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Sample records for 1d cds nanostructures

  1. One-dimensional CdS nanostructures: synthesis, properties, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Tianyou; Fang, Xiaosheng; Li, Liang; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2010-02-01

    One-dimensional (1D) semiconductor nanostructures are of prime interest due to their potential in investigating the size and dimensionality dependence of the materials' physical properties and constructing nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. Cadmium sulfide (CdS) is an important semiconductor compound of the ii-vi group, and its synthesis and properties have been of growing interest owing to prominent applications in several fields. This article provides a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art research activities that focus on the rational synthesis, novel properties and unique applications of 1D CdS nanostructures in nanotechnology. It begins with the rational design and synthesis of 1D CdS nanostructures, and then highlights a range of unique properties and applications (e.g. photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence, electrochemiluminescence, photocatalysis, lasers, waveguides, modulators, solar cells, field-effect transistors, photodetectors, field-emitters, and nanogenerators) associated with them. Finally, the review is concluded with the author outlook of the perspectives with respect to future research on 1D CdS nanostructures.

  2. Ion-sensing properties of 1D vanadium pentoxide nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The application of one-dimensional (1D) V2O5·nH2O nanostructures as pH sensing material was evaluated. 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures were obtained by a hydrothermal method with systematic control of morphology forming different nanostructures: nanoribbons, nanowires and nanorods. Deposited onto Au-covered substrates, 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures were employed as gate material in pH sensors based on separative extended gate FET as an alternative to provide FET isolation from the chemical environment. 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures showed pH sensitivity around the expected theoretical value. Due to high pH sensing properties, flexibility and low cost, further applications of 1D V2O5·nH2O nanostructures comprise enzyme FET-based biosensors using immobilized enzymes. PMID:22709724

  3. Ferromagnetism in sphalerite and wurtzite CdS nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed in undoped sphalerite and wurtzite CdS nanostructures which are synthesized by hydrothermal methods. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy results indicate that the sphalerite CdS samples show a spherical-like shape and the wurtzite CdS ones show a flower-like shape, both of which are aggregated by lots of smaller particles. The impurity of the samples has been ruled out by the results of X-ray diffraction, selected-area electron diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Magnetization measurements indicate that all the samples exhibit room-temperature ferromagnetism and the saturation magnetization decreases with the increased crystal sizes, revealing that the observed ferromagnetism is defect-related, which is also confirmed by the post-annealing processes. This finding in CdS should be the focus of future electronic and spintronic devices. PMID:23294671

  4. Flexible Photodetectors Based on 1D Inorganic Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Flexible photodetectors with excellent flexibility, high mechanical stability and good detectivity, have attracted great research interest in recent years. 1D inorganic nanostructures provide a number of opportunities and capabilities for use in flexible photodetectors as they have unique geometry, good transparency, outstanding mechanical flexibility, and excellent electronic/optoelectronic properties. This article offers a comprehensive review of several types of flexible photodetectors based on 1D nanostructures from the past ten years, including flexible ultraviolet, visible, and infrared photodetectors. High‐performance organic‐inorganic hybrid photodetectors, as well as devices with 1D nanowire (NW) arrays, are also reviewed. Finally, new concepts of flexible photodetectors including piezophototronic, stretchable and self‐powered photodetectors are examined to showcase the future research in this exciting field. PMID:27774404

  5. Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The current global energy problem can be attributed to insufficient fossil fuel supplies and excessive greenhouse gas emissions resulting from increasing fossil fuel consumption. The huge demand for clean energy potentially can be met by solar-to-electricity conversions. The large-scale use of solar energy is not occurring due to the high cost and inadequate efficiencies of existing solar cells. Nanostructured materials have offered new opportunities to design more efficient solar cells, particularly one-dimensional (1-D) nanomaterials for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. These 1-D nanostructures, including nanotubes, nanowires, and nanorods, offer significant opportunities to improve efficiencies of solar cells by facilitating photon absorption, electron transport, and electron collection; however, tremendous challenges must be conquered before the large-scale commercialization of such cells. This review specifically focuses on the use of 1-D nanostructures for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. Other nanostructured solar cells or solar cells based on bulk materials are not covered in this review. Major topics addressed include dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells, and p-n junction solar cells.

  6. Carbon-assisted morphological manipulation of CdS nanostructures and their cathodoluminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Meng; Zhai, Tianyou; Wang Xi; Liao Qing; Ma Ying; Yao, Jiannian

    2009-11-15

    CdS nanostructures with different morphologies and sizes were successfully fabricated through a facile and effective carbon-assisted thermal evaporation method. Through simply changing the positions of silicon substrates, the temperatures and the effects of carbon in different zones were modified, and thus the morphologies of CdS nanostructures were varied from multipods to nanobrushes to nanocups. These nanostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Cathodoluminescence (CL) measurement shows that the as-grown CdS nanostructures display different luminescent properties. CdS multipods and nanocups show mainly green emission centered at {approx}496 nm. However, nanobrushes exhibit predominant red emission band peaking at {approx}711 nm. These interesting results show that carbon not only affected the growth process but also influenced the properties of CdS nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: A facile and effective carbon-assisted thermal evaporation method is explored to synthesize CdS multipods, nanobrushes and nanocups. These CdS nanostructures display very different optical properties.

  7. Catalyst-nanostructure interaction in the growth of 1-D ZnO nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Borchers, C; Müller, S; Stichtenoth, D; Schwen, D; Ronning, C

    2006-02-02

    Vapor-liquid-solid is a well-established process in catalyst guided growth of 1-D nanostructures, i.e., nanobelts and nanowires. The catalyst particle is generally believed to be in the liquid state during growth, and is the site for impinging molecules. The crystalline structure of the catalyst may not have any influence on the structure of the grown nanostructures. In this work, using Au guided growth of ZnO, we show that the interfaces between the catalyst droplet and the nanostructure grow in well-defined mutual crystallographic relationships. The nanostructure defines the crystallographic orientation of the solidifying Au droplet. Possible alloy, intermetallic, or eutectic phase formation during catalysis are elucidated with the help of a proposed ternary Au-Zn-O phase diagram.

  8. Mixed-solvothermal synthesis of CdS micro/nanostructures and their optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shengliang; Zhang, Linfei; Huang, Zhenzhong; Wang, Shangping

    2011-01-01

    Several novel cadmium sulfide (CdS) micro/nanostructures, including cauliflower-like microspheres, football-like microspheres, tower-like microrods, and dendrites were controllably prepared via an oxalic acid-assisted solvothermal route using ethylene glycol (EG) and H2O as pure and mixed solvents with different S sources. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and UV-vis spectrophotometer (UV). It was found that CdS micro/nanostructures can be selectively obtained by varying the composition of solvent, concentration of oxalic acid, and sulfur sources. UV-vis absorption spectra reveal that their absorption properties are shape-dependent. The possible formation process of the CdS micro/nanostructures was briefly discussed. This route provides a facile way to tune the morphologies of CdS over a wide range.

  9. One-dimensional CdS nanostructures: a promising candidate for optoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiqiao; Wang, Xi; Xu, Junqi; Zhang, Qi; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Ma, Ying; Zhai, Tianyou

    2013-06-11

    As a promising candidate for optoelectronics, one-dimensional CdS nanostructures have drawn great scientific and technical interest due to their interesting fundamental properties and possibilities of utilization in novel promising optoelectronical devices with augmented performance and functionalities. This progress report highlights a selection of important topics pertinent to optoelectronical applications of one-dimensional CdS nanostructures over the last five years. This article begins with the description of rational design and controlled synthesis of CdS nanostructure arrays, alloyed nanostructucures and kinked nanowire superstructures, and then focuses on the optoelectronical properties, and applications including cathodoluminescence, lasers, light-emitting diodes, waveguides, field emitters, logic circuits, memory devices, photodetectors, gas sensors, photovoltaics and photoelectrochemistry. Finally, the general challenges and the potential future directions of this exciting area of research are highlighted.

  10. Quasi-one dimensional (Q1D) nanostructures: Synthesis, integration and device application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Chung-Jen

    Quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) nanostructures such as nanotubes and nanowires have been widely regarded as the potential building blocks for nanoscale electronic, optoelectronic and sensing devices. In this work, the content can be divided into three categories: Nano-material synthesis and characterizations, alignment and integration, physical properties and application. The dissertation consists of seven chapters as following. Chapter 1 will give an introduction to low dimensional nano-materials. Chapter 2 explains the mechanism how Q1D nanostructure grows. Chapter 3 describes the methods how we horizontally and vertically align the Q1D nanostructure. Chapter 4 and 5 are the electrical and optical device characterization respectively. Chapter 6 demonstrates the integration of Q1D nanostructures and the device application. The last chapter will discuss the future work and conclusion of the thesis.

  11. Controlled way to prepare quasi-1D nanostructures with complex chemical composition in porous anodic alumina.

    PubMed

    Lukatskaya, Maria R; Trusov, Lev A; Eliseev, Andrey A; Lukashin, Alexey V; Jansen, Martin; Kazin, Pavel E; Napolskii, Kirill S

    2011-02-28

    Herein we propose a novel approach to the preparation of quasi-1D nanostructures with various chemical compositions based on infiltration of colloidal solution into the asymmetric anodic alumina membrane. The proposed technique was successfully applied for the preparation of ordered arrays of the magnetically hard anisotropic hexaferrite nanostructures.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic activity of 1D TiO2 nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Julieta; Alarcón, Hugo; López, Alcides; Candal, Roberto; Acosta, Dwight; Rodriguez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Nanowire/nanorod TiO(2) structures of approximately 8 nm in diameter and around 1,000 nm long were synthesized by alkaline hydrothermal treatment of two different TiO(2) nanopowders. The first precursor was TiO(2) obtained by the sol-gel process (SG-TiO(2)); the second was the well-known commercial TiO(2) P-25 (P25-TiO(2)). Anatase-like 1D TiO(2) nanostructures were obtained in both cases. The one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures synthesized from SG-TiO(2) powders turned into rod-like nanostructures after annealing at 400 °C for 2 h. Conversely, the nanostructures synthesized from P25-TiO(2) preserved the tubular structure after annealing, displaying a higher Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area than the first system (279 and 97 m²/g, respectively). Despite the higher surface area shown by the 1D nanostructures, in both cases the photocatalytic activity was lower than for the P25-TiO(2) powder. However, the rod-like nanostructures obtained from SG-TiO(2) displayed slightly higher efficiency than the sol-gel prepared powders. The lower photocatalytic activity of the nanostructures with respect to P-25 can be associated with the lower crystallinity of 1D TiO(2) in both materials.

  13. Structural and Optical Study of Chemical Bath Deposited Nano-Structured CdS Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Dheeraj; Sharma, Pankaj; Sharma, Vineet; Barman, P. B.; Katyal, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    CdS is commonly used as window layer in polycrystalline solar cells. The paper presents a structural and optical study of CdS nano-structured thin films. High quality CdS thin films are grown on commercial glass by means of chemical bath deposition. It involves an alkaline solution of cadmium salt, a complexant, a chalcogen source and a non-ionic surfactant. The films have been prepared under various process parameters. The chemically deposited films are annealed to estimate its effect on the structural and optical properties of films. These films (as -deposited and annealed) have been characterized by means of XRD, SEM and UV-Visible spectrophotometer. XRD of films show the nano-crystalline nature. The energy gap of films is found to be of direct in nature.

  14. Bimetallic nanostructures as active Raman markers: gold-nanoparticle assembly on 1D and 2D silver nanostructure surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gunawidjaja, Ray; Kharlampieva, Eugenia; Choi, Ikjun; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2009-11-01

    It is demonstrated that bimetallic silver-gold anisotropic nanostructures can be easily assembled from various nanoparticle building blocks with well-defined geometries by means of electrostatic interactions. One-dimensional (1D) silver nanowires, two-dimensional (2D) silver nanoplates, and spherical gold nanoparticles are used as representative building blocks for bottom-up assembly. The gold nanoparticles are electrostatically bound onto the 1D silver nanowires and the 2D silver nanoplates to give bimetallic nanostructures. The unique feature of the resulting nanostructures is the particle-to-particle interaction that subjects absorbed analytes to an enhanced electromagnetic field with strong polarization dependence. The Raman activity of the bimetallic nanostructures is compared with that of the individual nanoparticle blocks by using rhodamine 6G solution as the model analyte. The Raman intensity of the best-performing silver-gold nanostructure is comparable with the dense array of silver nanowires and silver nanoplates that were prepared by means of the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. An optimized design of a single-nanostructure substrate for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), based on a wet-assembly technique proposed here, can serve as a compact and low-cost alternative to fabricated nanoparticle arrays.

  15. Scalable economic extracellular synthesis of CdS nanostructured particles by a non-pathogenic thermophile

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Ji Won; Ivanov, Ilia N; Duty, Chad E; Love, Lonnie J; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Wang, Wei; Li, Dr. Yi-Liang; Madden, Andrew; Mosher, Jennifer J; Hu, Michael Z.; Suresh, Anil K; Rawn, Claudia J; Jung, Hyunsung; Lauf, Robert J; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2013-01-01

    We report microbially facilitated synthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanostructured particles (NP) using anaerobic, metal-reducing Thermoanaerobacter sp. The extracellular CdS crystallites were <10 nm in size with yields of ~3 g/L of growth medium/month with demonstrated reproducibility and scalability up to 24 L. During synthesis, Thermoanaerobacter cultures reduced thiosulfate and sulfite salts to H2S, which reacted with Cd2+ cations to produce thermodynamically favored NP in a single step at 65oC with catalytic nucleation on the cell surfaces. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis of dry CdS NP revealed an exciton-dominated PL peak at 440 nm, having a narrow full width at half maximum of 10 nm. A PL spectrum of CdS NP produced by dissimilatory sulfur reducing bacteria was dominated by features associated with radiative exciton relaxation at the surface. High reproducibility of CdS NP PL features important for scale-up conditions was confirmed from test tubes to 24L batches at a small fraction of the manufacturing cost associated with conventional inorganic NP production processes.

  16. Self-assembly of functional molecules into 1D crystalline nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanbing; Xu, Liang; Liu, Huibiao; Li, Yongjun; Che, Chi-Ming; Li, Yuliang

    2015-02-01

    Self-assembled functional nanoarchitectures are employed as important nanoscale building blocks for advanced materials and smart miniature devices to fulfill the increasing needs of high materials usage efficiency, low energy consumption, and high-performance devices. One-dimensional (1D) crystalline nanostructures, especially molecule-composed crystalline nanostructures, attract significant attention due to their fascinating infusion structure and functionality which enables the easy tailoring of organic molecules with excellent carrier mobility and crystal stability. In this review, we discuss the recent progress of 1D crystalline self-assembled nanostructures of functional molecules, which include both a small molecule-derived and a polymer-based crystalline nanostructure. The basic principles of the molecular structure design and the process engineering of 1D crystalline nanostructures are also discussed. The molecular building blocks, self-assembly structures, and their applications in optical, electrical, and photoelectrical devices are overviewed and we give a brief outlook on crucial issues that need to be addressed in future research endeavors.

  17. Localized self-heating in large arrays of 1D nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Monereo, O; Illera, S; Varea, A; Schmidt, M; Sauerwald, T; Schütze, A; Cirera, A; Prades, J D

    2016-03-07

    One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer a promising path towards highly efficient heating and temperature control in integrated microsystems. The so called self-heating effect can be used to modulate the response of solid state gas sensor devices. In this work, efficient self-heating was found to occur at random networks of nanostructured systems with similar power requirements to highly ordered systems (e.g. individual nanowires, where their thermal efficiency was attributed to the small dimensions of the objects). Infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy were used to map the temperature profiles of films based on random arrangements of carbon nanofibers during self-heating. Both the techniques demonstrate consistently that heating concentrates in small regions, the here-called "hot-spots". On correlating dynamic temperature mapping with electrical measurements, we also observed that these minute hot-spots rule the resistance values observed macroscopically. A physical model of a random network of 1D resistors helped us to explain this observation. The model shows that, for a given random arrangement of 1D nanowires, current spreading through the network ends up defining a set of spots that dominate both the electrical resistance and power dissipation. Such highly localized heating explains the high power savings observed in larger nanostructured systems. This understanding opens a path to design highly efficient self-heating systems, based on random or pseudo-random distributions of 1D nanostructures.

  18. Hyperbranched quasi-1D TiO2 nanostructure for hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ghadirzadeh, Ali; Passoni, Luca; Grancini, Giulia; Terraneo, Giancarlo; Li Bassi, Andrea; Petrozza, Annamaria; Di Fonzo, Fabio

    2015-04-15

    The performance of hybrid solar cells is strongly affected by the device morphology. In this work, we demonstrate a poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl)/TiO2 hybrid solar cell where the TiO2 photoanode comprises an array of tree-like hyperbranched quasi-1D nanostructures self-assembled from the gas phase. This advanced architecture enables us to increase the power conversion efficiency to over 1%, doubling the efficiency with respect to state of the art devices employing standard mesoporous titania photoanodes. This improvement is attributed to several peculiar features of this array of nanostructures: high interfacial area; increased optical density thanks to the enhanced light scattering; and enhanced crystallization of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) inside the quasi-1D nanostructure.

  19. Quantitative 3D electromagnetic field determination of 1D nanostructures from single projection

    SciTech Connect

    Phatak, Charudatta; Knoop, Ludvig de; Houdellier, Florent; Gatel, Christophe; Hytch, Martin J.; Masseboeuf, Aurelien

    2016-03-10

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures have been regarded as the most promising building blocks for nanoelectronics and nanocomposite material systems as well as for alternative energy applications. Although they result in confinement of a material, their properties and interactions with other nanostructures are still very much three-dimensional (3D) in nature. In this work, we present a novel method for quantitative determination of the 3D electromagnetic fields in and around 1D nanostructures using a single electron wave phase image, thereby eliminating the cumbersome acquisition of tomographic data. Using symmetry arguments, we have reconstructed the 3D magnetic field of a nickel nanowire as well as the 3D electric field around a carbon nanotube field emitter, from one single projection. The accuracy of quantitative values determined here is shown to be a better fit to the physics at play than the value obtained by conventional analysis. Furthermore the 3D reconstructions can then directly be visualized and used in the design of functional 3D architectures built using 1D nanostructures.

  20. Quantitative 3D electromagnetic field determination of 1D nanostructures from single projection

    DOE PAGES

    Phatak, Charudatta; Knoop, Ludvig de; Houdellier, Florent; ...

    2016-03-10

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures have been regarded as the most promising building blocks for nanoelectronics and nanocomposite material systems as well as for alternative energy applications. Although they result in confinement of a material, their properties and interactions with other nanostructures are still very much three-dimensional (3D) in nature. In this work, we present a novel method for quantitative determination of the 3D electromagnetic fields in and around 1D nanostructures using a single electron wave phase image, thereby eliminating the cumbersome acquisition of tomographic data. Using symmetry arguments, we have reconstructed the 3D magnetic field of a nickel nanowire as wellmore » as the 3D electric field around a carbon nanotube field emitter, from one single projection. The accuracy of quantitative values determined here is shown to be a better fit to the physics at play than the value obtained by conventional analysis. Furthermore the 3D reconstructions can then directly be visualized and used in the design of functional 3D architectures built using 1D nanostructures.« less

  1. Quantitative 3D electromagnetic field determination of 1D nanostructures from single projection

    SciTech Connect

    Phatak, C.; Knoop, L. de; Houdellier, F.; Gatel, C.; Hÿtch, M. J.; Masseboeuf, A.

    2016-05-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures have been regarded as the most promising building blocks for nanoelectronics and nanocomposite material systems as well as for alternative energy applications. Although they result in confinement of a material, their properties and interactions with other nanostructures are still very much three-dimensional (3D) in nature. In this work, we present a novel method for quantitative determination of the 3D electromagnetic fields in and around 1D nanostructures using a single electron wave phase image, thereby eliminating the cumbersome acquisition of tomographic data. Using symmetry arguments, we have reconstructed the 3D magnetic field of a nickel nanowire as well as the 3D electric field around a carbon nanotube field emitter, from one single projection. The accuracy of quantitative values determined here is shown to be a better fit to the physics at play than the value obtained by conventional analysis. Moreover the 3D reconstructions can then directly be visualized and used in the design of functional 3D architectures built using 1D nanostructures.

  2. Localized self-heating in large arrays of 1D nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monereo, O.; Illera, S.; Varea, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sauerwald, T.; Schütze, A.; Cirera, A.; Prades, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer a promising path towards highly efficient heating and temperature control in integrated microsystems. The so called self-heating effect can be used to modulate the response of solid state gas sensor devices. In this work, efficient self-heating was found to occur at random networks of nanostructured systems with similar power requirements to highly ordered systems (e.g. individual nanowires, where their thermal efficiency was attributed to the small dimensions of the objects). Infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy were used to map the temperature profiles of films based on random arrangements of carbon nanofibers during self-heating. Both the techniques demonstrate consistently that heating concentrates in small regions, the here-called ``hot-spots''. On correlating dynamic temperature mapping with electrical measurements, we also observed that these minute hot-spots rule the resistance values observed macroscopically. A physical model of a random network of 1D resistors helped us to explain this observation. The model shows that, for a given random arrangement of 1D nanowires, current spreading through the network ends up defining a set of spots that dominate both the electrical resistance and power dissipation. Such highly localized heating explains the high power savings observed in larger nanostructured systems. This understanding opens a path to design highly efficient self-heating systems, based on random or pseudo-random distributions of 1D nanostructures.One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer a promising path towards highly efficient heating and temperature control in integrated microsystems. The so called self-heating effect can be used to modulate the response of solid state gas sensor devices. In this work, efficient self-heating was found to occur at random networks of nanostructured systems with similar power requirements to highly ordered systems (e.g. individual nanowires, where their thermal

  3. Combustion synthesis as a novel method for production of 1-D SiC nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Huczko, Andrzej; Bystrzejewski, Michał; Lange, Hubert; Fabianowska, Agnieszka; Cudziło, Stanisław; Panas, Andrzej; Szala, Mateusz

    2005-09-01

    1-D nanostructures of cubic phase silicon carbide (beta-SiC) were efficiently produced by combustion synthesis of mixtures containing Si-containing compounds and halocarbons in a calorimetric bomb. The influence of the operating parameters on 1-D SiC formation yield was studied. The heat release, the heating rate, and the chamber pressure increase were monitored during the process. The composition and structural features of the products were characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis/ thermogravimetric technique, Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. This self-induced growth process can produce SiC nanofibers and nanotubes ca. 20-100 nm in diameter with the aspect ratio higher than 1000. Bulk scale Raman studies showed the product to be comprised of mostly cubic polytype of SiC and that finite size effects are present. We believe that the nucleation mechanism involving radical gaseous species is responsible for 1-D nanostructures growth. The present study has enlarged the family of nanofibers and nanotubes available and offers a possible, new general route to 1-D crystalline materials.

  4. The excitonic photoluminescence mechanism and lasing action in band-gap-tunable CdS1-xSex nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jun; Zhou, Pengxia; Lu, Junfeng; Zheng, Hongge; Guo, Jiyuan; Wang, Fang; Gu, Ning; Xu, Chunxiang

    2015-12-01

    Bandgap tunable semiconductor materials have wide application in integrated-optoelectronic and communication devices. The CdS1-xSex ternary semiconductor materials covering green-red bands have been reported previously, but their basic band-gap and optical properties crucial to the performance of the CdS1-xSex-based optoelectronic devices have not been deeply understood. In this paper, we theoretically simulated and discussed the feasibility of bandgap-tunable CdS1-xSex nanomaterials for designing wavelength tunable microlasers. Then we fabricated the CdS1-xSex nanobelts with their band gap ranging from 2.4 to 1.74 eV by adjusting the composition ratio x in the vapor-phase-transport growth process. The temperature-dependent photoluminescence and exciton-related optical constants of the CdS1-xSex nanobelts were carefully demonstrated. Finally, the wavelength-tunable Fabry-Perot lasing in CdS1-xSex nanobelts was obtained, and the Fabry-Perot lasing mechanism was numerically simulated by the FDTD method. The systematic results on the mechanism of the tunable band gap, exciton properties and lasing of the CdS1-xSex nanostructure help us deeply understand the intrinsic optical properties of this material, and will build a strong foundation for future application of green-red wavelength-tunable CdS1-xSex microlasers.

  5. Structural resistance of chemically modified 1-D nanostructured titanates in inorganic acid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Marinkovic, Bojan A.; Fredholm, Yann C.; Morgado, Edisson

    2010-10-15

    Sodium containing one-dimensional nanostructured layered titanates (1-D NSLT) were produced both from commercial anatase powder and Brazilian natural rutile mineral sands by alkali hydrothermal process. The 1-D NSLT were chemically modified with proton, cobalt or iron via ionic exchange and all products were additionally submitted to intensive inorganic acid aging (pH = 0.5) for 28 days. The morphology and crystal structure transformations of chemically modified 1-D NSLT were followed by transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. It was found that the original sodium rich 1-D NSLT and cobalt substituted 1-D NSLT were completely converted to rutile nanoparticles, while the protonated form was transformed in a 70%-30% (by weight) anatase-rutile nanoparticles mixture, very similar to that of the well-known TiO{sub 2}-photocatalyst P25 (Degussa). The iron substituted 1-D NSLT presented better acid resistance as 13% of the original structure and morphology remained, the rest being converted in rutile. A significant amount of remaining 1-D NSLT was also observed after the acid treatment of the product obtained from rutile sand. The results showed that phase transformation of NSLT into titanium dioxide polymorph in inorganic acid conditions were controllable by varying the exchanged cations. Finally, the possibility to transform, through acid aging, 1-D NSLT obtained from Brazilian natural rutile sand into TiO{sub 2}-polymorphs was demonstrated for the first time to the best of authors' knowledge, opening path for producing TiO{sub 2}-nanoproducts with different morphologies through a simple process and from a low cost precursor.

  6. Chemically grown vertically aligned 1D ZnO nanorods with CdS coating for efficient quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSC): a controlled synthesis route.

    PubMed

    Mali, Sawanta S; Kim, Hyungjin; Patil, Pramod S; Hong, Chang Kook

    2013-12-28

    In the present article, vertically aligned ZnO nanorod arrays were synthesized by an aqueous chemical growth (ACG) route on a fluoride doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrate. These nanorods were further sensitized with cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots (QDs) by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique. The synthesized CdS coated ZnO nanorods were characterized for their structural and morphological properties with X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Finally, prepared CdS coated 1D ZnO photoelectrodes were tested for their photoelectrochemical performance. Our results show that the sample deposited after 40 SILAR cycles shows 5.61 mA cm(-2) short current density (JSC) with η = 1.61% power conversion efficiency.

  7. Superior photoluminescence and photocatalytic activity of CdS (core)-SiO2 (shell) nanostructures obtained by CdS photoetching and Au deposition.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nidhi; Pal, Bonamali

    2013-07-01

    Core-shell morphology of silica (SiO2) coated CdS nanocomposites (SiO2@CdS) of different shapes have been made for better stability, luminescence and photochemical activity of CdS nanoparticles. A thin layer (thickness 1-1.4 nm) of SiO2 shell is deposited over CdS nanorods (CdS-NR) of aspect ratio = 21 and CdS nanospheres (CdS-NS) of size 6-8 nm by alkyl silane agents. Synthesized nanostructures were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra, HR-TEM, BET surface measurement, LB surface film, and absorption and photoluminescence analysis. Photoetching (PE) of CdS core led to blue shift of the absorbance onset of SiO2@CdS-NR along with the appearance of an exciton band at 485 nm due to the quantum confinement effect. Photodissolution of CdS core shifts the band gap energy from initial 2.4 to 2.6 eV for CdS-NR and 2.5 to 2.67 eV for CdS-NS. TEM images reveal the increase in aspect ratio of NR from 21 to 31 and decrease in the spherical core to 2.5 nm from 6-8 nm after PE. Photoetched SiO2@CdS-NC displayed highly intense fluorescence emission (SiO2@CdS-NS > SiO2@CdS-NR) than unetched SiO2@CdS-NC at 488 nm corresponding to band edge position. The Au (0.5 wt.%) deposition onto photoetched SiO2@CdS-NR(PE) composites highly enhanced the fluorescence intensity in comparison to 1 wt.% of Au and Ag loading. SiO2@CdS-NC(PE) displayed improved photocatalytic activity during benzaldehyde photooxidation under UV (125 W, Hg-arc, 10.4 mW/cm2) irradiation. Silica coating onto CdS particles improves the photostability and photoactivity of CdS upon long UV irradiation.

  8. Characterization and thermal stability of cobalt-modified 1-D nanostructured trititanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgado, Edisson; Marinkovic, Bojan A.; Jardim, Paula M.; de Abreu, Marco A. S.; Rizzo, Fernando C.

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional (1-D) nanostructured sodium trititanates were obtained via alkali hydrothermal method and modified with cobalt via ion exchange at different Co concentrations. The resulting cobalt-modified trititanate nanostructures (Co-TTNS) were characterized by TGA, XRD, TEM/SAED, DRS-UV-Vis and N 2 adsorption techniques. Their general chemical formula was estimated as Na xCo y/2H 2-x-yTi 3O 7·nH 2O and they maintained the same nanostructured and multilayered nature of the sodium precursor, with the growth direction of nanowires and nanotubes along [010]. As a consequence of the Co 2+ incorporation replacing sodium between trititanate layers, two new diffraction lines became prominent and the interlayer distance was reduced with respect to that of the precursor sodium trititanate. Surface area was slightly increased with cobalt intake whereas pore size distribution was hardly affected. Besides, Co 2+ incorporation in trititanate crystal structure also resulted in enhanced visible light photon absorption as indicated by a strong band-gap narrowing. Morphological and structural thermal transformations of Co-TTNS started nearly 400 °C in air and the final products after calcination at 800 °C were found to be composed of TiO 2-rutile, CoTiO 3 and a bronze-like phase with general formula Na 2xTi 1-xCo xO 2.

  9. 3D and 2D structural characterization of 1D Al/Al2 O3 biphasic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Miró, M Martinez; Veith, M; Lee, J; Soldera, F; Mücklich, F; Bennewitz, R; Aktas, C

    2015-05-01

    1D Al/Al2 O3 nanostructures have been synthesized by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of the molecular precursor [(t) BuOAlH2 ]2 . The deposited nanostructures grow chaotically on the substrate forming a layer with a high porosity (80%). Depending on the deposition time, diverse nanostructured surfaces with different distribution densities were achieved. A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction has been evaluated for every nanostructure density using the Focus Ion Beam (FIB) tomography technique and reconstruction software tools. Several structural parameters such as porosity, Euler number, geometrical tortuosity and aspect ratio have been quantified through the analysis with specified software of the reconstructions. Additionally roughness of the prepared surfaces has been characterized at micro- and nanoscale using profilometry and AFM techniques, respectively. While high aspects ratio around 20-30 indicates a strong anisotropy in the structure, high porosity values (around 80%) is observed as a consequence of highly tangled geometry of such 1D nanostructures.

  10. Wavelength modulated SERS hot spot distribution in 1D nanostructures on metal film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Zeng, Xiping; Liu, Ting; Zhang, Xuemei; Wei, Hua; Huang, Yingzhou; Liu, Anping; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2016-10-01

    Surface plasmons confining strong electromagnetic fields near metal surfaces, well-known as hot spots, provide an extremely efficient platform for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, SERS spectra of probing molecules in a silver particle-wire 1D nanostructure on a thin gold film are investigated. The Raman features of SERS spectra collected at the particle-wire joints exhibit an obvious wavelength dependence phenomenon. This result is confirmed electromagnetic field simulation, revealing that hot spot distribution is sensitively influenced by the wavelength of incident light at the joints. Further studies indicate this wavelength dependence of hot spot distribution is immune to influence from the geometric shape of the particle or the angle between wire and particle, which improves fabrication tolerance. This technology may have promising applications in surface plasmon related fields, such as ultrasensors, solar energy and selective surface catalysis.

  11. Facile linker free growth of CdS nanoshell on 1-D ZnO: Solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Archana; Sinha, Bhavesh; Chung, Kookchae; More, Anup; Vanalakar, Sharad; Hong, Chang Woo; Kim, Jin Hyeok; Patil, Pramod

    2015-03-01

    One dimensional type-II core/shell heterostructures are widely employed in solar cells because of their adventitious role in both light absorption and charge separation. Here we report a facile two step chemical approach to synthesizing ZnO/CdS core/shell nanorod arrays. ZnO nanorods (ZNR) with a high aspect ratio were grown using a hydrothermal technique where a uniform CdS shell was deposited using a facile, linker free, one pot, Hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) based reflux technique for the first time. Though the reflux technique is quite similar to the chemical bath deposition technique (CBD), we obtained more uniform CdS coating and improved solar cell performance with the ZnO/CdS heterostructure compared to CBD-grown ZnO/CdS heterostructures. To obtain a conformal coating of CdS, we optimized the CdS deposition time. Formation of pure phase ZnO/CdS core/shell heterostructure was confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth analysis. Improved solar cell performance of 1.23% was obtained for ZnO/CdS core/shell structures with ZnS surface treatment. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Synthesis and Electron Field-Emission of 1-D Carbon-Related Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Han C.

    2002-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes, a new stable form of carbon that was first identified in 1991 [1], are fullerene-related structures which consist of graphitic cylinders closed at either end with caps containing pentagonal rings. Although carbon nanotube structures are closely related to graphite, the curvature, symmetry and small size induce marked deviations from the graphitic behavior. Various methods have been used to produce carbon nanotubes, e.g., arc-discharge, laser-vaporization, catalytic chemical vapor deposition, but too many impurities also be produced, such as fullerenes, carbon nanoparticles and amorphous carbons. The microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) system has been used to grow carbon nanotubes in this work and other 1-D carbon-related nanostructured materials was synthesized by the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma system. Plasma is generated by microwave excitation at 2.45 GHz by a magnetron passes through a waveguide and fed perpendicularly through a quartz dome into an 875 G magnetic field generated by the coils surrounding the resonance volume that creates the ECR condition. The deposition chamber was pumped down to the base pressure of 6.7X10-4 Pa (5X10-6 Torr) with a turbomolecular pump for ECR-plasma and subatmospheric pressures for MPECVD by a rotary mechanical pump. Well-aligned carbon-related nanostructures have been synthesized in nanoporous alumina or silicon with a uniform diameter of 30-100 nm by microwave excited plasma of CH_4, C_2H_2, N_2, H2 and Ar precursors. Nickel nanowires not only serve as catalysts to decompose hydrocarbons to form nanostructures but also function as an electrical conductor for other advanced applications. A negative dc bias is always applied to the substrate to promote the flow of ion fluxes through the nanochannels of the template materials that facilitate the physical adsorption and subsequent chemical absorption in the formation of carbon- and carbon-nitride nanotubes[2]. The electron

  13. Coupled leaky mode theory for light absorption in 2D, 1D, and 0D semiconductor nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yiling; Cao, Linyou

    2012-06-18

    We present an intuitive, simple theoretical model, coupled leaky mode theory (CLMT), to analyze the light absorption of 2D, 1D, and 0D semiconductor nanostructures. This model correlates the light absorption of nanostructures to the optical coupling between incident light and leaky modes of the nanostructure. Unlike conventional methods such as Mie theory that requests specific physical features of nanostructures to evaluate the absorption, the CLMT model provides an unprecedented capability to analyze the absorption using eigen values of the leaky modes. Because the eigenvalue shows very mild dependence on the physical features of nanostructures, we can generally apply one set of eigenvalues calculated using a real, constant refractive index to calculations for the absorption of various nanostructures with different sizes, different materials, and wavelength-dependent complex refractive index. This CLMT model is general, simple, yet reasonably accurate, and offers new intuitive physical insights that the light absorption of nanostructures is governed by the coupling efficiency between incident light and leaky modes of the structure.

  14. Optical anisotropy of quasi-1D rare-earth silicide nanostructures on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandola, S.; Speiser, E.; Esser, N.; Appelfeller, S.; Franz, M.; Dähne, M.

    2017-03-01

    Rare earth metals are known to interact strongly with Si(001) surfaces to form different types of silicide nanostructures. Using STM to structurally characterize Dy and Tb silicide nanostructures on vicinal Si(001), it will be shown that reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) can be used as an optical fingerprint technique to clearly distinguish between the formation of a semiconducting two-dimensional wetting layer and the metallic one-dimensional nanowires. Moreover, the distinctive spectral features can be related to structural units of the nanostructures. RAS spectra of Tb and Dy nanostructures are found to show similar features.

  15. Self-assembly of 1-D n-type nanostructures based on naphthalene diimide-appended dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hui; Nguyen, Tuan; Romano, Natalie C; Modarelli, David A; Parquette, Jon R

    2009-11-18

    n-Type 1D nanostructures are formed from the beta-sheet assembly of dipeptides bearing a 1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetracarboxylic acid diimide (NDI) side chain into either helical nanofibers or twisted nanoribbons. Amyloid-like 1-D helical nanofibers and twisted nanoribbons assemble in an aqueous solution depending on the placement of the NDI group. beta-Sheet-type hydrogen bonding and pi-pi association play important roles in directing the assembly process. A delicate balance between electrostatic repulsion and hydrophobic interactions is critical for self-assembly. Fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy experiments indicate that the nature of the intermolecular organization and packing within the nanostructures critically impacts intermolecular energy migration pi-electron delocalization.

  16. Significant enhancement of power conversion efficiency for dye sensitized solar cell using 1D/3D network nanostructures as photoanodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Baoyuan; Yu, Jichao; Hu, Yunxia; Xia, Chen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The single–crystalline TiO2 nanorod arrays with rutile phase have attracted much attention in the dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) applications because of their superior chemical stability, better electron transport properties, higher refractive index and low production cost. However, it suffers from a low surface area as compared with TiO2 nanoparticle films. In order to enlarge the surface area of TiO2 nanorod arrays, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes sample was synthesized using a facile two-step hydrothermal process involving hydrothermal growth 1D/3D nanorods and followed by post-etching treatment. In such bi-layer structure, the oriented TiO2 nanorods layer could provide direct pathway for fast electron transportation, and the 3D nanotubes layer offers a higher surface area for dye loading, therefore, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode exhibited faster electron transport and higher surface area than either 1D or 3D nanostructures alone, and an highest efficiency of 7.68% was achieved for the DSSCs based on 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode with further TiCl4 treatment. PMID:25800933

  17. Doped ZnO 1D nanostructures: synthesis, properties, and photodetector application.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Liang; Chang, Shoou-Jinn

    2014-11-01

    In the past decades, the doping of ZnO one-dimensional nanostructures has attracted a great deal of attention due to the variety of possible morphologies, large surface-to-volume ratios, simple and low cost processing, and excellent physical properties for fabricating high-performance electronic, magnetic, and optoelectronic devices. This article mainly concentrates on recent advances regarding the doping of ZnO one-dimensional nanostructures, including a brief overview of the vapor phase transport method and hydrothermal method, as well as the fabrication process for photodetectors. The dopant elements include B, Al, Ga, In, N, P, As, Sb, Ag, Cu, Ti, Na, K, Li, La, C, F, Cl, H, Mg, Mn, S, and Sn. The various dopants which act as acceptors or donors to realize either p-type or n-type are discussed. Doping to alter optical properties is also considered. Lastly, the perspectives and future research outlook of doped ZnO nanostructures are summarized.

  18. Fabrication of ZnO nanostructures sensitized with CdS quantum dots for photovoltaic application using a convenient solution method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Huan; Zhang, Gengmin; Yin, Jianbo; Liang, Jia; Sun, Wentao; Shen, Ziyong

    2015-01-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures sensitized with cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs) were fabricated using a simple and inexpensive solution method. ZnO nanostructures, in the form of either nanocones or nanorods, were first grown directly from fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates in aqueous solutions of zinc nitrate (Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}) and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA, C{sub 6}H{sub 12}N{sub 4}) under external voltages. Then, CdS QDs were attached to these ZnO nanostructures via reactions in the mixed aqueous solutions of cadmium nitrate (Cd(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}) and thioacetamide (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}NS). Photovoltaic responses were obtained from the quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) in which these CdS QD-covered ZnO nanostructures were employed as the photoanodes. The morphologies of the ZnO nanostructures, which could be effectively modulated via the substrate location in the solutions during the fabrication, were found to have played an important role in determining the properties of the QDSSCs.

  19. Ag plasmonic nanostructures and a novel gel electrolyte in a high efficiency TiO2/CdS solar cell.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P Naresh; Deepa, Melepurath; Srivastava, Avanish Kumar

    2015-04-21

    A novel photoanode architecture with plasmonic silver (Ag) nanostructures embedded in titania (TiO2), which served as the wide band gap semiconducting support and CdS quantum dots (QDs), as light absorbers, is presented. Ag nanostructures were prepared by a polyol method and are comprised of clumps of nanorods, 15-35 nm wide, interspersed with globular nanoparticles and they were characterized by a face centered cubic lattice. Optimization of Ag nanostructures was achieved on the basis of a superior power conversion efficiency (PCE) obtained for the cell with a Ag/TiO2/CdS electrode encompassing a mixed morphology of Ag nano-rods and particles, relative to analogous cells with either Ag nanoparticles or Ag nanorods. Interfacial charge transfer kinetics was unraveled by fluorescence quenching and lifetime studies. Ag nanostructures improve the light harvesting ability of the TiO2/CdS photoanode via (a) plasmonic and scattering effects, which induce both near- and far-field enhancements which translate to higher photocurrent densities and (b) charging effects, whereby, photoexcited electron transfer from TiO2 to Ag is facilitated by Fermi level equilibration. Owing to the spectacular ability of Ag nanostructures to increase light absorption, a greatly increased PCE of 4.27% and a maximum external quantum efficiency of 55% (at 440 nm) was achieved for the cell based on Ag/TiO2/CdS, greater by 42 and 66%, respectively, compared to the TiO2/CdS based cell. In addition, the liquid S(2-) electrolyte was replaced by a S(2-) gel containing fumed silica, and the redox potential, conductivity and p-type conduction of the two were deduced to be comparable. Although the gel based cells showed diminished solar cell performances compared to their liquid counterparts, nonetheless, the Ag/TiO2/CdS electrode continued to outperform the TiO2/CdS electrode. Our studies demonstrate that Ag nanostructures effectively capture a significant chunk of the electromagnetic spectrum and aid QD

  20. Sonochemical synthesis of 0D, 1D, and 2D zinc oxide nanostructures in ionic liquids and their photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Alammar, Tarek; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2011-12-16

    Ultrasound synthesis of zinc oxide from zinc acetate and sodium hydroxide in ionic liquids (ILs) is a fast, facile, and effective, yet highly morphology- and size-selective route to zinc oxide nanostructures of various dimensionalities. No additional organic solvents, water, surfactants, or templating agents are required. Depending on the synthetic conditions, the selective manufacturing of 0D, 1D, and 2D ZnO nanostructures is possible: Whereas the formation of rodlike structures is typically favored, ZnO nanoparticles can be obtained either under strongly basic conditions or by use of ILs with a long alkyl chain, such as 1-n-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([C(n)mim][Tf(2)N]; n>8). A short ultrasound irradiation time favors the formation of ZnO nanosheets. Prolonged irradiation leads to the conversion of the ZnO nanosheets into nanorods. In contrast, ionothermal synthesis (conventional heating) does not allow for morphology tuning by variation of the IL or other synthesis conditions, as the longer reaction times required lead always to the formation of well-developed hexagonal nanocrystals with prismatic tips. The ZnO nanostructures synthesized by using ultrasound were efficient photocatalysts in the photodegradation of methyl orange. The photoactivity was observed to be as high as 95 % for ZnO nanoparticles obtained in [C(10)mim][Tf(2)N].

  1. Simulation and optimization of 1-D periodic dielectric nanostructures for light-trapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Menon, Rajesh

    2012-01-16

    Light-trapping is essential to improve the performance of thin-film solar cells. In this paper, we perform a parametric optimization of 1-D square and sinusoidal grating structures that act as nanophotonic scatterers to increase light absorption in ultra-thin (10nm) solar cells. Our optimization reveals that the short-circuit current density in a device of active-layer thickness 10nm can be improved by a factor of ~5 in the presence of the scattering structure. More complex geometries allow for increased degrees of design freedom and potentially high enhancement of light absorption.

  2. Atomic layer deposition of 1D and 2D nickel nanostructures on graphite.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seung Wook; Yoon, Jaehong; Moon, Hyoung-Seok; Shong, Bonggeun; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2017-03-17

    One-dimensional (1D) nanowires (NWs) and two-dimensional (2D) thin films of Ni were deposited on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by atomic layer deposition (ALD), using NH3 as a counter reactant. Thermal ALD using NH3 gas forms 1D NWs along step edges, while NH3 plasma enables the deposition of a continuous 2D film over the whole surface. The lateral and vertical growth rates of the Ni NWs are numerically modeled as a function of the number of ALD cycles. Pretreatment with NH3 gas promotes selectivity in deposition by the reduction of oxygenated functionalities on the HOPG surface. On the other hand, NH3 plasma pretreatment generates surface nitrogen species, and results in a morphological change in the basal plane of graphite, leading to active nucleation across the surface during ALD. The effects of surface nitrogen species on the nucleation of ALD Ni were theoretically studied by density functional theory calculations. Our results suggest that the properties of Ni NWs, such as their density and width, and the formation of Ni thin films on carbon surfaces can be controlled by appropriate use of NH3.

  3. A facile route for 3D aerogels from nanostructured 1D and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung Mi; Jung, Hyun Young; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Jung, Yung Joon; Kong, Jing

    2012-11-01

    Aerogels have numerous applications due to their high surface area and low densities. However, creating aerogels from a large variety of materials has remained an outstanding challenge. Here, we report a new methodology to enable aerogel production with a wide range of materials. The method is based on the assembly of anisotropic nano-objects (one-dimensional (1D) nanotubes, nanowires, or two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets) into a cross-linking network from their colloidal suspensions at the transition from the semi-dilute to the isotropic concentrated regime. The resultant aerogels have highly porous and ultrafine three-dimensional (3D) networks consisting of 1D (Ag, Si, MnO2, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) and 2D materials (MoS2, graphene, h-BN) with high surface areas, low densities, and high electrical conductivities. This method opens up a facile route for aerogel production with a wide variety of materials and tremendous opportunities for bio-scaffold, energy storage, thermoelectric, catalysis, and hydrogen storage applications.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of 1D and 2D nickel nanostructures on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Seung Wook; Yoon, Jaehong; Moon, Hyoung-Seok; Shong, Bonggeun; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2017-03-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanowires (NWs) and two-dimensional (2D) thin films of Ni were deposited on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by atomic layer deposition (ALD), using NH3 as a counter reactant. Thermal ALD using NH3 gas forms 1D NWs along step edges, while NH3 plasma enables the deposition of a continuous 2D film over the whole surface. The lateral and vertical growth rates of the Ni NWs are numerically modeled as a function of the number of ALD cycles. Pretreatment with NH3 gas promotes selectivity in deposition by the reduction of oxygenated functionalities on the HOPG surface. On the other hand, NH3 plasma pretreatment generates surface nitrogen species, and results in a morphological change in the basal plane of graphite, leading to active nucleation across the surface during ALD. The effects of surface nitrogen species on the nucleation of ALD Ni were theoretically studied by density functional theory calculations. Our results suggest that the properties of Ni NWs, such as their density and width, and the formation of Ni thin films on carbon surfaces can be controlled by appropriate use of NH3.

  5. Engineering of lead chalcogenide nanostructures for carrier multiplication: Core/shell, 1D, and 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qianglu

    Near infrared emitting semiconductors have been used widely in industry especially in solar-cell fabrications. The efficiency of single junction solar-cell can reach the Shockley-Queisser limit by using optimum band gap material such as silicon and cadmium telluride. The theoretical efficiency can be further enhanced through carrier multiplication, in which a high energy photon is absorbed and more than one electron-hole pair can be generated, reaching more than 100% quantum efficiency in the high energy region of sunlight. The realization of more than unity external quantum efficiency in lead selenide quantum dots solar cell has motivated vast investigation on lowering the carrier multiplication threshold and further improving the efficiency. This dissertation focuses on synthesis of lead chalcogenide nanostructures for their optical spectroscopy studies. PbSe/CdSe core/shell quantum dots were synthesized by cation exchange to obtain thick shells (up to 14 monolayers) for studies of visible and near infrared dual band emissions and carrier multiplication efficiency. By examining the reaction mechanism, a thermodynamic and a kinetic model are introduced to explain the vacancy driven cation exchange. As indicated by the effective mass model, PbSe/CdSe core/shell quantum dots has quasi-type-II band alignment, possessing electron delocalized through the entire quantum dot and hole localized in the core, which breaks down the symmetry of energy levels in the conduction and valence band, leading to hot-hole-assisted efficient multi-exciton generation and a lower carrier multiplication threshold to the theoretical value. For further investigation of carrier multiplication study, PbTe, possessing the highest efficiency among lead chalcogenides due to slow intraband cooling, is synthesized in one-dimensional and two-dimensional nanostructures. By using dodecanethiol as the surfactant, PbTe NRs can be prepared with high uniformity in width and resulted in fine quantum

  6. Synthesis of 1D Silica Nanostructures with Controllable Sizes Based on Short Anionic Peptide Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengjie; Cai, Qingwei; Du, Mingxuan; Xue, Junyi; Xu, Hai

    2015-09-10

    Artificial synthesis of silica under benign conditions is usually achieved by using cationic organic matrices as templates while the anionic analogues have not received enough consideration, albeit they are also functioning in biosilica formation. In this work, we report the design and self-assembly of an anionic peptide amphiphile (I3E) and the use of its self-assemblies as templates to synthesize 1D silica nanostructures with tunable sizes. We show that short I3E readily formed long nanofibrils in aqueous solution via a hierarchical self-assembly process. By using APTES and TEOS as silica precursors, we found that the I3E nanofibrils templated the production of silica nanotubes with a wide size distribution, in which the silica size regulation was achieved by tuning the interactions among the peptide template and silicon species. These results clearly illustrate a facile method for generating silica nanomaterials based on anionic matrices.

  7. Photodeposition of Pt on Colloidal CdS and CdSe/CdS Semiconductor Nanostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-22

    CdSe nanoparticles nanorods nanostructures photocatalysis semiconductors Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting...National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Semiconductor photocatalysis has been identified as a promising avenue for the conversion of solar...sophistication leading to increasingly complex and multi-functional architectures. For photocatalysis in particular, the high surface- to- volume ratios in

  8. Light-directing chiral liquid crystal nanostructures: from 1D to 3D.

    PubMed

    Bisoyi, Hari Krishna; Li, Quan

    2014-10-21

    Endowing external, remote, and dynamic control to self-organized superstructures with desired functionalities is a principal driving force in the bottom-up nanofabrication of molecular devices. Light-driven chiral molecular switches or motors in liquid crystal (LC) media capable of self-organizing into optically tunable one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) superstructures represent such an elegant system. As a consequence, photoresponsive cholesteric LCs (CLCs), i.e., self-organized 1D helical superstructures, and LC blue phases (BPs), i.e., self-organized 3D periodic cubic lattices, are emerging as a new generation of multifunctional supramolecular 1D and 3D photonic materials in their own right because of their fundamental academic interest and technological significance. These smart stimuli-responsive materials can be facilely fabricated from achiral LC hosts by the addition of a small amount of a light-driven chiral molecular switch or motor. The photoresponsiveness of these materials is a result of both molecular interaction and geometry changes in the chiral molecular switch upon light irradiation. The doped photoresponsive CLCs undergo light-driven pitch modulation and/or helix inversion, which has many applications in color filters, polarizers, all-optical displays, optical lasers, sensors, energy-saving smart devices, and so on. Recently, we have conceptualized and rationally synthesized different light-driven chiral molecular switches that have very high helical twisting powers (HTPs) and exhibit large changes in HTP in different states, thereby enabling wide phototunability of the systems by the addition of very small amounts of the molecular switches into commercially available achiral LCs. The light-driven chiral molecular switches are based on well-recognized azobenzene, dithienylcyclopentene, and spirooxazine derivatives. We have demonstrated high-resolution and lightweight photoaddressable displays without patterned electronics on

  9. Apoferritin fibers: a new template for 1D fluorescent hybrid nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Rocío; Castello, Fabio; Bondia, Patricia; Casado, Santiago; Flors, Cristina; Cuesta, Rafael; Domínguez-Vera, José M.; Orte, Angel; Gálvez, Natividad

    2016-05-01

    Recently, research in the field of protein amyloid fibers has gained great attention due to the use of these materials as nanoscale templates for the construction of functional hybrid materials. The formation of apoferritin amyloid-like protein fibers is demonstrated herein for the first time. The morphology, size and stiffness of these one-dimensional structures are comparable to the fibers formed by β-lactoglobulin, a protein frequently used as a model in the study of amyloid-like fibrillar proteins. Nanometer-sized globular apoferritin is capable of self-assembling to form 1D micrometer-sized structures after being subjected to a heating process. Depending on the experimental conditions, fibers with different morphologies and sizes are obtained. The wire-like protein structure is rich in functional groups and allows chemical functionalization with diverse quantum dots (QD), as well as with different Alexa Fluor (AF) dyes, leading to hybrid fluorescent fibers with variable emission wavelengths, from green to near infrared, depending on the QD and AFs coupled. For fibers containing the pair AF488 and AF647, efficient fluorescence energy transfer from the covalently coupled donor (AF488) to acceptor tags (AF647) takes place. Apoferritin fibers are proposed here as a new promising template for obtaining hybrid functional materials.Recently, research in the field of protein amyloid fibers has gained great attention due to the use of these materials as nanoscale templates for the construction of functional hybrid materials. The formation of apoferritin amyloid-like protein fibers is demonstrated herein for the first time. The morphology, size and stiffness of these one-dimensional structures are comparable to the fibers formed by β-lactoglobulin, a protein frequently used as a model in the study of amyloid-like fibrillar proteins. Nanometer-sized globular apoferritin is capable of self-assembling to form 1D micrometer-sized structures after being subjected to a

  10. Structural and optical properties of nano-structured CdS thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Rekha; Kumar, Dinesh; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, Dinesh K.

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films have been deposited on conducting glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The effect of precursor concentration on the structural, morphological, compositional, and optical properties of the CdS films has been studied. Crystal structure of these CdS films is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and it reveals polycrystalline structure with mixture of cubic and wurtzite phases with grain size decreasing as precursor concentration is increased. Optical studies reveal that the CdS thin films have high transmittance in visible spectral region reaching 90% and the films possess direct optical band gap that decreases from 2.46 to 2.39 eV with decreasing bath concentration. Our study suggests that growth is nucleation controlled.

  11. From 1D and 2D ZnO nanostructures to 3D hierarchical structures with enhanced gas sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Alenezi, Mohammad R; Henley, Simon J; Emerson, Neil G; Silva, S Ravi P

    2014-01-07

    Facile and low cost hydrothermal routes are developed to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical ZnO structures with high surface-to-volume ratios and an increased fraction of (0001) polar surfaces. Hierarchical ZnO nanowires (ZNWs) and nanodisks (ZNDs) assembled from initial ZnO nanostructures are prepared from sequential nucleation and growth following a hydrothermal process. These hierarchical ZnO structures display an enhancement of gas sensing performance and exhibit significantly improved sensitivity and fast response to acetone in comparison to other mono-morphological ZnO, such as nanoparticles, NWs, or NDs. In addition to the high surface-to-volume ratio due to its small size, the nanowire building blocks show the enhanced gas sensing properties mainly ascribed to the increased proportion of exposed active (0001) planes, and the formation of many nanojunctions at the interface between the initial ZnO nanostructure and secondary NWs. This work provides the route for structure induced enhancement of gas sensing performance by designing a desirable nanostructure, which could also be extended to synthesize other metal oxide nanostructures with superior gas sensing performance.

  12. CdS quantum dots sensitized Cu doped ZnO nanostructured thin films for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poornima, K.; Gopala Krishnan, K.; Lalitha, B.; Raja, M.

    2015-07-01

    ZnO nanorods and Cu doped ZnO nanorods thin films have been prepared by simple hydrothermal method. CdS quantum dots are sensitized with Cu doped ZnO nanorod thin films using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The X-ray diffraction study reveals that ZnO nanorods, and CdS quantum dot sensitized Cu doped ZnO nanorods exhibit hexagonal structure. The scanning electron microscope image shows the presence of ZnO nanorods. The average diameter and length of the aligned nanorod is 300 nm and 1.5 μm respectively. The absorption spectra shows that the absorption edge of CdS quantum dot sensitized ZnO nanorod thin film is shifted toward longer wavelength region when compared to the absorption edge of ZnO nanorods film. The conversion efficiency of the CdS quantum dot sensitized Cu doped ZnO nanorod thin film solar cell is 1.5%.

  13. Continuous fabrication of scalable 2-dimensional (2D) micro- and nanostructures by sequential 1D mechanical patterning processes.

    PubMed

    Ok, Jong G; Panday, Ashwin; Lee, Taehwa; Jay Guo, L

    2014-12-21

    We present a versatile and simple methodology for continuous and scalable 2D micro/nano-structure fabrication via sequential 1D patterning strokes enabled by dynamic nano-inscribing (DNI) and vibrational indentation patterning (VIP) as well as a 'single-stroke' 2D patterning using a DNI tool in VIP.

  14. Spectromicroscopy for addressing the surface and electron transport properties of individual 1-d nanostructures and their networks.

    PubMed

    Kolmakov, Andrei; Potluri, Sai; Barinov, Alexei; Menteş, Tevfik O; Gregoratti, Luca; Niño, Miguel A; Locatelli, Andrea; Kiskinova, Maya

    2008-10-28

    Understanding size/dimensionality-dependent phenomena and processes relevant to chemical sensing and catalysis requires analytical methods with high surface sensitivity, which can exploit the structure and composition of nanomaterials at their natural length scales and working conditions. In the present study, we explored the potentials and complementary capabilities of several surface-sensitive microscopy approaches to shed light on the properties of individual SnO(2) nanowires and their networks. Our results demonstrate the unique opportunities provided by synchrotron-based photoelectron microscopies for surface-sensitive structural and chemical analysis, including in situ characterization of electron transport properties of a nanostructure wired as an active element in chemiresistor devices.

  15. Facile synthesis of {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure and energy storage ability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yousefi, Taher; Golikand, Ahmad Nozad; Hossein Mashhadizadeh, Mohammad; Aghazadeh, Mustafa

    2012-06-15

    The dense manganese oxide nanorods with an extremely narrow distribution are synthesized at a low temperature using first cathodic electrodeposition subsequently heat treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show that the nanorods have bar shapes, and their average diameter is less than 50 nm. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) study, the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern in TEM images and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) result show that the nanorods are {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} single crystal. The results of N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption analysis indicate that the BET surface area of the {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} nanorods is 93 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. By recording the potential-time curve during the electrodeposition process, it is revealed that water reduction reaction has a major role in the electrogeneration of base at the cathode surface under the applied electrochemical conditions. Finally, based on the H{sub 2} bubbling on the cathode surface, the mechanism of the formation and the growth of {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} nanorods are proposed and discussed. For the electrochemical supercapacitor application, electrochemically prepared {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} is found to be stable for a large number of cycles with high specific capacitance, 338 F g{sup -1} at a scan rate of 10 mV s{sup -1}. Finally, the charge-discharge mechanism is discussed. - Graphical abstract: Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New nanostructures of MnO{sub 2} is synthesized by simple method of cathodicelectrodeposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The product has unique one-dimensional morphology with average diameter size of 50 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The experiment conditions (temperature, current density) has not been reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The one-nanostructures obtained without using of hard template or surfactant.

  16. Synthesis of Tapered CdS Nanobelts and CdSe Nanowires with Good Optical Property by Hydrogen-Assisted Thermal Evaporation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Fei, Guangtao

    2009-07-10

    The tapered CdS nanobelts and CdSe nanowires were prepared by hydrogen-assisted thermal evaporation method. Different supersaturation leads to two different kinds of 1D nanostructures. The PL measurements recorded from the as-prepared tapered CdS nanobelts and CdSe nanowires show only a bandgap emission with relatively narrow full-width half maximum, which means that they possess good optical property. The as-synthesized high-quality tapered CdS nanobelts and CdSe nanowires may be excellent building blocks for photonic devices.

  17. ZnO Hierarchical Nanostructure Photoanode in a CdS Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cell

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan; Zhang, Gengmin; Sun, Wentao; Shen, Ziyong; Shi, Mingji

    2015-01-01

    A hierarchical array of ZnO nanocones covered with ZnO nanospikes was hydrothermally fabricated and employed as the photoanode in a CdS quantum dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC). This QDSSC outperformed the QDSSC based on a simple ZnO nanocone photoanode in all the four principal photovoltaic parameters. Using the hierarchical photoanode dramatically increased the short circuit current density and also slightly raised the open circuit voltage and the fill factor. As a result, the conversion efficiency of the QDSSC based on the hierarchical photoanode was more than twice that of the QDSSC based on the simple ZnO nanocone photoanode. This improvement is attributable to both the enlarged specific area of the photoanode and the reduction in the recombination of the photoexcited electrons. PMID:26379268

  18. 1D Ni-Co oxide and sulfide nanoarray/carbon aerogel hybrid nanostructures for asymmetric supercapacitors with high energy density and excellent cycling stability.

    PubMed

    Hao, Pin; Tian, Jian; Sang, Yuanhua; Tuan, Chia-Chi; Cui, Guanwei; Shi, Xifeng; Wong, C P; Tang, Bo; Liu, Hong

    2016-09-15

    The fabrication of supercapacitor electrodes with high energy density and excellent cycling stability is still a great challenge. A carbon aerogel, possessing a hierarchical porous structure, high specific surface area and electrical conductivity, is an ideal backbone to support transition metal oxides and bring hope to prepare electrodes with high energy density and excellent cycling stability. Therefore, NiCo2S4 nanotube array/carbon aerogel and NiCo2O4 nanoneedle array/carbon aerogel hybrid supercapacitor electrode materials were synthesized by assembling Ni-Co precursor needle arrays on the surface of the channel walls of hierarchical porous carbon aerogels derived from chitosan in this study. The 1D nanostructures grow on the channel surface of the carbon aerogel vertically and tightly, contributing to the enhanced electrochemical performance with ultrahigh energy density. The energy density of NiCo2S4 nanotube array/carbon aerogel and NiCo2O4 nanoneedle array/carbon aerogel hybrid asymmetric supercapacitors can reach up to 55.3 Wh kg(-1) and 47.5 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 400 W kg(-1), respectively. These asymmetric devices also displayed excellent cycling stability with a capacitance retention of about 96.6% and 92% over 5000 cycles.

  19. CdS sensitized 3D hierarchical TiO2/ZnO heterostructure for efficient solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaoke; Xie, Wen; Lim, Zhi Shiuh; You, Lu; Wang, Junling

    2014-07-17

    For conventional dye or quantum dot sensitized solar cells, which are fabricated using mesoporous films, the inefficient electron transport due to defects such as grain boundaries and surface traps is a major drawback. To simultaneously increase the carrier transport efficiency as well as the surface area, optimal-assembling of hierarchical nanostructures is an attractive approach. Here, a three dimensional (3D) hierarchical heterostructure, consisting of CdS sensitized one dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorods deposited on two dimensional (2D) TiO2 (001) nanosheet, is prepared via a solution-process method. Such heterstructure exhibits significantly enhanced photoelectric and photocatalytic H2 evolution performance compared with CdS sensitized 1D ZnO nanorods/1D TiO2 nanorods photoanode, as a result of the more efficient light harvesting over the entire visible light spectrum and the effective electron transport through a highly connected 3D network.

  20. CdS sensitized 3D hierarchical TiO2/ZnO heterostructure for efficient solar energy conversion

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhaoke; Xie, Wen; Lim, Zhi Shiuh; You, Lu; Wang, Junling

    2014-01-01

    For conventional dye or quantum dot sensitized solar cells, which are fabricated using mesoporous films, the inefficient electron transport due to defects such as grain boundaries and surface traps is a major drawback. To simultaneously increase the carrier transport efficiency as well as the surface area, optimal-assembling of hierarchical nanostructures is an attractive approach. Here, a three dimensional (3D) hierarchical heterostructure, consisting of CdS sensitized one dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorods deposited on two dimensional (2D) TiO2 (001) nanosheet, is prepared via a solution-process method. Such heterstructure exhibits significantly enhanced photoelectric and photocatalytic H2 evolution performance compared with CdS sensitized 1D ZnO nanorods/1D TiO2 nanorods photoanode, as a result of the more efficient light harvesting over the entire visible light spectrum and the effective electron transport through a highly connected 3D network. PMID:25030846

  1. Enhanced green and orange photoluminescence of nanostructured CdS in glass nanocomposites by energy transfer From Ho3+ and Eu3+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Chirantan; Karmakar, Basudeb

    2017-01-01

    We report enhanced photoluminescence (PL) of both band edge and trap state emissions in Ho3+ or Eu3+ ion doped CdS (II-VI semiconductor) nanoparticles (NPs) containing glass nanocomposites. These glass nanocomposites were synthesized by the conventional melt-quench technique. The sizes of CdS NPs are found to increase from 5-15 nm to 40-80 nm with the increase in thermal treatment. Band edge emission (green emission, peak around 495 nm) of CdS NPs is controlled by their size and enhanced about three to nine-fold by Ho3+ ions on excitation at 446 nm by a diode laser. Under the same excitation, twelve to fifty-fold enhanced trap state emission (orange and red emissions about 550-900 nm) of CdS NPs is obtained by Eu3+-doping compared to undoped CdS NPs containing glass nanocomposites. The predominant mechanism of PL enhancement is the energy transfer from rare earth ions to CdS NPs. Enhanced PL of these nanocomposites enables their applications in efficient solar concentrators, green and red light emitting component for white light emission devices.

  2. Spatially branched hierarchical ZnO nanorod-TiO2 nanotube array heterostructures for versatile photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic applications: towards intimate integration of 1D-1D hybrid nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Fang-Xing; Hung, Sung-Fu; Tao, Hua Bing; Miao, Jianwei; Yang, Hong Bin; Liu, Bin

    2014-11-01

    Hierarchically ordered ZnO nanorods (NRs) decorated nanoporous-layer-covered TiO2 nanotube array (ZnO NRs/NP-TNTAs) nanocomposites have been prepared by an efficient, two-step anodization route combined with an electrochemical deposition strategy, by which monodispersed one-dimensional (1D) ZnO NRs were uniformly grown on the framework of NP-TNTAs. The crystal phases, morphologies, optical properties, photocatalytic as well as photoelectrocatalytic performances of the well-defined ZnO NRs/NP-TNTAs heterostructures were systematically explored to clarify the structure-property correlation. It was found that the ZnO NRs/NP-TNTAs heterostructure exhibits significantly enhanced photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic performances, along with favorable photostability toward degradation of organic pollutants under UV light irradiation, as compared to the single component counterparts. The remarkably enhanced photoactivity of ZnO NRs/NP-TNTAs heterostructure is ascribed to the intimate interfacial integration between ZnO NRs and NP-TNTAs substrate imparted by the unique spatially branched hierarchical structure, thereby contributing to the efficient transfer and separation of photogenerated electron-hole charge carriers. Moreover, the specific active species during the photocatalytic process was unambiguously determined and photocatalytic mechanism was tentatively presented. It is anticipated that our work could provide new insights for the construction of various hierarchical 1D-1D hybrid nanocomposites for extensive photocatalytic applications.Hierarchically ordered ZnO nanorods (NRs) decorated nanoporous-layer-covered TiO2 nanotube array (ZnO NRs/NP-TNTAs) nanocomposites have been prepared by an efficient, two-step anodization route combined with an electrochemical deposition strategy, by which monodispersed one-dimensional (1D) ZnO NRs were uniformly grown on the framework of NP-TNTAs. The crystal phases, morphologies, optical properties, photocatalytic as well as

  3. Controlled growth of 1D and 2D ZnO nanostructures on 4H-SiC using Au catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Abhishek Singh; Opoku, Charles; Alquier, Daniel; Poulin-Vittrant, Guylaine; Cayrel, Frederic; Graton, Olivier; Hue, Louis-Pascal Tran Huu; Camara, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    A perfect control of nanostructure growth is a prerequisite for the development of electronic and optoelectronic device/systems. In this article, we demonstrate the growth of various ZnO-derived nanostructures, including well-ordered arrays of high aspect ratio single crystalline nanowires with preferred growth direction along the [0001] axis, nanowalls, and hybrid nanowire-nanowall structures. The growths of the various ZnO nanostructures have been carried out on SiC substrates in a horizontal furnace, using Au thin film as catalyst. From experimental observations, we have ascribed the growth mechanisms of the different ZnO nanostructures to be a combination of catalytic-assisted and non-catalytic-assisted vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) processes. We have also found that the different ZnO nanoarchitectures' material evolution is governed by a Zn cluster drift effects on the SiC surface mainly driven by growth temperature. Au thin film thickness, growth time, and temperature are the parameters to optimize in order to obtain the different ZnO nanoarchitectures.

  4. Controlled growth of 1D and 2D ZnO nanostructures on 4H-SiC using Au catalyst

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A perfect control of nanostructure growth is a prerequisite for the development of electronic and optoelectronic device/systems. In this article, we demonstrate the growth of various ZnO-derived nanostructures, including well-ordered arrays of high aspect ratio single crystalline nanowires with preferred growth direction along the [0001] axis, nanowalls, and hybrid nanowire-nanowall structures. The growths of the various ZnO nanostructures have been carried out on SiC substrates in a horizontal furnace, using Au thin film as catalyst. From experimental observations, we have ascribed the growth mechanisms of the different ZnO nanostructures to be a combination of catalytic-assisted and non-catalytic-assisted vapor–liquid-solid (VLS) processes. We have also found that the different ZnO nanoarchitectures' material evolution is governed by a Zn cluster drift effects on the SiC surface mainly driven by growth temperature. Au thin film thickness, growth time, and temperature are the parameters to optimize in order to obtain the different ZnO nanoarchitectures. PMID:25136283

  5. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2014-05-20

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  6. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I.; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2015-12-22

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  7. Preparation and characterization of photocatalytic carbon dots-sensitized electrospun titania nanostructured fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haopeng; Zhu, Yihua; Cao, Huimin; Yang, Xiaoling; Li, Chunzhong

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► The TiO{sub 2}-CDs nanostructured fibers are fabricated by using APS combining the electrospinning TiO{sub 2} nanostructured fibers and CDs. ► The CD can work as a photosensitizer in the degradation of rhodamine B under visible light irradiation. ► The TiO{sub 2}-CDs nanostructured fibers exhibit enhanced photocatalytic efficiency and can be easily handled and recycled. -- Abstract: The carbon dots (CDs) are new functional carbon-aceous materials. Compared to conventional dye molecules and semiconductor quantum dots, CDs are superior in chemical inertness and low toxicity. The TiO{sub 2}-CDs nanostructured fibers were fabricated by combining the electrospinning technique and reflux method. Compared with the pure TiO{sub 2} nanostructured fibers and P25, the TiO{sub 2}-CDs nanostructured fibers exhibited enhanced photocatalytic efficiency of photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2}-CDs nanostructured fibers could be attributed to the presence of CDs embedded in TiO{sub 2} nanostructured fibers. The CD can work as a photosensitizer in the degradation. Furthermore, the TiO{sub 2}-CDs nanostructured fibers could be easily handled and recycled due to their one-dimensional nanostructural property.

  8. Controlled growth of high-density CdS and CdSe nanorod arrays on selective facets of two-dimensional semiconductor nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xue-Jun; Chen, Junze; Tan, Chaoliang; Zhu, Yihan; Han, Yu; Zhang, Hua

    2016-05-01

    The rational synthesis of hierarchical three-dimensional nanostructures with specific compositions, morphologies and functionalities is important for applications in a variety of fields ranging from energy conversion and electronics to biotechnology. Here, we report a seeded growth approach for the controlled epitaxial growth of three types of hierarchical one-dimensional (1D)/two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures, where nanorod arrays of II-VI semiconductor CdS or CdSe are grown on the selective facets of hexagonal-shaped nanoplates, either on the two basal facets of the nanoplate, or on one basal facet, or on the two basal facets and six side facets. The seed engineering of 2D hexagonal-shaped nanoplates is the key factor for growth of the three resulting types of 1D/2D nanostructures. The wurtzite- and zinc-blende-type polymorphs of semiconductors are used to determine the facet-selective epitaxial growth of 1D nanorod arrays, resulting in the formation of different hierarchical three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures.

  9. Burning Your Own CDs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekhaml, Leticia

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the use of CDs (Compact Disks) for backing up data as an alternative to using floppy disks and explains how to burn, or record, a CD. Topics include differences between CD-R (CD-Recordable) and CD-RW (CD-Rewritable); advantages of CD-R and CD-RW; selecting a CD burner; technology trends; and care of CDs. (LRW)

  10. Facile microwave-assisted aqueous synthesis of CdS nanocrystals with their photocatalytic activities under visible lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Chonghai; Tian, Xiaobo

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Three kinds of CdS nanostructures have been controllably synthesized. • Ethanediamine acts as a phase and morphology controlling reagent. • Three CdS nanostructures display high visible light photocatalytic activities. • Cubic CdS-3 shows superior photocatalytic activity to the other hexagonal CdS. • The growth processes for fabrication of CdS nanocrystals are also discussed. - Abstract: Three kinds of CdS nanostructures, that is, hexagonal nanospheres (CdS-1), hierarchical caterpillar-fungus-like hexagonal nanorods (CdS-2) and hierarchical cubic microspheres (CdS-3), were controllably synthesized by a facile and one-pot microwave-assisted aqueous chemical method using ethanediamine as a phase and morphology controlling reagent. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The results show that CdS-1 is mainly composed of monodispersed hexagonal nanospheres with average diameters of about 100 nm; hexagonal CdS-2 has lengths in the range of 600–800 nm and diameters of 40–60 nm, assembled by nanoparticles about 20 nm in diameter; and CdS-3 is pure cubic microspheres with diameters in the range of 0.8–1.3 μm, aggregated by tiny nanograins with size of 5.8 nm. The band gap energies of CdS products were calculated to be 2.30, 2.31 and 2.24 eV observed from UV–vis DRS for CdS-1, CdS-2 and CdS-3, respectively. PL spectra of CdS samples showed that sphalerite CdS-3 possesses a very weak fluorescence, while wurtzite CdS-2 has a strongest green near-band edge emission (NBE) at 550 nm. The visible light photodegradation of methylene blue and rhodamine B in the presence of CdS photocatalysts illustrates that all of them display high photocatalytic activities. Significantly, the cubic CdS-3 exhibits more excellent photocatalytic

  11. One dimensional CdS nanowire@TiO2 nanoparticles core-shell as high performance photocatalyst for fast degradation of dye pollutants under visible and sunlight irradiation.

    PubMed

    Arabzadeh, Abbas; Salimi, Abdollah

    2016-10-01

    In this study, one-dimensional CdS nanowires@TiO2 nanoparticles core-shell structures (1D CdS NWs@TiO2 NPs) were synthesized by a facile wet chemical-solvothermal method. The different aspects of the properties of CdS NWs@TiO2 NPs were surveyed by using a comprehensive range of characterization techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescence spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and amperometry. The as-prepared nanostructure was applied as an effective photocatalyst for degradation of methyl orange (MO), methylene blue (MB) and rhodamine B (Rh B) under visible and sunlight irradiation. The results indicated significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity of CdS NWs@TiO2 NPs for degradation of MO, MB and Rh B compared to CdS NWs. The enhanced photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the enhanced sunlight absorbance and the efficient charge separation of the formed heterostructure between CdS NWs and TiO2. The results showed that MO, Rh B and MB were almost completely degraded after 2, 2 and 3min of exposure to sunlight, respectively; while under visible light irradiation (3W blue LED lamp) the dyes were decomposed with less half degradation rate. The catalytic activity was retained even after three degradation cycles of organic dyes, demonstrating that the proposed nanocomposite can be effectively used as efficient photocatalyst for removal of environmental pollutions caused by organic dyes under sunlight irradiation and it could be an important addition to the field of wastewater treatment. We hope the present study may open a new window of such 1-D semiconductor nanocomposites to be used as visible light photocatalysts in the promising field of organic dyes degradation.

  12. A Second Life for CDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snoderly, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Cutting a few CDs apart with scissors, the author found that the process created somewhat brittle shards. As a result, she started to paint a few with acrylic, finding to her amazement that the paint gave the CDs a leathery, more manageable texture. Upon further experimentation, she found that if the CDs are painted somewhat translucently in…

  13. Role of ZnO photoanode nanostructures and sensitizer deposition approaches on the photovoltaic properties of CdS/CdSe and CdS1-xSex quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şişman, İlkay; Tekir, Oktay; Karaca, Hüseyin

    2017-02-01

    Hierarchical bundle-like ZnO nanorod arrays (BNRs) were synthesized by a one-pot hydrothermal method based on two consecutive temperature steps for cascade CdS/CdSe and ternary CdS1-xSex alloy quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) as photoanode. The CdS/CdSe and CdS1-xSex QDs were deposited on the surface of the ZnO BNRs by conventional and modified successive ionic-layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) methods, respectively. Using the ZnO BNRs/CdS/CdSe photoanode, the power conversion efficiency reaches 2.08%, which is 1.8 times higher than that of pristine ZnO nanorods/CdS/CdSe photoanode, while by applying ZnO BNRs/CdS1-xSex, the power conversion efficiency improves 2.52%. The remarkably improved photovoltaic performance is mainly derived from the bundle-like nanorod arrays structure, which increases the QDs loading amount and the scattering effect for light absorption, and the appropriate conduction band energy, sufficient Se amount and well coverage of the ternary CdS1-xSex QDs result in enhanced photogenerated electron injection, high light absorption and reduced recombination, respectively. As a result, ZnO BNRs/CdS1-xSex combination can significantly improve performance of QDSSCs.

  14. Nano-architecture based photoelectrochemical water oxidation efficiency enhancement by CdS photoanodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareek, Alka; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Paik, Pradip; Joardar, Joydip; Borse, Pramod H.

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, 2D nanostructuring has been utilized to impart an efficiency improvement to the hexagonal phase CdS films for the photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells those were deposited by spray pyrolysis technique. By controlling the aerosol droplet- size, population and impingement time during the spray pyrolysis deposition, various nano-features viz. randomly aligned nanorods, nanotubes and nanowires of CdS has been demonstrated for the first time. A growth mechanism has been proposed to predict the temporal evolution of the nanostructures. The prominent nanoscale structures show improved optical properties in the visible range of solar spectrum. The structural studies validate the morphological differences of nanostructures in terms of the texture coefficient analysis as well as 2D micro x-ray diffraction imaging. Electrochemical characterization is carried out to understand the effect of nanostructuring on the PEC performance of the CdS photoanodes in the sulphide (0.1 M Na2S  +  0.02 M Na2SO3) electrolyte at applied bias of 0.2 V (versus SCE). The evolution of morphology from randomly aligned rods to nanowire is responsible for improved photocurrent (3.5 times). CdS film morphology can be tuned to nanotubes, nano- rose buds and nanorod bunches even by doping Zn2+ ions in CdS lattice. Nano-structuring of doped CdS has shown enhanced performance of the photoanodes. The nanotubes structures yielded highest photocurrent density of 1.6 mA cm‑2. Whereas modifying the 2D-nanostructured CdS film by simple MoO3 spray coating yields the photocurrent enhancement to 2.1 mA cm‑2.

  15. Rational design of hierarchical ZnO superstructures for efficient charge transfer: mechanistic and photovoltaic studies of hollow, mesoporous, cage-like nanostructures with compacted 1D building blocks.

    PubMed

    Chetia, Tridip Ranjan; Ansari, Mohammad Shaad; Qureshi, Mohammad

    2016-02-21

    Mesoporous and hollow zinc oxide (ZnO) hierarchical superstructures assembled with compact 1D building blocks that provide an efficient and faster transport pathway for photo-generated charge carriers have been synthesized using a biomass derived polysaccharide "alginic acid". To understand the interactions between the organic bio-template and inorganic growth units of ZnO in aqueous medium, the effects of additives such as the alginate ion (ALGI) and ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH), along with the controlled reaction conditions, are investigated using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and powder X-ray diffraction. Dynamic and steady-state photoluminescence measurements are carried out to understand the charge transfer processes in the compact 1D superstructures. Experimental analyses reveal that the alginate ions, under hydrothermal reaction conditions, act as a structure directing agent and assemble 1D ZnO nanorods (NRs) hierarchically while NH4OH assists the formation of ZnO growth units. A plausible mechanism for ZnO cage formation is proposed based on the experimental observations. Morphology dependent photovoltaic properties of ZnO heterostructures, i.e., for ZnO cages, ZnO NRs and ZnO PNPs, have been studied along with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Enhancement of ∼ 60% and ∼ 35% in power conversion efficiency (PCE) is observed in ZnO cage based devices as compared to ZnO NR- and ZnO PNP-based devices, respectively.

  16. Preparation and Structural Analysis of CdS Nanoparticle Embedded Polyurethane Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indolia, Ajay Pal; Kumar, Purushottam; Gaur, M. S.

    2011-07-01

    Polymer nanocomposite samples of different weight ratio of CdS were developed by solution embedding of nanoparticles in polyurethane. XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to understand the structural properties of polymer nanocomposite samples. SEM micrograph demonstrates the dispersion of CdS nanoparticles in polymer matrix. It has been observed that crystallinity of PU decreases with increase in concentration of CdS nanoparticles. The XRD data show the characteristic peaks of nanoparticles (i.e.CdS) in nanocomposite samples, which confirm the nanostructure formation in polymer matrix.

  17. Characterization and photocatalytic activities of C, N and S co-doped TiO(2) with 1D nanostructure prepared by the nano-confinement effect.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fan; Zhao, Weirong; Wu, Zhongbiao

    2008-09-10

    A novel method was developed for preparing high specific surface area (156.2 m(2) g(-1)) one-dimensional TiO(2) nanostructures co-doped with C, N and S by the nano-confinement effect. A nonmetal doping source (thiourea) was first intercalated into the inner space of H-titanate nanotubes prepared by the hydrothermal method, and then calcined at 450 °C for 2 h in air. The as-prepared C, N and S co-doped TiO(2) nanowires exhibited high visible light and enhanced UV-vis activities in photocatalytic degradation of toluene in the gas phase. The samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transform analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra and photoluminescence. The results indicated that the anatase nanowires grew along the [101] direction. Doping TiO(2) nanowires with C, N and S could not only broaden the light adsorption spectra into the visible region (400-600 nm), but also inhibit the recombination of photo-induced carriers. A mechanism is proposed to elucidate the nano-confinement effect of H-titanate nanotubes in the formation of C, N and S co-doping. Based on this mechanism, the effect of C, N and S co-doping on the band structure of TiO(2) nanowires is also discussed.

  18. One-dimensional boron nanostructures: Prediction, synthesis, characterizations, and applications.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jifa; Xu, Zhichuan; Shen, Chengmin; Liu, Fei; Xu, Ningsheng; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2010-08-01

    One-dimensional (1D) boron nanostructures are very potential for nanoscale electronic devices since their physical properties including electric transport and field emission have been found very promising as compared to other well-developed 1D nanomaterials. In this article, we review the current progress that has been made on 1D boron nanostructures in terms of theoretical prediction, synthetic techniques, characterizations and potential applications. To date, the synthesis of 1D boron nanostructures has been well-developed. The popular structures include nanowires, nanobelts, and nanocones. Some of these 1D nanostructures exhibited improved electric transport properties over bulk boron materials as well as promising field emission properties. By current experimental findings, 1D boron nanostructures are promising to be one of core materials for future nanodevices. More efforts are expected to be made in future on the controlled growth of 1D boron nanostructures and tailoring their physical properties.

  19. CdS nanoparticles sensitization of Al-doped ZnO nanorod array thin film with hydrogen treatment as an ITO/FTO-free photoanode for solar water splitting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) nanorod array thin film with hydrogen treatment possesses the functions of transparent conducting oxide thin film and 1-D nanostructured semiconductor simultaneously. To enhance the absorption in the visible light region, it is sensitized by cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles which efficiently increase the absorption around 460 nm. The CdS nanoparticles-sensitized AZO nanorod array thin film with hydrogen treatment exhibits significantly improved photoelectrochemical property. After further heat treatment, a maximum short current density of 5.03 mA cm−2 is obtained under illumination. They not only are much higher than those without CdS nanoparticles sensitization and those without Al-doping and/or hydrogen treatment, but also comparable and even slightly superior to some earlier works for the CdS-sensitized zinc oxide nanorod array thin films with indium tin oxide (ITO) or fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) as substrates. This demonstrated successfully that the AZO nanorod array thin film with hydrogen treatment is quite suitable as an ITO/FTO-free photoanode and has great potentials in solar water splitting after sensitization by quantum dots capable of visible light absorption. PMID:23098050

  20. Ag nanoparticle mediated growth of CdS nanobelts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, K.; Nuwad, J.; Thinaharan, C.; Dey, G. K.; Pillai, C. G. S.

    2007-06-01

    Catalytic growth of CdS have been carried out on large scale by evaporation of bulk CdS on Ag deposited Si (1 1 1) at atmospheric pressure. The as prepared CdS had wurtzite structure as evidenced by X-ray diffraction. The nanostructures were beltlike with several tens of micrometers length, several micrometers width and few nanometers to tens of nanometers thick as seen by scanning electron microscope and confirmed by TEM studies. The nanobelts were single crystalline in nature and showed reflection corresponding to (1 1 2) and (0 0 2) planes in SAED. The PL studies revealed the green band due to band gap emission and red band due to emission from the surface states. The higher intensity of the defect emission indicated the presence of considerable concentration of surface defects in the as prepared sample. The deposition of CdS could be explained on the basis of catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid and vapor-solid mechanism.

  1. Electrodeposition of one-dimensional nanostructures.

    PubMed

    She, Guangwei; Mu, Lixuan; Shi, Wensheng

    2009-01-01

    Electrodeposition is a simple and flexible method for the synthesis of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures and has attracted more and more attention in recent years. 1D nanostructures of metals, semiconductors and polymers have been successfully fabricated by electrodeposition. Templates were often used in the electrochemical process to realize the 1D growth. On the other hand, some materials with intrinsic anisotropic crystal structures can also be prepared by the template-free electrochemical method. In this paper, we review the recent patents progress and offer some prospects of future directions in electrodeposition of 1D nanostructures.

  2. Sonochemical synthesis of CdS and CdSe nanowires.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li-Ping; Xu, Shu; Miao, Jian-Jun; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2006-08-01

    A convenient sonochemical route was developed to fabricate one-dimensional (1D) CdS or CdSe assemblies via a simple template method with two-steps: Firstly, the colloid one dimensional cadmium hydroxide particles were prepared as templates under sonication; then, the colloid particles were converted into 1D CdS or CdSe assemblies via a replacement reaction after the surface nucleation and crystal growth processes. The as-prepared CdS and CdSe nanowires were characterized by XRD, TEM, XPS, and UV-visible Spectroscopy. The effects of the ultrasonic irradiation were discussed. It is believed that the ultrasound irradiation played a positive role in both the assembly of the colloid cadmium hydroxide particles into the 1D structure and the growth of CdSe and CdS nanowires. The effects of pH on the morphologies of the cadmium hydroxide template were also discussed. The band gaps of the as-prepared 1D CdSe and CdS assemblies were calculated to be 3.1 eV and 4.9 eV, respectively, indicating the quantum size effect. The as-prepared products might have potential applications in nanodevices in future.

  3. One‐Dimensional Ferroelectric Nanostructures: Synthesis, Properties, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Longyue; Kang, Xueliang

    2016-01-01

    One‐dimensional (1D) ferroelectric nanostructures, such as nanowires, nanorods, nanotubes, nanobelts, and nanofibers, have been studied with increasing intensity in recent years. Because of their excellent ferroelectric, ferroelastic, pyroelectric, piezoelectric, inverse piezoelectric, ferroelectric‐photovoltaic (FE‐PV), and other unique physical properties, 1D ferroelectric nanostructures have been widely used in energy‐harvesting devices, nonvolatile random access memory applications, nanoelectromechanical systems, advanced sensors, FE‐PV devices, and photocatalysis mechanisms. This review summarizes the current state of 1D ferroelectric nanostructures and provides an overview of the synthesis methods, properties, and practical applications of 1D nanostructures. Finally, the prospects for future investigations are outlined. PMID:27812477

  4. Broad spectral response photodetector based on individual tin-doped CdS nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Weichang E-mail: dstang@hunnu.edu.cn; Peng, Yuehua; Yin, Yanling; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Yong; Tang, Dongsheng E-mail: dstang@hunnu.edu.cn

    2014-12-15

    High purity and tin-doped 1D CdS micro/nano-structures were synthesized by a convenient thermal evaporation method. SEM, EDS, XRD and TEM were used to examine the morphology, composition, phase structure and crystallinity of as-prepared samples. Raman spectrum was used to confirm tin doped into CdS effectively. The effect of impurity on the photoresponse properties of photodetectors made from these as-prepared pure and tin-doped CdS micro/nano-structures under excitation of light with different wavelength was investigated. Various photoconductive parameters such as responsivity, external quantum efficiency, response time and stability were analyzed to evaluate the advantage of doped nanowires and the feasibility for photodetector application. Comparison with pure CdS nanobelt, the tin-doped CdS nanowires response to broader spectral range while keep the excellect photoconductive parameters. Both trapped state induced by tin impurity and optical whispering gallery mode microcavity effect in the doped CdS nanowires contribute to the broader spectral response. The micro-photoluminescence was used to confirm the whispering gallery mode effect and deep trapped state in the doped CdS nanowires.

  5. Supramolecular Gel-Templated In Situ Synthesis and Assembly of CdS Quantum Dots Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lili; He, Jie; Wang, Xiaoliang; Li, Dawei; He, Haibing; Ren, Lianbing; Jiang, Biwang; Wang, Yong; Teng, Chao; Xue, Gi; Tao, Huchun

    2017-01-01

    Although many studies have attempted to develop strategies for spontaneously organizing nanoparticles (NPs) into three-dimensional (3D) geometries, it remains a fascinating challenge. In this study, a method for in situ synthesis and self-assembly of a CdS quantum dots (QDs) gel using a Cd supramolecular gel as a scaffold was demonstrated. During the QDs formation process, the Cd ions that constituted the Cd gels served as the precursors of the CdS QDs, and the oleic acid (OA) that ligated with the Cd in the supramolecular gels was capped on the surface of the CdS QDs in the form of carboxylate. The OA-stabilized CdS QDs were in situ synthesized in the entangled self-assembled fibrillar networks (SAFIN) of the Cd gels through reactions between the gelator and H2S. As a result, the QDs exactly replicated the framework of the SAFIN in the CdS QD gels instead of simply assembling along the SAFIN of the supramolecular gels. Moreover, the CdS QDs showed extraordinary sensitivity in the fluorescence detection of IO4 - anions. The facile one-step method developed here is a new approach to assembling nanostructured materials into 3D architectures and has general implications for the design of low molecular mass gelators to bring desired functionality to the developed supramolecular gels.

  6. MoO3 Nanodots Decorated CdS Nanoribbons for High-Performance, Homojunction Photovoltaic Devices on Flexible Substrates.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhibin; Jie, Jiansheng; Sun, Zheng; Xia, Feifei; Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Xiaohong; Ding, Ke; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2015-05-13

    The p-n homojunctions are essential components for high-efficiency optoelectronic devices. However, the lack of p-type doping in CdS nanostructures hampers the fabrication of efficient photovoltaic (PV) devices from homojunctions. Here we report a facile solution-processed method to achieve efficient p-type doping in CdS nanoribbons (NRs) via a surface charge transfer mechanism by using spin-coated MoO3 nanodots (NDs). The NDs-decorated CdS NRs exhibited a hole concentration as high as 8.5 × 10(19) cm(-3), with the p-type conductivity tunable in a wide range of 7 orders of magnitude. The surface charge transfer mechanism was characterized in detail by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Kelvin probe force microscopy, and first-principle calculations. CdS NR-homojunction PV devices fabricated on a flexible substrate exhibited a power conversion efficiency of 5.48%, which was significantly better than most of the CdS nanostructure-based heterojunction devices, presumably due to minimal junction defects. Devices made by connecting cells in series or in parallel exhibited enhanced power output, demonstrating the promising potential of the homojunction PV devices for device integration. Given the high efficiency of the surface charge transfer doping and the solution-processing capability of the method, our work opens up unique opportunities for high-performance, low-cost optoelectronic devices based on CdS homojunctions.

  7. Tunable emission and conductivity enhancement by tellurium doping in CdS nanowires for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamran, Muhammad Arshad; Nabi, Ghulam; Majid, Abdul; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Alharbi, Thamer; Zhang, Yongyou; Zou, Bingsuo

    2017-02-01

    Improvement of the optical and electrical characteristics is essential to get advanced performance from one dimensional (1D) material. Here, we report the first synthesis of a single crystalline Te-doped CdS nanowires (NWs) by a chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) method. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra showed that Te concentration plays an important role in tuning emission color from orange to infrared (IR). Decrease in bandgap and PL intensity with increase in Te concentration was observed as compared to undoped CdS NWs. Red and IR emissions were found at 736.5 and 881 nm for doping concentration >6.06%. To our best knowledge, IR emission band has been observed for the first time in CdS NWs. Red-shift of LO phonon mode and its overtone in Raman spectra, and lifetime of red and IR emissions are longer than bandgap of host indicating the doping effect of CdS NWs. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the Te-doped CdS NWs further confirms the presence of Te in the CdS NWs. Output characteristics confirm enhanced output current Ids with the increase in doping concentration. A possible growth mechanism was proposed. Doping technique offers to develop high-quality, a very stable, effective, and easily-applicable way to enhance the performance of one dimensional optoelectronic devices and solar cell applications.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of nanostructured Mg-doped CdS/AAO nanoporous membrane for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaban, Mohamed; Mustafa, Mona; Hamdy, Hany

    2016-04-01

    In this study, Mg-doped CdS nanostructure was deposited onto anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane substrate using sol-gel spin coating method. The AAO membrane was prepared by a two-step anodization process combined with pore widening process. The morphology, chemical composition, and structure of the spin- coated CdS nanostructure have been studied. The morphology of the fabricated AAO membrane and the deposited Mg-doped CdS nanostructure was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM of AAO illustrates a typical hexagonal and smooth nanoporous alumina membrane with interpore distance of ~ 100 nm, the pore diameter of ~ 60 nm. SEM of Mgdoped CdS shows porous nanostructured film of CdS nanoparticles. This film well adherents and covers the AAO substrate. The energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) pattern exhibits the signals of Al, O from AAO membrane and Mg, Cd, and S from the deposited CdS. This indicates the high purity of the fabricated membrane and the deposited Mg-doped CdS nanostructure. Using X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, Scherrer equation was used to calculate the average crystallite size. Additionally, the texture coefficients and density of dislocations were calculated. The fabricated CdS/AAO was applied to detect glucose of different concentrations. The proposed method has some advantages such as simple technology, low cost of processing, and high throughput. All of these factors facilitate the use of the prepared films in sensing applications.

  9. Intercalibration of CDS and SUMER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauluhn, A.; Lang, J.; Schühle, U.; Solanki, S. K.; Wilhelm, K.; Pike, C. D.; Thompson, W. T.; Rüedi, I.; Hollandt, J.; Huber, M. C. E.

    2002-06-01

    The outcome of the Joint Observing Programme (JOP) Intercal-01, which is the intercalibration of the SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation) instrument (detectors A and B) and the two CDS (Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer) instruments, the Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS) and the Grazing Incidence Spectrometer (GIS), is presented. Recent calibration updates of both instruments have been employed, and the results indicate a very good correlation and agreement of the measured radiances within the individual uncertainties.

  10. Interactions between CdsD, CdsQ, and CdsL, Three Putative Chlamydophila pneumoniae Type III Secretion Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Dustin L.; Stone, Chris B.; Mahony, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Chlamydophila pneumoniae is a gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes pneumonia and bronchitis and may contribute to atherosclerosis. The developmental cycle of C. pneumoniae includes a morphological transition from an infectious extracellular elementary body (EB) to a noninfectious intracellular reticulate body (RB) that divides by binary fission. The C. pneumoniae genome encodes a type III secretion (T3S) apparatus that may be used to infect eukaryotic cells and to evade the host immune response. In the present study, Cpn0712 (CdsD), Cpn0704 (CdsQ), and Cpn0826 (CdsL), three C. pneumoniae genes encoding yersiniae T3S YscD, YscQ, and YscL homologs, respectively, were cloned and expressed as histidine- and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged proteins in Escherichia coli. Purified recombinant proteins were used to raise hyper-immune polyclonal antiserum and were used in GST pull-down and copurification assays to identify protein-protein interactions. CdsD was detected in both EB and RB lysates by Western blot analyses, and immunofluorescent staining demonstrated the presence of CdsD within inclusions. Triton X-114 solubilization and phase separation of chlamydial EB proteins indicated that CdsD partitions with cytoplasmic proteins, suggesting it is not an integral membrane protein. GST pull-down assays indicated that recombinant CdsD interacts with CdsQ and CdsL, and copurification assays with chlamydial lysates confirmed that native CdsD interacts with CdsQ and CdsL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating interactions between YscD, YscQ, and YscL homologs of bacterial T3S systems. These novel protein interactions may play important roles in the assembly or function of the chlamydial T3S apparatus. PMID:18281400

  11. One-dimensional hybrid nanostructures for heterogeneous photocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang-Xing; Miao, Jianwei; Tao, Hua Bing; Hung, Sung-Fu; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Hong Bin; Chen, Jiazang; Chen, Rong; Liu, Bin

    2015-05-13

    Semiconductor-based photocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis have received considerable attention as alternative approaches for solar energy harvesting and storage. The photocatalytic or photoelectrocatalytic performance of a semiconductor is closely related to the design of the semiconductor at the nanoscale. Among various nanostructures, one-dimensional (1D) nanostructured photocatalysts and photoelectrodes have attracted increasing interest owing to their unique optical, structural, and electronic advantages. In this article, a comprehensive review of the current research efforts towards the development of 1D semiconductor nanomaterials for heterogeneous photocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis is provided and, in particular, a discussion of how to overcome the challenges for achieving full potential of 1D nanostructures is presented. It is anticipated that this review will afford enriched information on the rational exploration of the structural and electronic properties of 1D semiconductor nanostructures for achieving more efficient 1D nanostructure-based photocatalysts and photoelectrodes for high-efficiency solar energy conversion.

  12. From Nanorods to Nanowires of CdS Synthesized by a Solvothermal Method: Influence of the Morphology on the Photoactivity for Hydrogen Evolution from Water.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Fernando; G Fierro, José Luis; Navarro Yerga, Rufino M

    2016-03-24

    The effect of temperature and water/thiourea ratio on the growth, crystallinity and morphological characteristics of CdS nanostructures synthetized by a solvothermal method using ethylenediamine as solvent were studied. The temperature and water/thiourea ratio used in the synthesis determine the surface area, shape, length and degree of crystallinity of the CdS nanostructures obtained. Nanowires of high crystallinity and length were obtained when the solvothermal synthesis was performed at 190 °C, while nanorods with lower length and crystallinity were obtained as the solvothermal temperature decreased to 120 °C. The change in the water/thiourea ratio affects the crystallinity and length of the CdS nanostructures to a lesser extent than temperature. Nevertheless an increase in the water/thiourea ratio used during the solvothermal synthesis resulted in CdS nanorods with higher crystallinity, lower aspect ratio and lower specific surface area. Textural, structural and surface properties of the prepared CdS nanostructures were determined and related to the activity results in the production of hydrogen from aqueous solutions containing SO3(2-) + S(2-) under visible light.

  13. Construction and Functions of Cyclodextrin-Based 1D Supramolecular Strands and their Secondary Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Yu

    2015-09-23

    Cyclodextrins (CDs), a class of cyclic oligosaccharides, are water-soluble, nontoxic, and commercial available with a low price, and their well-defined hydrophobic cavity can bind various organic/biological substrates. Through their molecular assembly mediated by organic, inorganic, or polymeric molecules as templates, CDs and their functional derivatives can be assembled to 1D supramolecular strands, wherein the functional groups of the CDs are closely located in a highly ordered manner. This structural feature greatly favors the cooperative effect of numerous functional groups in the supramolecular strand, as well as the interactions of the supramolecular strands with the multiple binding sites of substrates, especially biological substrates. Therefore, CD-based 1D supramolecular strands exhibit many material, biological, and catalytic functions, and these properties can be further improved through their secondary assembly. An overview of recent advances in the development of the construction and functions of CD-based 1D supramolecular strands and their secondary assemblies is given here. It is expected that the representative contributions described can inspire future investigations and lead to discoveries that promote the research of CD-based functional materials.

  14. Architectural control syntheses of CdS and CdSe nanoflowers, branched nanowires, and nanotrees via a solvothermal approach in a mixed solution and their photocatalytic property.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wei-Tang; Yu, Shu-Hong; Liu, Shu-Juan; Chen, Jun-Peng; Liu, Xian-Ming; Li, Fan-Qing

    2006-06-22

    Wurtzite CdS and CdSe nanostructures with complex morphologies such as urchin-like CdS nanoflowers, branched nanowires, and fractal nanotrees can be produced via a facile solvothermal approach in a mixed solution made of diethylenetriamine (DETA) and deionized water (DIW). The morphologies of CdS and CdSe nanocrystals can be easily controlled via tuning the volume ratio of DETA and DIW. Urchin-like CdS nanoflowers made of CdS nanorods are in a form of highly ordered hierarchical structures, while the nanowires are branched nanowires, and the fractal CdS nanotrees are a buildup of branched nanopines. The results demonstrated that solvothermal reaction in a mixed amine/water can access a variety of complex morphologies of semiconductor materials. The photocatalytic activity of CdS particles with different morphologies has been tested by the degradation of acid fuchsine under both UV and visible light, showing that the as-prepared branched CdS nanowires exhibit high photocatalytic activity for degradation of acid fuchsine.

  15. An improved pyrolysis route to synthesize carbon-coated CdS quantum dots with fluorescence enhancement effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Kejie; Liu Xiaoheng

    2011-10-15

    Well-dispersed carbon-coated CdS (CdS-C) quantum dots were successfully prepared via the improved pyrolysis of bis(1-dodecanethiol)-cadmium(II) under nitrogen atmosphere. This simple method effectively solved the sintered problem resulted from conventional pyrolysis process. The experimental results indicated that most of the as-prepared nanoparticles displayed well-defined core-shell structures. The CdS cores with diameter of {approx}5 nm exhibited hexagonal crystal phase, the carbon shells with thickness of {approx}2 nm acted as a good dispersion medium to prevent CdS particles from aggregation, and together with CdS effectively formed a monodisperse CdS-Carbon nanocomposite. This composite presented a remarkable fluorescence enhancement effect, which indicated that the prepared nanoparticles might be a promising photoresponsive material or biosensor. This improved pyrolysis method might also offer a facile way to prepare other carbon-coated semiconductor nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: We demonstrated a facile approach to synthesize well-dispersed carbon-coated CdS quantum dots. The as-prepared nanoparticles presented remarkable fluorescence enhancement effect. Highlights: > Carbon-coated CdS quantum dots were synthesized by an one-step pyrolysis method. > Well-dispersed CdS-carbon nanoparticles were obtained by an acid treatment process. > As-prepared nanoparticles presented remarkable fluorescence enhancement effect.

  16. Hydrogen Gas Sensors Based on Semiconductor Oxide Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Haoshuang; Wang, Zhao; Hu, Yongming

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the hydrogen gas sensing properties of semiconductor oxide (SMO) nanostructures have been widely investigated. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the research progress in the last five years concerning hydrogen gas sensors based on SMO thin film and one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. The hydrogen sensing mechanism of SMO nanostructures and some critical issues are discussed. Doping, noble metal-decoration, heterojunctions and size reduction have been investigated and proved to be effective methods for improving the sensing performance of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures. The effect on the hydrogen response of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures of grain boundary and crystal orientation, as well as the sensor architecture, including electrode size and nanojunctions have also been studied. Finally, we also discuss some challenges for the future applications of SMO nanostructured hydrogen sensors. PMID:22778599

  17. Superhydrophilic nanostructure

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Zormpa, Vasileia; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-05-12

    An embodiment of a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are formed into porous clusters. The porous clusters are formed into aggregate clusters. An embodiment of an article of manufacture includes the superhydrophilic nanostructure on a substrate. An embodiment of a method of fabricating a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes applying a solution that includes nanoparticles to a substrate. The substrate is heated to form aggregate clusters of porous clusters of the nanoparticles.

  18. Functionalized CdS nanospheres and nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeokjin; Yang, Heesun; Holloway, Paul H.

    2009-12-01

    Functionalized nanoparticles are discussed. Surfaces of CdS:Mn/ZnS core/shell nanospheres (Qdots) were converted from hydrophobic to hydrophilic by growth of a SiO 2 shell. The colloidal dispersion was stabilize by adding a surfactant with a negative surface charge, and a cell-penetrating-peptide, TAT, was attached through a primary amine group. The TAT functionalized Qdots were shown to pass the blood-brain-barrier and luminescence in the infused half of the brain. In addition, nanorods of S 2- rich CdS were synthesized by reaction of excess S with Cd precursors in the presence of ethylene diamine. The photoluminescence (PL) peak from the S 2- rich CdS nanorods was broad with a maximum at ∼710 nm, which was 40 nm longer in wavelength than the PL peak from Cd 2+ rich CdS (∼670 nm) nanorods. The influence of surface electron or hole trap states on the luminescent pathway of CdS nanorods were used to explain these shifts in wavelength. Nanocrystals of Au with ∼2 nm diameters were grown on S 2- rich surfaces of CdS nanorods. Significant quenching of photoluminescence was observed from Au nanocrystals on CdS nanorods due to interfacial charge separation. Charge separation by Au nanocrystals on CdS resulted in enhanced UV photocatalytic degradation of Procion red mix-5B (PRB) dye in aqueous solution.

  19. Web Services and Related Works at CDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaff, A.

    2004-07-01

    Started at CDS in 2002, the work around Web Services is in a full exploitation phase. Several services are now available via SOAP: the Sesame name resolver for Simbad-NED-VizieR, a GLU tag resolver, a UCD resolver, the UCD tag list, Aladin image Access, VizieR catalogue access, etc. A portal is available to publish all information about how to use CDS XML Webservices and also hints on how to start to use XML Web Services (tutorial, links, etc.). Other works around XML Web Services are also ongoing at CDS and are described in this article.

  20. One-Dimensional Oxide Nanostructures as Gas-Sensing Materials: Review and Issues

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyoung Jin; Jang, Ho Won

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we review gas sensor application of one-dimensional (1D) metal-oxide nanostructures with major emphases on the types of device structure and issues for realizing practical sensors. One of the most important steps in fabricating 1D-nanostructure devices is manipulation and making electrical contacts of the nanostructures. Gas sensors based on individual 1D nanostructure, which were usually fabricated using electron-beam lithography, have been a platform technology for fundamental research. Recently, gas sensors with practical applicability were proposed, which were fabricated with an array of 1D nanostructures using scalable micro-fabrication tools. In the second part of the paper, some critical issues are pointed out including long-term stability, gas selectivity, and room-temperature operation of 1D-nanostructure-based metal-oxide gas sensors. PMID:22319343

  1. Visible Light Photocatalysis via CdS/ TiO 2 Nanocomposite Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Wade, Jeremy; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2006-01-01

    Nmore » anostructured colloidal semiconductors with heterogeneous photocatalytic behavior have drawn considerable attention over the past few years. This is due to their large surface area, high redox potential of the photogenerated charge carriers, and selective reduction/oxidation of different classes of organic compounds. In the present paper, we have carried out a systematic synthesis of nanostructured CdS- TiO 2 via reverse micelle process. The structural and microstructural characterizations of the as-prepared CdS- TiO 2 nanocomposites are determined using XRD and SEM-EDS techniques. The visible light assisted photocatalytic performance is monitored by means of degradation of phenol in water suspension.« less

  2. Interoperability in the CDS services.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, F.; Allen, M.; Bonnarel, F.; Boch, T.; Derriere, S.; Egret, D.; Fernique, P.; Ochsenbein, F.; Schaaff, A.; Wenger, M.

    2002-12-01

    The Astrophysical Virtual Observatory Project (PI: P. Quinn, ESO) has three Work Areas: Science case (P. Benvenuti, ST-ECF), Interoperability (F. Genova, CDS) and Advanced technologies (A. Lawrence, AstroGrid). The development of an Interoperability prototype, implementing a set of European archives into VizieR and Aladin, in collaboration with all the AVO partners, has been a first-year milestone of the AVO. Interoperability standards are widely discussed in all VO projects, and in the Interoperability Working Group first set by the European OPTICON Network. They are a main topic of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance. Specific developments and customizations have been integrated in SIMBAD, VizieR and Aladin. The adopted VOTable standard is used for the exchange of tabular data, and a VOTable parser, able to give rapidly access to tables containing large numbers of objects, has been developed. The categorization of column contents in VizieR tables and catalogues has lead to the definition of the Uniform Content Descriptors (UCDs). The UCDs have proven very powerful for building new functionalities such as checking of table contents, catalogue selection (e.g. finding tables which contain specific information item), filtering (e.g. visualizing, through Aladin, objects of a specific magnitude or colour range) and data transformation and combination (e.g. computing a colour index).

  3. Management of Catalogs at CDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, G.; Boch, T.; Brouty, M.; Guéhenneux, S.; Genova, F.; Lesteven, S.; Ochsenbein, F.; Ocvirk, P.; Perret, E.; Pineau, F.-X.; Simon, A.-C.; Vannier, P.

    2015-04-01

    VizieR (Ochsenbein et al. 2000) provides access to the most complete library of published astronomical catalogs (data tables and associated data) available online and organized in a self-documented database. (There were 11769 catalogs in November 2013.) Indexing the metadata in the VizieR search engine requires the expertise of scientists and documentalists for each catalog ingested. The metadata go into an efficient position search engine that is adapted to big data. (For instance, the GAIA simulation catalog has more than two billion objects). Information in VizieR tables is well described and can be retrieved easily. The search results provide visibility to catalogs with tools and protocols to disseminate data to the Virtual Observatory, thus giving scientists data that is reusable by dedicated tools (e.g. image vizualisation tools). Also, new functionality allows users to extract all photometric data in catalogs for a given position. Finally, it is also through cross-identification tools that the CDS becomes a partner in producing large data sets, such as GAIA.

  4. CdS and CdTeS quantum dot decorated TiO2 nanowires. Synthesis and photoefficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Gonzalez, Yaocihuatl; Xu, William Z.; Chen, Bo; Farhanghi, Nasrin; Charpentier, Paul A.

    2011-02-01

    An easy process was developed to synthesize TiO2 nanowires sensitized with CdS and CdTeS quantum dots (QDs) requiring no pretreatment of the TiO2 nanowires prior to nanoparticle generation. CdS and CdTeS nanoparticles were firstly grown by an in situ colloidal method directly onto the TiO2 surface, hence not requiring subsequent functionalization of the QDs. The resulting nanostructure assembly and composition was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. Successful decoration of the TiO2 nanowires by the QDs was observed by TEM, while XPS spectra provided clear evidence for the coexistence of CdS and CdTeS QDs and TiO2 nanowires. The electronic structure of the TiO2 nanowires was preserved as indicated by Raman spectroscopy. Preliminary photocurrent measurements showed that inclusion of Te in CdS QDs improved the photocurrent efficiency. Compared to bare TiO2 nanowires, CdS/TiO2 nanoassemblies showed an enhancement in photocurrent efficiency of 300% while CdTeS/TiO2 presented an improvement of 350%. This study indicates that the generation of strongly anchored CdS and CdTeS QDs on a TiO2 nanowire surface is achievable without introduction of a linker molecule, whose presence is known to decrease the electron injection efficiency.

  5. Nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, Philip

    2001-03-01

    Nanostructured materials may be defined as those materials whose structural elements - clusters, crystallites or molecules - have dimensions in the 1 to 100 nm range. The explosion in both academic and industrial interest in these materials over the past decade arises from the remarkable variations in fundamental electrical, optical and magnetic properties that occur as one progresses from an `infinitely extended' solid to a particle of material consisting of a countable number of atoms. This review details recent advances in the synthesis and investigation of functional nanostructured materials, focusing on the novel size-dependent physics and chemistry that results when electrons are confined within nanoscale semiconductor and metal clusters and colloids. Carbon-based nanomaterials and nanostructures including fullerenes and nanotubes play an increasingly pervasive role in nanoscale science and technology and are thus described in some depth. Current nanodevice fabrication methods and the future prospects for nanostructured materials and nanodevices are discussed.

  6. A comparative study on CdS: PEO and CdS: PMMA nanocomposite solid films

    SciTech Connect

    Padmaja, S.; Jayakumar, S.; Balaji, R.; Vaideki, K.

    2016-08-15

    Cadmium Sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles were reinforced in Poly(ethylene Oxide) (PEO) and Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrices by in situ technique. The presence of CdS in PEO and PMMA matrix was confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis disclosed the co-ordination of CdS in the matrices. Thermal analysis of the nanocomposites was carried out using Differential Scanning calorimetric studies (DSC). The optical studies using UV–vis spectroscopy were carried out to find the band gap of the materials and the absorption onset. The CdS particle size in the matrices was found by Effective Mass Approximation (EMA) model using the band gap values and was confirmed by TEM studies. The surface trapped emissions of the nanocomposites were observed from the photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The distribution of CdS particles in the polymer matrices were presented by Atomic force microscopic studies (AFM).

  7. Tunable Design of Structural Colors Produced by Pseudo-1D Photonic Crystals of Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Tong, Liping; Qi, Wei; Wang, Mengfan; Huang, Renliang; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-07-01

    It is broadly observed that graphene oxide (GO) films appear transparent with a thickness of about several nanometers, whereas they appear dark brown or almost black with thickness of more than 1 μm. The basic color mechanism of GO film on a sub-micrometer scale, however, is not well understood. This study reports on GO pseudo-1D photonic crystals (p1D-PhCs) exhibiting tunable structural colors in the visible wavelength range owing to its 1D Bragg nanostructures. Striking structural colors of GO p1D-PhCs could be tuned by simply changing either the volume or concentration of the aqueous GO dispersion during vacuum filtration. Moreover, the quantitative relationship between thickness and reflection wavelength of GO p1D-PhCs has been revealed, thereby providing a theoretical basis to rationally design structural colors of GO p1D-PhCs. The spectral response of GO p1D-PhCs to humidity is also obtained clearly showing the wavelength shift of GO p1D-PhCs at differently relative humidity values and thus encouraging the integration of structural color printing and the humidity-responsive property of GO p1D-PhCs to develop a visible and fast-responsive anti-counterfeiting label. The results pave the way for a variety of potential applications of GO in optics, structural color printing, sensing, and anti-counterfeiting.

  8. Structural transformation in monolayer materials: a 2D to 1D transformation.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Kasra; Attariani, Hamed; LeSar, Richard A

    2016-07-20

    Reducing the dimensions of materials to atomic scales results in a large portion of atoms being at or near the surface, with lower bond order and thus higher energy. At such scales, reduction of the surface energy and surface stresses can be the driving force for the formation of new low-dimensional nanostructures, and may be exhibited through surface relaxation and/or surface reconstruction, which can be utilized for tailoring the properties and phase transformation of nanomaterials without applying any external load. Here we used atomistic simulations and revealed an intrinsic structural transformation in monolayer materials that lowers their dimension from 2D nanosheets to 1D nanostructures to reduce their surface and elastic energies. Experimental evidence of such transformation has also been revealed for one of the predicted nanostructures. Such transformation plays an important role in bi-/multi-layer 2D materials.

  9. Catalyst- and template-free low-temperature in situ growth of n-type CdS nanowire on p-type CdTe film and p-n heterojunction properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ligang; Liu, Wenchao; Cai, Hongling; Zhang, Fengming; Wu, Xiaoshan

    2016-12-01

    CdS is an important semiconductor used in optoelectronic devices. Simple techniques for growing CdS nanostructures are thus essential at a low cost. This study presents a novel method for growing single-crystal n-type CdS nanowires on p-type CdTe films by thermal annealing in an H2S/N2 mixed gas flow, which does not require the help of a catalyst or template. The formation process and growth mechanism of the nanowires are investigated. Well-dispersed whiskerlike CdS nanostructures are obtained at an appropriate annealing temperature and duration. We suggest that the stress-driving mechanism of nanowire formation may contribute to the growth of CdS nanowires, and that the evaporation of Te through the boundaries of the CdS grain seeds plays an important role in the sustainable growth of nanowire. In addition, CdS/CdTe heterojunction device is fabricated on Mo glass. The I-V characteristic of the heterojunction in dark shows typical rectifying diode behavior. The turn-on voltage can be regulated by annealing conditions. Meanwhile, the obvious photovoltaic effect is obtained on the in situ growth heterojunction prepared at low annealing temperature. Hence, this is a new fabricated method for CdTe-based materials in the field of energy conversion.

  10. Catalyst- and template-free low-temperature in situ growth of n-type CdS nanowire on p-type CdTe film and p-n heterojunction properties

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ligang; Liu, Wenchao; Cai, Hongling; Zhang, Fengming; Wu, Xiaoshan

    2016-01-01

    CdS is an important semiconductor used in optoelectronic devices. Simple techniques for growing CdS nanostructures are thus essential at a low cost. This study presents a novel method for growing single-crystal n-type CdS nanowires on p-type CdTe films by thermal annealing in an H2S/N2 mixed gas flow, which does not require the help of a catalyst or template. The formation process and growth mechanism of the nanowires are investigated. Well-dispersed whiskerlike CdS nanostructures are obtained at an appropriate annealing temperature and duration. We suggest that the stress-driving mechanism of nanowire formation may contribute to the growth of CdS nanowires, and that the evaporation of Te through the boundaries of the CdS grain seeds plays an important role in the sustainable growth of nanowire. In addition, CdS/CdTe heterojunction device is fabricated on Mo glass. The I-V characteristic of the heterojunction in dark shows typical rectifying diode behavior. The turn-on voltage can be regulated by annealing conditions. Meanwhile, the obvious photovoltaic effect is obtained on the in situ growth heterojunction prepared at low annealing temperature. Hence, this is a new fabricated method for CdTe-based materials in the field of energy conversion. PMID:27958306

  11. Catalyst- and template-free low-temperature in situ growth of n-type CdS nanowire on p-type CdTe film and p-n heterojunction properties.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ligang; Liu, Wenchao; Cai, Hongling; Zhang, Fengming; Wu, Xiaoshan

    2016-12-13

    CdS is an important semiconductor used in optoelectronic devices. Simple techniques for growing CdS nanostructures are thus essential at a low cost. This study presents a novel method for growing single-crystal n-type CdS nanowires on p-type CdTe films by thermal annealing in an H2S/N2 mixed gas flow, which does not require the help of a catalyst or template. The formation process and growth mechanism of the nanowires are investigated. Well-dispersed whiskerlike CdS nanostructures are obtained at an appropriate annealing temperature and duration. We suggest that the stress-driving mechanism of nanowire formation may contribute to the growth of CdS nanowires, and that the evaporation of Te through the boundaries of the CdS grain seeds plays an important role in the sustainable growth of nanowire. In addition, CdS/CdTe heterojunction device is fabricated on Mo glass. The I-V characteristic of the heterojunction in dark shows typical rectifying diode behavior. The turn-on voltage can be regulated by annealing conditions. Meanwhile, the obvious photovoltaic effect is obtained on the in situ growth heterojunction prepared at low annealing temperature. Hence, this is a new fabricated method for CdTe-based materials in the field of energy conversion.

  12. EMODEL_1D v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, David F.

    2016-07-06

    Program EMODEL_1D is an electromagnetic earth model construction utility designed to generate a three-dimensional (3D) uniformly-gridded representation of one-dimensional (1D) layered earth model. Each layer is characterized by the isotropic EM properties electric permittivity ?, magnetic permeability ?, and current conductivity ?. Moreover, individual layers of the model may possess a linear increase/decrease of any or all of these properties with depth.

  13. Dislocation-driven CdS and CdSe nanowire growth.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haoyu; Meng, Fei; Li, Linsen; Jin, Song; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2012-05-22

    We report the synthesis of CdS and CdSe nanowires (NWs) and nanoribbons (NRs) with gold catalysts by H(2)-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Nanopods and nanocones were obtained without catalysts at higher system pressure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies, including two-beam TEM and displaced-aperture dark-field TEM characterization, were used to investigate the NW growth mechanism. Dislocation contrast and twist contours have been routinely observed within the synthesized one-dimensional (1D) CdS and CdSe NWs, suggesting the operation of the dislocation-driven NW growth mechanism under our experimental conditions. The Burgers vectors of dislocations and the associated Eshelby twists were measured and quantified. We hypothesize that gold nanoparticles provide nucleation sites to initiate the growth of CdS/CdSe NWs and lead to the formation of dislocations that continue to drive and sustain 1D growth at a low supersaturation level. Our study suggests that the dislocation-driven mechanism may also contribute to the growth of other 1D nanomaterials that are commonly considered to grow via the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism.

  14. Nanostructured photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lan; Tan, H. Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    Energy and the environment are two of the most important global issues that we currently face. The development of clean and sustainable energy resources is essential to reduce greenhouse gas emission and meet our ever-increasing demand for energy. Over the last decade photovoltaics, as one of the leading technologies to meet these challenges, has seen a continuous increase in research, development and investment. Meanwhile, nanotechnology, which is considered to be the technology of the future, is gradually revolutionizing our everyday life through adaptation and incorporation into many traditional technologies, particularly energy-related technologies, such as photovoltaics. While the record for the highest efficiency is firmly held by multijunction III-V solar cells, there has never been a shortage of new research effort put into improving the efficiencies of all types of solar cells and making them more cost effective. In particular, there have been extensive and exciting developments in employing nanostructures; features with different low dimensionalities, such as quantum wells, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoparticles and quantum dots, have been incorporated into existing photovoltaic technologies to enhance their performance and/or reduce their cost. Investigations into light trapping using plasmonic nanostructures to effectively increase light absorption in various solar cells are also being rigorously pursued. In addition, nanotechnology provides researchers with great opportunities to explore the new ideas and physics offered by nanostructures to implement advanced solar cell concepts such as hot carrier, multi-exciton and intermediate band solar cells. This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains selected papers on nanostructured photovoltaics written by researchers in their respective fields of expertise. These papers capture the current excitement, as well as addressing some open questions in the field, covering topics including the

  15. Heat Capacity of 1D Molecular Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagatskii, M. I.; Barabashko, M. S.; Sumarokov, V. V.; Jeżowski, A.; Stachowiak, P.

    2017-04-01

    The heat capacity of 1D chains of nitrogen and methane molecules (adsorbed in the outer grooves of bundles of closed-cap single-walled carbon nanotubes) has been studied in the temperature ranges 2-40 and 2-60 K, respectively. The temperature dependence of the heat capacity of 1D chains of nitrogen molecules below 3 K is close to a linear. It was found that the rotational heat capacity of methane molecules is a significant part of the total heat capacity of the chains throughout the whole investigated temperature range, whereas in the case of nitrogen, the librations are significant only above 15 K. The dependence of the heat capacity for methane below 10 K indicates the presence of a Schottky anomaly caused by the tunneling between the lowest energy levels of the CH4 molecule rotational spectra. Characteristic features observed in the temperature dependence of the heat capacity of 1D methane crystals are also discussed.

  16. Upstream Design and 1D-CAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroyuki

    Recently, engineering design environment of Japan is changing variously. Manufacturing companies are being challenged to design and bring out products that meet the diverse demands of customers and are competitive against those produced by rising countries(1). In order to keep and strengthen the competitiveness of Japanese companies, it is necessary to create new added values as well as conventional ones. It is well known that design at the early stages has a great influence on the final design solution. Therefore, design support tools for the upstream design is necessary for creating new added values. We have established a research society for 1D-CAE (1 Dimensional Computer Aided Engineering)(2), which is a general term for idea, methodology and tools applicable for the upstream design support, and discuss the concept and definition of 1D-CAE. This paper reports our discussion about 1D-CAE.

  17. Helical Floquet Channels in 1D Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budich, Jan Carl; Hu, Ying; Zoller, Peter

    2017-03-01

    We show how dispersionless channels exhibiting perfect spin-momentum locking can arise in a 1D lattice model. While such spectra are forbidden by fermion doubling in static 1D systems, here we demonstrate their appearance in the stroboscopic dynamics of a periodically driven system. Remarkably, this phenomenon does not rely on any adiabatic assumptions, in contrast to the well known Thouless pump and related models of adiabatic spin pumps. The proposed setup is shown to be experimentally feasible with state-of-the-art techniques used to control ultracold alkaline earth atoms in optical lattices.

  18. Mining the CDS Collection: A Learning Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Patricio F.; Ochsenbein, François

    The experiences gained as a result of the CDS/ESO Datamining project are described in this paper as well as a brief outline of the tools developed (described in Ortiz et al. 1998 and Ortiz, 2000). Important issues about datamining and the exchange of information in the context of the Virtual Observatory are described and discussed, emphasizing the need of consistent meta-information for the exchange of data amongst servers and institutions.

  19. Lightweight Beryllium Free Nanostructured Nanostructured Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Plasma Processes, Inc. Lightweight Beryllium Free Nanostructured Composites SBIR Contract DASG60-02-P-41 Phase I Final Report 1/15/03 Submitted by...Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle Lightweight Beryllium Free Nanostructured Nanostructured Composites Contract

  20. Turning “on” and “off” nucleation and growth: Microwave assisted synthesis of CdS clusters and nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Edmy; Nater, Sariann; Rivera, Daniel; Colon, Jean Marie; Zayas, Francisco; Gonzalez, Miguel; Castro, Miguel E.

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Cadmium acetate and DMSO were employed as ion precursors. ► New approach to controlled CdS nanoparticle synthesis. ► CdS clusters and nanoparticles synthesis achieved using microwave irradiation. ► Microwave irradiation turns on and off nanoparticle growth. ► The formation of clusters, embryos and nanoparticles studied with optical spectroscopy. -- Abstract: We report here on the formation of CdS NP from the microwave assisted reaction of Cd(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2} with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). DMSO serves as the solvent and a controlled source of sulfide ions to form (CdS){sub 1≤n≤5} clusters at the early stages of the process. The clusters grow into CdS nanoparticles, with diameters that range from 1.6 nm up to over 250 nm, with microwave heating. The time dependence of the onset of light absorption and absorbance are consistent with a concurrent nucleation and growth processes. The formation of clusters and nuclei and their subsequent reactions is controlled by turning on and off the energy supply consistent with an energy barrier to the formation of CdS nanostructures.

  1. The Genomic CDS Sandbox: An Assessment Among Domain Experts

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Ayesha; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Eilbeck, Karen; Williams, Marc S.; Freimuth, Robert R.; Hoffman, Mark A.; Rasmussen, Luke V.; Overby, Casey L.; Shirts, Brian H.; Hoffman, James M.; Welch, Brandon M.

    2016-01-01

    Genomics is a promising tool that is becoming more widely available to improve the care and treatment of individuals. While there is much assertion, genomics will most certainly require the use of clinical decision support (CDS) to be fully realized in the routine clinical setting. The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) of the National Institutes of Health recently convened an in-person, multi-day meeting on this topic. It was widely recognized that there is a need to promote the innovation and development of resources for genomic CDS such as a CDS sandbox. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a proposed approach for such a genomic CDS sandbox among domain experts and potential users. Survey results indicate a significant interest and desire for a genomic CDS sandbox environment among domain experts. These results will be used to guide the development of a genomic CDS sandbox. PMID:26778834

  2. Calibration of a 1D/1D urban flood model using 1D/2D model results in the absence of field data.

    PubMed

    Leandro, J; Djordjević, S; Chen, A S; Savić, D A; Stanić, M

    2011-01-01

    Recently increased flood events have been prompting researchers to improve existing coupled flood-models such as one-dimensional (1D)/1D and 1D/two-dimensional (2D) models. While 1D/1D models simulate sewer and surface networks using a one-dimensional approach, 1D/2D models represent the surface network by a two-dimensional surface grid. However their application raises two issues to urban flood modellers: (1) stormwater systems planning/emergency or risk analysis demands for fast models, and the 1D/2D computational time is prohibitive, (2) and the recognized lack of field data (e.g. Hunter et al. (2008)) causes difficulties for the calibration/validation of 1D/1D models. In this paper we propose to overcome these issues by calibrating a 1D/1D model with the results of a 1D/2D model. The flood-inundation results show that: (1) 1D/2D results can be used to calibrate faster 1D/1D models, (2) the 1D/1D model is able to map the 1D/2D flood maximum extent well, and the flooding limits satisfactorily in each time-step, (3) the 1D/1D model major differences are the instantaneous flow propagation and overestimation of the flood-depths within surface-ponds, (4) the agreement in the volume surcharged by both models is a necessary condition for the 1D surface-network validation and (5) the agreement of the manholes discharge shapes measures the fitness of the calibrated 1D surface-network.

  3. Plasmonic Au nanoparticles embedding enhances the activity and stability of CdS for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Guiyang; Wang, Xiang; Cao, Jungang; Wu, Shujie; Yan, Wenfu; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    A composite photocatalyst of embedding plasmonic Au nanoparticle into CdS (Au@CdS) was prepared with a cysteine-assisted hydrothermal approach. This structure could take fully advantage of electromagnetic fields at the surface of the Au nanoparticles under visible light illumination. The photocatalytic hydrogen evolution activity of CdS could be significantly improved. Without the use of any other metal or metal oxide as cocatalysts, the quantum efficiency can reach 12.1 % over 0.5%Au@CdS at 420 nm. When using 0.1%Pt as a cocatalyst, the quantum efficiency of 0.5%Au@CdS can be further improved to 45.6%. This efficiency can be maintained more than 100 h in the test 12 days, exhibiting a relatively high stability. Photoluminescence (PL) characterization shows that the formation rate of photoexcited e-/h+ was dramatically increased when Au nanoparticles were embedded into CdS. Time-resolved PL measurement shows that Au@CdS also has a longer luminescence lifetime than that of CdS, reflecting that the photoexcited electrons in Au@CdS be with much longer lifetime to reduce H+ forming H2. All these enhancements can be attributed to the effective energy transfer between the Au surface and CdS due to the well matched composite nanostructure. Dr. Xiang Wang gratefully acknowledges the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division for the support of this work.

  4. Room-temperature synthesis of nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with highly enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Rajendra C.; Kang, Suhee; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jong-ho; Ahn, Sunghoon; Lee, Caroline S.

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure having a porous network is an exceptional photocatalytic material to generate hydrogen (H2) and decontaminate wastewater using solar energy. In this report, we synthesized nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) via a facile and template-free chemical approach at room temperature. The use of concentrated acids induced etching and lift-off because of strong oxidation and protonation. Compared with the bulk g-C3N4, the porous 1D microrod structure showed five times higher photocatalytic degradation performance toward methylene blue dye (MB) under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic H2 evolution of the 1D nanostructure (34 μmol g−1) was almost 26 times higher than that of the bulk g-C3N4 structure (1.26 μmol g−1). Additionally, the photocurrent stability of this nanoporous 1D morphology over 24 h indicated remarkable photocorrosion resistance. The improved photocatalytic activities were attributed to prolonged carrier lifetime because of its quantum confinement effect, effective separation and transport of charge carriers, and increased number of active sites from interconnected nanopores throughout the microrods. The present 1D nanostructure would be highly suited for photocatalytic water purification as well as water splitting devices. Finally, this facile and room temperature strategy to fabricate the nanostructures is very cost-effective. PMID:27498979

  5. Room-temperature synthesis of nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with highly enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Rajendra C; Kang, Suhee; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Ahn, Sunghoon; Lee, Caroline S

    2016-08-08

    A one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure having a porous network is an exceptional photocatalytic material to generate hydrogen (H2) and decontaminate wastewater using solar energy. In this report, we synthesized nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) via a facile and template-free chemical approach at room temperature. The use of concentrated acids induced etching and lift-off because of strong oxidation and protonation. Compared with the bulk g-C3N4, the porous 1D microrod structure showed five times higher photocatalytic degradation performance toward methylene blue dye (MB) under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic H2 evolution of the 1D nanostructure (34 μmol g(-1)) was almost 26 times higher than that of the bulk g-C3N4 structure (1.26 μmol g(-1)). Additionally, the photocurrent stability of this nanoporous 1D morphology over 24 h indicated remarkable photocorrosion resistance. The improved photocatalytic activities were attributed to prolonged carrier lifetime because of its quantum confinement effect, effective separation and transport of charge carriers, and increased number of active sites from interconnected nanopores throughout the microrods. The present 1D nanostructure would be highly suited for photocatalytic water purification as well as water splitting devices. Finally, this facile and room temperature strategy to fabricate the nanostructures is very cost-effective.

  6. Room-temperature synthesis of nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with highly enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Rajendra C.; Kang, Suhee; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Ahn, Sunghoon; Lee, Caroline S.

    2016-08-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure having a porous network is an exceptional photocatalytic material to generate hydrogen (H2) and decontaminate wastewater using solar energy. In this report, we synthesized nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) via a facile and template-free chemical approach at room temperature. The use of concentrated acids induced etching and lift-off because of strong oxidation and protonation. Compared with the bulk g-C3N4, the porous 1D microrod structure showed five times higher photocatalytic degradation performance toward methylene blue dye (MB) under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic H2 evolution of the 1D nanostructure (34 μmol g‑1) was almost 26 times higher than that of the bulk g-C3N4 structure (1.26 μmol g‑1). Additionally, the photocurrent stability of this nanoporous 1D morphology over 24 h indicated remarkable photocorrosion resistance. The improved photocatalytic activities were attributed to prolonged carrier lifetime because of its quantum confinement effect, effective separation and transport of charge carriers, and increased number of active sites from interconnected nanopores throughout the microrods. The present 1D nanostructure would be highly suited for photocatalytic water purification as well as water splitting devices. Finally, this facile and room temperature strategy to fabricate the nanostructures is very cost-effective.

  7. Glass-based 1-D dielectric microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiasera, Alessandro; Scotognella, Francesco; Valligatla, Sreeramulu; Varas, Stefano; Jasieniak, Jacek; Criante, Luigino; Lukowiak, Anna; Ristic, Davor; Gonçalves, Rogeria Rocha; Taccheo, Stefano; Ivanda, Mile; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ramponi, Roberta; Martucci, Alessandro; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a reliable RF sputtering techniques allowing to fabricate glass-based one dimensional microcavities, with high quality factor. This property is strongly related to the modification of the density of states due to the confinement of the gain medium in a photonic band gap structure. In this short review we present some of the more recent results obtained by our team exploiting these 1D microcavities. In particular we present: (1) Er3+ luminescence enhancement of the 4I13/2 → 4I15/2 transition; (2) broad band filters based on disordered 1-D photonic structures; (3) threshold defect-mode lasing action in a hybrid structure.

  8. DNA nanostructure meets nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guomei; Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-04-07

    Recent advances in DNA nanotechnology have made it possible to construct DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shapes with 2-3 nm of precision in their dimensions. These DNA nanostructures are ideal templates for bottom-up nanofabrication. This review highlights the challenges and recent advances in three areas that are directly related to DNA-based nanofabrication: (1) fabrication of large scale DNA nanostructures; (2) pattern transfer from DNA nanostructure to an inorganic substrate; and (3) directed assembly of DNA nanostructures.

  9. Centrosome Positioning in 1D Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlerz, Katrina; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    During cell migration, the positioning of the centrosome and nucleus define a cell's polarity. For a cell migrating on a two-dimensional substrate the centrosome is positioned in front of the nucleus. Under one-dimensional confinement, however, the centrosome is positioned behind the nucleus in 60% of cells. It is known that the centrosome is positioned by CDC42 and dynein for cells moving on a 2D substrate in a wound-healing assay. It is currently unknown, however, if this is also true for cells moving under 1D confinement, where the centrosome position is often reversed. Therefore, centrosome positioning was studied in cells migrating under 1D confinement, which mimics cells migrating through 3D matrices. 3 to 5 μm fibronectin lines were stamped onto a glass substrate and cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei and centrosomes migrated on the lines. Our results show that when a cell changes directions the centrosome position is maintained. That is, when the centrosome is between the nucleus and the cell's trailing edge and the cell changes direction, the centrosome will be translocated across the nucleus to the back of the cell again. A dynein inhibitor did have an influence on centrosome positioning in 1D migration and change of directions.

  10. One-dimensional nanostructure field-effect sensors for gas detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Cai, Bin; Tang, Qingxin; Tong, Yanhong; Liu, Yichun

    2014-07-31

    Recently; one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure field-effect transistors (FETs) have attracted much attention because of their potential application in gas sensing. Micro/nanoscaled field-effect sensors combine the advantages of 1D nanostructures and the characteristic of field modulation. 1D nanostructures provide a large surface area-volume ratio; which is an outstanding advantage for gas sensors with high sensitivity and fast response. In addition; the nature of the single crystals is favorable for the studies of the response mechanism. On the other hand; one main merit of the field-effect sensors is to provide an extra gate electrode to realize the current modulation; so that the sensitivity can be dramatically enhanced by changing the conductivity when operating the sensors in the subthreshold regime. This article reviews the recent developments in the field of 1D nanostructure FET for gas detection. The sensor configuration; the performance as well as their sensing mechanism are evaluated.

  11. One-Dimensional Nanostructure Field-Effect Sensors for Gas Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Cai, Bin; Tang, Qingxin; Tong, Yanhong; Liu, Yichun

    2014-01-01

    Recently; one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure field-effect transistors (FETs) have attracted much attention because of their potential application in gas sensing. Micro/nanoscaled field-effect sensors combine the advantages of 1D nanostructures and the characteristic of field modulation. 1D nanostructures provide a large surface area-volume ratio; which is an outstanding advantage for gas sensors with high sensitivity and fast response. In addition; the nature of the single crystals is favorable for the studies of the response mechanism. On the other hand; one main merit of the field-effect sensors is to provide an extra gate electrode to realize the current modulation; so that the sensitivity can be dramatically enhanced by changing the conductivity when operating the sensors in the subthreshold regime. This article reviews the recent developments in the field of 1D nanostructure FET for gas detection. The sensor configuration; the performance as well as their sensing mechanism are evaluated. PMID:25090418

  12. Unesco Integrated Documentation Network; Computerized Documentation System (CDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Dept. of Documentation, Libraries, and Archives.

    Intended for use by the Computerized Documentation System (CDS), the Unesco version of ISIS (Integrated Set of Information Systems)--originally developed by the International Labour Organization--was developed in 1975 and named CDS/ISIS. This system has a comprehensive collection of programs for input, management, and output, running in batch or…

  13. Performance of colloidal CdS sensitized solar cells with ZnO nanorods/nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Anurag; Das, Partha Pratim; Tathavadekar, Mukta; Das, Sumita

    2017-01-01

    As an alternative photosensitizer in dye-sensitized solar cells, bovine serum albumin (BSA) (a nonhazardous protein) was used in the synthesis of colloidal CdS nanoparticles (NPs). This system has been employed to replace the commonly used N719 dye molecule. Various nanostructured forms of ZnO, namely, nanorod and nanoparticle-based photoanodes, have been sensitized with colloidal CdS NPs to evaluate their effective performance towards quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). A polysulphide (Sx 2−)-based electrolyte and CuxS counter electrode were used for cell fabrication and testing. An interesting improvement in the performance of the device by imposing nanorods as a scattering layer on a particle layer has been observed. As a consequence, a maximum conversion efficiency of 1.06% with an open-circuit voltage (V OC) of 0.67 V was achieved for the ZnO nanorod/nanoparticle assembled structure. The introduction of ZnO nanorods over the nanoparticle led to a significant enhancement of the overall efficiency compared to the corresponding bare nanoparticles. PMID:28243559

  14. Study on structural, optical properties of solvothermally synthesized Ni doped CdS nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Kamaldeep Verma, N. K.

    2015-05-15

    Undoped and alkali metal i.e Ni doped CdS nanorods (Cd{sub x}Ni{sub 1-x}S) with (x = 0.0, 0.3,) has been synthesized by using a convenient solvothermal technique. In order to confirm the structure of the synthesized nanorods X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been done which reveals the formation of hexagonal phase of the dilute magnetic semiconducting nanorods having size of undoped 27.79nm and doped 17.49nm. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis depicts the presence of elements Cd, Ni and S in their stoichiometric ratio. Optical behavior of undoped and doped nanorods has been investigated. UV-visible spectra show the blue shift in the band gap, as compared to the bulk CdS which may be due the quantum confinement occurs in the nanostructures. Morphological analysis has been done with the help of Transmission electron microscope which confirms the polycrystalline nature of the synthesized nanorods.

  15. One-dimensional metal oxide nanostructures for heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Jia, Xinli; Liu, Bin; Yang, Yanhui

    2013-08-21

    Metal oxides are of paramount importance in heterogeneous catalysis as either supports or active phases. Controlled synthesis of one-dimensional (1D) metal oxide nanostructures has received enormous attention in heterogeneous catalysis due to the possibility of tailoring the properties of metal oxides by tuning their shapes, sizes, and compositions. This feature article highlights recent advances in shape controlled synthesis of 1D metal oxide nanostructures and their applications in heterogeneous catalysis, with the aim of introducing new insights into the heterogeneous catalyst design.

  16. Lyotropic liquid crystal directed synthesis of nanostructured materials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cuiqing; Chen, Dairong; Jiao, Xiuling

    2009-01-01

    This review introduces and summarizes lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC) directed syntheses of nanostructured materials consisting of porous nanostructures and zero-dimensional (0-D), one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructures. After a brief introduction to the liquid crystals, the LLCs used to prepare mesoporous materials are discussed; in particular, recent advances in controlling mesostructures are summarized. The LLC templates directing the syntheses of nanoparticles, nanorods, nanowires and nanoplates are also presented. Finally, future development in this field is discussed. PMID:27877273

  17. Spectroscopic analysis of impurity precipitates in CdS films

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J.D.; Keane, J.; Ribelin, R.; Gedvilas, L.; Swartzlander, A.; Ramanathan, K.; Albin, D.S.; Noufi, R.

    1999-03-01

    Impurities in cadmium sulfide (CdS) films are a concern in the fabrication of copper (indium, gallium) diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic devices. Devices incorporating chemical-bath-deposited (CBD) CdS are comparable in quality to devices incorporating purer CdS films grown using vacuum deposition techniques, despite the higher impurity concentrations typically observed in the CBD CdS films. In this paper, we summarize and review the results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Auger, electron microprobe, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analyses of the impurities in CBD CdS films. We show that these impurities differ as a function of substrate type and film deposition conditions. We also show that some of these impurities exist as 10{sup 2} micron-scale precipitates. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Spectroscopic Analysis of Impurity Precipitates in CdS Films

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J. D.; Keane, J.; Ribelin, R.; Gedvilas, L.; Swartzlander, A.; Ramanathan, K.; Albin, D. S.; Noufi, R.

    1999-10-31

    Impurities in cadmium sulfide (CdS) films are a concern in the fabrication of copper (indium, gallium) diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic devices. Devices incorporating chemical-bath-deposited (CBD) CdS are comparable in quality to devices incorporating purer CdS films grown using vacuum deposition techniques, despite the higher impurity concentrations typically observed in the CBD CdS films. In this paper, we summarize and review the results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Auger, electron microprobe, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analyses of the impurities in CBD CdS films. We show that these impurities differ as a function of substrate type and film deposition conditions. We also show that some of these impurities exist as 10{sup 2} micron-scale precipitates.

  19. Biosynthesis of CdS nanoparticles in banana peel extract.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guang Ju; Li, Shuo Hao; Zhang, Yu Cang; Fu, Yun Zhi

    2014-06-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by using banana peel extract as a convenient, non-toxic, eco-friendly 'green' capping agent. Cadmium nitrate and sodium sulfide are main reagents. A variety of CdS NPs are prepared through changing reaction conditions (banana extracts, the amount of banana peel extract, solution pH, concentration and reactive temperature). The prepared CdS colloid displays strong fluorescence spectrum. X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrates the successful formation of CdS NPs. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectrogram indicates the involvement of carboxyl, amine and hydroxyl groups in the formation of CdS NPs. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) result reveals that the average size of the NPs is around 1.48 nm.

  20. A Comprehensive Review of One-Dimensional Metal-Oxide Nanostructure Photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Tianyou; Fang, Xiaosheng; Liao, Meiyong; Xu, Xijin; Zeng, Haibo; Yoshio, Bando; Golberg, Dmitri

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) metal-oxide nanostructures are ideal systems for exploring a large number of novel phenomena at the nanoscale and investigating size and dimensionality dependence of nanostructure properties for potential applications. The construction and integration of photodetectors or optical switches based on such nanostructures with tailored geometries have rapidly advanced in recent years. Active 1D nanostructure photodetector elements can be configured either as resistors whose conductions are altered by a charge-transfer process or as field-effect transistors (FET) whose properties can be controlled by applying appropriate potentials onto the gates. Functionalizing the structure surfaces offers another avenue for expanding the sensor capabilities. This article provides a comprehensive review on the state-of-the-art research activities in the photodetector field. It mainly focuses on the metal oxide 1D nanostructures such as ZnO, SnO2, Cu2O, Ga2O3, Fe2O3, In2O3, CdO, CeO2, and their photoresponses. The review begins with a survey of quasi 1D metal-oxide semiconductor nanostructures and the photodetector principle, then shows the recent progresses on several kinds of important metal-oxide nanostructures and their photoresponses and briefly presents some additional prospective metal-oxide 1D nanomaterials. Finally, the review is concluded with some perspectives and outlook on the future developments in this area. PMID:22454597

  1. A 1-D dusty plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitu, M. L.; Ticoş, C. M.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.; Scurtu, A.

    2013-09-21

    It is demonstrated numerically that a 1-D plasma crystal made of micron size cylindrical dust particles can, in principle, work as a photonic crystal for terahertz waves. The dust rods are parallel to each other and arranged in a linear string forming a periodic structure of dielectric-plasma regions. The dispersion equation is found by solving the waves equation with the boundary conditions at the dust-plasma interface and taking into account the dielectric permittivity of the dust material and plasma. The wavelength of the electromagnetic waves is in the range of a few hundred microns, close to the interparticle separation distance. The band gaps of the 1-D plasma crystal are numerically found for different types of dust materials, separation distances between the dust rods and rod diameters. The distance between levitated dust rods forming a string in rf plasma is shown experimentally to vary over a relatively wide range, from 650 μm to about 1350 μm, depending on the rf power fed into the discharge.

  2. Click modification of diazido acridine intercalators: a versatile route towards decorated DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Moradpour Hafshejani, Shahrbanou; Watson, Scott M D; Tuite, Eimer M; Pike, Andrew R

    2015-09-01

    Diazido derivatives of 3,6-diamino acridine (proflavine) intercalate into DNA and undergo functionalization through click chemistry to form 1D nanostructures with redox active, conductive nanowire, and fluorescent properties. This two-step approach, intercalation followed by click modification allows for the controlled decoration of DNA nanostructures.

  3. Low-temperature biosynthesis of fluorescent semiconductor nanoparticles (CdS) by oxidative stress resistant Antarctic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, C; Monrás, J P; Plaza, D O; Collao, B; Saona, L A; Durán-Toro, V; Venegas, F A; Soto, C; Ulloa, G; Vásquez, C C; Bravo, D; Pérez-Donoso, J M

    2014-10-10

    Bacterial biosynthesis of nanoparticles represents a green alternative for the production of nanostructures with novel properties. Recently, the importance of antioxidant molecules on the biosynthesis of semiconductor fluorescent nanoparticles (quantum dots, QDs) by mesophilic bacteria was reported. The objective of this work was the isolation of psychrotolerant, oxidative stress-resistant bacteria from Antarctica to determine their ability for biosynthesizing CdS QDs at low temperatures. QDs biosynthesis at 15 °C was evaluated by determining their spectroscopic properties after exposing oxidative-stress resistant isolates identified as Pseudomonas spp. to Cd(2+) salts. To characterize the QDs biosynthetic process, the effect of metal exposure on bacterial fluorescence was determined at different times. Time-dependent changes in fluorescence color (green to red), characteristic of QDs, were observed. Electron microscopy analysis of fluorescent cells revealed that biosynthesized nanometric structures localize at the cell periphery. QDs were purified from the bacterial isolates and their fluorescence properties were characterized. Emission spectra displayed classical CdS peaks when excited with UV light. Thiol content, peroxidase activity, lipopolysaccharide synthesis, metabolic profiles and sulfide generation were determined in QDs-producing isolates. No relationship between QDs production and cellular thiol content or peroxidase activity was found. However, sulfide production enhanced CdS QDs biosynthesis. In this work, the use of Antarctic psychrotolerant Pseudomonas spp. for QDs biosynthesis at low temperature is reported for the first time.

  4. Enhanced Hydrogen Production from DNA-Assembled Z-Scheme TiO2-CdS Photocatalyst Systems.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke; Yehezkeli, Omer; Domaille, Dylan W; Funke, Hans H; Cha, Jennifer N

    2015-09-21

    A wide range of inorganic nanostructures have been used as photocatalysts for generating H2. To increase activity, Z-scheme photocatalytic systems have been implemented that use multiple types of photoactive materials and electron mediators. Optimal catalysis has previously been obtained by interfacing different materials through aggregation or epitaxial nucleation, all of which lowers the accessible active surface area. DNA has now been used as a structure-directing agent to organize TiO2 and CdS nanocrystals. A significant increase in H2 production compared to CdS or TiO2 alone was thus observed directly in solution with no sacrificial donors or applied bias. The inclusion of benzoquinone (BQ) equidistant between the TiO2 and CdS through DNA assembly further increased H2 production. While the use of a second quinone in conjunction with BQ showed no more improvement, its location within the Z-scheme was found to strongly influence catalysis.

  5. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milekhin, A. G.; Sveshnikova, L. L.; Duda, T. A.; Yeryukov, N. A.; Rodyakina, E. E.; Gutakovskii, A. K.; Batsanov, S. A.; Latyshev, A. V.; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2016-01-01

    We review our recent results concerning surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by confined optical and surface optical phonons in semiconductor nanostructures including CdS, CuS, GaN, and ZnO nanocrystals, GaN and ZnO nanorods, and AlN nanowires. Enhancement of Raman scattering by confined optical phonons as well as appearance of new Raman modes with the frequencies different from those in ZnO bulk attributed to surface optical modes is observed in a series of nanostructures having different morphology located in the vicinity of metal nanoclusters (Ag, Au, and Pt). Assignment of surface optical modes is based on calculations performed in the frame of the dielectric continuum model. It is established that SERS by phonons has a resonant character. A maximal enhancement by optical phonons as high as 730 is achieved for CdS nanocrystals in double resonant conditions at the coincidence of laser energy with that of electronic transitions in semiconductor nanocrystals and localized surface plasmon resonance in metal nanoclusters. Even a higher enhancement is observed for SERS by surface optical modes in ZnO nanocrystals (above 104). Surface enhanced Raman scattering is used for studying phonon spectrum in nanocrystal ensembles with an ultra-low areal density on metal plasmonic nanostructures.

  6. Tailoring CuO nanostructures for enhanced photocatalytic property.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Jin, Jun; Deng, Zhao; Huang, Shao-Zhuan; Hu, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Li; Wang, Chao; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Yu; Van Tendeloo, G; Su, Bao-Lian

    2012-10-15

    We report on one-pot synthesis of various morphologies of CuO nanostructures. PEG200 as a structure directing reagent under the synergism of alkalinity by hydrothermal method has been employed to tailor the morphology of CuO nanostructures. The CuO products have been characterized by XRD, SEM, and TEM. The morphologies of the CuO nanostructures can be tuned from 1D (nanoseeds, nanoribbons) to 2D (nanoleaves) and to 3D (shuttle-like, shrimp-like, and nanoflowers) by changing the volume of PEG200 and the alkalinity in the reaction system. At neutral and relatively low alkalinity (OH(-)/Cu(2+)≤3), the addition of PEG200 can strongly influence the morphologies of the CuO nanostructures. At high alkalinity (OH(-)/Cu(2+)≥4), PEG200 has no influence on the morphology of the CuO nanostructure. The different morphologies of the CuO nanostructures have been used for the photodecomposition of the pollutant rhodamine B (RhB) in water. The photocatalytic activity has been correlated with the different nanostructures of CuO. The 1D CuO nanoribbons exhibit the best performance on the RhB photodecomposition because of the exposed high surface energy {-121} crystal plane. The photocatalytic results show that the high energy surface planes of the CuO nanostructures mostly affect the photocatalytic activity rather than the morphology of the CuO nanostructures. Our synthesis method also shows it is possible to control the morphologies of nanostructures in a simple way.

  7. Directed self-assembly of CdS quantum dots on bacteriophage P22 coat protein templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, Anup; Bao, Yuping; Zhou, Ziyou; Prevelige, Peter E.; Gupta, Arunava

    2013-02-01

    The hierarchical organization of inorganic nanostructures has potential applications in diverse areas such as photocatalytic systems, composites, drug delivery and biomedicine. An attractive approach for this purpose is the use of biological organisms as templates since they often possess highly ordered arrays of protein molecules that can be genetically engineered for specific binding. Indeed, recent studies have shown that viruses can be used as versatile templates for the assembly of a variety of nanostructured materials because of their unique structural and chemical diversity. These highly ordered protein templates can be employed or adapted for specific binding interactions. Herein we report the directed self-assembly of independently synthesized 5 nm CdS nanocrystal quantum dots on ˜60 nm procapsid shells derived from wild-type P22 bacteriophage. The bacteriophage P22 shell is comprised of hexameric and pentameric clusters of subunits known as capsomeres. The pre-synthesized CdS QDs show the corresponding hexameric and pentameric patterns of assembly on these P22 shells, possibly by interacting with particular protein pockets.

  8. 1D-VAR Retrieval Using Superchannels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel; Larar, Allen; Smith, William L.; Schluessel, Peter; Mango, Stephen; SaintGermain, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Since modern ultra-spectral remote sensors have thousands of channels, it is difficult to include all of them in a 1D-var retrieval system. We will describe a physical inversion algorithm, which includes all available channels for the atmospheric temperature, moisture, cloud, and surface parameter retrievals. Both the forward model and the inversion algorithm compress the channel radiances into super channels. These super channels are obtained by projecting the radiance spectra onto a set of pre-calculated eigenvectors. The forward model provides both super channel properties and jacobian in EOF space directly. For ultra-spectral sensors such as Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed Interferometer (NAST), a compression ratio of more than 80 can be achieved, leading to a significant reduction in computations involved in an inversion process. Results will be shown applying the algorithm to real IASI and NAST data.

  9. Growth of Au nanocrystals on CdS nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Heesun

    2006-08-01

    Nanorods of S2- rich CdS were synthesized by a reaction of excess S versus Cd precursors in the presence of ethylene diamine. The photoluminescence (PL) emission from the S2- rich CdS nanorods was broad with a peak at ˜710 nm, which was 40 nm longer in wavelength than the PL peak from Cd2+ rich CdS (˜670 nm) nanorods. The influence of surface electron or hole trap states on the luminescent pathway of CdS nanorods will be discussed to explain these shifts in wavelength. Nanocrystals of Au ˜2 nm in size were grown on S2- rich surfaces of CdS nanorods. Significant luminescence quenching was observed from the Au nanocrystals on the CdS nanorods due to interfacial charge separation. Change separation by the Au nanocrystals on the CdS resulted in enhanced photocatalytic degradation of Procion red mix-5B (PRB) dye in an aqueous solution under UV light irradiation.

  10. Magnetic field induced controllable self-assembly of maghemite nanocrystals: From 3D arrays to 1D nanochains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yan; Chen, Qianwang; Chen, Rongsheng

    2015-08-01

    A hydrothermal process has been used to synthesize walnut-like maghemite superstructures which can be further self-assembled in a controllable manner into ordered three-dimensional (3D) architectures and one-dimensional (1D) nanochains in the presence of different external magnetic field. The assembly behavior of the maghemite nanoparticles isclosely related to the van der Waals interactions and external-field-induced magnetic dipole interactions. The magnetic properties of these nanostructures are also investigated.

  11. 75 FR 27411 - Airworthiness Directives; Turbomeca Arriel 1B, 1D, 1D1, and 1S1 Turboshaft Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... (that incorporate Turbomeca Modification (mod) TU 148), Arriel 1D, 1D1, and 1S1 turboshaft engines that do not incorporate mod TU 347. That AD also requires initial and repetitive replacements of 2nd stage... incorporate mod TU 148), 1D, 1D1, and 1S1 turboshaft engines that do not incorporate mod TU 347. We...

  12. Pressure-driven assembly of spherical nanoparticles and formation of 1D nanostructure arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huimeng

    2010-08-01

    External pressure was used to engineer nanoparticle assembly. Reversible manipulation of the unit-cell dimensions of a 3D ordered nanoparticle array under a hydrostatic pressure field enabled the fine-tuning of the interparticle distance. Under a uniaxial pressure field, nanoparticles were forced to contact and coalesce into nanorods or nanowires and ordered ultrahigh-density arrays (see picture; small arrows denote pressure).

  13. Recent developments in testing techniques for elastic mechanical properties of 1-D nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weidong; Li, Shuai; Zhang, Hongti; Lu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional (1-D) nanomaterials exhibit great potentials in their applications to functional materials, nano-devices and systems owing to their excellent properties. In the past decade, considerable studies have been done, with new patents being developed, on these 1-D building blocks for for their mechanical properties, especially elastic properties, which provide a solid foundation for the design of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) and predictions of reliability and longevity for their devices. This paper reviews some of the recent investigations on techniques as well as patents available for the quantitative characterization of the elastic behaviors of various 1-D nanomaterials, with particular focus on on-chip testing system. The review begins with an overview of major testing methods for 1-D nanostructures' elastic properties, including nanoindentation testing, AFM (atomic force microscopy) testing, in situ SEM (scanning electron microscopy) testing, in situ TEM (transmission electron microscopy) testing and the testing system on the basis of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) technology, followed by advantages and challenges of each testing approach. This review also focuses on the MEMS-based testing apparatus, which can be actuated and measured inside SEM and TEM with ease, allowing users to highly magnify the continuous images of the specimen while measuring load electronically and independently. The combination of on-chip technologies and the in situ electron microscopy is expected to be a potential testing technique for nanomechanics. Finally, details are presented on the key challenges and possible solutions in the implementation of the testing techniques referred above.

  14. Configuration space method for calculating binding energies of exciton complexes in quasi-1D/2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarev, Igor

    A configuration space method, pioneered by Landau and Herring in studies of molecular binding and magnetism, is developed to obtain universal asymptotic relations for lowest energy exciton complexes (trion, biexciton) in confined semiconductor nanostructures such as nanowires and nanotubes, as well as coupled quantum wells. Trions are shown to be more stable (have greater binding energy) than biexcitons in strongly confined quasi-1D structures with small reduced electron-hole masses. Biexcitons are more stable in less confined quasi-1D structures with large reduced electron-hole masses. The theory predicts a crossover behavior, whereby trions become less stable than biexcitons as the transverse size of the quasi-1D nanostructure increases, which might be observed on semiconducting carbon nanotubes of increasing diameters. This method is also efficient in calculating binding energies for trion-type electron-hole complexes formed by indirect excitons in double coupled quantum wells, quasi-2D nanostructures that show new interesting electroabsorption/refraction phenomena. Supported by DOE-DE-SC0007117.

  15. Hot electron induced NIR detection in CdS films

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Alka; Kumar, Rahul; Bhattacharyya, Biplab; Husale, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    We report the use of random Au nanoislands to enhance the absorption of CdS photodetectors at wavelengths beyond its intrinsic absorption properties from visible to NIR spectrum enabling a high performance visible-NIR photodetector. The temperature dependent annealing method was employed to form random sized Au nanoparticles on CdS films. The hot electron induced NIR photo-detection shows high responsivity of ~780 mA/W for an area of ~57 μm2. The simulated optical response (absorption and responsivity) of Au nanoislands integrated in CdS films confirms the strong dependence of NIR sensitivity on the size and shape of Au nanoislands. The demonstration of plasmon enhanced IR sensitivity along with the cost-effective device fabrication method using CdS film enables the possibility of economical light harvesting applications which can be implemented in future technological applications. PMID:26965055

  16. Biologically synthesized fluorescent CdS NPs encapsulated by PHB.

    PubMed

    Pandian, Sureshbabu Ram Kumar; Deepak, Venkataraman; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2011-04-07

    Here an attempt was made to biologically synthesize fluorescent cadmium sulfide nanoparticles and to immobilize the synthesized nanoparticles in PHB nanoparticles. The present study uses Brevibacterium casei SRKP2 as a potential producer for the green synthesis of CdS nanoparticles. Biologically synthesized nanoparticles were characterized and confirmed using electron microscopy and XRD. The size distribution of the nanoparticles was found to be 10-30 nm followed by which the consequence of time, growth of the organism, pH, concentration of CdCl(2) and Na(2)S on the synthesis of nanoparticles were checked. Enhanced synthesis and fluorescence emission of CdS nanoparticles were achieved at pH 9. The synthesized CdS NPs were immobilized with PHB and were characterized. The fluorescent intensity of the CdS nanoparticles remained unaffected even after immobilization within PHB nanoparticles.

  17. Synthesis of MoS(2)-C one-dimensional nanostructures with improved lithium storage properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaofeng; Wang, Zhiyu; Guo, Zaiping; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2012-07-25

    Uniform one-dimensional (1D) MoS2-C composite nanostructures including nanorods and nanotubes have been produced through a sulfidation reaction in H2S flow using MoOx/polyaniline hybrid nanostructures as the precursor. These MoS2-C 1D nanostructures exhibit greatly enhanced electrochemical performance as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Typically, stable capacity retention of 776 mA h g(-1) can be achieved after 100 cycles for MoS2-C nanotubes. Even cycled at a high current density of 1000 mA g(-1), these structures can still deliver high capacities of 450-600 mA h g(-1). The unique 1D nanostructure and the extra carbon in the hybrid structure are beneficial to the greatly improved electrochemical performance of these MoS2-C nanocomposites.

  18. Arbitrary multicolor photodetection by hetero-integrated semiconductor nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sang, Liwen; Hu, Junqing; Zou, Rujia; Koide, Yasuo; Liao, Meiyong

    2013-01-01

    The typical photodetectors can only detect one specific optical spectral band, such as InGaAs and graphene-PbS quantum dots for near-infrared (NIR) light detection, CdS and Si for visible light detection, and ZnO and III-nitrides for UV light detection. So far, none of the developed photodetector can achieve the multicolor detection with arbitrary spectral selectivity, high sensitivity, high speed, high signal-to-noise ratio, high stability, and simplicity (called 6S requirements). Here, we propose a universal strategy to develop multicolor photodetectors with arbitrary spectral selectivity by integrating various semiconductor nanostructures on a wide-bandgap semiconductor or an insulator substrate. Because the photoresponse of each spectral band is determined by each semiconductor nanostructure or the semiconductor substrate, multicolor detection satisfying 6S requirements can be readily satisfied by selecting the right semiconductors.

  19. Arbitrary Multicolor Photodetection by Hetero-integrated Semiconductor Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Liwen; Hu, Junqing; Zou, Rujia; Koide, Yasuo; Liao, Meiyong

    2013-01-01

    The typical photodetectors can only detect one specific optical spectral band, such as InGaAs and graphene-PbS quantum dots for near-infrared (NIR) light detection, CdS and Si for visible light detection, and ZnO and III-nitrides for UV light detection. So far, none of the developed photodetector can achieve the multicolor detection with arbitrary spectral selectivity, high sensitivity, high speed, high signal-to-noise ratio, high stability, and simplicity (called 6S requirements). Here, we propose a universal strategy to develop multicolor photodetectors with arbitrary spectral selectivity by integrating various semiconductor nanostructures on a wide-bandgap semiconductor or an insulator substrate. Because the photoresponse of each spectral band is determined by each semiconductor nanostructure or the semiconductor substrate, multicolor detection satisfying 6S requirements can be readily satisfied by selecting the right semiconductors. PMID:23917790

  20. Enhanced photoelectrochemical performance of ZnO nanorod arrays decorated with CdS shell and Ag2S quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holi, Araa Mebdir; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Lim, Hong-Ngee; Yap, Chi-Chin; Chang, Sook-Keng; Ayal, Asmaa Kadim

    2017-03-01

    Ternary nanostructured Ag2S/CdS/ZnO thin film was prepared by using a simple low-cost hydrothermal method. The hexagonal phase of ZnO nanorods and CdS shells combined with monoclinic Ag2S quantum dots resulted in improved optical and photoelectrochemical properties. CdS shell with high absorption property efficiently compliment the energy levels of ZnO and improved the ability of light absorption. Furthermore, narrow band gap Ag2S also played a vital part in the light harvesting. The photoelectrochemical performance of the ternary nanostructured Ag2S/CdS/ZnO NRs was investigated in a mixture of Na2S and Na2SO3 aqueous solutions under visible light illumination. The Ag2S/CdS/ZnO NRs were found to be more efficient than ZnO NRs, CdS/ZnO NRs, and Ag2S/ZnO NRs as this particular sample gave a maximum photocurrent of 5.69 mA cm-2, which is around 2 and 1.5 times greater than CdS/ZnO NRs and Ag2S/ZnO NRs, respectively. Besides that, it was found that this ternary film possessed 15 times higher photocurrent density than plain ZnO NRs. This is attributed to the larger amount of visible light absorbed by the ternary nanostructured composite.

  1. 1D-1D Coulomb drag in a 6 Million Mobility Bi-layer Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilodeau, Simon; Laroche, Dominique; Xia, Jian-Sheng; Lilly, Mike; Reno, John; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Gervais, Guillaume

    We report Coulomb drag measurements in vertically-coupled quantum wires. The wires are fabricated in GaAs/AlGaAs bilayer heterostructures grown from two different MBE chambers: one at Sandia National Laboratories (1.2M mobility), and the other at Princeton University (6M mobility). The previously observed positive and negative drag signals are seen in both types of devices, demonstrating the robustness of the result. However, attempts to determine the temperature dependence of the drag signal in the 1D regime proved challenging in the higher mobility heterostructure (Princeton), in part because of difficulties in aligning the wires within the same transverse subband configuration. Nevertheless, this work, performed at the Microkelvin laboratory of the University of Florida, is an important proof-of-concept for future investigations of the temperature dependence of the 1D-1D drag signal down to a few mK. Such an experiment could confirm the Luttinger charge density wave interlocking predicted to occur in the wires. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  2. Sigmoidal diagnostics with SOHO/CDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, G.; Gibson, S. E.; Mason, H. E.; Pike, C. D.; Mandrini, C. H.

    During the third Whole Sun Month Campaign (August 18 - September 14, 1999), the evolution of the active region NOAA 8668 was followed during its meridian passage and at the limb (Sigmoid JOP 106), with simultaneous observations with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and with other instruments, both satellite and ground-based. On August 21st, a small flare, associated with a brightening of the sigmoidal structure, occurred. SOHO Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) observations of this small flare are presented. Coronal temperatures and densities of the sigmoid are estimated. High transition region densities (in the range 2.5-7 × 10 11 cm -3), obtained using O IV, are present in the brightenings associated with the flare. At coronal level, high temperatures of at least 8 MK were reached, as shown by strong Fe XIX emission. After this small flare, relatively strong blue-shifts (⋍ 30 km/s) are observed in coronal lines, located at the two ends of a small loop system associated with the sigmoid.

  3. Organizing protein-DNA hybrids as nanostructures with programmed functionalities.

    PubMed

    Teller, Carsten; Willner, Itamar

    2010-12-01

    The structural and functional information encoded in the base sequence of nucleic acids provides a means to organize hybrid protein-DNA nanostructures with pre-designed, programmed functionality. This review discusses the activation of enzyme cascades in supramolecular DNA-protein hybrid structures, the bioelectrocatalytic activation of redox enzymes on DNA scaffolds, and the programmed positioning of enzymes on 1D, 2D and 3D DNA nanostructures. These systems provide starting points towards the design of interconnected enzyme networks. Substantial progress in the tailoring of functional protein-DNA nanostructures has been accomplished in recent years, and advances in this field warrant a comprehensive discussion. The application of these systems for the control of biocatalytic transformations, for amplified biosensing, and for the synthesis of metallic nanostructures are addressed, and future prospects for these systems are highlighted.

  4. Crystal orbital studies on the 1D silic-diyne nanoribbons and nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ying; Bai, Hongcun; Huang, Yuanhe

    2016-02-01

    This work presents crystal orbital studies on novel one-dimensional (1D) nanoscale materials derived from a Si-diyne sheet, based on the density functional theory. The two-dimensional (2D) Si-diyne layer is observed to be carbo-merized silicene, with a similar structure to graphdiyne. The 2D Si-diyne and its 1D ribbons and tubes, of different size and chirality, have been addressed systematically. The low dimensional Si-diyne materials studied exhibit relatively high stability, according to phonon-frequency calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. With comparable diameters, the Si-diyne tubes have lower strain energies than silicene and silicon carbide nanotubes. The Si-diyne layer and its 1D derivatives are all semiconductors, regardless of the size and chirality of the strips and tubes. In addition, the band gaps of the 1D Si-diyne nanoribbons and nanotubes with different chirality, always monotonically decrease as their sizes increases. A quantitative relationship between the band gap and the size of the ribbons and tubes was obtained. The mobility of charge carriers for the 1D Si-diyne structures was also investigated. It was found that both hole and electron mobility of the ribbons and tubes exhibit linear increase with increasing size. The electrons have greater mobility than the holes for each strip and tube. In addition, the mechanical properties of the Si-diyne nanostructures were also investigated by calculation of the Young’s modulus and the Poisson’s ratio.

  5. Bacterium Escherichia coli- and phage P22-templated synthesis of semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Liming

    The properties of inorganic materials in the nanoscale are found to be size- and shape-dependent due to quantum confinement effects, and thereby nanomaterials possess properties very different from those of single molecules as well as those of bulk materials. Assembling monodispersed nanoparticles into highly ordered hierarchical architectures is expected to generate novel collective properties for potential applications in catalysis, energy, biomedicine, etc. The major challenge in the assembly of nanoparticles lies in the development of controllable synthetic strategies that enable the growth and assembly of nanoparticles with high selectivity and good controllability. Biological matter possesses robust and precisely ordered structures that exist in a large variety of shapes and sizes, providing an ideal platform for synthesizing high-performance nanostructures. The primary goal of this thesis work has been to develop rational synthetic strategies for high-performance nanostructured materials using biological templates, which are difficult to achieve through traditional chemical synthetic methods. These approaches can serve as general bio-inspired approaches for synthesizing nanoparticle assemblies with desired components and architectures. CdS- and TiO2-binding peptides have been identified using phage display biopanning technique and the mechanism behind the specific affinity between the selected peptides and inorganic substrates are analyzed. The ZnS- and CdS-binding peptides, identified by the phage display biopanning, are utilized for the selective nucleation and growth of sulfides over self-assembled genetically engineered P22 coat proteins, resulting in ordered nanostructures of sulfide nanocrystal assemblies. The synthetic strategy can be extended to the fabrication of a variety of other nanostructures. A simple sonochemical route for the synthesis and assembly of CdS nanostructures with high yield under ambient conditions has been developed by exploiting

  6. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  7. Automated quantification of one-dimensional nanostructure alignment on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jianjin; Goldthorpe, Irene A.; Mohieddin Abukhdeir, Nasser

    2016-06-01

    A method for automated quantification of the alignment of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures from microscopy imaging is presented. Nanostructure alignment metrics are formulated and shown to be able to rigorously quantify the orientational order of nanostructures within a two-dimensional domain (surface). A complementary image processing method is also presented which enables robust processing of microscopy images where overlapping nanostructures might be present. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of nanowire-covered surfaces are analyzed using the presented methods and it is shown that past single parameter alignment metrics are insufficient for highly aligned domains. Through the use of multiple parameter alignment metrics, automated quantitative analysis of SEM images is shown to be possible and the alignment characteristics of different samples are able to be quantitatively compared using a similarity metric. The results of this work provide researchers in nanoscience and nanotechnology with a rigorous method for the determination of structure/property relationships, where alignment of 1D nanostructures is significant.

  8. Nanostructured Protective Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    potential superior wear resistance properties. The Nanostructured Protective Coatings (NPC) program was designed to establish a collaborative team of...understanding of PVD parameters, depositing coatings on practical substrates such as the Ti6Al4V used for turbine blades , and developing a versatile...Nanostructured Protective Coatings (NPC) program was designed to establish a collaborative team of three entities (Pennsylvania State University

  9. Optical Sensor Based on a Single CdS Nanobelt

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Yang, Shuming; Han, Feng; Wang, Liangjun; Zhang, Xiaotong; Jiang, Zhuangde; Pan, Anlian

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an optical sensor based on a cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanobelt has been developed. The CdS nanobelt was synthesized by the vapor phase transportation (VPT) method. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results revealed that the nanobelt had a hexagonal wurtzite structure of CdS and presented good crystal quality. A single nanobelt Schottky contact optical sensor was fabricated by the electron beam lithography (EBL) technique, and the device current-voltage results showed back-to-back Schottky diode characteristics. The photosensitivity, dark current and the decay time of the sensor were 4 × 104, 31 ms and 0.2 pA, respectively. The high photosensitivity and the short decay time were because of the exponential dependence of photocurrent on the number of the surface charges and the configuration of the back to back Schottky junctions. PMID:24763211

  10. Optical sensor based on a single CdS nanobelt.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Yang, Shuming; Han, Feng; Wang, Liangjun; Zhang, Xiaotong; Jiang, Zhuangde; Pan, Anlian

    2014-04-23

    In this paper, an optical sensor based on a cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanobelt has been developed. The CdS nanobelt was synthesized by the vapor phase transportation (VPT) method. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results revealed that the nanobelt had a hexagonal wurtzite structure of CdS and presented good crystal quality. A single nanobelt Schottky contact optical sensor was fabricated by the electron beam lithography (EBL) technique, and the device current-voltage results showed back-to-back Schottky diode characteristics. The photosensitivity, dark current and the decay time of the sensor were 4 × 10⁴, 31 ms and 0.2 pA, respectively. The high photosensitivity and the short decay time were because of the exponential dependence of photocurrent on the number of the surface charges and the configuration of the back to back Schottky junctions.

  11. Photoelectrochemical properties of chemosynthesized CdS thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, S. B.; Pawar, S. A.; Bhosale, P. N.; Patil, P. S.

    2012-06-01

    Thin film of cadmium sulphide (CdS) consisting cabbage like morphology was chemically synthesized at room temperature from an aqueous alkaline bath onto soda lime glass and fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)-coated glass substrates. The synthesized cabbages of CdS were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD pattern revealed the formation of CdS particles with a cubic crystal structure. SEM micrographs show that the cabbage like morphology is composed of nanopetals. Further, the photoelectochemical (PEC) performance was tested in Na2S-NaOH-S electrolyte which has maximum short circuit current of (Isc) 359μA/cm2.

  12. Selective response inversion to NO2 and acetic acid in ZnO and CdS nanocomposite gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calestani, D.; Villani, M.; Mosca, R.; Lazzarini, L.; Coppedè, N.; Dhanabalan, S. C.; Zappettini, A.

    2014-09-01

    High sensitivity zinc oxide (ZnO) tetrapods (TPs) have been functionalized by nucleating cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles (NPs) directly on their surface with a spotted coverage thanks to an optimized synthesis in dimethylformamide (DMF). The obtained hybrid coupled material has been used to realize a gas sensing device with a highly porous nanostructured network, in which the proper alternation of ZnO-TPs and CdS-NPs gives rise to unconventional chemoresistive behaviours. Among the different tested gases and vapours, the sensor showed a unique fingerprint response-inversion between 300 °C and 400 °C only for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and acetic acid (CH3COOH).

  13. Selective response inversion to NO₂ and acetic acid in ZnO and CdS nanocomposite gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Calestani, D; Villani, M; Mosca, R; Lazzarini, L; Coppedè, N; Dhanabalan, S C; Zappettini, A

    2014-09-12

    High sensitivity zinc oxide (ZnO) tetrapods (TPs) have been functionalized by nucleating cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles (NPs) directly on their surface with a spotted coverage thanks to an optimized synthesis in dimethylformamide (DMF). The obtained hybrid coupled material has been used to realize a gas sensing device with a highly porous nanostructured network, in which the proper alternation of ZnO-TPs and CdS-NPs gives rise to unconventional chemoresistive behaviours. Among the different tested gases and vapours, the sensor showed a unique fingerprint response-inversion between 300 °C and 400 °C only for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and acetic acid (CH3COOH).

  14. Effect of surface on the optical structure and thermal properties of organically capped CdS nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel Haj Mohamed, N.; Haouari, M.; Zaaboub, Z.; Hassen, F.; Maaref, H.; Ben Ouada, H.

    2014-08-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles were synthesized by a novel wet chemical route with various organic thiol stabilizers. Systematic experimental studies, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL), have evidenced that the stability, crystallinity, and optical properties of the CdS nanoparticles are affected by the organic groups which generate significant effects in surface reconstruction. Particle size was evaluated from UV-vis spectroscopy using the effective mass approximation (EMA) method and from XRD patterns based on Scherrer's formula. The S-H vibrations are not detectable in the infrared (IR) spectra of any of the bound ligands, which are expected for thiols covalently bound to the surface of nanoparticles. PL studies reveal that the emission from the nanostructures is not much influenced by the surface states, indicating a good passivation of the particle's surface. The time-resolved measurements reveal a biexponential decay behavior. The fast decay component is attributed to the recombination of core states, while the slow decay component of PL is associated with the charge-carrier recombination process with the involvement of surface states.

  15. Controlling Orientational Order in 1-D Assemblies of Multivalent Triangular Prisms.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Kevin L; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Schatz, George C

    2013-01-03

    Multivalent nanostructures are becoming an increasingly important player in the self-assembly of supramolecular lattices. Understanding the role that shape plays in the coordination of the assemblies is crucial for the functional response of the material. We develop a simple design rule for the assembly of multivalent Au triangular nanoprisms into 1-D ordered arrays based on both the length of the valent DNA and the aspect ratio of the prism. Using MD simulations, we describe an order parameter that captures the short-range order of the assembly controlled by the design parameters. The order parameter shows that even short chains (N = 4) of prisms have a high degree of orientational order that transitions to no orientational order when the DNA length is similar to the prism length. Unlike isotropic polyvalent assemblies, we find that the highly oriented chains of prisms lose orientational order in discrete steps during melting as the prisms in the arrays dissociate.

  16. Growth and characterization of CdS crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    A growth method for the physical vapor transport of compound semiconductors in closed ampoules is described. With the unique techniques applied in the heat treatment of the starting materials and the temperature profiles provided by the three-zone translational furnace, large crystals of CdS have been grown successfully by the method at lower temperatures than previously used. Both unseeded and seeded growth have been investigated. The CdS crystals were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) to study the microstructure and the dislocation etch-pits. The crystals were further characterized by infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) transmission measurements.

  17. New method for the controlled creation of sub-15 nm aluminum nanowires to probe the 1D superconductor-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan-Wall, Tyler; Hughes, Hannah; Hartman, Nik; McQueen, Tyrell; Markovic, Nina

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a new method for the creation of sub-15 nm aluminum nanostructures using a sodium bicarbonate solution. Using PMMA masks patterned with e-beam lithography, we can controllably etch lithographically-produced nanostructures while measuring their resistances in-situ using a 4-probe measurement. This technique allows for precise control over the final resistance and thus can be used to create a wide variety of nanodevices. In particular, this technique allows for the creation of nanowires to probe the superconductor-insulator transition in 1D.

  18. Optical properties of CdS nanocrystallites embedded in (Si 0.2Ti 0.8)O 2 sol-gel waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juodkazis, S.; Bernstein, E.; Plenet, J. C.; Bovier, C.; Dumas, J.; Mugnier, J.; Vaitkus, J. V.

    1998-03-01

    We report on the implementation of a two-grating coupler technique for measurement of repopulation of deep traps in CdS nanocrystallites embedded in a (Si 0.2Ti 0.8)O 2 waveguiding glass layer of high refractive index. A sol-gel process is used to produce this waveguide. The low attenuation (˜1 dB/cm) of the waveguide allows to in- and out-couple light by surface relief gratings embossed on the top layer of the waveguide. The spectral region of waveguiding (≈700 nm) that was studied corresponds to the deep trap spectral position in CdS. The waveguiding beam is used as a probe beam and we used the third harmonics of a YLF:Nd laser (347 nm) as a pump. The influence of bimolecular recombination on repopulation of deep traps is demonstrated. The linear recombination time as well as bimolecular and Auger coefficients are determined.

  19. Controlled Self-Assembly of Cyclophane Amphiphiles: From 1D Nanofibers to Ultrathin 2D Topological Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zhengxu; Li, Lianwei; Lo, Wai-Yip; Zhao, Donglin; Wu, Qinghe; Zhang, Na; Su, Yu-An; Chen, Wei; Yu, Luping

    2016-07-05

    A novel series of amphiphilic TC-PEG molecules were designed and synthesized based on the orthogonal cyclophane unit. These molecules were able to self-assemble from 1D nanofibers and nanobelts to 2D ultrathin nanosheets (3 nm thick) in a controlled way by tuning the length of PEG side chains. The special structure of the cyclophane moiety allowed control in construction of nanostructures through programmed noncovalent interactions (hydrophobic hydrophilic interaction and pi-pi interaction). The self-assembled nanostructures were characterized by combining real space imaging (TEM, SEM, and AFM) and reciprocal space scattering (GIWAXS) techniques. This unique supramolecular system may provide a new strategy for the design of materials with tunable nanomorphology and functionality.

  20. Conductance fluctuations in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ningjia

    1997-12-01

    In this Ph.D thesis the conductance fluctuations of different physical origins in semi-conductor nanostructures were studied using both diagrammatic analytical methods and large scale numerical techniques. In the "mixed" transport regime where both mesoscopic and ballistic features play a role, for the first time I have analytically calculated the non-universal conductance fluctuations. This mixed regime is reached when impurities are distributed near the walls of a quantum wire, leaving the center region ballistic. I have discovered that the existence of a ballistic region destroys the universal conductance fluctuations. The crossover behavior of the fluctuation amplitude from the usual quasi-1D situation to that of the mixed regime is clearly revealed, and the role of various length scales are identified. My analytical predictions were confirmed by a direct numerical simulation by evaluating the Landauer formula. In another direction, I have made several studies of conductance or resistance oscillations and fluctuations in systems with artificial impurities in the ballistic regime. My calculation gave explanations of all the experimental results concerning the classical focusing peaks of the resistance versus magnetic field, the weak localization peak in a Sinai billiard system, the formation of a chaotic billiard, and predicted certain transport features which were indeed found experimentally. I have further extended the calculation to study the Hall resistance in a four-terminal quantum dot in which there is an antidot array. From my numerical data I analyzed the classical paths of electron motion and its quantum oscillations. The results compare well with recent experimental studies on similar systems. Since these billiard systems could provide quantum chaotic dynamics, I have made a detailed study of the consequence of such dynamics. In particular I have investigated the resonant transmission of electrons in these chaotic systems, and found that the level

  1. Surface biofunctionalized CdS and ZnS quantum dot nanoconjugates for nanomedicine and oncology: to be or not to be nanotoxic?

    PubMed Central

    Mansur, Alexandra AP; Mansur, Herman S; de Carvalho, Sandhra M; Lobato, Zélia IP; Guedes, Maria IMC; Leite, Maria F

    2016-01-01

    Herein, for the first time, we demonstrated that novel biofunctionalized semiconductor nanomaterials made of Cd-containing fluorescent quantum dot nanoconjugates with the surface capped by an aminopolysaccharide are not biologically safe for clinical applications. Conversely, the ZnS-based nanoconjugates proved to be noncytotoxic, considering all the parameters investigated. The results of in vitro cytotoxicity were remarkably dependent on the chemical composition of quantum dot (CdS or ZnS), the nature of the cell (human cancerous and embryonic types), and the concentration and time period of exposure to these nanomaterials, caused by the effects of Cd2+ on the complex nanotoxicity pathways involved in cellular uptake. Unexpectedly, no decisive evidence of nanotoxicity of CdS and ZnS conjugates was observed in vivo using intravenous injections in BALB/c mice for 30 days, with minor localized fluorescence detected in liver tissue specimens. Therefore, these results proved that CdS nanoconjugates could pose an excessive threat for clinical applications due to unpredicted and uncorrelated in vitro and in vivo responses caused by highly toxic cadmium ions at biointerfaces. On the contrary, ZnS nanoconjugates proved that the “safe by design” concept used in this research (ie, biocompatible core–shell nanostructures) could benefit a plethora of applications in nanomedicine and oncology. PMID:27695325

  2. Surface biofunctionalized CdS and ZnS quantum dot nanoconjugates for nanomedicine and oncology: to be or not to be nanotoxic?

    PubMed

    Mansur, Alexandra Ap; Mansur, Herman S; de Carvalho, Sandhra M; Lobato, Zélia Ip; Guedes, Maria Imc; Leite, Maria F

    Herein, for the first time, we demonstrated that novel biofunctionalized semiconductor nanomaterials made of Cd-containing fluorescent quantum dot nanoconjugates with the surface capped by an aminopolysaccharide are not biologically safe for clinical applications. Conversely, the ZnS-based nanoconjugates proved to be noncytotoxic, considering all the parameters investigated. The results of in vitro cytotoxicity were remarkably dependent on the chemical composition of quantum dot (CdS or ZnS), the nature of the cell (human cancerous and embryonic types), and the concentration and time period of exposure to these nanomaterials, caused by the effects of Cd(2+) on the complex nanotoxicity pathways involved in cellular uptake. Unexpectedly, no decisive evidence of nanotoxicity of CdS and ZnS conjugates was observed in vivo using intravenous injections in BALB/c mice for 30 days, with minor localized fluorescence detected in liver tissue specimens. Therefore, these results proved that CdS nanoconjugates could pose an excessive threat for clinical applications due to unpredicted and uncorrelated in vitro and in vivo responses caused by highly toxic cadmium ions at biointerfaces. On the contrary, ZnS nanoconjugates proved that the "safe by design" concept used in this research (ie, biocompatible core-shell nanostructures) could benefit a plethora of applications in nanomedicine and oncology.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of one-dimensional nanostructured fluorine-doped tin dioxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Kenji; Bandara, Ajith; Okuya, Masayuki; Shimomura, Masaru; Rajapakse, R. M. G.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes preparation and characterization of the optically-transparent and electrically conducting thin films of fluoride-doped tin dioxide (FTO) one-dimensional nanostructures and features of the purpose-built, novel and advanced version of spray pyrolysis technique, known as Rotational, Pulsed and Atomized Spray Pyrolysis. This technique allows perfect and simple control of morphology of the nanostructures of FTO layer by adjusting the spray conditions. Effect of the different additives on crystal morphology and texture of the 1-dimensional (1-D) nanostructured FTO thin films is studied. Vertically aligned and well separated nanotubes are easily fabricated using propanone and ethanol as additives. We suggest that propanone additive plays a role to form vertically aligned nanotubes with (101) preferential orientation while (110) face is the predominant plane of well separated nanotubes with ethanol additive. The conductivity of the 1-D nanostructured thin films are also enhanced using the commercial FTO glasses as a substrate.

  4. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  5. One-dimensional and (001) facetted nanostructured TiO2 photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Wang, Xiao; Hao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    As one of the most important components in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), photoanode materials have attracted massive interest and been greatly developed through the efforts of various research institutions in recent years. Photoanode materials not only provide a large surface for the sensitizer to favor charge separation, but also conduct the electrons to the collection electrode. In recent years, one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures (nanotubes (NT), nanowires (NW) and nanorods(NR)), which offer direct pathways for electron transport, and nanostructures (nanosheets (NS) and nanoparticles (NP)) with (001) crystal facets which possess higher surface energies have been widely employed as photoanode materials. In this review, the progress of 1D nanostructures and those with (001) crystal facets, as well as their photovoltaic performance in DSCs will be discussed briefly. Further efforts are needed to provide theoretical research for 1D and (001) facet nanostructured TiO2 and to improve DSC performances based on these photoanodes.

  6. Crystalline Gaq3 Nanostructures: Preparation, Thermal Property and Spectroscopy Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ya-Wen; Cho, Chun-Pei; Perng, Tsong-Pyng

    2009-08-01

    Crystalline Gaq3 1-D nanostructures and nanospheres could be fabricated by thermal evaporation under cold trap. The influences of the key process parameters on formation of the nanostructures were also investigated. It has been demonstrated that the morphology and dimension of the nanostructures were mainly controlled by working temperature and working pressure. One-dimensional nanostructures were fabricated at a lower working temperature, whereas nanospheres were formed at a higher working temperature. Larger nanospheres could be obtained when a higher working pressure was applied. The XRD, FTIR, and NMR analyses evidenced that the nanostructures mainly consisted of δ-phase Gaq3. Their DSC trace revealed two small exothermic peaks in addition to the melting endotherm. The one in lower temperature region was ascribed to a transition from δ to β phase, while another in higher temperature region could be identified as a transition from β to δ phase. All the crystalline nanostructures show similar PL spectra due to absence of quantum confinement effect. They also exhibited a spectral blue shift because of a looser interligand spacing and reduced orbital overlap in their δ-phase molecular structures.

  7. Optical waveguide beam splitters based on hybrid metal-dielectric-semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunyun; Liang, Junwu; Zhang, Qinglin; Zhou, Zidong; Li, Honglai; Fan, Xiaopeng; Wang, Xiaoxia; Fan, Peng; Yang, Yankun; Guo, Pengfei; Zhuang, Xiujuan; Zhu, Xiaoli; Liao, Lei; Pan, Anlian

    2015-11-01

    Miniature integration is desirable for the future photonics circuit. Low-dimensional semiconductor and metal nanostructures is the potential building blocks in compact photonic circuits for their unique electronic and optical properties. In this work, a hybrid metal-dielectric-semiconductor nanostructure is designed and fabricated to realizing a nano-scale optical waveguide beam splitter, which is constructed with the sandwiched structure of a single CdS nanoribbon/HfO2 thin film/Au nanodisk arrays. Micro-optical investigations reveal that the guided light outputting at the terminal end of the CdS ribbon is well separated into several light spots. Numerical simulations further demonstrate that the beam splitting mechanism is attributed to the strong electromagnetic coupling between the Au nanodisks and light guided in the nanoribbon. The number of the split beams (light spots) at the terminal end of the nanoribbon is mainly determined by the number of the Au nanodisk rows, as well as the distance of the blank region between the nanodisks array and the end of the CdS ribbon, owing to the interference between the split beams. These optical beam splitters may find potential applications in high-density integrated photonic circuits and systems.

  8. A composite CdS thin film/TiO2 nanotube structure by ultrafast successive electrochemical deposition toward photovoltaic application

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fabricating functional compounds on substrates with complicated morphology has been an important topic in material science and technology, which remains a challenging issue to simultaneously achieve a high growth rate for a complex nanostructure with simple controlling factors. Here, we present a novel simple and successive method based on chemical reactions in an open reaction system manipulated by an electric field. A uniform CdS/TiO2 composite tubular structure has been fabricated in highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays in a very short time period (~90 s) under room temperature (RT). The content of CdS in the resultant and its crystalline structure was tuned by the form and magnitude of external voltage. The as-formed structure has shown a quite broad and bulk-like light absorption spectrum with the absorption of photon energy even below that of the bulk CdS. The as-fabricated-sensitized solar cell based on this composite structure has achieved an efficiency of 1.43% without any chemical doping or co-sensitizing, 210% higher than quantum dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) under a similar condition. Hopefully, this method can also easily grow nanostructures based on a wide range of compound materials for energy science and electronic technologies, especially for fast-deploying devices. PMID:25520588

  9. A composite CdS thin film/TiO2 nanotube structure by ultrafast successive electrochemical deposition toward photovoltaic application.

    PubMed

    Fu, Han; Liu, Hong; Shen, Wenzhong

    2014-01-01

    Fabricating functional compounds on substrates with complicated morphology has been an important topic in material science and technology, which remains a challenging issue to simultaneously achieve a high growth rate for a complex nanostructure with simple controlling factors. Here, we present a novel simple and successive method based on chemical reactions in an open reaction system manipulated by an electric field. A uniform CdS/TiO2 composite tubular structure has been fabricated in highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays in a very short time period (~90 s) under room temperature (RT). The content of CdS in the resultant and its crystalline structure was tuned by the form and magnitude of external voltage. The as-formed structure has shown a quite broad and bulk-like light absorption spectrum with the absorption of photon energy even below that of the bulk CdS. The as-fabricated-sensitized solar cell based on this composite structure has achieved an efficiency of 1.43% without any chemical doping or co-sensitizing, 210% higher than quantum dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) under a similar condition. Hopefully, this method can also easily grow nanostructures based on a wide range of compound materials for energy science and electronic technologies, especially for fast-deploying devices.

  10. The Learning Management System Evolution. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service (CDS) to better understand how higher education institutions approach learning management systems (LMSs). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of the Core Data Service, which contains several questions regarding information systems and applications.…

  11. Options for Putting CDS/ISIS Databases on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buxton, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To review the variety of software solutions available for putting CDS/ISIS databases on the internet. To help anyone considering which route to take. Design/methodology/approach: Briefly describes the characteristics, history, origin and availability of each package. Identifies the type of skills required to implement the package and the…

  12. Thiol surface complexation on growing CdS clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Swayambunathan, V.; Hayes, D.; Schmidt, K.H.; Liao, Y.X.; Meisel, D. )

    1990-05-09

    The growth of small CdS colloidal particles has been initiated by pulse radiolytic release of sulfide from thiol (3-mercapto-1,2-propanediol, RSH) in the presence of Cd{sup 2+} ions. The kinetics and stoichiometry of the ensuring reactions were followed by conductivity, absorption spectroscopy, and light-scattering techniques. The final CdS product has been identified by electron diffraction. The formation of Cd-thiolate complexes at the surface of the particles is indicated by conductivity and by energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX) results. The rate of formation of CdS clusters is strongly pH dependent due to the pH effect on the stability of Dd{sup 2+}/HS{sup {minus}} complexes. At low pHs (4.0-5.3) the growth mechanism is proposed to be primarily a cluster-molecule process. At this pH range Cd{sup 2+} ions at the CdS particle surface complex with thiolate ions stronger than in the bulk of the solution. The size control of the particles by thiols is proposed to result from a competition of thiolate ions with HS{sup {minus}} ions for cadmium ions at the surface of the growing particles.

  13. Functionalization of gold nanoparticles and CdS quantum dots with cell penetrating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Catherine C.; de la Fuente, Jesus M.

    2009-02-01

    During the last decade, there has been great deal of interest in the self-assembly fabrication of hybrid materials from inorganic nanoparticles and biomolecules. Nanoparticles are similar in size range to many common biomolecules, thus, nanoparticles appear to be natural companions in hybrid systems. At present, it is straightforward to control and modify properties of nanostructures to better suit their integration with biological systems; for example, controlling their size, modifying their surface layer for enhanced aqueous solubility, biocompatibility, or biorecognition. A particularly desirable target for therapeutic uses is the cell nucleus, because the genetic information is there. We review in this article the synthesis developed by our research group of water-soluble gold nanoparticles and CdS nanocrystals functionalized with a Tat protein-derived peptide sequence by straightforward and economical methodologies. The particles were subsequently tested in vitro with a human fibroblast cell line using optical and transmission electron microscopy to determine the biocompatibility of these nanoparticles and whether the functionalization with the cell penetrating peptide allowed particles to transfer across the cell membrane and locate into the nucleus.

  14. Experimental and theoretical XANES of CdSxSe1-x nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiu, Y. M.; Murphy, M. W.; Liu, L.; Hu, Y.; Sham, T. K.

    2014-03-01

    The morphology and electronic properties of the CdSxSe1-x nanostructures with varying alloy compositions have been acquired experimentally by X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structures (XANES) at the Cd, Se and S K-edge and L3,2-edges. The theoretical XANES spectra have been calculated using the density functional approach. It is found that the optical band-gap emission of these CdSxSe1-x nano-ribbons can be tuned to the range between that of pure CdS (2.43 eV) and CdSe (1.74 eV) by changing the S and Se ratio. This gradual shift in (optical and structural) properties from CdS character to CdSe character is also seen in the electronic structures. The densities of states and band structures show that with the addition of Se replacing S in CdS, the band gap shrinks. The K and L3,2 edges of Cd, Se, and S of the XANES structures of both the CdS and CdSe in B4 (wurtzite) and B3 (cubic zinc-blende) structures have been calculated and compared.

  15. Interaction of environmental contaminants with zebrafish organic anion transporting polypeptide, Oatp1d1 (Slco1d1)

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko; Fent, Karl; Smital, Tvrtko

    2014-10-01

    Polyspecific transporters from the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP/Oatp) superfamily mediate the uptake of a wide range of compounds. In zebrafish, Oatp1d1 transports conjugated steroid hormones and cortisol. It is predominantly expressed in the liver, brain and testes. In this study we have characterized the transport of xenobiotics by the zebrafish Oatp1d1 transporter. We developed a novel assay for assessing Oatp1d1 interactors using the fluorescent probe Lucifer yellow and transient transfection in HEK293 cells. Our data showed that numerous environmental contaminants interact with zebrafish Oatp1d1. Oatp1d1 mediated the transport of diclofenac with very high affinity, followed by high affinity towards perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), nonylphenol, gemfibrozil and 17α-ethinylestradiol; moderate affinity towards carbaryl, diazinon and caffeine; and low affinity towards metolachlor. Importantly, many environmental chemicals acted as strong inhibitors of Oatp1d1. A strong inhibition of Oatp1d1 transport activity was found by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), chlorpyrifos-methyl, estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2), followed by moderate to low inhibition by diethyl phthalate, bisphenol A, 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4 tetrahydronapthalene and clofibrate. In this study we identified Oatp1d1 as a first Solute Carrier (SLC) transporter involved in the transport of a wide range of xenobiotics in fish. Considering that Oatps in zebrafish have not been characterized before, our work on zebrafish Oatp1d1 offers important new insights on the understanding of uptake processes of environmental contaminants, and contributes to the better characterization of zebrafish as a model species. - Highlights: • We optimized a novel assay for determination of Oatp1d1 interactors • Oatp1d1 is the first SLC characterized fish xenobiotic transporter • PFOS, nonylphenol, diclofenac, EE2, caffeine are high affinity Oatp1d1substrates • PFOA, chlorpyrifos

  16. Measuring Strong Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Andy Minor

    2008-10-16

    Andy Minor of Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy explains measuring stress and strain on nanostructures with the In Situ Microscope. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  17. Measuring Strong Nanostructures

    ScienceCinema

    Andy Minor

    2016-07-12

    Andy Minor of Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy explains measuring stress and strain on nanostructures with the In Situ Microscope. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  18. The Intercalibration of SOHO EIT, CDS-NIS, and TRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P.

    2006-05-01

    Using coordinated observations of a quiet coronal region, we study the intercalibration of the CDS and EIT instruments on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE). We derive the differential emission measure (DEM) distribution from CDS spectral line intensities and convolve it with EIT and TRACE temperature response functions, calculated with the latest atomic data from the CHIANTI database, to predict count rates in their observing channels. We examine different analysis methods and briefly discuss some more advanced aspects of atomic modeling such as the density dependence of the ionization fractions. We investigate the implications for our study using data from the ADAS database. We find that our CDS DEM can predict the TRACE and EIT 171 and 195 Å channel count rates to within 25%. However, the accuracy of the predictions depends on the ionization fractions and elemental abundances used. The TRACE 284 Å and EIT 284 and 304 Å filter predictions do not agree well with the observations, even after taking the contribution from the optically thick He II 304 Å line to the TRACE 284 Å channel into account. The different CDS DEM solutions we derive using different ionization fractions produce fairly similar results: the majority of the CDS line intensities used are reproduced to within 20% with only around one-fifth reproduced to worse than 50%. However, the comparison provides us with further clues with which to explain the discrepancies found for some lines, and highlights the need for accurate equilibrium ionization balance calculations even at low density.

  19. 1d, 2d, and 3d periodic structures: Electromagnetic characterization, design, and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockett, Timothy John

    Periodic structures have many useful applications in electromagnetics including phased arrays, frequency selective surfaces, and absorbing interfaces. Their unique properties can be used to provide increased performance in antenna gain, electromagnetic propagation, and electromagnetic absorption. In antenna arrays, repeating elements create a larger eective aperture, increasing the gain of the antenna and the ability to scan the direction of the main beam. Three-dimensional periodic structures, such as an array of shaped pillars such as columns, cones, or prisms have the potential of improving electromagnetic absorption, improving performance in applications such as solar cell eciency and absorbing interfaces. Furthermore, research into periodic structures is a continuing endeavor where novel approaches and analysis in appropriate applications can be sought. This dissertation will address the analysis, diagnostics, and enhancement of 1D, 2D, and 3D periodic structures for antenna array applications and solar cell technology. In particular, a unique approach to array design will be introduced to prevent the appearance of undesirable grating lobes in large antenna arrays that employ subarrays. This approach, named the distortion diagnostic procedure, can apply directly to 1D and 2D periodic structures in the form of planar antenna arrays. Interesting corollaries included here are developments in millimeter-wave antenna measurements including spiral planar scanning, phaseless measurements, and addressing antennas that feature an internal source. Finally, analysis and enhancement of 3D periodic structures in nanostructure photovoltaic arrays and absorbing interfaces will be examined for their behavior and basic operation in regards to improved absorption of electromagnetic waves.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of nanostructured titanate materials by the hydrothermal treatment method.

    PubMed

    Doong, Ruey-an; Kao, I-ling

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of one-dimensional (1-D) tubular and fibrous nanostructured materials have recently received highly attention. Various morphologies of 1-D nanostructured titanate materials including nanosheets, nanotubes, nanowires, and nanoribbons have recently been successfully synthesized using the alkaline hydrothermal method. In spite of the controversy of the chemical structures and formation mechanisms, titanate nanostructures have attracted much attention on applications of dye-sensitized solar cell, hydrogen sensing, lithium storage and photocatalysis because of their unique features of high specific surface area, ion-exchange capacity and aspect ratio, and unique optical and electrochemical properties. The morphology and microstructure of titanate nanostructures are highly dependent on the preparation conditions. In this review, we highlight the synthesis of TiO(2)-derived nanomaterials under various hydrothermal conditions. The patents for fabrication of various morphologies of nanostructures are also introduced. Effects of preparation parameters including hydrothermal temperature, duration, alkaline concentration, starting materials, and post-treatment on the morphology and microstructure of titanate nanomaterials are reviewered. In addition, the microwave-assisted method for fabrication of 1-D titanate nanostructures is discussed and compared. The applications of titanate nanomaterials in photocatalysis, ion-exchange, and lithium storages are also introduced.

  1. Nanostructured Carbon Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    carbon coatings and explores a very broad range of potentially important carbon nanostructures that may be used in future technologies. A new method ...for the synthesis of nanostructured carbon coatings on the surface of SiC and other metal carbides is described. This method is accomplished through the...With the fall in cost of fullerene powders, this method may become important in the future as a method to produce nanocrystalline diamond free of metal

  2. Silicon carbide based one-dimensional nanostructure growth: towards electronics and biology perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latu-Romain, L.; Ollivier, M.

    2014-05-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures such as nanowires or nanotubes have attracted great interest in fundamental research as well as potential breakthrough applications. Among many materials, silicon carbide (SiC) has very interesting physical, chemical and electronic properties. This is why silicon carbide based 1D nanostructures, which combine excellent intrinsic properties with low dimensionality, have great potential. In this topical review, the growth of SiC 1D nanostructures is addressed as well as the potential applications of these peculiar nano-objects. This subject is first introduced by the interest in this material and by a summing up of the state of the art of SiC nanowire growth. In the second part, Si-SiC core-shell nanowire synthesis is described, followed by the growth of SiC nanotubes. In particular, these two kinds of nanostructures can be obtained via Si nanowire carburization. The third part is dedicated to the control of the synthesis from Si-SiC core-shell nanowires to SiC nanotubes using this original technique. Then, an alternative top-down approach to synthesize SiC 1D nanostructures is described. Finally, preliminary results towards integration for biology, energy and electronics are provided.

  3. One-pot synthesis of Ni doped CdS nanosheets for near infrared emission and excellent photocatalytic materials for degradation of MB dye under UV and sunlight irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Bilal; Ojha, Animesh K; Kumar, Sumeet

    2017-05-15

    Undoped CdS nanostructures and Ni (3%, 5% and 7%) doped CdS nanosheets were synthesized via template-free one pot solvothermal method. The synthesized products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy (RS), UV-visible (UV-vis.) spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy techniques. The Ni doped CdS nanosheets excited by 2.75eV revealed two weak near-infrared emission bands at 2.02 and 1.73eV. These two bands may be due to transition from of d electronic state of Ni to hybridized (p-d) state of Ni ions and S. The photodegradation of MB dye with Ni doped nanosheets is more efficient under sunlight compared to UV light irradiation. The 3% Ni doped nanostructures act as an efficient photocatalyst. The presence of Ni(2+) generate electron and holes and prolonged the recombination rate by introducing the temporary trapping sites, which essentially causes to improve the photocatalytic efficiency of the synthesized samples.

  4. Architectures for Nanostructured Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubloff, Gary

    2013-03-01

    Heterogeneous nanostructures offer profound opportunities for advancement in electrochemical energy storage, particularly with regard to power. However, their design and integration must balance ion transport, electron transport, and stability under charge/discharge cycling, involving fundamental physical, chemical and electrochemical mechanisms at nano length scales and across disparate time scales. In our group and in our DOE Energy Frontier Research Center (www.efrc.umd.edu) we have investigated single nanostructures and regular nanostructure arrays as batteries, electrochemical capacitors, and electrostatic capacitors to understand limiting mechanisms, using a variety of synthesis and characterization strategies. Primary lithiation pathways in heterogeneous nanostructures have been observed to include surface, interface, and both isotropic and anisotropic diffusion, depending on materials. Integrating current collection layers at the nano scale with active ion storage layers enhances power and can improve stability during cycling. For densely packed nanostructures as required for storage applications, we investigate both ``regular'' and ``random'' architectures consistent with transport requirements for spatial connectivity. Such configurations raise further important questions at the meso scale, such as dynamic ion and electron transport in narrow and tortuous channels, and the role of defect structures and their evolution during charge cycling. Supported as part of the Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DESC0001160

  5. D1/D5 dopamine receptors modulate spatial memory formation.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Weber C N; Köhler, Cristiano C; Radiske, Andressa; Cammarota, Martín

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effect of the intra-CA1 administration of the D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH23390 and the D1/D5 receptor agonist SKF38393 on spatial memory in the water maze. When given immediately, but not 3h after training, SCH23390 hindered long-term spatial memory formation without affecting non-spatial memory or the normal functionality of the hippocampus. On the contrary, post-training infusion of SKF38393 enhanced retention and facilitated the spontaneous recovery of the original spatial preference after reversal learning. Our findings demonstrate that hippocampal D1/D5 receptors play an essential role in spatial memory processing.

  6. Localized heating induced chemical vapor deposition for one-dimensional nanostructure synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnowchik, Brian D.; Lin, Liwei; Englander, Ongi

    2010-03-01

    Localized heating has emerged as a viable technique for the site specific synthesis of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. By localizing the heat source, the extent of chemical vapor deposition synthesis reactions can be confined to well-defined, microscale regions. Resistive heating has been extensively used to realize highly localized regions of elevated temperature while maintaining a microelectronics-compatible thermal environment elsewhere. Other localized heating methods are being pursued as well. Overall, the approach is simple, flexible, and robust, and offers unique opportunities in 1D nanostructure synthesis, characterization, and integration. Herein, the recent progress of these techniques is reviewed and discussed.

  7. Low-dimensional hyperthin FeS2 nanostructures for efficient and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    DOE PAGES

    Jasion, Daniel; Qiao, Qiao; Barforoush, Joseph M.; ...

    2015-11-01

    We report a scalable, solution-processing method for synthesizing low-dimensional hyperthin FeS2 nanostructures, and we show that 2D FeS2 disc nanostructures are an efficient and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst. By changing the Fe:S ratio in the precursor solution, we were able to preferentially synthesize either 1D wire or 2D disc nanostructures. The 2D FeS2 disc structure has the highest electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction, comparable to platinum in neutral pH conditions. Moreover, the ability of the FeS2 nanostructures to generate hydrogen was confirmed by scanning electrochemical microscopy, and the 2D disc nanostructures were able to generate hydrogen for overmore » 125 h.« less

  8. Electrochemical cortisol immunosensors based on sonochemically synthesized zinc oxide 1D nanorods and 2D nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Kaushik, Ajeet; Pokhrel, Nimesh; Bhansali, Shekhar; Pala, Nezih

    2015-01-15

    We report on label free, highly sensitive and selective electrochemical immunosensors based on one-dimensional 1D ZnO nanorods (ZnO-NRs) and two-dimensional 2D ZnO nanoflakes (ZnO-NFs) which were synthesized on Au-coated substrates using simple one step sonochemical approach. Selective detection of cortisol using cyclic voltammetry (CV) is achieved by immobilizing anti-cortisol antibody (Anti-C(ab)) on the ZnO nanostructures (NSs). 1D ZnO-NRs and 2D ZnO-NFs provide unique sensing advantages over bulk materials. While 1D-NSs boast a high surface area to volume ratio, 2D-NSs with large area in polarized (0001) plane and high surface charge density could promote higher Anti-C(ab) loading and thus better sensing performance. Beside large surface area, ZnO-NSs also exhibit higher chemical stability, high catalytic activity, and biocompatibility. TEM studies showed that both ZnO-NSs are single crystalline oriented in (0001) plane. The measured sensing parameters are in the physiological range with a sensitivity of 11.86 µA/M exhibited by ZnO-NRs and 7.74 µA/M by ZnO-NFs with the lowest detection limit of 1 pM which is 100 times better than conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbant immunoassay (ELISA). ZnO-NSs based cortisol immunosensors were tested on human saliva samples and the performance were validated with conventional (ELISA) method which exhibits a remarkable correlation. The developed sensors can be integrated with microfluidic system and miniaturized potentiostat for point-of-care cortisol detection and such developed protocol can be used in personalized health monitoring/diagnostic.

  9. Synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon nanostructures from polyurethane sponge for bioimaging and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Zhang, Jingchao; Zhuang, Jing; Wang, Xun

    2015-08-07

    A facile and environmentally friendly method was developed for the fabrication of N-doped carbon nanomaterials by hydrothermal treatment using polyurethane (PU) sponge as a carbon source. We have demonstrated that the hydrothermal decomposition of PU sponge involves top-down hydrolysis and bottom-up polymerization processes for the synthesis of N-doped carbon dots (N-CDs). Fluorescence spectroscopy and cytotoxicity studies indicated that these highly-soluble N-CDs show excellent photoluminescence properties and low cytotoxicity, and can be used as good probes for cellular imaging. Additionally, the N-doped hollow carbon nanostructures can be designed using a simple template method. The prepared N-doped double-shelled hollow carbon nanotubes exhibited excellent ORR electrocatalytic activity and superior durability. Indeed, our method described here can provide an efficient way to synthesize N-doped carbon-based materials for a broad range of applications.

  10. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia in Glut1D on Ketogenic Diet.

    PubMed

    Klepper, Joerg; Leiendecker, Baerbel; Heussinger, Nicole; Lausch, Ekkehart; Bosch, Friedrich

    2016-04-01

    High-fat ketogenic diets are the only treatment available for Glut1 deficiency (Glut1D). Here, we describe an 8-year-old girl with classical Glut1D responsive to a 3:1 ketogenic diet and ethosuximide. After 3 years on the diet a gradual increase of blood lipids was followed by rapid, severe asymptomatic hypertriglyceridemia (1,910 mg/dL). Serum lipid apheresis was required to determine liver, renal, and pancreatic function. A combination of medium chain triglyceride-oil and a reduction of the ketogenic diet to 1:1 ratio normalized triglyceride levels within days but triggered severe myoclonic seizures requiring comedication with sultiam. Severe hypertriglyceridemia in children with Glut1D on ketogenic diets may be underdiagnosed and harmful. In contrast to congenital hypertriglyceridemias, children with Glut1D may be treated effectively by dietary adjustments alone.

  11. TBC1D24 genotype–phenotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    Balestrini, Simona; Milh, Mathieu; Castiglioni, Claudia; Lüthy, Kevin; Finelli, Mattea J.; Verstreken, Patrik; Cardon, Aaron; Stražišar, Barbara Gnidovec; Holder, J. Lloyd; Lesca, Gaetan; Mancardi, Maria M.; Poulat, Anne L.; Repetto, Gabriela M.; Banka, Siddharth; Bilo, Leonilda; Birkeland, Laura E.; Bosch, Friedrich; Brockmann, Knut; Cross, J. Helen; Doummar, Diane; Félix, Temis M.; Giuliano, Fabienne; Hori, Mutsuki; Hüning, Irina; Kayserili, Hulia; Kini, Usha; Lees, Melissa M.; Meenakshi, Girish; Mewasingh, Leena; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Peluso, Silvio; Mey, Antje; Rice, Gregory M.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Taylor, Jenny C.; Troester, Matthew M.; Stanley, Christine M.; Ville, Dorothee; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Falace, Antonio; Fassio, Anna; Lemke, Johannes R.; Biskup, Saskia; Tardif, Jessica; Ajeawung, Norbert F.; Tolun, Aslihan; Corbett, Mark; Gecz, Jozef; Afawi, Zaid; Howell, Katherine B.; Oliver, Karen L.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; de Falco, Fabrizio A.; Oliver, Peter L.; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in TBC1D24. Methods: We acquired new clinical, EEG, and neuroimaging data of 11 previously unreported and 37 published patients. TBC1D24 mutations, identified through various sequencing methods, can be found online (http://lovd.nl/TBC1D24). Results: Forty-eight patients were included (28 men, 20 women, average age 21 years) from 30 independent families. Eighteen patients (38%) had myoclonic epilepsies. The other patients carried diagnoses of focal (25%), multifocal (2%), generalized (4%), and unclassified epilepsy (6%), and early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (25%). Most patients had drug-resistant epilepsy. We detail EEG, neuroimaging, developmental, and cognitive features, treatment responsiveness, and physical examination. In silico evaluation revealed 7 different highly conserved motifs, with the most common pathogenic mutation located in the first. Neuronal outgrowth assays showed that some TBC1D24 mutations, associated with the most severe TBC1D24-associated disorders, are not necessarily the most disruptive to this gene function. Conclusions: TBC1D24-related epilepsy syndromes show marked phenotypic pleiotropy, with multisystem involvement and severity spectrum ranging from isolated deafness (not studied here), benign myoclonic epilepsy restricted to childhood with complete seizure control and normal intellect, to early-onset epileptic encephalopathy with severe developmental delay and early death. There is no distinct correlation with mutation type or location yet, but patterns are emerging. Given the phenotypic breadth observed, TBC1D24 mutation screening is indicated in a wide variety of epilepsies. A TBC1D24 consortium was formed to develop further research on this gene and its associated phenotypes. PMID:27281533

  12. A simple route to vertical array of quasi-1D ZnO nanofilms on FTO surfaces: 1D-crystal growth of nanoseeds under ammonia-assisted hydrolysis process

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A simple method for the synthesis of ZnO nanofilms composed of vertical array of quasi-1D ZnO nanostructures (quasi-NRs) on the surface was demonstrated via a 1D crystal growth of the attached nanoseeds under a rapid hydrolysis process of zinc salts in the presence of ammonia at room temperature. In a typical procedure, by simply controlling the concentration of zinc acetate and ammonia in the reaction, a high density of vertically oriented nanorod-like morphology could be successfully obtained in a relatively short growth period (approximately 4 to 5 min) and at a room-temperature process. The average diameter and the length of the nanostructures are approximately 30 and 110 nm, respectively. The as-prepared quasi-NRs products were pure ZnO phase in nature without the presence of any zinc complexes as confirmed by the XRD characterisation. Room-temperature optical absorption spectroscopy exhibits the presence of two separate excitonic characters inferring that the as-prepared ZnO quasi-NRs are high-crystallinity properties in nature. The mechanism of growth for the ZnO quasi-NRs will be proposed. Due to their simplicity, the method should become a potential alternative for a rapid and cost-effective preparation of high-quality ZnO quasi-NRs nanofilms for use in photovoltaic or photocatalytics applications. PACS: 81.07.Bc; 81.16.-c; 81.07.Gf. PMID:22027275

  13. A simple route to vertical array of quasi-1D ZnO nanofilms on FTO surfaces: 1D-crystal growth of nanoseeds under ammonia-assisted hydrolysis process.

    PubMed

    Ali Umar, Akrajas; Abd Rahman, Mohd Yusri; Taslim, Rika; Mat Salleh, Muhamad; Oyama, Munetaka

    2011-10-25

    A simple method for the synthesis of ZnO nanofilms composed of vertical array of quasi-1D ZnO nanostructures (quasi-NRs) on the surface was demonstrated via a 1D crystal growth of the attached nanoseeds under a rapid hydrolysis process of zinc salts in the presence of ammonia at room temperature. In a typical procedure, by simply controlling the concentration of zinc acetate and ammonia in the reaction, a high density of vertically oriented nanorod-like morphology could be successfully obtained in a relatively short growth period (approximately 4 to 5 min) and at a room-temperature process. The average diameter and the length of the nanostructures are approximately 30 and 110 nm, respectively. The as-prepared quasi-NRs products were pure ZnO phase in nature without the presence of any zinc complexes as confirmed by the XRD characterisation. Room-temperature optical absorption spectroscopy exhibits the presence of two separate excitonic characters inferring that the as-prepared ZnO quasi-NRs are high-crystallinity properties in nature. The mechanism of growth for the ZnO quasi-NRs will be proposed. Due to their simplicity, the method should become a potential alternative for a rapid and cost-effective preparation of high-quality ZnO quasi-NRs nanofilms for use in photovoltaic or photocatalytics applications.PACS: 81.07.Bc; 81.16.-c; 81.07.Gf.

  14. Rab28 is a TBC1D1/TBC1D4 substrate involved in GLUT4 trafficking.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhou; Menzel, Franziska; Benninghoff, Tim; Chadt, Alexandra; Du, Chen; Holman, Geoffrey D; Al-Hasani, Hadi

    2017-01-01

    The Rab-GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 play important roles in the insulin-stimulated translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 from intracellular vesicles to the plasma membrane in muscle cells and adipocytes. We identified Rab28 as a substrate for the GAP domains of both TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 in vitro. Rab28 is expressed in adipose cells and skeletal muscle, and its GTP-binding state is acutely regulated by insulin. We found that in intact isolated mouse skeletal muscle, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Rab28 decreases basal glucose uptake. Conversely, in primary rat adipose cells, overexpression of Rab28-Q72L, a constitutively active mutant, increases basal cell surface levels of an epitope-tagged HA-GLUT4. Our results indicate that Rab28 is a novel GTPase involved in the intracellular retention of GLUT4 in insulin target cells.

  15. Evolution of Zinc Oxide Nanostructures from Non-Equilibrium Deposition Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-11

    is linearly related to the supersaturation, and exponentially related to the temperature and the growth energy barrier of corresponding facets...controlled conditions, we observed three unique 1D and 2D nanocrystal growth behavior, which revealed a series of unique growth kinetics at the...nanoscale under conditions far away from equilibrium. First, the wedding cake growth mechanism in the formation of 1D and 2D ZnO nanostructures was observed

  16. Nanostructured materials in potentiometry.

    PubMed

    Düzgün, Ali; Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A; Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Potentiometry is a very simple electrochemical technique with extraordinary analytical capabilities. It is also well known that nanostructured materials display properties which they do not show in the bulk phase. The combination of the two fields of potentiometry and nanomaterials is therefore a promising area of research and development. In this report, we explain the fundamentals of potentiometric devices that incorporate nanostructured materials and we highlight the advantages and drawbacks of combining nanomaterials and potentiometry. The paper provides an overview of the role of nanostructured materials in the two commonest potentiometric sensors: field-effect transistors and ion-selective electrodes. Additionally, we provide a few recent examples of new potentiometric sensors that are based on receptors immobilized directly onto the nanostructured material surface. Moreover, we summarize the use of potentiometry to analyze processes involving nanostructured materials and the prospects that the use of nanopores offer to potentiometry. Finally, we discuss several difficulties that currently hinder developments in the field and some future trends that will extend potentiometry into new analytical areas such as biology and medicine.

  17. Surface modification of cadmium sulfide thin film honey comb nanostructures: Effect of in situ tin doping using chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, K. C.; Basheer Ahamed, M.

    2016-01-01

    Even though nanostructures possess large surface to volume ratio compared to their thin film counterpart, the complicated procedure that demands for the deposition on a substrate kept them back foot in device fabrication techniques. In this work, a honey comb like cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films nanostructure are deposited on glass substrates using simple chemical bath deposition technique at 65 °C. Energy band gaps, film thickness and shell size of the honey comb nanostructures are successfully controlled using tin (Sn) doping and number of shells per unit area is found to be maximum for 5% Sn doped (in the reaction mixture) sample. X-ray diffraction and optical absorption analysis showed that cadmium sulfide and cadmium hydroxide coexist in the samples. TEM measurements showed that CdS nanostructures are embedded in cadmium hydroxide just like "plum pudding". Persistent photoconductivity measurements of the samples are also carried out. The decay constants found to be increased with increases in Sn doping.

  18. Nanostructured Semiconductor Device Design in Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Hongmei

    We demonstrate the use of embedded CdS nanowires in improving spectral transmission loss and the low mechanical and electrical robustness of planar CdS window layer and thus enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability of the CdS-CdTe solar cells. CdS nanowire window layer enables light transmission gain at 300nm-550nm. A nearly ideal spectral response of quantum efficiency at a wide spectrum range provides an evidence for improving light transmission in the window layer and enhancing absorption and carrier generation in absorber. Nanowire CdS/CdTe solar cells with Cu/graphite/silver paste as back contacts, on SnO2/ITO-soda lime glass substrates, yield the highest efficiency of 12% in nanostructured CdS-CdTe solar cells. Reliability is improved by approximately 3 times over the cells with the traditional planar CdS counterpart. Junction transport mechanisms are delineated for advancing the basic understanding of device physics at the interface. Our results prove the efficacy of this nanowire approach for enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability in windowabsorber type solar cells (CdS-CdTe, CdS-CIGS and CdS-CZTSSe etc) and other optoelectronic devices. We further introduce MoO3-x as a transparent, low barrier back contact. We design nanowire CdS-CdTe solar cells on flexible foils of metals in a superstrate device structure, which makes low-cost roll-to-roll manufacturing process feasible and greatly reduces the complexity of fabrication. The MoO3 layer reduces the valence band offset relative to the CdTe, and creates improved cell performance. Annealing as-deposited MoO3 in N 2 reduces series resistance from 9.98 O/cm2 to 7.72 O/cm2, and hence efficiency of the nanowire solar cell is improved from 9.9% to 11%, which efficiency comparable to efficiency of planar counterparts. When the nanowire solar cell is illuminated from MoO 3-x /Au side, it yields an efficiency of 8.7%. This reduction in efficiency is attributed to decrease in Jsc from 25.5m

  19. Preliminary Results from Coordinated UVCS-CDS-Ulysses Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parenti, S.; Bromage, B. J.; Poletto, G.; Suess, S. T.; Raymond, J. C.; Noci, G.; Bromage, G. E.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The June 2000 quadrature between the Sun, Earth, and Ulysses took place with Ulysses at a distance of 3.35 AU from the Sun and at heliocentric latitude 58.2 deg south, in the southeast quadrant. This provided an opportunity to observe the corona close to the Sun with Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) and Ultraviolet Coronograph Spectrometer (UVCS) and, subsequently, to sample the same plasma when it reached Ulysses. Here we focus on simultaneous observations of UVCS and CDS made on June 12, 13, 16 and 17. The UVCS data were acquired at heliocentric altitudes ranging from 1.6 to 2.2 solar radii, using different grating positions, in order to get a wide wavelength range. CDS data consisted of Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS) full wavelength rasters of 120" x 150" centered at altitudes up to 1.18 solar radii, together with Grazing Incidence Spectrometer (GIS) 4" x 4" rasters within the same field of view, out to 1.2 solar radii. The radial direction to Ulysses passed through a high latitude streamer, throughout the 4 days of observations, Analysis of the spectra taken by UVCS shows a variation of the element abundances in the streamer over our observing interval: however, because the observations were in slightly different parts of the streamer on different days, the variation could be ascribed either to a temporal or spatial effect. The oxygen abundance, however, seems to increase at the edge of the streamer, as indicated by previous analyses. This suggests the variation may be a function of position within the streamer, rather than a temporal effect. Oxygen abundances measured by SWICS on Ulysses are compared with the CDS and UVCS results to see whether changes measured in situ follow the same pattern.

  20. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  1. From 1D to 3D - macroscopic nanowire aerogel monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei; Rechberger, Felix; Niederberger, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying.Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM and TEM images, and digital photographs. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04429h

  2. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Regeneration**

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guobao; Ma, Peter X.

    2009-01-01

    Biomaterials play a pivotal role in regenerative medicine, which aims to regenerate and replace lost/dysfunctional tissues or organs. Biomaterials (scaffolds) serve as temporary 3D substrates to guide neo tissue formation and organization. It is often beneficial for a scaffolding material to mimic the characteristics of extracellular matrix (ECM) at the nanometer scale and to induce certain natural developmental or/and wound healing processes for tissue regeneration applications. This article reviews the fabrication and modification technologies for nanofibrous, nanocomposite, and nanostructured drug-delivering scaffolds. ECM-mimicking nanostructured biomaterials have been shown to actively regulate cellular responses including attachment, proliferation, differentiation and matrix deposition. Nano-scaled drug delivery systems can be successfully incorporated into a porous 3D scaffold to enhance the tissue regeneration capacity. In conclusion, nano-structured biomateials are a very exciting and rapidly expanding research area, and are providing new enabling technologies for regenerative medicine. PMID:19946357

  3. Synthesis of porphyrin nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou; Bai, Feng

    2014-10-28

    The present disclosure generally relates to self-assembly methods for generating porphyrin nanostructures. For example, in one embodiment a method is provided that includes preparing a porphyrin solution and a surfactant solution. The porphyrin solution is then mixed with the surfactant solution at a concentration sufficient for confinement of the porphyrin molecules by the surfactant molecules. In some embodiments, the concentration of the surfactant is at or above its critical micelle concentration (CMC), which allows the surfactant to template the growth of the nanostructure over time. The size and morphology of the nanostructures may be affected by the type of porphyrin molecules used, the type of surfactant used, the concentration of the porphyrin and surfactant the pH of the mixture of the solutions, and the order of adding the reagents to the mixture, to name a few variables.

  4. Polar discontinuities and 1D interfaces in monolayered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Gordillo, Rafael; Pruneda, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Interfaces are the birthplace of a multitude of fascinating discoveries in fundamental science, and have enabled modern electronic devices, from transistors, to lasers, capacitors or solar cells. These interfaces between bulk materials are always bi-dimensional (2D) 'surfaces'. However the advent of graphene and other 2D crystals opened up a world of possibilities, as in this case the interfaces become one-dimensional (1D) lines. Although the properties of 1D nanoribbons have been extensively discussed in the last few years, 1D interfaces within infinite 2D systems had remained mostly unexplored until very recently. These include grain boundaries in polycrystalline samples, or interfaces in hybrid 2D sheets composed by segregated domains of different materials (as for example graphene/BN hybrids, or chemically different transition metal dichalcogenides). As for their 2D counterparts, some of these 1D interfaces exhibit polar characteristics, and can give rise to fascinating new physical properties. Here, recent experimental discoveries and theoretical predictions on the polar discontinuities that arise at these 1D interfaces will be reviewed, and the perspectives of this new research topic, discussed.

  5. Nanostructured Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanying; Ning, Zhijun; Ågren, Hans

    2016-08-09

    We are glad to announce the Special Issue "Nanostructured Solar Cells", published in Nanomaterials. This issue consists of eight articles, two communications, and one review paper, covering major important aspects of nanostructured solar cells of varying types. From fundamental physicochemical investigations to technological advances, and from single junction solar cells (silicon solar cell, dye sensitized solar cell, quantum dots sensitized solar cell, and small molecule organic solar cell) to tandem multi-junction solar cells, all aspects are included and discussed in this issue to advance the use of nanotechnology to improve the performance of solar cells with reduced fabrication costs.

  6. Plasmonics in nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheyu; Zhu, Xing

    2013-07-26

    Plasmonics has developed into one of the rapidly growing research topics for nanophotonics. With advanced nanofabrication techniques, a broad variety of nanostructures can be designed and fabricated for plasmonic devices at nanoscale. Fundamental properties for both surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) and localized surface plasmons (LSP) arise a new insight and understanding for the electro-optical device investigations, such as plasmonic nanofocusing, low-loss plasmon waveguide and active plasmonic detectors for energy harvesting. Here, we review some typical functional plasmonic nanostructures and nanosmart devices emerging from our individual and collaborative research works.

  7. Nanostructured Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanying; Ning, Zhijun; Ågren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    We are glad to announce the Special Issue “Nanostructured Solar Cells”, published in Nanomaterials. This issue consists of eight articles, two communications, and one review paper, covering major important aspects of nanostructured solar cells of varying types. From fundamental physicochemical investigations to technological advances, and from single junction solar cells (silicon solar cell, dye sensitized solar cell, quantum dots sensitized solar cell, and small molecule organic solar cell) to tandem multi-junction solar cells, all aspects are included and discussed in this issue to advance the use of nanotechnology to improve the performance of solar cells with reduced fabrication costs.

  8. Pitch-based pattern splitting for 1D layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Ryo; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Mikami, Koji; Tsujita, Koichiro; Yaegashi, Hidetami; Oyama, Kenichi; Smayling, Michael C.; Axelrad, Valery

    2015-07-01

    The pattern splitting algorithm for 1D Gridded-Design-Rules layout (1D layout) for sub-10 nm node logic devices is shown. It is performed with integer linear programming (ILP) based on the conflict graph created from a grid map for each designated pitch. The relation between the number of times for patterning and the minimum pitch is shown systematically with a sample pattern of contact layer for each node. From the result, the number of times for patterning for 1D layout is fewer than that for conventional 2D layout. Moreover, an experimental result including SMO and total integrated process with hole repair technique is presented with the sample pattern of contact layer whose pattern density is relatively high among critical layers (fin, gate, local interconnect, contact, and metal).

  9. PC-1D installation manual and user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Basore, P.A.

    1991-05-01

    PC-1D is a software package for personal computers that uses finite-element analysis to solve the fully-coupled two-carrier semiconductor transport equations in one dimension. This program is particularly useful for analyzing the performance of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, but can be applied to any bipolar device whose carrier flows are primarily one-dimensional. This User's Guide provides the information necessary to install PC-1D, define a problem for solution, solve the problem, and examine the results. Example problems are presented which illustrate these steps. The physical models and numerical methods utilized are presented in detail. This document supports version 3.1 of PC-1D, which incorporates faster numerical algorithms with better convergence properties than previous versions of the program. 51 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. GIS-BASED 1-D DIFFUSIVE WAVE OVERLAND FLOW MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    KALYANAPU, ALFRED; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY N.; BURIAN, STEVEN J.

    2007-01-17

    This paper presents a GIS-based 1-d distributed overland flow model and summarizes an application to simulate a flood event. The model estimates infiltration using the Green-Ampt approach and routes excess rainfall using the 1-d diffusive wave approximation. The model was designed to use readily available topographic, soils, and land use/land cover data and rainfall predictions from a meteorological model. An assessment of model performance was performed for a small catchment and a large watershed, both in urban environments. Simulated runoff hydrographs were compared to observations for a selected set of validation events. Results confirmed the model provides reasonable predictions in a short period of time.

  11. Stepwise nanopore evolution in one-dimensional nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jang Wook; McDonough, James; Jeong, Sangmoo; Yoo, Jee Soo; Chan, Candace K; Cui, Yi

    2010-04-14

    We report that established simple lithium (Li) ion battery cycles can be used to produce nanopores inside various useful one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures such as zinc oxide, silicon, and silver nanowires. Moreover, porosities of these 1D nanomaterials can be controlled in a stepwise manner by the number of Li-battery cycles. Subsequent pore characterization at the end of each cycle allows us to obtain detailed snapshots of the distinct pore evolution properties in each material due to their different atomic diffusion rates and types of chemical bonds. Also, this stepwise characterization led us to the first observation of pore size increases during cycling, which can be interpreted as a similar phenomenon to Ostwald ripening in analogous nanoparticle cases. Finally, we take advantage of the unique combination of nanoporosity and 1D materials and demonstrate nanoporous silicon nanowires (poSiNWs) as excellent supercapacitor (SC) electrodes in high power operations compared to existing devices with activated carbon.

  12. Building Nanostructures with Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wang; Cheetham, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    The convergence of nanoscience and drug delivery has prompted the formation of the field of nanomedicine, one that exploits the novel physicochemical and biological properties of nanostructures for improved medical treatments and reduced side effects. Until recently, this nanostructure-mediated strategy considered the drug to be solely a biologically active compound to be delivered, and its potential as a molecular building unit remained largely unexplored. A growing trend within nanomedicine has been the use of drug molecules to build well-defined nanostructures of various sizes and shapes. This strategy allows for the creation of self-delivering supramolecular nanomedicines containing a high and fixed drug content. Through rational design of the number and type of the drug incorporated, the resulting nanostructures can be tailored to assume various morphologies (e.g. nanospheres, rods, nanofibers, or nanotubes) for a particular mode of administration such as systemic, topical, and local delivery. This review covers the recent advances in this rapidly developing field, with the aim of providing an in-depth evaluation of the exciting opportunities that this new field could create to improve the current clinical practice of nanomedicine. PMID:27066106

  13. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  14. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Josh B; Dick, Don D; McDonnell, Stephen J; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H G; Owen, William R; Alexander, Justin D; Jaeger, David L; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J; Wallace, Robert M; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M; Randall, John N; Von Ehr, James

    2015-07-17

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure.

  15. Emerging double helical nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Gui-Li; Wei, Fei

    2014-08-21

    As one of the most important and land-mark structures found in nature, a double helix consists of two congruent single helices with the same axis or a translation along the axis. This double helical structure renders the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) the crucial biomolecule in evolution and metabolism. DNA-like double helical nanostructures are probably the most fantastic yet ubiquitous geometry at the nanoscale level, which are expected to exhibit exceptional and even rather different properties due to the unique organization of the two single helices and their synergistic effect. The organization of nanomaterials into double helical structures is an emerging hot topic for nanomaterials science due to their promising exceptional unique properties and applications. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art research progress for the fabrication of double-helical nanostructures based on 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' strategies. The relevant nanoscale, mesoscale, and macroscopic scale fabrication methods, as well as the properties of the double helical nanostructures are included. Critical perspectives are devoted to the synthesis principles and potential applications in this emerging research area. A multidisciplinary approach from the scope of nanoscience, physics, chemistry, materials, engineering, and other application areas is still required to the well-controlled and large-scale synthesis, mechanism, property, and application exploration of double helical nanostructures.

  16. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  17. Complex WS 2 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, R. L. D.; Hsu, W. K.; Lee, T. H.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    2002-06-01

    A range of elegant tubular and conical nanostructures has been created by template growth of (WS 2) n layers on the surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. The structures exhibit remarkably perfect straight segments together with interesting complexities at the intersections, which are discussed here in detail in order to enhance understanding of the structural features governing tube growth.

  18. Gas sensors based on one dimensional nanostructured metal-oxides: a review.

    PubMed

    Arafat, M M; Dinan, B; Akbar, Sheikh A; Haseeb, A S M A

    2012-01-01

    Recently one dimensional (1-D) nanostructured metal-oxides have attracted much attention because of their potential applications in gas sensors. 1-D nanostructured metal-oxides provide high surface to volume ratio, while maintaining good chemical and thermal stabilities with minimal power consumption and low weight. In recent years, various processing routes have been developed for the synthesis of 1-D nanostructured metal-oxides such as hydrothermal, ultrasonic irradiation, electrospinning, anodization, sol-gel, molten-salt, carbothermal reduction, solid-state chemical reaction, thermal evaporation, vapor-phase transport, aerosol, RF sputtering, molecular beam epitaxy, chemical vapor deposition, gas-phase assisted nanocarving, UV lithography and dry plasma etching. A variety of sensor fabrication processing routes have also been developed. Depending on the materials, morphology and fabrication process the performance of the sensor towards a specific gas shows a varying degree of success. This article reviews and evaluates the performance of 1-D nanostructured metal-oxide gas sensors based on ZnO, SnO(2), TiO(2), In(2)O(3), WO(x), AgVO(3), CdO, MoO(3), CuO, TeO(2) and Fe(2)O(3). Advantages and disadvantages of each sensor are summarized, along with the associated sensing mechanism. Finally, the article concludes with some future directions of research.

  19. Gas Sensors Based on One Dimensional Nanostructured Metal-Oxides: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Arafat, M. M.; Dinan, B.; Akbar, Sheikh A.; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Recently one dimensional (1-D) nanostructured metal-oxides have attracted much attention because of their potential applications in gas sensors. 1-D nanostructured metal-oxides provide high surface to volume ratio, while maintaining good chemical and thermal stabilities with minimal power consumption and low weight. In recent years, various processing routes have been developed for the synthesis of 1-D nanostructured metal-oxides such as hydrothermal, ultrasonic irradiation, electrospinning, anodization, sol-gel, molten-salt, carbothermal reduction, solid-state chemical reaction, thermal evaporation, vapor-phase transport, aerosol, RF sputtering, molecular beam epitaxy, chemical vapor deposition, gas-phase assisted nanocarving, UV lithography and dry plasma etching. A variety of sensor fabrication processing routes have also been developed. Depending on the materials, morphology and fabrication process the performance of the sensor towards a specific gas shows a varying degree of success. This article reviews and evaluates the performance of 1-D nanostructured metal-oxide gas sensors based on ZnO, SnO2, TiO2, In2O3, WOx, AgVO3, CdO, MoO3, CuO, TeO2 and Fe2O3. Advantages and disadvantages of each sensor are summarized, along with the associated sensing mechanism. Finally, the article concludes with some future directions of research. PMID:22969344

  20. One-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures as absorber layers in solar cells.

    PubMed

    Jayadevan, K P; Tseng, T Y

    2005-11-01

    The one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructures of cadmium chalcogenides (Il-VI: CdSe, CdTe), InP and GaAs (III-V), and the ternary chalcopyrites CulnS2, CulnSe2, and CulnTe2 (I-III-VI2) are the candidate semiconductors of interest as absorber layers in solar cells. In the confinement regime (approximately 1-10 nm) of these 1-D nanostructures, the electronic energy levels are quantized so that the oscillator strength and the resultant absorption of solar energy are enhanced. Moreover, the discrete energy levels effectively separate the electrons and holes at the two electrodes or at the interfaces with a polymer in a hybrid structure, so that an oriented and 1-D nanostructured absorber layer is expected to improve the conversion efficiency of solar cells. The intrinsic anisotropy of Il-VI and l-lll-VI2 crystal lattices and the progress in various growth processes are assessed to derive suitable morphological features of these 1-D semiconductor nanostructures. The present status of research in nanorod-based solar cells is reviewed and possible routes are identified to improve the performance of nanorod-based solar cells. Finally, the characteristics of nanorod-based solar cells are compared with the dye-sensitized and organic solar cells.

  1. Synthesis of hybrid organic-inorganic nanocomposite materials based on CdS nanocrystals for energy conversion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laera, A. M.; Resta, V.; Ferrara, M. C.; Schioppa, M.; Piscopiello, E.; Tapfer, L.

    2011-11-01

    Efficient solar energy conversion is strongly related to the development of new materials with enhanced functional properties. In this context, a wide variety of inorganic, organic, or hybrid nanostructured materials have been investigated. In particular, in hybrid organic-inorganic nanocomposites are combined the convenient properties of organic polymers, such as easy manipulation and mechanical flexibility, and the unique size-dependent properties of nanocrystals (NCs). However, applications of hybrid nanocomposites in photovoltaic devices require a homogeneous and highly dense dispersion of NCs in polymer in order to guarantee not only an efficient charge separation, but also an efficient transport of the carriers to the electrodes without recombination. In previous works, we demonstrated that cadmium thiolate complexes are suitable precursors for the in situ synthesis of nanocrystalline CdS. Here, we show that the soluble [Cd(SBz)2]2·(1-methyl imidazole) complex can be efficiently annealed in a conjugated polymer obtaining a nanocomposite with a regular and compact network of NCs. The proposed synthetic strategies require annealing temperatures well below 200 °C and short time for the thermal treatment, i.e., less than 30 min. We also show that the same complex can be used to synthesize CdS NCs in mesoporous TiO2. The adsorption of cadmium thiolate molecule in TiO2 matrix can be obtained by using chemical bath deposition technique and subsequent thermal annealing. The use of NCs, quantum dots, as sensitizers of TiO2 matrices represents a very promising alternative to common dye-sensitized solar cells and an interesting solution for heterogeneous photocatalysis.

  2. Luminescence properties of Eu3+/CDs/PVA composite applied in light conversion film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiangling; He, Youling; Zhuang, Jianle; Zhang, Haoran; Lei, Bingfu; Liu, Yingliang

    2016-12-01

    In this work, blue-light-emitting carbon dots (CDs) were composited with red-light-emitting europium ions (Eu3+) solutions under the synergistic reaction of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to prepare the light conversion film. The formation mechanism of Eu3+/CDs/PVA film was detailedly discussed. It is the first report that this composite was synthesized through direct recombination of CDs and Eu3+ solutions instead of traditional methods based on Eu3+ coordination compound. Furthermore, tunable photoluminescence property can be successfully achieved by controlling the ratio of CDs to doped Eu3+, this property can meet the variable light component requirements for different species of plants.

  3. Growth and characterization of CdS buffer layers by CBD and MOCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Morrone, A.A.; Huang, C.; Li, S.S.

    1999-03-01

    Thin film CdS has been widely used in thin-film photovoltaic devices. The most efficient Cu(In,&hthinsp;Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells reported to date utilized a thin CdS buffer layer prepared by a reactive solution growth technique known as chemical bath deposition (CBD). Considerable effort has been directed to better understand the role and find a replacement for the CBD CdS process in CIGS-based solar cells. We reported a low temperature ({approximately}150&hthinsp;{degree}C) Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) CdS thin film buffer layer process for CIGS absorbers. Many prior studies have reported that CBD CdS contains a mixture of crystal structures. Recent investigations of CBD CdS thin films by ellipsometry suggested a multilayer structure. In this study we compare CdS thin films prepared by CBD and MOCVD and the effects of annealing. TED and XRD are used to characterize the crystal structure, the film microstructure is studied by HRTEM, and the optical properties are studied by Raman and spectrophotometry. All of these characterization techniques reveal superior crystalline film quality for CdS films grown by MOCVD compared to those grown by CBD. Dual Beam Optical Modulation (DBOM) studies showed that the MOCVD and CBD CdS buffer layer processes have nearly the same effect on CIGS absorbers when combined with a cadmium partial electrolyte aqueous dip. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Non-cooperative Brownian donkeys: A solvable 1D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez de Cisneros, B.; Reimann, P.; Parrondo, J. M. R.

    2003-12-01

    A paradigmatic 1D model for Brownian motion in a spatially symmetric, periodic system is tackled analytically. Upon application of an external static force F the system's response is an average current which is positive for F < 0 and negative for F > 0 (absolute negative mobility). Under suitable conditions, the system approaches 100% efficiency when working against the external force F.

  5. Assembling carbon fiber–graphene–carbon fiber hetero-structures into 1D–2D–1D junction fillers and patterned structures for improved microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huimin; Liu, Lin; Li, Hai-Bing; Song, Wei-Li; Bian, Xing-Ming; Zhao, Quan-Liang; Chen, Mingji; Yuan, Xujin; Chen, Haosen; Fang, Daining

    2017-04-01

    Since carbon-based structures of various dimensions, including one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes, two-dimensional (2D) graphene and three-dimensional (3D) carbon foams, have attracted significant attention as microwave absorption fillers, we present an exceptional hetero-junction filler with a 1D–2D–1D feature, achieved by manipulating 2D graphene into 1D carbon fibers in the fiber-extruding process under the electric field. The as-fabricated 1D–2D–1D structural fillers exhibited much-improved dielectric properties and promoted microwave absorption performance in their composites, which is linked to the establishment of enhanced polarization capability, the generation of increased electric loss pathway and the creation of more favorable electromagnetic energy consumption conditions. The results suggest that employing 2D graphene in the 1D–2D–1D nanostructures played the critical role in tuning the electromagnetic response ability, because of its intrinsic electric advantages and dimensional features. To broaden the effective absorption bandwidth, periodic pattern-absorbing structures were designed, which showed combined absorption advantages for various thicknesses. Our strategy for fabricating 1D–2D–1D structural fillers illuminates a universal approach for manipulating dimensions and structures in the nanotechnology.

  6. Multi-particle assembled porous nanostructured MgO: its application in fluoride removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangaiah, Vijayakumar; Siddaramanna, Ashoka; Thimanna Chandrappa, Gujjarahalli

    2014-12-01

    In this article, a simple and economical route based on ethylene glycol mediated process was developed to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) multiparticle assembled nanostructured MgO using magnesium acetate and urea as reactants. Porous multiparticle chain-like MgO has been synthesized by the calcination of a solvothermally derived single nanostructured precursor. The prepared products were characterized by an x-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, thermogravimetry, scanning/transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) and N2 adsorption (BET). As a proof of concept, the porous multiparticle chain-like MgO has been applied in a water treatment for isolated and rural communities, and it has exhibited an excellent adsorption capability to remove fluoride in waste water. In addition, this method could be generalized to prepare other 1D nanostructures with great potential for various attractive applications.

  7. Analytical predictions of the temperature profile within semiconductor nanostructures for solid-state laser refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bennett E.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Davis, E. James; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2016-03-01

    The laser refrigeration of solid-state materials with nanoscale dimensions has been demonstrated for both semi- conducting (cadmium sulfide, CdS) and insulating dielectrics (Yb:YLiF4, YLF) in recent years. During laser refrigeration it is possible to observe morphology dependent resonances (MDRs), analogous to what is well- known in classical (Mie) light scattering theory, when the characteristic dimensions of the nanostructure are comparable to the wavelength of light used to initiate the laser cooling process. Mie resonances can create substantial increases for internal optical fields within a given nanostructure with the potential to enhance the absorption efficiency at the beginning of the cooling cycle. Recent breakthroughs in the laser refrigeration of semiconductor nanostructures have relied on materials that exhibit rectangular symmetry (nanoribbons). Here, we will present recent analytical, closed-form solutions to the energy partial differential equation that can be used to calculate the internal spatial temperature profile with a given semiconductor nanoribbon during irradiation by a continuous-wave laser. First, the energy equation is made dimensionless through the substitution of variables before being solved using the classical separation-of-variables approach. In particular, calculations will be presented for chalcogenide (CdS) nanoribbons using a pump wavelength of 1064 nm. For nanostructures with lower symmetry (such as YLF truncated tetragonal bipyramids) it is also possible to observe MDRs through numerical simulations using either the discrete dipole approximation or finite-difference time-domain simulations, and the resulting temperature profile can be calculated using the finite element method. Theoretical predictions are presented using parameters that will allow comparison with experimental data in the near future.

  8. Plasmonic Excitations of 1D Metal-Dielectric Interfaces in 2D Systems: 1D Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Daniel R.; Menabde, Sergey G.; Yu, Sunkyu; Park, Namkyoo

    2014-04-01

    Surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) excitations of metal-dielectric interfaces are a fundamental light-matter interaction which has attracted interest as a route to spatial confinement of light far beyond that offered by conventional dielectric optical devices. Conventionally, SPPs have been studied in noble-metal structures, where the SPPs are intrinsically bound to a 2D metal-dielectric interface. Meanwhile, recent advances in the growth of hybrid 2D crystals, which comprise laterally connected domains of distinct atomically thin materials, provide the first realistic platform on which a 2D metal-dielectric system with a truly 1D metal-dielectric interface can be achieved. Here we show for the first time that 1D metal-dielectric interfaces support a fundamental 1D plasmonic mode (1DSPP) which exhibits cutoff behavior that provides dramatically improved light confinement in 2D systems. The 1DSPP constitutes a new basic category of plasmon as the missing 1D member of the plasmon family: 3D bulk plasmon, 2DSPP, 1DSPP, and 0D localized SP.

  9. Fabrication, characterization and applications of PZT and ITO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shiyou

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PbZr1--xTixO 3, PZT) is one of the most important piezoelectric materials, which has been used traditionally as sensors and actuators. One dimensional (1-D) PZT is expected to have great potentials as building blocks for micro and nano sensors and actuators, nano active fiber composites and integrated nanosystems. The objective of this research is to investigate the size effect on mechanical and piezoelectric properties through the fabrication and characterization of 1-D PZT nanostructures such as PZT nanofibers and nanotubes. The electrospinning process and template-assisted method were used to synthesize PZT nanofibers and nanotubes, respectively. Various novel experimental methods, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanomanipulator, were used to characterize the mechanical and piezoelectric properties of PZT nanostructures. The obtained results have shown that the piezoelectric and mechanical properties of PZT are size dependent. A single PZT nanofiber presented a lower young's modulus (42.99 GPa measured from AFM-base method and 46.6 GPa from vibration-based method, respectively) than that of PZT thin films and bulks. The PZT nanofibers with diameters smaller than 150 nm still demonstrated a strong electromechanical coupling effect. The piezoelectric constant (d 33) of PZT nanofibers increased from 574.1 pm/V to 860.5 pm/V when their diameters decreased from 112 nm to 50 nm. PZT nanotubes were found to have a d33 value of up to 595 pm/V. These values are significantly higher than that of PZT thin films and comparable to that of PZT bulks. The PZT nanofibers and nanotubes developed in this research not only provide new types of sensing and actuation mechanisms for various novel nanodevices, but also provide significantly improved performance compared with their thin film counterpart used in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). 1-D ITO nanostructures (nanofibers and nanotubes) were synthesized and characterized for potential use

  10. Surface photovoltage in exciton absorption range in CdS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morawski, A.; Banisch, R.; Lagowski, J.

    1977-01-01

    The high resolution, intrinsic spectra of surface photovoltage are reported for semiconducting n-type CdS single crystals. At reduced temperatures (120-160 K) the spectra exhibit three sharp maxima due to A, B and C free exciton transitions. Energy positions of these lines and valence band parameters (spin-orbit and crystal field splittings) estimated from surface photovoltage are in good agreement with values obtained by other methods. The excitonic transitions are very sensitive to surface treatment, i.e. polishing, etching, background illumination and surface doping. The mechanism of direct interaction of free excitons with surface states is proposed to explain exciton lines in surface photovoltage.

  11. Laser cooling of CdS nanobelts: thickness matters.

    PubMed

    Li, Dehui; Zhang, Jun; Xiong, Qihua

    2013-08-12

    We report on the thickness dependent laser cooling in CdS nanobelts pumped by a 532 nm green laser. The lowest achievable cooling temperature is found to strongly depend on thickness. No net cooling can be achieved in nanobelts with a thickness below 65 nm due to nearly zero absorption and larger surface nonradiative recombination. While for nanobelts thicker than ~120 nm, the reabsorption effect leads to the reduction of the cooling temperature. Based on the thickness dependent photoconductivity gain, mean emission energy and external quantum efficiency, the modeling of the normalized temperature change suggests a good agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Weakly-coupled quasi-1D helical modes in disordered 3D topological insulator quantum wires

    PubMed Central

    Dufouleur, J.; Veyrat, L.; Dassonneville, B.; Xypakis, E.; Bardarson, J. H.; Nowka, C.; Hampel, S.; Schumann, J.; Eichler, B.; Schmidt, O. G.; Büchner, B.; Giraud, R.

    2017-01-01

    Disorder remains a key limitation in the search for robust signatures of topological superconductivity in condensed matter. Whereas clean semiconducting quantum wires gave promising results discussed in terms of Majorana bound states, disorder makes the interpretation more complex. Quantum wires of 3D topological insulators offer a serious alternative due to their perfectly-transmitted mode. An important aspect to consider is the mixing of quasi-1D surface modes due to the strong degree of disorder typical for such materials. Here, we reveal that the energy broadening γ of such modes is much smaller than their energy spacing Δ, an unusual result for highly-disordered mesoscopic nanostructures. This is evidenced by non-universal conductance fluctuations in highly-doped and disordered Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3 nanowires. Theory shows that such a unique behavior is specific to spin-helical Dirac fermions with strong quantum confinement, which retain ballistic properties over an unusually large energy scale due to their spin texture. Our result confirms their potential to investigate topological superconductivity without ambiguity despite strong disorder. PMID:28374744

  13. Photochemical and photocatalytic evaluation of 1D titanate/TiO2 based nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, D. S.; Ferreira, D. P.; Graça, C. A. L.; Júlio, M. F.; Ilharco, L. M.; Velosa, A. C.; Santos, P. F.; Vieira Ferreira, L. F.

    2017-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) titanate based nanomaterials were synthesized following an alkaline hydrothermal approach of commercial TiO2 nanopowder. The morphological features of all materials were monitored by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and also Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) technique. In addition the photochemical behaviour of these nanostructured materials were evaluated with the use of laser induced luminescence (LIL), ground-state diffuse reflectance (GSDR), and laser-flash photolysis in diffuse reflectance mode (DRLFP). The mixed titanate/TiO2 nanowires presented the least intense fluorescence spectra, suggesting the presence of surficial defects that can extend the lifetime of the excited charge carriers. A fluorescent 'rhodamine-like' dye was adsorbed onto different materials and examined via photoexcitation in the visible range to study the self-photosensitization mechanism. The presence of the radical cation of the dye and the degradation kinetics, when compared with a neutral substrate-cellulose, provided significant evidences regarding the photoactivity of the different materials. Regarding all the materials under study, the nanowires exhibited a strong photocatalytic efficiency, for the adsorbed fluorescent probe. The photocatalytic mechanism was also considered by studying the photodegradation capability of the titanate based materials in the presence of an herbicide, Amicarbazone, after ultraviolet (UVA) photoexcitation.

  14. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was <1% of that from flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It

  15. Recent progress in design, synthesis, and applications of one-dimensional TiO2 nanostructured surface heterostructures: a review.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Kumar, Anil; Boughton, Robert I; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    One-dimensional TiO2 nanostructured surface heterostructures (1D TiO2NSHs) have been comprehensively studied during the past two decades because of the possible practical applications in various fields, including photocatalysis, dye-sensitized solar cells, sensors, lithium batteries, biomedicine, catalysis, and supercapacitors. Combining extensive advancements in materials science and nanotechnology, a 1D TiO2NSH material with well-controlled size, morphology, and composition has been designed and synthesized. More importantly, its superior properties, including a high aspect ratio structure, chemical stability, large specific surface area, excellent electronic or ionic charge transfer, and a specific interface effect, have attracted a great deal of interest in improving current performance and exploring new applications. In this tutorial review, we introduce the characteristics of 1D TiO2 nanostructures, the design principles for the fabrication of 1D TiO2NSHs, and we also summarize the recent progress in developing synthesis methods and applications of 1D TiO2NSHs in different fields. The relationship between the secondary phase and the 1D TiO2 nanostructure and between the performance in applications and the excellent physical properties of 1D TiO2NSHs are also discussed.

  16. Engineering DNA self-assemblies as templates for functional nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Gang; Ding, Baoquan

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA is a well-known natural molecule that carries genetic information. In recent decades, DNA has been used beyond its genetic role as a building block for the construction of engineering materials. Many strategies, such as tile assembly, scaffolded origami and DNA bricks, have been developed to design and produce 1D, 2D, and 3D architectures with sophisticated morphologies. Moreover, the spatial addressability of DNA nanostructures and sequence-dependent recognition enable functional elements to be precisely positioned and allow for the control of chemical and biochemical processes. The spatial arrangement of heterogeneous components using DNA nanostructures as the templates will aid in the fabrication of functional materials that are difficult to produce using other methods and can address scientific and technical challenges in interdisciplinary research. For example, plasmonic nanoparticles can be assembled into well-defined configurations with high resolution limit while exhibiting desirable collective behaviors, such as near-field enhancement. Conducting metallic or polymer patterns can be synthesized site-specifically on DNA nanostructures to form various controllable geometries, which could be used for electronic nanodevices. Biomolecules can be arranged into organized networks to perform programmable biological functionalities, such as distance-dependent enzyme-cascade activities. DNA nanostructures can carry multiple cytoactive molecules and cell-targeting groups simultaneously to address medical issues such as targeted therapy and combined administration. In this Account, we describe recent advances in the functionalization of DNA nanostructures in different fashions based on our research efforts in nanophotonics, nanoelectronics, and nanomedicine. We show that DNA origami nanostructures can guide the assembly of achiral, spherical, metallic nanoparticles into nature-mimicking chiral geometries through hybridization between complementary DNA

  17. Self-Assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles: From Molecules to Nanostructures to Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Honggang; Webber, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Peptide amphiphiles are a class of molecules that combine the structural features of amphiphilic surfactants with the functions of bioactive peptides and are known to assemble into a variety of nanostructures. A specific type of peptide amphiphiles are known to self-assemble into one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures under physiological conditions, predominantly nanofibers with a cylindrical geometry. The resultant nanostructures could be highly bioactive and are of great interest in many biomedical applications, including tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and drug delivery. In this context, we highlight our strategies for using molecular self-assembly as a toolbox to produce peptide amphiphile nanostructures and materials and efforts to translate this technology into applications as therapeutics. We also review our recent progress in using these materials for treating spinal cord injury, inducing angiogenesis, and for hard tissue regeneration and replacement. PMID:20091874

  18. Morphodynamics and sediment tracers in 1-D (MAST-1D): 1-D sediment transport that includes exchange with an off-channel sediment reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, J. Wesley; Viparelli, Enrica; Piégay, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    Bed material transported in geomorphically active gravel bed rivers often has a local source at nearby eroding banks and ends up sequestered in bars not far downstream. However, most 1-D numerical models for gravel transport assume that gravel originates from and deposits on the channel bed. In this paper, we present a 1-D framework for simulating morphodynamic evolution of bed elevation and size distribution in a gravel-bed river that actively exchanges sediment with its floodplain, which is represented as an off-channel sediment reservoir. The model is based on the idea that sediment enters the channel at eroding banks whose elevation depends on total floodplain sediment storage and on the average elevation of the floodplain relative to the channel bed. Lateral erosion of these banks occurs at a specified rate that can represent either net channel migration or channel widening. Transfer of material out of the channel depends on a typical bar thickness and a specified lateral exchange rate due either to net channel migration or narrowing. The model is implemented using an object oriented framework that allows users to explore relationships between bank supply, bed structure, and lateral change rates. It is applied to a ∼50-km reach of the Ain River, France, that experienced significant reduction in sediment supply due to dam construction during the 20th century. Results are strongly sensitive to lateral exchange rates, showing that in this reach, the supply of sand and gravel at eroding banks and the sequestration of gravel in point bars can have strong influence on overall reach-scale sediment budgets.

  19. 1D Josephson quantum interference grids: diffraction patterns and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, M.; Badoni, D.; Corato, V.; Merlo, V.; Ottaviani, I.; Salina, G.; Cirillo, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Winkler, D.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the magnetic response of transmission lines with embedded Josephson junctions and thus generating a 1D underdamped array. The measured multi-junction interference patterns are compared with the theoretical predictions for Josephson supercurrent modulations when an external magnetic field couples both to the inter-junction loops and to the junctions themselves. The results provide a striking example of the analogy between Josephson phase modulation and 1D optical diffraction grid. The Fiske resonances in the current-voltage characteristics with voltage spacing {Φ0}≤ft(\\frac{{\\bar{c}}}{2L}\\right) , where L is the total physical length of the array, {Φ0} the magnetic flux quantum and \\bar{c} the speed of light in the transmission line, demonstrate that the discrete line supports stable dynamic patterns generated by the ac Josephson effect interacting with the cavity modes of the line.

  20. 1-D Numerical Analysis of ABCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Richard

    1999-01-01

    ABCC engine combines air breathing and rocket engine into a single engine to increase the specific impulse over an entire flight trajectory. Except for the heat source, the basic operation of the ABCC is similar to the basic operation of the RBCC engine. The ABCC is intended to have a higher specific impulse than the RBCC for single stage Earth to orbit vehicle. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a useful tool for the analysis of complex transport processes in various components in ABCC propulsion system. The objective of the present research was to develop a transient 1-D numerical model using conservation of mass, linear momentum, and energy equations that could be used to predict flow behavior throughout a generic ABCC engine following a flight path. At specific points during the development of the 1-D numerical model a myriad of tests were performed to prove the program produced consistent, realistic numbers that follow compressible flow theory for various inlet conditions.

  1. Quantum Information Processing Using Local Control of Exchange in 1D Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Spatially resolved electroluminescence and photocurrent measurements from single- CdSe - nanowire optoelectronic devices,” in preparation (2006) L...Ouyang, J. McCarty, and H. Park, “Synthesis of CdSe /CdS nanowire heterostructures via metal-catalyzed liquid-solid growth,” in preparation (2006) W...nanocrystals and CdSe /CdS nanowire heterostructures. In the first study, we have fabri- cated and characterized light-emitting transistors incorporating

  2. Ultrahigh-Q nanocavity with 1D photonic gap.

    PubMed

    Notomi, M; Kuramochi, E; Taniyama, H

    2008-07-21

    Recently, various wavelength-sized cavities with theoretical Q values of approximately 10(8) have been reported, however, they all employ 2D or 3D photonic band gaps to realize strong light confinement. Here we numerically demonstrate that ultrahigh-Q (2.0x10(8)) and wavelength-sized (V(eff) approximately 1.4(lambda/n)3) cavities can be achieved by employing only 1D periodicity.

  3. Nonreciprocity of edge modes in 1D magnonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenkov, I.; Kalyabin, D.; Osokin, S.; Klos, J. W.; Krawczyk, M.; Nikitov, S.

    2015-03-01

    Spin waves propagation in 1D magnonic crystals is investigated theoretically. Mathematical model based on plane wave expansion method is applied to different types of magnonic crystals, namely bi-component magnonic crystal with symmetric/asymmetric boundaries and ferromagnetic film with periodically corrugated top surface. It is shown that edge modes in magnonic crystals may exhibit nonreciprocal behaviour at much lower frequencies than in homogeneous films.

  4. Optical dimensional metrology at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) on deep sub-wavelength nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodermann, B.; Ehret, G.; Endres, J.; Wurm, M.

    2016-06-01

    The dark-field microscopy method with alternating grazing incidence UV illumination (UV-AGID) developed at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt offers the possibility of measuring individual isolated line structures with linewidths down to the sub-wavelength regime. In contrast, scatterometry is able and already widely used to measure average dimensional parameters of periodic structures down to the deep sub-wavelength regime. Both methods can be used for dimensional measurements of micro- and nanostructures, in particular the critical dimensions (CDs) on wafers or photomasks in the semiconductor industry, complementing each other favourably. Based on numerical simulations, we have investigated the ultimate limits of these two methods in the deep sub-wavelength regime. It has been shown that AGID microscopy in the DUV spectral range is in principle capable of measuring line structures with CDs down to a few 10 nm, depending on the structure material. For scatterometry, no fundamental limit has been observed. In practice, a technical limit due to the limited signal-to-noise ratio is expected for CDs of a few nm in width.

  5. Double-sided CdS and CdSe quantum dot co-sensitized ZnO nanowire arrays for photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gongming; Yang, Xunyu; Qian, Fang; Zhang, Jin Z; Li, Yat

    2010-03-10

    We report the design and characterization of a novel double-sided CdS and CdSe quantum dot cosensitized ZnO nanowire arrayed photoanode for photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen generation. The double-sided design represents a simple analogue of tandem cell structure, in which the dense ZnO nanowire arrays were grown on an indium-tin oxide substrate followed by respective sensitization of CdS and CdSe quantum dots on each side. As-fabricated photoanode exhibited strong absorption in nearly the entire visible spectrum up to 650 nm, with a high incident-photon-to-current-conversion efficiency (IPCE) of approximately 45% at 0 V vs Ag/AgCl. On the basis on a single white light illumination of 100 mW/cm(2), the photoanode yielded a significant photocurrent density of approximately 12 mA/cm(2) at 0.4 V vs Ag/AgCl. The photocurrent and IPCE were enhanced compared to single quantum dot sensitized structures as a result of the band alignment of CdS and CdSe in electrolyte. Moreover, in comparison to single-sided cosensitized layered structures, this double-sided architecture that enables direct interaction between quantum dot and nanowire showed improved charge collection efficiency. Our result represents the first double-sided nanowire photoanode that integrates uniquely two semiconductor quantum dots of distinct band gaps for PEC hydrogen generation and can be possibly applied to other applications such as nanostructured tandem photovoltaic cells.

  6. The stability of 1-D soliton in transverse direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Deepa; Bera, Ratan Kumar; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman

    2016-12-01

    The complete characterization of the exact 1-D solitary wave solutions (both stationary and propagating) for light plasma coupled system have been studied extensively in the parameter space of light frequency and the group speed [Poornakala et al., Phys. Plasmas 9(5), 1820 (2002)]. It has been shown in 1-D that solutions with single light wave peak and paired structures are stable and hence long lived. However, solutions having multiple peaks of light wave are unstable due to Raman scattering instability [Saxena et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 072307 (2007)]. Here, we have shown with the help of 2-D fluid simulation that single peak and paired solutions too get destabilized by the transverse filamentation instability. The numerical growth rates obtained from simulations is seen to compare well with the analytical values. It is also shown that multiple peaks solitons first undergo the regular 1-D forward Raman scattering instability. Subsequently, they undergo a distinct second phase of destabilization through transverse filamentation instability. This is evident from the structure as well as the plot of the perturbed energy which shows a second phase of growth after saturating initially. The growth rate of the filamentation instability being comparatively slower than the forward Raman instability this phase comes quite late and is clearly distinguishable.

  7. Examining Prebiotic Chemistry Using O(^1D) Insertion Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Brian M.; Laas, Jacob C.; Weaver, Susanna L. Widicus

    2013-06-01

    Aminomethanol, methanediol, and methoxymethanol are all prebiotic molecules expected to form via photo-driven grain surface chemistry in the interstellar medium (ISM). These molecules are expected to be precursors for larger, biologically-relevant molecules in the ISM such as sugars and amino acids. These three molecules have not yet been detected in the ISM because of the lack of available rotational spectra. A high resolution (sub)millimeter spectrometer coupled to a molecular source is being used to study these molecules using O(^1D) insertion reactions. The O(^1D) chemistry is initiated using an excimer laser, and the products of the insertion reactions are adiabatically cooled using a supersonic expansion. Experimental parameters are being optimized by examination of methanol formed from O(^1D) insertion into methane. Theoretical studies of the structure and reaction energies for aminomethanol, methanediol, and methoxymethanol have been conducted to guide the laboratory studies once the methanol experiment has been optimized. The results of the calculations and initial experimental results will be presented.

  8. Development of 1D Liner Compression Code for IDL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, Akihisa; Slough, John; Pancotti, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    A 1D liner compression code is developed to model liner implosion dynamics in the Inductively Driven Liner Experiment (IDL) where FRC plasmoid is compressed via inductively-driven metal liners. The driver circuit, magnetic field, joule heating, and liner dynamics calculations are performed at each time step in sequence to couple these effects in the code. To obtain more realistic magnetic field results for a given drive coil geometry, 2D and 3D effects are incorporated into the 1D field calculation through use of correction factor table lookup approach. Commercial low-frequency electromagnetic fields solver, ANSYS Maxwell 3D, is used to solve the magnetic field profile for static liner condition at various liner radius in order to derive correction factors for the 1D field calculation in the code. The liner dynamics results from the code is verified to be in good agreement with the results from commercial explicit dynamics solver, ANSYS Explicit Dynamics, and previous liner experiment. The developed code is used to optimize the capacitor bank and driver coil design for better energy transfer and coupling. FRC gain calculations are also performed using the liner compression data from the code for the conceptual design of the reactor sized system for fusion energy gains.

  9. Low-dimensional hyperthin FeS2 nanostructures for efficient and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jasion, Daniel; Qiao, Qiao; Barforoush, Joseph M.; Zhu, Yimei; Ren, Shenqiang; Leonard, Kevin C.

    2015-11-01

    We report a scalable, solution-processing method for synthesizing low-dimensional hyperthin FeS2 nanostructures, and we show that 2D FeS2 disc nanostructures are an efficient and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst. By changing the Fe:S ratio in the precursor solution, we were able to preferentially synthesize either 1D wire or 2D disc nanostructures. The 2D FeS2 disc structure has the highest electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction, comparable to platinum in neutral pH conditions. Moreover, the ability of the FeS2 nanostructures to generate hydrogen was confirmed by scanning electrochemical microscopy, and the 2D disc nanostructures were able to generate hydrogen for over 125 h.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of integrated nanostructures & their applications to nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Shobha

    Current developments in optical devices are being directed toward nanocrystals based devices, where photons are manipulated using nanoscale optical phenomenon. Nanochemistry is a powerful tool for making nanostructures based on such nanocrystals. In this dissertation, various applications such as photodetectors/photovoltaics, photonic crystals and plasmonic applications involving nanoparticles and organic: inorganic hybrid systems have been investigated. The hall marks of quantum dots are well defined excitonic absorption and sharp emission profiles and their unique behavior comprises intense and immune to photobleaching luminescence, photon upconversion, slow exciton relaxation, multiexciton generation due to impact ionization, enhanced lasing, etc. Various quantum dots such as Indium Phosphide (InP), Cadmium Sulphide (CdS), Cadmium Selenide (CdSe), InP-CdS type-II core-shell, Lead Sulphide (PbS), Lead Selenide (PbSe) etc. have been prepared via hot colloidal synthesis and have been extensively characterized spectroscopically as well as structurally. These quantum dots were utilized for making solution processed organic: inorganic hybrid photodevices. Photodetecting device with enhanced efficiency has been fabricated using physical blend of PbSe and carbon nanotubes. Type-II quantum dots (InP-CdS) were also utilized for making solar cells and their efficiency was found to be much more than their parent quantum dots (InP and CdS). Photonic composite materials, such as polymers doped with nanoparticles, have attracted a great deal of attention because of relative ease and flexibility of their engineering as well as improved performance for applications in photonic or optoelectronic devices. 2D Photonic Crystals of enhanced structural and optical properties were fabricated by doping small amount of colloidal gold nanoparticles and patterned via multi-beam interference lithography. Spontaneous emission of quantum rods doped in such photonic crystal was controlled by

  11. Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that deals with the nanostructured superhydrophobic (SH) powders developed at ORNL. This project seeks to (1) improve powder quality; (2) identify binders for plastics, fiberglass, metal (steel being the first priority), wood, and other products such as rubber and shingles; (3) test the coated product for coating quality and durability under operating conditions; and (4) application testing and production of powders in quantity.

  12. Planar plasmonic chiral nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Shuai; Bao, Yanjun; Fang, Zheyu

    2016-02-01

    A strong chiral optical response induced at a plasmonic Fano resonance in a planar Au heptamer nanostructure was experimentally and theoretically demonstrated. The scattering spectra show the characteristic narrow-band feature of Fano resonances for both left and right circular polarized lights, with a chiral response reaching 30% at the Fano resonance. Specifically, we systematically investigate the chiral response of planar heptamers with gradually changing the inter-particle rotation angles and separation distance. The chiral spectral characteristics clearly depend on the strength of Fano resonances and the associated near-field optical distributions. Finite element method simulations together with a multipole expansion method demonstrate that the enhanced chirality is caused by the excitation of magnetic quadrupolar and electric toroidal dipolar modes. Our work provides an effective method for the design of 2D nanostructures with a strong chiral response.A strong chiral optical response induced at a plasmonic Fano resonance in a planar Au heptamer nanostructure was experimentally and theoretically demonstrated. The scattering spectra show the characteristic narrow-band feature of Fano resonances for both left and right circular polarized lights, with a chiral response reaching 30% at the Fano resonance. Specifically, we systematically investigate the chiral response of planar heptamers with gradually changing the inter-particle rotation angles and separation distance. The chiral spectral characteristics clearly depend on the strength of Fano resonances and the associated near-field optical distributions. Finite element method simulations together with a multipole expansion method demonstrate that the enhanced chirality is caused by the excitation of magnetic quadrupolar and electric toroidal dipolar modes. Our work provides an effective method for the design of 2D nanostructures with a strong chiral response. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  13. Temperature Evolution of Quasi-one-dimensional C60 Nanostructures on Rippled Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuanhui; Zheng, Husong; Mills, Adam; Heflin, James R.; Tao, Chenggang

    2015-01-01

    We report the preparation of novel quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) C60 nanostructures on rippled graphene. Through careful control of the subtle balance between the linear periodic potential of rippled graphene and the C60 surface mobility, we demonstrate that C60 molecules can be arranged into a quasi-1D C60 chain structure with widths of two to three molecules. At a higher annealing temperature, the quasi-1D chain structure transitions to a more compact hexagonal close packed quasi-1D stripe structure. This first experimental realization of quasi-1D C60 structures on graphene may pave a way for fabricating new C60/graphene hybrid structures for future applications in electronics, spintronics and quantum information. PMID:26391054

  14. Temperature Evolution of Quasi-one-dimensional C60 Nanostructures on Rippled Graphene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanhui; Zheng, Husong; Mills, Adam; Heflin, James R; Tao, Chenggang

    2015-09-22

    We report the preparation of novel quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) C60 nanostructures on rippled graphene. Through careful control of the subtle balance between the linear periodic potential of rippled graphene and the C60 surface mobility, we demonstrate that C60 molecules can be arranged into a quasi-1D C60 chain structure with widths of two to three molecules. At a higher annealing temperature, the quasi-1D chain structure transitions to a more compact hexagonal close packed quasi-1D stripe structure. This first experimental realization of quasi-1D C60 structures on graphene may pave a way for fabricating new C60/graphene hybrid structures for future applications in electronics, spintronics and quantum information.

  15. Low-Cost Copper Nanostructures Impart High Efficiencies to Quantum Dot Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P Naresh; Deepa, Melepurath; Ghosal, Partha

    2015-06-24

    Quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) were fabricated using low-cost Cu nanostructures and a carbon fabric as a counter electrode for the first time. Cu nanoparticles (NPs) and nanoneedles (NNs) with a face-centered cubic structure were synthesized by a hydrothermal method and electrophoretically deposited over a CdS QD sensitized titania (TiO2) electrode. Compared to Cu NPs, which increase the light absorption of a TiO2/CdS photoanode via scattering effects only in the visible region, Cu NNs are more effective for efficient far-field light scattering; they enhance the light absorption of the TiO2/CdS assembly beyond the visible to near-infrared (NIR) regions as well. The highest fluorescence quenching, lowest excited electron lifetime, and a large surface potential (deduced from Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM)) observed for the TiO2/CdS/Cu NN electrode compared to TiO2/CdS and TiO2/CdS/Cu NP electrodes confirm that Cu NNs also facilitate charge transport. KPFM studies also revealed a larger shift of the apparent Fermi level to more negative potentials in the TiO2/CdS/Cu NN electrode, compared to the other two electrodes (versus NHE), which results in a higher open-circuit voltage for the Cu NN based electrode. The best performing QDSC based on the TiO2/CdS/Cu NN electrode delivers a stellar power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.36%, greater by 56.8% and 32.1% than the PCEs produced by the cells based on TiO2/CdS and TiO2/CdS/Cu NPs, respectively. A maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 58% obtained for the cell with the TiO2/CdS/Cu NN electrode and a finite EQE in the NIR region which the other two cells do not deliver are clear indicators of the enormous promise this cheap, earth-abundant Cu nanostructure holds for amplifying the solar cell response in both the visible and near-infrared regions through scattering enhancements.

  16. Preparation of CdS Nanoparticles by First-Year Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkelmann, Kurt; Noviello, Thomas; Brooks, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The first year undergraduates use a simple method to synthesize 5-nm CdS nanoparticles in a water-in-oil microemulsion. The quantum size effect, the relationship between colors, optical absorbance, band-gap energy and the CdS particles affected by the formation of micelles are observed.

  17. Mechanistic aspects of biogenic synthesis of CdS nanoparticles using Bacillus licheniformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R. M.; Singh Bhadwal, Akhshay; Singh, Priti; Shrivastav, Archana; Singh, M. P.; Shrivastav, B. R.

    2014-06-01

    A novel eco-friendly effort has been made for the synthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles using bacterial biomass. Although some articles have been reported on CdS nanoparticles synthesis by bacteria, here we have synthesized CdS nanoparticles using non-pathogenic bacteria Bacillus licheniformis MTCC 9555. UV-Vis spectroscopy was carried out to confirm the formation of CdS nanoparticles; the peak occurring at 368 nm gives the indication of synthesis of CdS nanoparticles. The size and morphology of the synthesized CdS nanoparticles were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the nanoparticles are found to have a narrow size of 5.1 ± 0.5 nm with spherical morphology. Further, the nanoparticles were examined by energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy to identify the presence of elements and confirmed the existence of Cd and S in single nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis exhibited 2θ values corresponding to CdS nanocrystals. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) provides the evidence for the presence of proteins as possible biomolecules responsible for the stabilization of the synthesized CdS nanoparticles.

  18. The Ever-Present Demand for Public Computing Resources. CDS Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Core Data Service (CDS) Spotlight focuses on public computing resources, including lab/cluster workstations in buildings, virtual lab/cluster workstations, kiosks, laptop and tablet checkout programs, and workstation access in unscheduled classrooms. The findings are derived from 758 CDS 2012 participating institutions. A dataset of 529…

  19. BI Reporting, Data Warehouse Systems, and Beyond. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service [CDS] to better understand how higher education institutions approach business intelligence (BI) reporting and data warehouse systems (see the Sidebar for definitions). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of CDS, which contains several questions regarding…

  20. The Financial Management System: A Pivotal Tool for Fiscal Viability. CDS Spotlight. ECAR Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 CDS to better understand how higher education institutions approach financial management systems. Information provided for this spotlight was derived from Module 8 of Core Data Service (CDS), which asked several questions regarding information systems and applications. Responses from 525 institutions…

  1. Effect of photoanode surface coverage by a sensitizer on the photovoltaic performance of titania based CdS quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra M B; Pathan, Habib M

    2016-04-08

    In spite of the promising design and architecture, quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) have a long way to go before they attain the actual projected photoconversion efficiencies. Such an inferior performance displayed by QDSSCs is primarily because of many unwanted recombination losses of charge carriers at various interfaces of the cell. Electron recombination due to back electron transfer at the photoanode/electrolyte interface is an important one that needs to be addressed, to improve the efficiency of these third generation nanostructured solar cells. The present work highlights the importance of conformal coverage of CdS quantum dots (QDs) on the surface of the nanocrystalline titania photoanode in arresting such recombinations, leading to improvement in the performance of the cells. Using the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) process, photoanodes are subjected to different amounts of CdS QD sensitization by varying the number of cycles of deposition. The sensitized electrodes are characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and transmission electron microscopy to evaluate the extent of surface coverage of titania electrodes by QDs. Sandwich solar cells are then fabricated using these electrodes and characterized employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and J-V characteristics. It is observed that maximum solar cell efficiency is obtained for photoanodes with conformal coating of QDs and any further deposition of sensitizer leads to QD aggregation and so reduces the performance of the solar cells.

  2. Alternative nanostructures for thermophones.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Ali E; Mayo, Nathanael K; Jung de Andrade, Monica; Robles, Raquel O; Fang, Shaoli; Baughman, Ray H; Zhang, Mei; Chen, Yongsheng; Lee, Jae Ah; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-05-26

    Thermophones are highly promising for applications such as high-power SONAR arrays, flexible loudspeakers, and noise cancellation devices. So far, freestanding carbon nanotube aerogel sheets provide the most attractive performance as a thermoacoustic heat source. However, the limited accessibility of large-size freestanding carbon nanotube aerogel sheets and other even more exotic materials recently investigated hampers the field. We describe alternative materials for a thermoacoustic heat source with high-energy conversion efficiency, additional functionalities, environmentally friendly, and cost-effective production technologies. We discuss the thermoacoustic performance of alternative nanostructured materials and compare their spectral and power dependencies of sound pressure in air. We demonstrate that the heat capacity of aerogel-like nanostructures can be extracted by a thorough analysis of the sound pressure spectra. The study presented here focuses on engineering thermal gradients in the vicinity of nanostructures and subsequent heat dissipation processes from the interior of encapsulated thermoacoustic projectors. Applications of thermoacoustic projectors for high-power SONAR arrays, sound cancellation, and optimal thermal design, regarding enhanced energy conversion efficiency, are discussed.

  3. Plasmonic Nanostructured Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhazraji, Emad; Ghalib, A.; Manzoor, K.; Alsunaidi, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have investigated the scattering plasmonic resonance characteristics of silver nanospheres with a geometrical distribution that is modelled by Cellular Automata using time-domain numerical analysis. Cellular Automata are discrete mathematical structures that model different natural phenomena. Two binary one-dimensional Cellular Automata rules are considered to model the nanostructure, namely rule 30 and rule 33. The analysis produces three-dimensional scattering profiles of the entire plasmonic nanostructure. For the Cellular Automaton rule 33, the introduction of more Cellular Automata generations resulted only in slight red and blue shifts in the plasmonic modes with respect to the first generation. On the other hand, while rule 30 introduced significant red shifts in the resonance peaks at early generations, at later generations however, a peculiar effect is witnessed in the scattering profile as new peaks emerge as a feature of the overall Cellular Automata structure rather than the sum of the smaller parts that compose it. We strongly believe that these features that emerge as a result adopting the different 256 Cellular Automata rules as configuration models of nanostructures in different applications and systems might possess a great potential in enhancing their capability, sensitivity, efficiency, and power utilization.

  4. TRACE and CDS: JOP 146 Data Analysis Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. T.; Cirtain, J. W.; Martens, P. C. H.

    2003-05-01

    Joint Observing Program 146 was designed to collect data on coronal loops using the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on SoHO and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer. These two instruments collectively provide high spatial, temporal and temperature resolution. Calibration of the 171 Å filter on TRACE to spectral line intensities collected by CDS combines these qualities to produce the most detailed data currently available for the solar corona. We have determined an absolute value for the wavelengths of ions in data collected on September 18, 2001. This wavelength was then used to determine the Doppler shifts for many points along a coronal loop. The resulting values for velocity and intensity of Mg IX were then compared to the flux measured by the TRACE 171 Å filter. We find a appreciable correlation between the 171 Å filter and Mg IX. We use this determination to develop method of Differential Emission Measure analysis that provides a DEM for any pixel along a loop at nearly the same instant in time. This is uncharacteristic of DEM curves typically created from CDS data, as these curves are highly time dependant.

  5. Simple and green synthesis of protein-conjugated CdS nanoparticles and spectroscopic study on the interaction between CdS and zein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dezhi; Zhang, Li; Du, Xian; Wang, Yabo; Zhang, Qiuxia

    2016-09-01

    The present study demonstrates the role of zein molecules in synthesizing CdS nanoassemblies through protein-directed, green synthetic approach. Zein molecules can as capping ligand and stabilizing agent to regulate the nucleation and growth of CdS nanocrystals, and the obtained products are organic-inorganic nanocomposites. The analysis of surface charge and conductivity indicates that strong electrostatic force restricts mobility of ions, which creates a local supersaturation surrounding the binding sites of zein and reduces the activated energy of nucleation. The interaction between Cd2+/CdS and zein molecules was systematically investigated through spectroscopy techniques. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra were used to envisage the binding of the functional groups of zein with the surface of CdS nanoparticles. Ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra results show that Cd2+/CdS might interact with the aromatic amino acids of protein molecules and change its chemical microenvironment. The quantum-confined effect of nanocrystals is confirmed by optical absorption spectrum due to the small size (3-5 nm) of CdS particles. The data of circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicate that the formation of CdS nanocrystals could lead to the conformational change of zein molecules. Moreover, the possible mechanism of CdS nanocrystals growth in zein solution was also discussed. The weak interactions such as Van der Waals, hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonds in zein molecules should play a crucial factor in the self-assembly of small nanoparticles.

  6. Two-dimensional nanostructure-reinforced biodegradable polymeric nanocomposites for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Henslee, Allan M; Farshid, Behzad; Lin, Liangjun; Kasper, F Kurtis; Qin, Yi-Xian; Mikos, Antonios G; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-03-11

    This study investigates the efficacy of two-dimensional (2D) carbon and inorganic nanostructures as reinforcing agents for cross-linked composites of the biodegradable and biocompatible polymer polypropylene fumarate (PPF) as a function of nanostructure concentration. PPF composites were reinforced using various 2D nanostructures: single- and multiwalled graphene oxide nanoribbons (SWGONRs, MWGONRs), graphene oxide nanoplatelets (GONPs), and molybdenum disulfide nanoplatelets (MSNPs) at 0.01-0.2 weight% concentrations. Cross-linked PPF was used as the baseline control, and PPF composites reinforced with single- or multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, MWCNTs) were used as positive controls. Compression and flexural testing show a significant enhancement (i.e., compressive modulus = 35-108%, compressive yield strength = 26-93%, flexural modulus = 15-53%, and flexural yield strength = 101-262% greater than the baseline control) in the mechanical properties of the 2D-reinforced PPF nanocomposites. MSNP nanocomposites consistently showed the highest values among the experimental or control groups in all the mechanical measurements. In general, the inorganic nanoparticle MSNP showed a better or equivalent mechanical reinforcement compared to carbon nanomaterials, and 2D nanostructures (GONPs, MSNPs) are better reinforcing agents compared to one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures (e.g., SWCNTs). The results also indicated that the extent of mechanical reinforcement is closely dependent on the nanostructure morphology and follows the trend nanoplatelets > nanoribbons > nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy of the cross-linked nanocomposites indicated good dispersion of nanomaterials in the polymer matrix without the use of a surfactant. The sol-fraction analysis showed significant changes in the polymer cross-linking in the presence of MSNP (0.01-0.2 wt %) and higher loading concentrations of GONP and MWGONR (0.1-0.2 wt %). The analysis of surface area and aspect ratio

  7. Two-Dimensional Nanostructure- Reinforced Biodegradable Polymeric Nanocomposites for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Henslee, Allan M.; Farshid, Behzad; Lin, Liangjun; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Qin, Yi-Xian; Mikos, Antonios G.; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of two dimensional (2D) carbon and inorganic nanostructures as reinforcing agents of crosslinked composites of the biodegradable and biocompatible polymer polypropylene fumarate (PPF) as a function of nanostructure concentration. PPF composites were reinforced using various 2D nanostructures: single- and multi-walled graphene oxide nanoribbons (SWGONRs, MWGONRs), graphene oxide nanoplatelets (GONPs), and molybdenum di-sulfite nanoplatelets (MSNPs) at 0.01–0.2 weight% concentrations. Cross-linked PPF was used as the baseline control, and PPF composites reinforced with single- or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT, MWCNT) were used as positive controls. Compression and flexural testing show a significant enhancement (i.e., compressive modulus = 35–108%, compressive yield strength = 26–93%, flexural modulus = 15–53%, and flexural yield strength = 101–262% greater than the baseline control) in the mechanical properties of the 2D-reinforced PPF nanocomposites. MSNPs nanocomposites consistently showed the highest values among the experimental or control groups in all the mechanical measurements. In general, the inorganic nanoparticle MSNPs showed a better or equivalent mechanical reinforcement compared to carbon nanomaterials, and 2-D nanostructures (GONP, MSNP) are better reinforcing agents compared to 1-D nanostructures (e.g. SWCNTs). The results also indicate that the extent of mechanical reinforcement is closely dependent on the nanostructure morphology and follows the trend nanoplatelets > nanoribbons > nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy of the cross-linked nanocomposites indicates good dispersion of nanomaterials in the polymer matrix without the use of a surfactant. The sol-fraction analysis showed significant changes in the polymer cross-linking in the presence of MSNP (0.01–0.2 wt %) and higher loading concentrations of GONP and MWGONR (0.1–0.2 wt%). The analysis of surface area and aspect ratio of

  8. NANOSTRUCTURE PATTERNING UNDER ENERGETIC PARTICLE BEAM IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lumin; Lu, Wei

    2013-01-31

    Energetic ion bombardment can lead to the development of complex and diverse nanostructures on or beneath the material surface through induced self-organization processes. These self-organized structures have received particular interest recently as promising candidates as simple, inexpensive, and large area patterns, whose optical, electronic and magnetic properties are different from those in the bulk materials [1-5]. Compared to the low mass efficiency production rate of lithographic methods, these self-organized approaches display new routes for the fabrication of nanostructures over large areas in a short processing time at the nanoscale, beyond the limits of lithography [1,4]. Although it is believed that surface nanostructure formation is based on the morphological instability of the sputtered surface, driven by a kinetic balance between roughening and smoothing actions [6,7], the fundamental mechanisms and experimental conditions for the formation of these nanostructures has still not been well established, the formation of the 3-D naopatterns beneath the irradiated surface especially needs more exploration. During the last funding period, we have focused our efforts on irradiation-induced nanostructures in a broad range of materials. These structures have been studied primarily through in situ electron microscopy during electron or ion irradiation. In particular, we have performed studies on 3-D void/bubble lattices (in metals and CaF2), embedded sponge-like porous structure with uniform nanofibers in irradiated semiconductors (Ge, GaSb, and InSb), 2-D highly ordered pattern of nanodroplets (on the surface of GaAs), hexagonally ordered nanoholes (on the surface of Ge), and 1-D highly ordered ripple and periodic arrays (of Cu nanoparticles) [3,8-11]. The amazing common feature in those nanopatterns is the uniformity of the size of nanoelements (nanoripples, nanodots, nanovoids or nanofibers) and the distance separating them. Our research focuses on the

  9. Graphene oxide/polyaniline nanostructures: transformation of 2D sheet to 1D nanotube and in situ reduction.

    PubMed

    Rana, Utpal; Malik, Sudip

    2012-11-14

    The formation of unique polyaniline nanotubes has been reported in presence of graphene oxide (GO) which plays crucial dual role as dopant and soft template, simultaneously. GO in nanotubes is in situ reduced to reduced GO with restoration of electrical conductivities and enhanced thermal stabilities.

  10. FTIR, EPMA, Auger, and XPS analysis of impurity precipitates in CdS films

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J.D.; Rose, D.H.; Niles, D.W.; Swartzlander, A.; Al-Jassim, M.M.

    1997-12-31

    Impurities in cadmium sulfide (CdS) films are a concern in the fabrication of copper (indium, gallium) diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic devices. Films of CdS grown using chemical bath deposition (CBD) generally yield better devices than purer CdS films grown using vacuum deposition techniques, despite the higher impurity concentrations typically observed in the CBD CdS films. In this work, the authors present Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Auger, electron microprobe (EPMA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS), and secondary ion mass spectroscopic (SIMS) analyses of the impurities in CBD CdS films, and show that these differ as a function of substrate type and film deposition conditions. They also show that some of these impurities exist as 10{sup 2} micron-scale precipitates.

  11. Characterization of single crystalline CdS nanowires synthesized by solvothermal method.

    PubMed

    Hadia, N M A; García-Granda, Santiago; García, José R

    2014-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanowires with uniform diameter were prepared by the solvothermal method using ethylenediamine (en) as solvent. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scan electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the products are hexagonal crystals of CdS nanowires with diameter of 28 nm and length up to several micrometres. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) studies indicate the single-crystalline nature of CdS nanowires with an oriented growth along the c-axis direction. The absorption spectrum of the as-prepared CdS nanowires shows an absorption peak of around 485 nm. These CdS nanowires exhibit bright photoluminescence (PL) with two distinct emission bands at 502 nm and 696 nm.

  12. Mesoporous structured MIPs@CDs fluorescence sensor for highly sensitive detection of TNT.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shoufang; Lu, Hongzhi

    2016-11-15

    A facile strategy was developed to prepare mesoporous structured molecularly imprinted polymers capped carbon dots (M-MIPs@CDs) fluorescence sensor for highly sensitive and selective determination of TNT. The strategy using amino-CDs directly as "functional monomer" for imprinting simplify the imprinting process and provide well recognition sites accessibility. The as-prepared M-MIPs@CDs sensor, using periodic mesoporous silica as imprinting matrix, and amino-CDs directly as "functional monomer", exhibited excellent selectivity and sensitivity toward TNT with detection limit of 17nM. The recycling process was sustainable for 10 times without obvious efficiency decrease. The feasibility of the developed method in real samples was successfully evaluated through the analysis of TNT in soil and water samples with satisfactory recoveries of 88.6-95.7%. The method proposed in this work was proved to be a convenient and practical way to prepare high sensitive and selective fluorescence MIPs@CDs sensors.

  13. High-Performance Supercapacitor Electrode Based on Cobalt Oxide-Manganese Dioxide-Nickel Oxide Ternary 1D Hybrid Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashutosh K; Sarkar, Debasish; Karmakar, Keshab; Mandal, Kalyan; Khan, Gobinda Gopal

    2016-08-17

    We report a facile method to design Co3O4-MnO2-NiO ternary hybrid 1D nanotube arrays for their application as active material for high-performance supercapacitor electrodes. This as-prepared novel supercapacitor electrode can store charge as high as ∼2020 C/g (equivalent specific capacitance ∼2525 F/g) for a potential window of 0.8 V and has long cycle stability (nearly 80% specific capacitance retains after successive 5700 charge/discharge cycles), significantly high Coulombic efficiency, and fast response time (∼0.17s). The remarkable electrochemical performance of this unique electrode material is the outcome of its enormous reaction platform provided by its special nanostructure morphology and conglomeration of the electrochemical properties of three highly redox active materials in a single unit.

  14. RELIABILITY, VALIDITY, AND PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF THE GREEK TRANSLATION OF THE CAMBRIDGE DEPERSONALIZATION SCALE (CDS)

    PubMed Central

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Tsiori, Sofia; Poulakou, Garyfalia; Protopapas, Konstantinos; Katsarolis, Ioannis; Sakka, Vissaria; Kavatha, Dimitra; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The Cambridge Depersonalisation Scale is meant to capture the frequency and duration of depersonalisation symptoms over the ‘last 6 months’. Methods: In order to develop a Greek version of CDS scale, the CDS scale was translated in Greek by 2 psychiatrists. Then, the Greek version of CDS scale was back-translated by a person who did not knew the original English version. The back-translated version was reviewed in order to establish whether is consistent with the original English version. After this procedure we administered the Greek version of CDS scale to a sample of 294 Greeks in order to assess the reliability and the validity of the Greek version of scale. Results: The five components solution accounted for 58.204% of the total variation. Initial eigenvalues of the five components were: factor 1=11.555, factor 2=1.564, factor 3=1.356, factor 4=1.247 and factor 5=1.157. Six items did not load on any factor. Correlations between factors were low ranged from 0.134 to 0.314 and no complex variables were found. Cronbach’s alpha and Guttman split-half coefficient were used to evaluate interval consistency of CDS scale in 294 individuals. The alpha coefficients and Guttman split-half coefficient of the CDS scale were 0.938 and 0.921, respectively. The test-retest reliability proved to be satisfactory. The intraclass correlation coefficients for the total CDS score was very good and equal to 0,883. The CDS scale correlated highly with the SCL-90 and all subscales (p-value<0.0001). Conclusion: The psychometric strength of CDS – Greek its reliable for its future use, particularly for screening for subjects with possible diagnosis of CDS. PMID:27999491

  15. Drug delivery systems based on nucleic acid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jan Willem; Zhang, Feng; Herrmann, Andreas

    2013-12-10

    The field of DNA nanotechnology has progressed rapidly in recent years and hence a large variety of 1D-, 2D- and 3D DNA nanostructures with various sizes, geometries and shapes is readily accessible. DNA-based nanoobjects are fabricated by straight forward design and self-assembly processes allowing the exact positioning of functional moieties and the integration of other materials. At the same time some of these nanosystems are characterized by a low toxicity profile. As a consequence, the use of these architectures in a biomedical context has been explored. In this review the progress and possibilities of pristine nucleic acid nanostructures and DNA hybrid materials for drug delivery will be discussed. For the latter class of structures, a distinction is made between carriers with an inorganic core composed of gold or silica and amphiphilic DNA block copolymers that exhibit a soft hydrophobic interior.

  16. Tailoring properties and functionalities of nanostructures through compositions, components and morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Lin

    The field of nanoscience and nanotechnology has made significant progresses over the last thirty years. Sophisticated nanostructures with tunable properties for novel physics and applications have been successfully fabricated, characterized and underwent practical test. In this thesis, I will focus on our recent efforts to develop new strategies to manipulate the properties of nanostructures. Particularly, three questions have been answered from our perspective, based on the nanomaterials synthesized: (1) How does the composition affect a novel nanostructure? We started from single-molecule precursors to reach nanostructures whose bulk counterparts only exist under extreme conditions. Fe3S and Fe3S2 are used as examples to demonstrate this synthetic strategy. Their potential magnetic properties have been measured, which may lead to interesting findings in astronomy and materials science. (2) How to achieve modularity control at nanoscale by a general bottom-up approach? Starting with reviewing the current status of this field, our recent experimental progresses towards delicate modularity control are presented by abundant novel heteronanostructures. An interesting catalytic mechanism of these nanostructures has also been verified, which involves the interaction between phonons, photons, plasmons, and excitons. (3) What can the morphology difference tell us about the inside of nanostructures? By comparing a series of data from three types of CdSe/CdS core-shell structures, a conclusion has been reached on the CdS growth mechanism on CdSe under different conditions, which also may lead to a solution to the asymmetry problem in the synthesis of CdSe/CdS nanorods. Finally this thesis is concluded by a summary and future outlook.

  17. A facile self-template strategy for synthesizing 1D porous Ni@C nanorods towards efficient microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanan; Zhang, Xingmiao; Quan, Bin; Ji, Guangbin; Liang, Xiaohui; Liu, Wei; Du, Youwei

    2017-03-17

    Ni@C composites, which simultaneously possess porous, core-shell and 1D nanostructures have been synthesized with a facile self-template strategy. The precursors were obtained by a hydrothermal process using NiCl2 · 6H2O and nitrilotriacetic acid as the starting material and then annealed at 400 °C, 500 °C, and 600 °C. The Ni@C composites annealed at 500 °C display a nanorod feature with a length of ∼3 μm and diameter of 230-500 nm. In addition, about 3 nm carbon shells and 4 nm Ni cores can be found in Ni@C nanorods. Attributed to the interconnected mesoporous texture in nanorods, strengthened interfacial polarization from core-shell structure, and better impedance matching benefiting from a great deal of pores, Ni@C nanorod composites exhibit perfect microwave absorption performance. The minimum reflection loss (RL) value of -26.3 dB can be gained at 10.8 GHz with a thickness of 2.3 mm. Moreover, the effective bandwidth (RL ≤ -10 dB) can be achieved, 5.2 GHz (12.24-17.4 GHz) under an absorber thickness of 1.8 mm, indicating its great potential in the microwave absorption field. Considering this technique is facile and effective, our study may provide a good reference for the synthesis of 1D carbon-based microwave absorbers with core-shell nanostructure.

  18. A facile self-template strategy for synthesizing 1D porous Ni@C nanorods towards efficient microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanan; Zhang, Xingmiao; Quan, Bin; Ji, Guangbin; Liang, Xiaohui; Liu, Wei; Du, Youwei

    2017-03-01

    Ni@C composites, which simultaneously possess porous, core–shell and 1D nanostructures have been synthesized with a facile self-template strategy. The precursors were obtained by a hydrothermal process using NiCl2 · 6H2O and nitrilotriacetic acid as the starting material and then annealed at 400 °C, 500 °C, and 600 °C. The Ni@C composites annealed at 500 °C display a nanorod feature with a length of ∼3 μm and diameter of 230–500 nm. In addition, about 3 nm carbon shells and 4 nm Ni cores can be found in Ni@C nanorods. Attributed to the interconnected mesoporous texture in nanorods, strengthened interfacial polarization from core–shell structure, and better impedance matching benefiting from a great deal of pores, Ni@C nanorod composites exhibit perfect microwave absorption performance. The minimum reflection loss (RL) value of ‑26.3 dB can be gained at 10.8 GHz with a thickness of 2.3 mm. Moreover, the effective bandwidth (RL ≤ ‑10 dB) can be achieved, 5.2 GHz (12.24–17.4 GHz) under an absorber thickness of 1.8 mm, indicating its great potential in the microwave absorption field. Considering this technique is facile and effective, our study may provide a good reference for the synthesis of 1D carbon-based microwave absorbers with core–shell nanostructure.

  19. Extended-Range Ultrarefractive 1D Photonic Crystal Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal has been made to exploit the special wavelength-dispersive characteristics of devices of the type described in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms (NPO-30232) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 4 (April 2005), page 10a. A photonic crystal is an optical component that has a periodic structure comprising two dielectric materials with high dielectric contrast (e.g., a semiconductor and air), with geometrical feature sizes comparable to or smaller than light wavelengths of interest. Experimental superprisms have been realized as photonic crystals having three-dimensional (3D) structures comprising regions of amorphous Si alternating with regions of SiO2, fabricated in a complex process that included sputtering. A photonic crystal of the type to be exploited according to the present proposal is said to be one-dimensional (1D) because its contrasting dielectric materials would be stacked in parallel planar layers; in other words, there would be spatial periodicity in one dimension only. The processes of designing and fabricating 1D photonic crystal superprisms would be simpler and, hence, would cost less than do those for 3D photonic crystal superprisms. As in 3D structures, 1D photonic crystals may be used in applications such as wavelength-division multiplexing. In the extended-range configuration, it is also suitable for spectrometry applications. As an engineered structure or artificially engineered material, a photonic crystal can exhibit optical properties not commonly found in natural substances. Prior research had revealed several classes of photonic crystal structures for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden in certain frequency ranges, denoted photonic bandgaps. It had also been found that in narrow frequency bands just outside the photonic bandgaps, the angular wavelength dispersion of electromagnetic waves propagating in photonic crystal superprisms is much stronger than is the angular wavelength dispersion obtained

  20. ESO science data product standard for 1D spectral products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micol, Alberto; Arnaboldi, Magda; Delmotte, Nausicaa A. R.; Mascetti, Laura; Retzlaff, Joerg

    2016-07-01

    The ESO Phase 3 process allows the upload, validation, storage, and publication of reduced data through the ESO Science Archive Facility. Since its introduction, 2 million data products have been archived and published; 80% of them are one-dimensional extracted and calibrated spectra. Central to Phase3 is the ESO science data product standard that defines metadata and data format of any product. This contribution describes the ESO data standard for 1d-spectra, its adoption by the reduction pipelines of selected instrument modes for in-house generation of reduced spectra, the enhanced archive legacy value. Archive usage statistics are provided.

  1. Deconvolution/identification techniques for 1-D transient signals

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.M.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses a variety of nonparametric deconvolution and identification techniques that we have developed for application to 1-D transient signal problems. These methods are time-domain techniques that use direct methods for matrix inversion. Therefore, they are not appropriate for large data'' problems. These techniques involve various regularization methods and permit the use of certain kinds of a priori information in estimating the unknown. These techniques have been implemented in a package using standard FORTRAN that should make the package readily transportable to most computers. This paper is also meant to be an instruction manual for the package. 25 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Breakdown of 1D water wires inside charged carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Shashank

    2016-11-01

    Using molecular dynamics approach we investigated the structure and dynamics of water confined inside pristine and charged 6,6 carbon nanotubes (CNTs). This study reports the breakdown of 1D water wires and the emergence of triangular faced water on incorporating charges in 6,6 CNTs. Incorporation of charges results in high potential barriers to flipping of water molecules due to the formation of large number of hydrogen bonds. The PMF analyses show the presence of ∼2 kcal/mol barrier for the movement of water inside pristine CNT and almost negligible barrier in charged CNTs.

  3. Spatial coherence of polaritons in a 1D channel

    SciTech Connect

    Savenko, I. G.; Iorsh, I. V.; Kaliteevski, M. A.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2013-01-15

    We analyze time evolution of spatial coherence of a polariton ensemble in a quantum wire (1D channel) under constant uniform resonant pumping. Using the theoretical approach based on the Lindblad equation for a one-particle density matrix, which takes into account the polariton-phonon and excitonexciton interactions, we study the behavior of the first-order coherence function g{sup 1} for various pump intensities and temperatures in the range of 1-20 K. Bistability and hysteresis in the dependence of the first-order coherence function on the pump intensity is demonstrated.

  4. Nonlocal order parameters for the 1D Hubbard model.

    PubMed

    Montorsi, Arianna; Roncaglia, Marco

    2012-12-07

    We characterize the Mott-insulator and Luther-Emery phases of the 1D Hubbard model through correlators that measure the parity of spin and charge strings along the chain. These nonlocal quantities order in the corresponding gapped phases and vanish at the critical point U(c)=0, thus configuring as hidden order parameters. The Mott insulator consists of bound doublon-holon pairs, which in the Luther-Emery phase turn into electron pairs with opposite spins, both unbinding at U(c). The behavior of the parity correlators is captured by an effective free spinless fermion model.

  5. Nonlocal Order Parameters for the 1D Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montorsi, Arianna; Roncaglia, Marco

    2012-12-01

    We characterize the Mott-insulator and Luther-Emery phases of the 1D Hubbard model through correlators that measure the parity of spin and charge strings along the chain. These nonlocal quantities order in the corresponding gapped phases and vanish at the critical point Uc=0, thus configuring as hidden order parameters. The Mott insulator consists of bound doublon-holon pairs, which in the Luther-Emery phase turn into electron pairs with opposite spins, both unbinding at Uc. The behavior of the parity correlators is captured by an effective free spinless fermion model.

  6. Nanofluidic sustainable energy conversion using a 1D nanofluidic network.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hui; Kwak, Seungmin; Han, Sung Il; Chun, Dong Won; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Kim, Jinseok; Lee, Jeong Hoon

    2014-05-01

    We propose a 1-dimensional (1D) nanofluidic energy conversion device by implementing a surface-patterned Nafion membrane for the direct energy conversion of the pressure to electrical power. By implementing a -200-nm-thick nano-bridge with a 5-nm pore size between two microfluidic channels, we acquired an effective streaming potential of 307 mV and output power of 94 pW with 0.1 mM KCI under pressure difference of 45 MPa. The experimental results show both the effects of applied pressure differences and buffer concentrations on the effective streaming potential, and are consistent with the analytical prediction.

  7. 1-D blood flow modelling in a running human body.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Viktor; Halász, Gábor

    2017-04-10

    In this paper an attempt was made to simulate blood flow in a mobile human arterial network, specifically, in a running human subject. In order to simulate the effect of motion, a previously published immobile 1-D model was modified by including an inertial force term into the momentum equation. To calculate inertial force, gait analysis was performed at different levels of speed. Our results show that motion has a significant effect on the amplitudes of the blood pressure and flow rate but the average values are not effected significantly.

  8. Glancing angle deposited villi-like nanostructures for enhanced chemo-resistive performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Hi Gyu; Jung, Youngmo; Lee, Taikjin; Lee, Seok; Park, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Chulki; Kang, Chong-Yun

    Metal oxide nanostructures have attracted enormous attention for diverse applications such as solar cells, nanogenerators, nanolasers, optoelectronic devices and chemoresistive sensor. To achieve the enhanced electrical properties for these applications, one-dimensional (1D) metal oxide materials including nanowires, nanorods, nanotubes and nanobelts have been widely studied. However, the use of 1D nanomaterials as chemoresistive sensors is still in the beginning stage in how to integrate them. As an alternative, porous thin films based on 1D metal oxide nanostructures are considered as more desirable configuration due to their simplicity in synthesis, high reproducibility. In this study, we propose facile synthesis and self-assembled villi-like nanofingers (VLNF) WO3 thin films with large specific surface area on the SiO2/Si substrate. Room-temperature glancing angle deposition of WO3 by a simple controlling in both polar and azimuthal directions resulted in anisotropic nanostructures with large aspect ratio and porous structures with a relative surface area of 350 m2/g. Glancing angle deposited villi-like nanostructures for enhanced chemo-resistive performances.

  9. Spatially-interactive biomolecular networks organized by nucleic acid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jinglin; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2012-08-21

    Living systems have evolved a variety of nanostructures to control the molecular interactions that mediate many functions including the recognition of targets by receptors, the binding of enzymes to substrates, and the regulation of enzymatic activity. Mimicking these structures outside of the cell requires methods that offer nanoscale control over the organization of individual network components. Advances in DNA nanotechnology have enabled the design and fabrication of sophisticated one-, two- and three-dimensional (1D, 2D, and 3D) nanostructures that utilize spontaneous and sequence-specific DNA hybridization. Compared with other self-assembling biopolymers, DNA nanostructures offer predictable and programmable interactions and surface features to which other nanoparticles and biomolecules can be precisely positioned. The ability to control the spatial arrangement of the components while constructing highly organized networks will lead to various applications of these systems. For example, DNA nanoarrays with surface displays of molecular probes can sense noncovalent hybridization interactions with DNA, RNA, and proteins and covalent chemical reactions. DNA nanostructures can also align external molecules into well-defined arrays, which may improve the resolution of many structural determination methods, such as X-ray diffraction, cryo-EM, NMR, and super-resolution fluorescence. Moreover, by constraint of target entities to specific conformations, self-assembled DNA nanostructures can serve as molecular rulers to evaluate conformation-dependent activities. This Account describes the most recent advances in the DNA nanostructure directed assembly of biomolecular networks and explores the possibility of applying this technology to other fields of study. Recently, several reports have demonstrated the DNA nanostructure directed assembly of spatially interactive biomolecular networks. For example, researchers have constructed synthetic multienzyme cascades by

  10. Blood flow quantification using 1D CFD parameter identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosig, Richard; Kowarschik, Markus; Maday, Peter; Katouzian, Amin; Demirci, Stefanie; Navab, Nassir

    2014-03-01

    Patient-specific measurements of cerebral blood flow provide valuable diagnostic information concerning cerebrovascular diseases rather than visually driven qualitative evaluation. In this paper, we present a quantitative method to estimate blood flow parameters with high temporal resolution from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) image sequences. Using a 3D DSA dataset and a 2D+t DSA sequence, the proposed algorithm employs a 1D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for estimation of time-dependent flow values along a cerebral vessel, combined with an additional Advection Diffusion Equation (ADE) for contrast agent propagation. The CFD system, followed by the ADE, is solved with a finite volume approximation, which ensures the conservation of mass. Instead of defining a new imaging protocol to obtain relevant data, our cost function optimizes the bolus arrival time (BAT) of the contrast agent in 2D+t DSA sequences. The visual determination of BAT is common clinical practice and can be easily derived from and be compared to values, generated by a 1D-CFD simulation. Using this strategy, we ensure that our proposed method fits best to clinical practice and does not require any changes to the medical work flow. Synthetic experiments show that the recovered flow estimates match the ground truth values with less than 12% error in the mean flow rates.

  11. Tunability and Sensing Properties of Plasmonic/1D Photonic Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaban, Mohamed; Ahmed, Ashour M.; Abdel-Rahman, Ehab; Hamdy, Hany

    2017-02-01

    Gold/one-dimensional photonic crystal (Au/1D-PC) is fabricated and applied for sensitive sensing of glucose and different chemical molecules of various refractive indices. The Au layer thickness is optimized to produce surface plasmon resonance (SPR) at the right edge of the photonic band gap (PBG). As the Au deposition time increased to 60 sec, the PBG width is increased from 46 to 86 nm in correlation with the behavior of the SPR. The selectivity of the optimized Au/1D-PC sensor is tested upon the increase of the environmental refractive index of the detected molecules. The resonance wavelength and the PBG edges increased linearly and the transmitted intensity increased nonlinearly as the environment refractive index increased. The SPR splits to two modes during the detection of chloroform molecules based on the localized capacitive coupling of Au particles. Also, this structure shows high sensitivity at different glucose concentrations. The PBG and SPR are shifted to longer wavelengths, and PBG width is decreased linearly with a rate of 16.04 Å/(μg/mm3) as the glucose concentration increased. The proposed structure merits; operation at room temperature, compact size, and easy fabrication; suggest that the proposed structure can be efficiently used for the biomedical and chemical application.

  12. Tunability and Sensing Properties of Plasmonic/1D Photonic Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Shaban, Mohamed; Ahmed, Ashour M.; Abdel-Rahman, Ehab; Hamdy, Hany

    2017-01-01

    Gold/one-dimensional photonic crystal (Au/1D-PC) is fabricated and applied for sensitive sensing of glucose and different chemical molecules of various refractive indices. The Au layer thickness is optimized to produce surface plasmon resonance (SPR) at the right edge of the photonic band gap (PBG). As the Au deposition time increased to 60 sec, the PBG width is increased from 46 to 86 nm in correlation with the behavior of the SPR. The selectivity of the optimized Au/1D-PC sensor is tested upon the increase of the environmental refractive index of the detected molecules. The resonance wavelength and the PBG edges increased linearly and the transmitted intensity increased nonlinearly as the environment refractive index increased. The SPR splits to two modes during the detection of chloroform molecules based on the localized capacitive coupling of Au particles. Also, this structure shows high sensitivity at different glucose concentrations. The PBG and SPR are shifted to longer wavelengths, and PBG width is decreased linearly with a rate of 16.04 Å/(μg/mm3) as the glucose concentration increased. The proposed structure merits; operation at room temperature, compact size, and easy fabrication; suggest that the proposed structure can be efficiently used for the biomedical and chemical application. PMID:28176799

  13. Engineered atom-light interactions in 1D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael J.; Hung, Chen-Lung; Yu, Su-Peng; Goban, Akihisa; Muniz, Juan A.; Hood, Jonathan D.; Norte, Richard; McClung, Andrew C.; Meenehan, Sean M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Lee, Jae Hoon; Peng, Lucas; Painter, Oskar; Kimble, H. Jeff

    2014-05-01

    Nano- and microscale optical systems offer efficient and scalable quantum interfaces through enhanced atom-field coupling in both resonators and continuous waveguides. Beyond these conventional topologies, new opportunities emerge from the integration of ultracold atomic systems with nanoscale photonic crystals. One-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides can be engineered for both stable trapping configurations and strong atom-photon interactions, enabling novel cavity QED and quantum many-body systems, as well as distributed quantum networks. We present the experimental realization of such a nanophotonic quantum interface based on a nanoscale photonic crystal waveguide, demonstrating a fractional waveguide coupling of Γ1 D /Γ' of 0 . 32 +/- 0 . 08 , where Γ1 D (Γ') is the atomic emission rate into the guided (all other) mode(s). We also discuss progress towards intra-waveguide trapping of ultracold Cs. This work was supported by the IQIM, an NSF Physics Frontiers Center with support from the Moore Foundation, the DARPA ORCHID program, the AFOSR QuMPASS MURI, the DoD NSSEFF program, NSF, and the Kavli Nanoscience Institute (KNI) at Caltech.

  14. Constitutive modeling and control of 1D smart composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Jonathan P.; Ostrowski, James P.; Ponte-Castaneda, Pedro

    1998-07-01

    Homogenization techniques for determining effective properties of composite materials may provide advantages for control of stiffness and strain in systems using hysteretic smart actuators embedded in a soft matrix. In this paper, a homogenized model of a 1D composite structure comprised of shape memory alloys and a rubber-like matrix is presented. With proportional and proportional/integral feedback, using current as the input state and global strain as an error state, implementation scenarios include the use of tractions on the boundaries and a nonlinear constitutive law for the matrix. The result is a simple model which captures the nonlinear behavior of the smart composite material system and is amenable to experiments with various control paradigms. The success of this approach in the context of the 1D model suggests that the homogenization method may prove useful in investigating control of more general smart structures. Applications of such materials could include active rehabilitation aids, e.g. wrist braces, as well as swimming/undulating robots, or adaptive molds for manufacturing processes.

  15. Tunability and Sensing Properties of Plasmonic/1D Photonic Crystal.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Mohamed; Ahmed, Ashour M; Abdel-Rahman, Ehab; Hamdy, Hany

    2017-02-08

    Gold/one-dimensional photonic crystal (Au/1D-PC) is fabricated and applied for sensitive sensing of glucose and different chemical molecules of various refractive indices. The Au layer thickness is optimized to produce surface plasmon resonance (SPR) at the right edge of the photonic band gap (PBG). As the Au deposition time increased to 60 sec, the PBG width is increased from 46 to 86 nm in correlation with the behavior of the SPR. The selectivity of the optimized Au/1D-PC sensor is tested upon the increase of the environmental refractive index of the detected molecules. The resonance wavelength and the PBG edges increased linearly and the transmitted intensity increased nonlinearly as the environment refractive index increased. The SPR splits to two modes during the detection of chloroform molecules based on the localized capacitive coupling of Au particles. Also, this structure shows high sensitivity at different glucose concentrations. The PBG and SPR are shifted to longer wavelengths, and PBG width is decreased linearly with a rate of 16.04 Å/(μg/mm(3)) as the glucose concentration increased. The proposed structure merits; operation at room temperature, compact size, and easy fabrication; suggest that the proposed structure can be efficiently used for the biomedical and chemical application.

  16. Nanostructures for peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M.; Prieto, Tatiana; Nantes, Iseli L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese, and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design, and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting, and reusability. PMID:26389124

  17. CdS thin film solar cells for terrestrial power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirland, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    The development of very low cost long lived Cu2S/CdS thin film solar cells for large scale energy conversion is reported. Excellent evaporated metal grid patterns were obtained using a specially designed aperture mask. Vacuum evaporated gold and copper grids of 50 lines per inch and 1 micron thickness were adequate electrically for the fine mesh contacting grid. Real time roof top sunlight exposure tests of encapsulated CdS cells showed no loss in output after 5 months. Accelerated life testing of encapsulated cells showed no loss of output power after 6 months of 12 hour dark-12 hour AMI illumination cycles at 40 C, 60 C, 80 C and 100 C temperatures. However, the cells changed their basic parameters, such as series and shunt resistance and junction capacitance.

  18. Polar optical phonons in semiconducting CdS nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Belogorokhov, A. I. Belogorokhov, I. A.; Miranda, R. P.; Vasilevskii, M. I.; Gavrilov, S. A.

    2007-02-15

    We have experimentally and theoretically studied IR-active optical phonons, which are spatially confined in the volume of semiconducting CdS nanocrystals of various shapes synthesized in a dielectric matrix (porous aluminum oxide). Within an approach admitting the mixing of all expected types of vibrations, the complete sets of phonon modes are determined for a spherical quantum dot (QD) and a cylindrical quantum wire (QW) in this matrix. Based on these results, the polarizability spectra of QDs and QWs, as well as the effective dielectric function of a composite material containing such nanoparticles, are calculated for the far-IR wavelength range. It is established that the spectrum of the dielectric function exhibits specific features in the region between the transverse and longitudinal optical phonon frequencies of the massive semiconductor material. These features explain the rather unusual structure of the IR spectra of the composite samples studied.

  19. Electronic characteristics of 'real' CdS surfaces.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagowski, J.; Balestra, C. L.; Gatos, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    Photovoltage spectroscopy (including photovoltage inversion and photovoltage quenching) was used to determine the electronic characteristics of real (basal and prismatic) surfaces of CdS. In room atmosphere, surface states with the following positions were found in the cadmium surfaces: Ec - Et equal to 0.05, 0.4, and 0.8 eV, and Ev - Et equal to 0.83 eV. The same surface states were present in the sulfur surfaces, with the exception of those at Ec - Et equal to 0.4 eV. In the prismatic and unetched basal surfaces, states at Ec - Et equal to 1.1 eV were found in addition to all of those found on the cadmium surfaces.

  20. SOHO/CDS and SUMER coordinated observations of coronal streamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parenti, Susanna; Landi, Enrico; Bromage, B. J. I.

    2002-06-01

    In June 2000 the SOHO and Ulysses satellites reached the quadrature configuration with respect to the Sun. On this occasion the JOP 112 was run, with the aim of studying the coronal and solar wind physical parameters, with particular attention to the element composition. In this paper we present preliminary results from SOHO/SUMER and CDS/NIS data. The two instruments were pointed off-limb and observed the lower solar corona in the Ulysses direction (-58.2 deg in the S-E quadrant). During the period of observations (12-17 June) the observed corona was filled with streamers. From each instrument the electron density, temperature and element composition of the studied areas have been derived. A comparison of the results from the two instruments is then presented.

  1. Radiolytic production and properties of ultrasmall CdS particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.; Swayambunathan, V. ); Micic, O.I.; Nenadovic, M.T.; Meisel, D. )

    1989-06-01

    The radiolytic production of CdS particles from solutions containing cadmium ions and a thiol (3-mercapto-1,2-propanediol, RSH) is described. The production of the colloids is initiated by the reaction of solvated electron with the thiol to release HS{sup {minus}} ions. The polynuclear complexes of cadmium with the thiolate form of RSH act as moderators to the growth of the particles and allow reproducible production of practically any predetermined size particles. The complexes at the surface of the particles also stabilize the particles for long periods of time. The particles are strongly fluorescent from size of ca. 8 {angstrom} in radius. Excess electrons in these particles lead to bleaching of the exciton band due to Coulomb screening effects. At higher doses, formation of cadmium atoms leads to increased absorption in the visible range.

  2. TiO{sub 2} flower-like nanostructures decorated with CdS/PbS nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Trenczek-Zajac, Anita; Kusior, Anna; Lacz, Agnieszka; Radecka, Marta; Zakrzewska, Katarzyna

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} flower-like nanostructures were prepared with the use of Ti foil and 30% H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • QDs of CdS and PbS were deposited using the SILAR method. • The SILAR method makes it possible to control the size of QDs. • Band gap energy of CdS was found to be 2.35 eV. • Sensitization of TiO{sub 2} with CdS or PbS improves the photoelectrochemical properties. - Abstract: Flower-like nanostructures of TiO{sub 2} were prepared by immersing Ti foil in 30% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at 80 °C for times varying from 15 to 240 min. Upon annealing at 450 °C in an Ar atmosphere, the received amorphous samples crystallized in an anatase structure with rutile as a minority phase. SEM images revealed that partially formed flowers were present at the surface of the prepared samples as early as after 15 min of immersion. The size of the individual flowers increased from 400–800 nm after 15 min of reaction to 2.5–6.0 μm after 240 min. It was also found that surface is very rough and surface development is considerable. After 45 min of immersion, the nanoflowers were sensitized with CdS and PbS quantum dots (QDs-CdS/QDs-PbS) deposited using the SILAR method from water- and methanol-based precursor solutions at different concentrations (0.001–0.1 M). QDs-CdS crystallized in the hawleyite structure, while QDs-PbS in the galena form. SEM analysis showed the tendency of quantum dots to agglomerate at high concentrations of the precursor in water-based solutions. QDs obtained from methanol-based solutions were uniformly distributed. The produced QDs-PbS were smaller than QDs-CdS. Based on the optical reflectance spectra, the band-gap energies of TiO{sub 2} nanostructures with and without QDs were calculated to be 3.32 eV for flower-like TiO{sub 2} nanostructures and 2.35 eV for QDs-CdS. The photoelectrochemical behaviour of nanoflowers was found to improve significantly after the deposition of QDs-CdS.

  3. Toxicity of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles against Escherichia coli and HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sk Tofajjen; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2013-09-15

    The present study endeavours to assess the toxic effect of synthesized CdS nanoparticles (NPs) on Escherichia coli and HeLa cells. The CdS NPs were characterized by DLS, XRD, TEM and AFM studies and the average size of NPs was revealed as ∼3 nm. On CdS NPs exposure bacterial cells changed morphological features to filamentous form and damage of the cell surface was found by AFM study. The expression of two conserved cell division components namely ftsZ and ftsQ in E. coli was decreased both at transcriptional and translational levels upon CdS NPs exposure. CdS NPs inhibited proper cell septum formation without affecting the nucleoid segregation. Viability of HeLa cells declined with increasing concentration of CdS NPs and the IC₅₀ value was found to be 4 μg/mL. NPs treated HeLa cells showed changed morphology with condensed and fragmented nuclei. Increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found both in E. coli and HeLa cells on CdS NPs exposure. The inverse correlation between declined cell viabilities and elevated ROS level suggested that oxidative stress seems to be the key event by which NPs induce toxicity both in E. coli and HeLa cells.

  4. Raman spectroscopic studies of thin film carbon nanostructures deposited using electro deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Saurabh; Sasi, Arshali; Jhariya, Sapna; Sasikumar, C.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work our focus is to synthesize carbon nanostructures (CNS) by electro deposition technique without using any surface pretreatment or catalyst preparation before CNS formation. The process were carried out at significantly low voltage and at low temperature as reported elsewhere. Further the samples were characterized using different characterization tools such as SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The SEM results showed the fibres or tubular like morphology. Raman spectra shows strong finger print at 1600 cm-1 (G peak), 1350 cm-1 (D peak) along with the radial breathing mode (RBM) between 150cm-1 to 300 cm-1. This confirms the formation of tubular carbon nanostructures.

  5. Synthesis of CdS nanoparticles for photocatalytic application of methyleneblue degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Muthuraj, V.; Umadevi, M.; Sankarasubramanian, K.; Kajamuhideen, M. S.

    2014-04-24

    CdS nanoparticles were prepared by the reaction of cadmium acetate with thiourea in the presence and absence of methylene blue dye (MB). The nanoparticles were characterized by, XRD, FT-IR, UV-Vis. XRD study shows the presence of hexagonal phase for the nanoparticles whereas in case of the bulk samples only the hexagonal phase is observed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) showed a strong interaction of methyl groups with CdS nanoparticles. The degradation of methylene blue was analysed using UV-Vis absorbance spectrum. Thus the results authenticate that methylene blue dye influences the structural and optical properties of the CdS nanoparticles.

  6. The Structure and Optical Properties of CdS Superclusters in Zeolite Hosts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    diffraction, EXAFS analysis and optical absorption data reveal discrete (CdS)4 cubes located within the small sodalite units of the structure which begin to...Cd and S with a CdS bond length of 2.47K. At higher loadings these cubes begin to occupy adjacent sodalite ’ units where the Cd atoms point toward each...electronic properties can be controlled by using different zeolites as the template. - , - The unique stability of (CdS)4 clusters inside the sodalite

  7. PVP capped CdS nanoparticles for UV-LED applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaram, H.; Selvakumar, D.; Jayavel, R.

    2015-06-24

    Polyvinlypyrrolidone (PVP) capped cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles are synthesized by wet chemical method. The powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) result indicates that the nanoparticles are crystallized in cubic phase. The optical properties are characterized by UV-Vis absorption. The morphology of CdS nanoparticles are studied using Scanning electron microscope (SEM). The thermal behavior of the as prepared nanoparticles has been examined by Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The optical absorption study of pvp capped CdS reveal a red shift confirms the UV-LED applications.

  8. CdS loaded on coal based activated carbon nanofibers with enhanced photocatalytic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jixi; Guo, Mingxi; Jia, Dianzeng; Song, Xianli; Tong, Fenglian

    2016-08-01

    The coal based activated carbon nanofibers (CBACFs) were prepared by electrospinning a mixture of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and acid treated coal. Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles loaded on CBACFs were fabricated by solvothermal method. The obtained samples were characterized by FESEM, TEM, and XRD. The results reveal that the CdS nanoparticles are homogeneously dispersed on the surfaces of CBACFs. The CdS/CBACFs nanocomposites exhibited higher photoactivity for photodegradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation than pure CdS nanoparticles. CBACFs can be used as low cost support materials for the preparation of nanocomposites with high photocatalytic activity.

  9. Synthesis of CdS nanoparticles for photocatalytic application of methyleneblue degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthuraj, V.; Umadevi, M.; Sankarasubramanian, K.; Kajamuhideen, M. S.

    2014-04-01

    CdS nanoparticles were prepared by the reaction of cadmium acetate with thiourea in the presence and absence of methylene blue dye (MB). The nanoparticles were characterized by, XRD, FT-IR, UV-Vis. XRD study shows the presence of hexagonal phase for the nanoparticles whereas in case of the bulk samples only the hexagonal phase is observed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) showed a strong interaction of methyl groups with CdS nanoparticles. The degradation of methylene blue was analysed using UV-Vis absorbance spectrum. Thus the results authenticate that methylene blue dye influences the structural and optical properties of the CdS nanoparticles.

  10. Axion string dynamics I: 2+1D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Leesa M.; Moore, Guy D.

    2016-05-01

    If the axion exists and if the initial axion field value is uncorrelated at causally disconnected points, then it should be possible to predict the efficiency of cosmological axion production, relating the axionic dark matter density to the axion mass. The main obstacle to making this prediction is correctly treating the axion string cores. We develop a new algorithm for treating the axionic string cores correctly in 2+1 dimensions. When the axionic string cores are given their full physical string tension, axion production is about twice as efficient as in previous simulations. We argue that the string network in 2+1 dimensions should behave very differently than in 3+1 dimensions, so this result cannot be simply carried over to the physical case. We outline how to extend our method to 3+1D axion string dynamics.

  11. 1-D ELECTRO-OPTIC BEAM STEERING DEVICE.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Tsui, Chi Leung

    2011-06-05

    In this paper, we present the design and fabrication of a 1D beam steering device based on planar electro-optic thermal-plastic prisms and a collimator lens array. With the elimination of moving parts, the proposed device is able to overcome the mechanical limitations of present scanning devices, such as fatigue and low operating frequency, while maintaining a small system footprint (~0.5mm×0.5mm). From experimental data, our prototype device is able to achieve a maximum deflection angle of 5.6° for a single stage prism design and 29.2° for a cascaded three prisms stage design. The lens array shows a 4µm collimated beam diameter.

  12. Combinatorial approach to exactly solve the 1D Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Swarnadeep

    2017-01-01

    The Ising model is a well known statistical model which can be solved exactly by various methods. The most familiar one is the transfer matrix method. Sometimes it can be difficult to approach the open boundary case rather than periodic boundary ones in higher dimensions. But physically it is more intuitive to study the open boundary case, as it gives a closer view of the real system. We have introduced a new method called the pairing method to determine the exact partition function for the simplest case, a 1D Ising lattice. This method simplifies the problem's complexities and reduces it to a pure combinatorial problem. The study also reveals that it is possible to apply this pairing method in the case of a 2D square lattice. The obtained results agree perfectly with the values in the literature and this new approach provides an algorithmic insight to deal with such problems.

  13. Statistical analysis of 1D HRR target features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, David C.; Schmitz, James L.; Williams, Robert L.

    2000-08-01

    Automatic target recognition (ATR) and feature-aided tracking (FAT) algorithms that use one-dimensional (1-D) high range resolution (HRR) profiles require unique or distinguishable target features. This paper explores the use of statistical measures to quantify the separability and stability of ground target features found in HRR profiles. Measures of stability, such as the mean and variance, can be used to determine the stability of a target feature as a function of the target aspect and elevation angle. Statistical measures of feature predictability and separability, such as the Fisher and Bhattacharyya measures, demonstrate the capability to adequately predict the desired target feature over a specified aspect angular region. These statistical measures for separability and stability are explained in detail and their usefulness is demonstrated with measured HRR data.

  14. Axion string dynamics I: 2+1D

    SciTech Connect

    Fleury, Leesa M.; Moore, Guy D.

    2016-05-03

    If the axion exists and if the initial axion field value is uncorrelated at causally disconnected points, then it should be possible to predict the efficiency of cosmological axion production, relating the axionic dark matter density to the axion mass. The main obstacle to making this prediction is correctly treating the axion string cores. We develop a new algorithm for treating the axionic string cores correctly in 2+1 dimensions. When the axionic string cores are given their full physical string tension, axion production is about twice as efficient as in previous simulations. We argue that the string network in 2+1 dimensions should behave very differently than in 3+1 dimensions, so this result cannot be simply carried over to the physical case. We outline how to extend our method to 3+1D axion string dynamics.

  15. Effective theory of black holes in the 1/D expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emparan, Roberto; Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Ryotaku; Tanabe, Kentaro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2015-06-01

    The gravitational field of a black hole is strongly localized near its horizon when the number of dimensions D is very large. In this limit, we can effectively replace the black hole with a surface in a background geometry (e.g. Minkowski or Anti-deSitter space). The Einstein equations determine the effective equations that this `black hole surface' (or membrane) must satisfy. We obtain them up to next-to-leading order in 1/ D for static black holes of the Einstein-(A)dS theory. To leading order, and also to next order in Minkowski backgrounds, the equations of the effective theory are the same as soap-film equations, possibly up to a redshift factor. In particular, the Schwarzschild black hole is recovered as a spherical soap bubble. Less trivially, we find solutions for `black droplets', i.e. black holes localized at the boundary of AdS, and for non-uniform black strings.

  16. Uniform Propagation of Chaos for Kac's 1D Particle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we study Kac's 1D particle system, consisting of the velocities of N particles colliding at constant rate and randomly exchanging energies. We prove uniform (in time) propagation of chaos in Wasserstein distance with explicit polynomial rates in N, for both the squared (i.e., the energy) and non-squared particle system. These rates are of order N^{-1/3} (almost, in the non-squared case), assuming that the initial distribution of the limit nonlinear equation has finite moments of sufficiently high order (4+ɛ is enough when using the 2-Wasserstein distance). The proof relies on a convenient parametrization of the collision recently introduced by Hauray, as well as on a coupling technique developed by Cortez and Fontbona.

  17. 1-D ELECTRO-OPTIC BEAM STEERING DEVICE

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Tsui, Chi Leung

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design and fabrication of a 1D beam steering device based on planar electro-optic thermal-plastic prisms and a collimator lens array. With the elimination of moving parts, the proposed device is able to overcome the mechanical limitations of present scanning devices, such as fatigue and low operating frequency, while maintaining a small system footprint (~0.5mm×0.5mm). From experimental data, our prototype device is able to achieve a maximum deflection angle of 5.6° for a single stage prism design and 29.2° for a cascaded three prisms stage design. The lens array shows a 4µm collimated beam diameter. PMID:22199458

  18. Lanczos diagonalizations of the 1-D Peierls-Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, E.Y.; Campbell, D.K.; Gammel, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    In studies of interacting electrons in reduced dimensions'' one is trapped between the Scylla of exponential growth of the number of states in any exact many-body basis and the Charybdis of the failure of mean-field theories to capture adequately the effects of interactions. In the present article we focus on one technique -- the Lanczos method -- which, at least in the case of the 1-D Peierls-Hubbard model, appears to allow us to sail the narrow channel between these two hazards. In contrast to Quantum Monte Carlo methods, which circumvent the exponential growth of states by statistical techniques and importance sampling, the Lanczos approach attacks this problem head-on by diagonalizing the full Hamiltonian. Given the restrictions of present computers, this approach is thus limited to studying finite clusters of roughly 12--14 sites. Fortunately, in one dimension, such clusters are usually sufficient for extracting many of the properties of the infinite system provided that one makes full use of the ability to vary the boundary conditions. In this article we shall apply the Lanczos methodology and novel phase randomization'' techniques to study the 1-D Peierls-Hubbard model, with particular emphasis on the optical absorption properties, including the spectrum of absorptions as a function of photon energy. Despite the discreteness of the eigenstates in our finite clusters, we are able to obtain optical spectra that, in cases where independent tests can be made, agree well with the known exact results for the infinite system. Thus we feel that this combination of techniques represents an important and viable means of studying many interesting novel materials involving strongly correlated electrons. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Evaluating 1d Seismic Models of the Lunar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Thorne, M. S.; Weber, R. C.; Schmerr, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    A four station seismic network was established on the Moon from 1969 to 1977 as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP). A total of nine 1D seismic velocity models were generated using a variety of different techniques. In spite of the fact that these models were generated from the same data set, significant differences exist between them. We evaluate these models by comparing predicted travel-times to published catalogs of lunar events. We generate synthetic waveform predictions for 1D lunar models using a modified version of the Green's Function of the Earth by Minor Integration (GEMINI) technique. Our results demonstrate that the mean square errors between predicted and measured P-wave travel times are smaller than those for S-wave travel times in all cases. Moreover, models fit travel times for artificial and meteoroid impacts better than for shallow and deep moonquakes. Overall, models presented by Nakamura [Nakamura, 1983] and Garcia et al. [Garcia et al., 2011] predicted the observed travel times better than all other models and were comparable in their explanation of travel-times. Nevertheless, significant waveform differences exist between these models. In particular, the seismic velocity structure of the lunar crust and regolith strongly affect the waveform characteristics predicted by these models. Further complexity is added by possible mantle discontinuity structure that exists in a subset of these models. We show synthetic waveform predictions for these models demonstrating the role that crustal structure has in generating long duration seismic coda inherent in the lunar waveforms.

  20. EDITORIAL: Nanostructured solar cells Nanostructured solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenham, Neil C.; Grätzel, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Conversion into electrical power of even a small fraction of the solar radiation incident on the Earth's surface has the potential to satisfy the world's energy demands without generating CO2 emissions. Current photovoltaic technology is not yet fulfilling this promise, largely due to the high cost of the electricity produced. Although the challenges of storage and distribution should not be underestimated, a major bottleneck lies in the photovoltaic devices themselves. Improving efficiency is part of the solution, but diminishing returns in that area mean that reducing the manufacturing cost is absolutely vital, whilst still retaining good efficiencies and device lifetimes. Solution-processible materials, e.g. organic molecules, conjugated polymers and semiconductor nanoparticles, offer new routes to the low-cost production of solar cells. The challenge here is that absorbing light in an organic material produces a coulombically bound exciton that requires dissociation at a donor-acceptor heterojunction. A thickness of at least 100 nm is required to absorb the incident light, but excitons only diffuse a few nanometres before decaying. The problem is therefore intrinsically at the nano-scale: we need composite devices with a large area of internal donor-acceptor interface, but where each carrier has a pathway to the respective electrode. Dye-sensitized and bulk heterojunction cells have nanostructures which approach this challenge in different ways, and leading research in this area is described in many of the articles in this special issue. This issue is not restricted to organic or dye-sensitized photovoltaics, since nanotechnology can also play an important role in devices based on more conventional inorganic materials. In these materials, the electronic properties can be controlled, tuned and in some cases completely changed by nanoscale confinement. Also, the techniques of nanoscience are the natural ones for investigating the localized states, particularly at

  1. Mechanical design of DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Castro, Carlos E; Su, Hai-Jun; Marras, Alexander E; Zhou, Lifeng; Johnson, Joshua

    2015-04-14

    Structural DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that has demonstrated great potential for applications such as single molecule sensing, drug delivery, and templating molecular components. As the applications of DNA nanotechnology expand, a consideration of their mechanical behavior is becoming essential to understand how these structures will respond to physical interactions. This review considers three major avenues of recent progress in this area: (1) measuring and designing mechanical properties of DNA nanostructures, (2) designing complex nanostructures based on imposed mechanical stresses, and (3) designing and controlling structurally dynamic nanostructures. This work has laid the foundation for mechanically active nanomachines that can generate, transmit, and respond to physical cues in molecular systems.

  2. Structure and property of CdS thin films with different residual chlorine content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Kai; Wu, Weibing; Shan, Beibei; Nan, Huilin

    2016-10-01

    Two types of CdS thin films were synthesized via chemical bath deposition (CBD) method from solutions of acetate and chloride, respectively. The structural and photoelectric characteristics of both CdS thin films were characterized by XRD, SEM, PL, UV-vis and electrochemical measurements. The pristine films were hexagonal regardless of anion type in CBD solutions. Cl residual was confirmed in the CdS film from the Cl-containing solution. The residual Cl helps to reduce S vacancies and improve the crystallinity during annealing, which is proved by the left shift of peaks in XRD patterns, the increased band gap, and the lower carrier concentration. The present results are significant in choosing suitable anions during the CBD deposition of CdS thin film for improving the device performance of CdTe solar cell.

  3. Growth and characterization of CdS thin films on polymer substrates for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongseob; Kim, Eung Kwon; Lee, Suho; Lee, Jaehyeong

    2014-05-01

    In this work, cadmium sulfide (CdS) films were deposited on flexible polymer substrates such as polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). The r.f. magnetron sputtering, which is cost-effective scalable technique, was used for the film deposition. The structural and optical properties of the films grown at different sputtering pressures were investigated. When the CdS film was deposited at lower pressure, the crystallinity and the preferred orientation toward c-axis in hexagonal phase was improved. However, the optical transmittance was reduced as the sputtering pressure was decreased. Compared with the glass substrate, CdS films grown on polymer substrates were exhibited some wore structural and optical characteristics. CdTe thin film solar cell applied to sputtered CdS as a window layer showed a maximum efficiency of 11.6%.

  4. Enhanced photoelectrochemical properties of TiO2 nanorod arrays decorated with CdS nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zheng; Liu, Xiangxuan; Wang, Weipeng; Liu, Can; Li, Zhengcao; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2014-01-01

    TiO2 nanorod arrays (TiO2 NRAs) sensitized with CdS nanoparticles were fabricated via successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR), and TiO2 NRAs were obtained by oxidizing Ti NRAs obtained through oblique angle deposition. The TiO2 NRAs decorated with CdS nanoparticles exhibited excellent photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic properties under visible light, and the one decorated with 20 SILAR cycles CdS nanoparticles shows the best performance. This can be attributed to the enhanced separation of electrons and holes by forming heterojunctions of CdS nanoparticles and TiO2 NRAs. This provides a promising way to fabricate the material for solar energy conversion and wastewater degradation. PMID:27877718

  5. Development of a Higher Fidelity Model for the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2014-01-01

    Significant improvements have been made to the ACM model of the CDS, enabling accurate predictions of dynamic operations with fewer assumptions. The model has been utilized to predict how CDS performance would be impacted by changing operating parameters, revealing performance trade-offs and possibilities for improvement. CDS efficiency is driven by the THP coefficient of performance, which in turn is dependent on heat transfer within the system. Based on the remaining limitations of the simulation, priorities for further model development include: center dot Relaxing the assumption of total condensation center dot Incorporating dynamic simulation capability for the buildup of dissolved inert gasses in condensers center dot Examining CDS operation with more complex feeds center dot Extending heat transfer analysis to all surfaces

  6. Far-infrared investigations of the surface modes in CdS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajić, J.; Gilić, M.; Romčević, N.; Romčević, M.; Stanišić, G.; Lazarević, Z.; Joksimović, D.; Yahia, I. S.

    2014-09-01

    The properties of Cadmium sulphide (CdS) thin films were investigated by applying atomic force microscopy (AFM) and far-infrared spectroscopy. CdS thin films were prepared using thermal evaporation technique under a base pressure of 2 × 10-5 torr. The quality of these films was investigated by AFM spectroscopy. We apply far-infrared spectroscopy to investigate the optical properties of CdS thin films, and reveal the existence of a surface optical phonon (SOP) mode at 297 cm-1. For the first time, the dielectric function of CdS thin film is modeled as a mixture of homogenous spherical inclusions in air by the Maxwell-Garnet formula. In the analysis of the far-infrared reflection spectra, a numerical model for calculating the reflectivity coefficient for a system which includes films and substrates has been applied.

  7. An Optimal CDS Construction Algorithm with Activity Scheduling in Ad Hoc Networks.

    PubMed

    Penumalli, Chakradhar; Palanichamy, Yogesh

    2015-01-01

    A new energy efficient optimal Connected Dominating Set (CDS) algorithm with activity scheduling for mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) is proposed. This algorithm achieves energy efficiency by minimizing the Broadcast Storm Problem [BSP] and at the same time considering the node's remaining energy. The Connected Dominating Set is widely used as a virtual backbone or spine in mobile ad hoc networks [MANETs] or Wireless Sensor Networks [WSN]. The CDS of a graph representing a network has a significant impact on an efficient design of routing protocol in wireless networks. Here the CDS is a distributed algorithm with activity scheduling based on unit disk graph [UDG]. The node's mobility and residual energy (RE) are considered as parameters in the construction of stable optimal energy efficient CDS. The performance is evaluated at various node densities, various transmission ranges, and mobility rates. The theoretical analysis and simulation results of this algorithm are also presented which yield better results.

  8. Structural and chemical properties of highly oriented cadmium sulfide (CdS) cauliflower films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuri, R. S.; Gullapalli, S. K.; Zubia, D.; McClure, J. C.; Ramana, C. V.

    2010-08-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) films have been produced by sputter-deposition varying the sputtering-power ( P) in the range of 60-120 W. The crystal structure, morphology and chemical quality of the CdS films has been investigated employing X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray spectrometry (EDS). Structural characterization indicates that all the CdS layers exhibit cauliflower morphology. Highly oriented, single phase hexagonal-CdS films can be produced at P = 75-105 W while the films at other power contain mixed phases. Characterization using XPS and EDS indicate that the CdS layers are nearly stoichiometric at P = 75-105 W, at which point S-deficiency is induced resulting in Cd-rich-CdS layers.

  9. Continuous Microreactor-Assisted Solution Deposition for Scalable Production of CdS Films

    SciTech Connect

    Ramprasad, Sudhir; Su, Yu-Wei; Chang, Chih-Hung; Paul, Brian; Palo, Daniel R.

    2013-06-13

    Solution deposition offers an attractive, low temperature option in the cost effective production of thin film solar cells. Continuous microreactor-assisted solution deposition (MASD) was used to produce nanocrystalline cadmium sulfide (CdS) films on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrates with excellent uniformity. We report a novel liquid coating technique using a ceramic rod to efficiently and uniformly apply reactive solution to large substrates (152 mm × 152 mm). This technique represents an inexpensive approach to utilize the MASD on the substrate for uniform growth of CdS films. Nano-crystalline CdS films have been produced from liquid phase at ~90°C, with average thicknesses of 70 nm to 230 nm and with a 5 to 12% thickness variation. The CdS films produced were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-Ray diffraction to demonstrate their suitability to thin-film solar technology.

  10. Filtration-guided assembly for patterning one-dimensional nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaozhong; Wang, Chuan; Yeom, Junghoon

    2017-04-07

    Tremendous progress has been made in synthesizing various types of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures (NSs), such as nanotubes and nanowires, but some technical challenges still remain in the deterministic assembly of the solution-processed 1D NSs for device integration. In this work we investigate a scalable yet inexpensive nanomaterial assembly method, namely filtration-guided assembly (FGA), to place nanomaterials into desired locations as either an individual entity or ensembles, and form functional devices. FGA not only addresses the assembly challenges but also encompasses the notion of green nanomanufacturing, maximally utilizing nanomaterials and eliminating a waste stream of nanomaterials into the environment. FGA utilizes selective filtration of 1D NSs through the open windows on the nanoporous filter membrane whose surface is patterned by a polymer mask for guiding the 1D NS deposition. The modified soft-lithographic technique called blanket transfer (BT) is employed to create the various photoresist patterns of sub-10-micron resolution on the nanoporous filter membrane like mixed cellulose acetate. We use single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a model 1D NS and demonstrate the fabrication of an array pattern of homogeneous 1D NS network films over an area of 20 cm(2) within 10 min. The FGA-patterned SWCNT network films are transferred onto the substrate using the adhesive-based transfer technique, and show the highly uniform film thickness and resistance measurements across the entire substrate. Finally, the electrical performance of the back-gated transistors made from the FGA and transfer method of 95% pure SWCNTs is demonstrated.

  11. Filtration-guided assembly for patterning one-dimensional nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaozhong; Wang, Chuan; Yeom, Junghoon

    2017-04-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in synthesizing various types of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures (NSs), such as nanotubes and nanowires, but some technical challenges still remain in the deterministic assembly of the solution-processed 1D NSs for device integration. In this work we investigate a scalable yet inexpensive nanomaterial assembly method, namely filtration-guided assembly (FGA), to place nanomaterials into desired locations as either an individual entity or ensembles, and form functional devices. FGA not only addresses the assembly challenges but also encompasses the notion of green nanomanufacturing, maximally utilizing nanomaterials and eliminating a waste stream of nanomaterials into the environment. FGA utilizes selective filtration of 1D NSs through the open windows on the nanoporous filter membrane whose surface is patterned by a polymer mask for guiding the 1D NS deposition. The modified soft-lithographic technique called blanket transfer (BT) is employed to create the various photoresist patterns of sub-10-micron resolution on the nanoporous filter membrane like mixed cellulose acetate. We use single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a model 1D NS and demonstrate the fabrication of an array pattern of homogeneous 1D NS network films over an area of 20 cm2 within 10 min. The FGA-patterned SWCNT network films are transferred onto the substrate using the adhesive-based transfer technique, and show the highly uniform film thickness and resistance measurements across the entire substrate. Finally, the electrical performance of the back-gated transistors made from the FGA and transfer method of 95% pure SWCNTs is demonstrated.

  12. Alternative nanostructures for thermophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Nathanael; Aliev, Ali; Baughman, Ray

    2015-03-01

    There is a large promise for thermophones in high power sonar arrays, flexible loudspeakers, and noise cancellation devices. So far, freestanding aerogel-like carbon nanotube sheets demonstrate the best performance as a thermoacoustic heat source. However, the limited accessibility of large size freestanding carbon nanotube sheets and other even more exotic materials published recently, hampers the field. We present here new alternative materials for a thermoacoustic heat source with high energy conversion efficiency, additional functionalities, environmentally friendly and cost effective production technologies. We discuss the thermoacoustic performance of alternative nanoscale materials and compare their spectral and power dependencies of sound pressure in air. The study presented here focuses on engineering thermal gradients in the vicinity of nanostructures and subsequent heat dissipation processes from the interior of encapsulated thermoacoustic projectors. Applications of thermoacoustic projectors for high power SONAR arrays, sound cancellation, and optimal thermal design, regarding enhanced energy conversion efficiency, are discussed.

  13. Repairable, nanostructured biomimetic hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, M.; Brombosz, S.; Grubjesic, S.

    2013-03-01

    Proteins facilitate many key cellular processes, including signal recognition and energy transduction. The ability to harness this evolutionarily-optimized functionality could lead to the development of protein-based systems useful for advancing alternative energy storage and conversion. The future of protein-based, however, requires the development of materials that will stabilize, order and control the activity of the proteins. Recently we have developed a synthetic approach for the preparation of a durable biomimetic chemical hydrogel that can be reversibly swollen in water. The matrix has proven ideal for the stable encapsulation of both water- and membrane-soluble proteins. The material is composed of an aqueous dispersion of a diacrylate end-derivatized PEO-PPO-PEO macromer, a saturated phospholipid and a zwitterionic co-surfactant that self-assembles into a nanostructured physical gel at room temperature as determined by X-ray scattering. The addition of a water soluble PEGDA co-monomer and photoinitator does not alter the self-assembled structure and UV irradiation serves to crosslink the acrylate end groups on the macromer with the PEGDA forming a network within the aqueous domains as determined by FT-IR. More recently we have begun to incorporate reversible crosslinks employing Diels-Alder chemistry, allowing for the extraction and replacement of inactive proteins. The ability to replenish the materials with active, non-denatured forms of protein is an important step in advancing these materials for use in nanostructured devices This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences, USDoE under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  14. @AuAg nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rina; Soni, R. K.

    2014-09-01

    Bimetallic and trimetallic nanoparticles have attracted significant attention in recent times due to their enhanced electrochemical and catalytic properties compared to monometallic nanoparticles. The numerical calculations using Mie theory has been carried out for three-layered metal nanoshell dielectric-metal-metal (DMM) system consisting of a particle with a dielectric core (Al@Al2O3), a middle metal Ag (Au) layer and an outer metal Au (Ag) shell. The results have been interpreted using plasmon hybridization theory. We have also prepared Al@Al2O3@Ag@Au and Al@Al2O3@AgAu triple-layered core-shell or alloy nanostructure by two-step laser ablation method and compared with calculated results. The synthesis involves temporal separations of Al, Ag, and Au deposition for step-by-step formation of triple-layered core-shell structure. To form Al@Ag nanoparticles, we ablated silver for 40 min in aluminium nanoparticle colloidal solution. As aluminium oxidizes easily in water to form alumina, the resulting structure is core-shell Al@Al2O3. The Al@Al2O3 particle acts as a seed for the incoming energetic silver particles for multilayered Al@Al2O3@Ag nanoparticles is formed. The silver target was then replaced by gold target and ablation was carried out for different ablation time using different laser energy for generation of Al@Al2O3@Ag@Au core-shell or Al@Al2O3@AgAu alloy. The formation of core-shell and alloy nanostructure was confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy. The absorption spectra show shift in plasmon resonance peak of silver to gold in the range 400-520 nm with increasing ablation time suggesting formation of Ag-Au alloy in the presence of alumina particles in the solution.

  15. Novel fabrication of silica nanotube by selective photoetching of CdS nanorod template

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Joong-Ho; Chae, Weon-Sik; Cho, Hyeon Mo; Choi, Moon-Gun; Kim, Yong-Rok . E-mail: yrkim@yonsei.ac.kr

    2006-09-14

    CdS/silica core-shell nanorod was prepared by silica coating over the CdS nanorod template of which the surface was initially capped by (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane. The silica nanotube with both ends closed was fabricated from the core-shell nanorod by selective photoetching of the core CdS nanorod template with controlled photon energy in the oxygen-saturated aqueous solution including methyl viologen.

  16. Photocatalytic efficiency of CdS film synthesized by CBD method

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, T.; Sato, Y.; Jeyadevan, B.; Tohji, K.; Arai, T.; Shinoda, K.

    2006-05-15

    Cadmium Sulfide semiconductor has comparatively small band gap and act as photocatalyst under irradiation of visible light. For practical use, it is convenient to fix the photocatalyst on a substrate as a thin film. In this study, we prepared CdS thin film on Ti substrate by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD). To improve photocatalytic activity, CdS film was annealed and optimum thickness was investigated.

  17. Optical properties of CdS nanoclusters incorporated in zeolite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevel, Serhiy G.; Voznyi, Vladimir L.; Telbiz, German M.; Shwetz, Oleksiy V.

    1995-11-01

    Luminescence of CdS nanoclusters in type Y (FAU) zeolite is studied within 10 K - 293 K temperature range under excitation by third harmonic of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The exceptional features are revealed in comparison with bulk CdS crystals: essential short- wavelength shift of emission apparently due to quantum confinement and peculiar non- monotonic dependence of the overall emission intensity on temperature.

  18. Optical properties of colloidal CdS and ZnS quantum dots nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amran, Afiqah Shafify; Shamsudin, Siti Aisyah

    2016-11-01

    CdS and ZnS nanoparticles are luminescent semiconductors with great properties to be used in biosensors. Both semiconducting nanoparticles were synthesized in distilled water by using the simple colloidal method. Thioglycolic acid (TGA) was used as a stabilizer and Polyethyleneimine (PEI) was used as a surface modifier. The chemical composition and optical properties of the CdS and ZnS nanoparticles were investigated using Ultra Violet (UV) lamp, UV Spectroscopy and Photoluminescence (PL) Spectroscopy.

  19. Clusius-Dickel Separations (CDS): A new look at an old technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    The history, applications, and theoretical basis of the CDS technique are reviewed. The advantage to be realized by conduction of CDSs in low-g, space environments are deduced. The results are reported of investigations aimed at further improving CDS efficiencies by altering convective flow patterns. The question of whether multicellular flow or turbulence can introduce a new separation mechanism which would boost separation efficiencies at least an order of magnitude is considered. Results are presented and discussed.

  20. Nanostructured Materials for Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    2009-11-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose overall objective is to advance the fundamental understanding of novel photoelectronic organic device structures integrated with inorganic nanostructures, while also expanding the general field of nanomaterials for renewable energy devices and systems.

  1. Microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mammadov, Rashad; Tekinay, Ayse B; Dana, Aykutlu; Guler, Mustafa O

    2012-02-01

    Peptide-based nanomaterials have been utilized for various applications from regenerative medicine to electronics since they provide several advantages including easy synthesis methods, numerous routes for functionalization and biomimicry of secondary structures of proteins which leads to design of self-assembling peptide molecules to form nanostructures. Microscopic characterization at nanoscale is critical to understand processes directing peptide molecules to self-assemble and identify structure-function relationship of the nanostructures. Here, fundamental studies in microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures are discussed to provide insights in widely used microscopy tools. In this review, we will encompass characterization studies of peptide nanostructures with modern microscopes, such as TEM, SEM, AFM, and advanced optical microscopy techniques. We will also mention specimen preparation methods and describe interpretation of the images.

  2. Optical and structural properties of sputtered CdS films for thin film solar cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Donguk; Park, Young; Kim, Minha; Choi, Youngkwan; Park, Yong Seob; Lee, Jaehyoeng

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Photo current–voltage curves (a) and the quantum efficiency (QE) (b) for the solar cell with CdS film grown at 300 °C. - Highlights: • CdS thin films were grown by a RF magnetron sputtering method. • Influence of growth temperature on the properties of CdS films was investigated. • At higher T{sub g}, the crystallinity of the films improved and the grains enlarged. • CdS/CdTe solar cells with efficiencies of 9.41% were prepared at 300 °C. - Abstract: CdS thin films were prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering at various temperatures. The effects of growth temperature on crystallinity, surface morphology and optical properties of the films were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Raman spectra, UV–visible spectrophotometry, and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. As the growth temperature was increased, the crystallinity of the sputtered CdS films was improved and the grains were enlarged. The characteristics of CdS/CdTe thin film solar cell appeared to be significantly influenced by the growth temperature of the CdS films. Thin film CdS/CdTe solar cells with efficiencies of 9.41% were prepared at a growth temperature of 300 °C.

  3. Arrays of Ultrathin CdS Nanoflakes with High-Energy Surface for Efficient Gas Detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Hua; Yin, Peng-Fei; Kulinich, Sergei A; Zhou, Yu-Zhu; Mao, Jing; Ling, Tao; Du, Xi-Wen

    2017-01-11

    It is fascinating and challenging to endow conventional materials with unprecedented properties. For instance, cadmium sulfide (CdS) is an important semiconductor with excellent light response; however, its potential in gas-sensing was underestimated owing to relatively low chemical activity and poor electrical conductivity. Herein, we demonstrate that an ideal architecture, ultrathin nanoflake arrays (NFAs), can improve significantly gas-sensing properties of CdS material. The CdS NFAs are grown directly on the interdigitated electrode to expose large surface area. Their thickness is reduced below the double Debye length of CdS, permitting to achieve a full depletion of carriers. Particularly, the prepared CdS nanoflakes are enclosed with high-energy {0001} facets exposed, which provides more active sites for gas adsorption. Moreover, the NFAs exhibit the light-trapping effect, which further enhances their gas sensitivity. As a result, the as-prepared CdS NFAs demonstrate excellent gas-sensing and light-response properties, thus being capable of dual gas and light detection.

  4. Dynamic decoupling in the presence of 1D random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Arnab; Chakraborty, Ipsita; Bhattacharyya, Rangeet

    2016-05-01

    In the recent past, many dynamic decoupling sequences have been proposed for the suppression of decoherence of spins connected to thermal baths of various natures. Dynamic decoupling schemes for suppressing decoherence due to Gaussian diffusion have also been developed. In this work, we study the relative performances of dynamic decoupling schemes in the presence of a non-stationary Gaussian noise such as a 1D random walk. Frequency domain analysis is not suitable to determine the performances of various dynamic decoupling schemes in suppressing decoherence due to such a process. Thus, in this work, we follow a time domain calculation to arrive at the following conclusions: in the presence of such a noise, we show that (i) the traditional Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence outperforms Uhrig’s dynamic decoupling scheme, (ii) CPMG remains the optimal sequence for suppression of decoherence due to random walk in the presence of an external field gradient. Later, the theoretical predictions are experimentally verified by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on spin 1/2 particles diffusing in a liquid medium.

  5. 1-D Modeling of Massive Particle Injection (MPI) in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Parks, P. B.; Izzo, V. A.

    2008-11-01

    A 1-D Fast Current Quench (FCQ) model is developed to study current evolution and runaway electron suppression under massive density increase. The model consists of coupled toroidal electric field and energy equations, and it is solved numerically for DIII-D and ITER operating conditions. Simulation results suggest that fast shutdown by D2 liquid jet/pellet injection is in principle achievable for the desired plasma cooling time (˜15 ms for DIII-D and ˜50 ms for ITER) under ˜150x or higher densification. The current density and pressure profile are practically unaltered during the initial phase of jet propagation when dilution cooling dominates. With subsequent radiation cooling, the densified discharge enters the strongly collisional regime where Pfirsch-Schluter thermal diffusion can inhibit current contraction on the magnetic axis. Often the 1/1 kink instability, addressed by Kadomtsev's magnetic reconnection model, can be prevented. Our results are compared with NIMROD simulations in which the plasma is suddenly densified by ˜100x and experiences instantaneous dilution cooling, allowing for use of actual (lower) Lundquist numbers.

  6. Energy eigenfunctions of the 1D Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marojević, Želimir; Göklü, Ertan; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2013-08-01

    We developed a new and powerful algorithm by which numerical solutions for excited states in a gravito-optical surface trap have been obtained. They represent solutions in the regime of strong nonlinearities of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. In this context we also briefly review several approaches which allow, in principle, for calculating excited state solutions. It turns out that without modifications these are not applicable to strongly nonlinear Gross-Pitaevskii equations. The importance of studying excited states of Bose-Einstein condensates is also underlined by a recent experiment of Bücker et al. in which vibrational state inversion of a Bose-Einstein condensate has been achieved by transferring the entire population of the condensate to the first excited state. Here we focus on demonstrating the applicability of our algorithm for three different potentials by means of numerical results for the energy eigenstates and eigenvalues of the 1D Gross-Pitaevskii-equation. We compare the numerically found solutions and find out that they completely agree with the case of known analytical solutions.

  7. 1-D Numerical Analysis of RBCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1998-01-01

    An RBCC engine combines air breathing and rocket engines into a single engine to increase the specific impulse over an entire flight trajectory. Considerable research pertaining to RBCC propulsion was performed during the 1960's and these engines were revisited recently as a candidate propulsion system for either a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) or two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) launch vehicle. There are a variety of RBCC configurations that had been evaluated and new designs are currently under development. However, the basic configuration of all RBCC systems is built around the ejector scramjet engine originally developed for the hypersonic airplane. In this configuration, a rocket engine plays as an ejector in the air-augmented initial acceleration mode, as a fuel injector in scramjet mode and the rocket in all rocket mode for orbital insertion. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a useful tool for the analysis of complex transport processes in various components in RBCC propulsion systems. The objective of the present research was to develop a transient 1-D numerical model that could be used to predict flow behavior throughout a generic RBCC engine following a flight path.

  8. Control and imaging of O(1D2) precession.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiou-Min; Radenovic, Dragana Č; van der Zande, Wim J; Groenenboom, Gerrit C; Parker, David H; Vallance, Claire; Zare, Richard N

    2011-01-01

    Larmor precession of a quantum mechanical angular momentum vector about an applied magnetic field forms the basis for a range of magnetic resonance techniques, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging. We have used a polarized laser pump-probe scheme with velocity-map imaging detection to visualize, for the first time, the precessional motion of a quantum mechanical angular momentum vector. Photodissociation of O(2) at 157 nm provides a clean source of fast-moving O((1)D(2)) atoms, with their electronic angular momentum vector strongly aligned perpendicular to the recoil direction. In the presence of an external magnetic field, the distribution of atomic angular momenta precesses about the field direction, and polarization-sensitive images of the atomic scattering distribution recorded as a function of field strength yield 'time-lapse-photography' style movies of the precessional motion. We present movies recorded in various experimental geometries, and discuss potential consequences and applications in atmospheric chemistry and reaction dynamics.

  9. Cavitation Influence in 1D Part-load Vortex Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörfler, P. K.

    2016-11-01

    Residual swirl in the draft tube of Francis turbines may cause annoying low- frequency pulsation of pressure and power output, in particular during part-load operation. A 1D analytical model for these dynamic phenomena would enable simulation by some conventional method for computing hydraulic transients. The proper structure of such a model has implications for the prediction of prototype behaviour based on laboratory tests. The source of excitation as well as the dynamic transmission behaviour of the draft tube flow may both be described either by lumped or distributed parameters. The distributed version contains more information and, due to limited possibilities of identification, some data must be estimated. The distributed cavitation compliance is an example for this dilemma. In recent publications, the customary assumption of a constant wave speed has produced dubious results. The paper presents a more realistic model for distributed compressibility. The measured influence of the Thoma number is applied with the local cavitation factor. This concept is less sensitive to modelling errors and explains both the Thoma and Froude number influence. The possible effect of the normally unknown non-condensable gas content in the vortex cavity is shortly commented. Its measurement in future tests is recommended. It is also recommended to check the available analytical vortex models for possible dispersion effects.

  10. Characterization of Nanostructured Polymer Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-23

    of the film for complete polymer chain relaxation, including relaxation of surface features . The presence of intact surface globules at a substrate...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0059 Characterization of Nanostructured Polymer Films RODNEY PRIESTLEY TRUSTEES OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Final Report 12/23/2014...Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 06/01/2012-08/31/2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Characterization of Nanostructured Polymer Films 5a. CONTRACT

  11. Nanostructure-induced DNA condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ting; Llizo, Axel; Wang, Chen; Xu, Guiying; Yang, Yanlian

    2013-08-01

    The control of the DNA condensation process is essential for compaction of DNA in chromatin, as well as for biological applications such as nonviral gene therapy. This review endeavours to reflect the progress of investigations on DNA condensation effects of nanostructure-based condensing agents (such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, cationic polymer and peptide agents) observed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and other techniques. The environmental effects on structural characteristics of nanostructure-induced DNA condensates are also discussed.

  12. Toroidal nanostructures from self-assembly of block copolypeptides based on poly(L-arginine) and β-sheet peptide.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yong-beom; Lee, Eunji; Lee, Myongsoo

    2011-01-17

    We demonstrate here that rationally designed block copolypeptides based on poly(L-arginine) and β-sheet peptides can form toroidal nanostructures. In aqueous solution, we found that 1D nanoribbons roll up and connect in an end-to-end fashion under charge-balanced conditions, resulting in the formation of barrel-like toroidal nanostructures. Toroidal diameter was highly uniform (10 nm), indicating that there is a preferred geometrical packing requirement for toroid formation. Our results demonstrate that, when suitably designed, β-sheet nanostructures can be manipulated to form more complex 2D nanostructures. This finding offers new opportunities not only for the fabrication of more sophisticated peptide-based nanobiomaterials, but also for understanding and inhibiting protein misfolding diseases.

  13. Schottky nanocontact of one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures probed by using conductive atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung Ah; Rok Lim, Young; Jung, Chan Su; Choi, Jun Hee; Im, Hyung Soon; Park, Kidong; Park, Jeunghee; Kim, Gyu Tae

    2016-10-01

    To develop the advanced electronic devices, the surface/interface of each component must be carefully considered. Here, we investigate the electrical properties of metal-semiconductor nanoscale junction using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). Single-crystalline CdS, CdSe, and ZnO one-dimensional nanostructures are synthesized via chemical vapor transport, and individual nanobelts (or nanowires) are used to fabricate nanojunction electrodes. The current-voltage (I -V) curves are obtained by placing a C-AFM metal (PtIr) tip as a movable contact on the nanobelt (or nanowire), and often exhibit a resistive switching behavior that is rationalized by the Schottky (high resistance state) and ohmic (low resistance state) contacts between the metal and semiconductor. We obtain the Schottky barrier height and the ideality factor through fitting analysis of the I-V curves. The present nanojunction devices exhibit a lower Schottky barrier height and a higher ideality factor than those of the bulk materials, which is consistent with the findings of previous works on nanostructures. It is shown that C-AFM is a powerful tool for characterization of the Schottky contact of conducting channels between semiconductor nanostructures and metal electrodes.

  14. Absorption and emission spectroscopy of individual semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Matthew P.

    The advent of controllable synthetic methods for the production of semiconductor nanostructures has led to their use in a host of applications, including light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, sensors, and even television displays. This is, in part, due to the size, shape, and morphologically dependent optical and electrical properties that make this class of materials extremely customizable; wire-, rod- and sphere-shaped nanocrystals are readily synthesized through common wet chemical methods. Most notably, confining the physical dimension of the nanostructure to a size below its Bohr radius (aB) results in quantum confinement effects that increase its optical energy gap. Not only the size, but the shape of a particle can be exploited to tailor its optical and electrical properties. For example, confined CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and nanowires (NWs) of equivalent diameter possess significantly different optical gaps. This phenomenon has been ascribed to electrostatic contributions arising from dielectric screening effects that are more pronounced in an elongated (wire-like) morphology. Semiconducting nanostructures have thus received significant attention over the past two decades. However, surprisingly little work has been done to elucidate their basic photophysics on a single particle basis. What has been done has generally been accomplished through emission-based measurements, and thus does not fully capture the full breadth of these intriguing systems. What is therefore needed then are absorption-based studies that probe the size and shape dependent evolution of nanostructure photophysics. This thesis summarizes the single particle absorption spectroscopy that we have carried out to fill this knowledge gap. Specifically, the diameter-dependent progression of one-dimensional (1D) excitonic states in CdSe NWs has been revealed. This is followed by a study that focuses on the polarization selection rules of 1D excitons within single CdSe NWs. Finally

  15. Surface depletion induced quantum confinement in CdS nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Li, Dehui; Zhang, Jun; Xiong, Qihua

    2012-06-26

    We investigate the surface depletion induced quantum confinement in CdS nanobelts beyond the quantum confinement regime, where the thickness is much larger than the bulk exciton Bohr radius. From room temperature to 77 K, the emission energy of free exciton A scales linearly versus 1/L(2) when the thickness L is less than 100 nm, while a deviation occurs for those belts thicker than 100 nm due to the reabsorption effect. The 1/L(2) dependence can be explained by the surface depletion induced quantum confinement, which modifies the confinement potential leading to a quasi-square potential well smaller than the geometric thickness of nanobelts, giving rise to the confinement effect to exciton emission beyond the quantum confinement regime. The surface depletion is sensitive to carrier concentration and surface states. As the temperature decreases, the decrease of the electrostatic potential drop in the surface depletion region leads to a weaker confinement due to the decrease of carrier concentration. With a layer of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) passivation, PL spectra exhibit pronounced red shifts due to the decrease of the surface states at room temperature. No shift is found at 10 K both with or without PMMA passivation, suggesting a much weaker depletion field due to the freezing-out of donors.

  16. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy of One-Dimensional Nanostructure: Effects of Nanostructure Dimensions on the Tip Feedback Current under Unbiased Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hui; Kim, Jiyeon; Kim, Eunkyoung; Amemiya, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is developed as a powerful approach to electrochemical characterization of individual one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures under unbiased conditions. 1D nanostructures comprise high-aspect-ratio materials with both nanoscale and macroscale dimensions such as nanowires, nanotubes, nanobelts, and nanobands. Finite element simulations demonstrate that the feedback current at a disk-shaped ultramicroelectrode tip positioned above an unbiased nanoband, as prepared on an insulating substrate, is sensitive to finite dimensions of the band, i.e., micrometer length, nanometer width, and nanometer height from the insulating surface. The electron-transfer rate of a redox mediator at the nanoband surface depends not only on the intrinsic rate but also on the open-circuit potential of the nanoband, which is determined by the dimensions of the nanoband as well as the tip inner and outer radii, and tip–substrate distance. The theoretical predictions are confirmed experimentally by employing Au nanobands as fabricated on a SiO2 surface by electron-beam lithography, thereby yielding well defined dimensions of 100 or 500 nm in width, 47 nm in height, and 50 μm in length. A 100 nm-wide nanoband can be detected by SECM imaging with ∼2 μm-diameter tips although the tip feedback current is compromised by finite electron-transfer kinetics for Ru(NH3)63+ at the nanoband surface. PMID:20160938

  17. Effect of porosity on electrical conduction of simulated nanostructures by Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dariani, R. S.; Abbas Hadi, N.

    2016-09-01

    Electrical conduction of deposited nanostructures is studied by oblique angle deposition. At first, a medium is simulated as nanocolumns by Monte Carlo method, then the effects of porosity on electron transport in 1D and 2D are investigated. The results show that more electrons transfer in media with low porosity, but with increasing porosity, the distance between nanocolumns expands and less electrons transfer. Therefore, the transport current reduces at the surface.

  18. Spatio-temporal stability of 1D Kerr cavity solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelens, L.; Parra-Rivas, P.; Leo, F.; Gomila, D.; Matias, Manuel A.; Coen, S.

    2014-05-01

    The Lugiato-Lefever equation (LLE) has been extensively studied since its derivation in 1987, when this meanfield model was introduced to describe nonlinear optical cavities. The LLE was originally derived to describe a ring cavity or a Fabry-Perot resonator with a transverse spatial extension and partially filled with a nonlinear medium but it has also been shown to be applicable to other types of cavities, such as fiber resonators and microresonators. Depending on the parameters used, the LLE can present a monostable or bistable input-output response curve. A large number of theoretical studies have been done in the monostable regime, but the bistable regime has remained widely unexplored. One of the reasons for this was that previous experimental setups were not able to works in such regimes of the parameter space. Nowadays the possibility of reaching such parameter regimes experimentally has renewed the interest in the LLE. In this contribution, we present an in-depth theoretical study of the different dynamical regimes that can appear in parameter space, focusing on the dynamics of localized solutions, also known as cavity solitons (CSs). We show that time-periodic oscillations of a 1D CS appear naturally in a broad region of parameter space. More than this oscillatory regime, which has been recently demonstrated experimentally,1 we theoretically report on several kinds of chaotic dynamics. We show that the existence of CSs and their dynamics is related with the spatial dynamics of the system and with the presence of a codimension-2 point known as a Fold-Hopf bifurcation point. These dynamical regimes can become accessible by using devices such as microresonators, for instance widely used for creating optical frequency combs.

  19. Nonlinear electrical conductivity in a 1D granular medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcon, E.; Castaing, B.; Creyssels, M.

    2004-04-01

    We report on observations of the electrical transport within a chain of metallic beads (slightly oxidized) under an applied stress. A transition from an insulating to a conductive state is observed as the applied current is increased. The voltage-current ( U- I) characteristics are nonlinear and hysteretic, and saturate to a low voltage per contact (0.4 V). Our 1D experiment allows us to understand phenomena (such as the “Branly effect”) related to this conduction transition by focusing on the nature of the contacts instead of the structure of the granular network. We show that this transition comes from an electro-thermal coupling in the vicinity of the microcontacts between each bead - the current flowing through these contact points generates their local heating which leads to an increase of their contact areas, and thus enhances their conduction. This current-induced temperature rise (up to 1050 ^{circ}C) results in the microsoldering of the contact points (even for voltages as low as 0.4 V). Based on this self-regulated temperature mechanism, an analytical expression for the nonlinear U- I back trajectory is derived, and is found to be in very good agreement with the experiments. In addition, we can determine the microcontact temperature with no adjustable parameters. Finally, the stress dependence of the resistance is found to be strongly non-hertzian due to the presence of the surface films. This dependence cannot be usually distinguished from the one due to the disorder of the granular contact network in 2D or 3D experiments.

  20. Restrained dark U (1 )d at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Fagner C.; Fajfer, Svjetlana

    2016-12-01

    We investigate a spontaneously broken U (1 )d gauge symmetry with a muon-specific dark Higgs. Our first goal is to verify how the presence of a new dark Higgs, ϕ , and a dark gauge boson, V , can simultaneously face the anomalies from the muon magnetic moment and the proton charge radius. Second, by assuming that V must decay to an electron-positron pair, we explore the corresponding parameter space determined with the low-energy constraints coming from K →μ X , electron (g -2 )e, K →μ νμe+e-, K →μ νμμ+μ-, and τ →ντμ νμe+e-. We focus on the scenario where the V mass is below ˜2 mμ and the ϕ mass runs from few MeV to 250 MeV, with V -photon mixing of the order ˜O (10-3). Among weak process at low energies, we check the influence of the new light vector on kaon decays as well as on the scattering e+e-→μ+μ-e+e- and discuss the impact of the dark Higgs on e+e-→μ+μ-μ+μ-. Finally, we consider contributions of the V -photon mixing in the decays π0→γ e+e-, η →γ e+e-, ρ →π e+e-, K*→K e+e-, and ϕ (1020 )→η e+e-.

  1. A new general 1-D vadose zone flow solution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Fred L.; Lai, Wencong; Steinke, Robert C.; Zhu, Jianting; Talbot, Cary A.; Wilson, John L.

    2015-06-01

    We have developed an alternative to the one-dimensional partial differential equation (PDE) attributed to Richards (1931) that describes unsaturated porous media flow in homogeneous soil layers. Our solution is a set of three ordinary differential equations (ODEs) derived from unsaturated flux and mass conservation principles. We used a hodograph transformation, the Method of Lines, and a finite water-content discretization to produce ODEs that accurately simulate infiltration, falling slugs, and groundwater table dynamic effects on vadose zone fluxes. This formulation, which we refer to as "finite water-content", simulates sharp fronts and is guaranteed to conserve mass using a finite-volume solution. Our ODE solution method is explicitly integrable, does not require iterations and therefore has no convergence limits and is computationally efficient. The method accepts boundary fluxes including arbitrary precipitation, bare soil evaporation, and evapotranspiration. The method can simulate heterogeneous soils using layers. Results are presented in terms of fluxes and water content profiles. Comparing our method against analytical solutions, laboratory data, and the Hydrus-1D solver, we find that predictive performance of our finite water-content ODE method is comparable to or in some cases exceeds that of the solution of Richards' equation, with or without a shallow water table. The presented ODE method is transformative in that it offers accuracy comparable to the Richards (1931) PDE numerical solution, without the numerical complexity, in a form that is robust, continuous, and suitable for use in large watershed and land-atmosphere simulation models, including regional-scale models of coupled climate and hydrology.

  2. Modeling shear band interaction in 1D torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda; Hanina, Erez

    2017-01-01

    When two shear bands are being formed at close distance from each other they interact, and further development of one of them may be quenched down. As a result there should be a minimum distance between shear bands. In the literature there are at least three analytical models for this minimum distance. Predictions of these models do not generally agree with each other and with test results. Recently we developed a 1D numerical scheme to predict the formation of shear bands in a torsion test of a thin walled pipe. We validated our code by reproducing results of the pioneering experiments of Marchand and Duffy, and then used it to investigate the mechanics of shear localization and shear band formation. We describe our shear band code in a separate publication, and here we use it only as a tool to investigate the interaction between two neighboring shear bands during the process of their formation. We trigger the formation of shear bands by specifying two perturbations of the initial strength. We vary the perturbations in terms of their amplitude and/or their width. Usually, the stronger perturbation triggers a faster developing shear band, which then prevails and quenches the development of the other shear band. We change the distance between the two shear bands and find, that up to a certain distance one of the shear bands becomes fully developed, and the other stays only partially developed. Beyond this distance the two shear bands are both fully developed. Finally, we check the influence of certain material and loading parameters on the interaction between the two shear bands, and compare the results to predictions of the analytical models from the literature.

  3. SCCRO3 (DCUN1D3) Antagonizes the Neddylation and Oncogenic Activity of SCCRO (DCUN1D1)*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guochang; Stock, Cameron; Bommeljé, Claire C.; Weeda, Víola B.; Shah, Kushyup; Bains, Sarina; Buss, Elizabeth; Shaha, Manish; Rechler, Willi; Ramanathan, Suresh Y.; Singh, Bhuvanesh

    2014-01-01

    The activity of cullin-RING type ubiquitination E3 ligases is regulated by neddylation, a process analogous to ubiquitination that culminates in covalent attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 to cullins. As a component of the E3 for neddylation, SCCRO/DCUN1D1 plays a key regulatory role in neddylation and, consequently, cullin-RING ligase activity. The essential contribution of SCCRO to neddylation is to promote nuclear translocation of the cullin-ROC1 complex. The presence of a myristoyl sequence in SCCRO3, one of four SCCRO paralogues present in humans that localizes to the membrane, raises questions about its function in neddylation. We found that although SCCRO3 binds to CAND1, cullins, and ROC1, it does not efficiently bind to Ubc12, promote cullin neddylation, or conform to the reaction processivity paradigms, suggesting that SCCRO3 does not have E3 activity. Expression of SCCRO3 inhibits SCCRO-promoted neddylation by sequestering cullins to the membrane, thereby blocking its nuclear translocation. Moreover, SCCRO3 inhibits SCCRO transforming activity. The inhibitory effects of SCCRO3 on SCCRO-promoted neddylation and transformation require both an intact myristoyl sequence and PONY domain, confirming that membrane localization and binding to cullins are required for in vivo functions. Taken together, our findings suggest that SCCRO3 functions as a tumor suppressor by antagonizing the neddylation activity of SCCRO. PMID:25349211

  4. 25th anniversary article: label-free electrical biodetection using carbon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Kannan; Kern, Klaus

    2014-02-26

    Nanostructures are promising candidates for use as active materials for the detection of chemical and biological species, mainly due to the high surface-to-volume ratio and the unique physical properties arising at the nanoscale. Among the various nanostructures, materials comprised of sp(2) -carbon enjoy a unique position due to the possibility to readily prepare them in various dimensions ranging from 0D, through 1D to 2D. This review focuses on the use of 1D (carbon nanotubes) and 2D (graphene) carbon nanostructures for the detection of biologically relevant molecules. A key advantage is the possibility to perform the sensing operation without the use of any labels or complex reaction schemes. Along this spirit, various strategies reported for the label-free electrical detection of biomolecules using carbon nanostructures are discussed. With their promise for ultimate sensitivity and the capability to attain high selectivity through controlled chemical functionalization, carbon-based nanobiosensors are expected to open avenues to novel diagnostic tools as well as to obtain new fundamental insight into biomolecular interactions down to the single molecule level.

  5. One-pot solvothermal route to self-assembly of cauliflower-shaped CdS microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Ming; Cui, Yao; Liu, Lu; Zhou, Zhen

    2011-05-01

    Nearly monodispersed cauliflower-shaped CdS microspheres were prepared through a simple one-step solvothermal route on a large scale by employing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as the surfactant. Images by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) indicate that cauliflower-shaped CdS microspheres with diameters in the range from 1.3 to 4.5 μm are assembled by nanoparticles with an average diameter of approximately 30 nm. The possible formation mechanism of the cauliflower-shaped CdS microspheres was also proposed. The photovoltaic activity of cauliflower-shaped CdS architectures has been investigated, indicating that the as-obtained CdS microspheres exhibited higher photovoltaic performance in comparison with CdS nanoparticles.

  6. Improved stoichiometry and photoanode efficiency of thermally evaporated CdS film with quantum dots as precursor.

    PubMed

    Fan, Libo; Wang, Peng; Guo, Qiuquan; Lei, Yan; Li, Ming; Han, Hongpei; Zhao, Haifeng; Yang, Dongluo; Zheng, Zhi; Yang, Jun

    2015-08-21

    Good stoichiometry of cadmium sulfide (CdS) film facilitates its application in photovoltaic devices; however, traditional thermal evaporation usually results in a Cd-deficient CdS film at a low-substrate temperature. In this study, Cd-rich CdS quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by a facile co-precipitation method and used as the precursor to thermally evaporate CdS film on indium tin oxide-coated glass (ITO/glass). As a consequence, the stoichiometry of CdS film was greatly improved with atomic ratio of Cd to S restored to unity. More importantly, the newly developed CdS film, with its rod-like surface microstructure, acted as an efficient photoanode in a photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell. Its properties, including surface morphology and roughness, crystal structure, chemical composition, film thickness, energy-level structure and photosensitivity, are studied in detail.

  7. Resolution-optimized NMR measurement of (1)D(CH), (1)D(CC) and (2)D(CH) residual dipolar couplings in nucleic acid bases.

    PubMed

    Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Bryce, David L; O'neil-Cabello, Erin; Nikonowicz, Edward P; Bax, Ad

    2004-11-01

    New methods are described for accurate measurement of multiple residual dipolar couplings in nucleic acid bases. The methods use TROSY-type pulse sequences for optimizing resolution and sensitivity, and rely on the E.COSY principle to measure the relatively small two-bond (2)D(CH) couplings at high precision. Measurements are demonstrated for a 24-nt stem-loop RNA sequence, uniformly enriched in (13)C, and aligned in Pf1. The recently described pseudo-3D method is used to provide homonuclear (1)H-(1)H decoupling, which minimizes cross-correlation effects and optimizes resolution. Up to seven (1)H-(13)C and (13)C-(13)C couplings are measured for pyrimidines (U and C), including (1)D(C5H5), (1)D(C6H6), (2)D(C5H6), (2)D(C6H5), (1)D(C5C4), (1)D(C5C6), and (2)D(C4H5). For adenine, four base couplings ((1)D(C2H2), (1)D(C8H8), (1)D(C4C5), and (1)D(C5C6)) are readily measured whereas for guanine only three couplings are accessible at high relative accuracy ((1)D(C8H8), (1)D(C4C5), and (1)D(C5C6)). Only three dipolar couplings are linearly independent in planar structures such as nucleic acid bases, permitting cross validation of the data and evaluation of their accuracies. For the vast majority of dipolar couplings, the error is found to be less than +/-3% of their possible range, indicating that the measurement accuracy is not limiting when using these couplings as restraints in structure calculations. Reported isotropic values of the one- and two-bond J couplings cluster very tightly for each type of nucleotide.

  8. Chemically enabled nanostructure fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Fengwei

    The first part of the dissertation explored ways of chemically synthesizing new nanoparticles and biologically guided assembly of nanoparticle building blocks. Chapter two focuses on synthesizing three-layer composite magnetic nanoparticles with a gold shell which can be easily functionalized with other biomolecules. The three-layer magnetic nanoparticles, when functionalized with oligonucleotides, exhibit the surface chemistry, optical properties, and cooperative DNA binding properties of gold nanoparticle probes, while maintaining the magnetic properties of the Fe3O4 inner shell. Chapter three describes a new method for synthesizing nanoparticles asymmetrically functionalized with oligonucleotides and the use of these novel building blocks to create satellite structures. This synthetic capability allows one to introduce valency into such structures and then use that valency to direct particle assembly events. The second part of the thesis explored approaches of nanostructure fabrication on substrates. Chapter four focuses on the development of a new scanning probe contact printing method, polymer pen lithography (PPL), which combines the advantages of muCp and DPN to achieve high-throughput, flexible molecular printing. PPL uses a soft elastomeric tip array, rather than tips mounted on individual cantilevers, to deliver inks to a surface in a "direct write" manner. Arrays with as many as ˜11 million pyramid-shaped pens can be brought into contact with substrates and readily leveled optically in order to insure uniform pattern development. Chapter five describes gel pen lithography, which uses a gel to fabricate pen array. Gel pen lithography is a low-cost, high-throughput nanolithography method especially useful for biomaterials patterning and aqueous solution patterning which makes it a supplement to DPN and PPL. Chapter 6 shows a novel form of optical nanolithography, Beam Pen Lithography (BPL), which uses an array of NSOM pens to do nanoscale optical

  9. Evaluating Cytotoxicity and Cellular Uptake from the Presence of Variously Processed Ti02 Nanostructured Morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Wong, S.; Zhou, H.; Santull, A.C.

    2010-05-01

    We evaluated the cytotoxicity of various morphological classes of TiO{sub 2} nanostructures (including 0-D nanoparticles, 1-D nanorods, and 3-D assemblies) toward living cells. These TiO{sub 2} nanostructures were modified with fluorescent dye molecules, mediated via a dopamine linkage, in order to facilitate a confocal study of their internalization. Specifically, we noted that both TiO{sub 2} 1-D nanorods and 0-D nanoparticles could internalize into cells after 24 h of incubation time. However, only incubation with TiO{sub 2} 1-D nanorods and 3-D micrometer-scale sea urchin-like assemblies at concentrations of up to 125 {mu}g/mL yielded data suggestive of cell viabilities of close to 100%. Moreover, upon irradiation with UV light for periods of a few minutes at energy densities of up to 1 J/cm{sub 2}, we observed up to 60% mortality rates, indicative of the cytotoxic potential of photoirradiated TiO{sub 2} nanostructures due to the generation of reactive oxygen species.

  10. Engineering 1D Quantum Stripes from Superlattices of 2D Layered Materials.

    PubMed

    Gruenewald, John H; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Heung Sik; Johnson, Jared M; Hwang, Jinwoo; Souri, Maryam; Terzic, Jasminka; Chang, Seo Hyoung; Said, Ayman; Brill, Joseph W; Cao, Gang; Kee, Hae-Young; Seo, Sung S Ambrose

    2017-01-01

    Dimensional tunability from two dimensions to one dimension is demonstrated for the first time using an artificial superlattice method in synthesizing 1D stripes from 2D layered materials. The 1D confinement of layered Sr2 IrO4 induces distinct 1D quantum-confined electronic states, as observed from optical spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. This 1D superlattice approach is generalizable to a wide range of layered materials.

  11. Efficiency and stability aspects of CdS photoanode for solar hydrogen generation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareek, Alka; Gopalakrishnan, Arthi; Borse, Pramod H.

    2016-10-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell based technology is expected to be one of the easiest green technologies to harness and to convert available solar energy into hydrogen [1]. Among the known systems of GaAs, Si, GaP and CdS- Cadmium sulphide is one of the best suited PEC materials that display a balance between its efficiency and stability. It has capability to absorb the visible light photons (E∼1.5eV - 3eV), and displays the band- energetics that suits for water-splitting reaction (H2O→H2+O2), that ultimately is based on the electronic and optical structure of the sulphides. However, the photo-induced dissolution of CdS in an electrolyte during its photo-illumination in PEC cell is its major drawback [2]. Though arsenides and phosphides show higher efficiency however CdS exhibits significant stability. In contrast though TiO2/ ZnO show good stability but CdS displays good optical response towards visible light photons as compared null response of titanate like systems. This necessitates one to identify the practical way to inhibit the photocorrosion in case of CdS photoanodes which is mainly facilitated due to interaction of photogenerated holes with CdS lattice. In past, Pt/ RuO2/ Ru modified CdS surface were found to control the unwanted photocorrosion [3]. Commercially, usage of such materials is un-economic option for any technological usage. The present work discusses that with advent of present day new synthetic routes how the dynamics of photo generated holes and electrons can be controlled to improve the stability and efficiency of the sulphide photoanodes, which in turn shows an an improvement in the performance and stability of the PEC cell for desirable technological applications.

  12. Phonon engineering for nanostructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubry, Sylvie; Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sullivan, John Patrick; Peebles, Diane Elaine; Hurley, David H.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Emerson, John Allen

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the physics of phonon transport at small length scales is increasingly important for basic research in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, nanomechanics, and thermoelectrics. We conducted several studies to develop an understanding of phonon behavior in very small structures. This report describes the modeling, experimental, and fabrication activities used to explore phonon transport across and along material interfaces and through nanopatterned structures. Toward the understanding of phonon transport across interfaces, we computed the Kapitza conductance for {Sigma}29(001) and {Sigma}3(111) interfaces in silicon, fabricated the interfaces in single-crystal silicon substrates, and used picosecond laser pulses to image the thermal waves crossing the interfaces. Toward the understanding of phonon transport along interfaces, we designed and fabricated a unique differential test structure that can measure the proportion of specular to diffuse thermal phonon scattering from silicon surfaces. Phonon-scale simulation of the test ligaments, as well as continuum scale modeling of the complete experiment, confirmed its sensitivity to surface scattering. To further our understanding of phonon transport through nanostructures, we fabricated microscale-patterned structures in diamond thin films.

  13. Ultrahard magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahota, P. K.; Liu, Y.; Skomski, R.; Manchanda, P.; Zhang, R.; Franchin, M.; Fangohr, H.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.; Kashyap, A.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    The performance of hard-magnetic nanostructures is investigated by analyzing the size and geometry dependence of thin-film hysteresis loops. Compared to bulk magnets, weight and volume are much less important, but we find that the energy product remains the main figure of merit down to very small features sizes. However, hysteresis loops are much easier to control on small length scales, as epitomized by Fe-Co-Pt thin films with magnetizations of up to 1.78 T and coercivities of up to 2.52 T. Our numerical and analytical calculations show that the feature size and geometry have a big effect on the hysteresis loop. Layered soft regions, especially if they have a free surface, are more harmful to coercivity and energy product than spherical inclusions. In hard-soft nanocomposites, an additional complication is provided by the physical properties of the hard phases. For a given soft phase, the performance of a hard-soft composite is determined by the parameter (Ms - Mh)/Kh.

  14. Nanostructures in photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Kylie R

    2006-12-15

    The world has recently been waking up to the urgent need to move away from fossil fuels and towards a low-carbon economy. To achieve this, we need a way of producing electricity that is efficient, widely applicable and cheap. At the same time, there has recently been an appreciation of the tremendous scope for making entirely new types of devices, and even seeing new physics, by structuring matter at the nanoscale. Furthermore, the occurrence of self-assembly in nature suggests that a range of types of nanoscale structures could be made simply and cheaply. The application of nanostructures to photovoltaics combines a field of almost limitless possibilities with a problem of vital urgency. In this paper, some of the newer ideas emerging from this trend are described, along with how they challenge our ideas on what a solar cell looks like. We are at the beginning of a time of radically rethinking the design of the solar cell, which may lead to the exploitation of completely new physical ideas in achieving a sustainable energy future.

  15. Zinc oxide nanostructures for electrochemical cortisol biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Kaushik, Ajeet; Tracy, Kathryn; Bhansali, Shekhar; Pala, Nezih

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report on fabrication of a label free, highly sensitive and selective electrochemical cortisol immunosensors using one dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorods (ZnO-NRs) and two dimensional nanoflakes (ZnO-NFs) as immobilizing matrix. The synthesized ZnO nanostructures (NSs) were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), selective area diffraction (SAED) and photoluminescence spectra (PL) which showed that both ZnO-NRs and ZnO-NFs are single crystalline and oriented in [0001] direction. Anti-cortisol antibody (Anti-Cab) are used as primary capture antibodies to detect cortisol using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The charge transfer resistance increases linearly with increase in cortisol concentration and exhibits a sensitivity of 3.078 KΩ. M-1 for ZnO-NRs and 540 Ω. M -1 for ZnO-NFs. The developed ZnO-NSs based immunosensor is capable of detecting cortisol at 1 pM. The observed sensing parameters are in physiological range. The developed sensors can be integrated with microfluidic system and miniaturized potentiostat to detect cortisol at point-of-care.

  16. Preliminary abatement device evaluation: 1D-2D KGM cyclone design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclones are predominately used in controlling cotton gin particulate matter (PM) emissions. The most commonly used cyclone designs are the 2D-2D and 1D-3D; however other designs such as the 1D-2D KGM have or are currently being used. A 1D-2D cyclone has a barrel length equal to the barrel diamete...

  17. Large Area Synthesis of 1D-MoSe2 Using Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Poh, Sock Mui; Tan, Sherman J R; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Chen, Zhongxin; Abdelwahab, Ibrahim; Fu, Deyi; Xu, Hai; Bao, Yang; Zhou, Wu; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-01-23

    Large area synthesis of 1D-MoSe2 nanoribbons on both insulating and conducting substrates via molecular beam epitaxy is presented. Dimensional controlled growth of 2D, 1D-MoSe2 , and 1D-2D-MoSe2 hybrid heterostructure is achieved by tuning the growth temperature or Mo:Se precursor ratio.

  18. PPM1D exerts its oncogenic properties in human pancreatic cancer through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Guo, Bo-Min; Kang, Jie; Deng, Xian-Zhao; Fan, You-Ben; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Ai, Kai-Xing

    2016-03-01

    Protein phosphatase, Mg(2+)/Mn(2+) dependent, 1D (PPM1D) is emerging as an oncogene by virtue of its negative control on several tumor suppressor pathways. However, the clinical significance of PPM1D in pancreatic cancer (PC) has not been defined. In this study, we determined PPM1D expression in human PC tissues and cell lines and their irrespective noncancerous controls. We subsequently investigated the functional role of PPM1D in the migration, invasion, and apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 PC cells in vitro and explored the signaling pathways involved. Furthermore, we examined the role of PPM1D in PC tumorigenesis in vivo. Our results showed that PPM1D is overexpressed in human PC tissues and cell lines and significantly correlated with tumor growth and metastasis. PPM1D promotes PC cell migration and invasion via potentiation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway through downregulation of apoptosis-stimulating of p53 protein 2 (ASPP2). In contrast to PPM1D, our results showed that ASPP2 is downregulated in PC tissues. Additionally, PPM1D suppresses PC cell apoptosis via inhibition of the p38 MAPK/p53 pathway through both dephosphorylation of p38 MAPK and downregulation of ASPP2. Furthermore, PPM1D promotes PC tumor growth in vivo. Our results demonstrated that PPM1D is an oncogene in PC.

  19. Nanostructured catalysts for organic transformations.

    PubMed

    Chng, Leng Leng; Erathodiyil, Nandanan; Ying, Jackie Y

    2013-08-20

    The development of green, sustainable and economical chemical processes is one of the major challenges in chemistry. Besides the traditional need for efficient and selective catalytic reactions that will transform raw materials into valuable chemicals, pharmaceuticals and fuels, green chemistry also strives for waste reduction, atomic efficiency and high rates of catalyst recovery. Nanostructured materials are attractive candidates as heterogeneous catalysts for various organic transformations, especially because they meet the goals of green chemistry. Researchers have made significant advances in the synthesis of well-defined nanostructured materials in recent years. Among these are novel approaches that have permitted the rational design and synthesis of highly active and selective nanostructured catalysts by controlling the structure and composition of the active nanoparticles (NPs) and by manipulating the interaction between the catalytically active NP species and their support. The ease of isolation and separation of the heterogeneous catalysts from the desired organic product and the recovery and reuse of these NPs further enhance their attractiveness as green and sustainable catalysts. This Account reviews recent advances in the use of nanostructured materials for catalytic organic transformations. We present a broad overview of nanostructured catalysts used in different types of organic transformations including chemoselective oxidations and reductions, asymmetric hydrogenations, coupling reactions, C-H activations, oxidative aminations, domino and tandem reactions, and more. We focus on recent research efforts towards the development of the following nanostructured materials: (i) nanostructured catalysts with controlled morphologies, (ii) magnetic nanocomposites, (iii) semiconductor-metal nanocomposites, and (iv) hybrid nanostructured catalysts. Selected examples showcase principles of nanoparticle design such as the enhancement of reactivity, selectivity

  20. Carbon nanostructures for orthopedic medical applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhang, Lijuan; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-09-01

    Carbon nanostructures (including carbon nanofibers, nanostructured diamond, fullerene materials and so forth) possess extraordinary physiochemical, mechanical and electrical properties attractive to bioengineers and medical researchers. In the past decade, numerous developments towards the fabrication and biological studies of carbon nanostructures have provided opportunities to improve orthopedic applications. Therefore, the aim of this article is to provide an up-to-date review on carbon nanostructure advances in orthopedic research. Orthopedic medical device applications of carbon nanotubes/carbon nanofibers and nanostructured diamond (including particulate nanodiamond and nanocrystalline diamond coatings) are emphasized here along with other carbon nanostructures that have promising potential. In addition, widely used fabrication techniques for producing carbon nanostructures in both the laboratory and in industry are briefly introduced. In conclusion, carbon nanostructures have demonstrated tremendous promise for orthopedic medical device applications to date, and although some safety, reliability and durability issues related to the manufacturing and implantation of carbon nanomaterials remain, their future is bright.

  1. Novel hollow mesoporous 1D TiO2 nanofibers as photovoltaic and photocatalytic materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Thavasi, Velmurugan; Mhaisalkar, S G; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-03-07

    Hollow mesoporous one dimensional (1D) TiO(2) nanofibers are successfully prepared by co-axial electrospinning of a titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) solution with two immiscible polymers; polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) using a core-shell spinneret, followed by annealing at 450 °C. The annealed mesoporous TiO(2) nanofibers are found to having a hollow structure with an average diameter of 130 nm. Measurements using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method reveal that hollow mesoporous TiO(2) nanofibers possess a high surface area of 118 m(2) g(-1) with two types of mesopores; 3.2 nm and 5.4 nm that resulted from gaseous removal of PEO and PVP respectively during annealing. With hollow mesoporous TiO(2) nanofibers as the photoelectrode in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC), the solar-to-current conversion efficiency (η) and short circuit current (J(sc)) are measured as 5.6% and 10.38 mA cm(-2) respectively, which are higher than those of DSSC made using regular TiO(2) nanofibers under identical conditions (η = 4.2%, J(sc) = 8.99 mA cm(-2)). The improvement in the conversion efficiency is mainly attributed to the higher surface area and mesoporous TiO(2) nanostructure. It facilitates the adsorption of more dye molecules and also promotes the incident photon to electron conversion. Hollow mesoporous TiO(2) nanofibers with close packing of grains and crystals intergrown with each other demonstrate faster electron diffusion, and longer electron recombination time than regular TiO(2) nanofibers as well as P25 nanoparticles. The surface effect of hollow mesoporous TiO(2) nanofibers as a photocatalyst for the degradation of rhodamine dye was also investigated. The kinetic study shows that the hollow mesoporous surface of the TiO(2) nanofibers influenced its interactions with the dye, and resulted in an increased catalytic activity over P25 TiO(2) nanocatalysts.

  2. Key Physical Mechanisms in Nanostructured Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Stephan Bremner

    2010-07-21

    The objective of the project was to study both theoretically and experimentally the excitation, recombination and transport properties required for nanostructured solar cells to deliver energy conversion efficiencies well in excess of conventional limits. These objectives were met by concentrating on three key areas, namely, investigation of physical mechanisms present in nanostructured solar cells, characterization of loss mechanisms in nanostructured solar cells and determining the properties required of nanostructured solar cells in order to achieve high efficiency and the design implications.

  3. Towards promising modification of GeSi nanostructures via self-assembly on miscut Si(001) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong; Zhong, Zhenyang

    2016-03-01

    Self-assembled GeSi nanostructures on miscut Si(001) substrates are studied systematically with regard to the miscut angle and azimuth, the amount of Ge and the growth temperature. The comprehensive dependence of the spatial arrangement, which can exhibit one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) ordering, as well as the shape and density, of GeSi nanostructures on the miscut angle is observed. The orientation and side-walls of the 1D ordered in-plane GeSi nanowires on miscut Si(001) substrates are intimately associated with the miscut azimuth towards the <110> or <010> directions. Furthermore, the unique evolution of the GeSi nanostructures with the amount of Ge and the growth temperature on miscut Si (001) substrates towards the <010> direction is discovered. Such promising features of self-assembled GeSi nanostructures on miscut Si (001) substrates are explained in terms of the thermodynamics and growth kinetics, which are both affected significantly by the substrate vicinality. These results demonstrate that the miscut substrates offer a promising degree of freedom for the feasible modification of self-assembled nanostructures.

  4. Surfactant mediated one- and two-dimensional ZnO nanostructured thin films for dye sensitized solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marimuthu, T.; Anandhan, N.; Thangamuthu, R.; Mummoorthi, M.; Rajendran, S.; Ravi, G.

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) nanostructured zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were electrodeposited from aqueous zinc chloride on FTO glass substrates. The effects of organic surfactant such as cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) on structural, morphological, crystal quality and optical properties of electrodeposited ZnO films were investigated. The x-ray diffraction pattern revealed that the prepared thin films were pure wutrzite hexagonal structure. The thin films deposited using organic surfactant in this work showed different morphologies such as nanoplatelet and flower. The hexagonal platelet and flower-like nanostructures were obtained in the presence of CTAB and PVA surfactant, respectively. The crystal quality and atomic vacancies of the prepared nanostructured thin films were investigated by micro Raman spectroscopic technique. The emission properties and optical quality of the films were studied by photoluminescence spectrometry. PEMA-LiClO4-EC gel polymer electrolyte has been used to replace the liquid electrolyte for reducing the leakage problem. Graphene counter electrode was used as an alternative for platinum electrode. Eosin yellow dye was used as a sensitizer. J-V characterizations were carried out for different 1D and 2D nanostructures. The nanoflower structure exhibited higher efficiency (η = 0.073%) than the other two nanostructures.

  5. Limb darkening laws for two exoplanet host stars derived from 3D stellar model atmospheres. Comparison with 1D models and HST light curve observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, W.; Sing, D.; Pont, F.; Asplund, M.

    2012-03-01

    the stellar atmosphere and the observed data in the 2900-5700 Å region are not sufficient to distinguish more clearly between the 3D and 1D limb darkening predictions. Full theoretical spectra for both stars are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/539/A102, as well as at www.astro.ex.ac.uk/people/sing.

  6. Combinatorial Chemical Bath Deposition of CdS Contacts for Chalcogenide Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Mokurala, Krishnaiah; Baranowski, Lauryn L; de Souza Lucas, Francisco W; Siol, Sebastian; van Hest, Maikel F A M; Mallick, Sudhanshu; Bhargava, Parag; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-09-12

    Contact layers play an important role in thin film solar cells, but new material development and optimization of its thickness is usually a long and tedious process. A high-throughput experimental approach has been used to accelerate the rate of research in photovoltaic (PV) light absorbers and transparent conductive electrodes, however the combinatorial research on contact layers is less common. Here, we report on the chemical bath deposition (CBD) of CdS thin films by combinatorial dip coating technique and apply these contact layers to Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) and Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) light absorbers in PV devices. Combinatorial thickness steps of CdS thin films were achieved by removal of the substrate from the chemical bath, at regular intervals of time, and in equal distance increments. The trends in the photoconversion efficiency and in the spectral response of the PV devices as a function of thickness of CdS contacts were explained with the help of optical and morphological characterization of the CdS thin films. The maximum PV efficiency achieved for the combinatorial dip-coating CBD was similar to that for the PV devices processed using conventional CBD. The results of this study lead to the conclusion that combinatorial dip-coating can be used to accelerate the optimization of PV device performance of CdS and other candidate contact layers for a wide range of emerging absorbers.

  7. Characteristics of CdS: Cu Photosensitive Films Obtatined by Magnetron Sputtering Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseinov, Emil; Jafarov, Maarif; Gasanov, Ilham; Nasibov, Ilgar

    1997-02-01

    In2O3-CdS sandwich structures with thickness 0,5-1,5 mm have been obtained by magnetron sputtering method on glass substrates. Investigations of dark and light conductivity, the spectrum and kinetics of photoconductivity of CdS films have been carried out. The studies of the current-voltage characteristics of In2O3-CdS have been performed based on the generalized approximate theory of injection contact phenomena in semiconductors. The volume (n0) and precontact (nc) change carrier concentration, recombination (Nrec) and trapping (Ncn) center concentration, the absorption edge and the transmission coefficient, the region and the maximum of the photocurrent spectral dependence, the life time of nonequilibrium and minority carriers have been determined. With increasing the annealed sample thickness the conductivity has been shown to decrease as L-3, and the voltage at transition from the Ohm's law to a quadratic law increases as L2. It has been found that the In2O3 contact is close to a neutral one as a methalic transparent electrode than In. The CdS films obtained by magnetron sputtering method are characterized by high reproducibility, sensitivity, electric strength (106 V/cm), high resistivity (r˜ 109-1010 Ohm. cm), optical transmission (more than 60%). The In2O3-CdS structure is useful as the basic material of an image converter.

  8. Combinatorial Chemical Bath Deposition of CdS Contacts for Chalcogenide Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Mokurala, Krishnaiah; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; de Souza Lucas, Francisco W.; Siol, Sebastian; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.; Mallick, Sudhanshu; Bhargava, Parag; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-09-12

    Contact layers play an important role in thin film solar cells, but new material development and optimization of its thickness is usually a long and tedious process. A high-throughput experimental approach has been used to accelerate the rate of research in photovoltaic (PV) light absorbers and transparent conductive electrodes, however the combinatorial research on contact layers is less common. Here, we report on the chemical bath deposition (CBD) of CdS thin films by combinatorial dip coating technique and apply these contact layers to Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) and Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) light absorbers in PV devices. Combinatorial thickness steps of CdS thin films were achieved by removal of the substrate from the chemical bath, at regular intervals of time, and in equal distance increments. The trends in the photoconversion efficiency and in the spectral response of the PV devices as a function of thickness of CdS contacts were explained with the help of optical and morphological characterization of the CdS thin films. The maximum PV efficiency achieved for the combinatorial dip-coating CBD was similar to that for the PV devices processed using conventional CBD. The results of this study lead to the conclusion that combinatorial dip-coating can be used to accelerate the optimization of PV device performance of CdS and other candidate contact layers for a wide range of emerging absorbers.

  9. Observation of trapped-hole diffusion on the surfaces of CdS nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utterback, James K.; Grennell, Amanda N.; Wilker, Molly B.; Pearce, Orion M.; Eaves, Joel D.; Dukovic, Gordana

    2016-11-01

    In CdS nanocrystals, photoexcited holes rapidly become trapped at the particle surface. The dynamics of these trapped holes have profound consequences for the photophysics and photochemistry of these materials. Using a combination of transient absorption spectroscopy and theoretical modelling, we demonstrate that trapped holes in CdS nanorods are mobile and execute a random walk at room temperature. In CdS nanorods of non-uniform width, we observe the recombination of spatially separated electrons and trapped holes, which exhibits a t-1/2 power-law decay at long times. A one-dimensional diffusion-annihilation model describes the time-dependence of the recombination over four orders of magnitude in time, from one nanosecond to ten microseconds, with a single adjustable parameter. We propose that diffusive trapped-hole motion is a general phenomenon in CdS nanocrystals, but one that is normally obscured in structures in which the wavefunctions of the electron and trapped hole spatially overlap. This phenomenon has important implications for the oxidation photochemistry of CdS nanocrystals.

  10. In situ growth of well-dispersed CdS nanocrystals in semiconducting polymers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A straight synthetic route to fabricate hybrid nanocomposite films of well-dispersed CdS nanocrystals (NCs) in poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) is reported. A soluble cadmium complex [Cd(SBz)2]2·MI, obtained by incorporating a Lewis base (1-methylimidazole, MI) on the cadmium bis(benzyl)thiol, is used as starting reagent in an in situ thermolytic process. CdS NCs with spherical shape nucleate and grow well below 200°C in a relatively short time (30 min). Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements performed on CdS/MEH-PPV nanocomposites show that CdS photoluminescence peaks are totally quenched inside MEH-PPV, if compared to CdS/PMMA nanocomposites, as expected due to overlapping of the polymer absorption and CdS emission spectra. The CdS NCs are well-dispersed in size and homogeneously distributed within MEH-PPV matrix as proved by transmission electron microscopy. Nanocomposites with different precursor/polymer weight ratios were prepared in the range from 1:4 to 4:1. Highly dense materials, without NCs clustering, were obtained for a weight/weight ratio of 2:3 between precursor and polymer, making these nanocomposites particularly suitable for optoelectronic and solar energy conversion applications. PMID:24015753

  11. Sacrificial template growth of CdS nanotubes from Cd(OH){sub 2} nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xuemei; Chu Haibin; Li Yan . E-mail: yanli@pku.edu.cn

    2006-01-15

    A diffusion-controlled process was proposed for the preparation of inorganic nanotubes from nanowires. The preformed Cd(OH){sub 2} nanowires were used as the sacrificial templates to generate CdS nanotubes with different wall thickness. The axle-sleeve transition state found in-between the precursor and the formation of products proves the diffusion-controlled mechanism. CdS nanotubes can be prepared via this method at different temperature and with various sulfide sources. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results showed that all obtained CdS nanotubes consist conglomerated crystallites, and the crystallinity can be altered by changing the temperature of the growth process. The wall thickness of the produced CdS nanotubes can be controlled by changing the concentration of the sulfide source and stopping the reaction at different stages. -- Graphical abstract: CdS nanotubes were prepared with Cd(OH){sub 2} nanowires as the sacrificial templates. Diffusion played an important role in the process. The morphology of the produced nanotubes can be varied by alternating the reaction conditions.

  12. A Tunable Photoluminescent Composite of Cellulose Nanofibrils and CdS Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinwen; Tang, Aimin; Liu, Yuan; Fang, Zhiqiang; Fu, Shiyu

    2016-01-01

    The preparation of fluorescent nanocomposite materials with tunable emission wavelengths by combining cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) with inorganic nanoparticles is important for promoting CNFs applications. A CNF/CdS nanocomposite was prepared via in situ compositing at room temperature on oxidized CNFs with CdS quantum dots. By controlling the –COOH/Cd2+ ratio on the CNF, the feeding time of Na2S and the ultrasonic maturing time, the size of the CdS quantum dots on the CNF surface could be adjusted so that to obtain the CNF/CdS nanocomposite material with different fluorescent colors. The results indicated that the CdS particles quantized were evenly distributed on the CNF. The maximum average size of the CdS nanoparticles glowed red under the excitation of UV light was 5.34 nm, which could be obtained with a –COOH/Cd2+ ratio of 1.0, a Na2S feeding time of 20 min, and an ultrasonic maturing time of 60 min. A series of CNF/CdS nanocomposite materials were obtained with CdS nanoparticle sizes varying from 3.44 nm to 5.34 nm, the emission wavelength of which varied from 546 nm to 655 nm, and their fluorescence color changed from green to yellow to red. This is the first time the fluorescence-tunable effect of the CNF/CdS nanocomposite has been realized. PMID:28335292

  13. [Research on the polycrystalline CdS thin films prepared by close-spaced sublimation].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ding-Yu; Xia, Geng-Pei; Zheng, Jia-Gui; Feng, Liang-Huan; Cai, Ya-Ping

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, the factors of influence on the deposition rate of CdS films prepared by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) were first studied systematically, and it was found from the experiments that the deposition rate increased with the raised temperature of sublimation source, while decreased with the raised substrate temperature and the deposition pressure. The structure, morphology and light transmittance of the prepared samples were tested subsequently, and the results show: (1) The CdS films deposited under different oxygen partial pressure all present predominating growth lattice orientation (103), and further more the films will be strengthened after annealed under CdCl2 atmosphere. (2) The AFM images of CdS show that the films are compact and uniform in grain diameter, and the grain size becomes larger with the increased substrate temperature. Along with it, the film roughness was also augmented. (3) The transmittance in the shortwave region of visible light through the CdS films would be enhanced when its thickness is reduced, and that will help improve the shortwave spectral response of CdTe solar cells. Finally, the prepared CdS films were employed to fabricate CdTe solar cells, which have achieved a conversion efficiency of 10.29%, and thus the feasibility of CSS process in the manufacture of CdTe solar cells was validated primarily.

  14. Growth of CdS Nanorods and Deposition of Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Yang, Fanghong; Yang, Ping

    2015-05-01

    Systematic investigations have been done to deposit silver nanoparticles on seeded CdS nanorods. The CdS nanorods were synthesized by using CdS nanocrystals as seeds being indexed to the cubic structure (zinc-blende) and tetradecylphosphonic acid as surfactants to enable preferential growth on the reactive {001} facets. Ostwald ripening process occurred during the growth of CdS nanorods. Ag/CdS heterostructures were obtained through a facile method in which oleylamine was employed as reducing agents under an elevated temperature. Exposing CdS nanorods to Ag+ ions resulted in Ag domains depositing on the tips of the nanorods or defected sites embedding in the nanorod surfaces. Ag domains formed separate nuclei and grew quickly at a high concentration of AgNO3 solution. We further focused on discussing the morphology formation mechanism and optical properties of the heterostructures and the nanorods. The as-synthesized Ag/CdS heterostructures can facilitate charge separation at the metal-semiconductor interface. Herein, it opens up an application possibility of enhancing photocatalytic processes and other devices.

  15. Cytotoxicity tests of water soluble ZnS and CdS quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Li, Mengyan; Shih, Wan Y; Lelkes, Peter I; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2011-04-01

    Cytotoxicity tests of zinc sulfide (ZnS) and cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots (QDs) synthesized via all-aqueous process with various surface conditions were carried out with human endothelial cells (EA hy926) using two independent viability assays, i.e., by cell counting following Trypan blue staining and by measuring Alamar Blue (AB) fluorescence. The ZnS QDs with all four distinct types of surface conditions were nontoxic at both 1 microM and 10 microM concentrations for at least 6 days. On the other hand, the CdS QDs were nontoxic only at 1 microM, and showed significant cytotoxicity at 10 microM after 3 days in the cell counting assay and after 4 days in the AB fluorescence assay. The CdS QDs with (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPS)-replacement plus silica capping were less cytotoxic than those with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) capping and those with MPS-replacement capping. Comparing the results of ZnS and CdS QDs with the same particle size, surface condition and concentration, it is indicated that the cytotoxicity of CdS QDs and the lack of it in ZnS QDs were probably due to the presence and absence of the toxic Cd element, respectively. The nontoxicity of the aqueous ZnS QDs makes them favorable for in vivo imaging applications.

  16. CdS nanoparticles grown in a polymer matrix by chemical bath deposition.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, P K; Maity, R; Chattopadhyay, K K

    2005-02-01

    Nanocrystallites of CdS have been grown by chemical bath deposition within the pores of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) on glass and Si substrates. The CdS-PVA composite films are transparent in the visible region. XRD and TEM diffraction patterns confirmed the nanocrystalline CdS phase formation. TEM study of the film revealed the manifestation of nano CdS phase formation and the average particles size was varied in the range 5-12 nm. UV-vis spectrophotometric measurement showed high transparency (nearly 80% in the wavelength range 550-900 nm) of the films with a direct allowed band gap lying in the range 2.64-3.25 eV. Particle sizes have also been calculated from the shift of band gap with respect to that of bulk value and were found to be in the range 3.3-6.44 nm. The high dielectric constant (lies in the range 120-250 at high frequency) of PVA/CdS nanocomposite compared to that of pure PVA (-28) has been observed. The dielectric constant decreases with increase of dispersibility of the CdS nanoparticles within PVA. The nanocrystalline PVA/CdS thin films have also showed field emission properties with a turn-on field of approximately 6.6 V/microm, whereas only PVA thin film and bulk CdS on PVA have shown no field emission.

  17. Semiconductor nanostructure-based photovoltaic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Genqiang; Finefrock, Scott; Liang, Daxin; Yadav, Gautam G; Yang, Haoran; Fang, Haiyu; Wu, Yue

    2011-06-01

    Substantial efforts have been devoted to design, synthesize, and integrate various semiconductor nanostructures for photovoltaic (PV) solar cells. In this article, we will review the recent progress in this exciting area and cover the material chemistry and physics related to all-inorganic nanostructure solar cells, hybrid inorganic nanostructure-conductive polymer composite solar cells, and dye-sensitized solar cells.

  18. Nanostructured materials in electroanalysis of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Rahi, A; Karimian, K; Heli, H

    2016-03-15

    Basic strategies and recent developments for the enhancement of the sensory performance of nanostructures in the electroanalysis of pharmaceuticals are reviewed. A discussion of the properties of nanostructures and their application as modified electrodes for drug assays is presented. The electrocatalytic effect of nanostructured materials and their application in determining low levels of drugs in pharmaceutical forms and biofluids are discussed.

  19. Semiconductor nanostructure-based photovoltaic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Genqiang; Finefrock, Scott; Liang, Daxin; Yadav, Gautam G.; Yang, Haoran; Fang, Haiyu; Wu, Yue

    2011-06-01

    Substantial efforts have been devoted to design, synthesize, and integrate various semiconductor nanostructures for photovoltaic (PV) solar cells. In this article, we will review the recent progress in this exciting area and cover the material chemistry and physics related to all-inorganic nanostructure solar cells, hybrid inorganic nanostructure-conductive polymer composite solar cells, and dye-sensitized solar cells.

  20. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  1. Interfacing nanostructures to biological cells

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xing; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-09-04

    Disclosed herein are methods and materials by which nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, nanorods, etc. are bound to lectins and/or polysaccharides and prepared for administration to cells. Also disclosed are complexes comprising glycosylated nanostructures, which bind selectively to cells expressing glycosylated surface molecules recognized by the lectin. Exemplified is a complex comprising a carbon nanotube functionalized with a lipid-like alkane, linked to a polymer bearing repeated .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine sugar groups. This complex is shown to selectively adhere to the surface of living cells, without toxicity. In the exemplified embodiment, adherence is mediated by a multivalent lectin, which binds both to the cells and the .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine groups on the nanostructure.

  2. Nanostructure Neutron Converter Layer Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Thibeault, Sheila A. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods for making a neutron converter layer are provided. The various embodiment methods enable the formation of a single layer neutron converter material. The single layer neutron converter material formed according to the various embodiments may have a high neutron absorption cross section, tailored resistivity providing a good electric field penetration with submicron particles, and a high secondary electron emission coefficient. In an embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by sequential supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In another embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by simultaneous supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In a further embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by in-situ metalized aerogel nanostructure development.

  3. Zinc stannate nanostructures: hydrothermal synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Sunandan; Dutta, Joydeep

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured binary semiconducting metal oxides have received much attention in the last decade owing to their unique properties rendering them suitable for a wide range of applications. In the quest to further improve the physical and chemical properties, an interest in ternary complex oxides has become noticeable in recent times. Zinc stannate or zinc tin oxide (ZTO) is a class of ternary oxides that are known for their stable properties under extreme conditions, higher electron mobility compared to its binary counterparts and other interesting optical properties. The material is thus ideal for applications from solar cells and sensors to photocatalysts. Among the different methods of synthesizing ZTO nanostructures, the hydrothermal method is an attractive green process that is carried out at low temperatures. In this review, we summarize the conditions leading to the growth of different ZTO nanostructures using the hydrothermal method and delve into a few of its applications reported in the literature. PMID:27877377

  4. PREFACE: Self-organized nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, Sylvie; Ortega, Enrique

    2006-04-01

    In order to fabricate ordered arrays of nanostructures, two different strategies might be considered. The `top-down' approach consists of pushing the limit of lithography techniques down to the nanometre scale. However, beyond 10 nm lithography techniques will inevitably face major intrinsic limitations. An alternative method for elaborating ultimate-size nanostructures is based on the reverse `bottom-up' approach, i.e. building up nanostructures (and eventually assemble them to form functional circuits) from individual atoms or molecules. Scanning probe microscopies, including scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) invented in 1982, have made it possible to create (and visualize) individual structures atom by atom. However, such individual atomic manipulation is not suitable for industrial applications. Self-assembly or self-organization of nanostructures on solid surfaces is a bottom-up approach that allows one to fabricate and assemble nanostructure arrays in a one-step process. For applications, such as high density magnetic storage, self-assembly appears to be the simplest alternative to lithography for massive, parallel fabrication of nanostructure arrays with regular sizes and spacings. These are also necessary for investigating the physical properties of individual nanostructures by means of averaging techniques, i.e. all those using light or particle beams. The state-of-the-art and the current developments in the field of self-organization and physical properties of assembled nanostructures are reviewed in this issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. The papers have been selected from among the invited and oral presentations of the recent summer workshop held in Cargese (Corsica, France, 17-23 July 2005). All authors are world-renowned in the field. The workshop has been funded by the Marie Curie Actions: Marie Curie Conferences and Training Courses series named `NanosciencesTech' supported by the VI Framework Programme of the European Community, by

  5. The alpha(1D)-adrenergic receptor directly regulates arterial blood pressure via vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Akito; Nasa, Yoshihisa; Koshimizu, Takaaki; Shinoura, Hitomi; Oshikawa, Sayuri; Kawai, Takayuki; Sunada, Sachie; Takeo, Satoshi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2002-03-01

    To investigate the physiological role of the alpha(1D)-adrenergic receptor (alpha(1D)-AR) subtype, we created mice lacking the alpha(1D)-AR (alpha(1D)(-/-)) by gene targeting and characterized their cardiovascular function. In alpha(1D)-/- mice, the RT-PCR did not detect any transcript of the alpha(1D)-AR in any tissue examined, and there was no apparent upregulation of other alpha(1)-AR subtypes. Radioligand binding studies showed that alpha(1)-AR binding capacity in the aorta was lost, while that in the heart was unaltered in alpha(1D)-/- mice. Non-anesthetized alpha(1D)-/- mice maintained significantly lower basal systolic and mean arterial blood pressure conditions, relative to wild-type mice, and they showed no significant change in heart rate or in cardiac function, as assessed by echocardiogram. Besides hypotension, the pressor responses to phenylephrine and norepinephrine were decreased by 30-40% in alpha(1D)-/- mice. Furthermore, the contractile response of the aorta and the pressor response of isolated perfused mesenteric arterial beds to alpha(1)-AR stimulation were markedly reduced in alpha(1D)-/- mice. We conclude that the alpha(1D)-AR participates directly in sympathetic regulation of systemic blood pressure by vasoconstriction.

  6. Analysis of the rotational structure in the high-resolution infrared spectra of trans-hexatriene-1,1-d2 and -cis-1-d1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Fuson, Hannah A.; Tian, Hengfeng; Blake, Thomas A.

    2012-09-01

    Mixtures of trans-hexatriene-1,1-d2, -cis-1-d1, and -trans-1-d1 have been synthesized. Anharmonic frequencies and harmonic intensities were predicted with the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ model for the out-of-plane (a″) modes of the three isotopologues. Assignments are proposed for most of the a″ vibrational modes above 500 cm-1. Ground state (GS) rotational constants have been determined for the 1,1-d2 and cis-1-d1 species from the analysis of rotational structure of C-type bands in the high-resolution (0.0015 cm-1) infrared spectra in a mixture of the three isotopologues. The GS constants for the 1,1-d2 species are A0 = 0.8018850(6), B0 = 0.0418540(6), and C0 = 0.0397997(4) cm-1. The GS constants for the cis-1-d1 species are A0 = 0.809388(1), B0 = 0.043532(2), and C0 = 0.041320(1) cm-1. Small inertial defects confirm planarity for both species. These ground state rotational constants are intended for use in determining a semiexperimental equilibrium structure and evaluating the influence of chain length on π-electron delocalization in polyenes.

  7. Photoanodes based on TiO2 and α-Fe2O3 for solar water splitting - superior role of 1D nanoarchitectures and of combined heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Kment, Stepan; Riboni, Francesca; Pausova, Sarka; Wang, Lei; Wang, Lingyun; Han, Hyungkyu; Hubicka, Zdenek; Krysa, Josef; Schmuki, Patrik; Zboril, Radek

    2017-04-11

    Solar driven photoelectrochemical water splitting (PEC-WS) using semiconductor photoelectrodes represents a promising approach for a sustainable and environmentally friendly production of renewable energy vectors and fuel sources, such as dihydrogen (H2). In this context, titanium dioxide (TiO2) and iron oxide (hematite, α-Fe2O3) are among the most investigated candidates as photoanode materials, mainly owing to their resistance to photocorrosion, non-toxicity, natural abundance, and low production cost. Major drawbacks are, however, an inherently low electrical conductivity and a limited hole diffusion length that significantly affect the performance of TiO2 and α-Fe2O3 in PEC devices. To this regard, one-dimensional (1D) nanostructuring is typically applied as it provides several superior features such as a significant enlargement of the material surface area, extended contact between the semiconductor and the electrolyte and, most remarkably, preferential electrical transport that overall suppress charge carrier recombination and improve TiO2 and α-Fe2O3 photoelectrocatalytic properties. The present review describes various synthetic methods and modifying concepts of 1D-photoanodes (nanotubes, nanorods, nanofibers, nanowires) based on titania, hematite, and on α-Fe2O3/TiO2 heterostructures, for PEC applications. Various routes towards modification and enhancement of PEC activity of 1D photoanodes are discussed including doping, decoration with co-catalysts and heterojunction engineering. Finally, the challenges related to the optimization of charge transfer kinetics in both oxides are highlighted.

  8. Nanostructured Substrates for Optical Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Kemling, Jonathan W.; Qavi, Abraham J.; Bailey, Ryan C.

    2011-01-01

    Sensors that change color have the advantages of versatility, ease of use, high sensitivity, and low cost. The recent development of optically based chemical sensing platforms has increasingly employed substrates manufactured with advanced processing or fabrication techniques to provide precise control over shape and morphology of the sensor micro- and nano-structure. New sensors have resulted with improved capabilities for a number of sensing applications, including the detection of biomolecules and environmental monitoring. This perspective focuses on recent optical sensor devices that utilize nanostructured substrates. PMID:22174955

  9. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Libal, Andras J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  10. Shape-controlled continuous synthesis of metal nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Victor; Smith, Christopher D.; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2016-03-01

    A segmented flow-based microreactor is used for the continuous production of faceted nanocrystals. Flow segmentation is proposed as a versatile tool to manipulate the reduction kinetics and control the growth of faceted nanostructures; tuning the size and shape. Switching the gas from oxygen to carbon monoxide permits the adjustment in nanostructure growth from 1D (nanorods) to 2D (nanosheets). CO is a key factor in the formation of Pd nanosheets and Pt nanocubes; operating as a second phase, a reductant, and a capping agent. This combination confines the growth to specific structures. In addition, the segmented flow microfluidic reactor inherently has the ability to operate in a reproducible manner at elevated temperatures and pressures whilst confining potentially toxic reactants, such as CO, in nanoliter slugs. This continuous system successfully synthesised Pd nanorods with an aspect ratio of 6; thin palladium nanosheets with a thickness of 1.5 nm; and Pt nanocubes with a 5.6 nm edge length, all in a synthesis time as low as 150 s.A segmented flow-based microreactor is used for the continuous production of faceted nanocrystals. Flow segmentation is proposed as a versatile tool to manipulate the reduction kinetics and control the growth of faceted nanostructures; tuning the size and shape. Switching the gas from oxygen to carbon monoxide permits the adjustment in nanostructure growth from 1D (nanorods) to 2D (nanosheets). CO is a key factor in the formation of Pd nanosheets and Pt nanocubes; operating as a second phase, a reductant, and a capping agent. This combination confines the growth to specific structures. In addition, the segmented flow microfluidic reactor inherently has the ability to operate in a reproducible manner at elevated temperatures and pressures whilst confining potentially toxic reactants, such as CO, in nanoliter slugs. This continuous system successfully synthesised Pd nanorods with an aspect ratio of 6; thin palladium nanosheets with a

  11. Novel hollow mesoporous 1D TiO2 nanofibers as photovoltaic and photocatalytic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Thavasi, Velmurugan; Mhaisalkar, S. G.; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-02-01

    Hollow mesoporous one dimensional (1D) TiO2 nanofibers are successfully prepared by co-axial electrospinning of a titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) solution with two immiscible polymers; polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) using a core-shell spinneret, followed by annealing at 450 °C. The annealed mesoporous TiO2 nanofibers are found to having a hollow structure with an average diameter of 130 nm. Measurements using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method reveal that hollow mesoporous TiO2 nanofibers possess a high surface area of 118 m2 g-1 with two types of mesopores; 3.2 nm and 5.4 nm that resulted from gaseous removal of PEO and PVP respectively during annealing. With hollow mesoporous TiO2 nanofibers as the photoelectrode in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC), the solar-to-current conversion efficiency (η) and short circuit current (Jsc) are measured as 5.6% and 10.38 mA cm-2 respectively, which are higher than those of DSSC made using regular TiO2 nanofibers under identical conditions (η = 4.2%, Jsc = 8.99 mA cm-2). The improvement in the conversion efficiency is mainly attributed to the higher surface area and mesoporous TiO2 nanostructure. It facilitates the adsorption of more dye molecules and also promotes the incident photon to electron conversion. Hollow mesoporous TiO2 nanofibers with close packing of grains and crystals intergrown with each other demonstrate faster electron diffusion, and longer electron recombination time than regular TiO2 nanofibers as well as P25 nanoparticles. The surface effect of hollow mesoporous TiO2 nanofibers as a photocatalyst for the degradation of rhodamine dye was also investigated. The kinetic study shows that the hollow mesoporous surface of the TiO2 nanofibers influenced its interactions with the dye, and resulted in an increased catalytic activity over P25 TiO2 nanocatalysts.Hollow mesoporous one dimensional (1D) TiO2 nanofibers are successfully prepared by co-axial electrospinning of a titanium

  12. Electrical properties of point defects in CdS and ZnS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varley, J. B.; Lordi, V.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate native point defects in CdS and ZnS, which are conventional n-type buffer layers used in thin-film solar cells. Using hybrid functional calculations, we characterize the electrical behavior of these defects and also consider common impurities such as O, H, and their complexes. We find cation vacancies are the dominant compensating acceptors and recombination centers, and their effects are more dramatic in ZnS than in CdS. We also determine the band alignment for conventional Cu(In,Ga)Se2-based solar cells, giving insight into why CdS outperforms ZnS and why Zn oxysulfides are promising due to their improved conduction band offsets.

  13. Local field-induced optical properties of Ag-coated CdS quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Je, Koo-Chul; Ju, Honglyoul; Treguer, Mona; Cardinal, Thierry; Park, Seung-Han

    2006-08-21

    Local field-induced optical properties of Ag-coated CdS quantum dot structures are investigated. We experimentally observe a clear exciton peak due to the quantum confinement effect in uncoated CdS quantum dots, and surface plasmon resonance and red-shifted exciton peak in Ag-coated CdS composite quantum dot structures. We have calculated the Stark shift of the exciton peak as a function of the local field for different silver thicknesses and various sizes of quantum dots based on the effective-mass Hamiltonian using the numerical-matrix-diagonalization method. Our theoretical calculations strongly indicate that the exciton peak is red-shifted in the metal-semiconductor composite quantum dots due to a strong local field, i.e., the quantum confined Stark effect.

  14. Influence of Ag doping concentration on structural and optical properties of CdS thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pragati; Saxena, Nupur; Gupta, Vinay; Agarwal, Avinash

    2015-05-15

    This work shows the influence of Ag concentration on structural properties of pulsed laser deposited nanocrystalline CdS thin film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies confirm the dopant concentration in CdS films and atomic concentration of elements. XPS studies show that the samples are slightly sulfur deficient. GAXRD scan reveals the structural phase transformation from cubic to hexagonal phase of CdS without appearance of any phase of CdO, Ag{sub 2}O or Ag{sub 2}S suggesting the substitutional doping of Ag ions. Photoluminescence studies illustrate that emission intensity increases with increase in dopant concentration upto 5% and then decreases for higher dopant concentration.

  15. Longitudinal Oscillations in Coronal Loops - Joint Observations with SOHO/CDS and TRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, M. S.; Walsh, R. W.; De Moortel, I.; Ireland, J.

    2004-01-01

    Joint Observing Program (JOP) 83 Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (SOHO/CDS) and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) data is analysed for evidence of propagating intensity oscillations along loop structures in the solar corona. A propagating intensity oscillation with a minimum estimated speed of 50-195 km s is observed within a TRACE 171 Å coronal loop using a running difference method. Co-spatial and co-temporal CDS and TRACE observations of this loop are analysed using a wavelet analysis method. The TRACE data shows a propagating oscillation with a period of 300 s. This period is also observed with CDS suggesting propagating oscillations at chromospheric, transition region and coronal temperatures in the He I, O V and Mg IX lines.

  16. Joint observations of propagating oscillations with SOHO/CDS and TRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, M. S.; Walsh, R. W.; De Moortel, I.; Ireland, J.

    2003-06-01

    Joint Observing Program (JOP) 83 Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (SOHO/CDS) and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) data is analysed for evidence of propagating intensity oscillations along loop structures in the solar corona. A propagating intensity oscillation with a minimum estimated speed of 50-195 km s-1 is observed within a TRACE 171 Å coronal loop using a running difference method. Co-spatial and co-temporal CDS and TRACE observations of this loop are analysed using a wavelet analysis method. The TRACE data shows a propagating oscillation with a period of ~300 s. This period is also observed with CDS suggesting propagating oscillations at chromospheric, transition region and coronal temperatures in the He I, O V and Mg Ix lines.

  17. Deep trap levels in CdS solar cells observed by capacitance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmurcik, L.; Ketelsen, L.; Serway, R. A.

    1982-05-01

    Capacitance measurements have been carried out as a function of reverse bias voltage and signal frequency on thin-film and single-crystal CdS solar cells. It is shown that such measurements can reveal abrupt changes in C-V plots which are attributed to the presence of deep trapping states. The anomalous change in capacitance occurs when the bias voltage raises a trapping state above the Fermi level; the strength of the anomalies depends on several factors including temperature, signal frequency, and junction properties. Measurements taken on the CdS cells indicate that at least two deep trapping states are present in the partially formed i layer of CdS, which is consistent with results reported by other workers.

  18. Characterization of CdS nanoparticles during their growth in paraffin hot-matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Yordanov, Georgi G.; Adachi, Eiki; Dushkin, Ceco D. . E-mail: nhtd@wmail.chem.uni-sofia.bg

    2007-03-15

    This paper describes the optical and structural properties of CdS nanoparticles during their growth in paraffin hot-matrix containing stearic acid ligand. The nanocrystalline species are characterized with absorbance and photoluminescence spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The nanoparticles size-distribution, Stokes shift and mean molar concentration are derived from the optical spectra as functions of time. Their time evolution confirms a two-stage nanocrystal growth for CdS. The stability of aggregates of stearate-coated nanoparticles, tested against UV-illumination, shows that the band-edge emission is more sensitive to photo bleaching than the trap-state emission. The obtained new quantitative results are important for the large-scale manufacturing of CdS nanoparticles and their practical applications.

  19. Light-emitting structures of CdS nanocrystals in oxidized macroporous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, L.; Kuchmii, S.; Stroyuk, O.; Lytvynenko, O.; Sapelnikova, O.; Stronska, O.; Bo, Wang; Kartel, M.

    2016-12-01

    Structured silicon substrates (macroporous silicon) with SiO2 nanolayers and CdS nanocrystals were proposed to reduce the flow of electrons and recombination outside the nanoparticle layer. It was found that the resonance electron scattering in samples with low concentration of Sisbnd Osbnd Si states transforms into ordinary scattering on ionized impurities for samples with high concentration of Sisbnd Osbnd Si states. The maximal intensity of photoluminescence was measured for a structure with maximum strength of the local electric field at the Sisbnd SiO2 interface, indicating a significant decrease of non-radiative recombination in CdS nanocoating due to the flow of electrons from the silicon matrix towards the CdS nanocrystal layer. The quantum yield of photoluminescence increases with time due to evaporation of water molecules.

  20. Biosynthesis of luminescent CdS quantum dots using plant hairy root culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovaya, Mariya N.; Naumenko, Antonina P.; Matvieieva, Nadia A.; Blume, Yaroslav B.; Yemets, Alla I.

    2014-12-01

    CdS nanoparticles have a great potential for application in chemical research, bioscience and medicine. The aim of this study was to develop an efficient and environmentally-friendly method of plant-based biosynthesis of CdS quantum dots using hairy root culture of Linaria maroccana L. By incubating Linaria root extract with inorganic cadmium sulfate and sodium sulfide we synthesized stable luminescent CdS nanocrystals with absorption peaks for UV-visible spectrometry at 362 nm, 398 nm and 464 nm, and luminescent peaks at 425, 462, 500 nm. Transmission electron microscopy of produced quantum dots revealed their spherical shape with a size predominantly from 5 to 7 nm. Electron diffraction pattern confirmed the wurtzite crystalline structure of synthesized cadmium sulfide quantum dots. These results describe the first successful attempt of quantum dots synthesis using plant extract.

  1. Biosynthesis and characterization of CdS quantum dots in genetically engineered Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Congcong; Wang, Yanyan; Zhang, Jingpu; Huang, Huaiqing; Xu, Linru; Wang, Shuo; Fang, Xuexun; Fang, Jin; Mao, Chuanbin; Xu, Shukun

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) were prepared in genetically engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli) through the introduction of foreign genes encoding a CdS binding peptide. The CdS QDs were successfully separated from the bacteria through two methods, lysis and freezing–thawing of cells, and purified with an anion-exchange resin. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, luminescence spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were applied to characterize the as-prepared CdS QDs. The effects of reactant concentrations, bacteria incubation times, and reaction times on QD growth were systematically investigated. Our work demonstrates that genetically engineered bacteria can be used to synthesize QDs. The biologically synthesized QDs are expected to be more biocompatible probes in bio-labeling and imaging. PMID:21458508

  2. One-dimensional ZnO nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Jayadevan, K P; Tseng, T Y

    2012-06-01

    The wide-gap semiconductor ZnO with nanostructures such as nanoparticle, nanorod, nanowire, nanobelt, nanotube has high potential for a variety of applications. This article reviews the fundamentals of one-dimensional ZnO nanostructures, including processing, structure, property, application and their processing-microstructure-property correlation. Various fabrication methods of the ZnO nanostructures including vapor-liquid-solid process, vapor-solid growth, solution growth, solvothermal growth, template-assisted growth and self-assembly are introduced. The characterization and properties of the ZnO nanostructures are described. The possible applications of these nanostructures are also discussed.

  3. Pouous TiO2 nanofibers decorated CdS nanoparticles by SILAR method for enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fengyu; Hou, Dongfang; Hu, Fuchao; Xie, Kui; Qiao, Xiuqing; Li, Dongsheng

    2017-01-01

    1D porous CdS nanoparticles/TiO2 nanofibers heterostructure has been fabricated via simple electrospinning and a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) process. The morphology, composition, and optical properties of the resulting CdS/TiO2 heterostructures can be rationally tailored through changing the SILAR cycles. The photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and decomposition of rhodamine B (RhB) of the as-synthesized heterostructured photocatalysts were investigated under visible light irradiation. Compared to TiO2 nanofibers,the as-obtained CdS/TiO2 heterostructures exhibit enhanced photocatalytic activity for hydrogen production and decomposition of RhB under visible-light irradiation. The heterojunction system performs best with H2 generation rates of 678.61 μmol h-1 g-1 under visible light irradiation which benefits from the two effects: (a) the 1D porous nanofibrous morphology contributes to not only more active sites but also more efficient transfer of the photogenerated charges (b) the synergetic effect of heterojunction and photosensitization reducing the recombination of photogenerated electrons and holes.

  4. CdS quantum dots: growth, microstructural, optical and electrical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamad, Tansir; Majeed Khan, M. A.; Kumar, Sushil; Ahamed, Maqusood; Shahabuddin, Mohammed; Alhazaa, Abdulaziz N.

    2016-06-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots (QDs) with cubic phase were prepared using simple precursors by chemical precipitation technique, and their thin films were grown on glass substrates by chemical bath deposition. The obtained quantum dots were characterized for their structural, morphological, optical, thermal and electrical properties using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission transmission electron microscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis and low-temperature electrical transport measurements, respectively. XRD pattern reveals that the prepared CdS QDs are highly pure and crystalline in nature with cubic phase. The average particle size, estimated to be ~2 nm, is almost in agreement with the values calculated by Brusïs formula. Selected area electron diffraction also recognizes the cubic structure of CdS quantum dots. The UV-visible spectra exhibit a blueshift with respect to that of bulk sample which is attributed to the quantum size effect of electrons and holes. The band gap of CdS QDs is calculated from absorption data using Tauc plot and found to be 2.84 eV. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis reveals the presence of Cd and S in almost stoichiometric ratio in the prepared CdS QDs. Micro-Raman spectroscopic studies also yield convincing evidence for the transformation of structure. The emission spectra of CdS QDs show peak centered at 541 nm, which is attributed to the presence of cadmium vacancies in the lattice. The DC resistivity data at low temperatures are qualitatively consistent with the variable-range hopping model, and the density of states at the Fermi level is determined.

  5. Stability of Flame-Shock Coupling in Detonation Waves: 1D Dynamics (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    much sharper; however, the non-linear procedure necessary for sharpening CDs may also artificially sharpen the gradients in acoustic and entropy waves...approach, commonly chosen in funda- mental studies of detonation dynamics, is a 1-step model, in which the entire chemistry is described by the evolution of...better description is obtained with the 2-step model [12], where the heat release is associated with a second progress vari- able, whose evolution can

  6. XPB Induces C1D Expression to Counteract UV-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang; Liu, Juhong; Abu-Asab, Mones; Masabumi, Shibuya; Maru, Yoshiro

    2010-01-01

    Although C1D has been shown to be involved in DNA double-strand breaks repair, how C1D expression was induced and the mechanism(s) by which C1D facilitates DNA repair in mammalian cells remain poorly understood. We and others have previously shown that expression of XPB protein efficiently compensated the UV-irradiation sensitive phenotype of 27-1 cells which lacks functional XPB. To further explore XPB-regulated genes that could be involved in UV-induced DNA repair, Differential Display analysis of mRNA level from CHO-9, 27-1 and 27-1 complemented with wild-type XPB were performed and C1D gene was identified as one of the major genes whose expression was significantly up-regulated by restoring XPB function. We found that XPB is essential to induce C1D transcription after UV-irradiation. The increase of C1D expression effectively compensates the UV-induced proteolysis of C1D and thus maintains cellular C1D level to cope with DNA damage inflicted by UV-irradiation. We further showed that although insufficient to rescue 27-1 cells from UV-induced apoptosis by itself, C1D facilitates XPB DNA repair through direct interaction with XPB. Our findings provided direct evidence that C1D is associated with DNA repair complex and may promote repair of UV-induced DNA damage. PMID:20530579

  7. A Dynamic Approach to Make CDS/ISIS Databases Interoperable over the Internet Using the OAI Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayakanth, F.; Maly, K.; Zubair, M.; Aswath, L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: A dynamic approach to making legacy databases, like CDS/ISIS, interoperable with OAI-compliant digital libraries (DLs). Design/methodology/approach: There are many bibliographic databases that are being maintained using legacy database systems. CDS/ISIS is one such legacy database system. It was designed and developed specifically for…

  8. Adapting the Established SIS to Meet Higher Education's Increasingly Dynamic Needs. CDS Spotlight Report. ECAR Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service (CDS) to better understand how higher education institutions approach student information systems (SISs). Information provided for this spotlight was derived from Module 8 of the CDS survey, which asked several questions regarding information systems and applications. Responses from…

  9. Efficient photocatalytic selective nitro-reduction and C-H bond oxidation over ultrathin sheet mediated CdS flowers.

    PubMed

    Pahari, Sandip Kumar; Pal, Provas; Srivastava, Divesh N; Ghosh, Subhash Ch; Panda, Asit Baran

    2015-06-28

    We report here a visible light driven selective nitro-reduction and oxidation of saturated sp(3) C-H bonds using ultrathin (0.8 nm) sheet mediated uniform CdS flowers as catalyst under a household 40 W CFL lamp and molecular oxygen as oxidant. The CdS flowers were synthesized using a simple surfactant assisted hydrothermal method.

  10. Controlled placement and orientation of nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex K; Yuzvinsky, Thomas D; Fennimore, Adam M

    2014-04-08

    A method for controlled deposition and orientation of molecular sized nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) on substrates is disclosed. The method comprised: forming a thin layer of polymer coating on a substrate; exposing a selected portion of the thin layer of polymer to alter a selected portion of the thin layer of polymer; forming a suspension of nanostructures in a solvent, wherein the solvent suspends the nanostructures and activates the nanostructures in the solvent for deposition; and flowing a suspension of nanostructures across the layer of polymer in a flow direction; thereby: depositing a nanostructure in the suspension of nanostructures only to the selected portion of the thin layer of polymer coating on the substrate to form a deposited nanostructure oriented in the flow direction. By selectively employing portions of the method above, complex NEMS may be built of simpler NEMSs components.

  11. Magnetostatic interactions between wire-tube nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Aravena, D.; Palma, J. L.; Escrig, J.

    2015-05-01

    We have investigated the magnetostatic interactions between wire-tube nanostructures. We have observed that the coercivity of the array decreases when the distance between the nanostructures decreases. Besides, when the external magnetic field is applied along the axis of the nanostructures, the two Barkhausen jumps observed for an isolated wire-tube nanostructure give rise to several minor jumps for a weakly interacting array, which eventually become a single jump for the most interacting case. Additionally, the angle θ at which maximum coercivity is obtained varies as a function of the center-to-center distance between the nanostructures, while those remanences obtained for arrays with different distances between the nanostructures coincide. In this way, the study of magnetostatic interactions between wire-tube nanostructures is an interesting topic of research in connection with potential applications where it is usually desirable to avoid such interactions or at least control them.

  12. Organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructures for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AbdulAlmohsin, Samir M.

    The enticing electro-optical properties of nanostructured materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, CdS nanocrystals and ZnO nanowrie bring new vigor into the innovation of photovoltaics. The main purpose of this dissertation is to develop novel nano-structured materials for low cost solar cell applications. Fabrication, characterization, and solar cell application of organic-inorganic hybrid structures are the main focus of this research. Polyaniline (PANI)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) composite films were synthesized by an electrochemical polymerization of aniline with airbrushed MWNTs on ITO substrates. It was found that the incorporation of MWNTs in PANI effectively increase the film conductivity with a percolation threshold of 5% of nanotubes in the composite. The solar cell performance strongly depends on the conductivity of the composite films, which can be tuned by adjusting nanotube concentration. A higher conductivity resulted in a better cell performance, resulting from an efficient charge collection. This study indicates that PANI/MWNT composite films with optimized conductivity are potentially useful for low-cost hybrid solar cell applications. CdS nanocrystal-sensitized solar cells (NCSSCs) were investigated by using polyaniline (PANI) as a replacement for conventional platinum counter electrode. The growth time of the nanocrystals significantly affects the solar cell performance. At an optimum growth, the NCSSCs exhibit 0.83% of the conversion efficiency in comparison to 0.13% for the identical cells without CdS nanocrystals. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that the charge transfer in the solar cells with CdS nanocrystals was improved. The enhanced overall energy conversion efficiency by nanocrystals is attributed to improved light absorption and suppressed recombination rate of interfacial charges at the injection, resulting in significantly improved charge transfer and electron lifetime. In addition, the PANI electrodes

  13. Charge transfer dynamics between photoexcited CdS nanorods and mononuclear Ru water-oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Huan-Wei; Wilker, Molly B; Damrauer, Niels H; Dukovic, Gordana

    2013-03-06

    We describe the charge transfer interactions between photoexcited CdS nanorods and mononuclear water oxidation catalysts derived from the [Ru(bpy)(tpy)Cl](+) parent structure. Upon excitation, hole transfer from CdS oxidizes the catalyst (Ru(2+) → Ru(3+)) on a 100 ps to 1 ns timescale. This is followed by 10-100 ns electron transfer (ET) that reduces the Ru(3+) center. The relatively slow ET dynamics may provide opportunities for the accumulation of multiple holes at the catalyst, which is necessary for water oxidation.

  14. Coronal Magnetography of Solar Active Regions Using Coordinated SOHO/CDS and VLA Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to apply the coronal magnetographic technique to SOHO (Solar Heliospheric Observatory) /CDS (Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer) EUV (Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation) and coordinated VLA microwave observations of solar active regions to derive the strength and structure of the coronal magnetic field. A CDS observing plan was developed for obtaining spectra needed to derive active region differential emission measures (DEMs) required for coronal magnetography. VLA observations were proposed and obtained. SOHO JOP 100 was developed, tested, approved, and implemented to obtain coordinated CDS (Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer)/EIT (Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope)/ VLA (Very Large Array)/ TRACE (Transition Region and Coronal Explorer)/ SXT (Solar X Ray Telescope) observations of active regions on April 12, May 9, May 13, and May 23. Analysis of all four data sets began, with heaviest concentration on COS data. It is found that 200-pixel (14 A in NIS1) wavelength windows are appropriate for extracting broadened Gaussian line profile fit parameters for lines including Fe XIV at 334.2, Fe XVI at 335.4, Fe XVI at 360.8, and Mg IX at 368.1 over the 4 arcmin by 4 arcmin CDS field of view. Extensive efforts were focused on learning and applying were focused on learning and applying CDS software, and including it in new IDL procedures to carry out calculations relating to coronal magnetography. An important step is to extract Gaussian profile fits to all the lines needed to derive the DEM in each spatial pixel of any given active region. The standard CDS absolute intensity calibration software was applied to derived intensity images, revealing that ratios between density-insensitive lines like Fe XVI 360.8/335.4 yield good agreement with theory. However, the resulting absolute intensities of those lines are very high, indicating that revisions to the CDS absolute intensity calibrations remain to be included in the CDS software, an essential step to

  15. Surface plasmon polaritons suppress photoresponse of colloidal CdS nanorods in nanogap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peigang; Song, Jia; Pan, Aoqiu; Chen, Jianjun; Wang, Shunli; Shen, Jingqin; Wang, Pengchao; Zhan, Jianming; Qian, Huiqin; Tang, Weihua

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal CdS nanorods ∼4.9 nm in diameter and ∼60 nm long were positioned in gold bow-tie electrodes with a gap of ∼50 nm by an AC dielectrophoresis process to construct optoelectronic devices. The fabricated devices exhibited an excellent photoresponse to white and blue light, but no response to green light. However, the response of the devices to white light could be degraded by green light. This is considered to be related to surface plasmon polaritons suppressing the generation of photo-carriers in the CdS nanorods. The results indicate that surface plasmons do not always benefit nano-optoeletronic devices.

  16. Photoluminescence enhancement in CdS quantum dots by thermal annealing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The photoluminescence behavior of CdS quantum dots in initial growth stage was studied in connection with an annealing process. Compared to the as-synthesized CdS quantum dots (quantum efficiency ≅ 1%), the heat-treated sample showed enhanced luminescence properties (quantum efficiency ≅ 29%) with a narrow band-edge emission. The simple annealing process diminished the accumulated defect states within the nanoparticles and thereby reduced the nonradiative recombination, which was confirmed by diffraction, absorption, and time-resolved photoluminescence. Consequently, the highly luminescent and defect-free nanoparticles were obtained by a facile and straightforward process. PMID:22931230

  17. Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanostructures can have stress and thermal gradients that are larger than any macroscopic analogue. These gradients can lead to specific regions that are susceptible to failure via processes such as plastic deformation by dislocation emission, chemical debonding, and interfacial alloying. A program has been developed that rigorously simulates and predicts optoelectronic properties of nanostructures of virtually any geometrical complexity and material composition. It can be used in simulations of energy level structure, wave functions, density of states of spatially configured phonon-coupled electrons, excitons in quantum dots, quantum rings, quantum ring complexes, and more. The code can be used to calculate stress distributions and thermal transport properties for a variety of nanostructures and interfaces, transport and scattering at nanoscale interfaces and surfaces under various stress states, and alloy compositional gradients. The code allows users to perform modeling of charge transport processes through quantum-dot (QD) arrays as functions of inter-dot distance, array order versus disorder, QD orientation, shape, size, and chemical composition for applications in photovoltaics and physical properties of QD-based biochemical sensors. The code can be used to study the hot exciton formation/relation dynamics in arrays of QDs of different shapes and sizes at different temperatures. It also can be used to understand the relation among the deposition parameters and inherent stresses, strain deformation, heat flow, and failure of nanostructures.

  18. A transparent nanostructured optical biosensor.

    PubMed

    He, Yuan; Li, Xiang; Que, Long

    2014-05-01

    Herein we report a new transparent nanostructured Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) device. The unique features of the nanostructured optical device can be summarized as the following: (i) optically transparent nanostructured optical device; (ii) simple and inexpensive for fabrication; (iii) easy to be fabricated and scaled up as an arrayed format. These features overcome the existing barriers for the current nanopore-based interferometric optical biosensors by measuring the transmitted optical signals rather than the reflected optical signals, thereby facilitating the optical testing significantly for the arrayed biosensors and thus paving the way for their potential for high throughput biodetection applications. The optically transparent nanostructures (i.e., anodic aluminum oxide nanopores) inside the FPI devices are fabricated from 2.2 microm thick lithographically patterned Al thin film on an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate using a two-step anodization process. Utilizing the binding between Protein A and porcine immunoglobulin G (IgG) as a model, the detection of the bioreaction between biomolecules has been demonstrated successfully. Experiments found that the lowest detection concentration of proteins is in the range of picomolar level using current devices, which can be easily tuned into the range of femtomolar level by optimizing the performance of devices.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of one-dimensional Ag-doped ZnO/Ga-doped ZnO coaxial nanostructure diodes.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hsien-Ming; Chang, Yu-Tsui; Wu, Wen-Wei; Wu, Jenn-Ming

    2014-04-09

    In the pursuit of high injection current diode nanodevices, entire one-dimensional (1D) ZnO coaxial nanostructures with p-n homojunctions is one of the ideal structures. In this study, we synthesized entire 1D ZnO-based coaxial homojunction diodes with p-type Ag-doped ZnO (SZO) nanostructure shells covering n-type Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) nanopagoda (NPG) cores by a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique. The entire 1D SZO-GZO and SZO-ZnO coaxial nanostructures exhibit better diode characteristics, such as lower threshold voltage, better rectification ratios, and better ideality factor n, than that reported for either 2D or 2D-1D p-n heterojunction and/or homojunction diodes. The binding energies of Ga and Ag were evaluated by low-temperature and temperature-dependent photoluminescence. In comparison, the SZO-GZO coaxial p-n nanostructures display better diode performance than the SZO-ZnO ones.

  20. Broad range tuning of structural and optical properties of Zn x Mg1-x O nanostructures grown by vapor transport method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanjaria, Jignesh V.; Azhar, Ebraheem Ali; Yu, Hongbin

    2016-11-01

    One-dimensional (1D) Zn x Mg1-x O nanomaterials have drawn global attention due to their remarkable chemical and physical properties, and their diverse current and future technological applications. In this work, 1D ZnMgO nanostructures with different magnesium concentrations and different morphologies were grown directly on zinc oxide-coated silicon substrates by thermal evaporation of zinc oxide, magnesium boride and graphite powders. Highly well-defined Mg-rich ZnMgO nanorods with a rock salt structure and Zn-rich ZnMgO nanostructures with a wurtzite structure have been deposited individually by careful optimization of the source mixture and process parameters. Structural and optical properties of the deposited products were studied by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Cathodoluminescence measurements demonstrate strong dominant peaks at 3.3 eV in Mg poor ZnMgO nanostructures and 4.8 eV in Mg rich nanostructures implying that the ZnMgO nanostructures can be used for the fabrication of deep UV optoelectronic devices. A mechanism for the formation and achieved diverse morphology of the ZnMgO nanostructures was proposed based on the characterization results.

  1. Influence of tunable external stimuli on the self-assembly of guanosine supramolecular nanostructures studied by atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinli; Dong, Mingdong; Otzen, Daniel E; Yao, Yuheng; Liu, Bo; Besenbacher, Flemming; Mamdouh, Wael

    2009-12-01

    The self-assembly of guanosine (G) molecules on solid surfaces is investigated by tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) upon controlling and introducing external factors (stimuli) to the G stock solution such as incubation time, presence/absence of metal cations, and mechanical shaking. Surprisingly, at different stages of incubation time at room temperature and in the absence of any metal cations in the G stock solution, which are known to be one of the governing factors in forming G-nanostructures, two assembly pathways resulting into two distinct supramolecular nanostructures were revealed. Astonishingly, by introducing a mechanical shaking of the tube containing the G stock solution, one-dimensional (1D) wires of G molecules are observed by AFM, and very interestingly, novel "branched" supramolecular nanostructures are formed. We have also observed that the later branched G nanostructures can grow further into a two-dimensional (2D) thin film by increasing the incubation time of the G stock solution at room temperature after it is exposed to the external mechanical stimuli. The self-assembled nanostructures of G molecules are changed significantly by tuning the assembly conditions, which show that it is indeed possible to grow complex 2D nanostructures from simple nucleoside molecules.

  2. Investigations of inorganic and hybrid inorganic-organic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, Kinson Chihang

    This thesis focuses on the exploratory synthesis and characterization of inorganic and hybrid inorganic-organic nanomaterials. In particular, nanostructures of semiconducting nitrides and oxides, and hybrid systems of nanowire-polymer composites and framework materials, are investigated. These materials are characterized by a variety of techniques for structure, composition, morphology, surface area, optical properties, and electrical properties. In the study of inorganic nanomaterials, gallium nitride (GaN), indium oxide (In2O3), and vanadium dioxide (VO2) nanostructures were synthesized using different strategies and their physical properties were examined. GaN nanostructures were obtained from various synthetic routes. Solid-state ammonolysis of metastable gamma-Ga2O 3 nanoparticles was found to be particularly successful; they achieved high surface areas and photoluminescent study showed a blue shift in emission as a result of surface and size defects. Similarly, In2O3 nanostructures were obtained by carbon-assisted solid-state syntheses. The sub-oxidic species, which are generated via a self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, resulted in 1D nanostructures including nanowires, nanotrees, and nanobouquets upon oxidation. On the other hand, hydrothermal methods were used to obtain VO2 nanorods. After post-thermal treatment, infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that these nanorods exhibit a thermochromic transition with temperature that is higher by ˜10°C compared to the parent material. The thermochromic behavior indicated a semiconductor-to-metal transition associated with a structural transformation from monoclinic to rutile. The hybrid systems, on the other hand, enabled their properties to be tunable. In nanowire-polymer composites, zinc oxide (ZnO) and silver (Ag) nanowires were synthesized and incorporated into polyaniline (PANI) and polypyrrole (PPy) via in-situ and ex-situ polymerization method. The electrical properties of these composites are

  3. Tandem repeats modify the structure of the canine CD1D gene.

    PubMed

    Looringh van Beeck, F A; Leegwater, P A J; Herrmann, T; Broere, F; Rutten, V P M G; Willemse, T; Van Rhijn, I

    2013-06-01

    Among the CD1 proteins that present lipid antigens to T cells, CD1d is the only one that stimulates a population of T cells with an invariant T-cell receptor known as NKT cells. Sequencing of a 722 nucleotide gap in the dog (Canis lupus familiaris) genome revealed that the canine CD1D gene lacks a sequence homologous to exon 2 of human CD1D, coding for the start codon and signal peptide. Also, the canine CD1D gene contains three different short tandem repeats that disrupt the expected gene structure. Because canine CD1D cDNA lacks sequences homologous to human exon 2 and 3, the functionality of canine CD1d protein may be affected, and this could have consequences for the development and activation of canine NKT cells.

  4. Examination of 1D Solar Cell Model Limitations Using 3D SPICE Modeling: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, W. E.; Olson, J. M.; Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    To examine the limitations of one-dimensional (1D) solar cell modeling, 3D SPICE-based modeling is used to examine in detail the validity of the 1D assumptions as a function of sheet resistance for a model cell. The internal voltages and current densities produced by this modeling give additional insight into the differences between the 1D and 3D models.

  5. Photocatalytic applications with CdS • block copolymer/exfoliated graphene nanoensembles: hydrogen generation and degradation of Rhodamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaltsas, T.; Karousis, N.; Pispas, S.; Tagmatarchis, N.

    2014-11-01

    Amphiphilic block copolymer poly(isoprene-b-acrylic acid) (PI-b-PAA) was used to stabilize exfoliated graphene in water, allowing the immobilization of semiconductor CdS nanoparticles forming CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene. Characterization using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy proved the success of the preparation method and revealed the presence of spherical CdS. Moreover, UV-Vis and photoluminescence assays suggested that electronic interactions within CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene exist as evidenced by the significant quenching of the characteristic emission of CdS by exfoliated graphene. Photoillumination of CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene, in the presence of ammonium formate as a quencher for the photogenerated holes, resulted in the generation of hydrogen by water splitting, monitored by the reduction of 4-nitroaniline to benzene-1,4-diamine (>80 ± 4% at 20 min; 100% at 24 min), much faster and more efficient compared to when reference CdS • PI-b-PAA was used as the photocatalyst (<30 ± 3% at 20 min; 100% at 240 min). Moreover, Rhodamine B was photocatalytically degraded by CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene, with fast kinetics under visible light illumination in the presence of air. The enhancement of both photocatalytic processes by CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene was rationalized in terms of effective separation of holes and electrons, contrary to reference CdS • PI-b-PAA, in which rapid recombination of the hole-electron pair is inevitable due to the absence of exfoliated graphene as a suitable electron acceptor.

  6. Fabrication of zein nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luecha, Jarupat

    resins. The soft lithography technique was mainly used to fabricate micro and nanostructures on zein films. Zein material well-replicated small structures with the smallest size at sub micrometer scale that resulted in interesting photonic properties. The bonding method was also developed for assembling portable zein microfluidic devices with small shape distortion. Zein-zein and zein-glass microfluidic devices demonstrated sufficient strength to facilitate fluid flow in a complex microfluidic design with no leakage. Aside from the fabrication technique development, several potential applications of this environmentally friendly microfluidic device were investigated. The concentration gradient manipulation of Rhodamine B solution in zein-glass microfluidic devices was demonstrated. The diffusion of small molecules such as fluorescent dye into the wall of the zein microfluidic channels was observed. However, with this formulation, zein microfluidic devices were not suitable for cell culture applications. This pioneer study covered a wide spectrum of the implementation of the two nanotechnology approaches to advance zein biomaterial which provided proof of fundamental concepts as well as presenting some limitations. The findings in this study can lead to several innovative research opportunities of advanced zein biomaterials with broad applications. The information from the study of zein nanocomposite structure allows the packaging industry to develop the low cost biodegradable materials with physical property improvement. The information from the study of the zein microfluidic devices allows agro-industry to develop the nanotechnology-enabled microfluidic sensors fabricated entirely from biodegradable polymer for on-site disease or contaminant detection in the fields of food and agriculture.

  7. Emission energy, exciton dynamics and lasing properties of buckled CdS nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Sun, Liaoxin; Lu, Jian; Ren, Ming-Liang; Zhang, Tianning; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Xiaohao; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Changqing; Shen, Xuechu; Agarwal, Ritesh; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We report the modulation of emission energy, exciton dynamics and lasing properties in a single buckled CdS nanoribbon (NR) by strain-engineering. Inspired by ordered structure fabrication on elastomeric polymer, we develop a new method to fabricate uniform buckled NRs supported on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Wavy structure, of which compressive and tensile strain periodically varied along the CdS NR, leads to a position-dependent emission energy shift as large as 14 nm in photoluminescence (PL) mapping. Both micro-PL and micro-reflectance reveal the spectral characteristics of broad emission of buckled NR, which can be understood by the discrepancy of strain-induced energy shift of A- and B-exciton of CdS. Furthermore, the dynamics of excitons under tensile strain are also investigated; we find that the B-exciton have much shorter lifetime than that of redshifted A-exciton. In addition, we also present the lasing of buckled CdS NRs, in which the strain-dominated mode selection in multi-mode laser and negligible mode shifts in single-mode laser are clearly observed. Our results show that the strained NRs may serve as new functional optical elements for flexible light emitter or on-chip all-optical devices. PMID:27210303

  8. Effect of Reaction Temperature of CdS Buffer Layers by Chemical Bath Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Jin; Kim, Chae-Woong; Jung, Duk Young; Jeong, Chaehwan

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated CdS deposition on a Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) film via chemical bath deposition (CBD) in order to obtain a high-quality optimized buffer layer. The thickness and reaction temperature (from 50 degrees C to 65 degrees C) were investigated, and we found that an increase in the reaction temperature during CBD, resulted in a thicker CdS layer. We obtained a thin film with a thickness of 50 nm at a reaction temperature of 60 degrees C, which also exhibited the highest photoelectric conversion efficiency for use in solar cells. Room temperature time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) measurements were performed on the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film and CdS/CIGS samples to determine the recombination process of the photo-generated minority carrier. The device performance was found to be dependent on the thickness of the CdS layer. As the thickness of the CdS increases, the fill factor and the series resistance increased to 61.66% and decreased to 8.35 Ω, respectively. The best condition was observed at a reaction temperature of 60 degrees C, and its conversion efficiency was 12.20%.

  9. Optimization of CdS Buffer Layer for High Efficiency CIGS Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donguk; Jang, Yong-Jun; Jung, Ho-Sung; Kim, Minha; Baek, Dohyun; Yi, Junsin; Lee, Jaehyeong; Choi, Youngkwan

    2016-05-01

    In present work, effects of the thickness on the structural and optical properties of chemically deposited CdS thin films were investigated. In addition, we fabricated Cu(In, Ga)Se2 solar cells with various thicknesses of CdS buffer layer and optimized the thickness for a high efficiency. When the CdS thin films were thicker, the crystallinity improved but the transmittance decreased. The short-circuit current density (J(sc)) and the fill factor are the major efficiency limiting factors for the CIGS solar cells. As the thickness of the CdS buffer layer, the open-circuit voltage (V(oc)) and the fill factor increased, whereas the J(sc) slightly decreased. The improvement of the fill factor and thus efficiency resulted from larger shunt resistance. For the solar cells without a high resistive intrinsic ZnO layer, the highest efficiency was acquired at the thickness of 89 nm. With further increasing the thickness, the J(sc) decreased significantly, resulting in poor efficiency.

  10. Ultrafast Below-Band-Gap Laser Pulse Induced Relaxations in CdS Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmelev, A. G.; Leontyev, A. V.; Nikiforov, V. G.; Ivanin, K. V.; Lobkov, V. S.; Khasanov, O. Kh; Samartsev, V. V.

    2015-05-01

    We report an experimental study of the intra- and interband transitions in bulk CdS crystal induced by a strong below-band-edge femtosecond laser pulse. An additional peak was observed in spectrally resolved four-wave mixing signal shifted to lower energy and positive time delay.

  11. Maximize Institutional Relationships with CRMs. CDS Spotlight Report. ECAR Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service (CDS) to better understand how higher education institutions approach customer relationship management (CRM) systems. Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of the Core Data survey, which asked several questions regarding information systems and applications.…

  12. Surfactant-Assisted Growth of CdS Thin Films for Photovoltaic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, C. L.; Hasoon, F. S.

    2005-11-01

    A common non-ionic surfactant, Triton X-100, was used to modify the chemical bath deposition (CBD) of CdS "buffer" layers on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) data demonstrate that films produced with the surfactant have about the same levels of impurities as films grown without it. For thin, ~130 ..ANG.. CdS layers and relative to devices made without the surfactant, average absolute cell efficiencies were increased from 10.5% to 14.8%, or by a relative 41%. Visual inspection of the CdS depositions reveals one possible mechanism of the surfactant's effects: bubbles that form and adhere to the CIGS surface during the CBD reaction are almost completely eliminated with the addition of the TX-100. Thus, pinholes and thin areas in the CdS layers caused by poor wetting of the substrate surface are sharply reduced, leading to large increases in the open circuit voltage in devices produced with the surfactant.

  13. Emission energy, exciton dynamics and lasing properties of buckled CdS nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Sun, Liaoxin; Lu, Jian; Ren, Ming-Liang; Zhang, Tianning; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Xiaohao; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Changqing; Shen, Xuechu; Agarwal, Ritesh; Lu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    We report the modulation of emission energy, exciton dynamics and lasing properties in a single buckled CdS nanoribbon (NR) by strain-engineering. Inspired by ordered structure fabrication on elastomeric polymer, we develop a new method to fabricate uniform buckled NRs supported on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Wavy structure, of which compressive and tensile strain periodically varied along the CdS NR, leads to a position-dependent emission energy shift as large as 14 nm in photoluminescence (PL) mapping. Both micro-PL and micro-reflectance reveal the spectral characteristics of broad emission of buckled NR, which can be understood by the discrepancy of strain-induced energy shift of A- and B-exciton of CdS. Furthermore, the dynamics of excitons under tensile strain are also investigated; we find that the B-exciton have much shorter lifetime than that of redshifted A-exciton. In addition, we also present the lasing of buckled CdS NRs, in which the strain-dominated mode selection in multi-mode laser and negligible mode shifts in single-mode laser are clearly observed. Our results show that the strained NRs may serve as new functional optical elements for flexible light emitter or on-chip all-optical devices.

  14. Charge Transfer Dynamics in Complexes of Light-Absorbing CdS Nanorods and Redox Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilker, Molly Bea

    The use of photoexcited electrons and holes in semiconductor nanocrystals as reduction and oxidation reagents is an intriguing way of harvesting photon energy to drive chemical reactions. This dissertation describes research efforts to understand the photoexcited charge transfer kinetics in complexes of colloidal CdS nanorods coupled with either a water oxidation or reduction catalyst. The first project focuses on the charge transfer interactions between photoexcited CdS nanorods and a mononuclear water oxidation catalyst derived from the [Ru(bpy)(tpy)Cl]+ parent structure. The second project details the electron transfer kinetics in complexes of CdS nanorods coupled with [FeFe]-hydrogenase, which catalyzes H+ reduction. These complexes photochemically produce H2 with quantum yields of up to 20%. Kinetics of electron transfer from CdS nanorods to hydrogenase play a critical role in the overall photochemical reactivity, as the quantum efficiency of electron transfer defines the upper limit on the quantum yield of H 2 generation. Insights from these time-resolved spectroscopic studies are used to discuss the intricate kinetic pathways involved in photochemical H2 generation and the mechanism for electron transfer from photoexcited nanorods to hydrogenase in photocatalytic complexes.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of functionalized dithiocarbamates: New single-source precursors for CdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Novel single-molecular precursors for CdS are prepared by reacting functionalized secondary amine and CS2 with cadmium acetate dihydrate. All these precursors are characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy and solid-state 13C NMR. CdS semiconductor nanoparticles are synthesized using these precursors by a single-step solvothermal method with ethylenediamine at 117 °C. The synthesized semiconductor nanoparticles are investigated by infra-red spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction analysis, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, scanning electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission microscopy, selected area electron diffraction analysis and Raman spectroscopy. The synthesized CdS are hexagonal (zinc wurtzite) crystalline material, which are indicative of the reduction of particles. Comparison with the CdS and the mixture of CdS/CdSṡ0.5gl revealed that the CdS/CdSṡ0.5gl exhibited a well crystalline structure.

  16. Polyphenylenepyridyl dendrimers as stabilizing and controlling agents for CdS nanoparticle formation.

    PubMed

    Kuchkina, Nina V; Morgan, David Gene; Stein, Barry D; Puntus, Lada N; Sergeev, Alexander M; Peregudov, Alexander S; Bronstein, Lyudmila M; Shifrina, Zinaida B

    2012-04-07

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) are being actively explored for applications in medical diagnostics and therapy and numerous electronic devices including solar cells. In this paper we demonstrate the influence of the third generation rigid polyphenylenepyridyl dendrimers (PPPDs) of a different architecture on the formation of well-defined CdS NPs. A high temperature approach to the synthesis of novel CdS/PPPD nanocomposites is feasible due to the high thermal stability of PPPDs. The PPPD architecture affects the CdS NP formation: larger NPs are obtained in the presence of dendrimers with 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene cores compared to those with tetrakis(4-ethynylphen-1-yl)methane cores. The reaction conditions such as concentrations of PPPDs and NP precursors and the temperature regime also influence the CdS NP sizes. For the first time, we elucidated a mechanism of CdS NP formation in a non-coordinating solvent through the CdO redispersion in the presence of PPPDs. Interesting optical properties of these CdS/PPPD nanocomposites make them promising candidates for imaging applications.

  17. Photoluminescent nanocomposite materials based on SBMA copolymer and CdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovu, M.; Enachescu, M.; Culeac, I.; Verlan, V.; Robu, S.; Bojin, D.; Nistor, Iu.; Cojocaru, I.

    2015-02-01

    We present experimental results on copolymer-based nanocomposite made of styrene with butyl methacrylate (SBMA) (1:1) and inorganic semiconductor CdS. Thin film composite samples have been characterized by UV-Vis absorption and photoluminescent spectroscopy, as well as by transmission electron microscopy. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) examination confirms a relatively narrow distribution of CdS nanoclusters in the SBMA matrix, which covers the range 2-10 nm. On the other side, the average CdS particles size estimated from the position of first excitonic peak in the UV-Vis absorption spectrum was found to be 2.8 nm and 4.4 nm for two samples with different duration of thermal treatment, which is in good agreement with photoluminescence (PL) experimental data. The PL spectrum for CdS nanocrystals is dominated by near-band-edge emission. The relatively narrow line width (40-45 nm) of the main PL band suggests the nanoparticles having narrow size distribution. On the other side, relatively low PL emission from surface trap states at longer wavelengths were observed in the region 500-750 nm indicating on recombination on defects. Key words: nanocomposite, polymer matrix, photoluminescence,

  18. Cd–cysteine precursor nanowire templated microwave-assisted transformation route to CdS nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiao-Lin; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Zhang, Qian; Li, Zhi-Feng; Yang, Bin

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Cadmium sulfide polycrystalline nanotubes have been successfully synthesized by microwave-assisted transformation method using Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires as the source material and template in ethylene glycol at 160 °C or ethanol at 60 °C. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires were successfully synthesized in alkaline solution. ► CdS nanotubes were prepared by templated microwave-assisted transformation method. ► CdS nanotubes can well duplicate the size and morphology of precursor nanowires. ► This method has the advantages of the simplicity and low cost. -- Abstract: We report the Cd–cysteine precursor nanowire templated microwave-assisted transformation route to CdS nanotubes. In this method, the Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires are synthesized using CdCl{sub 2}·2.5H{sub 2}O, L-cysteine and ethanolamine in water at room temperature. The Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires are used as the source material and template for the subsequent preparation of CdS nanotubes by a microwave-assisted transformation method using ethylene glycol or ethanol as the solvent. This method has the advantages of the simplicity and low cost, and may be extended to the synthesis of nanotubes of other compounds. The products are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  19. CdS nanoparticles-enhanced chemiluminescence and determination of baicalin in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolan; Tan, Xinmei; Wang, Jianxiu

    2013-01-01

    CdS nanoparticles (CdS NPs) of different sizes were synthesized by the citrate reduction method. It was found that CdS NPs could enhance the chemiluminescence (CL) of the luminol-potassium ferricyanide system and baicalin could inhibit CdS NPs-enhanced luminol-potassium ferricyanide CL signals in alkaline solution. Based on this inhibition, a flow-injection CL method was established for determination of baicalin in pharmaceutical preparations and human urine samples. Under optimized conditions, the linear range for determination of baicalin was 5.0 x 10(-6) to 1.0 x 10(-3) g/L. The detection limit at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 was 1.7 x 10(-6) g/L. CL spectra, UV-visible spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to investigate the CL mechanism. The method described is simple, selective and obviates the need of extensive sample pretreatment.

  20. Ammonia free growth of CdS thin films by Chemical Bath Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaber, A.; Alamri, S. N.; Aida, M. S.

    2011-10-01

    CdS thin films were deposited by a chemical bath deposition technique (CBD). The bath solution is composed of CdCl2 (0.1 M) salt as a source for Cd and thiourea (0.1M) as a source of sulphur (S). To avoid the toxicity and volatility of the commonly used ammonia, ethanolamine (ETA ) is used as complexing agent. Films were deposited with different times from 30 to 120 minutes in order to study the films growth mechanism. The solution temperature was fixed at 60°C. The structural and morphological films characterizations were carried by XRD analysis and AFM observations. From the XRD analysis we inferred that obtained CdS films have a pure hexagonal structure with the preferential orientation along the plane (101). The pure hexagonal structure is highly recommended for the realization of CdTe/ CdS or CuInSe/CdS solar cells. The presence of the hexagonal structure and the low growth rate in order of 1nm/min suggest that the growth mechanism is achieved through the ion by ion process. The optical characterization result indicates that the obtained films have a high transparency from 80 to 60 % in the visible range. In conclusion we inferred that CBD ammonia free CdS thin films deposition enables the production of films suitable for photovoltaic applications.

  1. Surface piezoelectric effect in non-centrosymmetric semiconductors - CdS.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    It was found that mechanical bending of CdS wafers with the (00.1) orientation causes pronounced changes in the contact potential difference. The changes were of the order of one volt. This effect was attributed to the polarization induced in the depletion layer by the mechanical stress. On this basis a model was developed which accounts for the experimental results.

  2. Shape and phase control of CdS nanocrystals using cationic surfactant in noninjection synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Monodispersed CdS nanocrystals with controllable shape and phase have been successfully synthesized in this study by adding cationic surfactant in noninjection synthesis system. With the increase of the amount of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) added, the shape of the CdS nanocrystals changed from spherical to multi-armed, and the phase changed from zinc-blende to wurtzite. It was found that halide ion Cl- plays a key role in the transformation, and other halide ions such as Br- can also induce similar transformation. We proposed that the strong binding between Cd2+ and halide ions reduced the reactivity of the precursors, decreased the nuclei formed in the nucleation stage, and led to the high concentration of precursor in the growth stage, resulting in the increase of size and phase transformation of CdS nanocrystals. In addition, it was found that the multi-armed CdS nanocrystals lost quantum confinement effect because of the increase of the size with the increase of the concentration of CTAC. PMID:21711888

  3. Therapeutic implications of CD1d expression and tumor-infiltrating macrophages in pediatric medulloblastomas.

    PubMed

    Teo, Wan-Yee; Elghetany, M Tarek; Shen, Jianhe; Man, Tsz-Kwong; Li, Xiaonan; Chintagumpala, Murali; Su, Jack Meng Fen; Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William; Adesina, Adekunle M; Lau, Ching C

    2014-11-01

    Immunobiology of medulloblastoma (MB), the most common malignant brain tumor in children, is poorly understood. Although tumor cells in some MBs were recently shown to express CD1d and be susceptible to Vα24-invariant natural killer T (NKT)-cell cytotoxicity, the clinical relevance of CD1d expression in MB patients remains unknown. We investigated the expression of CD1d in pediatric MBs and correlated with molecular and clinical characteristics. Specifically, we explored if NKT cell therapy can be targeted at a subset of pediatric MBs with poorer prognosis. Particularly, infantile MBs have a worse outcome because radiotherapy is delayed to avoid neurocognitive sequelae. Immunohistochemistry for CD1d was performed on a screening set of 38 primary pediatric MBs. Gene expression of the membrane form of M2 macrophage marker, CD163, was studied in an expanded cohort of 60 tumors. Outcome data was collected prospectively. Thirteen of 38 MBs (34.2 %) expressed CD1d on immunohistochemistry. CD1d was expressed mainly on MB tumor cells, and on some tumor-associated macrophages. Majority (18/22, 82 %) of non sonic-hedgehog/Wingless-activated MBs (group 3 and 4) were CD1d-negative (p = 0.05). A subset of infantile MBs (4/9, 44.4 %) expressed CD1d. Macrophages infiltrating MB expressed CD163 apart from CD1d. Molecular subtypes demonstrated statistical differences in CD163 expression, SHH-tumors were the most enriched (p = 0.006). Molecular and clinical subtypes of pediatric MB exhibit distinct differences in CD1d expression, which have important therapeutic implications. High CD1d expression in infantile MBs offers potential new immunotherapeutic treatment with NKT cell therapy in infants, where treatment is suboptimal due delayed radiotherapy.

  4. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical. PMID:25751125

  5. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical.

  6. Analysis of Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared Spectra of the TRANS-HEXATRIENE-1,1-D2 and -CIS-1-D1 Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Fuson, Hannah A.; Tian, Hengfeng; Blake, Thomas A.

    2011-06-01

    Hexatriene-1,1-D2 with some admixture of the cis-1-D1 and trans-1-D1 species was synthesized by reaction of 2,4-pentadienal and (methyl-D3)-triphenylphosphonium iodide (Wittig reagent). The trans isomer was isolated by preparative gas chromatography, and the high-resolution (0.0015 Cm-1) infrared spectrum was recorded on a Bruker IFS 125HR instrument. The rotational structure in two C-type bands for the 1,1-D2 species was analyzed. For this species the bands at 902.043 and 721.864 Cm-1 yielded composite ground state rotational constants of A0 = 0.801882(1), B0 = 0.041850(2), and C0 = 0.039804(1) Cm-1. For the cis-1-D1 species the C-type band at 803.018 Cm-1 gave A0 = 0.809384(2), B0 = 0.043530(3), and C0 = 0.041321(2) Cm-1. By iodine-catalyzed isomerization, we have obtained some of the much less favored cis isomer and hope to obtain microwave spectra for its three deuterium-substituted species. The rotational constants reported here contribute to data needed for determining a semi-experimental structure for trans-hexatriene, which should show that the structural consequences of pi-electron delocalization increase with the chain length of polyenes.

  7. Mapping of the serotonin 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} autoreceptor gene (HTR1D) on chromosome 1 using a silent polymorphism in the coding region

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, N.; Lappalainen, J.; Linnoila, M.

    1995-04-24

    Serotonin (5-HT){sub ID} receptors are 5-HT release-regulating autoreceptors in the human brain. Abnormalities in brain 5-HT function have been hypothesized in the pathophysiology of various psychiatric disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, autism, mood disorders, eating disorders, impulsive violent behavior, and alcoholism. Thus, mutations occurring in 5-HT autoreceptors may cause or increase the vulnerability to any of these conditions. 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} and 5-HT{sub 1D{Beta}} subtypes have been previously localized to chromosomes 1p36.3-p34.3 and 6q13, respectively, using rodent-human hybrids and in situ localization. In this communication, we report the detection of a 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} receptor gene polymorphism by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the coding sequence. The polymorphism was used for fine scale linkage mapping of 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} on chromosome 1. This polymorphism should also be useful for linkage studies in populations and in families. Our analysis also demonstrates that functionally significant coding sequence variants of the 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} are probably not abundant either among alcoholics or in the general population. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer efficiency in the O/1 D/-N2 and O/1 D/-CO systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Black, G.

    1974-01-01

    With the aid of a molecular resonance fluorescence technique, which utilizes optical pumping from the v = 1 level of the ground state of CO by A 1 Pi-X 1 Sigma radiation, a study is made of the efficiency of E-V transfer from O(1 D) to CO. O(1 D) is generated at a known rate by O2 photodissociation at 1470 A in an intermittent mode, and the small modulation of the fluorescent signal associated with CO (v = 1) above the normal thermal background is interpreted in terms of E-V transfer efficiency. The CO (v = 1) lifetime in this system is determined mainly by resonance trapping of the IR fundamental band, and is found to be up to ten times longer than the natural radiative lifetime. For CO, (40 plus or minus 8)% of the O(1 D) energy is converted into vibrational energy. By observing the effect of N2 on the CO (v = 1) fluorescent intensity and lifetime, it is possible to obtain the E-V transfer efficiency for the system O(1 D)-N2 relative to that for O(1 D)-CO. The results indicate that the efficiency for N2 is (83 plus or minus 10)% of that for CO.

  9. Realization of III-V Semiconductor Periodic Nanostructures by Laser Direct Writing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuan-qing; Huang, Rong; Liu, Qing-lu; Zheng, Chang-cheng; Ning, Ji-qiang; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Zi-yang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrated the fabrication of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) periodic nanostructures on III-V GaAs substrates utilizing laser direct writing (LDW) technique. Metal thin films (Ti) and phase change materials (Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) and Ge2Sb1.8Bi0.2Te5 (GSBT)) were chosen as photoresists to achieve small feature sizes of semiconductor nanostructures. A minimum feature size of about 50 nm about a quarter of the optical diffraction limit was obtained on the photoresists, and 1D III-V semiconductor nanolines with a minimum width of 150 nm were successfully acquired on the GaAs substrate which was smaller than the best results acquired on Si substrate ever reported. 2D nanosquare holes were fabricated as well by using Ti thin film as the photoresist, with a side width of about 200 nm, but the square holes changed to a rectangle shape when GST or GSBT was employed as the photoresist, which mainly resulted from the interaction of two cross-temperature fields induced by two scanning laser beams. The interacting mechanism of different photoresists in preparing periodic nanostructures with the LDW technique was discussed in detail.

  10. Realization of III-V Semiconductor Periodic Nanostructures by Laser Direct Writing Technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuan-Qing; Huang, Rong; Liu, Qing-Lu; Zheng, Chang-Cheng; Ning, Ji-Qiang; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Zi-Yang

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we demonstrated the fabrication of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) periodic nanostructures on III-V GaAs substrates utilizing laser direct writing (LDW) technique. Metal thin films (Ti) and phase change materials (Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) and Ge2Sb1.8Bi0.2Te5 (GSBT)) were chosen as photoresists to achieve small feature sizes of semiconductor nanostructures. A minimum feature size of about 50 nm about a quarter of the optical diffraction limit was obtained on the photoresists, and 1D III-V semiconductor nanolines with a minimum width of 150 nm were successfully acquired on the GaAs substrate which was smaller than the best results acquired on Si substrate ever reported. 2D nanosquare holes were fabricated as well by using Ti thin film as the photoresist, with a side width of about 200 nm, but the square holes changed to a rectangle shape when GST or GSBT was employed as the photoresist, which mainly resulted from the interaction of two cross-temperature fields induced by two scanning laser beams. The interacting mechanism of different photoresists in preparing periodic nanostructures with the LDW technique was discussed in detail.

  11. A comprehensive review of semiconductor ultraviolet photodetectors: from thin film to one-dimensional nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sang, Liwen; Liao, Meiyong; Sumiya, Masatomo

    2013-08-13

    Ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors have drawn extensive attention owing to their applications in industrial, environmental and even biological fields. Compared to UV-enhanced Si photodetectors, a new generation of wide bandgap semiconductors, such as (Al, In) GaN, diamond, and SiC, have the advantages of high responsivity, high thermal stability, robust radiation hardness and high response speed. On the other hand, one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure semiconductors with a wide bandgap, such as β-Ga2O3, GaN, ZnO, or other metal-oxide nanostructures, also show their potential for high-efficiency UV photodetection. In some cases such as flame detection, high-temperature thermally stable detectors with high performance are required. This article provides a comprehensive review on the state-of-the-art research activities in the UV photodetection field, including not only semiconductor thin films, but also 1D nanostructured materials, which are attracting more and more attention in the detection field. A special focus is given on the thermal stability of the developed devices, which is one of the key characteristics for the real applications.

  12. A Comprehensive Review of Semiconductor Ultraviolet Photodetectors: From Thin Film to One-Dimensional Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Liwen; Liao, Meiyong; Sumiya, Masatomo

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors have drawn extensive attention owing to their applications in industrial, environmental and even biological fields. Compared to UV-enhanced Si photodetectors, a new generation of wide bandgap semiconductors, such as (Al, In) GaN, diamond, and SiC, have the advantages of high responsivity, high thermal stability, robust radiation hardness and high response speed. On the other hand, one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure semiconductors with a wide bandgap, such as β-Ga2O3, GaN, ZnO, or other metal-oxide nanostructures, also show their potential for high-efficiency UV photodetection. In some cases such as flame detection, high-temperature thermally stable detectors with high performance are required. This article provides a comprehensive review on the state-of-the-art research activities in the UV photodetection field, including not only semiconductor thin films, but also 1D nanostructured materials, which are attracting more and more attention in the detection field. A special focus is given on the thermal stability of the developed devices, which is one of the key characteristics for the real applications. PMID:23945739

  13. Combustion synthesis of Si-related crystalline nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soszyński, Michał; Łabędź, Olga; Huczko, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    The unique self propagated high temperature synthesis (SHS technique) allows for an effective, energetically autothermal formation of different novel materials, including nanostructural, non-stoichiometric and bearing new phases, this all during fast reaction in a mixture strong oxidant/strong reducer. This all results from specific characteristics of the process: high temperatures/pressures, short reaction times and very fast quenching of gaseous reaction products during their expansion from combustion zone towards cooling zone. Silicon carbide as so-called refractory special ceramics possesses very special physical and chemical properties, especially in case of its nanostructural morphology this including 1-D (nanofibres). The results of the exploratory runs regarding the application of SiCNFs as polymer modifier, super-hard ceramic composites (SiCNFs/nano-SiC mixtures) or electron emitter are very encouraging indeed. The results will provide the information regarding the possible reaction channels. The fundamental parametric studies concentrate on the relationship between many process variables and SiCNFs formation efficiency. Relatively costly commercial reactants (Aldrich) were previously used which are now replaced by waste Tarflen (as oxidant). Their cost is a few orders of magnitude (!) lower. It will drastically reduce the costs of SiCNFs production since the operational costs of energetically autogenic SSW technique are obviously very low.

  14. Electrochemiluminescence behaviors of Eu3+-doped CdS nanocrystals film in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Li; Shan, Yun; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Eu3+ doped CdS nanocrystals (CdS:Eu NCs) were synthesized via a co-precipitation method. The doping of Eu3+ ions caused a 4-fold enhancement in electrochemiluminescence (ECL) intensity and more stable cathodic signals compared to pure CdS NCs. Such enhancement was mostly ascribed to doping-induced improvement in the stability of reduced NCs. A new emission peak around 620 nm was observed in ECL spectra of the doped NCs, which belongeded to the 5D0 --> 7F2 transition of Eu3+ ions in CdS NCs. Correspondingly, a pair of oxidation and reduction peaks occurred at +1.01 V and +0.61 V because of the formation of Eu3+-surface states complex when the CdS:Eu NCs solution underwent cyclic voltammogram scanning. Benefiting from the strong ECL emission of the doped NCs and high affinity of the doped Eu3+ ions to oxygen, the CdS:Eu NCs film showed a great oxygen-sensitivity. The intense red luminescence of the characteristic transitions of Eu3+ in CdS:Eu NCs would also have enormous potential in bioanlytical systems.Eu3+ doped CdS nanocrystals (CdS:Eu NCs) were synthesized via a co-precipitation method. The doping of Eu3+ ions caused a 4-fold enhancement in electrochemiluminescence (ECL) intensity and more stable cathodic signals compared to pure CdS NCs. Such enhancement was mostly ascribed to doping-induced improvement in the stability of reduced NCs. A new emission peak around 620 nm was observed in ECL spectra of the doped NCs, which belongeded to the 5D0 --> 7F2 transition of Eu3+ ions in CdS NCs. Correspondingly, a pair of oxidation and reduction peaks occurred at +1.01 V and +0.61 V because of the formation of Eu3+-surface states complex when the CdS:Eu NCs solution underwent cyclic voltammogram scanning. Benefiting from the strong ECL emission of the doped NCs and high affinity of the doped Eu3+ ions to oxygen, the CdS:Eu NCs film showed a great oxygen-sensitivity. The intense red luminescence of the characteristic transitions of Eu3+ in CdS:Eu NCs would also have

  15. L1000CDS2: LINCS L1000 characteristic direction signatures search engine

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Qiaonan; Reid, St Patrick; Clark, Neil R; Wang, Zichen; Fernandez, Nicolas F; Rouillard, Andrew D; Readhead, Ben; Tritsch, Sarah R; Hodos, Rachel; Hafner, Marc; Niepel, Mario; Sorger, Peter K; Dudley, Joel T; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G; Ma’ayan, Avi

    2017-01-01

    The library of integrated network-based cellular signatures (LINCS) L1000 data set currently comprises of over a million gene expression profiles of chemically perturbed human cell lines. Through unique several intrinsic and extrinsic benchmarking schemes, we demonstrate that processing the L1000 data with the characteristic direction (CD) method significantly improves signal to noise compared with the MODZ method currently used to compute L1000 signatures. The CD processed L1000 signatures are served through a state-of-the-art web-based search engine application called L1000CDS2. The L1000CDS2 search engine provides prioritization of thousands of small-molecule signatures, and their pairwise combinations, predicted to either mimic or reverse an input gene expression signature using two methods. The L1000CDS2 search engine also predicts drug targets for all the small molecules profiled by the L1000 assay that we processed. Targets are predicted by computing the cosine similarity between the L1000 small-molecule signatures and a large collection of signatures extracted from the gene expression omnibus (GEO) for single-gene perturbations in mammalian cells. We applied L1000CDS2 to prioritize small molecules that are predicted to reverse expression in 670 disease signatures also extracted from GEO, and prioritized small molecules that can mimic expression of 22 endogenous ligand signatures profiled by the L1000 assay. As a case study, to further demonstrate the utility of L1000CDS2, we collected expression signatures from human cells infected with Ebola virus at 30, 60 and 120 min. Querying these signatures with L1000CDS2 we identified kenpaullone, a GSK3B/CDK2 inhibitor that we show, in subsequent experiments, has a dose-dependent efficacy in inhibiting Ebola infection in vitro without causing cellular toxicity in human cell lines. In summary, the L1000CDS2 tool can be applied in many biological and biomedical settings, while improving the extraction of knowledge

  16. UNDERFLIGHT CALIBRATION OF SOHO/CDS AND HINODE/EIS WITH EUNIS-07

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Tongjiang; Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Thomas, Roger J.; Rabin, Douglas M.; Davila, Joseph M.; Young, Peter R.; Del Zanna, Giulio

    2011-12-01

    Flights of Goddard Space Flight Center's Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS) sounding rocket in 2006 and 2007 provided updated radiometric calibrations for Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (SOHO/CDS) and Hinode/Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (Hinode/EIS). EUNIS carried two independent imaging spectrographs covering wavebands of 300-370 A in first order and 170-205 A in second order. After each flight, end-to-end radiometric calibrations of the rocket payload were carried out in the same facility used for pre-launch calibrations of CDS and EIS. During the 2007 flight, EUNIS, SOHO/CDS, and Hinode/EIS observed the same solar locations, allowing the EUNIS calibrations to be directly applied to both CDS and EIS. The measured CDS NIS 1 line intensities calibrated with the standard (version 4) responsivities with the standard long-term corrections are found to be too low by a factor of 1.5 due to the decrease in responsivity. The EIS calibration update is performed in two ways. One uses the direct calibration transfer of the calibrated EUNIS-07 short wavelength (SW) channel. The other uses the insensitive line pairs, in which one member was observed by the EUNIS-07 long wavelength (LW) channel and the other by EIS in either the LW or SW waveband. Measurements from both methods are in good agreement, and confirm (within the measurement uncertainties) the EIS responsivity measured directly before the instrument's launch. The measurements also suggest that the EIS responsivity decreased by a factor of about 1.2 after the first year of operation (although the size of the measurement uncertainties is comparable to this decrease). The shape of the EIS SW response curve obtained by EUNIS-07 is consistent with the one measured in laboratory prior to launch. The absolute value of the quiet-Sun He II 304 A intensity measured by EUNIS-07 is consistent with the radiance measured by CDS NIS in quiet regions near the

  17. Simple synthesis of PbSe nanocrystals and their self-assembly into 2D ‘flakes’ and 1D ‘ribbons’ structures

    SciTech Connect

    Díaz-Torres, E.; Ortega-López, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • PbSe is obtained in a simple way by the co-precipitation method at low-temperature. • The structural, morphological and optical properties of PbSe were studied. • Adding NH{sub 4}OH to the precursor solutions influences on the morphology. • 2D- and 1D-PbSe structures assemble by oriented attachment. • PbSe can be a potential candidate for thermoelectric applications. - Abstract: This work presents a simple and low-temperature method to prepare a variety of Lead selenide (PbSe) nanostructures, using aqueous solutions of Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and NaHSe. Nanostructures with different morphology were obtained by varying the Pb:Se molar ratio, as well as the mixing sequence of NH{sub 4}OH with either Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} or NaHSe. Nanoparticles with different shapes (spherical and octahedral), and self-assembled structures (flakes and ribbons) were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. X-ray results confirmed that the PbSe rock-salt crystalline structure was obtained for all of the prepared samples. The crystal size is in the order of 7.3 to 8.9 nm for single nanocrystals. The absorption spectra of the samples show exciton absorption bands at 1395 nm and 1660 nm. This material could be used to develop more advanced structures for thermoelectric generators.

  18. Recent developments and future directions in the growth of nanostructures by van der Waals epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakti Utama, Muhammad Iqbal; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Jun; Yuan, Yanwen; Belarre, Francisco J.; Arbiol, Jordi; Xiong, Qihua

    2013-04-01

    Here we review the characteristics of ``van der Waals epitaxy'' (vdWE) as an alternative epitaxy mechanism that has been demonstrated as a viable method for circumventing the lattice matching requirements for epitaxial growth. Particular focus is given on the application of vdWE for nonplanar nanostructures. We highlight our works on the vdWE growth of nanowire arrays, tripods, and tetrapods from various semiconductors (ZnO, ZnTe, CdS, CdSe, CdSxSe1-x, CdTe, and PbS) on muscovite mica substrates, irrespective of the ensuing lattice mismatch. We then address the controllability of the synthesis and the growth mechanism of ZnO nanowires from catalyst-free vdWE in vapor transport growth. As exemplified herein with optical characterizations of ZnO and CdSe nanowires, we show that samples from vdWE may possess properties that are as excellent as those from conventional epitaxy. With our works, we aim to advocate vdWE as a prospective universal growth strategy for nonplanar epitaxial nanostructures.

  19. Correlating Nanostructures with Function: Structural Colors on the Wings of a Malaysian Bee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matin, T. R.; Leong, M. K.; Majlis, B. Y.; Gebeshuber, I. C.

    2010-10-01

    Structural colours refer to colours generated by nanostructures, with the characteristic dimension of the structures on the wavelength of the visible light (i.e., some hundreds of nanometers). Examples for structural colours are the colours of CDs and DVDs, the colours of soap bubbles or oil films on water (thin films), or the colours of certain butterfly wings (e.g., photonic crystals). Recently, we located a Malaysian bee with iridescent structural coloration on its wings. The generation of the colouration is still unknown, and there is no respective scientific literature available. This study presents the first AFM experiments related to the structural coloration of the carpenter bee wing. First attempts to investigate the nanostructures of the wing were performed with non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM, Park Systems XE-100), using a Silicon nitride cantilever with a spring constant of 40 N/m and a resonance frequency of 300.000 kHz. The AFM scans reveal three layers with structures with a diameter of several hundreds of nanometres. This, rules out thin films as the structures yielding the coloration. Future research and correlation of various structures with function in this bee wings will shed light on the contribution of these structures visible in the first AFM scans to the colouration. Structural colours produced by nature inspire novel approaches in man-made colours, via biomimetics (i.e., knowledge transfer from biology to technology).

  20. Catalytic Effects of Cr on Nitridation of Silicon and Formation of One-dimensional Silicon Nitride Nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Liang, Feng; Lu, Lilin; Tian, Liang; Li, Faliang; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Shaowei

    2016-08-16

    The catalytic effects of chromium (Cr) on the direct nitridation of silicon (Si) and morphology of nitridation product were investigated. Cr dramatically improved the conversation of Si to silicon nitride (Si3N4). The complete conversion was achieved at 1350 °C upon addition of 1.25 wt% Cr. This temperature was much lower than that required in the case without using a catalyst. Meanwhile, Cr played an important role in the in-situ growth of one-dimensional (1-D) α-Si3N4 nanostructures. α-Si3N4 nanowires and nanobelts became the primary product phases when 5 wt% Cr was used as the catalyst. The growth processes of the 1-D α-Si3N4 nanostructures were governed by the vapor-solid mechanism. First-principle calculations suggest that electrons can be transferred from Cr atoms to N atoms, facilitating the Si nitridation.