Science.gov

Sample records for 1d hydrodynamic model

  1. Survey of Multi-Material Closure Models in 1D Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Maeng, Jungyeoul Brad; Hyde, David Andrew Bulloch

    2015-07-28

    Accurately treating the coupled sub-cell thermodynamics of computational cells containing multiple materials is an inevitable problem in hydrodynamics simulations, whether due to initial configurations or evolutions of the materials and computational mesh. When solving the hydrodynamics equations within a multi-material cell, we make the assumption of a single velocity field for the entire computational domain, which necessitates the addition of a closure model to attempt to resolve the behavior of the multi-material cells’ constituents. In conjunction with a 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, we present a variety of both the popular as well as more recently proposed multi-material closure models and survey their performances across a spectrum of examples. We consider standard verification tests as well as practical examples using combinations of fluid, solid, and composite constituents within multi-material mixtures. Our survey provides insights into the advantages and disadvantages of various multi-material closure models in different problem configurations.

  2. EFDC1D - A ONE DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC AND SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODEL FOR RIVER AND STREAM NETWORKS: MODEL THEORY AND USERS GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical report describes the new one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic and sediment transport model EFDC1D. This model that can be applied to stream networks. The model code and two sample data sets are included on the distribution CD. EFDC1D can simulate bi-directional unstea...

  3. Using 1D2D Hydrodynamic Modeling to Inform Restoration Planning in the Atchafalaya River Basin, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden-Lesmeister, A.; Remo, J. W.; Piazza, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Atchafalaya River (AR) in Louisiana is the principal distributary of the Mississippi River (MR), and its basin contains the largest contiguous area of baldcypress-water tupelo swamp forests in North America. After designation of the Atchafalaya River Basin (ARB) as a federal floodway following the destructive 1927 MR flood, it was extensively modified to accommodate a substantial portion of the MR flow (~25%) to mitigate flooding in southern Louisiana. These modifications and increased flows resulted in substantial incision along large portions of the AR, altering connectivity between the river and its associated waterbodies. As a result of incision, the hydroperiod has been substantially altered, which has contributed to a decline in ecological health of the ARB's baldcypress-water tupelo forests. While it is recognized that the altered hydroperiod has negatively affected natural baldcypress regeneration, it is unclear whether proposed projects designed to enhance flow connectivity will increase long-term survival of these forests. In this study, we have constructed a 1D2D hydrodynamic model using SOBEK 2.12 to realistically model key physical parameters such as residence times, inundation extent, water-surface elevations (WSELs), and flow velocities to increase our understanding of the ARB's altered hydroperiod and the consequences for baldcypress-water tupelo forests. While the model encompasses a majority of the ARB, our modeling effort is focused on the Flat Lake Water Management Unit located in the southern portion of the ARB, where it will also be used to evaluate flow connectivity enhancement projects within the management unit. We believe our 1D2D hybrid hydraulic modeling approach will provide the flexibility and accuracy needed to guide connectivity enhancement efforts in the ARB and may provide a model framework for guiding similar efforts along other highly-altered river systems.

  4. Dimuon radiation at relativistic energies available at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron within a (3 + 1)D hydrodynamic + cascade model

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, E.; Steinheimer, J.; Bleicher, M.; Schramm, S.

    2011-07-15

    We analyze dilepton emission from hot and dense matter using a hybrid approach based on the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) transport model with an intermediate hydrodynamic stage for the description of heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energies. During the hydrodynamic stage, the production of lepton pairs is described by radiation rates for a strongly interacting medium in thermal equilibrium. In the low-mass region, hadronic thermal emission is evaluated by assuming vector meson dominance including in-medium modifications of the {rho} meson spectral function through scattering from nucleons and pions in the heat bath. In the intermediate-mass region, the hadronic rate is essentially determined by multipion annihilation processes. Emission from quark-antiquark annihilation in the quark gluon plasma (QGP) is taken into account as well. When the system is sufficiently dilute, the hydrodynamic description breaks down and a transition to a final cascade stage is performed. In this stage dimuon emission is evaluated as commonly done in transport models. By focusing on the enhancement with respect to the contribution from long-lived hadron decays after freezeout observed at the SPS in the low-mass region of the dilepton spectra, the relative importance of the different thermal contributions and of the two dynamical stages is investigated. We find that three separated regions can be identified in the invariant mass spectra. Whereas the very low and the intermediate-mass regions mostly receive contribution from the thermal dilepton emission, the region around the vector meson peak is dominated by the cascade emission. Above the {rho}-peak region the spectrum is driven by QGP radiation. Analysis of the dimuon transverse mass spectra reveals that the thermal hadronic emission shows an evident mass ordering not present in the emission from the QGP. A comparison of our calculation to recent acceptance-corrected NA60 data on invariant as well as

  5. Improved Large-Scale Inundation Modelling by 1D-2D Coupling and Consideration of Hydrologic and Hydrodynamic Processes - a Case Study in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, J. M.; Bierkens, M. F.; Van Beek, R.; Winsemius, H.; Haag, A.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of fluvial floods is paramount to accurate flood hazard and risk modeling. Currently, economic losses due to flooding constitute about one third of all damage resulting from natural hazards. Given future projections of climate change, the anticipated increase in the World's population and the associated implications, sound knowledge of flood hazard and related risk is crucial. Fluvial floods are cross-border phenomena that need to be addressed accordingly. Yet, only few studies model floods at the large-scale which is preferable to tiling the output of small-scale models. Most models cannot realistically model flood wave propagation due to a lack of either detailed channel and floodplain geometry or the absence of hydrologic processes. This study aims to develop a large-scale modeling tool that accounts for both hydrologic and hydrodynamic processes, to find and understand possible sources of errors and improvements and to assess how the added hydrodynamics affect flood wave propagation. Flood wave propagation is simulated by DELFT3D-FM (FM), a hydrodynamic model using a flexible mesh to schematize the study area. It is coupled to PCR-GLOBWB (PCR), a macro-scale hydrological model, that has its own simpler 1D routing scheme (DynRout) which has already been used for global inundation modeling and flood risk assessments (GLOFRIS; Winsemius et al., 2013). A number of model set-ups are compared and benchmarked for the simulation period 1986-1996: (0) PCR with DynRout; (1) using a FM 2D flexible mesh forced with PCR output and (2) as in (1) but discriminating between 1D channels and 2D floodplains, and, for comparison, (3) and (4) the same set-ups as (1) and (2) but forced with observed GRDC discharge values. Outputs are subsequently validated against observed GRDC data at Óbidos and flood extent maps from the Dartmouth Flood Observatory. The present research constitutes a first step into a globally applicable approach to fully couple

  6. Development of a 1 D hydrodynamic habitat model for the Hippopotamus amphibious as basis for sustainable exploitation of hydroelectric power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manful, D. Y.; Kaule, G.; Wieprecht, S.; Rees, J.; Hu, W.

    2009-12-01

    Hydroelectric Power (HEP) is proving to be a good alternative to carbon based energy. In the past hydropower especially large scale hydro attracted significant criticism as a result of its impact on the environment. A new breed of hydroelectric dam is in the offing. The aim is to have as little a footprint as possible on the environment in both pre and post construction phases and thus minimize impact on biodiversity whilst producing clean renewable energy. The Bui dam is 400 MW scheme currently under development on the Black Volta River in the Bui national park in Ghana. The reservoir created by the Bui barrage is expected to impact (through inundation) the habitat of two species of hippos know to exist in the park, the Hippopotamus amphibius and the Choeropsis liberiensis. Computer-based models present a unique opportunity to assess quantitatively the impact of the new reservoir on the habitat of the target species in this case the H. amphibious. Until this undertaking, there were very few studies documenting the habitat of the H. amphibious let alone model it. The work and subsequent presentation will show the development of a habitat model for the Hippopotamus amphibius. The Habitat Information retrieval Program based on Streamflow Analysis, in short HIPStrA, is a one dimensional (1D) in-stream, spatially explicit hybrid construct that combines physico-chemical evidence and expert knowledge to forecast river habitat suitability (Hs) for the Hippopotamus amphibius. The version of the model presented is specifically developed to assess the impact of a reservoir created by a hydroelectric dam on potential dwelling areas in the Bui gorge for hippos. Accordingly, this version of HIPStrA simulates a special reservoir suitability index (Rsi), a metric that captures the”hippo friendliness” of any lake or reservoir. The impact of measured and simulated flood events as well as low flows, representing extreme events is also assessed. Recommendations are made for the

  7. Recent Advances in the Modeling of the Transport of Two-Plasmon-Decay Electrons in the 1-D Hydrodynamic Code LILAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delettrez, J. A.; Myatt, J. F.; Yaakobi, B.

    2015-11-01

    The modeling of the fast-electron transport in the 1-D hydrodynamic code LILAC was modified because of the addition of cross-beam-energy-transfer (CBET) in implosion simulations. Using the old fast-electron with source model CBET results in a shift of the peak of the hard x-ray (HXR) production from the end of the laser pulse, as observed in experiments, to earlier in the pulse. This is caused by a drop in the laser intensity of the quarter-critical surface from CBET interaction at lower densities. Data from simulations with the laser plasma simulation environment (LPSE) code will be used to modify the source algorithm in LILAC. In addition, the transport model in LILAC has been modified to include deviations from the straight-line algorithm and non-specular reflection at the sheath to take into account the scattering from collisions and magnetic fields in the corona. Simulation results will be compared with HXR emissions from both room-temperature plastic and cryogenic target experiments. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. A joint probability approach using a 1-D hydrodynamic model for estimating high water level frequencies in the Lower Rhine Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, H.; van Overloop, P.-J.; van Gelder, P. H. A. J. M.

    2013-07-01

    The Lower Rhine Delta, a transitional area between the River Rhine and Meuse and the North Sea, is at risk of flooding induced by infrequent events of a storm surge or upstream flooding, or by more infrequent events of a combination of both. A joint probability analysis of the astronomical tide, the wind induced storm surge, the Rhine flow and the Meuse flow at the boundaries is established in order to produce the joint probability distribution of potential flood events. Three individual joint probability distributions are established corresponding to three potential flooding causes: storm surges and normal Rhine discharges, normal sea levels and high Rhine discharges, and storm surges and high Rhine discharges. For each category, its corresponding joint probability distribution is applied, in order to stochastically simulate a large number of scenarios. These scenarios can be used as inputs to a deterministic 1-D hydrodynamic model in order to estimate the high water level frequency curves at the transitional locations. The results present the exceedance probability of the present design water level for the economically important cities of Rotterdam and Dordrecht. The calculated exceedance probability is evaluated and compared to the governmental norm. Moreover, the impact of climate change on the high water level frequency curves is quantified for the year 2050 in order to assist in decisions regarding the adaptation of the operational water management system and the flood defense system.

  9. KEPLER: General purpose 1D multizone hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, T. A.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Woosley, S. E.

    2017-02-01

    KEPLER is a general purpose stellar evolution/explosion code that incorporates implicit hydrodynamics and a detailed treatment of nuclear burning processes. It has been used to study the complete evolution of massive and supermassive stars, all major classes of supernovae, hydrostatic and explosive nucleosynthesis, and x- and gamma-ray bursts on neutron stars and white dwarfs.

  10. Vorticity and Λ polarization in event-by-event (3+1)D viscous hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Long-Gang; Fang, Ren-Hong; Petersen, Hannah; Wang, Qun; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2017-01-01

    We visualized the vortical fluid in fluctuating QGP using (3+1)D viscous hydrodynamics, computed the spin distribution and correlation of hyperons and estimated the polarization splitting between Λ and .

  11. Computation of 1-D shock structure using nonlinear coupled constitutive relations and generalized hydrodynamic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenwen; Jiang, Zhongzheng; Chen, Weifang

    2016-11-01

    The moment methods in rarefied gas dynamics could be divided into generalized hydrodynamic equations (GHE) and extended hydrodynamic equations (EHE), e.g., Burnett equations, Grad equations and R-13 equations, theoretically. Eu firstly developed the GHE based on a non-equilibrium canonical distribution function and demonstrated the thermodynamically consistent of this model. Subsequently, nonlinear coupled constitutive relations (NCCR) was proposed by Myong by omitting the product of heat flux and velocity gradient in GHE to reduce the computational complexity. According to the successful application in 1-D shock wave structure and 2-D flat plate flow, the capability of NCCR has already been demonstrated successfully. The motivation of this study was to investigate the different behavior of NCCR and GHE for monatomic and diatomic gases in one-dimensional shock structure problems. Therefore, argon and nitrogen shock structure was calculated using both GHE and NCCR model up to Ma=50. The 3rd order MUSCL scheme for inviscid term and the 2nd order central difference scheme for viscid scheme were employed to carry out the computations. Finally, the present results including shock wave profile and its qualitative properties by NCCR and GHE are compared with that of DSMC and NS equations. The results showed that the GHE yield 1-D shock wave in much closer agreement with DSMC results than do the NCCR model without considering the computational complexity and efficiency in present cases.

  12. Lotic Water Hydrodynamic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Judi, David Ryan; Tasseff, Byron Alexander

    2015-01-23

    Water-related natural disasters, for example, floods and droughts, are among the most frequent and costly natural hazards, both socially and economically. Many of these floods are a result of excess rainfall collecting in streams and rivers, and subsequently overtopping banks and flowing overland into urban environments. Floods can cause physical damage to critical infrastructure and present health risks through the spread of waterborne diseases. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has developed Lotic, a state-of-the-art surface water hydrodynamic model, to simulate propagation of flood waves originating from a variety of events. Lotic is a two-dimensional (2D) flood model that has been used primarily for simulations in which overland water flows are characterized by movement in two dimensions, such as flood waves expected from rainfall-runoff events, storm surge, and tsunamis. In 2013, LANL developers enhanced Lotic through several development efforts. These developments included enhancements to the 2D simulation engine, including numerical formulation, computational efficiency developments, and visualization. Stakeholders can use simulation results to estimate infrastructure damage and cascading consequences within other sets of infrastructure, as well as to inform the development of flood mitigation strategies.

  13. Calibration of a 1D/1D urban flood model using 1D/2D model results in the absence of field data.

    PubMed

    Leandro, J; Djordjević, S; Chen, A S; Savić, D A; Stanić, M

    2011-01-01

    Recently increased flood events have been prompting researchers to improve existing coupled flood-models such as one-dimensional (1D)/1D and 1D/two-dimensional (2D) models. While 1D/1D models simulate sewer and surface networks using a one-dimensional approach, 1D/2D models represent the surface network by a two-dimensional surface grid. However their application raises two issues to urban flood modellers: (1) stormwater systems planning/emergency or risk analysis demands for fast models, and the 1D/2D computational time is prohibitive, (2) and the recognized lack of field data (e.g. Hunter et al. (2008)) causes difficulties for the calibration/validation of 1D/1D models. In this paper we propose to overcome these issues by calibrating a 1D/1D model with the results of a 1D/2D model. The flood-inundation results show that: (1) 1D/2D results can be used to calibrate faster 1D/1D models, (2) the 1D/1D model is able to map the 1D/2D flood maximum extent well, and the flooding limits satisfactorily in each time-step, (3) the 1D/1D model major differences are the instantaneous flow propagation and overestimation of the flood-depths within surface-ponds, (4) the agreement in the volume surcharged by both models is a necessary condition for the 1D surface-network validation and (5) the agreement of the manholes discharge shapes measures the fitness of the calibrated 1D surface-network.

  14. Recent development of hydrodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2014-09-01

    In this talk, I give an overview of recent development in hydrodynamic modeling of high-energy nuclear collisions. First, I briefly discuss about current situation of hydrodynamic modeling by showing results from the integrated dynamical approach in which Monte-Carlo calculation of initial conditions, quark-gluon fluid dynamics and hadronic cascading are combined. In particular, I focus on rescattering effects of strange hadrons on final observables. Next I highlight three topics in recent development in hydrodynamic modeling. These include (1) medium response to jet propagation in di-jet asymmetric events, (2) causal hydrodynamic fluctuation and its application to Bjorken expansion and (3) chiral magnetic wave from anomalous hydrodynamic simulations. (1) Recent CMS data suggest the existence of QGP response to propagation of jets. To investigate this phenomenon, we solve hydrodynamic equations with source term which exhibits deposition of energy and momentum from jets. We find a large number of low momentum particles are emitted at large angle from jet axis. This gives a novel interpretation of the CMS data. (2) It has been claimed that a matter created even in p-p/p-A collisions may behave like a fluid. However, fluctuation effects would be important in such a small system. We formulate relativistic fluctuating hydrodynamics and apply it to Bjorken expansion. We found the final multiplicity fluctuates around the mean value even if initial condition is fixed. This effect is relatively important in peripheral A-A collisions and p-p/p-A collisions. (3) Anomalous transport of the quark-gluon fluid is predicted when extremely high magnetic field is applied. We investigate this possibility by solving anomalous hydrodynamic equations. We found the difference of the elliptic flow parameter between positive and negative particles appears due to the chiral magnetic wave. Finally, I provide some personal perspective of hydrodynamic modeling of high energy nuclear collisions

  15. Dynamic coupling of three hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnack, J. N.; Philip, G. T.; Rungoe, M.; Smith, G.; Johann, G.; Larsen, O.; Gregersen, J.; Butts, M. B.

    2008-12-01

    The need for integrated modelling is evidently present within the field of flood management and flood forecasting. Engineers, modellers and managers are faced with flood problems which transcend the classical hydrodynamic fields of urban, river and coastal flooding. Historically the modeller has been faced with having to select one hydrodynamic model to cover all the aspects of the potentially complex dynamics occurring in a flooding situation. Such a single hydrodynamic model does not cover all dynamics of flood modelling equally well. Thus the ideal choice may in fact be a combination of models. Models combining two numerical/hydrodynamic models are becoming more standard, typically these models combine a 1D river model with a 2D overland flow model or alternatively a 1D sewer/collection system model with a 2D overland solver. In complex coastal/urban areas the flood dynamics may include rivers/streams, collection/storm water systems along with the overland flow. The dynamics within all three areas is of the same time scale and there is feedback in the system across the couplings. These two aspects dictate a fully dynamic three way coupling as opposed to running the models sequentially. It will be shown that the main challenges of the three way coupling are time step issues related to the difference in numerical schemes used in the three model components and numerical instabilities caused by the linking of the model components. MIKE FLOOD combines the models MIKE 11, MIKE 21 and MOUSE into one modelling framework which makes it possible to couple any combination of river, urban and overland flow fully dynamically. The MIKE FLOOD framework will be presented with an overview of the coupling possibilities. The flood modelling concept will be illustrated through real life cases in Australia and in Germany. The real life cases reflect dynamics and interactions across all three model components which are not possible to reproduce using a two-way coupling alone. The

  16. Hydrodynamics of local excitations after an interaction quench in 1D cold atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchini, Fabio; Kulkarni, Manas; Trombettoni, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the hydrodynamic approach to the study of the time evolution—induced by a quench—of local excitations in one dimension. We focus on interaction quenches: the considered protocol consists of creating a stable localized excitation propagating through the system, and then operating a sudden change of the interaction between the particles. To highlight the effect of the quench, we take the initial excitation to be a soliton. The quench splits the excitation into two packets moving in opposite directions, whose characteristics for short times can be expressed in a universal way. Our treatment allows for the description of the internal dynamics of these two packets in terms of the different velocities of their components. We confirm our analytical predictions through numerical simulations performed with the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and with the Calogero model (as an example of long range interactions and solvable with a parabolic confinement). Through the Calogero model we also discuss the effect of an external trapping on the protocol. The hydrodynamic approach shows that there is a difference between the bulk velocities of the propagating packets and the velocities of their peaks: it is possible to discriminate the two quantities, as we show through the comparison between numerical simulations and analytical estimates. We show that our analytical results capture with remarkable precision the findings of the numerical simulations also for intermediate times and we provide predictions for the time at which the two packets becomes distinguishable. In the realizations of the discussed quench protocol in a cold atom experiment, these different velocities are accessible through different measurement procedures.

  17. Linking 1D evolutionary to 3D hydrodynamical simulations of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristini, A.; Meakin, C.; Hirschi, R.; Arnett, D.; Georgy, C.; Viallet, M.

    2016-03-01

    Stellar evolution models of massive stars are important for many areas of astrophysics, for example nucleosynthesis yields, supernova progenitor models and understanding physics under extreme conditions. Turbulence occurs in stars primarily due to nuclear burning at different mass coordinates within the star. The understanding and correct treatment of turbulence and turbulent mixing at convective boundaries in stellar models has been studied for decades but still lacks a definitive solution. This paper presents initial results of a study on convective boundary mixing (CBM) in massive stars. The ‘stiffness’ of a convective boundary can be quantified using the bulk Richardson number ({{Ri}}{{B}}), the ratio of the potential energy for restoration of the boundary to the kinetic energy of turbulent eddies. A ‘stiff’ boundary ({{Ri}}{{B}}˜ {10}4) will suppress CBM, whereas in the opposite case a ‘soft’ boundary ({{Ri}}{{B}}˜ 10) will be more susceptible to CBM. One of the key results obtained so far is that lower convective boundaries (closer to the centre) of nuclear burning shells are ‘stiffer’ than the corresponding upper boundaries, implying limited CBM at lower shell boundaries. This is in agreement with 3D hydrodynamic simulations carried out by Meakin and Arnett (2007 Astrophys. J. 667 448-75). This result also has implications for new CBM prescriptions in massive stars as well as for nuclear burning flame front propagation in super-asymptotic giant branch stars and also the onset of novae.

  18. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  19. Modeling an electric motor in 1-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Thomas G.

    1991-01-01

    Quite often the dynamicist will be faced with having an electric drive motor as a link in the elastic path of a structure such that the motor's characteristics must be taken into account to properly represent the dynamics of the primary structure. He does not want to model it so accurately that he could get detailed stress and displacements in the motor proper, but just sufficiently to represent its inertia loading and elastic behavior from its mounting bolts to its drive coupling. Described here is how the rotor and stator of such a motor can be adequately modeled as a colinear pair of beams.

  20. Hydrodynamic Synchronisation of Model Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putz, V. B.; Yeomans, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    We define a model microswimmer with a variable cycle time, thus allowing the possibility of phase locking driven by hydrodynamic interactions between swimmers. We find that, for extensile or contractile swimmers, phase locking does occur, with the relative phase of the two swimmers being, in general, close to 0 or π, depending on their relative position and orientation. We show that, as expected on grounds of symmetry, self T-dual swimmers, which are time-reversal covariant, do not phase-lock. We also discuss the phase behaviour of a line of tethered swimmers, or pumps. These show oscillations in their relative phases reminiscent of the metachronal waves of cilia.

  1. GIS-BASED 1-D DIFFUSIVE WAVE OVERLAND FLOW MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    KALYANAPU, ALFRED; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY N.; BURIAN, STEVEN J.

    2007-01-17

    This paper presents a GIS-based 1-d distributed overland flow model and summarizes an application to simulate a flood event. The model estimates infiltration using the Green-Ampt approach and routes excess rainfall using the 1-d diffusive wave approximation. The model was designed to use readily available topographic, soils, and land use/land cover data and rainfall predictions from a meteorological model. An assessment of model performance was performed for a small catchment and a large watershed, both in urban environments. Simulated runoff hydrographs were compared to observations for a selected set of validation events. Results confirmed the model provides reasonable predictions in a short period of time.

  2. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Instead of computing a large number of coarsely zoned hydrodynamic models covering the entire atmospheric instability strip, the author computed a single model as well as computer limitations allow. The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks was modified to include radiative transfer effects in optically thin zones.

  3. Non-cooperative Brownian donkeys: A solvable 1D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez de Cisneros, B.; Reimann, P.; Parrondo, J. M. R.

    2003-12-01

    A paradigmatic 1D model for Brownian motion in a spatially symmetric, periodic system is tackled analytically. Upon application of an external static force F the system's response is an average current which is positive for F < 0 and negative for F > 0 (absolute negative mobility). Under suitable conditions, the system approaches 100% efficiency when working against the external force F.

  4. Nonlocal order parameters for the 1D Hubbard model.

    PubMed

    Montorsi, Arianna; Roncaglia, Marco

    2012-12-07

    We characterize the Mott-insulator and Luther-Emery phases of the 1D Hubbard model through correlators that measure the parity of spin and charge strings along the chain. These nonlocal quantities order in the corresponding gapped phases and vanish at the critical point U(c)=0, thus configuring as hidden order parameters. The Mott insulator consists of bound doublon-holon pairs, which in the Luther-Emery phase turn into electron pairs with opposite spins, both unbinding at U(c). The behavior of the parity correlators is captured by an effective free spinless fermion model.

  5. Nonlocal Order Parameters for the 1D Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montorsi, Arianna; Roncaglia, Marco

    2012-12-01

    We characterize the Mott-insulator and Luther-Emery phases of the 1D Hubbard model through correlators that measure the parity of spin and charge strings along the chain. These nonlocal quantities order in the corresponding gapped phases and vanish at the critical point Uc=0, thus configuring as hidden order parameters. The Mott insulator consists of bound doublon-holon pairs, which in the Luther-Emery phase turn into electron pairs with opposite spins, both unbinding at Uc. The behavior of the parity correlators is captured by an effective free spinless fermion model.

  6. Evaluating 1d Seismic Models of the Lunar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Thorne, M. S.; Weber, R. C.; Schmerr, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    A four station seismic network was established on the Moon from 1969 to 1977 as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP). A total of nine 1D seismic velocity models were generated using a variety of different techniques. In spite of the fact that these models were generated from the same data set, significant differences exist between them. We evaluate these models by comparing predicted travel-times to published catalogs of lunar events. We generate synthetic waveform predictions for 1D lunar models using a modified version of the Green's Function of the Earth by Minor Integration (GEMINI) technique. Our results demonstrate that the mean square errors between predicted and measured P-wave travel times are smaller than those for S-wave travel times in all cases. Moreover, models fit travel times for artificial and meteoroid impacts better than for shallow and deep moonquakes. Overall, models presented by Nakamura [Nakamura, 1983] and Garcia et al. [Garcia et al., 2011] predicted the observed travel times better than all other models and were comparable in their explanation of travel-times. Nevertheless, significant waveform differences exist between these models. In particular, the seismic velocity structure of the lunar crust and regolith strongly affect the waveform characteristics predicted by these models. Further complexity is added by possible mantle discontinuity structure that exists in a subset of these models. We show synthetic waveform predictions for these models demonstrating the role that crustal structure has in generating long duration seismic coda inherent in the lunar waveforms.

  7. 1-D blood flow modelling in a running human body.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Viktor; Halász, Gábor

    2017-04-10

    In this paper an attempt was made to simulate blood flow in a mobile human arterial network, specifically, in a running human subject. In order to simulate the effect of motion, a previously published immobile 1-D model was modified by including an inertial force term into the momentum equation. To calculate inertial force, gait analysis was performed at different levels of speed. Our results show that motion has a significant effect on the amplitudes of the blood pressure and flow rate but the average values are not effected significantly.

  8. Constitutive modeling and control of 1D smart composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Jonathan P.; Ostrowski, James P.; Ponte-Castaneda, Pedro

    1998-07-01

    Homogenization techniques for determining effective properties of composite materials may provide advantages for control of stiffness and strain in systems using hysteretic smart actuators embedded in a soft matrix. In this paper, a homogenized model of a 1D composite structure comprised of shape memory alloys and a rubber-like matrix is presented. With proportional and proportional/integral feedback, using current as the input state and global strain as an error state, implementation scenarios include the use of tractions on the boundaries and a nonlinear constitutive law for the matrix. The result is a simple model which captures the nonlinear behavior of the smart composite material system and is amenable to experiments with various control paradigms. The success of this approach in the context of the 1D model suggests that the homogenization method may prove useful in investigating control of more general smart structures. Applications of such materials could include active rehabilitation aids, e.g. wrist braces, as well as swimming/undulating robots, or adaptive molds for manufacturing processes.

  9. A One-Dimensional (1-D) Three-Region Model for a Bubbling Fluidized-Bed Adsorber

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Andrew; Miller, David C.

    2012-01-01

    A general one-dimensional (1-D), three-region model for a bubbling fluidized-bed adsorber with internal heat exchangers has been developed. The model can predict the hydrodynamics of the bed and provides axial profiles for all temperatures, concentrations, and velocities. The model is computationally fast and flexible and allows for any system of adsorption and desorption reactions to be modeled, making the model applicable to any adsorption process. The model has been implemented in both gPROMS and Aspen Custom Modeler, and the behavior of the model has been verified.

  10. Hydrodynamical comparison test of solar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, K.; Kim, Y.-C.

    2012-12-01

    We present three dimensional radiation-hydrodynamical (RHD) simulations for solar surface convection based on three most recent solar mixtures: Grevesse & Sauval (1998), Asplund, Grevesse & Sauval (2005), and Asplund, Grevesse, Sauval & Scott (2009). The outer convection zone of the Sun is an extremely turbulent region composed of partly ionized compressible gases at high temperature. The super-adiabatic layer (SAL) is the transition region where the transport of energy changes drastically from convection to radiation. In order to describe physical processes accurately, a realistic treatment of radiation should be considered as well as convection. However, newly updated solar mixtures that are established from radiation-hydrodynamics do not generate properly internal structures estimated by helioseismology. In order to address this fundamental problem, solar models are constructed consistently based on each mixture and used as initial configurations for radiation-hydrodynamical simulations. From our simulations, we find that the turbulent flows in each model are statistically similar in the SAL.

  11. Combinatorial approach to exactly solve the 1D Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Swarnadeep

    2017-01-01

    The Ising model is a well known statistical model which can be solved exactly by various methods. The most familiar one is the transfer matrix method. Sometimes it can be difficult to approach the open boundary case rather than periodic boundary ones in higher dimensions. But physically it is more intuitive to study the open boundary case, as it gives a closer view of the real system. We have introduced a new method called the pairing method to determine the exact partition function for the simplest case, a 1D Ising lattice. This method simplifies the problem's complexities and reduces it to a pure combinatorial problem. The study also reveals that it is possible to apply this pairing method in the case of a 2D square lattice. The obtained results agree perfectly with the values in the literature and this new approach provides an algorithmic insight to deal with such problems.

  12. Examination of 1D Solar Cell Model Limitations Using 3D SPICE Modeling: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, W. E.; Olson, J. M.; Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    To examine the limitations of one-dimensional (1D) solar cell modeling, 3D SPICE-based modeling is used to examine in detail the validity of the 1D assumptions as a function of sheet resistance for a model cell. The internal voltages and current densities produced by this modeling give additional insight into the differences between the 1D and 3D models.

  13. Lanczos diagonalizations of the 1-D Peierls-Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, E.Y.; Campbell, D.K.; Gammel, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    In studies of interacting electrons in reduced dimensions'' one is trapped between the Scylla of exponential growth of the number of states in any exact many-body basis and the Charybdis of the failure of mean-field theories to capture adequately the effects of interactions. In the present article we focus on one technique -- the Lanczos method -- which, at least in the case of the 1-D Peierls-Hubbard model, appears to allow us to sail the narrow channel between these two hazards. In contrast to Quantum Monte Carlo methods, which circumvent the exponential growth of states by statistical techniques and importance sampling, the Lanczos approach attacks this problem head-on by diagonalizing the full Hamiltonian. Given the restrictions of present computers, this approach is thus limited to studying finite clusters of roughly 12--14 sites. Fortunately, in one dimension, such clusters are usually sufficient for extracting many of the properties of the infinite system provided that one makes full use of the ability to vary the boundary conditions. In this article we shall apply the Lanczos methodology and novel phase randomization'' techniques to study the 1-D Peierls-Hubbard model, with particular emphasis on the optical absorption properties, including the spectrum of absorptions as a function of photon energy. Despite the discreteness of the eigenstates in our finite clusters, we are able to obtain optical spectra that, in cases where independent tests can be made, agree well with the known exact results for the infinite system. Thus we feel that this combination of techniques represents an important and viable means of studying many interesting novel materials involving strongly correlated electrons. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Cavitation Influence in 1D Part-load Vortex Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörfler, P. K.

    2016-11-01

    Residual swirl in the draft tube of Francis turbines may cause annoying low- frequency pulsation of pressure and power output, in particular during part-load operation. A 1D analytical model for these dynamic phenomena would enable simulation by some conventional method for computing hydraulic transients. The proper structure of such a model has implications for the prediction of prototype behaviour based on laboratory tests. The source of excitation as well as the dynamic transmission behaviour of the draft tube flow may both be described either by lumped or distributed parameters. The distributed version contains more information and, due to limited possibilities of identification, some data must be estimated. The distributed cavitation compliance is an example for this dilemma. In recent publications, the customary assumption of a constant wave speed has produced dubious results. The paper presents a more realistic model for distributed compressibility. The measured influence of the Thoma number is applied with the local cavitation factor. This concept is less sensitive to modelling errors and explains both the Thoma and Froude number influence. The possible effect of the normally unknown non-condensable gas content in the vortex cavity is shortly commented. Its measurement in future tests is recommended. It is also recommended to check the available analytical vortex models for possible dispersion effects.

  15. Nested 1D-2D approach for urban surface flood modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murla, Damian; Willems, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Floods in urban areas as a consequence of sewer capacity exceedance receive increased attention because of trends in urbanization (increased population density and impermeability of the surface) and climate change. Despite the strong recent developments in numerical modeling of water systems, urban surface flood modeling is still a major challenge. Whereas very advanced and accurate flood modeling systems are in place and operation by many river authorities in support of flood management along rivers, this is not yet the case in urban water management. Reasons include the small scale of the urban inundation processes, the need to have very high resolution topographical information available, and the huge computational demands. Urban drainage related inundation modeling requires a 1D full hydrodynamic model of the sewer network to be coupled with a 2D surface flood model. To reduce the computational times, 0D (flood cones), 1D/quasi-2D surface flood modeling approaches have been developed and applied in some case studies. In this research, a nested 1D/2D hydraulic model has been developed for an urban catchment at the city of Gent (Belgium), linking the underground sewer (minor system) with the overland surface (major system). For the overland surface flood modelling, comparison was made of 0D, 1D/quasi-2D and full 2D approaches. The approaches are advanced by considering nested 1D-2D approaches, including infiltration in the green city areas, and allowing the effects of surface storm water storage to be simulated. An optimal nested combination of three different mesh resolutions was identified; based on a compromise between precision and simulation time for further real-time flood forecasting, warning and control applications. Main streets as mesh zones together with buildings as void regions constitute one of these mesh resolution (3.75m2 - 15m2); they have been included since they channel most of the flood water from the manholes and they improve the accuracy of

  16. 1-D Modeling of Massive Particle Injection (MPI) in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Parks, P. B.; Izzo, V. A.

    2008-11-01

    A 1-D Fast Current Quench (FCQ) model is developed to study current evolution and runaway electron suppression under massive density increase. The model consists of coupled toroidal electric field and energy equations, and it is solved numerically for DIII-D and ITER operating conditions. Simulation results suggest that fast shutdown by D2 liquid jet/pellet injection is in principle achievable for the desired plasma cooling time (˜15 ms for DIII-D and ˜50 ms for ITER) under ˜150x or higher densification. The current density and pressure profile are practically unaltered during the initial phase of jet propagation when dilution cooling dominates. With subsequent radiation cooling, the densified discharge enters the strongly collisional regime where Pfirsch-Schluter thermal diffusion can inhibit current contraction on the magnetic axis. Often the 1/1 kink instability, addressed by Kadomtsev's magnetic reconnection model, can be prevented. Our results are compared with NIMROD simulations in which the plasma is suddenly densified by ˜100x and experiences instantaneous dilution cooling, allowing for use of actual (lower) Lundquist numbers.

  17. Modeling multiphase flow using fluctuating hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Chaudhri, Anuj; Bell, John B; Garcia, Alejandro L; Donev, Aleksandar

    2014-09-01

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics provides a model for fluids at mesoscopic scales where thermal fluctuations can have a significant impact on the behavior of the system. Here we investigate a model for fluctuating hydrodynamics of a single-component, multiphase flow in the neighborhood of the critical point. The system is modeled using a compressible flow formulation with a van der Waals equation of state, incorporating a Korteweg stress term to treat interfacial tension. We present a numerical algorithm for modeling this system based on an extension of algorithms developed for fluctuating hydrodynamics for ideal fluids. The scheme is validated by comparison of measured structure factors and capillary wave spectra with equilibrium theory. We also present several nonequilibrium examples to illustrate the capability of the algorithm to model multiphase fluid phenomena in a neighborhood of the critical point. These examples include a study of the impact of fluctuations on the spinodal decomposition following a rapid quench, as well as the piston effect in a cavity with supercooled walls. The conclusion in both cases is that thermal fluctuations affect the size and growth of the domains in off-critical quenches.

  18. Brownsville Ship Channel Hydrodynamic Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    31  Figure 31. Laguna Madre analysis locations...wave resuspension and circulation of sediment in Laguna Madre .2 The navigation impacts are assessed by performing model simulations of the...to better resolve the shallow-water habitats, including South Bay, Bahia Grande, and South Laguna Madre . These habitats are discussed further

  19. Modeling shear band interaction in 1D torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda; Hanina, Erez

    2017-01-01

    When two shear bands are being formed at close distance from each other they interact, and further development of one of them may be quenched down. As a result there should be a minimum distance between shear bands. In the literature there are at least three analytical models for this minimum distance. Predictions of these models do not generally agree with each other and with test results. Recently we developed a 1D numerical scheme to predict the formation of shear bands in a torsion test of a thin walled pipe. We validated our code by reproducing results of the pioneering experiments of Marchand and Duffy, and then used it to investigate the mechanics of shear localization and shear band formation. We describe our shear band code in a separate publication, and here we use it only as a tool to investigate the interaction between two neighboring shear bands during the process of their formation. We trigger the formation of shear bands by specifying two perturbations of the initial strength. We vary the perturbations in terms of their amplitude and/or their width. Usually, the stronger perturbation triggers a faster developing shear band, which then prevails and quenches the development of the other shear band. We change the distance between the two shear bands and find, that up to a certain distance one of the shear bands becomes fully developed, and the other stays only partially developed. Beyond this distance the two shear bands are both fully developed. Finally, we check the influence of certain material and loading parameters on the interaction between the two shear bands, and compare the results to predictions of the analytical models from the literature.

  20. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1993-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) can be used to model hypervelocity impact phenomena via the addition of a strength of materials treatment. SPH is the only technique that can model such problems efficiently due to the combination of 3-dimensional geometry, large translations of material, large deformations, and large void fractions for most problems of interest. This makes SPH an ideal candidate for modeling of asteroid impact, spacecraft shield modeling, and planetary accretion. In this paper we describe the derivation of the strength equations in SPH, show several basic code tests, and present several impact test cases with experimental comparisons.

  1. ONE-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC/SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODEL FOR STREAM NETWORKS: TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical report describes a new sediment transport model and the supporting post-processor, and sampling procedures for sediments in streams. Specifically, the following items are described herein:

    EFDC1D - This is a new one-dimensional hydrodynamic and sediment tr...

  2. Self-Consistent Hydrodynamical Models For Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulangier, Jels; Homan, Ward; van Marle, Allard Jan; Decin, Leen; de Koter, Alex

    2016-07-01

    The physical and chemical conditions in the atmosphere of pulsating AGB stars are not well understood. In order to properly model this region, which is packed with shocks arisen from the pulsational behaviour of the star, we aim to understand the interplay between spatial and temporal changes in both the chemical composition and the hydro/thermodynamical behaviour inside these regions. Ideal models require the coupling of hydrodynamics, chemistry and radiative transfer, in three dimensions. As this is computationally not yet feasible, we aim to model this zone via a bottom-up approach. At first, we build correct 3D hydrodynamical set-up without any cooling or heating. Omitting cooling hampers the mass-loss of the AGB star within the reasonable confines of a realistic parameter space. Introducing cooling will decrease the temperature gradients in the atmosphere, counteracting the mass-loss even more. However, cooling also ensures the existence of regions where the temperature is low enough for the formation of dust to take place. This dust will absorb the momentum of the impacting photons from the AGB photosphere, accelerate outward and collide with the obstructing gas, dragging it along. Moreover, since chemistry, nucleation and dust formation depend critically on the temperature structure of the circumstellar environment, it is of utmost importance to include all relevant heating/cooling sources. Efforts to include cooling have been undertaken in the last decades, making use of different radiative cooling mechanisms for several chemical species, with some simplified radiative transfer. However, often the chemical composition of these 1D atmosphere models is fixed, implying the very strong assumption of chemical equilibrium, which is not at all true for a pulsating AGB atmosphere. We wish to model these atmospheres making as few assumptions as possible on equilibrium conditions. Therefore, as a first step, we introduce H2 dissociative cooling to the hydrodynamical

  3. Towards modeling hydrodynamic stress limitations on transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheny, A. M.; Bohrer, G.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Stoy, P. C.

    2011-12-01

    Evapotranspiration is one of the major forcing functions of Earth's climate, providing the link for the soil-plant-water continuum. Current models for transpiration assume a coupling between stomatal conductance and soil moisture through empirical relationships that do not resolve the hydrodynamic process of water movement from the soil to the leaves. This approach does not take advantage of recent advances in our understanding of water flow and storage in the trees, or of tree and canopy structure. It has been suggested that stomata respond to water potential in the leaf and branch, and that this hydrodynamic response is a mechanism for hydraulic limitation of stomatal conductance. Hydraulic limitations in forest ecosystems are common and are known to control transpiration when the soil is drying or when vapor pressure deficit (VPD) is very large. Hydraulic limitation can also impact stomatal apertures under conditions of adequate soil moisture and lower evaporative demand. Hydrodynamic stresses at the tree level act at several time scales, including the fast, minute-hour scale. These dynamics are faster than the time scales of hours to days at which drying soil will affect stomata conductance. The lack of representation of the tree-hydrodynamic process should therefore lead to atypical intra-daily patterns of error in results of current models. We use a large-scale comparison between observations and land-surface models to characterize the patterns of intra-daily error in simulated water flux. Through the use of the North American Carbon Program (NACP) dataset, more than 10 years of water flux data for 35 Fluxnet sites in the US and Canada have been analyzed. The diurnal error for each of the 24 models represented in this dataset allows the models to be categorized and evaluated on their ability to accurately predict the fast temporal dynamics of transpiration in different ecosystems and atmospheric forcing. Among well calibrated models, two general error

  4. HELIOS-CR A 1-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code with inline atomic kinetics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E.; Woodruff, P. R.

    2006-05-01

    HELIOS-CR is a user-oriented 1D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code to simulate the dynamic evolution of laser-produced plasmas and z-pinch plasmas. It includes an in-line collisional-radiative (CR) model for computing non-LTE atomic level populations at each time step of the hydrodynamics simulation. HELIOS-CR has been designed for ease of use, and is well-suited for experimentalists, as well as graduate and undergraduate student researchers. The energy equations employed include models for laser energy deposition, radiation from external sources, and high-current discharges. Radiative transport can be calculated using either a multi-frequency flux-limited diffusion model, or a multi-frequency, multi-angle short characteristics model. HELIOS-CR supports the use of SESAME equation of state (EOS) tables, PROPACEOS EOS/multi-group opacity data tables, and non-LTE plasma properties computed using the inline CR modeling. Time-, space-, and frequency-dependent results from HELIOS-CR calculations are readily displayed with the HydroPLOT graphics tool. In addition, the results of HELIOS simulations can be post-processed using the SPECT3D Imaging and Spectral Analysis Suite to generate images and spectra that can be directly compared with experimental measurements. The HELIOS-CR package runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac OSX platforms, and includes online documentation. We will discuss the major features of HELIOS-CR, and present example results from simulations.

  5. Kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri; Sire, Clément

    2007-10-01

    We derive general kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation that describe certain features of the morphogenesis of biological colonies (like bacteria, amoebae, endothelial cells or social insects). Starting from a stochastic model defined in terms of N coupled Langevin equations, we derive a nonlinear mean-field Fokker-Planck equation governing the evolution of the distribution function of the system in phase space. By taking the successive moments of this kinetic equation and using a local thermodynamic equilibrium condition, we derive a set of hydrodynamic equations involving a damping term. In the limit of small frictions, we obtain a hyperbolic model describing the formation of network patterns (filaments) and in the limit of strong frictions we obtain a parabolic model which is a generalization of the standard Keller-Segel model describing the formation of clusters (clumps). Our approach connects and generalizes several models introduced in the chemotactic literature. We discuss the analogy between bacterial colonies and self-gravitating systems and between the chemotactic collapse and the gravitational collapse (Jeans instability). We also show that the basic equations of chemotaxis are similar to nonlinear mean-field Fokker-Planck equations so that a notion of effective generalized thermodynamics can be developed.

  6. Detailed simulation of morphodynamics: 1. Hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, M.; de Vriend, H. J.; Mosselman, E.; Sloff, C. J.; Shimizu, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We present a three-dimensional high-resolution hydrodynamic model for unsteady incompressible flow over an evolving bed topography. This is achieved by using a multilevel Cartesian grid technique that allows the grid to be refined in high-gradient regions and in the vicinity of the river bed. The grid can be locally refined and adapted to the bed geometry, managing the Cartesian grid cells and faces using a hierarchical tree data approach. A ghost-cell immersed-boundary technique is applied to cells intersecting the bed topography. The governing equations have been discretized using a finite-volume method on a staggered grid, conserving second-order accuracy in time and space. The solution advances in time using the fractional step approach. Large-eddy simulation is used as turbulence closure. We validate the model against several experiments and other results from literature. Model results for Stokes flow around a cylinder in the vicinity of a moving wall agree well with Wannier's analytical solution. At higher Reynolds numbers, computed trailing bubble length, separation angle, and drag coefficient compare favorably with experimental and previous computational results. Results for the flow over two- and three-dimensional dunes agree well with published data, including a fair reproduction of recirculation zones, horse-shoe structures, and boiling effects. This shows that the model is suitable for being used as a hydrodynamic submodel in the high-resolution modeling of sediment transport and formation and evolution of subaqueous ripples and dunes.

  7. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gidaspow, D.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to convert a {open_quotes}learning gas-solid-liquid{close_quotes} fluidization model into a predictive design model. This model is capable of predicting local gas, liquid and solids hold-ups and the basic flow regimes: the uniform bubbling, the industrially practical churn-turbulent (bubble coalescence) and the slugging regimes. Current reactor models incorrectly assume that the gas and the particle hold-ups (volume fractions) are uniform in the reactor. They must be given in terms of empirical correlations determined under conditions that radically differ from reactor operation. In the proposed hydrodynamic approach these hold-ups are computed from separate phase momentum balances. Furthermore, the kinetic theory approach computes the high slurry viscosities from collisions of the catalyst particles. Thus particle rheology is not an input into the model.

  8. Multithread Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2006-01-01

    Past hydrodynamic simulations have been able to reproduce the high temperatures and densities characteristic of solar flares. These simulations, however, have not been able to account for the slow decay of the observed flare emission or the absence of blueshifts in high spectral resolution line profiles. Recent work has suggested that modeling a flare as a sequence of independently heated threads instead of as a single loop may resolve the discrepancies between the simulations and observations. In this paper, we present a method for computing multithread, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of solar flares and apply it to observations of the Masuda flare of 1992 January 13. We show that it is possible to reproduce the temporal evolution of high temperature thermal flare plasma observed with the instruments on the GOES and Yohkoh satellites. The results from these simulations suggest that the heating timescale for a individual thread is on the order of 200 s. Significantly shorter heating timescales (20 s) lead to very high temperatures and are inconsistent with the emission observed by Yohkoh.

  9. RECENT ADVANCES IN MACROMOLECULAR HYDRODYNAMIC MODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aragon, Sergio R.

    2010-01-01

    The modern implementation of the boundary element method (S.R. Aragon, J. Comput. Chem. 25(2004)1191–12055) has ushered unprecedented accuracy and precision for the solution of the Stokes equations of hydrodynamics with stick boundary conditions. This article begins by reviewing computations with the program BEST of smooth surface objects such as ellipsoids, the dumbbell, and cylinders that demonstrate that the numerical solution of the integral equation formulation of hydrodynamics yields very high precision and accuracy. When BEST is used for macromolecular computations, the limiting factor becomes the definition of the molecular hydrodynamic surface and the implied effective solvation of the molecular surface. Studies on 49 different proteins, ranging in molecular weight from 9 to over 400 kDa, have shown that a model using a 1.1 A thick hydration layer describes all protein transport properties very well for the overwhelming majority of them. In addition, this data implies that the crystal structure is an excellent representation of the average solution structure for most of them. In order to investigate the origin of a handful of significant discrepancies in some multimeric proteins (over −20% observed in the intrinsic viscosity), the technique of Molecular Dynamics simulation (MD) has been incorporated into the research program. A preliminary study of dimeric α-chymotrypsin using approximate implicit water MD is presented. In addition I describe the successful validation of modern protein force fields, ff03 and ff99SB, for the accurate computation of solution structure in explicit water simulation by comparison of trajectory ensemble average computed transport properties with experimental measurements. This work includes small proteins such as lysozyme, ribonuclease and ubiquitin using trajectories around 10 ns duration. We have also studied a 150 kDa flexible monoclonal IgG antibody, trastuzumab, with multiple independent trajectories encompassing over

  10. Hydrodynamic modeling of tsunamis from the Currituck landslide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.; Lynett, P.J.; Chaytor, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Tsunami generation from the Currituck landslide offshore North Carolina and propagation of waves toward the U.S. coastline are modeled based on recent geotechnical analysis of slide movement. A long and intermediate wave modeling package (COULWAVE) based on the non-linear Boussinesq equations are used to simulate the tsunami. This model includes procedures to incorporate bottom friction, wave breaking, and overland flow during runup. Potential tsunamis generated from the Currituck landslide are analyzed using four approaches: (1) tsunami wave history is calculated from several different scenarios indicated by geotechnical stability and mobility analyses; (2) a sensitivity analysis is conducted to determine the effects of both landslide failure duration during generation and bottom friction along the continental shelf during propagation; (3) wave history is calculated over a regional area to determine the propagation of energy oblique to the slide axis; and (4) a high-resolution 1D model is developed to accurately model wave breaking and the combined influence of nonlinearity and dispersion during nearshore propagation and runup. The primary source parameter that affects tsunami severity for this case study is landslide volume, with failure duration having a secondary influence. Bottom friction during propagation across the continental shelf has a strong influence on the attenuation of the tsunami during propagation. The high-resolution 1D model also indicates that the tsunami undergoes nonlinear fission prior to wave breaking, generating independent, short-period waves. Wave breaking occurs approximately 40-50??km offshore where a tsunami bore is formed that persists during runup. These analyses illustrate the complex nature of landslide tsunamis, necessitating the use of detailed landslide stability/mobility models and higher-order hydrodynamic models to determine their hazard.

  11. Quasi 1D Modeling of Mixed Compression Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Paxson, Daniel E.; Woolwine, Kyle J.

    2012-01-01

    The AeroServoElasticity task under the NASA Supersonics Project is developing dynamic models of the propulsion system and the vehicle in order to conduct research for integrated vehicle dynamic performance. As part of this effort, a nonlinear quasi 1-dimensional model of the 2-dimensional bifurcated mixed compression supersonic inlet is being developed. The model utilizes computational fluid dynamics for both the supersonic and subsonic diffusers. The oblique shocks are modeled utilizing compressible flow equations. This model also implements variable geometry required to control the normal shock position. The model is flexible and can also be utilized to simulate other mixed compression supersonic inlet designs. The model was validated both in time and in the frequency domain against the legacy LArge Perturbation INlet code, which has been previously verified using test data. This legacy code written in FORTRAN is quite extensive and complex in terms of the amount of software and number of subroutines. Further, the legacy code is not suitable for closed loop feedback controls design, and the simulation environment is not amenable to systems integration. Therefore, a solution is to develop an innovative, more simplified, mixed compression inlet model with the same steady state and dynamic performance as the legacy code that also can be used for controls design. The new nonlinear dynamic model is implemented in MATLAB Simulink. This environment allows easier development of linear models for controls design for shock positioning. The new model is also well suited for integration with a propulsion system model to study inlet/propulsion system performance, and integration with an aero-servo-elastic system model to study integrated vehicle ride quality, vehicle stability, and efficiency.

  12. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitri Gidaspow

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this investigation is to convert learning gas-solid-liquid fluidization model into a predictive design model. The IIT hydrodynamic model computers the phase velocities and the volume fi-actions of gas, liquid and particulate phases. Model verification involves a comparison of these computed velocities and volume fractions to experimental values. As promised in the SIXTH TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT, January 1996, this report presents measurements of radial distribution function for 450 micron glass particles in liquid-solid fluidized bed. The report is in the form of a preliminary paper. The authors need the radial distribution function to compute the viscosity and the equation of state for particles. The principal results are as follows: (1) The measured radial distribution function, g{sub 0}, is a monotonic function of the solid volume fraction. The values of the radial distribution function g{sub 0} are in the range of the predictions from Bagnold equation and Carnahan and Starling equation. (2) The position of the first peak of the radial distribution function does not lie at r = d at contact (d is particle diameter). This differs from the predications from the hard sphere model and the measurements in the gas-solid system (Gidaspow and Huilin, 1996). This is due to a liquid film lubrication effect in the liquid-solid system.

  13. 1-D Radiative-Convective Model for Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Cecilia W. S.; Robinson, Tyler D.

    2016-10-01

    We present a one dimensional radiative-convective model to study the thermal structure of terrestrial exoplanetary atmospheres. The radiative transfer and equilibrium chemistry in our model is based on similar methodologies in models used for studying Extrasolar Giant Planets (Fortney et al. 2005b.) We validated our model in the optically thin and thick limits, and compared our pressure-temperature profiles against the analytical solutions of Robinson & Catling (2012). For extrasolar terrestrial planets with pure hydrogen atmospheres, we evaluated the effects of H2-H2 collision induced absorption and identified the purely roto-translational band in our modeled spectra. We also examined how enhanced atmospheric metallicities affect the temperature structure, chemistry, and spectra of terrestrial exoplanets. For a terrestrial extrasolar planet whose atmospheric compostion is 100 times solar orbiting a sun-like star at 2 AU, our model resulted in a reducing atmosphere with H2O, CH4, and NH3 as the dominant greenhouse gases.

  14. Validation of 1-D transport and sawtooth models for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J.W.; Turner, M.F.; Attenberger, S.E.; Houlberg, W.A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the authors describe progress on validating a number of local transport models by comparing their predictions with relevant experimental data from a range of tokamaks in the ITER profile database. This database, the testing procedure and results are discussed. In addition a model for sawtooth oscillations is used to investigate their effect in an ITER plasma with alpha-particles.

  15. An analytical model of flagellate hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dölger, Julia; Bohr, Tomas; Andersen, Anders

    2017-04-01

    Flagellates are unicellular microswimmers that propel themselves using one or several beating flagella. We consider a hydrodynamic model of flagellates and explore the effect of flagellar arrangement and beat pattern on swimming kinematics and near-cell flow. The model is based on the analytical solution by Oseen for the low Reynolds number flow due to a point force outside a no-slip sphere. The no-slip sphere represents the cell and the point force a single flagellum. By superposition we are able to model a freely swimming flagellate with several flagella. For biflagellates with left–right symmetric flagellar arrangements we determine the swimming velocity, and we show that transversal forces due to the periodic movements of the flagella can promote swimming. For a model flagellate with both a longitudinal and a transversal flagellum we determine radius and pitch of the helical swimming trajectory. We find that the longitudinal flagellum is responsible for the average translational motion whereas the transversal flagellum governs the rotational motion. Finally, we show that the transversal flagellum can lead to strong feeding currents to localized capture sites on the cell surface.

  16. Chemical and Hydrodynamical Models of Cometary Comae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Multi-fluid modelling of the outflowing gases which sublimate from cometary nuclei as they approach the Sun is necessary for understanding the important physical and chemical processes occurring in this complex plasma. Coma chemistry models can be employed to interpret observational data and to ultimately determine chemical composition and structure of the nuclear ices and dust. We describe a combined chemical and hydrodynamical model [1] in which differential equations for the chemical abundances and the energy balance are solved as a function of distance from the cometary nucleus. The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of 1P/Halley. The anions O(-), OH(-), C(-), CH(-) and CN(-) have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu [2]. Organic molecular anions such as C4H(-) and C6H(-) are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas-phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not yet been fully explored. We present details of new models for the chemistry of cometary comae that include atomic and molecular anions and calculate the impact of these anions on the coma physics and chemistry af the coma.

  17. Kinetic and Stochastic Models of 1D yeast ``prions"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunes, Kay

    2005-03-01

    Mammalian prion proteins (PrP) are of public health interest because of mad cow and chronic wasting diseases. Yeasts have proteins, which can undergo similar reconformation and aggregation processes to PrP; yeast ``prions" are simpler to experimentally study and model. Recent in vitro studies of the SUP35 protein (1), showed long aggregates and pure exponential growth of the misfolded form. To explain this data, we have extended a previous model of aggregation kinetics along with our own stochastic approach (2). Both models assume reconformation only upon aggregation, and include aggregate fissioning and an initial nucleation barrier. We find for sufficiently small nucleation rates or seeding by small dimer concentrations that we can achieve the requisite exponential growth and long aggregates.

  18. Kinetic Model for 1D aggregation of yeast ``prions''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunes, Kay; Cox, Daniel; Singh, Rajiv

    2004-03-01

    Mammalian prion proteins (PrP) are of public health interest because of mad cow and chronic wasting diseases. Yeast have proteins which can undergo similar reconformation and aggregation processes to PrP; yeast forms are simpler to experimentally study and model. Recent in vitro studies of the SUP35 protein(1), showed long aggregates and pure exponential growth of the misfolded form. To explain this data, we have extended a previous model of aggregation kinetics(2). The model assumes reconformation only upon aggregation, and includes aggregate fissioning and an initial nucleation barrier. We find for sufficiently small nucleation rates or seeding by small dimer concentrations that we can achieve the requisite exponential growth and long aggregates. We will compare to a more realistic stochastic kinetics model and present prelimary attempts to describe recent experiments on SUP35 strains. *-Supported by U.S. Army Congressionally Mandated Research Fund. 1) P. Chien and J.S. Weissman, Nature 410, 223 (2001); http://online.kitp.ucsb.edu/online/bionet03/collins/. 2) J. Masel, V.A.> Jansen, M.A. Nowak, Biophys. Chem. 77, 139 (1999).

  19. Study of hydrodynamic model in sluice controlled river networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Zeng, Fantang

    2010-05-01

    Shiqi river network ,is situated in the Zhongshan city of Guangdong province in the P.R.China. The river network covers approximately 702.55km2 ,with a total river length of over 500km and extending over 34km from north to south and over 46km from east to west. The river network overlaps with the most densely populated and economically developed region in the Pear River Delta Economic Zone. In 2008 the region had a population of 1 846.9 thousands And a GDP of more than 8 2500 million RMB. All branches of the river network are encircled by the main rivers of Pear River Delta(PRD) network. With the economic and social development, all natural connections with the external rivers are controlled by the sluices, water body exchanges between the Shiqi river network and external rivers are significantly changed by human activities. The overall objective the research is to develop a tool for the local Environmental Protection Bureau to Understand and quantify the impact of the artificial construction on the hydrological cycle. The developed model can accurate representation of the water levels and flows in the study area, to allow accurate representation of the transport of pollutants. The river network topography is derived directly from the available database. Only the "major" rivers were included in the model, because cross-section data for the "minor" rivers are currently not available. In general, the 1D hydrodynamic model is provided with flow boundary conditions ("Q") at its upstream boundaries and with water level boundary conditions ("z") at its downstream boundaries. For all boundaries of Shiqi river network, there are no flow records available, all records are water level. To reflect the hydrodynamic process accurately, the author developed a new methods to set the hydrodynamic model's boundary. For each boundary, the boundary condition is "Z" when the sluice is open, and the boundary condition is "Q" while it is closed. The open or close condition is identified

  20. The use of hydro-dynamic models in the practice-oriented education of engineering students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sziebert, J.; Zellei, L.; Tamás, E. A.

    2009-04-01

    Management tasks related to open channel flows became rather comprehensive and multi-disciplinary, particularly with the predominancy of nature management aspects. The water regime of our rivers has proven to reach extremities more and more frequently in the past decades. In order to develop and analyse alternative solutions and to handle and resolve conflicts of interests, we apply 1D hydro-dynamic models in education for the explanation of processes and to improve practical skills of our students.

  1. Modeling the hydrodynamics of Phloem sieve plates.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Mullendore, Daniel Leroy; Holbrook, Noel Michele; Bohr, Tomas; Knoblauch, Michael; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Sieve plates have an enormous impact on the efficiency of the phloem vascular system of plants, responsible for the distribution of photosynthetic products. These thin plates, which separate neighboring phloem cells, are perforated by a large number of tiny sieve pores and are believed to play a crucial role in protecting the phloem sap from intruding animals by blocking flow when the phloem cell is damaged. The resistance to the flow of viscous sap in the phloem vascular system is strongly affected by the presence of the sieve plates, but the hydrodynamics of the flow through them remains poorly understood. We propose a theoretical model for quantifying the effect of sieve plates on the phloem in the plant, thus unifying and improving previous work in the field. Numerical simulations of the flow in real and idealized phloem channels verify our model, and anatomical data from 19 plant species are investigated. We find that the sieve plate resistance is correlated to the cell lumen resistance, and that the sieve plate and the lumen contribute almost equally to the total hydraulic resistance of the phloem translocation pathway.

  2. Radiation Hydrodynamics Modeling of Hohlraum Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mehul V.; Mauche, Christopher W.; Jones, Ogden S.; Scott, Howard A.

    2015-11-01

    Attempts to model the energetics in NIF Hohlraums have been made with varying degrees of success, with discrepancies of 0-25% being reported for the X-ray flux (10-25% for the NIC ignition platform hohlraums). To better understand the cause(s) of these discrepancies, the effects of uncertainties in modeling thermal conduction, laser-plasma interactions, atomic mixing at interfaces, and NLTE kinetics of the high-Z wall plasma must be quantified. In this work we begin by focusing on the NLTE kinetics component. We detail a simulation framework for developing an integrated HYDRA hohlraum model with predefined tolerances for energetics errors due to numerical discretization errors or statistical fluctuations. Within this framework we obtain a model for a converged 1D spherical hohlraum which is then extended to 2D. The new model is used to reexamine physics sensitivities and improve estimates of the energetics discrepancy. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Progress and Challenges in Coupled Hydrodynamic-Ecological Estuarine Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical modeling has emerged over the last several decades as a widely accepted tool for investigations in environmental sciences. In estuarine research, hydrodynamic and ecological models have moved along parallel tracks with regard to complexity, refinement, computational po...

  4. Hydrodynamical Modeling of the Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, Jonathan David

    2017-01-01

    Studies of the Local Interstellar Medium (LISM) provide us with the opportunity to make progress in understanding a wide range of physical processes that operate in the diffuse insterstellar medium (ISM) of galaxies. The LISM includes a large bubble of hot, supernova created gas, known as the Local Bubble, and several low density, warm clouds close to the Sun, known as the Complex of Local Insterstellar Clouds (CLIC). The CLIC includes the Local Interstellar Cloud that surrounds and confines the heliosphere and is the source of neutral H and He that has been detected flowing into the Solar System. Several important questions remain unanswered about the LISM including how the Local Bubble formed, how the CLIC got to be inside the Local Bubble, and what are the ongoing interactions of the hot gas with the CLIC gas. We report on our progress in creating numerical hydrodynamical models of the LISM that aim to help us to understand the wide range of observations we have of the CLIC and the Local Bubble and the origins and evolution of the LISM.

  5. GaAs solar cell photoresponse modeling using PC-1D V2.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, D. A.; Olsen, L. C.; Dunham, G.; Addis, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    Photoresponse data of high efficiency GaAs solar cells were analyzed using PC-1D V2.1. The approach required to use PC-1D for photoresponse data analysis, and the physical insights gained from performing the analysis are discussed. In particular, the effect of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As heteroface quality was modeled. Photoresponse or spectral quantum efficiency is an important tool in characterizing material quality and predicting cell performance. The strength of the photoresponse measurement lies in the ability to precisely fit the experimental data with a physical model. PC-1D provides a flexible platform for calculations based on these physical models.

  6. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical. PMID:25751125

  7. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical.

  8. Lattice Models for Granular-Like Velocity Fields: Hydrodynamic Description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manacorda, Alessandro; Plata, Carlos A.; Lasanta, Antonio; Puglisi, Andrea; Prados, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    A recently introduced model describing—on a 1d lattice—the velocity field of a granular fluid is discussed in detail. The dynamics of the velocity field occurs through next-neighbours inelastic collisions which conserve momentum but dissipate energy. The dynamics is described through the corresponding Master Equation for the time evolution of the probability distribution. In the continuum limit, equations for the average velocity and temperature fields with fluctuating currents are derived, which are analogous to hydrodynamic equations of granular fluids when restricted to the shear modes. Therefore, the homogeneous cooling state, with its linear instability, and other relevant regimes such as the uniform shear flow and the Couette flow states are described. The evolution in time and space of the single particle probability distribution, in all those regimes, is also discussed, showing that the local equilibrium is not valid in general. The noise for the momentum and energy currents, which are correlated, are white and Gaussian. The same is true for the noise of the energy sink, which is usually negligible.

  9. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a new computational technique uniquely suited to computation of hypervelocity impact phenomena. This paper reviews the characteristics, philosophy, and a bit of the derivation of the method. As illustrations of the technique, several test case computations and several application computations are shown.

  10. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1992-09-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a new computational technique uniquely suited to computation of hypervelocity impact phenomena. This paper reviews the characteristics, philosophy, and a bit of the derivation of the method. As illustrations of the technique, several test case computations and several application computations are shown.

  11. Hydrodynamic and Salinity Intrusion Model in Selangor River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haron, N. F.; Tahir, W.

    2016-07-01

    A multi-dimensional hydrodynamic and transport model has been used to develop the hydrodynamic and salinity intrusion model for Selangor River Estuary. Delft3D-FLOW was applied to the study area using a curvilinear, boundary fitted grid. External boundary forces included ocean water level, salinity, and stream flow. The hydrodynamic and salinity transport used for the simulation was calibrated and confirmed using data on November 2005 and from May to June 2014. A 13-day period for November 2005 data and a 6-day period of May to June 2014 data were chosen as the calibration and confirmation period because of the availability of data from the field-monitoring program conducted. From the calibration results, it shows that the model was well suited to predict the hydrodynamic and salinity intrusion characteristics of the study area.

  12. 3-D HYDRODYNAMIC MODELING IN A GEOSPATIAL FRAMEWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, J; Alfred Garrett, A; Larry Koffman, L; David Hayes, D

    2006-08-24

    3-D hydrodynamic models are used by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to simulate the transport of thermal and radionuclide discharges in coastal estuary systems. Development of such models requires accurate bathymetry, coastline, and boundary condition data in conjunction with the ability to rapidly discretize model domains and interpolate the required geospatial data onto the domain. To facilitate rapid and accurate hydrodynamic model development, SRNL has developed a pre- and post-processor application in a geospatial framework to automate the creation of models using existing data. This automated capability allows development of very detailed models to maximize exploitation of available surface water radionuclide sample data and thermal imagery.

  13. Benchmarks and models for 1-D radiation transport in stochastic participating media

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David Scott

    2000-08-01

    Benchmark calculations for radiation transport coupled to a material temperature equation in a 1-D slab and 1-D spherical geometry binary random media are presented. The mixing statistics are taken to be homogeneous Markov statistics in the 1-D slab but only approximately Markov statistics in the 1-D sphere. The material chunk sizes are described by Poisson distribution functions. The material opacities are first taken to be constant and then allowed to vary as a strong function of material temperature. Benchmark values and variances for time evolution of the ensemble average of material temperature energy density and radiation transmission are computed via a Monte Carlo type method. These benchmarks are used as a basis for comparison with three other approximate methods of solution. One of these approximate methods is simple atomic mix. The second approximate model is an adaptation of what is commonly called the Levermore-Pomraning model and which is referred to here as the standard model. It is shown that recasting the temperature coupling as a type of effective scattering can be useful in formulating the third approximate model, an adaptation of a model due to Su and Pomraning which attempts to account for the effects of scattering in a stochastic context. This last adaptation shows consistent improvement over both the atomic mix and standard models when used in the 1-D slab geometry but shows limited improvement in the 1-D spherical geometry. Benchmark values are also computed for radiation transmission from the 1-D sphere without material heating present. This is to evaluate the performance of the standard model on this geometry--something which has never been done before. All of the various tests demonstrate the importance of stochastic structure on the solution. Also demonstrated are the range of usefulness and limitations of a simple atomic mix formulation.

  14. Benchmarks and models for 1-D radiation transport in stochastic participating media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David Scott

    Benchmark calculations for radiation transport coupled to a material temperature equation in a 1-D slab and 1-D spherical geometry binary random media are presented. The mixing statistics are taken to be homogeneous Markov statistics in the 1-D slab but only approximately Markov statistics in the 1-D sphere. The material chunk sizes are described by Poisson distribution functions. The material opacities are first taken to be constant and then allowed to vary as a strong function of material temperature. Benchmark values and variances for time evolution of the ensemble average of material temperature energy density and radiation transmission are computed via a Monte Carlo type method. These benchmarks are used as a basis for comparison with three other approximate methods of solution. One of these approximate methods is simple atomic mix. The second approximate model is an adaptation of what is commonly called the Levermore-Pomraning model and which is referred to here as the standard model. It is shown that recasting the temperature coupling as a type of effective scattering can be useful in formulating the third approximate model, an adaptation of a model due to Su and Pomraning which attempts to account for the effects of scattering in a stochastic context. This last adaptation shows consistent improvement over both the atomic mix and standard models when used in the 1-D slab geometry but shows limited improvement in the 1-D spherical geometry. Benchmark values are also computed for radiation transmission from the 1-D sphere without material heating present. This is to evaluate the performance of the standard model on this geometry-something which has never been done before. All of the various tests demonstrate the importance of stochastic structure on the solution. Also demonstrated are the range of usefulness and limitations of a simple atomic mix formulation.

  15. Limb darkening laws for two exoplanet host stars derived from 3D stellar model atmospheres. Comparison with 1D models and HST light curve observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, W.; Sing, D.; Pont, F.; Asplund, M.

    2012-03-01

    We compare limb darkening laws derived from 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres and 1D hydrostatic MARCS models for the host stars of two well-studied transiting exoplanet systems, the late-type dwarfs HD 209458 and HD 189733. The surface brightness distribution of the stellar disks is calculated for a wide spectral range using 3D LTE spectrum formation and opacity sampling⋆. We test our theoretical predictions using least-squares fits of model light curves to wavelength-integrated primary eclipses that were observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The limb darkening law derived from the 3D model of HD 209458 in the spectral region between 2900 Å and 5700 Å produces significantly better fits to the HST data, removing systematic residuals that were previously observed for model light curves based on 1D limb darkening predictions. This difference arises mainly from the shallower mean temperature structure of the 3D model, which is a consequence of the explicit simulation of stellar surface granulation where 1D models need to rely on simplified recipes. In the case of HD 189733, the model atmospheres produce practically equivalent limb darkening curves between 2900 Å and 5700 Å, partly due to obstruction by spectral lines, and the data are not sufficient to distinguish between the light curves. We also analyze HST observations between 5350 Å and 10 500 Å for this star; the 3D model leads to a better fit compared to 1D limb darkening predictions. The significant improvement of fit quality for the HD 209458 system demonstrates the higher degree of realism of 3D hydrodynamical models and the importance of surface granulation for the formation of the atmospheric radiation field of late-type stars. This result agrees well with recent investigations of limb darkening in the solar continuum and other observational tests of the 3D models. The case of HD 189733 is no contradiction as the model light curves are less sensitive to the temperature stratification of

  16. Can hydrodynamic models be implemented and calibrated on the basis of remotely sensed data only?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeneghetti, Alessio

    2015-04-01

    The implementation and calibration of hydrodynamic models are often constrained by the amount of available data (such as topographic and hydraulic data) which may be absent (e.g. in remote areas) or not sufficient to build accurate and trustable models. Nevertheless, the greater availability of remote sensing data (e.g. altimetry data, radar imageries, etc.) stimulates the scientific community to resort to these new data sources for overcoming these limits. The present study analyzes the potential of remotely sensed data, i.e. (i) Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM; a freely available global Digital Elevation Model with a resolution of 90 m) and (ii) satellite altimetry data (i.e. ERS and ENVISAT data), for a complete implementation and calibration of a one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic model. The test site is represented by ~140 km stretch of the Po river (the longest Italian river) where both traditional and remotely sensed topographical and hydrometric data are available. Adopting the SRTM data for representing the riverbed and floodplain morphology, the study investigates the performances of different 1D models in which the geometry of the main channel, which is generally submerged and cannot be remotely surveyed, is reconstructed on the basis of different approaches. The model calibrations are performed referring to long satellite altimetry timeseries (~16 years of observations), while the simulation results are compared with those obtained by means of a quasi-2D model implemented with detailed topographical data (i.e. airborne LiDAR available on the study area). The results of the study are encouraging and show the possibility to implement and calibrate a reliable 1D model referring exclusively to low-resolution DEM (e.g. SRTM) and remotely sensed water surface data (i.e. ERS and ENVISAT). The 1D model is particularly accurate for describing high-flow and flood events (i.e. root mean square error equal to 0.11 m) and comparable with traditionally

  17. 2D MHD AND 1D HD MODELS OF A SOLAR FLARE—A COMPREHENSIVE COMPARISON OF THE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P.; Murawski, K.; Srivastava, A. K. E-mail: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl E-mail: asrivastava.app@iitbhu.ac.in

    2015-11-01

    Without any doubt, solar flaring loops possess a multithread internal structure that is poorly resolved, and there are no means to observe heating episodes and thermodynamic evolution of the individual threads. These limitations cause fundamental problems in numerical modeling of flaring loops, such as selection of a structure and a number of threads, and an implementation of a proper model of the energy deposition process. A set of one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic and two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic models of a flaring loop are developed to compare energy redistribution and plasma dynamics in the course of a prototypical solar flare. Basic parameters of the modeled loop are set according to the progenitor M1.8 flare recorded in AR 10126 on 2002 September 20 between 09:21 UT and 09:50 UT. The nonideal 1D models include thermal conduction and radiative losses of the optically thin plasma as energy-loss mechanisms, while the nonideal 2D models take into account viscosity and thermal conduction as energy-loss mechanisms only. The 2D models have a continuous distribution of the parameters of the plasma across the loop and are powered by varying in time and space along and across the loop heating flux. We show that such 2D models are an extreme borderline case of a multithread internal structure of the flaring loop, with a filling factor equal to 1. Nevertheless, these simple models ensure the general correctness of the obtained results and can be adopted as a correct approximation of the real flaring structures.

  18. Concurrent multiscale modelling of atomistic and hydrodynamic processes in liquids.

    PubMed

    Markesteijn, Anton; Karabasov, Sergey; Scukins, Arturs; Nerukh, Dmitry; Glotov, Vyacheslav; Goloviznin, Vasily

    2014-08-06

    Fluctuations of liquids at the scales where the hydrodynamic and atomistic descriptions overlap are considered. The importance of these fluctuations for atomistic motions is discussed and examples of their accurate modelling with a multi-space-time-scale fluctuating hydrodynamics scheme are provided. To resolve microscopic details of liquid systems, including biomolecular solutions, together with macroscopic fluctuations in space-time, a novel hybrid atomistic-fluctuating hydrodynamics approach is introduced. For a smooth transition between the atomistic and continuum representations, an analogy with two-phase hydrodynamics is used that leads to a strict preservation of macroscopic mass and momentum conservation laws. Examples of numerical implementation of the new hybrid approach for the multiscale simulation of liquid argon in equilibrium conditions are provided.

  19. Concurrent multiscale modelling of atomistic and hydrodynamic processes in liquids

    PubMed Central

    Markesteijn, Anton; Karabasov, Sergey; Scukins, Arturs; Nerukh, Dmitry; Glotov, Vyacheslav; Goloviznin, Vasily

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations of liquids at the scales where the hydrodynamic and atomistic descriptions overlap are considered. The importance of these fluctuations for atomistic motions is discussed and examples of their accurate modelling with a multi-space–time-scale fluctuating hydrodynamics scheme are provided. To resolve microscopic details of liquid systems, including biomolecular solutions, together with macroscopic fluctuations in space–time, a novel hybrid atomistic–fluctuating hydrodynamics approach is introduced. For a smooth transition between the atomistic and continuum representations, an analogy with two-phase hydrodynamics is used that leads to a strict preservation of macroscopic mass and momentum conservation laws. Examples of numerical implementation of the new hybrid approach for the multiscale simulation of liquid argon in equilibrium conditions are provided. PMID:24982246

  20. Bottom Roughness and Bathymetry Estimation of 1-D Shallow Water Equations Model Using Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooshyar, M.; Hagen, S. C.; Wang, D.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrodynamic models are widely applied to coastal areas in order to predict water levels and flood inundation and typically involve solving a form of the Shallow Water Equations (SWE). The SWE are routinely discretized by applying numerical methods, such as the finite element method. Like other numerical models, hydrodynamic models include uncertainty. Uncertainties are generated due to errors in the discrete approximation of coastal geometry, bathymetry, bottom friction and forcing functions such as tides and wind fields. Methods to counteract these uncertainties should always begin with improvements to physical characterization of: the geometric description through increased resolution, parameters that describe land cover variations in the natural and urban environment, parameters that enhance transfer of surface forcings to the water surface, open boundary forcings, and the wetting/drying brought upon by flood and ebb cycles. When the best possible physical representation is achieved, we are left with calibration and data assimilation to reduce model uncertainty. Data assimilation has been applied to coastal hydrodynamic models to better estimate system states and/or system parameters by incorporating observed data into the model. Kalman Filter is one of the most studied data assimilation methods that minimizes the mean square errors between model state estimations and the observed data in linear systems (Kalman , 1960). For nonlinear systems, as with hydrodynamic models, a variation of Kalman filter called Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), is applied to update the system state according to error statistics in the context of Monte Carlo simulations (Evensen , 2003) & (Hitoshi et. al, 2014). In this research, Kalman Filter is incorporated to simultaneously estimate an influential parameter used in the shallow water equations, bottom roughness, and to adjust the physical feature of bathymetry. Starting from an initial estimate of bottom roughness and bathymetry, and

  1. Constructing stable 3D hydrodynamical models of giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Springel, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interactions require stable models of stars as initial conditions. Such initial models, however, are difficult to construct for giant stars because of the wide range in spatial scales of the hydrostatic equilibrium and in dynamical timescales between the core and the envelope of the giant. They are needed for, e.g., modeling the common envelope phase where a giant envelope encompasses both the giant core and a companion star. Here, we present a new method of approximating and reconstructing giant profiles from a stellar evolution code to produce stable models for multi-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. We determine typical stellar stratification profiles with the one-dimensional stellar evolution code mesa. After an appropriate mapping, hydrodynamical simulations are conducted using the moving-mesh code arepo. The giant profiles are approximated by replacing the core of the giant with a point mass and by constructing a suitable continuation of the profile to the center. Different reconstruction methods are tested that can specifically control the convective behaviour of the model. After mapping to a grid, a relaxation procedure that includes damping of spurious velocities yields stable models in three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. Initially convectively stable configurations lead to stable hydrodynamical models while for stratifications that are convectively unstable in the stellar evolution code, simulations recover the convective behaviour of the initial model and show large convective plumes with Mach numbers up to 0.8. Examples are shown for a 2 M⊙ red giant and a 0.67 M⊙ asymptotic giant branch star. A detailed analysis shows that the improved method reliably provides stable models of giant envelopes that can be used as initial conditions for subsequent hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interactions involving giant stars.

  2. Column Testing and 1D Reactive Transport Modeling to Evaluate Uranium Plume Persistence Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Morrison, Stan; Morris, Sarah; Tigar, Aaron; Dam, William; Dayvault, Jalena

    2016-04-26

    Motivation for Study: Natural flushing of contaminants at various U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management sites is not proceeding as quickly as predicted (plume persistence) Objectives: Help determine natural flushing rates using column tests. Use 1D reactive transport modeling to better understand the major processes that are creating plume persistence Approach: Core samples from under a former mill tailings area Tailings have been removed. Column leaching using lab-prepared water similar to nearby Gunnison River water. 1D reactive transport modeling to evaluate processes

  3. Progress and challenges in coupled hydrodynamic-ecological estuarine modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ganju, Neil K.; Brush, Mark J.; Rashleigh, Brenda; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo L.; del Barrio, Pilar; Grear, Jason S.; Harris, Lora A.; Lake, Samuel J.; McCardell, Grant; O’Donnell, James; Ralston, David K.; Signell, Richard P.; Testa, Jeremy M.; Vaudrey, Jamie M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical modeling has emerged over the last several decades as a widely accepted tool for investigations in environmental sciences. In estuarine research, hydrodynamic and ecological models have moved along parallel tracks with regard to complexity, refinement, computational power, and incorporation of uncertainty. Coupled hydrodynamic-ecological models have been used to assess ecosystem processes and interactions, simulate future scenarios, and evaluate remedial actions in response to eutrophication, habitat loss, and freshwater diversion. The need to couple hydrodynamic and ecological models to address research and management questions is clear, because dynamic feedbacks between biotic and physical processes are critical interactions within ecosystems. In this review we present historical and modern perspectives on estuarine hydrodynamic and ecological modeling, consider model limitations, and address aspects of model linkage, skill assessment, and complexity. We discuss the balance between spatial and temporal resolution and present examples using different spatiotemporal scales. Finally, we recommend future lines of inquiry, approaches to balance complexity and uncertainty, and model transparency and utility. It is idealistic to think we can pursue a “theory of everything” for estuarine models, but recent advances suggest that models for both scientific investigations and management applications will continue to improve in terms of realism, precision, and accuracy. PMID:27721675

  4. A versatile compact model for ballistic 1D transistor: GNRFET and CNTFET comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frégonèse, Sébastien; Maneux, Cristell; Zimmer, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a versatile compact model dedicated to 1D transistors in order to predict the ultimate performances of nano-device-based circuits. We have developed a thermionic charge model based on the non-parabolic-energy-dispersion-relation NPEDR. The model is valid for both CNTFET and GNRFET. Model results are compared with GNRFET NEGF simulations. Then, GNRFET and CNTFET performances are analysed through two circuit demonstrators such as a ring oscillator circuit and 6T RAM.

  5. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere. I - Deep envelope models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks has been modified to include radiative transfer effects. This modified code has been used to compute deep envelope models of a classical Cepheid with a period of 12 days. It is shown that in this particular model the hydrogen ionization region plays only a small role in producing the observed phase lag between the light and velocity curves. The cause of the bumps on the model's light curve is examined, and a mechanism is presented to explain those Cepheids with two secondary features on their light curves. This mechanism is shown to be consistent with the Hertzsprung sequence only if the evolutionary mass-luminosity law is used.

  6. Accuracy of 1D microvascular flow models in the limit of low Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Pindera, Maciej Z; Ding, Hui; Athavale, Mahesh M; Chen, Zhijian

    2009-05-01

    We describe results of numerical simulations of steady flows in tubes with branch bifurcations using fully 3D and reduced 1D geometries. The intent is to delineate the range of validity of reduced models used for simulations of flows in microcapillary networks, as a function of the flow Reynolds number Re. Results from model problems indicate that for Re less than 1 and possibly as high as 10, vasculatures may be represented by strictly 1D Poiseuille flow geometries with flow variation in the axial dimensions only. In that range flow rate predictions in the different branches generated by 1D and 3D models differ by a constant factor, independent of Re. When the cross-sectional areas of the branches are constant these differences are generally small and appear to stem from an uncertainty of how the individual branch lengths are defined. This uncertainty can be accounted for by a simple geometrical correction. For non-constant cross-sections the differences can be much more significant. If additional corrections for the presence of branch junctions and flow area variations are not taken into account in 1D models of complex vasculatures, the resultant flow predictions should be interpreted with caution.

  7. Interfacing the NRL 1-D High Vertical Resolution Aerosol Model with COAMPS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    TERM GOALS Identify, understand and quantify all the physical processes that govern the aerosols in the marine environment and develop a...size and composition distributions are required. Many of the aerosol source, sink and transformation processes are highly dependent on meteorological...parameters such as wind speed, humidity profile, clouds, precipitation scavenging, etc. The NRL 1-D aerosol- processes model includes all these

  8. HYDRUS-1D Modeling of an Irrigated Agricultural Plot with Application to Aquifer Recharge Estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of methods are available for estimating aquifer recharge in semi-arid regions, each with advantages and disadvantages. We are investigating a procedure for estimating recharge in an irrigated basin. The method involves computing irrigation return flows based on HYDRUS-1D modeling of root z...

  9. Hydrodynamic model for picosecond propagation of laser-created nanoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Vikrant; Jurek, Zoltan; Ziaja, Beata; Santra, Robin

    2015-06-01

    The interaction of a free-electron-laser pulse with a moderate or large size cluster is known to create a quasi-neutral nanoplasma, which then expands on hydrodynamic timescale, i.e., > 1 ps. To have a better understanding of ion and electron data from experiments derived from laser-irradiated clusters, one needs to simulate cluster dynamics on such long timescales for which the molecular dynamics approach becomes inefficient. We therefore propose a two-step Molecular Dynamics-Hydrodynamic scheme. In the first step we use molecular dynamics code to follow the dynamics of an irradiated cluster until all the photo-excitation and corresponding relaxation processes are finished and a nanoplasma, consisting of ground-state ions and thermalized electrons, is formed. In the second step we perform long-timescale propagation of this nanoplasma with a computationally efficient hydrodynamic approach. In the present paper we examine the feasibility of a hydrodynamic two-fluid approach to follow the expansion of spherically symmetric nanoplasma, without accounting for the impact ionization and three-body recombination processes at this stage. We compare our results with the corresponding molecular dynamics simulations. We show that all relevant information about the nanoplasma propagation can be extracted from hydrodynamic simulations at a significantly lower computational cost when compared to a molecular dynamics approach. Finally, we comment on the accuracy and limitations of our present model and discuss possible future developments of the two-step strategy.

  10. Including Nearshore Processes in Phase-Averaged Hydrodynamics Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    physical modeling of hydrodynamics to the use of numerical models. A suitable set of equations conserving mass, momen- tum, and energy do not suffer...the high cost and scale effects of physical models. Numerical models, however, rely on a set of discritized and sim- plified equations , and nonphysical...used in the interest of brevity. The solution of Equation 24 along with Equation 26 constitutes a solution for the depth-dependent cross-shore

  11. Modeling High Resolution Flare Spectra Using Hydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry; Doschek, G.

    2006-06-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamic response of the solar atmosphere to the release of energy during a flare has been a long standing problem in solar physics. Early time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations were able to reproduce the high temperatures and densities observed in solar flares, but were not able to model the observations in any detail. For example, these simulations could not account for the relatively slow decay of the observed emission or the absence of blueshifts in high spectral resolution line profiles at flare onset. We have found that by representing the flare as a succession of independently heated filaments it is possible to reproduce both the evolution of line intensity and the shape of the line profile using hydrodynamic simulations. Here we present detailed comparisons between our simulation results and several flares observed with the Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS). Comparisons with 3D MHD simulations will also be discussed.

  12. Review of Zero-D and 1-D Models of Blood Flow in the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Zero-dimensional (lumped parameter) and one dimensional models, based on simplified representations of the components of the cardiovascular system, can contribute strongly to our understanding of circulatory physiology. Zero-D models provide a concise way to evaluate the haemodynamic interactions among the cardiovascular organs, whilst one-D (distributed parameter) models add the facility to represent efficiently the effects of pulse wave transmission in the arterial network at greatly reduced computational expense compared to higher dimensional computational fluid dynamics studies. There is extensive literature on both types of models. Method and Results The purpose of this review article is to summarise published 0D and 1D models of the cardiovascular system, to explore their limitations and range of application, and to provide an indication of the physiological phenomena that can be included in these representations. The review on 0D models collects together in one place a description of the range of models that have been used to describe the various characteristics of cardiovascular response, together with the factors that influence it. Such models generally feature the major components of the system, such as the heart, the heart valves and the vasculature. The models are categorised in terms of the features of the system that they are able to represent, their complexity and range of application: representations of effects including pressure-dependent vessel properties, interaction between the heart chambers, neuro-regulation and auto-regulation are explored. The examination on 1D models covers various methods for the assembly, discretisation and solution of the governing equations, in conjunction with a report of the definition and treatment of boundary conditions. Increasingly, 0D and 1D models are used in multi-scale models, in which their primary role is to provide boundary conditions for sophisticate, and often patient-specific, 2D and 3D models

  13. The Quantum Hydrodynamic Model for Semiconductor Devices: Theory and Computations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Quantum transport effects including electron or hole tunneling through potential barriers and buildup in quantum wells are important in predicting...semiconductor device. A new extension of the classical hydrodynamic model to include quantum transport effects was derived. This "smooth" quantum

  14. HYDRODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT MODELING STUDY IN A HIGHLY STRATIFIED ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the preliminary results of hydrodynamic and salinity predictions and the implications to an ongoing contaminated sediment transport and fate modeling effort in the Lower Duwamish Waterway (LDW), Seattle, Washington. The LDW is highly strati-fied when freshwate...

  15. Constraint on the 1D earth model near core-mantle boundary by free core nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengli; Zhang, Mian

    2015-04-01

    Free core nutation (FCN) is a normal mode of the rotating earth with fluid outer core (FOC). Its period depends on the physics of the mantle and FOC, especially the parameters near core-mantle boundary (CMB), like the density and elastic (Lame) parameters. FCN period can be determined very accurately by VLBI and superconductive tidal gravimetry, but the theoretical calculation results of FCN period from traditional approaches and 1D earth model (like PREM) deviate significantly from the accurate observation. Meanwhile, the influence of the uncertainty of a given earth model on nutation has never been studied before. In this work, a numerical experiment is presented to check this problem, and we want to see whether FCN can provide a constraint on the construction of a 1D earth model, especially on the gradient of material density near CMB.

  16. Multiphase Turbulence Modeling for Computational Ship Hydrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-30

    to the SGS model as bubbles become under-resolved, passing through the numerical Hinze scale. 3 iii. URANS closure modeling by analysis of the...variable density turbulence) for URANS models have been developed and tested a priori for turbulent mass flux and kinetic energy. The iLES...well as established the importance of turbulent mass flux and anisotropy in the wake that has guided the development of URANS closure models. This

  17. Thermodynamic nature of vitrification in a 1D model of a structural glass former

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, A. N.

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new spin-glass model with no positional quenched disorder which is regarded as a coarse-grained model of a structural glass-former. The model is analyzed in the 1D case when the number N of states of a primary cell is large. For N → ∞, the model exhibits a sharp freezing transition of the thermodynamic origin. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the glass transition is accompanied by a significant growth of a static length scale ξ pointing to the structural (equilibrium) nature of dynamical slowdown effects in supercooled liquids.

  18. SILVA: EDF two-phase 1D annular model of a CFB boiler furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Montat, D.; Fauquet, P.; Lafanechere, L.; Bursi, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    Aiming to improve its knowledge of CFB boilers, EDF has initiated a R and D program including: laboratory work on mock-ups, numerical modelling and on-site tests in CFB power plants. One of the objectives of this program is the development of a comprehensive steady-state 1D model of the solid circulation loop, named SILVA, for plant operation and design evaluation purposes. This paper describes its mathematical and physical modelling. Promising validation of the model on cold mock-up and industrial CFB is presented.

  19. Thermodynamic nature of vitrification in a 1D model of a structural glass former

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. N.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a new spin-glass model with no positional quenched disorder which is regarded as a coarse-grained model of a structural glass-former. The model is analyzed in the 1D case when the number N of states of a primary cell is large. For N → ∞, the model exhibits a sharp freezing transition of the thermodynamic origin. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the glass transition is accompanied by a significant growth of a static length scale ξ pointing to the structural (equilibrium) nature of dynamical slowdown effects in supercooled liquids.

  20. Thermodynamic nature of vitrification in a 1D model of a structural glass former.

    PubMed

    Semenov, A N

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new spin-glass model with no positional quenched disorder which is regarded as a coarse-grained model of a structural glass-former. The model is analyzed in the 1D case when the number N of states of a primary cell is large. For N → ∞, the model exhibits a sharp freezing transition of the thermodynamic origin. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the glass transition is accompanied by a significant growth of a static length scale ξ pointing to the structural (equilibrium) nature of dynamical slowdown effects in supercooled liquids.

  1. Study of the ion kinetic effects in ICF run-away burn using a quasi-1D hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.-K.; Molvig, K.; Albright, B. J.; Dodd, E. S.; Vold, E. L.; Kagan, G.; Hoffman, N. M.

    2017-02-01

    The loss of fuel ions in the Gamow peak and other kinetic effects related to the α particles during ignition, run-away burn, and disassembly stages of an inertial confinement fusion D-T capsule are investigated with a quasi-1D hybrid volume ignition model that includes kinetic ions, fluid electrons, Planckian radiation photons, and a metallic pusher. The fuel ion loss due to the Knudsen effect at the fuel-pusher interface is accounted for by a local-loss model by Molvig et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 095001 (2012)] with an albedo model for ions returning from the pusher wall. The tail refilling and relaxation of the fuel ion distribution are captured with a nonlinear Fokker-Planck solver. Alpha heating of the fuel ions is modeled kinetically while simple models for finite alpha range and electron heating are used. This dynamical model is benchmarked with a 3 T hydrodynamic burn model employing similar assumptions. For an energetic pusher (˜40 kJ) that compresses the fuel to an areal density of ˜1.07 g/cm 2 at ignition, the simulation shows that the Knudsen effect can substantially limit ion temperature rise in runaway burn. While the final yield decreases modestly from kinetic effects of the α particles, large reduction of the fuel reactivity during ignition and runaway burn may require a higher Knudsen loss rate compared to the rise time of the temperatures above ˜25 keV when the broad D-T Gamow peak merges into the bulk Maxwellian distribution.

  2. Density matrix spectra and order parameters in the 1D extended Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wing Chi; Gu, Shi-Jian; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2016-09-01

    Without any knowledge of the symmetry existing in a system, we derive the exact forms of the order parameters which show long-range correlations in the ground state of the one-dimensional (1D) extended Hubbard model using a quantum information approach. Our work demonstrates that the quantum information approach can help us to find the explicit form of the order parameter, which could not be derived systematically via traditional methods in the condensed matter theory.

  3. Modeling tidal hydrodynamics of San Diego Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, P.-F.; Cheng, R.T.; Richter, K.; Gross, E.S.; Sutton, D.; Gartner, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    In 1983, current data were collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration using mechanical current meters. During 1992 through 1996, acoustic Doppler current profilers as well as mechanical current meters and tide gauges were used. These measurements not only document tides and tidal currents in San Diego Bay, but also provide independent data sets for model calibration and verification. A high resolution (100-m grid), depth-averaged, numerical hydrodynamic model has been implemented for San Diego Bay to describe essential tidal hydrodynamic processes in the bay. The model is calibrated using the 1983 data set and verified using the more recent 1992-1996 data. Discrepancies between model predictions and field data in beth model calibration and verification are on the order of the magnitude of uncertainties in the field data. The calibrated and verified numerical model has been used to quantify residence time and dilution and flushing of contaminant effluent into San Diego Bay. Furthermore, the numerical model has become an important research tool in ongoing hydrodynamic and water quality studies and in guiding future field data collection programs.

  4. Box model and 1D longitudinal model of flow and transport in Bosten Lake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Li, WenPeng; Dong, XinGuang

    2015-05-01

    Bosten Lake in the southeast of Yanqi Catchment, China, supports the downstream agricultural and natural environments. Over the last few decades the intensive agricultural activities in Yanqi Catchment resulted in decreased lake levels and deteriorated lake water quality. A two-box model is constructed to understand the evolution of lake level and salinity between 1958 and 2008. The two-box model of the lake indicates that the evaporation does have the same trend as the observed lake area and the annual average evaporation agrees with the value obtained from the Penman-Monteith approach. To achieve a correct salt balance, the ratio of outflow concentration and average lake concentration has to be around 0.7. This is due to the incomplete mixing of the lake caused by short-circuiting between tributary inflow and the main outflow via the pump stations abstracting water from the lake. This short-circuiting is investigated in more detail by a 1D numerical flow and transport model of the lake calibrated with observations of lake level and lake concentrations. The distributed model reproduces the correct time-varying outflow concentration. It is used for the assessment of two basic management options: increasing river discharge (by water saving irrigation, reduction of phreatic evaporation or reduction of agricultural area) and diverting saline drainage water to the desert. Increasing river discharge to the lake by 20% reduces the east basin salt concentration by 0.55 kg/m3, while capturing all the drainage water and discharging it to depressions instead of the lake reduces the east basin salt concentration by 0.63 kg/m3. A combination of increasing river inflow and decreasing drainage salt flux is sufficient to bring future lake TDS below the required 1 kg/m3, to keep a lake level that sustains the lake ecosystem, and to supply more water for downstream development and ecosystem rehabilitation.

  5. A Systematic Comparison between 1-D and 3-D Hemodynamics in Compliant Arterial Models

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Nan; Alastruey, Jordi; Figueroa, C. Alberto

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In this article, we present a systematic comparison of computational hemodynamics in arterial models with deformable vessel walls using a one-dimensional (1-D) and a three-dimensional (3-D) method. The simulations were performed using a series of idealized compliant arterial models representing the common carotid artery, thoracic aorta, aortic bifurcation, and full aorta from the arch to the iliac bifurcation. The formulations share identical outflow boundary conditions and have compatible material laws. We also present an iterative algorithm to select the parameters for the outflow boundary conditions using the 1-D theory to achieve a desired systolic and diastolic pressure at a particular vessel. This 1-D/3-D framework can be used to efficiently determine material and boundary condition parameters for 3-D subject-specific arterial models with deformable vessel walls. Finally, we explore the impact of different anatomical features and hemodynamic conditions on the numerical predictions. The results show good agreement between the two schemes, especially during the diastolic phase of the cycle. PMID:24115509

  6. Hydrodynamic Tests of Models of Seaplane Floats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eula, Antonio

    1935-01-01

    This report contains the results of tank tests carried out at free trim on seventeen hulls and floats of various types. The data as to the weight on water, trim, and relative resistance for each model are plotted nondimensionally and are referenced both to the total weight and to the weight on water. Despite the fact that the experiments were not made systematically, a study of the models and of the test data permits nevertheless some general deductions regarding the forms of floats and their resistance. One specific conclusion is that the best models have a maximum relative resistance not exceeding 20 percent of the total weight.

  7. Hydrodynamic modeling for river delta salt marshes using lidar topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Ben R.

    2014-05-01

    Topographic data from lidar and multi-beam sonar create new challenges for hydrodynamic models of estuaries, tidelands, and river deltas. We now can readily obtain detailed elevation data on 1 m scales and finer, but solving hydrodynamics with model grid cells at these small scales remains computationally prohibitive (primarily because of the small time step required for small grid cells). Practical estuarine models for the next decade or so will likely have grid scales in the range of 5 to 15 m. So how should we handle known subgrid-scale features? Simply throwing out known data does not seem like a good idea, but there is no consensus on how best to incorporate knowledge of subgrid topography into either hydrodynamic or turbulence models. This presentation discusses both the theoretical foundations for modeling subgrid-scale features and the challenges in applying these ideas in the salt marshes of a river delta. The subgrid problem highlights some important areas for field and laboratory research to provide calibration parameters for new models that upscale the effects of known subgrid features.

  8. Modeling the Hydrodynamical Properties of the QGP at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garishvili, Irakli; Soltz, Ron; Pratt, Scott; Cheng, Micael; Glenn, Andrew; Newby, Jason; Linden-Levy, Loren; Abelev, Betty

    2010-11-01

    Comparisons of the RHIC data to various theoretical models suggest that the evolution of the QGP, a state of matter believed to be created in early stages of heavy ion collisions at RHIC, is qualitatively well described by hydrodynamics. However, the key properties of the QGP, such as initial temperature, Tinit, and the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density of matter, η/s, are not precisely known. To constrain these properties we have developed a multi-stage hydrodynamics/hadron cascade model of heavy ion collisions which incorporates Glauber initial state conditions, pre-equilibrium flow, the UVH2+1 viscous hydro model, Cooper-Frye freezeout, and the UrQMD hadronic cascade model. To test the sensitivity of the observables to the equation of state (EoS), we use several different EoS in the hydrodynamic evolution, including those derived from the hadron resonance gas model and lattice QCD. This framework has an ability to predict key QGP observables, such as, elliptic flow, spectra, and HBT radii for various particle species. For each set of model's input parameters (Tinit, η/s and initial flow) we perform a simultaneous comparison to spectra, elliptic flow, and HBT measured at RHIC. Based on this analysis the determinations of Tinit and η/s will be presented.

  9. Assimilation of measurement data in hydrodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamuz, Emilia; Romanowicz, Renata J.

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on developing methods to combine ground-based data from operational monitoring with data from satellite imaging to obtain a more accurate evaluation of flood inundation extents. The distributed flow model MIKE 11 was used to determine the flooding areas for a flood event with available satellite data. Model conditioning was based on the integrated use of data from remote measurement techniques and traditional data from gauging stations. Such conditioning of the model improves the quality of fit of the model results. The use of high resolution satellite images (from IKONOS, QuickBird e.t.c) and LiDAR Digital Elevation Model (DEM) allows information on water levels to be extended to practically any chosen cross-section of the tested section of the river. This approach allows for a better assessment of inundation extent, particularly in areas with a scarce network of gauging stations. We apply approximate Bayesian analysis to integrate the information on flood extent originating from different sources. The approach described above was applied to the Middle River Vistula reach, from the Zawichost to Warsaw gauging stations. For this part of the river the detailed geometry of the river bed and floodplain data were available. Finally, three selected sub-sections were analyzed with the most suitable satellite images of inundation area. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This research was supported by the Institute of Geophysics Polish Academy of Sciences through the Young Scientist Grant no. 3b/IGF PAN/2015.

  10. Hydrodynamic Model for Conductivity in Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, M.; Herrmann, H. J.; Succi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the recently developed picture of an electronic ideal relativistic fluid at the Dirac point, we present an analytical model for the conductivity in graphene that is able to describe the linear dependence on the carrier density and the existence of a minimum conductivity. The model treats impurities as submerged rigid obstacles, forming a disordered medium through which graphene electrons flow, in close analogy with classical fluid dynamics. To describe the minimum conductivity, we take into account the additional carrier density induced by the impurities in the sample. The model, which predicts the conductivity as a function of the impurity fraction of the sample, is supported by extensive simulations for different values of ε, the dimensionless strength of the electric field, and provides excellent agreement with experimental data. PMID:23316277

  11. Emergent 1d Ising Behavior in AN Elementary Cellular Automaton Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassebaum, Paul G.; Iannacchione, Germano S.

    The fundamental nature of an evolving one-dimensional (1D) Ising model is investigated with an elementary cellular automaton (CA) simulation. The emergent CA simulation employs an ensemble of cells in one spatial dimension, each cell capable of two microstates interacting with simple nearest-neighbor rules and incorporating an external field. The behavior of the CA model provides insight into the dynamics of coupled two-state systems not expressible by exact analytical solutions. For instance, state progression graphs show the causal dynamics of a system through time in relation to the system's entropy. Unique graphical analysis techniques are introduced through difference patterns, diffusion patterns, and state progression graphs of the 1D ensemble visualizing the evolution. All analyses are consistent with the known behavior of the 1D Ising system. The CA simulation and new pattern recognition techniques are scalable (in both dimension, complexity, and size) and have many potential applications such as complex design of materials, control of agent systems, and evolutionary mechanism design.

  12. Verification and comparison of four numerical schemes for a 1D viscoelastic blood flow model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofei; Fullana, Jose-Maria; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves

    2015-01-01

    A reliable and fast numerical scheme is crucial for the 1D simulation of blood flow in compliant vessels. In this paper, a 1D blood flow model is incorporated with a Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic arterial wall. This leads to a nonlinear hyperbolic-parabolic system, which is then solved with four numerical schemes, namely: MacCormack, Taylor-Galerkin, monotonic upwind scheme for conservation law and local discontinuous Galerkin. The numerical schemes are tested on a single vessel, a simple bifurcation and a network with 55 arteries. The numerical solutions are checked favorably against analytical, semi-analytical solutions or clinical observations. Among the numerical schemes, comparisons are made in four important aspects: accuracy, ability to capture shock-like phenomena, computational speed and implementation complexity. The suitable conditions for the application of each scheme are discussed.

  13. Current SPE Hydrodynamic Modeling and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban

    2012-08-14

    Extensive work has been conducted on SPE analysis efforts: Fault effects Non-uniform weathered layer analysis MUNROU: material library incorporation, parallelization, and development of non-locking tets Development of a unique continuum-based-visco-plastic strain-rate-dependent material model With corrected SPE data path is now set for a multipronged approach to fully understand experimental series shot effects.

  14. Optimisation of A 1d-ecosystem Model To Observations In The North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartau, M.; Oschlies, A.

    An optimisation experiment is performed with a vertically resolved, nitrogen based ecosystem model, comprising four state variables (1D-NPZD model): dissolved inor- ganic nitrogen (N), phytoplankton (P), herbivorous zooplankton (Z) and detritus (D). Parameter values of the NPZD-model are optimised while regarding observational data from three locations in the North Atlantic simultaneously: Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS), data of the North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (NABE) and observations from Ocean Weather Ship-India (OWS-INDIA). The simultaneous opti- misation yields a best parameter set which can be utilized for basin wide simulations in coupled physical-biological (general circulation) models of the North Atlantic. After optimisation of the 1D-NPZD model, systematic discrepancies between 14C-fixation rates and modelled primary production are emphasized. Using the optimal parame- ter estimates for coupled 3D-simulations, the biogeochemical fluxes show substantial differences in contrast to previous model results. For instance, rapid recycling of or- ganic matter enhances primary production rates. This becomes most evident within the oligotrophic regions of the subtropical gyre.

  15. Evaluation of 2 1-D cloud models for the analysis of VAS soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmitt, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluation of the satellite Visual Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder (VISSR) has begun to document several of its critical shortcomings as far as numerical cloud models are concerned: excessive smoothing of thermal inversions; imprecise measurement of boundary layer moisture; and tendency to exaggerate atmospheric stability. The sensitivity of 1-D cloud models to their required inputs is stressed with special attention to those parameters obtained from atmospheric soundings taken by the VAS or rawinsonde. In addition to performing model experiments using temperature and moisture profiles having the general characteristics of VAS soundings, standard input sensitivity tests were made and 1-D model performance was compared with observations and the results of a 2-D model experiment using AVE/VAS data (Atmospheric Variability Experiment). Although very encouraging, the results are not sufficient to make any specific conclusions. In general, the VAS soundings are likely to be inadequate to provide the cloud base (and subcloud layer) information needed for inputs to current cumulus models. Above cloud base, the tendency to exaggerate the stability of the atmosphere requires solution before meaningful model experiments are run.

  16. Testing a 1-D Analytical Salt Intrusion Model and the Predictive Equation in Malaysian Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisen, Jacqueline Isabella; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about the salt intrusion behaviour in Malaysian estuaries. Study on this topic sometimes requires large amounts of data especially if a 2-D or 3-D numerical models are used for analysis. In poor data environments, 1-D analytical models are more appropriate. For this reason, a fully analytical 1-D salt intrusion model, based on the theory of Savenije in 2005, was tested in three Malaysian estuaries (Bernam, Selangor and Muar) because it is simple and requires minimal data. In order to achieve that, site surveys were conducted in these estuaries during the dry season (June-August) at spring tide by moving boat technique. Data of cross-sections, water levels and salinity were collected, and then analysed with the salt intrusion model. This paper demonstrates a good fit between the simulated and observed salinity distribution for all three estuaries. Additionally, the calibrated Van der Burgh's coefficient K, Dispersion coefficient D0, and salt intrusion length L, for the estuaries also displayed a reasonable correlations with those calculated from the predictive equations. This indicates that not only is the salt intrusion model valid for the case studies in Malaysia but also the predictive model. Furthermore, the results from this study describe the current state of the estuaries with which the Malaysian water authority in Malaysia can make decisions on limiting water abstraction or dredging. Keywords: salt intrusion, Malaysian estuaries, discharge, predictive model, dispersion

  17. Hydrodynamical Models of Gas Cloud - Galaxy Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, M.; Dinge, D.; Jones, T.; Benjamin, B.

    1999-05-01

    Clouds of neutral hydrogen falling toward the Galactic plane with a speed of about 100 km/s or more are among those considered to be "high velocity clouds" (HVCs). As HVCs are often observed approaching the midplane, the collision of such clouds with the gaseous disk of the Galaxy has been proposed as a precursor event to the phenomena known as "supershells" and as a catalyst to star formation. While many previous analytic calculations have assumed that ram pressure of the resisting medium was negligible, and a ballistic approximation was valid, observations showing a correlation between speed and increased height above the plane, the opposite of what is expected for free fall, suggest otherwise. Benjamin & Danly suggested in 1997 that clouds falling at terminal velocity provide a simple explanation for the observed velocity distribution. In this work, numerical models are used to test the above hypotheses with clouds falling through a more modern model of the interstellar medium than that used in the seminal work by Tenorio-Tagle et al. (TT) in 1987. With the addition of more dense material to the model background, clouds were still able to form supershell-like remnants, though star formation does not appear to be triggered. Further, though agreement was not perfect, the terminal velocity model was found to be a better approximation for these clouds' fall than the ballistic case. Cooling was a physical process included in TT's work which was not included here, but was found to be non-negligible. Simulations which include a cooling algorithm must be done to confirm these results. This work was supported in part by NSF grant AST96-19438.

  18. Modeling Water Waves with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    criterion (Jeong & Hussain, 1995), which uses the symmetric and antisymmetric components of the velocity gradient tensor to identify regions of low...surf zone or as a first approximation to a tsunami . Wave data was obtain from the laboratory experiments of Ting (2006). In Figure 4, the measured...R., Hérault, A., & Bilotta, G. SPH modeling of mean velocity transmission in a rip current system, International Conference on Coastal Engineering

  19. Hydrodynamic characterization of Corpus Christi Bay through modeling and observation.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad S; Bonner, James S; Edge, Billy L; Page, Cheryl A

    2014-11-01

    Christi Bay is a relatively flat, shallow, wind-driven system with an average depth of 3-4 m and a mean tidal range of 0.3 m. It is completely mixed most of the time, and as a result, depth-averaged models have, historically, been applied for hydrodynamic characterization supporting regulatory decisions on Texas coastal management. The bay is highly stratified during transitory periods of the summer with low wind conditions. This has important implications on sediment transport, nutrient cycling, and water quality-related issues, including hypoxia which is a key water quality concern for the bay. Detailed hydrodynamic characterization of the bay during the summer months included analysis of simulation results of 2-D hydrodynamic model and high-frequency (HF) in situ observations. The HF radar system resolved surface currents, whereas an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measured current at different depths of the water column. The developed model successfully captured water surface elevation variation at the mouth of the bay (i.e., onshore boundary of the Gulf of Mexico) and at times within the bay. However, large discrepancies exist between model-computed depth-averaged water currents and observed surface currents. These discrepancies suggested the presence of a vertical gradient in the current structure which was further substantiated by the observed bi-directional current movement within the water column. In addition, observed vertical density gradients proved that the water column was stratified. Under this condition, the bottom layer became hypoxic due to inadequate mixing with the aerated surface water. Understanding the disparities between observations and model predictions provides critical insights about hydrodynamics and physical processes controlling water quality.

  20. Modeling Spitsbergen fjords by hydrodynamic MIKE engine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosecki, Szymon; Przyborska, Anna; Jakacki, Jaromir

    2013-04-01

    Two Svalbard's fjords - Hornsund (on the western side of the most southern part of Spitsbergen island) and Kongsfjorden (also on the western side of Spitsbergen island, but in the northern part) are quite different - the first one is "cold" and second one is "warm". It is obvious that both of them are under influence of West Spitsbergen Current (WSC), which curry out warm Atlantic water and cold East Spitsbergen Current detaches Hornsund. But there is also freshwater stored in Spitsbergen glaciers that have strong influence on local hydrology and physical fjord conditions. Both, local and shelf conditions have impact on state of the fjord and there is no answer which one is the most important in each fjord. Modeling could help to solve this problem - MIKE 3D model has been implemented for both fjords. Mesh-grid of the each fjord has been extended for covering shelf area. External forces like tides, velocities at the boundary and atmospheric forces together with sources of cold and dens fresh water in the fjords will give reliable representation of physical conditions in Hornsund and Kongsfjorden. Calculations of balances between cold fresh water and warm and salt will provide additional information that could help to answer the main question of the GAME (Growing of the Arctic Marine Ecosystem) project - what is the reaction of physically controlled Arctic marine ecosystem to temperature rise.

  1. An integrated coastal model for aeolian and hydrodynamic sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baart, F.; den Bieman, J.; van Koningsveld, M.; Luijendijk, A. P.; Parteli, E. J. R.; Plant, N. G.; Roelvink, J. A.; Storms, J. E. A.; de Vries, S.; van Thiel de Vries, J. S. M.; Ye, Q.

    2012-04-01

    Dunes are formed by aeolian and hydrodynamic processes. Over the last decades numerical models were developed that capture our knowledge of the hydrodynamic transport of sediment near the coast. At the same time others have worked on creating numerical models for aeolian-based transport. Here we show a coastal model that integrates three existing numerical models into one online-coupled system. The XBeach model simulates storm-induced erosion (Roelvink et al., 2009). The Delft3D model (Lesser et al., 2004) is used for long term morphology and the Dune model (Durán et al., 2010) is used to simulate the aeolian transport. These three models were adapted to be able to exchange bed updates in real time. The updated models were integrated using the ESMF framework (Hill et al., 2004), a system for composing coupled modeling systems. The goal of this integrated model is to capture the relevant coastal processes at different time and spatial scales. Aeolian transport can be relevant during storms when the strong winds are generating new dunes, but also under relative mild conditions when the dunes are strengthened by transporting sand from the intertidal area to the dunes. Hydrodynamic transport is also relevant during storms, when high water in combination with waves can cause dunes to avalanche and erode. While under normal conditions the hydrodynamic transport can result in an onshore transport of sediment up to the intertidal area. The exchange of sediment in the intertidal area is a dynamic interaction between the hydrodynamic transport and the aeolian transport. This dynamic interaction is particularly important for simulating dune evolution at timescales longer than individual storm events. The main contribution of the integrated model is that it simulates the dynamic exchange of sediment between aeolian and hydrodynamic models in the intertidal area. By integrating the numerical models, we hope to develop a model that has a broader scope and applicability than

  2. 1D-3D hybrid modeling-from multi-compartment models to full resolution models in space and time.

    PubMed

    Grein, Stephan; Stepniewski, Martin; Reiter, Sebastian; Knodel, Markus M; Queisser, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of cellular and network dynamics in the brain by means of modeling and simulation has evolved into a highly interdisciplinary field, that uses sophisticated modeling and simulation approaches to understand distinct areas of brain function. Depending on the underlying complexity, these models vary in their level of detail, in order to cope with the attached computational cost. Hence for large network simulations, single neurons are typically reduced to time-dependent signal processors, dismissing the spatial aspect of each cell. For single cell or networks with relatively small numbers of neurons, general purpose simulators allow for space and time-dependent simulations of electrical signal processing, based on the cable equation theory. An emerging field in Computational Neuroscience encompasses a new level of detail by incorporating the full three-dimensional morphology of cells and organelles into three-dimensional, space and time-dependent, simulations. While every approach has its advantages and limitations, such as computational cost, integrated and methods-spanning simulation approaches, depending on the network size could establish new ways to investigate the brain. In this paper we present a hybrid simulation approach, that makes use of reduced 1D-models using e.g., the NEURON simulator-which couples to fully resolved models for simulating cellular and sub-cellular dynamics, including the detailed three-dimensional morphology of neurons and organelles. In order to couple 1D- and 3D-simulations, we present a geometry-, membrane potential- and intracellular concentration mapping framework, with which graph- based morphologies, e.g., in the swc- or hoc-format, are mapped to full surface and volume representations of the neuron and computational data from 1D-simulations can be used as boundary conditions for full 3D simulations and vice versa. Thus, established models and data, based on general purpose 1D-simulators, can be directly coupled to the

  3. Quantum Nucleation of Phase Slips in a 1D Model of a Superfluid

    SciTech Connect

    Freire, J.A.; Arovas, D.P.; Levine, H.

    1997-12-01

    We use a 1D model of a superfluid based on the Gross-Pitaevskii Lagrangian to illustrate a general numerical method designed to find quantum tunneling rates in extended bosonic systems. Specifically, we study flow past an obstacle and directly solve the imaginary time dynamics to find the {open_quotes}bounce{close_quotes} solution connected with the decay of the metastable laminar state via phase slip nucleation. The action for the tunneling configuration goes to zero at the threshold (in superfluid velocity) for classical production of these slips. Applications to other processes are briefly discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Simulations of Edge Effect in 1D Spin Crossover Compounds by Atom-Phonon Coupling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, J.; Chiruta, D.; Jureschi, C. M.; Alayli, Y.; Turcu, C. O.; Dahoo, P. R.

    2016-08-01

    We used the atom-phonon coupling model to explain and illustrate the behaviour of a linear nano-chain of molecules. The analysis of the system's behaviour was performed using Free Energy method, and by applying Monte Carlo Metropolis (MCM) method which take into account the phonon contribution. In particular we tested both the MCM algorithm and the dynamic-matrix method and we expose how the thermal behaviour of a 1D spin crossover system varies as a function of different factors. Furthermore we blocked the edge atoms of the chain in its high spin state to study the effect on the system's behaviour.

  5. Optimal modeling of 1D azimuth correlations in the context of Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Kock, Michiel B.; Eggers, Hans C.; Trainor, Thomas A.

    2015-09-01

    Analysis and interpretation of spectrum and correlation data from high-energy nuclear collisions is currently controversial because two opposing physics narratives derive contradictory implications from the same data, one narrative claiming collision dynamics is dominated by dijet production and projectile-nucleon fragmentation, the other claiming collision dynamics is dominated by a dense, flowing QCD medium. Opposing interpretations seem to be supported by alternative data models, and current model-comparison schemes are unable to distinguish between them. There is clearly need for a convincing new methodology to break the deadlock. In this study we introduce Bayesian inference (BI) methods applied to angular correlation data as a basis to evaluate competing data models. For simplicity the data considered are projections of two-dimensional (2D) angular correlations onto a 1D azimuth from three centrality classes of 200-GeV Au-Au collisions. We consider several data models typical of current model choices, including Fourier series (FS) and a Gaussian plus various combinations of individual cosine components. We evaluate model performance with BI methods and with power-spectrum analysis. We find that FS-only models are rejected in all cases by Bayesian analysis, which always prefers a Gaussian. A cylindrical quadrupole cos(2 ϕ ) is required in some cases but rejected for 0%-5%-central Au-Au collisions. Given a Gaussian centered at the azimuth origin, "higher harmonics" cos(m ϕ ) for m >2 are rejected. A model consisting of Gaussian +dipole cos(ϕ )+quadrupole cos(2 ϕ ) provides good 1D data descriptions in all cases.

  6. General relativistic hydrodynamics with Adaptive-Mesh Refinement (AMR) and modeling of accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Orhan

    We present a general procedure to solve the General Relativistic Hydrodynamical (GRH) equations with Adaptive-Mesh Refinement (AMR) and model of an accretion disk around a black hole. To do this, the GRH equations are written in a conservative form to exploit their hyperbolic character. The numerical solutions of the general relativistic hydrodynamic equations is done by High Resolution Shock Capturing schemes (HRSC), specifically designed to solve non-linear hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. These schemes depend on the characteristic information of the system. We use Marquina fluxes with MUSCL left and right states to solve GRH equations. First, we carry out different test problems with uniform and AMR grids on the special relativistic hydrodynamics equations to verify the second order convergence of the code in 1D, 2 D and 3D. Second, we solve the GRH equations and use the general relativistic test problems to compare the numerical solutions with analytic ones. In order to this, we couple the flux part of general relativistic hydrodynamic equation with a source part using Strang splitting. The coupling of the GRH equations is carried out in a treatment which gives second order accurate solutions in space and time. The test problems examined include shock tubes, geodesic flows, and circular motion of particle around the black hole. Finally, we apply this code to the accretion disk problems around the black hole using the Schwarzschild metric at the background of the computational domain. We find spiral shocks on the accretion disk. They are observationally expected results. We also examine the star-disk interaction near a massive black hole. We find that when stars are grounded down or a hole is punched on the accretion disk, they create shock waves which destroy the accretion disk.

  7. Modelling the mechanics and hydrodynamics of swimming E. coli.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinglei; Yang, Mingcheng; Gompper, Gerhard; Winkler, Roland G

    2015-10-28

    The swimming properties of an E. coli-type model bacterium are investigated by mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations, combining molecular dynamics simulations of the bacterium with the multiparticle particle collision dynamics method for the embedding fluid. The bacterium is composed of a spherocylindrical body with attached helical flagella, built up from discrete particles for an efficient coupling with the fluid. We measure the hydrodynamic friction coefficients of the bacterium and find quantitative agreement with experimental results of swimming E. coli. The flow field of the bacterium shows a force-dipole-like pattern in the swimming plane and two vortices perpendicular to its swimming direction arising from counterrotation of the cell body and the flagella. By comparison with the flow field of a force dipole and rotlet dipole, we extract the force-dipole and rotlet-dipole strengths for the bacterium and find that counterrotation of the cell body and the flagella is essential for describing the near-field hydrodynamics of the bacterium.

  8. Assimilation of CryoSat-2 altimetry to a hydrodynamic model of the Brahmaputra river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Raphael; Nygaard Godiksen, Peter; Ridler, Marc-Etienne; Madsen, Henrik; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing provides valuable data for parameterization and updating of hydrological models, for example water level measurements of inland water bodies from satellite radar altimeters. Satellite altimetry data from repeat-orbit missions such as Envisat, ERS or Jason has been used in many studies, also synthetic wide-swath altimetry data as expected from the SWOT mission. This study is one of the first hydrologic applications of altimetry data from a drifting orbit satellite mission, namely CryoSat-2. CryoSat-2 is equipped with the SIRAL instrument, a new type of radar altimeter similar to SRAL on Sentinel-3. CryoSat-2 SARIn level 2 data is used to improve a 1D hydrodynamic model of the Brahmaputra river basin in South Asia set up in the DHI MIKE 11 software. CryoSat-2 water levels were extracted over river masks derived from Landsat imagery. After discharge calibration, simulated water levels were fitted to the CryoSat-2 data along the Assam valley by adapting cross section shapes and datums. The resulting hydrodynamic model shows accurate spatio-temporal representation of water levels, which is a prerequisite for real-time model updating by assimilation of CryoSat-2 altimetry or multi-mission data in general. For this task, a data assimilation framework has been developed and linked with the MIKE 11 model. It is a flexible framework that can assimilate water level data which are arbitrarily distributed in time and space. Different types of error models, data assimilation methods, etc. can easily be used and tested. Furthermore, it is not only possible to update the water level of the hydrodynamic model, but also the states of the rainfall-runoff models providing the forcing of the hydrodynamic model. The setup has been used to assimilate CryoSat-2 observations over the Assam valley for the years 2010 to 2013. Different data assimilation methods and localizations were tested, together with different model error representations. Furthermore, the impact of

  9. Use of hydrologic and hydrodynamic modeling for ecosystem restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obeysekera, J.; Kuebler, L.; Ahmed, S.; Chang, M.-L.; Engel, V.; Langevin, C.; Swain, E.; Wan, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Planning and implementation of unprecedented projects for restoring the greater Everglades ecosystem are underway and the hydrologic and hydrodynamic modeling of restoration alternatives has become essential for success of restoration efforts. In view of the complex nature of the South Florida water resources system, regional-scale (system-wide) hydrologic models have been developed and used extensively for the development of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. In addition, numerous subregional-scale hydrologic and hydrodynamic models have been developed and are being used for evaluating project-scale water management plans associated with urban, agricultural, and inland costal ecosystems. The authors provide a comprehensive summary of models of all scales, as well as the next generation models under development to meet the future needs of ecosystem restoration efforts in South Florida. The multiagency efforts to develop and apply models have allowed the agencies to understand the complex hydrologic interactions, quantify appropriate performance measures, and use new technologies in simulation algorithms, software development, and GIS/database techniques to meet the future modeling needs of the ecosystem restoration programs. Copyright ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  10. Multiscale Modeling Techniques for Plasma: 1D Scaling Results and Application to Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, Michael; Drake, J.

    2005-10-01

    We examine a novel simulation scheme called ``equation free projective integration'' which has the potential to allow global simulations which still include microscale physics, a necessary ingredient in order to model multiscale problems. Such codes could be used to examine the global effects of reconnection and turbulence in tokamaks, the Earth's magnetosphere, and the solar corona. Using this method to simulate the propagation and steepening of a 1D ion acoustic wave, we have already achieved excellent agreement between full particle codes and equation free with a factor of 20 speed-up. In this method of simulation, the global plasma variables stepped forward in time are not time-integrated directly using dynamical differential equations, hence the name ``equation free.'' Instead, these variables are represented on a microgrid using a kinetic simulation. This microsimulation is integrated forward long enough to determine the time derivatives of the global plasma variables, which are then used to integrate forward the global variables with much larger timesteps. Results will be presented of the successful application of equation free to 1-D ion acoustic wave steepening with a PIC code serving as the underlying kinetic model. Initial results of this technique applied to magnetic reconnection will also be discussed.

  11. Hydrodynamic model for particle size segregation in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Leonardo; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2003-12-01

    We present a hydrodynamic theoretical model for “Brazil nut” size segregation in granular materials. We give analytical solutions for the rise velocity of a large intruder particle immersed in a medium of monodisperse fluidized small particles. We propose a new mechanism for this particle size-segregation due to buoyant forces caused by density variations which come from differences in the local “granular temperature”. The mobility of the particles is modified by the energy dissipation due to inelastic collisions and this leads to a different behavior from what one would expect for an elastic system. Using our model we can explain the size ratio dependence of the upward velocity.

  12. Modeling electrokinetic flows by consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wenxiao; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Parks, Michael L.

    2017-04-01

    We present a consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics (I2SPH) discretization of Navier-Stokes, Poisson-Boltzmann, and advection-diffusion equations subject to Dirichlet or Robin boundary conditions. It is applied to model various two and three dimensional electrokinetic flows in simple or complex geometries. The accuracy and convergence of the consistent I2SPH are examined via comparison with analytical solutions, grid-based numerical solutions, or empirical models. The new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in microfluidics and complex fluids with charged objects, such as colloids and biomolecules, in arbitrary complex geometries.

  13. Modeling electrokinetic flows by consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Wenxiao; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; ...

    2017-01-03

    In this paper, we present a consistent implicit incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics (I2SPH) discretization of Navier–Stokes, Poisson–Boltzmann, and advection–diffusion equations subject to Dirichlet or Robin boundary conditions. It is applied to model various two and three dimensional electrokinetic flows in simple or complex geometries. The accuracy and convergence of the consistent I2SPH are examined via comparison with analytical solutions, grid-based numerical solutions, or empirical models. Lastly, the new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in microfluidics and complex fluids with charged objects, such as colloids and biomolecules, in arbitrary complex geometries.

  14. Models of Jupiter's Growth Incorporating Thermal and Hydrodynamics Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, G.; Lissauer, J. J.; Hubickyj, O.; Bodenheimer, P.

    2008-12-01

    We have modeled the growth of Jupiter incorporating both thermal and hydrodynamical constraints on its accretion of gas from the circumsolar disk. We have used a planetary formation code, based on a Henyey- type stellar evolution code, to compute the planet's internal structure and a three-dimensional hydrodynamics code to calculate the planet's interactions with the protoplanetary disk. Our principal results are: (1) Three dimensional hydrodynamics calculations show that the flow of gas in the circumsolar disk limits the region occupied by the planet's tenuous gaseous envelope to within about 0.25 Rh (Hill sphere radii) of the planet's center, which is much smaller than the value of ~ 1 Rh that was assumed in previous studies. (2) This smaller size of the planet's envelope increases the planet's accretion time, but only by 5-- 10%. In general, in agreement with previous results of Hubickyj et al. [Hubickyj, O., Bodenheimer, P., Lissauer, J.J., 2005. Icarus, 179, 415-431], Jupiter formation times are in the range 2.5--3 Myr, assuming a protoplanetary disk with solid surface density of 10 g/cm2 and dust opacity in the protoplanet's envelope equal to 2% that of interstellar material. Thermal pressure limits the rate at which a planet less than a few dozen times as massive as Earth can accumulate gas from the protoplanetary disk, whereas hydrodynamics regulates the growth rate for more massive planets. (3) In a protoplanetary disk whose alpha-viscosity parameter is ~ 0.004, giant planets will grow to several times the mass of Jupiter unless the disk has a small local surface density when the planet begins to accrete gas hydrodynamically, or the disk is dispersed very soon thereafter. The large number of planets known with masses near Jupiter's compared with the smaller number of substantially more massive planets is more naturally explained by planetary growth within circumstellar disks whose alpha-viscosity parameter is ~ 0.0004. (4) Capture of Jupiter's irregular

  15. Anticipating the Role of SWOT in Hydrologic and Hydrodynamic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelsky, T.; Biancamaria, S.; Andreadis, K.; Durand, M. T.; Schumann, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission is a joint project of NASA and CNES, the French space agency. It aims to provide the first simultaneous, space-based measurements of inundation extent and water surface elevation in rivers, lakes, and wetlands around the world. Although the orbit repeat time is approximately 21 days, many areas of the earth will be viewed multiple times during this window. SWOT will observe rivers as narrow as 50-100 m and lakes as small as 0.01-0.06 km2, with height accuracies of ~10 cm for water bodies 1 km2 in area. Because SWOT will measure temporal variations in the height, width, and slope of rivers, several algorithms have been developed to estimate river discharge solely from SWOT measurements. Additionally, measurements of lake height and area will allow estimation of variability in lake water storage. These new hydrologic measurements will provide important sources of information both hydrologic and hydrodynamic models at regional to global scales. SWOT-derived estimates of water storage change and discharge will help to constrain simulation of the water budget in hydrologic models. Measurements of water surface elevation will provide similar constraints on hydrodynamic models of river flow. SWOT data will be useful for model calibration and validation, but perhaps the most exciting applications involve assimilation of SWOT data into models to enhance model robustness and provide denser temporal sampling than available from SWOT observations alone.

  16. 1D finite volume model of unsteady flow over mobile bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiyan; Duan, Jennifer G.

    2011-07-01

    SummaryA one dimensional (1D) finite volume method (FVM) model was developed for simulating unsteady flow, such as dam break flow, and flood routing over mobile alluvium. The governing equation is the modified 1D shallow water equation and the Exner equation that take both bed load and suspended load transport into account. The non-equilibrium sediment transport algorithm was adopted in the model, and the van Rijn method was employed to calculate the bed-load transport rate and the concentration of suspended sediment at the reference level. Flux terms in the governing equations were discretised using the upwind flux scheme, Harten et al. (1983) (HLL) and HLLC schemes, Roe's scheme and the Weighted Average Flux (WAF) schemes with the Double Minmod and Minmod flux limiters. The model was tested under a fixed bed condition to evaluate the performance of several different numerical schemes and then applied to an experimental case of dam break flow over a mobile bed and a flood event in the Rillito River, Tucson, Arizona. For dam break flow over movable bed, all tested schemes were proved to be capable of reasonably simulating water surface profiles, but failed to accurately capture the hydraulic jump. The WAF schemes produced slight spurious oscillations at the water surface and bed profiles and over-estimated the scour depth. When applying the model to the Rillito River, the simulated results generally agreed well with the field measurements of flow discharges and bed elevation changes. Modeling results of bed elevation changes were sensitive to the suspended load recovery coefficient and the bed load adaptation length, which require further theoretical and experimental investigations.

  17. Stability of Blowup for a 1D Model of Axisymmetric 3D Euler Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tam; Kiselev, Alexander; Xu, Xiaoqian

    2016-10-01

    The question of the global regularity versus finite- time blowup in solutions of the 3D incompressible Euler equation is a major open problem of modern applied analysis. In this paper, we study a class of one-dimensional models of the axisymmetric hyperbolic boundary blow-up scenario for the 3D Euler equation proposed by Hou and Luo (Multiscale Model Simul 12:1722-1776, 2014) based on extensive numerical simulations. These models generalize the 1D Hou-Luo model suggested in Hou and Luo Luo and Hou (2014), for which finite-time blowup has been established in Choi et al. (arXiv preprint. arXiv:1407.4776, 2014). The main new aspects of this work are twofold. First, we establish finite-time blowup for a model that is a closer approximation of the three-dimensional case than the original Hou-Luo model, in the sense that it contains relevant lower-order terms in the Biot-Savart law that have been discarded in Hou and Luo Choi et al. (2014). Secondly, we show that the blow-up mechanism is quite robust, by considering a broader family of models with the same main term as in the Hou-Luo model. Such blow-up stability result may be useful in further work on understanding the 3D hyperbolic blow-up scenario.

  18. GE SBWR stability analysis using TRAC-BF1 1-D kinetics model

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.; Baratta, A.J.; Robinson, G.E.

    1996-07-01

    GE`s simplified boiling water reactor, with its unique feature of using natural circulation to remove the heat from the reactor core, is a complicated dynamic system. Previous work by authors using the TRAC-BF1 code and a point kinetics model predicted that an SBWR may experience large amplitude power oscillation under certain low pressure and high power operating conditions. To further confirm the existence of this power oscillation and explore the dynamic spatial reactor power distribution, the TRAC-BF1 1-D kinetics model was used. The results show that an instability exists and the power oscillation starting time and maximum peak power are different from the point kinetics results.

  19. Fluid friction and wall viscosity of the 1D blood flow model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Nishi, Shohei; Matsukawa, Mami; Ghigo, Arthur; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Fullana, Jose-Maria

    2016-02-29

    We study the behavior of the pulse waves of water into a flexible tube for application to blood flow simulations. In pulse waves both fluid friction and wall viscosity are damping factors, and difficult to evaluate separately. In this paper, the coefficients of fluid friction and wall viscosity are estimated by fitting a nonlinear 1D flow model to experimental data. In the experimental setup, a distensible tube is connected to a piston pump at one end and closed at another end. The pressure and wall displacements are measured simultaneously. A good agreement between model predictions and experiments was achieved. For amplitude decrease, the effect of wall viscosity on the pulse wave has been shown as important as that of fluid viscosity.

  20. One-electron singular spectral features of the 1D Hubbard model at finite magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Čadež, T.

    2017-01-01

    The momentum, electronic density, spin density, and interaction dependences of the exponents that control the (k , ω)-plane singular features of the σ = ↑ , ↓ one-electron spectral functions of the 1D Hubbard model at finite magnetic field are studied. The usual half-filling concepts of one-electron lower Hubbard band and upper Hubbard band are defined in terms of the rotated electrons associated with the model Bethe-ansatz solution for all electronic density and spin density values and the whole finite repulsion range. Such rotated electrons are the link of the non-perturbative relation between the electrons and the pseudofermions. Our results further clarify the microscopic processes through which the pseudofermion dynamical theory accounts for the one-electron matrix elements between the ground state and excited energy eigenstates.

  1. Minimum 1-D P-wave velocity reference model for Northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeifar, Meysam; Diehl, Tobias; Kissling, Edi

    2016-04-01

    Uniform high-precision earthquake location is of importance in a seismically active area like northern Iran where the earthquake catalogue is a prerequisite for seismic hazard assessment and tectonic interpretation. We compile a complete and consistent local earthquake data set for the northern Iran region, using information from two independently operating seismological networks, Iran Seismological Center (IRSC) network, administered by the Geophysical Institute of Tehran University, and Iran Broadband network administered by International Institute of Engineering Earthquake and Seismology (IIEES). Special care is taken during the merging process to reduce the number of errors in the data, including station parameters, event pairing, phase identification, and to the assessment of quantitative observation uncertainties. The derived P-wave 1D-velocity model for Northern Iran may serve for consistent routine high-precision earthquake location and as initial reference model for 3D seismic tomography.

  2. Validation of a Global Hydrodynamic Flood Inundation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, P. D.; Smith, A.; Sampson, C. C.; Alfieri, L.; Neal, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we present first validation results for a hyper-resolution global flood inundation model. We use a true hydrodynamic model (LISFLOOD-FP) to simulate flood inundation at 1km resolution globally and then use downscaling algorithms to determine flood extent and depth at 90m spatial resolution. Terrain data are taken from a custom version of the SRTM data set that has been processed specifically for hydrodynamic modelling. Return periods of flood flows along the entire global river network are determined using: (1) empirical relationships between catchment characteristics and index flood magnitude in different hydroclimatic zones derived from global runoff data; and (2) an index flood growth curve, also empirically derived. Bankful return period flow is then used to set channel width and depth, and flood defence impacts are modelled using empirical relationships between GDP, urbanization and defence standard of protection. The results of these simulations are global flood hazard maps for a number of different return period events from 1 in 5 to 1 in 1000 years. We compare these predictions to flood hazard maps developed by national government agencies in the UK and Germany using similar methods but employing detailed local data, and to observed flood extent at a number of sites including St. Louis, USA and Bangkok in Thailand. Results show that global flood hazard models can have considerable skill given careful treatment to overcome errors in the publicly available data that are used as their input.

  3. Nanoelectronic Modeling (NEMO): Moving from commercial grade 1-D simulation to prototype 3-D simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard

    2001-03-01

    The quantum mechanical functionality of commercially pursued heterostructure devices such as resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs), quantum well infrared photodetectors, and quantum well lasers are enabled by material variations on an atomic scale. The creation of these heterostructure devices is realized in a vast design space of material compositions, layer thicknesses and doping profiles. The full experimental exploration of this design space is unfeasible and a reliable design tool is needed. The Nanoelectronic Modeling tool (NEMO) is one of the first commercial grade attempts for such a modeling tool. NEMO was developed as a general-purpose quantum mechanics-based 1-D device design and analysis tool from 1993-97 by the Central Research Laboratory of Texas Instruments (later Raytheon Systems). NEMO enables(R. Lake, G. Klimeck, R. C. Bowen, and D. Jovanovic, J. Appl. Phys. 81), 7845 (1997). the fundamentally sound inclusion of the required(G. Klimeck et al.), in the 1997 55th Annual Device Research Conference Digest, (IEEE, NJ, 1997), p. 92^,(R. C. Bowen et al.), J. Appl. Phys 81, 3207 (1997). physics: bandstructure, scattering, and charge self-consistency based on the non-equilibrium Green function approach. A new class of devices which require full 3-D quantum mechanics based models is starting to emerge: quantum dots, or in general semiconductor based deca-nano devices. We are currently building a 3-D modeling tool based on NEMO to include the important physics to understand electronic stated in such superscaled structures. This presentation will overview various facets of the NEMO 1-D tool such electron transport physics in RTDs, numerical technology, software engineering and graphical user interface. The lessons learned from that work are now entering the NEMO 3-D development and first results using the NEMO 3-D prototype will be shown. More information about

  4. A world-line framework for 1D topological conformal σ-models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baulieu, L.; Holanda, N. L.; Toppan, F.

    2015-11-01

    We use world-line methods for pseudo-supersymmetry to construct sl(2|1)-invariant actions for the (2, 2, 0) chiral and (1, 2, 1) real supermultiplets of the twisted D-module representations of the sl(2|1) superalgebra. The derived one-dimensional topological conformal σ-models are invariant under nilpotent operators. The actions are constructed for both parabolic and hyperbolic/trigonometric realizations (with extra potential terms in the latter case). The scaling dimension λ of the supermultiplets defines a coupling constant, 2λ + 1, the free theories being recovered at λ = - /1 2 . We also present, generalizing previous works, the D-module representations of one-dimensional superconformal algebras induced by N = ( p , q ) pseudo-supersymmetry acting on (k, n, n - k) supermultiplets. Besides sl(2|1), we obtain the superalgebras A(1, 1), D(2, 1; α), D(3, 1), D(4, 1), A(2, 1) from (p, q) = (1, 1), (2, 2), (3, 3), (4, 4), (5, 1), at given k, n and critical values of λ.

  5. Explicit 3D continuum fracture modeling with smooth particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, W.; Asphaug, E.

    1993-01-01

    Impact phenomena shaped our solar system. As usual for most solar system processes, the scales are far different than we can address directly in the laboratory. Impact velocities are often much higher than we can achieve, sizes are often vastly larger, and most impacts take place in an environment where the only gravitational force is the mutual pull of the impactors. The Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique has been applied in the past to the simulations of giant impacts. In these simulations, the colliding objects were so massive (at least a sizeable fraction of the Earth's mass) that material strength was negligible compared to gravity. This assumption can no longer be made when the bodies are much smaller. To this end, we have developed a 3D SPH code that includes a strength model to which we have added a von Mises yielding relation for stresses beyond the Hugoniot Elastic Limit. At the lower stresses associated with brittle failure, we use a rate-dependent strength based on the nucleation of incipient flaws whose number density is given by a Weibull distribution. Following Grady and Kipp and Melosh et al., we introduce a state variable D ('damage'), 0 less than D less than 1, which expresses the local reduction in strength due to crack growth under tensile loading. Unfortunately for the hydrodynamics, Grady and Kipp's model predicts which fragments are the most probable ones and not the ones that are really formed. This means, for example, that if a given laboratory experiment is modeled, the fragment distribution obtained from the Grady-Kipp theory would be equivalent to a ensemble average over many realizations of the experiment. On the other hand, the hydrodynamics itself is explicit and evolves not an ensemble average but very specific fragments. Hence, there is a clear incompatibility with the deterministic nature of the hydrodynamics equations and the statistical approach of the Grady-Kipp dynamical fracture model. We remedy these shortcomings

  6. Hydrodynamic and Ecological Assessment of Nearshore Restoration: A Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Thom, Ronald M.; Fuller, Roger

    2010-04-10

    Along the Pacific Northwest coast, much of the estuarine habitat has been diked over the last century for agricultural land use, residential and commercial development, and transportation corridors. As a result, many of the ecological processes and functions have been disrupted. To protect coastal habitats that are vital to aquatic species, many restoration projects are currently underway to restore the estuarine and coastal ecosystems through dike breaches, setbacks, and removals. Information on physical processes and hydrodynamic conditions are critical for the assessment of the success of restoration actions. Restoration of a 160- acre property at the mouth of the Stillaguamish River in Puget Sound has been proposed. The goal is to restore native tidal habitats and estuary-scale ecological processes by removing the dike. In this study, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was developed for the Stillaguamish River estuary to simulate estuarine processes. The model was calibrated to observed tide, current, and salinity data for existing conditions and applied to simulate the hydrodynamic responses to two restoration alternatives. Responses were evaluated at the scale of the restoration footprint. Model data was combined with biophysical data to predict habitat responses at the site. Results showed that the proposed dike removal would result in desired tidal flushing and conditions that would support four habitat types on the restoration footprint. At the estuary scale, restoration would substantially increase the proportion of area flushed with freshwater (< 5 ppt) at flood tide. Potential implications of predicted changes in salinity and flow dynamics are discussed relative to the distribution of tidal marsh habitat.

  7. Hydrodynamic description of spin Calogero-Sutherland model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abanov, Alexander; Kulkarni, Manas; Franchini, Fabio

    2009-03-01

    We study a non-linear collective field theory for an integrable spin-Calogero-Sutherland model. The hydrodynamic description of this SU(2) model in terms of charge density, charge velocity and spin currents is used to study non-perturbative solutions (solitons) and examine their correspondence with known quantum numbers of elementary excitations [1]. A conventional linear bosonization or harmonic approximation is not sufficient to describe, for example, the physics of spin-charge (non)separation. Therefore, we need this new collective bosonic field description that captures the effects of the band curvature. In the strong coupling limit [2] this model reduces to integrable SU(2) Haldane-Shastry model. We study a non-linear coupling of left and right spin currents which form a Kac-Moody algebra. Our quantum hydrodynamic description for the spin case is an extension for the one found in the spinless version in [3].[3pt] [1] Y. Kato,T. Yamamoto, and M. Arikawa, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 66, 1954-1961 (1997).[0pt] [2] A. Polychronakos, Phys Rev Lett. 70,2329-2331(1993).[0pt] [3] A.G.Abanov and P.B. Wiegmann, Phys Rev Lett 95, 076402(2005)

  8. Dynamic mesoscale model of dipolar fluids via fluctuating hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, Rasmus A. X.; Chu, Jhih-Wei; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K.

    2014-11-07

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) is a general framework of mesoscopic modeling and simulation based on conservational laws and constitutive equations of linear and nonlinear responses. However, explicit representation of electrical forces in FHD has yet to appear. In this work, we devised an Ansatz for the dynamics of dipole moment densities that is linked with the Poisson equation of the electrical potential ϕ in coupling to the other equations of FHD. The resulting ϕ-FHD equations then serve as a platform for integrating the essential forces, including electrostatics in addition to hydrodynamics, pressure-volume equation of state, surface tension, and solvent-particle interactions that govern the emergent behaviors of molecular systems at an intermediate scale. This unique merit of ϕ-FHD is illustrated by showing that the water dielectric function and ion hydration free energies in homogeneous and heterogenous systems can be captured accurately via the mesoscopic simulation. Furthermore, we show that the field variables of ϕ-FHD can be mapped from the trajectory of an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation such that model development and parametrization can be based on the information obtained at a finer-grained scale. With the aforementioned multiscale capabilities and a spatial resolution as high as 5 Å, the ϕ-FHD equations represent a useful semi-explicit solvent model for the modeling and simulation of complex systems, such as biomolecular machines and nanofluidics.

  9. Dynamic mesoscale model of dipolar fluids via fluctuating hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Persson, Rasmus A X; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2014-11-07

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) is a general framework of mesoscopic modeling and simulation based on conservational laws and constitutive equations of linear and nonlinear responses. However, explicit representation of electrical forces in FHD has yet to appear. In this work, we devised an Ansatz for the dynamics of dipole moment densities that is linked with the Poisson equation of the electrical potential ϕ in coupling to the other equations of FHD. The resulting ϕ-FHD equations then serve as a platform for integrating the essential forces, including electrostatics in addition to hydrodynamics, pressure-volume equation of state, surface tension, and solvent-particle interactions that govern the emergent behaviors of molecular systems at an intermediate scale. This unique merit of ϕ-FHD is illustrated by showing that the water dielectric function and ion hydration free energies in homogeneous and heterogenous systems can be captured accurately via the mesoscopic simulation. Furthermore, we show that the field variables of ϕ-FHD can be mapped from the trajectory of an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation such that model development and parametrization can be based on the information obtained at a finer-grained scale. With the aforementioned multiscale capabilities and a spatial resolution as high as 5 Å, the ϕ-FHD equations represent a useful semi-explicit solvent model for the modeling and simulation of complex systems, such as biomolecular machines and nanofluidics.

  10. Study of hydrodynamic instabilities with a multiphase lattice Boltzmann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Ali Mauricio; Muñoz, José Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz hydrodynamic instabilities are frequent in many natural and industrial processes, but their numerical simulation is not an easy challenge. This work simulates both instabilities by using a lattice Boltzmann model on multiphase fluids at a liquid-vapour interface, instead of multicomponent systems like the oil-water one. The model, proposed by He, Chen and Zhang (1999) [1] was modified to increase the precision by computing the pressure gradients with a higher order, as proposed by McCracken and Abraham (2005) [2]. The resulting model correctly simulates both instabilities by using almost the same parameter set. It also reproduces the relation γ ∝√{ A} between the growing rate γ of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the relative density difference between the fluids (known as the Atwood number A), but including also deviations observed in experiments at low density differences. The results show that the implemented model is a useful tool for the study of hydrodynamic instabilities, drawing a sharp interface and exhibiting numerical stability for moderately high Reynolds numbers.

  11. Full Waveform 3D Synthetic Seismic Algorithm for 1D Layered Anelastic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaiger, H. F.; Aldridge, D. F.; Haney, M. M.

    2007-12-01

    Numerical calculation of synthetic seismograms for 1D layered earth models remains a significant aspect of amplitude-offset investigations, surface wave studies, microseismic event location approaches, and reflection interpretation or inversion processes. Compared to 3D finite-difference algorithms, memory demand and execution time are greatly reduced, enabling rapid generation of seismic data within workstation or laptop computational environments. We have developed a frequency-wavenumber forward modeling algorithm adapted to realistic 1D geologic media, for the purpose of calculating seismograms accurately and efficiently. The earth model consists of N layers bounded by two halfspaces. Each layer/halfspace is a homogeneous and isotropic anelastic (attenuative and dispersive) solid, characterized by a rectangular relaxation spectrum of absorption mechanisms. Compressional and shear phase speeds and quality factors are specified at a particular reference frequency. Solution methodology involves 3D Fourier transforming the three coupled, second- order, integro-differential equations for particle displacements to the frequency-horizontal wavenumber domain. An analytic solution of the resulting ordinary differential system is obtained. Imposition of welded interface conditions (continuity of displacement and stress) at all interfaces, as well as radiation conditions in the two halfspaces, yields a system of 6(N+1) linear algebraic equations for the coefficients in the ODE solution. An optimized inverse 2D Fourier transform to the space domain gives the seismic wavefield on a horizontal plane. Finally, three-component seismograms are obtained by accumulating frequency spectra at designated receiver positions on this plane, followed by a 1D inverse FFT from angular frequency ω to time. Stress-free conditions may be applied at the top or bottom interfaces, and seismic waves are initiated by force or moment density sources. Examples reveal that including attenuation

  12. Mesoscale modeling of molecular machines: cyclic dynamics and hydrodynamical fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Cressman, Andrew; Togashi, Yuichi; Mikhailov, Alexander S; Kapral, Raymond

    2008-05-01

    Proteins acting as molecular machines can undergo cyclic internal conformational motions that are coupled to ligand binding and dissociation events. In contrast to their macroscopic counterparts, nanomachines operate in a highly fluctuating environment, which influences their operation. To bridge the gap between detailed microscopic and simple phenomenological descriptions, a mesoscale approach, which combines an elastic network model of a machine with a particle-based mesoscale description of the solvent, is employed. The time scale of the cyclic hinge motions of the machine prototype is strongly affected by hydrodynamical coupling to the solvent.

  13. Delayed-feedback control in a Lattice hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redhu, Poonam; Gupta, Arvind Kumar

    2015-10-01

    The delayed-feedback control (DFC) method for lattice hydrodynamic traffic flow model is investigated on a unidirectional road. By using the Hurwitz criteria and the condition for transfer function in term of H∞ -norm, we designed the feedback gain and delay time to stabilize the traffic flow and suppress the traffic jam. The Bode-plot of transfer function have been plotted and discussed that the stability region enhances with delayed-feedback control. It is shown that the delayed-feedback control method stabilizes the traffic flow and suppresses the traffic jam efficiently. The simulation results are in good agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  14. 1D numerical model of muddy subaqueous and subaerial debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Imran, J.; Parker, G.; Locat, J.; Lee, H.

    2001-01-01

    A 1D numerical model of the downslope flow and deposition of muddy subaerial and subaqueous debris flows is presented. The model incorporates the Herschel-Bulkley and bilinear rheologies of viscoplastic fluid. The more familiar Bingham model is integrated into the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model. The conservation equations of mass and momentum of single-phase laminar debris flow are layer-integrated using the slender flow approximation. They are then expressed in a Lagrangian framework and solved numerically using an explicit finite difference scheme. Starting from a given initial shape, a debris flow is allowed to collapse and propagate over a specified topography. Comparison between the model predictions and laboratory experiments shows reasonable agreement. The model is used to study the effect of the ambient fluid density, initial shape of the failed mass, and rheological model on the simulated propagation of the front and runout characteristics of muddy debris flows. It is found that initial failure shape influence the front velocity but has little bearing on the final deposit shape. In the Bingham model, the excess of shear stress above the yield strength is proportional to the strain rate to the first power. This exponent is free to vary in the Herschel-Bulkley model. When it is set at a value lower than unity, the resulting final deposits are thicker and shorter than in the case of the Bingham rheology. The final deposit resulting from the bilinear model is longer and thinner than that from the Bingham model due to the fact that the debris flow is allowed to act as a Newtonian fluid at low shear rate in the bilinear model.

  15. Radiation Hydrodynamical Models for Type I Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Sorokina, Elena; Blinnikov, Sergei; Tolstov, Alexey; Bersten, Melina; Quimby, Robert

    The physical origin of Type I superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I), whose luminosities are 10 to 100 times brighter than normal core-collapse supernovae, remains still unknown. Radioactive-decays, magnetars, and circumstellar interactions have been proposed for the power source the light curves, although no definitive conclusions have been reached yet. Since most of light curve studies have been based on simplified semi-analytic models, we have constructed detailed light curve models for various mass of stars including very massive ones and large amount of mass loss with radiation hydrodynamical calculations. Here we focus on the magnetar and circumstellar interaction models and compare their rising time, peak luminosity, width, decline rate of the light curves with observations which show quite a large diversities. We then discuss how to discriminate these models, relevant models parameters, their evolutionary origins, possible roles of chemical enrichment of the early universe, and implications for the identifications of first stars.

  16. Two dimensional hydrodynamic modeling of a high latitude braided river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, E.; Pavelsky, T.; Bates, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers are a fundamental resource to physical, ecologic and human systems, yet quantification of river flow in high-latitude environments remains limited due to the prevalence of complex morphologies, remote locations and sparse in situ monitoring equipment. Advances in hydrodynamic modeling and remote sensing technology allow us to address questions such as: How well can two-dimensional models simulate a flood wave in a highly 3-dimensional braided river environment, and how does the structure of such a flood wave differ from flow down a similar-sized single-channel river? Here, we use the raster-based hydrodynamic model LISFLOOD-FP to simulate flood waves, discharge, water surface height, and velocity measurements over a ~70 km reach of the Tanana River in Alaska. In order to use LISFLOOD-FP a digital elevation model (DEM) fused with detailed bathymetric data is required. During summer 2013, we surveyed 220,000 bathymetric points along the study reach using an echo sounder system connected to a high-precision GPS unit. The measurements are interpolated to a smooth bathymetric surface, using Topo to Raster interpolation, and combined with an existing five meter DEM (Alaska IfSAR) to create a seamless river terrain model. Flood waves are simulated using varying complexities in model solvers, then compared to gauge records and water logger data to assess major sources of model uncertainty. Velocity and flow direction maps are also assessed and quantified for detailed analysis of braided channel flow. The most accurate model output occurs with using the full two-dimensional model structure, and major inaccuracies appear to be related to DEM quality and roughness values. Future work will intercompare model outputs with extensive ground measurements and new data from AirSWOT, an airborne analog for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, which aims to provide high-resolution measurements of terrestrial and ocean water surface elevations globally.

  17. 2D Biotope Mapping Using Combined LIDAR, Topographic Survey And Segmented 1D Flow Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entwistle, N. S.; Heritage, G. L.; Milan, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    Reach averaged habitat availability models such as PHABSIM are limited due principally to their failure to adequately map hydraulic habitat distribution at a representative scale. A lack of morphologic data, represented in the form of sparse geometric cross-sections fails to generate the necessary detail. Advances in data collection, improved spatial modelling algorithms and the advent of cross-section based segmentation routines in 1D hydraulic models provides the opportunity to revisit the issue of hydraulic habitat mapping and modelling. This paper presents a combined technique for habitat characterisation at the sub-bar scale is presented for the River Rede, Northumberland, UK. Terrestrial LIDAR data of floodplain, banks and exposed bar surfaces at an average 0.05 m spacing are combined with sparser total station survey data of submerged morphologic features. These data are interpolated to create a uniform DEM grid at 0.2 m spacing (adequate to detect the smallest variation in hydraulic habitat in this system). The data grid were then imported into the HECRAS 1D hydraulic model to generate a 2 m spaced series of cross-sections along a 220 m sinuous single thread reach exhibiting pool - riffle point-bar morphology. The hydraulic segmentation routine then generated estimates of depth averaged flow velocity, flow depth and sub unit discharge for 40 sub-divisions of the flow width for a series of flows from 0.5 m3s-1 up to bankfull flow of approximately 9 m3s-1. The resultant hydraulic data were exported in the project coordinate system and plotted to reveal the 2D pattern of hydraulic biotopes present across the range of flows modelled. The results reveal broadly realistic patterns consistent with previous empirical studies and compare well with LIDAR based biotope maps. Analysis of the temporal pattern of biotope change indicates that biotope diversity and complexity is at a maximum at lower flows and across shallower area (riffles) and that these dominate the

  18. Initial Stage of the Microwave Ionization Wave Within a 1D Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V. E.; Rakova, E. I.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of the microwave breakdown in a gas is simulated numerically within a simple 1D model which takes into account such processes as the impact ionization of gas molecules, the attachment of electrons to neutral molecules, and plasma diffusion. Calculations are carried out for different spatial distributions of seed electrons with account for reflection of the incident electromagnetic wave from the plasma. The results reveal considerable dependence of the ionization wave evolution on the relation between the field frequency and gas pressure, as well as on the existence of extended rarefied halo of seed electrons. At relatively low gas pressures (or high field frequencies), the breakdown process is accompanied by the stationary ionization wave moving towards the incident electromagnetic wave. In the case of a high gas pressure (or a relatively low field frequency), the peculiarities of the breakdown are associated with the formation of repetitive jumps of the ionization front.

  19. Method of single expression: an exact solution for wavelength scale 1D photonic structure computer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, Hovik V.; Knyazyan, Tamara M.

    2003-12-01

    The principles of the method of single expression (MSE) for boundary problems solution in classical electrodynamics are presented. In the MSE the solution of the Helmholtz's equation is presented in the special form of a single expression describing resultant amplitude and phase distributions in the medium. This form of solution presenation permits to pass over the restrictions of the superposition principle and to solve both linear and nonlinear problems with ths same ease. In the MSE the Helmholtz's equation is reformulated to the set of first order differential equations and the boundary problem is solved numerically. No approximations are implied either in Helmholtz's equation or in boundary conditions. Using the MSE steady-state boundary problems are modeled for wavelength scale multilayer and modulated 1D photonic structures including amplification and nonuniformity evoked by intense electromagnetic field.

  20. Multiscale Modeling Techniques for Plasmas: 1D Scaling Results and Application to Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, M. A.; Dorland, B.; Drake, J. F.; Stantchev, G.

    2005-12-01

    We examine a novel simulation scheme called "equation free projective integration"[1] which has the potential to allow global simulations which still include microscale physics, a necessary ingredient in order to model multiscale problems. Such codes could be used to examine the global effects of reconnection and turbulence in the Earth's magnetosphere, and the solar corona, as well as in laboratory Tokamaks. Using this method to simulate the propagation and steepening of a 1D ion acoustic wave, we have already achieved excellent agreement between full particle codes and equation free with a factor of 20 speed-up. This speedup appears to scale linearly with system size, so large scale 2D and 3D simulations using this method will show a speedup of 100 or more. In this method of simulation, the global plasma variables stepped forward in time are not time-integrated directly using dynamical differential equations, hence the name "equation free." Instead, these variables are represented on a microgrid using a kinetic simulation. This microsimulation is integrated forward long enough to determine the time derivatives of the global plasma variables, which are then used to integrate forward the global variables with much larger timesteps. Results will be presented of the successful application of equation free to 1-D ion acoustic wave steepening with a PIC code serving as the underlying kinetic model. Initial results of this technique applied to magnetic reconnection will also be discussed. 1 I. G. Kevrekidis et. al., Equation-free multiscale computation: Enabling microscopic simulators to perform system-level tasks, arXiv:physics/0209043.

  1. Kinetic study of run-away burn in ICF capsule using a quasi-1D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengkun; Molvig, K.; Albright, B. J.; Dodd, E. S.; Hoffman, N. M.; Vold, E. L.; Kagan, G.

    2016-10-01

    The effect of reduced fusion reactivity resulting from the loss of fuel ions in the Gamow peak in the ignition, run-away burn and disassembly stages of an inertial confinement fusion D-T capsule is investigated with a quasi-1D hybrid model that includes kinetic ions, fluid electrons and Planckian radiation photons. The fuel ion loss through the Knudsen effect at the fuel-pusher interface is accounted for by a local-loss model developed in Molvig et al.. The tail refilling and relaxation of the fuel ion distribution are evolved with a nonlinear Fokker-Planck solver. The Krokhin & Rozanov model is used for the finite alpha range beyond the fuel region, while alpha heating to the fuel ions and the fluid electrons is modeled kinetically. For an energetic pusher (40kJ), the simulation shows that the reduced fusion reactivity can lead to substantially lower ion temperature during run-away burn, while the final yield decreases more modestly. Possible improvements to the present model, including the non-Planckian radiation emission and alpha-driven fuel disassembly, are discussed. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Work supported by the ASC TBI project at LANL.

  2. Implementation of a hydrodynamic model for the upper Potomac Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Baltzer, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    A vertically integrated, two-dimensional hydrodynamic/transport model has been implemented for the upper extent of the Potomac Estuary between Indian Head and Morgantown, Md. The model computes water-surface elevations, flow velocities, and time-varying constituent concentrations by numerically integrating finite-difference forms of the equations of mass and momentum conservation in conjunction with transport equations for heat, salt, and dissolved constituents. Previous, preliminary calibration efforts have been extended and validity of the model implementation improved. Field-measured and model-computed water levels compare within ?? 2 cm and maximum computed flood and ebb flow discharges are within 3% of measured values. Indications are that further improvements can be effected.

  3. Modeling rainfall-runoff processes using smoothed particle hydrodynamics with mass-varied particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tsang-Jung; Chang, Yu-Sheng; Chang, Kao-Hua

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a novel treatment of adopting mass-varied particles in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is proposed to solve the shallow water equations (SWEs) and model the rainfall-runoff process. Since SWEs have depth-averaged or cross-section-averaged features, there is no sufficient dimension to add rainfall particles. Thus, SPH-SWE methods have focused on modeling discharge flows in open channels or floodplains without rainfall. With the proposed treatment, the application of SPH-SWEs can be extended to rainfall-runoff processes in watersheds. First, the numerical procedures associated with using mass-varied particles in SPH-SWEs are introduced and derived. Then, numerical validations are conducted for three benchmark problems, including uniform rainfall over a 1D flat sloping channel, nonuniform rain falling over a 1D three-slope channel with different rainfall durations, and uniform rainfall over a 2D plot with complex topography. The simulated results indicate that the proposed treatment can avoid the necessity of a source term function of mass variation, and no additional particles are needed for the increase of mass. Rainfall-runoff processes can be well captured in the presence of hydraulic jumps, dry/wet bed flows, and supercritical/subcritical/transcritical flows. The proposed treatment using mass-varied particles was proven robust and reliable for modeling rainfall-runoff processes. It can provide a new alternative for investigating practical hydrological problems.

  4. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of a tidal estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Roy A.; Cheng, Ralph T.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element model is described which is used in the computation of tidal currents in an estuary. This numerical model is patterned after an existing algorithm and has been carefully tested in rectangular and curve-sided channels with constant and variable depth. One of the common uncertainties in this class of two-dimensional hydrodynamic models is the treatment of the lateral boundary conditions. Special attention is paid specifically to addressing this problem. To maintain continuity within the domain of interest, ‘smooth’ curve-sided elements must be used at all shoreline boundaries. The present model uses triangular, isoparametric elements with quadratic basis functions for the two velocity components and a linear basis function for water surface elevation. An implicit time integration is used and the model is unconditionally stable. The resultant governing equations are nonlinear owing to the advective and the bottom friction terms and are solved iteratively at each time step by the Newton-Raphson method. Model test runs have been made in the southern portion of San Francisco Bay, California (South Bay) as well as in the Bay west of Carquinez Strait. Owing to the complex bathymetry, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the Bay system are dictated by the generally shallow basins which contain deep, relict river channels. Great care must be exercised to ensure that the conservation equations remain locally as well as globally accurate. Simulations have been made over several representative tidal cycles using this finite element model, and the results compare favourably with existing data. In particular, the standing wave in South Bay and the progressive wave in the northern reach are well represented.

  5. Deschutes estuary feasibility study: hydrodynamics and sediment transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Douglas A.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Lesser, Giles; Stevens, Andrew W.

    2006-01-01

    - Provide the completed study to the CLAMP Steering Committee so that a recommendation about a long-term aquatic environment of the basin can be made. The hydrodynamic and sediment transport modeling task developed a number of different model simulations using a process-based morphological model, Delft3D, to help address these goals. Modeling results provide a qualitative assessment of estuarine behavior both prior to dam construction and after various post-dam removal scenarios. Quantitative data from the model is used in the companion biological assessment and engineering design components of the overall study. Overall, the modeling study found that after dam removal, tidal and estuarine processes are immediately restored, with marine water from Budd Inlet carried into North and Middle Basin on each rising tide and mud flats being exposed with each falling tide. Within the first year after dam removal, tidal processes, along with the occasional river floods, act to modify the estuary bed by redistributing sediment through erosion and deposition. The morphological response of the bed is rapid during the first couple of years, then slows as a dynamic equilibrium is reached within three to five years. By ten years after dam removal, the overall hydrodynamic and morphologic behavior of the estuary is similar to the pre-dam estuary, with the exception of South Basin, which has been permanently modified by human activities. In addition to a qualitative assessment of estuarine behavior, process-based modeling provides the ability address specific questions to help to inform decision-making. Considering that predicting future conditions of a complex estuarine environment is wrought with uncertainties, quantitative results in this report are often expressed in terms of ranges of possible outcomes.

  6. On constitutive functions for hindered settling velocity in 1-D settler models: Selection of appropriate model structure.

    PubMed

    Torfs, Elena; Balemans, Sophie; Locatelli, Florent; Diehl, Stefan; Bürger, Raimund; Laurent, Julien; François, Pierre; Nopens, Ingmar

    2017-03-01

    Advanced 1-D models for Secondary Settling Tanks (SSTs) explicitly account for several phenomena that influence the settling process (such as hindered settling and compression settling). For each of these phenomena a valid mathematical expression needs to be selected and its parameters calibrated to obtain a model that can be used for operation and control. This is, however, a challenging task as these phenomena may occur simultaneously. Therefore, the presented work evaluates several available expressions for hindered settling based on long-term batch settling data. Specific attention is paid to the behaviour of these hindered settling functions in the compression region in order to evaluate how the modelling of sludge compression is influenced by the choice of a certain hindered settling function. The analysis shows that the exponential hindered settling forms, which are most commonly used in traditional SST models, not only account for hindered settling but partly lump other phenomena (compression) as well. This makes them unsuitable for advanced 1-D models that explicitly include each phenomenon in a modular way. A power-law function is shown to be more appropriate to describe the hindered settling velocity in advanced 1-D SST models.

  7. Modeling nanoscale hydrodynamics by smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Huan; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos

    2015-05-21

    Thermal fluctuation and hydrophobicity are two hallmarks of fluid hydrodynamics on the nano-scale. It is a challenge to consistently couple the small length and time scale phenomena associated with molecular interaction with larger scale phenomena. The development of this consistency is the essence of mesoscale science. In this study, we develop a nanoscale fluid model based on smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that accounts for the phenomena of associated with density fluctuations and hydrophobicity. We show consistency in the fluctuation spectrum across scales. In doing so, it is necessary to account for finite fluid particle size. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the present model can capture of the void probability and solvation free energy of apolar particles of different sizes. The present fluid model is well suited for a understanding emergent phenomena in nano-scale fluid systems.

  8. Modelling pulsar glitches with realistic pinning forces: a hydrodynamical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskell, B.; Pizzochero, P. M.; Sidery, T.

    2012-02-01

    Although pulsars are some of the most stable clocks in the Universe, many of them are observed to 'glitch', i.e. to suddenly increase their spin frequency ? with fractional increases that range from ? to ?. In this paper, we focus on the 'giant' glitches, i.e. glitches with fractional increases in the spin rate of the order of ?, that are observed in a subclass of pulsars including the Vela. We show that giant glitches can be modelled with a two-fluid hydrodynamical approach. The model is based on the formalism for superfluid neutron stars of Andersson & Comer and on the realistic pinning forces of Grill & Pizzochero. We show that all stages of Vela glitches, from the rise to the post-glitch relaxation, can be reproduced with a set of physically reasonable parameters and that the sizes and waiting times between giant glitches in other pulsars are also consistent with our model.

  9. Testing the accuracy of a 1-D volcanic plume model in estimating mass eruption rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, Larry G.

    2014-01-01

    During volcanic eruptions, empirical relationships are used to estimate mass eruption rate from plume height. Although simple, such relationships can be inaccurate and can underestimate rates in windy conditions. One-dimensional plume models can incorporate atmospheric conditions and give potentially more accurate estimates. Here I present a 1-D model for plumes in crosswind and simulate 25 historical eruptions where plume height Hobs was well observed and mass eruption rate Mobs could be calculated from mapped deposit mass and observed duration. The simulations considered wind, temperature, and phase changes of water. Atmospheric conditions were obtained from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis 2.5° model. Simulations calculate the minimum, maximum, and average values (Mmin, Mmax, and Mavg) that fit the plume height. Eruption rates were also estimated from the empirical formula Mempir = 140Hobs4.14 (Mempir is in kilogram per second, Hobs is in kilometer). For these eruptions, the standard error of the residual in log space is about 0.53 for Mavg and 0.50 for Mempir. Thus, for this data set, the model is slightly less accurate at predicting Mobs than the empirical curve. The inability of this model to improve eruption rate estimates may lie in the limited accuracy of even well-observed plume heights, inaccurate model formulation, or the fact that most eruptions examined were not highly influenced by wind. For the low, wind-blown plume of 14–18 April 2010 at Eyjafjallajökull, where an accurate plume height time series is available, modeled rates do agree better with Mobs than Mempir.

  10. Hydrodynamic ram modeling with the immersed boundary method

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.W.; Kashiwa, B.A.; Rauenzahn, R.M.

    1998-03-01

    The authors have modeled a hydrodynamic ram experiment conducted at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. In the experiment, a projectile traveling at 200 ft/sec impacted and penetrated a simulated airplane wing containing water. The structure consisted of composite panels with stiffeners and rivets, and an aluminum panel. The test included instrumentation to measure strains, accelerations, and pressures. The technique used for modeling this experiment was a multifluid compressible finite volume approach. The solid fields, namely the projectile and the plates which comprised the structure, were represented by a set of discrete, Lagrangian-frame, mass points. These mass points were followed throughout the computation. The contribution of the stress state at each mass point was applied on the grid to determine the stress divergence contribution to the equations of motion and resulting grid based accelerations. This approach has been defined as the immersed boundary method. The immersed boundary method allows the modeling of fluid-structure interaction problems involving material failure. The authors implemented a plate theory to allow the representation of each plate by a surface of mass points. This theory includes bending terms and transverse shear. Arbitrary constitutive models may be used for each plate. Here they describe the immersed boundary method as they have implemented. They then describe the plate theory and its implementation. They discuss the hydrodynamic ram experiment and describe how they modeled it. They compare computed results with test data. They finally conclude with a discussion of benefits and difficulties associated with this modeling approach and possible improvement to it.

  11. Assessing the habitability of planets with Earth-like atmospheres with 1D and 3D climate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godolt, M.; Grenfell, J. L.; Kitzmann, D.; Kunze, M.; Langematz, U.; Patzer, A. B. C.; Rauer, H.; Stracke, B.

    2016-07-01

    Context. The habitable zone (HZ) describes the range of orbital distances around a star where the existence of liquid water on the surface of an Earth-like planet is in principle possible. The applicability of one-dimensional (1D) climate models for the estimation of the HZ boundaries has been questioned by recent three-dimensional (3D) climate studies. While 3D studies can calculate the water vapor, ice albedo, and cloud feedback self-consistently and therefore allow for a deeper understanding and the identification of relevant climate processes, 1D model studies rely on fewer model assumptions and can be more easily applied to the large parameter space possible for extrasolar planets. Aims: We evaluate the applicability of 1D climate models to estimate the potential habitability of Earth-like extrasolar planets by comparing our 1D model results to those of 3D climate studies in the literature. We vary the two important planetary properties, surface albedo and relative humidity, in the 1D model. These depend on climate feedbacks that are not treated self-consistently in most 1D models. Methods: We applied a cloud-free 1D radiative-convective climate model to calculate the climate of Earth-like planets around different types of main-sequence stars with varying surface albedo and relative humidity profile. We compared the results to those of 3D model calculations available in the literature and investigated to what extent the 1D model can approximate the surface temperatures calculated by the 3D models. Results: The 1D parameter study results in a large range of climates possible for an Earth-sized planet with an Earth-like atmosphere and water reservoir at a certain stellar insolation. At some stellar insolations the full spectrum of climate states could be realized, i.e., uninhabitable conditions due to surface temperatures that are too high or too low as well as habitable surface conditions, depending only on the relative humidity and surface albedo assumed. When

  12. A 1-D evolutionary model for icy satellites, applied to Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud, Uri; Prialnik, Dina

    2016-04-01

    We develop a long-term 1-D evolution model for icy satellites that couples multiple processes: water migration and differentiation, geochemical reactions and silicate phase transitions, compaction by self-gravity, and ablation. The model further considers the following energy sources and sinks: tidal heating, radiogenic heating, geochemical energy released by serpentinization or absorbed by mineral dehydration, gravitational energy and insolation, and heat transport by conduction, convection, and advection. We apply the model to Enceladus, by guessing the initial conditions that would render a structure compatible with present-day observations, assuming the initial structure to have been homogeneous. Assuming the satellite has been losing water continually along its evolution, we postulate that it was formed as a more massive, more icy and more porous satellite, and gradually transformed into its present day state due to sustained long-term tidal heating. We consider several initial compositions and evolution scenarios and follow the evolution for the age of the Solar System, testing the present day model results against the available observational constraints. Our model shows the present configuration to be differentiated into a pure icy mantle, several tens of km thick, overlying a rocky core, composed of dehydrated rock at the center and hydrated rock in the outer part. For Enceladus, it predicts a higher rock/ice mass ratio than previously assumed and a thinner ice mantle, compatible with recent estimates based on gravity field measurements. Although, obviously, the model cannot be used to explain local phenomena, it sheds light on the internal structure invoked in explanations of localized features and activities.

  13. Sharp Eccentric Rings in Planetless Hydrodynamical Models of Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyra, W.; Kuchner, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Exoplanets are often associated with disks of dust and debris, analogs of the Kuiper Belt in our solar system. These "debris disks" show a variety of non-trivial structures attributed to planetary perturbations and utilized to constrain the properties of the planets. However, analyses of these systems have largely ignored the fact that, increasingly, debris disks are found to contain small quantities of gas, a component all debris disks should contain at some level. Several debris disks have been measured with a dust-to-gas ratio around unity where the effect of hydrodynamics on the structure of the disk cannot be ignored. Here we report that dust-gas interactions can produce some of the key patterns seen in debris disks that were previously attributed to planets. Through linear and nonlinear modeling of the hydrodynamical problem, we find that a robust clumping instability exists in this configuration, organizing the dust into narrow, eccentric rings, similar to the Fomalhaut debris disk. The hypothesis that these disks might contain planets, though thrilling, is not necessarily required to explain these systems.

  14. Significance of flow clustering and sequencing on sediment transport: 1D sediment transport modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Kazi; Allen, Deonie; Haynes, Heather

    2016-04-01

    This paper considers 1D hydraulic model data on the effect of high flow clusters and sequencing on sediment transport. Using observed flow gauge data from the River Caldew, England, a novel stochastic modelling approach was developed in order to create alternative 50 year flow sequences. Whilst the observed probability density of gauge data was preserved in all sequences, the order in which those flows occurred was varied using the output from a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) with generalised Pareto distribution (GP). In total, one hundred 50 year synthetic flow series were generated and used as the inflow boundary conditions for individual flow series model runs using the 1D sediment transport model HEC-RAS. The model routed graded sediment through the case study river reach to define the long-term morphological changes. Comparison of individual simulations provided a detailed understanding of the sensitivity of channel capacity to flow sequence. Specifically, each 50 year synthetic flow sequence was analysed using a 3-month, 6-month or 12-month rolling window approach and classified for clusters in peak discharge. As a cluster is described as a temporal grouping of flow events above a specified threshold, the threshold condition used herein is considered as a morphologically active channel forming discharge event. Thus, clusters were identified for peak discharges in excess of 10%, 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of the 1 year Return Period (RP) event. The window of above-peak flows also required cluster definition and was tested for timeframes 1, 2, 10 and 30 days. Subsequently, clusters could be described in terms of the number of events, maximum peak flow discharge, cumulative flow discharge and skewness (i.e. a description of the flow sequence). The model output for each cluster was analysed for the cumulative flow volume and cumulative sediment transport (mass). This was then compared to the total sediment transport of a single flow event of equivalent flow volume

  15. 1D-coupled photochemical model of neutrals, cations and anions in the atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrijevic, M.; Loison, J. C.; Hickson, K. M.; Gronoff, G.

    2016-04-01

    Many models with different characteristics have been published so far to study the chemical processes at work in Titan's atmosphere. Some models focus on neutral species in the stratosphere or ionic species in the ionosphere, but few of them couple all the species throughout the whole atmosphere. Very few of these emphasize the importance of uncertainties in the chemical scheme and study their propagation in the model. We have developed a new 1D-photochemical model of Titan's atmosphere coupling neutral species with positive and negative ions from the lower atmosphere up to the ionosphere and have compared our results with observations to have a comprehensive view of the chemical processes driving the composition of the stratosphere and ionosphere of Titan. We have updated the neutral, positive ion and negative ion chemistry and have improved the description of N2 photodissociation by introducing high resolution N2 absorption cross sections. We performed for the first time an uncertainty propagation study in a fully coupled ion-neutral model. We determine how uncertainties on rate constants on both neutral and ionic reactions influence the model results and pinpoint the key reactions responsible for this behavior. We find very good agreement between our model results and observations in both the stratosphere and in the ionosphere for most neutral compounds. Our results are also in good agreement with an average INMS mass spectrum and specific flybys in the dayside suggesting that our chemical model (for both neutral and ions) provides a good approximation of Titan's atmospheric chemistry as a whole. Our uncertainty propagation study highlights the difficulty to interpret the INMS mass spectra for masses 14, 31, 41 and we identified the key reactions responsible for these ambiguities. Despite an overall improvement in the chemical model, disagreement for some specific compounds (HC3N, C2H5CN, C2H4) highlights the role that certain physical processes could play

  16. 1D-3D hybrid modeling—from multi-compartment models to full resolution models in space and time

    PubMed Central

    Grein, Stephan; Stepniewski, Martin; Reiter, Sebastian; Knodel, Markus M.; Queisser, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of cellular and network dynamics in the brain by means of modeling and simulation has evolved into a highly interdisciplinary field, that uses sophisticated modeling and simulation approaches to understand distinct areas of brain function. Depending on the underlying complexity, these models vary in their level of detail, in order to cope with the attached computational cost. Hence for large network simulations, single neurons are typically reduced to time-dependent signal processors, dismissing the spatial aspect of each cell. For single cell or networks with relatively small numbers of neurons, general purpose simulators allow for space and time-dependent simulations of electrical signal processing, based on the cable equation theory. An emerging field in Computational Neuroscience encompasses a new level of detail by incorporating the full three-dimensional morphology of cells and organelles into three-dimensional, space and time-dependent, simulations. While every approach has its advantages and limitations, such as computational cost, integrated and methods-spanning simulation approaches, depending on the network size could establish new ways to investigate the brain. In this paper we present a hybrid simulation approach, that makes use of reduced 1D-models using e.g., the NEURON simulator—which couples to fully resolved models for simulating cellular and sub-cellular dynamics, including the detailed three-dimensional morphology of neurons and organelles. In order to couple 1D- and 3D-simulations, we present a geometry-, membrane potential- and intracellular concentration mapping framework, with which graph- based morphologies, e.g., in the swc- or hoc-format, are mapped to full surface and volume representations of the neuron and computational data from 1D-simulations can be used as boundary conditions for full 3D simulations and vice versa. Thus, established models and data, based on general purpose 1D-simulators, can be directly coupled to

  17. CO2 conversion in a gliding arc plasma: 1D cylindrical discharge model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weizong; Berthelot, Antonin; Kolev, Stanimir; Tu, Xin; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2016-12-01

    CO2 conversion by a gliding arc plasma is gaining increasing interest, but the underlying mechanisms for an energy-efficient process are still far from understood. Indeed, the chemical complexity of the non-equilibrium plasma poses a challenge for plasma modeling due to the huge computational load. In this paper, a one-dimensional (1D) gliding arc model is developed in a cylindrical frame, with a detailed non-equilibrium CO2 plasma chemistry set, including the CO2 vibrational kinetics up to the dissociation limit. The model solves a set of time-dependent continuity equations based on the chemical reactions, as well as the electron energy balance equation, and it assumes quasi-neutrality in the plasma. The loss of plasma species and heat due to convection by the transverse gas flow is accounted for by using a characteristic frequency of convective cooling, which depends on the gliding arc radius, the relative velocity of the gas flow with respect to the arc and on the arc elongation rate. The calculated values for plasma density and plasma temperature within this work are comparable with experimental data on gliding arc plasma reactors in the literature. Our calculation results indicate that excitation to the vibrational levels promotes efficient dissociation in the gliding arc, and this is consistent with experimental investigations of the gliding arc based CO2 conversion in the literature. Additionally, the dissociation of CO2 through collisions with O atoms has the largest contribution to CO2 splitting under the conditions studied. In addition to the above results, we also demonstrate that lumping the CO2 vibrational states can bring a significant reduction of the computational load. The latter opens up the way for 2D or 3D models with an accurate description of the CO2 vibrational kinetics.

  18. Self-consistent Modeling of Reionization in Cosmological Hydrodynamical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oñorbe, Jose; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Lukić, Zarija

    2017-03-01

    The ultraviolet background (UVB) emitted by quasars and galaxies governs the ionization and thermal state of the intergalactic medium (IGM), regulates the formation of high-redshift galaxies, and is thus a key quantity for modeling cosmic reionization. The vast majority of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations implement the UVB via a set of spatially uniform photoionization and photoheating rates derived from UVB synthesis models. We show that simulations using canonical UVB rates reionize and, perhaps more importantly, spuriously heat the IGM, much earlier (z∼ 15) than they should. This problem arises because at z> 6, where observational constraints are nonexistent, the UVB amplitude is far too high. We introduce a new methodology to remedy this issue, and we generate self-consistent photoionization and photoheating rates to model any chosen reionization history. Following this approach, we run a suite of hydrodynamical simulations of different reionization scenarios and explore the impact of the timing of reionization and its concomitant heat injection on the thermal state of the IGM. We present a comprehensive study of the pressure smoothing scale of IGM gas, illustrating its dependence on the details of both hydrogen and helium reionization, and argue that it plays a fundamental role in interpreting Lyα forest statistics and the thermal evolution of the IGM. The premature IGM heating we have uncovered implies that previous work has likely dramatically overestimated the impact of photoionization feedback on galaxy formation, which sets the minimum halo mass able to form stars at high redshifts. We make our new UVB photoionization and photoheating rates publicly available for use in future simulations.

  19. Parameter sensitivities in a 1-D model for DMS and sulphur cycling in the upper ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, N.; Denman, K.

    2008-07-01

    We have developed a marine DMS (dimethylsulfide) module and implemented it in a 1-D coupled atmosphere-ocean-biogeochemical model. In developing the marine sulphur model we have found that several parameters used in the model are not known to even an order of magnitude. Our approach is used to test the model's sensitivity to these parameters. A parameter change of ±25% is applied to test the respective range of changes in the DMS fluxes. The model is run for a 3-year time period as well as for the time period of the Subarctic Ecosystem Response to Iron Enrichment Study (SERIES) in July 2002. The simulated seasonal cycle is in agreement with available observations: Near surface DMS concentrations vary from 1.5nmolL-1 in winter to 13.5nmolL-1 in summer. Simulated DMS production is found to be most sensitive to variations of the S:N ratio and the bacterial consumption rate of DMS. Implementing light or UV limited bacterial activity shows a negligible effect in winter and increases DMS concentrations by 0.2- 0.6nmolL-1 in summer. Similarly a yield increase under UV stress increases summer values by 1- 2nmolL-1. The simulated diel cycle in surface DMS concentration is no more than 2.5nmolL-1, even when light-dependent changes in bacterial activity are considered. Simulating the DMS response to iron fertilization with the standard run leads to overestimation during an initial bloom of small phytoplankton. While implementing light-dependent bacterial activity has a minor effect, the implementation of yields that depend on nutrient availability significantly improves the results. The model confirms earlier results showing the importance of including atmospheric DMS concentrations in gas flux calculations when there are high surface concentrations and small atmospheric boundary layer heights. Simulated summer concentrations in the upper layer can be underestimated by 2nmolL-1 or more if the atmospheric concentration is set to zero. Our study shows that inclusion of

  20. Open boundary conditions for the Diffuse Interface Model in 1-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmarais, J. L.; Kuerten, J. G. M.

    2014-04-01

    New techniques are developed for solving multi-phase flows in unbounded domains using the Diffuse Interface Model in 1-D. They extend two open boundary conditions originally designed for the Navier-Stokes equations. The non-dimensional formulation of the DIM generalizes the approach to any fluid. The equations support a steady state whose analytical approximation close to the critical point depends only on temperature. This feature enables the use of detectors at the boundaries switching between conventional boundary conditions in bulk phases and a multi-phase strategy in interfacial regions. Moreover, the latter takes advantage of the steady state approximation to minimize the interface-boundary interactions. The techniques are applied to fluids experiencing a phase transition and where the interface between the phases travels through one of the boundaries. When the interface crossing the boundary is fully developed, the technique greatly improves results relative to cases where conventional boundary conditions can be used. Limitations appear when the interface crossing the boundary is not a stable equilibrium between the two phases: the terms responsible for creating the true balance between the phases perturb the interior solution. Both boundary conditions present good numerical stability properties: the error remains bounded when the initial conditions or the far field values are perturbed. For the PML, the influence of its main parameters on the global error is investigated to make a compromise between computational costs and maximum error. The approach can be extended to multiple spatial dimensions.

  1. Modelling Hydrology of a Single Bioretention System with HYDRUS-1D

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yingying; Wang, Huixiao; Chen, Jiangang; Zhang, Shuhan

    2014-01-01

    A study was carried out on the effectiveness of bioretention systems to abate stormwater using computer simulation. The hydrologic performance was simulated for two bioretention cells using HYDRUS-1D, and the simulation results were verified by field data of nearly four years. Using the validated model, the optimization of design parameters of rainfall return period, filter media depth and type, and surface area was discussed. And the annual hydrologic performance of bioretention systems was further analyzed under the optimized parameters. The study reveals that bioretention systems with underdrains and impervious boundaries do have some detention capability, while their total water retention capability is extremely limited. Better detention capability is noted for smaller rainfall events, deeper filter media, and design storms with a return period smaller than 2 years, and a cost-effective filter media depth is recommended in bioretention design. Better hydrologic effectiveness is achieved with a higher hydraulic conductivity and ratio of the bioretention surface area to the catchment area, and filter media whose conductivity is between the conductivity of loamy sand and sandy loam, and a surface area of 10% of the catchment area is recommended. In the long-term simulation, both infiltration volume and evapotranspiration are critical for the total rainfall treatment in bioretention systems. PMID:25133240

  2. Modelling hydrology of a single bioretention system with HYDRUS-1D.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yingying; Wang, Huixiao; Chen, Jiangang; Zhang, Shuhan

    2014-01-01

    A study was carried out on the effectiveness of bioretention systems to abate stormwater using computer simulation. The hydrologic performance was simulated for two bioretention cells using HYDRUS-1D, and the simulation results were verified by field data of nearly four years. Using the validated model, the optimization of design parameters of rainfall return period, filter media depth and type, and surface area was discussed. And the annual hydrologic performance of bioretention systems was further analyzed under the optimized parameters. The study reveals that bioretention systems with underdrains and impervious boundaries do have some detention capability, while their total water retention capability is extremely limited. Better detention capability is noted for smaller rainfall events, deeper filter media, and design storms with a return period smaller than 2 years, and a cost-effective filter media depth is recommended in bioretention design. Better hydrologic effectiveness is achieved with a higher hydraulic conductivity and ratio of the bioretention surface area to the catchment area, and filter media whose conductivity is between the conductivity of loamy sand and sandy loam, and a surface area of 10% of the catchment area is recommended. In the long-term simulation, both infiltration volume and evapotranspiration are critical for the total rainfall treatment in bioretention systems.

  3. Results and limits in the 1-D analytical modeling for the asymmetric DG SOI MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobianu, O.; Glesner, M.

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents the results and the limits of 1-D analytical modeling of electrostatic potential in the low-doped p type silicon body of the asymmetric n-channel DG SOI MOSFET, where the contribution to the asymmetry comes only from p- and n-type doping of polysilicon used as the gate electrodes. Solving Poisson's equation with boundary conditions based on the continuity of normal electrical displacement at interfaces and the presence of a minimum electrostatic potential by using the Matlab code we have obtained a minimum potential with a slow variation in the central zone of silicon with the value pinned around 0.46 V, where the applied VGS voltage varies from 0.45 V to 0.95 V. The paper states clearly the validity domain of the analytical solution and the important effect of the localization of the minimum electrostatic potential value on the potential variation at interfaces as a function of the applied VGS voltage.

  4. 1D and 2D urban dam-break flood modelling in Istanbul, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Hasan; Neal, Jeffrey; Bates, Paul; Döker, Fatih

    2014-05-01

    Urban flood events are increasing in frequency and severity as a consequence of several factors such as reduced infiltration capacities due to continued watershed development, increased construction in flood prone areas due to population growth, the possible amplification of rainfall intensity due to climate change, sea level rise which threatens coastal development, and poorly engineered flood control infrastructure (Gallegos et al., 2009). These factors will contribute to increased urban flood risk in the future, and as a result improved modelling of urban flooding according to different causative factor has been identified as a research priority (Gallegos et al., 2009; Ozdemir et al. 2013). The flooding disaster caused by dam failures is always a threat against lives and properties especially in urban environments. Therefore, the prediction of dynamics of dam-break flows plays a vital role in the forecast and evaluation of flooding disasters, and is of long-standing interest for researchers. Flooding occurred on the Ayamama River (Istanbul-Turkey) due to high intensity rainfall and dam-breaching of Ata Pond in 9th September 2009. The settlements, industrial areas and transportation system on the floodplain of the Ayamama River were inundated. Therefore, 32 people were dead and millions of Euros economic loses were occurred. The aim of this study is 1 and 2-Dimensional flood modelling of the Ata Pond breaching using HEC-RAS and LISFLOOD-Roe models and comparison of the model results using the real flood extent. The HEC-RAS model solves the full 1-D Saint Venant equations for unsteady open channel flow whereas LISFLOOD-Roe is the 2-D shallow water model which calculates the flow according to the complete Saint Venant formulation (Villanueva and Wright, 2006; Neal et al., 2011). The model consists a shock capturing Godunov-type scheme based on the Roe Riemann solver (Roe, 1981). 3 m high resolution Digital Surface Model (DSM), natural characteristics of the pond

  5. Column Testing and 1D Reactive Transport Modeling to Evaluate Uranium Plume Persistence Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. H.; Morrison, S.; Morris, S.; Tigar, A.; Dam, W. L.; Dayvault, J.

    2015-12-01

    At many U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management sites, 100 year natural flushing was selected as a remedial option for groundwater uranium plumes. However, current data indicate that natural flushing is not occurring as quickly as expected and solid-phase and aqueous uranium concentrations are persistent. At the Grand Junction, Colorado office site, column testing was completed on core collected below an area where uranium mill tailings have been removed. The total uranium concentration in this core was 13.2 mg/kg and the column was flushed with laboratory-created water with no uranium and chemistry similar to the nearby Gunnison River. The core was flushed for a total of 91 pore volumes producing a maximum effluent uranium concentration of 6,110 μg/L at 2.1 pore volumes and a minimum uranium concentration of 36.2 μg/L at the final pore volume. These results indicate complex geochemical reactions at small pore volumes and a long tailing affect at greater pore volumes. Stop flow data indicate the occurrence of non-equilibrium processes that create uranium concentration rebound. These data confirm the potential for plume persistence, which is occurring at the field scale. 1D reactive transport modeling was completed using PHREEQC (geochemical model) and calibrated to the column test data manually and using PEST (inverse modeling calibration routine). Processes of sorption, dual porosity with diffusion, mineral dissolution, dispersion, and cation exchange were evaluated separately and in combination. The calibration results indicate that sorption and dual porosity are major processes in explaining the column test data. These processes are also supported by fission track photographs that show solid-phase uranium residing in less mobile pore spaces. These procedures provide valuable information on plume persistence and secondary source processes that may be used to better inform and evaluate remedial strategies, including natural flushing.

  6. 1-D/3-D geologic model of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, D.K.; Henry, M.; Roberts, L.N.R.; Steinshouer, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    The 3-D geologic model of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin comprises 18 stacked intervals from the base of the Devonian Woodbend Group and age equivalent formations to ground surface; it includes an estimated thickness of eroded sediments based on 1-D burial history reconstructions for 33 wells across the study area. Each interval for the construction of the 3-D model was chosen on the basis of whether it is primarily composed of petroleum system elements of reservoir, hydrocarbon source, seal, overburden, or underburden strata, as well as the quality and areal distribution of well and other data. Preliminary results of the modeling support the following interpretations. Long-distance migration of hydrocarbons east of the Rocky Mountains is indicated by oil and gas accumulations in areas within which source rocks are thermally immature for oil and (or) gas. Petroleum systems in the basin are segmented by the northeast-trending Sweetgrass Arch; hydrocarbons west of the arch were from source rocks lying near or beneath the Rocky Mountains, whereas oil and gas east of the arch were sourced from the Williston Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and migration are primarily due to increased burial associated with the Laramide Orogeny. Hydrocarbon sources and migration were also influenced by the Lower Cretaceous sub-Mannville unconformity. In the Peace River Arch area of northern Alberta, Jurassic and older formations exhibit high-angle truncations against the unconformity. Potential Paleozoic though Mesozoic hydrocarbon source rocks are in contact with overlying Mannville Group reservoir facies. In contrast, in Saskatchewan and southern Alberta the contacts are parallel to sub-parallel, with the result that hydrocarbon source rocks are separated from the Mannville Group by seal-forming strata within the Jurassic. Vertical and lateral movement of hydrocarbons along the faults in the Rocky Mountains deformed belt probably also resulted in mixing of oil and gas from numerous

  7. A future Outlook: Web based Simulation of Hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, A. S.; Piasecki, M.

    2003-12-01

    Despite recent advances to present simulation results as 3D graphs or animation contours, the modeling user community still faces some shortcomings when trying to move around and analyze data. Typical problems include the lack of common platforms with standard vocabulary to exchange simulation results from different numerical models, insufficient descriptions about data (metadata), lack of robust search and retrieval tools for data, and difficulties to reuse simulation domain knowledge. This research demonstrates how to create a shared simulation domain in the WWW and run a number of models through multi-user interfaces. Firstly, meta-datasets have been developed to describe hydrodynamic model data based on geographic metadata standard (ISO 19115) that has been extended to satisfy the need of the hydrodynamic modeling community. The Extended Markup Language (XML) is used to publish this metadata by the Resource Description Framework (RDF). Specific domain ontology for Web Based Simulation (WBS) has been developed to explicitly define vocabulary for the knowledge based simulation system. Subsequently, this knowledge based system is converted into an object model using Meta Object Family (MOF). The knowledge based system acts as a Meta model for the object oriented system, which aids in reusing the domain knowledge. Specific simulation software has been developed based on the object oriented model. Finally, all model data is stored in an object relational database. Database back-ends help store, retrieve and query information efficiently. This research uses open source software and technology such as Java Servlet and JSP, Apache web server, Tomcat Servlet Engine, PostgresSQL databases, Protégé ontology editor, RDQL and RQL for querying RDF in semantic level, Jena Java API for RDF. Also, we use international standards such as the ISO 19115 metadata standard, and specifications such as XML, RDF, OWL, XMI, and UML. The final web based simulation product is deployed as

  8. Radiation-hydrodynamical modelling of underluminous Type II plateau supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Spiro, S.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Manicò, G.; Turatto, M.

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe, we infer explosion energies of 0.16-0.18 foe, radii at explosion of 1.8-3.5 × 1013 cm and ejected masses of 10-11.3 M⊙. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range ˜13.2-15.1 M⊙ for SN 2003Z and ˜11.4-12.9 M⊙ for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that (a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP; (b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explosions of red (or yellow) supergiant stars of low to intermediate mass; (c) some faint objects may also be explained as electron-capture SNe from massive super-asymptotic giant branch stars; and (d) LL SNe IIP form the underluminous tail of the SNe IIP family, where the main parameter `guiding' the distribution seems to be the ratio of the total explosion energy to the ejected mass. Further hydrodynamical studies should be performed and compared to a more extended sample of LL SNe IIP before drawing any conclusion on the relevance of fall-back to this class of events.

  9. A 1-D radiative conductive model to study the SOIR/VEx thermal profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahieux, Arnaud; Erwin, Justin T.; Chamberlain, Sarah; Robert, Séverine; Carine Vandaele, Ann; Wilquet, Valérie; Thomas, Ian; Yelle, Roger V.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2015-04-01

    SOIR is an infrared spectrometer on board Venus Express that probes the Venus terminator region since 2006. The measurements are taken on the morning and evening sides of the terminator, covering all latitudes from the North Pole to the South Pole. Its wavelength range - 2.2 to 4.3 μm - allows a detailed chemical inventory of the Venus atmosphere [1-5], such as CO2, CO, H2O, HCl, HF, SO2 and aerosols. CO2 is detected from 70 km up to 165 km, CO from 70 km to 140 km, and the minor species typically below 110 km down to 70 km. Number density profiles of these species are computed from the measured spectra. Temperature profiles are obtained while computing the spectral inversion of the CO2 spectra combined with the hydrostatic law [6]. These temperature measurements show a striking permanent temperature minimum (at 125 km) and a weaker temperature maximum (over 100-115 km). The time variability of the CO2 density profiles spans over two orders of magnitude, and a clear trend is seen with latitude. The temperature variations are also important, of the order of 35 K for a given pressure level, but the latitude variation are small. Miss-RT, a 1D radiative transfer model has been developed to reproduce the SOIR terminator profiles, derived from the Mars thermosphere code presented in [7]. This model has been expanded to better account for the CO2, CO, and O non-LTE radiative heating and cooling processes which have to be considered in the dense atmosphere of Venus. Radiative cooling by minor species detected by SOIR (e.g. HCl, SO2, and H2O) are found to be small in comparison to the 15 μm CO2 cooling. Aerosol cooling in the 60-90km altitude range may be important to the thermal balance. There is a good agreement between the 1D model temperature profile and the mean SOIR temperature profile. Further we can suggest parameters that can be adjusted to improve the agreement between the model and measurements. The remaining differences can be attributed to the atmosphere

  10. Dynamical Models of SAURON and CALIFA Galaxies: 1D and 2D Rotational Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinova, Veselina; van de Ven, G.; Lyubenova, M.; Falcon-Barroso, J.; van den Bosch, R.

    2013-01-01

    The mass of a galaxy is the most important parameter to understand its structure and evolution. The total mass we can infer by constructing dynamical models that fit the motion of the stars and gas in the galaxy. The dark matter content then follows after subtracting the luminous matter inferred from colors and/or spectra. Here, we present the mass distribution of a sample of 18 late-type spiral (Sb-Sd) galaxies, using two-dimensional stellar kinematics obtained with the integral-field spectrograph SAURON. The observed second order velocity moments of these galaxies are fitted with solutions of the Axisymmetric Jeans equations and give us an accurate estimation of the mass-to-light ratio profiles and rotational curves. The rotation curves of the galaxies are obtained by the Asymmetric Drift Correction (ADC) and Multi-Gaussian Expansion (MGE) methods, corresponding to one- and two-dimensional mass distribution. Their comparison shows that the mass distribution based on the 2D stellar kinematics is much more reliable than 1D one. SAURON integral field of view looks at the inner parts of the galaxies in contrast with CALIFA survey. CALIFA survey provides PMAS/PPAK integral-field spectroscopic data of ~ 600 nearby galaxies as part of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area. We show the first CALIFA dynamical models of different morphological type of galaxies, giving the clue about the mass distribution of galaxies through the whole Hubble sequence and their evolution from the blue cloud to the red sequence.

  11. Relationship between Pulmonary Airflow and Resistance in Patients with Airway Narrowing Using An 1-D Network Resistance and Compliance Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sanghun; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric; Lin, Ching-Long

    2016-11-01

    To predict the proper relationship between airway resistance and regional airflow, we proposed a novel 1-D network model for airway resistance and acinar compliance. First, we extracted 1-D skeletons at inspiration images, and generated 1-D trees of CT unresolved airways with a volume filling method. We used Horsfield order with random heterogeneity to create diameters of the generated 1-D trees. We employed a resistance model that accounts for kinetic energy and viscous dissipation (Model A). The resistance model is further coupled with a regional compliance model estimated from two static images (Model B). For validation, we applied both models to a healthy subject. The results showed that Model A failed to provide airflows consistent with air volume change, whereas Model B provided airflows consistent with air volume change. Since airflows shall be regionally consistent with air volume change in patients with normal airways, Model B was validated. Then, we applied Model B to severe asthmatic subjects. The results showed that regional airflows were significantly deviated from air volume change due to airway narrowing. This implies that airway resistance plays a major role in determining regional airflows of patients with airway narrowing. Support for this study was provided, in part, by NIH Grants U01 HL114494, R01 HL094315, R01 HL112986, and S10 RR022421.

  12. Radiation Hydrodynamical Models of the Inner Rim in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, Mario

    2016-06-01

    Many stars host planets orbiting within one astronomical unit (AU). These close planets’ origins are a mystery that motivates investigating protoplanetary disks’ central regions. A key factor governing the conditions near the star is the silicate sublimation front, which largely determines where the starlight is absorbed, and which is often called the inner rim. We present the first radiation hydrodynamical modeling of the sublimation front in the disks around the young intermediate-mass stars called Herbig Ae stars. The models are axisymmetric, and include starlight heating, silicate grains sublimating and condensing to equilibrium at the local, timedependent temperature and density, and accretion stresses parametrizing the results of MHD magneto-rotational turbulence models. The results compare well with radiation hydrostatic solutions, and prove to be dynamically stable. Passing the model disks into Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations, we show that the models satisfy observational constraints on the inner rims’s location. A small optically-thin halo of hot dust naturally arises between the inner rim and the star. The inner rim has a substantial radial extent, corresponding to several disk scale heights. While the front’s overall position varies with the stellar luminosity, its radial extent depends on the mass accretion rate. A pressure maximum develops at the position of thermal ionization at temperatures about 1000 K. The pressure maximum is capable of halting solid pebbles’ radial drift and concentrating them in a zone where temperatures are su ciently high for annealing to form crystalline silicates.

  13. Predictive Models for Hydrodynamic Coupling Coefficients in Clay Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueutin, P.; Gonçalvès, J.; Violette, S.

    2007-12-01

    In charged and low permeability media (e.g. clay media) the classical Darcy's law does not describe accurately the water movement. A generalized Darcy's law, one of the coupled fluxes equations, has to be used. The identification of the coupling parameters, in clay-rocks, is crucial in order to estimate the water flow. Here, we will only focus on the electrochemical-hydraulic coupling coefficients : the intrinsic permeability k and the osmotic permeability kc. These hydrodynamic coupling coefficients can be estimated using two approaches: (i) theoretical models : • porosity/intrinsic permeability relationships, defined for a clay medium, are used to estimate the intrinsic permeability. • an electrochemical model is used to estimate the osmotic coupling coefficient. The electrical model, a triple layer model, is implemented to simulate the interactions between the charged surfaces of the clay minerals and the pore solution. (ii) experiments : • at the sample scale. • at the field scale. The measurement of these parameters is generally challenging either at the sample or at the field scale. For this reason, predictive models can be useful. The purpose of this study is to give reference values for the two coupling parameters under consideration here, using to the petrophysical properties of the medium. Different models to estimate these coupling coefficients are tested : (i) the intrinsic permeability is estimated with a pretrophysical model. In this model, the intrinsic permeability depends on the effective pore radius and the electrical formation factor. (ii) the osmotic coupling coefficient is estimated with the model developed by Revil and Leroy (2004). The comparison between three different models with the available data shows that these data are more closely reproduced using this model. Some reference values are provided for several type of clays as a fonction of some readily measurable or estimable parameters or variables, such as the porosity, the

  14. Hydrodynamic Models for Multicomponent Plasmas with Collisional-Radiative Kinetics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    is lovingly dedicated to my mother, Mai Hoang, for everything she has given to me and her unconditional love. v Table of Contents 1 Introduction ...15 2 Hydrodynamic Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2.1 Introduction ...reactive hydrodynamics . . . . 29 3 Numerical Formulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 3.1 Introduction

  15. Reducing the number of parameters in 1D arterial blood flow modeling: less is more for patient-specific simulations.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Sally; Willemet, Marie; Chowienczyk, Phil J; Alastruey, Jordi

    2015-07-01

    Patient-specific one-dimensional (1D) blood flow modeling requires estimating model parameters from available clinical data, ideally acquired noninvasively. The larger the number of arterial segments in a distributed 1D model, the greater the number of input parameters that need to be estimated. We investigated the effect of a reduction in the number of arterial segments in a given distributed 1D model on the shape of the simulated pressure and flow waveforms. This is achieved by systematically lumping peripheral 1D model branches into windkessel models that preserve the net resistance and total compliance of the original model. We applied our methodology to a model of the 55 larger systemic arteries in the human and to an extended 67-artery model that contains the digital arteries that perfuse the fingers. Results show good agreement in the shape of the aortic and digital waveforms between the original 55-artery (67-artery) and reduced 21-artery (37-artery) models. Reducing the number of segments also enables us to investigate the effect of arterial network topology (and hence reflection sites) on the shape of waveforms. Results show that wave reflections in the thoracic aorta and renal arteries play an important role in shaping the aortic pressure and flow waves and in generating the second peak of the digital pressure and flow waves. Our novel methodology is important to simplify the computational domain while maintaining the precision of the numerical predictions and to assess the effect of wave reflections.

  16. Reducing the number of parameters in 1D arterial blood flow modeling: less is more for patient-specific simulations

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Sally; Willemet, Marie; Chowienczyk, Phil J.

    2015-01-01

    Patient-specific one-dimensional (1D) blood flow modeling requires estimating model parameters from available clinical data, ideally acquired noninvasively. The larger the number of arterial segments in a distributed 1D model, the greater the number of input parameters that need to be estimated. We investigated the effect of a reduction in the number of arterial segments in a given distributed 1D model on the shape of the simulated pressure and flow waveforms. This is achieved by systematically lumping peripheral 1D model branches into windkessel models that preserve the net resistance and total compliance of the original model. We applied our methodology to a model of the 55 larger systemic arteries in the human and to an extended 67-artery model that contains the digital arteries that perfuse the fingers. Results show good agreement in the shape of the aortic and digital waveforms between the original 55-artery (67-artery) and reduced 21-artery (37-artery) models. Reducing the number of segments also enables us to investigate the effect of arterial network topology (and hence reflection sites) on the shape of waveforms. Results show that wave reflections in the thoracic aorta and renal arteries play an important role in shaping the aortic pressure and flow waves and in generating the second peak of the digital pressure and flow waves. Our novel methodology is important to simplify the computational domain while maintaining the precision of the numerical predictions and to assess the effect of wave reflections. PMID:25888513

  17. Mid-Bay Islands Hydrodynamics and Sedimentation Modeling Study, Chesapeake Bay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    B3 Hydrodynamic and sediment transport modeling with M2D ................. B7 Hydrodynamics...maximum current field, normal tide ............................... B6 Figure B6. Alt JI-7 M2D model grid...B7 Figure B7. Alt JI-7 maximum current field, NE33 ........................................ B9 Figure B8. Alt JI-7 M2D

  18. Development of a 1D canopy module to couple mesoscale meteorogical model with building energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauree, Dasaraden; Kohler, Manon; Blond, Nadège; Clappier, Alain

    2013-04-01

    The actual global warming, highlighted by the scientific community, is due to the greenhouse gases emissions resulting from our energy consumption. This energy is mainly produced in cities (about 70% of the total energy use). Around 36% of this energy are used in buildings (residential/tertiary) and this accounts for about 20% of the greenhouse gases emissions. Moreover, the world population is more and more concentrated in urban areas, 50% of the actual world population already lives in cities and this ratio is expected to reach 70% by 2050. With the obviously increasing responsibility of cities in climate change in the future, it is of great importance to go toward more sustainable cities that would reduce the energy consumption in urban areas. The energy use inside buildings is driven by two factors: (1) the level of comfort wished by the inhabitants and (2) the urban climate. On the other hand, the urban climate is influenced by the presence of buildings. Indeed, artificial surfaces of urban areas modify the energy budget of the Earth's surface and furthermore, heat is released into the atmosphere due to the energy used by buildings. Modifications at the building scale (micro-scale) can thus have an influence on the climate of the urban areas and surroundings (meso-scale), and vice and versa. During the last decades, meso-scale models have been developed to simulate the atmospheric conditions for domain of 100-1000km wide with a resolution of few kilometers. Due to their low resolution, the effects of small obstacles (such as buildings, trees, ...) near the ground are not reproduced properly and parameterizations have been developed to represent such effects in meso-scale models. On the other side, micro-scale models have a higher resolution (around 1 meter) and consequently can better simulate the impact of obstacles on the atmospheric heat flux exchanges with the earth surface. However, only a smaller domain (less than 1km) can be simulated for the same

  19. A Nanoscale Hydrodynamical Model for Transport of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadauria, Ravi; Sanghi, Tarun; Aluru, N. R.

    2015-11-01

    We present here a one-dimensional isothermal hydrodynamic transport model for SPC/E water. Two separate mechanisms of flow, viz. viscous and slip are incorporated in the present formulation. Spatially varying viscosity is modeled using the local average density method. Slip velocity is provided as a form of the boundary condition which in turn depends upon the macroscopic interfacial friction coefficient. The friction coefficient bridges the atomistic and continuum descriptions of the problem. The value of this friction coefficient is computed using particle-based wall-fluid force autocorrelations and wall-fluid force-velocity cross correlations, where the particle trajectory is generated using a Generalized Langevin Equation formulation. To test the accuracy of the model, gravity driven flow of SPC/E water confined between graphene and silicon slit shaped nanochannels are considered as examples for low and high friction cases. The proposed model yields good quantitative agreement with the velocity profiles obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the slip length is constant for different channel widths for a fixed thermodynamic state under the linear response regime.

  20. Diesel Engine performance improvement in a 1-D engine model using Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karra, Prashanth

    2015-12-01

    A particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique was implemented to improve the engine development and optimization process to simultaneously reduce emissions and improve the fuel efficiency. The optimization was performed on a 4-stroke 4-cylinder GT-Power based 1-D diesel engine model. To achieve the multi-objective optimization, a merit function was defined which included the parameters to be optimized: Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Nonmethyl hydro carbons (NMHC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC). EPA Tier 3 emissions standards for non-road diesel engines between 37 and 75 kW of output were chosen as targets for the optimization. The combustion parameters analyzed in this study include: Start of main Injection, Start of Pilot Injection, Pilot fuel quantity, Swirl, and Tumble. The PSO was found to be very effective in quickly arriving at a solution that met the target criteria as defined in the merit function. The optimization took around 40-50 runs to find the most favourable engine operating condition under the constraints specified in the optimization. In a favourable case with a high merit function values, the NOx+NMHC and CO values were reduced to as low as 2.9 and 0.014 g/kWh, respectively. The operating conditions at this point were: 10 ATDC Main SOI, -25 ATDC Pilot SOI, 0.25 mg of pilot fuel, 0.45 Swirl and 0.85 tumble. These results indicate that late main injections preceded by a close, small pilot injection are most favourable conditions at the operating condition tested.

  1. 1D fluid model of the dielectric barrier discharge in chlorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avtaeva, Svetlana

    2016-09-01

    The 1D fluid model of the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in pure chlorine is developed. The discharge is excited in 8 mm gas gap between quartz dielectric layers of 2 mm thickness covered metallic electrodes. The source voltage US =U0 sin ωt with a frequency 100 kHz and amplitude 8 kV is applied to the electrodes. Chlorine pressure is varied from 15 to 100 Torr. At pressure of 15 Torr a breakdown appears with voltage drop across the discharge gap about 1 kV whereas at 100 Torr it appears with voltage drop about 2 kV. After the first current spike some lower current spikes are observes with chlorine pressure of 100 Torr and large in number current spikes of about identical magnitude are observed with the pressure of 15 Torr. The maximal current density at all pressures reaches about 4 mA/cm.2Total density of surface charge deposited on the electrodes during a half-cycle decreases with chlorine pressure because duration of the current spike discharge phase reduces with chlorine pressure. The average power density inputted in the discharge is 2.5-5.8 W/cm3 per a cycle. The Cl2 plasma is electronegative, the most abundant ions are Cl2+and Cl-. It is shown, that ions get about 95% of the discharge power as electrons get about 5% of the discharge power. 67-97% of the electron power is spending for dissociation and ionization of Cl2 molecules. Emission of Cl* atoms and Cl2*molecules is weak.

  2. Testing the early Mars H2-CO2 greenhouse hypothesis with a 1-D photochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natasha; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Ramirez, Ramses; Kasting, James F.

    2015-09-01

    A recent study by Ramirez et al. (Ramirez, R.M. et al. [2014]. Nat. Geosci. 7(1), 59-63. http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/ngeo2000 (accessed 16.09.14)) demonstrated that an atmosphere with 1.3-4 bar of CO2 and H2O, in addition to 5-20% H2, could have raised the mean annual and global surface temperature of early Mars above the freezing point of water. Such warm temperatures appear necessary to generate the rainfall (or snowfall) amounts required to carve the ancient martian valleys. Here, we use our best estimates for early martian outgassing rates, along with a 1-D photochemical model, to assess the conversion efficiency of CO, CH4, and H2S to CO2, SO2, and H2. Our outgassing estimates assume that Mars was actively recycling volatiles between its crust and interior, as Earth does today. H2 production from serpentinization and deposition of banded iron-formations is also considered. Under these assumptions, maintaining an H2 concentration of ˜1-2% by volume is achievable, but reaching 5% H2 requires additional H2 sources or a slowing of the hydrogen escape rate below the diffusion limit. If the early martian atmosphere was indeed H2-rich, we might be able to see evidence of this in the rock record. The hypothesis proposed here is consistent with new data from the Curiosity Rover, which show evidence for a long-lived lake in Gale Crater near Mt. Sharp. It is also consistent with measured oxygen fugacities of martian meteorites, which show evidence for progressive mantle oxidation over time.

  3. Hydrodynamic modeling of petroleum reservoirs using simulator MUFITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    MUFITS is new noncommercial software for numerical modeling of subsurface processes in various applications (www.mufits.imec.msu.ru). To this point, the simulator was used for modeling nonisothermal flows in geothermal reservoirs and for modeling underground carbon dioxide storage. In this work, we present recent extension of the code to petroleum reservoirs. The simulator can be applied in conventional black oil modeling, but it also utilizes a more complicated models for volatile oil and gas condensate reservoirs as well as for oil rim fields. We give a brief overview of the code by providing the description of internal representation of reservoir models, which are constructed of grid blocks, interfaces, stock tanks as well as of pipe segments and pipe junctions for modeling wells and surface networks. For conventional black oil approach, we present the simulation results for SPE comparative tests. We propose an accelerated compositional modeling method for sub- and supercritical flows subjected to various phase equilibria, particularly to three-phase equilibria of vapour-liquid-liquid type. The method is based on the calculation of the thermodynamic potential of reservoir fluid as a function of pressure, total enthalpy and total composition and storing its values as a spline table, which is used in hydrodynamic simulation for accelerated PVT properties prediction. We provide the description of both the spline calculation procedure and the flashing algorithm. We evaluate the thermodynamic potential for a mixture of two pseudo-components modeling the heavy and light hydrocarbon fractions. We develop a technique for converting black oil PVT tables to the potential, which can be used for in-situ hydrocarbons multiphase equilibria prediction under sub- and supercritical conditions, particularly, in gas condensate and volatile oil reservoirs. We simulate recovery from a reservoir subject to near-critical initial conditions for hydrocarbon mixture. We acknowledge

  4. Accuracy of an estuarine hydrodynamic model using smooth elements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Roy A.; Cheng, Ralph T.

    1980-01-01

    A finite element model which uses triangular, isoparametric elements with quadratic basis functions for the two velocity components and linear basis functions for water surface elevation is used in the computation of shallow water wave motions. Specifically addressed are two common uncertainties in this class of two-dimensional hydrodynamic models: the treatment of the boundary conditions at open boundaries and the treatment of lateral boundary conditions. The accuracy of the models is tested with a set of numerical experiments in rectangular and curvilinear channels with constant and variable depth. The results indicate that errors in velocity at the open boundary can be significant when boundary conditions for water surface elevation are specified. Methods are suggested for minimizing these errors. The results also show that continuity is better maintained within the spatial domain of interest when ‘smooth’ curve-sided elements are used at shoreline boundaries than when piecewise linear boundaries are used. Finally, a method for network development is described which is based upon a continuity criterion to gauge accuracy. A finite element network for San Francisco Bay, California, is used as an example.

  5. Hydrodynamic model of advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Horio, Masayuki; Lei, H.W.

    1997-12-31

    A hydrodynamic model was developed for the advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion (A-PFBC) process. The particular system investigated here is composed of a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) for coal gasification/desulfurization and a PCFB for combustion with the gas-solid counter-current flow through the two PCFBs. One of the most important parameters may be the material seal height (MSH) in the downcomer connecting the gasifier/desulfurizer and the combustor, which is thought to strongly influence the safe and stable operation of the process. In this mode, MSH was determined according to the pressure balance between the gasifier/desulfurizer and the combustor. The solid flux in the lower dense region of the two PCFBs was estimated by considering the clustering suspension and core-annulus flow. The mean cluster size and voidage in the cluster phase were predicted by the cluster size model of Horio-Ito (1996). Solid flux of the gasifier and combustor was calculated based on mass balances of limestone, char and ash in the system. Based on this model, the whole pressure profile loop in the system was predicted, and the effects of operating conditions on MSH between the gasifier and the combustor were investigated. The feasibility of the A-PCFB system with PCFBs both for the gasifier/desulfurizer and for the combustor was successfully confirmed.

  6. A 1-D modelling of climatic and chemical effects of greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vupputuri, R. K. R.; Higuchi, K.; Hengeveld, H. G.

    1995-09-01

    A coupled 1-D time-dependent radiative-convective-photochemical diffusion model which extends from the surface to 60 km is used to investigate the potential impact of greenhouse trace gas emissions on long-term changes in global climate, atmospheric ozone and surface UV-B radiation, taking into accoont the influence of aerosol loading into the atmosphere from major volcanic eruptions, of thermal inertia of the upper mixed layer of the ocean and of other radiativephotochemical feedback mechanisms. Experiments are carried out under global and annual average insolation and cloudiness conditions. The transient calculations are made for three different growth scenarios for increase in trace gas concentrations. Scenario 1, which begins in 1850, uses the best estimate values for future trace gas concentrations of CO2, CH4, N2O, CFC-11, CFC-12 and tropospheric O3, based on current observational trends. Scenarios 2 and 3, which begin in 1990, assume lower and upper ranges, respectively, of observed growth rates to estimate future concentrations. The transient response of the model for Scenario 1 suggests that surface warming of the ocean mixed layer of about 1 K should have taken place between 1850 and 1990 due to a combined increase of atmospheric CO2 and other trace gases. For the three scenarios considered in this study, the cumulative surface warming induced by all major trace gases for the period 1850 to 2080 ranges from 2.7 K to 8.2 K with the best estimate value of 5 K. The results indicate that the direct and the indirect chemistry-climate interactions of non-CO2 trace gases contribute significantly to the cumulative surface warming (up to 65% by the year 2080). The thermal inertia of a mixed layer of the ocean is shown to have the effect of delaying equilibrium surface warming by almost three decades with an e-folding time of about 5 years. The volcanic aerosols which would result from major volcanic eruptions play a significant role by interrupting the long

  7. ABSTRACTION OF INFORMATION FROM 2- AND 3-DIMENSIONAL PORFLOW MODELS INTO A 1-D GOLDSIM MODEL - 11404

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Hiergesell, R.

    2010-11-16

    The Savannah River National Laboratory has developed a 'hybrid' approach to Performance Assessment modeling which has been used for a number of Performance Assessments. This hybrid approach uses a multi-dimensional modeling platform (PorFlow) to develop deterministic flow fields and perform contaminant transport. The GoldSim modeling platform is used to develop the Sensitivity and Uncertainty analyses. Because these codes are performing complementary tasks, it is incumbent upon them that for the deterministic cases they produce very similar results. This paper discusses two very different waste forms, one with no engineered barriers and one with engineered barriers, each of which present different challenges to the abstraction of data. The hybrid approach to Performance Assessment modeling used at the SRNL uses a 2-D unsaturated zone (UZ) and a 3-D saturated zone (SZ) model in the PorFlow modeling platform. The UZ model consists of the waste zone and the unsaturated zoned between the waste zone and the water table. The SZ model consists of source cells beneath the waste form to the points of interest. Both models contain 'buffer' cells so that modeling domain boundaries do not adversely affect the calculation. The information pipeline between the two models is the contaminant flux. The domain contaminant flux, typically in units of moles (or Curies) per year from the UZ model is used as a boundary condition for the source cells in the SZ. The GoldSim modeling component of the hybrid approach is an integrated UZ-SZ model. The model is a 1-D representation of the SZ, typically 1-D in the UZ, but as discussed below, depending on the waste form being analyzed may contain pseudo-2-D elements. A waste form at the Savannah River Site (SRS) which has no engineered barriers is commonly referred to as a slit trench. A slit trench, as its name implies, is an unlined trench, typically 6 m deep, 6 m wide, and 200 m long. Low level waste consisting of soil, debris, rubble, wood

  8. An Integrated Numerical Hydrodynamic Shallow Flow-Solute Transport Model for Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alias, N. A.; Mohd Sidek, L.

    2016-03-01

    The rapidly changing on land profiles in the some urban areas in Malaysia led to the increasing of flood risk. Extensive developments on densely populated area and urbanization worsen the flood scenario. An early warning system is really important and the popular method is by numerically simulating the river and flood flows. There are lots of two-dimensional (2D) flood model predicting the flood level but in some circumstances, still it is difficult to resolve the river reach in a 2D manner. A systematic early warning system requires a precisely prediction of flow depth. Hence a reliable one-dimensional (1D) model that provides accurate description of the flow is essential. Research also aims to resolve some of raised issues such as the fate of pollutant in river reach by developing the integrated hydrodynamic shallow flow-solute transport model. Presented in this paper are results on flow prediction for Sungai Penchala and the convection-diffusion of solute transports simulated by the developed model.

  9. A hydrodynamic model of an outer hair cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.

    1982-01-01

    On the model it is possible to measure the force and the force direction for each individual hair as a function of the flow direction and velocity. Measurements were made at the man flow velocity .01 m/s, which is equivalent to a flow velocity in the real ear of about 1 micrometer/s. The kinematic viscosity of the liquid used in the model was 10,000 times higher than the viscosity of perilymph to attain hydrodynamic equality. Two different geometries for the sterocilia pattern were tested. First the force distribution for a W-shaped sterocilia pattern was recorded. This is the sterocilia pattern found in all real ears. It is found that the forces acting on the hairs are very regular and perpendicular to the legs of the W when the flow is directed from the outside of the W. When the flow is reversed, the forces are not reversed, but are much more irregular. This can eventually explain the half wave rectification of the nerve signals. As a second experiment, the force distribution for a V-shaped sterocilia pattern was recorded. Here the forces were irregular both when the flow was directed into the V and when it was directed against the edge of the V.

  10. Hydrodynamic Modeling of Oxidizer-Rich Staged Combustion Injector Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Brent (Technical Monitor); Canino, J. V.; Heister, S. D.; Garrison, L. A.

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to determine the unsteady hydrodynamic characteristics of coaxial swirl atomizers of interest in oxidizer-rich staged combustion (ORSC) liquid rocket engines. To this end, the pseudo-density (homogeneous flow) treatment combined with the Marker-and-Cell (MAC) numerical algorithm has been used to develop an axisymmetric with swirl, two-phase, unsteady model. The numerical model is capable of assessing the time-dependent orifice exit conditions and internal mixing for arbitrary fuel and oxidizer gas injection conditions. Parametric studies have been conducted to determine the effect of geometry, gas properties, and liquid properties on the exit massflow rate and velocity. It has been found that the frequency at which the liquid film oscillates increases as the density ratio and thickness increase, decreases as film thickness and liquid swirl velocity increase, and is unaffected by the mixing length. Additionally, it has been determined that the variation in the massflow rate increases as the liquid swirl velocity and liquid film thickness increase, and decreases as the density ratio, collar thickness, and mixing length increase.

  11. Analytical models for hydrodynamics of the steam superheating surfaces of a TGMP-344A boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikina, G. A.; Remeeva, A. R.

    2009-10-01

    A model with distributed parameters for describing the hydrodynamic processes in the convective steam superheater of a TGMP-344A boiler, which reflects the possibility that hydraulic pulsations will occur, is considered. A computer program is proposed that allows the frequency characteristics of hydrodynamic processes in complex systems to be estimated using recurrence relations.

  12. 1D Runoff-runon stochastic model in the light of queueing theory : heterogeneity and connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harel, M.-A.; Mouche, E.; Ledoux, E.

    2012-04-01

    Runoff production on a hillslope during a rainfall event may be simplified as follows. Given a soil of constant infiltrability I, which is the maximum amount of water that the soil can infiltrate, and a constant rainfall intensity R, runoff is observed where R is greater than I. The infiltration rate equals the infiltrability when runoff is produced, R otherwise. When ponding time, topography, and overall spatial and temporal variations of physical parameters, such as R and I, are neglected, the runoff equation remains simple. In this study, we consider soils of spatially variable infiltrability. As runoff can re-infiltrate on down-slope areas of higher infiltrabilities (runon), the resulting process is highly non-linear. The stationary runoff equation is: Qn+1 = max(Qn + (R - In)*Δx , 0) where Qn is the runoff arriving on pixel n of size Δx [L2/T], R and In the rainfall intensity and infiltrability on that same pixel [L/T]. The non-linearity is due to the dependence of infiltration on R and Qn, that is runon. This re-infiltration process generates patterns of runoff along the slope, patterns that organise and connect to each other differently depending on the rainfall intensity and the nature of the soil heterogeneity. The runoff connectivity, assessed using the connectivity function of Allard (1993), affects greatly the dynamics of the runoff hillslope. Our aim is to assess, in a stochastic framework, the runoff organization on 1D slopes with random infiltrabilities (log-normal, exponential, bimodal and uniform distributions) by means of theoretical developments and numerical simulations. This means linking the nature of soil heterogeneity with the resulting runoff organisation. In term of connectivity, we investigate the relations between structural (infiltrability) and functional (runoff) connectivity. A theoretical framework based on the queueing theory is developed. We implement the idea of Jones et al. (2009), who remarked that the above formulation is

  13. Radiation Hydrodynamics Models of the Inner Rim in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, M.; Fromang, S.; Turner, N. J.; Benisty, M.

    2016-08-01

    Many stars host planets orbiting within a few astronomical units (AU). The occurrence rate and distributions of masses and orbits vary greatly with the host star’s mass. These close planets’ origins are a mystery that motivates investigating protoplanetary disks’ central regions. A key factor governing the conditions near the star is the silicate sublimation front, which largely determines where the starlight is absorbed, and which is often called the inner rim. We present the first radiation hydrodynamical modeling of the sublimation front in the disks around the young intermediate-mass stars called Herbig Ae stars. The models are axisymmetric and include starlight heating silicate grains sublimating and condensing to equilibrium at the local, time-dependent temperature and density and accretion stresses parameterizing the results of MHD magnetorotational turbulence models. The results compare well with radiation hydrostatic solutions and prove to be dynamically stable. Passing the model disks into Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations, we show that the models satisfy observational constraints on the inner rim’s location. A small optically thin halo of hot dust naturally arises between the inner rim and the star. The inner rim has a substantial radial extent, corresponding to several disk scale heights. While the front’s overall position varies with the stellar luminosity, its radial extent depends on the mass accretion rate. A pressure maximum develops near the location of thermal ionization at temperatures of about 1000 K. The pressure maximum is capable of halting solid pebbles’ radial drift and concentrating them in a zone where temperatures are sufficiently high for annealing to form crystalline silicates.

  14. Gold-standard performance for 2D hydrodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternack, G. B.; MacVicar, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-dimensional, depth-averaged hydrodynamic (2D) models are emerging as an increasingly useful tool for environmental water resources engineering. One of the remaining technical hurdles to the wider adoption and acceptance of 2D modeling is the lack of standards for 2D model performance evaluation when the riverbed undulates, causing lateral flow divergence and convergence. The goal of this study was to establish a gold-standard that quantifies the upper limit of model performance for 2D models of undulating riverbeds when topography is perfectly known and surface roughness is well constrained. A review was conducted of published model performance metrics and the value ranges exhibited by models thus far for each one. Typically predicted velocity differs from observed by 20 to 30 % and the coefficient of determination between the two ranges from 0.5 to 0.8, though there tends to be a bias toward overpredicting low velocity and underpredicting high velocity. To establish a gold standard as to the best performance possible for a 2D model of an undulating bed, two straight, rectangular-walled flume experiments were done with no bed slope and only different bed undulations and water surface slopes. One flume tested model performance in the presence of a porous, homogenous gravel bed with a long flat section, then a linear slope down to a flat pool bottom, and then the same linear slope back up to the flat bed. The other flume had a PVC plastic solid bed with a long flat section followed by a sequence of five identical riffle-pool pairs in close proximity, so it tested model performance given frequent undulations. Detailed water surface elevation and velocity measurements were made for both flumes. Comparing predicted versus observed velocity magnitude for 3 discharges with the gravel-bed flume and 1 discharge for the PVC-bed flume, the coefficient of determination ranged from 0.952 to 0.987 and the slope for the regression line was 0.957 to 1.02. Unsigned velocity

  15. 1-D seismic velocity model and hypocenter relocation using double difference method around West Papua region

    SciTech Connect

    Sabtaji, Agung E-mail: agung.sabtaji@bmkg.go.id; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    West Papua region has fairly high of seismicity activities due to tectonic setting and many inland faults. In addition, the region has a unique and complex tectonic conditions and this situation lead to high potency of seismic hazard in the region. The precise earthquake hypocenter location is very important, which could provide high quality of earthquake parameter information and the subsurface structure in this region to the society. We conducted 1-D P-wave velocity using earthquake data catalog from BMKG for April, 2009 up to March, 2014 around West Papua region. The obtained 1-D seismic velocity then was used as input for improving hypocenter location using double-difference method. The relocated hypocenter location shows fairly clearly the pattern of intraslab earthquake beneath New Guinea Trench (NGT). The relocated hypocenters related to the inland fault are also observed more focus in location around the fault.

  16. Lattice hydrodynamic model based traffic control: A transportation cyber-physical system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Sun, Dihua; Liu, Weining

    2016-11-01

    Lattice hydrodynamic model is a typical continuum traffic flow model, which describes the jamming transition of traffic flow properly. Previous studies in lattice hydrodynamic model have shown that the use of control method has the potential to improve traffic conditions. In this paper, a new control method is applied in lattice hydrodynamic model from a transportation cyber-physical system approach, in which only one lattice site needs to be controlled in this control scheme. The simulation verifies the feasibility and validity of this method, which can ensure the efficient and smooth operation of the traffic flow.

  17. Update on PHELIX Pulsed-Power Hydrodynamics Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, Christopher; Reass, William; Oro, David; Griego, Jeffery; Turchi, Peter; Reinovsky, Robert; Devolder, Barbara

    2013-10-01

    The PHELIX pulsed-power driver is a 300 kJ, portable, transformer-coupled, capacitor bank capable of delivering 3-5 MA, 10 μs pulse into a low inductance load. Here we describe further testing and hydrodynamics experiments. First, a 4 nH static inductive load has been constructed. This allows for repetitive high-voltage, high-current testing of the system. Results are used in the calibration of simple circuit models and numerical simulations across a range of bank charges (+/-20 < V0 < +/-40 kV). Furthermore, a dynamic liner-on-target load experiment has been conducted to explore the shock-launched transport of particulates (diam. ~ 1 μm) from a surface. The trajectories of the particulates are diagnosed with radiography. Results are compared to 2D hydro-code simulations. Finally, initial studies are underway to assess the feasibility of using the PHELIX driver as an electromagnetic launcher for planer shock-physics experiments. Work supported by United States-DOE under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  18. A hydrodynamics-reaction kinetics coupled model for evaluating bioreactors derived from CFD simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Ding, Jie; Guo, Wan-Qian; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2010-12-01

    Investigating how a bioreactor functions is a necessary precursor for successful reactor design and operation. Traditional methods used to investigate flow-field cannot meet this challenge accurately and economically. Hydrodynamics model can solve this problem, but to understand a bioreactor in sufficient depth, it is often insufficient. In this paper, a coupled hydrodynamics-reaction kinetics model was formulated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to simulate a gas-liquid-solid three-phase biotreatment system for the first time. The hydrodynamics model is used to formulate prediction of the flow field and the reaction kinetics model then portrays the reaction conversion process. The coupled model is verified and used to simulate the behavior of an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor for biohydrogen production. The flow patterns were visualized and analyzed. The coupled model also demonstrates a qualitative relationship between hydrodynamics and biohydrogen production. The advantages and limitations of applying this coupled model are discussed.

  19. Hydrodynamic modeling of Singapore's coastal waters: Nesting and model accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, G. M. Jahid; van Maren, Dirk Sebastiaan; Ooi, Seng Keat

    2016-01-01

    The tidal variation in Singapore's coastal waters is influenced by large-scale, complex tidal dynamics (by interaction of the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea) as well as monsoon-driven low frequency variations, requiring a model with large spatial coverage. Close to the shores, the complex topography, influenced by headlands and small islands, requires a high resolution model to simulate tidal dynamics. This can be achieved through direct nesting or multi-scale nesting, involving multiple model grids. In this paper, we investigate the effect of grid resolution and multi-scale nesting on the tidal dynamics in Singapore's coastal waters, by comparing model results with observations using different statistical techniques. The results reveal that the intermediate-scale model is generally sufficiently accurate (equal to or better than the most refined model), but also that the most refined model is only more accurate when nested in the intermediate scale model (requiring multi-scale nesting). This latter is the result of the complex tidal dynamics around Singapore, where the dominantly diurnal tidal currents are decoupled from the semi-diurnal water level variations. Furthermore, different techniques to quantify model accuracy (harmonic analysis, basic statistics and more complex statistics) are inconsistent in determining which model is more accurate.

  20. Glut1 deficiency (G1D): Epilepsy and metabolic dysfunction in a mouse model of the most common human phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Good, Levi B.; Ma, Qian; Duarte, Joao; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Sinton, Christopher M.; Heilig, Charles W.; Pascual, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    Brain glucose supplies most of the carbon required for acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) generation (an important step for myelin synthesis) and for neurotransmitter production via further metabolism of acetyl-CoA in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. However, it is not known whether reduced brain glucose transporter type I (GLUT-1) activity, the hallmark of the GLUT-1 deficiency (G1D) syndrome, leads to acetyl-CoA, TCA or neurotransmitter depletion. This question is relevant because, in its most common form in man, G1D is associated with cerebral hypomyelination (manifested as microcephaly) and epilepsy, suggestive of acetyl-CoA depletion and neurotransmitter dysfunction, respectively. Yet, brain metabolism in G1D remains underexplored both theoretically and experimentally, partly because computational models of limited brain glucose transport are subordinate to metabolic assumptions and partly because current hemizygous G1D mouse models manifest a mild phenotype not easily amenable to investigation. In contrast, adult antisense G1D mice replicate the human phenotype of spontaneous epilepsy associated with robust thalamocortical electrical oscillations. Additionally, and in consonance with human metabolic imaging observations, thalamus and cerebral cortex display the lowest GLUT-1 expression and glucose uptake in the mutant mouse. This depletion of brain glucose is associated with diminished plasma fatty acids and elevated ketone body levels, and with decreased brain acetyl-CoA and fatty acid contents, consistent with brain ketone body consumption and with stimulation of brain beta-oxidation and/or diminished cerebral lipid synthesis. In contrast with other epilepsies, astrocyte glutamine synthetase expression, cerebral TCA cycle intermediates, amino acid and amine neurotransmitter contents are also intact in G1D. The data suggest that the TCA cycle is preserved in G1D because reduced glycolysis and acetyl-CoA formation can be balanced by enhanced ketone body

  1. Monitoring Mediterranean marine pollution using remote sensing and hydrodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Loggia, Goffredo; Capodici, Fulvio; Ciraolo, Giuseppe; Drago, Aldo; Maltese, Antonino

    2011-11-01

    Human activities contaminate both coastal areas and open seas, even though impacts are different in terms of pollutants, ecosystems and recovery time. In particular, Mediterranean offshore pollution is mainly related to maritime transport of oil, accounting for 25% of the global maritime traffic and, during the last 25 years, for nearly 7% of the world oil accidents, thus causing serious biological impacts on both open sea and coastal zone habitats. This paper provides a general review of maritime pollution monitoring using integrated approaches of remote sensing and hydrodynamic modeling; focusing on the main results of the MAPRES (Marine pollution monitoring and detection by aerial surveillance and satellite images) research project on the synergistic use of remote sensing, forecasting, cleanup measures and environmental consequences. The paper also investigates techniques of oil spill detection using SAR images, presenting the first results of "Monitoring of marine pollution due to oil slick", a COSMO-SkyMed funded research project where X-band SAR constellation images provided by the Italian Space Agency are used. Finally, the prospect of using real time observations of marine surface conditions is presented through CALYPSO project (CALYPSO-HF Radar Monitoring System and Response against Marine Oil Spills in the Malta Channel), partly financed by the EU under the Operational Programme Italia-Malta 2007-2013. The project concerns the setting up of a permanent and fully operational HF radar observing system, capable of recording surface currents (in real-time with hourly updates) in the stretch of sea between Malta and Sicily. A combined use of collected data and numerical models, aims to optimize intervention and response in the case of marine oil spills.

  2. Large-scale hydrodynamic modeling of the middle Yangtze River Basin with complex river-lake interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Xijun; Jiang, Jiahu; Liang, Qiuhua; Huang, Qun

    2013-06-01

    The flow regime in the middle Yangtze River Basin is experiencing rapid changes due to intensive human activities and ongoing climate change. The middle reach of Yangtze River and the associated water system are extremely difficult to be reliably modeled due to highly complex interactions between the main stream and many tributaries and lakes. This paper presents a new Coupled Hydrodynamic Analysis Model (CHAM) designed for simulating the large-scale water system in the middle Yangtze River Basin, featured with complex river-lake interactions. CHAM dynamically couples a one-dimensional (1-D) unsteady flow model and a two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic model using a new coupling algorithm that is particularly suitable for large-scale water systems. Numerical simulations are carried out to reproduce the flow regime in the region in 1998 when a severe flood event occurred and in 2006 when it experienced an extremely dry year. The model is able to reproduce satisfactorily the major physical processes featured with seasonal wetting and drying controlled by strong river-lake interactions. This indicates that the present model provides a promising tool for predicting complex flow regimes with remarkable seasonal changes and strong river-lake interactions.

  3. An evaluation of 1D loss model collections for the off-design performance prediction of automotive turbocharger compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, P.; Spence, S.; Early, J.; Filsinger, D.; Dietrich, M.

    2013-12-01

    Single-zone modelling is used to assess different collections of impeller 1D loss models. Three collections of loss models have been identified in literature, and the background to each of these collections is discussed. Each collection is evaluated using three modern automotive turbocharger style centrifugal compressors; comparisons of performance for each of the collections are made. An empirical data set taken from standard hot gas stand tests for each turbocharger is used as a baseline for comparison. Compressor range is predicted in this study; impeller diffusion ratio is shown to be a useful method of predicting compressor surge in 1D, and choke is predicted using basic compressible flow theory. The compressor designer can use this as a guide to identify the most compatible collection of losses for turbocharger compressor design applications. The analysis indicates the most appropriate collection for the design of automotive turbocharger centrifugal compressors.

  4. Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate-Scale Hydrodynamic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Labiosa, Rochelle G.; Kim, Taeyun

    2010-11-30

    The Washington State Department of Ecology contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to develop an intermediate-scale hydrodynamic and water quality model to study dissolved oxygen and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound and to help define potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies and decisions. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or dominate human impacts to dissolved oxygen levels in the sensitive areas. In this study, an intermediate-scale hydrodynamic model of Puget Sound was developed to simulate the hydrodynamics of Puget Sound and the Northwest Straits for the year 2006. The model was constructed using the unstructured Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model. The overall model grid resolution within Puget Sound in its present configuration is about 880 m. The model was driven by tides, river inflows, and meteorological forcing (wind and net heat flux) and simulated tidal circulations, temperature, and salinity distributions in Puget Sound. The model was validated against observed data of water surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity at various stations within the study domain. Model validation indicated that the model simulates tidal elevations and currents in Puget Sound well and reproduces the general patterns of the temperature and salinity distributions.

  5. MODELING HOW A HURRICANE BARRIER IN NEW BEDFORD HARBOR, MASSACHUSETTS, AFFECTS THE HYDRODYNAMICS AND RESIDENCE TIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic and transport models were used to simulate tidal and subtidal circulation, residence times, and the longitudinal distributions of conservative constituents in New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, before and after a hurricane barrier was constructed. The...

  6. Modeling of Waves, Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport for Protection of Wetlands at Braddock Bay, New York

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Support Program Modeling of Waves, Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport for Protection of Wetlands at Braddock Bay, New York En gi ne er R es ea...Operations Technical Support Program ERDC TR-14-8 March 2015 Modeling of Waves, Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport for Protection of Wetlands...Corps of Engineers (USACE), Buffalo Dis- trict, is conducting a study to evaluate shoreline protection measures for coastal wetlands at Braddock Bay

  7. Coupling hydrodynamic and wave propagation modeling for waveform modeling of SPE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larmat, C. S.; Steedman, D. W.; Rougier, E.; Delorey, A.; Bradley, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to bring empirical and theoretical advances to the problem of detection and identification of underground nuclear explosions. This paper presents effort to improve knowledge of the processes that affect seismic wave propagation from the hydrodynamic/plastic source region to the elastic/anelastic far field thanks to numerical modeling. The challenge is to couple the prompt processes that take place in the near source region to the ones taking place later in time due to wave propagation in complex 3D geologic environments. In this paper, we report on results of first-principles simulations coupling hydrodynamic simulation codes (Abaqus and CASH), with a 3D full waveform propagation code, SPECFEM3D. Abaqus and CASH model the shocked, hydrodynamic region via equations of state for the explosive, borehole stemming and jointed/weathered granite. LANL has been recently employing a Coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) modeling capability. This has allowed the testing of a new phenomenological model for modeling stored shear energy in jointed material. This unique modeling capability has enabled highfidelity modeling of the explosive, the weak grout-filled borehole, as well as the surrounding jointed rock. SPECFEM3D is based on the Spectral Element Method, a direct numerical method for full waveform modeling with mathematical accuracy (e.g. Komatitsch, 1998, 2002) thanks to its use of the weak formulation of the wave equation and of high-order polynomial functions. The coupling interface is a series of grid points of the SEM mesh situated at the edge of the hydrodynamic code domain. Displacement time series at these points are computed from output of CASH or Abaqus (by interpolation if needed) and fed into the time marching scheme of SPECFEM3D. We will present validation tests and waveforms modeled for several SPE tests conducted so far, with a special focus on effect of the local topography.

  8. A lattice Boltzmann study of non-hydrodynamic effects in shell models of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzi, R.; Biferale, L.; Sbragaglia, M.; Succi, S.; Toschi, F.

    2004-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann scheme simulating the dynamics of shell models of turbulence is developed. The influence of high-order kinetic modes (ghosts) on the dissipative properties of turbulence dynamics is studied. It is analytically found that when ghost fields relax on the same timescale as the hydrodynamic ones, their major effect is a net enhancement of the fluid viscosity. The bare fluid viscosity is recovered by letting ghost fields evolve on a much longer timescale. Analytical results are borne out by high-resolution numerical simulations. These simulations indicate that the hydrodynamic manifold is very robust towards large fluctuations of non-hydrodynamic fields.

  9. Simulation of Tailrace Hydrodynamics Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2001-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools to investigate hydrodynamic flow fields surrounding the tailrace zone below large hydraulic structures. Previous and ongoing studies using CFD tools to simulate gradually varied flow with multiple constituents and forebay/intake hydrodynamics have shown that CFD tools can provide valuable information for hydraulic and biological evaluation of fish passage near hydraulic structures. These studies however are incapable of simulating the rapidly varying flow fields that involving breakup of the free-surface, such as those through and below high flow outfalls and spillways. Although the use of CFD tools for these types of flow are still an active area of research, initial applications discussed in this report show that these tools are capable of simulating the primary features of these highly transient flow fields.

  10. A 1D model for tides waves and fine sediment in short tidal basins—Application to the Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Prooijen, Bram Christiaan; Wang, Zheng Bing

    2013-12-01

    In order to simulate the dynamics of fine sediments in short tidal basins, like the Wadden Sea basins, a 1D cross-sectional averaged model is constructed to simulate tidal flow, depth-limited waves, and fine sediment transport. The key for this 1D model lies in the definition of the geometry (width and depth as function of the streamwise coordinate). The geometry is computed by implementing the water level and flow data, from a 2D flow simulation, and the hypsometric curve in the continuity equation. By means of a finite volume method, the shallow-water equations and sediment transport equations are solved. The bed shear stress consists of the sum of shear stresses by waves and flow, in which the waves are computed with a depth-limited growth equation for wave height and wave frequency. A new formulation for erosion of fines from a sandy bed is proposed in the transport equation for fine sediment. It is shown by comparison with 2D simulations and field measurements that a 1D schematization gives a proper representation of the dynamics in short tidal basins.

  11. A fast hybrid (3-D/1-D) model for thermal radiative transfer in cirrus via successive orders of scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchez, Thomas; Davis, Anthony B.; Cornet, Céline; Szczap, Fredéric; Platnick, Steven; Dubuisson, Philippe; Thieuleux, François

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneity on the direct emission by cloud or surface and on the scattering by ice particles in the thermal infrared (TIR). Realistic 3-D cirri are modeled with the 3DCLOUD code, and top-of-atmosphere radiances are simulated by the 3-D Monte Carlo radiative transfer (RT) algorithm 3DMCPOL for two (8.65 μm and 12.05 μm) channels of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer on CALIPSO. At nadir, comparisons of 1-D and 3-D RT show that 3-D radiances are larger than their 1-D counterparts for direct emission but smaller for scattered radiation. For our cirrus cases, 99% of the 3-D total radiance is computed by the third scattering order, which corresponds to 90% of the total computational effort, but larger optical thicknesses need more scattering orders. To radically accelerate the 3-D RT computations (using only few percent of 3-D RT time with a Monte Carlo code), even in the presence of large optical depths, we develop a hybrid model based on exact 3-D direct emission, the first scattering order from 1-D in each homogenized column, and an empirical adjustment linearly dependent on the optical thickness to account for higher scattering orders. Good agreement is found between the hybrid model and the exact 3-D radiances for two very different cirrus models without changing the empirical parameters. We anticipate that a future deterministic implementation of the hybrid model will be fast enough to process multiangle thermal imagery in a practical tomographic reconstruction of 3-D cirrus fields.

  12. A Fast Hybrid (3-D/1-D) Model for Thermal Radiative Transfer in Cirrus via Successive Orders of Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fauchez, Thomas; Davis, Anthony B.; Cornet, Celine; Szczap, Frederic; Platnick, Steven; Dubuisson, Philippe; Thieuleux, Francois

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneity on the direct emission by cloud or surface and on the scattering by ice particles in the thermal infrared (TIR). Realistic 3-D cirri are modeled with the 3DCLOUD code, and top-of-atmosphere radiances are simulated by the 3-D Monte Carlo radiative transfer (RT) algorithm 3DMCPOL for two (8.65 micrometers and 12.05 micrometers) channels of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer on CALIPSO. At nadir, comparisons of 1-D and 3-D RT show that 3-D radiances are larger than their 1-D counterparts for direct emission but smaller for scattered radiation. For our cirrus cases, 99% of the 3-D total radiance is computed by the third scattering order, which corresponds to 90% of the total computational effort, but larger optical thicknesses need more scattering orders. To radically accelerate the 3-D RT computations (using only few percent of 3-D RT time with a Monte Carlo code), even in the presence of large optical depths, we develop a hybrid model based on exact 3-D direct emission, the first scattering order from 1-D in each homogenized column, and an empirical adjustment linearly dependent on the optical thickness to account for higher scattering orders. Good agreement is found between the hybrid model and the exact 3-D radiances for two very different cirrus models without changing the empirical parameters. We anticipate that a future deterministic implementation of the hybrid model will be fast enough to process multiangle thermal imagery in a practical tomographic reconstruction of 3-D cirrus fields.

  13. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors. Fifth technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gidaspow, D.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this work is to convert our `learning gas-solid-liquid` fluidization model into a predictive design model. The IIT hydrodynamic model computes the phase velocities and the volume fractions of gas, liquid, and particulate phases. Model verification involves a comparison of these computed velocities and volume fractions to experimental values.

  14. 1-D and 2-D resonances in an Alpine valley identified from ambient noise measurements and 3-D modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Olivier; Cornou, Cécile; Jongmans, Denis; Schwartz, Stéphane

    2012-09-01

    H/V spectral ratios are regularly used for estimating the bedrock depth in 1-D like basins exhibiting smooth lateral variations. In the case of 2-D or 3-D pronounced geometries, observational and numerical studies have shown that H/V curves exhibit peculiar shapes and that the H/V frequency generally overestimates 1-D theoretical resonance frequency. To investigate the capabilities of the H/V method in complex structures, a detailed comparison between measured and 3-D-simulated ambient vibrations was performed in the small-size lower Romanche valley (French Alps), which shows significant variations in geometry, downstream and upstream the Séchilienne basin. Analysing the H/V curve characteristics, two different wave propagation modes were identified along the valley. Relying on previous geophysical investigation, a power-law relationship was derived between the bedrock depth and the H/V peak frequency, which was used for building a 3-D model of the valley geometry. Simulated and experimental H/V curves were found to exhibit quite similar features in terms of curve shape and peak frequency values, validating the 3-D structure. This good agreement also evidenced two different propagation modes in the valley: 2-D resonance in the Séchilienne basin and 1-D resonance in the external parts. This study underlines the interest of H/V curves for investigating complex basin structures.

  15. Hydrodynamic properties of San Quintin Bay, Baja California: Merging models and observations.

    PubMed

    Melaku Canu, Donata; Aveytua-Alcázar, Leslie; Camacho-Ibar, Victor F; Querin, Stefano; Solidoro, Cosimo

    2016-07-15

    We investigated the physical dynamics of San Quintin Bay, a coastal lagoon located on the Pacific coast of northern Baja California, Mexico. We implemented, validated and used a finite element 2-D hydrodynamic model to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of the hydrodynamic of the bay in response to variability in the tidal regime and in meteorological forcing patterns. Our analysis of general circulation, residual currents, residence times, and tidal propagation delays allowed us to characterize spatial variability in the hydrodynamic basin features. The eulerian water residence time is -on average and under reference conditions- approximately 7days, although this can change significantly by region and season and under different tidal and meteorological conditions. Ocean upwelling events that bring colder waters into the bay mouth affect hydrodynamic properties in all areas of the lagoon and may affect ecological dynamics. A return to pre-upwelling conditions would take approximately 10days.

  16. A 1-D model of the nonlinear dynamics of the human lumbar intervertebral disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, Giacomo; Huber, Gerd; Püschel, Klaus; Ferguson, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Lumped parameter models of the spine have been developed to investigate its response to whole body vibration. However, these models assume the behaviour of the intervertebral disc to be linear-elastic. Recently, the authors have reported on the nonlinear dynamic behaviour of the human lumbar intervertebral disc. This response was shown to be dependent on the applied preload and amplitude of the stimuli. However, the mechanical properties of a standard linear elastic model are not dependent on the current deformation state of the system. The aim of this study was therefore to develop a model that is able to describe the axial, nonlinear quasi-static response and to predict the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of the disc. The ability to adapt the model to an individual disc's response was a specific focus of the study, with model validation performed against prior experimental data. The influence of the numerical parameters used in the simulations was investigated. The developed model exhibited an axial quasi-static and dynamic response, which agreed well with the corresponding experiments. However, the model needs further improvement to capture additional peculiar characteristics of the system dynamics, such as the change of mean point of oscillation exhibited by the specimens when oscillating in the region of nonlinear resonance. Reference time steps were identified for specific integration scheme. The study has demonstrated that taking into account the nonlinear-elastic behaviour typical of the intervertebral disc results in a predicted system oscillation much closer to the physiological response than that provided by linear-elastic models. For dynamic analysis, the use of standard linear-elastic models should be avoided, or restricted to study cases where the amplitude of the stimuli is relatively small.

  17. Hydrodynamic Model of Inundation Event at Confluence of Ohio and Mississippi Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, B. A.; Luke, A.; Alsdorf, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this project is to produce an accurate 2-D hydrodynamic model of an inundation event that occurred at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi River. The inundation occurred in the months of April and May 2011, with the city of interest being Cairo, Illinois. In order to relieve flooding within Cairo, a Bird's Point Levee was detonated by the Army Corps of Engineers. Cairo is a small city of 2,800 people, and is prone to flooding due to its proximity to the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi River. Cairo is also the only city in the U.S. completely surrounded by levees. The advantage of a 2-D modeling approach compared to a 1-D approach is that the floodplain geomorphological processes are more accurately represented. Understanding non-channelized flow that occurs during inundation events is a subject of growing interest, and is being addressed in other projects such as the NASA-SWOT mission scheduled for launch in 2019. The 2-D model utilized in this study is LISFLOOD-FP. LISFLOOD-FP is a 2-D finite-difference flood inundation model that has been proven to accurately simulate flood inundation for urban, coastal, and fluvial environments. LISFLOOD-FP operates using known hydraulic principles along with continuity and momentum equations to describe the flow of water through channels and floodplains. The digital elevation model used to represent the area's topography was obtained from the USGS National Elevation Data set, and our model uses input data from USGS stream gauges located upstream of the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi River. The gauging station located in Cairo will be used for model validation. Currently, many flood simulations are being modeled with varying conditions and input files. In situ cross sectional data is being used to represent the channel. We have found that using averages of the cross sectional data do not accurately represent the river channels, so future model runs will incorporate interpolation between

  18. Advancement of Global-scale River Hydrodynamics Modelling and Its Potential Applications to Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, D.

    2015-12-01

    Global river routine models have been developed for representing freshwater discharge from land to ocean in Earth System Models. At the beginning, global river models had simulated river discharge along a prescribed river network map by using a linear-reservoir assumption. Recently, in parallel with advancement of remote sensing and computational powers, many advanced global river models have started to represent floodplain inundation assuming sub-grid floodplain topography. Some of them further pursue physically-appropriate representation of river and floodplain dynamics, and succeeded to utilize "hydrodynamic flow equations" to realistically simulate channel/floodplain and upstream/downstream interactions. State-of-the-art global river hydrodynamic models can well reproduce flood stage (e.g. inundated areas and water levels) in addition to river discharge. Flood stage simulation by global river models can be potentially coupled with land surface processes in Earth System Models. For example, evaporation from inundated water area is not negligible for land-atmosphere interactions in arid areas (such as the Niger River). Surface water level and ground water level are correlated each other in flat topography, and this interaction could dominate wetting and drying of many small lakes in flatland and could also affect biogeochemical processes in these lakes. These land/surface water interactions had not been implemented in Earth System Models but they have potential impact on the global climate and carbon cycle. In the AGU presentation, recent advancements of global river hydrodynamic modelling, including super-high resolution river topography datasets, will be introduces. The potential applications of river and surface water modules within Earth System Models will be also discussed.

  19. Space-based observational constraints for 1-D fire smoke plume-rise models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Val Martin, Maria; Kahn, Ralph A.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Paugam, Ronan; Wooster, Martin; Ichoku, Charles

    2012-11-01

    We use a plume height climatology derived from space-based Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) observations to evaluate the performance of a widely used plume-rise model. We initialize the model with assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System and estimated fuel moisture content at the location and time of the MISR measurements. Fire properties that drive the plume-rise model are difficult to constrain, and we test the model with four estimates each of active fire area and total heat flux, obtained from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire radiative power (FRP) thermal anomalies available for each MISR plume and other empirical data. We demonstrate the degree to which the fire dynamical heat flux (related to active fire area and sensible heat flux) and atmospheric stability structure influence plume rise, although entrainment and possibly other less well constrained factors are also likely to be significant. Using atmospheric stability conditions, MODIS FRP, and MISR plume heights, we find that smoke plumes reaching high altitudes are characterized by higher FRP and weaker atmospheric stability conditions than those at low altitude, which tend to remain confined below the boundary layer, consistent with earlier results. However, over the diversity of conditions studied, the model simulations generally underestimate the plume height dynamic range observed by MISR and do not reliably identify plumes injected into the free troposphere, key information needed for atmospheric models to simulate smoke dispersion. We conclude that embedding in large-scale atmospheric studies an advanced plume-rise model using currently available fire constraints remains a difficult proposition, and we propose a simplified model that crudely constrains plume injection height based on two main physical factors for which some observational constraints often exist. Field experiments aimed at directly measuring fire and smoke

  20. New York Bight Study. Report 1. Hydrodynamic Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    Study. Report 1, Hydrodynamic mdeling / by Norman W. Scheff ner... Cet alo ] ; prepared for U.S. Army Engineer District, New York. 228 p. iV. ; 28 cm. -H...specify the river boundary condi- tion in this manner, because the head of tide is generally tens of miles up- stream of the river mouth and therefore...including the time for 0MB Nintrcto.s 0704-0188t.r] at .¢rc• .= IR buideriorlh te to verae I our r repons.ewingd instructions, searching existing data

  1. Space-based Observational Constraints for 1-D Plume Rise Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Maria Val; Kahn, Ralph A.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Paguam, Ronan; Wooster, Martin; Ichoku, Charles

    2012-01-01

    We use a space-based plume height climatology derived from observations made by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument aboard the NASA Terra satellite to evaluate the ability of a plume-rise model currently embedded in several atmospheric chemical transport models (CTMs) to produce accurate smoke injection heights. We initialize the plume-rise model with assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System and estimated fuel moisture content at the location and time of the MISR measurements. Fire properties that drive the plume-rise model are difficult to estimate and we test the model with four estimates for active fire area and four for total heat flux, obtained using empirical data and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) re radiative power (FRP) thermal anomalies available for each MISR plume. We show that the model is not able to reproduce the plume heights observed by MISR over the range of conditions studied (maximum r2 obtained in all configurations is 0.3). The model also fails to determine which plumes are in the free troposphere (according to MISR), key information needed for atmospheric models to simulate properly smoke dispersion. We conclude that embedding a plume-rise model using currently available re constraints in large-scale atmospheric studies remains a difficult proposition. However, we demonstrate the degree to which the fire dynamical heat flux (related to active fire area and sensible heat flux), and atmospheric stability structure influence plume rise, although other factors less well constrained (e.g., entrainment) may also be significant. Using atmospheric stability conditions, MODIS FRP, and MISR plume heights, we offer some constraints on the main physical factors that drive smoke plume rise. We find that smoke plumes reaching high altitudes are characterized by higher FRP and weaker atmospheric stability conditions than those at low altitude, which tend to remain confined

  2. RANS computations for identification of 1-D cavitation model parameters: application to full load cavitation vortex rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alligné, S.; Decaix, J.; Müller, A.; Nicolet, C.; Avellan, F.; Münch, C.

    2016-11-01

    Due to the massive penetration of alternative renewable energies, hydropower is a key energy conversion technology for stabilizing the electrical power network by using hydraulic machines at off design operating conditions. At full load, the axisymmetric cavitation vortex rope developing in Francis turbines acts as an internal source of energy, leading to an instability commonly referred to as selfexcited surge. 1-D models are developed to predict this phenomenon and to define the range of safe operating points for a hydropower plant. These models involve several parameters that have to be calibrated using experimental and numerical data. The present work aims to identify these parameters with URANS computations with a particular focus on the fluid damping rising when the cavitation volume oscillates. Two test cases have been investigated: a cavitation flow in a Venturi geometry without inlet swirl and a reduced scale model of a Francis turbine operating at full load conditions. The cavitation volume oscillation is forced by imposing an unsteady outlet pressure conditions. By varying the frequency of the outlet pressure, the resonance frequency is determined. Then, the pressure amplitude and the resonance frequency are used as two objectives functions for the optimization process aiming to derive the 1-D model parameters.

  3. Impact of sea spray on upper ocean temperature during typhoon passage: simulation with a 1-D turbulent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lianxin; Zhang, Xuefeng; Han, Guijun; Wu, Xinrong; Cui, Xiaojian; Shao, Caixia; Sun, Chunjian; Zhang, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Xidong; Fu, Hongli

    2015-09-01

    At the interface between the lower atmosphere and sea surface, sea spray might significantly influence air-sea heat fluxes and subsequently, modulate upper ocean temperature during a typhoon passage. The effects of sea spray were introduced into the parameterization of sea surface roughness in a 1-D turbulent model, to investigate the effects of sea spray on upper ocean temperature in the Kuroshio Extension area, for the cases of two real typhoons from 2006, Yagi and Soulik. Model output was compared with data from the Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO), and Reynolds and AMSRE satellite remote sensing sea surface temperatures. The results indicate drag coefficients that include the spray effect are closer to observations than those without, and that sea spray can enhance the heat fluxes (especially latent heat flux) considerably during a typhoon passage. Consequently, the model results with heat fluxes enhanced by sea spray simulate better the cooling process of the SST and upper-layer temperature profiles. Additionally, results from the simulation of the passage of typhoon Soulik (that passed KEO quickly), which included the sea spray effect, were better than for the simulated passage of typhoon Yagi (that crossed KEO slowly). These promising 1-D results could provide insight into the application of sea spray in general circulation models for typhoon studies.

  4. Radon exhalation from uranium mill tailings: experimental validation of a 1-D model.

    PubMed

    Ferry, C; Richon, P; Beneito, A; Robé, M C

    2001-01-01

    TRACI, a model based on the physical mechanisms governing the migration of radon in unsaturated soils, has been developed to evaluate the radon flux density at the surface of uranium mill tailings. To check the validity of the TRACI model and the effectiveness of cover layers, an in situ study was launched in 1997 with the French uranium mining company, COGEMA. The study consisted of continuous measurements of moisture content, suction, radon concentration at various depths inside a UMT cover, and flux density at its surface. An initial analysis has shown that radon concentration and flux density, as calculated with a steady-state diffusion model using monthly averaged moisture contents, are in good agreement with measured monthly averaged concentrations and flux densities.

  5. Hydrodynamical Simulations of Colliding Jets: Modeling 3C 75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, S. M.; Schive, H.-Y.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chiueh, T.; Musoke, G.; Young, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Radio observations suggest that 3C 75, located in the dumbbell shaped galaxy NGC 1128 at the center of Abell 400, hosts two colliding jets. Motivated by this source, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations using a modified version of the GPU-accelerated Adaptive-MEsh-Refinement hydrodynamical parallel code (GAMER) to study colliding extragalactic jets. We find that colliding jets can be cast into two categories: (1) bouncing jets, in which case the jets bounce off each other keeping their identities, and (2) merging jets, when only one jet emerges from the collision. Under some conditions the interaction causes the jets to break up into oscillating filaments of opposite helicity, with consequences for their downstream stability. When one jet is significantly faster than the other and the impact parameter is small, the jets merge; the faster jet takes over the slower one. In the case of merging jets, the oscillations of the filaments, in projection, may show a feature that resembles a double helix, similar to the radio image of 3C 75. Thus we interpret the morphology of 3C 75 as a consequence of the collision of two jets with distinctly different speeds at a small impact parameter, with the faster jet breaking up into two oscillating filaments.

  6. Interface-tracking electro-hydrodynamic model for droplet coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowl Erickson, Lindsay; Noble, David

    2012-11-01

    Many fluid-based technologies rely on electrical fields to control the motion of droplets, e.g. micro-fluidic devices for high-speed droplet sorting, solution separation for chemical detectors, and purification of biodiesel fuel. Precise control over droplets is crucial to these applications. However, electric fields can induce complex and unpredictable fluid dynamics. Recent experiments (Ristenpart et al. 2009) have demonstrated that oppositely charged droplets bounce rather than coalesce in the presence of strong electric fields. Analytic hydrodynamic approximations for interfaces become invalid near coalescence, and therefore detailed numerical simulations are necessary. We present a conformal decomposition finite element (CDFEM) interface-tracking method for two-phase flow to demonstrate electro-coalescence. CDFEM is a sharp interface method that decomposes elements along fluid-fluid boundaries and uses a level set function to represent the interface. The electro-hydrodynamic equations solved allow for convection of charge and charge accumulation at the interface, both of which may be important factors for the pinch-off dynamics in this parameter regime.

  7. Forward waveform modelling procedure for 1-D crustal velocity structure and its application to the southern Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seongryong; Rhie, Junkee; Kim, Geunyoung

    2011-04-01

    We propose a full-grid search procedure for broad-band waveform modelling to determine a 1-D crustal velocity model. The velocity model can be more constrained because of the use of broad-band waveforms instead of traveltimes for the crustal phases, although only a small number of event-station pairs were employed. Despite the time-consuming nature of the full-grid search method to search the whole model parameter space, the use of an empirical relationship between the P- and S-wave velocities can significantly reduce computation time. The proposed method was applied to a case in the southern Korean Peninsula. Broad-band waveforms obtained from two inland earthquakes that occurred on 2007 January 20 (Mw 4.6) and 2004 April 26 (Mw 3.6) were used to test the method. The three-layers over half-space crustal velocity model of the P- and S-wave velocities was estimated. Comparisons of waveform fitness between the final model and previously published models demonstrate advancements in the average value of waveform fitness for the inland earthquakes. In addition, 1-D velocity models were determined for three distinct tectonic regions, namely, the Gyonggi Massif, the Okcheon Belt and the Gyeongsang Basin, which are all located inside the study area. A comparison between the three models demonstrates that the crustal thickness of the southern Korean Peninsula increases from NW to SE and that the lower crustal composition of the Okcheon belt differs from that of the other tectonic regions.

  8. Development and validation of THUMS version 5 with 1D muscle models for active and passive automotive safety research.

    PubMed

    Kimpara, Hideyuki; Nakahira, Yuko; Iwamoto, Masami

    2016-08-01

    Accurately predicting the occupant kinematics is critical to better understand the injury mechanisms during an automotive crash event. The objectives of this study were to develop and validate a finite element (FE) model of the human body integrated with an active muscle model called Total HUman Model for Safety (THUMS) version 5, which has the body size of the 50th percentile American adult male (AM50). This model is characterized by being able to generate a force owing to muscle tone and to predict the occupant response during an automotive crash event. Deformable materials were assigned to all body parts of THUMS model in order to evaluate the injury probabilities. Each muscle was modeled as a Hill-type muscle model with 800 muscle-tendon compartments of 1D truss and seatbelt elements covering whole joints in the neck, thorax, lumbar region, and upper and lower extremities. THUMS was validated against 36 series of post-mortem human surrogate (PMHS) and volunteer tests on frontal, lateral, and rear impacts. The muscle architectural and kinetic properties for the hip, knee, shoulder, and elbow joints were validated in terms of the moment arms and maximum isometric joint torques over a wide range of joint angles. The muscular moment arms and maximum joint torques estimated from THUMS occupant model with 1D muscles agreed with the experimental data for a wide range of joint angles. Therefore, this model has the potential to predict the occupant kinematics and injury outcomes considering appropriate human body motions associated with various human body postures, such as sitting or standing.

  9. Strong decays of excited 1D charmed(-strange) mesons in the covariant oscillator quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tomohito; Yoshida, Kento; Yamada, Kenji; Ishida, Shin; Oda, Masuho

    2016-05-01

    Recently observed charmed mesons, D1* (2760), D3* (2760) and charmed-strange mesons, Ds1 * (2860), Ds3 * (2860), by BaBar and LHCb collaborations are considered to be plausible candidates for c q ¯ 13 DJ (q = u, d, s) states. We calculate the strong decays with one pion (kaon) emission of these states including well-established 1S and 1P charmed(-strange) mesons within the framework of the covariant oscillator quark model. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data and the typical nonrelativistic quark-model calculations. Concerning the results for 1S and 1P states, we find that, thanks to the relativistic effects of decay form factors, our model parameters take reasonable values, though our relativistic approach and the nonrelativistic quark model give similar decay widths in agreement with experiment. While the results obtained for 13 DJ=1,3 states are roughly consistent with the present data, they should be checked by the future precise measurement.

  10. Modeling structures of 1D PhC for telecommunication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawistowski, Zygmunt J.; Jaskorzyńska, BoŻena

    2016-09-01

    Effective method of modeling 1-dimensional photonic crystals structures is presented. As an illustration of the method a concept of widely tunable narrow band drop filter is described. As an active electro-optic material a liquid crystal is used. Very good parameters are obtained so the presented structure is suitable for fast packet switched wavelength division multiplexing networks (WDM).

  11. Using an improved 1D boundary layer model with CFD for flux prediction in gas-sparged tubular membrane ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Smith, R; Taha, T; Cui, Z F

    2005-01-01

    Tubular membrane ultrafiltration and microfiltration are important industrial separation and concentration processes. Process optimisation requires reduction of membrane build-up. Gas slug introduction has been shown to be a useful approach for flux enhancement. However, process quantification is required for design and optimisation. In this work we employ a non-porous wall CFD model to quantify hydrodynamics in the two-phase slug flow process. Mass transfer is subsequently quantified from wall shear stress, which was determined from the CFD. The mass transfer model is an improved one-dimensional boundary layer model, which empirically incorporates effects of wall suction and analytically includes edge effects for circular conduits. Predicted shear stress profiles are in agreement with experimental results and flux estimates prove more reliable than that from previous models. Previous models ignored suction effects and employed less rigorous fluid property inclusion, which ultimately led to under-predictive flux estimates. The presented model offers reliable process design and optimisation criteria for gas-sparged tubular membrane ultrafiltration.

  12. Reactive Transport Modeling of Microbially-Mediated Chromate Reduction in 1-D Soil Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, H.; Viamajala, S.; Alam, M. M.; Peyton, B. M.; Petersen, J. N.; Yonge, D. R.

    2002-12-01

    Cr(VI) reduction tests were performed with the well known metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in liquid phase batch reactors and continuous flow soil columns under anaerobic conditions. In the batch tests, the cultures were grown with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor and lactate as the electron donor in a simulated groundwater medium to determine yield coefficients and specific growth rates. The bench-scale soil column experiments were carried out with MR-1 to test the hypothesis that the kinetic parameters obtained in batch studies, combined with microbial attachment /detachment processes, will accurately predict reactive transport of Cr(VI) during bacterial Cr(VI) reduction in a soil matrix. Cr(VI)-free simulated groundwater media containing fumarate as the limiting substrate and lactate was supplied to a 2.1cm (ID) x 15 cm soil column inoculated with MR-1 for a duration of 9 residence times to allow for biomass to build-up in the column. Thereafter the column was supplied with both Cr(VI) and substrate. The concentrations of effluent substrate, biomass and Cr(VI) were monitored on a periodic basis and attached biomass in the column was measured in the termination of each column test. A reactive transport model was developed in which 6 governing equations deal with Cr(VI) bioreaction, fumarate (as electron donor) consumption, aqueous biomass growth and transport, solid biomass detachment and attachment kinetics, aqueous and solid phase enzyme reaction and transport, respectively. The model incorporating the enzyme reaction kinetics for Cr(VI) reduction, Monod kinetic expressions for substrate depletion, nonlinear attachment and detachment kinetics for aqueous and solid phase microorganism concentration, was solved by a fully implicit, finite-difference procedure using RT3D (A Modular Computer Code for Reactive Multi-species Transport in 3-Dimensional Groundwater Systems) platform in one dimension. Cr(VI)-free column data was used to

  13. Stochastic Heat Equation Limit of a (2 + 1)d Growth Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, Alexei; Corwin, Ivan; Toninelli, Fabio Lucio

    2017-03-01

    We determine a {q to 1} limit of the two-dimensional q-Whittaker driven particle system on the torus studied previously in Corwin and Toninelli (Electron. Commun. Probab. 21(44):1-12, 2016). This has an interpretation as a (2 + 1)-dimensional stochastic interface growth model, which is believed to belong to the so-called anisotropic Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) class. This limit falls into a general class of two-dimensional systems of driven linear SDEs which have stationary measures on gradients. Taking the number of particles to infinity we demonstrate Gaussian free field type fluctuations for the stationary measure. Considering the temporal evolution of the stationary measure, we determine that along characteristics, correlations are asymptotically given by those of the (2 + 1)-dimensional additive stochastic heat equation. This confirms (for this model) the prediction that the non-linearity for the anisotropic KPZ equation in (2 + 1)-dimension is irrelevant.

  14. A 1-D Model of the 4 Bed Molecular Sieve of the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert; Knox, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Developments to improve system efficiency and reliability for water and carbon dioxide separation systems on crewed vehicles combine sub-scale systems testing and multi-physics simulations. This paper describes the development of COMSOL simulations in support of the Life Support Systems (LSS) project within NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. Specifically, we model the 4 Bed Molecular Sieve (4BMS) of the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) operating on the International Space Station (ISS).

  15. Concurrent Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Interaction Forces Improves Particle Deposition Predictions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chao; Ren, Carolyn L; Emelko, Monica B

    2016-04-19

    It is widely believed that media surface roughness enhances particle deposition-numerous, but inconsistent, examples of this effect have been reported. Here, a new mathematical framework describing the effects of hydrodynamics and interaction forces on particle deposition on rough spherical collectors in absence of an energy barrier was developed and validated. In addition to quantifying DLVO force, the model includes improved descriptions of flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation functions. This work demonstrates that hydrodynamic effects can significantly alter particle deposition relative to expectations when only the DLVO force is considered. Moreover, the combined effects of hydrodynamics and interaction forces on particle deposition on rough, spherical media are not additive, but synergistic. Notably, the developed model's particle deposition predictions are in closer agreement with experimental observations than those from current models, demonstrating the importance of inclusion of roughness impacts in particle deposition description/simulation. Consideration of hydrodynamic contributions to particle deposition may help to explain discrepancies between model-based expectations and experimental outcomes and improve descriptions of particle deposition during physicochemical filtration in systems with nonsmooth collector surfaces.

  16. Status of hydrodynamic technology as related to model tests of high speed marine vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. A.; Savitsky, D.; Stevens, M. J.; Balquet, R. J.; Muller-Graf, B.; Murakami, T.; Prokohorov, S. D.; Vanoossanen, P.

    1981-07-01

    The High Speed Marine Vehicle Panel of the 16th International Towing Tank Conference prepared hydrodynamic technology status reports related to model tank tests of SWATH, semidisplacement round bilge hulls, planing hulls, semisubmerged hydrofoils, surface effect ships, and air cushion vehicles. Each status report, plus the results of an initial survey of worldwide towing tanks conducting model experiments of high speed vessels, are contained herein. Hydrodynamic problems related to model testing and the full-scale extrapolation of the data for these vehicle types are also presented.

  17. Numerical modeling of ocean hydrodynamics with variational assimilation of observational data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesny, V. B.; Agoshkov, V. I.; Shutyaev, V. P.; Le Dimet, F.; Ivchenko, B. O.

    2016-07-01

    Models and methods of the numerical modeling of ocean hydrodynamics dating back to the pioneering works of A.S. Sarkisyan are considered, with emphasis on the formulation of problems and algorithms of mathematical modeling and the four-dimensional variational assimilation of observational data. An algorithm is proposed for studying the sensitivity of the optimal solution to observational data errors in a seasurface temperature assimilation problem in order to retrieve heat fluxes on the surface. An example of a solution of the optimal problem of the World Ocean hydrodynamics with the assimilation of climatic temperature and salinity observations is offered.

  18. Dynamical signature of the edge state in the 1D Aubry-André model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H. Z.; Yi, X. X.; Oh, C. H.

    2014-04-01

    Topological features have become an intensively studied subject in many fields of physics. As a witness of topological phase, the edge states are topologically protected and may be helpful in quantum information processing. In this paper, we define a measure to quantify the dynamical localization of the system and simulate the localization in the one-dimensional Aubry-André model. We find an interesting connection between the edge states and the dynamical localization of the system, this connection may be used as a signature of the edge state and topological phase.

  19. Constraining quantum critical dynamics: (2+1)D Ising model and beyond.

    PubMed

    Witczak-Krempa, William

    2015-05-01

    Quantum critical (QC) phase transitions generally lead to the absence of quasiparticles. The resulting correlated quantum fluid, when thermally excited, displays rich universal dynamics. We establish nonperturbative constraints on the linear-response dynamics of conformal QC systems at finite temperature, in spatial dimensions above 1. Specifically, we analyze the large frequency or momentum asymptotics of observables, which we use to derive powerful sum rules and inequalities. The general results are applied to the O(N) Wilson-Fisher fixed point, describing the QC Ising model when N=1. We focus on the order parameter and scalar susceptibilities, and the dynamical shear viscosity. Connections to simulations, experiments, and gauge theories are made.

  20. 1D Unsteady Flow and Sediment Transport Model for Channel Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    bai, Y.; Duan, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional unsteady flow and sediment transport model for simulating flood routing and sediment transport over mobile alluvium in channel network. The modified St. Venant equation together with the suspended sediment and bed load transport equations are solved simultaneously to obtain flow properties and sediment transport rates. The Godunov-type finite volume method is employed, and the flux terms are discretized by using the upwind and the HLLC schemes. Then, the Exner equation is used to solve for bed elevation changes. In unsteady flow, sediment transport is non-equilibrium, therefore suspended load adaptation coefficient and bed load adaptation length are used to account for the difference between equilibrium and non-equilibrium sediment transport rate. At river confluences, water surface elevations are kept the same, and the law of mass conservation is used as the internal boundary conditions. An unprecedented flood event occurred in the Santa Cruz River, Tucson, Arizona, in July 2006, is used to test the performances of the model. Simulated results of water surface elevation and bed elevation changes show good agreements with the measurements.

  1. Modeling of the Plasma Electrode Bias in the Negative Ion Sources with 1D PIC Method

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, D.; Kuppel, S.; Hatayama, A.; Fukano, A.; Bacal, M.

    2009-03-12

    The effect of the plasma electrode bias voltage in the negative ion sources is modeled and investigated with one-dimensional plasma simulation. A particle-in-cell (PIC) method is applied to simulate the motion of charged particles in their self-consistent electric field. In the simulation, the electron current density is fixed to produce the bias voltage. The tendency of current-voltage characteristics obtained in the simulation show agreement with the one obtained from a simple probe theory. In addition, the H{sup -} ion density peak appears at the bias voltage close to the plasma potential as observed in the experiment. The physical mechanism of this peak H{sup -} ion density is discussed.

  2. Hyperbolic reformulation of a 1D viscoelastic blood flow model and ADER finite volume schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Montecinos, Gino I.; Müller, Lucas O.; Toro, Eleuterio F.

    2014-06-01

    The applicability of ADER finite volume methods to solve hyperbolic balance laws with stiff source terms in the context of well-balanced and non-conservative schemes is extended to solve a one-dimensional blood flow model for viscoelastic vessels, reformulated as a hyperbolic system, via a relaxation time. A criterion for selecting relaxation times is found and an empirical convergence rate assessment is carried out to support this result. The proposed methodology is validated by applying it to a network of viscoelastic vessels for which experimental and numerical results are available. The agreement between the results obtained in the present paper and those available in the literature is satisfactory. Key features of the present formulation and numerical methodologies, such as accuracy, efficiency and robustness, are fully discussed in the paper.

  3. Pool Formation in Boulder-Bed Streams: Implications From 1-D and 2-D Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, L. R.; Keller, E. A.

    2003-12-01

    In mountain rivers of Southern California, boulder-large roughness elements strongly influence flow hydraulics and pool formation and maintenance. In these systems, boulders appear to control the stream morphology by converging flow and producing deep pools during channel forming discharges. Our research goal is to develop quantitative relationships between boulder roughness elements, temporal patterns of scour and fill, and geomorphic processes that are important in producing pool habitat. The longitudinal distribution of shear stress, unit stream power and velocity were estimated along a 48 m reach on Rattlesnake Creek, using the HEC-RAS v 3.0 and River 2-D numerical models. The reach has an average slope of 0.02 and consists of a pool-riffle sequence with a large boulder constriction directly above the pool. Model runs were performed for a range of stream discharges to test if scour and fill thresholds for pool and riffle environments could be identified. Results from the HEC-RAS simulations identified that thresholds in shear stress, unit stream power and mean velocity occur above a discharge of 5.0 cms. Results from the one-dimensional analysis suggest that the reversal in competency is likely due to changes in cross-sectional width at varying flows. River 2-D predictions indicated that strong transverse velocity gradients were present through the pool at higher modeled discharges. At a flow of 0.5 cms (roughly 1/10th bankfull discharge), velocities are estimated at 0.6 m/s and 1.3 m/s for the pool and riffle, respectively. During discharges of 5.15 cms (approximate bankfull discharge), the maximum velocity in the pool center increased to nearly 3.0 m/s, while the maximum velocity over the riffle is estimated at approximately 2.5 cms. These results are consistent with those predicted by HEC-RAS, though the reversal appears to be limited to a narrow jet that occurs through the pool head and pool center. Model predictions suggest that the velocity reversal is

  4. Study on Effects of the Stochastic Delay Probability for 1d CA Model of Traffic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yu; Chen, Yan-Hong; Kong, Ling-Jiang

    Considering the effects of different factors on the stochastic delay probability, the delay probability has been classified into three cases. The first case corresponding to the brake state has a large delay probability if the anticipant velocity is larger than the gap between the successive cars. The second one corresponding to the following-the-leader rule has intermediate delay probability if the anticipant velocity is equal to the gap. Finally, the third case is the acceleration, which has minimum delay probability. The fundamental diagram obtained by numerical simulation shows the different properties compared to that by the NaSch model, in which there exist two different regions, corresponding to the coexistence state, and jamming state respectively.

  5. 1-D transient numerical model of a regenerator in a novel sub Kelvin Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Miller, Franklin K.

    2016-03-01

    A sub Kelvin Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator (AMRR) is being developed at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. This AMRR consists of two circulators, two regenerators, one superleak, one cold heat exchanger, and two warm heat exchangers. The circulators are novel non-moving part pumps that reciprocate a superfluid mixture of 4He-3He in the system. Heat from the mixture is removed within the two regenerators of this tandem system. An accurate model of the regenerators in this AMRR is necessary in order to predict the performance of these components, which in turn helps predicting the overall performance of the AMRR system. This work presents modeling methodology along with results from a 1-D transient numerical model of the regenerators of an AMRR capable of removing 2.5 mW at 850 mK at cyclic steady state.

  6. On the Possibility of a Hydrodynamic Model of the Electron

    PubMed Central

    Pekeris, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    We explore the possibility that the mutual repulsive forces of a uniformly charged sphere could be kept in balance dynamically by a steady circulation of the material, which is assumed to be a nonconducting perfect fluid of uniform density. An exact solution is obtained of Maxwell's equations and of the hydrodynamic equations in the nonrelativistic approximation, which satisfies the boundary conditions on the surface of the sphere. In this solution all the components of the velocity and of the magnetic field are found to vanish on the surface, but not the electric field. The pressure can also be made to vanish on the surface, but in the interior it turns out to be negative, which makes the present solution unacceptable. PMID:16592245

  7. Hydrodynamics of giant planet formation. II - Model equations and critical mass. III - Jupiter's nucleated instability

    SciTech Connect

    Wuchterl, G. )

    1991-05-01

    A spherically symmetric protoplanetary model with a growing rigid core and a gaseous envelope of solar composition is used to investigate the character and evolution of the nucleated instability; the model equations formulated are used to follow the static evolution of a protogiant planet in the 'Kyoto' solar nebula, lying at Jupiter's solar distance, to its critical core mass. Convective energy transfer has been formulated for inclusion in implicit radiation hydrodynamical computations. It is established that collapse need not occur at the critical mass, which in agreement with earlier investigations is found to be of the order of 13.1 earth masses. This model is then used as an initial condition for a radiation hydrodynamical calculation of the nucleated instability. It is found that nonlinear hydrodynamic waves are excited by a kappa mechanism, and that an outflow is driven. 56 refs.

  8. Development of a 3D to 1D Particle Transport Model to Predict Deposition in the Lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, Jessica M.; Grandmont, Celine; Shadden, Shawn C.; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E.

    2014-11-01

    Aerosolized particles are commonly used for therapeutic drug delivery as they can be delivered to the body systemically or be used to treat lung diseases. Recent advances in computational resources have allowed for sophisticated pulmonary simulations, however it is currently impossible to solve for airflow and particle transport for all length and time scales of the lung. Instead, multi-scale methods must be used. In our recent work, where computational methods were employed to solve for airflow and particle transport in the rat airways (Oakes et al. (2014), Annals of Biomedical Engineering 42, 899), the number of particles to exit downstream of the 3D domain was determined. In this current work, the time-dependent Lagrangian description of particles was used to numerically solve a 1D convection-diffusion model (trumpet model, Taulbee and Yu (1975), Journal of Applied Physiology, 38, 77) parameterized specifically for the lung. The expansion of the airway dimensions was determined based on data collected from our aerosol exposure experiments (Oakes et al. (2014), Journal of Applied Physiology, 116, 1561). This 3D-1D framework enables us to predict the fate of particles in the whole lung. This work was supported by the Whitaker Foundation at the IIE, a INRIA Associated Team Postdoc Grant, and a UC Presidential Fellowship.

  9. A 1D pulse wave propagation model of the hemodynamics of calf muscle pump function

    PubMed Central

    Keijsers, J M T; Leguy, C A D; Huberts, W; Narracott, A J; Rittweger, J; van de Vosse, F N

    2015-01-01

    The calf muscle pump is a mechanism which increases venous return and thereby compensates for the fluid shift towards the lower body during standing. During a muscle contraction, the embedded deep veins collapse and venous return increases. In the subsequent relaxation phase, muscle perfusion increases due to increased perfusion pressure, as the proximal venous valves temporarily reduce the distal venous pressure (shielding). The superficial and deep veins are connected via perforators, which contain valves allowing flow in the superficial-to-deep direction. The aim of this study is to investigate and quantify the physiological mechanisms of the calf muscle pump, including the effect of venous valves, hydrostatic pressure, and the superficial venous system. Using a one-dimensional pulse wave propagation model, a muscle contraction is simulated by increasing the extravascular pressure in the deep venous segments. The hemodynamics are studied in three different configurations: a single artery–vein configuration with and without valves and a more detailed configuration including a superficial vein. Proximal venous valves increase effective venous return by 53% by preventing reflux. Furthermore, the proximal valves shielding function increases perfusion following contraction. Finally, the superficial system aids in maintaining the perfusion during the contraction phase and reduces the refilling time by 37%. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25766693

  10. USING TWO-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS AT SCALES OF ECOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE. (R825760)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling of flow features that are important in assessing stream habitat conditions has been a long-standing interest of stream biologists. Recently, they have begun examining the usefulness of two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic models in attaining this objective. Current modelin...

  11. Hydrodynamic Modeling Analysis of Union Slough Restoration Project in Snohomish River, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2010-12-20

    A modeling study was conducted to evaluate additional project design scenarios at the Union Slough restoration/mitigation site during low tide and to provide recommendations for finish-grade elevations to achieve desired drainage. This was accomplished using the Snohomish River hydrodynamic model developed previously by PNNL.

  12. WASP4, a hydrodynamic and water-quality model - model theory, user's manual, and programmer's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, R.B.; Wool, T.A.; Connolly, J.P.; Schanz, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program Version 4 (WASP4) is a dynamic compartment-modeling system that can be used to analyze a variety of water-quality problems in a diverse set of water bodies. WASP4 simulates the transport and transformation of conventional and toxic pollutants in the water column and benthos of ponds, streams, lakes, reservoirs, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters. The WASP4 modeling system covers four major subjects--hydrodynamics, conservative mass transport, eutrophication-dissolved oxygen kinetics, and toxic chemical-sediment dynamics. The WASP4 modeling system consists of two stand-alone computer programs, DYNHYD4 and WASP4, that can be run in conjunction or separately. The hydrodynamic program, DYNHYD4, simulates the movement of water and the water quality program, WASP4, simulates the movement and interaction of pollutants within the water. The latter program is supplied with two kinetic submodels to simulate two of the major classes of water-quality problems--conventional pollution (dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, nutrients, and eutrophication) and toxic pollution (organic chemicals, heavy metals, and sediment). The substitution of either sub-model constitutes the models EUTRO4 and TOXI4, respectively.

  13. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Coarsening in the 1D Ising model evolving with Swendsen - Wang dynamics: an unusual scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, Bernard; Hakim, Vincent

    1996-12-01

    We consider a simple model of domain growth: the zero-temperature 1D Ising model evolving according to the Swendsen - Wang dynamics. We find that in the long-time limit, the pair correlation function scales with a characteristic length increasing as the square of the average domain size. In that limit, a few large domains occupy almost all the space with many small domains between them. In contrast to the usual picture of coarsening, the average domain size here is not a characteristic length of the growth problem. Instead, one finds a power-law distribution for the sizes of large domains with a cut-off at a length which grows as the square of the average size of the domains.

  14. Dynamic implicit-solvent coarse-grained models of lipid bilayer membranes: fluctuating hydrodynamics thermostat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaohong; Sigurdsson, Jon Karl; Brandt, Erik; Atzberger, Paul J

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a thermostat based on fluctuating hydrodynamics for dynamic simulations of implicit-solvent coarse-grained models of lipid bilayer membranes. We show our fluctuating hydrodynamics approach captures interesting correlations in the dynamics of lipid bilayer membranes that are missing in simulations performed using standard Langevin dynamics. Our momentum conserving thermostat accounts for solvent-mediated momentum transfer by coupling coarse-grained degrees of freedom to stochastic continuum fields that account for both the solvent hydrodynamics and thermal fluctuations. We present both a general framework and specific methods to couple the particle and continuum degrees of freedom in a manner consistent with statistical mechanics and amenable to efficient computational simulation. For self-assembled vesicles, we study the diffusivity of lipids and their spatial correlations. We find the hydrodynamic coupling yields within the bilayer interesting correlations between diffusing lipids that manifest as a vortex-like structure similar to those observed in explicit-solvent simulations. We expect the introduced fluctuating hydrodynamics methods to provide a way to extend implicit-solvent models for use in a wide variety of dynamic studies.

  15. Assessment of phenol infiltration resilience in soil media by HYDRUS-1D transport model for a waste discharge site.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, K; Pal, S; Chakraborty, B; Mukherjee, S N; Gangopadhyay, A

    2014-10-01

    The movement of contaminants through soil imparts a variety of geo-environmental problem inclusive of lithospheric pollution. Near-surface aquifers are often vulnerable to contamination from surface source if overlying soil possesses poor resilience or contaminant attenuation capacity. The prediction of contaminant transport through soil is urged to protect groundwater from sources of pollutants. Using field simulation through column experiments and mathematical modeling like HYDRUS-1D, assessment of soil resilience and movement of contaminants through the subsurface to reach aquifers can be predicted. An outfall site of effluents of a coke oven plant comprising of alarming concentration of phenol (4-12.2 mg/L) have been considered for studying groundwater condition and quality, in situ soil characterization, and effluent characterization. Hydrogeological feature suggests the presence of near-surface aquifers at the effluent discharge site. Analysis of groundwater of nearby locality reveals the phenol concentration (0.11-0.75 mg/L) exceeded the prescribed limit of WHO specification (0.002 mg/L). The in situ soil, used in column experiment, possess higher saturated hydraulic conductivity (KS  = 5.25 × 10(-4) cm/s). The soil containing 47 % silt, 11 % clay, and 1.54% organic carbon content was found to be a poor absorber of phenol (24 mg/kg). The linear phenol adsorption isotherm model showed the best fit (R(2) = 0.977, RMSE = 1.057) to the test results. Column experiments revealed that the phenol removal percent and the length of the mass transfer zone increased with increasing bed heights. The overall phenol adsorption efficiency was found to be 42-49%. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) predicted by HYDRUS-1D model appears to be close fitting with the BTCs derived from the column experiments. The phenol BTC predicted by the HYDRUS-1D model for 1.2 m depth subsurface soil, i.e., up to the depth of groundwater in the study area, showed that the exhaustion

  16. Basin infilling of a schematic 1D estuary using two different approaches: an aggregate diffusive type model and a processed based model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laginha Silva, Patricia; Martins, Flávio A.; Boski, Tomász; Sampath, Dissanayake M. R.

    2010-05-01

    processes. In this viewpoint the system is broken down into its fundamental components and processes and the model is build up by selecting the important processes regardless of its time and space scale. This viewpoint was only possible to pursue in the recent years due to improvement in system knowledge and computer power (Paola, 2000). The primary aim of this paper is to demonstrate that it is possible to simulate the evolution of the sediment river bed, traditionally studied with synthetic models, with a process-based hydrodynamic, sediment transport and morphodynamic model, solving explicitly the mass and momentum conservation equations. With this objective, a comparison between two mathematical models for alluvial rivers is made to simulate the evolution of the sediment river bed of a conceptual 1D embayment for periods in the order of a thousand years: the traditional synthetic basin infilling aggregate diffusive type model based on the diffusion equation (Paola, 2000), used in the "synthesist" viewpoint and the process-based model MOHID (Miranda et al., 2000). The simulation of the sediment river bed evolution achieved by the process-based model MOHID is very similar to those obtained by the diffusive type model, but more complete due to the complexity of the process-based model. In the MOHID results it is possible to observe a more comprehensive and realistic results because this type of model include processes that is impossible to a synthetic model to describe. At last the combined effect of tide, sea level rise and river discharges was investigated in the process based model. These effects cannot be simulated using the diffusive type model. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using process based models to perform studies in scales of 10000 years. This is an advance relative to the use of synthetic models, enabling the use of variable forcing. REFERENCES • Briggs, L.I. and Pollack, H.N., 1967. Digital model of evaporate sedimentation. Science, 155, 453

  17. Hydrodynamic interaction between two trapped swimming model micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Matas Navarro, R; Pagonabarraga, I

    2010-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of the behaviour of two active particles under the action of harmonic traps kept at a fixed distance away from each other. We classify the steady configurations the squirmers develop as a function of their self-propelling velocity and the active stresses the swimmers induce around them. We have further analyzed the stability of such configurations, and have found that the ratio between their self-propelling velocity and the apolar flow generated through active stresses determines whether collinear parallel squirmers or perpendicularly swimming particles moving away from each other are stable. Therefore, there is a close connection between the stable configurations and the active mechanisms leading to the particle self-propulsion. The trap potential does not affect the stability of the configurations; it only modifies some of their relevant time scales. We have also observed the development of characteristic frequencies which should be observable. Finally, we show that the development of the hydrodynamic flows induced by the active particles may be relevant even when its time scale orders of magnitude smaller than the other present characteristic time scales and may destabilize the stable configurations.

  18. Geometric and frequency EMI sounding of estuarine earthen flood defence embankments in Ireland using 1D inversion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganotti, Matteo; Jackson, Ruth; Krahn, Hartmut; Dyer, Mark

    2013-05-01

    Earthen flood defence embankments are linear structures, raised above the flood plain, that are commonly used as flood defences in rural settings; these are often relatively old structures constructed using locally garnered material and of which little is known in terms of design and construction. Alarmingly, it is generally reported that a number of urban developments have expanded to previously rural areas; hence, acquiring knowledge about the flood defences protecting these areas has risen significantly in the agendas of basin and asset managers. This paper focusses, by reporting two case studies, on electromagnetic induction (EMI) methods that would efficiently complement routine visual inspections and would represent a first step to more detailed investigations. Evaluation of the results is presented by comparison with ERT profiles and intrusive investigation data. The EM data, acquired using a GEM-2 apparatus for frequency sounding and an EM-31 apparatus for geometrical sounding, has been handled using the prototype eGMS software tool, being developed by the eGMS international research consortium; the depth sounding data interpretation was assisted by 1D inversions obtained with the EM1DFM software developed by the University of British Columbia. Although both sounding methods showed some limitations, the models obtained were consistent with ERT models and the techniques were useful screening methods for the identification of areas of interest, such as material interfaces or potential seepage areas, within the embankment structure: 1D modelling improved the rapid assessment of earthen flood defence embankments in an estuarine environment; evidence that EMI sounding could play an important role as a monitoring tool or as a first step towards more detailed investigations.

  19. Determinants of modelling choices for 1-D free-surface flow and morphodynamics in hydrology and hydraulics: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheviron, Bruno; Moussa, Roger

    2016-09-01

    This review paper investigates the determinants of modelling choices, for numerous applications of 1-D free-surface flow and morphodynamic equations in hydrology and hydraulics, across multiple spatiotemporal scales. We aim to characterize each case study by its signature composed of model refinement (Navier-Stokes: NS; Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes: RANS; Saint-Venant: SV; or approximations to Saint-Venant: ASV), spatiotemporal scales and subscales (domain length: L from 1 cm to 1000 km; temporal scale: T from 1 s to 1 year; flow depth: H from 1 mm to 10 m; spatial step for modelling: δL; temporal step: δT), flow typology (Overland: O; High gradient: Hg; Bedforms: B; Fluvial: F), and dimensionless numbers (dimensionless time period T*, Reynolds number Re, Froude number Fr, slope S, inundation ratio Λz, Shields number θ). The determinants of modelling choices are therefore sought in the interplay between flow characteristics and cross-scale and scale-independent views. The influence of spatiotemporal scales on modelling choices is first quantified through the expected correlation between increasing scales and decreasing model refinements (though modelling objectives also show through the chosen spatial and temporal subscales). Then flow typology appears a secondary but important determinant in the choice of model refinement. This finding is confirmed by the discriminating values of several dimensionless numbers, which prove preferential associations between model refinements and flow typologies. This review is intended to help modellers in positioning their choices with respect to the most frequent practices, within a generic, normative procedure possibly enriched by the community for a larger, comprehensive and updated image of modelling strategies.

  20. 2D Axisymmetric vs 1D: A PIC/DSMC Model of Breakdown in Triggered Vacuum Spark Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Stan; Moore, Chris; Boerner, Jeremiah

    2015-09-01

    Last year at GEC14, we presented results of one-dimensional PIC/DSMC simulations of breakdown in triggered vacuum spark gaps. In this talk, we extend the model to two-dimensional axisymmetric and compare the results to the previous 1D case. Specially, we vary the fraction of the cathode that emits electrons and neutrals (holding the total injection rates over the cathode surface constant) and show the effects of the higher dimensionality on the time to breakdown. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U. S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Giant Fluctuations of Local Magnetoresistance of Organic Spin Valves and the Non-Hermitian 1D Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, R. C.; Nemirovsky, D.; Kagalovsky, V.; Raikh, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, where the tunnel magnetoresitance (TMR) of a spin valve was measured locally, we theoretically study the distribution of TMR along the surface of magnetized electrodes. We show that, even in the absence of interfacial effects (like hybridization due to donor and acceptor molecules), this distribution is very broad, and the portion of area with negative TMR is appreciable even if on average the TMR is positive. The origin of the local sign reversal is quantum interference of subsequent spin-rotation amplitudes in the course of incoherent transport of carriers between the source and the drain. We find the distribution of local TMR exactly by drawing upon formal similarity between evolution of spinors in time and of the reflection coefficient along a 1D chain in the Anderson model. The results obtained are confirmed by the numerical simulations.

  2. Environmental and Water Quality Operational Studies. Physical Modeling of Reservoir Hydrodynamics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    reservoir flume (re- ferred to as the General Reservoir Hydrodynamic ( GRH ) Facility) located in the Hydraulics Laboratory of WES. In this case, the GRH was...their study. 49. GRH simulation. Data from the WES Generalized Reservoir Hydrodynamic ( GRH ) Facility was used as the prototype to make the second model...prototype comparison. The GRH is 80.0 ft long and 2.85 ft wide with a maximum depth of 3.0 ft. Details of the GRH are provided in Figure 6. 44 2.85 FT

  3. Coupled incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for continuum-based modelling sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahar, Gourabananda; Dhar, Anirban

    2017-04-01

    A coupled solenoidal Incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ISPH) model is presented for simulation of sediment displacement in erodible bed. The coupled framework consists of two separate incompressible modules: (a) granular module, (b) fluid module. The granular module considers a friction based rheology model to calculate deviatoric stress components from pressure. The module is validated for Bagnold flow profile and two standardized test cases of sediment avalanching. The fluid module resolves fluid flow inside and outside porous domain. An interaction force pair containing fluid pressure, viscous term and drag force acts as a bridge between two different flow modules. The coupled model is validated against three dambreak flow cases with different initial conditions of movable bed. The simulated results are in good agreement with experimental data. A demonstrative case considering effect of granular column failure under full/partial submergence highlights the capability of the coupled model for application in generalized scenario.

  4. Understanding the colloidal dispersion stability of 1D and 2D materials: Perspectives from molecular simulations and theoretical modeling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shangchao; Shih, Chih-Jen; Sresht, Vishnu; Govind Rajan, Ananth; Strano, Michael S; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2016-08-03

    The colloidal dispersion stability of 1D and 2D materials in the liquid phase is critical for scalable nano-manufacturing, chemical modification, composites production, and deployment as conductive inks or nanofluids. Here, we review recent computational and theoretical studies carried out by our group to model the dispersion stability of 1D and 2D materials, including single-walled carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide in aqueous surfactant solutions or organic solvents. All-atomistic (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can probe the molecular level details of the adsorption morphology of surfactants and solvents around these materials, as well as quantify the interaction energy between the nanomaterials mediated by surfactants or solvents. Utilizing concepts from reaction kinetics and diffusion, one can directly predict the rate constants for the aggregation kinetics and dispersion life times using MD outputs. Furthermore, the use of coarse-grained (CG) MD simulations allows quantitative prediction of surfactant adsorption isotherms. Combined with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the Langmuir isotherm, and the DLVO theory, one can directly use CGMD outputs to: (i) predict electrostatic potentials around the nanomaterial, (ii) correlate surfactant surface coverages with surfactant concentrations in the bulk dispersion medium, and (iii) determine energy barriers against coagulation. Finally, we discuss challenges associated with studying emerging 2D materials, such as, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), phosphorene, and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), including molybdenum disulfide (MoS2). An outlook is provided to address these challenges with plans to develop force-field parameters for MD simulations to enable predictive modeling of emerging 2D materials in the liquid phase.

  5. Multi-phase SPH modelling of violent hydrodynamics on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokos, Athanasios; Rogers, Benedict D.; Stansby, Peter K.; Domínguez, José M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the acceleration of multi-phase smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using a graphics processing unit (GPU) enabling large numbers of particles (10-20 million) to be simulated on just a single GPU card. With novel hardware architectures such as a GPU, the optimum approach to implement a multi-phase scheme presents some new challenges. Many more particles must be included in the calculation and there are very different speeds of sound in each phase with the largest speed of sound determining the time step. This requires efficient computation. To take full advantage of the hardware acceleration provided by a single GPU for a multi-phase simulation, four different algorithms are investigated: conditional statements, binary operators, separate particle lists and an intermediate global function. Runtime results show that the optimum approach needs to employ separate cell and neighbour lists for each phase. The profiler shows that this approach leads to a reduction in both memory transactions and arithmetic operations giving significant runtime gains. The four different algorithms are compared to the efficiency of the optimised single-phase GPU code, DualSPHysics, for 2-D and 3-D simulations which indicate that the multi-phase functionality has a significant computational overhead. A comparison with an optimised CPU code shows a speed up of an order of magnitude over an OpenMP simulation with 8 threads and two orders of magnitude over a single thread simulation. A demonstration of the multi-phase SPH GPU code is provided by a 3-D dam break case impacting an obstacle. This shows better agreement with experimental results than an equivalent single-phase code. The multi-phase GPU code enables a convergence study to be undertaken on a single GPU with a large number of particles that otherwise would have required large high performance computing resources.

  6. A Solar Wind Short Distance Propagation Model Based on Magneto-Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulchitsky, A.

    2006-12-01

    It is essential to know parameters of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and solar wind in the near Earth magnetosphere for research on the effects of the IMF in near-Earth space. Measurements of the IMF taken at the first Lagrange point (L_1) by the ACE space satellite, about 230 Earth Radii away, are typically used for estimation of IMF near the Earth. In many geophysical applications, it is assumed that we can use a simple kinematic approach to map the parameters measured at the satellite to the Earth by shifting them in time. The simple formula is to calculate the time delay as the distance from the Earth to the satellite divided by the velocity of the solar wind, projected along the Earth-Sun line. There are two important problems to be addressed with this simple kinematic approach. The first problem is that solar wind is not uniform and particles that hit the satellite often miss the Earth. Typically, the satellite is shifted by 30 or more Earth radii from the Earth-Sun straight line, and the Earth is also shifting from this line during the solar wind propagation time. IMF parameters may differ between the satellite and the Earth-Sun straight line. In this work, we address a second important problem: solar wind and IMF parameters may change during it's travel from the satellite towards the Earth. It is suggested here that a Magneto-Hydrodynamics approach can be used to deal with this problem. A simplified 1D solar wind propagation model was derived for this case using mass and momentum conservation laws and Maxwell equations. The model is simple and fast enough to use even in real-time applications, yet it takes into account real conservation laws of solar wind motion. To validate this model, comparisons of the IMF data and solar wind parameters were performed for the ACE and WIND satellites. Two different events were used. The first was from April 30, 1999, a day on which both satellites were approximately on the same line with the Sun. In that case

  7. Multi-site model-observations comparison shows the diurnal effects of hydrodynamic stress on evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheny, A. M.; Bohrer, G.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic limitations are known to control transpiration in forest ecosystems when the soil is drying or when the vapor pressure deficit between the air and stomata is very large, but they can also impact stomatal apertures under conditions of adequate soil moisture and lower evaporative demand. We use the NACP dataset of latent heat flux (LE) measurements and model observations for multiple site/model intercomparisons to evaluate the degree to which currently un-resolved high-frequency (sub-daily) hydrodynamic stresses affect the error in model prediction of latent heat flux. Particularly, we see that models have difficulty resolving the dynamics of intra-daily hysteresis. We hypothesize that this is a result of un-resolved afternoon stomata closure due to hydrodynamic stresses. We find that although no model or stomata parameterization was consistently best or worst in terms of ability to predict LE, errors in model-simulated LE were consistently largest and most variable when soil moisture and VPD were moderate to limiting. This suggests that models have trouble simulating the dynamics that cause stomata to close due to high VPD and moderate to low soil-water availability. Errors in LE occur most frequently when vegetative dynamics dominate. The majority of models tend to underestimate LE in the pre-noon hours and overestimate in the late evening. These diurnal error patterns are consistent with models' diminished ability to accurately simulate the natural hysteresis of transpiration. Nearly all models demonstrate a marked tendency to underestimate the degree of maximum hysteresis which, across all sites studied, is most pronounced during moisture limited conditions. The assumed empirical or semi-empirical coupling between stomatal conductance and soil moisture used by these current models does not resolve the hydrodynamic process of water movement from the soil to the leaves. This approach does not take advantage of advances in our understanding of water flow

  8. Hydrodynamic Hunters.

    PubMed

    Jashnsaz, Hossein; Al Juboori, Mohammed; Weistuch, Corey; Miller, Nicholas; Nguyen, Tyler; Meyerhoff, Viktoria; McCoy, Bryan; Perkins, Stephanie; Wallgren, Ross; Ray, Bruce D; Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Anderson, Gregory G; Pressé, Steve

    2017-03-28

    The Gram-negative Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus (BV) is a model bacterial predator that hunts other bacteria and may serve as a living antibiotic. Despite over 50 years since its discovery, it is suggested that BV probably collides into its prey at random. It remains unclear to what degree, if any, BV uses chemical cues to target its prey. The targeted search problem by the predator for its prey in three dimensions is a difficult problem: it requires the predator to sensitively detect prey and forecast its mobile prey's future position on the basis of previously detected signal. Here instead we find that rather than chemically detecting prey, hydrodynamics forces BV into regions high in prey density, thereby improving its odds of a chance collision with prey and ultimately reducing BV's search space for prey. We do so by showing that BV's dynamics are strongly influenced by self-generated hydrodynamic flow fields forcing BV onto surfaces and, for large enough defects on surfaces, forcing BV in orbital motion around these defects. Key experimental controls and calculations recapitulate the hydrodynamic origin of these behaviors. While BV's prey (Escherichia coli) are too small to trap BV in hydrodynamic orbit, the prey are also susceptible to their own hydrodynamic fields, substantially confining them to surfaces and defects where mobile predator and prey density is now dramatically enhanced. Colocalization, driven by hydrodynamics, ultimately reduces BV's search space for prey from three to two dimensions (on surfaces) even down to a single dimension (around defects). We conclude that BV's search for individual prey remains random, as suggested in the literature, but confined, however-by generic hydrodynamic forces-to reduced dimensionality.

  9. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere. III - Line spectrum and radius determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Line profiles are computed on the basis of the moving atmospheres from the hydrodynamic models investigated by Karp (1975). It is found that the velocity gradients in the atmosphere can be used to explain the apparent, slightly supersonic microturbulence. The total observed microturbulence is seen to be consistent with the linear sum of the classical microturbulence and that caused by the velocity gradients.

  10. Novel Modeling Tools for Propagating Climate Change Variability and Uncertainty into Hydrodynamic Forecasts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding impacts of climate change on hydrodynamic processes and ecosystem response within the Great Lakes is an important and challenging task. Variability in future climate conditions, uncertainty in rainfall-runoff model forecasts, the potential for land use change, and t...

  11. HOW TO MODEL HYDRODYNAMICS AND RESIDENCE TIMES OF 27 ESTUARIES IN 4 MONTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydrodynamics and residence times of 27 embayments were modeled during the first year of a project whose goal is to define the relation between nitrogen loadings and ecological responses of 44 systems that range from small to the size of Narragansett Bay and Buzzards Bay. The...

  12. Reduction of the uncertainties in the water level-discharge relation of a 1D hydraulic model in the context of operational flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habert, J.; Ricci, S.; Le Pape, E.; Thual, O.; Piacentini, A.; Goutal, N.; Jonville, G.; Rochoux, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a data-driven hydrodynamic simulator based on the 1-D hydraulic solver dedicated to flood forecasting with lead time of an hour up to 24 h. The goal of the study is to reduce uncertainties in the hydraulic model and thus provide more reliable simulations and forecasts in real time for operational use by the national hydrometeorological flood forecasting center in France. Previous studies have shown that sequential assimilation of water level or discharge data allows to adjust the inflows to the hydraulic network resulting in a significant improvement of the discharge while leaving the water level state imperfect. Two strategies are proposed here to improve the water level-discharge relation in the model. At first, a modeling strategy consists in improving the description of the river bed geometry using topographic and bathymetric measurements. Secondly, an inverse modeling strategy proposes to locally correct friction coefficients in the river bed and the flood plain through the assimilation of in situ water level measurements. This approach is based on an Extended Kalman filter algorithm that sequentially assimilates data to infer the upstream and lateral inflows at first and then the friction coefficients. It provides a time varying correction of the hydrological boundary conditions and hydraulic parameters. The merits of both strategies are demonstrated on the Marne catchment in France for eight validation flood events and the January 2004 flood event is used as an illustrative example throughout the paper. The Nash-Sutcliffe criterion for water level is improved from 0.135 to 0.832 for a 12-h forecast lead time with the data assimilation strategy. These developments have been implemented at the SAMA SPC (local flood forecasting service in the Haute-Marne French department) and used for operational forecast since 2013. They were shown to provide an efficient tool for evaluating flood risk and to improve the flood early warning system

  13. 1D Modeling of the Initial Stage of Wire Explosions and 2D Modeling of the m=0 Sausage Instability With Sheared Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhin, Volodymyr; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Bauer, Bruno; Lindemuth, Irvin; Sheehey, Peter

    2001-10-01

    1D modeling of the initial state of wire explosions (“cold start” with updated SESAME tables) was examined using 1D version of the Eulerian Magnetohydrodynamic Radiative Code (MHRDR). Simulations were carried out for two regimes: with (black body radiative model) and without radiative losses. Results of the simulations revealed strong dependence of the time of explosion and expansion speed of the wire on the implemented radiative model. This shows that it is necessary to accurately include radiative losses to model “cold start” wire explosions. 2D modeling of the m=0 sausage instability with sheared axial flow. The MHRDR simulations were used to obtain the growth rate of the m=0 sausage instability in plasma column with initial Bennett equilibrium profile with and without shear flow. These growth rates appeared to be in good agreement with growth rates calculated from the linearized MHD equations.

  14. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. IV. Oxygen diagnostics in extremely metal-poor red giants with infrared OH lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskas, V.; Kučinskas, A.; Bonifacio, P.; Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Steffen, M.; Spite, M.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Although oxygen is an important tracer of Galactic chemical evolution, measurements of its abundance in the atmospheres of the oldest Galactic stars are still scarce and rather imprecise. This is mainly because only a few spectral lines are available for the abundance diagnostics. At the lowest end of the metallicity scale, oxygen can only be measured in giant stars and in most of cases such measurements rely on a single forbidden [O i] 630 nm line that is very weak and frequently blended with telluric lines. Although molecular OH lines located in the ultraviolet and infrared could also be used for the diagnostics, oxygen abundances obtained from the OH lines and the [O i] 630 nm line are usually discrepant to a level of ~ 0.3-0.4 dex. Aims: We study the influence of convection on the formation of the infrared (IR) OH lines and the forbidden [O i] 630 nm line in the atmospheres of extremely metal-poor (EMP) red giant stars. Our ultimate goal is to clarify whether a realistic treatment of convection with state-of-the-art 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres may help to bring the oxygen abundances obtained using the two indicators into closer agreement. Methods: We used high-resolution (R = 50 000) and high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≈ 200-600) spectra of four EMP red giant stars obtained with the VLT CRIRES spectrograph. For each EMP star, 4-14 IR OH vibrational-rotational lines located in the spectral range of 1514-1548 and 1595-1632 nm were used to determine oxygen abundances by employing standard 1D local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) abundance analysis methodology. We then corrected the 1D LTE abundances obtained from each individual OH line for the 3D hydrodynamical effects, which was done by applying 3D-1D LTE abundance corrections that were determined using 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD and 1D hydrostatic LHD model atmospheres. Results: We find that the influence of convection on the formation of [O i] 630 nm line in the atmospheres of EMP giants

  15. Scaling tree-level hydrodynamics to plot-level hydrology using novel model and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, Gil; Matheny, Ashley; Mirfendersgi, Golnaz; Morin, Timothy; Fatichi, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Hydrodynamic limitations are driven by the water availability to leave of the individual tree crowns, and are known to control transpiration in forest ecosystems under both wet and dry conditions. Current land-surface models do not represent tree-level processes, nor do they represent the above-ground storage in trees. As the intra-daily dynamics of soil moisture are slower and very different than the faster dynamics of water storage in the tree xylem, the current approach that do not incorporate tree-water storage leads to deviations from the observed dynamics of transpiration. We propose a framework to resolve such tree hydrodynamics. The FETCH2 model resolves the water flow, water potential, and water storage in the tree stem and realistically links stomatal conductance to the water potential in the xylem, while water availability in the soil provides a bottom boundary condition for the hydrodynamic system. We use data from a large scale ecological disturbance experiment at a forest in Michigan to validate this approach. We use a very large array of sap-flow sensors in a plot with eddy-covariance measurements to parameterize the model at both tree-scale and plot scale. We demonstrate novel approaches to continuously measure tree water storage, and to evaluate tree-level hydrodynamic traits that control the ecohydrological response of the plot to water stress and disturbance.

  16. CFD modelling of flow field and particle tracking in a hydrodynamic stormwater separator.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Bang, K W; Choi, C S; Lim, H S

    2010-01-01

    The best management practices (BMPs) for control of urban stormwater pollution are evaluated to remove solid particles containing various pollutants. Currently, most storm runoff treatment devices using primary pollutant removal mechanism are applied to storm water since most pollutants in runoff are associated with the solid particulates. A hydrodynamic separator is a storm water treatment device using centrifugal motion which separates solids pollution from runoff. In this study, the velocity flow field and particle tracking of hydrodynamic separator were investigated using anthracite as a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model particle. The Fluent 6.3.26 CFD program was used to predict the solid particles removal efficiency for various parameters such as particle size, surface loading rate, and the ratio of underflow to overflow. The velocity flow field in a hydrodynamic stormwater separator (HDS) has been simulated using CFD RNG κ-ε model. Modeling results for the removal efficiency of HDS were similar with the results obtained from experimental measurements of laboratory scale HDS. These results showed that the simulated velocity field was useful to interpret the behavior of flow in the hydrodynamic separator. The results obtained from particle tracking can be applied to predict the separation efficiency.

  17. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for phase separating fluid mixtures. II. Diffusion in a binary mixture.

    PubMed

    Thieulot, Cedric; Janssen, L P B M; Español, Pep

    2005-07-01

    A previously formulated smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for a phase separating mixture is tested for the case when viscous processes are negligible and only mass and energy diffusive processes take place. We restrict ourselves to the case of a binary mixture that can exhibit liquid-liquid phase separation. The thermodynamic consistency of the model is assessed and the potential of the model to study complex pattern formation in the presence of various thermal boundaries is illustrated.

  18. Blow-up of the smooth solution to quantum hydrodynamic models in Rd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Boling; Wang, Guangwu

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we firstly investigate the local-in-time existence of smooth solution for the quantum hydrodynamic models (QHD) in Rd. Then we prove that any smooth solution of the QHD model which satisfies suitable conditions will blow up in finite time. The model can be derived from nonlinear Schrödinger equation by a Madelung transformation. The main idea is based on the construction of approximate solution and energy inequality.

  19. A comparison of two finite element models of tidal hydrodynamics using a North Sea data set

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Werner, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    Using the region of the English Channel and the southern bight of the North Sea, we systematically compare the results of two independent finite element models of tidal hydrodynamics. The model intercomparison provides a means for increasing our understanding of the relevant physical processes in the region in question as well as a means for the evaluation of certain algorithmic procedures of the two models. ?? 1989.

  20. Using remote sensing for validation of a large scale hydrologic and hydrodynamic model in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, R. C.; Bonnet, M.; Buarque, D. C.; Collischonn, W.; Frappart, F.; Mendes, C. B.

    2011-12-01

    We present the validation of the large-scale, catchment-based hydrological MGB-IPH model in the Amazon River basin. In this model, physically-based equations are used to simulate the hydrological processes, such as the Penman Monteith method to estimate evapotranspiration, or the Moore and Clarke infiltration model. A new feature recently introduced in the model is a 1D hydrodynamic module for river routing. It uses the full Saint-Venant equations and a simple floodplain storage model. River and floodplain geometry parameters are extracted from SRTM DEM using specially developed GIS algorithms that provide catchment discretization, estimation of river cross-sections geometry and water storage volume variations in the floodplains. The model was forced using satellite-derived daily rainfall TRMM 3B42, calibrated against discharge data and first validated using daily discharges and water levels from 111 and 69 stream gauges, respectively. Then, we performed a validation against remote sensing derived hydrological products, including (i) monthly Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS) anomalies derived from GRACE, (ii) river water levels derived from ENVISAT satellite altimetry data (212 virtual stations from Santos da Silva et al., 2010) and (iii) a multi-satellite monthly global inundation extent dataset at ~25 x 25 km spatial resolution (Papa et al., 2010). Validation against river discharges shows good performance of the MGB-IPH model. For 70% of the stream gauges, the Nash and Suttcliffe efficiency index (ENS) is higher than 0.6 and at Óbidos, close to Amazon river outlet, ENS equals 0.9 and the model bias equals,-4.6%. Largest errors are located in drainage areas outside Brazil and we speculate that it is due to the poor quality of rainfall datasets in these areas poorly monitored and/or mountainous. Validation against water levels shows that model is performing well in the major tributaries. For 60% of virtual stations, ENS is higher than 0.6. But, similarly, largest

  1. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. II. Spectral line formation in the atmosphere of a giant located near the RGB tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučinskas, A.; Steffen, M.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Dobrovolskas, V.; Ivanauskas, A.; Klevas, J.; Prakapavičius, D.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the role of convection in the formation of atomic and molecular lines in the atmosphere of a red giant star. For this purpose we study the formation properties of spectral lines that belong to a number of astrophysically important tracer elements, including neutral and singly ionized atoms (Li I, N I, O I, Na I, Mg I, Al I, Si I, Si II, S I, K I, Ca I, Ca II, Ti I, Ti II, Cr I, Cr II, Mn I, Fe I, Fe II, Co I, Ni I, Zn I, Sr II, Ba II, and Eu II), and molecules (CH, CO, C2, NH, CN, and OH). Methods: We focus our investigation on a prototypical red giant located close to the red giant branch (RGB) tip (Teff = 3660 K, log g = 1.0, [M/H] = 0.0). We used two types of model atmospheres, 3D hydrodynamical and classical 1D, calculated with the CO5BOLD and LHD stellar atmosphere codes, respectively. Both codes share the same atmospheric parameters, chemical composition, equation of state, and opacities, which allowed us to make a strictly differential comparison between the line formation properties predicted in 3D and 1D. The influence of convection on the spectral line formation was assessed with the aid of 3D-1D abundance corrections, which measure the difference between the abundances of chemical species derived with the 3D hydrodynamical and 1D classical model atmospheres. Results: We find that convection plays a significant role in the spectral line formation in this particular red giant. The derived 3D-1D abundance corrections rarely exceed ± 0.1 dex when lines of neutral atoms and molecules are considered, which is in line with the previous findings for solar-metallicity red giants located on the lower RGB. The situation is different with lines that belong to ionized atoms, or to neutral atoms with high ionization potential. In both cases, the corrections for high-excitation lines (χ > 8 eV) may amount to Δ3D-1D ~ -0.4 dex. The 3D-1D abundance corrections generally show a significant wavelength dependence; in most cases they are smaller in

  2. A Novel Method for Modeling Neumann and Robin Boundary Conditions in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Emily M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Amon, Cristina

    2010-08-26

    In this paper we present an improved method for handling Neumann or Robin boundary conditions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The Neumann and Robin boundary conditions are common to many physical problems (such as heat/mass transfer), and can prove challenging to model in volumetric modeling techniques such as smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). A new SPH method for diffusion type equations subject to Neumann or Robin boundary conditions is proposed. The new method is based on the continuum surface force model [1] and allows an efficient implementation of the Neumann and Robin boundary conditions in the SPH method for geometrically complex boundaries. The paper discusses the details of the method and the criteria needed to apply the model. The model is used to simulate diffusion and surface reactions and its accuracy is demonstrated through test cases for boundary conditions describing different surface reactions.

  3. A Generic 1D Forward Modeling and Inversion Algorithm for TEM Sounding with an Arbitrary Horizontal Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanhui; Huang, Qinghua; Xie, Xingbing; Tang, Xingong; Chang, Liao

    2016-08-01

    We present a generic 1D forward modeling and inversion algorithm for transient electromagnetic (TEM) data with an arbitrary horizontal transmitting loop and receivers at any depth in a layered earth. Both the Hankel and sine transforms required in the forward algorithm are calculated using the filter method. The adjoint-equation method is used to derive the formulation of data sensitivity at any depth in non-permeable media. The inversion algorithm based on this forward modeling algorithm and sensitivity formulation is developed using the Gauss-Newton iteration method combined with the Tikhonov regularization. We propose a new data-weighting method to minimize the initial model dependence that enhances the convergence stability. On a laptop with a CPU of i7-5700HQ@3.5 GHz, the inversion iteration of a 200 layered input model with a single receiver takes only 0.34 s, while it increases to only 0.53 s for the data from four receivers at a same depth. For the case of four receivers at different depths, the inversion iteration runtime increases to 1.3 s. Modeling the data with an irregular loop and an equal-area square loop indicates that the effect of the loop geometry is significant at early times and vanishes gradually along the diffusion of TEM field. For a stratified earth, inversion of data from more than one receiver is useful in noise reducing to get a more credible layered earth. However, for a resistive layer shielded below a conductive layer, increasing the number of receivers on the ground does not have significant improvement in recovering the resistive layer. Even with a down-hole TEM sounding, the shielded resistive layer cannot be recovered if all receivers are above the shielded resistive layer. However, our modeling demonstrates remarkable improvement in detecting the resistive layer with receivers in or under this layer.

  4. Numerical modelling of spallation in 2D hydrodynamics codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maw, J. R.; Giles, A. R.

    1996-05-01

    A model for spallation based on the void growth model of Johnson has been implemented in 2D Lagrangian and Eulerian hydrocodes. The model has been extended to treat complete separation of material when voids coalesce and to describe the effects of elevated temperatures and melting. The capabilities of the model are illustrated by comparison with data from explosively generated spall experiments. Particular emphasis is placed on the prediction of multiple spall effects in weak, low melting point, materials such as lead. The correlation between the model predictions and observations on the strain rate dependence of spall strength is discussed.

  5. A linked hydrodynamic and water quality model for the Salton Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chung, E.G.; Schladow, S.G.; Perez-Losada, J.; Robertson, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    A linked hydrodynamic and water quality model was developed and applied to the Salton Sea. The hydrodynamic component is based on the one-dimensional numerical model, DLM. The water quality model is based on a new conceptual model for nutrient cycling in the Sea, and simulates temperature, total suspended sediment concentration, nutrient concentrations, including PO4-3, NO3-1 and NH4+1, DO concentration and chlorophyll a concentration as functions of depth and time. Existing water temperature data from 1997 were used to verify that the model could accurately represent the onset and breakup of thermal stratification. 1999 is the only year with a near-complete dataset for water quality variables for the Salton Sea. The linked hydrodynamic and water quality model was run for 1999, and by adjustment of rate coefficients and other water quality parameters, a good match with the data was obtained. In this article, the model is fully described and the model results for reductions in external phosphorus load on chlorophyll a distribution are presented. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  6. Satellite-derived light extinction coefficient and its impact on thermal structure simulations in a 1-D lake model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolfaghari, Kiana; Duguay, Claude R.; Kheyrollah Pour, Homa

    2017-01-01

    A global constant value of the extinction coefficient (Kd) is usually specified in lake models to parameterize water clarity. This study aimed to improve the performance of the 1-D freshwater lake (FLake) model using satellite-derived Kd for Lake Erie. The CoastColour algorithm was applied to MERIS satellite imagery to estimate Kd. The constant (0.2 m-1) and satellite-derived Kd values as well as radiation fluxes and meteorological station observations were then used to run FLake for a meteorological station on Lake Erie. Results improved compared to using the constant Kd value (0.2 m-1). No significant improvement was found in FLake-simulated lake surface water temperature (LSWT) when Kd variations in time were considered using a monthly average. Therefore, results suggest that a time-independent, lake-specific, and constant satellite-derived Kd value can reproduce LSWT with sufficient accuracy for the Lake Erie station. A sensitivity analysis was also performed to assess the impact of various Kd values on the simulation outputs. Results show that FLake is sensitive to variations in Kd to estimate the thermal structure of Lake Erie. Dark waters result in warmer spring and colder fall temperatures compared to clear waters. Dark waters always produce colder mean water column temperature (MWCT) and lake bottom water temperature (LBWT), shallower mixed layer depth (MLD), longer ice cover duration, and thicker ice. The sensitivity of FLake to Kd variations was more pronounced in the simulation of MWCT, LBWT, and MLD. The model was particularly sensitive to Kd values below 0.5 m-1. This is the first study to assess the value of integrating Kd from the satellite-based CoastColour algorithm into the FLake model. Satellite-derived Kd is found to be a useful input parameter for simulations with FLake and possibly other lake models, and it has potential for applicability to other lakes where Kd is not commonly measured.

  7. Interpretation of MSL REMS data using 1D coupled heat and water vapor transport model of Mars subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloesener, Elodie; Karatekin, Özgür; Dehant, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) performed high-resolution measurements of temperature and relative humidity during more than one Martian year. In this work, a 1D subsurface model is used to study water vapor exchange between the atmosphere and the subsurface at Gale crater using REMS data. The thermal model used includes several layers of varying thickness with depth and properties that can be changed to correspond to those of Martian rocks at locations studied. It also includes the transport of water vapor through porous Martian regolith and the different phases considered are vapor, ice and adsorbed H2O. The total mass flux is given by the sum of diffusive and advective transport. The role of an adsorbing regolith on water transfer as well as the range of parameters with significant effect on water transport in Martian conditions are investigated. In addition, kinetics of the adsorption process is considered to examine its influence on the water vapor exchange between the subsurface and the atmosphere.

  8. Scale up tools in reactive extrusion and compounding processes. Could 1D-computer modeling be helpful?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradel, J.-L.; David, C.; Quinebèche, S.; Blondel, P.

    2014-05-01

    Industrial scale-up (or scale down) in Compounding and Reactive Extrusion processes is one of the most critical R&D challenges. Indeed, most of High Performances Polymers are obtained within a reactive compounding involving chemistry: free radical grafting, in situ compatibilization, rheology control... but also side reactions: oxidation, branching, chain scission... As described by basic Arrhenius and kinetics laws, the competition between all chemical reactions depends on residence time distribution and temperature. Then, to ensure the best possible scale up methodology, we need tools to match thermal history of the formulation along the screws from a lab scale twin screw extruder to an industrial one. This paper proposes a comparison between standard scale-up laws and the use of Computer modeling Software such as Ludovic® applied and compared to experimental data. Scaling data from a compounding line to another one, applying general rules (for example at constant specific mechanical energy), shows differences between experimental and computed data, and error depends on the screw speed range. For more accurate prediction, 1D-Computer Modeling could be used to optimize the process conditions to ensure the best scale-up product, especially in temperature sensitive reactive extrusion processes. When the product temperature along the screws is the key, Ludovic® software could help to compute the temperature profile along the screws and extrapolate conditions, even screw profile, on industrial extruders.

  9. Modeling partially coupled objects with smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.

    1996-10-01

    A very simple phenomenological model is presented to model objects that are partially coupled (i.e. welded or bonded) where usually the coupled interface is weaker than the bulk material. The model works by letting objects fully interact in compression and having the objects only partially interact in tension. A disconnect factor is provided to adjust the tensile interaction to simulate coupling strengths. Three cases of an example impact calculation are shown-no coupling, full coupling and partial coupling.

  10. Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for multiphase flow: Surface tension and contact line dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Panchenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel formulation of the Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model (PF-SPH) and use it to simulate two- and three-phase flows in bounded domains. In the PF-SPH model, the Navier-Stokes equations are discretized with the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method and the Young-Laplace boundary condition at the fluid-fluid interface and the Young boundary condition at the fluid-fluid-solid interface are replaced with pairwise forces added into the Navier-Stokes equations. We derive a relationship between the parameters in the pairwise forces and the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we demonstrate the accuracy of the model under static and dynamic conditions. Finally, to demonstrate the capabilities and robustness of the model we use it to simulate flow of three fluids in a porous material.

  11. Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for multiphase flow: Surface tension and contact line dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Panchenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel formulation of the Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) model and use it to simulate two- and three-phase flows in bounded domains. In the PF-SPH model, the Navier-Stokes equations are discretized with the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, and the Young-Laplace boundary condition at the fluid-fluid interface and the Young boundary condition at the fluid-fluid-solid interface are replaced with pairwise forces added into the Navier-Stokes equations. We derive a relationship between the parameters in the pairwise forces and the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we demonstrate the model's accuracy under static and dynamic conditions. Finally, we use the Pf-SPH model to simulate three phase flow in a porous medium.

  12. Dynamically Coupled Food-web and Hydrodynamic Modeling with ADH-CASM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piercy, C.; Swannack, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    Oysters and freshwater mussels are "ecological engineers," modifying the local water quality by filtering zooplankton and other suspended particulate matter from the water column and flow hydraulics by impinging on the near-bed flow environment. The success of sessile, benthic invertebrates such as oysters depends on environmental factors including but not limited to temperature, salinity, and flow regime. Typically food-web and other types of ecological models use flow and water quality data as direct input without regard to the feedback between the ecosystem and the physical environment. The USACE-ERDC has developed a coupled hydrodynamic-ecological modeling approach that dynamically couples a 2-D hydrodynamic and constituent transport model, Adaptive Hydraulics (ADH), with a bioenergetics food-web model, the Comprehensive Aquatics Systems Model (CASM), which captures the dynamic feedback between aquatic ecological systems and the environment. We present modeling results from restored oyster reefs in the Great Wicomico River on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay, which quantify ecosystem services such as the influence of the benthic ecosystem on water quality. Preliminary results indicate that while the influence of oyster reefs on bulk flow dynamics is limited due to the localized influence of oyster reefs, large reefs and the associated benthic ecosystem can create measurable changes in the concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon in the areas around reefs. We also present a sensitivity analysis to quantify the relative sensitivity of the coupled ADH-CASM model to both hydrodynamic and ecological parameter choice.

  13. Uncertainty Analysis and Parameter Estimation For Nearshore Hydrodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardani, S.; Kaihatu, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical models represent deterministic approaches used for the relevant physical processes in the nearshore. Complexity of the physics of the model and uncertainty involved in the model inputs compel us to apply a stochastic approach to analyze the robustness of the model. The Bayesian inverse problem is one powerful way to estimate the important input model parameters (determined by apriori sensitivity analysis) and can be used for uncertainty analysis of the outputs. Bayesian techniques can be used to find the range of most probable parameters based on the probability of the observed data and the residual errors. In this study, the effect of input data involving lateral (Neumann) boundary conditions, bathymetry and off-shore wave conditions on nearshore numerical models are considered. Monte Carlo simulation is applied to a deterministic numerical model (the Delft3D modeling suite for coupled waves and flow) for the resulting uncertainty analysis of the outputs (wave height, flow velocity, mean sea level and etc.). Uncertainty analysis of outputs is performed by random sampling from the input probability distribution functions and running the model as required until convergence to the consistent results is achieved. The case study used in this analysis is the Duck94 experiment, which was conducted at the U.S. Army Field Research Facility at Duck, North Carolina, USA in the fall of 1994. The joint probability of model parameters relevant for the Duck94 experiments will be found using the Bayesian approach. We will further show that, by using Bayesian techniques to estimate the optimized model parameters as inputs and applying them for uncertainty analysis, we can obtain more consistent results than using the prior information for input data which means that the variation of the uncertain parameter will be decreased and the probability of the observed data will improve as well. Keywords: Monte Carlo Simulation, Delft3D, uncertainty analysis, Bayesian techniques

  14. A Hydrodynamic Model of The Human Leg Circulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klabunde, Richard E.; McDowell, Donald E.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of a life-size model which shows blood flow under normal and pathological conditions. Four experimental procedures (single vessel occlusion, dilation of distal vascular bed, single artery stenosis, and multiple artery stenoses) typical of those demonstrated by the model are discussed and diagrammed. (DH)

  15. Development and evaluation of a coupled hydrodynamic (FVCOM) and water quality model (CE-QUAL-ICM)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeyun; Labiosa, Rochelle G.; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Chen, Changsheng; Qi, Jianhua; Cerco, Carl

    2010-01-08

    Recent and frequent fish-kills in waters otherwise known for their pristine high quality, created increased awareness and urgent concern regarding potential for degradation of water quality in Puget Sound through coastal eutrophication caused by increased nutrient loading. Following a detailed review of leading models and tools available in public domain, FVCOM and CE-QUAL-ICM models were selected to conduct hydrodynamic and water quality simulations for the fjordal waters of Puget Sound.

  16. A Modeling Study of Hydrodynamic Circulation in a Fjord of the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2012-10-01

    Increased eutrophication and degraded water quality in estuarine and coastal waters have been a worldwide environmental concern. While it is commonly accepted that anthropogenic impact plays a major role in many emerging water quality issues, natural conditions such as restricted water circulations controlled by geometry may also substantially contribute to unfavorable water quality in certain ecosystems. To elucidate the contributions from different factors, a hydrodynamic-water quality model that integrates both physical transport and pollutant loadings is particularly warranted. A preliminary modeling study using the Environmental Fluid Dynamic Code (EFDC) is conducted to investigate hydrodynamic circulation and low dissolved oxygen (DO) in Hood Canal, a representative fjord in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Because the water quality modeling work is still ongoing, this paper focuses on the progress in hydrodynamic modeling component. The hydrodynamic model has been set up using the publicly available forcing data and was calibrated against field observations or NOAA predictions for tidal elevation, current, salinity and temperature. The calibrated model was also used to estimate physical transport timescales such as residence time in the estuary. The preliminary model results demonstrate that the EFDC Hood Canal model is capable of capturing the general circulation patterns in Hood Canal, including weak tidal current and strong vertical stratification. The long residence time (i.e., on the order of 100 days for the entire estuary) also indicates that restricted water circulation could contribute to low DO in the estuary and also makes the system especially susceptible to anthropogenic disturbance, such as excess nutrient input.

  17. Fractal hydrodynamic model of high-fluence laser ablation plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Agop, M.; Nica, P.; Gurlui, S.; Focsa, C.

    2010-10-08

    Optical/electrical characterization of transient plasmas generated by high-fluence (up to 1 kJ/cm{sup 2}) laser ablation of various targets revealed as a general feature the splitting of the plume in two structures. In order to account for this behavior, a new fractal hydrodynamic model has been developed in a non-differentiable space-time. The model successfully retrieves the kinetics of the two structures.

  18. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors. Seventh technical progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Gidaspow, D.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this investigation is to convert our ``learning gas solid-liquid`` fluidization model into a predictive design model. The IIT hydrodynamic model computes the phase velocities and the volume fractions of gas, liquid and particulate phase. Model verification involves a comparison of these computed velocities and volume fractions to experimental values. A hydrodynamic model for multiphase flows, based on the principles of mass, momentum and energy conservation for each phase, was developed and applied to model gas-liquid, gas-liquid-solid fluidization and gas-solid-solid separation. To simulate the industrial slurry bubble column reactors, a computer program based on the hydrodynamic model was written with modules for chemical reactions (e.g. the synthesis of methanol), phase changes and heat exchangers. In the simulations of gas-liquid two phases flow system, the gas hold-ups, computed with a variety of operating conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas and liquid velocities, agree well with the measurements obtained at Air Products` pilot plant. The hydrodynamic model has more flexible features than the previous empirical correlations in predicting the gas hold-up of gas-liquid two-phase flow systems. In the simulations of gas-liquid-solid bubble column reactors with and without slurry circulation, the code computes volume fractions, temperatures and velocity distributions for the gas, the liquid and the solid phases, as well as concentration distributions for the species (CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}0H, ... ), after startup from a certain initial state. A kinetic theory approach is used to compute a solid viscosity due to particle collisions. Solid motion and gas-liquid-solid mixing are observed on a color PCSHOW movie made from computed time series data. The steady state and time average catalyst concentration profiles, the slurry height and the rates of methanol production agree well with the measurements obtained at an Air Products` pilot plant.

  19. Impact of Mars Water Ice Clouds and Thermal Aerosol Enforcement to the Shortscale Climate Dynamics: Evidence from 1-D Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, A. V.; Clancy, R. T.; Wilson, R. J.; Richardson, M.; Wolff, M.; Woods, S.

    1997-07-01

    Ground-based observations of Mars atmospheric temperatures, water, and aerosols have suggested that water ice clouds may regulate vertical distribution of dust and, hence, the global radiation balance, with strong seasonal forcing (Clancy et al., 1996). Under specific Martian conditions, condensation of atmospheric water occurs on the dust as Aitken cores, without external sources, dust is efficiently confined below the saturation level of water vapor. This in turn forces the thermal regime and the saturation conditions, particularly around the aphelion northern summer (Clancy et al., 1996). This effect is studied with two 1-D models, a time marching simulation (time step is 4 min), and reduced local steady-state model. Both models treat aerosol particle microphysics, turbulent transport and thermal enforcement interactively, including radiation transfer consistent with derived aerosol vertical and size distributions. Simulations show that in the aphelion season, when clouds are formed below or near 10 km, strong nonlinearity of cloud thermal feedback results in nonuniqueness of a steady-state solution with water vapor saturation level varying by as high as 5-7 km. Such model behavior appears related to observations of rapid variations of a global-average, lower atmosphere temperature over the planet in northern summer (Clancy, 1997). The stability of thermal equilibrium state is controlled by water vapor abundance and the strength of the dust source at the surface. Time marching simulations provide access to the dynamics of seasonal global dust storm relaxation that may play an important role in interannual climate variations on Mars. References: Clancy, R.T., A.W. Grossman, M.J. Wolff, P.B. James, Y.N. Billawala, B.J. Sandor, S.W. Lee, and D.J. Rudy. Water vapor saturation at low altitudes around Mars aphelion: A key to Mars climate? Icarus, 122, 36-62, 1996.

  20. A 1D Model of Radial Ion Motion Interrupted by Ion–Neutral Interactions in a Cometary Coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigren, E.; Eriksson, A. I.

    2017-04-01

    Because ion–neutral reaction cross sections are energy dependent, the distance from a cometary nucleus within which ions remain collisionally coupled to the neutrals is dictated not only by the comet’s activity level but also by the electromagnetic fields in the coma. Here we present a 1D model simulating the outward radial motion of water group ions with radial acceleration by an ambipolar electric field interrupted primarily by charge transfer processes with H2O. We also discuss the impact of plasma waves. For a given electric field profile, the model calculates key parameters, including the total ion density, n I , the H3O+/H2O+ number density and flux ratios, R dens and R flux, and the mean ion drift speed, < {u}I> , as a function of cometocentric distance. We focus primarily on a coma roughly resembling that of the ESA Rosetta mission target comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko near its perihelion in 2015 August. In the presence of a weak ambipolar electric field in the radial direction the model results suggest that the neutral coma is not sufficiently dense to keep the mean ion flow speed close to that of the neutrals by the spacecraft location (∼200 km from the nucleus). In addition, for electric field profiles giving n I and < {u}I> within limits constrained by measurements, the R dens values are significantly higher than values typically observed. However, when including the ion motion in large-amplitude plasma waves in the model, results more compatible with observations are obtained. We suggest that the variable and often low H3O+/H2O+ number density ratios observed may reflect nonradial ion trajectories strongly influenced by electromagnetic forces and/or plasma instabilities, with energization of the ion population by plasma waves.

  1. THE HYDRODYNAMICAL MODELS OF THE COMETARY COMPACT H ii REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Feng-Yao; Zhu, Qing-Feng; Li, Juan; Wang, Jun-Zhi; Zhang, Jiang-Shui E-mail: zhuqf@ustc.edu.cn E-mail: jzwang@shao.ac.cn

    2015-10-10

    We have developed a full numerical method to study the gas dynamics of cometary ultracompact H ii regions, and associated photodissociation regions (PDRs). The bow-shock and champagne-flow models with a 40.9/21.9 M{sub ⊙} star are simulated. In the bow-shock models, the massive star is assumed to move through dense (n = 8000 cm{sup −3}) molecular material with a stellar velocity of 15 km s{sup −1}. In the champagne-flow models, an exponential distribution of density with a scale height of 0.2 pc is assumed. The profiles of the [Ne ii] 12.81 μm and H{sub 2} S(2) lines from the ionized regions and PDRs are compared for two sets of models. In champagne-flow models, emission lines from the ionized gas clearly show the effect of acceleration along the direction toward the tail due to the density gradient. The kinematics of the molecular gas inside the dense shell are mainly due to the expansion of the H ii region. However, in bow-shock models the ionized gas mainly moves in the same direction as the stellar motion. The kinematics of the molecular gas inside the dense shell simply reflects the motion of the dense shell with respect to the star. These differences can be used to distinguish two sets of models.

  2. Hydrodynamic modeling of laser interaction with micro-structured targets

    SciTech Connect

    Velechovsky, Jan; Limpouch, Jiri; Liska, Richard; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

    2016-08-03

    A model is developed for numerical simulations of laser absorption in plasmas made of porous materials, with particular interest in low-density foams. Laser absorption is treated on two spatial scales simultaneously. At the microscale, the expansion of a thin solid pore wall is modeled in one dimension and the information obtained is used in the macroscale fluid simulations for the description of the plasma homogenization behind the ionization front. This two-scale laser absorption model is implemented in the arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian hydrocode PALE. In conclusion, the numerical simulations of laser penetration into low-density foams compare favorably with published experimental data.

  3. One-dimensional hydrodynamic model generating a turbulent cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sakajo, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    As a minimal mathematical model generating cascade analogous to that of the Navier-Stokes turbulence in the inertial range, we propose a one-dimensional partial-differential-equation model that conserves the integral of the squared vorticity analog (enstrophy) in the inviscid case. With a large-scale random forcing and small viscosity, we find numerically that the model exhibits the enstrophy cascade, the broad energy spectrum with a sizable correction to the dimensional-analysis prediction, peculiar intermittency, and self-similarity in the dynamical system structure.

  4. Hydrodynamic modeling of granular flows in a modified Couette cell.

    PubMed

    Jop, Pierre

    2008-03-01

    We present simulations of granular flows in a modified Couette cell, using a continuum model recently proposed for dense granular flows. Based on a friction coefficient, which depends on an inertial number, the model captures the positions of the wide shear bands. We show that a smooth transition in velocity-profile shape occurs when the height of the granular material is increased, leading to a differential rotation of the central part close to the surface. The numerical predictions are in qualitative agreement with previous experimental results. The model provides predictions for the increase of the shear band width when the rotation rate is increased.

  5. Hydrodynamic Modeling of Circulation and Sediment Transport in Lake Hartwell, SC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seker - Elci, S.

    2001-12-01

    This paper describes the application of a numerical model describing three-dimensional hydrodynamics of a large reservoir in the Piedmont region of South Carolina, USA. Emphasis is placed on long-term hydrodynamics, accounting for wind forcing, inflows, outflows, storage changes, and thermal stratification in Lake Hartwell. Lake Hartwell is a man-made reservoir on the Savannah River, bordering both Georgia and South Carolina. At the chosen site Environmental Protection Agency and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control detected large amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Motivation is related to the fate of eroded sediments deposited in the reservoir. The EFDC model is used to describe lake hydrodynamics and sediment fate. Model inputs include basin geometry, inflow locations and strengths, wind forcing, and sediment and water properties. The model has been verified by comparison to analytical tests, where possible, and sensitivity of model results to input parameters have been assessed. Model results for cases with realistic long-term forcing indicate likely zones of sediment erosion and deposition, useful for mitigation of pollution problems as well as predictions of reservoir lifetime and development of maintenance schemes.

  6. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic model for viscoelastic fluids with thermal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Ellero, Marco; Español, Pep

    2009-05-01

    We present a fluid-particle model for a polymer solution in nonisothermal situations. The state of the fluid particles is characterized by the thermodynamic variables and a configuration tensor that describes the underlying molecular orientation of the polymer molecules. The specification of very simple physical mechanisms inspired by the dynamics of single polymer molecules allows one, with the help of the general equation for nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling (GENERIC) formalism, to derive the equations of motion for a set of fluid particles carrying polymer molecules in suspension. In the simplest case of Hookean dumbbells we recover a fluid-particle version of the Oldroyd-B model in which thermal fluctuations are included consistently. Generalization to more complex viscoelastic models, such as finitely extensible nonlinear elastic Peterlin (FENE-P) model, with the proper introduction of thermal fluctuations is straightforward.

  7. A reduced-order model based on the coupled 1D-3D finite element simulations for an efficient analysis of hemodynamics problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soudah, Eduardo; Rossi, Riccardo; Idelsohn, Sergio; Oñate, Eugenio

    2014-10-01

    A reduced-order model for an efficient analysis of cardiovascular hemodynamics problems using multiscale approach is presented in this work. Starting from a patient-specific computational mesh obtained by medical imaging techniques, an analysis methodology based on a two-step automatic procedure is proposed. First a coupled 1D-3D Finite Element Simulation is performed and the results are used to adjust a reduced-order model of the 3D patient-specific area of interest. Then, this reduced-order model is coupled with the 1D model. In this way, three-dimensional effects are accounted for in the 1D model in a cost effective manner, allowing fast computation under different scenarios. The methodology proposed is validated using a patient-specific aortic coarctation model under rest and non-rest conditions.

  8. Hydrodynamic Instability in an Extended Landau/Levich Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Stephen B.; Sackesteder, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The classical Landau/Levich models of liquid propellant combustion, which serve as seminal examples of hydrodynamic instability in reactive systems, have been combined and extended to account for a dynamic dependence, absent in the original formulations, of the local burning rate on the local pressure and/or temperature fields. The resulting model admits an extremely rich variety of both hydrodynamic and reactive/diffusive instabilities that can be analyzed in various limiting parameter regimes. In the present work, a formal asymptotic analysis, based on the realistic smallness of the gas-to-liquid density ratio, is developed to investigate the combined effects of gravity, surface tension and viscosity on the hydrodynamic instability of the propagating liquid/gas interface. In particular, a composite asymptotic expression, spanning three distinguished wavenumber regimes, is derived for both cellular and pulsating hydrodynamic neutral stability boundaries A(sub p)(k), where A(sub p) is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the disturbance wavenumber. For the case of cellular (Landau) instability, the results demonstrate explicitly the stabilizing effect of gravity on long-wave disturbances, the stabilizing effect of viscosity and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wavenumbers for critical negative values of A(sub p). In the limiting case of weak gravity, it is shown that cellular hydrodynamic instability in this context is a long-wave instability phenomenon, whereas at normal gravity, this instability is first manifested through O(l) wavenumber disturbances. It is also demonstrated that, in the large wavenumber regime, surface tension and both liquid and gas viscosity all produce comparable stabilizing effects in the large-wavenumber regime, thereby providing significant modifications to previous analyses of Landau instability in which one or more of these effects were neglected. In contrast

  9. Hydrodynamics and Platoon Formation for a Totally Asymmetric Exclusion Model with Particlewise Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppäläinen, Timo; Krug, Joachim

    1999-05-01

    We consider a one-dimensional totally asymmetric exclusion model with quenched random jump rates associated with the particles, and an equivalent interface growth process on the square lattice. We obtain rigorous limit theorems for the shape of the interface, the motion of a tagged particle, and the macroscopic density profile on the hydrodynamic scale. The theorems are valid under almost every realization of the disordered rates. Under suitable conditions on the distribution of jump rates the model displays a disorder-dominated low-density phase where spatial inhomogeneities develop below the hydrodynamic resolution. The macroscopic signature of the phase transition is a density discontinuity at the front of the rarefaction wave moving out of an initial step-function profile. Numerical simulations of the density fluctuations ahead of the front suggest slow convergence to the predictions of a deterministic particle model on the real line, which contains only random velocities but no temporal noise.

  10. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for phase separating fluid mixtures. I. General equations.

    PubMed

    Thieulot, Cedric; Janssen, L P B M; Español, Pep

    2005-07-01

    We present a thermodynamically consistent discrete fluid particle model for the simulation of a recently proposed set of hydrodynamic equations for a phase separating van der Waals fluid mixture [P. Español and C.A.P. Thieulot, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 9109 (2003)]. The discrete model is formulated by following a discretization procedure given by the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method within the thermodynamically consistent general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling (GENERIC) framework. Each fluid particle carries information on the mass, momentum, energy, and the mass fraction of the different components. The discrete model allows one to simulate nonisothermal dynamic evolution of phase separating fluids with surface tension effects while respecting the first and second laws of thermodynamics exactly.

  11. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for phase separating fluid mixtures. I. General equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieulot, Cedric; Janssen, L. P. B. M.; Español, Pep

    2005-07-01

    We present a thermodynamically consistent discrete fluid particle model for the simulation of a recently proposed set of hydrodynamic equations for a phase separating van der Waals fluid mixture [P. Español and C.A.P. Thieulot, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 9109 (2003)]. The discrete model is formulated by following a discretization procedure given by the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method within the thermodynamically consistent general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling (GENERIC) framework. Each fluid particle carries information on the mass, momentum, energy, and the mass fraction of the different components. The discrete model allows one to simulate nonisothermal dynamic evolution of phase separating fluids with surface tension effects while respecting the first and second laws of thermodynamics exactly.

  12. Modeling the coupling of reaction kinetics and hydrodynamics in a collapsing cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Sudib; Deymier, Pierre; Muralidharan, Krishna; Frantziskonis, G.; Pannala, Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a model of cavitation based on the multiphase Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) that allows for coupling between the hydrodynamics of a collapsing cavity and supported solute chemical species. We demonstrate that this model can also be coupled to deterministic or stochastic chemical reactions. In a two-species model of chemical reactions (with a major and a minor specie), the major difference observed between the deterministic and stochastic reactions takes the form of random fluctuations in concentration of the minor species. We demonstrate that advection associated with the hydrodynamics of a collapsing cavity leads to highly inhomogeneous concentration of solutes. In turn these inhomogeneities in concentration may lead to significant increase in concentration-dependent reaction rates and can result in a local enhancement in the production of minor species.

  13. Hydrodynamic and morphodynamic modelling of the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelvink, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    Surf zones of sandy beaches are generally very dynamic systems showing complex behaviour over a range of time- and length scales. Modelling of this behaviour has evolved from two extremes of the spectrum: on the one hand, practical engineers who have to predict things on a timescale of months to years are trying to do this in an ever more detailed way, whereas research scientists (a.k.a. 'field guys') have typically tried to understand basic processes first. As long as predictive models are surf-zone averaged (as in many longshore transport predictors) or longshore-averaged (as in coastal profile models) many of the basic processes do not show up in the predictive models or are gathered in lump coefficients with a large scatter. This leads to a frustrating gap between the approaches, where it is often difficult to explain why large sums of money should be spent on either process research that does not improve predictions, or on development of models that do not represent many important processes. This presentation will focus on the challenge of bringing the process research and the development of predictive models together, in such a way that increased knowledge, for instance on the behaviour of rip currents or sand ripples, actually makes a difference in morphological predictions on practically relevant timescales. A very important step in meeting this challenge is to improve the efficiency of the process-based models that we can use both for integrating process knowledge and for making practical predictions. Some examples are: - reducing the domain by improving boundary conditions. A well-known example is the use of cyclic boundary conditions, but these are difficult to implement in implicit schemes and cannot be combined with tidal currents. A Neumann-type boundary condition where the longshore water level gradient is imposed at lateral boundaries provides a solution for surf zone models. - improving the smoothness of transport patterns by taking into account

  14. A 1D-ecosystem model for pelagic waters in the southern Baltic Sea. Numerical simulations (future decades)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzierzbicka-Glowacka, L.; Maciejewska, A.; Osiński, R.; Jakacki, J.; Jędrasik, J.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional Ecosystem Model. Mathematically, the pelagic variables in the model are described by a second-order partial differential equation of the diffusion type with biogeochemical sources and sinks. The temporal changes in the phytoplankton biomass are caused by primary production, respiration, mortality, grazing by zooplankton and sinking. The zooplankton biomass is affected by ingestion, excretion, respiration, fecal production, mortality, and carnivorous grazing. The changes in the pelagic detritus concentration are determined by input of: dead phytoplankton and zooplankton, natural mortality of predators, fecal pellets, and sinks: sedimentation, zooplankton grazing and decomposition. The nutrient concentration is caused by nutrient release, zooplankton excretion, predator excretion, detritus decomposition and benthic regeneration as sources and by nutrient uptake by phytoplankton as sinks. However, the benthic detritus is described by phytoplankton sedimentation, detritus sedimentation and remineralisation. The particulate organic carbon concentration is determined as the sum of phytoplankton, zooplankton and dead organic matter (detritus) concentrations. The 1D ecosystem model was used to simulate the seasonal dynamics of pelagic variables (phytoplankton, zooplankton, pelagic detritus and POC) in the southern Baltic Sea (Gdańsk Deep, Bornholm Deep and Gotland Deep). The calculations were made assuming: 1) increase in the water temperature in the upper layer - 0.008oC per year, 2) increase in the available light - 0.2% per year. Based on this trend, daily, monthly and seasonal and annual variability of phytoplankton, zooplankton, pelagic detritus and particulate organic carbon in different areas of the southern Baltic Sea (Gdańsk Deep, Borrnholm Deep and Gotland Deep) in the euphotic layer was calculated for the years: 2000, 2010, 2020, 2030, 2040 and 2050.

  15. Automatic 1D integrated geophysical modelling of lithospheric discontinuities: a case study from Carpathian-Pannonian Basin region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinč, Michal; Zeyen, Hermann; Bielik, Miroslav

    2014-06-01

    Using a very fast 1D method of integrated geophysical modelling, we calculated models of the Moho discontinuity and the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary in the Carpathian-Pannonian Basin region and its surrounding tectonic units. This method is capable to constrain complicated lithospheric structures by using joint interpretation of different geophysical data sets (geoid and topography) at the same time. The Moho depth map shows significant crustal thickness variations. The thickest crust is found underneath the Carpathian arc and its immediate Foredeep. High values are found in the Eastern Carpathians and Vrancea area (44 km). The thickest crust modelled in the Southern Carpathians is 42 km. The Dinarides crust is characterized by thicknesses more than 40 km. In the East European Platform, crust has a thickness of about 34 km. In the Apuseni Mountains, the depth of the Moho is about 36 km. The Pannonian Basin and the Moesian Platform have thinner crust than the surrounding areas. Here the crustal thicknesses are less than 30 km on average. The thinnest crust can be found in the SE part of the Pannonian Basin near the contact with the Southern Carpathians where it is only 26 km. The thickest lithosphere is placed in the East European Platform, Eastern Carpathians and Southern Carpathians. The East European Platform lithosphere thickness is on average more than 120 km. A strip of thicker lithosphere follows the Eastern Carpathians and its Foredeep, where the values reach in average 160 km. A lithosphere thickness minimum can be observed at the southern border of the Southern Carpathians and in the SE part of the Pannonian Basin. Here, it is only 60 km. The extremely low values of lithospheric thickness in this area were not shown before. The Moesian Platform is characterized by an E-W trend of lithospheric thickness decrease. In the East, the thickness is about 110 km and in the west it is only 80 km. The Pannonian Basin lithospheric thickness ranges from 80 to

  16. Thermal and hydrodynamic modelling of active catheters for interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Marchandise, Emilie; Flaud, Patrice; Royon, Laurent; Blanc, Raphaël; Szewczyk, Jérome

    2011-07-01

    Interventional radiologists desire to improve their operating tools such as catheters. Active catheters in which the tip is moved using shape memory alloy actuators activated using the Joule effect present a promising approach for easier navigation in the small vessels. However, the increase in temperature caused by this Joule effect must be controlled in order to prevent damage to blood cells and tissues. This paper is devoted to the simulation and experimental validation of a fluid-thermal model of an active catheter prototype. Comparisons between computer-predicted and experimentally measured temperatures are presented for both experiments in air and water at 37°C. Good agreement between the computational and experimental results is found, demonstrating the validity of the developed computer model. These comparisons enable us to highlight some important issues in the modelling process and to determine the optimal current for the activation of the catheter.

  17. Numerical study on pollutant transport in Dalian bay based on hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Huiting; Li, Jin; Zhang, Hongxing; Zhao, Kaibin; Zhang, Mingliang

    2017-01-01

    Based on the depth-averaged two-dimensional shallow water and pollutant transport equation, the coupling model of water flow and water quality with explicit scheme is developed in this study. The unstructured triangular grid is adopted to locally refine the mesh around sewage outlet or in high-gradient regions of terrain change for the coupling model. The finite volume method is applied to ensure the conservation of mass for each element. This hydrodynamic model applies the Roe solver approximate Riemann solution with second-order accuracy to compute the water momentum flux on the grid interface. Taking Dalian Bay as the research object, the numerical model established is used to simulate the hydrodynamic characteristics and pollutant transport process. The computed results of the tide level, flow current and flow direction agree well with the measured data in Dalian Bay. The spatial and temporal distribution of pollutant in water are analyzed and discussed in this study. Simulated results show that the two-dimensional hydrodynamic and pollutant transport model can accurately simulate the mass transport in coastal waters, and it can provide a scientific basis on coastal water environment protection for the research water.

  18. Reshocks, rarefactions, and the generalized Layzer model for hydrodynamic instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mikaelian, K O

    2008-06-10

    We report numerical simulations and analytic modeling of shock tube experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. We examine single interfaces of the type A/B where the incident shock is initiated in A and the transmitted shock proceeds into B. Examples are He/air and air/He. In addition, we study finite-thickness or double-interface A/B/A configurations like air/SF{sub 6}/air gas-curtain experiments. We first consider conventional shock tubes that have a 'fixed' boundary: A solid endwall which reflects the transmitted shock and reshocks the interface(s). Then we focus on new experiments with a 'free' boundary--a membrane disrupted mechanically or by the transmitted shock, sending back a rarefaction towards the interface(s). Complex acceleration histories are achieved, relevant for Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. We compare our simulation results with a generalized Layzer model for two fluids with time-dependent densities, and derive a new freeze-out condition whereby accelerating and compressive forces cancel each other out. Except for the recently reported failures of the Layzer model, the generalized Layzer model and hydrocode simulations for reshocks and rarefactions agree well with each other, and remain to be verified experimentally.

  19. Hydrodynamic Forces on Reverse Tainter Valves; Hydraulic Model Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    FACILITY: Completion of a physical model study of the culvert valves of the Eisenhower and Snell Locks, St. Lawrence Seaway (Stockstill et al., in...evaluation of culvert valves at Eisenhower and Snell Locks, St. Lawrence Seaway. Vicksburg, MS: US Army Engineer Research and Development Center

  20. Assessment of Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Hydrodynamic Model Domain Expansion and Refinement, and Online Dissemination of Model Results

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2010-08-01

    In this report we describe the 1) the expansion of the PNNL hydrodynamic model domain to include the continental shelf along the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and Vancouver Island; and 2) the approach and progress in developing the online/Internet disseminations of model results and outreach efforts in support of the Puget Sound Operational Forecast System (PS-OPF). Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics, for fiscal year 2010 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

  1. A numerical method of reduced complexity for simulating vascular hemodynamics using coupled 0D lumped and 1D wave propagation models.

    PubMed

    Kroon, Wilco; Huberts, Wouter; Bosboom, Marielle; van de Vosse, Frans

    2012-01-01

    A computational method of reduced complexity is developed for simulating vascular hemodynamics by combination of one-dimensional (1D) wave propagation models for the blood vessels with zero-dimensional (0D) lumped models for the microcirculation. Despite the reduced dimension, current algorithms used to solve the model equations and simulate pressure and flow are rather complex, thereby limiting acceptance in the medical field. This complexity mainly arises from the methods used to combine the 1D and the 0D model equations. In this paper a numerical method is presented that no longer requires additional coupling methods and enables random combinations of 1D and 0D models using pressure as only state variable. The method is applied to a vascular tree consisting of 60 major arteries in the body and the head. Simulated results are realistic. The numerical method is stable and shows good convergence.

  2. The application of single particle hydrodynamics in continuum models of multiphase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Rand

    1988-01-01

    A review of the application of single particle hydrodynamics in models for the exchange of interphase momentum in continuum models of multiphase flow is presented. Considered are the equations of motion for a laminar, mechanical two phase flow. Inherent to this theory is a model for the interphase exchange of momentum due to drag between the dispersed particulate and continuous fluid phases. In addition, applications of two phase flow theory to de-mixing flows require the modeling of interphase momentum exchange due to lift forces. The applications of single particle analysis in deriving models for drag and lift are examined.

  3. Flood hazard maps from SAR data and global hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustarini, Laura; Chini, Marci; Hostache, Renaud; Matgen, Patrick; Pappenberger, Florian; Bally, Phillippe

    2015-04-01

    With flood consequences likely to amplify because of growing population and ongoing accumulation of assets in flood-prone areas, global flood hazard and risk maps are greatly needed for improving flood preparedness at large scale. At the same time, with the rapidly growing archives of SAR images of floods, there is a high potential of making use of these images for global and regional flood management. In this framework, an original method is presented to integrate global flood inundation modeling and microwave remote sensing. It takes advantage of the combination of the time and space continuity of a global inundation model with the high spatial resolution of satellite observations. The availability of model simulations over a long time period offers the opportunity to estimate flood non-exceedance probabilities in a robust way. The probabilities can later be attributed to historical satellite observations. SAR-derived flood extent maps with their associated non-exceedance probabilities are then combined to generate flood hazard maps with a spatial resolution equal to that of the satellite images, which is most of the time higher than that of a global inundation model. The method can be applied to any area of interest in the world, provided that a sufficient number of relevant remote sensing images are available. We applied the method on the Severn River (UK) and on the Zambezi River (Mozambique), where large archives of Envisat flood images can be exploited. The global ECMWF flood inundation model is considered for computing the statistics of extreme events. A comparison with flood hazard maps estimated with in situ measured discharge is carried out. An additional analysis has been performed on the Severn River, using high resolution SAR data from the COSMO-SkyMed SAR constellation, acquired for a single flood event (one flood map per day between 27/11/2012 and 4/12/2012). The results showed that it is vital to observe the peak of the flood. However, a single

  4. Microfluidic culture models to study the hydrodynamics of tumor progression and therapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Cara; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2013-08-01

    The integration of tissue engineering strategies with microfluidic technologies has enabled the design of in vitro microfluidic culture models that better adapt to morphological changes in tissue structure and function over time. These biomimetic microfluidic scaffolds accurately mimic native 3D microenvironments, as well as permit precise and simultaneous control of chemical gradients, hydrodynamic stresses, and cellular niches within the system. The recent application of microfluidic in vitro culture models to cancer research offers enormous potential to aid in the development of improved therapeutic strategies by supporting the investigation of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis under physiologically relevant flow conditions. The intrinsic material properties and fluid mechanics of microfluidic culture models enable high-throughput anti-cancer drug screening, permit well-defined and controllable input parameters to monitor tumor cell response to various hydrodynamic conditions or treatment modalities, as well as provide a platform for elucidating fundamental mechanisms of tumor physiology. This review highlights recent developments and future applications of microfluidic culture models to study tumor progression and therapeutic targeting under conditions of hydrodynamic stress relevant to the complex tumor microenvironment.

  5. Hydrodynamic and hydrostatic modelling of hydraulic journal bearings considering small displacement condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chi-Yin; Chuang, Jen-Chen; Tu, Jia-Ying

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes modified coefficients for the dynamic model of hydraulic journal bearing system that integrates the hydrodynamic and hydrostatic properties. In recent years, design of hydraulic bearing for machine tool attracts worldwide attention, because hydraulic bearings are able to provide higher capacity and accuracy with lower friction, compared to conventional bearing systems. In order to achieve active control of the flow pressure and enhance the operation accuracy, the dynamic model of hydraulic bearings need to be developed. Modified coefficients of hydrostatic stiffness, hydrodynamic stiffness, and squeeze damping of the dynamic model are presented in this work, which are derived referring to small displacement analysis from literature. The proposed modified coefficients and model, which consider the pressure variations, relevant geometry size, and fluid properties of the journal bearings, are able to characterise the hydrodynamic and hydrostatic properties with better precision, thus offering the following pragmatic contribution: (1) on-line prediction of the eccentricity and the position of the shaft in the face of external force that results in vibration; (2) development of active control system to regulate the supply flow pressure and to minimize the eccentricity of the shaft. Theoretical derivation and simulation results with different vibration cases are discussed to verify the proposed techniques.

  6. A general method for generating bathymetric data for hydrodynamic computer models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burau, J.R.; Cheng, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    To generate water depth data from randomly distributed bathymetric data for numerical hydrodymamic models, raw input data from field surveys, water depth data digitized from nautical charts, or a combination of the two are sorted to given an ordered data set on which a search algorithm is used to isolate data for interpolation. Water depths at locations required by hydrodynamic models are interpolated from the bathymetric data base using linear or cubic shape functions used in the finite-element method. The bathymetric database organization and preprocessing, the search algorithm used in finding the bounding points for interpolation, the mathematics of the interpolation formulae, and the features of the automatic generation of water depths at hydrodynamic model grid points are included in the analysis. This report includes documentation of two computer programs which are used to: (1) organize the input bathymetric data; and (2) to interpolate depths for hydrodynamic models. An example of computer program operation is drawn from a realistic application to the San Francisco Bay estuarine system. (Author 's abstract)

  7. Validation of Hydrodynamic Load Models Using CFD for the OC4-DeepCwind Semisubmersible: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Benitz, M. A.; Schmidt, D. P.; Lackner, M. A.; Stewart, G. M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2015-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were carried out on the OC4-DeepCwind semi-submersible to obtain a better understanding of how to set hydrodynamic coefficients for the structure when using an engineering tool such as FAST to model the system. The focus here was on the drag behavior and the effects of the free-surface, free-ends and multi-member arrangement of the semi-submersible structure. These effects are investigated through code-to-code comparisons and flow visualizations. The implications on mean load predictions from engineering tools are addressed. The work presented here suggests that selection of drag coefficients should take into consideration a variety of geometric factors. Furthermore, CFD simulations demonstrate large time-varying loads due to vortex shedding, which FAST's hydrodynamic module, HydroDyn, does not model. The implications of these oscillatory loads on the fatigue life needs to be addressed.

  8. A 3D Hydrodynamic Model for Cytokinesis of Eukaryotic Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    remark that more features can be added to the model by augmenting the corresponding free energy . 2.2 Transport equations for biomass Given the...density for component i, i = 1, 2, 3. For incompress- ible materials, we enforce ϕ1 + ϕ2 + ϕ3 = 1. (2) 2.1 Thermodynamic free energy We denote the domain...in which the cell resides together with the buffer fluid as Ω. The free energy of this mixture system is proposed as follows, F = ∫ Ω fdx, (3) where f

  9. Mg line formation in late-type stellar atmospheres. II. Calculations in a grid of 1D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Y.; Barklem, P. S.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Mg is the α element of choice for Galactic population and chemical evolution studies because it is easily detectable in all late-type stars. Such studies require precise elemental abundances, and thus departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) need to be accounted for. Aims: Our goal is to provide reliable departure coefficients and equivalent widths in non-LTE, and for reference in LTE, for diagnostic lines of Mg studied in late-type stars. These can be used, for example, to correct LTE spectra and abundances. Methods: Using the model atom built and tested in the preceding paper in this series, we performed non-LTE radiative transfer calculations in a grid of 3945 stellar 1D atmospheric models. We used a sub-grid of 86 models to explore the propagation of errors in the recent atomic collision calculations to the radiative transfer results. Results: We obtained departure coefficients for all the levels and equivalent widths (in LTE and non-LTE) for all the radiative transitions included in the "final" model atom presented in Paper I. Here we present and describe our results and show some examples of applications of the data. The errors that result from uncertainties in the collisional data are investigated and tabulated. The results for equivalent widths and departure coefficients are made freely available. Conclusions: Giants tend to have negative abundance corrections while dwarfs have positive, though small, corrections. Error analysis results show that uncertainties related to the atomic collision data are typically on the order of 0.01 dex or less, although for few stellar models in specific lines uncertainties can be as large as 0.03 dex. As these errors are less than or on the same order as typical corrections, we expect that we can use these results to extract Mg abundances from high-quality spectra more reliably than from classical LTE analysis. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130

  10. Ejecting basaltic achondrites from Vesta: Hydrodynamical impact models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asphaug, E.; Melosh, H. J.; Ryan, E.

    1993-01-01

    Vesta is a large asteroid whose crust is mostly basaltic. Spectral heterogeneity suggests a sizable olivine feature which may be explained as impact excavation. The spectral data probably show a localized feature approximately 200 km in diameter or a diffuse feature approximately 400 km in diameter. Lightcurve irregularities suggest heterogeneity on a similar scale. This heterogeneity may represent the crater bowl, the extent of its ejecta deposit, or indeed something unrelated to cratering. In any case, drawing direct inferences about the state of Vesta's surface on the basis of these observations involves substantial speculation. We are still far from understanding the boundary between cratering and catastrophic disruption, particularly on targets for which strength and self-gravity both matter. But we are now able to model the underlying physical process -- dynamic fragmentation -- accurately with fragmentation hydrocodes such as SALE 2D and SPH3D. We present several impact scenarios for Vesta; our study is similar to a previous impact model for the formation of Stickney crater on Phobos. We illustrate the effects of impactors of different sizes and velocities, and the effect of gravity and structural inhomogeneity.

  11. Mixing in microchannels based on hydrodynamic focusing and time-interleaved segmentation: modelling and experiment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Huang, Xiaoyang

    2005-11-01

    This paper theoretically and experimentally investigates a micromixer based on combined hydrodynamic focusing and time-interleaved segmentation. Both hydrodynamic focusing and time-interleaved segmentation are used in the present study to reduce mixing path, to shorten mixing time, and to enhance mixing quality. While hydrodynamic focusing reduces the transversal mixing path, time-interleaved sequential segmentation shortens the axial mixing path. With the same viscosity in the different streams, the focused width can be adjusted by the flow rate ratio. The axial mixing path or the segment length can be controlled by the switching frequency and the mean velocity of the flow. Mixing ratio can be controlled by both flow rate ratio and pulse width modulation of the switching signal. This paper first presents a time-dependent two-dimensional analytical model for the mixing concept. The model considers an arbitrary mixing ratio between solute and solvent as well as the axial Taylor-Aris dispersion. A micromixer was designed and fabricated based on lamination of four polymer layers. The layers were machined using a CO2 laser. Time-interleaved segmentation was realized by two piezoelectric valves. The sheath streams for hydrodynamic focusing are introduced through the other two inlets. A special measurement set-up was designed with synchronization of the mixer's switching signal and the camera's trigger signal. The set-up allows a relatively slow and low-resolution CCD camera to freeze and to capture a large transient concentration field. The concentration profile along the mixing channel agrees qualitatively well with the analytical model. The analytical model and the device promise to be suitable tools for studying Taylor-Aris dispersion near the entrance of a flat microchannel.

  12. Modeling hydrodynamics of large lagoons: Insights from the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clunies, Gregory J.; Mulligan, Ryan P.; Mallinson, David J.; Walsh, J. P.

    2017-04-01

    Large estuaries are influenced by winds over adjacent coastal ocean and land areas causing significant spatial variations in water levels, currents and surface waves. In this study we apply a numerical model to simulate hydrodynamics and waves in the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine System, a large and shallow back-barrier basin in eastern North Carolina, over a one-month study period (September 2008) with observations from several storm wind events of differing time scales and directions. Model performance is evaluated for a spatially varying wind field from the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) dataset in comparison to spatially uniform forcing from wind observations at offshore, coastal and land-based sites across the region. A spatially uniform wind field from offshore winds observations results in statistically better hydrodynamic simulations of water levels (R = 0.88) in the estuaries than NARR (R = 0.48) after comparison with measurements and indicates the importance of strong marine winds over most of the estuary surface area. The influence of a prominent bathymetric feature on hydrodynamics in Pamlico Sound is also investigated by numerically removing a 30 km long and 2-3 m deep shoal from the model grid and replacing it with an idealized depth of 6 m. The removal of the shoal increases water level setup by 14% at the estuarine shoreline, decreases current magnitudes by up to 40% in the shoal region and increases significant wave heights locally by up to 25% in the sound, indicating the importance of this relict geomorphic feature as a major control on the hydrodynamic response of the system during wind events. The results suggest that increasing the water depth over the shoal can lead to higher storm surges and wave heights with the possibility of increased inundation and erosion of the back-barrier and mainland coastal regions. The complex bathymetry and marine wind influence are critical input conditions for modeling large and shallow lagoonal

  13. A model of hydrodynamic interaction between swimming bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Gyrya, V.; Aranson, I. G.; Berlyand, L. V.; Karpeev, D.; Penn State Univ.

    2010-01-01

    We study the dynamics and interaction of two swimming bacteria, modeled by self-propelled dumbbell-type structures. We focus on alignment dynamics of a coplanar pair of elongated swimmers, which propel themselves either by 'pushing' or 'pulling' both in three- and quasi-two-dimensional geometries of space. We derive asymptotic expressions for the dynamics of the pair, which complemented by numerical experiments, indicate that the tendency of bacteria to swim in or swim off depends strongly on the position of the propulsion force. In particular, we observe that positioning of the effective propulsion force inside the dumbbell results in qualitative agreement with the dynamics observed in experiments, such as mutual alignment of converging bacteria.

  14. Development of a Hydrodynamic Model of Puget Sound and Northwest Straits

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

    2007-12-10

    The hydrodynamic model used in this study is the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) developed by the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth. The unstructured grid and finite volume framework, as well as the capability of wetting/drying simulation and baroclinic simulation, makes FVCOM a good fit to the modeling needs for nearshore restoration in Puget Sound. The model domain covers the entire Puget Sound, Strait of Juan de Fuca, San Juan Passages, and Georgia Strait at the United States-Canada Border. The model is driven by tide, freshwater discharge, and surface wind. Preliminary model validation was conducted for tides at various locations in the straits and Puget Sound using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) tide data. The hydrodynamic model was successfully linked to the NOAA oil spill model General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment model (GNOME) to predict particle trajectories at various locations in Puget Sound. Model results demonstrated that the Puget Sound GNOME model is a useful tool to obtain first-hand information for emergency response such as oil spill and fish migration pathways.

  15. 1D-Var multilayer assimilation of X-band SAR data into a detailed snowpack model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, X. V.; Ferro-Famil, L.; Gay, M.; Durand, Y.; Dumont, M.; Morin, S.; Allain, S.; D'Urso, G.; Girard, A.

    2014-10-01

    The structure and physical properties of a snowpack and their temporal evolution may be simulated using meteorological data and a snow metamorphism model. Such an approach may meet limitations related to potential divergences and accumulated errors, to a limited spatial resolution, to wind or topography-induced local modulations of the physical properties of a snow cover, etc. Exogenous data are then required in order to constrain the simulator and improve its performance over time. Synthetic-aperture radars (SARs) and, in particular, recent sensors provide reflectivity maps of snow-covered environments with high temporal and spatial resolutions. The radiometric properties of a snowpack measured at sufficiently high carrier frequencies are known to be tightly related to some of its main physical parameters, like its depth, snow grain size and density. SAR acquisitions may then be used, together with an electromagnetic backscattering model (EBM) able to simulate the reflectivity of a snowpack from a set of physical descriptors, in order to constrain a physical snowpack model. In this study, we introduce a variational data assimilation scheme coupling TerraSAR-X radiometric data into the snowpack evolution model Crocus. The physical properties of a snowpack, such as snow density and optical diameter of each layer, are simulated by Crocus, fed by the local reanalysis of meteorological data (SAFRAN) at a French Alpine location. These snowpack properties are used as inputs of an EBM based on dense media radiative transfer (DMRT) theory, which simulates the total backscattering coefficient of a dry snow medium at X and higher frequency bands. After evaluating the sensitivity of the EBM to snowpack parameters, a 1D-Var data assimilation scheme is implemented in order to minimize the discrepancies between EBM simulations and observations obtained from TerraSAR-X acquisitions by modifying the physical parameters of the Crocus-simulated snowpack. The algorithm then re

  16. Modeling the tidal and sub-tidal hydrodynamics in a shallow, micro-tidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayson, Matthew D.; Gross, Edward S.; Fringer, Oliver B.

    2015-05-01

    The three-dimensional hydrodynamics of Galveston Bay were simulated in two periods of several month duration. The physical setting of Galveston Bay is described by synthesis of long-term observations. Several processes in addition to tidal hydrodynamics and baroclinic circulation processes contribute substantially to the observed variability of currents, water level and salinity. The model was therefore forced with realistic water levels, river discharges, winds, coastal buoyancy currents (due to the Mississippi River plume) and surface heat fluxes. Quantitative metrics were used to evaluate model performance against observations and both spatial and temporal variability in tidal and sub-tidal hydrodynamics were generally well represented by the model. Three different unstructured meshes were tested, a triangular mesh that under-resolved the shipping channel, a triangular mesh that resolved it, and a mixed quadrilateral-triangular grid with approximately equivalent resolution. It is shown that salinity and sub-tidal velocity are better predicted when the important topographic features, such as the shipping channel, are resolved. It was necessary to increase the seabed drag roughness in the mixed quadrilateral-triangular grid simulation to attain similar performance to the equivalent triangular mesh.

  17. Modified-Gravity-GADGET: a new code for cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of modified gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchwein, Ewald; Baldi, Marco; Springel, Volker

    2013-11-01

    We present a new massively parallel code for N-body and cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of modified gravity models. The code employs a multigrid-accelerated Newton-Gauss-Seidel relaxation solver on an adaptive mesh to efficiently solve for perturbations in the scalar degree of freedom of the modified gravity model. As this new algorithm is implemented as a module for the P-GADGET3 code, it can at the same time follow the baryonic physics included in P-GADGET3, such as hydrodynamics, radiative cooling and star formation. We demonstrate that the code works reliably by applying it to simple test problems that can be solved analytically, as well as by comparing cosmological simulations to results from the literature. Using the new code, we perform the first non-radiative and radiative cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of an f (R)-gravity model. We also discuss the impact of active galactic nucleus feedback on the matter power spectrum, as well as degeneracies between the influence of baryonic processes and modifications of gravity.

  18. Reduction of waste water in Erhai Lake based on MIKE21 hydrodynamic and water quality model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changjun; Liang, Qinag; Yan, Feng; Hao, Wenlong

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the ecological water environment in Erhai Lake, different monitoring sections were set to research the change of hydrodynamics and water quality. According to the measured data, MIKE21 Ecolab, the water quality simulation software developed by DHI, is applied to simulate the water quality in Erhai Lake. The hydrodynamics model coupled with water quality is established by MIKE21FM software to simulate the current situation of Erhai Lake. Then through the comparison with the monitoring data, the model parameters are calibrated and the simulation results are verified. Based on this, water quality is simulated by the two-dimensional hydrodynamics and water quality coupled model. The results indicate that the level of water quality in the north and south of lake is level III, while in the center of lake, the water quality is level II. Finally, the water environment capacity and total emmision reduction of pollutants are filtered to give some guidance for the water resources management and effective utilization in the Erhai Lake.

  19. Free-expansion experiments and modeling in detonation: Chemistry and hydrodynamics on a laboratory scale

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, N.R.; Blais, N.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory-scale (25-50 mg) detonations of PETN, RDX, HNS, and TNT have been carried out in a high-vacuum chamber, and collisionless molecular beams of the freely expanding detonation products have been analyzed as a function of time with a mass spectrometer. Concurrently, time-sequenced schlieren and shadowgraph images of the initial expansion of the product plume are recorded using a pulsed laser for illumination. These data tie the chemistry and hydrodynamics of the detonation event together. The results, interpreted with the aid of a computer model, suggest that this experiment freezes the chemical reactions of detonation by rapid adiabatic cooling and provides a continuum of samples in the molecular beam, representing the sequence of reactions in the detonating charge. With a suitable model of the expansion hydrodynamics, the hydrodynamic histories of a sequence of volume elements can be associated with their frozen chemistries. We expect experiments like this to provide a test for molecular models of detonation. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Hydration from hydrodynamics. General considerations and applications of bead modelling to globular proteins.

    PubMed

    García de la Torre, J

    2001-11-28

    The effect of hydration on hydrodynamic properties of globular proteins can be expressed in terms of two quantities: the delta (g/g) parameter and the thickness of the hydration layer. The two paradigms on hydration that originate these alternative measures are described and compared. For the numerical calculation of hydrodynamic properties, from which estimates of hydration can be made, we employ the bead modelling with atomic resolution implemented in programs HYDROPRO and HYDRONMR. As typical, average values, we find 0.3 g/g and a thickness of only approximately 1.2 A. However, noticeable differences in this parameter are found from one protein to another. We have made a numerical analysis, which leaves apart marginal influences of modelling imperfections by simulating properties of a spherical protein. This analysis confirms that the errors that one can attribute to the experimental quantities suffice to explain the observed fluctuations in the hydration parameters. However, for the main purpose of predicting protein solution properties, the above mentioned typical values may be safely used. Particularly for atomic bead modelling, a hydrodynamic radius of approximately 3.2 A yields predictions in very good agreement with experiments.

  1. Two-phase electro-hydrodynamic flow modeling by a conservative level set model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan

    2013-03-01

    The principles of electro-hydrodynamic (EHD) flow have been known for more than a century and have been adopted for various industrial applications, for example, fluid mixing and demixing. Analytical solutions of such EHD flow only exist in a limited number of scenarios, for example, predicting a small deformation of a single droplet in a uniform electric field. Numerical modeling of such phenomena can provide significant insights about EHDs multiphase flows. During the last decade, many numerical results have been reported to provide novel and useful tools of studying the multiphase EHD flow. Based on a conservative level set method, the proposed model is able to simulate large deformations of a droplet by a steady electric field, which is beyond the region of theoretic prediction. The model is validated for both leaky dielectrics and perfect dielectrics, and is found to be in excellent agreement with existing analytical solutions and numerical studies in the literature. Furthermore, simulations of the deformation of a water droplet in decyl alcohol in a steady electric field match better with published experimental data than the theoretical prediction for large deformations. Therefore the proposed model can serve as a practical and accurate tool for simulating two-phase EHD flow.

  2. Applying downscaled global climate model data to a hydrodynamic surface-water and groundwater model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric; Stefanova, Lydia; Smith, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Precipitation data from Global Climate Models have been downscaled to smaller regions. Adapting this downscaled precipitation data to a coupled hydrodynamic surface-water/groundwater model of southern Florida allows an examination of future conditions and their effect on groundwater levels, inundation patterns, surface-water stage and flows, and salinity. The downscaled rainfall data include the 1996-2001 time series from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting ERA-40 simulation and both the 1996-1999 and 2038-2057 time series from two global climate models: the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamic Laboratory (GFDL). Synthesized surface-water inflow datasets were developed for the 2038-2057 simulations. The resulting hydrologic simulations, with and without a 30-cm sea-level rise, were compared with each other and field data to analyze a range of projected conditions. Simulations predicted generally higher future stage and groundwater levels and surface-water flows, with sea-level rise inducing higher coastal salinities. A coincident rise in sea level, precipitation and surface-water flows resulted in a narrower inland saline/fresh transition zone. The inland areas were affected more by the rainfall difference than the sea-level rise, and the rainfall differences make little difference in coastal inundation, but a larger difference in coastal salinities.

  3. Modelling large floating bodies in urban area flash-floods via a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, Raffaele; Sole, Aurelia; Mirauda, Domenica; Adamowski, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Large debris, including vehicles parked along floodplains, can cause severe damage and significant loss of life during urban area flash-floods. In this study, the authors validated and applied the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model, developed in Amicarelli et al. (2015), which reproduces in 3D the dynamics of rigid bodies driven by free surface flows, to the design of flood mitigation measures. To validate the model, the authors compared the model's predictions to the results of an experimental setup, involving a dam breach that strikes two fixed obstacles and three transportable floating bodies. Given the accuracy of the results, in terms of water depth over time and the time history of the bodies' movements, the SPH model explored in this study was used to analyse the mitigation efficiency of a proposed structural intervention - the use of small barriers (groynes) to prevent the transport of floating bodies. Different groynes configurations were examined to identify the most appropriate design and layout for urban area flash-flood damage mitigation. The authors found that groynes positioned upstream and downstream of each floating body can be effective as a risk mitigation measure for damage resulting from their movement.

  4. Hydrodynamic interaction of two swimming model micro-organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takuji; Simmonds, M. P.; Pedley, T. J.

    2006-12-01

    In order to understand the rheological and transport properties of a suspension of swimming micro-organisms, it is necessary to analyse the fluid-dynamical interaction of pairs of such swimming cells. In this paper, a swimming micro-organism is modelled as a squirming sphere with prescribed tangential surface velocity, referred to as a squirmer. The centre of mass of the sphere may be displaced from the geometric centre (bottom-heaviness). The effects of inertia and Brownian motion are neglected, because real micro-organisms swim at very low Reynolds numbers but are too large for Brownian effects to be important. The interaction of two squirmers is calculated analytically for the limits of small and large separations and is also calculated numerically using a boundary-element method. The analytical and the numerical results for the translational rotational velocities and for the stresslet of two squirmers correspond very well. We sought to generate a database for an interacting pair of squirmers from which one can easily predict the motion of a collection of squirmers. The behaviour of two interacting squirmers is discussed phenomenologically, too. The results for the trajectories of two squirmers show that first the squirmers attract each other, then they change their orientation dramatically when they are in near contact and finally they separate from each other. The effect of bottom-heaviness is considerable. Restricting the trajectories to two dimensions is shown to give misleading results. Some movies of interacting squirmers are available with the online version of the paper.

  5. The hydrodynamic model testing for closed loop DP assisted mooring

    SciTech Connect

    Aalbers, A.B.; Merchant, A.A.

    1996-12-31

    Far East Levingston Shipbuilding (FELS) is presently completing the construction of the Smedvig Production Unit SPU 380, which will be operated as FPSO for Esso Balder Field Offshore Norway. In good cooperation with FELS and ND and A Inc. of Houston an extensive model test program was carried out for approval and optimization of the DP assisted mooring system. The main aspects were: investigate the performance of the mooring in two water depths, i.e. 250 m and 70 m; optimization of DP control for the three azimuthing thrusters; measurement of motions and wave induced loads at e.g., the bilge keels, keel and deckhouse front; and determination of limit sea state for turning the vessel around against the weather. The tests were carried out in the Wave and Current Basin of MARIN, using a closed loop DP control system to steer the thrusters. The paper presents the findings with respect to the effect of DP control strategy on mooring loads and presents selected results of wave induced loads on bilge keels and deck house.

  6. A marching in space and time (MAST) solver of the shallow water equations. Part I: The 1D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, C.; Tucciarelli, T.

    2007-05-01

    A new approach is presented for the numerical solution of the complete 1D Saint-Venant equations. At each time step, the governing system of partial differential equations (PDEs) is split, using a fractional time step methodology, into a convective prediction system and a diffusive correction system. Convective prediction system is further split into a convective prediction and a convective correction system, according to a specified approximated potential. If a scalar exact potential of the flow field exists, correction vanishes and the solution of the convective correction system is the same solution of the prediction system. Both convective prediction and correction systems are shown to have at each x - t point a single characteristic line, and a corresponding eigenvalue equal to the local velocity. A marching in space and time (MAST) technique is used for the solution of the two systems. MAST solves a system of two ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in each computational cell, using for the time discretization a self-adjusting fraction of the original time step. The computational cells are ordered and solved according to the decreasing value of the potential in the convective prediction step and to the increasing value of the same potential in the convective correction step. The diffusive correction system is solved using an implicit scheme, that leads to the solution of a large linear system, with the same order of the cell number, but sparse, symmetric and well conditioned. The numerical model shows unconditional stability with regard of the Courant-Friedrichs-Levi (CFL) number, requires no special treatment of the source terms and a computational effort almost proportional to the cell number. Several tests have been carried out and results of the proposed scheme are in good agreement with analytical solutions, as well as with experimental data.

  7. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. V. Oxygen abundance in the metal-poor giant HD 122563 from OH UV lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakapavičius, D.; Kučinskas, A.; Dobrovolskas, V.; Klevas, J.; Steffen, M.; Bonifacio, P.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Spite, M.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Although oxygen is an important tracer of the early Galactic evolution, its abundance trends with metallicity are still relatively poorly known at [Fe/H] ≲ -2.5. This is in part due to a lack of reliable oxygen abundance indicators in the metal-poor stars, and in part due to shortcomings in 1D LTE abundance analyses where different abundance indicators, such as OH lines located in the UV and IR or the forbidden [O I] line at 630 nm, frequently provide inconsistent results. Aims: In this study, we determined the oxygen abundance in the metal-poor halo giant HD 122563 using a 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmosphere. Our main goal was to understand whether a 3D LTE analysis can help to improve the reliability of oxygen abundances that are determined from OH UV lines in comparison to those obtained using standard 1D LTE methodology. Methods: The oxygen abundance in HD 122563 was determined using 71 OH UV lines located in the wavelength range between 308-330 nm. The analysis was performed using a high-resolution VLT UVES spectrum with a 1D LTE spectral line synthesis performed using the SYNTHE package and classical ATLAS9 model atmosphere. Subsequently, a 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD and 1D hydrostatic LHD model atmospheres were used to compute 3D-1D abundance corrections. For this, the microturbulence velocity used with the 1D LHD model atmosphere was derived from the hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmosphere of HD 122563. The obtained abundance corrections were then applied to determine 3D LTE oxygen abundances from each individual OH UV line. Results: As in previous studies, we found trends in the 1D LTE oxygen abundances determined from OH UV lines with line parameters, such as the line excitation potential, χ, and the line equivalent width, W. These trends become significantly less pronounced in 3D LTE. Using OH UV lines, we determined a 3D LTE oxygen abundance in HD 122563 of A(O)3D LTE = 6.23 ± 0.13 ([O/Fe] = 0.07 ± 0.13). This is in fair agreement

  8. Hydrodynamic Instability and Thermal Coupling in a Dynamic Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    For liquid-propellant combustion, the Landau/Levich hydrodynamic models have been combined and extended to account for a dynamic dependence of the burning rate on the local pressure and temperature fields. Analysis of these extended models is greatly facilitated by exploiting the realistic smallness of the gas-to-liquid density ratio rho. Neglecting thermal coupling effects, an asymptotic expression was then derived for the cellular stability boundary A(sub p)(k) where A(sub p) is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the disturbance wavenumber. The results explicitly indicate the stabilizing effects of gravity on long-wave disturbances, and those of viscosity and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wavenumbers for critical negative values of A(sub p). In the limit of weak gravity, hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion becomes a long-wave, instability phenomenon, whereas at normal gravity, this instability is first manifested through O(1) wavenumbers. In addition, surface tension and viscosity (both liquid and gas) each produce comparable effects in the large-wavenumber regime, thereby providing important modifications to the previous analyses in which one or more of these effects was neglected. For A(sub p)= O, the Landau/Levich results are recovered in appropriate limiting cases, although this typically corresponds to a hydrodynamically unstable parameter regime for p << 1. In addition to the classical cellular form of hydrodynamic stability, there exists a pulsating form corresponding to the loss of stability of steady, planar burning to time-dependent perturbations. This occurs for negative values of the parameter A(sub p), and is thus absent from the original Landau/Levich models. In the extended model, however, there exists a stable band of negative pressure sensitivities bounded above by the Landau type of instability, and below by this pulsating form of hydrodynamic

  9. Using a coupled eco-hydrodynamic model to predict habitat for target species following dam removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomsic, C.A.; Granata, T.C.; Murphy, R.P.; Livchak, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    A habitat suitability index (HSI) model was developed for a water quality sensitive fish (Greater Redhorse) and macroinvertebrate (Plecoptera) species to determine the restoration success of the St. John Dam removal for the Sandusky River (Ohio). An ArcGIS?? model was created for pre- and post-dam removal scenarios. Inputs to the HSI model consist of substrate distributions from river surveys, and water level and velocity time series, outputs from a hydrodynamic model. The ArcGIS?? model predicted habitat suitability indices at 45 river cross-sections in the hydrodynamic model. The model was programmed to produce polygon layers, using graphical user interfaces that were displayed in the ArcGIS?? environment. The results of the model clearly show an increase of habitat suitability from pre- to post-dam removal periods and in the former reservoir. The change in suitability of the model is attributed mostly to the change in depth in the river following the dam removal for both the fish and invertebrate species. The results of the invertebrate model followed the same positive trend as species enumerations from the river basin. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of longitudinal ridges on the hydrodynamic performance of a leatherback turtle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Kyeongtae; Kim, Jooha; Lee, Sang-Im; Choi, Haecheon

    2014-11-01

    Leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) known as the fastest swimmer and the deepest diver among marine turtles have five longitudinal ridges on their carapace, and these ridges are the most remarkable morphological features distinguished from other marine turtles. To investigate the effect of these ridges on the hydrodynamic performance of the leatherback turtle, we model a carapace with and without ridges using a stuffed leatherback turtle in the National Science Museum, Korea. We measure the drag and lift forces on the ridged model in the ranges of real leatherback turtles' Reynolds number (Re) and angle of attack (α), and compare them with those of non-ridged model. At α < 6°, longitudinal ridges decrease drag on the ridged model by up to 32% compared to non-ridged model. On the other hand, at α > 6°, the drag and lift coefficients of the ridged model are higher than those of the non-ridged model, and the lift-to-drag ratio of the ridged model is higher by about 7% than that of the non-ridged model. We also measure the velocity field around both models using a particle image velocimetry and explain the hydrodynamic role of ridges in relation to diving behaviors of leatherback sea turtles. Supported by the NRF Program (2011-0028032).

  11. The tidal hydrodynamics modeling of the Topolobampo coastal lagoon system and the implications for pollutant dispersion.

    PubMed

    Montaño-Ley, Y; Peraza-Vizcarra, R; Páez-Osuna, F

    2007-05-01

    The tidal hydrodynamics of the Topolobampo coastal lagoon system (Mexico) has been investigated through a modified two dimensional non-linear hydrodynamic finite difference model. The advective and diffusive process acting over a hypothetical pollutant released into the coastal lagoon have also been simulated. Maxima tidal currents (0.85 m/s) were predicted within the main channel, in agree with direct measurements. The direction of the observed fastest currents (SW), also agree quite well with the direction of the strongest tidal current predicted in this investigation, which occur during the ebb when the water of the coastal lagoon is discharged into the Gulf of California. Residual currents (0.01-0.05 m/s) were also predicted. The hypothetical pollutant released within the Topolobampo Harbor would spread to both Ohuira and Topolobampo sections, reaching the inlet after approximately 12 days.

  12. Hydrodynamic models of a cepheid atmosphere. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ., College Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    A method for including the solution of the transfer equation in a standard Henyey type hydrodynamic code was developed. This modified Henyey method was used in an implicit hydrodynamic code to compute deep envelope models of a classical Cepheid with a period of 12(d) including radiative transfer effects in the optically thin zones. It was found that the velocity gradients in the atmosphere are not responsible for the large microturbulent velocities observed in Cepheids but may be responsible for the occurrence of supersonic microturbulence. It was found that the splitting of the cores of the strong lines is due to shock induced temperature inversions in the line forming region. The adopted light, color, and velocity curves were used to study three methods frequently used to determine the mean radii of Cepheids. It is concluded that an accuracy of 10% is possible only if high quality observations are used.

  13. Comparison of two methods of mathematical modeling in hydrodynamic sealing gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutil, Jaroslav; Fojtášek, Kamil; Dvořák, Lukáš

    2015-05-01

    The aim of work is to compare two possible methods of mathematical modeling of hydrodynamic instabilities. This comparison is performed by monitoring the formation and evolution of Taylor vortices in hydrodynamic sealing gap. Sealing gaps are a part of the hydraulic machines with the impeller, such as turbines and pumps, and they have an effect on the volumetric efficiency of these devices. This work presents two examples of sealing gaps. These examples are closed sealing gap and modified sealing gap with expansion chamber. On these two examples are applied procedures of solution contained in CFD software (ANSYS Fluent 14.5). In ANSYS Fluent is two possible basic approaches of solution this task: the moving wall method and the sliding mesh method. The result of work is monitoring the impact of the expansion chamber on the formation of hydrodynamic instabilities in the sealing gap. Another result is comparison of two used methods of mathematical modeling, which shows that both methods can be used for similar tasks.

  14. Analysis of the thermomechanical inconsistency of some extended hydrodynamic models at high Knudsen number.

    PubMed

    Dadzie, S Kokou; Reese, Jason M

    2012-04-01

    There are some hydrodynamic equations that, while their parent kinetic equation satisfies fundamental mechanical properties, appear themselves to violate mechanical or thermodynamic properties. This paper aims to shed some light on the source of this problem. Starting with diffusive volume hydrodynamic models, the microscopic temporal and spatial scales are first separated at the kinetic level from the macroscopic scales at the hydrodynamic level. Then, we consider Klimontovich's spatial stochastic version of the Boltzmann kinetic equation and show that, for small local Knudsen numbers, the stochastic term vanishes and the kinetic equation becomes the Boltzmann equation. The collision integral dominates in the small local Knudsen number regime, which is associated with the exact traditional continuum limit. We find a subdomain of the continuum range, which the conventional Knudsen number classification does not account for appropriately. In this subdomain, it is possible to obtain a fully mechanically consistent volume (or mass) diffusion model that satisfies the second law of thermodynamics on the grounds of extended non-local-equilibrium thermodynamics.

  15. High-energy Particle Transport in Three-dimensional Hydrodynamic Models of Colliding-wind Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Dubus, G.

    2014-02-01

    Massive stars in binary systems (such as WR 140, WR 147, or η Carinae) have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy γ-rays. The emission is thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide and produce relativistic particles that subsequently might be able to emit γ-rays. Detailed numerical hydrodynamic simulations have already offered insight into the complex dynamics of the wind collision region (WCR), while independent analytical studies, albeit with simplified descriptions of the WCR, have shed light on the spectra of charged particles. In this paper, we describe a combination of these two approaches. We present a three-dimensional hydrodynamical model for colliding stellar winds and compute spectral energy distributions of relativistic particles for the resulting structure of the WCR. The hydrodynamic part of our model incorporates the line-driven acceleration of the winds, gravity, orbital motion, and the radiative cooling of the shocked plasma. In our treatment of charged particles, we consider diffusive shock acceleration in the WCR and the subsequent cooling via inverse Compton losses (including Klein-Nishina effects), bremsstrahlung, collisions, and other energy loss mechanisms.

  16. Numerical modeling of humic colloid borne americium (III) migration in column experiments using the transport/speciation code K1D and the KICAM model.

    PubMed

    Schüssler, W; Artinger, R; Kim, J I; Bryan, N D; Griffin, D

    2001-02-01

    The humic colloid borne Am(III) transport was investigated in column experiments for Gorleben groundwater/sand systems. It was found that the interaction of Am with humic colloids is kinetically controlled, which strongly influences the migration behavior of Am(III). These kinetic effects have to be taken into account for transport/speciation modeling. The kinetically controlled availability model (KICAM) was developed to describe actinide sorption and transport in laboratory batch and column experiments. Application of the KICAM requires a chemical transport/speciation code, which simultaneously models both kinetically controlled processes and equilibrium reactions. Therefore, the code K1D was developed as a flexible research code that allows the inclusion of kinetic data in addition to transport features and chemical equilibrium. This paper presents the verification of K1D and its application to model column experiments investigating unimpeded humic colloid borne Am migration. Parmeters for reactive transport simulations were determined for a Gorleben groundwater system of high humic colloid concentration (GoHy 2227). A single set of parameters was used to model a series of column experiments. Model results correspond well to experimental data for the unretarded humic borne Am breakthrough.

  17. Numerical modeling of humic colloid borne Americium (III) migration in column experiments using the transport/speciation code K1D and the KICAM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüßler, W.; Artinger, R.; Kim, J. I.; Bryan, N. D.; Griffin, D.

    2001-02-01

    The humic colloid borne Am(III) transport was investigated in column experiments for Gorleben groundwater/sand systems. It was found that the interaction of Am with humic colloids is kinetically controlled, which strongly influences the migration behavior of Am(III). These kinetic effects have to be taken into account for transport/speciation modeling. The kinetically controlled availability model (KICAM) was developed to describe actinide sorption and transport in laboratory batch and column experiments. Application of the KICAM requires a chemical transport/speciation code, which simultaneously models both kinetically controlled processes and equilibrium reactions. Therefore, the code K1D was developed as a flexible research code that allows the inclusion of kinetic data in addition to transport features and chemical equilibrium. This paper presents the verification of K1D and its application to model column experiments investigating unimpeded humic colloid borne Am migration. Parameters for reactive transport simulations were determined for a Gorleben groundwater system of high humic colloid concentration (GoHy 2227). A single set of parameters was used to model a series of column experiments. Model results correspond well to experimental data for the unretarded humic borne Am breakthrough.

  18. Coupling Kinetic and Hydrodynamic Models for Simulations of Gas Flows and Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, V. I.; Arslanbekov, R. R.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents adaptive kinetic/fluid models for simulations of gases and weakly ionized plasmas. We first describe a Unified Flow Solver (UFS), which combines Adaptive Mesh Refinement with automatic selection of kinetic or hydrodynamic models for different parts of flows. This Adaptive Mesh and Algorithm Refinement (AMAR) technique limits expensive atomistic-scale solutions only to the regions where they are needed. We present examples of plasma simulations with fluid models and describe kinetic solvers for electrons which are currently being incorporated into AMAR techniques for plasma simulations.

  19. Validating a hydrodynamic framework for long-term modelling of the German Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koesters, Frank; Pluess, Andreas; Heyer, Harro; Kastens, Marko; Sehili, Aissa

    2010-05-01

    The intention of the "AufMod" project is to set up a modelling framework for questions concerning the large-scale, long-term morphodynamic evolution of the German Bight. First a hydrodynamic model has been set up which includes the entire North Sea and a sophisticated representation of the German Bight. In a second step, simulations of sediment transport and morphodynamic changes will be processed. This paper deals with the calibration and validation process for the hydrodynamic model in detail. The starting point for "AufMod" was the aim to better understand the morphodynamic processes in the German Bight. Changes in bottom topography need to be predicted to ensure a safe and easy transport through the German waterways leading to ports at the German coast such as Hamburg and Bremerhaven. Within "AufMod" this question is addressed through a combined effort of gaining a comprehensive sedimentological and bathymetric data set as well as running different numerical models. The model is based on the numerical method UnTRIM (Casulli and Zanolli, 2002). The model uses an unstructured grid in the horizontal to provide a good representation of the complex topography. The spatial resolution increases from about 20 km in the North Sea to 20 m within the estuaries. The model forcing represents conditions for the year 2006 and consists of wind stress at the surface, water level elevation and salinity at the open boundaries as well as freshwater inflows. Temperature is not taken into account. For the model validation, there exists a large number of over 40 hydrodynamic monitoring stations which are used to compare modelled and measured data. The calibration process consists of adapting the tidal components at the open boundaries following the approach of Pluess (2003). The validation process includes the analysis of tidal components of water level elevation and current values as well as an analysis of tidal characteristic values, e.g. tidal low and high water. Based on these

  20. Application of 3D hydrodynamic and particle tracking models for better environmental management of finfish culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Navas, Juan; Telfer, Trevor C.; Ross, Lindsay G.

    2011-04-01

    Hydrographic conditions, and particularly current speeds, have a strong influence on the management of fish cage culture. These hydrodynamic conditions can be used to predict particle movement within the water column and the results used to optimise environmental conditions for effective site selection, setting of environmental quality standards, waste dispersion, and potential disease transfer. To this end, a 3D hydrodynamic model, MOHID, has been coupled to a particle tracking model to study the effects of mean current speed, quiescent water periods and bulk water circulation in Mulroy Bay, Co. Donegal Ireland, an Irish fjard (shallow fjordic system) important to the aquaculture industry. A Lagangrian method simulated the instantaneous release of "particles" emulating discharge from finfish cages to show the behaviour of waste in terms of water circulation and water exchange. The 3D spatial models were used to identify areas of mixed and stratified water using a version of the Simpson-Hunter criteria, and to use this in conjunction with models of current flow for appropriate site selection for salmon aquaculture. The modelled outcomes for stratification were in good agreement with the direct measurements of water column stratification based on observed density profiles. Calculations of the Simpson-Hunter tidal parameter indicated that most of Mulroy Bay was potentially stratified with a well mixed region over the shallow channels where the water is faster flowing. The fjard was characterised by areas of both very low and high mean current speeds, with some areas having long periods of quiescent water. The residual current and the particle tracking animations created through the models revealed an anticlockwise eddy that may influence waste dispersion and potential for disease transfer, among salmon cages and which ensures that the retention time of waste substances from cages is extended. The hydrodynamic model results were incorporated into the ArcView TM GIS

  1. Model of the hydrodynamic loads applied on a rotating halfbridge belonging to a circular settling tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dascalescu, A. E.; Lazaroiu, G.; Scupi, A. A.; Oanta, E.

    2016-08-01

    The rotating half-bridge of a settling tank is employed to sweep the sludge from the wastewater and to vacuum and sent it to the central collector. It has a complex geometry but the main beam may be considered a slender bar loaded by the following category of forces: concentrated forces produced by the weight of the scrapping system of blades, suction pipes, local sludge collecting chamber, plus the sludge in the horizontal sludge transporting pipes; forces produced by the access bridge; buoyant forces produced by the floating barrels according to Archimedes’ principle; distributed forces produced by the weight of the main bridge; hydrodynamic forces. In order to evaluate the hydrodynamic loads we have conceived a numerical model based on the finite volume method, using the ANSYS-Fluent software. To model the flow we used the equations of Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) for liquids together with Volume of Fluid model (VOF) for multiphase flows. For turbulent model k-epsilon we used the equation for turbulent kinetic energy k and dissipation epsilon. These results will be used to increase the accuracy of the loads’ sub-model in the theoretical models, e. the finite element model and the analytical model.

  2. Model-Based Least Squares Reconstruction of Coded Source Neutron Radiographs: Integrating the ORNL HFIR CG1D Source Model

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Gregor, Jens; Bingham, Philip R

    2014-01-01

    At the present, neutron sources cannot be fabricated small and powerful enough in order to achieve high resolution radiography while maintaining an adequate flux. One solution is to employ computational imaging techniques such as a Magnified Coded Source Imaging (CSI) system. A coded-mask is placed between the neutron source and the object. The system resolution is increased by reducing the size of the mask holes and the flux is increased by increasing the size of the coded-mask and/or the number of holes. One limitation of such system is that the resolution of current state-of-the-art scintillator-based detectors caps around 50um. To overcome this challenge, the coded-mask and object are magnified by making the distance from the coded-mask to the object much smaller than the distance from object to detector. In previous work, we have shown via synthetic experiments that our least squares method outperforms other methods in image quality and reconstruction precision because of the modeling of the CSI system components. However, the validation experiments were limited to simplistic neutron sources. In this work, we aim to model the flux distribution of a real neutron source and incorporate such a model in our least squares computational system. We provide a full description of the methodology used to characterize the neutron source and validate the method with synthetic experiments.

  3. New Insights into White-Light Flare Emission from Radiative-Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Chromospheric Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, S. L.; Carlsson, M.; Allred, J. C.; Uitenbroek, H.; Osten, R. A.; Holman, G.

    2015-12-01

    The heating mechanism at high densities during M-dwarf flares is poorly understood. Spectra of M-dwarf flares in the optical and near-ultraviolet wavelength regimes have revealed three continuum components during the impulsive phase: 1) an energetically dominant blackbody component with a color temperature of T≈104 K in the blue-optical, 2) a smaller amount of Balmer continuum emission in the near-ultraviolet at λ≤3 646 Å, and 3) an apparent pseudo-continuum of blended high-order Balmer lines between λ=3 646 Å and λ≈3 900 Å. These properties are not reproduced by models that employ a typical "solar-type" flare heating level of ≤ 10^{11} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} in nonthermal electrons, and therefore our understanding of these spectra is limited to a phenomenological three-component interpretation. We present a new 1D radiative-hydrodynamic model of an M-dwarf flare from precipitating nonthermal electrons with a high energy flux of 10^{13} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. The simulation produces bright near-ultraviolet and optical continuum emission from a dense (n>10^{15} cm^{-3}), hot (T ≈12 000 - 13 500 K) chromospheric condensation. For the first time, the observed color temperature and Balmer jump ratio are produced self-consistently in a radiative-hydrodynamic flare model. We find that a T≈104 K blackbody-like continuum component and a low Balmer jump ratio result from optically thick Balmer (∞→ n=2) and Paschen recombination (∞→ n=3) radiation, and thus the properties of the flux spectrum are caused by blue (λ≈4 300 Å) light escaping over a larger physical depth range than by red (λ≈6 700 Å) and near-ultraviolet (λ≈3 500 Å) light. To model the near-ultraviolet pseudo-continuum previously attributed to overlapping Balmer lines, we include the extra Balmer continuum opacity from Landau-Zener transitions that result from merged, high-order energy levels of hydrogen in a dense, partially ionized atmosphere. This reveals a new diagnostic of

  4. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. 1; The Numerical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahe; Mariska, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Acceleration and transport of high-energy particles and fluid dynamics of atmospheric plasma are interrelated aspects of solar flares, but for convenience and simplicity they were artificially separated in the past. We present here self consistently combined Fokker-Planck modeling of particles and hydrodynamic simulation of flare plasma. Energetic electrons are modeled with the Stanford unified code of acceleration, transport, and radiation, while plasma is modeled with the Naval Research Laboratory flux tube code. We calculated the collisional heating rate directly from the particle transport code, which is more accurate than those in previous studies based on approximate analytical solutions. We repeated the simulation of Mariska et al. with an injection of power law, downward-beamed electrons using the new heating rate. For this case, a -10% difference was found from their old result. We also used a more realistic spectrum of injected electrons provided by the stochastic acceleration model, which has a smooth transition from a quasi-thermal background at low energies to a non thermal tail at high energies. The inclusion of low-energy electrons results in relatively more heating in the corona (versus chromosphere) and thus a larger downward heat conduction flux. The interplay of electron heating, conduction, and radiative loss leads to stronger chromospheric evaporation than obtained in previous studies, which had a deficit in low-energy electrons due to an arbitrarily assumed low-energy cutoff. The energy and spatial distributions of energetic electrons and bremsstrahlung photons bear signatures of the changing density distribution caused by chromospheric evaporation. In particular, the density jump at the evaporation front gives rise to enhanced emission, which, in principle, can be imaged by X-ray telescopes. This model can be applied to investigate a variety of high-energy processes in solar, space, and astrophysical plasmas.

  5. A modeling approach of the influence of local hydrodynamic conditions on larval dispersal at hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Bailly-Bechet, Marc; Kerszberg, Michel; Gaill, Françoise; Pradillon, Florence

    2008-12-07

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent animal communities along oceanic ridges are both patchy and transient. Larval dispersal is a key factor in understanding how these communities function and are maintained over generations. To date, numerical approaches simulating larval dispersal considered the effect of oceanic currents on larval transportation over hundreds of kilometers but very seldom looked at the effect of local conditions within meters around chimneys. However, small scale significant variations in the hydrodynamics may influence larval fate in its early stages after release, and hence have a knock-on effect on both dispersal and colonization processes. Here we present a new numerical approach to the study of larval dispersal, considering small scales within the range of the biological communities, called "bio-hydrodynamical" scale, and ranging from a few centimeters to a few meters around hydrothermal sources. We use a physical model for the vent based on jet theory and compute the turbulent velocity field around the smoker. Larvae are considered as passive particles whose trajectories are affected by hydrodynamics, topography of the vent chimney and larval biological properties. Our model predicts that bottom currents often dominate all other factors either by entraining all larvae away from the vent or enforcing strong colonization rates. When bottom currents are very slow (<1 mms(-1)), general larvae motion is upwards due to entrainment by the main smoker jet. In this context, smokers with vertical slopes favor retention of larvae because larval initial trajectory is nearly parallel to the smoker wall, which increases the chances to settle. This retention phenomenon is intensified with increasing velocity of the main smoker jet because entrainment in the high velocity plume is preceded by a phase when larvae are attracted towards the smoker wall, which occurs earlier with higher velocity of the main jet. Finally, the buoyancy rate of the larvae, measured to be

  6. Analytic Modeling of the Hydrodynamic, Thermal, and Structural Behavior of Foil Thrust Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Prahl, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    A simulation and modeling effort is conducted on gas foil thrust bearings. A foil bearing is a self acting hydrodynamic device capable of separating stationary and rotating components of rotating machinery by a film of air or other gaseous lubricant. Although simple in appearance these bearings have proven to be complicated devices in analysis. They are sensitive to fluid structure interaction, use a compressible gas as a lubricant, may not be in the fully continuum range of fluid mechanics, and operate in the range where viscous heat generation is significant. These factors provide a challenge to the simulation and modeling task. The Reynolds equation with the addition of Knudsen number effects due to thin film thicknesses is used to simulate the hydrodynamics. The energy equation is manipulated to simulate the temperature field of the lubricant film and combined with the ideal gas relationship, provides density field input to the Reynolds equation. Heat transfer between the lubricant and the surroundings is also modeled. The structural deformations of the bearing are modeled with a single partial differential equation. The equation models the top foil as a thin, bending dominated membrane whose deflections are governed by the biharmonic equation. A linear superposition of hydrodynamic load and compliant foundation reaction is included. The stiffness of the compliant foundation is modeled as a distributed stiffness that supports the top foil. The system of governing equations is solved numerically by a computer program written in the Mathematica computing environment. Representative calculations and comparisons with experimental results are included for a generation I gas foil thrust bearing.

  7. Synthesis of Hydrodynamic and Wave Models with Sediment Data in a Shallow Tidal Embayment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, N. G.; Kaergaard, K.; Jensen, J. H.

    2006-12-01

    Hydrodynamic and wave models have been established for Tampa Bay in Florida and the approaches to the Bay on the west Florida Shelf of the Gulf of Mexico. It uses an unstructured, bathymetry-following flexible mesh (bffm) which adapts to the complex coastline and inter-connected navigation channels. The model packages came from DHI Water & Environment. The hydrodynamics were calibrated against tidal currents in the main navigation channel supplied by the NOAA/NOS PORTS system operated by the University of South Florida. The model was validated for a period in September 2004 (including the passing of the hurricane Frances) using data from six tidal gauges in the Bay. Wave data were collected at several stations around the Bay in 2004 and from June 2005 to December 2006. These data were compared with both a full spectrum and parametric wave model. Production runs of all models were made for a 9 month period using measured surface elevation as boundary conditions extending from spring 2004 to winter 2005 and measured wind data at a station within the Bay. The results were used to derive exchange times and local wave climates around the Bay. The hydrodynamic and wave models were then used to determine sediment mobility. It is found that current is the most important influence on sediments in the deeper parts of the Bay but waves dominate sediment dynamics in the shallow regions of the Bay. Swell waves penetrate only a limited distance into the Bay. Comparisons are made with maps of bottom sediment and coastal habitat obtained from various data sources.

  8. Nuclear subsurface explosion modeling and hydrodynamic fragmentation simulation of hazardous asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premaratne, Pavithra Dhanuka

    Disruption and fragmentation of an asteroid using nuclear explosive devices (NEDs) is a highly complex yet a practical solution to mitigating the impact threat of asteroids with short warning time. A Hypervelocity Asteroid Intercept Vehicle (HAIV) concept, developed at the Asteroid Deflection Research Center (ADRC), consists of a primary vehicle that acts as kinetic impactor and a secondary vehicle that houses NEDs. The kinetic impactor (lead vehicle) strikes the asteroid creating a crater. The secondary vehicle will immediately enter the crater and detonate its nuclear payload creating a blast wave powerful enough to fragment the asteroid. The nuclear subsurface explosion modeling and hydrodynamic simulation has been a challenging research goal that paves the way an array of mission critical information. A mesh-free hydrodynamic simulation method, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) was utilized to obtain both qualitative and quantitative solutions for explosion efficiency. Commercial fluid dynamics packages such as AUTODYN along with the in-house GPU accelerated SPH algorithms were used to validate and optimize high-energy explosion dynamics for a variety of test cases. Energy coupling from the NED to the target body was also examined to determine the effectiveness of nuclear subsurface explosions. Success of a disruption mission also depends on the survivability of the nuclear payload when the secondary vehicle approaches the newly formed crater at a velocity of 10 km/s or higher. The vehicle may come into contact with debris ejecting the crater which required the conceptual development of a Whipple shield. As the vehicle closes on the crater, its skin may also experience extreme temperatures due to heat radiated from the crater bottom. In order to address this thermal problem, a simple metallic thermal shield design was implemented utilizing a radiative heat transfer algorithm and nodal solutions obtained from hydrodynamic simulations.

  9. A simple 1-D radiative-convective atmospheric model designed for integration into coupled models of magma ocean planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcq, E.

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the early history of telluric interiors and atmospheres during the ocean magma stage, a coupled interior-atmosphere-escape model is being developed. This paper describes the atmospheric part and its first preliminary results. A unidimensional, radiative-convective, H2O-CO2 atmosphere is modeled following a vertical T(z) profile similar to Kasting (1988) and Abe and Matsui (1988). Opacities in the thermal IR are then computed using a k-correlated code (KSPECTRUM), tabulated continuum opacities for H2O-H2O and CO2-CO2 absorption, and water or sulphuric acid clouds in the moist convective zone (whenever present). The first results show the existence of two regimes depending on the relative value of the surface temperature Ts compared to a threshold temperature Tc depending on the total gaseous inventory. For Ts < Tc, efficient blanketing results in a cool upper atmosphere, a cloud cover, and a long lifetime for the underneath magma ocean with a net thermal IR flux between 160 and 200 Wm-2. For Ts > Tc, the blanketing is not efficient enough to prevent large radiative heat loss to space through a hot, cloudless atmosphere. Our current calculations may underestimate the thermal flux in the case of hot surfaces with little gaseous content in the atmosphere.

  10. Optimization of a Two-Fluid Hydrodynamic Model of Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2009-07-01

    A hydrodynamic model of two-phase, churn-turbulent flows is being developed using the computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) code, NPHASE-CMFD. The numerical solutions obtained by this model are compared with experimental data obtained at the TOPFLOW facility of the Institute of Safety Research at the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The TOPFLOW data is a high quality experimental database of upward, co-current air-water flows in a vertical pipe suitable for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. A five-field CMFD model was developed for the continuous liquid phase and four bubble size groups using mechanistic closure models for the ensemble-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Mechanistic models for the drag and non-drag interfacial forces are implemented to include the governing physics to describe the hydrodynamic forces controlling the gas distribution. The closure models provide the functional form of the interfacial forces, with user defined coefficients to adjust the force magnitude. An optimization strategy was devised for these coefficients using commercial design optimization software. This paper demonstrates an approach to optimizing CMFD model parameters using a design optimization approach. Computed radial void fraction profiles predicted by the NPHASE-CMFD code are compared to experimental data for four bubble size groups.

  11. Hydrodynamic modelling and global datasets: Flow connectivity and SRTM data, a Bangkok case study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigg, M. A.; Bates, P. B.; Michaelides, K.

    2012-04-01

    The rise in the global interconnected manufacturing supply chains requires an understanding and consistent quantification of flood risk at a global scale. Flood risk is often better quantified (or at least more precisely defined) in regions where there has been an investment in comprehensive topographical data collection such as LiDAR coupled with detailed hydrodynamic modelling. Yet in regions where these data and modelling are unavailable, the implications of flooding and the knock on effects for global industries can be dramatic, as evidenced by the recent floods in Bangkok, Thailand. There is a growing momentum in terms of global modelling initiatives to address this lack of a consistent understanding of flood risk and they will rely heavily on the application of available global datasets relevant to hydrodynamic modelling, such as Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data and its derivatives. These global datasets bring opportunities to apply consistent methodologies on an automated basis in all regions, while the use of coarser scale datasets also brings many challenges such as sub-grid process representation and downscaled hydrology data from global climate models. There are significant opportunities for hydrological science in helping define new, realistic and physically based methodologies that can be applied globally as well as the possibility of gaining new insights into flood risk through analysis of the many large datasets that will be derived from this work. We use Bangkok as a case study to explore some of the issues related to using these available global datasets for hydrodynamic modelling, with particular focus on using SRTM data to represent topography. Research has shown that flow connectivity on the floodplain is an important component in the dynamics of flood flows on to and off the floodplain, and indeed within different areas of the floodplain. A lack of representation of flow connectivity, often due to data resolution limitations, means

  12. On the sensitivity of urban hydrodynamic modelling to rainfall spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, G.; Reinoso, R.; van de Giesen, N. C.; Clemens, F. H. L. R.; ten Veldhuis, J. A. E.

    2015-02-01

    Cities are increasingly vulnerable to floods generated by intense rainfall, because of urbanisation of flood-prone areas and ongoing urban densification. Accurate information of convective storm characteristics at high spatial and temporal resolution is a crucial input for urban hydrological models to be able to simulate fast runoff processes and enhance flood prediction in cities. In this paper, a detailed study of the sensitivity of urban hydrodynamic response to high resolution radar rainfall was conducted. Rainfall rates derived from X-band dual polarimetric weather radar were used as input into a detailed hydrodynamic sewer model for an urban catchment in the city of Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The aim was to characterise how the effect of space and time aggregation on rainfall structure affects hydrodynamic modelling of urban catchments, for resolutions ranging from 100 to 2000 m and from 1 to 10 min. Dimensionless parameters were derived to compare results between different storm conditions and to describe the effect of rainfall spatial resolution in relation to storm characteristics and hydrodynamic model properties: rainfall sampling number (rainfall resolution vs. storm size), catchment sampling number (rainfall resolution vs. catchment size), runoff and sewer sampling number (rainfall resolution vs. runoff and sewer model resolution respectively). Results show that for rainfall resolution lower than half the catchment size, rainfall volumes mean and standard deviations decrease as a result of smoothing of rainfall gradients. Moreover, deviations in maximum water depths, from 10 to 30% depending on the storm, occurred for rainfall resolution close to storm size, as a result of rainfall aggregation. Model results also showed that modelled runoff peaks are more sensitive to rainfall resolution than maximum in-sewer water depths as flow routing has a damping effect on in-sewer water level variations. Temporal resolution aggregation of rainfall inputs led to

  13. MODELING OF FRICTION STIR WELDING (FSW) PROCESS USING SMOOTH PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS (SPH)

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Grant, Glenn J.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2006-06-14

    We present a novel modeling approach to simulate FSW process that may have significant advantages over current traditional finite element or finite difference based methods. The proposed model is based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, a fully Lagrangian particle method that can simulate the dynamics of interfaces, large material deformations, void formations and material's strain and temperature history without employing complex tracking schemes. Two- and three-dimensional simulations for different tool designs are presented. Preliminary numerical results are in good qualitative agreement with experimental observations.

  14. The Roles of RNA Polymerase I and III Subunits Polr1c and Polr1d in Craniofacial Development and in Zebrafish Models of Treacher Collins Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Achilleos, Annita; Neben, Cynthia L.; Merrill, Amy E.; Trainor, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a global process required for growth and proliferation of all cells, yet perturbation of ribosome biogenesis during human development often leads to tissue-specific defects termed ribosomopathies. Transcription of the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) by RNA polymerases (Pol) I and III, is considered a rate limiting step of ribosome biogenesis and mutations in the genes coding for RNA Pol I and III subunits, POLR1C and POLR1D cause Treacher Collins syndrome, a rare congenital craniofacial disorder. Our understanding of the functions of individual RNA polymerase subunits, however, remains poor. We discovered that polr1c and polr1d are dynamically expressed during zebrafish embryonic development, particularly in craniofacial tissues. Consistent with this pattern of activity, polr1c and polr1d homozygous mutant zebrafish exhibit cartilage hypoplasia and cranioskeletal anomalies characteristic of humans with Treacher Collins syndrome. Mechanistically, we discovered that polr1c and polr1d loss-of-function results in deficient ribosome biogenesis, Tp53-dependent neuroepithelial cell death and a deficiency of migrating neural crest cells, which are the primary progenitors of the craniofacial skeleton. More importantly, we show that genetic inhibition of tp53 can suppress neuroepithelial cell death and ameliorate the skeletal anomalies in polr1c and polr1d mutants, providing a potential avenue to prevent the pathogenesis of Treacher Collins syndrome. Our work therefore has uncovered tissue-specific roles for polr1c and polr1d in rRNA transcription, ribosome biogenesis, and neural crest and craniofacial development during embryogenesis. Furthermore, we have established polr1c and polr1d mutant zebrafish as models of Treacher Collins syndrome together with a unifying mechanism underlying its pathogenesis and possible prevention. PMID:27448281

  15. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish

  16. Mapping fractures using 1D anisotropic modelling of magnetotelluric data: a case study from the Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, A.; Heinson, G.; Holford, S.; Thiel, S.

    2015-06-01

    We present 1D anisotropic inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) data as a potential tool for mapping structural permeability in sedimentary basins. Using 1D inversions of a 171 site, broadband MT data set from the Koroit region of the Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia, we have delineated an electrically anisotropic layer at approximately 2.5 to 3.5 km depth. The anisotropy strike is consistent between stations at approximately 160° east of north. The depth of anisotropy corresponds to the top depth of the Lower Cretaceous Crayfish Group, and the anisotropy factor increases from west to east. We interpret the anisotropy as resulting from north-northwest oriented, fluid-filled fractures resulting in enhanced electrical and hydraulic conductivity. This interpretation is consistent with permeability data from well formation tests. It is also consistent with the orientation of mapped faults in the area, which are optimally oriented for reactivation in the current stress field.

  17. On the hydrodynamic model of thermal escape from planetary atmospheres and its comparison with kinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    Parkers' model of thermal escape implies the search of solutions of one-dimensional hydrodynamic equations for an inviscid but thermally conducting gas with a critical point and vanishing temperature far from the source. The properties of solutions of this model are studied for neutral mon- and diatomic gases with the viscosity index varying from 1/2 to 1. The domains of existence and uniqueness of solutions in terms of the source Jeans escape parameter and Knudsen number are established. The solutions are found to exist only in a narrow range of the critical point Jeans parameter. The lower and upper limits of this range correspond to solutions that are dominated by either heat conduction or adiabatic expansion. Thermal escape described by Parker's model occurs in two asymptotic regimes: the low-density (LD) regime, when escape is dominated by heat conduction, and the high-density (HD) regime, when escape is dominated by adiabatic expansion. Expressions for the mass and energy escape rates in these regimes are found theoretically. The comparison of results of hydrodynamic and kinetic simulations performed in identical conditions shows that Parker's model is capable of describing thermal escape only in the HD regime, providing decent agreement with the kinetic model in terms of the atmospheric structure below the exobase and the mass and energy escape rates. In the LD regime, Parker's model predicts a much faster drop in atmospheric temperature and less extended atmospheres, and can both over- and underestimate the escape rates in orders of magnitude.

  18. Hydrodynamic consequences of flexural stiffness and buoyancy for seaweeds: a study using physical models.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Hannah Louise

    2006-06-01

    An upright posture in the water column may expose benthic marine organisms to faster flow higher in the water column than near the substratum, potentially increasing rates of mass exchange while also exposing the organisms to higher hydrodynamic forces. Benthic organisms maintain upright postures in the water column by one of two mechanisms, stiffness or buoyancy. Turbinaria ornata is a tropical macroalga that uses either buoyancy or flexural stiffness (EI), depending on its flow habitat. This study used physical models of T. ornata to compare the effect of different magnitudes of these two mechanisms on relative water velocity and hydrodynamic forces in both unidirectional and wavy flow. Models of the alga were constructed to span and exceed natural levels of T. ornata's EI and buoyancy. Models with high EI and high buoyancy maintained upright postures in both unidirectional flow and waves, and experienced higher forces than models with low EI and moderate or low buoyancy that deflected in the direction of water motion. In waves, buoyant models that were deflected by high velocity rebounded back into upright positions when the flow slowed. Non-buoyant, flexible models were also pushed over by flow but lacked the ability to rebound upright, which led to decreased force in unidirectional flow, but high force in waves.

  19. Better Insight Into Water Resources Management With Integrated Hydrodynamic And Water Quality Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debele, B.; Srinivasan, R.; Parlange, J.

    2004-12-01

    Models have long been used in water resources management to guide decision making and improve understanding of the system. Numerous models of different scales -spatial and temporal - are available. Yet, very few models manage to bridge simulations of hydrological and water quality parameters from both upland watershed and riverine system. Most water quality models, such as QUAL2E and EPD-RIV1 concentrate on the riverine system while CE-QUAL-W2 and WASP models focus on larger waterbodies, such as lakes and reservoirs. On the other hand, the original SWAT model, HSPF and other upland watershed hydrological models simulate agricultural (diffuse) pollution sources with limited number of processes incorporated to handle point source pollutions that emanate from industrial sectors. Such limitations, which are common in most hydrodynamic and water quality models undermine better understanding that otherwise could be uncovered by employing integrated hydrological and water quality models for both upland watershed and riverine system. The SWAT model is a well documented and verified hydrological and water quality model that has been developed to simulate the effects of various management scenarios on the health of the environment in terms of water quantity and quality. Recently, the SWAT model has been extended to include the simulation of hydrodynamic and water quality parameters in the river system. The extended SWAT model (ESWAT) has been further extended to run using diurnally varying (hourly) weather data and produce outputs at hourly timescales. This and other improvements in the ESWAT model have been documented in the current work. Besides, the results from two case studies in Texas will be reported.

  20. The conformation of serum albumin in solution: a combined phosphorescence depolarization-hydrodynamic modeling study.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, M L; Duchowicz, R; Carrasco, B; de la Torre, J G; Acuña, A U

    2001-01-01

    There is a striking disparity between the heart-shaped structure of human serum albumin (HSA) observed in single crystals and the elongated ellipsoid model used for decades to interpret the protein solution hydrodynamics at neutral pH. These two contrasting views could be reconciled if the protein were flexible enough to change its conformation in solution from that found in the crystal. To investigate this possibility we recorded the rotational motions in real time of an erythrosin-bovine serum albumin complex (Er-BSA) over an extended time range, using phosphorescence depolarization techniques. These measurements are consistent with the absence of independent motions of large protein segments in solution, in the time range from nanoseconds to fractions of milliseconds, and give a single rotational correlation time phi(BSA, 1 cP, 20 degrees C) = 40 +/- 2 ns. In addition, we report a detailed analysis of the protein hydrodynamics based on two bead-modeling methods. In the first, BSA was modeled as a triangular prismatic shell with optimized dimensions of 84 x 84 x 84 x 31.5 A, whereas in the second, the atomic-level structure of HSA obtained from crystallographic data was used to build a much more refined rough-shell model. In both cases, the predicted and experimental rotational diffusion rate and other hydrodynamic parameters were in good agreement. Therefore, the overall conformation in neutral solution of BSA, as of HSA, should be rigid, in the sense indicated above, and very similar to the heart-shaped structure observed in HSA crystals. PMID:11325741

  1. Observations and 3D hydrodynamical models of planetary nebulae with Wolf-Rayet type central stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechy-García, J. S.; Velázquez, P. F.; Peña, M.; Raga, A. C.

    2017-01-01

    We present high-resolution, long-slit spectroscopic observations of two planetary nebulae, M 1-32 and M 3-15, with [WC] central stars located near the Galactic bulge. The observations were obtained with the 2.1-m telescope of the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, San Pedro Mártir. M 1-32 shows wide wings on the base of its emission lines and M 3-15 has two very faint high-velocity knots. In order to model both planetary nebulae, we built a three-dimensional model consisting of a jet interacting with an equatorially concentrated slow wind, emulating the presence of a dense torus, using the Yguazú hydrodynamical code. From our hydrodynamical models, we obtained position-velocity diagrams in the [N II]λ6583 line for comparison with the observations. We find that the spectral characteristics of M 1-32 and M 3-15 can be explained with the same physical model - a jet moving inside an asymptotic giant branch wind - using different parameters (physical conditions and position angles of the jet). In agreement with our model and observations, these objects contain a dense torus seeing pole-on and a bipolar jet escaping through the poles. Then, we propose to classify this kind of objects as spectroscopic bipolar nebulae, although they have been classified morphologically as compact, round, or elliptical nebulae or with `close collimated lobes'.

  2. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Stochastic Model for Flow and Transport in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Meakin, Paul

    2008-11-03

    A meso-scale stochastic Lagrangian particle model was developed and used to simulate conservative and reactive transport in porous media. In the stochastic model, the fluid flow in a porous continuum is governed by a combination of a Langevin equation and continuity equation. Pore-scale velocity fluctuations, the source of hydrodynamic dispersion, are represented by the white noise. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics method was used to solve the governing equations. Changes in the properties of the fluid particles (e.g., the solute concentration) are governed by the advection-diffusion equation. The separate treatment of advective and diffusive mixing in the stochastic transport model is more realistic than the classical advection-dispersion theory, which uses a single effective diffusion coefficient (the dispersion coefficient) to describe both types of mixing leading to over-prediction of mixing induced effective reaction rates. The stochastic model predicts much lower reaction product concentrations in mixing induced reactions. In addition, the dispersion theory predicts more stable fronts (with a higher effective fractal dimension) than the stochastic model during the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities.

  3. REIONIZATION ON LARGE SCALES. I. A PARAMETRIC MODEL CONSTRUCTED FROM RADIATION-HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, N.; Trac, H.; Cen, R.; Loeb, A.

    2013-10-20

    We present a new method for modeling inhomogeneous cosmic reionization on large scales. Utilizing high-resolution radiation-hydrodynamic simulations with 2048{sup 3} dark matter particles, 2048{sup 3} gas cells, and 17 billion adaptive rays in a L = 100 Mpc h {sup –1} box, we show that the density and reionization redshift fields are highly correlated on large scales (∼> 1 Mpc h {sup –1}). This correlation can be statistically represented by a scale-dependent linear bias. We construct a parametric function for the bias, which is then used to filter any large-scale density field to derive the corresponding spatially varying reionization redshift field. The parametric model has three free parameters that can be reduced to one free parameter when we fit the two bias parameters to simulation results. We can differentiate degenerate combinations of the bias parameters by combining results for the global ionization histories and correlation length between ionized regions. Unlike previous semi-analytic models, the evolution of the reionization redshift field in our model is directly compared cell by cell against simulations and performs well in all tests. Our model maps the high-resolution, intermediate-volume radiation-hydrodynamic simulations onto lower-resolution, larger-volume N-body simulations (∼> 2 Gpc h {sup –1}) in order to make mock observations and theoretical predictions.

  4. The raspberry model for hydrodynamic interactions revisited. I. Periodic arrays of spheres and dumbbells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Lukas P.; Peter, Toni; Holm, Christian; de Graaf, Joost

    2015-08-01

    The so-called "raspberry" model refers to the hybrid lattice-Boltzmann and Langevin molecular dynamics scheme for simulating the dynamics of suspensions of colloidal particles, originally developed by Lobaskin and Dünweg [New J. Phys. 6, 54 (2004)], wherein discrete surface points are used to achieve fluid-particle coupling. This technique has been used in many simulation studies on the behavior of colloids. However, there are fundamental questions with regards to the use of this model. In this paper, we examine the accuracy with which the raspberry method is able to reproduce Stokes-level hydrodynamic interactions when compared to analytic expressions for solid spheres in simple-cubic crystals. To this end, we consider the quality of numerical experiments that are traditionally used to establish these properties and we discuss their shortcomings. We show that there is a discrepancy between the translational and rotational mobility reproduced by the simple raspberry model and present a way to numerically remedy this problem by adding internal coupling points. Finally, we examine a non-convex shape, namely, a colloidal dumbbell, and show that the filled raspberry model replicates the desired hydrodynamic behavior in bulk for this more complicated shape. Our investigation is continued in de Graaf et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 084108 (2015)], wherein we consider the raspberry model in the confining geometry of two parallel plates.

  5. Stellar hydrodynamical modeling of dwarf galaxies: simulation methodology, tests, and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Recchi, Simone; Hensler, Gerhard

    2015-07-01

    Context. In spite of enormous progress and brilliant achievements in cosmological simulations, they still lack numerical resolution or physical processes to simulate dwarf galaxies in sufficient detail. Accurate numerical simulations of individual dwarf galaxies are thus still in demand. Aims: We aim to improve available numerical techniques to simulate individual dwarf galaxies. In particular, we aim to (i) study in detail the coupling between stars and gas in a galaxy, exploiting the so-called stellar hydrodynamical approach; and (ii) study for the first time the chemodynamical evolution of individual galaxies starting from self-consistently calculated initial gas distributions. Methods: We present a novel chemodynamical code for studying the evolution of individual dwarf galaxies. In this code, the dynamics of gas is computed using the usual hydrodynamics equations, while the dynamics of stars is described by the stellar hydrodynamics approach, which solves for the first three moments of the collisionless Boltzmann equation. The feedback from stellar winds and dying stars is followed in detail. In particular, a novel and detailed approach has been developed to trace the aging of various stellar populations, which facilitates an accurate calculation of the stellar feedback depending on the stellar age. The code has been accurately benchmarked, allowing us to provide a recipe for improving the code performance on the Sedov test problem. Results: We build initial equilibrium models of dwarf galaxies that take gas self-gravity into account and present different levels of rotational support. Models with high rotational support (and hence high degrees of flattening) develop prominent bipolar outflows; a newly-born stellar population in these models is preferentially concentrated to the galactic midplane. Models with little rotational support blow away a large fraction of the gas and the resulting stellar distribution is extended and diffuse. Models that start from non

  6. Modeling the hydrodynamic interactions of deep anoxic lagoons with their source basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianni, Areti; Zacharias, Ierotheos

    2012-09-01

    This study investigates the management of an extension of the anoxic water layers, from deeper to shallower environments, and aims to control the consequences in lagoon environments with great economic and ecological value. The physicochemical status in a deep anoxic lagoon (Aitoliko, Greece) was monitored and the spatial distribution of anoxic conditions in the bottom waters was the focal point. The study investigated the management of an extension of the anoxic water layers, from deeper to shallower environments, and aims to control the consequences in lagoon environments with great economic and ecological value. A three-dimensional numerical model was used in order to describe the hydrodynamic conditions in the lagoon. The model was calibrated and validated with field measurements and it was used as a tool to examine how morphological modifications in lagoon's sill and changes of the lagoon's salt/fresh water budget can affect water column hydrodynamics. The model reliably reproduced the hydrodynamic changes in the lagoon caused by morphological and/or hydraulic modification, demonstrating an ideal management plan for the control of deep anoxic hypolimnia. It is concluded that by decreasing fresh water discharges into a deep lagoon, epilimnetic density values increase while the metalimnion extends. By extending the sill's cross section, water fluxes with the source basin are increased, affecting the surface layer density. Even under these conditions fresh water discharges control the characteristics of a thin surface water layer. If the sill's cross section expansion is followed by a decrease of fresh water discharge, turbulence conditions in the water column of a deep basin are substantially affected.

  7. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiment on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Castor, J.; Rubenchik, A.; Berning, M.

    1996-02-12

    Supernova 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. On quite a separate front, the detrimental effect of hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has long been known. Tools from both areas are being tested on a common project. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Nova Laser is being used in scaled laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under supernova-relevant conditions. Numerical simulations of the experiments are being done, using hydrodynamics codes at the Laboratory, and astrophysical codes successfully used to model the hydrodynamics of supernovae. A two-layer package composed of Cu and CH{sub 2} with a single mode sinusoidal 1D perturbation at the interface, shocked by indirect laser drive from the Cu side of the package, produced significant Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth in the nonlinear regime. The scale and gross structure of the growth was successfully modeled, by mapping an early-time simulation done with 1D HYADES, a radiation transport code, into 2D CALE, a LLNL hydrodynamics code. The HYADES result was also mapped in 2D into the supernova code PROMETHEUS, which was also able to reproduce the scale and gross structure of the growth.

  8. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiment on the Nova laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Castor, J.; Rubenchik, A.

    1996-02-01

    Supernova 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. On quite a separate front, the detrimental effect of hydrodynamic instabilities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has long been known. Tools from both areas are being tested on a common project. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Nova Laser is being used in scaled laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under supernova-relevant conditions. Numerical simulations of the experiments are being done, using hydrodynamics codes at the Laboratory, and astrophysical codes successfully used to model the hydrodynamics of supernovae. A two-layer package composed of Cu and CH2 with a single mode sinusoidal 1D perturbation at the interface, shocked by indirect laser drive from the Cu side of the package, produced significant Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth in the nonlinear regime. The scale and gross structure of the growth was successfully modeled, by mapping an early-time simulation done with 1D HYADES, a radiation transport code, into 2D CALE, a LLNL hydrodynamics code. The HYADES result was also mapped in 2D into the supernova code PROMETHEUS, which was also able to reproduce the scale and gross structure of the growth.

  9. Maxwell and very-hard-particle models for probabilistic ballistic annihilation: Hydrodynamic description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppex, François; Droz, Michel; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2005-08-01

    The hydrodynamic description of probabilistic ballistic annihilation, for which no conservation laws hold, is an intricate problem with hard spherelike dynamics for which no exact solution exists. We consequently focus on simplified approaches, the Maxwell and very-hard-particle (VHP) models, which allows us to compute analytically upper and lower bounds for several quantities. The purpose is to test the possibility of describing such a far from equilibrium dynamics with simplified kinetic models. The motivation is also in turn to assess the relevance of some singular features appearing within the original model and the approximations invoked to study it. The scaling exponents are first obtained from the (simplified) Boltzmann equation, and are confronted against direct Monte Carlo simulations. Then, the Chapman-Enskog method is used to obtain constitutive relations and transport coefficients. The corresponding Navier-Stokes equations for the hydrodynamic fields are derived for both Maxwell and VHP models. We finally perform a linear stability analysis around the homogeneous solution, which illustrates the importance of dissipation in the possible development of spatial inhomogeneities.

  10. Modeling hydrodynamics, temperature and water quality in Henry Hagg Lake, Oregon, 2000-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annette B.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2004-01-01

    The two-dimensional model CE-QUAL-W2 was used to simulate hydrodynamics, temperature, and water quality in Henry Hagg Lake, Oregon, for the years 2000 through 2003. Input data included lake bathymetry, meteorologic conditions, tributary inflows, tributary temperature and water quality, and lake outflows. Calibrated constituents included lake hydrodynamics, water temperature, orthophosphate, total phosphorus, ammonia, algae, chlorophyll a, zooplankton, and dissolved oxygen. Other simulated constituents included nitrate, dissolved and particulate organic matter, dissolved solids, and suspended sediment. Two algal groups (blue-green algae, and all other algae) were included in the model to simulate the lakes algal communities. Measured lake stage data were used to calibrate the lakes water balance; calibration of water temperature and water quality relied upon vertical profile data taken in the deepest part of the lake near the dam. The model initially was calibrated with data from 200001 and tested with data from 200203. Sensitivity tests were performed to examine the response of the model to specific parameters and coefficients, including the light-extinction coefficient, wind speed, tributary inflows of phosphorus, nitrogen and organic matter, sediment oxygen demand, algal growth rates, and zooplankton feeding preference factors.

  11. The moreau-evans hydrodynamic model applied to actual hall-héroult cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, René J.; Ziegler, Donald

    1988-10-01

    An extension of the Moreau-Evans[1] model for Hall-Héroult cells hydrodynamics is presented. Numerical techniques are used to solve the Moreau-Evans model equations with realistic electromagnetic force fields; the predicted results are compared with those of another model which is the property of Kaiser Aluminum Company and whose results are considered as in fairly good agreement with available measurements (velocity in aluminum, for instance). The main input in this hydrodynamic model, i.e., the electromagnetic force field throughout the two liquids, was previously computed. For a given cell design these data were calculated using the electromagnetic program of Lympany and Evans.[2] For actual cells the forces were deduced from measurements of the magnetic field provided by Kaiser Aluminum Company. As expected, the cryolite flow is found to be governed by the large channels, and to be strongly dependent on the presence of such a channel between the two files of anodes. The use of numerical solution has made possible the analysis of new effects as the interfacial drag and the influence of small channels between anode blocks.

  12. Linked Hydrologic-Hydrodynamic Model Framework to Forecast Impacts of Rivers on Beach Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, E. J.; Fry, L. M.; Kramer, E.; Ritzenthaler, A.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of NOAA's beach quality forecasting program is to use a multi-faceted approach to aid in detection and prediction of bacteria in recreational waters. In particular, our focus has been on the connection between tributary loads and bacteria concentrations at nearby beaches. While there is a clear link between stormwater runoff and beach water quality, quantifying the contribution of river loadings to nearshore bacterial concentrations is complicated due to multiple processes that drive bacterial concentrations in rivers as well as those processes affecting the fate and transport of bacteria upon exiting the rivers. In order to forecast potential impacts of rivers on beach water quality, we developed a linked hydrologic-hydrodynamic water quality framework that simulates accumulation and washoff of bacteria from the landscape, and then predicts the fate and transport of washed off bacteria from the watershed to the coastal zone. The framework includes a watershed model (IHACRES) to predict fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) loadings to the coastal environment (accumulation, wash-off, die-off) as a function of effective rainfall. These loadings are input into a coastal hydrodynamic model (FVCOM), including a bacteria transport model (Lagrangian particle), to simulate 3D bacteria transport within the coastal environment. This modeling system provides predictive tools to assist local managers in decision-making to reduce human health threats.

  13. The Raspberry model for hydrodynamic interactions revisited. II. The effect of confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Joost; Peter, Toni; Fischer, Lukas P.; Holm, Christian

    2015-08-01

    The so-called "raspberry" model refers to the hybrid lattice-Boltzmann (LB) and Langevin molecular dynamics schemes for simulating the dynamics of suspensions of colloidal particles, originally developed by Lobaskin and Dünweg [New J. Phys. 6, 54 (2004)], wherein discrete surface points are used to achieve fluid-particle coupling. In this paper, we present a follow up to our study of the effectiveness of the raspberry model in reproducing hydrodynamic interactions in the Stokes regime for spheres arranged in a simple-cubic crystal [Fischer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 084107 (2015)]. Here, we consider the accuracy with which the raspberry model is able to reproduce such interactions for particles confined between two parallel plates. To this end, we compare our LB simulation results to established theoretical expressions and finite-element calculations. We show that there is a discrepancy between the translational and rotational mobilities when only surface coupling points are used, as also found in Part I of our joint publication. We demonstrate that adding internal coupling points to the raspberry can be used to correct said discrepancy in confining geometries as well. Finally, we show that the raspberry model accurately reproduces hydrodynamic interactions between a spherical colloid and planar walls up to roughly one LB lattice spacing.

  14. Well-posedness on a new hydrodynamic model of the fluid with the dilute charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Chun; Tan, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    We use an energetic variational approach to derive a new hydrodynamic model, which could be called a generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Navier-Stokes system. Such the system could describe the dynamics of the compressible conductive fluid with the dilute charged particles and be used to analyze the interactions between the macroscopic fluid motion and the microscopic charge transportation. Then, we develop a general method to obtain the unique local classical solution, the unique global solution under small perturbations and the optimal decay rates of the solution and its derivatives of any order.

  15. Discrete-element modelling and smoothed particle hydrodynamics: potential in the environmental sciences.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Paul W; Prakash, Mahesh

    2004-09-15

    Particle-based simulation methods, such as the discrete-element method and smoothed particle hydrodynamics, have specific advantages in modelling complex three-dimensional (3D) environmental fluid and particulate flows. The theory of both these methods and their relative advantages compared with traditional methods will be discussed. Examples of 3D flows on realistic topography illustrate the environmental application of these methods. These include the flooding of a river valley as a result of a dam collapse, coastal inundation by a tsunami, volcanic lava flow and landslides. Issues related to validation and quality data availability are also discussed.

  16. New control strategy for the lattice hydrodynamic model of traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chenqiang; Zhong, Shiquan; Li, Guangyu; Ma, Shoufeng

    2017-02-01

    The new delayed-feedback control strategy is applied for lattice hydrodynamic model of traffic flow by considering the control signal of the variation rate of the optimal velocity. The linear stability condition is derived in the frequency-domain with control theory. Then, different feedback gains under the periodic boundary scenery and on-ramp scenery are simulated. The periodic boundary scenery provides an initial small disturbance situation on the circle road, while the on-ramp scenery reproduces the disturbance triggered by the on-ramp on the open road. Both the theoretical analysis and simulations show that this new control signal has a positive effect to suppress traffic jams.

  17. Toward Developing a Hydrodynamic Flow & Inundation Model of the Lower Pearl River

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-20

    AUTHOR(S) Paul McKay, Cheryl Ann Blain 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 73-6205-A9-5 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Sid. Z39.18 Toward Developing a Hydrodynamic Flow and Inundation Model of the Lower Pearl River Paul McKay and Cheryl... Ekman transport due to offshore forcing or surge tied to local storm events. Both channels of the lower Pearl are bordered by extensive floodplains

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: A grid of 1D low-mass star formation models (Vaytet+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaytet, N.; Haugbolle, T.

    2016-11-01

    We ran 143 1D simulations of gravitationally collapsing Bonnor-Ebert spheres, varying the initial mass, radius and temperature of the parent cloud. The properties of the first and second Larson cores are reported. The simulation outputs for each run are provided (one separate file per snapshot), as well as the initial parameters and core properties in a summary tablec1.dat. All the data from the simulations (figures and raw data for every output) are publicly available at this address: http://starformation.hpc.ku.dk/grid-of-protostars. (2 data files).

  19. Development of a Hydrodynamic and Transport model of Bellingham Bay in Support of Nearshore Habitat Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    2010-04-22

    In this study, a hydrodynamic model based on the unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) was developed for Bellingham Bay, Washington. The model simulates water surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity in a three-dimensional domain that covers the entire Bellingham Bay and adjacent water bodies, including Lummi Bay, Samish Bay, Padilla Bay, and Rosario Strait. The model was developed using Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s high-resolution Puget Sound and Northwest Straits circulation and transport model. A sub-model grid for Bellingham Bay and adjacent coastal waters was extracted from the Puget Sound model and refined in Bellingham Bay using bathymetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and river channel cross-section data. The model uses tides, river inflows, and meteorological inputs to predict water surface elevations, currents, salinity, and temperature. A tidal open boundary condition was specified using standard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predictions. Temperature and salinity open boundary conditions were specified based on observed data. Meteorological forcing (wind, solar radiation, and net surface heat flux) was obtained from NOAA real observations and National Center for Environmental Prediction North American Regional Analysis outputs. The model was run in parallel with 48 cores using a time step of 2.5 seconds. It took 18 hours of cpu time to complete 26 days of simulation. The model was calibrated with oceanographic field data for the period of 6/1/2009 to 6/26/2009. These data were collected specifically for the purpose of model development and calibration. They include time series of water-surface elevation, currents, temperature, and salinity as well as temperature and salinity profiles during instrument deployment and retrieval. Comparisons between model predictions and field observations show an overall reasonable agreement in both temporal and spatial scales. Comparisons of

  20. Combining Envisat type and CryoSat-2 altimetry to inform hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Raphael; Nygaard Godiksen, Peter; Villadsen, Heidi; Madsen, Henrik; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Hydrological models are developed and used for flood forecasting and water resources management. Such models rely on a variety of input and calibration data. In general, and especially in data scarce areas, remote sensing provides valuable data for the parameterization and updating of such models. Satellite radar altimeters provide water level measurements of inland water bodies. So far, many studies making use of satellite altimeters have been based on data from repeat-orbit missions such as Envisat, ERS or Jason or on synthetic wide-swath altimetry data as expected from the SWOT mission. This work represents one of the first hydrologic applications of altimetry data from a drifting orbit satellite mission, using data from CryoSat-2. We present an application where CryoSat-2 data is used to improve a hydrodynamic model of the Ganges and Brahmaputra river basins in South Asia set up in the DHI MIKE 11 software. The model's parameterization and forcing is mainly based on remote sensing data, for example the TRMM 3B42 precipitation product and the SRTM DEM for river and subcatchment delineation. CryoSat-2 water levels were extracted over a river mask derived from Landsat 7 and 8 imagery. After calibrating the hydrological-hydrodynamic model against observed discharge, simulated water levels were fitted to the CryoSat-2 data, with a focus on the Brahmaputra river in the Assam valley: The average simulated water level in the hydrodynamic model was fitted to the average water level along the river's course as observed by CryoSat-2 over the years 2011-2013 by adjusting the river bed elevation. In a second step, the cross section shapes were adjusted so that the simulated water level dynamics matched those obtained from Envisat virtual station time series. The discharge calibration resulted in Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients of 0.86 and 0.94 for the Ganges and Brahmaputra. Using the Landsat river mask, the CryoSat-2 water levels show consistency along the river and are in

  1. Source tracking using microbial community fingerprints: Method comparison with hydrodynamic modelling.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, D T; Jovanovic, D; Lintern, A; Teakle, I; Barnes, M; Deletic, A; Coleman, R; Rooney, G; Prosser, T; Coutts, S; Hipsey, M R; Bruce, L C; Henry, R

    2017-02-01

    Urban estuaries around the world are experiencing contamination from diffuse and point sources, which increases risks to public health. To mitigate and manage risks posed by elevated levels of contamination in urban waterways, it is critical to identify the primary water sources of contamination within catchments. Source tracking using microbial community fingerprints is one tool that can be used to identify sources. However, results derived from this approach have not yet been evaluated using independent datasets. As such, the key objectives of this investigation were: (1) to identify the major sources of water responsible for bacterial loadings within an urban estuary using microbial source tracking (MST) using microbial communities; and (2) to evaluate this method using a 3-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The Yarra River estuary, which flows through the city of Melbourne in South-East Australia was the focus of this study. We found that the water sources contributing to the bacterial community in the Yarra River estuary varied temporally depending on the estuary's hydrodynamic conditions. The water source apportionment determined using microbial community MST correlated to those determined using a 3-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the transport and mixing of a tracer in the estuary. While there were some discrepancies between the two methods, this investigation demonstrated that MST using bacterial community fingerprints can identify the primary water sources of microorganisms in an estuarine environment. As such, with further optimization and improvements, microbial community MST has the potential to become a powerful tool that could be practically applied in the mitigation of contaminated aquatic systems.

  2. Developing Sediment Transport and Dredging Prediction Model of Ohio River at Olmsted Locks and Dams Area using HEC-RAS (1D/2D)By Ganesh Raj Ghimire1 and Bruce A. Devantier 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment deposition is a serious issue in the construction and operation of large reservoir and inland navigation projects in the United States and around the world. Olmsted Locks and Dams in the Ohio River navigation system is facing similar challenges of huge sediment deposition during the ongoing in-wet construction methodology since 1993. HEC-RAS 5.0 integrated with ArcGIS, will be used to yield unsteady 2D hydrodynamic model of Ohio River at Olmsted area. Velocity, suspended sediment, bed sediment and hydrographic survey data acquired from public archives of USGS and USACE Louisville District will be input into the model. Calibration and validation of model will be performed against the measured stage, flow and velocity data. It will be subjected to completely unsteady 1D sediment transport modeling new to HEC-RAS 5.0 which incorporates sediment load and bed gradation via a DSS file, commercial dredging and BSTEM model. Sediment model will be calibrated to replicate the historical bed volume changes. Excavated cross-sections at Olmsted area will also be used to predict the sediment volume trapped inside the ditch over the period between excavations and placement of dam shells at site. Model will attempt to replicate historical dredging volume data and compare with the deposition volume from simulation model to formulate the dredging prediction model. Hence, the results of this research will generate a model that can form a basis for scheduling the dredging event prior to the placement of off-shore cast shells replacing the current as and when required approach of dredging plan. 1 Graduate Student, Department of Civil Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale Carbondale, Illinois, 62901-6603 2 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale Carbondale, Illinois, 62901-6603

  3. Understanding macroalgal dispersal in a complex hydrodynamic environment: a combined population genetic and physical modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Georgina; Kregting, Louise; Beatty, Gemma E; Cole, Claudia; Elsäßer, Björn; Savidge, Graham; Provan, Jim

    2014-06-06

    Gene flow in macroalgal populations can be strongly influenced by spore or gamete dispersal. This, in turn, is influenced by a convolution of the effects of current flow and specific plant reproductive strategies. Although several studies have demonstrated genetic variability in macroalgal populations over a wide range of spatial scales, the associated current data have generally been poorly resolved spatially and temporally. In this study, we used a combination of population genetic analyses and high-resolution hydrodynamic modelling to investigate potential connectivity between populations of the kelp Laminaria digitata in the Strangford Narrows, a narrow channel characterized by strong currents linking the large semi-enclosed sea lough, Strangford Lough, to the Irish Sea. Levels of genetic structuring based on six microsatellite markers were very low, indicating high levels of gene flow and a pattern of isolation-by-distance, where populations are more likely to exchange migrants with geographically proximal populations, but with occasional long-distance dispersal. This was confirmed by the particle tracking model, which showed that, while the majority of spores settle near the release site, there is potential for dispersal over several kilometres. This combined population genetic and modelling approach suggests that the complex hydrodynamic environment at the entrance to Strangford Lough can facilitate dispersal on a scale exceeding that proposed for L. digitata in particular, and the majority of macroalgae in general. The study demonstrates the potential of integrated physical-biological approaches for the prediction of ecological changes resulting from factors such as anthropogenically induced coastal zone changes.

  4. Mesoscopic model for microscale hydrodynamics and interfacial phenomena: slip, films, and contact-angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Colosqui, Carlos E; Kavousanakis, Michail E; Papathanasiou, Athanasios G; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G

    2013-01-01

    We present a model based on the lattice Boltzmann equation that is suitable for the simulation of dynamic wetting. The model is capable of exhibiting fundamental interfacial phenomena such as weak adsorption of fluid on the solid substrate and the presence of a thin surface film within which a disjoining pressure acts. Dynamics in this surface film, tightly coupled with hydrodynamics in the fluid bulk, determine macroscopic properties of primary interest: the hydrodynamic slip; the equilibrium contact angle; and the static and dynamic hysteresis of the contact angles. The pseudo-potentials employed for fluid-solid interactions are composed of a repulsive core and an attractive tail that can be independently adjusted. This enables effective modification of the functional form of the disjoining pressure so that one can vary the static and dynamic hysteresis on surfaces that exhibit the same equilibrium contact angle. The modeled fluid-solid interface is diffuse, represented by a wall probability function that ultimately controls the momentum exchange between solid and fluid phases. This approach allows us to effectively vary the slip length for a given wettability (i.e., a given static contact angle) of the solid substrate.

  5. Regional scale hydrodynamic modelling of offshore wind farm development areas off the east coast of Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara Murray, Rory; Gallego, Alejandro

    2013-04-01

    There is considerable interest in Scotland, supported by the Scottish Government, in the expansion of renewable energy production. In particular, significant offshore wind energy developments are already planned in coastal waters to the east of the Forth and Tay estuaries. It is important to understand the local and cumulative environmental impact of such developments within this region, to aid licensing decisions but also to inform marine spatial planning in general. Substantial wind farm developments may affect physical processes within the region, such as tidal-, wind-, and wave-driven circulation, as well as coastal sediment transport and more complex estuarine dynamics. Such physical impacts could have ecological and, ultimately, socio-economic consequences. The Firth of Forth and Tay areas both exhibit complex estuarine characteristics due to fresh water input, complex bathymetry and coastline, and tidal mixing. Our goal is to construct an unstructured grid hydrodynamic model of the wider Firth of Forth and Tay region using the Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM), resolving the complex estuarine hydrography of the area and representing offshore wind developments. Hydrodynamic modelling will provide an accurate baseline of the hydrography in this region but also allow the assessment of the effect on the physical environment of multiple wind farm development scenarios.

  6. Channeling of fast ions through the bent carbon nanotubes: The extended two-fluid hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Karbunar; Duško, Borka; Ivan, Radović; Zoran, L. Mišković

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the interactions of charged particles with straight and bent single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) under channeling conditions in the presence of dynamic polarization of the valence electrons in carbon. This polarization is described by a cylindrical, two-fluid hydrodynamic model with the parameters taken from the recent modelling of several independent experiments on electron energy loss spectroscopy of carbon nano-structures. We use the hydrodynamic model to calculate the image potential for protons moving through four types of SWNTs at a speed of 3 atomic units. The image potential is then combined with the Doyle-Turner atomic potential to obtain the total potential in the bent carbon nanotubes. Using that potential, we also compute the spatial and angular distributions of protons channeled through the bent carbon nanotubes, and compare the results with the distributions obtained without taking into account the image potential. Project supported by the Funds from the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia (Grant No. 45005). Z. L. Mišković thanks the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada for Finacial Support.

  7. Hydrodynamics of discrete-particle models of spherical colloids: a multiparticle collision dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Poblete, Simón; Wysocki, Adam; Gompper, Gerhard; Winkler, Roland G

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamic properties of a spherical colloid model, which is composed of a shell of point particles by hybrid mesoscale simulations, which combine molecular dynamics simulations for the sphere with the multiparticle collision dynamics approach for the fluid. Results are presented for the center-of-mass and angular velocity correlation functions. The simulation results are compared with theoretical results for a rigid colloid obtained as a solution of the Stokes equation with no-slip boundary conditions. Similarly, analytical results of a point-particle model are presented, which account for the finite size of the simulated system. The simulation results agree well with both approaches on appropriative time scales; specifically, the long-time correlations are quantitatively reproduced. Moreover, a procedure is proposed to obtain the infinite-system-size diffusion coefficient based on a combination of simulation results and analytical predictions. In addition, we present the velocity field in the vicinity of the colloid and demonstrate its close agreement with the theoretical prediction. Our studies show that a point-particle model of a sphere is very well suited to describe the hydrodynamic properties of spherical colloids, with a significantly reduced numerical effort.

  8. Mesoscopic model for microscale hydrodynamics and interfacial phenomena: Slip, films, and contact-angle hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colosqui, Carlos E.; Kavousanakis, Michail E.; Papathanasiou, Athanasios G.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2013-01-01

    We present a model based on the lattice Boltzmann equation that is suitable for the simulation of dynamic wetting. The model is capable of exhibiting fundamental interfacial phenomena such as weak adsorption of fluid on the solid substrate and the presence of a thin surface film within which a disjoining pressure acts. Dynamics in this surface film, tightly coupled with hydrodynamics in the fluid bulk, determine macroscopic properties of primary interest: the hydrodynamic slip; the equilibrium contact angle; and the static and dynamic hysteresis of the contact angles. The pseudo-potentials employed for fluid-solid interactions are composed of a repulsive core and an attractive tail that can be independently adjusted. This enables effective modification of the functional form of the disjoining pressure so that one can vary the static and dynamic hysteresis on surfaces that exhibit the same equilibrium contact angle. The modeled fluid-solid interface is diffuse, represented by a wall probability function that ultimately controls the momentum exchange between solid and fluid phases. This approach allows us to effectively vary the slip length for a given wettability (i.e., a given static contact angle) of the solid substrate.

  9. Multi-Material Closure Model for High-Order Finite Element Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Dobrev, V. A.; Kolev, T. V.; Rieben, R. N.; ...

    2016-04-27

    We present a new closure model for single fluid, multi-material Lagrangian hydrodynamics and its application to high-order finite element discretizations of these equations [1]. The model is general with respect to the number of materials, dimension and space and time discretizations. Knowledge about exact material interfaces is not required. Material indicator functions are evolved by a closure computation at each quadrature point of mixed cells, which can be viewed as a high-order variational generalization of the method of Tipton [2]. This computation is defined by the notion of partial non-instantaneous pressure equilibration, while the full pressure equilibration is achieved bymore » both the closure model and the hydrodynamic motion. Exchange of internal energy between materials is derived through entropy considerations, that is, every material produces positive entropy, and the total entropy production is maximized in compression and minimized in expansion. Results are presented for standard one-dimensional two-material problems, followed by two-dimensional and three-dimensional multi-material high-velocity impact arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian calculations. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.« less

  10. Multi-Material Closure Model for High-Order Finite Element Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrev, V. A.; Kolev, T. V.; Rieben, R. N.; Tomov, V. Z.

    2016-04-27

    We present a new closure model for single fluid, multi-material Lagrangian hydrodynamics and its application to high-order finite element discretizations of these equations [1]. The model is general with respect to the number of materials, dimension and space and time discretizations. Knowledge about exact material interfaces is not required. Material indicator functions are evolved by a closure computation at each quadrature point of mixed cells, which can be viewed as a high-order variational generalization of the method of Tipton [2]. This computation is defined by the notion of partial non-instantaneous pressure equilibration, while the full pressure equilibration is achieved by both the closure model and the hydrodynamic motion. Exchange of internal energy between materials is derived through entropy considerations, that is, every material produces positive entropy, and the total entropy production is maximized in compression and minimized in expansion. Results are presented for standard one-dimensional two-material problems, followed by two-dimensional and three-dimensional multi-material high-velocity impact arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian calculations. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. A quasi-continuum hydrodynamic model for slit shaped nanochannel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadauria, Ravi; Aluru, N. R.

    2013-08-01

    We propose a quasi-continuum hydrodynamic model for isothermal transport of Lennard-Jones fluid confined in slit shaped nanochannels. In this work, we compute slip and viscous contributions independently and superimpose them to obtain the total velocity profile. Layering of fluid near the interface plays an important role in viscous contribution to the flow, by apparent viscosity change along the confining dimension. This relationship necessitates computing density profiles, which is done using the recently proposed empirical-potential based quasi-continuum theory [A. V. Raghunathan, J. H. Park, and N. R. Aluru, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 174701 (2007)], 10.1063/1.2793070. Existing correlations for density dependent viscosity provided by Woodcock [AIChE J. 52, 438 (2006)], 10.1002/aic.10676 are used to compute viscosity profile in the nanopores. A Dirichlet type slip boundary condition based on a static Langevin friction model describing center-of-mass motion of fluid particles is used, the parameters of which are dependent on the fluctuations of total wall-fluid force from an equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. Different types of corrugated surfaces are considered to study wall-fluid friction effects on boundary conditions. Proposed hydrodynamic model yields good agreement of velocity profiles obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations for gravity driven flow.

  12. Hydrodynamic pressure computation under real sea surface on basis of autoregressive model of irregular waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, A.; Gankevich, I.

    2015-05-01

    Determining the impact of external excitations on a dynamic marine object such as ship hull in a seaway is the main goal of simulations. Now such simulations is most often based on approximate mathematical models that use results of the theory of small amplitude waves. The most complicated software for marine objects behavior simulation LAMP IV (Large amplitude motion program) uses numerical solution of traditional hydrodynamic problem without often used approximations but on the basis of theory of small amplitude waves. For efficiency reasons these simulations can be based on autoregressive model to generate real wave surface. Such a surface possesses all the hydrodynamic characteristics of sea waves, preserves dispersion relation and also shows superior performance compared to other wind wave models. Naturally, the known surface can be used to compute velocity field and in turn to determine pressures in any point under sea surface. The resulting computational algorithm can be used to determine pressures without use of theory of small-amplitude waves.

  13. Design of a Free-running, 1/30th Froude Scaled Model Destroyer for In-situ Hydrodynamic Flow Visualization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-03

    Froude Scaled Model Destroyer for In- situ Hydrodynamic Flow Visualization LT Dave Cope 3 May 2012 Advised by Prof Chrys Chryssostomidis Dr...Scaled Model Destroyer for In-situ Hydrodynamic Flow Visualization (BRIEFING CHARTS) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Design and build a 1/30th Froude scaled, free-running model of the David Taylor Model Basin 5415 hull for hydrodynamic visualization and

  14. Understanding leachate flow in municipal solid waste landfills by combining time-lapse ERT and subsurface flow modelling - Part II: Constraint methodology of hydrodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Audebert, M; Oxarango, L; Duquennoi, C; Touze-Foltz, N; Forquet, N; Clément, R

    2016-09-01

    Leachate recirculation is a key process in the operation of municipal solid waste landfills as bioreactors. To ensure optimal water content distribution, bioreactor operators need tools to design leachate injection systems. Prediction of leachate flow by subsurface flow modelling could provide useful information for the design of such systems. However, hydrodynamic models require additional data to constrain them and to assess hydrodynamic parameters. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a suitable method to study leachate infiltration at the landfill scale. It can provide spatially distributed information which is useful for constraining hydrodynamic models. However, this geophysical method does not allow ERT users to directly measure water content in waste. The MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy) methodology was proposed to delineate the infiltration area precisely during time-lapse ERT survey in order to avoid the use of empirical petrophysical relationships, which are not adapted to a heterogeneous medium such as waste. The infiltration shapes and hydrodynamic information extracted with MICS were used to constrain hydrodynamic models in assessing parameters. The constraint methodology developed in this paper was tested on two hydrodynamic models: an equilibrium model where, flow within the waste medium is estimated using a single continuum approach and a non-equilibrium model where flow is estimated using a dual continuum approach. The latter represents leachate flows into fractures. Finally, this methodology provides insight to identify the advantages and limitations of hydrodynamic models. Furthermore, we suggest an explanation for the large volume detected by MICS when a small volume of leachate is injected.

  15. Hydrodynamic model for ultra-short pulse ablation of hard dental tissue

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.; Alley, W.E.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Neev, J.

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 fsec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  16. An efficient numerical model for hydrodynamic parameterization in 2D fractured dual-porosity media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahs, Hassane; Hayek, Mohamed; Fahs, Marwan; Younes, Anis

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a robust and efficient numerical model for the parameterization of the hydrodynamic in fractured porous media. The developed model is based upon the refinement indicators algorithm for adaptive multi-scale parameterization. For each level of refinement, the Levenberg-Marquardt method is used to minimize the difference between the measured and predicted data that are obtained by solving the direct problem with the mixed finite element method. Sensitivities of state variables with respect to the parameters are calculated by the sensitivity method. The adjoint-state method is used to calculate the local gradients of the objective function necessary for the computation of the refinement indicators. Validity and efficiency of the proposed model are demonstrated by means of several numerical experiments. The developed numerical model provides encouraging results, even for noisy data and/or with a reduced number of measured heads.

  17. Nanocarrier Hydrodynamics and Binding in Targeted Drug Delivery: Challenges in Numerical Modeling and Experimental Validation.

    PubMed

    Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S; Muzykantov, Vladimir; Eckmann, David M; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2013-02-01

    This review discusses current progress and future challenges in the numerical modeling of targeted drug delivery using functionalized nanocarriers (NC). Antibody coated nanocarriers of various size and shapes, also called functionalized nanocarriers, are designed to be injected in the vasculature, whereby they undergo translational and rotational motion governed by hydrodynamic interaction with blood particulates as well as adhesive interactions mediated by the surface antibody binding to target antigens/receptors on cell surfaces. We review current multiscale modeling approaches rooted in computational fluid dynamics and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics to accurately resolve fluid, thermal, as well as adhesive interactions governing nanocarrier motion and their binding to endothelial cells lining the vasculature. We also outline current challenges and unresolved issues surrounding the modeling methods. Experimental approaches in pharmacology and bioengineering are discussed briefly from the perspective of model validation.

  18. Hydrodynamic Model with Binary Particle Diameters to Predict Axial Voidage Profile in a CFB Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. J.; Zhang, H.; Yang, H. R.; Wu, Y. X.; Lu, J. F.; Yue, G. X.

    A hydrodynamic model with binary particle diameters was developed to better predict axial voidage profile in a CFB combustor. In the model, the CFB is regarded as a superposition of two sub-beds, a fast fluidized bed in the upper riser with a characteristic particle diameter of O.2mm and a bubbling fluidized bed or turbulent bed in the bottom riser with a characteristic particle diameter of 2mm. Furthermore, a variable critical particle diameter whose terminal velocity equals to the superficial gas velocity was employed to determine which flow regime the particle belongs to. The results show that binary particle diameter model has the advantages in describing wide particle diameter distribution while reducing the complexity of computation. The model was verified by the field data of voidage profile in a 300MW CFB boiler.

  19. Validating a 0D predator-prey model for LH Transition with its 1D-2D supersets: effects of heating and fueling on Hysteresis and transition dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, Mikhail; Diamond, Patrick; Miki, Kazuhiro

    2013-10-01

    The LH transition crucially depends on the heat and particle deposition, transport and electric field shear suppression. Despite the inhomogeneity of these phenomena, a popular 0D predator-prey model seems to capture the essential transition dynamics, including the limit cycle pre-H-mode oscillations (or I-mode). However, its predictions regarding hysteresis are inconclusive. This is understandable at least because of the known deep fuel lowering of the transition threshold. The readily available fueling devices are the edge neutral penetration and an internal deposition via the supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI). This suggests a minimal extension of the 0D model by using bi-modal particle distributions. To formulate this extension accurately, a step-by-step comparison with a 1D treatment is required. Fortunately a suitable 1D numerical model has been recently developed specifically for the LH transition studies. In this work, we use the 1D model for the following purposes. First, we explore fueling effects as occurring both by edge neutral penetration, and internal deposition (SMBI) at a finite depth within the separatrix. Second, as the 0D model responds positively to the oscillating heating power, we include a periodic repetitive SMBI firing. Supported by the US DoE.

  20. 3D Hydrodynamical and Radiative Transfer Modeling of Eta Carinae's Colliding Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas Ignatius; Clementel, Nicola; Gull, Theodore R.; Kruip, Chael J. H.; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Icke, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of full 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the massive binary system Eta Carinae (Clementel, Madura, et al. 2014, MNRAS, 443, 2475 and Clementel, Madura, et al. 2015, MNRAS, 447, 2445). We accomplish this by applying the SimpleX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Voronoi-Delaunay grid to 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the binary colliding winds. We use SimpleX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium in 3D. We investigate several computational domain sizes and Luminous Blue Variable primary-star mass-loss rates. We show how the SimpleX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in Eta Carinae's spatially extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SimpleX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the Eta Carinae system, such as the LBV primary's mass-loss rate and the companion star's temperature and luminosity. We furthermore present new methods of visualizing and interacting with output from complex 3D numerical simulations, including 3D interactive graphics and 3D printing (Madura et al. 2015, arXiv:1503.00716). While we initially focus specifically on Eta Carinae, the methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR 140, WR 137, WR 19) and dusty ‘pinwheel’ (WR 112, WR 104, WR 98a) binary systems. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SimpleX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  1. Microbial risk assessment of drinking water based on hydrodynamic modelling of pathogen concentrations in source water.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Ekaterina; Petterson, Susan R; Dienus, Olaf; Nyström, Fredrik; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Pettersson, Thomas J R

    2015-09-01

    Norovirus contamination of drinking water sources is an important cause of waterborne disease outbreaks. Knowledge on pathogen concentrations in source water is needed to assess the ability of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) to provide safe drinking water. However, pathogen enumeration in source water samples is often not sufficient to describe the source water quality. In this study, the norovirus concentrations were characterised at the contamination source, i.e. in sewage discharges. Then, the transport of norovirus within the water source (the river Göta älv in Sweden) under different loading conditions was simulated using a hydrodynamic model. Based on the estimated concentrations in source water, the required reduction of norovirus at the DWTP was calculated using quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). The required reduction was compared with the estimated treatment performance at the DWTP. The average estimated concentration in source water varied between 4.8×10(2) and 7.5×10(3) genome equivalents L(-1); and the average required reduction by treatment was between 7.6 and 8.8 Log10. The treatment performance at the DWTP was estimated to be adequate to deal with all tested loading conditions, but was heavily dependent on chlorine disinfection, with the risk of poor reduction by conventional treatment and slow sand filtration. To our knowledge, this is the first article to employ discharge-based QMRA, combined with hydrodynamic modelling, in the context of drinking water.

  2. Transient pressure changes in the vertebral canal during whiplash motion--A hydrodynamic modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hua-Dong; Svensson, Mats Y; Nilsson, Håkan

    2016-02-08

    In vehicle collisions, the occupant's torso is accelerated in a given direction while the unsupported head tends to lag behind. This mechanism results in whiplash motion to the neck. In whiplash experiments conducted for animals, pressure transients have been recorded in the spinal canal. It was hypothesized that the transients caused dorsal root ganglion dysfunction. Neck motion introduces volume changes inside the vertebral canal. The changes require an adaptation which is likely achieved by redistribution of blood volume in the internal vertebral venous plexus (IVVP). Pressure transients then arise from the rapid redistribution. The present study aimed to explore the hypothesis theoretically and analytically. Further, the objectives were to quantify the effect of the neck motion on the pressure generation and to identify the physical factors involved. We developed a hydrodynamic system of tubes that represent the IVVP and its lateral intervertebral vein connections. An analytical model was developed for an anatomical geometrical relation that the venous blood volume changes with respect to the vertebral angular displacement. This model was adopted in the hydrodynamic tube system so that the system can predict the pressure transients on the basis of the neck vertebral motion data from a whiplash experiment. The predicted pressure transients were in good agreement with the earlier experimental data. A parametric study was conducted and showed that the system can be used to assess the influences of anatomical geometrical properties and vehicle collision severity on the pressure generation.

  3. High-resolution modelling of 3D hydrodynamics in coastal archipelagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miettunen, Elina; Tuomi, Laura; Ropponen, Janne; Lignell, Risto

    2016-04-01

    Dynamics of the coastal seas are affected by eutrophication, over-fishing, coastal construction and climate change. To enable the sustainable development of these areas, monitoring and modelling of the state of the sea are needed. The Archipelago Sea, located in the northern part of the semi-enclosed and brackish water Baltic Sea, is one of the most complex coastal areas with over 40 000 small islands and islets. It is also very vulnerable area already heavily stressed with eutrophication. Applicable modelling tools are needed to support the decision making and to provide sufficiently reliable information on the effects of the planned actions on the state of the coastal waters. We used 3D hydrodynamic model COHERENS to model the Archipelago Sea area with high spatial resolution of 0.25 nmi. Boundary conditions for this limited area were provided from coarser resolution, 2 nmi, Baltic Sea grid. In order to evaluate the performance of the high-resolution coastal model implementation a comprehensive measurement dataset was gathered, including hydrographic data from three intensive monitoring stations and several more rarely visited monitoring or research stations. The hydrodynamic model was able to simulate the surface temperature and salinity fields and their seasonal variation with good accuracy in this complex area. The sharp depth gradients typical for this area provided some challenges to the modelling. There was some over mixing and related to too strong vertical currents in the steep slopes of the deeper fault lines. Also the water exchange between the more open sea and coastal areas through narrow channels between the islands is not sufficiently well reproduced with the current resolution, leading to too high bottom temperatures.

  4. Gender-Specific Hippocampal Dysrhythmia and Aberrant Hippocampal and Cortical Excitability in the APPswePS1dE9 Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Papazoglou, Anna; Soos, Julien; Lundt, Andreas; Wormuth, Carola; Ginde, Varun Raj; Müller, Ralf; Henseler, Christina; Broich, Karl; Xie, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial disorder leading to progressive memory loss and eventually death. In this study an APPswePS1dE9 AD mouse model has been analyzed using implantable video-EEG radiotelemetry to perform long-term EEG recordings from the primary motor cortex M1 and the hippocampal CA1 region in both genders. Besides motor activity, EEG recordings were analyzed for electroencephalographic seizure activity and frequency characteristics using a Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) based approach. Automatic seizure detection revealed severe electroencephalographic seizure activity in both M1 and CA1 deflection in APPswePS1dE9 mice with gender-specific characteristics. Frequency analysis of both surface and deep EEG recordings elicited complex age, gender, and activity dependent alterations in the theta and gamma range. Females displayed an antithetic decrease in theta (θ) and increase in gamma (γ) power at 18-19 weeks of age whereas related changes in males occurred earlier at 14 weeks of age. In females, theta (θ) and gamma (γ) power alterations predominated in the inactive state suggesting a reduction in atropine-sensitive type II theta in APPswePS1dE9 animals. Gender-specific central dysrhythmia and network alterations in APPswePS1dE9 point to a functional role in behavioral and cognitive deficits and might serve as early biomarkers for AD in the future. PMID:27840743

  5. Ice Concentration Retrieval in Stratiform Mixed-phase Clouds Using Cloud Radar Reflectivity Measurements and 1D Ice Growth Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Damao; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Fan, Jiwen; Luo, Tao

    2014-10-01

    Measurement of ice number concentration in clouds is important but still challenging. Stratiform mixed-phase clouds (SMCs) provide a simple scenario for retrieving ice number concentration from remote sensing measurements. The simple ice generation and growth pattern in SMCs offers opportunities to use cloud radar reflectivity (Ze) measurements and other cloud properties to infer ice number concentration quantitatively. To understand the strong temperature dependency of ice habit and growth rate quantitatively, we develop a 1-D ice growth model to calculate the ice diffusional growth along its falling trajectory in SMCs. The radar reflectivity and fall velocity profiles of ice crystals calculated from the 1-D ice growth model are evaluated with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) ground-based high vertical resolution radar measurements. Combining Ze measurements and 1-D ice growth model simulations, we develop a method to retrieve the ice number concentrations in SMCs at given cloud top temperature (CTT) and liquid water path (LWP). The retrieved ice concentrations in SMCs are evaluated with in situ measurements and with a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation with a bin microphysical scheme. These comparisons show that the retrieved ice number concentrations are within an uncertainty of a factor of 2, statistically.

  6. Macroinvertebrate response to flow changes in a subalpine stream: predictions from two-dimensional hydrodynamic models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddle, T.J.; Holmquist, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic models are being used increasingly as alternatives to traditional one-dimensional instream flow methodologies for assessing adequacy of flow and associated faunal habitat. Two-dimensional modelling of habitat has focused primarily on fishes, but fish-based assessments may not model benthic macroinvertebrate habitat effectively. We extend two-dimensional techniques to a macroinvertebrate assemblage in a high-elevation stream in the Sierra Nevada (Dana Fork of the Tuolumne River, Yosemite National Park, CA, USA). This stream frequently flows at less than 0.03?m3?s?1 in late summer and is representative of a common water abstraction scenario: maximum water abstraction coinciding with seasonally low flows. We used two-dimensional modelling to predict invertebrate responses to reduced flows that might result from increased abstraction. We collected site-specific field data on the macroinvertebrate assemblage, bed topography and flow conditions and then coupled a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model with macroinvertebrate indices to evaluate habitat across a range of low flows. Macroinvertebrate indices were calculated for the wetted area at each flow. A surrogate flow record based on an adjacent watershed was used to evaluate frequency and duration of low flow events. Using surrogate historical records, we estimated that flow should fall below 0.071?m3?s?1 at least 1?day in 82 of 95?years and below 0.028?m3?s?1 in 48 of 95?years. Invertebrate metric means indicated minor losses in response to modelled discharge reductions, but wetted area decreased substantially. Responses of invertebrates to water abstraction will likely be a function of changing habitat quantity rather than quality.

  7. An optimal hydrodynamic model for the normal type IIP supernova 1999em

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utrobin, V. P.

    2007-01-01

    Context: There is still no consensus about progenitor masses of type IIP supernovae. Aims: We study a normal type IIP SN 1999em in detail and compare it to a peculiar type IIP SN 1987A. Methods: We computed the hydrodynamic and time-dependent atmosphere models interpreting simultaneously both the photometric and spectroscopic observations. Results: The bolometric light curve of SN 1999em and the spectral evolution of its Hα line are consistent with a presupernova radius of 500 ± 200~R⊙, an ejecta mass of 19.0 ± 1.2~M⊙, an explosion energy of (1.3±0.1) × 1051 erg, and a radioactive 56Ni mass of 0.036 ± 0.009~M⊙. A mutual mixing of hydrogen-rich and helium-rich matter in the inner layers of the ejecta guarantees a good fit of the calculated light curve to that observed. Based on the hydrodynamic models in the vicinity of the optimal model, we derive the approximate relationships between the basic physical and observed parameters. The hydrodynamic and atmosphere models of SN 1999em are inconsistent with the short distance of 7.85 Mpc to the host galaxy. Conclusions: .We find that the hydrogen recombination in the atmosphere of a normal type IIP SN 1999em, as well as most likely other type IIP supernovae at the photospheric epoch, is essentially a time-dependent phenomenon. It is also shown that in normal type IIP supernovae the homologous expansion of the ejecta in its atmosphere takes place starting from nearly the third day after the supernova explosion. A comparison of SN 1999em with SN 1987A reveals two very important results for supernova theory. First, the comparability of the helium core masses and the explosion energies implies a unique explosion mechanism for these core collapse supernovae. Second, the optimal model for SN 1999em is characterized by a weaker 56Ni mixing up to ≈660 km s-1 compared to a moderate 56Ni mixing up to ~3000 km s-1 in SN 1987A, hydrogen being mixed deeply downward to ~650 km s-1.

  8. Near-infrared spectro-interferometry of Mira variables and comparisons to 1D dynamic model atmospheres and 3D convection simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittkowski, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Freytag, B.; Scholz, M.; Höfner, S.; Karovicova, I.; Whitelock, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We aim at comparing spectro-interferometric observations of Mira variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with the latest 1D dynamic model atmospheres based on self-excited pulsation models (CODEX models) and with 3D dynamic model atmospheres including pulsation and convection (CO5BOLD models) to better understand the processes that extend the molecular atmosphere to radii where dust can form. Methods: We obtained a total of 20 near-infrared K-band spectro-interferometric snapshot observations of the Mira variables o Cet, R Leo, R Aqr, X Hya, W Vel, and R Cnc with a spectral resolution of about 1500. We compared observed flux and visibility spectra with predictions by CODEX 1D dynamic model atmospheres and with azimuthally averaged intensities based on CO5BOLD 3D dynamic model atmospheres. Results: Our visibility data confirm the presence of spatially extended molecular atmospheres located above the continuum radii with large-scale inhomogeneities or clumps that contribute a few percent of the total flux. The detailed structure of the inhomogeneities or clumps show a variability on time scales of 3 months and above. Both modeling attempts provided satisfactory fits to our data. In particular, they are both consistent with the observed decrease in the visibility function at molecular bands of water vapor and CO, indicating a spatially extended molecular atmosphere. Observational variability phases are mostly consistent with those of the best-fit CODEX models, except for near-maximum phases, where data are better described by near-minimum models. Rosseland angular diameters derived from the model fits are broadly consistent between those based on the 1D and the 3D models and with earlier observations. We derived fundamental parameters including absolute radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities for our sources. Conclusions: Our results provide a first observational support for theoretical results that shocks induced by convection and pulsation in the

  9. Hydrodynamic simulations of metal ablation by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Colombier, J.P.; Combis, P.; Bonneau, F.

    2005-04-15

    Ablation of Cu and Al targets has been performed with 170 fs laser pulses in the intensity range of 10{sup 12}-10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. We compare the measured removal depth with 1D hydrodynamic simulations. The electron-ion temperature decoupling is taken into account using the standard two-temperature model. The influence of the early heat transfer by electronic thermal conduction on hydrodynamic material expansion and mechanical behavior is investigated. A good agreement between experimental and numerical matter ablation rates shows the importance of including solid-to-vapor evolution of the metal in the current modeling of the laser matter interaction.

  10. Hydrodynamic model calibration from pattern recognition of non-orthorectified terrestrial photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquale, N.; Perona, P.; Wombacher, A.; Burlando, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a remote sensing technique for calibrating hydrodynamics models, which is particularly useful when access to the riverbed for a direct measure of flow variables may be precluded. The proposed technique uses terrestrial photography and automatic pattern recognition analysis together with digital mapping and does not require image ortho-rectification. Compared to others invasive or remote sensing calibration, this method is relatively cheap and can be repeated over time, thus allowing calibration over multiple flow rates . We applied this technique to a sequence of high-resolution photographs of the restored reach of the river Thur, near Niederneunforn, Switzerland. In order to calibrate the roughness coefficient, the actual exposed areas of the gravel bar are first computed using the pattern recognition algorithm, and then compared to the ones obtained from numerical hydrodynamic simulations over the entire range of observed flows. Analysis of the minimum error between the observed and the computed exposed areas show that the optimum roughness coefficient is discharge dependent; particularly it decreases as flow rate increases, as expected. The study is completed with an analysis of the root mean square error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MEA), which allow finding the best fitting roughness coefficient that can be used over a wide range of flow rates, including large floods.

  11. Modeling hydrodynamic self-propulsion with Stokesian Dynamics. Or teaching Stokesian Dynamics to swim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James W.; Brady, John F.; Moore, Rachel S.; ChE 174

    2011-07-01

    We develop a general framework for modeling the hydrodynamic self-propulsion (i.e., swimming) of bodies (e.g., microorganisms) at low Reynolds number via Stokesian Dynamics simulations. The swimming body is composed of many spherical particles constrained to form an assembly that deforms via relative motion of its constituent particles. The resistance tensor describing the hydrodynamic interactions among the individual particles maps directly onto that for the assembly. Specifying a particular swimming gait and imposing the condition that the swimming body is force- and torque-free determine the propulsive speed. The body's translational and rotational velocities computed via this methodology are identical in form to that from the classical theory for the swimming of arbitrary bodies at low Reynolds number. We illustrate the generality of the method through simulations of a wide array of swimming bodies: pushers and pullers, spinners, the Taylor/Purcell swimming toroid, Taylor's helical swimmer, Purcell's three-link swimmer, and an amoeba-like body undergoing large-scale deformation. An open source code is a part of the supplementary material and can be used to simulate the swimming of a body with arbitrary geometry and swimming gait.

  12. A hydrodynamical model for the explosion of a neutron star just below the minimum mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colpi, Monica; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1993-01-01

    The instability of a neutron star at the minimum mass is investigated using a hydrodynamical model to follow the evolution of the unstable star. A detailed analysis of the linear stability of the equilibrium configurations near the minimum mass is performed by solving the radial eigenvalue problem for the fundamental mode. The minimum mass configuration M(mmc) of 0.196 solar mass is found to be stable to small perturbations. Stability to radial perturbations is lost only at a lower critical mass of 0.16 solar mass, corresponding to about 0.8 M(mmc). It is shown that a simple dynamical model constructed using a 3-polytrope equation of state for hot dense matter reproduces the key dynamical features of the instability in the explosion phase.

  13. PROBING NEAR-SURFACE ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE WITH LIDAR MEASUREMENTS AND HIGH-RESOLUTION HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    J. KAO; D. COOPER; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    As lidar technology is able to provide fast data collection at a resolution of meters in an atmospheric volume, it is imperative to promote a modeling counterpart of the lidar capability. This paper describes an integrated capability based on data from a scanning water vapor lidar and a high-resolution hydrodynamic model (HIGRAD) equipped with a visualization routine (VIEWER) that simulates the lidar scanning. The purpose is to better understand the spatial and temporal representativeness of the lidar measurements and, in turn, to extend their utility in studying turbulence fields in the atmospheric boundary layer. Raman lidar water vapor data collected over the Pacific warm pool and the simulations with the HIGRAD code are used for identifying the underlying physics and potential aliasing effects of spatially resolved lidar measurements. This capability also helps improve the trade-off between spatial-temporal resolution and coverage of the lidar measurements.

  14. Photobioreactors for microalgal cultures: A Lagrangian model coupling hydrodynamics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Giuseppe; Gargiulo, Luigi; Lettieri, Paola; Mazzei, Luca; Salatino, Piero; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Closed photobioreactors have to be optimized in terms of light utilization and overall photosynthesis rate. A simple model coupling the hydrodynamics and the photosynthesis kinetics has been proposed to analyze the photosynthesis dynamics due to the continuous shuttle of microalgae between dark and lighted zones of the photobioreactor. Microalgal motion has been described according to a stochastic Lagrangian approach adopting the turbulence model suitable for the photobioreactor configuration (single vs. two-phase flows). Effects of light path, biomass concentration, turbulence level and irradiance have been reported in terms of overall photosynthesis rate. Different irradiation strategies (internal, lateral and rounding) and several photobioreactor configurations (flat, tubular, bubble column, airlift) have been investigated. Photobioreactor configurations and the operating conditions to maximize the photosynthesis rate have been pointed out. Results confirmed and explained the common experimental observation that high concentrated cultures are not photoinhibited at high irradiance level.

  15. Mixed-RKDG Finite Element Methods for the 2-D Hydrodynamic Model for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Zhangxin; Cockburn, Bernardo; Jerome, Joseph W.; ...

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new method for numerically solving the equations of the hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices in two space dimensions. The method combines a standard mixed finite element method, used to obtain directly an approximation to the electric field, with the so-called Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) method, originally devised for numerically solving multi-dimensional hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, which is applied here to the convective part of the equations. Numerical simulations showing the performance of the new method are displayed, and the results compared with those obtained by using Essentially Nonoscillatory (ENO) finite difference schemes. Frommore » the perspective of device modeling, these methods are robust, since they are capable of encompassing broad parameter ranges, including those for which shock formation is possible. The simulations presented here are for Gallium Arsenide at room temperature, but we have tested them much more generally with considerable success.« less

  16. Effect of forward looking sites on a multi-phase lattice hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redhu, Poonam; Gupta, Arvind Kumar

    2016-03-01

    A new multi-phase lattice hydrodynamic traffic flow model is proposed by considering the effect of multi-forward looking sites on a unidirectional highway. We examined the qualitative properties of proposed model through linear as well as nonlinear stability analysis. It is shown that the multi-anticipation effect can significantly enlarge the stability region on the phase diagram and exhibit three-phase traffic flow. It is also observed that the multi-forward looking sites have prominent influence on traffic flow when driver senses the relative flux of leading vehicles. Theoretical findings are verified using numerical simulation which confirms that the traffic jam is suppressed efficiently by considering the information of leading vehicles in unidirectional multi-phase traffic flow.

  17. A high resolution hydrodynamic model system suitable for novel harmful algal bloom modelling in areas of complex coastline and topography.

    PubMed

    Aleynik, Dmitry; Dale, Andrew C; Porter, Marie; Davidson, Keith

    2016-03-01

    Fjordic coastlines provide sheltered locations for finfish and shellfish aquaculture, and are often subject to harmful algal blooms (HABs) some of which develop offshore and are then advected to impact nearshore aquaculture. Numerical models are a potentially important tool for providing early warning of such HAB events. However, the complex topography of fjordic shelf regions is a significant challenge to modelling. This is frequently compounded by complex bathymetry and local weather patterns. Existing structured grid models do not provide the resolution needed to represent these coastlines in their wider shelf context. In a number of locations advectively transported blooms of the ichthyotoxic dinoflagellate Karenia mikimotoi are of particular concern for the finfish industry. Here were present a novel hydrodynamic model of the coastal waters to the west of Scotland that is based on unstructured finite volume methodology, providing a sufficiently high resolution hydrodynamical structure to realistically simulate the transport of particles (such as K. mikimotoi cells) within nearshore waters where aquaculture sites are sited. Model-observation comparisons reveal close correspondence of tidal elevations for major semidiurnal and diurnal tidal constituents. The thermohaline structure of the model and its current fields are also in good agreement with a number of existing observational datasets. Simulations of the transport of Lagrangian drifting buoys, along with the incorporation of an individual-based biological model, based on a bloom of K. mikimotoi, demonstrate that unstructured grid models have considerable potential for HAB prediction in Scotland and in complex topographical regions elsewhere.

  18. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. 1. The Numerical Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-10

    The Astrophysical Journal, 702:1553–1566, 2009 September 10 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/702/2/1553 C© 2009. The American Astronomical Society. All rights...to investigate a variety of high-energy processes in solar, space, and astrophysical plasmas. Key words: acceleration of particles – hydrodynamics...and can be viewed as an elementary process of sequential excitation of multiple loops. Evolution on longer timescales (say, !100 s) involves multiple

  19. Determination of the quench velocity and rewetting temperature of hot surfaces: Formulation of a nonisothermal microscale hydrodynamic model.

    PubMed

    David, M B; Zvirin, Y; Zimmels, Y

    1999-06-01

    A nonisothermal microscale model of the three-phase, solid-liquid-gas, contact zone is formulated in the context of rewetting phenomena. The model incorporates hydrodynamics, heat transfer, interfacial phenomena, and intermolecular long range forces, in a two-dimensional proximal region of the order of 1000 A in width and 100 A in thickness. The model comprises scaled mass, momentum, and energy balances, and their corresponding scaled boundary conditions. The small contact angles which are characteristic of rewetting situations facilitate the use of the lubrication approximation, and the dynamics of the liquid and gas phases is decoupled by applying the one-sided simplification. The microscale hydrodynamic model reflects the strong effect of the solid-liquid interactions on the film profile, and the attendant flow and thermal fields. Thinner films having smaller contact angles involve stronger solid-liquid attraction forces, and consequently they exhibit higher rewetting temperatures and lower evaporation and vapor recoil effects. Thermocapillary and evaporation and conduction effects are expressed by appropriate dimensionless numbers. A set of such numbers is defined in the context of the differential equations of the microscale model. This model covers the hydrodynamic aspect of rewetting phenomena, which are also controlled by thermodynamic and macroscale constraints. This calls for interfacing and appropriate combination between the microscale hydrodynamic model, thermodynamics, and other macroscale rewetting models, for the determination of rewetting temperatures and quench velocities of liquids on hot solid surfaces. This is addressed elsewhere, in subsequent papers that follow this work.

  20. Chemical evolution during the process of proto-star formation by considering a two dimensional hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ankan; Majumdar, Liton; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2013-10-01

    Chemical composition of a molecular cloud is highly sensitive to the physical properties of the cloud. In order to obtain the chemical composition around a star forming region, we carry out a two dimensional hydrodynamical simulation of the collapsing phase of a proto-star. A total variation diminishing scheme (TVD) is used to solve the set of equations governing hydrodynamics. This hydrodynamic code is capable of mimicking evolution of the physical properties during the formation of a proto-star. We couple our reasonably large gas-grain chemical network to study the chemical evolution during the collapsing phase of a proto-star. To have a realistic estimate of the abundances of bio-molecules in the interstellar medium, we include the recently calculated rate coefficients for the formation of several interstellar bio-molecules into our gas phase network. Chemical evolution is studied in detail by keeping grain at the constant temperature throughout the simulation as well as by using the temperature variation obtained from the hydrodynamical model. By considering a large gas-grain network with the sophisticated hydrodynamic model more realistic abundances are predicted. We find that the chemical composition are highly sensitive to the dynamic behavior of the collapsing cloud, specifically on the density and temperature distribution.

  1. Understanding macroalgal dispersal in a complex hydrodynamic environment: a combined population genetic and physical modelling approach

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Georgina; Kregting, Louise; Beatty, Gemma E.; Cole, Claudia; Elsäßer, Björn; Savidge, Graham; Provan, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Gene flow in macroalgal populations can be strongly influenced by spore or gamete dispersal. This, in turn, is influenced by a convolution of the effects of current flow and specific plant reproductive strategies. Although several studies have demonstrated genetic variability in macroalgal populations over a wide range of spatial scales, the associated current data have generally been poorly resolved spatially and temporally. In this study, we used a combination of population genetic analyses and high-resolution hydrodynamic modelling to investigate potential connectivity between populations of the kelp Laminaria digitata in the Strangford Narrows, a narrow channel characterized by strong currents linking the large semi-enclosed sea lough, Strangford Lough, to the Irish Sea. Levels of genetic structuring based on six microsatellite markers were very low, indicating high levels of gene flow and a pattern of isolation-by-distance, where populations are more likely to exchange migrants with geographically proximal populations, but with occasional long-distance dispersal. This was confirmed by the particle tracking model, which showed that, while the majority of spores settle near the release site, there is potential for dispersal over several kilometres. This combined population genetic and modelling approach suggests that the complex hydrodynamic environment at the entrance to Strangford Lough can facilitate dispersal on a scale exceeding that proposed for L. digitata in particular, and the majority of macroalgae in general. The study demonstrates the potential of integrated physical–biological approaches for the prediction of ecological changes resulting from factors such as anthropogenically induced coastal zone changes. PMID:24671941

  2. Hydrodynamic supercontinuum.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Hoffmann, N; Onorato, M; Genty, G; Dudley, J M; Akhmediev, N

    2013-08-02

    We report the experimental observation of multi-bound-soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) in the context of hydrodynamic surface gravity waves. Higher-order N-soliton solutions with N=2, 3 are studied in detail and shown to be associated with self-focusing in the wave group dynamics and the generation of a steep localized carrier wave underneath the group envelope. We also show that for larger input soliton numbers, the wave group experiences irreversible spectral broadening, which we refer to as a hydrodynamic supercontinuum by analogy with optics. This process is shown to be associated with the fission of the initial multisoliton into individual fundamental solitons due to higher-order nonlinear perturbations to the NLS. Numerical simulations using an extended NLS model described by the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation, show excellent agreement with experiment and highlight the universal role that higher-order nonlinear perturbations to the NLS play in supercontinuum generation.

  3. Anomalous Fourier's Law and Long Range Correlations in a 1D Non-momentum Conserving Mechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data