nervous system (ENS) development. The expression and function of SOX10 are now well established, but those of ZFHX1B remain elusive. Here we describe the expression profile of Zfhx1b and its genetic interactions with Sox10 during mouse ENS development. Through phenotype analysis of Sox10;Zfhx1b double mutants, we show that a coordinated and balanced interaction between these two genes is required for normal ENS development. Double mutants present with more severe ENS defects due to decreased proliferation of enteric progenitors and increased neuronal differentiation from E11.5 onwards. Thus, joint activity between these two transcription factors is crucial for proper ENS development and our results contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis of ENS defects observed both in mutant mouse models and in patients carrying SOX10 and ZFHX1B mutations. PMID:20206619

  17. Cancer Activation and Polymorphisms of Human Cytochrome P450 1B1

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Young-Jin; Kim, Donghak

    2016-01-01

    Human cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s, CYPs) are major oxidative catalysts that metabolize various xenobiotic and endogenous compounds. Many carcinogens induce cancer only after metabolic activation and P450 enzymes play an important role in this phenomenon. P450 1B1 mediates bioactivation of many procarcinogenic chemicals and carcinogenic estrogen. It catalyzes the oxidation reaction of polycyclic aromatic carbons, heterocyclic and aromatic amines, and the 4-hydroxylation reaction of 17β-estradiol. Enhanced expression of P450 1B1 promotes cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. There are at least 25 polymorphic variants of P450 1B1 and some of these have been reported to be associated with eye diseases. In addition, P4